(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Twelve months with the Eighth Massachusetts infantry in the service of the United States"

Class 




bit 


Hook 


■ 


PRESENTED BY 

■ 




Col. William A. Pew, ik. 



Twelve Months with the Eighth 
Massachusetts Infantry in the 
Service of the United States 



By HARRY E. WEBBER 

With an Introduction by Maj. Gen. J. P. Sanger, U. S. A. 

(retired). Sometime Commander of the Third 

Division, First Army Corps, 

U. S. A. 




. 



SALEM. MASS. 
Newcomb & Gauss, Printers 

1908 










,3 



Copyright, 1968 
By Harry E. Webber 



Gift 






To the Officers and Men of the 

Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V., 

this volume is dedicated 



CONTENTS. 



Preface, 

Introduction, 

Call to Arms, 

Muster In, 

Chickamauga, 

Sickness at Chickamauga, 

Lexington, 

Americus, . 

Matanzas, . 

Muster Out, 

Welcome Home, . 

Eoll of Honor, 

Some Statistics, . 

Field and Staff. . 

Non-Commissioned Staff, 

The Band, 

Company A, Newburyport, 

Company B, Amesburj-, 

Company C, Marblehead, 

Company D, Lynn, 

Company E, Beverly, 

Company F, Haverhill, 

Company G, Gloucester, 

Company H, Salem, 

Company I, Lynn, 

Company K, Danvers, 

Company L, Lawrence, 

Company M, Somerville, 

Chronology, 

Appendix, 



Page 

9 

13 

35 

47 

57 

77 

95 

113 

131 

151 

157 

169 

177 

187 

193 

197 

203 

217 

233 

247 

261 

275 

289 

303 

319 

333 

347 

361 

377 

387 



Preface 




T is a habit with the citizens of old Essex, one 
of the pioneer counties of the grand old Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, to point with 
pride to the fact that since the earliest days of 
the settlement, she was ever ready to take up arms at the 
country's call, and her sons were always found ready and 
willing to go forth to do battle for what they believed to 
be the right. 

The record of her soldiers and sailors is a splendid one, 
and her sons have nobly represented her on land and on 
sea. It is perhaps a far cry from the early days of the 
settlement to the opening of hostilities in the last conflict 
at arms in which the men of the county figured. 

In the earlier events the hazards of warfare were per- 
haps more, but on the other hand, in those days it was 
necessary for all men able to handle a gun to fight, while 
in the recent clash at arms the men who answered their 
country's call volunteered their services, seeking the priv- 
ilege of bearing arms rather than having the duty forced 
upon them. Honor to them all, not only for "what they 
did, but all they dared." 

Massachusetts has furnished her full quota of men at 
every call of the country. Old Essex has given her share, 
and as one of the Essex Regiments, the Eighth has figured 
on several occasions. 

Of those previous to 1898 this volume has no detailed 
account to present, but it is a matter of pride to the 
citizens of this county that it is said of the Eighth Massa- 
chusetts that it was the first National Guard regiment 
ready, after a canvass of its officers and men, to volunteer, 



10 Twelve Months with the 

and was one of the first to leave the state in the service of 
the nation in the conflict with Spain. 

The call to arms on this occasion did not come unex- 
pectedly. For some months events had been so shaping 
themselves that it was evident to all close observers of 
national affairs that a conflict was almost inevitable, and 
the government had been placing itself in a position to 
enable the country to acquit itself creditably when the 
clash came. 

War has been declared between nations for many 
causes, some of them trivial. Some have been wars of 
oppression, some of conquest, and so on, but the conflict of 
1898 was in its way unique. It was a war waged in the 
interests of humanity. For years upon years, one of our 
next door neighbors, so to speak, the island of Cuba, lying 
just off our southern coast, had felt the iron heel of the 
despots of the Kingdom of Spain. As act after act of 
oppression galled upon the natives of the island they were 
stirred to revolt, only to be subdued and then subjected to 
even more crushing indignities. 

The last great revolt was perhaps the best organized of 
any, and spreading from one end of the island to the 
other, became of such magnitude as to almost reach the 
dignity of a war between nations instead of the rebellion 
of a colony against its dominating power. 

With the same spirit that made heroes out of our fore- 
fathers in the days of '76, the Cubans fought for their 
rights and for independence, and their gallant struggles 
not only enlisted the almost universal sympathy of this 
country, but many soldiers of fortune from the United 
States fought under the Cuban colors. 

While the attitude of the government was diplomatical- 
ly neutral, the press and a large majority of citizens were 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry H 



out and out sympathizers with the Cuban cause, and it 
was but a question of a short time before arms, ammuni- 
tion, supplies and men found themselves surreptitiously 
on the way to Cuba, in aid of the cause of the islanders. 

Naturally this state of affairs was resented by the 
Spaniards, and the feelings of the two nations gradually 
became more and more strained, even though diplomati- 
cally there was no breach. 

~No doubt the sensational press, especially the so-called 
"yellow journals", had a great deal to do with inflaming 
the public passion, but carefully planned investigations 
of the conditions on the island revealed a state of affairs 
so gross that the worst stories of cruelty and inhumanity 
seemed plausible, and the feeling against Spain eventually 
became so bitter that it needed only the spark to kindle 
the flame of war. 

This was eventually furnished, and is one of the black- 
est chapters of the Cuban war, by the destruction of an 
American warship while lying peacefully at anchor in 
Havana harbor, under the guns of the Spanish forts, and 
in a time of peace. 

The "Maine" had been ordered to Cuban waters to look 
out for American interests. She was received in due form 
by the Spanish authorities, and her berth was picked out 
by them. While lying at anchor on the night of February 
15, 1898, she was blown up from the outside, presumably 
by a mine, and many lives lost, while many more men 
were horribly injured. 

This was undoubtedly the specific act that led to the 
opening of war between the United States and Spain, the 
details of which will be found in other volumes. 

It is the purpose of this book to treat simply of the part 
played in the conflict by the Eighth Regiment, Massachu- 



12 Twelve Months with the 



setts Infantry, U. S. V., which was the official designation 
of the boys of the Eighth Regiment Infantry, Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Militia, when called into the service of the 
United States. 

Although one of the first volunteer regiments to get 
away, it so happened that it was so assigned for duty that 
it missed getting into an engagement with the enemy, 
although being sent to Cuba and performing several 
months of its service there. It was the first foreign ser- 
vice of the regiment, and was a performance that will take 
a prominent part in the history of the Eighth Massachu- 
setts, which embraces so long and honorable a record. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 13 



Introduction 




To the officers and men of the Eighth Massachusetts 
Infantry, U. S. V.: — 

HAVE been requested by the author, Mr. 
Harry E. Webber, to write some account of 
the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, while 
under my command during the Spanish- 
American war. 

I reported for duty in Chickamauga Park, June 20th, 
1898, and was assigned to the Second Brigade, First 
Division of the First Corps, consisting of the Third Illi- 
nois, Fourth Pennsylvania, and Fourth Ohio Regiments. 
These were all good regiments, especially the Fourth 
Pennsylvania, under Colonel David B. Case. As I ex- 
pected to remain with this brigade throughout the war, 
I began an inspection by company, battalion, and regi- 
ment, so that I might learn something more about their 
actual condition, and the capacity of the officers than 
could be learned on parade. I mention this circumstance, 
not because it concerns the Eighth Massachusetts, but be- 
cause the information I gathered was of the greatest use 
to me later on in dealing with other volunteer regiments. 
I did not complete this inspection, however, as on the 
28th of June, I was assigned to the command of the 
Third Division of the First Corps, composed of the 
Twelfth Minnesota, Fifth Pennsylvania, First South Car- 
olina, Eighth Massachusetts, Twelfth New York, Twenty- 
First Kansas, Ninth Pennsylvania, Second Missouri, and 
First New Hampshire. Subsequently, during the changes 
and vicissitudes which occurred, there were assigned or 



16 Twelve Months with the 



attached to this Division, the Third United States Volun- 
teers, Engineers, the Fifth Missouri, the One Hundred 
and Sixtieth Indiana, the Second, Third and Fourth Ken- 
tucky, Third Mississippi, First Territorial, and the Third 
and Fourth Immune Regiments of Infantry, and one 
squadron of the First Kentucky Cavalry, — so that I had 
ample opportunity to observe and compare different vol- 
unteer regiments. 

The Eighth Massachusetts arrived in the Park May 
19 th, and came under my observation about one month 
later, and before I joined the Third Division. It was the 
only volunteer regiment I saw fully uniformed in kahki. 
As this dress was new to me, it attracted my attention at 
once, and I rode over twice to the Second Brigade of the 
Third Division for a better look at the regiment, which, 
needless to say, made a very favorable impression. 

As will doubtless be remembered, the Third Division 
remained in the Park until the 21st of August, when it 
was transferred to Lexington, Kentucky, where it went 
into camp on the Bryan road at Clark's Farm, about five 
miles east of the city. There it remained until November 
4th, its official designation was changed by orders from 
the War Department, to the Second Division, First Army 
Corps, and on the 10th it was ordered to Georgia, the 
Headquarters Signal Company, Third United States Vol- 
unteers, Engineers, and First Brigade to Columbus, the 
Second Brigade to Americus, and the Third Brigade to 
Albany. At this time the Second Brigade consisted of 
the Eighth Massachusetts, Twelfth New York and Fourth 
Kentucky, under Brigadier General Waites, U. S. V. The 
Fourth Kentucky was ordered to be mustered out, leaving 
the other two regiments to compose the Brigade, and this 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 17 

arrangement was not changed while the Division re- 
mained in service. 

On the 16th of November I was relieved from the com- 
mand of the Second Division and ordered to the Second 
Brigade, relieving General Waites, and was thus brought 
into closer contact with the Eighth Massachusetts. The 
Brigade remained in Americus until November 20th 
when, under orders from the War Department, the head- 
quarters, the Brigade Hospital and the Twelfth New 
York Regiment, were ordered to Charleston, S. C. en 
route to Matanzas, Cuba, where it arrived January 1st. 

A few days later the Eighth Massachusetts rejoined, and 
not long thereafter the One Hundred and Sixtieth Indi- 
ana, Third Kentucky, Tenth United States Infantry, and 
six troops of the Second United States Cavalry which 
composed the garrison of the city and district of Matan- 
zas, and the Second Brigade of the Second Division of the 
First Army Corps, practically ceased to exist. When the 
Third Division became the Second Division, Major Gen- 
eral Ludlow was assigned to command it. He remained 
in command until December 17th when I was ordered to 
relieve him. I rejoined the Second Brigade in Americus 
December 26th and went with it to Cuba. 

The Eighth remained in Matanzas until x\pril 4, 1899, 
when it sailed for Boston, where it was mustered out of 
the service of the United States, and reverted to its status 
as a regiment of the National Guard. While it was not 
given to the Eighth Massachusetts to undergo the supreme 
test of the battlefield, it proved beyond the shadow of a 
doubt by its calm indifference to death in other forms and 
its devotion to duty, that it would have met that test with 
a glorified record of good discipline and steadfast courage. 
Who among all of those who had the misfortune to re- 



18 Twelve Months with the 



main in Chickamauga Park through the summer of 1898, 
will ever forget the trials and dangers of that encamp- 
ment? From forty to sixty thousand men huddled to- 
gether within an area not too large for a sedentary camp 
of two divisions.* 

Prior to August 1st the camps of all the regiments of 
the Third Division, were in the woods with an average of 
from six to eight men in a tent, many of which were unfit 
for occupancy. Polluted water, insufficient supplies and 
protection from the incessant rains of that year, and the 
fact that neither the camp nor the tents were ever moved, 
from lack of space, produced their inevitable result, and 
when the Third Division left the Park, August 21st, 
there were twenty-nine officers and 1237 enlisted men on 
the sick report, out of 337 officers and 9464 men present; 
or, in other words, one officer out of twelve and one man 
out of eight. Although questioned at the time by those 
high in authority, it is now well known that a large pro- 
portion of the sick had typhoid fever; in fact it was epi- 
demic.** 

My recollections of Chickamauga Park are not pleasant 
for reasons which I cannot very well explain here. It is 
sufficient to say that I was fully cognizant of the wretched 
conditions which sent the sick report higher each day and 
subjected the sick in hospital to needless privation and 
suffering, but was powerless to prevent or ameliorate them. 
In fact, for administrative purposes, I was very little 
more than a figure head, although held responsible by the 



*NOTE— In 1898, the Park proper contained 5530.4 acres, of which 
2032.8 acres were cleared and 3506.6 wooded. Troops on the march 
may camp or bivouac in the woods with but little risk to the 
health of the men, but in a sedentary camp the tents must be in 
the open. 



♦•NOTE — The records of the War Department show that in August 
there were 1568 cases of typhoid in the Division and General 
Hospitals; there were probably as many mora in the regiments. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 19 

regiments, whose appeals for a relief which never came 
while we remained in the Park, were most distressing to 
me. At that time the collapse of the war had not been 
foreseen, and although the Spanish forcca in the eastern 
district of Santiago, Cuba had capitulated July 16, it 
was not until the protocol of August 12th, providing for 
a cessation of hostilities, that we felt the war was over 
and that the Third Division would probably never fire a 
hostile shot. In the meantime, however, under the orders 
of the Corps Commander, the Division was held in readi- 
ness to move at a moment's notice, and every effort was 
made to prepare it for service against the Spaniards. 

To this end, and on the day after I assumed the com- 
mand, orders were issued to prepare the Division for ac- 
tive service in accordance with the instructions of the War 
Department. These prescribed the clothing, ammunition, 
and rations to be carried on the person and in the two 
wagons allowed each company, — all other clothing and 
all other personal belongings oi" the men to be packed in 
boxes legibly marked with the company and regiment, and 
turned over to the depot quartermaster for storage or ship- 
ment. To render the officers and men expert in packing, 
and to determine just what could be carried under the in- 
structions referred to, each regiment was required to 
strike tents and pack up, after which it was marched to 
the regimental parade grounds, followed by its wagons, 
and inspected by the Brigade Commander. It was well 
understood that all regimental and company property 
which had not been disposed of when marching orders 
were received, must be abandoned. 

As up to the time I assumed command of the Division 
there had been no target practice, on July 1, Major 
Edward H. Eldredge, of the Eighth Massachusetts, was 



20 Twelve Months with the 



appointed Inspector of Rifle Practice, and preparations 
were at once made to begin target practice. Nothing 
could have been more fortunate than the selection of the 
major for this most important branch of instruction. Con- 
scientious, enthusiastic, and thoroughly competent, he had 
the target ranges established, and the Division at work 
firing within a week, and this was continued daily (Sun- 
day excepted), until just before the Division left the 
Park. 

On July 26 a division rifle competition was held, each 
regiment furnishing a team of 12 men; ten shots were 
fired off hand by each man, at 160 yards (possible score 
600 points). The highest score was made by the Eighth 
Massachusetts with 481 points ; the lowest score was 409. 

In the course of the instruction it was found that many 
men had never fired a gun and were correspondingly ig- 
norant of this most important requirement. What would 
they have done in the line of battle? Well, I will tell 
you. Those who were not killed would have been perfect- 
ly demoralized until they either ran away or perhaps 
were wounded, in which case they would have added 
vastly to the cares of the Division Commander and his 
medical staff. In either case, they would have been of 
no possible use except as stretcher bearers. Nothing 
could be more objectionable on the part of the high mil- 
itary authorities than to send such men under fire, and 
there is no possible excuse for it. 

Other measures taken to prepare the Division for active 
service were careful instruction in guard duty, the service 
of advance guards and outposts, by battalions and regi- 
ments ; litter drill and " first aid." 

As it was rumored that the First Corps would be sent 
against Havana, orders were issued for the formation of 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 21 

a pioneer detachment in each regiment to consist of one 
officer, two non-commissioned officers and ten privates, 
to be specially selected for their practical knowledge of 
the duties of pioneers, viz: the removal of obstructions, 
corduroying roads, the building, repair and destruction of 
simple bridges, culverts, railroad beds and embankments, 
and the use of high explosives. No difficulty whatever 
was experienced in finding the men who in the discharge 
of their duties rendered most valuable services to the 
Division. 

To give the brigade and regimental commanders some 
idea of the difficulty of forming the Division in line of 
battle on broken and obstructed ground, and to exercise 
the officers and men in preserving the line, supplying 
ammunition, and caring for the wounded, — problems in 
which the entire Division took part, were carried out 
practically. 

Many of you will doubtless remember those exercises 
and how difficult it was to form the Division in line with- 
out wide gaps between brigades, or to move it in any 
direction without breaking the formation. These problems, 
although extremely simple, were of great benefit as a relief 
to the monotony of drill, and in testing the field efficiency 
of the medical and ordinance services. 

In the meantime, the Corps Commander, with the First 
Division of the Corps, left the Park en route to Cuba and 
Porto Rico, and on August 15th I went to Lexington to 
select a camp for the Third Division, in which the typhoid 
had spread rapidly, and on August 21st, the movement to 
Lexington began. Although we left between three and 
four hundred men in the hospital when we moved to Lex- 
ington, the Division was so thoroughly impregnated with 
this disease and with malarial fever that more cases were 



22 Twelve Months with the 



inevitable, and the hospital of 1000 beds, which was estab- 
lished in anticipation of this very contingency, proved 
inadequate, and but for the timely removal of the 
convalescents to other places, would have needed a large 
extension. Those of the regiment now living will not have 
forgotten the struggle which then took place to stamp out 
the typhoid fever. It was a fight to a finish, in which 
every available means known to medical and sanitary 
science was used during a period of three months. 

For the information of those members of the regiment 
who have joined since the war with Spain, and because it 
was the most serious condition which confronted the regi- 
ment during its service in the field, I venture to give some 
account of our efforts to overcome this dread disease. 

In selecting and arranging the site of the Division en- 
campment, I was influenced more by sanitary requirements 
than by any other considerations whatever. To the camp 
of each regiment fifty acres of cleared land were allowed. 
This insured wide company streets, sufficient space between 
tents to admit of their being moved, plenty of room for 
the regimental and battalion staffs, guard tents, cook tents, 
sinks, corrals, and regimental parade grounds, with suf- 
ficient isolation from neighboring regiments. 

Ground was also set aside for division and brigade head- 
quarters, and for a general parade ground, the division 
hospital and the various departments of supply, and these 
were far enough removed from each other and the troops 
to prevent any encroachment. All told, the Division 
occupied about 1000 acres. 

The different camps were then laid out by the division 
engineer, aided by the pioneer corps, and a copious supply 
of pure water secured, and all the sinks (kitchen and 
men's), were dug, ditched and housed, and tent floors made 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 23 



ready before the first regiment of the Division arrived, so 
that there was no occasion for defiling the ground or for 
unnecessary exposure to the weather. 

As soon as practicable after the regiments arrived, the 
following sanitary orders were carried into effect. A non- 
commissioned officer was placed in charge of every sink, 
who received his instructions from the regimental surgeon 
as to the use of chloride of lime, quick lime, crude pe- 
troleum and corrosive sublimate, large quantities of which 
were provided by the medical purveyor and chief quarter- 
master of the Division. 

For example, a box of the chloride of lime was kept in 
each of the men's sinks and it was the duty of the non- 
commissioned officer in charge to see that a small quantity 
was thrown into the sink three times daily, and that the 
sink floors were scrubbed every morning and then mopped 
with a solution of corrosive sublimate. All the men's 
sinks were lighted at night. Quick-lime and crude pe- 
troleum were also used in all the sinks, not only as 
disinfectants, but to keep the flies away. 

Tents were moved once each week, the sites vacated 
thoroughly sprinkled with quick-lime, the under surface 
of the floors lime washed, and the tent floors mopped with 
a solution of corrosive sublimate; tent walls were raised, 
clothing and bedding thoroughly aired daily; all bed 
sacks were filled with clean straw, the old straw burned, 
and the bed sacks boiled every month, and whenever a 
man was sent to the hospital his bed sack received the 
same treatment; all water barrels were burned out every 
two weeks, all stable manure removed from the camp 
daily, and together with all other refuse, burned, and for 
this purpose regimental or brigade crematories were con- 
structed as might be most convenient. 



24 Twelve Months with the 

Facilities were provided in each company for washing 
and bathing and every soldier was required to bathe at 
least twice each week and to keep his hair and beard neat- 
ly trimmed. All drinking water was boiled and filtered 
and the men cautioned against drinking water of any 
other kind. 

The indiscriminate sale and use of farm products, gar- 
den truck, fruit, pies, cakes, and all soft drinks were pro- 
hibited, nor were hucksters permitted in any of the regi- 
mental camps without the written authority of the com- 
manding officer. 

To insure the execution of these instructions, a division 
sanitary inspector was appointed, whose duty it was to 
visit the camp of each regiment daily and, together with 
the medical officer on duty and officer of the day, make 
inspection of the police of the camp, giving all needful 
orders for the correction of sanitary abuses and defects. 

As no regimental hospitals were contemplated by the 
War Department, and none were permitted in Camp Ham- 
ilton, men sick enough to require treatment in bed were 
removed to the division hospital. On arriving there their 
clothing was removed and carefully disinfected, labeled 
and packed away, and if their cases were of doubtful char- 
acter they were sent to the detention ward until the nature 
of their disease could be determined, when they were dis- 
posed of accordingly. 

At 2 P. M. daily a medical officer of each regiment re- 
ported at the division hospital, and with the medical 
officer in charge of the wards, visited the sick of his regi- 
ment and decided whether they should be returned to duty 
or not. This had a very good effect, as it brought the 
medical officers of the regiment into daily contact with the 
sick of their own regiments, which was a great comfort to 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 25 



them, and besides kept the medical officers fully informed 
of their condition. 

As far as possible the sick of the different regiments 
were kept together, and no one except the regimental and 
company commanders, the medical officers, chaplains, and 
immediate relatives of the sick were allowed to visit them. 
This restriction was rendered necessary by the danger of 
infection in typhoid cases, and to prevent the excitement 
and noise caused by visitors. 

I am aware that many of the requirements and restric- 
tions ordered at that time were considered harsh and 
unnecessary and gave rise to some bad feeling and grumb- 
ling, .but as they had the unqualified approval of the 
medical staff, I had no hesitation in enforcing them. That 
they were fully justified was clearly shown by the results. 

Within a short time after our arrival in Lexington the 
number of sick increased so rapidly that the division hos- 
pital was filled to overflowing. But in the course of five 
or six weeks, and as a consequence of our strenuous ef- 
forts, the number began to diminish, until finally, and 
before the Division moved to Georgia in November, not 
a single case remained in the Division outside of the hos- 
pitals, and no new cases were ever reported to me while 
the Division remained in service. 

Of the part taken by the Eighth Massachusetts in this 
heroic struggle, a great deal might be written by way of 
commendation. It is probably sufficient to say that 
Colonel Pew and his officers appeared to realize fully the 
gravity of the situation, and relying on the good discipline 
and high order of intelligence of the rank and file, 
had but little difficulty in carrying out the sanitary regu- 
lations of the camp, thus preserving the lives of many of 
the men. 



26 Twelve Months with the 



Before leaving this subject, and at the risk of exhaust- 
ing your patience, I can not refrain from giving you a 
word of warning. Of all the diseases which infest 
sedentary camps, such as those established in the United 
States and Cuba during the recent war, none is more in- 
sidious or deadly in its effects than typhoid fever. 

It would be very unusual indeed for a regiment of the 
National Guard or of Volunteers to assemble in camp at 
any time without bringing with it at least one case of un- 
developed typhoid fever. Now, a week may elapse before 
such a case is discovered and reported, and in the mean- 
time the man who has it may have given it to a dozen 
other men through fecal and urinary discharges, and 
through carelessness in using the sink in washing his 
hands and bathing, and in keeping his clothing absolutely 
free from that kind of pollution. Hence the importance 
of personal cleanliness and the strictest enforcement of all 
the sanitary rules which may be established. 

In a camp of regular soldiers thoroughly instructed in 
the duties of sentinels, and not afraid to enforce their 
orders, this is not difficult, but among volunteers where 
guard duty is often not understood, or is looked upon with 
disfavor, and but little sense of individual responsibility, 
it is a very difficult matter, and such camps may speedily 
and easily become hot beds for the spread of typhoid and 
other diseases. 

Bear this in mind and resolve that should the exigencies 
of the military service ever require you to go into camp 
again, you will not only keep yourselves clean, but will 
insist on a clean camp, clean kitchens and sinks, clean 
food and mess kits, and that you will mercilessly punish 
all infractions of sanitary rules, as well as the sentinels 
or other guards who knowingly permit them. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 27 



I remained in command of the Second Division until 
November KUh, when I was relieved, and on the 21st 
assumed command of the Second Brigade at Americus. 
Although I knew the Eighth Massachusetts quite well, I 
now determined to know it thoroughly, and on November 
28th, commenced an inspection of the regiment by bat- 
talion, and in order that every officer and enlisted man 
might attend, it was ordered that no guard or other detail 
would be furnished by the battalion under inspection. 

I began with the First Battalion of the Eighth Massa- 
chusetts and wound up with the Third Battalion, giving 
each just such a critical inspection as was prescribed for 
regulars. In other words, I made a careful examination 
of the arms and equipments, clothing, camp and garrison 
equipage, mess books, records and drills of each company, 
battalion and regiment. 

Target practice was resumed as soon as the Brigade 
was settled in camp, and each regiment was given the 
most careful and detailed instruction in outpost duties 
and those of the advanced guard. An effort was also 
made to instruct the Brigade in the principles of a front 
and flank attack, beginning at short distances, which were 
extended finally to 3000 yards over obstructed ground, the 
enemy's position being indicated, and as far as possible the 
exercises made as realistic as possible. 

The month spent at Americus was full of professional 
interest and profit, and caused me to realize more fully 
the very great advantage of a brigade camp over larger 
ones, and how much better it would have been at the out- 
set to have fully equipped each regiment in its State 
camp, to then have assembled it with other regiments in a 
brigade camp — preferably in the same State — commanded 
by a thoroughly competent and active general officer, there 



2$ Twelve Months with the 



to receive the preliminary instruction so easily given un- 
der such circumstances, and so next to impossible in the 
camp of a Division of an army corps. 

The Eighth Massachusetts and Twelfth New York 
were fairly well equipped when I joined them in the Park, 
but the First South Carolina regiment was without arms, 
equipment or uniforms. The men ate with their fingers 
for several weeks, and relied on such crude dishes as could 
be improvised from tomato-cans, etc. I have no doubt that 
much of the complaint made by this regiment about the 
rations, was chiefly due to this. 

The Eighth Massachusetts in two detachments left 
Americus January 6th and 8th, and arrived in Matanzas 
January 10th and 13th and went into camp near Fort San 
Severino on the west side of the bay. 

On the 12th of January the last of the fifteen thousand 
Spanish soldiers under Generals Merina and Molina, 
composing the garrison of Matanzas, sailed away, and 
about 8 o'clock in the evening, General Bettancourt and 
his detachment of insurgent troops marched into the city, 
which went wild with excitment. The First Battalion 
Eighth Massachusetts and Twelfth New York were held 
in readiness that night lest there should be any hostile 
demonstration towards the Spanish residents of the city. 
It turned out that the natives were so intent on celebrat- 
ing the departure of the Spanish troops that no attention 
was paid to anything else, and apart from that the night 
passed quietly. 

On January 12th Major-General J. H. Wilson relieved 
me from command of the Department of Matanzas, and 
on the following day I was assigned to command the Dis- 
trict of Matanzas with headquarters in the city. Up to 
this time I had been interested chiefly in arranging for 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 29 



the evacuation of the Spaniards, in earing for the troops 
and getting them settled in camp. 

On January 5th a bureau of street cleaning and sanita- 
tion had been established as the result of a careful in- 
spection of the city, and the prevalence of yellow fever 
during the preceding month. Six deaths had occurred, 
and we were all somewhat solicitous about the future. 
Two cases occurred, one a civilian who died, the other a 
soldier, who recovered. 

As a precautionary measure the old yellow fever hos- 
pital was burned and a new one of canvas erected near 
the district hospital. I then gave my attention to the 
very serious and delicate duties connected with the ad- 
ministration of the District and City of Matanzas, in 
accordance with the laws of war, and the orders of the 
President. 

Although by virtue of the military occupation of Cuba 
martial law prevailed, it was the President's wish that as 
far as possible the inhabitants might be secured in their 
persons, and property, and in all their private rights and 
relations as long as they performed their duties, and that 
they be protected in their homes, their employments, and 
in the free exercise of their religion. That as far as possi- 
ble the municipal laws such as related to the private rights 
of persons and property, and provided for the punish- 
ment of crime, should be continued in force, to be 
administered by the ordinary tribunals substantially as 
they were before the occupation. 

The frame work of municipal government in Cuba was 
excellent, far better in some respects than our own, but 
Spaniards filled nearly all the insular, provincial and 
municipal offices and municipal government was under 
the direct supervision of the provincial and insular 



30 Twelve Months with the 



governments. Nevertheless, the municipal organization 
was complete, excellent of its kind, and ample for 
the government of the city and district, and I determined 
at the outset to instil into the local authorities a proper 
sense of their responsibilities and authority as the agent 
of a free and liberal government, and to require them to 
perform all their duties, using the troops only when 
necessary to aid their efforts to maintain law and order 
and to prevent any disorderly conduct on the part of the 
officers or men. To this end a provost marshal with a 
suitable guard was appointed and Fort San Severino was 
converted into a military prison. 

The scope of this article will not admit of a detailed 
account of all that was done for the people and City of 
Matanzas during our stay there. It is probably sufficient 
to say that we cleaned and disinfected the city and estab- 
lished a system of sanitation so thorough that a recent 
traveler through the island told me that Matanzas was the 
cleanest and healthiest city in Cuba, and that there had 
been no case of yellow fever there since we left. To ac- 
complish this a certain number of our officers and non- 
commissioned officers and men associated with the various 
city officials, who were, however, required to take the lead, 
the officers acting as advisers and assistants when necessa- 
ry. 

Matanzas was suffering at that time from the effects of 

the reconcentration ordered by General Weyler, and the 
population has been increased from about 25,000 to 
40,000, chiefly refugees. As soon as it could be done these 
people were returned to their old homes, or provided with 
homes elsewhere. In the meantime, they, together with 
all other indigent poor, to the number of 19,373, were fed 
by the United States Government. Prior to this many — 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 31 



chiefly children — died of starvation, and many more would 
have followed but for the timely arrival of the troops. 

Some idea of what was done by the Army for the people 
of Matanzas may be gathered from the vital statistics of 
the city. During the year 1897 there were 6,729 recorded 
deaths, and in 1898, 5,972, or an average of 6,350 or 
over 500 deaths per month. In April, 1899, the last re- 
port rendered before we left showed a total of 68 deaths, 
quite a perceptible decrease in four months. I have en- 
larged somewhat on this subject because the results of our 
efforts were so gratifying, and because the Eighth Massa- 
chusetts took an important part in this work, especially 
Chaplain George D. Sanders. 

Another most useful and special service rendered by 
the Eighth was a settlement of the first strike ever inaug- 
urated in Matanzas. Labor unions and strikes were 
unknown before American occupation, but it was not long 
before labor union delagates from the States arrived in 
Havana, and soon unions were formed and rumors of 
strikes reached Matanzas, to be followed later by two del- 
egates who organized a union and started a strike for 
shorter hours and higher pay among the employees of the 
railway and the stevedores engaged in loading the annual 
sugar crop, then arriving in vast quantities. As a large 
number of the native workmen did not care to strike, 
those who did immediately began the kind of intimidation 
usually resorted to in this country, and several were as- 
saulted and more threatened, and the situation became 
serious. 

At this point the manager of the road appealed to me 
for protection and I sent two companies of the Eighth to 
the freight yards to see that protection was given. I gave 
no instructions but relied on the experience and good sense 



32 Twelve Months with the 



of the officers and men, and they ended the strike to my 
entire satisfaction. No doubt they can recall the circum- 
stances, and the very effective measures resorted to. 

That they were good and sufficient may be inferred 
from the fact that no one ever complained of them, except 
the two delegates, and they were told they could go to 
jail or leave town, which latter they did by the first avail- 
able train, and peace and contentment prevailed thereafter 
to the end. 

On the 20th of January commenced the festivities to 
celebrate the evacuation of Cuba by the Spaniards, and 
on February 22nd another fiesta was held in honor of 
General Maximo Gomez, at that time the idol of the 
Cubans. Upon both occasions the entire population 
thronged the streets and the greatest excitement prevailed. 
General Gomez remained in Matanzas three days, and 
with his departure the city settled down into its usual 
calm. 

Thanks to the tact and excellent conduct of the troops, 
nothing occurred to disturb the festivities; the crowds 
were handled with great skill and with due regard to their 
susceptibilities and their first taste of personal liberty — 
not only as individuals but as a community. And to the 
very great honor of the troops it may be said that this was 
ever the rule in dealing with the residents of the city, no 
complaint of misconduct, public or private, having ever 
been made to me. 

The Eighth Massachusetts was especially fortunate in 
gaining the good will of the Cubans, and when it left 
Matanzas was the recipient of a letter of enthusiastic 
commendation from the mayor of the city. A copy of 
the letter was sent to me, and the very complimentary 
expressions of the mayor were neither exaggerated nor 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 33 



unmerited. The regiment deserved a great deal from 
the people of Matanzas, and it was very gratifying to me 
to know that they appreciated your services. 

I regret that in this brief sketch I have not been able 
to go more into detail concerning the duties, the trials 
and successful achievements of the Eighth Massachusetts 
during the Spanish War. It is sufficient for me to say 
as your brigade and division commander, that while we 
were together, a day rarely passed that I did not ride 
through your camp, turn out the guard and take a general 
look around, and on every Sunday make a careful in- 
spection, and it gives me the greatest pleasure to say that 
in point of efficiency the regiment had few equals, and no 
superiors, among the volunteer regiments which came 
under my observation. 

Proper esprit du corps and a high sense of duty per- 
vaded the regiment, due in great measure to the excellent 
example of Colonel Pew and his field officers, Lieutenant- 
Colonels Bailey and Stopford and Majors Eldredge and 
Graves. During the summer of 1907 I visited the regi- 
ment in camp at South Framingham and was glad to note 
that the instruction and the experience of the war had not 
been forgotten. 

In conclusion I beg to remind you that while all mil- 
itary efforts should be directed towards the preparation 
of soldiers for the great tests of the battlefield, because so 
much may depend on the result, there are other tests 
which if successfully borne, entitle soldiers to as much 
credit as good conduct under fire, although they may not 
bring them as much renown. 

Among disciplined soldiers it is the exception to find 
one who does not behave well under fire, but it by no 
means follows that the bravest will not falter in their duty 



34 Twelve Months with the 

if beset in a sedentary camp with plague, pestilence or 
famine. It is not as much of a strain on the nerves to see 
a soldier killed in battle as to see him die of an epidemic 
disease, nor do I believe it is as hard for the soldier. When 
a soldier goes under fire, he is facing the very contingency 
for which he enlisted and for which he has been trained. 
He knows he may be shot and wounded or killed, but his 
duty lies unequivocably before him and appeals directly 
to his pride and to his manhood in a way disease can 
never do. Who will sav then that the men who fought 
the battle of San Juan deserved more credit than those 
who died from typhoid fever while acting as volunteer 
nurses to their comrades or in the discharge of other 
duties, when by getting a furlough or running away they 
could have avoided all risk. The excitement of battle and 
the example of brave men have made a hero of many a 
man who but for that would have run away. 

But in a typhoid fever camp death lurks everywhere 
and there is no stimulating excitement to strengthen 
those who have to face it. 

Therefore the highest honors should not be given solely 
to those soldiers who are so fortunate as to do their duty 
under fire, but to those as well who do their duty where- 
ever they may be, regardless of consequences, and in all 
the circumstances which may attend them. 

Do not therefore complain, as I have heard some of you 
do, or tinge your recollections of the war with regret, be- 
cause you did not take part in the only battle that was 
fought, but, hoping for better luck next time, find supreme 
satisfaction in the reflection that you did your whole duty 
in places where death was quite as imminent as on San 
Juan Hill, and that no other regiment, regular or volun- 
teer, could have done more. 
J. P. Sanger, 

Major General, U. S. A., Retired. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 35 



The Call to Arms 




ETWEEN February 15th, when the U. S. S. 
Maine was destroyed in the harbor of Havana, 
and March 28th, 1898, when Congress re- 
ceived the report of the Naval Board of 
Inquiry, declaring the Maine to have been destroyed by 
an exterior explosion, public opinion in the United States 
was crystalizing in favor of declaring war with Spain 
and recognizing the independence of Cuba. 

On March 16th a meeting of the officers of the Eighth 
Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., was held in the Head- 
quarters of the regiment at Salem. The officers, with one 
exception, authorized the Colonel to tender their services 
as part of any quota Massachusetts might be called upon 
to furnish. Company commanders were directed to in- 
terview each member of their companies and report to the 
Adjutant the number of men ready to volunteer. The 
reports of the various company commanders, show that by 
April 1st, all but eleven men had authorized the Colonel 
to tender their services. It is said that the Eighth was 
the first National Guard Regiment in the country ready, 
after a careful canvass of its officers and men, to volunteer. 

On March 29th resolutions declaring w r ar with Spain 
were introduced into both houses of Congress. Congress 
had appropriated $50,000,000 for national defence, and 
the Legislature of Massachusetts followed with an appro- 
priation of $500,000 to equip troops. 

War was coming and troops were to be needed. This 
much was certain, but no one could tell how the necessary 
troops would be raised. It was rumored that the military 
advisors of the government were divided in their councils. 



38 Twelve Months with the 

and that some favored the retention of the Militia for 
local defence, and the organization of new regiments of 
volunteers to fill the expected call. For weeks the Adju- 
tant was ready to tender the services of the Eighth as a 
militia, or volunteer regiment, whichever way the call 
came. The tension was so great that on April 22nd the 
following letter was sent to the Governor: — 

"Headquarters Eighth Eegiment Infantry. 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, 

Salem, Mass., April 22, 1898. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General, State of Massachusetts, 

State House, Boston, Mass. 

Sir:— 

I have the honor to represent to the Commander-in- 
Chief that the officers and men of the Eighth Regiment 
are willing and anxious to respond to any call for volun- 
teers, and I hereby tender the services of the Regiment, 
if agreeable to the wishes of the Commander-in-Chief, to 
form a part of any quota that Massachusetts may be called 
upon to furnish. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

William A. Pew, Je. 

Colonel." 



The above letter was acknowledged by the following 
communication : — 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 39 

"Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Executive Department, 

Boston, Mass, April 22, 1898. 

Col. William A. Pew, Jr., 

Headquarters Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
Salem, Mass. 

My dear Sir: — 

I have this moment had placed in my hands your letter 
of April 22nd addressed to Maj. Gen. Samuel Dal ton, ex- 
pressing to the Commander-in-Chief the willingness and 
desire of the officers and men of the Eighth Regiment to 
respond to any call for volunteers and tendering the ser- 
vices of the Regiment, if agreeable to the wishes of the 
Commander-in-Chief, to form a part of any quota that 
Massachusetts may be called upon to furnish. 

I appreciate highly the zeal and patriotism of your of- 
fer, which will be placed upon file for future reference. 

Very truly yours, 

Roger Wolcott." 

On April 23rd the President called for one hundred 
twenty-five thousand volunteers, and on April 25th war 
was declared with Spain. During the evening of the 25th, 
Governor Wolcott was notified by a telegram from the 
Secretary of War, that the Massachusetts quota, under the 
call of the President, would be four regiments of infan- 
try, and three batteries of heavy artillery. Nothing was 
yet decided how these regiments should be raised. 

The infantrv organizations in Massachusetts Militia 
were at this time five line regiments and two corps of 
cadets. This information as to the Massachusetts quota 



40 Twelve Months with the 



increased the suspense, as it was apparent, that even if 
militia regiments were accepted, all could not go. About 
this time the newspapers published statements from the 
Governor, which were construed to mean, the state militia 
would be used for local defence, as there was much talk 
of a descent upon the Massachusetts coast by Cevera's 
fleet, which was then rendezvouing at the Cape Verde 
Islands. 

