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Full text of "The Trumbull papers"

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COLLECTIONS 



JIASSACIIUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 




Committee of Publication. 

WINSLOW WARREN. 
HENRY F. JENKS. 
GEORGE B. CHASE. 



COLLECTIONS 



iMASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



VOL. X. — FIFTH SERIES. 



WITH GENERAL INDEX TO THE TEN VOLUMES. 



i3ublt5t}eti at tf}C (!r{)argc of tijc iBassarijusftts ft?tstortcal eTutst JFunH. 




BOSTON: 
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY. 

M.DCCC.LXXXVIII. 



.''-W " 

'.>' 



SniljErsitD ^rcss : 
John Wilson and Son, Cambridge. 



7^ ^ JV 




PREFACE. 



Ix the year 1885 this Society published a volume of 
Historical Collections (IX. 5th Series), made up of early 
miscellaneous papers, and letters of Dr. William Samuel 
Johnson and Colonel Jedediah Huntington, selected from 
the Trumbull Papers in the possession of the Society. The 
jDresent volume is from the same collection, and includes 
the correspondence in those papers between General 
Washington and Governor Trumbull, with a few letters 
from the former to General Gates, General Putnam, and 
others, and also an official correspondence during the years 
1775 to 1778 between Trumbull and Joseph Warren, 
James Warren, General Gage, and John Hancock. 

Eighty-six of the letters of Washington, beginning with 
the one dated March 24, 1779, and marked in this volume 
with an asterisk, are printed from original letters in the 
collection ; the remaining letters are from copies in Gov- 
ernor Trumbull's letter-books. 

The proportion of letters printed from copies is so large 
that the Committee has thought it best, instead of fol- 
lowing the spelling of copies, — which may or may not 
have been exact transcripts of the originals, — to adopt 
the modern spelling, except with reference to names of 
persons or places, and, in order to secure uniformity, to 
follow the same rule in printing from orighials. 



VI PREFACE. 

A list of all letters from Washington contained in this 
Trumbull collection is printed at the end of the volume, 
and also a list of letters therein from Trumbull to Wash- 
ington, with references to former publication of all letters 
in the collection omitted here, or for any reason reprinted. 
The letters from Trumbull referred to as printed by 
Sparks will be found in the volumes of Sparks's Letters 
to Washington ; in all other cases the references are to 
the volumes of Sparks's Writings of Washington or to 
Force's Archives, with the exception of one reference 
to Washington's Official Letters. 

In some cases it was found that the letters appeared in 
Sparks's volumes in a different form, or with changes or 
omissions, and wherever the differences were of impor- 
tance the -letters have been reprinted, with references 
to the former publication. In many cases the letters 
are here printed from originals, while the printing by 
Sparks is from copies. In others the reverse may be 
true ; but the references will enable readers to compare 
for themselves. 

A table of contents and index of the Fifth Series of 
Collections will be found at the end of this volume. 

W. W. 

BosTOX, MarcJi 1, 1888. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
Preface v 

Trumbull Papers : — 

Letters of General "Washington, Governor Trumbull, 
General Gates, Joseph "Warren, James "Warren, John 
Hancock, General Gage, and others 1-283 

List of Letters of "Washington in the Trumbull Papers . 319 

List of Letters of Governor Trumbull to "VYashington, 

IN SAME 326 



Contents of the Fifth Series of Massachusetts Histori- 
cal Collections 331 

General Index to the Fifth Series 337 



THE TRUMBULL PAPERS. 

Vol. II. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 




TRU3IBULL AND WASniXGTON LETTERS. 



GOVERNOR TRU.MBULL TO GENERAL WASHINGTON. 

Lebaxon, 13th July, 1775. 

Sir, — T have to observe to your Excellency that the 
Honorable Congress have altered the arrangement of the 
Generals appointed by our Assembly. Wish the order we 
adopted had been pursued. Fear Generals Wooster and 
Spencer will think they have reason to complain. They 
are gentlemen held in high estimation by our Assembly, 
and by the officers and troops under their command. 
There are reasons to fear that inconveniences will arise 
from the alterations made by the Congress in the rank 
and station of those Generals. At the same time they 
have the highest sense of General Putnam's singular 
merit and services. 

Is it impracticable to derive some method to obviate 
the difficulties that are apprehended? The army before 
Boston is necessarily thrown into two grand divisions. 
General Spencer, with a number of our troops, hath been 
hitherto at Roxbury, and General Putnam at Cambridge. 
That destination, continued and observed, may prevent 
uneasy competition, preserve good order, and promote 
the public service. 

I am, with great truth and regard, sir. 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

Jon'^." Trumbull. 

His Exckllexcy General Washington. 

1 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Camp at Cambridge, 
August 9 th, 1775. 

SiR^ — From some late intelligence out of Boston, and 
sundry corroborating circumstances, there is great reason 
to suspect that the Ministerial troops intend either to 
make a diversion to the southward, or wholly to remove. 
If they should do either, it is most probable New York 
is the place of their destination. I therefore think it 
most advisable that the troops of your Colony Avho have 
not yet marched, or may easily be recalled, should wait 
further orders. You will therefore, sir, be pleased to 
give the necessary directions for this purpose as soon as 
possible. 

No occurrence in the camp of any consequence since 
I had the pleasure of addressing you last. 
I am, sir, with due regard. 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

G*;^. Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 21st August, 1775. 

Sir, — Your esteemed favor of the 14th ^ instant is re- 
ceived. None of the powder is stopped that I requested, 
and hope it is best that it happened so. 

None is lately arrived to this Colony, although daily 
expected ; as we are greatly exhausted, should be obliged 
to have your order for some of the next parcel that 
passes through, if none arrive here before. I shall take 
care of the lead ordered from Ticonderoga. The lead 

1 Force, Arch., iii., Ser. 4, p. 137. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 3 

mine you mentioned at Middletown is working ; seven or 
eight tons of rieh ore is raised, and works going np to 
smelt it. 

There is anotlier discovered at Woodbury in this Colony, 
and make no doubt of finding beds of sulphur among us. 
Our people are busy in making petre, — all wh'ch it is 
hoped may prove to public advantage. 

I have enclosed for your observation the intelligence 
received from Brigadier Wooster. Since writing above, 
have received and enclosed for your notice the intelli- 
gence from Ticonderoga. You will receive this by the 
hand of our mutual good friends Colonel Dyer and Colo- 
nel Elderkin, who will be able to inform better than I can 
by writing. 

I am, with great truth and sincerity, 

Your very humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

General "Washingtox. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Camp at Cambridge, 

August 23d, 1775. 

Sir, — Yesterday I received advice from Boston that 
a number of transports have sailed on a second expedi- 
tion for fresh provisions. As they met with su(!h success 
before, it is probable they may pursue the same course, 
only advancing farther. We think Montague Point, on 
Long Island, a very probable place of their landing; I 
have therefore thought it best to give you the earliest 
intelligence. But I do not mean to confine your atten- 
tion or vigilance to that place. You will please to extend 
your views as far as the mischief may be probably 
extended. 



4 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

We have no transaction of sufficient consequence in 
the camp to make a part of a letter. 

I am, sir, with much respect and esteem. 

Your most obhged and humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

P. S. You will please to let me know in your next, 
what progress you make with the hunting-shirts. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHIXGTOX. 

Lebanon, 6th Sept., 1775. 

Sir, — I have no further intelligence concerning the ships 
that infest our coasts. It is most probable they are not 
those your Excellency notified to me. 

This afternoon received intelligence from Mr. Shaw, of 
New London, that he had, by Captain Champlin, who 
arrived last evening, received and landed safe about 
three tons of powder. Have ordered it to Norwich, 
excepting a present supply for our two armed sloops. 

Please to give me directions concerning such part as 
may be thought fit to be spared for 3'our camp. 
I have the honor to be, most respectfully, sir. 

Your very obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 



Camp at Cambridge, 
Oct. 5th, 1775. 



Sir, — By a person from Boston the day before yester- 
day we learn that a small fleet, consisting of a sixty-four- 
gun ship, a twenty, two sloops of eighteen guns, two 
transports, and about six hundred men sailed as yester- 



TRUMBULL AND WASUIXGTOX LETTERS. 

day. They took on board two mortars, four howitzers, 
and other artillery, tVom which we suspect that they 
intend to bombard some town on the coast. General 
Cage is recalled; General Howe commands in his place. 
We have some late accounts from England, but see no 
prospect of an accommodation. General Gage's account 
of Bunker Hill is returned, and corresponds pretty much 
with ours as to killed and wounded. You will please to 
forward the enclosed to the Commissary-General with all 
expedition, and believe me, 

Sir, your most obedient and very humble servant, 

G" WASHINGTO^r. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXGTON. 

Lebanon, 9th October, 1775. 

Sir, — Pursuant to request from the Continental Con- 
gress this day received, have given orders to Captain Giles 
Hall, Commander of the brigantine "Minerva," to sail with 
all possible despatch on a cruise to the River St. Lawrence, 
or thereabouts, in quest of two vessels from England, 
bound to Quebec, with arms, etc., as I presume you will 
be fully advised of before this reaches you, by the same 
express from the Continental Congress ; and it is sup- 
posed sundry armed vessels will be despatched from the 
Colonies of Massachusetts Bay and Rhode Island for the 
same purpose. This enterprise as yet remains a pro- 
found secret with us, and the orders are given to Captain 
Hall not to be opened until he is out of sight of land. 
The '' Minerva " will sail in a very few days. 
I am, most respectfully, sir, 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

Jox"^" Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Camp at Cambridge, 
Oct. 24, 1775. 

Sir, — Your favor of the 12th instant I duly received, 
and thank you for enclosing Captain Thompson's infor- 
mation. The contents of the depositions now trans- 
mitted to you are of such a nature that I have thought 
no time should be lost in giving you the earliest notice 
of them. 

I am, sir, your most obedient servant, 

G? Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 6th November, 1775. 

Sir, — I have received 3'our favor of the 29th ^ October 
ultimo, wherein you mention the case of Dr. Cheney, com- 
missioned from hence as a surgeon, which you are per- 
suaded to have been obtained by some misrepresentation. 
Indeed I was not apprised of any misconduct or bad 
behavior of his. If he was guilty of any such thing, 
should be glad he may be convicted and discharged. 
I will give a detail of his case as it lay before me and 
my council. 

I had no personal knowledge of the surgeon or his 
mates appointed to the third regiment raised in this 
Colony, nor that either of them was returned, until the 
13th September I received a letter from Nathaniel Wales, 
Esq., wherein he mentions, " I have this moment received 
a letter from Colonel Stores, informing me that Dr. 
Cheney has left the army, that the regiment have no 

1 Force, Arch., iii., Ser. 4, p. 1249. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 7 

doctor but Dr. Spakling, wlio is not esteemed very 
highly. They do not esteem him as a physician, what- 
ever he may be of a surgeon. Colonel Stores urges 
extreme hard to have one sent equal to Dr. Cheney, or 
that Dr. Cheney may be sent back." Thereupon I sent 
for the doctor, who came to me. I inquired the reason 
of his leaving the service. He let me know there was 
a misunderstanding between him and Dr. Spalding, and 
he therefore asked the favor of a dismission of your 
Excellency, and obtained it, and did not incline to return 
under him. I discoursed with him concerning the sick- 
ness and the manner of treating and providing for the 
sick, and other affairs of the army. He did not express 
one word to me in disparagement of any or either the 
general officers, nor of any one else, excepting the rea- 
sons he gave of Dr. Spalding and his own disagreement. 
He appeared to me a sensible, prudent, man. I dismissed 
him at that time. Hearing of Dr. Turner's returning to 
Norwich, I sent to him to see him before he returned 
to the army, which was principally from concern for the 
uneasiness which had happened between the two physi- 
cians, and the representation of the unskilfulness of him 
who remained w^ith the regiment. He came, and we 
discoursed on the subject, and found that he did not look 
on Dr. Spalding as a person skilled in physic, that the 
person he served his time with was a skilful surgeon who 
made no profession of physic ; and Dr. Turner expressed 
his apprehension that Dr. Spalding had not made any 
great proficiency in surgery, which increased my concern, 
as I was told the other mate was young and unexperi- 
enced. At the next meeting of my Council I laid the 
case before them, called in Dr. Cheney, and conferred 
with him ; proposed his return. He remained dissatisfied 
with the treatment he met with from Dr. Spalding. We 
thou";ht ourselves warranted, from what accounts came 



8 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

from Colonel Stores and Dr. Turner, to believe that regi- 
ment not well provided for with skilful physicians and 
surgeons, and urged Dr. Cheney to return, and gave him 
a new commission for that end. I have reason to suspect 
an invidious design of his competitor, as Dr. Spalding 
may be called, against him, and doubt not your caution 
that his case and circumstances may be impartially ex- 
amined. Since my beginning to write I received per 
Mr. Wales, who is one of my Council of Safety, an extract 
from Colonel Stores's letter to him, which is enclosed. 

I have received applications for the advancement of 
officers and filling vacancies, which have hitherto declined, 
save in the case of Captain Dyer and Lieutenant Hunting- 
ton, which I perceive hath been attended with difficulty. 
There is an application made to me by Lieutenant Moses 
Cleveland, who served under Captain Parrit Avhile styled 
a company of Rangers. The latter received a commission 
for captain, and his subalterns not returned with him 
were not known, and by that means this subaltern was 
neglected. He hath remained in the army. If he is 
found fit for a subaltern's commission and there is a 
vagancy, he will meet your favor. 

Major-General Schuyler, in a letter to me of the 31st of 
August, says : " I have ordered the lead I can spare to 
Albany, with directions to forward it by the most direct 
road to General Washington, that you may not have any 
unnecessary trouble." In my last to him have mentioned 
it, and likewise wrote to Commissary Phelps at Albany, 
to be informed concerning it. 

I am. with great truth and regard, sir. 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon'^.? Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASUINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Camiuudgi:, December 14tli, 1775. 

Sir, — I beg leave to recoinrnend to your kind notice 
Messieurs Peiiet and Do Pliarne, two French gentlemen 
who came here last night. They laid before me a plan 
for furnishing the Continent with military stores, which 
seems to promise success ; but not thinking myself author- 
ized to make any contract with them respecting the same, 
and not knowing how far Congress may have taken meas- 
ures for a supply of these articles, I have prevailed upon 
them to go to Philadelphia, and recommend them and 
their propo.sals to the consideration of that body. There 
the matter will be at once agreed upon or rejected. They 
are to travel at the Continental expense, and I pray the 
favor of you to supply them with such necessaries as they 
may want, and have carriages provided for expediting 
their journey as much as possible. Whatever charge or 
expense you may be at on their account, you will please 
to make me acquainted with, and it shall be immediately 
paid. 

I am, sir, your most obedient servant, 

G? Wasuington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Cambridge, 19th January, 177G. 

Sir, — The enclosures herewith sent convey such full 
accounts of tlie sad reverse of our affairs in Canada as 
to render it unnecessary for me, in my present hurry, to 
add aught to the tale. 

Your spirited Colony will, I have no doubt, be suffi- 
ciently impressed with the expediency of a vigorous 
exertion to prevent the evils which must follow from the 
repulse of our troops. Tt does not admit of a doubt but 
that General Carlton will improve this advantage to the 

2 



10 TRUMBULL AXD ^VASHINGTOX LETTERS. 

utmost ; and if he should be able to give another current 
of sentiments to the Canadians and Indians than those 
they seemed inclined to adopt, words are uunecessary 
to describe the melancholy effect that must inevitably 
follow. 

I am persuaded, therefore, that you will exert your- 
selves to the utmost to throw in the reinforcement by 
the route mentioned in General Schuyler's letter, that 
is now required of your Colony, as the doing of it expedi- 
tiously may prove a matter of the utmost importance. 

You will perceive by the minutes of the council of war, 
enclosed, that the regiment asked of you for Canada is one 
of the four applied for in my letter of the 16th ^ instant, 
and that the only difference, with respect to the requi- 
sition, lies in the length of time and place of service, as 
no good could result from sending troops to Canada for 
a shorter period than the Continental Army is raised forj 
namely, till the 1st of January, 1777. 
I am, with very great esteem, sir. 

Your most obedient, humble servant. 

G" Washington". 

P. S. Your fixvor of the 16th ' instant now lays before me ; 
but the hurry in which I am engaged at present allows 
no more than time for acknowledgment of it. 

Yours, etc., 

G? W. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Cambridge, 
14th March, 1776. 

Sir, — Since I did myself the honor to write you last, 
the enemy have embarked their troops on board a num- 
ber of transports, and are now making a shameful retreat 

1 Force, Arch., iv., Ser. 4, p. 697. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 11 

from Boston. Various arc the conjectures of their des- 
tination, though most agree it is either for Ilahfax or 
New York. 

The latter phxce seems by much the most probable. 
Be that as it may, New York is a post of infinite impor- 
tance both to them and us, and much depends on priority 
of possession. I therefore entreat you, sir, immediately 
to throw two thousand men into that city, from the fron- 
tiers of Connecticut, to maintain the place till I can arrive 
there with the army under my conunand. The rifle regi- 
ment will march this day. To-morrow a brigade will follow, 
and be succeeded by others as quick as possible. 

You are sensible, sir, of the great importance of a stren- 
uous exertion at this critical period, — a period which may 
in its consequences determine the fate of America. The 
zeal and activity heretofore shown by the good people of 
your Government in defence of the liberties of x\merica 
leaves me no room to doubt their readiness on the present 
occasion. 

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, sir, 
Your obedient, humble servant, 

G° Washington. 

Ills Honor Goveuxoh Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 2oth March, 1776. 

Sir, — I do most heartily congratulate you on your 
success, that, after a long, incessant, and persevering 
fatigue, you happily have caused our enemies to evacu- 
ate the town of Boston, to leave that strong fortress they 
built when they trampled on the properties of the inhab- 
itants of that distressed town, profaned the sacred places 
dedicated to divine worship and service, and designed 
the ruin of the lives, properties, and lil)erties, of our 
whole country. The lustre of the British arms is tar- 
nished. By a shameful and ignominious retreat tlicy 



12 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

have lost their honor, — indeed, none could be maintained 
or gained in so Avicked and scandalous a cause. I hear 
they have demolished the Castle ; hope soon to know 
they have left the coast. Where destined, remains con- 
jectural. Some imagine Howe intends for Halifax, there 
to wait the opening of St. Lawrence, and then rush to the 
assistance of Carlton. 

It is said Lord Cornwallis, with three thousand troops, 
is gone to North Carolina. Clinton has preceded them, 
and is to take the command there. Governor Martin is 
stimulating the Highlanders and Regulators to join them, 
and, with the assistance of the slaves, reduce that Colony 
to a state of abject submission to our British taskmasters. 
Martin will, I fear, succeed too well in his attempts to 
divide that Province. It is said that near three thousand 
msurgents were preparing to oppose their militia. This 
is cruel, wicked, detestable policy. Savages are merciful 
compared with our enemies. 

Commissioners were expected to sail for the southward 
Colonies some time in January. They are to treat with 
Provinces separately, by no means with the Congress, 
nor by any act of theirs recognize the legality of that 
body. Their business is to divide our councils and ex- 
ertions as much as possible, to hold out pardons to peni- 
tent sinners, to those avIio are abject enough to take the 
guilt of treason upon them and supplicate remission. 
May we thankfully rejoice that the Lord reigns, that 
hitherto he hath helped us, and our eyes be upon him, 
to turn their counsels to foolishness, to bring down their 
high looks, and defeat their arts and arms. 

I received yours of the 21st' on Sunday morning. 
Four battalions from your camp came into Norwich last 
Saturday. Colonel Webb marched this morning to em- 
bark at New London ; the other three at Norwich this 
day. I hear another is on the road. I wish to have the 

^ Force, Arch., v., Ser. 4, p. 456. 



I. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 13 

rest of your troops to pursue tlieir route on or near tlie 
sea coasts. They can be accommodated with covering and 
provision full as well, much the same distances, and 
better road at this season, than the more interior, that 
they may be ready to oppose the enemy in case they 
make any attempt on this Colony. 

Captain Niles, on board our armed schooner '' Spy," is 
cruising near Block Island and Montauk Point to dis- 
cover and give intelligence of the motions of the enemy. 
I have received none at present. Enclosed is account 
of hunting frocks you sent to me last summer to procure, 
and of a chest of arms sent you last month ; the total, 
<£486 OS., which please to remit to me per Mr, Bacon, 
the post rider, who brings this. 

In answer to Aours of the 15th,^ relative to three dol- 
lars advanced per man towards the pay of the militia 
from this Government, I choose that you give your war- 
rant for the whole, and order three dollars advanced per 
man, to be paid into the hands of the respective colonels 
of the three regiments, to be by them returned and paid 
back to our Committee of Pay Table, — which I conceive 
to be an easy method, or any other way you think best 
to have replaced at our Pay Table. Please to remember 
that in my last I mentioned my desire of four tons of 
powder being replaced by the Continent as soon as you 
can advise the Congress thereof, to be sent and lodged, 
one ton at Fairfield, one ton at New Haven, and two tons 
at Middletown in this Colony ; it being only a small part 
of tlie quantity of that article we have furnished to their 
army, and are in necessity of it for the various services 
we have undertaken, both for the land and sea service. 
I am, with great esteem and regard, sir, 
Your most obedient humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

1 Force, Arch., iv., Ser. 4, p. 1157.^** ^r> 



14 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Cambridge, 

27th March, 1776. 

Sir, — I take this earliest opportunity to acquaint you 
that the men-of-war and transports with the Ministerial 
troops sailed this afternoon from Nantasket Harbor. 
There is only a man-of-war and two or three other 
armed vessels now remaining there. 

In consequence of this movement I have ordered a bri- 
gade to march to-morrow morning for New York, and 
shall follow with the remainder of the army as soon as I 
can receive certain information of the fleet being clear 
of the coast, and that we are in no further danger of 
their returning to attack us at a disadvantage. I shall 
leave a few regiments at Boston to protect the Continen- 
tal stores and to assist in fortifying the town and harbor, 
agreeable to the directions that may be given by the 
General Assembly of this Colony. 

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, sir. 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Honor Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Cambridge, 28th March, 1776. 

Sir, — I have been all this day at Boston. On my re- 
turn, your esteemed favor of the 25th was handed to me. 
I have not time to answer it at present. The next oppor- 
tunity will convey to you that, and the money for amount 
of the account you have enclosed. 

I am, with very great respect, sir. 

Your most humble and obedient servant, 

G? Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

New York, '20th April, 1770. i 

Sir, — B}^ the returns just delivered me of the state 
of our ammunition, 1 find we are greatly deficient in the 
article of ball ; and as I understand a large quantity of 
lead has been manufactured at Middletown, in your Gov- 
ernment, I must beg the favor of you to forward as 
much as 3'ou can spare to me as soon as possible. 
1 am, very respectfully, sir, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

G9. Washington. 

GovERxon Trumbull. 

P. S. As the quantity of powder here is much smaller 
than I expected, and the demand from Canada greater, I 
should be obliged to you if you would inform me how 
that has been disposed of which was said to be imported 
lately into your Government on Continental account. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

New York, April 2i?d, 1770. 

Sir, — When I had the honor of seeing you at Norwich 
you gave me some encouragements to hope }'ou would 
spare me a number of arms, which 30U said were then 
repairing. The great deficiency of arms in the regi- 
ments raised in this Province and the Jerseys (some 
being totally unprovided) obliges me to request the favor 
of you to forward all that are finished to me by the first 
convenient opportunity: I am extremely sorry to trouble 
you so often with requisitions, but I doubt not you will 

^ This letter is printed in Force, Arch., v., Sor. 1, p. 007, without the 
postscript. 



16 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

readily excuse me when you consider that the good of 
the service makes it necessary. 

I am, most respectfully, sir, 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

G^- Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 

TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 29th April, 1776. 

Sir, — I am fovored with your two letters of the 20th 
and 22d instant. Of the lead ore which is raising at Mid- 
dletown in this Colony, but small quantity is yet smelted. 
The work is going on, and hope you may be supplied 
with lead from thence e'er long. We are not furnished 
with experienced workmen as we could wish. The only 
workman to be depended on is at present unfit for duty. 

Some arms are wanted to furnish our troops at New 
London. We have nearly sufficient for that purpose. 
When these are supplied, hope we shall be able to furnish 
some for Continental service. Our Assembly is nigh; 
shall consult them on the subject of j^our requests. 

The quantity of powder arrived at New London on 
Continental account, is not so large as was represented. 
This Colony have powder arrived at Philadelphia, which 
is proposed to be exchanged for what is here. Whether 
this will take place am not yet acquainted. I promise 
myself that this Colony will be refunded the quantity 
mentioned in mine of the 16tli^ February last which was 
lent for Continental use, the security of this Colony ren- 
dering the same absolutely necessary. The account I 
mentioned to you at Norwich have desired the Com- 
missary-General to receive the money for. The vouchers 
are already transmitted, and I suppose in 3'Our hands. 

I am etc, Jon"^ Trumbull. 

General Washington. 

1 Force, Arch., iv., Ser. 4, p. 1163. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 17 



WASHINGTON TO COLONEL THOMAS SEYMOUR. 

Headquarters, New York, 
July 8th, 177G. 

SiR^ — B}- a letter from his Honor Governor Trum- 
bull, received on the 5tli^ instant, I was informed he had 
ordered three regiments of horse on to this place, under 
your command, with all possible despatch, and was de- 
sired, in case they were not wanted, to inform Colonel 
Silliman thereof; accordingly I wrote Colonel Silliman, 
acquainting him it was my desire the men might come 
on, provided they could leave or send back their horses, 
which letter did not go forward as soon as I intended. 
Major Starr this morning waited on informing me of his 
arrival with fifty of the troop, and that the rest were on 
their march. I have ordered him to find some pasture 
for his horse this day, and immediately ride forward and 
acquaint you that there is not more forage on hand or 
to be had than is absolutely necessary for the use of our 
working and artillery horses, and that is my desire your 
men may be halted some way in the rear of this place, 
and their horses sent back ; otherwise the men can only 
be a moth and a check to the service, as they cannot act 
as horsemen in case of action, or if they could, forage 
would not be found to support them. I think it abso- 
lutely necessary the men should be here till the new 
levies all arrive ; but for the above reasons shall be 
necessitated to order their return unless they can be per- 
suaded to come on without their horses. I would not 
be supposed by this to discourage the troops of horse 
from being in constant readiness in the different Slates, 
as I am fully persuaded they will be much more useful 
than the militia to throw in succors to a place on an 
emergency. I am pleased to see with what cheerfulness 



1 Force, Arch., vi., Ser. 4, p. 1253. 
3 



18 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

and alacrity the troops from your Province step forward 
to the assistance of their countrymen whenever called, 
and doubt not it will continue. 

Major Starr will be able to inform you fully, from what 
I have mentioned to him, the absolute necessity for the 
men, and the utter impossibility of keeping the horse. 
Baggage-wagons may be hired to bring on baggage for 
your men from any place they leave their horse. 
I am, sir. 

Your most humble servant, 

G° Washington. 

Colonel Seymour. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New York, 
July 21st, 1776. 

Dear Sir, — By letter received from five gentlemen, 
committee appointed by Provincial Convention of this 
State to reconnoitre and report the situation of the high 
lands and forts on Hudson's River, I find them in great 
want of cannon, two men of war and three tenders being 
but about ten miles below them, and in daily expecta- 
tion of their attempting to pass the forts Montgomery 
and Constitution to burn the two frigates building at 
Poughkeepsie. In this situation they have mentioned 
sending to your Honor a request for those now at Salis- 
bury Furnace, which I am fully persuaded you will, if 
possible, readily comply with, as it is not in my power 
to lend them any assistance from this quarter. 
I have the honor to be, sir, 

Your most humble servant, 

G?. Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 19 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Nkw York, July 25th, 1776. 

Sir, — Congress having empowered mo to appoint 
suitable places of rendezvous for the battalions raising for 
the Northern Army, and to communicate the same to yon, 
— also that one month's pay should be advanced them, 
etc., as you will perceive by the enclosed copy of their 
Resolution, which I have the honor to transmit, — I must 
request of you to direct your proportion of the same to 
march by companies, as they are raised, to Skenesborough, 
and there receive orders and instructions for their con- 
duct from the officer commanding the Northern Army, 
and also to advance the month's pay and tixke every ne- 
cessary measure for forwarding their march and comply- 
ing with the purport of the said Resolve, assuring you 
that whatever money may be advanced necessarily in 
carrying the same into execution shall be repaid to your 
order. Before I conclude I cannot but confess I do not 
clearly understand what battalions the enclosed Resolve 
alludes to, and therefore beg leave to refer you to the 
requisition I presume Congress have made of you. 
I am, sir, very respectfully. 
Your most obedient servant, 

G? Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New York, 
8th August, 177(5. 

Dear Sir, — As Captain Bacon has been here in pur- 
suit of some duck and other articles for the Northern 
Army, and is now gone into Connecticut, I take the 
liberty of forwarding a letter for him to Governor Cooke, 
under cover to you, by which Captain Bacon can be 



20 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

furnished with what duck is wanting, provided he does not 
meet with it in Connecticut. I wrote you particular y 
last evening^ by Mr. Root, of Hartford, smce which noth- 
ino- material has happened. 

I am, sir, with sentiments of esteem, 

Your most humble servant. 

[Signature omitted.] 

Governor Trumbull. 

P S Should you not have opportunity to present the 
enclosed to Captain Bacon, you will please to forward 
it to Governor Cooke, together with the nrtel hgence of 
mine of yesterday to your Honor contained, as I have not 
time to write him particularly. 

TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebaxox, August 13th, 1776. 
Sir - Your favor of the 7th instant by Mr. Root,' and 
the intelligence it contains, has given me great concern 
and anxiety. The soon-expected strength of the enemy 
ad weakness of your army were equally unforeseen and 
sul-isincr Though I never gave credit to the public 
c ^::mts'of your number.s, yet I could not suspect^ they 
fell so much short of the numbers proposed as I find 

^Immediately upon receipt of your letter I summoned 
my Council of Safety and ordered nine reg-ents o ou 
m litia,in addition to the five Western regiments, foui teen 
hi t^ whole, to march without loss of time and join you, 
ZZ the command of Oliver Wolcott, Esq., colonel of the 
Kfneteenth Regiment, as their ^Hgacl^-gen- ' -J^^;. 

appointed and ^^^t!::^^^^'^^ 

are accompanied with the most piessm 

of speedily carrying them into execution, enfo_icedJiy 



TPxUMBULL AND WASIIIXOTOX LETTERS. 21 

communicating as mncli of the intelligence yon are 
plea:?ed to favor me with of your situation and danger, 
as I thought prudent and necessary. 

I have likewise proposed tiiat companies of volunteers, 
consisting of able-bodied men not in the milit'a, should 
associate and march to your assistance imder officers they 
should choose, and have promised them like wages and 
allowance of provisions, etc., as the Continental Army 
receive. Some such companies are formetl, and expect 
more will be. Whatever their number may be, they will 
be ordered to join some one of our militia regiments, and 
submit themselves to the command of their field olHcers 
while they continue in service. 

Colonel Ward's regiment is on their march to join. 
I am far from trusting merely in the justice of our cause; 
I consider tiiat as a just ground to hope for the smiles of 
Heaven on our exertions, which ought to be the greatest 
in our power, 

[Si(jnature otniUeii] 
His Excellenxy Gexekal Washixctox. 



^ TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXGTOX. 

Lebanon, August IGth, 177G. 

Sir, — Major-General Schuyler has requested that two 
hundred seamen may be raised in this State to man the 
vessels on the lake. As most of our seamen have 
marched with our militia to join your army, I have to ask 
the favor of your Excellency to permit Captain David 
Hawley and Captain Frederick Chappel to enlist such 
number of seamen out of our militia as may be neces- 
sary for that service. 

I am, sir, witli great respect, 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

JoN^" Trumbull. 

His Excellency (Jenkkal WAsnixciTON. 



22 TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Camp above the Falls of Trenton, 
December 22d, 1776. 

Sir, — When I wrote to you on the 14tli^ instant, 
I had little doubt of receiving considerable support from 
the militia of this State, and was taught to believe that 
a large part of the old troops coming with General Lee 
had re-enlisted. In the first I have every reason in the 
world to be disappointed; in the latter I find myself 
wofully deceived. It is easier to conceive than describe 
the situation I am in, — left, or shall be in a very few 
days, with only a very few Southern regiments (reduced 
almost to nothing) to oppose Howe's main army, already 
posted in such a manner as to pour in his whole force 
upon us so soon as the frost affords him a passage over 
the Delaware, and our number such as to give no effect- 
ual opposition. Thus circumstanced, it is a matter of 
concern to me that in my last I directed you to take 
back any of the militia designed for the support of the 
army under my command, and have to request that 
instead of ordering the return of any of those that were 
destined for this Department, by order of the respective 
States, that you will hasten them on with all possible 
expedition, as I see no other chance of saving Philadelphia 
and preventing a fatal blow to America in the loss of a 
city from whence so much of our resources are drawn. 

[Signature omitled.] 

WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 

10th January, 1777. 

Sir, — I am honored with your favor of the 23d ^ last 
month. I hope the Congress have, in consequence of 
your application, ordered up a supply of money for the 

1 Force, Arch., iii., Ser. 5, p. 1215; Sparks's Writings of Washington, iv. 
219. 

2 Force, Arch., iii., Ser. 5, p. 1389. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 23 

bounty to the new enlisted troops in yonr State ; but lest 
they should not have done it, I shall order Colonel Palfrey 
to send what cash he can spare to the Deputy-Pay- 
Master at Peekskill, to be applied to the use of the 
recruiting service to the eastward. He some little time 
ago sent a hundred and fifty thousand dollars to Peek- 
skill to be distributed by General Heath among the 
recruiting oiticers. If that sum should not be expended, 
some money may be drawn from thence. In the mean 
time I must beg the favor of you to advance the neces- 
sary sums out of the treasury of your State, assuring you 
it shall be refunded as early as possible. 

I am very happy to hear that your Assembly have it 
in contemplation to send a body of troops forward to 
serve till your regular enlistments can be completed. 
Nothing can be more distressing to the enemy or service- 
able to me than an army hanging upon the rear of New 
York, to move forward as circumstances may require. 
Their wishes and views are certainly towards Philadelphia; 
and valuable as the acquisition of that city would be, it 
would be paying too dear a price for it, were they to 
give up New York to a force that might be thrown into 
it after their army has moved southward. Our success 
at Trenton has been followed by another lucky blow at 
Princetown on the 3d instant. I lay with about five 
thousand men at Trenton. The enemy advanced a superior 
force down upon me from Princetown on the second. Not 
choosing to risk an engagement there, I decamped as 
soon as it was dark, and marched along their Hank to 
Princetown, which lay directly in their rear. I arrived 
there by break of day and found three regiments of 
British troops ready drawn up to march to Trenton. We 
immediately attacked them, and in a short time put them 
completely to the rout. We have already taken three hun- 
dred prisoners, and the country people are daily bringing 
in stragglers. Their loss upon the whole will amount to 



24 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

at least five hundred. The enemy, confounded at this un- 
expected stroke in their rear, and fearing that their 
baggage at Brunswick would fall into our hands, marched 
back in the greatest hurry from Trenton to Brunswick, 
where their main body now lays. They have called in 
all their outposts, so that their late possession of the 
greatest part of Jersey is reduced to the compass of a 
very few miles. They evacuated Elizabeth Town with 
so much precipitation that we made one hundred prisoners 
and took the baggage of two regiments, besides a quantity 
of provisions. 

These successes, though comparatively small, have 
greatly inspirited the inhabitants of this State and Penn- 
sylvania; and I am in great hopes, if we can once put the 
enemy into winter quarters, and get some little leisure, 
that our affairs may be put in such a train and upon 
such a footing as will insure success the next campaign. 
I have the honor to be, with great sincerity, sir. 
Your most obedient servant, 

G^- Washington. 

Hon. Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

MiDDLETOWN, January 14th, 1777. 

SiR^ — Have to acknowledge the receipt of your several 
favors of the 12th, 14th, 16th, and 21st ^ December, 
since which the agreeable intelligence of a series of signal 
successes which have attended you in the Jerseys affords 
the most animating hopes and prospects; upon which 
events we most heartily congratulate you, and trust 
that Heaven will still continue to succeed and bless our 
exertions, and enable you to surmount every obstacle 



1 Force, Arch., iii., Ser. 5, pp. 1186, 1215, 1246, 1338 ; Sparks's Writings of 
W\ashiiigtoii, iv. 212, 219. 



TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 25 

and rise superior to every embarrassment and dinioulty 
that A'ou may yet be called to encounter. 

Our lour battalions are filling up witli all po.^sible de- 
spatcli, and three of them are gone and going on to your 
assistance, together with a number of volunteer coui- 
panies equal to a battalion, which we are in hopes may 
answer in lieu of one of the battalions we had previously 
designated for Providence. The new army, we have 
great reason to expect, will soon be filled, under the 
great encouragements that are given, and the spring 
that this new turn in our aflairs must naturally give ; 
but money and clothes will be very necessary to expedite 
the same. Should therefore think it requisite that the 
recruiting officers be furnished as soon as possible with 
a sufficiency of cash for the purpose of enlistments, and 
that our proportion of the Continental clothing coming 
from the eastward be ordered to be stopped and delivered 
here for their supply. Likewise how, when, and where 
they are to be armed and accoutred, will be necessary 
to be known. 

I immediately laid yours of the IGth before our Assem- 
bly, Avho granted ten thousand pounds to Colonel Sheldon 
for the purpose you mention ; and agreeable to 30 ur 
direction, have drawn on the Continent, through you, for 
a reimbursement of the same. Observe what has passed 
between yourself and General Howe respecting our suf- 
fering prisoners, and am well assured of your feelings for 
them. The unheard-of cruelty and inhumanity with 
which they have been treated, demands our just resent- 
ments and a spirited remonstrance to General Ilowe 
upon that subject. Have forwarded all their prisoners 
in this State to Rhode Island in pursuance of your advice, 
and now enclose the necessary returns requested, with a 
line to General Howe to wait your requisition for an 
exchange. In this place T cannot help icminding your 
Excellency's very particular attention to tlie case of 

4 



26 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTOX LETTERS. 

Colonel Ethan Allen, whose early captivity and long 
sulFe rings entitle him to a preference in point of exchange. 
His spirit and bravery might be of singular service to his 
country, and his Tory enemies in New York are seeking 
his ruin. I would also mention the case of one Captain 
Isaac Fellows, who is also a prisoner in New York, and 
is confined in close jail under pretence of suspicion of 
being concerned in the late fire in the city, and is used 
with great inhumanity, and refused to be brought to 
trial. 

Colonel Ward's regiment, whose time don't expire till 
May, I am advised are much in want of necessary cloth- 
ing, which Avish they may be supplied with, if possible, from 
the Continental stores; but if that can't be done, must 
request that they may be returned, as soon as the public 
service will permit, to some station this side the North 
Eiver, that they may be supplied from their friends with 
such necessary clothing as they may want. 

I am, with the most sincere esteem and regard, 
Your most obedient, humble servant. 

[Signature omitted.] 

P. S. The list of prisoners is not yet come to hand, and 
must be omitted till my next. 

I have taken the liberty to advise Major-General 
Spencer to wait your Excellency's further orders by 
express before he sends Colonel Ely's regiment, belong- 
ing to our four battalions from Providence, hoping it 
will meet your approbation. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

MioDLETOWN, January 14th, 1777. 

giR^ — Agreeable to your direction, have drawn in 
favor of John Lawrence, Esq., Treasurer, for the sum of 
ten thousand pounds lawful money advanced to Colonel 



mha 



TRUSIBULL AND WASniNGTOX LETTERS. 27 

Sheklon to enable liiin to raise a regiment of cavalry, 
and charge the same to the Continent, as per his re(H;i[)t, 
a copy of which send enclosed. 

From your humble servant, 

JoN^.'.' Trumbull. 

To Ills EXCELLKXCY CiKNERAL WaSIIIN<.;TOX. 

P. S. It would be agreeable to receive an order npon 
the Commissioner of the Loan Office here for the above 
sum, to prevent risk, provided he be furnished with 
certificates, etc., which I hope he will receive by this 
express. 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXGTOX. 

Lebaxox, January 23d, 1777. 

Sin, — I most sincerely congratulate you upon the 
happy success which has lately attended your arms, which 
I have the pleasure to be informed of by your favor of 
the 10th instant, which came to hand by Colonel Stewart 
this afternoon. 

I have not yet heard of any money sent into this State 
by Congress to pay the bounty to the new enlisted troops. 
Some small part of the one hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars you sent to Peekskill has, I believe, been distri- 
buted to some of our colonels, though by far the greatest 
part of the recruiting officers are in the State lying still 
for want of money to pay the promised bounty, without 
which soldiers will not enlist. I am happy to hear 
you intend sending forward money for this service, for 
indeed it suffers for want of it ; and Congress, amidst the 
variety of business that engages their attention, seems 
to have forgot this necessary step, although the only 
season in which we can hope to fdl up the new army is 
wasting fa.st and will soon be over. It would give me 
great pleasure to be able to advance the necessary sums 



28 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

out of onr treasury. Our Assembly have provided funds 
only for satisfying such demands as were expected to be 
made upon it, and money comes in no faster than we are 
obliged to issue it to pay such public debts as justice will 
not permit to be delayed. The Continental Loan Office 
might be called in aid, but unhappily the check-books 
and loan-tickets are not arrived, and the loan officer has 
been able to do nothing in his office. In this situation 
no money for this service can be depended upon here. 
Permit me to entreat your Excellency to forward the 
necessary sums without delay, as little progress can be 
expected to be made in raising and equipping tliat army 
upon which our defence, under God, depends, till a sup- 
ply for this purpose is received. 

Some of the battalions are partly filled, but the bounty 
and clothing promised by Congress are not furnished 
them. If this was done, it would excite others to enlist, 
and I flatter myself the troops might soon be raised and 
ready for service. 

Three battalions of our troops, engaged to serve till the 
loth of March, are gone to join General Heath. Sixteen 
companies of volunteers are likewise marched. They are 
formed into a battalion under Colonel Noadiah Hooker, 
are equal to a full battalion in number, and have engaged 
to continue in service for the term of two months from 
this enlistment. One battalion of our troops, engaged 
till the 15th of March, are ordered to Providence to 
assist in defending the State of Rhode Island against the 
enemy stationed at Newport. 

I enclose you a return of prisoners of war collected 
and sent to Newport, agreeable to your request. The 
friends of the officers and soldiers now prisoners of war 
from this State, especially those confined in New York, 
are impatient for their release, — and with good reasons, as 
their sufferings there from cold, hunger, nakedness, sick- 
ness, the want of every necessary, and accumulated 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON" LETTERS. 20 

insult, exceed all description. Mnn^^, incapable to sup- 
port the load of suffering, have fell sacrifices to the rigor 
and inhumanity of our polished enemies, after having 
endured hardships and tortures incomparably more severe 
and excruciating than the wildest savage would inllict 
upon his barbarous foe. Others, by the help of a strong 
constitution, yet endure their misery. They can endure 
but little longer. I hope your humanity will relieve 
them before they fall victims to the accursed policy of 
our inhuman enemies. I am unable to mention all the 
officers from this State now prisoners. I entreat your 
Excellency to effect their exchange as soon as possible. 
Major Meigs and Captain Ilanchet were taken at Quebec, 
and are here on their parole. General Waterbury was 
taken on Lake Champlain ; Major AYells, Lieutenants 
Fitch, Fanning, and Cleaveland on Long Lsland ; Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel ILirt and Brigade-Mnjor Wyllys on York 
Island; and Lieutenant Hopkins on Long Lsland. I beg 
leave to recommend these gentlemen in particular to 
3'our Excellency's care to have them exchanged, and 
generally all offtcers and soldiers from this State now 
prisoners of war. 

This letter will be delivered to you by Brigade-Major 
"Wyllys, who is out upon his parole for thirty days to 
procure his exchange. I wish your Excellency to take 
measures to prevent the necessity of his return. Lieuten- 
ant Hopkins is likewise out upon his parole for the same 
purpose. I beg leave to propose he may be exchanged 
for a Lieutenant McDermot, of the Sixteenth Regiment 
of British troops, now a prisoner in this State, if agreeable. 
His parole admits of his release upon sending in a pris- 
oner of equal rank. I am sensible your Excellency needs 
no arguments or motives to induce you to effect the 
exchange of our prisoners in the speediest manner; yet 
I must entreat your pardon for just mentioning a jealousy 
our enemies endeavor to instil into our prisoners, — that 



30 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

the prisoners from the Southern States are taken better 
care of than ours ; and indeed I fear we in this State 
inadvertently have failed in some degree of doing all we 
ought to, or might have done, to procure their discharge, 
which makes me more earnest, and perhaps too impor- 
tunate, to have it soon effected. 

Should your Excellency find it necessary to raise 
another battalion in this State, I beg leave to mention 
Jesse Root, Esq., of Hartford, as a gentleman well qualified 
for the command. His spirit and zeal, as well as his other 
talents, are surpassed by few gentlemen in this State. 
The battalion of volunteers now in service, of which he 
is lieutenant-colonel, were raised at his request and by 
his efforts. Permit me likewise to recommend the bearer, 
Major Wyllys, a promising youth, who bids fiiir to do 
honor to the ancient and honorable family he is de- 
scended from, and is ambitious to continue in the ser- 
vice. His captivity prevented his being provided for in 
the battalions now raising in this State. 
I am, etc., 
^ Jon"^" Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Towx, 
2ith January, 1777. 

Sir, — I received your several favors of the 12th and 
14th instant by Lieutenant Fellows, to whom I granted 
a flag with a letter to General Howe, desiring that his 
brother. Captain Fellows, might be one of the first officers 
exchanged. 

I have remonstrated very sharply with General Howe 
upon his treatment of our prisoners, and I hope it will 
be attended with good effects. I have repeatedly en- 
deavored to procure the enlargement of Colonel Ethan 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 31 

Allen, but none of my propositions were ever accepted 
of. The reason I cannot tell. 

I have wrote pressingly to Congress to forward money 
to the Eastward for the recruiting service, and shall direct 
Mr. Mease, who is appointed Clothier-General, and who 
is expected here every day, to allot a proportion of the 
clothes taken and purchased for the Continent, to each 
State. 

I observe that you have advanced Colonel Sheldon 
ten thousand pounds lawful money, for which you desire 
my draft on the Commissioners of the Loan Ofhce. 
I would not hesitate to do this if I had received any 
authority from Congress empowering me to draw upon 
that fund. I will write to them respecting it, and if they 
grant me liberty, I will immediately transmit you a proper 
draft. 

I refer you to a particular letter of this date concern- 
ing the expediency of forwarding the new levies, and 
subscribe myself, 

With great esteem, sir. 

Your most obedient servant, 

G?. Washington. 

P. S. A few days ago General Dickinson, with a party 
of four hundred militia, beat a foraging party of the 
enemy of superior numbers and took forty wagons and 
upwards of one hundred horses, mostly English. 
Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Tow-n, 
1st February, 1777. 

Sir, — I have the pleasure of 3'ours of the 23d January 
by Major Wyllys, and thank you for your congratulations 
upon our late successes, which have been attended with 



32 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

very happy consequences, as the enemy have remained 
very quiet at Brunswick and Amboy since the affair at 
Princetown. 

I have wrote to Congress in a very pressing manner 
not only to send on a present supply of money, but to 
forward the check-books and loan-tickets with the great- 
est expedition. 

I most sincerely wish it were in my power to procure 
the immediate release of all our officers and soldiers who 
have been so unfortunate as to fall into the hands of our 
enemies ; but when the chance of war has turned the 
scale against us in point of numbers, what more can be 
done than to give those a preference who have longest 
endured captivity ? That I might avoid every imputation 
of partiality for the officers of any particular State, I have 
in all my letters to General Howe, and to Mr. Loring, the 
Commissary of prisoners, directed that an equal propor- 
tion of officers of the Eastern and Southern States be 
sent out. But without paying any regard to my request, 
they have given Pennsylvania more than her proportion, 
having never discharged one of the Maryland officers 
taken upon Long Island. Major Meigs and Captain 
Hanchet are already released. We have no general 
officer to joropose for Colonel Waterbury, and if we 
had. General Thompson, who was taken long before, 
has a preference. 

If General Howe does not accede to the proposal of 
Congress for giving up all the Hessian field-officers taken 
at Trenton, for General Lee, Lieutenant-Colonel Hart and 
Major Wells will probably come in for their turn of 
exchange. You, by your return, have sent in but three 
captains, and I have convinced Major Wyllys, who ranks 
as captain, that I cannot consent to propose him for one 
of those without doing injustice to Captain Dearborn,^ 

1 Afterwards Major-Geueral Henry Dearborn of Continental Army. 



TRUMBULL AND WASTIIXGTON" LETTERS. 33 

who was taken at Quebec 31st December, 1775, and 
Captains Trowbridge and Percival, taken the 27th Au- 
gust last upon Long Island. By my state of tlie ex- 
change of prisoners, a captain is still due to us. If 
there should be, I have desired Major AVyllys may be 
accepted for him. 

You mention the names of several subalterns who were 
taken upon Long Island and York Island, whose release 
you would wish, but there are yet eight gentlemen taken 
at Quebec who have a right to a preference. I have 
made a proposition to General Howe, which, if he accepts, 
will give great relief to our prisoners. It is the establish- 
ment of an agent, to reside at New Y^ork, to see that 
the prisoners are well used, and to supply them with 
necessaries. 

I should have had no objection to appointing Colonel 
Eoot^ to the command of a regiment, could it possibly 
be raised upon the terms allowed by Congress, which is 
a bounty of $20 ; but by your State and that of Massa- 
chusetts having given an additional bounty of S33|, not 
a man can be raised till the eierht reo-iments allotted to 
your State are full. I have, I may say, unfortunately 
given seven of the additional regiments to gentlemen of 
New England, and I was under the strongest hopes that 
they, from their influence, would have soon filled their 
regiments ; but I cannot suppose that men will enlist for 
a bounty of $20 with them, when they can get $53^ 
from this State. 

I have the honor to be, with esteem and regard, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G^ Washington. 

GovERXOR Trumbull. 

^ Jesse Root, subsequently Chief-Justice of Connecticut. 



34 TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, February 1st, 1777. 

Sir, — I tills minute received your favors of the 24th 
ultimo, and note the contents, but have not time to be 
very particular in my answer at this time. I most fully 
agree with you in the importance of raising and furnish- 
ing the new army, and wish it was in my power to do 
more than I can to forward it, nothing is wanting that 
I can, and some progress is made therein, and I hope 
soon to give you a more favorable account. The service 
there greatly suffers for want of clothing and money. 
The faster those articles can be forwarded, the more the 
service will be promoted ; and I am certain your Excel- 
lency will do ever^^thing in 3^our power to remove those 
obstacles. It is a matter of great difficulty also about 
arming the men, as we have no intimation how they are 
to be supplied, nor whether there is an}^ allowance for 
such as find themselves. Good arms are also very scarce 
and difficult to be obtained with us. 
I am, etc., 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
Gth February, 1777. 

Sir, — I am this evening honored with yours of the 
1st instant, and am to thank you for your promise of for- 
warding the new levies, which I am sure you will perform 
to the utmost of your abilities. 

I have, as I wrote you in my last, pressed Congress to 
send you forward a supply of money and the proper 
books to open your Loan Office. 



i 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 35 

As Mr. Mease, the Clothier-General, is now here, I 
showed him that part of your letter respecting clothing, 
and I refer you to him for a letter which he will write to 
you upon that head. 

Instead of hiring arms, as has been the custom here- 
tofore, I would have them purchased of the owners on 
account of the Continent. They will by these means be 
kept in better repair, for a man looks upon himself at 
liberty to use his own firelock as he pleases. But in the 
purchase of the arms I would have special care taken 
as to quality, for our stores are already cumbered with 
useless ones. 

I have the honor to be, with sincere regard, sir. 
Your most obedient servant, 

G" Washingtox. 
IIox. GovERxoR Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, February 7th, 1777. 

Sir, — I enclose you a copy of a letter just received 
from Major-General Schuyler, expressing his strong ap- 
prehensions of an attack on Ticonderoga, and press- 
ing me to send forward troops, etc. He had doubtless 
informed your Excellency of the situation of affairs in 
that quarter. Were the quota of this State raised, I 
should not consider myself properly authorized to order 
their march, but according to your mind and direction, (but 
unhappily that is far from the case). Many difficulties 
intervene to retard the recruiting service, many of your 
officers declining, and many embarrassments about ap- 
pointing and arranging of them, a number yet in cap- 
tivity^, sufficient money not received to pay the premiums, 
nor any clothing sent to be delivered out, nor advice how 
or where it is to be had, which is an essential disadvan- 



36 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

tage, — the very sight of it would be a great stimulus to 
our fatigued aud almost naked soldiers. I understand 
there is now lodged in this State clothing for two bat- 
talions, of scarlet turned up with blue and buff, part of a 
capture brought into Dartmouth in Massachusetts, — it is 
said peculiarly thick and strong, and lined, being designed 
for Canada. Colonel Webb, lately appointed by you, 
I hear has orders for enough to clothe his regiment, and 
has taken or is taking it of them. I find they are es- 
teemed more valuable than any others that are expected 
to be obtained, and fear it will be a ground of conten- 
tion. I wish to know whether any methods will be taken 
to make an equality in value of clothes among them, and 
how the rest are to be supplied. We have and are col- 
lecting all the cloth we can in this State for the army, 
and hope we shall have enough for two battalions ; and 
should wish for 3-our directions whither and how I shall 
dispose of them, and that a sufficient quantity for the 
troops expected from this State may be sent and properly 
lodged within it, and necessary directions about them, 
and also the premium money, — without both which the 
service will, as it has already, greatly suffer. 

1 have not certain evidence, but hope that four bat- 
talions, — namely. Colonel Huntington's, and W^llys's, 
Douglass's, and Bradlej^'s, — are at least one hundred each, 
the others less, but cannot say, — very hearty. The small- 
pox is spreading in many towns, communicated by our 
cruel enemies to the prisoners they have lately sent out, 
and by them through the country, — which is an additional 
delay to the recruiting service. We are constantly doing 
everything in our power to remove, and hope the diffi- 
culties will be surmounted. 

It does not seem in my power to send any relief to 
General Schuyler. The few Continental troops raised are 
scattered, unpaid, and unclothed. I should therefore 
have no other way but to send militia. So many of them 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 37 

are now volunteers near New York, at Providence and 
New London, and every man of tliein, in their turns, 
having been drafted, and very many having suflered 
extremely in sickness, etc., the last season, and many died, 
that it wonld be likewise the sentence of death to order 
any more, and at this extreme season, to the North, and 
militia are at best but a poor relief; beside that the 
frequent calls upon them, and the great ftxtigues they have 
suffered, has much tended to give them a distrust to the 
service, and is one great and principal means of retarding 
the present enlistments, and would do so more and more. 
I hope your Excellency will be able to send season- 
able succors that Avay, or that kind Providence will pre- 
vent the need of them. It would be the highest possible 
satisfaction to be able to comply with every reasonable 
requisition for the public good. 

I see by your instructions for recruiting that the one 
hundred acres of land is mentioned as an encouragement. 
I am at a loss whether that is to be given to those who 
engage for three years only, as by the la^t resolve of 
Congress, which I have seen, respecting it, the land was 
granted to those only who should engage during the war. 
By a letter from Major-General Greene, eopy of which 
is enclosed, am led to suggest that the prisoners lately 
sent to this State by your Excellency are divided and 
scattered into several towns and placed in families, where 
some are willino; to labor and to be treated in the same 
manner as those who are lately gone from us, some of 
whom behaved well, and some ill. But all claimed the 
allowance for support, over and above their actual main- 
tenance and w\ages where they served. I understand that 
they have been confined in barracks and jails in the 
Southern States. We had not such barracks to contain 
them, if it Avould have been best to keep them in that 
manner. Their officers have been heretofore very troub- 
lesome by pretending to exercise command over the men. 



38 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

I wish your Excellency's advice as to the most projoer 
mode of treating them, and whether it may be expedient 
for us to erect such buildings if their behavior should 
render it necessar}'. 

I observe the contents of your letters of the 24th ^ ul- 
timo, and the great necessity you have of a regular body 
of troops, on whom alone, under God, any reliance for 
permanent security and defence can be placed, and am 
doing everything possible to promote the raising them ; 
but for reasons before mentioned, it has been impossible 
to forward them more. I hope, however, they will be 
ready early in the spring. It is a misfortune that cannot 
be enough lamented that we are so unready to improve 
so happy an opportunity as now presents to strike a de- 
cisive blow this winter. I observe also by your letters 
that you are doing everything in your power to forward 
clothing and money for the new levies ; but as we feel 
the want of them so sensibly, I could not forbear to re- 
peat it. If your Excellency should not think it improper 
to give me discretionary power to use for the recruits in 
this State any Continental clothing which may be had in 
these parts unappropriated, I should hope and believe 
the service will be promoted b}^ it. 

Could not a body of men in the Grants, or of the Green 
Mountain Boys, so called, be very expeditiously raised 
for the relief of Ticonderoga, if proper encouragement 
was offered? — unless their having before exerted them- 
selves and being denied any pay should have given them 
an incurable aversion to the service. 

I am, sir, with great respect and regard, 
Your most obedient servant, 

Jon'." Teumbull. 

To General Washington. 

^1 Vide supra and Sparks's Writings of Washington, iv. 294. 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

IIeadquarteus, Morris Town, 
February 9th, 1777. 

Sir, — You will receive herewith sixty thousand dollars 
for the use of the recruiting service in your State, which 
I desire you will distribute among the officers in pro- 
portion to their wants. 

I desire you will not appropriate any part of this 
money to the reimbursement of the sum advanced to 
Colonel Sheldon, as I every day expect an order from 
Congress which will enable me to give you a draft for 
the whole sum upon the Loan Office. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 

February lOtli, 1777. 

Sir, — The impossibility of keeping the small-pox from 
spreading through the army in the natural way has 
determined us, upon the most mature deliberation, to 
inoculate all the new troops that have not had this dis- 
order. I have wrote to General Parsons to fix upon some 
proper place and to superintend the inoculation of the 
troops of your State, taking it for granted that you 
would have no objection to so salutary a measure, upon 
which depends not only the lives of all the men who have 
not had the small-pox, but also the health of the whole 
army, which would otherwise soon become a hospital of 
the most loathsome kind. Proper steps are taking to 
inoculate the troops already here, and all the Southern 



40 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

levies will undergo the operation as they pass Phila- 
delphia. 

I have wrote to the States of New York and Rhode 
Island to have their troops also inoculated, and I hope 
our army will by these precautions be entirely free of 
that terrible disorder the ensuing campaign. As the 
troops from Massachusetts and New Hampshire are 
ordered immediately up to Ticonderoga, they can (as was 
the case last year) be inoculated there. 

I am, with the greatest esteem and respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G^- Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
February 11th, 1777. 

Sir, — I did myself the pleasure to write you yesterday, 
and informed you that I had sent you sixty thousand 
dollars for the recruiting service in your State. After 
I had sent the money off I received a letter from Gen- 
eral Knox advising me that he was under the most 
pressing necessity for twenty thousand dollars for the 
use of the Ordnance Department, but that he could not 
get that sum in the State of Massachusetts. I must 
therefore desire that 3^ou will reserve that sum for Gen- 
eral Knox, for which he will either draw or send. I am 
furnished with the following resolve of Congress of the 
29th January : " That the Treasurer of the United States 
be directed to give order for the payment of thirtj'-three 
thousand three hundred and thirty-thi-ee and one third 
dollars to the State of Connecticut out of the Continental 
Loan Office in that State, in payment of that sum ad- 
vanced by Governor Trumbull to Colonel Sheldon, at the 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 41 

request of General Wiisliington, for raising and equipping 
a regiment of light horse, the said State to be account- 
able ; and that the President acquaint General Washington 
with this resolution." 

1 have the honor to be, with great esteem and regard, 
Your most obedient, humble servant, 

G°- Wasuington. 

IIox. GovEKNOR Tkumbull, Coxxecticut. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
February 20th 1777. 

Sir, — A letter from you to General Heath, inclosing 
a petition from the officers taken at Princetown for lib- 
erty to send one of the party into New York for their 
l)aggage, was transmitted to me by General McDougall, 
General Heath having gone to Massachusetts. 

I am so sensible that these people, by remaining any 
length of time in the country'', not only acquire a knowl- 
edge of our affairs, but spread a ver}^ pernicious influence 
among the people, that I think it will be best to send 
them immediately in, and obtain an equal number of our 
officers in exchange. I therefore desire that they may 
be sent towards Providence, with orders to halt within 
eight or ten miles, till General Spencer or General Arnold 
is informed of their being there, that they may direct in 
what manner they may be sent in, so as not to see any- 
thing of the disposition of our troops. Be pleased to 
make the eldest officer sign a return specifying their 
names and ranks, and transmit it to me. 

In a letter of the 7th February you desire to know 
what will be the best manner of disposing of the privates. 
I think they had better be cantoned in the country as 

6 



42 TRUMBULL AXD WASmXGTON LETTERS. 

near together as convenient; and if any of them are 
tradesmen, and are willing to work at their occupations, 
they may be usefully emplo3-ed. 

I have the honor to be, sir. 
Your most obedient seivant, 

G*^. Washingtox. 

P. S. If you can think of any more convenient way of 
sending in the prisoners than to Providence, I leave it 
to you. G. W. 

GovERNOu Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXGTON. 

Lebanon, February 21th, 1777. 

Sir, — I am now to acknowledge the receipt of your sev- 
eral favors of the olst^ January, and the first, sixth, ninth, 
tenth, and eleventh instant ; also of sixty thousand dollars, 
of which I have forwarded twenty thousand to General 
Knox agreeable to your request. The remaining forty 
thousand I shall divide out to the colonels of our battal- 
ions as needed, having regard to the sums they have 
already received for that service. 

Upon request of Congress a law was passed by the 
General Assembly in December, 1775, to prevent and 
punish the harboring or concealing deserters, and for 
returning them to the service they have deserted. If any 
further regulations should appear necessary, they will 
doubtless cheerfully be come into. 

"What clothiuijr is in this State we have ordered to be 

o 

delivered to the colonels of our battalions. There will 
be probably enough for four battalions, of which the 
clothing for five is collected or manuflictured in this 
State. The residue was sent here by the Continental 
agents. The quantity is much less than we should have 

^ Sparks's Writings of Washington, iv. 305. 



TliUMBULL AND WASniXGTON LETTERS. 43 

had, had we retained the clothing purchased here and 
sent to the Northern army and to the Continental 
stores in the State of New York. Colonel Samuel 13. 
Webb's battixlion is likewise provided for. The clothing 
for our remaining four battalions we have applied for to 
Messrs. Livingston and Trumbull/ who have referred us 
to the Clothier-General, to whom we shall apply, and hope 
we may succeed, unless your Excellency shall point out 
some other method of furnishing them. 

Part of the check-books for this State are received, 
and lodged with the Loan Officer ; the remainder, we are 
assured by the treasurer, will be forwarded in season. 
The Loan Officer hath already borrowed seventy thousand 
dollars, which will nearly answer the drafts made upon 
liim. 

When the new army has got through inoculation 
for the small-pox, I flatter myself it will not only con- 
tribute to their health and safetj^, but also that of the 
inhabitants. Our returning soldiers have spread the 
infection into almost every town in the State, — a mischief 
that cannot happen when the army are out of danger of 
receiving it. Though at present the inoculating such 
numbers may expose us to have it spread from them, we 
have concerted the best measures in our power to pre- 
vent the mischief, and are happy to find General Parsons 
disposed to give us his assistance to render them as 
effectual as possible. 

[Sijnature omitled.] 

TRUMBULL TO WASIITXGTOX. 

Lebaxox, February 25th, 1777. 

Sir, — I am honored with yours of the 6th instant, and 
observe the contents. We are under great, and I fear 
insurmountable, difficulties Avith respect to procuring 

1 Joseph Trumbull, Comraissary-Geueral Revolutionary Army. 



44 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

arms for the Continental troops raising in this State, 
although all })ersons caj)able have been employed near 
two years in manufacturing them. Many of our best 
arms were stopped the last year at Roxbury and at the 
end of both campaigns at the Northward ; and a great 
number were lost in the retreat from, and other move- 
ments about. New York the last season ; and many others 
have been turned into the stores by sick men. and all 
remain out of this State. Many of these were purchased 
by and belonged to this State. From these causes, not- 
withstanding our utmost endeavors, the number of good 
arms are considerably diminished. We shall, however, 
use our best endeavors to furnish the new levies as far 
as possible and in the manner you propose. But if we 
should not be able, I hope your Excellency can make up 
the deficiency from the Continental stores. You observe 
that your stores are alread^^ cumbered with useless arms. 
I presume the situation of your army is such that the 
repair of them cannot be attended to, and would there- 
fore move your Excellency that as many of them capable 
of being made useful as may be, be sent as early as pos- 
sible to my care, and I will take immediate and the best 
orders to have them put into good condition and rendered 
fit for service. I had near two hundred barrels sent me 
last year by General Schuyler, and had them repaired 
soon, and the}'' are now in the army, very useful and good 
arms. I move it to your Excellency with a sincere and 
single view to promote the good of the service. 

I am, sir, with the highest esteem and regard. 

Your most obedient and most humble servant. 

[Signature omitted.] 
IIis Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASDIXGTON LETTERS. 45 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, February 2Gth, 1777. 

giR^ — Major Wyllys, having returned to New York, is 
again permitted to return home upon his parole, to ne- 
gotiate his exchange, and yesterday presented me with 
a letter from Mr. Loring, Commissary of prisoners, in 
which is the following paragraph : " Having received a 
letter from General Washington by Brigade-Major 
Wj'llys desiring he might be exchanged the first after 
Captains Dearborn and Trowbridge, who go for Captains 
Williams and Delaplace, he is permitted to go out again 
on his parole, engaging to send in Captain Luke, of the 
Fifty-fifth Regiment, in return, which, when effected, will 
release him from captivity ; " and desired me to give 
orders that Captain Luke might be sent in accordingly. 

It would have given me great pleasure to have been 
able to gratify him in this request, but as I consider the 
exchange of prisoners as your Excellency's province, I can 
only refer him to you, and entreat your Excellency to 
order the proposed exchange to take place. The bearer 
will return to me immediately, and I shall hope for the 
pleasure of receiving your Excellency's permission by 
him to send in Captain Luke as proposed, as Major 
Wyllys has an offer of a company in the new arm}', which 
he proposes to accept if released. I apprehend it is of 
consequence that he should be speedily exchanged, that 
the raising the company may not be delayed. 
I am, etc. 

[Signature omitted.] 



46 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASIIIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Toa\ts', 
3d March, 1777. 

Sir, — I am to acknowledge the receipt of your several 
favors of the 21st,^ 24th, 25th, and 26th February, which 
came to hand yesterday. It gives me pleasure to hear 
that your State has come to the resolution of granting 
the colonial bounty to Colonel Webb's additional regi- 
ment; and if the other States will do the same, it will in 
a great measure obviate the objection which I made to 
their granting a higher bounty than was allowed by the 
Resolves of Congress. The reasons which j-ou gave for 
a deviation from the Resolve carry weight with them, 
but I assure you, you are mistaken when you think that 
the necessaries of life are cheaper to the Southward than 
the Northward. It is true that less clothing is sufficient 
for them ; but as they manufticture little among them- 
selves, they are obliged to pay most extravagantly for 
what they wear. 

I have ordered the Clothier-General to supply each 
State with their proportion of what clothing, of different 
kinds, are in the public stores ; but you must be sensible 
that a very full proportion of the clothing purchased for 
the use of the continent, out of the prize vessels, must 
be brought on for the use of the Southern Continental 
troops, as the country from whence they come furnishes 
scarce any woollen goods. To prevent confusion and dis- 
appointment in future; I beg that no clothing may be 
stopped upon the Ava}^ without a particular order from 
the Clothier-General or myself. 

I am glad to hear that the sum of money lately sent 
to you, with the assistance of the Loan Office, is like to 
answer your wants ; and I hope that, as the obstructions 

1 Sparks's Letters to Washington, i. 342. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTON LETTERS. 47 

which before retarded the recruiting service .are now 
removed, that business will go on briskly. 

Inoculation at Philadelphia and in this neighborhood 
has been attended with amazing success ; and I have not 
the least doubt but 3^0 ur troops will meet the same. 

As I have, in many of my late letters, mentioned the dis- 
tress that the continent in sreneral is under for the want of 

o 

arms, I need only repeat to you the necessity that there 
is for making a strict collection of the public arms, and 
purchasing such as can be obtained from private persons. 

Some time ago General Schuyler wrote to me, and 
informed me that there were a great number of arms 
returned into the stores at Albany, wanting repair. I 
directed that they should be sent down to the most con- 
venient place for that purpose ; but perhaps that may not 
yet be done. You will therefore please to make inquiry 
into the matter, and if they remain there, have them 
repaired and put into the hands of the troops. 

All the arms fit for the field have been constantly re- 
paired as fast as it could be done. What I call useless, 
are such as are so light and thin in the barrel that they 
would not bear a charge with safety, at the best, much 
less after being eat up with rust. 

All the officers taken at Princetown having been or- 
dered to be sent in, Captain Luke will go in of course, and 
Major Wyllys will be thereby released from his parole. 

As I am about endeavoring to make a settlement with 
General Howe for the expenses heretofore incurred on 
account of the prisoners on both sides, I beg you will 
furnish me with an account of what has been disbursed 
by your State towards the maintenance of the British 
prisoners that have been at different times sent to be 
quartered among you. And I wish that in future a very 
regular account may be kept. 

I have the honor to be, sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 
Hon. Governor Trumbull. G? WaSHIXOTON. 



48 TRUMBULL AXD WASHIXGTOX LETTERS. 



TRUftlBULL TO WASIITXGTOX. 

Lebanon, 8th March, 1777. 

Sir, — I trouble you -witli the enclosed papers lately 
sent to me, respecting prisoners cantoned, by court-martial, 
to confinement in Simsbury Mines in this State, and sent 
thither agreeable to your Excellency's order, with an 
account of expenses incurred for their support, etc. I 
shall take it as a favor in behalf of the Committee of said 
town, if the necessary orders are given for the refunding 
the expenses they have occasioned. 

I am, with every sentiment of esteem and regard, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

Jon"^.? Trumbull. 

General Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXGTON. 

Lebanon, 10th :\Iarch, 1777. 

vSiR, — I acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 
3d instant, received day before 3'esterday, and observe 
the contents. I have wrote to the Clothier-General by 
this express, and have stated what I understand to be 
their condition relative to the clothes for our nine and a 
part of battalions raising in this State, and shall wait his 
approbation and further orders as mentioned in mine to 
him. Our new enlisted soldiers are under inoculation. 
Have heard of nothing unsuccessful among them. I hope 
our quota will be a good measure raised, answerable to 
your expectations. The opening of the spring and enter- 
ing upon the necessary business of it, will bring them to 
a choice ; and I believe the old soldiers will enter the 
service w^ith alacrity. 

I have this day wrote to General Schuyler, on the 
paragraph relative to old arms in the stores at Albany. 
Apprehend some relief on that score from him. Have 



TRUJIBULL AND WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 49 

instructed a person in the Commissary-Gene ral's employ, 
now in Massachusetts State, to purchase a supply for four 
resriments, if to be had. Shall send out others in this 
State to purchase whatever number can be obtained. 
Indeed, great attention hath been had to that article in 
this State, and no endeavors are wanting on our part. 

Expect to give the necessary orders to-morrow to send 
in Captain Luke and the officers with him; and 'tis with 
pleasure I can inform Major Wyllys that his parole will 
bo released on the going in of Captain Luke. I think it 
may be best to send these officers to New York, and shall 
send you the captain's receipt when obtained. 

Enclosed are extracts from two letters very surprisingly 
brought to light, — one from General Wentworth to his 
sister Fisher, the other from John Cochran to his wife. 
The originals, with several others, I sent last week to the 
President of the Council at New Hampshire. The eight 
other letters mentioned are not come to hand. 

Eleven ships lately appeared off the harbor of New^ 
London. It was at first thought their intention was to 
pass up the Sound. Yesterday they hauled in between 
Fisher's Island and the main ; are landing some troops 
and setting up their tents on the island. One of the 
ships is a large man-of-war, and two others smaller. It 
may be their design to take hold of New London and 
secure to themselves that harbor, or else to o;et w^ood and 
fresh provisions, possibly from the main. Hope they will 
be prevented. 

Brigadier-General Knox's receipt for twenty thousand 
dollars is not \_8ic\ paid to him, agreeable to your request 
of the 11th February last, is enclosed, and you will re- 
place the same in the way which suits best. 
I am, with esteem and regard, sir. 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 



50 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHIXGTOX. 

Lebanon, March 21st, 1777. 

Sir, — Your favor of the 6th ^ mstant was delivered to 
me the 14th, by General Sullivan. I have ordered two 
thousand men to be drafted from our militia, and marched 
to Peekskill with all expedition, agreeable to your re- 
quest. They will be under the command of Brigadier- 
General Wadsworth, and will attend your orders. I have 
given them the assurances you have authorized me to do, 
respecting the small-pox. Flatter myself General Par- 
sons will, in ten days or a fortnight, send you a battalion 
of Continental troops from this State, and hope more will 
soon follow. 

We are using every means in our power to forward 
raising our Continental battalions. Though the success has 
not yet been equal to our wishes, we do not despair 
bringing them into the field, or a good part of them, the 
ensuing month. 

I have been greatly alarmed with an account of your 
ill state of health, but had the pleasure, yesterday, to 
hear you was mending. May God preserve your life and 
restore your health, for the sake of your country as well 
as your friends and your own, is the sincere wish of 
Sir, with highest esteem and regard, 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

Jon'^.? Trumbull. 

To General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 



Headquarters, Morris Town, 
23d March, 1777. 



Sir, — I am honored with yours of the 8th and 10th 
instant, the first accompanying an account of the Com- 

^ Sparks's Writings of Washington, iv. 351. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 51 

mittee of Simsbury against prisoners who were sent tlicre 
by my order. There is no part of the cliarge to be ob- 
jected against, but that of £9-6-0 said to be for the ex- 
pense and trouble of the Committee themselves. I cannot 
see how either could have been incurred in so trivial a 
matter, or if any, that it could have been so large a pro- 
portion. However, I think the State had better pay what 
is reasonable and right, and make a Continental charge 
of it. 

I wish you may not have been deceived in the forward- 
ness of your regiments, for I can assure you the returns 
fall far short of what was given out. Chandler's, Swift's, 
and Charles Webb's, by General Parsons's letter of the 
6th instant, had only eighty men each, though the latter 
sent his son down some weeks ago, and drew four hun- 
dred stand of arms, assuring me that his father had as 
many men ready. None of the other regiments were 
half full. Durkee's had only one hundred and forty men. 
From this state of facts it is evident that if the most 
spirited exertions are not made, the enemy will take the 
field before we can draw a sufficient head of men tot^ether 
to oppose them. I am informed that the State of Mas- 
sachusetts have called upon their different districts to 
furnish as many men as are sufficient to make up their 
quota of the eighty-eight battalions, and that they have 
succeeded by this mode far better than if they had pro- 
ceeded in their usual line of enlistment. I don't know 
whether your State can exercise such powers, but if you 
can, you could never make use of them at a better time. 
From the present appearance of the weather the spring 
promises to be a forward one ; and from every account, 
the enemy only wait for good weather and good roads to 
take the field. 

The reinforcement of Russians spoke of by Governor 
Wentworth is mentioned in several letters that have 
been thrown out, I believe with an intent to divide and 



52 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

intimidate. For although I do not doubt but they would 
employ Russians, or any other barbarians, to accomplish 
their designs, I do not think there is a probability that 
they can be here shortly, if at all. 

Governor Livingston informed me, a few days ago, that 
he understood that Governor Franklin, by some means 
or other, continued to carry on a correspondence with 
Mr. Hugh Wallace, of New York ; and a gentleman of the 
name of Livingston, who went into New York and took 
protection, but not liking his situation returned again, 
informed upon oath, that he heard that Governor Frank- 
lin granted protections to such as would take them, in 
Connecticut ; and that one Shackles, of Middletown, car- 
ried on a correspondence with Miles Sherbrook, of New 
York. This, Livingston says he had from Sherbrook's 
clerk. I don't know that the foregoing amounts to pos- 
itive proof against Governor Franklin, but it ought, at 
least, to put you upon your guard, and have him nar- 
rowly watched. 

I have the honor to be, sir. 

Your most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
29th March, 1777. 

Sir, — I am honored with yours of the 21st bj^ express, 
and return you my most sincere thanks for your ready 
compliance with my request for two thousand militia. 
A late manoeuvre of the enemy convinces us of the ne- 
cessity that there is for an immediate march of this body 
of men to Peekskill. 

I imagine upon information of our weakness at that 
post (the Eastern militia having just left it), and that 



i 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. &o 

there were a valuable parcel of stores there, last Sunday 
a frigate ami four transports ran up the river; they landed 
a number of men, said to be four regiments of British, 
drove off General McDougal, who had but two hundred 
and twenty men at that time with him, and burnt the 
storehouses, Avith what stores they contained. As I have 
not yet had a particular account from General McDougal, 
I don't know the quantity or value, but I hope there are 
not many of the military kind lost. I am informed by a 
gentleman who is come down, that rum, sugar, and mo- 
lasses are the principal. The next day the troops went 
on board and the ships fell down again. 

Perhaps, finding their conquest so easy, they may be 
induced to return again, and attempt the forts, which are 
at present too weakly garrisoned to make much resistance. 

I yesterday received information from an intelligent 
gentleman, who says, " The enemy are steering off, first 
on to Staten Island and then to New York. Last Sunday 
at least two thousand crossed on to the Island, and I 
believe are there yet. It is a fact that New York is 
fuller of troops than it has been some time past." If this 
should prove true, I don't know what other motive they 
can have for withdrawing their troops from Jersey, but 
to go up the North River. General Arnold also says in 
a letter of the 11th instant, that ten transports, appear- 
ing full of troops, passed Point Judith to the westward, on 
the 4th. This also looks as if a collection of troops was 
making at New York for some purpose or other. 

To frustrate any designs of this kind, I beg that not 
only your militia, but your Continental troops, may be 
hastened on with all expedition ; for if I am not speedily 
reinforced in Jersey, the enemy may safely leave small 
garrisons in Amboy and Brunswick, which they have 
fortified strongh', and make use of the residue, or such 
number as they may think necessary, to seize upon the 
forts and passes upon the North liiver. \Yhen they have 



54 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

once possessed them, a small force will maintain tliem, 
especially as they have the command of the water. The 
command of the passages over the North River and the 
free navigation of it would prove fatal to us, as the 
Eastern and Southern States would not only be cut off 
from each other, but Ticonderoga must also be evacuated 
for want of supplies. I wrote you fully on the 23d, 
pressing you to fill up your regiments by drafts, if it 
could not be done by any other means. To this I have 
not had your answer. 

I have the pleasure to inform 3-ou that a vessel arrived 
at Philadelphia a few days ago from France, with eleven 
thousand stand of arms and some other military stores. 
The accounts of the intentions of France were most 
favorable. 

The late arrival of arms from Portsmouth is so ample, 
that we shall have no future complaint for the want of 
them. I shall therefore expect every man of the new 
levies in the field shortly, — those who have had the 
small-pox, immediately ; and those who have not, as soon 
as they recover from inoculation. 

I am, sir, with the most perfect esteem. 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRU:MBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
31st March, 1777. 

Sir, — Since I did myself the pleasure to write to you 
yesterday, I have received information that the enemy 
have embarked three thousand men, some said with an 
intent to go to Chesapeake Bay, others, to go up the 
North River again. As this last is the most probable, 
I beg you will hasten your militia to Peekskill with the 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 65 

utmost expedition, and also what Continental troops are 
ready. Should the enemy get up the river before they 
arrive, they would meet with little or no opposition. 
I am, sir, with the greatest respect, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G*? Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Morris Town, April 12th, 1777. 

SiK, — As Mr. Fornandez, an officer just released from 
captivity by an exchange, informs me that large and 
weekly supplies of fresh provisions are brought into York, 
— which, he was informed by a friend of ours, came from 
Connecticut, but whether by water or by land he does 
not know, — this information I have thought proper to 
transmit to your Honor by the earliest opportunity, that 
you may adopt such measures as its importance demands, 
and which shall seem most likely to prevent a practice so 
wicked, and so injurious in its consequences. It is proba- 
ble the most common mode of conveyance is by water, 
and that the supplies are from those who live on the 
Sound. However, it will be well to have the disaffected 
bordering on the State of York watched with a scrupu- 
lous care, as well as those contiguous to the Sound. 

Mr. Fornandez adds that Colonel Rogers and other 
officers whose names he does not recollect, have left York 
on the recruiting service, and gone into Connecticut, as 
he was advised. It is also said by a Mr. Deputy Com- 
missary Frink, who has been just exchanged too, that 
Selleck, of Stamford, is frequently in the City of York, 
and that one John Hart is gone to Rhode Island to pass 
counterfeit money. It highly imports us to detect and 
apprehend these villains, whose crimes are of great enor- 
mity ; and I should hope if this intelligence is commu- 



56 TKUMBULL AXD WASHIXGTOJ^ LETTERS. 

nicated to some of our prudent, trusty friends in different 
parts of the State, in those most favorable to their views, 
that it might be effected. Rogers is an active instrument 
in the enemy's hands, and his conduct has a pecuHar 
claim to our notice. 

I have nothing special to mention respecting the enemy. 
As yet they have made no movement ; but from our ad- 
vices of their preparations, there are strong reasons to 
believe that they are upon the eve of doing it, and from 
a variety of combining circumstances, it appears that 
Philadelphia will be the first object of their attention. 
I only regret that I have not the means the exigency 
of our affairs requires, and that a strange, unaccountable 
languor seems but too generally to prevail at a time when 
the preservation of our rights and of all that is dear calls 
loudly for the most vigorous and active exertions. 
I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G?. Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 14th April, 1777. 

Sir, — I am favored with your Excellency's letter of 
the 23d ultimo, also with those of 2Pth and 31st same 
month, which came safe to hand. Yesterday received 
your Proclamation of 6th April, relative to deserters. 
Mine of 21st March informed you of the order given for 
marching two thousand militia to Peekskill, agreeable to 
your request, and that Brigadier-General Wadsworth was 
to take the command. Want of health prevented General 
Wadsworth from engaging in that service. Brigadier- 
General Erastus Wolcott supplies his place, and is, before 
this time, at the place of his destination, as I hope are 
also the full complement of his command. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. o7 

Before the receipt of your favor of 23d March, I had 
assigned to each town in this State their several quotas 
of the Continental troops to be raised in same, and issued 
ni}' proclamation which accompanied the assignment, most 
earnestly recommending the immediate filling i^p their 
respective numbers. This not fulfilling my wishes, an- 
other Proclamation and Order is gone forth from the 
Provincial Council of Safety, copy of which you have here- 
with, requiring the several militia companies to furnish 
their respective deficiencies by an immediate draft, unless 
their quotas are filled up by voluntary enlistments. The 
drafted men to be held in service until 1 January next, 
unless sooner discharged by the enlistment of others in 
their room into the Continental Army. The drafts are 
to join the Continental companies under Continental 
officers, and march to service as soon as they have passed 
inoculation for the small-pox. This measure, I have 
great reason to hope, will prove effectual, and I trust I 
shall have the pleasure soon to afford your Excellency 
the full complement of men from this State, for this cam- 
paign. The strange delay of raising and completing the 
standing Continental Army has been very unhappy. 
I wish this substitute may prove agreeable. Shall wish 
to have your Excellencj^'s sentiments upon it. If this 
State's proportion of the permanent army should not be 
completed by the expiration of the term for which the 
drafts are taken, the like measure will, probably, be re- 
peated till that desirable object can be attained. 

Particular note is made of that part of your letter of 
23d March, respecting Governor Franklin and Mr. Shay- 
lor.^ Sundry letters written by the former to his friends 
in New York have been intercepted, and Jianded me, 
also one protection of his given to a certain Mr. Ketchum, 
of Norwalk. A careful watch is, and will be, kept upon 

^ This name is writteu " Shackles " in the letter referred to, q. v. 



58 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

their conduct for further discoveries. The intercepted 
letters are directed to Governor Skeene, Mr. Wallace, 
Colonel Fanning, and the Rev. Mr. Jonathan Odell, and 
Rev. Mr. Bowden. That to Mr. Odell is most worthy 
of notice. 

A fleet of the enemy, forty sail or more, passed New 
London westward 13th instant. They are from New 
Port, whether with troops is uncertain. 'Tis given out 
they have taken none. 

I am, etc., 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Morris Town, April 21st, 1777. 

Sir, — I yesterday received the favor of your Honor's 
letter of the 16th,^ with its enclosures, for which and your 
attention to the publishing of my Proclamation, I am 
greatly obliged. I fear all the militia intended for Gen- 
eral Wolcott's command have not arrived at Peekskill 
yet, as not more than eight hundred were there by my 
last advices from that quarter, and which are of a later 
date than your favor. 

I mark with peculiar satisfaction and thanks your con- 
stant and unwearied assiduity in giving the service every 
aid in your power ; at the same time I cannot but regret 
the occasion which compels us again to bring troops into 
the field for a shorter period than during the war or for 
three years at least, but we must adapt our measures 
to the exigency of our affairs. I would fain hope that 
many of the drafts, before the time expires for which 
they are called out, by the industry and care of the 

* The letter referred to is probably that of the 14th, printed above. 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 59 

officers, nicay be induced to engage for a longer term, that 
your quota may be completed by regular enlistments 
being continued in the States for that purpose. 

Mr. Franklin's conduct is trul}' reprehensible, and I am 
amazed that men under such engagements should not 
be more regardful of the ties of honor. 

I am, sir, "vvith sentiments of great respect, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G° Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebaxon, May 4th, 1777. 

Sir, — The attention of the enemy appears of late to 
be much turned upon this State. We have for some time 
been repeatedly advised of it ; we now realize it. A few 
days since they landed at Fairfield, to the number of near 
three thousand, — it is said under General Erskine, — and 
made a forced march to Danbury, about twenty-two 
miles, and there destroyed seventeen hundred barrels of 
pork, fifty ditto beef, seven hundred bushels of wheat, 
near seventeen hundred bushels corn, rye, and wheat, 
sixteen hundred tents, and many other valuable articles 
belonging to the United States. We had no standing 
troops in this State, and could only collect the militia in 
that quarter to oppose them, who rallied as soon as pos- 
sible, under the command of Major-General Wooster, 
Brigadier-Generals Arnold and Silliman, who had several 
skirmishes, and harassed and galled the enemy on their 
hasty return, whereby they suffered considerable loss. 
We have buried thirty of their dead ; they carried off 
some, we know not how many. The loss on our side 
about twenty killed, seventy wounded. Among the 
wounded, and supposed mortally, General Wooster, who 
behaved with great spirit and bravery; so did General 



GO TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Arnold. By the prisoners, some relenting tories, and 
some of our friends who fell into and have escaped the 
hands of the enemy, we are informed that their next 
designs are upon New Haven, New London, or Saybrook, 
to penetrate the country, and join somewhere up Con- 
necticut River, where they expect to be met by General 
Carlton. This State is, no doubt, more in consideration 
of the enemy, as it is the great source, among the New 
England States, of provisions both for the army and the 
country ; and by their frequent attacks on the different 
parts, they know they keep us in alarm, and so much 
divert us from our husbandry as will soon reduce us to 
that want which both the army and country must sensibly 
feel. The Congress have already given liberty to have 
two battalions of our Continental forces stationed in this 
State. We hope your Excellency will give orders for so 
many at least, or as many more as shall be thought 
proper to be stationed in this Colony on the sea-coast. 
We are in great hopes our quota of the Continental army 
will soon be completed. Numbers from each regiment 
are already gone forward. We have really need of aid 
at this time ; our western towns on the sea-coast greatly 
fatigued and distressed, lying open and unguarded against 
the enemy, who are very near them, and may in a few 
hours be surprised both by land and water. 

We are in great hopes the army with 3^ou is well and 
respectably reinforced from the southward, sufficient to 
oppose and annoy the enemy in that quarter; and we 
fear a defection of many in these exposed towns, unless 
timely supported. Our militia are almost worn out by 
repeated calls which continued not only in the summer, 
but through the Avinter and spring, to the State of Rhode 
Island and New York, within our own at New London, 
Stamford, Greenwich, etc. ; and now the season opens for 
husbandry the enemy are sufficiently apprised of the 
advantages they may gain by harassing us at this season. 



Tnu:iIBULL AXD WASHINGTON" LETTERS. Gl 

The county of Fairfield, where is raised the greatest sur- 
phis of provisions, must soon be ruined. The enemy are 
in possession of the Saw Pitts and Rye. If a regiment 
or two w^ere stationed at Ilorseneck, or thereabouts, 
would not only secure against the frequent mcursions of 
the enemy on those towns, but also at the same time be 
a check on them against their marching up towards the 
Peekskills, as they might be readily thrown on their rear. 



General Washington. 



[Signature omitted. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, 18th May, 1777. 

SiK, — Last evening I had the honor to receive yours 
of the 11th ^ instant. That the enemy will harass our 
coasts, and injure the maritime towns by sudden de- 
barkations and attacks, is beyond a doubt. At the same 
time I join with you, that their capital object is either 
Philadelphia, or Pludson's River. Am sorry to find the 
forces with you are so deficient, or inadequate, to check 
the progress of the enemy. The measures hitherto 
adopted in this State have not brought in a number of 
men as wished. The Assembly have gone into a mode 
I expect will nearly fill our eight battalions, our pro- 
portion of the sixteen, and of the artillery or matrosses, 
and what falls short will be filled with substitutes to 
serve till the 1st of January next. Enclosed is a copy 
of the Act of our Assembly, passed for that purpose. It 
was our expectation that the whole one hundred and 
four battalions, light horse, and artillery men, being com- 
pleted, that those needful for the several main bodies or 
corps at the posts you mention, there would be sufficient 

^ Sparks's Writings of Washington, iv. 412. 



G2 TRUMBULL AND WASmXGTON LETTERS. 

to be stationed at places more immediately threatened. 
I conceived that the Honorable Congress meant it, by 
the encouragements given us that two battalions might 
be stationed at places more immediately threatened. 
I conceived that the Honorable Congress meant it, by 
the encouragements given us that two battalions might 
be stationed on our sea-coasts. I requested General Par- 
sons that the troops might be inoculated in the western 
part of this State, and while convalescent might be sta- 
tioned in Stamford, Horseneck, and at Danbury, when 
our proportion, that is, our nine and half battalions and 
matrosses, filled. I can't give up the hopes that two regi- 
ments may be stationed here, as there is great difficulty 
to raise two or three more by the State, which must be 
done, or the advantages the enemy will have over us 
will be intolerable. To suffer them to get footing at 
New London, will be attended with very unhappy con- 
sequences. It is necessary that all our people be classed 
for the army, for the husbandry, teamsters, and artificers. 
If the State must raise two or three more regiments for 
themselves, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, 
to arm them. So many arms were carried out of this 
State to the camp near Boston, and the last year to New 
York, which were retained or never returned, that we 
are extremely exhausted ; hoping there would be no 
occasion for this State to raise more than the proportion 
mentioned above. And although three thousand stand 
have been brought in, yet I thought we might expect 
some further supply for our battalions out of the arm}'', 
imported to Portsmouth in the " Amphitrite," as likewise 
some of the field^pieces and other military stores, ball, 
flints, tin plates, etc. I sent off twelve horses with men, 
and ten or twelve teams to fetch them hither, to remain 
till your orders could be known, and informed Colonel 
Langdon that whatever he sent me would be in the way 
to whatever place you should see fit to order them. But 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTOX LETTERS. C3 

neither he nor General Heath dare comply with my re- 
quest, and so my expectation failed ; and I am obliged 
to direct the stores to return, and the teams to go into 
Boston, to bring off some stores of provisions from there, 
not equally serviceable for us. It may be just enough 
for me, for being too oflicious; but I hope an error on 
that hand will be easily pardoned, when reformed. 
Whether it will not be reasonable to allow this State the 
use of some field-pieces, arms, etc., and when our troops 
are filled, two battalions may not be stationed here, 
I leave to your consideration. I shall do everj'thing 
in my power to forward the troops from hence to your 
aid ; but of their marches I conclude General Parsons 
gives frequent information. 

The harbor of New London is an object worthy of 
attention, and our frontiers towards New York have 
been sadly neglected and exposed, and not only Dan- 
bury stores destroyed, but quantities of cattle and small 
stock taken from Ilorseneck and on its borders in the 
State of New York, and driven off to the enemy, and 
a considerable number of our men fallen off and gone 
to them. 

B}^ a letter of the IGth instant, T am informed by Gen- 
eral Silliman that one Captain Chorter came out of New 
York the day before, says the enemy have sent for troops 
from Rhode Island, that their bridge of boats is finished, 
that it was talked in the city of an attack on Philadel- 
phia, and that the enemy intended soon to get possession 
of New London. By another from General Spencer of the 
same day, he says a deserter who came from New Port 
the 15th informs that the troops arrived at New Port 
this week ; in the transports were only the grenadiers 
and infantry belonging to two regiments; that on 
Wednesday last it was given in public orders that to- 
morrow morning two and an half regiments of the Hes- 
sians and one British Regiment (the Sixty-tliird) be in 



64 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

readiness to embark, he supposes for New York. Caution 
is necessary on the shores of Connecticut. 

I am, with great esteem and regard, sir. 
Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Teumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, May 22d, 1777. 

SiE, — As it may be of consequence for j^ou to be ac- 
quainted with every movement of the enemy, would in- 
form your Excellency, that by a letter this day received 
from Governor Bradford, dated the 20th instant, have in- 
telligence that on the forenoon of that day twenty-seven 
sail left New Port and appeared to be bound up Sound, and 
that they learnt by some deserters, before that time, that 
two Hessian Regiments and a half and the Sixty-third 
British Regiment were under orders to embark last Satur- 
day. This fleet, I understand, was last night seen to pass 
Saybrook, standing westward towards New York. These 
frequent appearances of their ships and fleets upon our 
coasts, and traversing our shores, keep our sea coasts 
especially under continual apprehensions and alarms, and 
by calling our husbandmen from the field greatly threaten 
us with scarcity and distress. 

Have acknowledged the receipt of your favor of the 
11th instant, by mine of the 18th, to which refer, and 
must beg your kind attention and answer to the matters 
therein contained ; and will only add thereto, that upon 
laying our distressed situation before the Congress, re- 
questing the aid of some Continental troops to be here 
stationed, they referred the matter to the Board of War, 
who were of opinion that the enclosed Resolve of the 
10th of December, 1776, relative to the two battalions, 
has not been superseded, and therefore no occasion for a 



TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. G5 

new one for that purpose, for which reasons, and those 
mentioned in my last, can't but still hope your Excel- 
lency will spare ns those two battalions. 
I am, with great esteem and regard. 
Your most obedient, humble servant. 

[Signature omitted.] 
To nis Excellency General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
May 2:3(1, 1777. 

Sir, — I was yesterday honored with 3'our letter of 
the 18th instant. As I could only repeat the observa- 
tions contained in my letter of the 11th, upon your re- 
quest for two regiments to remain in Connecticut, I must 
beg leave to refer your attention to them, and to a few 
more which I shall now subjoin. If the several battalions 
designed to compose the army were complete, I should 
then hope a few troops might be spared to guard those 
places most accessible to parties of the enemy and their 
cruisers ; but as their state is very different, it cannot be 
done, unless we endanger objects of the last importance 
to us. I shall not trouble yon with a minute detail of the 
forces assembled at this time from the different States. 
By the last return from Peekskill on the 10th, not more 
than three hundred and thirty Connecticut troops were 
there then. In addition to these, there is a detachment 
here, under Lieutenant-Colonel Butler, consisting of 
about men. I will not comment upon this sub- 

ject, because I know it will not give you less pain than it 
does myself; and my only design in mentioning it, is to 
show I have but too just grounds for my anxiety and de- 
sire that troops should come on. I wish those assembled 
as yet, from some other States, did not bear a proportion 

9 



6G TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

too analogous to this. When those from Massachusetts, 
Connecticut, and Rhode Island do arrive, my present in- 
tention is to post a respectable number about the White 
Plains, to act as an army or detachment of observation, 
etc., and from which your State, as far as I am able to 
judge, will be more likely to be protected against any 
capital attempts of the enemy, than any other. It will 
be impossible to secure every place against their small 
marauding, plundering parties, but nothing will be so 
probable to effect it as our drawing our strength to a 
point, which will oblige them to do the same. If we 
divide and act in detachments, so will they. 

I am extremely sorry you should have been at so much 
trouble and expense in sending to Colonel Langdon for 
part of the military stores in his hands. His refusal, 
and that of General Heath, I am persuaded, you will 
consider right, and founded in necessity upon mature 
reflection. All the stores are coming to Springfield, 
where they will be deposited in the public magazine, 
except such as will be immediately wanted for the army ; 
and I feel myself extremely unhappy in not having it 
in my power to consent that a part should be appro- 
priated as 3'ou request. Our stores will by no means 
authorize me to do otherwise than to keep them for the 
forming army. Were they once let out, how could I 
collect them, or how could I be answerable for them to 
the States at large ? They are not more than equal to 
our certain demands ; and in respect to artillerj', the 
quantity imported and fit for the field is far inferior to 
that we are to oppose and what we want. I have, with 
pain, been obliged to refuse other requisitions of the 
same nature, and am concerned I should have been laid 
under the necessity, when the expediency of preventing 
the stores beinii; scattered throuo-hout the States re- 
quired it. 

I am much obliged by the co^y of the Act you were 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. C7 

pleased to transmit me, and I only hope its effects may 
be eqnal to your wishes. 

I have nothing of importance to communicate in the 
military line here. I am told, from the last advices from 
France, things seem to be in a fjivorable train, and that 
Spain appears to be equally disposed to render us every 
assistance. 

Governor Tryon, it is reported, is dead of the wound 
he received in the Danbury expedition. How far it is 
true, I know not. It is also said seventeen ships came 
in at Sandy Hook on the 22d, and more were in the 
offing. 

I have the honor to be, with great esteem and respect, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G^- Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Morris Town, May 26th, 1777. 

Sir, — I was yesterday evening honored with your 
letter of the 22d instant. It is certainly of importance 
that I should have the earliest intelligence of the enemy's 
movements, and I beg leave to thank you for the in- 
formation you have been pleased to transmit on that 
head. 

Your anxiety for troops to remain in Connecticut, and 
my inaliility to grant them, when I examine matters 
upon a large, and I believe just, scale, distress me much. 
I assure you, sir, no requisition has more weight with me 
than yours, nor will ever be more readily granted when 
circumstances will admit, and when I think it will not, 
in its consequences, be injurious to the general good. 
I must take the liberty of referring you to my letters of 
the lltli and 23d for my reasons why we should draw 
our forces to a point, and which, I trust, upon considera- 



68 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

tion, will appear good and satisfactory. A capital object 
in the enemy's plan is to divide and distract our atten- 
tion. For this purpose has the division under Lord 
Piercy been kept so long at Rhode Island, expecting 
from thence, that the apprehension of an invasion, or 
their penetrating the country, would prevent any troops 
coming from the eastward. Could I but assemble all 
our forces, our situation would be respectable, and such, 
I should hope, as would compel General Howe to employ 
his together, or to hazard their destruction. On the 
other hand, whilst the quotas from the several States 
are so extremely deficient, should they be divided, and 
act m detachments, there will be just grounds to appre- 
hend our ruin. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G*^ Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, 9th June, 1777. 

Sir, — I have to acquaint your Excellency that sev- 
eral of the regiments of militia in this State, ordered in 
the service of the United States the last campaign, are 
still unpaid ; and many of the soldiers belonging to 
said Regiments have enlisted into the Continental Army, 
and appear very desirous to receive their wages for 
their former services, before they join the army. I 
heartily wish that every ground of uneasiness might 
be removed out of the way of their proceeding with 
alacrity, and engaging with spirit in the defence of their 
country ; and indeed many of them want the money to 
leave for the support of their families. The Treasury of 
this State is so exhausted, that at present it is impossible 
that they should be paid here, which otherwise should 
have ordered, thereby to promote the general service. 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTEKS. GO 

Must, therefore, earnestly request your Excellency to 
order payment upon their proper appliciition. 
I am, with great esteem and regard, 
Your Excellenc3''s very obedient and humble servant, 

Jo^V} Trumbull. 

IIis Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

IL\RTFORD, 9th June, 1777. 

Sir, — I am to acknowledge the favor of yours of the 
7th ^ April last, enclosing the pay abstract of the Tenth 
Resriment of the Connecticut Militia, from October to 
January last, representing the unreasonable disproportion 
of officers was an objection to giving the necessary orders 
for payment. Am now to acquaint your Excellency 
that the regiment was ordered to join the Continental 
Army in New York, in August last, which service they 
cheerfully engaged in, and continued to perform initil 
the 27th day of September, during which time, by the 
reason of particular circumstances of the army, great 
numbers sickened, and many others on their return home, 
by which means the regiment was greatly weakened and 
distressed ; that in the latter end of October the regi- 
ment was again ordered into service, when the officers 
esteemed it their duty to attend, and the privates being 
prevented as above, the number which arrived at the 
place of rendezvous being small, rendered the party at 
that post too weak to discharge the supernumerary 
officers, as they consented to go on all foraging and 
scouting parties as privates, to promote the public ser- 
vice, and would add strength in case of an attack. As 
the privates in the regiment, by reason of sickness most 
probably occasioned by their late service, were prevented 
from marching, take leave to suggest, whether it be 

^ Sparks's Writings of Washington, iv. 379. 



70 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

not reasonable the States should pay the officers accord- 
ing to the rank they held by their military commissions, 
who cannot be considered as responsible for the sickness 
or inability of the soldiers to perform their duty. Must 
therefore request that you will be pleased to give the 
necessary orders accordingly. 

I am, sir, with the highest esteem and regard. 

Your most obedient, most humble servant. 

[Siynature omitted.] 
His Excellency General Washington. 



TKUMBULL TO WASIIINGTOX. 

Hartford, June 12th, 1777. 

Sir, — I had the pleasure duly to receive your letters 
of the 23d and 26th ultimo, and freely acquiesce in the 
justice and propiiety of the measures you have pursued, 
although it obliges us to give up the idea of retaining 
Continental troops for immediate defence, and to raise 
two battalions more at our own expense for that purpose, 
which the General Assembly cheerfully came into, rather 
than endanger objects of the last importance or embar- 
rass your measures by insisting farther upon the Resolve 
of Congress, which had encouraged us to hope we might 
be spared the expense and detriment to our country 
business, arising from the drawing off more men from 
the field and paying them while in service. Could you 
spare us two or three field-pieces for each of these bat- 
talions, it would be very acceptable ; yet if the general 
service will be prejudiced thereby, we cannot, with 
propriety, wish to be indulged in this request. 

I have not yet obtained full returns of the execution 
of the Act of Assembly for filling up the Continental 
Army ; yet, from the returns I have received, I flatter 
myself they will be so far completed that the recruiting 
officers will soon be able to fill up the companies that 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 71 

are yet deficient. I trust they will be pushed on by the 
officers to join you with all possible expedition, though 
many of them are so far debilitated by inoculation for 
the small-pox, and lameness and disorders consequent 
thereon, which will, of necessity, for some time retard 
their march. 

An exchange of prisoners is wished for as soon as may 
be convenient. The prisoners taken in the incursion to 
Danbury mutually wish for an exchange ; and as a great 
part of the prisoners taken from us were opulent farmers, 
it will be of public advantage to have them restored to 
their liberty, and a capacity to cultivate their estates. 
I am, etc., 

joxTH Tkumbull. 

His Excellency General Wasuington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Camp at Middle Brook, 
June 20th, 1777. 

Dear Sir, — General Howe has suddenly quitted his 
new post between Somerset and Brunswick, and has 
returned to his old situation. The whole desio:n of his 
making his late movement this way may possibly have 
been to induce us to draw off our troops from Peekskill ; 
though I think it most probable that he was disappointed 
in his expectations of the manner in which we should 
act, and that finding the people turned out with great 
spirit to strengthen our opposition, he concluded it most 
prudent to relinquish his intentions and resume his 
former position. But lest the first supposition should 
be true, I have ordered Generals McDougal and Glover 
not to proceed. If they are at a distance from Peekskill 
they are to halt where they are; and if they are near 
it, they are to go back. You will cease sending any 
more on. 



72 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTEES. 

General Scliuyler writes to me that, from some intelli- 
gence he had lately received, there was reason to appre- 
hend General Burgoyne was making preparation for an 
immediate attack upon Ticonderoga, and on that account 
requests a reinforcement; but as the alarm may, very 
likely, prove false, until we have further evidence that 
such an event is about to take place, I do not think it 
advisable to lessen our force on this quarter, by sending 
them to where, perhaps, they may not be wanted. 

It will be proper you should keep in view that the 
enemy's motions must, of necessity, be in concert, and 
if they operate to the northward, you will undoubtedly 
have a visit your way ; besides, being continually pre- 
pared for this casualty, it will be highly useful to use 
every method of gaining intelligence from New York. 
The most effectual means of doing this is to have persons 
frequently going into and coming out from the city. 
I am, with regard, dear sir. 

Your most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquartehs, Middle Brook, 
23d June, 1777. 

Sir, — I have had the honor to receive your letter of 
the 12th instant. Permit me to assure you, sir, that 
it would give me pleasure to comply with your re- 
quest for field-pieces were it in my power; but it is 
not. We have not sufficient for the army. General 
Schuyler applied for twelve, by a late letter, for his 
department, which cannot be furnished. Our number is 
so small that we do not think it expedient to appoint 
more than two to each of our brigades. We are obliged 
to keep some reserve in case of misfortunes. 

Your exertions to complete your quota of troops oblige 



I 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 73 

me much, and I am liappy to hear they arc likely to be 
attended with so mnch success. 

In respect to exchanging the prisoners taken in the 
Danbury expedition, as the action was chiefly with the 
militia, it seems to fall with more propriety under your 
direction. I am content that you should make a propo- 
sition of the sort, if it be agreeable to General Howe, 
and that the exchange should take place, if he will 
accede to it. ^Ye are in dispute upon the subject of 
the agreement between us, and I could not make the 
proposition with any degree of propriety. 

On Saturday night and yesterday morning. General 
Howe and his army evacuated Brunswick. Our advices 
of their intention, unhappily, were too late for us to 
make such dispositions to annoy them, as we wished : 
they had conveyed away their whole baggage, and were 
clear of all incumbrances. General Greene commanded 
the brigades particularly detached on this service ; but 
before they could get up, the enemy retreated. General 
Wayne's only arrived in time on the ground, and be- 
haved in a manner that does them honor. 

Colonel Morgan and his corps of light troops com- 
posed of rifle-men distinguished themselves greatly ; 
and hanging on the flanks of the enemy, did them a 
good deal of damage. They are now within their lines 
at Amboy. What their next operations and movements 
will be, I cannot determine. I should have been more 
particular upon this subject, had not the urgency of 
Mr. Trumbull's business, by whom this goes, required 
his departure. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir. 
Your most obedient, humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

P. S. Yours of the 9th June has been also received. 
General Putnam has ordered payment for the militia 
mentioned therein. 

10 



74 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, June 27th, 1777. 

Sir, — In my letter of the 12th mstant, I took the 
liberty to express our wishes for an exchange of our 
prisoners, since which I have received the most pressing 
request from a large number of them, to the same pur- 
pose, especially from Captain Trowbridge and Lieutenants 
Fitch and Fanning, whose circumstances are peculiarly 
difficult and distressing. Mr, Loring, Commissary of 
Prisoners, has, by a message by Mr. Webb, of Weathers- 
field, lately returned from New York (whither he went 
with a flag, to transact some business of great importance 
to him), acquainted me that he is ready to give, in ex- 
change for Mr. Chew and Mr. Bell, Deputy Commissaries 
of Forage/ any two of our subaltern officers ; or, for Mr. 
Chew, any committee-man in their power. If any ex- 
change of prisoners can now be made, and you have no 
material objection against it, I should be glad of your 
permission to exchange Captain Raymond, Mr. Chew, 
and Mr. Bell, prisoners in this State, taken on Long 
Island by Colonel Meigs, for Captain Trowbridge and 
Lieutenants Fanning and Fitch, who were all made 
captive on Long Island last summer. I the rather wish 
Mr. Chew's exchange, as he is a gentleman of sense 
and address, acquainted with gentlemen in every part of 
this State, and capable of doing as much hurt — much 
more, I believe — by his residence here, than he could 
do in arms against us. 

I am obliged again to trouble your Excellency with 
a request much against my inclination, but our situation 
requires it, — it is to desire we may have from the Labo- 
ratory at Springfield five hundred or one thousand small 
arms, upon loan or purchase. We should prefer the 
latter. 

^ See the Petitions of Joseph Chew aud others, Appendix A and B. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. iO 

In 1775 we armed upwards of seven thousand men, 
and sent them into service. When they were discharged 
in Canada and at Boston, all the arms fit for service were 
detained and paid for. Unfortunately, they have none 
of them found their way into this State again, or into 
the hands of Continental soldiers raised in other States. 
In like circumstances are all the arms purchased in this 
State for the army in 1775, which were bought out of 
the hands of our militia. Many guns were left last year 
by our militia battalions and regiments; all which be- 
longed to such men as died, and to many that were sick, 
were left in stores in the State of New York, and are to 
us irrecoverable. The Laboratory at Springfield has 
drawn off many, I am informed, most, of our manufac- 
turers of fire-arms ; so that our manufacture, which was 
carrying on upon public account, is almost at an end. 
We depended upon two battalions of Continental troops, 
agreeably to the Resolve of Congress; therefore have 
gone further in stripping ourselves to supply our Conti- 
nental battalions raising here, than we should have dared 
otherwise to have done. Although many of the arms 
which were in the hands of our soldiers in years past 
were of a more ordinary kind than we could have Avished, 
yet it is doubtless true that we have more good arms 
taken from us when the Continent were obliged to do it, 
and now in the hands of the Continent or their soldiers 
not belonging to this State, than would furnish our 
quota of the Continental Army. We think, therefore, 
we have a just claim to consideration in this respect, 
whenever it is in the power of the Continent to supply 
us ; if that is now the case you will judge. If we cannot 
obtain this favor, we must take arms out of the hands 
of militia to supply our two battalions raising for our 
defence, which, in effect, reduces our strength in case of 
an invasion, and loses us the service of just so many 
men as we are obliged to take arms in this way. 

I am, sir, etc., [Sirjnalure omilkJ] 



76 TEUMBULL AND WASHIXGTOX LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO GENERAL PUTNAM.^ 

Middle Brook, July 1st, 1777. 

Dear Sir, — At sunset this evening I received your 
letter of the 30th ult. The intelHgence contained in the 
copies of the letters you transmitted is truly interesting, 
and it appears almost certain to me that General Howe 
and General Burgoyne design, if possible, to unite their 
attacks and form a situation [_sic] of their two armies. 

I approve much of your conduct in ordering Nixon's 
brigade to be in readiness, and I desire it may be em- 
barked immediately, with their baggage, to sail for 
Albany as soon as General Parsons's and Varnum's bri- 
gades are so near Peeks Kill that they can arrive to 
supply their place before any troops can come up the 
river and effect a landing, or as soon as a number of 
mihtia equal to them can be got in. They will proceed 
up the river with the utmost despatch on either of these 
events happening. The ships that were at Amboy 
moved down round Staten Island this morning, and all 
the troops that were encamped opposite to the town 
struck their tents and marched off. 

Upon the whole, there is the strongest reason to con- 
clude that General Howe will push up the river iuime- 
diately to co-operate with the army from Canada, which, 
it appears from the accounts transmitted by General 
St. Clair, has certainly in view an attack on Ticonderoga 
and the several dependent posts. 

In this view of things it seems absolutely necessary 
for you to pursue the most speedy and effective measures 
to obtain a respectable reinforcement of the most neigh- 
boring militia. No time is to be lost ; much may be at 
stake ; and I am persuaded if General Howe is going up 
the river, he will make a rapid and a vigorous push to 
gain the Highland passes. 

' a part of this letter is printed in Sparks's "Writings of Washington, iv. 475. 



TRUMBULL AND WASIIINGTOX LETTERS. 77 

The militia cannot object to turning out, as the time 
of their detention cannot be long. Mr. Howe's move- 
ments "vvill soon be understood. 

You will not think of sending Glover's brigade down 
to the White plains in the present situation of affairs. 

I cannot pretend to give directions about taking the 
guns from the forts for the ships. I shall leave it to 
you and the other general officers to act therein, as 
may appear most expedient in ^-ours and their opinions. 

The letter for General George Clinton I have left open 
for your perusal, which you will despatch to him by 
express after sealing it. 

I am, dear sir, 
Your affectionate, humble servant, 

G" Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRTJMBULL.i 

Headquarters, Camp at Middle Bkook, 
July 2d, 1777. 

Sir, — I had last night the honor of your letter of the 
27th of June. 

The proposition for the exchange of the gentlemen 
you mention is entirely agreeable to me, as they are now 
entitled to a releasement from the time of their captivity, 
aiid fall within the right of exchange I have prescribed 
to myself. 

I am sorry it is not in m}^ power to comply with your 
request for arms. Notwithstanding the many arrivals 
we have had, there is scarcely a sufficiency to supply 
the demand for the Continental troops. What has be- 
come of them, I am unable to conceive. Every State 
complains of a deficiency ; a great part of the several 
quotas has come into the field very indifferently fur- 

1 A part of this letter is printed iu Sparks'a Writings of Washington, iv. 470. 



78 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

nislied, and yet the public magazines are very nearly 
exhausted. The importations from time to time far 
exceed the nmnber of Continental troops raised to make 
use of them. These have not, and could not have, been 
all put into their hands, and yet there are very few of 
them now to be found undisposed of If they are not, 
many of them, in possession of the militia, it is impossible 
to imagine where they are, as a very considerable [sicl 
part has ever fallen into the hands of the enemy. The 
fluctuating state of the army, and the irregular manner 
in which the militia usually left camp, rendered it im- 
practicable, on their return home, to withdraw the arms 
intrusted to them at their coming out, and gave them a 
fair opportunity of appropriating them to their own use, 
which every reason obliges me to believe the}^ did not 
fail to improve. It appears to me highly probable that, 
upon a careful scrutiny, many individuals will be found 
to possess more than they have occasion for, and that 
the surplus will fully answer the purpose you have in 
view. It is painful to me to refuse any request of 3-ours ; 
but when, for want of being fully acquainted with all 
circumstances, 3'ou make one that happens to interfere 
with the general good, I am convinced it is your wish 
I should give the preference to that. You will easilj^ be 
sensible, sir, that it would be improper entirely to drain 
the public arsenals or to straiten the Continental army 
in order to accommodate the militia. In case of emer- 
gency it will be much easier to draw them thence and 
give them to the inhabitants, than, if they were once 
distributed to them, and should be wanted by the Conti- 
nental troops, to recover them to answer the call. 
Should your State be seriously invaded and your militia 
unprovided for defence, j^ou cannot doubt they would 
be supplied with every necessary in the power of the 
Continent; and that any arms in store not immediately 
required for the army would be given to those who were 



I 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 79 

disposed to make use of them. But wlieu Contincutal 
arms are wanted for Continental troops, it cannot be 
expected that those should remain unsupplied and those 
arms be dedicated to another purpose. They cannot, 
in any case, or at any time, be so useful as in their 
hands. 

Since my last, the enem3^ disappointed in their attempt 
upon our right, have made an experiment upon our left ; 
and, frustrated in that also, have abandoned the Jerseys, 
and encamped upon Staten Island. There is a great 
stir among their shipping ; and in all probability their 
next movement will be by water, though it is impossible 
to decide with certainty to what place. But I last night 
received intelligence from General Schuyler, that General 
Burgoyne is beginning to operate to the northward. 
If it is not merely a diversion, but a serious attack, of 
which it bears strongly the appearance, it is a certain 
proof that the next step of General Howe's army will be 
towards the Peekskill, and that very suddenly, in order, 
if possible, to get possession of the passes in the High 
Lands before this army can have time to form a junction 
with the troops already there. To guard against contin- 
gencies, I have this morning sent off General Parsons's 
and General Yarnum's brigades, to march with all de- 
spatch towards Peekskill, and when they are arrived at 
or near that post, a reinforcement will proceed thence 
immediately to Albany on their way to Ticonderoga. 
The whole army are lying on their arms, ready to move 
wherever the decisive operation of the army may call 
them. I have also urged General Clinton, without loss 
of time, to call out a respectable body of the New York 
militia to join General Putnam. I have the fullest con- 
fidence you will do everything you can to second my 
endeavors, by forwarding, as fast as possible, the remain- 
ing troops of your State, or whatever else may be in 
your power. 



80 TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 

Our greatest- exertions will be requisite to counteract 
the enemy in their first attempts, on which their success 
chiefly depends. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G? Washington. 

Morris Town, July 4th, 1777. — Yesterday the army 
marched to this place, where they will be more conven- 
ient to succor Peekskill, should an attempt be made that 
way or further eastward ; and will be near enough Phila- 
delphia to oppose any design against that, should the 
enemy resume the project of going there. 

General Sullivan's division is further advanced towards 
Peekskill. 

If you effect the exchange you propose, you will in- 
form Mr. Boudenotte,^ Commissary of Prisoners, with 
what has been done, which you will be pleased to do on 
every similar occasion, as without it he could not know 
the true state of his Department. 

On a second view, I must beg you will postpone the 
exchange of those gentlemen till you hear from Mr. 
Boudenotte, to Avhom I will communicate your proposi- 
tion, and who, I doubt not, will do what you wish. But 
as he has been appointed to transact everything re- 
lating to prisoners, any interference with his department 
will tend to throw it into confusion, and prevent the 
salutary effects to be expected from it. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
July 7th, 1777. 

Sir, — I had the honor of writing to you the 2d 
instant, with a postscript of the 4th. I there informed 

1 Elias Boudinot. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 81 

you of the enemy having evacuated the Jerseys and of 
the inteUigence received from Ticonderoga, which in- 
duced me to suppose it highly probable the next opera- 
tion of General Howe would be up the North River. 
But as I have received no information since the first, of 
the 26th ult., to confirm the expectation of a serious 
attempt in that quarter, I am led very much to suspect 
that the hostile appearances that way may be only a 
diversion to keep awake our apprehensions for the secu- 
rity of the posts there, prevent our drawing away any 
part of our forces from thence, and even tempt us to 
weaken ourselves here by sending reinforcements to 
them, while the real design may be to attack elsewhere. 
This supposition is also agreeable to the accounts we 
daily receive from deserters and others who come from 
the enemy. We are told by these, that accommodations 
for horses are filling up in tlie transports, that they are 
taking in large supplies of provisions, water, and prov- 
ender, and that officers' baggage is continually trans- 
porting on board of them from New York, marked with 
their names and the corps they belong to. 

These representations, if true, seem to denote an ex- 
pedition that would take longer time than would be 
necessary for one up the North River ; but where, is all 
matter of conjecture, and cannot be determined with 
any degree of certainty. Prudence dictates that we 
should be as much upon our guard as possible every- 
where ; and on this account I have thought it my duty 
to communicate to you the information I have received, 
that in case anything should be meditated against the 
Eastern States, 3-ou may not be taken by surprise, but 
may have warning to put matters in the best situation 
you can, to give them a proper reception. On my part 
no vigilance nor exertions shall be wanting to ascertain 
their intentions, and give effectual assistance wherever 
they may direct their efforts. 

11 



82 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Since my last, I have had advices from the southward 
that the pubhc magazines there are entirely emptied of 
arms, and that the troops now coming on will be desti- 
tute, unless they can be supplied out of those imported 
to the eastward. This will oblige me to order most of 
the arms at Springfield to be sent forward to furnish 
those troops. It is matter of equal concern and surprise 
to hear such loud complaints in the Eastern States for 
want of arms, when we consider the quantities brought 
into them both on public as well as private account, 
which their situation enabled them to receive in much 
greater propoi'tion than the other States, and the arrivals 
of which have been announced in all the public papers 
as well as in private and official letters. How they have 
been applied it is impossible for me to conceive. 

In case of an actual invasion of your State, should such 
an event take place, and should there be a necessity for 
it, towards furnishing your militia, you may draw out of 
the store at Springfield a thousand arms for that purpose, 
if there be any remaining after the number I shall be 
obliged to call for is supplied. This you will be pleased 
to consider as a loan, not a sale, and to be replaced as 
soon as circumstances will permit. 

By the enclosed I have instructed the Commissary of 
Stores to deliver them. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G-9 Washington. 

P. S. The enclosed information came to hand since 
writing the above. The other letters you will be pleased 
to forward, as directed, with all despatch. They are in- 
clined to put the other Eastern States upon their guard 
also. 



I 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTON LETTERS. 83 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, Mth July, 1777. 

Sir, — I have received your letters, that of the 7th 
in.stant on the 10th ; that of the 2d, with postscript of 
the 4th, the next day. Thankfully acknowledge the at- 
tention paid to mine. The northern posts are truly alarm- 
ing. Although before you receive the intelligence I 
send you enclosed, you doubtless will have received 
more full and authentic accounts of this affair, yet 
conclude it best to let 3'ou have copies of the letters I 
have received. They may be of some use. The ac- 
counts they contain are such as give us surprising ideas 
of our dangers. Internal enemies are always to be con- 
sidered as the most dangerous, and to be watched with 
the greatest attention. I cannot forbear expressing my 
fears of such being concerned in this surprising event. 
Our utmost exertions are certainly necessary at this 
time, to keep up the spirits of our people and to stop 
the progress of the enemy. The Lord reigns ! Let us 
rejoice with thankfulness beforehand for the mercies 
we have received, and with hope of those we stand in 
need of. Future events are in the safe hand of the 
Supreme Director of all. Let us wait and patiently hope 
and trust in [him] for our salvation. He sets one thing 
over against another that we may find nothing after 
him.^ Although it be comparatively small, yet the ac- 
quisition of Major-Gencral Prescott as a prisoner,'- with 
his aide-de-camp and a sentinel, at Rhode Island, is of some 
consequence, as it may serve to release Major-General 
Lee from his captivity by way of exchange. jMajor- 
General Spencer informs me of this, and that it is his 

^ See Eccles. vii. 1 i : God also hath set the one over against the other, 
to the end that man should find nothing after him. 

2 See Washington's reply of 17th July, 1777, referring to this capture. 
Sparks's Writings of Washington, iv. 497. 



84 TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTON" LETTERS. 

design to send these prisoners to my care, to keep them 
in safety till your pleasure is known. As it \Yill be very 
difficult to keep him here, I think it will be best at 
least to send General Prescott forward under strong guard 
to you, even if he should be sent back again ; but pos- 
sibly he may not be here before the return of this ex- 
press, which I wish may be as speed}^ as possible. On 
this extraordinary emergency from the northward I shall 
directly send to Springfield for the thousand arms you 
are kind enough to allow me to take on loan. How[ever] 
it is with other States as to arms, sure I am the represen- 
tation from this State in my letter is just, ^ye have 
possibly erred on the safer hand of being righteous over- 
much. Please to direct Mr. Boudenot to write me con- 
cerning the prisoners. Ours are in unhappy circumstances 
with the enemy. Please to give me every information 
and direction needful. 

I am, with great esteem and regard, sir. 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon"^" Trumbull. 

His Excellexcy General "Washington. 



TROIBULL TO TVASHIXGTOX. 

Lebanon, 15th July, 1777. 

Sir, — William Adams, a lieutenant in Colonel Dur- 
kee's battalion, raised in this State, thinking himself 
superseded in appointments, hath applied to me for a 
dismission which doth not belong to me to grant ; I do 
therefore refer the matter to your Excellency's consid- 
eration. 

I am, with great esteem. 

Your Excellency's humble servant. 

[Signature omitted.] 
To HIS Excellency General Washington. 



i 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 85 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 25th July, 1777. 

Sir, — I have the honor of yours of the 17th^ instant. 
On the first intelligence received from Major-General 
Schuyler, by his letter of the 28th June ult., that 
the enemy had advanced as far as Crown Point, and 
sent out parties by the way of Otter Creek and on the 
west side of Lake George, and requiring the aid of 
militia from the States of New York, Massachusetts Bay, 
and Connecticut, I did inmiediately direct Brigadier- 
General Oliver Wolcott forthwith to order the brigade 
under his command, which lies in the most northerly 
part of this State, to hold themselves in readiness to 
march at the shortest notice, and to draft one half 
of the same, see them armed, equipped, and furnished 
with ammunition, knapsacks, blankets, and so much 
provision as he should jndge necessary, and appoint 
suitable officers to command them; at the same time 
take care to gain intelligence of the state of affairs at 
the northward ; and left at his discretion to order the 
part drafted, or such other part of his brigade as he 
should think proper, more or less, as the case should 
require, to march to the support and assistance of the 
northern army, which orders were attended. The intelli- 
gence he gained, so uncertain, that he thought fit to 
order the march of the half of Colonels Burrell's and 
Humphrey's regiments to the northward. On the 9th 
instant received General Wolcott's return of his conduct, 
and that he reserved the other two regiments for future 
direction. Our intelligence remained far from explicit, 
but the extreme busy season, to which may be added 
the distrust of being commanded by officers whose con- 
duct in evacuating the posts at Ticonderoga was so 

1 Sparks's Writings o^ Wasliingtoii, iv. 497. 



86 TRUMBULL AND WASHIXGTOX LETTERS. 

much censured, inclined the men to incur the fine in the 
case, rather than turn out with the freedom and spirit 
they would otherwise have done. Our intelligence re- 
maining doubtful, and our minds anxious to have every 
assistance in our power, on the 12th instant w^'ote to 
General Schuyler; and, that no time might be lost in 
affording our aid, desired Major-General Wadsworth to 
go with it and with power to call for militia from this 
State, as should appear to be needful, and to gain full 
intelligence in the affair. He went; and 3'esterday 
returned with a letter from Major-General Schuyler, 
iind made a report of the material circumstances which 
he was able to obtain. Copies of both are enclosed for 
your observation. 

It is not wonderful that the minds of all friends to 
our cause should be asfitated on the evacuation of the 

C5 

important posts at Ticonderoga, etc., with the cannon, 
ordnance stores, ammunition, provision, tents, clothing, 
etc., in such astonishing hurry and confusion, considering 
the apparent circumstances and unhappy consequences 
that must attend that hasty resolution, which occasions 
some to cry, treachery; others, cowardice; all, blame. 
While the true and real grounds of it remain unknown, 
the officers concerned must be violently perturbated, 
the men distrustful, and the service suffer. A speedy 
inquiry seems necessary ; when the facts are fresh in the 
minds of all, may be examined with care, discussed with 
candor, and treated in a manner the same may appear 
to merit. 

If this unhappy event should render it necessary for 
your Excellency to send a larger number of your army 
to the northward to stop the career of our enemies in 
that quarter than can be well spared during the sus- 
pense of General Howe's intentions and operations, our 
militia, 'tis apprehended, w^ill turn out wnth much better 
spirit to defend the pass of the enemy through the High- 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 87 

lands, than to go to the northward in their present 
situation. 

Major-General Spencer sent General Prescott to this 
place, agreeable to your desire. The day before yester- 
day I caused him to be removed to East-Windsor, where 
tlie people are generally well affected, where he is gen- 
teelly accommodated, but strongly guarded. At his 
request I suffered his aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Barring- 
ton, to attend him. I hope this capture of General 
Prescott may procure the releaseraent of General Lee, 
and bring about a general exchange of prisoners, so 
much wished for. 

Sunday last were alarmed at the appearance of twenty- 
four sail of the enemy's ships passing from New York 
throuEfh the Sound, showing themselves as standino; for 
Fairfield, and in like manner at sundry other places. 
Captain Niles, in our armed schooner " Spy," who was 
ordered out for discovery, was chased into New London 
harbor. Several broadsides, with other random shots, 
was fired at him. The enemy pursued till they came 
within a short distance from the light-house in that 
harbor. They passed by, only two ships and three or 
four schooners and sloops went in at New Port. Mr. 
Shaw says he found they are bound home with sick and 
wounded soldiers. Mr. Shaw was at the time in a flag 
to carry letters to thirty-one gentlemen at New York, 
who were allow^ed to return on parole, who were sent 
into this State for their inimical principles, to return 
when called for. He proceeded up the Sound as far as 
Huntington, when, meeting with a British ship, the 
commander prevented hiui from going up any further, 
saying that he had positive orders not to let any flag 
proceed any further. Mr. Shaw gave him the letters, 
and hath his receipt to deliver them to Lord Howe, 
mentioning the purport. 

The earth helps us. I never saw it better covered 



88 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

with its fruits for our support. The enemy threaten its 
destruction; may God prevent it! 

By your permission have received from Springfield 
about one thousand arms on loan. Doubt not they will 
be very useful for our defence. The spirits and ardor 
of oiu^ people are not subdued or abated. Men who 
have tasted of freedom, and who have felt their personal 
rights, are not easily taught to bear with encroachments 
on either, and cannot, without great preparation, be 
brought to submit to oppression. The admiration of 
riches leads to despotical government. Amo?' sceleratus 
hahendl, at this time, greatly endangers these States, from 
want of consideration that, if the public is not saved, 
their personal interests and pursuits must be lost. Ef- 
fectually to guard the safety of the people, great care 
is needful to preserve their virtue. Virtue is true bliss ; 
't is the great object of all good government. We will 
persevere in its pursuit. The Lord reigneth ! Let us 
rejoice therein. He sets one thing over against another 
that we may find nothing after him. 

I am, with great esteem and respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient and most humble servant, 

Jon"^" Trumbull. 

His Excellkncy General Washington. 

P. S. Just after finishing my letter, I received a 
requisition from General Schuyler, for a reinforcement of 
one thousand men from this State, for the reasons sug- 
gested. I conceive the best we can do may be effected 
by your ordering Continental troops who can move 
forward sooner, and their room supplied by Colonel 
Enos's battalion now in service on the western part 
of our sea-coasts, and their station again supplied by 
militia, if necessary, which we hope to find otherwise. 
Colonel Enos' battalion is enlisted for the defence of 
the sea-coasts and frontiers of this State and parts adja- 



TRL^MBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 89 

cent, without expectation of a lengthy march. I shall 
give orders to our brigadiers of militia, to draft and 
equip men to march on the shortest notice. AVhile this 
is doing, shall wait your approbation of the measure, 
and be ready to carry the same into execution. 

The cry of the people for an inquiry increases. It 
must be soon, full, and made public, or it will not be 
satisfactory. In the present situation at the northward 
it will be impracticable to procure men to go, ihc 
distrust of the officers is so great. They say 'twas not the 
men's fault that Ty. was evacuated. They went to 
fight, and would have done it if the officers had done 
their duty. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 28th July, 1777. 

Sir, — Last evening received a letter from Major- 
General Putnam informing that the enemy's fleet hath 
sailed, — in suspense to what part designed, although I 
believe their object to be Philadelphia, or North River, 
or both. Yet, if they steer eastward, I fancy they will 
rather attack Portsmouth, to co-operate with General Bur- 
goyne. The country back is thinly inhabited, and little 
or no force to resist them, and the Canadians and Indians, 
seeing such an opening, may be encouraged to spread 
ruin and devastation on our extended frontiers. 

Although I wrote you largely on the 25th, yet I can't 
forbear adding by this opportunity, that the Northern 
army, under Major-General Schuyler, are retired two or 
three miles below Fort Edward. All the houses, barracks, 
stores, etc., at that place are burned and destroyed. It 
seems a maxim with General Schujder to leave no sup- 
port to the enemy as he retires. The want of carriages 
may hinder the enemy's progress. I Avish three or four 
thousand Continental troops, well officered, could be 

12 



90 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

spared from your army. The}' might be sent up suddenly 
and prevent the career of the enemy. 

[The] 23d instant a party of the enemy surprised our 
advanced picket, killed seven, and wounded thirteen, 
three of which are since dead. Ten fine brass field-pieces 
are gone up. There is not much to be said for the spirit 
of the people in that quarter. Those who are escaped 
from Ty. with General St. Clair, are much fiitigued and 
worn out. General Nixon's brigade is their main de- 
pendence. The militia are one half gone home, the other 
half uneasy, I wish you knew fully their situation, and 
the necessity of a speedy reinforcement to save that part 
of the country. The necessity of an inquiry into the 
evacuation of Ty., etc., I have mentioned in my former. 
It needs no repetition, but only that it is called for by all. 

[Signature omitted.] 

WASHIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Philadelphia, August 4th, 1777. 

Sir, — T have been honored with your letter of the 
28th ultimo. I confess the conduct of the enemy is dis- 
tressing beyond measure, and past our comprehension. 
On Thursday and Friday last their fleet, consisting of two 
hundred and twenty-eight sail, were beating off the Capes 
of Delaware, as if they intended to come in. From this 
circumstance, nobody doubted but that Philadelphia was 
the immediate object of their expedition, and that they 
would commence their operations as soon as possible. 
They have stood out to sea again, but how far, or where 
they are going, remains to be known. From their entire 
command of the water they derive immense advantages, 
and distress us much by harassing and marching our 
troops from post to post. I wish we could fix on their 
destination ; in such case I should hope we would be pre- 
pared to receive them. 

I had been advised before that the Northern army had 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 91 

taken post below Fort Edward. I am told by those ac- 
quainted with the country, that Fort Edward is not 
tenable, and that the grounds where the army now is are 
good and pretty defensible. I hope they will prove so 
on trial. If Fort Edward was so situated, and the evac- 
uation necessary, though I regret the expense incurred 
in building the barracks, etc., yet their destruction might 
be advisable, as otherwise they would have afforded 
shelter and protection to the enemy. I should be happy, 
if I could spare the reinforcement of Continental troops 
which you mention. But it cannot be done. We now 
feel sensibly the fatal consequences arising from the de- 
ficiency in our regiments, and that languor which has 
but too generally prevailed throughout the States. If 
the quota of men exacted from the States were complete, 
we could, with great ease, check the progress of General 
Burgoj'ne, and bid defiance to all their armies. I trust, 
however, though this is not our condition, and though mat- 
ters do appear somewhat gloomy at present, that a steady 
perseverance, and our spirited exertions, will put things 
right again. It behooves every man to turn out and act 
with vigor at this juncture. Every motive of self-pres- 
ervation, of liberty, and happiness, has a claim upon our 
efforts, and requires our aid. Surely the militia do not 
mean to be supine spectators of their own and their coun- 
try's ruin. I cannot entertain so ungenerous a thought, 
and one so unworthy and derogatory of their former 
characters. 

The panic, I flatter myself, is nearly subsided, and I 
doubt not but they will give the army every possible 
assistance. The inquiry you mention will certainly be 
made, and in the course of a short time, I suppose as soon 
as circumstances will admit it. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G^. Washington. 



92 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Philadelphia, August 4th, 1777. 

Sir, — The great expense and loss of time that has 
attended the recruiting service in most of the States, and 
the little advantage derived from it, has induced Con- 
gress to recommend the executive powers of each to 
adopt certain new regulations for promoting this impor- 
tant and essential business, and for taking it entirely out 
of the hands of the officers of the army. The resolve on 
this subject, and the regulations recommended, passed 
on the 31st ultimo, and will, I presume, be transmitted 
you by the President. 

I will not urge the expediency of carrying this pro- 
ceeding into immediate execution. I shall on]y observe 
the necessity is obvious, and that it demands our most 
active attention. The principal cause of my troubling 
you at this time is to request that after the persons rec- 
ommended are appointed in your State, you will be 
pleased to transmit me their names, their places of resi- 
dence, and those designed for the rendezvous of recruits 
and deserters. As soon as I am advised upon those sub- 
jects, I shall recall all the officers who are recruiting, and 
order them forthwith to join their respective corps. Be- 
fore I conclude, I would beg leave to mention that the 
success of this interesting business in all its j^arts will 
depend much upon a judicious choice of those who are 
to be employed in it, and that I think the districts* should 
not be too large and extensive. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G?. Washington. 

Ills Excellency Govekxor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 93 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXGTOX. 

Lebaxok, 7th August, 1777. 

Sir, — Yesterday received a letter of the 3d instant 
from General Putnam, enclosing a copy of yours to him 
of 1st instant, advising that the enemy's fleet, on the 31st 
ultimo, sailed out of the Capes of Delaware, in an eastern 
course, requesting all possible assistance to prevent the 
enemy's possessing themselves of the passes in the High- 
lands. Previous to this, in pursuance of a former requi- 
sition from General Putnam, orders had been given to 
Brigadier-General Silliman to send on to Peekskill Col- 
onel Enos's battalion which was raised for the defence 
of this State ; and on the requisition of General Putnam, 
to send on such part of the militia of his brigade as might 
be w^anted and could be spared, having respect to the 
defence of the sea-coast. Similar orders were likewise 
given to Brigadier-General Oliver \yolcott, in conse- 
quence of which a part of Colonel Enos's battalion, five 
troops of horse, and two regiments of Brigadier Silliman's 
brigade, likewise three regiments of Brigadier Oliver 
Wolcott's brigade, have been ordered to march, and hope, 
by this time, many of them have arrived. Orders were 
yesterday issued for a further number of the militia, to 
complete about three thousand in the wdiole, to march 
immediately to Peekskill under the command of Brigadier- 
General "Ward. A large quantity of powder belonging 
to the States being deposited at Norwich, contiguous to 
New London, on the appearance of a fleet of the enemy's 
ships off the harbor of New London, it was judged pru- 
dent, to provide against accident, to remove one hundred 
barrels of the powder to Lebanon, one hundred to Cov- 
entry, and one hundred to Windham, one hundred still 
remaining at Norwich. The sudden and unexpected 
retreat from Ticonderoga and Mount Independence, fol- 
lowed with the loss of all the ordnance stores ; and a requi- 



94 TRUMBULL AND WASEIXGTON LETTERS. 

sition made by General Putnam, through the Deputy 
Adjutant-General Root, of the 28th ultmio, to have the 
militia furnished with ammunition, as that article was 
wanting there, has induced me to send forward to Farm- 
ington in this State, one hundred barrels of powder 
belonging to the State, which, if wanted at Peekskill, 
may go forward by the teams which go with it to Farm- 
ington ; and this express will return to Hartford season- 
ably, that the teams may go on from Farmington to the 
place where you may direct the same. 

[Signature ornitted.] 
His Excellekcy General Washingtox, or, in his absence, to 
Major-General Putxam. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 1st September, 1777. 

Sir, — I acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 
31st ^ July ultimo, and am happy to congratulate you on 
the success of General Stark near Bennington, and Col- 
oUel Gansevort at Fort Stanwix; events which demand 
our highest gratitude to the Supreme Director, for his 
merciful appearance for us at that critical juncture. 
This ought not to lessen our desires that a thorough and 
impartial inquiry be made into the grounds and reasons 
for the evacuation of Ticonderoga and Mount Indepen- 
dence, and that there was no good ground to stand upon 
for our defence, until the way was left open to the enemy 
near down to Albany. That it may prove satisfactory to 
the public, it is necessary that time and care be taken 
to procure every document and evidence needful, fully 
to elucidate the matters of facts, with their attending 
circumstances, that the determination may appear to be 
thorough, candid, and impartial. 

1 Sparks's Writings of Washington, v. 9. 



TEUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 05 

Your several requisitions made through Major-General 
Putnam have been duly attended to. 

I have to acknowledge the honor of your two letters 
of the 4th of August. On that respecting the recruiting 
and taking up deserters, this State is divided into six 
brigades of militia ; the limits of each is made a district ; 
the officers and places of rendezvous shall be soon ap- 
pointed, and you noticed thereof in my next. 

On the other, have to observe that previous to our 
receiving General Gates's letter fix)m Philadelphia, of 
the same date, our General Assembly ordered about one 
hundred or one hundred and fifty light horsemen and 
two regiments of our militia, consisting of seven hun- 
dred and twenty-eight men each, to continue in service 
for two months after they join the Northern army, un- 
less sooner dismissed. Immediately after receiving his 
letter we wrote to him to know whether he desired us 
to send only the number he had requested, and received 
for answer, that he requested the whole that were ordered 
by the Assembly. The light horsemen and many of 
foot are arrived, doubtless, before this. The residue are 
marching on. Our militia are not about to give up 
their country's cause. I depend upon their vigorous 
exertions at this season, and hope for something notable 
from them. 

I received from Major-General Putnam a. copy of yours 
of the 22d of August to him, with Mr. Bradley's intelli- 
gence. Copies of them are forwarded to the Eastern 
States, and proper attention will be paid to your requi- 
sition. The two Brigadiers, 0. Wolcott and Silliman, 
are ordered to furnish Major-General Putnam with men 
from their brigades, answerable to his requests. 

