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Full text of "Twelfth Annual Report of The National Farm School November 1909"

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TWELFTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of 

The National Farm Schoo 



GRADUATES OX THEIR OWN ACRES 




Henry, Jacob and Joseph Ratner, and their father, thrashing 
their grain, Norristown, Pa. 



FARM SCHOOL. BUCKS COUNTY. PA. 



NOVEMBER 1909 



CLASS IN ORCHARDING 




Officers of the National Farm School 

1909—1910 



PRESIDENT, 
JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Germantown. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, TREASURER, 

HARRY B. HIRSH ISAAC H. SILVERMAN 

SECRETARY, 

ISAAC LANDMAN 

334 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia. 

LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, President. HARRY B. HIRSH, Vice-President. 

I. H. SIIv\'ERMAN, Treasurer. ISAAC LANDMAN, Secretary. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

(Having served consecutively for ten years.) 

ADOLPH EICHHOEZ, HOWARD A. EOEB, I. H. SILVERMAN, 

MORRIS A. KAUFMANN, 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

ALBERT J. BAMBERGER, EDWIN FLEISHER, ALFRED M. KLEIN, 

BERNARD BINSWANGER SIMON FRIEDBERGER, ARNOLD KOHN, 

HART BLUMENTHAL, S. GRABFELDER, LEON MERZ, 

W. ATLEE BURPEE, HARRY B. HIRSH, BARNEY SELIG, 

BENJ. FINBERG, ABRAHAM ISRAEL, JOS. N. SNELLENBERG. 

NATIONAL AUXILIARY BOARD 

LOUIS I. AARON Pittsburg, Pa. 

JULIUS ADLER Portland, Ore. 

HENRY BEER New Orleans, La. 

I. W. BERNHEIM Louisville, Ky. 

HARRY FELIX Newark, N. J. 

HENRY FRANK Natchez, Miss. 

MAURICE FREIBERG Cincinnati, O. 

BERNARD GINSBURG Detroit, Mich. 

MRS. JACOB HECHT Boston, Mass. 

A.. HIRSHHEIMER LaCrosse, Wis. 

M. HORKHEIMER Wheeling, Va. 

ADOLPH LEWISOHN New York City. 

LEON MANDEL Chicago, 111. 

LOUIS NEWBURGER Indianapolis, Ind. 

E- RAAB Richmond, Va. 

EDW. E. RICHARDS Mobile, Ala. 

ALEX. SANGER Dallas, Tex. 

SIGMUND SONNEBORN Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID STERNBERG Memphis, Tenn. 

HARRIS WEINSTOCK Sacramento, Cal. 

FERD. WESTHEIMER St. Joseph, Mo. 

A. YOUNKER Des Moines, Iowa. 



OFFICERS OF THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



THE FACULTY 



JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D., President. 

JOPIN HOSEA WASHBURN, Ph. D., (Gottingen), 

Director and Professor of AgricuItHral Chemistry. 
WIIvEIAM H. BISHOP, B. Sc, (Mass, Agricultural College), 

Professor of Agriculture, Superintendent of the Farms. 
RAYMOND PRE AS, B. A. (Mittenberg College), 

Governor of the Dorrnitories Instructor in Physics and Soili. 
WAETER F. FANCOURT (Kew Botanical Gardens, England), Professor of Horticulture. 
MRS. CHARLES NIGHTINGAEE, Instructor in English. 

J. C. MICHINER, v. S,, Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene, 
MISS HETTY ABRAHAM, Matron. 
HARMAN KRAFT, Foreman, Home Farm. 
HOWARD F. YOUNG, Foreman, Schoenfeld Farm No. 3. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 



COMMITTBB ON SCHOENFBLD FARMS FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Barnett Binswanger, Chairman Arnold Kohn, Chairman 

Iveon Merz Abraham Israel Harry B. Hirsh .Barnett Binswanger 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

Alfred M. Klein, Chairman 

Hart Blumenthal Arnold Kohn Leon Merz Bernard Selig 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE HOUSE COMMITTEE 

I H. Silverman, Chairman Leon Merz, Chairman 

Edwin M. Fleisher A. J. Bamberger Jos. N. Snellenburg Howard A. Loeb 

ADMISSION COMMITTBB 

Morris A. Kaufmann, Chairman 

Isaac Landman Alfred M. Klein 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE . SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

Bernard Selig, Chairman Hart Blumenthal, Chairman 

Simon Friedberger Benj. Finberg Adolph Eichholz Harry B. Hirsh 

FARM PRODUCTS 

W. Atlee Burpee 

Harry Felix Samuel Grabfelder 

LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Associated with the Local Board 

Mrs. Martha Fleisher, Chairman, pro tern. Mrs. Joseph Guckenheimer, Treasurer 

Miss Linda Strauss, Secretary 

Mrs. A. J. Bamberger Miss Frieda Jonas 

Mrs. Isidore Baum Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf 

Mrs. David Berlizheimer Mrs. M. F. Langfeld 

Mrs. Plart Blumenthal Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 

Mrs. C. Davidson Mrs. R. B. Schoneman 

Mrs. Adolph Eichholz Mrs. I. H. Silverman 

Mrs. Simon Friedberger Mrs. Meyer Sycle 
Mrs. Harry B. Hirsh 

Honorary Surgeon to the School, Sidney L. Olsho, M. D., 1700 Walnut Street, Phila. 

Honorary Dentist to the School, L. I. Bernstein, D. D. S., 1901 N. 32nd St., Phila. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



ONlv OF THE GRADUATES 




J. H. Wiseman, in charge of the Farm of the Jewish Consumptive Sanatorium, 

Bagleville, Pa. 

Eighth Graduation at the National 
Farm School 

Farm School Pa., March 2, 1909. 



Due to the fact that the call for graduates of The National 
Farm School is being made preparatory to the spring work, in 
the lines in which these graduattes have specialized, the 
Board of Managers decided to graduate the class of 1909 earlier 
in the spring than in previous years. 

Graduating exercises were held on Tuesday evening, March 
2d. 1909, in Segal Hall, at Farm School, Pa., in the presence 
of the Board of Directors and many friends of the institution, 
who journeyed out to the School for this purpose. 

The President of the School presided at the exercises, which 
were very informal. Eleven young men received diplomas and 
certificates. 

Dr. Krauskopf, after explaining the reasons for changing 
the time of graduation, said in part : 

The secret of success lies witliin us and not outside of us, and by 
success we mean the carrying out of some well-sustained, conscientious 
and courageous effort. No success worthy of consideration has been 
obtained without an early and thorough preparation. The whole world 
is open to him who consecrates himelf to some mission in life, and you, 
filled with ambition, starting out now to rtap the reward of your training 
and preparation, should remember that those qualities which we have 



EIGHTH GRADUATION 



tried to implant in you here must be your guiding stars in future years. 
Concentratae your efforts. Dissipation of energy is the coffin of success, 
the great achievements of this world are attracted by concentration, 
and if with firm purpose and courage you do your alloted tasks you will 
be factors in not only making of yourselves men of fine character but 
also the pioneers in creating that sturdy class of huband-men who 
have always been the bulwark of a nation. 

Dr. John H. AA'ashburn, the Director of the School, spoke 
to the graduates on the importance of their calling. In bidding 
the graduates farwell, Dr. Washburn said : 

Stick to agriculture. Get a farm of your own as soon as possible. 
Save your money in every way and constantly improve your farm. 

He said that scientific farming is the one business that gives 
a youth better prospects and a better living than any other 
employment, and that it is virtually the only business where 
one's usefulness and value increases with years. 

Mr. Harry B. Hirsh, vice-president; Air. Harry Felix, chair- 
man of the Schoenfeld Farms ; I\Ir. A. M. Klein, chairman of the 
Committee on Curriculum, and Adolph Eichholz, Esq.; Pro- 
fessors Bishop and Fancourt, members of the faculty, also ad- 
dressed the students. 

The following were then awarded diplomas : 
Henry Berg Samuel Friedman 

Lewis Ostorlenk Israel Wallman 

The following received certificates : 

Max Coltun AVilliam Snowvice 

Harry Naum Joseph Ratner 

Edward Alajor Benjamin Lenik 

Jacob Kahan 

The Freshman Class, of thirty-fave students, was admitted 
to the School on March loth. 




Class in Trucking 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Spring Festival at the National 
Farm School 

Farm School, Pa., June 6, 1909. 



In previous years, the main feature of the Spring Festival 
at The National Farm School was the class graduation. This 
year, since graduation was held in March and all the graduates 
were already in their positions, the features of the exercises at 
the School were : the dedication of the Elise Binswanger Nursery, 
of the Francis E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing Greenhouse, and of Lake 
Archer Rosenthal ; the consecration of the Memorial Trees and 
the installation of the freshman class of thirty students. 

The special train to Farm School carried an unusually large 
number of friends of the School and the exercises were held in 
the grove facing the campus. The Hon. Irving Lehman, Judge 
of the Supreme Court, of New York, presided. 

After the invocation by Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz, of Phila- 
delphia, the President of the School introduced Judge Lehman 
who, speaking on "The Return of the Jew to the Soil," said in 
part: 

The time has now come for the Jew to become a producer and 
do his share toward adding to the wealth of the world. He has lived 
apart from the rest of mankind in the narrow confines of a Ghetto. 
Let Mm come forth and till the soil. The world calls us, the soil calls 
us, a broad avenue leads from the Ghetto to the big, active life of this 
country. , 

In the early days of Jewish national life the men of the nation 
were successful farmers, and he who made two blades of grass grow 
where only one grew before was honored and considered a benefactor. 
Our origin and history have molded us and left their imprint upon us. 
The United States owes its greatness to the fact that each race which 
has sought these shores has brought the best of its racial characteristics, 
and has discarded that which has been undesirable. Let us, then, cut 
away from the weaknesses which have been due to bad conditions and 
do the best that is in us. 

In the congested districts of our large cities impoverishment per- 
petuates the old conditions, but a man cannot be healthy or strong in a 
two-room flat. We realize our duty to those of our race who come to 
this land from foreign shores. 



SPRING FESTIVAL 



In founding and maintaining this Farm School, we are refuting 
the reproach that the Jew is never a producer. Here we take boys who 
have seldom felt the warm glow of the sun; here they will be taught 
the art of growing things, with the aid of sun and shower, and from 
this place they will go forth to lead brothers, fathers and mothers from 
dark, cooped-up quarters into the green, open world, where they will 
respond to the healing efforts of nature. 

Judge John L. Kinsey, of Philadelphia, dedicated the 
Memorial Trees, planted as living monuments to deceased bene- 
actors of The National Farm School. In the course of his 
memorial address, he said: 

On the graves of those who have served their country on the field 
of battle we place wreaths of laurel. This custom dates from the re- 
motest antiquity and is a beautiful expression of the love we have for 
those who have fallen in their country's service. We, however, at the 
National Farm School, instead of placing flowers on the graves of those 
who have saved humanity for humanity's good, plant on these grounds 
living trees and consecrate them to their memory. 

Rev, Dr. Henry Berkowitz, of Philadelphia, consecrated the 
Elise Binswanger Nursery, the gift of the grandson and grand- 
daughter of Mrs. Binswanger, who resided in Kansas City, Mo. 
He concluded his brief tribute to her memory with these words : 

An ancient Hebrew Poet has given us an idyllic picture of the 
sower: 

"Tho' he goeth on his way weeping 

Bearing the burden of precious seed, 

He shall come again with singing 

Bringing his sheaves with him, 
They that sojv in tears 
Shall reap in Joy." (Psalm 126) 

To one of those rare spirits who reveal to us the force of that 
comforting and sublime lesson, do we dedicate this nursery. The moral 
planting of the life of Elise Binswanger will, under God, yield abundant 
fruitage of good in the character of generations to come, who shall here 
learn to know and bless her name. 

The Vegetable Forcing Greenhouse, presented to the School 
by Mr. Ferdinand Loeb, in memory of his wife, Frances E. Loeb, 
and built by the students as part of the practical course in 
horticulture, was dedicated by Abraham Israel, Esq., Esq. Mr. 
Israel said, in the course of his tribute to the memory of Frances 
E. Loeb : 

It is especially fitting that a structure adapted to such uses should 
have been erected in her memory. She had been reared in the country. 
Her childhood and youth were spent among the flowers and plants, and 
she loved them dearly. She was an arident admirer of Nature. Indeed, 
this fondness was but one form of her love for all living things, and of 
her desire to care for them and help them. 



SPRING FESTIVAL 



So when, in this greenhouse^ the little plants are nurtured from 
the first glimmering of life to maturity by our helping hand, we will 
be performing such acts as the kindness of her heart constantly guided 
her to do. 

Lake Archer Rosenthal, presented to the School by Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, in memory of their brother, was conse- 
crated by Mr. Robert W. Montgomery, with an eloquent tribute 
to his deceased friend. 

After these dedicatory exercises, the Rev. Wm. Arnhold 
pronounced the Kaddish. 

In the afternoon, after luncheon served by the Ladies' Aux- 
iliary Committee, Mr. Ralph Blum introduced Mr. Leigh 
Mitchell Hodges, who formally installed the freshman class on 
their entrance upon a career which places them "into actual 
partnership with God." 

Dr. John H. Washburn, the Director of the School, awarded 
prizes to efficient students, totaling $125,00. At the close of 
the exercises, the .donation of an altar cloth to the chapel of 
the School, by Mrs. Max Oppenheimer, in memory of her 
daughter, Huldah, was announced by the President. 




A Family from the Philadelphia South Side gaining its -first experience in 
County Life on the Farm of a Graduate 



10 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Twelfth Pilgrimage and Annual Meeting 
at the National Farm School 

Farm School, Pa., October 3, 1909. 



More than five hundred men, women and children pilgrimed 
to Farm School, Pa., to participate in the Twelfth Annual Suc- 
coth Pilgrimage and Annual fleeting of The National Farm 
School, on Sunday, October 3d, 1909. 

After Rabbi Isaac Landman, of Philadelphia, delivered the 
invocation, the President of the School introduced Mr. Isaac 
H. Clothier, of Philadelphia, as the presiding officer. In the 
course of his opening remarks, Mr. Clothier said : 

When I remember, among other persecutions, the denial of owner- 
ship of land to the Jews, it is to me a most impressive coincidence that 
this pioneer school of farming should have been founded and fostered 
by this remarkable people, who, originally a race despised by so-called 
Christians, have by correct living, intelligence, economy and thrift, 
earned and received the respect of mankind, and with their business 
probity, their genius for the conduct of affairs, their energy and skill, 
have become leaders in commerce, and in most every form of productive 
industry, and to-day are almost the bankers of the world. It is a further 
coincidence that the school was established in the State founded by 
William Penn, the great apostle of religious liberty. 

Rev. Dr. William Rosenau, of Baltimore, brought the pil- 
grims the spiritual message of the day, in a stirring sermon on, 
"The Feast of the Ingathering." 

The Rev. Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, Founder and President 
of The National Farm School, then read his annual message, 
printed in full on pages 12 to 23 of this book. 

Mr. Samuel S. Fleisher, of Philadelphia, Chairman of the 
Baron De Hirsch School, of Woodbine, N. J., and one of the 
American Trustees of the Baron DeHirsch fund, followed with 
an address, abstracts of which, under the title, "Do Our Agri- 
cultural Schools Pay?" are printed on pages 39 to 41. 

At the afternoon session, Dr. John H. Washburn, the Di- 
rector of the School, read his annual report, given in full on 
pages 24 to 30. 



TWELFTH PILGRIMAGE AND ANNUAL MEETING 11 

The Secretary read the Treasurer's Report, printed on 
pages 34 to 38, after which the prizes, to the sum of $112.50, 
were distributed to the students who showed exceptional merit 
and progress in their work. 

A request made by President Dr. Krauskopf, that after 
twelve years of service in this office he be permitted to resign 
the presidency of the institution, met with unanimous protest, 
and at the unanimous request of the assemblage, voiced by 
Adolph Eichholz, Esq., he consented to serve for another year. 
Other officers elected were: Vice-President — Harry B. Hirsh; 
Treasurer — Isaac H. Silverman ; Secretary — Rabbi Isaac Land- 
man; Directors — Hart Blumenthal, Abram Israel, Arnold Kohn, 
Alfred M. Klein, B. Selig and Edwin Fleisher. 



CLASS IN AGRICULTURAIv CHEMISTRY 




In the Zadok Eisner Laboratory 



12 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

A Statement of the National 
Farm School 

FOR THE YEAR 1908-09 
By Its President. 



It was in the autumn of 1897 when we made our first 

Pilgrimage to the National Farm School. At that time, a harvest 

pilgrimage from the city to the country was 

Misgivings re- unique. The people of that day had, for the most 
specting Farm , . . , , , 

School in 1897. part, outgrown the custom, mstituted by our 

fathers of old, of observing, if not even remem- 
bering, the autumnal harvest festival. In days of old, our ances- 
tors, adhering to an ancient rite, pilgrimed to Jerusalem, and 
there, in large numbers, offered their thanksgiving for the boun- 
tiful harvest garnered. 

To adapt the Palestinian ceremony to this modern pilgrim- 
age, almost necessitated the citation of Biblical precedent, to 
such an extent was it regarded as an innovation. 

It was, furthermore, necessary to appear in an apologetic 
attitude toward the public, not only for the pretty rite purposely 
adapted but also for the occasion itself, which was 
belief that Jew ^o celebrate on American soil the dedication of 
is unfit for American youths, both Jewish and non-Jewish, 
' to the vocation of agriculture. So firmly en- 
trenched was the conviction among the overwhelming majority 
that Jewish people were disqualified from farming, and hence 
Jewish youths have no inclination for its alleged hard labor, that 
we were compelled to be bold in defending our stand. It was 
argued, furthermore, that farming offered no inducements to any 
ambitious lad, and, at best, but a precarious living was the re- 
ward of incessant toil. 

By some mischance, farming had fallen into disrepute among 
people in the East — the farmer viewed as a clod-hopper and ag- 
riculture the occupation for unintelligent people 
culture^ is ^ ' o'*' ^Y ^ ^ort of obverse reasoning, the harmless 
degrading and hobby of a millionaire. That the same amount 
'of brains, energy and technical knowledge usually 
devoted to other businessess, if applied to farming would be 



STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 13 

more profitable than many occupations ordinarily regarded as 
fairly lucrative, was a notion not generally prevalent- 

To counteract this opinion which was held by the many, 
was a difficulty we had to overcome. 

Twelve years have elapsed since the first pilgrimage to the 
Farm School was instituted. To-day we appear before you with 
a message identical in import to that first an- 
nounced. But this is to be noted — we no longer Facts of to-day 
plead, we affirm. Instead of apologizing for ngf unfounded'. 
our movement, we find, to our great gratification, 
a general approval of the entire plan and policy as incorporated 
in the curriculum of the school, under whose auspices we are 
here assembled. There is no longer apprehension of the Jew's 
unfitness for agriculture. During the last decade, this doubt has 
been exploded. There is no longer any misgiving as to the will- 
ingness of Jewish lads to take up agriculture as a life pursuit. 
The roster of students at the school disproves this misconception, 
which was urged at first as an argument against the necessity 
of this school. There is to-day no intelligent man or woman 
who doubts the profitableness of tilling the soil. The income 
obtained from the farm exceed the profit derived from any 
other resource in our country. 

So great is the demand for intelligent and technically-trained 
youths for agricultural employment that it was necessary for 
the school, this year, to change the date of graduation from June 
to March, in order to permit the graduating students to begin 
their work with the commencement of spring. 