The suspense of the militia was not relieved until late 
in the afternoon of April 27th, when the Governor re- 
ceived a letter from the Secretary of War, requesting him 
to furnish four regiments of infantry to serve for the 
period of two years unless sooner discharged. In his let- 
ter the Secretary of War expressed a desire that as far as 
practicable, the National Guard be given preference. 

To meet this summons to arms, the Governor, by an 
order issued April 28th, designated as the four infantry 
regiments to be offered the privilege of volunteering under 
this call, the Second, Sixth, Eighth and Ninth. The com- 
manding officers of these regiments were required to cause 
an individual canvass to be made of their subordinate of- 
ficers and enlisted men, to ascertain and make careful 
record of those desiring to volunteer. These were to be 
held subject to future orders and at the earliest possible 
day, mustered into the service of the United States. 

On the same evening that this communication was re- 
ceived from the Secretary of War, the Governor notified 
the Colonel of the Eighth Regiment to report to him in 
person the next morning at the State House, Boston. 
Colonel William A. Pew, Jr. immediately notified all the 
officers of the regiment to meet him at the State House 
the following afternoon at 2 o'clock. The commanding 
officers of the four regiments designated, to be given the 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 41 



privilege of volunteering, met the Governor at the State 
House in the forenoon of April 28th, and received their 
official orders. They were directed to recruit their com- 
panies to seventy-four men, and were informed that the 
field, staff, and company officers would be appointed by the 
Governor, upon the recommendation of the commanding 
officer of each regiment. 

At 2 o'clock in the afternoon, Colonel Pew met the of- 
ficers of the Eighth at the State House, and arranged the 
details for the organization of the regiment. The various 
company commanders had already received orders from 
Regimental Headquarters to secure a list of recruits, so 
that if called into the active service, they would have their 
companies at war strength. The militia companies at this 
time were allowed sixty men in the State service. 

From the State House, company commanders immedi- 
ately proceeded to their home stations, and began recruit- 
ing to seventy-four men. 

Although the night of April 28th was stormy, and rain 
fell in torrents, excitement was high, and the company 
armories of the Eighth were filled with militiamen, and 
recruiting was brisk. There was no difficulty in securing 
the additional men. 

In about all the cities and towns immediately following 
the call for troops, Volunteer Aid Societies or Relief Com- 
mittees were formed at mass meetings, and various sums 
of money were raised to equip the volunteers or to look 
after their families. 

On April 29th, the Eighth Regiment was ordered to 
report at the State Camp Grounds at South Framingham, 
on Thursday, May 5th, at 11 o'clock, A. M. The camp 
was placed under the command of Col. E. P. Clark, the 
senior officer. 



42 Twelve Months with the 



From April 28th to May 5th, was a continuous round 
of excitement and bustle in the armories. 

The companies were ordered to assemble on Lowell 
Street near the Union Station in Boston not later than 
10.30, May 5th. The scenes about the armories of the 
various companies on May 5th was most pathetic, as the 
wives, mothers, or sweethearts of the men gathered for the 
farewell. In every instance the companies were escorted 
to the station by local or military bodies, and the demon- 
strations which took place as the companies marched 
through the crowded streets had not been duplicated since 
the call of President Lincoln was answered in 1861. 

At Newburyport, the public and parochial schools were 
given a half holiday, and the streets were decorated with 
flags and bunting. Company A was escorted to the railroad 
station by the Mayor and members of the City Govern- 
ment, the Grand Army Post, and members of the Fire 
Department. The streets were filled with thousands of 
people, who displayed their enthusiasm by cheers and the 
waving of flags and handkerchiefs. A field piece was 
fired at brief intervals and the church bells and steam 
whistles joined in the chorus of God speeds. 

At Amesbury, the streets through which Company B 
passed, were packed with humanity. Whistles of the fac- 
tories were blown, bells were rung, and there was a general 
outburst of enthusiasm. The company was escorted to the 
train by the Grand Army Veterans and members of the 
High School Battalion. 

At Marblehead, cheering crowds greeted the members 
of Company C, under the escort of the Grand Army Post 
and a delegation of citizens. Previous to starting from the 
Armory, the Selectmen spoke words of farewell to the 
soldiers. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 43 



In Lynn, patriotism was at fever heat. The factories 
and schools closed, and thousands lined the streets. Flags 
were flying from all staffs, and many were carried by the 
people along the line of march. Companies D and I were 
escorted to the station by General Lander Post, G. A. R., 
and the English and Classical High School Battalions. 
The Mayor and members of the City Government reviewed 
the parade. At Central Square, near the station, twenty 
thousand people gathered, and as the train bearing the 
Lynn volunteers steamed out of the station, there arose a 
mighty cheer for the soldier boys. 

In Beverly, business was suspended, and the citizens 
turned out en masse to bid good bye to Company E. The 
company was escorted by the Grand Army Post, Fire 
Department, school children, and a cavalcade of citizens. 

At Haverhill, Company F and the Regimental Drum 
Corps were given a most enthusiastic send off. The com- 
pany was escorted by the Grand Army Post and Sons of 
Veterans. Mayor Chase delivered a farewell address at 
the City Hall, after which the line of march was taken to 
the station, where a crowd, numbering fifteen thousand, 
witnessed their departure. 

At Gloucester, Company G marched through lanes of 
cheering citizens, the escort consisting of the Grand Army 
Post, the Fourth of July Committee, the High School 
Battalion, and the Sons of Veterans. The procession was 
led by the Mayor. Hon. W. W. French presented the 
Company with a silk flag on behalf of citizens, and the gift 
was accepted by Captain Edward J. Horton for the com- 
pany. 

Salem witnessed scenes of enthusiasm as Company II 
marched away. The streets were packed, and thousands 
•of small flags were waved by the cheering citizens as the 



44 Twelve Months with the 



company marched to the station, escorted by the Second 
Corps of Cadets, Grand Army Post, Naval Veterans, Let- 
ter Carriers and Clerks, the Salem Light Infantry Veteran 
Association, the Veteran Firemen Association, and a 
barouche containing among others, Francis D. Cahill, 
Salem's survivor of the Maine explosion. The Mayor and 
the City Government reviewed the parade at City Hall, 
and a large crowd packed the streets near the station to 
witness the train, containing the members of the company, 
pull out for Boston. 

In Danvers, the people were early astir to give Company 
K a rousing farewell. It was escorted through the princi- 
pal streets by a cavalcade, the Grand Army Post, High 
School Cadets, and a body of citizens. 

Lawrence turned out in force to speed the departure of 
Company L. At the Armory, Kev. Dr. H. E. Barnes of- 
fered prayer, after which the men marched to the station 
escorted by the Grand Army Post and Battery C. As the 
train bore the company out of the station, Battery C fired 
a salute, and the whistles of the locomotives in the engine 
yard mingled with the cheers that arose from thousands of 
throats. 

At Somerville, on the evening before departure, Com- 
pany M was entertained by the citizens at Union Hall. 
The next morning they were escorted to the station by a 
large company of citizens, the Grand Army Posts, and 
members of the Kelief Corps. 

The reception of the regiment in Boston was equally 
enthusiastic. The Evening Transcript described the scenes 
along the line of march as follows : — 

"From 9 o'clock this morning until the order to march 
was given, the Union Station was filled with cheering 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 45 



thousands and marching companies. They came by dif- 
ferent trains, according to the places from which they 
started. As the companies left the train, they formed in 
the train shed, and marched to Lowell Street, where the 
parade was formed, with the right of line resting on Cause- 
way Street. At 10.50 o'clock the regiment had formed on 
Lowell Street. An orderly announced that all of the com- 
panies had arrived at their positions in the line. Colonel 
Pew gave the command, and the clear, shrill notes of the 
bugle echoed along the line. Just then the sun, which 
had been hidden behind gray and threatening clouds, 
broke out, and the men welcomed this as a good omen in 
their coming service. The regiment swung off to the tune 
of the 'Stars and Stripes Forever' by the Eighth Eegiment 
Band. Half way down the line was the Fife and Drum 
Corps playing The Girl I Left Behind Me.' Lowell Street, 
Merrimac Streets, and in fact all of the streets about the 
Union Station were crowded by thousands, and the various 
companies were given a most enthusiastic reception all 
along the line of march, which was over the following 
streets: — Merrimac to Haymarket Square, Washington 
and School, Beacon, Arlington and Boylston Streets to 
Huntington Avenue, a special train being taken at the 
Huntington Avenue station of the Boston & Albany K. R. 

Far down Beacon Street could be seen the crowding 
thousands from a point of vantage on the State House 
steps; people were standing on tiptoe and craning their 
necks for a glimpse of the approaching troops. Presently 
the strains of martial music floated from below, mingled 
with the subdued and far away cheers which heralded the 
approach of the soldiers. The cheerings grew nearer and 
louder. One could catch now and again the air of the 
stirring march, and now the platoon of mounted police 
swung around the turn. On a chestnut horse at the head 
of the regiment, came Colonel William A. Pew, Jr. of 
Salem. 

The head of the line passed Park Street and approached 
the State House steps. The cheering grew continuous, and 
there was a great waving of flags and handkerchiefs. Gen- 



46 Twelve Months with the 



eral Curtis Guild, Jr. stepped to the side of the railing 
and swung his hat, calling for three cheers for Colonel 
Pew. They were given with a will, the thousands packed 
outside of the police lines taking up the cry. Colonel Pew 
and his staff saluted, and the review was in progress. 

To none of the troops which have passed in review be- 
fore Governor Wolcott and his staff at the State House, 
has there been given such a demonstration as that ac- 
corded to the Eighth Regiment this morning. It was 
shortly after 11 o'clock when the head of the line reached 
the corner of Park and Beacon streets, and from the 
moment that the first company had passed in review until 
the last of the batch of raw recruits which brought up the 
rear had gone from view, there was one continuous round 
of applause and cheering. General Curtis Guild, Jr. led 
in the cheering at the State House, and every time that 
he waved his hat there was an answering thunder of 
cheers. There were cheers for Colonel Pew, for the 
Eighth Regiment, and Essex County. Old Glory was 
cheered to the echo, and the gathered multitude was not 
too hoarse to give three and a tiger for the raw recruits 
who brought up the rear. Governor Wolcott and his 
staff reviewed the parade as usual, from the lower steps at 
the entrance to the State House. Above the upper steps- 
were packed with gaily dressed women and enthusiastic 
men. The balconies were crowded, and the streets in all 
directions, as far as the eye could see, were jammed with 
crowding thousands. ~No more soldierly looking body of 
men had passed the State Capitol for years than the 
Eighth Regiment, which passed in review on its way to 
the front this morning. 

The Commanding Officer and Staff were mounted, this 
being the first regiment parading with these officers 
mounted. The men were in heavy marching order, with 
rations for twenty-four hours in their haversacks. Officers 
and men of the whole regiment wore their campaign hats, 
and this gave them a businesslike appearance that seemed 
to say, — ' We are going to the front to work.' : 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 47 



Muster In 




HORTLY after 2 o'clock on the afternoon of 
May 5th, the Eighth marched onto the State 
Camp Grounds at South Framingham. The 
Second and Ninth Regiments turned out with 
a hearty welcome as the Fife and Drum Corps swung 
through the gate playing "Teddy Was a Sojer." 

When the four volunteer regiments were mustered into 
the service, they dispensed with bands. The Eighth, how- 
ever, took its drum corps, which as early as March 16th 
had volunteered, through the Drum Major. Drum Major 
Thomas was and still is (1908) an institution in the reg- 
iment. Ko one remembers when he was not Drum Major. 
Rumor says he was drummer boy at Bunker Hill, Lundy 
Lane and Chepultepec, and all know he marched with 
Sherman to the sea. Invincible against fever and malaria, 
he is never sick. Always busy, never complaining or tired, 
he is a cheerful regimental inspiration. Time does not 
change him, except as it adds new glories in the form of 
service stripes. His reveille from Low Scotch, through 
Austrian, Hessian, Double Drag, Dutch, to Quick Scotch, 
is always welcome as an eye opener. It is a tradition that 
the Colonel gets up before reveille for the mere pleasure of 
seeing Thomas lead, and of watching the drum sticks rat- 
tle. It is certainly true that the regiment was never late 
when Thomas led the band. 

Camp was soon established. The Second Regiment, 
which assembled May 3rd, occupied the right of the line; 
next came the Ninth, which came into camp May 4th, fol- 
lowed by the Eighth. On the left was reserved a position 
for the Sixth, which was to assemble the next day. Ad- 



50 Twelve Months with the 



jutant Edward H. Eldredge was detailed as Brigade 
Adjutant General, and his place on the Regimental Staff 
was filled by Lieutenant Thomas D. Barroll of L Com- 
pany. 

Dame Rumor was soon busy spreading reports that the 
United States, personified by impartial and inexorable 
army surgeons, was rejecting men as unfit for foreign ser- 
vice. Already ten officers of the Second had been rejected 
for physical deficiencies. What pledges, words and wills 
had been unable to accomplish, the dread of a full service 
medical examination accomplished, and officers and men, 
who for years had smoked or broken minor rules of health, 
stopped on the moment to brace themselves for this ordeal. 

The officers were ordered before the doctors the day 
after arriving in camp, and at intervals of twenty minutes 
they reported in groups of threes. Major Dudley B. Pur- 
beck, who had recently suffered from a serious illness, was 
rejected. There was much excitement in the streets of 
Company C when it was reported that Captain James 
Tucker, Lieutenants Edgar J. Marshall and Frank B. 
Denning had failed to pass. The Selectmen and influential 
citizens of Marblehead were appealed to, and in some way 
secured a re-examination and a reversal of the finding in 
the case of Lieutenant Denning, who was finally mus- 
tered and commissioned as Captain. 

After the officers had passed, the enlisted men faced 
the surgeons, the companies going up in alphabetical 
order. Many men were rejected and sent home. It was 
the rule not to muster a company until it had a full com- 
plement of qualified officers and men. The process was 
slow, and it was not until May 10th that the first company 
of the Eighth was mustered, followed in rapid succession 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry SI 



by the others. The last company was mustered May 1 1th, 
and the Colonel sworn in. 

The ceremony of mustering was interesting and im- 
pressive. Companies were marched to Brigade Head- 
quarters, with the men arranged alphabetically in line. 
Facing the colors, taking off their hats, and raising their 
right hands, after roll call, they subscribed the following 
oath administered by Captain Erastus M. Weaver, U. S. 
A.:— 

"All and each of you do solemnly swear that you will 
bear true faith and allegience to the United States of 
America, and that you will serve them honestly and faith- 
fully against all their enemies whomsoever, and that you 
will obey the President of the United States, and the 
orders of the officers appointed over you, according to the 
rules and articles of war, so help you God." 

There was much pleasant rivalry between the Eighth 
and Ninth Regiments in a race to be first mustered in the 
United States service. The last company of the Ninth 
was mustered in just before the last company of the 
Eighth, and the Colonel of the Eighth being the last offi- 
cer in the Regiment to be mustered into the service, was 
mustered in before the Colonel of the Ninth. The im- 
portant question was never settled, which regiment was 
first mustered into the United States service. 

After a company was mustered into the service, its Cap- 
tain was given a copy of the Articles of War, and directed 
to read them to his company. From this tiresome read- 
ing of all the articles at once, a company wag said it was 
the general impression that the whole regiment was 
ordered by the President to suffer death or such other pen- 
alty as the court martial should prescribe. 

The designation of the Regiments as finally mustered 
into the United States service, early became a matter of 



52 Twelve Months with the 



interest. It was rumored that in as much as Massachu- 
setts sent sixty-two regiments to the Civil War, the num- 
bering of the regiments in the Spanish War was to begin 
where the numbering of the Civil War regiments left off. 
In that case the Eighth would be known as the Sixty- 
Third or Sixty-Fourth Regiment. This enumeration was 
followed in some states. The designation of the regiment 
was left to Governor Wolcott, who published as the official 
name, Eighth Regiment Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. 

The facings on the uniform was immediately changed 
from blue to white, and a collar device adopted consisting 
of crossed rifles with the figure eight above, and the ab- 
breviation " Mass." below the rifles. 

During the stay at Framingham everyone was busy, 
recruits were drilled, the regiment was exercised in strik- 
ing and pitching tents, company cooks and kitchen police 
were made familiar with the army ration, battalions and 
companies were drilled, guards were instructed, and the 
usual parade and daily ceremonies held. The days were 
crisp and clear ; the evenings, however, were chilly, but the 
dampness was dissipated by roaring camp fires on the 
parade, about which the soldiers clustered until taps. 

It was the intention of the Adjutant-General of Mas- 
sachusetts to have the regiments leave the State in order 
of the seniority of the Colonels. This would give third 
place to the Eighth. 

On May 13th, the Adjutant-General of the United States 
Army telegraphed the United States mustering officer 
at South Eramingham to notify the Colonels of mustered 
regiments to report direct to the War Department 
when their regiments would be ready to leave the State. 
This notice was sent to the Headquarters of the Eighth 
and Ninth. Colonel Pew immediately telegraphed the 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry S3 



War Department that the Eighth was ready to leave at 
once, and in a few hours received a telegraphic order to 
take the regiment to Chickamauga Park, Georgia. O wing 
to the lack of railroad transportation, it was impossible for 
the Regiment to get away until May 16th. 

Saturday, May 14th, was Eighth Regiment day at 
Camp Dewey. On Friday evening as soon as the soldiers 
were notified that the regiment was to hold itself ready to 
move at once, they rushed to the telegraph station and 
sent word to their friends at home that if they wished to 
see them, they should come to Camp Dewey in the morn- 
ing, as it was expected that the Regiment would be on its 
way south by Saturday night. 

Early in the morning, the friends of the soldiers began 
to arrive on the field, and every train brought crowds un- 
til by noon there were hundreds from every town and city 
having a company in the regiment. As the families of 
the soldiers came into camp, they brought with them 
boxes and bundles of the good things which a New Eng- 
land housewife knows so well how to cook, and during 
the hours between drills, there were family picnics all 
about the camp. 

In the afternoon, Governor Wolcott and some of his 
staff visited the camp to present the officers with their 
commissions in the United States service. After passing 
in review before His Excellency, the Regiment formed 
three sides of a hollow square, with officers in the center. 
The Governor and his party formed a fourth side. The 
square was surrounded by friends of the Regiment, who 
covered half of the great parade ground. The remarks 
of His Excellency were deeply impressive, and at times 
he visibly showed the emotion which he felt. In a voice 
audible to everyone on the field, Governor Wolcott said : — - 



54 Twelve Months with the 



"Men of Essex and Middlesex: — Two days ago your 
parting cheers made sweet music in the ears of your com- 
rades of the Second Regiment as they left the Common- 
wealth in the high service of the United States of Amer- 
ica. Today you obey the same summons, and are ready, 
as they were, to endure hardship and suffering in the same 
exalted cause. 

Your cause, men of Massachusetts, is a just and right- 
eous one. I greatly misread the heart of this great nation 
if the historian of the future shall not record that this 
war was entered upon by a mighty and free people, who 
had heard, as long as they could endure them, the sighs 
and groans of an oppressed neighboring population, bend- 
ing beneath the tyranny of a nation of the old world. 

It is to set free the oppressed and to bind up their 
wounds that you now enter the service of the United 
States. You will find yourselves shoulder to shoulder 
with the men of other states. Let there be no other rivalry 
than generous emulation, that you shall show that the 
men of Massachusetts, where valor calls for sacrifice, or 
where the duty of the soldier calls for prompt obedience 
and good discipline, are second to the sons of no other 
Commonwealth and no other State in the United States 
of America. 

You leave with the prayers and the confidence of the 
people of this Commonwealth. Officially, as the Governor 
of the Commonwealth, I bid you Godspeed ! And may the 
God of battles bring you victory and an honorable peace ! 

It is now my privilege and honor to present to the 
officers of the Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, United 
States Volunteers, the commissions under which they enter 
the service of the United States." 

After presenting the commissions, Governor Wolcott 
said : — ■ 

"Colonel Pew: — You have a regiment worthy of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and of the service of the 
United States of America". 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry gS 



The following officers received their commissions from 
Governor Wolcott on this occasion : — 

Colonel — William A. Pew, Jr. of Salem. 

Lieutenant Colonel — Edwin W. M. Bailey of Ames- 
bury. 

Majors — William Stopfoed of Beverly; Frank A. 
Graves of Marblehead ; Edward H. Eldredge of Boston. 

Adjutant — Lieutenant Thomas D. Barroll of 
Boston. 

Quartermaster — Lieutenant Charles F. Wonson of 
Gloucester. 

Surgeon — Major William Cogswell of Salem. 

Assistant Surgeons — Lieutenant Thomas L. Jen- 
kins of Topsfield; Lieutenant Frank P. T. Logan of 
Gloucester. 

Chaplain — Rev. George D. Sanders of Gloucester. 

Company A, Newburyport — Captain, Alexander G. 
Perkins; First Lieutenant, George W. Langdon ; 
Second Lieutenant, George LI. Dow. 

Company B, Amesbury — Captain, Horace S. Bean; 
First Lieutenant, John M. Pettingill; Second Lieuten- 
ant, Frank Stinson. 

Company C, Marblehead — Captain, Frank B. Den- 
ning ; First Lieutenant, Linville H. Wardwell ; Second 
Lieutenant, Frederic P. Smith. 

Company D, Lynn — Captain, Charles T. Hilliker; 
First Lieutenant, Thomas J. Coby; Second Lieutenant, 
William F. Young. 

Company E, Beverly — Captain, Frederick W. Stop- 
lord ; First Lieutenant, Charles H. Farnham ; Second 
Lieutenant, Francisco A. DeSousa. 

Company F, Haverhill — Captain, William C. Dow; 
First Lieutenant, Per Justus Swanberg; Second 
Lieutenant, David E. Jewell. 

Company G, Gloucester — Captain, Edward J. Hor- 
ton ; First Lieutenant, Charles M. McIsaac ; Second 
Lieutenant, James C. N"utt. 



56 Twelve Months with the 



Company H, Salem — Captain, Walter P. Nichols; 
First Lieutenant, Geoege N. Jewett ; Second Lieuten- 
ant, Augustus G. Reynolds. 

Company I, Lynn — Captain, John E. Williams ; 
First Lieutenant, Francis H. Downey; Second Lieuten- 
ant, William H. Perry. 

Company K, Danvers — Captain, A. Preston Chase; 
First Lieutenant, Henry W. French; Second Lieuten- 
ant, Stephen N. Bond. 

Company L, Lawrence — Captain, James Forbes; 
First Lieutenant, James H. Craig; Second Lieutenant, 
Roland H. Sherman. 

Company M, Somerville — Captain, Herbert W. 
Whitten; First Lieutenant, George I. Canfield; 
Second Lieutenant, Frederick W. Pierce. 

From May 14th to May 16th the Regiment waited, un- 
certain when its train transportation would arrive. Short- 
ly after noon on the 16 th, camp was struck. It was a 
damp and dreary day. There was no large crowd to 
cheer their departure, as the home stations of the com- 
panies were too remote, and the movement too sudden for 
the friends of the regiment to see them off. Late in the 
afternoon the regiment passed in review before Governor 
Wolcott, and took up its line of march for the railroad 
station. There it was quickly embarked in three sections. 
Each battalion had a section consisting of eleven cars, 
one for baggage, one for guard quarters, and two for each 
company. A Wagner sleeper was furnished on each 
section for the accommodation of the officers. The first 
section pulled out of the station at South Framingham at 
6 o'clock, followed shortly afterwards by the others. The 
last section left at 6.30. The three sections carried 47 
officers and 896 men. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry r ? 



Chickamauga 




HE route of the regiment to Chickamauga was 

T\\ through the valleys of the Hudson and Shen- 
RS5 nandoah. The cities of New York, Philadel- 
phia, Baltimore, Washington and Knoxville, 
were seen in passing, but stops were only made to allow 
the officers to obtain meals for themselves and coffee for 
the men. The Government furnished travel rations for 
the men consisting of hard tack, canned corned beef, beans 
and tomatoes, and a money allowance for coffee. In their 
year of service, no one in the regiment ever discovered a 
use for canned tomatoes as a travel ration. 

During the trip hard tack circulated as souvenirs among 
the girls at the various stops, usually inscribed with the 
donor's name and address, and given in exchange for 
pieces of ribbon and other feminine favors. Enthusiastic 
crowds were in evidence at all the stations, where they 
gathered to see the troop trains pass. The men were con- 
fined to the cars, but managed to carry on many flirtations 
and make exchanges through the windows. Every day they 
were taken out at some stop for a run around or a bit of 
setting up exercise, and once the Third Battalion took ad- 
vantage of a mountain stream for bathing purposes. 

On the morning of May 19 th the regiment awoke to 
find itself in the Citico Freight Yard, just outside the city 
of Chattanooga, together with other troop trains contain- 
ing the men of the Twelfth New York, and the Twenty- 
First Kansas, with whom the regiment subsequently bri- 
gaded. After spending a day in the freight yard, the sec- 
tions began late in the afternoon to slowly travel the four- 
teen miles between Chattanooga and Chickamauga Park. 



60 Twelve Months with the 



At Battle Station the battalions disembarked, the baggage 
was piled near the track and left under guard, while the 
regiment enjoyed its first bivouac on a neighboring hill. 

The Colonel reported to General Brooke and was told 
that a camp site would be assigned and transportation for 
the baggage furnished the following day. 

Chickamauga Park is a National Keservation in the 
northwestern corner of the State of Georgia, embracing 
some ten squares miles of territory, and commemorates the 
battle which was fought there in 1863. The park is 
wooded, with here and there open fields. Much of the 
underbrush had been cleared away, and good dirt roads 
constructed by the Government. The water supply con- 
sisted of a few dozen wells, which had supported a small 
farming population before the Government purchased the 
land. The soil is clayey above a limestone formation, 
which frequently outcrops and renders digging difficult. 
The months of May and June are liable to be pleasant and 
dry, but in July and August, abundant rain turns the 
ground where vegetation is worn off, into a mire of sticky 
mud. On one side, the Park is bounded by Chickamauga 
Creek, meaning in the Indian tongue, "The River of 
Death", and into this creek the whole surface of the Park 
drains. The Government intended to organize on this 
ground the First, Third and Sixth Army Corps, and at 
one time assembled about 55,000 men for this purpose. 
The camp was named, Camp George H. Thomas, in honor 
of the gallant soldier who rendered conspicuous service to 
the Federal cause in the battle of Chickamauga. 

The Eighth Regiment was assigned to the Second Bri- 
gade, Third Division, First Army Corps. As Colonel 
William A. Pew, Jr. was the senior Colonel in the three 
regiments comprising this brigade, he was assigned to the 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 61 



command, pending the arrival of a Brigadier General, 
and the command of the Eighth Regiment devolved upon 
Lieutenant Colonel Edwin W. M. Bailey. Colonel Pew 
remained in command of the Brigade until June 29th, 
when he was succeeded by General Waites of Texas. 
Lieutenant Thomas D. Barroll, the Regimental Adju- 
tant, and Lieutenant Charles F. Wonson, the Regimental 
Quartermaster, were detailed to Brigade Headquarters, 
and acted respectively as Adjutant General and Brigade 
Quartermaster. Their places in the regiment were filled 
by the detail of Lieutenant George W. Langdon, Acting 
Regimental Adjutant, and Lieutenant George I. Canfield, 
Acting Regimental Quartermaster, while Lieutenant Au- 
gustus G. Reynolds acted as Regimental Commissary. 

The Third Division of the First Army Corps encamped 
on the Alexander Bridge road, near the southeastern 
corner of the Park, and about three miles from the rail- 
road station. The camp of the Eighth was located in the 
woods, which were not dense, but more than sufficient for 
shade purposes. The tents of the Commanding Officer 
and his staff faced the west. Fifty paces in front of 
Headquarters were the tents of the line officers, and fifty 
paces in front of the quarters of the line officers were the 
heads of the Company streets. The tents of the men faced 
south, and were five paces apart. The Company streets 
were thirty paces wide. Thirty paces from the last tent 
in the Company street were the Company kitchens, and 
fifty paces in rear of the kitchens, were the Company 
sinks. The Eighth had the longest camp front of any 
Regiment in the Park, and later when sickness began to 
appear in the various camps, the wisdom of this arrange- 
ment was apparent. 

Until May 23rd, when wagons and mules were issued 



62 Twelve Months with the 



to the Regiment, water was scarce. Every farm well in 
the vicinity was under guard, and had a line of details 
waiting for a turn at the pump handle. The wells were 
pumped dry many times daily. The details remained in 
line waiting for them to fill up. Chickamauga Creek was 
already contaminated by drainage, and long expeditions 
were made to obtain enough water for drinking and cook- 
ing purposes. 

With the issuing of transportation, water was hauled 
for all purposes from the Blue Spring, some five miles 
from camp, until the Government constructed a pipe line 
and brought water to the vicinity of every camp. This- 
pipe line water was never used in the Regiment for drink- 
ing, and during the whole stay of the Regiment at Chick- 
amauga, all drinking water was daily brought from the 
Blue Spring. 

The lack of water led to the circulation of many absurd 
rumors at home. It was reported that the wells had been 
poisoned by the Spanish spies, and that some had been 
detected in the act and shot. The water famine was much 
exaggerated in the reports from Chickamauga. The reg- 
iment undoubtedly suffered much inconvenience at first, 
but not greater than should have been expected from the 
hurried manner in which the troops were brought together. 

For some time the army mule was a source of enter- 
tainment and worry to the regiment. The Government 
issued to each regiment twenty-seven wagons and one hun- 
dred and eight mules. Previous to this issue, these mules 
were assembled in a large corral near the railroad station. 
Usually, a detail of four men was sent to draw a wagon, 
four mules and harnesses. The mules were turned over 
to this detail, together with various parts of harnesses and 
a wagon, as they came from the factory. It was the duty 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 63 



of the detail to hold the mules and at the same time as- 
semble harnesses and wagon. This was new work for 
most of the men, and the outfits were brought into camp 
after many sad experiences. It was not unusual for the 
detail to start from the corral driving in a careful man- 
ner, but after going a mile or two without mishap, the 
desire to speed a little overcame this caution, and the 
mules were urged to a trot or canter. As few of these 
animals had been broken, the first turn of a road presented 
an opportunity for a spill. 

There was such a turn near the camp of the Eighth, 
and many of the men used to sit under the trees watching 
the details from other regiments navigate their mules 
around the bend. Often mules would continue on a 
straight course into the woods, and bid up when some tree 
separated the leaders and threw them down, with the 
wheel mules and wagon piled on top. This performance 
was at first a daily occurrence, and apparently resulted in 
no injury to the mules or men. 

Another source of amusement was to hire the darkies 
who loafed about the camps, to break the mules. They 
were usually ridden bare back, and succeeded in throwing 
their riders several times before they would submit. 

The mule quarters at first consisted of a cable stretched 
from tree to tree, to which the mules w r ere fastened by 
halters. This was the practice in all the camps, and every 
night each regiment lost from ten to twelve mules. The 
mules usually wandered around the park until appropri- 
ated by some Quartermaster to make up his quota. 

After submitting for a few nights to this loss, Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Bailey determined to construct a corral of 
rails, and for this purposes obtained permission to use the 
top rails of various fences along the Alexander road. Thi9 



64 Twelve Months with the 



work of construction took place on a moonlight night, and 
in the morning it was discovered that the rail fences for 
a long distance had disappeared, and a large area in the 
camp of the Eighth was surrounded with a Virginia fence 
some 12 feet high. The detail charged with the work of 
construction stoutly maintained, when explanation was 
demanded, that none of them had taken anything but "top 
rails". With this improvised stable the Quartermaster of 
the Eighth was able to maintain his supply of mules. 

There were two entrances to this corral at which sen- 
tinels were maintained, with orders to allow any stray 
mules to go in, but none to come out. Every morning an 
extra surplus of mules was found in the corral. 

The wagon master, who was a civilian employee, and 
had been hired by the Quartermaster on account of his ex- 
perience with mules, soon had his pick of all the mules in 
the Park. His first duty in the morning was a readjust- 
ment of mule property. Any surplus was held and de- 
livered to inquiring Quartermasters who had lost mules. 
As all mules look alike to most Quartermasters, it came 
to pass in the course of time, that the wagon master of the 
Eighth had by far the best mule teams of any Regiment. 
It was, in fact, a selection from the mules of fifty odd 
regiments. 

Apparently no one suspected this process of eliminating 
poor mules, and the corral of the Eighth was looked upon 
as a public benefaction, where lost mules could usually be 
found and identified. The process of identification was 
directed and controlled by the experienced wagon master 
of the Eighth. 

During May the evenings were delightfully cool in con- 
trast with the heat of the day. Work finished, with parade 
and after supper, the men collected in groups to sing, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 65 



listen to the drum corps, or gossip about the future of the 
regiment. Rumors of immediate moves were always in 
circulation. It was generally believed that the First 
Corps was destined to invest Havana in the fall, but this 
belief was often shaken by rumors of orders to go to Ma- 
nila, Honolulu, Santiago, or Porto Rico. The regiment 
was always expecting marching orders in the immediate 
future. 

Almost every large congregation contains some men 
who need a free application of soap and water. In a 
camp where many men are herded together, the personal 
cleanliness of each soldier is a factor in the general health. 

As soon as the pipe line was established, and water was 
abundant, orders were issued in regard to bathing, and 
were enforced by weekly inspections. The men were re- 
quired to strip in quarters, and were examined by the sur- 
geons. The first inspection disclosed an unfortunate who 
had secreted on his person, a liberal amount of Georgia 
real estate. 

Eight husky sergeants, armed with fresh stable brooms 
and soap, were detailed to accompany the victim to the 
stand pipe. The detail, clad only in their birthday clothes, 
marched through the camp, conducting the victim in solemn 
procession, to the place of execution. The novel sight of 
the naked detail and prisoner attracted many spectators 
from the regiment, who observed the enforced bathing, and 
materially assisted by their advice and presence the cleans- 
ing operation. The man was washed as he had never been 
washed before. 

The result of this public exhibition deterred others 
from disregarding bathing regulations. During the ser- 
vice of the regiment, no other man was ever reported as 
the result of these inspections, for personal uncleanliness. 



66 Twelve Months with the 



At midnight on May 28th, the first death occurred in 
the regiment. Private Herbert O. Burnham, Company 
D, passed away at the Regimental Hospital. He con- 
tracted pneumonia at Framingham, was taken sick on the 
train, and gradually grew worse until the end came. The 
next night, a second member of the command obeyed the 
summons and was mustered out by death. Clarence L. 
Bartol of Company C, died at the Regimental Hospital 
of heart disease. The two deaths coming so close together, 
produced an effect upon the men, and caused them to real- 
ize more fully the duties of the service upon which they 
had entered. 

The regiment early established a club for the enlisted 
men where they could loaf and make small purchases. 
These clubs were authorized by Army Regulations, and 
known as Post Exchanges or Canteens. They were man- 
aged by a council of officers. The profits on all sales went 
to the men. Regular dividends were declared and paid 
to company commanders, and were accounted for by them 
to the government, as a part of their company fund. Can- 
teen dividends could be used only to improve the ration or 
condition of the men. The sale of beer and light wines 
was permitted. 

The Eighth carried on its list of Canteen supplies, 
draught beer, which was furnished by a Chattanooga 
brewery, together with a supply of ice sufficient to keep 
the beer cool. This was the only supply of ice in camp, 
and the only place where a cool drink could be had. 

In close proximity to the Canteen, was the Y. M. C. A. 
tent, which offered another home for the enlisted men 
where they could read, write letters, play games, and 
meet for social or religious purposes. The most excellent 
young gentlemen in charge, viewed with disapproval the 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 67 



sale of beer in the rival club. The beer was also con- 
demned by the surgeons, on the ground that it was not up 
to standard in quality, and that the poor quality of the 
beer aggravated intestinal troubles. 

One day at mess the Commanding Officer entered into 
an agreement with the Y. M. C. A. representative, that 
the sale of beer should be prohibited at the Canteen as long 
as the Y. M. C. A. furnished for the enlisted men a barrel 
of distilled ice water in front of their tent. The Regi- 
mental Quartermaster furnished daily transportation to 
Chattanooga where barrels of distilled water and ice were 
purchased from the brewery company, and duly installed 
by the Y. M. C. A. This supply was maintained during 
the time the regiment remained at Chickamauga. The 
w r ater and ice cost as much as beer, but the expense was 
borne by contributions solicited by the Y. M. C. A. man- 
ager from the various friends of temperance in the north. 

This substitution of water for beer gave the Colonel 
some notoriety as a temperance reformer, and caused him 
to receive much advice about running the regiment. . 

One lady who had devoted fifty years to the cause of 
temperance, wrote a poem which she sent to the Colonel 
and requested him to have the men learn it by heart and 
recite it in unison as part of the ceremony at evening 
parade. 

Another friend of the. cause sent a few thousand printed 
pledges, with the advice that the men be required to sign 
a few pledges each day and carry them in their various 
pockets. She thought every time anything was taken from 
a pocket, a pledge would come out, and stimulate by its 
sight, each man to renewed interest to the cause of tem- 
perance. 

The old battleground offered opportunities to the sou- 



68 Twelve Months with the 



venir hunters, and many bullets, pieces of shells and rifles 
were picked up and sent home. Another craze was col- 
lecting State buttons from the uniforms of volunteers from 
various states. These buttons treated to a gold wash and 
attached to a belt, were favorite souvenirs for sweethearts. 
In addition to his duties as Battalion Commander, 
Major Edward H. Eldredge was detailed as Division In- 
spector of Rifle Practice. Under his supervision a rifle 
range was opened near the Alexander Bridge, and twenty- 
seven targets were installed. Three targets were assigned 
to each regiment of the Division for daily use. Lieutenant 
George W. Langdon of Company A, acted as Inspector, 
and supervised the regimental work at this range. Near 
the end of July, a division rifle match was shot, in which 
the following scores were made : — 



Eighth Massachusetts, . 


481 


First New Hampshire, 


474 


Twelfth New York, . 


473 


Twelfth Minnesota, 


457 


Fifth Pennsylvania, 


457 


Twenty-First Kansas, . 


456 


Second Missouri, 


436 


First South Carolina, . 


409 


Ninth Pennsylvania, 


409 



The war strength of a company in the United States 
service was 106 enlisted men. Under the first call, Mas- 
sachusetts was required to furnish three batteries of 
Heavy Artillery. Influence was at once brought to bear 
upon the authorities at Washington to accept the First 
Heavy Artillery as a Regiment of twelve batteries. To 
accomplish this and keep within the quota allowed Massa- 
chusetts, infantry companies were cut down to 74 men. 
To this extent the four infantry regiments which were 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 69 



raised for foreign service, were crippled to increase the 
strength of the coast guard. 

Upon the second call for volunteers, it was decided to 
raise the infantry companies to full war strength of 10G 
men, and about the first of June the Eighth was ordered to 
send a recruiting detail of three officers and twelve men to 
Massachusetts for recruiting purposes. The officers in 
charge of this detail were Major William Stopford, Cap- 
tain Herbert W. Whitten of Company M, and Lieutenant 
Henry W. French of Company K. The detail left Chat- 
tanooga on June 8th. The first batch of new recruits 
arrived at Chickamauga on June 25th, from which time 
until after the 4th of July, recruits arrived daily. 

The average recruit who responds to the first call for 
volunteers, is usually an all around better man than the 
average recruit obtained upon subsequent calls. The in- 
terference with the original Government plan of raising 
four full regiments, not only weakened the regiment at 
first, but later lowered its morale by introducing a poorer 
class of men than could have been obtained if the com- 
panies had recruited to a full strength at their home 
stations under the first stimulus of war. 