Measures are taking to find the causes of deficiencies 
in filling our quota of the Continental Army, that a proper 
remedy may be provided, agreeable to what may appear 
to be right, for making them up. 



96 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

My near connection with the Commissary- General is 
the occasion that I forbear to mention my fears and con- 
cerns for that department. The whole matter, with its 
causes and probable consequences, are better known to 
you than to me. 

I am, with esteem and regard, sir, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Newport, 
8th September, 1777. 

Sir, — I was yesterday honored with yours of the 1st 
instant. You have my thanks for your ready compliance 
with my requisition, through General Putnam, for a re- 
inforcement to the important [post] at Peekskill, and it is 
an additional pleasure to me to find that you have also 
sent a reinforcement to the army. 

Since General Howe's debarkation at the head of 
Chesapeake Bay, he has made very little progress, having 
only moved five or six miles from the shore with strong 
grounds in his front. Our advanced parties have had a 
small skirmish with his, but the damage on either side 
is considerable. General Howe's plans are yet very 
mysterious ; a few days ago he sent all his tents and 
baggage on board again, and his ships have fallen some 
distance down Chesapeake Bay. This can be for no 
other purpose but to go round to Delaware, and meet him 
there, as he can easily extend himself across the isthmus, 
which is narrow. This will be a strange manoeuvre 
indeed, as it will be exposing his ships to some danger 
upon the coast, at this tempestuous season, and should 
an accident happen to the fleet he must be ruined. A 
little time must unfold his true designs, which I trust we 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 97 

shall be able to baffle, as the troops are in good spirits, 
and the people of the country show an universal good- 
will to oppose the common enemy. 
I have the honor to be, 

With sincere respect and regard, sir. 
Your most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

GovERXOR Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. i 

Headquarters, October 1st, 1777. 

Sir, — I was yesterday honored with yours of the 24th 
ultimo, with its enclosures. 

The prosperous complexion of our Northern affairs is 
a very pleasing and important circumstance. It is much 
to be wished they may continue in the same train, and 
have as favorable an issue as they seem now to promise. 
If they have, besides the more immediate advantages that 
will accrue from disappointing the views of the enemy 
in that quarter, it will necessarily have a happy influence 
upon our affairs here. 

With respect to the promotion of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Meigs, as I know not how he stood in the time [Line], I 
am unable to judge of its propriety. In consequence of 
powers given me by Congress, to prevent the confusion 
which arose in the army for want of some common estab- 
lishment of promotion, I sometime since appointed a board 
of general officers to take the matter into consideration, 
and agreeable to tlieir opinion, fixed it as a general rule 
that all officers below the rank of major should rise 
regimentally till they attained that rank, and that all 
of that degree and above it should succeed to vacancies 
according to seniority in the Line of the State to which 
they belong. If Colonel Meigs was the oldest Lieutenant- 

^ a portion of this letter is printed in Sparks's Writings of Washington, 
V. 75. 

13 



98 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Colonel in the Line, his late appointment was regular and 
unexceptionable ; if not, his seniors Avill have a right 
to complain. 

You will have heard before this gets to hand, that the 
enemy have at length gained possession of Philadelphia. 
Many unavoidable difficulties and unfortunate accidents 
that we had to encounter concurred to promote their 
success. This is an event that we have reason to wish 
had not happened, and will be attended with several ill 
consequences ; but I hope it will not be so detrimental 
as many apprehend, and that a little time and persever- 
ance will give us an opportunity of making amends for 
our late ill fortune, and putting our affairs in a more 
flourishing condition than at present. Our army has now 
had the rest and refreshment it stood in need of, and our 
men are in very good spirits. 

With great regard and esteem, 

I have the honor to be, dear sir. 

Your most obedient servant, 

G°. Washington. 

P. S. The state of things here has obliged me to draw 
a further reinforcement from Peekskill, in addition to 
that which came under General McDougall. This will 
render that post weaker than is consistent with its se- 
curity; and I must therefore entreat you will be kind 
enough to afford General Putnam every aid from the 
militia of your State that you possibly can. You are 
sensible of the importance of taking care of that post, 
and I am persuaded you will do everything in your 
power to contribute towards it. 



TKUMBULL AND WASIIIXGTON LETTERS. 99 

WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Camp, Pawlin's Mill, 7th October, 1777. 

SiK, — I have the honor to transmit you an account of 
an action between the American Army and that of the 
Britisli, laying at Germantown, upon the morning of the 
4 th instant. 

Having obtained information of the situation of the 
enemy, we determined to endeavor to do something by 
way of surprise. We accordingly marched all night, and 
reached the town by break of day. We attacked upon 
two quarters, upon both of which we were successful ; but 
the morning was so exceedingly foggy that we could not 
see the confusion the enemy were in and the advantage 
we had gained, and fearing to push too far through a 
strong village we retired after an engagement of two 
hours, bringing off all our artillery with us. We did not 
know till after the affair was over how near we were to 
gaining a complete victory ; but we have since learned, 
from deserters and others that have come out, that 
preparations were making to retreat to Chester. While 
the action lasted it was pretty severe. Our loss will 
amount, in killed and wounded, to upwards of three 
hundred. What that of the enemy is we do not exactly 
know, but one deserter tells us that when he came 
away the returns amounted to upwards of seven hundred, 
among which are General Agnew killed, and Sir William 
Erskine badly wounded. Other accounts say that upwards 
of two hundred wagons went into Philadelphia loaded 
with wounded. If this is true, their loss is more than 
the deserter mentions. Upon the whole, our men are in 
high spirits, and much pleased with the fortune of the 
day, though not so completely lucky as could have been 
wished. 

I have the honor to be, sir, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

G*^- Washington. 



100 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, 14th October, 1777. 

Sir, — I have the honor of j^our letter of the 1st 
instant. Have now the pleasure to congratulate you on 
the further successes of our army at the northward. 
Hope this aurora borealis may not only dispel the 
gloom, and establish our affairs in that quarter, but 
be the forerunner of success and victory in every other 
Department. 

The greatest part of our intelligence is contained in 
the enclosed Hartford paper. By the last accounts the 
enemy were environed by our troops, and seemed in 
great confusion and distress, — their baggage scattered, 
and much of it destroyed by themselves, great numbers 
of their horses killed on the road, several hundred barrels 
of provisions fallen into our hands. The enemy, in their 
retreat, have burnt General Schuyler's house, out-houses, 
and mills, and the houses of all who were reputed friendly 
to their country. 

General H. Clinton, from N. York, made a sudden push 
up North River ; before a sufficient number of militia 
arrived, hath taken Fort Montgomery by storm after a 
gallant defence by the garrison under Governor Clinton. 
He, his brother. Colonel Dubois, Major Humphrey, etc., 
escaj^ed after the enemy had entered. The enemy are in 
possession of the pass at the Highlands; hope they will 
soon be obliged to retire back with loss and disappoint- 
ment. 

[Signature 07tutted.] 

WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Camp near White Marsh, 15 Miles from Philadelphia, 
October 26, 1777. 

Sir, — I was honored a few days ago with your favor 
of the 14th, for which, and its enclosure, I return you 
my thanks. 



1 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON" LETTERS. 101 

I am happy in congratulating you, in turn, on the 
further success of our arms at the northward, in the 
surrender of General Burgoyne. The particulars of this 
fortunate event will have reached you before this, I 
expect, and therefore shall not add more upon the 
subject. 

I have also the pleasure to inform you that on the 
22d instant about twelve hundred Hessians under the 
command of Count Donnop, in an attempt to take our 
fort at Red Bank by storm, were repulsed with the 
loss of about four hundred in killed, wounded, and pris- 
oners. Among the prisoners is the Count himself, badly 
wounded. After the repulse, the enemy retreated with 
great precipitation, and recrossed the Delaware as soon 
as possible. The next morning several of their ships of 
war warped through the lower tier of chevaux-de-frise, 
and attacked Fort Mifflin and our armed vessels which 
were posted near it. The cannonade was severe, and of 
long continuance. The enemy had two ships burnt, — 
one, said to be the "Augusta," of sixty-four guns, the other 
a frigate of thirtj'-two. We are not informed whether 
they were set on fire by our shot, or from what cause 
their destruction proceeded. The first, in returning, got 
aground. Our loss at Red Bank did not exceed thirty- 
two in killed and wounded ; and not above four in the 
action with the ships of war. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect. 
Your most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 2d December, 1777. 
Sir, — I was honored with your favor of the 26th 
October ultimo, received some time last month, for which 
I return my thanks. 



102 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

I have received several of your applications, through 
Major-General Putnam, which have been executed in the 
best manner our circumstances would admit. 

On the last request from the Major-General, in addition 
to Colonel Enos's regiment and others with him before, 
I ordered Colonel Ely's battalion, nearly full, from New 
London, — marched the 22d November ultimo, — and also 
two hundred men from each of the three nearest brio-ades, 
— Silliman's, Oliver Wolcott's, and Ward's, — making 
six hundred men, to join the Continental Army near New 
York; and our armed schooner "Spy" to go up Sound as 
far as best, to be under direction of General Putnam, or 
the general officer there. 

The expedition to Newport hath unhappily failed. An 
inquiry hath been made into the reasons. General Spen- 
cer exculpated. A Brigadier Palmer failed in his duty. 
The enemy were meditating an attack on Bedford, and had 
actually embarked troops which were prevented by this. 

I have enclosed a copy of my letter to the Honorable 
Congress, which takes up various matters which I think 
proper to communicate to 3^ou, and cannot do it better 
than by its enclosure. Be so good as to admit Brigadier- 
General Huntington to see this on his apphcation to your 
Excellency. 

The article of clothing is of utmost importance, and 
[I] shall attend to and prosecute it with vigor. I believe 
considerable quantities for the troops, from the several 
towns of this State, are coming, and will be on for them 
very soon. 

Mr. Brown, the express who carries this, goes on to 
Congress, and will return by your headquarters. Your 
communications will be gratefully accepted. 
I am, with great esteem and regard, sir, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON" LETTERS. 103 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Gulf Mill, 
15th December, 1777. 

Sir, — I have the honor of yours of the 2d instant. I 
am much obliged for the attention you have paid to my 
requests through General Putnam, and I shall ever ac- 
knowledge the readiness with which you have alwa}^? 
afforded any assistance from your State, when demanded 
immediately by myself 

I was never consulted in the least upon the Rhode 
Island expedition, and I cannot therefore pretend to say 
who were, or were not, to blame ; but it undoubtedly 
cost the public an enormous sum to little or no purpose. 

I observe by the copy of your letter to Congress that 
your State had fallen upon means to supply your troops 
with clothing. I must earnestly beg that it may be sent 
on to camp as flist as it is collected. To cover the country 
more effectually, we shall be obliged to lay, in a manner, 
in the field the whole winter, and except the men are 
warmly clad they must suffer much. 

Among the troops of your State there are three hun- 
dred and sixty-three drafts whose time of service will 
expire with this month. This deduction, with the former 
deficiency of the regiments, will reduce them exceedingly 
low; and, as I have represented this matter to Congress 
very fully, I hope they have before this time urged to 
the States the necessity which there is of fdling their 
regiments this winter. But lest they should not have 
done it, I beg leave to urge the matter to your immediate 
consideration. Recruits for the war ought, by all means, 
to be obtained if possible, but if that cannot be done, 
drafts for one year at least should be called out Avithout 
delay. And I hope that as many as are now upon the 
point of going home will be immediately reinstated. We 
must expect to lose a considerable number of men by 



104 TRUMBULL AND WASHmGTOX LETTERS. 

sickness, and other ways, in the course of the winter; 
and if we cannot take the field in the spring with a 
superior, or at least an equal force with the enemy, we 
shall have labored through the preceding campaign to 
little purpose, 

I have the honor to be. 

With great respect and esteem, sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G9. Washixgton. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Valley Forge, 
December 29th, 1777. 

Sir, — I take the liberty of transmitting to you the en- 
closed return, which contains a state [ment] of such of the 
Connecticut regiments as are in the army immediately 
under my command. By this you ^,\i\\ discover how de- 
ficient, how exceedingly short, they are of the complement 
of men which of right, according to the establishment, 
they ought to have. This information I have thought it 
my duty to lay before you, that it may have that atten- 
tion which its importance demands; and in full hope that 
the most early and vigorous measures will be adopted, 
not only to make the regiments more respectable, but 
complete. The expediency and necessity of this proced- 
ure are too obvious to need arguments. Should we have 
a respectable force to commence an early campaign with, 
before the enemy are reinforced, I trust we shall have an 
opportunity of striking a favorable and an happy stroke. 
But if we should be obliged to defer it, it will not be easy 
to describe, with any degree of precision, what disagree- 
able consequences may result from it. We may rest as- 
sured that Britain will strain every nerve to send from 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 105 

home and abroad, as early as possible, all the troops it 
shall be in her power to raise or procure. Her views and 
schemes for subjugating these States and bringing them 
under her despotic rule will be unceasing and unremitted. 
Nor should we, in my opinion, turn our expectations to, 
or have the least dependence on, the intervention of a 
foreign war. Our wishes on this head have been disap- 
pointed hitherto, and perhaps it may long be the case. 
However, be this as it may, our reliance should be wholly 
on our own strength and exertions. If, in addition to 
these, there should be aid derived from a war between 
the enemy and any of the European powers, our situation 
will be so much the better ; if not, our efforts and exer- 
tions w^ill have been the more necessary and indispensable. 
For my own part, I should be happy if the idea of a for- 
eign rupture should be thrown entirely out of the scale 
of politics, and that it may have not the least weight in 
our public measures. No bad effects could flow from it, 
but, on the contrary, many of a salutary nature. At the 
same time, I do not mean that such an idea ought to be 
discouraged among the people at large. 

Your ready exertions to relieve the distresses of your 
troops for clothing have given me the highest satisfaction. 
At the same time, knowing how exceedingly the service 
has been injured, how that every measure will be pur- 
sued that circumstances will admit to keep them supplied 
from time to time, no pains, no efforts can be too great 
for this purpose. The articles of shoes, stockings, and 
blankets demand the most particular attention, as the 
expenditure of them, from the operations and common 
accidents of war, we find to be greater than of any other 
articles. I assure you, sir, it is not easy to give you a 
just and accurate idea of the sufferings of the troops at 
large. Were they to be minutely detailed, the relation 
— so unexpected, so contrary to the common opinion of 
people distant from the army — would scarcely be thought 



106 TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTON LETTERS. 

credible. I fear I shall wound your feelings by telling 
you, that by a field-return on the 23d instant, we had 
in camp not less than 2,898 men unfit for duty by 
reason of their being barefoot and otherwise naked. Be- 
sides these, there are many others detained at the hospi- 
tals and in farmers' houses for the same causes. I will 
no longer dwell upon the melancholy subject, being 
firmly convinced that your views and most studious care 
will be employed to render the situation of the troops, 
both officers and privates, comfortable in future. If the 
several States direct their attention to this indispensably 
essential object, as I trust they will, I have the most 
sanguine hopes that their supplies, with those immediately 
imported by Congress themselves, will be equal to every 
demand. 

The return transmitted comprehends only such troops 
of your State as are at this camp. I imagine all the 
regiments stand nearly upon the same footing in point of 
deficiency ; and from it you will be able to form a pretty 
just estimate of the men that will be necessary to fill 
the whole. 

Before I conclude I would also add that it will be 
essential to inoculate the recruits or levies as fast as they 
are raised that their earliest services may be had. Should 
this be postponed the work will be to do, most probably, 
at an interesting and critical period, and when their aid 
may be materially wanted. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G° Washington. 

P. S. We have taken post here for the winter, as a 
place best calculated to restrain the ravages of the enemy, 
and busily employed in erecting huts. 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 107 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, 14tli January, 1778. 

Sir, — I am honored with your letters of the 15th and 
29th December last. I render you my thanks for the 
communications they contain. It affords me pleasure to 
find our exertions to relieve the distresses of our soldiers 
for clothing hath met so much success. Particular atten- 
tion will be given on that head in future. The time is 
come when they will claim a new suit. 

By my last you was informed of our sending Colonel 
Joseph Trumbull to purchase clothing at the eastward. 
He found that Messrs. Otis and Andrews, within a few days 
before his coming to Boston, received a commission from 
Mr. Mease, and instructions from Congress and from him, 
to purchase all the clothing in that part of the world for 
the immediate use of the Continental Array, with all pos- 
sible despatch. With them he agreed not to interfere or 
attempt purchasing ; and that Governor Trumbull should 
send them, requesting a quantity such as their proportion 
of the men in the army, and engage to get them made 
and transported to the army, and deliver them to Mr. 
Mease, or dispose of them to our troops by order of your 
Excellency — taking proper receipts therefor — on which 
they would deliver him the goods. I did accordingly, 
to expedite the business, and the clothing is come to 
hand. Such as is fit for immediate use — viz., blankets, 
stockings, shoes, shirts, hats, caps, etc. — will be sent 
on to your headquarters wuth all convenient despatch. 
Those that are to be made up will be put into hands 
of tailors. I have thought it best that officers from 
each regiment might have orders to take care of the 
matter, and that the head workman should be put under 
oath to see the same faithfully executed. Major-General 
Parsons and Huntington are now in this State, with them 
I purpose to consult for the better effecting it. I fancy 



108 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

there are a number of soldiers among om* troops who are 
tailors, and might be employed in the business. 

In consequence of this undertaking of mine, I have to 
request your directions and orders that these clothing 
may be delivered to the soldiers of this State, with advice 
of the best mode of doing it. 

The General Assembly of this State came together last 
Thursday. Yours of the 29th ultimo came to hand the 
10th instant, and was laid before them. The deficiencies 
in our regiments, shown by the return sent me, will meet 
the attention its importance demands. 

I hope, with you, that early and vigorous measures will 
be adopted to complete them to their full complement. 
Expediency and necessity require it, not only from this, 
but also from the other States. Our inveterate foes will 
strain every nerve in the manner you mention, which 
should excite us to be beforehand with them to strike a 
home blow before they can be reinforced. It is my most 
ardent desire that every necessary preparation be made. 
Such a stroke will best relieve the sufferings of the army. 
For them I have very tender feelings. At the same time, 
sir, I feel most cordially for the weight and burdens that 
lie on your Excellency. The matter of inoculation will 
be attended to. 

A general exchange of prisoners is expected to take 
place this winter, — a thing very desirable, and doubt not 
your endeavors for it. 

[Signature omitted.] 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Valley Forge, 
24th January, 1778. 

Siu, — I am honored with yours of the 14th instant, 
and am much obliged for your promised attention to the 
completing of your regiments ; and I hope your exertions 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 109 

will be attended with the desired success. I am also to 
thank you for your care in providing clothing for your 
troops. If the coats should not be cut out before this 
reaches you, instead of the usual regimental coat, I would 
recommend a garment of the pattern of the sailors for 
jacket. This sets close to the body, and by buttoning 
double over the breast, adds much to the warmth of the 
soldier. There may be a small cape and cuff of a differ- 
ent color to distinguish the corps. I have consulted most 
of the officers of the army, and they all seem to think 
that this kind of coat will be much the best, at least, 
till we can fall upon means of procuring full supplies of 
complete uniforms. We cannot spare tailors to go from 
hence; therefore, if you cannot get all the clothes readily 
made up, I think 3'ou had better send part of the cloth 
here, with all kinds of necessary trimmings, and the regi- 
mental tailors will soon make them up under the inspec- 
tion of their officers. As the overall is much preferable 
to breeches, I would recommend as many of them as 
possible. 

The transports that lately arrived at Rhode Island went 
from Philadelphia. They were empty, and were taken 
away by Lord Howe to secure them during the winter, 
as the port of Philadelphia was so crowded that had any 
part of the fleet taken fire, the whole would have been 
consumed. 

Nothing has been wanting upon my part to procure the 
release of our prisoners upon just and equitable terms. 
Congress are fully possessed of all the letters that have 
ever passed between General Howe and myself upon the 
subject of exchange, and they have been pleased to 
approve of the steps I have from time to time taken. If 
they should think it most conducive to the general good 
to settle this unhappy dispute upon his terms, I shall 
most cheerfully acquiesce ; for nothing can be more dis- 
tressing to me than to receive daily applications from the 



110 TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

friends of those in captivity, and not have it in my power 
to afford them any redress. 

I have the honor to be, with the greatest regard, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

09. Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Yallky Forge, 6th February, 1778. 

Sir, — I must take the liberty of addressing you on 
a subject which, though out of your sphere, I am fully 
persuaded will have every possible attention in your 
power to give. It is the alarming situation of the army 
on account of provision. Shall not undertake minutely 
to investigate the causes of this, but there is the strongest 
reason to believe that its existence cannot be of long du- 
ration, unless more constant, regular, and larger supplies 
of the meat kind are furnished than have been for some 
time past. We have been once on the brink of a dis- 
solution in the course of the present year for want of this 
article, and our condition now is but little better. What 
is still more distressing, I am assured by Colonel Blaine, 
Deputy-Commissary in the middle district, comprehend- 
ing the States of Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland, 
that they are nearly exhausted in this instance, and the 
most vigorous and active exertions on his part will not 
procure more than sufficient to supply the army during 
this month, if so long. This being the case, and as any 
relief that can be obtained from the more southern States 
will be but partial, trifling, and of a day, we must turn 
our views to the eastward, and lay our account of sup- 
port from thence. Without it we cannot but disband. 
I must therefore, sir, entreat you in the most earnest 
terms, and by that zeal which has so eminently distin- 
guished your character in the present arduous struggle, 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. Ill 

to give every countenance to the person or persons em- 
ployed in the purchasing line in your State, and to urge 
them to the most vigorous efforts to forward supplies of 
cattle from time to time ; and thereby prevent such a 
melancholy and alarming catastrophe. As I observed 
before, this subject is rather out of your province, yet 
I know your wishes to promote the service in every pos- 
sible degree will render any apology unnecessary, and 
that the bare state of facts will be admitted as a full and 
ample justification for the trouble it is like to occasion 
you. 

I have the honor to be, 

With great respect and esteem, sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G^ Washington. 

IIis Excellency Governok Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Valley Forge, 
31st March, 1778. 

Sir, — It is some time since I have been honored with 
a letter from you. The sole reason of my taking up your 
attention at this time is to lay before you a short state 
of our present situation, the apparent views of the 
enemy, and from thence to show the absolute necessity 
which there is for drawing our force together as quick as 
possible, and being able to take the field before the enemy 
are in a condition to begin their operations. Notwith- 
standing the orders I had given last year to have all the 
recruits inoculated, I found, upon examination, that 
between three and four thousand men had not had the 
small-pox; that disorder began to make its appearance 
in camp, and to avoid its spreading in the natural way, 
the whole army [was] immediately inoculated. They 
have gone through w^ith uncommon success, but are not 



112 TRUMBULL AND WASEINGTON LETTERS. 

yet sufficiently recovered to clo duty. All the men of the 
eastern regiments who were drafted for eight and twelve 
months were discharged in the winter, and their places 
have not yet been filled up. Seven of the Virginia regi- 
ments had been enlisted for two years ; and their time of 
service expiring about two months ago, they were dis- 
charged likewise. Full two thousand men belonging to 
the different States are returned unfit for duty, for want 
of clothing, and must consequently be deducted from the 
effective list, from which also are to be taken the sick 
present and in hospital. From the above you may form a 
pretty just estimation of our present force, — I mean with 
which we should be able to look the enemy in the face. 

General Howe has already drawn a body of men, said to 
be two thousand five hundred, from New York, and several 
accounts from Ehode Island speak confidently of the in- 
tended evacuation of New Port, which I suppose, if it takes 
place, is also to reinforce Philadelphia. These things in- 
dicate the intention of an early movement on the part of 
the enemy, and indeed, if they have the least penetration, 
or have profited by past experience, they must know that 
an early campaign upon their part will be highly advan- 
tageous to them. Had they attacked us last spring in the 
neighborhood of Morris Town before our levies joined, 
they would undoubtedly have routed us, and perhaps 
have hindered us from making a junction of any conse- 
quence during the remainder of the campaign. 

After the foregoing, little need be said to convince you 
of the absolute necessity of sending forward your levies 
w^ith the greatest expedition. They are wanted now to 
enable us to act merely on the defensive ; but would the 
States exert themselves and send such a body of men into 
the field, before the enemy are fully reinforced, as would 
enable us to act upon the offensive, such advantages 
might be taken of them in their present situation, and 
such posts occupied as would reduce them to the greatest 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 113 

distress. We may be assured that, notwithstanding the 
severe blow which Great Britain met with in the loss 
of Burgoyne's army, she will exert herself most stren- 
uously to repair her credit this campaign. It is plain 
that France is playing a politic game, enjoying all the 
advantages of our commerce without the expense of war. 
It will probably end in a rupture between the two courts, 
but perhaps not so speedily as some imagine. 

Such of the levies as have not been inoculated need 
not be detained on that account. We have found it 
more convenient to inoculate them in and near camp. 
They can be of service in case of emergency, and are not 
to be subjected to a long march immediately upon their 
recovery, which has always been much more fatal than 
the disorder. 

Among the troops returned unfit for duty for want 
of clothing, none of your State are included. The care of 
your legislature in providing clothing and necessaries of 
all kinds for their men is highly laudable, and reflects 
the greatest honor upon their patriotism and humanity. 

I wrote to you the 6th ultimo upon our then want of 
provisions, to which having received no answer, I am 
doubtful of the letters getting to hand. We have been 
since better supplied, and as I am informed that Mr. 
Wadsworth has accepted of the commissary department, 
I hope that we shall do better in future. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir. 
Your most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXOTON-. 

Lebaxon, 5th May, 1778. 

Sir, — Your alarming letter of the 6th February last 
came to, and was opened at, Hartford, where the General 
Assembly were then sitting, on the 17th of that month. 

15 



114 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

I was at that time so indisposed as to attend business but 
a small part of the sessions. This, added to the total 
difference of my sentiments from a great majority of the 
Assembly, on the subject of the Regulating Act then in 
consideration, occasioned my not answering you immedi- 
ately, and I find no one else gave himself the trouble 
of writing. 

My fears of the ill effects of the regulations which have 
been gone into are not removed. The event, I hope, 
will disprove them. But the injustice of the present 
mode I shall ever testify against. 

The activity and abilities of Mr. Wadsworth and Cham- 
pion will doubtless be exerted to the utmost, and I hope 
will not fail of success. 

What fish can be procured are putting up, which may 
serve the troops on Hudson's River, and leave to you 
almost, or quite, all the beef we can provide. 

Your other letter of the 31st March was received the 
9th April. Major-General Putnam came a few days after 
to collect the new recruits, and was furnished with the 
orders and assistance necessary. What numbers have 
been raised I cannot ascertain, but expect our deficiencies 
will not be great. 

The inoculation is omitted. The clothing our troops 
goes on tolerably well. Hope the mode taken will meet 
your approbation. 

The passing news you will see from the enclosed 
paper. I am. 

Your Excellency's respectful and obedient servant, 

JoN^" Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTON LETTERS. IL 



WASHINGTON TO GENERAL GATES, OR COMMANDING 
OFFICER AT FISIIKILL. 

Valley Fohgk, May 17th, 1778.^ 

Sir, — From a variety of concurring circumstances and 
the general information of persons coming from Phila- 
delphia, it would appear that the enemy mean to evacuate 
the city, and accordingly are preparing to embark. Some 
accounts are that part of the heavy cannon and baggage 
are already on board, and the whole agree that all the 
transports are taking in wood and water. Whether an 
evacuation is really intended, or what their destination 
will be, supposing that it should take place, is a matter 
that cannot be determined here. However, I think it is 
right to give you the substance of the intelligence, that 
you may be in the best situation circumstances will admit 
of, in case it should be their view to operate on the North 
River. That you may be the more respectable, if such 
should be their design, you will retain all the eastern 
recruits intended for the regiments here, till I give further 
directions respecting them. It is probable the point of 
evacuation, or the contrary, will become so certain, that 
it may be decided in a few days what measures will be 
the best to pursue ; perhaps at the same time it might 
not be improper for you to make requisition of the 
militia, or a part of them, to reinforce the Highland posts, 
and complete the works, agreeable to the powers vested 
in you for that purpose. Their services may be very 
beneficial on condition of a sudden push on the part of 
the enemy, and will not, at any rato, involve any con- 
siderable expense, as a little time will demonstrate what 
operations the enemy have in contemplation. I have 
also written to General McDougall requesting him to 
remain where he is, till he hears further from me. 

If the enemy now in Philadelphia are going to leave 

1 See Appendix C, General Gates's letter in reply to this. 



116 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTEES. 

the continent, in consequence of the state of affairs in 
Europe, I should suppose they will also abandon New- 
York, and that the same preparations for a removal will 
be making there that are in Philadelphia. It will be very 
material to obtain good information from thence, and I 
am persuaded 3'ou will use all the means in your power 
to effect it. If some one or two intelligent persons could 
be sent in for that purpose, in whose integrity and ve- 
racity you could implicitly confide, their report might be 
exceedingly interesting. As soon as the objects of the 
present preparations in Philadelphia are well understood, 
I will advise, and if they shall seem to be directed to the 
northward of this, I shall afford the earliest, and every 
possible aid that I can give. 

I am, sir, your most obedient servant, 

G° Washington. 

Major-General Gates, or (Commanding Officer at Fishkill. 



WASHIi^GTON TO GENERAL GATES. 

Headquarters, Valley Forge, 
18th June, 1778. 

SiE, — This morning about sunrise the rear of the 
enemy's army evacuated Philadelphia. 

To-day. and to-morrow morning our whole army will 
move towards the Delaware, and should the enemy march 
rapidly through the Jersey I shall proceed northward as 
expeditiously as possible. My movements, however, will 
be directed by theirs. 

In your quarter you will take the proper measures on 
this occasion, and let me particularly recommend to your 
attention the great object of provisions. 

I am, sir, your obedient and very humble servant, 

G9 Washington. 

2 o'clock p. M. 

Hon. Major-General Gates. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 117 



WASHINGTON TO TRU.AIBULL. 

Headquarters, Haverstraw, 

18th July, 1778. 

Sir, — I did myself the honor to transmit you, a few 
days ago, the accounts which I had then received of the 
arrival of a French lleet upon the coast. I soon after had 
the pleasure of receiving a letter from the Admiral, Count 
D'Estaing, dated off Sandy Hook, where he now lies with 
twelve sail of the line, and four frigates. The British 
fleet are within the Hook. 

I am so fully convinced of the advantages that will 
result from having all our frigates, privateers, and armed 
vessels of every kind cruising off the east end of Long 
Island, that I have taken the liberty of mentioning it 
again to you, and have wrote to the same effect to the 
States of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. The British 
fleet, awed by the French, will be obliged to keep to- 
gether, which will afford the noblest opportunity to our 
cruisers to pick up whatever is inward bound. 
I have the honor to be, 

With great respect and esteem, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

P. S. You will oblige me by forwarding the letters to 
General Sullivan, Governor Greene, and the President of 
Massachusetts, by a fresh express. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

IlEAPQrAUTKRS, WlIITE PlAINS, 

22(1 July, 1778. 

Sir, — I was yesterday honored with yours of the 18th, 
and thank j^ou for the steps you have taken to carry my 
requests into execution. I must make an apology for 
not informing you, in particular, of our success at Mon- 



118 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTOX LETTERS. 

mouth, on the 28th last month. The multiplicity of 
affairs then upon my hands prevented me from writing 
but to the Congress and General Gates, and I expected that 
the intelligence would have reached you through the lat- 
ter channel. You must, before this time, have seen my 
public letter which contains a full account of the action. 

The intention of the Count D'Estaing was to have 
entered the harbor of New York ; but unluckily, there is 
not sufficient draft of water to admit vessels of the rate 
of his line-of-battle ships. He has therefore determined 
to operate against Rhode Island, to which place he has 
sailed ere this. I have made a large detachment from 
this army, as circumstances would admit of, to co-operate 
with him. The Admiral will probably be able to land 
some force, but our principal dependence must be on our 
own troops, and the rapidity with which they are col- 
lected and operate. 

I had, upon presumption that this expedition would 
take place, desired General Sullivan to draw together 
five thousand men from the States of Connecticut, Rhode 
Island, and Massachusetts, in consequence of a resolve of 
Congress of the 11th instant. 

I am convinced that you will be so well satisfied of the 
importance of the subject in view, as to exert yourself 
to turn out the force of your State upon the occasion. 
I would go more longly into the matter, had I not an 
opportunity of referring you to Lieutenant-Colonel Lau- 
rens, one of my aids, who I am sending express to General 
Sullivan. 

I am exceedingly sorry to hear of the illness of your 
son. Colonel Joseph Trumbull, whose recovery I hope is 
not so much despaired of as you seem to apprehend. 
I have the honor to be. 

With great regard and esteem, sir, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G°- Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 119 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 25th July, 1778. 

Sir, — I received a letter from Mnjor-General Sullivan, 
of the 22d, advising that he expects the enemy will make 
a descent on Providence in a very short time, — that they 
are noAV seven thousand strong, and in a day or two will 
be eleven, — requesting aid from this State. Although 
we are exceedingly exhausted of men, etc., and this criti- 
cal moment for securing the labors of the last and the 
produce of this year, which is of essential consequence, 
rendered it additionally distressing to take off more of 
our militia, yet I doubt not we should have made an 
effort to support them ; but before we had come to a full 
determination your Excellency's fxvor of the 22d from 
White Plains came to hand advising; of Admiral D'Es- 
taing's design at Rhode Island, which has greatly relieved 
our anxiety for the fate of Providence. I was this day 
with my Council considering how and in what manner to 
raise or furnish aid, etc., agreeable to your Excellency's 
requisition, when I just received another letter from 
Major-General Sullivan of yesterday requesting, by au- 
thority derived from you, five hundred militia from this 
State to act under his command at Providence. In 
consequence of which we have given orders for eight 
companies of militia men to be marched immediately 
to Providence. So exceedingly difficult was it to take 
off any more from the pressing labors in the field, that 
instead of it, we have thought it necessary to call these 
companies from our sea-coasts, which strips them from 
Fairfield to New London, and leaves us none of our regi- 
ments raised heretofore by enlistment and detachment 
for our own defence, in addition to all in the various 
Continental services in which so many of our inhabitants 
are engaged. If a larger number of the enemy's troops 
should be drawn from New York to N. Port than your 



120 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Excellency was aware of, perhaps you may be able to 
spare a further detachment from your army so as to 
release our men who will leave our sea-coasts exposed. 

A<^''reeable to your desire, signified by Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel Laurens, I yesterday gave orders for a considerable 
number of skilful pilots to be sent out from New London 
in quest of the French fleet, whose seasonable aid appears 
probable to be of very great importance, and with whom 
this State will be forward to co-operate to the utmost of 
our power. 

I very sincerely thank your Excellency for 3'Our 
friendly and affectionate good will and wishes towards 
my late dear son, whom it pleased the sovereign Arbiter 
of life and death to remove from this world about sunris- 
ing of the 23d instant. 

This is a heavy and sore breach upon me and my 
family ; but it is my duty to be still and know that God 
has done it, who has a right to dispose of all his creatures 
as He please th, and ever exercises that right in perfect 
consistence with holiness, justice, and goodness. 
I am, with great truth and regard, sir, 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General "Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUIMBULL. 

Headquarters, White Plains, 
28th July, 1778. 

Sir, — I was this morning honored with yours of the 
25th. I think you need be under no apprehensions 
for the safety of your coast while the Count D'Estaing's 
squadron lays off the harbor of Newport, as the enemy 
will have sufficient upon their hands to prevent their 
carrying on a predatory war. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 121 

I took the liberty of suggesting to the Count the ad- 
vantage of sending a ship of force down the Sound to 
prevent the enemy from reinforcing through Hell Gate, 
but whether he will incline to divide his fleet in that 
manner, I cannot say. 

I am well aware of the inconveniency of drawing out 
the militia at this time, but I am in hopes that the 
importance of the object, and I think I may say the 
moral certainty of success if the enterprise is supported 
with spirit, will outweigh every other consideration. 
Besides, the time of service will probably be but short, 
as the expedition will either be immediately determined 
in our favor, or must be laid aside. 

It is impossible for me to spare larger detachments 
from this army than I have already done ; as the enemy 
in and about New-York are superior in force to our main 
body. Should they reinforce Rhode Island, I shall do so, 
of course. 

I sincerely condole wuth you on the death of your 
worthy son Colonel Joseph Trumbull, whose exertions in 
the cause of his country, while he continued in a public 
character, will reflect honor upon his memory ; and for 
whom, when living, I entertained a most cordial regard. 
I am, with the greatest esteem, sir. 

Your most obedient and humble servant, 

G9. Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, '1th August, 1778. 

Sir, — Enclosed is a resolution of the Governor and 
Council of Safety of this State. It is hoped that your 
Excellency will make no hesitation to grant the warrant 
to the amount of the enclosed account. It seems more 
reasonable for payment to be made to Brigadier-General 

16 



122 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Saltonstall from the chest of the United States of Amer- 
ica rather than by this State, to whom he will look for 
payment if he fails of it from your Excellency. 
I am, with esteem and regard, 

Your Excellency's obedient, humble servant, 

Jon"^" Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, White Plains, 

8tli August, 1778. 

Sir, — The fleet at Rhode Island, under the Count 
D'Estaing, suffers many inconveniences in the procuring 
of water. I could wish, in case you think it practicable, 
in case it can be any ways effected, that vessels may 
be sent forward immediately from New-London with a 
proper supply. From the situation of his squadron, with 
respect to water, it is a measure which, if undertaken and 
executed with alacrity, cannot fail of being of the utmost 
consequence to the Count. It may prevent also accidents 
of a very alarming nature, should he be obliged to put 
to sea. You will, therefore, I hope, take the matter into 
consideration, and give it that attention which its impor- 
tance demands. I am, sir. 

Your most obedient and very humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, August 27th, 1778. 

Sir, — The act of the General Assembly of this State for 
raising the two battalions, commanded by Colonels Enos 
and McClellan, provides that the battalions or any de- 
tachment therefrom shall not be continued in actual 



I 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 123 

service more than three months at any one time, to be 
computed from the time they shall arrive at the place of 
their destination. The exigency of the case requiring, 
they were ordered to march by companies as they could 
be raised and equipped. Of course arrived at the place 
of destination at different periods of time, — namely, be- 
tween the 1st and 20th of June last. Have therefore to 
request your Excellency, if the public service permit, to 
dismiss said battalions to return home together the 5th of 
September next ; as thereby the men, who are generally 
farmers, will be enabled to sow their fields, and provide 
subsistence for themselves and families another year, 
which otherwise must be untilled and neglected, many of 
the militia being called into service in the State of Rhode 
Island, great part laborers, absent, and very few to be 
hired. 

These two battalions continue until 1st March next to 
have a recess as mentioned. To grant it at the time men- 
tioned, and to all at once may be beneficial. They may 
be called soon, if needful ; their present situation is at 
West Point. 

I am, with great esteem and regard, sir. 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellexcy General Washingtox. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 27th August, 1778. 

Sir, — I received your favor of the 8th instant, re- 
questing that the fleet under the command of the Count 
D'Estaing might be supplied with water from New Lon- 
don, for which I gave immediate orders, and sundry 
vessels were employed in that business, by which con- 
clude they were, and might still, have been supplied with 



124 TEUMBULL AND WASUIXGTON LETTERS. 

that very necessary article, had they continued on that 
station ; but alas ! contrary to our expectation, the Count 
with the whole of his fleet are withdrawn and gone to 
Boston, to repair the damages they received in the late 
heavy gale, and this notwithstanding the entreaties of 
General Sullivan, and the other general officers, to the 
contrary ; of which event your Excellency hath undoubt- 
edly been advised before this. 

The consequence, I fear, will be that we shall be 
obliged to evacuate Rhode Island. Thus are our raised 
expectations from an expedition, which had all the ap- 
pearance of success, damped. This shows us that we 
ought not to place our dependence too much on foreign 
aid ; — but may such disappointment teach us to place our 
trust and confidence in that Supreme Being who governs 
the universe, and can, with infinite ease, turn those 
things which we are ready to conclude are against us, 
eventually to our advantage, in whose allwise disposals 
may we cheerfully acquiesce, and rest satisfied that what- 
ever he doth is right. 

' I must now beg leave to turn your attention to a case 
of peculiar and accumulated distress, I mean the dis- 
tressed situation of the inhabitants of Westmoreland, on 
the Susquehanna, who survived the more than barbarian 
cruelty of the Indians and Tories, which, in conjunction, 
they savagely wreaked on that unhappy place, in begin- 
ning of July last, slaying above three hundred men, and 
driving more than three thousand inhabitants, mostly 
women and children, from their before peaceful habita- 
tions, after having stripped and plundered them of all 
the necessaries of life, burning and destroying all their 
buildings, and carrying off all their cattle and other live 
stock, leaving them in the most destitute and deplorable 
circumstances, — a particular representation whereof hath 
lateh^ been laid before me by Messrs. Jenkins, Gallup, 
and Harding, persons of integrity, who removed from the 



TRUMBULL AXD WASIIIXCxTON' LETTERS. 125 

eastern part of this State, ami settled at said Westmore- 
land, and had the good fortune to escape the carnage ; 
they also inform, that at the time the inhabitants came 
off, there was on the ground large and very valuable 
crops of English and Indian corn, ^vhich must inevitably 
be lost unless speedy measures be taken to prevent it. 

Your Excellency hath imdoubtedly been made ac- 
quainted with the distresses of this people, and felt the 
tenderest emotions for them, and a willingness to afford 
them all the relief in your power, consistent with the 
safety and good of the whole. 

I have this day wrote to Congress on the subject, and 
proposed to their consideration, whether it would not be 
advisable that a sufficient force, to consist of fifteen hun- 
dred or two thousand men, be immediately sent into that 
part of the country, under whose protection the inhabi- 
tants would return and secure their crops, which w^ould 
be an important acquisition, and also to pursue that de- 
testable banditti into their own country, chastise them for 
their insolence, and cruelty exercised towards the inno- 
cent inhabitants aforementioned, and effectually prevent 
their making any further depredations on that, or any 
other of our back settlements. Such measure, am per- 
suaded, would produce the happiest effects. Would rec- 
ommend this affair to your Excellency's consideration, 
and wish, in case the state of the army and present ap- 
pearances of things will permit, that your Excellency 
would order a sufficient number to be detached from 
the Continental army, and employed for the purpose 
aforesaid. 

I am, with esteem and regard, sir, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon'^" Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Wasuington. 



126 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, 6th September, 1778. 

Dear Sir,. — I had the satisfaction of your two favors, 
both of the 27th ultimo. 

The battahons of Colonel Enos McClellan, I am in- 
formed by Colonel Malcom, Avho commands where they 
were stationed, were to be discharged, and I suppose 
they are now on their way home. 

The violent gale which dissipated the two fleets when 
on the point of engaging, and the withdrawing of the 
Count D'Estaing to Boston, may appear to us as real 
misfortunes, — but with you I consider storms and victory 
under the direction of a wise Providence, who, no doubt, 
directs them for the best of purposes, and to bring round 
the greatest degree of happiness to the greatest number 
of his people. 

I feel with you for the unfortunate frontiers exposed 
to all the inroads of an enemy, whose natural barbarity 
in war has been increased by the arts and influence of 
a civilized nation. I had early ordered for the defence 
of the inhabitants. Colonel Hartley's regiment, Colonel 
Butler's, Colonel Olden's with the remains of Morgan's 
rifle corps. These, I believe, have been of considerable 
service, but I am unhappy in not having it in my power 
to afford them at present a more complete and sufficient 
security, from this army, for the purpose you mention, 
of carrying the war into the enemy's country. It is of 
the utmost importance to maintain the force now in the 
field, and even to increase it as far as possible. How- 
ever, as soon as circumstances will admit of putting a 
more comprehensive plan into execution, I shall be ready 
to give it all kind of furtherance in my power. 
I am, dear sir. 

Your most obedient servant, 

G^- Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 127 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Fredericksburg, 
22d September, 177S. 

Sir, — I do myself the honor of transmitting yoa copies 
of two letters from Colonel Bidtlle and Charles Pettit, 
Esq., upon the subject of forage. The representations 
of these gentlemen are so full, and so well founded re- 
specting the difficulties that attend the getting of this 
important article, from the reluctance of the holders to 
part with it, and the exorbitant and enormous prices 
they demand for it, that I shall not trouble you with any 
observations upon the occasion ; however, I think it ne- 
cessary to add, that unless some effectual means can be 
devised by which the army may be supplied with forage 
with more certainty, and on terms much more moderate 
than it is at present, it will be impossible for it to exist 
long. What the means will be I shall not attempt to 
point out, for I confess the subject appears to me to be 
involved in great 'intricacy, and I am the less inclined to 
enter upon it, from a perfect conviction, that you and the 
other branches of your legislature will be forward to 
adopt every expedient that may seem calculated to afford 
the smallest relief in this interesting and essential point. 
I have the honor to be. 

With great respect and esteem, sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 

P. S. The rate? of wagonage and cartage also call 
for the interposition of the legislature. They are now 
exorbitant in the extreme. 

Governor Trumbull. 



128 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTEES. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Fredericksburg, 

11th October, 1778. 

Dear Sir, — I am honored witli yours of the 9th, en- 
closing a resolution of your legislature, directing two 
companies of Colonel Enos's regiment to be stationed at 
Greenwich. I cannot but express my fears that they 
will be in danger, except they act as a kind of patrol. 

The light corps of the army under General Scott 
affords as much cover to that part of the country as it 
is possible for me to give in our present situation. It is 
so near to Kingsbridge, at which the enemy keep a very 
considerable force, that to post a body of troops there, 
out of supporting distance, would be an invitation to the 
enemy to come out, and certain destruction to the men. 
Strong patrols from the advanced corps go as far down 
as they can, consistent with safety, and prevent the 
enemy from doing more than taking off some forage or 
cattle, if they fall in their way; this is -an inconvenience 
that those who lay near the enemy's lines must from the 
nature of things unavoidably submit to. 

From every information the enemy are upon the eve 
of some general and important move. Many think that 
they mean to evacuate New York totally. If they do 
this, the most likely place of operation, if they remain 
upon the Continent, will be against Boston, for the purpose 
of destroying the French fleet in that harbor. To be 
prepared to throw m the most timely assistance, should 
such an event take place, was the reason of my with- 
drawing the army from the White Plains, and taking the 
present position. The expediency of this move naturally 
exposed the southwest quarter of your State somewhat 
more than when we lay lower down. But I am in hopes 
that the inhabitants have not suffered much from the 
ravages of the enemy, as our advanced corps have been 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 120 

very alert and have kept them pretty much within 
bounds, except when they came out in great force. 
I have the honor to be, with the highest esteem, 
Your Excellency's most obedient 

G? Wasuington. 

His Excellency Governor Tkumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, October 28th, 1778. 
Sir, — As the season approaches when the army will 
be drawing into winter quarters, beg leave to suggest to 
your Excellency whether it will not be convenient, ben- 
eficial, and consistent with the general good of the ser. 
vice, that the troops from this State, or one brigade of 
them, should be cantoned out somewhere near the sea- 
coasts, upon the southeastern and western frontiers of 
this State, where they may be best accommodated, and 
serve as a protection thereto, and for the relief of our 
militia during their stay, which I doubt not will be agree- 
able to our troops. I thought proper thus timely to 
mention this for your consideration, and am, with great 
esteem and regard. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, 

Very humble servant, 

Jon'^? Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Fredericksburg, 
7th November, 1778. 

Dear Sir, — I am honored by yours of the 28th. I had, 
previous to the receipt of it, determined upon such a dis- 
position of the troops for the winter as will serve the 
purposes you mention. As soon as the intentions of the 

17 



130 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

enemy are more clearly known, I shall fix upon the 
places of cantonment, and assign the troops to their re- 
spective stations. 

A fleet of upwards of one hundred sail left the Hook 
on the morning of the 3d, supposed to be bound to the 
West Indies. I cannot ascertain the number of troops 
on board. Whether a further embarkation from New 
York is to take place this Fall, I am not able yet to deter- 
mine, but as we have spies upon their motions, I expect 
soon to learn that they are preparing for it. 
I am, dear sir, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 17th November, 1778. 

Sir, — Captain Samuel Parmele of Guilford, in this 
State, brought me a number of evidences and applications 
relative to Luther Parmele, son to the captain, William 
Handy, Leuman Goave, Ichabod Hill, and Daniel Tuthill, 
all of Guilford, — young men imposed upon by Lieutenant 
Linus Hopson, and induced to enlist into the Continental 
service as shoemakers, in a company of mechanics. The 
young men were minors, and learning the trade of shoe- 
makers or cordwainers, and induced by delusion to enlist, 
supposing they might perfect themselves in their busi- 
ness, and would not have entered the service on any 
other conditions, when they find to their surprise, there 
are no shoemakers employed in the mechanic companies. 
It will prove very detrimental to the public, as well as to 
them, to have such deceit and delusion practised. 

I do, on the request of Captain Parmele, recommend 
their case to your wise and prudent consideration, that 



i 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 131 

justice may be done them, and they dismissed from the 
service, with proper allowances and wages, for the time 
they have been therein. He will produce to you the 
evidences and necessary documents, which renders it un- 
necessary for me to enlarge on the subject. 
I am, with esteem and regard, sir. 

Your obedient, humble servant, 

Jon"^." Trumbull. 

IIis Excellency General Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Middle Brook, 
December 19, 1778. 

Dear Sir, — I am honored with your Excellency's favor 
of the 12th instant, enclosing the copies of two letters 
relative to the disposition of the troops on the east side 
of the North River, and the quartering of Colonel Shel- 
don's regiment of dragoons. 

There is nothing 1 have more at heart than the ease 
and security of every part of the country and its inhabi- 
tants, and I wish your Excellency to believe that in the 
present distribution of the army, I have consulted these 
objects, to the best of my judgment, as far as could be 
done, consistently with a due attention to other objects, 
too essential to be neglected. You are sensible, sir, that 
in military operations there are many partial evils, which 
must be submitted to, to attain the principal end to which 
they are directed ; however desirable the protection of 
those parts of the country most contiguous to the enemy, 
and the convenience of the inhabitants in general, these 
must sometimes give place to other considerations of 
greater magnitude. The present disposition of the army, 
after a full consideration of every circumstance, has been 
thought best calculated to unite the greatest number of 
advantages with the fewest disadvantages. To enter into 



132 TEUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

a detail of the reasons on which it has been formed, 
would be giving your Excellency unnecessary trouble. 
I shall therefore only observe that the easy subsistence 
and accommodation of the troops, their discipline and 
security, and the facility of collecting them to the prin- 
cipal points of defence, which require their being as little 
dispersed as possible, and the protection and conven- 
ience of the country and the inhabitants, have all been 
endeavored to be provided for, as far as they could be 
reconciled to each other, and to the general situation of 
our affairs at this period. 

The great desire I feel to comply with your Excellency's 
wishes on every occasion, makes it painful to me, that in 
the present case, I do not think it would be advancive 
of the service to make these changes in the disposition of 
the troops, which your transmitting the letter from Colo- 
nels Enos and Meade seems to indicate would be agree- 
able to you. I should not be without apprehensions for 
the safety of the brigades themselves, stationed where 
they propose. 

The detaching one so far from the High Land posts 
would lessen the security of those important places, an 
unequal portion of -duty would be thrown upon the ad- 
vanced brigades, and the discipline of the whole would 
be injured by adding to the dispersion. The directions 
I have given to Generals Putnam and McDougall, to keep 
a succession of parties constantly advanced towards the 
enemy's lines, from the Sound to the North River, with- 
out being liable to the same disadvantages, will pretty 
effectually answer the same end. If this has not yet 
been done, it is, I suppose, to be ascribed to the troops 
having been hitherto employed in covering themselves 
for the winter. 

With respect to the proposal for dividing Sheldon's 
regiment, and sending a part of it to Wallingford, or 
Middletown, this arrangement would interfere with a 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTEKS. 133 

general principle essential to order and discipline, to 
which I have strictly adhered, for keeping every corps 
m a collected state. It has been with great reluctance 
that I have separated the different regiments of cavalry 
from each other, but the impossibility of subsisting and 
accommodating them, in one body, put me under a ne- 
cessity of making a division of this kind. To carry it 
further would be ruinous to this useful part of the army ; 
and I do not apprehend that the regiment in question 
could be removed to any other \_sic'] where it could be 
equally well provided in a collected state, with forage and 
quarters, without being attended with the same incon- 
veniences as at Durham. This place was pointed out as 
the most commodious, by the Quartermaster-General, in 
his arrangement for cantoning the army ; and as I have 
received a very favorable account of the situation of the 
regiment, in point of accommodation, from Colonel Shel- 
don himself, this is an additional motive to wish its con- 
tinuance where it is. 

With the truest respect and esteem, 
I have the honor to be, dear sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G° Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Middle Brook, 
March 24th, 1779. 

Sir, — The present situation of the enemy, and the 
appearances that hostilities are still to continue, make it 
necessary that we should know our resources with tolera- 
ble certainty, and the aid that may be derived from the 
militia in case it should be requisite. To this end I must 
take the liberty of soliciting your good offices, and to 
request that your Excellency will inform me, by tlic first 



134 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

safe occasion that shall present itself, what force of well- 
armed militia, rank and file, may, in your judgment, be 
drawn from Connecticut by the first of June, for three 
or four months, if the measure should be found expedient; 
and what part of them, on account of their contiguity, 
may be assembled at Co-os by that period to act for 
the same term, and as circumstances may point out. 
Your Excellency will readily perceive the necessity there 
is for my obtaining good information in this respect, in 
order to determine on some system of conduct, and such 
as there will be a prospect of supporting when adopted. 
I have the honor to be. 

With great respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 
G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO GENERAL GATES. 

Headquarters, Middle Brook, 
April 17th, 1779. 

Sir, — I shall be under the necessity of drawing away 
a part of the troops now under your command, to serve 
elsewhere. You will therefore be pleased to direct Gen- 
eral Glover's brigade to hold itself in readiness to march 
at the shortest notice. I hope the powerful aids of 
militia, which you may call in on any emergency, in 
conjunction with the force still remaining, and the fifteen 
hundred troops to be raised by a late act of the State 
of Rhode Island, will secure you from experiencing any 
ill effects from this diminution, and enable you to cover 
the principal points which require attention. 

I am, sir, your most obedient servant, 

G°- Washington. 

Major-General Gates. 



I 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 135 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 27th April, 1779. 

Sir, — I have taken time and opportunity to consult 
with gentlemen, in order to give the better information 
on the head of inquiry mentioned in your letter of the 
24th of March last. 

This State intend to complete their quota of Conti- 
nental battalions ; after this, it is my opinion that one 
battalion of militia equal in number to a Continental one 
may be drawn from hence well equipped, and commanded 
by our militia officers, and assembled at Co-os agreeable 
to your proposal. It is indeed apprehended that, if the 
service would admit thereof, the longer before the same 
is required the less it will hinder our agriculture, and 
if not called for till August, harvest and getting hay will 
be nearly finished, and the men can be soon collected and 
equipped. Of this I shall want advice sometime in May, 
when our Assembly will be sitting. 

Our extensive sea-coasts, with the present situation 
and movements of the enemy, strongly indicate invasion 
or frequent irruptions into this State, that it is one object 
of their rage and depredations. This occasions my ap- 
plication and request, that one or two regiments of Con- 
tinental troops may be stationed at New Haven and New 
London, for the defence of our sea-coasts. The calling 
of militia is a great prejudice to the husbandry, and, un- 
less we have aid from Continental troops, or the enemy 
change their present position and object, I dare not give 
encouragement for more than one battalion of militia. 

I am, with esteem and regard. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ TiiUiMBULL. 

His ExcKLLENcy General Wasuington. 



136 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

FisnKiLL, June 18th, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — Mr. Starr, an agent for the Board of War 
in a factory at Middletown, has represented to me that 
the pubhc service is hke to suffer very materially from 
the workmen employed with him being called out to serve 
in the militia. 

The business under Mr. Starr's direction is of so much 
importance, that I could wish if possible it might meet 
with no interruption. I am therefore induced to request 
the favor of your Excellency to grant an exemption to 
such of the militia as are engaged in this factory. They 
will certainly be more useful here than they can be in 
the field. But as I am sensible that an indulgence of 
this kind may be abused and extended too far, I beg leave 
to suggest to your Excellency that it will be proper to 
accompany it with restrictions that it will prevent its 
being made a sanction to excuse persons who are not 
really entitled to it. 

With the most perfect respect and esteem, 
I have the honor to be. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G?- Washington. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

[Circular.] 

Headquarters, West Point, 
August 26th, 1779. 

Sin, — In a letter which I had the honor of addressing 
to your Excellency on the 22d of May, I took the liberty 
to mention the inconveniencies which had prevailed for 
want of system in the clothing department, and the ne- 
cessity there was for an early appointment of State or 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTON LETTERS. 137 

sub-clotliiers, agreeable to the ordinance established by 
Congress, by their Act of the 23d of March, with which 
I presumed your Excellency had been made acquainted. 
I am now under the necessity of troubling you with a 
farther address, upon the subject of clothing itself. From 
the best information I have been able to obtain, both from 
returns and particular inquiries, I fear there is but too 
much reason to apprehend that, unless the respective 
States interpose with their exertions, our supplies of this 
essential article will be very deficient; and that the 
troops may again experience on this account a part of 
those distresses which were so severely and injuriously 
felt in past stages of the war ; and which a regard to the 
interests of the States as well as to the duties of human- 
ity, should prevent, if it be practicable. I do not know 
exactly how matters will turn out with respect to woollen 
clothing, I should hope tolerably well, but if the attention 
of the State should even go to this, there will be little 
probability of our having an over-supply. But the arti- 
cles to which I would take the liberty to solicit your 
Excellency's most particular attention, are blankets, 
shirts, shoes, and hats (more especially the two first), as 
our prospect of these is by no means pleasing, and such 
indeed as decides that the supply from the Continen- 
tal clothiers and agents will fall far short, or at least 
stand upon too critical and precarious a footing. The 
importance and advantages of good supplies of cloth- 
ing are evident, and they have been most remarkably 
and happily demonstrated in the health of the troops, 
since they have been pretty comfortably provided for 
in this instance, — a circumstance of uU others the most 
interesting. 

While I am on the subject of clothing, I would also 
beg leave to add, that the condition of the officers in this 
respect appears to me to require the attention of their 
States. It is really in many instances painfully distress- 

18 



138 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

ing. The want of necessaries and of tlie means of pro- 
curing them, at the j^resent exorbitant prices, has 
compelled a great many officers, of good reputation and 
merit, to resign their commissions ; and if they are not 
relieved, it must be the case with many others, as they 
will have no alternative. 
I have the honor to be. 

With the greatest respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 
G? Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

[Circular.] 

Headquarters, West Point, ^ 
August 26th, 1779. 

Sir, — I have the honor to enclose your Excellency 
a list of sundry officers belonging to your State who have 
been in captivity and are reported by the Commissary of 
Prisoners as violators of parole. A conduct of this kind, 
so ignominious to the individuals themselves, so dis- 
honorable to their country and to the service in which 
they have been engaged, and so injurious to those 
gentlemen who were associated with them in misfortune, 
but preserved their honor, demands that every measure 
should be taken to deprive them of the benefit of their 
delinquency, and to compel their return. We have 
pledged ourselves to the enemy to do everything in our 
power for this purpose ; and, in consequence, I directed 
Mr. Beatty, Commissary of Prisoners, to issue the sum- 
mons, which you will probably have seen in the public 
papers. But as it is likely to have a very partial opera- 
tion, I find it necessary, in aid of it, to request the inter- 

1 This letter appears to be a duplicate of letter to J. Powell, President of 
the Council of Massachusetts. Sparks's Writings of Washington, vi. 334. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 130 

position of the executive powers of the different States 
to enforce a coinpHance. 

Most of these persons never having been, and none of 
them now being in Continental service, miHtary authority 
will hardly be sufficient to oblige them to leave their 
pLaces of residence and return to captivity, against their 
inclination. Neither will it be difficult for them to elude 
a miHtary search and keep themselves in concealment. 
I must therefore entreat that your Excellency will be 
pleased to take such measures as shall appear to you 
proper and effectual, to produce their immediate return. 
This will be rendering an essential service to our offi- 
cers in general in captivity, will tend much to remove 
the difficulties which now lie in the way of exchanges, 
and to discourage the practice of violating paroles in 
future. 

I have the honor to be. 
With the greatest respect and esteem, 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Goverxor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, West Point, 
October 7th, 1779. 

Sir, — I had the honor of addressing your Excellency 
on the 4th instant, upon the subject of an expected co- 
operation with the Count D'Estaing against the common 
enemy. I find upon a consultation with Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Knox, that the probable expenditure of ammunition, 
should such an event take place, will be more than our 
Continental magazines are likely to affi)rd. You must 
be so fully sensible of the consequences which would 
follow the interruption of our operations for want of 
powder, even for one day, that I shall make no apology 



140 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

for requesting a loan from the State of Connecticut of 
as much of that article, from their private magazines, as 
they can possibly spare, should any enterprise of con- 
sequence, in conjunction with the fleet and army of His 
Most Christian Majestj', be undertaken. 

I have, upon every occasion, so fully experienced your 
Excellency's zeal and attention to the concerns of the 
general interest, that I am convinced of your using all 
your influence with the State in obtaining the grant of 
this my request. I shall be glad to know what reliance 
I may have upon you, and what quantity I may expect. 

I have the honor to be. 

With the greatest respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G?- Washington. 

P. S. I have this moment been honored with yours of 
the 2d, the contents of which afl^ord me great pleasure. 

Your Excellency may depend on the earliest intelli- 
gence of the Count's approach. I beg leave to refer you 
to mine of the 4th for the ^particulars required in yours 
of the 2d. 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, West Point, 
loth October, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — I find, upon recurring to my letter of the 
7th to your Excellency, that I was not sufficientlj- explicit 
in answering that part of yours of the 2d instant, in which 
you desire to know whether in my opinion the militia 
at present on duty on the coast may be safely withdrawn 
from thence in case of the expected operations, and be 
considered as part of the four thousand demanded of the 
State. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 141 

Tliey undoubtedly may under such circumstance^!, be- 
cause the enemy must, during the course of the opera- 
tions, be confined to the defensive only, and that, upon 
a very contracted plan. The troops that are already 
drawn out, and upon the coast, may remain at their pres- 
ent stations till more particularly called for. I only wish 
that they may be formed into proper sized regiments, 
completely officered, and in every respect ready to march 
at a moment's warning, and that a return may be made 
to me specifying the corps, their stations, and the officers 
upon whom I may call to march and join the army when 
necessary. Those wanting to complete the number of 
four thousand may rendezvous at Seabrook and Stratford, 
as requested in mine of the 4tli instant, or join those now 
on the coast, as you shall judge best. 

I must beg your attention to that part of mine of the 
4th which respects the time of service of the militia now 
required, perhaps that of those of whom we have been 
speaking (except Colonel Mead's and Colonel Wells's 
regiments) may expire before the stipulated time. If so, 
they must either be engaged anew, or others may be pre- 
pared to relieve them upon the ground, as the deficiency 
of so large a number, at a critical moment, might be fatal 
to the whole plan of operations. 
I have the honor to be, 

With the greatest respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^. WASniXGTON. 
Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 



Headquarters, West Point, 
October 13th, 1779. 



Sir, — In mine of the 12th, I requested j-ou to employ 
the men of your regiment in making fascines, etc., and 
desired you to communicate the same request to the com- 



142 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON" LETTERS. 

raanding officers of the other corps on duty upon the 
Sound. I have since thought that the work might be 
facilitated, under the direction of an officer acquainted 
with that kind of business, and haye therefore sent Mons. 
Mournand, major in the corps of engineers, to give ne- 
cessary instructions for the formation and lengths of 
the fascines, gabions, etc. Your giving this gentleman 
all possible aid and countenance in the execution of the 
command upon which he is sent, and recommending 
the same to the other commanding officers of corps in 
the neigborhood of your post, will promote the public 
service, and oblige. 

Sir, your most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, 14th October, 1779. 

„Dear Sir, — Your favors of the 4th, 7th, and 10th, are 
duly arrived. Enclosed you will have our doings respect- 
ing the militia desired from this State, which are not 
yet carried into complete effect, — waiting some further 
intelligence from the Count's fleet. Respecting your 
Excellency's request for powder, there is considerable 
quantity in the State. I this day meet my Assembly in 
this place, and by their direction I fancy you may be 
supplied with ten or fifteen tons if needed. I must beg 
the earliest intelligence from your Excellency of your 
expectations from the fleet, when our utmost exertions 
may be depended on as soon as our co-operation becomes 
necessary. 

I am, sir, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTOX LETTERS. 143 



♦WASIIIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, West Point, 
15tli October, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — I have been duly favored with your Ex- 
cellency's letter of yesterday's date, and thank you for 
your ready attention to my requisitions. 

The moment I receive the intelligence from the Count 
which is to determine our operations, or how far the 
assistance of the country will be necessary to carry them 
into execution, I shall do myself the honor to give yon 
the earliest advice. I wait anxiously for this communi- 
cation, for as your Excellency observes the season is 
coming upon us very fast. 

I congratulate you on the success of our Western 
expedition. Everything is completely destroyed in the 
country of the hostile Indians, and the whole undertaking 
finished with the most inconsiderable loss. The army 
under General Sullivan, I expect, is by this time at Easton 
on its march to this place. 

I have the honor to be, 

With the greatest regard. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. AVASniNGTON". 
His Excellency Jonathan Trumbull, Esq. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TUUMBULL. 

Headquarters, West Point, 
4tlj Xovember, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — I have to acknowledge your Excellency's 
favor of the 30th of last month relative to the case of 
Lieutenant Sylvanus Meade. 

I am induced to believe, on considering the peculiarity 
of the circumstances attending^ Mr. Meade's coming out 
of New York, that he acted without design of violating 



144 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

any engagement which the indulgence he received from 
the enemy implied. And I shall direct the Commissary 
of Prisoners to account for him by a regular exchange, 
without his returning to the enemy. 

I would beg leave to request your attention to a subject 
which I mentioned to your Excellency in a former letter. 
I mean the piracies on the wretched inhabitants of Long 
Island. A very late one, said to be committed by some 
subject of the State of New York, makes me renew my 
application for your endeavors to stop a practice so con- 
trary to good policy and the interests of our cause. I have 
written to Governor Clinton more particularly on this 
business. 

I am, dear sir, with great regard, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, West Point, 
12th November, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — I have been honored with your Excel- 
lency's favor of the oth.^ 

The operations to the southward have been of so much 
longer duration than was at first apprehended, and no 
certain accounts being yet received that have come to 
my knowledge, induces me to think that the probabihty 
of an attempt against the enemy in this quarter, more 
especially considering the advanced state of the season, is 
a matter of the greatest uncertainty. Under these cir- 
cumstances, and desirous to avoid every possible expense, 
I would not wish that the required number of militia 
should at this time be drawn to their places of rendezvous. 

1 Sparks's Letters to Washington, ii. 341. 



TRUMBULL AND WASUINGTON LETTERS. 145 

Their being held in readiness will be, in my opinion, suffi- 
cient to answer the purpose of the expected co-operation. 
How far it may be advisable, on other accounts, I must 
leave to your Excellency's determination. 

Besides what I have mentioned, there are other reasons 
why the militia should not be assembled without an ab- 
solute occasion. I allude in particular to the condition 
of our magazines of flour. The uncommon drought (not 
to hint at circumstances which must be well known 
to your Excellency) has affected us exceedingly in this 
article. A considerable quantity of wheat now lies in 
the mills in this State, unmanuflictured for want of water, 
and the same cause produces the same effects in some of 
the neighboring States. 

I need not take notice to your Excellency of my inten- 
tion to afford every protection to your State which our 
strength, a proper dependence on our supplies, and the 
situation of things in general, will admit. Our arrange- 
ments for the winter shall be directed by these objects. 
But should the enemy keep themselves united, as at 
present, and make no considerable detachments, we may 
find it absolutely expedient to observe a similar conduct, 
that the common cause may not encounter the greater 
evil, while we attempt to avoid the lesser. 

I am, dear sir, with the greatest regard, 

Your Excellency's obedient and humble servant, 

G^- Washington. 

His Excellency Governou TauMBULL. 



*WASHIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, West Point, 
10th November, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — In my letter of the 12th I mentioned to 
your Excellency that the operations to the southward had 
taken up more time than was at first apprehended, and 

19 



146 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

that this, with the advanced season of the year, made the 
expected co-operation a matter of the utmost uncertainty. 
I am sorry to inform you that by despatches received hist 
nio;ht, there has been an alteration of circumstances in 
that quarter which must render it altogether impossible, 
at least for the present. 

It woidd appear that there was a necessity for the 
Count's returning to the West Indies, which made it 
impracticable to spend that time before the works of 
Savannah requisite to carry them by regular approach. 
This induced the allied arms to hazard the reduction of 
the place by assault. It was undertaken accordingly on 
the 9th of October, when we were repulsed. I do not 
learn the particulars of our loss. The Count was slightly 
wounded in the leg and arm, and General Pulaski died 
a few days after of his wounds. The allied officers and 
men behaved with great bravery and spirit. This repulse 
comprehends the whole of our misfortune, as we met with 
no hindrance in removing our stores and baggage. I 
have drawn together these several matters more for your 
private satisfaction than any public purpose, as Congress, 
1 suppose, I \_sic'] will direct a publication. 

The requisition for the militia holding themselves in 
readiness being no longer necessary, your Excellency 
will take such order as you may think proper on the 
occasion. I cannot but express my sense to your Ex- 
cellency of the ready compliance in every step which 
appeared necessary in the business that for some time 
past has engaged our attention. And I promise myself 
everything to our cause from the good disposition of the 
militia when it may become proper to make use of their 
services. 

I have the honor to be, with great regard. 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Exckllexcy Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTON LETTERS. 147 

* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

West Point, November 20th, 1779. 

Sir. — I have been honored with your Excellency's 
letter of the 16th. I assure you, sir, I should esteem my- 
self happy if it were in my power to comply with your 
request with respect to the troops ordered from Rhode 
Island, but it is really not. I have no alternative in the 
matter, or at least I could not consent to their remaining 
with you, without departing from such an arrangement 
as a reo-ard to the o-eneral interest and the situation of 
our affairs seem to me indispensably to require, — a cir- 
cumstance which your Excellency would neither wish 
nor permit. An attention to the general weal must be 
with me, as it will ever be with you, the first object, and 
whenever this shall appear to me secure, I persuade my- 
self with great satisfaction and confidence that you be- 
lieve I shall most cheerfully afford any aid in my power 
to give, to individual States, — protection to all is my 
warmest wish, but unfortunately, our means will not 
admit of it, and I have frequently to regret, as in the 
present instance, that my abilities are not equal to my 
inclinations, and I would willingly hope that whenever 
I do not comply with matters of your request, that you 
will indulgently impute it to the real cause, that of ne- 
cessity. In the disposition of the army I must particu- 
larly attend to the security of this post — to the security 
of itself against insult and against defeat. If the enemy 
remain in New York in near their present force, notliing 
more can be promised from it, and possibly not this, if 
they are governed by a spirit of enterprise. There is one 
circumstance more which I will add ; you w^ill but too 
readily feel the inference. Enlistments of a permanent 
nature were not the policy of the times, and accordingly 
our army was levied. You, with me, will painfully reflect 
on the period. Desirous, ho^vever, to give such protec- 



148 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

tion to the State as our circumstances may possibly 
justify, T mean to station the New Hampshire troops at 
Danbury, and Moylan's and Sheldon's regiments east of 
that ; which makes a part of my arrangement. I cannot 
do more with the least propriety, as a greater division or 
extension of our force might at least expose us to great 
accidents. Light parties will be detached from hence 
during the winter towards the enemy's lines, which will 
in some measure enable General Poor to turn his atten- 
tion more to the Sound, and to give aid in case of exi- 
gency. These and pressing calls for succor to be sent 
to South Carohna and Georgia, and for which I shall be 
happy, if we should not have occasion to fear much ; but 
no more can be possibly afforded than the remains of 
two regiments of North Carolina, which were here, and 
this by direction of Congress, founded more in the abso- 
lute necessity of the measure than our abilities to spare 
them. 

I have the honor to be, 

With sentiments of great regard 
And respectful attachment, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morristown, 
8th December, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — I have been honored with your Excel- 
lency's favors of the 23d ultimo. It gives me great pleas- 
ure to find your intention of laying the state of the 
troops of your line before your Assembly at as early a 
period as possible. I have directed the returns which 
you call for to be made out, and I hope they will be 



i 



TRUMBULL AND WASUINGTOX LETTERS. 149 

transmitted in time to meet the Assembly at the opening 
of the session. 

I had, previous to the receipt of your Excellency's 
letter, furnished Congress with a very exact return of 
the state of the army, specifying the different terms of 
service, and earnestly requested them to call upon the 
different legislatures to make up the deficiencies which 
would soon follow by the expiration of the former en- 
listments. 

With respect to the expediency of immediately filling 
the vacancies which have happened in the Connecticut 
Line, and which your Excellency has been pleased to refer 
to my consideration, I am clearly of opinion that justice 
to the officers in succession, and good policy, require the 
measure. Making promotions is very different from in- 
troducing new officers. The approbation of the particular 
gentlemen named by you does not in anywise lay with 
me ; I can only hope that they are entitled by the course 
of succession, as established by the regulations of the 
army, to the vacancies to which they are nominated. The 
recommendation is to be transmitted directly by the State, 
and not through me, to the Board of War, who will issue 
the commissions in consequence. 

You will be pleased to be particular in ascertaining the 
dates at which the vacancies happened, and naming the 
officers who occasioned them. 

I am, with the highest respect and regard, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Wasuington. 

GovEBNOR Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIIXGTON. 

Lkbaxox, 27th Docpmber, 1779. 

Dear Sir, — I have duly received your Excellency's 
letter of the 20th November, and painfully note some of 



150 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

its paragraphs as they respect the interests of the States. 
The recruiting anew the army is an object of great weiglit 
on my mind. Important however as I deem it, I have 
not yet received a word from Congress on the subject of 
measures to be taken for that purpose. 

Many evil and pernicious practices having been for 
some time past carried on by some of the people of this 
State with the enemy at New York and on Long Island, 
by which the enemy have drawn from us large supplies 
of provisions and refreshments, to the great detriment of 
our own support, — to prevent as much as possible such 
wicked and illicit communications in future, measures are 
taken, and now putting into execution by this State, to 
watch and intercept all intercourse whatever with the 
enemy from our shores and borders, without special per- 
mission for special purposes. In aid of these measures 
of Government, if your Excellency should be pleased to 
give particular orders to General Poor to lend us his as- 
sistance and co-operation I flatter myself it might have a 
happy effect. On this ground I beg your Excellency to 
send such instructions to General Poor as you may think 
conducive to the end proposed. I have also thought 
whether some additional aid might not be afforded from 
the Light Dragoons posted in this State ; by being de- 
tached on particular occasions, as they may receive orders 
from the executive power of this State, they may in some 
good measure subserve the design in view. 

I have long imagined that the interests of the Union 
might be much served, and our supplies much augmented 
or better secured, by particular attention being paid to the 
prevention of these surreptitious supplies of provisions 
which have been clandestinely cast into the lap of our 
enemies, not only from persons particularly inimical to 
the States, but from many others in this and the neigh- 
boring States who border on the enemy, from views of 
private interest, arising from the tempting prospects of 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 151 

gain which have been presented to them ; and perhaps 
instances are not wanting where these temptations have 
overcome the virtne of those who have been specially 
employed for particnlar purposes of secret service. Will 
your Excellency be pleased to turn a thought to the 
subject, and favor me with your sentiments thereon ? 

The mention of the Light Dragoons reminds me of a 
circumstance relating to that corps which I have wanted 
to hint to you, — that is, that I fear your Excellency has 
not been well informed of the situation of the towns in 
which these troops are posted, with respect to the maga- 
zines of forage which have been provided for the subsist- 
ence of their horses. The principal magazine of hay, I 
am told, is now from twenty to twenty-five miles distance 
from the places where the troops are now lodged, which 
must occasion great expense in the carriage, over roads 
which at some times, and especially in the spring, are so 
bad that a good team will scarcely carry enough for their 
own support on the way. Suffer me to suggest to you, 
that during the winter season, when the River Connecti- 
cut is generally well frozen, I should imagine the horses 
might be lodged near their magazines of forage without 
any prejudice to the general service, especially as there 
are already large buildings erected by the Quartermaster 
as barns and stables for covering the horses, and I have 
no doubt the men may be well lodged and accommodated. 
I only hint this circumstance at a time when there is 
great need of retrenching our expenses as much as possi- 
ble, and flatter myself your Excellency may improve it to 
some general advantage. 

Wishing you the compliments of the season, I am, with 
great sincerity of respect and esteem, dear sir. 

Your most obedient and most humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 



152 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
January 8th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I bave the honor to enclose your Excel- 
lency the copy of a letter I have just received ffom the 
late Commissary General, by which 3^ou will see upon how 
ill a footing our future prospects of supplies are, particu- 
larly with respect to meat. This corresponds with repre- 
sentations from every quarter, and with what we actually 
feel. The army has been near three months on a short 
allowance of bread ; within a fortnight past almost perish- 
ing. The}^ have been sometimes without bread, some- 
times without meat ; at no time with much of either, aud 
often without both. They have borne their distress, in 
which the officers have shared a common lot with the 
men, with as much fortitude as human nature is capable 
of ; but they have been at last brought to such a dreadful 
extremity, that no authority or influence of the officers, 
no virtue or patience in the men themselves, could any 
louger restrain them from obeying the dictates of their 
sufferings. The soldiery have in several instances plun- 
dered the neighboring inhabitants even of their necessary 
subsistence. Without an immediate remedy this evil 
would soon become intolerable, and unhappily for us we 
have no prospect of relief through the ordinary channels. 
We are reduced to this alternative, either to let the army 
disband or to call upon the several counties of this State 
to furnish a proportion of cattle and grain for the imme- 
diate supply of our wants. If the magistrates refuse their 
aid, we shall be obliged to have recourse to a military 
impress. 

But this, sir, is an expedient as temporary in its relief 
as it is disagreeable in its execution aud injurious in its 
tendency. An army is not to be supported by measures 
of this kind. Something of a more permanent and effec- 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 153 

tiial nature must be done. The legislative authority of 
the respective States mast interpose its aid. The public 
treasury is exhausted ; we have no magazines anywhere 
that I know of; the public officers have neither money 
nor credit to procure supjDlies. I assure your Excellency, 
as f\ir as my knowledge extends this is a faithful represen- 
tation of our affairs. Our situation is more than serious, 
it is alarming. I doubt not your Excellency will view 
it in the same light, and that the Legislature of the State 
of Connecticut will give a fresh proof of their wisdom 
and zeal for the common cause, by their exertions upon 
the present occasion ; and I hope I shall be thought to 
be justified by circumstances when I add, that unless each 
State enters into the business of supplying the army, as 
a matter seriously interesting to our political salvation, 
we may shortly be plunged into misfortunes from which 
it may be impossible to recover. 

I have made a similar representation to all the States 
on which we depend for supplies. Maryland has passed 
an act which promises us much assistance in the article 
of flour and forage, though it must be some time before 
we can feel the benefit of it. She has appointed Commis- 
sioners in each county, with full power to purchase or 
impress all the grain in the State, more than is sufficient 
for the use of the inhabitants, and has interested them in 
a vigorous execution of the Commission. I flatter myself 
the other States will make equal exertions ; and then 
we shall escape the calamities with which we are now 
threatened. 

I have the honor to be. 

With the utmost respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



154 TEUMBULL AXD WASIIIXGTOX LETTERS. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morristown, 
14tli January, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I was yesterday honored with your Ex- 
cellency's favor of the 27tli ultimo. It gives me pleasure 
to hear that the Legislature of your State have fallen 
upon so effectual measures to put a stop to all illicit 
intercourse between its inhabitants and the enemy in 
New-York and upon Long Island. The practice, I am 
convinced, has been extremely beneficial to our enemy 
and detrimental to us. I have ever exerted the military 
authority to the utmost to restrain it, and I flatter myself 
that I have lately, in conjunction and with the approba- 
tion of the civil power of this State, checked the practice 
in this quarter, which had grown under the cover of flag- 
boats, and through their abuse, to a most alarming height. 
I left orders of a similar nature with General Heath, 
which I am persuaded he will execute punctually, so far 
as cases may fall within the limits of his command. I 
have given directions to General Poor to assist the civil 
authority when called upon for the more effectual execu- 
tion of the law, to which you refer. Colonel Moylan, who 
commands the cavalry now stationed at Colchester, is also 
desired to do the same. I must, however, observe to your 
Excellency, that as the Horse, after a fatiguing campaign, 
require as much repose as possible in their Avinter quarters, 
I shall be obliged to you for dispensing with their ser- 
vices as far as circumstances will admit, only calling upon 
them in cases of emergency. 

The Cavalry had, previous to your Excellency's repre- 
sentation, been ordered to remove to Colchester, upon 
hearing that there would be much difficulty and expense 
in procuring forage in their former quarters. 

The impossibility of obtaining intelligence from the 
enemy by any other means than giving persons some 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 155 

jilausible pretext for entering their lines, has laid us 
under the necessity of allowing particular people to carry 
in small matters of produce, and to bring out goods in 
return. That they abuse this indulgence is too true ; but 
when we consider the risk they run, and that the persons 
who are willincr to undertake business of this kind are 

o 

generally such as are influenced by interested motives, 
we must not wonder at their preferring their own emolu- 
ment to the public good. 

I am, dear sir, with great regard. 

Your obedient and humble servant, 

G^. ^yASIIINGTON. 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



*W^ASHIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headq\jarters, Morris Town, 

February 20th, 1780. 

Sir, — Your Excellency will have received, I make no 
doubt, a cop3^ of an Act of Congress of the 9th instant, 
ascertaining the quotas of non-commissioned officers and 
privates to be furnished by the respective States for the 
ensuing campaign, and directing all the men in the addi- 
tional corps, the Guards, Artillery, and Horse, and the reg- 
imented artificers in the department of the Quartermaster 
General and Commissary General of military stores, as 
well as those of the battalions in the State Lines, whose 
times of service do not expire before the last of September 
next, to be counted as part of the quotas of the States to 
which they respectively belong. The quota of the State 
of Connecticut is fixed at 3,238 ; and I have now the 
honor to enclose your Excellency a special return of the 
non-commissioned officers and privates in her eight bat- 
talions, and of those belonging to her in Lamb's Artillerj', 
and Livingston's, Hazen's, Sherburne's, and Webb's regi- 



156 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

merits, and Major GIbbs's corps of Guards, designating in 
a particular manner the proportion engaged for the war, 
and by monthly columns the periods when, and in what 
proportion, the services of the rest will expire. Your 
Excellency will observe by the Act, that the men whose 
engagements expire before the last of September, as I 
have already taken the liberty to mention, are not to be 
counted as part of the 3,238, and therefore, according to 
the return enclosed, the deficiency to be raised is 1,569. 
There are, however, one or two corps, besides those I have 
mentioned, not acting immediately with this part of the 
army, in which there may be some men belonging to the 
State, and I consider it as an unlucky circumstance that 
I have not such returns of them in m}^ possession as will 
ascertain the point, and the credit to which the State 
may be entitled in consequence. Colonel Sheldon's is the 
principal corps under this description, and I have written 
both to him and Colonel Moylan to furnish your Excel- 
lency, without delay, with a particular state of the men 
in their regiments, which may belong to the State. I 
also expect returns of one or two corps in the course of 
a few days, when, if there should happen to be any men 
in them in which you are more particularly interested, 
I shall take the earliest occasion to communicate it and 
their number. I have thought it more advisable to trans- 
mit the present return than to delay it till those of every 
little detached corps could be collected ; as the want of 
those, admitting there should be a few more in some of 
them belonging to the State, can make no material differ- 
ence with respect to the deficiency to be levied, and as 
the postponing the business on that account would inter- 
fere essentially with the views of Congress, and indeed 
entirely defeat them, as to the time assigned for the 
recruits taking the field. At any rate, this must be 
found too short for those of the more remote States, and 
especially where their Legislatures are to be convened. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 107 

I woiikl observe before I conclude, that this return bccars 
the fullest number of men, under every description, that 
the State can have in her eight battalions and the other 
corps which it comprehends and they would most proba- 
bly be found, if an actual inspection could take place, to 
fall a good deal short of the complement, as there is al- 
ways a material difference between an army 'on paper 
and its real efficient strength. A comparative view be- 
tween the total of an army as borne upon every general 
return, and the column of the present fit for duty, and 
the absentees that can be satisfactorily accounted for, 
demonstrates this beyond question. 
I have the honor to be, 

With the highest esteem and respect, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G? Wasuington. 

His Excellexcy Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
February 26th, 1780. 

Sir, — Since I had the honor of addressing your Ex- 
cellency on the 20th instant, it has been found that 
there was an error in the return then transmitted, with 
respect to the number of men belonging to the State, in 
the Artillery. Instead of four, there are seventy-seven 
in Lamb's battalion, seventy-six of which are for the war, 
and seven in Captain Walker's company for the same 
time. 

I have the honor to be, 

With the most perfect respect and esteem, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G? Wasuington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



158 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, March 10th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I had the honor to receive your favor of 
the 20th ultimo enclosing a return of the troops now in 
service from this State, and marking the deficiencies 
which are to be made good for the ensuing campaign, on 
the 5th instant, previous to which the General Assembly 
of the State had stated their deficiency at eighteen hun- 
dred, and had passed an act for the recruiting that num- 
ber of men immediately, offering them, in addition to all 
Continental encouragements, three hundred dollars bounty 
each man, and all those supplies and advantages which 
the State has heretofore allowed to her troops. The num- 
ber provided for by this Act will not be lessened in con- 
sequence of your Excellency's letter, in the hope that 
eighteen hundred nominal number may produce us at 
least fifteen hundred effectives in some season, though 
not possibly at so early a day as the first of April, which 
is already at hand. 

It is hoped that the army will be satisfied and pleased 
with the measures which the General Assembly have at 
length taken for the establishment and regulation of their 
pay, though sorry I am to say that in this instance there 
hath been too great delay. 

I have likewise before me imanswered a letter from 
3'Our Excellency of the 8th of January last. I have been 
at a loss what answer to give. Of meat, we have un- 
doubtedly an ample plenty, but the changes of unessen- 
tial modes and forms, as well as of the more important 
regulations, of the purchasing officers, are so reiterated 
and numerous, and the embarrassments for want of cash 
so perpetual and insurmountable, that we know not what 
to do. It would be a difficult task for Government to 
command individuals to incur the expense of fattening, 
unless at the same time they should place before them 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 100 

the hope of some reasonable reward. For the State, is^ 
treasury is exhausted to furnish in proper season the 
necessary sums for the recruiting service, and our credit 
is attacked with a new and insurmountable obstacle. The 
people who are the principals in ftittening cattle for the 
army loudly complain that, having received no payment 
whatever for some time past for the stock which they 
have furnished the public, they find themselves now ab- 
solutely unable to purchase lean cattle to carry on their 
business, besides that the avails of the last sale will not 
at this day make good an equal number of lean. To this 
effect, a number of the principal people of this class pre- 
sented a memorial to the Assembly a few days since, 
representing that unless the debts of the Commissary's 
department were in some way discharged, at least in 
part, it would be absolutely impossible for them to con- 
tinue their supplies to the army ; whereas were but the 
past debts paid, they would still go on for some time longer 
on credit ; and this memorial, by the direction of the As- 
sembly, I transmit by this conveyance to Congress, urg- 
ing them to execute some plan for the discharge of Mr. 
Wadsworth's debts, or at least to put it in his power to 
make the experiment of a mode which was indeed prom- 
ised him when last at Philadelphia, but which care has 
not been taken to fulfil. Of three millions which were 
then engaged to him, an order for only one has been ob- 
tained, and of the bills of exchange and loan certificates 
from whose sale even this sum was to have been raised, 
the bills only are sent on to the loan officer, and these 
too in bills of such large amount as few people can pos- 
sibly purchase ; Colonel Wadsworth having engaged a 
sufficient number either of creditors or gentlemen in trade 
to have taken off nearly the sum at once, who now upon 
the opening of spring and business, find it necessary to 

1 We print this line as it is clearly written, but the meaning is obscure; 
probably "is" should be "its." — Eds. 



160 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

lay out their moneys in other modes, rather than hazard 
another month's delay. Indeed, my dear sir, our circum- 
stances appear truly deplorable. 

I can only say that whatever is in the power of this 
small State to effect for the salvation of the country will 
be executed with earnest pleasure. 

I have the honor to be, with all esteem and respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General "Washington. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
25th March, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I have to acknowledge two favors from 
your Excellency, both of the 10th of this month. 

I flatter myself that the measures of the Assembly for 
recruiting the quota of troops, and bringing them into 
the field, will fully answer your Excellency's expectations. 
I am persuaded, that for such an essential purpose, noth- 
ing will be left undone. 

That part of your Excellency's letter which relates to 
the obstructions that oppose both the raising and pur- 
chasing of cattle is very interesting. You are not unac- 
quainted with our difficulties heretofore, to keep the 
army together, and at the same time preserve it from 
starving. We are still in the most dependent and pre- 
carious situation in this respect. I flatter myself, how- 
ever, that the late system of finance adopted by Congress, 
by giving the old money a fixed value, and providing the 
exchequer with new, which is to have the same consider- 
ation as specie, will obviate those embarrassments and 
difficulties with which we have struggled. This and the 
measures recommended by Congress to furnish the army 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. IGl 

with supplies, assisted by the exertions of the respective 
States, I trust will have a salutary operation, and give to 
our affairs in general a more agreeable countenance. I 
am happy in the opinion, that there is no system which 
has the public good for its object but will receive your 
utmost protection, and be forwarded by every ineans in 
your Excellency's power. 

I have the honor to be, 

With the greatest regard, dear sir, 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦ WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

(Circular.) 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
March 26th, 1780. 

Sir, — Your Excellency will have received, I presume, 
before this, a transcript of an Act of Congress of the 25tli 
of last month, calling on the several States for specific 
quantities of provision, rum, and forage for the army, 
and directing the articles of supplies to be collected and 
deposited at such places, in each of the States, as should 
be judged most convenient by me. In the case of a de- 
fensive war like ours, which depends almost wholly on 
the movements and operations of the enemy, it is difficult, 
if not impracticable, to fix on places of deposit for stores, 
which may not be rendered improper by subsequent 
events ; and all we can do upon sucli occasions is to col- 
lect them where it shall appear from a comparative view 
of circumstances that they will be probably secure, and 
most likely to facilitate the purposes intended. I have 
considered the point with respect to the supplies required 
of your State, and I beg leave to inform your Excellency, 
that it appears to me they should be deposited at the 

21 



162 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

following places, and in the proportions set against each 
respectively, viz. : — 

Gallons of Ram. Tons of Hay. 

Danbury 10,000 200 

"Waterbury 100 

Hartford 10,000 200 

New Fail-field . . . . 48,558 



G8,558 500 

As to the beef, the time and place of delivery, and the 
proportion from time to time, must be governed by the 
occasional requisitions of the Commissary General, which 
must also be the case with respect to the salt, and its 
ultimate place of deposit. 

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 

4th April, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — Immediately upon the receipt of your 
Excellency's favor of the 22d ultimo, I desired Brigadier- 
General Huntington to send as many officers as could 
possibly be spared from the Connecticut Line, to take your 
instructions relative to the business of recruiting. Tlie 
number, from our circumstances at this time, will fall in- 
finitely short of your Excellency's requisition, but you 
may be assured that every expedient has been fallen 
upon to make it as large as possible. 

Not having seen a copy of your late law, I have not 
been able to inform the officers going upon the recruit- 
ing service, to what emoluments they will be entitled, to 
compensate them for their trouble and necessary and 
unavoidable expenses. The travelling charges only of a 
subaltern officer to and from Connecticut, at this time. 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 1(;3 

will amount to nearly his year's pay. I make no doubt 
but the State will take the matter into consideration, and 
make a reasonable provision, if it has not been already 
done. I hope the endeavors of your State, and of every 
other in the Union, to complete their quotas of troops 
will be attended with the desired success, than which 
nothing will contribute more to put an end to the contest 
in which we are engaged, and which, from its weight, 
bears hard upon our abilities to continue it. 

I am, with very sincere respect and esteem. 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

His Excellency Goverxor Trumbull. G?- WASHINGTON. 



*WASIIIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 

27th April, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I am informed by Lieutenant-Colonel 
Stevens, at present the commanding officer of Colonel 
Lamb's regiment of Artillery, that there are four com- 
panies in that regiment which were raised in Connecti- 
cut, and have been adopted and supplied by the State, 
for which reason he has desired liberty to send an officer 
from each company on the recruiting service, not doubt- 
ing but they will be allowed the same privileges and 
bounties as are granted to those recruiting for the Line. 

Not knowing what arrangements you may have made, 
I have directed the officers to apply to your Excellency 
before they enter upon the business, that they may not 
interfere with any regulations which may have been 
made for obtaining the deficiency of the quota of your 
State. 

I have the honor to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant.^ 

Governor Trumbull. 



^ The signature of this letter appears to have been cut off. — Eds. 



164 TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



*WASHIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris To\vx, 
May 19th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to forward you, by ex- 
press, two packets which have just been transmitted to 
my care by His Excellency the Minister and the Consul 
of France. According to the letters which accompanied 
those despatches, they will announce to your Excellency 
the very generous and affectionate resolution of His Most 
Christian Majesty to send a land and naval armament 
to co-operate with us, and that their arrival may be very 
soon expected. I most sincerely congratulate your. Ex- 
cellency on this interesting event, which I hope, if we 
avail ourselves properly of it, as well as demonstrating 
his Majesty's wisdom and regard for us, will be attended 
with the most important and decisive advantages in our 
present struggle, and lead to the conclusion we so ar- 
dently wish, — the establishment of our Independence, and 
an honorable peace. The Minister and the Consul are 
very anxious that there should be provided a supply of 
fresh provisions and vegetables against the arrival of the 
fleet, which they seem to think will be at Rhode Island, 
in the first instance, and that arrangements should take 
place with respect to some other matters. From the im- 
portance of the subject, they entreat your Excellency's 
aid to put the business in an immediate and proper train ; 
and influenced by the same opinion, and knowing from 
a happy experience your readiest disposition to promote 
the common cause wherever possible, I am confident 
that their requisition will meet, in every point, with your 
warmest and most strenuous support. 

The accounts received from Charles Town on our part 
only come down to the 15th of April. The enemy's bat- 
teries had then been opened for some days, without any 
other effect than killing three privates and a woman and 



TKUMBULL AND WASIIINGTOX LETTERS. 1G5 

child, and firing one or two lioiises. It has, however, l^een 
reported that they have received advices in New York 
to the 1st and some say the od instant, and that matters 
had not tlien undergone any material change. It is cer- 
tain the York papers, to the 15th instant, are silent on 
Southern operations, which is conclusive with me that 
they had nothing important in their favor to that period 
with respect to them. 
I have the honor to be, 

With very sincere esteem and respect, dear sir, 
Y^our Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Goveknor Trumbull. 



* WASIIINGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
May 26th, 1780. 

My dear Sir, — It is with infinite pain I inform you 
that we are reduced to a situation of extremity for want 
of meat. On several days of late the troops have been 
entirely destitute of any, and for a considerable time past 
they have been, at best, at a half, a quarter, an eighth 
allowance of this essential article of provision. The men 
have borne their distress with a firmness and patience 
never exceeded ; and every possible praise is due the 
officers for encouraging them to it by precept, by exhor- 
tation, by example. But there are certain bounds be- 
yond wliich it is impossible for human 7iature to go. We 
are arrived at those. The want of provision last night 
produced a mutiny in the army of a very alarming kind. 
Two regiments of the Connecticut Line got under arms, 
and but for the timely notice and exertions of their 
officers, it is most likely it would have been the case with 
the whole, with a determination to return liome. After 



166 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

a long expostulation by their officers, and some of the 
Pennsylvania Line who had come to their assistance, they 
were prevailed on to go into their huts. But this without 
relief can only be momentary. I will not dwell longer 
on this melancholy subject, being fully convinced that 
your Excellency will hasten to us every possible relief in 
your power. 

I am, my dear sir, 

With the warmest regard and respect, 
Your most obedient servant, 

G*?. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO COLONEL HENRY CHAMPION. 

Headquarters, May 26th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — We are in a situation of extremity for 
want of meat ; the troops on several days have been en- 
tirely destitute of any, and for a considerable time past 
they have been at but half, at quarter, at an eighth 
allowance of this essential article ; this distress produced 
a mutiny last night in the Connecticut Line. I entreat 
your best and every exertion to give us relief. 
I am, dear sir, with great regard. 
Your most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

Colonel Henry Champion. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Morris Town, 
1st June, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — We have just received a hand-bill from 
New York, published by authority, containing an account 
of the surrender of Charlestown, the 12th instant, said to 
have come by the " Tris," which left that place the 17th. 



TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 167 

The particulars nre not given ; some leading matters are 
mentioned, but they are probably either false or exag- 
gerated. There are circumstances of suspicion attending 
this account, but as it is announced by authority, I can- 
not suppose it to be a forger}^, but believe the general 
fact of a surrender to be true. The conditions may be 
more or less advantageous. 

Advice is just come to me from Amboy, that the day 
before yesterday one hundred sail of vessels entered 
Sandy Hook. This, if true, and there is no reason to 
doubt it, can be nothing else than Sir Henry Clinton 
returned from the southward, with the whole or a part of 
his army. Flushed with his success there, and tempted 
by the present posture of our affairs, it will be extraor- 
dinary if he does not immediately aim a blow at West 
Point. If he does, we have everything to apprehend, 
from the total want of provision in the garrison, which 
has been for some time on half allowance. 

This is too serious a danger not to demand instant 
exertions to obviate it. We can send nothing but flour 
from this quarter. I am informed there are between two 
and three thousand barrels of salted meat in Connecticut, 
but the Quartermaster, for want of money, can do noth- 
ing towards its transportation. We must in this exigency 
look to the State, and request the interposition of its au- 
thority to furnish wagons, without a moment's loss of 
time ; Mr. Hubbard, the Quartermaster at Hartford, will 
receive the wagons and forward the provision. 

We shall endeavor to forward flour from hence, but 
we must, in like manner, have recourse to the aid of Gov- 
ernment, or impress by military power. I know your 
Excellency's wisdom and zeal too well not to be con- 
vinced you will give the matter the speediest and most 
effectual attention. 

Indeed, my dear sir, our affairs are hastening rapidly to 
a crisis. The States must determine whether they will be 



168 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

free, by a vigorous exertion of all their resources, or sub- 
mit to the domination of Great Britain. My anxiety to 
hear in what manner they will take up the several impor- 
tant matters recommended to them in the late circular 
letter of the Committee of Congress, exceeds description. 
I have the honor to be, 

With perfect esteem and respect, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

P. S. It will be necessary still to forward supplies of 
live cattle, to preserve the stock of salt meat, which ought 
to be kejDt if possible for a deposit in case of a siege. 
This too will require your Excellency's aid. 

It is essential towards the proposed co-operation that 
we should prepare a large number of fascines and gabions, 
and the most convenient places will be on Connecticut 
River, and adjacent to the Sound, particularly on Connecti- 
cut River. I entreat your Excellency to give pointed 
orders to the militia, to carry on this business with indus- 
try and despatch. The officers of militia will take their 
directions from Major Murnon, of the corps of engineers, 
who is now in Connecticut for this purpose. This is an 
object of real importance. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

(CmCULAR.) 

Connecticut. Headquarters, Morris Town, 

2d June, 1780. 

Sir, — By the letter from the Honorable the Commit- 
tee of Congress at Morris Town, which goes with these 
despatches, you will find that these gentlemen and my- 
self, after maturely considering the matter, deem it essen- 
tial to the success of the measures in contemplation to be 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTON" LETTERS. 169 

carried on ai!;:iinst the enemv, to call on the States for 
certain aids of militia, in addition to the requisitions for 
men already made, and that they should be at places of 
rendezvous appointed by ine, by the 15th day of next 
month. The aid requested in this instance of your State 
is founded on a principle of apportionment common to all 
the States, from New Hampshire to Maryland inclusive 
(the others, on account of their distance and the opera- 
tions in the Southern quarter, not now being called on), 
and is stated at two thousand five hundred and itucnt/j, rank 
and file. This number, ivcll armed, and equipped in every 
other respect for the field in the best manner circum- 
stances will admit, under proper officers, I wish to be at 
Danbury at the time mentioned by the Committee, which 
appears to rae a suitable place for their rendezvousing at 
in the first instance, and from whence they will proceed 
on my orders, as occasion may require. It will also be 
material, on account of disciplining and organizing the 
men, as well as on account of public economy, that they 
should be formed into full regiments. If this is not done, 
it will render our arrangements extremely difficult and 
irregular, and will add, by greatly increasing the number 
of officers, very considerably to the public expense. I 
would beg leave to observe, that I think the whole num- 
ber of militia requested from you should be comprised 
in five regiments, about the same size, which would make 
them nearly equal to the establishment fixed for those of 
the Continental Line. 

This additional aid will not, I trust and earnestly en- 
treat, impede in the smallest degree the filling up the 
regiments of the State, by drafts, to their full comple- 
ment, as requested by the Honorable the Committee in 
their letters of the 25th ultimo. This is a point of such 
great importance, so absolutely essential to give the least 
prospect of success to our operations, and indeed on which 
they depend, that I could not forbear mentioning it. If 

22 



170 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

the regiments are completed by drafts, it is possible our 
demands for militia may be a good deal diminished ; but 
this must be governed by events, and therefore, for ob- 
jects so very intei-esting, so important as those to which 
we look, we should provide whatever may be possibly 
requisite. 

I have the honor to be, 
With the greatest respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Springfield, 
June 10th, 1780. 

Sir, — I have the honor to introduce to you Monsieur 
De Corny ,^ Commissary of War, in the service of His 
Most Christian Majesty. This gentleman is charged with 
the important trust of procuring the necessary supplies 
of every sort for the French army, on which business he 
is now proceeding to the Eastern States. I have given 
him this letter for your Excellency, to request you will 
afford him all the assistance in your power, towards ac- 
complishing the objects of his mission in their fullest ex- 
tent. I have assured him that you will be happy in the 
opportunity of ficilitating his operations in every way 
that may contribute to the success of the combined oper- 
ations. Gratitude for so generous a succor, and the in- 
terest of these States, unite in requiring this of us. Your 
Excellency's known wisdom and zeal make it unnecessary 
to suggest motives. 



^ Louis Dominique Ethis De Corny, a French writer better known as 
D'Ethis. Born 1738, died 1790. 



TRUMBULL AND WASUIXGTON LETTERS. 171 

I take the liberty to recommend Monsieur De Corny 
to your Excellency's particular attention. Ilis personal 
merit and zeal in the common cause entitle him to every 
mark of consideration. 
I have the honor to be, 

With perfect respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G*' Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Springfield, 
nth June, 17SL). 

Dear Sir, — I am honored with your Excellency's 
favor of the 6th, conveying the very agreeable intelli- 
gence that a quantity of salted provision is on the way 
to West Point. It gives me much pleasure to hear that 
vigorous measures are pursuing, by your State, to draw 
forth its resources of men and supplies, and I am not 
without hope that the same good disposition will pervade 
the whole. I am persuaded that the zeal which you 
have manifested upon every former occasion will, if pos- 
sible, be increased upon this. The generous interposition 
of our ally calls for every exertion upon our part ; and if 
we do not strenuously embrace the favorable opportunity 
which now presents itself, we shall perhaps set down with 
the melancholy reflection that we lost the prize for which 
we long nobly and virtuously contended, by a want only 
of a proper use and direction of the means which we have 
within our power, at the last and critical moment. 

The loss of Charlestown seems now reduced to a cer- 
tainty. It will no doubt give spirit to our enemies, 
and have a temporary effect upon our affairs. But if 
extensively considered and rightly improved, it may be 
attended in the end by happy consequences. The enemy, 



172 TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

by attempting to hold conquests so remote, must dissi- 
pate tlieir force, and of course afford opportunities of 
striking one or the other extremity. 

General Knyphausen, with the greater part of the 
force left with hiin, made a landing at Elizabeth Town, 
last Wednesday morning, and advanced within a mile of 
this place. He was warmly opposed in his progress by 
General Maxwell's brigade, and the few Jersey militia, 
who assembled on the instant. He returned the same 
evening to Elizabeth Town Point, and, by throwing over 
his wagons and part of his Artillery and Cavalry to Staten 
Island, seemed determined to return to his former posi- 
tions in New York and its dependencies. He however, 
on Friday, brought back some Artillery and Horse, and 
still remains in force upon the Point. The meaning of 
this manoeuvre yet remains a secret. He either wants 
to draw us to an unequal engagement with inferior num- 
bers (as to Continental troops), or to amuse us here, 
while perhaps part of the troops is to be drawn from the 
southward, and to operate suddenly against the posts 
upon the North River, which are in so defenceless a 
state, on account of the expiration of the services of the 
men who were allotted to garrison them, that I am very 
apprehensive for the consequences, should such an at- 
tempt be in contemplation. This is an additional motive 
to my wish to have those posts well supplied with pro- 
visions. We might then, upon an emergency, call in a 
body of neighboring militia to the reinforcement of the 
garrison. 

The enemy, who are undoubtedly well informed of our 
circumstances, are now taking advantage of the reduced 
state of the Continental army. We have been compelled 
to behold them ravaging a fine country below the moun- 
tain, with a force, in fact inconsiderable, but still such 
as we should not have been justified in meeting ; and to 
this indignity we must, as often as they please, submit, 



TRUMBULL AND -WASIIIXaTON LETTERS. 173 

till we receive the quotas of men required from tlie re- 
spective States. 

I most sincerely condole with 3-our Excellency on the 
late severe stroke which you have met with in your 
family. Although calamities of this kind are what we 
should all be prepared to expect, yet few, upon their 
arrival, are able to bear them with a becoming fortitude. 
Your determination, however, to seek assistance from the 
Great Disposer of all human events is highly laudable, 
and is the source from whence the truest consolation is 
to be drawn. 

I am, with the greatest affection, respect, and esteem, 
Dear sir, your most obedient and humble servant, 
Governor Trumbull. G^ WASHINGTON. 



WASHINGTON TO COMMITTEE OF CO-OPERATION.i 

Headquarters, Springfield, 
June nth, 1780. 

Gentlemen, — It appears to me to be a very eligible 
step, at the present juncture, to reiterate our instances 
with the several States, to engage them to press the 
measures recommended in your former letter. Not only 
the time is sliding away very fast, every moment of 
which ought to be improved for the intended co-opera- 
tion, but the movements of the enemy demand every 
exertion in our power for the purposes of defence. 

There can now remain no doubt that Charlestown and 
its garrison have fallen. There is every reason to believe 
that Sir Henry Clinton, with the whole or the greatest 
part of his force, will shortly arrive at New York. The 
expectation of the French fleet and army will certainly 
determine the enemy to unite their force. General 
Knyphausen still continues in the Jerseys with all the 

1 Philip Schuyler, John Mathews, and Nathaniel Peabody, a committee 
from Congress. 



174 trt7:mbull axd tvashixgtox letters. 

force -which can be spared from New York; a force 
greatly superior to ours. Should Sir Henry join him 
the superiority will be decided, and equal to almost any. 
thing the enemy may think proper to attempt. It is 
true, they are at this time inactive, but their continuance 
where they are proves that they have some project of 
importance in contemplation. Perhaps they are only 
waiting till the militia grow tired and return home 
(which they are doing every hour), to prosecute their 
designs with less opposition. This would be a critical 
moment for us. Perhaps they are waiting the arrival of 
Sir Henry Clinton, either to push up the North River, 
against the Highland posts, or to bend their whole force 
against this army. In either case the most disastrous 
consequences are to be apprehended. You who are well 
acquainted with our situation need no arguments to 
evince the danger. The militia of this State have run 
to arms, and behaved with an ardor and spirit of which 
there are few examples. But perseverance in enduring 
the rigors of military service is not to be expected from 
those who are not by profession obliged to it. The re- 
verse of this opinion has been a great misfortune in our 
affairs, and it is high time we should recover from an 
error of so pernicious a nature. We must absolutely 
have a force of a different composition, or we must re- 
linquish the contest. In a few days we may expect to 
have to depend almost wholly on our Continental force, 
and this (from your own observation) is totally inadequate 
to our safety. The exigency calls loudly upon the States 
to carry all the recommendations of the Committee into 
the most vigorous and iuimediate execution, but more 
particularly that of completing our battalions by a draft, 
and with all the expedition possible. 

I beg leave to advise that these ideas be all clearly 
held up to the States. Whatever inconvenience there 
may be in diffusing the knowledge of our circumstances, 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 175 

delicate as they are, there is, in my opinion, more danger 
in concealing than disclosing them. 
I have the honor to be, 

"With perfect respect, and esteem. Gentlemen, 
Your most obedient, and humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

Committee of Conghess for Co-operation. 



WASHINGTON TO COMMITTEE OF CO-OPERATION. 

Headquarters, Springfield, 
June 12th, 1780. 

Gentlemen, — I have received information, which 
though not official I deem authentic, that some of the 
States have taken up the measure of augmenting their 
battalions by a draft, on a less extensive footing than was 
urged in your circular letter of the 2{)th May. Though 
I wish to pay in every instance implicit deference to the 
determination of the respective States, I think it my 
duty, in the present crisis, once more to declare with 
freedom, that I conceive the measure of filling our bat- 
talions to their full complement fundamental to a co- 
operation on a large scale ; that anything short of this 
will infallibly compel us to confine ourselves to a more 
defensive plan, except as to some little partial indecisive 
enterprises against remote points; and will of course 
disappoint the expectations of our allies and protract the 
war. The force which has been stated as necessary, is 
as small as can give us any prospect of a decisive effort. 
If it is not furnished we must renounce every hope of 
this kind. It remains with the States to realize the 
consequences. 

I have the honor to be. 

With the greatest respect and esteem, 
Gentlemen, your most obedient servant. 
The Committee of Co-operation. G- WASHINGTON. 



176 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Springfield, 
June 14th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I was yesterday honored with your Ex- 
cellency's letter of the 8th, inclosing a copy of one to 
Congress. There is nothing I am so happy in as in com- 
plying with every request you make, and motives of 
public utility would induce me to take any step which I 
conceived I could do with propriety to forward measures 
which in any manner affect the supplies of the army. 
But in the present case the affair appears to me to stand 
upon a delicate footing, and to relate to arrangements of 
such a nature as I have always cautiously avoided inter- 
fering in. I trust my scruples to your Excellency's deli- 
cacy ; and I have no doubt, on reconsideration, you will 
approve my declining to write to Congress on the sub- 
ject in question. 

I thank your Excellency for the exertions you are 
making to give relief to our distresses. Every new cir- 
cumstance proves more and more the necessity of exer- 
tion in the present crisis, and evinces how much we have 
to fear if a spirit of energy does not immediately and 
generally pervade the States. 

The enemy still continue in the position they took at 
Elizabeth Town Point, and are in all probability waiting 
the arrival of Sir Henry Clinton, to commence a vigorous 
operation somewhere. Our situation is as embarrassing 
as you can imagine. When they imite their force it will 
be infinitely more so. Time must unfold the result. 
I have the honor to be. 

With every sentiment of the truest esteem and respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G?. Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 177 



•WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

IIeadqi-artkrs, Springfield, 
June ISth, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I have just received authentic advice that 
a large fleet appeared off Sandy Hook yesterday after- 
noon, and entered as fast as they came np. From every 
circumstance this can be no other than Sir Henry CHnton. 
If the enemy push directly up the North River, much is 
to be apprehended for West Point. It requires all our 
exertions to put it in a state of defence. I some days 
since directed General Howe to apply to your Excellency 
for the State regiments to reinforce the garrison. I now 
entreat you to hasten them forward with all possible ex- 
pedition, together with the drafts for the Continental bat- 
talions, which I am informed the State had determined to 
make. They will proceed to West Point till further orders. 
Every effort to keep up a full supply of provisions is indis- 
pensable. I would also recommend that your Excellency 
should put two or three thousand militia under marching 
orders to repair to West Point, on the application of 
Major-General Howe, in case of a sudden emergency. 
I have the honor to be, 

AVith every sentiment of respect. 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G? Washington. 



WASHINGTON TO COMMITTEE OF CO-OPERATION. 

Headquarters, Si-rixgeield, 
June '20th, 17S0. 

Gentlemen, — Agreeable to your recommendation I 
have thought proper to send Brigadier-General Parsons, 
to the State of Connecticut. My orders to him will re- 
late to the collecting, arranging, and forwarding the 
drafts and recruits from that State to the army. The 
Committee will give him what further instructions they 

23 



178 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

think proper, which he will execute with judgment and 
zeal. It will be useful to inform him of the requisitions 
they have made to the State, as his influence there may 
enable him to contribute to their success. 
I have the honor to be. 

With perfect respect and esteem. 

Gentlemen, your most obedient servant, 

G? Washington. 

The Honorable the Committee of Co-operation. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarteks, Springfield, 
June 20th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I have thought proper to send Brigadier- 
General Parsons to your State, to receive, arrange, and 
forward to the army the drafts and recruits which may 
be furnished for the Continental battalions in consequence 
of the late requisitions of the Committee of Congress. 
Your Excellency will be pleased to give him such infor- 
mation and advice as will be requisite for his government. 

So important is the present crisis that I can omit no 
occasion of urging the necessity of the greatest vigor and 
decision in our public measures ; the filling our battalions 
above all, to their full complement, without a moment's 
delay, is perhaps a point on which the fate of America is 
suspended. With proper exertion we may have every- 
thing to animate our hopes, on one side, and with an 
imperfect exertion we have everything to dread, on the 
other. I anxiously and ardently hope this idea may gov- 
ern all those who have influence in our public affairs. I 
know your Excellency too well, and esteem you too 
highly to doubt your best endeavors. 

With perfect respect, I have the honor to be. 
Your most obedient and humble servant, 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G- WASHINGTON. 



TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 179 



WASHINGTON TO COMMITTEE OF CO-OPERATION. 

Headquartkks, Kockaway, 
23d June, 1780. 

Gentlemen, — The enemy are now in full force, bend- 
ing their march towards Morristown, and by my last 
advices, had advanced beyond Springfield. They were 
vigorously opposed by our advanced corps. But what 
could the valor of a handful do against so infinite a supe- 
riority of numbers ? The enemy can effect any particular 
object they may attempt. Besides the army, they can 
Lave no other in this State than our stores ; as we cannot 
defend them, we must endeavor to remove them. 

I am so entirely engaged in attention to our military 
operations, that I must entreat you to write to the Ex- 
ecutives of Pennsylvania and Jersey, pressing them to 
bring out all the wagons they can to our relief An ap- 
plication has been already made to Pennsylvania for two 
hundred and fifty wagons; these ought to be instantly 
furnished. 

But we do not know what may be the ultimate designs 
of the enemy ; all we know is, that they are very strong, 
and that we are very weak. I beg leave to recommend 
that the States may be again called upon to redouble 
their exertions to comply with the demands that have 
been already made upon them. It is essential to our 
immediate safety, to say nothnig of the expected co- 
operation. If she means to be free, this is the moment 
for America to exert herself 

With every sentiment of esteem, 

I have the honor to be, gentlemen, 

Your most obedient and humble servant, 

G" Wasuington. 

Honorable Committee of Co-operation. 



180 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

Headquarters, Ramapaugh, 
June 27th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — By a letter from your Excellency to Major 
General Howe, which he communicated to me, it ap- 
peared that you were ordering a body of two thousand 
militia to his assistance. This measure at the time was 
a very eligible one ; but as, by the removal of our stores 
most exposed, we have had it in our power to detach a 
reinforcement of Continental troops to West Point, and 
to remove the rest of the army to this place, I consider 
that important post as now in a state of sufficient security 
to enable us to dispense with the immediate services of 
the militia. The calling them forth will be peculiarly 
inconvenient at this time, both because it will impede 
our preparations and injure agriculture. The completing 
the Continental battalions by an instant draft, to their 
full establishment, is the pivot on which the intended 
co-operation ahbolidclij turns. Without this we can under- 
take nothing offensive ; for which reason I am willing to 
submit to all the embarrassments arising from the present 
weakness of the army, rather than retard that essential 
measure by employing the militia. I therefore advise 
that the body of militia (now probably on the march) 
may return home and only be held in readiness. The 
enemy continue to menace us. 

I can omit no occasion of repeating my earnest en- 
treaties to your Excellency to use all your influence to 
forward the measures recommended by the Committee 
of Co-operation. I assure you with the greatest sincerity 
and truth that nothing short of them will answer our 
purpose, and that I am fully persuaded, from a general 
view of European and American affairs, the fate of our 
cause depends on the exertions of this campaign. The 

1 a portion of this letter is printed in Sparks's Writings of Washington, 
vii. 93. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. ISl 

sparing system has been too long tried, till it lias brought 
us to a crisis little less than desperate, and if the oppor- 
tunity now before us be neglected, I believe it ^vill be too 
late to retrieve our affairs. These are ideas that I may 
safely trust to your judgment, though 1 know thc}^ would 
be slighted by those indolent and narrow politicians who, 
except at the moment of some signal misfortune, are con- 
tinually crying, — All is well ! — and who, to save a little 
present expense and avoid some temporary inconvenience 
(with no ill designs in the main), would protract the war 
and risk the perdition of our liberties. As I always speak 
to your Excellency in the confidence of friendship, I shall 
not scruple to confess that the prevailing politics, for a 
considerable time past, have filled me with inexpressible 
anxiety and apprehension, and have uniformly appeared 
to me to threaten the subversion of our independence. 
I hope a period to them is now arrived, and that a change 
of measures will save us from ruin. 

I beg your Excellency to accept my warmest acknowl- 
edgments for your exertions in support of West Point. 
With perfect respect and esteem, 
I have the honor to be. 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

(Circular.) 

Headquarters, Ramapaugh, 
June 30tli, 1780. 

Sir, — As the levies required of the States for filling 
their battalions have not yet joined the army, or the 
French fleet arrived, I beg leave to inform your Excel- 
lency that it will be unnccessiiry for the militia, which 
the Honorable the Committee of Congress were pleased to 



182 TRUMBULL AXD WASHIXGTON LETTERS. 

call for on a late occasion, to be at the place appointed 
for their rendezvous, before the 25th of next month. By 
this time I would willingly hope that things will be in 
such a train, as to enable us to commence our operations, 
and to make their aid essential. The present crisis is by 
far the most important and delicate that this country has 
ever experienced, and it pains me in the extreme that we 
are so backward in all our measures. I hope a moment 
will not be lost in pushing on the levies to fill the bat- 
talions. Our allies would be chagrined, were they to 
arrive to-day, to find that we have but a handful of men 
in the field, and would doubt, it is more than probable, 
whether we had any serious intentions to prosecute meas- 
ures with vigor. If we do not avail ourselves of their 
succor by the most decisive and energetic steps on our 
part, the aid they so generously bring may prove our 
ruin ; and at best it will be in such case among the most 
unfortunate events, next to that of absolute ruin, that 
could have befallen us. I think it my duty, as often as 
I have the honor of addressing the States, to forewarn 
them that the completion of their battalions to their full 
establishment of five hundred and four, rank and file, is 
a measure of indispensable necessity to the intended co- 
operation, and that without it we cannot even attempt 
anything decisive. 

I have the honor to be, 

AYith the greatest respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G?- Washington. 

P. S. As my request to delay the assembling of the 
militia at the place appointed for their rendezvous, pro- 
ceeds principally from the French fleets not being arrived, 
I beg leave to observe, if this event should have taken 
place when this reaches your Excellency, or it happens 
soon after, my request is not to have an operation ; but 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 183 

in such case it is my desire that the assenibhng of the 
militia should be hastened as much as possible. 
His Excellency Govekxor Trumbull. 



♦ WASmXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Colonel Dey's, Bergen County, 

3d July, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I have been informed that the State of 
Connecticut have in possession a very considerable quan- 
tity of saltpetre, which they are unable to manufacture 
into gunpowder, for want of sulphur. The Continent, on 
the contrary, have a quantity of sulphur at Springfield, 
which lies idle for want of the other necessary ingredients. 
I have therefore to propose to your Excellency that the 
sulphur, or as much as may be necessary, shall be de- 
livered over to the State, to be manufactured into powder 
for the use of the Continent, the public making com- 
pensation for the same. 

When we come to make the estimate of ammunition 
necessary for the probable expenditure of our expected 
co-operation, we find a most alarming deficiency in the 
public magazines, and it therefore behooves us to fall upon 
every expedient to raise an adequate supply, and no one 
seems to present a fairer or readier prospect than the 
plan I have just mentioned. If the measure meets your 
Excellency's approbation, I shall be glad to be informed 
of the quantity of public saltpetre in the State, and how 
much powder can be manufactured in a week, or in any 
given time. You will also oblige me exceedingly by 
informing me whether the State have any, and how much 
powder, and whether they could spare it to the Continent 
upon an emergency. 

I have the honor to be, with very great esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G'? WASHINGTON. 



WASHINGTON TO PRESIDENT OF CONGRESS.^ 

Headquarters, Bergen County, 
10th July, 1780. 

giR^ — X have with great pleasure seen the very laud- 
able association of the merchants of Philadelphia, for pro- 
curing a quantity of provisions and rum for the army. I 

1 Samuel Huntington of Connecticut. 



184 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



♦ WASHINGTON TO TRUxMBULL. 

Headquarters, near Passaic Falls, | 

July 7th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I am informed there are two regiments 
of State troops, amounting to six hundred men, posted at 
Stanford, under the command of Colonel Welles, to which 
place Major Murnan has been sent, for the purpose of 
cutting fascines, and will stand in need of every assis- 
tance which can be afforded him. If your Excellency 
will give directions that such of these troops, and of the 
militia, which may be occasionally there, and can possi- 
bly be spared from other duty, should be employed in 
making these preparations, it will be a very acceptable 
and important service. 

Should Major Murnan have made application person- 
ally to your Excellency, I doubt not the necessary orders 
are already given. If he has not, the pressing nature of 
the service is such, that I flatter myself there will be no 
delay in giving such instructions to the commanding offi- 
cer as will effectually promote the pubHc interest in this 
respect. 

I have the honor to be, 

With great respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G?. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 185 

am well persuaded that the same spirit exists in those of 
the other eonsiderable trading towns, who perhaps only 
want being made acquainted with the distresses of the 
army, in articles almost as essential as those of provision, 
to produce similar associations for the purpose of provid- 
ing such matters as may be recommended to them. 

We are so scantily supplied with marquees, and tents, 
and have so little prospect of procuring a sufficient num- 
ber by the common means, that some gentlemen have 
suggested the propriety and expediency of an address 
to the merchants, from New London to Portsmouth in- 
clusive, requesting their assistance at this critical time, 
and giving them the same assurances of reimbursement 
which have been given to the merchants of Philadelphia. 
By the estimates of the Quartermaster-General, a sum 
not exceeding forty thousand pounds lawful money, 
would make a sufficient provision of marquees, tents, 
knapsacks, and some other articles in that way; and 
should the mode I have hinted be thought advisable, he 
would furnish the proportions which each town should, 
in his opinion, be requested to provide. Some private 
letters have, I believe, been written to the principal trad- 
ing gentlemen to the eastward on this subject, which 
may perhaps produce an offer on their parts ; but I am 
so exceedingly anxious on account of the backward state 
of our preparations of every kind, that I cannot help rec- 
ommending an application to them, notwithstanding, by 
Congress collectively, or through their own .delegates, as 
may be judged most proper. 

I observe that by the present regulations of the Bank 
of Philadelphia, the funds are to be applied solely to the 
purchases of rum and provision. But if an application of 
part of them could be diverted to the purchase of tents, 
(the materials for making which I am told are plenty in 
Philadelphia), it would add to our stock in a very little 
time. The Committee of Co-operation have already 

24 



186 TllUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

recommended this deviation, and I beg leave to express 
my concurrence with them. 

I have the honor to be, witli the greatest respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient humble servant, 

G?. Washington. 

His Excellenxy the President of Coxgeess. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, near Passaick Falls, 
July 11th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I beg leave to suggest to j-our Excellency 
that it is a matter of great importance for me to be ac- 
quainted with our several harbors, their depth of water 
within and leading to them, and all the difficulties and 
circumstances attending their navigation. At present 
this knowledge is more peculiarly essential with respect 
to the eastern ports, and particularly in the instance of 
New London. In the course of our operations this cam- 
paign, and indeed immediately, this may be of the great- 
est use. I have therefore to entreat the favor of 3^our 
Excellency to furnish me by the earliest opportunity 
with a correct map of that harbor, in case you have one, 
describing in a particular manner the channel leading to 
it from the Sound, with its depth, and width, and such 
obstacles and, shoals as may attend the navigation. If your 
Excellency should not be in possession of a map that will 
answer, I request that you will be so obliging as to pro- 
cure me one as soon as it can be done, and, if it should 
be requisite, even by an actual survey and sounding. I 
feel myself under no difficulty in asking this flivor of 
your Excellency, as you will perceive at once the neces- 
sity there is for my possessing the information, and as I 
know there is nothing in your power which will not be 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTON LETTERS. 187 

done with the greatest cheerfuhiess that may in the least 
promote the public cause. 
I have the honor to be, 

With the most perfect esteem and regard, 
Dear sir, your most obedient servant, 

G^. Washington-. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



WASHIXGTOX TO COMMITTEE OF CO-OPERATION. 

Headquarters, 13th July, 1780. 

Gentlemen, — We have received intelligence through 
different channels from New York, that the " Guadeloupe " 
had arrived there on Sunday morning, and brouglit an 
account that she had fallen in with a large French fleet, 
consisting of several sail of the line, and a number of 
transports, between the capes of Virginia and Delaware. 
This intelligence has every appearance of authenticity, 
and if true, the arrival of the fleet on the coast may be 
immediately looked for. This, indeed, must be the case 
at any rate from the time they are said to have sailed. 

It cannot be too much lamented that our preparations 
are still so greatly behindhand. Not a thousand men that 
I have heard of, have yet joined the army, and in all 
probability the period for commencing our operations is 
at hand. I am happy to learn that a spirit of animation 
has diffused itself throughout the States, from which we 
may expect the happiest consequences. But the exi- 
gency is so pressing, that we ought to multiply our 
efforts to give new activity and dispatcli to our measures, 
levying and forwarding the men, providing the supplies 
of every sort required ; forage and transportation demand 
particular attention. After what had been preconcerted 
with the Honorable the Congress, after two months pre- 
vious notice of the intended succor, if our allies find us 



188 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

unprepared, and are obliged to wait several weeks in a 
state of inaction, it is easy to conceive how unfavorable 
the impression it will make of our conduct. Besides this, 
the season is exceedingly advanced. A decisive enterprise, 
if our means are equal to it, will not permit us to lose a 
moment of the time left for military operations, which, if 
improved with all the vigor in our power, is less than 
were to be wished for an undertaking of so arduous and 
important a nature. 

So much is at stake, so much to be hoped, so much to 
be lost, that we shall be inexcusable if we do not employ 
all our zeal and all our exertion. 

With the highest respect, 

G" Washington. 

Committee for Co-operatiox. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, 14th July, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — There is expected a quantity of clothing, 
arms, and ammunition, in the French fleet for the United 
States, which I have requested might be forwarded to 
New London, under convoy of a frigate or two. I shall 
send Mr. Olney to receive it, and expedite it to the army. 
But as the Quartermaster-General has no means in his 
power which could procure a sufficient number of wagons 
or teams in time, I beg leave to request your Excellency 
to interpose your authority to furnish them. We cannot 
commence our operations before we receive these articles, 
and with all the exertion that can be made, they will 
scarcely arrive in proper time so as not to delay us con- 
siderably. I therefore request your Excellency will have 
the goodness to give the matter a particular attention, 
that it may be conducted with all the dispatch the nature 
of the case will admit. I presume your Excellency will 



TRUMBULL AND WASUINGTON" LETTERS. 189 

think an impress necessary to obt<ain the wagons or teams 
with the expedition the exigency requires, and will give 
your orders accordingly. The succor of our generous 
ally being now arrived, I doubt not will give a new 
spring to our operations. Relying upon the zeal of the 
States, I shall hazard arrangements with the officer com- 
manding his Most Christian Majesty's troops for com- 
mencing our operations at a very early period. 

A regard to our national character obliges me to it, 
and I hope the same motive Avill stimulate the States, 
to exert their utmost activity to comply with those en- 
gagements which circumstances compel me to enter into 
in their behalf. The success of our measures not less 
than our honor demand it. 

With every sentiment of respect and attachment, 
I have the honor to be, your Excellency's 
Most obedient and humble servant, 

G9. Washington. 

P. S. Mr. Olney goes directly to New London, where I 
shall be happy the person your Excellency shall author- 
ize to impress the wagons may meet him. 



WASHINGTON TO GEORGE OLNEY. 

Headquarters, Bergen County, 
18th July, 1780. 

Sir, — There is a considerable quantity of linen over- 
alls at Springfield, for which the troops are exceedingly 
distressed, and which the Clothier has not been al)le to 
forward for want of transportation ; you will be pleased 
to turn your attention to them, as well as to the articles 
brought over in the fleet. There may be a few shirts, 
shoes, stockings, and other things fit for summer wear ; if 



190 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

there are, you will have them also sent forward, in the 
first instance, to the Deputy-Clothier at New Windsor. 
I am, sir, yours etc. 

G^ Washington. 

George Olnet, Esq. 



WASHINGTON TO COLONEL ELISHA SHELDON. 

Headquarters, Bergen County, 
20th July, 1780. 

Sir, — I have received yours of the 19th. General 
Parsons had written to me before on the subject of the 
men drafted from the militia Light Horse, and 1 informed 
him that I could not consent to their joining your regi- 
ment or any other corps of Horse. All the levies are 
wanted for the battalions of Infantry, and if there has 
been any misunderstanding between those men and the 
States, as to the mode of service, they must settle it 
themselves. But I cannot conceive that it ever was in 
contemplation that they should serve on horseback, as 
the law calls only for Foot ; you must let them know that 
they must either join the Inflmtry, or procure others 
in their places. 

I am, sir, your most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

Colonel Sheldon. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Bergen County, 

22d July, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — Unfortunately for us, the "Alliance " frigate, 
to which the arms and powder we expected were com- 
mitted, is not arrived. The disappointment will frustrate 
our prospects, unless we can obtain aid from the particu- 
lar States, few of which, however, have it in their power 
to afford us any. All the arms we can muster in the 



TRUMBULL AND WASIIINGTOX LETTERS. 191 

public possession for our recruits do not exceed six thou- 
sand, whereas double the number will be wanted. I am 
therefore compelled to request of the State of Connecti- 
cut a loan of two thousand arms, and if they have any 
cartouche boxes, as many as they can spare. It is essen- 
tial that whatever of these articles can be furnished, 
should be forwarded without delay to Fishkill, and de- 
livered to the Commissary of Military stores there. I 
must also entreat j^our Excellency to have this effected, 
as the officers in the service of the Continent are without 
means of transportation. The time presses so much that 
not a moment is to be lost. 

I again beg leave to repeat my entreaties that the 
measures in execution may not be suffered to relax, but 
may be pushed on with increased activity and exertion. 
The time, my dear sir, is precious beyond description ; 
none but those thoroughly acquainted with the nature 
of the objects in view can form a just idea of it. 

I requested your Excellency in a former letter to as- 
sist with the means of forwarding; the clothino- which 
came for us in the French fleet. I repeat my request. 
We want to be equipped and ready to commence our 
operations as soon as possible, and the credit of the 
troops makes it of real importance to have them clad 
before we appear by the side of our allies. 
I have the honor to be. 
With the sincerest respect and attachment, 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G*?. Wasiiixgtox. 

P. S. I am anxious to know as soon as possible what 
may be expected in the articles of arms and powder. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



192 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



*WASHINGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Bergen County, 
July 27th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor of your Excellency's 
favors of the 18th and 19th instants. Colonel Wadsworth 
has forwarded the map of New London, which you were 
so Jvind as to furnish. It answers the purpose for which 
I principally wanted it, which was to show the draft of 
water leading into the harbor. I very much fear that 
we shall be obliged to transport our clothing from France 
the whole way from Ehode Island by land, as it is much 
wanted, and as there will be no prospect of doing it by 
water, while the British fleet maintains a superiority off 
the harbor of New Port. I have written to Mr. Olney to 
this effect, and must request your Excellency's aid and 
assistance to him in transporting it through your State, 
should he find himself under the necessity of asking it. 
You may be assured that the troops of Connecticut 
shall have their full proportion of the clothing imported 
on Continental account. 

Should the navigation be secure, I make not the least 
doubt but the Count De Rochambeau will prefer a water 
transportation for a certain distance to a march by land. 
But should circumstances or his own inclinations make 
the latter necessar}^, I should hope that every exertion 
would be made to accommodate him in every respect. 

It would certainly be a very desirable thing to remove 
the cattle from the east end of Long Island, but, in the 
present situation of matters, it cannot be attempted. 

I have the honor to be, 

With the highest respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient humble servant. 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 193 

WASHINGTON TO NEHEMIAH HUBBARD. 

For Nchem Huhhard Esq., Deputy Quartermaster- General. 

Sir, — The exigency of the present juncture requiring 
a large supply of boards, planks, and scantling, which 
cannot be procured in the ordinary way, you are hereby 
directed and empowered to impress all of those articles 
you can find in the State of Connecticut, according^ to 
the orders you shall receive from the Quartermaster- 
General, and wagons to transport them, for which this 
shall be your warrant. G*?- Washington. 

Given at Robinson's Farms, State of New York, July 31st, 1780. 



•WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, near Orange Town, 
8th August, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — T am honored with your Excellency's favor 
of the 4tli instant. I am sorry that any disputes and dif- 
ferences should have happened between Major Murnan 
and the inhabitants, and militia. As it is difficult to rec- 
oncile matters after they have been carried to such a 
height as appears by Captain Green's deposition, I have 
thought it best to recall Major Murnan. You will be 
pleased to forward the inclosed to him, which is for that 
purpose. 

Your Excellency will, I presume, before the receipt of 
this, have heard that General Clinton, with the fleet and 
troops which had been at Huntington, returned on the 
31st ultimo to New York. Should the militia, in conse- 
quence of this, return to their former station on Connec- 
ticut River, you will be pleased to direct them to proceed 
in making fascines and gabions. 

I have the honor to be. 

With the highest respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient humble servant, 

Governor Trumbull. G*?. WASHINGTON. 

25 



194 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTEKS. 



WASHINGTON TO COMMITTEE OF CO-OPERATION. 

Headquarters, Orange Town, 

17th August, 1780. 

Gentlemen, — We are now arrived at the middle of 
August; if we are able to undertake anything in this 
quarter, this campaign, our operations must commence 
in less than a month from this, or it will be absolutely 
too late. It will then be much later than were to be 
wished, and with all the exertions that can be made, we 
shall probably be greatly straitened in time. 

But I think it my duty to inform you, that our pros- 
pects of operating diminish in proportion as the effects 
of our applications to the respective States unfold, and 
I am sorry to add that we have every reason to appre- 
hend we shall not be in a condition at all to undertake 
anything decisive. 

The completion of our Continental battalions to their 
full establishment of 504 rank and file, has been uniformly 
arid justly held up as the basis of offensive operations. 
How far we have fallen short of this, the following state 
of the levies received and of the present deficiencies will 
show. 

By a return to the 16th instant we had received from 

Rank andjile. 

New Hampshire 457 

Massachusetts 2898 

Rhode Island 502 

Connecticut 1356 

New York 283 

New Jersey 165 

Pennsylvania 482 

6143 

The deficiencies of the battalions, from a return of the 
12th, allowing for the levies since arrived to the 16th, 
are of 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 195 



Battalions. Rank and file 



New Hampshire 3 

Massachusetts, including Jackson's, adopted . IG 

Rhode Ishmd 2 

Connecticut, including Webb's, adopted . . 9 

New York 5 

New Jersey 3 

Penusvlvauia 11 



248 
3514 

198 
1866 
1234 

569 
2768 



In the whole 10,397 

If the amount of these deficiencies, and the detached 
corps necessarily on the frontier and at particular posts, 
be deducted, and a proper allowance made for the ordi- 
nary casualties, and for the extra calls upon the army for 
wagoners, artificers, etc., it will be easy to conceive how 
inadequate our operating force must be to any capital 
enterprise against the enemy. It is indeed barely suffi- 
cient for defence. 

Hitherto, all the militia for three months, that have 
taken the field under my orders, have been about 

700 from New Hampshire, 
1700 from Massachusetts, 
800 from New York, 
500 from New Jersey. 

A part of the eastern militia has been detained to assist 
our allies at Rhode Island, and will shortly march to join 
the army. But from all the information I have, the 
number of militia will fall as far short of the demand as 
the Continental troops, and from the slow manner in 
which the latter have for some time past come in, I fear 
we have had nearly the whole we are to expect. 

In the article of provisions, our prospects are equally 
unfavorable. We are now fed by a precarious supply 
from day to day. The Commissary, from what has been 
done in the several States, so far from giving assurances 
of a continuance of this supply, speaks in the most dis- 
couraging terms, as you will perceive by the inclosed copy 



196 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

of a letter of the 15th instant, in which he proposes the 
sending back the Pennsylvania militia, who were to as- 
semble at Trenton the 12th, on the principle of a failure 
of provisions. 

As to forage and transportation, our prospects are still 
worse. These have lately been principally procured by 
military impress, — a mode too violent, unequal, oppres- 
sive, and consequently odious, to the people, to be long 
practised with success. 

In this state of things, Gentlemen, I leave it to your 
own judgment to determine, how little it will be in my 
power to answer the public expectation, unless more 
competent means can be, and are without delay, put into 
my hands. From the communications of the General and 
Admiral of our allies, the second division, without some 
very unfortunate contrariety, will in all probability arrive 
before the time mentioned as the ultimate period for 
commencing our operations. I submit it to you whether 
it will not be advisable, immediately, to lay before 
the several States a view of our circumstances at the 
juncture, in consequence of which they may take their 
measures. 

I have the honor to be, 

With the greatest respect and esteem. 

Gentlemen, your most obedient servant, 

G^- Washington. 

N. B. The return of the Rhode Island recruits is of 
the last of July; more may have since joined. 

There is a body of Connecticut State troops and militia 
employed in preparing fascines, etc., on the Sound. 

Honorable Committee op Co-operation. 



TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 197 



•WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

IIeadquakteks, Okange Town, 
August 22cl, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I am again reduced to the painful neces- 
sity of informing your Excellency of the situation in 
which we are, with respect to provision of the meat kind, 
and of earnestly entreating every assistance in your 
power to give, for our relief. 

The whole army has been already without meat one 
day, and a great part of it two. We have none now in 
camp, and no good prospect that I can find of receiving 
any within a reasonable time. The most we can hope 
for, from any resources within our own command, are 
sixty barrels of salt meat, on the way from West Point, 
which post is now almost entirely degarnished, and can- 
not have by the last return more than a hundred and 
twenty barrels, at most, in store. 

Your Excellency from this state of matters will but too 
sensibly feel for our alarming situation, and the more so 
when you reflect we are in a country that did not afford 
much meat at any time, and that it has been exhausted 
by the armies on both sides, to the extreme distress of 
its inhabitants. Our condition at any period would be 
painful, and highly injurious to the public service: but 
to be in a starving situation at the commencement of the 
campaign, before our operations have even begun, is 
peculiarly so ; must be discouraging in the extreme to 
our new levies, who now compose half our army; and 
must blast and put an end to all our prospects, if we 
are not relieved from it, though in every other respect 
events should arise bidding fjiir for success. I will not 
attempt to detail the consequences to which this would 
lead, nor the ideas and apprehensions it would excite 
in our allies and friends abroad, nor the confidence the 
enemy would derive from it. These will but too readily 



198 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTEES. 

occur to your Excellency, and I am sure you will believe 
with me that our friends would be greatly alarmed and 
embarrassed at least at the circumstance, while the cry 
of the enemy would be, — We will persevere in the war ! 
America cannot maintain even a small army, — for our 
present one cannot be ranked under any other appella- 
tion ; or, what will be equally encouraging to them, but 
more disgraceful to us, they will say — Their boasted 
patriotism is gone, or their wisdom and energy, for 
though their resources for war still remain, they will not 
bring them into action ! 

I am now arranging matters to make a forage on this 
impoverished people, having no other alternative left me, 
from which I could draw the least possible relief; and 
even from this, though it will ruin them, I expect to 
derive the most trifling succor. I rely on that goodness 
and promptitude 1 have ever found in your Excellency 
to promote the public service, and am persuaded you 
will exert all your influence to give us relief, on the 
present important and alarming occasion. 

I have the honor to be. 

With the most sincere respect and esteem. 
Dear sir, your most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 
(Circular.) 