AVithin these twelve years a great change has come over 
the people of our country and the world, with regard to agri- 
culture. It is part of a world-wide movement |y,jghty change 
whose slogan is "Back to the Soil". Men grow, in favor of 
evolve. We are to-day the outcome of yesterday. a9'''cu'tu'*e. 

The idea of one man becomes the heritage of 
many. AVhere twelve years ago one man advocated farming, 
hundreds to-day are zealously proposing it. Where a decade ago 
one man was inspired with the dignity of the calling and the 
freedom and liberty it bestowed, now we are witnessing this 
Nation seriously considering the wholesomeness and profit of 
farming. 

Farming is the national watch-word- America became 



14 STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 

mighty as an agricultural nation. The favorite theme of ex- 
President Roosevelt was the substantiality of the 
Government's farm. Through his zeal and enthusiasm, a famous 
greatest con- commission, composed of noted agricultural spe- 
cialists, was appointed to investigate the condi- 
tion of American farm life, with the sole purpose of ascertaining 
wherein the social, economic and educational factors af rural life 
might be improved. The work of the commission was thorough 
and marked improvements are sure to follow as a result of 
searching investigation. 

The policy of the strenuous President is followed by Presi- 
dent Taft, as he evinces in a recent address. So keenly sensitive 
is he to the importance of an efficient agricultural bureau, that 
the administration has retained in the cabinet as chief of the 
Agricultural Department, the services of Secretary James Wilson, 
who is now serving with signal ability the fourth successive ad- 
ministration. This was done that the knowledge and experience 
gained by him and his methods might not be jeopardized by 
the uncertain experiments of an untried successor. 

As a result of this national regard for the welfare of agri- 
culture, farming has become more attractive and lucrative than 
Increasing ever. We judge of this by outward evidences 

numbers de- and from within. There are four times as many 
selves to its students enrolled to-day than there were a dozen 
pursuit. years ago. It is generally known that the yield 

from field and farm has been almost inconceivably enlarged- 
The aid of the national treasury has been invoked to stimulate 
irrigation. Deep rivers have been tapped, from which now flow 
broad streams to water hitherto arid regions. By the lifting of 
a dam or the opening of a sleuce-gate, new territories magically 
leap into life. The old Biblical phrase comes to mind — the desert 
has been made to blossom as the rose, and the barren soil has 
become the prolific breeding plot for uncounted harvests. 

Pity it is that so few are informed of the manifold benefits 
which of late years have been devised to improve rural life and 
the science of agriculture. 

The Farmers' Institutes, the Railroad Instruction Trains, 
Government and State Bulletins, with their simph^-worded, but 
exact information, confer a blessing that is in- 
New allies calculable in its far-reaching importance. So 
agri"cult'ure,^ rapidly has the trolley crept out of crowded 
streets into the country that one is unaware, un- 
less directly concerned, of the assistance this mode of transpor- 



GRADUATES ON THEIR OWN ACRES 



15 




The Laiichman Boys and their Stock 




The Laucliinan Boys and their Helper in the Hay Barn 



WILLIAM AND HARRY LAUCHMAN, ON THEIR OWN FARM, 
RUSHLAND, PA. 



16 STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 

tation has rendered modern farming. The old time isolation of 
the farmer, which was the bugbear of the farmer's wife, and a 
source of condolence on the part of the city dwellers, is nearly- 
banished. Telephone, good roads, automobiles, rural free de- 
livery, not to mention labor-saving machinery, are the recent 
agencies which have been allied to agriculture- They have 
wonderfully stimulated the interest of the farmer in his work, 
and have assisted him materially in disposing of his produce. 

New processes are now being employed in tilling so as to 
supply the exhaustless demand for food. With an increasing 
population, the need of an ample food supply is obvious- Some 
are even now alarmed at the prospects of an inadequate food 
supply for the teeming millions. America was once the granary 
of the world. AVe are no longer able to make this boast. Un- 
less more soil is cultivated, and that under cultivation skilfully 
conserved, w^e, as a Nation, wull be obliged to import food-stuffs 
to feed our vast industrial masses. 

Fortunately, the wisdom of our age has arrested the drift 

city-ward. 3,Iore attention is given to agriculture to-day than 

ever before. Schools are opening in all parts of 

and drawing the country to instruct vouths and maidens in 
to it some of , , , ^^ ' . , . ,. . 

best minds. husbandry. Young men with an mclmation to- 

ward a healthful outdoor life such as farming af- 
fords, complete school and college courses only to enter schools 
of agriculture for the purpose of gaining needful technical ex- 
perience in managing farms. In some instances, men retire 
from business, or clerical positions to turn back again to the 
source of life, and so, by the opportunities now afforded, there 
is a perceptible movement country ward. 

This is a most encouraging sign. In part, it sustains us. 
We feel that we are a factor in this movement, and pride our- 
Jew takes con- selves in being a means in hastening it- But 
spicuous part we are especiallv elated because in this tendency 
in this country- , j A, u. u r j, ji 

ward move- country-ward, there are to be found a goodly 

'"e"*- number of Jews. In the company that is to-day 

marching from city to country a considerable number of Jewish 
men and women are facing the fields and pastures. Had any- 
one, in 1897, predicted that twelve years hence there would be 
two agricultural schools maintained by Jews, such a person 
would have been scoffed at. The fact is there are two schools 
to-day in existence, both crowded to the doors and obliged 
to turn away applicants. So eagerly has the Jew, for example. 



STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 17 

adapted his ancient calling to a modern situation that, 
last January, a convention of Jewish farmers met in 
New York City, the first of its kind in this country, and 
perhaps the only one of its kind that had ever gathered. That 
these Jewish farmers are sincere, and that their ambition to be 
abreast of the times is substantial, one needs but read their 
monthl}^ magazine "The Jewish Farmer", published in New 
York, and written in Yiddish. In full accord with this deep- 
seated interest, there is now being held, in New York City, an 
agricultural exhibit, displayed in the Ghetto district, as a living 
testimonial of their zeal, their endeavor and the proud witness 
of their handiwork. Jewish farmers are now located in almost 
every State of the Union. An increasing number of city-inhabit- 
ing Jews are planning to take up farms, and they do so because 
those who are now located on farms are successful, and those 
who are fortunate enough to be farming, find therein the freedom 
and happiness that make life worth while. 

The farm and the life of the farmer appeal to the Jew in 

whom the traditions of his people are still alive. It is his Biblical 

environment. Cruelty and oppression banished 

him from his former estate but he has never ^arm appeals 

to Jew. 
veiled his eyes to the vision of that future when, 

in the day of universal peace and justice, each man will sit 
under his vine and his fig tree. His ideal for the future of hu- 
manity is agricultural. So it is instinctive with him to find 
grace and healing in farming. The claims of modern scientific 
agriculture fall on appreciative ears. He hears an old melody, 
as it were, a familiar tune. The attractiveness of modern farm- 
ing contributed in part to his desire to return to the soil. 

But more than the attractiveness of farming, the haunting 

pathos of his life in the crowded Ghetto awakens within him 

the yearning to share more of the sweetness 

- . "^ , . 1 . Ml- Farm also a 

and sanity of a rural existence than is possible m means of es- 

the stifling atmosphere of the congested city, in cape from 

the din and clamor, the filth and dirt, of the 

Ghetto. The sane and wholesome, that which is natural and 

true, is the ideal of life the Jew upholds. Toward this end he 

shapes all his activities. This wise, beautiful way of living is 

inculcated in his religion. It is the theme of prayer and poem- 

This alTords him a (spiritual outlook on life, and centuries of 

experience have counseled him to adopt this course. When, 

as in our day, moral depravity threatens to undermine the 



18 STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 




Monorial Trees Segal Hall Main Building Green Houses R. R- Stat: 'U Jl'iiid Mill 

PANORAMIC VIEW OF THE SCHOOL FROM THE RAILROAD 

purity of his home life, when tuberculosis and foul disease 
stalk through his habitation, he sees with horror the ravages 
of city life, and he is only too anxious to rid himself of the plague 
which is laying low his dear ones, upsetting the foundation of his 
home, and destroying the existence of his being- 
City life, as it is lived by the multitudes, contributes the 
larger part of applicants. So many are now begging to be as- 
sisted in going back to the farm that our Agri- 
Demands for , , . . , f^ . . -1 1 
farms larger cultural Aid bocieties cannot cope with them. 

than means So many are the students on whom parents rely 

for labor and assistance in establishing their in- 
dividual farms that we have been embarrassed with the 
number of seriously-minded earnest young men who fill all the 
requirement, but who are prevented from entering our school 
because of our insufficient funds. AVere it not for the aid given 
by the State, we would be woefully handicapped. 

Happily, our splendid Commonwealth came to our rescue 
by increasing our appropriation to $io,ooo annually, for a period 

of two years. Special gratitude is due our Gov- 
Assistance ernor, and a number of friends throughout the 

state. State, through whose kindness we are enabled 

to enjoy their beneficent appropriation. In ap- 
preciation of our good work, the State has, in addition, allowed 
$5,000 toward the erection of a new dormitory, and we are con- 
fidently expecting that friends of this worthy cause will soon 
realize our needs in this particular, and help us to complete the 
dormitory, the foundation of which is soon to be laid. Inspired 
by the example of the State, which recognizes in the work of 
this school an effective means of strengthening its citizenship, 
we fervently trust that other friends will come to our aid, and 



STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 19 




Chestnut Grove The Lake Th.: Z; . _ .. 'Jut Houses 

PANORAMIC VIEW OF THE SCHOOL FROM THE RAILROAD 

help us to realize these purposes for which the school is founded. 

Our progress has been real and encouraging. In many ways 
our school has enlarged and advanced. A new Vegetable Green- 
house, the gift of Mr. Ferdinand Loeb, in mem- 
ory of his wife ; the Nursery, dedicated to the 

r T,/r T^i- -n- r tt- ^Y individuals. 

memory of Mrs. Ease Bmswanger, of Kansas 

City, Mo. ; the Evergreen Plot, set aside in the 
nursery and consecrated to the memory of Henrietta Krauskopf, 
have been added to the school's equipment. We have a Lake, 
the donation of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, in memory of 
their departed brother, Anshel Rosenthal. This lake, when 
flooded, is to serve as a swimming pool for our students, during 
the heated months, and in winter is to be our source of ice- 
supply. So full of water was this lake last winter that, when the 
first freeze came, we cut from it all the ice needed for our 
households and dairies, a supply amounting to almost $300. Un- 
fortunately, the serious leaks in the dam last spring obliged 
us to let out the water so that the necessary repairs might be 
made. When the leaks were finally stopped the drouth was 
upon us, dried up both the springs that supply the lake with 
its water, and left it dry ever since. After the fall rains and 
winter snows there will be an abundance of water, and the 
lake will be able to confer the benefits which its kind donors 
intended. 

From the noblest of Farm School supporters, the donor 
of three farms, a liberal contributor at all times, from 
him whom we so greatly honor, Mr. Max Schoenfeld, of Ror- 
schach, Switzerland, $1,000 has been received for the making 
of good roads in and about Farm School lands. With a few 



20 STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 

more friends of his generous impulses, we would be able to count 

our students by the hundreds. 

Our greatest need, in addition to the new dormitory and 

more means of maintenance, are farms on which to place our 

graduates. We know of no better way to root 

Farms for ^ student in agriculture than to afford him means 

graduates our . ,,.,.". ^ , . ^^ . 

greatest need, o^ establishing" a tarm ior himseli as soon as he 

graduates. Invariably, such a student brings his 
folks from the Ghetto to dwell and to work with him. So 
closely knit are family ties that what happens in one family is 
imitated in another branch, and soon a small cluster of friends 
and relatives are grouped together in rural settlements. Some 
of our graduates have done this. Quite a number have ob- 
tained farms which they manage with credit, and whereon they 
have placed their parents and other members of their family. 
To locate families on farms is the dominant ambition of our 
school, and were it possible for us to have funds at our dis- 
posal and so establish our graduates, we would be enabled to 
realize this dream. 

Our graduates are eager for this assistance which would 
enable them to begin their life pursuit as freeholding farmers. 
This is the goal toward which they look throughout their stu- 
dent years- 

As a means of realizing this end, a fund has been created by 
Mr. William Volker, of Kansas City, Mo., to be known as the 
Th "Gradu- Graduates' Aid Fund. To his gift of $150, Mr. Al- 
ates' Aid fred Benjamin, of the same city, has contributed 

$100. This is, of course, a very small sum. It is our 
ambition that the fund will be so enlarged by contributions and 
legacies, that eventually, from the interest, sums will be loaned 
to worthy students to enable them to establish themselves on 
farms of their own, and thereby effectively carry out the in- 
struction they have received. 

Here is a field of great usefulness which our fraternities 
should not be slow to cultivate. They have within their power 

means of extending loans to our graduates so 
A new field for that they might buy farms in the suburbs of our 
fraternities. large cities. Such farms would enable these lads 

to establish themselves and eventually make it 
possible to become owners of them. AVhat worthier benefit can 
a fraternity devise than this? Here is a ready means at hand 
for doing constructive work, and we most sincerely recom- 



STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 190S-1909 21 

mend this policy to those fraternities, who have the welfare of 
humanit}^ at heart- 

What becomes of our students in general can be learned 
from the list of graduates and their occupations which is ap- 
pended below. 

Of other gifts outside of the city, mention must be made of 
the late Mrs. Louis Loeb who was a friend from the first, and 
who bequeathed to our school the sum of $i,ooo. 
We also acknowledge greatfully the sum of $250 Bequests and 
from- the estate of Solomon Blumenthal; $500 Donation. 
from the estate of Isaac Sailer; $500 from the 
estate of INIoses H. Stern; $78.05 from the estate of Esther Sai- 
ler, all of Philadelphia ; $100 from the estate of Rebecca Haas, 
of Indianapolis. To our list of Life Members, we have added 
during the past year the name of Bonham Galland, of Seattle, 
Washington ; Isaac H. Clothier, and Simon Zweighaft, of our 
city. Of special large donations, mention need be made of $100 
given by Morris Leon, of New York ; $250 by Samuel Snellen- 
burg ; $300 by Isadore Newman, of New Orleans ; $500 by Nathan 
Snellenburg, and $114 for tools, by Harry Rosenthal, of our 
city. 

It is gratifying to find the Farm School favorably spoken 
of ever3^where and enthusiastically written up in sectarian and 
secular papers. This assures us that our school insufficient 
is gaining in favor and is being approved- Yet support of 
the support is substantially obtained from Phila- outside of 
delphia and our State, while from the country Pennsylvania. 
at large it is comparatively small. When one realizes that 
large number of our students comes from New York and Chicago, 
it is natural to infer that these centres of population should ac- 
cord us a larger support than they do- Fully conscious of the 
need of large and ample funds, and for general propaganda, 
the need of a field secretary is becoming a growing necessity. 
Means must be obtained for the purpose of engaging one to un- 
dertake this work. A field secretary can be a delegate, as it 
were, to the country at large for our Farm School to solicit in 
its behalf. Our treasury cannot afiford the salary for such a field 
secretary. Here is a splendid opportunity for some one of means 
to prove himself a benefactor of our institution. 

Honorable exception to the support of the school from out- 
side cities must be made in favor of the Federation of Charities 



22 STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 

of Alilwaukee, which has increased its donation from $ioo to 
$300. 

Special mention must be made of the kindness of the Agri- 
cultural Aid Society of New York which assisted, during the 
past year another of our graduates to establish himself on a 
farm of his own. 

We have continued to receive from the Federation of Jewish 
Charities of Philadelphia the annual contribution of $6,400. 

Four years ago, the Federation began this policy 
adelphia Fed- of donating this sum, for which we are deeply 
eration of Jew- grateful. Although we have almost doubled our 

number of students, although the annual expense 
of maintenance has materially advanced, the Federation has not 
been enabled to increase our allowance correspondingly. Were 
larger funds available for this Society, we would, no doubt, re- 
ceive our share of the larger income. Unfortunately, however, 
the Federation does not yet receive from our community that 
larger support which its good work deserves- Many have not 
yet enrolled themselves in the Federation, and others do not 
give commensurate with their means. With returning pros- 
perity, it is to be hoped that people will do their full duty to the 
Federation, which might enable us to profit from a larger ap- 
propriation, and hence to extend the usefulness of our institu- 
tion. 

The buildings and farms of the school are in splendid condi- 
tion. Never before has the school been garbed with such pros- 
perity, nor were the evidences of advancement 

Charm of so apparent as they are to-day. The Memorial 

Farm School ^ j n u • j 1 id 

grounds. Farms are gradually becommg models. By 

means of the new roads the farms are to be in- 
terlaced by what may be regarded as boulevards. When these 
are completed, and lined with a double row of fruit trees along 
their five miles stretch, and flanked by groves of old and stately 
trees, our entire school-ground will resemble more a park 
than an ordinary farm. We invite you to inspect our estate not 
to-day only, when it wears its gala attire, but at any time, es 
pecially during the working season, when our students are 
busy in the various lines of activity. 

Particular results of our work will be told by the Director 



STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 1908-1909 



23 



Acknowledg- 
ment of ser- 
vices rend- 
ered. 

Also to the 



in his report. Our financial status will be told you in the Treas- 
urer's report. Our thanks are due to the Director 
and faculty for their good work, to the matron 
and household staff for their devoted service, to 
the students for their zeal and endeavor, to the 
Board for its unfailing devotion to the cause. 
Ladies' Auxiliary Committee for their kindly aid, to the physi- 
cians, donors, supporters, and to the speakers who are with us 
to-day, and to those who graced our Arbor-Day exercises with 
their presence, and cheered us with their words of hearty ap- 
proval- 

In conclusion, a personal note. For twelve years, I have 
served in the capacity as President. I am naturally proud of 
what has been achieved. By the aid of friends 

and supporters, the school has been placed upon A new Presi- 

,- r • -NT 1 . rr .1. dent recom- 

a firm footing. Now, that new orncers are to be mended. 

appointed, having served for twelve years, I beg 
to lay down the staff of office as President of the Farm School. 
A new head may be able tb direct more wisely. As long as I 
am among the living, the school can rely upon me to render as 
much assistance as I have rendered in the past- I believe that 
the interests of the school would be better served if another were 
to assume its leadership. I sincerely hope that you may concur 
in this conviction of mine. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, President. 
Farm School, Bucks Co., October 3, 1909- 




Thrashing the Winter Wheat 



24 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The Director's Report. 



The past year has been, to The National Farm School, one 
of satisfactory growth in all its various departments. The 

number of students receiving instruction at the 
The present time is sixty (60). Ninety-seven (97) 

enrollment. have received instruction since the first of last 

September. Of this number four (4) have passed 
a four-years' course, graduating with diplomas ; eight (8) have 
left, receiving certificates for two or three-years' work; and 
twenty-seven (27) have left without certificates, many of them 
called away because it was necessary for them to assist at home. 
A number of these latter hope to return later to finish their 
course. 

During the past year, we have been able to give more in- 
struction in the academical work of the Institution. During the 
entire summer, every morning, from 7 :oo to 8 :oo, 
The academic j^^g been devoted to recitations in Land Measure- 

, ^'^^ ' ment, agricultural chemistry and the study of 

work. J?, . ^ . . . 

soils. The opportunity for instruction m prac- 
tical agriculture, at this Institution, are second to that of no 
other Institution in America. All the work on our four hundred 
acres is performed by the pupils themselves. We have twenty- 
four horses that, every day, are being driven and worked by our 
pupils. No other Institution allows so many horses to be in 
care of its students. As a result, our students have greater 
opportunities for plowing, mowing, cultivating and working. 
special agricultural machinery than most farmer boys have dur- 
ing the same period of time. 