On June 12th the regiment had its first experience with 
a Southern rain storm. After a long dry spell, the heavens 
opened, and the floods descended. Innocent looking gullies 
became rushing brooks, which soon overflowed their banks 
and inundated many canvas homes. After the storm, a 
system of drainage was inaugurated, and the men were set 
to work on a main drain and connecting trenches, con- 
structed on lines taught by experience. 

In the wake of the storm, and as it were, a silver lining 
to the clouds, came Paymaster James C. Barr of the 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, M. V. M., with $17,500. 



70 Twelve Months with the 



from the State of Massachusetts in payment of the men 
for the time they had served at the Framingham camp. 
This was the first pay the regiment received, and the pay- 
master was welcomed like flowers in the spring. He was 
met at the railroad station by an armed party and escorted 
to camp, where his little fortune was safely guarded until 
distributed in payment to the men. 

On June 22nd Captain Walter H. Nichols of Company 
H resigned, making the first break among the officers of 
the regiment. 

On June 26th the camp was stirred to excitement by 
reason of an order transferring the regiment to the First 
Brigade, First Division, First Army Corps. The First 
Brigade was composed of the Eighth Massachusetts, 
Second Wisconsin, and Fifth Illinois Regiments, and was 
commanded by General Oswald Ernst. The division was 
commanded by General J. M. Wilson. The Brigade was 
expected to move in a few days to Newport News, where 
it was to take transports for Santiago. Camp took on 
new life and excitement. All superfluous baggage was 
packed for storage or home shipment. The excitement 
lasted a number of days, but the regiment was doomed to 
disappointment, as the order was countermanded and the 
regiment restored to its former place in the Third Divi- 
sion. 

July 4th was observed as a holiday. Congressman 
William II. Moody of the Sixth Massachusetts District, 
who was spending a few days in camp, delivered a 
patriotic address. A program of sports had been arranged 
for the day, but the arrival of the U. S. Paymaster caused 
the games to be called off. About $45,000 was paid to 
the regiment, the men being paid from May 5th to June 
30th. Many of the men took advantage of the arrival of 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 



the money for a trip to Chattanooga, where they passed 
the remainder of the day visiting the city or Lookout 
Mountain. In the evening there was a mammoth bonfire 
in camp, red fire was burned, and the drum corps gave a 
concert of patriotic airs, in celebration of the victory of 
Sampson over the fleet of Cevera off Santiago, the news 
of which was received that afternoon. 

As the summer advanced, and the heat increased, 
reveille was sounded at 4.30 and drills were held at a cor- 
respondingly early hour, so that by the middle of the 
morning, all drills were over. 

Soon after arriving in camp, the brigade was practiced 
in extended order and the use of cover. This drill was 
known to the men as " snake drill." Major Parker, of the 
Twelfth jSTew York, a Regular Army officer, acted as in- 
structor at first. Before many weeks the regiment became 
proficient in advancing on a position, and at the same time 
taking advantage of natural cover. On several occasions 
the regiment gave exhibitions for the benefit of officers of 
other organizations. 

The evening parade was usually witnessed by many 
spectators. The field where it was held was near the 
camps of the Third Army Corps, and the men from this 
organization usually assembled to watch the ceremony. 
The drum corps had been increased to forty-seven pieces, 
and became celebrated for its military marches. 

The men, early in the summer, discarded the blue 
uniform for brown canvas, and with the ponchos worn 
white side out in a yoke from the left shoulder, presented 
in ranks a natty and business-like appearance. Their drill 
and marching was excellent, and upon all ceremonies and 
reviews they created a most favorable impression. 

On July Sth Captain Jacob C. R. Peabody arrived in 



72 Twelve Months with the 



camp and assumed command of Company H. On July 
11th Assistant Surgeon Thomas L. Jenkins resigned. 

Late on July 14th, news was received that Santiago 
had fallen. A celebration was promptly inaugurated. The 
three regiments in the brigade interchanged marching 
calls, headed by their band or field music. As the Eighth 
marched through the camp of the Twelfth New York 
singing patriotic songs, they were received with a novel 
illumination, a man stood at the entrance of each tent 
holding a lighted candle. In the camp of the Twenty- 
First Kansas, speeches were made by the Colonels of both 
regiments, after which the Eighth returned to its camp. 

On July 21st the camp was again stirred by the report 
that the regiment had been selected for Porto Rico, and 
would embark in a few days. There was much activity 
in camp securing requisitions for the men. General 
Brooke, who commanded the First Corps, left for Porto 
Rico, and some of the regiments of the corps reached that 
Island before the order was countermanded. 

The dull routine of camp life, repeated disappoint- 
ments in orders to move, continued excessive heat, rain 
and mud, and the prevalence of camp diseases, were fast 
impairing the efficiency of the First Corps. General 
Breckenridge who succeeded General Wade in command, 
immediately planned to break the monotony by a practice 
march. The Third Division was ordered on a march into 
Tennessee, and a detail was sent in advance to secure 
camp sites. 

Pending this general movement, the Eighth was granted 
permission to make a short march to Pea Vine Ridge. The 
start was made at daybreak on July 19th along the Ring- 
gold Pike, which had been traveled by Sherman in his 
march to Atlanta. The morning was spent in advanced 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 73 



guard work. The farmers along the route cherished un- 
pleasant memories of Northern troops, and spent their 
time guarding live stock while the regiment remained in 
the vicinity. Camp was made at noon near the Craven 
House, and the afternoon was devoted to play. Many of 
the men dammed a mountain brook and spent the after- 
noon splashing in its pools. 

The Craven House was occupied by an old sailor from 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, who had ended his sea days 
many years before, and had settled with a Georgia wife 
in the Pea Vine Valley. The old gentleman was filled 
with enthusiasm to see the regiment, when he learned it 
was from Massachusetts, and had a company from old 
Newburyport. Unfortunately Company A had been left 
in Chickamauga as a camp guard. After the camp was 
established, the Colonel called to pay his respects. The 
excitement of the day had been too much for the old gen- 
tleman, and he was found stricken with apoplexy. 

The neighbors were too busy watching their property 
to render assistance, and a detail from the regiment cared 
for the old gentleman until he died that night. 

As the day wore on and no raids were made by the 
Northern troops upon barns or hen houses, the farmers 
allowed their curiosity to overcome their fears, and visited 
camp. They were soon selling peaches, butter milk and 
sweet potato pies to the troops. These pies were christened 
"rubbernecks" by the men, and were held in light esteem, 
although heavy as lead. 

On July 23rd all the state knapsacks were condemned. 
They were little box affairs, covered with enamel leather, 
and had seen service at many a Framingham muster. They 
were piled at the head of each company street and burned. 
Blanket bags were later issued and were more acceptable. 



7-/ Twelve Months with the 



The tents brought from Massachusetts had been earlier 
condemned as unserviceable, and were replaced by a new 

issue. 

August 1st, Lieutenant George K Jewett of Company 

H resigned. 

On August 9th the regiment was presented with a new 
set of colors. During its term of service it had three sets, 
two furnished by Massachusetts, and one drawn from the 
Government Quartermaster's department. The Regimen- 
tal flag furnished by the Quartermaster's department, bore 
the coat of arms of the United States upon a blue field. 
This flag was rarely carried, and is the only one of its 
kind in the collection of flags carried by Massachusetts 
regiments, preserved at the State House. 

By the middle of August the camp in the woods was 
water logged. Continual rain had saturated the soil. The 
drains took care of surface water, but as there was no 
sepage through the clay the drains were powerless to carry 
off the mass of water imprisoned in the soil, and for 
which evaporation was the only escape. Rain and evapo- 
ration were in equilibrium. The mud on the legs of the 
men like mercury in a thermometer, registered the fluctu- 
ation from this equilibrium. Ordinary rubbers were use- 
less, and sometimes rubber boots were inundated. 

Although the Government had furnished no lumber for 
tent floors, the men had quite generally appropriated 
means to raise their beds above the ground. The larceny 
of boards was encouraged as a sanitary virtue. A few 
buildings which the Park authorities cherished as ancient 
landmarks, about which the tide of the great battle ebbed 
and flowed in 1863, has entirely disappeared. The com- 
panies of the Third Battalion had purchased lumber at 
Chattanooga and constructed tent floors. The quarters of 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 75 



the enlisted men were on the highest ridge and were less 
exposed. The quarters of the Colonel and Staff were ap- 
proachable only through a sea of liquid mud, and were 
shifted onto higher ground. 

Application was repeatedly made for permission to 
change the camp. The order for a change came just be- 
fore the regiment moved to Lexington. The First Battal- 
ion was the only unit to occupy the new camp, which was 
located in an open field on the eastern side of the Alexan- 
der Bridge road. 

On August 19th Lieutenant Roland H. Sherman of 
Company L, resigned and was discharged. 

In order to fill the vacancies in the line officers of the 
regiment, the following promotions were made while at 
Chickamauga: Second Lieutenant Augustus G. Reynolds 
was promoted to first lieutenant in Company H, and 
First Sergeant Thomas O. H. Pineau of that company was 
commissioned second lieutenant. First Sergeant Eugene 
Larrivee, of Company L, was commissioned second lieu- 
tenant in that company. 

On August 21st orders were received to furlough all 
sick men, as the regiment was to leave Chickamauga. Some 
two hundred furloughs were issued. On the night of 
August 22nd a huge bonfire in camp celebrated the last 
night at Chickamauga. Early the next morning camp 
was broken, and the regiment marched to Rossville, 
Georgia, where it entrained early in the morning and was 
enroute to the blue grass region of Kentucky. Chickamau- 
ga was left with no regrets. 



Sickness at Chickamauga 




HE prevailing sickness at Chickamauga was 
nr^ \\ diarrhoea, dysentery and typhoid. During the 
spring and summer about 80,000 men passed 
through the park, but there were probably 
never over 50,000 encamped there at any one time. The 
board which investigated the sanitary conditions of 44,803 
men at Camp Thomas, reported 9,960 probable cases of 
typhoid, and 713 fatal results from this disease. One man 
in every five suffered from this fever, and almost every 
man was afflicted with some intestinal disorder. Much has 
been said as to whether this suffering was preventable, 
and was due to ignorance and neglect, or was paid as the 
necessary price of war. 

In the first call for troops the War Department ex- 
pressed a desire that the States should give preference 
among volunteers to National Guard organizations, in the 
expectation that they were equipped and had been pre- 
pared for war by a previous training. 

Massachusetts perhaps, satisfied this expectation as 
fully as any state. Her regiments were at least uniformed, 
armed, and equipped with means for preparing food, but 
they had no experience in caring for themselves in the 
field. The Government ration consisted of bread, coffee, 
potatoes, onions, canned tomatoes, fresh beef seven days, 
and bacon three days out of ten. One hundred rations 
were sufficient in quantity to feed one hundred men one 
day, but this required careful management on the part of 
company commanders, and proper preparation by company 
cooks. Any system of training men for the field should 
make provision for accustoming men to live, and live 
comfortably upon this ration. 



80 Twelve Months with the 



It is not an answer to say that the United States Army 
in time of peace, does not live upon this ration, but sup- 
plements it by purchases from their company funds. A 
volunteer regiment going into the United States service, 
will have no company funds, and must live on the ration 
until companies accumulate funds, which ordinarily would 
be impossible in the field. Any system of training which 
fails to recognize this fact is false in theory and practice. 

Previous to the Spanish War, the Massachusetts Militia 
were fed by caterers at their summer outings. There was 
a Commissary Department, but its officers were appointed 
for other reasons than efficiency and experience in hand- 
ling supplies. Some states had commissary departments 
which furnished rations, and required the companies to 
prepare the food, but there was no where any systematic 
attempt to train men to manage and support life upon the 
Government ration. 

Resulting from a lack of previous experience, the Massa- 
chusetts regiments suffered during the first six months of 
their field service. Men were starving in the regiments, 
because unable to assimilate the Government ration, 
which, through a lack of experience in handling and pre- 
paring, was served to them in a form which did not 
properly nourish, and aggravated and perpetuated the 
ordinary intestinal troubles which recruits usually ex- 
perience when first taking the field. Many men were 
improperly nourished, their vitality lowered, and their 
power of resisting disease impaired. So far as this re- 
sulted from a defect in their militia training, the State 
of Massachusetts was responsible. 

For a number of years the Massachusetts Militia had 
been equipped for eye service. The men were supplied 
with the equipments they could carry on their person, and 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 81 



which contributed to the success of a parade, by giving it 
a ready-for-war appearance. Not much attention was paid 
to other equipments. 

There was a limited supply of blankets, ponchos, buzza- 
cotts and tentage, but not enough for all the troops. These 
were held at the Framing-haul Arsenal, and did duty for 
a mysterious field equipment, ready for instant use. There 
were no shelter tents or wagons. Some of the supplies 
were of a stage property kind. The shovels carried by an 
improvised pioneer corps in one of the Boston street 
parades, lasted two hours when used for digging by a 
detachment of the Eighth. The Militia of Massachusetts 
had never been properly equipped for field service. 

The appropriation of $500,000 by the Legislature in 
April, enabled them to take the field better supplied than 
the Guard Regiments from many states, but they were 
never fully equipped by the State, or instructed in the 
A B C of a soldier's duty. 

They had been assembled for years in brigade camps, 
and taught ceremonies and parades, but no attempt had 
been made to teach company commanders the important 
lesson of how to meet the requirements of the field, and 
care for their men under service conditions. The in- 
creasing sick list reported in all the camps, accentuated 
this absence of individual experience and trained com- 
pany officers. 

The War Department was as unprepared as the Militia 
of Massachusetts. The machinery for handling an army 
of 26,000 men in peace, was called upon to mobilize 
275,000 men of war. It was altogether inadequate to 
meet the emergency. There were practically no reserve 
supplies. On April 23rd the Government had enough 
Springfield rifles to equip the volunteers, but that was all. 



82 Twelve Months with the 



The cloth of the uniforms first issued to some regiments 
at Chickamauga, was not manufactured when the regi- 
ments were mustered into service. 

Large quantities of commissary supplies were purchased 
in the market, and rushed to the large camps for concen- 
tration. These supplies were uniformly of standard 
quality, and were accumulated in sufficient quantities at 
the depots, but were often delayed in distribution to the 
troops. Volunteer officers were at first unacquainted with 
the use of requisition blanks, and the red tape of Govern- 
ment issue, and the Commissary Department lacked facil- 
ities to make prompt and full deliveries. This was the 
earliest department, however, to get into working order, 
and subsequent complaints at Chickamauga were due to 
the inexperience of officers and men in handling the 
rations. 

The Quartermaster's Department also made large pur- 
chases in the market, but were handicapped by having to 
wait for articles to be manufactured to fill orders. This 
department at Chickamauga was further handicapped by 
inefficiency and failure to appreciate the situation, and the 
necessary requirements of the troops. 

As soon as wagon transportation was issued to the 
Eighth, they began to bring the water from the Blue 
Spring. This was a long haul, and required many barrels 
for transportation and storage in camp. The supply of bar- 
rels issued by the Quartermaster's Department to the 
regiment was inadequate. The Chief Quartermaster was 
repeatedly requested to furnish sufficient barrels for this 
purpose, and refused. The regiment subsequently pur- 
chased, at its own expense, at Chattanooga, sufficient recep- 
tacles. 

The refusal of the Chief Quartermaster was reported to 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 83 

the Inspector General's Department, and was thus com- 
mented upon: — 

"One of the principal appeals made to me during the 
many inspections that I made was for water barrels and 
boilers, so that the strict order to boil all drinking water 
might be complied with. I made several trips to the 
office of the chief quartermaster in behalf of the command 
on this matter, but without success. I finally went to the 
corps commander, and he told me to go again to the chief 
quartermaster, who told me that the regiments had as 
many as 15 water barrels to each regiment (twelve com- 
panies), and the water being hauled from four to seven 
miles. This reply convinced me at once of a total failure 
to appreciate the condition of affairs, what was required, 
and what should be done. Owing to a failure of this 
department to provide the proper shelter, supplies, and 
clothing, I am satisfied that much of the sickness was 
caused. 

The whole matter sums itself up in this, that the 
regulations necessary for the conduct of a small army dur- 
ing a period of thirty-five years of peace, when built upon 
and expanded into those required for an army ten times 
as large in time of war, failed absolutely and went to 
pieces." 

The Regimental Commander repeatedly asked the 
Quartermaster's Department for disinfectants and lum- 
ber; these requisitions were disallowed. Whatever sup- 
plies of this nature the regiment had, were purchased by 
private contribution, until the spread of disease excited 
public indignation and demanded liberal issues. After 
official investigation began, a change was noticed in the 
policy of the department. By the end of the summer it 
is probable that porcelain lined bath tubs would have been 
issued for the mere asking. 



84 Twelve Menths with the 



During the hot summer months, 75 per cent, of the men 
at Chickamauga were forced to wear heavy woolen cloth- 
ing. The Eighth was the only regiment fully equipped 
with canvas suits. These had been purchased by the 
State of Massachusetts. If sufficient energy had been dis- 
played by the Quartermaster's Department, the same 
clothing would have been purchased and issued to all the 
regiments. What supplies were on hand were held in 
small storehouses, and their issues blocked by lack of sys- 
tem and necessary labor to handle the goods. 

The Medical Department at Chickamauga was ineffi- 
cient and displayed lack of both professional and executive 
ability. There was an unnecessary shortage of medical 
supplies and hospital attendants. No provision was at 
first made for general hospitals. The sick were cared for 
in regimental hospitals, and later when these were 
abolished, in Division Hospitals. Division hospitals are 
organized to accompany troops in the field, and serve as 
a collecting station, where the injured receive temporary 
treatment and are transferred as soon as practicable to 
general hospitals. 

The field hospitals at Chickamauga were swarmed with 
the sick, and were forced to become general hospitals, as 
no other provision had been made. The accommodations 
were inadequate. Hospital tents were insufficient in num- 
ber, and were not supplied with proper furnishings. There 
was a lack of medicine and nourishing food. The nurses 
were enlisted men detailed from the various regiments, 
and were ignorant of their duties, and without experience. 

The quarters and grounds were dirty, and the service 
was undisciplined, disorganized and demoralized. Until 
taken firmly in hand by General Sanger and reorganized, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 85 

the Third Division Hospital was a monument to the igno- 
rance and incapacity of the Medical Department. 

This Department was thus described in an inspection 
report : — 

"I found quite a number of sick in each regiment, and 
was informed by the regimental surgeons that they could 
not get from the medical depot those medicines and other 
supplies needed for the sick, and was also informed that, 
in reply to their request, they were told that no issue of 
medicine or medical supplies could be had from the depot 
until the field cases were filled; that, although the medi- 
cines were on hand, it was not the intention to make issues 
until everything could be done in the order required by 
the Army Regulations, resulting in unnecessary discom- 
fort and suffering to the sick. The different aid societies 
did a great deal toward helping out the unfortunate con- 
ditions, but on the whole, the administration of the affairs 
of this department was a dismal failure. Those regimental 
medical officers bought a great deal of medicine with their 
own funds and from funds furnished them by their friends 
at home. There were no cots, blankets, pillows, nor sheets. 
The medicine and medical supplies were entirely inade- 
quate for many days after my reporting for duty. There 
were no floors in the tents where the sick were. They 
were crowded together in dangerous proximity to each 
other, and those gentlemen of the medical profession of 
the volunteer service were very bitter in their denunci- 
ations of our miserable system." 

The medical officers of the Eighth were at all times 
zealous and efficient in instructing officers how to combat 
disease, and the regimental officers were intelligent and 
active in carrying out these instructions. 

Before typhoid became epidemic, Colonel Pew assem- 
bled officers and men after evening parade, and explained 



86 Twelve Months with the 



to them the nature and cause of this fever. He said this 
disease had already broken out, and he anticipated it 
would become a scourge to the troops, because of the un- 
sanitary condition of the various camps. That it was 
caused by microscopic germs found in the discharges of 
the sick. That these germs were very tenacious of life, 
and increased and multiplied rapidly in filth. That when 
dry they would drift about in the air and lodge on food, 
clothing or the person. That they were harmless unless 
taken into the mouth, but as they were too small to be seen, 
there was always danger of contagion. That they were 
killed by boiling, and for that reason the men would be 
required to drink only boiled water, and keep their food 
protected against dust. That all human excreta must be 
deposited in the proper place, and covered with a paddle, 
as Moses taught the children of Israel to care for them- 
selves in the Wilderness. That police regulations would 
be enforced, and camp conditions made as unfavorable as 
possible for the growth and development of these germs. 
He urged the men to appreciate the danger to which they 
were exposed, and to avoid it by complying strictly with 
all sanitary regulations. 

The Medical Board appointed to examine into the 
causes of the existence and spread of typhoid in the 
national camp of 1898, reported that this fever was 
brought to Camp Thomas by the volunteers, and spread by 
the neglect of the rules of sanitation and military hygiene. 
Out of forty-eight regiments whose medical records were 
examined, nine regiments reached Chickamauga with de- 
veloped cases of typhoid, twenty-five regiments developed 
cases within two weeks, and at the expiration of one month 
only two regiments of the forty-eight were free from this 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 87 



disease. The first case of typhoid in the Eighth Regiment 
was reported July 13. 

The average volunteer at Chickamauga had little disci- 
pline, and a slight knowledge of sanitation. He was will- 
ing to fight, as he had enlisted for that purpose, but he 
rather resented as an invasion of personal rights, any 
attempt to dictate what he should eat or drink. He did 
not accept in full faith the germ theory of disease, and 
was skeptical about the existence of bugs he could not see. 

If water looked clear and was cool, he was unwilling 
to believe it was unwholesome, especially when it tasted 
sweet and satisfied his cravings. He was willing to be- 
lieve that any water in which fish could swim, was good 
to drink, or to accept any other absurd test which was 
current. 

The experience of an outpost from the regiment illus- 
trates the chances intelligent college men would take, 
when it became a question of satisfying the appetite. This 
outpost was established on the banks of Chickamauga 
Creek, below the inflow of camp sewerage, and obtained 
their drinking water from a spring bubbling up in the 
slope of the bank. A sudden rain caused the creek to rise 
and submerge the spring. After the water subsided, the 
outpost discovered the surface of the spring covered with 
slime. 

Someone suggested bad germs floated, and acting upon 
this theory, they plunged a canteen to the bottom of the 
spring, with the opening stopped by the thumb against the 
entrance of bacteria. When the canteen was on the bot- 
tom, the thumb was removed until the canteen was filled, 
the opening was then again plugged with the thumb, and 
.the supply brought to the surface. Every member of this 



88 Twelve Months with the 



outpost was stricken with typhoid as a result of this ex- 
periment. 

Although orders had been issued to drink only boiled 
water, most men in the corps drank what they pleased. 
Unsatisfactory rations led many men to patronize the 
various food venders. Near the railroad station a swarm 
of booths sprung up, where all kinds of food were dis- 
pensed. These stands were not subject to medical 
inspection, and later were denounced by the Medical 
Department as sources of contagion. 

The chief sources of contagion were company sinks. 
Digging and caring for sinks did not appeal to the men 
as heroic soldiering. They hated and shirked this duty and 
as a result the sinks of many regiments were so repulsive 
that the men refused to use them, and polluted territory 
surrounding the camp. 

The care of the sinks was always a matter of great 
solicitude to the officers of the Eighth. Their cleanliness 
was insisted upon at all times with martinet rigidity, and 
men were punished for not using them, after the formality 
of a trial and conviction before a summary court. 

It was recognized that these pest holes might become 
breeding grounds of flies which would infest the camp and 
carry contagion. The following extract from a circular 
shows to what extent this danger was appreciated. 

"No doubt typhoid fever, camp diarrhoea, and probably 
yellow fever are frequently communicated to soldiers in 
camp through the agency of flies, which swarm about 
fecal matter and filth of all kinds deposited upon the 
ground or in shallow pits and directly convey infectious 
material, attached to their feet or contained in their 
excreta, to the food which is exposed while being prepared 
at the company kitchens or while being served in the mess 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 89 



tent. It is for this reason that a strict sanitary police is 
so important." 

Although the Eighth prevented flies breeding in its 
own camp, it could not prevent them swarming from 
other camps and spreading contagion. Flies increased 
and multiplied. A roast of beef exposed for a few 
minutes looked as black as a mass of charcoal, so dense was 
its surface packed with flies. Netting was purchased, and 
an attempt was made to keep all food covered. Some of 
the officers constructed mess quarters of scantlings covered 
with fly screens. 

For two months the Eighth Regiment, fully realizing 
the danger to which it was exposed, fought against 
typhoid and combated it with intelligence and energy. 
During the last two months of its stay at Chickamauga, 
it was smitten with a heavy hand, and became the 
victims of a system which failed to furnish sanitary safe- 
guards against the spread of communicable disease. 

Digging was at all times difficult in the territory of the 
Eighth, as the soil was a hard clay and the outcropping 
ledges caused the abandonment of many sink holes when 
half dug. When the rainy season began a new danger 
threatened the regiment. The sinks would fill with water 
and stay full. Refilling the holes with lumps of clay that 
had been taken out, would cause an overflow and pollute 
the surrounding ground. Sinks had to be abandoned after 
every heavy rain, and new holes dug. 

The ground in the rear of the camp was filled with open 
pits in which polluted water stagnated. It was noticed 
that this stagnant water became the breeding ground for 
insects. The ingenuity of the officers was taxed to invent 
a method of sealing these sinks. A happy suggestion oc- 



90 Twelve Months with the 



curred to a group of officers who had been in the habit of 
dining at an Italian Restaurant in Boston. They had 
seen flasks of Chianti sealed with a few spoonfuls of olive 
oil, and the analogy suggested oil to seal the sinks against 
insect life. A can of kerosene was secured, and the ex- 
periment tried. 

As the oil spread over the surface of the water, it was 
noticed that it apparently interfered with the comfort of 
the wigglers, as they came to the surface. Crude petro- 
leum was suggested as being stickier than refined oil, and 
a can was procured in Chattanooga and tried. Experi- 
ments showed that this oil often imprisoned the mother 
insect when laying eggs, and was a complete bar through 
which the wigglers, when grown, could not penetrate and 
emerge from the pits. Crude petroleum was purchased 
by the barrel and used in these open sinks. 

From the Eighth Regiment the use of petroleum spread 
through the First and Third Corps, and subsequently be- 
came recognized throughout the country as a means of 
destroying mosquitoes and other insects that breed in 
stagnant waters. 

The efforts which were made by the. Eighth Regiment 
to maintain a sanitary camp, were recognized in the report 
of Colonel A. A. Woodhull, Deputy Surgeon General, U. 
S. A., on conditions in Camp George H. Thomas. Under 
the various sub-headings of his report, he refers to the 
regiment as follows: — 

Under the sub-heading "Water Supply" he says: — 

"There are general instructions to boil all water, 
whether filtered or not. In the only regiment where I 
could be sure the order was actually enforced (Eighth 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 91 



Massachusetts), no typhoid has yet been recognized, and 
although the camp is very low and wet and remittant fever 
has occurred within the last fortnight, the general sick 
rate is only 2.56 per cent." 



*&* 



Under sub-heading "Character of Troops" he says: — 

"The dirty camps are the sickly camps here as else- 
where. But discipline and intelligence have their reward 
also. Without specifying instances low in the scale, at- 
tention is invited to the Eighth Massachusetts, already 
cited, where the positive enforcement of orders by punitive 
measures when necessary has resulted in the actual use of 
only boiled water for drinking, with exemption from 
typhoid fever and a low sick rate as a probable conse- 
quence." 

Again, under the heading "Third Division, First 
Corps" he says: — 

"The Eighth Massachusetts, whose discipline is good 
and which boils its water, has a sick rate of 2.56, although 
its camp site is bad." 

Some of the volunteers were handicapped by the quali- 
ties of their officers. The American soldier responds to 
sympathetic leadership, but not to the sympathy that 
expresses itself in exaggeration of his hardships, and in 
frequent reference to his woes. This kind of talk destroys 
the back bone of resistence, and makes a company a mob 
of weaklings. 

It is easy enough to be pleasant 

When life moves along like a song, 

But the man worth while is the man with a smile, 

When everything goes dead wrong. 



92 Twelve Months with the 



General Chaffee has said: — 

"Soldier's do not like sympathy ; sympathy is for women 
and children. Soldiers are men, but they do like fair 
commendation when deserving of it, and especially when 
their fortitude has been severely tested. Commend our 
soldiers for manfully undergoing privations and they will 
readily respond again; but prate of their privations, de- 
ficiencies, and heavy burdens, and they soon learn to dread 
the hour that shall disturb their ease; the spirit becomes 
one of submission rather than one cheerfully embracing 
the opportunity to exhibit their endurance and their 
stamina." 

The strength of the Eighth lay in the manhood of her 
officers and men, who were ready with a determined smile 
to face any game into which they were called. 

A commission appointed by the President to investigate 
the sanitary conditions of the military camps of 1898 
reported early in 1899. The report contains an allusion 
to the Eighth Massachusetts. It says: — 

"The intelligent and watchful supervision on the part 
of the surgeons and regimental officers, and the observance 
of the well established rules of camp sanitation shown by 
the record of the Eighth Massachusetts Volunteers at 
Camp Thomas, is very commendable. This regiment was 
for many weeks very healthy, while much sickness was 
occurring in regiments near by, although the camp site, 
water and drill were practically the same." 

This was a great compliment to the volunteer regimen- 
tal commander and his officers. 

In some of the camps in the United States, no thorough- 
ly well established rules of sanitation were observed. Little 
restriction was placed on drunkenness and immorality. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 93 



Soldiers did not seem to care how they lived, and their 
officers did not watch or teach them. Frequently the food 
was poorly cared for, and badly cooked, and the men were 
permitted to eat and drink anything and everything they 
could find. Sickness naturally followed in regiments 
where laxity prevailed. 

The Eighth, according to evidence before the commis- 
sion, followed just the opposite plan. Discipline was strict 
and impartial, and the health of the troops consequently 
of the best. They were a source of much admiration to 
all who saw them, both at Camp Thomas and the other 
places. No other regiment in the whole American army 
wa8 similarly favored in the Commissioner's report. 



Lexington 




HE Kentucky home of the Eighth was about 
^Tp \\ five miles from Lexington on a knoll between 
the Bryan Pike and the Kentucky & Eastern 
Railroad. Access to the city and its markets 
was over the Pike or by rail from the station of Montrose, 
a few hundred yards away. A pipe line connecting with 
the city supply, brought water to the foot of every com- 
pany street. Lumber was to be had upon requisition, and 
abundant facilities were offered for being and keeping 
well. The sun penetrating to every corner of the camp, 
dried the seeds of disease, and the breezes from the hay 
and clover fields blew away and dissipated the germs. The 
expanding green and golden fields rolling into distant 
stretches, rested eyes accustomed to the damp and closed 
woods of Georgia. 

Men depressed by the atmosphere of Chickamauga, 
opened their eyes upon a new world, and began to expe- 
rience the joy of living. The place, time of year, and the 
intelligent efforts of officers to stamp out disease, backed 
by unlimited Government supplies, infused new life into 
the tired and jaded regiments of the Third Division. 
General Sanger was indefatigable in his efforts to restore 
health, and was loyally supported by the line and medical 
officers. 

It was not given to the Eighth, however, to overcome 
at once the results of their long stay at Chickamauga, 
surrounded by infection. For months they had fought 
contagion, and kept typhoid at bay, but were finally 
powerless against the swarm of flies that overspread their 
camp, depositing bacteria upon food and clothing. The 



98 Twelve Months with the 



regiment left Chickamauga inoculated with poison, and 
during the first few weeks at Lexington, enteric fever 
broke out and was more prevalent than at any other 
period. 

For a month the energies of the regiment were devoted 
to getting down to the bed rock of health. Sources of 
contagion were destroyed or removed. At sick call, men 
with abnormal temperatures were removed from their 
comrades, and sent to the general hospital. Suspicious 
cases were held under observation until the outcome was 
known. Sick men who might be a source of new contagion, 
were at once separated from the regiment, and so thor- 
oughly was this work done, that more than half the 
regiment was away from the colors. 

A systematic crusade was made against the old germs 
that had traveled with the regiment from Chickamauga 
hid in blankets, clothing or personal belongings. Corrosive 
sublimate and chlorinated lime were freely used. 

Clothing and blankets were boiled, brushed, and hung 
up for sunshine and wind to work through. All excreta was 
collected in closed sinks from which flies were excluded, 
and germ life was poisoned with chemical agents. 

Tent floors were daily washed with corrosive sublimate, 
and weekly stood on end for the under side to be dried and 
white washed. Location of tents were frequently changed, 
and the uncovered ground thoroughly treated with lime. 
The camp was thoroughly drained, policed, and was as 
near medically clean as the science of military hygiene 
permitted. 

As soon as possible a new issue of tentage was obtained, 
and those used at Chickamauga were destroyed. Each 
tent was furnished with a floor, and wooden sleeping 
bunks. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 99 



Sales by pedlers were regulated by orders from 
Division Headquarters. Chickamauga Park had been 
overrun by fakirs selling cakes, pies and other foods, much 
of which was believed to have been contaminated, and to 
have materially contributed to the spread of camp diseases. 
As soon as the food pedlers appeared in the new camp, 
they were rounded up by the guard and expelled. Certain 
permits were issued, regulating the sale of foods. Pedlers 
were required to report to the Officer of the Day, and con- 
duct their business under his direction and supervision. 

Many men suffering from intestinal troubles, could not 
assimilate the sturdy Government ration, and large quan- 
tities of milk and eggs were daily needed for their 
nourishment. Such perishable articles were not furnished 
by the Government, and company commanders had to 
depend upon the company fund for their purchase. 

The sale of beer was the chief source of revenue to the 
Canteen, and was accordingly resorted to. A commodious 
wooden building was erected as a Post Exchange, and a 
large ice box was constructed, where gallons of milk and 
hundreds of eggs were stored. Captain Horace S. Bean, 
of Company B, was put in charge of the Canteen, and 
made large purchases from the neighboring farmers. The 
favorite tipple served over the bar was a milk and egg 
shake. Many of the company commanders served an egg 
nogg to each man at 10 A. M. and 4 P. M. dailv. The 
best quality of beer was obtained from Milwaukee, and 
was hereafter retained as a regular Canteen supply, while 
the regiment remained in the service. 

The profit on the sale of beer became a material factor 
in building up the health of the regiment, and augmenting 
the company funds. At one time over three thousand dol- 
lars was divided among companies as a Canteen dividend. 



100 Twelve Months with the 



A new hospital tent was received from the Massachu- 
chusetts Volunteer Aid Association, and was pitched on 
the left flank of the regiment. As the regimental hospital 
had been abolished, this was used as a dispensary. All 
soldiers requiring treatment reported to the dispensary, 
where their case was diagnosed by the regimental surgeon, 
and if it was found that the patient was in a condition 
requiring treatment, he was immediately sent to the 
Division hospital. 

This was known as the John Blair Gibbs Hospital, and 
was situated about a mile from camp. It was presided 
over by a competent staff of skilled surgeons, assisted by 
a corps of trained nurses, from whom the men received 
excellent treatment. 

During this period of recuperation, furloughs were 
freely given. This privilege was sometimes abused, and 
some men without any ailment, except a desire to go home, 
managed to pass the surgeons and secure a furlough. The 
"furlough walk" and "furlough face" came to be recognized 
as evidence of homesickness, and was more or less joked 
about among the men as means of obtaining a furlough. 
Nearly all the men, however, who were sent home, needed 
a change, and were granted furloughs as a sanitary pre- 
caution. 

Lexington had been the home of Henry Clay, and as a 
compliment to the city, the camp was named Camp Henry 
Clay, in honor of the Kentucky statesman. This name 
was subsequently changed, as the War Department had 
adopted the practice of naming the camps in honor of 
soldiers who had fallen in the Spanish War, to Camp 
J. M. Hamilton, in honor of an officer in the Ninth United 
States Infantry, who fell at Santiago. 

The "P jacket" first appeared in the regiment at Camp 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 10 1 



Hamilton. Previous to its introduction, one unacquainted 
with military affairs, could not distinguish prisoners from 
other soldiers. 

These jackets were a distinctive badge. They were a 
blue jumper with a large capital P painted in white upon 
the back, and a smaller letter P, and the prisoner's number 
painted upon the arm. 

It was related that a party of young ladies visiting the 
camp, became very much interested in these uniforms ; but 
not understanding the letter P, inquired its significance 
from one of the prisoners, and was smilingly told that it 
stood for " Perfect," and that the jacket was a badge of 
honor. 

The condition of the regiment was a source of great 
solicitude to its friends at home, and many anxious in- 
quiries were made as to its health and surroundings. On 
September 8th, Mayor Ramsdell of Lynn, visited the 
camp and remained a number of days. He was the first 
of several Northern people who visited the camp to inquire 
into and report upon the condition of the troops. 

On September 8th, the camp was visited by a delegation 
from Massachusetts, headed by Colonel Benjamin S. 
Lovell of Weymouth, of the military committee of Gov- 
ernor Wolcott's council. This trip was the result of a 
story printed in a Cincinnati paper, to the effect that the 
Eighth was demoralized with typhoid fever. 

Colonel Lovell and others, who were in attendance at 
the national encampment of the G. A. R., in the Ohio 
city, saw the report in the paper, and Colonel Lovell tele- 
graphed for authority to proceed to Lexington and make 
an investigation, and permission was granted by Governor 
Wolcott. 

A special car was chartered, and Colonel Lovell, Colonel 



102 Twelve Months with the 



William M. Olin, secretary of the commonwealth, a 
veteran of the Civil War, who camped at Lexington in 
those stirring days, Captain J. G. B. Adams, sergeant-at- 
arms of the Massachusetts legislature, himself a past 
commander-in-chief of the G. A. R., accompanied by Mrs. 
L. A. Turner, prominent in Women's Relief Corps 
circles, and other Massachusetts people, made the trip to 
Lexington. 

The clay was spent in looking over the regiment, and 
Colonel Lovell, Colonel Olin and Captain Adams, made a 
thorough inspection of the regiment and its conditions, in 
regard to food, sanitary arrangements, and especially in 
regard to sickness. Colonel Lovell made a report to the 
governor upon his return home, and the same is on file 
at the State House, although it could not be located at the 
time this chapter was written. 

At the close of the day, the entire party went back to 
Cincinnati, satisfied that the report was greatly exag- 
gerated by the newspaper which had published the story, 
as there was but little typhoid among the men. 

On September 12th, Mayor Chase of Haverhill, also 
visited the camp, being the guest of Company F of that 
city. 

The troops quartered in and about Lexington were the 
Eighth Massachusetts, Twelfth New York, Twenty-First 
Kansas, One Hundred and Sixtieth Indiana, Third Ken- 
tucky, Fourth Kentucky, Third Mississippi, Second Mis- 
souri, Seventh United States Immunes, colored, Eighth 
United States Immunes, colored. On September 26th, the 
Twenty-First Kansas left for Fort Leavenworth, to be 
mustered out of the service, and upon the day following 
their place was taken by the First Territorial Regiment. 
This regiment was enlisted from the territories of New 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 103 



Mexico, Arizona, Oklahoma, and Indian Territory, and 
was composed of ranchmen, cowboys, and some Indians. 
Their initial appearance in the camp of the Eighth was 
explosive. As soon as a camp site had been assigned them, 
and they were dismissed, they started on a round of visits 
to the various camps. The visit was made upon the run, 
accompanied by a continuous yelling and whooping. This 
whirlwind of noise passed through every company street 
in the ]\ T ew York and Massachusetts regiments without 
stopping, and disappeared to repeat the performance in the 
camps of other regiments. The most orderly member of 
the command was a large brown bear, which did duty as 
regimental mascot. 

Some amusement was furnished one evening as the men 
assembled for parade, by a barouche containing four ladies 
of the town, driven by a stately colored man. They dis- 
appeared in the camp of the Twelfth New York, but 
shortly returned with the large letters I. C, in chalk on 
the back of the carriage. 