Headquarters, near the Liberty Pole in Bergen County, 

27th August, 1780. 

Sir, — The Honorable the Connnittee of Co-operation 
having returned to Congress, I am nnder the disagreea- 
ble necessity of informing your Excellency that the army 
is again reduced to an extremity of distress for want of 
provisions. The greater part of it had been without meat 



i 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 199 

from the 21st to the 26th. To endeavor to obtain some 
rehef, I moved down to this place with a view of strip, 
ping the lower parts of the county of its cattle, which, 
after a most rigorous exaction, is found to afford be- 
tween two and three days' supply only, and those con- 
sisting of milch cows, and calves of one or two years old. 
When this scanty pittance is consumed, I know not what 
will be our next resource, as the Commissary can give me 
no certain information of more than 120 head of cattle 
expected from Pennsylvania, and about 150 from Massa- 
chusetts ; I mean in time to supply our immediate wants. 

Military coercion is no longer of any avail, as nothing 
further can possibly be collected from the country in 
which we are obliged to take a position, without depriv- 
ing the inhabitants of the last morsel. This mode of 
subsisting, supposing the desired end could be answered 
by it, besides being in the highest degree distressing to 
individuals, is attended with ruin to the morals and disci- 
pline of the army ; during the few days which we have 
been obliged to send out small parties to procure provi- 
sions for themselves, the most enormous excesses have 
been committed. 

It has been no inconsiderable support of our cause, to 
have had it in our power to contrast the conduct of our 
army with that of the enemy, and to convince the in- 
habitants that, while their rights were wantonly violated 
by the British troops, by ours they were respected. This 
distinction must unhappily now cease, and we must as- 
sume the odious character of the plunderers, instead of 
the protectors of the people, the direct consequence of 
which must be to alienate their minds from the army, 
and insensibly from the cause. 

We have not yet been absolutely without flour; but we 
have this day but one day's supply in camp, and I am not 
certain that there is a single barrel l^etwecn this place 
and Trenton. I shall be obliged therefore to draw down 



200 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

one or two hundred barrels from a small magazine which 
I had endeavored to establish at West Point, for the se- 
curity of the garrison, in case of a sudden investiture. 

From the above state of facts it may be foreseen that 
this army cannot possibly remain much longer together, 
unless very vigorous and immediate measures are taken 
by the States to comply with the requisitions made upon 
them. The Commissary-General has neither the means 
nor the power of procuring supplies. He is only to 
receive them from the several agents. Without a speedy 
change of circumstances, this dilemma must be involved, 
— either the army must disband, or what is, if possible, 
worse, subsist upon the plunder of the people. 

I would fain flatter myself that a knowledge of our 
situation will produce the desired relief, — not a relief of 
a few days, as has generally heretofore been the case, 
but a supply equal to the establishment of magazines for 
the winter. If these are not formed before the roads are 
broken up by the weather, we shall certainly experience 
the same difficulties and distresses the ensuing winter 
which we did the last. Although the troops have, upon 
every occasion hitherto, borne their wants with unpar- 
alleled patience, it Avill be dangerous to trust too often 
to a repetition of the causes of discontent. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir. 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

His Excellency Goverxor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, near the Liberty Pole, Bergen County, 
28th August, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I was a few days ago honored with yours 
of the 9th ; since the receipt of it I have seen Commis- 
sary Cheever, and have had an opportunity of making 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTOX LETTERS. 201 

particular inquiry into the state of the arms at Springfield. 
He tells me that the repair of such of the old muskets as 
are worth the trouble and expense, is going on as flist as 
the circumstances of want of hands and want of money 
will admit. The greater part of the gun-barrels, he says, 
are absolutely unfit for use, having been taken out of old 
stocks at different times, and not imported in their pres- 
ent state from Europe. I will direct General Knox to 
make inquiry after the 100 barrels of powder at Farm- 
ington, and if they belong to the Continent, to have them 
removed to one of the public magazines. 

From the accounts brought by the " Alliance " frigate, I 
think the prospects of operating, at least during the time 
for which the militia were drawn out, are so very preca- 
rious, that, circumstanced as we are in regard to provision 
(as my circular letter of this date particularly points out), 
it will be more advisable to discharge them immediately 
than to keep them up. You will therefore be pleased to 
give order for the dismission of all those who were raised 
in consequence of the requisition of the Committee of 
Co-operation. I should hope that if such a reinforcement 
should unexpectedly arrive to our allies, as would enable 
us to carry on operations against the enemy, that the 
militia might be shortly reassembled. But I wish that 
this suspension of a part of our preparations may not 
have any influence upon procuring the number of men 
necessary to complete the Continental battalions. For 
want of them, I am still obliged, much against my incli- 
nation, to keep the militia of some of the States in the 
field; and this consideration should evr be kept in view, 
that should we operate, the fuller the Continental bat- 
talions the smaller will be the demand for militia. 

I have the honor to be, 
With very great respect and esteem. 
Dear sir, your most obedient and humble servant. 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G- WASHINGTON. 

26 



202 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 31st August, 1780. 

Sir, — I have the honor to receive, enclosed in a cir- 
cular letter from the Honorable Committee of Co-opera- 
tion, a copy of your letter to them dated 17th instant. 
I am sorry to find the large deficiencies from the respec- 
tive States, as expressed in that letter. 

I think it my duty to inform your Excellency that 
measures have been, and still are, taking to furnish the 
men requested from this State, with the other requisites 
of provisions, teams, horses, etc. ; that T believe the men 
will be soon collected to the army, not without some un- 
avoidable, though I hope no great failures. The men to 
serve in the Continental army till the first of January, 
are daily going forward ; the three- months men are also 
collecting. Of these latter, Hezekiah Wyllys, Esq., Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Commandant, hath with him at New 
London, and on Norwich River, cutting and preparing fas- 
cines, gabions, etc., about 800 ; he is with me this day, in- 
forms that work is now going on well and will not be long 
in accomplishing, and his corps ready to join the army. 
The rest were ordered to Danbury. Lieutenant-Colonels 
Wells and Beebe, with their regiments, are at Horseneck, 
ready for your call. Hope when they are marched off, 
that place may be in greater safety than they have been 
for some time past. The appearance of anything deci- 
sive being undertaken, this State I think will supply men 
sufficient to fill all its deficiencies in that regard, by send- 
ing volunteers and independent companies to enter the 
service, agreeable to a proposition sent me by Brigadier- 
General Parsons. 

On the score of provisions, good Providence hath af- 
forded ample supplies. The regulations of Congress have 
put us into a condition, whereby the supply, especially 
of fresh beef, I fear, will come on to the army very 



TKUMBULL AUD WASUINGTON LETTERS. 203 

irregularly. We have been endeavoring a correspondence 
of the superintending commissaries of the New England 
States, that they may know and keep up a regular course 
of droves of cattle. This State, if I am not misinformed, 
is in advance beyond the rest, and the requisition made 
from it. I have heard there hath been a time lately 
when the army were destitute of cattle on hand, and at 
other times there may be more than is convenient. The 
droves ouf-'ht to be under a direction which will brino; 
them on regularly. This State have at New London 
four or five hundred barrels of best Irish mess beef, 
which, if requested, may be sent. It will be best to take 
an opportunity to send it into Connecticut River, to Mid- 
dletown or Hartford, which will be a great saving in ex- 
pense of carriage ; which brings me to the Quartermaster's 
department, the new regulations of which, I fear, will 
bring on us fresh embarrassments. I should have thought 
former experience would have taught a useful lesson on 
the expediency of making such refined rules and changes 
in the season for an active campaign ; however, this State 
will make the best of it, though my fears are many. 

The great difficulties and perplexities you are laid 
under, Avhen duly notified to the concerned, and not re- 
moved, must forever exculpate your Excellency from 
imputations of blame ; it is my wish also to exculpate 
this State. 

The affair of our currency is in a delicate situation ; I 
see nothing to relieve but taxation and loans. 

The enemy are endeavoring to sap the foundation of 
our credit, by draining us of our specie by clandestine 
trade, by sending out their emissaries with goods to sell 
for hard money only, and by the nefarious practice of 
sending counterfeit bills amongst us. 

The Lord reigns is just matter for our rejoicing with 
thankfulness for mercies received, and in hope of those 
we still stand in need of, and a real behef thereof; a solid 



204 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

foundation for our humble trust in him, for he is good, — • 
a strong hold in the day of trouble ; he knoweth them 
that trust in him. 
I am, with every sentiment of esteem and consideration, 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Bergen County, 

5th September, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I am honored by your Excellency's favor 
of the 31st ultimo, accompanied by a letter to the Com- 
mittee of Co-operation, which I took the liberty of open- 
ing, as those gentlemen had been, some little time before, 
recalled by Congress. Our situation, in respect to meat, 
is, if possible, worse now than it was when I addressed 
my circular letter of the 27th ultimo. The country in 
the neighborhood is daily more and more exhausted, and 
our prospects of an immediate supply from a distance are 
far from being adequate to our wants. The whole army 
will be this day without meat, and some part of it has 
been several days on short allowance. 

While I rejoice to hear that the country abounds in 
supplies, I cannot but be alarmed at finding your Excel- 
lency express a fear that they will come on irregularly to 
the army. I very much approve of the plan of establish- 
ing a correspondence between the superintending com- 
missaries of the New England States, for want of which 
we are, no doubt, subjected to many inconveniences. 

I will not undertake to say how the account of supplies 
furnished by the State of Connecticut stands upon a gen- 
eral scale ; but, if I am not misinformed by the Commis- 
sary-General;, she is very considerably deficient upon the 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 205 

requisitions made by the Committee of Co-operation. He 
tells me he has received no cattle from Colonel Champion 
for five weeks past. 

The four or five hundred barrels of salt beef which 
your Excellency mentions, will be a most valuable acqui- 
sition to the magazine at West Point, as we have been 
under the necessity of consuming the small quantity 
which I had wished to keep in reserve at that post, to 
secure it in case of a sudden investiture. You will there- 
fore oblige me by forwarding it as expeditiously as pos- 
sible to that place. 

I have the honor to be, 
AYith the highest respect and esteem, dear sir, 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G^. Washington. 

GovERxoR Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO COLONEL NEHEMIAH HUBBARD. 

Headquarters, Bergen County, . 
13th September, 1780. 

Sir, — I have made an appointment to meet the Count 
De Rochambeau, and the Chevalier De Ternay, who will 
be accompanied by the commanding officers of artillery, 
and engineers in the French army, at Hartford on the 
20th instant. The Marquis De la Fayette, General Knox, 
and the commanding officer of the corps of engineers in 
our service, will accompanj^ me. You will be pleased to 
provide the best quarters which the town affords, and 
make every necessary preparation of forage and other 
matters. I shall have an escort of twelve or fifteen dra- 
goons, the French General will probably have a like 
number. 

I am, sir. 

Your most obedient servant, 

G?. Washington. 

Colonel Nehem Hubbard. 



206 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 
(Circular.) 

Headquarters, near Passaic, 
October 1 8th, 1780. 

Sir, — In obedience to the orders of Congress, I have 
the honor to transmit your Excellency the present state 
of the troops of your Line, by which you will perceive 
how few men you will have left after the 1st of January 
next. When I inform you also that the troops of the 
other Lines will be in general as much reduced as yours, 
you will be able to judge how exceedingly weak the 
army will be at that period, and how essential it is the 
States should make the most vigorous exertions to re- 
place the discharged men as early as possible. 

Congress are now preparing a plan for the new estab- 
lishment of their army, which, when finished, they will 
transmit to the several States, with requisitions for their 
respective quotas. I have no doubt it will be a primary 
object with them to have the levies for the war; and this 
appears to me a point so interesting to our independence, 
that I cannot forbear entering into the motives which 
ought to determine the States without hesitation or alter- 
native to take their measures decisively for that object. 

I am religiously persuaded that the duration of the 
war, and the greatest part of the misfortunes and per- 
plexities we have hitherto experienced, are chiefly to be 
attributed to the system of temporary enlistments. Had 
we in the commencement raised an army for the war, 
such as was within the reach of the abilities of the States 
to raise and maintain, we should not have suffered those 
military checks which have so frequently shaken our 
cause, nor should we have incurred such enormous ex- 
penditures as have destroyed our paper currency, and 
with it all public credit. A moderate, compact force, on 
a permanent establishment, capable of acquiring the dis- 
cipline essential to military operations, would have been 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 207 

able to make head against the enemy, without compari- 
son better than the throngs of mihtia which have been 
at certain periods not in the fiekl, but on their way to 
and from the field ; for, from that want of perseverance 
which characterizes all militia, and of that coercion which 
cannot be exercised upon them, it has always been found 
impracticable to detain the greatest part of them in ser- 
vice even for the term for which they have been called 
out ; and this has been commonly so short, that we have 
had, a great proportion of the time, two sets of men to 
feed and pay, one coming to the army, and the other 
going from it. From this circumstance, and from the 
extraordinary waste and consumption of provision, stores, 
camp equipage, arms, clothes, and every other article in- 
cident to irregular troops, it is easy to conceive what an 
immense increase of public expense has been produced 
from the source of which I am speaking. I might add 
the diminution of our agriculture, by calling off at criti- 
cal seasons the laborers employed in it, as has happened 
in instances without number. 

In the enumeration of articles wasted, — I mention 
clothes, — it may be objected that the terms of engage- 
ment of the levies do not include this article ; but if we 
want service from the men, particularly in the cold sea- 
son, we are obliged to supply them notwithstanding, and 
they leave us before the clothes are half worn out. 

But there are evils still more striking that have befal- 
len us. The intervals between the dismission of one army 
and the collection of another, have more than once 
threatened us with ruin, which humajily speaking noth- 
ing but the supineness and folly of tlie enemy could have 
saved us from. How did our cause totter at the close of 
1776, when, with a little more than two thousand men, 
we were driven before the enemy through tlie Jerseys, 
and obliged to take post on the other side the Delaware, 
to make a show of covering Philadelphia, while in reahty 



208 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

nothing was more easy to them, with a little enterprise 
and industry, than to make their passage good to that 
city, and dissipate the remaining force which still kept 
alive our expiring opposition ! What hindered them from 
dispersing our little army, and giving a fatal blow to our 
affairs during all the subsequent winter, instead of remain- 
ing in a state of torpid inactivity and permitting us to 
hover about their quarters, when we had scarcely troops 
sufficient to mount the ordinary guards ? After having 
lost two battles, and Philadelphia in the following cam- 
paign, for want of those numbers and that degree of dis- 
cipline which we might have acquired by a permanent 
force in the first instance, in what a cruel and perilous 
situation did we again find ourselves in the winter of 
1777 at Valley Forge, within a day's march of the enemy, 
with a little more than a third of their strength, unable 
to defend our position, or retreat from it for want of the 
means of transportation ? What but the fluctuation of our 
army enabled the enemy to detach so boldly to the south- 
ward in 1778 and 1779 to take possession of two States, 
Georgia, and South Carolina, while we were obliged here 
to be idle spectators of their weakness, set at defiance 
by a garrison of six thousand regular troops, accessible 
everywhere by a bridge which nature had formed, but 
of which we were unable to take advantage from still 
greater weakness, apprehensive even for our own safety ? 
How did the same garrison insult the main army of these 
States the ensuing spring, and threatened the destruction 
of all our baggage and stores, saved by a good counte- 
nance more than by an ability to defend them ! 

And what will be our situation this winter, our army 
by the first of January diminished to little more than a 
sufficient garrison for West Point, the enemy at full lib- 
erty to ravage the country wherever they please, and, 
leaving a handful of men at New York, to undertake 
expeditions for the reduction of other States, which for 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 209 

want of adequate means of defence, will, it is much to be 
dreaded, add to tlie number of their conquests, and to 
the examples of our want of energy and wisdom ? 

The loss of Canada to the Union and the fate of the 
brave Montgomery, compelled to a rash attempt by the 
immediate prospect of being left without troops, might be 
enumerated in the catalogue of evils that have sprung 
from this fruitful source. 

We not only incur these dangers and suffer these 
losses, for want of a constant force equal to our exigen- 
cies ; but while we labor under this impediment, it is 
impossible there can ever be any order, or economy, or 
system in our finances. If we meet with any severe blow, 
the great exertions which the moment requires to stop 
the progress of the misfortune, oblige us to depart from 
general principles, to run into any expense, or to adopt 
any expedient however injurious, on a large scale, to 
procure the force and means which the present emer- 
gency demands. Everything is thrown into confusion, 
and the measures taken to remedy immediate evils 
perpetuate others. The same is the case if particular 
conjunctures invite us to offensive operations; we find 
ourselves unprepared, without troops, without magazines, 
and with little time to provide them. We are obliged 
to force our resources by the most burdensome methods 
to answer the end ; and after all, it is but half answered. 
The design is announced by the occasional effort, and the 
enemy have it in their power to counteract and elude 
the blow. The prices of everything, — men, provisions, 
etc., — are raised to a height to which the revenues of no 
government, much less ours, would suffice. It is impos- 
sible the people can endure the excessive burden of boun- 
ties for annual drafts and substitutes, increasing at every 
new experiment. Whatever it might cost them once 
for all to procure men for the war would be a cheap 

bargain. 

27 



210 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

I am convinced our system of temporary enlistments 
has prolonged the war, and encouraged the enemy to 
persevere. Baffled while we had an army in the field, 
they have been constantly looking forward to the period 
of its reduction as the period to our opposition, and the 
season of their successes. They have flattered themselves 
with more than the event has justified, for they believed 
when one army expired we should not be able to raise 
another. Undeceived, however, in this expectation by ex- 
perience, they still remain convinced, and to me evidently 
on good grounds, that we must ultimately sink under a 
system which increases our expense beyond calculation, 
enfeebles all our measures, affords the most inviting op- 
portunities to the enemy, and wearies and disgusts the 
people. This has doubtless had great influence in pre- 
venting their coming to terms, and will continue to ope- 
rate in the same way. The debates on the Ministerial 
side have frequently manifested the operation of this mo- 
tive, and it must in the nature of things have had great 
weight. 

The interposition of neutral powers may lead to a ne- 
gotiation this winter. Nothing will tend so much to 
make the Court of London reasonable as the prospect 
of a permanent army in this country, and a spirit of 
exertion to support it. 

It is time we should get rid of an error whicli the ex- 
perience of all mankind has exploded, and which our own 
experience has dearly taught us to reject, — the carrying 
on a war with militia or (which is nearly the same thing) 
temporary levies, against a regular, permanent, and disci- 
plined force. The idea is chimerical, and that we have 
so long persisted in it is a reflection on the judgment 
of a nation so enlightened as we are, as well as a strong 
proof of the empire of prejudice over reason. If we con- 
tinue in the infatuation we shall deserve to lose the ob- 
ject we are contending for. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 211 

America has been almost amused out of her liberties. 
We have frequently heard the behavior of the militia ex- 
tolled upon one and another occasion, by men who judge 
only from the surface, by men who had particular views 
in misrepresenting, by visionary men whose credulity 
easily swallows every vague story in support of a favor- 
ite In^Dothesis. I solemnly declare I never was witness 
to a single instance that can countenance an opinion of 
militia or raw troops being fit for the real business of 
fighting. I have found them useful as light parties to 
skirmish in the woods, but incapable of making or sus- 
taining a serious attack. This firmness is only acquired 
by habits of discipline and service. I mean not to de- 
tract from the merit of the militia ; their zeal and spirit 
upon a variety of occasions have entitled them to the 
highest applause ; but it is of the greatest importance we 
should learn to estimate them rightly. We may expect 
everything from ours that militia is capable of; but we 
must not expect from any, services for which regulars 
alone are fit. 

The late battle of Camden is a melancholy comment 
upon this doctrine. The militia fled at the first fire, and 
left the Continental troops surrounded on every side, and 
overpowered by numbers, to combat for safety instead of 
victory. The enemy themselves have witnessed to their 
valor. 

An ill effect of short enlistments, which I have not yet 
taken notice of, is that the constant fluctuation of their 
men is one of the sources of disgust to the officers. Just 
when by great trouble, fatigue, and vexation (with which 
the training of recruits is attended), they have brought 
their men to some kind of order, they have the mortifica- 
tion to see them go home, and to know that the drudg- 
ery is to recommence the next campaign. In regiments 
so constituted, an officer has neither satisfaction nor credit 
in his command. 



212 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Every motive which can arise from a consideration of 
our circumstances, either in a domestic or foreign point 
of view, calls upon us to abandon temporary expedients, 
and substitute something durable, systematic, and sub- 
stantial. This applies as well to our civil administration 
as to our military establishment. It is as necessary to 
give Congress, the common head, sufficient powers to 
direct the common forces, as it is to raise an army for 
the war ; but I should go out of my province to expati- 
ate on civil affairs. — I cannot forbear adding a few more 
remarks. 

Our finances are in an alarming state of derangement. 
Public credit is almost arrived at its last stage. The peo- 
ple begin to be dissatisfied with the feeble mode of con- 
ducting the war, and with the ineffectual burdens imposed 
upon them, — which, though light in comparison with 
what other nations feel, are from their novelty heavy 
to them ; they lose their confidence in Government 
apace. The army is not only dwindling into nothing, 
but the discontents of the officers as well as the men 
have matured to a degree that threatens but too general 
a renunciation of the service at the end of the campaign. 
Since January last we have had registered at headquar- 
ters more than one hundred and sixty resignations, 
besides a number of others that never were regularly 
reported. I speak of the army in this quarter. We 
have frequently in the course of the campaign experi- 
enced an extremity of want. Our officers are indecently 
defective in clothing. Our men are almost naked, totally 
unprepared for the inclemency of the approaching sea- 
son. We have no magazines for the winter. The mode 
of procuring our supplies is precarious, and all the reports 
of the officers employed in collecting them are gloomy. 

These circumstances conspire to show the necessity of 
immediately adopting a plan that will give more energy 
to Government, more vio-or and more satisfaction to 



TRUMBULL AND WASUINGTON LETTERS. 213 

tlie army ; without it we have everything to fear. I am 
persuaded of the sufliciency of our resources if properly 
directed. 

Should the requisitions of Congress by any accident 
not arrive before the Legislature is about to rise, I beg 
to recommend that a plan be devised which is likely to 
be effectual for raising the men that will be required for 
the war, leaving it to the Executive to apply it to the 
quota which Congress will fix. I flatter myself, however, 
the requisitions will arrive in time. 

The present crisis of our affairs appears to me so seri- 
ous as to call upon me as a good citizen to give my sen- 
timents freely for the safety of the Republic. I hope the 
motive will excuse the liberty I have taken. 

I have the honor to be. 

With the highest respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G^- Washington. 

Ills Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, near Passaic Falls, 

28th October, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I am to request your Excellency to 
direct the salt beef mentioned in your letter of the 31st 
August, and concerning which I wrote to you from Har- 
ford, to be forwarded with as much expedition as possi- 
ble to Fishkill Landing by the upper route, as that by 
Crumpond ^ has become dangerous, from the incursions of 
the enemy's Refugee Corps. I am the more anxious to 
have this parcel of salt provision brought speedily to the 
North River, as I see no other on which I can depend 



1 a village east of Peekskill, six or eiglit miles from Hudson River; 
bend of the river near by goes by the name of Crum Elbow. — Eds. 



214 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

for furnisliing a winter supply for the important garrison 
of Fort Schuyler, and if it is not got up to that post in 
the month of November, it will be extremely difficult 
afterwards from the badness of the road. 

Although the season is already arrived when the mag- 
azines of salt meat for the ensuing winter and campaign 
should be laid in, I cannot learn that the Commissary- 
General has been enabled to put up a single barrel; so 
far from it, it is with difficulty the troops in any quarter 
are subsisted upon fresh meat from day to day. 
I have the honor to be. 

With the highest respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant. 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G9. WASHINGTON. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, near Passaic Falls, 
1st November, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I was yesterday honored with your Ex- 
cellency's favor of the 27th ultimo. The letters enclosed 
for the President of Congress were immediately for- 
warded by express. 

I am happy in believing that the despatches for which 
you are apprehensive were not in the mail lately lost at 
Stratford, as the new regulations for the army were not 
completed when that post left Philadelphia. They were 
finished the 21st ultimo, and I hope will reach most of 
the Legislatures during their Fall session. 

I have the honor to be, with perfect respect. 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

P. S. I transmitted your Excellency some very impor- 
tant despatches on the IStli ultimo ; I hope they have got 
safe to hand. 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 215 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

(Circular.) 

Headquarters, Passaic Falls, 
10th November, 1780. 

Sir, — From a collective view of the state of our cloth- 
ing, I find we have not more in the public magazines 
than will be sufficient for one half of the men enlisted for 
the war, or whose term of service will extend beyond the 
winter. To depend any longer upon the supply expected 
from Europe arriving in time to relieve the wants of the 
troops, will be leaving the matter upon too precarious a 
footing. I have therefore thought it a duty incumbent 
upon me to give you this information, that you may en- 
deavor to procure and send forward the articles most es- 
sential to the convenience and comfort of the men. I 
should have done it sooner, but I still flattered myself 
with an ample supply from abroad. 

The articles most wanted will be waistcoats, blankets, 
woollen overalls, and stockings. The greater part of the 
men have coats that may enable them, with warm under- 
clothes, to rub through the severity of the winter. I would 
recommend that the cloth, with thread, buttons, etc., be 
sent to the army in the piece 5 it may be made up there 
agreeable to the wants of the men, and quicker than at 
home, as there are tailors sufficient in every corps. 

The returns with which you have been lately fur- 
nished, very accurately point out the number of men 
entitled to clothing from the public. A supply equal to 
half that number will be absolutely necessary ; and as 
there is no probable chance, for the reasons I have before 
mentioned, of obtaining it from the Continental agents, I 
must entreat the exertions of each State in behalf of its own 
troops, as the only means of preventing a number of them 
from experiencing extreme distress the ensuing winter. 

I have the honor to be, with very great respect. 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 
State of Connecticut. G?. WASHINGTON. 



216 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
December 8th, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — On my arrival at this place, I met with 
your Excellency's favor of the 27th November, and im- 
mediately gave orders for the returns which you request 
therein. They shall be transmitted to you, as soon as 
they are brought in. I have given directions to Colonel 
Sheldon to make the return of his regiment immediately 
to you. I very much regret that the requisition of Con- 
gress for your quota of men, had not reached you in 
time to have determined your Legislature upon fixing 
the period of service for the war. We are deceiving our- 
selves, and keeping alive the hopes of our enemy, while 
we levy an army for a day short of the period of the dis- 
pute. I did not expect that the recruits would be got 
into service, at least in any considerable numbers, by the 
1st of January. And rather than enter again into the 
fatal error of short enlistments, I would prefer putting 
matters to some hazard during the winter, to calling upon 
the States for a body of men to serve between the 1st 
of January and the probable time of bringing the levies 
into the field; because I am certain it would operate 
against more permanent engagements. 

What your Excellency proposes respecting the French 
troops cannot be accomplished. (In confidence I say it.) 
They are thought by the French General and Admiral 
necessary, circumstanced as matters are, to the security 
of their navy. 

As soon as the near arrangement of the army is com- 
pleted, your Excellency shall be furnished with a list of 
the officers. 

I have the honor to be. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G? Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 217 

P. S. I received yours per Mr. Bael, and gave the nec- 
essary orders upon the occasion. 
His Excellency Goveunou Tkumijull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
December 10th, 1780. 

Sir, — Your Excellency will, I presume, have received, 
before this reaches you, an Act of Congress of the 4th of 
last month, calling on the several States for specific quan- 
tities of fresh and salt provisions, flour, salt, and rum for 
the army, and directing all of the above articles, except 
the fresh meat, to be collected, and deposited at such 
places in each of the States as should be judged most 
convenient by me. This communication I should have 
done myself the honor of making somewhat earlier, had 
not the greater part of my time, since the receipt of the 
Act, been taken up in arranging and visiting the hospi- 
tals and winter cantonments of the army. 

Upon considering the point with respect to the supplies 
required of your State, I beg leave to inform your Excel- 
lency that it appears to me they should be deposited at 
the following places and proportions. The salt provisions 
and salt to be delivered at or near Bull's Iron Works and 
Hartford, in equal proportions ; the first second and third 
deliveries of rum, at or near Bull's Iron Works ; the last 
at Hartford. 

The Commissary-General, as he is directed, will inform 
you from time to time of the quantities of live cattle 
which will be necessary, and where they are to be 
delivered. 

I have the honor to be. 

With great respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G^- WASHINGTON. 

28 



218 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, December 15th, 1780. 

Sir, — Would acquaint your Excellency, we just re- 
ceived intelligence from New York, in three different 
wa,ys, and in such a manner that we have great reason 
to think it may he depended on, that the enemy are medital^ 
ing a blow against this State. The traitorous Arnold, it 
is said, is preparing to come out with three or four British 
regiments, in order to penetrate into the country ; and it 
is very probable it will be by the way of Kingsbridge. 
It is certain considerable preparations and movements 
are making for some notable attempt; I think it my duty 
to give you the earliest intelligence of this designed move- 
ment, that your Excellency may take such measures as 
you may judge requisite therein. 

We have upon this occasion put our militia on the sea- 
coast in readiness, and have ordered one thousand forth- 
with to the western frontiers. You are sensible the great 
advantage it will be to have a sufficient body of disci- 
plined regular troops for the militia to act under and 
co-operate with. Therefore doubt not but your Excel- 
lency will think it necessary and expedient, and will 
readily afford all the assistance in your power from the 
Continental Army, upon this emergency; especially if the 
enemy should move out in force against us. Whatever 
intelligence further may come to hand relative to the 
movements, shall take care forthwith to forward, and 
must request your Excellency to do the like. 

And am with due respects, 

Your most obedient and very humble servant. 

(Signature omitted.) 
His Excellency General "Washington. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 219 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
December 17th, 1780. 

Sir — I submitted to the interference of the State of 
Connecticut last year with respect to the cantonment of 
the Horse without any animadversion or remark, because 
I was hopeful that the impropriety of it would appear to 
them, and prevent the like in future. I shall (as it is 
the request of the State, and because it is my wish to 
harmonize, as much as possible, with the civil authority, 
in the prosecution of a cause in which we are all equally 
interested), send Sheldon's regiment this winter to the 
State of Massachusetts ; but I cannot help remonstrating 
very pointedly against a repetition of the practice in 
future, for the following reasons : — 

Four things have always influenced me in the distribu- 
tion of the troops to their winter cantonments, — security 
of our capital posts, which makes it necessary that they 
should have such a relative situation to each other as to 
afford the necessary succor ; cover to the country ; their 
own convenience ; and the convenience of the inhabi- 
tants, where the two last were not incompatible with the 
two first. 

It is unnecessary, I am persuaded, for me to remark 
that if any one State can or will undertake to point out 
a cantonment for one part of the army, another may with 
equal propriety do it for another part ; and that upon the 
same principle, and by the same parity of reasoning that 
Connecticut undertakes to advise or direct Sheldon's Horse 
to Massachusetts, Massachusetts may order them to New 
Hampshire, and New Hampshire to some other State. In 
a word, it is striking at the most essential privilege of the 

^ This letter is published in Sparks's Writings of Washington, vii. 331, ia 
a slightly different form, with a note as to matter referred to. — Eds. 



220 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Commander-in-Chief, and is pregnant with every mischief 
that can be conceived. 
I have the honor to be, 

With great respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Clinton.^ 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
19th December, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — I have this morning received your Ex- 
cellency's favor of the 15th. I have likewise had infor- 
mation from New York that the enemy were preparing 
to make a move of some kind, but all my intelligences 
suppose that it will be a further detachment to the south- 
ward. Indeed, the situation of their affairs in that 
quarter seems to require a reinforcement. Should they 
however turn their views towards the western parts of 
your State, I shall throw in as much Continental force 
as can be spared, consistent with the safety of these posts, 
to aid the militia. 

The scarcity of provisions (especially of flour, of which 
we were sometimes without, and frequently upon half 
and quarter allowance), and the miserable condition which 
most of the levies were in for want of clothing, have 
obliged me already to discharge the greater part of them, 
and your Excellency must know that the terms of ser- 
vice of the whole will expire the last of this month. We 
shall then be reduced to the bare garrison of West Point 
and its dependencies, and the number of men requisite 
to cover our communication from the southward, through 

^ This address is evidently a clerical error, and intended for Trumbull. — 
Eds. 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 221 

Jersey, Thus your Excellency must perceive tliat, should 
the enemy move out while this river continues open, it 
will be in my power to aflbrd but very little assistance, 
without putting these valuable posts to a most imminent 
risk. 

The principal inducement with me in wishing to have 
Sheldon's regiment cantoned in the neighborhood of Col- 
chester was, that they might be at hand, should such an 
event as you now apprehend take place. 

Should I hear that the enemy have embarked, I shall 
communicate the intelligence to your Excellency, that 
you may as soon as possible get rid of the inconvenience 
and expense of the militia. 

I have the honor to be, with very great respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^. Washington. 

His Excellexcy Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
20th December, 1780. 

Dear Sir, — Enclosed are the returns called for in 
your Excellency's letter of the 27th ultimo. Colonel 
Sheldon is directed to make that of his regiment imme- 
diately to you. That, with those now transmitted, will, 
I believe, include all the men belonging to the State of 
Connecticut who are serving in any department of the 
Continental Army. 

I have the honor to be, with very great respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



222 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
January 2d, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to inform your Excel- 
lency of the sailing of the embarkation/ which I men- 
tioned in my letter of the 13th of December. The fleet, 
consisting of thirty-two sail, left the Hook on the 22cl 
ultimo, with a detachment of about sixteen hundred 
troops on board, under the command of Arnold. It is 
conjectured they are designed as a further reinforcement 
to the Southern army, which is said to be greatly weak- 
ened by the severity of the service and climate. 
I have the honor to be. 

With great respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
January 5th, 1781. 

Sir, — Tt is with extreme anxiety and pain of mind I 
find myself constrained to inform your Excellency, that 
the event I have long apprehended would be the conse- 
quence of the complicated distresses of the army, has at 
length taken place. On the night of the first instant, a 
mutiny was excited by the non-commissioned officers and 
privates of the Pennsylvania Line, which soon became so 
universal as to defy all opposition ; in attempting to quell 
this tumult, in the first instance, some officers were killed, 

1 This refers to the departure of a portion of Sir Henry Clinton's fleet 
from New York. — Eds. 

2 This letter is a copy of one to President Meshech Weare, published in 
Sparks's Writings of Washington, vii. 352. — Eds. 



TRUMBULL AND WASIIIXGTOX LETTERS. 223 

others wounded, and the lives of several common soldiers 
lost. Deaf to the arguments, entreaties, and utmost ef- 
forts of all /heir officers to stop them, they moved off from 
Morris Town, the place of their cantonment, with their 
arms, and six pieces of artillery ; and from accounts just 
received by General Wayne's aide-de-camp, they were still 
in a body on their march to Philadelphia, to demand a 
redress of their grievances. At what point this defec- 
tion will stop, or how extensive it may prove, God only 
knows ; at present, the troops at the important posts in 
this vicinity remain quiet, not being acquainted with this 
unhappy and alarming afKiir ; but how long tliey will 
remain so cannot be ascertained, as they labor under 
some of the pressing hardships with the troops who have 
revolted. 

The aggravated calamities and distresses that have 
resulted from the total want of pay for nearly twelve 
months, the want of clothing at a severe season, and not 
unfrequently the want of provisions, are beyond de- 
scription. The circumstances will now point out much 
more forcibly what ought to be done than anything that 
can possibly be said by me on the subject- 
It is not within the sphere of my duty to make requi- 
sitions, without the authority of Congress, from individual 
States ; but at such a crisis as this, and circumstanced as 
we are, my own heart will acquit me, and Congress and 
the States (eastward of this) whom, for the sake of dis- 
patch I address, I am persuaded will excuse me, when 
once for all I give it decidedly as my opinion that it is 
vain to think an army can be kept together much longer, 
under such a variety of sufferings as ours has experi- 
enced; and that unless some immediate and spirited meas- 
ures are adopted to furnish at least three months pay to 
the troops, in money which will be of some value to 
them, and at the same time ways and means are devised 
to clothe and feed them better (more regularly, I mean) 



224 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

than they have been, the worst that can befall us may 
be expected. 

I have transmitted Congress a copy of this letter, and 
have in the most pressing manner requested them to 
adopt the measure which I have above recommended, 
or something similar to it, and as I will not doubt of their 
compliance, I have thought proper to give you this pre- 
vious notice, that you may be prepared to answer the 
requisitions. 

As I have used every endeavor in my power to avert 
the evil that has come upon us, so will I continue to 
exert every mean I am possessed of to prevent an ox- 
tension of the mischief ; but I can neither foretell or be 
answerable for the issae. 

That you ma}'' have every information that an officer 
of rank and abilities can give of the true situation of our 
affairs, and the condition and temper of the troops, I have 
prevailed upon Brigadier-General Knox to be the bearer 
of this letter; to him I beg leave to refer ^'our Excel- 
lency for many matters which would be too tedious for 
a letter. 

I have the honor to be, with great esteem and respect, 
Your Excellency's most obedient humble servant, 

G*?. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumcull. 



TRUMBULL TO WASIIINCxTON. 

Led ANON, 12tli January, 1781. 

Sir, — James Wilson, a soldier of this State on duty at 
Horseneck, was placed a sentinel over Nathan Frink, a no- 
torious traitor to the States, who had been taken in arms 
against the same. Frink found means to bribe Wilson to 
suffer his escape, and both went oil' together ; after this 
Wilson was taken from the enemy, tried by a Court- 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 225 

martial, and sentenced to suffer death. While this sen- 
tence was sent to me for confirmation, Wilson again 
escaped, I believe after his sentence was confirmed. 
Some time after this Wilson comes to our lines under 
a flag, to procure his fiimily to be removed within the 
lines of the enem}^ Under the last-mentioned circum- 
stances he was detained by General Silliman, and remains 
in custody. The question to your Excellency is whether 
the protection of a flag is to be deemed so sacred as to 
screen a villain from the execution of a sentence which 
he has so justly merited. I shall be much obliged by a 
resolution of this query, the ratlier as a Captain Samuel 
Marsh, of this State militia, who was going into New York 
under sanction of a flag, to make some inquiry for the 
welfare of his son, who was lately wounded and taken 
by the enemy, is now detained under a pretence of being 
treated in the same line as we shall deal with Wilson. 
If your Excellency should be of opinion that the sanction 
of a flag is not so sacred as to protect Wilson from death, 
I will be much obliged if you will be pleased to write per 
the bearer of this to General Chnton, stating the circum- 
stances, and desiring the release of Captain Marsh. If a 
flag is to be deemed so sacred as to screen the villains, as 
well as the honest man, this State must take their meas- 
ures accordingly. 

I am, with the highest esteem and consideration, 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

Jonth Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
January, 178L 

Sir, — Under the circumstances your Excellency states 
in your letter of the 12th, there is to me no doubt that 

29 



226 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Wilson may be detained and punished, notwithstanding 
the sanction of a flag. But there is a fact alleged by the 
enemy, which would entirely change the nature of the 
case. They pretend that Wilson came out under a pass- 
port or permit from Colonel Wells of your militia, while 
commanding officer at Horseneck, or in that vicinity. 
If this is true, however censurable Colonel Wells might 
be in giving the permit, I should advise to respect it and 
release Wilson. This is a point, if possible, necessary to 
be ascertained, previous to an application to General 
Clinton. If, upon investigation, your Excellency finds 
the pretended passport to be false, I will make a demand 
as you request of Captain Marsh, unless your Excellency 
should prefer doing it yourself, as the whole affair has 
been hitherto without my participation. 

I am happy to be able to inform your Excellency, agree- 
able to the resolve of Congress, that a detachment of the 
Jersey troops has been already marched to Wyoming. 
With the warmest sentiments of respect and esteem, 
I have the honor to be. 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G^ Washington. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
January 19th, 1781. 

Deae Sie, — I should not trouble your Excellency 
with such reiterated applications on the score of supplies, 
if any objects less than the safety of the posts on this 
river, and indeed the existence of the army, were at stake. 
By the enclosed extracts of a letter of yesterday, from 
Major-General Heath, j^ou will see our present situation 
and future prospects. 

If therefore the supply of beef cattle demanded by the 
requisitions of Congress from your State is not regularly 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 227 

forwarded to the army, I cannot consider myself as re- 
sponsible for the maintenance of the garrisons below, or 
the continuance of a single regiment in the field. 
I have the honor to be, 

With very great regard and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 
• G^ Washington. 

Ills Excellency Goveijxor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.i 

(CiRCULAK.) 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
January 22d, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — I have received the disagreeable intelli- 
gence that a part of the Jersey Line had followed the 
example of that of Pennsylvania, and when the advices 
came away it was expected the revolt would be general. 
The precise intention of the mutineers was not known, 
but their complaints and demands were similar to those 
of the Pennsylvanians. 

Persuaded that without some decisive effort at all haz- 
ards to suppress this dangerous spirit, it would speedily 
infect the whole army, I have ordered as large a detach- 
ment as we could spare from these posts to march under 
Major-General Howe, with orders to compel the mutineers 
to unconditional submission, to listen to no terms while 
they were in a state of resistance, and on their reduction 
to execute instantly a few of the most active and most in- 
cendiary leaders. I am not certain what part the troops 
detached for this purpose will act, but I flatter myself 
they will do their duty. I prefer any extremity to which 
the Jersey troops may be driven, to a compromise. 

The weakness of the garrison, but still more its embar- 

^ This letter is the same as one addressed to President Meshech Weare, 
published in Sparks's Writings of Washington, vii. 381. — Eds. 



228 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

rassing distress for want of provisions, made it impossible 
to prosecute such measures with the Pennsylvanians as 
the nature of the case demanded, and while we were 
making arrangements, as far as practicable, to supply 
these defects, an accommodation took place, which will 
not only subvert the Pennsylvania Line, but have a very 
pernicious influence on the whole arn?y. I mean how- 
ever by these remarks only to give an idea of the misera- 
ble situation we are in, not to blame a measure, which 
perhaps in our circumstances was the best that could 
have been adopted. 

The same embarrassments operate against coercion at 
this moment, but not in so great a degree ; the Jersey 
troops not being, from their number, so formidable as 
were the Pennsjdvanians. 

I dare not detail the risks we run from the present 
scantiness of supplies. "We have received few or no cattle 
for some time past, nor do we know of any slwrtly to be 
expected. The salted meat we ought to have reserved 
in the gan-ison is now nearly exhausted. I cannot but 
renew my solicitations with your State to exert every 
expedient for contributing to our immediate relief. 

I have the honor to be, with the greatest esteem. 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G° Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
29th January, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — In the letter which I did myself the honor 
of writing to you the 22d instant, I informed 3'ou of the 
revolt of the Jersey troops, and of the measures I intended 
to pursue in consequence. I have now the pleasure to 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 229 

inform you that Major-General IIowc, with the detach- 
ments under his command, surrounded the mutineers in 
their quarters on the morning of the 27th, brought them 
without difficulty to an unconditional surrender, and had 
two of the most active instigators immediately tried and 
executed. 

It was judged unnecessary to extend the example fur- 
ther, as there was every appearance of genuine contri- 
tion. I hope this will completely extinguish the spirit of 
mutiny, if effectual measures are taken to prevent its 
revival, by rendering the situation of the soldiery more 
tolerable than it has heretofore been ; without this, it 
may be smothered for a while, but it must again break 
out with greater violence. It is not to be expected that 
an army can be permanently held together by those ties 
on which we have too long depended. 

I cannot omit doing justice to the detachment which 
was sent on this service. There was in its behavior every 
mark of fidelit}^, obedience, disapprobation of the conduct 
of the mutineers, and a conviction of the necessity of 
bringing them to submission and punishment. They 
made a long march over mountainous roads and through 
a deep snow with the greatest patience, and obeyed 
every order with alacrity. 
I have the honor to be, 

With great esteem and respect, sir, 

Your obedient and most humble servant, 

G^- Washington. 

(Circular.) 

P. S. I have had the honor to receive your favor of 
the IGth instant, by Colonel Dennison. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



230 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, 31st January, 178L 

Sir, — "With much anxiety I give you an answer to 
your late letters respecting the supply of the army. 

Colonel Champion has been with me on the subject; 
he will do everything in his power, with the means where- 
with he is furnished. Cattle are plenty to be had ; noth- 
ing but money is wanting. Colonel Champion will send 
on this week not less than fifty head of cattle, not over 
one hundred ; he is furnished with means to procure a 
further supply, — I wish it was more ample. Every exer- 
tion in my power will be put in motion to fulfil your 
Excellency's wishes. I have been informed that great 
irregularity has been practised in the carrying on cattle 
to the army, — at one time great supplies, at others very 
scanty. After the last complaint of want, they were sent 
on in such numbers that great waste has been sufiered, — 
not less I am told than 1000 head of cattle, — for want of 
pasture and forage, and that after much waste they have 
been barrelled, and come out of pickle nothing but bone, 
to the great injury of the army. I know your Excellency 
is troubled with everything, — is there not somchodi/ who 
may regulate this matter so as to have a greater equal- 
ity of supplies ? The salted provisions which have been 
put up by this State is ordered on to its repositories in 
this town and Bull's Falls ; some will be sent through to 
your camp. Permit me to query whether Bull's Falls is 
a proper place for forming magazines. I fear not. I 
have conversed with General Knox on the subject. I 
would mention Woodbury and Litchfield. If you should 
think with me you will please to give me information in 
season to alter the route of what is going to Bull's. 

I am happy to find General Knox has had so great suc- 
cess in his embassy to the States eastward of this. This 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 231 

State has not jet concluded on their measures; my Coun- 
cil is to meet me here on Monday next, when the subject 
of satisfaction to the army will be brought on, and I have 
much confidence that a concurrence will be given to the 
measures adopted by the other N. E. States. 

I do myself the pleasure to send you per General Knox 
for your perusal two volumes of pamphlets lately sent me 
from London by my son ; they are curious, and perhaps 
to you new. After perusal, your Excellency will please to 
return me them by some safe opportunity as soon as 
convenient. 

With great, etc., I am, your most, etc., 

Jon™ Tkumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
February 4th, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — I was yesterday honored with your Ex- 
cellency's letter of the 31st of January, by General Knox. 
The exertions the Eastern States are making afford, me 
great satisfaction. 

I am sorry there should be so much justice in your 
Excellency's observation respecting the irregularity of 
supply, and consequent waste of the live cattle some- 
times sent to the army. It is easy to trace this misfor- 
tune to its source. Each State is called upon for the 
weekly or monthly proportion of the supplies demanded 
by Congress. A failure in any one involves the army 
in distressing want. To relieve this, the most pressing 
representations are made, which in some instances are 
attended with such efficacy as to bring on the supplies 
that have been retained, and produce such a temporary 
redundance as is attended with the loss and waste which 



232 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

your Excellency mentions. To depend upon a daily sup- 
ply of live cattle, as has been the case hitherto, under 
these circumstances must produce one of the disagreea- 
ble alternatives before recited. The negligence of the 
purchaser or driver, the badness of the roads or inter- 
ruption of water, inevitably bring on a scarcity, which 
threatens the army with dissolution ; while, on the con- 
trary, a large stock in hand, produced by whatever 
contingency, is attended with waste, as neither the Com- 
missary or Quartermaster have the means of disposing 
of the cattle immediately, or supporting them alive in 
camp. I have not the least doubt but the army might 
be fed at half the present expense, by having proper 
magazines laid in, and arrangements made for the de- 
partment. At the same time, I do not see but two ways 
to remedy the evil complained of, — either to furnish the 
Commissary-General with money to purchase, and make 
him accountable for the supplies of the army, which 
mode, I conceive, would be far preferable ; or to oblige 
the State agents or contractors to comply punctually 
with the requisitions made upon them. 

In determining the places of deposit for the specific 
supplies required of the States, it was necessary I should 
have regard to the subsequent transportation to the 
probable theatre of action, and to the difficulty of per- 
forming this by land carriage, from the want of money 
and means in the Quartermaster department. I will can- 
didly acknowledge, it was from these considerations I 
was induced to fix one of the magazines of the State of 
Connecticut at Hartford, from whence water transporta- 
tion might eventually [be] had ; and the other at Bull's 
Falls, as being the nearest point to the North River, and 
our present principal fo[rce whe^Jre the deposit could 
safely be made. From the western part of the State, and 
the places contiguous to the Sound which may be as near 

1 Manuscript torn. — Ens. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTON LETTERS. 233 

to West Point as Bull's Iron Works, it will certainly bo 
eligible to have the provisions forwarded directly to 
the former. 

I thank you for the books sent, and will return them 
after perusal. 

With the greatest consideration and esteem, 
I have the honor to be, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G^ Washington. 

His Excellency Goveuxok Trumbull. 



* WASHIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New "Windsor, 
21st February, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — Having been obliged to make a very 
considerable temporary detachment from the army, I 
am under the necessity of immediately calling in what 
recruits may be raised in the neighboring States to re- 
place it. I have directed the superintending officers at 
the different places of rendezvous to do this, but I must 
request your Excellency, if it possibly can be done, to 
furnish them in whole or in part with clothing, as I do 
not believe our whole stock on hand consists of more 
than waistcoats and breeches for 2000 men. If the re- 
cruits could be made tolerably comfortable they might 
do garrison duty, which is what they will be employed 
in until the spring. 

I cannot avoid mentioning a matter to your Excellency 
which is well worth 3^our attention ond that of the Legis- 
lature. It is the shameful neglect, not to call it worse, 
of those persons appointed by law to muster and pass the 
recruits. General Parsons informs that the first which 
came from your State, seven in number, were all totally 
unfit for service. He has sent them to Hartford, that the 

30 



234 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Legislature may themselves be witnesses of the imposi- 
tion which has been put upon the public, and which will 
be practised in numberless instances, while any but mili- 
tary men, interested in having healthy, sound soldiers, 
are to be judges of the sufficiency of the recruit. To 
endeavor to remedy this evil, I have ordered a good field- 
officer to be stationed at each place of rendezvous, and 
if any man is brought in, not qualified for the service, 
he is to refuse receiving him and to send him immedi- 
ately back to the town which furnished him. 

I had the honor of receiving your Excellency's favor 
of the 5th, by the Duke de Lauzun. The corps of inva- 
lids are stationed, by order of Congress, at Philadelphia 
and Boston, and it is not therefore in my power to send 
the invalids of the army to any other places except by 
the authority of Congress. 

I have the honor to be. 

With great respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
April 10th, 17S1. 

Dear Sir, — By an almost total failure of the supplies 
of beef cattle demanded by Congress of the Eastern 
States, I find we are again reduced to the verge of dis- 
tress (our little magazines which were laid up for an 
emergency being entirely exhausted), and that there is 
no prospect of an immediate relief, but from the salted 
provisions of Connecticut. 

I have therefore to request in the most earnest man- 
ner that your Excellency will interpose your influence 
and authority to aid the Quartermaster in forwarding 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 235 

these provisions, and that a sufficient number of teams 
may be procured in tlie several towns westward of Con- 
necticut River, to take up at once the whole of the salted 
meat in those towns, and transport it directly to Fishkill, 
or the nearest landing on the North River, where it can 
safely be deposited ; or that some other speedy and 
effectual means may be devised for the transportation. 
Mr. Pomeroy, the Deputy Quartermaster of your State, 
having informed Mr. Stevens, the acting Commissary with 
the army, that there were some embarrassments which 
prevented the forwarding these provisions, I have al- 
ready written to the former, expressing my idea of his 
misapprehension of this matter, and directing him (if 
there still remained any difficulties) to make application 
to your Excellency for their removal. 

Convinced that nothing but an immediate supply 
through this channel can avert the most imminent and 
fatal misfortunes, I have been thus explicit and pointed 
in my representation, and cannot but flatter myself that, 
on such an occasion, the substantial farmers will furnish 
their teams with great alacrity, upon your requisition ; 
especially as the roads are now good, and as the whole 
business may be performed without interfering much 
with the planting season. 
I have the honor to be. 

With great respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Goveuxor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
April 17th, 178L 

Dear Sir, — By the letter from the Quartermaster- 
General, transmitted herewith, your Excellency will be 



236 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

pleased to observe the necessity of furnishing the camp 
equipage specified in the estimate for the troops of your 
State, as also the reason why this application was not 
made at an earher period. 

Every other effort for a supply having failed of success, 
this is the last resource now remaining ; and I have only 
to add my earnest wishes that this may not disappoint 
our expectations. 

With great respect and esteem, 
I have the honor to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
May 10th, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — Major-General Heath, second in command, 
and an officer whose high rank and consideration entitle 
him to very particular notice and attention, is prevailed 
upon to proceed to the several Eastern States, to repre- 
sent the distresses of the army for want of provision, and 
the consequences which must inevitably ensue, unless a 
more regular system and more vigorous measures for 
affording supplies are speedily adopted. 

From the post of Saratoga to that of Dobb's Ferry 
inclusive, I believe there is not (by the returns and re- 
ports made to me) at this moment one day's supply of 
meat for the army on hand. Our whole dependence for 
this article is on the Eastern States ; their resources of 
it, I am persuaded, are ample : to request and urge that 
they may be drawn forth regularly, and to be informed 

1 This letter, with trifling changes and without the postscript, is published 
in Sparks's Writings of Washington, viii. 36. — Eds. 



I 



THUMBULL AND WASUIXGTON LETTERS. 237 

with precision and certainty what may absohitcly be 
depended npon through the campaign, are the objects 
of this application. 

I have already made representations to the States of 
the want of provisions, the distress of the army, and the 
innumerable embarrassments we have suffered in conse- 
quence, not merely once or twice, but have reiterated 
them over and over again ; I have struggled to the utmost 
of my ability to keep the army together, but all will be 
in vain without the effectual assistance of the States. I 
have now only to repeat the alternative which has been 
so often urged, that supplies, particularly of hecf cattle^ 
must be speedily and regularly provided, or our posts 
cannot be maintained, nor the army kept in the field 
much longer. 

I entreat your Excellency that this representation may 
be received in the serious light it is meant and deserves, 
or that I may stand exculpated from the dreadful con- 
sequences which must otherwise inevitably follow in a 
short time. 

I enter not into the detail of matters, as General Heath 
will be able to give your Excellency every necessary in- 
formation, and lay the proper estimates of supplies for 
the campaign before you. 

I have the honor to be. 

With great esteem and respect, 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G° Washington. 

P. S. I have received your Excellency's letter of the 
27th of April. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



238 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTOX LETTERS. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Weathersfield, May 22d, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to enclose to your 
Excellency a resolution of Congress respecting mounting 
and equipping the corps of Dragoons raised by the State 
of Connecticut. I am the more induced to wish this may 
be done, as Colonel Sheldon's is now the only regiment 
of cavalry destined to act with the army under my im- 
mediate command, and as the number of men in that 
regiment now mounted are totally unequal to the ser- 
vices which must be expected and required of them. 
Being impressed with the importance of the subject, I 
take the liberty therefore to recommend it to the earliest 
and most effectual attention of your State. 
I have the honor to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G? Washington. 

His Excellency Goveuxor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

Weathersfield, 24th May, 1781. 

Sir, — In consequence of a conference held between 
his Excellency the Count de Rochambeau and myself, 
at this place, the French Army will march as soon as cir- 
cumstances will admit, and form a junction with the 
American upon the North River. 

The accomplishment of the object which we have in 
contemplation is of the utmost importance to America, 
and will in all probability be attained, unless there 
should be a failure on our part in the number of men 

^ This letter, with trifling changes, is the same as one published in 
Sparks's Writings of Washington, viii. 51, addressed to President Meshech 
Weare, and was sent as a circular to all the New England States. — Eds. 



TRUMBULL AND WxVSIIIXGTON LETTERS. 239 

■which will be required for the operation, or the enemy 
should withdraw a considerable part of their force from 
the southward. It is in our own power by proper exer- 
tions to prevent the first, and should the last take place, 
we shall be amply repaid our expenses by liberating the 
Southern States, where we have found by experience we 
are oidy vulnerable. 

Upon the calculations that I have been able, in con- 
cert with some of the most experienced French and 
American officers, to form, the operation in view will 
require, in addition to the French Army, all the Conti- 
nental battalions from New Hampshire to New Jersey 
inclusive, to be completed to their full establishment. 
You must be sensible that the measures taken for that 
purpose, in consequence of the last requisition of Con- 
gress, have been very far from answering the end, as few 
recruits, comparatively speaking, have yet been sent for- 
ward, and, of those, many have been discharged on ac- 
count of inability. You must also take into consideration 
that a number of those men who were returned w^hen 
the requisition was made, have since been taken off by 
the various casualties incident to an army, — I estimate 
about one sixth of the number, — and therefore provision 
must at this time be made to replace them. 

From what has been premised you will perceive, with- 
out my urging further reasons, the necessity I am under 
of calling upon you in the most earnest manner to devise 
means to send into the field, without delay, the number 
of men which have been already voted for the comple- 
tion of the battalions of your State, inid the further de- 
ficiency of one sixth just mentioned. The term of three 
years or for the war would undoubtedly be preferable 
to any shorter period, but, if they cannot be obtained on 
those conditions, necessity must oblige us to take them 
for the campaign only, wdiich ought to be reckoned to 
the last of December. 



240 TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTOiN- LETTERS. 

I should hope that, by proper exertions in collecting 
and sending forward the men that have been already 
raised, and compelling, by rigorous and decisive methods, 
the delinquent towns to furnish their quotas, the greater 
part of the men may be collected by the 1st of July. 

Arguments surely cannot be wanting to impress the 
Legislature with a due sense of the obligation which they 
are under of furnishing the means now called for. The 
enemy, counting upon our want of ability or upon our 
want of energy, have, by repeated detachments to the 
southward, reduced themselves to a situation which in- 
vites us to take advantage of it; and should the lucky 
moment be lost, it is to be feared that they will, after 
subduing the Southern States, raise a force in them suf- 
ficient to hold them, and return again to the northward 
with such a number of men as will render New York 
secure against any force which we can, at this time of 
day, raise or maintain. Our allies in this country expect 
and depend upon being supported by us in the attempt 
which we are about to make, and those in Europe will be 
astonished should we neglect the favorable opportunity 
which is now offered. 

As it is probable that some militia, in addition to 
the full complement of Continental troops, may be ne- 
cessary to support communications and other purposes, 
you will be pleased to direct 1500 men to be held in 
readiness to march within one week after I shall call 
for them, to serve three months after they have joined 
the army ; and I would take the liberty of requesting that 
the Executive may be vested with full powers, during the 
recess, to comply with any further requisitions I may 
make for men, provisions, or for the means of transpor- 
tation, — wliich last may be most essential in the course 
of our operations, should it become necessary to bring 
provisions or stores from a distance. 

I shall be glad to be favored with an answer as soon as 



TRUMBULL AXD WASniXGTOX LETTERS. 241 

possible, with an assurance of what I may depend upon, 
that if I do not clearly see a prospect of being supported, 
I may turn my views to a defensive instead of an offen- 
sive plan, and save the Slates and our allies the expense 
which would be needlessly incurred by any but an ample 
and effectual preparation. 
I have the honor to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G? WASniXGTON. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

■Weathersfield, 25th May, 178L 

Sir, — It having been represented to me that some 
powder has been made by your Excellency's directions, 
at Glastenbury and New Haven in this State, of mate- 
rials belonging to the Continent, I take the liberty ear- 
nestly to request that such measures may be taken by 
the State as will transport it to Fishkill, with the utmost 
expedition, great care being had that it should not be 
injured by the weather on its route. 

The great demand we shall have for powder in the 
proposed operations of the campaign obliges me to apply 
to the respective States, wdio have any, for a loan to sup- 
ply our deficiency. I therefore request of your Excel- 
lency as great a loan of that necessary article as the State 
of Connecticut can possibly spare, and that it be trans- 
ported by the State to Fishkill. 

If the measures which have been taken to procure an 
ample supply of powder from Europe shall prove success- 
ful, the Continent will soon have ability to repay any 
loan which may be furnished on this occasion. I beg a 
speedy and explicit answer on this subject. 

I have the honor to be, with the greatest respect. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G^ WASHINGTON. 

31 



242 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New Windsor, 
15th June, 178L 

Sir, — I flatter myself the proper measures have been 
before this time taken to procure the number of men for 
Continental and militia service, required by my letter of 
the 24th May from Weathersfield. In the calculation 
which I then made of the aid of militia which would 
be necessary to support the operations which we have 
in view, I included sixteen hundred from Pennsylvania ; 
but that State, having been since called upon to embody 
and march two thousand four hundred men immediately 
to the assistance of Virginia, I am obliged to add the 
number which I shall be disappointed in from Pennsyl- 
vania to the quotas required from the other States. Your 
proportion of them will be six hundred, which, with the 
requisitions of the 24th of May, will make in the whole 
two thousand one hundred. 

.From circumstances, I have reason to expect that our 
operations will commence somewhat earlier than I at first 
expected. I am in immediate want of eight hundred 
militia for a particular purpose. Your Excellency will 
therefore oblige me by ordering that number to repair, 
as soon as possible, from the most contiguous counties 
to West Point, — the remainder to march in such time 
that they may punctually join the army by the 15th of 
July next. 

I am convinced that I need not enter into a repetition 
of the arguments which were made use of in my letter 
of the 24th May, to induce the most strenuous exertions 
to fill up the Continental battalions. I will only say that 
our success will depend upon that being done. Without 
it, there is not a chance, and with it we have the fairest 
prospect. These men must be sent forward as fast as 
they are raised. 



TRUMBULL AXD WASmXGTON LETTERS. 243 

T am in hopes that the Assembly will at their present 
meeting take elTectual measures for supplying the quota 
of beef called for in the requisitions which were laid be- 
forQ you by Major-General Heath. Your Excellency must 
be fully sensible that our whole dependence for provi- 
sions is upon the exertions of the States, and that with- 
out their punctual compliance with the demands made 
upon them the force which will be collected must soon 
disband ; whereby the immense expense which we are 
now incurring by our preparations will be a dead loss, 
and the consequence, in a political view, of a most seri- 
ous and alarming nature. 
I have the honor to be, 

With great respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G9. Washington. 
P. S. By a general return of the 9th instant, the total 
amount of your five regiments of Infantry was 1G68, in 
which are included 563 recruits, being all that had joined 
up to the 1st instant. 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, New "Windsor, 
June 24th, 178L 

Dear Sir, — I am honored with your Excellency's 
letter of the 30th instant, together with the several 
enclosures. 

The measures which have been taken by your Legis- 
lature to produce a prompt complianne with the requisi- 
tions upon the State, are of a good complexion, and 
afford me great satisfaction. 

I flatter myself the ample powers with which your 
Excellency and your Council are invested will be stren- 
uously exerted to carry those salutary measures into 



244 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

execution. I shall be extremely happy to see yon at 
the army ; and am 

With the highest sentiments of esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant. 
His Excellency Goveknor Trumbull. G- WASHINGTON. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Peekskill, 
28th June, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — Enclosed your Excellency will receive 
copy of a letter addressed to me from General Parsons, 
representing the situation of the troops of your Line of 
the army. 

I feel myself so distressed at this representation, not 
only as it affects the troops themselves, but from the ap- 
prehension I have of the consequences which may, from 
their feelings, be produced to the general service, that, 
although it is not within my province to interfere with 
the internal resolutions or determinations of the States, 
I did not think it amiss to transmit this letter to your 
Excellency, and to beg the most serious attention of the 
State to its subject. 

Permit me, sir, to add, that policy alone in our present 
circumstances seems to demand that every satisfaction 
which can reasonably be requested should be given to 
those veteran troops who, through almost every distress, 
have been so long and so faithfully serving the States; 
as, from every representation, I have but too much rea- 
son to suppose that the most fatal consequences to your 
Line will ensue upon the total loss of any further expec- 
tations than they at present have, of relief from the 
State ; and how serious will be the consequences to our 
present meditated operations, should any disturbance 
arise in so respectable a body of the troops composing 
this army as that from the State of Connecticut, I leave 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 245 

the State to reflect. For myself, I lament the prospect 
in its most distant idea. 

If your Legislature should not be sitting (as I suppose 
they are not), I leave it to your Excellency to determine 
whether it is necessary immediately to convene them on 
this subject. I have only to wish that it may have as 
early a consideration as may be found convenient, or con- 
sistent with other circumstances which must be best 
known to your Excellency. 
I have the honor to be, 

With most perfect esteem and regard, sir, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 
Governor Trumbull. 0° WASHINGTON. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Peekskill, 
1st July, 1781. 

My dear Sir, — I am obliged again to trouble your 
Excellency with the distress we are in for want of pro- 
visions to feed the troops. By a return from the Com- 
missary-General of Issues, we have received from the 
12th of May to this day only 312 head of cattle, and 
those in the following proportions, viz : — 

New Hampshire 30 

Massachusetts Bay 230 

Connecticut 52 

312 
From this supply, with the help of salted provisions, we 
have barely subsisted from hand to mouth. The army 
is now augmenting and in the field, yet our prospects of 
provisions rather seem on the decline than otherwise, if 
we may judge from its actual arrival, very little having 
come on lately, and no knowledge being had of any sup- 
ply on the roads. Thus circumstanced, I am obliged to 
declare that unless more strenuous exertions are made 
by the States to feed their few troops in the field, we 



246 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

shall be reduced to the necessity not only to relinquish 
our intended operations, but shall be obliged absolutely 
to disband for want of subsistence ; or, which is almost 
equally to be lamented, the troops will be obliged to 
seek it for themselves wherever it is to be found. Either 
of these circumstances taking place will put us into a 
most distressing situation on our own account, and at the 
same time place us in a most shameful point of view in 
the eyes of our French allies, and unhappily reduce them 
to a most disagreeable dilemma. 

Our expectations looking altogether to the Eastern 
States for a supply of the meat kind, I must entreat 
your Excellency that every possible measure may be 
exerted that your State may furnish its quota of fresh 
beef, and that we may have a speedy earnest of their 
intentions. 

I am informed that the salted provision begins to fail 
coming on ; I hope your quantity is not yet exhausted. 
That I may obtain a thorough knowledge of what is now 
on hand, on the road, and in the State, and that I may 
thereby be enabled to judge what our dependence may 
be on that article, I have desired Colonel Stewart, C. 
Gen. of Issues, to send on the road into your State one 
of his most active and intelligent people, to make strict 
inquiry, and to obtain a real return of all he can find, 
and to urge the necessity of immediate forwarding. If 
he should have occasion to apply to your Excellency, I 
dare say you will give him every assistance and informa- 
tion in your power. 

I have the honor to be, 

With perfect esteem and consideration, sir, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G?. Washington. 

P. S. M. Stevens will mention the necessity of rum, 
and the deficiency from your State of that article. 

Governor Trumbull. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTOX LETTERS. 247 

TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 9th July, 178L 

Dear Sir, — I have before me your Excellency's letter 
of the 1st mstant. Enclosed is the result of a meeting 
of Commissioners at Providence the 26th June ; for the 
month of July, it was thought best for every State to 
get forward their whole quota of fresh beef as fast as pos- 
sible. For this State Colonel Champion was first furnished 
with £500, and now with near £800 more in hard cash, 
with which to purchase, and several of the towns have 
collected so as to send forward immediately. For the fol- 
lowing months certain da^s are fixed for each State to 
furnish their fresh beef, and I am in hopes there will be 
no failure ; this State will furnish £800 hard money more 
to add to invigorate and hasten the supplies. 

I intend to remain at home till the troops are for- 
warded from hence, then to remove to Hartford to pro- 
mote the hastening on the fresh beef and other supplies ; 
and should it appear necessary and expedient, shall re- 
move further westward with an Executive Council about 
me, to promote everything needful that is in our power. 
My great object is to forward our troops, and by the most 
strenuous exertions to feed the army that they be not 
reduced to any disagreeable necessities. 

The salted provisions are ordered to be forwarded by 
the Deputy-Quartermaster, and I doubt not they will 
turn out in the whole about 8,000 lbs. The quantity 
gone on I suppose to be not more than one half of them. 
Mr. Stevens, Assistant Commissary-( General, will give a 
thorough knowledge thereof, far better than is in my 
power to do. He was with me, and received the infor- 
mation I was able to give him. Mr. Pomeroy hath orders 
to send on 20 hhds. of rum, sixty bbs. of powder, and 
more will be ordered as soon as I get to Hartford. There 
is fifty-seven bbs. more of the powder belonging [to] the 



248 TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Continent to be sent, and what further supplies of that 
article I shall be granted by the State is not yet deter- 
mined ; I know there is considerable that may be spared. 
Inquiry Avill be made into the quantity on hand, and 
notice given General Knox. 
I have the honor to be, 
With great esteem and consideration, 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Teumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 17th July, 178L 

Dear Sir, — Since my last to your Excellency, I have 
received a letter from General Parsons, dated 10th in- 
stant, filled with severe remarks and reflections on our 
Legislature. Copy thereof, with my answer is enclosed. 

I wish to do the things that make for peace with both 
officers and men of the Connecticut Line of the army, 
consisting of our own people, raised for defending and 
securing the rights and liberties of the whole, embarked 
in the same common cause, and to return to citizens 
again when the contest with the British King and min- 
istry is ended, — to prevent if possible discord and division, 
so very dangerous in our situation and hazardous to our 
present operations. Surely the officers do not desire to 
inflame the soldiery with apprehensions that the Assem- 
bly deny them that justice which was done them the last 
year, with which they were satisfied, when the Com- 
mittee from the Line knew the whole accounts of pay 
and wages were gone through and ready to be closed on 
the same principles, and that nothing remained in ques- 
tion but only the detained rations of the officers; this 
was not agitated till it became time for the Committee 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 249 

to return to their duty, when there was scarcely time for 
the members of so numerous a body to deUberate on the 
subject — eight pence half-penny per ration was offered 
from 1st April, 1780 — many were of opinion that by the 
time of payment that rate would be more than sufficient 
for the same ; others proposed to secure a specific pay- 
ment. As to what was due before that 1st of April, 1780, 
it naturally lay open for the direction of the Honorable 
Congress. In the midst of these deliberations the Com- 
mittee left us unexpectedly. I observed no design to deny 
justice to the officers ; to the soldiery there could be none, 
— the accounts were fully agreed, prepared, and ready to 
be closed. I choose to forbear any recrimination, yet 
suffer me to inquire why the Committee from the Line 
did not bring on the settlement for detained rations ear- 
lier; they knew it must require time for deliberation, 
when they well knew the principles for settlement of pay 
and wages were agreed on the last year. Do they mean 
to press for more than justice from the necessity of their 
present services, and the fears of fatal consequences if 
denied ? The whole Line know and ought to consider 
their pay and wages are secured in full value, while de- 
preciation operates as a heavy tax upon the rest of the 
people. The officers may likewise consider that their pay 
was raised by Congress 50 per cent above what the State 
agreed with them for. The maxim adopted by the enemy 
is that old one of divide et impem. Will we suffer avarice 
to divide and ruin us and our cause, and give them op- 
l)ortunity to exult and triumph over us ? 

Providence hath and doth smile pro[)itiously upon us, 
and calls aloud for union, vigorous exertions, patience 
and perseverance, and to endure hardship as good sol- 
diers that the end may be peace. Justice and peace ride 
together in the same chariot ; it will be my constant en- 
deavor that peace may be obtained on just and honorable 
terms, and that justice be done to them who jeopard their 



250 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

lives in the high places of the field in defence, and to se- 
cure the blessings of freedom for ourselves and posterity. 

I wrote yesterday to the Treasurer to inform me this 
week Avhat sum of hard money is and can be immedi- 
ately collected for the army, which shall be sent forward 
without delay. 

The measures directed and orders given for raising 
and marching our troops to the army, are now diligently 
carrj'ing into execution. 
I have the honor to be, 
"With every sentiment of esteem and consideration, 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

(ClHCULAR.) 

Headquarters, Dobbs Ferry, 
2d August, 178L 

Sir, — I regret being obliged to inform your Excel- 
lency that I find myself at this late period very little 
stronger than I was when the army first moved out of 
their quarters. Of the militia which were required from 
the State of Connecticut, and which were to have joined 
me by the 15th of last month, only 176 have come 
on, and of the levies for the Continental battalions only 
221 in the course of the last month. The reinforcements 
from the other States have been far short of this . . . 
proportion. 

I leave your Excellency to judge of the delicate and 
embarrassed situation in which I stand at this moment, 
unable to advance with prudence beyond my present 

1 This letter, except part of the first paragraph, the postscript, and a < 
few verbal alterations, is the same as one printed in Sparks's Writings of 
Washington, viii. 123, addressed to Meshech Weare. — Eds. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 251 

position, while perhaps in the general opinion my force 
is equal to the comniencenient of operations against New 
York ; my conduct must appear, if not blamable, highly 
mysterious at least. Our allies, with whom a junction 
has been formed near four weeks, and who were made to 
expect from the engagements which I entered into with 
them at Weathersfield in May last, a very considerable 
augmentation of our force by this time, instead of seeing 
a prospect of advancing, must conjecture upon good 
grounds that the campaign will waste fruitlessly awa}'. 
I shall just remark that it will be no small degree of 
triumph to our enemies, and will have a ver^' pernicious 
influence upon our friends in Europe, should they find 
such a failure of resource, or such a want of energy to 
draw it out, that our boasted and expensive preparations 
end only in idle parade. 

I cannot yet persuade myself, and I do not discontinue 
to encourage our allies, with a hope that our force will 
still be sufficient to carry our intended operations into 
effect; or if we cainiot fully accomplish that, to oblige 
the enemy to withdraw part of their force from the south- 
ward to support New York, and which, as I informed you 
in my letter from Weathersfield, was part of our plan. 

Your Excellency must be sensible that the fulfilment 
of my engagements must depend upon the degree of 
vigor with which the Executives of the several States 
exercise the powers with which they have been vested, 
and enforce the laws lately passed for filling up and sup- 
plying the army. In full confidence that the means 
which have been voted will be obtained, I shall continue 
my preparations ; but I must take the liberty of inform- 
ing you that it is essentially necessary I should be made 
acquainted, and that immediately upon the receipt of 
this, of the number of Continental levies and militia 
wliich have been forwarded, and what are the prospects 
of obtaining the remainder. I will further add that it 



252 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

will be equally necessary to see that the monthly quota 
of provisions stipulated at the meeting of the Commis- 
sioners at Providence is regularly complied with. 
I have the honor to be, 

With perfect esteem and regard, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G" Washington. 
P. S. For the quiet of the troops of your Line, I am 
anxious that a sum of money, to the amount of two or 
three months' pay, may come on immediately. If this is 
much longer delayed, I am very fearful what may be the 
consequences. 
Governor Trumbull. ' 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Dobbs Ferry, 
3d August, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — I have been honored with your Excel- 
lency's favor of the 31st ultimo. I most ardently wish 
that your orders for reinforcing and supplying the army 
may be carried into execution with a zeal and ardor equal 
to that with which, I am persuaded, they are given. 

Money for the pay of the troops of your Line will be 
exceedingly welcome ; the sooner it arrives the more sal- 
utary will be its consequences. 

It will be very difficult for the Quartermaster-General, 
unfurnished as he is with money or the means of trans- 
portation, to get on the clothing which you are so good 
as to mention ; if the States could find means to hand it 
on to us, it would prove a very agreeable circumstance. 

Your Excellency, I fancy, must be better able to judge 
of the security of some place for yourself and Council to 
sit at in the western part of your State, than I am. I 
imagine however that you may be quite secure at Dan- 



TKUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 253 

biiiy, unless you fear the designs of your own internal 
disaffected people ; from the enemy at New York or on 
Long Island there can be, I think, but little or no danger. 
Against the disaffected in the vicinity of Danbury a small 
guard will give you protection. On your coming this 
way, I flatter myself you will be so good as to do me 
the honor of a visit at camp ; be assured, sir, I shall esteem 
myself peculiarly happy in such an event, and I will make 
it my care to render your stay with me as agreeable as 
circumstances will permit. 
I have the honor to be. 

With perfect esteem and regard, dear sir. 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 
Governor Trumbull. G^. WASHINGTON. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Dobbs Ferry, 
August 16th, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — It being of the utmost importance that a 
quantity of salted provision, not less than 1,000 barrels, 
should be immediately shipped from Connecticut River to 
Rhode Island, the Quartermaster-General has despatched 
Mr. Mix, an officer in his department (who will have 
the honor of delivering this letter to your Excellency), 
to see that business carried instantly into execution. 

I pray your Excellency therefore to give every aid 
and assistance in your power to enable him to expedite 
the transportation of this provision with all possible de- 
spatch, and that you will i'<s\ie your imprt'ss warrant to obtain 
vessels for the purpose, if they cannot be otherwise pro- 
cured. This warrant to be made use of, in case the other 
measures which your Excellency shall be pleased to sug- 
gest do not instantly meet with success. 

I have the honor to be. 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 
His Excellency Governor Trumbull. G- WASHINGTON. 



254 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

(circular.) 

Headquarters, King's Ferry, 
22d August, 178L 

Sir, — I feel myself unhappy in being obliged to in- 
form your Excellency that the circumstances in which 
I find myself at this late period have induced me to 
make an alteration of the main object which was at first 
adopted, and which has hitherto been held in view, for 
the operations of this campaign. It gives me pain to say 
that the delay of the several States to comply with my 
requisitions of the 24th of May last, on which in a great 
measure depended the hopes of our success in that at- 
tempt, has been one great and operative reason to lead 
to this alteration. Other circumstances, it is true, have 
had their weight in this determination ; and it may in the 
course of events prove happy for the States that this 
deviation from our main design has been adopted. 

The fleet of the Count De Grasse, with a body of 
French troops on board, will make its first appearance 
in the Chesapeake, which, should the time of the fleet's 
arrival prove favorable, and should the enemy under 
Lord Cornwallis hold their present position in Virginia, 
will give us the fairest opportunity to reduce the whole 
British force in the South, and to ruin their boasted ex- 
pectations in that quarter. ToAvards effecting this desira- 
ble object it has been judged expedient, taking into 
consideration our own present circumstances, with the 
situation of the enem.y in New York and at the south- 
ward, to abandon the siege of the former place, and to 
march a body of troops, consisting of a detachment from 
the American army with the whole of the French troops, 
immediately to Virginia. With this detachment, which 
will be very considerable, I have determined to march 
myself The American troops are already on the west 
side of the Hudson, and the French army will be at King's 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. Zbo 

Ferry this da^'. When the whole are crossed our inarch 
will be continued with as much despatch as circumstances 
will admit. 

The American army which will remain in this depart- 
ment (excepting two light companies and some detach- 
ments), consists of the two regiments of New Hampshire, 
ten from Massachusetts, five of Connecticut Infantry, 
with Sheldon's Legion, Crane's Artillery, the State troops 
and militia ; which force, with proper exertions from the 
States, will, it is expected, be sufficient to hold the enemy 
in check at New York, and prevent their ravages on the 
frontiers. The command during my absence is committed 
to Major-General Heath, who will have the honor to com- 
municate with the States on every occasion which may 
require their attention. 

As the enemy's force in New York has been for some 
time past very considerable, and it being reported with 
a good degree of certainty that they have lately received 
a very respectable reinforcement of German recruits from 
Europe, it will be necessary still to send forward a great 
part, if not the whole of the militia requested from your 
State, in the same manner as if no alteration had taken 
place in our measures. You will therefore continue to 
send on at least 1,400 men from your State, to the orders 
of General Heath, with as much despatch as possible, un- 
less you should be informed from him that this number 
need not be completed. 

On this occasion I cannot omit to repeat to you my 
opinion of the absolute importance of filling your Con- 
tinental battalions to their complete numbers, for the war 
or three years ; not only our past experience for a course 
of years, but our present circumstances should strongly 
enforce the necessity of this measure. Every campaign 
teaches us the increasing difficulty and expense of pro- 
curing short-termed levies, and their decreasing utility 
in the field. The large reinforcements which the enemy 



256 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

have this campaign sent to America indicates their ex- 
pectation of the continuance of the war. Should that be 
the case, the best way to meet them is certainly with a 
permanent force ; but should the war be drawing to a 
close, a jDcrmanent and respectable army will give us the 
happiest prospects of a favorable peace. In every view, 
a permanent army should be the great object with the 
States, as they regard sound policy, prudence, or economy, 
or in a word, as they wish to see a happy establishment 
to their independence. 
I have the honor to be. 

With every sentiment of personal attachment. 
Your Excellency's most obedient and very humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 

* V^ASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.i 

Philadelphia, 28tli November, 1781. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to acknowledge your 
favor of the 6th instant, and to thank your Excellency 
with great sincerity for the very cordial and affectionate 
congratulations which you are pleased to express on our 
late success in Virginia. 

I most earnestly hope that this event may be produc- 
tive of all those happy consequences which your Excel- 
lency mentions ; and I think that its good effects cannot 
fail to be very extensive, unless from a mistaken idea of 
the magnitude of this success unhappily a spirit of re- 
missness should seize the minds of the States, and they 
should set themselves down in quiet with a delusive hope 
of the contest being brought to its close. I hope this 
may not be the case. To prevent so great an evil shall 
be the study of my winter's endeavor ; and I cannot but 

1 This letter is printed in Sparks's Writings of Washington, viii. 212, 
■with some verbal alterations. — Eds. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 257 

flatter m3'self that the States, instead of relaxing in their 
exertions, will be stimulated to the most vigorous prepa- 
rations for another active, glorious, and decisive campaign; 
which if properly prosecuted will, I trust, under the 
smiles of Heaven, bring us to the end of this long and 
tedious war, and sit us down in the full security of the 
great object of our toils, — the complete establishment of 
peace, liberty, and independence. 

Whatever may be the policy of European Courts dur- 
ing this winter, their negotiations will form too precarious 
a dependence for us to trust to. Our wisdom should dic- 
tate to us a serious preparation for war, and in that state 
we shall find ourselves in a situation secure against every 
event. 

Your Excellency's wish for some ships of our ally to 
be stationed at New London, I should have been happy 
in promoting, would circumstances have permitted ; but 
the Admiral De Grasse has taken almost all his ships of 
war with him from this coast, and except a frigate or two 
left in York River for the security and aid of the French 
troops, who will have their winter quarters in the vicinity 
of York Town, not a ship of force is left upon the Ameri- 
can Station. The supply of fresh beef to the French 
"West India Islands is certainly a desirable object to our 
alHes, and is worthy of attention; but no security can 
be given to its transportation from the quarter your 
Excellency mentions. 

I have the honor to be, 

With great sincerity of respect and regard, 
Your Excellency's mo.^t obedient 

and most humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



258 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

(Circular.) 

Philadelphia, 22d January, 1782. 

Sir, — Although it may be somewhat out of my pro- 
vince to address your Excellency on a subject not imme- 
diately of a military nature, yet I consider it so nearly 
connected with, and so essential to the operations under 
my direction, that I flatter myself my interference will 
not be deemed impertinent. 

Upon applying to the Superintendent of Finance, to 
know how hv I might depend upon him for the pay, 
feeding, and clothing of the army for the current year, 
he very candidly laid open to me the state of our mon- 
eyed affairs, and convinced me that although the assist- 
ances we had derived from abroad were considerable, yet 
they would be by no means adequate to our expenses. 
He informed me further, that to make up this deficiency 
the States had been called upon by Congress for eight 
millions of dollars for the service of the year 1782, and 
showed me the copy of a circular letter from himself to 
the several Legislatures, in which he had so fully and 
clearly pointed out the necessity of a compliance with 
the requisition, that it is needless for me to say more on 
that head than that I entirely concur with him in opin- 
ion, so far as he has gone into the matter. But there 
are other reasons which could not be so Avell known to 
him as they are to me, as having come under my imme- 
diate observation, and which, therefore, I shall take the 
liberty to mention. 

Your Excellency cannot but remember the ferment 
into which the whole army was thrown twelve months 
ago, for the want of pay and a regular supply of cloth- 
ing and provisions, and with how much difficulty they 

1 This letter, except the postscript, is the same as one printed in Sparks's 
Writings of '\^'ashington, viii. 226, addressed to Meshech Weare. — Eds. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniNGTOX LETTERS. 250 

were brought into temper, by a partial supply of the two 
first, and a promise of more regular supplies of all in fu- 
ture. Those promises the soldiery now begin to claim ; 
and although we shall be able to satisfy them tolerably 
in respect to clothing, and perfectly in regard to provi- 
sion (if the Financier is enabled to comply with his con- 
tracts), 3^et there is no prospect of obtaining pay, until 
a part of the mone}' required of the States can be brought 
into the public treasury. You cannot conceive the un- 
easiness which arises from the total want of so essential 
an article as money, and the real difficulties in which the 
officers in particular are involved on that account. The 
fjivorable aspect of our affairs, and the hopes that mat- 
ters are in a train to afford them relief, contribute to 
keep them quiet ; but I cannot answer for the effects of 
a disappointment. 

Enabling the Financier to comply with his contracts is 
a matter of the utmost consequence ; the very existence 
of the army depends upon it. Should he fail in his pay- 
ments the contract ceases, and there is no alternative 
left but to disband, or live upon the seizure of the neigh- 
boring property. The saving to the public by feeding 
an army by contract is too well known to need any 
illustration, and that alone ought to be a sufficient in- 
ducement to the States to find the means of adliering 
to it. 

It will perhaps be urged that the sum called for is 
immense, and beyond the ability of the countiy to pay. 
There is one plain answer to that objection, should it be 
made ; it is, that if the war is carried on. a certain expense 
must be incurred, and tliat such ex])cuso must be drawn 
from the people, either by a partial, cruel, and I may say, 
illegal seizure of that property which lays most con- 
venient to the army, or by a regular and equitable tax in 
money or specific articles. Money, if it can be procured, 
is to be preferred, because it is neither liable to waste 



260 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

nor is it expensive in the mode of collection or transpor- 
tation ; whereas, I think I may venture to say, that a 
great proportion of the specific articles have been wasted 
after the people have furnished them, and that the trans- 
portation alone of what have reached the army has, in 
numberless instances, cost more than the value of the 
articles themselves. 

To bring this war to a speedy and happy conclusion 
must be the fervent wish of every lover of his country, 
and sure I am that no means are so likely to effect these 
as vigorous preparations for another campaign. Whether 
then we consult our true interest, substantial economy, 
or sound policy, we shall find that relaxation and lan- 
guor are of all things to be avoided. Conduct of that kind 
on our part will produce fresh hopes and new exertions 
on that of the enemy, whereby the war, which has al- 
ready held beyond the general expectation, may be pro- 
tracted to such a length, that the people, groaning under 
the burden of it and despairing of success, may think any 
change a change for the better. 

I will close with a request that your Excellency will 
be good enough to take the first opportunity of laying 
these my sentiments before the Legislature of your State. 
From the attention which they have ever been pleased 
to pay to any former requisitions or representations of 
mine, I am encouraged to hope that the present, which 
is equally important with any I have ever made, will 
meet with a favorable reception. 

I have the honor to be, with great respect. 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G? Washington. 

P. S. The return of troops called for by resolve of the 
10th of December, is collecting, and will be forwarded 
very soon. The remote situation of some of the corps has 
made it a tedious business, but such is the nature of it 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 261 



that an accurate return cannot be digested until tlie 
returns of all the Legionary Corps and those of Artillery 
are obtained, that credit may be given for the men serv- 
ino; in them. 
His Excellency Governor Tkumuull. 



♦WASIIIXGTOX TO TRUMBULL.i 

Headquauteks, Philadelphia, 

January 31st, 1782. 

Sir, — I have the honor of transmitting herewith accu- 
rate returns of the number of men now actually in ser- 
vice from your State, in order that measures may be 
adopted for completing the regiments to the full estab- 
lishment, agreeably to the resolution of Congress of the 
10th of December. I cannot omit so favorable an occa- 
sion of expressing my sentiments on that subject, and of 
entreating in the most earnest manner that there may 
be a speedy, pointed, and effectual compliance with those 
requisitions. 

It will, I flatter myself, be unnecessary to recapitulate 
all the arguments I made use of in the circular letter I 
had the honor to address to the Governors of the several 
States, at the close of the campaign of 1780 ; in which, it 
must be remembered, I took the liberty to in-ge, from 
the knowledge I had of our affairs and a series of expe- 
rience, the policy, the expediency, the necessity of re- 
cruiting the armj^, as the only probable means of bringing 
the war to a speedy and happj^ conclusion. If those argu- 
ments had any influence at that time, if the consequent 
exertions were crowned with any success, if the present 
crisis exhibits new and more forcible inducements for still 
greater efforts, let me point your Excellency and the 

^ This letter, except the last paragraph, is the same as one printed 
in Sparks's Writings of Washington, viii. 232, addressed to Meshech 
Weare. — Eds. 



262 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Legislature to these considerations ; and especially let me 
recommend in the warmest terms that all the fruits of 
the successes which have been obtained the last campaign 
may not be thrown away by an inglorious winter of lan- 
guor and inactivity. 

However, at this advanced stage of the war, it might 
seem to be an insult upon the understanding to suppose 
a long train of reasoning necessary to prove that a re- 
spectable force in the field is essential to the establish- 
ment of our liberties and independence ; yet, as I am 
apprehensive, the prosperous issue of the combined op- 
eration in Virginia, may have (as is too common in such 
cases) the pernicious tendency of lulling the country into 
lethargy of inactivity and security ; and as I feel my own 
reputation, as well as the interest, the honor, the glory, 
and happiness of my country is intimately concerned in 
the event, I will ask the indulgence to speak the more 
freely on those accounts, and to make some of the obser- 
vations which the present moment seems to suggest, — 
that the broken and perplexed state of the enemy's ali'airs, 
and the successes of the last campaign on our part, ought 
to be a powerful incitement to vigorous preparations for 
the next; that nnless we strenuously exert ourselves to 
profit by these successes, we shall not only lose all the 
solid advantages that might be derived from them, but 
we shall become contemptible in our own eyes, in the 
eyes of the enemy, in the opinion of posterity, — and even 
in the estimation of the whole world, which will consider 
us as a nation unworthy of prosperity, because we know 
not how to make a right use of it; that, although we can- 
not by the best concerted plans absolutely command suc- 
cess, although the race is not always to the swift or the 
battle to the strong, yet, without presumptuously waiting 
for miracles to be wrought in our favor, it is our indispensa- 
ble duty, with the deepest gratitude to Heaven for the past 
and humble confidence in its smiles on our future opera- 



i 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 263 

tions, to make use of all the means in our power for our 
defence and security ; that this period is particularly im- 
portant, because no circumstances shice the commence- 
ment of the war have been so favorable to the recruiting 
service as the present, and because it is to be presumed 
from the increase of population and the brilliant pros- 
pects before us, it is actually in our power to complete 
the army before the opening of the campaign ; that how- 
ever flattering these prospects may be, much still remains 
to be done, which cannot probably be effected unless the 
army is recruited to its establishment, and consequently 
the continuance or termination of the war seems princi- 
pally to rest on the vigor and decision of the States in 
this interesting point; and finally, that it is our first 
object of polic}-, under every supposable or possible case, 
to have a powerful army early in the field ; for we must 
suppose the enemy are either disposed " to prosecute the 
war" or "enter into a negotiation for peace," — there is 
no other alternative. On the former supposition, a respec- 
table army becomes necessary to counteract the enemy, 
and to prevent the accumulating expenses of a lingering 
war ; on the latter, nothing but a decidedly superior force 
can enable us boldly to claim our rights, and dictate the 
law at the pacification. So that, whatever the disposition 
of the enemy may be, it is evidently our only interest and 
economy to act liberally, and exert ourselves greatly dur- 
ing the present winter to cut off all the expenses of the 
war at once, by putting a period to it. 

And soon might we hope to enjoy all the blessings of 
peace, if we could see again the same animation in the 
cause of our country inspire every breast, the same pas- 
sion for freedom and military glory impel our youths to 
the field, and the same disinterested patriotism pervade 
every rank of men, as was conspicuous at the commence- 
ment of this glorious revolution ; and I am persuaded 
onl}^ some great occasion was wanting, such as the present 



264 TRUMBULL AXD TVASIIIXGTOX LETTERS. 

moment exhibits, to rekindle the latent sparks of that pa- 
triotic fire into a generous flame, to rouse again the un- 
conquerable spirit of liberty, which has sometimes seemed 
to slumber awhile, into the full vigor of action. 

I cannot now conclude this letter without expressing 
my full expectation that the several States, animated with 
the noblest principles and convinced of the policy of com- 
plying faithfully wdtli the requisitions, will be only emu- 
lous which shall be the foremost in furnishing its quota 
of men ; that the calculation of the numbers wanted to 
fill the deficiencies may be so ample as (allowing for all 
the casualties and deductions) will be sufficient certainlj^ 
to complete the battalions; that the measures for this 
purpose may be so explicit, pointed, and energetic, as 
will inevitably furnish the recruits in season ; and that 
such checks may be established to prevent imposition as 
to the quality of the men, that no recruits may be ac- 
cepted but those who are in fact able-bodied and effec- 
tive. Should any of a different description be sent to the 
army, they must be rejected, the expenses thrown away, 
and the service injured, though others are required to fill 
their places ; for it is only deceiving ourselves with hav- 
ing a nominal instead of a real force, and consuming the 
public provisions and clothing to no effect, by attempting 
to impose decrepit and improper men or boys upon us 
as soldiers. 

The returns before alluded to being but this moment 
collected, I regret that it was not possible they should 
have been forwarded sooner. To prevent miscarriage or 
delay in so important a communication, I have committed 
them to Brigadier-General Huntington, who will have 
the honor of delivering these despatches and explaining 
my ideas very perfectly. As he is charged solely with this 
business, he will return as soon as it is negotiated ; but 
he is instructed to wait until he can bear such official 
accounts from your Excellency to me as will fully inform 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 265 

me what aid may absolutely be relied upon from your 
State, which in conjunction with the other reports of a 
similar nature must serve as a basis on which we may 
build our final plans and arrangements for the ensuing 
campaign. 

I have the honor to be, 

With great respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^ Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 
(Circular.) 

Headquarters, Philadelphia, 
March 5th, 1782. 

Sir, — The operations of next campaign being contin- 
gent, depending in a great degree upon measures which 
are not within my control, and very much upon the plans 
of the enemy and their efforts to carry them into execu- 
tion, it is impossible for me, at this time, to say whether 
any, or how many militia the States in this part of the 
Continent may be called upon to furnish for the purposes 
of the ensuing campaign ; but as I am persuaded myself 
it is the wish of every one of them to see a vigorous of- 
fensive plan prosecuted, with a view of terminating the 
war honorably and speedily, it becomes my duty to in- 
form, that the Continental force (admitting the battalions 
should be completed), aided by any auxiliary troops that 
I have any expectations of, is totally i])adequate to the 
first and great object which presents itself to our view ; 
and therefore it may be essential to my future plans that 
the Executive powers of the States should be (if they are 
not so already) vested with sufficient authority to call 
forth, properly equipped, such a body of militia as the 
exigencies of service may require. The demand will not 
be made but in case of necessity, and will be postponed 

34 



266 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

as long as possible ; the consequence therefore of the 
Avant of such powers, or of the delay occasioned by call- 
ing an assembly on such an emergency, might prove fatal 
to our operations and injurious to our cause. 

I need not add how much it is my wish and desire, and 
how much the public interest will be promoted by it, that 
the Continental regiments should be completed. Every 
man of which these are deficient will add to the draft 
of militia, and doubly to the public expenses ; while these 
troops will not be so competent to the purposes for which 
they are wanted, to say nothing of the disadvantages 
which agriculture and manufactures will sustain by having 
the laborers and artisans called off from their work. 

I would beg leave to suggest that the longer term 
militia can be drawn out for, the more beneficial and less 
expensive will their services be ; and that in case of a 
siege, they ought to be engaged during the continuance 
of it, or until relieved by an equal number, so that the 
operating strength ma}^ not be diminished at a critical 
moment, when it may be most wanted. 

I have the honor to be, 

With perfect respect and esteem. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^ Washington. 

P. S. I have had the honor to receive your Excel- 
lency's letter of the 21st February, 1782. 

His Excellency Goveuxor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.i 
(Circular.) 

Headquarters, Newburgh, 
4th ]\ray, 1782. 

Sir, — I find myself arrived at that period at which I 
hoped to have seen the battalions of the several States 

^ This letter, except the last paragraph before postscript, is the same as 
one printed in Sparks's Writings of Washington, viii. 283, addressed to 
]Me.shech Weare. — Eds. 



TRUMBULL AXD WASHINGTON LETTERS. 2G7 

completed to their full establisliinent, in conformity to 
the requisitions of Congress of the 10th of December lust. 

The enclosed return of recruits, which I have caused 
to be made out to the 1st instant, will show how totally 
short of my expectations the exertions of the States have 
fallen ; from your State only eight recruits have joined 
the army in consequence of the above requisition. 

All my accounts froui Europe concur in declaring that 
it is the determination of the British King and Ministry 
still to prosecute the war. It becomes therefore our 
decided duty to be prepared to meet these hostile inten- 
tions, in whatever way they are to be carried into execu- 
tion ; to do which our utmost exertions will be necessary. 
You will suffer me, sir, to entreat that if your State have 
any expectations from the military operations of this sea- 
son, not another moment may be lost in providing for 
and carrying into execution the full completion of their 
battalions. It is scarcely necessary to inform you that on 
this expectation all my calculations must be formed, and 
on this event must rest the hopes of the ensuing campaign. 

My intelligence of the actual aid we may expect from 
our allies is not yet so explicit as will lead me to decide 
absolutely on the mode of operations for the campaign. 
But w^ere our expectations of support from that quarter 
ever so promising, yet from the negligence and languor 
of the States, from whence our exertions are to spring, I. 
am not enabled to give any assurance of our being pre- 
pared to co-operate with our allies in an}^ great objects 
equal to their expectations, or our own ability. I am 
sorry to acquaint yoiu" Excellency thai I have the best 
authority to assure you that the Court of France is much 
dissatisfied wdth this want of vigor and exertion in the 
States, and with that disposition which appears willing at 
least, if not desirous, to cast all the burden of the Ameri- 
can war upon them. Waiving the injustice and impolicy 
of such conduct (wdiich to me appear very conspicuous), 



268 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

how humiliating is the idea that we should rest our 
dependence for support upon others, bej^ond that point 
which absolute necessity dictates; how discouraging to 
our allies, and how dishonorable to ourselves must be our 
want of vigor and exertion, — at a time especially, when, 
if not wanting to ourselves, our prospects are the fairest 
that our wishes could extend to ! 

I find from the proceedings of the several States that 
their calculation of deficiencies, formed on application to 
the respective towns which furnish the men, are greatly 
different from the returns from the army. I forbear men- 
tioning many reasons which might be assigned to produce 
this difference, and which in my opinion originate prin- 
cipally within the States, and will content myself with 
this one observation, that should the States deceive them- 
selves in this respect, and fail to furnish the expected 
force in the field, they will not only throw an essential 
injury upon the army, but the unhappy consequences of a 
failure of military operations will reverberate upon them- 
selves, whilst recrimination can have no effect towards 
alleviating our protracted misfortunes and distress. 

Although money matters are not within my line, yet 
as they are so intimately connected with all military op- 
erations, and being lately informed by the Financier, in 
answer to some small requisition upon him, that he has 
not yet received one penny in money from any one State 
upon the requisition of Congress for the 8,000,000 of dol- 
lars ; but that on the contrary some of the States are de- 
vising ways to draw from him the small sums he has been 
able otherwise to establish, and that he is at this time 
barely able to feed the army only, and that from hand 
to mouth, I cannot but express to yon my apprehen- 
sions from that quarter, and to urge with all the warmth 
of zeal and earnestness the most pointed and effectual 
attention of your State to the actual raising and collect- 
ing their proportion of the mentioned requisition. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 2G9 

Upon the present plan of non-compliance with requi- 
sitions for men and supplies, let me seriously ask your 
Excellency, — IIow is it possible for us to continue the 
war ? How is it possible to support an army in money and 
recruits? To what a wretched state must we soon be re- 
duced ? How dangerous is it to suffer our affiiirs to run 
at hazard, and to depend upon contingencies ? To what do 
the present measures tend, but to the utter ruin of that 
cause which we have hitherto so long and nobly sup- 
ported, and to crush all the fair hopes, which, were we 
only to exert the power and abilities which Providence 
hath bountifully placed in our reach, are now in our view ? 
But if the States will not impose, or do not collect and 
apply taxes for support of the war, the sooner we make 
terms the better ; the longer we continue a feeble and 
ineffectual war the greater will be our distress at the 
hour of submission. For my own part I am fully per- 
suaded that without the means of execution, no officer, 
whoever he may be, who is placed at the head of the 
military department, can be answerable for the success 
of any plans he ma}- propose or agree to. 

Upon this subject, I will only add, that from past ex- 
perience and from present prospects, I am of opinion that 
if the States would furnish the supplies agreeal)le to the 
late requisitions, and would suffer the pa}^, clothing, and 
subsistence of the army to go through one common chan- 
nel, that two thirds of their former expenses would be 
saved ; at the same time that many partialities, discon- 
tents, and jealousies which now subsist would be removed 
and subside, and an establishment of order, regularity, and 
harmony in our general affairs would be experienced, 
which cannot arise from the present disjointed and dif- 
ferent systems of finance adopted by separate States. 

While acting in m^' military capacity I am sensible of 
the impropriety of stepping into the line of civil polity. 
My anxiety for the general good, and an earnest desire 



270 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

to bring this long protracted war to a liappy issue, when 
I hope to retire to that peaceful state of domestic pleas- 
ures, from which tlie call of my country has brought me 
to take an active part, and to which I most ardently wish 
a speedy return, I hope will furnish my excuse with your 
Excellency and Legislature, while I request your pardon 
for this trespass. 

If I should have occasion for the militia of your State, 
the call will be sudden, and their movements must be 
rapid ; otherwise great expense will accrue, and only dis- 
grace and disappointment will ensue. For these reasons, 
I beg leave to recall your Excellency's attention to my 
letter of the 5th of March last, and to pray most earn- 
estly that every previous arrangement may be taken to 
facilitate their march when requested. 

With great respect and esteem, 
I have the honor to be. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^- Washington. 

P. S. 8th May, 1782. Since writing the above, I 
have been furnished with sundry English and New York 
papers, containing the last intelligence from England, 
with the debates in both Houses of Parliament upon seve- 
ral motions made respecting the American war. Least 
your Excellency may not have had so full a sight of 
these papers as I have, I take the liberty to mention 
that I have perused these debates with great care and 
attention, with a view if possible to penetrate their real 
design ; and upon the most mature deliberation I can 
bestoAV, I am obliged to declare it as my candid opinion 
that the measure in all its views, so far as it respects 
America, is merely delusory, having no serious intention 
to admit our Independence upon its true principles, but 
is calculated to produce a change of ministers, to quiet 
the minds of their own people, and reconcile them to a 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 271 

contiiiiuince of the war ; while it is meant to amuse this 
comitry with a false idea of peace, to draw us off from 
our connection with France, and to lull us into a state 
of securit}^ and inactivity. — which taking place, the Minis- 
try will be left to prosecute the war in other parts of the 
world with greater vigor and effect. 

Your Excellency will permit me on this occasion to 
observe, that even if the nation and Parliament are really 
in earnest to obtain peace with America, it will undoubt- 
edly be wisdom in us to meet them with great caution 
and circumspection, and by all means to keep our arms 
firm in our hands, and instead of relaxing one iota in our 
exertions rather to spring forward with redoubled vigor, 
that we may take advantage of every favorable oppor- 
tunity, until our wishes are fully obtained. No nation 
yet suffered in treaty by preparing most vigorously for 
the field. 

The industry which the enemy are using to propagate 
these pacific reports appears to me a circumstance very 
suspicious, and the eagerness with which the people, as 
I am informed, are catching at them is in my opinion 
equally dangerous. 

I am as above, 

G*^- Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL.^ 

Headquar TERS, 8th May, 178-2. 

Sir, — I had the honor to receive your Excellency's 
favor of the 24th of April, enclosing a copy of your letter 
to Congress on the subject of American prisoners con- 
fined in England, with your sentiments on the necessity 
of retaliation. 

* This letter, except the last two paragraphs, is printed in Sparks's Writ- 
ings of Washington, viii. 292, with a few verbal changes. — Eds. 



272 TRUMBULL AND WASIIINGTOX LETTERS. 

I am sorry to inform your Excellency that a meeting 
of Commissioners which had among other matters been 
concerted for the purposes of a general exchange, com- 
prehending that of a release of our countrymen prisoners 
in Europe, as well as others, has been unhappily dissolved 
without effecting any one of those benevolent purposes, 
which, on our part, were the objects of their mission. 
This circumstance, I fear, will place any future exchanges 
at a great distance ; no means however in my power 
will be omitted to effect so desirable an event. 

I have the honor to concur fully with your Excellency 
on the subject of retaliation, and inform that the circum- 
stances attending the death of Captain Huddy are like 
to bring that object to a point. A demand hath been 
made by me for the perpetrators of that horrid deed ; the 
reply to this demand received from General Robertson 
is not satisfactory. I have informed him therefore that 
orders are given to designate by lot a British officer of 
the rank of Captain Huddy, for retaliation ; that the time 
and place of his execution are fixed ; and that nothing 
can stay my resolution from being carried into complete 
effect but a strict compliance to my first request. I ex- 
pect General Robertson's next answer will bring this 
ungrateful business to an issue. 

I am much obliged by your hint respecting the pow- 
der ; General Knox, in whose department it is, shall be 
informed, when he arrives from Philadelphia. 

If the demands of the campaign, which is not yet fully 
decided, shall require the powder of your State, it will be 
thankfully received. 

With great sincerity of respect and esteem, 
I have the honor to be, 
Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G" Washington. 

Governor Trumbull. 



I 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 273 



♦ WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, Newburgh, 
May 10th, 17S2. 

Sir, — I have the honor to enclose to your Excellency 
the copy of ca letter of this chite to Colonel Canfield, pro- 
hibiting the practice of sending flags from, or receiving 
them at any place except the post of Dobbs Ferry. This 
I thought essentially necessary for many reasons, which 
I doubt not will occur to your Excellency, and therefore 
request your aid in carrying the measure into effect, and 
tliat you will be pleased to communicate your orders to 
all persons who may have occasion to be acquainted with 
the matter in the State over which you preside. 

Orders similar to those of Colonel Canfield are given 
to all the officers commanding on the lines, in the seve- 
ral States contiguous to posts occupied by the British ; 
which I shall cause to be rigidly obeyed ; and shall hope 
for the concurrence of the civil power in preventing all 
other intercourse with the enemy as far as possibly can 
be done. 

I have the honor to be. 

With great esteem and respect. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



WASHINGTON TO COLONEL CANFIELD, OR OFFICER 
COMMANDING STATE TROOPS OF fONNECTICUT.i 

Headquarters, Newburgh, 
lOtli May, 1782. 

Sir, — I have given the most peremptory orders that 
no flag from the enemy shall be received at any other 

^ This letter appears to be the enclosure referred to in the pi-evious letter 
to Governor Trumbull. — Eds. 

35 



274 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTOX LETTERS. 

place or post but Dobbs Ferry, on any business or pre- 
text wbatever ; and that no flag from us to them shall, 
for any reason however pressmg, be permitted to pass to 
the enem3^'s lines but from the same place. 

You will take measures for carrying this order effect- 
ually into execution, so far as relates to the posts within 
the limits of your command, and the places at and from 
which flags have been sent and received, by immediately 
jDutting in arrest any officer who shall presume to con- 
travene the intention of this order on our side ; and by 
detaining as prisoners any persons who may come from 
the enemy with flags, after this regulation has been an- 
nounced in such a manner as that the British Commander 
in Chief may give his directions for the prevention of this 
practice in future. I have written to Sir Gu}^ Carleton 
on the subject, and presume the letter will reach him by 
the time this is handed to you. 

A copy of this is also communicated to Governor Trum- 
bull, whose concurrence and assistance on this occasion 
I have solicited. 

I am, sir, your, &c. 

(Signed) Q^ Washington. 

To Colonel Caxfield, on Officer commanding the 
State Troops of Connecticut. 



♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, 29th May, 1782. 

Sir, — I have been honored with your tAvo letters of 
the 21st and 23d of this month. 

Your Excellency's reply to Dean's letter I read with 
great satisfliction ; and this pleasure was heightened by 
finding that it contained not only your own sentiments, 
but also conve3^s the sense of the legislative body of 
your State. From a variety of circumstances I view the 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 275 

present as the most critical moment that we have ahnost 
ever experienced throiigliout the present contest. 

I am very sorry not to have it in my power to com- 
ply with your Excellency's request for a small invalid 
guard for New Gate prison. 1 assure you, sir, that, in 
present circumstances and with present prospects, 1 must 
estimate every invalid (capable of any service) as a good 
man, and keep them on constant duty. 

With great regard and esteem, I have the honor to be, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^ Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 
(Duplicate.) 

Headquarters, 3d July, 1782. 

Sir, — I am honored with your Excellency's letter of 
the 21st of June. 

Captain Johnson, who was the bearer of it, had per- 
mission granted to hhn to go to the enemy's lines for the 
purpose of carrying money to the prisoners. 

That your Excellency may be fully informed on what 
foothig the exchange of naval prisoners now stands, I 
have directed the Commissary of Prisoners to report to 
you what he has done in that business. Not having any 
agency in the exchange of naval prisoners, I cannot give 
the dh'ections your Excellenc}^ requests ; and indeed, was 
this not the case, I should be extremely unwilling to give 
any sanction to partial exchanges, it having been always 
my opinion that this business should be conducted on a 
more general scale : the irregular and partial mode that 
has been adopted has been pregnant with many evils. 
I have the honor to be, sir, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

G^^ Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Ti; cm hull. 



276 TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

30th July, 1782. 

Sir, — The foregoing was put into the Post Office 
agreeable to its date, to be conveyed to your Excellency, 
but through the inattention of the Postmaster was made 
up in the Southern mail ; and on its return from Phila- 
delphia by the Eastern post, was captured with his mail 
and carried into New York, — which forms a necessity for 
transmitting this duplicate. 

With great regard and esteem, I have the honor to be, 
Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

G9. Washington. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



* WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

■ Headquarters, 13th November, 1782. 

Sir, — I do myself the honor to enclose you the extract 
of a letter which I have lately received from his Excel- 
lency the Minister of France, on the subject of the amaz- 
ing quantities of provisions which the enemy draw from 
the States contiguous to New York. The evil complained 
of has been long growing, and has at length arisen to a 
height truly alarming. I persuade myself no arguments 
will be wanting to induce the Legislature of 3'our State, 
at their next sitting, to pay that attention to the matter 
which its importance deserves. 

I have ever been of opinion, and every day's experience 
convinces me more and more of the truth of it, that noth- 
ing short of laws making the supply of the enemy with 
provisions or stores, or holding any kind of illicit inter- 
course with them, felony of death, will check the evil so 
justly complained of A moment's reflection must con- 
vince every thinking mind, that four such armies as I 
command would be inadequate to the purpose. The at- 
tempt by military coercion alone might prove ruinous. 



TRUMBULL AND WASniXGTON LETTERS. 277 

For to guard the immense length of communication from 
the coast of Monmouth in Jerse}^ eastward, would so dis- 
sipate my force, that every detachment would invite and 
be at the mercy of the enemy. This observation is too 
striking to need urging, and shows in the clearest point 
of view that rigid laws, rigidly .executed, are the only 
remedies that can be applied, next to a sufficient force to 
invest the enemy in their post of New York. 

I have the honor to be, with respect and esteem, 

Your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant, 

G*'. Washington. 

♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, January 14th, 1783. 

Sir, — I enclose a letter from Major Tallmadge to your 
Excellency, which came under a flying seal to my hands ; 
the observations contained in it appear to be highly wor- 
thy of consideration. 

The importance of absolutely cutting off all manner 
of commerce and illicit intercourse with the enemy is so 
great, and at the same time so obvious, that I conceive it 
only necessary to recommend the subject without enlarg- 
ing upon it, in order to engage your Excellency to use 
your utmost endeavors to effect a purpose of such inter- 
esting consequence to the public. 

I have the honor to be, with perfect respect, 
Y^our Excellency's most obedient servant. 

G*^- WASniNGTON. 

Ills EXCELLENXY GOVERNOR TrUMBULL. 



•WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 

Headquarters, 5th March, 178.3. 

Sir, — I have been honored with your Excellency's 
letter of the 24th of February. 



278 TRUilBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 

Circumstanced as our aifairs are, it is impracticable for 
me to comply with your request for a body of Continen- 
tal troops to be stationed at Stamford ; some aid, however, 
may be given to your State troops, by the countenance 
and increase of our marching parties, who are patrolling 
on the lines, and may extend as far as the Sound. I will 
give orders for this purpose, and will direct the officers 
on that command to hold communication with Colonel 
Canfield, or other commanding officer of the State troops; 
who may afford them all the necessary assistance in their 
power, as circumstances may require. 

On this occasion, I cannot omit to mention to your 
Excellency, that I am informed of a very unwarrantable 
trade and intercourse with the enemy from the western 
shores of your State ; particularly in transporting across 
the Sound great quantities of provisions, — meat and bread 
in open day, without interruption; and that, as I am told, 
almost under the eye of the officers and troops stationed 
in that quarter; in which business, it is to be feared, 
your commissioned boats and vessels are not exempted 
from bearing a part. Are there no practicable means of 
preventing these shamefid abuses, or is the measure tole- 
rated by the State ? 

The frequent indulgences given, as I am informed, to 
flags to pass in the Sound to and from New York, in a 
great measure serve not only to frustrate those beneficial 
effects 1 expected to experience from fixing on Dobbs 
Ferry as the only pL^ce of intercourse of that kind with 
the enemy, but are, I fancy, prostituted to the vile pur- 
poses of extending that illicit trade and communication 
with them, which, in my opinion, it should be the care of 
the States to prevent by every possible means. 

1 have the honor to be, 

With high regard and esteem, 
Your Excellency's most obedient and most humble servant, 

Ills Excellency Governor Trumbull. ^" WASHINGTON. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 279 

♦WASHINGTON TO TRUMBULL. 
(Circular.) 

IIkadquauters, April 14th, 1783. 

SiK, — Previous to the disbanding the army, — an event 
which, it is to be wished, may take place with as much ease 
and satisfiiction as circumstances will admit, — Congress 
have directed tliat a complete settlement and liquidation 
of all their accounts shall be made. To effect this the 
Paymaster-General is arrived, with full instructions to 
enter immediately upon the settlement, and to complete 
it as soon as possible. In performing this duty he in- 
forms me that recourse must be had to the several States 
for their accounts (if they have any) against their re- 
spective lines. This requisition probably may have been, 
or will be, made by Mr. Morris. But as I consider it of 
the utmost importance both for the ease and quiet of the 
army, as well as in point of economy to the public, that 
this business should be effected with all the despatch that 
it is possible to give it, I have procured from the Paymas- 
ter-General the enclosed minutes of what he judges ne- 
cessary to obtain from the States, as part of the ground 
of his settlement; which I take the liberty to transmit 
to your Excellency, with my most earnest request that 
you will be pleased to give directions that the earliest 
attention may be given to forward, without the least de- 
lay, to Mr. Pierce, Paymaster-General, whatever informa- 
tion, accounts, or papers shall on examination of his 
minutes be found necessary, together with any other 
papers, or documents, which may be thought proper from 
your State, to effect the settlement proposed. 

I have taken this liberty the rather, as it is judged 
that, on a supposition of the utmost despatch in the 
States, the greatest delay in completing this very im- 
portant settlement will most probably arise from the 
time necessary to obtain their accounts. 
I have the honor to be. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant. 

Ills EXCELLENXY GOVKRXOR TrUMBULL. G2^4¥ASCINGT0N. 

/<!S' OF 1>U • '■ \ 

I ■m<rT\7-T^cTTv I 



280 TEUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Hartford, 17th May, 1783. 

Sir, — I duly received your letter relative to a speedy 
settlement with the army, enclosing queries by the Pay- 
master-General. 

I sent immediately a copy of the queries to the Com- 
mittee of Pay Table, with directions to answer the same 
as soon as possible. 

At the opening of the present session of the General 
Assembly the same was laid before them. Measures are 
taken to procure every necessary document for a speedy 
settlement. An early discharge of the army is expected. 
And 'tis hoped there will be no failure on the part of 
this State. 

I do most sincerely congratulate you on the important 
event of the cessation of hostilities, and ardently wish 
for the arrival of the definitive treaty. 

With every sentiment of esteem, gratitude, and consid- 
eration, 

1 have the honor to be, 
Your Excellency's most obedient and very humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 

Lebanon, 10th June, 1783. 

Sir, — I have the honor to transmit the resolve of the 
General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, acknowl- 
edging the receipt of your favor of June, 1783, and tes- 
tifying the high sense they entertain of your exalted 
merits, and their obligations to you and your patriot 
army (through the blessing of Heaven) for the establish- 
ment of freedom, independence, and peace. 



TRUMBULL AND WASHINGTON LETTERS. 281 

Periiilt me to address your Excellency on the pathetic 
manner 3'ou take leave of myself, and the State over 
which I have the honor to preside ; to assure you how 
great pleasure and satisfaction we have enjoyed, in the 
wisdom, magnanimit3% and skill shown in forming, dis- 
ciplining, and conducting the army of the United States 
to so glorious an event ; and also in the patriotic virtue 
displayed in this last address, which exhibits the founda- 
tion principles so necessary to be freely and fully incul- 
cated, and appear to be the interest of all to agree in and 
pursue, — to maintain and support an indissoluble union of 
the States, under one federal head, a sacred regard to 
public justice, a proper peace establishment, and a pacific 
and friendly disposition among the people of the United 
States ; to exhibit and maintain a good character for wis- 
dom, honesty, firmness, and benevolence. How pleasing 
the national prospect! How critical the present moments ! 
Moderation, patience, and diligence are required to calm 
the public mind so variously agitated by prejudice, pas- 
sion, and popular sinister designs. "We have the conso- 
lation, That the Lord reigns. Tranquillity and happiness 
will be disturbed during the tumult. God grant that it 
may soon subside ! 

In your retirement, my earnest prayer is that every 
temporal and heavenly blessing may attend you. I can- 
not persuade myself that the calls of the country will 
suffer so exalted a character and benevolent mind to 
withdraw from employment for the public good ; al- 
though it is your wish. 

With every sentiment of regard, gratitude, and esteem, 
I have tlie honor to be 
Your Excellency's most obedient and very humble servant, 

Jon"^.' Trumbull. 

His Excellency General Washington. 



LETTEHS 



JOHN HANCOCK, JOSEPH WARREN, THOMAS GAGE, 
JAMES WARREN, AND GOVERNOR TRUMBULL. 

Taken from the Trumbull Papers. 



JOIIX HANCOCK TO THE GOVERNOR AND CO. OF 
CONNECTICUT. 

In Provincial Congress, Concord, 
April 10th, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — In consideration of the measures that 
have been taken for years past by the British Adminis- 
tration, to subjugate the North American Colonies, the 
rapidity with which their pLans have hitherto been exe- 
cuted, the late very alarming intelligence from Great 
Britain, the false and inflammatory accounts that have 
been laid before our Sovereign and his Parliament, to 
induce them to consider this Colony in a state of rebel- 
lion, and our sister Colonies as countenancing us therein, 
and the violent measures that are ordered in consequence 
thereof, together with the daily and hourly prepara- 
tions that are making by the troops under the com- 
mand of General Gage in Boston, — this Congress have 
come to a full conclusion, that very little if any expec- 
tation of the redress of our common and intolerable 
grievances is to be had from the humble and dutiful 
petition, and other wise measures, of the late Honorable 
Continental Congress ; and therefore have come into 



284 LETTERS OF JOHN HANCOCK AXD JOSEPH WARREX. 

certain resolutions to be communicated to you by dele- 
gates appointed for that purpose, in which they are 
earnestly desirous of the concurrence of your Colony. 

Wishing that the American Colonies may, at this im- 
portant crisis, be under the direction and blessing of 
Heaven, I am, in the name and by order of this Congress, 
Gentlemen, your most obedient servant, 

John Hancock, President. 

The Honorable the Governor and Co. of Connecticut. 



JOSEPH WAEREX TO GOVERNOR TRUMBULL. 

Cambridge, April 22, 1775. 

May IT Please Your Honor, — On Wednesday the 
19th instant, early in the morning, a brigade of General 
Gage's army marched into the country to Lexington, about 
twelve miles from Boston, where they met with a small 
party of minute men exercising, who had no intentions of 
injuring the King's troops, but they fired npon our men, 
without any provocation, killed eight of them the first 
onset, then marched forward to Concord, where they 
destro^^ed the magazine and stores for a considerable 
time ; our people, however, mustered as soon as possible, 
and repulsed the troops, pursuing them quite down to 
Charlestown, until they reached a place called Bunker's 
Hill, — although they received a very large reinforce- 
ment from General Gage. As the troops have now 
commenced hostilities, we think it our duty to exert 
our utmost strength to save our country from absolute 
slavery. We pray your Honor will afford us all the as- 
sistance in your power. We should be glad that our 
brethren who come to our aid may be supplied with 
military stores and provisions, as we have none of either 
more than are absolutely necessary for ourselves. We 



LETTERS OF JOSEril WARREN. 285 

pray God to direct you to such measures as shall tend to 
the salvation of our common liberties. 

By order of the Committee of Safety, 

Jos. Warren, Chairman. 

Honorable J. Trumbull, Esq. 



JOSEPH WARREN TO THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY 
OF CONNECTICUT. 

In Provincial Congress, Watertown, 
April 23d, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — Before this letter can reach you, we 
doubt not you have been sufficiently certified of the late 
alarming resolutions of the British Parliament, wherein 
we see ourselves declared rebels, and all our sister Col- 
onies in New England, in common with us, marked out for 
the severest punishment. In consequence thereof Gen- 
eral Gage has suddenly commenced hostilities, by a large 
body of troops under his command secretly detached in 
the night of the 18th instant, which on the morning en- 
suing had actually begun the slaughter of the innocent 
inhabitants in the very heart of the country, before any 
intentions of that kind were suspected ; and although the 
roused virtue of our brethren in the neighborhood soon 
compelled them to a precipitate retreat, they marked 
their savage rout with depredations, ruins, and butcheries 
hardly to be matched by the armies of any civilized 
nation on the globe. 

Justly alarmed by these manoeuvres, vast multitudes of 
the good people of this and the neigliboring Colonies are 
now assembled in the vicinity of Boston, for the protec- 
tion of the country. The gates of that devoted town are 
shut, the miserable inhabitants pent up there with a 
licentious soldiery as in one common prison ; large rein- 
forcements of the troops under General Gage are hourly 



286 LETTER OF JOSEPH WARREN. 

expected ; and no reason is left to doubt that this whole 
force, as soon as collected, will be employed for the de- 
struction, first of this, and then of the neighboring Col- 
onies engaged in the same interesting cause, and that 
all America will be speedily reduced to the most abject 
slavery unless it be immediately defended by arms. 

Unavoidably reduced to this necessity by circumstances 
that will justify us before God and the impartial world, 
this Congress, after solemn deliberation and application to 
Heaven for direction in the case, have this day unani- 
mously resolved that it is our duty immediately to estab- 
lish an army for the maintenance of the most invaluable 
rights of human nature, and the immediate defence of 
this Colony where the first attack is made; that thirty 
thousand men are necessary to be forthwith raised in the 
New England Colonies for that purpose, and that of that 
force 13,600 shall be established by this Colony without 
delay. 

We have not a doubt of the virtue of the Colony of 
Connecticut, no less engaged than ourselves in the glo- 
rious cause at stake, and equally involved in the miseries 
that must ensue, should it be lost. In testimony of 
our reliance on you, we have sent this express to give 
you the earliest notice of these resolutions, and the cir- 
cumstances that liave necessitated them, and earnestly to 
request your speediest concurrence, and such assistance 
in this most important cause as the present urgent neces- 
sity requires, and the many former evidences we have 
had of the spirit and firmness of the Colony of Connecti- 
cut give us the highest reason to expect. 
We are, gentlemen, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jos. Warren, President jtro tern. 

P. S. The great confusions in this Colony prevent our 
being able to send with this letter such depositions as 



LETTERS OF JOSEPH WARREN. 287 

might give full and particular information of the facts 
above referred to ; but measures are taken for that pur- 
pose, and we shall not fail to transmit the result of them 
by the first opportunity. 

To THE Governor and Company of Connecticut. 



JOSEPH WARREN TO THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY 
OF CONNECTICUT. 

In Committee of Safety, at Cambridge, 
April 26, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — The distressed situation in which we 
are, and the danger to which the liberties of all America, 
and especially the New England Colonies, are exposed, 
will be the best apology for our importunate application to 
you for immediate assistance. We pra}^, as you regard the 
safety of your country, that as large a number of troops 
as you can spare may immediately march forward, well 
stocked with provisions and ammunition ; that i\\Qy come 
under proper officers, enlisted for such time as is neces- 
sary ; that as large a train of artillery as can be procured 
be sent down to our aid. We rely greatly upon you, as 
we know the bravery of your men. Our men have be- 
haved with the utmost resolution ; but as many of them 
came far from home without any preparation, it is impos- 
sible to keep them in the field, without allowing many of 
them time to return to their families for one or two days, 
during which time we may possibly be all cut off, as we 
have a powerful and watchful enemy to deal with. We 
are far from despairing. We firmly trust that, by the 
blessing of Heaven on us, we shall deliver our country. 
We are determined, at all events, to act our parts with 
firmness and intrepidity, knowing that slavery is far 
worse than death. We pray that our sister Connecticut 



288 LETTERS OF JOSEPH WARREX AND GOV. TRUMBULL. 

would immediately put in for a share of honor of saving 
the liberties of America, as a moment lost may never be ■ 
recalled. ' 

May God direct you and us at this important moment, 
on which the fate of us and posterity depends. 
We are, gentlemen. 

With great affection and respect. 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jos. Warren, Chairman. 

Governor and Company of Connecticut. 



GOVERNOR TRUMBULL TO GENERAL THOMAS GAGE. 

Hartford, 28th April, 1775. 

Sir, — The alarming situation of public affairs in this 
country, and the late unfortunate transactions in the 
Province of the Massachusetts Bay, have induced the 
General Assembly of this Colony now sitting in this 
place to appoint a committee of their body to wait upon 
your Excellency, and to desire me, in their name, to write 
to you relative to these very interesting matters. 

The inhabitants of this Colony are intimately connected 
with the people of your Province, and esteem themselves 
bound by the strongest ties of friendship, as well as com- 
mon interest, to regard with attention whatever concerns 
them. 

You will not therefore be surprised that your first 
arrival at Boston with a body of his Majesty's Troops, for 
the declared purpose of canying into execution certain 
Acts of Parliament which, in their apprehension, were 
unconstitutional and oppressive, should have given the 
good people of this Colony a very just and general alarm. 
Your subsequent proceedings in fortifying the town of 
Boston, and other military preparations, greatly increased 



LETTER OF GOYERXOR TRUMBULL. 289 

their appreliensions for the safety of tlicir friends and 
brethren; they could not be unconcerned spectators of 
their sufferings, in that which they esteemed the com- 
mon cause of this country ; but the hite hostile and secret 
inroads of some of the troops under your command into 
the heart of the country, and the violences they have 
committed, have driven them almost to a state of desper- 
ation ; they feel now, not only for their friends, but for 
themselves and their dearest interests and connections. 
We wish not to exaggerate ; we are not sure of every 
part of our information, but by the best intelligence that 
we have yet been able to obtain, the late transaction was 
a most unprovoked attack upon the lives and property of 
His Majesty's subjects, and it is represented to us that 
such outrages have been connnitted as would disgrace 
even barbarians, and much more Britons, so highly filmed 
for humanity as well as bravery. It is feared, therefore, 
that we are devoted to destruction, and that you have it 
in command and intention to ravage and desolate the 
country. If this is not the case, permit us to ask, why 
have these outrages been committed ? Why is the town 
of Boston now shut up ? To what end are all the hostile 
preparations that are daily making? And why do we 
daily hear of fresh destinations of troops to this country ? 
The people of this Colony, you may rely upon it, abhor 
the idea of taking arms against the troops of their Sover- 
eign, and dread nothing so much as the horrors of a civil 
war; but, sir, at the same time we beg leave to assure 
your Excellency that, as they apprehend themselves jus- 
tified by the principle of self-defence, they are most 
firmly resolved to defend their rights and privileges to 
the last extremity ; nor will they be restrained from giv- 
ing aid to their brethren if any unjustifiable attack is 
made upon them. Be so good, therefore, as to explain 
yourself upon this most important subject, so fiir as is 
consistent with your duty to our common sovereign. Is 

■r.7 



290 LETTER OF GOVERNOR TRUMBULL. ADDRESS, ETC. 

there no way to prevent this unhappy dispute from com- 
ing to extremities ? Is there no alternative but absolute 
submission, or the desolations of war? By that humanity 
which constitutes so amiable a part of your character, 
and for the honor of our Sovereign, and by the glory of 
the British empire, we entreat you to prevent it if possi- 
ble. Surely it is to be hoped that the temperate wisdom 
of the empire might even yet find expedients to restore 
peace, that so all parts of the empire ma}^ enjoy their 
particular rights, honors, and immunities. Certainly this 
is an event most devoutly to be wished ; and will it not be 
consistent with your duty to suspend the operations of 
war on 3'our part, and enable us on ours to quiet the 
minds of the people, at least till the result of some 
further deliberations may be known ? The importance of 
the occasion will, no doubt, sufficiently aj^ologize for the 
earnestness w^ith which we address you, and any seeming 
impropriety which may attend it, as well as induce you 
to give us the most explicit and favorable answer in j^our 
power. 

I am, with great esteem and respect. 

In behalf of the General Assembly, sir. 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon"^? Trumbull. 

His Excellency Thos. Gage, Esq. 



ADDRESS TO THE INHABITANTS OF GREAT BRITAIN. 
From the Minutes of Provincial Congress of Massachusetts. 

Ix Provincial Congress, Watertown, 
April 2Gtli, 1775. 
To the Inhabitants of Great Britain : 

Friends and Fellow-Subjects, — Hostilities are at 
length commenced in this Colony by the troops under 
command of General Gage ; and it being of the greatest 



ADDRESS OF PROVINCIAL CONGRESS OF MASS. 291 

importance that an early, true, and authentic account of 
this inhuman proceeding should be known to you, the 
Congress of this Colony have transmitted the same, and 
from want of a session of the Honorable Continental Con- 
gress, think it proper to address you on the alarming 
occasion. 

By the clearest depositions relative to this transaction, 
it will appear that on the night preceding the 19th of 
April instant, a body of the King's troops, under com- 
mand of Colonel Smith, were secretly landed at Cam- 
bridge, with an apparent design to take or destroy the 
military and other stores provided for the defence of this 
Colony, and deposited at Concord ; that some inhabitants 
of the Colony, on the night aforesaid, whilst travelling 
peaceably on the road between Boston and Concord, 
were seized and greatly abused by armed men, who 
appeared to be officers of General Gage's army ; that 
the town of Lexington by these means was alarmed, and 
a company of the inhabitants mustered on the occasion ; 
that the Regular troops, on their way to Concord, 
marched into the said town of Lexington, and the said 
company on their approach began to disperse ; that, not- 
withstanding this, the Regulars rushed on with great 
violence, and first began hostilities by firing on said 
Lexington company, whereby they killed eight and 
wounded several others; that the Regulars continued 
their fire until those of said company, who were neither 
killed nor wounded, had made their escape ; that Colonel 
Smith, with the detachment, then marched to Concord, 
where a number of Provincials were jigain fired on by 
the troops, two of them killed and several wounded, 
before the former fired on them ; and that these hostile 
measures of the troops produced an engagement that 
lasted through the day, in Avhich many of the Provin- 
cials, and more of the Regular troops were killed and 
wounded. 



292 ADDRESS OF PROYIXCIAL CONGRESS OF MASS. 

To give a particular account of the ravages of the 
troops as they retreated from Concord to Charlestown, 
would be very difficult, if not impracticable ; let it suffice 
to say, that a great number of the houses on the road 
were plundered and rendered unfit for use ; several were 
burnt ; women in child-bed were driven by the soldiery 
naked into the street; old men, peaceably in their 
houses, were shot dead, and such scenes exhibited as 
would disgrace the annals of the most uncivilized nations. 
These, brethren, are marks of ministerial vengeance against 
this Colony for refusing, with her sister Colonies, a sub- 
mission to slavery, but they have not yet detached us 
from our royal Sovereign. We profess to be his loyal and 
dutiful subjects, and, so hardly dealt with as we have been, 
are still ready, with our lives and fortunes, to defend 
his person, family, crown, and dignity. Nevertheless, to 
the persecution and tyranny of his cruel ministr}^, we 
will not tamely submit; appealing to Heaven for the jus- 
tice of our cause, we determine to die or be free. We 
cannot think that the honor, wisdom, and valor of Brit- 
ons will suffer them to be longer inactive spectators of 
measures in which themselves are so deeply interested, — 
measures pursued in opposition to the solemn protests of 
many noble lords, and expressed sense of conspicuous 
commoners, whose knowledge and virtue have long char- 
acterized them as some of the greatest men in the nation ; 
measures executing contrary to the interest, petitions, 
and resolves of many large, respectable, and opulent 
counties, cities, and boroughs in Great Britain ; measures 
highly incompatible with justice, but still pursued with a 
specious pretence of easing the nation of its burdens; 
measures which, if successful, must end in the ruin and 
slavery of Britain, as well as the persecuted American 
Colonies. 

We sincerely hope that the Great Sovereign of the 
universe, who hath so often appeared for the English 



ADDRESS, ETC. LETTER OF JOSEril WARREX. 203 

nation, -will support you in every rational and manly 
exertion with these Colonies for saving it from ruin, 
and that in a constitutional connection with our mother 
countr}', we shall soon be altogether a free and happy 

V^^V^^- Jos. Warren, Fn'sideut jjro tern. 

A true extract from the 3Imutes. 

Sam^ Freeman, Secretary p-o tern. 



JOSEPH WARREX TO BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 

Ix PuovixciAL Congress, Watertown, 

April 20tli, 1775. 

Sir, — From the entire confidence we repose in yonr 
faithfulness and abilities, we consider it the happiness of 
this Colony, that the important trust of agency for it in 
this day of nnequalled distress is devolved on your 
hands, and we doubt not your attachment to the cause of 
the liberties of mankind w^ill make every possible exer- 
tion in our behalf a pleasure to you, although our cir- 
cumstances will compel us often to interrupt your repose 
by matters that will surely give 3^0 u pain. A singular 
instance hereof is the occasion of this letter ; the con- 
tents of this packet will be our apology for troubling j'ou 
with it ; by these }ou will see how and by whom w' e are 
at last plunged into the horrors of a most unnatural war. 
Our enemies, Ave are told, have despatched to Great Brit- 
ain a fallacious account of the tragedy they have begun ; 
to prevent the operation of which to the public injury, we 
have engaged the vessel that conveys this to you, as a 
packet in the service of this Colony, and we request your 
assistance in supplying Captain Derby, who counnands 
her, with such necessaries as he shall want, on the credit 
of your constituents in Massachusetts Bay. 

But we most ardently wish that the several papers 
herewith enclosed may be immediately printed and dis- 



294 LETTER OF JOSEPH WARREN. EXTRACT, ETC. 

persed through every town in England, and especially 
communicated to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common 
Council of the city of London, that they may take such 
order thereon as they may think proper ; and we are 
confident your fidelity will make such improvement of 
them as shall convince all who are not determined to be in 
everlasting blindness, that it is the united efforts of both 
Englands that must save either ; but that whatever price 
our brethren in the one may be pleased to put on their 
constitutional liberties, we are authorized to say that the 
inhabitants of the other, with the greatest unanimity, are 
inflexibly resolved to sell theirs only at the price of their 

^^^^^' Jos. Warren, President pro tern. 

To THE Honorable Benjamin Franklin, Esq., London. 

A true copij. 

Attest SamV Freeman, Secretary pro tern. 



EXTRACT FROM MIN^UTES OF PROVINCIAL CONGRESS 
OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

In Provincial Congress, Watertown, 
April 29, 1775. 

Whereas, the reducing of the several regiments to be 
raised in the Provincial service from one thousand men 
in a regiment to five hundred and ninety, makes the 
service of the field officers of said regiment less burden- 
some ; therefore Resolved, That the pay of said field officers 
be reduced one fifth part from the first establishment, 
and that said field officers' pay in said service of this 
Province to the last day of December next, unless dis- 
missed before, shall be as follows, namely, a colonel's 
pay, twelve pounds per month ; a lieutenant-colonel's pay, 
nine pounds twelve shillings per month ; a major's pay, 
eight pounds per month. 

Jos. Warren, President pro tern. 

Attest Sam^ Freeman, Secretary pro tern. 



LETTER OF PROVINCIAL CONGRESS OF MASS. 295 



DOCLTMEXT SENT TO GOVERNOR TRUMBULL FROM PRO- 
VTXCL\L CONGRESS OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

On the 27th instant, as a party of the Massachusetts 
forces, together with a party of New Hampshire forces, in 
all about six hundred men, were attempting to bring off 
the stock upon Hog Island, and about thirty men upon 
Noddels Island were doing the same, when about a hun- 
dred Regulars landed upon the last mentioned island, and 
pursued our men till they had got safely back to Hog 
Island ; then the Regulars began to fire very briskly by 
platoons upon our men. In the mean time an armed 
schooner mounting four six-pounders and twelve swivels, 
with a number of barges, came up to Hog Island to pre- 
vent our people leaving said island, but to no purpose ; 
after this she attempted to return back to the place 
where she was stationed at Winnisimmet, and five or six 
minutes would have secured her ; but our men put in a 
heavy fire of small arms upon several barges which were 
towing her back, for there was little wind and Hood tide, 
and two three-pounders coming to hand that instant, 
began to play upon them and soon obliged the barges to 
quit her and every of her crew ; after which fire was set 
to her. Although the barges exerted themselves very vig- 
orously to prevent it, she was burnt upon the ways of 
Winisimet ferry. We have not lost a single life, although 
the engagement was very warm from the armed schooner 
and armed sloop that lay within roach of small arms, 
from one or two twelve-pounders on Noddels Island, and 
from the barges, which were all fixed with swivels. 
Hog Island was stripped of all stock, and some were 
taken from Noddels Island by our forces. Two or 
three persons only of our men were wounded, but not 
mortally ; how many of the enemy were killed and 
wounded we cannot ascertain. Since which we have 



296 LETTER OF JOSEPH WARREN. 

got in our hands all in the schooner that was not 
destroyed by fire. 

Headquarters at Cambridge, May 29, 1775. 
(yl coi^ij of this ordered to he stnt to Governor TnimbuU.') 



JOSEPH WARREN TO THE GOVERNOR AND COMRANY 
OF CONNECTICUT. 

Cambridge, May 2d, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — We j^esterday had the pleasure of a 
conference with Doctor Johnson^ and Colonel Wolcott,^ 
who were appointed by 3'our Assembly to deliver a letter 
to and hold a conference with General Gage. We feel 
the warmest gratitude to 3^ou for those generous and 
affectionate sentiments which you entertain towards us ; 
but you will allow us to express our uneasiness on account 
of one paragraph in your letter, in which a cessation of 
hostilities is proposed. We fear that our brethren of 
Connecticut are not even yet convinced of the cruel 
designs of Administration against America, nor thoroughly 
sensible of the miseries to which General Gage's army 
have reduced this wretched Colony. We have lost the 
town, and we greatly fear, the inhabitants, of Boston, as 
we find the General is perpetually making new conditions, 
and forming the most unreasonable pretences, for retard- 
ing their removal from that garrison. Our people have 
been barbarously murdered by an insidious enemy, wlio 
under cover of the night have marched into the heart of 
the country, spreading destruction with fire and sword. 
No business but that of war is either done or thought of 
in this Colony ; no agreement or compact with General 

^ William Samuel Johnson, b. Oct. 7, 1727, afterwards Delegate to Con- 
gres.s and President of Columbia College. — Ens. 

2 Oliver Wolcott, Senior, b. Nov. 20, 172G, afterwards Delegate to Con- 
gress and Governor of Connecticut. — Eds. 



LETTERS OF JOSEPH WARREN AND THOMAS GAGE. 297 

Ga^e will in the least alleviate our distress, as no confi- 
dence can possibly be placed in any assurances lie can give 
to a people whom he has first deceived in the matter of 
taking possession of and fortifying the town of Boston, 
and whom he has suffered his army to attack in the most 
inhuman and treacherous manner. Our only relief now 
must arise from driving General Gage with his troops out 
of the country, which, by the blessing of God, we are de- 
termined to attempt, and hope to accomplish or perish in 
the attempt, as we think an honorable death in the field, 
whilst fighting for the liberties of all America, fjxr prefer- 
able to being butchered in our houses, or to being reduced 
to an ignominious slavery. We must expect that our sis- 
ter Colony Connecticut will afford immediately all possi- 
ble assistance, as at this time delay will be attended with 
all that fatal train of events which would follow from an 
absolute desertion of the cause of American liberty. 
Excuse our earnestness upon this subject, as we know 
that upon the success of our present exertions depend 
the lives and liberties of our country and succeeding 
generations. 