The excellent work of orchard experimentation, under the 
charge of Prof. H. A. Surface, of the Entomological Division 
of the Department of Agriculture at Harrisburg, 
P^bUc hag been continued throughout the year, under 

instruction ^j^^ supervision of Prof. E. L. Loux; and further, 

in orchardmg. , ,. , .... . , 

public demonstrations m trimming, pruning and 

spraying have been conducted at the School, associated with 
evening classes or lectures on this most important subject. This 
work has been a means of great inspiration to our students in 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 25 

the study of orcharding, and they, likewise, have been of great 
value to the public in general. 

The influence of the above instruction on our own orchards 

must not go unnoticed. Our apple trees, especially those on 

the Schoenfeld Farms, were d3ing of scale and 

other diseases, at the time the farms were pur- Improvement 

chased. The diseases have been checked. These . . 

orchards. 

orchards, had they been left untreated, would 
have been, at this time, entirely dead, or dying, like eighty per 
cent, of the orchards one sees, travelling between Philadelphia 
and Easton. However, instead of that condition, they have 
been renovated and are looking healthy, giving us the greatest 
crop the)^ have borne for many years. The old peach orchard, 
which three years ago was pronounced worthless, has taken 
on new vigor, put out new wood and has borne us several hun- 
nred baskets of peaches during the past year. 

Our winter lectures, in Forestry and Horticultural subjects, 
have been continued throughout the year. Prof. Irving C. 
Williams, Mr. John S. Lewis, Mr. W. H. Grove, 
Mr. Edwin Lonsdale, and Mr. S. S. Skidelsky Public lecture 
have given most entertaining and practical course. 
lectures upon these subjects. During the entire 
spring and summer, the pupils have been delightfully entertained 
and instructed by a series of moving-picture entertainments, 
which were furnished to us by the kindness of Mr. S. Lubin. 

The Schoenfeld Farms are all conducted in such a manner 
that they are a practical illustration in certain lines of agri- 
culture. It is because we consider them as special illustrations 
and valuable opportunities for instruction, that we speak of 
them under this head. 

Schoenfeld Farm No. i was successfully conducted last year 
by Wm. A. Lauchman and Israel Wallman. Both were emi- 
nently successful, and Mr. Lauchman has been 

equallv successful during the past year on his 

r T^ 1 1 1 -n Tv/r T 1 the Students 

own farm, at Rushland, Pa. Mr. Lauchman owns 

this farm and cultivates it with the aid of his 
brother. I have visited him several times during the year and 
he is having excellent success, quite equal to that of older 
farmers, while Israel Wallman is equally successful as superin- 
tendent of a large farm, at Pequannok, N. J. This year, Farm 
No. I is being conducted by two pupils, Harry Aarons and 



Successes of 
the stude 
on No. 1. 



26 THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

Joseph Sarner. They have had good success. All of our stu- 
dents are watching- them with interest. There is no more prac- 
tical object lesson to our pupils of what each and every one 
of them could do, if they had the opportunity. 

This farm, during the past year, produced 14,061 quarts of 
milk, and much fruit, potatoes, corn, swine and poultry. The 
two students, Aarons and Sarner, are keeping a very accurate 
account of the records of each cow, horse, and of the hens 
and swine, to know definitely which crop and which animals 
give the best returns. 

Schoenfeld Farm No. 2 is a laboratory of orcharding and 

market gardening. We have, at present, a most promising 

., - orchard of sixteen acres of peach and apple trees, 

No- 2, a 1 rr J 

laboratory trimmed, sprayed and entirely cared for by our 

of orcharding students. The experimental bed, containing two 
and gardening. ^(,^gg ^f asparagus, has shown satisfactory growth 
during the past year. We have here also a small orchard of 
quinces. It is intended to add to these each year, until the 
entire farm is a model of orcharding and gardening. 

Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 is used for instruction in general 
farming and marketing. Some of its crops are disposed of by 
sending a market wagon to Philadelphia. This 
No. 3, a model g^ygg ^s an excellent opportunity to instruct our 
for the practi- ... ^- r xu • r j- 

I f rmer pupils m the preparation of their crops for dis- 

posal. The dairy at Number 3. during the year, 
from September, produced 35,171 quarts of milk. The thirteen 
cows milking at the present time are giving more milk than 
sixteen were giving at the same time last year. This means 
that the herd of Number 3 has improved twenty-five per cent, 
upon what it was a year ago, and that the probability of the 
production for the next six months is twenty-five per cent. 
greater than during the same period last year. The receipts 
from the whole farm, for the year, are larger than the previous 
year, together with more material on hand. The gross receipts 
from Farm No. 3, for products sold from September to Sep- 
tember, was $2,900.31. The accounts which we are keeping of 
this farm will be of great value to our students for study. 

The improvements on our Home Farm have been the liming 



WINTER WORK IN HORTICULTURE 



27 




28 THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

of a ten-acre field; the completing of a three-story building: the 

first floor to be used for a wagon-shed, the second 

Improvements ^g ^ carpenter shop, the third for storage of seeds 

and small imp-lemetns. The lake is of great ser- 
Farm. ^ ° 

vice as an ice pond. Last year we were able to 
harvest 200 tons of ice and, if it had not been for the lake, we 
would not have been able to procure a pound, because the 
weather was too mild to make ice on the large ponds or creeks 
distant from the School. The improvement of our dairy herd 
should be noted. It has increased, during the past five years, 
in number of animals, over twenty-five per cent., while the in- 
come per cow, for the past six months, is eighty-four per cent, 
more than it was five years ago. The total number of quarts 
of milk produced for the year ending September 30th, 1909, is 
65,078, which, for a herd of forty animals, counting both young 
and old, is considered very good. 

The past season has, in many respects, been an unusual 
one, in being unfavorable for the production of certain crops 

and extremely favorable for the production of 
The year's others. The average value of crops for the past 

crops. year is rather greater than that of the previous 

year. The hay was much better. The silage 
is about the same. Corn is not so good. The potatoes are a 
decided failure. The peaches, apples and many of the garden 
crop are decidedly better in both quantity and quality than ever 
before, notwithstanding, that we have had a drought, which 
has been unprecedented during the life of The National Farm 
School. The produce delivered by the Farm and Horticultural 
Departments to the Boarding House is of interest. The Board- 
ing Department has received, during the past year, 20,821 quarts 
of milk, 5 barrels sour krout, 6,015 ears of corn, 425 bushels 
potatoes, 100 bushels apples, 800 bunches radishes, 36 bushels 
spinach, 34 bushels carrots, 350 heads lettuce, 50 bushels onions, 
45 bushels tomatoes, 20 bushels salsify, 35 bushels parsnips, 35 
bushels beats, 30 bushels lima beans, 70 bunches asparagus, 6 
bushels kohlrabi, and 12,038 heads of cabbage. The milk, poul- 
try, vegetables, etc., consumed by our School, which was pro- 
duced on our Home Farm, amounts in value $3,520.02. The 
total amount of milk produced on the three farms, during the 
year, is 114,310 quarts. The other products on our Home Farm 
have been satisfactory. We have raised 78 pigs, 200 fowl, 500, 
dozen eggs, put into the barn 116 tons hay, 90 bushels onions, 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 29 

140 tons silage, picked and sold over2,ooo bushels tomatoes, and, 
in the fields yet to be harvested, we have 500 to 600 bushels 
of corn, 400 bushels potatoes, 300 to 400 bushels apples, 5,000 
heads of cabbage, and 2,000 bushels of tomatoes. 

77^1? fact that 60 boys, all of thevi coming to us luiacquaiyited 
with the viost elementary processes of agriculture , are able to care 
for the above animals, cultivate and harvest the crops o?i our 
400 hundred acres, is of itself aii ansiver to the qicestio?i, "will 
the National Faj'm School make farmers of its pupils f ' ' 

The Horticultural Department has added, during the past 

year, to its opportunities for instruction, a new 

1 J xi 1 ^^ .L- Horticulture. 

green-house and a nursery, the latter consisting 

of 250 Conifera, 1,500 flowering shrubs, 1,000 trees, 80 peonies, 

several hundred roses, and 10,000 privets. 

The vegetable garden, the asparagus bed and the vineyard 
have given very satisfactory results, notwithstanding the 
drought. From the greenhouses were sold, dur- 
ing the past year, over 1,000 carnations. A new Gardening. 
heating system was installed, which furnishes 
heat to both the old and new houses. All of the vegetables re- 
ported as being furnished to the Boarding Department, were 
raised in the Horticultural Department. The prospects for 
greenhouse products, for the coming winter, are superior to 
those of a year ago. 

Another addition to our opportunities for instruction has 
been afforded by Air. Max Schoenfeld by his donation of $1,000 
to the School for better roads. We have already 
done much work in the woods and across the Road-building. 
fields in the making of these roads. After the 
harvesting we will devote all of the time available to the per- 
manent improvement of our farm houses. 

Last year, under the topic of needs of the Institution, I 
spoke of the necessity in our library of books along the lines 
of agriculture and allied sciences. We have, at Needs of the 
present, a much better selection of books on Library and 
general literature, history and travel than on the Repair 
the above-mentioned subjects. In the many kind Shop. 
donations, which we have received, most of the books were 
works on literature. I hope that the next year will bring us 
means to purchase the technical works on agriculture and allied 
sciences. Our little blacksmith shop is part of the result of a 



30 



THE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 



donation of blacksmiith tools, received from A'lr. Henry Rosen- 
thal. We are still in need of twenty elementary sets of car- 
penter tools for winter instruction in carpentering. The most 
pressing need at the present time is increased housing for our 
farm animals. 

I want to acknowledge the excellent work done by every 
member of our Faculty. They are conducting courses in theo- 
retical and practical instruction, which require 
The Faculty. as much work and talent, as is demanded of 
teachers, who give the courses in our agricultural 
colleges, where they have from two to three times the teaching 
force, per capita, that is employed at this Institution. The en- 
thusiastic industry of every member and the devout sacrifice of 
their personal time for the good of the Institution, has alone 
made it possible for us to achieve satisfactory results in the 
past year. 

It is with regret that I received the resignation of Prof. 
E. M. Baker, who has given us most devout and efhcient service 
during the past three and a half years. The entire faculty wish 
him God-speed in his new undertaking. The Board of Managers 
have appointed, to succeed Mr. Baker, Mr. Raymond Freas, who 
was instructor in chemistry, during the past year, at Pennsyl- 
vania State College. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN H. WASHBURN. 
Farm School, Pa., October 3, 1909. Director. 




Beginning a Day's Work 
Students receiving orders at the Barns early in the morning 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



What Some of the Graduates of the National 
Farm School are doing. 



Aarons, Harry, Farm School, Pa. — Cultivating Schoenfeld Farm, No. 1, 

on half shares with School. 
Anderson, Victor, Sanatoga, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Berg, Henry, Amesbury, Mass., care of J. E. Chesley — Superintendent of 

fruit farm. 
Brown, Benjamin, Edison, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Chodes, Benjamin, Ithaca, N. Y. — Student in Veterinary, Cornell College. 
Coltun, M. J., Bordentown, N. J. — General Agriculture. 

Condor, Louis, Burlington, Vt. — Student in agriculture, Vermont Uni- 
versity. 
Feldman, Nathan, 865 N. 6th St., Philadelphia — Landscape gardener and 

pomologist. 
Fleisher, Max, Vineland, N. J. — Superintendent of Dairy, N. J. Training 

School. 
Frank, Harrj^ Jacobs P. O., Miss. — Stock Raising. 
Friedman, S., Yorkton Heights, N. Y. — Farm Manager. 
Galblum, Samuel, Eagleville, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Glantz, Emanuel, Beverly, Mass, Cherry Hill Farm — Dairying. 
Goldman, Joseph, Glenwood, Col. — Fruit raising. 
Goldman, Meyer, Norma, N. J. — Instructor in Elementary Agriculture 

to children of Jewish Colony. 
Green, Meyer, New Brunswick, N. J. — Rutger's College. 
Heller, C. J., Norfolk, Va. — Asst. Supt., Va. Truck Experiment Station. 
Hirsch, Harry S., Chicago, 111. — Raises chickens and pigeons. 
Horn, Chas., Philadelphia — Asst. Supt. Phila. Vacant Lot Cultivation 

Association. 
Horn, Irving, Philadelphia — In business. 

Ibaugh, G. W., Valhalla, N. Y.— Director Braer Farm School. 
Kahan, Samuel, Hawthorne, N. Y. — Instructor in Agriculture, Hawthorne 

School. 
Kysela, Rudolph, Denver, Col. — Fruit raising and agricultural machinery. 
Klein, Julian, Chicago, 111. — Auditor. 

Krintzmain, Philip, Elizabeth, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Landsman, Harry — Has gone to Palestine to take up farming for himself 

in a Zionist Colony and to instruct others (not yet heard from). 
Leff, Isador, Guilford, Conn., R. F. D. No. 1— General agriculture. 
Lenik, Benjamin, Earlville, 111., care of S. J. Haight, Jr.— Superintendent 

of farm. 



32 



GRADUATES ON THEIR OWN ACRES 




Brown and His Helper — His Corn-field 




Brown's Poultry 



BENJAMIN BROWN, ON HIS OWN FARM, EDISuN, PA. 



WHAT SOME OF THE GRADUATES ARE DOING 33 

Lauchman, Win., Rushland, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Lee, Elmore — Died in Denver, Col., 1908. 

Leon, IMarcus, Des Aloines, la. — Representing the Pierce Agricultural 

Publications. 
Leib, Louis, Bala, Pa. — Superintendent of estate. 
Major, Edward, Vineland, X. J. — Superintendent of orchards, N. J. 

Training School. 
]\lalish, I\l., Philadelphia, 932 N. 12th St.— Operating a milk route. 
]\Iargoliuth, Aaron, Alinneapolis, ]\Iinn. — General agriculture. 
Miller, Abe, Chicago, 111., 730 W. 61st St.— J. C. Vaughn Seed House. 
]\Iitzmain, 'M. B., Berkeley, Cal. — Asst. Prof, in Entomology, Univ. of 

California. 
Monblatt, Alex., Chicago, 111. — In business. 
IMorris, ]\Iax, Birmingham, Ala. — In business. 
Naum, Harr}^ Xewburgh, N. Y., Aspetong Farm — Dairyman. 
Newman, Abe, Reno, Col. — Fruit raising. 
Norwick, Jacob, Philadelphia — In business. 
Ostrolenk, Bernard, Amherst, ]\Iass. — Student in agriculture, IMassachu- 

setts State Agricultural College. 
Ostrolenk, Lewis, Shippensburg, Pa., R. F. D. Xo. 6 — Orcharding. 
Peyser, Sol., X"ew York, 165 Broadway — Attorne3^ 
Ratner, Henry, Norristown, Pa. — Cultltvating his own farm ("Valley 

Brook Farm"), with his brotliers. 
Ratner, Jacob, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivatting his own farm ("Valley 

Brook Farm"), with his brothers. 
Ratner, Joseph, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm ("Valley 

Brook Farm"), with his brothers. 

Rich, Harry, Havana, Fla. — In charge of tobacco plantations of Wm. 

Taussig Tobacco Co. 
Rock, Louis — Horticulture. 
Rudley, Samuel, Burlington, Vt., care of Chas. H. Foote — In charge of 

estate; student in Horticulture, Vermont University. 

Schlessinger, Al., Hawthorne, N. Y. — Hawthorne School landscape gar- 
deninig. 

Schulman, Harry, St. Louis, Mo. — Orcharding. 

Silverstein, Hyman, Terryville, Conn. — General agricultm'e. 

Snowvice, Wm., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, R. F. D. 1 — General agriculture. 

Stabinsk}^ Julius, Peck, La. — General agriculture. 

Stern, I., X'ew York — Studying agricultural mechanics. 

Taubenhaus, Jacob, X^ewark, Del. — Instructor in Plant Pathology, Dela- 
ware College. 

Wallman, Israel, Pequonnok, N. J. — Farm superintendent. 

Weinberg, Harry, Palestine, Texas — In charge of tobacco plantations of 
Wm. Tausig Tobacco Co. 

Wiseman, J. H., Eagleville, Pa. — In charge of farm of Jewish Consump- 
tive Sanatorium. 

Zallinger, Bernard, Chicago, 111. — 4855 Calumet Ave. — Horticulture. 
Eleven have not been heard from at time of going to press. 
Seven cannot be located. 



34 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Report of the Treasurer of the 
National Farm School 



GENERAL FUND. 

In submitting the Treasurer's Report, from October ist, 
1908, to September 30th, 1909, I desire to call your especial 
attention to the fact that the increase in the number of students 
necessitated a larger expenditure for maintenance, as well as 
additional dormitory room. The dormitory requirement was 
met by converting the building on Schoenfeld Farm No. i, into 
dormitory rooms, and not withstanding the increased number of 
students and the expense of maintaining them, the total main- 
tenance and operation of the National Farm School was $2,373.48 
less than the previous year. The budget system, inaugurated 
two years ago by the Board, has brought about a perfect con- 
dition, inasmuch as the expenditures exceeded the income but 
by the sum of $175. 

Our total receipts for the past year were $32,235.67; our 
expenditure, $32,411.17. We were, therefore, unable to wipe 
out our deficit of 1907 and 1908, and our present deficit is 
$2,286.36. 

Three thousand three hundred and sixty-seven dollars and 
fifty-six cents of the foregoing expenditure was required in 
fitting out the dormitory, installing a new heating system for 
the green houses and erecting wagon and repair shops and 
sheds. These items are properly chargeable to property account 
and not to maintenance. Our net cost of maintenance for the 
past year is, therefore, $29,043.61, being an average cost of $1-14 
per student per day, including instruction, board, clothing and 
every other expense attached to the operation of the school and 
farms. 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 

We have received during the past year $2, 938.05 in bequests 
and special donations, and from Life Memberships the sum of 
$300, all of which has been placed to the credit of our Endow- 
ment Fund, making a total for that fund to date of $70,359.69. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 35 

The total value of our buildings, farms and equipment is 
estimated to be worth $175,000.00, free and clear of all en- 
cumbrances-. 

We owe to banks, etc., $6,522.43. 

FLORA SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARMS. 

The business year of Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 began March 
1st, last. Report attached shows the operation from March 
ist to September 30th — seven months : Income from sale of farm 
products, $1,226.33 ; expenditures, $1,420.20, showing a deficit 
of $193.87 for the seven months. 

There are, however, crops in the barns and in the fields 
to be sold amounting, as estimated by the Director, to about 
$1,750, making the net income from Farm No. 3 approximately 
$1,500 for the business year. 

In connection with the foregoing it should be noted that 
$384.25 was paid for labor expended on Farm No, 3, which, 
if operated by the owner, would mean, that additional amount 
of increase in his net earnings. 

The conception, therefore, of The National Farm School 
and this manner of illustrating how profitably a farm can be 
conducted by farmers, practically and scientifically trained, con- 
clusively shows that, in addition to an honest, honorable living, 
farming can be made to pay. 

The donation of $10,000, by Mr. Max Schoenfeld, for the 
purchase and equipment of the farms designated as "Flora 
Schoenfeld Memorial Farms Nos. i and 2", has now been en- 
tirely expended, as per report attached, and are being operated 
in accordance with the desires of the donor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. H. SILVERMAN, 

Treasurer. 
GENERAL FUND. 
Deficit, September 30, 1908 $ 2,110.86 

RECEIPTS. 