The camp site of the Eighth had formerly been culti- 
vated, but during the summer the land had run to weeds. 
These were waist high until mowed. During one of the 
early changes of guard, the old guard was marched by the 
Lieutenant through some of these weeds, towards the regi- 
imental parade, where they were to be dismissed. Suddenly 
the guard broke ranks, and each man rushed for his 
quarters. The Lieutenant stopped in amazement and 
shouted to his men, "What in blank are you running for 1 ' ? 
Before he got an answer, a swarm of hornets attached 
themselves to his person, and he was soon running as fast 
as any member of his guard. 

The men were encouraged to engage in sports as a 
recreation. At one time, foot ball was taken up in a mild 



104 Twelve Months with the 



way, but after the Kentucky State College defeated Com- 
pany H by a score of 59 to 0, interest in this strenuous 
sport died out. 

Lexington was well supplied with entertainment, and on 
several occasions enlisted men attended the theatre and 
circus in a body. 

Two evenings were known at the Opera House as Eighth 
Regiment nights, when the drum corps took part in the 
performance, and a large delegation from the regiment 
was represented in the audience. 

The drum corps was well received throughout the south, 
and their rendering of Dixie was always greeted with 
Southern yells of approval. 

On one occasion Company L was entertained at the home 
of Mrs. Kate Breen, where Lieutenant Breen, Inspector of 
Rifle Practice of the Ninth Massachusetts Infantry, was 
visiting. He acted as host, and left with the men a 
pleasant memory of his hospitality. 

Dr. Horace B. Frost, of Boston, joined the regiment 
here, having been commissioned Assistant Surgeon, with 
the rank of Lieutenant, vice Jenkins, resigned. 

The people of Lexington were most courteous and kind 
to the regiment. Many homes were opened, and the genial 
social life was welcomed as a help in making officers and 
men contented. On September 24th, the regiment was the 
guest of the Jockey Club at the Loudon Park. It gave 
an exhibition drill, and witnessed the races. 

One of the features was a running race, open only to 
the officers of the Third Division. It was participated in 
by 20 officers, the leaders finishing in the following 
order : — 

Major Nickerson, Seventh United States Cavalry ; Lieu- 
tenant Hero, Fourth United States Artillery ; Lieutenant- 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 105 



Colonel Bailey; Colonel Pew; Major Eldredge; Adjutant 
Barroll, and Quartermaster Wonson, all of the Eighth 
Massachusetts; Lieutenant Horton, Twelfth New York, 
and Lieutenant Stinson, Eighth Massachusetts. 

This contest was continued two other days, the "finals" 
being run off Saturday, open to the entire camp (12,000), 
any military horse, with an officer " up." The final was 
won by Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Eighth Massachusetts, 
on his mare " Alathea," with Adjutant Barroll, Eighth 
Massachusetts, second, on Colonel Pew's "Essex." 

Ladies were frequently the guests of the regiment, and 
especially on review days. Two large reviews were held 
in which all the troops participated, one in honor of Gen- 
eral Russell A. Alger, Secretary of War, and the other in 
honor of Governor Bradley of Kentucky. On September 
20th, General Russell A. Alger arrived by rail, and was 
met at the station by the Second Brigade, and escorted to 
General Breckenridge's headquarters. Later on, a review 
was tendered by the Division. The Eighth paraded over 
eight hundred men, and from this time its numbers were 
continually increasing by the return of convalescents to 
duty, and the expiration of furloughs. 

After the review, the Secretary of War inspected the 
Division Hospital and the various camps. He spent some 
time in the camp of the Eighth, chatting with the officers, 
and took occasion to compliment the regiment upon its 
intelligent struggle against typhoid at Chickamauga. 

Early in August, the Secretary of War had sent Colonel 
Hopkins, Assistant Inspector General of the United States 
Army, to examine and report upon the condition of the 
troops at Chickamauga. Colonel Hopkins' report to the 
Secretary of War was subsequently published, but was un- 
known to the regiment at this time. In it he said that the 



106 Twelve Months with the 



Eighth Massachusetts was the only regiment in the Park he 
was sure had complied with sanitary regulations, and that 
its low sick rate, as compared with that of other regi- 
ments, showed an intelligent appreciation of the situation 
by the officers, and an earnest effort to stop the 
spread of preventable disease, by the application of hy- 
genic measures. 

Later in the day, the Generals and Colonels of the 
Division met the Secretary at General Breckenridge's 
headquarters, and were invited to express their opinion on 
the sanitary conditions. Some of the officers bitterly 
denounced the inefficiency of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment and the Medical Department at Chickamauga; the 
Chief Surgeon of the corps was characterized as a horse 
doctor, and his professional qualifications were criticised. 

Several changes of officers were made in October. On 
the 20th, General Breckenridge turned over the command 
of the Corps to General James H. Wilson, under whom the 
Eighth served until mustered out. 

On the 7th, Rev. George D. Sanders, the Chaplain, re- 
signed. The Rev. Milo H. Gates of Ipswich, was ap- 
pointed to fill this vacancy November 11th, but before 
being mustered in, was thrown from a horse, and owing to 
his injuries was unable to pass the physical examination. 
Chaplain Sanders was subsequently re-appointed and 
joined the regiment in Cuba. 

On October 24th, Lieutenant Francis H. Downev of 
Company I, died at the St. Joseph's Hospital in Lexing- 
ton, of pneumonia. Funeral services were held over his 
remains in the city, and were attended by the officers of 
the regiment, and by Companies D and I. He was the 
only officer in the command who died during the service. 

On the 28th, Lieutenant-Colonel Edwin W. M. Bailey 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 107 



resigned, and Major William Stopford was promoted to 
Lieutenant-Colonel. The vacancy in majority was not 
tilled, as the United States allowed at this time but two 
majors to a regiment. Colonel Stopford continued to 
command the First Battalion. Owing to the place of his 
promotion, he became known in Lexington society as the 
real Kentucky Colonel. 

Lieutenant Stephen X. Bond of Company K, resigned 
on October 28th. 

During the temporary absence of the regimental sur- 
geon, Captain Rutherford of the Second Missouri, was 
assigned and remained on duty with the regiment several 
weeks. 

After the Third Division had recovered its health, the 
proposition to make a practice march was again discussed. 
Lieutenant Francisco A. DeSousa of Company E, with a 
detail from the regiment, was sent over the road to Frank- 
ford, Kentucky, to locate camps and select a suitable place 
for rifle practice. It was the intention to have each regi- 
ment march to Frankford and spend a week at target 
practice. Owing to the lateness of the season and the ap- 
proach of cold weather, the undertaking was abandoned. 

On October 10th, General Waites, who was about to 
retire from the command of the Second Brigade, tendered 
the officers a reception at his quarters. Soon after the 
officers of the Eighth had returned to their camp, Colonel 
Pew received directions through a staff officer to issue ball 
ammunition, and hold his men in readiness to march. The 
order was immediately obeyed. No explanation was 
offered, and the regiment awaited developments. 

In the quiet night the measured beat of marching was 
heard along the Bryan Pike, and the Regimental Guard 
reported the One Hundred and Sixtieth Indiana going 



108 Twelve Months with the 



into Lexington to quell a riot. A member of the Third 
Kentucky on provost duty in the city, had shot and killed 
a soldier of the Twelfth New York, who refused to halt 
when ordered. The sentinel was arrested pending an in- 
quiry. 

A rumor spread through the camp that a number of the 
Twelfth New York and the First Territorial Eegiments 
had started for the city to lynch this sentinel. There was 
more or less disturbance at the Montrose station by a mob 
of excited soldiers, and several shots were fired. 

The Eighth was ordered to deploy one battalion as 
skirmishers across the Bryan Pike, and railroad track, and 
stop all soldiers. The other two battalions were to remain 
under arms in camp as a reserve. Colonel Stopford exe- 
cuted this deployment with the First Battalion. Nothing 
happened, and he was withdrawn before morning. The 
situation in the city was easily controlled by the provost 
guard with the help of the One Hundred and Sixtieth 
Indiana. 

In October Governor Wolcott directed General Robert 
A. Blood, the Surgeon General of Massachusetts, to visit 
the camps of the Eighth and Fifth Massachusetts regi- 
ments and report on the sanitary condition, rations and 
hospital accommodations of these regiments. As a result 
of this trip, General Blood made the following report to 
the Governor: — 

"After three or four days at Camp Meade, visiting the 
Fifth Regiment, I proceeded to Camp Hamilton, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, where I arrived in due time. I found the 
camp of the Eighth Regiment about four or five miles out 
from Lexington, and in the heart of the blue-grass coun- 
try. This was a most delightful situation, and I think, 
one of the finest locations for a camp I have ever seen. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 109 



I was cordially received by Colonel Pew, commander 
of the Eighth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and 
every opportunity was given me by the Colonel to inspect 
this camp. This regiment was stationed at Camp Thomas 
for a long time. There had been a great deal of sickness, 
mostly typhoid fever, but at the time of my visit there 
were no new cases, and the cases in the hospitals were pro- 
gressing favorably. At this time there were no regimental 
hospitals. Orders for re-establishing the regimental 
hospitals had just been received from headquarters, but 
no medicines or medical supplies had been issued. I looked 
the camp over very carefully, saw the men on duty and off 
duty, and visited other camps for comparisons. I saw no 
regiment at Camp Hamilton that seemed so thoroughly 
up to all that goes to make a good regiment as the Eighth. 
The men were soldierly in their bearing, the grounds were 
kept in perfect condition, tents were all in order and 
scrupulously clean. A great many of the men had fixed 
up temporary bunks or cots for their beds. Altogether 
this was perhaps the cleanest regiment, excepting the 
Fifth Massachusetts, that I saw in all my visiting soldiers 
in the field. It was certainly equal to any. 

I saw almost nothing in the sanitary arrangements of 
this regiment to criticise. The only thing, as with the 
Fifth Regiment, which I think could be improved, is the 
company cooking. Of course this will improve in time. 
I stayed with this regiment nearly a week. I visited and 
dined with General Breckenridge, commander of this post, 
and with other general officers commanding divisions and 
brigades. General Breckenridge was very kind to me, 
showing me every attention, and all the officers I met at 
Camp Hamilton treated me with the greatest considera- 
tion. I take this opportunity to thank them. This army 
corps was, I believe, under better discipline than any other 
corps I saw during the summer, with the exception, possi- 
bly, the regulars at Montauk. 

I desire to say here, that, in my judgment, Colonel 
Pew is a most excellent commander, and all the officers of 
the Eighth whom I met seemed to be well up in their 



110 Twelve Months with the 



profession and doing most excellent work. The regiment 
as I saw it was an honor to the State." 



By the end of October the nights had become chilly, and 
although bed sacks and extra blankets were issued to the 
men, it was difficult to keep warm. Americus, Georgia, 
had been designated in orders as the future home of the 
Eighth Massachusetts and Twelfth New York and a detail 
from the Eighth was already upon the ground preparing 
a camp site. 

Orders were issued for the Eighth to entrain on Novem- 
ber 10th for Americus, and upon this date the regiment 
was transferred to the Second Brigade, Second Division, 
First Army Corps. The regiment had been ordered to 
entrain early in the morning near the Montrose station, 
but owing to the delay in loading the baggage of Brigade 
Headquarters, it was impossible for the Quartermaster 
of the Eighth to begin loading his baggage before after- 
noon. 

The regiment had risen early, and had its breakfast 
before 5 o'clock, and in compliance with orders, all bag- 
gage had been packed and transported to the station. The 
day was cold and raw, and a steady downpour of rain had 
converted the camp site into a mass of mud. Tents had 
been struck and shipped to the station, and the men were 
required to remain on the camp ground all day without 
food or shelter, waiting for the passenger sections to pull 
in from Lexington. 

Many of the men in their efforts to keep warm, drank 
too much whiskey, and a large number in the regiment be- 
came sadly demoralized. The guard house, a wooden 
structure, was set on fire, and some of the prisoners had 
a narrow escape from cremation. The event was known 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry HI 



as the evacuation of Lexington. The troop trains did not 
arrive until after dark, when the regiment embarked, and 
for the first time since five in the morning, the men were 
served with food and hot coffee. The departure from Lex- 
ington was sad and dispiriting and was made under trying 
conditions. 



Americus 



HEN the regiments of the Second Division 

W\\ were moved from Lexington, they were as- 
§3 signed to camps in southwestern Georgia, in 
the cities of Macon, Columbus, Americus and 
Albany. The Eighth Massachusettts and the Twelfth New 
York went to Americus, where three regimental camp 
sites had been prepared, and orders were issued for the 
Eighth United States Infantry to join the brigade. This 
order was countermanded, and no other regiments went to 
'Americus. 

On the morning of November 12th, the four sections 
bearing the Eighth Massachusetts and its impedimenta 
reached Americus. The two camp sites were about a mile 
from the city, and separated by the highway. The Eighth 
was assigned to a large sodded field, where substantial 
wooden company sinks had been constructed, water pipes 
laid to each company kitchen, and an electric street light- 
ing system was being installed. 

For a week the men of the Eighth were as industrious 
as ants. Each company erected a long shed at the foot of 
the company street, one end of which was closed in for a 
kitchen, in which was assembled every convenience for 
preparing food. The rest of the shed was used as a mess 
house, and furnished with long deal tables and benches, 
where the men could sit and enjoy their meals. Canvas 
awnings were attached to the long sides of the mess hall, 
to be used as a protection against rain and wind. 

Deep pits were dug for kitchen sinks. These were 
covered with tree trunks and the dirt replaced and care- 
fully arranged in a mound. A detachable hopper was 



US Twelve Months with the 



placed in the top of each mound to drain liquid wastes 
into the sinks ; the solids were than collected in closed iron 
cans, and were carted twice daily to a crematory. The 
hoppers were enclosed in wooden boxes with covers, which 
were always resplendent with a fresh coat of whitewash. 

Long wash stands were constructed with an overflow 
trough into the kitchen sinks. A pipe ran the length of 
these stands, with frequent faucets and iron wash basins. 
Each company was supplied with a bathing tent in which 
a shower bath was constructed, where the men could bathe 
every day if they so desired, and were required to bathe 
twice a week. Tent floors were provided, and lumber for 
bunks and clothing racks. A system of drainage was in- 
stalled, and each company street ditched and crowned to 
the center. 

Battalion water plants were constructed, where all the 
water supplied to the regiment for drinking purposes was 
boiled, filtered and iced. 

The means for caring for the sick were excellent. In 
addition to a regimental hospital, used as a dispensary, 
but supplied with quarters sufficient to care for a number 
of men, there was a brigade hospital located in a dwelling 
house, and adjacent to this were erected a number of hos- 
pital tents with double boarded floors, and with sides also 
boarded, so that patients were as comfortable in the mild 
climate of Georgia as if they had been in the best managed 
institution of the kind in Boston. The Brigade Hospital 
was in charge of Major William Cogswell. 

A building was erected for a post exchange, which was 
successfully operated by a council of officers consisting of 
Captains Alexander G. Perkins of Company A, William 
C. Dow of Company F, and Edward J. Horton of Com- 
pany G. All necessaries that were needed by the men 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 117 



were offered for sale here at reasonable rates, and its res- 
taurant became famous for egg sandwiches and oyster 
stews. All these paraphernalia of comfort and health 
were daily inspected by company commanders, battalion 
commanders, regimental commander, and the brigade com- 
mander. 

Just before Thanksgiving, Colonel Arnold A. Rand of 
Boston, visited the camp and reported its condition to 
Governor Wolcott. He said: — 

"I think you would be glad to know that the regiment is 
in most excellent condition ; the officers cheery, trim, and a 
credit to the State. I did not see the regiment on parade, 
but which was very much better, I saw quite thoroughly 
the quarters, and examined everything as to the sanitary 
condition, from the sinks to the corral. I also saw the men 
at mess, and the quality of the rations. The whole regi- 
ment seemed in excellent condition, and is such a credit to 
the state that it is a very great pleasure to make such a 
report to you." 

The men were allowed much liberty between drills, and 
passes were issued to visit the city during the day. Many 
side trips were made to Andersonville to visit the site of 
the celebrated prison where many Federal soldiers were 
confined during the Civil War. Order was preserved in 
Americus by a provost guard, under command of Lieuten- 
ant George H. Dow of Company A. This guard arrested 
all soldiers found in the city without proper passes, and 
returned them to the guard houses of their respective reg- 
iments for trial for absense without leave. 

The camp at Americus was at first named in honor of, 
Major Forse. The name was subsequently changed to 



118 Twelve Months with the 



Camp Gilman, as another camp had earlier received the 
name of Camp Forse. 

During the first few days at Americus, the Eighth was 
greeted with many showers. The weather, however, was 
so mild that the men did not wear overcoats except as a 
protection against the rain. During the entire stay of the 
Eighth, wildflowers and roses were in full bloom. 

On one side of the camp an extensive cotton field waved 
acres of bolls, breaking into white flowering balls, which 
at a distance looked like a sea of white roses. It is said 
that the low prices of cotton did not warrant picking this 
field, and it was left intact and beautified the approach to 
camp. 

At no great distance were fields of sugar cane fit for har- 
vesting, where the men were often welcomed and treated 
to a supply of chewing cane for the company. A solitary 
peanut farm was discovered by some of the soldiers in 
their peregrinations, and its product brought to camp. 

The Georgia pines attracted much attention. Many of 
these trees were transplanted and grouped about the camp 
for landscape effect. Every line officer had one at his 
front door. 

All the officers constructed wooden porches in front of 
their" tents. The porch had two faces, in one of which 
was a door, and in the other a glass window. The interior 
space between the two faces was utilized for a Sibley 
stove, and the pipe was carried through the wooden roof of 
the porch. All these porches were whitewashed. A line 
of officers' tents looked like a row of diminutive cottages, 
and in the morning when every funnel was smoking, sug- 
gested the busy preparation of breakfast in many little 
home9. 

The officers of the regiment, however, messed together 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 119 



in a commodious building, which was divided into a dining 
hall and kitchen. The dining hall was also used as a 
regimental school room, and as a place for social meeting 
in the evening. 

On one occasion a birthday dinner was given in this 
hall at which a historic cake figured. A lady sent this 
cake with an appropriate number of candles to one of the 
officers, and by way of a joke, wrote a letter to the 
Secretary of War, pretending to be the officer's sister, and 
asked to have the regiment held at Americus until her 
brother got his cake. This letter was preserved by Secre- 
tary Alger as a bonafide communication, and was later 
commented upon in his history of the War with Spain as 
follows : — 

"Of all the requests however received, perhaps the most 
unique was that which came from a young lady in Boston. 
Her note paper, hand writing, and rhetoric vouched at 
least for the culture of the writer. Her request was simple 
and plainly worded. With much unfeigned earnestness 
she stated her case. The press despatches had announced 
that the volunteer regiment of which her brother was a 
member, was to leave for Cuba at a fixed date, but the 
brother's birthday came two days before the date assigned 
for his embarkation. A birthday box of cake, jellies, pies, 
•etc., she said, had been forwarded to him, and would not 
be received if the regiment left on the date announced. 
She naively asked that the regiment be detained until the 
sweetmeats arrived, as she was sure it would make no 
• difference to the Government, whereas, it would be such a 
disappointment to her brother." 

During the first few weeks at Americus, the camp was 
overrun with colored people. They came from far and 
near to see the soldiers. Many of them carried covered 



120 Twelve Months with the 



baskets, and it was not long before a well-founded suspicion 
grew, that many of these baskets came into camp empty, 
and went out filled with plunder. The Eighth soon had a 
little race problem of its own to solve. In each company 
a squad of strong men assumed the duty of elevating the 
colored race. 

The process of elevation consisted in capturing every 
colored man with a covered basket, and tossing him on a 
blanket into the air, until the arms of the soldiers got 
tired, and they could keep it up no longer. The sight of 
a negro with a basket was the signal for a rush in his 
direction with a blanket, and he was soon traveling sky- 
ward, in spite of every objection on his part to such 
treatment. For a few days, every such colored visitor was 
received in the open arms of a regulation blanket. 

As objectionable visitors became scarce, and covered 
baskets disappeared, this moral propaganda ceased, and as 
far as the Eighth was concerned, the race problem was 
solved. 

Major Edward H. Eldredge was detailed by General 
Waites to select a rifle range for the entire brigade. He 
selected one about half a mile from the camp, where targets 
were installed under his direction at 200 and 500 yards. 
It was reported that the regiment was to be armed with the 
Krag-Jorgensen rifles before the command was sent to 
Cuba, and it was the intention to have the soldiers spend a 
portion of each day at the range. 

On November 20th, General Sanger arrived to relieve 
General Waites of the command of the Second Brigade. 
Under General Sanger, active preparations were at once 
begun for Cuba. Medical inspections were instituted to 
weed out officers and men unfit for foreign service. The 
regiment received a consignment of Krag-Jorgensen rifles, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 121 



and its supplies generally were overhauled and replen- 
ished. General Sanger made a thorough inspection of the 
regiment by battalions. This inspection lasted three days. 
Permission was obtained from the Adjutant-General of the 
Army to recruit the regiment to full strength, by transfer- 
ring men from regiments in Massachusetts not yet mus- 
tered out. A number of men who served in Porto Rico 
with the Sixth Massachusetts, and were at home waiting 
muster out, were transferred to the Eighth under this per- 
mission, and joined the regiment in December and 
January. 

On December 9th, General Wilson, the Corps Com- 
mander, and General Ludlow, the Division Commander, 
visited Americus to inspect the brigade. Owing to a severe 
storm, the review of the troops was omitted ; but the camp 
was thoroughly inspected by the Generals. 

At the hospital of the Eighth, General Wilson said to the 
officer in charge: — "Surgeon, this is a model hospital, be- 
cause it has no patients." The health of the regiment bad 
steadily improved since the end of the first month at 
Lexington, and on the morning of this inspection there 
were just 1000 men present for duty with the colors. On 
December 27th, for the first time in seven months, there 
was not a single soldier of the Eighth in either the Regi- 
mental, Brigade, or Division Hospital. 

On December 12th the mess-house of Company L 
burned. A kettle of fat boiled into the fire, and the flames 
quickly caught the roof of the kitchen and spread, explod- 
ing a can of kerosene. The building was soon wrapped in 
a sheet of flames. The regiment turned out and saved the 
adjoining buildings, but the mess house, with all the com- 
pany supplies, was a total loss. The men of L were 



122 Twelve Months with the 



assigned to other companies for rations, until a new dining 
hall and kitchen were constructed. 

About this time, Company L met with another loss, in 
the death of its mascot. The company had appropriated 
a young razor-back at Chickamauga, which, becoming at- 
tached to the company, followed it from camp to camp. 
He lived in the company street and was as familiar with 
the men as a well-trained dog. By Thanksgiving, the pig 
had grown to such proportions that he was ordered by 
higher authority, turned over to a butcher and served to 
the company as rations. 

Company F had a lady goat as a mascot. She went 
through the service with the company, and was finally 
mustered out in Haverhill, where her descendents are 
numerous. The goat would follow the drum corps any- 
where as long as it was marching away from camp, 
but immediately the direction was taken towards camp, 
the goat became obdurate and had to be pulled home. 

Just before Thanksgiving, the Colonel received the fol- 
lowing telegram from Captain Augustus P. Gardner : — 

"Should be glad to pay cost of best Thanksgiving dinner 
for your regiment. If you approve, wire answer." 

The proper answer was promptly wired, and the regi- 
mental commissary was sent into market to purchase 
turkeys and all that goes to make up a best Thanksgiving 
dinner. A similar dinner was furnished to the regiment 
at Christmas time by Hon. George von L. Meyer. These 
feasts were much appreciated by the men and were enjoyed 
amidst much merry making. 

About this time several changes occurred among the 
commissioned officers, Captain Frank B. Denning and 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 223 

Lieutenant Linville H. Wardwell of Company C leaving 
the service by resignation. Second Lieutenants F. A. 
DeSousa of Company E and David F. Jewell of Company 
F were promoted to first lieutenants. The former was 
assigned to Company I and the latter to Company K. 

At the same time First Sergeant Loran J. Harvey of 
Company I, and Sergeant Alexander Eobertson of Com- 
pany E were commissioned as second lieutenants, after 
a competitive examination. The former was attached to 
Company E and the latter to Company F. 

On December 22nd the weather bureau, predicting a 
great storm, sent a telegram of warning to all the military 
camps. The telegram to the Eighth stated that the ther- 
mometer would drop 30 degrees. Not knowing just what 
to do with this information, the Colonel directed it to be 
published at evening parade. At evening parade, the 
orders of the day were read by the Adjutant, and on this 
occasion the telegram was read as the last part of the daily 
order ; then followed the usual phraseology, — "By order of 
Colonel Pew." The reading of this telegram at the end of 
an order, caused considerable amusement in camp, at the 
idea that Colonel Pew would order the thermometer to 
drop 30 degrees. 

A flag pole was furnished the regiment and erected near 
the center of the camp. On December 28th a garrison flag- 
was received and broken out from this pole with appropri- 
ate ceremonies. Thereafter, at reveille and retreat it was 
hoisted and lowered. The flag and pole were carried to and 
used in Cuba. On being mustered out, the flag was pre- 
sented to the regiment, and is now preserved at regimental 
headquarters. 

During this stay at Americus, Major Frank A. Graves 
and Captain Charles T. Hilliker of Company D were ab- 



124 Twelve Months with the 

sent from the regiment most of the time on court martial 
duty at Columbus. 

A common diversion in southern Georgia is cock fight- 
ing. Many mains were attended by members of the regi- 
ment. A number of officers were presented with railroad 
passes, and invited to go to Savannah to see a review of 
part of the Seventh Corps, previous to its embarkation for 
Havana. Permission was obtained for about 20 officers 
to make this trip. The train left Americus at midnight, 
but through some misunderstanding, the officers assembled 
at the hotel about 7 o'clock, and had an evening upon their 
hands. 

One of the officers, thinking cock fighting was not ta- 
booed by law, and having been told by a prominent citizen 
that a main could be arranged on short notice at any time, 
called up the citizen by telephone in the hotel lobby, and 
invited him to bring the cocks to the hotel and begin at 
once. He was promptly suppressed by the hotel pro- 
prietor, and the law explained to him. A quiet, gentle- 
manly main was tolerated, but not a public and bold de- 
fiance of the law. 

A quiet, gentlemanly main was accordingly arranged 
for in a large upper room, occupied by the grand jury as 
sleeping apartments, while they were supposed to be en- 
gaged in an all-night session at the Court House. Various 
mysterious bundles were smuggled into these quarters by 
darkies, the windows were darkened, cocks were heeled, 
and fighting was soon in progress. After several fights 
had been pulled off, word came that the grand jury was 
about to leave the Court House, and retire for the night. 
There was a wild scramble to put the place in order, and a 
hurried exit of cocks and darkies. The officers brought up 
the rear of this retreat, and wished the grand jury a 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 125 



pleasant night's rest as they passed them in the hotel 
corridors. 

About the middle of December, General Ludlow, who 
commanded the Division, was ordered to Havana as a 
military governor. His place was taken by General 
Sanger, and the command at Americus devolved upon 
Colonel Pew. 

Conical tents were issued in sufficient quantity to equip 
half the command. This was the regiment's first ex- 
perience with khaki canvas. Company commanders were 
loath to substitute them for the wall tents which they had 
been using. Accordingly each company was required to 
erect these tents on one side of the company street. After 
the first night, almost every company commander informed 
headquarters that he had no objections to having his whole 
command in conical tents. It did not take the men long to 
discover the advantages of khaki canvas, and that they 
could burn a light behind it after taps, with no fear of 
detection. Conical tents at once became popular in all the 
companies. 

On December 23rd, the Twelfth New York received 
orders to proceed to Charleston and embark with General 
Sanger for Matanzas. Major Eldredge was detached from 
the regiment to accompany General Sanger as a member 
of his staff. The command of the Third Battalion was 
assumed by Captain William C. Dow, of Company F. 
The New York regiment left Americus the day after 
Christmas. Fifty-four men and one officer remained be- 
hind as unfit for foreign service, and were temporarily 
attached to the Eighth until they could be mustered out. 

On December 30th, the Eighth received orders to pre- 
pare for Cuba. They reported 40 officers, 1112 men, 29 



126 Twelve Months with the 



wagons, 119 mules, 26 horses, and 26 civilian employees, 
with all necessary supplies ready to move at once. 

At this time, when the regiment was anxious to move, 
and congratulating itself on the absence of all sickness, 
measles broke out. The matter was kept quiet, and every 
company was inspected by the surgeons twice daily, to 
detect and isolate suspected cases. The surgeons thought 
the spread of the disease could be stopped if everything in 
camp was boiled. 

The last day of the year was as mild and pleasant as a 
summer day in the North. Early in the morning, active 
preparations began for boiling. Everything that could 
hold and boil water, was called into service. Caldrons, 
pots, pans, and kettles, were soon steaming all over the 
camp. Visitors were excluded for the day, and by noon 
time the whole regiment had committed its belongings to 
boiling water. 

A naked drum corps furnished music for a couple of 
hours, and the men danced about like a mob of naked sav- 
ages. At a distance, passing natives gathered on the high- 
way and wondered what it was all about. The colored 
people were willing to believe that the evil one was at the 
bottom of it all. After the regiment had boiled itself free 
from germs, the guard was relieved, and went through the 
same process. 

Everything in the regiment which could stand boiling, 
was boiled, and everything which could not stand a soaking 
was otherwise disinfected. Measles were thoroughly 
stamped out, and at the end of a week when the regiment 
left for Cuba, but five men remained behind for this rea- 
son. 

On January 4th a large delegation of citizens visited 
camp to say good-bye. After evening parade Colonel Lane, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 127 



in behalf of the City of Americus, addressed the regiment. 
He spoke in laudatory terms concerning the conduct of the 
soldiers, and how the presence of Massachusetts troops in 
Georgia had created new bonds of sympathy between 
North and South. 

Colonel Lane had requisitioned a wagon as a convenient 
platform from which to address the soldiers. Many citi- 
zens had come in carriages, and these carriages were 
wedged in about the orator, facing the regiment. At the 
conclusion of Colonel Lane's remarks, Drum Major 
Thomas, catching the enthusiasm of the moment, caused 
the drum corps to break into "Dixie" under the very 
noses of several hundred horses. Horses turned short in 
their shafts, and stampeded to the rear, the orator's plat- 
form slid from under him, and it was some time before 
the ceremonies of leave taking could be resumed with 
proper decorum. 

The next evening the regiment returned the courtesy 
of this call by marching into town and holding an evening 
parade in the public square. On the return to camp, it 
found that Harry E. Stiles, its bandmaster in the 
Militia service, had reported for duty, to organize a band 
and accompany the regiment to Cuba. 

More changes among the commissioned officers occurred 
during this month. Lieutenant Eugene Larrivee of Com- 
pany L resigned. Chaplain George D. Sanders, who had 
resigned, was re-commissioned and rejoined the regiment. 
Lieutenant John M. Pettengill of Company B was pro- 
moted to captain and assigned to Company C. Second 
Lieutenants Frank Stinson of Company B and Frederic 
P. Smith of Company C were each made first lieutenants 
in their companies. 

First Sergeant Edgar J. Whelpley of Company H, 



128 Twelve Months with the 



First Sergeant James W. Jackman of Company K, Ser- 
geant Charles E. Warner of Company I and Sergeant 
William H. Clendennin of Company M were commis- 
sioned second lieutenants. Lieutenant Whelpley went to 
Company C, Lieutenant Jackman to Company B, Lieu- 
tenant Warner to Company G and Lieutenant Clendennin 
to Company L. 

On January 6th the First Battalion under command of 
Lieutenant Colonel Stopford, entrained for Savannah, 
where it embarked on board the transport Obdam. It 
broke camp during a rain storm on the coldest day the reg- 
iment had experienced in Georgia. 

As soon as the Twelfth New York left, Colonel Pew be- 
gan to collect a supply of lumber for use in Cuba. The 
buildings which this regiment had occupied were pulled 
down, and every board washed with a solution of corrosive 
sublimate. Two cars were obtained and loaded to accom- 
pany the regiment. 

On the evening of January 8th the Second and Third 
Battalions and Headquarters entrained for Savannah. The 
most of January 9th was spent in being shifted about in 
the freight yards at Savannah. A casual visitor to one of 
the sections told the officers that the ground in the yard 
where they were was so saturated with pine pitch, that a 
lighted match dropped would start a conflagration. One of 
the officers, thinking to call this bluff, made an experiment. 
The visitor had told the truth, and the regiment had a con- 
flagration on its hands. The flames licked up the ground 
as if it had been saturated with kerosene. The soldiers 
were powerless to stop the fire with the means at their 
disposal. The railroad fire department appeared with 
chemical tanks, and soon had it under control, before any 
damage had been done, except blistering a few cars. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 129 

In Savannah the Colonel received a letter from Major 
Eldredge, telling him the character of the camp site the 
regiment was to occupy at Matanzas. The Major suggested 
the men would have to use iron tent pins and do some 
blasting to make their Cuban home comfortable. The 
Depot Quartermaster at Savannah was called upon and 
furnished a supply of drills, sledge hammers, powder and 
iron rods. The soldiers spent most of the night in the 
cars, while details were loading supplies onto the trans- 
port. At 3 o'clock on the morning of January 10th, the 
men began to embark, and at daylight the transport Mich- 
igan had cast off, and was slowly steaming down the river. 
At last the regiment was off for Cuba. 




u 



< 

■■J 

H 

z 

w 
s 



Matanzas 



N January 10th the Obdam bearing the First 

0\\ Battalion of the Eighth, came to anchor at 
» Matanzas, in a wide, shallow bay, where ships 
lie a mile or more off shore to discharge. Hills 
topped with palms, rose on either side of the city, which 
spread out on a strip of land between two little rivers, 
and straggled up the slopes, until the stone houses of the 
town proper gave place to palm thatched huts on the out- 
skirts. The city upon a close inspection, was dirty and 
battered, but from the sea its pink and blue walls pre- 
sented a picturesque appearance. 

General Wilson, the Military Governor, and his staff, 
immediately landed, and were received by the Twelfth 
New York. The men of the Eighth witnessed this func- 
tion from a distance. They were kept on the transport 
during the day, while their baggage was landed. 

The military camps were located on the western shore 
of the bay, where the northeast trades blow continually 
across the bay from the open ocean, always insuring pure 
air. It was a scant mile from the city, and pipes from 
the municipal water service were laid, insuring a bounti- 
ful supply of water. 

The camp of the Eighth lay behind the old Spanish 
Fort San Severino, and between the camp of the engineer 
battalion, and the Twelfth New York. A broad boulevard 
in a bad state of repair extended from the old fort to the 
town. All the troops were encamped along this boulevard, 
on ground that for rockiness and general hardness of ap- 
pearance, outclassed any perpendicular farm in New Eng- 
land. 

The rocks were of coral and volcanic origin, thrown up 



134 Twelve Months with the 



ages ago, and appeared above the surface in many fantas- 
tic shapes. Every square yard had its share of rock jutt- 
ing above the red soil in sharp pinnacles. The ground had 
been covered with brush and cactus, but the engineers had 
been at work during the week prior to the arrival of the 
Obdam, clearing this away, so that when the First Bat- 
talion landed, it found the ground cleared of all vegeta- 
tion. 

The landing was made at a small wharf near the fort, 
and a few steps across the dilapidated boulevard, brought 
the men to their future home. The regiment had an 
excellent site, the bay lay before it, and the ground 
rose in terraces from the water until it terminated in a 
range of hills a mile back of the camp. 

Major Eldredge who had preceded the regiment as a 
member of General Sanger's staff, received the public 
property turned over to the United States by Spain, in 
accordance with the evacuation agreement, in Matanzas, 
and later in the City of Cardenas and other towns in the 
province. When the regiment arrived, he was busily en- 
gaged at Matanzas in establishing charities, and in reor- 
ganizing the police department. The country about the 
city, as in other parts of Cuba, was a waste, and the people 
were in a destitute condition. It was the first duty of the 
United States to care for the people, and supply them 
with food. 

While the First Battalion was locating itself at Matan- 
zas, the Second and Third Battalions were enjoying a de- 
lightful voyage. During the whole trip the sea was calm, 
and the Michigan glided along as smoothly as any pleas- 
ure yacht upon a summer cruise. Very few men com- 
plained of sea sickness, and soon got over any unpleasant 
feeling, and enjoyed the trip. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 135 



It was warm and stuffy where they were quartered in 
the hold, but their discomfort vanished with daylight, 
when they climbed on deck to loll in the shade and enjoy 
the steady northeast trade. The Michigan was formerly 
a freight vessel of the Warren Line, used as a cattle boat 
to carry live stock to England. 

The enlisted men were assigend quarters between decks. 
There were no berths, but each man was furnished with 
a duck hammock, which at night was hung on hooks 
in wooden uprights. These hammocks were hung in tiers, 
one over the other. In the morning the hammocks were 
rolled and stored, and the quarters prepared for inspec- 
tion, which took place twice daily, at 10 A. M., and just 
before retreat. These inspections were made by the 
Colonel, accompanied by the transport quartermaster, the 
police officer, medical officer, and master of the ship. After 
the morning inspection, daily exercise was required on 
deck. 

Sometime during the day every man had a bath. They 
stripped on the forward deck, and were pumped upon 
with a stream of water from the ocean. 

The officers quarters were as cramped as those of the 
men. There were only ten state rooms. The ships guard 
consisted of one company detailed for each day, the cap- 
tain acting as officer of the day, and the lieutenants as 
officers of the guard. Each company commander provided 
his command with proper police utensils from the ships 
quartermaster, and looked after the policing of the com- 
pany quarters. Cooking was done in the ship's galleys. 
During the trip, Stiles commenced work with the musi- 
cians on board, for the new regimental band. This 
nucleus had band practice every day. 

During the second day the transport steamed along the 



136 Twelve Months with the 



Florida coast within sight of a continuous stretch of beach 
sand and palm groves. At Jupiter Inlet a salute was ex- 
changed with some guns mounted near the summer hotels, 
and the ship went so near the shore that the winter visitors 
could be counted on the hotel piazzas. 

Late in the afternoon of the 12th, the first glimpse was 
caught of Cuba. During the night the transport lay off 
shore waiting for a pilot. On the morning of the 13th, a 
pilot came on board and the vessel steamed into the Bay 
of Matanzas, and came to anchor about two miles from 
the city. A guard detail was immediately placed upon 
the small wharf near San Severino to guard the baggage 
as it was landed. Details were made to clear up the ship 
and assist in discharging baggage and live stock. 

As soon as the sentries were posted on the wharf, the 
soldiers began to be lightered to the shore. A corral was 
established near the wharf, where the horses and mules 
were soon assembled. Before night the men on the Mich- 
igan were landed, and had joined their comrades of the 
First Battalion in a pup camp, between the Boulevard 
and the water, under the walls of San Severino. 

For a week the soldiers of the Eighth were busy pre- 
paring their new camp. Large hospital tents were issued 
to the command. Each company was divided into squads 
of six men under a corporal, and assigned to a tent. These 
tents were large enough to accommodate ten men, and in 
them seven men had all the room they required. A large 
fly was issued with each tent. As it was impossible 
to drive tent pins, large joists were used in the framing of 
the tent floors, and portions of these joists were extended 
on either side, to which the guy ropes were attached. The 
tent floors were laid about a foot above the surface of the 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 137 

ground on posts. To every man there was issued a Gold 
Medal cot. 

Each company, with the lumber brought from Ameri- 
cus, erected a frame mess house with substantial flooring, 
and constructed mess tables and seats. The roofs of these 
mess houses were covered with canvas, and in the rear of 
each a kitchen was built. The quarters of the battalion 
commanders were upon a terrace slightly raised above the 
level of the line officers street. Behind this terrace was an- 
other, the center of which was occupied by Regimental 
headquarters. On one side of this terrace, a Regimental 
hospital was established, and on the other end, a stable 
with a canvas roof for the horses and mules. 