I am, with great respect and esteem, gentlemen, 

Your obedient, humble servant, 
Jos. Warren. 

Governor axd Company of Connecticut. 



GENERAL THOMAS GAGE TO GOVERNOR TRUMBULL. 

Boston, Hd Maj', 1775. 

Sir, — T am to acknowledge the receipt of your letter 
of the 28th April last, in behalf of the General Assembly 
of your Colony, relative to the alarming situation of public 
affairs in this country, and the late transactions in this 
Province ; that this situation is greatly alarming and that 
these transactions are truly unfortunate, are truths to be 

38 



298 LETTER OF THOMAS GAGE. 

regretted by every friend to America, and by every well- 
wisher for the peace, prosperity, and happiness of this 
Province. The intimate connection and strong ties of 
friendship between the inhabitants of yonr Colony and 
the deluded people of this Province cannot fail of induc- 
ing the former to interpose their good offices to convince 
the latter of the impropriety of their past conduct, and to 
persuade them to return to their allegiance, and to seek 
redress of any supposed grievances in those decent and 
constitutional methods in which alone they can hope to 
be successful. 

That troops should be emploj^ed for the purpose of 
protecting the magistrates in the execution of their duty, 
when opposed with violence, is not a new thing in the 
English or any other government. That any acts of the 
British Parliament are unconstitutional or oppressive, I 
am not to suppose ; if any such there are in the apprehen- 
sion of the people of this Province, it had been happy for 
them if they had sought relief only in the way which the 
Constitution, their reason, and their interest pointed out. 
You cannot wonder at my fortifying the town of Boston, 
or making any other military preparations, when you are 
assured that, previous to my taking these steps, such 
were the open threats and such the warlike preparations 
throughout this Province, as rendered it my indispensable 
duty to take every precaution in my power for the pro- 
tection of his Majesty's troops under my command against 
all hostile attempts. 

The intelligence you seem to have received relative to 
the late excursion of a body of troops into the country is 
altogether injurious, and contrary to the true state of 
facts. The troops disclaim with indignation the barbarous 
outrages of which they are accused, so contrary to their 
known humanity. I have taken the greatest pains to 
discover if any were committed, and have found examples 
of their tenderness, both to the young and the old, but no 



LETTER OF THOMAS GAGE. 299 

vestige of cruelty or barbarity. It is very possible that 
in firing into houses, from whence they were fired upon, 
that old people, women, or children may have suffered, 
but if any such thing has happened, it was in their de- 
fence and undesigned. I have no command to ravage 
and desolate the country, and were it my intention, I 
have had pretence to begin it upon the sea-ports, who 
are at the mercy of the fleet. For your better infor- 
mation, I enclose you a narrative of that affair, taken 
from gentlemen of indisputable honor and veracity, who 
were eye-witnesses of all transactions of that day. The 
leaders here have taken pains to prevent any account of 
this afHiir getting abroad but such as they have thought 
proper to publish themselves ; and to that end the post 
has been stopped, the mails broke open and letters taken 
out, and hy these means, the most injurious and inOam- 
matory accounts have been spread throughout the Conti- 
nent, wdiicli has served to deceive and inflame the minds 
of the people. 

When the resolves of the Provincial Congress breathed 
nothing but war, when those two great and essential 
prerogatives of the King, — the levying of troops, and dis- 
posing of the public moneys, — were wrested from him, 
and when magazines were forming by an assembly of men 
unknown to the Constitution, for the declared purpose of 
levying war against the King, — you must acknowledge 
it was my duty, as it was the dictate of humanity, to pre- 
vent, if possible, the calamities of a civil war, by destroy- 
ing such magazines ; this and this alone I attempted. 

You ask, Why is the town of Boston now shut up? I 
can only refer you for an answer to those bodies of armed 
men who now surround the town, and prevent all access 
to it. The hostile preparations you mention are such as 
the conduct of the people of this Province has rendered it 
prudent to make, for the defence of those under my com- 
mand. You assure me the people of your Colony abhor 



300 LETTER OF THOMAS GAGE. 

the idea of taking arms against the troops of their sover- 
eign. I Avi^h the people of this Province (for their own 
sakes) could make the same declaration. 

You inquire, Is there no waj^ to prevent this unhappy 
dispute from coming to extremities ; is there no alterna- 
tive but absolute submission, or the desolations of war ? 
I answer, I hope there is. The King and Parliament seem 
to hold out terms of reconciliation, consistent with the 
honor and interest of Great Britain and the rights and 
privileges of the Colonies. They have mutually declared 
their readiness to attend to any real grievances of the 
Colonies, and to afford them every just and reasonable 
indulgence, which shall in a dutiful and constitutional 
manner be laid before them ; and his Majesty adds, it is 
his ardent wish that this disposition ma}^ have a hapjjy 
effect on the temper and conduct of his subjects in Amer- 
ica. I must add likewise the resolution of the 27th 
February, on the grand dispute of taxation and revenue, 
leaving it to the Colonies to tax themselves under certain 
conditions. Here is surely a foundation for an accommo- 
dation to people who wish a reconciliation rather than a 
destructive war between countries so nearly connected by 
the ties of blood and interest ; but I fear that the leaders 
of this Province have been, and still are, intent on shed- 
ding blood. 

I am much obliged by your favorable sentiments of my 
personal character, and assure you, as it has been my 
constant wish and endeavor hitherto, so I shall continue 
to exert my utmost efforts to protect all his Majesty's 
liege subjects under my care, in their persons and prop- 
erty. You ask whether it will not be consistent with my 
duty to sus^jend the operations of war on my part. 1 
have commenced no operations of war but defensive. Such 
you cannot wish me to suspend, while I am surrounded by 
an armed country, who have already begun and threaten 
fm'ther to prosecute an offensive war, and are now vio- 



LETTERS OF THOMAS GAGE AXD GOY. TRUMBULL. 301 

lently depriving mo, the King's troops, and many others 
of the King's subjects under my innnediate protection, of 
all the conveniences and necessaries of life with which the 
country abounds ; but it must quiet the minds of all rea- 
sonable people when I assure you that I have no disposi- 
tion to injure or molest quiet and peaceable subjects, but 
on the contrary- shall esteem it my greatest happiness to 
defend and protect them against every species of violence 
and oppression. 

I am, with great regard and esteem, 

Sir, 3'our most obedient, humble servant, 

The Hoxorable Governor Trumbull. ^^^- ^^C}^- 



GOVERNOR TRUMBULL TO JOSEPH WARREN. 

Hartford, May 4th, 1775. 

Sir, — Your letter of the 2d May instant is received. 
You may be informed from our letter to Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Putnam what is already done by our General Assem- 
bly, and need not fear our firmness, deliberation, and 
unanimity to pursue the measures which appear best for 
our common defence and safety, and in no degree to relax 
our vigilant preparations for that end, and to act in union 
and concert with our sister Colonies, and shall be cautious 
of trusting promises which may be in the power of any one 
to evade. We hope no ill consequences will attend our 
embassy to General Gage ; should be glad to be furnished 
with the evidences duly authenticated, concerning the at- 
tack on the 19th of April last at Lexington, which it is 
presumed you have taken ; although we are at a distance 
from the distressing scenes before your eyes, yet are most 
sensibl}' affected with the alarming relations of them. 
I am, w^ith regard and affection, 

Sir, your obedient, humble servant, 

Jo:^"^." Trumbull. 

The Honorable Joseph Warren, Esq. 



302 LETTER OF JOSEPH WARREK. 



JOSEPH WARREN TO THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY 
OF CONNECTICUT. 

Ix Provincial Congress, Watertown, 
May 5, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — The delegates appointed by your re- 
spectable Assembly to treat with General Gage on the late 
unhappy events which have occurred in this Colony have 
favored us with a conference, and communicated the sub- 
stance of their interview with him. 

We are greatly alarmed at the unparalleled wickedness 
of our unnatural enemies in endeavoring to jDcrsuade our 
sister Colony that the inhabitants of this first commenced 
hostilities, — a suggestion which we cannot but think will 
appear absurd, when the great inequalitj^ of the Lexington 
company and the detachment of Eegular troops which 
attacked them is coolly considered. 

But to put this matter in the clearest light, we beg 
leave to enclose you the copies of depositions taken by 
order of this Congress and despatched for London, contain- 
ing the most incontestable evidence that the King's troops 
first fired upon and killed several of the inhabitants of this 
Colony, before an^^ injury was offered to them. We also 
enclose 3^ou the copy of an address to the inhabitants of 
Great Britain,^ and of a letter to our Colony ngent,^ and 
think it expedient to suspend the publication of the address 
and letter until they shall have had their effect in England. 

The experience which we have had of General Gage 
hath fully convinced us that little dependence can be 
placed in his professions ; whilst he has been collecting his 
forces, fortifying our capital, and in every other respect 
preparing for war, we have been amused with pretensions 
to benevolence and kindness, evidently calculated to re- 
tard the measures which we were necessarily pursuing 
for self defence ; and we are constrained to declare that 

1 See pages 290 and 293. — Eds. 



LETTERS OF JOSEPH WARREN. 303 

sl^ould he be at <anv future time possessed of forces supe- 
rior to tliose raised to oppose him, ^\o should, from his 
past conduct, have no hopes left of escaping the heaviest 
vengeance which ministerial tyranny can devise, assisted 
by the most inveterate enemies to mankind in general, 
and of this their native country in particular. 

On the exertions of the Colonies and blessings of 
Heaven we alone can depend for safety and support ; and 
it is clearly the opinion of this Congress that the estab- 
lishment of a powerful army is the best and only measure 
left to bring the present disputes to a happy issue. It is 
evidently the business of the General to subjugate this 
and the other Colonies ; and we think there are the most 
convincing proofs that, in order to effect it, he is con- 
stantly aiming to suspend their preparations for defence, 
until his reinforcements shall arrive. But although we have 
been under great apprehensions with respect to the advan- 
tages wliich the conference of Connecticut with General 
Gage might give our enemies, yet we have the greatest 
confidence in the wisdom and Yigihi-nce of your respect- 
able Assembly and Colony of Connecticut, as well as of our 
other sister Colonies ; and have reason to hope, that while 
he fails in his intentions to lull and deceive this Continent, 
he can never accomplish his designs to conquer it. 

We are, with the greatest respect, gentlemen. 
Your very humble servants, 

Jos. Warken, President pro ton. 
Attest SamT^ Freeman, Secretary pro tern. 

To THE Honorable tiik Governor and Company of the 
Colony of Connecticut. 



JOSEPH WARREX TO GOVERNOR, COUNCIL, AND ASSEMBLY 
OF CONNECTICUT. 

Watertown, May 17th, 1775. 

May it Please Your Honors, — We have the happi- 
ness of presenting our congratulations to you on the 



304 LETTER OF JOSEPH WARREN. 

reduction of that important fortress, Ticonderoga. We 
applaud the conduct of both officers and soldiers, and are 
of the opinion that the advantageous situation of that for- 
tress makes it highly expedient that it should be repaired 
and properly garrisoned. In the mean time, as we suppose 
there is no necessity for keeping all the cannon there, we 
should be extremely glad if all the battering cannon, 
especially brass cannon, which can be spared from that 
place, or procured from Crown Point (which we hope is by 
this time in the hands of our friends), may be forwarded 
this way with all possible expedition, as we have here to 
contend with an army furnished with as fine a train of 
artillery as ever was seen in America, and we are in 
extreme need of a sufficient number of cannon to fortify 
those important passes, without which we can neither 
annoy General Gage, if it should become necessary, nor 
defend ourselves against him. We must therefore most 
earnestly recommend this very important matter to j'our 
immediate consideration ; and we would suggest it as our 
opinion, that the appointing Colonel Arnold to take charge 
of the cannon and bring them down with all possible haste 
may be a means of settling any dispute which may have 
arisen between him and some other officers, which we are 
always desirous to avoid, and more especially at a time 
when our common danger ought to unite us in the strong- 
est bonds of amity and affection. 
We are, gentlemen, 

Your most obedient, humble servants. 

Signed, by order of Provincial Congress, 

Jos. Warren, President jjvo iem. 

Attest ,Sam^ Freeman, Secretary fro tern. 

To THE HOKORABLE GOVERNOR, CoUNCIL, AND ASSEMBLY OF CONNECTICDT. 



LETTER OF GOVERXOR TRUMBULL. 305 



GOVERNOR TRUMBULL TO PROVINCIAL CONGRESS OF 
MASSACHUSETTS. 

Hartford, May 25th, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — Your letter of the ITtli inst., with the en- 
closed resolve of the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts 
Bay, was delivered to me by Colonel Easton^ and communi- 
cated to the General Assembty, who have desired me to re- 
turn their con i»;ratulations on the reduction of Ticonderosra, 
a fortress truly important, and to assure 3^ou they entertain 
a proper sense of the merit of those officers and soldiers 
by whose bravery and good conduct it was achieved. 
As this advantage was gained by the united counsels and 
enterprise of a number of private gentlemen in your 
Province, New Hampshire, New York, and this Colony, 
prompted only by a zeal for the liberties of their country, 
without public authority (to our knowledge), and is oi 
great and general importance to the united Colonies, it 
was tliought best to take the advice of the Continental 
Congress upon the manner of treating it in future, both 
by the General Assembly of this Colony and the Committee 
of New York, as well as by you. Despatches were accord- 
ingly sent to Philadelphia, and the resolution of the Con- 
tinental Congress thereupon hath been received this day 
by express, with a letter from the Committee of New 
York, copies of which enclosed are herewith sent you. By 
these you will see the present custody of that fortress is 
committed to the Province of New York, with the assist- 
ance of the New England Colonies if needed. 

The General Assembly of this Colony behold your situ- 
ation with concern, and a fixed resolution to contribute 
everything in their power to your defence and preserva- 
tion, and, as far as pertains to them, are willing and desir- 
ous you should have the benefit of such artillery as may 
be spared from the fortresses of Crown Point and Tycon- 
deroga ; but as they do not consider themselves as entitled 

^ James Easton. See Drake's Diet, of Amer. Biog. — Eds. 
39 



306 LETTER OF GOVERNOR TRUMBULL. 

to the command of those places, they cannot take upon 
themselves to give orders for the removal of the heavy 
cannon that may be spared, without the concurrence of 
the other Colonies interested in them. 

The necessity of securing and maintaining the posts on 
the lakes for defence of the frontiers becomes daily 
more evident from the iterated intelligence we receive of 
the plan formed by our enemies to distress us by inroads 
of Canadians and savages from the Province of Quebec 
upon the adjacent settlements. The enclosed copy of a 
letter from our delegates attending at New York, to com- 
municate measures with the Provincial Congress in that 
city, throws an additional light on this subject, and is 
thought worthy to be communicated to you ; and whilst 
the designs of our enemies against us fill us with concern, 
we cannot omit to observe the smiles of Providence upon 
us in revealing their wicked plans, and hitherto prospering 
the attempts of the Colonies to frustrate them. With a 
humble reliance on the continuance of divine favor and 
protection in a cause of the justice of which a doubt can- 
not be entertained, the General Assembly of this Colony 
are ready to co-operate with the other Colonies in every 
exertion for their common defence, and to contribute their 
proportion of men and other necessaries for maintain- 
ing the posts on the frontiers, or defending or repelling 
invasions in any other quarter, agreeable to the advice 
of the Continental Congress. I am, gentlemen, 

In behalf of the General Assembly of this Colony, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon™ Trumbull. 

To Honorable Provincial Congress of Massachusetts. 

In the lower House. 

The above draught of a letter read and approved. 

Test Rich': Law, Clerk. 
Concurred in the upper House. 

Test George Wyllys, Secretary. 



LETTERS OF JOSEPH WARREX AXD GOV. TRUMBULL. 307 

JOSEPH WARREN TO THE GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OF 
CONNECTICUT. 

In Provincial Congress, Watertown, 
May 27, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — Enclosed is copies of a letter from Col- 
onel Arnold and a list of military stores at Ticonderoga, 
etc. 

We have wrote you of the 17th instant, relative to that 
fortress, etc., and were desirous that you Avould give such 
orders relative thereto as to you should seem meet; but 
we are of opinion that the advice of the Continental Con- 
gress should be had thereon as soon as may be, and also 
the particular advice of the Provincial Congress of New 
York, to each of whom Ave have wrote upon this matter. 
Those fortresses being within the jurisdiction of the Colony 
of New York, we are of opinion that it is necessary to 
consult them upon a matter in which they are so greatly 
interested. 

We have appointed and directed Colonel Joseph Hen- 

shaw to repair to you and consult with you upon the 

affair of that fortress, the maintenance of which we think 

of the utmost importance to the security of New York and 

the New England Colonies. His instructions will be laid 

before you, and we have no doubt you will take such 

measures relative thereto as will promote the general 

safety of these Colonies. t iir n • 7 . 

•^ Jos. Warren, President. 

To THE Honorable the Governor and Company 
OF THE Colony of Connecticut. 



GOVERNOR TRUMBULL TO PROVINCIAL CONGRESS OF 
MASSACHUSETTS. 

Hartfoup, 29th May, 1775. 

Gentlemen, — Tam desired to enclose to j^ou copy of 
a letter from the Provincial Congress of New York, dated 
25th instant, which you will receive herewith per M. Brown, 



308 LETTER OF GOV. TRUMBULL. 

who is on liis return from the Continental Congress. The 
contents of the above-mentioned letter were immediately 
taken into consideration of this Assembly, in consequence 
whereof they have come into the following resolutions : 
" That one thousand men (including four companies which 
we had before ordered), under command of Colonel Hinman, 
should march as soon as possible to Tyconderoga and 
Crown Point, for the support and defence of those for- 
tresses. That they continue there until they are relieved 
by the Province of New York, or are otherwise ordered 
by this Assembly, That Colonel Hinman take the com- 
mand of our troops on those stations. That the troops be 
furnished with 1 lb. of powder and 3 lbs. of ball to each 
soldier. That Colonel Hinman be ordered to keep up the 
strictest vigilance to prevent any hostile incursions from 
being made into the settlements of the Province of Quebec, 
and that the Provincial Congresses of New York and 
Massachusetts Bay be advised of these measures, and the 
New York Congress be requested to forward the necessary 
supplies for said troops and such further supplies of am- 
munition as the}^ shall judge necessary." Advice of these 
resolutions are already forwarded to New York per M, 
Colton, your express to Philadelphia. It is matter of 
doubt with us whether the above-mentioned detachment 
of troops ordered by this Colony will be sufficient for the 
important purposes for which they are destined. But we 
recollect that Colonel Arnold is now on the spot, with a 
commission (as we understand) to raise a regiment in the 
pay of your Province. We are not informed how far he has 
proceeded in that design ; if he meets with success in his 
intentions, we flatter ourselves that his regiment, together 
with our troops, will be able to keep their ground. 

We would recommend to your consideration the fur- 
nishing such additional quantity of powder as you shall 
think necessary to be sent forward for the support of those 
northern fortresses. Am very sorry to have it to say we 



LETTER OF JAMES WATIREN TO GOV. TRUMBULL. 309 

are credibh^ informed there is not 500 lbs. of powder in 
the city of New York ; but at same time are advised 
that they are taking means to supply themselves with 
that very important article. 
I am, gentlemen, 

Your most obedient, humble servant, 

Jon'^'.^ Trumbull. 

Provincial Congress of Massachusetts Bay. 



JAMES 1 WARREX TO GOVERNOR TRLT^IBULL. 

In Provincial Congress, Watertown, 
June 25, 1775. 

Mat it Please Your Honor, — From advices received 
diverse ways, we have the greatest reason to determine 
that all the British troops already destined, or that may 
be ordered to America this season, will come to Boston; it 
being evidently their design, if possible, to rout our army 
before that place, destroy all our magazines, and thereby 
strike terror and faintness into the hearts of all friends 
to right and liberty throughout the continent, to revive 
and animate their scattered friends, and break the union 
of the Colonies, and in that way insure final success to 
their tyrann}^ This being undoubtedly the plan of our 
enemies, it is of inexpressible consequence that the ground 
that we have taken should at all events be maintained. 
Your Honor is no doubt fully sensible that our army, for 
the present, is unavoidably checked Avith regard to offen- 
sive operations for a reason of which you are not un- 
apprised. We have only the means of acting on the 
defensive, and that for a very short time. 

As Boston is impregnable against everything but great 
artillery, very few troops are sufficient to keep it ; and as 
there are two passes at least, very distant from each other, 
by which the enemy will probably attempt to advance 

^ Gen. James Warren, of Plymouth, Mass., who succeerled Joseph Warren 
as President of Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, upon death of latter at 
Bunker Hill. — Eds. 



310 LETTER OF JAMES WARREN TO GOV. TRUMBULL. 

into the country, it is thereby rendered necessary that we 
should throw our army into at least two grand divisions, 
each of which ought to be able to withstand almost the 
whole force of the enemy. Your Honor is acquainted 
that it was supposed at first to be necessary that thirty 
thousand men should be raised and stationed to act, for 
this season, in the environs of Boston. Thirteen thousand 
and six hundred was the number supposed by our Con- 
gress to be this Colony's proportion of such an army, and 
that number we have to our utmost been endeavoring 
fully to complete ; but because there are deficiencies in 
our regiment (as your Honor well knows there always 
will be in such cases), in order to make that quota good, 
we have been obliged to increase the number of the regi- 
ments ; but still there is a deficiencj^ and because of the 
inexpressible importance of having our army effectually 
strong, we are, with unremitted efforts and by every de- 
vice, at vast expense laboring to make that number fully 
complete, or rather to exceed it. 

3Iay it please 3'our Honor, because we are vastly appre- 
hensive of the fatal consequences of a general defeat of 
this army to the whole American cause, and are so unut- 
terably solicitous to have it effectually strengthened, we 
have called in every individual of our levies from all our 
outposts to join the army, although by that measure we 
expose all our towns on the sea-coast to the rage and dep- 
redations of the enemy, and run the dreadful risk of the 
best of our towns beiniz; reduced to ashes and takins; the 
miserable fate of Charlestown. 

We beg leave to acquaint your Honor that it is most 
clearly our opinion, and that we have the best ground to 
suppose, that as soon as the enemy have recovered a 
little breath from their amazing fatigues of the ITth of 
June, and the surprising losses w^iich they there undoubt- 
edly sustained shall be made up by arrivals of new 
troops, wdiich is almost taking place, they will direct all 
their force to some one point, and make the utmost 



LETTER OF JAMES WARREN TO GOV. TRUMBULL. 311 

efforts to force our lines, destroy our magazines, and 
thereby strike general terror and amazement into the 
hearts of the inhabitants of the whole continent. From 
this view of the case we cannot a moment longer forbear 
addressing 3-our Honor, and most earnestly suggesting to 
the immediate consideration of your General Assembly, 
not only the expediency but the indispensable necessity 
of an immediate augmentation of the troops from your 
Colony for the more effectual strengthening of the army. 
What the number of the augmentation ought to be we 
most cheerfully submit to the good judgment of your As- 
sembly, not in the least doubting but their wisdom and 
justice will direct and dispose theni to do all that is proper 
in so important a crisis as we really consider the present. 

We need not express to your Honor the indispensable 
necessity of despatch in making reinforcements, nor the 
propriety and advantage of making any new levies which 
your Assembly may order, with all possible speed, with- 
out the first raised companies waiting for the completing 
of others ; inasmuch as your Colony has here on the spot 
all the proper officers to make the necessary dispositions 
for their reception, and as the season of their being of 
any advantage for the support of our Colony may be 
irrecoverably lapsed before their arrival if the least 
unnecessary delay should be indulged. 

We have made a representation to the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor of Rhode Island similar to the foregoing, and are 
about to make alike representation of [.s/e] the Congress of 
New Hampshire, and to send the same by special express. 

We suppose the whole number of our enemy's land 
forces, when joined with the four regiments which were 
ordered to New York, will amount to upwards of ten 
thousand exclusive of negroes and Tories, who are every 
way provided and furnished in the best manner for ac- 
tion. We have the fullest confidence that your Honor's 
zeal and ardor for the salvation of our country, and the 



312 LETTERS OF JAMES WAEREN TO GOV. TRUMBULL. 

preservation of our inestimable rights, will render any 
importunity unnecessary to induce you to take all the 
requisite steps to effect the proposed augmentation, for 
which we are most solicitous. 

We are, may it please your Honor, 
With the greatest respect, 

Your Honor's most obedient, humble servant. 
By order of Congress, 

James Warren, President. 

To THE Honorable Governor Trumbull. 



JAMES WARREN TO GOVERNOR TRUMBULL. 

In Congress, Watertown, 
July 12th, 1775. 

May IT Please Your Honor, — The brig " Nancy," 
now in the harbor of Stoning ton in Connecticut, being 
laden with molasses, the property of the late Joshua 
Winslow, of Boston, a noted and active friend to Adminis- 
tration, and so we are well informed, is now directed to be 
conveyed to New York, and from thence, as we conjec- 
ture from sundry suspicious circumstances, sent to Boston; 
the master who has undertaken this business being now 
in custody, having given the information before men- 
tioned. Tlie Congress of the Massachusetts Bay beg 
leave to observe to your Honor whether prudence and 
good policy do not suggest to detain said brig and cargo, 
or such part of it as belongs to said Winslow, for the use 
of the Colonies, rather than to suffer them to fall into the 
hands of General Gage, where they will be improved to 
the support of our enemies and to augment the distress 
of these Colonies. 

We have the honor to be, with great respect. 

Your Honor's most humble servant. 
In behalf and by order of Congress, 

James Warren, President. 

The Honorable Governor Trumbull. 



APPENDIX. 



A. 

TO THE HONORABLE JONATHAN TRUMBULL, ESQ., GOVERNOR 
AND COMMANDER-IN-CHLEF OF CONNECTICUT, etc. 

The humble petition of James Rajanond, Captain, for himself 
and detachment ; Joseph Chew and George Bell, of the Com- 
missary General's department ; Peter Paton, Magnus Morrison, 
Peter Friesburgh, Ab"* Harris, James Baily, Joseph Kelly, 
W™ Stout, Samuel Osborn, and John Wilkie, Masters, in be- 
half of themselves and their men belonging to the vessels 
lately destroyed at Sag Harbor : — 

Humbly informing your Honor that at tlie time of their being 
made prisoners, most of them lost everything they had ; that 
the affairs of your petitioners in the Commissary and Naval 
Department are so peculiarly situated, we are like to be the 
greatest sufferers ; that we flatter ourselves if leave could be 
granted to Joseph Chew, Deputy Commissary (who has for 
some time had the management of the service we were em- 
ployed in), to go to New York, he could effect our being ex- 
changed, which would not only alleviate our misfortunes, but 
give relief to the same number now suffering imprisonment, 
who would return to this government in our places. In case 
this wished-for event did not take place, ho could obtain and 
bring to us such supplies and necessaries as might relieve us 
from the want we now are in, whicli under the unhappy situa- 
tion of our affairs we cannot expect to be done by letter or by 
one unacquainted with the service of that department in which 
we have been employed. I, Captain Raymond, also hope from 
his representation myself and i)arty may be exclianged ; if not, 
that he may bring such supplies of money and clothing that 
may enable me and them to live comfortably during our con- 

40 



314 APPENDIX. 

finement ; and the said Joseph Chew for himself, and all of us 
for him, engage and promise that whatever parole he may enter 
into on this occasion shall be strictly observed and performed. 

Your petitioners beg pardon for the trouble their situation 
obliges them to give, and humbly hope from your Honor's 
known humanity and benevolence you may be pleased to grant 
their request ; and they will as in duty bound ever pray, etc. 

James Raymond, Captain. 

Jos. Chew, Z). Commissary of Forage. 

George Bell, Collector of Forage. 



Hartford, 31st May, 1777. 



Peter Paton, 

Magnus Morison, 

Petter Frisberg, 

Abreham Harres, 

James Bailie, ) Masters of Vessels. 

Joseph Kelly, 

William Stout, 

John Wilkie, 

Samuel Osborn, 



B. 



TO HIS EXCELLENCY GOVERNOR TRUMBULL AND THE HON- 
ORABLE COUNCIL OF SAFETY FOR THE STATE OF CON- 
NECTICUT, KTC. 

The memorial of Joseph Chew, lately made prisoner on 
Long Island, humbly requesting your Honors to alter the 
place of his confinement from Wellington. 

Your memorialist has long had the King's commission. 
During the time he was in England his family were obliged 
to leave their habitation, with the loss of all their stock, most 
of their household furniture, etc., for no other cause than his 
being in the King's service. He is, and always will be, truly 
sensible of the protection and kindness they met with on 
coming to this Government, as well as of the great favor they 
were on the point of receiving from his Excellency the Gov- 
ernor at the time it was his misfortune to be made a prisoner. 



APPENDIX. olb 

They consist of a wife and number of small cliiklren, whose 
circumstances some of your Honors are acquainted with ; who, 
he believes, notwithstanding his sentiments, are willing he 
should enjoy their company (after upwards of two years' sepa- 
ration) during his captivity; this is a blessing he cannot possibly 
have if he is ordered to any very remote place, for reasons not 
unknown to some of your Honors, and that can be explained if 
he has the honor of personally attending you. 

Your memorialist begs leave to assure your Excellency and 
Honors that during his confinement he will have nothing to do 
with politics or attempt a correspondence or thing contrary to 
the true intent and meaning of the parole he takes, but observe 
such rules as may give no cause of offence or uneasiness. 

Had he so little regard to himself as to forfeit his honor in 
this case, — a thing his own commander would condemn as 
much as it can be detested here, — the -situation of his wife 
and children are the firmest ties and the most binding security 
that can be given for his behavior. 

The relief and good offices he may liave afforded those in 
distress since this unhappy contest he makes no merit of ; their 
situation required it ; and had his ability been equal to his in- 
clination, many more would have known it. Such times as 
these render it highly necessary to make use of every occasion 
in order to alleviate the misery of the unfortunate. 

Your Excellency's and Honors' memorialist begs liberty to 
add that whatever indulgences you may please to grant him 
and his family shall not in any manner of way or means be 
abused, and that he shall as in duty bound ever pray, etc. 

Jos. Chew, 

D. Commissar ij of Forage to the Army at New York, etc. 
Hartford, 7th June, 1777. 



c. 

GENERAL GATES TO GENERAL WASHINGTON. 

FisuKiLL, 2l8t May, 1778. 
Sir, — Last night I had the honor to receive your Excel- 
lency's letter of the 17th instant. The enemy in this quarter 
are also appearing to evacuate the Forts Washington and Inde- 



316 APPEXDIX. 

pendence, having been observed from Fort Lee to be moving 
some of their heavy cannon from the hill, and to all appearance 
embarking them on board a transport at the wharves. Previ- 
ous to your Excellency's giving me the hint I had despatched a 
trusty person to obtain intelligence of the enemy's intended 
movements, and hourl}^ expect the best information that can 
be procured ; upon its arrival it shall be immediately trans- 
mitted to your Excellency. A copy of 5^our letter shall this 
morning be forwarded to Governor Trumbull, with my request 
to have the six regiments of militia, voted by the Legislature 
of Connecticut, in readiness to march at the shortest notice ; 
for the scantiness of my provision magazine makes me dread 
the instant calling any more troops to this post. The day be- 
fore 3'esterday a large bag, sealed up, and directed to Governor 
Trumbull from Governor Tryon, was sent by a flag to my ad- 
vanced post. Upon "being brought to headquarters, it was in 
a few minutes sent ofE b}' a special express to the Governor 
at Hartford, where he is now meeting his Assembly. Horses, 
carriages, and forage are so much in request here, that there 
is no moving the artillery, camp equipage, or stores, until 
proper supplies of each can be obtained. 

At General Greene's desire I have advanced Colonel Hay, his 
deputy, ^50,000, but that is but a trifle in comparison of the 
sum necessarily required to purchase the articles here men- 
tioned. I must therefore entreat your Excellenc}^ will press 
General Greene to furnish Colonel Hay Avith a proper supply 
of cash. Colonel Wadsvvorth and Colonel Cuyler are very 
fully informed of the state of my provision magazine, so there 
is nothing left for me to do on that head. Your Excellency 
may be satisfied that the most attentive regard shall be paid 
to the motions of the enemy : but I cannot but lament the 
wa'etched plight this post is in, either for enterprise or retreat, 
by the want of proper means to move the camp equipage, 
artiller}', and stores. 

The Board of War desire I would request your Excellency 
to send them the returns of military stores, etc., which I 
brought to the Valley Forge for your inspection, as they have 
not yet been entered in the books of the office. 

Epclosed is a letter I have just received from Mr. Hayes, Sur- 
geon of the British Hospital at Albany. If your Excellency 
has no objection to granting the prayer of his petition, I will, 



APPENDIX. 317 

upon knowing your answer, order tlie prisoners down from 
Albany. At present I could wish them to be removed from 
thence, and there is no mode of doing tliat but by water, as 
they are most of them disabled from marching. 
I am, sir, 

Youl- Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Horatio Gates. 

IIis Excellency Gexeral Washington. 



GENERAL GATES TO GOVERNOK TRUMBULL. 

FisHKiLL, 21st May, 1778. 

Sir, — For yonr particular perusal I send your Excellency, 
in the packet, a letter I received last night from General Wash- 
ington, with my answer returned this morning to him. Your 
Excellency will see the reason why I do not immediately re- 
quest to be reinforced with the six regiments of militia ordered 
by the Legislature of Connecticut to be embodied for the public 
service ; but I must nevertheless entreat your Excellency will 
be pleased to order those regiments to be so collected and pro- 
vided that they may be ready to march in six hours after they 
receive your orders. My opinion with respect to the militia 
perfectly coincides with your Excellency's, which is never to 
call for them until the instant they are wanted, and to return 
them to their homes the moment the service is performed. 

My affectionate compliments wait upon your sons, Colonel 
Joseph and John Trumbull. It is with infinite regret that I 
reflect upon the loss I sustained in the hitter's being torn from 
his friend ; but the spirit of party and the spirit of avarice are 
meant to have too much dominion here as well as in the Old 
World. 

I am, sir. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Horatio Gates. 

His Excellency Governor TucMnuLL. 



318 APPENDIX. 



GENERAL GATES TO GOVERNOR TRUMBULL. 

FisiiKiLL, May 25th, 1778. 

Sir, — Enclosed T have the honor of sending your Excellency 
copies of two letters which I received yesterday afternoon. It 
is difficult to determine the enemy's real object ; but I tliink 
there is reason to conclude that they will make an immediate 
incursion into this, or one of the Eastern States. If in exe- 
cuting this plan they should be assisted by Sir Henry Clinton's 
army, which may suddenly march across the Jerseys and join 
them, their operations may prove very serious, as this post is too 
weak to make a formidable stand. I am under the necessity, 
therefore, of requesting that your Excellency would order the 
six regiments your Legislature has voted for the ensuing cam- 
paign, to join me as soon as possible. I am induced to be the 
more pressing in this request, because it is highly probable that 
the desperate state of the enemy's affairs, both in Europe and 
America, may compel them to undertake the most hazardous 
enterprise. 

I have the satisfaction of informing 3'our Excellency that my 
provision magazine is at present large enough to supply the 
reinforcements that come in. 

I have the honor to be. 
With the greatest respect. 

Your Excellency's most obedient, humble servant, 

Horatio Gates. 

His Excellency Governor Trumbull. 



LIST 
OF ALL LETTERS FROM GENERAL WASHINGTON 

Contained in the Trumbull Volumes in Possession of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society, with References to former 
Printing, or to the Pages of this Volume where now Printed. 



Those marked * are originals. The figures printed in heavy type refer to the 
preceding pages of this volume. 



1775. 


July 18 


July 


18 


July 


21 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


9 


Aug. 


14 


Aug. 


23 


Sept. 


2 



"Wasbinaton to Trumbull 



Sept. 



Sept 


9 


Sept 


21 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


29 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


15 


Nov. 


15 


Dec 


2 


Dec. 


5 


Dec. 


14 



Sparks, iii. 31 

Sparks, iii. 32 

Force, Arch. ii. Ser. iv. 1710 

Partly printed irf Sparks, iii. 46 ; 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 37 

2 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 137 

3 

Partly printed in Sparks, iii. 74 ; 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 632 

Sparks, iii. 83 ; Force, Arch. iii. 

Ser. iv. 675 

Force, Arch. iii. Sor. iv. 683 

Sparks, iii. 96 

4 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 1055 

6 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 1249 

Sparks, iii. 138 ; Force, Arch. iii. 

Ser. iv. 1335 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 1562 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 1562 

Sparks, iii. 182 ; Force, Arch. iv. 

Ser. iv. 157 

Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 238 



320 LETTERS OF WASniXGTOX. 

1775. 
Dec. 15 Washington to Trumbull, Sparks, iii. 198; Force, Arch. iv. 

Ser. iv. 283 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 298 
See Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 448 



Dec. 17 
Dec. 23 
1776. 
Jan. 7 
Jan. IG 
Jan. 19 
Jan. 20 
Jan. 21 
Jan. 25 
Feb. 8 
Feb. 8 
Feb. 15 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 22 
Mar. 9 
Mar. 14 
Mar. 21 
Mar. 27 
Mar. 28 
Apr. 20 

Apr. 22 
Apr. 2G 

May 2 
June 10 
June 28 
July 7 
July 8 
July 9 

July 11 
July 15 
July 19 
July 21 
July 24 
July 25 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Ausr. 7 



Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 



595 
697 
9 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 790 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 798 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 856 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 962 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 962 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 1157 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv, 1203 
Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 1476 
Force, Arch. v. Ser. iv. 165 
10 
Force, Arch. v. Ser. iv. 456 
14 
14 
(Parth' printed in Force, Arch. v. 
Ser. iv. 997), 15 
15 
Sparks, iii. 373 ; Force, Arch. v. 
Ser. iv. 1087 
Force, Arch. v. Ser. iv. 1173 
Sparks, iii. 416 
Forpe, Arch. vi. Ser. iv. 1124 
Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 106 
Col. Thomas Seymour, 17 

Trumbull, Sparks, iii. 453 ; Force, Arch, i, Ser. 

V. 142 

" Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 192 

Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 352 

" Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 450 

18 
" Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 558 

19 

Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 712 

" Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 712 

" See Sparks, iv. 33 ; Force, Arch. i. 

Ser. V. 821 



LETTERS OF WASHINGTON-. 321 

1776. 
Aug. 8 Washington to Trumbull. 19 

Aug. 11 " " Sparks, iv. 40; Force, Arch. i. 

Ser. V. 897 
Aug. 16 " " Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 981 

Aug. 18 " " Sparks, iv. 53 ; Force, Arch. i. 

Ser. V. 1028 
Aug. 24 " " Force, Arch. i. Ser. V. 1143 

Sept. 6 " " Sparks, iv. 78 ; Force, Arch. ii. 

Ser. V. 196 
Sept. 9 " " Sparks, iv. 88 ; Force, Arch. li. 

Ser. V. 257 
Sept. 23 " " Sparks, iv. 108; Force, Arch. ii. 

Ser. v. 465 
Sept. 26 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 549 

Sept. 30 " " Sparks, iv. 127; Force, Arch, ii. 

Ser. V. 609 
Oct. 1-3 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 826 

Oct. 8 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 947 

Oct. 9 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v, 957 

Oct. 15 " " Sparks, iv. 152 ; Force, Arch. ii. 

Ser. V. 1064 
Oct. 16 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 1076 

Nov. 10 " " Sparks, iv. 170; Force, Arch. iii. 

Ser. V. 632 
Nov. 17 " " Force, Arch. iii. Ser. v. 741 

Dec. 12 " " Sparks, iv. 212 ; Force, Arch. iii. 

Ser. V. 1186 
Dec. 14 " " Sparks, iv. 219; Force, Arch. iii. 

Ser. v. 1215 
" " Force, Arch. iii. Ser. v. 1246 

Force, Arch. iii. Ser. v. 1338 
22 
" " Washington's Ofiicial Letters, vol. i. 

337 

22 
30 

Sparks, iv. 294 

" Gen. Assembl}' of Conn., See Sparks, iv. 305 

Trumbull, 31 

34 
39 
39 
41 



Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


27 


177 


7. 


Jan. 


10 


Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


24 


Jan. 


31 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


6 


Feb. 


9 


Feb. 


10 



322 



LETTERS OF WASHINGTON. 



1777. 












Feb. 11 


"Washing 


ton to Trumbull, 






40 


Feb. 20 


" 




' 






41 


Mar. 3 


" 










46 


Mar. G 


" 










Sparks, iv. 351 


Mar. 23 


" 










50 


Mar. 29 


" 










52 


Mar. 31 


" 










54 


Apr. 12 


" 










55 


Apr. 21 


" 










58 


May 11 


" 










Sparks, iv. 412 


May 23 


" 










65 


May 26 


" 










67 


June 20 


" 




" 






71 


June 23 


" 


" 






72 


July 1 




Gen. Putnam 


(P 


artly 


printed in Sparks, iv. 
475), 76 


July 2-4 


" 


Trumbull (Partly 


prin 


ted in Sparks, iv. 476), 












77 


July 7 


" 


" 






80 


July 17 


" 


" 






Sparks, iv. 497 


July 31 


" 


" 






Sparks, v. 9 


Aug. 4 


" 


" 






90 


Aug. 4 


» 


•' 






92 


Sept. 8 


" 


" 






96 


Sept. 11 


" 


President of Congress 


Sparks, v. 57 


Oct. 1 


55 


Trumbull (Partly 


printed in Sparks, v. 75), 97 


Oct. 7 


" 


" 






99 


Oct. 26 


" 


" 






100 


Dec. 15 


" 


" 






103 


Dec. 29 


" 


55 






104 


1778. 












Jan. 24 


" 


" 






108 


Feb. 6 


" 


" 






110 


INIar. 31 


" 


" 






111 


May 17 


" 


Gen. Gates, 






115 


JMay 25 


" 


" 






Sparks, v. 381 


June 18 


" 


" 






116 


July 14 


» 


TrumbuU, 






Sparks, v. 440 


July 18 


" 


" 






117 


July 22 


>» 


" 






117 


July 28 


» 


" 






120 


Aug. 8 


" 


" 






122 


Sept. 6 


" 




" 






126 



LETTERS OF WASHINGTON. 



323 



lingto 


n to Trumbull, 






127 


n 


»» 

Gen. Gates, 
Trumbull, 






128 
129 
131 

133 
134 
136 
136 


: 


„ 


(See 


Sparks, vi 


334), 138 
139 


" 


» 






140 


" 


" 






141 


" 


» 
» 






143 
143 
144 


»> 


n 






145 


" 


i> 






147 


" 


" 






148 


" 


» 






152 


" 


» 






154 


" 








155 
157 
160 
161 


" 


M 






162 


,, 


J> 






163 
164 
165 


" 


Col. Henry Champion, 




166 


" 


Truml)ull, 






166 
166 
170 
171 


" 


Comm. of Co-operation, 




173 


" 


" 






175 


" 


Trumbull, 






176 
177 


n 


Comm. of Co 


•operation, 


Spai 


ks, vii. 80 
177 


" 


Trumbull (Pa 


•tl y printed 


in Sparks, vii. 93), 180 


" 


» 






181 



324 




LETTERS OF WASHINGTON. 






1780. 














*July 3 Washington to Tninibull, 








183 


*July 7 


" 


" 








184 


July 10 


" 


President of Congress, 






184 


*July 11 


" 


Trumbull, 








186 


July 13 


?» 


Comm. of Co 


-operation. 






187 


*July 14 


» 


Trumbull, 








188 


July 18 


" 


Geo. Olney, 








189 


July 20 


» 


Col. Elisha Sheldon, 






190 


*Jaly 22 


" 


Trumbull, 








190 


*July 27 


>7 


" 








192 


July 31 


" 


Nehemiah Hubbard, 






193 


*Aug. 8 


" 


Trumbull, 








193 


Aug. 17 


" 


Comm. of Co 


-operation. 






194 


*Aug. 22 


" 


Trumbull, 








197 


*Aug. 27 


» 


" 








198 


*Aug. 28 


» 


" 








200 


*Sept. 5 


" 


" 








204 


Sept. 13 


" 


Nehemiah Hubbard, 






205* 


*Oct. 11 


" 


Trumbull, 




See Spark 


s, vii. 245 


*Oct. 18 


" 


" 








206 


*Oct. 28 


" 


" 








213 


*Nov. 1 


" 


" 








214 j 


*Nov. 10 


" 


» 








215 j 


♦Dec. 8 


" 


" 








216 j 


*Dec. 10 


" 


" 








217 1 


*Dee. 17 


" 


» 








219 


*Dec. 20 


» 


" 








221 


1781. 














*Jan. 2 


" 


>' 








222 


*Jan. 5 . 


" 


" 


(See 


Sparks, 


vii. 


352), 222 i 


*Jan. (no elate 


)" 


" 








225 


*Jan. 19 


" 


" 








226 


*Jan. 22 


" 


j> 


(See 


Sparks, 


vii. 


381), 227 


*Jan. 29 


» 


» 








228 


*Feb. 4 


>J 


» 








231 


*Feb. 21 


" 


" 








233 


*Apr. 10 


5> 


" 








234 


♦Apr. 17 


" 


» 








235 


♦May 10 


" 


n 


(See 


Sparks, 


viii 


. 3G), 236 


♦May 22 


» 


" 








238 


♦May 24 


" 


" 


(See 


Sparks, 


viii 


51), 233 


♦May 25 


" 


" 








241 1 


♦June 15 


" 


j> 








242 





LETTERS OF WASHINGTON. 


825 


1781. 








*Jime 24 


"Washington to Trumbull, 




243 


♦June 28 


" " 




244 


*July 1 


" " 




245 


*Aug. 2 


" (Partly printed in Sparks, yiii. 123) 


,250 


*Aug. 3 


" 




252 


*Aug. IG 


" '♦ 




253 


*Aug. 22 


91 n 




254 


*Nov. 28 


i» >» 


(See Sparks, viii. 212), 


255 


1782. 








*Jan. 22 


" 


(See Sparks, viii. 22G), 


258 


*Jan. 31 


" " 


(See Sparks, viii. 232), 


261 


*Mar. 5 


" " 




265 


*May 4-8 


" " 


(See Sparks, viii. 283), 


266 


*31ay 8 


" " 


(See Sparks, viii. 292), 


271 


*May 10 


" 




273 


May 10 


Col. Canfield, 




273 


*May 29 


Trumbull, 




274 


*Jiily3-3C 


) 




275 


*Xov.l8 


" 




276 


1783. 








*Jan. 14 


" 




277 


*Mar. 5 


" " 




277 


Mar. 15 


"Washington's Newburgh Add 


ress. Sparks, viii 


560 


*Apr. 14 


Washington to Trumbull, 




279 


June 7 


" President of Congress, Sparks, viii 


438 



LIST OF LETTERS FROM GOVERNOR TRUMBULL 
TO GENERAL WASHINGTON 

CONTAI>rED IN THE TkUMBULL VOLUMES IN POSSESSION OF THE 

Massachusetts Historical Society, with References to former 
Printing, or to Pages of this Volume where now Printed. 

The references to Sparks in this hst are to his volumes of Letters to Washington. 



1775. 
Jul}' 13 Trumbull to Washington, 1 

" " Sparks, i. 2 ; Force, Arch. ii. Ser. 

iv. 1658 
" " Sparks, 1. 4 ; Force, Arch. ii. Ser. 

iv. 1676 
" " Sparks, i. 9 ; Force, Arch. ii. Ser, 

iv. 1763 
" " Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 57 

" " Force, Arch. iii. Ser. [\. 70 

" " Sparks, i. 21 ; Force, Arch. iii. Ser. 

iv. 87 
" " Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 97 

2 
" " Sparks, i. 31 ; Force, Arch. iii. Ser. 

iv. 647 
4 

" " Sparks,!. 37; Force, Arch. iii. Ser. 

iv. 718 
5 
" Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 988 

" " Force, Arch. iii. Ser. iv. 1254 

»» »» 6 

" " Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 213 

" " Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 227 



July 


13 


July 


17 


July 


31 


Aug. 


7 


Aug. 


8 


Aug. 


11 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


21 


Sept. 


5 


Sept. 


6 


Sept. 


15 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


30 


Nov. 


6 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


9 



Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


IS 


Jan. 


22 


Jan. 


24 


Feb. 


2 


Feb. 


5 



LETTERS OF TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 327 

177G. 
Jan. 1 Trumbull to Washington, Sparks, i. 103 ; Force, Arch. iv. 

Ser. iv. 532 
" " Sparks, i. 118 

" " Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 765 

" " Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 808 

" Sparks, i. 137 ; Force, Arch. iv. 

Ser. iv. 839 
" " Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 917 

" " Sparks, i. 141 ; Force, Arch. iv. 

Ser. iv. 945 
Feb. 12 " " Sparks, i. 143 ; Force, Arch. iv. 

Ser. iv. 1017 
Feb. 16 " " Force, Arch. iv. Ser. iv. 1163 

Mar. 18 " " Force, Arch. v. Ser. iv. 406 

Mar. 25 " " 11 

Apr. 29 " " ' 16 

June 22 " " Force, Arch. vi. Ser. iv. 1032 

July 3 " " Force, Arch. vi. Ser. iv. 1253 

Jul}' 4 " " Sparks, i. 253 ; Force, Arch. vi. 

Ser. iv. 1275 
Juh' 6 " " Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 45 

July 16 " " Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 378 

July 17 " " Force, Arch. i. Ser. v. 400 

Aug. 5 " " Sparks, i. 268 ; Force, Arch. i. 

Ser. v. 776 
Aug. 13 " " 20 

Aug. 16 " " 21 

Aug. 31 " " Sparks, i. 281 ; Force, Arch. i. 

Ser. V. 1277 
Sept. 2 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 128 

Sept. 5 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 187 

Sept. 10 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 278 

Sept. 11 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. V. 295 

Sept. 11 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 295 

Sept. 20 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 422 

Sept. 27 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 574 

Sept. 27 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 574 

Sept. 28 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 593 

Oct. 2 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 847 

Oct. 11 " " Sparks, i. 291; Force, Arch. ii. 

Ser. V. 1001 
Oct. 13 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 1028 

Oct. 14 " " Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 1041 



328 

177( 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 

177: 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
May 
Maj 
May 
June 
June 
June 
June 
July 
July 
July 
July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Dec. 

177) 
Jan. 
May 
July 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Oct. 



LETTERS OF TRUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 



21 Trumbull to AYashington, 
G 

12 
23 

28 

r. 

10 
14 
14 
23 

1 

7 
21 
24 
25 
26 

8 
10 
21 
14 

4 
18 
22 

9 

9 
12 
27 
14 
15 
25 
28 

7 

1 
14 

2 

14 

5 
25 

4 
27 
27 
28 



Force, Arch. ii. Ser. v. 1171 
Force, Arch. iii. Ser. v. 1103 
Force, Arch. iii. Ser. v. 1193 
Force, Arch. iii. Ser. v. 1389 
Force, Arch. iii. Ser. v. 1469 

22 
24 
26 
27 
34 
35 
Sparks, i. 342 
42 
43 
45 
48 
48 
50 
56 
59 
61 
64 
68 
69 
70 
74 
83 
84 
85 
89 
93 
94 
100 
101 

107 
113 
119 
121 
122 
123 
129 



LETTERS OF TliUMBULL TO WASHINGTON. 



329 



1778. 
Nov. 17 

1779. 
Apr. 27 
Oct. U 
Nov. 5 
Dec. 27 

1780. 
Mar. 10 
Aug. 31 
Dec. 15 

1781. 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 31 
July 9 
July 9 
July 17 
Sept. 13 

1783. 
May 17 
June 10 

1784. 
Apr. 20 



Trumbull to Washington, 



130 

135 
142 

Sparks, ii. 311 
149 

158 
202 
218 

224 
230 

Sparks, iii. 350 
247 
248 

Sparks, iii. 403 

280 
280 

Sparks, iv. 6G 



42 



CON^TENTS 

OF TIIK 

TEN VOLUMES OF THE 
COLLECTIONS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

FIFTH SERIES, 1871-1887. 



VOLUME I. (1871). 

Committee of Publication. — Robert C. Winthrop, Charles Deaxe, 
Chandler Robbins, Charles C. Smith. 

Winthrop Papers. Pakt III. 

Complete List of Members of the Societ}', in the Order of 

their Election xiii 

Complete List of the Ofllcers of the Society xxiv 

Resident Members, in the Order of their Election . . . xxvii 

Ofllcers of the Society elected April 13, 1871 .... xxix 
Letters of Lucy Downing and Others from the Winthrop 

Collection '. 3-450 

Miscellaneous Papers from the Winthrop Collection . . 451-509 

Fac-similes of Signatures and Seals 511 



VOLUME II. (1876). 

Committee of Publication. — Ciiarlks Deaxe, Chandler Robbixs, Wil- 
liam G. Brooks. 

Belkxap Papers. Part I. 

Omcersof the Society elected April, 187G xv 

Resident Members xvi 

Ilonorar}' and Corresponding Members xviii 

Members Deceased xx 

Correspondence between Jercm}' Belknap and Ebenezcr 

Hazard 1-500 



CONTENTS OF THE TEN VOLUMES. 



VOLUME III. (1877). 

Committee of Publication. — Charles Deane, Chandler Robbins, Wil- 
liam G. Brooks. 

Belknap Papers. Part 1 1. 

Correspondence between Jeremy Belknap and Ebenezer 

Hazard 1-371 

Prefatory Note 375 

Queries relating to Slaveiy in Massachusetts .... 379-431 

Negro Petitions for Freedom 432-437 

Brief of Levi Lincoln in the Slave Case tried 1781 . . 438-442 

VOLUME IV. (1878). 
Committee of Publication. — Charles Francis Adams, Richard Froth- 

INGHAM, WiNSLOW WaRREN. 

Heath, Winthrop, and Warren Papers. 

Officers of the Society elected April 11, 1877 .... vii 

Resident Members of the Society viii 

Honorary and Corresponding Members elected under the 

Original Act of Incorporation, 1794 x 

Honorary and Corresponding Members elected since the 

Passage of the Act of 1857 xi 

Members Deceased xii 

Letters of George Washington to William Heath . . . 1-285 
Correspondence between John Adams and Prof. John 

Winthrop 287-313 

Correspondence between John Adams and Mrs. Merc\' 

Warren 315-511 

VOLUME V. (1878). 

Committee of Publication. — George E. Ellis, William H. Whitmore, 
Henry Warren Torrey, James Russell Lowell. 

Sewall Papers. Part I. 

Officers of the Society elected April 10, 1878 .... v 

Resident Members vi 

Honorary and Corresponding Members viii 

Members Deceased x 

Diary of Samuel Sewall, 1G74-1 700 1-509 



I 



CONTENTS OF THE TEN VOLUMES. 333 



VOLUME VI. (1879). 

Committee of Publication. — Gkorge E. Ellis, William H. Whitmore, 
IIkxry \Varkp:x Torkey, Jamks Russell Lowkll. 

Sewall Papers. Part II. 

Tables of Contents of Notes in Vols. I. and II., Sewall 

Papers i 

Miscellaneous Items from Sewall Papers 7*_27* 

Reprint of '' A Memorial of the Present Deplorable State 

of New England " 31*-64* 

Reprint of "A Modest Enqnir^^ into the grounds and 
occasions of a late Pam[)hlet intituled a Memorial of 
the Present Deplorable State of New Enghmd " . . 65*-95* 
Reprint of " The Deplorable State of New England " 97*-131* 
Diary of Samuel Sewall, 1699-1700 to 1714 .... 1-440 

VOLUME VII. (1882). 

Committee of Publication. — George E. Ellis, William II. Whitmore, 
Henry Warrex Tourey, James Russell Lowell. 

Sewall Papers. Part III. 

Diary of Samuel Sewall, 1714-1729 1-410 

General Index of the Three Volumes of Sewall's Journal 431 



VOLUME VIII. (1882). 

Committee of Publication. — Charles C. Smith, George Dexter, Robert 
C. WiNTHROP, Jr. 

WiN'THROP Papers. Part IV. 

Officers of the Society elected AprillS, 1882 .... vii 

Resident Members, in the Order of their Election . . viii 

Honorary and Corresponding Members x 

INIembers Deceased xii 

Letters of John Winthrop. .Jr.. II(Miry AVinthrop. Forth 
Wintlirop, Stephen Winthrop, Adam Winthrop, Deane 
Winthrop, Samuel Winthrop, Fitz John Winthrop, 
Wait Wintlirop, and J(»hn Winthrop, F. R. S., 1G22- 

1701 3-572 

Autographs ■ 574 



334 CONTENTS OF THE TEN VOLUMES. 



VOLUME IX. (18«5). 

Committee of Publication. — Chakles Deane, Justin Winsor, Arthur 
Lord. 

Trumbuli, Papers. Part I. 

Pxlitorial Note vii-xvii 

i^arly Miscellaneous Papers 1-209 

Letters of Dr. William Samuel Johnson 211—490 

Letters of Colonel Jedediah Huntington 491-518 



VOLUME X. (1887). 

Committee of Publication. — WissLOW Warren, Henry F. Jenks, George 
B. Chase. 

Trumbull Papers. Part II. 

Correspondence between General Washington and Gov- 
ernor Trumbull and Others 1-281 

Correspondence between Governor TrnmbuU and Joseph 
Warren, James Warren, John Hancock, and General 
Gage 283 

List of Letters of General Washington contained in the 
Trumbull Papers in the Possession of the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society 319 

List of Letters of Governor Trumbull to General AVash- 

ington in the same Papers 326 

Contents of the Ten Volumes of Collections, 5th Series . 331 

General Index 337 



INDEX 

OF THE 

COLLECTIONS 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Fifth Series. 



INDEX 

OF THE 

COLLECTIONS 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Fifth Series. 



A. 

Abacliuchood, wounded by Ninicrnft's 
son, 9. 142. 

Abbeville, , 2. 438. 

Abhinsdon Hospital, 5. 302. 

Abbington (Abbin>(don), Eitg., tbe mar- 
ket-house at, 5. 304. 

Abbot, , innkeeper, 2. 387. 

Abbot, .1//-., assists in the Quelch piracy 
affair, 6. 105, 106. Delivers oration, 7. 
2-38. 

Abbot, Rev. Hull, mentioned, 7. 33G, 3-56. 

Abby, sloop, z- 322, 326, 348. 

Abigail, Widow of Indian MomontaiKj, 6. 
375, 434. 

Abington, attempts to cast cannon at, 4. 
304. Mentioned, 6. 97. 

Abington Law, 6. 85*. 

Abney, Thomas, 5. 300. 

Abraham, Samuel, Indian of Natirh, 7. 
135. J ' / 

Abstract of Gov. Dudley's ' Transac- 
tion witli tlie Indians,' 6. 85. 

Acadie, 6. 2(i(). 

Accession of King George I., 7. 94. 

Accombamuck, 8- 558. 

Accord Pond, 6. 97. 

' Account of the College of New Jersey,' 
3- ^7, 28. 

Acherley, Roger, 4. 324. 

Ackerly, a spi/, 4. 167. 

Act, of Uniformity, 5. 156 ; 7. 105. Of 
Parliament, 5. 393; 6. 40*, 51*, 106*, 
125, 248, 352; 7. 66. Declaring the 
Rights and Liberties of the Subject, 5. 
434. Of Assembly, 5. 457, 458 ; 6. 107*, 
108*, 114* 126*; 7. 102. For Manu- 
facture of Salt, 5. 457. Conccruini, 



Supplies to other Provinces, 5. 458. 
Against Atheism, 5. 462. For Courts, 
5. 495. Allowing and disallowing laws, 

5. 496. Of the Governor and Assem- 
bly, 6. 41*, 108*. Of the General Court, 

6. 55*. Against Fornication, 6. 143. 
Passed for altering Style of Royal 
Title, 6. 225. To prevent Oppression 
of Debtors, 6. 366. Prohibiting bring- 
ing in Indian Servants or Slaves, 6. 
380. Prohibiting E.xport of Grain, 6. 
384. For shortening the Years for 
Marriage, 6. 415. For better Observa- 
tion of Lord's Day, 6. 420, 421 ; 7. 81. 
For preventing Growth of Schism, 7. 
13, 17, 18. For continuing Commis- 
sions, 7. 33. Of the Province, 7. 40* 
For Bills of Credit, 7. 49, 235. For 
building Light-house, 7. 102, 103. For 
making Returns of Marriages, etc., 7. 
112. I'roviding for Posthumous Chil- 
dren, 7. 121. As to Quorums, 7. 165. 
Concerning Official Oaths, 7. 236. As 
to tlie Three Official Oaths, 7. 2.36. 
Concerning Bills of Credit, 7. 276. 
About Counterfeiting, 7. 276. Against 
the Extraordinary Expense at Funerals, 

7. 356. Against giving of Scarfs at 
Funerals, 7. 356. Of General Pardon, 
considered in Parliament, 9. 225. Of 
Navigation, 9. 231, 236. Of Indemnity, 
in Parliament, 9. 237. Of Congress 
concerning the Quotas of several States 
to he furnislied for ensuing Campaign, 
10. 155. Of Congress, calling for Pro- 
visions for the Army, 10. 217. 

Acts of Trade, letter'of Fitz-John Win- 

throp concerning, 8. 361. 
Acushnet, 6. 160. 



43 



J38 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Adams, , Chariest own, a stabbing I 

affair, 5. 183. 
Adams, Vapl., lived at Japan, i. 278. 
Adams, Rev. Mr., Soconnet, i. 447. 
Adams, J/rs.,6. 3«0; 7. 38L 
Adams, Mrs. Abigail (Smith), mentioned. 

3. 272 ; 4. 319, 401, 499, 509-511. Let- 
ters from, to Mrs. Warren, 4. 493-495, 
501. Letter to, from Mrs. Warren, 4 
503. 

Adams, Abraham, wnholder,6.2o5; 7. 31. 

Adams, Anna, 7. 186. 

Adams, Archclaiis, mariner, 7. 188. 

Adams, Mrs. Avis, death of, 6 12. 

Adams, Charles Francis, preface to the 
correspondence between John Adams 
and Mrs. Warren signed bj-, 4. 317- 
319. 

Adams, David, clockmaJcer, 7. 31. 

Adams, Edward, 6. 47. 

Adams, Eliplialet, birth of, 5. 41. Preach- 
es, 7. 21, 104,380. 

Adams, Hugh, mentioned, 2. 212 ; 5. 3. 
Letter from, 6. 11. Lawsuit against 
Haws, 7. 76. 

Adams, Jacob, death of, 7. 148, 149. 

Adams, Capt. John, 6. 12, 68, 69. 

Adams, Pres. Jolin, mentioned, 3. 117, 
1 33, 1 52, 270 ; 4. 289, 503. Let ter of , to 
Dr. Belknap, on slavery in ]\lassachu- 
setts, 3. 401, 402. Letter of, to Dr. 
Belknap, 3. 416. His correspondence 
with I'rof. John Winthrop, 4. 291-313. 
Introduces the Messrs. Hall to Prof. 
Wiiitlirop, 4. 291. On pa}' of troops, 
and the proposal to appoint ofhcers 
frdm other colonies than Massachu- 
setts to command them, 4. 294-296. Ad- 
vises against a separate declaration of 
independence by one colony, 4. 300. 
Chief Justice, 4. 307, 357. Eager for 
declaralion of independence, 4. 308, 309. 
His correspondence with Mrs. Warren, 

4. 319-511. Defends himself from the 
charge of being a monarchist, 4 324- 
328, 332. Kepels the charge of cor- 
ruption, 4. 335-338. His views of the 
principles of the American Revolu- 
tion, 4. 338-350. When he first 
tliought of independence, 4. 340. His 
letters to Gen. Brattle on the inde- 
pendence of the Judiciary, 4. 344. His 
share in the answer of the House of 
Pepresentativcs to Gov. Hutchinson's 
speech on the powers of Parliament, 4. 
346, 347. Author of the report of the 
committee on the rights of the colonies, 
4. 348. In favor of vigorous resist- 
ance and separation from Great Brit- 
ain, 4. 349, 350. Not satisfied with the 
Articles of Confederation, 4. 351. His 
iileas of a republican form of govern- 
ment, 4. 353. Controverts Mrs. War- 
ren's statement that he began his 
political career in 1774, 4. 354-358. 



Anecdotes of, 4. 356, 361, 362. His 
comments on Mrs. Warren's account 
of the mission to France, 4. 366-374. 
His unpleasant situation in France, 
4. 367, 368. Letter froin, to Samuel 
Adams, on the diplomatic situation 
in France, 4. 368-371. His expenses 
as Commissioner, 4. 371-373. Disap- 
pointed in e.xpecting to return in the 
' Alliance,' 4. 374. His letter to Con- 
gress, 4. 374, 375. His services in 
the Convention to form a Constitution 
for Massachusetts. 4. 375. His views 
of alliance with France, 4. 376. His 
commissions to Great Britain, 4. 377- 
380. His commission to negotiate a 
loan, 4. 382, 383. His services in Hol- 
land, 4. 384-393. His commission to 
make a treaty with Holland, 4. 385. 
Defends himself from the cliarge of 
bad manners and morals, 4. 388, 389. 
Defends M. Dumas, 4 389. 390. His 
residence and associates in Amster- 
dam, 4. 391, 392. His residence at the 
Hague, 4. 393. Date of his reception 
as minister to Holland, 4. 400. Ac- 
count of political parties in Holland, 4. 
400-406. Relates anecdotes to prove 
the attachment of the Dutch to the 
Stadtholdership, 4. 402-406. His ill- 
ness in Holland, 4. 407. Criticises Mrs. 
Warren's assertion that he was not 
naturally fitted for the Court of France, 
4. 407-411. Reasons for Franklin's 
dislike of him, 4. 408, 413, 414. His 
interview with Brissot, 4. 410. With 
the Duke de Liancourt, 4. 410. His 
account of his labors in France and 
Holland, 4. 411-416. Disliked by Ver- 
gennes, 4. 412. 413, 415. Letter from, 
to Mrs. Warren (in her praise), quoted, 
4. 422. His work in Holland, 4. 425, 

426. Declines to treat with Great 
Britain until the United States are rec- 
ognized as a nation, 4. 426. DitBcul- 
ties with Franklin and Vergennes, 4. 

427, 428. Claims that he was rightly 
at the liead of the connnission, 4. 430, 
"131. Considers ' republicanism ' an in- 
definite term, 4. 431, 432. Reasons for 
his defeat in the election of 1801, 4. 

433. Election slanders against him, 4. 
433-436. Curious interview with a 
Pemisylvania German clergyman, 4. 

434, 435. Accused of a desire to set up 
an established (Presbyterian) church, 
4. 434-436. On the title to be given to 
the President, 4. 436-438. On titles 
generally, 4. 438, 439. Criticises Jlrs. 
Warren's estimate of Francis Dana, 4. 
439-447. The status of Americans an 
open question in the proposed media- 
tion of Austria and Russia, 4. 441-444. 
Note from, to the Count de Vergennes, 
4. 441. Interview with M. Rayncval, 



OF rilK MASSACHUSETTS IIISTOIIICAL SOCIETY. 



539 



4. 44*2. Refuses to attend tlio Conjrress 
at Vienna, unless the iiuleiRiiilence of 
America is recognized, 4. 44->, 4 14 Ue- 
niarks on Verjjennes and Franklin, 4. 
444, 445. Praises Mr. Dana's lii.uh 
qualities and aptness for diploinaiio 
employment, 4. 440, 447. Commission 
to, witii Franklin and otliers, to nejio- 
tiate for jjeace, 4. 4o7-4ull; to ac- 
cept the mediation of Germany and 
Russia, 4. 45!>, 400. His various resi- 
dences in France, 4. 4(il, 4()2. Enmity 
of the Warren fasnily to, 4. i(>-{, 404. 
His detractors, 4. 404. His labors on 
the question of the independence of 
the colonics, 4. 40-5-401). Uesolution 
proposed by him, in conjunction witli 
J{. H. Lee, 4. 4l35, 4(iO. The story of 
his invoking the God of Eloquence, 4. 
466-409. His speecli on independence, 
4. 407-469. Anecdote of the Abbe 
Raynal, 4. 468, 469. Claims credit for 
industry, 4. 409, 470. His policy with 
France while I'rcsident, 4. 470, 471. 
Remarks on ambition, 4. 471, 472, 474. 
His views of republics, 4. 472-474. 
Happiness in I'etirement, 4 47'). Ab- 
stained, as Vice-l'resident, from inter- 
ference in patronage, 4. 476. Jealousy 
among men in public life, 4. 477, 478. 
His opinions at different times of King, 
4. 487; of Franklin, 4. 488 His opin- 
ion of Napoleon, 4. 404. Mr. Gerry's 
views on the correspondence between, 
and Mrs. Warren, 4. 490-498. Mr. 
Gerry acts as mediator, 4 499, 500. 
Token of friendship sent to Mrs. War- 
ren, 4. 502, 503. Letters from, to Mrs. 
Warren, 4. 504-500, 508, £09. Letter 
to, from tiov. .McKenn, 4. 506-503. 
Letter to, from Mrs. Warren, 4. .509- 
511. His 'Defence of the Constitu- 
tions of America,' 4. ;W2. 

Adams, Pres. John Quincy. 4. 336, 488. 

Adams, Rir. Joseph, deatii of, 2. 212, 
217. At Samuel Sewall's wedding, 7. 
2:]:{. 

Adams, Mary, death of, 5. 49. 

Adams, Moses, Sherh'/ni, 5. 19L 

Adauis, Nathaniel, his ' Annals of Ports- 
mouth ' cited, 2. 162 n., 109 n., 225 n. ; 7. 
185. 

Adams, Roger, 5. 368. 

Adams, Samuel, father of Gov. Samuel, 
7. 01, 101. 

Adams, Gov. Samuel, mentioned, 3. 17, 
110, 151 ; 4. 312, 3:]:;, 335, 341, 340, 347, 
372, 373, 39.5, 477, 478. Letter to. from 
John Adams (in France), 4. .368-371. 

Adams, Thomas, i. 285; 3. 301. 

Adams, William, storekeeper at Alhamj, 4. 

Adams, Lii^nt. William, 10. 84. 
Adams, li,i: William, 5. 6, 77. Denth 
of, 5 92. 



Adan, John Richardson, 4. GOO. 

Addauis, JiiTias, / '/liiadelpliid, a partner 
of Kben Hazard, 3. 242, 251, 293, 295, 
301. 

Addington, Mrn. Anne, ivfc af Isaac, Sr., 
741. 

Addington. J/;s. Elizabeth. Jirst u-fe of 
tlip ^crreturii, death of, 6. 372, 373. 

Addington, Mra. Elizabeth, sicond wife of 
the Hecrelari/, 1. 30 h; 6. 407. 

Addington, Secretan/ Isaac, 5. 378; 6. 95*, 
110*, 10, 58. 68, 102, 188, 199, 400, 415, 
419, 424, 438; 7.5, 17. 33. 39, 41-43, 
07 ; 8. 402, 525, 551. Chosen deputy, 
5. 07. Chosen connnissioner, 5. 183. 
Voted for at town meeting, 5. 214. One 
of the owners of ship ' America.' 5. 230. 
Goes to the castle concerning batteries, 

5. 316. At Nantasket, 5. •■!2(). Concern- 
ing a discourse at Sir William Phipi)s', 
5 339. Makes a will for Mr. Elisha 
Cook, 5. 372. Concerning the choosing 
of Representatives, 5. -liil. N'oted on, 
at -May election, 5. 426, 454; 6. 18, 
102, 256, 385. Draws up a release for 
Ninicraft, 5. 592. Order concerning 
the public highway, 5. 508. One of 
council concerning Rev. Mr. Cheever 
of Maiden, 6. 21*. Secretary of the 
Council, 6. 93*. Present at Peter Ser- 
geant's marriage, 6. 42. Goes to meet 
Gov. Dudley on his arrival, 6. TT. At 
opening of court, 6. 63. Cliief justice, 

6. 64. Opens the court at Boston, 6. 
08. Resigns chief justiceship, 6. 83. 
Elected councillor, 6. 188, 224. Con- 
gratulates Gov. Niciiolson's arrival, 6. 
402. .Marriej? Mailam Wainwright, 6. 
407. Death of, 7 41 and ,1. . 

Addington, Isaac, Sr., 7. 41. Witness, g. 
103. 

Address, to the King, 5. 79, 124; 7. 21, 
28. From Fellows of Harvard, 5 480, 
481. To Gov. Dudley from (ieneral 
Assembly at Boston, 6. 39*, 40*. 44*, 
50*. 74* 91*. To tlie Queen, 6. 44* 
49*. 78*, 83*. 88*, 89* 101*. 104*. 110*, 
111*. 131*. 220, 252, 207, 208, 324, 353. 
To Gov. Dudley from Massachusetts 
Militia, 6. 40* 84* 90*. To the Queen 
from New England Ministers, 6. 88*, 
100*. To the Queen from Merchants 
anil Traders of Boston. 6. 89*. To the 
Queen from Military Officers, 6. 90*. 
To the (iueen from the Council and 
Assembly, 6. 91*, 101*. To the Queen 
from Council and Representatives of 
New Hami)'*iiire, 6. 93*. Of the Kirk 
of North Britiin to the Queen. 6. 109*. 
122*, 12.;*. By S. S. to Gov. Dud- 
ley, 6. 58. To merchants to procure 
provisions for the army. 10. 18.5. Of 
the Provincial Congress to the Inhab- 
itants of Great Britain, 10. 290-293. 

.\(lkins, Thomas, 5 125. 



340 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Administration of England, changes in, 

9. 473. 
Admiralty, Court of, 5. 135, 139, 194: 6. 

39*. 53*, 73*, 74*, 84* ; 7. <J5, 375, 37ii. 
Admiralty, High Court of, Enyland, 6. 

55*. 
Admiralty, Judge of, see Judge. 
Adventure, ship, 8. 357, 362. 363, 375. 
Advertisement of Southack's Chart, 7. 

185. Of a design to print a view of 



Joston. 



307 



Advice, ship, 6. 3, 5, 7. 

Affidavits, 6. 33*. 40* 52*, 54*, 56*. 83*- 
85* 101* 113*; 7. 330. Laid hefore 
the Queen and Council, relating to Gov- 
ernor of New England, 6. 47*. Of 
Capt. John Calley. 6. 47*, 67* 84*. Of 
Col. William Partridge, 6. 52* 54*, 67*. 
83* 84*. Of Tiiomas Newton, 6. 55*, 
84*. In connection with Gov. Dudley's 
quarrel with the Carters, 6. 144. 

Africa, 6. 217. 

Africa, .«//(>, 8. 31. 

Agamenticus, i. 37. 

Agamenticus Hills, 5. 284. 

Agawam, i. 202, 265. 296. Agreement 
appointing W. Pynchon a magistrate, 
I. 487. 

Agawam River, 7. 196. 

Agents, for the Province of Colonics in 
England, 6. 104* 273-275, 284, 2S8 ; 7. 
27, 30, 109, 111, 112. For Connecticut, 
6. 275. 

Agents in England, 5. 326 ; 6. 104*. 

Agnew, Gen. James, mentioned, 4. 76. 
Killed in action at Germantown, 10. 99. 

Agnew's 'Protestant Exiles,' quoted, 6. 
234, 262. 

Agreement, between John Winthrop and 
John Clarke concerning Connecticut 
Charter, 9. 50, 50)!. With Frencli peo- 
ple settled in Narragansett, g. 171. 

Agrippa, Cornelius, i. 162. 

Agus, Rev. B., 5. 257. 

Ahaden, Indian squaw, 9. 102. 

Airs, Mr., 5. 232. 

Airs, Rev. Mr., Castle Chaplain, see Eyre. 

Aitken, Robert, 2. 124, 125, 151, 157, 161, 

178, 179, 181, 188, 189, 211, 215, 226, 
230-232, 234, 236, 241, 246, 256-262, 265, 
270, 27;3-278, 281, 286, 287, 289, 290, 
292, 293, 298, 299, 302-305, 316-319, 
322. 327, 328, 331-335. 337, 341-343. 348, 
351, 352, 354, 356-358. 361, 369, 370, 
872, 374, 376, 377, 379, 380, 382, 383, 
386, 401-404, 406-408, 410, 411, 413, 
414, 416, 417, 419, 420, 424, 425, 435, 
438, 440, 442, 446, 468, 473, 476,483, 484, 
492, 497, 499 : 3. 1, 9, 15, 142, 168, 17»l, 

179, 188, 211, 25B, 267, 269, 274, 276, 
277 n., 279, 281, 288, 293-295, 300, 303, 
326, 313, 344, 346, 348, 349, 352, 357, 360 
-362. His edition of the Bible, 2. 159, 
162. His ' Pennsvlvania IMagazine,' 2. 
161, 104, 109. Jo'scph Belknap bound 



apprentice to him, 2. 245. His literary 
newspaper, 2. 245, 249. Pronunciation 
of his name, 2. 339. Joseph Belknap 
released from his articles of appren- 
ticeship, 2. 479. 480. 
Aitken, Mrs. Robert, 2. 299, 335. 
Albani, Cardinal, 6. 32. 
Albany, N. Y., Congress at. in 1754, 3. 
153, 155. Town of, 5. 17, 95, 225, 22'.>, 
310, 311, 320, 329, 391, 398, 430, 444; 
6. 5, 153, 262, 273, 329, 390 ; 7. 12, 273, 
350; 8. 91, 313. Garrison at, 8. 100. 
Surrender of, 9. 92. 

Albany Expedition, 5. 323. 

Alba Regalis, Hungary, surrendered, 5. 
227. 

Albemarle, Duke of, concerning Sir Wil- 
lia«n Phipps, 5. 203, 204. 

Albeny, wife of Indian RomonocJ:, 9. 122. 

Alberoni, Sjianish minister, 7. 127. 

Alcock, Dr., 5. 23, 38. 

Alcock, Eliza, 5. 21 ; 6. 301. 

Alcock, George, 5. 42. 

Alcock, John, mentioned, 5. 16, 164. 
Death of, 5. 320. Biographical sketch 
of, 7. 372. 

Alcock, Dr. Jolm, letter from, i. 390. 
Notice of, I. 390 «. 

Alcock, Mrs. Palgrave (Esther), 7. 372. 

Alcock, Palgrave, 5. 478 ; 7. 372. 

Alcocke, John, letter signed by, 9. 29. A 
Narragansett proprietor, 9. 98, 111. 

Alcot, Mr., member of General Council, 
5. 361. 

Alcott, A. Bronson, 5. xxxvi. 

Alcott, Abby M., 5. xxxvi. 

Alcott, Anna 15., 5. xxxvi. 

Alcott, Elizabeth P., 5. xxxvi. 

Alcott, Louisa M., 5. xxxvi. 

Alcraft, John, mentioned, 9. 204. 

Alden, Mr., 5. 37. 

Alden, Ca/it., in the army under Wash- 
ington, 4. 84 ; 5. 234. 

Alden, Mrs., 5. 29. Buried, 5. 421. 

Alden, Col. Ichabod, 4. 65. 

Alden, John, ancient magistrate of Ply- 
mouth, I. 430. Death of, 5. 190. A 
truce with the Indians, 5. 334. 

Alden, Capt. John, Boston, seized by 
French frigate, 5. 350. Sails for Can- 
ada, 5. 358. Accused of witchcraft, 
5. 361. Imprisonment, 5. 379. Death 
of, 6. 54. 

Alden, John, Jr., 5. 350, 358. 

Alden, AVilliam, 6. 301. 

Alderton's Point, 5. 182. 

Alerton, Viscount, 6. 427. 

Alexander the Great of Macedonia,^. 411. 

Alexander I. of Russia, 4. 502. 

Alexander, James, 6. 334-336. 

Alexander, Jolm, 6. 12. 

Alford, Mr., death of, 5. 33. 

Alford, Mr., mariner, 8. 227, 420, 525, 
559. 

Alford, Capt., 6. 25. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



S41 



Alford, Eiisi'in Benjamin, 5. 78. Select- 
man, 5. I'Jo. 
Alfoi-d, I.icut., 5. 100. 
Alford, .Marv, 5. 110. 
Alford, William, 5. 119. 
Alj;ier», 5. lO,), 07.3. 
Alison, Ann, 6. 110. 
Alison, Comfort, 6. 110. 
Alison, Elizabeth, 6. 110. 
Aliston, Matthew, i. 188, 189. 
Allare, Louis, 5. '2Q2. 

Allen, Capt., 8. 40, 57. 

Allen, Capt. Bozoon, 5. 278. Selectman, 
5. 341. 

Allen, Col., i. 444. Died, 6. 130. 

Allen, Dr., 5. 017. 

Allen, Mr, Xcw Y'orL; 2. 491. 

Allen, Daniel, 6. 128. 

Allen, Ebenezer, concerning Gay Head 
Indians, 6. 432-436. Nominated for 
justice, 7. 23. 

Allen, Mrs., 5. xxviii. Death of, 6. 301. 

Allen, Elizabeth, see Gardner, Mrs. 

Allen, Col. Ethan, 2. 24, 27 ; 3. 1(17. Held 
as prisoner by the British, 10. 2(j. Con- 
cerning his release, 10. 30. 

Allen, Francis, jeweller, London, i. 204, 
208. 

Allen, George, 6. 97, 102. 

Allen, Mrs. Hannah, 5. 228. 

Allen, Deacon Henrv, 5. 160, 214, 418. 

Allen, James, 5. 202 ; 6. 197, 30li, 411. 

Allen, James, 7. 304. 

Alien, Mrs. James (Martha), 7. 3(54. 

Allen, Rev. Mr., baptizes S. Scwall's 
ciiild, 5. xxviii. At ordination of Mr. 
Morton, 5. 155. Concerning common 
prayer worsliip, 5. 1(52. Offended iiis 
churcli by his singing, 5. 211. At or- 
dination of Mr. Walter, 5. 232. At 
council of churches, 5. 352. Concern- 
ing the college charter, 5. 441. At or- 
dination of Mr. Pemberton, 6. 22. 

Allen, liev. James, 1.435; 7. 117. 

Allen, Mrs. Rec. James( Elizabeth), 7. 117. 

Allen, Jeremiah, Treasurer, 5. 385 ; 7. 94, 
96, 117, 190, 197, 209, 212, 213, 278, 336, 
803. 

Allen (Alline), John, i. 310 ; 5. 330 ; 6. 28, 
100 ; 7. 180. 

Allen, Ret: John, i. 491. 

Allen, Rev. Joseph, ' Alarm to the Un- 
converted,' 7. 144. 

Allen, Josiah, 6. 14*. 

Allen, JM-. Lydia,6. 1-30. 

Allen, J//S. Martha, 6. 410, 411. 

Allen, P., 5. 382. 

Allen, Rebecca, i. 103. 

Allen, Samuel, 5. 271. 

Allen, Goi\ Samuel, 2. 110. 

Allen, Silence, 6. 193 ; 7. 16. 

Allen, Tiiomas, 3. 209. 

Allen, Rev. Tliomas, i. 102 n. 

Allen, Rev. Thomas (?), 4. 67. 

Allen, William, D.D., 2. 225 «.; 6. 19*. 



Allerton (Allertown), Mr., i. 29, 19G; 
8. 28, 29, 31-33. 

Allerton, Isaac, 5. 182. 

Allerton, Point, 5. 182. 

Alliance, frl>i<ite, 4. 307, 374, 412. Ex- 
pected ' with ammunit'.on, 10. 190. 
Mentioned, 10. 201. 

Alliance, Triple, 7. 120. 

Allibone's ' Dictionary of Authors,' 5. 
497 ; 7. 48, 307. 

Allin, , 5. 88. At ordination of Mr. 

Wadsworth, 5. 432. 

Allin, .Mr., concerning his hiring a farm, 
8. 405. 

Allin, lienjamin, 5. 484. 

Allin, Daniel, 5. 386; 6.285. 

Allin, Diana, 6. 267. 208. 

Allin, Edward, 5. 31, 32, 41. 

Allin, Henry, 5. 169; 6. 21*. 

Allin, James, 5. 480; 6. 21* 23* 

Allin, Ladii, 6. 267. 

Allin, Sir Richard, 5. .34 ; 6. 267. 

Allison, Mrs. Christopher, 6. 119. 

Allison, James, 6. 119. 

Allison, James, .//•., 6. 119. 

Allison, John, 6. 119. 

Alhvard, James, i. 501. 

Ailyn, Mrs., illness of, 8. 144. 

Allyn, Mrs. Ann, i. 310 ». 

AUyn (Allin), John, Hartford, Secretary 
of Colontf of Connecticut, mentioned, i. 
310 H., 399; 8. 144, 145, 147, 226. 274, 
384, 405, 406, 447, 524, 547, 550 ; 9. 36, 
61, 94, 104. Letter of Governor of Con- 
necticut to Governor of Massachusetts, 

8. 151. Letters of John Winthrop, Jr., 
to, 8. 295, 300. Letter of Wait Win- 
throp to, 8. 522. Death of. 8. 525. Pres- 
ent at a certain meeting, 9. 59 n. Let- 
ter from John Winthroj). concerning 
the government at Wickford, 9. 78. 
Mentioned, 9. 89. Letter concerning 
claim of the heirs of Duke of Hamil- 
ton, 9. 114, 116n. Secretary, 9. 159. 
Letter to Fitz John Winthrop relative 
to Soso's right in Narragansett country, 

9. 160. 

Almanacs, 5. 1, 9-12, 16, 24, 3.3, 43. 48-50, 
68, 292, 293, 308, 399, 438; 6. 141, 221, 
230. 

Almanza, battle of, 6. 191. 

Almsbury, 6 45* ; 7. 355. 

Almshouse (.round, 6. 29. 

Almon, John, his ' Remembrancer,' 2. 
451. 

Alsop, George, i. 374. 

Alsop, Joseph, 8. 44. 

Alsop, Rev. Vincent, 5. 257. 

Alsopp, Timothv, i. 501. 

Alsted. Rev. John Hein, 6 123. 

Alumni of Harvard, 5. 447; 6. 81. 

Alwiim, Richard, i. 501. 

Ambov, N. ./., British troops at, 10. 32. 



Army under (Jen. Howe 
Mentioned, 10. 107. 



r3. 



342 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Amereday, John, i. 50L 

America, 5. 4o0. Dr. Belknap's conjec- 
tures concerning the origUial popula- 
tion of, 2. 127, l:i5, 138, 151, 15'.», 1G7, 
168, 177, 353, 413. 417. A Frencli 
squadron coming to, 5. 506. Concern- 
ing the King of Spain, 6 85*. ' First 
Voyages into' (Casas), 6. l:^. Abori- 
gines of, 6. 141. To be made subordi- 
nate to England, 9. 365, 366. Lord 
Ciiatham's sentiments concerning, 9 
398. 

America, /r/^a/e, launch of, 2. 169. 

America, slup, 5. 230, 235, 2-36, 288, 289. 

'America Invincible,' jioem, 3. 43. 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
2. 34, 40, 46, 68, 88, 94, IIOh., 436, 490, 
494, 496 ; 3. 103, 109, 160, 292, 294, 299, 
333, 349. P'oundation of, i. 63. Eben- 
ezer Hazard elected a member of, i. 88. 
Dr. Belknap elected a member of, i. 
404. 

American Antiquarian Society, 3. 377, 
438 ». ; 5. 56. Library of, 7. 4. 

' American Apollo,' 3. 275, 277, 280, 281, 
283, 285, 288, 290-292, 294. 296, 298, 
302, 304, 309, 311, 315, 322, 355. Sketch 
of, 3. 277 ?i. Cited, 3. 851 n. 

American Army, see Army, American. 

American chronology, a compilation of, 
suggested by Hazard, 2. 37, 50, 117, 
119, 123. 

American envoys not received by Euro- 
pean courts, 4. 440-446. 

American geography. Hazard's proposed 
work on, 2. 5, 14, 25, 26. 

* Anferican Herald,' newspaper, 2. 370. 

American Isthmus, 5. 488. 

'American Magazine,' 3. 69«., 71, 78, 82, 
83, 88, 91-95. 

'American Museum,' 2. 451 n., 454, 462, 
463, 465, 469, 473, 476, 489 ; 3. 38, 139, 
815. 

American jiapcr money, proposal of Ver- 
gennes in regard to, 4. 412 

American Philological Association, 6. 154. 

American Philosophical Society, Pli.Ui- 
delphia, 2. 33, 52, 75, 255, 300, 305, 316, 
326, 332, 379, 404 n., 406, 411, 412, 425, 
435; 3. 179. 188, 190, 242, 283, 288, 
292, 294-297, 315, 318, 321, 328, 354. 

' American Quarterly Register,' 5. xv ; 6. 
117. 

American Revenue Act, debated in House 
of Commons. 9. 421. Debate in Parlia- 
ment on, 9. 422. See Duty Act. 

American Revolution, John Adams's 
principles of, 4. 338-350. About one 
third of the colonists opposed to, 4. 
506. 

American Spaniards, 6. 110. 

American troo))s. 6. 265. 

Ames & Goodall's 'Acts and Resolves,' 
7. 236. ' Province Laws,' 7. 276. 330. 

Ames, , Maishjidd, 5. 36 ; 6. 216. 



Ames, Dr. William, 5. 196. Writings, 7. 

63. 
Ames, Ellis, 5. 407, 429. 
Ames, Fisher, LL.D.,2,. 6,244, 216, 247. 
Ames, William, Jr., 7. 63. 
Amesbury, Mass., whirlwind at, 2. 38, 50, 

56. See Almsbury. 
Amherst, Sir Jeffrey, 4. 340. Contest of, 

9. 303. 

Amherst, N. II., 5. xxxi. 

Amity, ship, 7. 111. 

Aninmnition, and arms seized in a flag 
of truce, 6. 39*, 50*. Letter of Gen. 
Wasliington concerning the manufac- 
ture of, 10. 183; Gen Washington 
requests a loan of, from Connecticut, 

10. 191. 

Aniory, Capt. Simon, 4. 45, 48, 130 ; 6. 
120. 

Amory, Thomas C, his ' Life of General 
Sullivan ' cited, 2. 433 n. 

Aniphitrite, ship, 10. 62. 

Amsdal, Mrs., 6. 175. 

Amsden, Jacob, 6. 27. 

Amsterdam, Emj., 5. 198; 8. 18, 421; 9. 
65. 

Amsterdam ' Gazette,' 5. 226. 

Anabaptists, sect of, 5. 30 ; 6. 14, 252 ; 8. 
200. 

Anapangew, witness to deed, 9. 76. 

Ancaster, Duke of, in Parliament, 9. 397. 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany, Boston, 3. 40 ; 6. 35. 

Anderson, Elizabeth (Mrs. Breese), 3. 
371 n. 

Anderson, Emma, 7. 136. 

Anderson, Garland, 3. 371 n. 

Anderson, Mrs. Jane (Chevalier), 3. 371 n. 

Anderson, John, 7. 136. 

Anderson, Mary, 7. 135. 

Anderson, Robert, 5. 25, 42. 

Andover, Mass., 1. 319 n. ; 5. 471 ; 6. 62. 
Powder-mill at, 4 304. 

Andre', Major John, 2. 77. 

Andrew, John, eonceniiiig certain boun- 
dary lines, 9. 172. 

Andrews, Biskop, 7. 181. 

Andrews, Lieut., 5. 189, 190. 

Andrews, Mr., purcliases clothing for the 
troops, 10. 107. 

Andrews, Benjamin, 4. 93. 

Andrews, Ebenezer T., 3. 83 >j., 257. See 
also Thomas & Andrews, Missrs. 

Andrews, Bev. Jedediah, 3. 311, 317, 322. 

Andrews, John. 5. 190. 

Andrews, Rev. John, D.D., 3. 98. 

Andrews, Richard, letter of, i. 271. No- 
tice of, I. 271 71. 

Andrews, Robert, 5. 258. 

Andrews, S., 6. 357. 

Andros, Rev. Mr., 6. 81. 

Andros, -Sir Ednmnd, mentioned, i. 423n.; 
2. 119; 5. 183. 192-194, 202, 266, 333, 
430; 6. 67* 104*; 7.42; 8. 408, 412, 
423, 425, 432, 447. Expected at Bos- 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



343 



ton, 5. 148. Arrives at Boston, 5. 159. 
The iidniinistration of, 5. 174. rutitiun 
of Samuel Sewall to, 5. 220. The 
downfall of, 5. 2t51. Imprisoned. 5. 470. 
Governor at New York, 8. 102, 284. 
Letters of John Winthrop, Jr.. to, 8. 
164, 1(56. 283. 284, 287-280, 291, 203. 
Concerning S'f t of ''^"^1 on Lon^ Island, 
8. 28(). Land granted to Fitz-John 
Winthrop by. 8. 378. Letter concern- 
ing New York, 8. 431. Commissioned 
Governor of Massacliusetts Colony, 
etc , 8. 404. Arrival of, at Nantasket, 
8. 471. Installed Governor of New 
England, 9. IUji. Petition of Ather- 
ton Proprietors to, 9. 109. Exercises 
government over people of Connecti- 
cut, 9. 175. Report concerning claim 
of Duke of Hamilton, 9. 185. 

Andros, Lndij Marv, 5. 102 ; 8. 47('). 
Death of, 5. 200; '8. 481. Funeral, 5. 
202. 

Andros Tracts, 5. 98, 143, 183, 193, 195, 
254, 256, 2G1, 203, 309, 311, 379 ; 6. 413. 

Angel (mone3'), 6. 413 ; 7. 28. 

Angier, ^frs. Ann, mother of Rev. Samuel, 
death of, 5. 228. 

Angrier, Mrs. Hannah, wife of Rev. -Saw- 
«e/, 6. 233. Death of, 7. 14, 15. 

Angier, Ames, 7. 246, 288. 

Angier, Mr.s. Ames (Margaret), 7. 288. 

Angier, Laurence, 7. 15. 

Angier, Rev. Samuel, 5. 173 ; 6. 233, 278. 
333, 347 ; 7. 15, 209. At ordination of 
Mr. Porter, 6. 370. 

Anglo-American newspaper, first, 6. 100. 

Angola, Indian slave, 6. 197. 

Anjou, fJuLe of, 6. 82. 

Ann, .thip, 7. 317. 

Ann Cleeve, ship, London, 8. 36. 

Annan, Rev. Robert, 2. 447 ; 3. 341. 

Annapolis-roval, formerly Port Ro^al, 5. 
321 ; 6. 293, 298, 316, 335. 

Anncsley, Dr. S., 5. 253, 257. 

Annesley vs. Tucker, 5. 468. 

Anniversary Week, 6. 380. 

Ansley, xee Harrison & Ansley, Messrs. 

Anstruther, Col. John, 4. 82. 

Answer to Randolph's representation 
concerning Narragansett country, 8. 
439. 

Antaby, T., witness to will of Edward 
Hopkins, 9. 22. 

Anthony, ^fr., a tenant on Fisher's 
Island, 8. 539. 

Anthony, Joseph, 3. 242, 244. 

Anthony, Thomas, 3. 242, 244, 249. 

Anthony & Hewes, Messrs., 3. 244. 

' Anti- Burghers,' 2. 180. 

Anticosti Island, 5. 346. 

Anti-Federalists, 4. 464, 471, 485. 

Antigua, Island of, 8. 135. Invasion of, 
by the French from Martiiiico, 8. 205- 
258. 

Anti-slavery Tract of S. Sewall, 6. 10. 



Antonio, slonp, 6. 7. 

Antrani, .1//- , 6. l'.)2. 

Anville. Nicolas de la Rochefoucauld, 
Dttc d', 4. 339. 

Aonemo, i. 262-264. 

Aosoe, Jonas, 6 434. 
I ' Apollo Press,' Boston, 3 355. 

Apparition of a man at sea, 8. 168. 
\ Appeals from the colonial government 
j to England, i. 435. 

Appleton, Rev. Mr., 7. 83, 118, 191, 332, 
356, 362. 

Apjileton, Mrs., wife of Rev. Nathaniel, 7. 
I 291, 338. 

Ajipleton, Widow, 5. 400; 6. 187, 348. 
{ Appleton, Benjamin, 7. 338. 

Appleton, Elizabeth, wife of Richard Dum- 
mer, 5. .\.\ii; 6. 352; 7. 54. 

Appleton, Madam Elizabeth, 7. 381. 

AjipIeton, Isaac, 7. 338. 

Appleton, Capt. or Col. John, 5. 180, 190, 
427 ; 6. 205, 313, 377, 385 ; 7. 47. Death 
of, 5. 504. 

Appleton, John, death of, 7. 338. 

Appleton, Mrs. John (Widow Dutch), 7. 
338. 

Appleton, Mrs. John (Rebecca), 7. 338. 
j Ajjpleton, Joseph, 5. 256. 

Appleton, Jose, 7. 295. 

Appleton, Rev. Nathaniel, 3. 389 n. 
\ Appleton, Nathaniel, 3. 217, 332. Note 
i of, to Dr. Belknap, 3. 388. 

Appleton, Dr. Nathaniel Walker, 3. 347. 

Appleton, Oliver, 7. 338. 

Appleton, Capt., ('ol. or .Tudne Samuel, 
5. 77, 132, 207 ; 6. 78, 131, 162, 188, 224 ; 
7.121,122,338. 

Appleton, Samuel, Sr., 7. 338. 

Appleton, Mrs. Samuel, Sr. (Ilannali), 7. 
1 338. 

' Appleton, Mrs. Samuel, Sr. (Mary), 7. 
338. 

.\pp!etons, Boston family of, 7. 333. 

Apple Island, 5. 310. 

Ap])le-trees, blossoming of, in New Hamp- 
shire in 1784, 2. 349. Destruction of, 
by caterpillars, 8. 123. 

Apthorp, Rev. East. 4. 343. 

Ar — nge's Letter, 6. 29, 81. 

Arbella, ,s/(/y», i. 123h.. 218. 

Archdale, Anne, 5. 403. 

Arrhdale, Cnv. John. 5. 402, 403. 

Archdale, IMary. 5. 403. 

Archdale. Thomas, 5. 403. 

Arclicr, Aliie, 5. xii. 

Archer, Major, 8. 146. 

Archer, John Rose, 7. 336. 
i Archisden, Thomas, 8. 190, 198. 
! Arcus (Acres), John. 7. 44, 163. 
' Ardel, .Mrs. Mary, 6. 11* 324. Tombstone 

of. 6. 324 
! Ardfl, William, 6. 324. 

Argilla, Gov. Symonds's estate at, 5. 
I 400. 
1 Argyle. Duke of 6. 339 ;, 5. 90, 93, 97. 



844 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Arksden, Mr., i. IL 

Arlington, Sir Giles, i. 176 n. 

Arlington, Lord, letters of John Win- 
throp, Jr., to, 8. 101. 117 

Arlington, Susan, see Crane, Lady. 

Arlington, 6. oU2. 

Armand, Col. Charles, Marquis de la 
liouerie, 4. 87. 

Armitage, Mrs., 7. 228, 233. 

Arniitage, Isabella, 7. 255. 

Armitage, Joseph, i. 328, 329, 364. 

Arms, difficulty of procuring, 10. 44. 
Pressing need of, 10. 47. Arrival of, 
from France, 10. 54. Need of, in 
Connecticut, 10. 62. Disposition of, 
by Connecticut, 10. 75. Gen. Wash- 
ington's letter concerning Gov. Trum- 
bull's request for, 10. 77. 

Arms and ordnance, arrival of, at Ports- 
mouth, 4. 43, 44, 46. Arrival of, from 
France, 4. 50. To be removed from 
the coast, 4. 51, 52. 

Armstrong, Major, 6. 369 ; 7. 66. 

Armstrong, Jolin, 4. 407, 408. 

Armstrong, R., 6. 29* 81*. 

Army, American, queries in regard to 
raising, 4. 3, 4. Winter quarters of, 
1779-80, 4. 130, 135-140; 1780-81, 4. 
171-173, 175; 1781-82, 4. 228, 229. 
Returns of, 4. 231, 233, 234, 237, 240. 
Strength of, 4. 251. Good feeling of, 
with the French troops, 4. 278. Well 
fed and well clothed the last winter 
ot the war, 4. 280. See Clothing, 
Provisions, Massachusetts Line, Of- 
ficers, etc. Charge of mnintaining, 6. 
38*^. Pay of, 6. 73*. Necessity of, in 
America, considered in Parliament, 9. 
229. Stationed at Cambridge. 9. 498. 
See Troops. Divisions of, at Ro.xbury 
and Cambridge, 10. 1 ; Gen. Wasliing- 
ton's rule for promotion in, 10. 97. 
Encounter with tlie Britisli at German- 
town, 10. 99. Filling the vacancies 
in, 10. 149. Scarcity of provisions for 
the, 10. 152. Concerning the quotas 
of certain States, 10. 155. An army 
sent from France to assist the Colonies, 
10. 164. Letter of Gen. Washington 
concerning provisions for, 10. 184. 
Movement of merchants for procuring 
provisions for, 10. 184. Funds of the 
Bank of Philadelphia applied to provis- 
ions for, 10. 185. Clotliing, etc., arriv- 
ing for, by French fleet, 10. Ib8. Let- 
ter of Gen. Washington on temporary 
enlistments, 10. 206-213. A rc^sunie of 
the fluctuations of, by Gen. Washing- 
ton, 10. 207-213. Letter of Gen. Wash- 
ington urging the enlistment of men 
for longer terms, 10. 239. Distress of, 
along theConnecticut line, 10. 244. In- 
dignant letter of Gov Trumbull con- 
cerning Gen. Parsons's reflections on 
treatment of, 10. 248. Force of, sta- 



tioned in New York, 10. 255. Good ef- 
fects of supplying, by contract, 10. 
259. Letter of Gen. Washington urg- 
ing the filling up of the regiments, 10. 
261. Letter of Gen. Washington con- 
cerning the disbanding of, 10. 279. 
Gen. Washington's retirement from, 
10. 280. Pay of the regiments in the 
provincial service, 10. 294. 

Army, British, reinforced, 4. 120. 
Strength of, in April, 1782, 4. 249, 250. 

Arnold, Capt. John, 5. 322, 501 ; 8. 273, 
289, 325. Concerning certain boundary, 
9 200. 

Arnold, Gen. Benedict, 2. 77 ; 3. 410 ; 4. 26, 
39, 67, 162, 165, 167, 24a When colonel 
commands secret expedition, g. 501. 
Concerning the exchange of prisoners, 
10. 41. In skirmish with British at 
Danbury, 10. 59. Preparing an attack 
against Connecticut, 10. 218. Sailing of 
a fleet from Sandy Hook under com- 
mand of, 10. 222, 222 n. To remove cer- 
tain cannon from Crown Point, 10. 304. 
Mentioned, 10. 307. To raise troops for 
defence of Ticonderoga, 10. 308. 

Arnold, Gov. Benedict, Rhode Island, i. 
346, 347; 2. 3. Letter of, i. 330. No- 
tice of, I. 330 n. 

Arnold, Capt. Berachiah, his will, 7. 160, 
161, 349. 

Arnold, Mrs. BeracJiiah (Abigail), 6. 23- 
7. 159-161, 349. 

Arnold, Edward, 7. 160. 

Arnold, Mrs. Edward (Martha), 7. 160. 

Arnold, Hannah, 6. 23; 7. 160, 349. 

Arnold, John, 6. 48. 

Arnold, Joseph, 6. 1. 

Arnold, William, i. 333, 346 n. Letter of, 
1.360; 6. 320. 

Arnold, .l/rs. William (Mary), 6 320; 7-159. 

Arnout, Mr., interpreter to the Five Na- 
tions of Indians, 8. 308, 311, 316. 

Arran, Lord, 8. 350. 

Arran, Earl of, see Hamilton, James, 
Duke of. 

Arrowsick, conference at, 7. 244. 

Arrowsick Island, Me., 5. 38 ; 7. 148, 153, 
244. 

Arrowsmith, Jiev. John, D.D., 6. 123. His 
' Tactica Sacra,' 6. 123. 

Arthur, Mr., 8. 394. 

Artluir, Abigail, see Hazard, Mrs. Eben- 
ezer. 

Artluir, Joseph, 3. 371 n. 

Artichoke Precinct, 6. 384. 

Artichoke River, 6 384. 

Articles against Gov. Dudley, 6. 69*, 78*. 

Artillery, army not well supplied with, 
4. 55. Arrival of, from France, 4. 78. 
Winter-quarters of the park of, 1780- 
81. 4. 172. Mentioned, 6. 42, 255, 279. 

Artillery Companv, 5. 99, 151 ; 6. 54, 98, 
387. 

Artillery Day, 6. 251, 257. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



345 



Artillery Election, 5. 78, 151. -452 ; 6. 57. 

Artillery Sermon, 5. '.»(>, 4l'7 ; 6 oo, 'jS, 
18.3, 279, 305, 387 ; 7. 47, 18G. 

Artillery Trainintr, 6. 88, 252. 

Arundel, Eaii of, i. 482. 

Asbestos, 3. 38, 47, 49. 

Ashburton Place, Boston, 5 fil. 

Ashby. Mr., father of Josepli and Simon, 
8. 532. Concerning a farm for, 8. 423. 

Asliby, Joseph, 8. 502. 

Ashi)y, Simon, 8. 502. 

Ashfonl, I. 100 ».; 7. 195. 

Ashgood (Asbud). Joseph, 5. 035. 

Ashley, Major Moses, 4. 275. 

Ashley, town of. 5. 299. 

Ashly, Mr., 6. 352. 

Ashly, Capt. Jtulrje, 7. 318. 

Ashly, Gilbert, 6." 11. 

Ashton, Jtidiji', England, 9. 408. 

Ashton, Mr:, 8. 284. 

Ashurst, Cor., 5. 502; 6. 134, 217. 

Ashurst, Mrs. Diana, 6 207. 

Ashurst, Henry, father of Sir Henri/, 6. 
267,268. 

Ashurst, Sir Henrv, i. 448 ; 5. 269, 356, 
371), 393, 394, 481 : 6. 115*, 117*, 118* 
41, 149, 2(57, 268. 274, 275, 315 : 8. 104, 
356,540,560. Letter of Wait Winthrop 
to, 8. 533, 544. Letter to, 9. 180. Con- 
cerning the Mohegan Case, 9. 223. 
Memorial presented by, 9. 404. 

Ashurst, Robert, 6. 268. 

Ashurst, Thomas, 6. 268. 

Asliurst, Thomas Henry, 6. 267, 263. 

Ashurst, William, M.P'., uncle of Sir IVU- 
iiam, 6. 268. 

A.shurst, Sir William, father of Sir Wil- 
liam Henri/, i. 255; 6. 243, 267. 268, 
27;i-275, 283, 284, 416, 419, 437 ; 7. 49, 
60-62, 251. 

Ashurst, Sir William Henry, 6. 268. 

Askew, Sir George, 8. 229. 

Aspinwall, Ca,>t.l6. 243; 7. 31, 232, 347. 

Assembly, 5 3'.i8, 399, 462 ; 6. 105*, 108*, 
117*-121*, 126*, 4; 7. 28. 

Assemblymen, choosing of, 5. 424, 478. 

Assembly of Rhode Island, protest against 
the purchase of Narragansctt by Gov. 
Winthrop et al., 9. 9. 

Assembly of Connecticut, 10. 1. Meas- 
ures taken by, to raise troops, 10. 61. 

Assessors chosen, 6. 303. 

Assistants, Court of, 5. 48, 77, 78. 

Assowamset, 6. 166, 167. 

Astley (Ashly), Sir Jacob, 8. 205. 

Astwood, John, i. 363. 

Athearn, Jabez 7. 182. 

Atliern, Simon, 6. 436. 

Atherton, . 5. 420. 

Atherton (Adderton), .V«/oc Tlimiphrey, 
8.560. At Narragansctt, 8. 42. Letter 
of John Wintiirop, Jr , to, 8. 42. Pur- 
cliase of land from the Indians, 8. 83. 
Concerning purchase of Narragansctt 
9- 7, 8, 22. Concerning certain wam- 



pum paid, 9. 13. Death mentioned, 9. 
31,31 H. ; 5.4I6. Mentioned, 9. 52. Pur- 
chase of Narragansctt lands by, 9. 70, 
74, 75. Confirmation of deeds to, 9. 82. 
A Narragansctt proprietor, 9. 98, 98«., 
111. 

Atherton, Increase, a Narragansett pro- 
prietor, 9. HI. 

Atherton (Company, see Narragansett. 

Atherton Proprietors, letter by Daniel 
Denison in behalf of, 9. 27. Claim to 
Narragansett land, 9. 164, 169, 170. 
Agreement with the French settled iu 
Narragansett country, 9. 171. 

Atiems, 8. 557. 

Atkins, Alderman, i. 294. 

Atkins, Chief Baron, 5 255. 

.\tkinson, George, 2. 175. 

Atkinson, Mrs. M., 6. 331. 

Atkins(m, Theodore, 6 52*, 331 ; 7. 347. 

Atlee, Col. Samuel J., 4. 17. 

Atlee, William Augustus (?), 2. 355. 

Attawanhood, confirmation of deeds by, 
9. 79. 

Attendorf, see Ottendorf. 

Attleborougii, 6. 426. 

Attlebury, 5. 304. 

Attorney-General of England, 5. 71 ; 7. 
239. 

Attorneys appointed for Narragansett 
lands, 9. 161. 

Atwater, Ann, 7. 374. 

Atwater, Hannah, 6 393. 

Atwater, Joshua, 5. 55, 211, 356; 7. 374. 

Atwater, Mary, 7. 120, 374. 

Atwell, Mary, 5. 258, 266. 

Atwood, Capt., 6. 195, .301. 

Atwood, Mrs. Ann, 6. 408. 

Atwood, Deacon John, 6. 299; 7. 14-17. 

Atwood, Elizabeth, 7. 254. 

Atwood, Herman, 6. 40?. 

Atwood, Joe, 5. 214. 

Atwood, John, 5. 202, 208. 

Atwood, JHd(/e William, 6. 55*, 85*, 45. 

Au-camp-pachang-sag-gunsh, 5l)•e«^f/^(Jn£/- 
motlwr to Unras, 9. 102. 

Auchmuty, Robert, 6. 45, 46; 7. 109, 118, 
130, 132, 169,210, 211,375 

Auchmuty, Robert, .//•., 6 46 ; 7. 109. 

Auchmuty, Samuel, 7. 109. 

Audley, Lord, 5. 261. 

Augusta, Me., 7. 245. 

Augusta, enmiifs friiiate, l)urncd, 10 101. 

Auinay, Charles de Menou d', i. 158. 

' Aurora,' Phdadilphin newspaper, 4. 474. 

Austin, .lA/-., 7. 155, 259. 

Austin, Elhridge (}., 5. xx.xiv. 

Austin, Jonathan Loring, 4. 440. 

Austin, ^faJ. Jonathan Williams, 4. 44. 

Avery, Deacon, death of, 6. 249. 

Avery, Dr. William, 5. 23. Death of, 5. 
170, 171. 

Avery, Mrs., 5. 213, 236 ; 6. 101 ; 7. 72. 

Avery, Rer. John, 7. 178. 

Avery, Rev. Joseph, 7. 23. 



41 



M6 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Avery, Lydia, 7. 72. , 

Avery, Kobert, 6. 101. 

Avery, Samuel, 8. 441, 446, 447, 474, 475, 

5GU. 
Avery, LipMt. Thomas, 8. 425, 431, 436, 

447, 455, 48o, 497. In expedition 

against Canada, 8. 314. 
Averyes, Mrs., 5. 170, 317. 
Award under an agreement between Jolm 

Winthrop, Jr., and John Clarke, 8. 82. 
Awashons, Indian, witness to deed, 9. 26. 
Awaslius, Indian, g. 23. 
Aylesbury, Eng. 6. 300. 
Aylett, Mrs. Mary, i. 372 n. 
Aylett, Thomas, i. 372 n. 
Aylett, Capt. Thomas, 8 245. 
Aylmer. Lord, 6 261. 
Ayrs, Mr., 7. 220, 354. 



B. 



Babb, Mr., 1. 280. 

Babcock, Col, concerning letter written 

by, in behalf of Mohegan Indians, 9, 

322. 
Babcock (Badcok), Mr., messenger, 8. 430 
Babcock, George, 5. 411. 
Babcock, James, concerning certain pris 

oners taken to Rhode Island, 9. 203 

Constable, 9. 204. 
Babcock, John, disturber of the peace, 9 

202, 203. 
Babcock, Joseph, disturber of the peace 

9.^202. 
Babington, Mr., i. 186. 
Babso'n, Jolm J., his ' History of Gluu 

cester ' cited, 2. 171 n. 
Baclie, Richard, 3. 190. 
Bacon, C<ipt., 10. 19. 
Bacon, Mr., a post-rider, 10. 13. 
Bacon, Edward, i. 289 «. 
Bacon, Francis, letter of, i. 289. 
Bacon, Francis, Lord Veridam, 2. 38; 4 

324. 
Bacon, Nathaniel, 3. 430. 
Badcock, Samuel, 7. 177. 
Baddesley, Eng., 5. xii, 8, 250, 294, 296 ; 

7. 118. 
Badlam, Lieut.-Col Ezra, 4. 251, 258, 266 

276. 
Baei, Mr., 10. 217. 

Bagdat, siege of, by the Turks, 8. 11. 
Bahama Islands, i. 341, 342. 
Bailey, see. Bavley. 
Bailey, Rev. Mr., 5. 448, 452. 
Bailey, Mrs. Elizabeth, 7. 75. 
Bailey, Francis, 2. 122, 171, 183, 249, 413 

417 ; 3. 24, 29. 
Baile}% James, prisoner of war, 10. 313. 
Bailey, Col. John, 4. 116. 
Bailey, Sarah, 6. 171. 
Baillie (Baylie), Robert, 3. 364. 



Baily, mariner, 5. 221. 

Bally, Mrs.. 5. xxvii ; 6. 172. 

Baily, G., 5. 7. 

Baily, John, 5. 443; 6. 8* 119, 171. 

Baily, Thomas, 5. 230. 

Bairsto, George, innkeeper, 5. 69. 

Bairsto, Joseph, 7. 251. 

Bairsto, Widow, 5. 422. 

Bairstow, William, 7. 18. 

Bake, Robert, i. 501. 

Baker, , Lynn, cousin to S. Sewall, 6. 

356. Death of, 7. 76. 
Baker, Capt., commander at Fort Albany, 

8. 102. 105, 109, 1 14. 
Baker, Mrs., 5. 119, 151, 208,224; 7. 82. 
Baker, Alexander, 5. 53. 
Baker, Rec. Daniel, 5. xxiii. 
Baker, Elizabeth, 7. 334. 
Baker, John, i. 315. 
Baker John, 5. 53. His will, 7. 334. 
Baker, John, Jr., 7. 334. 
Baker, Mrs. John (Thankful), 7. 334. 
Baker, Josiah, 5. 53. 
Baker, Peter, 5. 149. 
Baker, Priscilla, 5. 406. 
Baker, Richard, 7. 334. 
Baker, Samuel, 6. 116*. 
Baker, Silence, 7. 334. 
Baker, Thomas, 5. 159 ; 7. ."34. Mortgage 

given to Mrs. Usher, 7. 371. 
Baker, Mrs. Thomas (Thankfull), 7. 371. 
Baker's Cove, 2. 128. 
Balch, Nathaniel, 3. 342. 
Balch, Thomas, 6. 196. 
Balchar, Mrs., 5. 346. 
Balchar, Jeremiah, 5. 460. 
Baldwin, Abraham, 3. 66. 
Baley, Theophilus, deed to J. Winthrop, 

Jr., I. 495. 
Ball, .1/r., concerning bills of exchange, 

8. 516. 
Ball, William, 2. 274, 286, 292, 479, 483 ; 

3.301,344. 
Ballard, Mrs., r,. 170; 7. 1. 
Ballard, Jervis, 5. 145, 154, 214 ; 6. 47. 
Ballard, John, 7. 1. 
Ballard, Major William Iladson, 4. 141, 

177. 
Balle, Thomas, i. 501. 

Ballentine, , 5. 421 ; 6. 186. 

Ballentine, Col., 7. 308. 

Ballentine, Madame, 6. 235. 

Ballentine, Ca^^L John, 6. 24, 98, 235, 297; 

7. 363. 
Ballooning, 2. 377. 
Ballyfin, Ireland, 5. 477. 
Balston, Capt., 5. xxxviii, 465. 
Balston, Mrs. Anne, 6. 184. 
Balston, Benjamin, 6. 130. 
Balston, Elizabeth, 6. 130. 
Balston, Hannah, 5. xxxviii. 
Balston, James, 6. 130, 184. 
Balston, John, mariner, 5. 49, 53, 186 ; 6. 

130, 184, 185 ; 7. 101. 
Balston, Jonathan, 5. xxxviii ; 6. 130, 181. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



34- 



Balstnn, .V-s. Jonatlian, 6. loO. 

Ralston, Lvilia. 6. 1.^1. 

HaLston, flis. Maitlia, 6. ISi. 

Balston, Mary, 6. loO. 

Balston, Nathaniel, 5. xxxvi, xxxvii ; 6. 

130. 
Balston, Ms. Natlianiel (Eunice), 5. 

xxxvii, xxxviii. 
Balston, I'rudence, 6. KJO, 184. 
Balston, ]^)l)ert, 6. 130. 
Balston, William, 6. 130. 
Baltimore, Cecil Calvert, Lord, 3. 114, 

V2C,, 132. 
Bambazeen, nn liulinn. 5. 404. 
Banbury, Enij.,6. 170; 7. 17. 
Banbury Cakes, 6. 176, 177. 
Bane, Cafit., 7. 235, 230. 
Bangor, 7. 350. 

Banister, , an Enfjiishmnn, 5. 87. 

Banister, Mr., 5. 341, 350, 414 ; 6. 75, 88, 

140. 
Banister, Madam", 7. 115. 
Banister, John, 6. 2'JO, 291. Death of, at 

Banburv, 7. 17, 114. 
Banister, Samuel, 6. 220, 315 ; 7. IGl, 1G2. 
Binister, Mrs. S., 5. 11* 318. 
Banister. Thomas, 5. 74, 313, 348, 502. 

Death of, 6. 2G0. 
Banister, Thomas, Jr., 6. 226, 420, 421. 
Bank of riiiiailelphia, f unJs of, ai)plicd 

to provisions for the army, 10. 1S5. 
Bank, Tiie, a name given to rortsniouth, 

N. H., 7. 185, 221, 308. 
Bank, establislunent of a, proposed by 

John Winthrop, Jr., 8 8(5. 
Bank of the United States,. 2 301. 
Bankers' Charter, 7. 27. 
Banks, Sister, i. 102. 
Banks, Col., 6. 404. 
Banks, .Sir Henry, candidate for Mayor 

of London, 9. 377. 
Banks, John, mesaenqer, g. 94, 95. 
Banks, .V;V JoJin, 8.138, 157, 101. 
Banks, iSir Joseph, grandson of Joseph 

Banks, M. P., 3. 4U: 6.405. 
Banks, Joseph, M. P., 6. 405. 
Banniard, Mr.t., 6. l'J8. 
Bannister. Mr., meniioned, g. 301. 
Bannister, t'u/>l. Seth, 4 110, 25i, 278. 
Banns of marriage, 7. 305. 
Bant, .l/;s , 7. 135. 
Bant, John, manner, 5. 234, 258, 374, 485 ; 

7. 278. 
Baptisms of Sewall's cliildren, 5. 40, 48, 

49; 7. 107, 328. 329, 351, 383, 384, 395. ; 
Baptis, Joiin, 7. 335. ! 

Bai)tist Church, 6. 120, 386. 
I5aptists, 6. 13; 7. 298. 
Barbadoes, i. 36, 100 n.. 351, 353, 416, 

474 ; 5. 82, 403. 431 ; 8. 74 ; g. 234. Col. 

Dongan governor of, 5. 213. A great 

mortality at, 8 161, 384. 
Barbarities, Indian, 6 33*, 45* 57* 80*. 
Barbarous murder of Leister and ilil- 

burn, 6. 106*, 114*. 



Barber, , 5. xxix ; 7. 75. 

Barber, Capt.. 5. 459; 6. 114. 
Barbour, VVilliam, witness to will of Ed- 
ward Ilopkins, g. 22. 
Barbut, William, 5. 292. 
Barclay, Robert, 2. 157. 
Barclay Castle, ship, 5. 274. 
Barefoot, Walter, 2. 18, 250. 

Barington, , mariner, 5. 104. 

Barker, , innkeeper, 5. 450. 

Barker, Mr., i. 361. 

Barkett, Robert, i. 356. 

Barkley, Alderman, 8. 205. 

Barkley, Mrs., i. 353. 

Barkly, Mr , i. 360. 

' Barley, Siberian,' 2. 75, 77, 80. 

Barlow, Cupt., 7. 312, 367. 

Barlow, Joel, 4. 376, 395. 

Barlow, Dr. T., 5. 303. 

Barniudas, 5. 151, 343, 350 ; 6. 306 ; 7. 

44. 
Barnard (Barnad), Bartholomew, 8. 395, 

459. 
Barnard, Deacon, 6. 80 ; 7. 34. 189, 222, 

370. 
Barnard, Edward, 5. 302. 
Barnard, Rev. John, 6. 355, 357, 400 ; 7. 

24. Ordained at .Marblehead, 7. 92. 

Preaches Artillery Sermon, 7. 186. 
Barnard, Rev. Tlionias, 5. 89 ; 7. 199. 

Married third wife, 6. 114. At ordina- 
tion, 6. 401. 
Barnard, Capt. Thomas, 3. 82, 119, 201, 

238. 
Barnes, John, i. 501. 
Barnes, Robert, i. 501. 
Barnes, William, i. 501. 
Barneveldt, John van, 4. 401, 403. 
Barns, Benjamin, 7. 79. 
Barns, James, 5. 122, 474 , 6. 253, 275, 

303, 308, 320. 
Barnstable, Mass., i. 196 , 6. 413 ; 7. 353. 
Barnstable Bar, 5. 311. 
Barnstable Court, 7. 128. 
Barnstable, AV/., 6. 120. 
Baron, //vV/k/c, 6. 125. 
Barony of Ilampstead Marshall, 5. 192. 
Barras, Louis, Conde dc, 4. 223. 
Barre, Col., mentioned, 9. 213. Speech 

in Parliament, concerning the Colonies, 

9. 313. Action concerning the Duty 

Act, 9. 339. In Parliament, 9. 423, 437. 

Speech concerning war with Spain, 9. 

462. 
Barre, John, i 401. 
Barre', Madame dc, 9 472. 
Barrel!, Mrs. Abiali, 6. 324 ; 7. 27. 
Barrel!, Elizabeth, 7. 3-36. 
Barrel!, Capt. John, 6. 324 ; 7. 115, 344. 
Barrel!, ^lary, 7. 336. 
Barret, G., 5" 2, 4. 

Barrett, , 5. 49,230. 

Barrett, Nathaniel, 2. 79, S2 
Barrett, Mrs. Rebeckali, 5. 286. 
Barrett, Thomas, 5. 302. 



348 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Barriiigton, , 7. 243. 

liarriiigton, Lieut., aide-de-camp to Gen. 

Prescott, 10. 87. 
Barrington, Lord, g. 423. Concerning 

military in tlie Colonics, 9. 436. 
Barrington, Mrs. Dorothy, i. 212 ?i. 
Barrington, Sir Francis, i. 212 n. 
Barrington, Mrs. Joanna, i. 212 n. 
Barrington, Robert, letter of, i. 212. 
Barrow, Thomas, 6. 51*. 
Barr^-, Mr., 7. 351. 
Barston, John, 6. 92. 
Bartholomew, Mr., death of, 5 370. 
Bartholomew, Henry, 8 411, 418. 
Bartholomew Day, 5. 186. 
Bartlet, Mr., 1. 366. 
Bartlet, John, 6. 145, 338. 
Bartlett, John, 2. 386. 
Bartlett, Josiah, i. 501. 
Bartlett, Uichard, 6. 17*. 
Bartlett, Samuel, 6. 3-]8. 
Barton, Mr., Ew/laiul, 5. 299 ; 7. 351. 
Barton, Mr., concerning certain bound- 
ary, 9. 200. 
Barton, Dr. Benjamin Smith, 3. 320, 321, 

328, 357, 363, 365, Sm. 
Barton, Margaret, 6. 180. 
Bartram, Isaac, his paper on ' Siberian 

Barley,' 2. 75, 77, 78, 80. 
Bartram, William, 2. 425 ; 3. 284, 289. 
Barwick, town of, 5. 296. 
Baskerville, John, 3. 268. 
Bass, Rev. Mr., 7. 261. 
Bass, John, will of, 7. 109. 
Bass, Joseph, 7. 109. 
Basset, Dr., 5. 292. 
Basset, Major, 6. 106, 341. 
Basset, Rev. Nathan, 7. 332. 
Basset, William, 6. 432. 
Bastian, see Sebastian. 
Bastian, Jane, 6. 46, 75. 
Bastian, Mary, 6. 183. 
Bastwick, Dr. John, i. 150 »., 151 n. 
Batch, Rev. William, 7. 868. 
Batchclder, Abraham, 2. 422, 426. 

Bate, , 7. 76. 

Bate, Mrs., 7. 76. 

Bate, Esther, 7. 180. 

Bate, Dr. George, i. 102. 

Bates, Edward, i. 313, 377. 

Bates, James, 7. 333, 334. 

Bates, Mary, 7. 333. 

Bath and Wells, Bishop of, 5. 209. 

Bathe, Co!., 5. 254. 

Bathurst, Jud(/e (afterward Lord Apf^- 

lei/), mentioned, 9 408. Lord High 

Chancellor, 9. 473. 
Battan, Cupl., 8. 202, 4.35. 
Batten, Benjamin, i. 419. 
Batter, Mrs. Mary, 5. 249, 300. 
Batters, E., 5. 7, 90. 
Battersby, Joiin, marriage of, 7. 124. 
Battersea, Eiifi-j 5- 65. 
Battis, , French prisoner, 6. 37*, 48'", 

74*, 75*. 



Baudouin, James, 6. 41.3. 

Baudouin, John, 6. 413. 

Baudouin, Pierre, 6. 413. 

Baulston, William, letter of, i. 343. 

Bauman, Major Sebastian, 4. 147, 152. 

Baxter, Mrs., 5. 238. 

Ba.\ter, George, letters of, i. 368, 369. 

Notice of, I. 368 «. 
Baxter, Rev. Joseph, 5. 150, 434, 459, 467 ; 
I 6. 139. 

I Baxter, Nicholas, a gunner at the fort, 5. 
I 154. 

I Baxter's Directory, 5. 212. 
I Baxter's ' History of his Life and Times,' 

6. 70 ; 7. 154, 175. 
Baxter & Co., Messrs., Ridanojid, Va., 3. 

411. 
Bay of Caviat, 8. 369. 
Bay ofDarien, 8. 369. 
Bay of Fundy, concerning the tides of, 

8. 128. 
Bay Psalm Book, 6. 294 ; 7. 25. 
Bayard, Col., 5. 343. 

Bayard, N., secretari/ to Gov. Colve, 9. 96. 
Bayberry wax, adulteration of, 8. 509. 
Bayer, Lieut.-Col. Bastien, 8. 257. At 

the inyasion of the Island of Antigua, 

8. 255. 
Bayles, John, i. 397 n., 399 
Bayley, see Bailev. 
Bayley, Daniel, 6. 178. 
Bayley, Isaac, 6. 179. 
Bayley (Bayly), Rev. James, marries 

Mary Carr, 5. 178. ^Mentioned, 5. 233, 

349, 410; 6. 166, 171-174, 176. Death 

of, 6. 179. 
Bayley (Bailey), Rev. John, 5. 01, 07, 117, 

128, 145. Death of, 5. 465, 466. 
Bayley, Joseph, 6. 173, 337, 338. 
Bayley, Joshua. 6 179, 187. 
Bayley, Mrs. Lydia, yz'rs^ ivife of Rev. John, 

6. 118. 
Bayley, Prentice, 6. 179. 
Bayley, Mrs. Rebecca, ivife of Rev. Thomas, 

5. 390; 6. 119. 
Bayley, Rev. Thomas, 5. 93. 
Baylie, see Baillie, Robert. 
Baylies, William, M.D., 3. 160. 
Bayly, John, ./;•., 5. 349. 
Bayly, Mrs. Susanna, 5. 182,369. Mar- 
ries Rev. Mr. Thacher, 5. 509 ; 6. 102, 

172,176, 179,247,287; 7. 75. 
Baylye, ^irs., wife of Rev. John, marriage 

of,'8. 501. 
Bayljes, the, concerning wages of their 

brother, 8. 499. 
Beacli, Benjamin, 4. 464. 
Beach, Richard, 8. 392. 
Beach Island, 7. 184. 
Beachamp (Bechamp), John, i. 272, 273. 
Beachy Head, 5. 24(), 330, 
Beacon Hill, 5. 60. 63, 431, 481 ; 7, 52, 79. 
Beacon Island, 7. 103. 
Beacon Street, 5. 65, 72-74, ISO. 
Beacon Street Mall, 5. 4b2. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



349 



r 



Beal, Edward, 7. 18i. 

Beal, Father, 5. 208. 

Boale, (•oodmaii, 8. 44. 

Hoamont, h'cr. Mr., England, 5. 290. 

Boan, Lieut., 6. 82 ; 7. 342. 

Beane, J., 8. 80. 

Bear, Gilbert, 5. xxii, 294, 295, 300. 

Beard, , imiriner, 7. 114. 

Beard, dipt., 7. 17. 

Beard, Ca/it. John, juror, 9. 138. 

Bearstow, George, 5. oOG. 

Beat of drum, 7. 38. 

Beattv, Mr., Commissarij of Prisoners, 

10. "138. 
Beanulianip, Lorrf, g. 431. 
Bcaucliainp, Richard, his statue, 5. 304. 
Beaver skins, 6. 38*. 
Beccles, Km/., 6. 342. 
Beck, Mrs.,'5.202. 
Beckford, Alderman, mentioned, 9. 313. 

Appointed .Vlayor of London, 9. 377. 
Bccon, Ei)iiraiMi, 6. 419. 
Beilford, Duke of', g. 408. 
Bedford, Mr., 5. 258, 275, 276. 
Bedford Party, coalition of, witli the 

Ministry, 9. 251. 
Bedford, Rockingham, and Grenville 
Parties, to form a ministry, 9. 241. 
Tiieir reconciliation, and union con- 
sidered, 9. 304-361). 
Bedford, town of, 8. 348 ; 10. 102. 
Bedford Street, 5. 378. 
Bedwell, Benjamin. 6. 24. 
Bee, Matthew, 6. 12. 
Beebe, Lieut.- Col., with regiment at 

Horseneck, 10. 202. 
Becking, Frederick, 3. 250, 259, 261, 202, 

271. 
Beekman, John M., 4. 205. 
Beele, Lawrence, i. 501. 
Beers, Isaac, 3. 345. 

Beers. James, testifies concerning Roma- 
nock's possessions, 9. 135. 
Begelos, Samuel, 5. 377. 
Belchar, see Belcher. 

Belcher, , tenant of S. Sewall, 6. 

355. 

Belcher (Belchar), , 7. 220, 372. 

Belcher, .Mrs., Newbun/, 6. 60. 

Belcher, Abigail, 7. 100. 

Belcher, Andrew, tnrerner, 8. 228, 282, 

408, 411, 419, 48G, 492, 509, 525, y47. 
Belcher, Andrew, Jr., 7. 114. 
Belcher, Cd/it. Andrew, mentioned, 5. 220, 
451, 498 ; 6. 23, :V-l, 05, 93, 160, 238 ; 7. 
8, 127, 133. Marriage of his daughter, 
5. 487. Voted for at town meeting, 5. 
496. Concerning money for St. Chris- 
topher Island, 6. 95*. Death of his 
daughter, 6. 5. Concerning Kidd's 
treasure. 6. 7. The celebration of 
Queen .\nne's birthdav, 6. 72. Chosen 
Councillor, 6. 78, \»i<, 224, 250. Met 
the Governor at Cambridge, 6. 102. 
Death of his negro, 6. 150. His new 



wig, 6. 152. Attacked with gout, 6. 
15:^, 312; 7. 30. His praver-meeting, 
6. 184. Concerning Mr. Willard, 6. 180. 
At Harvard Commencement, 0. 190. 
Concernin"! tlic Indians at Nantucket, 
6. 197. His land at tiie South End, 6. 
198. Attends instalment of Mr. Lev- 
erett, 6. 208. Concerning muster-rolls, 
6. 213. Invited to the Castle, 6. 253. 
Dines with the Governor and Council, 
6. 209. At meeting of the Council, 6. 
278, 380; 7. 21, 58, 104. His sending 
wheat to Curasso in Capt. Rose's ship, 
6. 280, 384. News of the taking of 
Douay, 6 287. Visits the Governor 
with S. Sewall, 6. 288. Furnishes sup- 
plies for an expedition against Quebec, 

6. 313. Voting at church meeting, 6. 
339, 345. Present at tlie complaint 
against Col. Fo.xcroft, 6. 357. Concern- 
ing Bill of Credit, 6. 366. Goes to 
Menotomy fishing, 6. 392. Sick with 
a fever, 6. 395. At ordination of Mr. 
Stevens, 6. 402. At marriage of Gov. 
Dudley's daughter, 7. 5. At Jonathan 
Belcher's great supper, 7. 20. Com- 
plaint against yEneas Salter, 7. 72. 
Concerning a ball at Edward Enstone's, 

7. 111. Bearer at funeral of S. Sew- 
all's wife, 7. 144. His death, 7. 14(). 
Biographickl note of, 7. 100. His tomb, 
7. 297. 

Belcher, ^Lrs. Andrew (Hannah), 6. 23, 
239, 344 ; 7. 149, 159, 100, 210, 264. 

Belcher, Mrs. Andrew (Sarah), 7. 100. 

Belcher, Anne, 7. 100, 198, 284. 

Belcher, C, 5. 229; 7. 125. 

Belcher, Edward, i. 490. 

Belcher, Edward. 7. 100. 

Belcher, Edward, J;-., 7. 160. 

Belcher, Mrs. Edward (Christian), 7. 100. 

Belcher, Mrs. Edward, Jr. (Mary), 7. 
160. 

Belcher, Elizabeth, 5. 423. 

Belcher, Jeremiah, 5. 220. 

Belcher, Jonathan, .//■., 7. 278. 

Belcher, Gov. Jonathan, mentioned, 2. 70, 
233 ; 3. 28 ; 6. 220, 254 ; 7. KM), 197, 243, 
310, 311, 310, 301. Married, 6. 151. 
153. Meeting with Cajjt. Paxton, 6. 
343. Concerning Hills of Credit, 6. 305. 
Makes a treat for Mr. Wainwright, 6. 
370. Gives a great supper, 7. 20. At 
the Assembly, 7. 153. Settlement with 
his mother, 7. 104, 107. At Overseers' 
meeting at Harvard College, 7. 203. 
His memorial for reimbursement, 7. 
200. At meeting of Council, 7. 238, 
243. Concerning the Fast, 7. 28(5. 

Belcher, Afrs. Jonathan (Mary), 6. 151, 
153. 

Belcher, Rev. Josepli, Dedliam, 5. 387, 
459, 475; 6.31, 112, 186; 7. 305, 324, 
325. 

Belcher, Joseph, Jr., 6. 344 ; 7. 200. 



850 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Belcher, Josiah, 6. 19*. 

Belcher, Marv, 6. 5. 

Belcher, MehitaLle, 7. 160. 

Belcher, Rev. Samuel, 5. 48G ; 6. 81, 178, 
187. 

Belcher, William, 6. 356. 

Belford Farm, 5. 376. 

Belgrade, 5. 227. 

I^elknap, , 7. 350. 

Belknap, Miss, New York, 3. 133, 134. 

Belknap, Mrs. Abigail, 7. 79, 151, 270. 

Belknap, Elizabeth, 3 211. 

Belknap, Jane, see Marcou, Jane. 

Belknap, Jeremiah, 7. 97, 281. 

Belknap, Rev. Jeremy, his ' History of 
New Hampshire,' 2.'l9-21, 98 ; 3. 88, 95, 
108, 110, 113, 11(5, 108 n., 317. His 
' History of New Hampshire' cited, 2. 
10 «., 79 n., 112 n., 110 n., 122 n. ; 3. 376. 
Publication of the first volume, 2. 122, 
124, 127, 133, 100. 177, 181, 187, 189, 
198, 199, 214-216, 222-^24, 226, 227, 
237, 239-248. 250, 256-260, 263-267, 
272, 278, 284, 292, 294, 304, 317, 320, 
321, 331, 334-337, 344, 348, 352, 354, 
369, 372. 377, 378, 380, 382, 383, 386, 
401, 411, 414, 415. Slow sale of the 
volumes, 2. 491, 499; 3. 1, 217. Publica- 
tion of tlie remaining volumes, 3. 197, 
200, 244, 246, 247, 253, 258, 2ol, 203, 
266, 272, 283. His interest in natural 
history and philosoj)liv, 2. 39, 40, 56, 
83, 88, 117, 154-156, 208, 219, 234, 251- 
25.5, 306, 327. His account of the dark 
day in New England, 1780, 2. 52-55. 
Illness of, 2 85. His ' Conjectures on 
the Original Population of America,' 

2. 127, 135, 1.38-142, 151, 153, 167, 177, 
301, 306, 310. ' Life of,' by Mrs. Mar- 
cou, cited, 2. 184 n, 412 u., 420 n., 
428 n. ; 3. 115 11. His views on political 
matters, 2. 207, 282, 283, 309-315, 431 ; 

3. 124. Meteorological Record, 2. 280. 
His religious views, 2. 173, 190-193, 
324-326, 339, 347, 304-368, 383. Elect- 
ed a member of the American Pliilo- 
sophical Society, 2. 300, .305. Date of 
his birth, 2. 320. His ' Memoir on 
Parsnips,' 2. .332. Diary of his ' Tour 
to tiie White Mountains,' 2 386-401 ; 
3. 170-178, 180-189. His ' Description 
of the White Mountains,' 2 404 n. His 
iournev to Philadelphia, 2. 420 n. His 
■' Foresters,' 2. 421, 424, 474, 482. 484, 
489, 492, 496 ; 3. 1, 13, 15, 135, 137, 141, 
197, 200, 278, 285, 289, 293, 295, 297, 
31.3, 317, 427. Anecdote about the au- 
thorshij), 3. 227. His Election Sermon, 
2. 423, 4.34. His 'Tour' ])ublished in 
the Transactions of the Pliilosophical 
Society, 2. 42-5. His position as minis- 
ter of" Dover, 2. 428. His salary, 2 
428 n. One of his political letters pub- 
lished in the ' New Haven Gazette,' 2. 
439, 441, 466. Kemoves from Dover, 



! 2. 440. Preaches at Exeter, 2. 443. 
' Project for establishing him in Phila- 
delpliia as editor of a magazine, 2. 450- 
i 455, 459, 461. Invited to the Federal 
Street Church in Boston, 2. 454, 457- 
459. His salary in Boston, 2. 4-58. Sale 
of his house in Dover, 2. 4()4 n. His 
house in Boston, 2. 465, 485. His 
' American BioErraphy,' 2 500 ; 3. 344, 
347-349, 364, 366, 308-370, 411. Offered 
a share in the 'Anterican Magazine,' 
3. 88, 91, 97. His ideas of copyridit, 
3. 141-143. His views of the deatji of 
children, 3. 170. His opinion of the 
Quakers, 3. 221. Receives the degree 
of D.D. from Harvard College, 3. 306. 
His ' Discourse on Columbus,' 3. 307, 
308, 312, 314, 315, 317, 318, 822. 
Changes his house in Boston, 3. 330. 
Plan sliowing the various houses in 
which he lived in Boston, 3. 351. His 
health, 3. 352, 354, 350. His literary 
labors in 1795, 3. 353. His death, 3. 
306 n. Letter of St. George Tucker to, 
in regard to slavery in Massachusetts, 3. 
379-381. Letter of Dr. John Eliot to, 
about slavery, 3. 382, 383. Letters of 
Samuel Dexter to, in reference to Judge 
Tucker's queries on slavery, 3. 384-388. 
Note of Nathaniel Appleton to, 3. 388. 
Letter of .Judge Winthrop to, on slav- 
ery, 3. 389-391. Letter of Thomsis Pem- 
bcrton to, on Judge Tucker's queries, 
3 391-394. Letter from Samuel Dexter 
to. 3. 395-398. Letter from Dr. Holy- 
oke to, on Judge Tucker's queries, 
3. 398-401. Pres. Adams's letter to, 
3 401, 402. Letter from Gov. Sulli- 
van on slavery in Massachusetts, 3. 402, 
403. Letters from Judge Tucker to, 
3. 404-412. Gov. Sullivan's letter to, 
on slavery in Virginia, 3. 412-416. 
Letter from Pres. Adams to, 3 416. 
Judge Tucker's letter acknowledg- 
ing election to the Historical Society, 
3. 416, 417. Letter from Judge Tucker 
in regard to slavery in Virginia, 3. 417- 
423. Letters from Judge Tucker to, 
3 423-431. 