Dues and Donations, Net Receipts $9,888.18 

State of Pennsylvania 8,125.00 

Federation of Jewisli Charities of Philadelpliia 6,400.00 

Interest on Investments 2,962.26 



36 REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

General Fund {Continued). 

Sale of Farm Products 3,824.43 

Received on Account of Students' Board 606.15 

Sale of Pamphlets "Ascendency of Womanhood", Net 

Receipts 149.01 

Memorial Trees, Net Receipts 168.14 $32,123.17 

$30,012.31 

Cash in Hands of Director $ 100.00 

Cash in Hands of Office 12.50 112.50 

$30,124.81 
EXPENDITURES. 

Brooms and Brushes $ 34.72 

Conveyance 635.90 

Dry Goods 1,518.31 

Insurance 368.94 

Fuel 1,566.33 

Groceries 2,146.84 

Ice 39.35 

Lighting 788.82 

Plumbing 801.26 

Printing and Stationery (Including Propaganda) 237.19 

Painting 474.11 

Provisions 4,059.63 

Rent 239.19 

Repairs 498.82 

Supplies, Educational 221.60 

Farm 4,013.63 

Medical 166.97 

Salaries, Matron 600.00 

Officers 2,088.58 

Teachers 5,211.42 

Wages 2,559.86 

Sundries 367.27 

Horticultural Department 379.41 

Library Account 25.46 $29,043.61 

Improvements 3,367.56 

Total Expenditures $32,411.17 

" Receipts 30,124.81 



Deficit, September 30, 1909 $ 2,286.36 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 37 

ENDOWMENT FUND ACCOUNT. 

Balance uninvested, as per previous report $ 1,899.14 

Received, During 1909 3,238.05 

$ 5,137.19 
Amount invested, during 1909 976.44 

Balance uninvested $ 4,160.75 

ENDOWMENT FUND INVESTMENTS. 

1st Mortgage, 5 per cent, 2317-19-21-23 York St $8,000.00 

5 per cent, 2414 Segdley Ave 1,500.00 

5 per cent:, 322 N. 6th St 3,000.00 

" " 5 per cent., 323 Washington Ave., and 

rear 318 League St 2,500.00 

5 per cent, 1323 N. 7th St 3,000.00 

5 4-10 per cent, 611 Lombard St 2,000.00 

5 4-10 per cent, 1837 S. 7th St 1,500100 

5 per cent., 2008-10 S. 10th St 4,000.00 

" 6 per cent., 224 N. Ohio Ave., Atlantic 

City 3,500.00 

" " 6 per cent^j, 117 N. Florida Ave., Atlan- 
tic City 2,600.00 

" " 5 per cent 814.30 Moyamensing Ave.. 8,400.00 

5 per cent, 775 S. 3d St 2,000.00 

5 1-2 per cent, 305 S. 6th St 2,700.00 

51-2 per cent^i, 1619 S. 19th St 1,800.00 

5 4-10 per cent, 1035 South St 5,000.00 

5 per cent., N. W. Cor. 32d & Berks Sts. 4,000.00 

5,000 Market Street "L", 4 per cent 5,050.00 

2,000 Pi & R. 4's, 4 per cent 1,920.00 

1,000 P. R. R. Convertibles, ^Vz per ceat 917.50 

2,000 P. R. R. Convertibles, 3i^ per cent 1,835.00 

Wisconsin Central 1st 4's, 4 per cent 976.44 $66,198'.94 

$70,359.69 

FLORA SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARM NO. 3 

Balance on Hand, March 1st 1909 $ 333.98 

RECEIPTS. 

Sale of Farm Products $1,220.53 

Sundries 5.80 1,226.33 

$ 1,560.31 



38 REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Interest $ 80.06 

Provisions 177.85 

Farm Supplies 703.64 

Wages 384.25 

Repairs 39.31 

Painting 22.20 

Insurance 3. .56 

Printing and Stationery 3.08 

Sundries 6.25 $ 1,420.20 

Balance on Hand, September SOth, 1909 $ 140.11 

FLORA SCHOENFELD MEMORIAL FARM NOS. i AND 2 

Balance unexpended, as per previous report $ 303.82 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
Improvements $ 303.82 

INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 

Original Donation $10,000.00 

FARM NO. 1. 

Real Estate and Buildings $ 5,506.56 

Live Stock 713.64 

Tools and Implements 410.53 

Furniture and Furnishings 59.97 $ 6,690.70 

FARM NO. 2. 

Real Estate and Buildings $ 2,584.86 

Live Stock 491.60 

Tools and Implements 190.00 

Furniture -and Furnishings 42.84 $ 3,309.30 

$10,000.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



CLASS IN LAND MEASUREMENT 




Elementary Surveying of Farm Lands and for Road Building, combining- 
Scientific and Practical Work 

Do Our Agricultural Schools Pay? 

ABSTRACT OF AN ADDRESS 

By SAMUEL S. FLEISHER. Chairman of the Baron De Hirsch Agricultural School. 

at the Twelfth Annual Meeting of The National Farm School, 

Farm School, Pa., Sunday, October 3rd 1909. 



Regarding the agricultural training for the Jewish youth, 
and in answer to the question with which we are always brought 
face to face — "does it pay" ; does the outlay promise commen- 
surate or adequate results : however inclined one may be to 
answer superficially or hastily, there is that in the circumstance 
which must cause him to pause. 

The Baron de Hirsch Agricultural School, of which I have 
the honor and pleasure to be Chairman, inherits its fund from 
that far-sighted son of Israel, Maurice de Hirsch. Baron 
Earlier than any, he foresaw a period of horrible De Hirsch's 
tribulation for our people in Russia such as few foresight and 
eras in the career of any people compare with, sagacity. 
With sure foresight, he divined that an enormous exodus of Jews 



40 DO AGRICULTURAL SCHOOLS PAY? 

from that country was inevitable. With similar sagacity he 
concluded that the safety of the new immigration, wheresoever 
it might go, required recognition of the fact that we were dealing, 
not with sporadic or individual immigration, such as has been 
known, but with the impending removal of a whole people — 
capitalists, scholars and laymen. How best to establish them 
in their new seats was the question. 

Swelling the trading, the mercantile, the financial and pro- 
fessional classes was not the solution. The agricultural and 
Exploding dan- mechanical work of the new country must also 
gerous myths be represented. For the latter, trade schools have 
concerning the been provided, and the myth that the Jew can 
•^^^^ only peddle and trade has already been exploded. 

The more dangerous myth that the Jew will not till the soil, 
and thus identify himself with the very body of the land on 
which he lives, unfortunately, still flourishes. Those who know, 
however, will convince you that even though the Jew has been 
forcibly weaned from the land, he has not lost love or hunger 
for it. 

Nothing can be more pathetic than the state of mind of 
thousands of Russian adults who, reared in pursuits as far as 
. . possible away from agriculture, dream that, if left 

Dreams versus iree, they can at once take up an agricultural 
Practical Edu- pursuit and succeed in it ; but while these dreams 
cation. ^^^ ^^^ ^g realized, it surely is as practicable to 

train the young mind to the agricultural career as to any other. 
It is not practicable to turn out farmers by the thousands and 
tens of thousands in any one year, or in any short space of time, 
but it is within our power to pursue steadily and unflinchly an 
educational movement which will, in proper time, secure to Israel 
in America, as in the Argentine and other countries, its due pro- 
portion of agriculturists. Thus we come a little nearer to an- 
swering the question — "does it pay?" 

In the ordinary mercantile sense, which demands a direct 
yearly return for capital and labor invested, no scheme of edu- 
cation ever pays. In that sense, universities, 
When educa- colleges and even common schools are non-pay- 
tion does not . ^^^ however, heightened individual and na- 

and does pay. . , , r it > ^ -i.- 

tional character, saner use of life s opportunities, 

better thinking and living for all, are to be counted as good 



DO AGRICULTURAL SCHOOLS PAY? 41 



things, then these so-called non-paying investments yield 
usurious interest. In that sense, and in that sense alone, zve 
onszccr tJic question zvith an emphatic affirmative. Even though 
it is true that an average pupil costs between $550 and $600 
per year in this expensive country, the expense 
does not compare unfavorably with that of other ^° ^°^P'*^'^ 
similar institutions. Our great charitable estab- 
lishments, such as hospitals, cost more per capita. Are we 
ashamed of that expense? On the contrary, it is a proud feather 
in Israel's cap. 

A personal investigation shows that the physical, moral 
and financial conditions of the Jewish farms are beyond reproach. 
I desire to lay especial stress upon the physical qq tuberculo- 
benefits derived through its occupation. Tuber- sis and delin- 
culosis, which has claimed so many victims quent children 
among the city workers, is practically unknown. P^^" 
There is no need of probation or truant officers ; in fact, we find 
that children are frequently sent to farms as a means of curing 
delinquency. 

When we reflect that every generatioyi lives by its active 

healthy workers^ and that countries grow great by their exertions, 

we must realize that the growth of the healthy Does the 

zvorker conduces more directly to the 7iational iv el fare healthy 

than the mere comforting of the afflicted. We owe worker pay? 

duties to the healthy nation as tirgerit as those we ozve to its 

ailiyip; conting^eyit, and when, as in our case, every _ ... ,, 
<^ * ' ' ' -; Emphatically, 

class of students that we send from the school is agriCUL- 
a powerful missionary agent calling on countless TURAL 
others to e?iter upon a new and ziseful field of SCHOOLS DO 
labor he?'etofore inaccessible, we may say with 
emphcLsis, and zvith confidence , that the u?idertaki7ig does pay, and 
that it is profitable i?i the highest setise of the zvord. 

When we reflect that there are more than 1,500,000 Jews 
in the United States, it seems small to say that their rural 
population is about 25,000. If, however, we re- 
call that thirty years ago there was practically What the 

, , 1 , J 1 future holds 

no Jewish rural population, the stupendous char- ^^^^y^^ 

acter of what has been achieved will appear. 
Still more, if we consider that our present rural population ex- 
ceeds the whole Jewish population of the United States seventy 
years ago, we begin to realize the possibilities of our movement 
to further encourage agricultural pursuits among our people. 



42 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Report of the Ladies' Auxiliary 
Committee. 



The Ladies' Auxiliary Committee of The National Farm 
School, during the third year of its association with the Executive 
Board, met regularly each month and did most excellent work in 
the interest and welfare of the institution. Committees of four of 
the ladies made consecutive monthly visits to the School and re- 
ported the existing conditions, making suggestions for improve- 
ment here and there and endeavoring, in every way possible, to 
benefit the management of the School, especially the household and 
domestic arrangements. 

The treasurer's report of the Ladies' Auxiliary Committee and 
the report of the Sewing Circle follow. 

MRS. MARTHA S. FLEISHER, 

Chairman, Protem. 



1908 


Nov. 


15, 


Nov. 


16, 


Nov. 


24, 


1908 


Nov. 


24, 


Nov. 


30, 


1909 


Jan. 


28 


Feb. 


6, 


Feb. 


23, 


Apr. 


17, 


Jun. 


3, 


Nov. 


10, 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

RECEIPTS 

Balance, as reported $89.99 

Mrs. J. Sondheim 5.00 

Mr. and Mrs. S- Weil 10.00 

$104.99 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Purchase of Buttons $ 5.96 

Waste Paper Baskets 10.00 

Christmas Gifts 8.00 

35 yards Binding 1.05 

N. Snellenburg & Co., (Notions, etc.) 4.35 

20 yards Rubber Cloth 16.00 

N. Snellenburg & Co., (Notions, etc.) 5.36 

Balance on Hand 54.27 

$104.99 

MKS. J. GUCKEXHEIMER, 

Treasurer. 



REPORT OF LADIES' AUXILIARY 43 



The National Farm School Sewing Circle. 

The National Farm School Sewing Circle, under the direction 
of the Ladies' Auxiliary Committee, commenced its season's work 
on November 5th, 1908, and met regularly in the Sewing Room 
of Temple' Keneseth Israel on the first and third Thursday of 
every month, throughout the season, until April, 1909. The ladies 
labored 'most diligently, and the 559 pieces made and sent to the 
School went far towards supplying the needs of the institution. 
As the demands for the necessary articles for the linen room, 
owing to the increased number of students, are much greater than 
ever before, all those desiring to help in this good work are most 
welcome; and donations, preferably of money, would be most 
gratefully accepted by the Sewing Circle to enable it to continue 
in its noble work. 

DONATIONS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR 

Bamberger, Mrs. A. J $ 5-00 

Bendheim, Mrs. (Through Mrs. H. Rosenthal) 5.00 

Bierwald, Mrs. Joel 1-00 

Blumenthal, Mrs. Sol 5.00 

Fleisher, Mrs. A 12-00 

Gels, Mrs. M 3-00 

Goldstein, Wm. (Through Mrs. H. Rosenthal) 5.00 

Goldstein Mrs. Chas S. (Through Mrs. H. Rosenthal) 10.00 

Guckenheimer Mrs. J 10.00 

Krauskopf, Mrs. Jos 5.00 

Raab, Mrs. Julia 5.00 

Silverman, Mrs. I. H 5.00 

Sycle, Mrs. M. 5.00 

A Friend (Through Mrs. Hart Blumenthal), Large Lot of Buttons 

Fleisher, Mrs. A 2 Dozen Bath Towels 

Lederer, Mrs. Geo., in Memory of her Daughter, Mrs. D. L. Bam- 
berger 10 yards of Muslin 

Nelke, Mrs. H 1 Piece of Glass Toweling 

Schoneman, Mrs. R. B 3 Dozen Bath Towels 

Snellenburg, Mrs. N 2 Pieces of Toweling 

Articles made and sent to the School: 

50 Sheets, 76 Pillow Cases, 191 Towels, 60 Bath Towels, 
24 Laundry Bags^ 38 Waiters' Aprons, 120 Napkins. 

MRS. ROSA B. SCHONEMAN, 

Chairman. 



|S■i|!|S|Jp)JS|■>^JI|^>i|•|^g;|;?^ 



Scholarship and Prizes Endowed 



^- 



Scholarships 



igo8— "WM. S. RAYNER SCHOLARSHIP." The 
income of $5,000 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by his daughter, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 

1908— "DR. SAMUEL L. FRANK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP." The income of $5,000 contributed to 
the Endowment Fund by his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 



Pri 



zes 



igo7_"THE HERBERT T. HYMAN PRIZES." 
The interest of $150 donated by Mrs. Bernard 
Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the En- 
dowment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of New 
York, in memory of his father. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the En- 
dowment Fund by Mrs. Louis S. Eliel, in 
memory of her father. 



$JiJmMm4<ifi$Ji^^^^^ 





Prizes to Students 





The appeal made to friends of the school to con- 
tribute money prizes for efficiency in the various de- 
partments of the School, was answered, to so pleasing 
an extent, that, during the past year, $237.50, in cash, 
were awarded to the various students at the School for 
proficiency, effort and improvement. The money for 
these prizes is contributed as follows: 

"The Herbert T. Hyman Prizes." The interest ol $150.0( 
donated by Mrs. Bernard Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of $250.00 
contributed to the Endowment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of 
New York, in memory of his father. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of $250.00 
contributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. L. S. Eliel, of 
Philadelphia, in memory of her father. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, (annual) $25.00 

Mr. Joseph Potsdamer, (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Samuel Grabfelder, (annual) 25.00 

Mr. Louis Loeb, in memory of his wife, (annual) . . 25.00 

Members of Camp Arden, Philadelphia 25.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Cohen, Pittsburg, (annual) . . 20.00 
Mr. and Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in 

memory of their son, Ralph, (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Jacob Cartun, Philadelphia, 10.00 

Mr. Ralph Blum, Philadelphia, (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Moe Lieberman, Philadelphia, (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. L. Marks, Chicago, (annual) 10.00 

Mr- I. H. Silverman, Philadelphia, (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Henry C. Schmidt, Philadelphia 10.00 

Mr. S. S. Skidelsky, Philadelphia 10.00 

Mr. Samuel D- Lit, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mr. Edward Alburger, Cynwyd, Pa 2.00 

Mr. Harry L. Stern Philadelphia 2.00 




w 
w 



s,®M®, 



SnU'3^ 

V 






Farms Donated 



In memory of Flora Schoenfeld, 

by her husband, Max Schoenfeld, 

of Rorschach, Switzerland. 



I. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. i, 

40 acres, in the Spring of 1904. 

II. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2, 

38 acres, in the Spring of 1905. 

III. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, 

163 acres, in the Fall of 1907. 



These farms all adjoin the original tract of 
Farm School land. 



fe^rtw 




1 

t% 







yrfc) 



m 



.1 

IS 



®1 /^, 



I 

all 



In memory of Ida M. Bloch, Kansas City, Mo., by her 
husband and family. Erected iS 



III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory, 

In memory of Zadok M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., 
by his wife. Erected 1899. 

IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Rose Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
her children. Erected 1899. 



V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1899. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall, 

Containing Library, lyecture Hall, Administration Of- 
fices and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Erected 1906. 

VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing 
Green House, 

In memory of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband. 
Erected looS. 









sMra 
(Aim. 



gA'fs, 





Mi®, 



Permanent Improvements 



I. Lake Archer Rcsenthal 

In memory of Archer Rosenthal, Philadelphia, Pa., by his brother 
and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, buiit in 1908. 

11. Elise Binswangfer Nursery 

In memory of Elise Binswanger, Kansas City, Mo., by her grandson 
and granddaughter, planted in 1909. 




GRADUATES ON THEIR OWN ACRES 




Victor Anderson, his father and hired man, (a Russian Jew), in the field, Sanatoga, Pa. 



Legacies and Beque^s 



-tS'lllllS 



IMoney received in legacies and bequests is placed in the 

Endowment Fund. 
Estate of — 

1905 — Moses Lichten $ 500 00 

1906 — INIarx Wineland, Erostberg, Md., 500 00 

1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia, 

(For Bernard and Frances Seligman Library Alcove),. . . 200 OO 

— Fannie Houseman, Philadelphia, 

(In memory of her son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman), . lOO OO 

— Edward Popper, Greenville, Texas, lOO oo 

—Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia, 200 00 

— Fannie Simon, Philadelphia, 50 00 

— Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia, 500 00 

1908 — Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala., 100 00 

— Eleanore Samuel, Philadelphia, 343 29 

" — Solomon Blumenthal, Philadelphia, 250 00 

1909 — Moses H. Stern, Philadelphia 500 00 

" — Esther Sailer, Philadelphia, 78 05 

" — Rebecca Haas, Indianapolis, Ind., 100 00 

" — Blanche Loeb, New York 1,000 00 



M 



emoria 



1 T 



rees 



15)- 



Planted in Spring, 1909, fn Memory of 



Josephine S. Adler 
Sophie Arnold 
Sophia Aarons 
Sidney Adler 
Michael Asher 
Sophia Asher 
Isaac Bernstein 
Rebeccah Bernstein 
Hannah H. Bash 
Morris H. Bash 
Adeline Dreifus 
Carrie Dreifus 
Henry Frank 
Babetta Frank 
Herbert Goldstein 



D. Frank Greenewald 
David Goldman 
Ida Grant 
Pauline Hilbronner 
Hedwig Holzmark 
Henry Klein 
Pauline Kamsler 
Morris Krauskopf 
Henrietta Krauskopf 
Benjamin Klodowsky 
Etta Laura Lieberman 
Bertha Ullman Loeb 
Pauline Landau 
Jennie W. Levine 
Alexander Loeb 
Benjamin Metzel 



Solomon Mastbaum 

Minna Davidson Mastbaum 

Julius Oppenheimer 

Reuben Pimentel 

Archer Rosenthal 

Annie E. Raphael 

Rachel S. Skidelsky 

Hannah Springer 

Jennie Sobel 

Moses II. Stern 

Caroline Washer 

Adolph Wonderlich 

Anna Mailert Zellner 

Isaac Zellner 

Sophia Zweighaft 



The National Farm School 



AND 



The Federation of Jewish Charities 

= of Philadelphia ===^^==== 



Abstract from Dr. Krauskopf's Message, October 3, 1909 

We have continued to receive from the Federation 
of Jewish. Charities of Philadelphia the annual con- 
tribution of $6,400. Four years ago, the Federation 
began this policy of donating this sum, for which we 
are deeply grateful. Although we have almost doubled 
our number of students, although the annual expense 
of maintenance has materially advanced, the Federa- 
tion has not been enabled to increase our allowance 
correspondingly. Were larger funds available for this 
Society, we would, no doubt, receive our share of the 
larger income. Unfortunately, however, the Federation 
does not yet receive from our community that larger 
support which its good work deserves. Many have 
not yet enrolled themselves in the Federation, and 
others do not give commensurate with their means- 
With returning prosperity, it is to be hoped that people 
will do their full duty to the Federation, which might 
enable us to profit from a larger appropriation, and 
hence to extend the usefulness of our institution. 