The greatest difficulty was experienced in constructing 
roads through this camp. The rocks cropped out in points, 
which had to be broken with sledge hammers, or blasted 
with powder. Major Graves performed the important 
duties of superintendent of streets, and soon had a beau- 
tiful macadamized road running the whole length of the 
camp in front of the line officers quarters. 

From the center of this road, a well constructed way 
led to the field officers terrace, and to the corral on the 
headquarters terrace. Each company street was also 
macadamized. The rough pointed stones which had been 
broken off were laid as a foundation and gravel and sand 
were brought in as a covering. These roads were crowned 
in the center, and were a most creditable production, and 
the source of much favorable comment and praise. Major 
Graves was often congratulated upon the work of his new 
department. 

The gray walls of San Severino early attracted the 
attention of the soldiers. It was an old Spanish fort 



238 Twelve Months with the 



erected to defend the approach to Matanzas, and had just 
been evacuated by Spanish troops. 

The Cuban visitors to camp who could make themselves 
understood, spread harrowing tales of death recently in- 
flicted upon insurgents within its gloomy masonry. The 
old fort had been standing for centuries, and looked to the 
imagination like a suitable home for any kind of horror 
or torture. The tales told were to the effect that insur- 
gents were often lined up in squads against the walls and 
shot to death, or decapitated and their bodies thrown into 
the bay. A special wall in the counterscarp was pointed 
out as the execution place. 

The American soldiers, ever on the outlook for souve- 
nirs, succeeded in probing many battered bullets from the 
coral masonry of this wall, which were sent home as 
evidence of these tales. The fort was soon occupied and 
used as a military prison. 

Lieutenant James H. Craig of Company L was detailed 
as its first commander, and under him the casements were 
made habitable for its guards, and for the prisoners await- 
ing general court martial or serving sentences. An old 
piece of Spanish ordnance was mounted on the parapet 
and did duty for a sunrise and sunset gun. 

This picturesque pile was always in the foreground of 
any outlook from the camp of the Eighth, and under its 
shade the men loafed, or took they daily dip in the waters 
of the bay. All shipping passed the fort or lay at anchor 
under its guns. In the morning or at night the water in 
front of it was alive with birds and pelicans, diving for 
food, with great fish bags hanging from their lower jaws, 
and in the lazy afternoons, these same birds were seen 
perched on pieces of floatsam taking siestas. 

A few miles across the bay the walls of a settlement said 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 139 



to be occupied by Cuban insurgents, broke with a broad 
band of glittering white between the bright blue of the 
water, and the green expanse of grass and palms, which 
on rolling hills, rose to meet the blue sky on a distant 
horizon. The steady trade wind, beginning about eight 
in the morning, and dying away just before sunset, ren- 
dered life in the shade of the fort pleasant and comfort- 
able, however high the thermometer mounted in the suu. 

As soon as the camp was put in condition, military 
work outside of guard and provost duty was usually per- 
formed in the early morning or late afternoon. During 
the middle of the day officers and men had leisure to en- 
joy the pleasure of just living and being in the tropics. 

Much of the hard work in unloading transports and 
getting the camp sites ready for occupation was done by 
Cubans in the employ of the government. Some two hun- 
dred of these worked about the camps in squads, under the 
charge of non-commissioned officers from the engineer 
battalion. A large number were employed in cleaning up 
the city, and putting it in a sanitary condition. Much 
work was undertaken by the government to furnish 
employment to the poor. 

Lieutenant Colonel William Stopford was appointed 
general police officer for all the camps, and had quite a 
force of civilian employees under him. In his sanitary 
work he was charged with the duty of destroying the many 
reconcentrado huts that had been constructed on the out- 
skirts of the town. The sides of these huts were made of 
dried palm bark, and the roofs were thatched with palm 
leaves. They had been built by the poor country people 
compelled to come within the lines of concentration by the 
Spanish soldiery. Their owners were usually glad to take 
the fifteen dollars offered by the government and move 



140 Twelve Months with the 



out. The purchase and moving out process was completed 
in a few minutes, and the evacuated homes set on fire. 

There was a great deal of destitution throughout the 
cities and towns of Matanzas Province. Most of the towns 
had been occupied as fortified camps by the Spanish 
troops, and the people of the surrounding country had 
been brought within the limits of the camps to prevent 
their helping the insurgents. 

The food supply was inadequate to support the popula- 
tion herded together in this way, and there were many 
deaths from starvation, and great mortality, especially 
among the children. Committees were formed throughout 
the Province for the purpose of getting food to these 
people. Captain Horace S. Bean of Company B was sent 
into the interior to organize these committees and super- 
intend the distribution. 

Chaplain George D. Sanders was detailed on special 
duty as chairman of the commission on charities and cor- 
rections for the District, where he served with much 
credit until mustered out. 

Many poor people came to the camp to collect scraps of 
food that were thrown away. They were mostly children 
and were not burdened with much covering. They were 
special objects of pity to the soldiers, who supplied them 
with food and clothing. After the depots were opened in 
the city for the distribution of food, people were forbid- 
den, for sanitary reasons, assembling about the mess 
houses. 

The men were annoyed by other visitors for whom they 
had no compassion. There was a large variety of bugs 
and insects that made their homes among the coral rocks. 
Centipedes and tarantulas were especially unwelcome, as 
they formed the unpleasant habit of spending the night 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 141 



in flannel shirt sleeves and trouser legs, and resented being 
disturbed in the morning when the owner put on his cloth- 
ing. Fortunately, their bites, although very painful, were 
not deadly. It was soon discovered that they disliked tent 
floors which had been washed with a solution of corrosive 
sublimate, and after a while these pests either died, or 
migrated to other quarters, where they were treated to less 
frequent doses of corrosive sublimate. 

Everything in the City of Matanzas, including streets, 
people, buildings and language, were at first matters of 
great curiosity to the soldiers. The city was supposed to 
have a population of some 40,000, and was the chief sea 
port and capital of the province bearing the same name. 
The streets were narrow and ill kept. The sidewalks were 
not over two and a half feet wide, and most of the road- 
ways were so rough that it would be impossible to drive a 
light American wagon over them without great discomfort. 

The houses were mostly alike, built of stone or stucco, 
and many were colored a light blue or pink. They were 
built about a square court yard, and usually not over two 
stories in height. The front of the houses were flush with 
the sidewalks, and the windows barred on the outside. No 
glass was used, but behind the iron bars, were shutters, 
which, when opened, permitted anyone in the street to look 
upon the family life within the front room. The front 
door was usually large enough to allow a carriage to enter 
the house, and opened into a passageway leading to a 
court. The kitchen was in the corner of this court, or in a 
covered way leading into a back court. This back court 
was sometimes used as a stable, and the exit from the 
stable was through the court and front door of the house. 
Charcoal brasiers were used exclusively for cooking, and a 
stove was unknown. The sleeping rooms were usually 



142 Twelve Months with the 



upon the second floor, and opened upon a balcony, which 
ran around three sides of the court. In the better class 
of houses there was usually a fountain in the court, sur- 
rounded by flowers and shrubbery. 

Owing to the absence of decent roads, everything 
brought from the country had to be carried upon pack 
horses. The milk dealers carried their cans in the pouches 
of a huge saddle placed upon a very small horse. Fodder 
was carried through the streets on similar saddles, and a 
horse bearing a load of grass, looked as if he was going to 
a masquerade disguised as a hay cock. Venders peddled 
bunches of poultry tied together by the legs, and fishermen 
went about earrving blue lobsters hanging bv their tails 
from sticks, and advertised their wares in shrill invitations 
to buy "langostas frescas." 

Life in the streets and in the stores, the manner of pre- 
paring and marketing foods, the different business methods, 
and the Spanish language as a setting to all this strange- 
ness, was new and interesting. The men enjoyed the 
custom of storekeepers charging different prices to officers 
and enlisted men over the same counter for the same 
article, and the bland way a haberdasher would meet an 
officer's protest, by telling him that everything ought to 
cost him more, as his pay was larger. On Sunday, the 
only places of business closed were the U. S. Quartermaster 
and Commissary Depots. 

Sundav afternoons and evenings were holidavs for ev- 
eryone except the storekeepers, and during Lent the streets 
were filled with masqueraders. This mannor of life was 
new to the men from New England. Passes to visit the 
city were freely issued, when not interfering with military 
duty, and men with good records were allowed to visit 
Havana for a few davs. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 143 

The City Hall in Matanzas, known as the Municipal 
Palace, was situated on the Plaza in the middle of the 
city. The Plaza was planted with palms and other trop- 
ical trees, and was the center of business and social life. 
In the evening, one of the military bands furnished music, 
and the citizens promenaded or gathered about the tables 
in the restaurants, whose many open doors made them a 
continuation of the sidewalk. The buildings facing the 
square were stately and picturesque, and in the evening 
when the Plaza was thronged with merry groups, and the 
electric lamps sparkled among trees and fountains, life 
seemed very gay and foreign. 

The provost guard was always on duty, and patrolled 
the streets to maintain order. During the last of the stay 
at Matanzas, Major Eldredge acted as Provost Marshal, 
and Companies M, E, K, and H were detached from the 
regiment as a permanent part of his guard, and were quar- 
tered in the old Spanish barracks. 

On January 20th, the Cubans began a celebration in 
honor of independence. Xo restrictions were placed upon 
these festivities, but troops were held in readiness to sup- 
press disorder. Many cruelties had been inflicted upon 
the people of Matanzas by representatives of the Spanish 
Government, and intense hatred was manifested against 
the power that repressed them so long. As many Spaniards 
remained in the city, it was feared, in the enthusiasm of 
the celebration, some outburst of violence might occur 
against them. General Betancourt, who commanded the 
Cuban insurgents, assured General Wilson that his people 
were too happy to commit any breach of the peace. 

Orders were issued to the troops in camp that a single 
gun fired from San Severino, was the signal to assemble, 
and that any disturbance was to be at once suppressed. At 



144 Twelve Months with the 



the end of the boulevard, near its entrance to the city, a 
marble statute of Alphonse XII, King of Spain, was 
walled up in a brick casing to hide it, and preserve it as 
a work of art against vandalism. 

The celebration was held in a most peaceable and orderly 
manner, and was a joyful expression of gratitude for de- 
liverance from oppression. Extensive preparations were 
made by the people; public and private buildings were 
decorated, and numerous arches spanned the streets, bear- 
ing appropriate inscriptions in both Spanish and English. 
One arch bore the inscription, " Hurrah for us." The 
word "us" painted in small letters, referred to the United 
States, and was evidently the way the author remembered 
the marks on Government property. The American and 
Cuban flags were waved together throughout the city. 

The exercises commenced with a street parade of Cuban 
troops, the fire department, school children and citizens. 
The Eighth Drum Corps did duty at the head of the in- 
surgent soldiers. In the afternoon, vespers were held in 
the Cathedral, and at night there was a display of fire- 
works and general public rejoicing throughout the city. 

An interesting feature of the celebration took place the 
next day opposite the camp of the Eighth, where a solemn 
high mass of requiem was celebrated to the memory of 
some sixty persons who had been garroted on the spot by 
the public executioner. These were political prisoners 
who had suffered in the death chair, by having their necks 
broken while held in an iron collar, by a screw driven 
against their spinal cord, and operated on the back of the 
chair, very much as the screw of a letter press is worked. 

An altar, covered with black velvet and decorated with 
silver fringe, was erected on the site of these executions. 
The priests and acolytes were dressed in black. During 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 145 

the services the Cuban soldiers rested on their arms, and 
formed a military guard about the altar. The Eighth 
Eegiment and the Cuban Infantry Bands furnished music 
for the mass. The relatives of the persons executed at- 
tended in deep mourning, and added to the solemnity of 
the services by their expressions of intense grief. The cor- 
ner stone of a monument to the memory of these patriots 
was laid with Catholic ceremonies. A detail from the En- 
gineer Battalion prepared and lowered this stone in place 
during the ceremonies. 

In the afternoon the school children, dressed in Ameri- 
can and Cuban colors, led by the Eighth Eegiment Drum 
Corps, paraded and held a festival in the theatre. During 
the evening there were numerous balls and fetes and 
further exercises in the theatre. Twenty men from each 
company were given passes and allowed to go into town. 
On January 23rd the celebration concluded with a review 
of all the troops, before the Municipal Palace, to show 
that the American troops sympathized with the inhabitants 
in their festivities. 

On February 9th, a shot was fired by a member of the 
Eighth Regiment in the discharge of his duty. It was 
the stormiest night the regiment experienced in Cuba. 
About midnight the sentinel in front of the Colonel's 
quarters thought he saw two men coming from the hills 
and creeping towards the tents. They refused to halt 
when challenged. The sentinel rested his rifle over a cor- 
ner of the tent, with the muzzle a few inches above the 
Colonel's ear and fired. The sentinel reported that one of 
the men uttered an exclamation in good strong English, 
and the two beat a hasty retreat. As an investigation dis- 
closed two goats in rear of the camp, it was generally sup- 
posed that the sentinel attributed some general remarks of 



146 Twelve Months with the 



the Colonel about this occurrence, to one of the goats. 
On February 11th all the troops at Matanzas were re- 
viewed by General Breckenridge, Inspector General of the 
United States Army. The review took place upon the 
boulevard, and was followed by a careful inspection of the 
camps. This inspection was thus commented upon in his 
official report to the War Department: — 

"Matanzas Infantry Camp a model. ****** These 
same soldiers had a perfect camp also at Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. Such seasoned, well-instructed soldiers as the best 
of these, like the Eighth Massachusetts, Twelfth New 
York, and Third Engineers, and such handsome, health- 
ful camps, wrung from adverse nature are gratifying to 
all whoever commanded them, and are to be expected from 
such officers as Generals Wilson and Sanger." 

On February 20th the Regiment assisted in the recep- 
tion of General Maximo Gomez, the Commander-in-Chief 
of the Cuban Army. The men of the Eighth were 
stationed about five paces apart on each side of the streets 
leading from the Plaza to the railroad station. An escort 
consisting of six troops of the Second United States Cav- 
alry, the fire department of the city, societies of citizens, 
and the school children, all under the command of Colonel 
Pew, met the General at the station, and conducted him 
between the lines of the Eighth, to the Municipal Palace. 
The streets were decorated with flags, and the citizens 
turned out in holiday apparel. The General was received 
with all the honors due his exalted station and standing in 
the island. Enthusiasm was unbounded, and the Cuban 
General appeared much moved by the ovation accorded 
him alone; the entire route. 

Flowers were showered upon him from the balconies, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 147 



and flags were everywhere waved. The General was slight 
in stature, appeared about seventy years of age, and was 
mounted on a handsome Cuban charger. 

As the procession passed, the members of the Eighth 
fell in behind and brought up the rear in columns of fours. 
At the Municipal Palace the General reviewed the troops 
forming his escort. General Gomez remained in the city 
a number of days, and upon leaving was escorted to the 
railroad station bv the Eighth. 

During his stay, he visited the camps and spent some 
time at the target range, which had been installed under 
the direction of Major Eldredge. The General tried his 
hand at shooting, and received an excellent score card 
from Lieutenant Craig, who was in charge of the range. 
His visit was made the occasion of a reception and ball 
given at the theatre, by all the officers of the Garrison. 
This ball was the social function of the season, and was in 
acknowledgment of the many courtesies extended to the 
officers by the citizens of Matanzas. 

The Twelfth New York was the first Volunteer Regi- 
ment to leave Matanzas. When the transport which was 
to carry it home, arrived in the bay, the band of the 
Eighth paraded through the line officers street, and com- 
pany after company fell in and marched to the camp of 
the Twelfth to show the good feeling existing between the 
regiments. While marching over the band played "On 
the Bowery." As the column passed through the camp of 
the Twelfth, its band got together and joined the band 
of the Eighth on the march back, playing "Home, Sweet 
Home." The men of the two regiments fell in together 
behind the bands, and after marching through both camps, 
halted in the open space between the camps while the 
bands played "Auld Lang Syne." 



148 Twelve Months with the 



On March 21st the Eighth, after evening parade, es- 
corted the Twelfth New York to the wharf, where it 
embarked in lighters to go on board the transport "Meade", 
which sailed the following day. 

On March 27th, orders were issued for the Eighth to be 
mustered out in Boston. On April 2nd, the transport 
"Meade" returned from New York, and the Eighth was 
ordered to embark the following day. In the evening the 
officers, with the band, called upon General Sanger to pay 
respects for the last time to their chief. During most of 
their service, they had served in his command. They ap- 
preciated the efforts he had made to maintain their health, 
and held in high esteem his qualities as an officer and 
soldier. 

On the afternoon of April 3rd the post flag was lowered 
in the camp of the Eighth, and the regiment, numbering 
46 officers and 1177 men, embarked. Early the next 
morning the transport steamed out of Matanzas Bay, and 
the foreign service of the regiment was ended. 

Just before sailing, a messenger from the Municipal 
Government of Matanzas presented the Colonel with an 
official copy of a proclamation, which had been adopted 
and issued by the city the preceding day. 

"TO THE EIGHTH REGIMENT OF 
MASSACHUSETTS. 

The brief period which you have spent among us has 
been sufficient to enable us to appreciate your patriotism, 
your great virtues, and your self-sacrifice and generosity. 
An indelible token of eternal gratitude and admiration 
you leave stamped upon our hearts. You are worthy sons 
of George Washington. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 149 



You are returning to your beloved homes. Return then ; 
There, love, friendship and hope await you. Speed you, 
and be you happy there, you who have accomplished in 
Cuba the greatest moral and material undertaking of the 
19th century. There you will be able to hold up your 
heads among the great and the good ; for great and noble 
also are those who there have contributed to the glory of 
the homeland. Believe therefore, and be assured that you 
leave friends here, brethren whose gratitude will ever 
cause them to love and bless you. Farewell ! 
Matanzas, April 3, 1899: 

Alfred O. Carnot, 

Mayor of the City. 
By order of the Council: 

Municipal Residence." 



Muster Out 




HE trip to Boston was uneventful, except that 

T\\ sea sickness among the cooks and the novelty 
of handling rations on board ship, somewhat 
disarranged the commissary department. 

Early Sunday morning, April 9th, Boston Light was 
sighted. At quarantine, Governor Wolcott boarded the ship 
bringing the welcome of the Commonwealth. In the after- 
noon the regiment disembarked at the New England docks, 
and marched to the South Armory. A salute was tendered 
the Mayor at City Hall, and the Governor at the State 
House. There was a tremendous outpouring of people to 
welcome the troops, and their demonstration was magnifi- 
cent. The soldiers marching with rythmic swing and 
perfect alignment, and their brown, hearty and healthy 
appearance, testified to the drill and discipline they had 
undergone during their term of service. The regiment 
was furloughed to report at the South Armory on April 
12th, and the companies were dismissed to their home sta- 
tions, where they were received with great demonstrations 
of joy and many impromptu celebrations. 

On April 12th the companies reported in Boston. The 
men were quartered in the South Armory. There was 
practically nothing for them to do except guard duty and 
evening parade on Boston Common. This parade daily 
attracted a large crowd of spectators. The clerical force of 
each company however, was busy on the muster out rolls, 
and the quartermaster's department was straightening out 
its accounts with the government, and getting ready for 
the final reckoning. 

On April 19th the men were dismissed to report on 



254 Twelve Months with the 



April 28th, which was the day selected for mustering out 
the regiment. 

A day or so previous to muster out a change occurred in 
the commissioned officers of the regiment. Captain Jacob 
C. R. Peabody of Company H, resigned to accept a posi- 
tion on General Ludlow's staff. First Lieutenant Augus- 
tus G. Reynolds was promoted to captain of the company, 
and Second Lieutenant William F. Young of Company D 
became first lieutenant of Company H, while Color Ser- 
geant William F. Marston of Company G was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in Company D. 

On the morning of April 28th the Eighth reported for 
its last day of duty. It did not take long to set the wheels 
of mustering out in motion. Every man discharged was 
given two months extra pay. One hundred eight thousand 
dollars in gold and silver representing the amount due the 
men was paid out. There was a large crowd present 
from all the towns represented by the companies. Captain 
Erastus M. Weaver officiated as mustering out officer. It 
took about half an hour to muster out each company, and 
the work was completed by 5.30. 

At the time of muster out, the roster of the regiment 
was as follows, numerous changes having taken place dur- 
ing its term of service. 

Colonel — William A. Pew, Jr. of Salem. 

Lieutenant Colonel — William Stopford of Beverly. 

Majors — Frank A. Graves of Marblehead, and Ed- 
ward H. Eldredge of Boston. 

Adjutant — Lieutenant Thomas H. Barroll of Bos- 
ton. 

Quartermaster — Lieutenant Charles F. Wonson of 
Gloucester. 

Surgeon — Major William Cogswell of Boston. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 155 



Assistant Surgeons — Lieutenant Frank P. T. Logan 
of Gloucester and Lieutenant Horace Bird Frost of 
Boston. 

Chaplain — Rev. George D. Sanders of Gloucester. 

Company A, Newburyport— Captain, Alexander G. 
Perkins ; First Lieutenant, George W. Langdon ; Second 
Lieutenant, George H. Dow. 

Company B, Amesbury — Captain, Horace S. Bean ; 
First Lieutenant, Frank Stinson ; Second Lieutenant, 
James W. Jackman. 

Company C, Marblehead — Captain, James M. Petten- 
gill ; First Lieutenant, Frederic P. Smith ; Second 
Lieutenant, Edgar J. Whelpley. 

Company D, Lynn — Captain, Charles T. Hilliker; 
First Lieutenant, Thomas J. Coby; Second Lieutenant, 
William F. Maeston. 

Company E, Beverly — Captain, Frederick W. Stop- 
ford; First Lieutenant, Charles H. Farnham; Second 
Lieutenant, Loran J. Harvey. 

Company F, Haverhill — Captain, William C. Dow; 
First Lieutenant, Per Justus W. Svanberg; Second 
Lieutenant, Alexander Robertson. 

Company G, Gloucester — Captain, Edward J. Hor- 
ton ; First Lieutenant, Charles M. McIsaac ; Second 
Lieutenant, Charles R. Warner. 

Company H, Salem — Captain, Augustus G. Rey- 
nolds; First Lieutenant, William F. Young; Second 
Lieutenant, Thomas O. H. Pineau. 

Company I, Lynn — Captain, John E. Williams ; 
First Lieutenant, Francisco A. DeSousa; Second Lieu- 
tenant, William H. Perry. 

Company K, Dan vers — Captain, A. Preston Chase ; 



156 Twelve Months with the 



First Lieutenant, David E. Jewell; Second Lieutenant, 
David F. Whittier. 

Company L, Lawrence — Captain, James Forbes; 
First Lieutenant, James H. Creig; Second Lieutenant, 
William H. Clendennin. 

Company M, Somerville — Captain, Herbert W. 
Written; First Lieutenant, George I. Canfield; Sec- 
ond Lieutenant, Frederick W. Pierce. 

With the muster out of Colonel Pew, the Eighth Regi- 
ment Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V., ceased to exist, 
after just a year's service, reckoning from the day the rolls 
were opened for volunteers. It was in the service longer 
than any other regiment from Massachusetts, and while 
it never took part in a battle or skirmish, its record 
stands second to no other volunteer regiment in the service 
of the United States. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 157 



Welcome Home 



,N, 



fault could be found by the members of the 
regiment with the receptions they received 
upon the return of the companies to the home 
stations. Although it was Sunday night, the 
enthusiasm knew no bounds, and in most places a large 
procession awaited the arrival of the company, took it un- 
der escort and started for the armory. Later, in most 
every place, official receptions were held, but they lacked 
the spontaneous enthusiasm which marked the welcome 
home on the arrival of the companies from the South Ar- 
mory, Boston. 

As these receptions took place within the year covered 
by the service of the regiment, it seems fitting that a brief 
account of them should find a place in this history of the 
organization. 

Company A of Newburyport reached home about 9.15 
o'clock, but its coming had been announced some two hours 
previously, by the sounding of the militia call on the fire 
alarm, consequently there was a tremendous crowd at the 
station, which gave the command a rousing cheer as the 
men stepped from the train. 

A delegation of paraders were awaiting the arrival of 
the company and the line was soon formed in the follow- 
ing order; Newburyport Cadet Band; Mayor Huse and 
members of the city government ; Company L, Massachu- 
setts Naval Brigade; National Band of Newburyport ; 
Company A, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. ; 
Newburyport fire department; Newburyport Bicycle club 
and Shields Division, A. O. H. The line of march led 
through the principal streets which were packed with peo- 
ple who cheered and burned red fire as the company 



160 Twelve Months with the 



passed. Wolfe tavern was finally reached, and there the 
festivities of the evening ended with a supper served the 
members of the company. 

On April 23, Company A was officially entertained at 
a banquet which was spread in the armory and to which 
some 400 people sat down. Mayor Huse presided at the 
after dinner exercises and there was speaking by promi- 
nent citizens. 

The Amesbury company, Company B, arrived from 
Boston at 9.40 o'clock and found a large crowd waiting 
its arrival, the fire alarm having sounded the warning of 
the company's approach. All the business houses were 
brilliantly illuminated and a salute was fired as the train 
rolled into the station. A parade was formed and passed 
through the principal streets in the following order; 
Drum corps ; veterans of Company B ; E. P. Wallace Post 
122, G. A. It. ; high school battalion ; the fire department 
and Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. 

The official welcome home took place on April 26th, 
when there was a public reception to the members of the 
company from 4 to 6 o'clock at Armory Hall, followed by 
a big banquet in the evening, at which time Commander 
Charles E. Kennard of Post 122, G. A. R. presided and 
speeches were made by prominent townspeople. 

The Grand Army post, headed by a drum corps, and 
hundreds of the people of Marblehoad were at the station 
to welcome home Company C and gave the members a 
rousing reception. The company was escorted to Abbot 
Hall, where II. C. Sparhawk, chairman of the board of 
selectmen welcomed them home in the name of the town, 
and Captain Pettengill and Lieutenant Whelpley re- 
sponded for the company. The men were then dismissed. 

On April 14th, the town was alive with bunting and en- 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 161 



thusiasm, for this was the day of the official welcoming. A 
big parade was a feature of the day, the line being formed 
in the following order: Thomas Swasey, chief marshal, 
and staff; Excelsior Drum Corps; John Goodwin Post, 
G. A. R., barge containing crippled Civil War veterans; 
cannon captured by the IT. S. 8. Marblehead at Fort Cayo 
del Torei; Cuban mine pulled up at Guantanamo by the 
Marblehead, on drays; Company C, Eighth Massachusetts 
Infantry, U. S. V. ; officers of the fire department in car- 
riages ; Pickett Veteran Firemen's Association ; Lafayette 
Brass Band of Salem; members of fire department; 
Phenix Veteran Firemen's Association ; apparatus of the 
fire department; Thorners Rough Riders. There was an 
exhibition drill by Company C, a supper and reception. 
The day's exercises wound up at Abbot Hall, where 
Henry C. Sparhawk, of the board of selectmen presided, 
and speeches were made by various people. Among the 
incidents of the day was the presentation of a button to 
every member of the company by the Volunteer Aid 
Association, through its president, Mrs. Mary E. Graves. 

Central Square, Lynn, was black with people awaiting 
the home-coming of the members of Companies I) and I 
of that city, and every train which passed through with 
companies aboard, bound homeward, was greeted with 
loud cheers. Finally, the Lynn companies arrived, and 
the air was rent with cheers, and excitement was at a high 
pitch. Cannon boomed and red fire was burned in quan- 
tities. Mayor Shepard had met the company at Boston, 
and found that it was the wish of the men to go directly 
home, so beyond this outburst of enthusiasm, nothing was 
done in the way of a welcome, the companies marching 
directlv to the armory, and the men were there dismissed. 

On April 13th, however, Lynn people officially received 



262 Twelve Months with the 



the companies in a manner which will not soon be forgot- 
ten. The city was bedecked with bunting, and thousands 
crowded the streets through which the parade passed, and 
cheered to the echo the returned war veterans. The parade 
was formed in the following order: General Charles C. 
Erye, chief marshal, and staff ; Lynn Brass Band ; General 
Lander Post, No. 5, G. A. K. ; Lieutenant-Colonel Mudge 
Camp, Sons of Veterans; Lynn Light Infantry Veteran 
Association; Wooldredge Cadet Veterans; Lynn Cadet 
Band; English High School Battalion; Classical High 
School Battalion; carriages containing Mayor Shepard, 
and members of the city government; Eighth Massachu- 
setts Infantry ; U. S. V. Band ; Company I, Eighth Mas- 
sachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. ; Company D, Eighth Mas- 
sachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. ; Veterans of Company E, 
Massachusetts Naval Brigade; Veterans of the Spanish 
War. A banquet at the State Armory followed, at which 
time 800 plates were laid and Mayor Shepard acted as 
toastmaster, and speeches were made by many prominent 
people, both in military and civil life. 

Mayor Benjamin D. Webber, of Beverly, went to Boston 
as soon as he heard that the Transport Meade was in, and 
together with other prominent citizens went down the har- 
bor to welcome the members of Company E. A specially 
chartered tug was used. Learning that the company was to 
come home that night, he telephoned to Beverly the fact, 
and upon the arrival of Company E at the station, a large 
gathering of people was on hand and welcomed the com- 
mand with three rousing cheers. A parade was formed, 
consisting of a Drum Corps, Post 89, G. A. R., and John 
Low Camp, Sons of Veterans, and the line of march taken 
up for the armory, where there were short speeches, fol- 
lowed by a collation. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry J63 



The official celebration in honor of the return of the vol- 
unteers took place on April 11th, when a parade was 
formed in the following order: Captain W. E. Perry, 
chief marshal, and staff ; Beverly Cadet Band ; John H. 
Chipman Post, 89, G. A. R. ; John Low Camp, Sons of 
Veterans; Preston Post, 188, G. A. R; Charles Haddock 
Camp, Sons of Veterans ; barouches containing disabled 
Civil War veterans and Mayor Webber and members of 
the city government ; Lynn Brass Band ; Company E, 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. ; Beverly fire 
department, apparatus and men; Bass River Lodge, I. O. 
O. F. ; letter carriers ; Excelsior Drum Corps ; Golden 
Star Council, O. U. A. M. ; Young Men's Catholic Tem- 
perance Society ; Ancient Order of Hibernians ; Bass River 
Court of Forresters; carriages containing members of 
Roger Conant Council, Royal Arcanum, and Beverly 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias ; four-horse drag with members 
of Jubilee Yacht Club ; carriages containing citizens. 

After the parade, the members of the company enjoyed 
a New England boiled dinner at the armory, and in the 
evening attended exercises at the City Hall. Mayor 
Webber presided, speeches were made by representative 
citizens, and the school children sang patriotic songs. 

On the evening of April 28th, the members of the com- 
pany were tendered a banquet at City Hall, Mayor 
Webber making a speech of welcome and presiding the 
remainder of the evening, during which various prominent 
citizens responded to toasts. The galleries were filled with 
people, they having been thrown open to the public. 

Company F, of Haverhill, arrived home rather un- 
expectedly at 8.15 P. M., but Mayor Chase was awake 
and the city was not caught napping. There was a good- 
sized crowd present at the depot, and it enlarged every 



J64 Twelve Months with the 



minute, so that by the time the parade moved, the streets 
were filled with a shouting, cheering people. The parade 
formed as follows: Haverhill City Band; Major How 
Post, 47, G. A. R. ; General Burnside Command, Veterans' 
Union; Provisional Company, State Militia; Eighth 
Regiment Drum Corps; Company F, Eighth Massachu- 
setts Infantry, IT. S. V.; carriages containing Mayor 
Chase and members of the city government. 

It was 11.15 P. M. before the members of Company G 
returned once more to Gloucester. For several hours a 
crowd had awaited their coming at the depot, the military 
call on the fire alarm having notified the citizens that the 
company was on its way home. Although the hour was 
late, there was plenty of enthusiasm, and salutes were 
fired and red fire burned. A parade was formed, made up 
in the following order: Gloucester Band; Massachusetts 
Naval Brigade, mounted detachment of citizens; Colonel 
Allen Post 45, G. A. R. ; Company G, Eighth Massachu- 
setts Infantry, IT. S. V. ; delegations from the various fire 
companies; Wingaersheek Band; Wingaersheek Tribe of 
Red Men ; Gloucester Council Knights of Columbus ; Por- 
tuguese Acoriana Society ; carriages containing prominent 
citizens. 

On April 14th, the official celebration took place, when 
a big parade passed through the principal streets of the 
city, in the following order : Fitz E. Oaks, chief marshal, 
and staff; Gloucester Band; Company M, Massachusetts 
Naval Brigade; High School Cadet Battalion; Colonel 
Allen Post 45, G. A. R. ; Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, 
IT. S. V. Band ; Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, IT. S. V. ; members of the fire department ; J. Franklin 
Dyer Camp, Sons of Veterans; Hutchinson's Military 
Band ; Ocean Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; Wingaersheek Tribe, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 165 



Red Men ; Fernwood Lodge, A. O. U. W. ; Gloucester 
Council, Knights of Columbus; St. Angelo Council, 
Knights of Malta ; Acoriana Beneficiary Society ; carriages 
containing distinguished citizens; mounted men. 

In the evening there was a big banquet, at which time 
Judge Taft presided and there were speeches by men in 
the public life of Gloucester, and men in military circles. 

When Company H, of Salem, reached home, it found 
thousands of people awaiting its return. The churches 
had dismissed their congregations that the members might 
unite with the other citizens in a royal welcoming of the 
soldier boys. Red fire was burned freely and there were 
salutes. At the station, a big parade awaited the volunteers, 
and taking the company under escort, marched to the 
Armory, where the men were dismissed. The parade was 
as follows : Salem Cadet Band ; Second Corps Cadets, 
M. V. M.; Phil H. Sheridan Post 34, G. A. R. ; postal 
clerks and carriers; Salem Light Infantry Veteran Asso- 
ciation; Mayor James H. Turner and members of the city 
government; Army and Navy League; Company II, 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, II. S. V. The fire alarm 
had sounded an agreed upon signal, which gave those in- 
tending to parade time enough to gather at the various 
headquarters. Mayor Turner had met the company in 
Boston and made the arrangements for the affair. 

Tuesday, April 11th, was the day set aside for the 
official celebration, and the streets were lined with thou- 
sands, who cheered and shouted, but it was not the spon- 
taneous outburst that had been given the company when 
it first arrived home. 

The parade passed through the principal streets of the 
city, and was made up as follows: Colonel Samuel A. 
Johnson, chief marshal, and staff; Salem Cadet Band; 



166 Twelve Months with the 



Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M. ; Phil H. Sheridan Post 
34, G. A. R. ; Army and Navy League ; Lieutenant-Colonel 
Henry Merritt Camp, Sons of Veterans; carriages con- 
taining disabled members of the G. A. R., and Mayor Tur- 
ner and members of the city government ; National Guards 
Band; Salem Light Infantry Veteran Association; Com- 
pany H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. ; Salem 
Brass Band ; Salem Letter Carriers and Postal clerks ; 
Salem Fire Department ; Salem Veteran Firemen's Asso- 
ciation; Salem Drum Corps; Father Mathews Total Ab- 
stinence Society; St. Joseph's Benefit Society; street de- 
partment drivers, mounted. 

In the evening the Salem Light Infantry Veteran 
Association tendered a banquet to the volunteers in the 
armory at the Franklin building. Captain John P. Rey- 
nolds acted as toastmaster, and a number of distinguished 
citizens and military guests responded to the toasts. 

The West Peabody Brass Band, Ward Post 90, G. A. 
R. and ex-members of Company K, were found waiting 
at the depot by the members of Company K of Danvers, 
when they stepped from the train. Line was immediately 
formed and through a lane of red fire and cheering citi- 
zens, the company marched to the armory, partook of a 
lunch and then separated for their homes. 

On April 11 the town officially received her sons back 
from the Spanish war with a parade, reception and ban- 
quet. The parade formed in the following order: Chief 
Marshal F. TJ. French and staff ; cavalcade of citizens ; 
West Peabody Brass Band; Ward Post 90, G. A. R. ; 
carriages containing the selectmen and guests; Company 
K, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V. ; ex-members 
of Company K and citizens ; school children. 

After the parade a reception was in progress at the 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry M 

Town Hall for two hours, after which the line was re- 
formed and the party proceeded to the armory, where a 
fine banquet was served, followed by speeches from prom- 
inent townspeople and guests, M. C. Pettengill acting as 
presiding officer. 

Mayor Eaton went to Boston, met the members of Com- 
pany L, and telephoned word back to Lawrence that the 
company was coming home. The fire alarm was immedi- 
ately blown and as at the other places, the company was 
met by a big crowd at the depot, and a procession to escort 
it to its armory. Battery C, M. V. M. fired a salute as 
the train rolled into the station. The parade formed in 
the following order: Colonel Donovan, chief marshal; 
band ; Battery C, M. V. M. ; Company F, Kinth Infantry, 
M. V. M. ; Colonel Sargeant camp, Sons of Veterans; 
band ; Needham Post 39, G. A. R. ; drum corps ; seven fire 
companies; Gratton Guards ; citizens committee; Company 
L, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, IT. S. V. ; city govern- 
ment and citizens in carriages. The parade marched 
directly to the armory, where the volunteers were dis- 
missed. 

Through a misunderstanding on the part of somebody, 
there was no one to welcome home the members of Com- 
pany M, at Somerville, and when they arrived at the 
armory they found the place locked and deserted. Fi- 
nally the police were secured and the doors forced open 
and the command marched inside. After giving three 
cheers for the city and the company, the men were dis- 
missed. 

Somerville citizens more than made up for the lack of 
■ cordiality on the night of the return home, by the enthusi- 
astic reception they gave the company and other Somer- 
ville volunteers at the official welcome home which took 



168 Twelve Months with the 



place on April 19, The principal part of the day's 
programme was a big parade, which moved through the 
principal streets, packed with cheering people, in the fol- 
lowing order: Chief Marshal, F. DeWitt Lapham and 
staff; platoon of 20 members of the National Lancers, M. 
V. M. ; First Regiment Band ; company of letter carriers ; 
Bunker Hill Cadet Band; Bunker Hill Guards, Division 
37, A. O. EL; Davitt Guards, Division 40, A. O. H. ; 
Knights of Sacred Heart Drum Corps ; Knights of Sacred 
Heart; Somerville Veteran Firemen's Association; T. F. 
Meagher Drum Corps; W. C. Kingsley Post 139, G. A. 
R. ; Company M, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. 
V. ; unattached soldiers and sailors ; carriages containing 
city officials and guests. 

Following the parade, the company and invited guests 
were given lieht refreshments at Bow Street hall, after 
which many speeches were made, Alderman Wilson acting 
as presiding officer. 

In the evening, at 6 o'clock, the company was banquettcd 
in Beacon hall, where plates were spread for a large gath- 
ering. After the banquet had been enjoyed, Alderman 
Wilson, who again acted as chairman, rapped for order 
and speeches followed by prominent city officials and 
guests. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 169 



The Roll of Honor 




N every war the percentage of deaths from dis- 
ease is greater than of deaths on the battle- 
field, and the Spanish war was no exception. 
Of the hundreds of Massachusetts young men 
who volunteered and answered the call of President 
McKinley for troops, 292 were called upon to sacrifice 
their lives for their country. 

Of this number, but nine were killed or died of wounds 
on the battlefield, the remaining 283 dying of disease or 
meeting death in an accidental manner. 

The First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery lost one man 
during its term of service; the Second Massachusetts In- 
fantry had nine killed or died of wounds received in 
battle and 89 died of disease ; the Fifth Massachusetts 
Infantry lost nine men during its term of service; the 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry lost 26 men during its term 
of service; the Eighth Massachusetts Infantry lost 31 men, 
and the Ninth Massachusetts Infantry 125 men. The Na- 
val Brigade, during its term of service, lost two men, 
making the total number of men who were killed, died of 
wounds or disease, 292. 