Belknap, Mrs. Jeremy, 2. passim ; 3 1- 
370, passim. Letters of Mr. Hazard to, 
3. 368, 370, 371. Letter of, to Mr. Haz- 
ard, 3. 370. 

Belknap, John, 3. 220, 225, 366 n., 367. ' 

Belknap, Joseph, .son of Rev. Jeremt/ Bel- 
hmp, 2. 215 n., 230, 260, 262, 270, 276, 
279, 286, 287, 289, 293. 298, 299, 302- 
305, 317, 320,357, 403-405, 483; 3. 232, 
2.5.5-2-37, 261, 26-3, 277 n. Apprenticed 
to Robert Aitken, 2. 230-232, 24.5, 419. 
His indentures cancelled, 2. 479, 480, 
483, 484. Sketch of his life, 2. 484 n. 
See also Belknap & Hall, and Belknap 
& Young. 

Belknap, Joseph, Boston, 5 341, .398, 508; 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS IirSTORrCAL SOCIETV. 



6. Ifi, IIG, 307; 7. 76, 77, 79. Will of, 
7 79. 

Belknap, Samuel, illness of, 3 81. 83, 86, 
DO, 9t5, lOJ, lOo, 110, 113. Death of, 3. 
114, 115. 

Belknap. Sarah, 3 113, 153,275,279,281. 

Belknap & Hall, Messrs., 3 277 n., 355, 
481 ". 

Belknap & Young, ^[essrs., 3 231, 481 n. 

Bell, Anne, 7. il5. 

Bell, Daniel, 5. 63. 

Bell, George, his exchange as prisoner of 
war, 10. 74, 313. 

Bell, Robert, 2. 211, 214, 249, 259, 308, 
322, 413. 

Bell, C«/)/. Thomas (?), 4. 33. 

Bell, M'l/or William, 6. 35. 

Bellamy, , 6. 1(5 ). 

Bellaraj-, Capf., 7. 129. 

Bellingham, Mulam. 8. 536. 

Belling.iam .I//-.-. Elizabeth. 5. 61, 70,442, 
479 ; 6. 193; 7. 262. 231, 293, 364. 

Bellingham, Mrs. Penelope, 5- 75 ; 6. 50, 
57. 

Bellingham, Richard, Goi-ernor of Massa- 
chusetts, I. 148 «., 151, 32), 355 «., 367, 
375, 493 ; 5. xiv, 59-62 ; 6 57, 197, 198 ; 
8. 117, 146, 150. His will, 6. 197, 
193. 

Bellingham, Samuel, 6. 198; 7. 159, 163, 

Bellingiiam, Mrs. Samuel, 5 433 ; 6 198. 

Bellingham, William, letter of, i. 355. 

Bellomont, Rieiiard Coote, Dyrd, 5. 203, 
3,J5, 411, 413, 430, 476. 477, 493, 497, 
493, 509. 501, 507 ; 6. 103*. 114* 3. 4, 

7. 20, 33, 174, 417 ; 8. 35), 372, 380, 525, 
515, 513, 550, 552, 553, 550, 500, 570 ; 9. 
180. Appointed Governor of Massa- 
chusetts, 8. 321. Appointed Governor 
of New York, etc., 8.305 (!. Letters of 
Fitz-John Winthrop to, 8. 340, 313, 351, 
365-370, 370-330. Treaty with the 
Five Nations of Indians, 8. 351. Arri- 
val of, at New York, 8 355, 533, 511. 
Illness of, 8. b'y'y. Going to Rhode Isl- 
and, 8. 553. Referred to, concerning 
certain boundaries, 9. 199. 

B.'ilomont, Lidj, 5. 493-501, 503, 507. 
B.'llomont Gate, 5. 500; 6. 174. 
Ballomont's Stable, 6. 174. 
Bembo, Aim., concerning the territories 

in America, 8 572. 
Berais, John, 5. 94. 
Bemont, Edward, i. 242. 
Ben, an Indian boi/, 8 560. 
Ben.ial, E-isifjn, 5. 13. 
H ■ndal, Mr.<\ 5. 13. 
Hend.ill, Mr., 8. 56. 
Bendall, Edward, 5. GO, 01. 
Benefactors of Harvard, 6. 111,112, 
Benezet, Anthony, 2. 315, 350. 

Benjamin, , 5. 75. 

Bennet, , 5. 320 ; 7. 222. 

Bennet, Capt., 5. .390; 6. 198,414. 
Bennet, Mrs. Hannah, 6. 414. 



Bennet, Henry, name subscribed to letter 
of King Charles 11,9. 55. 

Bennet, James, 6. 414. 

Bennet, Joanna, Jr., 6. 414. 

Bennet, Mrs. Joanna, 6. 414. 

Bennet, Jonatiian, 6. 414. 

Bennet, Mary, 6. 414. 

Bennet, Peter, 6. 414. 

Bennet, Samuel, 6. 414. 

Bennet, Mrs. Saraii, 6. 130, 414. 

Bennet, William, 6. 414. 

Bennett, Dr. David, 5 204; 7. 88. 

Bennett, Henry, 5. 2»7, 288. 

Bennett, John, 7. 310, 414. 

Bennett, Mrs. R., 5. 201 ; 6. 414 ; 7. 88. 

Bennett, Spencer, 5. 201 ; 7. 88. 

Benning, see Binning. 

Benning, ^frs. Elizabeth, 7 79. 

Bennington, Gen. Stark's victory at, 10. 
94. 

Benson, Egbert, LL.D., 4. 267, 208. 

Bent, Capt., 8. 524, 527. 

Benton, Capt., i\. 21'A. 

Bergen-op-Zoom, 5. 71. 

Beringer, M , Secretary to French Lega- 
tion at the Hague, 4, 411. 

Bermudas or Somers Islands, i. 277 n., 
310-342,350; 8. 136. Concerning the 
governor of, 8. 401. 

Bernard, , carpenter, 6. 180, 195. 

Bernard, Miss, 5. 295. 

Bernard, C5(V Francis, Goremor of Massa- 
chusetts, mentioned, 3 385,395; 4 336; 
9 291, 379. Concerning a certain duty 
levied, 9 387. Concerning a disunion 
at Boston, 9 402. Complaint against 
dismissed, 9 418. 

Bernard, Jane, 5 53. 

Bernard, Tiiomas, 6. 245, 

Bernon, Gabriel, 5. 292 ; 6 202. 

Berry, Justice, 6. 315; 7. 83, 355. 

Berry, Thomas, ' Sir ' , 6. 3.54. 

Berry, Abigail, 7. 379. 

Berry, Mrs. Grace, 6 208 

Berry, John, mariner, Salem, 7. 379. 

Berry, Capt. John, 8. 258, 320. 

Berrv, Mrs. Margaret, 6. 192. 

Berry, Oliver, 7. 379. 

Berrv, Thomas, mariner, 5. 50. Death of, 
5. "104 : 6. 268. 

Berry, Thomas, Jr., 6. 192, 285. 

Berry, Capt. Thomas, death of, 5. 428. 
Mentioned 6. 192. 

Berton, I'ett r. a Frenchman interested 
in settling Hotchester, 9 171. 

Berwick, l>nke of, 6. 191. 

Berwick, A/k/.. 5. 209. 

Berwick, Me., 6 93; 7. 6. 

P.est, Capt., 8. 10. 

Bethune, George, 6. 303: 7. 51. 

Bethime, Nathaniel, 7. 51. 

Betty, nerjro ivoman, 6. 340, 311. 

Betty, ship, 5. 243. 

Beverley, Robert. 3. 404. 

Beverley, 7. 83, 375. 



352 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Beverley Troop, 6. 104, 105. 

Be'ville, Gen. do, French Quartermaster- 
General, 4. 239, 264, 265. 

Biarn (Biron), , 3. 411. 

Bible, first American editions of, 2. 159 n. 
American editions of, 3 0O8. 

'Bi-Centcnnial Book of Maiden,' 5 130. 

Bicker, H., 4. 387, 392. 

Bickerings with Mr. Noyes about proph- 
ecy, 6. 99, 100. 

Biddeford, Me., 7. 240. 

Biddle, Col., concerning forage for the 
army, 10. 127. 

Biddle, Clement, 3. 279. 300, 303. 

Bigelow, Major, Tiniotliy, 4. 141. In ex- 
pedition to Quebec, 9. -501. 

Bigelow, James, 5. 100, 101. 

Bigelow, John, 8. 401. 

Bigg, John, 7. 191, 333. 

Bigg, Mrs. John (Hannah), 7. 191. 

Bigg, Kachel, 7. 333. 

Biggs, John, i. 200, 486. 

Bignell's Farm, 5 149. 

Bilbao, 5. 156, 229, 231, 256 

Biles, Mr., England, 5. 295. 

Bill, Capt. Jonatiian, 5. 214, 475 ; 6. 254, 
297 ; 7. 169. 

Bill, Thomas, 7. 97, 169. 

Bill, for courts, 5. 370. Put up on Fast 
Day, 5. 445 ; 6. 7*. To naturalize For- 
eign-born Children of Citizens, 6. 7*. 
Against Mixed Marriages, 6. 143. 
Against Fornication, 6 143. For Se- 
curity of Queen's Person and Govern- 
ment, etc., 6. 160. For an Agent, 6 
273. For the Tax, 7. 47. About In- 
dians and Negroes, 7. 87. Of Credit, 
Altering a, 7. 112. Of Exclusion, 7. 
236. For £50,000, 7. 285, 286. 

Billericay (Billerica), 6. 170. 

Billiards, 7. 307. 

Billing, Joseph, 6. 8, 222. 

Billing, William, petition of, concerning 
his tenancy, 9. 67. 

Billinge's Inn, 5. 88, 318 ; 6. 41 ; 7. 18. 

Billings, , 7. 183; 8. 668. 

Billings, Capt., 7. 331. 

Billings, Capt. Ebenezer, 7. 19. Deatli 
of. 7. 162, 163. 

Billings, liev. Richard, 7. 163. 

Billings, Capt. Roger, death of, 7. 163. 

Billingsgate, London, 5. 8. 

Billingsgate Precinct, 6. 387. 

Bills burned. 6 273. 

Bills of Credit, 6. 113, 332, 365, 360, 430 ; 
7. 2.3, 48, 112, 138. 189, 210, 235. 
Counterfeiting, 7. 189, 196, 210. Con- 
cerning certain, 8. 50. Liberty to New 
York to issue, 9. 4.38. 

Bills of Exchange, concerning, 8. 510, 
512. 516. 

Bingham, Nathaniel, lieutenant in Revo- 
lutionary arm}', 9. 507. 

Bingley, William. 2. 162. 

Binning, Mrs, Elizabeth, 7. 79. 



Binning, John, 7. 79. 

Biographical Dictionary, proposed, by 
Dr. Belknap, 2. 3-5, 7, 10, 12, 26, 37, 
50. 

Biographical Sketches, of John Winthrop, 
Jr., 8. 3. Of Henrv Winthrop, 8. 178. 
Of Forth Winthrop's. 184. Of Stephen 
Winthrop, 8 199. Of Adam Winthrop, 
8.219. Of Deane Winthrop, 8. 231. Of 
Samuel Winthrop, 8. 234. Of Fitz- 
John Winthrop, 8. 267. Of Wait Still 
Winthrop, 8. 382. Of John Winthrop, 
F. R.S., 8. 571. 

Birch, G., 9. 204. 

Birch, Gen. Samuel, 4. 27-5, 276. 

Birchard, John, name signed as clerk, 9. 
67. 

Bird, Ebenezer, 6. 71. 

Bird, Elinor, 6. 198. 

Bird. John, 6. 47. 

Bird Island, 5. 472 ; 8. 5-54. 

Birde, Henry, i. 501. 

Birds-eve, Mr., death of, 6. 48. 

Birge, John, 5. 112 ; 7. 56, 261. 

Birmingham, Eng., 7. 88, 89. 

Biron, see Biarn. 

Births of Sewall's children, 5 40, 48-50, 
56, 110, 106, 223, 328, 351, 381, 394, 
426 ; 6. 49. 

Bisby's Ferry, 6. 340. 

Biscon, Isaac, 5. 292. 

Bishop, Mrs., 5. 149, 150. 

Bishop, Goodman, 5 126; 7.227. 

Bishop, Nathaniel, 7. 113, 114. 

Bishop, Capt. Phanuel, 3. 6. 

Bishop, petition for a, 7. 62. 

Bishop-Stafford, 5. 261, 307. 

Bishop-Stoke Street, 5. 73. 

Bishop's Lane or Alley, 7. 11-3, 114, 139. 

Bishop's ' New England Judged ' men- 
tioned, 9. 26 n. 

Bishop's iito]ie, England, s. xii, xxi, 8, 20, 
262,300,473; 7.' 15. 

Bishops, for America, 4. 34.3. Sending 
of, to American colonies, 9. 390, 412, 
434. 

Bissitree, Eng., 5. 149. 

Black, Moses, 2. 458. 

Black Friars, London, 7. 322, 32.3. 

Black Horse, the, 7. 57. 

Black lead, concerning a sale of 
Found in Rhode Island, 9. 28. 

Blackden, Major, 4. 80, 81. 

Blacket, Capt., 7. 29. 

Blackledge, Mr., i. 439. 

Blackleech, John, waterspout seen by, 
8. 94. Concerning marriage of, 8. 491. 

Blackmore, ('apt., 6. 265. 

Blackpoint, 5. 24; 6. 84. 

Blackstone, Dr., 9. 345. 

Blackstone, William, 5. 73, 74 ; 6. 24, 169; 
7. 308. House of, a boundarv, 9, 1.59. 

Blackstone, Sir William, 3. 425«., 439; 
4. 324. 

Blackstone's Commentaries, 7. 353. 



8. 50. i 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



Blackstono's Point, 5. 186 ; 6. 2G0. 

Blackstone's liights in Boston, 7. '-iio. 

Blivclistone's Kiver, 6. Hid. 

BlackwiiU, A',1,/., 5. 2Li8. 

Blackwtll, Mrs.,s. 110,271. 

Black well, FrancfS, 5. Uli. 

BlackwfU, John, Cd/itain of the troop, 5. 
77, Do, IIU, lo2, 215, 323. 

BlackwoU, John, 9. 153. 

Blag- , 5. 2o4. 

Blauge, Capt., 5. 315. 

Blagrove, ,5. 484; 6. 163, 1G4, 167, 

200, 238 ; 7. 2u9. 

Blagrove, Madam, 7. 57. 

Blagrove, Rtv. Benjamin (?), 3. 230, 233, 
2o'.i. 

Blaine, Col. Ephraim, 4. 167. 

Blair, Rev. Hugh, D.D., 2. 424, 427. His 
' Lectures on lihetoric,' 2. 277, 308, 310, 
317, 327, 337, 341, 351, 358, 370. 

Blair, Robert, 4. 221. 

Blake, , coroner, 5. 179, 208. 

Blake, John, 7. 372 ; 8. 427, 480. Death 
of, 8. 4'.I0. Letter of. concerning estate 
of John White, 9. 123. 

Blake, (!<n. Kobcrt, commander of Eng- 
lish fleet, 8. 211, 229. 

Blake, Ensign William, 7. 260. 

Blake, William, Dorchester, 6. 47. 

Blake's Annals, 5. 49. 

Blanchard, Mr., 7. 223. 

Blanching business, 6. 115*. 

Bland, Giles, i. 354 h. 

Bland, Mrs. Jane. i. 338h. 

Bland, John, the father, i. 3.^8 n. 

Bland, John, (he son, 1. 338 n., 339. Let- 
ter of, I. 854. 

Bland, Col. Richard, i. 354 ; 3. 410. Let- 
ter of, I. 338. 

Bland, Theoderick, i. 338n. 

Blanker, Robert, i. 501. 

Blanklcr, Thomas, i. 501. 

Blany, Mr., financial troubles of, 8. 445, 
448, 457, 458. 

Blanv, Mrs., 8. 525. 

Blathwait, William, 5. 69, 255. 430; 6. 
10:)*. Letter of FitzJohn Wintlirop 
to, 8. 344. Member of House of Com- 
mons, 8. 344 n. 

Blaxton, William, 5. 112. 

Blazing star, 5. 49. Anpearanco of a, 8. 
389, 400. 

Blew, , mariner, 6. 262. 

Blew Hills, 5. 199. 

Bligh, .Samuel, 5. 103, 330; 6. 296; 7. 
208. J . . , / 

Blin, Mrs., 6. 51. 

Blin, James, 6. 141. 

Blin, William, 6. 52. 

Blindness, remarkable case of (Mehitable 

Whidden's), 2. 238, 243. 
Blinman, Rev. Richard, 1. 42. .381 ; 8. 49. 
Blish, Abraham, 5. 214 ; 6. 117, 257. 
Rlish, .Ur,s. Susan, 6. 117. 
Blisland, Jiiifj., 5. 150. 



319, 
35b. 



5. 430 ; 



45 



Bliving, Edward, disturber of the peace, 

9, 202. 
Block Island, i. 248, 250, 390; 5. 

501. Arrival of pirates at, 8. 357, 

Mentioned, 9. 1 ; 10. 13. 
Block Island Harry, 5. 501, 502. 
Blocket, Samuel, 5. 386. 
Bhmd, James ('?), 6. 18*. 
Bloody Foint, 5. 188. 
Bloun't, Anthony, 6. 212. 
Blowar, Fiam, Cambriil</e, 5. 401 ; 6. 257 ; 

8. 153. 
Blower, Mrs. Fiam, 6. 257. 
Blower, Rev. Mr., 5. 202, 304, 305; 6. 8, 

307, 368; 7. 131, l-j-j. 
Blower, Thomas, i. 286, 287 ; 6. 384, 403. 
Blowers, Joiin, 5. 72 ; 6. 240 ; 7. 240. 
Blowing up of a vessel in Boston Harbor, 

8. 168. 
Blue Anchor Tavern, 5. 89, 461 
Blue Bell Tavern, 5. 453. 
Blue Coat Boys, 5. 247, 248. 
Blue Stockings, Capt., i. 440. 
Bluette, John, letter of, i. 199. 
Blumfeild, William, 8. 08. 
Blunt's Workhouse, 6. 418. 
Bly, Anne, 6. 415. 
Boad, Henry, letter of, i. 358. 
Board of Trade and Flantations, 

6.58. 

Board of War, 10. 64. Concerning mili- 
tary stores, 10. 316. 
Bodge, Fernandino, 8, 204, 236. In busi- 
ness with Samuel Winthrop, at Island 

of Teneriffe, 8. 203. 
Bodicot, 5. 304. 
Bodin, see Bowdoin. 
Bodleian Library, Oxford, 5. 303. 

Bodwin, , 6. 88. 

Bogistow (now Ilolliston), 6. 76. 

Bogle, Ale.xander, 5. 53. 

Boies, Jonathan, 2. 458. 

Bointon, Mr., 7. 251. 

Bolingbroke, Henry St. John, Viscount, 4. 

324; 6.314,304. 
Bollan, Mr., petition preferred by, 9. 319. 
BoUen, James, letter of, i. 412. 
Bolt, John, 5. 127 ; 6. 179, 305. Merchant 

in Boston, 8. 497. 
Bolton, Dnke of, i. 275. Quoted, 9. 466. 
Bonibazeen, Indian, 6. 82. 
Bond, r„/,<., 5. 377,410. 
Bond, Majn,, 7. 08. 
Bond, Mi:, i. 1.5.3. 
Bond, Mrs., 7. 183. 
Bond, [Ion. F., 5. 71, 77, 82, 95, 96. 
Bond, Sir George, 5. 71. 
Bond, Mathew, i. 501. 
Bond, Dr. Thomas, 4. 237. 
Bond, William, 5. 71, 371. Concerning 

Samuel Wintlirop's business with, 8. 

202. 
Bond, Col. William, 4. 26 2«. 
Bond, Prof Willinm Cranch, 3. 180 n. 
Bondet, — — , 5. 348. 



354 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Bonfire. 5. 22G; 6. 407. 

Bonner, , 5. 74 ; 6. 134. 

Bonner, Mrs., 6. 297 ; 7. 370. 
Bonner, CajA. Jolin, 6. 134, 227, 318. His 
map of Boston, 7. 307, 370. 

Bonus, , 6. 41. 

Book of Possessions, 5. 37. 
Book of tlie Lockes, 5. 51. 
Books, desired by Joiin Winthrop, Jr.: 
Helinont's Works, 8. 41 ; Paulin, and 
' Propugnaculi Fabri,' 8. 41 ; ' Traite' 
des Chilfres,' of Blaise de Vigcncre, 8. 
41 ; certain, sent to him by Samuel 
Hartlib, 8. 74 ; ' riiilosopliia Naturalis,' 
by John Pliociliden, 8. 94. 
Books wanted by Harvard College, 6. 13. 

Of the College Records, etc., 6. 209. 
Booksellers, shops of, 5. 161. 
Boole, Mr., 8. 35. 

Boon, , mariner, 5. 29, 32 ; 6. 92 ; 7. 

218. 
Boon, ^frs., buried, 6. 409. 
Boone, Nicholas, 6. 100 ; 7. 238 
Boor, James, interpreter, 9. 110. 
Boosye, James, 1. 192, 193. 
Booth, William, 7. 196. 
Bootman, John, 7. 335. 
Bordman, Andrew, town clerk, 6. 163, 192 ; 

7. 52. 
Bordman, Major, death of, 1685, 5. 67. 
Bordman, Widow, 5. 224 ; 7. 224. 
Bordman, Andrew, death of, 1(387, 5. 1S2. 
Bordman. Andrew, Jr., 6. 81, 135. 
Bordman, Mary, 5. 224. 
Boreland, see Borland, John. 
Borland, Mrs., 7. 277. 
Borland, Francis, 5. 497. 
Borland, John, 5. 341, 413, 496, 497. His 
trade with the French, 6. 40* 51*, 117* 
119* 120*, 60. 165, 200, 206, 215, 238. 
298, 316, 317 ; 7. 277. 
Borland, A'er. John, 5. 496, 497, 
Borland, L. V., 5. 65. 
Borne, Major Nehemiah, i. 158; 8. 226. 
Borre, Chevalier Prudhomme de, ap- 
pointed a Brigadier-General, 4 49. 
Borrowes, Samuel, letters of, i. 192, 193. 
Boston, a ne(jro, 6. 388; 7. 173. 
Boston, Jane, 6. 319. 

Boston, Mass., i. 27, 37, 205, 213 n., 217, 
233 n., 349, 350, 443, 492 ; 8. 88. Castle 
at, 1. 244«. Boston church, 1. 102, 2107)., 
324. Boston lecture, 1.334. Social con- 
dition of, in 1780, 2. 47. Printing in, 
1782,2. 131,133. Town meeting in, 1784, 

2. 358-361. Federal Street Church, 2. 
447 n., 454, 457, 458. Fire in, 1787, 2. 
460, 470-472. Visit of the French fleet 
to, 1787, 2. 486-488. Burglary prevalent 
in, 2. 488. Brattle Street Church, 3. 5. 
Negroes kidnapped in, 3. 19-21, 25, 32. 
Petition to the General Court on ac- 
count of the kidnapped negroes, 3. 22, 
23. Return of the kidnapped negroes, 

3. 55, 59. Attempts to establish Roman 



Catholic services in, 3. 110, 116, 119, 241. 
First directory of, published, 3. 115. 
Maps of, 3. 115. Washington's visit to, 
in 1789, 3. 203. Monument on Beacon 
Hill, 3. '^33. Trinity Church used for a 
Roman Catholic funeral, 3. 241. Ton- 
tine Crescent, 3. 351. Lodge of colored 
Masons in, 3. 383. Instructions issued 
by Washington to Ward on leaving, 4. 
4-8. Burgoyne's army prisoners at, 4. 
77. Gen. Howe abandons the idea of 
retaking, 4. 94, 96. Affray in, with 
French sailors, 4. 95. Fortification of 
the harbor of, 4. 98, 101, 297, 300, 303. 
Gen. Gates appointed to command at, 

4. 103, 104. Evacuation of. 4. 296, 297. 
Manner of setting the watch at, 5. 53. 
Deputies for, voted on, 5. 67, 342. 378. 
The King proclaimed in, 5. 70. Choos- 
ing of jurymen in, 5. 133. Concerning 
tlie introduction of St. George's cross, 

5. 147. Sketch of the town-house of, 5. 
160. Revolt against Andros in, 5. 174. 
A proclamation for keejiing the peace 
in, 5. 312. Commissioners chosen at, 5. 
317. Merchants of, 5. o-JO; 6. 117*; 7. 
i"i06. Small-pox at, 5. 324. Training- 
day at, 5. 413. Suffering during the 
winter of 1696,5. 442. Concerning the 
making of snlt at, 5. 457. Tow'n meet- 
ing held at, 5. 496 ; 6. 74, 79. Supply- 
ing ammunition to the Indians, 6. 45*, 
48*. Arrival of Capt. Kidd at, 6. 4, 7, 
Petition concerning importation of ne- 
groes, 6. 16. Court held at, 6. 47. 
Pirates executed at. 6. 109. Ministers 
of, 6 100*, 122* 357, 398; 7. 40, 242. 
Deed of land from Samuel Sewall to 
town of, 6. 129. Pelham's map of, 6. 
133. Bonner's map of, 6. 134; 7. 188, 
307. Election day at, 6. 2C6. Price's 
map of, 6. 320. Bread riot in, 6. 384. 
Enforcement of the Sunday law in, 6. 
420-423. Erection of meeting-house on 
Church Green. 7. 61. Act for building 
a light-house in the harbor, 7. 102. 
Burials in the town for the year 1717, 
7. 176. View of the town of, 7. 310. 
Booksellers of, 7. 378. Sickness at, 8. 
51. Arrival of Col. Nichols at, 8. ! 0. 
Town of, 8 115. Small-pox at, 8. 116. 
Accidental blowing up of a ship at, 8. 
168. Fire at, 8. 495. Mortality in, from 
colds, 8. 526. Agreement not to import 
British manufactures, 9. 248. Insubor- 
dination at, 9. 293, 300, 301 /;. I'unished 
by Parliament for insubordination, 9. 
310. Resolutions of House of Lords 
concerning, 9. 312. Action of mer- 
chants concerning importation of goods, 
9. 402. Catastrophe at, 9. 435. Troops 
to be removed from, 9. 488. Sends 
back cargo of English goods, 9 442. 
Army at, 10. 1 , 4. Evacuation of, by 
the English, 10. 10, 11. Hostilities of 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIKTY. 



355 



Gen. Gage's army in, lo. 285. Gath- 
ering of the people to i)rotect against 
Gen. Gage's army, lo. 285. Wretclied 
condition of, muler (Jen. Gage's nian- 
ageniLMit, lo. 2!>(>. Wliy fortified by 
Gen. Gage, lo. 298. Letter of Gen. 
James Warren concerning the defence 
of, ID 309-312. 

Boston ' Advertiser/ 5. x.\M.\ ; 7. 53. 

Boston Athena.nim, 6. 35, 40, 2(39. 

' Boston Clironiclc,' iirirspnprr, 4. 464, 474. 

Boston Common, 5. 17. 42, 72-74, 82, 100, 
102, 10:1, 175, 179, 18G, 212, 210, 226, 
344, 3.>j. :]tJl, 377, 378. 410, 413 ; 6. 11, 
27, 55, 119, 189, 344, 353, 3r)0, 384, 410, 
411 ; 7. 10, 52, 142, 208, 258, 272, 349, 
3(58, 372. 374. 

Boston Companies, 5. 470. 

Boston Dock, 5. 293. 

Boston ' Flying Post,' 7. St. 

'Boston Gazette,' n«;rs/w/>pr, 4 341,356; 
7. 84, 248, 301, 304, 319, 331. See ' Ga- 
zettes.' 

Boston Harbor, 5. 237 ; 6. 190, 198 ; 7. 
103. 

Boston Neck, 5. 501. Concerning land 
I owned tliere by J. Winthrop, Jr., 8. 

400. Concerning sale of land at, 8. 
' 442, 452. 

Boston ' N. E. Courant,' see New Eng- 
land. 

Boston ' NewsLetter,' 6. 97*. 103*, 104*, 
112*. 113* 118*. 125* 100, 106, 110, 
120, 149. 168, 222, 288, 319, 323, 410; 
7. 28. 53, 84. 85. 94, 103, 105. 108, 161, 
162, 165, 166. 169, 176, 184-186, 191, 
193, 213, 227, 232, 235, 238, 250, 266. 
291, 29.-)-298, 304-307, 309, 317, 319- 
322, 321 326, 330, 331, 335, 357, 361, 
365, 3(iS-:!70. 377, 378, 381. 

Boston Post-Ollice, 7. 191, 193. 

Boston Postmaster, 7 84. 

Boston Prison, 5 357, •■idi ; 6. 423. 

Boston Regiment, 6. 410; 7. 249. 
I Boston Sconce, 5. 470, 471; 6. 33, 252, 
283. 

Boston Superior Court, 6. 238, 241. 

Boston Tax-lists. 5. 53. 2yl, 355; 7. 241. 

Boston Tliursday Lecture, 5. 52 ; 6. 369, 
381 ; 7. 143. 

Boston Town Records, 5. 37, 57, 90, 108. 
160, 179, 325, 401, 474, 508; 6. 128, 
129, 286. .308, 309. 414 ; 7. 18, 73, 79, 
95. 148, 199, 246, 292, 371. 

Boston ' Transcript,' 5. 60; 6. 40, 113 ; 7. 
62. 

Boston Troop. 6. 227. 

Bostwick, , 4. 151. 

Bostwick, Hec. David, his ' LTTtsn f Presi- 
dent Davies.' 2. 10. N. 

Boswell, Sir William, letter of. i .%3. 

Bosworth, .V>-.s-. Beatrice, 6 329, 332. 

Boswortli, Bi-iijamin. 6 .■!.32. 

Boswortli, Ki'becca, 6. 332. 

Bosworth, Zakcus, i. 480. 



Bottetourt, f^rd, sent as Governor of 
Virginia. 9. 295. 

Boudinot (Boudenotte). Elias, Commisstui/ 
0/ prisoners, 4. 83 ; 10. 80, 84. 

BouUanger, Nicolas Antoine, 4. 376, 395. 

Boundary between Massachusetts and 
Connecticut. 6. 389. 

Boundary of Connecticut and Rhode 
Island colonies, 9. 51. Ix>tter of John 
Winthrop to Thomas Willet concern- 
ing certain, 9. 55. Letters of John 
Winthrop to Peter Stuyvesaiit con- 
cerning certain, 9. 57. Letters of 
King's Conunissioners to John Win- 
throp concerning certain, 9. 66. Of 
Narragansett lands between Connecti- 
cut and Rhode Island, 9. 76. Of par- 
cel of land given by John Mason, 9. 
80. Letter of Rhode Island to Con- 
necticut concerning, 9. 196, 198. Be- 
tween Rhode Island and Connecticut, 
9. 200. 

Bounds of land, 6. 52*. 7G. 

Bounty, for the army, 4. 2-3, 127, 157, 
158, 190. On the inaiiufa('ture"()f salt- 
petre, 4. 304, 3U6. Of land offered to 
volunteers. 10. 37. Granting of. to 
Col. Webb's regiment, 10. 40. Offered 
to recruits in Connecticut, 10. 158. 

Bourgogne. Frmch war-vessel, at Ports- 
mouth, 2 148. 

Bourn, , 5. 2(5. 

Bourn, Capt., 7. 287, 342. 

Bourn, Dr., 6. 166. 

Bourne, Mrs. Abigail, 7. 4. 

Bourne, Silvanus, 3. 110. 

Mow Church, Lomlon, 6 254. 

Bowden. Rev. Mr., 10. -58. 

Bowditch. Cni>L, 6. 100; 7. 1G2. 

Bowditch, N. I., 5. 60-63, 72, 73, 231 ; 7. 
52. 

Bowdoin. James, 6. 413 ; 7. 224, 329. 

Bowdoin, C/or. James, his ' Discourse be- 
fore the American Academy ' cited, 2. 
110. Mentioned, 2. 480, 488: 3. 103, 
104, 107, 232, 260, 294, 390, 395, 390 ; 
4. 3.59, 474. 

Bowdoin, John, 6. 413. 

Bowdoin, Mrs. Sarah, 6. 413. 

Bowdoin Square, 6. 417. 

Bowdry, Mrs. Jane, 7. 330. 

Bowen, Prof., 5. 203. 

Bowen, Abel, Ids 'Picture of Boston' 
cited, 3. 123;/ 

Bowen, Elizabeth, 6. 372. 

Bowles, C<ipt., 6. 07. 

Bowles, Major, 7. 97, 179. 201, 202. 

Bowles. John, 5. 5, 49, 'J3. 

Bowling Green 6. 417. 

Bowls, Mr.. 5. 192. 312 ; 6. 179. 

Bowls, Mrs.. 5. 178. 

Bowman, Francis, 7 287. 

Bows, Nicholas. 6. 170; 7. 213. 

Mowtel. Marv, 6. 52. 

Boyd, Rev. Mr., 7. 191, 214, 215. 



356 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS. 



Boydell, Edwarrl, 7. 3G9, 370. 

Bovdell, Jol.ii, 5. xix ; 7. 114, i:]l, 133, 141, 

154, lOy-171, 175, 180, 181, 189, 208, 

211-213, 215, 276, 310, 342, 300, 309, 

370. 
Boyle, Robert, letter of, i. 400; 2. 137. 

Concerning a charter for Connecticut, 

8. 75, 76. Letters of John VVinthrop, 

Jr., to, 8. 84, 104. Mentions an herb 

for the cure of king's evil, 8. 104. 
Boylston, Dr. Tlionias, 1 7. 218. 
Boylston, Thomas, 3. 384. 
Boylston, Ward Nicholas, 6. 24. 
Boylston Market Association, 6. 23. 
Boylston Street, 5 200, 425; 6.23, 225, 

320,300,411; 7. 100. 
Boynton, Capt., 6. 02. 
Boys, Mr., 5. xii: 
Brabins. Winifred, 6. 113. 
Brackenbury, Dr. Samuel, 5. 21-24, 35, 

43, 48 ; 6. 09. 
Brackenridge, Hugh Henry, 2. 227. 
Bracket, Deacon, 5. 232. 
Bracket (Brackett), Goodman, i. 134,140. 
Bracket, Peter, 5. 73. 
Brackett, Joshua, M.D., 2. 97, 213, 225, 

240,242,243, 273,407,482. 
Brackett, Mrs. Joshua, 2. r.i9. 
Bradford, Cafd., wounded, 5. 14; 9. 97. 
Bradford, Major William, 5. 454; 6. 95. 
Bradford, Mrs., 8. 408. A prescription 

for, 8. 414. 
Bradford, Sherif, 5. 463. 
Bradford, Alden, LL.D., 3. 391 n. 
Bradford, Charles F., 7. 109. 
Bradford, David, 3. 350. 
Bradford, John, 6. 78. 
Bradford, Moses, 5. 358. 
Bradford, Dicut. Samuel, 6. 438. 
Bradford, Thomas, 2. 147)/. ; 8. 154,400. 
Bradford, William, P,inis;/lraNia, informs 

of the movements of the British, 10 04. 
Bradford, Wiiimm, Dhiladeljihia, 2. 147 n., 

281,297. 
Bradford, Gov. William, i. 271-273, 312, 

303, 449; 5. 378, 400, 410, 420; 6. 223; 

7. 128. 
Bradford, town of, 6. 14*. 16* 220; 7. 

187. 

Bradish, , a youth, drowned, 5. 159. 

Bradish, Joseph, 5. 495, 498, 503 ; 6. 4, 6. 
Bradish, Joseph B., pirate, 8. 358, 547, 

549. 

Bradley, , 6 87*. 

Bradley, Col., 10. 36. 

Bradley, Mr., 10. 95. 

Bradley, ilfrs.. 6. 59*, 60*, 84*, 86*, 87*. 

Bradly, Mr., Soulham/iton, Eng., 5. 8. 

Brads'lreet, Capl., 5, 367. 

Bradstreet, Dr., dead at Jamaica, 8. 430. 

Bradstrcet, Mrs. Ann (Dudley), notice 

of, I. 174 n.; 7. 13. 
Bradstrcet, Mrs. Ann (Downing), second 

wife of Gov. Bradstreet, x. 49 n., 174 n. ; 

5." xiii, 74, 76, 116, 158, 214, 228, 232, 



311, 315, 332, 335, 357, 369, 412; 6 -26, 
31, 142, 191), 289, 320, 377, 378; 8. 422, 
494. Letter to, i. 174. 

Bradstreet, Mrs. Vol. (Ann), ivifeo/Dud- 
Ici/ Bradstreet, 7. 13. 

Bradstreet, Dorothy, 6 277 ; 7. 5. 

Bradstreet, Col. Dudley, mentioned, 5. 
142, 190, 471 ; 7. 13. Appomted Coun- 
cillor, 9. 140. 

Bradstreet, Her. Dudley, Jr., 7. 13. 

Bradstreet, Dudley, 3(/, 7. 13. 

Bradstreet, Dr. Humphrey, 7. 32. 

Bradstreet, John Ann. 7. 173. 

Bradstreet, Mrs. Mercy, 5. 232; 6. 277; 
7. 273. 

Bradstreet, Moses, 5. xxi ; 7. 32. 

Bradstreet, Samuel, a hm/, 7. 211. 

Bradstreet, Dr. Samuel, 6. 277 ; 7. 173. 

Bradstreet, Mrs. Sarah, Neichurij, 7. 32, 
35. 

Bradstreet (Broadstreet), Simon, 5. 454; 

7. 13, 173. 

Bradstreet, Gov. Simon, commission of, i. 
303. Letter to, i. 441. Married Sam- 
uel Sewall and Mrs. Hull, 5. xiv. Mar- 
ried Mr. Nathan Oliver, 5 32. Chosen 
Governor, 5. 48, 174. Mentioned, 5. 06, 
72, 102,412 ; 6.20* 3; 7. 13, 173. Con- 
cerning proclaiming the King, 5. 09. 
His land and taxes, 5. 74-70. Nomina- 
tion of, 5. 132. At meeting concerning 
Church of England, 5. 142. At funeral 
of Madam Andros, 5. 203. Sickness of, 
5. 216, 376, 409. At ordination of Ne- 
liemiah Walter, 5. 232. At dinner with 
S. Sewall, 5. 31 1. An order to suppress 
unlawful assemblies, etc., 5. 312. At 
funeral of S. Sewall's cliild, 5. 332. At 
funeral of Major Samuel Ward, 5. 335. 
Letter to Sir William Phipps, 5. 336 
A codicil to his will, 5. 372. Moves to 
Salem, 5. 412, 413. Concerning a Fast, 
5. 439. Death of, 5. 450. Funeral of, 
5. 451 ; 8. 150, 151, 154, 508. Commis- 
sioner of Massachusetts Colony, 8. 225. 
Letter of Fitz-John Winthrop to, on the 
failureof the expedition against Canada, 

8. 320. Commissioner of Connecticut, 

9. 3. Letter to Governor and Council 
of Connecticut, 9. 31. Mentioned, g. 
41, 54. A Narragansett proprietor, 9. 
08, 111. Appointed Councillor, 9. 146. 
Signs commission, g. 163. 

Bradstreet, A'er. Simon, Charlestoirn, men- 
tioned, I. 110; 7. 103, 254. Ordained 
at Charlestown, i. 447. A candidate 
for the South Church, i. 448. His pe- 
culiar text, I. 466. At funeral of Mr. 
Morton, i. 477. Baptizes Simon, a 
Jew, 6. 65. At meeting of council at 
Cambridge, 6. 209. Preaches at Charles- 
town, 6. 260, 310, 334, 343 ; 7. 139, 174, 
199, 279. At funeral of Madam Shep- 
pard, 6. 261. At funeral of Mr. Benja- 
min Woodridge, 6. 272. At onlina- 



I 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTOIUCAL SOCIETY, 



tion of Mr. Stevens, 6. 401. Preaches 
at the Fust at Cambridge, 7. I'.'.j. 
Prayed at openingof court. 7. 1U2, o47. 
Samuel bewail visits at his house, 7. 
211. 

Bradstreet, Mrs. Rei\ Simon (Marv), 
Chmlestotcn,j. 13,20, 3i, 71, 172,211, 
Sbii. 

Bradstreet, Rev. Simon, New London, 7. 
o5G. 

Brain (Brayne), Widow, i. 181. 

Brain, Uicliard, letter of, i. Itil. 

Bniin, Thoiiias, i. 181, 182. 

Braintree, Harris, 5. 4-j2. 

Braintree, Ma.ss., i. 156, 210 «., 280; 5. 
12, 104. 154, 10!); 6 15* 1. 92, 101, 191, 
221, 222, 228 ; 7. 8'.), 101), 210, ;ja8. 

' Braintree Instructions,' 4. .141. 

Braithwaite's Lines on Banbury, 6. 176. 

Braiuan's Batlis, 5. 180. 

Bramiial, , 7. 99. 

Branipstone, Sen/eant, i. 189. 

Brancli, Mrs. Elizabeth, 8. In. 

Branch, Reynold, 8. 7 n. 

Brand, , i. 179. 

Brand, Sir Alexander, 7. 78, 79. 

Brandon, Benjamin, 7. 1)15. 

Brandon, John, 5. 5 i. 

Brandt, Joseph, 2. 228. 

Branilvwine, battle of, 4 74. 

M rail ford, Co:ui , 7. :319. 

Branning, Joseph, 5. 284. 

Brattle, , a student, 7. 276. 

Brattle, Catherine [or Katherine), 5. 482 ; 
6. 19J; 7. 122, 158, 108, 170, 202. 

Brattle, Cnpl. Edward, 5. 37; 6. 18* 220, 
41:3; 7.23,227, 386. 

Brattle, Mr.-<. Edward (Mary), 7. .3;10. 

Brattle, Elizabeth, wifeofNutkaiiiel Oiicer, 
5. 32; 7. 170, 220,200,273. 

Brattle, Mary, 7. 199, 205. 

Brattle, Thomas, boundarvof his land, 5. 
190, 202. Lent S. Sewa'll ten shillin-s, 
5. 2-*S. Dined with Gov. Bradstreet, 
5. 311. Dined at the Royal E.xchanire, 
5. 3-JS. Chosen assemblyman, 5 425. 
Death mentioned, 6. 11*. At funeral 
of John Eyre, 6. 10. At corporation 
meeting, 6. 84. At instalment of .Mr. 
Leverett at Harvard College, 6. 209. 
Sickness of, 6. 280. The fining of John 
Bannister, 6. 291. Nomination for 
Judge, 6. 3,»4, 319. Mentioned, 7. 97, 
158,"^ 22'), 202, 290. 

Brattle, Mr.-t. Thomas (Elizabeth), her 
death, i. 4;J2, 4;!3. Mentioned, 5. 50, 
57; 6. 18*, 19* 2:53, 343, 413; 7. 50, 
120, 158. 

Brattle, dm. William, 4. 344. 

Brattle, /.Vy. William, i. 447 ; 5. 202, 247, 
248, 252, 255, 257, 204, 207, 208, 270, 
280, 287, 289-291, ;W0, :J9I, 4:!8, 454, 
4<i2. 405, 40o, 477, 505 ; 6. 2, 8, 23, 37. 
48, 60. 84, 04, 130, 13-5, 101, 104, 175, 
183, 100, 208, 209, 214, 229, 232, 23:3, 



243, 257, 200, 272, 278, 279, 331. 335, 

3:57, 34:J, 347, 355, 'doS, 302, 384, 391, 

401,413; 7. 50, 115. Death of, 7. 120, 

122, 158. Sermon on, and Life of, 7. 

120, 122. 
Brattle, Mrs. William (Elizabeth), death 

of, 7. 50. 
Brattle's Close, 6. 232. 
Hrattle Arms, 7. -i^-i. 
Brattle Square, 6. 11;). 
Brattle Street, 6 323. 
Brattle Street Church, 5. xxxix, 506; 6. 

08O, 394, 400. ' History of,' see History. 
Brattle Street Society, 6. oGS. 
Bray, 5 301. 
Bray Church, 5. 301. 
Brazer's Block, 5. 100. 
Bread, scarcity of, in winter of 1770, 4. 

140, 148, 15:J. 
Bread Riot, 6. :384. 
lireadcale, , jiister of Margaret Lake, 

I. 99. 
Breadens (Breedars), Capt. Thomas, 8. 

105, 425. 
Breading, Mr., 5. 208. 
Bream, .l//>-., 7. 99, 116, 12-3. 
Hream, Benjamin. 5. :)41 ; 7. 125. 
Breck, .1/-. v. Joanna, 6. 219. 
Breck, John, 6. 47. 
Breck, Robert, 6. 219. 
Breden, Thomas, 6. 211. 
Breerton, William, concerning certain 

boundary, 9. 51. 
Breese, Abb^•, 3. 252, 2-30; 5. xxxv. 
Brcese, Arthur, 3. 2 JO. 
Breese, Hon. Samuel, 2. 420, 42:3, 477, 

478, 480, 485, 487; 3. 45, lOl, 10:3, 

127 n., 149, 100, 2-52, 254, 250, 257, 

259, 304, 326, 350, 303, 308, 371 «.; 5. 

xxxv. 
Breese, Mrs. Samuel, 3. 147, 149, 105, 

252, 254,2.50, 371. 
Breese, Miss Susan, 3. 45, 131, 10-3, 197, 

209,254, 27:3,275, 371. 
Brenton, Major, 6. 07, 81, 237. 
Brenton, ICben, 5 :380. 
Brenton, Elizabeth, 6. .120. 
Brenton, Jaldeel, 5. :380. 
Hrenton, Sarah, nee Eliot, Mrs. 
Brenton, dor. William, i. 378, 430 n ; 5. 

340, 336, 394, 475. 502; 6. 54, 322, 320 ; 

7. 50 ; 8. 534 : 9. 34. 

Brereton. Willi. im, Lord, appointed to 
settle bonncU between Rhode Island 
and Ccmnecticut, 8 82,8:5. One of the 
founders of the Royal Society. 8. 80, 
136. Letter of John Winthrop, Jr., to, 

8. 138. 
Brest, 5. 350. 
Brett, Liput., 6. 340. 

Brett, Mr., Bri'l'/nrntpr, 6. 75, 334. 

Brewer, , 6. 1h4 ; 7. 208, 304. 

Brewer, Ca/'t., 8. 105. 
Brewer, .Mrs., 7. 190. 
Brewer, /hv. Mr., 7. 100, 190. 



358 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Brewer, Daniel, 6. 47. 

Brewer, Xatliaiiiel, 5. 373; 7. 173. 

Brewster, Mr., i. 210 «., 372. 

Brewster, Mr., died at iS'ew London, 8. 

t»8b. 

Brewster, Mrs., 8. 54. 

Brewster, Benjamin, murder of his ser- 
vant by Indians, 8 51, 517. 

Brewster, Edward, wampum paid for mo- 
lestation to farm of, 9. 12. Desired at 
Wickford as minister, 9. tJO. 

Brewster, Jonatlian, ofEeer in Gen. Hun- 
tington's regiment, 9 501, 502, 501. 

Brewster, Joseph. 7 1. 

Brewster, Elder William, 5 182. 

Brewsters, the, 5. 182. 

Briant, liev. Mr., 5 2G2, 804, 305. 

Briant, Joseph, wider-sherijf, 6. 276, 340 ; 
7. 44, 75, 128, 183, 219. 

Bribery, 6. 40*, 107*, 118* 124*. 

Brice, Bev. Mr., 5. 301. 

Bricket, Nathaniel, 6. 30. 

Brick Meeting-house, Cornhill, 7. 331. 

Brick Meeting-house, Hauover Street, 7. 
347. 

Bride Brook, 5. 390. 

Bridgam, Henry, death of, 8. 385. 

Bridge, Benjamin, 7. 150. 

Bridge, liev. Christopher, 5. 493, 504 ; 6. 
57. 

Bridge, Ebenezer, 7. 150. 

Bridge, Matthew, 6. 15*. 

Bridge, Samuel, 6. 323 ; 7. 150, 151. Will 
of, 7. 150. 

Britlge, Mr^. Samuel, 6. .323. 

Bridge, lieL: Thomas, 6. 83, 110, 181, 184, 
207, 210, 215, 218, 248. 270. 273, 2'.)6- 
298, 803, 330, 332, 357, 369, 378, 385, 
40(3, 400, 412 ; 7. 23, 43-45, 55, 59, 60, 
76. 

Bridge, William, 7. 150. 

Bridgeman, William, g. 181. 

Bridger, John, 6. 207, 337, 338; 7. 189, 
225. 

Bridgewater, 5. 412 ; 6. 75, 115, 305, 313, 
8.34. 

Bridgham, Mrs., 6. 302. 

Bridffham, Henry, 7. 250, 252, 282. 

Bridgham, John, 7. 282. 

Bridgham, Joseph. 5. 100, 219, .337, 352, 
358, 375, 382, 388, 417, 456, 462-484; 
6. 102. 137, 154, 231, 247-249, 303, 312, 
3fi0, 373. 

Bridgham, Samuel. 5. 48. 

Bridon. Henry, 8. 188. 

Brief from the Governor, 6. 94*. 

'Brief Relation of State of New Eng- 
land,' 5. 263. 

Briefs or patents for eoUections, i. 461. 

Brigade Majors, pav of, 4. 49. 

Brigantine, 5. 86, l'76. 189, 369, 387, 389, 
40.3, 405, 413 ; 6. 54, 126. Blown up 
off Cape Ann, 8. 389. Doings of a, 8. 
549. 

Briggs, James, 7. 251. 



I Briggs, John, 5. 501 ; 7. 265, 268. 

j Bright, Deacon, 5. 153. 

i Bright, Mr., 8. 208. 

I Bright, Ann, 7. 75. 

j Brightman, pirate, 8 547. 

Brightman, Mrs. Abiei, 6. 114. 
I Brightman, Henry, 6. 113, 114. 

Brightman, Henry, ./;•., 6. 114. 

Brightman, Joseph, 6. 114 ; 7. 206. 

Brightman, William, 5. 153. 

Brightman's Epistle, 6. 270, 271. 

Brighton, 5. 98 ; 6 234. 

Brigs's Indian, 6. 354. 

Bril, Betty, 5. x.xvii. 

Brill, , 6. 371 ; 7. 9, 232, 248. 

Brill, Eng., 5. 149. 

Brindley, ilr., 5. 77. 

Brinley, Catherine, 7. 337. 

Brinley, Francis, 6. 420, 421 ; 7. 337. Let- 
ter of P"itz-John Winthrop to, 8. 872. 
Assistant of Rhode Island, 8. 448, 452, 
500. A Narragansett proprietor, 9. 
111. Bearer of letters, 9. 113. Men- 
tioned, 9. 153. Signs commission, 9. 
163. 

Brinley Catalogue, 6. 2G9. 

Brinley Library, 5. 292. 

Brinsdell, , concerning sale of a house 

to, 8. 457. 

Brinsmead, Rev. Mr., 5. 68, 85, 338, 346, 
359, 4.56, 478 : 6. 34. 

Brisco, Joseph, 5. 54, 140, 159, 166, 417; 
6. 91, 104-106, 373 ; 7. 198. 

Brissot de Warville, Jean Pierre, 3. 221, 
282,283.288; 4. 410. 

Bristow, Widow, i. 213. 

Bristol, Lord, command of the Privy 
Seal, 9. 304. 

Bristol, o negro, 7. 238. 

Bristol, Eng., city of, 8. 3-5. Captured 
from Prince Rupert, 8. 201. 

Bristol, R. I., 6. 46, 238, 265, 322, 3.32, 
426 ; 7. 181, 183. Meeting of Superior 
Court at, 8. 559. 

Bristol Channel, 5. 244 ; 8. 487. 

Bristol County. 7. 102. 

Bristol Court," 6. 40, 167, 264, 420; 7. 194, 
227. 

Bristol Gate, 7. 19. 

Bristol-Man. 5. 88. _ 

Britannia, ship, 5. 272. 

Britannic Majesty, petition from States 
at war for protection, 8. 571. 

British administration consider the Colo- 
nies in rebellion, 10. 283, 285. 

British Army, 6. 313. At Brunswick, 
N. J., 10 32. At Staten Island and 
New York, 10. 53. Land at Peeks- 
kill and seize stores, 10. 53. Their 
movements and intentions, 10. 63, 64. 
Evacuate New Jersey, 10. 79. Advance 
of, to Crown Point, 10. 85. Pursue the 
armed schooner ' Spy,' 10. 87. Con- 
cerning the movements of, 10. 90, 93. 
In action with the American army at 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



859 



Germantown, lo. 90. About to evacu- 
ate Pliilailelpliia, lo. 115, 110. Cou- 
ceriiinsr tlicir movements at New 
York, 10. 128. Leave Sandy Hook, lo. 

100. At Charleston, S. C, lo. Uil. 
Jloving towards Morristown, lo. 17'.'. 
Their attacks at Lexinjiton and Con- 
cord, lo. 2S4, 21U. Retreat from Con- 
cord to Charlestown, lo. 2U1. 

British, the, recolonize New rrovidencc, 
6. 8S. 

British Court, 6. 73* 

British fleet, at Sandy Hook, lo. 117. 
OtT liarbor of Newport, lo. 1U2. 

British manufactures, disturbance in 
rarliament concerning tiie Colonies 
not importing, g. 248. Demand for, 
by tlie war between Turks and Rus- 
sians, g. o8l. Importation of, by East 
India Company, g. 384. Exported to 
West Indies, etc., g. o88. 

British men-of-war appear off New Lon- 
don, lo. 41). 

Britisli Museum, 6. 29*. 

Britisli nation, 6. 57*. 

British troops, 6. 100, 309; 7. 87. 

' Britisli West Indies,' Edward's, 6. 89. 

Broadiiurst, Mr., Albanij, 6. 153. 

Broadlands, Enq., 5. 8. 

Broad Seal, 5. 138, 130, 340 ; 6. 422 ; 7. 
152. 

Broad Sound, 5. 91. 

Broadside of Boston Streets, 6. 2?5. 

Brock, , Readinq, 5. 177, 217. 

Brock, John, i. lOG.' 

Brockherst, Mr., 5. 438. 

Brockhole, Major Anthony, 8. 299. 

Brockhurst, Jlnjor, 8. 4'.)(). 

Brocklebank, CapL, 5. 12. 

Brockton, 7. 250. 

Broinficld, Mrs. or Madam, 5. 298 ; 6. 112, 
100 ; 7. 243. 375. 

Bromfield, Mrs. Betty, 7. 188, 189. 

Broinfield, Edward, 5. 125, 234, 302, 308, 
307, 425, 479, 480, 49(5, 508 ; 6 42, 72, 
78, 80, 131, 1G2, 16G, 188, 250, 203, 300, 
327, 407. 410, 419-424 ; 7. 8, 80, 90, 130, 

101, 180, 182, 183. 109, 220, 278, 324, 
33tj, 33!), 303, 364, 374, 382. 

Bromfield, Mrs. Edward (Mary), 7. 99, 

304. 
Bromfield, Frances, 6. 329; 7. 304. 
Bromfield, Henry, 7. 80, 85, 89, 94, 99, 

100. 
Bromfield, John, Reminiscences of, 7. 

90. 
Bromfield Street, 6. 174. 
Bromsal, Cupt. John, 6. 421. 

Bronsdon, , 5. 22« ; 6. 128, 421. 

Brooke, Lor,l, i. l'13. 250, 303, 329, .373 «.; 

5. 301, 300; g .381. Letter of, i. 240. 

Notice of, I. 240 n. 
Brooke, Robert, 8. 07. 
Brooker, .!//•., 7. 272. 
Brooker, William, 7. 84. 



Brookes, Capt., taking of his vessel by 
Adm. De Ruyter, 8.^253, 202. 

Brookfield, 5. 33 ; 7. 100, 107. To be a 
depot for stores, 4. S4. Sulphur in, 4. 

;u)4. 

Rrookhaven, Capt., i. 432; 5. 2G3. 

Brookhaven, John, appointed to settle 
bounds bctwei'u Riiode Island and Con- 
necticut, 8. 82, 83. Decides certaiii 
boundary, g 51. 

Brookhaven. L. I., i. 100 h. 

lirooking, John, 5. 222. 

Rrookiiige, (^aleb, i. 501. 

Brookline, 6. 142-144, 140, 245, 270, 272, 
285, 308, 350 ; 7. 31, 174, 190. 

Brooklyn, 5. 318. 

Brooks, Mr., 1. 445. 

Brooks, Ebenezer, 7. 191. 

Brooks, Deacon Samuel, 2. 32. 

Brooks, Thomas, 5. 318. 

Hroomfeild, Mr., 8. 572. 

Broomfield, Mr., Charlestown, 3. 291, 292. 

Brother David, g. 504, 500, 512. 

Brother Jack (John Trumbull), g. 512, 

Broughton, Mrs., 5. 189. 

Rroughton, George, 5. 20, 188, 189. 326. 

Broughton, John, 5. 20, 24, 31, 188. 

Broughttm, John. 5. 187, 189. 

Broughton, Thomas, 6. 25, 408. 

Brouillan. 6^01;., 6. 200. 

Brown, , 5. 00, 78, 191, 378, 395, 408, 

420; 6. 130, 102,250. 

Brown, , Barbadoes, 5. 94. 

Brown, , innkeeper, 2 387. 

Brown, , Salem, 5. 200, 201, 296; 6. 

119,410; 7. 74. 
Brown, Capt., Fri/eburg, Me., 2. 398, 399. 
Brown, Dr., Halifax, 3. 325. 
Brown, Miss, 5. 10. 

Brown, Mr., carrier of letters, 10. 102, 307. 
Brown, Mr., 1. 43. 
Brown, Mrs., 5. 11, 20, 110; 6. 243; 7. 

177, 178. 
Brown, Ileo. Mr., 3. 313, 816-318. 
Brown, Rev. Mr., 5. 164, 192; 7. 03. 
Brown, Andrew, 3. 336; 4. 4(i4. 
Brown, Benjamin, 5. 235, 437 ; 6. 40, 78, 

131, 154, 102, 188, 107, 243-245. 
Brown, Edmond, 5. 160, 358; 5. 12*; 7. 

333. 
Brown, Elizabeth, 5. xxxii ; 7. 336. 
Brown, Etmicf, 5. xxxviii. 
Brown, Capi (iawen.4. 09. 
Brown, Mrs. Hannah, 7. 74. 
Brown, James, /Jrputi/ ."Oierijf, 5. 458. 
Brown, John, .SV., a Narragansett pro- 
prietor, g. i)8, 111. 
Brown (Browne). John, i. 145))., 361,363. 

Letters from, i. 311. 
Brown, John, Commissioner of Connecticut, 

g.3. 
Brown, Capt. John, 5. 101. 340, 380, 414, 

479, 492; 6. 65, 93, 103, 270, 401, 410; 

7. 381. 



360 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Brown, Madam John, 7. G8. 

Brown, Joseph, 5. ul, o56, ;J8G; 6 12*. 

Brown, Joshua, 6. 3i38. 

Brown, Mary, see Willett, Mrs. 

Brown, Mary, 7. 79. 

Brown, Mrs. Mehitable, 5. 356. 

Brown, Madam Kebecca, 6. 119; 7. 179. 

Brown, Lieut. Richard, death of, 4. 8'J/i. 

Brown, Itcv. Kicliard, 6. 354 ; 7. ■J.M. 

Brown, Samuel, Jr., 7. o49. 

Brown, Co/. Samuel, 7. 5. 25, 127, 1?.0, 
166, 186, 207, 237, 242, 24y, 273, 34'J, 
365, 306, 375. 

Brown, Mrs. Samuel, 6. 51. 

Brown, Mrs. Samuel (Abigail), 7. 349, 
366. 

Brown, Mrs. Samuel, Jr. (Katherine), 7. 
349. 

Brown, Mrs. Sarah, 6. 410. 

Brown, Thomas, 5. 230; 6. 11* 255; 7. 
79, 333. 

Brown, Mrs. Thomas (Patience), 7. 333, 
334. 

Brown, Major William, 5. xiii, 185, 227, 
333, 370, 387, 437, 451, 454, 481 ; 6. 31, 
34, 40, 78, 100, 119, 132, 188, 204, 224, 
245, 289, 367, 386, 406 ; 7. 4, 25, 65, 67, 
74, 349. 

Brown, Mrs. Major William (Mary), 5. 
370 ; 7. 25, 349. 

Brown, William, Rehohoth. 7. 102. 

Brown, Mrs. William (Elizabeth), 7. 102. 

Brown, William, marriage of, to Mrs. 
Ba\'lye, 8. 501. Burning of his ware- 
house, 8. 530. 

Brown, William, Salem, illness of, 8. 424. 
Death of, 8. 481. 

Browne, Cousin, 8. 524. 

Browne, Elder, i. 421. 

Browne, Jonathan, inaster of the ' Mar- 
garet Catch' Salem, 8. 263." 

Browne, Samuel, Salem, 8. 571 n. 

Brownes, Anne, 7. 336. 

Brownes, Elizabeth, 7. 336. 

Brownes, Hannah, 7. 336. 

Brownes, Jane, 7. 336. 

Browninsf, , a bookseller, 5. 161, 309. 

Brunet, L'apt. Henry, 8 287. 

Bruning, Henry, i. 287. 

Brunker, Lord] 8. 91. 

Brunning, Joseph, 5. 122. 

Brunsdon, Mr., died 1701, 6. 48. 

Brunswick, N.J., British troops at, 10. 32. 

Brunton, Widoir, 5. 270. 

Brush Hill, 7. 57. 

Bryan, Mrs., death of, 8 148. 

Bryan, Alexander, 8 111, 115,148, 149, 
161, 162. Concerning letters of credit, 
8. 278. Commissioned for port of Mil- 
ford, 8. 351 ; 9. 88. 

Bryant, Capt. David, 4. 11. 

Bryant, George, 4. So-]. 

Brydone, Patrick, 2. 161. 

Bryson, James. 2. 199, 258, 350, 449; 3. 1, 
141, 190, 198, 201. 



Buchncr, Andrew, M.D., 2. 295. 

Buck, E., 5. 309, 310. 

Buckingliam, Marquis of, land granted to, 

9. 182. 

Buckingham, Samuel, juror, g. 138. 

Buckley, , 5. 16, 96. 

Buckley, Rev. Mr., 5 156. 

Buckley, Joseph, }nariner, 5. 337. 

Buckly, Alderman, see Barkley, 8. 200. 

Buckminster, Capt.,Q. 21'i. 

Buckminster, Joseph, D.D., 2. 60, 84 ; 3. 
3, 14, 19, 100, lOU, 264, 265. ' Metro- 
politan,' 2. 112, 113, 122, 137, 116, 147, 
158, 167, 204, 215, 228, 230, 237, 335, 
340, 341, 343, 347, 351, 354, 361, 373, 
409. Marriage of, 131, 132. 

Buckminster, ^frs. Joseph (Stevens), 2. 
129, 342; 6. 13, 133, 135, 149, 153. 

Buckminster, Reo. Joseph Stevens, birth 
of, 2. 354. 

Bucknam, John, 5. 436. 

Bucks County, AW/., 5. 149, 403. 

Bud, Mr., house of, near West Point, 4. 
137. 

Buda, 5. 156. The Emperor's army in, 
destroyed by the Turks, 8. 450. 

Budington's ' History of First Church/ 
Cltarleslown, 7. 86. 

Buenos Ayres, 5. 33. 

Buffaloes, 3. 52, 59, 60. 

Buffon, Georges Louis Le Clerc, Comte 
de, 2. 112, 150. 

Bugsby Hole, 5. 268. 

Hulfinch, Charles, 3, 234. 

Bulfinch, Judith, 5. xxxix. 

Bunnell, T., 5. 61, 04, 65. 

Bulfinch Street, 5. 62-65. 

Bulkelcy, Gershom, 8. 107, 110, 162, 281, 
467. 

Bulklcy, John, 6. 276. 

Bulkley, Peter, 5. 48, 66, 70, 78, 82, 93, 
132, 137, 139, 102, 215. Ai)pointed 
Councillor, 9. 140. 

Bulkley, Rev. Peter, i. 339 h. 

Mulkly, Rer. E., 5. 418. 

Bull, Capt. David, 8. 145, 172, 374, 396. 

Bull, Elizabeth, 7. 208. 

Bull, Coi'. Hyram, 5. 319. 

Bull, Jireh, i. 427. 

Bull, Major Jonatlian, 8. 149 170, 561. 

Bull, Sert/t. John, 5. 53, 55, 102, 119, 172, 
173, 342, 346, 350. 

Bull, Thomas, mentioned, 9. 128. 

Bull Pasture, 5. 109. 

Bull's Falls, concerning a magazine at, 

10. 230. 

Bull's Iron Works at Hartford, 10. 217. 

Bull's Wharf, 5. 385. 

BuUard, Martlia, 6. 184. 

Bullion, increase of, 6. 87*. 

Bullivant. /M B., 5. 87, 168, 172, 176, 

I'.'O, 201, 209, 214, 236, 415, 430, 436, 

486 ; 7. 89. 
Bullock, Gouda-ife, i. 138. 
Bumper, origin of the word, 2. 404. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS IHSTOrwICAL SOCIETY. 



IGl 



Bumstead, Tlioinns, 5. 107 ; 6. 40. 
{uinstoeii, Jeretni;ili, witiu'ss, 9. lliO. 
JuiR'li of Grapes Inn, 7. '.V2o. 
}uiul.)X or Bmulofke, William, i. 219. 
Junker, Mr., 2. 400. 
iunkor, llorr. s/iip of] 8. 153. 

Bunker Hill, Dr. (Jordon's account of the 
battle of, 3. lot), LJ'J, Uil, l(j:5. Dr. 
Belknap's views on the battle, 3. LjO. 
Mr. Thatcher's account of the battle of, 
3. \6'i. Direction of the wind daring 
the battle of, 3. 1(5:!. Mentioned, 4. 5, 
2'.)2-2!>4. Gen. Gage's accoiuit of the 
battle of, 10. 5. Army of Gen. Gage 
pursued from Concord to. 10. 284. 

Burbenk, Mr., Eufjhtnd, 5. 2jy. 

Burbenk, Tiinotliy, 5. 817. 

Burch, William, i. 501. 

Burchsted, Dr., 6. 72. 

Burden, George, i. 486, 490. 

Burdet, Rev. George, 2. 0I8, o27, 339, 
340. 

Burdett, Mrs. Anne, i. 268. 

Burdett, George, shocmakrr, i. 208. 

Burfort, Mr., Kw/land, 5 2-39. 

Burgers and Boores, volunteers in expe- 
dition against Canada, 8. oil. 

Burgers and Maquaes, 8. 315. 

Burgcs, Dr., i. 6. 

Burgess, Rec. Mr., Ewjland, 5. 46. 

Burgess, Rev. Daniel, 2. 471. 

Burgess, Col. Elisha, or Eliseus, 7. 34, 46, 
58, 02, 68, GO, 77, 85. 

Burgess, Rvr. John, D.D., 1. 73 n. 

Burgess, Roger, 5 53. 

Burgh, James, 4. 3-jO. 

'Burgliers.' 2 180. 

Burgiss, William, 7. 307. 

Burglary, 5. 80. 

Burgovne, den. John, 2. 44, 421, 425; 4. 
65, (57, 71, 75. 77, 79, 80, 82, 89 «. ; 5. 
447; 10. 91, 113. His army prisoners 
at Boston, 4. 77. Concerning an attack 
on Ticonderoga, 10. 72. His intended 
movements, 10. 76. Ills war move- 
ments, 10. 79. Concerning an attack 
at Portsmouth, lo. 89. Surrender of, 
10. 101. 

Burgoyne, Sir Robert, i. Ill n. 

Burijravius, the works of, i. 149. 

Burliil, .Jolm,6. 410. 

Burial Hill, Cluirlcxtnn-n. 5. 447. 

Burials in Boston, 7. 176. 

Burke, Planus, 2. 431. 

Burke, Edmund, in Parliament, 9. 231. 
Mentioned, 9. 313. Sentiments in Par- 
liament concerning the duty act, g. 
337. Motion in Parliament ccmcerning 
American affairs, 9. 436. Quoted con 
cerning war, 9 4(')-3. 

Burlesque on Sewell's Verses, 6. 35. 

Burley, Mr., 2. 400. 

Burlington, 5. xi, x.xxi, xxxii, 51 ; 7. 121. 

Burnaby, Andrew. D.D., his 'Travels 
through the Middle Settlements of 



North America,' 2. 14, 17, 22, 24, 25, 29, 
30. 

Rurnap, Copt. 7. 181, 192, 203, 288. 

Murne, , 7. 10. 

IJurnel, Samuel, 6. 276. 

Rurnet, Gor., 7. 5. 

Burnet, Gilbert, D.D., Bit^hop of SnJishury, 
4. 422 : 6. 391. His ' Life of John, Earl 
of Rochester ' cited, 2, 85, 89. 

Rurnct, Mary, 7. 349. 

Burnet's 'History of the Reformation,' 
I 6. 391. 

Burning of Dutch ships and a town in 
I Holland, 8. 105. 

I ' Burnings Bewayled,' sermon by Dr. 
Mather, 6. 323. 

Burr, , 5. 457. 

Burr, Col. Aaron, 4. 433, 452, 474, 484, 
j 494. 
1 Burr, Rev. Aaron, 2. 8. 

Burr, Mrs. Frances, 7, 53. 
; Burr, Rev. John, 7. 53. 

Burrard, George, i. 501. 

i Burrel, , a quaker, 5. 459. 

j Burrell, , Lontuwain, 7. 335. 

Burrell, Col., 10. 85. 

Burrill, George, 6. 211. 

Burrill, Speaker John, 7. 6, 74, 96, 190, 
297. 

Burrill, Samuel, 7. 90. 

Burrill, Sarah. 7. 96. 

Burrington, Capt., 6. 56. 

i Burroughs, , 5. 450; 6. 42, 157, 344. 

j Burroughs, Mrs. Elizabeth, 6. 410. 

Burroughs, Francis, 5. 233; 6. 47, 179, 410. 

Burroughs, Rev. George, 5. 106, 340, 363, 
431. 

Burrouglis, Rev. Jeremiah, 6. 417. 

Burroughs, Sarah, 5. 410. 

Bouroughs, ^[rs. Sarah, 5. 479. 

Burrows, Mr., Enr/lis/i merchant, 8. 28. 

Rurt, George, i. 38. 

Rurtis, William, 4. 168. 

Rurton, Mr., i. 153. 

Rurton, Mrs. Abigail. 5. -3.50. 

Burton, Rev. Henry, i. 151 h. 

Rurton, Stephen, 5. 350. 

Rurton's ' History of Scotland,' 7. 77. 

Rurying Hill, Pl>/moiiilt, 6. 429. 

Rurying Point, 6. 245 ; 7. 7 4. 

Rury St. Edmunds, town of, 8. 185, 187. 

Busby, Dr., 5 2-53. 

Rusby, il//s., 6. 201. 

Rusby, Abraham, 5. 170, 171. 

Rusiiee, Mou^k nr, 6. 54. 

Rushnell, a harher, y 111. 

Rushnell, (Jnodman Edward, r. 213, 214. 

Rushnet, 5. 2'.)-i. 

Russledom. 5. 299. 

Rutchcr, Mr.. 5. 417 ; 6. 153. 

Rutcher, Alwin, 6. 153. 

Butcher, Elizabeth, 7. 220, 3-57. 

Rutcher, Uol)ert, 7. 225. 

Rutcher, Thomas, 7. 225, 220. 

Rutler, Mr., 5. 2, 21 ; 6. 414, 432. 
46 



ZC2 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Butler, Capt., 5. 85, 154; 6. 316. 

Butler, Rev. Mr., Ewjlaud, 5. l!UG. 

Butler, jSlrs. Ann, 7. 7:J. 

Butler, Hannah, 6. 207. 

Butler, Mrs. Joanna, 6. 414. 

Butler, John, 6. 418. 

Butler, Joseph, D.D., Bishop of Durham, 

3. 085. 
Butler, Mrs. Mary, 6. 414; 7. 73 
Builer, Peter, 5. 85, 111, llU, 127, 43G; 7. 

Butler, Stephen, 6 414. 

Butler, Mrs. Tabitlia, 6. 414. 

Butler, CW.Zebulon, 4. 235. With troops 
in Connecticut, 10. 05. Sent to the 
defence of Westmoreland, 10 12(3. 

Butler's Wharf, 6. 10, 314, SW. 

Butterworth, , 7. 103. 

Buttolph, N., 6. 33*. 92, 206; 7. 344. 

Buttolpli, Thomas, i. 489, 4U0; 6. 408. 

Button, (ioodman, i. 66. 

Button, John, i. 480 ; 6. 408. Witness to 
deed, 9. 35, 36. Signs letter, 9. 37. 

Butts, the, 5. 437, 451 ; 6. 03, 240 ; 7. 231. 

Butt's Brook, 6. 383, 384. 

Bvfield, Mrs. Col. (Deborah), 6. 237 ; 7. 
■57, 1.33. 

Byfield, Deborah, .Tr., 5. 436; 7. 337. 

Byficld, Capt. or Col. Nathaniel, 5. 153, 1G3, 
31'.), 380, 3S0, 42:), .4:;6, 439, 410, 441, 
457, 479, 49()-49S ; 6. 2, 4, 5, 8, 24, 40, 
45, 57, 103-105, 2:;.:, 2:;'., :;05 ; 7. 5, 18, 
09, 133, 169, 1S2, 2:'.4, I'.Mt, 3ri2 ; 8 533, 

Byfield, .1//-.S. Col. (S.-srah), 7. 182, 194. 

Byfield, Sarah, .//•., 5. 493. 

Byfield, town of, 6. 90, 101, 187, 256 ; 7. 
230. 

Bvles, Daniel, 2. 262. 

Byles, Josial), 6. 220. 

Byles, Mrs. Josiah (Elizabeth), 6. 220; 7. 
200,326,301. 

Byles, Mather, D.D , 2. 68, 432; 3. 51, 
53, 201, 239. Hymn by, and Josepli 
Green's parody on the same, 2. 70, 71. 
Anecdote of, 2. 285. Anecdote told 
by, 2. 471. List of articles found in 
his house after his death, 3. 234, 235; 
6. 220. 

Byles, Thomas, 2. 262, 285. 

Byng, Adin. John, 3. 135. 



c. 

Cabal, , 6. 189. 

Cabot, Edward C, 5. xxxii. 
Cailarque, French settlement at 8. 373. 
Cade, George, i. 501. 
Cailiz, 7. 25. 

Cadogan, William, ^^.D., 3 144. 
C^adwallader, (ipd. John, 4. 33. 
CjEsalpinns, Andreas, i. 154. 
Caesar, Charles, 6. 160, 



Cahos, , sentenced by court-martial, 

4 197. 

Cajanaquand, Indian, mentioned, 9. 9. 

Cajo, Enoch, 7. 308. 

Calamy, Dr., 6. 427 ; 7. 133, 144. His 
' History,' 5. 213 ; 6. 70. His Abridg- 
ment of Bax'ter, 6. 70; 7. 154, 175. His 
' Ejected Ministers,' 6 417. 

Caldwell, Rev. James, death of, 2. 11-3. 

Caldwell, James, 3. 438. 

Caldwell, Mrs. James, death of, 2. 113. 

Caldwell, John, 3. 438 n. 

Caldwell, Setli, 3. 438 n. 

Caldwell, William, 3. 439. 

Calef, Robert, 5. 221 ; 6. 53, 03 ; 7. 123. 

Caley, Thomas, letter of, i. 198. 

Calf, Mr., 6. 419. 

Calkoen, Hendrik, 4. 392. 

Callender, James Thompson, 4. 4G4. 

Callender, Joseph, 3. 209. 

Calley, C<i/>f. John, 6. 3b*, 47*, 50*, 84* 
85*, 131*, 201. 

Cally, Nicholas, i. 501. 

Calvin, Mrs. 5. 258. 

Calvin, John, 3. 254; 5. 83; 5. 137; 7. 
323. 

Caly, Abraham, 8. 185, 187, 189, 190. 

Cambel, Duncan, 8. 527, 559, 564, 565. 

Cambrav. Cardinal of, 7. 154. 

Cainbridn-e, I ) nice of,' Q. All. 

Cambridue, Kn,i.,' ^. 307, 447. Colleges 
and Halls at, 5. 259-201. 

Cambridge, Muss. (Newtowne), men- 
tioned,^!. 474, 478; 4. 6 ; 5. 33, 98, 99, 
168, 178, 181, 362, 438,487 ; 6. 14*, 15*. 
19* 44, 84, 135, 208, 234, 209 ; 7. 9, 52. 
60, 86, 108, 115, 119, 125, 132, 157, 340. 
Biirgoyne's armv prisoners at, 4. 77. 
Church at, 5. 3,'l27, 396 ; 6. 17*, 20* 
118, 394, 397. Grannnar School at, 5. 
168. Paige's ' History of,' 5. 325, 362 ; 
6. 133, 203, 269 ; 7. 15, 64, 100, 218, 289, 
373. Corporation Meeting at, 6. 84 ; 7. 
68. Fast at, 7. 290. College at, 9. .391. 
Army stationed at, 9. 493. Gen. Put- 
nam with troops at, 10. 1. A division 
of the army at, 10. 1, 2. Col. Smith 
with the King's troops landed at, 10. 
291. 

Cambridge Almanac, 5. 157. 

Cambridge Artillery, 5 99. 

Cambridge Burying Place, 5. 505. 

' Cambridge Chronicle,' netispaper, 3. 
277 n. 

Cambridge Court, 5. 51 ; 6 66, 84, 114, 
135, 138, 228, 260 ; 7. 94, 190, 191, 289, 
290, 325. 

Cambridge North-farms, 5. 435. 

Cambridge Prison, 5. 302. 

Cambridge Street, 6. 417 ; 7 227. 

Cambridge Superior Court, 6. 391. 

Cambridge Troop, 6. 227. 

Cambridge University, Emjland, 6 



123, i 



Cambridge Village, 5. 302. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



103 



Canulen, Lord, mentioned, 9. 009, 407. 

Camilen, Mr., i. lo4. 

Camden, 6\ C, 4 214. Gates's defeat 
at, 4. 103. Conduct of niililia at bat- 
tle of, 10. 211. 

Camp, T. H., 5. xxxi. 

(^•imiibell, Cot. Artluir, 2. 91, 95. 

(^impbell, Cnl. Donald, 4. 100. 

C^ampbell, Elizabeth, 7. 328. 

Campbell, Jolin, 5. 5;)7 ; 6. 100, 149, 241, 
3:39, 413; 7. 81, 150, 193. 

Campbell, I'rentiec, 6. 130. 

Campbell, Sarali, 6. 413. 

Campecbe Hospital. 6. 237. 

Campion, Mr., 1. 3ol, 353. 

Canada, 5. xv, 32.5. 334, 337, 3-!;8, 459; 6. 
37*, 39*, 41*, 47*, 48*, 58*, 01*, 92*, 
130*, 142, 105, 200, 254, 201, 20S, 301, 
315, 328, 329, 374, 3S.>, 300, 403; 7. 
347, 350, 355. Proposed road to, 2. 112. 
Trade of, witli Vermont, 2. 143. Secret 
expedition to, proposed in 1777, 4. 08. 
Washington's opinion in ret^ard to, 4. 
6^. Expedition, 6. 254, 255, 2-39, 313, 
314, 317, 322. New expedition to, 6. 
324. Commissioners to, 7. 347. Dec- 
laration of war against tlie French in, 
8. 101. C'oncerning the subjection of 
the French colonies at, 8. 103. Con- 
cerning war against, 8. 305. Expedi- 
tion against tiie Frencli at, 8 300-318. 
Journal of Fitz-John VVinthrop con- 
cerning the expedition against, 8. 312- 
318. Letter of Fitz-John Winlhrop to 
Governor and Council of Connecticut, 
concerning the expedition against, 8. 
308, 310. Mjeasons wiiich liindered the 
army from going to, by Fitz-Jolin Win- 
tlirop, 8. 318. Uepulse of continental 
troops in, 10 9. The loss of, to the 
Union, 10 209. 

Canada, Governor of, 7. 347. 

Canada Indians, 7. 37. 

Canada Uiver, 5 340 ; 6. 318; 7. 30. 

Canary Islands, 5. 245. 

Canfield, Col. Samuel, 4. 257. 276, 277. 
Letter from Gen. Washington concern- 
ing the sending of flags, 10. 273. 

Cannon, attempts to cast, in the colonies, 
4. 2.(8. 300, 304. Scarcity of, 4. 313. 

Canoe Uiver, 6. 203. 

Canonicus, i. 204 ; 5. 15, 21-23. Land 
purchased from, 9. 104. 

Canonicut, 5. 501; 7. 193. 

Canso, 7. 335. 

Canterbury, Archbishop of, i, 482; 5. 398, 
403 ; 6. 24* ; 7. 300. 

Canterbury, 7. 101. 

Canterbury, A'/ir/., 5. 52, 247, 272, 293. 

Canterbury Cathedral, 5. 293. 

Canton Street, 6. 310. 

Canton Turnpike. 7. 102. 

Capac, see Manco Capac. 

Cape Ann, affray with man-of-war at, 9. 
496. 



Cape Anne, 5. 284, 431 ; 6. 50* 103-105, 

120, 142 ; 7. 335. 330. 
Cape Bon Sperance, 5. 506. 
Cape IJritoon, 5. 335; 7.245. 
Cape Cancer, 7. 185. 
Cape Cod, 5.283,324, 3.30, 3.-.0; 6. 71. 

Freeman's ' History of,' 7. 178. 
Cape de Verd Islands, 8. 357. 
Cape Harbor, 6. 243. 
Cape Hace, i. 120. 
Cape Sable, 6. 02*, 310 ; 7. 335. 
Cape-Sable Indians, 6. 50. 
Capen, Mr., 6. 14, 187 ; 7. 240. 
Capen, Purcluise, 5. 432. 
Capes of Delaware, 10. 90. 
Capital crime, 7. 270. 
Caple, Arthur, Lord, belieaded, 5. 300; 

8. 209, 220. 
Captain's Island, 6. 133. 
Captives, 6 37*, 38*. 
Captivity of Rev. Joiin Williams, 6. 64*. 
' Capture and Trial of Pirates,' copy of 

tiie report published in Boston ' News 

Letter,' 6. 100. 
Car, George, 5. 87. 
Card, John, 5. 350. 
Card, Mrs. Martha, 5. 35G. 
Carder, Richard, i. 301. 
(^ardnus drink, 5. 85. 
Carey, Matthew, 2. 450-453, 457, 459, 

4()1, 402, 470, 477, 480, 483, 484, 489, 

4'Jl, 494; 3. 1-5, 38, 40, 00, 72, 70, 79, 

97, 112, 142, 203, 209. 211, 218, 237, 

207, 270, 308, 315, 338, 346, 420 «. 
Carey, Nathaniel, 5. 302 ; 6. 90. 
Carey, Mrs. Nathaniel, 5. 302. 
Caribbee Islands, concerning forces for, 8. 

117, 119. 
Carkeete, Nicholas, i. 501. 
Garleton, G'e/i., with army at Quebec, 9. 

511. 
Garleton, Sir Guv, Lnrd Dorchester, 2. 130, 

203 ; 4. 51, 206, 202, 209, 271-273; 10. 

274. 
Carlowitz, peace of, 6 99. 
Carlton, Edward, i. 305. Letters of, 303, 

307, 308. Notice of, 303 n. 
Carlton Place, 6. 119. 
Carmartluii. Francis Godolphin, Marqu'is 

of, 4. 322. 323. 
Carmichael, Rev. John, 2. 492. 
Carolina, i. 445; 7. 53. Description of 

Province <.f, 5. 403. Governor of, 5. 

90-'.)8, ll'.. 40-J. Mortality at, 8. 503. 
Carolina Indian Man, 6. 248. 
Carolina Ministers, 7. 49. 
Carolina, North and South, 5. 402, 403; 

6. 1,89. 
Caroline, sloop, 2. 274. 
Carpenter, , innkeeper, 6. 194, 300, 

42(i ; 7. 19, 50, 102, 192, 227. 
Carpenter, Mr.. 5. .389. 
Carpenter, William, letter of, i. 340. 

Notice of, I. 340 n. 
Carr, Caleb, witness to deed, 9. 23. 



?M 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Carr, S!r Robert, 8. 107, 111 n. One of 
the King's commissioners, letter by, 9. 
63, 60, 72. Concerning certain deeds, 
9. 166. Commissioner, 9. 184. 

Carr & Maverick, Commissioners, arrive 
at Portsmoutli, 8. [)2 n. 

Carr's Bridge, 6. oU. 

Carre, Ezekiell, a Frenchman, concern- 
ing tlie settlement of liotchester, 9. 
171. 

Carrier, Martha, 5. 363. 

Carroll, Jolm, D.D., Bishop of Baltimore, 
3. 123, 268, 205. 

Carter, Mr., tradesman at Boston, 8. 426, 
442, 156, 498, 530, 554. Deatli of, 8. 
544. 

Carter, Jolm, 3. 46. 

Carter, Haipli, 5. 116. 

Carter, Mrs. Kutb, 5. 468 : 7. 220. 

Carter, Samuel, 5. xxii ; 6. b49. 

Carteret, Gov., i. 412. 

Carters, the, affro-.it Gov. Dudley, 6. 144. 

Cartridge-box, new kind of, 4. 62. 

Cartwright. Col. George, 8. 104, 125, 130. 
Commissioner of the King, letter by, 
9. 63,66, 72. Concerning certain deeds, 
9. 166. Commissioner, 9 184. 

Cartwright, Capt. Thomas, 4. 129. 

Carver, Capt., 6. 318. 

Carver, Cajit. Jonathan, 2. 414 

Carwithin, Mrs., 5 l'J3. 

Carv, Capt., 5. 2o3, 209; 6. 89, 387; 7. 
2o9. 

Cary, Col. Richard, 3. 48, 84, 136, 143. 
Death of, 3. 212, 213. 

Carv, Richard, Jr., 3. 213. 

Car\i, Rec. Joseph, 5. 43, 226; 6. 159, 
177, 271 ; 7. 70, 154. His • Exposition 
of the Book of Job,' 2. 16; 6. 177, 189, 
271. 

Casco, 5. 317, 820 ; 6. 129*. 189; 7. 378. 

Casco Bay, 5. 54 ; 6. 38*, 72* 129* 81, 
89, 189, 3sy : 7. 37, 237, 2 J4, 334, 378. 
Fortification at, 6. 38*, 72. Soldiers 
at, 6. 38*, 72*. 

Casco Fort, 6. 16*, 38*, 49*. 72* 83. 

Castccn, Moiis.. 5. 321, 430; 7. 293. 

Castine, , 6. 328. 

Castle. 5. 88. 108 ; 6. 33, 40 ; 7. 22, 104. 

Castle Island, 5. 124, 147. 

Castle Street, 6. 309, 310. 

Castle Tavern, 5. 196; 6. 159. 

Castle William, 6. 117, 242; 7. 94, 120, 
298. 

Castle of Casell near Mantua, 8 16. 

Castle of Sestos and Abidos, 8. 13. 

Caswell, WuIoh; 7. 282. 

Caterpillars, destruction of the apple- 
trees by, 8. 123. 

Cathcart, Robert, 6. 433, 436. 

Catherine II. of /!i,iixm, 4. 440. 445, 454. 
Reasons for refusing to receive Mr. 
Dana, 4. 440-444. Mediation offered 
by, 4. 441-444, 459, 460. 

Catherine Hall, Cambridijc, 6. 00. 



Catholicism, Roman, 2. 61. 

Catlin, Goodman, 8. 170. 

Cattapesset, relative of Uncas, 9. 103. 

Cattle and sheep for Fisher's Island, 8. 
531. 

Cattle, concerning the sale of, 8. 422, 431, 
438, 444, 468, 480, 497. 

Catwater, 5. 277. 

Caucus, 6 154. 

Caucus Club, 6. 154. 

Cauley, John, i. 501. 

Caulkins, Miss, quoted, 9. 1 n. 

Caupliin, , 6. 121*. 

Cauplin, , 6. 40*. 

Cavalry, 4 80, 81. 

Cave, Jane, 5. 301, 303. 

Cawfield, Lieul.-Gor., CoL, 6. 322. 

Cawley, Justice, 7. 214. 

Cay ley, Capt., 7. 118. 

Caysley, Jonathan, 5. 1. 

Cedar business, the, 8. 481. 

Cedar Swamp, 6. 308. 

Cedar Swamp Jleadow, 6 195. 

Ceelv, Christopher, i. 501. 

Cecly, Oliver, i. 501. 

Ceely, Thomas, i. 50L 

Central Yard, 6. 119. 

Centre Haven, 6. 408. 

Centre Street, 5. 74. 

Centurion, ship, 6. 59. 

Ceres, ship, 3. 255, 204, 274. 

Ce'risier, Antoine Marie, his ' Grundwet- 
tinge Herstellung,' 4. 406. 

Certificate of Col. Tartriiige, 6. 56*. 

Cessation of arms, proclamation for, 6. 
364 ; 7. 378. 

Ceylon, Asia, 5. 498 ; 6. 7. 

Chadburn, Col., 2. 54. 

Chadder, Capt., 7. 60, 111. 

Chaddock, John, petition of, i. 492. No- 
tice of, 492 71. 

Chaddock, Gov. Capt. Thomas, i. 279. 

Chadwell. Benjamin, 7. 335. 

Chadwell's Inn, 7. 55. 

Chadwick, Capt., abducts certain negroes 
from Havana, 9. 889. Death of, at 
Carolina, 9. 389. 

Chadwick, Jolm, 7. 88. 

Challenge, Josiah, 7. 353. 

Chalmans, Thomas. 8. 187. 

Chalmers, George, his ' Political Annals 
of America,' 3. 152, 154. 218, 219, 223. 

Cliambaud, Louis, 3. 218, 222. 

Chamberlain, Lieut., in Revolutionary 
Army, 9. 307. 

Chamberlain, Capt. Thomas. 5. 118, 198. 

Chambers, ^fr., 7. 1.32, 223, 373. 

Chambers, Anne, i. 200. 

Chambers, Charles, 8. 545. 

Chambers, Epliraim, his 'Dictionary of 
Arts and Sciences,' 2 39, 150. 

Chambers, Capt. Matthew (?), 4. 187. 

Chambers, Rebecca, 7. 356. 

Chnmpcrnonn, Francis, appointed coun- 
cillor, 9. 146; 10. 114. 



I 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



3G5 



Champion, Cd/., io. 114. Furnishing pro- 
visions to tlio army, lo 2-')L). Furiiishi'ii 
with nionev to supply provisions, lo. 
'J47. 

Ciiaiuplin, Cdjit., couLXM-ning some pow- 
der, IO 4. 

Chaniplin, Mr., a tnessem/er, 8. 470, 48G, 
487. 

Champlin, Cnpt. William, concerning 
certain boinulary, 9. 2l)l). Justice, 9. 
201. Nenci^rate's chiim of land, 9 208. 

Ciiampnev, Mrs., 6. Id-i. 

Champney, Abigail, 6. :!()0. 

Ciiampney, Daniel, 5. 158; 8. 478, 479. 

Chancellor of E.xehequer, opinion of, con- 
cerning affairs of the Colonies, 9. 22J, 
280. 

Chancery, Court of, 6. 109*, 118* 416. 

Chancy, see Cliaunev. 

Cliand'ler, Capt. or SLiJor, 6. 225, 248, 290; 
7. 194, 195. 

Cliandler, Col. Gardiner, 4. 340. His regi- 
ment, 10. 51. 

Chandler,Thomas Bradbury, D D , 3. 1G5. 

Ciiandler's Lane, 6 17*. 

Chaney, , 5. I'JS, ^52. 

Chancy, , chaplain to forces sent 

against Canada, 8 ■M'-'>. 

Chanev, .1//-.s'., 5. 144 ; 6 :]74 : 7. 257. 

Channing. William Kllery, L'.Z^., 2. 447 /i. 

Chantorell, John, 6 210. 

Chanterell, Mary. 6. 2iO. 

Chapin, Abel, 7. .')07. 

Chapin, Samuel, 7. ol7. 

Chapin, Sarah, 5. 115. 

Chaplains. 5. 21'.); 6. 214. 253, 31S, .319; 
7. 1 13. Pa V of, 4. 49 Number of, 4. (37. 

Chaplins, Clement, 8 61. 

Chapman, Lord Man ;,-. 5. 301. 

Chapman, Goodman, 8. 419. 

Chapman, John, 8. 147. 

Ciiapman, Robert, 9. 25. 

Chappel, Cni)t. Frederick, 10 21. 

Charcoal, concerning the making of, 8. 
136. 

'Charles' (galley), 6. 103. 

Charles L, 9. 165, 181. Beheaded, 8. 200 

Charles II. of E„;/lmi(l, 2. 3 ; 4. 438; 8. 
75 n., 83, 02, 96, 97. Colonies on Long 
Island, 8 151. Instructions concerning 
cliange of government in New England 
Colonies, 8. 3)1. Declaration of war 
against tiie French in Canada, 8. 101. 
Letter to Jolm Endicott, known as the 
' King's Mandamus,' 9. 20. Mentioned, 
9. 37, 52. Letter to the New England 
Colonies, 9. 51,55;;. Grant of Narra- 
gansett lamls, 9 179. Commissioners 
appointed by, 9. 184. Proclamation 
concerning Niirragansett County, 9. 
184. Mentioned, 9. 20fi. 404. 

Ciiarles III. of S,,m,i. 4. 440. 

Charles Wl.' of Siupchn . 4. 502. 

Charles River, 5. 49. 466, 472 ; 6. 88, 260. 

Charles Street, 5. 73, 74. 



Charleston, S. C, i. 447 ; 4. 159; 5. 460, 
503; 6. 11. Strength of Britisii army 
in 1782, 4. 249. Working of the ene- 
mies' batteries at, 10. 164. Surrender 
of, 10. 166. 

Charlestown, Mass., i. 447 ; 5. 82, 99, 115, 
140, 151, 155, 178, 183, 225, 311, 321, 
330,333, 360,409,449; 6. 19*, 1,72, 139, 
1.54, 255, 298; 7. 86, 118, 1.32, 307 ; 10. 
171, 173. Burning of, 4. 292. Froth- 
ingham's 'History of,' 5. 183. Concern- 
ing a map of, 8. 421. Houses burned 
at, 9. 509. 

Charlestown Churcli, 6. 394, 397 ; 7. 86, 
103. 

Cliarlestown Court, 6. 71. 72. 119. 126, 
147,248; 7. 118, 163,241,370. 

Charlestown Ferry, 5. 6, 193, 222; 6. 187; 

7. 307. 
Charlestown Hill, 6. 266. 
Charlestown Oak, 7. 224. 
Charlestown River, 5. 338. 
Charlestown Rode, 5. 457. 
Charlevoi.v, Peter Francis Xavier, 2. 26, 

28, 101. 

Charlotte, Queen, birth of a prince to, 9. 
483. 

Charnock, Hannah, 6. 320. 

Charon, British ship, burned at York- 
town, 4. 22o. 

Chart of Sea Coast, Southack's, 7. 185. 

Charter, the, 5. 81, 131, 16-5, 169, 17.5,254, 
386 ; 6. 67* ; 7. 33. 34, 77, 214, 277, 289, 
312, 313. Of Massachusetts, 5. 09, 110, 
111, 174 ; 7. 36 ; 8. 300. The new, 5. 
356, 3711. 429 ; 6. 108*. John Winthrop, 
Jr., in England, concerning a, for Con- 
necticut, 8. 75.76. Mr. Clarke, in Eng- 
land, concerning a, for Rhode Island, 

8. 75, 76. Of Connecticut, concerning, 
8. 31)1,842; concerning the surrender 
of, 9 175. Agreement between John 
Winthrop and Joliii Clarke concern- 
ing Comiecticut 9. 50. See Patents. 
Concerning tlie, for Narragansett, 9. 
33. 

Charter Colonies, concerning their main- 
tenance, 9. 210. 

Charter, Exjdanatory, 7 -369. 

Charter for Harvard, 5. 412, 480, 464 ; 6. 
84. 

Charter Street. 5. 221 ; 7. 207. 

Chastellux, Fran9ois Jean, Marrjuis de, 3. 
221 ». 

Chatham, /^rd, mentioned, 9. 215, 304, 
418,437,484. Illness of, 9. 227. Con- 
cerning his retirement, 9. 241. Recov- 
ers liis health, 9. 363. Sentiments con- 
cerning duty ta.v, 9. 366. Again in 
Parliament, 9. 397. Sentiments con- 
cerning America, 9. 368. Speech con- 
cerning the Colonies, 9. 424. See Pitt, 
William. 

Chatham, Ko^j., 5. 247. 272; 7. 76. 

Chauniont, Le Ray de, 4. 372. 



866 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Chauncy (Cliancy, Cliaunccy,), Charles, 
D.D., Presifleut of Harvard Culletje, i. 
375 n. ; 2. 171, 172 n., 201, 348, 400, 407, 
409, 4(55; 5. xiii, xiv, xxxvi, xxxvii, 
282 ; 7. 340 ; 8 58. Death of, 8. 389. 

Chauncy, Mrs. Charles, 5 xxxvii. 

Chauncy, Seryeaut Charles, Jr., 5. xxxvii ; 
6. 30, 308. 

Chauncy, Elizabeth, 5. xxxvii. 

Chauncy, Rev. I.. 5. 483. 

Chauncy, Rev. Isaac, 5. 247. 

Chauncy, Rev. Israel, 5. 282; 6. 70. 

Chauncy, Nathaniel, 5. xxxiv, 103 ; 7. 197. 

Chauncy Memorials, 5. xxxvii. 

Cheapside, J.oiidon, 5. 8. 

Chebacco, 6. 104. 

Checkley, Capt. Anthonv, 5. 57, 415; 6. 
11*48,68,94,240. 

Checkley, John, 7. 312. 

Checkley, Cu/jt. or Col. Samuel, 5. 78, 94, 
95, 122, 142, 108, 337, 358, 374, 399, 
409, 421, 422, 4^8 ; 6. 8, 10, 11, 45, 74, 77, 
98, 121, 132, ■z:,:\. -jnT. 309; 7. 113, 158, 
231, 284, ;:;4o, .-.T.",, ;;s2. 

Checkley, il/r.s. ( >»'. S;imnel (Mary), 5. 
421 ; 6. 347 ; 7. 231, 293, 294. 

Checklev, Samuel, Jr., 5 422. 

Checkley, Rev. Samuel, 7. (31, 182, 193, 
194, 218, 231, 283, 317, 329, 840, 3G0. 

Clieehahteaumuck, Caleb, 5. 480. 

Cheesborough, Nathaniel, constable pro 
tempore, 9. 203. 

Cheeseborough, William, i. 371. 

Cheesebrooke, Goodman Elisha, Souther- 
ton, 9. 5»(., 6. 

Cheeseman, Edward, 7. 335. 

Chee§man, Capt. Samuel, 3. 260, 276, 279, 
298, 358. 

Clicever, Commissary, 10. 199, 200. 

Cheever, Abigail, 6. 154. 

Cheever. Ezekicl, 5. 121, 130, 369, 443, 
507 ; 6. 45, 52, 12i», 154, 21(i, 230, 230. 

Cheever ( Chicver), Mrs. Ezekiel, 5. 309. 

Cheever, Samuel, 5. 89. 

Cheever, Richard, 5. 374. 

Cheever, Rrv. Thomas, 5. 97, 127, 130, 
151 ; 6. 20*-23*, 230; 7. 25, 63. 

Chelmsford, 5. 95, 418 ; 6. 67. 118, 386. 

Chelsea, 5. 130; 6. 384, 414; 7. 150. 

Chelsea, Evg , 5. 270. 

Cheney, Dr., his resignation from the 
army, 10. 6. His disagreement with Dr. 
Spalding, 10. 7. 

Chenej', Daniel, 6. 171. 

Chenev, Margaret, 5. 51. 

Cherokees, 6. 439. 

Cherubim's Heads, 7. 347, 348. 

Chesapeake Bay, 10 54. 

Chesborough, Samuel, illness of, 8. 148. 

Chesebrooke, Mr., 8. 472. 

Cliester, Col. J. L., 5. xv ; 6. 29*. 

Chester, Col. John, 4. 15. 

Chester, Col. John, 9. 470. In camp at 
Roxbiiry, 9. 498. Mentioned for pro- 
motion,'9. 513. 



Chester, Enrj., 5. xvi, 329. 

Chester, Bisliop of, 6. 374. 

Chester, ship, 6. 327. 

Chesterfield, Philip Dormer Stanhope, 
Earl of, 2. 6, 57, 58, 66, 76 ; 4. 420. 

Chesters, Mr., 8. 271. 

Chevalier, Jane, see Anderson, Jane. 

Chever, Bartholomew, 5. 387 ; 7. 361. 

Chew, Mr , concerning his exchange as 
prisoner of war, 10. 74. 

Chew, Joseph, prisoner of war, 10. 313. 
Petition of, to Gov. Trumbull, 10. 314- 

Chew, Hon. Samuel, 2. 157, 161. 

Cheyny, Mrs., 6. 171, 173. 

Cheyny, Peter, 5. 343. 

Cheyny, T., 5. 6, 61. 

Chichester, Enq., 5. 19, 255. 

Chickasaws, 7.' 139. 

Chickatabut, Indian, 6. 375. 

Chickering, John, 8. 156, 392. 

Chickering, Sarah, 7. 264, 266, 267, 269, 
271-273. 

Chickery, Mr., dies, 5. 15. 

Clrickinns, , signs deed, 9. 110. 

Chickley, , 5. 123. 

Chickley, Joshua, 5. xxvii. 

Chief Judge, 6. 105*. In Province of 
New York, 6. 106*. 

Chief Justice, see also Major-Gen. Win- 
throp. 

Chief Justice of Canada, 5. xxi. Of Mas- 
sachusetts, 5. xxi. Of Superior Court, 
5. xxi, 370, 389, 500 ; 6. 40; 7. 42. 

Chief Tool, 6. 105*. 

Chiffinch, Thomas, a Narragansett pro- 
prietor, 9. 111. 

Child, Capt., 7. S55. 

Child, Mrs., 8. 252, 254. 

Child, Benjamin, 6. 112. 

Child, Deacon tphraim, mentioned, 8. GO, 
144, 224, 246, 248, 262. Letteis of. i. 
165-169, 199. Notice of, i. 165 n. 
Death of, 8. 251. 

Child, Goodman, 8. 237. 

Child, Mr.-;. Katherine, 6. 170. 

Child, Mrs. Margaret, 7. 250. 

Child, Dr. Robert, i. I45n.; 8. 334. No- 
tice of, I. 148 n. Letters of, i. 148-16.'). 
Imprisonment of, 8. 222. Letter of 
John Winthrop, Jr., to, 8. 41. 

Child, Thomas, 6. 170, 356. 

Children born : a daMghter to Aunt Gost- 
lin, 8. 25; son to Mrs. Newman, 8. 71 ; 
daughter to Stejjlien Winthrop, 8. 212; 
son to Stephen Winthrop, 8 218; daugh- 
ter to Samuel Winthroj), 8. 242; hoy to 
Samuel Winthrop, 8. 247 ; daughter to 
Mrs. Curwin, 8. 391 ; daughter to Mrs. 
Wharton, 8. 419; daughter to Mrs. 
Curwin, 8. 421 ; girl to Mrs. Wharton, 
8 431 ; girl to Wait Winthrop, 8. 435 ; 
boy to Mrs. Wharton, 8. 445; daughter 
to Wail Winthrop, 8. 470. 

Childs, , Rehol>oth, 5. 459, 501. 

Childs, Samuel, 7. 100. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



3GT 



Cliilmark. Enq., 5. 20G; 6. 16G, ^35 ; 7. 'J2. 

Chilton, Mary, 7. 30. 

Cliiiia ware, concerning duty on, 9. 215, 

231. 
Chip, Dr., 5. 48(j ; 6. 32, 248. 
Cliipinan, KIdcr, 5. 210. 
Chipping, Wycombe, Enq., 5. 403. 
Chiswell, Richard, 5. 201'. 
Chittenden, ^V. Thomas, 2. 176. 
Choctaws, 6. 439. 
Clioiseul, Due de, dismissed from court, 

9. 472. 
Chorter, Capt., informs of the movements 

of the British, 10. 63. 
Christ Church, Boaton, 7. 308, 826. 
Christ Church, London. 5. 45. 
('hrist's Hospital, .Smithjield , Enfj.,5. 248. 
Christian Town, 6. 434, 438. 
Christianity, evidences of, 2. 15, 17. Do- 
nation of Edward Hopkins towards 

promotion of, 9. 20. 
Christians, rumor of Indians' design 

against, 8. o.^O. 
Christmas, 5. 114, 115,406, 489, 491; 6. 

92, 150; 7. 32, 33, 314-316, 346. At 

Boston, 8. 567. 
Christophers, Jeffrey, 8. 417, 428, 444-440, 

561. Concerning bond money for 

Thomas Dimon, 45',), 473. 
Christophers, Joim, arrival from Eng- 
land, 8. 493. 
Christopiiers, Justice Richard, 9. 205. 
' Chronicle,' see ' Boston Ciironicle.' 
Cluib, Cai>t., 5. 431, 433, 471. 
Chubb, Tliomas, 3. 385. 
Church, S/ierif/; 7. 19.3. 
CImrch, Col. Benjamin, 4. 3.39 ; 5. 413 ; 6. 

4o*, 126*, 127*, 04, 238, 252. 397, 488. 
Cinirch, /Jr. Benjamin, mentioned, 2. 

95 n. ; 5. 203. In camp at Hoxbury, 9. 

502. 
Church, Caleb, 7. 179. 
Church, Edward, 4. 464. 
Church, Joseph, 6 3l)*, 225, 237. 
Churcli, Nicolets, 5. 7. 
Church Council, 5. .3.52; 6. 21*. 
Churcli Estate, 5. 491.' • 
Church Green, 7. 61. 
Church rates, i. 464. 
Church of England, 5. 142, 180, 214, 216, 

219, 491 ; 6. 286, 352, 379, 386; 7. 32, 

106, 308, .309, 316. 
Church of England Catechise, 5. 209. 
Churcli of England Minister, 7. 214, 260. 
Church of Enirland IVotistants, 7. 99*. 
Ciiurciies of Boston, 6. :',^o, ;J80 ; 7. 328. 
Churciiill, Col. Charles, 6. 31.3. 
Churclmian, John, 3. 283, 288. 

Chute, , I 80. 

Cincinnati, Society of the, 2. 303, .307 ; 

3 150; 5. xl. 
Cinque Ports, 5. 2.')2. 
Circular letter, 10. 136, 1-38, 161, 168,181, 

198. Concerning jirovisions, finance, 

etc., 10. 2iJ0. Clothing for the army, | 



10. 215. Of Gen. Washington concern- 
ing meeting in the Jersey Line, 10 227. 
Of (Jen. Washington concerning the 
joining of the French and American 
army at North River, 10. 238. Of Gen. 
Washington, calling for tioojjs, 10. 2.jO, 
254, 265, 266. Of Gen. Washington, 
concerning tiie state of the finances, 10. 
258. Calling for recruits, 10. 267. Of 
Gen. Washington, concerning the dis- 
banding of tiie armv, lo. 279. 

Cist, Charles, 2. 122, 451. 

City Clerk, 7. 158. Office of, 5. 291. 

City Hall, 5. 161. 

Civil Officers, 7. 40. 

Clanbrassil, Ein'l of, 7. 334. 

Clap, , engaged in illicit trade, 6. 49*. 

Clap, Elder, 6. 357 ; 7. 154. 

Clap, Nurse, 5. 33. 

Clap, Desire. 5. 208. 

Clap, Mrs. Hannah, 6. 239. 

Clap, Rev. Nathaniel, 5. 501 ; 6. 322, 363; 
7. 154, 193. 

Clap, Capt. Roger, 5. 119, 124. 152. 154, 
339, 340. Memoirs of, 6. 239. 

Clap, Samuel, 6. 239. 

Clap, Supply, 5. 124, 125. 

Clap, Thomas, 4 342. 

Clapham, Peter, action against, concern- 
ing estate of John White, 9. 127. 

Clapham, Em/., 5. 254. 

Clare, Lord, vice-treasurer of Ireland, 9. 
290. Debate in rarlianie'nt, 9. 431. 

Clarendon. Earl of (Edward Hyde), 6. 
54; 8. 75 7i. Letter from John Win- 
throp, Jr., to, 8. 75, 75 n., 92. 

Claridge, William, 5. 305. 

Clark, Maior, appointed on the watch, 
1680, 5. 55. 

Clark, Major, in camp at Roxbury, 9. 497. 

Clark, Mrs., 5. 2. 145, 154, 228, 331; 6. 66, 
150,345; 7. 314. 

Clark, Rex. Mr., 5. 150, 172 ; 6. 30. 

Clark, Anne, 6. 3y9. 

Clark, Boilston, 5. 165. 

Clark, Deborali, 6. 233. 

Clark, Elizabeth, lulfe of Elisha Hutchin- 
son, 6. 370, 407. 

Clark, Elizabeth P., wife of Stephen Salis- 
hurij, 5. xxxiv. 

Clark, Francis, 6. .308, 413. 

Clark, George, 5 341. 

Clark, (Jrace, 7. 255. 

Clark, Hannah, 6. 413; 7. 373, 374. 

Clark, James, 7. 191. 

Clark, Jane, 6. 399. 

Clark, Cajii. John, 7 374. 

Clark, .1//-.S. Capt. John (Marv), 7. 374. 

Clark, Dr. John, 5 240. Death of, 5. 338. 

Clark, Dr. John, son of Dr. John, chosen 
justice of peace, 6. 15. Chosen rej)re- 
sentative. 6. 253, 308 ; 7. 5, 258. Cho- 
sen Speaker, 6. 256. Concerning the 
entail on his estate. 6. 361. At Mr. 
Jonathan Belcher's supper, 7. 20. 



868 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Death of his wife, 7. 148. Published \ 
to marry, 7. 17t5. Biograpliical notice 
of, 7. 18L Married second wife, 7. 182. | 
Appointedspecial jud':je,7. 191. Death | 
of liis second wife, 7. 314. 

Clark, Mrs. John {Madam Elizabeth), 
daur/hter of Cvl. Hutchinson, 7. 181, 182, 
300; 314. 

Clark, Mrs. John (Mary), 6. 393 ; 7. 374. 

Clark, Mrs. John (Saraii), death of, 7. 148. 
Mentioned, 7. 181, 306, 382. 

Clark, Jolin, Jr., 7. 50, 200. 

Clark, Elder Jonas, Cambridge, 5. 144, 
438 ; 6. 20*. Death of, in 1700, 6. 1. 

Clark, Jonas, a brazier, 5. 18. Chosen 
selectman, 6. 275, 303 ; 7. 236, 255, 308, 
368, 373, 374 ; 8. 504. j 

Clark, Mrs. Jonas (Sarah), 7. 236, 373. ' 

Clark, Jonas, Jr., 7. 368. 

Clark, Joseph, 6. 51. 

Clark, Martha, 5. 49. 

Clark, .Alarv, 6. 24, 37 ; 7. 120, 374. 

Clark, Nathan, 5. 185, 329. 

Clark, Mrs. Kebec(-a, 6. 326. 

Clark, Samuel, 5. 54, 67, 88, 96, 184, 222, 
339 ; 6. 143, 279 ; 7. 93, 120. 

Clark, Mrs. Samuel (Hannah), 7. 93, 120. 

Clark, Thomas, 5. 48; 6. 47, 233, 324, 
370, 399, 421 ; 7. 138, 139, 158, 220, 243, 
363, 373. 

Clark, Thomas, Chelmsford, death of, 6, 
118. 

Clark, Mrs. Tilly, 7. 86. 

Clark, Cajjt. Timothy, 5. 374, 386, 456, 
471 ; 6. 8, 53, 93, 180, 251, 276, 303, 318, 
373, 379, 401, 417; 7. 74, 98, 115, 133, 
147, 102, 174, 233, 245, 247, 288, 292, 
293, 329, 330, 373, 374. 

Clark, Timothy, Jr., 5. 399. 

Clark, Weston, 5. 502. 

Clark's (Tiiomas) Wharf, 7. 243. 

Clarke, Mr., Iladlei/, persuades Pacon- 
tuck Indians to peace, 8. 89. 

Clarke, Capt. Christopher, master of a 
ship, 8. 49, 103, 105, 243, 251, 271, 272, 
424, 508, 513, 540. Associated with 
Capt. Kidd, 8. 368-370. 

Clark, Lif-ut. James, 4. 85. 

Clarke, John, i. 200. 

Clarke, John, concerning a charter for 
Rhode Island, 8. 75, 76, 79. Agent for 
Rhode Island, 8. 75. Award under an 
agreement between John Wintlirop, 
Jr., and, 8. 82. Concerning purchase 
of land in Connecticut, 8. 356. Letter 
to John Wintlirop concerning estate of 
Mr. Fenwick, 9. 24. Agent for Rhode \ 
Island opposition to Narragansett char- 
ter, 9. 33. Mentioned, 9. 37. Concern- ! 
ing inhabitants of Providence Planta- | 
tions, 9. 39. Opposition to Narragan- | 
sett patent, 9. 40, 40 n., 42. His 
opposition to the Connecticut charter, 
9.44. Agreement with John Wintlirop ' 
concerning Connecticut charter, 9. 50. 



Petition preferred against, by John 
Scott, 9. 53. Commissioner of Rhode 
Island, 9. 198. Agreement with Gov. 
John AViiithrop concerning certain 
boundary, 9. 200. 

Clarke, AV/-. John, D.D., 2. 171, 172 n., 
362, 368; 3. 65, 167, 179. His funeral 
sermon on Dr. Chauncy, 2. 465. 

Clarke, Commissarii Jonathan, 4. 92. 

Clarke. Joseph, Wesierli/, i. 441. 

Clarke^ William, 5. 75, 235; 6. 8, 103, 119, 
253, 284, 310, 307 ; 7. 117, 199,200, 219, 
271, 285, 368, 373. 

Clarke, Capt. William. 1. 175 ; 5. 38, 230, 
233, 234-237, 239, 273, 277, 279, 287- 
289,389; 7. 210. 

Clarke, Mrs. William (Hannah), 7. 373. 

Clarke, Mrs. William (Mary;, 7. -IGS. 

Clarkson, Cornelia, 3. 240, 243, 256, 257, 
267, 281, 354, 358. 

Clarkson, Dr. Gerardus, 2. 115, 184, 
269 «., 290, 29.3, 298, 305, 333, 381, 420 «., 
425, 428, 430, 438, 446, 479, 480, 483, 
484, 486, 488, 494, 496 ; 3. 13, 15, 110, 
118, 121, 127, 133, 198, 201, 205. 240, 
243, 341 n. ' Ulvsses,' 2. 260, 263, 268, 
297, 320, 336, 338, 341, 355, 410, 424, 
440. Death of, 3. 239, 240. 

Clarkson, Rev. Joseph, 3. 243, 270. 

Clarkson, Matthew, 2. 355, 420, 450, 453; 
3. 243, 341, 342. 

Clarkson, Rebecca, 3. 243. 

Clarkson, Thomas, his 'Essay on Sla- 
very,' 3. 27, 28, 32, 33, 215, 216. 

Clarkson, Dr. William, 3. 243, 270. 

Claybrook, Eng., 7. 247. 

Clayton, Col. Jasper, 6. 313. 

(leare, Mrs., i. 23. 

Cleaveland, A. P., 5. xxxT. 

Cleaveland, Rebecca S., 5. xxxv. 

Cleaveland (Cleveland), Samuel, 8. 517. 
Concerning a lease for, 8. 504. Com- 
plaint of, against Major James Fitch, 
8. 506, 507. 

Cleaveland, Stephen II., 5. xxxv. 

Cleaves, George, i. 239. 

Cleft, Major Waterman, 4. 121, 122, 126. 

Clemens, 'Mr., 8. 368. 

Clements, Elizabeth, 5. 349. 

Clempson, Thomas, 5. 303. 

Clendon, William, 5. 158. 

Clerical etiquette, in leaving one parish 
for another, 2. 440. 

Clerk of the market, i. 470. 

Cleveland, Capt., resignation of, 4. 88. 

Cleveland, Lieut. Moses, in Connecticut 
army, ic 8. Taken prisoner, 10. 29. 

Cleverlee, Widow, 7. 369. 

Cleverly, , 5. 146. 

Clevborne, Capt , of ship 'Africa,' 8. 31. 

Cliffe, Capt., 5. 485. 

Cliffe, Joseph, 5. 284. 

Cliffinch, Thomas, mentioned, 9 54. 

Clifford, :Margaret, 5. 328- 

Clifts, , 5. 26. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



569 



Clinton, Gov. George, 4. 8, 12, 13, 15, 17, 
31, 53, 134, 138, 13'J, 140, 153, IG'J, 170, 
177, 283. A letter for. 10. 77. DLteiids 
Fort Montgomery, 10. 100. Mentioned, 
10. 144. 

Clinton. AV Henry, 2. 64, 105 ; 4. 87, 1)0, 
97, 91), 103. 110, lilt, 120, 159. 101. 102, 
205, 207, 22G. Commands at BunkiT 
Hill, 9. 500. In command at North 
Carolina, 10. 12. Concerning the call- 
ing of militia, 10. 79. Takes Fort 
Montgomery, 10. 100. Returns to 
Sandy Hook from Charleston, 10. KiT. 
Expected arrival at New York, 10. 173. 
Arrival of, with fleet at Sand}- Hook, 
10. 177. Return to New York from 
Huntington, lo. 193. Mentioned, 10. 
222 H. Concerning his military move- 
ments, 10. 318. 

Clinton, Gen. James, 4. 31, 40, 1G8, 170, 
170, 179, 180, 284. 

Cloane, Lieut. Connolly, 4. 83. 

Cloeck, Cornelius, letter signed by, 9. 69. 

Clopton, Bridget, i. 192 n. 

Clopton, Margery, see Dogget, Mrs. 

Clopton, Thomasine, see Winthrop, Mrs. 

Clopton, William, i. 179 n. 

Clopton Family, i. 241 n. 

Clothing for the armv, 4. 92, 94-96, 99, 
132, 149, 171, 184, "l92, 210, 229, 233, 
234, 236, 238, 242-244, 270. Scarcity 
of, among the Massachusetts troops, 4. 
56-58,00. Supplies of, badly managed, 
4. 59. Difficulty in obtaining, 4. 93. 
Distribution of, 4. 149, 150, 180. Scar- 
city of, 4. 171. Arrival of, from Spain, 
4. 213. Supplies of, 4. 229. A seizure 
of, 10. 36. Concerning, 10. 43, 40, 48. 
Sufferings of the troops for, 10. 105. 
Purchase of, for the troops, 10. 107. 
Concerning the making of, for the 
troops, 10. 109. Necessity of, 10. 
137. Arriving for the army by French 
fleet, 10. 188. A call for, from Gen. 
Washington, 10. 215. 

Clotworthy, Sir John, i. 407. Letter 
from, 1. 203. Letters to be read through 
a casement, i. 200, 208. 

Clough, John, 6. 198. 310, 320. 

Clough Street, 6. 320. 

Clover-seed, concerning the sale of, 8 449. 

Clutterbuck, William, arrives from New 
Castle, 5. 97, 158 ; 8. 470. 

Clymer, George, 4. 507. 

Coates, Mr.,1. 333. 

Cobb, Mr., Hinqham, 6. 183. 

Cobb, Anne, 6. 408. 

Cobb. William, 6. 408. 

Cobbett, n>r. Tiiomas. notice of, i. 2G8n. 
Letters from, i. 2G8, 328, 333: 5. 66, 
103. 

Cobbett, William ('Porcupine'), 3. 349 «.; 
4. 464. 

Coburn, Mrs., death of, 8. 398. 

Cochecha, 7. 304. 



Cochitawick, i. 318 n. 

Cochran. Dr. Jolm, 3. 235; 4. 192, 190, 

207, 233 ; 10. 49. 
' Cock and Hen,' Dr. Belknap's Apologue 

of the, 2. 8, 9, 11. 
Cock-fighting, 5. 107, 108. 
Cock-skailing, 5. 122. 
Cocke, neqro, 6. 333. 
Cockle, James, 4. 340. 
Cockrill, John, complaint of Daniel Cone 
1 against, 8. 44. 
! Coiidington, Mmhim, 7. 193. 
I Coddington, Natiianiel, commissioner of 
I niunh- Island, 9. 198, 198 n. 
! Coddington, Gur. William, i. lln., 203n. 

Notice of, I. 195 n. ; 8. 31, 372. 

Codman, , messenger, 8. 486. 

Codman, John, 3. 252, 253, 260. 
Codnar, Peter, 6. 15*. 
Codnor. James, 6. 211. 
Codrington. Gen., 6. 287. 
Coflin,'lt7(/(;»', 6. 102, 149. 
Coffin, Ebenezer, 6. 51*. 
Coffin, Enoch. 7. 355. 
Coffin, Lucri'tia F., 5. xxxvi. 
Coffin, AK'hital)le, 7. 210. 
Coffin, Nathaniel, 6. 01 ; 7. 119, 130. 
Coffin, Peleg, 3. 340. 
Coffin, Tristram, 6. 14, 61, 94. 
Coffin's ' History of Newbury,' see 'New- 
bury, History of.' 
Coggan, John, i. 117, 490; 5. GO, 170; 8. 

36. Death of, 8. 51. 
Coggeshall. John, letters from, i. 345, 

349. Notice of, i. 345 n. 
Coginaquand (Cochanaquand and Co- 

janaquant), Narracjansett sachem, deed 

given by, 9. 22. Concerning deed, 9. 

74, 74 n. Concerning land sold by 9. 

82. Brother to Cosequance, 9. 105. 
Cogro, negro, 7. 190. 
Cogswell, Dr., in camp at Roxburv, 9. 

499. 
Cogswell, Major Thomas, question as to 

the rank of, 4- 141-140. 
Cohasset Rocks. 6. 429 ; 7. 3-3. 
Coin, Act of Parliament regulating, 6. 248. 
Coin, French, of Louis XIV., 2. 93. 
Coke, Mtuhnn, 6. ISO. 
Coke, Sir Edward, 2. 150. 
Coke, John, i. 482. 
Cokecro signs deed, 9. 110. 
Colbron, William, 5. 109, 179, 207. 
Colburn, M,^.,&. 197. 
Colchester, cavalry stationed at. 10. 154. 

Col. Sheldon's regiment quartered at, 

10. 221. 

Colc'ord, , 7. 220. 

Cold winter of 1779-80, 2. 30, 31, 36. 

Colden, Cadwallader, 3. 158. 

Cole, CapL, 5. 410. 

Cole, Mr., England (?), dead. 5. 46-5. 

Cole, ^fr., appointed commissioner for 

Wickford, 9. 81. 
Cole, Frances, wife of Gilbert, 7. 239. 



47 



UNIVERSITY 



370 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Cole, Cant. Albert (?), prisoner of war, 4. 

108. 
Cole, Daniel, i. 311. 
Cole, Elizabeth, wife of William, i. 808. 
Cole, Gilbert, 5. 30, 135, 22«, 230 ; 6. 219, 

359 ; 7. 162, 174. 
Cole, Henry, death of, 6. 21. 
Cole, James, i. 311. 
Cole, James, Plijmuuth, innkeeper, 5. 472, 

473. 
Cole, John, 5. 333 ; 7. 95, 344. 
Cole, Joseph, married, i. 89 n. 
Cole, Mary, wift of Joseph, letter from, i. 

89. 
Cole, Samuel, i. 486. 
Cole, Reo. Thomas, 6. 101. 
Cole, William, i. 308 n. 
Coleborn, Mrs., 5. 1. 
Colebrooke, Eng., 5. 301. 
Coleman, William, 5. 341, 390, 399; 6. 48, 

49. 
Colepeper, Baron, 5. 49. 
Coles's Dictionary, 5. 202 ; 6. 413. 
Colethirst, Mr., i. 79, 80. 
Colick, a remedy for, 8. 111. 
Collamor, Mr., 7. 19. 
Collection, at South Church, 6. 324. For 

relief of St. Christopher's and Nevis, 

6. 42*. 

College, Baliol, 0.rford, 5. 304. 
College, Brazen-nose, Oxford, 5 303. 
College Charter, 5. 441. 
College, Christ Church, Oxford, 5. 301, 

303. 
College, Corpus Christi, Oxford, 5. .304, 

307 ; 6. 427. 
College, Eaton, Oxford, 5. 806. 
College, Emmanuel, Cumbridije, 5. 259, 

447. 
College Hall, 6. 164, 228, 238; 7. 311. 
College, King's, Cumbridge, 5. 260. 
College Library, 6. 238. 
College, Magdalen, Cambridge, 5. 200. 
College, Magdalen, Oxford. 5. 30l, 303. 
College, New, O-z/ort/, 5. 301. 
College, Queen's, Cambridge, 5. 260. 
College, Queen's, Oxford, 5. 303. 
College, St. John's, Cambridge, 5. 259 ; 6. 

123. 
College, Sidney, Cambridge, 5. 260. 
College, Trinity, Cambridge, 5. 259 ; 6. 

123. 
College, donations towards erecting a, at 

New Haven, 9. 391. 
Colleges in Cambridge, prospect of the, 

7. 378. 

Collicot, Richard, 5 xiii, 17, 144. 
Collier, Capt. John, 8. 258, 284. 
Collier, Moses, 5 25. 
Collins, Deacon Edward, 5. 85 ; 6. 207. 
Collins, Bev. John, Edinburgh, i. 40. 

Death of, 5. 201. 
Collins, Mrs. Martha, 5. 433, 462 ; 6. 9. 
Collnony, Baron of (Richard Coote), 5. 



Collucott, Mrs., 5. 354. 

Colman, Mr., Boston, 8. 547. 

Colman, Rev. Benjamin, mentioned, 3. 
324 ; 5. xxxix, 149, 507, 509 ; 6. 3, 23, 
57, 74, 94, 141, 181, 355 ; 7. 9, 12, 14, 
45, 57, 59, 120, 145, 148, 161, 338, 372, 
378. 

Colman, Mrs. Rev. Benjamin (Jane), 5. 
xxxix ; 6. 24, 282, 399 ; 7. 61, 115, 235, 
259, 275, 323. 

Colman, Mrs. Grace, 6. 342. 

Colman, John, 7. 16, 27, 250. His pamph- 
let, ' Distressed State of Town of Bos- 
ton Considered,' 7. 250. 

Colman, Lydia, 7. 262. 

Colman, Matthew, 6. 342. 

Colman, Turell's 'Life of,' 5. 507; 7. 344. 

Colman, William, 6. 842. 

Colonial policy of England, 2. 14, 17. 

Colonial Records, 5. 51, 57-59, 70, 71, 81, 
86, 87, 109, 169, 315, 324. 

Colonies, report of the Committee of 
Congress on the rights of the, 4. 348, 
349. Of New England, letter of Charles 
II. to the, 9. 54, 55 n. Continental, 
determined to die or be free, 10. 292. 
Their loyalty to the Sovereign 10. 292. 
The terms of reconciliation held out 
to, 10. 300. 

Colony, of Massachusetts, 5. 48, 49, 102, 
128, 218, 292, 446; improvement iu 
affairs of, 8. 534. Arms of the, 5. 49. 
Seal of the, 5. 49 ; 6. 138. Laws of 
the, 5. 71. Of Connecticut, urged by 
the Provincial Congress to join in de- 
fence, 10. 284, 286, 287. 

Colors, the, 5. 147 ; 6. 42, 83, 2.35. 

Colson, , constable's assistant, 6. 421 ; 

7. 293. 

Colt, Peter, 4. 79. 

Colton, Capt., 5. 381 ; 7. 101. 

Colton, Mr., express to Philadelphia, lo. 
308. 

Colton, Isaac, 4. 2.39. 

Columbia College, Xew York, 3. 130. 

Columbia, ship, 3. 231. 

' Columbian Centinel,' newspaper, 3. 15, 
19, 43, 66, 116, 133, 149, 208, 212, 233, 
239, 298, 301, 329, 342. See also Rus- 
sell, Benjamin. 

' Columbian Magazine,' 2. 451 n.,454, 459, 
461, 462, 465, 473, 474, 476, 482, 496, 
500 ; 3. 1, 13, 19, 2.3, 25-28, -52, 59, 77, 
80, 83, 88, 89, 92, 99, 105-107, 139, 142, 
149, 158, 198, 286 n., 294, 325. See also 
' Universal Asylum.' 

Columbina, 6. 271; 7.367. 

Columbus, Christopher, 3. 307. Dr. Bel- 
knap's discourse on, 3. 808, 312, 314, 
315. 317, 318, 322 ; 7. 266. 

Colve, Gov. Anthony, letter to, concern- 
ing action of Dutch forces toward the 
planters at Manhattan, 9. 93, 93 n., 
94 n. Letter to Colony of Connecticut, 
9. 95. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETVT. 



Colvill, William, 4. 08. 

Combs, Capt. Abi'l. 7. 25. 

Combs, John, 7. 'S'-jo. 

Combs, Robert, 5. 158. 

Comer, John, concerning estate of John 
White, 9. 124. 

Comer, Thomas, 6. 0. 

Comet, appearance of a, 2. .'301 ; 5. 414 ; 
6. 53 ; 8. 4(ia. 

Comets seen at Boston, 8. 389. 

Comfort, Jacob, 7. 1. 

Commencement, Harvard, 5. xiii, 15, 85, 
219, 322, 3'.)0, 450, 481 ; 6. 14*, S7, 81, 
111, 112, 133, 186, 190, 191. 193, 282, 
283, 318, 354, 390; 7. 8, 9, 21, 90, 134, 

187, 222, 258, 315, 302, 378. 
Commercial Street, 6. 409. 
Commissary's Department, 4. 78, 79, 257. 
Commissary-General, 10. 5. Concerning 

the supplies for the army, 10. 232. 

Commission, of Admiralty, 5. 139; 7. 375. 
Superseding Dudley, 5. 174. To search 
Ships, 6 50*. From King James, 6. 
105*. Of Enquiry, 6. 107*, 121*. Re- 
lating to Pirates, 6. 134. For Indian 
Affairs, 6. 142. Judge's, 6. 3-57, 358. 
From Corporation, 6. 416. Of Gov. 
Burgess, 7. 59, 05. Of King George, 7. 
375. For the Colony of Massachusetts, 
etc., 8. 459. 

Commissioner, of Impost, 6. 90 ; 7. 86. 
Of Customs, 6. 102; 9. 244. Of Propa- 
gation of Gospel Society, 6. 420; 7. 12, 
110, 278. Of Indian Society, 7. 110. 
Oath of, 9. Gl. 

Commissioners, of the United Colonies, 
I. 387 ; letter from, i. 362, 481 ; order 
of, relating to Philip's war, 9. 99. I'o 
France, expenses of, 4. 370-372 ; Mr. 
Adams's views on the number of, 4. 
370-372. To make a treaty of peace, 
appointment of, 4. 413, 414, 426, 431. 
Mentioned, 5. 77,94. 133, 139, 214, 317, 
430 ; 6. 116, 197, 219, 344, 356, 416 ; 7. 
104, 100, 192, 237, 240, 264, 278, 281, 
207. Of Oyer and Terminer, 5. 359. 
Of Cliancery, 5. 388. Of the Privy 
Seal, 6. 149. For Trades, etc., letter 
of Fitz-John Winthrop to, 8. 352, 3.59, 
361. Appointetl for town of Wickford, 
9. 59. Of Customs, projxjsal to estab- 
lish in America, 9. 220, 231, 240. 

Commissioners' Court, 5. 50. 

Commissioners' Meeting, 5. 290, 302, 370. 
379, 392, 405; 7. 20, 39, 115, 127, 152, 

188, 215, 216, 294. 

Commissions, to John Adams, as minister 
to Great Britain, 4. 378, 379; for mak- 
inga treaty of commerce with England, 
4. 379, 380 ; to negotiate a loan in Hol- 
land, 4. 382, 383 ; to make a treaty of 
commerce with Holland, 4. 385. To 
Adams, Franklin, Jay, Laurens, and 
Jefferson, to treat for peace, 4. 457-459 
To the same persons to accept the medi- 



ation of Germany and Russia, 4. 459, 
4()0. Mentioned, 5. 183, 219, 220, 231, 
317, 340, 344, 308, 389, 500; 6. 40, 46, 
58, 59, 64, 82, 84, 85, 357, 358 ; 7. 33, 
34, 39, 40, 58, 69, 70, 104, 105, 152, 334, 

Conmiittee, of Militia, 5. t)4, 55, 439; 7. 
0. Of both Houses, 6. 220. For in- 
corporating the Town, 6. 247, 248. To 
consider of Grain, 6. 402. For signing 
Bills of Credit, 7. 49. Respecting Min- 
isters, 7. 350, 357, 358. Of Congress, 
10. 178. Of Cooperation, letter of 
Gen. Washington to, concerning defi- 
ciencies in Continental battalions, 10. 
187, 194. 

Commonplace Book, S. Sewall's, 6. 12*. 

Common-prayer, 5. 150, 157, 102, 177, 
295 ; 6. 233. 

Common-prayer Book, 5. 140, 185, 454 ; 

6. 8(5* 232 ; 7. 17. 
Common Street, 7. 10, 307. 
Connnons of England, 5. 202. 
Commons Votes, 6. 160. 
Commutation of penance, i. 452. 
Comjiany's Bonds and Mortgages, 7. 334. 
Company's Books, 7. 335. 
Company's Seal, 7. 334. 

Compton, Eiitj., 5. 300. 

(Comptroller of (/'ustoms, 6. 90. 

Conant, Mr., 7. 101. 

Conant, Roger, i. 219. 

Conclin, Thomas, seized for a pirate, 8. 
348. 

' Conclusions,' paper of, by John Win- 
throp, 8. 21 n. 

Concord, Mass., i. 127, 132, 339 «. ; 5. 21, 
215, 227, 320, 418, 435 ; 6. 11*, 18* 48, 

07, 287, 347 ; 7. 88, 255, 3.-^0, 351. At- 
tack of Gen. Gage's army at, 10. 284. 

Concord Street, Boston, 6. 119. 

Condey, Capt., 5. 90. Death of, 1085, 5. 

93. 
Condey, , mariner, cast away, 1091, 5. 

348. 
Condorcet, Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas 

de Caritat, Murqnls do, 4 473. 
Cone, Daniel, held for debt of James 

Parker, 8. 44. 
Coney (Conney), j\f(idam, 7. 40. 
Coney, Anna, 7. 215. 
Coney, Capt. John, 5. 214, 232, 324, 327, 

508 ; 6. 137, 180, 249, 347, 393 ; 7. 102, 

374, 375. 
Coney, Afrs. Mary, 6. .393 ; 7. 375. 
Coney, Mrs. Sarah, 5. xxxviii ; 6. 347. 
Coney's Street or Lane, Boston, 5. 37; 6. 

210,211. 
Confederation, American, weakness of, 

2. 207. Dr. Belknap's views on the 

iTistability of government under, a. 

.309-315. Articles of, 4. 310, 361, 352, 

4!)7, 498. 
Conference, 6. 104, 105, 199,200, 241, 212, 

305. 366. 
Conference Meeting, 5. 29. 



372 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Confessions of persons accused of witch- 
craft, 5. 365. 

Conflagrations at Constantinople, 8. 11. 
The great Are in London, 8. 115. At 
Boston, 8. 4!)5. At Salem, 8. 530. 

Congregational Meeting, 6. 842. 

Congress, concerning the rank of certain 
Generals, 10. ' 1. Not recognized by 
English Commissioners, 10. 12. Appro- 
priation of, for raising troops, 10. 40. 
Petition of Connecticut for a loan, 10. 
159. A new system of finance adopted 
by, 10. 160. Act of, for a collection of 
supplies for the army, 10. 161. Plan 
for the establishment of the army, 10. 
200, 213. Resolution of, concerning 
the equipping of Dragoons in Connecti- 
cut, 10. 238. A call for $8,000,000 for 
war expenses, 10. 258, 268. 

Congress, Continental, report of commit- 
tee of, on the rights of the Colonies, 
4. 348, 349. Commissions to foreign 
countries issued by, 4. 378-380, 382, 
383, 385, 457-460. Proceedings of, on 
the question of a title for the President 
of the United States, 4. 437. Secret 
Journals of, 4. 382, 507. Journal of, 
cited, 4. 507. 

Congress of the Government, 6. 203. 

Congress Street, 6. 113, 232. 

Connecticut, i. 100, 215, 216, 240, 248, 
260-262, 394, 410-412, 445, 487, 507, 
508. Letter to the General Court, i. 
383. Churches in, i. 384 n. Patent, i. 
394. Printing of the Laws, i. 420. 
Delay in troops from, 4. 60. Recruits 
frtjm, 4. 117. Number of militia still 
expected from, 1781, 4. 219. Men- 
tioned, 5. xii, 78, 193-195, 197, 215, 315, 
317, 318, 326, 352, 459; 6. 16* 109*, 
125*, 4, 60, 65, 84, 109, 133, 135, 150, 
158, 217, 238, 318, 828, 367, 389, 432; 
7. 65, 113, 134, 146, 160, 276, 277. Law 
of, 7. 65. Apostasy in, 7. 309, 310. 
John Winthrop, Jr., sent to England 
concerning a charter for, 8. 75. Claims 
to Pequot country, 9. 3. Letter of 
Simon Bradstreet to Governor of, con- 
cerning patent for Narragansett, 9. 31. 
And Rhode Island Colonies, boundary 
of, 9. 51. Laws and Liberties recom- 
mended to people of, 9. 73, 73 ;;. Let- 
ter from the King relative to militia 
in, 9. 176. Letter from Rhode Island 
concerning boundary, 9. 196, 196 n., 
198. Parliament friendly to, 9. 235, 
238. Interview of William Samuel 
Johnson with Lord Hillsborough con- 
cerning, 9. 253, 295. Addresses from, 
sent to the King, 9. 321. Petition con- 
cerning claim to Pemisylvania lands, 
9. 453. Advantages it furnishes the 
enemy if attacked, 10. 60. Quota of 
soldiers in service, 10. 155. Bounty 
offered to her recruits, 10. 158. A call 



on, for militia, by Gen. Washington, 
10. 169. Brig.-Gen. Parsons sent to re- 
cruit in, 10. 177. 

Connecticut and Rhode Island, settling 
of the bounds between, 8. 82. Con- 
cerning the charter and government of, 
8. 301. Controversy between, 8. 367. 
A call of Massachusetts for troops 
from, 10. 311. 

Connecticut College, 7. 264. 

Connecticut Commissioners, 6. 54, 390. 

Connecticut Ferry, 5. 14. 

Connecticut Flax, 5. 453. 

Connecticut Line of the army, 4. 121, 122, 
126, 175, 177, 178. Winter-quarters of, 
1780, 4. 172. Reflections of Gen. Par- 
sons on treatment of soldiers along, 
10. 248. Pay for the troops wanted, 
10. 252. 

Connecticut River, i. 223, 234 n., 331, 
482,483; 5. 17 ; 6. 63*. 

' Connecticut,' Trumbull's, see Trum- 
bull. 

Conners (a new fish), 5. 93. 

Connonicus, lineal descent of, 9. 104. 

Constable's oath, 9. 61. 

Constables, 5. 38, 73, 125, 162, 175, 201, 
206, 214, 236, 312, 313, 341, 374; 6. 8, 
335 ; 7. 214. Fines of, 6. 304. 

Constantinoj)le, great fire at, 8. 11. The 
plague at, 8. 14. 

Constitution of the United States, influ- 
ence of Mr. Adams's ' Defence ' in the 
adoption of, 4. 332, 333. 

Continental army, enlistments into, 10. 
68-70. Concerning deficiencies in num- 
bers, 10. 194. 

Continental Congress, order concerning 
the cruise of the ' Minerva,' 10. 5. 
Resolution of, concerning the fortress 
at Ticonderoga, 10. 305. See Congress. 

Continental Line, 10. 169. 

Continental money, 4. 56. Proposal of 
Vergennes in regard to, 4. 412. 

Continental troops, repulse of, in Canada, 
10. 9. Concerning their pay, 10. 19, 
27. 

Contract, the good effects of supplying 
the army by, 10. 259. 

Contractors, dispute between, and the 
army, 4. 267, 268. 

Contribution for St. Christopher's, 6.418. 

Controversy between Connecticut and 
Rhode Island, concerning the, 8. 367. 

Conventicles, i. 452. 

Convention of Congregational Ministers, 
6. 386. 

' Convention Troops,' 4. 77, 82, 89, 91, 
102-104, 209. 