LEGACIES AND ENDOWMENTS 

TO THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITY OP 
PHILADELPHIA 

1902— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG, in memory of her 

husband, Isaac Hamberg $ iqo go 

1902— CHILDREN OF DAVID ETTINGER, in memory 

of their father loo oo 

1903— MRS. ALICE HAGEDORN, in memory of her 

husband, John J. Hagedorn S,ooo oo 

1903— HERMAN JONAS 7,300 00 

1903— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) 100 00 

1903— ERNST KAUFMANN 2,000 00 

1904— MRS. CARRIE HAMBERG (additional) 100 00 

1904— AUGUSTUS MARKS, in memory of his wife, 

Virginia Marks 50 00 

1904— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 10 00 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 10000 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1905— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1905— SIGMUND ROEDELHEIM 50000 

1905— MRS. CARRIE KRIEGER, in memory of her 

husband, Samuel Krieger 1,000 00 

190S — WM. KRIEGER, in memory of his father, 

Samuel Krieger . 100 00 

190s— HERMAN B. BLUMENTHAL 2,00000 

1905— S. M. and M. S. FRIDENBERG, in memory 

of Esther, wife of S. JM. Fridenberg 1,000 00 

1906— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 100 00 

1906— AUGUSTUS MARKS (additional) 40 00 

1908— MRS. FANNIE A. LEBERMAN 500 00 

1908— ISSAC HERZBERG 3,000 00 

1909— CHILDREN OF THE LATE SIMON AND 

ROSA FLEISHER, creating the Simon and Rosa 

Fleisher Endowment S,ooo 00 



THE GRADUATES' AID FUND 

The Graduates' Aid Fund, founded by Mr. William Volker, 
of Kansas City, Mo., has for its object the building up of a fund, 
the interest of which is to be devoted to extending loans to suchi 
of the graduates of The National Farm School who shall establish 
themselves on farms of their own. 

Contributions have been received from : 

Mr. William Volker, Kansas City, Mo $150.00 

Mr. A. W. Benjamin, Kansas City, Mo 100.00 



SUNDRY DONATIONS 

Abraham, Miss Hetty 8 Volumes for Library 

Alburger, Mrs. M. M., Phila. . . . Stock Chrysanthemums and Other Plants 

Armhold, Miss Nettie, Phila. .'. Table Silverware 

Aschenbach & Miller, Phila Quantity of Drugs 

Baum, Mr. Isidore, Phila Whiskey for Medicinal Purposes 

Blumenthal, Mrs Hart, Phila. . . White Spread and Sewing-Room Sundries 
Blumenthal, Mr. Walter H., Phila., 34 Volumes of the Works of Thomas 

Carlyle. 
Diligent Sewing Circle, through Mrs. H. J. Tictiner, Phila., Pillow Cases 

and towels. 

Epstein, Mr. Paul, Boston, Mass 50 Large Gas Mantles 

Friedberger, Mr. Simon, Phila 2 Fire Extinguishers 

General Light Co., Phila "Aceterator" 

Hennings, John & Son, Phila. . . 400 ft. Iron Pipe for Railing around Lake 

Hirsch, A., Atlantic City, N. J 12 Suits of Clothing 

Jewish Publication Society, Phila 2 Volumes for Library 

Manischewitz, B., Cincinnati, Ohio 300 Pounds Matxos 

Mann, William Cd., Phila $5.00 on Duplicating Machine 

Mansbach, Dr. Louis A., Phila 28 Books for Library 

Martin, John, Phila., Set of Books, "Messages and Papers of the Presi- 
dents". 

Mulford, H. K. Co., Phila Quantity of Drugs 

Needlework Guild of America, Phila., 278 Pieces of Wearing Apparel 

and Pillow Cases. 
Nixon, W. H., of the Martin and Wm. H. Nixon Paper Co., Phila., Paper 

for this Book. 

Powers, Weightman, Rosengarten & Co., Phila Quantity of Drugs 

Price & Co., Thos. W Paper for Cover of this Book 

Rosenthal, Mr. Harry, Phila., Blacksmith and Carpenter Tools to the 

amount of $114.00. 

Snellenburg, Mrs. J. J., Phila Shuffle Board 

Stern, Mr. Harry L. and Sisters, Phila., 33 Books for "Lina Stern Memorial 

Alcove". 

The National Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mich Year's Subscription 

The National Farm School Sewing Circle, Phila. . . Sewing-Room Sundries 

The Western Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mo Year's Subscription 

Weil, Mr. and Mrs. S., Phila : $10 for Waste Paper Baskets 

Wolf, Hon. Clarence, Phila., Copies Annual Reports Depts. of Fisheries 

and Agriculture of Pa. 
Wolf & Co., Phila Envelopes for Mailing this Book 



52 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SENIOR CLASS 

AARONS, HARRY Milwaukee, Wis. 

BLACKMAN, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSEXSTEIN', LEONARD Milwaukee, Wis. 

SILVER, CHARLES Philadelphia, Pa. 

SOBEL, SOLOMON New York City, N. Y. 

SOLOMON, EMANUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

SPEYER, AARON Cleveland, O. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

ATKATZ, JOSEPH New York City, N. Y. 

GOLDBERG, BENJAMIN Pittsburg, Pa. 

HALBERT, MICHAEL Norma, N. J. 

HAUSMAN, SAMUEL ^'ew York City, N. Y. 

LANDSMAN, HARRY New York City, N. Y. 

LEFF, ISADOR Xew York City, N. Y. 

LEBESON, HYMAN Philadelphia, Pa. 

MARGOLIN, LOUIS New York City, N. Y. 

MICHELSON, MOSES Indianapolis, Ind. 

MILLER, JOSEPH Pittsburg, Pa. 

ROCKLIN, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

SARNER, JOSEPH Philadelphia, Pa. 

SPARBERG, LOUIS Superior, Wis. 

WOLF, HAROLD Philadelphia, Pa. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

DRUCKERMAN, BENJAMIN New York City, N. Y. 

EINSTEIN, SYLVAN Reading, Pa. 

ERDE, HERMAN New York City, N. Y. 

FINK, LOUIS Buffalo, N. Y. 

FINKEL, ALBERT Philadelphia, Pa. 

GABRIEL, ISRAEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

HOFFMAN, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEBESON, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEVIN, JULIUS Providence, R. 1. 

LUBIN, HARRY New York City, N. Y. 

MOSKOVITZ, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

PACKER, BENJAMIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

PUTTERMAN, MORRIS Detroit. Mich. 

REITZES, MORRIS GloversvUle, N. Y. 

ROSENFELT, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

RUBENSTEIN, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

SALINGER, MORRIS Des Moines, la. 

SCHLOSSBERG, HARRY Carmel, N. J. 

STRAUS, DAVID Louisville, Ky. 

STRICK:MAN, Abraham Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

ALLMAN, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

BERNSTEIN, LOUIS Chicago, 111. 

BROUDE, harry Philadelphia, Pa. 

CHESIN, ISIDORE Philadelphia, Pa. 

EINSTEIN, DAVID Philadelphia, Pa. 

EPSTEIN, ABRAHAM Brooklyn, N. Y. 

EPSTEIN, SAMUEL Boston, Mass. 

FRIEDMAN, DAVID New York City, N. Y. 

GREENSPAN, PERRY •• Philadelphia, Pa. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



53 



GORIN, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

HAAS, ISAAC Philadelphia, Pa. 

HARRISON, BERYL Des Moines, la. 

KELTZ, MICHAEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

KLEIN, ABRAHAM Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEVY, JEROME Chicago, 111. 

LEWIS, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

LIPSCHUTZ, NATHAN Philadelphia, Pa. 

LY'ONS, JULIUS Egg Harbor, N. J. 

MARCUS, JESSE Chicago, 111. 

MINKOWSKY, JACOB Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MORRELL, JACOB Savannah, Ga. 

OFSOFF, NATHAN Philadelphia, Pa. 

PLOTKIN, MICHAEL Brooklyn, N. Y. 

POPOLOW, PHILIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

ROSENBERG, NATHAN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ROSENBERG, ABRAHAM Chicago, 111. 

ROSENBLOOM, WILLIAM Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SILVERGLATE, ELLIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

SPECTER, HARRY Washington, D. C. 

SPIELMAN, JACOB New York City, N. Y. 

SWEETMAN, LAWRENCE Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WEISS, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

WITKIN, ABRAHAM Philadelphia, Pa. 



IN THE CLASS ROOM 




Where the Scientific Study precedes the actual Practice of Agriculture. 



54 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Life Members 



One payment of 
ALABAMA 
Mobile. 
Bemheimer, Mrs. L. 
CALIFORNIA 
Bakersfieid. 
Cohn, C. 

ENGLAND 
London. 
Meyer, Arthur 

ILLINOIS 
Champaign. 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 
Kuhn, Florence L. 
Chicago. 

Mandel, Leon 
Stettauer, Mrs. D. 
INDIANA 
Ligonier. 
Strauss, Ike 
Strauss, Jacob 
IOWA 
Waveriy 

A. Slimmer 
Sioux City a 

Wise, Mrs. Chas. 
LOUISIANA 
New Orleans. 
District Grand Lodge, 

No. 7, I. O. B. B. 
Newman, Isadore 
MARYLAND 
Baltimore. 

*Rayner, Wm. S. 
MASSACHUSETTS 
Boston. 
Hecht, Mrs. Lina 
Shuman, A. 

MISSISSIPPI 
Natchei. ^3 

Frank, H. 

MISSOURI 
St- Louis. 

*Rice, Jonathan 
Stix, C. A. 

NEW YORK 
New York. i 

Abraham, A. 
Blumenthal, Geo. 
Budge, Henry 
Guggenheimer, Wm. 
Krauskopf, Mary G. 
Lewisohn, Adolph 
Meyer, Wm. 
Silberberg, G. 
Sidenberg, G. 
•Deceased. 



$100.00, one time, into the 
Niagara Falls. 

Silverberg, Bertha 
Rochester. 

Lowenthal,, M. 

Silberberg, M. 

Silberberg, G. 

Silberberg, G. 
OHIO 
Cincinnati. 

Block, Samuel 

Lowman, Leo. J. 

Meis, Henry 
Columbus. 

B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood 

Lazarus, Fred'k 

Lazarus, Ralph 

Miller, Leopld 

Zion Lodge No. 62, 
L O. B. B. 
Youngstown. 

Theobald, Mrs. C. 
PENNSYLVANIA 
Allegheny. 

Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 
Altoona. 

Henry, S. Kline 
Langhorne. 

Branson, I. L. 
Philadelphia. 

Betz & Son 

Bloch, B. B. 

Blum, Ralph 
*Blumenthal, Herman 

Blumenthal, Sol. 

Byers, Jos. J. 

Clothier, Isaac H. 

Federation Jewish 
Charities 

Fleisher, Martha S. 

Grant, Adolph 

Harrison, C. C. 

Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
*Jonas, Herman 

Kaas, Andrew 

Kaufman, Morris A. 

Kayser, Samuel 

Krauskopf, Harold 

Langfeld, A. M. 

Levy, Sol. 

Lit, S. D. 
*Merz, Daniel 

Merz, Mrs. Regina 

Muhr, Jacob 
*Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
*Pfaelzer, Simon 

Reform Congregation 



Endowment Fund. 
Keneseth Israel 
*Rorke, Allen B. 
Rosenberg, Grace 
Rosenberg, Walter J. 
Rosenberg, Walter I. 
Schloss, Mrs. Herman 
Schoch, Henry R. 
Silberman, Mrs. Ida 
Silverman, I. H. 
*Snellenberg, J. J. 
Snellenberg, Nathan 
Snellenberg, Samuel 
Stemberger, Samuel 
*Teller, Benj. F. 
Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
*Teller, Joseph R. 
Trautman, Dr. B. 
Wanamaker, John 
*Weiler, Herman 
Wolf, I., Jr. 
Zweighaft, Simon 
Pittsburg. 
Browarsky, Max 
Cohen, Aaron 
Cohen, Josiah 
Dreifus, C. 
*Frank, Samuel, by his 
son Ed. K. Frank 
Guckenheimer, Isaac 
Hamburger, Philip 
Hanauer, A. M. 
Kaufman Bros. 
Marcus, Aaron 
Solomon & Rubin 
Weil, A. Leo 
Weil, J. 
SWITZERLAND 
Rorschach. 
Schoenfeld, Max 
TEXAS 
Dallas. 
Sanger, Alexander 
Sanger, Mrs. Philip 
Silberstein, A. 
VIRGINIA 
Norfolk. 
Ladies' Hebrew Be- 
nevolent Asso. 
Richmond. 
Milheiser, Gustave 
Milheiser, Mrs. R. 
WEST VIRGINIA 
Wheeling. 

Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
WASHINGTON 
Seattle. 

Galland, Bonham 
Galland, Mrs. C K. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



55 



List of Members and Contributors 

For the Year Ending September 30, 1909. 



ALABAMA. 

Alexander City 
Herzfeld, R ?5.00 

Birmingham 

Adler, Morris 10.00 

Congregation 

Emanu-El 5.00 

Gadsden 

Frank, Ferdinand.. 5.00 

Huntsviile 

Ermann, Carrie & 
Gustav 5.00 

Livingston 
Levy, M 5.00 

Mobile 

*Bernheimer, Mrs. L., 
Council of Jewish 

Women of Mobile S-oo 
Forchheimer, M. .. 25.00 
Hess, Henry 5.00 

Montgomery 

Kahl, Montgomery 10.00 

Kahn, M 5.00 

Ivoeb, Jacques .... S.oo 

Sheffield 

Goldman, Mr. and 
Mrs. H 10.00 

Selma 
Levy, D 5.00 

Uniontown 

Ernst, A. E., for 
Israelites of town 5.00 

Meyer, F 5.00 

Pake, L. J 5.00 

Wetumpka 

Hohenberg, M.&Co. 5.00 

ARIZONA. 

Tucson 

Jacobs, M. Lionel 10.00 

ARKANSAS. 

Fulton 

Rosenberg, Geo. .. 10.00 

Helena 

Solomon, Louis . . 2.00 

Huntington 

Mayer, Herman . . 5.00 



*Life Member. 



Little Rock 

Abeles, Chas. T... 10.00 
B'nai Israel Con- 
gregation 10.00 

Cohen, M. M 7-^ 

Lasker, Mrs. A. .. S-oo 
Pfeifer, Albert ... 5.00 
Pfeifer, Jos., Cloth- 
ing Co 5-00 

Pine Bluff 
Rosenberg, F. M. . 10.00 

Roth, L S-oo 

CALIFORNIA. 

Bakersfield, Cal. 

*Cohn, C. 
Fresno 

Einstein, Louis & 

Co 10.00 

La Jolla 

Lieber, W. S 5.00 

Lieber, Mrs. W. S. E.OO 

Los Angeles 

Cohn, Kaspard 10.00 

Davidson, Mrs. H. 1.00 
Hecht, Rabbi S. (D.D.) 2.00 

Hoffman, Hugo .. 5.00 

Meyer, Alex B.OO 

Newmark, Harris.. 10.00 

Watchorn, Robert 10.00 

Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A 10.00 

Cohen, Isadore ... 5.00 

Jaffee, M. S B.OO 

Weinstock, Harris. 25.00 

San Francisco 

Hirschfelder, Dr. J. 0. 5.00 

Levi, Jac, Sr 10.00 

Schwabacher, Abe. 5.00 

Sloss, Mrs. M. C... B.OO 

COLORADO. 

Colorado Springs 
Cahn, Isaac 5.00 

Denver 

Eisner, Dr. J 5.00 

Eppstein, A. M.... 5.00 

Kubitshek, Henry.. 10.00 

CONNECTICUT. 

Hartford 
Lyons, Bernhard... 5.00 

Nev7 Haven 

Adler, Max 5.00 

Ullman, Isaac M... 5.00 

Waterbury 
Chase, Isidor 5.00 



DELAWARE. 

Seaford 

Greenebaum, E. .. 5.00 

Van Leer, Chas. .. 5.00 

Wilmington 

Faber, Jacob 5.00 

Levy, D. L... 10.00 
l.ieberman, Rosa . . 10.00 
Moses Montefiore 

Beneficial Society 5.00 

A. Rothschild .... 10.00 
DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA. 

Washington, D. C. 

Behrend, Amnon .. 5.00 

Berlawski, A 2.00 

Berliner, Emil ... 25.00 

Blout, Isaac L 5.00 

Blumenfeld, Mrs. M.. 5.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Edw.. 10.00 

Cohen, Max B.OO 

Deborah Lodge ... 5.00 

Eisenmann, Jacob. 2.00 

Frledlander, H. .. B.OO 

Goldenberg, M. . . 5.00 

Hahn, Wm 5.00 

Hecht, Alex lO.OO 

Herman, Mrs. Mom- 

nle 5.00 

Herman, Saml. ... 5.00 

Hillman, Joel 6.00 

Kahn, Sigmund .. 5.00 

Kaufman, Dr. H... 1.00 

Kaufman, Mrs. Marx 1.00 

Kohner, Max 5.00 

Luchs, Mrs. Julia 2.00 

Luchs, Leopold ... 5.00 

Marks, Mrs. A. D.. 2.00 

Oppenheimer, Sim'n 5.00 

Prince, A. D 5.00 

Rich, M. M 3.00 

Salamon, B 1.00 

Sondheimer, J. . . 5.00 

Wallerstein, Mrs. G. 1.00 
Washington Hebrew 

Congregation .... B.OO 

FLORIDA. 

Kissimmee 

Katz, M 5.00 

Miami 

Cohen, Isidore — B.OO 



56 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Pensacola 

Hebrew Ladles' Ben. 

Society B.OO 

Jacoby, M 5.00 

Falahassee 

Hirschberg, Julius. 10.00 

Warrington 

Herschkovitz, David 5.00 

GEORGIA. 
Albany 

Brown, S. B 10.00 

Atlanla 
Council Jewish Wo- 
men 10.00 

Hebrew Benevolent 

Cong 10.00 

Hebrew Ladies' Ben. 