Of this number, as the foregoing list will show, the 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry contributed the lives of 
one officer and 30 enlisted men, to which might be added 
the name of Private Charles A. Currier of Company B, 
who died soon after being transferred to the Hospital 
Corps, U. S. A. 

The great majority of these men died in the hospitals 
in the south, far from home and friends. They gave up 
their lives willingly to their country's cause, and who is 



172 Twelve Months with the 

there to say that theirs was not as much a hero's death as 
that of the men who fell while bravely charging through 
the Cuban jungles or up the steep slope of San Juan Hill. 

The roll of honor of the Eighth is as follows: 

May 28, 1898. — Private Herbert O. Burnham of Com- 
pany D of Lynn, of pneumonia, at regimental hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

May 29 — Private Clarence L. Bartol of Company C 
of Marblehead, of heart disease, at regimental hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

June 11 — Corporal Clarence R. Stewart of Company 
M of Somerville, of pneumonia, at regimental hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

June 13 — Private Timothy O. Lamprey of Company B 
of Amesbury, of appendicitis, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

July 18 — Private Harvey Dunn of Company L of Law- 
rence, of typhoid fever, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

August 2 — Private Frank A. Hinckley of Company I 
of Lynn, of typhoid fever, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

August 4 — Corporal John M. Dor an of Company G of 
Gloucester, of typhoid fever, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

August 7 — Private Walter D. Thompson of Company I 
of Lynn, of malarial fever, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 173 

August 19— Musician Spencer S. Hobbs of Company K 
of Danvers, of typhoid fever, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

August 26 — Private Joseph Pocket of Company I of 
Lynn, of typhoid fever, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

September 2— Sergeant Frank E. Draper of Company 
M of Somerville, of typhoid fever, at Third Division Hos- 
pital, Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

September 3 — Private Kenneth G. Constine of Com- 
pany B of Amesbury, of typhoid fever, at Third Division 
Hospital, Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

September 6— Private John F. Dottridge of Company 
D of Lynn, of typhoid fever, at John Blair Gibbs General 
Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

September 6 — Sergeant Fred Thomas of Company F 
of Haverhill, of typhoid fever, at Sternberg General Hos- 
pital, Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

September 6 — Corporal George Patten of Company B 
of Amesbury, of typhoid fever, while on furlough at 
Amesbury, Massachusetts. 

September 7 — Sergeant John F. Balch of Company A 
of Newburyport, of typhoid fever, at Third Division Hos- 
pital, Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 

September 13 — Private Henry A. Deasy of Company 
H of Salem, of typhoid fever, while on furlough at Kings- 
ton, New Hampshire. 

September 15 — Private Michael J. Hayes of Company 
I of Lynn, of dysentery, at Third Division Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia. 



174 Twelve Months with the 

September 17 — Corporal John H. Nichols of Company 
H of Salem, of typhoid fever, at John Blair Gibbs General 
Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

September 18 — Private Rolvin G. Coombs of Company 
B of Amesbury, of typhoid fever, at John Blair Gibbs 
General Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

September 19 — Private George F. Walen of Company G 
of Gloucester, of typhoid fever, at John Blair Gibbs Gen- 
eral Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

September 22 — Private John F. Hanson of Company 
L of Lawrence, of typhoid fever, at John Blair Gibbs 
General Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

September 22 — Private George O. Cook of Company D 
of Lynn, while on furlough at Dorchester, Massachusetts. 

September 24 — Corporal Henry Higgins of Company 
B of Amesbury, of typhoid fever, at John Blair Gibbs 
General Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

September 30 — Private William B. Cahoon of Com- 
pany G of Gloucester, of peritonitis, at John Blair Gibbs 
General Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

October 8 — Private William H. Florence of Company 
C of Marblehead, of bright's disease, at John Blair Gibbs 
General Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

October 10 — Private William D. Curley of Company G 
of Gloucester, of typhoid fever, at John Blair Gibbs Gen- 
eral Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

October 20 — Private Thomas Sweeney of Company B 
of Amesbury, of malarial fever, at John Blair Gibbs Gen- 
eral Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 175 

October 24 — First Lieutenant Francis H. Downey of 
Company I of Lynn, of pneumonia and fever, at St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky. 

March 3, 1899. — Private Lewis F. Channell of Com- 
pany F of Haverhill, of typhoid fever, on board the U. S. 
Hospital Ship "Missouri," off Cuba. 

March 15 — Private Charles W. Benson of Company C 
of Marblehead, of malarial fever, on board U. S. Hospital 
Ship "Missouri," off Cuba. 



August 9 — Private Charles A. Currier, U. S. Hospital 
Corps, formerly member of Company B of Amesbury, of 
exhaustion following typhoid fever, on board U. S. Hos- 
pital Ship "Relief" off Ponce, Porto Rico. 



Some Statistics 




URING the year of service in the volunteers 
1465 names were borne upon the rolls of the 
Eighth Massachusetts Regiment. This does 
not necessarily mean that 1465 different men 
were connected with the regiment, for that was not so, for 
some of the men's names appear upon the rolls twice, such 
as when an enlisted man was promoted to be an officer, or 
when an officer was transferred from one company to an- 
other, or an enlisted man transferred from a company to 
the regimental band. 

The following figures will no doubt be of interest to 
the men who served in the regiment. 

Of the officers of the regiment 46 were mustered out 
with the regiment, 12 resigned and were discharged, one 
died, one was discharged by reason of promotion outside 
the regiment, and four were discharged for promotion in 
the regiment. 

Of the enlisted men, 1161 were mustered out, 53 were 
discharged for disability, 5 were discharged because they 
were minors, 2 were discharged (no reason given), 51 
were discharged by order, (the majority for physical un- 
fitness), 11 were discharged for promotion; 6 were dis- 
honorably discharged ; 71 were discharged by reason of 
transfer, 30 died, and 11 deserted. 

The record by companies is as follows : 



Field and staff — Ten mustered out and three resigned. 
Total 13. 



180 Twelve Months with the 

^on-Commissioned staff — Nine mustered out with the 
regiment and three were discharged by order. Total 12. 

Band — Twenty were mustered out with the regiment. 
Total 20. 

Company A, Newburyport — Three officers and 96 men 
were mustered out with the regiment, one man was dis- 
charged for disability ; one man was discharged by reason 
of being a minor ; two men were discharged by order ; one 
man was dishonorably discharged; five men were trans- 
ferred; one man died and two men deserted. Total 112. 

Company B, Amesbury — Three officers and 96 men 
were mustered out with the regiment ; one officer was dis- 
charged for promotion; ten men were discharged for dis- 
ability; three men were discharged by order; eight men 
were transferred and six men died. Total 127. 

Company C, Marblehead — Three officers and 97 men 
were mustered out with the regiment; two officers re- 
signed; seven men were discharged for disability; one 
man was discharged by order ; two men were transferred ; 
three men died and two men deserted. Total 117. 

Company D, Lynn — Three officers and 94 men were 
mustered out with the regiment; one officer was dis- 
charged for promotion; three men were discharged for 
disability; three men were discharged by order; two men 
were dishonorably discharged; ten men were transferred; 
three died and two deserted. Total 121. 

Company E, Beverly — Three officers and 96 men were 
mustered out with the regiment; one officer and one en- 
listed man were discharged for promotion; one man was 
discharged ; two men were discharged for disability ; two 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 181 

men were discharged by order ; one man was dishonorably 
discharged and eight men were transferred. Total 115. 

Company F, Haverhill — Three officers and 96 men 
were mustered out with the regiment ; one officer and two 
enlisted men were discharged for promotion; four men 
were discharged for disability ; five men were transferred 
and two died. Total 113. 

Company G, Gloucester — Three officers and 92 men 
were mustered out with the regiment; one officer re- 
signed ; four men were discharged for disability ; one was 
discharged by reason of being a minor ; ten men were dis- 
charged by order ; one man was discharged for promotion ; 
one man was dishonorably discharged; four men were 
transferred and four died. Total 121. 

Company H, Salem — Three officers and 91 men were 
mustered out with the regiment ; two officers resigned ; one 
officer was discharged for promotion outside the regiment ; 
six men were discharged for disability ; ten men were dis- 
charged by order; two men were discharged for promo- 
tion ; six men were transferred and two died. Total 123. 

Company I, Lynn — Three officers and 94 men were 
mustered out with the regiment; one officer died; one 
man was discharged for disability; one man was dis- 
charged ; five men were discharged by order ; two men were 
discharged for promotion; four men were transferred; 
four died and two deserted. Total 117. 

Company K, Danvers — Three officers and 93 men were 
mustered out with the regiment ; two officers resigned ; 
five men were discharged for disability ; six men were dis- 
charged by order ; one man was discharged for promotion ; 



182 Twelve Months with the 



one man was dishonorably discharged; four men were 
transferred, one died and one deserted. Total 117. 

Company L, Lawrence — Three officers and 98 men were 
mustered out with the regiment; two officers resigned; 
two men were discharged for disability ; two men were dis- 
charged by reason of being minors ; one man was dis- 
charged by order ; one man was discharged for promotion ; 
five men were transferred, two died and one deserted. 
Total 117. 

Company M, Somerville — Three officers and 89 men 
were mustered out with the regiment ; eight men were dis- 
charged for disability; one man was discharged by reason 
of being a minor ; five men were discharged by order ; one 
man was discharged by promotion ; ten men were trans- 
ferred; two died and one deserted. Total 120. 

By the foregoing it will be seen that Company B of 
Amesbury had the largest number of entries upon its rolls 
during the year, 127, while Company F of Haverhill had 
the smallest, 113. Company E of Beverly was the only 
company which did not have a death among its members 
during the term of service. 

There were ten states and eighty-nine cities and towns 
represented in the regiment, according to the residences 
as given upon the muster out roll on file at the Adjutant- 
General's office, at the State House. 

The ten states were Massachusetts, Maine, New Hamp- 
shire, Vermont, Rhode Island, New York, Ohio, Minneso- 
ta, Pennsylvania and Georgia. 

The cities and towns represented, and the number of 
men furnished the regiment by each, are as follows: 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 183 



Lynn 214; Salem 16S; Haverhill 145; Lawrence 114; 
Newburyport 101 ; Somerville 99 ; Amesbury 96 ; Glouces- 
ter 95; Marblehead T4; Beverly 72, and Danvers 45. 
These eleven places represent the home stations of the 
companies comprising the regiment; Lynn, of course, fur- 
nishing two companies to the command. 

The other places represented in the regiment were as 
follows : Peabody 19 ; Boston 20 ; Lowell 19 ; Cambridge 
15; Marlboro 14; Swampscott 6; Topsfield 8; Merrimac 
2 ; Middleton 4 ; Ipswich 6 ; Hamilton 3 ; Manchester 2 ; 
Essex 3 ; North Andover 5 ; Andover 3 ; Saugus 2 ; Rock- 
port 8 ; Melrose 2 ; Worcester 3 ; Milford 4 ; Wakefield 3 ; 
South Framingham 5 ; Greenwood 2 ; Fitchburg 5 ; Web- 
ster 2 ; Southbridge 5 ; Dorchester 7 ; Charlestown 6 ; 
Waltham 2; Chelsea 2; North Cambridge 2; West Som- 
erville 2 ; Allston 3 ; South Lawrence 2 ; Medford 2 ; 
Americus, Georgia, 2 ; and South Boston ; Everett ; Quin- 
cy ; Wellesley Hills ; East Boston ; Pawtucket, R. I. ; West 
Chelmsford ; Cambridgeport ; Freedom, N. H. ; Washing- 
ton Court House, Ohio; Concord; Cambridge, Vermont; 
Lewiston, Penn. ; Middleboro ; Portland, Me. ; Chatfield, 
Minn. ; Revere ; Seabrook, 1ST. H. ; Stoneham ; Pittsfield ; 
Newton ; Staten Island, New York ; Hingham ; Winches- 
ter ; Cleveland, Ohio ; Milton ; Keene, N. H. ; Stowe ; Rox- 
bury ; Madrid, N. IL, ; South Hampton, N. H. ; Saco, 
Me. ; Reading ; Hyde Park ; Kingston, N. H. ; Brockton ; 
Dedham; Roslindale; Cliftondale; Wenham; Boxford 
and Salisbury, one each. 

Of the original men who went to South Framingham 
with the regiment, the greater number were single, the 
muster rolls showing a large percentage of single men. 
The companies were then allowed 77 men, and the figures 
are as follows: 



184 


Twelve Months with the 




Married. 


Single. 


Total. 


Company A, Newburyport, 


. 12 


65 


77 


Company B, Amesbury, 


. 16 


61 


77 


Company C, Marblehead, . 


. 15 


62 


77 


Company D, Lynn, . . . 


. 15 


62 


77 


Company E, Beverly, . . 


9 


68 


77 


Company F, Haverhill, 


. 20 


57 


77 


Company G, Gloucester, 


. 13 


64 


77 


Company H, Salem, . 


. 14 


63 


77 


Company I, Lynn, . . . 


. 12 


65 


77 


Company K, Danvers, . 


5 


72 


77 


Company L, Lawrence, . 


. 17 


60 


77 


Company M, Somerville, . 


. 13 


64 


77 


Field and Staff and N". C. O. 








Staff, 


10 


9 


19 


Totals, 


170 


773 


943 



On the following pages will be found a complete roster 
of the regiment, containing the name of every man who 
served in the regiment during its year of service. 

The record of each man is a copy of that contained in 
the muster out roll, now on file at the Adjutant General's 
office, State House, Boston, Mass. 

The greatest possible care has been taken to avoid 
errors, and in only one case was a change made in a man's 
record. Upon the muster out roll the man was charged 
with being a deserter and also with having been dis- 
charged honorably. After consulation with the company 
commander, it was decided that the man should be given 
the benefit of an honorable discharge, especially as he was 
not classified as a deserter in the summary at the end of 
the company roll. 

It will be noticed that two men, both of whom were 
former members of the First Massachusetts Heavy Artil- 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 185 



lery are credited as enlisting from Americus, Georgia. 
This is so stated upon the muster out roll, and consequent- 
ly is so printed. They were probably mustered into the 
regiment in the Georgia town, hence the reason for being 
credited to it. In a few cases the date of transfer of a 
man from a company to the band does not agree, one date 
being recorded on the band roll and another on the com- 
pany' roll. This is sometimes true as to his place of resi- 
dence, but the muster out rolls were followed in these 
cases. 

The full record of the men transferred to the Reserve 
Ambulance company, U. S. A., or the Hospital Corps, U. 
S. A., has been added to the record. Their record on the 
muster out roll ends with the day of their transfer from 
the regiment, but it was thought best to publish their full 
service record, which was secured from the War Depart- 
ment, through the courtesy of Hon. A. P. Gardner, rep- 
resentative in Congress from the Sixth Massachusetts 
district. 



Field and Staff 



Pew, William A. Jr., Salem, Colonel, April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Assigned to command Second Brigade, Third 
Division, First Army Corps, May 20 to June 29. 
Commander of Second Brigade, First Army Corps, 
October 28 to October 31, also from November 1 to 
November 3, and December 17 to December 24. 

Bailey, Edwin W. M., Amesbury, Lieutenant-Colonel, 
April 28, 1898, resigned October 28, 1898. 

In command of the regiment from May 19 to June 
29. 

Stopford, William, Beverly, Major, April 28, 1898; 
Lieutenant-Colonel, October 31, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

On recruiting service June 11 to June 20. Com- 
manded regiment by reason of seniority, October 24 ; 
October 29 to November 4; November 8, 17, 18, 27, 
28; December 18 to 25, 1898; January 31, February 
1, 22, 25, 26; March 23 to 25, 1899. 

Graves, Frank A., Marblehead, Major, April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Special duty on General Court Martial, October 
26 to November 23 and on detached service, General 
Court Martial, November 23 to December 21. 



190 Twelve Months with the 

Eldredge, Edward H., Boston, Major, April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Special duty as Inspector Rifle Practice, Third 
Division, First Army Corps, June 30 to July 24. 
Inspector Rifle Practice, Second Brigade, Third Di- 
vision, First Army Corps, December 13 until depar- 
ture for Cuba. Inspector Rifle Practice, District of 
Matanzas, January 12, 1899. Special duty as Pro- 
vost Marshal, District of Matanzas, February 27 to 
April 3. 

Cogswell, William, Boston, Surgeon, April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Special duty with Ambulance Corps, First Army 
Corps, June 20 to July 9. Special duty as Brigade 
Surgeon, September 22 to December 16. Division In- 
spector at Lexington, Kentucky, September 27 to 
November 6. 

Barroll, Thomas D., Boston, Adjutant, April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Special duty as Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gener- 
al, Second Brigade, Third Division, First Army 
Corps, May 20 to June 19. 

Wonson, Charles F., Gloucester, Quartermaster, April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Special duty as Acting Commissary Subsistence, 
and Acting Assistant Quartermaster, Second Bri- 
gade, Third Division, First Army Corps, May 20 
to July 7. Acting Assistant Quartermaster, Second 
Brigade hospital, November 7 to December 17, 1898. 
Special duty as Depot Quartermaster at Americus, 
Georgia, December 25 to January 8, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 191 



Logan, Frank P. T., Gloucester, Assistant Surgeon, 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Special duty at Division Hospital, Third Division, 
First Army Corps, June 10 to December 20. 

Frost, Horace B., Boston, Assistant Surgeon, August 26, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Acting Regimental Surgeon September 22 to De- 
cember 16, 1898. Special duty as Assistant Inspector 
of Sanitary Conditions, District of Matanzas, Janu- 
ary 30 to April 3, 1899. 

Jenkins, Thomas L., Topsfield, Assistant Surgeon, April 
28, 1898; resigned July 11, 1898. 

Sanders, George D., Gloucester, Chaplain, April 28, 
1898; resigned October 7, 1898; re-commissioned 
Chaplain, January 6, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Special duty as chairman of the Commission of 
Charities and Corrections, District of Matanzas, Jan- 
uary 28, 1899, until muster out. 



N on- Commissioned Staff 



Sanborn, John R., Haverhill, Sergeant-Major, February 
1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Com- 
pany F.) 

Dodge, Julian M., Hamilton, Sergeant-Major, April 28, 
1898 ; discharged by order, January 5, 1899. 

Perkins, Charles F., Salem, Quartermaster-Sergeant, 
April 28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Spaulding, Charles L., Beverly, Hospital Steward, 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Burnham, E. Bennett, Essex, Hospital Steward, April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wood, George A., Lynn, Hospital Steward, April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Thomas, Walter H., Haverhill, Chief Musician, April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Stiles, Harry E., Lynn, enlisted private, January 4, 
1899, as per authority Secretary of War, in letter of 
October 11, 1898; appointed Principal Musician, 
January 19, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Banan, Frederick, Lawrence, Principal Musician, April 
28, 1898 ; discharged by order January 14, 1899. 

Clohecy, Patrick, Haverhill, Principal Musician, April 
28, 1898; discharged by order December 4, 1898. 



196 Twelve Months with the 



Johnson, Edgar J., Lawrence, Principal Musician, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899 ; mustered out x\pril 28, 1899. (See 
Company D.) 

Berry, William F., Greenwood, Band Sergeant, March 
1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Com- 
pany M.) 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 197 



The Band 



Boucher, Alfred, Haverhill, enlisted Company D, April 
28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 1899 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Brasseur, George D., Haverhill, enlisted Company F, 
April 28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Crowley, Herbert L., North Cambridge, enlisted Com- 
pany M, April 28, 1898; transferred to band March 
20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cummings, John A., West Somerville, enlisted Company 
M, April 28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 
1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dickie, William A., Newburyport, enlisted musician, 
Company A, April 28, 1898; transferred to band 
March 20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Drolet, Charles F., Rockport, enlisted Company G, 
April 28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 
1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Givan, Charles F., Charlestown, enlisted Company M, 
June 20, 1898 ; transferred to band, March 20, 1899 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Goette, Albert H., Cambridgeport, enlisted Company 
M, June 29, 1898; transferred to band March 20, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



200 Twelve Months with the 



Greenlay, Joseph B., Haverhill, enlisted corporal, Com- 
pany F, April 28, 1898; transferred to band March 
20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Heffernan, Patrick J., Haverhill, enlisted musician, 
Company H, April 28, 1898 ; transferred to band, 
March 20, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

James, Charles T., Allston, enlisted Company M, April 
28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 1899; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Larkin, John, West Chelmsford, enlisted Sixth Massa- 
chusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898 ; transferred from 
band Sixth Massachusetts Infantry to Company B, 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, January 1, 1899 ; 
transferred to band from Company B, March 20, 
1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McBarron, James H., Boston, enlisted musician Com- 
pany M, April 28, 1898 ; transferred to band, March 
20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Miner, Herbert W., Haverhill, enlisted musician, Com- 
pany F, April 28, 1898 ; transferred to band, March 
20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mitchell, Charles R., South Lawrence, enlisted Com- 
pany B, April 28, 1898; transferred to band March 
20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mudgett, William L., Haverhill, enlisted musician, 
Company B, April 28, 1898; transferred to band, 
March 20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 201 

Phillips, William K, South Lawrence, enlisted musi- 
cian, Company L, April 28, 1898; transferred to 
band, March 20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sweetseb, Fbedebic J., Haverhill, enlisted Company 
E, April 28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Stickney, Hoeace I., Lynn, enlisted musician, Company 
D, April 28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 
1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Taylob, Edwaed P., Lynn, enlisted Company I, April 
28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 1899; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Company A, Newburyport 



Perkins, Alexander G., Newburyport, Captain, April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Commanded the Second Battalion by reason of 
seniority, October 27 to November 8 and November 
19 to December 22, 1898. 

Langdon, George W., Newburyport, First Lieutenant, 
April 28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Detailed Battalion Adjutant, May 11 to 19 ; Act- 
ing Regimental Adjutant, May 20 to June 19. Bat- 
talion Adjutant, June 20 to 31 ; Regimental 
Inspector Rifle Practice, July 1 to 29 ; Inspector 
Rifle Practice Second Brigade, Third Division, First 
Army Corps, July 30 to August 19 ; Battalion 
Adjutant, September 20 to October 14, Inspector 
Small Arms Practice, First Army Corps, October 
15, 1898 to January 5, 1899. 

Dow, George H., Newbury port, Second Lieutenant, April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out, April 28, 1899. 

Commanded the company by reason of seniority 
October 12 to 21 and October 29 to November 8. 
Provost Marshal, Americus, Georgia, November 12, 
1898 to January 8, 1899. 

Miller, Edward, Newburyport, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; First Sergeant September 1, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Gould, Harlan W., Newburyport, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant, enlisted April 28, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 



206 Twelve Months with the 



Roberts, William H., Newburyport, First Sergeant, en- 
listed April 28, 1898; mustered out as Sergeant 
April 28, 1899. 

Howard, Charles W., Newburyport, Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Connell, John, Newburyport, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kelley, John J., Newburyport, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Sergeant September 20, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Fields, Benjamin, Newburyport, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Flagg, Joseph G., Newbury port, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hay, Frederick J., Newburyport, Corporal, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Jackman, Fred C, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

O'Beirne, Edward Jr., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; Corporal August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

McGlew, Hugh, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, September 20, 1898; mustered out April 
28 ? 1899, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 207 

Monyihan, Cornelius P., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

O'Connor, Patrick J., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Corporal, November 23, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Williams, George F., Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 
1898; Corporal, November 23, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Davis, John F., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, November 23, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Erickson, John O., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 17, 1899; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Hall, William E., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal (cook), February 17, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Kilborn, John A., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal, March 12, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Danforth, Edward C, Newburyport, Musician, enlisted 
April 28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Preble, Charles E., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Musician, March '20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



208 Twelve Months with the 



Burns, Jeremiah, Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898 ; 
Wagoner, September 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Horgan, John J., Newburyport, Artificer, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Argyle, John H., Newbury port, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bunker, Willard F., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Barry, George F., Newburyport, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; discharged by order February 15, 1899. 

Barrett, Joseph J., Newburyport, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; discharged by order February 17, 1899. 

Boardman, Charles A., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Balch, John P., Newburyport, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; died at Third Division Hospital, Chicka- 
mauga Park, Georgia, September 7, 1898. 

Brainard, Charles H., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brady, William H., Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Buckler, Frank J., Newburyport, enlisted July 1, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Buckley, Matthew F., Newburyport, enlisted June 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 209 



Burns, Andrew J., Newburyport, enlisted June 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Chisnall, Joseph E., Newburyport, enlisted April 28 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Curtis, Philip E., Newbury port, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cilley, James T., ISTewburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Coburn, Albert T., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cook, John E. H., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carolan, Charles, ISTewburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Clarke, Robert E., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carver, Verner A., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dickie, William A., Newburyport, Musician, enlisted 
April 28, 1898 ; transferred to band March 20, 1899. 

Donahue, Daniel F., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; transferred to Reserve Ambulance Company, 
U. S. A., June 29, 1898; discharged, April 12, 
1899. 

Dineen, John J., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



210 Twelve Months with the 



England, Albert G., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
dishonorably discharged February 25, 1899. 

Eastman, F. Leonard, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
transferred to Reserve Ambulance Company, U. S. 
A., June 29, 1898 ; discharged January 13, 1899. 

Follensbee, Arthur D., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; deserted October 4, 1898. 

Fowler, Andrew J., Seabrook, N. 11., enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Greenaway, William F., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Goodwin, Harry L., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order March 17, 1899; order 
revoked, April 22, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Gray, Harven J., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 
1898 ; discharged May 12, 1899. 

Hall, Oscar F., Haverhill, enlisted July 5, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 1898 ; 
discharged January 6, 1899. 

Hill, Walter, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hazlewood, Fred, Newbury port, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Healey, Frank J., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 211 



Hennessey, Ernest W., Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Heaney, Michael F., Newbury port, enlisted June 21, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hopkinson, Edgar G., ISTewburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hopkinson, George H., Newbury port, enlisted July 1, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hosman, Charles, ISTewburyport, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Janvrin, Joshua, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Janvrin, John, Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Joy, Walter, Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Kelso, George H., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Looney, George J., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lambert, Otis, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McFadden, Owen J., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



212 Twelve Months with the 



McDonald, Peter L., Newbury port, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Metcalf, Chester A., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McShane, James B., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McGullough, Robert R., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Murphy, John J., Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Moriarty, Jeremiah, Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McMahon, William W., Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McCarthy, Richard F., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Morrill, L. Edward, Newbury port, enlisted June 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Norton, John E., Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Connor, John S., Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Connell, Jeffrey J., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 213 



Oliver, William H., Newburyport, enlisted June 28 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Pickard, George A., Newburyport, enlisted April 28 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Poore, Edwin H., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
discharged as a minor, June 30, 1898. 

Pearson, Alfred Jr., Newburyport, enlisted June 21 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Powers, Fred W., ISTewburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Patterson, Frank C, Newburyport, enlisted April 28 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Robinson, John, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Shea, Charles, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sargent, Donn D., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sargent, John C, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, William F., ISTewburyport, enlisted April 28 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Spear, Thomas W., Newburyport, enlisted April 28 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



214 Twelve Months with the 



Sheehan, Bartholomew, Newburyport, enlisted April 28 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Steen, Edward W. P., Newburyport, enlisted April 28 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Shields, John J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; de 
serted September 16, 1898. 

Spofford, Amos L., Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sanders, Joseph E., Newburyport, enlisted June 21 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sullivan, John L., Newburyport, enlisted June 22, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Twomey, Hugh, Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Tobin, James E., Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Tobey, Herbert A., JSTewburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Tobey, Edward E., Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Terry, John, Newburyport, enlisted June 21, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Tyman, John L., Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 215 



Upton, John M., Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Watts, David, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Watts, Charles, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, January 4, 1899. 

White, George, Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wall, William B., Newburyport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Company B> Ames bury 



Bean, Horace S., Amesbury, Captain, April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Commanded First Battalion by reason of seniori- 
ty, June 10 to July 21; December 20, 1898 to Janu- 
ary 19, 1899. Detached service, distributing rations, 
Matanzas, Cuba, January 19 to April 3, 1899. 

Pettingell, John M., Amesbury, First Lieutenant, April 
28, 1898 ; commanding Company, June 10 to July 
20; discharged for promotion, January 17, 1899. 
(See Company C.) 

Assigned as Commanding Officer, Company C, 
December 21, 1898. 

Stinson, Frank, Amesbury, Second Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; First Lieutenant, January 4, 1899; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Acting Regimental Adjutant, October 1 to 22. De- 
tached service as Aid-de-camp to General Waites, 
October 26 to November 4. Regimental commissary, 
November 4, 1898 to April 28, 1899. 

Jackman, James W., Topsfield, Second Lieutenant, Janu- 
ary 21, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See 
Company K.) 

Higgins, Michael S., Amesbury, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Manahan, Ezra F., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, December 26, 1898; Sergeant, February 
17, 1899 ; Quartermaster-Sergeant, February 17, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



220 Twelve Months with the 



Sweet, Frank M., Amesbury, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Melia, John J., Amesbury, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Granigan, John S., Amesbury, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Parker, Martin H., Amesbury, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Walsh, Nicholas L., Amesbury, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Burke, James R., Amesbury, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Moisan, Joseph E., Amesbury, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ware, Samuel E., Amesbury, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Farrell, John J., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Moisan, Eugene J., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Peterson, Fred G., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 221 



Sanders, Arthur L., Salem, enlisted July 8, 1898; Cor- 
poral, December 26, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Boardman, Fred B., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 17, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
28, 1899. 

Fowden, Arthur, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal February 17, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Locke, Manford E., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 17, 1899; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Cyr, Louis, Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898; Corporal 
(cook), February 17, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Taylor, William J., Merrimac, Musician, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gage, Henry W., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Musician, March 22, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Lundquist, John A., Amesbury, Artificer, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hibbs, Frank F., Amesbury, Wagoner, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ariel, Edward H., Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



222 Twelve Months with the 



Bailey, Warren A., Merrimac, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Baker, Martin H., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bean, Oscar W., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability January 4, 1899. 

Blaisdell, Harry, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, January 11, 1899. 

Bolan, Michael J., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bonnar, William H., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bourbeau, Oliver J., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bragdon, Edward L., South Framingham, enlisted Com- 
pany E, Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; 
transferred to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts In- 
fantry, December 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Brooks, John C, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Burns, John, Wakefield, enlisted Company H, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 27, 1898; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Jan- 
uary 11, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 223 



Campbell, William, Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Chartier, Frank X., Marlboro, enlisted Company F, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, June 15, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Clisbee, Walter A., Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; Corporal, 
July 11, 1898; transferred to Company B, Eighth 
Massachusetts Infantry, January 11, 1899 ; mus- 
tered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Cole, Joseph, Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Collis, Charles M., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Currier, Charles A., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
transferred to Reserve Ambulance Company, U. S. 
A., July 3, 1898; died on Hospital Ship "Relief," 
August 9, 1898. 

Constine, Kenneth G., Madrid, ~N. H., enlisted May 5, 
1898; died at Third Division Hospital, Chickamau- 
ga Park, Georgia, September 3, 1898. 

Copeland, Edward, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cook, Michael J., Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



224 Twelve Months with the 



Coombs, Rolvin G., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
died John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, Lexington, 
Kentucky, September 18, 1898. 

Cowen, John E., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Craig, Robert A., Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Crean, James, Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Davidson, William, Lowell, enlisted Company C, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred to 
Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Decem- 
ber 16, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Denoyelle, Joseph P. A., Amesbury, enlisted June 21 
1898 ; discharged for disability, November 10, 1898 

Donovan, William, Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898 
discharged for disability, January 4, 1899. 

Donoghue, John J., Lawrence, enlisted May 5, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dooling, Timothy, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Downer, Michael F., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dufault, Noel, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 225 



Eaton, Oscar R., South Hampton, N. H., enlisted June 
21, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

England, Walter H., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, November 3, 1898. 

Emerson, George B., Peabody, enlisted June 30, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Feltham, Albert, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
transferred to Reserve Ambulance Company, U. S. 
A., July 3, 1898; discharged March 13, 1899. 

Ferris, Samuel J., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Flanders, Frank W., Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Flanders, Carl L., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Foley, Michael H., South Framingham, enlisted Company 
E, Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, June 16, 1898; 
transferred to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts In- 
fantry, December 30, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Gelley, William H., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gilmore, Walter A., Milford, enlisted Company M, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 17, 1898; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Jan- 
uary 6, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



226 Twelve Months with the 



Gowen, George L., Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gowen, Harry W., Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Green, John F., Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 15, 1898; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 18, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Green, Stephen H., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hanson, Edward, Lowell, enlisted Company M, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 30, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Heenan, William, Jr., Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hessian, James, Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hinckley, Samuel A., Amesbury, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; discharged by order, December 11, 1898. 

Higgins, Henry, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral August 1, 1898; died John Blair Gibbs Gen- 
eral Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky, September 24, 
1898. 

Higgins, Thomas P., Amesbury, Quartermaster-Sergeant, 
enlisted April 28, 1898; discharged for disability, 
January 11, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 227 

Hughes, Edward, Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hunt, G. Raymond, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Knight, George, Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lane, John W., Beverly, enlisted May 5, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Lamprey, Timothy O., Salisbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
died at Third Division Hospital, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, June 13, 1898. 

Larduer, Robert E., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; discharged for disability, 
January 10, 1899. 

Larkin, John, Lowell, enlisted Sixth Massachusetts In- 
fantry, June 22, 1898; transferred from band Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry to Company B, Eighth Mass- 
achusetts Infantry, January 1, 1899 ; transferred to 
regimental band, March 22, 1899. 

Lefebore, Edmond, Salem, enlisted June 24, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Marth, William H., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Malenfant, Ludger, Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



228 Twelve Months with the 



McCarthy, John, Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

McCarthy, Daniel, Peabody, enlisted June 30, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McCutcheon, James E., Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McKay, John, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McMeniman Patrick, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Millerick, James H., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., October 22, 
1898; deserted, January 17, 1899. 

Mudgett, William L., Haverhill, Musician, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; transferred to band March 22, 1899. 

Mitchell, Charles R, Lawrence, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
transferred to band March 22, 1899. 

Murray, Adolph E., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Murray, Louis E., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Murphy, James, Peabody, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Brien, Maurice F., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 229 

O'Bryan, Stephen, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Oulette, John, Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Page, Frank L., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Parker, Charles W., Reading, enlisted Company A, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Jan- 
uary 2, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Porter, Samuel L., Amesbury, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; discharged by order February 17, 1899. 

Pierce, Wallace A., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., October 22, 
1898; discharged May 3, 1899. 

Patten, George, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; died at Amesbury, Mass., 
while on sick furlough, September 6, 1898. 

Pickering, Leon Q., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Quimby, Arthur, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ramsdell, Peter F., Salem, enlisted July 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Richardson, Lenord J., Salem, enlisted July 2, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



230 Twelve Months with the 



Roche, George F., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Scanlon, Jerry, Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Stiles, George M., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, January 11, 1899. 

Stickles, James P., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., October 22, 
1898; discharged, November 27, 1899. 

Scott, John J., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, January 11, 1899. 

Sweet, Hayden E., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, February 21, 1899. 

Stowe, Arthur W., Cambridge, enlisted Company E, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, June 20, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 13, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Sweeney, Thomas P., Salem, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
died at John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, October 20, 1898. 

Tarbell, Harry A., Fitchburg, enlisted Company B, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 16, 1898; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Jan- 
uary 2, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Teed, Arthur M., Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 231 

Tuxbury, George E., Amesbury, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Vincent, Joseph, Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Willey, Howard A., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order January 14, 1899. 

Wilson, Arthur J. H., Amesbury, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wilson, George L., Eoxbury, enlisted Company H, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Walsh, Patrick D., Amesbury, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Woodward, John, Amesbury, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Company C, Marblehead 



Pettingell, James M., Amesbury, Captain, January 18, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Company 
B.) 

Denning, Frank B., Marblehead, Second Lieutenant, 
April 28, 1898; Captain, May 11, 1898; resigned 
December 9, 1898. 

Smith, Frederic P., Dedham, Second Lieutenant, May 10, 
1898; First Lieutenant, January 11, 1899; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Detached service as aid-de-camp Second Brigade, 
Third Division, First Army Corps, May 27 to June 
10. Commanding Company I, October 2 to 5. 
Commanding Company C, by reason of seniority, 
October 6 to December 20. Battalion Adjutant De- 
cember 20, 1898 to April 28, 1899. 

Wardwell, Linville H., Beverly, Sergeant Major, April 
28, 1898; First Lieutenant, May 11, 1898; resigned 
December 13, 1898. 

Battalion Adjutant May 11 to November 4. Aid- 
de-camp Second Brigade, Third Division, First 
Army Corps, November 5 to 21. 

Whelpley, Edgar J., Salem, Second Lieutenant, January 
22, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See 
Company H.) 

Pierce, Cornelius, Marblehead, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



236 Twelve Months with the 



Mahoney, John W., Marblehead, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Quartermaster-Sergeant, December 25, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lent, Jesse G., Marblehead, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Osgood, Fred H., Marblehead, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sandwich, James T., Marblehead, Corporal, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; Sergeant July 12, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Imperial, Albert F., Marblehead, Corporal, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; Sergeant, March 1, 1899; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

O'Brien, Daniel J., Salem, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Doe, Charles F., Marblehead, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Robbins, Frederick L., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal July 15, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Mitchell, Benjamin, Lynn, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Kelley, John W., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 237 



Ryan, Thomas P., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Peach, Harry S., Marblehead, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out 
as Corporal, April 28, 1899. 

Bartol, Arthur W., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal October 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Taylor, William A., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Corporal, March 1, 1899; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Smith, Frank M., Marblehead, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Reddy, John A., Amesbury, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
Corporal, March 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

January, Samuel M., Lynn, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
Corporal March 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Campbell, James N\, Haverhill, Musician, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Spurr, George G. Jr., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Artificer, November 20, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

McDonald, Stephen, Marblehead, Wagoner, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



238 Twelve Months with the 



Bagley, Thomas W. F., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; 
discharged for disability, October 4, 1898. 

Ballard, Harry C, Marblehead, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ballard, Waldo P., Marblehead, Quartermaster-Sergeant, 
enlisted April 28, 1898; mustered out as private 
April 28, 1899. 

Bartol, Clarence L., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
died at Regimental Hospital, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, May 29, 1898. 

Benson, Charles W., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
died on Hospital Ship "Missouri," off Cuba, March 
15, 1899. 

Birmingham, Thomas J., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Boyden, Arthur C, Swampscott, enlisted June 24, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Broderick, Patrick, Jr., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cahill, James J., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cahoon, James A., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carroll, William D., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 239 



Casey, Daniel M., Swampscott, enlisted June 24, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Chapman, Arthur, Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Chapman, Lewis H. A., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Coates, William W., Saco, Maine, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
discharged by order December 20, 1898. 

Collins, John C, Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Connell, Harry, Swampscott, enlisted June 24, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cook, Charles E., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cook, Monroe E., Worcester, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Crane, Michael J., Salem, enlisted June 24, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Curwen, James H., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dailey, William F., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dennis, William F., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



240 Twelve Months with the 



Dixey, John G., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dixey, William F., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Doherty, Charles E., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Doherty, George V., Somerville, enlisted July 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Doliber, Ashton, Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dry den, Dennis, Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dugan, Daniel H., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899: 

Florence, Gerry G., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Florence William H., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 
1898 ; died at John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, 
Lexington, Kentucky, October 8, 1898. 

Freeman, Frank B., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Frost, Arthur D., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Frost, Frank I., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 241 



Gleason, William H., Marblehead, Corporal, enlisted 
April 28, 1898 ; discharged for disability January 4, 
1899. 