Converse, , Se7)., Wubiii'ii, 6. 62. 

Converse, Isaac, 6. 262. 

Converse, Capt. James, 5. 320, 358, 377; 
6. 75, 93*, 132. 

Conway, Secretan/, in Parliament, 9. 231. 
Resignation of, 9. 241. Retirement 



OF THE MASSACHCrSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



373 



from office, 9. 251. Mentioned, 9. 423, 
486, 508. In rarlianient, 9. 461. 

Conway, Gen. Thomas, 4. 5l'. 

Conv-hasset, 7. 184. 

Cook, , imikitper, 6. 276, 304, 305, 

340, 375 ; 7. 44, 75. 

Cook, Dr. Elislia, 8. 547, 540, 550. 

Cook, or Cooke, Jiuhje Elisha, 5. 72, 77, 
117, 118, 124, 132," 137, 139, 109, 188, 
214, 232, 208, 309, 307, 309, 378, 379, 
389, 395, 397, 398, 413, 415, 420, 435, 
443, 454, 462, 400. 474 ; 6. 8*, 21*, 2, 5, 
10, 24, 40, 40, 47, 54, 64, 78, 103, 129, 
162, 224, 225, 310 ; 7. 25, 29, 50, 59, 60, 
63, 64, 187 ; 8. 547, 549, 550. 

Cook, Mrs. Elisha ( Elizabeth), 5. 389, 
451 ; 6. 63, 64, 137, 376 ; 7. 25. 50, 53. 

Cook. Capt. James, 2. 154. 160, 273, 347 ; 

. 3. 401. Last voyage of, 2. 413. 417. 

Cook, Mrs. Richard, death of, 5. 333. 

Cooke, Capt., 6. 314. 

Cooke, Cousin, 8. 36, 43, 74. 

Cooke, Gov., 10. 19. 

Cooke, , agent, 7. 368. 

Cooke, Elisha, Jr., 5 379 ; 6. 55, 03, 179; 
7. 64, 67, 100, 102, 105, 110, 131, 141, 
151, 171, 180, 181, 183, 185, 187, 189, 
196, 210-213, 219, 220, 222, 246, 247, 
255, 258, 280, 285, 289, 308, 314. 361. 

Cooke, Mrs. Elisha, Jr. (Jane), 6. 179 ; 7. 
219, 361,366. 

Cooke, Elizabeth, 7. 79, 361. 

Cooke, Mary L., 7. 361. 

Cooke, Midillecott, 7. 352. 301. 

Cooke, Richard, i. 486, 490. 

Cooke, Thomas, 1. 99. 

Cookham Parish, Enri., 5. 301. 

Coombs, County Suffolk, En;;., 7. 231. 

Cooper, Mrs., 5. .x.xxix, 285, 444. 

Cooper, Abigail, 5. xxxix. 

Cooper, Alice G., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Jord Ashley, made Lord Chan- 
cellor of England, 8. 394. 

Cooper, Caroline P., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Caroline S., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Charles W., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Edward, 7. 379. 

Cooper, Edward, Jr., 7. 379. 

Cooper, Mrs. Edward (Abigail), 7. 370. 

Cooper, Mrs. Edward (Elizabeth), 7. 
379. 

Cooper, Elizabeth D., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Elizabeth S., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Emma E., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Enuna P., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Gabriel, 5. xxxix. 

Cooper, George. 5. xl. 

Cooper, Goodman, i. 293. 

Cooper, Mrs. Hannah, 7. 241, 268, 275. 

Cooper, Harriet C, 5. xl. 

Cooper, Helen M., 5. xl. 

Cooper, James I., 5. xl. 

Cooper, James S . 5. xl. 

Cooper, Jolm, 5. xxxix, xl. 

Cooper, John, 8. 158. 



Cooper, Deacon John, Cambrid(je, died 
1091, 5. 348. 

Cooper, John T., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Judith, or Sever, 5. xxxix, 03, 04. 

Cooper, Mary, 5. xl; 7. 379. 

Cooper, Mary E., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Mehitable, .//•., 5. xxxix ; 7. 344. 

Cooper, Mrs. Mehitable. 5. 103 ; 6. 159, 
174, 233, 354 ; 7. 4, 208. 

Cooper, Richard \V.. 5. xxxix. 

Cooper, Samuel, 5. xl. 

Cooper, Deacon Samuel, Cambridge, died 
1717, 7. 159. 

Cooper, a en. Samuel, 5. xl. 

Cooper, ^ef. Samuel, /).//, 2. 334; 4. 344; 
5. xxxix, 63, 64 ; 7. 352. 

Cooper, Samuel T., 5. xl. 

Cooper, Thomas, 5. xxxvii, xxxix, 63, 64, 
163, 374 ; 6. 174, 233. 

Cooper, Bishop Tiiomas. 6. 136. 

Cooper, Rev. William, 5. xviii, xix, xxvii, 
xxi.x, xxxvii, xxxix; 6. 62, 63, 65, 354, 
362, 384; 7. 30, 98, 113, 117, 119, 125, 
126, 139, 140, 145, 160-162, 174, 175, 
182, 187-189, 198, 208. 230-238, 241, 
243, 244, 246, 248, 250, 253-255, 263, 
265, 266, 2'J8, 269, 275, 277, 280-283, 
289, 290, 293, 296, 300, 305, 300, 311, 
312, 314, 316, 321, 324, 327, 328, 332, 
337, 339, 340-342, 344, 346, 347, 352, 

304, 366, 367, 369, 371, 372, 376, 378, 
380. 

Cooper, Mrs. William (Judith), 5. xviii, 
xxxix ; 7. 236, 237, 253, 254, 259, 203, 
268, 270, 271, 275, 276, 281, 282, 292, 

305, 324, 346, 351, 359. 302. 

Cooper, Mrs. William, Jr. (Catherine), 5. 

xxxix. 
Cooper. William. .Jr., town clerk, 5. xxxix, 

xl, 63, 64 ; 7. 158. 
Cooper, W^illiam P., 5. xl. 
Cooper, William S., 5. xl. 
Cooper's orders, i. 497. 
Co-operation, Committee of, letter of Gen. 

Washington to. 10. 173, 174, 177, 179. 
Co-OS, tiHcn, 10. 134. 
Coote, Sir Plenry, 5. 477. 
Coote, Richard, 5. 477. 
Coots, 5. 477. 
Cope, Sir Edward, 1. 495. 
Copeland, Lawrence, death of, 6. 1. 
Copeland, Rei . I'atrick, letters from, i. 

277, 350. 
Copenhagen, 5. 253. 
Coper, Rebecca, i. 28. 

Cophee, , 7. 9. 

Copley, Jolm Singleton, /?. A.^. 115. 

Copp, , WnLefield, N. II., 2. 380. 

Copp. Ann, 6. 408. 

Copp, Benjamin, 2, 388. 

Copp, Elder Davi.i, 6. 51, 137, 154, 231, 

248, 299, 407-409. 
Copp, David. Jr.. 6. 408, 
Copp, Mrs. Goorlith or Juditii, 6. 408. 
Coi)p, Joanna, 6. 408. 



374 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Copp, John, 6. 408. 

Copp, Jonathan, 6. 408. 

Copp, Lydia, 6. 4U8. 

Copp, Martha, 6. 408. 

Copp, iMis. Obedience, 6. 408. 

Copp, Ruth, 6. 4U«. 

Copp, Samuel, 6 408. 

Copp, William, 6. 408. 

Copp's Hill, 5. 38, 121, 447 ; 6. 119, 408, 
409 ; 7. 379. 

Copper, found in a piece of niarcasite, 8. 
91. Search for, in New England, 8. 
127. Specimens of, in Massachusetts, 
8. 142. 

Copperas, in New Hampshire, 2. 32. 40. 

Copyright, Connecticut law of, 2. li^'S. 

Corey, Giles, executed for witchcraft, 5 
364. 

Cork, Ireland. 6. 72. 

Corlet, WUlou; 5. 465 ; 6. 16.3, 191, 192. 

Corlet, A. R., 6. 13*. 

Corlett, Elijah, i. 409; 5. 108. 

Corman, Indian, witness to deed, 9. 34. 

Corn, destroyed by worms, 8. 109, 119, 
122. Price of, in London, 8. 30. Ex- 
portation of, from England prohibited, 
9 250. 

Cornbury, Lord, 6. 54, 56, 84, 149. 

Come, Peter, 4. 276. 

Cornhill (Street), 6. 323, 324; 7. 193, 307, 
357, 381. 

Cornil, Mr., a Qualer, 6. 265. 

Corning, Harrv, 7. 215. 

Cornish, Mr., i. 274-276. 

Cornish, Sheriff, 5. 119. 

Cornish, Richard, 5. xxii, 225, 258, 302, 

Cornish, John, 5. 423 ; 6. 426 ; 7. 18. 

Cornish, Joshua, 7. 136, 137. 

Cornish, Lydia, 5. 395. 

Cornman, of Xenecraft's kingdom, 9. 140; 
a Narragansett counsellor, 9. 158. 

Cornwall, Mr., 7. 199. 

Cornwall, Entj., 5. 71, 155, 269, 275, 276, 
299. 

Cornwallis, Gen. Charles Cornwallis, 
MarquS, 2. 102; 4 26, 214, 222, 223, 
225, 226. Surrender of, at Yorktown, 
4. 228. 

Cornwallis, Lord, with troops at North 
Carolina, 10 12. With the enemy in 
Virginia, 10. 254. Washington designs 
an attack upon. 10. 254. 

Corny, Louis Ethis de, 4. 161. 

Coronation day. 6. 101 ; 7. 109. 

Coroner, duty of a, 7. 3.30. 

Corporation bonds, 6. 29. 

Corporation for Propagating the Gospel, 
6. 122, 262, 267, 429. 

Corpressants (electric balls), 5. 2.39. 

Correspondence with French Governor, 
6 37* 47*. With the enemv, 6. 37*, 
47*. 54*. AVith Governor 'of Port 
Royal, 6. 44*, 54*. With Galleu Em- 
issary, 6. 83*. 



Corryel's Ferry, 4. 28. 

Corunna, seaport in Spain, 5. 400. 

Cor win, Capt. George, 6. 328; 7. 4, 186. 
See also Curwin. 

Corwin, Bev. George, 6. 245; 7. 2, 25. 
Death of, 171», 7. 185, 186. 

Corwin, John, 6. 327, 328 ; 7. 95. 

Corwin, Jonathan, 5. 38, 323, 352, 359, 
378, 387, 406, 426, 454 ; 6. 30*, 34, 78, 
79, 83, 130, 162, 188, 224, 225, 256, 257, 
333, 346, 348, 375, 396, 399, 425; 7. 25. 
29. 

Corwin, Mrs. Margaret, 5. 412; 6. 11*, 
327, 328 ; 7. 95. 

Corwin, Mrs. Mary S., 7. 95. 

Cosequance (Pcsacus), descended from 
Connouicus, 9. 105. 

Costume of ladies in 1782, 2. 129. 

Cosuequansh, Sachem, deed of Narragan- 
sett given bv, 9. 8, 22. 

Cotes, Mrs. INIartlia, 7. 293. 

Cotta, John, 7. 327. 

Cottingham, Mary F., 5. xxxiii. 

Cottington, Sir E., 5. 296. 

Cottington, Francis, i. 482. 

Cotton, Mr., Sandicich, 8. 567. 

Cotton, Mrs., 5. xiv, 473; 6. 137, 312, 438; 
7. 300-304, 306, 323, 369, 373. 

Cotton, Mrs. Anne, 7. 200. 266. 

Cotton, Elizabeth, 7. 5, 301. 

Cotton, Mrs. Johannah, 5. 59. 

Cotton, John, Xewton, 7. 247, 300, 304. 

Cotton, Rev. John, Boston, i. 10, 20. 39, 
124, 151, 205, 279, 352. Notice of, i. 
195 H. Letters from, i. 195, 356. 

Cotton, Rev. John, Plymouth Co., 2. 16, 
88, 95 ; 5. 59-61, 65, 67, 84, 95, 259, 324, 
460, 461, 472, 473, 503 ; 6. 11, 12, 137, 
210, 381, 430 ; 7. 62, 306, 322, 329, 340, 
3-52, 367, 373. Death of, in Carolina, 8. 
563. 

Cotton, Rev. John, Hampton, 5. 233 ; 6. 
137, 276-278, 301. 

Cotton, Mrs. Rev. John (Mary), 7. .300. 

Cotton, Hon. Josiah, 3. 326; 5. 475; 6. 

276, 277; 7-44. 
Cotton, Mary, 7. .300, 351. 
Cotton, Nathaniel, 7. 261. 

Cotton, Rev. Rowland, 6. 212, 213, 267, 

277, 398, 430, 431, 438, 439; 7. 131, 209, 
2.38, 305, 377. His Sermon, 6. 431. 

Cotton, Mrs. Rev. Rowland (Elizabeth), 

7. 377. 
Cotton, Seaborn, 5. 59, 134 ; 7. 1, 5. 
Cotton, Tlieophilus, 7. 288. 
Cotton, Rev. Thomas, 5. 105 ; 7. 238, 

32.5. 
Cotton, Mrs. Rev. Tliomas (Bridget), 7. 

325. 
Cotton, William, witness to deed, 9. 35, 

36. 
Cotton Hill, 5. 62, 63, 150, 207, 377, 462, 

481, 486, 500, 508 ; 6. 22, 76 ; 7. 157. 
Cotton House. 5. 62, 63, 494. 
Council (EngUsh), 5. 254, 270. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



375 



Council, The, 5. 70, 78, 83, 102, 131, 1G2, 
163, 160, 170, ISO, 193, 199, "JOl, 477, 480, 
487, 489, 493, 495-498, 500, 504; 6. 30*, 
30*, 44*, 50*, 51*, 82*, 83* 91*-94*, 
2-5, 7, 16, 20, 24, 33, 3G, 40, 41. 44-46, 
63, 54, 56-00, 60, 393, 401, 404, 400, 
412-415, 417, 422, 424. 425, 427 ; 7. 5, 
7, 8, 10, 12, 14, 15, 18. 20, 21, 23, 24, 28, 
30, 33, 310-318, 340, 349, 350, 354, 358, 
359, 302, 304, 369, 381. 

Council Board, 6. 81*, 335. 

Council Clianiber, 5. 161, 373. .389, 403, 
458; 6. 95* 112*. 114*, 128* 79, 91, 
121, 123, 147 ; 7. 20, 22, .35, 43, 84. 87, 
109, 147, 166, 212, 217, 277, 294, 298, 
314, 339, .360, 308. 

Council Daj', 5. 388 ; 6. 217, 349. 

Council at Hartford, letter of Fitz-John 
Winthrop to, 8. 372. 

Council, of State, petition of the mer- 
chant adventurers of Plymouth to, i. 
499. Records, 5. 142, 315, 360; 6. 34, 
103, 188, 203, 319 ; 7. 66, 70, 89, 92, 94, 
118, 188. Of Churches, 5. 352, 399, 
460 ; 6. 21*, 23*, 156 ; 7. 76, 344. Of 
Orleans, 6. 123*. Of War, 6. 127*, 285. 
Of Safety, 7. 42, 74; of Connecticut, 
10. 20, 121. Of Constance, 7. 154. Of 
Massachusetts concerning pirates, 8. 
549. Plymouth, deed of lands to, 9. 
187. 

Councillors, 5. 161, 162, 174, 223, 398, 
407; 6. 102*, 104*, 110*, 113*-115*, 
117*, 121*, 124*, 125*, 3, 34, 255, 288, 
294, 297, 357. List of, 6. 188. 

Counterfeit money, the passing of, 10. 55. 

Counterfeit notes or bills, 7. 307, 327, 
339. 

Counterfeiter, 7. 210. 

Counterfeiting bills of credit, 7 276, 307. 

Counterfeiting in England, 7. 277. 

County Court, 5. 8;5-S7, 99-102, 104, 111, 
112, 128, 133, 176, 415. Of Connecti- 
cut, meeting of, 8. 3u8. 

Court, held at Fairfield to settle estate of 
John White, 9. 1-38. Cost of holding, 
to settle estate of John White, 9. 139. 
Appointed to be held by President and 
Council of Massachusetts, 9. 152. Ap- 
pointed to be held at Narragansett 
country, oath of office, duties, etc., 9. 
153-157. Duties of, concerning the 
militia, 9. 1.5G. 

Court Chamber, 7. 129, 1-30, 284. 

Court-house, 5 202. 

Court-martial, 6. 129*. 

Court of Admiralty in Massachusetts, 8. 
562. 

Court of Aldermen, 8. 32. 

Court of Appeals, 6. 47. 

Court of Assistant Jurymen, 5 92. 

Court of Assistants, 5."ll7, 129, 151, 354, 
357, 360. 

Court of Assize, 6. 24. 

Court of Chancery, 5. 71, 118, 174. 



Court of Claims, letter of Fitz-John Win- 
throp for. concerning the Narragansett 
conntry, 8. 292. 

Court of Common Pleas, 5. xl ; 6. 304 ; 
7, 200, 240. 

Court of Delegates, 7. 22-3, 226. 

Court of Faculties, 7. 360. 

Court of Inquiry, 6. 103. 

Court of P4eas, 8. 481. 

Court of Vice-Admiralty, 6. 55*. 

Court of Wards, London, 8. 3. 

Court Street, Boston, 5. 60-63, 75, 202 ; 
6. 417 ; 7. 82. 

Courtemaruh, Capt., 6. 134. 

Courts of Justice, 5. I6l, 439; 6. 118*. 
Suspension of, in Massachusetts, 4. 302, 
306-308. 

Cousins's Island, 7. 334. 

Covent Garden, London, 5. 248 ; 7. 151. 

Coventry, Thomas, i. 482. 

Coventry. Conn., 10. 93. 

Coventry, Enrj., 5. xi, xv-xviil, 2-35. 250, 
262, 304, 307, 31-5. Mayor of, 5. xi, 
xvi, xvii. Inundation at, 5. 484. 

Coventry, Mass., 7. 101, 195, 197. 

Coventry Street, Sevvall's Elm Pasture, 
5-73. 

Coward, William, 5. 309, 310. 

Cowel, Edward, 5. 121, 122, 349; 6. 53. 

Co well, Nurse (Hannah), 5. 397,442; 6. 
51,410. 

Cowell, Joseph, 5. 194, 317. Concerning 
a horse for, 8. 411. 412. 

Cowell, Thomas, 7. 340. 

Cowell, William, 6. 189. 

Cowell's Corner, 5. 73. 

Cowell's Lane, 5. 73, 75. 

Cowes, Enrj., 5. 340, 465, 480 ; 7. 104. 

Coweset, 8. 541. 

Coweset Cove, 6. 169. 

Cowesick, or Cowstick, 6. 61*, 84*. 

Cowper, William, letter of Fitz-John Win- 
throp to, 8. 355, 355 n. 

Cox, Capt., I. 278. 

Cox, Rer. Henry, Enrjlund, 5. xil, 18, 71, 
204. 

Cox, Thomas, 6. 102. 

Coxe, Tench, 3. 190. 

Coxwell, ^fr., i. 250, 251". 

Coy, Matthew, Qnalmgae, 8. 569. 

Coytmore, Mr., 8. 36. 

Coytmore, Mrs. Thomas, fowih icife of 
John Win'l'rop,Z. 199 «. 

Cozen, Jamt ,- 8. 4. 

Crab, Robert, i. 201. 

Crabtreo, Mrs. Alice, 5. 355. 

Crabtrce, Benjamin, 5. .355. 

Crabtree, Francis, 5. 355. 

Crabtree, John, /o/nrr, died 1656, 5. 355. 

Crabtrce, Jolm, signs letters in 1072,9.37. 

Cradock, George, 6. 40 ; 7. 337. 

Cradock, Our. Matthew, i. 484. Illness 
of, 8. 28. Speculates in Indian wheat, 
8. 31. 

Craflord, Mr., 5. 284. 



376 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Cragg, Mr., 5. 2L 

Craigliead, Rev. Thomas, 7. 22, 28, 45. 

Craigie, David, 7. 95, 208. 

Craigie, Mrs. David (Elizabeth), 7. 95. 

Craigie, J/rs. Deborah, 7. 20». 

Craigie, Jolin, 7. 208. 

Craigie, Nathaniel, 7. 208. 

Craigie, William, 7. 208. 

Crandall, Joseph, warrant to, g. 201. 

Crane, Mr., concerning farm at Blue 
Hills, 5. 199. 

Crane, Ensign, i. 449. 

Crane, Lady Dorothy, ivife of Sir Robert, 
I. 176 n. 

Crane, Mis. Dorotliy, n-ife of Richard, 
letter of, i. 87. 

Crane, Ebenezer, 5. 290. 

Crane, Mrs. Elizabeth, 5. 290. 

Crane, Henry, 5. 290. 

Crane, Col. John, 4. 157, 158, 192, 251, 255. 
With artillery at New York, 10. 255. 

Crane, Mary, i. 87. 

Crane, Richard, 1. 87 n. Letter from, i. 
291. Letter to, i. 87. His wife, i. 
291 n. 

Crane, Sir Robert, i. 180. Letter from, 
I. 176. 

Crane, Ladi/ Susan, wife of Sir Robert, i. 
176 n. 

Crane Neck, 6. 17*. 

Crane's Plain, 5. 336, 366. 

Cranfield, Edward, Governor of New 
Hampshire, 2. 3, 14 ; 5. 50, 82 ;' 8. 430. 
Departure for Barbadoes, 8. 453. Con- 
cerning grievances of Narragansett 
Conipany, 9. 111«. Appointed Com- 
missioner, 9. 184. 

Cranston, John, witness to deed, 9. 23. 

Cranston, Samuel, Governor of Rhode 
Island, 6. 41, 168. Warrant to Joseph 
Crandall, 9. 201. 

Cratey, , mariner, 5 213. 

Craucreeco signs testimony, 9. 121, 122. 

Craven, Eai-I of 5. 192. 

Craven, Madam, 5. 192, 209. 

Craven, Sir Thomas, 5. 192. 

Craven, Sir William, 5. 192. 

Crease, , 6. 226, 373. 

Cree Church, England, 5. 258. 

Creedy, Eng., 6. 188. 

Creek, Cornelius, 5. 346. 

Creek Indians, 6. 439. 

Crevocoeur, Hector St. John. 2. 493. 

Crick, Serrieant, at artillery election, 5. 78. 

Crimble Passage, Emj., 5. 276, 277. 

Crines, Mrs., 5. 159. 

Crisp, Richard, 5. 349 ; 7. 381 ; 8. 445. 

Crisp, Mrs. Riciiard (Sarah), 7. 381. 

Crisp, Sarah, wife of Dr. John Clark, 7. 
181. 

Crispe, Nicholas, i. 74 n. 

Christophers, Richard, 7. 195. 

Christophers, Mrs. R. (Elizabeth), 7. 195. 

Croakliam, John, 6. 332. 

Crocker, Capt., 6. 372 ; 7. 128, 353, 359. 



Crofts, Capt., 6. 57, 70. 

Crominelin, Amsterdam, 4. 392. 

Crompton's Inn, Ipswich, AJuss., 6. 30, 31, 
61 ; 7. S3. 

Cromwell, Mrs. Anna, 6. 48. 

Cromwell, Sir Henry, i. 212 n. 

Cromwell, Joanna, see Barrington, Mrs. 

Cromwell, Oliver, 2. 464; 5. 104, 170, 437; 
7. 52, 225. 429. INIade Lord General of 
the English, 8. 211, 251. Design into 
the West Indies, 8. 216. De'sire of 
Parliament to make him king, 8. 217. 
Victories in Ireland, 8. 227. 

Cromwell, Capt. Thomas, 6. 48 ; 8. 225. 

Crooked Lane, 5. 210, 341. 

Cropcr, Mr., Em/land, 5. 261. 

Crosby, Dr. Ebenezer, 3. 51, 53. 

Crosby, Joseph, 6. 47. 

Cross Highway, 6. 309. 

Cross in Baptism, 5. 207, 507 ; 6. 49 ; 7. 
195, 298. 

Cross-Keys Inn, Cripplegate, London, 6. 78. 

Cross on the Colors, 5. 147, 148. 

Cross Street, 6. 211, 212. 

Cross, the bawdy bloody, 6. 356. 

Crosses in hats, 6. 159. 

Crossman, Mr., England, 5. 264, 267 ; 6. 
263. 

Crouch, Rev. Mr., Emjland, 5. 267. 

Crow, Capt , 5. 503 ; 6. 32, 41. 

Crown Coffee House, 7. 110, 111. 

Crown of England, 6. 89*, 91*, 93*. 

Crown Point, advance of the Briti.-^li to, 
10. 85. Concerning cannon at, 10. 303. 

Crowne, Col, i. 394. 

Crowninshield, Edward A., 5. 108. 

Crumb, Daniel, disturber of the peace, 9. 
202. 

Crump, Thomas, 6. 336. 

Crumphorne, Thomas, i. 501. 

Crumpond, a village in New York, 10. 
213, 213 n. 

Cruso, Rev. Timothy, 5. 464. 

Crute, John, i. 501 

Crute, Richard, 1. 501. 

Cuba, 5. 348. 

Cubitt, Joseph, i. 501. 

' Culheag,' a log trap, 2. 392. 

Cullecke (CuUick), Elizabeth, wife of 
John, I. 419; 9. 18. 

CuUick, Capt. John, i. 387, 419. Men- 
tioned in will of Edward Hopkins, 9. 
18. Receives legacy from Edward 
Hopkins, 9. 20. Mentioned, 9. 25. 

Culliford, Capt., Stamford, 8. 360. 

Cullimer, Capt. Anthonv, drowned, 5. 387. 

Culliver, Capt. John, 6.' 222. 

Culi^epper, Lord, Governor of Virginia, 
5. 49; 8. 42-3. Interested in tlie grie- 
vances of Narrag.ansett Conipany, 9. 
Ill n. 

Cumberland, Henry Frederick, Duke of, 
3. 383. 

Cumberland County, Enq., 6 .328; 7. 7(. 

Cumby, Robert, 5. 169 ; 6. 280. 



I 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



577 



Cumings, Archibald, death of, 7. 381. 
Cummings, Saruli, 5. xxvii ; 7. ol, 40. 
Cunable, John, 5. 413; 7. 12, 18. 
Cunable, Kobert. 6. D 

Ciind)', , C'<//(^ Foi/'s mate, 8. 424. 

Death of, 8. 454. 
Curaooa, 6. 7. 
Curasso, 6. 384. 
Curen, Mr. and ^frs., i. 10-3. 
Cures by touching, i. 404 it seq. 
Curlers "^Lake (Lake Chaniplain), 8. 310, 

315. 
Currency, the endeavors of the enemy 

concerning, 10. 203. 
Currier, Mr., 8. 387. 

Curtice, Rev. Mr., death of, at Charles- 
town, 6. 11, 12 
Curtis, , mariner, 5. 229, 231, 484; 6. 

14. 
Curtis, Joseph, recorder, 9 120. 
Curtis, Major William, 4. 86. 
Curtys, John, 6. 50*, 51*. 
Curwen, John, i. 55. 
Curwen, Susanna, 7. 337. 
Curwin, Mrs. Elizabeth, 6. 113. 
Curwin, Mrs. Ellis, married, 8. 150. 
Curwin, George, 8. 2i50, 262, 263, 451 n., 

463. Illness of, 8. 449. Death of, 8. 

451. 
Curwin, Mrs. George (Mehitable), 7. 150. 
Curwin, Rev. George, 7. 150, 155. His 

Journal, 7. 150. 
Curwin, Hannah, 7. 74. 
Curwin, Hannah, 8. 567. 
Curwin, John, death of, g. 112 ;j. 
Curwin, Mrs. John, mentioned, 9. 160. 
Curwin, Jonathan, 6. 113 ; 7. 56, 57, 92. 
Curwin, Lisse, sickness of, 8. 481. 
Curwin, Mrs. Margaret, 8. 435, 484, 526, 

541, 568. A daugliter born to, 8. 391, 

421. Illness of, 8. 408, 429, 454. 559. 

Family of, sick with small-pox, 8. 494. 
Curwin, Moll, illness of, 8. 558. 
Curwin, Pegge, 8. 494. 
Curwin, Samuel, 7. 150; 8. 521. Death 

of, 8. 539. 
Curwins, Mr., i. 38. 
Cashing, Col. Thomas, 6. 303 ; 7. 168, 234, 

313. 
Cushing, Mrs., 7. 183. 
Cushing, Caleb, 6. 27. 
Cushing, Justice Daniel, Ilinnham, death 

of, 6. 27. 
Cushing, Edmund L., 6. 27. 
Cushing, Jeremiah, Sritmite, 6. 156. 
Cushing, Rev. Jeremiali, 5. 486. 
Cushing, Rev. Job, 7. 227. 
Cushinjg, John, 6. 30*, 27, 188, 224, 225, 

427. 
Cushing, Capt. Joshua, 6. 340, 341, 375 ; 

7. 37, 39, 67, 121, 158, 168. 
Cushing, Luther S., 6. 27. 
Cushing, Lydia, 6. 270. 
Cushing, Matthew, 6. 27. 
Cushing, Nathan, 6 27. 



Cushing, Thomas, patriot, 4. 40, 320, 340 

477, 478. 
Cushing, William. 6. 27. 
Cushing's (Tiicoi)hilus) Inn, 5. 473; 6. 
9, 29, 42, 75, 97 ; 7. 45, 128, 129, 183, 
219, 251. 
Cushman, Mr., 7. 44. 
Cushman, Mrs., Pli/mouth, 5. 450. 
Cushman, Robert, his sermon at Ply- 
mouth, 2. 93 «. 
Cushman, Elder Thomas, 2. 93 «. 
Cushnet, 6. 107. 
Ciist, 6Vr John, Spiakrr in Parliament, 9. 

276. Death of, 9, 408. 
Custom House, 6. 53*, 120*, 125*, 90. 
Custom-house fees, act passed concern- 
ing, 9. 438. 
Custom-house officers, concerning writs 

of assistance to, 9. 202. 
Cutler, Cafjt. and Major John, 6. 67, 221. 
Cutler, Dr., 7. 13, 14, 71, 143, 146, 295, 

326, 349. 
Cutler, Widow, Charlestoicn, 6. 1. 
Cutler, Benjamin, Enqland, 5. 301. 
Cutler, John, 5. 380; 6. 302; 7. 73. 
Cutler, Rev. Manasseh, 2. 385, 386, 391, 
395, 397, 405, 408, 411, 412, 419, 425, 
428, 442, 483. 484, 480-488, 490, 495, 
496; 3. 45, 53, 57, 61, 82, 170, 171, 
176, 183, 186, 187, 189, 214, 215, 217, 
282, 288. His removal to Ohio, 2. 
430. 
Cutler, Mrs. Mary, 7. 150, 218. 
Cutler, Peter, 7. 295. 
Cutler, J//-S. Ruth, 7. 142,218. 
Cutler, Rev. Timothy, President of Yale, 

7. 11, 222, 264, 266, 268, 309. 
Cutt, Bridget, 7. 2. 
Cutt, John, I. 501. 
Cutt, Richard, 7. 2. 
Cutting, Cousin, 7. 153. 
Cutting, John, i. 88 «., 285. 
Cutting, Mrs. Mary, letter from, 1. 88. 
Cutts, Mr., 7. 55. 
Cutts, John, 5. 90. 
Cutts, Robert, 8. 60, 149. 
Cuyler, Col., mentioned, 10. 316. 



D. 



Dafforn, Mrs., 7. 70, 340. 
Daffy's & Bullivant's elixirs. 8. 446. 
Dagget, J//.S- , Attlehoroufjh, 6. 438. 
Dagget, , innkeeper, Attlelorough, 6. 

396, 397. 
Daggett, Capt., Boston, 1787, 2. 479. 
Daille, Rev. Pierre, 5. 491 ; 6. 153, 407; 

7. 45. 
D'Ailly, Cardinal Pierre, 7. 154. 
Daking, see Dorking. 
Dallas, Alexander James, 2. 485, 489-491, 

497 ; 3. 27, 35, 86, 138. 



378 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Dallavar, Joseph, name signed to deed, 
9.7L 

Dally, Elizabeth and Patience, receive 
legacy from Edward Hopkins, 9 20. 

Dally, Henrjs receives legacy from Ed- 
ward Hopkins, and made executor of 
will of, 9. 21. 

Dalton (Daulton), Rev. Timothy, i. 334, 
335. 

Dalton, Tristam, 3. 6. 

Damaris (^ove, 7. 864. 

Damariscotta River, 7. 364. 

Damon, Eliza, 5. 157. 

Dana, Father, 5. 316. 

Dana, Chief Justice, 6. 144. 

Dana, Francis, LL.L)., 3. 6, 8, 9, 376, 377 ; 

4. 296, 439, 454, 455. Mrs. Warren's 
estimate of, 4. 440. Refusal of the 
Empress of Russia to receive him, 4. 
440-444. His treatment in Russia. 4. 
444, 445. His qualifications for diplo- 
matic position, 4. 446, 447. 

Dana, Ricliard, 6. 234. 

Dana's Brook, 6. 234. 

Danbury, Conn., a skirmish with the 
British at, 10. 59. Depredations of the 
British at, 10. 63. Exchanging the 
prisoners taken at, 10. 73. Troops to 
be stationed at, 10. 148. The regi- 
ments of militia to assemble at, 10. 16'J. 
A town in Connecticut, 10. 252. 

Dancing-school, 5. 112. 

Daney, Anne, 6. 234. 

Daney, Elias, 6. 234. 

Danford, , innkeeper, 5. 492 ; 6. 199. 

Danford, Eliezer, 5. 48. 

Daiiforth, Abiel, 6. 411 ; 7. 364. 

Danforth, Ebenezer, 5. 54. 

Danforth, Elijah, 7. 169, 189. 

Danforth, Elizabeth, wife of Francis Fox- 
a-oft, 7. 289. 

Danforth, Rei: John, Z)o?T/(es<er, letter of, 
I. 446. Mentioned, 5. 104, 117, 162, 232, 
311, 332, 348, 378, 379, 387, 409, 411, 
412, 415, 426, 436, 438, 451, 454, 459, 
496 ; 6. 93, 166, 167, 178, 188, 209, 233, 
264, 306, 368, 412; 7. 14, 89, 90, 115, 
179, 205, 232. 

Danforth, Mrs. Rev. John (Elizabeth), 5. 
163, 348, 411 ; 6. 233. 

Danforth, Jonathan, died 1682, i. 433; 6. 
20*. 

Danforth, Mary, icife of Samuel Phipps, 

5. 204. 

Danforth, Marv, wife of Edward Brom- 
Jield, 7. 99, 3ti4. 

Danforth, Mary, v'lfe of Thomas, Cam- 
bridge, death of. 5. 450. 

Danforth, Meiiitable, 6. 233. 

Danforth, Nicholas, Cambridge, 1. 447 ; 5. 
419. 

Danforth, Samuel, Taunton, 6. 346 ; 7. 
45. 

Danforth, Rev. Samuel, Roxbury, i. 440; 
3. 66; 5. 4, 6, 39, 115, 155, 171, 178. 228; 



6. 368, 374, 411 ; 7. 98, 364. Minister 

of Roxbury, 8. 121. 
Danforth, Justice Thomas, Cambridge, i. 

409, 424. Notice of, i. 409 n. 'Men- 
tioned, 5. 48, 66, 67, 77, 132, 370, 371, 

378, 387, 426, 454, 478, 496, 504, 505 ; 

6. 8* 14* 1, 198 ; 8. 384, 391, 538, 

659. Deatii of, 8. 504. 
Danforth, Mis. Thomas, 5. 67. 
Danfortli, Got: Thomas, 7. 289. 
Daniel, Indian, 7. 104. 
Daniel, Simon, 7. 245. 
Daniel, Mrs. Simon (Jane), 7. 245. 
Daniel, Thomas, 7. 2, 120. 
Daniels, Ehsha, 4. 115. 
Danvers, 5. xxxii : 7. 68. 
Darby, , 6. 107, 319. Concerning a 

horse for, 8. 475. 
Darby, Major Samuel, 4. 182, 183. 
Darcy, Brian, i. 83 ?i. 
Darcy, John, i. 83 n. 
Darien Scheme, 5. 496. 
Dark day in Canada, 2. 425. In New 

England, 2. 52-55, 58. 
Darley, Henry, i. 482, 483. 
Darly, Dr., i. 303. 

Darrell, , 7. 326. 

Dartford, town, 5. 247. 

Dartmouth, Lord, 6. 228. 

Dartmouth, Eng., 5. 130, 268, 269 ; 10. 

36. 
Dartmouth College, 2. 47. Education at, 

3. 40-43. 
Dartmouth, frigate, 5. 151. 
Darwall, William, 8. 406. 
Dashwood, Sir S., 5. 255. 
Dassett, John, 5. 75. 
Dassett, Mrs. Martha, 7. 324. 
Dassitt, Joseph, 5. 1, 380. 
Dastom, Mr., 6. 236. 
Dastorme, Mrs., 7. 241. 
Dauche, Mr., England, 5. 252. 
D'Aulnay, Charles de Menou, i. 158. 
Dauphin of France, 5. 506 ; 6. 315, 

374. Celebration of the birth of, 4. 

201. 

Dauson, , 5. 250, 252, 301, 302. 

Dauson, George, attorney on estate of 

John White, 9. 124. 
Dauson, Thoma, 5. 303. 
Davenant, Bishop, 5. 296. 
Davenport, Col., Stamford, mentioned, 9. 

391. 
Davenport, Mrs., concerning her house, 

8. 416. 
Davenport, Judge Addington, 5. 181 ; 6. 

242, 303, 308, 402 ; 7. 20, 23, 35, 36, 5Vi, 

70, 73, 100, 121, 124, 169, 170, 185, 189, 

195, 214, 220, 223. 244, 247, 248, 259, 

276, 287, 310, 315, 340, 358, 359, 362, 

368, 369, 376, 380. 
Davenport, Addington, Jr., 5. xxviii, 

xxxvii, xxxviii ; 7. 342. 
Davenport, J/?-s. A., Jr. (Jane), 5. xxxvii, 

xxxviii. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



370 



Davenport, Bridget, 5. 40. 

Davenport, Elizabeth, 5. xxxviii. 

Davenport, Caiit. Humphrey, 8. 397. 

Davenport, Jane, 5. xx.wiii. 

Davenport, Joiui, 7. 344, 355, 379. 

Davenport. Ilvo. Jolni, i. L'18, 319, 352, 
374 n. ; 5. 147 ; 8. iS'l. Trustee of will 
of Edward Hopkins, 9. 19. Receives 
legacy from liim, 9. 20. Memorial for 
erection of a college, 9. 390. 

Davenport, Cajd. Nathaniel, killed, 9 97. 

Davenport, Mrs. (Uebecca Addington), 
mother of Judge Addington Davenport, 7. 
13, 213," 355. 

Davenport, Richard, letters from, i. 244, 
248. Notice of, i. 248 n. Mentioned, 
8. 53. Letter to Gov. Winthrop of 
JIassachusetts, 9. 1, \n. 

Davenport, Miss Truecross, i. 244 n. 

Daves, George, i. 474. 

David, 6\ S.'s servant, 6. Ill, 121, 151; 

7. 20, 24, 136, 13.1 
D.ivie, Ladi/,6. 193. 

Davie, Gen. Sir H. R. R, 6. 18S. 
Davie, Humphrey, 5. 48, 61, 77, 91, 95, 
117, 129, 132, 137, 143, 171, 174; 6. 188; 

8. 405. 

Davie, John, 5. 184. 

Davie, .SVr John, 6. 188. 

Davie, Sir William, 6. 188. 

Davies, Henry E., 5 xxxv. 

Davies, Rev. Samuel, 2. 8, 10, 12. 'Life 

of,' by David Bostwick, 2. 10. 'Life 

of,' by Dr. Gibbons, 2. 12. 
Davis, Capt., brings news of Mr. Salton- 

stall's marriage, 1699, 8. 554. 
Davis, Capt., death of, 1676, 5. 13. 
Davis, Dr., 7. 153. 
Davis, Hon. Jud<;e, 5. 62. 
Davis, Major, death of, 1704, 6. 118. 
Davis, Mrs., death of, 1690, 5. 329. 
Davis, JVurse, 5. xxvii. 
Davis, Amasa, captain in ami'/, 1732, 4. 

239. 
Davis, Capt. and Col. Benjamin, raer- 

cliant of Boston, i. 432 ; 5. 29, 92, 94, 

95, 143, 158, 1G2, 161, 1G8, 171, 190,207, 

236, 328, 335, 386, 442, 443 ; 6. 105, 237. 

322, 396 ; 7. 19, 193, 227 ; 8. 44, 447, 

448. 
Davis, Benjamin, chairmaher, 7. 52. 
Davis, Ebeu, 6. 145. 
Davis, Capt. Edward, wrecked, 1791, 3. 

257. 
Davis, Mrs. Elizabeth, 7. 207. 
Davis, Widoiv E!izai)eth, 6. 257. 
Davis, Hannah, 6. 46 
Davis, James, 5. 60, 328. 
Davis, John, Mr. IVooilcoct's man, i. 65, 

217, 486. 
Davis, John, death of, 5. 182. 
Davis, John, master of sloop ' Success,' 6. 

439, 440. 
Davis, John, Lf^.D., 3. 326, 357-359, 367, 

368. His edition of Cushman's Ser- 



mon, 2. 93 n. His edition of Morton's 
Memorial cited, 2. 445 n. 

Davis, Joseph, 5. 34, 202, 208. 

Davis, Joshua, 6 114. 

Davis, Mrs. Mary, death of, 1G81, 6. 13*; 
7.4. 

Davis, Capt. Nicholas, baptized, 7. 309. 

Davis, Robert, captain of miUlury, 1778, 
4.88. 

Davis, Sarah, 5. xxvii. 

Davis, Silvanus, 5 378; 6. 16*. 

Davis, Simon, 7. 115. 

Davis, Thomas, 7. 440. 

Davis, Tobias, 6. 47 

Davis, William, 1.432; 6. 180. 

Davis, Lient. William, 4 99. 

Davis, Mrs. William, 1706, 6. 180, 203. 

Davison, />?•., i. 150. 

Davison, Major Daniel, 6. 14, 38, 01, 124, 
161. 

Davison, Nicholas, 7. 2. 

Dawes, Hon. Thomas, 3. 234 n. 

Dawes, Major Thomas, 4. 70. 

Daws, Ambrose, 5. 214 ; 6. 142. 

Daws, Father, 5. 401, 417. 

Daws, William, death of, 7. 96. 

Day, Mr.. 8. 463. 

Day, Sir James, 4. 152. 

Day, Capt. Luke, 2. 455, 450; 4. 278, 282. 

Day, Stei)hon, letter from, i. 364. 

Day, William, i. 364. 

Dayton, Gen. Elias, 4. 279. 

Dayton, Capt. Jonathan, 3. 3, 4, 67. 

Deacon, Mr., i. 126. 

Deacon, Goodicife, death of, 5. 337. 

Deafness, proposed cure for, 2. 295-297, 
349. 

Dean, Nathaniel, 7. 277. 

Dean, Capt. Richard, decides certain 
boundary, 9. 51. 

Dean, Kobinson, 6. 16*. 

Dean, Thomas, 5. 30, 32, 72, 73. 

Dean, William, 6. 47. 

Deane, Ann, i. 112. 

Deane, Antony, i. 234 n. 

Deane, Charles, i. 353 n. 

Deane, Elizabeth, see Tyndale, ^Frs. 

Deane (Deans), Sir John, 8 231 n. 

Deane, Capt. Richard, appointed to settle 
bounds between Rhode Island and Con- 
necticut, 8. 82, 83, 143. 

Deane, Silas, 4. 49, 57, 366, 307, 390, 408, 
413, 428, 431 >, 440. His expenses in 
France, 4. 37 J . 

Deane, Thomas, 5. GO. 

Deane, Capt. William, and others ap- 
pointed assistants, i. 474. 

Dearborn, CV//><., a prisoner of war, 10. 
32, 32 H., 45. 

Debert, Mr., Enrjland, 9 213. 

De Borre, Chevalier Prudhomme, 4. 49. 

De Chafeau, Capt., 6. 116*. 

Declaration, of Independence, when 
signed, 4. 505. Gov. McKean's ac- 
count of the passage of the, 4. 507. 



380 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



By Court of Massachusetts, 5. 15. Of 
Indulgence, 5. 186. Of War, 5. 255. 
By Governor, relating to Winchester 
and Trowbridge Affair, 6. 151, 152. 
Against transubstantiation, 6. 312, 
357, 3G5. Of Wait Winthrop and oth- 
ers, concerning public tranquillity, 8. 
491. 
De Clodore, Jean, Governor of Martinique, 

at the invasion of Antigua, 8. 257. 
De Corny, Louis Dominique Ethis, in 
charge of supplies for the French 
army, 10. 170, 170". 
Dedham, 5. 15, 96, 387 ; 6. 415. 

Dedimus, 6. 312 ; 7. 46, 183. 

Dedington, town, 5. 304. 

Deed of Gift, Mrs. Norton's, 5. 334. 

Deed, of Narragansett land to John Win- 
throp, 9. 8, 22. Mortgage, of Narra- 
gansett sachems, 9. 25. Of Narragan- 
sett, given by Scuttub, 9. 34. Con- 
firmation of Narragansett lands, 9. 70, 
74, 75, 82. Between John ISIason and 
Uncas et al., 9. 79. Of the Sascoe 
Indians to town of Fairfield, 9. 108. 
Of Narragansett land to Marquis of 
Hamilton, 9. 187. 

Deen, Mr., i. 6. 

Deer, shooting of, by Niantic Indians, 8. 
39. For Fisher's Island, 8. 536. 

Deer Island, 5. 223, 231, 316, 499 ; 7. 00. 

Deerfield, or Dearfield, or Derefield, 6. 
39* 46*, 63*, 64* 84* 96, 127, 332, 
374 ; 7. 12 ; 8. 530. Descent on, 6. 63*, 
64*. Fight at, 7. 100. 

Deering, Henry, 7. 147. 

Deering, il/rs. Henry, 7. 147. 

Deffores, Mrs., 7. 87. 

DeFoe, ,5. 156; 6.97. 

De Frouw, the, a Dutch ship, 9. 30 n. 

Degaloon, ^frs., 7. 368. 

De Gray, Mr., Chief Justice, 9. 473. 

De la Lande & Fvnje, Messrs., French 
bankers, 4. 392, 416. 

De Lancey Family, 3. 168. 

Delancey, Goi. Oliver, 4. 9, 38, 183. 

Delaplace, Capt., a prisoner of war, 10. 45. 

De las Casas, Don Bartholemew, 6. 13. 

Delavall, Copt., 8. 115. 

De Lolme, John Louis, 4. 324. 

Demarara, 5. xxxix. 

Demincas, , a messenger, 8. 413. 

Dcming, David, 6. 133, 140, 155, 178, 356 ; 
7. 12, 50, 162, 215, 278, 354. 

Deming, Mrs. David (Mary), 6. 51, 178; 
7. 354. 

Deming, Mrs. Hannah, 7. 354. 

Deming, Mrs. Honour, 7. 354. 

Deming, Jane, 7. 354. 

Deming, John, 7. 3-54. 

Deming, Joseph, 7. 354. 

Deming, Samuel, 7. 354. 

Democracy, 2. 359, 360, 371. 

' Democritus,' of Exeter, N. H., 2. 43, 46, 
446 n. 



Den, Mr., 5. 7. 
Denbigh, Lord, 9. 465. 
Denison, Major Daniel, 5. 48 ; 6. 12*. 
Letter to John Wintlirop in behalf of 
Atherton Proprietors, 9. 27. Letter 
signed by, 9. 29, 32. Mentioned, g. 54. 
A Narragansett proprietor, g. 98, 111. 
Denison, Cajtt. George, death of, 8. 502. 
Letter signed by, 9. 29, 32, 37. A Nar- 
ragansett Proprietor, 9. 98, 111. 
Denison, George, county clerk at New Lon- 

don, 8. 505. 
Denison, George, disturber of the peace, 

g. 202. Appointed constable, 9. 204. 
Denison, Hannah, 6. 414. 
Denison, John, sheriff, 6. 282, 480, 433, 

437,438; 7. 61, 185,221. 
Denison, Col. John, 7. 377. 
Denison, Rev. John, Ipswich, 7. 225, 353, 

377. 
Denison, Mrs. Rev. John (Elizabeth), 7. 

377. 
Denison, Robert, constable pro tern., 7. 185, 

221 ; 9. 203. 
Denison, William, 7. 177, 178, 180, 205, 

206. 
Denison, il//s. William (Dorothy), 7. 177, 
179, 180, 182, 186-192, 197-202, 204- 
206, 208, 267. 
Denman, Stephen, 5. 294. 
Dennington, Enrj., 7. 89. 
Dennison, Col., war of 1775, 10. 229. 
Dennv, Daniel, 7. 231. 
Denn'y, Deborah, 7. 231, 233, 2.34. 
Denny, Henry G., 6. 144. 
Denny, Samuel, 7. 231. 
Denny, Thomas, 5. xxxv. 
De Peyster, Helen, 5. xxxv. 
De Peyster, Laura B., 5. xxxv. 
De Pliarne, Mons., concerning provisions 

for the army, 10. 9. 
' Deplorable State of the Plantations,' 6. 

103*. 
Deptford.^H^-., 5. 252. 
Deptford, ship,Q. 53* 84* 127* 134, 161, 

189. 
Deputies, 5. 67, 342, 487, 500 ; 6. .34, 40, 
78, 367, 385. 392, 402, 425 ; 7. 6, 7, 20, 
317, 345, .357. House of, 5. 360 ; 6. 90 ; 
7. 285, 316. List of, 6. 188. Kesolve 
of, 7. 6. Clerk of the House of, 7. 
297. 
Derby, Capt., of a vessel in tlie service 

of Colony of Massachusetts, 10. 293. 
Dering, Henry, 5. 159, 185, 489 ; 6. 26, 55, 

175, 257, 319, 36-3. 
Dering, J/»-s. Henry (Elizabeth), 7. 270, 
Derings, Henry, 5. 338. 
De Kogers, Indian, 6. 374. 
De Kogers, Sarah, 6. 374. 
De Ruyter, Michael, fleet of, seize Capt. 
Brooke's ship, and many others, 8. 253, 
Ship taken by, at Nevis, 8. 97, 98, 134. 
Dervall, Mr., 9. 91 n. 
Derwentwater, Earl of 7. 77. 



OF THE MASSACEIUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



381 



Deserters, a law of tlie General Assembly 
concerniiiijr, lo. 42, 5(3. 

Desertion from the arniv, 4. 56. 08, 207, 
221, iSS, 2oD, 245, 250, 203, 285. 

De Stael, see Staiil-Holslem. 

De Sweet, Widow Oliver, 5. 355. 

De Ternay, Chevalier, meeting with Gen. 
Washington, 10. 205. 

De Vau.x, Peter, 5. 292. 

Devereux, Abigail, 5. xxx. 

De Vic, Sir Henry, letter to, i. 323. No- 
tice of, I. 323 «. 

De Vienne, Marquis, 4. 100. 

Deving, Henry, 5. 78. 

Devolution Government, 7. 38, 39. 

Devonshire, Eng., 5. 270 ; 6. 188 ; 7. 151. 

Devonsiiire, ship, 6. 310. 

Devonshire Street, 5. 4(51. 

Devotion, , innkeeper, 6. 169, 237, 204, 

205, 370. 

Devurux, , a letter carrier in England, 

8. 191. 

Dewing (Doing), Francis, 7. 188. 

De Witt, Cornells, 4. 388, 401, 403. 

De Witt, Jan, 4. 388, 401, 403. 

Dexter, Gregory, i. 414 n., 415. 

Dexter, Samuel, 3. 370, 387 n. Letters 
of, to Dr. Belknap, in answer to Judge 
Tucker's queries, 3. 384, 388. Letters 
of, to Dr. Helknap, on slavery, 3. o.)b- 
398. Sketch of, 3. 3S7 n. 

Dexter, Timothy, Lnrd, 3. 351. 

Dey, Col., Gen. Washington's head- 
quarters witli, 10. 183. 

Dible, Samuel, 6. 15*. 

Dickenson, John, i. 482. 

Dickerman, Z,/eM^ Abraham, /wor, 9. 138. 

Dickerson, Mr., married, 8. 187. 

Dickinson, Gen. John, LL.D., 2. 185, 193, 
195, 202 ; 4. 302, 332, 333, 350, 30-5, 460, 
4(58, 507. His ' Farmer's Letters,' 4. 
356. Takes a foraging party prisoners, 
10. 31. 

Dickinson, Rnv. Jonathan, 2. 8 ; 7. 210, 
217, 288, 344. 

Dickson, David, i. 200. 

Die, Mr., England, 5. 300. 

Die, College of, 7. 3(17. 

Dieppe, City of, 8. 41. 

Digby, Sir Kenelm, 8. 10 n. 

Digby, Adin. Robert, 4. 225, 228. 

Digger, George, i. 501. 

Dighton Rock, 2. 34-3, 353, 301 ; 3. 7G, 77, 
100. Inscription on the, 3. 81. 

Dill, George, letter from, i. 269. 

Dillaway, C. K., 7. 97. 

Dillinghasn. John, 8. 32. 

Dilly, Charles, 3. 114, 197. 

Dilly & Longman, Messrs., 2. 449. 

Dimon, Capt. Thomas, 7. 301. Loss of 
his barque, 8. 419. Concerning bond 
money for, 8. 459, 473. 

Dimond, Robert, 6. 347. 

Dineley, William, i. 4is0. 

Dinsdal, Hannah, 6. 216. 



I Discussion between Judge Sewall and 

Paul Dudlev, 6. 430. 
Disney, Col. Henry, 6. 313. 
Dissenters' Mceting-housis, 7. 01. 
Distich, by Jud-r Sewall. 6. 311, 339 ; 7. 

22. Of" nishop Jewells Tutor, 7. 215. 
Dixie, Elizabeth, 5. 341. 
Dixon, David, i. 251. 
Dixon, Robert, 8. 180. 
Dixwell, John, the reqicide, 6. 138 ; 7. 352. 
' Dixwell. John, /;•., 6. 138 ; 7. 352. 
i Doane, Isaiah, 5. 65. 
Dobbins, Capt., concerning bail, 5. 392, 

393. 
1 Dobbs's Ferry, 4. 175 ; 10. 236. Orders 
I to the commandant at, 4. 201, 202. The 

only place of intercourse with the ene- 
my, 10. 273, 278. 
Dobson, Thomas, 3. 250, 253, 255, 259, 

273, 274. 291, 297, 301. 303, 305, SOB- 
SI 0, 312-315, 317, 318, 320, 322, 323, 

325, 343, 340, 348, 349, 352, 354, 357, 

300, 361, 308. 
Dobson, Verier, i. 158. 
Dock Square, 5. 190, 202 ; 6. 323 ; 7. 64. 
Dockwra, Mr., concerning a penny-post, 

5. 2(i:;. 
Dod, .\fr., 5. 33, 482 ; 6. 43. 
Dogget, Capt., Marshti,-ld, 6. 437, 438. 
Dogget, Martha, see Firmin, Mrs. 
Dogget, Thomas, England, letter from, 

I. 179, 199 «. 
Doggett, Mrs. Margery, England, i. 179n., 

199 n. 
Doggett. Mrs., Marsh field, 6. 130. 
Dole (Doel), Dr. William, Newbury, 5. 205, 

397. 
Dole (Doel), Dr. Benjamin, death of, 7. 1. 
Doleberry (Dolberrv), , mariner, 5. 

99, 356. 
Dolliver, Paul, 6. 244. 
Dolphin, tavern, y. 186. 
Done, , Justice of Dillinqsqate, Well- 

fleet, 6. 387. 
Done, Capt. Joshua, 7. 113. 
Dongan, Col. Thomas, 5. 213; 6. 434. 

Letter of Fitz John Winthrop to, 8. 

2)7. Governor at New York, 8. 435. 

To be Governor of Barbadoes, 8. 472, 

483, 501. 
Donnell, Samuel, Depntu, 5. 378, 387. 
Donnop. (Jount, repulse of, at Red Bank, 

10. 101. 
Dorby, Eleaz( r, 6. 303. 
Dorchester, Camlina, i. 447. 
Dorchester, Mass., i. 105 n., 241, 260 n., 

274)!., 310 n.; 2. 19; 5. 492, 500, 504, 

508 ; 6. 313, 308 ; 7. 179. Men from, i. 

216, 217. Burning of house at, 9. 511. 
Dorchester Antiquarian and Historical 

Society, 6. 239. 
Dorchester Case, 7. 131. 
Dorchester Church. 6. 394. 397. 
Dorchester Neck, 5. 49, 112, 117, 504 ; 6. 

353 ; 7. 334. 



382 



IXDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Dorking (Daking), 'Williain, 4. 275. 

Dormers, Mr., Enqland, 5. liy. 

Dorr, Joseph, 7. 8, 180. 

Dorrance, , cujitain of mUitarij^ 1782, 

4. 273, 274. 

Dorsett, Edward, i. 482. 

Dotey, , mariner, 5. oil. 

Dotey, John, 5. oil. 

Douay, taking of, 6. 287. 

Doughty, Elizabetli, see Cole, M^rs. 

Doughty, Rev. Francis, letter from, i. 
308. 'Notice of, i. 308 n. 

Douglas, James, 6. 334, 335. 

Douglas, Col. William, in Revolutionary 
army, 4. 15 ; 9. 507 ; 10. 36. 

Douglass, Dr. William, 2. 120, 209. 

Douse, Capt., 7. 210, 230, 288. 

Dover, Eng , 5. xiii, 31, 240, 252, 274, 293 ; 
7. 256. 

Dover. .V. H.. i. 327, 329; 2. 222 ; 5. 405; 
6. 45*, 54* ; 7. 49. 

Dover Castle, 5. 297. 

Dover Court, origin of the name, 2. 19. 

Dover, ship, 6 53*. 

Dover Street, Boston, 5. 109; 6. 225, 309. 

Dovvden, Joseph, 6. 8. 

Dowdesvvell, Mr., in Parliament, 9. 231, 
431. Mentioned, 9. 813. 

Down, Capt. N., 5. 27, 28, 479. 

Downing, Ann, see Bradstreet, Mrs. 

Downing, Benjamin, 5. 26. 

Downing, Charles, letters of, i. 172-176. 

Downing, P.manuel, i. 3, 4?!., 5, 11 n., 19, 
23. 42. 48, 49«., 50. 51. 71, 72, 81, 91, 
94. 115, 116, 1.52 «., 182, 190, 196. 200, 
201, 202 «., 224. 227, 336, 337, 366 »»., 
496 ; 5. 74 ; 8. 3, 4, 14 «., 18, 20. 24, 28, 
30-32, 34, 36, 52, 183, 186, 198, 200, 204, 
208, 212, 215. Letters from, i. 256, 373. 
Letter to, i. 81. His still, i. 36. 

Downing, Mrs. Emanuel (Lucv), i. 49 n., 
70n.. 72, 81 n., 91, 94 n., 114«., 115. 
200 n., 228, 366 n., 421 ; 7. 105. Letters 
of, I. 3-63. Notice of, i. 3. Arrival 
in New England, i. 23 n. ; 8. 3, 4, 7, 8, 
12, 14 n., 20, 24, 2-5, 36, 52, 183. 186, 198, 
204. 212. Her expenses, i. 62. Illness 
of, 8. 30, 32. 

Downing, Mrs. Frances, letter from, i. 95. 

Downing, George. 8. 4. 36 

Downing, Sir George, i. 19 n., 30. 34, 42, 

45, 52, 59, 60. 62, 169, 172. 211, 373 ; 
6. 188. His wife, i. 45. Accused of 
meanness, i. 63. 

Downing, James, i. 21, 28, 29, 203. 
Downing. Joseph, letter from, i. 202. 
Downing, Joshua, i. 14, 29, 30, 37, 40. 42, 

46, 53. His wife, i. 95 n. Letters of, 
I. 169-172. 

Downing, Lucy, see Norton, Mrs. 
Downing, Martha, see Peters, Mrs. 
Downing, Mary, see Stoddard, Mrs. 
Downing, Robert, i. 7. 
Downing, Robin, i. 36, 40, 42. 
Downing, Mrs. Sarah, i. 172 n., 175. 



Downing, Susan, i. 11, 23, 203. 

Downing, William, son of George, born, i. 
60. 

Downs, the, 5. 134 ; 7. 77. 

Downs, Mrs., death of, 5. 206. 

Downs, Thomas, 6. 150, 251. 

Dows, Capt., 6. 156. 

Dows, Benjamin, 7. 132, 249. 

Dows, Benjamin, Jr., 7. 181. 

Dowse, Francis, 5. 202 ; 7. 311, 373. 

Doxie, Thomas, i. 369. 

Dracot, Mr., England, 5. 276. 

Dracot, town, 6. 53. 

Draft, letter of Gen. Washington concern- 
ing a, 10. 175. Gen. Washington urges 
a, for the Continental army, 10. 180. 

Drafting, Gov. Trumbull orders troops to 
be raised by, 10. 57. 

Dragon, /r/^rofe, 6. 2-54, 261. 

Dragon Tavern, see Green Dragon. 

Dragoons, 5. 324. Resolutions of Con- 
gress concerning the, of Connecticut, 
10. 238. 

Drake, Sir F., 5. 276. 

Drake, Job, 8. 170, 401. 

Draper, Widow, 6. 319. 

Draper, John, 5. 1(53. 

Draper, Jonathan, 7. 173. 

Draper, Mary, 5. lliO. 

Draper, Moses, 5. 381. 

Draper, Richard, 5. 145; 6. 275; 7. 88, 
89. 

Dream of S. S., 6. 12-3, 157, 179, 221, 300; 
7. 99, 127, 213. 

Dreux, France. 5. 508. 

Drew, ]Mary, 6. 373. 

Drew, Capt. Sylvanus, 4. 7. 

Drinker, Edward, 6. 120. 

Drinker, Goodman, 8. 398. 

Driver, Robert, 5. 8. 

Driving a nail, 6. 97 ; 7. 379. 

Driving a pin, 6. 80, 139, 283, 355; 7. 86, 
103, 185, li)5. 

Drought in 1782, 2. 143, 151, 156. 

Drugo, 8. 431. 

Drur3% Father, 7. 323. 

Drury, John, 6. 68. 

Drury, Col. Luke, 2. 480. 

Dry, Moses, 5. 292. 

Diiane, James, 4 466. 

Duane, William, 4. 464. 

Da Bart, , 6 260. 

Dublin, 6. 89, 313. 

Dubois, Col., at defence of Fort Mont- 
gomerv, 10. 100. 

Dubois, 'Mr., England, 5. 247. 

Du Coudray, Philippe Charles Jean Bap- 
tiste Tronson, 4. 57. 

Dudley, , England, 5. xvii. 

Dudley, Major, 5. 138-141 ; 6. 298. 

DudleV, Mrs. Abigail, 5. 163 ; 7. 74. 

Dudley, Ann, see Bradstreet, Mrs. 

Dudley, Mrs. Anne, icife of Gov. Thomas, 
6. 66, 77, 112, 177, 207, 357 ; 7. 13, 146. 

Dudley, Deborah, 6. 3.30. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



883 



Du.llov, Edmuml, 8. 377, 433, 434. 

Diulli'v, K.hvard. 5. »0. 

Dudlcv, John, son of SdjiiucI and Mnni. 1. 

05, 0(wi.; 8. 43, "60, 61, 183, 2li3, 2ia, 
249, 447. 

Dudley, //on. John, 2.446 H. 

Dudley, Gor. Joseph, i. 174, 432, 433, 
435 ; 2. 127. Letter to, i. 433. Men- 
tioned, 5. xxvi, 48, 69, 77, 198, 395; 

6. 9*, 29*, 30* 33*, 3-5*, 38*-42*, 44*- 
4G*, 48*-55*, 67*, 69*. 78*-81*, 84*- 
86*, 90*-95*, 100*. 101*, 103*-124*, 
128*, 129*. 131*, 40 ; 7. 66, 97, 231. 
His cliaracter by his enemies, 6. 06*. 
His ffovernment, 6. 39*. His charac- 
ter, 6. 43*. His innocence, 6. 61S*, 
73*. His character by his defenders, 
6. 89*. His maladministration, 6. 99*, 
102*, 124*, 130*. His salary, 6. 73*. 
His vindication, 6. 115*. His trading 
with the French, 6. 130*, 200, 201. 
His plots, 6. 40. Opposition to iiim 
for Governor, 6. 41. Arrival from 
England as Governor, 6. 57. Ap- 
points a Fast-Day, 6. 65. Keeps Christ- 
mas, 6. 92. Concerning his coat of 
arms, 6 129. Concerning the election 
of a Speaker, 6. 131, 132. The carters' 
(Winchester and Trowbridge) affront 
to him, 6. 141, 145. His declaration 
concerning the carters. 6. 152. The 
first governor born in New England, 
6. 199. Heads Mr. Cotton Mather's 
letter to Sir Charles Hobby, 6. 201. 
Instalment of Mr. Leverett, 6. 208. 
Lieutenant-Governor of Isle of Wight, 

6. 214. Adjourns the court, 6. 238. At 
funeral of grandson, 6. 247. Concern- 
ing the agency for Canada, etc., 6. 268. 
His letter to the Council, 6. 275. Con- 
cerning a minister for tlie Episcopal 
Church, 6. 338. Waited upon by S. 
Sewall and others concerning the ex- 
piration of his office, 7. 36, 6(3. Meets 
the new Governor, Sliute, 7. 105. In- 
terview with S. Sewall concerning liis 
son, 7. 108, 137, 173. At funeral of S. 
Sewall's wife, 7. 144. Interviewed by 
S. Sewall concerning Mrs. Denison, 7. 
186. Dines with S. Sewall on the occja- 
sion of his marriage, 7. 233. Taken 
sick, 7. 234, 246, 247. Death and 
burial, 7. 248. Departure for England, 
8. 425. Assistant Secretary, 9. 126. 
Appointed President of Massachusetts 
Bay, 9. 146. Mentioned, 9. 153, 223. 
Appointed Commissioner, 9. 184. 

Dudley, Madam Joseph (Kebecca), 5. 
xxviii, 312, 455, 4fi7, 489, 49'2 ; 6. 60, 61, 
65, 80, 82, 112, 114, 158, 177, 18.5, 207, 
237, 247, 283, 296, 207, 361, 362, 372; 

7. 16, .36, 92, 108, 1.56, 157, 166, 167. 
190, 198, 201, 210, 225, 233, 234, 246- 
249, 252, 2C2, 278, 280, 281, 283, 309, 
310. 



Dudley, Kate, dauqhter of Gov. Josrph, 6. 

60, ■77, 158, 247, 360 ; 7. 5. 
Dudley, Mrs. Mary, daiu/hter of Gov. Jo- 

srjih, 6. 66, 112, 247, 360 ; 7. 14. 
Dudley, Mercy, see Woodbridge, ^^r.<l. 
Dudley, Paul, son of Gov. ./aeph, 6. 33*, 

39*. 42*. 52*, 53*, 55*, 73*, 81*, 100*. 

105*, 107*, 12b*-122*. At Salem Court, 

5. 387. His original letter, 6. 109*. 
Appointed Queen's attorney, 6. 59. In 
pursuit of pirates, 6. 102. Dines with 
the Governor, 6. 112. Buries his son, 

6. 129. Concerning tlie carters' affront 
to the Governor, 6. 147, 148. Married 
Lucy Wainwright, 6. 148. Attorney 
for "Mr. Lillie, 6. 102. Mentioned, 6. 
195, 208,209, 237; 7. 14, 24, 105, 182, 
204. At funeral of S. Sewall's grand- 
son. 6. 247. At funeral of Major Bunn, 
6. 255. In court on case of Mr. Cumby, 

6. 280. At funeral of S. Sewall's daugh- 
ter, 6. 290. Concerning the selling of 
land on Boston Neck, 6. 309. At Salem 
Court, 6. 326. Discourse with S. Sew- 
all on the resurrection, 5. 430. Sued by 
Col Nicholson, 6. 438. Council at his 
liouse, 7. 10. Concerning case of Capt. 
Steel, 7. 29. "Wishes his father i)rayed 
for as Governor, 7. 42. Concerning the 
Fast, 7. 4.3. Propounded for Judge of 
Probate, 7. 45. Chosen attorney, 7. 86. 
Nominated for justice, 7. 134, 167. At 
meeting of Overseers of Harvard Col- 
lege, 7. 202. Concerning printing the 
Election Sermon, 7. 214. Executor 
of his father's will, 7. 249. Bearer at 
funeral of S. Sewall's wife, 7. 256. Con- 
cerning the making of counterfeit bills, 
7. 276. Question concerning the militia, 

7. 313. Concerning keeping of Christ- 
mas, 7. 315. WelcoiTies Pres. Wads- 
worth of Harvard College, 7. 362. Ke- 
turns from Court, 7 376. 

Dudley, Paul, .sw* of Gov. Thomas, death 

of, 1681, 6. 17*. 
Dudley, Mrs. Paul, son of Gov. Tliomas 

(Lucy), 6. 112, 148; 7. 14. 
Dudley, Mis. Paul, son of Gov. Joseph 

(Mary), 6. 158, 195, 207; 7. 125, 139, 

167. 
Dudley, Rebecca, Jr., daughter of S. Sew- 
all, Jr., 6. 359. 
Dudley, Robert. 5. 304. 
Dudley, Sam.j.l, i. 64;i., 66n., C7, 255; 

6. 97,98: 8 ;6. 
Dudley, Mrs. Samuel (Mary), letters of, 

I. 64-69. Notice of, i. 64 /i. 
Dudley, Sarah, 6. 109. 
Dudley, Thomas, son of Paul, 6. 129. 
Dudley, Ca]^L Thomai, 5. 180, 194, 196, 

206, 374, 375; 6. 65, 66, 125, 129, 158, 

159, 201 ; 7. 74. 
Dudley. Gov. Thomas, i. 20, 64 n.. 148 n., 

151, 174n., 317 n., 318, .360, 417, 495; 

6. 350 ; 7. 142, 182, 248 ; 8. 459. Letter 



584 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



to, I. 346. Deputy-Governor of Massa- 
chusetts Colony, 8. 225. Concerning 
the election of, 8. 4(32. Elected judge, 
8. 472. 

Dudley, iMrs. Thomas, 6. 158. 

Dudlev, Col. William, 5. xxviii, 371, 378; 

6. 37* 47*. 09*, 127*, 129*, 98, 111, 
142, 144-146, 152, 247. 327, 389, 39.3, 
410 ; 7. 86, 40, 84, 85, 92, 119, 179, 192, 
228, 229, 231, 278, 279, 316, 355. 

Dudley Estate, 6. 158. 

Duel fougiit, 5. 410 ; 6. 384. 

Duelling, 7. 2U8. 

Duen, Mrs., 5. 450. 

Duer, Samson, 5. 341. 

Duffield, Rev. George, D.D., 3. 100, 104. 

107, 109. 
Dugard, William (?), 2. 346. 
Dugdale, Mary, 5. xv, xvii. 
Dugdale, Sh- AVilliam, 5. xv, xvii. 
Duke, Dr., i. 80 n. 
Duke de Guise, 8. 10. 
Duke de Lorraine, 8. 30. 
Duke of Bavaria, dead, 8. 30. 
Duke of Buckingham, expedition of, to 

Rochelle, 8. 4 n. 
Dulcimer, a musical instrument, 7. 131. 
Dull, Goodman, 5. 21. 
Du Luth, Daniel Greysolon, Sieur, 2. 42. 
Dumaresque, Capt., 7. 260. 
Dumas, Charles William Frederick, 4. 

387, 391, 393, 397. Mr. Adams defends 

the character of, 4. 389, 390. 
Dumenee, Capt., 5. 278-280. 
Dummer, Capt., 5. xiii; 6. 24, 251; 7. 127, 

185. 
Dummer, Abigail, 5. xxii, 300. 
Dunnner, Mrs. Alice, 5. xii, xviii, xxii. 
Dummer, Mrs. Catherine, 7. 5. 
Dummer, Dorothy, 5. xxii. 
Dummer, Edmund, 5. xxi. 
Dummer, Elizabeth, 5. xxii ; 6. 30 ; 7. 

54. 
Dummer, Hannah, 5. xxii ; 6. 393 ; 7. 53. 
Dummer, Henry E., 7. 54. 
Dummer, Jane, 5. xviii, xxii. 
Dummer, Capt. Jeremiah, 5. xiv, xxi, 

xxii, 85, 295, 302, 341, 349, 358, 375, 

439, 4(i7, 507; 6. 21, 66, 72, 159, 232, 

255, 208, 271, 272, 283, 284, 288, 393, 

405, 416 ; 7. 5, 27, 33, 53, 374. 
Dummer, Mrs. Jeremiah (Ann), 6. 414; 

7. 53, 374. 

Dummer, Jeremy or Jeremiah, Jr., 5. 

xxii ; 6. 283, 284, 288 ; 7. 34, 53, 54, 66, 

6<), 70, 78, 79,85, 104, 111. 
Dummer, Rev. Dr. Jeremiah, 6. 92, 111, 

112, 128, 124, 3.57. 
Dummer, John, 5. xxi, xxii, 261, 300 ; 6. 

30; 7.54,230. 
Dunnner, Mr. Joseph, 8. 492, 550, 561. 

Concerning sale of a horse to, 8. 456. 
Dummer, Mary, 5. xxii, 3, 295, 391 ; 7. 

364. 
Dummer, Mehitable, 5. xxii. 



Dummer, Nathaniel, Sen., 5. xxii, 14, 256, 

294,298; 7.54. 
Dummer, Nathaniel, 5. xxii, 14, 85, 88, 

91, 98, 110, 134, 189, 249, 256, 270, 287, 

294, 295, 298, 299, 300 ; 7. 54. 
Dummer, Richard, Jr., 5. xxii, 143, 233, 

308 ; 6. .30 ; 7. 53, 54. 
Dummer, Richard, Sen., 5. xxi, xxii, 253, 

258,298,300,413; 7.53,54. 
Dummer, Mrs. Richard (Mary), ^rs« ivife, 

7. 53. 
Dummer, Mrs. Richard (Frances), second 

wife, 7. 53. 
Dummer, Rev. S., 0/ York, 5. 321. 
Dummer, Samuel, 5. xxii; 7. 53, 54, 278, 

318, 346. 
Dummer, Sarah, 5. xxii, 14, 19, 295. 
Dummer, Shubael, 5. xxii; 6. 71 ; 7. 53, 54. 
Dunnner, Stephen, Jr., 5. xxii. 
Dummer, Stephen, Sen., 5. xii, xiii, xviii, 

xxii, 7, 14, 18-20, 33, 252, 257, 267, 273, 

300. 
Dummer, Thomas, Jr., 5. xxi, xxii, 250, 

295. 
Dummer, Thomas, Sen., 5. xxi, xxii. 
Dummer (2d), William, 5. xiv, xxi, xxii, 

184 ; 6. 55, 315, 349; 7. 5, 16, 43, 53, 84, 

97, 103. 
Dummer (od), Lieut.-Gov. William, 5. 

xxii ; 6. 315; 7. 5, 34, 54, 103-105, 107, 

109, 11.3, 116, 144, 146, 147, 155, 238, 

248, 278, 280, 28(5, 317, 326, 336, 359, 

363, 374. His ' Memorial or Memoran- 
dum,' 7. 107. 
Dummer, Madam William, 7. 167, 230, 

346, 374, 382. 
Dummer Academy, 7. 5, 54. 
Dunnner Family, 7. 53, 54. Genealogy 

of, 5. x.xi, xxii. 
Dun, William, 5. 309. 
Duncan, Mr., Dorchester, 5. 163. 
Duncan, Cajit., 4. 240. 
Duncan, Nathaniel, i. 148 n. 

Dunch, , Ahbim/don, Eng., 5. 301. 

Dunch, Dulcibella.'s. 252. 
Dunckerley, Adj. Joseph, 4. 80. 
Duncome, Mr., 9, 8. 
Dunfrey, 5. 270. 
Dungan, Gov., 5. 185. 
Dunkirk, 5. 374; 7. 126. 
Dunkirk, skip, 6. 316. 
Dunlap, Edward, 4. 221. 
Dunlap, John, 3. 320, 327, 328. 
Dunmore, Lord, in Parliament, 9. 397. 
Dunnam, Rev. Jonathan, 6. 437. 
Dunning, Mr., in Parlianient, 9. 431. Con- 
cerned in Mohcgan cause, 9 481. 
Dunstable, Mass.,\ 112, 233; 6. 67,409; 

7. 26, 216, 223. 
Dunster, Henry, President of Harvard 

College, 1. 320, 352 ; 7. 16 ; 8. 30, 44, 

235, '239. 
Dunton, , atithor of Letters from New 

Enqland; 5. 73, 89, l26, 160, 197, 286; 6. 

119. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



585 



Diinton, John, 5. 158, 430; 6. 410. 

Dupec, Mall/iew jSmith's man, 6. l<89. 

l)ii IVyster, Copt., 5. 319. 

])u rortiiil-Lfbcgue, Chevalier Louis, 4. 
98, 101, 140. 

Du Pratz, Le Page, his ' History of Lou- 
isiana,' 2. 20, 28. 

Durant, Tlionias, i. 501. 

Durell, Copt., 7. 278, 296, 310, 339. 

Durkce, Col. John, 4. 10. His regiment, 
10. 51. 

Durkoe, Cnpt. Robert, concerning tlie 
abduction of certain negroes, 9. 389. 
Suit brought against Mr. Mott, 9. 412. 

Durnford, Kiif/., 5. 297. 

Dustin (Dust.^n), Hannah, 5. 452, 453. 

Dutch, take city of Wesei, 8. 21. Give 
presents to Uncas, 8. 53. Concerning 
certain patents, 8. 79. Dutch fleet at 
Virginia, 8. 150. Landed at Manliat- 
tan Island, 8. 150. Concerning, 8. 152. 
At St. Ciiristopher's Island,' 8. 253. 
Trouble with, on Long Island, 8. 274- 
277. Rumored invasion of England, 
8. 480, 487. Capitulation to the Eng- 
lish, 9. 65 n. Conquest of New York 
by, 9. 88. Molestation and oppression 
of poor planters at Manhattan bv, 9- 93. 

Dutch Church, 5. 318. 

Dutch Embassadors, 5. 256. 

Dutcli privateer, seizure of logwoodmen 
at Bay of Cam peachy by, 8. 389. 

Dutch ship at Nameag, 8. 40. Bhips and 
town burned in Holland, 8. 105. 

Dutch trading law, concerning, 8. 56 n. 

Dutch trading sloop seized at Long Island, 

8. 56. 

Dutch, Widow, 7. 338. 

Dutchfel, Mr. Thomas, i. 295. 

Dutchmen, at siege of Kochelle, 8. 5. Wit- 
nesses of peace with the Mohawk In- 
dians, 8. 89. 

Dutton, Mr., 8. 391. 

Dutton, Eliza, 5. xl. 

Duty Act, debate in Parliament concern- 
ing, 9. 312-310. Petitions of New 
York and Pennsylvania to Parliament 
concerning, 9. 324. Action of the 
agents of the Colonies concerning, 9. 
325. Debated in Parliament, 9. 334- 
311. Speech in Parliament of Gov. 
Pownall concerning, 9. 335. Speeches 
in Parliament of Lord North, Mr. Dy- 
son, Edmund Burke, and Col. Barre, 

9. 337, 338. Concerning a repeal of, 
9. 346-350. Sentiments of William 
Samuel Joimson concerning, 9. 351- 
353. Its effect on exports from Eng- 
land, 9. 300. Of Connecticut should be 
corrected, 9. 428. 

Duty on boards, 7. 6. 

Duty Tax, concerning tea and flaxseed, 
9. 215. Concerning salt, 9. 229. Con- 
cerning window glass, paper. China- 
ware, etc., 9. 231, 239. Act of Parlia- 



ment levying, in New England Colo- 
nies, 9. 276. Letters of William Pitkin 
concerning duties levied on the Colo- 
nies, 9. 270, 285. Imposed by Connec- 
ticut on imported iJritisii goods, 9. 387. 
Laid on English importations by the 
Connecticut Colony, 9. 392. Concern- 
ing repeal of, 9. 394, 400. Concerning 
manufactures in the Colonies, 9. 400. 
Charged by the Colonies on imports, 
explanation of, 9. 419. Debate in Par- 
liament on, 9. 430. 

Duxbury, Muss., i. 145 n., 284, .311; 5. 
309, 362, 473 ; 6. 15, 375, 438 ; 7. IIG. 

Duyckinck, Evart A. and George L., 
their ' Cyclopedia of American Litera- 
ture ' cited, 2. 73 «. 

Dwarf, advertisement about a, 5. 308. 

Dwi-ht, Mrs. Elizabeth, 6. 301. 

Dwitiht, Jiuioe Henrv, 7. 318. 

Dwight, John, 6.41-1 

Dwight, Rev. Josiah, 5. 16, 24 ; 6. 17G, 
180 : 7. 194, 195, 200. 

Dwight, .Marv, 6. 415. 

Dwiiiht, Seth', 6. 158, 175, 186, 324. 

Dwight, Capt. Timothy, 5. 15-17, 31, 38, 
52, 53, 354. Death of, 7. 100, 194. 

Dwight, Mrs. Timothy (Anna), 7. 194. 

Dwight, Mrs. Timothy (Bethia), 7. 166. 

Dwight, Mrs. Timothy (Sarah), 5. 52. 

Dwight Genealogy, 6. 415. 

Dver, , Braintree, slioots an Indian, 

6. 15*. 

Dyer, Capt., 5. 378, 495; 7. 07. 

Dyer, Col. Eliphalet, mentioned, 9. 438, 
501. 

Dyer, Capt. and Col., concerning his ad- 
vancement, 1776, 10. 3, 8. 

Dyer, Deacon, Wei/mouth, death of, 6. 117. 

Dyer, Deputi/, 6. 335, 336. 

Dyer, Quartermaster, 1659, I. 170. 

Dyer, Giles, 5. xxxviii, 380 ; 6. 68, 254, 
290, 302, 325, 392, 394, 395, 424 ; 7. 238, 
284. 

Dyer, Joshua C, 6. 23. 

Dyer, Mrs. Marv, 6. 316; 7. 18, 115. 

Dyer (Dicr), William, 8. 424, 459. 

Dyer's {Mrs.) monstrous birth, 6. 15*. 

Dyke, Rev. Daniel, 7. 48. 



E. 



)1, 74. 



Eady, , constable, 1715, 7. 

Eals, Rev. Mr., 1720, 7. 251. 

Eames, Capt. Samuel, 3. 322, 324, 320, 
328, 348. 

Eames, Thomas, his barns burned by In- 
dians, 5. 21. Deatli of, 6. 15*. 

Earl, , prison-keeper, 5. 183. 

Earl, Rev. Dr. Jabez, 7. 44, 45, 07. 

Earl, .l/;-,s-. Joan. 5. 50L 

Earl, Ralph, 5. 001. 



386 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Eartliquake, 5 6G, 211, 362, 367, 308. In ! 
1784, 2. 29y. In 178(3, 2. 424. Kenioval 
of a hill near Kennebunk River by, 8. 
138. 

East, Francis, 5. 74, 170, 171 ; 6. 113. 

East Boston, 5. 41, 117, 151. 

East Chester, town of, 8. 152. 

East Hampton, L. I., i. 371 ; 6. 408, 440 ; 
8. 272 ; 9. 7. 

East India Company, acquisitions of, con- 
sidered in Parliament, 9. 215, 224. Im- 
portations of Britisli manufactures, 9. 
384. Petition for repeal of dutj^ on tea, 
g. 394. Concerning duty tax, g. 407. 
Concerning their territory in India, g. 
485. 

East Indies, 5. 53 ; 6. 113*, 4, 254. 

Eastabrooks. Vapt., 7. 260. 

Easte, Joseph, 1. 186. 

Easterl)rooks, Rt. Mr., preaches Elec- 
tion Sermon, 1705, 6 132. 

Easter Dav, 5. 67, 177, 210. 

Eastham, 5. 324, 325, 328; 6. 71, 252, 387; 
7. 126. 

Eastman, John, 5 159. 

Easton, Col, 10. 305. 

Eastwick, Pliesant, 8. 263. 

Eaton, Mr., 3. 149. 

Eaton, Hannah, receives legacy from Ed- 
ward Hopkins, g. 20. 

Eaton, Jabez, 5. 18. 

Eaton, Joshua, 6. 114 ; 7. 148. 

Eaton, Nathaniel, 6. 113. 

Eaton, Rev. Nathaniel, i. 285, 295, 320. 
Notice of, I. 285 H. 

Eaton, Mrs. Ruth, 6. 114. 

Eatbn, Gov. Tlieophilus, Neir ILiven, i. 
285 n., 319, 363. Death of, 8. 51. Com- 
missioner of Connecticut, g. 3. Trustee 
of will of Edward Hopkins, g. 19. Re- 
ceives legacy from him. g. 20. 

Eaton, Mrs. Tlieophilus, 8. 51. 

Eb, brother to Jedediali Huntiivjton, g. 499. 

Eckard, Lawrence, 2. 295. 

Eckhart, Philip, confined on suspicion, 4. 
51. Released, 4. 51. 

Eckins, Abell, i. 501. 

Eckley, Rev. Joseph, D.D., 2. 21, 190. 

Eclipse, 5. 11, 104, 109, 157; 6. 14* 16*, 
17*, 7, 159, 160, 183, 410; 7. 125, 140, 
312. 

Eden, Dorothy, see Barrington, Mrs. 

Eden, John, i. 83 n. 

Eden, Mrs. Mary, letter of, i. 83 n. 

Eden, .S'jV Thomas, i. 83 n., 212 h. 

Edes, Lieut. Joseph, 4. 186. 

Edford, Eng., 7. 255 

Edgar, Capt. Jolm, 4. 232. 

Edgar, ship, 6. 313. 

Edgartown, 6. 262, 387, 436. 

Edgeremet, Chief, 5. 334. 

Edict of Nantes, 5 130, 491. 

Edinburgh, Scotland, 5. 428; 6. 142; 7. 
151. 

Edinburgh College, 5. 428. 



Edmonds, Thomas, i. 482. 

Edmund, AJr. Davenport's man, 8. 62, 68. 

Edmunds, James, 5. 13. 

Edmunds, Joshua, 7. 372. 

Edsal, Mr., Brookline, 5. 318. 

Education in New Hampshire before and 

after the American Revolution, 2. 287- 

291. 
Edwards, Mr., England (1), mentioned, g. 

53. 
Edwards, Rev. Mr., London, 5. 45. 
Edwards, David, i. 433 ; 5. 434. 
Edwards, John, 5. 287, 2»9, 295, 299 ; 7. 

113, 354. 
Edwards, Dr. John, 5. 275-280, 287, 289, 

290. 
Edwards, Mrs. John (Sybil), 7. 113. 
Edwards, l\ev. Jonathan, 2. 8. 
Edwards, Palsgrave, 7. 371, 372. 
Eel River, 7. 47. 

Eels, Major Samuel, Milford, 6. 97. 
Eels, Rev. Mr., Phjmouth, 1704, 6. 252, 340, 

342; 7.44,219.' 
Effingham, Thomas Howard, 3c? Earl of, 

3. 383. 

Ekins, Mr., England, 5. 269. 

Elatson, Mr., buried his wife, 1694, 5. 

398. 
Elderkin, Col., 1776, mentioned, 10. 3. 
Elderkin, Jolm, 1665, 8. 272. 
Eldred, Lieut., prisoner of war, 1781, 4, 

191. 
Eldred, Nathaniel, merchant at Barbae 

does, 8. 282. Letter of Fitz-John Win- 

throp to, 8. 282. 
Eldridge, Capt., 5. 91, 124, 226, 390; 6. 

169 ; 8. 514, 516. 
Eldridge, Samuel, witness to deed, g. 

26. 
Election, 6. 34, 103, 130-32, 224, 256, 312, 

385 ; 7. 5, 68, 69, 185, 242, 254, 357. 

First, for President, 4. 334. Of 1800, 

4. 336, 433-436. Annual, 5. 68. For 
Presidency of Harvard, 6. 196. Of 
Joseph Sewall to Soutli Church, 6. 
346. 

Elections, in Massachusetts, 8. 225, 406, 
436, 463. In England, cost of, etc., g. 
270. 

Election Dav, 5. 72, 77, 344, 360, 378, 390, 
406, 426, 453, 454, 480 ; 6. 78, 162, 282, 
343, 348, 352 ; 7. 4, 47, 254, 356. 

Election Sermons, 5. 100, 399, 478, 497 ; 

6. 77, 178, 224, 256, 278, 333, 385, 386 ; 

7. 7, 214, 348. 
Election Week, 6. 386. 

Elegy and Epitaph on Alicia Lisle, 6 8*. 
Eliaicim, see E. Mather. 
Eliezer, Mr., buried at Dcdham, 7. 257. 
Eliot, Rev. Mr., Fairfield, Conn., 2. 434. 
Eliot, Uncle, 5. 16, 52. 
Eliot, Abigail, 6. 180. 
Eliot, Andrew, 6. 400 ; 7. 22. 
Eliot. Rev. Andrew, D.D., 2. 247 n., 434; 
4. 356. 



OF THE ^rASSACHUSETTS HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



387 



Eliot, Asaph, 5. 81, 94 ; 8. 425, 441, 442, 
453. 

Eliot, Benjamin, 5. 7G. 142, 18(j-188, 192, 
420 ; 6. 198, 279; 7. 08 1. 

Eliot, Ebenezer, 7. 270. 

Eliot, ^Jl■s. Ebenezer (Elizabeth), 7. 
270. 

Eliot, Elizabeth, 6. 14*. 

Eliot, Francis, Braintree, 5. 187 ; 6. 3-30. 

Eliot, Hannah, 6. 23 ; 7. o49. 

Eliot, Jacob, i. 486. 

Eliot, Capt. and Deacon Jacob, 5. 52, 93, 
109, 130, 140, 142, 147, 154, 158, 105, 
1G9, 171, 173. 179, 187, 213, 230, 233, 
322, 332, 334, 337, 3.38, 351, 352, 382, 
425, 474, 475, 491 ; 6. 11* 21*, 23, 25, 
225, 320; 7. IGO. 

Eliot, Jacob, Jr., 6. 180, 320. 

Eliot, ^fl■s. Jacob (Margery or Mary), 5. 
52, 109, 425, 474; 6. 11* 180. Death 
of, 6. 20G 

Eliot, Rev. John, the Apostle, i. 422, 491. 
Letter of, i. 424. Letter to, i. 375. 
Notice of, 3. 56, 63, 65, 69, 87-90, 96, 
99, 329; 5. 75, 170, 186, 187. Death 
of, 5. 320, 321, 345 ; 6. 25, 250, 320 ; 7. 
16, 22. A minister among the Lidiaus, 
8. 121. 

Eliot, Mrs. John (' Apostle '), 6. 213. 

Eliot, Rev. John, D.D., Boston, 2. 15, 16, 
18, 21, 23, 26-29, 35, 47, 128, 130-132, 
281 ; 3. 313. ' Freemason,' 2. 163, 223, 
247, 258, 267, 275, 279, .300, 308, 318, 
329, 332, 333, 335, 340, 343, 354, 361, 
368, 401, 407. Marriage of, 2. 247. 
Letter from, to Dr. Belknap, in an- 
swer to Judge Tucker's queries, 3. 382, 
383. 

Eliot. John. Jr., 5. xxiil ; 6. 165 ; 7. 242. 

Eliot, Rev. Joseph, 5. 52, 69, 153, 154, 184, 
192, 194. 215, 309, 356, 303, 3(59, 425; 
6. 25, 350; 7. 334. Letter to John 
Winthrop, Jr., i. 430. 

Eliot, Mrs. Joseph (Silence), 6. 25; 7. 
242, 333, 334. 

Eliot, Mrs. Rev. Joseph (Sarah), 5. 356: 
6. 320. 

Eliot, Mary, 6. 350. 

Kliot, Philip, 5. 187. 

Eliot, Samuel, son of Rer. John, 2. 199, 
206, 210, 214, 218. 222. 223 n., 228, 230, 
235, 240, 241, 246, 249, 258, 264-2i)7, 
278, 287. 292, 293, 332, 335. 348, 355, 
362, 380, 402, 407, 449, 457, 469, 470 ».; 
3. 115 n., 400. Extract from a letter 
of, 2. 272. 

Eliot, Samuel Atkins. 2. 223 n. 

Eliot, .Mrs. Sarah, i. 430 «. 

Eliot Heirs, 6. 3i0. 

Eliot Publications, 6. 429. 

Eliot Street, 5 10.) ; 6. 110, 320. 

Eliot's Bible, 5. 15 ; 6. 429. 

Elithrop, Co'isin (Male), 7. 296. 

Elithrop, Cousin .Mary, 7. 122, 2-30, .382. 

Elizabeth of England, 3. 3U4 ; 4. 446. 



Elizabeth, Sara, John, and Samuel, diH- 
drtn of' Saniutl Winthrop, 8. 246. 

EHzabeth, ship, 7. 227. 

Elizabeth Town, .V. ./., 7. 225. Evacu- 
ated by the British, 10. 24. 

Elizabeth's Island, 5. 3G6 ; 8. 427 n., 44-3. 
rurchase of, by Wait Winthrop, 8. 427, 
428. 

Elizabeth's Spring, 8. 541. 

Elkin, Henry, i. 486. 

Elkins, Thomas, 5. 36. 

Ellacott, Vines, settled at Saco, 7. 334. 

Ellary, Capt., Newport, 6. 322; 7. 369. 

Ellary. J/)-.9., 6. 322; 7. 193. 

Ellen, Daniel, 7. 72. 

Ellery, William. M.C., 3. 292. 

Elleston. George. 5. 233. 

Elliot, B.. bookseller, 5. 161 ; 6. 3.3*. 

Elliot, Edward, signs petition, 9. 454. 

Elliott. Col. Simon. 2. 458; 3. 87, 361, 362. 

Ellis, Dr., 6. 332, 373 ; 7. 72, 132. 

Ellis, .l/;-.s., 5. 40, 328, 408 ; 6. 49, 51. 

Ellis, Edward, dies 1695, 5. 53, 401. 

Ellis, John Harvard, i. 174 n. 

Ellis, Robert, 5. 494. 

Ellis, W., his account of Cook's Voyage, 
2.413. 

Elliston, Jackson, 5. .369. 

Ellsworth, , captain in armi/ at Rox- 

bury camp, 9. 507. 

Elm Pasture. 5.73, 74; 6. 128, 343; 7. 
161, 217, 288, 292, 352. 

Elm Street, 5. 196, 202 ; 6. 159. 

Eloquence in New Hampshire, 3. 40. 

Eltham, Em;., 5. 305. 

Ely, Col., i6. 26. 

Ely, Danyell. i. 501. 

Ely, Richard, i. 419 ; 8. 435. 

Ely, Samuel, 2. 133. 

Ely, Enr/., 5. 260. 

Emanuel College, England, 5. 238. 

Embargo laid on vessels bound for Eng- 
land, 8. 490. 

Emerson, John, 5. 324; 6. 266, 284; 7. 
308. 

Emerson, Rev. John, letter of, i. 4-37. 

Emerson, Thomas, 1. 437. 

Emery, Abigail, 6 351 ; 7. 174. 

Emery, Eleanor, 6. 171. 

Emery, Enoch, 2. 397. 

Emery, John, 6. 102, 384. 

Emery, Noah, 2. 118. 

Emery, Samuel, 3. 335. 

Emes, Henry 5. 125. 

Emitrration from Ireland, concerninff, 8. 
450. 

Emmerson. Rev. Mr., Watertown, 5. 422, 
437 ; 7. 221. 339. 356. 

Emmerson, Elizabeth, 5. 350, 379. 

P^mmerson, Joseph. 7. 188. 

Emmery, .Jonathan, 6. 175. 

Emmctt, Mr., i. 201. 

Emmons, Benjamin, 6. 120. 

Emmons, Mis. .Mary. 6. 120 ; 7. 286. 

Emmons, Nathaniel, 6. 120. 



388 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Emmons, Obadiali, death of, 6. 120. 

Emmons, Samuel, 6. 120. 

Emmons, Thomas, 6. 120. 

Emmons's Corner, 6. 417. 

Emms, Charles, 5. 305. 

Emons, Brother, 5. 236, 32-3, 340 ; 6 275. 

Einons, Sister, 5. 330 ; 7. 231. 

Emons, Widow, 6. 417 ; 7. 266. 

Emory, J/r., 6. 110; 7. 179. 

Emperor Joseph, 6. 315. 

Emperor of Germany, 7. 03. 

Enipson, Sir Richard, 8. 377, 

Ems, , carpenter, 5. 422. 

Ems, Henry, baker, 5. 389. 

Endicott, Madam Elizabeth, 7. 113. 

Endicott, Mrs. Elizabeth, wi/e of Zenibha- 
hel, 8. 248, 441, 441 n., 526, 568. 

Endicott, Gov. John, 5. 60, 147. Men- 
tioned, I. 28, 29, 60, 118, 244 H., 363, 
373, 495, (Indeco) 218, 220, (Indecot) 
219. Letter to, i. 400. And Mrs. En- 
dicott, 8. 36. Letter from Thomas 
Welles and otJiers to, 8. 54. Governor 
of Massachusetts, 8. 54 n., 57, 225. 
Letter from Charles II., known as the 
'King's Mandamus,' 9. 26. Mentioned, 
9. 35 n. Attestation to a deed, 9 36. 

Endicott, Zerubbabel, 7. 113; 8. 441 n. 

Enerill, James, i. 400. 

Enfield, Eng., 5. 257 ; 7. 65. 

Enfield, Mass., 7. 101. 

England, 5. xii, xvi, xviii, xxi, xxii, xxix, 
6-8, 19, 20, 30. 47, 51-53, 65, 71, 87,93, 
102, 104, 106-108, 120, 130-132, 139, 
147, 152 ; 6. 30* 43* 68*, 3, 20, 32, 33, 
41, 43, 52, 54, 58, 84, 98 ; 7. 12. 14, 18, 
K), 23, 24, 27, 28. Colonial policy of, 
2. 14, 17. Law of, 7. 65. And Holland, 
concerning war between, 8. 202. Death 
of Queen Mary of, 8. 325. Laws of, 
concerning cost of trying prisoners, 8. 
562. How slie shows her indignation 
against offenders, 9. 362. The despotic 
power and influence of the ministry 
in, 9. 364. Threatened with Avar by 
France, 9. 385. Appearance of war 
with Spain, 9. 466. Enters into con- 
vention with France, 9. 474. See Great 
Britain. 

Engles (Engs or Inglis), Maudit, 5. 74. 
His pasture, 7. 216, 217. 

English, the, rights of, to deer killed by 
Indians, 8. 39. Concerning a league 
with Uncas, 8. 53. Friendly feelings 
toward the Mohawk Indians, 8. 88. 
On Long Island, concerning, 8. 151, 
150, 158, 164, 274-277. Concerning the 
claim of New Netherlands by, 9. 68. 

English Channel, 5. 152. 

English Church, 5. 156, 168, 431 ; 6. 286, 
287. 

English Corporation for Propagating the 
Gospel, 6. 262. 

English Exchequer Bills, 7. 277. 

English Fishery, 6. 48*. 



English Fleet, 5 3.30 ; 6. 72. Sails from 
Boston, 10. 4. 

English House of Commons, see House. 

English man or men, 5. 15, 24, 246, 453 ; 
6. 65, 432. 

English money, cost of exchange at Con- 
stantinople, 8. 11, 12. Exchange at 
Venice, 8. 15. 

English plantations on Long Island, their 
loyalty, 8. 164. 

English sliips taken at Nevis, 8. 97. 

English transports in search of provis- 
ions, 10. 3. 

English troops, 6. 265. Evacuation of 
Boston by the, 10. 10. The battles of, 
at Trenton and Princeton, 10. 23. 

English vessels, the ' Minerva' in pursuit 
of, 10. 5. 

Engs, Samuel, 6. 213. 

Enlargement of English Church in Bos- 
ton, 6. 287. 

Enos, Col. Roger, 4. 224. Mentioned, 9. 
501. Stationed with battalion in Con- 
necticut, 10. 88. To be sent to Peeks- 
kill, 10. 93. Commands a battalion at 
West Point, 10. 122. His regiments 
sent to the defence of Greenwich, 10. 
128. Concerning the disposition of 
troops, 10. 132. 

Ensign of the Watcli, 5. 54, 55. 

Ensor, Mary, 7. 89. 

Enstone, Edward, 7. 111. 

Entick, John, his ' Spelling Dictionary,' 
2. 174, 183, 274. 

Enville, see Anville. 

Epes, Major, 6. 14, 69, 238, 241, 807 ; 7. 
82, 255. 

Epes, Daniel, 6. 225, 256, 263, 310, 320, 
350 ; 7. 5, 26, 68, 127, 130, 186, 242. 

Epes, Mrs. Daniel (Hannah), 6. 403; 7. 
26. 

Ephraim, Peter, 5. 315. 

Episcopacy, resistance to the establish- 
ment of, one of Mr. Adams's principles 
of tlie Revolution, 4. 343. In Scotland, 
6. 352. 

Episcopal Church, 5. 231 ; 6. 338, 384, 412. 

Episcopal clergy, complaints of persecu- 
tion during the Revolution, made by, 
2. 134. Notice of, 6. 352 ; 7. 73. 

Episcopalians, opposed to the separation 
from England, 4. 506. 

Epistle dedicatory to Earl of Sunder- 
land, 6. 99* 101*. 

Epitaph under Father and Mother, 6. 44. 

Eppes, Daniel, the/aiher, i. 102 «. 

Eppcs, Cnpt. Daniel, the son, i. 102 n., 
110 n., llln. 

Eppes, Mrs. Elizabeth, i. Ill n. 

Eppes, Mrs. Lucy, letter from, i. 110. 

Eppes, Mrs. Martha, i. 102 n. 

Eppes, Symonds, i. Ill ». 

Epping, 5. 261, 307. 

Epps, Major, 5. 406. 

Epps, Daniel, 5. 132. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETr. 



389 



Epps, Sanniol, cousin of John Winlhrop, 
Jr., 8. 148, 149, loS! 450, 657. Sails 
for England, 5. 4. Death of, in Lon- 
don, 5. 91 ; 8. 454. 

Epsom, Jing., 7. 204, 2.18. 

Erskin, Mr., sworn as witness, 7. 230. 

Erskine, Rev. Dr., 2. 424. 

Erskine, Sir William, 4. 76. Lands at 
Fairfield with British troops, 10. 69. 
Wounded in action at Germantown, 
10. 99. 

Erving, John, 5. 68-65. 

Erving, Rev. John, U.D., 2. 368, 368 ; 3. 
311,341. 

Escourt, Ephraim, i. 501. 

Escutcheons, 6. 300, 303. 

Esrom, taking of, by the Grand Seignior, 
8. 11. 

' Essay on the Agitation of the Sea,' 2. 25, 
31, 251-253. 

Esscombuet, an Indian, 6. 38*, 40* 73*. 

Essecombewit's Submission, 6. 417. 

Esse.x, a negro child, 7. 174. 

Esso.x County, 5. 317, 3-39, .373, 416 ; 6. 
47* 118* 63, 105; 7. 121, 2y7. 

Essex, Enq., 5. xvi. 

Essex Galley, the, 8. 554. 

Essex Institute at Salem, 5. xvi. 

Essex soldiers, slain by Indians, 7. 100. 

Essex Street, 7. 343 

Estabrooks, Mrs. Abigail, 6. 10. 

Estabrooks, Rev. Benjamin, 5. 435; 6. 11. 

Estabrooks, Daniel, 6. 10, 11. 

Estabrooks, Joseph. 5. 89. 

Estaing, Charles Hector Tlie'odat, Comte 
d', 2. 20, 21 ; 4. 90-92, 97, 98, 124. 
Arrival at Sandy Hook with French 
fleet, 10. 117. To operate against Rhode 
Island, 10. 118, 119. With his fleet at 
Rhode Island, 10. 122. Gone to Boston 
with his fleet, 10. 124. Mentioned, 10. 

139. Wounded in assault at Savannah, 
10. 146. 

Estwick, Mr., 8. 385. 

Ethiopian John, baptized, 7. 367. 

Eugene, Prince, 6. 269. 

Euphrates, prophecies concerning the, 6. 

140, 141. 

Euphrates River, 5. 68, 69, 437; 6. 55, 

140; 7.321. 
Europe, every power in, except France 

liad refused to receive a minister from 

the United States, 4. 440. ISIentioned, 

5. 336, 359 ; 6. 91*, 94*, 217. 306. 
European Plantations in America, 6. 217. 
Eustace, ^rr., 5. 442 : 6. 332, 357. 
Eustus, William, 7. 227. 
Evans, Mr., 1041, i. 148, 150. 
Evans, Mr., 1690, 5. 333 ; 6. 308. 
Evans, David, 8. 61. Death of, 8. 251. 
Evans, Eleanor, 5. 54. 
Evans, Rev. Israel, 2. 36, 110, 122, 125, 

408, 411 ; 3. 103, 141, 145, 149, .300, 304. 

Installed minister of Concord, N. H , 

3- 148. 



I Evans, Cnpt. John, 2. 387, 398, 309. 
I Evans, Jonatlian, 5. 228. 
P>ans, Richard, i. 501. 

1 Evarton, , nmriner, 8. 555. 

Eve, J/;s. Judith, mentioned in will of 
I Edward Hopkins, g. 19. 
Everenden, S, 5. 41. 
Everenden, Walter, 5. 208. 
Everet, Capt. Clement, 8. 239. 
Everett, Edward, 5. 447. 
Everett, Rei: Oliver, 3. 264, 265. 
Everit, 3/r.s-., 6. 17*. 
Everton, J/r,s., 6. 124. 
Evesham, Knf/., 6. 269. 
Ewing, Gen. James, 4. 33. 
Exceter, shi/i, 5. 273, 274. 
Exchange Tavern, 5. 399, 495, 498; 6. 

224, 226, 386, 406 ; 7. 222, 367. 
Exchange, the, 5. 161, 247 ; 6. 42.3. 
Execution, at Salem, 5. 363-365. Of 

David Wallis, 6. 399. Of the Pirates, 

from Boston ' News Letter,' 6. 109, 

110. 
Executor, power of an, to sue, 8. 423. 
Exeter, xY. H., 1. 824 n. ; 5. 122, 128, 338; 

6. 45*, 64*, 30, 38 ; 7. 220, 343. 
Expedition, against the French, 6. 265. 

To attack Quebec, 6. 313, 321. 
Expenses of the Commissioners to France, 

4. 370-372. 
Exports, table showing the. from England 

to the Colonics, 9. 424. From England 

to America, 9.' 479. 
Extract from English Journal about De- 
bate in Parliament as to Queen Anne's 

Succession, 6. 160. 
Eyers, Thomas, i. 36, 39. 
E>re, Mrs., 5. 182, 455 ; 6. 80, 128, 195, 

356 ; 7. 168. 
Eyre, Rev. Mr., chaplain at the Castle, 7. 

262. Resigns cliaj)laincy, 7. 308. 
Eyre, Bethiah, 6. 3s3 ; 7. 262. 
Evre, Eliza, 5. H'S. 
E>re, John, 5. 182, 338, 4.39, 457, 479, 482, 

496, 503 ; 6. 8, 15, 10 ; 7. 123, 149, 168, 

176, 178, 262, 360, 368 ; 8. 492. 
Eyre, Mrs. John (Katherine), 6. 383; 7. 

168,176,211,262. 
Eyre, John, Jr., 7. 262, 204, 265, 267, 269. 

271, 360. 
Eyre, Joseph, 5. 103. 
P^yre, Katherine, Jr., 7. 262. 
Eyre, Thomas, 5. 103. 
Eyre, William, 5. 103. 



F. 

Faber, Pierre Jean, i. 140, 1-52, 159. 
Facines, gabions, etc., concerning the 
making of, 10. 142. 

Fairbank, , 6. 76. 

Fairbanks, Mary, 5. xxxii, xxxiii. 



300 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Fairfax, Thomas, Lord, resigns command 

of English forces, 8. 211. 
Fairfield, Conn., negroes kidnapped at, 3. 

o2. Burned by the British, 4. 109. 

Mentioned, 5. 475 ; 8. 349. Sickness 

at, 8. 51. Town in Connecticut, 9. 48. 

Deed of, given by Sascoe Indians, 9. 

108. Concerning certain land grants, 

9. 128. Court held at, to settle estate 

of John White, 9. 138. Landing of 

British troops at, 10. 59. 
Fair Oak, Euq., 5. 295. 
Fairwether, John, 8. 143. 

Fales, , innkeeper, 7. 227. 

Falkland, ship, 5. 444. 
Falkland Islands, taking of, from Eng- 
land by Spain, 9 450. Cost of the 

dispute over, 9. 475. 
Fallopius, Gabriel, i. 154. 
Falmouth, Enq., 5. 403, 413; 6 54. 
Falmouth, Mass., i. 239 m.; 6. 1(50, 183, 

432 ; 7. 378. 
Faneuil, Mons., a French officer of 1777, 4. 

48, 69. 
Faneuil, Andrew, 5. 61, 62, 291, 292. 
Faneuil, Benjamin, 5. xxxviii, 291, 292. 
Faneuil, John, 5. 291, 292. 
Faneuil, Peter, 5. 61-65. 
Faneuil Hall, 5. 161 ; 6. 399. 
Faning, Nell, i. 104. 
Fannevol, Mr., 5. 279, 281, 291. 
Fanning, Lieut, and Col.,^mk at camp at 

Roxbury, 9. 500. Taken prisoner, 10. 

29, 58, 74. 
Fannvil, Mr., 5. 345. 
Farjeham, Enr/., 5. 299. 
Farmer, John, his edition of Belknap's 

' New Hampshire ' cited, 2. 10 n. 
Farmer's Letters, the, 9. 291. 
Farmington, town in Connecticut, 5. 464 ; 6. 

8*; 8. 56, 111; 9. 18. Powder stored 

at, 10. 94, 201. 

Farnham, , Sen., killed, 1701, 6. 51. 

Farnum, David, 1706, deposition concern- 
ing land, 6. 408 ; 7. 244. 
Farnum, to7rn, 5. 268, 300. 
Farren, James, i. 222. 
Farrington, Louisa E., 5. xxxii. 
Farrington, Lieut.-Col. Thomas, 4. 56. 
Farwell, Mr., concerning Mrs. Avery's 

mortgage, 5. 213, 216. 
Farwell, Henry, Dvnstable, 6. 409. 
Fast, or Fasts, 5. 50, 66; 6. 2, 7, 28, 65, 

121; 7.1, 13, 15,41-43. 
Faunce, Mathias, i. 486. 
Faunce (Fance), Deacon Thomas, 5. 470; 

7. 376. 
Fausdicke, Sarah, 6. 415. 
Faxon, Thomas, 5. 128. 
Fayall, 6. 54. 
Faver wether, Copt. John, 5. 67, 124, 169, 

208, 211, 214, 221, 235, 316, 438, 4-57, 

488, 495; 6. 11* 25, 260, 251, 319, 343, 

344. 
Faymouth, 5. 270, 493. 



Fayrebanks, Richard, i. 486. 
Favrewether, Thomas, 5. 90 ; 7. 223. 
Feake, ]\[rs. Elizabetli, i. 7, 34, 118, 225. 
Feake, Robert, i. 225??. 
Featherstone, Mr., i. 183, 184, 186. 
Feaver, Nicholas, executed, 5. 8. 
Febe's Neck, a road, 7. 19. 
Federal Capital, the, 2. 416. 
Federal Constitution, the, 2. 495, 496, 498 ; 

6. 2, 29, 30, 33, 34, 36, 87, 39, 47-50, 54, 

65, 57, 58. Massachusetts convention 

to ratify, 3. 5-10, 13-17. 
Federal Street Church, Boston, 2. 447 »., 

454. Dr. Belknap called to, 2. 457, 458. 
Federalists, 4. 470, 471, 476. 
Fellmonger, Mr., Bristol, 5. 148. 
Fellmonger. Mrs. Anne, 5. 148. 
Felloes, Richard, Hartford, 8. 44. 
Fellows, Lieut., a brother of Capt. Fellows, 

10. 30. 
Fellows, Mrs., 5. 35. 
Fellows, Capt. Isaac, held as prisoner by 

the British, 10. 26, 30. 
Fellows, Gen. John, 4. 15, 217. 
Fellows of Harvard College, 5. 322, 480 ; 

6. 12*, 81, 100, 133, 165, 195, 196, 209, 
318, 332, 861, 392 ; 7. 78. 

Fen, Benjamin, Milford, death of, 1673, 
8. 146. 

Fenn, Benjamin, /e(?-oc, 1684, 9. 138. 

Fenner, Capt. Arthur, notice of, i. 106 n. 

Fenno, Mrs., death of, 1718, 6. 409. 

Fenno, , constable, 6. 422; 7. 118. 

Fenno, John, 3. 122, 123, 126, 130, 132, 
241, 248, 260, 274, 278, 281, 295, 297, 
304, 314, 315, 317, 320, 828, 344, 360, 
354. 

Fenno, John Ward, 4. 464. 

Fenwick, Elizabeth, i. 419. 

Fenwick (Fenick), George, i. 92 n., 129, 
130, 241, 256, 419, 482, 483. Letter 
from, I. 223. 

Fenwick (Phenwick), George, 8. 39. Let- 
ter of John Clarke concernijig estate 
of, 9 24. Concerning certain land 
purchased of, 9. 115, 381, 413. Dona- 
tion toward erecting a college, 9. 391. 
Mentioned, 9. 403. 

Fenwick, Mary, letter from, i. 92. 

Ferguson, Gen. Sir H. R., 6. 188. 

Fermous, Neicfoundland, i. 120. 

Ferris, Joshua, 4. 181. 

Fessenden (Fissenden), Nicholas, son of 
Nicholas, 5. 98, 115, 118, 198, 363; 6. 
135, 328 ; 7. 93, 125. 

Fissenden, Aunt, England, 5. xxii, 52, 293; 
7-93. 

Fissenden, Benjamin, Cambridge, Mass., 

7. 9.3, 187. 

Fissenden, Elizabeth, England, 5. xxii, 

52, 293. 
Fissenden, Hannah, England, 5. xix, 5, 

51, 364. 
Fissenden, Jane, England, 5. 50, 52, 293. 
Fissenden, John, England, 5. xxii, 293. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



391 



Fissenden, Mary, England, 5. xxii, 52, 

203. 
Fissenden, Nicholas, Sin., Camhriihje, 

Enff., 5. 6, 51 ; 7. 100, 125, 213, 230. 
Fissenden, Mrs. i^icliolas (Margaret), 7. 

93. 
Fever in Pliiladelphia, see Philadelphia. 
Fevers, antidote for, 8. 429. 
Ficinus, Marsilius (Marcilio Fieino), name 

given as a compliment to John VVin- 

tlirop, Jr., I. 210/1. 
Fidelity, ship, 5. 249, 254. 

Field, , London, Eng., 2. 125 ; 3. 103. 

Fiennes, Charles, 9. 381. 

Fifield, Mrs., 7. 265. 

Fifield. Mrs. E., 5 222. 

Fifield, Giles, 5. 222 ; 6. 301. 

Fifield, Mrs. Maria, 6. 373. 

Fifield, Mrs. Mary, 6. 373. 

Fifield, Mehetable, 5 432. 

Fifield, Richard, 5 222 ; 6. 12, 32, 33, 373. 

Figges, , master of school at Ramsey, 

5 xii- 

Finance, Superintendent of, statement of 
deficiency in, 10. 2-58. A call upon the 
Legislatures to supply the deficiency 
in, 10. 258. 

Finances, the, in a state of derangement, 
10. 212. 

Finch, Catherine, see Wentworth, Mrs. 

Finch, Capt. Jeremiah, 7. 317. 

Finch, .S/V Movie, i. 187 n. 

Fine, for drinking, etc., 6. 420, 421. Im- 
posed upon the son of Ann Piiillips, 8. 
100. 

Finley, Mrs. Ann (Clarkson), 3. 243. 

Finley, Rebecca {Mrs. Breese). 3. 371 n. 

Finley, Rev. Samuel, D.D., 2. 8, 10 ; 3. 127, 
371 n. 

Fire, 6. 115, 235, 2-58, 330, 418-421 ; 7. 
284, 312, 324. Boston's first great, 1G53. 
5. 28. At Coney's Street, 5. 37. At 
S. S.'s House, 6. 258, 289, 35(3. In 
Boston, 1711, 6. 323, 330. 

Fires, extraordinary casualties by, in 
England, i. 454. 

Fire-ships, 6. 321. 

Firmin, Giles, i. 199 n. 

Firmin, Mrs. Martha, t. 109 /!. 

First Church. 5. xxxvii, fil, 02, 11.3, 121, 
363, 430, 432 ; 6. 46, 100, 120, 158, 2'K, 
323, 324, 378, 385. 397 ; 7. 59, 105, 215, 
341, 302. 

First English woman in Boston, 7. 308. 

Fisher, Daniel, elected Assistant, 8. 430. 

Fisher, Dr. Joshua, 2. 386, 389, 395 ; 3. 
171, 173, 175. 

Fisher, Rfiv. Nathaniel, 7. 261. 

Fisher's Island, i. 416; 8. 222, 285 n., 
384 ; 9. 140. Letters concerning the 
patent of, 8. 285-290, 294. Warrant of 
Governor of Connecticut concerning, 
8. 285. Letter of Wait Winthrop con- 
cerning the patent of, 8. 420. Plunder 
of pirates at, 8. 494. Concerning ten- 



ants for, 8. 528, 531, 542. Concerning 
some deer for, 8. 536. Concerning im- 
I)rovements on, 8. 639. 

Fisherton Bridge, 5. 290. 

Fishery, American, considered in Parlia- 
ment, 9. 219, 20(3. 

Fishkill, N. Y., 4. 177, 189, 190, 19.]. 
Provisions sent to, 10. 213. Transpor- 
tation of powder to, 10. 241. 

Fishmongers' Co., London, 5. 93. 

Fisk, Copt., 6. 104. 

Fisk, Rec. Mr., Dorchesler, i. 448. 

Fisk, David, 6. 136. 

Fisk, John, 7. 198. 

Fisk, Rev. Moses, 5. 387. 

Fisk, Mrs. Moses (Ami), 5. 36G. Death 
of, 6. 228. 

Fisk. Rev. Samuel, 7. 98, 119, 125, 138, 
154, 155, 207, 237, 242, 273, 337, 366. 

Fisk, Thomas, 5. 17. 

Fitch, Lieut., a prisoner of war, 1777, 10. 
29, 74. 

Fitch, Ret: Mr., 7. 110, 221. 

Fitcii, Mrs. Abiel, 6 411. 

Fitch, Benjamin, 6. 8, 411. 

Fitch, Daniel, governor at Antigua, 8. 256. 
Manuscript of, 9. 382. 

Fitch, Elizabeth, 6 411. 

Fitch, Jabez, i. 440 ; 5. 485. 

Fitch, James, witness to deed, 9. 80. 

Fitch, Major James, 8. 499, 506. Let- 
ter of Fitz-John Winthrop to, 8. 29.^. 
Complaint of B. Palmer and Samuel 
Cleveland against, 8. 506. Outrages 
at Quinibaug'^ 8 511, 517, 518. 

Fitcli, Jeremiah, 6. 411. 

Fitch, John, 6. 411. 

Fitch, Capt. Joseph, 8. 310, 313, 318. En- 
gaged in expedition against Canada, 8. 
315. Concerning sale of certain land, 
8. 460. 

Fitch, Martha, 6. 411 ; 7. 362, 364. 

Fitch, Mary, 6. 411. 

Fitch, Samuel, 6. 411. 

Fitch, Sarali, 6. 411. 

Fitch, Col. Thomas, son of Thomas, Sen., 
6. 35, 36, 98. 186, 2.35', 251, 253, 272, 
297, 308, .309, 346, 356, ,381, 383, 394, 
410, 411,416; 7. 38, 60, 60, 72-75, 77, 
101, 111, 11.3, 110, 120. 1.34, 140, 140. 
157. 101, 162, 170, 177, 180, 182, 187. 
191, 210, 229, 240, 242, 244, 245. 204, 
276, 278. 286, 288, 292. 204. 297, 310, 
311, 329, 330, 330, 349, .303, 364, 367, 
372, 375. His heirs, pedigree, and will, 
6.411. 

Fitch, Mmhme Col. Thomas (Abiel), 6. 
411; 7. 98, 364. 

Fitch, Thomas, Jr., .<ion of Col. Thomas, 
death of, 1713,6.410.411. 

Fitch, Thomas, Sen., death of, 1098, 6. 
411. 

Fitch, Mrs. Thomas (Martlia), Sm., 6 
411. 

Fitch, Zacharv, 6. 411. 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Fitzherbert, William, signs petition, 9. 

454. 
Five Nations, of Indians, 5. 430 ; 6. 262, 
319 ; 7. 10. Concerning peace with, 8. 
879, obO. Tlieir peaceable intentions, 
8. 306, 308, 311, 381, 533. Earl of Bel- 
lomont's treaty with, 8. 351, 376, 378. 
Flack, Widow, 6. 068. 
Flack, Samuel, 7. 160. 
Flack, Mrs. Samuel (Anne), 7. 160. 
Flag, of Truce, 4. 119, 257, 260, 2U1, 276, 
277; 6. 3y* 47*-50*, 74* 115* 116*, 
125* 126* 259, 260. Hoisted half-way, 
6. 252. Admiral's, 6. 318. Letter of 
Gov. Trumbull concerning the protec- 
tion of, 10. 225. 

Flags, letter of Gen. Washington con- 
cerning, 10. 273. 

Flamsted, John, 5. 252. 

Flats, the, about four miles from Albany, 
8. 313. 

Flavell, Eev. John, 5. 247, 256, 273, 336 ; 
6. 60. Lines on his Sermon, bv S. Sew- 
all, 5 510. His works, 6. 122", 338. 

Flaxseed, concerning exportation of, 9. 
215. 

Fleet, John, 2. 177 ; 3. 300. 

Fleet, Thomas, 2. 177; 3 276, 300, 303; 
5. 108 ; 7. 84, 85, 98. 

Fleet, Thomas & John, Messrs., 3. 271, 
279, 284, 280, 289. 

Fleet, arrival of the French, at Newport, 
4. 161. Mentioned, 5. 327-329, 400 ; 6. 
41*, 74*, 128* 129* 72, 82, 98, 112, 140, 
142, 161, 190, 220, 259, 265, 293, 313, 
816. Of English and Dutch men-of- 
war, 6. 53*. For Canada, 6. 315. Sail- 
ing of, from Boston, against Canada, 
8. 493. 

Fleet Fever, 5. 380. 

Fleming, , 5. 294. 

Fletcher, Col. and Gov. Benjamin, i. 444, 
445 ; 5. 362. Concerning his raising 
militia in State of Connecticut, 8. 327, 
330. Governor of Province of New 
York, 8. 327 ; 9. 176. 

Fletcher, Edward, 6. 113. 

Fletcher, H., 7. 120. 

Fletcher, Samuel, 4. 92. 

Flies, a great swarm of, at Wethersfield, 
8. 129. 

Flint, Rev. Josiah, Dorchester, 5. 32, S3, 
46, 83 ; 6. 165, 802, 331, 339, 406 ; 7. 50, 
149. 

Flint, Mrs., Jr., 5. 32, 83 : 6. 253. 

Flint, Mrs., Sen., 5. 32, 07, 83; 6. 253. 

Flint, Deborah, 6. 210. 

Flint, Henry, 5. 180, 381; 6. 209, 232, 294; 
7. 194. 

Flint, Mrs. Margery, 5. 169, 180, 208 ; 7. 
294. 

Flint, Rev. Moses, 6. 80, 81 ; 7. 9, 218, 
222. 

Flint, Roval, 3. 290. 

Flint, Ruth, 5. 1, 24. 



\ Flint, Seth, 5. 1. 
Flint, Thomas, i. 221, 222, 495, 
Flint, William, i. 38. 
Floid, Noah, 6. 16*. 
Flood, Gammar, 5. 183. 
Flood, Henry, 5. 123. 
Flood, Hugh, 5. 214. 
Flood, Mary, 5. 123. 
Flood, Sarah, 5. 123. 
Florida, i. 341. Gulf of, waterspout seen 

in, 8. 94. 
Flowers, Capt. Samuel, 4. 154. 
Flucker, , mariner, taken by pirates, 

7. 307. 

Flume, Dr. Belknap's account of a, in 
Salmon River, N. H., 2. 164-156, 160. 

'Foresters,' the, 2. 421, 424, 474, 482,484, 
489, 492, 496; 3. 1, 13, 15,135-137, 141, 
197, 200, 278, 285, 289, 293, 295, 297, 
313, 317, 427. Anecdote about the 
authorship of, 3. 227. 

Flying Horse, ship, 6. 51*. 

Flying Post, newspajier, 5. 464 ; 7. 84, 222. 

Flynt, Anna, 5. 52, 53 ; 7. 194. 

Flynt, Dorothy, 5. xxiii. 

Flynt, Indiiferent, 6. 357. 

Foe, Dishey, a French prisoner, 6. 47*, 
48*. 

Folsoni, Hannah, 5. xxix. 

Fones, Cujit., 5. 77. 

Fones, Ann, i. 70 n. 

Fones, Anne, 8. 19 n. 

Fones, Elizabeth, see Feake, Mr.<;. 

Fones, Elizabeth, ivije 0/ Henri/ Winthrop, 

8. 178 n. 

Fones, John, 9. 153. 

Fones, Martha, see Winthrop, Mrs., 8 25, 

36. 
Fones, Mary, i. 71 ; 8. 22, 197. 
Fones, Mrs. Priscilla, see Paynter, Mrs. 
Fones, Samuel, i. 118, 225. 
Fones, Thomas, i. 71, 114 «., 176. His 
death, i. 70 n. Mentioned, 8. 7, 9. 
Death of, 8. 19 n. Letter of Henry 
AVintlirop to, 8. 179. At Ipswich, 8. 
186. 
Fones, Ursula, 8. 196 n., 198. 
Fonthill, En(]., 5. 296. 
Foote, Pasco, 8. 433. 

Forage, for the army, 4. 36, 39, 130, 172, 
174, 184, 187. An important foraging 
party, 4 174, 175. Concerning a sup- 
ply of, 10. 127. For the Light Dra- 
goons, 10. 151. 
Forbes, Mr., 1. 166. 
Forbes, Bishop Patrick, 6. 94. 
Forbidden Marriages, 5. 407. 
Fordham, Rev. Robert, i. 371. 
Foreland, Mr., 6. 410. 
Forgery of Penn's Will, 7. 88. 
Forkner, D., 5. 306. 
Forman, Gen. David, 4. 205. 
Fornandez, Mr., an officer, 10. 53. 
Fort, the, 5. 100 ; 6. 89 ; 7. 365. Governor 
of, 7. 365. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



303 



Fort Ann, 6. 141. BuiKling of, on Kenne- 
bec Hiver, 8. 487. 

Fort Conotitution, on the Hudson River, 
10. 18. 

Fort Dummer, 7. 304. 

Fort Edward, retirement of Gen. Schuy- 
ler from, 10. 89. As a place of defence, 
lo. 91. 

Fort-Fight, 5. 159, 508. 

Fort Granby, capture of, 4. 215. 

Fort Hill, 5. 141, 163, 174, 175, 190-192, 
194, 195, 197, 335, 377, 470 ; 6. 353 ; 7. 
350. 

Fort James, surrender of, to the Dutch, 

9. 88«. 

Fort Lamot, 8. 3 1(5. 

Fort Mifflin, attacked by the enemy, 10. 

101. 
Fort Montgomery, on the Hudson River, 

10. 18. 

Fort Mott. capture of, 4. 215. 

Fort Orania, i. 399. 

Fort Richmond, 7. 350. 

Fort St. Andrew, 5. 490. 

Fort St. George, 5. 498. 

Fort Schuyler, a f/arrison p«st, 10. 214. 

Fort Stanwix, success of Gen. Gansevoort 
at, 10. 94. 

Fort Trumbull, mentioned, 9. 1 n. 

Fort Washington, capture of, 4. 23. 

Fort William, 5. 488; 6. 141. 

Forth, John, i. 242 n. 

Forth, ^lary, see Winthrop, ]\Irs. 

Forth, Philip, letter from, i. 242. 

Forth, William, i. 242 n. 

Fortification on the Neck, 6. 225, 309 ; 7. 
134, 137. 

Forster, Dr. Isaac, 4. 108. 

Fortescue, Sir Jolin, 4. 324. 

Fosdick, Mrs., 7. 243. 

Fosdike, Mr., 8. 375, 476, 490. 

Foss, Joshua, Jr., 2. 426, 478. 

Foster, Capt. and Col. John, i. 351 ; 5. 
381, 390, 391, 393, 406, 425, 435, 453, 
470, 489, 492, 495, 502, 506 ; 6. 2, 5, 42, 
43, 68, 92, 103, 109, 122, 130, 134, 138, 
154, 132, 174, 208, 219, 229, 240, 256, 
259, 262, 273, 280, 299, .303, 312, .331 ; 
7. 229 ; 8. 456. .525, 533, 553, 566, 570 

Foster, Mr., artist, Enqland, i. 335. 

Foster, Mrs., 5. 205, 411 ; 6. 11*; 7. 20. 

Foster, Rev. Mr., 5. 3-32. 

Foster, Mrs. Abigail, 6. 300, 303; 7. 
354. 

Foster Comfort, 3 7. 333. 

Foster, Danforth.^ 7. 333. 

Foster, E<lward,^ 7. .333. 

Foster, Elisha,^ 7. 33-;. 

Foster, Elizabeth, 5. 108. 

Foster, Elizabeth.^ 7. 333. 

Foster, Hope, 7. 3-33. 

Foster, Hopestiil,i 7. 333, 334. 

Foster, Mrs. Hopestill^ (Patience), 7. 
3.33. 

Foster, Capt. Hopcstill,- 7. 33-3, 334. 



Foster, Mrs. Cnpt. H.- (Mary), 7. 333. 

Foster, Hopestill,^ 7. 333. 

Foster, Mrs. Hopestlll^ (Elizabeth), 7. 

Foster, Hopestill,< 7. 333. 

Foster, Mrs. llopestill* (Elizabeth), 7. 
333. 

Foster, Hopestill.s 7. 333. 

Foster, Hopestill,*' 7. 333. 

Foster, Mrs. Ilopestill" (Sarah), 7. 333. 

Foster, Hopestili,^ 7. 333. 

Foster, Mrs. Hopestill," 7. 333. 

Foster, Rev. Isaac, 5. 50 ; 7. 20. 

Foster, James,"^ 7. 333. 

Foster, John, i. 397 n., 399, 474. 

Foster, John, author of the Almanac, 
death of, 1681, 5. 49, 57. 

Foster, Jolin,^ 7. 333; 8. 492. Map of 
Boston by, 8. 421. 

Foster, Col. John, 6. 300. 

Foster, Eydia, 6. 800. 

Foster, Mary,» 7. 333. 

Foster, Patience,* 7. 33.3, 334. 

Foster, Richard, 5. 409. 

Foster, Richard,* 7. 333. 

Foster, Mrs. S., 5. 500 ; 6. 91. 

Foster, Standfast,* 7. 333. 

Foster, Deacon Thomas, 4. 357, 365. 

Foster, Thankfull,^ 7. 333, 334. 

Foster, Timothy, 7. 367. 

Fosterling, Mr., 5. 31. 

Fountain, Rev. Peter, 6. 262. 

Four Churches, Names of the, 6. 385. 

Foveran, Scotland, 7. 151. 

Fowl, Capt., 6. 89. 

Fowl-Meadow, 6. 65. 

Fowle, Mrs., i. 11. 

Fovvle, David, his ' New Hampshire Ga- 
zette,' 2. 108, 132. 

Fowle, Thomas, i. 188, 189. 

Fowler, James, 5. 163. 

Fox, Mr., Emjland, 9. 345. 

Fox, Rev. Jabez, 5. 29, 435, 460; 6. 62, 
74. 

Fox, Mrs. Jabez (Judith), 6. 18*, 74, 

Fox, George, 2. 328. 339. 

Fox, Martyrol, 6. 20*. 

Vox, frigate,/^. 69. 

Fox Point in Dorchester, men-of-war 
fired upon at, 9. 500. 

Foxcroft, ilAr., iiorse sold to, 8. 448. 

Foxcroft, Eliza. 5. 99. 

Foxcroft, Francis, 5. 1.33, 184, 337, 386, 
469, 496, 5(iJ ; 6. 6, 47, 61, 06, 67, 98, 
111, 128,214,270, 357; 7. 50, 80, 125, 
218, 289, 379, 380. 

Foxcroft, Mrs. Francis (Elizabeth) 5. 
504; 7. 289. 

Foxcroft, ifad. or Mrs. Martha, 5. 419 ; 
6. 343. 403. 

Foxcroft, Rev. Thomas. 5. 64. 65 ; 7. 108, 
124, 125, 148, 171, 17-5, 186, 187, 214, 
215, 222, 2:W, 247, 257, 280, 281, 283, 
284, 312. 3.30, 332, 374, 380. Sermons 
of, 7. 2.34, 237, 238, 326. 



394 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Foxcroft, Mrs. Thomas (Anna), 7. 215, 
217, 247. 

Foy, Capt. John. 5. 50, 93, 177, 196, 209, 
219, 23.5, 268-270, 356, 480, 493; 6. 14* 
17*, 251, 279, 327 ; 7. 68, 69, 328 ; 8. 
423, 434, 480, 484, 527, 545. 

Foy, Mrs. John (Dorothy), 7. 328. 

Foye, Mrs. Elizabeth, 7. 295, 328. 

Foye, William, 7. 94, 117, 156, 328. 

Foyes. Mr., 6. 248. 

Frame, Richard, 5. 390. 

Framingham, 6. o4. 

France, arrival of arms from, 4. 43, 50, 
52, 78. AHiance with, 4. 85. Arrival 
of minister from, 4. 122. Celebration 
of the birth of the Dauphin of, 4. 261. 
Resistance to, one of Adams's princi- 
ples of the Revolution, 4. 338-340. 
Adams opposed to alliance with, 4. 
350. Adams's letter on Commission- 
ers to, 4. 368-371. Expenses of the 
Commissioners to, 4. 370-372. Pres. 
Adams keeps peace with, 4. 470, 
471. Mentioned, 5. 130, 246, 255, 350, 
356, 457, 472, 492, 608; 6. 129* 33, 
142, 217, 269, 392; 7. 126, 217, 301. 
Concerning England's negotiations 
with, 9. 304 Threatens war with Eng- 
land, 9. 385, 395. Changes at the court 
of, 9. 472. Sends arms and military 
stores, 10. 54. Favorably disposed to- 
ward the Colonies, 10. 67. In policy 
between Hritain and the Colonies, 10. 
113. Minister and consul of, 10. 164. 
His Majesty of, sends an army to as- 
sist the Colonies, 10. 164. Dissatisfied 
with want of exertion of the Colonial 
States in the war, 10. 267. See French 
Army ; French Fleet. 

France and Holland, rumors of war be- 
tween, 8. 261, 264. 

France and Spain, skirmishes between, 
8. 571. 

Francis, Ebenezer (?), 5. 61. 

Francis, John, 5. 5. 

Francis, Phillipp, i. 501. 

Francis, Richard, (Avnhridqe, death of, 
5. 171. 

Francis, Stephen, 5. 380. 

Francisco, negro, 7. 335. 

Franklin, Governor, granting protections, 
10. 52, 57, 59. 

Franklin, Mmhnn, 7. 308, 369. 

FrankUn, Benjamin, 2. 25. 309. 4.32 : 3. .39, 
43, 71, 155, 157, 190, 239, 294, 296. 401, 
419; 4. 293, 312, 322, 325, 367, 368, 
371-373, 384, 390, 395, 407-409, 411- 
414, 420, 421, 424, 426-431, 440, 444, 
446, 447, 449, 455, 458, 461, 462, 488, 
489. Not liked bv Mr. Adams, 4. 408, 
409, 413, 414. O'pinirns of Mr. Ad- 
ams in regard to, 4. 426-428, 431, 488. 
Conmiissioned, with Adams and oth- 
ers, to negotiate for peace, 4. 457-459. 
Commissioned with the same, to accept 



the mediation of Germany and Russia, 
4. 459, 460. Mentioned, 6. 73, 236, 381 ; 
7. 171, 361. Agent in London for Col- 
ony of Massachusetts, 10. 293. Letter 
from Joseph Warren to, in London, 10. 
293. 
Franklin, Ebenezer, 6. 73. 
Franklin, Henry, 7. 189, 342, 361. 
Franklin, Mrs. Henry (Margaret), 7 

361. 
Franklin, James, 5. 252 ; 7. 84. 
Franklin, John, 7. 361. 
Franklin, Josiali, lutlicr of Bnijomhi, 6 

236, 381; 7. 75, 136, "155, 171, 21b, 

361. 
Franklin, William, 7. 361. 
I Franklin, Gov. William, 2. 182. 
' Franklin Alley, 5. 202. 
Franklin Street, 5. 202 ; 6. 114. 
Franks, Major David S., 4. 165. 
Frary, Abigail, 6. 23 ; 7. 349. 
Frary, Eleazer, 7. 100. 
Frary, Hannah, duuylder of Thtophilus, 6. 

23 ; 7. 160. 
Frary, John, 7. 160. 
Frary, Mehitable, 6. 23. 
Frary, Sampson, 7. 160. 
Frary, Lieut, or dipt. Theophilus. 5. 55, 

58, 92, 102, 103, 117, 121, 124, 125, 130, 

136, 139, 147, 169, 171, 172, 179, 214, 

217,226, 230, 317, 322, 326, 329, 334, 

335, 337, 341, 342, 351, 367, 382, 414, 

417, 420, 421, 425, 434, 459, 474, 477, 

479, 480, 496 ; 6. 8, 23 ; 7. 160, 349, 

372. Will of, 7. 160. 
Frary, il7?s. Theophilus (Mary), 7. 160. 
Frary, Mrs. Theophilus (Hannah), 5. 

322 ; 6. 23 ; 7. 349. 
Frary Family and Estate, 6. 23. 

Frasier, , a Jew, 6. 80*. 

Frazon, Joseph, 6. 95. 

Freak, John, death of, by blowing 

up of a vessel at Boston, 6. 370 ; 8. 

168. 
Freak, Mrs. John (Mary Clarke), 5. 310 ; 

6. 370. 
Freak, Mary, daughter of John, married 

Josiah Walcot, 5. 390." 
Frederick 11. of Prussia, 4. 323, 440. 
Frederikshall, Noriraij, 7. 217. 
' Free Tlioughts on the Toleration of 

Popery,' 3. 342. 
Free trade granted at Genoa, 8. 9. 
Freeman, liev. James, 2. 500; 3. 213, 

315, 345. His 'Journal,' 2. 227. His 

' Historv of Cape Cod,' see Cape Cod. 
Freeman, John, 8. 10, 12. 
Freeman, Nathaniel. 7. 115. 
Freeman, Samuel, Secretary/ of Provincial 

Congress, 10. 303. 
' Freemason,' see Eliot, John. 
Freetown, 7. 14, 329. 
French, , innkeeper, 6. 396; 7. 57, 102, 

103, 227. 
French, Capt., 6. 127. 



« 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



395 



French, Goodman, ]\is daughter, i. "201. 
French, John, 5. 1"JS. 
French, Thomas, i. 200 ; 5. 100. 
Frencli, in Canada, or Acadia, 6. 142 ; 

7. 347. Expedition against, 8. 0OG-0I8. 
Concernin;? the subjection of places 
in Canada^S. 103. Treaty of, with the 
Indians, 8. 103. Forces of, at Canada, 

8. 118. 

French Army, 4. 69, 173. Strengtli of, 
in America (1782), 4. 2.J2. Good feel- 
ing between the, and the Ameri(;an, 4. 
278, 279. To join tlie American, at 
North River, 10. 238. Quartered for 
the winter in Yorktown, 10. 237. 

Frencii Cliurch in Boston, 5. 4;il ; 7. 45. 

Frencli descent on Newfoundland, 6. 73*. 

French Heet, 4. 22.5 ; 5. 330. Affray 
between sailors and people in Rostoii, 

4. 95. Arrival of, in Newport, 4. 1(31. 
Departure of, 4. 278. Arrival of, at 
Sandy Hook, 10 117. Arrival of, ex- 
pected, 10. 173. Arrival of, expected 
at New York, 10 187. 

French fort, capture of, 5. 321. 