Society 10.00 

Hirshberg, Isaac A. 5.00 
Dublin 
Weischselbaum S.&Co. 5.00 

Eastman 

Herrman, Mrs. J. 

D S-oo 

Macon 

Wolff, Edw 10.00 

Sandersville 

Cohen, Louis 5.00 

Savannah 

Levy, B. H 5.00 

Mohi", Amson... 5.00 

West Point 

Hagedorn, P 5.00 

Hagedorn, Z 5.00 

IDAHO 
Boise 

Ladies' Judith 
Montiflore Soc 5.00 

ILLINOIS. 

Athens 

Salzenstein, C. S.. 5.00 
Champaign, III. 

*Kuhn, Caroline L. 
♦Kuhn, Florence L. 

Chicago 

Adier, Mrs. D B.OO 

Alsehuler, S 5.00 

Becker Bros. & Co. 10.00 

Born & Co., M 10.00 

Davis, J B.OO 

Despres, Samuel .. B.OO 

Eisenstaedt, I. ... 10.00 
♦Life Member. 



Foreman, Oscar . . 5.00 

Frank, Henry L... 10.00 

Friend, A. S 10.00 

Friedman, Mrs. Mina B.OO 

Gatzert, August .. B.OO 

Gimbel, C. A 10.00 

Greenebaum, Ellas. 10.00 

Greenebaum Sons.. 5.00 

Harris, Mrs. S. H. B.OO 

Heyman, E. S 10.00 

Isaiah Sabbath School 10.00 

Katz, E 10.00 

Klee, Max 10.00 

Kohn, Isaac 5.00 

Lebolt, J. Y., mem- 
ory of Mr. and 

Mrs. L. E. Lebolt 10.00 
*Mandel, Leon. 

Mandel, Simon 5.00 

Orschel, Mrs. I. .. 5.00 

Reitler, Chas 10.00 

Richter, Simon 5.00 

Rosenwald, M. S... 5.00 

Rothschild, M. L... 5.00 

Rubovitz, Toby ... 5.00 
Schanfarber, Rabbi T. 5.00 

Schlessinger, H. J. 10.00 

Schwabacher, M... 10.00 

Stein, A 10.00 

Stein, Ignatz 10.00 

Steele, H. B 5.00 

♦Stettauer, Mrs. D. 

Stone, A. L 10.00 

Stolz, Rev. Dr. 

Jos 5.00 

Straus, A. S 5.00 

Subert, Mrs. B B.OO 

Wurmser, J 5.00 

Zalinger, B 5.00 

Galesburg 

Jewish Aid Society 5.00 

Spear, S 5.00 

Lincoln 

Griesheim, Meyer.. 3.00 

Lehrberger, Leo. . . 2.00 

Moline 

Rosensteln, L. ... 2.50 

Park Ridge 
Silberman, Adolph. 10.00 
Peoria 
Anshal Emeth Sab- 
bath School 10.00 

Greenhut, J. B. .. 25.00 

Levi, Rev. Chas... 5.00 

Quincy 

Meyer, J 5.00 

Seeberger, Geo. .. 6.00 

Rock Island 

Kohn, Mrs. Mollle B.OO 



Simon, L 5.00 

Washburn 

Fuik.s, Jacob 3.00 

INDIANA. 
Albion 

Stiefel Mrs. Louis 5.00 
Angcia 

Stiefel, Mrs. L. C. 3.00 
Attica 

Levor, Levi S. . . . 2.50 
Columbia 

Ladies' Hebrew Ben. 
Society 5.00 

Fort Wayne 

Ackerman, Abe ... 10.00 

Baum, Jos 5.00 

Freiberger, Leopold 10.00 
Ladies' Hebrew Ben. 

Society 10.00 

Goshen 

Salinger, Nathan . 5.00 

Hartford City 

Weller, Mrs. Amy.. 5.00 

Indianapolis 
Federation of Jewish 

Charities 200.00 

Jackson, J. W 10.00 

Kahn, Henry 10.00 

Newberger, Louis. iO.OO 
Sommers, Chas. B. 5.00 

Kendallville 
Keller, Jacob 5.00 

Kokomo 
Levi, I. S 5.00 

Lafayette 

Jewish L a d i e s' 

Aid Society 5.00 

Loeb, J. Louis B.OO 

Lebanon, Ind. 
Adler, Phil 5.00 

LIgonier 

Strauss, Jacob .... 10.00 
■•Strauss, Ike. 
♦Strauss, Jacob. 
Mt. Vernon 
Rosenbaum, J & Lee B.OO 

Muncie 
Hene, M. B.OO 

Portland 

Weller, Morris 5.00 

Cronbach, Abraham 

Rabbi i2-W 

Summitville 

Children of Anna 
Warner, in Her 
Memory 10.00 

Jewish Ladies Aux- 
iliary of Summit- 
ville, Anderson 
and Elmwood .. 10.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1909 



57 



Terre Haute 
Herz, A 5.00 

INDIAN TY. 

Chelsea 

Cohen, Isaac B.OO 

IOWA. 
Cedar Rapids 
Smulekoff, 11 5.00 

Charles City 
Hecht, J 10.00 

Decorah 
Baer B 5.00 

Des Moines 

Brody, F 5.00 

Frankel A 5.00 

Frankel, Mrs. B. .. 10.00 

Friedlich 1 5.00 

Sheuermau, L 10.00 

Yunker, M 5.00 

Keokuk 

Weil, I. B B.OO 

Oskaloosa 

Baldauf, Saml. ... 10.00 
Rosenblatt, A. ... B.OO 

Sioux City 

Mt. Sinai Cong. 

Sabbath School.. 5.00 
♦Wise, Mrs. Chas. 

Waverly, Iowa 
♦Slinamer, A. 

KANSAS. 

Kansas City 

Holzmark Bros. .. 10.00 
Leavenworth 
Woolfe & Winnig.. B.OO 

Salina 

Stiefel, Moses 5.00 

Stlefel, S B.OO 

KENTUCKY 
Bowling Green 

Cristal, Sam 5.00 

Nahm, Sam B.OO 

Danville 

Lyons, S. & H B.OO 

Henderson 

Baldauf, Morris ... 10.00 

Lexington 

Shane, Miss R B.OO 

Speyer & Sons 5.00 

Weil, Jonas 10.00 

Wolf, Simon 5.00 

•Life Member. 



Louisville 

Barkhouse, Louis. 25.00 

Bernheim, B 25.00 

Bernheim, I. W.... 25.00 
Bernheim, B. Palmer 5.00 

Blum, S 5.00 

Brooks, Mrs. M... 5.00 
Council Jewish Wo- 
men 10.00 

Khrman, H B.OO 

Flarsheim, M. H. .. 5.00 

Greenebaum, L,. • • 3-oo 

Hyman, Jacob B.OO 

Kaufman, H 5.00 

Kohn, A B.OO 

Morgenroth, Mrs. H. 5.00 

Sabel & Sons, M... 10.00 

Sachs, Morris ... 5.00 

Sachs, Edw. 5.00 

Sloss, Stanley E... 5.00 

Straus, Benj 10.00 

Straus, Mrs. Sarah 5.00 

Trost Bros 5.00 

Maysville 

Merz, Mrs. A. L... 5.00 

Merz, Eugene 5.00 

Merz, Millard 5.00 

Owensboro 

Hirsch, A 10.00 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. A. 10.00 

r aducah 

Benedict, Mrs. J... 5.00 

Dreyfus, Sol 5.00 

Fels, Mrs. J. E. . . 5-oo 

Friedman, Herman 5.00 

Friedman, L. Jos... ]0.00 

Israel Temple S. S. 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 

Shelbyville 

Jewish Literary 

Society 5.00 

Samuel Leopold ... 5.00 

Salinger, J 5.00 

LOUISIANA 

Alexandria 

Ginsburg, B 10.00 

Posner & Fried .. 5.00 

Simon Bros 5.00 

Donaldsonvjile 

Netter & Co 25.00 

Jeannette 

Wormser, M. & C. 5.00 

Monroe 

Gross, Mrs. Floren- 
tine 2. BO 

New Orleans 

AbramEon, S 5.00 

Aschaffenburg, A... 5.00 



Benjamin, E. V.... 10.00 

Bruenn, B B.OO 

Council of Jewish 

Women 25.00 

Godchaux, Mrs. P. . 5.00 

Kohn, Jos 5.00 

Marks Ins. Agency. 5.00 
*Ne\viuan, Isidore. 
Newman, Isidore. 300.00 

Stern, Maurice 25.00 

Weil, Mrs. E. L. . . 5.00 

Weis, Julius 25.00 

Plaquemlne 

Kern, Dave 1.00 

Levy, H. J 5.00 

Wolf, Simon ^-W 

Rayville 

Titche, Chas 6.00 

St. Francisville 

Teutsch, R 5.00 

St. Gabriel 

Moyse, Simon 5.00 

Shreveport 

Heilperin, H. L... 5.00 

Phelps, E. 5.00 

MARYLAND. 

Baltimore 

Adler, Chas 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. S. J... 2.00 

Adler, Simon C... 5.00 

Bamberger, Elkan. 5.00 

Brandy, M. & Sous 5.00 

Burk, Chas 5.00 

Drey. Elkan 10.00 

Eisenberg, A. ...... 5.00 

Epstein, Jacob .. 5.00 

Frank, Solomon .. B.OO 
Goldenberg, Mrs. 

R. H 5.00 

Gottshalk, Jos. .. 10.00 

Goldenberg, J 5.00 

Gottlieb. F. H 10.00 

Gutman, Mrs. Joel . 5.00 

Gutmacher, Rev. A. 5.00 

Gottschalk, Levi .. 5.0e 

Hamberger, M. J... B.OO 

Hochschild, Max .. 5.00 

Kraus, Henry 5.00 

Leopold, r 5.00 

Levy, Wm 10.00 

Rayner, A 5.00 

*Rayner, Wm. S. 
Rosenau, Rev. Dr. 

Wm 5.00 

Rothhalz, J. 5.00 

Skutch, Max 5.00 

Sonneborn, Henry. 50.00 

Sonneborn, Moses S. 5.00 

Sonneborn, Sig. B. 5.00 



58 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Strouse, Isaac 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Ma- 
tilda 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Hennle 2.00 

Ulman, A. J 5.00 

Ulman, Nathan ... 5.00 
Van Leer, Hannah 5.00 
Walter, Moses R.. 5.00 
Weinberg, Mrs. C. 5.00 

Westheimer, H. .. 10.00 
Cumberland 

Rosenbaum, Simon 5.00 
Rosenbaum, S u s- 

man 5.00 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
Boston 

Baer, L 10.00 

Green, Jos 2.00 

Hecht, I. H 25.00 

♦Heclit, Mrs. Lina. 

Kaffenburgh, J. .. 5.00 

Koshland, J 5.00 

Morse, Godfrey 5.00 

Ratsheskey, A. C. .. 5.00 

Rosenthal, Jacob .. 5.00 

Schoener, Jos. Z... 5.00 

Shuman, Saml. .. 5.00 
♦Shuman, A. 

Ziegel, L. 5.00 

Roxbury 

Van Noorden, E... 5.00 

Waltham 

Bayard, H 5.00 

Worcester 

Goding, Jacob L... 5.00 

MICHIGAN. 

Alma 

Pollasky, M 5.00 

Bay City 

Greenberg, Karl .. 1.00 

Kohn, Jos. E 5.00 

Charlotte 

Vomberg, M 5.00 

Detroit 

Fechheimer, H. M.. 5.00 

Ginsburg, B 5.00 

Goldman, A 5.00 

Heineman, Sol. E. 5.00 

Rothman, E. M... 5.00 

Schloss, Seligman.. 5.00 

Schloss, M. 1 5.00 

Sloman, Eugene H. 10.00 

Van Baalen, I. ... 10.00 

Wineman, L, 15.00 

Elk Rapids 

Alpern, H 5.00 

*I<ife IMember 



Grand Rapids 

Brandy, M. & Sons 5.00 

Lobeusky, Jacob.. 5.00 

May, Bernard S. . . 5.00 

May, Meyer S. . . . . 5.00 

Pressburg, H. L,... 2.00 

Sandler, Louis.... 5.00 

Wolf, G. A 5.00 

Hawks 

Horwitz, Harris .. 5.00 

Lansing, Mich. 

Beck, Louis 5.00 

Wolverine 

Levis, Walter J.... 5.00 

MINNESOTA. 
Duluth 

Hammel, Louis ... 5.00 

Minneapolis 

Barnet, H. M 5.00 

Simon, D 5.00 

Weil, 1 10.00 

St. Paul 

Bergman, D 10.00 

Goodkind, Benj. .. 5.00 

Guiterman, A 5.00 

Hirschman & Co... 5.00 

Marx, B 5.00 

Recht, S. H 5.00 

MISSISSIPPI. 
Brookhaven 

Cohn, David Z 10.00 

Cohn, Louis 10.00 

Greenville, Miss. 

Leyser, Miss B 5.00 

Lyons, Mrs. Jos... 2.00 

Lorman 
Cohn Bros 5.00 

Kosciusko 

Links, Mrs. A 1.00 

Lowenberg, Mrs. G. i.oo 

Lowenberg, Mr. G i.oo 

Lowenberg, Mrs. L. 1.00 

Meridian 

Moskovitz, A 5.00 

Threefoot, H. M... 10 00 

Natchez 

Frank, Henry 5.00 

♦Frank, Henry. 

Moses, Mrs. Simon 5.00 

Zerkowsky, Sam 5.00 

Port Gibson 
Bock, David 5.00 

Vicksburg 

Anshe Chased Con- 
gregation 25.00 

Ladies' Hebrew 
Ben. Asso 10.00 

Religious School of 
Congregation An- 
che Chesed 5.00 



Yazoo City 

Wise, H 10.00 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas City 

Benjamin, Alfred.. 6.00 
Bernheimer G. Bros. 

Bloch, Sol 10.00 

& Co 10.00 

Davidson, Julius.. 10.00 

Hyman, A 5.00 

Levy, I. A. 5.00 

Mayer, Rabbi H. H. 5.00 
Rothenberg& Schloss 10.00 

Sachs, Oscar 5.00 

Shane, M 5.00 

Lexington 

Sinauer, Henry ... 5.00 

Louisiana 

Michael Bros 5.00 

St. Joseph 

Binsvi'anger, Simon 5.00 

Block, Saml 5.00 

Feffer, J. A 1.00 

Felsenstein, David. 2.00 

Fishmon, H. 1.00 

Hassenbusch, Sam'l 2.00 

Levy, Gus 5.00 

Lowenstein, Mrs. 

Walter 5.00 

Schloss, Moses A.. 1.00 
Westheimer, David F. 5.00 

Westheimer, F. ... 25.00 
Westheimer, E u- 

gene lo.oo 

St. Louis 

Bry, N & L 5.00 

Dobriner, C 5.00 

Drey, Mrs. 1,. H... 5.00 

Eiseman, B 10.00 

Frohlichstein, S. H. 5.00 

Goldman, 1 10.00 

Levis, Leo 10.00 

Lippman, Jos. M... 5.00 

Littman, M 10.00 

♦Rice, Jonathan. 

Sale, Lee 5.00 

Sale, Hon. N. M. . . 5.00 

Seelig, S 6.00 

Shroder, S. W. ... 5.00 

Singer, J. W. 5.00 

♦Stix, C. A. 

Stix, E. W 5.00 

Stix, Wm 10.00 

Walrtheim, A 5.O0 

Wolff, A. L 10.00 

Wolff, Mrs. Sig. ... 5.00 
Wolff, Wilson, Drug 

Co 10.00 

Woolf, Morris 5.00 

Tipton 

Cohn, L S'OO 



IN THE INDIVIDUAL GARDENS 



59 




60 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



MONTANA. 

Great Falls 

Wertheim, N 10.00 

Missoula 

Leiser, Esther .... lo.oo 

NEBRASKA. 

Columbus 

Gluck, Israel 5.00 

Lincoln 

Frleud, Morris B.OO 

Mayer Bros 10.00 

Weil, M B.OO 

Omaha 

Levy, M. 10.00 

Levi, 1 5.00 

Pepperberg, J 5.00 

Rosenthal, B. & H. 5.00 

NEW JERSEY. 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Rothschild, Saml. 10. OO 

Camden 
Blank, J. Z B.OO 

East Orange 

Back, Albert 5.00 

Jersey City 

Kaufmann, Mrs. 

Herbert 10.00 

IViontclair 

Hirsh, Mrs. Sam- 
son 5.00 

Newarkc 

Bamberger, L 10.00 

Foster, Rev. Sol... B.OO 

Fuld, Felix 25.00 

Goetz, Jos 5.00 

Lehman, S 5.00 

Michael, Chas 5.00 

Michael, Oscar ... B.OO 

Plaut, Moses 6.00 

Scheuer, Selig 5,00 

Scheuer, Simon ... B.OO 

Straus, Moses .... 5.00 

Stern, Mrs. C. S... B.OO 

Stelner, Jos 5.00 

Plainfieid 
Newcorn, Wm 5.00 

Somerville 

Mack, Alex. W 5.00 

Mack, Adolph B.OO 

Mack, Mrs. Louis C. B.OO 

NEW MEXICO. 
R OS we 11 

Jaffa, Mrs. Nathan B.OO 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Durham 

Kronheimer, B. F. 5.09 

*Life Member 



Goldsboro 

Weil, Mrs. Henry.. 5.00 

Weil, Sol 10.00 

Greensboro 

Cone, Caesar 10.00 

Cone, Julius W... 5.00 

Wilmington 

Solky, J. M 5.00 

NORTH DAKOTA. 
Fargo 

Stern, Max 5.00 

NEW YORK. 

Albany 

Albany Congrega- 
tion Beth Bmeth. 25.00 
Brillman, Isaac ... 5.00 
Laventall, Mrs. J. 5.00 

Lesser, Wm 5.00 

Mann, Mrs. Dinah 

J 5.00 

Sporborg, Mrs. H. 

J 6.00 

Waldman, Louis I. 10.00 

Brooklyn 

Abraham, R 25.00 

Blum, Edw. C 10.00 

Gibb, Walter 5.00 

Joachim, Chas. ... 10.00 

May, Moses 10.00 

Neuburger, Dr. J. B. 5.00 

Rothchild, S. F. .. 10.00 

Werbelovsky, J. .. 5.00 

Buffalo 

Block, Mrs. Jos 15.00 

Boasberg, E 5.00 

Fleischmann, Simon 5.00 

Jacobson, S 5.00 

Keiser, August ... B.OO 

Keiser, L 10.00 

Meyers, L 5.00 

Shroder, M 5.00 

Wile, Herman 5.00 

Winters, A 10.00 

Binghampton 

Hirschman, Sig. J. B.OO 

Elmira 

Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Friendly, H 3.00 

Gienfaiis, N. Y. 

Bnumann. J. P 5.00 

Hawthorne, N. Y. 

Kahan, Jacob .... 5.00 

Herkimer 

Schermer, Benj. .. i.oo 
Mt. Vernon 

Samuels, Julius .. B.OO 

Samuels, Moritz .. B.OO 



Niagara Falls 

Elbe, Mrs. H 5.00 

Silberberg, Moses L. B.OO 
*Siiverberg, Bertha 

Clean 

Marcus, H. W 5.00 

Rochester 

Adler, A 10.00 

Adler, 1 10.00 

Adler, Mrs. Lewis B.OO 

Adler, Simon 5.00 

Adler, Solomon .. B.OO 

David, Marcus B.OO 

Garson, J. L 5.00 

Katz, A. J 10.00 

Kirstein, Mrs. J. E. 5,00 
♦Lowenthal, M. 

Lowenthal, L 10.00 

Michaels, Jos 10.00 

Rosenbloom, Max .. 5.00 
♦Silberberg, M. 
•Silberberg, G. 
♦Silberberg, G. 

Solomon, S. L 5.00 

Stern, Morley A... 10.00 

Weil, K. M 5.00 

Wile, Julius M.... 10.00 

Syracuse 

Eisner, Henry ... 5.00 

Jacobson, Dr. N... 5.00 

Marshall, Jacob .. 5.00 

Mitchell, Mrs. S... E.OO 

Rubin, M. D 10.00 

New York City 

♦Abraham, A. 

Alexander, Arthur . 5.00 

Auerbach, Louis .. 10.00 

Bauer, Abram 5.00 

Benjamin, Geo 5.00 

Benjamin, M. W.. 10.00 

Bernheimer, Louis 5.00 

Bijur, Nathan 10.00 

Bloomingdale, Mrs. 

J. B 10.00 

Brand, Herman . . 5.00 
♦Blumenthal, Geo. 

Brown, Emil 5.00 

Bowsky, Louis . . . 5.00 

Brill, 1 5-00 

♦Budge, Henry. 

Buttenweiser, J. L. 10.00 

Cohn, Salo 5-oo 

Cohn, A 25.00 

Centennial Lodge, 

No. 763, F. & A.M. 10.00 

Cohen, Jos. H. . . . 10.00 

Conheim, H 10.00 

Danenbaum, C. .. 5.00 

Danenbaum, M. C. 5.00 

De Boer, D. H. . . . 5.00 

Erlanger, A 25.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1909 



61 



Estricher, Henry.. B.OO 

Friedman, Sol. & Co. 10.00 

Fleischer, N'atliaii. 5,00 

Goldenberg, S. L... 5.00 

Gotthell, Paul .... B.OO 
*Gu{;j;enheinior,AVm. 

Guinzburg, Victor. 25.00 

(ioodhart, T. J 20.00 

Goldsmith, Herman 5.00 

Heavenrich, Julius. i.oo 

Hendricks, Mrs. C. 10.00 

Heidelbach, Louis. 5.00 

Holzman, Ascher.. l&.OO 

Holzman, S. L 5.00 

Horkheimer, E. S.. lo.oo 

Herrmann, Uriah.. 5.00 
Herman, Mrs. Esther 10.00 

Herman, Nathan . . 5.00 

Isaac, Mannie .... 10.00 

Johnson, Alex. . . . 5.00 

Jonas, Wm 25.00 

Kaufman, Jos. H.. 5.0O 

Kaufman, Julius . . 10.00 

Klee, Benj 10.00 

Kahn, Louis 5.00 

Kleinert, J. B 10.00 

Kohn, Emil W... 6.00 
Kohnstamm, Leo, 

Edw. & Jos 25.00 

♦Krauskopf, Mary 

G. 

Krauskopf, Nathan loo.oo 
Krauskopf, Mrs. 

Nathan 10.00 

Krauskopf, Mrs. 

Henrietta 5.00 

Ladenburger, Theo 10.00 

Lang, G 5.00 

Lauterbach, Edw.. 10.00 

Leon, Maurice 100.00 

Levy, Morris B.OO 

Loeb, Maurice 5.00 

Loeb, Louis 5.00 

Loeb, Emil 5.00 

Leri, Emil S 5.00 

Levi, Henlein 5.00 

Levi, Mrs. Leo N. 5.00 
*Lewisohn, Adolph 

Lewisohn, Sam S.. 10.00 

Loewenstein, H. . . 5.00 

Mendelson, Leon .. 30.00 

Mendelsohn, Lewis 5.00 

Mautner, Julius . . 10.00 

Morgenthau, H. .. 10.00 

Mack, Marx H.... lo.oo 

Mack, Fred A 10.00 

Mayer, Otto L 10.00 

Meyer Harrison D. 

(in memory of 

Sophie Meyer) . . 20.00 

*Life INIember 



•Meyer, Wm. 

Modey, 1 3.00 

Oppenheim, Mrs. 

L 5.00 

Pulaski, M. .11 10.00 

Rice, S. M 25.00 

Rothschild, Jacob. 5.00 
Rothschild, Mrs. 

Wm 5.00 

Sanger, Isaac 10.00 

Schoenfeld, Mrs. D. 5.00 

Seril, R 10.00 

Shoenberg, J. E. . . 10.00 

Steiner, Jos. & Bros. 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry. 10.00 

Stern, Leopold 10.00 

Stern, Leopold 5.00 

Strasburger, Louis. 10.00 

Strasser, W. W... 5.00 

Schoenfeld, Max... 100.00 

Stroock, L. S 5.00 

Stroock, R. L. .. B.OO 

Sulzberger, Cyrus.. 5.00 
Schiff, Jacob H... 350.00 

Schaffner, Abe 5.00 

Sinshelmer, Alice.. B.OO 

Scholle, Melville J. B.OO 

Sidenberg, Henry. . B.OO 

♦Sidenberg, G. 
♦Silberberg, G. 

Sondheim, Max 5.00 

Solomon, Mrs. B... 5.00 

Speyer, James ... 10.00 

Stern, Benj. 10.00 

Straus, Isidor 200.00 

Tannenbaum, Leon, 

Sr 10.00 

Toch, Henry M.... 5.00 

Untermeyer, Henry 5.00 

Veit, B 5.00 

Vollter, A 5.00 

Weinberg, A 10.00 

Wolf, Louis 10.00 

Younker. H 10.00 

Zeckendorf, Louis s-oo 

OKLAHOMA 

Chelsa 

Cohen, Isaac 5.00 

OHIO. 

Akron 

Akron Schwester- 

bund. The 5.00 

Polsky, A 10.00 

Temple Literary 

Socy 2.00 

Archbold 

Hirsch, H 10.00 

Beliaire 

Blum, Henry 5.00 

Blum, Isaac 5.00 

Chillicothe 

Schachne, Moritz.. 5.00 



Cincinnati 

Ach, Samuel 5.00 

B e c k m a u, N. 

Henry 5.00 

Bettman, Levi 10.00 

Bing, J. & S 5.00 

Block, Abe 5.00 

Block, Leon 5.00 

Block, Jos. E 5.00 

♦Block, Samuel. 

Dreifus, David S.. 5.00 

Ezekiel, H. C 3.00 

Englander, I. ... 5.00 

Fox, Henry B.OO 

Fox, Sol 10.00 

Frazer, Isidore ... 10.00 

Freiberg, Abr 10.00 

Freiberg, B 5.00 

Freiberg, J. W B.OO 

Freiberg, Maurice . . 5.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Grossman, Rev. Dr. 

L 5.00 

Greenbaum, Walter 

G 5.00 

Guggenheim, Ell... B.OO 

Hahn, Henry B.OO 

Jonas, H. B.OO 

Kahn, Felix 5.00 

Krohn, Irwin M. .. 5.00 

Krohn, Louis .... 5.00 

Kaufman, Ell B... 5.00 

Levi, Louis S 10.00 

Levy, Henry M 5.00 

*Lowman, L. J. 

Mack, Mrs. M. W. 5.00 

Marcus M 5.00 

Marks, Leslie V... 5.00 

Marx, Louis 10.00 

May Bros 5.00 

Mayer, E 10.00 

Mayer, Mrs. L 5.00 

Mayer, Simon 5.00 

Meiss, Leon 5.00 

Mendel, Henry .... 10.00 

Miller, E. L 5.00 

Mook & Weil .... 5.00 
♦Meis, Henry. 

Meis, Nathan 5-oo 

Meiss, Harry 5.00 

Nusbaum, M 10.00 

Newburgh. Louis.. 5.00 

Oflfner, Alex 5.00 

Peyser, Sol. D 5.00 

Phillips, G. J 10.00 

Plaut, A 5.00 

Pollak, E 10.00 

Pritz, Carl E S-^o 

Pritz, Benj 5.00 

Pritz, Sidney E.... 5.00 
Rheinstrom, Mrs. 

A S-oo 

Rheinstrom, Sigmund 5.00 



62 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Rosenthal, Saml... 10.00 

Roth, Chas 10.00 

Rothschild, Lester. 5.00 

Seasongood, A 10.00 

Seinsheimer, Mrs.S. 5.00 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar. 10.00 

Sterne, E. M 5.00 

Shohl, Chas 5.00 

Sturm, Simon .... 5.00 

Trost, Carrie L 10.00 

Trost, S. W 10.00 

Ullman, Adolph .. 5.00 

Westheimer, T. F. 5.00 

Westheimer, Leo... 10.00 

Westheimer, Morris 10.00 

Wildberg, L 5.00 

Wyler, Isaac 5.00 

Winkler, Eli 5.00 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Council 

of Jewish Women 15.00 
Daughters of Israel 

Lodge, No. 1 5.00 

Einstein, L 5.00 

Eisenman, Chas. .. 5.00 

Forchheimer, B. ... 5.00 

Cries, Rabbi, M. J. 10.00 

Gross, Sam'l 5.00 

Halle, Mrs. M 10.00 

Hartman, Saml 5.00 

Hays, Jos 5.00 

Hexter, K 5.00 

Hexter, Sol. 'M.... 5.00 

Joseph, Isaac 10.00 

Joseph, Sig 5.00 

Marks, Martin A... 5.00 

Peskind, Dr. J. A. 10.00 

Shlesinger, S 5.00 

Shlesinger, H 5.00 

Schwab, Mrs. Flora 5.00 

Stearn, Abraham.. 10.00 

Weil, Meyer 5.00 

Columbus 

Basch, Jos 5.00 

Basch, G. J. & E. 
R., in honor of 
their third birth- 
day anniversary. 10.00 

♦B'nai Israel Sis- 
terhood. 

Lazarus, Jeffery L. 3.00 

Lazarus, Robt. ... 3.00 

•Lazarus, Fred'k. 
♦Lazarus, Ralph. 
*Mi!ler, Leopold. 
Crestline 

Reder, Jake 5.00 

Dayton 

Ach, F. J 10.00 

Daneman, Mrs. Jacob 1.00 

Galion 

Gottdiener, H. ... 5.00 

*Life Member 



Lima 

Michael, K'. L 5.00 

Marion 

Barron, A 5.O0 

Council of Jewish 

Women .... 7.00 

Family Literary 

Club 1. 00 

iVIt. Vernon 

Meyers, Mrs. Max. 5.00 
Piqua 
Anshe Emeth Cong. 5.00 

Plymouth 
Spear, Sol 5.00 

Portsmouth 

Sandusky 

Kaplan, Saml. . . . 5.00 
tpringfieid 

Jewish Thimble 

Social 5.00 

Toledo 

Federation of Jewish 

Charities 1 00.00 

Wyoming 

Pentlarge, Fred 5.00 

Youngstown 

Grossman, Dr. J. 

B 5.00 

Guthman, Leo. ... 5.00 
Hirschberg, B. ... 5.00 

Strouss, I 5.00 

♦Theobald, Mrs. C. 
Weil, Mrs. Saml.. 5.00 
Youngstown Hebrew 
Ladies' Benevolent 
Society 5.00 

Zanesviiie 

Starr, A. E 5.00 

Zanesviiie Hebrew- 
Ladies Aid Soc'y 5.00 

OREGON. 
Portland 

Ostrow, M 5.00 

Selling, B 10.00 

Selling, Mrs. Philip 10.00 

Sax, L 10.00 

Swett, Z 5.00 

Tilzer, Dr. A 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Allegheny 

Sunstein, A. J 10.00 

Sunstein, C 5.00 

Wertheimer, Saml. 10.00 

Allentown 

Denison, L 5.00 

Feldman, Chas. .. 5.00 

Haltzel, Henry S. 5.00 

Heinz, F. & 1 5.00 

Hess, Max 5.00 



Hess, Chas 5.00 

Kline, Chas 5.00 

Sofranscy, Abra- 
ham 25.00 

Altoona, Pa. 

♦Kline, Henry S. 

Bethlehem 

Fritz, John 5.00 

Reis, Louis 5.00 

Braddock 
Katz, Leo A 5.00 

Bradford 

Greenwald, David.. 5.00 

Chester 

Levy, Moses 5.00 

Coatesville 

Braunstein, 1 5.00 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Shoemaker, H. J.. 5.00 

Easton 

Brlcker, W. R 1.00 

Friedlander, Moe 

A 5.00 

Kahn, M 5.00 

Mayer, Jacob 5.00 

Sherer, S 5.00 

Springer, E 5.00 

Erie 

Sobel, Isador 5.00 

Harrisburg 

Astrich, H 10.00 

Jaeobson, M. E 5.00 

Hazleton 

Friedlander, M 5.00 

Jenkintown 

Silberman, Max .. 5.00 

Johnstown 

Rothstein, M 5.00 

Kittanning 

Einstein, Jacob .. 5.00 

Lancaster 

Cohen, E. M 5.00 

Hecht, Mrs. H 5.00 

Moss, S. R 5.00 

Rich, Israel A 5.00 

Rosenthal, Morris.. 5.00 

Siesel, S. 5.00 

Langhorn 

♦Branson, I. L. 
Leberman, J. A... 10.00 

Luzerne 

Freedman, Max .. 5.00 

New Castle 
Feuchtwanger, Mar- 
cus 5.00 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30. 1909 



63 



Pittsburg 

Aarou, Mrs. MIna. . 5.00 

Aaron, Chas. I. . . S-oo 

Aaron, Louis I. .. lo.oo 

Aaron, Marcus 5.00 

Aronson, J. L 5.00 

•Browarsky, Max 
*Coben, Aaron 
♦Colien, Josial) 
♦Dreifus, C. 

DeRoy, Jos 5.00 

Dreifus, C 5.00 

Floersheim, B 5.00 

Forst, Morris 5.00 

Franlc, Isaac .... lo.oo 
Frank, Sam ( i n 

memoriam) 5.00 

♦Frank, Samuel, 
by liis sou, Ed. 
K.' Frank 
♦Guckenheimer, 

Isaac 
Goldsmit, Louis .... 5.00 

Gross, Isaac 5.00 

Guckenlieimer, Mrs. 

A. 10.00 

Gusky Orphanage .. 50.00 
Hanauer, Mrs. H. 5.00 
♦Hamburger, Philip 
♦Hanauer, A. M. 
♦Kaufman Bros. 

Kann, W. L 5.00 

Kaskel, Solomon.. 10.00 
Kaufman, Henry .. 10.00 
Kaufmann, Morris. 25.00 

Klee, W. B 10.00 

Lehman, A. C. 5.00 

■ ♦Marcus, Aaron 

Oppenheimer, M... 10.00 
Oppenheimer, W. .. 10.00 
Raphael, Rudolph. 30.00 

Rauh, A. L 5.00 

Rauh, Enoch 5.00 

Rauh, Marcus 5.00 

Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 20.00 
♦Rauh, Mrs. Rosa- 
lie 
Rosenberg, Hugo.. 5.00 
Rothchild, M. N... 5.00 

Stadfleld, Jos 5.00 

Sldenberg, Hugo .. 25.00 
•Solomon & Rubin 
♦Weil, A. Leo 
♦Weil, J. 

Weil, A. Leo 25.00 

Wertheimer, E. .. 10.00 
Wertheimer, Isaac 10.00 

Wolf, Fred 5.00 

Weil, Jacques 5.00 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S 1.00 

*Life Member 



Weitzenkorn, A. .. 6.00 
Weitzenkorn, M.... 5.00 

Reading 

Bash, Wm 500 

Schweriner, S. S... 10.00 

Rocinester 

Rapport, H. T 5.00 

Scranton 

Krotosky, Isidore.. 5.00 

Krotosky Bros 5.00 

Gettinger, Louis .. 5.00 

Roos, Dr. Ellas J.. 5.00 

Selin's Grove 
Weis, S 5.00 

Sinamokin 
Gelb, W. B. & Co. 5.00 

South Betiiiehem, 

Refowich, A 5.00 

Weisenbei'ser, S. . . 5.00 

Titusville 
Berwaki, H. P.... 10.00 
Hershberg, H. L. . 10.00 

Wilkes-Barre 

Long, Mrs. Dora.. 5.00 

Marks, Mrs. L. W. 5.00 

Strauss, S. J 5.00 

Stern, Henry F. ... 5.00 

Wiliiamsport 

Goldenberg, C. N. 

& Co 5.00 

York 

Lehmeyer, K 10.00 

Lcbacli, Mrs. L.... 3.00 
Philadelphia 

Federation of Jewish 

Charities 6,400.00 

Acker, Finley 5.00 

Arensberg, N 5.00 

Arnold, Lizzette & 

Julia 10.00 

Arnold, Lizzette .. 10.00 

Baird, J. E 10.00 

Bash, H 20.00 

Brum, Mrs. J. D.. 3.(W 

Baum, Saml 5.00 

Beckman, S 10.00 

Blank, Mrs., in 
memory of her 
daughter Rose 

Blank i-oo 

*Betz & Son 
♦Bloch, B. B. 
♦Blum. Ralph 
♦Blumeuthal, Her- 
man 
♦Blumenthal, Sol. 
♦Byers, Jos. J. 
♦Clothier, Isaac H. 
Cressy, Kendall, B. 5.00 

Dallett, W. P 5.00 

Delaney & Co 5.00 



Fabian Saml., 

(Memory of wife) 10.00 
Family Sewing Cir- 
cle 3.00 

Feustman, N. Maur- 

-ice 5.00 

♦Federation Jew- 
ish Charities 
♦Fleisher, Martha 

S. 
♦Grant, Adolph 

Fisher, D 15.00 

Fleishman, Morris. 5.00 
Friend of the 
School, through 
Dr. Krauskopf 10.00 

^Federation Jewish 

Charities 
•X-Fleisher, Ma tha 
*Grant, Adolph 
Gans, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 
Goldstein, Chas., 

Wm. & Harry.. 50.00 
Grabfelder. Samuel 100.00 
Goldstein, Mr. & 

Mrs. Sol 25,00 

Graves, N. Z 6.00 

♦Harrison, C. C. 
♦Hagedorn, Mrs. 
Alice 

Heebner, Saml 5.00 

Hensell, Colladay & 

Co 5.00 

Herzberg, Mrs. L. . 6.00 
Hilbronner, Fannie, 
in memory of her 

Parents 2.00 

Hirsh, Mrs. Gab... 10.00 

Jessar, B. Z 5.00 

♦Jones, Herman. 
*Kaas, Andrew. 
♦Kaufmann, Morris 

A. 
♦Kayser, Sam'l. 
♦Krauskopf, Harold. 
♦Langfeld, A. M. 
♦Levy, Sol. 
♦Lit, S. D. 

Lubin S 100.00 

Malish, Mr. and 
Mrs. (Library 

Fund) 10.00 

♦Merz, Daniel. 
*Merz, Mrs. Regina. 
*Muhr. Jacob. 
McCreary, Geo. D.. 5.00 
Moore and White.. 5.00 
Myers, Mrs. Yette. 5.00 

Nachod, J 5.00 

Newman, Adolph.. 35.00 
Ostheimer, Wm. J. 5.00 
Paxson & Sons, J. W. 3.00 
♦Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
♦Pfaelzer, Simon. 



64 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



Raff, A Raymond.. B.OO 

*Refonii Congrega- 
tion Keneseth Is- 
rael . 

*Rorke, Allen B. 

♦Rosenberg, Grace. 

*Ro-enberg, Walter 
J. 

♦Rosenberg, Walter 

I- 
Rolph, Wm. T 5.00 

Rosenthal, Harry.. 10.00 

Rubin, Mrs. Jos. 
(in memory of 

Her Parents 20.0° 

*Sauger, Alexander 

•X-Sanger Mrs. Philip 

*Silberstein, A. 
Stern. Mrs. Lina 
(in memory of), 
by Ida and Har- 
vey Stern, Mrs. 
L. Schloss and 
Mrs. I. M. Koch 30.00 

Schwacke, J. H... 5.00 
Schwarz, Leonard 

(in honor of his 

confirmation) 10.00 

Sharp, S. S 10.00 

Showell, E. B 5.00 

Silberman, Mrs.Ida 25.00 

Smith & Co., B. B. 5.00 

Snellenburg, N. . . 500.00 

Snellenburg, Sam'l 250.(K) 

Snellenburg, Mrs. 
Sam'l (Library 
Fund) 25.00 

Stamm, Jos 5-°° 

Solomon, Mrs. B. .. 5.00 

Soulas, G. A 5.00 

Stelnhardt, Mrs. F. 3.00 

*Schloss, Mrs. Her- 
man. 

*Schoch, Henry R. 

*Silberman, Mrs. 
Ida. 

♦Silverman, I. H. 

*Snellenberg, J. J. 

♦Snellenberg, Na- 
than. 

*Snellenberg, Sam- 
uel. 

♦Sternberger, Sam- 
uel. 

♦Teller, Benj. F. 

♦Teller, Mrs. B. F. 

♦Teller, Joseph R. 

♦Trautman, Dr. B. 

♦Wanamaker, John. 

♦Weiler, Herman. 

♦Wolf, I.. Jr. 

Weil, Gertrude F. 
(in honor of Eliz- 
abeth Weil's 
birthday) 5.00 

Wilson & Rich- 
ards 5.00 

♦Zweighaft, Simon. 
*Life Member 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Charleston, S. C. 

Falk, David B 10.00 

Florence 

Sulzbacher, S. I... 5.00 

TENNESSEE. 

Columbia 

Lazarus, Benj 5.00 

Clarksville 

Adler, M 10.00 

Knoxville 

Finkelstein, Max... 2.00 
Rosenthol, D. A... 5.00 

Memphis 
Federation of Jewish 
Charities 100.00 

Nashville 

Loveman, Adolph.. 5.00 

TEXAS. 

Beaumont 

Doutser, B. 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. L. R... 5.00 

Ladies' Bene. Soc'y 10.00 

Dallas 

Burk & Co 5.00 

Friend, Alex. M. B.OO 

Hexter, Victor .... 5.00 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J 5.00 

Myers, Seymour .. 5.00 

Ortlieb, Max 5.00 

Sanger Bros 5.00 

♦Sanger, Alexander-. 
♦Sanger, Mrs. Philip 
♦Silberstein, A. 

El Paso 

Aronstein, S 5.00 

Goodman, Ignatius 5.00 

Kohlberg, B 5.00 

Krupp, Harris 5.00 

Stolaroff, 1 5.00 

Ft. Worth 

Bath, Felix P 5.00 

Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Friend, Mrs. A. M. 15.00 

Friend. Henry M . . 5.00 

Gernsbacher Bros. 5.00 

Levy, S 5.00 

Marx, Herman . . . 5.00 

Weltman, Mrs. L. 2.00 

Galveston 

Cohen, R. 1 5.00 

Hebrew Benevolent 
Society 25.00 

Mineola 

Bromberg, I. G. .. 5.00 

Midland 

Halff, Henry Mayer 5.00 
Palestine 

Maier, S 5.00 



Paris 

Frank. Wni 5.00 

San Antonio 

Halff, Mrs. M 25.00 

Halff, S 5.00 

Holzmark, Mrs. T. 5.00 

Texarkana 

Schwartz, J 5.00 

Victoria 

Levi & Co., A 10.00 

Levi. G. A 5.00 

Waco 

Sanger, A. S 5.00 

Sanger, L, 5.00 

UTAH. 
Salt Lake City 

Baer, Adolph 5.00 

Jewish Relief So- 
ciety 5.00 

Marcus, Louis . . . 2.50 
VIRGINIA. 
Alexandria 
Council of Jewish 

Women 10.00 

Harrisonburg 

Oestreicher, S 1.00 

Lynchburg 

Lazarus, L 5.00 

Guggenhelmer, Mrs. 

M 100.00 

Norfolk 

Hecht, Jos. B 5.00 

Hecht, Jacob 5.00 

Heller, C. S 5.00 

Hlrschler, E 5.00 

♦Ladies' Hebrew 
Benevolent So- 
ciety. 

Richmond 

Binswanger, H. S. . 5.00 
Blnswanger, Helen 5.00 
Binswanger, M. I.. B.OO 

Kaufmann, I B.OO 

Millhiser, Emanuel 5.00 
Millhiser, Mrs. C. S-oo 
♦;Millheiser, Gus- 

tave. 
♦Millheiser, Mrs. R. 

Raab, E B.OO 

Wallersteln, H. S. . . 5.00 
Staunton 
Strauss, L. G 5.00 

WASHINGTON. 

Everett 

Hockstader, B 5.00 

Seattle, Wash. 

Eckstein, Mrs. N. 10.00 
♦Galland, Mrs. C. 

K. 
♦Galland, Bonham. 

Tacoma 

Feist, Theo S-oo 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1909 



65 



Klaber, Herman.. 10.00 
Ladles' Montlfloro 
Society 5.00 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
Bluefield 

Heller, Mrs. Flor- 
ence Simon .. 6.00 
Charleston 

Frankenberger, M. 5.00 

Paint Pleasant 

Friedman, J 10.00 

Friedman, M 6.00 

Wheeling 

Bloch, Samuel S... 5.00 

Baer, Henry 5.00 

Emsheimer, Jos. ... 5.00 



Hebrew Coog. Les- 
hera Shomayim .. 
♦Ilorlvhuinu-r, Mrs. 
B. 



10. CO 



Horkhelmer, 


M. .. 


25.00 


Horkheimer, 


Louia 


5.00 


Isenberg, I. 




5.00 


Rice, A. M. 




5.00 


Rice, S. M. 




5.00 


Sonneborn, 


M 


E.OO 



Wolf, Leo 5.00 

WISCONSIN. 

Chittewa Falls 

Chippewii Valley 



Aid Society 
La Crosse 

Hirshheimer, A. 



5.00 



25.00 



Milwaukee 




Aarons, Lehman . . 


5.00 


Cohen, Mrs. G 


5.00 


Heller, Simon .... 


5-00 


Miller, M 


6.00 


Milwaukee Feder- 




ated Jewish Chari- 




ties 


300.00 


Reichenbaum, Chas. 


10.00 


Schuster, Chas. ... 


3.00 


Tabor, L. L 


5.00 


ENGLAND 




London 


■) 


*Meyer, Arthur. 




SWITZERLAND 


Rorschach. 




*Sclioenfeld, Max. 





BENEVOLENT ORDERS 



Independent Order B'nai 

ALABAMA. GEORGIA. 

Birmingham Lincoln 

Birmingham, N'o. Liberty, No. 294 ., 5.00 

3'^^ S.oo Springfield 

Demopolis Emes, No. 67 5.00 

Morris Ely, No. 283 10.00 

Mobile INDIANA. 

Beth Zur, No. 84. ... 5.00 Fort Wayne 

Mn^*-^,^.^^^^, Emek Beracha, No. 
ontgomery 

Emanuel, No. 103.. 5.00 ^^ ^'^•'"^ 

CONNECTICUT. Indianapolis, Ind. 

New Haven Esther. No. 323 .. . 10.00 

Horeb, No. 25 5.00 Terre Haute 

COLORADO. ^^° ^^'°' ^*'- ^^° ^''•°'' 

Denver IOWA. 

Denver, No. 171.... 10.00 Qes Moines 

DELAWARE. ^®s Moines, No. 

.A/;i„j„„j.-_ 330 5.00 

Wilmmgton 

Wilmington, No. 470. 5.00 KENTUCKY. 

DISTRICT OF COLUM- Lexington 
BIA. 

... . . . Lexington, No. 289 5.00 

Washington 

Argo Lodge, No. Paducah 

413 10.00 Harmony, No. 149.. 5.00 

Savannah , ^,,,-, , . , . 

Joseph, No. 76 5.00 LOUISIANA. 

ILLINOIS. ""'ew Orleans 

Crescent City, No. 

Bloomington 182 10.00 

Abraham Lincoln, ^„. , . , r^ 1 

♦District Grand 

No. 190 5.00 Lodge. No. 7. 

Chicago MICHIGAN. 

Oriental, No. 189.. 10.00 Grand Rapids 

Ramah, No. 33.... 10.00 ^ ,. 

! Julius Houseman, 

* Life Member. No. 238 5.00 



Brith 



Kalamazoo 

Mishan, No. 247... 5.00 
MINNESOTA. 

Minneapolis 

Minneapolis, No. 271. 10.00 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Columbus 

Joachim, N'o. 181.. 2.00 
Grrreenville, Miss. 

Deborah, No. 161. . 5.00 
Jackson 

Manasah, No. 202 .. 3.00 

Natchez, Miss. 

Ezra, No. 134 ... 10.00 

MISSOURI. 
St. Joseph 

Joseph, No. 73 10.00 

St. Louis 

Eben Ezra, No. 47 10.00 
Missouri, No. 22.. 6.00 

MONTANA. 

Butte 
Baron De Hlrsh, 
No. 420 5.00 

NEBRASKA 

Omaha 

Nebraska, No. 354. 5.00 

NEW JERSEY. 

Trenton 

Trenton, No. 319. ... 5.00 

NEW MEXICO 
East Las Vegas 
J. E. Rosenwald, 
No. 545 10.00 



66 



LIST OF MEMBERS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



NEW YORK. 
Albany 

Gideon, No. 140... S-oo 

Rochester 

Zerubbabel, No. 53 10.00 
New York City. 

Hebron, No. 5 BOO 

Henry Jones, No. 79. 2.00 

Washington, No. 19 lo-oo 

Zlon, No. 2 10.00 

Plattsburgh, N. Y. 

Joel, No. 118 5.00 

OHIO. 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati, No. 4.. 10.00 

Columbus, Ohio 

*Zion, No. 62. 



Dayton 

Eschol, No. 55.... 10.00 

OREGON. 
Portland 

Portland, No. 416.. 10.00 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Allegheny 

Jericho, No. 44 10.00 

Saar Sholem, No. 
154 10.00 

Erie 

Philadelphia 
Joshua, No. 23 ... 10.00 

TENNESSEE. 

iViemphis 

Memphis No. 35.. 10.00 



Nashville 

Malmonides, No. 46 



5.00 



TEXAS 
San Antonio 
Edar, No. 211 5.00 

UTAH. 

Salt Lake City 
B. F. Peixotto, No. 421 lO.Oo 

WASHINGTON. 
Seattle 
Hildesheimer, No. 503 6.00 

WISCONSIN. 
iVIilwaukee 

Gilead, No. 41 . . . 5.00 
Isaac, No. 87 5.00 



Order" B'rith Abraham 



CONNECTICUT. 

Norwich 

Norwich City, No. 62 

iVllNNESOTA. 

Minneapolis 

Minneapolis, No. 63 

NEW YORK. 

Niagara Lodge, No. 



5.00 



5.00 



Elmira 

Elmira, No. 272... 



3.00 



New York City 

American, No. 167 5.00 
Ben. Harrison, No. 9. 3.00 

■ PENNSYLVANIA. 

Philadelphia 

Liberty, No. 6 5.00 

Pittsburg 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Providence 

Star of Rhode Is- 
land, No. 330.... 4.00 

TEXAS. 

Dallas 

Alex. Kohut, No. 247 5.00 

WISCONSIN. 
Milwaukee 



148 



s-oo 



Hope, No. 210 



2.00 Wisconsin, No. 80. 10.00 



Independent Order Free Sons of Israel 



* Life Member. 



WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 
Cream City Lodge, 

No. 63 5.00 



Form A -5. 

Rabbi Joseph Kraiiskopf. D. D., President. I. H. Silverman, Treasurer 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Philadelphia 605 Land Title Building, Philadelphia 

Rabbi Isaac Landman, Secretary 
334 Mutual Life Building. Philadelphia 



fiDemberebtp of ^be IRational ifarm ScbooL 

I, the undersigned, being in sympathy with the object of the 
"National Farm School" — the training of lads in the practice and 
science of agriculture, for agricultural callings — do hereby agree to 
subscribe as one of the Maintainers of the institution, the dues of a 

Life: Member ($100.00) Patron ($25.00) Supporter ($5.00) 
Friend ($50.00) Member ($10.00) 

Name • 

Address 

Date 

NOTE— Underscore the clasi of membership you wish to join. Life Membership calls for but one 
Ithe first) payment. Make check payable to the NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL. 



form Of Xegaci? 

TO THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL, DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

"1 give and bequeath unto the National Farm School, Bucks 

Co., I'a., near Doylestozvn, the sum of dollars, 

free from all taxes, to be paid to the Treasurer, for time being, 
for the use of the institution." 



Iform of 2)evt0e 

OF REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT. 

"I Give and devise unto the National Farm School, Bucks 
Co., Pa., near Doylestown, (here describe the property or ground 
rent), together with the appurtenances in fee simple, and all 
policies of insurance covering said premises, whether fire, title 
or otherzvise, free from all taxes." 



Improves Light 



This is a picture of the 
Welsbach Junior Light 
actual size — 5 inches 
high. 

SimpHcity itself in at- 
taching to gas fixture. 
Screw off the old, ex- 
travagant open tip — 
screw on the economical 
Junior — takes one min- 
ute to do it. 



Mantle and chimney 
in one piece — renewals 
are made with the same 
ease as you would screw 
on an electric light bulb. 

An open tip burner 
uses 8 feet of gas per 
hour — a Welsbach Jun- 
ior uses but 2 feet — just 
one-quarter as much. 




>aves 



Gas 



An open tip burner 
gives a 25-candle power 
light of a sickly yellow 
— the Welsbach Junior 
gives a 50-candle power, 
white, soft, mellow light. 

Use your own globes 
with the Welsbach Jun- 
ior — the Junior is com- 
pletely hidden from view 
by the ordinary gas 
globe. 

A Welsbach Junior 
should be used in every 
room in the house — par- 
lor, bathroom, bedroom, 
kitchen — anywhere. The 
more of them you use, 
the more marked the de- 
crease in your gas bill. 

Made of the best ma- 
terials and in the best 
possible way — the Wels- 
bach way. 



Actual Size. 



Burns 5 hours for one centos worth of gas 

Economy — Quality — Simplicity 
PRICE COMPLETE IN A BOX. 35 CENTS EACH 

For Sale by All Gas Companies, Dealers and the Welsbach Stores 




Rabbi JOS. KRAUSKOPF, D. D 



AN APPRECIATION 

The following letters, entirely unsolicited, attest the high 
character of all our work: 

"My Dear Mr. Cutekunst: 

"Please accept my sincere thanks for the photographs you 
have made of me, and which have just reached me. They are 
certainly magnificent likenesses, and well attest the fact that 
the hand that has delighted Philadelphia with its art for the 
past half century has not yet lost its cunning. 

'Trusting that kind Providence may spare you to us and 
to your art yet many a year in health and good cheer, I am 

Very appreciatively yours, 

"JOS. KRAUSKOPF." 



r. GUTEKUNST, 712 ArcH St. and 1700 North Broad St. 

Stetson Hats 

Retail Department 

1108 Chestnut Street 



The Commonwealth Title Insurance 
and Trust Company 

Northwest Corner Chestnut and Twelfth Street 
CAPITAL, - - $1,000,000 

SURPLUS, - - $1,276,401,89 

Insut'es Titles Issues Seairehes 

Heeeives Deposits Lioans Money 

Executes Trusts Becomes Surety 

Acts as t^egistPar of Stocks and Bonds 

Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent for $3.00 and upwards 



OFFICERS 



Dimner Beeber, President 
Francis E. Brewster, Fist Vice-President 
Franklin L,. Lyle, Second Vice-President 
Henry M. Dechert, 

Chairman of Board & Executive Com. 
James V. Ellison, Secretary & Treasurer 
Andrew T. Kay, Title Officer 

DIRECTORS 



Charles K. Zug, Trust Officer 

Edmund B. McCarthy, Asst. Sec'y & Treas. 

Robert J. Williams, Assistant Title Officer 

Charles E. Fellows, Real Estate Officer 

T. C. Jordan, Assistant Trust Officer 

R. F. Reaver, Safe Superintendent 



Dimner Beeber 
Francis E. Brewster 
Charles Carver 
Henry M. Dechert 



Bernard Gilpin 
George E. Kirkpatrick 
Franklin L. Lyle 
Frederick McOwen 



Edward A. Schmidt 
E. Cooper Shapley 
Henry R. Shoch 
John H. Sloan 



Frederick Sylvester 
John T. Windrim 
Isaac D. Yocum 



THE ORIGINAL AND GENUINE 

"PHILADELPHIA" Lawn Mowers 



20 Style Hand 



5 Style Horse 

j^ Crucible Steel 
Knires, hardened 
and tempered in 
Oil. 1^ All parts 
machine made true 
to guage and fit like 
a watch. ^ ^ 




Ask the Gardener who uses one. 



We are the largest makers of High Grade Mowers in the world 

which are acknowledged to be the leaders on the market. 

— Catalogue for the asking — 

Tim Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 

3101-3109 CHESTNUT ST. PHILADELPHIA 

WOODMAN'S ORIENTAL AND DOMBSTIC RUGS i 




1504 W^alnxit Street 

We also import Ladies' Gowns from India and China^ 
Unique Furniture from the Philippine Islands, to be seen here 
at all times. Something new and interesting. 

Cleaning, repairing and storing rugs, a specialty. 



JOSEPH H. PARVIN 

COTTON YARNS 

126 CHESTNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA 



KEYSTONE, MAIN 390 —TELEPHONES— BELL, MARKET 409 

NATIONAL ANILINE & CHEMICAL CO. 

ANILINE COLORS, DYE STUFFS 
AND CHEMICALS = 

109 NORTH Water street Philadelphia 

AGENTS FOR 

SCHOELLKOPF, HARTFORD & HANA CO. 
A. LEE COMPANY 



F. C. Bros. & Co 



T. W. Sparks 

121 Walnut St 



NEW YORK: 34s, 347 Broadway BOSTON: 67 Chauncy Street 

CHICAGO: 605 Medinah Temple 

CATLIN & COMPANY 

YARNS 

128-130 Chestnut Street Philadelphia 

COPS, SKEINS, CONES, TUBES, AND WARPS 

BalUnger ^ Jberrot 

1211 Hrcb Street 

aSosertown JSuilDtng 



A Safe City Light 
FOR Country Homes 



A pure white and wholesome light at less cost than oil, 
gas or eledlricity, per each candle-power >!• >^ 




Absolutely safe, less danger than any other light known 



Needs attention ten minutes once in eight weeks and re- 
quires cleaning but twice a year, for the average dwelling 



Full Information on Application 



GENERAL LIGHT CO 

1 1 20 Betz Building 
PHILADELPHIA, PA.