Goss, Joseph H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Gosselin, Alfred W., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Granger, Samuel G., Swampscott, enlisted June 24, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Graves, Charles H., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Graves, Fred L., Marblehead, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hathaway, Stephen, Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hathorne, James F., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Henry, James F., Salem, enlisted June 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Henry, James J., Salem, enlisted June 24, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Huntington, George D., Amesbury, enlisted May 10, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Imbeault, Joseph, Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



242 Twelve Months with the 



Kane, John J., Brockton, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability, January 6, 1899. 

Keegan, Charles J., Salem, enlisted May 10, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, January 6, 1899. 

Kiely, William H., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Knowland, Fred B., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., Au- 
gust 9, 1898 ; discharged February 6, 1899. 

Lahey, John J., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Love, Patrick W., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lundergan, Edward J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lyons, Thomas P., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McHugh, John J., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McKenna, Daniel F., Milford, enlisted Company M, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, April 24, 1898; ap- 
pointed corporal; transferred to Company C, Eighth 
Massachusetts Infantry, January 7, 1899 ; mustered 
out as private April 28, 1899. 

McNulty, Charles J., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 243 



Markey, Michael A., Salem, enlisted June 24, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Maley, Charles E., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Melanson, Leander, Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, April 24, 1898; transferred 
to Company C, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, 
January 7, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mercier, Jules J., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Munroe, Archibald M., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Morse, Frank E., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability March 22, 1899. 

Nutting, John H., Wakefield, enlisted Company H, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 24, 1898; transferred 
to Company C, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 31, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Brien, Timothy J., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Phalen, Martin M., Salem, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Phillips, Joseph, Marblehead, enlisted April 28,1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Punchard, J. Frank, Marblehead, Artificer, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out as private April 28, 1899. 



244 Twelve Months with the 



Rhoades, Thomas H., Jr., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Robbins, Charles S., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; deserted September 19, 
1898. 

Ronan, Patrick, Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Rowe, Leonard, Marblehead, enlisted Juno 24, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Savory, George H., Marblehead, Musician, enlisted April 
28, 1898; discharged for disability February 15, 
1899. 

Selman, Andrew M., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Shattuck, William G., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sicard, Amand V., Lowell, enlisted Company H, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, April 24, 1898; transferred 
to Company C, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 31, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, Frank O., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Snow, Charles C, Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899, 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 245 



Stevens, George C, Swampscott, enlisted June 24, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sweeney, Michael, Salem, enlisted June 24, 1898; mus 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Symonds, Herbert N"., Marblehead, enlisted April 28 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Talham, George F., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898 
deserted September 12, 1898. 

Thompson, William P., Swampscott, enlisted June 24 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Valley, Edward K., Marblehead, enlisted June 24, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Weed, Wallace D., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

West, Walter S., Kingston, K". H., enlisted May 10, 1898 
discharged for disability February 6, 1899. 

Whitney, Charles R., Hyde Park, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Widger, Charles H., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Woodfin, John S., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 16 
1898; discharged by order March 31, 1899. 

Worcester, William C, Lynn, enlisted June 24, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Company D, Lynn 



Hilliker, Charles T., Lynn, Captain, April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Detached service, General Court Martial, Novem- 
ber 19 to 25, and November 28 to December 6, and 
December 14 to 22. 

Cobey, Thomas J., Lynn, First Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Battalion Adjutant July 6 to August 29. Com- 
manding Company B, November 15 to November 24. 
Battalion Adjutant November 25 to December 21. 

Young, William F., Lynn, Second Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; discharged for promotion, April 11, 1899. 
(See Company H.) 

Commanding Company B, December 21 to 27. 
Special duty Quartermaster's department, December 
28, 1898 to February 2, 1899. Provost Guard, Ma- 
tanzas, Cuba, February 14 to April 3, 1899. 

Marston, William F., Gloucester, Second Lieutenant, April 
12, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Com- 
pany G.) 

Gallagher, John B., Lynn, First Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Green, Byron S., Lynn, Quartermaster-Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Jeffers, Charles J., Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



250 Twelve Months with the 



Williams, John F., Waltham, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Campbell, William M., Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Johnson, Charles J., Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lafferty, John H., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dorman, William, Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Crowley, Thomas C, Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hamilton, James L., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Mulchay, James J., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Linehan, John L., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wiley, Frank E., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, Alpheus S., Revere, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, November 6, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 251 



Stephens, William J., Lynn, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
Corporal, November 6, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 

'V<ij-4JJ« i-k. Ht ...4— 

Swift, Charles Z., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
Corporal, November G, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Arrington, Arthur W., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; 
Corporal, February 6, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Heyden, Joseph T., Swampscott, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
Corporal (cook), January 10, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Aklund, Erick Y., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; Musi- 
cian, July 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lee, John H., Lynn, enlisted May 9, 1898; Musician, 
March 22, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Burt, Silas G., Lynn, Wagoner, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Stuart, Angus A., Dorchester, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Artificer, January 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Allen, Llewellyn C, Dorchester, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Allen, William H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral, August 1, 1898; discharged for disability, 
April 2, 1899. 



252 Twelve Months with the 

Bacon, Henry F., Worcester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Batchelder, Ezra BT., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bird, George W., Southbridge, enlisted Company K, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company D, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Burnham, Carroll V. H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Burnham, Herbert O., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
died at Regimental Hospital at Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, May 28, 1898. 

Burke, Michael, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Bourbeau, Frank A., Lynn, enlisted June 27, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Bradley, Alvin E., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Boucher, Alfred, Lynn, enlisted May 9, 1898 ; transferred 
to the band March 22, 1899. 

Canney, Fred H., Lynn, enlisted May 9, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Carroll, Stephen F., Lynn, enlisted June 29, 1898; dis- 
charged without honor, March 4, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 253 



Childs, Louis II., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, October 8, 1898. 

Clark, David II., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Cochrane, William A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Colby, Henry S., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Connor, Laurence H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 4, 
1898; discharged April 22, 1899. 

Connors, Joseph H., Lynn, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability, October 8, 1898. 

Connors, Edward F., Lynn, enlisted May 9, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Cook, George O., Dorchester, enlisted May 9, 1898 ; died 
at Dorchester, Massachusetts, while on sick furlough, 
September 22, 1898. 

Cormack, Alexander R., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Crawford, Ernest E., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out as private April 28, 1899. 

Crosbie, Thomas R., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 8, 1898 ; 
discharged March 13, 1899. 



254 Twelve Months with the 



Curran, Patrick, Lynn, enlisted May 9, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

de Forge, Joseph H. C, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Derby, Charles E., Lynn, enlisted June 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dewar, Daniel W., Dorchester, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Disbrow, Henry C, Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Dottridge, John F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; died 
at John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, Lexington, 
Kentucky, September 6, 1898. 

Face, Edward L., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, IT. S. A., July 4, 1898; 
discharged March 26, 1899. 

Farrell, Lawrence J., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Farrington, William W., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Frazel, Jeremiah, Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred 
to Company D, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 23, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 255 



Gaiuley, George, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Gaiuley, Louis 1ST., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Garceau, Napoleon, Southbridge, enlisted Company K, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; trans- 

V 7 V 7 7 

f erred to Company D, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Griffin, William R., Lewiston, Pennsylvania, enlisted 
June 20, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Goodhue, Robert W., Peabody, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Grovestein, Joseph L., Cambridge, enlisted July 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hayden, Ellis L., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hinds, Jesse T., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Hurd, William E., Worcester, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hurney, Patrick J., Marblehead, enlisted June 27, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hood, Thomas H., Portland, Maine, Artificer, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out as private, April 28, 
1899, 



256 Twelve Months with the 



Johnson, Edgar J., Lynn, Musician, enlisted April 28, 
1898; transferred to the band, February 1, 1899. 

Kemmett, James E., Lynn, enlisted June 27, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Kennedy, George W., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kent, Myron I., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Kelley, Michael J., Jr., Fitchburg, enlisted Company D, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Company D, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 31, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Langlois, Adolphe, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lincoln, Fred W. C, Dorchester, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Llewellyn, James, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Mansfield, George A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Martin, James J., Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred 
to Company D, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 257 



Martin, Walter F., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Moore, Albert, Somerville, enlisted July 5, 1898, deserted 
August 27, 1898. 

Moore, John, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Mullen, Lawrence F., Salem, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McFadden, John, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McGee, Timothy E., Marlboro, enlisted Company F, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, June 20, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Company D, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 23, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

McKenna, Robert J., Lynn, enlisted June 27, 1898 ; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., October 4, 
1898; discharged May 1, 1899. 

McLeod, Malcolm, Dorchester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McPherson, Thaddeus J., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Nicholson, George W., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Nolan, Martin S., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



258 Twelve Months with the 



Ober, Frank H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Rourke, Thomas J., Fitchburg, enlisted Company D, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, June 16, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company D, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 29, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Pack, Frederick W M Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Pastell, Walter, Lynn, enlisted May 5, 1898; transferred 
to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., November 17, 1898; 
discharged May 3, 1899. 

Pichette, Joseph A. V., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Potter, Leslie E., Cambridge, Vermont, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order, January 19, 1899. 

Rich, Walter F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., October 4, 1898; 
discharged May 1, 1899. 

Schmidt, William A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Shelley, Thomas H., Chatfield, Minnesota, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Shores, Robert M., Middleboro, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 259 



Simmons, E. Mitchell, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order September 19, 1898. 

Small, Laurie A., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U". S. A., November 17, 
1898. Never joined. Deserted November 17, 1898. 
Surrendered, April 28, 1899 and discharged without 
honor, May 8, 1899, charge of desertion not removed. 

Smith, Clifton E., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; de- 
serted, October 21, 1898. 

Smith, George H., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Somes, Norman F., Cliftondale, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Spencer, Hamilton, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Spinney, Claud C, Lynn, enlisted June 27, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Stickney, Horace I., Lynn, Musician, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; transferred to the band March 22, 1899. 

Stone, Harry M., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Stone, Louis, Manchester, N. H., enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Stewart, John A., Dorchester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



260 Twelve Months with the 



Stuart, Charles F., Lynn, enlisted May 9, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Symonds, Ormond S., Saugus, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Talbot, Charles G., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Vose, Frank H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Ward, Arthur G., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Watkins, John J., Amesbury, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Welck, William J., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; dis- 
honorably discharged March 17, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 261 



Company E, Beverly 



Stopford, Frederick W., Beverly, Captain, April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Provost Guard, Matanzas, Cuba, March 16 to 
April 3, 1899. 

Farnham, Charles H., Beverly, First Lieutenant, April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Special duty with engineering party, making 
camp at Lexington, Kentucky, August 16 to Septem- 
ber 17. Command of engineering party at Americus, 
Georgia, October 26 to November 26. Regimental 
pioneer officer, December 4. 

DeSousa, Francisco A., Beverly, Second Lieutenant, 
April 28, 1898; discharged for promotion, Decem- 
ber 16, 1898. (See Company I.) 

In command of reconnoitering party locating rifle 
ranges and camps, October 4 to 14. 

Harvey, Loran J., Lynn, Second Lieutenant, December 
16, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Com- 
pany I.) 

Standley, Edward A., Beverly, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; First Sergeant, October 1, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Colson, William L., Beverly, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Quartermaster-Sergeant, April 15, 1899; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



264 Twelve Months with the 



Hathaway, Walter H., Beverly, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out as Sergeant April 28, 

1899. ,,{ ...., 

* 

Foster, Alonzo G., Beverly, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fraser, Thomas J., Beverly, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Standley, Arthur L., Beverly, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Sergeant, January 1, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Schade, Harry D., Beverly, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out as Corporal, April 28, 1899. 

Robertson, Charles H., Beverly, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Stone, Warren E., Marblehead, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Clark, Frank B., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, Roland K., Hamilton, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Williams, George S., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 20, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 265 



White, Frank H., Lynn, enlisted June 23, 1898; Corpo- 
ral (cook), December 6, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

McRae, Harry, Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; Corpo- 
ral January 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Rice, Henry H., Pittsfield, enlisted May 10, 1898; Cor- 
poral, January 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Magner, James M.„ Beverly, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lanctot, Joseph A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral, April 15, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, Russell K, Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, April 15, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Rowe, Oscar W., Haverhill, Musician, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sweetman, William D., Beverly, Musician, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Washer, Carlos J., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; Ar- 
tificer, October 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Clark, Charles A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Wagoner, June 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



266 Twelve Months with the 



Anderson, Albert A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Andrews, Wallace A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Barnard, George E., Salem, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Barry, Thomas F., Peabody, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Batchelder, George D., Beverly, enlisted June 14, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Beeman, Iver C, Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged by order, February 17, 1899. 

Beckford, Fred H., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Birmingham, Walter J., Salem^ enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bray, Ferdinand W., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brennan, Leslie A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brock, Arthur S., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Burke, Louis, Salem, enlisted June 23, 1898; transferred 
to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., October 22, 1898; dis- 
charged April 30, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 267 



Butman, Clarence P., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Butman, William E., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Campbell, John A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carlton, Harry R., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 1, 
1898; discharged February 13, 1899. 

Chapman, John C, Beverly, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Church, John P., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 1, 1898; 
discharged April 3, 1899. 

Collins, Jtoscoe J., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Conroy, Daniel A., Peabody, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Coughlin, Edward M., Webster, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Creamer, Benjamin F., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cresoe, George H., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
honorably discharged, March 2, 1899. 



26$ Twelve Months with the 

Cronin, John A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dailey, Harry F., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dillon, James F., Peabody, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Doolen, Daniel J., Salem, enlisted June 20, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dow, Thomas W., Manchester, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dutra, Frank T., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Egan, William F., Salem, enlisted June 20, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Farrell, David E., Marblehead, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fiske, Lewis W., Providence, R. I., enlisted June 14, 
1898 ; transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., Feb- 
ruary 19, 1899 ; discharged July 5, 1899. 

Fitzgerald, Thomas E., Marlboro, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fleet, Roland H., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., November 15, 
1898 ; discharged April 9, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 269 

Flint, Arthur L., Beverly, enlisted June 23, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hanson, Paul P., Essex, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Haskell, William R., Ipswich, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hazlett, Walter H., Hamilton, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Heath, Melvin A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Herrick, Everett A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hoogerzeil, William H., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Jellison, Frank L., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability January 6, 1899. 

Johnson, Adna B., Salem, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 1898 ; 
discharged January 13, 1899. 

Jones, Warren F., Wenham, enlisted June 14, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Keenan, Hugh J., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kenaley, James F., Peabody, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability February 9, 1899. 



270 Twelve Months with the 

Kimball, Kenneth E., Ipswich, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kingsley, Frederick S., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lane, Thomas P., Lynn, enlisted June 23, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Laraway, Ernest W., Haverhill, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

LeDuc, William H., Stoneham, enlisted Company H, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company E, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try December 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Lee, Henry W., Beverly, enlisted June 14, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lilly, Walter A., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Little, William H., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

MacLeod, George I., Boston, enlisted Company H, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 15, 1898; transferred 
to Company E, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McLaughlin, John J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 271 



Mack, Albert F., Beverly, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., October 22, 1898. 

Magner, David F., Beverly, Quartermaster-Sergeant, en- 
listed April 28, 1898; mustered out as private April 
28, 1899. 

Maurais, Wilfred A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Meagher, James J., Webster, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Murphy, Michael J., Salem, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1898. 

Noble, Shirley 0., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Norton, Charles E., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Connell, John J., Lynn, enlisted June 23, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Leary, James A., Salem, enlisted June 20, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Palky, Phillipe, Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Paul, Herbert A., Lynn, enlisted June 14, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899, 



272 Twelve Months with the 



Pierce, Fred E., Beverly, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Prentiss, Harris B., Beverly, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Purcell, William J., Somerville, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ralph, Charles, Ipswich, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Reed, John W., Beverly, enlisted June 15, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Roberts, James H., Salem, enlisted June 15, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Robertson, Alexander, Beverly, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; Sergeant, November 25, 1898 ; discharged 
for promotion, December 16, 1898. (See Company 
F.) 

Roche, John H., Salem, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Russell, Norman F., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 
1898; transferred back to Company E, Eighth Mass- 
achusetts Infantry, November 7, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Ryan, Joseph, Peabody, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 273 



Simpson, John G., Beverly, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Skane, Richard A., Beverly, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 1, 
1898; discharged February 10, 1899. 

Stanley, Arthur, Beverly, enlisted June 16, 1898; dis- 
charged by order, March 21, 1899. 

Spaulding, Frank A., Lynn, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sweetser, Frederic J., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to band, March 20, 1899. 

Tufts, George B., Lynn, enlisted June 23, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Waggott, William O., Beverly, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wheeler, Frank B., Beverly, enlisted June 14, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

White, Edward A., Cambridge, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Williams, Ezra W., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Woodberry, Frank L., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Woodbury, Roland S., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Company F, Haverhill 



Dow, William C, Haverhill, Captain, April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Commanding the Third Battalion, by reason of 
seniority, October 8 to 29 and December 23, 1898 
to March 23, 1899. 

Svanberg, Per Justis W., Amesbury, First Lieutenant, 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Commanding the company by reason of seniority, 
October 8 to 29 and December 27, 1898 to March 
25, 1899. 

Jewell, David E., Haverhill, Second Lieutenant, April 
28, 1898; discharged for promotion, December 16, 
1898. (See Company K.) 

Battalion Adjutant, September 19 to October 2. 

Robertson, Alexander, Beverly, Second Lieutenant, De- 
cember 16, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See 
Company E.) 

Priest, William O., Haverhill, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; First Sergeant, September 8, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Sleeper, Harry E., Haverhill, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Quartermaster-Sergeant, September 8, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hadley, George E., Haverhill, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



278 Twelve Months with the 



Woods, Fred C, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; Sergeant, September 22, 

West, William J., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Sergeant, February 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Leslie, Pearl A., Haverhill, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, February 11, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Morrison, Allen C, Haverhill, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Nason, George H., Haverhill, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Day, Koy M., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Damon, Milton A., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Dyer, Bert M., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lovejoy, Fred S., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Short, Harry H., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 279 



Jones, Frederick H., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Glover, Charles F., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, September 22, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Austin, Charles F., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Lambert, Simeon J., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal, February 8, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Moore, Fred S., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral (cook), November 20, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Wentworth, Leslie C, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Artificer, February 8, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Brown, Alexander H., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Assistant Wagonmaster, July 15, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Barker, Charles O., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bartlett, Herbert E., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



280 Twelve Months with the 



Bartlett, John P., Salem, enlisted July 7, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, January — , 1899. 

Bean, Arthur W., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bond, Horace A., Haverhill, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Bisbee, Orlando A., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brindley, Charles F., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brindley, William H., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brasseur, George D., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to the band March 20, 1899. 

Briggs, Arthur C, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bouley, Edward F., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Caldwell, Henry W., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Channell, Louis N"., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
died on board Hospital Ship "Missouri," March 3, 
1899. 

Cooper, Charles N"., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 281 



Colby, George W. L, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cotter, Maurice, Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Cook, Charles H., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Connelly, Edward A., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Crowell, Arthur 0., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., June 29, 
1898; discharged May 3, 1899. 

Delorie, Frank E., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Desmond, John A., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dufrense, Eamond, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dorherty, John S., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dunnells, Harold A., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dubrey, Joseph, Concord, enlisted Company I, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 23, 1898; transferred 
to Company F, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 31, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



282 Twelve Months with the 



Ford, Fred A., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Foren James H., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fuller, Erford C, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Finnegan, Patrick, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gilbert, Joseph A., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Glover, Clinton P., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, September 10, 1898. 

Goodwin, Leberton W., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Godbout, Leon J., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gove, Ira S., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Green, Andrew W., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Greenlay, Joseph B., Haverhill, enlisted Corporal, April 
28, 1898; Musician, July 15, 1898; transferred to 
the band, March 20, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 283 



Hearin, Frank L., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Henckler, Otto, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Henderson, George, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hinkson, Harry F., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hayes, Joseph, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Houle, Albert, Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hawkins, Herman, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hill, George V., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Jones, John C, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Kershaw, John L., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lafree, Peter K, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Law, Edgie B., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



284 Twelve Months with the 



Lang, William T., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lambert, Joseph A., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Laform, Louis, Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lyden, John J., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lafleur, John S., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Liberty, Joseph F., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mase, Willard H., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mills, William H., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Miller, Albert M., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Miner, Herbert W., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to the band March 20, 1899. 

McConihe, Harry C, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McConihe, William P., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 
1898; discharged for disability, October 8, 1898. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 285 



Mahoney, Jeremiah, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mercier, Louis N\, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mack, Frank, Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Mudgett, Perley W., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
discharged for disability, December 31, 1898. 

Morrow, John, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Nason, Alfred K., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Noonan, Thomas F., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Peavey, Harry M., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Patnod, Adolpheus J., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Rich, Harry W., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Roberts, Carl S., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Rowe, Harry E., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



286 Twelve Months with the 



Sabin, Ernest E., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sanborn, John R., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, September 22, 1898; discharged for pro- 
motion, February 1, 1899. (See K C. O. staff.) 

Stockbridge, Ralph C, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Strafford, Thomas, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sullivan, Michael J., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Thomas, Fred, Haverhill, Quartermaster-Sergeant, en- 
listed April 28, 1898; died at Sternberg Hospital, 
Chickamauga Park, Georgia, September 6, 1898. 

Warren, Samuel M., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Walker, John G., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Webster, Edward C, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Webster, George P., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wentworth, George, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 287 

Wentworth, Harris M., Haverhill, Artificer, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; discharged as private April 28, 
1899. 

White, Merritt E., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., June 29, 
1898; discharged July 4, 1899. 

Whittier, David F., Haverhill, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; discharged for promotion, Septem- 
ber 7, 1898. (See Company K.) 

Winslow, George, Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Woodbury, George W., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

West, Edward A., Haverhill, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Company G, Gloucester 



Horton, Edward J., Gloucester, Captain, April 28, 1898 : 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mclsaac, Charles M., Gloucester, First Lieutenant, April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Acting Regimental Quartermaster, October 3 to 14. 
Battalion Adjutant, November 21. Assistant Quar- 
termaster, December 26 to January 23, 1899. Battal- 
ion Adjutant, January 23. Acting Regimental Ad- 
jutant, January 30 and March 11 and 12. 

Nutt, James C, Gloucester, Second Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; resigned December 27, 1898. 

Warner, Charles R., Lynn, Second Lieutenant, January 
21, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Com- 
pany I.) 

Thomas, William H., Gloucester, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Jacobs, Thomas W., Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898 ; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; Sergeant, December 27, 
1898; Quartermaster-Sergeant, same date; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Morris, Charles A., Gloucester, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McDonald, Jerome, Jr., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; Sergeant, March 1, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



292 Twelve Months with the 



McDonald, Hugh M., Gloucester, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Anderson, William S., Gloucester, Corporal, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wheeler, Willis E., Gloucester, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Parsons, Ernest D., Gloucester, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Blake, Charles C, Gloucester, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Rogers, Frank, Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; Cor- 
poral, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cunningham, Frederick W., Gloucester, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

MacDonald, Fred E., Gloucester, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Ehler, Ernest A., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 4, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Hill, Rupert G., Charlestown, transferred from Company 
M, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, September 1, 
1898; Corporal, September 1, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 293 

Somers, Samuel J., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Day, William F., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; Cor- 
poral February 1, 1S99 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Witham, Sidney, Gloucester, enlisted April 30, 1898; 
Corporal, March 29, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Burns, John M., Gloucester, Artificer, enlisted April 30, 
1898; Corporal (cook), February 21, 1899; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Parker, John E., Gloucester, Musician, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brady, Edward, Lawrence, Musician, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Eaton, Kobert L., Rockport, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
Artificer, February 21, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Witham, Charles S., Gloucester, enlisted July 2, 1898; 
Wagoner, November 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Allen, Frank G., Rockport, enlisted May 10, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Baker, Charles, Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



294 Twelve Months with the 



Blagdon, William, Gloucester, enlisted April 30, 1898; 
discharged by order March 10, 1899. 

Bradley, John, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Brazier, Alfred H., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brewer, William H., Lynn, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Brooks, William H., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bonney, Ralph W., Fitchburg, enlisted Company B, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 16, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cahoon, William B., Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898 ; 
died at John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, September 30, 1898. 

Carney, John A., Gloucester, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carpenter, Joseph H., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Casey, Edward L., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Clark, Walter H., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 295 



Coffey, George F., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Collins, John E., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Cottle, Henry, Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Cronin, Edmund T., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cross, Alexander J., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Curley, William D., Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898; 
died at John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, October 10, 1898. 

David, Charles A., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, April 2, 1899. 

Day, Fred A., Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dalton, Patrick J., Gloucester, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Davis, Harry C, Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

DeVeau, Leroy E., Gloucester, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; 
transferred to the Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 
9, 1898; discharged May 1, 1899. 



296 Twelve Months with the 



Dinn, John C, Rockport, enlisted April 29, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Doren, John M., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; died at Third Division 
Hospital, Chickamauga Park, Georgia, August 4, 
1898. 

Douglass, Leonard G., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Douglass, George A., Wakefield, enlisted Company H, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, July 2, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 13, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Drolet, Charles F., Rockport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

Elwell, Zeno, Essex, enlisted April 28, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Eerguson, Alexander, Jr., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order, February 24, 1899. 

Frost, George R., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, November 2, 1898. 

Gauld, Archibald G., Gloucester, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Giles, Alfred B., Rockport, enlisted June 28, 1898; dis- 
charged by order, February 10, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 297 



Gosby, Edward M., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 1, 
1898; discharged, February 9, 1899. 

Hall, Elmer A., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hanson, Peter, South Framingham, enlisted Company E, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 16, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Herty, William H., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hilliard, John A., Somerville, enlisted May 10, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hickey, Patrick H., Southbridge, enlisted Company K, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 13, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Holloran, William H., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Horton, Myron O., Fitchburg, enlisted Company B, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 16, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hotchkiss, Bickford, Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



298 Twelve Months with the 



Ingersoll, Edward T., Gloucester, enlisted June 30, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Irving, Alonzo L., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Irving, Robert T., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Jacobs, Charles F., Gloucester, enlisted April 30, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kearsey, John J., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kelly, Martin F., Manchester, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lawson, George R., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Malonson, Joseph H., Gloucester, Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant, enlisted April 28, 1898; discharged by order, 
December 25, 1898. 

Marshall, Antone F., Rockport, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, January 20, 1899. 

Marston, Edmund F., Gloucester, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Marston, William F., Gloucester, enlisted Sergeant, 
April 28, 1898; discharged for promotion, April 11, 
1899. (See Company D.) 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 299 



Martin, James S., Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898; 
discharged for disability, January 4, 1899. 

MacDonald, James A., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 
1898; discharged by order, January 30, 1899. 

Maclsaac, James A., Chelsea, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Montgomery, Lewis, Gloucester, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Morey, George H., Gloucester, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Morris, Edward J., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Murray, Daniel W., Lynn, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Nutton, William H., Gloucester, enlisted June 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. (This man was car- 
ried on muster-in roll as Mutton). 

O'Connor, Bartholomew F., Lynn, enlisted June 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ott, Odd F., Washington Court House, Ohio, enlisted 
October 28, 1898; discharged by order, March 14, 
1899. (On detached service at First Army Corps 
Headquarters, as Musician.) 

Parker, Jesse, Rockport, enlisted May 10, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



300 Twelve Months with the 



Parsons, Benjamin F., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged for disability, October 7, 1898. 

Powers, Edward K., Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Pichette, Prank, Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Price, Albert D., South Framingham, enlisted Company 
E, Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; 
transferred to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts 
Infantry, December 23, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Reardon, Timothy, Hudson, enlisted June 2, 1898; dis- 
honorably discharged, March 4, 1899. 

Reno, Joseph, Southbridge, enlisted Company K, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company G, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 16, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Rich, Albert A., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Richardson, Herbert A., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Robinson, Frank H., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry SOI 

Rogers, John J., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged by reason of being a minor, January 16, 
1899. 

Rowe, John W., Jr., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Saunders, Ernest, Gloucester, enlisted June 30, 1898 
discharged by order, March 24, 1899. 

Smith, Charles W., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, William S., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Spates, Arthur N., Gloucester, enlisted April 30, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Strangman, Herbert T., Gloucester, enlisted April 29 
1898; discharged for disability, September 30, 1898 

Syms, George J., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Tarr, Albert C, Rockport, enlisted June 28, 1898; trans- 
ferred to the Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 
1898; discharged July 24, 1899. 

Thomas, George F., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Thomas, Walter R., Gloucester, enlisted April 29, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



302 Twelve Months with the 



Thomas, William H., Gloucester, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; discharged by order, March 18, 1899. 

Tuck, George C., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Vivian, William H., Gloucester, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Walen, George F., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
died at John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, September 19, 1898. 

Warren, Hughie A., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Watson, Melvin L., Freedom, N. H., enlisted May 10, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wenneberg, John E., Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

White, Walter, Gloucester, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Williams, Abraham D., Gloucester, enlisted June 20, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wilkins, George A., Gloucester, Wagoner, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out as private April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 303 



Company H, Salem 



Reynolds, Augustus G., Salem, Second Lieutenant, May 
10, 1898; First Lieutenant, August 15, 1898; Cap- 
tain, April 12, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 
Regimental commissary, May 20. Detached service 
to Third Division, First Army Corps Hospital, as 
Acting Assistant Quartermaster and Acting Commis- 
sary Subsistence, July 12 to August 11. Command- 
ing Company K, September 10 to 17. Detached ser- 
vice as Acting Assistant Quartermaster and Acting 
Commissary Subsistence, Third Division, First Ar- 
my Corps Hospital, September 17 to December 23. 
Special duty construction of hospitals, First Army 
Corps, November 4, 1898. Special duty in charge 
of repairs of Santa Ysabil Hospital, Matanzas, 
Cuba, February 28 to April 4. Commanded the 
company by reason of seniority, December 23, 1898 
to February 28, 1899 and from April 4 to 11. 

Peabody, Jacob C. R., Danvers, Captain, July 8, 1898 ; 
discharged to accept Captain's commission, Assistant 
Quartermaster, in quartermaster's department, U. 
S. V., April 11, 1899 ; resigned, May 17, 1899. 

Detached service as Aid-de-camp, General Lud- 
low's staff, October 15, 1898 to April 11, 1899. 

Nichols, Walter P., Salem, Captain, April 28, 1898; 
resigned June 26, 1898. 

Young, William F., Lynn, First Lieutenant, April 12, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Company 
D.) 



306 Twelve Months with the 



Jewett, George H"., Salem, First Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; resigned August 11, 1898. 

Pineau, Thomas O. H., Salem, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898 ; discharged for promotion, August 
14, 1898; Second Lieutenant, August 15, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

In command of company by reason of seniority, 
September 27 to December 22, 1898 and March 1 to 
April 3, 1899. 

White, Ernest C, Salem, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; First Sergeant, February 1, 1899; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Prall, Ralph T., Cleveland, Ohio, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Corporal, September 1, 1898; Sergeant, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899 ; Quartermaster-Sergeant, February 1, 
1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

David, Frank, Salem, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fuller, John I., Danvers, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, September 1, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Aull, Samuel G., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898; Sergeant, February 1, 1899; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hamilton, Frank L., Corporal, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Sergeant, February 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 307 

Carroll, James T., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Gunnison, Fred L., Salem, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Griffin, John C, Peabody, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Langmaid, Harry T., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898 ; 
Corporal, October 24, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

McCue, Frederick W., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, October 24, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Maclnnis, John W., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Parker, Penuel A., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
Corporal, November 9, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Raymond, Henry E., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Rudderham, Howard C, Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
Corporal, October 24, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



308 Twelve Months with the 



Robinson, Frank W., Salem, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Semple, Frank, Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; Corpo- 
ral, March 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Young, Ernest A., Milton, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Sweeney, Thomas L., Peabody, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
Corporal (cook) November 9, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

McNeill, Jesse P., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Musician, August 15, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Collins, John J., Salem, Artificer, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Adams, Charles H., Salem, enlisted June 27, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Ahern, Arthur J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Anderson, John W., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Barrett, Jefferson F., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, February 21, 1899. 

Batchelder, Charles E., Salem, enlisted, Sergeant, April 
28, 1898; discharged for disability, January 10, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 309 



Bixby, William A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Brine, Charles H., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Brine, Lewis R., Winchester, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, October 28, 1898. 

Burdett, Harold C, Hingham, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; discharged by order, 
October 18, 1898. 

Campbell, Frederick H., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carbone, Anthony, Boston, enlisted Company M, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred to 
Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Janu- 
ary 12, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Casey, Michael W., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Caverly, Arthur S., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Claxton, James, Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898 ; dis- 
charged by order, February 25, 1899. 

Cochrane, Percy W., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



310 Twelve Months with the 



Colleary, Michael E., Marlboro, enlisted Company F, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, June 16, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 27, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Coombs, David W., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Copeland, Henry P., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cotter, Garrett E., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Cowern, Walter H., Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 27, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Curtin, John, Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

deComana, Mihran H. H., Boston, enlisted June 16, 
1898 ; transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., No- 
vember 4, 1898; discharged April 20, 1899. 

Deasy, Henry A., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; died 
while on sick furlough at Pittsfield, 1ST. H., Septem- 
ber 3, 1898. 

Dickey, Arthur L., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 311 



Dickey, Asa R., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Demerritt, Elwood, Boston, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dennis, Ellis L., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 1898; 
discharged April 17, 1899. 

Dow, Charles EL, Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dow, Clarence G., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dow, Walter E., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Ferguson, Frank E., Lynn, Quartermaster-Sergeant, en- 
listed April 28, 1898; discharged for disability, 
January 17, 1899. 

Finney, Harry W., Medford, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; discharged by order, 
September 11, 1898. 

Fitzgerald, John J., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Foley, James J., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Garrett, Thomas, Jr., Staten Island, New York, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; discharged by order, September 10, 
1898. 



312 Twelve Months with the 



Garrity, Thomas A., Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred to 
Cpmpany H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 22, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Goldthwaite, William B., Salem, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Graves, William W., Salem, enlisted July 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Gray, John C, Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hawkins, Benjamin F., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Heffernan, Charles J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Heffernan, Patrick J., Haverhill, Musician, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; transferred to band, March 20, 
1899. 

Henneberry, Richard J., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
discharged by order, February 1, 1899. 

Hoberg, Frank A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Howe, Everett C, Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infanty, May 6, 1898; transferred to 
Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Janu- 
ary 7, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 313 



James, Daniel E., Salem, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; dis- 
charged by order, February 1, 1899. 

Kane, Thomas, Salem, enlisted June 27, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Kelly, William P., Salem, enlisted June 27, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

King, James H., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Kirby, Edward J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lee, Arthur L., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability January 10, 1899. 

Lovett, George F., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McLaughlin, Frank, Salem, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; discharged by order, February 21, 1899. 

Maak, George A., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Mallard, Herbert F., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 1, 
1898; discharged February 17, 1899. 

Milliken, Frank S., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Mitchell, William W., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



314 Twelve Months with the 

Moore, Cornelius, Salem, enlisted July 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Murphy, Michael W., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Murray, Ernest, Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Murray, John S., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Nichols, John H., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898; died at John Blair Gibbs Gen- 
eral Hospital, Lexington, Kentucky, September 17, 
1898. 

Norwood, Herbert O., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Connell, Thomas H., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ordway, Gardner E., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Osborn, John F., Boston, transferred from the band to 
Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Parsons, Arthur W., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Parsons, Henry G., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 1, 1898; 
discharged April 15, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 315 



Pearson, Fred E., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Perkins, Edwin M., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Phillips, Herbert N., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Pollock, George F., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Raymond, Henry E., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1S99. 

Ready, Thomas H., Ipswich, enlisted June 16, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Reagan, John J., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Ricker, James E., Salem, Wagoner, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged for disability January 10, 1899. 

Ring, James, Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Rogers, Charles W., Beverly, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ruggles, Harry C, Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 15, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 29, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



316 Twelve Months with the 



Ryan, George A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Schwartz, Ardeen, Marlboro, enlisted Company F, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 27, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Silver, Fayette O., Boston, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability January 10, 1899. 

Smith, Nathaniel A., Newton, enlisted May 5, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability October 12, 1898. 

Staten, Fred N., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Sylvester, Robert G., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Tansey, Patrick I., Salem, enlisted June 1G, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Thurston, Charles W., Cambridge, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Turner, Harry A., Boston, enlisted Company H, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred 
to Company H, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 29, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Upton, Thomas A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 317 



Vaughn, Alfred W. Keene, N. H., enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Verry, Frank J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Wardwell, Henry F., Salem, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order, November 4, 1898. 

"Whelpley, Edgar J., Salem, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; First Sergeant, August 23, 1898; discharged 
for promotion, January 23, 1899. (See Company 
C.) 

White, James H., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Whitford, Robert A., Waltham, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 
1898; discharged January 13, 1899. 

Wright, George S., Salem, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Company I, Lynn 



Williams, John E., Lynn, Captain, April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Downey, Francis H., Lynn, First Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; died at St. Joseph's Hospital, Lexington, 
Kentucky, October 24, 1898. 

Special duty as Regimental Commissary, July 15, 
1898. 

DeSousa, Francisco A., Beverly, First Lieutenant, De- 
cember 16, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See 
Company E.) 

Special duty with Company B, January 15 to 
February 9. Special duty as Quartermaster, 
Division Hospital, Matanzas, Cuba, March 13 to 
April 3, 1899. 

Perry, William H., Lynn, Second Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Atwood, Ernest C, Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; First Sergeant, January 21, 1899; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Connell, Walter T., Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Purdy, Fred G., Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



322 Twelve Months with the 



Downey, Lewis A., Lynn, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898 ; Sergeant, September 19, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Goodwin, Fred W., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, February 1, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Paris, Alphonse L., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, February 1, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Thomas, Leon P., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Newhall, Charles H., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gillis, Lib. V., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; Corporal, 
August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Williamson, Andrew, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Dolan, Charles P., Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted Aprfl 28, 
1898; mustered out as Corporal, April 28, 1899. 

Cutting, Francis E., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
Corporal, November 25, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1&99. 

Besse, Walter M., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; Corpo- 
ral November 25, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 323 



Anderson, William J., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, November 25, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

McGuire, James M., Lynn, enlisted May 5, 1S98 ; Corpo- 
ral, November 25, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Roby, Junius V., Lynn, enlisted May 5, 1898 ; Corporal, 
November 25, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McCarty, John M., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Hogan, Wimburn L., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Ward, John H., Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth Mass- 
achusetts Infantry, June 28, 1898; transferred to 
Company I, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 27, 1898; Corporal (cook), March 19, 1899; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Schier, John A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; Musi- 
cian, November 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Condon, Thomas J., Lynn, Musician, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cann, Ernest L., Lynn, enlisted May 5, 1898; Artificer, 
January 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



324 Twelve Months with the 

Wood, Coleman, Lynn, enlisted, April 28, 1898 ; Wagon- 
er, September 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Barber, John F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Bailey, Charles E. B., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Barnes, Frank H., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Bessom, Edward F., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Bolser, Samuel, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, January 7, 1899. 

Bunker, Charles T., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Carlton, Samuel, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Casey, Thomas J., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Collins, Edward F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Condon, Daniel A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; trans- 
ferred to the Hospital Corps, U. S. A., June 29, 
1898; discharged, March 16, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 325 

Condon, James F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Cunniff, James E., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Daley, Charles J., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dauphinee, Thomas M., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, February 11, 1899. 