French goods, prohibition of, into Eng 

land, taken off, 8. 421. 
French Governor, at Port Roval, 6. 37*, 

39*, 48*, 49*. 
French King, 5. IIG, 332, 401, 403, 478; 

6. 88, 89; 8. 434. 
Frencli men-of-war, 5. 24G, 346, 350; 

6. 82. 
French messengers from Canada, 6. 301, 

302. 
French missionary at Norridgewock, 7. 

92. 
French pickeroon seizes seven vessels, 

5. 405. 

French priests, 6. 58*, 60» 61*. 

French prisoners, 6. 37*. 39*, 47* 48* 49«, 
83* 260. 

French privateers, 6. 99, 194. 

French prize, 5. 3-50, 365. 

French Protestants, in Boston, 5. 491. At 
Rochelle, expedition for relief of, 8. 4. 

French refugees. 5. 506. 

French Revolution, 3. 166, 190. 

French squadron, a. for America, 5. 
430. 

French war vessels in Portsmouth har- 
bor, 2. 148. Accident to one of, 2. 
162. 

French and Indian captives, 6. 374. 

French and Indian traders, 6. 4.5* 

French and Indians, trade with, 6. 37*, 
40*, 44*, 54*. 110*, 116* 117*. 

French and Mohawk Indians, concern- 
ing the war between, 8. 99, 102. Ex- 
pected invasion of, 8. 107, 109. 113, 
114. 

French and Spanish fleets, reported en- 
gagement between, 8. 166. 

Freneau, Philip, 2. 186, 199, 203, 216,417 ; 
4. 464. 



Fresh Meadows, Xewbury, 6. 20*. 

Fresh Pond, 5. 439. 

Friend-Indians, disposing of, 5. 313, 

315. 
Friends, Society of, concerning the per- 
secutions of, 8. 261. 
Friendship, s/,i/>, 8. 28. 
Friesburgh, Peter, prisoner of war, 10. 

313. 
Frink, Dfipiitif-Cominissari/, 10 55. 
Frink, Nathan, a notorious traitor, 10. 

224. 
Frizel, John, 7. 245, 288, 291. Death of, 

7. 325. 
Frog Lane, 6. 23, 321, 410, 411 ; 7. 160. 
Frontenac (Frontipiak), Count Louis de 

Buade, i. 444 ; 5. 430. 
Frost, Cvl. and Jttdi/e Charles, son of Mnj. 

Charles, 7. 1-52, 221, 286, 291. 
Frost, Major Charles, 5. 378, 387, 400, 

426, 4.54. Death of, 5. 456. 
f'rost, Mr., 8. 220. 
Frost, Mrs., 7. 243, 322. 
Frost, Abigail, 7. 27. 
Frost, Isaac, suit against, concerning 

estate of Joiin White, 9 127. 
Frost, John, 7. 10. 
Frosts or Caulks. 7. 161, 165. 
Frothingham's ' History of Charlestown,' 

see ("harlestown. 
Fry, Thomas, 5. 302. 
Frye. Lieut., 1780, 4. 182, 264. 
Frye, Rev. Mr., English chaplain with Capt. 

Loverell, 7. 354. 
Fryer, Natiianiel, member of the Council, 

5- 312. 
Fryer, Mrs. Abigail, 7. 27. 
Fullam, Capt. Francis ('(), 7. 210, 211, 

258. 
Fuller, Capt., 6 186. 
Fuller, Dr., Jjiswich, death of, 7. 229. 
Fuller, Major Abraham, 2. 109 ; 3. 7. 
Fuller, Goodman, father of John, i. 293. 
Fuller, James, i. 474. 
Fuller, John, i. 293. 
Fuller, Ross, mentioned, 9. 31.3. Action 

in Parliament concerning the Colonics, 

9 315. 
Fuller, Thomas, 6. 47. 
Fulling Mill, 5. 211, 221, 875 ; 6. 169, 187, 

352; 7 56, 291. 
Funeral Sermon for Iving William III., 

6. 57. 
Funnell, Mr., mariner, 8. 507. 
Furbur, Capt. Jethro, 6. 45*, 53* 83*, 

84*. 
Furbur, William, 5. 31. 
Furgison, Archibal, 6. 51*. 
Furloughs, 4. .37, 130, 138, 139, 191. Num- 
ber of, 4. 84. Abu.'se of, 4. 84. 
Furse, Benjamin, i. 501. 
Fvfeild, Mr., 1695, master of the ship ' .Swal- 

'loH-; 8. 508. 
Fvficld, Ciipt., 1708. mentioned, 6. 2:37. 
F> field, Mrs., 6. 139. 



396 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



G. 

Gage, Mr., in expedition against Hispani- 
ola, 5. 436. 

Gage, Gen. and Gov. Thomas, 3. 124, 395, 
4o"2, 434; 4. 355, 359, 3(35. Concerning 
billeting the troops in Connecticut, 9. 
229. Demand for troops, 9 245. Men- 
tioned, 9. 500. Account of Bunker 
Hill, 10. 5. Recalled, 10. 5. With troops 
at Boston, 10. 283. Attack of his arni}^ 
at Lexington and Concord, 10. 284, 
291. LetW of Gov. Trumbull to, con- 
cerning his military preparations in 
Boston, 10. 288, 290. His arrival in Bos- 
ton, 10. 288. P'ortifies town of Boston, 
10. 288. Letter to Gov. Trumbull con- 
cerning his warlike preparations, 10. 
297-30L Destruction caused in Bos- 
ton and vicinity by the army of, 10. 
296. Why lie fortified tiie town of 
Boston, 10. 298. Disclaims the alleged 
barbarous treatment by his soldiers, 
10. 298. Concerning the resolves of 
the Provincial Congress, 10. 299. Con- 
cerning terms of reconciliation, 10. 300. 
Concerning a suspension of operations 
of war, 10. 300. His peaceable inten- 
tions, 10. 301. Letter of Joseph War- 
ren concerning his military movements, 
10. 302. 

Gager, John, 8. 452. 

Gailer, Mr., death of, 8. 149. 

Gaine, Hugh, 2. 186, 199; 3. 295: 4. 
27. 

Ga^ns, , sheriff, 7. 83. 

Gains, Col. George, 2. 175. 

Gale, Mary, married, i. 89 n. 

Galen Emissary, 6. 44*, 54*, 83*. 

Gales, Mr., Ent/lund, 5. 303. 

Gales, Amy, 5." 299, 302. 

Gahleo, 8. 93n. 

Galler, Mrs., 5. 298. 

Gallison, Henry, 5. xxx. 

Gallison, Mrs. Henry, 5. xxx. 

Gallison, John, 5. xxx. 

Gallop, see Gallup. 

Gallop, Lieiil. B., 5. 309. 

Gallop, Mrs. Elizabeth, 6 .301. 

Gallop, Capt. John, killed in Narragan- 
sett fight, I. 97 n., 99; 9. 97. 

Gallop, Mrs. Capt. John (Hanncali), letter 
from, I. 97, 104. 

Gallop, Joseph, 6. 301. 

Gallop, Capt. Samuel (?), at Casco Bay, 
6. 89, 98. 

Galloway's house, troops sent to, 1782, 
4. 248. 

Gallows, 5. 21, 22, 91 ; 6. 41*, 50*, 110. 

Gallup, Mr., 8. 421. 

Gallup, Mr., concerning tlie inhabitants 
of Westmoreland, 10. 124. 

Gallup, Adam, 8. 505. 

Gallup, Hannah, 8. 499. 

Gallup, John, 8. 33, 40G, 421, 499, 532. 



Letter of Wait Winthrop to, 8. 504, 

505. 
Gallup (Gallop), Capt. Samuel, liiyhsheriff 

of Bristol, 8. 373, 399. 
Gallup, William, 8. 480, 641. 
Galvan, Major, 1781, 4. 197, 198. 
Gambling, John, or Benjamin, 7. 249. 
Ganajohahore, Sachem, 6. 261. 
Gannett, Rev. Ezra Stiles, D.D., 2. 447 n. 
Gannett, Joanna White, 5. xxxiii. 
Gansevoort, Col. Peter, his success at 

Fort Stanwix, 4. 177 ; 10. 94. 
Ganson, Mr., 5. 2, 
Garanger, , a Frencli officer, 1780, 4. 

105. 
Garbet, Dr., i. 100. 
Garbrand, Mrs. D., 5. 801. 
Garbrand, Martha, 5. 301. 
Garcilaso de la Vega, his ' Eoj'al Com- 
mentaries of Peru, 2. 157, 161,167,174, 

176, 242, 256, 273, 299, 306, 316, 334, 

380,404,407; 3. 79,82, 119. 
Gardener, Sergeant Andrew, 5. 55, 98, 102, 

107, 118, 162, 165, 194, 210, 225. 
Gardener, Betty, 5. 355. 
Gardener, Hannah, 7. 26, 219. 
Gardener, James, 6. 223. 
Gardener, Capt John, 5. 97, 304; 6. 197, 

288,331,332; 7.25,26, 195. 
Gardener, Joshua, 5. 339, 353. 
Gardener, T., 5. 225. 
Gardiner, , concerning Kidd's treas- 
ure, 6. 7. 
Gardiner, , 1779, captain of military, 

4. 125. 
Gardiner, Capt., 1675, killed in Narra- 

gansett fight, 9. 97. 
Gardiner, Capt., Englishman, encounter 

with privateers, 9. 90. 
Gardiner, Mr., 8. 143, 144, 557. 
Gardiner, >S'//- Christopher, i. 381. 
Gardiner, Capt. Joseph, 1658, i. 45. 
Gardiner, Lieut. Lion, i. 234. Letter from, 

I. 385. Detains the vessel of Capt. 

Penny, 8. 56. Mentioned, 8. 220, 221 ; 

9. 15. 
Gardiner, Dr. Sylvanns, 7. 219. 
Gardiner's Island, 6. 7. 
Gardner, Mr., with prisoners of war, 1782, 

4. 263. 
Gardner, Mrs. Ann, i. 61, 53, 65, 61, 103. 

See Bradstreet, Mrs. 
Gardner, Mrs. Elizabeth, see Stone, Mrs. 
Gardner, George, married, i. 102 /(. 
Gardner, Mrs. John (Sarah), 7. 195. 
Gardner, John, 5. 78. 
Gardner, Capt. Joseph, Salem, i. 49 n., 

58. 60 ; 5. 74. 
Gardner, Nancy, 5. xxxiv. 
Gardyner, Christopher, letter of, i. 381. 

His father, r. 382. 
Garfield, Caj>t., town clerk, 5. 400, 
Garfield, Lieut. Benjamin, 5. 371. 
Garrard, Sarah, see Downing, Mrs. 
Garrard, Sir Thomas, Bart., i. 172. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



397 



Garratt, Mr., i. 45. 
Giirrott, John, 5. 103. 

Garter King of Arms, 5. xv. 
Garth, Mr., action coucerning the Mutiny 
Act, 9. 321). 

Gaskill, Samuel, 5. 391 ; 6. 12. 
GassarcU's works in French, i. 150. 
Gatciiell, John, 6. 211. 

Gatchell, Mrs. .Martlia, 6. 211. 

Gatchman, Dr., ^alem, 6. 1U4. 

Gates, Amos. 6. 64, 105, 372, 406. 

Gates, Gen. Horatio, 4-26,28, 94, 101, 103, 
104, 107,. 125, 1(50, 103, 164. Sending 
of troops to, 10. 05. Commanding at 
Fislikill, 10. 115. Letter of Gen. Wash- 
ington to, 10. 115, 110, lis. Letter to 
tien. Wasliington, 10. 315. At Fishkili, 
10. 317. Letter to Gov. Trumbull, 10. 
317, 318. Orders regiments from Con- 
necticut to defend Fishkili, 10. 318. 

Gates, N., 5. xxix. 

Gates, Simon. 5. 32, 127, 150, 210,-225, 

. 242, 332, 303, 479 ; 6. 406. 

Gates, J/rs. Simon (Margaret), 5. 332, SCO, 
472, 479 ; 6. 139, 158, 105. 

Gaul, }[r., his will, 7. 178. 

Gay Head, Mass., i. 413 ; 2. 253; 6. 166, 
433. 

Gay Head Indians, 6. 433, 434. 

G:iy Head Neck, 6. 434, 435. 

Gazetteer, 6. 203. 

Gazettes, 5. 180, 193, 200,250, 370; 6. 32, 
52, 53, 50, 69. See ' Boston Gazette.' 

Gednev, Capt. and Col. Bartholomew, 5. 
78, 132, 135, 137, 138, 140, 142, 185, 
195, 203, 227, 333, 339, 301, 370, 373, 
378, 387, 395, 398, 400, 418, 420, 433, 
437, 451, 451, 461 ; 6. 8*, 47, 101, 104; 
7.207; 9. 120, 146. 

Gedney, Mrs. Col. Bartholomew (Han- 
nah), 5. 189. Death of, 5. 461. 

Gedney, Elizabeth, 7. 207. 

Gedney, Margaret, 7. 207. 

Gedney, William, shcrig", 7. 131, 207, 238. 

Gee, Joshua, 5. 199, 234, 300, 408 ; 6. 6, 
20*, 45, 299, 302, 396, 408, 409; 7. 11, 
34, 189, 258, 280, 320, 380. 

Gee, Mrs. Joshua (Elizabeth), 7. 180. 

Gee, Rev. Joshua, son of Joshua, 7. 34, 340. 

Gendal, .Tustice, 5. 229. 

Gener, Capt. Tliomas, 8. 300, 42-% 434, 
451. 

General Assembly. 6. 107*, 110*, 115*. 

General Assembly at Boston, 6. 38*-40*, 
128* 129*. 

General Assembly of Connecticut, 8. 06, 
97, 101, 288, 322, 357,544; 10. 108, 113. 
Concerning a revision of laws, 8 352. 
Raising of troops by, lo tiS. Act of, 
10. 122. Act of, to supply recruits, 10. 
158. Concerning removal of cannon 
from Crown Point, 10. 305. Offers of 
assistance to Massachusetts, 10. 306. 

General Council, 5. 301 ; 5. 113*, 123*, 
229 ; 7. 34, 310, 332. 



[ General Court, 5. 5, 51, 57; 6. 14*. 17* 
10, 33, 43, 53, 00 ; 7. 22, 27-29, 370, 371, 
374. May Meeting of, 6. 380. A 
special meeting of, 8. 108, 112. At 
Plymouth, 8. 528. Of Connecticut, 8. 
171, 502; letter of John Winthrop, Jr., 
to, 8. 168. Of Massachusetts, 8. 552, 
609. 
I General Court Records, see Records. 

General Training, 5. 6. 

Geneva, 7. 307. 

Genoa Paper, 6. 206. 

Gent, Daniel, 5. 53. 

Gent, Thomas, 5. 53. 
- Gentils, Philippe de, 7. 93. 

' Gentleman's Magazine,' 2. 25, 104 ; 3. 
203. 

Geoffries, see Jeffries. 

George 11. of Kwjland, 2. 10 ; 3. 28. 

George III. of Enqlavd, 2. 194, 205; 4. 
307, 322, 330, 378, 379. Death of his 
sister, Princess Louisa Anne, 9. 276. 
Speech in Parliament, 9. 345. Speech 
of, debated in Parliament, 9. 461. 

George IV. of Enqland, 4. 336. 

George. Mr.', 8. 502. 

George, John, 5. 141, 148, 149, 16:3; 6. 
229, 252, 204, 303 ; 7. 27, 49, 80. 

George, Madam John (Lydia), 7. 27, 49, 
80. 

George, Katherine, 5. 149. 

George's Island, 5. 320. 

Georgia, value of a dollar in, 2. 423, 427. 
Fleet sails from New York for 4. 148. 
Indignities toward the Crown, 9. 237. 
Calls for protection at, 10. 148. Taken 
possession of by the enemy, 10. 208. 

Georgius, Franciscus, i. 149. 

Gerard, Conrad Alexander, LL.D., 2. 62 ; 
4. 97. 

Germaine, Lord George, 2. 107, 108. 

German Churches, 6. 270. 

German Divine, 7. 137. 

German Prince, 7. 93. 

German recruits sent to aid the enemy in 
I New York, lo 255. 
i Germantown, battle of, 4. 70. 

Germany, Emperor of, offers mediation 
to the powers at war, 4. 412, 413. King 
of Sweden's army in, 8. 30. Sources 
of trade in, 9. 384. 

Gerrish, Madam, 6. 343 ; 7. 83, 230, 239, 
254, 268. 

Gerrish, Anna, 7. 131. 

GerrLsh, Mrs. Aime, 6. 330. 

Gerrish, Elizabeth, 5. xx ; 7. 08. 

Gerrisli, Hannah. 5. xxxviii; 6. 266, 307. 

Gerrish, Jane, 5. xx, 344. 

(Jerrish, Joanna, 5. xx, 406, 432, 452, 500. 

Gerrish, Capt. John, 5. xx, 95, 157, 185, 
188 ; 6. 55, 266, 286, 334, 346, 395, 409 ; 
7. 99, 156, 314, 357. 

Gerrish, Joseph, 5. xx, 414, 448. 487 ; 6. 
31, 101, 103, 105, 330. 395; 7-279. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Joseph, 6. 101. 



398 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Gerrish, Rev. Josepli, 5. xxxviii, 227, 451, 

507 ; 6. 14, 251, 2t).], o-J6 ; 7. 2oy, 240. 
Gerrish, Mary, 5. xx, xxvii, 297. 
Gerrish, Moses, 5. xix, xx, xxxviii, 87, 

396, 397. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Moses (Jane), 5. xii, xx, 87, 
201, 310, 353, 487 ; 6. 31, 3'J, 62, 77, 101, 
161, 187, 255, 256, 295; 7. 118. 119, 355. 

Gerrish, Moses, Jr., 7. 83, 153, 230, 374, 
38 L 

Gerrish, Mrs. Moses, Jr., 7. 374, 381. 

Gerrish, Paul, 6. 286. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Paul. 6. 286. 

Gerrish, Capt. Kichard, 7. 82, 187. 

Gerrish, Kichard, Jr., 7. 82, 83, 187. 

Gerrish, Samuel, bookseller, 5. xvlii, 
xxxviii ; 6. 186, 249-251, 257, 263, 2G6, 
269, 286, 289, 290, 307, 336, 344. 347 ; 
7. 33, 125, 158, 161, 180, 223, 224, 226, 
239, 240, 253, 307, 325, 326, 331, 357, 
360. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Samuel (Mary), 5. xxxviii ; 

6. 263, 266, 281, 286, 289, 290, 295, 336; 

7. 239. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Samuel (Portion), 6. 336. 

Gerrish, Mrs. Samuel (Sarah), 6. 347 ; 7. 
253, 279. 

Gerrish, Samuel, ./;•., 5. xxxviii. 

Gerrish, Sarah, duughter of yjoses, 5. xx. 

Gerrish, William, 5. xx ; '6. 336. 

Gerrv, Gov. Elbridge, 3. 5, 7-9, 18, 105, 
108; 4. 319, 338, 361, 461, 505. His 
observations on the correspondence be- 
tween John Adams and Mrs. Warren, 
4. 496-4'jS. Acts as a mediator, 4. 499, 
600. Letters from, to Mrs. Warren, 4. 
495-501, 504. 

Gerrv, Mrs. Elbridge, 4. 495, 499, 500, 
504. 

Gerry, Elbridge, Jr., 4. 500. 

Gerry, Thomas, 4. 500. 

Gery, Arthur, i. 490. 

Gery, Thomas, 6. 50*. 

Ghests, Mr., 8. 243. 

Gibbins, Mr., difficulty with S. Sewall, 6. 
180. 

Gibbins, Mrs., 6. 180, 181. 

Gibbon, Henry, 5. 457. 

Gibbon, Samuel, 5. 457. 

Gibbons, Mr., mariner or messenger, 8. IGO, 

397, 401. 

Gibbons, Major Edward, letter from, i. 

233. Notice of, i. 233 n. ; 5. 349. Of 

Massachusetts Colony, 8. 212, 225. 
Gibbons, Rev. Thomas, D.D., liis ' Life of 

President Davies,' 2. 12. 
Gibbons, William, 5. 92, 207. 
Gibbs, Benjamin, 8. 160, 386, 387, 389. 
Gibbs, Mrs., icidoiv of Benjamin, married 

to Anthony Chicklev, 8. 413. 
Gibbs, Major Caleb, '4. 175, 208. The 

regiment under his command, 10. 156. 
Gibbs, George, 5. 252. 
Gibbs, Henry, son of Rev. Henry, 7. 342, 



Gibbs, Rev. Henry. 5. xix, 400 ; 6. 98, 111, 

135 ; 7. 50, 52, l&J, 300-303, 306. 
Gibbs, ^frs. Henry, 7. 304. 
Gibbs, Sir Henry, England, 6. 98. 
Gibbs, Jacob, 7. 306. 
Gibbs, Madam Mary, 5. xix ; 7. 299-SOl. 

Marries S. Sewall, 7. 302-306. 
Gibbs, Marv, Jr., 7. 306. 
Gibbs, Pobert, i. 501; 5. xix, 44, 163, 190, 

197 ; 6. 69, 70, 98, 135, 156, 183, 186, 

196 ; 7. 169, 202, 306. 
Gibbs, Samuel, 7. 306. 
Gibbs, William, 7. 52. 
Gibs, Widow, her son dies, 6. 412. 
Gibson, Col., 5. 459 ; 7. 51. 
Gibson, Goodman, i. 132. 
Gibson, Anne, letter of, i. 79. 
Gib.son, Benjamin, tisher in Grammar 

School, 7. 247. 
Gibson, Rev. Benjamin, 7. 322. 
Gibson, Mrs. Mary, i. 207. 
Gibson, /?et'. Richard, letter from, i. 267. 

Notice of, I. 2G7 n. * 

Gibson, Samuel, Cambridge, 8. 148. 
Giflard, , organist, made a notary, 7. 

360. 
Gilbert, Mr., Oxford, Eng., 5. 250, 303. 
Gilbert, Dr. Daniel, 5. xxix, 257, 263, 306, 

315. 
Gilbert, Ensign Elisha, 4. 147. 
Gilbert, Jonathan, 8. 155, 272. 
Gilbert, Matthew, 8. 56. 
Gilbert, Peter C, 4. 262. 
Gilbert, Sarah, 7. 160. 
Gilbert, Capt. Thomas, in cruise against 

pirates. 6. 104, 396. 
Gilbert, Rev. Thomas, Topsjield, 5. xlii. 
Gilbert, William, 5. 372. 
Gilbert, William W., 3. 4. 
Gilchrist, Charles, 4. 241. 
Giles, see Gyles. 
Giles, Goodman, 8. 34. 
Giles, Mr., 8. 399. 
Giles, Henry, 7. 335. 
Gilford, town of, 5. 59 ; 8. 80. 
Gill, Deacon, 5. 438. 
Gill, Widow, 7. 170. 
Gill, Capt. Michael, 5. 121 ; 6. 156, 402. 
Gill, Obadiah, 5. 202, 208, 341, 358, 374, 

474, 508 ; 6. 8. 
Gill River, 5. 297. 
Gill, see Wright & Gill. 
Gillam, Mrs., 5. 233. 
Gillam, Abigail, daughter of Mrs. Abigail, 

7. 74. 
Gillam, Mrs. Abigail, 7. 74. 
Gillam, Capt. Benjamin, 5 82, 163, 224, 

226, 230, 356, 465 ; 6. 14* 19* 158, 

161 ; 7. 73. 
Gillam, Benjamin, Jr., 7. 73. 
Gillam, Mrs. Hannah, 7. 73. 
Gillam, James, 6. 4, 6. 
Gillam, Joseph, 5. 21, 24, 42, 43 ; 6. 

14*. 
Gillam, Zacre, mentioned, 9. 40 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



>99 



Gillani, Zechiiriah. 7. 7.3 ; 8. 388, 407. 
(iillain, Mrs. Zocliariah (Pliebe), 7. 7;J. 
Gillams (Gilhams), Ctipt. B(.'njaiiiin, 8. 
1-21, 12"), 130. Sliip of, taken by the 

Dutch, 8. 104. 
Gillinghain, Eng., 5 294, 206, 297, 302. 
Gillon, Commodore Alexander, 2. 117. 
Gilman, Elizabetli, 6 414. 
Oilman, Capt. Jolni, 6. 38. 
Gimat, Cheraller, 4. 197. 
Girdler, Ahby I., 5 xl. 
Glasford, Scolland, 5. 497. 
Glasgow, Scotland, 7. 325. 
Glastonbury, Conn., 5. 302. Manufacture 

of powder at, 10. 241. 
Glauber, Joliann Kudolpli, i. 159, 161. 

Notice of. I. 159 )j. 
Glauber's Works, translated, 8. 503, 511, 

513. 
Glaubcrus, a book written in Hish Dutch, 

8.41. 
' Gleaner,' 5 60, 61 ; 7. 52. 
Gleason, Mrs., 6. 361. 
Gleason, N., 5. x.xix ; 7. 174, 292. 
Gloria Patri, 6. 120* 355. 
Gloucester, Mass., distressing condition 

of, I. 437; 6. 104, 105, 126, 127, 399; 7. 

373. 
Gloufer (Glover?), Mr., 16-39, i. 48, 95. 
Glover, Mr., mariner, 8. 402. 
Glover, Widow, 5. 236; 6. 135. 
Glover, Elizabeth, married to Adam 

Winthrop, i. 91 n.; 8. 221. 
Glover, Habakkuk, 5. 196 ; 6. 2-30. 
Glover, Mrs. Hannah, 6. 11* 250. 
Glover, John, 5. 434. 
Glover, Gen. John. 4. 47, 82. 88, 110-114, 

119, 123, 133, 135, 1.36. 159, 160, 172, 

178, 258, 269, 2rf9. In Continental 

army, 10. 71, 77. A requisition made 

on his troops, 10. 131. 
Glover, A'eu. Jose', i. 91 «., 361 n., 422 ; 8. 

150 n. 
Glover, Richard, 2. 205. 
Glover, Samuel, 7. 01. 
Glover, Sarah, married, i. 91 n. 
Glover, Susan, 6. 119. 
Glover, Tliomas, 5. 250. 
Glyn, Sergeant, elected member of Par- 
liament, g. 311. 
Go.ad, Thomas, i. 9, 10. 
Goave, Leuman, induced to enlist in the 

armv, lo. 130. 
Goble,"l)anit'l,5. 22. 
Goble, Stei)hen, 5. 21. 
Go<ldard, Dr., England, 8. 136. 
I Goddard, •.!//•., Walrrioion, $. G7. 
Goddard, Giles. 5. 101. 
Goddard, William, 5. 54. 
Godfrey, John, 5. 9. 
Godfrey, Peter, 7. 79. 
Godfrey, ^rrs. Peter (Mary), 7. 79. 
Godfry, Mr., i. 37. 
Godwin, Dr., death of, 6. 13*. 
Goff, Rev. Mr., England, 5. 293. 



Goff, Co/. E., 5. 479; 6. 227; 7. 9, 176, 191, 
279, 291, 339. 

Goff, Madam E. (Hannah), 6. 403; 7. 191, 
199. 

Goff, Lydia, 6. 114. 

Goff, Samuel, 6. 47. 

Goff College, 5. 10. 

Golfe, , the regicide, 5. 170; 6. 301. 

Goffe (Gough), Thomas, i. 196, 2d5; 8. 
26. 

Gold, Mr., 7. 14. 

Gold, Llent.-Coo. Nathan, 7. 195. 

Gold, Mrs., mentioned, 9. 134. 

Gold, John, 5. 146. 

Gold, Major Nathan, 5. 317, 318 ; 7. 134; 
8. 150. 153. 

Gold, Thomas, Connecticut, his mark, 9. 
83. Mentioned, 9. 91 n. 

Gold, Thomas, at Ten Hills, Charlestown, 
8.44. 

Golden Island, 5. 488 ; 8. 549. 

Golding, .1/r., i. 350, 351. 

Goldsmith, Mr., 5. 354. 

Goldsmith, Goodman, killed by lightning, 
8. 396. 

Goldsmith, Oliver, 3. 118. His ' Animated 
Nature,' 2. 137, 142, 150, 154, 160. 

Goldsmith's Hall, 5. 248. 

Goldthwaite, Ezckiel, 7. 158, 185. 

Goldwire, , scltouiteacher at Broadllng, 

5.8. 

Goldwire, Mr., England, 5. 250, 294-296, 
299. 

Goldwire, Miss, England, 5. 294. 

Golston, Goodman, i. 178. 

Gooch, James, 6. 8, 117 ; 7. .348. 

Gooch, Mrs. Sarah, 6. 117. 

Goodale, Charles, 5. xxxi. 

Goodell, A. C, ' Collections of Essex In- 
stitute,' 5. 415, 429. 

Goodenough, Capt., 5. 227. 

Good Friday, 7. 181. 

Goodhue, Rer. Francis, 7. 321. 

Goodhue, William, 5. 190 ; 6. 194, 199. 

Gooding, John, 5 214. 

Gooding, N., 5. 336. 

Gooding, Thomas, 5. 250. 

Goodman's Fields, 5. 253. 

Goodrich, Col. William, 6. 197. 

(ioodridge, Benjamin, 5. 11. 

Goodson, Adm., i. 381. 

Good Will, schooner, 7. 335. 

Goodwin, Dr., President of Maqdalen Col- 
lege, 5. 303, 4.52, 465, 478 ; 7. 85. His 
Sermons, 7. 85, 277. 

Goodwin, Mr., England, i. 335 ; 5. 2.')0. 

Goodwin, George, publisher, Hartford, 2. 
147 n. 

Goodwin, John, Sen., 6. 8. 

Goodwin, Cn/it. Nathaniel, 3. 18. 

Goodwin, Thomas, 5. 263. 

Goodwin, William, trustee of will of Ed- 
ward Hopkins, 9. 19. Treats with Indi- 
ans concerning certain lands, 9. 118. 

Goodyeare, John, i. 501. 



400 



I^'DEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Goodyeare, Moses, i. SOL 

Googe, Mr., a tenant of S. Sewall's, 6. 22. 

Gookin, Capt., 5. 377 ; 7. 302 ; 8. 62, 68. 

Gookin, Mrs., death of, 5. 2U. 

Gookin, Daniel, Jr., 5. 418. 

Gookin, MaJ.-Gen. Daniel, i. 106, 433. 
Notice of, I. 106 n. Mentioned, 3. 309, 
315 ; 5. 48, 77, 132, 137, 142, 150, 152. 
Death of. 5. 170, 171. S. Sewall's dream 
of him, 5. 241. 

Gookin, Rev. Daniel, author of * Indian 
History,' 3. 30y, 315; 5. xxiii, 1-4, 6, 
51, 68, 150, 208, 232 ; 6. 76, 160, 186, 
439 ; 7. 60. Death of, 7. 159, 161. 

Gookin, Rev. Mrs. Daniel (Elizabeth), 5 
xxiii; 6. 114, 160; 7. 159. 

Gookin, Reu. Nathaniel, i. 433 ; 5. .50, 68, 
82, 84, 322, 362, 363 ; 6. 20* 118, 243; 
7. 183. 

Gookin, Mrs. Rev. Nathaniel, 7. 149, 183, 
267. 

Gookin, Richard, 6. 160 ; 7. 62. 

Gookin, Samuel, 5. 150, 178, 341, 351; 
6. 11,56, 81, 3-58; 7. 838,362. 

Goose, Mrs. Mary, 5. 377, 380 ; 6. 51, 130. 

Goose, Capt., commanded ship from Eng- 
land, I. 309 ; 8. 34. 

Goose, Isaac, 5. 67, 88, 96, 107, 108, 119, 
120, 131, 145, 185; 6. 11* 130, 294. 

Goose, Mrs. Isaac (Elizabeth), 6. 108. 

Goose, Isaac, Jr., 6. 95. 

Goose, Lydia, 6. 279. 

Goose, Peter, 5. 108. 

Goose, Peter, Jr., 5. 108. 

Goose, WhIoic Susanna (' Jlother Goose '). 
5. 53, 108, 109, 333. 

Goram, Mrs. Mary, 7. 102. 

Gordon, Dr. Alexander, 6. 421. 

Gordon, /^er. William. D.D., 2. 1, 12, 19, 21, 
22, 24, 25, 27, 29, 30, 32, 44, 51, 60, 103, 
105 n., 108, 111-113, 115, 119, 125, 126, 
135, 147, 188, 198, 223, 240-243, 256, 
264, 340, 348, 357, 435, 442, 457, 481, 
489, 496; 3. 102, 105, 107, 110, 111, 
113, 11.5, 118, 120, 132, 145, 150, 156, 
159, 101, 162, 166. Sketch of, 2. 147 n. 
Extract from a letter of, 2. 449. Criti- 
cisms on his Historj', 3. 151, 153. His 
'American Revolution' cited, 2. 23 n. 

Gore, Mr., 5. 180, 181 ; 7. 183, 187. 

Gore, Capt., 7. 104. 

Gore, John, 7. 172. 

Gore, Obadiah,7. 157. 

Gore, Stephen, 6. 309. 

Gore's Roll of Arms, 6. 109, 300; 7. 150, 
363. 

Goreham, John, sheriff of Barnstable, 6. 
41.3. 

Gorges, Sir Ferdinando, i. 209 n., 325 n., 
435 n.; 2. 128; 3. 49, 51. His 'Amer- 
ica Painted to the Life,* 2. 1. Men- 
tioned, 5. 403 ; 7. 187. Charter given 
to, 9. 183 n. 

Gorliam, Nathaniel, 3. 5, 08, 281, 283, 
284. 



Gorton, Samuel, i. 145 n. Mentioned, g. 
165. Reference to his book, 9. 167. 

Gortonists, i. 361, 505. 

Gospel, letter of John Winthrop for 
propagation of, 9. 45. 

Gospel, Society for Propagation of, see 
Society. 

Gosport, Eng., 5. 298. 

Gosse, John, 1. 198. 

Gostlin, Benjamin, 8. 52, 72, 218. 

Gostlin, Margret, i. 24. 

Gostlin, Thomas, 8. 6, 9, 10, 20, 188, 196, 
197. 

Gostlin, Mrs. Thomas, 8. 6, 9, 10, 20. 
Daughter born to, 8. 25. 

Gostling, Mrs. Jane Winthrop, i. 6, 11, 
17, 200 n. 

Gostling, Philip, 1.201. 

Gostling, Thomas, i. 6, (Gostlin) 9. 14, 17, 
53, (Gozlin) 59, (Gosling) 71, (Goslin) 
178. Letter from, 1.200. 

Gott, Charles, i. 31, 40. 

Gouge, Edward, 6. 122. 

Gould, Goodman, concerning the letting 
of Ten Hills Farm to, 8. 224, 228. 

Goulding, Capt., killed, 9. 97. 

Gouldings, Mary, 5. 20. 

Gouldston, Robert, letter from, i. 237. 
I Gourd, Benjamin, 5. 2. 

Gout, remedies for, 3. 140, 144. 

Gouvion, Lieut.-Col. Jean Baptiste, 4. 126, 
135, 176. 

Gove, Caroline INI., 5. xxxv. 

Gove, Edward, 2. 106, 111, 112, 122. 

Gove, John, u-itness, 9. 173. 

Government, John Adams's views on, 
4. 324-328. Differences of, among the 
States, under the Articles of Confed- 
eration, 4. 351, .352. The earliest stip- 
ulation for a republican form was in 
the Constitution, 4. 352. Constitution 
of the new, 5. 174. Seized, 6. 36*. Con- 
cerning bills of credit, 6. 366. 

Governor, the, his Ladv, 5. 34, 192, 
193; 6. 91, 111, 121, "122, 128, 152, 
190, 195, 228, 233, 239, 272; 7. 36, 45. 
His Life Guard, 5. 220. Speeches of, 
6. 75, 138; 7. 236, 238, 255, 257, 285, 
286 His salary, 6. 226, 227 ; 7. 2-58. 
Powers of, 6. '228 ; 7. 5, 312, 313, 
369. 

Governor and Company, 5. 79, 84, 128, 
129, 131, 134, 138. 

Governor and Company of Connecticut, 
letter of Joseph Warren to, 10. 285, 
287, 296, 302, .303. Letter of John Han- 
cock to, 10. 283. 

Governor and Council, 5. xix, 368, 371, 
433, 439, 441, 458, 461-463, 498, 500; 
6. 51*. 95* ; 8. 65, 82, 90, 132, 152, 165, 
19.3, 197, 232, 240, 263, 283, 307, 314, 
349,365,379, 415,416; 7. 29, 40, 214, 
215, 287, 310. Of Massachusetts. 8. 
101. At Boston, 8. 300. Of Connecti- 
cut, 8. 513. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



401 



Governor, of Barbadocs, 5. 21:1 Of Con- 
necticut, 5. xii ; 6. 11*, 217, 411; 7. 
7'J : 8. 272, 325; letter of, to the Gov- 
ernor of M;issacliusetts,8. 151 ; letter of 
Fitz-John Wintlirop to, on tlie failure 
of the expedition against Canada, 8. 
322. Of East India Company, 6. 08. Of 
Havana, 5. 485. Of Massachusetts, 5. 
204 ; 6. 151 ; 8. 482, 563 ; visit to Rhode 
Island and New York, 8. 485 ; at reni- 
aquid, 8. 487, 488 : concerning certain 
pirates, 8. 561. Of New Haven, 8. 53. 
Of New Jersey, 6. 3. Of New York, 

5. 270, 318, 333. 312, 343, 410; 6. 54, 
140, 271 ; 8. 143, 273, 270, 458. Of 
Nova Scotia, 6. 142; 7. 229, 248. Of 
riymouth, 6. 14*. Of Port Roval, 5. 
330, 337 ; 6. 44*, 45*, 54*, 03*, 83*, 84*. 
Of Province of New England, 5. 350. 
Of Rhode Island, 6. 380; 7. 103. Of 
Virginia, sea Virginia. 

Governor's Island, 5. 472 ; 6. 134. 
Governors of her Majesty's Plantations, 

6. 87*. 

Gower, Lord, President of Council in lieu 

of Lord Northington, 9. 251. Men- 
tioned, 9. 405. 
Grace, Edward, 5. 300. 
Grafford, Mr., 5. 188, 422. 
Graffort, Mrs. Bridget, 7. 2. 
Graffort, Thomas, 7. 2. 
Graf ten, Mr., Salem, i. 245; 5. 224, 412 ; 

6. 230. 
Grafton, Duke of, debate in Parliament, 

9. 225. Mentioned, 9. 308, 508. Resigns, 

9. 408. 
Grafton, Joseph, 8. 33, 31, 477. 
Grafton, town of, 5. 15. 
Graham, the pirate, 5. 86. 
Graham (Grayham), James, Attornei/-Gen- 

erul to Gov. Andros, 5. 210-218, 231 ; 8. 

490. 
Grammar schools, 6. 308 ; 7. 247. 
Granary, the, 6. 20, 117-120, 130, 272, 

320, 324, 373 ; 7. 354. 
Granary- Yard Inscriptions, .seeBridgman. 
Granby, J/an/u/.s of, mentioned, 9. 203, 

395. Resigns all employments, 9. 408. 
Grand, -S'(V George, 4. 302. 
Grand Jury, 5. 436, 483, 504 ; 6. 69, 277, 

280, 281. 322, 333, 382, 300 ; 7. 2, 25, 

20, 250, 3.38, 379, 380. 
Grand Seignior, forces of, at Bagdat, 8. 11. 
Granger, teacher ofwritinf/, 7. 245. 
Grann, siege of, 5. 105. 

Grant, ,tnuriiier, 6. 101. 

Grant, Gen. James, 4 70. 

(irant, Jo.seph, 5. 341. 

Grant for enlargement of English 

Cluircli, 6. 280. 
Graiitliam, Lord, in House of Lords, 9. 

4i;.5. 
Grasse-Tilly, Francois Joseph Paul, Comte 

de, 4. 220, 222, 224. With French troops 

in the Chesapeake, 10. 254, 257. 



Gratrix (Grcatorex ?), Mr., his account 
of the cures done by him, 1. 403. 

Graunt, Mrs., Emjland, 5. 205. 

Graves, Adin., 9. 511. 

(iraves. Dr., Thomas, 7. 110, 210. 

Graves, Mr., 8. 340. 

Graves, Deacon George, dead, 1073, 8. 
150. 

Graves, Russel, 5. 215. 

Graves, A'ei'. Thomas, 5. 12, 307, 454 ; 6. 
7*, 308 ; 7. 139, 210, 254. 

Graves, the, 6. 134. 

Graves End, Eng., 5. xiii, 148, 271, 273, 
288, 289. 

Gravesend, New Netherlands, i. 370. 

Gravesend, plantation on Long Island, 
cattle killed by lightning at, 8. 95. 

Gray, Mr., Philadelphia, 1702, 3. 310, 
31L 

Gray, Mr., Lona Island, 8. 152. 

Gray, iVidoio, 6. 223. 

Gray, Benjamin, 6. 307. 

Gray, Francis C, i. 121 n. 

Gray, Harrison, 6. 112, 115; 7. 04, 113, 
150. 

Gray, Horace, LL.D., 3. 438 n. 

Gray. John, 6. 114. 

Gray's Inn, Society of, 6. GO. 

Grayhound, ship, 7. 325. 

Grayhound Tavern, 5. 181 ; 7. 190, 102. 

Grazebrook, A., 5. xvi. 

Grazebrook, Margaret, 5. xvi, xvii. 

Great Brewster, 7. 103. 

Great Britain, commission of John Ad- 
ams as minister to, 4. 377-380. Treaty 
of peace with, 4. 413, 414, 426-428. 
Commissions to Adams and others to 
negotiate with, 4. 457-450. Attempted 
treaty of commerce with, 4. 407. Men- 
tioned, 5. xi, 240 ; 6. 85*. 222, 392 ; 7. 
89, 103, 126. 

Great Council of Plymouth, England, 
land granted by, 9. 182. 

Great Island, 5. 205, 284, 308 ; 6. 304 ; 7. 
27. 

Great Malvern, concerning Winthrop's 
relations at, 8. 525 n. 

Great Seal, Em/., 5. 104. 

Greaton, Col. John, 4. 20, 28, 59, 65, 264, 
279. 

Greece, 5. 472. 

Grecian, Mrs., 5. 217. 

Greek Church, s, 6. 178. 

Greele, Loui.«;i M., 5. xxxv. 

Greelo, Samuel, 5. xxx, xxxv. 

Greele, Samuel S., 5. xxxv. 

Green, , sea-captnin, 1700, 6. 12. 

Green, , captain o/' rnililan/, 1778, de- 
position concerning Major Murnan, 10. 
193. 

Green, Deacon, 7. 266, 283, 293, 345. 

Green, .Arajor. 5. 310. 

Green, Mrs., 6. 363, 422; 7. 03, 112, 192, 
213, .32.3. 

Green, Rev. Mr., 5. 362 ; 6. 354. 



402 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Green, Uev. Ashhel, 7).Z>., 3. 262, 266-269, 

284, 309, 341, :J42. 
Green, B., 6. 209, 296, 328 ; 7. 239, 265. 
Green, Bartholomew, son of Samuel, Bos- 
ton, 6. 28, 78, 100, 306, 336, 337, 356, 

392; 7. 161,218,307,331,337. 
Green, Mrs. Bartholomew, 6. 252. 
Green, C, 5. 24. 
Green, Deborah, 6. 170. 
Green, Dorcas, 5. 325. 
Green, Mrs. Elizabeth, 7. C8. 
Green, Ellen, 7. 68. j 

Green, Hannah, 5. 325; 6. 285. ! 

Green, Jane, 5. 325 ; 6. 101, 285 ; 7. 144. ] 
Green, Jeremiah, 5. 124. I 

Green, John, a child, 7. 54. 
Green, John, 5. 70, 502; 7. 68. 
Green, John, the profane, 6. 337, 379. 
Green, John, false affirmation concerning 

Narragansett lands, 9. 165. Coramis- | 

sioner of Rhode Island, 9. 198. 
Green, John, Jr., i. 362. 
Green, John, Sen., i. 361, 362. Petition 

of, I. 50.5. 
Green, Jonas, 5. 825. 
Green, Joseph, 2. 08. His parody on 

Mather Byles's Hymn, 2. 71-73. 
Green, Joseph, 5. 325 ; 7. 68. 
Green, Rev. Joseph, 7. 353. 
Green, Joseph, Jr., 7. 68. 
Green, Joshua, 7. 68. 
Green, L>r. Joshua, 7. 68. 
Green, Marshal John, 5. 162, 178, 290, 

311, 31.5, 341. 
Green, Nathaniel, Boston, 5. 90, 124; 6. 2.39, 

284 ; 7. 97, 145 ; 8. 504, 545, 547, 551. 
Green, Fercival, 5. 325 ; 7. 68. 
Green, Mrs. Ruth, 7. 68. 
Green, Samuel, letters of, i. 420, 422. 
Green, Samuel, 5. 15, 50, 57, 122, 324 ; 7. 

14. 
Green, Dr. Samuel Abbott, 7. 68. 
Green, Samuel, Jr., 5. 324, 325 ; 6. 136, 

363 ; 7. 14. 
Green, Mrs. Samuel, Jr., 5. .324, 325. 
Green, Timothy, 5. 325; 6. 28, 415; 7. 

14. 
Green, William. 5. 222. 
Green, ]\frs. William, 5. 222. 
Green Bush, 8. 318. 
Green Chamber, 6. 27. 
Green Dragon, 5. 163 ; 6. 159, 2-56, 266, 

273, 282, 284, 292, 325, 379, 385 ; 7. 20, 

26, 28, 45, 47, 106, 1.30, 131, 133, 179, 

186, 229, 254, 278, 818. 
Green Lane, 5. 193, 221 ; 6. 129. 
Green Mountain Bovs, raising an army 

of, 10. 38. 
Green River, 7. 101. 
Greene, Capf., 8. 890. 
Greene, Bartholomew, Cambridge, letter 

from, I. 216. 
Greene, Col. Christopher, 4. 160, 161, 164, 

167,28.5. 
Greene, Gardiner, 5. 60, 62, 65. 



Greene, Natlianiel, Major-General ofU. S. 
Arm II, 2. 102; 3. 152, 154; 4. 19,"22, 23, 
61, 93, 95, 96, 131, 135, 165, 168, 204, 
214,215. Concerning prisoners of war, 
10. 37. At the evacuation of Bruns- 
wick, 10. 73. Concerning a supply of 
cash, 10. 316. 

Greene, Gov. William, 4. 213 ; 10. 117. 

Greenhill, Mr., i. 153. 

Greenland, Mr., his will, 5. 343. 

Greenleaf, Capt., 6. 61, 251 ; 7. 55, 81. 

Greenleaf, Benjamin, 5. xxxvii. 

Greenleaf, Enoch, 5. 374 ; 6. 137 ; 7. 81. 

Greenleaf, Steven, captain of militanj, 5. 
10, 70, 223. Death of, 5. 335. 

Greenleaf, Thomas, 3. 24, 29, 37, 44, 46, 
54. 

Greenleaf, William, 3. 79, 82. 

Greenlef, ^^d^cife Hannah, 6. 49-51. 

Greenlef, Samuel, 6. 389. 

Grcenough (Greno), 3fr., master of a 
ship, 8. 387. 

Greenough, Mrs. E., 5. 215. 

Greenougli, Luke, 6. 321. 

Greenough, Mrs. Luke, 6. 821. 

Greenoush, Capt. William, 5. 335, 339, 
360,369,381; 7. 131, 360. 

Greenwich, troops sent to the defence 
of, 10. 128. 

Greenwich, Enfj., 5. 248, 252, 253. 

Greenwich Hospital, 7. 77. 

Greenwood, , mariner, 5. 405 ; 7. 360. 

Greenwood, ]\[r., 8. 211. 

Greenwood, Mrs. Mary, 5. 322 ; 6. 264. 

Greenwood, Samuel, 6. 303, 321 ; 7. 284. 

Greenwood, Rev. Thomas, 5. 4-59 ; 6. 64, 
194, 236, 264, 265, 288 ; 7. 102, 226, 260. 

Gregory, Dr. John, his ' Father's Legacy 
to liis Daughters,' 2. 67, 69. 

Gregory, John, 5. 149. 

Gregory, Matthew, 5. 343. 

Grenville, Lord George, concerning the 
repeal of the Stamp Act, 9. 215. Con- 
cerning taxing the Colonies, 9. 231. 
Complaint against certain newspaper 
articles, 9. 247. Sentiments concern- 
ing the Duty Act, 9. 340. Mentioned, 
9.845,363)). Quoted, 9. 422. In Par- 
liament, 9. 487, 461. 

Grenville Party, reconciled to the Admin- 
istration, 9. 474. 

Gresham College, 5. 247,248; 8. 131. 

Grevil, Fulke, 5. 304. 

Greville, Robert, Baron Brooke, i. 256. 
Letter from, i. 240. Notice of, i. 240 «. 

Grew, Dr. N , 5. 250, 304, 305. 

Grew, Dr. Obed, 5. 2-50, 262, 304, 305. 

Grey, Gen. Charles, 4. 94, 96, 97. 

(jriee, Widoto Samuel, 7. 305. 

(^.rice, John, 6. 330. 

Grice, Josiah, 5. 3.39. 

(Jrice, Samuel, 7. 292. 

Gridley, Jeremiah, 4. 824, 340, 357. 

Gridley, Gen. Richard, 4. 6. 

Gridlye, Richard, i. 486. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



403 



Griffin, John, 5. V^G. 

i;riffin, Lydiii, 5. 7"J. 

Ciriffin, liichanl, i. 221 ; 5. 309. 

Griffin, sliip, i. li>5. 

Griffis, Peter, 7. 52. 

Grifiths, Mrs., i. 58. 

Grigg, Kicliard, i. 501. 

Griggs, Elder, 6. 231. 

Griggs, Isaac, 5. 214, 217. 

Griggs, William, 6. 8, 22; 7. 158. 

Grigis, , seizes a vessel, i. 386. 

Grindal, Mr., at ordination of Kev. Dan- 
iel Gookin, 5. (38. 

Griper, Mr., 8. 407. 

Griswell, Mrs., 8. 399. 

Griswold, Matthew, elected Deputy Gov- 
ernor of Connecticut, g. 380. 

Groin (Groyne), the, 5. 398, 400. 

Gross, Elizabeth, 6. 410. 

Grosse, Isaac, i. 486. 

Grotius, Hugo, 4. 401, 403. 

Groton, Mass., I. 03; 5. 146, 391 ; 6. 67, 
188 ; 7. 13, 68 ; 8. 530. History of, see 
Butler. 

Groundsill, Dr., 6. 248. 

Group, the, by Mrs. Warren, 4. 509, 510. 

Grove, Edward, 5. 153. 

Grumman, Ichabod, 3. 68. Affidavit of, 
3- 3, 4. 

Grundy, Robert, 5. 235. 

Grymes, William, 5. 288. 

' Guadeloupe,' arrival of, at New York, 
10. 187. 

Guard Ship, 5. 354. 

Guernsey, JCnr/., 5. 174, 175. 

Guernsey, sliiji, 6. 260. 

Guift, vessel, 8. 26. 

Guild, Benjamin. 2. 441, 491, 494. 

Guild's Inn, 7. 102. 

Guile, Samuel, 5. 7. 

Guilford, 5. 356, 369. 

Guinea, 6. 16. 

Guise, Duke of, i. 161. 

Gullagher, Christian, 3. 269 n. 

Gulleck (Gullet), C'«/»^ John, of ship 'Ad 
venture,' 8. 357, 362, 370, 375, 561, 569. 
Letter of Fitz-Jolm Winthrop to, 8. 370, 
374. 

Gulliver, Anthony, 5. 97. 

GuUock, CajH. Thomas, 5. 506 ; 6. 8. 

Gundison, Iluag, i. 486. 

Gunison, Ilugii, Seti., i. 490. 

Gunn, Abel, >/-or, 9. 138. 

Gunn, Jokeamah, Juror, g. 1-38. 

Gunner, , mariner, 5. 284. 

Gunnery, experiments in, 4. 152. 

Guntlirop, Matilda, 7. 252. 

Gurdon, Brampton, i. 8 (Gourden), 11, 
84 >,., 218 n., 220 n. ; 8. 20, 26-29. Death 
of, in England, 8. 189. 

Gurdon, Mrs. Meriell, letter from, i. 84. 

Gurdon, Robert, i. 189. 

Gurdon Family, i. 241 n. 

Gustavus III. of Sweden, 4. 509. 

Guthrie, William, 3 329. 



I Gwin, , mariner, 5. 374. 

I Gybbes, Major Robert, i. 501. 

Gyles, John, ' Memoirs ' of, 2. 3, 6, 8. 
! Gyseiaer. C. de, pensionary o/Dort, 4. 387. 



H. 

Haberfeild, Mr., clothier at Boston, smit- 
ten with palsy, 6. 272; 8. 668. 

Hacket, Jud(/e, 7. 229. 

Hacket, Jilrs., death of, at sea, 7. 188. 

Hackley, Mr., London, Encj., i. 173. 

Hackney, Em]., 5. 250 ; 7. 59. 

Iladdam, town of, 8. 357, 433. 

Hadley, Mass., i. 302, 399 ; 5. 84, 483 ; 
6. 801. The Englisli at, want peace 
with tlie Indians, 8. 89. Some Indian 
women killed at, by Mohawk Indians, 

8. 98. 

Hague, the, 7. 64, 93, 126. 
Haiiaton, William, 5. 76, 314. 
Haines, Mr., Charkstown, 8. 36. 
Haines, John, Connecticut, i. 261, 264. 
Hains, James, Sudbury, mentioned, 7. 236 ; 

9.6. 
Hairwood, Mr., 8. 218. 
Haker, Mr., 8. 425. 

Hale, , Canihridqe, Mass., 2. 240. 

Hale, Dr., 6. 384. 

Hale, Mrs., 5. 67 ; 6. 31. 

Hale, Rev. James, 7. 19. 

Hale, John, England, i. 243. 

Hale, John, messenqer (1), 8. 144, 154, 278. 

Hale, Rev. John, Beverly. 5. 282, 363, 451. 

His ' Modest I^iquiry,' 5. 464 ; 6. 61. 
Hale, Judith, 7. 230. 
Hale, Mrs. Mary, 7. 149, 312. 
Hale, Sir Matthew, his ' Origination of 

Mankind,' 6. 123. 
Hale, Mosos. 6. 391. 
Hale, Capt. Thomas, 6. 161 ; 7. 23, 231, 

287. 
Haley, ^fndam, 5. 65. 
Haley, John, 8. 385. 
Half Moon, the, place about ten miles 

from Albany, 8. 318. 
Half-way Poii'd, 6. 309. 
Half well, Henry, i. 501. 
Halifax, Lord, appointed tc Privy Seal, 

9. 417. Sc retary of Slate, 9. 473. 
Death of, 9. 483. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia, 10. 11. 

\U\\,Mr., 5. 286; 7.86,201. 

Hall, Caj/t., Connecticut, concerning put- 
ting tlie cross in colors, 5. 337 ; 6. 
12* ; 8. 287, 289. 

Hall, Mr., Enyland, i. 254, 255; 8. 272, 
508. 

Hall. Rev. Dr., Enqland, 5. 300. 

Hall, Aquila, 4. 291, 292. 

Hall, Cai't. Giles, commander of the ' Mi- 
nerva,' 10. 5. 



404 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Hall, Henrv, i. 441. 

Hall, Hugh, 7. 189. 

Hall, John, i. 434; 5.48. 

Hall, Josias Carvill, 4. 2'Jl, 202. 

Hall, Ned, 8. 424. 

Hall, Prince, 3. 12, 25, 28, 55, 59, 895 n., 
396, 397, 436 n. 

Hall, Samuel, 2. 189 ; 3. 78, 82, 277 n., 
357. 

Hall, Thomas, 2. 484 n. ; 3. 277 n. See 
also Belknap & Hall. 

Hall, William, 8. 187. 

Hallam, John, 8. 375, 547. 

Hallawell, Benjamin, 5. 267, 285, 291, 
375 ; 7. 34. 

Hallawell, Marv, 5. 875. 

Hallett, William, 1. 368. Postscript 
from, I. 369. 

Halsev, James, 5. 214. 

Haman, , Clerk of Court, 5. 175, 176. 

Hamblen, Thomas, 5. 355 

Hambleton, Col. Andrew, 6. 3 ; 7. 2 ; 
8. 350, 531, 537. 

Hamilton, , a hurrjlar, robs Jlr. Sheafe 

on the Common, 5. 216. 

Hamilton, , captain of the ' Kingjisher,' 

death of, 5. 176, 177, 198 ; 6. 70. 

Hamilton, Madam, 5. 507. 

Hamilton, Alexander, 2. 466 ; 3. 217, 3-39 ; 
4. 333, 334, 433, 437, 452, 464, 470, 474, 
484 ; 9. 193 «., 9. 195 n. Letter from 
Fitz-John Winthrop, 9. 193. 

Hamilton, Andrew, letters of, i. 443, 444 
Notice of, I. 443 71. ; 6. 3. Letter to 
Fitz-John Winthrop, 9. 193. 

Hamilton, Anne, Duchess of, 7. 334. 
fclaim to Narragansett lands, 9. 180, 
182. Concerning her claim, 9. 183 n. 
Memorial of Earl of Arran relative to 
her claim, 9. 186. 

Hamilton, James, Dul-e of, 7. 106. 

Hamilton (Hambleton), James, Duke of, 
beheaded, 8. 209, 226. 

Hamilton, James, Duke of also Earl of 
Arra/i, concerning claim to Narragan- 
sett lands, 9. 72, 114. Grant of Narra- 
gansett lands to, 9. 180, 182-185. Death 
of, 9. 181. Reports concerning his 
claim to Narragansett lands, 9. 185. 
Memorial concerning claim of Anne, 
Duchess of Hamilton, 9. 186. Deed 
of Narragansett land to, 9. 187. Sir 
Francis Pemberton's opinion of case 
of, 9. 190. Letters concerning his 
claim to lands in Connecticut, 9. 193. 

Hamilton, James, Jr., 7. 334. 

Hamilton, James, Lord Limerick and Earl 
of Clanhrassil, 7. 334. 

Hamilton, (Hen. James Inglis, 4. 79, 103. 

Hamilton, Joseph, 2. 400. 

Hamilton, William. Duke of 9. 181. 

Hamilton, Sir William, 2'. 191, 328, 339, 
354. 

Hamlen, Widow, 5. .355, 356. 

Hamlin, Erecte, death of, 5. 355. 



Hamlin (Hamblin), Capt. Giles, 8. 59, 
60, 246, 282, 529, 565. 

Hammersmith Iron Works (Lynn), 7. 97. 

Hammon, Mrs., death of, 8. 435. 

Hammond, , decoying negroes, 3. 25. 

Hammond, Major, 7. 286, 287. 

Hammond, Mrs. Abigail, 6. 321. 

Hammond, Asa, 5. 65. 
i Hammond, John, 6. 47, 78. 

Hammond, Joseph. 6. 75, 131, 162. 

Hammond, Cupt. Lawrence, 5. 48, 82, 
205, 333, 396, 454, 498; 6. 62, 321. 

Hammond, William, Watertown, 1637, i. 
125 n., 126. 

Hamott, William, i. 501. 

Hampden, John, English patriot, i. 152 n., 
445; 9. 381. 

Hampshire, Eng., 5. xii, xxi, 8, 70, 71, 
132, 235, 273 ; 6. 220 ; 7. 200, 287. 

Hampshire County, 5. 57, 59. 

Hampshire, ship, 7. 25. 

Hampstead, Eng., 5. 265. 

Hampstead Plain, Long Island, descrip- 
tion of, 2. 252. 

Hampton, 5. 188, 189, 233, 294, 405; 6. 45* 
! 54*, 14. 38, 276, 277, 301 ; 7. 1, 55, 130, 
I 149, 230, 288. 

Hampton Court, Eng., 5. 254-256. 
i Hampton, N. H., i. 334. Petition of, 
! 1.493. 
[ Hanchet, Copt., in expedition to Quebec, 

9. 501. A prisoner of war, 10. 29. 
I Released, 10. 32. 

I Hancock, Ebenezer, 4. 4-3, 50, 52, 60, 62, 
158. 
Hancock, Gov. John, 3. 15, 18, 32, 184, 
212, 341, 356 ; 4. 188, 196, 217, 254, 293, 
333, 346. 477, 478. Seizure of his ves- 
sel at Boston, 9. 301 n. Letter to the 
Governor of Connecticut, 10. 283. Con- 
cerning the resolutions of the Provin- 
cial Congress, 10. 283. President of 
the Provincial Congress at Concord, 

10. 284. 

Hancock, Mrs. John, 3. 53. 

Hand, Gen. Edward, 4. 135, 282. 

Handy, Major, 1710, 6. 292, 

Handy, William, induced to enlist in the 
army, 1776, 10. 130. 

Hanley, David, 4. 157. 

Hanmer, Sir Thomas, 7. 106. 

Hannah, an interpreter, 9. 159. 

Hanoides, a Hungarian, 1. 154. 

Hanover, Europe, 6. 427 ; 7. 7, 103. 

Hanover Street, 5. 37, 202, 203; 7. 347. 

Hanover, Treaty of, 7. 361. 

Hanson's Point, 6. 110. 

Harbach, John, 3. 282. 

Harbery, Enq., 5. xvi. 

Harbone, William, 8. 187. 

Harbors, letter of Gen. Washington ask- 
ing a map of the, 10. 186. 

Harcourt, Lord Chancellor, 1719, 6. 416, 
419. 

Harcourt, Sir Thomas, 1627, 8. 190. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETV, 



405 



Hardenburpli, , death of, 4. 11. 

Harding:, Mr., conceniing tlie inhabitants 

of Wcstmorchmd, 10. TJ-t. 
Hardins; (Harden), dipt. Robert, i. 332. 
Hardwick, Daniel, i. 219. 
Hardwick, Lord Chancellor, concerning 

military power, 9. 436. 
Hardy, Silas, 2. 4()4. 
Hare, Robert, 4. 311. 
Harfield, Mr., Enqland, 5. 271. 
1 Harker, John, i. 108. 
Harker, Richard, i. 361. 
Harlakenden, Richard, i. 83 n. 
Harlakenden, Roger, i. 83 n. 
Harlakenden, Symonds, i. Ill n. 
Harley, Sir E , 5. 251. Created Earl of 

Oxford, 6. 315. 
Harlock, John, 6. 435. 
Harman, Capl., in expedition against 

Indians, 7. 342, 343. 
Harman, Widow, 6. 216. 
Harman, Ames, 6. 216. 
Harman, Sir Jfonathan, service of, at 

Martinique, 8. 259. 
Harradine, Andrew, 7. 335. 
Harrington, James, 4. 324. 
Harris, Mr., mariner, 8. 456, 481, 489, 548, 

553. 
Harris. 3frs., 5. 119, 159 ; 7. 181, 297. 
Harris, Abraham, prisoner of war, 10. 313. 
Harris, Benjamin, 2. 209 ; 6. 332, 345. 
Harris, Bennv, 5. 237. 
Harris, Rev. Rainy, 6. 394, 395 ; 7. 330, 

372. 
Harris, Sir James, 4. 455. 
Harris, John, 7. 353. 
Harris, Mrs. Rebecca, 6. 3.32. 
Harris, Thomas, 6. 332. 
Harris, Timothy, 7. 40. 
Harris, William, Patuxef, R. /., i. 507, 

509. Notice of, i. 414 «. ; 8. 292. 
Harris, William, Boston, 5. 222 ; 7. 181, 

220. 
Harris, Mrs. William (Sarah), 7. 181. 
Harrison, Col. Charles, 4. 115. 
Harrison, Mrs. Dorothy, i. 30. 
Harrison, John, letters of, i. 116, 119- 

123. 
Harrison, Matthew, i. 194. 
Harrison, Ralph, 6. 90. 
Harrison, Richard, 4. 278. 
Harrison, William, bodies -maker, Boston, 

buried, 5. 14(5. 
Harrison, William, attorney on estate of 

John While, 9. 124. 
Harrison & Ansley, Messrs., rmhUshers, 2. 

223. 

Hart, , innkeeper, 6. 46, 77. 

Hart, Lieut.-CoL, a prisoner of war, 10. 

29, 32. 
Hart, John, passing counterfeit money, 

10. 55. 
Hart, Samuel, 7. 2. 
Hart, Serqeant Solomon, fire at house of, 

8. 111. 113. 



Hartford, Conn., 1. 102 n., 363, 387, 390 «., 
411, 413, 421, 449. Controversy in the 
cluirch at, i. 383-385 ; 5. 142, 194, 2;iii, 
488, 491 ; 6. 112; 7. 134, 146, 190, 195, 
223; 8. 63, 103, 134, 341; 9. 7. A 
magazine for provisions at, 10. 2.!2. 

Hartley, Col., sent to the defence of 
Westmoreland, 1778, lo. 126. 

Hartley, David, signed peace treaty on 
behalf of England, 4. 429. 

Hartlib, Samuel, sends certain books to 
John Winthrop, Jr., 8. 74, 86. 

Hartshorn, John, 7. 2. 

Harvard, Mrs. Anna, 5. 417. 

Harvard, Rev. John, 5. 440, 447. Death 
of, 5. 447. His house, 5. 446, 447. His 
monument, 5. 447. 

Harvard College, i. 195 n., 390 n. ; 2. 25, 
481 ; 3. 198, 304, 342, 371, 387 «.,391 n. ; 
4. 291 ; 5. xiii, xiv, 50, 51, 104, 156, 
182, 183, 241, 347, 430, 432, 442, 447, 
480, 481, 493, 494, 500 ; 6. 12*, 13*, 
20, 35, 39, 81, 94, 111, 112, 117, 133, 
192, 193, 196, 198, 204, 205, 263, 358, 
392, 400, 428, 420, 439 ; 7. 9, 10. 11, 49, 
63, 78, 80, 92, 120, 157, 162, 174, 178, 
201, 202, 259, 264, 295, 296, 300, 362, 
365, 381. Removal of apparatus, etc., 
from Cambridge, 4. 292. Graduates 
of, 5. 480 ; 6. 39, 272, 439 ; 7 260, 262, 
264, 319, 320. Treasurer of, 6. 209; 
7. 297. Librarian of, 6. 282; 7. 378. 
Trustees of, 7. 78. Council of, 7. 78 ; 
Addition to, 7. 157. Committee of, 

7. 162, 164. President and Fellows 
of, 7. 300. Vice-President of, 7. 381. 
Sums collected for, at Charlestowii 
and Cambridge, 8. 389. Vacation at, 

8. 532. Concerning incorporation of, 
8. 551. Hall at, 5. xiv; 7. 108, 157. 
Library at, 5. 307, 475 ; 6. 29* 28, 
352 ; 7. 108, 157. Corporation of, 5. 
494 ; 7. 78, 295, 338, 340, 341, 344, 355. 
President of, see President. 

Harvard Fellows, see Fellows. 

' Harvard Graduates,' Sibley's, see Sib- 

ley. 
Harvard University, Quincy's History 

of, see History. 
Harvey, Mr., gone to England, 8. 17. 
Harvey, Mrs. Martha, 6. 408. 
Harvey, William, 6. 408. 
Harvey, Dr. W lliam, notice of, 1. 162 n. 
Ilarwood, John, Knc/land, i. 39. 
Harwood, John, Kw/lish merchant, 5, 25.3, 

260 ; 8. 67, 144, 145, 391, 393, 394, 408 ; 

9.30. 
Harwood, Mehitable, 7. 284. 
Haselrigge, Sir Arthur, notice of, i, 373. 
Ilaskins, /!<i.\ J//., Rn(il(iml, 5. xii. 
Ilaslitt, Col. John, 4. 15, 17. 
Ilaslitt, see Hazlitt. 
Ilassit, Josiah, 6. 433. 
Hasting, Draron, death of, 6. 135. 
Hasting, Daniel, 6. 322, 310, 318, 3.52. 



405 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Hastings, Widoiv, 7. 15. 

Hastings, Jonathan, 2. 35, 82, 132, 213, 
214, 227, 235, 240, 334, 343, 348, 358, 
376, 380, 449, 460, 470 ; 3. 24, 28, 45, 
55, 117, 118, 141, 167, 194, 196, 200, 
302. 

Has3', Jacob, 7. 52. 

Haszard, Mrs. Mary, 2. 196. 

Hatch's Tavern, 5. 194. 

Hatch, Mr., riiessengcr, 8. 517. 

Hatch, Mrs., 5. 431 ; 6. 51, 362. 

Hatch, Nathaniel, 5. xxxviii. 

Hatch, Thomas, 6. 399. 

Hate, Mary, 7. 312. 

Hatfield, 5. 9, 14, 48, 103, 483 ; 6. 283, 318, 
355; 7. 5, 12, 100, 101, 214, 255, 358- 
360. Murder of two English at, 8. 351. 
Man and boy killed at, by Indians, 8. 
536. 

Hatherly, Timothy, 8. 29, 31, 32. 

Hathorn, L, 5. 132, 137. 

Hathorn, il7<(/o/- William, death of, 6. 14*. 

Hathorne, Col. John, 5. 77, 359, 365, 387, 
398, 431, 437, 454, 505; 6. 2, 15, 40, 
63, 64, 68, 71, 73, 77, 78. 88, 97, 101, 
114, 115, 139, 148, 151, 154, 162-165, 
187, 194, 199, 223, 241, 245, 251, 255, 
256, 260, 263, 264, 287, 292, 298, 311, 
340, 346, 348, 349, 384, 403 ; 7. 25, 55, 
74, 130. 

Hathorne, William, Commissioner of Con- 
necticut, 9. 3. 

Hatsel, Henry, 5. 249, 290. 

Hatten, Mrs., 5. 18, 20. 

Hatterworth, Enq., 5. 298. 

Haitok, Capt., death of, 8. 415. 

Haugh, Anna, 5. 123. 

Haugh, Atherton, 5. 448. 

Haugh, Samuel, 5. 49, 313, 320, 333, 349, 
420, 421, 448, 464, 499 ; 7. 132. 

Hause, , a tow-man, i. 386. 

Havana, 5. 485. Picture of the Virgin 
(black) at, 2. 176. 

Haverhill, Mass., 5. 7, 349, 373, 379, 388 ; 
6. 95, 234, 357 ; 7. 69, 220. Surprise 
of, by Indians, 6. 234. 

Haward, Nathaniel, 8. 384. 

Haward, William, i. 493, 494. 

Hawes, Thomas, Stambridge, Eng., letter 
from, I. 182. 

Hawes, Thomas, juror, Fairjield, Conn., g. 
138. 

Hawking, i. 467 etseq. 

Hawkins, Dr., 5. 22, 23. 

Hawkins, Mrs., 1. 39, 40. 

Hawkins, Mrs. Abigail, 6. 51, 95, 300. 

Hawkins, Elizabetli, married, i. 91 jj. 

Hawkins, Hannah, 6. 300. 

Hawkins, James, i. 130; 5. 169; 6. 109, 
271. 

Hawkins, John, 5. 334. 

Hawkins, Sir John, 3. 394. 

Hawkins, Mary, see Aylett, Mrs. 

Hawkins, Mary, 6. 49. 

Hawkins, Robert, 6. 116. 



Hawkins, Thomas, i. 91 n., 372 ; 6. 300. 

Hawkins, Thomas, a pirate, 5. 308. 

Hawkins, Capt. Thomas, cast away, 1646, 
8. 205. 

Hawksworth, , sherijf, 6. 70. 

Havvle}', , Justice 0/ Northamptonshire, 

6. 21. 

Hawley, Mr., England, i. 47. 

Ilawley, Capt. David, 10. 21. 

Hawley, Caj)t. John, 6. 312. 

Ilawley, Major Joseph, 4. 345, 346. 

Hawley Street, 5. 453; 6. 113, 114. 

Hawly, Joseph, Recorder, 9. 120. 

Haws, , in suit against Hugh Adams, 

7.76. 

Haws, Benjamin, 6. 432, 433, 436, 438. 

Hawthorn, William, Salem, 5. 48, 185, 308, 
322. 

Hawthorne, William, i. 29, 417, 418. 

Hay, Col. Udney, 4. 140, 146, 151, 180, 
184, 185, 187, 188 ; 10. 316. 

Hay, concerning the threshing of, for 
seed, 8. 449. 

Hayden, Mrs., 7. 180. 

Hayden, Nehemiah, 5. 336. 

Hayes, Alderman, 5. 105. 

Hayes, Mr., Surgeon of British Hospital, 
10. 316. 

Hayford, John, 5. 208. 

Ilayman, Elizabeth, 7. 50. 

Haynian, Grace, daughter of John, 6. 268. 

Hayman, Major John, 6. 268. 

Ilayman, Mrs. John (Grace), 6. 268. 

Hayman, Nathan, 6. 268 ; 7. 50. 

Hayman, Samuel, 6. 11* 78, 79, 89, 103, 
154, 268, 369 ; 7. 136. 

Hayman, il/rs. Samuel (Mary), 7. 135, 136. 

Hay market, south end of Boston, 9. 509. 

Ilaymarket Square, 7. 64. 

Haynes, John, Boston, 1636, i. 20. 

Ilaynes, John, London, Eng., 8. 267. 

Haynes, Joseph, 8. 267. 

Haynes, Lad>/ Mabel, 8. 267. 

Hayns, David, 7. 22. 

Haytcr, Thomas, mentioned in will of 
Edward Hopkins, 9. 20. Signer of will 
of Edward Hopkins, 9. 22. 

Hay ward, Lieut. John, jmUic notary, 5. 102, 
141. 

Hayward, John, 5. 31, 41, 196, 207, 302, 
357. 

Hayward House, County Hants, Enq., 7. 
99. 

Haywood, Capt. Anthony, 5. 168, 190. 

Hazard, Alderman, 2. 460, 462. 

Hazard, Ebenezer, his difficulties in col- 
lecting his historical papers, 2. 13. His 
interest in natural history and philos- 
ophy, 2. 31-35, 38, 45, 59, 62, 91, 219- 
221. An American chronology suggest- 
ed by, 2. 37, 50, 117, 119, 123. Elected 
a member of the American Academy, 
2. 88, 94. Appointed Postmaster-Gen- 
eral, 2. 115 «., 116 w. His salary as 
Postmaster-General, 2. 118. His ora- 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTOKICAL SOCIETY. 



40: 



tion in praise of knowloilixc, 2. 120, 128, 
12'J, 181, 132, 137. His estimate uf the 
cost of printing Dr. Belknap's first vol- 
iime, 2. 223. 224. His marriage, 2. 24G, 
247, 2olJ, 257. His tlieological views, 2. 
o'\d, 382. His son SaTuuel born, 2. 351. 
His residence in Piiilailelpliia, 2. 372. 
Illness, 2. 381. Removes to New York, 
2. 118. His residence in New York, 2. 
420,441. His daughter Klizabetli born, 

2. 438. His collection of newspapers 
and pampidets, 2. 477, 478, 481, 4i)l. 
Affidavit of Ichabod Grumman con- 
cerning him, 3. 3, 4. Opposition to 
him as Postmaster-General, 3. 4, 24, 3-5- 
37, 43, 63-69, 71, IDO. 191. Death of 
his mother, 3. -58. His labors in the 
post-office, 3. 01. His collection of pa- 
pers, 3. 71, 72, 75. Publication of his 
collection of papers, 3. 85, 80, 91, 219. 
223, 246, 248-251, 2.55, 258, 202, 270, 
279, 290, 292, 305, 309, 328, 349. His 
account of the ' American Magazine 
and Register,' 3. 91-95. His opiniim 
of the Society of the Cincinnati, 3. 150 ; 
of the Bible as a school-book, 3. 155. 
Removed from the office of Postmaster- 
General, 3. 192. Reasons given for 
his removal from office, 3. 193. Occu- 
pation after losing his office, 3. 195. 
His ancestry, 3. 196. Vindication of 
his conduct in office, 3. 207, 209,211. 
Birth of his son Erskine, 3. 208. His 
attempt to obtain another public office, 

3. 23-3-237. Removes to Philadelphia, 
3. 242. Residence there, 3. 242, 324. 
The first volume of his ' Collections ' 
published, 3. 290. List of subscribers 
in Boston and vicinity to his first vol- 
ume, 3. 292 n. Elected a Correspond- 
ing Member of the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society, 3. 297. Birth of his 
son Ebenezer, 3. 311. Death of his 
son Ebenezer, 3. 316. Letter to S. A. 
Otis, describing the fever in Philadel- 
phia, 3. 334-337. 

Hazard, .Urs. Ebenezer, 2. 256-500 ; 3. 1- 

371 passim. 
Hazard, Ebenezer, Jr., 3. 314, 318. Birth 

of, 3 311. Death of, 3. 310. 
Hazard, Elizabeth, birth of, 2. 438. 
Hazard, Erskine, 3. 275. Birth of, 3. 208. 
Hazard, Samuel, 2. 421, 425, 434, 400; 3. 

50, 78, 80, 122, 230, 304. Birth of, 2. 

351. 
Hazard, Thomas, 5. 501 ; 6. 159, 108. 
Hazard, xloop, 7. 33. 
Hazen, Col. Moses, 2. 54 ; 4. 130, 132, 135, 

166, 177, 180, 190, 193, 197, 198, 221, 

2.30, 251. Commands artillery, 10. 155. 
Hazlitt (Hazlett), Rev. William, 2. 358, 

370, 371 ; 3. 108. 
Head, f'cipt., 5. 151. 
Head, John, wool-comher, 7 191. 
Healy, Martha, 7. 177. 



Hcane, David, i. 181. 

Heard, Mr., Ipswich, 2. 380. 

Hearne, Thomas, 3. 118. 

Heath, Mr., the kiwi's workman, 8. 23. 

Heath, Mrs. Elizabeth, 6. 410. 

Heath, Capt. Joseph, 7. 212, 350. 

Heath, Peleg, 5. 310. 

Heath, (ien. William, asked concerning 
organization of the army, 4. 3, 4. Or- 
dered to detach troops to meet ex- 
pected attack on New York, 4. 9, 10. 
To co-operate with Gov. Clinton. 4. 12. 
To repair to head-quarters, 4. 13. To 
obstruct roads leading to Kingsbridge, 
4. 14. Reinforcements to be sent to 
him, 4. 15. Requested to hasten the 
choice of officers, 4. 18. Ordered to 
guard tiie posts and passes of the 
Highlands, 4. 19-22. Notified of the 
surrender of Fort NVasiiington, 4. 23. 
To send troops to Wasiiington, 4. 26. 
Ordered to join Lee at Pittstown, 4. 27. 
To return to his former station, 4. 28. 
Nova Scotia Indians placed under his 
command, 4. 29. To forward troops 
to Washington, 4. 30, 31. News of the 
battle of Trenton sent him, 4. 32. An 
attack on New York suggested to, 4. 
38. Ordered to hasten the despatch of 
troops from Boston, 4. 42. Author- 
ized to draw arms for Massachusetts 
troops, 4. 46. Notified of attack on 
Ticonderoga, 4. 51. A request of, for 
field-pieces refused, 4. 55. Urged to 
forward troops, 4. 00. Advised to dis- 
courage the application of French offi- 
cers. 4. 69. The elaboratory at Spring- 
field in his command, 4. 73. To supply 
the Continental vessels with ammuni- 
tion, 4. 74. Urged to delay the depar- 
ture of Burgoyne's troops, 4. 77. Let- 
ter to, introducing Major Blackden, 4. 
80. Letter to, introducing Capt. Hop- 
kins, 4. 81. Communicates resigna- 
tion of Col. Lee and Major Swazy, 
4. 84. Informed of tiie alliance witli 
France, 4. 85. Advised to assist in 
intercepting a fleet witii provisions for 
the British, 4. '.'O. To urge measures 
for supply of the army, 4. 93. Cau- 
tioned not to keep superfluous stores 
in Boston, 4. 95. To co-operate with 
Gen. Du P'.rtail in the fortification of 
Boston, 4 98. Authorized to grant 
discharges to officers, 4. 99. Direc- 
tions to, in regard to removal of Con- 
vention troops from Boston, 4. 103. 
Requested to join the main army, 4. 
105, 100. Ordered to send troops to 
Crompond, 4. 109. To gain accurate 
news of tile force at Verplanck's Point, 
4. 114. To fortify a spot in the moun- 
tain gorge, 4. 115. To send an officer to 
New London to get information of the 
French fleet, 4. 124, 125. Concerning 



408 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



commissions for the Massachusetts 
line, 4. 127. To go into winter quar- 
ters, 4. 180. Asks for leave of absence, 
4. 131. Complains of a scarcity of 
flour, 4. 133, 13-1. Command of the 
North Uiver posts assigned to, 4. 135. 
Instructions to, as commander on the 
North River, 4. 13G-140. Payment of 
troops in his command, 4. 147. Di- 
rections to, in regard to clotliing the 
troops, 4. 149, 150. Leave of absence 
granted to, 4. 152. Gen. Poor placed 
under his command, 4. 154. Requested 
to make a return of the Massachusetts 
troops, 4. 156. Arrives at Roxbury, 
4. 156. Asks to liave recruiting offi- 
cers sent to Massachusetts, 4. 157. 
Authorized to allow a bounty to men 
enlisted for tlie artillery, 4. 158. To 
repair road from Newport to Provi- 
dence, 4. 161. Returns to West Point, 
4. 164. Want of supplies for the 
Highland posts, 4. 167. To send troops 
to Albany to Gen. Clinton, 4. 170. 
Winter quarters for 1780-81, 4. 171, 
172. To send out a strong foraging 
party, 4. 174. In regard to trial of 
Major Reid, 4. 180, 181. Ordered to 
forage in Westchester County, 4. 184. 
Commends conduct of Col. Pritchard, 
4. 186. His complaint of orders issued 
for the government of the post at Fish- 
kill, 4. 189, 190, 193, 194. Ordered to 
send a detachment of troops to the 
Southern army, 4. 197, 198. To secure 
West Point, 4. 197, 198. Concerning 
chain across the river at, 4. 201. His 
rations and extra expenses as com- 
manding officer, 4. 204. Informs Wasli- 
ington of a plot against his life or lib- 
erty, 4. 205. Concerning Burgoyne's 
troops (prisoners), 4. 209. Directed 
to go to the New England States and 
arrange a system of supplies for the 
army, 4. 209. His instructions, 4. 210- 
212. To urge forward the new levies, 
4. 214, 216. To rejoin the army im- 
mediately, 4. 218. The application of 
the Stockbridge Indians referred to 
him, 4. 219, 220. To forward supplies 
to tlie main army. 4. 221. Informed 
of the surrender of Yorktown, 4. 228. 
Winter quarters, 1781-82, 4. 229, 230. 
To make an accurate return of the 
troops under his command, 4. 231, 2-34, 
237. Compelled to order Gen. Mc- 
Dougall under arrest, 4. 2-38. His stor- 
age of arms and magazines at West 
Point, 4. 242. To concert with Gen. 
Schuyler an expedition against the 
vessels in Lake Champlain, 4. 244, 245. 
Informed of the strength of the enemy 
in New York, and his opinion asked 
in regard to the campaign of 1782, 4. 
249-252. Asks for leave of absence. 



4. 252. Concerning the recruits from 
Massachusetts, 4. 256, 263. Recom- 
mends Col. Greaton to be made Brig- 
adier-General, 4. 264. A misunder- 
standing with Col. Putnam, 4. 260, 267. 
To prepare for referees in tiie dispute 
with Messrs. Sands & Co., 4. 267, 268. 
Appointed to act for America in the 
matter of the court-martial of Capt. 
Lippencott, 4. 271. His instructions, 4. 
271-273. Gen. McDougall declines to 
prosecute the charges he had proposed 
to make against him, 4. 275. Leave 
of absence granted to, 4. 275. In- 
formed of the treaty with Holland, 
4. 279. To rejoin the army, 4. 282. 
To superintend the army in Washing- 
ton's absence, 4. 283. Mentioned, 10. 23, 
28, 41, 226. Concerning arms, 10. 63. 
Concerning miUtary, 10. 66. Concern- 
ing the piracies of provisions from 
Long Island, 10. 154. Sent to the 
Eastern States for provisions for the 
army, 10. 2.36. Concerning provisions 
for the army, 10. 243. In command of 
troops in New York, 10. 255. His ']Me- 
moirs ' cited, 4. 269 n. See also Wash- 
ington, Pi-es. George. 

Heathcot, Mr., 8. 288. 

Heaton, Nathaniel, i. 490. 

Hedge, Mrs., 7. 128. 

Hedge, Elisha, 6. 10. 

Hedges, Mr., Bristol, 5. 318, 319. 

Heelye, Joseph, i. 182. 

Heerboord, Adrian, 5. 51. 

Heifford, John, 5. 252. 

Heines (Haynes), John, Commissioner of 
Connecticut, 9. 3. 

Heister, Daniel, 4. 84, 86. 

Hellespont, the, 8. 13. 

Hell-Gate, 5. 319. Concerning the tides 
of, 8. 128. 

Helmes, Mr., i. 361. 

Helmont, J. B. v., i. 159, 161, 359. No- 
tice of, I. 159 n. His works, certain 
books, 8. 41. 

Helvet Sluys, 7. 24. 

Hely, Goodman, flogs a Harvard student, 
5-4; 7-137. 

Heman, Mr., at election, 5. 378. 

Hemmenway, Rev. Moses, D.D., 2. 173. 

Hempstead, L. I, i. 371 n. ; 5. 318. 

Henchman, Capt., 5. 16, 24, 29, 32, 33, 55, 
83, 100, 360 ; 6. 12* 126. 

Henchman, C, 5. 14, 16,24. 

Henchman, Daniel, 4. 334; 7. 218, 281, 
307, 348, 381. 

Henchman, Mrs. Dorothy, 7. 328, 329. 

Henchman, Hannah, 5. 41 ; 7. 282. 

Henchman, Hezekiah, 5. 374, 390 ; 7. 
348. 

Henchman, Nathaniel, 6. 41, 171, 222; 
7. 133, 348. 

Henchman, ^frs. Nathaniel (Anna), 6. 
171 ; 7. 123, 175. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



■400 



Henchman, Richard, 6. 00, 13G ; 7. 04S, 

849. 
Henchman, Major Thomas, 5. 325. 
Hendcn, Sergeant, i. 189. 
Hendon, a market town, England, 5. 296. 
Hendrick, Daniel, i. 258. 
Henley, Col. David. 4. 57, 76, 77. 
Henly, Mr., England, 5. 294. 
Hennepin, Father Louis, 2. '2C>. 101. Ilis 

views on the conversion of the Indians, 

2. 42, 4(5. 
Henry VIII. of England, 2. 46. 
Henry, Prince 0/ Orange, 8 19 »i. 
Henry, Rev. Matthew, 7. 17, 18. 
Henshaw, Mr., 4. 299. 
Hensliaw, Col. Joseph, concerning the 

fortress of Ticonderoga, 10. o07. 
Her Majesty, Queen Anne, 6. 43*, 49*, 

68*, 71*, 72* 74* 79*-85*, 87*, 99*. 

Enemies of, 6. 33*, 101* 116*, 117*. 

Subjects of, 6. 33*, 39* 49* 87*. Ser- 

Tice of, 6. 40*, 42* 104. Ships of war, 

6. 85*. In Council, 6. 68*, 72* 83* 

101*, 125*. Her Majesty's Government 

of this Province, 6. 421,' 423. 
Heraldic Journal. 5. 477 ; 6. 98, 109, 117, 

129, 134, 233, 269, 300, 368; 7. 51, 74, 

150, 105, 328. 
Herbert, Lord, 6. 228. 
Herborn, Naasau, 6. 123. 
Herendean (Hearndale), Benjamin, i. | 

105. 
Hermer, Edmund, 6 198. 
Hermer, Samuel, 6. 198. 

Hern, , 6. 28, 124, 139, 198 ; 7. 83. 

Heron, Capt., 6. 58. 

Herrick, , captain ofmilitar,/, 6. 105. 

Herridge, Christian, 5. "317, 338. 

Herring Pond, 6. 166. 

Herring River, 5. 26. 

Herryman, Mr., 8. 441. 

Hersey, John, 6. 47. 

Hertel, Capt. Fram/ois, 5. 316. 

Hertford, Lord, 9. 431. 

Hertogenbosch, tlie, yielded to Henry, 

Prince of Orange, 8. 19 n. 
Herts, County of, Eng., 5. xvi. 
Hervey, liev. James, his ' Letters' cited, 

2. 51. His ' Meditations,' 2. 247. 
Hesilrige, Sir Arthur, Baronet, i. 482, 

483. 
Hessians repulsed at Red Bank, 10. 101. 
Hester, John, 7. 225. 
Hester, Mary, 7. 225. 
Hester, William, 7. 225. 
Hetora, testimony of, g. 121, 122. 
Hett, Hannali, 5. 77, 240, .390. 
Heurnius, Justus, 6. 122, 123. 
Heveningham, Eng., 6. 268. 
Hewes, Joshua, 5. 355. Attorney on 

estate of John White, 9. 124. 
Hewes, Josiah, 3. 242, 244. 
Hewes & Anthony, Messrs., 3. 251. 
Hews, James, 6 189. 
Hews, John, 5. 337. 



Ilcwson, Thomas, letter from, i. 218. 

Notice of, I. 218 H. 
Heydon, Sir John, i. 882. 
Ileyman, John, i. 501. 
Ileysham, Robert, 3. 335. 
Hey wood, Capt. Benjamin, 4. 119. 
Hibbens, William, i. 366 «., 495; 5. 109. 
Hide, Mr., 8. 17. 
Higbee, Edward, 8. 110. 
Higbee, Edward, Jr., 8. 112. 
Higginson, Cousin, 7. 316, 322. 
Iligginson, Hon. Mr., vindication of, 6. 

97*. Stigmatized, 6. 112*. 
Higginson, Mrs., 6. 172, 199 ; 7. 55. 
Iligginson, Elizabeth S., 5. xx.\iv. 
Higginson, liev. Francis, i. 40; 7. 247. 
Higginson, Henry, 5. 97. 
Higginson, John, captain ofrnilitari/, 5. 94, 

140, 255, 365, 387, 498, 499; 6. 112* 

113*, 40, 78, 188, 224, 243, 245, 288, 

820, 349, 402; 7. 20, 25, 26, 74, 127, 174, 

181, 204, 208, 247. 
Higginson, Rev. John, Guilford, 5. 464 ; 6. 

142, 244-246; 7. 174, 247; 8. 55, 395. 

Testimony concerning Indian lands, 9. 

118, 129. 
Higginson, Mrs. John (Sarah), 6.26; 7. 

247. 
Higginson, Mrs. Margaret, 7. 25, 26, 

366. 
Higginson, Martha S., 5. xxxiv 
Higtiinson, Nathaniel, 5. 498; 6. 13*, 

il0*-112*, 124*, 131*. 
Higginson, Sarah, 5. 255. 
Higginson, Stephen, 4. 281 ; 5. xxxiv. 
High Court of Justice, England, 5. 104. 
High Dutch in singing, 6. 151. 
Highgate, 5. 265. 
High Lake, Ireland, 5. 329. 
Highlands on the Hudson Rivtr, Gen. 

Heath's division to guard the passes 

of, 4. 19-22. 
High Sheriff, 5. 173, 175, 219. Of New 

England, 5. 204. 
High Treason, 5. 104 ; 6. 40*, 50* 79* 

130* 131* 149. 
Hight, Mr., Jefferson, N. IL, 2. 394. 
Highways, repair of, in England, 1. 456. 
Hilbon's Point, Mass., 5. 188. 
Hill, Mr., coming from Kngland, i. 117. 
Hill, Mr., Sayhrouk, i. 130. 
Hill, Mrs., 6. 51. 
Hill, Nurse, 5. Ill, 113, 114, 184, 383; 6. 

49,51; 7. il 
Hill, Abraham, 6. 158. 
Hill, Annis, 5. 341. 
Hill, C, /io^ion, 5. 60. 
Hill, Charles, Neiv London, 8. 115. 
Hill, Edward, 7. 88. 89. 
Hill, Mrs. Edward (Deborah), 7. 88. 
Hill, Edward, J/-., 7. 88. 
Hill, Elizabeth, 7. 282. 
Hill, G. James, 5. 34. 
Hill, Hannah,7. 88, 282. 
Hill, Henry, 6. 8 ; 7. 61. 



410 



INDEX OF THE COLI;ECTIONS 



Hill, IchaLod, induced to enlist in tlie 
arniv, lo. 120. 

Hill, Ignatius, 7. 282. 

Hill, Isaac, 6. 21*. 

Hill, James, Jr., 5. 401 ; 7. 282. 

Hill, Capt. James, 5. xxx, xxxiv, 95, 121, 
156, 164, 165, 176, 214, 216, 335, 336, 
338, 341, 344, 362, 367, 374, 400, 401, 
417, 421, 451, 463, 467 ; 6. 8, 10, 134, 
160, 175, 246, 257, 279, 286, 287, 324, 
346, 377 ; 7. 14, 32, 98, 101, 174, 22y, 
241, 245, 266, 268, 280-283. 

Hill, Mrs. Capt. James (Hannah), 7. 282, 
283. 

Hill, Capt. Jeremiah, 4 75. 

Hill, Brig.-Gen. John, 6. 313, 316-319. 

Hill, Joseph, 5. xxxiv; 7. 2, 88, 89. 

Hill, Joseph S., 5. xxxiv. 

Hill, Kitty, 5. xxvii. 

Hill, Margaret, 7. 361. 

Hill, Margaret V., 5. xxxiv. 

Hill, Richard, i. 9. Letter from, i. 336. 

Hill, Richard S., 5. xxxiv. 

Hill, Samuel, 3. 258, 261. 

Hill, Samuel, son 0/ James, 5. xxxiv. 

Hill, Samuel S., son of James, 5. xxxiv. 

Hill, Sarah, 7. 88. 

Hill, Sewall, 5. xxxiv. 

Hill, Sim., 6. 394. 

Hill. Thomas, 5. 53, 341. 

Hill, Valentin, i. 285. 

Hill, William, clerk oj Fairfield, 9. 110. 

Hill, William R., 5. xxxiv. 

Hillegas, Michael, 3. 193. 

Hiller, Mr., 7. 254. Death of, 7. 278, 
279. 

Hiller, Mrs., 5. 463, 506. 

Hiller, Benjamin, 6. 198 ; 7. 38, 104. 

Hiller, Josepli, 6. 198, 427 ; 7. 38, 104. 

Hiller, Mrs. Josepli (Susanna), 6. 198. 

Hilles, Joanna, see Winthrojj, Mrs. 

Hilles, William, i. 86 n. 

Hilliard, Thomasin, see Noell, ilfj-s. 

Hills, Mrs., Erif/land, 5. xxii, 295. 

Hills, David, killed by Indians, 6. 56. 

Hillsborough, Lord, Secretary of State 
for the Colonies, 9. 251. Portrayed, 9. 
252. Interview with William Samuel 
Johnson, 9. 253, 295. Head of Board 
of Trade, 9. 290. Speech of, concern- 
ing the conduct of the Colonies, 9. 306. 
His resolutions concerning the Colo- 
nies, 9. 308. Interview with William 
Samuel Johnson concerning Mohegan 
case, 9. 322, 386. In Ireland, 9. 368. 
Sentiments concerning the duty im- 
posed on British importations by Con- 
necticut Colony, 9 392. Concerning 
the Connecticut Duty Act, 9. 428. 
Mentioned, g. 437. Signs petition, 9. 
454. 

Hillyer, Lient., in camp at Roxbury, 9. 
500. Promoted to adjutancv, 9. 506. 

Hilton, Mrs. Richard, 7. 197. 

Hinckley, Guv. Thomas, i. 312 h. 



Ilincks, John, member of Council, ^. 142; 
9. 146. (Hinkes.) 

Hinde vs. Dimond, 7. 25. 

Hinds, Henry, New York, 4 507. 

Hingham, Mass., i. SGn., 310; 5. 25, 3.5, 
52, 170, 187, 208, 346. 349, 399, 406 ; 6. 
13* 27, 97, 183, 189, 221, 276, 304, 375 ; 
7. 75, 105, 129, 149, 158, 186, 220, 352, 
.353, 376. 

Hinkley, Gov., 5. 110, 137, 138, 104, 187, 
326, 378 ; 8. 464. 

Hinkley, Mr., in suit against Crocker, 7. 
353. 

Hinksman, Capt., 5. 14. Engaged in 

. King Philip's war. 8. 404. 

Plinksman, John, concerning the sale of 
land to, 8. 386, 388, 390. 

Hinman, Col., sent to the defence of Ti- 
conderoga, 10. 308. 

Hinsdale, Rev. Ebenezer, 7. 100. 

Hinsdale, Nahuman, 7. 100. 

Hinsdale, Samuel, 7. 100. 

Hinsdale, N. H., 7. 100. 

Hirst, Mrs., 6. 282, 303, 403 ; 7. 25. 

Hirst, Eliza, 5 xxxvii ; 6. 24, 239, 243, 
245, 282, 311, 320; 7. 9, 61, 91, 145, 
278, 287, 307, 378. 

Hirst, Elsa, 6 69, 

Hirst, Experience, 7. 91. 

Hirst, Grove, 5. xviii, xxxv,i, xxxvii, 502, 
503 ; 6. 23, 24, 45, 47, 52, 60, 61, 66, 68, 
69, 73, 91, 95, 112, 128, 153, 170, 179, 
206, 282, 286, 308, 320, 396, 403 ; 7. 27, 
78, 89, 90, 91, 144, 145, 175. 

Hirst, Mrs. Grove (Elizabeth), 5. xxxvi, 
xxxvii ; 6. 24, 26, 39, 42, 47, 52, 66, 69, 
72, 73, 82, 91, 93-95, 102, 112, 122, 128, 
140, 141, 153, 179, 206, 210, 221, 223, 
239, 243, 247, 250, 282. 286, 311, 320, 
355, 359, 381, 396, 403 ; 7. 13, 61, 74, 
78, 80, 83, 89-91. 

Hirst, Hannah, 5. xxxvi, xxxvii, xxxviii; 
6. 243 ; 7. 91, 145, 237, 248, 249, 372. 

Hirst, Henry, 6. 404. 

Hirst, Jane, 5. xxxvii, xxxviii ; 7. 91, 145, 
270, 278, 292, 334, 378. 

Hirst, Marv, 5. xxxvi, xxxvii ; 6- 94, 95, 
243; 7. 25, 86. 91, 145. 233, 243, 260, 
264, 270, 278, 308, 311, 320. 

Hirst, Samuel, 5. xxxvii ; 6. 24, 140, 141, 
158, 356; 7. 9, 91, 113, 127, 145, 150, 
201, 207, 216, 217, 222, 250, 259, 270, 
276, 278, 295, 308, 327, 372. 

Hirst, William, 5. xxxvi, xxxvii, 481, 503, 
504; 6. 13, 24, 26, 28, 31, 73, 77, 82, 92, 
99, 102,122, 140, 142, 153, 199, 235, 286, 
239, 243, 245, 250, 266, 282, 285, 289, 
320, 328, 329, 345, 348, 355, 375, 384, 
389, 396, 400, 403, 404, 406, 415 ; 7. 24, 
25, 61, 68, 71, 89, 91, 97, 110, 113, 116, 
118, 144, 145, 157, 159, 162, 173, 174, 
199, 254. 

Hirst, Mrs. William, 6. 24, 26, 93-95, 179, 
239, 215, 250, 282, 384. 

Hirst, William, a child, 7. 14, 41. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



411 



Hirst Line, 5. xxxvi. 

His Majesty, promise of, concerning New 

England colonies, 8. 460. 
Hispaniola, 5. 401, 43(3, 437 ; 7. 4. Defeat 

of the expedition to, i. 3bO. 
' Historical Magazine,' 5. 37, 161, 456, 

477. 
Historical Society, see Massachusetts His- 
torical Society. 
' History of Harvard University' (Quin- 

cy's), 5. 480; 6. 29*, 20, 84, 112, 41(3; 

7. 1.37, 201. 203, 258, 208, 341, 344. 
' History of Brattle Street Church,' 6. 3. 
Hiuhborn, Mr., 3. 70. 

Hitehborn, , drummer, 5. 175. 

Ilitehborn, Thomas, 5. 346. 
Hitehbourn, Richard, 6. 303. 
Hitchcock, Luke, sherlj; 7. 100. 
Ilitciicock, David, 7. Go. 
Hitclicock, R,l: Enos, A/A, 3. 228, 232. 

His ' Memoirs of the Ijioomsgrove 

Family,' 3. 238. 
Hitclicock, Mrs. Elizabeth, 7. Co. 
Hitcliinge, Henry, i. 501. 
Hitte, Hannah, 5. 49. 
Ilittee, Iiidiun girl, 6. 340, 341. Indenture 

of, 6. 341. 
Hittyings, Robert, i. 501. 
Hixon, Joseph, 5 xxxix. 

Hoag, , Quaker, 6. 102. 

Hoar, , carpenter, 7. 284. 

Hoar, Widow, 7. 102. 

Hoar, Bridget, daujhter of Pres. Leonard, 

5 xiv. 
Hoar, Dorcas, 5. 305. 
Hoar, Joanna, wife of Edmund Quinci/, 5. 

xxiii ; 7. 195. 
Hoar, John, 5. 32, 383. 
Hoar, Pres. Leonard, 5. xiv, 3. Death of, 

5. 104. Mentioned, 7. 194, 195. 
Hoar, Mrs. Leonard (Bridget), 5. xiv, 

104, 153, 169, 181, 182; 7. 195. 
Hoar, .Margery, 7. 194. 
Hoar, Samuel, 7. 292. 
Hoar, Mrs. Samuel (Mary), 7. 292, 294. 
Hoar's Lane, 5. 72. 
Hoarc, ^/rs. Hannah, 5. 72. 
Hoare, William, 5. 72, 75; 7. 2G1, 297. 

Will of, 7. 201. 
Hobart, Mr., Uim/ham, death of, 5. 406 ; 

6. 2. 

Hobart, Mrs., 5. 372 ; 6. 234, 330, 337. 

Hobart, ' Sir,' 7. 9. 

Hobart, Abiel, 7. 205. 

Hobart, David, 5. xxiii, 347 ; 6. 221. 

Hobart, Gershom, ./r., 5. 403. 

Hobart, Rev. Gershom, 5. 13, 35, 41, 52, 
332, 455. 

Hobart, Japheth, 5 40, 53. 

Hobart, John Sloss, Lf. D., 4. 208. 

Hobart, Sir Henry, i. 176 /). 

Hobart, Rev. Nehemiah, 5. 3, 41, 52, 131, 
192, 321, 332, 351, 353, 302, .303, 366, 
381, 383, 387, 391, 419, 454 ; 6. 94, 117, 
138, 193, 209, 221, 234, 239, 252, 201, 



27i), 282, 293, 308, 330, 338, 344, 345, 

347,300-362,410. 
Hobart, Rev. Peter, 5. 52. 

Hobbs, , South Ucrwick; Me., 5. 189. 

Hobbs's Hole, 5. 189. 

Hobby, Major and Sir Charles, 6. 43, 65, 

69, 08, 70, 79, 121, 142, 149, 201, 203, 

243. 248, 257, 261, 202, 284, 333, 339, 

356, 383,395, 410; 7. 63. 
Hobbv, Ladii, 6. 195. 
Hobby, Vapl John, 6. 306. 
Hobby, Richard, 6. 300. 

Hobins, , innkeeper, 6. 210. 

Hobs, Mary, 5. xiii. 

Hobson, , a Cambridge (Eng.) carrier, 

8. 17, 190. 

Hockanum, Mass., 7. 101, 195. 

Hockerred, Emj., 5. 2til. 

Hockevill, Emj., 5. 307. 

Hodgden, Alexander, 3. 305, 307, 309. 

Hodge, Capt., 6. 107. 

Hodge, Dr. Hugh, 3. 335. 

Hodge, Robert, 3. lUO. 

Hodge & Shaker, Messrs., 3. 100. 

Hodges, Mr., England, i. 102, 224. 

Ilodshon, John, 4. 392, 416. 

Hoeling, Mrs., 8. 372. 

Hog Island, 5. 151, 172, 176, 181, 191, 195, 
208, 210, 212-214, 217, 219-221, 228, 
229, 231, 234, 341, 346, 306, 475, 498; 
6. 00, 89, 280, 344, 355, 302, 309; 7. 
141, 334; 8. 554. Attack upon pro- 
vincials at, 10. 295. 

Hogarth, William, 3. 234. 

Hogg, Richard, 6. 113. 

Hogge, Rychard, at inquest of William 
Richards, i. 490. 

Hoggevill, Eng., 5. 307. 

Hogkins, John, 2. 372. 

Ilogsden, Eng., 5. 206. 

Ilogsdowne, Eng., i. 160. 

Holbech, Enq., 5. xvii. 

Holberton, VapL, 6. 196; 7. 70. 

Holbrook, Capt., foreman of jurii, 5. 
145. 

Holbrook, Goodman, Sherborn, 5. 191 ; 7. 
293. 

Holbrook, Felix, 3. 387. 

Holbrook, Mrs. Hannah, 7. 325. 

Holbrook, Ldiabod, 6. 127. 

Holbrook, Thomas, 6. 76. 

Holburn, 6. 300. 

Holden, Randall, i. 347, 318, 301. Peti- 
tion of, I. "lOy. Concerning Narragan- 
sett land, 9. 165. Concerning certain 
deeds of land in Narragansett country, 

9. 168. 

Ilolderness, Earl nf, mentioned, 9. 308 
Holker, John, 4. 101. 
Holland, Lord, beheaded, 8. 209, 220. 
Holland, ^Ir., a Eellow of Corpus Christi 

College, 5. 304, 307. 
Holland, .1//-., Enqlnnd, i. 153. 
Holland, Mrs., 6. VI'.). 
Holland, H. W., 6. 90. 



412 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Holland. 5. 90, 213, 223, 248, 480; 7. 63, 
lUO, 126. Treaty witli, 4. 279. Com- 
mission to John Adams to make a 
treaty with, 4. 385. Date of Mr. Ad- 
ams's reception as minister to, 4. 400. 
Account of political parties in, 4. 400- 
406. Reasons wliy the people of, fa- 
vored the American cause, 4. 40L An- 
ecdotes showing the attaclmient of the 
people of, to the Stadtholdership, 4. 
402-406. Negotiation of treaty witli, 
and loan, 4. 425, 426, 490. Flooded, 8. 
671. Loss of provinces by, 9. 85. 

Hollett, John, i. 501. 

HoUingsworth, Elizabeth, 5. 52. 

Hollings worth, Thomas, 5. 128. 

Hollis Prof essor, so called, of Harvard 
College (Edward Wiggleswortli), 7. 
300, 311. 

Hollis, Thomas, 4. 350 ; 7. 340. 

HoUis Street, 6. 320. 

Hollister, Stephen, 8. 315. 

HoUiston, 6. 76. 

HoUon, John, 8. 442. 

HoUoway, Ebenezer, 5. 180. 

HoUowell, Mr., 5. 1U6. 

Holman, John, chosen on the night watch, 
5. 54 ; 7. 16U. 

Holman, Mrs. John (Anne), 7. 142. 

Holmes, Dr., in Gen. Huntington's regi- 
ment, 9. 501. 

Holmes, Alexander, 6. 30*, 131*. 

Holmes, Ebenezer, 7. 260. 

Holmes, Joseph, aUnrneij, g. 138. 

Holmes, Joshua, 9. 204. 

Holmes, Mary, 7. 361. 

Holmes, Rev. Obadiah, i. 347, 348. No- 
tice of, I. 347 n. 

Holmes, Dr. Oliver Wendell, i. 167 n. 

Holmes's Hole, 6. 166, 436, 437. 

Holms, Joseph, Jr., 5. 53. 

Holms, Capt. Nathaniel, 6. 319. 

Holt, Lord Chief Justice, 5. 255. 

Holt, Alice, 5, '294. 

Holt, Jane, 5. xxii, 294, 300. 

Holt, Mehetabel, 5. xxii, 6, 298, 302. 

Holt, Sarah, 5. 7. 

Holt, Thomas, 5. xxii, 298. 

Holton, Mr., ,Sulem, 6. 331. 

Holyday, John, 5. 35. 

Holygrave, John, Jr., i. 501. 

Holyoke, Mr., i. 129. 

Holyoke, Edward, i. 488, 489. 

Holyoke, Rev. Edward, 6. 320. 

Holyoke, Dr. Edward A., 2. 376. Letter 
of, to Dr. Belknap, with observations 
on Judge Tucker's queries about sla- 
very in Massachusetts, 2. 398-401. 
Sketch of, 2. 398 n. 

Holyoke, Edwin, 6. 209 ; 7. 49, 50, 78. 

Holyoke, Elizur, 5. 147, 150, 1.51, 154, 341, 
421 ; 6. 11* 8, 73, 79, 134, 206. 238, 306, 
320, 339, 398, 410 ; 7. 123, 127. 

Holyoke, Hannah, 6. 320. 

Holyoke, Jacob, 6. 320. 



Holyoke, John, 5. 483 ; 6. 320. 

Holyoke, Mary, 6. 320. 

Holyoke, Samuel, 6. 320. 

Holyoke, Sarah, 6 320. 

Holyoke Street, 6. 320. 

Homan, Mr., i. 364. 

Homan, Alice, see Tinker, Mrs. 

Homes, Frank, 6. 334 ; 7. 57, 295. 

Homes, Joseph, 6. 405. 

Homes, Capt. Nathaniel, 5. 498 ; 6. 388. 

Homes (Holmes), Rev. Nathaniel, 7. 200. 

Homes, Robert, 6. 433. 

Homes (Holms), Rev. William, 7. 22, 28, 

39. 
Homes (Holms), , innJcpepcr, 6. 170, 

173, 181 ; 7. 61, 327, 357, 364. 
Honington, Eng., 6. 98. 
Honorable Artillery Co. of London, 6. 

35. 
Honywell, A., 5. 228. 
Hood, Adm. ^ir Samuel, 2. 108. 
Hooder, Thomas, 5. 302. 
Hooft, Gerrit, Burqomaster of Amsterdam, 

4. 391. 
Hook, Major, 5. 256, 378, 392, 395-398, 

406. 
Hooke, Rev. William, 5. 437; 8. 41, 49, 

51, 64, 66, 67. Concerning the patent 

for New Haven, 8. 77. 
Hooker, Edward, 5. 300. 
Hooker, Rev. Jolm, death of, 1697, i. 

447 ; 5. 4G4. 
Hooker, Col. Noadiah, 10. 28. 
Hooker, Samuel, 6. 8*. 
Hooker, A'ey. Thomas, Hartford, i. 102 n., 

241,352, 384 n.; 5. 259. Mentioned, 

9. 18. Meeting in his barn to treat 

with Indians concerning certain lands, 

9. 119. Mentioned, 9. 161. 
Hooper, Mr., present at an autopsv, 5. 

21. 
Hooper, Mr., delegate of North Carolina 

in Congress, 9 514. 
Hooper, Erasmus, i. 501. 
Hooper, John, i. 501. 
Hop-yards, 6. 62. 
Hope, Mr., Holland, banking-house of, 

4. 392. 
Hopewood, Capt., 5. 315. 
Hopkins, Lieut, and Ca],t., 4. 81, 114, 115. 

A prisoner of war, 1778, 10. 29. 
Hopkins, Caleb, sea-captain, 3. 251, 268, 

270. 
Hopkins, Edward, i. 215, 368. His legacy 

to Harvard College, 6. 416 ; 7. 49. 

Letter of John Winthrop, Jr., to, 8. 88. 

Commissioner of Connecticut, 9. 3. 

Will of, 9. 17. Donation for advance- 
ment of learning, 9. 19. Donation for 

promoting Christianity, 9. 20. Treats 

with Indians about certain lands, 9. 

118. Donation toward educational 

purposes, 9. 381. Death in England, 

9. 381. Donation towards establishing 

a college, 9. 390. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



413 



Hopkins, Ezekiel, Commodore of American 

uari/, 4. 2S»7, oOO. 
Hopkins, Henry, brother of Edimrd, g. lU. 
Hopkins, Dr. Lemuel, 3. 227. 
Hopkins, AVc. Samuel, D.D., 3. 331. 
Hopkins. GoiK Stephen, 3. 'JU, 1U2, 280, 

284, 289 ; 4. 483. His account of Trovi- 

dcnee, K. I.. 3. 96. 
Hopkinson, Francis, LL.D., 2. 182, 338, 

31.3, 4'JG ; 3. 88, 227, 228. 
Hopkinston, Mr., 7. 170, 177. 
Hopkinton (Maguakaquog), 6. 396, 420; 

7. 60. 
Hopson, Lieut. Linus, induces minors to 

enlist in the armv, 10. 130. 
Hopton. Sir Ralph', 8. 202, 205. 
Hord, zYwrse, 5. 331. 
Uord, John, 5. 331, 332. 
Hordgraves, Mr., i. 37. 
Hornbuckle, .1//-*'., 7. 172. 
Home, John, in controversy witli Mr. 

Wilkes, 9. 482. 
Horneca, Fizeau, & Grand, Messrs., a 

French banking-house, 4. 392. 
Horse, letter of Gen. Washington con- 
cerning the winter cantonment of, 10. 

219. 
Horscneck, 10. 61. Depredations of the 

British at, 10. 63. 
Horse-stealing, remedy for, in England, 

I. 458. 
Horses, concerning the sale of, 8. 386, 

423, 431, 432, 445, 446, 448, 456, 488, 

495, 532, 546. 
Horsey, Mr., a son-in-law of Mr. Salton- 

stall, 5. 257. 
Horsman, Madam Dulcibella, 5. 252, 253, 

25y. 

Horton, , mariner, wrecked, 6. 19*. 

Horton, , captain ofmilitari/, 4. 89. 

Horton, Rev. Thomas, 6. 217. 

Hosbrook, Elias, 4. 255. 

Houchin, Elizabetii, 7. 117. 

Houchin, Jeremiah, 7. 117. 

Houell, Josiah, i. 501. 

Houghton, Mr., 5. 90, 323, 357. 

Houghton, Ellen C., 5. xxxiii. 

Hounsel, John, 5. 180. 

Hounslow, Eng., 5. 301. 

House, Indian, witness to deed, 9. 34. 

House of Commons, Em/land, 5. 46, 161. 

251 ; 6. 101*, 214 ; 7. 165. Concerning 

expulsion from, 9. 409. 
House of Deputies, 6. 163. 
House of Lords, 6. 217. 
House of Office, 6. 308. 
' House of Seven Gables ' (Hawthorne), 

5. 414. 
House-raising, 6. 80. 
Hovey, James, 4. 342. 
How, Jud'/e, death of, 1693, 5. 388. 
How, Madam, 5. 2. 
How, James, Ipswich, death of, 1702, 6. 

56. 
How's Inn, Sudbury, 6. 84 ; 7. 100. 



Howard, Anthonv, 5. 52. 

Howard, I/on. Ciiaries, 8. 130. 

Howard, John, 5. 5U, 216, 436 ; 6. 25, 35, 
115,344, 373. 

Howard, Margaret, 5. 62. 

Howard, Mary, 5. 482. 

Howard, Nathaniel, 8. 394. Concerning 
sale of land to, 8. 391. 

Howard, Robert, 5. 214 ; 6. 395. Notary 
public of Massacluisctts Colony, 9. 12. 

Howard, Sarah, 6. 85. 

Howard Street, 5. 62. 

Howcliin, Mr., concerning the model of 
tlie town house, 5. 160 ; 6. 5. 

Ilowchin, .Mrs., 5. 380. 

Howe, Riciiard, Earl, 4. 93, 312. 

Howe, Gen. Robert, 4. 112-114, 119, 121 
123, 124, 128, 134, 152, 157, 192, 227 
253. 

Howe, Sir William, 2. 134 ; 3. 191 ; 4, 
21, 26, 27, 48, 61, 64, 65, 67, 71, 72, 75, 
76, 79, 83, 312. Succeeds Gen. Gage 
9 506. Commands in place of Gen 
Gage, 10. 5. The evacuation of Bos- 
ton by, 10. 12. With his army at New 
Jersey, 10. 22, 23. Concerning tlu 
treatment of Northern prisoners, 10. 
25, 28. Concerning the expense ol 
prisoners of war, 10. 47, 68. Con 
cerning his movements, 10. 71. At 
Amboy, 10. 73. Evacuation of Bruns- 
wick by, 10 73. Leaves Amboy, 10. 
7t). iVIovonients of his army, 10. 79. 
His intended movements, 10. 81, 112. 
Concerning his movements at Chesa- 
pei\ke Bay, 10. 96. Mentioned. 10. 177. 
Sent to quell the mutiny at New Jer- 
sey, 10. 227. 

Howell, . rahinet-maher. 7. 12, 13, 162. 

Howell, David, LL.D., 3. 220, 222, 224, 
225. 

Howell, Edward, i. 489. Concerning a 
certain fine, 8. 1U6. 

Howell, George, 5. 149. 

Howell, Henry, 6. 335, 380, 419, 421, 422; 
7. 52. 

Howell, John, infant, death of, 7. 354. 

Howell, Capt. John, concerning English 
planters on Long Island, 8. 158, 273. 

Howell, Mrs Katharine, 7. «0, 114. 

Howell, N., Jr., 5. 149. 

Howell, Nathan, 5. 149; 7, 80, 263. 

Howen, Wid„.r, 5. 109. 

Howen, John 5. 53. 

Howen, Robert, 5. 62. 

Howes, Edward, i. 219 n., 256 n. 

Howes, Jcjshua, ailomci/, g. 138. 

Howland, Southworth, 4. 342. 

i lowlands, , innkeifter, 5. 501. 

Howlett, Abigail, 5. 52. 

Hewlett, Samuel, 5. 52. 

Hoyle, John, i. 501. 

Hoyle, Joshua, letter from, i. 204. Lines 
on the departure of Gov. Winthrop by, 
I. 205. 



414 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Hoyle, Mary, i. 177, 204 n. 

Hoyt, , scalped by Indians, 5. 432. 

Hubbard, , made justice of Braintry, 

6. 393 ; 7. 357. 

Hubbard, Benjamin, letter from, i. 335. 

His wife, i. 330. 
Hubbard, Dudley (1 ), 2. 386. 
Hubbard, John (?), 2. 386. 
Hubbard, Mrs., 6. 82, 93, 223, 271, 290 ; 

7. 139, 1.59, 161. 

Hubbard, Mrs. Elizabeth, 6. 407 ; 7. 346. 
Hubbard, Mr., quurlermaster at Hartford, 

10. 167. 
Hubbard, John, 5. 219, 405 ; 6. 11* 172, 

179,206,270-272; 7. 141. 
Hubbard, Mrs. John (Ann), 6. 272; 7. 

14L 
Hubbard, Mrs. Mary, 6. 65, 117, 272. 
Hubbard, Nathaniel, 6. 46, 272, 277 ; 7. 

166. 
Hubbard, Nehemiah, 1704, 6. 117, 277. 
Hubbard, Nehemiah, letter of Gen. 

Wasliington to, 1778, 10. 193, 205. 
Hubbard, Rev. Peter, Hingham, death of, 

1678, 6. 1.3*. 
Hubbard, Kichard, Ipsivich, death of, 

1681, 6. 17*. 
Hubbard, Mrs. Sarah, 7. 44. 
Hubbard, Thomas, 6. 117, 248,409; 7. 91, 

146. His tomb, 6 272. 
Hubbard, Rev. WilUam, i. 418 «. ; 

' Narrative of the Troubles ' in 1653, 

5. 28, 32, 34, 41, 68, 82, 89, 118, 143, 

146, 150, 154, 187, 219, 225, 318, 451, 

456, 489 ; 6. 14, 22, 29, 77, 116, 137, 155, 

231, 236, 239, 249, 272, 2b6 ; 7. 2, 14, 

14^1. 
Hubbard, Zechariah, 6. 272. 
Hubbarts, Mr., 8. 554, 555. 
Huhbell, Lieut., in expedition against 

Canada, 8. 312. Sick with smali-pox, 

8. 312, 316. Death of, 8. 317. 
Huchins, Goodman, 5. 194, 367. 
Huckmore, Thomas, i. 501. 

Huddy, Capt. Joslma, a prisoner of war, 
4. 271, 272. Death of, 10 272. 

Hudson, Lieut., concerning land pur- 
chased, 8. 83. 

Hudson, Mrs. A., 5. 196. 

Hudson, Barzillai, 2. 147 n. 

Hudson, Francis, 6. 24. 

Hudson, William, Boston, 1635, i. 219, 
220; 6. 113. 

Hudson, Capt. William, member of the 
night watch, 1680, 5. 55, 196. 

Hudson, Lieut. William, concerning pur- 
chase of Narragansett, 9. 8, 23. Letters 
signed by, 9. 29, 31, 32, 37; purchase 
of Narragansett land by, 9. 35. Ap- 
pointed connnissioner of Wickford, 9. 
59, 81. A Narragansett proprietor, 9. 
98, 111. 

Hudson River, 8. 314 ; 10. 18. Passage 
on the ice from New York to the 
Highlands, 1779, 4. 155. 



Hudson's Bay, La Perouse's attack on, 
4. 27». 

Hudson's (Capt. William) Lane, 5. 196- 

Hughes, Airs., 6. 427. 

Hughes, Dr. George, 6. 427. 

Hughes, Major Hugh, 4. 40, 184. 

Hughes, Capt. John, 4. 176. 

Huguenot Clergyman, 5. 98 ; 6. 407. 

Huguenot Congregation, 6. 407. 

Huguenot Refugee, 6. 234, 413. 

Huguenots, 5. 130, 252, 491 ; 6. 262, 391. 
Settlement of Rochester in Narragan- 
sett country by, 9. 173 n. 

Hull, Mr., 8. 513. 

Hull, .Mrs., death of, 1695, 8. 504. 

Hull, Cornelius, testimony, 9. 135. 

Hull, Edward, 5. xxiii, 25, 33, 61, 247, 
251, 256-259, 261, 263-265, 267, 271- 
274, 276, 277, 286-290, 293, 294, 307 ; 
6 198. 

Hull, Hannah, 5. xviii, xxiii, 1. 

Hull, John, 5. 204. 

Hull, Capt. John, i. 432 ; 5. xiv, xviii, 
xxii, xxiii, xxvi-xxix, xxxvii-xxxix, 
1, 7, 17, 25, 30, 31, 33, 34, 36, 39-43, 
50, 52-61, 03. 66, 97, 114, 115, 235, 251, 
259, 327, 443, 503 ; 6. 16*, 18* 62, 76, 

Hull, Joseph, 5. 502; 9. 208. 

Hull, Mrs. Judith, 5. 17, 18, 21-25, 40, 56, 
72, 84, 110, 114, 121, 122, 184, 190, 192, 
198, 199, 223, 228, 236, 249, 251, 282, 
310, 311, 319, 320, 322, 327, 328, 332, 
369, 374, 376, 384, 392, 394, 408-410, 
443, 444 ; 6. 13* 18*, 50. 

Hull, Robert, signs an acknowledgment, 
1637, I. 486. 

Hull, Robert, 5 xxiii ; 6. 1.3*. 

Hull, Gen. William, 4. 141, 184, 187, 189, 
264. Question as to his rank, 4. 141- 
146. 

Hull Family, 5. xi, xxiii. 

Hull, Mass., 5. 327 ; 5. 185, 284, 332 ; 7. 
174, 184, 256. 

Hull House, the, 5 377. 

Hull Street, 6. 35, 129; 7. 80, 135, 136, 
314, 325, 326. 

Hull-Street Tombs, 7. 135, 136. 

number, ship, 6. 318. 

Humfrey, Dorcas, i. 334. 

Ilumfrey (Humphrey, Humphries, Hum- 
phryes), John, i. 10,20, 93 n.,151, 239, 
327, 333,334,381. 

Humphrey, Col., 10. 85. 

Humphrey, Major, at defence of Fort 
Montgomery, 10. 100. 

Humphrey, John, 9. 381. 

Humphrej'es, Elder, Dorchester, death of, 
1086, 5. 137. 

Humphreys, Charles, 4. 507. 

Humphreys, Col. David, 4. 186, 188, 
461. 

Humphries (Humfrics), John, speculates 
in Indian wheat, 8. 31, 36. 

H\nn])hrv, Capt., in cnmp at Roxbury, 
1776, 9. 500, 502, 506. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



415 



Ilumphry, Jonathan, Jr., Ensign at Uox- 
bury Camp, 9. 507. 

Humphrys, Robert, 5 "JSS. 

Hiinance, George, i. 501. 

Hungary, 5. 97, 10.3, 227. Rising of 
Protestant malecontonts in, 8. 434. 

Hungerfonl, Mr., 5. 474. 

Hunking, Mark. 2. o. 

Hunt, Vapt., 8. 374, 875. 

Hunt, Major, Braintri/, 5. 467. 

Hunt, Mr., going to Isle of Providence, 
16:J5, I. 218. 

Hunt, Ann. 5. xvii. 

Hunt, Daniel, 5. 309 ; 7. 210. 

Hunt, Col. Epiiraini, 5. 128, 50.'^ ; 6. 11*, 
78. 79, 127, 162, 188, 224, 274, 300, 
302. 

Hunt, Jabez, 6. 411. 

Hunt, John, 5. x.xiii, 128, 154, 300 ; 7. 331. 

Hunt. Mrs. John (Riitii). 5. 300, 300, 385; 
6. 27, 183, 185, 277, 304 ; 7. 216, 331. 

Hunt, Joseph, 6. 75. 

Hunt, .\frs. Marv, 6. 411. 

Hunt, Priscilla, 6. 411. 

Hunt, Tliomas, 5. 154, 474, 508; 6. 50, 
71, 20.5,411; 9.48. 

Hunter, Col. and Gov., 6. 271 ; 7. 10, 30, 
42. 

Hunting, Capt., Charlcs^town, 5. 183, 103, 
419; ^6. 41, 52. 

Hunting, ^[rs., Charlestown, 7. 174. 

Hunting, Rev. Mr., 6. 440. 

Hunting, Alexander, witness, 9. 173. 

Hunting-shirts, 10. 4, 13. 

Huntingdon, Selina, Countess of, 3. 1G6. 

Huntington, Col., 10. 36. 

Huntington, Lieut., concerning liis ad- 
vancement, 10. 8. 

Huntington, Gen. Ebenczer, 4. 38. 

Huntington, Jabez, letters from his fa- 
ther, Jedcdiali Huntington, 9. 503, 516 ; 
note concerning, 9. 513. 

Huntington, Col. Jabez, entertains Gen. 
Washington, 9. 517. 

Huntington, L'/v/.-G't-/!. Jedediah, 10. 102, 
107. Sends officers to enlist recruits, 
10. 102. Bearer of despatches to Gov. 
Trumbull, 10. 2G4. 

Huntington, Gm. Jedediah, 4. 107, 110, 
120, 178, 240. Letters to Jonathan 
Trumbull, 9. 493, 496-409, 501. 502, 
504, 505, 508, 510, 513, 514, 516,517. 
Biograpliical sketch of, g. 403 n. Let- 
ter to Jonatiian Trumbull, Jr., 9. 49.5. 
In camp at Roxbury, 9. 496. Returns 
of sick, etc., in his regiment, 9. 501. 
Letters to Jabez Huntington, 9. 503, 
512, 516. Wife visits him at Roxbury 
camp, 9. 505 n. At Norwich, 9. 516. 

Huntington, Mrs. Jedediah, visit to Rox- 
bury camp, and deatli of, 9. 505 n. 

Huntington, Samuel, 4. 379, 380, 38.3, 
385, 4.59, 460. 

Huntington, Samuel, Connecticut, Presi- 
dent of Conrjress, 10. 184. 



Huntington, Simeon, sent to purchase 
arms, 9. 210. Mentioned for Lieuten- 
ant, 9. 502. 

Huntley, Rachel, letters of, i. 74-78. 
Notice of, I. 74 n. 

Huntley, Tliomas, i. 74 n. 

Hurd, Mr., eru/ruver, 7. 359. His portrait 
of Rev. Joseph Sewall, 5. xv. 

Hurd, Nurse, 5. 23, 40, 323. 

Ilurd, John, 5. 54. 

Hurd, Joseph, 5. 54. 

Hurd, Rev. Riciiard, D.D., liis 'Introduc- 
tion to the Study of the Prophecies,' 
2. 229, 236. 

Hurd, Sarah, 5. 377. 

Hurst, Mr., burning of his house. 8. 
530. 

Ilust, Rev. Mr.,Virfjinia (?), 3, 379, 423. 

Hutchins, Capt. Nathaniel, 4. 86. 

Hutchins, Cnj>t. Thomas, 3. 52, 5-3, 57, 60, 
61, 136, 143; 6. 369. Anecdote of, 3. 
130. 

Hutchins, William, 2. 372. 

Hutchinson, Capt., 1. 300. 

Hutchinson, Justice, 5. 196. 

Hutchinson, Mr., i. 340, 365, 378. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Abigail, 5. 447. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Ann, i. 96, 107 «., 105 n., 
324 n., 344 n. ; 8. 202 n. 

Hutchinson, Col. E., estate of, 7. 177. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Col. E. (Hannah), 6. 
300. 

Hutchinson, Capt. Edward, .Jr., i. 107 n. 

Hutchinson, Edward, Sm., i. 490; 5. 
100, 443, 457 ; 6. 55, 298, 300, 303, 370, 
409 , 7. 98, 131, 140, 14-5, 149, 162, 296, 
207, 325, 337, 349, 360. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Edward (Lydia), 6. 
300. 

Hutchinson, Capt. Edward, concerning 
purchase of Narragansett, 9. 8, 23. 
Concerning certain wampum paid, 9. 
12. Concerning deed of Narragansett, 
9. 022. Letter to Jolm Winthrop, con- 
cerning patent for Narragansett, g. .30. 
Adds Jr. to his name, 9. 31 n. Letter 
signed by, 9. 32. Letter from Jolm 
Wintiirop, 9 33. Purchase of Narra- 
gansett land by, 9. 35, 70, 75. Letter 
to John Wintiirop in London, 9. 37, 
38. Concerning Narragansett aif.iirs, 
9. 39. Concerning Narragansett patent, 
9. 40, 43. Mentioned, 9. 52, 54. Letter 
from Jolin Scott, 9. 53. Appointed 
commissioner for Wickford, 9. 50. 81. 
A Narragansett proprietor, 9. 98, 111. 

Hutchinson, Eliakim, 5. 05, 116, 19(>, 211, 
213, 323, 324, 369. 380, 39(5, 40(1, 426, 
457, 467, 468, 470, 485, 402, 500 ; 6. 2, 
5, 20, 21, 23-25, 34, 40. 41, 48, 57, 07, 
78, 102, 117. 121, 122, 126, 1.35, 137, 153, 
162, 172, 174, 188, 100, 203, 208, 224, 
233, 253, 255, 256, 250, 263, 272, 278, 
301, 306, 328, 3:'.9, 357, 363, SCO, 360, 
373,402,407, 400, 410, 412, 416, 419, 



416 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



422, 424 ; 7. 4, 17, 20, 35, 38, 43, 50. 59, 
6(3, ye, 98, 105, 113, 132, 141, 140, 147, 
151, 182. 277, 280. 

Hutcliinson, Mrs. Eliakim (Sarah), 7. 
280. 

Hutchinson, Capl. Elisha, 5. 55, 67, 77, 
110, 132, 164, 165, 169, 170, 186, 196, 
220, 253, 2.55-257, 261, 266, 267, 269, 
271,275,284, 308, 311, 313, 315, 316, 
322, 326, 330, 333-335, 337, 340, 355, 

357, 360, 361, 380-382, 395, 398, 405, 
409, 426, 451, 454, 456, 457, 465, 407, 
470, 485, 489, 492, 495, 502, 508; 6. 
112* 5, 8, 21, 24, 25, 35, 40-42, 53, 55, 
59, 68, 72, 78, 88, 90-92, 103, 109, 117, 
118, 121, 12.5, 130, 131, 134, 138, 152, 
154, 162, 174, 175, 183, 188, 191, 190, 
201, 203, 204, 208, 214, 224, 233, 240, 
248, 253-257, 263, 274, 300, 302, 306, 
324, 327, 331, 333, 339, 343, 344, 346, 
348, 349, 367-370, 372, 385, 386, 395, 
402, 407, 409. 410, 415, 422, 424 ; 7. 17, 
20, 27, 28, 30, 35, 37, 38, 43, 47, 48, 50, 
58, 59, 66, 67, 87, 98, 105, 112, 113, 116, 
121, 123, 132, 185, 136, 141, 144, 146, 
147, 149, 152-154, 167, 177, 314; 8. 83, 
172. Departure for England, 8. 480, 
489, 501. Signs letters, 9. 37. A 
Narragansett proprietor, 9. 98, 111. 
Mentioned, 9. 153. Attorney for Nar- 
ragansett land, 9. 161. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Elisha, 5. 312, 369, 411, 
467 ; 6. 11*, 203, 233, 300, 359, 370, 411 ; 
7. 4, 281. 

Hutchinson, Elizabeth, 7. 178, 181, 306, 
314. 

Hutchinson, Capt. Ezekiel, 5. 290. 

Hutchinson, Ereake, marriage of, to Mr. 
Woolcott, 8 501. 

Hutchinson, Col. Israel, 4. 12. 

Hutchinson, Dr. James, 3. 335. 

Hutchinson, Richard, 6. 203 ; 7. 182. 

Hutchinson, Samuel, 5. 110. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Sarah, 6. 300 ; 7. 4. 

Hutchinson, Gov. Thomas, 2. 334 ; 3. 28, 
37, .308, 384, 388, 395, 432 ; 4. 336, 340, 
343, 346, 355, 365. His ' History of 
Massachusetts ' cited, 2. 3. Answer 
of the House of Representatives to his 
speech on the powers of Parliament, 
4. 346, 347. Mentioned, 5. 497 ; 6. 35, 
91, 226, 253, 300, 308, 333, 386, 402 ; 
7. 20, 27, 35, 36, 46, 59, 66, 67, 91, 98, 
107, 117, 124, 132, 142, 149, 150, 151, 
154, 162, 278, 280, 284, 325, 326, 349, 

358, 374. 

Hutcliison, Goodman, sale of meadow- 
land to, 8. 387, 389. 

Hutchison, , captain ofnrtUhry. 5. 13, 

22, 110. 121, 136, 143, 156; 6. 226; 7. 
189, 286. 

Hutchison, William, valedictory at Har- 
vard College by, 6. 134. Marriage, 6. 
203; 7.4, 117, 182,258,296. 

Hyde, Edward, Earl of Clarendon, 8. 75 n. 



Hyde, Lieut. Jedediah, interested in the 
abduction of certain negroes, 9. 389. 
Suit brought by, 9. 412. 



Ice, passage on the, from New York to 

the Highlands, 4. 155. 
Illinois, 5. xl. Concerning the settlement 

of, 9. 243. 490. 
Illuminations, 5. 504 ; 6. 72, 159. 
Ilsly, William, 6. 371, 405, 406. 
Importations from England sent back by 

Boston, 9. 442. 
Importers of negroes, 6. 16. 
Incest, Bill against, 5. 407, 408. 
' Inconvenient,' S. Sewall's use of the 

word, 6. 270. 
Indenture made between certain parties, 

6. 310. 

Independence, question of, 4. 298, 300- 
302, 305, 306, 309,340; Mr. Adams's 
speech on, 4. 467-469. Declaration of 
4. 312; when signed, 4. 505; Gov. Mc- 
Kean's account of the passage of, 4 
507. Of the Judiciary, Mr. Adams's 
letters to Gen. Brattle on, 4. .344 ; one 
of John Adams's principles of the Rev 
olution, 4. 344-346. 

Independence, Fort, the enemy evacu- 
ating, 10. 315. 

' Independent Chronicle,' newspaper, 2 
142, 151. 

' Independent Gazetteer,' 2. 35, 130. 

Indian Bible, 5. 295 ; 6 258, 266, 296, 429 

7. 180. Printing of, i. 422. 
Indian boy, 5. 14; 6. 194. 
Indian canoes, 5. 317 ; 6. 440. 
Indian chiefs, 6. 261. 
Indian College, 5, 480. 
Indian converts, 7. 245. 

Indian corn, 6. 38*, 48*. Price of, in 
1782, 2. 144. A special kind of, 8. 136. 

Indian, David, 5. 76. 

Indian executed, 5. 21. 

Indian girl, 6. 340. 

Indian, Joseph, 5. 123, 124 

Indian kings, 6. 261. 

Indian lands, from Quilipoke to IManhat- 
tan, testimony of John Higginson con- 
cerning, 9. 118. 

Indian massacre, 5. 170. 

Indian meeting-house, 5. 150, 210 ; 6. 213. 

Indian messenger, 5. 20. 

Indian preacher, 6. 212, 213, 437 ; 7. 135. 

Indian Psalter, 5. 15 ; 6. 296. 

Indian Queen, tavern, 5. 453. 

Indian sachems, 6. 80, 82, 261, 318, 375. 

Indian scalps, 6. 351 ; 7. 343. 

Indian scholars, 6. 429. Latin composi- 
tions of, 8. 84. 

Indian school, 5. 15. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



41' 



Iiulian slave, 6 198. 

Iiulian squaw, 5. 22G ; 6. 58* GO* 61* 
81]*, 107. 

Iiulian Territory, 6. 439. 

Iiulian testimony concernino; Sasqua 
lanls, 9 122. Concerning I'equot 
lands, 9. 121, Uln. 

Indian, Tiionias, 5. 'J29. 

Lillian trade, 6. 78*. 

Indian traders, 6. 38* 48* 78* 79*. 
Trial of, 6. 38*, 78. 

Indian village, 6. 429. 

Indian wheat bargained for from Vir- 
ginia, 8. 31. 

Indians, or Indian, 2. 13, 83 n., 100, 227 ; 
3 50, oi), 07, 429, 430; 5 15-17, 19, 21, 
22, 24, SS, 41, 49, 68, 75. 80, 95, 96, 108, 
11.5, 121, 122, 108-170, 174, 185, 194, 
207, 222, 224, 225, 227, 229, 230, 311, 
315. 320, 321, 330, 334, 339, 344, 3;0, 
382, 391, 403, 430, 452, 453, 459, 480, 
592 : 6. 14*-10*. 37* 38* 44*- 19*, 54* 
57*-61* 72*-75*, 84*-80«, 92*. 120*, 
130* 5, 67, 84, 85, 89, 93, 9.5, 114, 1.34, 
140, 143, 154, 105, 167, 173, 181, 186, 
197, 212, 213, 22-3, 234, 262, 261, 2>5. 
298, 30-5, 310, 318, 328, 329, 340, 354, 
375, 389, 390, 426-429, 433, 435, 437- 
440; 7 12. 53, 87, 92, 100, 101, 104. 
126, l.J.j, 214, 241, 288, 347, 3.30, 354, 
37a. Insolence of, I. 387 e« .SSI/. Trea- 
ties witli, 2 4, 0, 10, 12. Gen. Sulli- 
van's expedition against, 2. 23, 36. 
Fatiier Hennepin's views on the con- 
version of, 2. 42, 40. Indian idols, 2 
80. Indian slaves, 3. 399. Offer of 
services of, in the Revolution, 4. 29, 
219. Soutliern, 5. 21. Barbarous, 6. 
30*. Eastern, 6. 4.3* 03*, 91* 202 ; 7. 
811. Torturing a man, 6. 58*. Roast- 
ing a cliild, 6. 58*. Hanging a woman, 
6. 58*, 80*. House firetC 6. 59*. Eng- 
lishman stabbed bv, 6. 59*. Case of 
Mrs. IJra.lley, 6. 59*-61*, 86* 87*. 
Capturing Mr. Adams and wife, 6. 59*. 
Murder of seventy English, 6. 03*. 
Captivity of nearly one hundred Eng- 
lisii, 6. 03*. Surprising plantations, 6. 
6.]'*^ Butcher and capture one hundred 
and fiftv people at Deerfiehl, 6. 64*. 
Murder of Mrs. Williams by, 6. 64*. At 
Martlia's Vineyard, 7. 260, 327. Nian- 
tic, their rights to deer killed b}- them, 
8. 39. At Narragansett, concerning, 
8. 40. Narragansett, peaceable toward 
the English, 8. 42. Paeontuck, murder 
friendly Indians, 8. 54. Monliegen, 
murder of, by other Indian.s, 8. 54. 
Murder of Mr. Brewster's servant I>y, 
8. 54. Mohawk, intentions toward the 
English, 8. H8; warlike intentions of, 
8. 98. Newport, warlike intentions of, 
8. 98. Letters concerning treaty of 
peace with, 8. 175. 176. Join with the 
English and Dutch against the French 



at Canada, 8. 300. Kill a man and boy 
at Hatfield, 8. 530. Concerning their 
employment as a means of civilization, 
9. 45. Proposal to settle them in Ohio 
and Illinois country, 9. 243. 

Indians and French, see French and In- 
dians. 

Indictments, removal of, one of the griev- 
ances in England, i. 452. 

Indies, the, 6. 41*, 122*. 

Infant baptism, 7. 299. 

Inferior Court, 5. 398; 6. 63, 92, 123. 
Clerk of, 7. 305. 

Ingenhouse, John, his ' Experiments on 
Vegetables,' 2. 218. 219, 2::J4. 

Ingersol, , innkeeper, Springfield, 7. 

iOl, 190. 

Ingersoll, Jolm, 5. 346. 

Inglis (Engs), Maudit, 5. 74. 

Inglis, Rev. Charles, D.D., 2. 140, 147. 
Interrupted in performing service in 
Trinity Church, New York, 2. 134, 144 ; 
4. 28. 

Inman, John, i. 103. 

Innovation, rage for, in Massachusetts, 4. 
308, 310. 

Inns of Court education, 6. 358. 

Inoculation for small-pox, 4. 41, 42, 192, 
196, 203, 233, 23.7, 245. 

Inquest about Mrs. Bradstreet's negro, 

7, 35. 

Inspectors of Grammar Schools, 7. 247. 

Installation of Harvard President, 6. 
209. 

Instow, Devonshire, Enrj., 7. 151. 

Instructions to Judge Sewall and Penn 
Townsend for disposing of land for In- 
dians, 6. 427. 

Instrument for ascertaining depth at sea, 

8. 87. 

Inundation, in Boston, 7. 323. 324. In 
the low countries of England, 8. 424. 

Invalid corps ordered to West Point, 4. 
215. 

Invasion from France, 5. 4-34. 

Ipswich, Kiif]., 5. 287, 288. 

Ipswich, Muss., 1.41, 64»., 60, 70, 110, 
247, 318 ; 8. 6-3, 388, 423. Bar at, 5. 
34.3. Jail at. 5. 364. Felt's ' History 
of,' 5. 400. Court held at, 5. 426, 478 ; 
6. 39, 77 ; 7. 83, 286, 2K8, .3.35, 377. 
Farms at, 6. 17*, 29 ; 7. 23. Dam and 
Bridge at, 6. 19*. Parties drowned at, 
8. 33. Ve^.- 'Is wrecked at, 8. 110. 

Ipswich Bay, 7. 127. 

I[)swich Church, 7. 377. 

Ipswich Begiment, 6. 105. 

Ipswich River, 6. 313. 

Ireland, William, 7. 334. 

Ireland, 5. 204, 242, 244. 258. 267, 275, 
291, ,321. 326, 329, 477 ; 6. 433; 7. 19, 
22. 85. 219. Protestants of, 5. 291. 
And England, in the siege of Rochelle, 
8.5. 

Ireward, Nicholas, i. 501. 



418 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Iron, discovered in New England by John 
Winthrop, Jr., 8. oO. Stone and iron 
works in New England, 8. 127. Trepara- 
tions concerning iron-works, by John 
"Winthrop, Jr., 8. 36. An invention for 
turning it into steel, 8. 140. 

Iroquois Indians, the, 7. 311. 

Irvine, iVr., Philadelphia, 3. 220. 

Irvine, Gen. William, 4. 1U8. 

Isabella, schooner, 3. 292. 

Isinglass, 2. 33, 39, 45, 49, 52, 56, 59, 68, 
75, 76, 81, 82, 110, 112, 254. Manner 
of its discovery in New Hampshire, 2. 
79. 

Island-Dam, 5. 234. 

Island Ter Schellingh, 9. 96. 

Isle of Pines, 5. 234. 

Isle of Sable, expedition to, i. 258, 259. 

Isle of Wight, 5. 119, 245, 246, 374; 6 
68* 92, 214 ; 7. 234 ; 8. 355. 

Isles of Shoals, i. 267 n. ; 6. 45* 105 ; 7. 
335 ; 8. 34. 

Islington, Eng., 5. 265. 

Italy, 5. 226, 898. 

Itching Ferry, Eng., 5. 299. 

Ive, Mr., England, atlorneij to S. Seicall, 
5. 134, 254; 270, 271, 291, 444, 480. 

Ive, John, Charlestown, death of, 5. 482. 

Ivemay, Charles, 7. 335. 

Ivers, Thomas, 2. 472. 

Ives, John, 5. 81, 411. 

Izard, Ralph, 4. 368, 371, 408, 413, 428, 
440. 



J. 



Jacie (Jase), Mr., 8. 219. 

Jack, negro, 5. 50, 210. 

Jackenson, James, i. 501. 

Jackson, Dr., Eaton, N. H., 2. 387. 

Jackson, Goodman, i. 247. 

Jackson, Mr., 5. 318, 393, 489, 507 ; 6. 

231 ; 7. 29, 30. 
Jackson, Mr., 8. 502. 
Jackson, Mrs., Neivton, 5. 455 ; 6. 234, 239. 
Jackson, Abigail, 7. 80. 
Jackson, Abraham, 6. 148. 
Jackson, Elizabeth, 7. 80. 
Jackson, Col. Plenry, 4. 57, 59, 70, 77, 88, 

99, 100, 143, 198. 
Jackson, Jeremiah, 6. 16*. 
Jackson, John, 7. 80. 
Jackson, John, a'torneij on estate of John 

White, 9. 1-24. 
Jackson, Jonathan, 6. 17*. 
Jackson, Mrs. Jonathan, commits suicide, 

6. 17*. 
Jackson, Rev. Joseph, 3. 133, 135. 
Jackson, Mercv, 7. 80. 
Jackson, Patrick T., 5. 01, 65. 
Jackson, Richard, reception of William 

Samuel Johnson in London, 9. 214. 

Action in colonial affairs, 9. 229, 235 ?i. 



Letter from William Pitkin, concern- 
ing duties levied on the Colonies, 9. 
285. Mentioned, 9. 356. Letter to 
Jonathan Trumbull, 9. 433. Resigns 
agency of Connecticut Colony, 9. 449- 

Jackson, Thomas, 7. 80. 

Jackson, Major William, 3. 200. 

Jacob, Eliot, 5. 92. 

Jacobite Plot, 5. 433. 

Jacobite Rebellion, 7. 77. 

Jacobs, , master of sloop, 8. 550. 

Jacobs, Capt., Eraintry, 7. 183. 

Jacobs, Deacon, Sciiitale, 7. 376. 

Jacobs, Rev. Mr., England, 5 275-277. 

Jacobs, D., 6. 276. 

Jacobs, George, 5. 363. 

Jacobs, Mrs. Hannah, 7. 183. 

Jacobs, John, 5. 25. 

Jaffrey, George, 2. 98, 99, 118. 

Jago, Wall, a Plymouth petitioner, 1. 501. 

Jamaica, L. I., 5. 318; 6. 135, 194; 7. 
321. 

Jamaica, W. L, i. 880 ; 5. 96, 97, 104, 
120, 203. 328, 337, 346, 862, 367, 437, 
488; 6. 119, 142; 7. 54, 173, 199,225; 
8. 116. 

Jamaica, ship, 6. 32, 83. 

James I., deed of lands of New England, 
9 182, 187. 

James II. 0/ England, 4. 488 ; 8. 285. 
Commissions a President for Massa- 
chusetts Bay, 9. 145. 

James, a black man, 8. 462, 565. 

James the Printer, an Indian, 5. 14, 15, 
324; 6 263, 296. 

James, John, 8. 123. 

James, Ivatherine, mentioned in will of 
Edward Hopkins, 9. 19. 

James, Margaret, 5. 285. 

James, Dr. Thomas, Providence, letters to 
John Winthrop, i. 321 ; 9. 6. Concern- 
ing English planters on Long Island, 8. 
158. 

James, Walter, i. 88. 

James's squaw, 5. 108. 

James Fort on Manhattan Island, 8. 91. 

James River, 9. 90. 

Jamison, , brings news of the army, 

5- 459. 

Jane, a negro, 5. 495 ; 6. 22, 29. 

Janverin, , mariner, 7. 294. 

Japhet, Sarah, 6. 434. 

Jaques, Lieut., in Indian expedition, 1724, 
7. 343. 

Jaques, S., 5. 135. 

.larvis, , England, 5. 294. 

Jarvis, , mariner, 5. 336; 7. 24. 

Jarvis, Dr. Charles, 4. 333. 

Jarvis, John, 5. 306. 

Jarvis, Leonard, 4. 43. 

Jav, John, 4. 833, 336, 364, 381, 407, 408, 
410, 413, 414, 417, 420, 426, 428, 429, 
444, 447, 449, 458. President of Con- 
gress, 4. 110, 133. Commissioned, with 
Adams and others, to negotiate for 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 



419 



peace, 4. 457-459. Commissioned, with 
the same, to accept the mediation ol 
Germany and Kussia, 4 459, 400. 

Jealousy in public men, 4. 478. 

Jefferson, Fns. Thomas, 2. U[> n. ; 3. 210, 
•im, 203, 2(35, 281, 284, 292, 2'.t5, 321, 
362 n., 407, 410, 412, 418. 424, 428, 429 ; 
4. 182, 318, 322, 330, 337, 364, 370, 398, 
407, 408, 414, 415, 430, 4.39, 449, 452. 
458, 401, 402, 4o4. 474, 475, 477, 481. 
485. 497, 505. Commissioned, witii Ad- 
ams ami otiiers, to negotiate for peace, 

4. 457-459. C'ommissioned. with the 
same, to accept the mediation of Ger- 
many and Kussia, 4. 459, 400. 

Jeffrey, , 8. 499. 

Ji.ft"rev, Francis, Lord, 5. 65. 

Jeffrey, Robert, i. 128. 

Jeffrey, Tatriclv, 5. 02, 05. 

Jeffries, Mrs. Anne, 6. 399. 

Jeffries, David. 2 98. 100, 102; 5. 152; 

6. 13, 112, 118, 310, 340, 301, 381, 3o3, 

399; 7. 07, 73, 111, 150, 101, 199, 202, 

200, 284, 302. 31 0, 300. 
Jeffries, ^irs. David ( Ivatherinc), 7. 110, 

211,202,284. 
Jeffries, David, Jr., 7. Ill, 114, 211, 270. 
Jeffries, David, 3(/, 7. 209, 272, 274. 
Jeffries, Elizabeth, 7. 270. 
Jeffries. Mrs. Elizabeth, 5. 481 ; 7. G7. 
Jeffries, Frances, 7. 07. 
Jeffries, George, 5. 104. 
Jeffries, John. 6. 399. 
Jeffries, Dr. John, 5. 152. 
Jeffries, Dr. John, Jr., 5. 152. 
Jekvll, John, 5. 63, 64; 6. 196, 356, 421, 

440 ; 7. 230, 370. 
Jekyll, Mrs. John (Hannah), 7 370. 
Jekyll, Hir Joseph, 6. 190. 
Jem, Cousin, 8. 198. 
Jemeson, Mary, 6. 374. 

Jenkins, , mariner, 6. 112. 

Jenkins, Mr., Em/land, his son beheaded. 

5. 104. 

Jenkins, ^fr., concerning the inhabitants 

of Westmoreland, 10. 124. 
Jenkins, John, 3. 247. 
Jenkinson, Charles, mentioned, 9. 251. 
Jenner, t'apt. Thomas, Charlestotvn, ^. 119, 

120. Death of, 5. 158. 

Jennings, , Emjlaud, 5. 303, 307. 

Jennings, Mrs. E., 5. 289. 

Jennings, John, 5. 274, 275, 289, 290. 

Jennings, William, i. 501. 

Jennison, Nathaniel, 3. 40.3. 

Jennison is. Caldwell, case of, 3. 377, 

403 n. Levi Lincoln's brief in, 3. 438- 

442. 
Jeremy, Indian, 6. 375. 
Jerico, 5. 318. 
Jersey, Lord, 8. 376. 
Jersey-Men, 5. 281, 282. 
Jersey, Isle of, 5. 8. 
Jerusalem, 5. 84, 105. 
Jesse, Mr., 6. 51. 



! Jesson, CapL, 5. 438. 

Jessop, Mr., I. 394. 

Jesuit priests, 6. 374, 389 ; 7. 245. Supe- 
rior of the, 8. 370. Attempt to win the 
Five Nations of Indians, 8. 378. 

Jethro, n myro, 5. 14, 22. 

Jewell, Nathaniel. 5. 207. 

Jewett, Nehemiah, 5. 415, 416, 462; 6. 
104, 387. 

Jews or Jew, 5. 68. 121, 165. 199, 226, 268 ; 

6. 80*, 05, 95, 118. Uurying-ground of, 
5. 301 ; 6. 95. 

J. F., 8. 484. 

Jocelyn, Abraham, 6. 332. 

Jocelyn, Mrs. Beatrice, 6. 332. 

Jocelyn, Robert, Earl of Roden, 7. 434, 

435. 
'Joe,' Portngtwse coin, 3. 270 n., 272. 
John, Saint,' Evanf/elist, 4. 478. 
John, Indian interpreter, 9. 71. 
John Carter Brown Library, 6. 29*. 
Johnese, alias Capt. Stanton, 8. 422. 

Johnson, , printer, 5. 3. 

Johnson, , sea-captain, taken by Count 

D'Estaing's fleet, 1779, 4. 124. 
Johnson, , cajilain of militari/, in 

French and Indian War, 8: 307, 310, 

313, 316, 318; 9. 97. 
Johnson, Major, 5. 338, 355. 
Johnson, Mr., England, i. 193. 
Johnson, Mr., mariner, 8. 445. 
Johnson, Mrs., 7. 80. 
Johnson, Widow, 6. 297 ; 7. 292. 
Johnson, Benjamin, 6. 107, 108. 
Johnson, Cooke, 5. 60. 
Johnson, Daniel, 4. 342. 
Johnson, David, 5. 380. 
Johnson, Ebenezer.*/»/or, 9. 138. 
Johnson, Capt. Edward, i. 417 ; 5. 145. 
Johnson, Nur.<e Elizabeth, 6. 93, 285. 
Johnson, Capt. Francis, i. 218-220. 

Death of, 5. 340. 
Johnson, llumfry, 5. 347. 
Johnson, Isaac, 8. 28. 
Johnson, James, signs petition, 1G37, 1. 

486. 
Johnson, James, member of the watch, 

1079, 5. 53. 
Johnson, John, 6. 337. 
Johnson. John II., signs deed, 9. 74. 
Johnson, Joseph, 5. 111. 
Johnson, Kathcrine, 7. 334. 
Johnson, Marin.uluke, S. Green's charges 

against, i. 4.i2, 423. 
Johnson, Ixid/i Mary, 4. 37. 
Johnson, Matthew. 5 345. 
Johnson, Nicholas, letter from, i. 290. 
Johnson, Hobert, 7. 270. 
Johnson, Lieut. Sanmel, 5. 07; 6. 280; 

7. 89. 

Johnson, Samuel, LL.I)., 2. 222, 204. 
Johnson, Thomas, 5. .309, 310. 
Johnson, William. 5. 77, 132. 1.37, 145. 
Jolmson, Sir William, 2 46 ; 3. 152. VA, 
158, 102, 164 ; 5. 208. His treaty, 9 333. 



420 



IXDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Johnson, William Samuel, sent to Eng- 
land as counsel for Connecticut, 9. 
218. Letters to William Pitkin, g. 218, 
214, 217, 222, 228, 236, 239, 242, 244, 
247, 289, 29.3, 300, 804, 312 ; to Joseph 
Trumbull, 9. 830 ; to Jonathan Trum- 
bull, 9. 3Gy, 382, 392, 397, 405, 411, 
421, 420, 429, 435, 439, 445, 454, 461, 
470, 473, 476, 481, 482, 484. Inter- 
views with Lord Hillsborough concern- 
ing Connecticut Colony, 9. 253, 295, 
305. Letters from William Pitkin to, 
concerning certain duties levied, 9. 
276; from Jonathan Trumbull, 9. 380, 
388, 400, 419, 458. Interview with Lord 
Hillsborough concerning Mohegan 
Case, 9. 322. How the Colonies should 
address Parliament concerning the 
Duty Act, 9. 351-353. Extract from 
letter of English clergyman to, 9. 379. 
Presents the Susquehannah land claim 
to the Board of Trade, 9. 447 ; on re- 
sumption of trade with England by New 
York, 9. 450. Sails for America in 
ship ' Lady Gage,' 9. 483 ; return to 
America and death of, 9. 483 n. Let- 
ter of, mentioning interview with Lord 
Shelburnc, concerning American af- 
fairs, 9. 489. Holds conference with 
Gen. Gage, 10. 296, 296 n. 

Johnston, , captain of militart/, 1776, 

10. 275. 

Johnston, Go7\, of Florida, sentiments 
concerning military power in the Col- 
onies, 9. 436. 

Jolpnnot, Gabriel, 5. xxxix. 

Johonnot, Mrs. Gabriel, 5. xxxix. 

Johonnot, Samuel C.,-5. xxxix. 

Johonnot, Zachary, 5. xxxix. 

Jolls, CapL, 5. 90, 100; 8. 455. Death 
of, in London, 5. 105. 

Jolly, John, i. 355. 

Jones, , 5. 27 ; 7. 101. 

Jones, , mariner, 8. 435, 442, 452, 

455, 464, 494, 537, 546, 653, 570. 

Jones, Abraham, 7. 174. 

Jones, Mrs. Abraham (Sarah), 7. 174, 371. 

Jones, Capt. John, 9. 171. 

Jones, Rev. John, letter Irom, i. 339. 

Jones, Commodore John Paul, 2. 148 ; 4. 
374, 430. 

Jones, Matthew, 8. 243, 420, 428, 430, 
431, 435, 436, 442. 

Jones, Philip, 5. 50. 

Jones, William, Deptdy-Gorernor of Con- 
necticut, 8. 405, 517 ; 9. 138. 

Jones, Ensign Winsor, 4. 80. 

Jones's Bridge, 5. 27. 

Jones's River, 6. 252 ; 7. 47. 

Jope, John, i. 501. 

Jordan, Mr., death of, 8. 40. 

Joseph II. of Austria, mediation offered 
by, 4. 441-444, 459, 400. 

Joseph Gaily, ship, 5. 479. 

Josiah, Indian sachem, 6. 375. 



Josiah, Charles, 6. 375. 

Josiah, Jeremy, 6. 375. 

Josse, David, 6. 125. 

Josselyn, John, 2. 135. His 'New Eng- 
land's Rarities ' cited, 2. 120 n. His 
' Voyages to New England ' cited, 3. 
376. 

Jotham, Capt., 4. 164. 

Journal of the expedition against Can- 
ada, by FitzJohn Winthrop, 8. 312. 

Joy, Michael, 3. 136-139, 197, 200. 

Joy, Thomas, 5. 160. 

Joy Street, 5. 73, 482. 

Joy's Building, 5. 160 ; 6. 100. 

Joyce, , messenger, 5. 1. 

Joyliff, John, 5. 37, 124, 125, 158, 169, 
182, 195, 213, 214, 230, 317, 341, 354, 
358, 878, 382 ; 6. 17*, 48, 95. 

Joyliff, Mrs. John (Anna), 5. 217 ; 6. 48. 

Judd. Nurse, 5. 383 ; 7. 50. 

Judd, Roger, 5. 216, 408, 409, 444, 481, 
490, 492. 

Judge of Bristol Court, 6. 270. 

Judge, of Court of Common Pleas, 5. 
xf; 6. 295, 304; 7. 42, 102, 287. Of 
Supreme Court, 5. xxx ; 6. 27. Of 
Probate, 5. 370 ; 6 63, 205, 227, 270, 
357; 7 42, 45, 121, 132, 182, 336, 
360. Of the Admiralty, 5. 498; 6. 
73*, 74* 45, 148; 7. 5, 70, 109. Of 
Superior Court, 5. 500; 6. 110*, 15, 
63, 205, 216, 272, 357 ; 7. 70, 181, 386. 
Salary of, 7. 6. 

Judges, 5. 175, 446, 504 ; 6. 8* 108* 
124* 59, 112, 144, 151. 163, 165, 170, 
280, 307, 314, 335, 349-351, 381 ; 7. 
114, 128, 18.3, 204, 212, 213, 241, 251, 
310, 318, 319, 347, 353, 355, 366, 380. 
English and American, 6. 430. Of 
England, 7. 71. Of Inferior Court, 
7. 287, 318. Of Massachusetts, 7. 71. 

Judicial Proceedings, corruption in, 6. 
82*. 

Judiciary, tlie independence of the, a 
principle of the Revolution, 4. 344-346. 
Mr. Adams's letters to Gen. Brattle, 
4. 344. 

Juno, a servant, 7. 264, 269, 271, 274. 

Juno, sloop, 3. 303. 

Jupe, Mary, see Morse, Mrs. 

Jupiter and the satellites, letter of John 
Winthrop, Jr., to Sir Robert Moray, 
concerning, 8. 93. 

Jurors, concerning the rights of, 9. 478. 

Jury, 5. 349, 356, 357, 474, 495, 496 ; 6. 
14*, 10* 18* 14, 39, 41, 46, 47, 92, 139. 
165, 264, 280, 308, 401 ; 7. 55, 62, 76, 
130, 191, 241, 261. 

Jury of Tryals, 5. 4.36, 483 ; 7. 2. 

Justice and Justices, of Superior Court, 
6. 27, 79, 134, 349 ; 7. 152. Of Inferior 
Court, 6. 387. Of Connnon Pleas, 6. 
437 ; 7. 52. Of Supreme Court, 7. 197. 

Justices, 5. 450, 508; 6. 114*, 118*, 6, 
60, 64, 116, 145, 162, 167, 218, 231, 282, 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



421 



242. 293, 304, 325, 330. 335, 340, 307, 
387, 391, 303, 300 ; 7. 23, 45, SO, US, 
108, 109, 250, 370. 
Justices of the Peace, 5. 301, 500; 6. 
118*, 124* 15, 152, 174, 204, 284, 202, 
295, 350, 437 ; 7. 170, 240, 280, 287, 318. 



K. 

Kallenclor, Josepli, 6. 276, 290. 
Karnes, Henry Home, Lord, 3. 232. 
Kane, Col. Richard, 6. 313. 
Kaquendero, Indian orator, 6. 261. 
Kates, Richard, 5. 169; 6. 344. 
Katlierine Hall, Cnmhridi/e, 5. 261. 
Katherine Wheel Tavern, i. 122 n. 
Kay, Mrs. Anno, school mistress, 5. 411 ; 

6. 327 ; 7. 34, 50. 
Kay, Lvdia, 7. 133, 198, 215, 210. 280, 

284, 304. 
Kay, .Mary, 5. 77, 178 ; 7. 72. 
Kay, Thomas, 5. 125. 
Keach, Abigail, 7. 319. 
Keane, Cajit., i. 354. 
Keane, Cousin, a icoman preacher, 8. 205. 
Keats, Richard, 5 53. 
Keayne, Benjamin, 5. 109. 
Keayne (Ivaine), Cnpt. Robert, letters 

from, I. 254, 378. Xotice of, i. 254 n. ; 

5. 109 ; 6. 35 ; 8. 36. 
Keeeh, Reo. Mr., at council of ministers, 

5- 352. 
Keelin-r, Samuel, 6. 28, 210, 297, 303, 

412;^ 7. 39. 
Keffler, Dr., England, 8. 130. 
Kein, Esther, 5. 111. 
Keith, George, 5-219; 6. 58. 
Keith, Major James, 4. 273. 
Keith, Rec. James, Bridqewater, 5. 173, 

412 ; 6. 115, 334. 
Keith, Rec. Reuel, 5. xxxiv. 
Keith, Sir William, 3. 404. 
Keitli's tavern, 4. 27, 30. 
Kellev, Mr., 3. 218. 
Kellond, .\fadam, 5. 144, 167, 228. 
Kellond, Tliomas, son of Madam, death 

of, 5. 144; 6. 300, 303; 8. 403. 
Kellsoll, John, 7. 95. 
KelisoU, Mrs. John (Rebecca), 7. 95. 
Kelly, C<ii)t., Enrjiand, 5. 255. 
Kelly, Joseph, prisoner of war, 1777, 

10. 313. 
Kemp, William, i. 177. 
Kempc-nfoldt, Col. M., 6. 313. 
Ken, Bishop, 5. 200. 
Kend:i!, Jonathan, 6. 336. 
Kendiiskeag, rirer in Maine, 7. 350. 
Kenihvorth, Enr/., 5. xvii. 
Kenmure, Lord, 7. 77. 
Kennebec River, trading-house on, i. 

39ij n. ; 5. 242 ; 7. 13.3, 245. 293. 
Kennebeck Indians, 7. 241, 2;i2, 342. 



Kennebunk River, wonderfid removal of 
a hill near, 8. 138. Building of L'ort 
Ann on, 8. 487. 

Kennedy, Mrs. S., 5. 63, 04. 

Kenney, Nurse, 7. 224. 

Konrick, John, 6. 113. 

Kent, John, Newbury, 5. 343 ; 6. 30, 41, 
307 ; 7. 119, 335. 

Kentish, Rer. Mr., Emjland, 5. 257. 

Keppel, Adni. Lord Augustus, 4. 97. 

Koppele, Mrs., Philadelphia, 3. 335. 

Kerby, Mr., London, En;/., 8. 28. 

Kerker, Henry, i. 7 ; 8. 19. 

Kesh-ke-choo-vvat-ma-kunsh, (jrand mother 
to Uncus, 9. 102. 

Ketchum, Mr., Norwalk a protection 
given to, 10. 57. 

Keyn, Capt., suit for his farm, 5. 140, 413. 

Kibbe, Joshua, 6. 304 ; 7. 303. 

Kibbee, , tenant of S. Sewall, 6. 76, 

90. 

Kick, Abraham, 5. 262, 203, 267, 209. 

Kidbye, Goodman, i. 4. 

Kidd, Capt. Robert, a pirate, 8. 303, 370, 
376, 526, 553, 557. 

Kidd, Capt. William, 6. 3, 4, 0, 7. 

Kidd Treasure, the, 6. 7. 

Kidder, F., 5. 1. 

Kidlington, Enr/., 5. 304. 

Kiggin, Ca/>t., 5 438. 

Kilby, Christopher, 7. 222. 

Kilby, Thomas, 7. 222. 

Kilcup, Mrs., marries Ezekiel Lewis, 6. 
117. 

Killed and wounded in Narragansett 
fight, names of, 9. 90. 

Killingsly, Conn., 7. 191. 

Killsa, Capt. Moses, 2. 274, 303, 308. 

Kimball, James W., 5. xxxv. 

Kimberlcy, Kleazar, mentioned, 9. 81, 
104, 104 n., 180. 

Kimberly, Thomas, j!(ror, 9. 138. 

Kinch, , 8. 325, 499, 508. Impressed 

aboard the ' Royal William,' 8. 503. 

King, the, 5. 204, 229, 442 ; 6. 105* ; 7. 
00, 69, 133, 212, 289. Letter of, 5. 48. 
Coronation of, 5. 84, 85. Proclamation 
of, 5. 90, 100, 107, 152 ; 7. 287. Birth- 
day of, 5. 151, 402, 504 ; 7. 255. Dec- 
laration of, 5. 177, 186. Intruders into 
his i)ossession, 5. 219. Command of, 6. 
7. Death of 6. 50. Right and title of, 

7. 187. Si..ech of, 7. 120, 129, 245, 
319. 

King Alfred's Davs, 6. 122*. 
King Charlos L.V 104, 100, 201. 254; 
6. 99*, 230, 333. Beaten at Bristol, 

8. 201. Beheaded, 8. 209, 22(;. 

King Charles II., 5. xii. 09, 174; 6. 99*, 

429; 7. 250; 8. 249, 2()t, 341. 
King Charles V., anniversary of execu- 
tion of, 6. 333. 
King Charles XII. of Sweden, 7. 127, 
, 2i7. 
I King ICdward, 5. 9, 259. 



42: 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



King George I., 7. 19, 20, 24, 28, 29, 36, 
59, 100, 103, 1«7, 375. Accession of, 
7. 2:5. 91. 

King Henry IV., 5. 8 ; 6. 20*. 

King James II., 5. 9, 69-71, 79, 87, 89- 
91, 10(5, 107, 121, 131, 137, 157, 167, 174, 
175, 186, 192, 211, 226, 241, 245, 246, 
254, 304, 321, 404, 430, 434; 6. 35* 
67* 105* 12-5. 199; 7. 313. 

King Louis XIV., 5. 224,401,402,444; 

7. 60. 

King Philip, see Philip. 

King Piiilip's War, see Philip. 

King Richard II., 5. xvi. 

King Solomon, 5. 99. 

King William III., 5. 254, 203, 268, 329, 

350, 403, 404, 430, 431, 433, 434, 488 ; 

6. 36* 67* 68*, 56, 57, 58; 7. 240. 

Concerning Harvard College, 8. 551. 
King William and Queen Mary, 5. 175, 

269, 326, 404, 434; 6. 312; 7. 38, 

249. 
King, Lords, and Commons, 6. 106*. 
King of England, 8. 8. 
King of France, Governors, 6. 84*. 

Army of, at Rochelle, 8. 5. In Italy, 

concerning his actions there, 8. 15, id. 
King of Poland, 5. 462 ; 7. 93. 
King of Spain, 5 479, 506 ; 6. 32, 98, 99. 

Death of, 8. 544. 
King of Sweden, army of, in Germany, 

8. 30. Woun.ied, 8. 30. 
King, Capl., England, 5. 305. 
King, Col., 6. 31'6, 317. 
King, Mr., 8. 456. 

King, Mrs., Miliar Vaiighan's daughter, 

deatli of, 7. 130. 
King, Elizabeth, 5. 293. 
King, Francis, 6. 110. 
King, John, 6. 440. 
King, Ralph, 5. 118. 
King, Richard, i. 131. 
King, Rufus, LL.D., 3. 5-8. 11, 68; 4. 

487, 488. 
King, Tiiomas, death of, 5. 305. 
King, William, 5. 53. 
King Street, 6. 248, 316, 323 ; 7. 169, 324, 

325, 381. 
Kinge, John, i. 501. [183. 

Kingfisher, ship, 5. 155, 159, 162, 176-178, 
King Fislier, //-(V/a^e, 8. 464. 
King's Attorney, death of, 5. 205. 
King's Bench, Court of, 5. 131. 
King's Chapel, 5. 231,430 ; 6. 57, 70. 386, 

395, 412 ; 7. 61, 111. Yard of, 6. 119, 

205, 325 ; 7. 304. Warden of, 6. 395. 

Organist of, 7. HI. 
' King's Chapel Epitaphs,' see Bridgman. 
King's Commissioners, 6. 101. Letter of, 

to John Winthrop, 9. 62, 63 «., 66, 72. 
King's Council, 5. 139 ; 7. 65. 
King's Evil, 5. 317. An herb for the cure 

of, 8. 104. 
King's Ferry, 4. 165, 177, 178, 185. Works 

at, 4. 131, 138. 



' King's Mandamus,' letter written by 

Charles IL to John Endicott, 9. 26 n. 
Kings, Jolm, i. 501. 
Kingsbridge, .?v\ Y., 4. 174 ; 10. 128. 

Roads leading to, to be obstructed, 4. 

14. 
Kingsbury, Goodman, 8. 27. 
Kingsbury, Lieut., mentioned, 9. 502. 
Kingsbury, Henry, i. 165. 
Kingston, Mass., 5. xxxix, 63; 7. 219, 

220. 
Kinnycott, George, i. 501. 
Kinsale, Ireland, 7. 124. 
Kinsman, Henry, i. 64. 
Kinsman, John, sergeant in army, 9. 507. 
Kinsman, Eobert, 5. 190. 
Kippis, Rev. Andrew, D.D., 3. 854, 401. 
Kirbridge, Eng., 5. 298. 
Kirby, Francis, i. 13, 42, 202, 270 n. 
Kirby, Jane, Enrjland, 5. 298. 
Kirby, John, 8. 221. 
Kirby Street, London, 5. 255. 
Kirk, Col. Piercv, 5. 87, 132; 6. 313. 
Kirk of Korth Britain, 6. 100*. 
Kirke, »SiV David or Davy, i. 120, 499, 

500. 
Kirke, Col. Percy, Governor of Tangiers, 

8. 300, 451. 
Kitchen, Madam, Salem, 6. 403 ; 7. 377. 
Kitchen, Mrs. Bethiah, 7. 207. 
Kitchen, Robert, 5. 224; 6. 69, 246. Death 

of, 6. 365. 
Kittery, 5. xxxvii, 106, 396 ; 6. 45* 54* 

13, 38, 77 ; 7. 1, 2, 6, 55, 81, 130, 184, 

334. Selectmen of, 7. 55. 
Kittery Court, 7. 184. 
Kittery Grant, place where masts were 

cut, 5. 338. 
Knapp, Joshua, interpreter, 9. 122, 123. 
Knapton, Copt., 8. 291. 
Kneeland, Samuel, 5. 63; 6. 363. 
Knell, Nicholas, testimony of, 9. 120. 

Mentioned, g. 129. 

Knight, , Brcivster, 7. 1. 65, 81. 

Knight, Mr., Boston, merchant, 8. 543. 

Knight, Mrs., England, 1. 80. 

Knight, Mrs., Jier ferry near Portsmouth, 

2. 65. 
Knight, Mrs. Anna, 6. 48. 
Knight, Christopher, 5. 310. 
Knight, Edmund, will of, 7. 348. 
Knight, Mrs. Edmund (Grace), 7. 348. 
Kniglit, Ezekiel, i. 359. 
Knight, John, 7. 348. 
Knight, Robert, 6. 48. 
Kniglitbridge, Mr., i. 189, 190. 
Knightly, Richard, 9. 381. 
Knollys, Bee. Hanserd, i. 814. Letter 

from, I. 280. Notice of, i. 280 n. 

Knott, , manner^ 5. 48. 

Knowles, , deed given to, by S. Sew- 
all, 6. 169. 
Knowlinge, Stephen, i. 501. 
Knowlton, Deacon, 6. 31. 
Knowlton, Nathaniel, 7. 285. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



4-23 



Knox, , concerning land in Coney's 

Lane, 6. 210, L'll. 

Knox, Uen. Henrv, 4. 8, 10, 11, 10, 00. 43, 
52. 54, 59, 73, "123, 125, 165, 178, 1S)U, 
202, 242, 273, 277, 334 ; 10. 40. Keccipt 
for money, 10. 49. Concerning aninui- 
nition, 10. 139. Concerning powder at 
Farmington, 10. 201. Witii Wasliing- 
ton, meets some French officers, 10. 
205. His embassy to tlie Eastern 
States, 10. 230. Mentioned, 10. 248, 
272. 

Knox, Rev. Hngh, D.D., his ' Moral and 
ReHgious Miscellany,' 3. 100, 102, 108. 

Knyphausen, Gen., his landing at Eliza- 
bethtown, 10. 172, 173. 

Knyphausen, Dodo Henri, Baron, 4. 33. 

Kosciuszko, Thaddeus, 4. 1(38. 

Kuffler (Keflar), Abraham, letter from, i. 
270. Died, i. 382. 

Kuffler, John Sibert, letter from, i. 882. 

Kuiin, Dr. Adam, 3. 337. 



Labec, Mary, 7. 225. 

La Blond, James, 7. 82. 

La Blond, Mrs. James (Anne), 7. 82. 

La Blond, Peter, sou of, lamp.';, 7. 82, 83. 

La Bloom, Mr., 6. 235, 23G, 320. 

La Corogne, Spain, 5. 400. 

Lafayette, Gilbert Motier, Marquis de, 2. 

104; 4. 173,207, 208,220, 226. With 

Gen. Washington, 10. 205. 
Laffen, William, 7. 335. 
Lake, Mr., 5. 37, 259 ; 7. 227. 
Lake, Mr., Dublin, i. 204. 
Lake, Anna, i. 99 n. 
Lake, Hanna; 8. 36. 
Lake, John, i. 35, 37, 42,44)!., (Lacke) 

4(5, 97 n. 
Lake, John, son of John and Margaret, i. 

99 n. 
Lake, John, Boston, death of, 5. 323. 
Lake, Lanct., 5. 302. 
Lake (Lack), Mrs. JNIargaret, I. 44 n., 94, 

97 n., 107, 168, 372; 8. 30, 74, 205, 224, 

226. Letter from, i. 99. Death of, 8. 

163. 
Lake, ^^rs. Mary, 6. 137. 
Lake, Capt. Thomas, killed by Indians at 

Quinebeck, 1667, 5. 17. 38. 
Lake, Thomas, letter from John Win- 

throp, Jr., to, IGGl, 8. 73. 
Lake Champlain, Britisii vessels frozen 

in, 4. 244, 245. 
Lake George, a brigade ordered to, 10. 

85. 
Lake Tlieracoies, 8. 103. 
Lakeville, Mass., 6. 166. 
La Loutre, Jesuit Father, 6. 389. 
Lamb, Capt., Neponset, 1715, 7. 57, 232. 



Lamb, Col., concerning his battalion, 

1780, 10. 155, 157. 
Lamb, George, 7. 333. 
Lamb, James and Thomas, Messrs., •5. 

248. ^ 

Lamb, Gen. John, 4. 110. 106, 251. 
Lamb. Joshua, 7. 371. Signs commission, 

9. 163. 
Lamb, ^/rs. Joshua (Susanna), 7. 371. 
Lamb, Thomas, 2. 458. 
Lamb's Dam, 9. 499. 
Lambert, Goodman, 8. 28. 
Lambert, John, 6. HI. 
Lamerton, Mr., 8. 44. 
Lamin, Mr., 5. 273. 
Lamin, Mrs., 5. 287. 
Lampton, /iVt'. .I/?-., sent from England to 

the Episcopal Church. 6. 338. 
Lamshood, William, i. 501. 
Lancashire, Eni)., 6. 267 ; 7. 103, 204. 
Lancaster, Penn., 2. 32. 
Lancaster, Mass., 5. 22, 337, 453, 459; 6. 

67, 114, 140; 8. 530. 
Land, concerning the sale of, in England, 

8. 31. Letter of Fitz-Jolm Winthrop, 
for patent of land on Long Island, 8. 
378. Concerning the sale of, 8. 383, 
387, 388, 390, 391, 398. At Boston 
Neck, 8. 442. 452. Concerning land 
allotted to John Winthrop, Jr., 8. 455. 
Concerning a grant of , from Owaneco 
to John Winthrop, Jr., 8. 460-462. Con- 
cerning the title to certain, at Quini- 
baug, 8 505. Of John Winthrop, sale 
of, in England, 8. 26, 28, 29. Concern- 
ing the granting of, west of New York, 

9, 390. 

Land tax, fixed in Parliament, 9. 250. 

Advanced, 9. 471, 485. 
Land of Nod, 6. 62, 118, 124, 130, 139, 

164 ; 7. 177, 181, 202, 203, 209, 211, 382. 

Proprietors, 7. 197, 198, 209, 214. 
Landen, Mr., councillor, Enrjlund, i. 181. 
Lander, Daniel, a pirate, 5. 309. 
Land's End, 5. 244. 
Lane, Mr., mariner, 8. 252, 253. 
Lane, Capt. Anthonv, i. 416. 
Lane, Edward, 6. 109 ; 7. 150. 
Lane, Mrs. Edward (Anne), 7. 150, 301. 
Lane, Eliza, 5. 122, 144, 145, 176, 199, 

222. 
Lane, Jane, .'"c Bland, ^frs. 
Lane, Job, 6 324 ; 9. 379. 
Lane, Joseph, i. 3o»/i. 
Lane Papers, 6. 324. 
Langalkrie. Marquis de, 7. 03. 
Langden, Mr., his liouse burned, 5. 330 ; 

6. 355 ; 7. 50. 
Langdon, Cut., concerning arms for Con- 
necticut, 10. 62. In charge of military 

stores, 10. 66. 
Langdon, John, LL.D.,7.. 113, 169 »., 407, 

433.434: 3 105, 108,210; 4. 50. 
Langdon, ('apt. Jolin, 4 99. 
Langilon, .U/s. John, 3. 135. 



424 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Langdon, Rev. Samuel, D.D., President of 

Harcurd Culiei/e, 2. 65, tiO. 
Langdon, Woodbury, 2. 433, 434. 
Lange, John, i. SOL 
La Perouse, Jean Fran9ois de Galaup, 

Comte de, 4. 278. 
Lapis calaminaris, a mineral, 2. 32. 
La Pluclie, Abbe', liis ' Nature Displayed,' 

2.40. 
La Poterie, ^We Claude, 3. 110, 116, 119, 
121, 123. 

La Prere de Magdalena, au Indian settle- 
ment, 8. 317. 

Lapton, Jane, 5. 303. 

Lapvvorth, Mrs. A., 5. 305. 

Lapworth, Mary, 5. 305. 

Lapwortli, En(j., 5. 305. 

Laraby, Mr., mariner, 8. 243. 

Lardner, Reo. Nathaniel, D.D., 2. 138 n. ; 
5-272 

Lardner, Eichard, 5. 272, 273. 

Larimore, Capt., 6. (55. 

Larine, Breckvelt de, death of, 3. 210. 
Funeral of, 3. 243. 

Lark, sloop, 5. 224. 

Larkhani, Rev. Thomas, letter from, i. 
313. Notice of, i. 313«. 

Larkin, , constable, 5. 198, 208, 236. 

Larkin, Deacon John, 3. 312, 362. 

Larkin, Roger, disturber of the peace, 9. 
202. 

Larned, Deacon, 6. 76, 156 ; 7. 197. 

Larnell, Benjamin, 6. 297, 335, 343, 356, 
362,369,3^6,428; 7. 10,11. 

La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Fran(;ois 
Alexandre Fre'de'ric, Due de, 4. 473. 
Interview of, with John Adams, 4. 410. 

La Roy, P. D', 5. 317. 

Larramore Gaily, at Cape Ann, 6. 103. 

Larrimore, Capt. T., 6. 103-106. 

Larvey, Sergeant James. 4. 194. 

La Sensible, y"y/(/«^e, 4. 369. 

Lasher, Col. John, 4. 22. 

Lason, , niessenijer, 5. 249. 

Lason, Capt. George, petition of, 6. 124- 
126. 

Lason, Mrs. George (Martha), 6. 125. 

Latham, William, 8. 433, 502, 539, 567. 

Lathem, Goodman, 8. 232. 

Latiierby, , carpenter, 6. 362. 

Latimer, Mr., 7. 215. 

Latin compositions of two Indian schol- 
ars, 8. 84. 

Latin poems or verses, 7. 320-322. 

Latin. School, 5. 151, 378. 

La Tour, Claude Etienne de, i. 492. 

La Tour, Madame, suit of, 8. 200 n. 

Latrop, Capt., 5. 10, 11. 

Latta, Rev. James, 2. 165, 180. 

Lattimer,j1/r., death of (Attorney of Court 
of Wards, England), 8. 3. 

Lattimore, Cajit., 8. 558. 

Laud, Archbishop William, i. 31 ?!., 150 n. 

L'Auguste, French war vessel, accident to, 
2. 102. 



Laurens, Col. John, 3. 154 ; 4. 220. Aid 

to Gen. Washington, 10. 118, 120. 
Lausanne, France, 5. 104. 
Lauthoup, Thomas, i. 248. 
Lauzern, Due de, 10. 234. 
Lavinder, Mr., 1. 185. 
Law, Richard, clerk of Provincial Congress, 

10. 306. 
Law officers, papers relating to the ap- 
pointment of, in tiie American colonies, 
8. 332. 

Law-suits, delays in, in England, i. 462. 

Lawrence, Mr., son-in-law of Capt. Davis, 
death of, 5. 335. 

Lawrence, Rev. Mr., England, 5. 267. 

Lawrence, Abiel, 6. 211. 

Lawrence, Amory A., 4. 283 n. 

Lawrence, Henry, i. 482, 483. Letter 
from, I. 214. Concerning a Charter for 
Connecticut, 8. 76. 

Lawrence, Judge John, 4. 205, 262: 10. 
26. 

Lawrence, Mary, married William Wlut- 
tingham, 6. 367, 374 ; 7. 368. 

Lawrence, Robert F., his ' Churches of 
New Hampshire' cited, 2. 212 n., 408 ?i. 

Lawrence, Rev. William, 4. 284 n. 

Laurens, Henry, 4 382,383,386,407,408, 
415, 417, 419, 430, 449, 458. His com- 
mission to Holland, 4. 419, 460, 461. 
Commissioned with Adams and others 
to negotiate for peace, 4. 4-57-459 ; to 
accept the mediation of Germany and 
Russia, 4. 459, 460. 

Laws, concerning a revision of, in Con- 
necticut, 8. 352, 353. Repeal of cer- 
tain, 8. 551. And liberties recommend- 
ed to the people of Connecticut, propo- 
sals concerning, 9. 73, 73 n. 

' Laws, Liberties, and Orders of Harvard 
College,' 5. 51. 

Lavvson, Mr., 8. 545. 

Lawson, Rev. Mr., 5. 217, 232, 268, 360, 
371. 

Lawson, D.. 5. 49, 213. 

Lawson, Capt. R., engaged in unlawful 
trade, 6. 40*, 45* 51*, 54* 117* 119* 
120* 124, 165,211,223, 252. 

Lawton, Christopher Jacob, 7. 95. 

Lawton, Mrs. C. J. (Sarah), 7. 95. 

Lay, Robert, servant of, nmrdered by 
Indians, 8. 54. Concerning pay for 
certain workmen, 9. 24. 

Layfield, Samuel, England, 5. 250, 267, 
284-286. 

Layson, , sheriff, 7. 81. 

Layton, Capt., 7. 55. 

Lazar, or pest-liouse, 6. 353. 

Lazaretto, a place of quarantine near 
Venice, 8. 14, 17. 

Lea, Thomas, 7. 88. 

Leach, , prisoner of war, 1776, 4. 117. 

Leach, , sea-captain, 1688, 5. 213. 

Leach, Ambrose, i. 355. 

Leach's Stream, 6. 263. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Lead, mine of, i. 152, 154. Found in 

Massachusetts, 8. 14-'. Conci'miny: the 

deeds for eertiiin mines, 8, 4Go. Mine 

of, at Middleton, lo. 3. 

Lcadbeter, Rev. Mr., Kugland, 5. 205. 

Leader, lildiard, i. 08, 153 n., 151), 162; 

8. 232. 
Learned, Gen. Ebenezer, 4. 82, 83, IIG. 
Learning, donation of Edward Hopkins 

for advancement of, 9. 19. 
Leatiier or cloth, to make waterproof, 8. 

510, 513. 
Lebanon, Conn., 9. 333 ; 10. 1, 93. 
Lechmere, LorJ, 6. 209. 
Leclimere, Mrs. Anne, 6. 209; 7. 05, 

147. 
Leclimere, Lucv, 6. 303. 
Leclimere, M'S. Marv, 6. 209; 7. 147. 
Lechmere, llichard, 6. 209; 7. 230, 290, 

30^1, 314. 
Lechmere, Thomas, 6. 269 ; 7. 65, 2-30, 

290, 308, 314. 
Lechmere Point, Enq., 6. 269. 
Leddell, Sarah, 7. 301. 
Ledyard, Dr. Isaac, 4. 237. 
Ledyard, John, 2. 413. 
Lee, Mr., rector of Groton, 8. 6, 20. 
Lee, Anne, 5. 148-150, 305. 
Lee, Arthur, 4. 307, 308, 390, 39-5, 403, 
411-413, 424, 428, 440. His expenses 
as Commissioner at Paris, 4. 371, 372. 
Lee, Benjamin, 4. 500. 
Lee, Gen. Charles, 2. 171, 195, 425 ; 4. 21, 
27. Death of, 1783, 2. 184. In War of 
Revolution, 10. 22. A prisoner of war, 
10. 32, 83, 87. 
Lee, Francis II., 7. 05. 
Lee, George, i. 380, 387. 
Lee, Col. Henry, in War of Revolution, 

1781,4. 118,215. 
Lee, Henry, Boston, 1005, 6. 211. 
Lee, Lieut. Israel, in War of Revolution, 

1779, 4. 124. 
Lee, John, 6. 211. 
Lee, Dr. John, 7. 88, 89. 
Lee, Jndije Josejih, 4. 504. 
Lee, Joshua, 6. 211. 
Lee, Katherine, 5. 303. 
Lee, Lydia, 5. 148, 149; 7. 27, 80. 
Lee, Mrs. Piiocbe, 5 295. 
Lee, Rebecca, 5. 149. 
Lee, Richard Henry, 3. .35, 115; 4 371, 
437. His share in the Declaration of 
Independence, 4. 405, 400. 
Lee, Rev. Samuel. 5. 148-150, 152-154, 
159, 103, 10.3, 170, 172, 170, 220, 227, 
340 ; 7. 27. 
Lee, Thomas, 5. xvii ; 6. 210, 211, .30.3. 
Lee, William, i. 501; 4. 440 5-302; 7. 

80. 
Lee, Mrs. William (Mercv), 7. 80. 
Lee, Col. William Raymond, 4. 57, 59, 02, 

76, 77, 84, 88. 
Lee, Enq., 5. 18, 20, 33, 298, 299, 302. 
Lee, Fort, 10 310. 



Leech, Mr., house struck by lightning, 
7. 156. 

Leech (Lech), Ambrose, witness to deed, 
9. 35, 36. Signs letter, 9. 37. 

Leeds, Mrs. Hannah, 6. 239. 

Leeds, Richard, 6. 239. 

Leet, Goodman, 8. 160, 107. 

Leet, William, letter of John Winthrop, 
Jr., to, 8. 170. 

Lee-ward Islands, 6. 319. 

Lefebure de Le Barre, Lieut.- Gen. An- 
tony, concerned in the invasion of 
Antigua, 8. 250. Attack on St. Chris- 
topher's by, 8. 259. 

Leffingwell, Mr., 9. 517. 

Legacies, the, of Gen. Codrington, 6. 
287. 

Legal-Tender Act, 6. 300. 

Legare, Francis, admitted into the Col- 
ony, 5. 292. 

Leget, Mr., 8. 392. 

Legg, Col., 6. 104. 

Legg, Daniel, 7. 336. 

Legg, Elizabeth, 7. 330. 

Legg, John, 5. 380. Will of, 7. 336. 

Legg, John, 8. 470. 

Legg, Mary, 7. 330. 

Legg, Cdpt. Samuel, 5. 159, 199, 390, 
4^50, 479, 508 ; 6. 16*, 74, 77-79, 153, 
102, 172, 177. Will of, 1700, 7. 330. 
Arrival of, from England, 1087, 8. 
481. 

Legg, Mrs. Samuel (Deliverance), 7. 262. 
Death of, 7. 336. 

Legislature, 5. 100, 101, 434 ; 6. 20, 265. 
Of Connecticut, indignant letter of ■ 
Gov. Trumbull, concerning Gen. Par- 
sons's reflections on, 10. 248. 

Legitt, Mr., sale of Ten Hills farm to, 
by Wait Winthrop, 8. 400, 481. 

Leicester, Earl of, 5. 304. 

Leicester, Enrj., 5. 304 ; 7. 95, 197, 231. 

Leicester County, "Entj., 5. 252. 

Leigh, Mrs. Elizabeth, letter from, i. 177. 

Leigh, Rev. William, i. 11, 13, 14. Let- 
ters from, I. 177, 226. 

Leisler, Capt., fires on town of New 

York, 5,342, 343. Is executed, 5. 345. 

Leisler, Gov. Jacob, Neiv York, i. 439; 

5. 317,319, 3:]3; 9. 173 «. 
Leland, Ebenezer, 6. 70. 

Lello, John, mentioned in will of Edward 

Hoi)kins, 9 21. 
Le iMaiune, <"/>(., concerning business' 

with, 8. 414, 417. 

Lemmon, , death of, 6. 257. 

Lendall, Elizabeth, 6. 326. 

Lendall, Mrs. Jane, 6. .320. 

Lendall, Mary, 6. 320. 

Lendall, Poole, 6. .326. 

Lendall, Timothy, 6. 326. 

Le Neve's Catalogue of Knights, 5. 193; 

6. 149. 

Lennard, Capt., 6. 115, 104, 264. 
Lennerson, Samuel, 5. 452, 453. 



426 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Lenox, Duke of, land granted to, 9. 182. 

Leonard, , Juclt/e of Coininon Fleas, 

Taunton, 6. 167 ; 7. 102. 

Leonard, Vol., 7. 115. 

Leonard, Rev. Nathaniel, 7. 352, 353, 
376. 

Leonard, Richard, i. 474. 

' Leonidas,' pseudonym, 2. 148, 158. 

Leopard, shijj, 6. 314. 

Leopold I., Emperor of Germany, 8. 434. 

Ijerejfriffate, 5. 385. 

Le See, Moses, 5. 292. 

Lesley, , schoolmaster, 2. 318. 

Leslie, Gen. Alexander 4. '21^). 

Leslie, Rev. Charles, 2. ^oG. His ' Short 
and Easy Method with the Deists,' 
2. 212, 218, 228. 

Lethbridge, Rev. Dr., 5. 306. 

Lethered, , mariner, 7. 218, 310, 335. 

' Letitia Cunningham,' book, 2. 183, l'J3. 

Letter, to Mr. Humphreys, 5. 81. From 
an Indian captive, 6. 62*. From 
K. A. (Ar— ng), 6. 81*. From Cotton 
Mather, 6. 138 ; 7. 177. From Gov. 
Dudley to the Council. 6. 275. From 
Rev. J. Keith, 6. 334. From Rev. W. 
Cooper, 7. 343. From Rev. B. Colman, 
7. 344. To Lieutenant-Governor and 
Council, 7. 359. To Hon. S. Parti'idge, 
7. 360. 

Letters, from Judge S. Sewall, 5. 25, 39, 
58, 76, 229, 231, 251, 262, 263, 314, 3^0, 
373, 375, 414, 432, 485; 6. 9* 21, 23, 
29, 351, 352; 7. 48, 168, 299. From 
inhabitants of New England with ref- 
erence to Gov. Dudley, 6. 40*- 
4*3* 75*-82*. Of complaints against 
Dudley, 6. 75*-82*. From White- 
Hall, London, 6. 228. From Christo- 
pher Taylor, 7. 96, 97. From Sewall 
to Mrs. Mary Gibbs, 7. 299, 301-304. 
Against Gov. Shute, 7. 319. Lost at 
sea, 8. 130. And documents relating 
to slavery in Massachusetts, j. 373- 
442. 

Leven, Earl of, i. 47 n. 

Leveret, Cap't., 1658, 8. 46. 

Leveret t, Ann, daughter of Gov. John, 
6. 272 ; 7. 41, 141. 

Leverett, Elizabeth, dour/hter of Gov. John, 
married Elisha Cooke, 7. 50, 213. 

Leverett, Hudson, 5. 180 ; 6. 192 ; 7. 30- 
32, 72, 73. Will of, 7. 31. 

Leverett, J\frs. Hudson (Elizabeth), sec- 
ond ivife, 7. 31, 72. 

Leverett, Mrs. Hudson (Sarah), first 
wife, 7. 31. 

Leverett, Gov. John, i. 295. Letter 
of, I. 418. Death of, 1678, 5. 48. 
Mentioned, 5. xiv, ICO, 437, 470 ; 6. 
232, 272; 7. 41, 50, 141, 213, 225, 260, 
336 ; 9. 91. Letter of John Wintlirop, 
Jr., to, 1672, 8. 146, 151. 
Leverett, Mrs. Gov. John (Sarah), 5. 214, 
286, 326, 451 ; 6. 68, 91, 120, 121, 187, 



192, 214, 233, 403 ; 7. 181, 182, 191, 225, 
257, 258. 

Leverett, Judge John H., 6. 8*. 

Leverett, John, Presideiit of Harvard Col- 
lege, I. 447 ; 5. xxxiv, lo4 ; 6. 29*, 83, 
84, 104, 192, 196, 214, 285, 357, 416; 7. 
49, 72, 86, 89, 121, 122, 136, 148, 155, 181, 
182, 191, 203. 225, 257, 326, 332, 336. 

Leverett, Mrs. Pres. John (Margaret), 

6. 192,285; 7. 31,86,89, 182. 
Leverett, Margaret, daughterof Pres. John, 

7.86. 

Leverett, Mary, daughter of Hudson, 7. 
31, 182. 

Leverett, Sarah, married Nathaniel By- 
field, 7. 182. 

Leverett, Thomas, son of Hudson, 6. 192; 

7. 31, 73. 

Leverett, Mrs. Thomas (Rebecca), 5. 352; 

7. 73, 260. 

Leverett Genealogy, 6. 192. 
Leverett Memorial, 5. xxxiv ; 6. 233. 
I.evett, Capt. Christopher, i. 118. 
Levin, Capt., 8. 483, 484. 

Lewin, , mariner, 8. 436, 453. 

Lewis, , innkeeper, Salem. 5. 402, 406; 

6. 29, 31, 404 ; 7. 24, 26, 336. 

Lewis, , mariner, 5. 132, 156. 

Lewis, Capt., 1661, 5. xiii. 

Lewis, Mrs., death of, at Boston, 6. 95. 
Lewis, Rev. Daniel, 6. 375. 
Lewis, Ezekiel, 6. 117, 153 : 7. 306. 
Lewis, Israel, disturber of tlie peace, 

9. 202. 
Lewis, James, disturber of the peace, 

9. 202. 
Lewis, John, 8. 143. Disturber of the 

peace, 9. 202. 
Lewis, Lieut. Joseph, 1780, 4. 176. 
Lewis, Mary, see Gibson, Mrs. 
Lewis, Paul, 6. 276. 
Lewis, Thomas, Saco, i. 267. 
Lewis, William, captain of military, 1675, 

8. 170. 

Lewisse, John, mariner. 8. 386. 
Lexington, weather at the time of the 
battle of, 2. 330. Mentioned, 6. 135 ; 

7. 287. Attack of Gen. Gage's array 
at, 10. 284. 

Libanius, i. 154. 

Libbey, Jeremiah, 2. 90, 113, 115, 221, 
223, 225, 235, 240, 241, 243, 246, 248, 
277, 284, 333, 334. 340, 343, 344, 347, 
349, 356, 358, 414, 415, 440, 442, 444, 
460, 482 ; 3. 197, 200, 217, 291, 298. 

Libel stuck up on doors of New South 
Church, 7. 116, 117. 

Libels of David's Psalms, 6. 294. 

Liberty, sloop, destruction of, 9. 359, 
359 7>. 

Library, destruction of Mather's, by fire, 
5. 28'. 

License, for tavern, 6. 55*. To work 
ship on Lord's Day, 6. 268. 

Lichmore, Mr., 6. 246. 



OB^ THE .MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



427 



LiilJal, Kathcrine, 5. 303. 

I.idget, Anne, daiKjUter of Charles, 7. 225. 

Liilget, C'll. Charles, son of Peter, 5. 13, 

145, 184. 18(5, 190, 194, '201, 213, 234, 

481 ; 7. 224. 
Liilget, Mrs. Charles (Mary), death of, 

7. 224, 225. 
LiJget, Cliarlcs, Jr., 7. 225. 
Lldget, Peter, death of, 1(570, 5. 12, 99, 

145, 150, 151, 174, 175, 185; 7. 224. 
Lieutenant, nf the Watcli, 5. 54, 55. Of 

Artillery Company, 6. 120*. 
Lieutenant-Governor, of New Hampshire, 

6. 31; 7. 378. Of Guernsey, 6. 08*. 

Of Isle of AVight. 6. 08* 214. Of New 

York. 6. 100*. Of Antigua, 7. 252. 
Light Drngoons, concerning the forage 

for, 10. 151. 
Lightfoot, CapL, Antigua, 8. 401. 
LiglUfoot, Mr., linen-draper, 9. 309. 
Light Horse corps, 10. 1!'0. 
Lighthouse, the, 7. 98, 103, 240. 
Lightning, a tree struck by, at Stratford, 

8. 95. (^attle killed by, at Gravesend, 
8. 95. House at Wenham struck by, 8. 
390. 

Lignum-vitje, 5. 110. Concerning some, 
brought from Antigua, 8. 401. 

Lillie, Samuel, 6. 23, 102, 103. His peti- 
tion, 7. 100, 161. 

Lillie, Mrs. Samuel (Meliitable), 6. 23, 
362; 7. 149, 160. 

Lily, Mr., messenger, 8. 495. 

Lima, earthquake at, 5. 211. 

Liman, Deacon, 7. 241. 

Limerick, Lord, 6. 437. His land, 7. 334. 

Limerick, Ireland, 5. 452. 

Limestone in ^lassachusetts, 5. 458. 

Limmington, Eng., 5. 299. 

Lincoln, (Jen. Benjamin, 2. 20, 448, 456, 
457, 400, 472, 480 ; 3. 134, 320, .348 ; 
4. 18, 19, 30, 37, 192, 200, 231, 240, 254, 
281. 

Lincoln, Hon. Levi, 3. 377, 403 n. His 
brief in the case of Jennison vs. Cald- 
well, 3. 438-442. 

Lincoln, Bishop of, 5. .303; 6. 136. 

Lincoln, Capt. Hufus, 4. 191. 

Lincoln, Eng., 5. 49, 303. 

Lincoln's Inn, Eng., 6. 1.59. 

Lincorn, Mercy, 5. 159. 

Lindal, Mrs., dawihter of Capt. Corivin, 
death of, 1700. 6. 161. 

Un(\a.\\,.]nd()e Timothy, 6. 295; 7. 162, 
164, 242, ■ 2.55, 258. Burning of his 
warehouse, 8. 530. 

Lindall, Mrs. Timothy (Jane), daughter of 
John Pole, death of, 6. 295. 

Lindall Street, 6. 113, 232. 

Luidon, .James, memher of the u-atch, 5. 5;3. 
At council of churches, 5. .352. 

Lindsey. , mariner, 6. 92, 128. 

Linn, Rev. William. D.D., 3. 121, 120, 
129. 

Linne' (Linnaeus), Carl von, 2. 143. 



Linte, Goodman, i. 131. 

Lion, John, 5. 478, 488 ; 6. 77, 322. 

Lion, killed, 6. 10*. Mentioned, 7. .381. 

Lippincott, Capt. Kichard, 4. I'l")'.!, 271. 

Lisbon, Spaiti, 6. 15(5, 190; 7. I'J!), 217. 

Lisle, Ladii Alicia, ((-//e of Lord John, 5. 
71, 104, iOO; 6. 8*. 

Lisle, Bridget, 5. 104 ; 7. 195. 

Lisle, Lord John, 5. 104 ; 7. 195. 

Litchfield, CWh., 4. 123, 125 ; 10. 230. 

Lithgow, Major William, 4. 91. 

Littei, , Fellow of Emanuel College, 5. 

259, 200. 

Little, Dr., 7. .353. 

Little, Goodman, 5. 7. 

Little, Rev. Mr., Ph/mouth, 5. 472, 503; 6. 9, 
183, 276, 277, 305, 340, 341 ; 7. 44, 128, 
129, 183. 219. 

Little, Rer. Daniel, Wells, 1780,2. 70. 80, 
81, 380, 388 n., 395, 397, 399, 400 ; 3. 171, 
176, 185. 

Little, Ephraim, 7. 45. 

Little, George 4. 342. 

Little, Mrs. Hannah, 6. 276 ; 7. 44, 45, 352. 

Little, Isaac, 5. 386. 

Little Compton, R. L, 5. 370 ; 6. 342 ; 7. 
10.3. 

Little Farm, the, 5. 9. 

Little Park, 5. 149. 

' Little picture,' the, of Gov. John Win- 
throp, 8. 500. 

Littleton, Lord, 9. 437. 

Littleton, Mass., 7. 54, 226. 

Lively, ship, 5. 278. 

Livermore, Samuel, 2. 434, 4-35. 

Liverpool, Eng., 5. 2, 246, 374. 

Livingston, CoL, 1099, 6. 3. 

Livingston, Gov., granted a protection in 
New York, 10. 52. Concerning cloth- 
ing for the army, 10. 43. Concerning 
Gov. Franklin, 10. 52. 

Livingston, Col. James, in Continental 
army, 1780,4. 10(>, 184-180. 

Livingston, Major John, at Quebec, 1711, 
6. 328, 369. 

Livingston, Rev. John II., D.D., 3. 129. 

Livingston, Kobcrt, letter of Fitz-Jolm 
Winthrop to, 8. 305, 380. 

Livingston, Kobert R., 4. 407, 408. 

Livingston, Gen. William, at Elizabeth- 
town, 1770, 4. 8. 

Livingstone (Levingstone), John, letter 
from, I. 20<'.. Notice of, i. 206 n. 

Livy Titus, 4. 430. 

Lloyd, Mr., death of, 1693, 5. 382. 

Lloyd, Janifs, 4. 464. Marries Mrs. Re- 
becca Leverett, 5. 352 ; 7. 2(50. 

Llovd, Madam James (Rebecca), 5. 248, 
271 ; 7. 260, 280. 

Lloyd, Rebecca, daughter of Madam Re- 
becca, 7. 260. 202. 

Lloyd, Dr. James, 5. 00, 65. 

Lloyd, Nathaniel, 5. x.xxviii. 

Lloyd's Neck, proposed attack on, 4. 
117. 



428 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Loan, proceedings in negotiating a, in 

Holland, 4. 426. 
Loan Otfice, concerning the opening of a, 

in Connecticut, 10. 34, 40. 
Lobb, Kichard, 5. 270. 
Lock, Mr., death of, from a riot, 5. 198. 
Lock, Mr., Ewjiand, 5. 299; 8. 46, 50. 
Locke, John, concerning a constitution 

for Carolina, 5. 402. 
Lockyer, , his monument in England, 

5. 253. 

Lockyer, Rev. Mr., 6. 100. 

Lodowick, Capt., 5. 318, 391. 

London, Mr., 8. 543. 

London, Bishop of, 5. 141, 431 ; 6. 58, 
338. 

London, Eng., plague in, i. 225. Men- 
tioned, 5. xiii, xxi, 19, 20, 34, 42, 45, 48. 
61, 69-71, 85, 90, 91, 93, 98, 99, 104, 
105, 118, 119, 131, 133, 148, 149, 154, 
156, 160, 168, 175, 192, 199, 200, 202, 
209, 213, 229, 231, 241-243, 250-252, 

255, 258, 261, 262, 271, 272, 277, 289, 
292-294, 296, 301, 304, 305, 307, 308, 
336, 375, 391, 403, 404, 429, 499, 503; 

6. 19* 24*, 29*, 47«, 50*, 52* 55* 65*, 
81* 88*, 89*, 9.3* 97* 101* 106*, 109* 
110*, 112*, 117* 118*, 120*, 128*, 6, 
35, 52, 70, 99, 101, 113, 123, 142, 156, 
159, 170, 196-198, 203, 234, 254, 262, 
267,273, 306, 342, 400, 408, 410, 412; 

7. 4, 34, 77, 85, 95, 103, 105, 107, 111, 
114, 120, 126, 151, 182, 210, 224, 225, 

256, 287, 288, 312, 325, 358, 381. The 
great fire in, 8. 115. Remonstrance of, 
concerning rights of Parliament, 9. 426 ; 
crfncerning the right of, to the soil, 9. 
478. 

London ' Daily Advertiser,' 7. 53. 

London ' Flying Post,' 7. 84. 

London ' Gazette,' 7. 42. 

London ' Genealogist,' 7. 151. 

Long, Capt., t'liarleslown, 7. 163. 

Long, Mr., alderman of Bristol, Eng., i. 
306. 

Long, Mr., Boston, 8. 226. 

Long, Mrs., Cliarlestown, death of, 5. 
179. 

Long, Mary, loife of Samuel Bradstreet, 
death of,'7. 356. 

Long, Zechariah, 5. 16. 

Long Island, i. 93 n., 100, 100 v., 157,245, 
249, 261,262, 319.334, 368, 369 n.,371 n., 
386, 495 ; 5. 118, 379 ; 6. 314, 440 ; 10. 3 
Origin of, 2. 25. Description of parts 
of, 2. 251-2-53. Attack on the refugee 
post on, 4. 227. Arrival at, of Col. 
Nicolls, 8. 90, 92. Sickness at, 8. 51. 
Concerning the English colonies on, 8. 
151. Molestation of English planters 
on, 8. 156, 158. Loyalty of the Eng- 
lish planters on, 8. 164. Trouble with 
the Dutch on, 8. 274, 277. Mentioned, 
9. 7 71., 49. Piracies committed on, 10. 
144, 150. 



Long Meadow, 5. 483 ; 7. 101, .358. 

Long Wharf, 5. xxxvii ; 6. 440; 7. 38, 
110, 187, 199, 381. 

Longchamps, Charles Julien de, 2. 384. 

Long-Ditton, Eng., 6. 233. 

Longfellow, Ann, 5. xx. 

Longfellow, Mrs. Anne, 5. xx, 143, 343. 

Longfellow, Elizabeth, 5. xx. 

Longfellow, Nathan, 5. xx ; 7. 186, 355. 

Longfellow, Stephen, 5. xx. 

Longfellow, William. 5. xx. 114, 157,335, 
385, 412, 448; 6. 17*; 7.230. 

Longitude at sea, concerning an instru- 
ment for finding, 8. 135. 

Longman, Thomas. 2. 166, 181, 204, 21.5, 
218, 228. 235, 2.36, 206, 272, 273, 275, 
277, 284. 286, 292. 303. 333, .340, 343, 
346, 356, 374, 383, 401, 410; 3. 116, 
197. Letter from, to Dr. Belknap. 2. 
264, 265. Mr. Hazard writes to him 
respecting an English edition of Bel- 
knap's New Hampshire, 2. 402, 403, 

Lopez, , 7. 340. 

Lopez, D., 5. 231. * 

Lord, Capt., 5. 69, 70. ■ 

Lord, Mr., Carolina, i. 447. , 

Lord, Mrs.. 7. 18, 53, 264. | 

Lord, Benjamin, Beriricl; 2. 54. 

Lord, Capt. Richai;d. concerning wam- 
pum, 9. 56. A Narragansett proprie- 
tor, 9. 98, 111. 

Lord, Richard. ./?•.. letter signed by, 9. 31. 

Lord Chancellor of England, 8. 76. Sen- 
timents towards America, 9. .398, 300. 

Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 5. 204 ; 6 43. 

Lord Chief Justice of England, 5. 104. 

Lord High Treasurer, 6. 41*, 79* 3-39; 7. 
106. 

Lord Mavor of London, 5. 71, 192, 267, 
301, 403. Committed to the Tower, 9. 
480. 

Lords Justices, instructions of, concern- 
ing naval officers, 8. .363. Of England, 
order concerning certain pirates, 8. 
376. 

Lords of Trade, etc., 8. 349. Act of, 
concerning pirates, 8. 367. 

Loree, Rev. Mr., 5. 188. 

Corie, Mr., 5. 217, 227. 

Lorin, Mr., 6. 391. 

Loring, Mr., conunissari/ of prisoners in 
War of Revolution, 10. o'J!,, 74. 

Loring, Daniel, 7. 206. I 

Loring, Daniel, Jr., 7. 208. ■ 

Loring, Isaac, 6. 6'J ; 7. 208. 

Lorina, John, 7. 256. 

Loring, Nathaniel, 7. 208. 

Loring, Priscilla, 7. 20a. 

Lossberg, Gen. Baron von, 4. 269. Regi- 
ment of, 4. 33. 

Lothrop, Barnabas, 5. 361, 378, 406, 420, 
454 ; 6. 134, 166, 375, 414. 

Lothrop, Major, 7. 353. 

Lothrop, Isaac, 7. 128. 

Lothrop, Mrs. Mehitable, 6. 183. 437. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORTCAL SOCIETY. 



420 



Lothrop, Dr. S. K.. ' Eistory of Brattle 
Street Cluircli.' bv, 6. 3. j 

Lothrop, L\ipt. Tlioinas, 6. 432, 435, 438; j 
7- 100, 126. 

Lott.i, Mrs , 7. 294. 

Lotteries, raije for, in New England, 3. 
217.248,251. ; 

Loudon, John Campbell, ith Earl, 4 339. | 

Louis XIV. of France, coin of, 2. 93 ; 8. ' 
434. I 

Louis XVL of France, 3. 325, 328; 4. j 
378, 409, 428. 442, 459, 4d2. _ _ | 

Louisa Anne, Pri/icea^, deatli of, 9. 27(5. 

Louisbursi, Gov. Shirley's instructions to 
Sir William Pepperell in the expedi- 
tion asjainst. 2. 120, 124, 12(). Sioije 
of, 2. 126, 127. Capitulation of, 2. 127, 
130, 133. 

Louisburg Square, 5. 74. 

Love, John, 6. 79. 

Love, Ricliie, 7. 39. I 

Love, William, 5. 188, 189. j 

Loveberry, , court-martialled, 1780, 

4. 167. I 

Lovel's Island, 5. 91. | 

Lovelace, Gov. Francis, at Milford, 6. ; 
238, 243; 8. 148, 149. Gone to Mary- i 
land, concerning Indians, 8. 143. At j 
New York, 8. 14S-151, 1-53. Letters to 
Jolm Wintlirop, 9.*83, 85, 88, 91. Let- I 
ter from John Winthrop, 9. 89. De- | 
parture for Ensfland, 9. 92. 

Lovell, Isaac, letters from, i. 243, 292. 

Lovell (Lovewell), John, 4. 339. 

Lovell, Thomas, i. 21-3. 

Loves, Mr., Enqland, death of, 5. 265, 
267. 

Lovett, Louisa K., 5. xxxiii. 

Lovewell, C'apf. John, 2. 397; 3. 150; 7. 
3.54. 

Lovewell's Fight, ballad on, 7. 3-54. 

Lovewell's Pond, battle of, 2. 397, 398. 

Lovie, Rev. Mr., 5. 205. 

Low, Anthony, 5. 88. 

Low, Frances, 5. 88. 

Lowden, Lord, i. 121. 

Lowiler, , a pirate, 7. .307. 

Lowdcr. .Mr., BrookUne, 6. 409. 

Lowder, Henry, 6. 180. 

Lowder, .1/rs. Henry (Abigail), 6. 180. 

Lowder, William, 6. 184. 

Lowdcr, Mrs. William (Lydia), 6. 184. 

Lowe, the pirate, 7. .'307. 

Lowe, Emmanuel, 5. 403. 

Lowel, Gideon, 6. 189. 

Lowell, Ebenczer, 5. 207. 

Lowell, Mrs. Elizabeth, 5 207. 

Lowell, John, LL.D., 3. 283, 294, 370, 
403. 

Lowell, John, 5. 65. 

Lower House, the, 6. 11.5* 131*. 

Lowndes, William Thomas, his ' Biblio- 
graphers' Manual ' cited, 2. 219 n. 

Lowton, Jacol), 7. 19R. 

Lowton, James, 7. 196. 



Loyalt}' of the American colonists at the 

beginning of the Kevolution, 2. 121, 

124. 
Luas, Mr., Bristol, 7. 193. 
Lubenham, /uu/., 5. 252. 
Lucar, Mark, i. 94. 
Lucas, Rev. Mr., 7. 260. 
Luce, Capt. Abijali, 2. 292, 295. 
' Lucius,' pseudo)ii/m, 2. 203. 
Ludlow. George, letter from, i. 250. No- 
tice of, I. 250 n. 
Ludlow, Roger, i. 217, 248, 250 «., 2G1, 

0G.3, 387; 8. 27. Letter from, i. 260. 

Notice of, I. 260?!. 
Lue, Martha, 6. 210. 
Lueyes, Jacob, a merchant in London, 8. 

262. 
Luff kin, Nathaniel, letter from, i. 286. 
Luke, Capt., British prisoner, his exchange 

as prisoner of war, 10. 45. Concern- 
ing his exchange, 10. 47, 49. 
Lumbard, Jonathan, 6. 432. 
Lumber, a medium of exchange in New 

Hampshire, 2. 222, 225. 
Lummacke, Father, 5. 6. 
Lunt, Daniel, 5. 191, 343. 
Lunt, Major Ezra, 4. 239. 
Luscombe, Mrs., daughter of Madam Kel- 

lond, 5. 144, 167. 
Luscombe, Major Hnmphrv, 5. 99, 121, 

12.5, 138, 168, 190, 213. 
Lusher, Eleazcr, letter of, i. 417. 

Luther, , innkeeper, 6. 116. 

Luther, Martin, 7. 323. 

Luttrell, Col., election to Parliament, 9. 

.143. Effect of his introduction into 

House of Commons, 9. 362. 
Luxemburg, Gen. and Duke, 5. 401, 403. 
Luxford, Mrs., death of, 5. 348. 
Lu.vford, James, i. 24, 25, 304, .30.5, 311. 

Letters of, i. 127-148. Sentences of, 

I. 127 n., 139 ?i. 
Luzerne, Anne Ce'sar de la, 4. 122, 1C6, 

337, 338, 388, 430. 
Lvcurgus, 4. 32-5, 377. 
l/vdo. Madam or Mrs., 6. 139, 233, 235, 

357. 
Lvde, Byfield, 6. 2.33 ; 7. 3-37. 
l/vde, Judqe Edward, 5. 202 ; 6. 23.3, 331, 

■395 ; 7. 73, 75, 284. Death of, 7. 337. 
Lyde, Ii^dward, Sen., 7. 337. 
Lvde, Mrs. Judge Edward ^^ (Catherine), 

'7. 3.37. 
Lyde, Mrs. Judge Edward 2 (Deborah), 

7. 3.37. 
Lyde, Afrs. Judge Edward 1 (Susanna), 

'7. 337. 
Lvde, James, 5. 4.36. 
Lvde, Mrs. Mary, 6. 331. 
Lvman, Major Daniel, 4. 206. 
l/vman. Gen. Phineas, 9. 333, 3-33 n., 391. 

Interested in settlement of Illinois 

country, 9. 490. 
r.yme. Conn, 7. 21, .322. 
Lynch, Thomns, 4. 296. 



430 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Lynde, Capt., 5. 363, 37L 37G. 

Lyude, Mrs., 5. 409 : 6. 26, 65. 

Lynde, Benjamin. 6. 350, 357, 358, 375, 
395, 418, 425, 430; 7. 20, 21, 25, 29, 35, 
38, 40, 44, 47, 50. 55-57, 67, 72, 73, 75, 
76, 81, 100, 102, 109, 110, 115, 130, 131, 
163, 181, 186, 191, 211, 212, 220, 221, 
235, 242, 249, 252, 261, 313, 319, 338, 
353, 358, 359, 362, 366, 376. 

Lynde, Benjamin, Jr., 6. 358 ; 7 366. 

Lynde, Diaries of Benjamin and Benja- 
min, Jr., by Dr. F. E. Oliver, 7. 366. 

Lynde, Hannah, 7. 191. 

Lynde, Joseph, 5. 427, 454, 488, 507 ; 6. 
5, 40, 47, 78, 79, 124, 134, 188, 190, 202, 
209, 224, 255, 278, 283, 306, 326. 328, 
357, 409 ; 7. 35-37, 46, 50, 59, 67, 74, 
109, 121, 136, 148, 163, 179, 216, 252, 
348, 381. 

Lynde, Mrs. Joseph (Emma), 6. 88 ; 7. 
136. 

Lynde, Mary, 7. 204. 

Lynde, Justice S., 5. 195, 196 ; 6. 130, 179, 
395, 396, 399, 417, 418, 425, 430 ; 7. 1, 2. 

Lynde, Samuel, 5. 64, 358 ; 6. 8, 286, 304, 
305, 307, 310, 349; 7. 28, 113, 166, 173, 
179, 292. A Narragansett proprietor, 
9. 08, 111. 

Lynde (Lines), Simon, Boston, 5. 60, 195, 
196 ; 8. 36, 161. Death of, 8. 480. Signs 
conmiission, 9. 163. 

Lvnde, Tliomas, 7. 136. 

Lynde, Mrs. Thomas (Mary), 7. 136. 

Lyndon, , house burned at Salem, 5. 

481. 

Lyndsey's Inn, 6. 412. 

Lyrai. il/a.ss., i. 153 n., 327 »., 828. 347 w. ; 
5. 7. 118, 135, 177, 352, 456, 459 ; 6. 14*, 
42, 48, 26.3, 282, 356, 414 ; 7. 63, 94, 96, 
97, 121, 141, 224, 288. Petition of, i. 
488. Lewis's ' History of,' 5. 177. 

Lynnfield, 7. 194. 

Lyon, Capt., in Gen. Huntington's regi- 
ment, 1776, g. 497. 

Lyon, Richard, 7. 16. 

Lytherland, AVilliam, 6. 25. 



M. 



Mably, Ahb^ Gabriel Bonnet, 2. 483. 
Macaulay, Airs. Catherine, 4. 327, 356, 

399. 
Maccarta, Thadeus, 5. 121, 226, 357, 396, 

438,469,495; 6.94; 7. 251. 
Maccarty, Mrs., 6. 150. 
Maccarty, ^frs. Ruth. 7. 169. 
MacDaniel, E.. 7. 307. 
]\Iacdonnel, Alice, 6. 50. 
Macgregor, Mr., 7. 191. 
Macliarta, Hfrs., 5. 33, 357. 

Macharty, , imirinrr, 8 514. 

Machias Centennial, 5. xl. 



Machin, Capt. Thomas, 4. 185. 
Mackentosh, Judqe Henry. Bristol, 6. 64, 

82, 139. 264, 270, 288, 322, 396, 397 ; 

7. 19, 56, 102, 103, 227, 261. 
Mackintosh, Peter, 4. 404. 
Macquerry, Archibald, 6. 53. 
Madagascar, 6 4. 

Madeira, 5. 132, 401, 403 ; 6. 56 ; 8. 41. 
Madison, Pres. James, 3. 274 ; 4. 333, 

437, 438. 
Madison, Rev. James, D.D., Bishop of Vlr 

glnia, 3. 410., 
Madras, 5. 498. 
Ma : ga : nott, Indian counsellor, signs deed 

9. 74. 
Magaw, Col. Robert, 4. 15, 17, 23. 
Magaw, Rev. Samuel, D.D., 3. 257, 258 

261. 
Magazine Street, Camhridgeport, 6. 133. 
Magazines, to be removed from the sea- 
coast, 4. 51. Providing, 6. 73*. 
Magee, Capt. James, 2. 473, 476, 483, 485 

486. 
Magga.te, Mr., mentioned, 9. 8. 
Magimkaquog (Hopkinton), 6. 425; 7 

60, 62. 
Magimkaquog A^olume, 6. 425, 426 ; 7. 1 

19. 24. 
Magistrates of Connecticut, letter of 

John Winthrop, Jr., to, 8. SO. 
Magna Charta, 6. 67*, 85*. 
' Magnalia, The,' maqazlne, 5. 203. 
• Magnetic Bucket,' the, 2. 404, 408. 
Magramt, witness to deed, 9. 76. 
Maidenhead, Eng., 5. 301. 
Maidstone, John, letter from, i. 190. 

Notice of, I. 190 n. ; 8. 51. 
Maine, State of, 5. xxi, 38, 85. 174, 188, 

403, 426. Province of, 6. 144 ; 7. 69, 

187, 211. Wonderful removal of a hill 

near Kennebunk River, 8. 138. 
Maio, Daniel, 5. 208. 
Major, Mr., i. 445. 
Major of the Watch, 5. 55. 
Makepeace, Solomon, sergeant in army 

at Roxbunj Camp, 9. 507. 
Maker Church, Cornwall, Eng., 5. 275, 276. 
Malcom, Col., in command at West Point, 

1777, 10 126. 
Maiden, 5. 130, 131, 222, 223, 347, 352, 

436, 449 ; 6. 20*-23*, 81, 100, 133, 272, 

.354; 7. 190,216,339,356. 
Maiden Street, Boston, 6. 309. 
Malford, Eng., 7. 79. 
Malignant fever, 5. 146. 
Malionipe, Indian, 5. 22. 
Mall, Thomas, letter of, i. 403. 

Mallestone, , a fencing-master, 7. 88. 

Mallet, Paul Henry, 3. 411. 
Mallet, Thomas, 5. 501. 
Mallin, Mr., i. 156. 
Malplaquet, battle of, 6. 269. 
Malt House, 6. 242, 7. 176. 
Maltby (^Slalbye), John, 8. 115. 
Malyne, Jacob, 5. 374. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



431 



Manianowiint, 9. 142. 

Mamoro, 6. ■>;'.•. 

Alaii-of-war, 6. IDO, 317, 321, 355. 

Manchester, Duke of, resigns, 9. 408. 
Mentioned, 9. 465. 

Manchester, Earl of, I. 353, 354, 394, 482. 

Manchester, Km]., 5. 47 ; 7. 50. 

Manchester Company, 6. 104. 

Manco Capac, Inca of Peru, 2. 11, 141, 1G8. 

Man-gowanmett, relative of Uncas, 9. 
103. 

Manhattan (Manhados), surrenders to 
Col. NicoUs, 8. !)0, <J2. Landing of 
Dutch fleet at, 8. 150. Letter concern- 
ing action of Dutch forces at, toward 
the poor people, 9. 93. Letter of 
Gov. Colve, concerning the subjuga- 
tion of the people at, 9. 9.5. 

Manifesto Church, tlie Brattle Street 
Church. BoMon, 6. .'l 48. 

Manly, William, 6. 300 ; 7. 155, 161, 243, 
266. 

Manly, Mrs., 7. IGl. 

Manly, Commodore John, 4. 63. 

Mann, Mrs., 5. 220, 349; 7. 282. 

Mann, Abigail, 7. 208. 

Mann, Deborah, daughter of Mrs. Deborah, 
7. 208. 

Mann, Hannah, 7. 67. 

Mann, John, 7. 208, 281. 

Mann, Nathaniel, master of the ' Fidelity' 
5. 68, 120 ; 7. 208. 

Mann, Mrs. Nathaniel (Deborah), her 
death and will, 7. 208. 

Mann, Rev. Samuel, Wrentham, 5. 35.1, 
459; 6. 83, 278. 31)7 ; 7. 10, 56, 213, 283. 

Mann, William, 6. 8. 

Mannaring, Mr., merchant in England, 8. 
67. 

Manning, Capt., sickness of, 8. 149. 

Manning, Rev. James, D.D , 3. 12. 

Manning, Mary, married William Adams, 
5-6. 

Manning, Mrs. Mary, Boston, 8. 385. 

Mansfield, Lord, mentioned, 9. 222, 320. 
Debate in Parliament, 9. 225. Chan- 
cellor of Exchequer pro tem., 9. 243. 
In Parliament, 9. 3'J9. Concerning the 
seals, 9. 408. 

Mansfield, Rev. Isaac, 2. 446. 

Mansfield, iMoses, 8. 517. 

Mansfield, Walter, i. 501. 

Mansfield, Walter, Jr., i. 501. 

Manshanshowet, 8. 5-57. 

Manton, Dr. T., 5. 236-238, 242. ' Com- 
mentary on St. James,' 5. 238 ; 7. 283. 

Mantua and Savoy, conclusion of peace 
between, 8. 15. 

Manufactures, action in Parliament con- 
cerning, in the Colonies, 9. 2(i5. Peti- 
tions to Parliament concerning, 9. 2'.)1. 
Siiould be encouraged iii the Colonies, 
9. 400. 

Manumit River, 6. 1G6. 

Maple sugar, 3. 181. 



Maplesdcn, Capt., 8. 10, 11. 

Maquaes and Unyades, Indian trilws, 1. 
440 ; 5. 332 ; 6. 5, 261, 262 ; 8. 311. 

Marblehead, Mass., 4. 5 ; 5. 84, 196, 213, 
224, 340, 357, 390, 400, 431, 465, 479 ; 6. 
47*, 50*, 20, 52, 57, 60, 92, 103-105, 205. 
220, 320, 321, 333, 349, 400 ; 7. 23, 37, 
80, 92, 184, 214, 227, 260, 330, 335, 336, 
363. Mr. John Barnard the minister 
at, 6. 400. 

Marbois, Francois de Barbe', 2. 68, 100, 
108, 154; 3. 189; 4. 388, 430. Inter- 
cepted letter from, 4. 414, 429. 

Marcasite, found to contain copper, 8. 91. 

March, Col., 5. 413. Commanded fort at 
Casco Bay, 6. 72*, 83, 189. 

March, George, 5. 413. 

March, Hugh, 5. 413. 

March, Judith, 5. 11. 

Marcou, Mrs. Jane (Belknap), her ' Life 
of Dr. Belknap ' cited, 2. 184 n., 412 n., 
420 r,., 428/1.; 3. 115 «. 

Marcus Antonius (Deane Winthrop), 8. 
428, 444. 

Marcy, Mrs., 5. 239. 

Mare'chausse'e, the, militani tune, 4. 172, 
188. 

Maria, Indian, 6. 308. 

Maria Theresa of Austria, 4. 440. 

Maria, ship, 3. 251. 

Marice, , S. SewaU's landlord, 5. 6; 

7. 249. 

Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, 4. 509. 

Marietta, Ohio, settlement of, 2. 493. 

Marion, Gen. Francis, 4. 215. 

Marion, Isaac, 5. 350 ; 6. 182 ; 7. 114. 

Marion, John, 5. 222, 341, 350 ; 6. 130, 137, 
154, 184. 248, 257, 283, 386, 410 ; 7. 30, 
34. 52, 63, 98, 176, 209, 218, 344, 368, 
374. 

Marion, John, Jr., 5. 333, 508. 

Marion, Joseph, 6. 182 ; 7. 58, 113. 

Marion, Mrs. Prudent, 6. 130. 

Marion, Samuel, 5. 2(l8; 7. 379. 

Marion, Sarah, 6. 185. 

Mariot, .Mr., Brookline, 5. 318. 

Mark of gold worth .33s. Ad., 5. 202. 

Mark of silver worth 13.9. 4rf.. 5. 202. 

Markham. Ensign, dismissed from regi- 
ment, 1775, 9. 506. 

Markoe, I'eter, 4 46 1. 

Marli)orough, Ihirhess of, 6. 214. 

Marlborough, fhike of, 6 89* 213, 214, 
269; 7. 19, l-'6. To be decorated, 9. 
251. 

Marlboron-h, Ma.<;s., 5. 12, 95, 194, 227, 
352,482, 4«4; 6.406; 7. 197. 

Marlborough Street, 6. 114 ; 7. 208. 

Marollcs, Louis de, a persecuted Huguenot, 
6. 391. 

Marooumpum, witness to deeil, 9. 110. 

Marquis de la Fayette, a store-ship, 4. 
243. 

Marrant, Rev. John, 3. 166, 190. 196. 

Marrett, , (Jharlestown, 7. 224. 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Marrett, Rev. John, 5. xxxi. 

Marrett, Mrs. Reo. John (Martha), 5. 
xxxi. 

Marriage, prohibited times for, i. 462. 
Sewall's, 5. xiv, IL Of first cousins, 
5. 96, 424. Witli wife's sister or niece, 

5. 407; 6. 305, 306. Anniversary of 
Samuel Sewall, 6. 302; 7. 74. Be- 
tween wliites and negroes or Indians, 

6. 143. Of Mary Sewall, 6. 263. 
Marriage Bill, 7. 112. 

Marriage Point, i. 249. Mentioned, 9. 

1 n., 2. 
Marry, law for justices and ministers to, 

5. 368. 

Marseilles, France, 6. 202. 
Marsh, Mr., death of, 1725, 7. 372. 
Marsh, Col, defended Port Eoyal, 1710. 

6. 260. 

Marsli, Rev. Mr., Braintree, 6. 286, 379, 

887 ; 7. 125. 
Marsh, James R., 5. 315. 
Marsh, Joseph, 7. 172. 
Marsh, Mary, 7. 88. 
Marsh, Capt. Samuel, taken prisoner by 

the enemy, 1778, 10. 225. 
Marslial, Capt., Salem, 5. 71, \4?>, 224. 
Marshal, John, 5. 452; 6. 113; 7. 224, 

225. 
Marslial, the, of New London, 8. 605. 

Marshall, , wife of, drowned, 8. 33. 

Marshall, Capt., killed in Narragansett 

fight, 9. 97. 
Marshall, Capt. Elihu, 4. 185. 
Marshall, Capt. Samuel, 8. 271. 
Marshall, James, 5. 74. 
Marshall, Chief Justice John, his ' Life of 

Washington,' 4. 506. 
Marshall, Samuel, 5. 125, 234, 324; 6. 11, 

27.5. 
Marshall, Thomas, 6. 114 ; 7. 224. 
Marshfield, Mass.. i. 387 n., 389 ; 6. 9, 99, 

130, 216, 218, 223, 403 ; 7. 37, 75, 200, 

201. 
Marshpee, 6. 166. 

Marston, , master of sloop, 6. 104. 

Marston, Deacon, 6. 3li. 

Marston vs. Brown, 6. 367. 

Marston, B., 6. GO, 208. 

Marston, Natiianiel, 7. 25. 

Martha's Vinevard, 2. 253 : 5. 26, 29, 368; 

6. 166, 191, ;^63, 364, 401, 425-427, 434, 

439, 440; 7. 22, 23, 52, 181, 266, 334. 

Conversion of the Indians at, 8. 84. 
Martha's Vineyard Sound, 6. 194. 
Martin, Commodore, his offence with Mr. 

Pemberton, 6. 292, 293, 295. 
Martin, Mr., mariner, 8. 167. 
Martin, Gov. Alexander, 4. 3.32. His 

action concerning North Carolina, 10. 

12. 
Martin, Alice, 6. 170. 
Martin, John, 6. 170. 
Martin, L. P., 5. xxxi. 
Martin, Thomas, 8. 388. 



Martin, William, 3. 279, 285, 289. 
Martindell, Mr., Emjland, 8. 326. 
Martingale, Mr., concerning certain 

boundary, 9. 200. 
Martinique, the French from, invade the 

island of Antigua, 6. 83, 306 ; 8. 255- 

258. 
Marty n, Mr., assessor, 6. 303. 
Martyn, Capt. Edward, 6. 297; 7. 34, 165, 

168. Will of, 7. 16-5, 169. 
Martyn, Mrs. Capt. Edward (Sarah), 7. 

165, 169. 
Martyn, Michael, 7. 165. 
Martyn, Richard, 7. 105. 
Martyr, Prof. Peter, 7. 178. 
Martyrdoni'of King Charles I., 5. 201. 
Mary, Princess, 1. 122 n. 
JNIary, armed sloop, 5. 309, 357. 
Maryland, 5. b9, 134, 175, 317, 325. 

Terms on which she acceded to the 

Confederation, 2. 117. Furnishes pro- 
visions for the army, 10. 153. A call 

on, for militia, 10. 169. 
Maryland Indians, 7. 10. 
Maryland Point, 7. 53. 
Marvon, John, Jr., 5. 417, 474; 6, 8. 
Maryon, John, Sen., 5. 112, 358, 374, 384, 

417, 474; 6. 1, 29, 316, 409; 7. 59, 99, 

283. 
Masham, Mrs. Abigail, 6. 313. 
Mashpan, Mass., 6. 438. 
Mason, Capt., vindication of, 6. 97*. 
Mason, Col., 5. 197. 
Mason, Dr., 3. 376 ; 5. 37. 
Mason, Mr., England, 8. 489. 
Mason, Arthur,"5. 54, 72 ; 6. 96, 219, 357, 

384 ; 7. 10 ; 8. 43. 
Mason, Daniel, witness to deed, 9. 80. 
Mason, Capt. David, 5. 498, 502; 6. 142, 

196 ; 7. 331, 343 ; 8. 540. Will of, 7. 

343. Arrival from London, 8. 553, 

566, 570, 571. 
Mason, Elizabeth, i. 195. 
Mason, Jacob, 5. 397. 
Mason, Joanna, married Robert Breck, 

6. 1,-19. 
Mason, Mrs. Johanna, death of, 6. 120, 

121. 
Mason, John, 5. 349. 
Mason, Ca}it. John, Norwich, wounded in 

Narragansett fight, 9. 97. 
Mason, Capt. John, Deputij-Governor of 

Connecticut, I. 245 n., 263, '415 n.; 8. 77; 

9. 48. Letter of John Winthrop, Jr., 

to, concerning patent for New liaven, 

8. 77. Confirmation of deeds between 

Uncas and, 9. 79. 
Mason, Co/>^. John, Governor of Newfound- 
land, I. 209 n., 325 »., 435; 2. 98, 128. 

His patent, 2. Ill, 112. 
Mason, Col. John Tufton, 2. 116, 118. 
Mason, Lieut. John, 8. 279, 402, 
Mason, Jonathan, 5. 65. 
Mason, Joseph, 5. 357. 
Mason, Mary, 7. 105. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



483 



Mason, Robert, 2. 3, 13, 98, 250. Ap- 
pointed councillor, 9. 14(5. 

Mason, Samuel, 5. 53, 102 ; 8. 343, 515. 
("onunissioner of Connecticut, 9. 1!'8. 
Mentioned, 9. '204. Order to, concern- 
ing tax-gatherers, 9. 205. Concerning 
land grant on the Oliio, 9. 221. Ke- 
turn home relative to the Mohegan af- 
fair, 9. 320. Misrepresentations con- 
cerning the Mohegan case, 9. 367. His 
action in the Mohegan case, connnent- 
ed on by Mr. Johnson, 9. 809-372. 

Mason, Stephen, 5 254, 284, 280; 7. 63; 
8. 503, 508, 511, 513. 

Mason, Stephens Thompson, 4. 464. 

' Mason Catechism,' 2. 4tJ7. 

Masonic Lodge, colored, in Boston, 3. 383. 

Mass, Capt., 5. 108. 

Massachusee Psalter, 6. 290. 

Massachusetts, i. 107 »., 416, 445, 487, 
505. 507, 508; 5. 79, 84, 87, 405, 174, 
183, 236, 291, 317, 404, 458, 462; 6. 
124*, 125*, 130* 45, 78, 132, 189, 265, 
392 ; 7. 109, 204, 235, 307, 309, 347, 350. 
Letters to the Governor and Assistants, 
I. 2G0, 480. Cotton on the preface to 
the Laws of, i. 358. Letter to the Gov- 
ernor or 13eput\'-Governor, i. 360. 
Churches in, i. 384;;. General Court 
of, I. 417. Declaration of the Gov- 
ernor, Deputy-Governor, and Assist- 
ants, I. 494. Objections against the 
Laws of, I. 502. Opinion of the Soli- 
citor-General upon the patent of, i. 
503. Answer of, to the claim of Ma- 
son and Gorges, 2. 128, 131. Act of, 
against witchcraft, 1092, 2. 209, 210. 
Boundary witii New Hampshire, 2. 
242. Slavery in, 3. 2. Convention 
in, to ratify the federal Constitution, 

3. 5-10, 13-17. Political status of ne- 
groes in, 3. 11. Petition of the Gen- 
eral Court to Parliament, 1652, 3. 
78, 82. Boundary with Plymouth 
Colony, 3. 323, 320. Letters and doc- 
uments relating to slavery in, 3. 373- 
442. Attem()ts in, to prevent the im- 
portation of slaves, 3. 385, 387, 388. 
Negro petitions for freedom to the 
General Court of, 3. 22, 23, 432-437. 
Gen. Ward to command in, after 
Washington's departure, 4. 4. Route 
of march of troops from, to New. Jersey, 

4. 45. Able to clothe and arm her 
troops, 4. 46. Powder due to, 4. 47. 
Resolve of Congress transmitted to 
President and Council of, 4. 51. Re- 
cruiting in, 4. 52. Number of men still 
expected from, 4. 219. Pay of troops 
of, 4. 294. Proposal to appoint officers 
from other States, 4. 294-296. The 
people of, eager for separation from 
Great Britain, 4. 298, 300. Suspension 
of courts of justice in, 4. .302, 306-rj08. 
Answer of House of lieprescntatives 



55 



of, to Gov. Hutchinson's speech on the 
powers of Parliament, 4. 340, 347. 
Convention to form a Constitution for, 
4. 375. Earl of Bellomont ajipointed 
(Jovernor of, 8. 324. Concerning the 
charter of, 8. 300. Commission consti- 
tuting a President and Council for, 9. 
145. Assembly of, to be dissolved by 
order of Parliament, 9. 291, 294. En- 
listment of tro()i)s in, 10. 51. Con- 
sidered in rebellion against the British 
administration, 10. 283. A call upon 
Connecticut and Rhode Island for 
troops, 10. 311. 'Acts and Resolves 
of,' cited, 2. 210 n. ; 3. 376. ' Archives 
of,' cited, 3. 436 n. 'Records of the 
General Court' cited, 3. 376. ' Massa- 
chusetts Gazette ' cited, 3. 78. ' Judi- 
cial History of ' (Washburn's), 5. 368; 
6. 45. 

Massachusetts Archives, 5. 311, 317, .3.36, 
434,4:19,440; 6. 90, 132,242, 413; 7. 90. 

Massaciiusetts Bay, 5. 79, 182, 288, 434, 
440 ; 6. 44*, 46*, 50*, 52*, 55*, 56«, 82*, 
90* 91* 94* 58 ; 7. 103. Bill concern- 
ing the constitution of, 9. 471. 

Massachusetts books and papers, 5. 168. 

Massachusetts Charter, 5. 254. 

Massachusetts Colony, 6. 99* ; 7. 187 ; 
10. 5. 

Massachusetts Hall (Harvard), 7. 157. 

Massachusetts Historical Society, 2. 247 
n. ; 3. 169 «., 253 n.. 284, 297, 299, 308, 
311,315, 320, 322, 326, 327, 333, 341, 
346, 347, 349, 350, 355, 356, 359, .362- 

305. 369. 376, 383 n., 391 n., 394 n., 
403 n., 411, 416, 422, 424, 426 n., 431. 
' Proceedings ' of, cited, 3. 11 «., 123 n., 
153 «., 231?!., 245 n., 356 n., 370 «., 
397 n., 4:;8 n. ; 4. 289 ; 5. 58, 195, 204, 
315, 470 ; 6. 10, 70, 133, 183. ' Collec- 
tions ' of, 3. 12 n., 280 «., 357, 358, 360, 

306, 367, 375-377, 423 n.; 5. 112, 148, 
198, 229,231, 255, 499; 6. 16(3, 208, 438, 
'139; 7. 80, 129, 220. 'Catalogue of 
the Library' cited, 3. 43 n., 320 n. 
Formation of, 3. 231, 233, 245. Pub- 
lication of the early ' C/ollections' of, 
3. 277 n. Library of, 3. 289 h., 411 >i.; 
6. 109, 263; 7. 292, 337. Cabinet of, 5. 
95; 6. 106, 425. Gallery of, 6. 40. 
Mentioned, 6 205; 7. 135, 248, 307, 368. 
Rooms of, 7 307. 

Massachusetts f-ine in the armv, 4. 40, 41, 
45, 40. 50-58, 00, 127, 129. 130, 156, 175, 
177, 178, 180, 195, 219, 2.3(), 252,294- 
290. Officers of, 4. 116. 127. 141-146, 
200. Winter-quarters of, 1780-81, 4. 
172. 

' Massachusetts Magazine,' 3 8.3, 93, 196, 
198, 203. 

Massachusetts Medical Society, 3. 398 n. 

' Massachusetts Spy ' cited, 3. 25 n. 

Massachnsett.s. .<./(//), 6. 48. 

Massacre, 5. 25, 311 ; 6 36*. 



434 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Massacre, Piedmont, 5. 140. 

Massey, Gen. Eyre, 4. 86. 

Massie, , crier of the Court, 5. 175, 183. 

Massinger, Rev. Henrv, 7. 226. 

Mast Heet, 5. 430 ; 6. 110*, 268, 363. 

Mast ships, 6. 196. 

Master, Capt. R., 4. 103 ; 5. 404. 

Master of Catherine Hall, 6. 60. 

Masters, Giles, King's attorney, death of, 
5. 20-5. 

Mather, Madam Anne, 7. 324. 

Mather, Rev. Cotton, 2. 156 ; 3. 62, 67, 
116, 188, 202. Preaches funeral ser- 
mon for S. Sewall's mother, 5. xix. 
Marries Mr. Grove Hirst and Elizabeth 
Sewall, 5. xxxvi ; 6. 24. Letter of S. 
Sewall to, 5. 58. Ordained pastor of 
North Church, 5. 71, 75, 76. Married 
to Mrs. Margaret Phillips, 5. 136. Ac- 
count of his third marriage, 5. 148. 
Preaches election sermon, Charlestown, 
5. 151. Preaches Newburv Lecture, 
5. 177. Child dies, 5. 198. His ' Life 
of Sir William Phips,' 5. 203. His 
account of Increase Mather's escape 
from Boston. 5. 209. At death of Ids 
brother Nathaniel at Salem, 5. 232. 
Visits condemned prisoners, 5. 309. 
At Gov. Bradstreet's treat, 5. 311. 
Sermon vindicating the wearing of 
periwigs, 5. 342. At execution of cer- 
tain persons for witchcraft, 5. 363. 
Has a son born, 5. 376. His quarrel 
with Dr. Elisha Cooke, 5. 379. Prays 
at opening of Council, 5. 380. Death 
of his daughter Maria, 5. 384. Present 
at the departure of Sir William Phipps, 

5. 393. Prays with S. Sewall when 
his house is injured bv hail, 5. 402. 
His bill for a Fast, 5. 4-39. Death of 
his uncle, N. Mather, 5. 465. Preaches 
Mr. Bayley's funeral sermon, 5. 466. 
Preaches at South Meeting-house, 5. 
486. Concerning the conversion of 
negroes, 6. 16. On committee to inves- 
tigate case of Mr. Chiever, of Maiden, 

6. 21*. His participation in the writing 
of the three memorial pamphlets, 6. 29*, 
78*-81*. Preacher of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company, 6. 35. 
Speaks hard words of S. Sewall, 6. 
43. S. Sewall rebukes him, 6. 44. 
Publication of the ' Magnalia,' 6. 70. 
His diary, 6. 70, 217, 390: 7. 341, 
344. His character as depicted by 
Gov. Dudley's partisans, 6. 78*, 80*, 
81*. Abdicates from the Corporation 
of Harvard College, 6. 84. Prays with 
the condemned pirates, 6. 108. Goes 
with them to their execution, 6. 109. 
Bearer for Rev. Mr. Willard, 6. 194. 
Voted on for President of Harvard 
College, 6. 196. Receives a bequest 
from Airs. Bellingham, 6. 198. Con- 
cerning his letter to Sir Charles Hobby 



on ' The Deplorable State of New 
England,' 6. 200, 201, 203, 212. His 
disaffection with Gov. Dudley, 6. 200, 
325. Preaches funeral sermon for 
Fitz-John AVinthrop, 6. 204. Death 
of his son Nathaniel, 6. 269. At wed- 
ding of Samuel Gerrish, 6. 347. At 
Commencement at Harvard College, 
6. 354. Keeps a Fast at Newton, 
6. 364. Dedication at New Court 
Chamber, 6. 381. His son. Increase, 

6. 390. Preaches Mrs. Rock's funeral 
sermon, 6. 400. At ordination of Rev. 
Mr. Stevens, 6. 401, 402. Death of 
his second wife, 6. 407. Concerning 
Mr. Edward Hopkins's legacy, 6. 416. 
At the gathering of the New North 
Church, 7. 22. At Council, 7. 40. Con- 
cerning a public Fast, 7. 43. Married 
to his third wife, 7. 49. Preaches at 
the Fast, 7. 51. Concerning Gov. Dud- 
lej-'s signing a petition for a Bishop, 

7. 62. His connection by marriage 
with S. Sewall, 7. 80. At ordination 
of Mr. Barnard, of Marblehead, 7. 02. 
Death of his daughter Katherine, 7. 
114. Bearer at Mr. Pemberton's fu- 
neral, 7. 121. His marriage of John 
Battersby declared null, 7. 124. At 
ordination of Thomas Foxcroft, 7. 148. 
At ordination at Hingham, 7. 186. At 
ordination of Mr. Thomas Prince, 7. 
198. His daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Byles, 7. 200. At ordination of Thomas 
Walter, 7. 201. At ordination of 
Rev. Samuel Chickley, 7. 218. Con- 
cerning S. Sewall's marriage to Mrs. 
Gibbs, 7. 301. At ordination of Mr. 
Nathan Bassett, 7. 332. Bearer at Pres. 
Leverett's funeral, 7. 336. Letter on 
the nomination of Rev. Joseph Sewall 
for President of Harvard College, 7. 
341. Preaches funeral sermon for Mr. 
Walter, 7. 347. Bearer at Madam 
Bradstreet's funeral, 7. 3-56. Bearer at 
JIadam Cotton's funeral, 7. 378. Death 
of his daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Cooper, 
7. 379. His tract entitled ' Marah,' 7. 
177. His sermons : On the Rainbow, 
6. 328, 332, 333, 339 ; ' Children Walk- 
ing in the Truth,' 6. 344 ; Funeral Ser- 
mon on Mrs. Rock, 6. 400 ; ' Just Com- 
memorations,' 7. 57 ; ' Victorina,' 7. 
116 : on Rev. J. Gerrish, 7. 2-39 ; 'De- 
tur Digniori,'7. 239; ' Undoubted Cer- 
tainties,' 7. 265 ; ' A Call to the Tempt- 
ed,' 7. 331 ; ' Do Thyself no Harm,' 7. 
337 ; of the ' Glory "of Aged Piety,' 7. 
380. His writings : ' Remarkables,' 5. 
28, 209; Papers, 5. 200, 231, 270, 
Book on ' Witchcraft,' 5. 367 ; ' Dead 
Faith,' 5. 465; 'Magnalia,' 6. 70; 
' Church History,' 6. 70 ; 7. 103 ; Tract 
of Religion, 6. 80* ; ' Treatise of Tithes,' 
6. 175; Letters, 6. 200, 201 ; Letter to 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



435 



Gov. Dudley, 6. 212, 213, 291 ; 'Theo- 
polis Americana,' 6. 2(39; 'Case of 
Conscience,' 6. 30(); 'Nehemiah, Essa}- 
on Consolations,' 6 35(5 ; Circular Let- 
ter, 6- 371 ; Treatise on Antinomian- 
ism, 6. 376 ; Speech at Ordination, 6. 
402 ; Disquisition on Councils, 7. 129 ; 
'Jews of Berlin,' 7. 1R4, 325 ; 'Essay 
to do good unto the Widow,' 7. 177 ; 
' Ornaments for Daughters of Sion,' 7. 
228 ; Essay on Divine Providence, 7. 
240; 'India Ciiristiana,' 7. 301; Answer 
to Baxter about the Jews, 7. 306 ; 
' Treatise of the New English Ecclesi- 
astical Discipline,' 7. 327 ; ' Order of 
tlie Gospel,' 7. 327 ; ' Essay on Early 
Piety,' 7. 379. Death of, 7. 390. 

Mather, Mrs. Cotton (Elizabeth), 6. 407. 

Mather, Mrs. Cotton (Lydia), 5. 148; 7. 
49, 105, 164, 189. 

Mather, Mrs. Cotton (Margaret), 5. 136. 

Mather, Eliakim, 5. 58, 78, 83, 85, 110, 
135, 136, 157, 169, Ibl, 199, 215, 222, 
234, 270, 273, 313, 320, 322, 325, 328, 
339, 340, 348. 

Mather, Elizabeth, daughter of Cotton, 6. 
220 ; 7. 379. 

Mather, Rev. Increase, i. 431, 448; 3. 
16:?-155; 7.337. Marries Samuel Ger- 
rish to -Mrs. Sarah Coney, 5. xxxviii ; 6. 
347. His wonderful prediction of the 
burning of his church, 5. 28. Holds a 
fast, 5. 50. Letter from S. Sewall to, 5. 
58. Confirms a deed of land, 5. 59, 60. 
Desires Cotton Mather to be ordained, 
5. 71. Ordains his son Cotton. 5. 76. 
Bearer at funeral of Kev. Thomas 
Shepard, 5. 82. Extract from his 
work, ' Vindication of New England,' 
5. 98. Disapproved of mixed dances, 5. 
104, 122. Concerning the cross on the 
flag, 5. 147 ; 6. 12*. At ordination 
of ^Ir. Morton, Charlestown, 5. 155. 
Lecture against card-playing, etc., 5. 
169. Intends going to England, 5. 197. 
Arrested by order of Randolph, 5. 198. 
Becomes the agent to England for the 
Colonists, 5. 198, 200. His trouble 
with Randolph, 5. 201. Preaches his 
farewell sermon, 5. 206. Mr. Larke's 
unsuccessful attempt to arrest him, 
5. 208, 209. Letters from S. Sewall to 
Idm in England, 5. 22a, 231. S. Sewall 
in England with him, 5. 247, 251, 252, 
301, 307. Goes to Hampton Court 
with S. Sewall, 5. 256. Concerning 
Sir Edmund Andros raising money 
without an Assembly, 5. 266. De- 
livers an obligation of £150 to Mr. 
Stephen Mason, 5. 284 iMoney lent 
him by S. Sewall, 5 288. Concerning 
nomination of Sir William Pliips, 5. 
356. Arrival home from England, 5. 
3(30. Attends a treat at Mr. Cooper's, 
5 96. His remarks on the Rev. Wra. 



Veazie, 5. 430. At ordination of Mr. 
Benjamin Wadsworth, 5. 432. Presi- 
dent of Harvard College, 5. 438. Dis- 
likes the draught for the College Char- 
ter, 5. 441. The falling ovX with Mr. 
WiUard, 5. 464. At funeral of Mr. 
Morton, 5. 477. Fellows of Harvard 
propose sending him to England to 
solicit for a charter, 5. 480. The Har- 
vard Committee request his removal 
from Boston to Cambridge, 5. 487. 
His letter to Hon. William Stoughton 
concerning his removal, 5. 493. At 
ordination of Mr. Gookin, of Cam- 
bridge. 6. 20*. Chosen moderator of 
conmiittee to examine into Mr. Cliie- 
ver's case of Maiden, 6 21*. Concern- 
ing the election of Leverett to Harvard 
College, 6. 29*. At the Fast at Brattle 
Street Church, 6. 2. At ordination of 
Rev. Mr. Pemberton, 6. 22. Remark 
on Capt. Sewall, 6. 45. Exclusion 
from Corporation of Harvard College, 
6. 84. Marries Mr. Hutchinson and 
Mrs. Foster, 6. 91. Prays for the 
malefactors executed, 6. 110. At or- 
dination of Nathaniel Gookin, Cam- 
bridge, 6. 118. Bearer to Mr. WiUard, 
6. 195. Voted on, for President of 
Harvard, 6. 196. A bequest from Mrs. 
Elizabeth Bellingham, 6. 198. Con- 
cerning Cotton Matiier's letters, 6 203. 
Concerning the installation of Presi- 
dent Leveret, 6. 208. A prayer which 
reflects on S. Sewall, 6. 215. 'Attacked 
with gout, 6. 247. His seventieth 
birthday, 6. 257. Preaches Artillery 
sermon, 6. 279. Preaches funeral ser- 
mon for John Foster, 6. 300. With 
the Councillors at South Church, 6. 
312. At burial of Capt. Fayerweather, 

6. 344. Keeps a Fast at Newton, 6. 
364. Mr. Harris's preface against, 6. 
367. His circular letter, 6. 371. Prays 
in the Council, 6. 386. At ordination 
of Mr. Stevens, Charlestown, 6. 401. 
At gathering of New North Church, 

7. 23. Present of an angel from S. 
Sewall, 7. 28, 66. Reads the order 
for a Fast in the Council, 7. 43. 
Bearer to Mr. Bridge, 7. 60. Prays 
at the first as*''mbly at the New Srmth 
Church, 7. JI'l. Bearer to Mr. Pem- 
berton, 7. 121. At ordination of Mr. 
Thomas Foxcroft, 7. 148 At ordina 
tion of Mr Prince. 7. 108 Death of 
his grandson at Jamaica, 7. I'lO. At 
ordination of .Mr. Thomas Waller, 7. 
201. At ordination of Samuel Chock- 
ley, 7. 218. His agency in procuring 
the Provincial Charter, 7. 289. Be- 
wails the aposta,sy of Rector Cutler, 
of Connecticut, 7. 30'J. Sickness of, 7. 
325. Death and funeral. 7 326. His 
sermons: ' Burnings Bewayled' on oe- 



486 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



casion of the great fire, 6. 323 ; ' Christ 
tlie Great Saviour,' 7. 7G ; ' A Call to 
the Tempted,' on self-murder, 7. 33L 
His paper, ' Treatise of Councils,' 7. 
129. His tract, ' Do thyself no Harm,' 
7. 337 ; 8. 489. 

Mather, Mrs. Dr. Increase (Mariah), 5. 
59, 311 ; 6. 438, 440. 

Mather, Mrs. Dr. Increase (Ann), 7. 54, 
183. 

Mather, Increase, Jr., 6. 390. 

Mather, Katherine, daughter of Cotton, 7. 
114. 

Mather, Maria, daughter of Cotton, 5. 384. 

Mather, Nathaniel,' 5. 80, 227, 232, 250, 
259, 267, 270, 4(55 ; 6. 269. 

Mather, Rev. Richard, i. 491; 2. 19; 5. 
xhi; 7. IB. Letter to, i. 375. 

Mather, Rev. Samuel, D.D, 2. 172 ; 5. 
xxviii, 148, 261, 273, 274, 301, 307, 324, 
456, 461 ; 6. 407 ; 7. 196, 279, 319, 342, 
352, 353, 367, 378, 379. His list, 6. 400 ; 
7. 240. Letter of Fitz-John Winthrop 
to, 8. 357. 

Mather, Mrs. Sarah, 5. 59, 351. Married 
Kev. Neheniiah Walter, 7. 199. 

Mathesius, a book, i. 150. 

Mathewes, Mr., Boston, 8. 227. 

Mathews, John, member of Congressional 
Committee, 10. 173. 

Mathews, Capt. Thomas, commander of 
the ' Dover,' 6. 53*, 322. 327, 346. 

Matlack, Timothy, 4. 326. 

Matrosses, the, a ndlitary company, 6. 257, 
271. 

Matson, Thomas, i. 486. 

Mattakeese, Indian name for Du.vburtj, 6. 
375. 

Mattakeese Meetinghouse, 6. 341, 375. 

Mattan : tuck, deed confirmed by, 9. 75. 
Motlier of Scuttup, 9. 104. 

Mattatuxitt Erook, boundary of certain 
land, 9. 74. 

Matthews, William, innkeeper, England, 
5. 303. 

Mattoonuck, town, 5. 501. 

Mattoonus, an Indian, 5. 15. 

Maud, Daniel, 5. 60, 61, 65. 

Maiile, Thomas, 5. 414-416, 436. 

Maverick, Hog Island, 5. 210. 

Maverick (Maverack), Samuel, 3. 391 ; 8. 
72, 105, 200. Mentioned, 9. 33. Com- 
missioner of the King, letter 1\v, 9. 
63, 66, 72. Concerning certain decdt;, 
g. 160. Concerning land granted to 
Duke of Hamilton, 9. 184. 

Maverick, Thomas, i. 155. 

Maxemus Farms, 9. 109. 

Maxfield, Mr., a Scotchman, 5. 301. 

Maxwell, , warned the Council to 

meetings, 5. 463; 6. 45, 57, 123, 152, 
150, 174, 215, 219, 255, 259, 266, 274, 
299, 302, 304, 333, 366, 401 ; 7. 39. 

Maxwell, Col., passenger with William 
Samuel Johnson, 9. 213. 



Maxwell, Major and Gen. Hugh, com- 
mands in 1779, 4. 141. Opposes Gen. 
Knypliausen at Elizabethtown, 10. 172. 

Maxwell, William, drowned while skat- 
ing, 5. 439, 506. 

May, Rev. Dr., 5. 295. 

May, Abigail, 5. xxxvi. 

May, Catherine, 5. xxxv. 

May, Charles, 5. xxxv. 

May, Charlotte C, 5. xxxvi. 

May, Edward, 5. xxxv. 

May, Eliza S., 5. xxxv, xxxvi. 

May, Elizabeth G., 5. xxxiv. 

May, George E., 5. xxxvi. 

May, John, 6. 309. 

May, John E., 5. xxxvi. 

May, Joseph, son of Joseph, 5. xxxvi. 

May, Joseph, married Dorothy Sewall, 

5. XXX, xxxv. 
May, Louisa, 5. xxxv. 
May, R. P., 5. 212. 

May, Samuel J., 5. xxxv, xxxvi. 
Mayer, Edmund, 8. 187. 
'Mayflower,' ship, 5. 182. 
May -pole, 5. 178. 
May Training, 5. 42. 
iMayhew, 3/r., 1639, i. 132, 250. 
Mayhcw, Benjamin, 6. 434, 435. 
Mayhew, Experience, daughter of Rev. 

Experience, 7. 150. 
Mavhew, Rev. Experience, 6. 270, 271, 

286, 290, 291, 295,433; 7. 24, 69, BR 

134, 150, 153, 190. 207, 234, 286, 244, 

327, 345, 365, 377. His Sermons, 7. 

266, 267, 348. His ' Indian Churches,' 
7. 327. 
IVIayhew, Hannah, 6 435. 
Mayhew, Mrs. Jane, 6. 437. 
]\Layhew, John, 7. 53. 
Mayhew, John, 8. 429, 446. 
Mavhew, Rev. Jonathan, D.D., 2. 223 ; 3. 

329 ; 4. 356, 365. 
Mayhew, Major Matthew, 6. 434, 436- 

438 ; 7. 53. 
Mayhew, Pain, 7. 182. 
Mayhew, Reliance, 7. 14, 365. 
Mavhew, Thomas, son of Rev. Thomas, Jr., 

6. 166, 260, 269,433-435, 437 ; 7. 52. 
Mayhew, Rev. Thomas, Jr., 6. 437 : 7. 52. 

Lost at sea, in 1657, 8. 84 n. Concern- 
ing aid for the widow of, 8. 84. A 
preacher to the Indians at Martha's 
Vineyard, 8. 84. 

Mayhew, Capt. Zachary, 7. 181. 

Maylem, James, 5. 167 ; 6. 5. 

Maynard, Sergeant, opinion concerning 
certain charity, 9 391. 

Maynard, Lieut. Robert (A'. N.), 7. 213. 

Mavne, Rice, i. 501. 

Mayo, Mr., 5. 3, 406 ; 6. 430. 

Mayo, Deacon, Brookiine, 7. 75, 289. 

Mayo, Rev John,i. 392. 

McCarthy, Capt., in slave trade, 3. 384. 

McClearv, Samuel F., 7. 158. 

McCleary, Samuel F., Jr., 7. 158. 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



437 



McClellan, Col. Enos, coniinands a bat- 
talion at West Point, lo. 122. His bat- 
talions dismissed, lo. 1-0. 

McCurdy, Evelyn, 5. xxxv. 

McDerniot, Lieut., a British prisoner of 
war, 10. 29. 

McUouald, , British commissioner, 4. 

404. 

McDougall, Gen. Alexander, 1778, 3. 79, 
164; 4. 31, 58, 50, 101, 181, 184, 185, 
236,2;i8, 24G, 252, 270, 275; 10. 41,98, 
115. Ordered to command at West 
Point, 4. 210. Driven from Peekskill 
by the British, 10. 53. In Continental 
army, 10. 71. Concerning the disposi- 
tion of troops, 10. 132. 

McFall, Capt., desires a connnission in 
army, 1778, 4. 101. 

McGregory (Magrigory), Major, in In- 
dian expedition, 1088, 8. 4'JO. 

McKean, Re.i:. Josepli, 3. 213. 

McKean, Goo. Thomas, 4. 327, 433, 452, 
505, 507. Letter from, to John Adams, 
4. 500-508. 

McKiver, Murdoch, witness to deed, 7. 
10. 

McKnight, Dr. Charles. 4. 17, 1G6, 207. 

McKnight, Rev. John, 3. 147. 

McKon key's Ferry, 4. 32. 

McLellan, Ivlward, 5. xxxv. 

McMillan, , Cuiucay, N. H., 2. 387, 

397. 

McMurray, William, liis ' Map of the 
United States,' 2. 249, 259 ; 3. 282, 287, 
288. 

McNeill, Archibald, 2. 458. 

McNeill, Robert, 2. 458. 

McSparran, M. James, 7. 219, 227. 

McSparran, Mrs. James (Hannah), 7. 219. 

Meacham, Mr., Corentn/, 7. 101. 

Meacham, Mrs., Coventri/, 7. 101. 

Mead, Capt., at meeting of the Council, 
7.29. 

Meade, Col., concerning the disposition 
of troops, 1778, 10. 132. 

Meade, Mr., 5. 58. 

Meade, Lieut. Sylvanus, concerning his 
exchange, 1778, 10. 143. 

Mead field, see Medfield. 

Meadforth, Mass., 7. 83. 

Meadows, Ph., 6. 228. 

Mears (Meres), John, 5. 508; 8. 419, 
420. 

Mease, James, Clothier- General of the arrnr/, 
4. 01; 10. 31, 35, 30. Concerning the 
purchase of clothing for the troops, 10. 
107. 

Mecksa, son of Connonicus, g. 104. 

Medcalfe, Mr., concerning bill of ex- 
change, 8. 516. 

Meddleton, Edmund, i. 474. 

Medfield (Meadfield), Ma^^s., 5. xxxii, 
xxxiii, 15, 95, 96, 150, 232. 346, 317, 
459, 485 ; 6. 114, 139, 236, 377 ; 7. 154, 
100, 2G0, 286. 



Medford. Mass., 5. xxxiii ; 6. 31, 209, 272, 
321, 350, 370; 7. 11, 91, IKS, 130, 131, 
191, 220, 300, 380. Church at, 7. 344. 

Mediation offered by German v and Kus- 
sia, 4. 412, 413, 410-444, 45'.», 400. 

Medical department of the army, 4. 218. 

Medockiwando, Indian, Z. 490. 

Medway, Mass., 6. 404. 

Meere, Robert, 5. 01. 

Meers, James, 5. 308, 313, 341, 393, 397, 
407,433; 6. 213, 257, 303. 

Meeting-house, burning of, at New Lon- 
don, 8. 503. 

Meeting-house Hill, 6. 158, 192. 

Meeting-house land, Mrs. Winthrop's 
deed of, 5. 334. 

.Megonko Hill, 6. 396. 

Mehetabel, ship, 5. 268. 

Mehitabel, meaning of the name, 5. 376. 

Meiiitable, ship, 8. 510. Wait Winthrop's 
interest in, 8. 512. 

Meigs, Major, in secret expedition to 
Quebec, 9. 501. ■ A prisoner of war, 10. 
29. Released, 10. 32. Prisoners of 
war taken by, 10. 74. Promotion of, 
10. 97. 

Meigs, ^1//-., mentioned by Ebenezer Haz- 
ard, 2. 442. 

'Melcliisedec,' of the Colony of Massachu- 
setts (John Harvard), 5. 447. 

Mellowes, Oliver, signs petition, 1037, i. 
480 ; 6. 210. 

Mellows, Abraham, 6. 210. 

Mellows, John, Jr., 6. 210,211. 

Mellows, John, Sen., 5. 37 ; 6. 210-212. 

Mellows, Mrs. Martha, 6. 210. 

Mellows, Martha, Jr., 6. 210, 211. 

Mellows, Sarah, Jr., 6. 210. 

Mellows, Mrs. Sarah, 6. 210. 

' .Melodies of Mother Goose,' 5. 108. 

Melvil, Mrs., her daughter buried, 7. 
294. 

Melvill, Mr., Newport, 6. 322. 

.Melvill, David, 7. 307. 

Melyen, Mrs., 7. 07, 108, 115. 

Melyen, Abigail, 5. xviii, xix, 212 ; 7. 147, 
255. 

Melyen, Jacob, 5. xviii, 315, .341, 431 ; 6. 
8, 110, 128. Death of, 6. 174, 350. 

Melyen, Samuel, 6. 136 ; 7. 147. 

Melyen, Mrs. Samuel (Hannah), 7. 147. 

' Memorial about Slavery,' by S. Sewall, 
6. 10. 

' Memorial of Present Deplorable State 
of New EngMnd,' 6. 29*, 33«, 35*. 67*, 
200. Answers thereto in the 'Modest 
Enquiry.' 6. 71*-75*. Recapitulation 
of tiie Nine Articles therein, 6. 69*- 
71*. 

Memorial, relating to Gov. Dudley's ad- 
ministration, 6 107*. Relating to the 
Ivennebeck Indians, 7. 292. 

Memorial Slotie, 5. 109. 

.Mendham, Mass., 5. 13; 9. 123. 

Mendon, Mass., 5. 300; 7. 173, 227. 



438 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Men-of-war, affray at Cape Ann with, 9. 

496. At New London, 9. 495. 
Men-of-war ships, 6. 2(31, yi3. 
Menevall, M. de, Governor of Port Royal, 

5. 336, 339. 
Menocticot (Braintree), 5. 12. 
Menotomy (Arlington), 6. 392; 7. 289, 

290. 
Menzies, Jolin, registrar, 6. 45; 7. 70, 77, 

180, 212, 325. 
Meqiiinez, Morocco, 6. 3, 
Merchants of Philadelphia, movement of, 

for procuring provisions for the army, 

1778, 10. 184. 
Mercier, Mr., 7. 377. 
Merideth, Sir William, mentioned, 9. 423. 

Speech quoted, 9. 461. 
Merret, Dr., England, 8. 136. 
Merrill, Mr., Conway, N. H., 2. 387 n. 
Merrill, Abraham, 6. 338. 
Merriniac Company, concerning patents 

of land purchased by them, 8. 463. 
Merrimac River, 5. 373 ; 6. 67, 156 ; 7. 81, 

321, 851. 
Merrimack, 1.205, 318 n. 
Merriwether, John, 6. 398. 
Merry, William, 5. 274, 277, 280. 
Merry's Point, 5. 470. 
Merrymak, a pamphlet, 7. 279, 283, 292. 
Message, from Gov. Dudley, 6. 132, 227. 

From Council to Gov. Dudley, 7. 36. 
Messenger, Rev. Mr., 7. 227, 261. 
Messenger, Edward, i. 98; 8. 58, 115, 170, 

392. 
Messenger, Mrs. Elizabeth, 6. 210. 
Messenger, Henry, 5. 158, 168. 
Messenger, Thomas, 5. 426 ; 6. 210 ; 7. 52. 
Messinger, Simeon, witness, 9. 126. 
Metansis, Bay of, 5. 485. 
Metcalf, Mr., 6. 391, 4-32. 
Meteorological Record for 1783 in New 

Hampsliire, 2. 280. 
' Metropolitan,' see Buckminster, Joseph. 
Mexican revolt, 5. 485. 
Mexico, 5. 152, 240, 462 ; 6. 53. Viceroy 

of, 5. 484. Bay of, 5. 485. 
Miantinomy, descent of, 9. 105. 
Miantonomo (Miontonomo, Maantone- 

mo), I. 262, 264, 331. 
Mico, Capt., I. 102. 
Mico. John, 5. 341, 457, 466, 490; 6. 28, 

207, 208, 23.3, 285, 332, 405 ; 7. 157, 161, 

199, 26.5, 368. 
Mico, Mrs. John (Mary), 5. 4-55; 6. 250, 

405; 7. 157, 199, 200, 265, 269, 271, 273, 

308, 368. 
Middle Meeting-house, 5. 167. 
Middle Street, 6. 320. 
Middleboro', 6. 166, 218, 277 ; 7. 177. 
Middlebury men, 6. 183. 
Middlccot, Mrs., 7. 188, 374. 
Middlecot, Jane, 7. 361. 
Middlecot, Pain, 5. 494. 
Middlecot, Richard, 5. 324, 338, 341, 378, 

494 ; 6. 21 ; 7. 374. 



Middlecot, Mrs. Richard (Sarah), 7. 374. 

Middlesex, 5. 65, 67, 178, 204, 359 ; 6. 69. 
Sheriff of, 7. 54. 

Middlesex election, in England, 9. 409. 

Middlesex Deeds, 5. 325. 

Middlesex Probate Files, 7. 63. 

Middleton, Vol., i. 382. 

Middleton, Mr., comes to Boston from 
Barbadoes, 5. 71. 

Middleton, Mr., brother to the Earl of Mid- 
dleton, 8. 154, 443. 

Middleton, William, 5. 53. 

Middleton, Eng., 5. xvi. 

Middleton's 'Evangelical Biography,' 6. 
61. 

Middletown, Conn., 5. 122. Lead mine 
at, 10. 3, 15, 17. Mentioned, 10. 
132. 

Mifflin, Gen. Thomas, 2. 122, 124, 223, 
281, 407; 3. 351, 352 ; 4. 11, 13, 15, 64, 
284. 

Mighill, Rev. Mr., Concord, 5. 21 ; 6. 190. 

Mighill, Elizabeth, 7. 65. 

JMighill, Mrs. Mary, 7. 40, 56. 64, 65. 

Milborne (Milbourne), Jacob, letters of, 
I. 439, 440. Letter to Fitz-John Win- 
throp, 9. 173, 173 n. 

Milbrook, Eng., 5. 275, 276. 

Milburn, Eng., 5. 298. 

Mildmay, Mrs. Alice, i. 189 h. 

Mildmay (Millmav), Sir Henry, i. 11, 14, 
17, 18, 203n., 235n., 237«. Letter from, 
I. 189. 

Mildmay, Sir Thomas, i. 189 n. 

Mildmay Family, i. 241 n. 

Mile-End, Enq., 5. 255. 

Miles, Capt., 6. 112. 

JMiles, Hezekiah, his escape from the In- 
dians, 5. 403, 404. 

Milford, Conn., i. 374 n.; 8. 56, 108, 148, 
162, 370; 9. 58, 64, 119. Donation to- 
ward erecting a college, 9. 391. 

Milford Haven, Earl of, 6. 427. 

Milford Haven, 6. 349. 

Military discipline, exercise in, at Wick- 
ford, Conn., 9. 60. 

Military, Gov. Pownall concerning the, 

9. 428 ; debate in Parliament on estab- 
lishing, in the Colonies, 9. 435. 

Militia, 5. 54; 6. 90*, 91*; 7. 313. Peti- 
tions of Governor and Company of Con- 
necticut, concerning the raising of, by 
Benjamin Fletcher, 8. 327, 330. Rais- 
ing of, 8. 489. Concerning the organiz- 
ing of, by the Court, 9. 156 ; the King's 
letter to Connecticut concerning, 9. 
176. Concerning the pay of, 10. 13. 
Of Connecticut, not in fighting condi- 
tion, 10 3(), 37. Concerning the paj' of, 
in Connecticut, 10. 68, 69. Sent to the 
defence of Providence, 10. 119. Tlie 
disposition of, 10. 144. A call on sev- 
eral States for, by Gen. Washington, 

10. 169. Concerning the calling of, 
10. 180-182. The deficiencies in num- 



OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



4.9 



ber of, lo. 195. Not fit for serious 

work, lo. 1211. Circular letter of Gen. 

Wash iriif ton calling for, lo. 265. 
Milk Street, 6. 113. 

Mill, buililingof a, at Mistick River,8. 148. 
Mill-Bridire Street, 5. 103 ; 6. 32(3. 
Mill Canal, 6. 319. 
Mill Creek, 5. 32(3 ; 6. 54, 242. 
Mill Dam, 5. 74 ; 7. 64. 
Mill Pond, 5. 1G3 ; 6. 166, 212, 408, 417. 
Millar, Rev. Robert, liis ' Propagation of 

Cliristianity ' cited 2. 140 ». 
Millburn, Mr., executed, 5. 345. 
Millel, Mons., French priest, 1. 444. 
Miller, , innkeeper, Milton, 6. 186, 222, 

223, 305, 426. 
Miller, Capt., 6. 56. 
Miller, Alexander, 5. 377 ; 7. 379. 
Miller, Charles, 3. 244. 
Miller, Frank, 5. 377. 
Miller, Jeremiali, 8. 571 n. 
Miller, Paul, 5. 439. 
Miller, Rev. Samuel, D.D., 3. 306, 300. 
Miller (Millard), Thomas, 5. 73. 
Millet, Mr., concerning a certain bond, 

I. 274, 275. 
Mills, , innkeeper, '6. 277, 297 ; 7. 45, 

129. 
Mills, Capt, 5. 291 ; 6. 205 ; 7. 75, 128. 
Mills, Mrs. E., 5. 248, 282, 299, 326. 
Mills, Edward, 6. 21, 198. 
Mills, John, 6. 288. 
Mills, Richard, letter concerning internal 

distractions at Westchester, 9. 48. 
Mills, Sarah, wife of William Btumfeild, 8. 

68. 
Mills, Susanna, 6. 206. 
Milner. Mr., mariner, 8. 325, 326, 503, 508, 

512. 
Milton, Joseph, 7. 184. 
Milton, Mass., 5. 25, 97, 139, 381, 383, 402, 

411,4-52; 6.10. 17,115,118, 158,179, 

180, 221, 222, 229, 261, 362, 375. 39i, 

399, 409; 7. 18, 19, 4-5, 89, 121. 133, 162, 

188, 199, 242,287, 326, 372. Church at, 

6. 394, 397. 

Miner, , messenger, 8. 531, 532. 

Miner, Mr., Norwich, 9. 512. 

Minerals, sent to Jolm Winthrop, Jr., for 

experiment, 8. 59. Search for, in Xevv 

England, 8. 126, 127. Specimens of, 

found in Massachusetts, 8. 142. 
Minerva, brignntine, in quest of English 

vessels, 10. 5. 
Mines, concerning, in North America, 8. 

132, 133. Concerning a subscription 

for. 8. 483. 
Mingo, (in Indian hoy, 5. 472 ; 6. 32 ; 8. 

436,481,499, 532,559, 566. 
Minister, taken captive at Deerfield, 6. 

39*. Concerning the calling of a, lo 

the island of St. Christopher's, 8. 247, 

248. 
Minister of France, concerning illicit 

trading with the enemy, 10. 270. 



Ministerial troops, concerning their re- 
moval, 10. 2. Their movement, 10. 

Ministers, scandalous or dumb, i. 461. 

Ministry in England, concerning forma- 
tion of a new, 9. 211, 251-253. Power 
and influence of, 9. 364. 

Minor, Mr., orchard of, at Fisher's Island, 
8. 498. 

Minor, John, Indian interpreter, 9. 110. 

Minor, Tliomas, letter to John \Vinthrop, 
about Ninicraft's message, 9. 5, 5 ?i. 
Mentioned, 9. 23. Commissioner, 9. 158. 

Minot, Capt., 6. 67. 

Minot, Hun. George Richards, 4. 340. His 
' History of the Insurrection in Massa- 
chusetts,' 2. 133 n., 457 n ; 3. 55, 59, 00, 
428, 431. 

Minot, James, 5. 163. 

Minot, John, 6. 47. 

Minot, Mary, 7. 3.36. 

Minot, Stephen, 6. 55*, 8, 310, 348, 424 ; 

7. 336. 

Minott, Co!., 7. 344. 
Minute-guns, 7. 130. 
Miquillon and St. Pierre, islands of, 9. 

219. 
Mirallez, Don Juan de, death of, 2. 61. 
Mirick, James, 5. 144, 195; 7. 118. 
Mistick (Mystic) Uiver, building of the 

mill at, 8. 148. Concerning the mill at, 

8. 274. 541, 542, 568. Floating batteries 
in, 9. 507. 

Mistress or Mrs., appellation of, 6. 405 ; 

7. 8(3. 
Mitchell, Mr., 5. 181, 241. Death of, 5. 

399. 
Mitchell, Jonathan, Jr., 7. 191. 
Mitchell, Mrs. Jonathan, Jr. (Hannah), 

5. 198; 7. 191. 
Mitchell, A'cr. Jonathan, i. xix ; 7. 101, 

257, 365. His ' Sermons of Glory.' 7. 

304, 307, 308. 
Mitchell, lAlargaret, i. xix ; 7. 191, 305. 
Mitchell, William, 5. 335. 
Mitchelson, Dame, 5. 348. 
Mitchelson, Edward, 6. 14*. 
Mitchelson, Ruth, 7.68. 
Mitt, John, 7. 335. 
Mittimus Hill, 6. 158. 
Mix, Mr., Gloureslvr, 6. .390. 
Mix, Mr., officer in Quartermaster's de- 
partment in Connecticut, 10. 253. 
Mocha, friif'te, 6. 6. 
Mock-quaoii'JTs, i. 331. 
Mogungug lands, 6. 300. 
Mohacs. battle of. in Hungary, 5. 103. 
Mohawk Indians, i. 245 h., 249 h., 390, 

400; 5. 21-23, 185, -329; 6. 15», 2(il, 31!). 

Intentions of, toward the English, 8. 

88. Kill some In<lian women at Had- 

ley, 8 98. Warlike intentions of, 8. 

98. Concerning the war between the 

French and, 8. 99, 102. Treaty of the 

French with, 8. 103. 



440 



INDEX OF THE COLLECTIONS 



Mohegan Case, 9. 222 n., 392, 401, 429, 
454. Sir Fletcher Norton's opinion on, 
9. 223. Probable cost of, 9. 273. In- 
terview of William Samuel Johnson 
with Lord Hillsborough concerning, 9. 
322. Mr. Mason's misrepresentations 
concerning, 9. 367. Mr. Mason'