Demers, Peter, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Dennehy, Albert M., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dolan, William H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dow, Charles F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Driscoll, Daniel H., Lynn, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Eaton, George W., Lynn, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Finlaison, Walter G., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fitzgerald, James F., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 189S; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



326 Twelve Months with the 



Foisy, Joseph M., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1890. 

Fitzgerald, James, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Ford, Charles S., Somerville, enlisted July 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

French, William W., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gallagher, Owen J., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Gargan, Patrick, Lynn, enlisted June 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Gilmour, Philip D., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Genery, Timothy J., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

George, Harry J., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Gibbons, Andrew P., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gowan, Howard E., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 1898; 
discharged, May 12, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 327 



Harvey, Loran J., Lynn, First Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; discharged for promotion, December 15, 
1898. (See Company E.) 

Haselton, Granville, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1S98; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hastings, Fred D., Lowell, enlisted Company C, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898; transferred 
to Company I, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 27, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hayes, Michael J., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; died 
at Third Division Hospital, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, September 15, 1898. 

Heffernan, John F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Henneberry, Thomas, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hill, Winfred S., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hinckley, Frank A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; died 
at Third Division Hospital, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, August 2, 1898. 

Kelly, John P., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Kingsley, Charles G., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



328 Twelve Months with the 



Knox, George H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lambert, George W., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Lane, Elmer C, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Lewis, Michael F., Lynn, Wagoner, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order, March 23, 1899. 

Looney, John T., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Linehan, John J., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Loftus, Patrick, Lynn, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Macey, George T., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Manson, James A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McCoy, Frank H., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McDermott, James H., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McHugh, Patrick, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 329 



Melntire, Albert S., Lynn, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McKerness, George, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McKenna, James M., Lynn, enlisted June 20, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McRay, Keneth, Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Morse, Fred B., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged by order, January 19, 1899. 

Murray, Michael J., Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898; transferred 
to Company I, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Jan- 
uary 27, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1S99. 

Murphy, Lawrence H., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Muse, Daniel, Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Neal, Walter B., Lynn, enlisted May 5, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Nolan, John J., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Norton, Lewis W., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



330 Twelve Months with the 



Nute, George L., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Perron, Albert J., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Pocket, Joseph, Lynn, Musician, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
died at Third Division Hospital, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, August 26, 1898. 

Quinn, Frank J., Lynn, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Rodgers, Daniel A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Rodrick, Albert F., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., June 
29, 1898; discharged, November 28, 1898. 

Ryan, Patrick D., Somerville, enlisted July 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Scott, J. Chester, Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, John P., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged by order, August 2, 1898. 

Smith, Ora W., Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Snow, Frank G., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; dis- 
charged January 13, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 331 



Stevens, George H., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; de- 
serted, November 9, 1898. 

Stewart, Thomas B., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Sullivan, John E., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out as private, April 
28, 1899. 

Taylor, Edward P., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

Thompson, Walter D., Lynn, enlisted June 22, 1898 ; 
died at Third Division Hospital, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, August 7, 1898. 

Waltham, Ernest, Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred to 
Company I, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Janu- 
ary 27, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Warner, Charles R., Lynn, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, September 19, 1898; First Ser- 
geant, December 16, 1898 ; discharged for promo- 
tion, January 20, 1899. (See Company G.) 

Weaver, Harvey F., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Wessel, Charles A., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



332 Twelve Months with the 



White, Albert B., Lynn, Artificer, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order as private, March 15, 
1899. 

Wood, Manley E., Lynn, enlisted April 28, 1898; Musi- 
cian July 1, 1898; discharged February 10, 1899. 

Woods, Frank, Lynn, enlisted June 25, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Young, Harold L., Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 13, 1898; transferred 
to Company I, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 27, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 333 



Company K, Danvers 



Chase, A. Preston, Dan vers, Captain, April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Detailed General Court Martial June 8 to July 
11; December 11 to 21, 1898; January 7 to — . De- 
tailed as Judge Advocate, March 8. Summary 
Court Officer. December 7 to 17 ; 18 to 26. 

French, Henry W., Danvers, First Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; resigned, September 1, 1898. 

On recruiting service, June 11 to July 20, 1898. 

Bond, Stephen 1ST., Boston, Second Lieutenant, April 28, 
1898; First Lieutenant, September 15, 1898; re- 
signed October 25, 1898. 

Jewell, David E., Haverhill, First Lieutenant, December 
16, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. (See Com- 
pany F.) 

Acting Regimental Adjutant, December 16 to 18. 
Battalion Adjutant, December 22. Acting Regimen- 
tal Adjutant, February 25 and 26. General Court 
Martial, January 17. 

Whittier, David F., Haverhill, Second Lieutenant, Sep- 
tember 17, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899.. 
General Court Martial, March 8, 1899. 

Cook, Melvin J. G., Danvers, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; First Sergeant, January 22, 1899; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 



336 Twelve Months with the 



Collins, John J., Topsfield, Quartermaster-Sergeant, en- 
listed April 28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Martin, James H., Middleton, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Curtis, Oscar L., Danvers, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, November 20, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Wrest, James, Danvers, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; Corpo- 
ral, August 1, 1898; Sergeant, December 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Folsom, Fred B., Peabody, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, February 11, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Dow, Eugene M., Topsfield, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Van Iderstein, Harry, Boxford, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Earley, Willoughby P., Middleton, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Corporal, September 2, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Smiley, Bertrand C, Peabody, enlisted June 17, 1898; 
Corporal, September 2, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 337 

Robblee, Minot P., Dan vers, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out as Corporal, April 28, 1899. 

Scott, Albert J., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; Corpo- 
ral, January 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Connolly, Thomas, Danvers, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
Corporal, January 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Jacques, Alphonse, Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, January 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

O'Hara, John J., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, January 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Orne, Edward L., Beverly, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Goodale, Harry J., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, April 3, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Smith, George W. C, Somerville, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; Corporal, April 3, 1899 ; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Potter, Charles H., Topsfield, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal (cook), November 18, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Mead, John J., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out as Musician, April 28, 1899. 



338 Twelve Months with the 



Gorman, James, Melrose, enlisted June 16, 1898 ; Arti- 
ficer, November 10, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Sullivan, John B., Dan vers, Wagoner, enlisted April 28,. 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Adams, William F., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
deserted, January 5, 1899. 

Barrett, Harold D., Roslindale, enlisted May 5, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Berry, Charles H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898;. 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Best, George A., Lynn, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Blodgett, Walter A., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Buckley, Dennis, Haverhill, enlisted June 17, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cahill, John F., Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Calley, Samuel, Salem, enlisted June 17, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 1898; 
discharged, May 10, 1899. 

Campbell, George R., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 339 

Carey, John J., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Carey, Thomas, Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Chase, Benjamin W., Danvers, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898 ; discharged by order, as private,. 
February 10, 1899. 

Chisholm, Joseph W., Peabody, enlisted June 30, 1898;. 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Clement, Eugene C, Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, October 10, 1898. 

Collins, Peter F., Salem, enlisted June 18, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Connors, Maurice, Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability, October 7, 1898. 

Crosby, Joseph B., Danvers, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Curtis, Edward A., Stowe, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Derby, Arthur P., Danvers, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order as private, January 25 r 
1899. 

Donohue, William, Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



340 Twelve Months with the 



Doyle, Thomas H., Ipswich, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Duffy, Thomas F., Danvers, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Fardy, Benard F., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fogarty, James J., Peabody, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fox, Fred J., Lowell, Musician, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
discharged for disability, October 21, 1898. 

Flemming, William H., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; 
dishonorably discharged, February 25, 1899. 

Floyd, Charles F., Middleton, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Funke, Arthur E., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Griffin, Ernest J., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Haddock, Leslie B., Haverhill, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, March 11, 1899. 

Hafey, James H., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Harrigan, John, Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 341 



Harris, Allen J., Melrose, enlisted June 16, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Hatstatt, Ernest F., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, IT. S. A., August 9, 
1898; discharged April 20, 1899. 

Dowd, Thomas E., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hobbs, Spencer S., Dan vers, Musician, enlisted April 28, 
1898; died at Third Division Hospital, Chickamau- 
ga Park, Georgia, August 19, 1898. 

Howe, Samuel A., Topsfield, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Howell, James A., Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Howlett, Stephen F., Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Jackman, James W., Topsfield, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; Sergeant, August 18, 
1898; First Sergeant, August 18, 1898; discharged 
for promotion, January 22, 1899. (See Company 
B.) 

Jackson, Isaac B., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, January 4, 1899. 

Jacques, Arthur H., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



342 Twelve Months with the 



Kelley, Jeremiah J., Haverhill, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Knight, Charles A., Salem, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Lebel, Octave, Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Lee, James J., Charlestown, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Reserve Ambulance Company, First 
Army Corps, July 1, 1898; discharged May 4, 
1899. 

Little, Frank W., Danvers, Artificer, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Lovelace, Clifford E., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mack, Daniel, Somerville, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Haguire, John J., Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Mahoney, Jeremiah J., Milford, enlisted Company M, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company K, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, January 12, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

banning, John H., Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 343 



Marshall, John R. G., Somerville, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Marshall, William H., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, January 25, 1899. 

Marston, Daniel W., Danvers, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Martin, John J., Milford, enlisted Company M, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company K, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Jan- 
uary 7, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Meskill, Thomas H., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McFarland Frank W., Beverly, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out as private, 
April 28, 1899. 

McGovern, Charles, Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, January 11, 1899. 

McGrath, David, Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, October 22, 1898. 

McGrath, Patrick, Danvers, enlisted June 18, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

McGuigan, James A., Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McLean, John A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



344 Twelve Months with the 



Nimblett, Joseph A., Dan vers, enlisted June 17, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Nolan, John T., Lawrence, enlisted May 5, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Hare, Henry, Salem, enlisted June 18, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

O'Neil, John J., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Page, Louis, Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Parker, Charles J., Newburyport, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Patterson, Frederick C, Boston, enlisted Company H, 
Sixth Massachuestts Infantry, May 6, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Company K, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, January 7, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Perry, Charles H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Peters, Edwards W. A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order, February 9, 1899. 

Peterson, Levi S., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 345 



Rabbitt, Michael C, Boston, enlisted Company H, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; transferred to 
Company K, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Janu- 
ary 7, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Reedy, Edward F., Ipswich, enlisted June 30, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Reynolds, James W., Danvers, enlisted June 17, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Richardson, William W., Middleton, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Robbins, Harry, Somerville, enlisted May 5, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Reserve Ambulance Company, First Army 
Corps, July 1, 1898; discharged March 13, 1899. 

Rooney, John F., Danvers, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Saul, John H., Salem, enlisted July 5, 1898 ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Seaward, Ralph E., Haverhill, enlisted May 5, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Segal, Isaac, Salem, enlisted June 17, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Shallow, Patrick, Salem, enlisted June 30, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, Martin P., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



346 Twelve Months with the 



Stringer, Edward, Peabody, enlisted July 6, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Strout, Fred E., Peabody, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Sullivan, John F., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Taylor, Harold E., Topsfield, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Terry, James P., Somerville, enlisted May 5, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Watson, Thomas F., Danvers, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 347 



Company L, Lawrence 



Forbes, James Lawrence, Captain, April 28, 1808; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Craig, James H., Boston, Second Lieutenant, May 2, 
1898 ; First Lieutenant, May 11, 1898 ; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Commanding company by reason of seniority Oc- 
tober 15 to December 3. Regimental Inspector Rifle 
Practice, December 21, 1898, to March 31, 1899. 
Provost Guard, Fort San Severino, Matanzas, Cuba, 
January 15 to February 1. 

Sherman, Roland H., Lawrence, Second Lieutenant, 
April 28, 1898; resigned August 18, 1898. 

Aid-de-camp, Second Brigade, Third Division, 
First Army Corps, June 10 to August 18. 

Larrivee, Eugene, Lawrence, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; discharged for promotion, Septem- 
ber 15, 1898; Second Lieutenant, September 16, 
1898; resigned January 10, 1899. 

Clendenin, William H., Somerville, Second Lieutenant, 
February 4, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 
(See Company M.) 

Hepworth, Joseph, Lawrence, Quartermaster-Sergeant, 
enlisted April 28, 1898; First Sergeant, September 
1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



350 Twelve Months with the 



Fish, Albert C, Lawrence, Corporal, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Sergeant, September 21, 1898; Quartermaster- 
Sergeant, September 21, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Shea, John F., Lawrence, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McNiff, William, Lawrence, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Halloran, Dennis A., Lawrence, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Sergeant, December 30, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Armitage, George A., Lawrence, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Sergeant, December 30, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Haggerty, Michael J., Lawrence, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McKobbie, John D., North Andover, Corporal, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Connors, James E., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Connors, Charles T., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Quealy, Lot W., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 351 



Buckley, Frank S., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Connors, John T., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Farr, Edward, Lawrence,, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Henderson, John, Andover, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, September 21, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Callaghan, John, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, November 7, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Connors, James F., North Andover, enlisted April 28, 
1898; Corporal, December 30, 1S9S; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Houston, John A., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, December 30, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Nelligan, Michael F., Lawrence, Musician, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Provost, Joseph A., Lawrence, Artificer, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fish, John K., North Andover, Wagoner, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



352 Twelve Months with the 

Henderson, George M., Andover, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal (cook), October 17, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Anderson, John S., North Andover, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Benoit, Eugene O., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bliss, William F., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Boyle, Michael F., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by reason of being a minor, June 24, 

1898. 

Brennan, Patrick J., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brown, Ralph S., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Buchan, Raymond L., Andover, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Buckman, Leroy M., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Caffrey, James T., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cahill, Dennis, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 353 



Cain, Hugh H., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 189S; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Callahan, William H., Lawrence, enlisted May 9, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carpenter, John A., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Casey, Martin F., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cody, Nelson, Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898 ; mus 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Collopy, Michael EL, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Crowley, John H., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cunningham, John A., Lawrence, enlisted April 28 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Daley, William J., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dillon, Walter E., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9 
1898; discharged April 30, 1899. 

Doherty, John J., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



354 Twelve Months with the 



Donnelly, Edward V., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Donohue, James W., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dowd, William, Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Dunn, Harvey A., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
died at Third Division Hospital, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, July 18, 1898. 

Egan, John J., Lawrence, enlisted May 9, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Entwistle, William, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Evans, Mark, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Earr, Samuel, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Flagg, George W., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gague, Lyndon A., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, IJ. S. A., July 1, 
1898; discharged April 25, 1899. 

Greenlaw, Elmer E., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry J5j 



Griffin, Michael P., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hanson, John P., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
died at John Blair Gibbs General Hospital, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, September 22, 1898. 

Haycock, Albert T., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by reason of being a minor, June 12, 
1898. 

Heald, Herbert L., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hewitt, Thomas J., Lawrence, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; Sergeant, September 1, 189S ; mustered out 
as private, April 28, 1899. 

Hurley, Joseph A., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kant, Patrick, Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Keefe, James, Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Keilig, Charles E., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Kelly, John D., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Kelly, Patrick, Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



356 Twelve Months with the 



Leary, James, Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., August 9, 1898 ; 
discharged April 20, 1899. 

Lehmann, Kudolph, Lawrence, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mahoney, Denis W., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Matthews, Edward W., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McDonald, Thomas M., Lawrence, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McDonald, James P., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McKenny, Benjamin H., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order, February 6, 1899. 

Mice, George A., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Moody, John W., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; dis- 
charged for disability, January 4, 1899. 

Moran, Joseph F., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Morgan, Charles H., Lawrence, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 357 



Murtha, Thomas H., Southbridge, enlisted Company K 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; trans 
ferred to Company L, Eighth Massachusetts Infan 
try, December 16, 1898; mustered out April 28 
1899. 

Myers, Eobert M., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Brien, James W., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

O'Donnell, Patrick, Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Pallister, Arthur F., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Palmer, George H., Lawrence, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out as private, April 28, 1899. 

Parke, Frank G., Lowell, enlisted Company C, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898; transferred 
to Company L, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, De- 
cember 16, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Phillips, William N., Lawrence, Musician, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

Pigott, David A., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Pottle, Herbert E., Lawrence, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



358 Twelve Months with the 



Powers, John A., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Raidy, John A., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Ray, James F., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Regan, John J., North Andover, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Richard, Joseph E., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
deserted August 15, 1898. 

Rondeau, Louis !N\, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sawyer, Charles F., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Scott, John J., Salem, enlisted July 6, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Scott, Walter R., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sheridan, James E., Lawrence, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smart, William H., Haverhill, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Smith, John C, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 359 



Sweet, Arthur D., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
transferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., July 1, 
1898; discharged April 17, 1899. 

Sweet, Irving L., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1S98; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Sullivan, James J., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Taylor, Alfred E., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
discharged for disability, October 22, 1898. 

Vatter, Arthur L., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Walker, George IL, Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Welch, Jeremiah R., Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Welch, John, Salem, enlisted July 6, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Westervelt, Raymond S., Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Whittaker, James EL, Lawrence, enlisted June 25, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wilkinson, Hartley, Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



360 Twelve Months with the 



Williamson, Donald R., Lowell, enlisted Company C, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Company L, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, December 24, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Winslow, Arthur M., Lawrence, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 361 



Company M, Somerville 



"Whitten, Herbert W., Cambridge, Captain, April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ou recruiting duty June 11 to July 20. Com- 
manded Second Battalion by reason of seniority 
September 17 to October 17. Assistant Provost 
Marshal, District of Matanzas, Cuba, January 24. 
Summary court, District of Matanzas, Cuba, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1899. 

Cantield, George I., Somerville, First Lieutenant, April 
28, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Acting Quartermaster of regiment May 20, to 
August 22. Provost guard at Santa Christina bar- 
racks, January 24 to April 3, 1899. 

Pierce, Frederick W., Somerville, Second Lieutenant, 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Regimental Inspector Rifle Practice, November 
27 to December 27. Provost guard duty, January 
24 to April 3. On General Court Martial, February 
4 to April 1, 1899. 

Wiley, Joseph E., Somerville, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; First Sergeant, November 15, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Kelsey, James H., Boston, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; Quartermaster Sergeant, 
February 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



364 Twelve Months with the 



Kenny, John, Somerville, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Clement, Herman J., Somerville, Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hanaford, Louis L., Somerville, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Sergeant, September 17, 1898; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Briggs, Arthur W., Somerville, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; Sergeant, February 1, 1899; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. 

Tibbetts, George W., Somerville, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gilson, Valentine E., Somerville, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gilson, Howard A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, June 8, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

McDonald, Neil, Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Kenny, William, Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out xlpril 28, 
1899. 

Ulm, Albert A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 365 



Gerry, Charles A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, August 1, 1898; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Gammon, Eugene H., Somerville, enlisted June 20, 
1898; Corporal, September 17, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Rowe, James E., Chelsea, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
Corporal, November 14, 1898 ; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

McLean, Daniel A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal, February 1, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Durno, William J., Cambridge, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Corporal, February 1, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Grace, James W., Somerville, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
Corporal, February 5, 1899; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Webber, Leon S., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Corporal (cook), December 6, 1898; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 

Brobick, John L., Cambridge, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; 
Musician, March 20, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 
1899. 

Ahearn, Frank, Pawtucket, R. I., enlisted April 28, 
1898; Musician, March 1, 1899; mustered out 
April 28, 1899. 



366 Twelve Months with the 

McKay, Thomas O., Somerville, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; 
Artificer, December 11, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Smith, Norman H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Wagoner, September 25, 1898; mustered out April 
28, 1899. 

Anderson, Joseph M., Somerville, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Apel, Daniel C, Cambridge, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Beck, Everett W., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Berry, William F., Greenwood, Musician, enlisted April 
28, 1898; transferred to the band as Band-Sergeant, 
March 1, 1899. 

Bingham, Henry S., Somerville, enlisted June 23, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Bodge, George H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Brown, William H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Burgess, Charles E., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Campbell, Joseph, Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, January 5, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 367 



Campbell, William C, Somerville, enlisted June 23, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Carty, John J., Somerville, Wagoner, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged as private, April 28, 1899. 

Caswell, Charles E., Medford, First Sergeant, enlisted 
April 28, 1898; discharged for disability as private, 
January 19, 1899. 

Clark, Hiram D., Somerville, Sergeant, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; discharged for disability, January 5, 1899. 

Clendenin, William H., Somerville, Corporal, enlisted 
April 28, 1898 ; discharged for promotion, Febru- 
ary 2, 1899. ^See Company L.) 

Colbath, Thomas B. M., Somerville, enlisted June 20, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Collupy, Carroll A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Collupy, Everett H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cowan, John W., East Boston, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Cox, Francis H., Somerville, enlisted May 9, 1898; trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps, U. S. A., June 29, 1898; 
discharged April 17, 1899. 

Crowley, Herbert L., North Cambridge, enlisted May 8, 
1898; transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 



368 Twelve Months with the 



Cummings, John H., West Somerville, enlisted May 9, 
1898; transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

Davis, Winfred D., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Donohue, James A., Lowell, enlisted Company M, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 24, 1898; transferred 
to Company M, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, 
January 7, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Doten, Chester G., Somerville, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dowdell, Millard F., Charlestown, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Dowling, Fred E., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Drady, Archie J., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Draper, Frank E., Somerville, Sergeant, enlisted April 
28, 1898; died at Third Division Hospital, Chick- 
amauga Park, Georgia, September 2, 1898. 

Dyer, Edward J., Cambridge, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Fealey, Thomas H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, December 22, 1898. 

Freeborn, Frank 0., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 369 

Gallagher, William H., Somerville, enlisted June 21, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gilson, Claude U., Wellesley Hills, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Givan, Charles F., Charlestown, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

Goette, Albert H., Cambridgeport, enlisted June 29, 
1898; transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

Goodrich, Clarence E., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Graves, Frank H., Somerville, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Gray, Herman L., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Greenwood, Edwin E., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hardcastle, William J., Boston, enlisted June 23, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Halloran, John J., Lowell, enlisted Company C, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898; transferred 
to Company M, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, 
January 9, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



370 Twelve Months with the 



Hill, Rupert G., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
Wagoner, May 26, 1898; transferred to Company 
G, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, September 11, 
1898. 

Holland, John P., Somerville, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Howe, Frank G., Lowell, enlisted in Company G, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 22, 1898; transferred 
to Company M, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, 
January 9, 1899; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Hunt, Ernest W., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898 
deserted, July 6, 1898. 

Hunter, Walter, Medford, enlisted June 22, 1898; mus 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

James, Charles T., Allston, enlisted April 28, 1898 
transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

Keville, William J., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898 
discharged by order, November 14, 1898. 

Knox, Charles W., Somerville, enlisted June 21, 1898 
discharged for disability, January 5, 1899. 

Leighton, Albro B., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Marston, Benjamin F., Somerville, enlisted June 20, 
1898 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 371 



Maynard, Erville H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 
1898; discharged by order, January 18, 1899. 

McBarron, James H., Boston, enlisted May 5, 1898; 
transferred to the band, March 20, 1899. 

McCann, Eugene F., Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, June 24, 1898; transferred 
to Company M, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, 
January 7, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

McDonald, Charles E., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Mclnnes, Daniel H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, March 21, 1899. 

Miers, Walter B., Somerville, enlisted June 20, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Monroe, Frank J., Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth 
Massachusetts Infantry, May G, 1898 ; transferred 
to Company M. Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, 
January 7, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Morgan, Albion B., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Moulton, Edmund A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Murry, John P., Allston, enlisted April 28, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 



372 Twelve Months with the 



Nevins, Joseph H., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Oliver, Arthur R., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged for disability, January 5, 1899. 

Odom, John S., Quincy, enlisted June 20, 1898 ; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Paine, Melvin P., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Parkhurst, Charles W., Cambridge, enlisted June 21, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Penney, George S., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Plunkett, Eichard A., Everett, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Porter, Wilfred EL, Americus, Georgia, enrolled in the 
band, January 3, 1899 ; transferred to Company M, 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, January 19, 1899 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. Previous service: En- 
listed as private in Battery L, First Massachusetts 
Heavy Artillery, May 9, 1898; mustered out Novem- 
ber 14, 1898. 

Rebello, William P., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Rice, Harry E., Cambridge, enlisted April 28, 1898; dis- 
charged for disability, October 14, 1898. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 373 

Richardson, William A., Cambridge, enlisted June 21, 
1898; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Riley, Charles A., Cambridge, enlisted Juhc 20, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Ring, Arthur W., Cambridge, enlisted June 29, 1898 ; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Robertson, William J., South Boston, enlisted July 5, 
1898 ; discharged for disability, February 9, 1899. 

Robinson, Clarence A., Boston, enlisted June 26, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Sanborn, Lyman H., Somerville, enlisted June 21, 1898; 
transferred to Division Hospital, August 9, 1898; 
discharged January 7, 1899. 

Sanson, Joseph, Lowell, enlisted Company G, Sixth Mass- 
achusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898; transferred to 
Company M, Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, Janu- 
ary 7, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Scharpf, Leo, Cambridge, enlisted June 29, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Simmons, John, Americus, Georgia, enlisted in the band, 
December 6, 1898 and transferred to Company M, 
Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, same date ; mustered 
out April 28, 1899. Previous record; Enlisted as 
a private in Battery L, First Massachusetts Heavy 
Artillery, May 9, 1898 ; mustered out November 14, 
1898. 



3 74 Twelve Months with the 



Snow, Walter R., Somerville, Artificer, enlisted April 28, 
1898 ; discharged by order, as private, February 28, 
1899. 

Stagg, John W., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Stewart, Clarence R., Somerville, Corporal, enlisted April 
28, 1898 ; died at Regimental Hospital, Chickamau- 
ga Park, Georgia, June 11, 1898. 

Tabor, Charles S., Charlestown, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Taylor, Albert C, Somerville, enlisted May 9, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Taylor, Arthur F., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
Wagoner, August 6, 1898; mustered out as private, 
April 28, 1899. 

Tesson, William A., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
discharged by order, February 23, 1899. 

Walker, Henry E., Saugus, enlisted June 23, 1898; mus- 
tered out April 28, 1899. 

Wallace, Patrick H., Lowell, enlisted in Company G, 
Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, May 6, 1898 ; trans- 
ferred to Company M, Eighth Massachusetts Infan- 
try, January 9, 1899 ; mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wallace, William B., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898 ; 
discharged by reason of being a minor, July 18, 

1898. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 375 



Webb, Richard I., Soinerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Whitney, James E., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

Wiley, Richard S., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 

York, James W., Somerville, enlisted April 28, 1898; 
mustered out April 28, 1899. 



Chronology 



February, 1898. 

15. U. S. S. Maine destroyed in Havana harbor. 

March. 

9. Congress appropriates $50,000,000 for national de- 
fence. 

16. Meeting of the Eighth Eegiment, M. V. M. officers 

at headquarters in Salem to discuss matter of 
regiment volunteering in case of war with 
Spain. Decision was to volunteer. 

24. Spanish torpedo gunboat flotilla assembled at Cape 
Verde Islands. 

28. Congress received report of 1ST aval Board of Inquiry 
declaring that U. S. S. Maine was destroyed by 
an exterior explosion. 

April. 

9. General Fitz Hugh Lee, consul-general, left Havana. 
15. Legislature of Massachusetts appropriated $500,000 
for local defence and equipment of troops. 

21. Spanish government sent passports to U. S. Minis- 

ter Woodford. 

22. Colonel William A. Pew, Jr., commanding Eighth 

Regiment, M. V. M., tenders services of regi- 
ment to Governor Wolcott. 

23. President William McKinley calls for 125,000 

troops. 



380 Twelve Months with the 



25. Congress declares war to have existed with Spain 
since April 21. 

Admiral Dewey and fleet sailed from Hong 
Kong for Manilla. 

Governor Wolcott received notification from 
Secretary of War regarding quota to be fun- 
nished by Massachusetts. 

27. Governor Wolcott received letter from Secretary of 

War requesting four Infantry regiments, and 
one of heavy artillery. 

28. Colonel Pew and commanders of Second, Sixth and 

Ninth Regiments ordered to Boston to hold con- 
ference with Governor Wolcott. 

Officers of Eighth Regiment met Colonel Pew 
at State House and arrangements made for re- 
cruiting a regiment of volunteers. 

Recruiting opened in cities and towns repre- 
sented by companies in Eighth Regiment. 

29. Eighth Regiment ordered to report at State Camp 

Grounds, South Eramingham, May 5, at 11 
A. M. 

May. 

1. Admiral Montojo's Spanish fleet destroyed in Manila 
Bay by fleet under command of Admiral Dewey. 
News received several days later. 

5. Companies of Eighth Regiment left home stations 

amid ovations. Reviewed at State House by 
Governor Wolcott. Went into camp at South 
Framingham. 

6. Examination of commissioned officers. 

7. Examinations of enlisted men commenced. Many 

rejected and sent home. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 381 



10. Companies B, F, E, G, L and M, sworn into the 

United States service. Governor Wolcott wit- 
nessed swearing in of Company L. 

11. Companies A, C, D, H, I and K, sworn into the 

United States service, completing the regiment. 
Second Massachusetts Infantry left camp for 

Tampa, Florida. 
14. Governor Wolcott and staff visited camp. Governor 

presented commissions to officers of Eighth 

Regiment. 

Regiment received orders to move to Chicka- 

mauga Park, Georgia. 
16. Regiment left camp for Chickamauga Park, 

Georgia, after being reviewed by Governor 

Wolcott. 

19. Regiment arrived at Citico freight yard, outside 

Chattanooga, Tennessee. Arrived at Chicka- 
mauga Park, Georgia, early in evening and 
went into bivouac for night. 

20. Marched to camp site on Alexander road and went 

into camp. Assigned to Second Brigade, Third 
Division, First Army Corps, with Twelfth Xew 
York and Twenty-First Kansas Regiments. 
Colonel Pew, senior commander, placed in com- 
mand of brigade. 
28. First death in regiment. Private Herbert O. 
Burnham of Company D, of Lynn. 



June. 

3. U. S. S. Merrimac sunk in entrance to Santiago 
harbor by Hobson and others. 
13. Paymaster Barr, Eighth Regiment, M. V. M., ar- 
rived in camp with state pay. 



382 Twelve Months with the 



17. Bunker Hill day observed with bon-fire, and con- 
cert by Drum Corps. 

20. Expedition under command of General Shafter 
landed at Baiquiri. 

24. Action with the Spaniards at La Guasimas. 

29. Colonel Pew relieved and brigade placed under com- 
mand of General Waites of Texas. 

July. 

1-2. Actions with Spaniards at El Caney and San Juan 
hill. 

Members of regiment transferred to United 
States Hospital Corps about this time. 

3. Congressman William H. Moody of Massachusetts, 

arrived in camp. 

Admiral Cevera's Spanish fleet annihilated 
off Santiago. 

4. National holiday duly celebrated. Congressman 

Moody delivered patriotic address. Programme 

of sports interferred with by arrival of United 

States Paymaster. 
13. First case of typhoid made its appearance in the 

regiment. 
17. Eegiment celebrated the fall of Santiago, assisted by 

Twelfth New York and Twenty-First Kansas 

Regiments. 
19. Regiment, with exception of Company A of New- 

buryport, went on hike to Pea Vine valley, 

pitched camp and returned following day. 
23. Old knapsacks, issued by state, condemned and 

burned. Blanket bags issued in their places. 
26. Spain asks terms of peace. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 383 



29. Eighth Regiment won division rifle match with 

score of 481. 

30. First division sham fight took place. 

August. 

9. New stand of colors received by regiment. 

Colonel Pew addressed men concerning ty- 
phoid fever. 
12. Peace protocol signed and hostilities suspended. 
16. First furloughs granted to men broken down in 
health. 

Eighth Regiment participated in big review at 
Snodgrass Hill. 

22. Bon-fire and celebration in honor of receipt of orders 

to break camp. 

23. Regiment marched over road to Rossville, Georgia. 

Embarked for Lexington, Kentucky. 

24. Arrived and went into camp on Clark farm at Mon- 

trose, a few miles outside of Lexington, Ken- 
tucky. 

September. 

15. Twenty-First Kansas volunteers of the brigade re- 
ceived orders to prepare for home and muster 
out. 

20. Secretary of War, General Russell A. Alger of 
Michigan, visited camp and reviewed the troops. 

23. Governor Bradley of Kentucky and staff reviewed 

the troops. 

24. Regiment visited Louden Park race track, Lexing- 

ton, and gave exhibition drill. 



384 Twelve Months with the 



26. Twenty-First Kansas regiment departed for muster 

out at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

27. First Territorial regiment arrived in camp from 

west. 

October. 

10. First battalion of regiment sent out on Bryan Pike 

on account of trouble at Lexington. 

11. Men of regiment visited Forepaugh & Sells Brothers 

circus at Lexington. 
20. General Breckinridge turned command over to Gen- 
eral Wilson. 

November. 

10. Regiment transferred to Second Brigade, Second 
Division, First Army Corps. 
Evacuation of Lexington. 

12. Regiment arrived at Americus, Georgia, and went 

into camp. 

Krag-Jorgensen rifles arrived. 
Thanksgiving day. Men enjoyed dinner provided by 
Captain Augustus P. Gardner of Hamilton, 
Massachusetts. 

December. 

10. Commissioners at Paris signed treaty of peace. 

25. Christmas day. Camp decorated. Men provided with 

dinner by Hon. George von L. Meyer of Ham- 
ilton, Massachusetts. 

26. Twelfth New York regiment left camp enroute for 

Cuba. 
31. Orders received for regiment to prepare to move to 
Cuba. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 3X5 



January. 

6. First Battalion broke camp and left for Cuba, via 
Savannah, Georgia. 

8. First Battalion embarked on Transport Obdam 

from Savannah for Cuba. 

Second and Third Battalions left Americus, 

Georgia, for Cuba, via Savannah. 

9. Arrived at Savannah. Fire in freight yard. 

10. Second and Third Battalions embarked on Trans- 
port Michigan for Cuba. 

First Battalion arrived and landed at Matan- 
zas, Cuba. 

13. Second and Third Battalions arrived and landed at 
Matanzas, Cuba. 

20. Cuban insurgents laid down their arms. Celebration 
in honor of event. 

February. 

20. Regiment participated in parade and reception to 

General Gomez, Cuban General. 
25. Twelfth New York regiment of brigade got orders 

to prepare for home and muster out. 

March. 

18. Regiment received orders to prepare for home and 
muster out. 

24. Regiment escorted the Twelfth New York to Trans- 
port Meade and watched it embark for home. 



386 Twelve Months with the 



April. 

3. Regiment embarked on Transport Meade for home. 

4. Transport sailed for Boston at 6.30 A. M. 

9. Transport arrived at Boston. Regiment disembarked 
at New England dock and marched to South 
Armory, being reviewed at State House by 
Governor Wolcott and staff. Regiment fur- 
loughed and companies returned to home sta- 
tions. Receptions given returning commands. 

11. President William McKinley officially proclaimed 

the war to have terminated. 

12. Men of regiment reported for duty from furlough. 
19. Regiment furloughed until April 28. 

28. Regiment reported for duty at 8.30 A. M. and 
companies were mustered out in the following 
order: Companies E, D, G, M, L, K, B, C, F, 
I, H, and A, Band, field and staff, Colonel Pew. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 387 



Appendix 



The following letters will be of interest to the members 
of the regiment, showing, as they do, the standing the 
reaiment and its commander had with officers higher in 
authority in '98, and the fact that the good opinion is 
retained 10 years later. 



Headquarters, Department of Matanzas, 

Matanzas, Cuba, March 10, 1899. 
To the President, 

Executive Mansion, Washington. 

Si r: — I take pleasure in saying that I have known 
Colonel William A. Pew, Jr., Eighth Massachusetts 
Volunteers, since his entry into the service at Camp 
Thomas. He has served with me in Kentucky, Georgia, 
and in this Island, and has shown himself to be m every 
way competent to command his regiment, which is one of 
the best I have seen in the Army. Colonel Pew is a 
lawyer by profession, but has devoted himself very per- 
sistently to the National Guard, with which he has served 
some eighteen or twenty years. Withal, he is still in the 
prime of life, and should occasion require it, I should be 
glad to see you avail of his services for the Eegular Army, 
or any further service that may be necessary in the vol- 
unteers. Colonel Pew is entirely capable, correct in his 
habits, soldierly in his bearing, and at all times attentive 
to his duties. You could not do better, if his services 
were required, than appoint him to the rank of Brigadier 
General, which grade I am sure he would have won had 
it been his good fortune to participate in the conflict with 

the enemy. 

I cordially commend him for the above promotion, and 



390 Twelve Months with the 

bespeak your good opinion of him, such officers as he will 
commend to your notice, and the regiment itself. 

Very respectfully, 

(Signed) James H. Wilson, 

Major General of Volunteers. 



Headquarters, District of Matanzas, 

Matanzas, Cuba, March 13, 1899. 

To the Adjutant General, U. S. Army, 

Washington, D. C. 

Sir: — I have the honor to recommend for appointment 
as Brigadier General of Volunteers, Colonel William A. 
Pew, of the Eighth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. 
Colonel Pew has been under my command since last June 
and has proved his capacity in many ways. He has been 
at times during this interval, in command of a brigade, 
and also of the Third Division, First Army Corps. He 
has one of the best regiments in the service in all respects, 
due largely to his intelligence and faithful service. I 
consider him fully qualified to discharge the duties of 
Brigadier General. 

Very respectfully, 

(Signed) J. P. Sanger, 

Brigadier General, U. S. V. 



Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 391 

Wilmington, Delaware, 

October 22, 1907. 

H. E. Webber, Esq., 

Salem Post Office, Salem, Mass. 

My dear Sir: — Replying to your letter of October 19th, 
I hasten to say that the Eighth Massachusetts Infantry 
served under my command during the war with Spain. 
It was a most excellent volunteer regiment, exceedingly 
well officered, from Colonel Pew down to the lowest 
lieutenant. It was noted for the good discipline dis- 
played by it throughout its entire service, and what struck 
me particularly were the good relations existing between the 
officers and the enlisted men at all times and in all places. 
It was quite apparent that the officers treated their men 
with just consideration, equally removed from undue 
familiarity on the one hand and oppressive severity on 
the other. They took every care to instruct their men in 
all their duties, and while the regiment did not participate 
in any battle, it showed by its promptitude and willing 
obedience to orders, that it would give a good account 
of itself in the presence of the enemy. Its camps were 
noted for their cleanliness and good police, and both 
officers and men for the cheerful intelligence with which 
they performed such duties as were assigned to them. In 
the late war between the States, it was said that Massa- 
chusetts sent her best to support the Union, and judging 
from the character of this regiment, it is safe to say that 
she did the same in the war against Spain. 

Yours very truly, 

(Signed) James H. Wilson. 



New Yoke, October 25, 1907. 

Mr. H. E. Webbek, Salem, Mass. 

Dear Sir: — Your letter of the 23rd inst. received. I 
remember the arrival of the Eighth Massachusetts Regi- 
ment at Camp George H. Thomas, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, and assigned it on report of its colonel to the 
Second Brigade, Third Division, First Army Corps. 
Colonel W. A. Pew, Jr., commanded this regiment at that 
time, and afterwards served under my command in Cuba. 
I can say that I thought very highly of the regiment. It 
was in good discipline, well instructed, good soldiers in 
fact, and it gives me pleasure to bear this testimony 
through the regiment, its officers and soldiers. 

I am, Sir, 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) John R. Bkooke. 



. x*~> i*v» 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS