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Full text of "Twentieth century history of Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, and representative citizens"

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TWENTIETH CENTURY HISTORY 



OF 



CLEARFIELD COUNTY 

PENNSYLVANIA 



AND 



REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



BY 

ROLAND D. SWOOPE, Jr. 



•Study History, for it is Philosophy Teaching by Example" 



PUBLISHED BY 

RICHMOND-ARNOLD PUBLISHING CO. 

F. J. Richmond, Prtsident C. R. Aknold, Stcreiary and Treasurer 

CHICAGO, ILL. 






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PREFACE. 

Only those who have undertaken similar work can appreciate the amount of 
labor involved in preparing a history of a great county like Clearfield, particu- 
larly when, as in this instance, so much of the early history of the county is 
dependent upon local tradition and practically all of the early settlers have passed 
away. 

While great care has been taken to avoid mistakes, it is but natural that in a 
work of such an extensive scope errors will occur and for such as may be found 
in the book, the editor asks the indulgence of the reader. 

Whatever be its merits or imperfections, the work of preparation has been 
one of great interest and instruction to the editor. 

To the many persons who have so kindly aided us by giving information and 
data, we desire to take this method of returning our sincere thanks. 

Roland D. Swoope, Jr. 

CURWENSVILLE, Pa., 

June, 191 1. 

Note. — Sketches unrevised by subscribers are distinguished by a small 
asterisk (*). 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I PAGE 

Geography, Topography and Geology 19 

Dimensions and Acreage of the County— Its Situation and Boundaries 
— Hills and Valleys — Streams — Character of the Soil — Geological Strata 
— Coal Measures — Conglomerate — Mahoning Sandstone — The Three 
Great Coal Basins — Fire-clay — Limestone-Oil and Gas-Iron Ore, Etc. 

CHAPTER II 

Indian Occupation 22 

The Andastes — Their Conflict with the Iroquois and Partial Destruc- 
tion — Brule's Expedition — His Capture and Escape — The Lennia-Lenapes 
or Delawares — The Monceys — Their Subjection by the Iroquois — The 
Shawnees and Tuscaroras — Retreat of the Indians. 

CHAPTER III 

Land Titles 24 

Charles the Second's Grant to William Penn — Penn's Lease from Gov- 
ernor Dongan — Indian Deed Confirming the Purchase — Indian Deed to 
Penn's Heirs — The Articles of Consideration — Penn's Will — His Sale to the 
Crown — Thomas Penn Assumes Charge of the Province — First Surveys 
— Early Land Owners — Litigation over Titles. 

CHAPTER IV 

The Early Settlers 27 

Character of Clearfield County's Early Population — Former Political 
Divisions — The First White Settler — The Leading Pioneers of the County 
and the Credit Due Them. 

CHAPTER V 

Organization of the County 30 

Penn's Division of Pennsylvania into Three Counties — Thirty-six 
Counties Formed in 1803 — Additions in 1804. Including Clearfield County 
— The Act in Regard to Same — Annexation of Clearfield to Centre County 
— Settlement of Jurisdiction — Appointment of Commissioners to Select 
Seat of Justice — The Site Selected and Named Clearfield — Population of 
the County in 1806 — Election Laws — Organization of the Townships and 
Boroughs. 



CONTEXTS 



CHAPTER \'I 



County and Other Officials 38 

A List of the Principal State and County Officials — United States Sen- 
ators — Representatives in Congress — U. S. District Attorney — U. S. 
Marshall — Clerk of House of Representatives — State Officers — Senators, 
Representatives — President Judges — Associate Judges — Deputy Attorneys 
— General and District Attorneys — Sheriffs — Registers and Recorders — 
Treasurers — Prothonotaries — County Superintendents — County Commis- 
sioners and Clerks. 



CHAPTER VII 

Military History and the County Militia — The Civil War 44 

Loyalty of Clearfield County's Sons — Military Organizations Before 
the \^'ar — Thirty-fourth Regiment, Fifth Reserves — Its General and Indi- 
vidual Record, Officers and Men — Forty-second Regiment, "Bucktails" — 
The Fifty-first Regiment — Fifty-ninth Regiment, Second Cavalry — Eighty- 
fourth Regiment. 

CHAPTER VIII 

Military History — The Civil War — Continued 74 

History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment — Roster of Officers 
and Men — History of the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regiment, with 
Roster — In Other Commands — Independent Battalion. 

CHAPTER IX 

The Spanish-American War 115 

History of the Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, with 
Roster and Individual Records. 



CHAPTER X 

The Press 174 

A Sketch of Journalism in Clearfield County — The First County Paper 
— A Home-made Press — The "Banner"' — Clearfield Republican — Clearfield 
Whig — Raftsman's Journal — Clearfield Citizen — The Times-Monitor — 
Evening Herald — Clearfickl County Times — Curwensville Herald — County 
Review — The Mountaineer — DuBois Morning Courier — DuBois Express — 
The Enterprise — DuBois Morning Journal — Houtzdale Citizen — Osceola 
Reveille — The Leader-Courier — Coalport Standard — The Hustler, and 
Other Newspapers. 



CONTENTS 7 

CHAPTER XI 

The Bench of Clearfield County 178 

Clearfield County's Judicial Connection with Centre County Previous 
to 1822 — The Act of 1822 Providing for the Holding of Courts in Clear- 
field County — Population at That Time — Provision for Keeping Prisoners 
— Sketches of Hon. Charles Huston, Hon. Thomas Burnside, Hon. George 
W. Woodward, Hon. Robert C. White, Hon. John G. Knox, Hon. James 
T. Hale — The Twenty-fifth District Formed — Hon. James Burnside, Hon. 
James Gamble, Judge Linn, Hon. Joseph B. AIcEnally, Hon. Charles A. 
Mayer — Act of 1874 Providing for an Addition Law Judge — Hon. John 
H. Orvis Appointed — Clearfield County Created a Separate Judicial Dis- 
trict — Hon. David L. Krebs, Hon. Cyrus Gordon — Hon. Allison O. Smith. 

CHAPTER Xn 

The Bar of Clearfield County — Former Members 184 

Character of the Clearfield County Bar — First Resident Member of the 
Bar — Sketches of Leading Members of the Bar in Former Days. 

CHAPTER Xni 

Clearfield County Bar — Present Members 193 

Brief Biographical Notices of the Present Members of the Clearfield 
County Bar. 

CHAPTER XIV 

The Medical Profession igg 

Early Physicians of the County — Registration Law of 1881 — Alphabet- 
ical List of Physicians who have Registered in the County from 1881 to the 
Present Time, with Biographical Mention. 

CHAPTER XV 

Public Institutions 214 

The Clearfield Hospital— The DuBois Hospital— The Clearfield County 
Home. 

CHAPTER XVI 

Education 220 

A History of the Schools from 1834 to the Present Time— School Law 
of 1834— Compulsary School Law— Early Schools and Schoolhouses— 
Schools and Academies of Clearfield, Curwensville, DuBois and Other 
Towns. 



8 CONTEXTS 

CHAPTER XVII 

Transportation Facilities 224 

Turnpike Days — Water Transportation — The Tyrone and Clearfield 
Railroad — The Pennsylvania & Northern — The Buflfalo, Rochester & Pitts- 
burg R. R.— The Karthaus R. R.— The Beech Creek R. R.— The Cresson, 
Clearfield County & New York Short Route R. R. — The Philipsburg R. R. 
— The Clearfield Southern R. R. — The West Branch R. R. — The Curwens- 
ville & Bower R. R. — The Buflfalo & Susquehanna R. R. — The Franklin 
& Clearfield R. R. — The DuBois Street Railway — The Philipsburg Street 
Railway Co. 

CHAPTER XVIII 

Manufacturers 227 

The Lumber Industrj' — Method of Operating — Rafting — Log Drivers 
and Lumber Arks — Conflict with "Square Timber" Men — Marking the 
Logs — Erection of Saw-mills — Decline of the Business — The Fire Brick 
Industry — Firms and Companies Engaged in the Business — The Tanning 
Industry. 

. CHAPTER XIX 

Financial Institutions 233 

Banking in the Early History of the County — Private and State Banks 
— Special Act of the Legislature Necessary to Incorporation Before i860 — 
The Act of i860 — Unreliability of the State Banks — Passage of the 
National Banking Law — Banks of Clearfield County with their Oflficers and 
Directors. 

CHAPTER XX 

Agriculture 239 

The Patrons of Husbandry, "The Grange" — Object of the Society — 
When Founded — The First Grange Founded in Clearfield County — Other 
Branches of the Society — The Clearfield County Agricultural Society. 

CHAPTER XXI 

Coal Production and Development 242 

Early Coal Shipments — Early Coal Mines and Railroads — The Mos- 
hannon Branch of the T. & C. R. R. — Coal Companies and Proprietors — 
Description of the Mines, with Character of the Product, Quantity Mined 
and Shipped, etc. 



CONTENTS 9 

CHAPTER XXII 

Religious Development 251 

Pioneer Clergy of the County — First Services of the Different De- 
nominations — Early Churches and Meeting-houses — Growth of the Various 
Churches— Y. M. C. A. 

CHAPTER XXIII 

The Townships 258 

Sketches of the Different Townships — When Erected — Boundaries — 
Population and Principal Occupations of the Inhabitants, etc. 

CHAPTER XXIV 

The Boroughs 318 

Historical Sketches of the Boroughs of Brisbin, Burnside, Chester Hill, 
Clearfield, Coalport, Curwensville, DuBois, Glen Hope, Grampian, Hotrtz- 
dale, Irvona, Lumber City, Mahaffey, Newburg, New Washington, Osceola 
Mills, Ramey, Troutville, Wallaceton and Westover. 

CHAPTER XXV 

Statistics 333 

Increase in Population Shown by Census Returns by Townships — 
Wealth of the County — Summary of Assessments for 1910. 

Representative Citizens 337 



INDEX 



Adamson, James 813 

Addleman, Charles C 675 

AUdleman, G. Lloyd 801 

Ake, Dr. N. F. K 374 

Alexander, Hon. Joseph 760 

Ardary. James M 539 

Ardary, John R 539 

Arnold, Samuel 779 

Aughenbaugh, Austin H 836 

Bailey, Charles C 463 

Bailey, J. D 689 

Bailey, Joseph 463 

Bailey, Lewis E 791 

Ball, John 943 

Barnett, D. H 753 

Barrett, Prof. H. J 580 

Baummer, George J 751 

Beatty, Austin 731 

Beauseigneur, Joseph 745 

Beauseigneur, Peter 370 

Beuseigneur, Q. E 670 

Beish, Isaac 573 

Bell. Arthur A 766 

Bell, Jlrs. Eliza C 699 

Bell, Emory W 931 

Bell, John W 699 

Bell, Singleton 196 

Bellis, Enoch 617 

Bensinger, Joe 507 

Betts, Frederick- G. ' 9S1 

Betts, William 1 981 

Betts, Hon. William W 973 

Beyer, Lewis W. . 458 

Biekford, S. M 567 

Bigler, George R 197 

Bigler. Hon. William 337 

Bigler. William D 181 



P.ilger, George M 475 

Billotte, E. D 456 

Bird, E. T 475 

Blakeslee, Austin 464 

Blandy, E. C 498 

Bloom, Conrad 657' 

Bloom, Harvey 655 

Bloom, Jolin 1 548 

Bloom, John J 603 

Bloom, John W 896 

Bloom, Mrs. Luella 726 

Bloom, T. Jeff 485 

Bloom, W. Sloss 726 

Bloom, Zaehariah M 679 

Boag, John 436 

Boal, Caleb T 546 

Boal, James 546 

Bonsall, Amos 511 

Boone, Charles 598 

Boose, Earl G. . . 198 

Borst, Joseph J 781 

Bouch. George W 349 

Boultop, Hon. Harry 443 

Bowman. H. L 423 

Bowman, Jonathan 423 

Bowman, Stacy 899 

Boyce, Murray L 999 

Boyce, William M 759 

Boyer, Louis E 198 

Boyle. J. J 966 

Bressler, David 725 

Breth, Adam 776 

Briel, J. S 337 

Brothers, Charles F 848 

Brown, Albert S 960 

Brown, David 600 

Brown, Charles 580 

Brown, Perry ■ 600 



11 



12 



INDEX 



Brow n, Peter -iSl 

Brown, William H 580 

Bryan, Vt. Wallace S 474 

Buterbaugh, Jesse 937 

Byers, Harry , ■ ■ 19" 

Byers, James W 860 

Byers, John M. 868 

Caldwell, James R 748 

Caldwell, Reuben 834 

Calkins. W. L 198 

Campbell, Frank M 915 

Campman. Frederick 904 

Carr, C. P 644 

Carr, W. S 897 

Casey, T. F 977 

Catlicart, Orant 569 

Cathcart, James 570 

Cathcart, William M 574 

Catlicart, W. W 653 

Chapman, Joseph H 938 

Chase. A. R 197 

Chase. Benj. F 197 

Chase, John M 367 

Chase, Rev. John M 367 

Chase, Wm. A 195 

Chick, William 653 

Clary, H. B : . 953 

Cole. Arthur L 195 

Coleman. Henry M 918 

Collins, Dr. Howard A 971 

Conley, Frank G 626 

Conner Harry C 667 

Conner, John B 979 

Conner, John C 667 

Cooker, Frank R 884 

Copelin, George S 555 

Comely, Charles L 591 

Comely, Dr. J. M 729 

Corp. Jacol) W 577 

Coudriet, Lawrence M 910 

Cowder. A. W 465 

Cowen. I. W 566 

Cox. Michael J 404 

Craiff. Frank 418 

Craip. Michael 362 

Croyl. James H 401 

Curry. G. B 594 

Dale, John A 400 

Dale, .Toseph L 668 

Dale, Roland E 814 



Darr, Lucius L 846 

Davidson, Archer 734 

Davidson, Mack 731 

Davis, Elisha M 341 

Davis, Joseph 721 

Davis, J. T 908 

Davis, Thomas R 485 

Davison, James 833 

DeHaas, William T 505 

Denling, W. A 655 

Densham, William H 962 

Derminer, Jules 839 

Derrick, W. E 445 

Dewalt, William A 474 

Dielil. Blair W 829 

Diehl. Harry E 973 

Dielil, John C 733 

Diem, Henry .1 735 

Dietz, Frank R 735 

Doherty. John 514 

Doll. Joseph A 641 

Dotts, John 489 

Dotts. Philip 489 

Draiicker, Arthur M 935 

Draucker, Perry W 678 

DuBois, John 631 

DuBois, John E 630 

Dunlap. David T 661 

Dunliip. John R 760 

Dyer, Fred J 681 

Kcliard. Samuel B 357 

Eillund, John F 823 

Edwards, Leno W 197 

Eisenman, Samuel A 713 

Elliott, Dr. C. B 358 

Erhard. C. E 652 

Estrieher. Frank W 426 

Evans, Frank W 883 

Fargo, Waldo R 906 

Fawcett, John E 591 

Fennell, William 742 

Fergtison, Edward W 773 

Fielding, Frank 193 

Finstliwait. Franklin 765 

First National Bank of Osceola 498 

Flegal. Dr. I. S 865 

Flegal, William T 533 

Forsyth, John C 197 

Foulke, John T 404 

Fowler, Edward 561 



INDEX 



13 



Fowler, Samuel E 931 

Frendberg, Andrew 856 

Frendberg, Charles 867 

Fry, Howard M 851 

Fulford, George M 380 

Fulford, John H 380 

Fulton, David 843 

Gafley, Thomas 503 

Gallagher, Patrick 810 

Gallaher, John F 483 

Gallaher, George W 424 

Gatehouse, James 381 

Gearhart, J. E 343 

George, Richard H 954 

Gill, Charles G 488 

Gill, Josiah 488 

Gilliland, Joseph 889 

Gilliland, Dr. W. S 824 

Gilmartin, M. J 565 

Gingery, Dorsey J 383 

Ginter, George 443 

Ginter, Henry E 443 

Gleason, James A 198 

Glenn, Asher G. G 372 

Goff, Manley B 458 

Gordon, Hon. Cyrus 717 

Gorman, Anthony M 547 

Gos8, G. 755 

Gould, William A 558 

Graham, John A 681 

Grattan. Patrick 454 

Green, John A 435 

Griffith, S. Dorsey 978 

Groff, John F 630 

Grove, Harvey B 467 

Guinzburg, Frank 732 

Haag, Adam J 628 

Haag, Amos G 862 

Haag, Christian B 357 

Hagerty, William A 973 

Hahne, Frank 544 

Halfpenney, George Y 857 

Harber, Alfred J 945 

Harder, Hon. .John E 968 

Harper, Dr. Francis W 749 

Harris, Hon. Frank G 374 

Harris, Frank G 194 

Harris, Hon. George A 634 

Harris, .John 514 

Harrison, Frederick J 802 



Hartshorn, Benjamin 818 

Hartswick, Howard B 196 

Hay, Isaac D 619 

Hay, William T 619 

Heberling, John 665 

Hegarty, David 530 

Hegarty, Jerry 342 

Hegarty, Reuben 506 

Helper, William 858 

Helsel, William 700 

Henderson, David R 639 

Henderson, Elwood >S 652 

Henderson, Dr. J. L 457 

Henderson, Robert 639 

Henderson, Samuel T 747 

Henderson, William A 639 

Henderson, William H 747 

Henry, Edgar T 787 

Hensal, David C 771 

Hepburn, Samuel T 834 

Herron, Hon. David S 553 

Hertlein, Christian M 816 

Hess, E. W 425 

Hess, C. H 782 

Hibner, Delos E 537 

Hibner, John E 527 

Hickman, Henry 638 

Higgins, Joseph G 517 

Hile, Allen W 590 

Hile, Anthony 403 

Hile, Anthony 427 

Hile, C. A 590 

Hile, James H 403 

Hile, Lewis L 803 

Hileman, Clark 340 

Hiller, Frederick J 372 

Hiller, Philip Ernest 372 

Killer's Sons, Isaac 371 

Hilliard, Henry 836 

Hilling. William 394 

Holden, John S 744 

Holt, John 477 

Holt, Reuben 477 

Hoover, Daniel W 565 

Hoover, Henry 844; 

Horning, John H 892 

Horton, J. K 197 

Hosier, Rush N 949 

Houst, Rev. Anthony 896 

Howe, C. Cyrenius 805 

Howe, Frank A 905 

Hovt, Charles E 611 



14 



INDEX 



Hoyt, Hirani M 590 

Hoyt, Isaac •- • - 590 

Hoyt, James S -JSO 

Hoyt, Margaret 694 

Hoyt, T. C 639 

Hughes, Edward L 528 

llullilieii. Balsar 718 

Huniplircys, Thomas 662 

Hunter, A. J 414 

Hunter, Alfred R 413 

Hunter, Jolin H 414 

Hunter, Robert E 470 

Hurd, Jidin W 955 

Hurd, Melvin J 531 

Hurd, Ur. Michael 343 

Hutchinson. Adam S 742 

Hutton. Frank 198 

Ifcrt, Uriah J 599 

Imhof, Fred C 616 

Inipson, Lewis M 827 

Ireland. Thaddcus 512 

Irsvin, Alexander H 904 

Irwin. Ellis 415 

Irwin, John F 415 

Jackson. Dr. Kohert 976 

Jacobson, Gilbert 951 

Johnson, A. J 915 

.lohnson. Charles A 847 

Jdlinson, Edgar A. 851 

Ji)linsi)n, Elali 678 

Johnson, Gust A 814 

Johnson, (iuy L 900 

Johnson, John A 664 

Johnson, Joseph 562 

■Johnson, Alr.ttliew W 821 

Johnson. Walfrid 878 

Jnliiiston, David W 828 

Johnston, Geo. W 720 

Johnston, John C 627 

Johnst(Ui. Robert M. . 82S 

Johnston, Watson L 720 

Jones, Harry h 863 

Jones. Robert K 607 

.lones, Sanuiel M 579 

Jones, William J 478 

Jury. Isaiah 769 

Kantz. Kdwin K 864 

Kantz. George D 912 

Kantz. Reuben H 887 



Kastcn, Herman C 833 

Keen, Thomas E 692 

Kelley, James H 511 

Kelly, M. J 365 

Kephart, Simon 541 

Kester, I. M 504 

Kester, Isaac M 504 

King. Dr. H. 904 

King, Samuel M 629 

Kinney, John M 800 

Kinports, Porter 624 

Kirk, A. M. & .Son 654 

Kirk, Dr. George B 893 

Kirk, George C 433 

Kirk, Henry P 654 

Kirk. .James E 976 

Klare. Andrew J 871 

Kleinginna, K. F 581 

Kline, J. F 400 

Knarr. Hon. George A 567 

Kiiair. (Jeorge L. 568 

Knarr. Hon. Henry S 608 

Knepp, Isaac 356 

Knepp, Matthew 417 

Kohler, Fred 682 

Kopp, William J 854 

Kraih. William F 732 

Kramer. Aaron G 194 

Kratzer, Capt. J. Elliott 763 

Kresge. Harry F 584 

Kujawa, Joseph A 793 

Kuntz. Jacob L 637 , 

Kyler. Leonard 442 'f 

Laing. Hon. James W 966 

Lamont. Reynold 855 

Langsford, William C 934 

Lansberry, Archie B 832 

I.arock, Joseph 889 

Leafgren, Andrew 810 

Leavy. Fred B 898 

I.ee. Ash B : 711 

Lee. John 592 

Lee. Rev. Samuel 743 

Leib, J. Lewis 730 

Leipold, Dr. Bert E 488 

Leonard. Alvin U 396 

Leonard. .lames 646 

Lewis. Marshall H 894 

Liddle. Andrew 556 

Liddle. W. H 556 

Lightner, John L 389 



INDEX 



15 



Lightiier, John L 3S9 

Little. Wesley D 935 

Liveright, Alfred M 453 

Lixfield. Henry 594 

Long, W. 940 

Lott, Hon. Fred 793 

Loughhead. David P 377 

Lowell, Horace H 605 

Lowell, Thomas J 605 

Lukehart, Oeo. A •. 19S 

Lnmadue, William F 42S 

Luther, .James B 455 

Luther, J. G 455 

Luzier, T. S 664 

Lyons, William H 689 

Lytle, J. B 404 

McCamley, James J 441 

McCardell, Abner B 417 

McCardell, David A 524 

McCardell, Elmer B 382 

McClelland, John A 864 

McClure, John R 677 

McCUire, Wilson 677 

MeCracken, Edward M 921 

McCracken, Fred S 914 

MeCraeken, John W 197 

McCracken, Joseph N 775 

McCracken, Lewis 916 

McCieery, John S 870 

McCrossin, James 618 

McCrossin, .John H 466 

McCully, Alfred D 903 

McCully, Solomon 348 

McCurdy, Daniel W 191 

McDermott, Peter 885 

McDonald, Charles A 623 

McDonald, Mrs. Mary C 518 

McDowell, James E 92a 

McEnally, Hon. Joseph B . 487 

McEnally, Wright 487 

McFarlane. .James F 498 

McGarvey. John J 734 

McGaney, Robert H 691 

McGee, James W 571 

McGonigal, James L 950 

McGrath, John B 531 

Mcintosh, David 557 

McKeage, George A 869 

McKe^hen, H. D 620 

McLarren, .John 498 

McMullen, George F 453 



McMurray, Giarles D 449 

JlcMurray, G. R 355 

McQuiUen, John T 463 

McQuown. J. A 787 

McQuown, J. S 638 

McQuown, Martin L 196 

McQuown, William W 503 

MacMinn, Herman S 924 

Magee, John A 879 

Mahaffey. E. B 361 

Malia lie}', James 757 

-Mahatrey, John C 785 

Mahaffey, William T 755 

Mahaffey, William T 785 

Maines, Alonzo Bigler 918 

Mapes, M. V 737 

Mattern, Charles 553 

Matthews, Ira E 839 

Maurer, R. S 867 

Maxwell, Charles B 964 

Means, Prof. Herbert G 508 

Meas, James 1 526 

Meckley. Samuel T 523 

Menzie, William 626 

Merris. John E 538 

Merritt, Berten 875 

Merritt, George 876 

Merritt, Howard M 876 

Merritt, John 876 

Miller, Jacob H 969 

Miller, Lewis P 943 

Miller, Dr. 8. J 370 

Miller, Wm. C 196 

Miller. W. H 593 

Mills, John 520 

Milsom, Daniel 930 

Minns, George. Jr 360 

Mitchell, David 852 

Mitchell, James 429 

Mitchell, James T 772 

Mitchell. Oscar 194 

Jlitchell, William 429 

Moore, Charles W 589 

Montgomery, Andrew J 970 

Moore, Herbert A 198 

Moore, James S 468 

Moore, N. R 450 

Moore, Samuel R 897 

Moore, William .S 625 

Jlorrow, Mathew T 604 

Moshannon Coal Company, The 965 

Mossop, Frederick 423 



16 



IXDEX 



ilosbop, Richard 423 

Mott, Nelson F 841 

Moulthrop, Hon. Alonzo S 587 

JIuuntz. Mrs. Ella 782 

Jloyer, Daniel 932 

Mover, Daniel A 958 

.Mover, Peter 958 

Jluirhead, Kobert S 869 

Murray, Aaron 389 

Murray, Alexander 772 

Murray, Hazard A l'J7 

Murray, Thomas H 772 

Neeper, Leonard R 797 

Neir, Gideon D 612 

Neff, Isaiah 912 

Neff, J. B 012 

Nelson, S. A 483 

Newconib, Mitchell 379 

Newcomer, Josiah R 770 

Norris, Blake W 891 

Norris, James R 794 

Norris, Capt. John H 749 

Norris, Ord L 788 

Notter, Charles H 473 

Nowry, John 620 

Nowry, Robert 620 

Oaks, George W 362 

O'Connor, John 881 

O'Laughlin, James P 197 

Olson, Emil 871 

Owens, Emory E 877 

Owens, Harry M 713 

Owens, Henry 712 

Owens, James C 948 

Park, Dr. Milo E 798 

Passmore, Eli L 696 

Passmore, CJeorge C 670 

Patehin, Aaron 656 

Patchin. Aaron W 392 

Patehin. Carl E 736 

Patchin Family 656 

Patchin. Jotm 656 

Patchin, Hon. .John H 501 

Patchin, Ray C 392 

Patchin, William E 469 

Paterson, Alexander 824 

Patterson, Alex 196 

Patterson, Wm. H 195 

Patrick, Hon. Charles B 645 



Patrick, Dallas 729 

Patton, Charles E 963 

Penepacker, Charles F 961 

Pentz, W. C 195 

Peters, A. G 428 

Peterson, Andrew J 828 

Peterson, Anton 825 

Phillips, Zachary T 917 

Pifer, Charles E 438 

Pifer, George W 438 

Pifer, James H 438 

Pilkington. Fred 723 

Piper, Dr, \V. S 391 

Planten, (ieorge H 582 

Pollum, Dr. James 1 831 

Porter, Miles R 578 

Porter, Robert 578 

Potter, Hon. Johnson W., M. D 405 

Potter, William B 944 

Powell, A. J 463 

Powell, (ieorge 391 

Powell, William J 391 

Pritchard, Lewis A 956 

l\irnell. Dr. Howard G 581 

Radebaugh, .lolin .^^ 606 

Radebaugh, William H 606 

RafTerty, .James L 623 

RatTerty, John Y 623 

Rauch, J. Wilson 861 

Rea, James A 908 

Read, David R 707 

Read, Dr. F. B 932 

Read, George W 874 

Read, J. Perry 707 

Read, S. C 685 

Reams. William A 642 

Redding. James 484 

Reed, A, H 930 

Reed, Frank B 402 

Reese, George W 857 

Reese, James W 813 

Reidy, Michael 384 

Reiley. Dr. W. Edgar 850 

Reiter, John W 830 

Renaud, Ernest 395 

Ribling. Hon. Henry 804 

Richanls. Daniel 368 

Richards, .Tames 368 

Richards, Josiah S 436 

Richner. Hon. Jesse 937 

Robacker, Oiarles E 891 



INDEX 



17 



Robbins, Lewis C 880 

Robison, Cyrus 433 

Robison, Samuel 433 

Roessner, Joseph W 673 

Ross, Frank 869 

Ross, George C 886 

Rousey, Henry 969 

Rowles, C. P 758 

Rowles, Dr. John F 934 

Rowles, Joseph H 525 

Rowles, Dr. Lewis C 769 

Rowles, L. William 525 

Rudolph, Phineas W 774 

Rumberger, Amos H 413 

Rusnak, Martin 938 

Sancroft, Jacob 859 

Sankey , Mrs. Laura N 386 

Sceurman, Jacob W 393 

Schmitt, F. W 401 

Schnars, E 534 

Schryver, William T 777 

Schultz, William 846 

Schwer, Matthias 817 

Seofield, Fred R 198 

ScoUins, John J 974 

Seyler, Joseph 650 

Shadeck, Matthew 849 

Shafer, Albert 419 

Shafer, Jonathan 671 

Shafer, Samuel 419 

Shaffer, Emanuel S 964 

Shaffer, John R 706 

Shaw, A. B 339 

Shaw, Joseph 394 

Shaw, Richard 399 

Shaw, William M 355 

Shepherd, Nathaniel H 946 

Shimel, H. M 539 

Shimel, M. F 569 

Shoff, Abram C 452 

Slioff, C. C 497 

Shoff, Harry J 719 

Shoff, Robert M 844 

Shugart, George B '. 373 

Slaughenhoupt, J. A 516 

Sloppy, George H 735 

Sloppy. K. A 683 

Smail. T. D 902 

Smathers, Dr. Wilson J 738 

Smeal, Daniel J • 8S8 

Smith, Allison 353 

2 



Smith, Elmer B 884 

Smitli, Frank 572 

Smith, Frank S 601 

Smith, George W 684 

Smith, Harvey T 384 

Smith, H. W 194 

Smith, James B 666 

Smith, James L 597 

Smith, John N 941 

Smyers, George W 440 

Sneddon, J. S 597 

Snyder, John F 195 

Snyder, Thomas G 533 

Snyder, T. Lansing 526 

Somraerville, James L 919 

Soulsby, James E 782 

Spackman, James 416 

Spackman, Dr. .James P 803 

Spackman, William 416 

Spencer, H. W 476 

Spencer, L. W 476 

Stagner, Henry 724 

Stanley. G. M 907 

Stauffer, James B 675 

Steinkerchner, Joseph C 952 

Steinkerchner, William B 951 

Stephens, A. P 530 

Stevens, Blair 711 

Stevens, Lloyd C 560 

Stevenson, John 503 

Stewart, Leslie 842 

Stone, John 385 

Stott, Peter 933 

Straw, Enoch 1 515 

Straw, Harrison 441 

Straw, Isaac 515 

Straw, John T 704 

Straw, Perry C 634 

Straw, Uriah H 616 

Strickland, J. C 703 

Strickland. William H 559 

Sullivan, Dr. John C 961 

Sullivan, Patrick T 466 

Sunderland, Thomas J 822 

Sweeney, Harrison H 506 

Swoope, Henry B 686 

Swoope, J. B 547 

Swoope. Roland D 365 

Swoope, Roland D., Jr 396 

Swoope, Wm. 1 196 

Tate, Ira F 561 



18 



INDEX 



Telford, Mrs. Lavina 695 

Thompson, E<lward A 872 

Thompson, Roll B 377 

Thompson, R. William 414 

Thomson, William H 554 

Thorp. C. A 8S3 

Tobias, William E 903 

Todd. H. W 498 

Tonkin, Robert D 901 

Torrence, Cliarles L 479 

Towns, George E 598 

Tozer. Salmon 874 

Tozer. William F 378 

Turner, E. K 545 

Turner, .lames K., Esq 537 

Turley, Edgar W 369 

Turley, George W 369 

Tj-ler, David 658 

Urey, John M 197 

Van Tassel, A. R 519 

Veespr, John 513 

Viebahn, Edward A 584 

Viebahn, Julius 479 

Wachob, George B 697 

Wagner. Harry E 640 

Walker. E. J 391 

Walker, George W 514 

Wall. Isaiah 350 

Wall, James D 430 

Wall, Miles 809 

Wall, Thomas 430 

Wall, W. 1 350 

Wallace. Harry F 194 

Wallace. Robert 540 

Wallace. William A 490 

Wallace. William E 497 

Walls, Harvey 710 

Ward. Prof. Harry E 967 

Waring, De Lancey H 939 

Waterworth, Dr. S. J 519 



Watson, James 792 

Way, David 613 

Way, Thomas L 613 

Weaver, Charles C 980 

Weaver, James L 651 

Weaver, John H 790 

Weber, George J 923 

Webster, Edward W 909 

Welch, Walter 197 

Welty, S. B 714 

Wilkinson, John H 649 

Williams, A. C 588 

Williams, David 699 

Williams, Luther H 345 

Wilson, Dr. Robert V 461 

Wilson, Smith V. V 194 

Wilson, Dr. Ward 435 

Wingert, William 406 

AVink, William T 583 

Wise, S. J 746 

Wise, William L 646 

Wonier, George D 820 

Wood. Dr. George W 383 

Woofls, Franklin M 800 

Woodside, Dr. H. A 449 

Woodward, A. H 196 

A\'oodward, Walter H 347 

Woolridgc. Edward H 504 

Work, Aaron X 570 

Work. John N 708 

Wrye. Charles 9.57 

Wynn, D. Ross 601 

Yeaney. Dr. Gillespie B 371 

Yingling, Isaac J 877 

Yingling. William Irwin 801 

Young. Augustus J 832 

Young, Da\-id S 709 

Young. John W 691 

Young, Xewton B. 811 

Zeigler, George W 196 









a> 

CO 

3 



HI 

5 



History of Clearfield County 

CHAPTER I. 

GEOGRAPHY, TOPOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY. 

Dimensions and Acreage of the County — Its Situation and Boundaries — Hills and Valleys — 
Streams — Character of the Soil — Geological Strata — Coal Measures — Conglomerate — 
Mahoning Sandstone — The Three Great Coal Basins — Fire-Clay — Limestone — Oil and 
Gas — Iron Ore, Etc. 



Geography — Clearfield County is one of the 
largest in Pennsylvania, covering a territory of 
thirty-six and seventeen-twentieth miles from 
north to south, and about forty and one-half 
miles from east to west. It has an area of 
eleven hundred and thirty square miles, or seven 
hundred and twenty-three thousand, two hun- 
dred acres. 

It lies a little to the west of the center of the 
State on parallel 41°, 4' north latitude, and lon- 
gitude 1°, 30' west from Washington, D. C. It 
is bounded on the north by Elk and Cameron, 
on the east by Centre and Clinton, on the south 
by Cambria and on the west by Jefferson and 
Indiana counties. 

Topography — Clearfield County is situated 
in the western foothills of the Allegheny Moun- 
tains, lying between the main ridge and the 
great secondary formation known as the 
"Stony Mountains." Although at some points 
these hills reach an altitude of from sixteen 
to twenty-two hundred feet, they form no dis- 
tinct chains, but are interspersed with table- 
lands and valleys. 



The county is traversed by a number of 
streams, the most important of which is the 
West branch of the Susquehanna river, which 
has its source in Cambria county and enters 
Clearfield County at its southwestern boundary. 
It flows in a northeasterly direction through 
the count}' in a winding course of nearly one 
hundred miles, entering Clinton County at its 
western boundary. Finally it unites with the 
Xorth Branch at Sunbury, Northumberland 
County, forming the broad Susquehanna which 
empties its waters into Chesapeake Bay. The 
most important tributaries to the West Branch 
within Clearfield County are Chest, Ander- 
son. Montgomery-, Moose, Clearfield, Moshan- 
non, Deer, Sandy and Musquito creeks, and 
Lick Run, Trout Run and Upper Three 
Run. 

Moshannon Creek forms the boundary be- 
tween Clearfield and Centre counties. 

Clearfield Creek has two tributaries — Little 
Clearfield and Muddy Run. 

Chest Creek traverses the mountainous ter- 
ritory in the Southern part of the county. 



19 



20 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Anderson Creek has its source in the north- 
eastern part of the county, and unites w ith tlie 
West Branch at Cunvensville. It has several 
tributaries, the most important of which is 
Little Anderson Creek. 

These various streams furnish splendid nat- 
ural drainage to all sections of the county, 
and in the valleys traversed by them, large 
areas of very fertile land, suitable for agri- 
cultural purposes, are to be found. 

The highlands are well watered by smaller 
streams, and the soil is especially adapted for 
farming land. Although it is only since the 
exhaustion of the timber supply in the county, 
in the last fifteen years, that attention has 
been turned to agriculture, today some of the 
finest and most profitable farms in the state lie 
within the boundaries of Clearfield County. 

Geology — Gtology is the science which 
treats of the history of the earth and its life, 
especially as recorded in the rocks. 

The principal authorities on the science of 
geology have agreed upon the following clas- 
sification of the different periods of time indi- 
cated by the rock formation : 



Caenozoic 



Mesozoic 



Palaeozoic 



Eozoic 



AEONS 

Quaternary 
Tertiary 

Cretaceous 

Jurassic 

Triassic 

Upper Carbon- 
iferous 

Lower Carbon- 
iferous 

Devonian 

Silurian 

Cambrian 

Huronian 
Laurcntian 



ORGANIC REIGNS 

Man 
Mammals 

Reptiles and 
Birds 



Amphibians 
and Land 
imals 

Fishes 

Marine Invar 
teb rates 



Protozoans 



An- 



The principal geological measures appear- 
ing in the fonnations within Clearfield County 
are the lower carboniferous measures of the 
Paleozoic formation. It is by reason of the 
existence of the.se measures that the county 
is so rich in mineral wealth. What is known 
as the Pottsville or Serai conglomerate is the 
foundation of all the great coal fields and no 
productive coal measures have ever been found 
beneath this rock. 

The conglomerate is a coarse sand rock, con- 
taining large, white flint-like pebbles, and is a 
species of silicious quartz. W^herever it is 
found, it is considered as a sure indication of 
the presence of coal in the hills covering this 
rock. The out-crop of this conglomerate is 
usually found in the beds of streams, where 
the water has washed away the soil and ex- 
posed the surface of the rock. 

Clearfield County contains seven veins of 
bituminous coal that are thick enough to be 
profitably mined. These veins are designated 
by letters, the bottom vein being generally 
known as "A" and the top, or cap vein, as "G." 
Between veins "B" and "C" is an intennediate 
vein, usually found at a distance of thirty feet 
above "B." Between "C" and "D" are also 
found intermediate veins at about the same 
distance. 

Above the "G" or cap vein is found the Ma- 
honing sandstone, the presence of which indi- 
cates the top of the coal measures. Still above 
this are found the rocks composing what are 
known as the barren measures, such as are 
found near Ramey and capping the summits 
of the Bloomington Ridge south of Curwens- 
ville. 

There are three great coal basins which pass 
through the county in a general southwest and 
northeast direction. These are known as the 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



21 



first, second and third coal basins, and are sep- 
arated by two anticlinals known as the first 
and second axis. The tliird basin is sepa- 
rated by the Boon's mountain anticlinal from 
the basin of Jefferson and Elk counties, known 
as the fourth coal basin. 

The first basin covers the coal territory of 
Gulich, Bigler, Beccaria, Woodward and Mor- 
ris townships, which include the Coalport, 
Madera, Houtzdale, Osceola, Philipsburg and 
Morrisdale coal developments. 

The second basin includes the Ansonville. 
Gazzam, Boardman and Karthaus sub-basins 
and the Penn township sub-basin. 

The third basin contains the Brady, Sandy, 
and Huston townships, and the DuBois coal 
territory. 

A more detailed account of the various coal 
measures and their operation may be found in 
the chapter relating to the history of the coal 
interests of the county. 

Another geological formation of great im- 
portance to the county is the fire-clay, which is 
found at the bottom of the lower coal measures 
in all three of the coal basins that pass through 
the county. It is found in veins, ranging 
from four to twelve feet in thickness, and is 
usually in three layers. It is of superior qual- 



ity and has been developed by manufacturing 
the various kinds of brick, which now forms 
one of the principal industries of the county. 

In many places in the county are found ex- 
tensive deposits of sandstone, which have been 
quarried on a large scale, the stone, on account 
of its peculiar qualities, and extreme purity 
and whiteness, is specially adapted for build- 
ing purposes and bridge work. 

Three beds of limestone have been found 
about two hundred feet above the river in 
Greenwood township. Various experiments 
have been made in burning this limestone, but 
it has been found to be too impure to make 
good lime. 

Several test wells were drilled for oil and 
gas, but were abandoned before reaching the 
proper strata, although all the geological for- 
mations along Anderson Creek indicate that 
oil and gas will be found when wells are 
drilled to sufficient depth. 

Small deposits of iron ore have been found 
at various points in the county. Attempts 
have been made to utilize this ore, the princi- 
pal one by Peter A. Karthaus at the old fur- 
nace on Moshannon Creek, but this enterprise 
did not prove successful. 



CHAPTER II 



INDIAN OCCUPATION 



The Andastes — Their Conflict with the Iroquois and Partial Destruction — Brule's Expedition 
— His Capture and Escape — The Lenni-Lcnapes or Delazuares — The Monccys — Their 
Subjection by the Iroquois — The Shawnees and Tuscaroras — Retreat of the Indians. 



A great tribe of Indians known as the An- 
dastes occupied the country now called western 
Pennsylvania as early as the sixteenth century. 
This tribe bclong-ed to the Algonquin family 
and were bitter enemies of the Iroquois, with 
whom they carried on continual war, until only 
a remnant of the Andastes remained. These 
survivors finally settled near the mouth of the 
river now known as the Susquehanna, and 
were called Susquehannocks or Conestoga 
Indians. 

In Chaniplain's narrative of his voyage of 
1618, which is the earliest account we have of 
the West Branch valley, it is recorded that he 
sent a Frenchman, named Etienne Brule, with 
a small party of Indians to endeavor to secure 
the assistance of the Andastes in his attack on 
the Iroquois towns. Brule succeeded in this 
design, and marched with a large party of An- 
dastes to join Champlain, but was unable to 
reach him, because prior to his arrival Cham- 
plain had been forced to retreat. Brule re- 
turned with the Andastes to their camp, and 
spent the balance of the year with them. 
From there he attempted, with guides fur- 
nished by the Andastes, to reach Quebec, but 
was captured by the Iroquois. Finally he es- 



caped, and after many perils rejoined Cham- 
plain. 

After the Andastes left the West Branch 
valley, it was inhabited by the Lenni-Lenapes 
or Delaware tribe, who were also of the Al- 
gonquin family. The term "Lenni-Lenape" 
meant "Original People," and they were di- 
vided into various tribes. 

The Moncey, or Wolf tribe, the most active 
and warlike of them all, occupied the moun- 
tainous country between the Blue Mountains 
and the sources of the Susquehanna river. 

After the Iroquois had succeeded in driving 
out the Andastes, they made war upon the 
Lenni-Lenapes, whom they soon conquered. 
Terms of peace were made, by which the Dela- 
wares gave up their lands to the Iroquois, and 
thereafter held them as tenants of that pow- 
erful tribe. 

The Shawnee and Tuscarora tribes, by per- 
mission of the Iroquois, moved from the Caro- 
linas northward and occupied, with the Lenni- 
Lenapes, the country along the West Branch 
valley. These Indians occupied this territory 
until about 1750, when they were driven out 
by the encroachments of the white men, and 
moved west of the Ohio river. 



90 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



23 



There is no reliable data upon which to 
found a history of any greater length than we 
have given in this brief resume of the terri- 
tory which is now Clearfield county, at the 
time it was occupied by the Indians. There 
are many legends and traditions which have 
been handed down from the time the first 
white men followed the Indian paths through 
the West Branch Valley; but all of these are 
so intermingled with the Indian history of 
other sections of the State that to properly 



tell it would require more space than we have 
at our command. 

Suffice it to say that in this region, as in all 
others where the white man met the red man 
in the inevitable conflict of the superior against 
the inferior race, the Indians were forced 
back, and ever backward, toward the setting 
sun, from whence tradition told them they had 
come. The war-whoop was heard no longer, 
and the last Indian was driven from his be- 
loved hunting grounds along the river "Otzin- 
achson." 



CHAPTER III 



LAND TITLES 



Charles the Second's Grant to JVilliaiii Pcnn — Penn's Lease from Governor Dongan — Indian 
Deed Confirming the Purchase — Indian Deed to Penn's Heirs — The Articles of Consid- 
eration — Penn's Will — His Sale to the Crown — Thomas Penn Assumes Charge of the 
Provime — First Surveys — Early Land Owners — Litigation Over Titles. 



The lands in the province of Pennsylvania 
were granted to William Penn by King 
Charles II of Great Britain by Royal Charter, 
dated the fourth day of March, A. D. 1681, 
in payment of a claim which Penn's father, 
Admiral William Penn, had at the time of his 
death against the English Government, 
amounting to f 16,000. 

Under this charter Penn and his descend- 
ants claimed title to all the lands in the prov- 
ince, but in order to avoid trouble with the 
Indians, Penn's representatives, on coming 
into possession, negotiated with the various 
tribes for a release of their claim to the lands. 

In Vol. I, of Pennsylvania Archives, pages 
121 and 122, may be found a copy of the cu- 
rious instrument, dated January 12, 1696, by 
which William Penn leased from Thomas 
Dongan. late governor of New York, for one 
thousand years, at the annual rental of a 
"pepper com." the lands of which Clearfield 
County is a part. 

Governor Dongan had acquired from the 
Iroquois, either by purchase or gift, the title 
which they claimed to said lands by right of 
conquest. On January 13, 1696, Dongan 



made a deed to William Penn for the same 
lands for a consideration of £100, and on Sep- 
tember 13, 1700, the Indian chiefs occupying 
these lands confirmed the purchase by William 
Penn by a deed which may be found recorded 
in the Recorder's office at Philadelphia, in 
Deed book F, Vol. VIII, page 242. 

By an article of agreement, dated April 23, 
1 70 1, recorded at Philadelphia in Deed book 

F, Vol. VIII, page 243, the chiefs of the Sus- 
quehanna Indians confirmed the deed of Gov- 
ernor Dongan. 

Thirty-five years later, October 11, 1736, at 
a great council called at Philadelphia a large 
number of chiefs, representing the difYerent 
tribes, executed a deed forever releasing to 
John, Thomas and Richard Penn all titles and 
claims to the Susquehanna lands. This deed 
is also recorded in Philadelphia, in Deed book 

G, Vol. V, page 277. This deed describes the 
property conveyed as follows : 

"They, die said Kakiskerowand. Tayen- 
hunty, Caxhaayn, Kuchdacharj' Saweegateeos, 
Sachems or Chiefs of the Nations of ye Onon- 
dagoe-Kanickhungo, Tagachskaholoo, Sagoa- 
yaton-dackquas, Ashcoalaax, Hetquantagech- 



24 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



25 



ta, Sachems or Chiefs of the Senekaes; Sayueh- 
sanyunt, Sunaratchy, Kanawatoe, Tecochtsee 
gherochgoo, Sachems of Chiefs of the Cayoo- 
goes; SaHscaquoh, Shecalamy, Tahashwanga- 
roras, Sachems or Chiefs of the Oneydoes, and 
Sawantga and Tyeros, Sachems or Chiefs of 
the Tuskaroros, for themselves and on behalf 
of all the five nations aforesaid, and every of 
them, have given, granted, bargained, sold. Re- 
leased and Confirmed, and by these presents 
Do, and every one of them doth give, grant. 
Bargain, sell, release and Confirm unto the 
said proprietaries, John Penn, Thomas Penn 
and Richard Pemi, their Heirs, Successors and 
Assigns, all the said River Susquehannah, with 
the lands lying on both sides thereof, to Ex- 
tend Eastward as far as the heads of the 
Branches or Springs which run into the said 
Susquehannah. And all the lands lying on the 
West side of the said River to the setting of 
the Sun, and to extend from the mouth of the 
said River Northward, up the same to the 
Hills or mountains called in the language of 
the said Nations, the Tyannuntasacta, or End- 
less hills, and by the Delaware Indians, the 
Kekkachtananin Hills, together, also, with all 
the islands in the said River, Ways, Waters, 
Watercourses, Woods, Underwoods, Timber 
and Trees, Mountains, Hills, Mines, Valleys, 
Minerals, Quarries, Rights, Liberties, Privi- 
leges, Advantages, Hereditaments and Appur- 
tenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise 
appertaining." 

Among the articles mentioned as the consid- 
eration of this curious document, and partic- 
ularly interesting on account of the well-known 
peace-loving qualities of the Penns are : 500 
lbs. of powder, 600 lbs. of lead, 43 guns and 25 
gallons of rum, besides 200 lbs. of tobacco, and 
1,000 pipes. 



William Penn died in 1713, and by his will, 
his property in the province was devised to his 
wife, Hannah, in trust to sell so much of his 
estate as was necessary to pay his indebted- 
ness ; and then to convey to his son by a former 
wife 40,000 acres of land; and all the residue 
of his lands in the province to his children by 
his second wife — John, Thomas and Richard. 

After Penn made this will, he agreed to sell 
his Pennsylvania property to the Crown for 
£12,000 and received part of the purchase 
money. This agreement of sale was never 
consumniated, but it caused litigation between 
the widow and children which was, however, 
finally compromised. 

In 1732 Thomas Penn came to this country 
to take charge of the province for himself and 
brothers, in whom the title of William Penn 
was then vested. 

In 1779 the Commonwealth of Pennsylva- 
nia purchased the title of the Penns for the 
sum of £130,000 sterling, by virtue of an act 
of assembly, approved June 28th, 1779, known 
as the Devesting Act. 

The first surveys of the land in the territory 
now composing Clearfield County were made 
as early as 1769. 

Among the earliest sur\'eyors were : Judge 
Smith, James Harris, Canan, Samuel Brady, 
the Indian fighter, and Daniel Turner. 

After the lands were opened to purchase, 
they were rapidly taken up and sur\'eyed, and 
patents issued to the purchasers, most of whom 
were non-residents. 

Among the largest land-holders were the 
Holland Land Company, Nicklin and Griffith, 
James Hopkins, McConnell and Reynolds, 
James Yard, Cramer and Bates, the Keatings, 
Charles Mead, Thomas Kitland, William 
Parker, James Wilson, Samuel M. Fox, Henry 



26 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Drinker, George Roberts, Joseph P. Morris, 
Robert Morris, Jolin Hallowell, Walter Stew- 
art, Archibald McCall, Richard Peters, Rawle 
and Morgan, Phillips and Company, James C. 
Fisher and William Scott. These men owned 
many thousand acres of land in what is now 
Clearfield County. 



For many years after the organization of 
the county there was tedious and expensive lit- 
igation over land titles, most of which was 
caused by the difficulties encountered by the 
early surveyors, but these disputes were finally 
settled by the Supreme Court. 



CHAPTER IV 



THE EARLY SETTLERS 



Character of Clearfield County's Early Population — Former Political Divisions — The 
White Settler — The Leading Pioneers of the County and the Credit Due Them. 



First 



The future character of the population of a 
country is largely dependent upon the type of 
men and women who were the first to locate in 
it, and the people of Clearfield County are for- 
tunate in the fact that those who originally set- 
tled here ; who cut out roads through its for- 
ests, cleared its first farms and made them- 
selves homes, were of that strong and sturdy 
stock that produces men able to cope with great 
diiificulties and overcome them. These were 
the kind of men who were the early pioneers 
in opening up the territory now Clearfield 
County and battling with the forces of nature. 

Prior to the year 1804, what is now the great 
and rich County of Clearfield was a part of 
Lycoming and Huntington Counties. These 
counties were divided by the West Branch of 
the Susquehanna, those living on its Northern 
or Western bank being located in Lycoming 
county, while those who settled on its Southern 
or Eastern bank became citizens of Hunting- 
don county. 

It has long been a disputed question as to 
who was the first resident in the territory now 
comprising Clearfield County. Undoubtedly 
the first white settler was a man known as Cap- 
tain Edward Rickerts, mentioned in the jour- 
nal of James Harris, who surveyed along 



Clearfield Creek in the autumn of 1784. But 
it is argued that Captain Rickerts did not re- 
main long enough in this section of the country 
to be counted as a resident. So it is generally 
conceded that James Woodside, who settled in 
the vicinity now known as Brady township in 
1785, was the first white resident of what is 
now Clearfield county. A monument to his 
memory was erected in Luthersburg cemetery 
in 1886, and a year previous the centennial of 
his birth was celebrated in the town of Luthers- 
burg. 

Some old residents of the central part of the 
county still insist that Daniel Ogden, who set- 
tled on the site of the present town of Clear- 
field in 1797, has a right to this honor. How- 
ever, it is entirely possible that Mr. Woodside 
lived on the western side of the great forests 
for many years, without ever coming in con- 
tact with Mr. Ogden. This theory peacefully 
settles the discussion and so we shall adopt it 
here. 

The next pioneer to come "up the river" 
was Arthur Bell, who arrived soon after Dan- 
iel Ogden. He settled in the locality now 
known as Bell township. His son, Grier, is 
said to have been the first white child born in 
this county. Next came Casper Hockenberry 



27 



28 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



and James McCracken, who were related by 
marriage to Arthur Bell, and settled near him. 
In 1799 Thomas AlcClure, better known as 
"Squire" McCIure, came to this vicinity from 
Cumberland. 

About this time a widow by the name of 
Lewis, but called "Granny Leathers" came to 
Clearfield and started a distillery. When the 
War of 1812 broke out, Granny disappeared, 
but. her son, David, remained. He, with sev- 
eral other men, made a good living by holding 
up and robbing the wagons of Bellefonte mer- 
chants. Finally they were captured by several 
Center county citizens, and David was shot, 
and died. Settlement became more rapid after 
1800, and we shall not attempt to make more 
than a mention of the numerous families who 
came to this section of the country from 1800 
until the year Clearfield county was organized. 
Longer accounts of some of tliese men may be 
found in the histories of the various townships 
and boroughs. 

Martin Hoover, who came from York coun- 
ty, settled in 1801, in what afterwards became 
Lawrence township, and Alexander Read, 
(who became the first postmaster in tlie coun- 
ty) settled in the vicinity the following year. 
Frederick Hennich, or Haney, built a home 
near Hoover about this time, and in 1803 
Abraham Hess same from York county and 
located on Clearfield creek. Paul Clover, the 
first resident on the site of Curwensville made 
a settlement in 1801 at the junction of Ander- 
son creek and the Susquehanna river. Robert 
Askey settled just below this place at about the 
same time. David Litz made a clearing at the 
place afterwards known as Litz's bridge. He 
is said to have floated the first log raft down 
the river. Joseph Leonard occupied the cabin 
built by Captain Rickerts on Clearfield creek. 



Abraham Leonard settled on the Showshoe 
and Packersville turnpike in 1801. John 
Owens and Robert Graham settled on the oppo- 
site side of the creek about this time. Abra- 
ham Passmore, Henry Irwin, Thomas Mapes 
and Daniel Turner located along the river in 
1802. 

Settlements were being made farther east 
at the same time; in 1801 Jacob Wise, Robert 
Anderson and a man named Potter made 
homes along Moshannon Creek. In 1802 
John Kline settled near Montgomery creek, 
and Hugh Frazier built a cabin on W'oli Run. 
John Carothers built a house a few miles far- 
ther down the river the same year. 

William Bloom made a clearing along the 
Susquehanna in 1801 on the land now called 
the Irvin Farm. A few years ago Colonel E. 
-V. In'in of Curwensville had the site of this 
settlement marked by a sign bearing a suitable 
inscription. 

Others who settled along the river about 
this time were Robert Creswell, Benjamin Jor- 
don, George and John Welch. Jolin Ferguson, 
Peter Young, Samuel Ewing, Nicholas Straw, 
Samuel Fulton (the first prothonotary) and 
Leonard Kyler, for whose family Kylertown 
is named. After the organization of Clear- 
field county in 1804, the population of this ter- 
ritory increased rapidly. 

Of the many who came then, we mention 
the following: Thomas Forcey, Joseph Pat- 
terson (a maker of spinning-wheels), John 
Moore, W'illiam Tate, Robert Maxwell, Wil- 
liam Kersey, James and Samuel Ardery, Ben- 
jamin Hartshorn (who built the first tannery 
in this county), John Bennett, Nun England, 
W'illiam Hepburn, Joseph Spencer, Francis 
Stephens, Samuel Cochran (an escaped slave), 
James Gallagher, Hugh Carson, James Moore 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



29 



(at whose home the first pubHc reHgious ser- 
vices were held), the Johnsons, David Wall, 
Caleb Davis, Gideon Widemire, Jonathan 
A\'ain, Dr. Coleman (who named our Gram- 
pian Hills), Joseph Boone, Abraham Goos, 
Nicholas and Henry Kephart, Valentine and 
David Flegal, Absalom Pierce, John Gearhart, 
Benjamin and Nicholas Smeal, James Rhea, 
James McNeil, the McKees, Dunlaps, Cath- 
carts, Ames, Feltwells, Thompsons, Currys, 
W'illiamses and Swans; Robert Collins, Jacob 
Spencer, W'illiam Alexander, Robert and Sam- 
uel Hagerty, Ignatius Thompson, Moses Nor- 
ris, John Rowles, Archibald and Robert Shaw, 
David Hanna, the Smileys. Dillons and Goons. 
From this time on, the country opened up by 



these courageous and industrious pioneers be- 
came more thickly populated year by year. 
Earge and productive farms were made, good 
roads built, towns and villages sprang up, un- 
til today it is hard for us to realize that all 
this country' was once a vast forest. It is 
harder still for us with our latter day com- 
forts and luxuries to understand the privations 
and hardships which these first citizens ien- 
dured. But as we read these names, which 
have come to stand for so much in our country, 
state and nation, we are moved to a deeper 
respect and appreciation of these men who 
made our countr^^ our prosperity — and even 
oursdz'cs, possible ! 



CHAPTER V 



ORGANIZATION OF THE COUNTY 



Petin's Division of Pennsylvania into Three Counties — Thirty-six Counties Formed in i8oj — 
Additions in 1804, Including Clearfield County — The Act in Regard to Same — Annexa- 
tion of Clearfield to Centre County — Settlement of Jurisdiction — Appointment of Commis- 
sioners to Select Seat of Ji<stice — The Site Selected and Named Clearfield — Population 
of the County — Election Lazvs — Organisation of the Townships and Boroughs — Histor- 
ical Society — Clearfield — The County Seat. 



In 1682 William Penn divided the original 
territory of Pennsylvania into three counties — 
Philadelphia, Bucks and Chester. No other 
division was made for nearly 50 years, nhen 
Lancaster was formed from part of Chester 
in 1729. 

Other counties were created in quick succes- 
sion until, in 1803, Pennsylvania was divided 
into thirty-six counties as follows: Philadel- 
phia, Bucks, Chester. Lancaster, York, Cum- 
berland, Berks, Northampton, Bedford, North- 
umberland, \Vestmoreland, Washington, Fay- 
ette, Franklin. Montgomery, Dauphin, Lu- 
zerne, Huntingdon, Allegheny, Delaware, 
Mifflin, Somerset, Lycoming, Greene, Wayne, 
Armstrong, Adams, Butler, Beaver, Centre, 
Crawford, Erie, Mercer, Venango, \\^arren 
and Indiana. 

On the twenty-sixth of March, 1804, by an 
Act of Legislature, six new counties were 
added to these. They were Jefferson, Mc- 
Kean, Potter, Tioga, Cambria and Clearfield. 

The following is that part of the Act refer- 
ring to the boundaries and erection of Clear- 
field county : 



"Section III. And be it further enacted by 
the authority aforesaid, That so much of the 
county of Lycoming included in the following 
boundaries, to wit: Beginning where the line 
dividing Cannon's and Brodhead's district 
strikes the west branch of the Susquehanna 
River; thence north along the said district 
line until a due west course from thence will 
strike the southeast corner of McKean county; 
thence west along the southern boundar)^ of 
McKean county to the line of Jeflferson coun- 
ty ; thence southwesterly along the line of Jef- 
ferson county to where Hunter's district line 
crosses Sandy Lick Creek; thence south along 
the district line to the Canoe Place on Susque- 
hanna River; thence an easterly course to the 
southwesterly corner of Centre county on the 
heads of Muchanon Creek; thence down the 
Muchanon Creek, the several courses thereof to 
its mouth : thence down the west branch of the 
Susquehanna River to the place of beginning, 
be, and the same is hereby erected into a sep- 
arate county to be henceforth called Clearfield 
county, and the place of holding the courts of 
justice in and for said the county, shall be fixed 



30 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



31 



by the Legislature at any place which may be 
most beneficial and convenient for the said 
county." 

It will be noticed that no mention is made of 
Huntingdon county, although at that time the 
lands lying between Moshannon creek and the 
West branch were a part of Huntingdon coun- 
ty, so that Clearfield was formed from parts 
of both Huntingdon and Lycoming counties. 

Section VII provided for the appointment of 
three commissioners to mark the boundaries of 
the county. 

The next section provided: "That as soon 
as it shall appear by an enumeration of the 
taxable inhabitants within the counties thus 
created, that any of them according to the rates 
which shall then be established for apportion- 
ing the representation among the several coun- 
ties of the Commonwealth, shall be entitled to 
a separate representation, provision shall be 
made by law for apportioning the said repre- 
sentation, and enabling such county to be repre- 
sented separately, and to hold the courts of jus- 
tice at such place in said county as is, or here- 
after may be, fixed for holding the same by 
the Legislature, and to choose their county offi- 
cers in like manner as the other counties of this 
Commonwealth." 

Section IX required the governor to appoint 
three tiustees "who shall receive proposals in 
writing for the grant or conveyance of any 
lands within the county, or the transfer of any 
other property, or the payment of any money 
for the use of said county, for fixing the place 
of holding courts of justice in the county." 

And further, in Section XI it is provided 
"That for the present convenience of the in- 
habitants of said counties of Clearfield and Mc- 
Kean and until an enumeration of the taxable 
inhabitants of the said counties shall be made. 



and it shall be otherwise directed by law, the 
said counties of Clearfield and McKean shall be 
and the same are hereby annexed to the county 
of Centre, and the jurisdiction of the several 
courts of the county of Centre, and the author- 
ity of the judges thereof shall extend over, 
and shall operate and be effectual within said 
counties of Clearfield and McKean." 

This annexation of Clearfield to Centre in 
the early days of our county's history <has 
given rise to the mistaken idea that Clearfield 
was once a part of Centre county. We hope 
that the above quotation will correct this im- 
pression. 

It is not strange that a question soon arose 
as to just how great an extent the officers of 
Centre county had power in Clearfield county. 

This question was settled in 1805 by an Act 
which announced that the jurisdiction of Cen- 
tre county justices of the peace did not extend 
over this county in cases of debts or demands, 
but provided that the authority of the com- 
missioners and other officers of Centre county 
should extend over and be full and effectual in 
this county. Also, that the inhabitants of this 
county were entitled to exercise and enjoy the 
same rights and privileges, and to be subject 
to the same regulations as if this were a part 
of Centre county; and further, that the Centre 
county officers should keep separate books of 
the affairs of this county. 

By Section IV it is provided "That the 
county of Clearfield shall be an election dis- 
trict, and the electors thereof shall hold their 
general elections at the house of Benjamin 
Jordon, in the said district, and shall be enti- 
tled to vote for members of the Federal and 
State Legislatures, sheriffs, commissioners, 
and other county officers for Centre county." 

The above named district was 'known as 



32 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



"Chencleclamousche," and it comprised the en- 
tire county. 

In the year 1803, the governor issued the 
following order: 

"Pennsylvania, ss. 
Thomas McKean 

In the name and by the 
(Place of the Great Seal.) authority of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania : 
Thomas McKean, Governor 
of the said Commonwealth. 
"To Roland Curtin of the County of Centre, John 
Fleming, of the county of Lycoming, and James 
Smith of the county of 

"Gentlemen : — 

"Sends Greeting. 

"Whereas, In and by an Act of the General Assem- 
bly of this Commonwealth, dated the fourth day of 
April, instant, it is amongst other things provided, that 
the governor shall be authorized and empowered to ap- 
point three disinterested commissioners, who do not 
reside or own any land in the County of Oearfield, 
which Commissioners, or a majority of them, shall 
meet at the house of Benjamin Patton in the town of 
Bellefonte, on the twentieth day of May next, and 
from thence proceed to view and determine on the 
most eligible and proper situation for the seat of jus- 
tice and public buildings for the county of Qearfield. 

"Now Know Ye, That having full confidence in your 
integrity, judgment and abilities, I have appointed, and 
by these presents I do appoint you the said Roland 
Curtin, John Fleming and James Smith, Commission- 
ers for the purpose aforesaid: Hereby requiring you 
and each of you, with all convenient dispatch to pro- 
ceed in the execution of the trust in you reposed as 
aforesaid, and to make a full and accurate report in 
writing, into the office of the Secretary of the Common- 
wealth, on or before the first Monday of December 
next. 

"piven under my Hand and the Great Seal of the 
State at Lancaster, this sixth day of April, Anno Dom- 
ini. 1805, and of the Commonwealth the twenty-ninth. 

"By the Governor, 

"T. M. Thompson, 
"Secretary of the Commonwealth." 

Tliese commissioners met as directed on the 
twentieth of May, at the house of Benjamin 
Patton in Bellefonte. 



Several proposals were made to them and 
they visited the county in order to examine 
these localities. They considered tiie lands of 
Paul Clover, at the mouth of Anderson creek, 
those at the junction of Clearfield creek and the 
Susquehanna, and also the farm of Martin 
Hoover, about half way between Chenclecla- 
mousche and Curvvensville. 

Finally they decided upon the lands of 
Abraham W'itmer as a site for the county seat, 
upon which the Indian town of Chencleclam- 
ousche had stood. 

Abraham W'itmer, who was a resident of 
Lancaster, gave a town lot for the court-house, 
another for the jail, one for a market, and 
three for an academy. 

Besides all this land, he contributed thrc 
thousand dollars, half of which was to be used 
in erecting the public buildings and the other 
half for the use of an academy or public school. 

The Commissioners made the following re- 
port to the Governor as soon as the location 
was decided upon : 

"Sir : — By virtue of an act of the General Assembly 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, entitled, 'An 
act authorizing the appointment of Commissioners to 
fix upon a proper site, for the seat of justice in Clear- 
field county.' 

"We, the subscribers, appointed by his excellency, 
the governor, agreeable to the provisions of the above 
mentioned act. passed on the tenth day of April in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and five 
— Report, That agreeable to the provisions of the above 
mentioned act, we met in the house of Benjamin Pat- 
ton, in the town of Bellefonte, on the twentieth day of 
May, one thousand eight hundred and five, and after 
receiving the different proposals made by several per- 
sons, proceeded to view and determine on the most 
eligible and proper situation for the seat of justice and 
public buildings for the said county of Clearfield, and 
do find that the old town of Chincleclamouse in the 
said county (the property of Abraham Witmer of the 
township of Lancaster in the county of Lancaster and 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania) situated on the south 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



33 



side of the west branch of the Susquehanna river in 
the county aforesaid, is the most eligible and proper 
situation for the seat of justice and public buildings in 
the said county; and that we have laid out the said 
town ; and we also further report that we have received 
from the said Abraham Witmer, his bond, which is 
hereto annexed for the conveyance of certain lots and 
the payment of certain sums of money at the time and 
for the purpose therein mentioned. 
"We are with respect your humble servants, 

"Roland Curtin, 

"Jno. Fleming, 

"Jas. Smith. 
"To Thomas McKean, 
"Thompson, Esq., Secy." 

The proceedings of the General Assembly, 
following and relating to the report of the 
Commissioners, confimied their report as fol- 
lows : "The commissioners appointed by this 
act fixed the place of holding the courts, etc., 
on lands of Abraham Witmer, at Chinglegla- 
mouch, old town, on the west branch of Sus- 
quehanna, and the new county town is now 
laid out and called Clearfield." 

The elections of the district of "Chencle- 
clamousche" (which embraced the entire coun- 
ty) were appointed to be held at the house of 
Benjamin Jordon; the counties of Lycoming, 
Centre, Clearfield, McKean, Tioga, and Potter, 
having an aggregate of four thousand five hun- 
dred taxables, were entitled to have one mem- 
ber in the State Senate, while Centre, Clear- 
field and McKean counties were entitled by 
number of taxables to one member of the 
House of Representatives. 

Clearfield County itself, by the enumeration 
of taxable inhabitants in 1806, was found to 
have a total of 104, sixteen of whom were 
single. 

The township of Chincleclamousche was di- 
vided in 1807, and two new townships, Bec- 
caria and Bradford, were formed. 



The next enumeration of taxables, in 1808, 
showed Chincleclamousche to have iii, Brad- 
ford 36 and Beccaria 28 — a total of 175, which 
proved that the county taxables had increased 
in two years by just 71 ! 

In 1 81 2 the General Assembly passed a law 
providing that the electors of the county be 
authorized to choose Commissioners at the 
next election, in October, and "that the powers 
and authority of the Commissioners of Centre 
county over Clearfield county cease and deter- 
mine, except the provision relating to the se- 
lection of jurors, in which case the Commis- 
sioners of Centre county shall retain jurisdic- 
tion in the county." 

Finally, the limited organization of the 
county was made complete by the Act approved 
January 29th, 1822, by which Clearfield coun- 
ty became entitled to all the rights and privi- 
leges of other counties of the State. It also 
authorized that courts should be held in the 
county, the Courts of Common Pleas, Quarter 
Sessions, and "such other courts as by law are 
authorized." The first term of court was ap- 
pointed to be held the following October, and 
all suits already commenced by citizens of the 
county, and then pending, were transferred 
from Centre to Clearfield county, but all coun- 
ty prisoners were left in the Bellefonte jail un- 
til one could be erected in Clearfield. 

In the 106 years which have elapsed since 
the organization of our county, it has grown 
from a poorly organized, sparsely populated 
group of three townships, having in all a tax- 
able population of 175, to the splendid organ- 
ization comprising 30 rich townships and 20 
prosperous boroughs, with a total population 
of nearly 100,000 which we know today as 
Clearfield county! 



34 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



ORGANIZATION OF TOWNSHIPS AND BOROUGHS. 

From the time of its organization until the 
year 1807, Clearfield County had but one town- 
ship, known by the Indian name of "Chincle- 
clamousche." This township comprised the 
entire territory of the county, and had a taxa- 
ble population of 104. 

This arrangement was found to be very in- 
convenient, for often citizens, in order to vote, 
had to travel a distance of from fifteen to 
thirty miles to the place of holding elections — 
a distance which was most difficult to cover in 
those days of few and almost impassable 
roads. 

So, in 1807 two divisions were made of old 
Chincleclamousche, and the townships Brad- 
ford and Beccaria were fonned from the part 
south and east of tlie West Branch. 

This was better than before, but soon the 
voters grew tired of the unnecessary incon- 
venience arising because of the large territory 
included in each township. So again Chincle- 
clamousche was divided and in 1813 Pike and 
Lawrence townships were made. 

For the same reasons of greater convenience 
Covington and Gibson townships were formed 
in 1817 from that part of Chincleclamousche 
lying north of the West Branch. 

Gibson township had a brief life, for in 1843 
part of it was taken in forming Elk county, 
and the rest was added to the township ad- 
joining it. 

Sinnamahoning township (afterwards 
named Fox) was also short-lived. Erected in 
1 82 1, part of it was, in 1868, added to Synder 
township, Jefferson county; part to Horton 
township, Elk county, and part to Huston 
township of this county. 

From this time on new divisions of the orig- 



inal township of Chincleclamousche were 
made, until that name was dropped altogether. 

I'ollowing is a list of the present townships 
in order of their formation : Bradford and 
Beccaria, 1807; Pike and Lawrence, 1813; 
Covington, 1817; Brady and Chest, 1826; De- 
catur, 1828; Girard, 1832; Penn and Jordan, 
1834; Bell and Burnside, 1835; Morris, 1836; 
Boggs, 183S; Ferguson, Huston and Karthaus, 
1839; Goshen, 1845; Woodward, 1846; 
Union, 1848; Knox, 1854; Graham, 1856; Gu- 
lich, 1858; Bloom, i860; Pine, 1873; Green- 
wood, 1875; Sandy, 1878; Bigler, 1882; Coop- 
er, 1884. 

Boroughs — The first town to become inde- 
pendent of its township and to be incorporated 
was the old town of Chincleclamousche, better 
known then as "Old Town." 

In the year 1840 this village became a bor- 
ough under the name of Clearfield. 

The town of Curwensville, laid out by John 
Curwen in 1798, was the next to become a bor- 
ough. It was incorporated as such in 1851, 
and for seven years Cleai-field and Curwens- 
ville shared the distinction of being the only 
boroughs in the county. 

But in 1858 the hamlet of Lumberville be- 
came a borough under the name of Lumber 
City, and in 1859 New Washington and in 
1864 Osceola were incorporated. 

No other boroughs were added to this list 
for eight years, when, in 1872, the village of 
Houtzdale was incorporated. From that year 
on the number of boroughs increased rapidly 
and in the following order: Wallaceton, 
1873; Burnside, 1874; Newburgli, 1875; Du- 
Bois and Glen Hope, 1881 ; Chester, Hill, Coal- 
port, Brisbin and West Clearfield 1883; Gram- 
pian, 1885; Mahaffey, 1889; Trautville and Ir- 
vona, 1890; Ramey, 1893; Westover, 1895. 







i I 





AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



35 



West Clearfield was consolidated with Clear- 
field in the year 1901, so that the number of 
boroughs in the County at the present time is 
twenty. 

THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF CLEARFIELD 
COUNTY 

The Historical Society of Clearfield County 
was incorporated August 15th, 19 10. The ob- 
ject of the Society is the collection and preser- 
vation of historical data pertaining to the nat- 
ural, civil and literary development of the 
County of Clearfield. 

Membership in the Society is divided into 
three classes : 

1st. Contributing members. 

2nd. Corresponding members. 

3rd. Honorary members. 

The Contributing membership is limited to 
thirty persons, residing in Clearfield County, 
elected by ballot, and who each pay annual dues 
not less than $5.00. 

Corresponding membership consists of per- 
sons residing in the County and duly elected to 
membership, who in consideration of their ser- 
vices or contributions to the Association, are 
not required to pay dues. 

Honorary membership is limited to fifteen 
persons, not residing in the County of Clear- 
field, who shall contribute to the Society or 
the cause of historical research. 

Four stated meetings of the Society are 
held each year, to wit : On the first Mondays 
of March, June, September and December. 
At the June meeting, the officers are elected. 

This society which has been incorporated, 
during the preparation of the present history 
of Clearfield County, will be of great value to 
the future historian, who may desire some re- 
liable information in regard to the early his- 



tory of the County, and by reference to the 
records of this society, will be able to ascertain 
the facts without the great difficulty and delay 
experienced by the editor of the present 
history. 

The present officers of the Society are as 
follows : 

Thomas H. Murray, President; W. C. 
Pentz, Vice President; Alexander Paterson, 
Treasurer; L. C. Norris, Secretary. 

Trustees — Thomas H. Murray, Roland D. 
Swoope, A. B. Reed, Singleton Bell, John F. 
Short, A. M. Liveright. 

CLEARFIELD THE COUNTY SEAT 

Long before the history of the white man in 
this region began, there had been an Indian vil- 
lage on the present site of Clearfield. This 
group of native huts was called in the Indian 
tongue "Acht-schingi-clamme," the English of 
which is, "It almost joins." This referred to 
the bend in the river at this point. Another 
interpretation of Acht-schingi-clamme is given 
in the journal of Bishop Ettwein, who will be 
mentioned later. He says it signifies "Na 
one tarries here willingly," and has reference 
to an old Indian legend of an eccentric brave, 
who hid in the rocks along the river bank and 
terrified his tribesmen by "appearing in fright- 
ful shapes." 

The few early chroniclers who mentioned 
Acht-schingi-clamme in their writings, spelled 
the word as it sounded to them, and so we 
have the following wide diversity of spelling 
from which to choose : "Chincleclamoose," 
"Chinklacamoose," "Shinglemuce," "Shingla- 
clamush," "Chinglecamouche" and "Chincle- 
clamousche." The last of these is the one most 
generally used. 

The first recorded history of this ancient 



36 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



town begins with the French and Indian war, 
at which time the French started to build a fort 
at this point. They were attacked by the Eng- 
lish, and the Indians, themselves, burned their 
village rather than have it taken by the enemy. 

The same year (1758) Frederick Post, a 
Moravian, passed through the remains of this 
village on his way to the Ohio to confer with 
the Indians there. Of the fourteen years 
which intervened from this time until the fliglit 
of the Moravians to Ohio, we have no history. 

In 1772 this band of 151 souls set forth on 
tiieir long journey from the banks of the 
North Branch to the Ohio. 

They were divided into two companies, one 
of which was in the charge of Bishop John 
Ettwein. The latter kept a careful journal of 
daily events, from w-hich we quote the follow- 
ing: "Tuesday, July 14th — Reached Clear- 
field Creek, where the buffalos formerly 
cleared large tracts of undergrowth so as to 
give them the appearance of cleared fields. 
Hence the Indians called the creek "Clearfield." 
This repudiates the theory that the Indians, 
themselves, cleared fields here, as is generally 
understood. Here again recorded history 
ceases, and for twenty-five years we have no 
facts concerning this spot. 

In 1797, Daniel Ogden and his son, Mat- 
thew, came "up the river" and settled near the 
ruins of old "Chincleclamousche." Here otl,ier 
settlers came in the next few years, and a little 
settlement called "Old Town," sprang up. This 
name referred, of course, to the ancient Indian 
village. 

After the organization of Clearfield County 
in 1804, the next step was to decide upon the 
location for a county seat. It was quite nat- 
ural that the site of "Old Town," located at al- 
most the exact centre of the county and having 



long been recognized as a favorable place for 
dwellings, should be selected for this purpose. 
Most of the land belonged to Abraham Wit- 
mer, of Lancaster county, who donated several 
lots and three thousand dollars for the erection 
of public buildings. The town now received 
the name of Clearfield and was laid out in the 
following way : Market street, the main 
street running east and west, was laid on the 
old Milesburg road, and the northern and 
southern limits of the town lay two squares on 
each side of this street. Walnut and Locust 
lay parallel to Market on the North, and Cher- 
ry and Pine on the South. The river fomied 
the western boundary and streets ran north and 
south as follows : Water street, Front or First 
street. Second street. Third street and Fourth 
street, which formed the eastern boundary. 

The first jail was built on Second street, 
near Cherry. It was a very rude structure of 
logs, but it was used until the erection of a 
new jail, on the site of the present Opera house 
block. This was used until 1870, when the 
jail now in use was erected. 

The first courthouse was built in 18 14, on 
the corner of Second and Market streets, and 
was in use for forty-six years. In i860, a 
new building was started, and the present 
courthouse was completed in 1862. 

The academy was built on First street, near 
Cherry, and for many years was the only 
source of education (beyond the rude country 
schools) in the county. Many i)upils came 
from miles around to receive their education 
here. The old building was torn down a few 
years ago to make room for the fine new High 
School building. The old academy was the 
last of the original public buildings to be de- 
stroyed, and the hundreds of men and vromen 
througliout tlie county who iiad, at some time 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 37 

in their lives, been pupils there, marked with seat, from the beginning of its history to its 
deep regret the passing of this last monument incorporation as a borough in 1840. Its fur- 
to the early days of the county seat. ther history may be found under the title 

In this chapter we have attempted to give a "Borough of Clearfield." 
brief history of the historic site of the county 



CHAPTER ^'I 

COUNTY AND OTHER OFFICIALS 

A List of the Principal State and County Officials — United States Senators — Representatives 
in Congress — U. S. District Attorney — U. S. Marshal — Clerk of House of Representa- 
tives — State Officers — Senators, Representatives — Present Judges — Associate Judges — 
Deputy Attorneys — General and District Attorneys — Sheriffs — Registers and Recorders- 
Treasurers — Prothonotaries — County Superintendents — County Commissioners and 
Clerks. 



UNITED STATES OFFICERS 

United States Senators: 

\VilIiam Bigler — 1855-61. 

William A. Wallace— 1875-81. 

Representatives in Congress: 

Alexander Irvin — 30th Congress 1847-49. 

John Patton — 38th and 50th Congresses — 
1861-63, 1887-89. 

James Kerr — 51st Congress 1 889-1 891. 

William C. Arnold — 54th and 55th Con- 
gress 1895-99. 

United States District Attorney: 

H. Bucher Swoope — 1869-74. 

United States Marshal: 

Alexander Irvin. 

Clerk of House of Representatives: 

James Kerr — 1891-1895. 

STATE OFFICERS 

Goz'ernor: 

William Bigler — 1852-5. 

State Treasurer: 

Frank G. Harris — 1902-04. 

State Senators: 



William Bigler, 1842. 
Alexander Irvin, 1847. 
William A. Wallace, 1863-75. 
Thomas J. Boyer, 1876. 
William W. Betts, 1887-94. 
M. L. McOuown, 1895- 1898. 
William C. Heinle, 1899-1902. 
Alexander E. Patton, 1903-04. 
Edward A. Irvin, 1904-06. 
George M. Dimeling, 1907. 
Members of the House of Representatives 
in the State Legislature: 

Martin Hoover, first (date unknown). 
Greenwood Bell, second (date unknown). 
John Irvin, third (date unknown). 
1837-38 — James Ferguson. 
1839-40 — James H. Lafferty. 
1841-42 — G. R. Barrett. 
1844-45 — Lewis W. Smith. 
1846-47 — Charles S. Worrell. 
1848-49 — George Walters. 
1850-51 — William J. Hemphill. 
1853-54 — A. Caldwell. 
1858-62-3-4— T. J. Boyer. 



38 



AiND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



39 



A. S. Moul- 



1867-68— Thomas J. McCullough. 

1872-73 — John Lawshe. 

1874 — Johnson W. Potter 

1875-76 — W. R. Hartshorne. 

1877-78 — Aaron C. Tate. 

1879-80 — A. D. Bennett. 

1881-82 — James Flynn. 

1883-84— J. P. Taylor. 

i885-8^J. H. Norris. 

1887-88 — Aaron G. Kramer. 

1889-92— John F. Farrell, P. S. Weber. 

1893-94 — John K. Gorman, Charles S. 
King. 

1895-96 — John H. Patchin, C. D. Ames. 

1 897- 1 902 — Frank G. Harris, Joseph Alex- 
ander. 

1903-06 — Harry Boulton, F. R. Scofield. 

1907-08 — Jonathan Currier, A. S. Moul- 
throp, Peter Gearhart. 

1909-10 — Jonathan Currier, 
throp, S. R. Hamilton. 

President Judges: 

1822-6 — Charles Huston. 

1826-41 — Thomas Burnside. 

1841-51 — George W. Woodward. 

1851-52— R. G. White. 

1852-3 — ^John C. Knox. 

1853 — James T. Hale. 

1853-59 — James Burnside. 

1859 — James Gamble. 

1859-68 — Samuel Linn. 

1868— Joseph B. McEnally. 

1868-84— Charles A. Mayer. 

1875-84 — John H. Orvis (addl. law judge). 

1884-94 — David L. Krebs. 

1 894- 1 904 — Cyrus Gordon. 

1904 — Allison O. Smith. 

Associate Judges: 

1822-6 — Francis W. Rawle, Moses Boggs. 

1826-40 — Moses Boggs, Hugh Jordon. 



1840-41 — Moses Boggs, James Ferguson. 

1 84 1 -6 — James Ferguson, John Patton. 

1846-51 — Abram K. Wright, James T. 
Leonard. 

185 1-6 — Richard Shaw, John P. Hoyt. 

1856-61 — William L. Moore, Benjamin 
Bonsall. 

1861-6 — James Bloom, John D. Thompson. 

1866-71 — Samuel Cloyd, Jacob Wilhelm. 

187 1-6 — William C. Foley, John J. Read. 

1876-81 — Vincent Holt, Abram Ogden. 

1 88 1 -6 — John L. Cuttle, John Hocken- 
berry. 

Deputy Attorneys-General and District At- 
torneys: 

Samuel M. Green. 

Josiah W. Smith. 

Samuel H. Tyson. 

George R. Barrett. 

Lewis W. Smith. 

John F. Weaver. 

D. Rush Petrikin. 

George W. Hecker. 

J. B. McEnally. 

Joseph S. Frantz. 

Thomas J. McCullough. 

Robert J. Wallace. 

Israel Test. 

William M. McCullough. 

A. W. Walters. 

Frank Fielding. 

William McCullough. 

Joseph F. McKenrick. 

Smith V. Wilson. 

Singleton Bell. 

Americus H. Woodward. 

William I. Swoope. 

James H. Kelley. 

Sheritfs: 

1822 — Greenwood Bell. 



40 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



823-6 — Greenwood Bell. 
826-9 — William Bloom. 
829-32 — Lebbus Lutber. 
832-5 — Robert Ross. 
835-8 — James Ferguson. 
838-41— Abram K. Wrigbt. 
841-4 — George Leecb. 
844-7 — Ellis Irwin. 
847-50 — Jobn Stites. 
850-3 — Alexander Caldwell. 
853-6— William Powell. 
856-9 — Josiab R. Read. 
859-62— Frederick G. Miller. 
862-5 — Edwin Perks. 
865-8 — Jacob A. Faust. 
868-71 — Cyrenius Howe. 
871-4 — Justin J. Pie. 
874-7 — William R. McPherson. 
877-80— Andrew Pentz, Jr. 
880-3 — James Mahaffey. 
883-6— R. Newton Shaw. 
886-89— Jesse E. Dale. 
889-92 — Edgar L. McCloskey. 
892-95 — Fred M. Cardon. 
895-98 — Frank Smith. 
898-1901— David D. Gingery. 
901-04 — Hugh McCullough. 
904-07 — James P. Staver. 
907-10 — Cornelius Allen. 
910 — E. H. Woolridge. 
Registers and Recorders: 
856-62 — James Wrigley. 
862-68— I. G. Barger. 
868-75— Asbury W. Lee. 
875-81 — L. J. Morgan. 
881-87 — George Ferguson. 
887-93— D. R. Fullerton. 
893-99 — Bine Koozer. 
899-1905 — E. E. Jimeson. 
gos—W. T. DeHaas. 



Treasurers: 
Arthur Bell. 
Samuel Coleman. 
Samuel Fulton. 
Alexander B. Reed. 
James Ferguson. 
Alexander Ir\in. 
G. Philip Geulich. 
Martin Hoover. 
James T. Leonard. 
Christopher Kratzer. 
D. W. Moore. 
Robert Wallace. 
J. W. Wright. 
Isaac Bloom. 
Arthur Bell. 
John McPherson. 
Eli Bloom. 
John McPherson. 
George B. Goodlander. 
Joseph Shaw\ 
Christopher Kratzer. 
D. W. Moore. 
William K. Wrigley. 
Lever Flegal. 
Samuel P. Wilson. 
David W. Wise. 
David McGaughey. 
Philip Botts. 
John W. Wrigley. 
John M. Troxell. 
James Mitchell. 
James McLaughlin. 
W^ C. Goss. 
Leslie Stewart. 
William Boyce. 
Prothonotarics: 
1822 — Samuel Fulton. 
1825 — Reuben Winslow. 
1827 — Joseph Boone. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



41 



1836 — Ellis Irwin. 

1839 — James T. Leonard. 

1842 — Alexander Irvin. 

1846— William C. Welch, Ellis Irwin (by 
appointment ) . 

1 85 1 — William Porter. 

1857 — George Walters, James T. Leonard 
(by appointment). 

i860 — John L. Cuttle. 

1863 — D. F. Etzweiler. 

1869 — Aaron C. Tate. 

1875 — Eli Bloom. 

1 88 1 — James Kerr. 

1887— Alfred M. Bloom. 

1893 — Dorsey J. Gingery. 

1899 — Grant H. Thompson. 
1905 — Roll B. Thompson. 
County Superintendents: 
1854-7 — A. T. Schryver. 
1857-60— L. L. Still. 
1860-3 — J. Broomall. 
1863-6— C. B. Stanford. 
1866-72— G. W. Snyder. 
1872-8 — J. A. Gregory. 
1878-84— M. L. McOuown. 
1884-90 — Matthew Savage. 
1890-95 — G. W. Weaver. 
1895-1902 — E. C. Shields. 
1902 — Wm. E. Tobias. 
County Commissioners and Clerks: 
1812-13 — Hugh Jordon, Samuel Fulton, 
Robert Maxwell; Clerk, Joseph Boone. 

1814-15 — Hugh Jordon. William Tate, 
Robert Maxwell; Clerk, Joseph Boone. 

1817-18 — Thomas McClure, David Fergu- 
son. Robert Ross; Clerk, Joseph Boone. 

1819 — Da\id Ferguson, Robert Ross, Wil- 
liam Ogden; Clerk, Joseph Boone. 

1820 — William Ogden, Greenwood Bell, 
Alexander Read, Jr. ; Clerk, Joseph Boone. 



1821 — Alexander Read, Jr., Matthew Og- 
den, Greenwood Bell ; Clerk, David Ferguson. 
1822 — Alexander Read, George Welch, 
Abraham Leonard ; Clerk, David Ferguson. 

1823 — George Welch, Elisha Schofield, 
Martin Nichols; Clerk, James Reed. 

1824 — Martin Nichols, Elisha Schofield, 
George Welch; Clerk, James Reed. 

1825 — Schofield, Nichols, Job England; 
Clerk, James Reed. 

1826 — England, Nichols, George Wilson; 
Clerk, James Reed. 

1827 — England, Wilson, Joseph Hoover; 
Clerk, James Reed. 

1828 — Joseph Hoover, George Ross, Rob- 
ert Wilson; Clerk, James Reed. 

1829 — Hoover, Ross, A. Caldwell; Clerk, 
Lewis W. Smith. 

1830 — Ross, Caldwell. J. Schnarrs; Clerk, 
Jas. T. Leonard. 

183 1 — Caldwell, Schnarrs, George Leech; 
Clerk, Jas. T. Leonard. 

1832 — Schnarrs, Leech, Ignatius Thomp- 
son ; Clerk, Jas. T. Leonard. 

1833 — Leech. Thompson, I. H. Warwick; 
Clerk, Jas. T. Leonard. 

1834 — Warwick. Thompson, Matthew Og- 
den; Clerk, L. W. Smith. 

1835 — Warwick, Ogden, Smith Mead; 
Clerk, L. W. Smith. 

1836 — Ogden, Mead, William Dunlap; 
Clerk, L. \\. Smith. 

1837 — Mead, Dunlap, James B. Graham; 
Clerk. L. W. Smith. 

1838 — Dunlap, Graham, Isaac Goodfellow; 
Clerk, James Reed. 

1839 — Graham, Goodfellow, John Stites; 
Clerk, James Reed. 

1840 — Goodfellow, Stites, John McMur- 
ray; Clerk, G. R. Barrett. 



42 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1841 — McMurray, Stites, James B. Cald- 
well; Clerk, H. B. Beissel. 

1842 — McMurray, Caldwell, George C. 
Passmore; Clerk, H. B. Beissel. 

1843- — Caldwell, Passmore, John Carlisle; 
Clerk, H. B. Beissel. 

1844 — Passmore. Carlisle, Grier Bell; 
Clerk, H. B. Beissel. 

1845 — Carlisle, Bell, Samuel Johnson; 
Clerk. H. B. Beissel. 

1846 — Johnson, Bell, Abr ani Kyle r; Clerk, 
H. P. Thompson. 

1847 — Johnson, ^ler, James A. Reed; 
Clerk. H. P. Thompson. 

1848 — Kyler, Reed, James Elder; Clerk, 
H. P. Thompson. 

1849 — Reed, Elder, Benjamin Bonsall; 
Clerk, W. A. Wallace. 

1850 — Elder, Bonsall, S. \Vay; Clerk, H. 
B. Beissel. , 

185 1 — Bonsall, Way, William Alexander; 
Clerk, Jno. F. Irwin. 

1852 — Way, Alexander, Philip Hevener; 
Clerk, G. B'. Goodlander. 

1853 — Alexander. Hevener, Samuel Shoff; 
Clerk, G. B. Goodlander. 

1854 — Hevener. Shoff, R. Mahaffey; Clerk. 
G. B. Goodlander. 

1855— Shoff, Maiiaffey, David Ross; Clerk. 
R. J. U'allace. 

1856— Mahaffey, Ross. J. Wilhelm; Clerk. 
R. J. Wallace. 

1857 — Ross. Wilhelm. John Irvin; Clerk. 
R. J. Wallace. 

1858 — Wilhelm. Irvin, George Erhard; 
Clerk. R. J. Wallace. 

1859 — Irvin, Erhard. William McCracken; 
Clerk. William Bradley. 

i860 — Erhard, McCracken, William Mer- 
rill : Clerk, William Bradley. 



1861— McCracken, Merrill. S. C. Thomp- 
son; Clerk, William Bradley. 

1862 — Merrill, Thompson, Jacob Kuntz; 
Clerk, William Bradley. 

1863 — Thompson, Kuntz, Thomas Dough- 
erty; Clerk, William Bradley. 

1864 — Kuntz, Dougherty. Amos Read; 
Clerk, William Bradley. , 

1865 — Dougherty, Read. Conrad Baker; 
Clerk, \\'illiam Bradley. 

1866 — Read, Baker, Charles S. Worrel; 
Clerk, William Bradley. 

1867 — Baker, Worrel, Henry Stone; Clerk, 
William Bradley. 

1868 — Worrel, Stone, Othello Smead; 
Clerk, William Bradley. 

1869 — Stone, Smead, S. H. Shaffner; 
Clerk, G. B. Goodlander. 

1870 — Smead. Shaffner, Samuel H. Hind- 
man; Clerk, G. B. Goodlander. 

1871 — Shaffner, Hindman, David Buck; 
Clerk. G. B. Goodlander. 

1872 — Hindman, F. F. Conteret, Gilbert 
Tozer; Clerk, G. B. Goodlander. 

1873 — Conteret, John D. Thompson. Gil- 
bert Tozer; Clerk, G. B. Goodlander. 

1874 — Same. 

1875 — Conrad W. Kyler, Thompson, Clark 
Brown ; Clerk. G. B. Goodlander. 

1876-7-8 — Brown, Thomas A. McGee, 
Harris Hoover; Clerk, John W. Howe. 

1 879-80- 1 — Conrad W. Kyler. Elah John- 
son, John Norris; Clerk, Jacob A. Foss. 

1882-3-4— C. K. McDonald. John T. 
Straw. John Picard : Clerk, R. A. Camp- 
bell. 

1885-6-7 — James Savage, C. K. McDonald, 
Clark Brown; Clerk, R. A. Campbell. 

1888 — James Savage, George I. Thomp- 
son, Jacob Mock; Clerk, W. V. Wright. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



43 



1891 — George I. Thompson, E. G. Gear- 
hart, John McGaughey; Clerk, Geo. E. Ow- 
ens. 

1894— W. T. Ross, James S. Read, A. E. 
Woolridge; Clerk, Harry E. Rowles. 

i897_A. E. Woolridge, W. C. Davis, D. 
H. Waring; Clerk, P. T. Davis. 



1900 — W. C. Davis, C. H. Cole, H. J. 
Diem; Clerk, P. T. Davis. 

1503— C. P. Rowles, S. R. Hamilton, B. F. 
Wilhelm; Clerk, A. K. Staver. 

1906 — Same. 

1909 — J. S. Richards, W. C. Langsford, D. 
J. Gingery; Clerk, L. C. Norris. 



CHAPTER VII 

MILITARY HISTORY AND THE COUNTY MILITIA— THE CIVIL WAR 

Loyalty of Clcarddd County's Sons — Military Organizations Before the War — Thirty-fourth 
Regiment. Fifth Reserves — Its General and hidividual Record, Officers and Men — Forty- 
second Regiment, "Bucktails" — Th.e Fifty-first Regiment — Fifty-ninth Regiment. Second 
Cavalry — Eighty-fourth Regiment. . 



In all the great army which stniggled for 
the preservation of the L'nion during the stir- 
ring days of the Civil war, there were no 
braver men nor truer patriots than the sons of 
Clearfield county. By the deeds they did and 
the hardships they endured, they shared in 
making possible the glorious Union of today. 

But these men were not alone in this loy- 
alty to their country, for when, thirty-three 
years later, the clouds of war again gathered 
on the horizon of our national life, the sons 
of those veterans who fought in that other 
war, also struggled to uphold the righteous 
principles of freedom which our nation had 
adopted. It is with pride that we record the 
names and deeds of Clearfield county's brave 
sons, and we trust that new loyalty and patri- 
otism may be inspired in the hearts of those 
who read the pages of this brief militan,' his- 
tory. 

Before the days of our Civil war, a volun- 
teer battalion was organized under the State 
law. This organization was made in 1840, 
with George R. Barrett in command. By 
1 84 1 the battalion had increased in numbers 
until it was possible to form a regiment of 



alx)ut six companies of sixty men each. Ma- 
jor Barrett was now made colonel, and E. W. 
Wise became inajor. The regiment annually 
attended the State encampment — journeys not 
easily accomplished in tliose days of no rail- 
roads, for it was often necessary' to march 
forty or fifty miles to the camp. This organi- 
zation existed for about seven years. 

A section of the State militia, of which 
Hon. William Bigler was colonel, was in ex- 
istence about the same time. It was here tliat 
Hon. John Patton received his title of "Gen- 
eral." Hon. William A. Wallace was cap- 
tain of another organization known as the 
"Guards." These three compri.sed the only 
military organizations existing in the county 
before the war days. Although of brief du- 
ration, these military companies helped to keep 
alive the spirit of patriotism in the hearts of 
the citizens, for nothing is more inspiring 
than the tramp of many feet, marching in uni- 
son; the sight of gay uniforms, and the sound 
of fife and drum. 

So, although the militia of the early days 
of our county had no opportunity to engage 
in actual warfare, who shall say how great 



44 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



45 



was its influence in arousing and strengthen- 
ing the loyaky and patriotism of the citizens 
of Clearfield county? 

THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT FIFTH RESERVES 

This regiment was organized at Camp Cur- 
tin June 20, 1861, and together with the 
"Bucktails" was sent to the relief of Colonel 
Lew Wallace, at Cumberland, Md. On July 
13th they were stationed at Bridge 21, on the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad which had been 
burned by the rebels. From that point they 
moved to New Creek. July 22d they were 
sent to Piedmont to protect the Unionists. 
After the battle of Bull Run July 21st, they 
were ordered to Washington and from there 
to Harrisburg. On August 8th they were or- 
dered back to Washington and went into 
camp at Tennallytown. On the 14th of Sep- 
tember they were reviewed by Governor Cur- 
tin, President Lincoln, General McClellan and 
others. On December 20th, the regiment was 
ordered to Dranesville and on the 9th of April, 

1862, they occupied Manassas. On May 7th 
they arrived at Falmouth and on May 25th 
crossed the Rappahannock. June 9th they 
were ordered to Mechanicsville and composed 
part of the right wing of McClellan's army, 
five miles from Richmond, where they en- 
gaged in what is known as the "Seven Days' 
Battle," in which the Confederate forces were 
routed. They were then ordered to Acquia 
Creek and from there to Washington where 
they participated in the Second Battle of Bull 
Run. They also took part in the battles of 
Antietam and Fredericksburg. In February, 

1863, they were again ordered to Washington 
and encamped at Miner's Hill. The regiment 
took part in the battle of Gettysburg; did 
guard duty along the Orange and Alexandria 



railroad, and in February, 1864, had a battle 
with guerrillas near Brentzville, where Major 
Larimer was killed. May 4, 1864, under 
Grant, they crossed the Rapidan and engaged 
in the battle of the Wilderness. The regimen: 
participated in the engagements which fol- 
lowed until May 31, 1864, when their term 
of service expired and they were mustered out 
at Harrisburg, Pa., on the nth of June, 1864. 
Field and Staff 

Colonels: — Seneca G. Simmons, June 21, 
1861 ; killed at Charles City Cross Roads, June 
30, 1862. 

Joseph W. Fisher, May 15, 1861 ; promoted 
from lieutenant-colonel August i, 1862, brevet 
brigadier-general November 4, 1865; mus- 
tered out with regiment June 11, 1864. 

Lieutenant-Colonels: — George Dare, June 

21, 1 861; promoted from major August i, 
1862; killed at Wilderness May 6, 1864. 

Alfred M. Smith, May 15, 1861 ; promoted 
from captain Company C to major February 

22, 1864, to lieutenant-colonel May 7, 1864, 
to brevet colonel March 13, 1865; mustered 
out with regiment June 11, 1864. 

Majors: — Frank Zentmyer, June 21, 1861 : 
promoted from captain Company I, August i, 
1862; killed at Fredericksburg December 13, 
1862; burial record, died at Richmond, Va., 
December 31, 1862. 

J. Harvey Larimer, May 15, 1861 ; promo- 
ted from captain Company E ,May i, 1863; 
killed at Bristow Station, February 14, 1864. 

James A. McPherran, June 16, 1861 ; pro- 
inoted from captain Company F, May 7, 1864, 
to brevet lieutenant-colonel March 13, 1865; 
mustered out with regiment June 11, 1864. 

Adjutants: — A. G. Mason, June 21. 1861 ; 
discharged March 27, 1863, to accept appoint- 
ment on General Meade's staff; brevet major 



46 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



August I, 1864, brevet lieutenant-colonel 
March 13, 1865. 

John L. Wright, May 15, 1861 ; mustered 
out with regiment June 11, 1864; brevet cap- 
tain March 13, 1865. 

Quartermaster: — Samuel Evans, June 21, 
1861 ; commissioned captain May 7, 1864, not 
mustered; brevet captain March 13, 1865; 
mustered out with regiment June 11, 1864. 

Surgeons : — John T. Carpenter, June 21, 
1861 ; promoted and transferred to Western 
army as brigade surgeon. 

Samuel G. Sane, September 16, 1861 ; pro- 
moted surgeon of enrollment board, i6th dis- 
trict, Pa., March 10, 1864; to assist surgeon- 
general, Pa.; to brevet lieutenant-colonel 
March 13, 1865. 

Henry A. Grim, April 16, 1862; promoted 
from assistant surgeon 12th regiment P. V. 
R. C; mustered out with regiment June 11, 

1864. 

Assistant Surgeons:—'^. P. Marsh, June 
21, 1 861; promoted surgeon 4th regiment Pa. 
Cavalry, 64th regiment P. V. 

E. Donnelly, June 21, 1861 ; promoted to 
surgeon 31st regiment P. V., April 28, 1862. 

W. H. Davis, June 27, 1862; promoted to 
surgeon 33d regiment P. V., December 20, 
1862. 

J. M. Groff, August 2, 1862; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate July 21, 1863. 

O. C. Johnson, March 9, 1863; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate September 28, 1863. 

H. T. Whitman, September 16, 1863 
wounded at Bethesda Church May 30, 1864 
mustered out with regiment June 11, 1864 
brevet major March 13, 1865. 

Chaplain: — S. L. M. Consor; mustered out 
by special order of war department November 
I, 1862. 



Scrgeant-Majors: — E. L. Reber, June 21, 
1861; transferred to 191st P. V.; veteran. 

R. M. Smith, June 21, 1861; promoted to 
second lieutenant August 8, 1862; transferred 
to Company G. 

G. P. Swoope, June 21, 1861 ; promoted to 
first lieutenant March 4, 1863; transferred to 
Company L 

Quartermaster-Sergeant : — Harry Mullen, 
June 21, 1861; transferred to 191st P. V.; 
veteran. 

Commissary-Sergeant: — J. W. Harris, June 
21, 1861 ; transferred to 191st P. V.; veteran. 

Hospital Stezvard: — John H. Johnson, July 
21, 1861 ; transferred to 191st P. V.; veteran. 

Principal Musicians: — E. L. Scott, June 21, 
1861 ; mustered out with regiment June 11, 
1864. 

W. L. Smeadley, June 21, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to 191st P. v.; veteran. 

COMPANY c 

Recruited in Clearfield County 

Captains: — J. Oscar Loraine, June 21, 
1861 ; resigned November 7, 1861. 

Alfred M. Smith, May 15, 1861 ; promoted 
from sergeant to first lieutenant July 25, 1861 ; 
to captain November 15, 1861, to major Feb- 
ruary 22, 1864. 

David McGaughey, June 21, 1861 ; promo- 
ted from sergeant to first lieutenant Novem- 
ber 16, 1 86 1, to captain March 22, 1864, bre- 
vet major March 13, 1865; wounded at Wil- 
derness May 9, 1864; mustered out witli com- 
pany June II, 1864. 

First Lieutenants: — J. Harvey Larrimer, 
May 15, 1861 ; promoted to captain Company 
F July 12, 1861. 

Jolm E. Potter, June 21, 1861 ; promoted 
from corporal to second lieutenant August 15, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



47 



1862, to first lieutenant March 22, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant: — John W. Bigler, June 
21, 1861 ; resigned June 22, 1862. 

First Sergeant: — Wm. A. Ogden, June 21, 
1861 ; commissioned captain June 4, 1864, not 
mustered; mustered out with company June 
II, 1864. 

Sergeants: — Thos. H. Wilson, June 21, 
1861 ; mustered out with company June 11, 
1864. 

James C. Miller, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

James L. McPherson, June 21, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

George B. Hancock, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 
__, John Huidekoper, June 21, 1861 ; promoted 
to second lieutenant Company 3, 150th regi- 
ment P. v., October 30, 1862. 

Martin Mullen, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Fredericksburg December 13, 1862. 

Corporals: — Wm. C. McGonagle, June 21, 
1861 ; mustered out with company June 11, 
1864. 

Oliver Conklin, June 21, 1861 ; absent, 
wounded, at muster out. 

Smith B. Williams, June 21, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Jos. W. Folmer, June 21, 1861; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Edward Blingler, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11. 1864. 

Richard S. Carr, June 21, 1861 ; discharged 
October 24, 1863, for wounds received in ac- 
tion. 

Bolivar T. Bilger, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Fredericksburg December 13, 1862. 

John W. Hoy, June 21, 1861 ; killed in ac- 
tion June 30, 1862. 



James Leonard, June 21, 1861; killed in ac- 
tion June 30, 1862. 

George W. Young, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Bristow Station October 14. 

E. S. Woolstencroft, June 21, 1861 ; de- 
serted May 4, 1862. 

Musicians: — David McR. Betto, June 21, 
1861 ; promoted to second lieutenant Company 
E March 5, 1863. 

Lyman McC. Shaw, August 8, 1861; de- 
serted July 5, 1862. 

Privates: — Wm. B. Beamer, June 21, 1861 ; 
mustered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Wm. M. Bahans, June 21, 1861 ; discharged 
November 9; 1861. 

Wm. Baughman, June 21, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate October 23, 1862. 

Samuel I. Burge, July 21, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate May 4, 1863. 

Solomon M. Bailey, April 7, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 

Math. J. Caldwell, July 21, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Robert E. Carson, June 21, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. ; mustered out with com- 
pany June II, 1864. 

Daniel Curley, June 21, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

John M. Caldwell, July 21, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate September 25, 
1861. 

John A. Coyle, June 21, 1861; discharged 
May 15, 1863, for wounds received in 
action. 

Alexander Carr, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Fredericksburg December 13, 1862; burial 
record, died at Richmond, Va., December 31, 
1862. 

J. H. DeHass, June 21, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 



48 



TTISTORV OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



John Dolan, August 30, 1862; discharged 
July 31, 1863, for wounds received in 
action. 

Benj. F. Derrick, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Bristow Station October 14, 1863. 

Wm. Evans, April 8, 1864; transferred to 
191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 

Henry J. Fisher, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Hiram France, June 21, 1861 ; discharged 
November 12, 1862, for wounds received in 
action. 

Miles Ford, June 21, 1861; killed in action 
June 30, 1862. 

Henry J. Fitchner, July 22, 1861 ; deserted 
August 12, 1862. 

John A. Green, July 21, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

Henry Garv^er, June 21, 1861'; transferred 
from V. R. C. ; mustered out with company 
June II, 1864. 

Loren Goodfellow, November i, 1861 ; 
transferred to 191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 

Claudius Girard, December 2t,, 1863; trans- 
ferred to 191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 

W'm. A. Haight, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1864. 

Henry A. Harlan, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1864. 

Wm. R. Hemphill, June 21, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 20, 
1862. 

David B. Horn, April 7, 1864; transferred 
to 191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 

Philo B. Harris, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. 

David W. Horn, March 30, 1864: killed at 
Wilderness May 9, 1864. 

Joseph Jackson, June 21, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate September 13, 1862. 



Wm. Jones, June 21, 1861 ; deserted Sep- 
tember 16, 1862. 

John T. Kirk, June 21, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1864. 

Douglas N. Koons, June 21, 1861; dis- 
charged, date unknown. 

Geo. W. Lingle, June 21, 1861; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1864. 

James I. Leightley, June 21, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Robert C. Larrimer, June 21, 1861; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Joseph Lines, June 21, 1861 ; transferred 
from V. R. C. ; mustered out with company 
June II, 1864. 

James Lingle, June 21, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

Geo. W. Livergood, June 21, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 24, 
1862. 

Sampson B. Lingle, June 21, 1861 ; dis- 
charged April 4, 1863, for wounds received 
in action. 

Rob. Livingston, July 15, 1861 ; died at 
Camp Tenally, Md., September 13, 1861. 

Stephen D. Logan, June 21, 1861 ; died at 
Harrison's Landing, Va., August 5, 1862. 

Martin Livergood, July 15, 1861 ; died at 
Annapolis, Md., September 24, 1862. 

Chas. W. Mitchell, June 21, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred from V. R. C. ; mustered out with com- 
pany June II, 1864. 

Patrick Malone, June 21, 1861; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Wesley B. Miller, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Lorine Merrell, June 21, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate, date unknown. 

Henry S. Merrell, June 21, 1861; died at 
Philadelphia August 14, 1862. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



49 



John Maughamer, June 21, 1S61 ; deserted 
April 4, 1863. 

Martin McCallister, June 21, 1861 ; absent, 
wounded, at muster out. 

Archibald McDonald, June 21, 1861 ; 
discharged on surgeon's certificate January 11, 
1863. 

W. L. McGaughey, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Fredericksburg December 13, 1862. 

Michael O'Leary, June 21, 1861; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

H. F. Passmore, June 21, 1861 ; discharged 
January 11, 1863, for wounds received in ac- 
tion. 

David Payne, June 21, 1861 ; killed in ac- 
tion June 30, 1862. 

Thos. W. Potter, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Fredericksburg December 13, 1862. 

Wm. Robinson, June 21, 1861 ; died at 
Washington, D. C, March 26, 1863 ; buried 
in Military Asylum Cemetery. 

Geo. H. Sweet, June 21, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Oliver St. George, June 21, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to western gunboat service February 
17, 1862. 

David Smay, February 26, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 

Christian Smay, February 26, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 

H. B. Spachman, June 21, 1861 ; died at 
Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, August 9, 1861. 

Philip G. Shaffner, June 21, 1861; killed in 
action June 30, 1862. 

Henry B. Smith, June 21, 1861 ; killed in 
action June 30, 1862. 

Peter F. Stout, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Gaines's Mill, June 27, 1862. 

Martin Stone, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Gaines's Mill, June 27, 1862. 



Geo. \V. Soule, June 21, 1861 ; killed at 
Bull Run, August 30, 1862. 

David R. P. Shirey, June 21, 1861 ; de- 
serted June 9, 1862. 

John Verner, June 21, 1861 ; deserted Sep- 
tember 14, 1862. 

Harrison Welton, June 21, 1861 ; deserted 
January 22, 1862. 

Nicholas Zeigler, April 7, 1864; transferred 
to 191st P. V. June 6, 1864. 



FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT- 



BUCKTAILS 



This regiment was one of the most noted 
ones in the Amiy of the Potomac. On the 
24th of April, 1861, one hundred men had 
assembled at a rafting-place on the Sinnama- 
honing, where they constructed transports. 
The only uniform was a red shirt, black pants, 
and a bucktail in the cap. Two days later, 
three hundred and fifteen strong, they em- 
barked on three rafts, and with a green hick- 
ory pole, surmounted by a bucktail, for a flag 
staff, the stars and stripes flying, and fife and 
drum rousing the echoes of the mountain sides, 
onward down the West Branch sailed the pa- 
triotic flotilla. 

Authority had been given to muster them 
in as the Seventeenth (three months) Regi- 
ment. An organization was commenced with 
Thomas L. Kane as colonel, but as a Seven- 
teenth Regiment had been mustered in at 
Philadelphia, the organization was not con- 
summated, and Colonel Kane, declining a 
commission, was mustered in as a private May 
13, 1861. 

Other companies were recruited — one in 
Warren county, one in Chester, one in Perry, 
one in Clearfield, one in Carbon, and two in 
Tioga, and the material had been assembled 
for a first-class regiment. On the 13th day of 



50 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



June a regimental election was held, which re- 
sulted in the selection of Thomas L. Kane as 
colonel, but, with that patriot'ism which al- 
ways marked the career of an unselfish soldier, 
he resigned, that Lieutenant-Colonel Biddle, 
who liad served in Mexico, might be placed 
in command. The name of the organization 
was changed from the "Rifle Regiment," to 
"Kane Rifle Regiment of Pennsylvania Re- 
serve Corps," and started into service as the 
Forty-second of tiie line, altliough it was uni- 
versally known as tlie "Bucktail Regiment." 

June 2 1 St, with the Fifth, Colonel Sim- 
mons, and Barr's Battery, the Forty-second 
was ordered to the support of Colonel Wal- 
lace, at Cumberland, Md., but before reaching 
that place Colonel Wallace, in accordance 
with orders, had moved to Martinsburg. 

July 1 2th, Lieutenant-Colonel Kane, with 
a scouting party of sixty men, crossed into 
Virginia, and at New Creek village were sur- 
rounded by McDonald's cavalry. A stubborn 
engagement took place, in which the Confeder- 
ates were worsted. Colonel Biddle, with his 
command, moved to tlie relief of Kane, and 
dispatched the latter with two hundred men 
to follow the enemy. He came upon them at 
Ridgeville, nine miles from New Creek, and 
after a skirmish, took possession. Colonel 
Biddle arrived, and the next morning the 
force fell back to New Creek and Piedmont, 
which position they held until July 27th, when 
ordered to Harrisburg, where they were re- 
viewed by Governor Curtin August ist. On 
the 6th of August they were ordered to report 
to General Banks, at Harper's Ferr}'. Octo- 
ber 1st the command moved to Tennallytown 
and joined the Reserves. December 12th, Col- 
onel Biddle resigned to go to Congress, having 
been elected from Philadelphia. 



December 20th. the Forty-second, under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Kane, marched with Orr's 
Brigade to Dranesville, where the enemy was 
in force. It was here that Colonel Kane was 
shot in the face, the ball crashing through the 
roof of his mouth, inflicting a painful wound. 
Bandaging his face, he continued to advance 
with his men and amid the smoke of the con- 
test, fought with Spartan detennination. 

On the loth of March. 1862, the Bucktails 
moved to Alexandria. The Reserves were 
then assigned to the First Corps, and the Buck- 
tails ordered to Falmouth. The middle of 
May found them within six miles of Hanover 
Court-house. It was at this time that Col- 
onel Kane, with four companies, was ordered 
to join Fremont. In the pursuit of Jackson 
up the Shenandoah valley, the Bucktails were 
in the extreme advance. Colonel Kane with 
his scouts — one hundred men — had a stubborn 
fight with General Asliby at Harrisonburg; 
the latter had with him Stuart's brigade. 
Bravely the "Bucktails" held their ground, 
waiting reinforcements, but in this they were 
disappointed. In the fight Colonel Kane was 
wounded and taken prisoner. Captain Tay- 
lor, admiring the brave commander, dashed 
through the fire and smoke to rescue him, and 
was also captured. The Confederates were so 
strongly impressed by such an exhibition of 
self-sacrifice and bravery, that they offered to 
parole him, but he and Colonel Kane refused. 
The loss of the "Bucktails" in killed, wounded, 
and prisoners, was fifty-two — half the num- 
ber engaged. 

The other six companies — four hundred 
strong — went into camp at Dispatch Station. 
June 13th they participated in a skirmish with 
Stuart's Cavalry at White House, the Federal 
base of supplies. June 27th they were ordered 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



51 



to Gaines's Mills, and participated in that 
memorable engagement, pronounced by mili- 
tary men as one of the most desperate conflicts 
of the first two years of the rebellion. On the 
evening of the 28th they commenced to march 
through White Oak Swamp, and on the night 
of the 29th performed picket duty on the Rich- 
mond road leading to Charles City, and took 
part in the battle of Charles City Cross Roads 
fought June 30th. 

From the Peninsula the regiment proceeded 
to Warrenton and participated in the second 
battle of Bull Run. 

Returning to the four companies remaining 
with Fremont's Corps (now Sigel's), after 
the battle of Cross Keys, we find them engaged 
at Cedar Mountain. On the 19th of August 
they encamped at Brandy Station, on the 
Orange and Alexandria railroad, where Lievi- 
tenant-Colonel Kane joined them, he having 
been held a prisoner of war since the fight at 
Harrisonburg. August 22d they marched 
back to Catlett's Station. Then occurred an- 
other of General J. E. B. Stuart's wild rides 
for the purpose of capturing General Pope and 
his headquarters' train. Colonel Kane with a 
few men, met some of Stuart's horsemen at 
Cedar Run bridge, and with a single volley 
drove them in confusion. Moving into Mary- 
land they took part in the battle of South 
Mountain September 14th, and the next day 
at 3 P. M. reached the battle field of Antie- 
tam. In the two days the regiment lost in 
killed and wounded one hundred and ten offi- 
cers and men. The next fight was at Freder- 
icksburg. December 12th the Reserves crossed 
to the right bank of the Rappahannock. 

Febniary 6, 1863, they were ordered to the 
defenses of Washington, and established camp 
at Fairfax; June 25th, were ordered to join 



the Fifth Corps, then marching into Pennsyl- 
vania, and were participants in the battle of 
Gettysburg. The remaining months of 1863 
they were constantly on the skirmish line, and 
at the close of the campaign went into winter 
quarters at Bristow Station, where they re- 
mained until the last of April, 1864; April 
29th, broke camp and reached Culpepper on 
the 30th; May 4th, crossed the Rapidan and 
took part in the battle of the Wilderness. 
They distinguished themselves at Spottsyl- 
vania; at Mountain Run they made two as- 
saults on the enemy's works, but they were 
unsuccessful. May nth occurred the assault 
by the entire army. On the 12th the "Buck- 
tails" were employed picking off Confederate 
artillery men. 

The last fight of the "Bucktails" was on 
the Mechanicsville road, May 30th, their term 
of enlistment expiring that day. The regi- 
ment was mustered out at Harrisburg June 
II, 1864. 

On the Fourth of July, 1866, the bunting 
which floated over the rafts in 1861, and 
which they had carried in their campaigns 
amid the blaze of artillery and the leaden 
storm of infantry, was borne in procession in 
Philadelphia by the veterans, and delivered to 
the governor of the State amid the cheers of 
assembled thousands. 

Company K of this regiment was recruited 
at Curwensville, with Edward A. Irvin, cap- 
tain. 

Field and Staff 

Colonels: — Thomas L. Kane, May 12, 
1861 ; mustered as private May 13, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to colonel June 12, 1861 ; resigned and 
elected lieutenant-colonel June 13, 1861 ; 
wounded at Dranesville December 28, 1861, 
and at Harrisburg June 6, 1862; promoted to 



52 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



brigadier-general September 7, 1862, to brevet 
major-general March 13, 1865; resigned No- 
vember 7, 1863. 

Chas. J. Biddle, May 29, 1861 ; resigned 
February i, 1862. 

Hugh \\. McNeil, May 20, 1861; promoted 
from captain Company D January 22, 1862; 
killed at Antietam September 16, 1862. 

Charles F. Taylor, May 28, 1861 ; promoted 
from captain Company H March i, 1863; 
killed at Gettysburg July 2, 1863. 

Lieutenant-Colonel: — Alanson E. Niles, 
May 31, 1861 ; promoted from captain Com- 
pany E to major March i, 1863, to lieutenant- 
colonel May 15, 1863; resigned March 28, 
1864. 

Majors: — Roy Stone, May 29, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to major June 13, 1861 ; to colonel of 
149th P. V. August 29, 1862. 

W. R. Hartshorn, May 29, 1861 ; promoted 
to adjutant February, 1862, to major May 22, 
1863; mustered out with regiment June 11, 
1864. 

Adjutants: — John T. A. Jewett, May 29, 
1861 ; promoted to captain Company D Febru- 
ary 5, 1862. 

Roger Sherman, May 28, 1861 ; promoted 
from sergeant-major to adjutant May 23, 
1862; resigned March 21, 1864. 

Quartermasters: — Henry D. Patton, May 
29, 1861 ; promoted to captain and A. Q. M. 
U. S. V. December i, 1862. 

Lucius Truman, May 29, 1861 ; transferred 
to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Surgeons: — S. D. Freeman, May 29, 1861 ; 
resigned October i, 1862. 

John J. Comfort, December 17, 1862; 
transferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; 
brevet lieutenant-colonel March 13, 1865. 

Assistant Surgeons: — W. T. Humphrey, 



June 21, 1861 ; promoted to surgeon 149th P. 
V. September 5, 1862. 

\V. B. Jones, August 2, 1862; resigned No- 
vember 1, 1862. 

Daniel O. Crouch, December i, 1S62; re- 
signed June 10, 1863. 

Lafayette Butler, September 30, 1863; 
transferred to 190th P. V. May 30, 1864. 

Chaplain: — W. H. D. Patton, August 3, 
1861 ; resigned November 11, 1862. 

Scrgcant-Major: — Wm. Baker, August 15, 
1862; transferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 
1864. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant : — Wm. C. Hunter, 
May 21, 1861 ; transferred to 190th P. V. May 
31, 1864; veteran. 

Commissary-Sergeant: — John Semon, May 
29, 1861 ; promoted from corporal Company 
K January i, 1863; mustered out with com- 
pany June II, 1864. 

Hospital Stezvards: — R. Fenton Ward, May 
29, 1861 ; promoted to second lieutenant Com- 
pany I July I, 1862. 

Jeremiah J. Starr, May 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 
Principal Musician: — Henry Zundel, May 
29, 1861 ; promoted from pri%'ate to company 
F September, 1863; mustered out with com- 
pany June II, 1864. 

COMPANY K 

Recruited in Curwensville, Clearfield County 
Captains: — Edward A. Irvin, May 29, 
1861 ; commissioned lieutenant-colonel Sep- 
tember 10, 1862, not mustered; discharged 
May I, 1863, for wounds received in action. 

James M. Welch, May 29, 1861; promoted 
from second lieutenant March 21, 1863; 
transferred to V. R. C. September 12, 1863. 
First Lietttenants : — W. R. Hartshorn, May 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



53 



29, 1861 ; promoted to adjutant February, 
1862. 

John P. Bard, May 29, 1861 ; promoted 
from sergeant to second lieutenant March i^, 
1863; to brevet captain March 13, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Second Lieutenants: — Daniel C. Dale, May 
29, 1861 ; promoted from sergeant March 23, 
1862; died February 17, 1863. 

John E. Kratzer, May 29, 1861 ; promoted 
from sergeant February 17, 1863; transferred 
to V. R. C. May 31, 1864. 

First Sergeants — Thos. J. Thompson, May 
29, 1861 ; transferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 
1864; veteran. 

Lewis Hoover, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Daniel Blett, May 29, 1861 ; promoted to 
second lieutenant Company F July i, 1863. 

John H. Norris, May 29. 1861 ; transferred 
to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

James F. Ross, May 29, 1861 ; transferred 
to 109th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

Wm. G. Addleman, May 29, 1861; dis- 
charged May 24, 1864, for wounds received 
in action, date unknown. 

James G. Hill, May 29, 1861; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate May 8, 1862. 

Corporals: — Edmund M. Curry, May 29, 
1861 ; mustered out with company June 11, 
1864. 

Wm. F. Wilson, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Robert G. McCracken, May 29, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

Alex. Robertson, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

David M. Glenn, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Cortes Bloom, May 29, 1861 ; discharged 



November 28, 1862, for wounds received in 
action, date unknown. 

Abraham Carson, May 29, 1861 ; dis- 
charged March 6, 1863, for wounds received 
in action, date unknown. 

Samuel Reed, May 29, 1861; discharged 
April 23, 1863, for wounds received in ac- 
tion, date unknown. J 

Amos Swift, July 31, 1861 ; transferred to 
190th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

John Lemon, May 29, 1861 ; promoted ta 
sergeant January i, 1863. 

John H. Wilson, May 29, 1861 ; died De- 
cember 9, 1 86 1. 

Privates: — John M. Addleman, October 3, 
1861; transferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 
1864. 

Isaiah Bloom, May 29, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

Enos Bloom, May 29, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

Zachariah Bailey, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Richard J. Bard, May 29, 1861; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate November 20, 1861. 

James L. Barr, March 21, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate December 3, 1862. 

John F. Barnes, July i, 1861; transferred 
to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

Arnold Bloom, October 3, 1861 ; transferred 
to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

James C. Billis, May 28, 1861 ; transferred 
to Company H, November i, 1861. 

John B. Brink, February 29, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Joseph P. Broomall, October 3, 1861 ; killed 
at South Mountain September 14, 1862. 

Andrew J. Cupples, May 29, 1861 ; 
wounded at Wilderness May 7, 1864; absent 
at muster out. 



54 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Henry Cogley, May 31, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

John H. Couher, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Thos. Conkhn, May 29, 1861; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

Chas. M. Clarlv May 29, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate August 10, 1861. 

Artliur Conner, May 29, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate November i, 1862. 

D. R. P. Chatham, May 29, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to U. S. Sig. Corps August 29, 1862. 

Jacob Connelly, February 29, 1864: trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Wm. S. Cummings, May 29, 1861 ; killed 
at Antietam September 17, 1862. 

Frank Chase, July i, 1861; deserted April 
13, 1862. 

Mamming S. Dunn, May 29, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company June 11, 1864. 

G. P. Dougham, October 3, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 11, 
1862. 

Wm. G. Denick, March 28, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Levi Ennis, May 29, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

James Flanigan, July 31, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate November 21, 1861. 

Frank A. Fleming, October 3, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate, date un- 
known. 

Isaac Fruze, May 29, 1861 : discharged on 
surgeon's certificate May 30, 1863. 

James Frantz, October 3, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate March 10, 1863. 

Robt. R. Fleming, February' 29. 1864; 
transferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Adam Fogle, February 9, 1864; transferred 
to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 



A. Harrison Frantz, May 29, 1861 ; cap- 
tured, died at Belle Isle, Va.. July 15, 1862. 

Martin F. Frantz, October 3, 1861 ; de- 
serted December i, 1862. 

James Glenn, November 18, 1861 ; wounded 
in action, date unknown; discharged on sur- 
geon's certificate May 16, 1862. 

Charles M. Goff, March 28, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Samuel Gunsalus, March 28, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Burton Granger, May 29, 1861 ; died Octo- 
ber 2, 1862, of wounds received in action. 

Ellis J. Hall, May 29, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1864. 

Lorenzo D. Hile, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

John Henry, October 3, 1861 ; transferred 
to i90lh P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

John W. Haslet, May 29, 1861 ; transferred 
to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

Henry J. Hall, July 31, 1861 ; transferred 
to 109th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

Joseph K. Henry, May 29, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate July 20, 1861. 

C. Hockenburg, October 3, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 19, 
1862. 

Thomas Honitler, May 29, 1861 ; dis- 
cliarged on surgeon's certificate June 26, 
1862. 

William Hosford, July i, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate December i, 1862. 

Thos. Humphrey, October 3, 1861 ; 
wounded in action, date unknown; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate December i, 1862. 

W. M. Humphrey, July i, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate April 20, 1863. 

Edward Halcomb, May 29, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to Company D, October 12, 1861. 



AND REPRESENTATI\-E CITIZENS 



55 



James Henry, May 29, 1861 ; killed at Bull 
Run August 29, 1862. 

Charles Hall, July 31, 1861 ; killed at An- 
tietam September 17, 1862. 

William Hinnigh, May 29, 1861 ; killed in 
action May 7, 1864. 

Austin Irvin, July i, 1861 ; died March 6, 
1863. 

Peter Jaggers, July 31, 1861 ; transferred 
to Company D, November i, 1861. 

Samuel Kingston, July 31, 1861 ; dis- 
charged January 20, 1862, for wounds re- 
ceived in action, date unknown. 

John Kratzer, May 29, 1861 ; killed at Bull 
Run Aug-ust 30, 1862. 

George W. Knapp, July i, 1861 ; died Sep- 
tember 2^1, 1862, on board transport from 
Richmond. 

Frost Littlefield, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Cyrus B. Lower, October 27, 1863 ; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Ephraim Morrow, May 29, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to Signal Corps August, 1861. 

Isaiah McDonald, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Peter C. McKee, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Charles R. McCrum, May 29, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 11, 
1862. 

Geo. W. McDonald, May 29, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

Alexander McDonald, October 3, 1861 ; 
transferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; vet- 
eran. 

John Moyer, May 29, 1861 ; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate January i, 1862. 

Casper P. Mason, May 29, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 10. 1863. 



Samuel Mortimer, May 29, 1861 ; died Sep- 
tember 10, 1863, from wounds received in ac- 
tion, date unknown. 

Hiram McClenahan, May 29, i86r ; trans- 
ferred to 44th P. V. November i, 1861. 

Francis C. Morrow, July i, 1861; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Nath. A. McCloskey, May 29, 1861 ; died 
November 28, 1861. 

And'n J. Montonz, May 29, 1861 ; died 
May, 1864, of wounds received in action. 

David McCullough, May 29, 1861; de- 
serted December 8, 1862. 

George O'Leary, July i, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate November 20, 1861. 

Peter Piper, May 29, 1861 ; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate July 30, 1862. 

Robert B. Pettingill, May 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to Company H, October 12, 1861. 

John Rish, May 29, i86r ; died June 11, 
1864, of wound received at Bethesda Church 
May 30, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, 
Arlington. 

Thomas Riley, May 29, 1861 ; killed at 
South Mountain September 14, 1862. 

Reuben Rex, May 29, 1861 ; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate June 11, 1862. 

Robert W. Ross, October 3, 1861 ; died Jan- 
uary 7, 1863, of wounds received in action. 

Edward D. Stock, May 29, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company June 11, 1864. 

Joseph G. Spencer, May 29, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate September 22, 
1861. 

James Spence, October 3, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate September i, 1862. 

Abel Sonders, July 21, 1863; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate November 19, 1862. 

Joseph Shirk, May 29, 1861 ; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate December 22, 1862. 



56 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Philander Smith, May 29, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate, date unknown. 

George B. Scott, May 29, 1861 ; discharged 
February 9, 1863, for wounds received in ac- 
tion, date unknown. 

Daniel Shaver, May 29, 1861 ; discharged 
April 20, 1863, for wounds received in action, 
date unknown. 

Peter Spargo, May 29, 1861 ; transferred to 
United States Signal Corps August 23, 1863. 

Jesse E. Shaver, March 28, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864. 

Porter Smith, May 29, 1861; killed at 
Fredericksburg December 13, 1862. 

Wm. H. Spence, May 29, 1861 ; deserted 
August 7, 1 86 1. 

Dwight Seaman, May 29, 1861 ; deserted, 
date unknown. 

George W. Taylor, May 29, 1861; dis- 
charged May 25, 1863, for wounds received 
in action, date unknown. 

Daniel F. Williams, May 29, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 22, 
1862. 

Joseph Williams, October 3, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to 190th P. V. May 31, 1864; veteran. 

James M. Williams, February 27, 1864; 
died May, 1864, of wounds received in action. 

THE FIFTY-FIRST REGIMENT 

The portion of this regiment that was re- 
cruited in Clearfield county was exceedingly 
small, only comprising a contingent of sixteen 
men, enlisted by Peter A. Gaulin, who after- 
wards was promoted to captain of Company 
G. A major portion of these were enlisted in 
October. 1861, for the regular three years' 
service, but some slight accessions were made 
in 1864. 



The greater portion of the regiment was 
raised in the counties of Montgomery, Un- 
ion, Snyder, Centre, and Northampton. The 
field officers were John F. Hartranft, colonel; 
Thomas S. Bell, lieutenant-colonel; Edwin 
Schall, major. 

Those of the regiment from Clearfield 
county were recruited mainly from the north- 
ern part. The muster-roll of that part of 
Company G shows the name, rank, date of 
muster, and disposition of each man. 

Captain: — Peter A. Gaulin, October 17, 
1 86 1 ; promoted from second to first lieutenant 
February 12, 1862, to captain January 11, 
1863; resigned March 16, 1864. 

First Sergeant: — Wm. Heichel, October 17, 
1861 ; promoted from sergeant to first ser- 
geant February 13, 1865; mustered out with 
company July 27, 1865. 

Sergeants: — George Dumont, October 17, 
1861 ; promoted from corporal to sergeant 
February 13, 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany; veteran. 

Lewis Cartuyvel, October 17, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to quartermaster-sergeant March 9, 
1865; veteran. 

Corporals: — Serdon RoUey, February 28, 
1864; mustered out with company July 27, 
1865. 

Charles Heichel, Febniary 29, 1864; pro- 
moted to corporal April 6. 1865; mustered 
out July 27, 1865. 

Wm. Maurer, October 17, 1861 ; mustered 
out October 16, 1864 — expiration of term. 

Privates: — Philip Cayot. October 17, 1861; 
absent, sick, when mustered out; veteran. 

Cornelius Conway, October 17, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate, date un- 
known. 

Huston Heickel, October 17, 1861; trans- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



57 



ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, date un- 
known. 

Wm. Mackey, October 17, 1861 ; died in 
Kentucky, date unknown. 

Jno. McGonegal, September 27, 1S64; 
drafted; discharged by general order June i, 
1865. 

August Rolley, October 17, 1861 ; cap- 
tured ; died at Andersonville, Ga., May 29, 
1864; grave 1454. 

Nicholas Rolley, October 17, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate June 6, 1865 ; 
veteran. 

Christian Simons, October 17, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate, date un- 
known. 

Wallis Wiggins, October 17, 1861 ; killed at 
Antietam September 17, 1862. 

FIFTY-NINTH REGIMENT SECOND C.WALRY 

The proportion of this regiment that was 
recruited in Clearfield county was exceedingly 
small, less than fifty men, and they were at- 
tached to Company F. These men were re- 
cruited in the eastern part of the county by 
Thomas G. Snyder, who was made first lieu- 
tenant, and who died of wounds received at 
Occoquan, Va., on December 28, 1862. The 
regiment was raised in the fall of 1861, in 
various sections of the State, and rendez- 
voused at Camp Patterson, six miles from 
Philadelphia. The field officers were as fol- 
lows: Richard Price Butler, colonel; Joseph 
P. Brinton, lieutenant-colonel ; Charles F. 
Taggard and J. Archambault, majors. 

At Baltimore the regiment was reviewed by 
General Dix. At Cloud's Mills it was assigned 
to the brigade commanded by General Cooke, 
First Reserve Army Crops, General Sturgis, 
but in August was transferred to General 



Bu ford's brigade. Its first engagement took 
place near Culpepper, and afterwards partici- 
pated in the Bull Run fight, where it lost heav- 
ily. On September 10, Buford was appointed 
to McClellan's staff, and Colonel Price suc- 
ceeded to the command of the brigade. On 
October i the regiment was transferred to 
General Bayard's command, and assigned to 
the First Brigade. They were constantly 
scouting until late in December, when, on the 
28th they fell into an ambuscade at Occoquan 
and suffered a great loss. Lieutenant Thomas 
G. Snyder was mortally wounded and cap- 
tured here. He died in the enemy's hands. In 
killed, wounded and missing it lost over one 
hundred men. The regiment wintered at Ac- 
cotink. 

In April, 1863, at Fairfax Court-house, it 
was assigned to the Second Brigade of Gen- 
eral Stahel's Division. In June it participated 
in the Gettysburg campaign, conducted twen- 
ty-five hundred prisoners to Westminster, and 
on the 7th rejoined the army at Middletown. 
It started in pursuit of Lee's army and went 
as far as Warrenton, and afterwards did guard 
duty at Meade's headquarters. It was then 
assigned to the Second Brigade. Its subse- 
quent history is told by the engagement at 
Beverly's Ford, on the heights around Rappa- 
hannock Station, the raid on Luray, after 
which it again went into winter quarters. The 
next year it moved with the Army of the Po- 
tomac and went with Sheridan on his memo- 
rable raid, and rejoined the army on the 25th. 
In Sheridan's second raid it also engaged. Its 
subsequent career was identified with the 
Army of the Potomac, at Wyatt's Farm, 
Boydton Plank Road, McDowell's Hill, and 
Five Forks, and was present at Lee's surren- 
der at Appomattox. The regiment was mus- 



58 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



tered out of service at Cloud's Mills, July 13, 
1865, after which "the boys" returned home, 
all but the dead, whose bones are bleaching 
from the Potomac to the Blackwater. 

EIGHTY-FOURTH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER 
INFANTRY 

This regiment was organized under a spe- 
cial order from the war department, issued 
by General Cameron, then secretary of war, 
to General J. Y. James, of Warren county, 
William G. Murray, of Blair county, as col- 
onel; Thomas C. McDowell, of Dauphin 
county, as lieutenant-colonel; Walter Barrett, 
of Clearfield county, as major; Thomas H. 
Craig, of Blair county, as adjutant; Dr. G. F. 
Hoop, of Clearfield county, as surgeon; C. A. 
W. Redlick, of Alieglieny county, as assistant 
surgeon; Alexander McLeod, of Clearfield, as 
cliaplain, and J. Miles Kephart, of Centre 
county, as quartermaster. 

The point of rendezvous was Camp Cross- 
man, three miles from Huntingdon. Late in 
the fall of 1 86 1 the regiment moved to Camp 
Curtis, at Harrisburg. In December of the 
same year the regiment was ordered to Han- 
cock, Md., to protect tliat point from a threat- 
ened invasion by the command of General 
Jackson. There the regiment received their 
arms in the afternoon, and the ne.xt morning, 
before daylight, was ordered to march to the 
town of Bath to assist in bringing away a 
battery of artillery. Before they reached that 
point they were informed of the near approach 
of Jackson's army. They succeeded in secur- 
ing the artilleiy, but one-half of the regi- 
ment was compelled to wade the Potomac 
River to escape capture. 

From there, under command of General 
Lander, they marched to Cumberland, Md., 



frum whence, in a few days, they went into 
camp at a point on the Paw Paw River, where 
General Lander fomied his division. They 
remained at this point until the early spring 
of 1862. General Lander having died during 
the winter. General James Shields was ap- 
pointed to command. 

As soon as the season permitted, the camp 
was broken up and the division moved to ]\Iar- 
tinsburg, Va. At this time Clearfield county 
was represented by Company G, captain, 
JMerrick Howsler, of Cameron county; Com- 
pany H, captain, \\'illiam M. Behan; Com- 
pany I, captain, Joseph L. Kirby; first lieuten- 
ant, Clarence L. Barrett ; second lieutenant, 
John B. Ferguson; Company K, captain, Mat- 
thew Ogden. and second lieutenant, John S. 
Jury ; also from Clearfield coimty were Fred 
Barrett and Riciiard H. Shaw, hospital stew- 
ards. At the point last above referred to, the 
Eighty-fourth was brigaded with the One 
Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania, the Four- 
teenth Indiana, and the Thirteenth Indiana. 
L'pon the arrival of the division in Martins- 
burg, immediate preparation was made to at- 
tack General Jackson at Winchester, Va. In 
less than a week tlie whole force was march- 
ing to that point. When the division arrived 
at Winchester, it was found that Jackson had 
retired down the Shenandoah valley. 

Early on the morning of March 22 the pick- 
ets were driven in, and by ten o'clock the bat- 
tle of Kernstown was commanded. It raged 
fiercely until in the afternoon. Here Colonel 
Murray was killed, evidently by a sharp- 
shooter. The figure "84" in his cap was 
driven into his brain by the force of the bullet; 
also Captain Patrick Gallagher, of Company 
E, and Lieutenant Charles Reem. of Company 
A. Nearly one-half of the regiment were 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



59 



killed or wounded. The regiment was made 
the subject of a special complimentary order 
from the commanding general for gallantry 
upon this occasion. 

Following under the various commanders, 
from the second battle of Bull Run, it partic- 
ipated in all the battles until it was finally 
merged, January 13, 1865, with the Fifty-sev- 
enth Pennsylvania Infantry, and ceased to 
hold its place in the Pennsylvania line. 
Field and Staff 

Colonels: — William G. Murray, December 
23, 1861 ; killed at Winchester, March 2^, 
1862. 

Samuel M. Bowman, June 21, 1862; pro- 
moted to brevet brigadier-general March 13, 
1865; discharged May 15, 1865. 

Lieutenant-Colonels: — T. C. McDowell, 
December 18, 1861 ; resigned July, 1862. 

Walter Barrett, December 23, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from major; resigned September 10, 
1862. 

Thomas H. Craig, December 24, 1861 ; 
promoted from adjutant to major July 31, 
1862, to lieutenant-colonel October i, 1862; 
resigned December 21, 1862. 

Milton Opp, October i, 1861 ; promoted 
from captain Company F to major October 
I, 1862, to lieutenant-colonel December 23, 
1862 ; died May 9 of wounds received at Wil- 
derness, Va., May 6, 1864. 

George Zinn, October i, 1861 ; promoted 
from captain Company D to major December 
23, 1862, to lieutenant-colonel August i, 
1864; wounded in action October i, 1864; 
promoted to colonel 57th P. V. March 19, 
1865. 

Adjutants: — Joseph J. Vaughan, June 21, 
1862; promoted to adjutant June 21. 1863; 
discharged January 17, 1865. 



Edmund Mather, September 21, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from first lieutenant Company B, Jan- 
uary 18, 1863 ; transferred to V. R. C. Novem- 
ber 26, 1863; discharged December 16, 1863. 

Charles W. Forrester, October i, 1862; 
promoted from second lieutenant Company F, 
January i, 1864, to captain Company G, 57th 
P. v., Januar}' 13, 1865. 

Quarter master: — J. Miles Kephart, Decem- 
ber 20, 1861 ; mustered out December 31, 
1864 — expiration of term. 

Surgeons:— G\hho\\ty F. Hoop, December 
18, 1861 ; resigned September 12, 1863. 

John S. Waggoner, February 2, 1863; 
wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 
1863; promoted from assistant surgeon Octo- 
ber 24, 1863; resigned April 15, 1864. 

S. B. Sturdevant, August 19, 1864; mus- 
tered out January 13, 1865. 

John P. Norman, June i, 1863; promoted 
from assistant surgeon April 25, 1864; re- 
signed July 3, 1864. 

Assistant Surgeons: — C. A. W. Redlick, 
December 18, 1861 ; promoted to surgeon 
136th P. V. September 2, 1862. 

G. W. Thompson, August i, 1862; resigned 
August 31, 1S62. 

James D. McClure, September 13, 1862'; 
promoted to surgeon 147th P. V. May 14, 
1863. 

Willian Jack, June 7, 1864; transferred to 
57th P. V. January 13, 1865. 

Chaplains: — Alexander McLeod, December 
28, 1861 ; discharged October 6, 1862. 

John Thomas, February 27, 1864; dis- 
charged January 13, 1865. 

Sergeant-Majors: — William M. Gwinn, De- 
cember 5, 1861 ; promoted to second lieuten- 
ant Company C, April 23, 1862. 

John W. Kissel, December 9, 1861; pro- 



60 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



moted from private Company F, to second 
lieutenant Company D, December 23, 1862. 

John S. Jury, 1861 ; promoted to second 
lieutenant Company K, October 3, 1864. 

Quartermaster - Sergeants: — Harvey S. 
Wells, October 24, 1861 ; promoted to first 
lieutenant company F, February 19, 1864. 

Gabriel H. Ramey, December 23, 1861 ; 
promoted from private Company F; dis- 
charged December 13, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

Commissary-Sergeant: — J. Russell Win- 
gate, December 24, 1861 ; promoted from pri- 
vate Company D to second lieutenant Com- 
pany G, October 15, 1862. 

Principal Musicians: — Foster Wighennan, 
December 24, 1861 ; promoted from private 
Company D; not accounted for; veteran. 

Thaddeus Albert, December 5, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from private Company F ; not accounted 
for. 

Hospital Stczcards: — Frederick Barrett, 
December 24, 1861; promoted from private 
Company D. 

Richard H. Shaw, 1861 ; promoted from 
private Company K. 

COMP.VNY II 

Recruited in Clearfield and Dauphin Counties 
Captains: — Wm. Bahan, September 24, 
1862; discharged June 8, 1863. 

Clarence G. Jackson, August 2, 1862; pro- 
moted from second to first lieutenant January 
18, 1863; to captain July i, 1863; wounded 
and captured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 
1863; transferred to Company H, 57th P. V. 
January 13, 1865. 

First Lieutenants: — Alexander R. Ninin- 
ger, August 6, 1862; promoted from second 
lieutenant; discharged January 17, 1863. 



James S. Mitchell, March 17, 1862; promo- 
ted from first sergeant to second lieutenant 
January 18, 1863; to first lieutenant July i, 
1863; transferred to Company H, 57th P. V. 
January 13, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant: — William A. Wilson, 
May 28, 1862; wounded at Chancellorsville, 
Va., May 3, 1863; promoted from private 
July I, 1863; transferred to Company H, 57th 
P. V. January 13, 1865. 

Sergeants: — Arthur C. Gilbert, June 5, 
1862; promoted to first lieutenant Company I, 
October i, 1862. 

William F. Fox, June 5, 1862; wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; not ac- 
counted for. 

Andrew D. Seely, August 6, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Company H, 57th P. V. January 13, 
1865. 

Privates: — James Burk, June 5, 1862; died 
October 24, 1864; buried in National Ceme- 
tery, Arlington, Va. 

James Bassett, June 5, 1862; transferred to 
Company H, 57th P. V. January 13, 1865. 

C. Frank Barton, August 6, 1862; captured 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

William Beach, September 13, 1862; not 
accounted for. 

James J. Briner, September 23, 1862; not 
accounted for. 

David M. Bryan, September 15, 1862; 
not accounted for. 

Charles E. Crawford, June 5, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 

James Curry, July 7, 1862; not accounted 
^foi-. 

Martin Cosgrove, July 18, 1862; not ac- 
counted for. 

John Campbell, July 31, 1862; captured at 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 61 

Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; trans- Samuel S. Fowler, August 25, 1862; not 

f erred to Company H, 57th P. V. January 13, accounted for. 

1865. Nelson Green, June 5, 1862 ; not accounted 

P'rank Cook, August 13, 1862; not ac- for. 

counted for. Joseph Glasgow, June 5, 1862; not ac- 

James Chamberlain, August 25, 1862; counted for. 

transferred to Company H, 57th P. V., Jan- John Garrigan, June 5, 1862; not accounted 

uary 13, 1865. for. 

Isaac Chase, September 13, 1862; not ac- Joseph Griffith, July 7, 1862; transferred 

counted for. to Company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. 

Frederick Conklin, September 11, 1862; Willett C. Gearhart, August 6, 1862; not 

captured, died at Salisbury, N. C, November accounted for. 

8, 1S64. Edward Gillnett, September 13, 1862; not 

James Dunlap, July 5, 1862; not accounted accounted for. 

for. Joseph L. Hughes, July 7, 1862; not ac- 

W'ashington Dibert, May 20, 1864; trans- counted for. 

ferred to Company H, 57th P. V., January Benj. F. Hughes, July 7, 1862; not ac- 

13- 1865. counted for. 

Wm. L. Dewalt, June 5, 1862; captured at John Harrington, August 6, 1862; wounded 

Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. and captured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 

Felix Despies', July 7, 1862; not accounted 1863. 

for. ' George Hiney, killed at Chancellorsville, 

Wm. J. Duryea, August 8, 1862; trans- Va., May 3, 1863. 

ferred to Company H, 57th P. V., January 13, James M. Jordon, September 10, 1862; not 

1865. accounted for. 

Thomas Dailey, August 11, 1862; trans- Salisbury H. James; not accounted for. 

ferred to Company H, 57th P. V., January George A. Kline, August 6, 1862; captured 

13. 1865. at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; trans- 
Nicholas Eisman, July 31, 1862; trans- ferred to Company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 

ferred to Company H, 57th P. V., January 1865. 

13- 1865. Frank Lewis, June 5, 1862; transferred to 

David Estep, September 2;^, 1862; trans- Company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. 

ferred to Company E. Joseph Lindemuth, June 5, 1862; not ac- 

Uriah M. Edgar, September 23, 1863; not counted for. 
accounted for. James M. Lewis, May 17, 1862; trans- 
Frederick Fink, July 31, 1862; not ac- ferred to Company K. 
counted for. Thomas B. Lou, August 21, 1862; trans- 
Charles H. Frees, August 25, 1862, ferred to V. R. C. ; died at Washington, D. C, 

wounded and captured at Chancellorsville, March 8, 1864. 

Va., May 3, 1863. William H. Lane, September 5, 1862; 



62 HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 

transferred to Company H, 57th P. V., Janu- George Rehr, June 5, 1862; not accounted 

ary 13, 1865. for. 

Francis A. Leas, September 13, 1862; not William H. Ruch, August 6, 1862; trans- 
accounted for. ferred to company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 

George Maguire, June 5, 1862; not ac- 1865. 

counted for. James J. Ruch, August 6, 1862 ; transferred 

Thomas E. Merchant, June 25, 1862; to company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 

transferred to Company F. 1865. 

Oscar B. Millard, August 6, 1862; not ac- Allen B. Reams, .August 30, 1862; trans- 
counted for. ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 

Thomas B. Miller, August 21, 1862; not 1865. 

accounted for. William H. Shaffer, June 5, 1862; not ac- 

Henry Manes, September I, 1862; cap- counted for. 

lured at Cliancellorsville, Va., May 3. 1863; John Schneiber, July 7, 1862; transferred 

transferred to company H, 57th P. V., Janu- to V. R. C, September 26, 1863; discharged 

ary 13, 1865. July 6, 1865. 

Wm. IT McE June 5, 1862; not ac- John Stifer, .August 6, 1862; not accounted 

counted for. for. 

James McGowan, .August 5, 1862; not ac- Jacob Stoner, September 5, 1862; not ac- 
counted for. counted for. 

Garrett Nolan, June 5, 1862; not accounted Joshua P. Sherman, August 6, 1862; not 

for. accounted for. 

Jacob Nevil, October 3, 1862; transferred Alonzo Solt, Augu.'st 21, 1862; not account- 
to company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. ed for. 

Daniel Oberly, September 17, 1862; trans- .Andrew J. Sollery, September 12, 1862; 

ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, transferred to company H, 57th P. V., January 

1865. 13. 1865. 

Levi Ostrander, September 30, 1862; trans- George Thompson, June 5, 1862; not ac- 

ferred to company L 57th P. V., January 13, counted for. 

1865. Timothy Torsey, July 18, 1862; not ac- 

Herman Perry, June 5, 1862; not accounted counted for. 
for. Thomas Wright. June 5, 1862; not account- 
John Pea, .August 6, 1862; transferred to ed for. 
company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. Amos Whitnight, August 6, 1862; not ac- 

Augustus B. Pearce, September 13. 1862; counted for. 

not accounted for. .Abner Welsh, August 6, 1862: wounded 

Benjamin F. Petemian, September 17, at Chancellorsville. Va., May 3, 1863; not ac- 

1862; not accounted for. counted for. 

Daniel Quick. .August 6, 1862; transferred Joseph P. Warren, August 21, 1862; not 

to company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. accounted for. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



63 



Daniel Wilhelm. August ii, 1862; not ac- 
counted for. 

William Young, August 5, 1862; not ac- 
counted for. 

Rudolph L. Young, August 30, 1862; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 

COMPANY I. 

Recruited in Clearfield and Blair Counties. 

Captains — Joseph L. Curby, September 25, 
1861 ; resigned September 10, 1862. 

John H. Comfort, November 17, 1862; re- 
signed November 28, 1862. 

Arthur C. Gilbert, June 5, 1862; promoted 
from sergeant company H, to first lieutenant 
October i, 1862; to captain; resigned April 
15. 1863. 

John R. Ross, November 15, 1862; pro- 
moted from first lieutenant May i, 1863; 
wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 
1863 ; promoted to brevet major April 9, 1865 ; 
transferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 
13, 1865. 

First Lieutenants — Isaac Hooper, Septem- 
ber 16, 1861 ; resigned February 14. 1862. 

Clarence L. Barett, February i. 1862; pro- 
moted from second lieutenant February 15, 
1862; resigned August 2, 1862. 

John B. Ferguson, 1861 : promoted from 
first sergeant to second lieutenant February 
15, 1862; to first lieutenant; resigned Novem- 
ber 15, 1862. 

George S. Good, November 17, 1862; pro- 
moted from second lieutenant May i, 1863; 
wounded and captured at Chancellorsville, 
Va., May 3, 1863 : captured at Mine Run No- 
vember 30, 1863; discharged December 31, 
1864. 

Second Lieutenants — John ^^^ Paulley, 



September 25, 1861 ; resigned January 31, 
1862. 

Alban H. Nixon, October 24, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from sergeant to second lieutenant 
March 3, 1862; to first lieutenant company K, 
January 18, 1863. 

First Sergeant — Hiram F. Willis, Septem- 
ber 20, 1862; promoted to first sergeant; cam- 
missioned second lieutenant May i, 1863; not 
-mustered; wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., 
May 3, 1863 ; discharged to accept commission 
in V. R. C. 

SergeaJits — Thomas Gouldsberry, 1861 ; 
transferred to company K, 1862. 

A. G. Jamison, 1861 ; not acounted for. 

William Clouser, 1861 ; not accounted 
for. 

William W. Alsbach, 1861 ; transferred to 
company K, 1862. 

Corporals — Johnson Cassidy, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to company K, 1862. 

James Gorman, 1861 ; transferred to com- 
pany K, 1862. 

Ellis Hart, 1861 ; discharged, date unknown. 

Robert Jamison, 1861 ; transferred to com- 
pany K, 1862. 

Isaac Manes, 1861 ; transferred to company 
K, 1862. 

Alexander Reed, 1861 ; transferred to com- 
pany K, 1862. 

Joseph Repetto, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Charles White, 1861 ; transferred to com- 
pany K, 1862. 

Musician — Simon C. Whitmer, 1861 ; not 
accounted for. 

Privates — Thomas Adams, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to company K. 1862. 

Howard D. Avery, September 30, 1862; 
transferred to company I, i;7th P. V., January 
13, 1865. 



64 HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 

Joseph Apt, iS6i ; transferred to company William Booze, 1861 ; transferred to com- 

K, 1862. pany K, 1862. 

John Brady, 1861; discharged May 10, Gemmil Baker, 1861 ; transferred to com- 

1862. pany K, 1862. 

Henry C. Bowers, 1861; transferred to Anson N. Bidwell, March 31, 1864; trans- 
company K, 1862. ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, 

Joseph Bennett, 1861 ; not accounted for. 1865. 

Houser Baltzer, 1861 ; discharged, date un- Walter Barrett, March 31, 1864; not ac- 

known. counted for. 

Jacob N. Brigham. September 30, 1862; John B. Campbell, 1861 ; transferred to 

captured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 5, company K, 1862. 

1863: died August 2. 1864; buried at Cyprus Samuel Curry, 1861; discharged, date un- 

Hill Cemeter}', L. 1. known. 

Daniel L. Brown, 1861; died at Annapolis, Geo. W. Colmer, 1861; transferred to com- 

Md., June 15, of wounds received at Chancel- pany K, 1862. 

lorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. John Cramer, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Eliphalet W. Bruch, 1861 ; transferred to John Cunningham, 1 86 1 ; not accounted for. 
company I, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. Wayne Campbell, October 29, 1862; wound- 
Truman Brigham, 1861 ; not accounted for. ed at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 

William Bone, October 29, 1862; trans- transferred to company I, 57th P. V., Janu- 

ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, ary 13, 1865. 

1865. Zartis Campbell, October 29, 1862; trans- 
Demetrius Barnhart, November 4, 1862; ferred to company I. 37th P. V., January 13, 
transferred to company I, 57th P. V., Janu- 1865. 
ary 13, 1865. John Clements, November 6, 1862; not ac- 

Jacob Bastain, September 27, 1862; trans- counted for. 

ferred to company B. Valentine Culp, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

James Burk, September 29, 1862; not ac- Christopher Cassidy, 1861 ; transferred to 

counted for. company K, 1862. 

Samuel H. Boyer, October 6, 1862; not ac- John J. Charles, March 31, 1864; trans- 
counted for. ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, 

Daniel C. Boyer, October 6, 1862; died 1865. 

June 12, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, John H. Davis, 1861; discharged, date un- 

Arlington, Va. known. 

Nelson Bliss, 1861 ; transferred to company Elias Dexter, September 30, 1862; not ac- 

K, 1862. . counted for. 

Newton Bailey, 1861 ; transferred to com- Judson Davy, September 30, 1862; trans- 

pany K, 1862. ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, 

Samuel Bailey, 1861 ; transferred to com- 1865. 

pany K, 1862. James A. Davis. September 30, 1862; trans- 







■?v^""'' 




\ // 



a; 

7"' 

5 





AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 65 

ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, John R. Gaston, March 31, 1864; not ac- 

1865. counted for. 

Frank Duaenhaffer, November 4, 1862; John Hoggencamp, September 30, 1862; 

captured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, not accounted for. 

1863; transferred to company I, 57th P. V., William Hoffman, September 30, 1862; 

January 13, 1865. captured, died at Alexandria, Va., February 

John Dash, 1861 ; deserted, date unknown. 8, 1865, grave 2993. 

Daniel Elmore, October 25, 1862; not ac- James Haas, October 6, 1862; transferred 

counted for. to company G, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. 

John Evans, 1861 ; not accounted for. Jonathan Haas, September 15, 1862; trans- 
Henry Evans, 1861 ; deserted, date un- ferred to company G, 57th P. V., January 13, 
known. 1865. 

Alexander Funk, 1861 ; died, date unknown. George W. Harp, October 6, 1862; not ac- 

Sidney Farley, 1861 ; not accounted for. counted for. 

John H. Ferguson, 1861 ; wounded at Port Samuel Hughes, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Republic, June 9, 1862; transferred to com- Peter S. Hart, 1861 ; wounded on picket 

pany K, 1862. June 19, 1864: transferred to company K, 

James H. Ferguson, 1861 ; transferred to 57th P. V., January 13, 1865; veteran. 

Company K, 1862. George Hoffman, 1861 ; transferred to 

William Frampton, September 30, 1862; company K, 1862. 

not accounted for. William Hagerty, 1861 ; transferred to Com- 

John W. Frainpton, September 30, 1862; pany K, 1862. 

not accounted for. Uriah Haneigh, 1861 ; transferred to Com- 

Isaac Frampton, March 31, 1864; not ac- pany K, 1862. 

counted for. James Hepburn, 1861 ; transferred to Com- 

John Green, 1861 ; transferred to Company pany K, 1862. 

K, 1862. Jno. Heitzenrether, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Abraham Glunt, 1861 ; died, date unknown. Robert Harbridge, 1861 ; transferred to 

Joseph M. Gavitt, September 30, 1862: not Company K, 1862. 

accounted for. Joel Hofford, 1861 ; transferred to Com- 

John G. Guthrie, November 4, 1862; not pany K, 1862. 

accounted for. James A. Haines, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Edward Gibson, September 15, 1862; not Samuel Hare, 1861 ; transferred to com- 

accounted for. pany K, 1862. 

Charles Gearhart, November 6, 1862; not William A. Hallowell, 1861 ; not accounted 

accounted for. for. 

Theo. J. Garretson, 1861 ; transferred to Ephraim Hanes, March 3, 1864; not ac- 
company K. 1862. counted for. 

Jacob Gilnett, 1861 ; transferred to Com- Patrick Hagerty, March 30, 1864; not ac- 

pany K, 1862. counted for. 



66 HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 

Samuel H. Hulse, March 31, 1864; not ac- John Mark, 1861; transferred to company 

counted for. K, 1862. 

Samuel Johnson, 1861 ; transferred to com- James Mosher, September 30, 1862; not 

pany K, 1862. accounted for. 

Chester T. Jackson, September 30, 1862; George \V. Marks, September 30, 1862; 

not accounted for. transferred to V. R. C. ; discharged July 5, 

James Jefferson, September 29, 1862; not 1865. 

accounted for. Andrew J. Mosher, September 30, 1862; 

Jacob Kessler, September 30, 1862; cap- wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 

tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 1863; transferred to company I, 57th P. V., 

Levi Kessler, September 30, 1862; trans- January 13, 1865. 

ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, John L. Markles, September 30, 1862; 

1865. wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 

Orlando Krigbaum, October 6, 1862; trans- 1863; not accounted for. 

ferred to company G, 57th P. V., January 13, John Mosher, September 30, 1862; not ac- 

1865. counted for. 

William Kratzer, 1861 ; transferred to com- John P. Myers, September 30, 1862; 

pany K, 1862. wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 

Robert L. Lydic, 1861 ; transferred to com- 1863; not accounted for. 

pany K, 1862. An^os J. Mitchell, September 30, 1862; not 

Joseph L. Lydic, 1861 ; transferred to accounted for. 

company K, 1862. Virgil B. Mitchell, October 29, 1862; 

Justice Lukins, September 30, 1862; not ac- wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 

counted for. 1863; not accounted for. 

David Luke, September 30, 1862; not ac- Andrew J. Marks, September 30, 1862 ; cap- 
counted for. tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 

George Lloyd, September 15, 1862; not ac- transferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 

counted for. 13, 1865. 

A. B. Lawrence, September 15, 1862; Jacob S. Miller, December 21, 1861 ; trans- 
transferred to company B. ferred to company K, 1862. 

H. K. Lawrence, September 15, 1862; Dennis Maghar, March 30, 1864; not ac- 

trans ferred to company B. counted for. 

James M. Lewis, May 17, 1862; trans- Daniel McGowan, September 30, 1862; not 

ferred to company H. accounted for. 

Ellis Manes, 1861; deserted, date unknown. John McMeer, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Isaac Miller, 1861; deserted, date unknown. F. McCracken, 1861; not accounted for. 

Orange J. Michaels, 1861; transferred to Philip McCracken, 1861 ; transferred to 

company K, 1862. company K, 1862. 

John Miles, 1861 ; discharged, date un- William McAfoose, 1861 ; transferred to 

known. company K, 1862. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 67 

Edwin North, September 30, 1862; wound- May 19, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, 

ed at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; Arlington, Va. 

transferred to company I, 57th P. v., January Jerome Skinner, September 30, 1862; not 

13, 1865. accounted for. 

Samuel Olinger, 1861 ; died at Alexandria, Bradley Sherwood, September 30, 1862; 

Va., July 1862. transferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 

William Oliver, September 30, 1862; not 13, 1865. 

accounted for. Jesse Scott, October 29, 1862; not ac- 

Levi Ostrander, September 30, 1862; trans- counted for. 

ferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 13, H. E. Schemerhorn, October 29, 1862; not 

1865. accounted for. 

George C. Parsons, September 30, 1862; John Shister, September 15, 1862; not ac- 

not accounted for. counted for. 

John Poudler, 1861 ; deserted, date un- Cyrus Stebbins, November 14, 1862; not 

known. accounted for. 

Theodore Pardee, 1861; drowned at Han- William Scott, September 15, 1862; not ac- 

cock, Md., date unknown. counted for. 

Jackson Potter, 1861 ; died at Alexandria, John W. Simonton, 1861 ; captured, died at 

Va., date unknown. Richmond, Va., March 27, 1864. 

Jacob Rup, 1861 ; transferred to company Henry Sell, 1861 ; discharged, date un- 

K, 1862. known. 

James Reed, 1861 ; not accounted for. Henry Stugart, 1861; transferred to coin- 
Robert L. Rodkey, 1861 ; transferred to pany K, 1862. 
company K 1862. "7°^'" B- Shankle, 1861 ; transferred to Corn- 
George W. Rogers, September 30, 1862; pany K, T862. 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., Janu- D. F. Stanberger, 1861 ; deserted, date un- 
ary 13, 1865. known. 

Arthur Robbins, September 15, 1862; trans- Robert Sayers, March 31, 1864; not ac- 

ferred to company B. counted for. 

Jacob Ramard, November 6, 1862; not ac- George Taylor, September 30, 1862; not 

counted for. accounted for. 

James Rue, March 31, 1864; transferred to Hamlet H. Taylor, March 31, 1864; trans- 
company I, 57th P. v., January 13, 1865. ferred to company H, 57th P. V., January 13, 

James G. Robinson, March 31, 1864; trans- 1865. 

ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, Adam Ulrich, September 15, 1862; trans- 

1865. ferred to company B. 

David L. Sutliff, September 30, 1862; died John Varner, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

August I, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, Thomas Wisner, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Antietam, Md., section 26, lot D, grave 409. Franklin Weaver, 1861 ; transferred to 

Joseph G. Sutliff, September 30, 1862; died company K, 1862. 



68 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



John Woodward, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Samuel C. White, September 30, 1862; not 
accounled for. 

Osmer White, September 30, 18C2; not ac- 
counted for. 

James Wright, September 30, 1862; not 
accounted for. 

Samuel Williani.s, September 30, 1862; not 
accounted for. 

George \\'. Welton, September 30, 1862: 
not accounted for. 

Moses Wood, September 30, 1862; trans- 
ferred to company I. 57th P. V., January 13, 
1863. 

Henry D. Wood, September 30, 1862; 
transferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 
13. 1865. 

Richard Williams, September 30, 1862; not 
accounted for. 

Abraham Whipple, September 15. 1862; 
not accounted for. 

.And. Wadsworth, September 27, 1862; not 
accounted for. 

COMPANY K. 

Recruited in Clearfield County 

Captains: — Matthew Ogden, September 13, 
1861 ; resigned November 20, 1862. 

Jacob Peterman, November 20, 1862; killed 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

Albert H. Nixon, October 24, 1861 ; cap- 
tured at Bull Run August, 1862; promoted 
from second lieutenant company I to first lieu- 
tenant January 18, 1863; to captain July 28, 
1863; captured at Chancellorsville May 3, 
1863; wounded at Mine Run November 27, 
1863, and at Cold Harbor, Va., with loss of 
arm, June i, 1864; promoted to brevet major 
and lieutenant-colonel March 13, 1865. 



First Lieutenants: — Charles H. Volk, Sep- 
tember 23, 1861 ; resigned July 8, 1862. 

Luther B. Sampson, October 3, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to sergeant October 2^, 1861 ; to sec- 
ond lieutenant June 21, 1862; to first lieuten- 
ant May I, 1863; to captain company F, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864. 

Second Lieutenants: — John S. Jury, 1861 ; 
promoted from sergeant-major to second lieu- 
tenant October 3, 1864; to first lieutenant De- 
cember 14, 1864; transferred to company K, 
57th P. v., January 13, 1865. 

John W. Taylor, September 14, 1861 ; re- 
signed June 21, 1862. 

James B. Davidson, December 5. 1861 ; pro- 
moted from first sergeant July i, 1863; dis- 
charged April 30, 1864. 

James M. Lewis, May 17, 1862; promoted 
to second lieutenant November 17, 1864; 
transferred to company I, 57th P. V., January 
13, 1865. 

First Sergeant: — Isaac Manes, December 7, 
1861 ; promoted from sergeant May 3, 1863; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 

13, 1865 ; veteran. 

Sergeants: — I'eter -A Young, 1861 ; dis- 
charged November 24, 1862. 

Martin V. Pearce, 1861 ; deserted January 

14, 1862. 

Daniel Graham, 1861 ; wounded and cap- 
tured at Port Republic, Va., June 9, 1862; 
captured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

George W. Ogden, 1861 ; discharged Feb- 
ruai7 7, 1863. 

Wm. K. Armagast, 1861; died November 
13, 1862. 

Charles Hall. 1861 : killed at Deep Bottom. 
Va., August 16, 1864. 

William W. Alsbach, 1861 ; discharged Feb- 
ruary 7, 1863. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



69 



Charles White, 1861 ; promoted from pri- 
vate ; wounded and captured at Chancellors- 
ville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

James H. Ferguson, 1861 ; captured at 
Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

Robert H. Jamison, December 5, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from private; captured at Chancellors- 
ville, Va., May 3, 1863; transferred to com- 
pany K, 57th P. v., January 13, 1865; veteran. 

Cor/'ora/.y.-— William A. Nelson, October 
24, 1861 ; captured at Chancellorsville, Va., 
May 3, 1863; wounded October 18, 1864; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 

13, 1865 ; veteran. 

Richard J. Conklin, 1861 ; deserted, date 
unknown. 

Simon Hamlin, 1861 ; died at Cumberland, 
Md., May 30, 1862. 

John B. Miller, 1861 ; deserted February 7, 
1862. 

Cornelius Wilson, 1861 ; died May 31, 1863. 

Joseph H. Barger, December 5, 1861 ; cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 
wounded at Pleasant Hill June i. 1864; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., Januaiy 13, 
1865; veteran. 

George S. Kyler, 1861; discharged October 

14, 1863. 

R. J. Shaffner, October 24, 1861 ; captured 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 
13, 1865; veteran. 

Matthew O. Tate, 1861 ; wounded and cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

Wm. B. Hemphill, August 16, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 

Robert Harbridge, December 7, 1861 ; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., Jan- 
uary 13, 1865 ; veteran. 



Musicians: — Frederick H. Jordan, October 
24, 1861 ; transferred to company K, 57th 
P. v., January 13, 1865; veteran. 

William Taylor, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged July 7, 1862. 

Privates: — Robert Archy, 1861 ; discharged 
1862. 

John W. Antes, 1861 ; deserted, date un- 
known. 

Elijah Ashenfelter, 1861 ; died February 8, 
1863. 

Perry Addleman, August 16, 1862; cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 
13, 1865. 

Thomas Adams, 1861 ; died at Alexandria, 
Va., January 7, 1863, of wounds received at 
Port Republic June 9, 1863; grave 667. 

Joseph Apt, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Victor L. Abbott, April 7, 1864; wounded 
at Deep Bottom, Va., August 15, 1864; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 

Otto C. Buck, 1861 ; died November 20. 
1864; buried in National Cemetery, Arlington, 
Va. 

George Baughman, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

David Buck, 1861 ; discharged October 30, 
for wounds received at Bull Run, Va., August 
30, 1862. 

Henry Bigham, 1861 ; wounded at Port Re- 
public, Va., June 9, 1862. 

William Booze, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Samuel Bailey, 1861; discharged January 
9, 1863. 

Newton Bailey, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Nelson Bliss, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

John Brimmer, 1861 ; discharged December 
3, 1861. 

Henry C. Bowers, December 7, 1861 ; 



70 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



transferred to company K, 57th P. V., Jan- 
uary 13, 1865; veteran. 

Gcmmil Baker, 1861 ; discharged March 3, 
1863. 

George Baines, March 31, 1864; not ac- 
counted for. 

John R. Carr, 1861; discharged December 
23 for wounds received at Winchester, Va., 
March 2;^, 1862. 

Solomon Cupler, 1861 ; died at Harrisburg, 
Pa., January 5, 1862. 

Peter Curley, 1861 ; discharged, date un- 
known. 

Samuel Cross, 1861 ; discliarged February 
8, 18C3. 

Michael Culp, 1861 ; transferred to V. R. C, 
date unknown. 

William Clonser, 1861 ; not acounted for. 

Valentine Culp, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

John B. Campbell, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

George W. Comer, December 7, 1861; 
wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 
1863; transferred to company K, 57th P. V., 
January 13, 1865. 

Christopher Cassidy, 1861 ; wounded at 
Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 

Johnson Cassidy, 1861; not accounted for. 

Solomon Cassidy, December 7, 1861 ; cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., Jan- 
uary 13, 1865; veteran. 

John Dash, 1861; transferred to company I. 

Levi Drocker, 1861 ; deserted, date un- 
known. 

Samuel B. Devore, October 24, 1861 ; cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., Janu- 
ary 13, 1865. 



Roland Dixon, 1861 ; deserted October 14, 

1861. 

Levi H. Derrick, March 4, 1864; wounded 
at Pleasant Hill, Va., June i, 1864; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 

Robert Dane, March 4, 1864; wounded at 
Wilderness May 5, 1864; not accounted for. 

Alfred Everhart, April 7, 1864; wounded 
at Wilderness May 5, 1864; transferred to 
company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. 

John Fontenroy, 1861 ; captured at Chan- 
cellorsville, Va., May 3. 1863. 

Sidney I-"arley, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

John H. Ferguson, 1861 ; not accounteil for. 

James Gomlic, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Robert Graham, October 24, 1861 ; captured 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865 ; veteran. 

James L. Graham, 1861 ; killed at Win- 
chester, Va., March 23, 1862. 

John Grady, 1861 ; not accouiited for. 

Jacob Gilnett, December 7, 1861 ; killed at 
Pleasant Hill, Va., June i, 1864; veteran. 

Edward Gilnett, 1861; wounded at Fred- 
ericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862; not ac- 
counted for. 

James Garley; discharged, date unknown. 

Theo. J. Garretson, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

John Green, 1861 ; killed at Mine Run, Va., 
November 27, 1863. 

Thos. Gouldsberry, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

James Gorman, 1861 ; wounded and cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

Harvey H. Hite, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Henry C. Heise, 1861 ; captured at Chan- 
cellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

Samuel Hare, December 7, 1861; wounded 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863, and 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



71 



Wilderness May 4, 1864; transferred to com- 
pany K, 57th P. v., January 13, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

Joel Hufford, 1861 ; wounded and captured 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; dis- 
charged September 25, 1863. 

Samuel Hamlin; died, date unknown. 

George Hoffman, 1861 ; wounded and cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 
not accounted for. 

Uriah Haneigh, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

James Hepburn, December 7, 1861 ; wound- 
ed at Wilderness, Va., May 3, 1864; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865; veteran. 

William Hagerty, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Thomas H. Irvine, 1861 ; deserted, date un- 
known. 

Gratz M. Johnson, 1861 ; wounded at Cedar 
Mountain August 9, 1862, Bull Run August 
30, 1862; and Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 
1863 ; not accounted for. 

Samuel Johnson, December 7, 1861 ; not 
accounted for. 

Ellis Kyler, 1861 ; discharged December 9 
for wounds received at Port Republic, Va., 
June 9, 1862. 

Peter A. Kyler, 1861 ; died at Winchester, 
Va., June 7, 1862; burial in National Ceme- 
tery, lot 10. 

John Kennedy, 1861 ; discharged July 10, 
1862. 

John Krise, 1861 ; deserted June 5, 1862. 

Joseph Kretzer, November 2, 1861 ; dis- 
charged November 18, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

William Kretzer, 1861 ; killed at Chancel- 
lorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

John Kesigle, 1861 ; wounded and captured 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 



William Luzier, 1861 ; wounded at Win- 
chester, Va., March 23, 1862; not accounted 
for. 

Henry Lightner, 1861 ; not acounted for. 

John Luzier, October 24, 1861 ; captured at 
Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; ex- 
changed ; not accounted for ; veteran. 

John Lytle, 1861 ; wounded and captured 
at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

Isaac Lyons, 1861; discharged February 11, 
1863. 

Henry Lubold, December 5, 1861 ; wounded 
at Cedar Mountain August 9, 1862, Bull Run 
August 30, 1862, Chancellorsville May 3, 
1863, and Wilderness May 6, 1864; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865 ; veteran. 

Mervin Ludlow, 1861 ; deserted June 16, 
1862. 

Joseph Larrion; killed June 19, 1864. 

Joseph L. Lydic, 1861 ; wounded at Chan- 
cellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; veteran. 

Robert L. Lydic, December 7, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 

James A. Meade, October 24, 1861 ; cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 
13, 1865; veteran. 

Adam Miller, 1861 ; deserted February 7, 
1862. 

James Maguire, 1861 ; not accounted 
for. 

Miles Miller, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

George Morkret, December 5, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to company K, 58th P. V., January 13, 
1865 ; veteran. 

Jacob S. Miller, December 21, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to company I, S/th P. V., January 13, 
1865. 



72 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



William Moley; killed at Wilderness, Va., 
May 6, 1864. 

Orange J. Michaels, 1861 ; not accounted 
for. 

John Mark, December 5, 1861; captured at 
Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865 ; veteran. 

Philip McCracken, December 7, 1861 ; 
wounded at Cedar Mountain August 9, 1862, 
and Wilderness May 6, 1864; transferred to 
company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865; 
veteran. 

William McAfoose, 1861 ; discharged Jan- 
uary 9. 1863. 

Samuel McLaughlin, 1861 ; discharged 
March 9, 1863. 

John Nesemier, 1861 ; transferred to V. R. 
C, date unknown. 

Christopher Netzel, October 2, 1862 ; wound- 
ed at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863 ; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., Januar}' 13, 
1865. 

William S. Ogden, 1861 ; discharged No- 
vember 24, 1863. 

James W. Owens, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Henr}' C. Owens, 1861 ; wounded at Port 
Republic, Va., June 9, 1862; not accounted 
for. 

Jonas L. Pownall, October 24, 1861 ; cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3. 1863; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 
13, 1865; veteran. 

Andrew Peters, 1861 ; discharged July 4, 
1862. 

James C. Reams, 1861 ; discharged Febru- 
ary IT. 1863. 

Michael Reep, 1861 ; killed at Spottsylvania 
C. H., May 12, 1864. 

Isaac Robinson, 1861 ; died, date unknown. 



John Riddle, 1861 ; not accounted for. 

Bretlan A. Reams, August 30, 1862; 
wounded at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 
1863: transferred to company K, 57th P. V., 
January 13, 1865. 

George W. Rowles, 1861 ; deserted October 
14, 1861. 

John F. Rote, 1861 ; deserted September 25, 
1861. 

Alexander Reed. 1861 ; wounded at Thor- 
oughfare Gap, Va., August 28, 1862; killed 
at Spottsylvania C. H., May 12, 1864. 

Jacob Reep, December 7, 1861; transferred 
to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. 

Robert L. Rodkey, December 7, 1861; 
wounded and captured at Chancellorsville, Va., 
May 3, 1863; transferred to company K, 57th 
P. v., January 13, 1865; veteran. 

Samuel J. Rodkey, February 22, 1864; 
transferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 
13. 1865. 

Daniel G. Smith. 1861 ; killed at Winches- 
ter, Va., March 2^. 1862; buried in National 
Cemetery, lot 10. 

A. C. Spanogle, 1861 ; discharged, date un- 
known. 

John H. Siiimel, October 24, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 
1865 ; veteran. 

Richard H. Shaw. 1861 ; promoted to hos- 
pital steward, date unknown. 

Samuel Snoddy. 1861 ; wounded at Wilder- 
ness, Va., May 6, 1864; not accounted for. 

Michael Stejbig, 1861; not accounted for. 

John Solomons, December 5. 1861 ; cap- 
tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863; 
wounded at Spottsylvania C. H. May 12, 
1864; transferred to company K, 57th P. V., 
January 13, 1865; veteran. 

Jacob Schooly, 1861 ; not accounted for. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 73 

Nicholas Simpson, 1861 ; discharged Feb- Nathan B. Trude, March 31, 1864; wound- 

ruary 21, 1863. ed at Pleasant Hill, Va., June i, 1864; trans- 
Joseph F. Stouffer, August 11, 1862; trans- ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 

ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, 1865. 

1865. Jacob Wainright, 1861 ; killed at Winches- 
John B. Shankle, December 7, 1861; ter, Va., March 23, 1862; buried in National 

wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864, Cemetery, lot 9. 

and Deep Bottom, August 15, 1864; trans- Daniel K. Weld, 1861 ; discharged Decem- 

ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, ber 6, 1862. 

1865 ; veteran. G. Waldenmyer, 1861 ; discharged, date un- 

Henry Stugart, 1861 ; discharged March 9, known. 

1863. Edward Welsh, 1861 ; discharged Febru- 

"" Charles Snyder, October 24, 1861 ; trans- ary 8, 1862. 

ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, Franklin Weaver, 1S61 ; wounded and cap- 

1865; veteran. tured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 

John A. Shankle, March 31, 1864; trans- 1863. 

ferred to company K, 57th P. V., January 13, John F. Weaver, March 31, 1864; not ac- 

1865. counted for. 

John Thompson, October 24, 1861: trans- Rudolph L. Young, August 30, 1862; 

ferred to company K, 57th P. v., January 13, wounded October 27, 1864; transferred to 

1865 ; veteran. company H. 



CHAPTER Mil 



MILITARY HISTORY— THE CIVIL WAR— CONTINUED 



History of the One Hundred and Fifth Regiment — Roster of Officers and Men — History of 
the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Regiment, zciih Roster — In Other Commands — Inde- 
pendent Battalion. 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH REGIMENT. 

Early in the month of August, 1861, Amor 
A. McKniglit, who had seen ser\-ice as one of 
the three months' men, was authorized to 
raise a regiment for the three years' service. 
The men enhsted were mainly from what was 
at that time known as the "Wild Cat" dis- 
trict, being the congressional district of which 
this county then fontied a part. The sturdy 
residents responded quickly and nobly to the 
call, an organization was completed, and field 
officers elected as follows: Amor A. Mc- 
Knight, colonel; W. ^\'. Corbett, lieutenant- 
colonel; M. M. Dick, major. The regiment 
rendezvoused at Pittsburgh, but were not long 
permitted to remain there, as, early in Octo- 
ber, the command was ordered to the front, 
and in pursuance thereof went to Washington 
and encamped for a brief time, and then 
moved to a point about one mile south of .Al- 
exandria, known as Camp Jameson, where 
they went into winter quarters. Here it was 
assigned to Jameson's Brigade, which was 
made up in the main of Pennsylvania troops. 

In March following, 1862, they broke camp 
and were transported to Fortress Monroe, and 



immediately participated in the siege of York- 
town, doing guard duty and suffefing only 
from sickness caused by the unhealthful local- 
ity in which they were placed. Upon the 
evacuation of the place by the enemy, they 
joined in pursuit, and after a hard march 
through rain and mud reached Williamsburg. 
The ne.xt day, May 4, they were advanced as 
skirmishers, and planted the colors on the 
principal fort of the enemy. It was next en- 
gaged at Fair Oaks, where it got into exceed- 
ingly close quarters, but through the coolness 
and efficiency of the officers in command, and 
the bravery and determined fighting done by 
the men, it was eventually victorious and es- 
caped annihilation and capture, but not with- 
out serious loss and injury to officers and men. 
The result of this battle to the regiment was 
forty-one killed, one hundred and fifty 
wounded, and seventeen missing. Headley, in 
mentioning the part taken by the One Hundred 
and Fifth during the battle of Fair Oaks, says : 
"Napoleon's veterans never stood firmer dur- 
ing a devastating fire." On the 26th and 27th 
of June following the regiment was again en- 
gaged at the battles of Mechanicsville and 
Gaines's Mill, but met with no serious loss. 



74 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



75 



After this the anny fell back and began a re- 
treat to the James River, and Jameson's Bri- 
gade was placed under command of General 
Robinson. During this retreat, in which the 
Federal forces were hard pressed by the Con- 
federates, the regiment was constantly under 
orders and frequently exposed to the enemy's 
fire. On the 30th, at Charles City Cross 
Roads, it had a sharp engagement with the 
rebels in repelling an attempt on the part of 
the latter to capture a battery, in which the 
regiment lost fifty men in killed and wounded. 
At Malvern Hill, the next day, it was under a 
heavy artillery fire, but not closely engaged. 
At the close of the campaign on the Peninsula, 
the regiment was assigned to duty in guarding 
the railroad between Manasas and Warren- 
town Junction. At the Second Bull Run it 
was again hotly engaged and its ranks fear- 
fully decimated by being in an open position 
and exposed to the deadly fire of the enemy, 
but nevertheless held firmly to its place in sup- 
port of a battery. At sundown it was re- 
lieved and placed on picket duty until nearly 
midnight, and then moved to Centreville, 
where it lay until the 31st. General Kearney, 
in his report of the Second Bull Run fight, 
says: "The One Hundred and Fifth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers were not wanting. They 
are Pennsylvanians — mountain men — again 
have they been fearfully decimated. The des- 
perate charge of these regiments sustains the 
past history of this division." 

The regiment was, at the close of Pope's 
campaign, ordered into the defenses of Wash- 
ington, and remained there until after the bat- 
tle of Antietam. On the 2Sth of October fol- 
lowing it moved to White's Ford, crossed the 
Potomac and proceeded to the Ball's Blufif bat- 
tle ground, where for several days it was en- 



gaged in scouting expeditions in the vicinity of 
Leesburg and Millville. With the main army 
it then advanced to the Rappahannock, and on 
the 24th of November reached Falmouth. On 
the 13th of December it crossed the river, and 
at a double quick went to the relief of the 
Pennsylvania Reserves, who were hotly en- 
gaged and hard pressed, and took a position 
in the rear of Randolph's battery. At dusk it 
advanced and lay upon their amis in front of 
the battery for a space of thirty-six hours, 
within the reach of, but concealed from the 
rebel sharpshooters, but was then relieved and 
returned to camp across the river. From this 
time until the latter part of January, 1863, the 
regiment remained in camp, and were then or- 
dered to move, but owing to the impassable 
condition of the roads, were compelled to 
return. 

The troops were reviewed by Governor Cur- 
tin on the 26th day of March, and on the loth 
of April following were visited by President 
Lincoln and General Hooker, the latter having 
now been advanced to the chief command. On 
the 28th of April the brigade to which the regi- 
ment was attached, started on the Chancellors- 
ville campaign and occupied a prominent posi- 
tion in the engagements that followed, charg- 
ing here and there in the thickest of the fight, 
constantly under the terrible fire of artillery 
and infantry, suffering every hardship known 
to modern warfare, until on the 5th of May it 
was ordered across the river to Falmouth. In 
killed, wounded, and missing the regiment 
lost in this battle an aggregate of seventy-seven 
men out of three hundred and forty-seven that 
entered, among the killed being the gallant 
Colonel McKnight. Then commenced the 
move to the northward, and the regiment 
reached the scene of Gettysburg on the night 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



of July I, and on tlie clay following Compa- 
nies A, C, D, F, and I were deployed as skir- 
misliers in support of the Sixty-third regiment, 
wiiere they remained until afternoon when 
they were called in, and with the regiment, 
took a position on the right of the brigade when 
battle commenced. During the terrible battle 
that ensued the regiment behaved nobly, and 
fought' as brave men can fight, first advancing 
and then retiring, officers and men alike being 
cut down under the merciless artillery and in- 
fantry fire, until at night, they took a position 
on the road connecting Cemetery Ridge with 
Round Top. Of two hundred and forty-seven 
men who went into this fight, the regiment lost 
in killed, wounded and missing, one hundred 
and sixty-eight, more than half of its numer- 
ical strength. 

Gettysburg over, after a series of move- 
ments, and a sharp brush at Auburn, the regi- 
ment brought up at Fairfax Station, where for 
a brief time it was assigned to provost duty, 
but again advanced, and in the latter part of 
November took part in tlie battle of Locust 
Grove. At the close of the Mine Run cam- 
paign it went into winter quarters at Brandy 
Station. 

On the 28th of December two hundred and 
forty men, nearly the entire strength of the 
regiment, re-enlisted, and were given a veteran 
furlough. While away about fifty recruits 
were obtained. 

Early in May of the succeeding year prepa- 
rations for the spring campaign w'ere com- 
pleted, and refreshed and recruited the regi- 
ment moved with the army to participate in the 
memorable seven-days battle of the Wilderness. 
Next came Petersburg, in which it took part, 
and after that the raid on the Weldon Rail- 
road, July 26 the regiment participated in the 



movement across the James River, and re- 
turned in time to be of good service during the 
events that followed, but suffered severe losses. 
Colonel Craig was mortally wounded and 
died a day later. In the various attacks on the 
Weldon Railroad that followed during the fall 
and early winter, it took a lively part, after 
which it again went into winter quarters. 

The next spring, 1865, the regiment en- 
gaged at Hatcher's Run and Sailor's Creek, 
and upon the surrender of General Lee 
marched, by way of Richmond, to Bailey's 
Cross Roads, where it encamped. On June 23 
it marched in the grand review at Washington, 
and on the nth of July was finally mustered 
out of service. 

Field and Staff 

Colonels: — Amor .\. McKnight. October 12, 
1S61 ; wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862; 
resigned July 28, 1862; recommissioned Sep- 
tember 20, 1862; killed at Chancellorsville, Va., 
May 3, 1863. 

Calvin A. Craig, August 28, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from captain company C to lieutenant- 
colonel April 20, 1863; to colonel May 4, 1863; 
wounded at Gettysburg July 2, 1863, at W^il- 
derness May 5, 1864. and at Petersburg June 
1864: died August 17th of wounds received at 
Deep Bottom, August 16, 1864. 

James Miller, October 23, 1861 : promoted 
from captain company K to major January 14, 
1865; to colonel May 13, 1865: mustered out 
with regiment July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Licntcnant-Coloncls: — William W. Corbet, 
October 12. 1861; commissioned colonel July 
29. 1862, not mustered; resigned September 
ID, 1862. , 

J. \\'. Greenawalt, September 4, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from captain company E to major No- 
vember 29, 1862; to lieutenant-colonel May 4, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



77 



1863; died May 17th of wounds received at 
Wilderness May 5, 1864. 

Oliver C. Reddic, September i, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from captain company I, May 15, 1865; 
mustered out with regiment July 11, 1865; 
veteran. 

Majors: — Mungo M. Dick, September 4, 
1861 ; promoted from captain company E, Sep- 
tember 20, 1861 ; resigned Augxist 9, 1862. 

Levi Bird Duff, May i, 1861 ; promoted 
from captain company D May 4, 1863 ; com- 
missioned lieutenant-colonel May 18, 1864, 
not mustered; discharged October 25th for 
wounds, with loss of leg, received at Peters- 
burg June 18, 1864. 

Adjutants: — Orlando Gray, August 29, 
1861 ; promoted from first lieutenant company 
H, September 15, 1861 ; resigned August 26, 
1862. 

John H. ^^'oodward, September 4, 1861 ; 
promoted from private company E to princi- 
pal musician October i, 1S61 : to sergeant- 
major; to adjutant August 2j, 1862; to first 
lieutenant company G November 27, 1862. 

Hillis McKown, October 24. 1861 ; pro- 
moted from private company C to sergeant- 
major February 10, 1863: to adjutant Sep- 
tember 28, 1864; mustered out with regiment 
July II, 1865; veteran. 

Oiiartcniiastcrs: — Robert J. Nicholson, 
September 9, 1861 : promoted from first lieu- 
tenant company B, October i, 1861 ; resigned 
October 16, 1862. 

Harrison i\I. Coon, October 25. 1861 ; pro- 
moted from private company G to quartermas- 
ter-sergeant October 26, 1861 ; to quartermas- 
ter November 2-. 1862; discharged on sur- 
geon's certificate August 8, 1864. 

Joseph G. Craig, September 15, 1861: pro- 
moted from first lieutenant, company C to ad- 



jutant March 28, 1863; to quartermaster Sep- 
tember 28, 1864; mustered out with regiment 
July II, 1865. 

Surgeons: — Alexander P. Heichhold, Octo- 
ber 23, 1861 ; resigned September 12, 1862. 

William Watson, September 16, 1S62; dis- 
charged by general order May 27, 1865. 

Adam Wenger, November 7, 1862; pro- 
moted from assistant surgeon June 2, 1865 ; 
mustered out with regiment July 11, 1865. 

Assistant Surgeons: — William F. Smith, 
October 15, 1861; resigned September 12, 
1862. 

George W. Ewing, August 4, 1862; pro- 
moted to surgeon 115th P. V. April 7, 1863. 

Aaron C. Vaughn, May 15, 1863; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate September 3, 
1864. 

Joseph Taylor, June 7, 1865 ; mustered out 
with regiment July 11, 1865. 

Chaplains: — Darius S. Steadman, October 
12, 1861 ; resigned June 23, 1862. 

John C. Truesdale, June i, 1864; mustered 
out with regiment July 11, 1865. 

Sergcant-Majors: — W. H. McLaughlin. Oc- 
tober 23, 1861 ; transferred to Company H, 
July I, 1862. 

George Van Vliet, October 23, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from first sergeant. Company I, to ser- 
geant-major June 5, 1862; to first lieutenant 
Company H, July 11, 1862. 

Robert J. Boyington, October 5, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from sergeant Company I; to second 
lieutenant Company I, February 6, 1863. 

Tihon Reynolds, September i, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from "private Company H, September 
28, 1864: to captain Company H, November 
24, 1864; veteran. 

Ivester H. Dean, February 29, 1864: pro- 
moted from corporal Company K, November 



78 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



24, 1864; mustered out with regiment July 
1 1, 1865; veteran. 

Quartermaster Sergeants: — Fleming Y. 
Caldwell, September 9, 1861 ; promoted from 
private Company A to commissary sergeant 
September 20, 1861; to quartermaster-ser- 
geant January 7, 1865; mustered out with reg- 
iment July II, 1865; veteran. 

Benj. M. Stauffer, October 25, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from private Company G, November 
I, 1862; mustered out with regiment July 11, 
1865; veteran. 

Hospital Stezvard: — Charles D. Shrieves, 
December 16, 1861 ; mustered out with regi- 
ment July II, 1865; veteran. 

Commissary Sergeants: — John Coon, Octo- 
ber 25, 1861 ; promoted from private Com- 
pany G. January 7, 1865 ; mustered out with 
regiment July 11, 1865; veteran. 

D. R. Crawford, October 23, 1861 ; dis- 
charged September 25, 1864; veteran. 

Principal Musicians: — Andrew McKown, 
August 28, 1861 ; promoted from corporal 
Company D, August 28, 1863; mustered out, 
expiration of temi. 

Eli B. Clemson, August 28, 1861 ; promo- 
ted from private Company D, September i, 
1864; mustered out with regiment July 11. 
1865 ; veteran. 

Joseph Lichtenberger, August i, 1861 : mus- 
tered out with regiment July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

James H. Craig, October 24, 1861 ; promo- 
ted from sergeant Company C, August 28, 
1864; discharged September 25, 1864; vet- 
eran. 

COMPANY C 

Recruited in Clearfield and Clarion Counties 
Captains: — Calvin A. Craig, August 28, 



1861 ; wounded at Bull Run August 29, 1862; 
promoted to lieutenant-colonel April 20, 1863. 

Charles E. Patton, August 28, i86i ; pro- 
moted from first lieutenant April 20, 1863; 
killed at Boydton Plank Road October 27, 
1864. 

Joseph B. Brown, October 21, 1861; pro- 
moted to corporal December i, 1861 ; to ser- 
geant, January i, 1862; to first sergeant Octo- 
ber 3, 1863; to first lieutenant March i, 1864; 
to captain November 7, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

First Lieutciuiuts: — Joseph Craig, Septem- 
ber 15, 1861 ; promoted to first lieutenant July 
29, 1862; to adjutant March 28, 1863. 

William H. Hewitt, August 31, 1861; pro- 
moted to first lieutenant May 14. 1863; dis- 
charged by general order May 19, 1865. 

Richard G. Warden, August 26, 1861 ; pro- 
moted from sergeant to first sergeant Novem- 
ber I, 1864; to first lieutenant June 8, 1865; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865; 
veteran. 

Second Lieutenants: — Isaac A. Dunston, 
October 25, 1861 ; promoted from first ser- 
geant July 29, 1862; to second lieutenant May 
I, 1863; died August 2d, of wounds received 
at Gettysburg July 2, 1863. 

Henry H. ^Tjchaels, October 25, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to corporal April i, 1864; to sergeant 
November i, 1864; to second lieutenant June 
8, 1865; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865 ; veteran. 

First Sergeants: — John R. Osborn. January 
4. 1864; promoted to corporal January' i, 
1865; to first sergeant June 8, 1865; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Addison Lau, September 12, 1861 ; died 
June 17th of wounds received at North Anna 
River May 23, 1864; veteran. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



79 



George Laing, December 24, 1863; promo- 
ted from sergeant September 15, 1864; com- 
missioned second lieutenant October 22, 1864, 
not mustered; discharged by general order 
May 17, 1865; veteran. 

David H. McCauley, December 24, 1863; 
promoted from sergeant March i, 1864; dis- 
charged February 22, 1865; veteran. 

Sergeants: — Charles C. Weaver, October 
25, 1861 ; promoted to corporal April i, 1864; 
to sergeant August 28, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Samuel H. Mays, October 25, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to corporal August 28, 1864; to ser- 
geant May 17, 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany July II, 1865; veteran. 

James E. Lafferty, October 25, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to corporal August 28, 1864; to ser- 
geant May 29, 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany July II, 1865; veteran. 

Horace H. Ferman, December 24, 1863; 
promoted from corporal June i, 1864; dis- 
charged February 22, 1865; veteran. 

Charles Rodgers, September 9, 1863; 
drafted; promoted to corporal January i, 
1865; to sergeant June 8, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

Samuel Lattimore, December 24, 1863; 
wounded at Petersburg June 21, 1864; dis- 
charged Febmary 22, 1865; veteran. 

John H. Piersall, December 24, 1863; pro- 
moted from .private June i, 1864; discharged 
February 22, 1865 ; veteran. 

\\'illiam D. Lyttle, December 24, 1863 ; pro- 
moted from private January 24, 1864; dis- 
charged February 22, 1865; veteran. 

Stewart Orr, October 25, 1861; promoted 
to corporal April i, 1864; to sergeant August 

28, 1864; discharged by general order May 

29, 1865 ; veteran. 



William McNutt, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate February 4, 
1863. 

John Clary, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
from corporal April i, 1862; discharged Au- 
gust 28, 1864 — expiration of term. 

Andrew A. Harley, August 28, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to corporal April i, 1863; to sergeant 
May I, 1863; discharged August 28, 1864 — 
expiration of term. 

James H. Craig, October 24, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to principal musician August 28, 1864; 
veteran. 

William P. Lowry, October 24, 1861 ; 
transferred to V. R. C. December i, 1864; 
veteran. 

Corporals: — Isaac G. Miller, October 21, 
1861 ; promoted to corporal June, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

John Ashbaugh, July 17, 1863; drafted; 
promoted to corporal January i, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Eli H. Chilson, October 21, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to corpora] June i, 1864; mustered out 
with company June 11, 1865; veteran. 

Isaac Lytle, October 16, 1861; promoted to 
corporal May 29, 1865; mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Aaron Young, February 12, 1864; promo- 
ted to corporal June 8, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

James W. Watkins, February 18, 1864; pro- 
moted to corporal June 8, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

John H. Hager, July 16, 1863; drafted; 
promoted to corporal June 8, 1865; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

James B. Allison, October 21, 1861 ; died 
at White Oak Swamp June 28, 1862. 



80 



HISTORY OF CraARFIELD COUNTY 



Richard M. Rockey, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate June 16, 1862. 

Samuel James, October 24, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate August 7, 
1862. 

Edward Keefer, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate September 26, 
1862. 

James W. Spears, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate September i, 
1862. 

Andrew G. Sager, October 23, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to corporal August 28, 1864; dis- 
charged by general order June 6, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

George Warden, Januar}' 4, 1864; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. December 28, 1864; vet- 
eran. 

William Whipple, August 28, 1861 : not on 
muster-out roll. 

Musicians: — Andrew Stedham, December 
25, 1863; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865; veteran. 

Charles F. Cross. December 25, 1863; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

rrivatcs:— Robert Allen, April 22, 1864; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

T. T. Armagost. October 24, 1861; died at 
Savage Sta-tion July i. 1862. 

James A. Ardery, October 24, 1861; de- 
serted December 15. 1862. 

William Allshouse, August 28. 1861 ; dis- 
charged .\ugust 27. 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

David Allison, October 24, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate August 13, 
1862. 

Levi .Mlshouse, July 17, 1863; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 



Robert E. Alexander, February 29, 1864; 
absent, sick, at muster out. 

F. M. Bookwalter, February 15, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

George A. Brown, July 16, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Levi Bush, September 7, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

James Biggins, March 31, 1864; wounded 
in action June 16, 1864 — expiration of term. 

George W. Bennett, December 31, 1861; 
died at Chester, Pa., August 5th, of wounds 
received at Charles City Cross Roads, Va., 
June 30, 1862. 

John Burton, July 30, 1864; drafted; miss- 
ing in action near Hatcher's Run March 29, 
1865. 

Wm. H. Bookwalter, April 8, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 20, 
1862. 

F. O. Bookwalter, April 8, 1862 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate January 6, 1863. 

Wm. Bunnel, October 24, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate March 28, 1863. 

Charles L. Brooks, September 9, 1863; 
drafted; discharged January 21. 1865, for 
wounds received in action September 4, 
1864. 

Hezekiah Bowser, February 11, 1864; dis- 
charged by general order June 5, 1865. 

Benn Bannister, September 5, 1861 : de- 
serted: returned; discharged by general order 
May 17. 1865. 

Wm. J. Crick, October 25, 1861 : deserted; 
returned; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 

Simon Crandall. March 29, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11. 1865. 

E. P. Cochran. February 22. 1864: mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



81 



■ Craig Carnery, July 13, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John C. Church, July 11, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Benj. F. Coursin, July 18, 1863; drafted; 
discharged by general order July 27, 1865. 

A. J. Cyphert, April 12, 1861 ; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate November 25, 1862. 

Jesse R. Craig, October 24. 1861 : dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 29, 
1863. 

George dinger. April 8. 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate March 28, 1863. 

David Cyphert April 8, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate August 17, 1863. 

George G. Cyphert, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged May 2"/, 1864, for wounds received 
at Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863. 

James K. Cyphert, April 12, 1862: dis- 
charged April 18, 1865 — expiration of term. 

George Camp, July 10, 1864; drafted; dis- 
charged by general order June 13, 1865. 

M. G. DeVallance, April 9. 1864; wounded 
in action June 16, 1864; mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865. 

George Dugan, October 25, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

John Divinne, June 14, 1864; drafted; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Geo. W. Davis, October 24. 1861 ; died at 
Camp Franklin, Va., December 5, 1861. 

James Day, September 8, 1863; drafted; 
deserted May 3, 1864. 

John Divine. x\pril 14, 1864; discharged by 
general order May 29, 1865. 

David Dugan, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
March i, 1865, for wounds received at Deep 
Bottom August 16, 1864; veteran. 

James Devanny, July 16, 1863; drafted: 
transferred to Company D, February 26, 1864. 



Andrew Dougan, February 29, 1864; not 
on muster-out roll. 

William O. Easton, March i, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Andrew Richer, July 16, 1864; drafted; 
transferred to Company D, February 26, 
1864. 

Edward Floyd, April 13. 1864; wounded at 
Opequan August 16, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

Alanson R. Felt, April 9, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

William George, July 18, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Archibald George, October 25, 1861 ; absent 
on furlough at muster-out; veteran. 

E. A. Gooderham, October 24, 1861 ; killed 
at Malvern Hill, July i, 1862. 

John Goodman, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate February 11, 
1863. 

John Gould, June 17, 1864; drafted; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate March 18, 
1865. 

Albert Gordon, July 28, 1864; discharged 
by general order May 22, 1865. 

Richard Holland, July 29, 1864; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Lee Hileman, September 16, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1864. 

Samuel Harrison, Sr., July 10, 1863; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Miles Haden, February 24, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

Lebanah H. Hetrick, July, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

James A. Harley, October 25, 1861 ; de- 
serted; returned; mustered out with company 
July II, 1865. 



82 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Charles Haniniond, June lo, 1864; substi- 
tute; absent, sick, at muster out. 

George Hilbert, October 25, 1861 ; wounded 
at Wilderness May 5, 1864; absent at muster 
out; veteran. 

Henry Hamma, January' 4, 1864; wounded 
at Boydton Plank Road October 27, 1864; ab- 
sent at muster out ; veteran. 

Edward Harrison, October 24, 1861 ; died 
at Philadelphia December 12. 1862. 

Joseph L. Harley, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 28, 1864 — expiration of temi. 

J. \V. T. Hollopiter, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 28, 1864 — expiration of term. 

David Hetrick, April i^, 1862; discharged 
April 8, 1865 — expiration of term. 

Ami Hager. July, 1863; drafted; dis- 
charged by general order May 29, 1865. 

William Hamma, October, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to Company D, February 26, 1864; vet- 
eran. 

Robert Hunter, August i, 1861; trans- 
ferred to Company D. February 26, 1864. 

John Isaman, July 18, 1863; drafted; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Ingham, March 10, 1864; wounded at 
Wilderness May 5, 1864; absent at muster 
out. 

John C. Johnson, April 9, 1864; wounded 
at Wilderness May 6, 1864; absent at muster 
out. 

Jesse Kearnigham, March 29, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

David Kidder. July 11, 1863; drafted; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Samuel Keifer, October 2^. 1861 ; absent 
on furlough at muster out ; veteran. 

M. S. Kirkpatrick. April 8. 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate Febniarv 1 1 . 
1863. 



Patrick Long, March 4, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

Thomas B. Lines, March 16, 1864; missing 
in action at Wilderness May 6, 1864. 

John Mott, October 16, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company July ii, 1865; veteran. 

Robert Moore, March 24, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

William Mattis, March 20, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Alays, October 24, 1861 ; died Sep- 
tember 8th of wounds received at Bull Run 
August 29, 1862. 

David Michael, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate August 10, 
1862. 

John Mills, February 26, 1864; discharged 
by general order May 29, 1865. 

Obediah Mills, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 19, 
1862. 

Thomas M. Mitchell, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 28, 1864 — expiration of term. 

David Mitchell, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 11, 
1863. 

Edwin Marquis, July 24, 1863; drafted; 
transferred to Company D, February 26, 1864. 

.•\llen Morrison, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 11, 
1863. 

James Maloy, October 24, 1861 ; discharged 
October 24th for wounds received at Charles 
City Cross Roads June 30. 1862. 

John W^ McCormick, October 24, 1861 ; 
killed at Spottsylvania Court House May 12, 
1864. 

Henry McCormick. October 24, 1861 ; died 
of wounds received at Bull Run August 29, 
1862. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



83 



Geo. D. Funkhouser, January 4, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

Wm. H. Fetter, February 27, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Jacob Fry, October 24, 1861 ; killed at Get- 
tysburg July 3, 1863 ; buried in National Cem- 
etery, section C, grave 90. 

John M. Fry, October 24, 1861 ; died at 
Alexandria December 18, 1861 ; burial record, 
died at Alexandria, Va., December 11, 1863, 
grave 1164. 

David Fleck, October 24, 1S61 ; died at 
Camp Jameson, Va., January 18, 1862; burial 
record, died at Alexandria, Va., December 9, 
1864, grave 1139. 

Perry C. Fox, April 9, 1864; missing in ac- 
tion near Petersburg June 22, 1864. 

David Girts, February 4, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

George McGlaughlin, October 24, 1861 ; 
died July nth of wounds received at Fair 
Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Ab'm. McGlaughlin, October 24, 1861 ; died 
at Philadelphia June 25, 1862; burial record, 
September 28, 1862. 

Robert McFadden, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate October 4, 
1862. 

David McKown, Ju'Jy 17, 1863; drafted; 
discharged by general order May 29, 1865. 

Ross McCoy, October 24, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate November 8, 1862. 

Hillis McKown, October 24, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to sergeant-major February 10, 1863. 

Isaac McCullough, September 9, 1861 ; not 
on muster-out roll. 

David P. Nail, October 24, 1861 ; killed at 
Auburn, Va., October 13, 1863. 



Adam Nuff, April 18, 1862; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate October 22, 1862. 

Wm. J. Newgant, September 9, 1861 ; not 
on muster-out roll. 

Jacob S. Oburn, July 29, 1864; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Joseph R. Ogden, February 26, 1864; ab- 
sent, sick, at muster out. 

Robert Owens, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 20, 
1865; veteran. 

George W. Peck, March 20, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

Michael Phillips, March 29, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

Coleman E. Parris, April 9, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

William Pike, April 29, 1864; wounded at 
Petersburg June 15, 1864; absent at muster 
out. 

Frederick Peters, December 24, 1863; 
killed at Hatcher's Run March 25, 1865. 

Jonathan Pierce, October 24, 1861 ; died 
June 23d of wounds received at Wilderness 
May 5, 1864; veteran. 

Oliver N. Powell, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate August 6, 
1862. 

Jacob F. Phillips, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate February 20, 
1863. 

John Palmer, September 9, 1863; drafted; 
transferred to Company D, February 26, 1863. 

F. Rumbarger, July 29, 1864; substitute; 
discharged by general order May 29, 1865. 

Abraham J. Riggles, December 27, 1863; 
deserted ; returned ; mustered out with com- 
pany July II, 1865. 

Edgar E. Riddell, September 30th; 



84 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



wounded at Wilderness May 6, 1864; absent 
at muster out. 

David Richards, March 10, 1864; wounded 
at Spottsylvania C. H. May 10, 1864; absent 
at muster out. 

George Reicli, April 18, 1862; wounded at 
Mine Run November 27, 1863; discharged 
April 10, 1865. 

Jeremiah Rhodes, October 24, 1861; died 
July 1 6th, of wounds received at Gettysburg 
July 3, 1863; buried in National Cemetery, 
section A, grave 67. 

William Rockey, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 2-/, 1864 — expiration of term. 

Isaac N. Rainey, October 24, 1861 : dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate Januarj' 24, 
1863. 

John S. Rockey, October 24, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate August 20, 
1863. 

David P. Reich, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 3, 
1862. 

Joseph Kinsel, March 23, 1864; transferred 
to Company D, February 26, 1865. 

John Scott, October 25, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Emer)' E. Stitt, July 17, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

William C. Smith, July 17, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

George W. Saunders, September 30, 1861 ; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865; 
veteran. 

Michael Shanhan, September 30. 1861 ; 
mustered out with company July 11. 1865; 
veteran. 

David R. Shannon, February 13, 1864; 
wounded at Wilderness May 6, 1864; absent 
at muster out. 



David Shagel, July 18, 1863; drafted; 
wounded at Wilderness May 6, 1864; dis- 
charged by general order July 19, 1865. 

Ami Sibley, April 7, 1864; wounded at Wil- 
derness May 5, 1864; absent at muster out. 

Barnard Smith, March 10, 1864; wounded 
at Wilderness May 5, 1864; absent at muster 
out. 

Philip Smith, October 24, 1861 ; killed at 
Wilderness May 5, 1864; veteran. 

Templeton Sayers, October 24, 1861 ; died 
at Camp Jameson, Va., November 30, 1861. 

James Sallinger, October 24, 1861 ; died at 
Harrison's Landing July 8, 1862. 

James Schofield, October 24, 1861; died 
near Alexandria October 7, 1862. 

Jacob Sealor, October 24, 1861 ; died at 
Point Lookout August 16, 1862. 

John Shields, April 27, 1864; missing in ac- 
tion near Petersburg June 22, 1864. 

James Stephenson, July 2, 1863; drafted; 
deserted January 10, 1865. 

^\'illiam Speady, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 27, 1864 — expiration of temi. 

Daniel Sarver, August 22, 1862; discharged 
by general order May 29, 1865. 

Francis Snyder, July 16, 1863; drafted; 
discharged January 2. 1865, for wounds re- 
ceived at Wilderness May 6, 1864. 

Francis Smith, April 8, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate August 7, 1862. 

George Settlemoyer, December 31, 186 1; 
discharged on surgeon's certificate August 7, 
1862. 

John SoUinger, October 24, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December t8, 
1862. 

Palmer J. Stephens, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 15, 
1863. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



85 



Jackson Spears, October 24, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate May 29, 1863. 

H. Schreckengost, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged December 22d for wounds received at 
Chancellorsville May 3, 1863. 

George Stokes, February 29, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company D, February 26, 1864; vet- 
eran. 

John Smith, July 11, 1863; drafted; trans- 
ferred to Company D, February 26, 1864. 

John Stedham, August i, 1861 ; transferred 
to Company D, February 26, 1864. 

Peter L. Smith, September 9, 1861 ; not on 
muster-out roll. 

Thomas M. Tantlinger, September 9, 1861 ; 
substitute; died at Washington April 4, 1865; 
burial record, March 27, 1865; buried in Na- 
tional Cemetery, Arlington, Va. 

John H. Twining, March 26, 1864; miss- 
ing in action at Wilderness May 6, 1864. 

Isaac Turner, June 7, 1864; substitute; 
transferred to V. R. C. September 25, 1864. 

Wm. W. Vaneps. March 11, 1864; nius- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Philip W. Welch, June 22, 1864; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Alexander Walker. September 9, 1863; 
drafted; mustered out with companv Julv 11, 
1865. 

Samuel F. Williams, September 30, 1861 ; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865; 
veteran. 

^Villiam C. W'ilson, June 30, 1864; substi- 
tute: killed at Deep Bottom August 16, 1864; 
burial record, died at Philadephia September 
16. 1864. 

John A. L. ^^'ilson. March 25, 1864: died 
at City Point January 24, 1865. 

James Woods, October 24, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate September 26, 1862. 



Samuel Walker, October 24, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 14, 1862. 

\\'illiam Westover, October 24, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate February 17, 
1863. 

John Withrow, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 27, 1864 — expiration of temi. 

Thomas F. Wilson, February 29, 1864; 
transferred to Companv D, Februarj' 26, 
1865. 

Abraham Young, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 27, 1864 — expiration of tenn. 

COMPANY D 

Recruited in Allegheny and Clearfield Counties 

Captains: — John Rose, August 28, 1861 ; 
resigned January 27, 1862. 

Levi Bird Duff, May i, 1861 ; wounded at 
Fair Oaks May 31, 1862; promoted from cor- 
poral Company A, 38th P. V. February 8, 
1862, to major May 4, 1863. 

Isaac L. Piatt, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
from sergeant to first sergeant January 28, 
1862; to first lieutenant July i, 1862; to cap- 
tain April 21, 1864; discharged October 8, 
1864 — expiration of term. 

William Kelly, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
to corporal February 28, 1862 ; to sergeant 
July I, 1862; to first sergeant July i, 1863; 
to captain November 26, 1864: mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

First Lieutenants: — Wm. W. ^^^orrell. Au- 
gust 28, 1861 : resigned Januarj^ 27, 1862. 

J. P. R. Cummisky, February 6. 1862; 
killed at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Joseph L. Evans, September 12, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to second lieutenant December 15, 1864; 
to first lieutenant May 15, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Horace Warner, December i, 1864; pro- 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



nioted from 2d U. S. Sharpshooters February 
18, 1865; discharged March 15, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants: — Charles C. Wilson, 
August 28, iSOi ; resigned January 2-/, 1S62. 

George Gibson, August i, 1861; promoted 
from first sergeant December i, 1864; to sec- 
ond lieutenant May 15, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Charles H. Powers, August 28, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to first sergeant August 31, 1861; to 
second lieutenant January 28, 1862; killed at 
Chancellorsville May 3, 1863. 

James Silvis, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
from sergeant to first sergeant November i, 
1862; to second lieutenant July i, 1863; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate August 6, 

1864. 

First Sergeants:—]. K. P. McCullough, 
August I, 1861 ; promoted to sergeant Novem- 
ber 26, 1864; to first sergeant May 15, 1865; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

Sergeants:— ]u\v.\ McKindig, August i, 
1861; promoted to sergeant November 26, 
1864: mustered out with company July 11, 
1865 ; veteran. 

George O. Riggs, August 28, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to corporal December 31, 1864, to ser- 
geant May 15, 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany July II, 1865; veteran. 

Wm. C. McGarvey, August 28, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to corporal December i, 1862; to ser- 
geant May 15, 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany July II, 1865; veteran. 

Milton Craven, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
to corporal April 30, 1863; to sergeant March 
I, 1864; wounded, with loss of arm, at Wil- 
derness May 6, 1864; absent in hospital at 
muster out; veteran. 

Ebenezer BuUers, August 28, 1861 ; promo- 



ted to corporal July, 1862; to sergeant April 
I, 1863; discharged August 28, 1864 — expira- 
tion of term. 

John C. Jolinson, August 28, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to sergeant July i, 1862; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate February i, 1863. 

Mahlon B. Loux, August 28, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to corporal March i, 1862; to sergeant 
June 30, 1863; discharged August 28, 1864 — 
expiration of term. 

Isaac M. Temple, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
cliarged on surgeon's certificate December 30, 
1862. 

Corporals: — Joseph F. Wolford, August i, 
1861 ; promoted to corporal December 31, 
1864; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865; veteran. 

John R. Shaffer, August 28, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to corporal December 31, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Robert Scott, February 10, 1864; promoted 
to corptjral December 31, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

James Hare. August i, 1861 ; promoted to 
corporal March i, 1865; mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Osborn Hod, February 28, 1864; promoted 
to corporal May 15, 1865; mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865. 

Edward Kline, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
to corporal May 15, 1865; mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Daniel R. Snyder, August 28, 1861 ; died 
June 1st of wounds received at Wilderness 
May 6, 1864; veteran. 

James H. Green, August 28, 1861 : dis- 
charge<l August 2, 1862. 

Gilbraith Patterson, August 28, 1861 ; died 
December 6, 1864. 

Charles E. Hoel, August 28, 1861; promo- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



ted to corporal April 30, 1863; wounded at 
Wilderness May 6th, and with loss of arm 
at Spottsylvania C. H. May 10, 1864; dis- 
charged August 28, 1864 — expiration of term. 

John B. Horning, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate Januaiy 8, 
1863. 

Darius Vastbinder, August 28, 1861 ; pro- 
moled to corporal March i, 1865; discharged 
by general order May 29, 1865. 

D. H. Paulhamus, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged December loth, for wounds received 
at Gettysburg July 2, 1863. 

Andrew McKown, August 28, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to principal musician August 28, 1863. 

Jerome B. Taylor, August 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. October 2, 1863. 

Privates: — Milton J. Adams, March 21, 
1864; wounded at Spottsylvania C. H. May 
12, 1864; absent at hospital at muster-out; 
veteran. 

Benjamin F. Alexander, April 18, 1864; 
discharged by general order June 24, 1865. 

Amos Ashkettle, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 4, 
1862. 

Ebenezer O. Bartlett, August 28, 1861 ; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865; 
veteran. 

John Berchtold, June 13, 1864; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Bickerton, July 16, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Philip Black, March 31, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

Daniel Bowers, March 31, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Boyle, August i, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

John Becker, September 7, 1863 ; drafted ; 



wounded at Wilderness May 6, 1864; absent 
in hospital at muster out. 

David Bell, August 28, 1861 ; died June 23d 
— burial record, June 26th — of wounds re- 
ceived at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862; buried in 
Cypress Hill Cemetery, L. I. 

Richard Bedell, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 28, 1864 — expiration of term. 

Silas Bouse, August 28, 1861 ; transferred 
to V. R. C. November i, 1863; returned June 
25, 1864; discharged August 28, 1864 — expi- 
ration of term. 

Oliver P. Boyd, July 11, 1863; drafted; dis- 
charged by general order June 6, 1865. 

John Bulgar, February 26, 1864; discharged 
September 21, 1864. 

Asa Bowdish, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
October 29, 1861. 

Byron Bryant, x\ugust 28, 1861 ; discharged 
August 28, 1864 — expiration of term. 

Wm. Cameron, July 25, 1864; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Christopher Chadderton, July 20, 1864; 
substitute; mustered out with company July 
II, 1865. 

John S. Christie, August 28, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

George Colston, August i, 1861; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Isaiah Corbett, December 26, 1863 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

James R. Corbett, August 28, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1861 ; vet- 
eran. 

Samuel Criswell, August 28, 1861; killed 
at Charles City Cross Roads June 30, 1862. 

Andrew Christie, August 28, 1861 ; died 
June 17th of wounds received at Petersburg, 
June 16, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, 



88 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



City Point, section E, division i, grave 135; 
veteran. 

Edward Cox, March iS, 1865; substitute; 
deserted June 24, 1865. 

Anson L. Curry, August 28, 1861 ; deserted 
November, 1862. 

Joel Clark, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
August 28, 1864 — expiration of term. 

Vincent Crabtree, March 16, 1865; substi- 
tute; discharged by general order May 29, 
1865. 

James M. Cree, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 8, 
1863. 

Eli B. Clemson, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
to principal musician September i, 1864; vet- 
eran. 

Francis Davis, February 22, 1864; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

\\'illiam Dunn, August 25, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Thomas Davis, February 22, 1864; drafted; 
died December 31, 1864; buried in National 
Cemetery, Arlington, Va. 

James Devanny, July 16, 1863; drafted; 
captured June 22, 1864. 

Matthew Eagleson, July 11, 1863; drafted; 
died Februarj' 19, 1865; buried in Poplar 
Grove National Cemetery, Petersburg, Va., 
section D, division C, grave 33. 

Andrew Eicher, July 16, 1863; drafted; 
missing in action at Boydton Plank Road. Va., 
October 2j, 1864. 

James Fair, August i, 1861 ; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Samuel Free, February 27. 1864; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Calvin Frj'er. March 18, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Fleming, July 10, 1863; drafted; 



wounded October 2, 1864; absent in hospital 
at muster out. 

Jacob F"rickie, June 30, 1864; substitute; ab- 
sent, sick, at muster out. 

C. Fischer, June 29, 1864; substitute; de- 
serted July 29, 1864. 

Charles ^I. Frazier, March 22, 1862; dis- 
charged March 22, 1865 — expiration of term. 

Ransom Freeman, August 28, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate March 18, 
1862. 

Simon Fulton, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate February 9, 1863. 

Charles Frick, March 2^, 1865 ; discharged 
by general order May 29, 1865. 

Charles Graham, August 28, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

William Griffith, February 15, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

James K. Grimley, March 2t„ 1865; sub- 
stitute; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 

Samuel Gross, March 23, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

James Gracey, July 11, 1863; drafted; dis- 
charged by general order May 29, 1865. 

Andrew Henderson, July 18, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Alexander D. Hoel, October 25, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

Henry Houser, March 18, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Josiah M. Hays, July 16, 1863; drafted; 
absent, sick, at muster out. 

Samuel S. Hays, February 22, 1864; 
drafted; died at Beverly, N. J., October 9, 
1864. 

John Hilliard, August 28, 1861 ; died De- 



o 

a 








I i ■ ■ ^- r<i?i-f 





AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 
buried at Point Lookout, 



89 



cember 15, iS6j 
Md. 

Sebastian Hogaii, August 28, 1861 ; died 
October 6, 1861. 



charged on surgeon's certificate December 2-j, 
1862. 

John KHnger, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
September 3rd for wounds received at Glen- 



Robert Hunter, August i, 1861 ; missing in dale, Va., June 30, 1862. 
action at Spottsylvania C. H. May 12, 1863. Edward Knapp, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
Isaiah Haines, August 25, 1861 ; discharged charged August 28, 1864 — expiration of tenn. 



on surgeon's certificate April 4, 1862. 

William Hamma, October 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged by general order May 29, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

Nathaniel B. Hippie, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 4, 1862. 



Frank Livingston, August 28, 1861 ; de- 
serted June 27, 1863. 

William Lightner, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate March 25, 
1862. 

John Mayberry, July 29, 1864; substitute; 



William B. Hoel, August 28, 1861 ; dis- mustered out with company July 11, 1865 



charged on surgeon's certificate January 8, 
1863. 

George Hollenbeck, September 30, 1862; 
discharged by general order May 29, 1865. 

Lyman Hegley, August 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. November 6, 1863. 

John Hennessy, March 2, 1865; not on 
muster-out roll. 

Eli Ice, July 29, 1864; substitute; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate June, 1865. 

Wilder Jackson, September 2, 1863; 
drafted; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 

Jonathan Jamison, August i, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

James Kelly, February 7, 1865; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Knoll, February 7, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865. 

Gottfried Kammur, March 16, 1865; sub- 
stitute: deserted March 27, 1865. 

Henry Keys, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate March 27, 1862. 
Joseph F. Kirby, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 



David kulholland, October 25, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; '^'ct- 
eran. 

James Murphy, August 7, 1862; wounded 
at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863; absent in 
hospital at muster out. 

Edwin Marquis, July 24, 1863; drafted; 
missing in action September 13, 1864. 

James Mack, March 16, 1865; substitute; 
deserted April 28, 1865. 

Thomas J. Morrison, March 17, 1865; sub- 
stitute; deserted June 25, 1865. 

Malvin Munger, October 25, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to 33rd N. Y. V. August 31, 1862. 

Archibald F. Mason, October 28, 1861 ; 
discharged on surgeon's certificate Februarv 
27, 1863. 

Henry Marquett, September 4, 1863; 
drafted; prisoner from October 27, 1864, to 
March 4, 1865; discharged by general order 
June 17, 1865. 

James McAfee, August i. 1861 ; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Charles A. McCosh, August i, 1861 : mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 



90 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Samuel McFadden, August 28, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

William McKelvy, August 1, 1861; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

Alexander P. McArdle, August 28, 1861 ; 
discharged on surgeon's certificate August 4, 
1862. 

David McCardle, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged August 28, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

Reed McFadden, August 28, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 6, 

1861. 

Sam McLaughlin, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 28, 
1863. 

John McLaughlin, August 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. September 12, 1863. 

Irwin McCutcheon, August i, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. August I, 1864; veteran. 

Nathan Noble, August 28, 1861 ; captured 
at Gaines's Mills, June 27, 1862; died July 
20, 1862. 

■ Benjamin Newcomb, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate August 10, 
1862. 

James O'Nell, September 4, 1863; substi- 
tute; deserted September 23, 1863. 

Casper Pitcher, June 13, 1864; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

William Pennington, August 28, 1861 ; 
killed at Fairoaks May 31, 1862. 

George Plotner, August 28, 1861 ; killed at 
Fairoaks, May 31, 1862. 

Joseph Pete, March 18, 1865; deserted June 
25, 1865. 

Josiah Y. Reppeard, March 31, 1864; 
killed at Wilderness May 5, 1864. 



William Riddle, August 28, 1861 ; killed at 
Fairoaks May 31, 1862. 

George L. Riley, March 31, 1864; killed at 
\\'ilderness May 5, 1864. 

Charles B. Ross, August 28, 1861 ; killed at 
Fairoaks May 31, 1S62. 

Joseph Riensel, March 23, 1864; captured 
at Boydton Plank Road October 27, 1864; 
died at Annapolis, Md., March 16, 1865. 

John Robinson, March 18, 1865; deserted 
June 5, 1865. 

Isaac L. Rearick, July 18, 1863; drafted; 
discharged on surgeon's certificate February 

5- 1865. 

Solomon B. Riggs, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged April 20, 1865, for wounds received 
at Petersburg June 22, 1864. 

John Rorabaugh, August 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to Y. R. C. November 6, 1863. 

William M. Riggs, August 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. December 20, 1863. 

Samuel K. Shipley, September 4, 1863; 
substitute; deserted; returned; out with com- 
pany July II, 1865. 

Andrew Sites, August 28, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

George Smith, August i, 1861 ; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Herman Sneer, September 4, 1863; 
drafted; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 

George Staum. June 13, 1864; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

George J. Stiles, September 4, 1863; 
drafted: mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 

Gershom Saxton, August 28, 1861 ; killed 
at Wilderness May 5, 1864. 

William Shaffer, August 28, 1861 ; killed at 
Deep Bottom .August 16, 1864; veteran. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



91 



William Smith, August 28, 1861 ; captured 
June 22, 1862; died in Richmond July 2, 1862. 

Henry Shaffner, August 28, 1861 ; died July 
2nd of wounds received at Fairoaks May 31, 
1862. 

George Stokes, February 28, 1864; cap- 
tured; died at Salisbur}', N. C, January 23, 
1865 ; veteran. 

John Smith, July 11, 1863; drafted; miss- 
ing in action at Boydton Plank Road October 
27, 1864. 

Samuel Sharp, September i, 1863; substi- 
tute; deserted June 25, 1865. 

Richard Smith, March 16, 1865; substitute; 
deserted April i, 1865. 

Isaac Solly, August 28, 1861 ; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate October 4, 1862. 

William H. Saxton, August 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to loth U. S. Infantry December 20, 
1862. 

Robert Shull, August 19, 1862; discharged 
by general order May 29, 1865. 

Perry Smith, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate December 31, 1862. 

Almon Spencer, March 22, 1862; dis- 
charged March 22, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

John Stedham, April i, 1861 ; captured; 
discharged May 19, 1865 — expiration of term. 

Harvey D. Thompson, July 15, 1863; 
drafted; discharged by general order June 24, 
1865. 

James Thompson, February 14, 1865; 
wounded at Sailor's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865; 
absent in hospital at muster out. 

William Todd, March 16, 1865; substitute; 
deserted June 25, 1865. 

Robert Tozer, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate April 4, 1862. 

Solomon Tozer, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 



charged on surgeon's certificate February 11 
1863. 

Charles Truck, March 25, 1865; substitute; 
discharged by general order May 29, 1865. 

Bos well C. Thorn, xA.ugust 28, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. December 15, 1863. 

Gabriel Vastbinder, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 11. 
1862. 

Anthony Williams, August i, 1864; substi- 
tute; mustered out with companv July 11, 
1865. 

William Wilson, February 12, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

William Woodward, March 31, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Henry C. Wykoff, March 22, 1862; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

John Wilson, August 28, 1861 ; killed at 
Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

George Wood, August 28, 1861 ; killed at 
Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862. 

William Williams, July 27, 1864; substi- 
tute: deserted February 4, 1865. 

Charles D. Warner, September 8. 1863; 
drafted; discharged bv general order June 23, 
1865. 

John Williams, August 28, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate June 27, 
1862. 

Ellis Wilson, August 28, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate February 2, 1863. 

George Wilson, August 28, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 13, 
1862. 

Thomas F. Wilson, February 29, 1864; 
prisoner from September 10, 1864, to March 
12, 1865; discharged by general order June 6, 
1865. 



92 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Henry B. White, July ii, 1863; drafted; 
transferred to V. R. C January 5, 1865. 

George Yingling, February 25, 1864; 
wounded at Boydlon Plank Road October 28, 
1864; absent in hospital at muster out. 

John Yingling, August 28, 1861 ; killed at 
I'etersburg lune 16, 1864; buried in National 
Cemetery, City Point, section D, division i, 
grave 78; veteran. 

Company 1' 

Recruited in Clearfield, Indiana and Venango 
Counties 

Captains: — Robert Kirk, September 9, 
1861 ; wounded at Fair Oaks May 31, 1862; 
and at Bull Run August 29, 1862; killed at 
Chancellorsville May 3, 1863. 

John Daugherty, September 9, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to first sergeant January 2, 1862 ; to sec- 
ond lieutenant September 29, 1862; to first 
lieutenant November 26, 1862; to captain Au- 
gust 19, 1863; mustered out October 7, 1864 
— expiration of term. 

William Kemper, September 17, 1861; pro- 
moted from corporal to sergeant January 2, 
1862; to first sergeant September 29. 1862; 
to second lieutenant January i, 1863; to cap- 
tain November 24, 1864: mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865. 

First Lieutenants: — James B. Greggir, Sep- 
tember 9, 1861 ; wounded at Fair Oaks, May 
31, 1862; resigned October 24, 1862. 

Henry P. McKilli]), September 9. 1861 ; 
promoted to corporal January i, 1863: to ser- 
geant July I. 1863; to first sergeant April i, 
1864; to first lieutenant November 26. 1864; 
mustered out with company July 11. 1865; 
veteran. 

Second Lieutenants: — L)a\id Ratcliff, Octo- 
ber 25, iSC)! ; resigned December 2. 1861. 



Ezra B. Baird, September 9, 1861 ; promo- 
ted from first sergeant to second lieutenant 
January 2, 1862; wounded at Fair Oaks May 
31, 1862; resigned October 24, 1862. 

Ogg Neil, Febmary 19, 1862; promoted 
to corporal August 28, 1863; to sergeant 
July I, 1864: to first sergeant December 17, 
1864; to second lieutenant June 8, 1865; 
mustered out with company July 11. 1865; 
\eteran. 

First Sergeants: — William T. Stewart, Sep- 
tember 17, 1861 ; promoted to corporal, Au- 
gust 27, 1863, to sergeant July i, 1864, to first 
sergeant June 9, 1865; mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Jacob S. Smith, Septeml^er 9, 1861 ; promo- 
led from sergeant January i, 1863: killed at 
Chancellorsville May 3, 1863. 

Sergeants: — Lewis Findley, August 28, 
1861 ; promoted to corporal July i, 1864; to 
sergeant September i, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Will. W. Hazelett, September 17, 1861; 
promoted to corporal September i, 1864; to 
sergeant December 17, 1864; mustered out 
with company July 11. 1865; veteran. 

John ^I. Brewer. I'ebruarv- 28, 1864; pro- 
moted to corporal September i, 1864; to ser- 
geant December 17. 1864: mustered out with 
company July 11, 1865. 

Samuel H. Pound, February 17, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal December 17, 1864; to ser- 
geant June 9. 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany July II, 1865; veteran. 

Robert Doty, September 9, 1861 ; promoted 
from corporal to sergeant September 9, 1862; 
killed at Gettysburg July 2, 1863; buried in 
National Cemetery, section E, grave 9. 

John W. Smith. September 9, i86i ; promo- 
ted to corporal August 28, 1863; to sergeant 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



93 



April I, 1864; killed at Petersburg June 18, 
1864; veteran. 

Samuel Adamson, September 9, 1861 ; died 
May 20, 1863, of wounds received in action: 
burial in Military Asylum Cemetery, D. C. 

John Hendricks, October 25, 1861 ; dis- 
charged October 25, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

Elijah Pantall, October 25, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. March 4, 1864. 

Jonathan Brindle, October 25, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. June 18, 1864. 

Corporals: — Luke Loomis, Jr., July 8, 1864; 
drafted; promoted to corporal December 17, 
1864; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 

Joshua Pearce, September 9, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to corporal June 9, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Joseph Taylor, September 9, 1861 ; promo- 
ted to corporal June 9, 1865 ; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Wm. H. Hazelett, September 17, 1861 ; pro- 
moted to corporal June 9, 1865; mustered out 
with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Charles B. Gill, August 28, 1861 ; promoted 
to corporal September i, 1864; absent, 
wounded, at muster out ; veteran. 

John W. Lynn, July 16. 1863; drafted; dis- 
charged by general order June 24, 1865. 

John N. Means, February 28, 1864; promo- 
ted to corporal June 9, 1865. 

Lewis D. Ensinger, September 9, 1861 ; 
promoted to corporal January i, 1862; 
killed at Charles City Cross Roads June 30, 
1862. 

Ira F. Mott, September 3, 1861; promoted 
to corporal August 28, 1863 ; killed at Wilder- 
ness May 5, 1864; veteran. 

George B. Hall, September 17, 1861 ; dis- 



charged on surgeon's certificate October 12, 
1864; veteran. 

George W. McFadden, August 28, 1861 ; 
prisoner from October 2y, 1864, to March 2, 
1865; discharged by general order June 5, 
1865 ; veteran. 

Thomas Niel, October 19, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate March 4. 1865 ; vet- 
eran. 

Irwin B. Nicodemus, May 7, 1862 ; dis- 
charged May 19, 1864 — expiration of temi. 

James Randolph, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate June 30, 
1863. 

George \V. Randolph, September 9, 1861" 
discharged October 25, 1862, for wounds re- 
ceived in action. 

John N. Vanhorn, October 25, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate Februarv 6, 
1863. 

Peter W'heelan, November 2, 1861 ; dis- 
charged November i, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

George W. Campbell, September 9. 1861 ; 
discharged February 25, 1863, for wounds re- 
ceived in action. 

Privates: — Wm. H. H. Anthony, Septem- 
ber 17, 1861 : missing in action at Spottsyl- 
vania C. H. May 12, 1864; veteran. 

Jonathan Ayers, February 25, 1864: miss- 
ing in action at Boydton Plank Road October 
27, 1864. 

James D. Anthony, October 25, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate October 14, 
1862. 

Thos. S. Anderson, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged Februarj' 6, 1863, for wounds re- 
ceived in action. 

James Aul, October 25, 1861 ; transferred 
to V. R. C. July I, 1864. 



94 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



William W. Brillhart, February lO, 1864; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John W. Br}'ant, August 2, 1864; mustered 
out will) company July 11, 1865. 

Jacob L. Bee, February 11, 1864; absent, 
sick, at muster out. 

Joim W. Brooks, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate ]\l:irch 25, 
1863. 

Charles Berry, October 25, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate February 18, 
1863. 

James Buher, July 7, 1864; substitute; pris- 
oner from August 16, 1864, to IMarch 13, 
1865; discharged by general order June 29, 
1865. 

John H. Bush, February 28, 1864; absent, 
wounded, at muster out. 

James Crock, September 9, 18C1 ; killed at 
Fair Oaks May 31, 1863. 

James Crawford, March 16, 1865; substi- 
tute; deserted June 23, 1865. 

John Carr, March 18, 1865; substitute; de- 
serted April 27, 1865. 

Samuel Cochran, September 9, 1861 ; de- 
serted June 30, 1863; returned; discharged 
May 2',, 1865, to date expiration of term. 

John Cupler, September 9, 1863; discharged 
February 15, 1863, for wounds received in ac- 
tion. 

\Vm. A. Chambers, April 30, 1862: trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. October i, 1863. 

Perry C. Cupler, September 9, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. September i, 1863. 

Alichael Dolan, March 18, 1865; substitute: 
absent, sick, at muster out. 

William W. Dixon, February 14, 1864; ab- 
sent on furlough at muster out. 

Peter Depp. September 9, 1861: killed at 
Chancellorsville May 3, 1863. 



Henry H. Depp, September 9, 1861 ; died 
at New Haven, Conn., July 6, 1862, of wounds 
received in action. 

Peter Dalton, March 18, 1865; substitute; 
deserted July i, 1865. 

Thomas Daily, jMarch 10, 1865; substitute; 
deserted June 26, 1865. 

Patrick Delaney, March 17, 1865; substi- 
tute; deserted May 15, 1865. 

Philip B. Depp, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 12, 
1861. 

John P. Drum, October 25, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January i, 
1863. 

James Drum, September 9, 1861; dis- 
charged July 23, 1863, for wounds received 
in action. 

Jonathan Doty, September 9, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out September 30, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

Samuel Edwards, September 17, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 12, 
t86i. 

Chauncey A. Ellis, October 25, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out September 9, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

John M. Fleming, September 17. 1861 ; mus- 
tered 'out with company July 11, 1864; vet- 
eran. 

Alfred Foltz. March 5. 1865; substitute; alj- 
sent, sick, at muster out. 

Wm. Fitzgerald, March 17, 1865; .substi- 
tute: deserted April 4, 1865. 

Samuel Fry. October 26, 1861 ; discharged 
January 2, 1863; for wounds received in ac- 
tion. 

John F. Fulmer, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged September 8, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



95 



Samuel D. Fulmer, September 9, 1861; dis- 
charged August 24, 1864, for wounds received 
in action. 

Thomas S. Guiles, March 15, 1S65; substi- 
tute; deserted June 23, 1865. 

Stephen Gleeson, March 16, 1865; substi- 
tute; mustered out with company July 11, 
1S65. 

George Gossor, March 3, 1S65; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

James Gallagher, March 13, 1865; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Joseph Graham, February 23, 1865; 
drafted ; mustered out with company July 1 1 , 
1865. 

Anthony A. Gallagher, July 15, 1864; 
drafted; absent, sick, at muster out. 

Henry A. L. Girts, September 9, 1862; 
transferred to V. R. C. October i, 1863; dis- 
charged by general order June 29, 1865. 

Jonathan Himes, September 3, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1S65; vet- 
eran. 

W'm. S. Hendricks, September 17, 1861 ; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865; 
veteran. 

Isaac Hendricks. February 28, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Joseph Hill, September 9, 1861 ; killed at 
Fair Oaks May 31, 1862. 

Alonzo Hemstreat, September 9, 1861 ; 
killed at Gettysburg July 2, 1863. 

George W. Hoover, October 25, 1861 ; died 
at Fortress Monroe June 4, 1862, of wounds 
received in action. 

Benjamin B. Hall. February 29, 1S64; cap- 
tured: died at Andersonville, Ga.. July 17, 
1864; grave, 3474. 

John Hare, March 17, 1865; substitute; de- 
serted April 2-, 1865. 



James Hopkins, September 9, 1862; de- 
serted October, 1863. 

Thomas Hombs, January 30, 1864; de- 
serted May 6, 1864. 

H. H. Hollowell, October 26, 1861 ; de- 
serted October, 1863. 

Simon D. Hugus, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate March 14, 
1862. 

John C. Hollowell, October 26, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November i, 
1862. 

Thomas M. Hauck, October 25, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 24, 
1862. 

Edward Hogan, March 17, 1865; substi- 
tute ; discharged on surgeon's certificate June 
II, 1865. 

Geo. W. Hollowell, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged January 13, 1863, for wounds re- 
ceived in action. 

Samuel Hannah, September 9, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to 1st U. S. Cavalry January 17, 1863. 

George K. Hoover, October 26, 1861 ; trans- 
ferred to V. R. C. October 7, 1863. 

Daniel Johnston, October 25, 1861 ; killed 
at Bull Run August 29, 1862. 

John D. Jewell, September 3, 1861 ; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865; vet- 
eran. 

Jackson Jones, July 11. 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

James A. Johnston, June 9, 1864; substi- 
tute; killed near Weldon Railroad, Va., Octo- 
ber 2, 1864. 

Robert J. Jewett, Febraary 17, 1862; died 
at Washington, D. C, June 4, 1864, of 
wounds received in action ; buried in National 
Cemetery, Arlington, Va. ; veteran. 

James Jenkins, July 27, 1864; drafted; 



96 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



missing in action at Deep Bottom, Va., Octo- 
ber 2, 1864. 

Amos S. Knauer, March 11, 1865; drafted; 
mustered out with company July u, 1865. 

Harrison Keltz, September 9. 1861 : de- 
serted June 25, 1863; returned April 25, 
1865; mustered out with company Julv 11, 
1865. 

Charles Kleffer. October 25, 1861 ; died at 
Camp Jameson, Va., January 28, 1862. 

John Kelly, March 16, 1865; substitute; de- 
serted April 2, 1865. 

John Kelly, June 27, 1862; captured; died 
at Salisbury, N. C, Dec. 15, 1864. 

Jacob Kurtz, March 16, 1865; substitute, 
deserted April 2, 1865. 

Thomas Kennan, March 17, 1865; substi- 
tute; deserted June 29, 1865. 

Robert S. Laughry, February 24, 1864; 
mustered out with company July n. 1865. 

Levi S. Lust, March 18. 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Nicholas Lutcher, March 17, 1865; substi- 
tute; mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Charles Lyle, January 29, 1864; killed at 
Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; buried in Wil- 
derness burial grounds. 

John Myer, March 16, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Edward Mingus, March 18, 1865; substi- 
tute; deserted; returned June 29, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

George R. Moyer, March 16, 1865; substi- 
tute; mustered out with company July 11. 
1865. 

Garret P. Mattis, March 17, 1865; substi- 
tute; mustered out with company July 11, 

1865. 

Peter Morgan, March 22, 1865; substitute; 
discharged by general order July 12, 1865. 



Wm. Mann, January 16, 1863; killed at 
Sailor's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865. 

Scott Mitchell. June 4, 1864; substitute; 
died November 6, 1864. 

\\'m. C. Martin, September 17, 1861 ; died 
Januarj' 6, 1865; veteran. 

Geo. W. Maynard, September 9, 1861 ; 
missing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864. 

George Moore, March 15, 1865; substitute; 
deserted May 20, 1865. 

John Miller, September 9, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate January 29, 1863. 

Jas. A. Minish, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged September 8, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

James McCarty, March 17, 1865; substitute; 
absent, wounded, at muster out. 

Rob. McMannes, October 26, 1861 ; died at 
Harrison's Landing, Va., July 20, 1862. 

Michael McDannell, March 16, 1865; substi- 
tute; deserted April 27, 1865. 

Thomas McFadden, March 17, 1865; sub- 
stitute; deserted April i, 1865. 

John McKean. September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 11, 
1863. 

Sam. A. McGhee, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged September 8, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

Wm. T. Niel, May 7, 1862; discharged on 
surgeon's certificate August 6, 1862. 

Thomas Orr, September 9. 1861; killed at 
Bull Run, Va., August 29, 1862. 

Wm. O'Brian, March 16. 1865; substitute; 
deserted April 4, 1865. 

Matthew O'Donnell. March 17. 1865; sub- 
stitute, deserted April i, 1865. 

Chas. W. O'Niel, March 18, 1865; substi- 
tute; deserted June 24, 1865. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



97 



James O'Bran, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged September 10, 1862, for wounds re- 
ceived in action. 

Thomas O'Brichel, September 9, 1861 ; dis- 
charged September 8, 1864 — expiration of 
term. 

Charles Parry, March 18, 1865; substitute; 
discharged by general order June 12, 1865. 

David R. Porter, January 11, 1864; died at 
Philadelphia, Pa., February 13, 1865. 

Jas. R. Pounds, October 25, 1861 ; missing 
in action at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863. 

Jackson Piper, October 25, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 11, 
1862. 

Adam Ritz, March 18, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Enos Ratzel, March 18, 1865; drafted; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Amos Redky, March 24, 1865; drafted; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Riley, March 16, 1865; substitute; de- 
serted April 5, 1865. 

Jacob Reel, March 21, 1865; drafted; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Peter Rourke, March 16, 1865; substitute; 
deserted July i, 1865. 

Irwin Robinson, February 15, 1864; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April 20, 

1865. 

Jas. W. Shafifer, March 19, 1862; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865; veteran. 

Isaac Smith, July 16, 1863; drafted; mus- 
tered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Geo. Shields, September 8, 1862; deserted 
June 30, 1863; returned November 14, 1864; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

John Schmidt, March 17, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11. 1865. 

Asher A. Sellers, February 24, 1865; 



drafted; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 

John Service, August 28, 1861 ; absent, 
wounded, at muster out; veteran. 

David Simpson, February 14, 1864; dis- 
charged by general order June 27, 1865. 

Chas. Smouse, September 9, 1861 ; killed at 
Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1864. 

David S. Simpson, September 9, 1861 ; 
killed at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863. 

Samuel Stevenson, July i, 1864; substitute; 
captured; died at Salisbury, N. C, December 
27, 1864. 

Lewis Stem, June 13, 1864; substitute; 
missing in action at Boydton Plank Road, Va., 
October 27, 1864. 

James S. Smith, February 28, 1864; substi- 
tute; missing in action at Boydton Plank 
Road, Va., October 27, 1864. 

Dan. Sullivan, March 16, 1865; substitute; 
deserted April 5, 1865. 

Andrew J. Smith, September 8, 1862; de- 
serted October, 1863. 

Henry Shaffer, October 25, 1861 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate September 15, 
1862. 

Peter C. Spencer, October 25, 1861; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 31, 
1862. 

John Stewart, October 25, 1861 ; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate January 30, 1863. 

David C. Simpson, February 14, 1864; dis- 
charged by general order June 2, 1865. 

Daniel Tallman, September 9, 1861 ; de- 
serted May 10, 1862. 

Sterling M. Thomas, September 9, 1861 ; 
deserted April i, 1862. 

Peter Vanoligan, March 18, 1865 ; substi- 
tute; mustered out with company July 11, 
1865. 



98 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



John Vorece, March lo, 1865; substitute; 
deserted May 2, 1865. 

Sam. W. Walker. February 18, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July il, 1865. 

Isaac Wray, February 18, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 11, 1865. 

Newton Wilson, July 16, 1863; drafted: 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Moses White, March 17, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Conrad Wolf, March 15, 1865; substitute; 
mustered out with company July 11, 1865. 

Henry Wimmer, March 17, 1865: substi- 
tute: mustered out with company July 11. 
1865. 

John Williams, March 16, 1865; substitute; 
absent, sick, at muster out. 

Wm. H. Wilson, September 9. 1861 : killed 
at Fair Oaks, Va., May 31, 1862. 

Albert C. Wheeler, September 9, 1861 ; 
killed at Charles City Cross Roads June 30, 
1862. 

David Willard, September 3, 1861 ; killed 
at Wilderness, Va., May 5. 1864; veteran. 

John P. Williamson, October 26, 1861 ; 
captured; died 1862. 

Joseph White, October 25, 1861 ; captured; 
died date unknown. 

Ferdinand Wagner, March 17, 1865: sub- 
stitute: deserted April i, 1865. 

David K. Williams, October 26, 1862; 
transferred to Company F, i8th Regiment, 
Veteran Reserve Corps, January 20, 1865. 

George W. Young, October 26, 1861 ; died 
at New Haven, Conn., June 28, 1862. 

THE ONE HUNDRED .\NI? FORTY-NINTH REGI- 
MENT BUCKTAILS 

Organized July, 1862 
The successes achieved and the gallant ser- 



vices rendered by the original famous "Buck- 
tails" induced the war department to organize 
and equip other similar regiments. In less than 
twenty days the One Hundred and Forty-ninth 
and the One Hundred and Fiftieth regiments 
were formed and ready to receive their equip- 
ments for the field. These two were suddenly 
called to the defense of the nation's capitol, as 
the hosts of the Confederacy had invaded 
Maryland and seriously threatened the whole 
region around Washington. 

Clearfield county was represented in the 
One Hundred and Forty-ninth, either in whole 
or in part, in the fomiation of Companies B 
and E. Upon the complete organization of the 
regiment the following were the field officers : 
Roy Stone, colonel; Walton Dright, lieuten- 
ant-colonel : George W^ Speer, major. For 
the remaining part of the year 1862, and until 
the middle of February of the succeeding year, 
the regiment remained on duty in the vicinity 
of Washington, after which they were ordered 
to the front, and proceeded to Belle Plain, Va., 
where with the One Hundred and Forty-third 
Pennsylvania they formed the Second Brigade 
of the First Army Corps, and Colonel Stone 
was placed in command. 

They were first under fire from the enemy 
on the Rap])ahann(Kk, a short distance from 
Pollock's ^Mills. and held firmly to their posi- 
tion. Early the next morning. May 2, it 
marched to join the main amiy in the fierce 
battle at Chancellorsville and arrived there be- 
fore daylight on the morning of the 3d, and at 
once began the construction of rifle-pits. For 
several days and nights following the regi- 
ments were engaged, reconnoitering and skir- 
mishing here and there, attacking the enemy's 
pickets and capturing several prisoners, and 
generally rendering commendable service. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



99 



bravely facing danger with the fearlessness of 
veterans. 

Following close upon the heels of Chancel- 
lorsville came the Gettysburg campaign, Gen- 
eral Lee, commanding the Confederate forces, 
having moved northward early in June. Dur- 
ing the first and second days the regiment was 
actively engaged, occupying prominent and im- 
portant positions, and exposed to an almost 
constant fire from the enemy's battery or 
sharpshooters. During the third day it was 
held in reser\e and was marching to meet 
Pickett's division when the Confederate forces 
withdrew. In this long and bloody fight the 
regiment certainly established the fact that the 
naine by which they were known, "Bucktails," 
was worthily applied; but the command fared 
badly at Gettysburg. Colonel Stone, the gal- 
lant commander, was severely wounded, as 
was Lieutenant Colonel Dwight, Captain John 
Irvin, of Company B, and Lieutenant Mitch- 
ell, of Company E. In his official report of the 
Gettysburg fight General Doubleday says: "I 
relied greatly on Stone's Brigade to hold the 
post assigned it (between the brigades of Cut- 
ler and Meredith), as I soon saw that I should 
be obliged to change front with a portion of 
my line, to face the northwest, and his brigade 
held the pivot of the movement. My confi- 
dence in this noble body of men was not mis- 
placed. They repulsed the repeated attacks 
of vastly superior numbers, and maintained 
their position until the final retreat of the whole 
line." After the battle the regiment lay en- 
camped for a day or two on the field, and 
started with the army in pursuit of Lee and 
his retreating forces. The events that fol- 
lowed during the fall campaign were unim- 
portant, and early in December, they went 
into winter quarters near Culpeper. 



Early in May of the year 1864, the brigade 
was prepared for the spring campaign and 
moved from their winter camp to a point near 
the old Wilderness Tavern, but remaining 
there but a single night, again moved forward 
out on the Log road, where a line of battle 
was formed, then pushing forward met the 
enemy in a fierce and almost hand to hand con- 
flict, but having an inferior position for suc- 
cessful battle, was slowly forced back to the 
Lacy House, where they re-formed and were 
held in reserve for the rest of the day. In 
this encounter the regiment sufifered severely 
at the hands of the rebels, being taken at a 
great disadvantage and somewhat by sur- 
prise. Early in the evening, however, the 
regiment retrieved its loss, having been moved 
to the right of the Second Corps, led the charge 
and drove the enemy from his position, and 
with but slight loss to its own force. On the 
morning of the 6th the battle was renewed 
with all its vigor, with success at first, but 
later the whole line was compelled to fall back 
leaving the brave commander, Wadsworth, dy- 
ing on the field. In the afternoon the brigade 
was ordered to a charge against Longstreet's 
forces in the hope of recovering a lost posi- 
tion, and nobly was the order executed, after 
which the regiment was relieved and retired to 
the rear for rest and recuperation. In this 
two days' contest the regiment lost in killed, 
fifteen; in wounded, ninety-nine, and in pris- 
oners taken, ninety-two — about one-fourth of 
its entire number. 

On the morning of the i8th, after an all 
night march, the regiment reached Laurel Hill, 
and immediately went to the relief of the cav- 
alry. Although very much fatigued from its 
long march, and being in an exposed position, 
it held firmly to its ground during the day, and 



100 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



at evening threw up breast works. After a day 
in reserve it again went to tlie front attacking 
the enemy and driving them into their works. 
On the 1 2th they again charged, but were re- 
pulsed with some loss. The men then went 
to support the Sixth Corps, and took a posi- 
tion at the front where they were exposed to 
the merciless fire of the rebel sharpshooters. 
They then moved again, and during the night 
of the 13th to a p(jsition one mile east of 
Spottsylvania Court-house. With the First 
Division the regiment moved on to Petersburg, 
and both in the siege and assault ui>on the en- 
emy's works its was actively engaged. It was 
then under command of Colonel John Irvin, 
he having been promoted to that rank April 
22, 1864. From the time of the opening of 
the campaign in May, until the close of the 
month of July, the One Hundred and Forty- 
ninth Regiment, according to the report of 
Colonel Irvin, lost two commissioned officers, 
and thirty-two men killed, six commissioned 
officers, and two hundred and forty-three men 
wounded, and one hundred and twenty-one 
missing, an aggregate of four hundred and 
four. 

On the 1 8th of August, 1864, the regiment 
joined in the first assault on the Weldon Rail- 
road. Although at close quarters, and in a se- 
vere struggle, on account of an admirable po- 
sition, its loss was very light, while that of 
the beaten enemy was quite severe. On the 
nth of September, they were relieved from 
duty at the front and went into reserve, and 
so continued until the 7th of December, when 
it joined in the grand raid upon the Weldon 
Railroad, and on the return therefrom acted as 
rear guard, in which position they were con- 
tinually harassed by the Confederate cavalry. 



In the early part of February, 1865, it 
joined the movement to Dabney's Mills, and 
participated in the engagement at that point, 
the last conflict at arms in which the gallant 
regiment took an active part. It was then de- 
tached from the Army of the Potomac and 
sent to Elmira, N. Y., where, with the One 
Hundred and Fiftieth, it was on guard duty 
at the camp for rebel prisoners. Here it re- 
mained until the close of its term of service, 
and was mustered out on the 24th of June, and 
proceeding to Harrisburg was paid off, and 
finally disbanded. 

Field and Staff. 

Colonels: — Roy Stone, August 30, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, July i, 1863; bre- 
vetted brigadier-general September 7, 1864; 
discharged by special order January 27, 
1865. 

John Irvin, August 26, 1862; promoted 
from captain company B, to major Febru- 
ary 10, 1864; to lieutenant-colonel April 22, 
1864; to colonel February 21. 1865; dis- 
charged by special order August 4, 1865. 

Lieutenant - Colonels: — Walton Dwiglit. 
August 27, 1862; promoted from captain 
company K, August 29, 1862; wounded at 
Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; discharged 
by special order March 31, 1864. 

James Glenn, .\ugust 23, 1862; promoted 
from captain company D, to major April 22. 
1864; to lieutenant-colonel February 21, 
1865; discharged by special order August 4, 
1865. 

Majors: — George \\'. Speer, August 26, 
1862; promoted from captain Company I, 
August 29, 1862; discharged by special or- 
der March 23, 1865. 

Edwin S. Osborne, August 30. 1862: pro- 
moted from captain Company F, February 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



101 



25, 1865 ; discharged by special order July 
21, 1865. 

Adjutants: — John E. Parsons, August 30, 
1862; promoted to captain and assistant ad- 
jutant-general U. S. Vols. June 30, 1864; 
resigned January 30, 1865. 

John F. Irwin, August 26, 1862 ; promoted 
from first lieutenant company B, Septem- 
ber 5, 1864; mustered out with regiment 
June 24, 1865. 

Quartermasters: — John M. Chase. Au- 
gust 26, 1862; promoted from first lieuten- 
ant Company B, August 29, 1862; discharged 
by special order May 10, 1863. 

Darius F. Ellsworth, August 26, 1862; 
promoted from private Company K, to 
quarter-master sergeant February 21, 1863; 
to quartermaster November 22, 1863; to 
captain and A. Q. M. U. S. Vols. June 30, 
1864: mustered out September 20, 1865. 

George W. Turner, August 22, 1862: pro- 
moted from sergeant Company F, to quar- 
termaster-sergeant November 22, 1863; to 
quartermaster October 18, 1864: mustered 
out with regiment June 24, 1865. 

Surgeons: — W. T. Humphrey, Septem- 
ber 12, 1862; discharged by special order 
January 17, 1865. 

Ab'm Harshberger, November 22, 1863; 
promoted from assistant surgeon February 
4, 1865; mustered out with regiment June 
24, 1865. 

Assistant Surgeons: — W. R. D. Black- 
wood, September 12, 1862; promoted to 
surgeon 40th Regiment P. V., April 28, 
1863. 

White G. Hunter, September 12, 1862; 
promoted to surgeon 211th Regiment P. V., 
September 22. 1864. 

William H. King, March 23, 1863; pro- 



moted to surgeon i82d Regiment P. V., 
July 27, 1863. 

David W. Riggs, February 15, 1865; mus- 
tered out with regiment June 24, 1866. 

John Graham, April 17, 1865; mustered 
out with regiment June 24, 1865. 

Chaplain: — James F. Calkins, June 3, 
1863; mustered out with regiment June 24, 
1865. 

Sergeant - Majors: — David Allen, August 
26, 1862; promoted from private Company 
H, September 21, 1862; transferred to Com- 
pany H, June 18, 1865. 

William T. Easton, August 23, 1862; pro- 
moted from sergeant Company D, January 
I, 1864; to first sergeant 32d Regiment U. 
S. C. T. March 28, 1864, and to captain 103d 
Regiment U. S. C. T. March 18, 1865; dis- 
charged May 5, 1866. 

Henry Landrus, August 30, 1862; pro- 
moted from sergeant Company G, April 3, 
1864; wounded and captured at Wilderness, 
Va., May 5, 1864; discharged by general 
order May 31, 1865. 

W. M. Berkstresser, August 12, 1863; 
drafted ; promoted from private company 
G, June I, 1865; mustered out with regiment 
June 24, 1865. 

Hospital Stezvard: — Adelbert J. Higgle, 
August 26, 1862; promoted from private 
company K, September 12, 1862; mustered 
out with regiment June 24, 1865. 

Quartermaster - Sergeant: — Samuel L. 
Miles, August 26, 1862; promoted from pri- 
vate company B, to commissary-sergeant 
September 12, 1862; to quartermaster-ser- 
geant October 18, 1864; mustered out with 
regiment June 24, 1865. 

Commissary-Sergeant : — Charles A. Da- 
vidson, August 26, 1862; promoted from 



102 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



private company F, October 18, 1864; mus- 
tered out with regiment June 24, 1865. 

Principal Musician: — Henry Moyer, Au- 
gust 19, 1862; promoted from musician 
Company C, March i, 1864; mustered out 
with regiment June 24, 1865. 

Company B. 

Captains: — J^hn Irvin, August 26, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg. Pa.. July i, 1863; 
promoted to major February 10. 1864. 

William Holden, August 26, 1862; pro- 
moted from second to first lieutenant May 
16, 1863: to captain February 11. 1864; dis- 
charged December 21, 1S64. 

John L. Rex, August 26, 1862; promoted 
from sergeant to first sergeant February 12, 
1863; to second lieutenant February 20, 1864; 
to first lieutenant September 5, 1864; to cap- 
tain January 30, 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany June 24, 1865. 

First-Licutcnants: — John M. Chase, August 
26, 1862; promoted to quartermaster August 

29, 1862. 

John F. Irvin, August 26. 1862; promoted 
from sergeant to second lieutenant September 

30, 1862; to first lieutenant Februar}- 20, 1864; 
to adjutant September 5, 1864. 

Albert B. Cole, August 26, 1862; pro- 
moted from sergeant to first sergeant ; to 
second lieutenant September 5, 1864; to 
first lieutenant January 30. 1865; killed at 
Hatcher's Run. Va.. February 6, 1865. 

Milton McClure, August 29, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal February 14, 1863; to 
sergeant September 5, 1864; to first lieu- 
tenant March 27, 1865: mustered out with 
company June 24, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant: — Newton Read, Au- 
gust 26, 1862; promoted from corporal to 



sergeant August 31, 1864; to second lieuten- 
ant June 7, 1865: mustered out with com- 
pany June 24. 1865. 

I'irst Scry cant: — Oscar B. Welch, Au- 
gust 26, 1862; wounded at Laurel, Va., May 
8, 1864; promoted from corporal to ser- 
geant; to first sergeant September 5, 1864; 
absent in hospital at muster out. 

Sergeants: — William I. Bard. August 26, 
1862; wounded at Spottsylvania C. H., May 
10, 1864: promoted from corporal February 
20, 1864; mustered out with company June 

-4. 1865- 

John Henry, August 26, 1862; wounded 
at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; promoted 
to corporal February 27, 1863; to sergeant 
June 6, 1865: mustered out with ccjuipany 
June 24, 1865. 

Edward Livingston, August 26, 1862; 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; 
promoted to corporal September i, 1863; 
to sergeant June 6, 1865; mustered out with 
company June 24, 1865. 

Charles W. Needier, August 29. 1862; 
promoted to corporal February 14, 1863; 
to sergeant February 20, 1864: missing in 
action at Wilderness, Va., May 5. 1864. 

Robert Fleming, August 26, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate June 26, 
1865. 

Daniel Shunkweiler, August 26, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corjis, date 
unknow'u. 

Corporals: — Andrew S. Wall, August 26, 
1862: promoted to corporal February 20, 
1864; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Joseph Baish. August 26, 1862; wounded 
at Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864; promoted 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



103 



to corporal February 20, 1864; mustered out 
with company June 24, 1865. 

John H. Smith, August 26, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal September 5, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Daniel W. Sloppy, August 26, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal September 5, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Marion Sharp, August 26, 1862 ; wounded 
at Petersburg, Va., June iS, 1864; promoted 
to corporal June 6, 1865; mustered out with 
company June 24, 1865. 

Charles P. McMasters, August 26, 1862 
wounded at North Anna River, Va., May 23 
1864; promoted to corporal June 6, 1865 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865 

Horace N. Toby, August 19, 1863 
drafted; promoted to corporal June 6, 1865 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

George Hagen, August 26, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal February 12, 1863; miss- 
ing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 
1864. 

William Curry, August 26, 1862; died at 
Washington, D. C, October 7, 1862. 

Ellis Lewis, August 26, 1862; promoted 
to corporal; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July 
I. 1863. 

John P. Spencer, August 26, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal; killed at Wilderness, Va., 
May 6, 1864. 

Thomas Adams, August 26, 1862; de- 
serted February 8, 1863. 

William Sloppy, August 26, 1862; de- 
serted July I, 1863. 

Musicians: — George L. Way, August 
26, 1862; mustered out with company June 
24, 1865. 

David A. Wilson, August 26, 1862; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 



Privates: — Joseph Alexander, August 26, 
1862; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 
1863; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps 
January 10, 1865 ; discharged by general or- 
der June 2y, 1865. 

Bernard Adams, August 26, 1862; killed 
at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

John Blair, August 26, 1862; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. \ 

Abraham T. Bloom, August 26, i862r 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; \ 
absent in hospital at muster out. \ 

David Bloom, August 26, 1862; missing 
in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

Calvin Becannan, August 13, 1863; drafted; 
missing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864. 

John W. Bowers, March 6, 1865: mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Jacob Burtner, August 13, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Benj. F. Brant, August 26, 1863; drafted; 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; ab- 
sent in hospital at muster out. 

John B. Bott, September 19, 1863; substi- 
tute; absent in hospital at muster out. 

Andrew J. Brant, September 23, 1863; sub- 
stitute; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864; absent in hospital at muster but. 

Willis G. Button, October 16, 1863; substi- 
tute; wounded at Petersburg, Va., June 18, 
1864; discharged by general order May 31, 
1865. 

Simon B. Benson, October 16, 1863; substi- 
tute; mustered out with company Tune 24, 
1865. 

Henry M. Bloom, August 26, 1862; dis- 
charged by special order January 31, 1863. 

Jas. M. Boal, August 26, 1862; discharged 
by surgeon's certificate April 14, 1863. 



104 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Reuben K. Barnhart, August 19, 1863; 
drafted; discharged by general order May 24, 
1865. 

Conrad Barrett, August 26, 1862; wounded 
at North Anna River, Va., May 22, 1864; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps; dis- 
charged by general order July 29, 1865. 

Jacob D. Birsh, August 26, 1862; deserted; 
returned; discharged by special order July 8, 
1865. 

Chas. D. Button, October 19, 1863; substi- 
tute; killed at Laurel Hill, Va., May 5, 1864. 

John H. Curry, August 26, 1862; wounded 
at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Jas. L. Clark, August 26, 1862; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Wm. H. Connell, August 26, 1862; 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5. 1864; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Geo. W. Curry, August 26, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate, February 11. 1863. 

David C. Cady, August 19, 1863; drafted; 
transferred to United States Navy April 22, 
1864. 

Samuel Connor, August 13, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company A, 49th Regiment P. V., 
date unknown. 

James Cree. September 3, 1863; substitute; 
died at Culpeper, Va., December 28, 1864. 

John Crance, August 19, 1863; drafted; 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5. 1864; 
died at Alexandria, Va., May 16, 1864. 

Richard A. Curry, August 26, 1862; killed 
at Gettysburg, July i, 1863. 

Joseph D. Dale, August 26, 1862; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Wm. Delancy, March 5, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 24. 1865. 

John P. Doan, August 19, 1863; drafted; 



discharged on surgeon's certificate March 24, 
1864. 

Daniel R. Davis, August 26, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 
1863; discharged by general order June 
29, 1865. 

Wm. P. Dixon, August 26, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, date un- 
known. 

Rob. P. Dixon, August 26, 1862; died at 
Andersonville, Ga., July 26, 1864; grave 4087. 

Eli Erhart, August 26, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate February 27, 1863. 

Michael Fulermer, August 13, 1863; 
drafted; mustered out with company June 24, 
1S64. 

Cornelius Fitzgerald, August 24. 1863; 
drafted : absent in hospital at muster out. 

Luther Fisler, August 16, 1863; substi- 
tute; missing in action at Wilderness, Va., 
May 5, 1864. 

David Fink, August 26, 1862; missing in 
action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

Mortimer Farley, March 31, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Henry Farley, November 7, 1863; captured 
at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; discharged 
by special order April 8, 1865. 

Morris Farley, August 26, 1862 : wounded 
at Weldon Railroad, Va., Aug. 21. 1864; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, date 
unknown. 

Wm. Fleming, August 26, 1862; killed 
at Gettysburg, Pa.. July i, 1863. 

Wm. C. Gibbs, October 13, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Samuel GafYord, August 18, 1863; drafted; 
captured at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; 
discharged by general order June 8, 1865. 

Samuel George, August 26, 1862; trans- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



105 



ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, date un- 
known. 

Benjamin F. George, August 26, 1862; 
killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

David C. Heiges, August 26, 1862; absent 
in hospital at muster out. 

Andrew Heiges, August 26, 1862; missing 
in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

George W. Hardinger, August 26, 1863; 
drafted; missing in action at Wilderness, 
Va., May 5, 1864. 

Wm. Hardegan, August 26, 1863 ; 
drafted; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 
5, 1864; absent in hospital at muster out. 

James K. Hancock, August 26, 1862; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 
Charles Hawk, September 16, 1863; sub- 
stitute; discharged by special order March 
25, 1864. 

James W. Henry, August 26, 1862; dis- 
charged by general order May 19, 1865. 

Wm. H. Harding, November 7, 1863; cap- 
tured at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; dis- 
charged by general order June 12. 1865. 

Miles H. Hang, August 26, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps; discharged 
by general order July 12, 1865. 

Bailey Heiges, September 24, 1863; substi- 
tute; died at Washington, D. C, December 
20, 1863; buried in Military Asylum Ceme- 
tery. 

Alexander Haney, August 26, 1862; died at 
Washington, D. C, February 5, 1864. 

Andrew T. Jackson, August 26, 1862; de- 
serted ; returned ; discharged by special order 
July 8, 1865. 

Barnard Kemper, September 12, 1868; 
drafted ; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Levi Kegg, September 23, 1863; substi- 



tute; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864; absent in hospital at muster out. 

Darius Knapp, August 19, 1863; drafted; 
died at Culpeper C. H. Va., December 28, 
1865. 

George W. Leech, November 8, 1863; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Andrew Lembie, September 26, 1863; sub- 
stitute; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

David W. Lee, August 26, 1862; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Jacob T. Leins, August 26, 1862 ; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; 
discharged on surgeon's certificate April 2, 
1864. 

John Lininger, August 26. 1862; wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; transferred 
to Veteran Reserve Corps, date unknown. 

Wm. Lewis, August 26, 1862; deserted July 
I, 1863. 

James B. Martin, March 7, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

John H. Mock, October 2, 1863; substi- 
tute; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Luke S. Munn, August 26, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate April i, 1864. 

Wm. A. Moore, March 7, 1865 ; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Samuel L. Miles, August 26, 1862; promo- 
ted to commissary-sergeant September 12, 
1862. 

John A. Murphy, August 26. 1862; died at 
Philadelphia, Pa., July 11, 1865, buried in 
Military Asylum Cemetery, Washington, D. C. 

James L. McCullough, August 26, 1862; 
absent in hospital at muster out. 

James M. McDowell, August 26, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; 



106 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



discharged on surgeon's certifkate April 2^, 
1864. 

George McDowel, August 26, 1862; dis- 
charged by special order October 14, 1862. 

Harvey McCracken, August 26. 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps; dis- 
charged by general order July 17, 1865. 

William H. McKee, August 26, 1862; died 
at Washington, D. C, November 21, 1862. 

Thomas McKenzie, August 17, 1863; 
drafted; killed at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 
1864. 

Samuel McClure, August 26, 1862; killed at 
Gettysburg, Pa., July i. 1863. 

James M. McKee, August 26, 1862; de- 
serted Februar)' 8, 1863. 

William H. McDonald, August 26, 1862; 
deserted February 12, 1863. 

Shadrik H. Phillips, August 26, 1862; died 
August 22, 1863; buried in Cypress Hill Cem- 
etery, L. I., grave 815. 

Joseph G. Russell, March 8, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Philip Rigard, September 15, 1863; drafted 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Henry Runyan, August 13, 1863; drafted; 
discharged by special order July 18, 1865. 

Richard Rowls, August 26, 1862; deserted 
June 14, 1865. 

Harvey F. Smith, March 8, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Daniel Smith. August 26, 1862; missing in 
action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1865. 

Samuel Stine. August 14, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with coinpany June 24. 1865. 

Rob. H. Slocum. April 23, 1864; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 



Wm. H. Stage, August 26, 1862; discharged 
by special order September 2, 1863. 

Jacob Seigler, August 14, 1863; drafted; 
wounded at Cold Harbor, Va., June 2. 1864; 
discharged by general order May 17, 1865. 

Benjamin F. Shave, August 19, 1863; 
drafted; wounded at Hatcher's Run, Va., 
February 6, 1865; discharged by general order 
May 16, 1865. 

Daniel Shumber, September 15, 1863; sub- 
stitute ; deserted ; returned ; discharged by spe- 
cial order July 8, 1865. 

William Smith, August 26, 1862; deserted 
February 12, 1863; returned; discharged by 
special order July 8, 1865. 

Columbus Smith, Aug. 26, 1862; deserted; 
returned ; discharged by special order July 8, 
1865. 

Franklin Smith, August 26, 1862; deserted; 
returned ; discharged by special order July 8, 
1865. 

Sylvanus Snyder, August 26, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Va., July i, 1863; 
transferred to Veteran Reser%'e Corps, date 
unknown. 

W. Stambaugh, August 26, 1862; died at 
Orange Court House. Va., of wounds 
received at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 18G4. 

Andrew J. Sawer, August 19, 1863; sub- 
stitute: killed at Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 
1865. 

William Slocum, August 19, 1863; drafted; 
died at Washington, D. C, December 19, 1864; 
buried in National Cemetery. Arlington. Va. 

Samuel Starr, August 26. 1862; killed at 
Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Willis Taylor, March 8, 1865 ; mustered out 
with company June 24. 1865. 

Thomas Tcmpleton, February 25, 1865; 
deserted June 14. 1865. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



107 



Martin Van Buren, March lO, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Amos Wall, March i, 1865; mustered out 
with coinpany June 24, 1865. 

Jos. G. WilHams, August 26, 1862 ; wounded 
at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Henry Wynn, Jr., September 15, 1863; 
drafted ; wounded at Spottsylvania Court 
House, May 16, 1864; mustered out with com- 
pany June 24, 1865. 

Ira C. Wood, August 19, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Wm. S. Ward, August 16, 1863; draft- 
ed ; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Alex. J. Wolford, September 23, 1863; sub- 
stitute; wounded at Weldon Railroad, Va., 
September 20, 1864. 

Francis Ward. September 14, 1863; substi- 
tute; missing in action at Wilderness, Va., May 
5, 1864. 

John Waterson, August 26, 1862; missing 
in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

James A. Wilson, August 26, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 12, 
1862. 

John Wimer, August 26, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate March 12, 1863. 

John Wolf, September 19, 1865; substi- 
tute; captured at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864; discharged by general order June 12, 
1865. 

John Whitfield, August 26, 1862; drafted; 
discharged September 7, 1863. 

Joseph Whitman, August 26, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps; discharged 
by general order November 18, 1865. 

Jacob Zerr, September 23, 1863; drafted; 
aDsent in hospital at muster out. 



Company E. 

Captains: — Zara C. McCullough, August 30, 
1862; discharged on surgeon's certificate De- 
cember 12, 1863. 

Amos Row, August 30, 1862; promoted 
from first lieutenant January 30, 1864; 
wounded at Hatcher's Run, Va., February 6, 
1865 ; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

First Lieutenant : — Thomas Liddell, August 
23, 1862; promoted from first sergeant to sec- 
ond lieutenant February 3, 1864; to first lieu- 
tenant April 22, 1864; wounded at Wilderness, 
Va., May 5, 1864; mustered out with company 
June 24, 1865. 

Second Lieutenants: — Meredith L. Jones, 
August 30, 1862; commissioned first lieuten- 
ant December 11, 1863; not mustered; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate March 18. 
1864. 

Robert A. Mitchell, August 23. 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; and 
at Petersburg. Va., June 18, 1864; promoted 
from sergeant to first sergeant February 
3, 1864; to second lieutenant April 22, 
1864; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

First Sergeant: — James W. Irwin, August 
23, 1862; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa.. July i, 
1863; and at Wilderness, Va., May 5. 1864; 
promoted from sergeant April 26, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Sergeants: — Wesley H. Shirey, August 29, 
1862 ; promoted to corporal November i, 1862 ; 
to sergeant May i, 1865; mustered out with 
company June 24, 1865. 

Hiram H. Hawk, August 26, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal January i. 1863; to sergeant 
January i, 1864; wounded at Petersburg, Va., 



108 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



May 8, 1864; mustered out witli company 
June 24, 1865. 

Abednego Crane, August 23, 1862; pro- 
moted to corporal September i, 1863; to ser- 
geant April 26, 1864: wounded at Laurel Hill, 
Va., May 8, 1864; mustered out with company 
June 24. 1865. 

Milton S. Lawhead, August 23, 1862: pro- 
moted to corporal September i, 1863: to ser- 
geant September 26, 1864; mustered out with 
company June 24, 1865. 

Cornelius Owens, August 23, 1862; wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa., July i. 1863; promoted to 
second lieutenant 41st Regiment U. S. C. T. 
September 26, 1864; discharged September 30, 
1865. 

William L. Antes, August 23, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps 
March 15, 1864. 

George W. Miller, August 23, 1862: pro- 
moted from corporal April 26, 1864: killed 
at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

Corporals: — Michael B. Cramer, August 23, 
1862: wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 
1863; promoted to corporal November i, 
1863; captured at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864; died at Florence, S. C, or Salisbury, 
N. C, January 10, 1865. 

George W. Luzere, August 29, 1862 
promoted to corporal November i, 1863 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865 
John M. McCumber, August 23, 1862 
promoted to corporal January i, 1864 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865 
John W. Dehess, August 23. 1862 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864 
promoted to corporal April 26, 1864; dis- 
charged by general order July 6, 1865. 
William F. Krise, August 23, 1862; pro- 



moted to corporal April 26, 1864; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

William L. Taylor, August 23, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863, 
and at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; pro- 
moted to corporal April 26, 1864; mustered 
out W'ith company June 24, 1865. 

Jason Kirk, Jr., August 23, 1862; dis- 
charged by general order May 13, 1865. 

John H. Mason, August 23, 1862; dis- 
charged January 28, 1864, for wounds re- 
ceived at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

William Pierce, August 24, 1862; dis- 
charged January 7, 1864, for wounds re- 
ceived at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Stephen Brundage, August 29, 1862; 
promoted to corporal ; died at Washington, 
D. C, October 30, 1862. 

James A. Birchfield, August 23, 1862; 
promoted to corporal ; died at Clearfield, 
Pa., August 18, 1863. 

Abram B. Davis, August 23, 1862; died at 
Washington, D. C, September 29, 1862. 

Benj. B. McPherson, August 2^, 1862; 
promoted to corporal ; killed at Gettysburg, 
Pa., July I, 1863. 

Musicians: — James H. West, August 23, 
1862; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Hiram G. Blair, August 29. 1862; 
mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Privates: — Henry C. Alleman, September 
19, 1863; drafted: wounded at Wilderness, 
Va., May 5, 1864; mustered out with com- 
pany June 24, 1865. 

John Allen, September 14, 1863; drafted; 
discharged by special order December 18, 
1863. 

Joshua Armstrong, August 23, 1862; dis- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



109 



charged on surgeon's certificate December 
5, 1S63. 

John W. Alworth, August 29, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate December 
10, 1863. 

George W. Ardry, August 23, 1862; died 
at Bealton Station, Va., September 9, 1863. 

Robert J. Alexander, September 22, 
1863; drafted; died at Alexandria, Va., 
December 20, 1863; burial record, Decem- 
ber 22, 1863; grave 1219. 

John R. Ball, August 23, 1862; wounded 
at Vv'^ilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Daniel Baker, August 27, 1863; drafted; 
discharged by general order June 2. 1865. 

John A. Bobst, August 15, 1863; drafted; 
wounded at Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Frederick Beesecker, August 27, 1863; 
drafted; mustered out with company June 
24, 1865. 

George Baight, August 24, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Thomas Boyden, August 15, 1863; 
drafted; mustered out with company June 
24, 1865. 

David Bowman, October 14, 1863 ; 
drafted ; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 
5, 1864, and at Hatcher's Run, February 6, 
1865 ; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

James Baine, August 15, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 

1865. 

John F. Bowman, October 14, 1863; 
drafted: wounded at Laurel Hill, Va., May 
8, 1864; transferred to V. R. C. ; discharged 
by general order July 31, 1865. 

James S. Bradley, August 23, 1862 ; dis- 



charged on surgeon's certificate March 25, 
1863. 

James H. Bush, August 25, 1862 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864 
and at Hatcher's Run, February 6, 1865 
discharged by general order May 17, 1865 

Perry A. Bush, August 14, 1863; drafted 
captured at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864 
discharged by general order June 12, 1865 

Michael Baine, September 12, 1863 
drafted; discharged by special order Sep- 
tember 13, 1864. 

David B. Bernard, August 23, 1862; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps 
March 30, 1864; discharged August 23, 
1865 — expiration of term. 

James R. Brewer, August 25, 1863; 
drafted; died at Alexandria, Va., June 6th, 
of wounds received at Laurel Hill, May 8, 
1864. 

George W. Bowman, October 14, 1863; 
drafted; died at Andersonville, Ga., Oc- 
tober i8th of wounds received at Wilder- 
ness, May 5, 1864; grave 11087. 

Calvin Bowman, October 14, 1863 ; 
drafted; died at Washington, D. C, May 
18, 1864; buried in National Cemetery, 
Arlington, Va. 

'William Carr, August 23, 1862; missing 
in action at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. 

Jos. P. Catherman, August 23, 1862; 
mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Benj. F. Carr, August 23, 1862; captured 
at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864; died at 
Annapolis, Md., March 11, 1865. 

Joseph M. Cook. August 15, 1863; 
drafted ; mustered out with company June 
24, 1865. 

Francis Culloton, August 15, 1863; 



110 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



drafted ; mustered out witli company June 
24, 1865. 

Justice Carey, September 11. 1863; 
drafted; wounded at \\'ilderness, Va., May 
5, 1864; discharged by general order June 
24, 1865. 

Joiin M. Caldwell, August 23. 1862: dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate November 
26, 1862. 

Peter Curley, August 23, 1862; wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; transferred 
to Veteran Reserve Corps December 15, 
1863. 

David Cramer, August 23, 1862; 
wounded at Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864; 
died at Washington, D. C, June 3rd — 
burial record June 6th — of wounds received 
at Spottsylvania C. H., Va.. May 12, 1864; 
buried in Cypress Hill Cemetery, L. L 

John L. Cavender, September 15, 1863; 
drafted ; captured at Wilderness, Va., May 
5th : died at Andersonvillc, Ga., September 
14, 1864; grave 8700. 

Patrick Culloton, August 29, 1862; de- 
serted January 29, 1863. 

Valentine Dice, February 26, 1864; 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864: 
absent at muster out. 

David Dulberger, August 15, 1863; 
drafted: mustered out with company June 
24, 1865. 

Edwin R. Dailey, August 29, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April i, 
1863". 

Jas. H. Dauglierty, August 29, 1862: dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April i, 
1863'. 

Wm. Davis, August 15, 1863; drafted; 
died at Washington, D. C, January 2, 1864. 

John Darcy, August 29, 1862; died at 
Belle Plaine, Va., March 11. 1863. 



Tobias Edward, August 15, 1863; 
drafted; captured at Weldon Railroad, Va., 
August 21, 1864; discharged by general 
order June 12, 1865. 

John Funk, August 15, 1862: drafted; 
wounded at Petersburg, Pa., June 18, 1864; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

James M. Fo.k, August 2;^, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate March 21, 
1864. 

Frank Freel, August 23. 1862; wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps February 
15. 1864. 

Charles Fry, August 15, 1862; drafted; 
died December 27, 1863 — burial record 
December 28th — at Alexandria, Va. ; grave 
1236. 

James W. Goss, August 23, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; 
absent in hospital at muster out. 

Edward Goss, August 23, 1862; wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Charles H. Garrison, August 29, 1862; 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Frederick Gamp, October 16, 1863; 
drafted : discharged by general order, June, 
1865. 

Samuel C. Gephart, August 24, 1863; 
drafted; wounded at Laurel Hill, Va., May 
8, 1864; mustered out with company Jime 
24, 1865. 

Jas. W. Guthery, September 22, 1863; 
drafted; mustered out with company June 
24, 1865. 

Augustus Grey, Februarj^ 7, 1865: dis- 
charged by general order June 2, 1865. 

Wm. Grey, February 24, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



111 



Henry P. Hummel, August 29, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Wm. Gready, August 29, 1863; deserted 
January 29, 1863. 

Nathan Haring, August 29, 1863: miss- 
ing in action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 
1863. 

Andrew Hamaker, August 14, 1863; 
drafted; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 
5, 1864; mustered out with company June 
24, 1865. 

Wm. Hoover, August 23, 1862 ; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate March 20, 

1863. 

Michael Hinkle, August 15, 1863; 
drafted; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 
5, 1864; discharged by general order May 
17, 1865. 

Elias Heddings, October 15, 1863; 
drafted; died at Washington, D. C, May 
19th of wounds received at Spottsylvania 
C. H., Va., May 12, 1864: buried in National 
Cemetery, Arlington. 

Martin Hashuishall, August 17, 1863; 
drafted; wounded and captured at Wilder- 
ness, Va., May 5, 1864: died at Anderson- 
ville, Ga., September 27, 1864; grave 9843. 

Wm. H. Ike, August 25, 1862; captured 
at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; died at 
Wilmington, N. C, March 26, 1865; buried 
in National Cemetery; grave 1002. 

John C. Johnson, August 2^, 1862; ab- 
sent in hospital at muster out. 

James T. Jones, August 23, 1862; died at 
Washington, D. C, November 20, 1862. 

Oliver H. P. Krise, August 23, 1862; 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Daniel S. Kephart, August 23, 1862; 



missing in action at Gettysburg, Pa., July 

I, 1863. 

John Kivlan, August 29, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate December 28, 1862. 

Andrew Krise, August 22,, 1862; de- 
serted; dishonorably discharged June 18, 
1864. 

Christian Lanich, August 23, 1862; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

James Lucas, z\ugust 29, 1862; wounded 
and missing in action at Gettysburg, Pa., 
July I, 1863. 

Joseph Linard, August 17, 1863; drafted: 
wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Chas. Larimer, August 23, 1863; wounded 
at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863; discharged 
by general order June 12, 1865. 

Harvey Lloyd, August 23, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps December 15, 
1861. 

William Mays, August 30, 1862; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

John Miller, September 14, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

David S. Maxwell, August 17, 1863; 
drafted ; mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

James D. Maffit, August 23, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate January 12, 
1863. 

Alonzo J. W. Merrell, August 23, 1862; 
discharged on surgeon's certificate February 

II, 1863. 

Thomas E. Miller, August 23, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate April i, 
1863. 

William L. Mackey, August 23, 1862; died 
at Washington, D. C, January 12, 1863; 
buried in Military Asylum Cemetery. 



11: 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



William H. Miller, August 25, 1862; de- 
serted February 16, 1863. 

George McCanns, August 17, 1863; drafted: 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

James D. McMuIIin, February 7, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Patrick McCail, August 29, 1862; deserted 
Januar>- 29, 1863. 

Levi F. Noss, August 14, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

John H. Ogden. August 23, 1862; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

William H. Phillips, August 23, 1862; miss- 
ing in action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 
1863. 

Henry W. Peters, August 23, 1862; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Benjamin F. Peterson, August 27, 1862; 
drafted: mustered out with company June 24, 
1865. 

Peter Pfeffer, August 23, 1862; discharged 
on surgeon's certificate April i, 1863. 

James Rinehart, August 23, 1862 ; wounded 
at Gettysburg. Pa., July i, 1863; absent, sick, 
at muster out. 

Henry Rose, August 14, 1863; drafted; dis- 
charged by special order June 29, 1865. 

Lazarus A. Riggle, August 15. 1863; 
drafted; wounded at Wilderness, Va., May 5, 
1864; mustered out with company June 14, 
1865. 

Cortes Reams, August 23, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Resen-e Corps December 15, 
1863. 

William S. Renshaw, October 16, 1863; 
drafted: captured at Weldon Railroad. Va., 
August 21, 1864; died at Salisbury, N. C, De- 
cember 26, 1864. 

J. C. W. Reynolds, August 2;^, .1862; de- 
serted November 26, 1862. 



Elias Schoepp, August 23, 1862; mustered 
out with company June 24, 1865. 

Henry B. Snyder, September 14, 1863; 
drafted ; missing in action at Wilderness, Va., 
May 5. 1864. 

Henr)' A. Snyder, August 14, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

James Steele, August 28, 1863; drafted; 
mustered out with company June 24, 1865. 

James C. Sutton, February 7, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

Oliver Smith, August 29, 1862; died at 
Washington, D. C, June 18, 1863; buried in 
Military Asylum Cemetery. 

Henry Shaffer, August 13, 1863; drafted; 
died at Warrentown Junction, Va., November 
9. 1863. 

William F. Snyder, September 14, 1863; 
drafted; died at Warrentown Junction, Va., 
November 12, 1863. 

William O. Snyder, August 27, 1863; 
drafted; died at Paoli Mills, Va., December 
18, 1863; buried in National Cemetery, Cul- 
peper C. H., block i, section A, row 9, grave 
302. 

Samuel Smith, August 23. 1862; deserted 
February 3, 1863. 

Levi L. Tate, August 23. 1862; absent on 
detached ser\-ice at muster out. 

John Tilus, August 29, 1862; killed at Wil- 
deniess, Va., May 5, 1864. 

Edward Tinsdale, October 6, 1863; drafted; 
captured May 21, 1864; died at Andersonville, 
Ga., July 28, 1864, grave 4160. 

Joseph R. Weasner, August 23, 1862 ; mus- 
tered out with company June 24, 1865. 

John Woleslagle. August 29, 1862; dis- 
charged on surgeon's certificate October 2, 
1864. 
Chester O. Wells, August 23, 1862; dis- 





H. S. KNAKR STORK 




H. S. KXAKK HAKX 




^.■Z3S#ft 



> 

to 



c 

o 

> 




AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



113 



charged on surgeon's certificate January 30, 
1863. 

Phil. M., Woleslagle, August 29, 1862; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps Decem- 
ber I, 1863. 

Edward Williamson, October 16, 1863; 
drafted ; wounded and captured at North Anna 
River, Va., May 23, 1864; died at Richmond 
June 6, 1864. 

Samuel Yocum, August 14, 1863; drafted; 
wounded at V^ilderness, Va., May 5, 59th 
Regiment, 2d Cavalry, 1864; mustered out 
with company June 24, 1865. 

Company F. 
Recruited in Clearfield and Centre Counties. 

Captains: — P. Benner Wilson, August 18, 
1861 ; promoted to major October 28, 1862. 

W. W. Anderson, September 14, 1861 ; 
promoted from ist lieutenant, company E, 
to captain, February 2, 1863; to major i8ist 
Regiment P. V., February 18, 1864. 

Clement R. See, November 10, 1861 ; 
promoted from 2d to ist lieutenant Oc- 
tober 2, 1862; to captain April 23, 1864; 
wounded at St. Mary's Church, Va., June 
24, 1864; discharged September 6, 1864. 

William H. Sheller, October 10, 1861 ; 
promoted from ist sergeant to 2d lieuten- 
ant May 2, 1864; to captain December 25, 
1864: transferred to company F, ist Cav- 
alry, June 17, 1865; veteran. 

IN OTHER COMMANDS 

From the upper part of the county a con- 
tingent of some fifteen men were enlisted, 
which formed a part of Company H, of the 
Sixty-Fourth Regiment — the Fourth Cav- 
alry. They were enlisted mainly in Burn- 
side and the surrounding townships, but the 



military record gives this county no credit 
for any part of that or any other company 
of the Sixty-Fourth. The regiment entered 
the service in October, 1861, and was 
mustered out in July, 1865. 

Clearfield county was also represented in 
Battery A, First Regiment of artillery — 
Campbell's Battery, the Forty-Third in the 
line. The contingent was small, compris- 
ing less than ten recruits. 

INDEPENDENT BATTALION. 

Mustered in July 3-28, 1863 — Discharged 
August 8, 1863. 
Field and Stafif. 

Lieutenant Colonel: — John M'Keage. 

Major: — Richard J. Crozier. 

Adjutant: — Edmund Bedell. 

Quartermaster: — John H. Keatley. 

Surgeon : — John Feay. 

Assistant Surgeon : — Joseph F. Wilson. 

Sergeant Major: — Thomas J. Moore. 

Quartermaster Sergeant: — H. Lloyd 
Irvine. 

Commissary Sergeant: — Orlando L. 
Swope. 

Hospital Steward : — Jacob L. Brallier. 

Company C. 

Captain: — Henry B. Swoope. 

First Lieutenant: — Richard S. Carr. 

Second Lieutenant : — Thomas C. Geary. 

First Sergeant — Charles Hemphill. 

Sergeants : — George Newson, Isaiah 
Hancock, Allen M. Hunter, George A. 
Boal. 

Corporals : — John Hoover. Scott Flegal, 
Alexander Speadey. Isaiah Warrick, Aaron 
Cramer, William A. Derb}', Jordan Fox, 
William Lawhead. 



114 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Musicians: — James McCullough, Matth- 
ias Shea. 

Privates: — Samuel Ardy, Edward Bow- 
ers, Jacob L. Brallier (pr. to Hos. Stew, 
July II, 1863), John Carnes. Edward 
Carter, Frederick Cardon. John Carter. 
Samuel Caldwell, Hiram Caldwell, William 
Carnes, John L. Conklin. James L. Davis, 
Sidney W". Fo.x, Newton Fulton, Peter 
Feaster, William Fauver, Martin L. Gulick, 
Samuel Gillong, Samuel Gill, Samuel 
Huston, John A. Hoffman, William L. Ir- 
vin. John Jordan, Harry L. Kessler, Albert 



Logan, James Lyman, Samuel S. Moore, 
Robert Michaels, Daniel M'Mullin, Samuel 
M'Cleary, John M'Intyre, Frederick S. Nev- 
ling, Greenbury B. Nevling, Westley Nev- 
ling, Isaac Norris, Milton A. J. Ogden, 
Robert S. Ross, George B. Reninger, Ira 
Shaffer, James W. Stewart, Edward L. 
Stoughton, David L. Siby. Joseph Shirk, 
Joseph H. Smith, John L. Shaffner, Henry 
C. Shaffner, Hardman H. Stephens, James 
Sybert, George Shimmel, Andrew Snyder, 
Harvey Smith, Robert Tozer, Ernest Wil- 
son, Samuel Watson, William Wollislagle. 



CHAPTER IX 

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 

History of the Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, zvith Roster and Individual 

Records. 



FIFTH REGIMENT PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER 
INFANTRY. 

Pursuant to General Orders No. 7, A. 
G. O., dated April 25, 1898, the Fifth Regi- 
ment Infantry, N. G. P., on April 27, 1898, 



marched three miles and went into camp 
along Alexander Bridge road. The regi- 
ment was assigned to the First Brigade, 
Third Division, First Army Corps. On 
June 20th, Majors John P. Kennedy and 
Robert C. McNamara were detailed to re- 
left their respective home stations, and pro- cruit the companies of their respective bat- 
ceeded by rail to Mt. Gretna, Pa., where talions to one hundred and six men, the full 
they arrived early on the morning of April complement being readily secured and all 
28th, being the first infantry organization 
in the division to reach the point of mobil- 
ization. The total strength of the regiment 
when it reported for duty was 37 officers 
and 483 enlisted men, a total of 520 men. 

On May 11, 1898, the regiment was 
mustered into service of the United States 
by Major W. A. Thompson, U. S. Army, 
and comprised thirty-seven officers and six 
hundred and four enlisted men. Pursuant 
to telegraphic orders from the War Depart- 
ment, the regiment broke camp at Mt. 
Gretna on the morning of May 17, 1898, 
and at 12:30 P. M. started by rail for Chick- 
amauga, Georgia. The regiment arrived at 
Battlefield Station, Chickamauga Park, 
Georgia, on the afternoon of May 19th, at 
5 P. M., bivouacked for the night on Snod- 
grass Hill, and on the morning of May 20th 

115 



the recruits having reported by July 4, 1898. 
Orders were received on June 29, 1898, 
to recruit a third battalion of four compan- 
ies of one hundred and six men each. The 
work of recruiting and mustering the addi- 
tional battalion was placed in charge of 
Captain Hugh S. Taylor, Company B. 
Within three weeks all the companies had 
been mustered in, and had reported for duty 
at Camp George H. Thomas. Company I 
was recruited at Somerset ; Company K, at 
Wellsboro; Company L, at Clearfield, and 
Company M, at Gettysburg. Lieutenant 
Colonel Rufus C. Elder was placed in com- 
mand of the First Battalion; Major John P. 
Kennedy, formerly of the First Battalion, 
was assigned to the command of the Second 
Battalion, and Major Robert C. McNam- 
ara, formerly of the Second Battalion, to 



116 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



command of the Tliird. August 12. 1898, 
the regiment moved about one-half mile 
nearer Battlefield Station, and encamped 
along the Brotherton road. Here there was 
good drainage and higher ground. On tlie 
afternoon of the 22d, the regiment left Ross- 
ville and traveled by rail to Camp Hamil- 
ton, near Lexington, Ky., a distance of t;\vo 
hundred and fifty miles, the first battalion 
reaching its destination on the 23d of Au- 
gust, and the other battalion on the 24th. 
The camp at Lexington was all that could 
be desired for health or beautiful surround- 
ings. 

On September 17, 1898, the regiment was 
granted a thirty days' furlough and each 
company was directed to proceed to its 
home station. The headquarters of the 
regiment were established at Altoona. Pa. 
After the expiration of the furlough, ten 
days were given for muster out, and this 
time was afterwards increased an additional 
twenty days to give the regiment an oppor- 
tunity to participate in the Peace Jubilee at 
Philadelphia, on October 27, 1898. The 
regiment was finally mustered out, Novem- 
ber 7, 1898. 

ROSTER. 

Abernathy, Frederick C, Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Charleston, Pa., Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

.■\bernathy, Joseph W., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Mardin, Pa., Enrd. July 12, 1898: M. I. July 
14, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 23, 1898. G. O. 
8 c. s. Regt.; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Adams, Reuben A., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnston, Pa. (N. G. P.); enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May ir, 1898; Prom. Corp. Sept. 
10. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



Adams, Zenas B., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville. Pa, (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov 7, 
1898. 

Agan, Thomas, I'riv. Co. L; Res. Philips- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Agey, Frank S., Priv. Co. F; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. ; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. L June 22, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ahlbom, George C, Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Aikens, Howard W., Sgt. Co. G; Res. Lew- 
istown. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Akins, Oliver C, Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Albert, Leon H., Priv. Co. E; Res. Wood- 
land, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Alexander, James W., Sgt. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Allen, Jonn T., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Allen, William H., Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Amberson, William S., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Waynesboro, Pa; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Anderson. Blake W., Priv. Co. C; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg. Pa.: Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. L 
June 21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



117 



Anderson, Charles E., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. ; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; died from wounds self-inflicted Aug. 
20, 1898. 

Anderson, Samuel, Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Anderson, Telford M., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Andrews, Samuel A., Corp. Co. C; Res. 
Duncansville, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Apker, Alba M., Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Archey, John O., Priv. Co. G; Res. Belle- 
ville, Pa. ; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 29, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ardary, Charles B., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. I. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Ardary, Oscar B., Priv. Co. L; Res. Cur- 
wensville. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Armour, Frank, Priv. Co. D; Res. West 
Fairfield, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898: M. I. May 
II, 1898: Prom. Corp. June 28, 1898; Prom. 
Sgt. July 31, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Armstrong, James E., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Arnold Ellsworth J., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lew- 
istown, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ashcom, Dick, Priv. Co. F; Res. Ligonier, 



Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ault, John S., Priv. Co. A; Res. Corn- 
propst Mills, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. 
June 27,, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ault, William C, Priv. Co. K; Res. Lib- 
erty, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Aurand, Clyde, Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Aurand, James F., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 2j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ayers, Frank S, Priv. Co. I; Res. Mc- 
Alevy's Fort, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ayers, Harry E., Priv. Co. C; Res. Olivia, 
Pa.: Enrd. April 28, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ayers, Hays S., Priv. Co. I; Res. Listie, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ayers, Walter H., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Rochester Mills, Pa. (M. G. P.); Enrd. 
April 27, 1898; M. L May 11, 1898; Prom. 
Corp. June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Bailey, Arthur L., ist Sgt. Co. K; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Apptd. ist Sgt. July 23, 1898, 
per G. O. 8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7. 1898. 

Bailey, Joseph O. W., Priv. Co. K. ; Res. 
Mansfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 12. 1898; ^I. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bailey, Ralph J., Priv. Co. K; Res. Mans- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 



118 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



14, 1898; Prom. Sgt. July 22,, 1898, G. O. 
8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Baker, James R., Priv. Co. D ; Res. Black- 
lick, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Apptd. Artf. June 3, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Baker, Merrill, Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Baldridge, Joseph G., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Greenshurg, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Baldwin, Charles VV., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Somerset, Pa.; Enrd. July 8, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bane, John A., Priv. Co. I; Res. Meyers- 
dale, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Banker, William L., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Tioga, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bannon, George C, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bare, John S., Capt. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Barger, Orval E., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Reedsville, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Barnes, William F., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. 
June 30, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Barnett, Edmond B., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Somerset, Pa.; Enrd. July 7, 1898; M.I. 
July 8, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Barnett, George W., Priv. Co. F; Res. 



Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 

May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Barnhart, Charles \\., Priv. Co. M; Res. 

York, Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. 1. July 

20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Barr, David S., ist Lieut. Co. C; Res. 

Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. 1. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Barr, James C, Corp. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Barratt, Fred F., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 3, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; Apptd. Wag. June 27, 1898; Transfd. 
to 3d Div. Amb. Corps, per S. O. 29, ist A. 
C. Hdq., dated July 19, 1898. 

Barrett, Harry M., Priv. Co. F ; Res. Loop, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 2t,. 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bartley, James P., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 

21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Barto, Benjamin R., Priv. Co. D; Res. 

Blairsville, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Bathurst, Charles W., Q. M. ; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 5, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Bathurst, Samuel P., Priv. Co. B; Res. Ro- 
land, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bathurst, Zebulum. Priv. Co. L; Res. Ches- 
ter Hill, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. as cook, Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Baunier. William [.. Priv. Co. H; Res. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



119 



Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bayard, Roger T., Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Beachtel, Wilham L., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Wentz, Md.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Beard, Charles C, Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Beaver, Charles J., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lew- 
istown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
ir, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Beitler, Frank A., Priv. Co. M; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bell, Jesse S., Priv. Co. F; Res. Marion Cen- 
tre, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bellinger, Floyd, Priv. Co. K; Res. Charles- 
ton, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Benford, Bernard H., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Somerset, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Benford, Harr>' C, Priv. Co. I; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bennett, Marion A., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Seven Stars, Pa.; Enrd. July 19, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Benson, Edward, Priv. Co. L; Res. Cur- 
wensville, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Best, Irvin W., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 



M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Biesecker, Charles, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bird, Cyrus M., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Meyers- 
dale, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bittner, Edward A., Priv. Co. I; Res. Gar- 
rett, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bixby, Walter S., Priv. Co. K; Res. Mid- 
dlebury, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Black, Victor H., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Blake, George, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Boynton, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 189S; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Blake, Roland G., Priv. Co. C; Res. Mar- 
tinsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Blakeley, Joseph A., Corp. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; died at Sternberg Hosp. 
Camp Thomas, Ga., Aug. 25, 1898. 

Bliss, WiUard D. ; Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bloom, Thomas M., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Curwensville, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. 
I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Bloom, Zane C, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 
21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Blough, Nathaniel, Sgt. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 



120 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; M. 1. .May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Boger, Allen E., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Hays 
Mills, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bookhamer, David G., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bookhamer, Isaac L., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
2'j, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bottorf, Charles W. ; Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; died Sept. 13, 1898. 

Bowen, Charles R., Corp. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bowen, John R., Priv. Co. K ; Res. Wells- 
boro. Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bower, H. Harris. Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Lewisburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Sgt. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Bowman, Albert J., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
2'J. 1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Bowman, Oscar F., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. Sept. 
10, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Boyer. Emanuel D., Corp. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 
27. 1898: M. I. May 11. 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bradley. William S., Priv. Co. B: Res. 
Axeman, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 189S. 



Brady, Charles A., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Chambersville, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; 
M. I. June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Brady, Myrl \V., Priv. Co. F; Res. Cov- 
ode, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brallier, John K., Priv. Co. D; Res. Indi- 
ana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brant, Henry C, Priv. Co. M; Res. York, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20. 
1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brant, Thomas C, Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; .M. 
I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Brechbiei, George A., Mus. Co. D; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brecher, Henry, Jr., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Marshfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brehman, Frank, Corp. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Q. M. Sgt. Aug. 
31, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brenneman, John R., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bridge, Edward G.. Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Britten, William H., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Osceola Mills, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; 
M. I. July 14. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Brosius, Raymond S., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



121 



June 27, 1898; Transfd. to 3d Div. Hosp. 
corps, July 20, 1898. 

Brosius, Roy B., Priv. Co. E ; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-j, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Brown, Burt A., Priv. Co. F; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. ; Enrd. June 22, 1898: M. I. June 22, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brown, Charles A., Priv. Co. K; Res. Olms- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. July 12. 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brown, Henry E., Priv. Co. C; Res. Dun- 
cansville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brown, James, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clearfield, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brown, John, Priv. Co. B; Res. Milesburg, 
Pa. ; Encd. June 2-j. 1898; M. I. June 27, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brown, John, Priv. Co. K; Res. Wellsboro, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brown, Robert D., Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg. Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Brown, Robert K., Priv. Co. E; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Buchanan, Joseph B., Priv. Co. F; Res. Ho- 
mer City, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2T, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bunn, Herbert H., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27. 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Bunnell. John M.. Priv. Co. L; Res. Gram- 



pian, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Burchfield, Herbert E., Q. M. Sgt. ; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom, to 2d Lient. Co. 
K, Aug. 14, 189S; Comsd. Aug. 10, 1898; M. 
1. Aug. 14, 1898; joined for duty same day; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Burchfield, Theodore, Col. ; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Burk, Calvin, Priv. Co. I; Res. Queen, Pa.; 
Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Burk, John W.. Artf. Co. H; Res. Cone- 
maugh, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Burnhimer, Andrew H., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Tanoma, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; ^I. I. 
June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bush, Benjamin W., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
WilHamsport, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; 
M. I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Artf., 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Bushman, Samuel M., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Buskey, John E., Priv. Co. I; Res. Mey- 
ersdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Butler, Joseph H., Sgt. Maj.; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May n. 1898; Dischd. Aug. 12, 1898, 
per S. 0.186 A. G. O. 

Butt, Harry J., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Gettys- 
burg, Pa. ; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Burford, Joseph, Priv. Co. F; Res. Indi- 



122 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



ana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Byeriy, Paul R., Priv. Co. E; Res. Millers- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. May 2, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; Prom. Corp. June 2-j, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Byers, Harry, ist Sgt. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-j, 1898; 
M. I. May i, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Cadwalader, George W., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cairns, James, Priv. Co. K. ; Res. Bloss- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Caldwell, David, Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Caldwell, David M., Battn. Adj.; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898; M. O. witli Regt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Calhoun, Austin J., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Mifflintown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Callahan, Harry E., Priv. Co. K; Res. 

• Slate Run, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 

July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Calvin, Samuel, Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. 
June 21. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cameron, Thomas B., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Bolivar, Pa.; Enrd. June 25, 1898; M. I. 
June 25, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cameron, William H., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield. Pa.; Enrd. July 14. 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Campbell, Daniel, Priv. Co. K; Res. 



Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Campbell, David M., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
BJairville, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. 
June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Campbell, Edward S., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Campbell, George W'., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blacklick, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May il, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Campbell, Lee, Priv. Co. F; Res. Roches- 
ter Mills, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Canedy, Albert, Priv. Co. K; Res. Tioga, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carey, Thomas D., Priv. Co. I; Res. Sli- 
go. Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898: Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carey, William J., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 189S; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carlson, Gust., Priv. Co. K; Res. Knapp, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carly, W. J., Priv. Co. L ; Res. Chester 
Hill, Pa.: Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carmon, Oliver, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carothers, Joseph A., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. 
16, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carpenter, George B., Q. M. Sgt. Co. H; 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



123 



Res. Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carson, Charles, Priv. Co. G; Res. Reeds- 
ville, Pa. ; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 29, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Carson, Oscar W., Priv. Co. M; Res. Ben- 
dersville. Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cartwright, Orville B., Mus. Co. R; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cass, Edwin A., Priv. Co. K; Res. Farm- 
ington Centre, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cass, Eugene L., Priv. Co. K; Res. Farm- 
ington Centre, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. 
I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cassidy, David, Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cathcart, James A., Corp. Co. F; Res. 
Chambersville, Pa (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 

27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Catlin, Edson J., 2d Lt. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro. Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; Comsd. 1st Lieut. Aug. 10, 1898; M. I. 
I St Lieut. Aug. 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Chambers, Archibald C, Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Houtzdale, Pa.; Enrd. 'July 14, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Chambers, John, Jr., Priv. Co. E; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. L June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Charles, Harry, Priv. Co. B; Res. Miles- 
burg, Pa.: Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. L June 

28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



Chase, John \V., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Chase, Thomas M., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Chase, William C, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Chorpenning, Roy A., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Christner, Francis, Priv. Co. I; Res. Gar- 
rett, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Christy, James H., Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Clark, Benjamin F., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Mansfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Clark, C. B., Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. L July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. as Sgt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Clark, Frank E., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. L June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Clark, Frank S., Sgt. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Clarke, Harry L., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Clary, Harry B., Priv. Co. L; Res. Gram- 
pian, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. L July 14, 



124 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; Prom. Corp. Sept. i. 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Clawson. Ellis R.. Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Branch, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Clawson, Harry S., Priv. Co. F ; Res. 
Smathers, Pa. (x\. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Clayson, Berton, Priv. Co. K; Res. Slate 
Run, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Cleaver, Albert \V., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. 
L July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

dinger, John W., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Cochrane, Charles F., Priv. Co. I; Res. Elk- 
Pa.; Enrd. July 8, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
U. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cochrane. Charles P., Priv. Co. I; Res Elk- 
Lick. Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. L July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cole, Frank W., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. L June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cole, Thomas H., Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.: Enrd. July 14. 1898; M. I. July 
14. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Coleman, Paul, Priv. Co. F; Res. Clarks- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. June 
22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Coleman. William E.. Private Co. F; Res. 
Indiana. Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 
1898; M. I. May 11. 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7. 1898. 

Coleman. William S., Priv. Co. F; Res. 



Clarksburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. 
June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Collar, Jacob, Priv. Co. L; Res. Munson, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Colony, George H., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Mansfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Confer, Miles, Priv. Co. E; Res. Woodland. 
Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Conklin, Roscoe, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field. Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Conklin, William G., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 
II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Conlan, Frank, Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa. ; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Conley, James T., Priv. Co. I; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 6. 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Connolly, Francis P., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
York, Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 
20. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Conrad, George S.. Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Conrad, Winfield F., Priv. Co. A; Res. Or- 
bisonia. Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cooney, Henry B., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town. Pa.; Enrd. May 9. 1898; M. L May 11. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Coonsie, Reuben H.. Priv. Co. E; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cope, John B., Priv. Co. M; Res. Gettys- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



125 



burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Copenhaver, Courtland G., Priv. Co. E; 
Res. Ramey, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Corbin, George B., Corp. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Corbin, Frank M., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cornelius, Leslie A., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. 1. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Corwell, James A., Priv. Co. M; Res. Fair- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 16, 1898; M. I. July 20. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Coulter, Charles A., Priv. Co. A ; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Coulter, Thomas J., Priv. Co. A: Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Countryman, George F., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Lavansville, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cover, William T., Priv. Co. C; Res. Ah 
toona. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898 

Cowen, George, Priv. Co. L; Res. Philips- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cox, Clyde R., Priv. Co. B; Res. Roland. 
Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Grain, John H., Priv. Co. B; Res. Port Ma- 
tilda, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 



M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Cramer, Louis L., Priv. Co. F; Res. Creek- 
side, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Crawford, John E., Priv. Co. L; Res. Osce- 
ola Mills, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cree, Nathan A., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
2^. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cresswell, George E., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 11, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Crissman, George H., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Cronmiller, John H., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Curwensville, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Crossley, Charles R., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Mansfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 23, 1898; 
G. O. 8 c.s. Regt.; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Crotty, Walter J., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Crum, Ira A., Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. ; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cullison, Asa C, Priv. Co. M; Res. Gettys- 
burg, Pa. ; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cummings, Oscar F., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



126 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cummins, Robert D., Priv. Co. I; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. L July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Cunninghani. Harry C, Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Currens, John E., Priv. Co. M. ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. L July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 189S. 

Curry, Jesse S., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville. Pa. (N. G. P) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; ^l. O. with Co. Nov 7, 
1898. 

Curtin, J. Latimer, Priv. Co. B; Res. Ro- 
land, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Custer, Irvin B., Priv. Co. H; Res. Vinco, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. L June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dale, David, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Lemont, 
Pa.; Enrd. April 29. 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Daley, R. Clarence, Priv. Co. R; Res. Rom- 
ola, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27. 1898; M. 
L May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 30, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dally, William P.. Priv. Co. M; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. L July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Daly, Sheridan J.. Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; Prom. Q. M. Sgt. Sept i, 1898; G. O. 
31 Regt. Hdq.; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Darby, Arthur, Mus. Co. D; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Daugherty, David N., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 



diana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Davis, Edward, Priv. Co. B; Res. Philips- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Davis, Ivan, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk Lick, Pa. ; 
Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Davis, James F., Priv. Co. I; Res. Listie, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. L July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Davis, Oscar ]\I., Priv. Co. H; Res. Cone- 
maugh. Pa; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. June 
28. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Davis, Perry, Priv. Co. I; Res. Listonburg, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 7, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Davis, Thomas H., Priv. Co. I; Res. Liston- 
burg, Pa.: Enrd. July 7, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Deane, Alan B., Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Deats, George \\'., Priv. Co. K; Res. Kee- 
neyville. Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Decker, James E., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 1898: M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

DeForrest, Jesse F., Priv. Co. .'\; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. .April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

De Hass, Charles J.. Priv. Co. E; Res. Kerr- 
moor. Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 
21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1S98. 

De Hass, David W., Priv. Co. E ; Res. Kerr- 
moor. Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 
21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



127 



De Huff, Edward F., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 2^, 1898; M. I. 
June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Deitz, George K., Priv. Co. I; Res. Listie, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1S98. 

Delozier, Frederick, Priv. Co. C ; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; Apptd. Ms. Sept. I, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Delozier, Joseph, Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Denning, Oden R., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

De Turk, Benjamin H., Mus. Co. A; Res. 
Ahoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Detwiler, Calvin, Priv. Co. C ; Res. Yellow 
Springs, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; ^L I. May 
II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dibble, Amos W., Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro. Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dibble, John C, Priv. Co. K; Res. Draper, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1S98; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dibble, William G., Priv. Co. K; Res. Olms- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898: M. I. July 14, 
1898; died at Sternberg Hosp., Chicamauga, 
Ga., Aug. 31, 1898. 

Diehl, James F., Priv. Co. M; Res. Gettys- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
189S; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dipple, Charles P., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lew- 
istown. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 



II, 1898; detached Aug. 12, S. O. 2 2, as 
mounted orderly for the Comdg. officer; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ditzer, Joseph. Priv. Co. C ; Res. Hollidays- 
burg. Pa.; Enrd. .\pril 28, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Di.xon, Edward E., Priv. Co. D; Res. Black- 
lick. Pa; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 24, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dodson, Lewis M., Priv. Co. M; Res. York, 
Pa. ; Enrd. July 19, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
Prom. Corp. Sept. i, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Doty, James H., Priv. Co. E; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Doud, Claud R., Priv. Co. K; Res. Bloss- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Douds, Robert S., Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dougherty, John F., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dougherty, Thomas M., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Houtzdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Downs. Milton H., Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Dressier, Herbert A., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Reedsville, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dunkle, John C, ist Lieut. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7. 1898. 

Dunlap, Edwin D., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



128 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898: M. I. May u, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dunn, Milton, Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dunn, Samuel F., Priv. Co. K; Res. Well.s- 
boro, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dupont, Frederick O., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Rockwood, Pa.; Enrd. July 8, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dvvyer, Frank, Priv. Co. E; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Dye, Robert, Priv. Co. I; Res. Somerset, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Earhart, Harry \V., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May u, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Eberhart, George A., Corp. Co. D; Res. 
Belief onte, Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 
1898; M. I. May n, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Eboch. Edward T., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Eboch, Theodore H., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Philipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Ebright, Josiah M., Mus. Co. H : Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Eck. Emanuel E., 2d Lieut. Co. A ; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. as 2d Lieut. 
Co. A, 5th P. V. I., July 14, 1898; to accept 
Apptmt. as 1st Lieut.: M. I. as ist Lieut. 



Co. I, 5th P. \'. I., July 15, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Eckley, Don Pedro, Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Wailaceton, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Eddington, Alex., Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Edwards, Paul J., Sgt. Co. K; Res. West- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 11. 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; Apptd. Sgt. July 23, 1898; G. O. 8, 
c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Eichinger, Harper, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Elder, Rufus C, Lieut. Col. ; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Eline, John A., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Y'ork. 
Pa. ; Enrd. July 19, 1898 ; M. I. July 20, 1898 ; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Eikin, William F., 2d Lieut. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Elkin, William F., Jr., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Jeannette, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Ellis, Frank S., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (X. G. P.) : Enrd. April 2j, 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7. 1898. 

Ellis, \\illiam A.. Priv. Co. G; Res. Mif- 
flintown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Ellis, William V.. Sgt. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May II. 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



129 



Eminhizer, Abraham H., Priv. Co. B; 
Res. Bellefonte, Pa. (X. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Apptd. Wag. 
May 2^, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Endres, William, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Engelbach, George K., Corp. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Engle, Calvin U., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Engle, Irwin J., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

English, Roscoe H., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Apptd. Corp. July 23, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

English, Thomas W., Corp. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May i, 1898; Prom. Sgt. Sept. 
10, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ennish, Henry N., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Yeagertown, Pa.; Enrd. June 29. 1898; M. 
I. June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Enos, Wilson G., Priv. Co. I; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; died at Mercy Hosp. Pittsburg, Pa., 
Sept. 18, 1898. 

Erb, Andrew B., Corp. Co. D ; Res. Blairs- 
viile, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Erb, John E., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Philips- 



burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ergler, Joseph F., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ertel, William G., Priv. Co. B ; Res. How- 
ard, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898 

Estricher, Charles C, Priv. Co. E; Res. 
New Washington, Pa. ; Enrd. June 21, 1898; 
M. I. June 21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Everhart, Daniel \\ ., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
York, Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Everitt, Charles F., Corp. Co. K; Res. 
Westfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; Apptd. Corp. July 23, 1898; 
G .0. 8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Ewing, Charles, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Everett, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
transfd. as Corp. to 3d Div. Hosp. Corps 
July 20, 1898. per S. O. 29. 

Fagan, Hubert E., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. ; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fails, Harvey, Priv. Co. D; Res. Black- 
lick, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Fair, Ira H., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 
don, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fair, John S., Adj. ; Res. Altoona, Pa. (N. 
G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. May 5, 
1898: M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fair, Philip W., Priv. Co. C : Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



130 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Farley, John T., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Faust, Edward H., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Houtzdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fauver, James F., Priv. Co. E ; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Fee, Harry W., Sgt. Co. F; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. as Corp. April 2-j, 
1898; M. I. as Sgt. May II, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Feidt, G. A., Priv. Co. E; Res, Indiana, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 21, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Feigler, Franklin D., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Winterstown, Pa.; Enrd. July 10, 1898; M. 
I. July 20, 1898; iM. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Feit, George J., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Sgt. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Felding, William H., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Lindenhall, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 2-j. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fennell, William H., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Saltsburg. Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fenstermacher, William L., Priv. Co. M; 
Res. Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; 
M. I. July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Ferell, Charles, Priv. Co. I; Res. Addison, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5. 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Fickes, George, Priv. Co. M ; Res. York, 
Pa. ; Enrd. July 19, 1898 ^M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



Field, Harry B., Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; Apptd. Q. M. Sgt. July 23, 1898; 
G. O. c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Filler, Harry K., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Rains- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Finn, Daniel J., Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April zj, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fisher, Arthur P., Priv. Co. A ; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fisher, Harry W., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. 

I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Fisher, Oliver S., Priv. Co. D ; Res. Blairs- 
ville, Pa. ; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 24, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fissel, Frank, Priv. Co. C; Res. Duncans- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Fister, Harry A., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9. 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fite, Charles J., Priv. Co. H ; Res. Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. ; Enrd. April 29, 1898; M. I. May 

II, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fix. David D., Sgt. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Dischd. Aug. 10, 1898; 
par. 16 S. O. 187 A. G. O. 

Fleck, Cecil W., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



131 



Fleitz, Joseph P., Priv. Co. K; Res. Hills 
Creek, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fleming, Giles, Priv. Co. K; Res. Tioga, 
Pa. : Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fleming, James A., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Crete, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Flinn, Frank, Priv. Co. H : Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Flynn, Michael, Priv. Co. D ; Res. Coke- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. June 25, 1898; M. I. June 
25, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fogle, Warren E., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Ber- 
lin, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. " 

Folk, Elmer E., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk Lick, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 7, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fonner, Joseph, Priv. Co. C ; Res. Wil- 
liamsburg, Pa.; Enrd. "May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Force, Fred, Priv. Co. L. ; Res. Curwens- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; reduced from rank of Corp. at his own 
request Aug. i, 1908; detailed as Mus. Sept. 
I, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ford, Henry H., Priv. Co. D ; Res. West 
Fairfield, Pa; Enrd. June 24. 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; Apptd. Co. cook July 31, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Forquer, James, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Ursina, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Forsha, Addison, Sgt. Co. D; Res. 
Knights, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fort, Clarence W., Priv. Co. L; Res. Cur. 
wensville. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fosselman, John J., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Donnelly Mills, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Foster, John V., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Foster, Richard, Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. ; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

France, Edgar W., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Knights, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Francis, Bert., Priv. Co. K; Res. Delmar, 
Pa. ; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Frank, Frederick, Priv. Co. B ; Res. Penn 
Hall, Pa. ; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Frankhouser, Harry A., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. ; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. L 
June 29. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Frankhouser, Ralph, Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Curwensville, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. 
I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Franks, John L., Priv. Co. B; Res. Miles- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Franson, Gust W., Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa. ; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Frazier, Harry D., Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



132 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Freeman, Ralph, I'riv. Co. L; Res. Gram- 
pian, Pa. ; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

French, David B., Priv. Co. K; Res. Farm- 
ington, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fritz, Jacob L., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville. Pa.: Enrd. June 24, 1898; AI. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Frybarger, Andrew, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Apptd. Wag. July i, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Fulton, J. D., Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; Ai. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Gallagher, Ira H., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Trent, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
deserted Aug. 12, 1898; at Chickamauga 
Park, Georgia. 

Gambell, Ralph E., ist Lieut. Co. K; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Comsd. Capt. Aug. 10, 1898; 
M. I. as Capt. Aug. 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gamble, Gibson, Priv. Co. K; Res. Cedar 
Run, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gantz, Samuel S., Priv. Co. E; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. ; Enrd. May 9, 1898 ; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Garbrick, Philip F., ist Sgt. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gardner, Benjamin K., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gardner, Harry A., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 2"^, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Garis, Charles, Sgt. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; died at Div. Hosp. Aug. 
28, 1898. 

Garland, George W., Priv. Co. C ; Res. 
Duncansville, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. 
I. May II, 1898 ; iM. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Garland, William L., Mus. Co. C; Res. 
Philadelphia, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; as Mus. in Co. E; Tranfd. to Co. C 
May 7, 1898; M. I. Co. C, May 11, 1898; 
Prom, to Prin. Mus. Sept. i, 1898, per Regtl. 
G. O. 29; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Garman, Daniel E., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Garman, Thomas W., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Scalp Level, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Garner, Jacob E. T., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7. 1898. 

Garrett, Oliver P., Corp. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gasteiger, Justus A., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Somerset, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gasteiger, Louis D., Priv. Co. I ; Res. 
Somerset, Pa. ; Enrd. July 5, 1898 ; M. I. July 
8. 1898; Prom. Sgt. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gaulin, Peter J. S., Priv. Co. E; Res. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



133 



Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 
II, 1898; Prom. Sgt. June 27, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1S9S. 

Gearhart, Ralph, Priv. Co. L; Res. Blue 
Ball, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Geesey, Charles H., Jr., Priv. Co. D; Ries. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Transfd. to 3d Div. Amb. 
Corps 1st Corps June 27, 1898. 

Geiselman, John W., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Fairplay, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Geissinger, Andrew B., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. 
June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Geissinger, Michael L., Priv. Co. A ; Res. 
Mill Creek, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

George, David H. ; Priv. Co. F. ; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

George, France M., Priv. Co. D ; Res. 
Knights, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 2-j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

George, Herbert C, Priv. Co. D : Res. 
Knights, Po. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

George, James H., Corp. Co. D : Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898: Prom. Sgt. June 
3, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov 7, 1898. 

Gephart, Adam, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. : Enrd. May 9, 1898 ; M. I. May 11, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gerhard, Calvin S., Priv. Co. D; Res. 



Blacklick, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 31, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gettig, Samuel D., Sgt. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Getty, Clarence H., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 2-]. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ghuer, John E., Priv. Co. E; Res. Benore, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gibboney, James, Priv. Co. G ; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gibbons, Walker G., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 
21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gilbert. Frederick J., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; yi. I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gillaspie, John A., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gillin, James, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Vinco, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 27, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gladhill, James L., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Fairfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Glazier, Herbert S., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Enrd. June 23. 1898; M. 

I. June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Glazier, John H., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon. Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 

II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



134 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Glessner, Charles W., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
York, Pa.; Enrd. July 19. 1898; M. L July 
20, 189S; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Glover, Samuel P., Asst. Surg. ; Res. Ai- 
toona, Pa.: Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Godard, Edgar E., Priv. Co. A ; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. 
I. June 2;^, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Goddard, John S., Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 2j, 1898; M. L June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Godel, Peter, Priv. Co. L; Res. Gearhart- 
bille. Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. L July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gohn, Philip S., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gender, George A., Priv. Co. H. ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Good, Irvin H., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Trent, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5. 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Goodman. Harry J., ist Segt. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898: Dischd. July 14, 
1898, to accept appointment as 2d Lieut, of 
same Co.; Apptd. 2d Lieut July 15. 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Goodman, Wesley L., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. L 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Goodwin, Temple E., Priv. Co. K; 
Charleston, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gorman, John W., Priv. Co. F; Res. Hor- 
ton, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 



M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Goshorn, Ulysses S.. Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M, L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Goss, Herbert N., Priv. Co. G; Res. Cross 
Grove, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Goss. James H., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898 

Grahbe. William A., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Graham, H. C, Priv. Co. L. ; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 14. 7898; M. L July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Graham, Lloyd, Priv. Co. L; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Graham, Samuel M., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. April 28, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 26. 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Gratz, Simon, Priv. Co. G; Res. Orbi- 
sonia. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Gray, Victor. Q. M. Sgt. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. L July 
14, 1898; Reduced to ranks at his own re- 
quest August 31, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Graybill, John H., Priv. Co. M ; Res. East 
York. Pa.; Enrd. July 20. 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Grazier, Durbin H., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Fishertown. Pa.; Enrd. May 9. 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Green, Vern S., Priv. Co. K; Res. Brown- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



135 



lee, Pa.; Enrd. July ii, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Greene, William A., Priv. Co. C ; Res. Tip- 
ton, Pa. ; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Greenwood, Charles T., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Scottdale, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Grenoble, Cline J., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Pleasant Gap, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Grew, Adam, Priv. Co. I; Res. Summit 
Mills, Pa.; Enrd. July 7, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Griesemer, Jack M., Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa. ; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898: M. O. with Co. as ist Sgt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Griesemer, John E., Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 9, 
1898. 

Griest, Harry R., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Flem- 
ing, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898: 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 30, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Griffith, Charles K., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Scottdale, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. 
June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Griffith, William C, Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Transfd. to 3d Div. Amb. 
Corps July 2, 1898, per S. O. 10. 

Groff, John, Priv. Co. I; Res. Berlin, Pa.; 
Enrd. July 5, 1898 ; M. I. July 8, 1898 ; Prom. 
Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Groom, Henrv, Priv. Co. G; Res. Ralston 



Spa., N. Y.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Grove, Albert, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 
don, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Growden, Thomas J., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Cumberland Valley, Pa. ; Enrd. May 2, 1898 ; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Gushard, William I., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Patterson, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Haddie, Edgar M., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hagarman, Basil E., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Centennial, Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hainsey, Harry, Sgt. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898 ; Dischd. July 7, 1898, per 
S. O. 155 A. G. O. 

Halferty, Clarence A., Priv. Co. D ; Res. 
New Florence, Pa.; Enrd. June 25, 1898; 
M. I. June 25, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Halferty, Harry M., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
New Florence, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; 
M. I. June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hall, Silas J., Priv. Co. A ; Res. Mill Creek, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 25, 1898; M. I. June 25, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hamilton, Joseph, Priv. Co. C; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg. Pa; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
IMay II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hammaker, Samuel H., Priv. Co. C; Res. 



136 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hamnie, Charles L., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Hanover, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hammer, George H., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Conner, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2^, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hammers, James S., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hammond, Fred., Priv. Co. K; Res. Elk- 
land, Pa. : Enrd. July 1 1, 1898: ^L I, July 14, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hampton, Harry E., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Curwensville, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. 
I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hanawalt, Reuben E., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hancock, Edward, Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa. ; Enrd. July 13, 1898: M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hanley, William E.. Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Duncansville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
2T, 1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hannel, Blair, Priv. Co. C: Res. Duncans- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. May 10. 1898; M. I. May 11. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hanson, C. E., Priv. Co. L; Res. James- 
town, N. Y. : Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Harder, John E., Capt. Co. L; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hakcom. Harry, Priv. Co. D; Res Blairs- 
ville. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 



M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Harmon, Zenas E., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Harper, Horace M., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Fleming, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Harrier, Orin, Priv. Co. E; Res. Shiloh, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Harris, Alexander S., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov .7, 1898. 

Harris, John V., Priv. Co. G ; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M, I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Harrison, William N., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898: M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Harshbarger, James, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Newton Hamilton, Pa. ; Enrd. May 10, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hartman, George P., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
DuBois, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hartman, Joseph F., Chaplain; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.( N. G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Resigned July 25. 1898. 

Hartzell, Charles Z., Priv. Co. C. ; Res. 
Newport, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Harwick, Edgar G., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



137 



Harvey, Charles D., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Covington, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 189S: AI. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Harvey, John S., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898: ]M. I. 'Sla.y 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898 

Hatfield, William H., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Pittsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hathaway, George M., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hauck, E. K., Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14. 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hauser, Harry, Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1S98; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hawn. Robert M., Corp. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27. 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898; Prom. Sgt. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hay, George B.. Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hayes, Robert G., Asst. Surg. ; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-. 1898; 
M. I. May 5, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hazel, D. Oliver, Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa. (N. G. P).; Enrd. April 27. 1898: 
M. I. May 11, 189S; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hazel, John M., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Axeman, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hazlett, Ernest M., Priv. Co. K; Res. Nel- 
son, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; died Aug 30, 1898, at 3d Div. Hosp., 
Chickamauga, Ga. 



Hazlett, Roy S., Priv. Co. F; Res. Kent, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 23, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Heath, Joseph H., Priv. Co. I; Res. Lull, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Heaton, Harry A., Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Heichel, Jack A., Priv. Co. K; Res. Blanch- 
ard, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; I\L O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Heiges, Colvin, Priv. Co. M; Res. Frank- 
lintown, Pa.; Enrd. July 19, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Heller, George J., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hemphill, Charies P., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hemphill, Samuel J., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom, to Corp. 
July 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Henderson, Alexander, Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Bolivar, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Henderson, Clark C, Priv. Co. D; Res. Bol- 
ivar, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L May 11. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Henderson, Ross, Priv. Co. D; Res. Boli- 
var, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hengst, Allison, Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom, to Corp. 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



138 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTV 



Herald, William B., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Coneniaugh, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Herb, George C, Priv. Co. I; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Herbst, Harry H., Priv. Co. M; Res. North 
Hopeville, Pa.; Enrd. July 19, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hering, George A., Priv. Co. D; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hershey, Harry B., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898: M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Heslop, Wesley J., Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hess, Harry H.. Priv. Co. L; Res. Houtz- 
dale. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14. 
1898; M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hess, William M., Priv. Co. B; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. April 28, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hickok, Ross., ist Lieut. Co. M; Res. Har- 
risburg. Pa.; Enrd. Aug. 8, 1898; M. L Aug. 
8, 1898; Enlisted as Priv. in Baty. A, Pa. 
Arty., at Camp Hastings, May 5, 1898; 
Dischd. at Newport News, Va., July 28, 1898, 
to accept commission; Apptd. ist Lieut. Co. M 
July 28, 1898; M. I. as ist Lieut. Camp 
Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Ga., Aug. 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hicks, Howard, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hill. Charles, Priv. Co. M; Res. York, Pa.; 
Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20. 1898; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 



Hill, Don J., Q. M. Sgt. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May u, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hill, Edgar W., Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
28, 1868; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hill, John M., Priv. Co. G; Res. Northum- 
berland, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hill, Joseph, Priv. Co. D; Res. Cokeville, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hill, Joseph A., Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg. Pa.: Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hills, Frank D., Priv. Co. K; Res. Farm- 
ington, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. L May 
II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hobbs, James F., Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Hoblitzell. Frank W.. Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Meyersdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; Apptd. 2d Lieut. July 14, 1898; 
Comsd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 15, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898, as 2d Lieut. 

Hoecht, James C, Priv. Co. M; Res. Frank- 
lintown. Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 
20. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hoff, R. C, Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, Pa.; 
Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. L June 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Hoffman, Burkett W., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hoffman, David H., Priv. Co. G; Res. Levv- 
istown. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 



AXD REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



139 



M. I. May ii, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hoffman, Fred \\'., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 2-j, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Hoffman, James, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hoffman, William H., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewiston, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 30, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hollen, Ira A., Priv. Co. C; Res. Juniata, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 20. 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hollopetor, Cyrel B.. Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Rockton, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Homan, George W.. Priv. Co. H; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg, Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; AI. I. 
May II, 1898; died June 27, 1898, at 3d Div. 
Hosp. of typhoid fever. 

Homan, William L., Priv. Co. M; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 16, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; Apptd. Cook July 22, 1898; M. 6. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hoover, Charles S., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Cross Fork, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hoover, Edwin B., Priv. Co. K; Res Olean, 
N. Y.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hoover, George P., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Fleming, Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hoover, Hayes, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Spring- 
ho'pe. Pa.; Enrd. June 2j, 1898; \l. I. June 
2-j, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



toona. Pa.; Enrd, June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hornick, Leander G., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 2-j, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hospelhorn, James L., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Fairplay, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hosteller, Braden F.. Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Trent, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Householder, Eugene B., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Hopewell, Pa.; Enrd. June 23. 1898; M. I. 
June 21. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Householder, Robert E., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Ligonier. Pa.; Enrd. :\Iay 9, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Howard, Dwight L., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Bendersville, Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hoy. Harry M., Priv. Co. B; Res. Milheim, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Huey, Charles E., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Huey, Frank E, Priv. Co. B ; Res. Fillmore, 
Pa.: Enrd. June 2j, 1898; M. I. June 2-j, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hugg. Toner A., Priv. Co. B; Res. Miles- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hughes, Samuel H., ist Lieut. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N. G. P) ; Enrd. April 2-j, 1898; 
ISI. I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Hulslander, Frederick L., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Slate Run. Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. 



Hopkins, ]\Iiles C, Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- July 14, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



140 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Hurst, William P., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898: M. I. July 8, 
1898; Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 189S. 

Huston, .Augustus E., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Black Lick, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. L 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Huston, George T., ist Lieut. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-/, 
1898; M. L May 11. 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Huston, Joseph N., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. L 
June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Hutchison, Chester F., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 2, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Inscho, Frederick E., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Westfield, Pa.; Enrd. July "13, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898: :M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Irvin. John E., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 
don, Pa.; Enrd. ]\Iay 7, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; ^l. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Irwin, Elbridge B., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. :\Iay II. 1898; il. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Irwin. George C, Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. (. . G. P.): Enrd. April 2"/, 
1898; ^I. I. May II. 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Iseman, John \V., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville, Pa (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. :May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Isenberg, Edmund R.. Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May n, 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Isenberg, James H, Priv. Co. A; Res. Himt- 



ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Isett, James H, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 
don, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898: :\L O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Isett, Samuel E., Priv. Co. C; Res. Wil- 
liamsburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1908; M. I. 
June 21, 1898; M. O. with Co. No. 7, 1898. 

Ivison, John J., Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jack, James P., Priv. Co. F; Res. Kent, Pa.; 
Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 23, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. No. 7, 1898. 

Jackson, Chauncey T., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N.G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Jackson, George L., ist Lieut. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jackson, Harry A., Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
21. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jacobs. Edward W., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Cleai-field, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jacoby, Emory A., Priv. Co. M; Res. Cen- 
tennial, Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898: M. I. July 
20. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Jamison, William F., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9. 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jenkins. J. Arthur. Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg. Pa.: Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. T. June 
24. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



141 



Jenkins, Richard, Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. June 25, 1898; M. I. June 25, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jobe, Marion E., Priv. Co. M; Res. York- 
Springs, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; Sgt. 
Sept. I, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Johnson, Albert S., Mus. Co. F; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Johnson, Charles, Priv. Co. L; Res. Win- 
burne. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Johnson, John E., Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Johnson, Joseph M., Mus. Co. G; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Johnson, Swan, Priv. Co. L; Res. W'in- 
burne, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Johnston, Harry L., O. M. Sgt. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. May 10, 
1898; M. I. May 11. 1898; Prom. Sgt. Maj. 
Aug. 13, 1898 by Regtl. G. O. 19 (on F. & S. 
Roll enrolled April 27, 1898) ; M. O. with 
Regt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Johnston, John P., Priv. Co. B; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Johnston, William W., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Pittsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jones. Charles S., Corp. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 1898: 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 



Jones, Edwin T., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jones, George H., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Johnstonbaugh, John L., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
State College. Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Apptd. Mus. Aug. 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Jordan, ^^'iIliam. Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Judy, George C, Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kalbach, W. D., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Kamerly, James C, Priv. Co. C ; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May II. 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kann, Charles R., Priv. Co. I; Res. Berlin, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kantner, Asberry, Priv. Co. C : Res. Dun- 
cansville, Pa. (N. G. P.). Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kappes, Frederick \\'., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kase, Charles H., Priv. Co. B : Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898: 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Tranfd. to 3d Div. ist 
A. C. Hosp. June 9, 1S98. 

KaufTman, James S.. Sgt. Co. F: Res. 
Homer City, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27. 



142 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; iM. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kautz, William H., Priv. Co. I; Res. Jen- 
ners, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Keeney, Clarence A., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Hammond, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 2t„ 1898, 
G. O. 8 C. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Keesey, Adam, Priv. Co. M ; Res. York, 
Pa. ; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Keime, Urban, Priv. Co. M ; Res. Gettys- 
burg, Pa. ; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Keith, John deK., Priv. Co. H ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. April 29, 1898; AI. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Keller, John O., Corp. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. wnth Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Keller, William W., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Pine Grove Mills, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; 
M. I. June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Kellerman, Hickman J., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kelley, William P., ist Lieut. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kelly, Aaron B., Priv. Co. L; Res. Wig- 
ton, Pa. : Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898: M. O. wMth Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Kelly, Harry J., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 



ville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Kemery, Victor M., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Medi.x Run, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kempfer, John J., Priv. Co. F ; Res. Selins- 
grove, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; AL I. June 
22,, 1898; M. O. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kennedy, Jesse F., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kennedy. John P., Maj. ; Res. Blairsville, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kennedy, Rodney C, Priv. Co. K ; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12. 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kennedy, Thomas S.. Priv. Co. G ; Res. 
Lew-istown, Pa. ( ;N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. as 
Corp. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kennedy, William A., Priv. Co. .\ ; Res. 
Mill Creek, Pa.; Enrd. June 2^. 1898: M. I. 
June 22,, 1S98; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kephart, Charles B., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Tianeytown, ]\Id. ; Enrd. April 29, 189S: M. 
I. :\Iay II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Ke]iliart. John .\., Pri\-. Co. E ; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
U. I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Kerr, James B., Priv. Co. E; Res. New- 
tonburg. Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. 
June 21, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kerr, John M., Priv. Co. F; Res. Shelocta, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



143 



Kerr, Steele H., Priv. Co. F; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Kerrigan, William B., Priv. Co. I ; Res. 
Sand Patch, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kerstetter, Stover L., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
jMilheim, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Kiebler, Paul E., Priv. Co. D ; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. April 2-j, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kieferle, Harry C, Priv. Co. G; Res. Mt. 
Union, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; Vi. I. June 
29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kilbourne, Louis H., Sgt. Co. K ; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898: Prom. Sgt. July 23, 1898, G. 
O. 8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Killinger, Claude C, Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kime, George E., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa. ; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kine, Charles F., Priv. Co. I ; Res. King- 
wood, Pa. ; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898: Prom. Sgt. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

King, Curtis W., Priv. Co. M ; Res./ Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

King, Harry S., Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa. ; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kinley. William C, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Kinneman, Charles L., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 



Abbottstown, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. 
I. July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kipp, \\'illiam A., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Leechburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kirkwood, Robert C, Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. x\pril 2^, 
1S98; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kissinger, Ambrose L., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
York, Pa. ; Enrd. July 20, 1898 ; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Klinefelter, Daniel W.. Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Conemaugh, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Dischd. as Wag. 
Oct. 14, 1898, per telegram from W. Dept. 

Knepp, Cloyd B., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Knipple, Delinger C, Priv. Co. I ; Res. 
Queen, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Knisely, Calvin, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Alum 
Bank, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Koch, Daniel J., Priv. Co. B; Res. Fair 
brook. Pa.; Enrd. June 2-j. 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Koch, William J., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa. ; Enrd. July 15. 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kolher, Anthony M., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Koontz, Arthur B., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kooser, Ernest O., Capt. Co. I; Res. 



144 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Somerset, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; iM. O. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Krape, Frank 1*"., Priv. Co. E; Res. Spring 
Mills, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898: M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 
1898. 

Krebs, William M., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Shindle, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kreider, Oscar B., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898: M. L 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Mus. Xov. 
7, 1898. 

Kreiger, Harry C., Priv. Co. H. ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. 1. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kunkle, Charles L., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Creekside, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kunkle, Frank P., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Saltsburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Kurtz, Nathan E., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Kvarnstrom, Gust., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Slate Run, Pa.; Enrd. July 12. 1898: M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Lamb, Benjamin, Jr., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Gearhartsville. Pa.: Enrd. July 13. 1898: 
M. 1. July 14, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Lambing, Benjamin \V., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Nolo, Pa.; Enrd June 22, 1898: M. I. June 
22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Landerkin. Lewis E., Priv. Co. D ; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 3j. 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Xov. 7, 1898. 

Landis, Bert F., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Somer- 
set. Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1S98; M. L July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Landis, Norman B., Priv. Co. I ; Res. 
Meyersdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 8. 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Langham, Harl B., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1908. 

Langham, Robert M., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 
II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lardin, Lewis E., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown. Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Large. William W., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Livermore. Pa.; Enrd. June 24. 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; I\I. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lasher, Edward, Priv. Co. C ; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2y, 
1898: M. I. May 11. 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 189S. 

Lathers, Thomas P., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 
21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lathers, William J.. Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Gearhartsville, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; 
M. I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 
1898. 

Lawhead, Edward ;M., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Leechburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 25, 1898; M. I. 
June 25. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lawhead. Fred R.. Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield. Pa.: Enrd. July 14. 1898; M. I. 
July 14. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 189S. 

Lawrence, John I.. Priv. Co. M: Res. Mc- 
Sherrytown. Pa.; Enrd. July 15. 1898: M. I. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



145 



July 20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lay, William G., Priv. Co. K; Res. Sul- 
livan, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Leabhart, Archie E.. Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. 

I. June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Learner, William C, Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Leathers, George H., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Howard, Pa. ; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 

II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Lefever, Curtis A., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Lit- 

tlestown, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. L 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lefifard, William D., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.( N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
z-j, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Legore, Harry F., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Sil- 
ver Run, Md. ; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; Apptd. Wag. Aug. i, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Leighow, Oscar M., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Woodland, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Leipold, Frank D., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Transfd. to N. C. 
Staff June 21, 1898; as Prin. Mus. by G. O. 
7, Hdqt. 5th Regt. P. V. ; M. O. with Regt. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Letterman, Frank H., Sgt. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11. 1898; Prom, ist Sgt. 
July 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



10 



Lewis, Iddo M., Priv. Co. F; Res. Locust 
Lane, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Liddick, Thurston, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. 

I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Lightfoot, Charles C, Mus. Co. G; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lightner, Blake, Priv. Co. E; Res. Irvona, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Likens, Homer B., Priv. Co. A ; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 

II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Lindsay, Charles B., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Lindsey, Harry R., Priv. Co. L; Res. Trout- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Linton, Reuben M., Priv. Co. I; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; Prom. 1st Sgt. July 16, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lippart, Edward, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Lippart, Jacob, Priv. Co. E ; Res. Cleai-field, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Little, Edward S., Priv. Co. M; Res. York, 
Pa.: Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Little, Frank, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 



146 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



don, Pa (N. G. P.); Enrd. April -'7, 1898; 
M I. May n. 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M.'O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Litzinger, David \V., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Xov. 7, 1898. 

Livengood, Harry, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Livingston, Charles F., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (X. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Xov. 7, 1898. 

Lloyd, William, Priv. Co. L ; Res. Philips- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Logan, George, Priv. Co. E : Res. Clear- 
field. Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May n. 1898; Prom. Corp. June 2~, 
1898; M. b. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Logan, Ward, Q. M. Sgt. Co. E ; Res. Clear- 
field. Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1S98; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 
1898. 

Loin-, l-"rank C, Priv. Co. F; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Prom. Corp. .Aug. 30, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Long, Clyde Z., Priv. Co. B; Res. Howard, 
Pa. (X. G.'P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Long, Henry W., Priv. Co. I: Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898: M. I. July 8, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Long, William. Priv. Co. C; Res. Hollidays- 
burg. Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 
1898. 

Lose. John \A'., Corp. Co. B; Res. Belle- 



fonte. Pa. (X. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. O. M. Sgt. by 
Regtl. G. O. 4, May 11, 1898 ;ll. O. with Co. 
Xov. 7, 1898. 

Lott, Henry G., Priv. Co. M; Res. Gettys- 
burg. Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898: M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Lotz, Edward M., Priv. Co. C; Res. Dun- 
cansville, Pa.; Enrd. May 10. 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Louther, Valentine C, Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown. Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April zy, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Xov. 7, 1898. 

Low, Andrew L.. Priv. Co. M; Res. Fair- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 16. 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. " 

Loyd. Robert P., Priv. Co. E; Res. Philips- 
burg. Pa.; Enrd. May 7. 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Lucas. Benjamin W^, Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Howard, Pa. ; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lucas, D. Cameron, Priv. Co. L; Res. Wig- 
ton. Pa.; Enrd. July 14. 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. as Sgt. Xov. 7, 1898. 

Lucas, Samuel L.. Priv. Co. B; Res. Flem- 
ing, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898: :\I. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 
1898. 

Ludwig, Albert L., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Friendsville. Md. : Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. 
July 8. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lumadue, George M., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Woodland, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898: M. I. 
May II. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Luther, Edgar A., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898: Disclid. by S. O. from 
Sect. War Sept. 23. 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



147 



Luther, William J., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lutz, Simon M., Priv. Co. H; Res. Bed- 
ford, Pa.; Enrd. April 29, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; Tranfd. to Reserve Amb. Corps 
June 2y, 1898, per S. O. 5. 

Lynn, Nelson, Sgt. Co. C; Res. Hollidays- 
burg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Lyons, Robert B., Priv. Co. A; Res. Birm- 
ingham, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Lytel, Oram C, Priv. Co. F; Res. Glen 
Richey, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; Tranfd. to Reserve Amb. Corps July 
3, 1898; per S. O. 5. 

Maginnis, George M., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
DuBois, Pa.; Enrd. July 14. 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Mahaffey, James G., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mahaffey, James T., Priv. Co. E ; Res. Mc- 
Gees Mills, Pa.; Enrd. May 9. 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; died at St. Joseph Hosp., Lex- 
ington, Ky., Sept. 10, 1898. 

Mahaffey, Paul R., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mahan. William M., Capt. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April ij. 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Mallory, Thomas C, Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Malone, James, Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Marietta, George W., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Livemiore, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. 1. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Markle, George N., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Prom. Corp. Sept. i, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Markle, Lee, Priv. Co. E ; Res. DuBois, Pa. ; 
Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 21, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Markley, Milton C, Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Marsh, Benjamin O., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. June 
22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Marsh, James A., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Marshall, George M., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Marshall, John R., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. 1. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Martin, George A.. Priv. Co. M; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Martin. George W., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon. Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Martin, Harry, Priv. Co. C; Res. Duncans- 
ville. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 



148 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



M. I. May ii, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Martin, Howard W., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. 
June 2^, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Martin, John C, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon. Pa. (N. G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 1898: 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Martin, Lemon, Priv. Co. C; Res. Duncans- 
ville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Martz, Harry A., Priv. Co. C; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Martz, John D., Priv. Co. F; Res. Congru- 
ity, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mateer, Nelson, Priv. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. ( N. G. P. ) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May ii, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mathews, Bert L, Priv. Co. D; Res. Ligon- 
ier, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Matlack, Lewis H., 2d Lieut Co. L; Res. 
Philadelphia, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. in Co. F, 
1st Rcgt., as Corp., April 28, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; Apptd. 2d Lieut. Co. L, 5th Regt., 
July 20, 1898; M. I. July 31, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. L Nov. 7, 1898. 

Matthews, Charles, Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Matthews, Edward B.. Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mav, James E.. Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 



town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. .\pril 2j, 1898: 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

May, Leroy, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johnstown, 
Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 2j, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

May, Samuel M., Priv. Co. I; Res. Meyers- 
dale, Pa.: Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mays, Frank E., Priv. Co. E; Res. Osceola 
3klills, Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; Prom, to Artf. June 27, 1898; taken 
sick at his home in Osceola Mills, failed to re- 
port Oct., 1898; died Tuesday, Nov. 8, 1898. 

]\IcCafferty, Dorsey G., Sgt. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCall, Hugh C, Priv. Co. M; Res. York, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCall, Jacob A., Priv. Co. B; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCamant, Thomas M., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCann, James M., Priv. Co. L; Res. Os- 
ceola :\[ilis. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 
7. 1898. 

McCaulay. Harry, Priv. Co. G; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCausland, William H., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McClaran, Rome V., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Saltsburg, Pa.; Enrd. April 27. 1898; M. I. 
]\Iay II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



149 



McCIean, Robert B., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Q. M. Sgt. Aug. i. 1898; 
k. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McClellan, Burl, Priv. Co. E ; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McClellan, George B., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7. 1898. 

McClellan, Harley, Priv. Co. G; Res. Mif- 
flintown. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCloskey, George A., Mus. Co. F; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

McComish, Charles D., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

McComish, Ralph C, Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCoy, Robert AI., Priv. Co. F; Res. Cook- 
port, Pa.: Enrd. June 2, 1898; M. I. June 22, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCrady, Manuel, Priv. Co. F; Res. Glen 
Campbell, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May ti, 1898; Prom. Corp, June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCreary, George S., Sgt. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 189S. 

McCrossin, Edward G.. Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898;. M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 



McCrossin, James G., Priv. Co. E; Res. Os- 
ceola Mills, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. 
June 21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCullough, A., Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCullough, Charles H., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCullough, Frederick E., Priv. Co. K; 
Res. Farmington, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; 
M. I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

McCune, Edward N., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June oy, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McCune, Philip, Priv. Co. D; Res. Coke- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McDonnell, James W., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McElcarr, William G., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P) ; Enrd. April 2j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

McElrath, Charles F., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Beaver Springs, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. 
I.June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

McElwee, Wilson H., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

McEntire, Lindsey W., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Clarion, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Mus. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

McFadden, John, Priv. Co. C: Res. Holli- 
daysburg, Pa. (N. G. P).; Enrd. April ly. 



150 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Xov. 7, 1898. 

McFeaters, William, Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Black-lick, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

iMcGarey, John, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Xov. 7, 
1898. 

,McGhee, W. E., Pnv. Co. E; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McGunigal, Samuel A., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (X. G. P.): Enrd. April 2-], 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898: .M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

McHenry, David, Priv. Co. F ; Res. Indiana, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mcllhenny, James G., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Gettysburg. Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mcllroy, James T., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mclntyre, J. C, Priv. Co. L; Res. Wigont, 
Pa.: Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14. 
1898; M. O. with Co. as Artf. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mcjunkin, William P.. Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Ebenezer, Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. Mny II, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

McKee, Harry D., Priv. Co. C; Res. Roar- 
ing Spring, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. 
June 21. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McKee, W^illiam C, Sgt. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 28, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Dischd. July 31, 
1898, to accept commission as 2d Lieut.; 



Prom, to 2d Lieut. July 31, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

2ilcKovvn, George \V., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Tunkhannock, Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. 
I. July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McLain, James, Priv. Co. B; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; .M. O. with Co. i\ov. 7, 1898. 

McLaughlin, F'rank W., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Davis, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2^, 1898; 
AI. 1. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

McLaughlin, John A., Corp. Co. F ; Res. 
Davis, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 2-], 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McAIanaway, Harry F., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Penn Hall, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

McMichael, George W., Priv. Co. A; 
Res. Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898. 
M. I. June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, i8y8. 

McXaniara, Robert C, Maj.; Res. Bed- 
ford, Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

McPherran, Alton, Priv. Co. G; Res." 
Yeagertown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. 
I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Meese, William B., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Beilefonte, Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. L 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Meise, J. IL, Priv. Co. L; Res. Clearfield, 
Pa. ; Enrd. July 14, 1898 ; M. I. July 14, 1898 ; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Meller, Harry B., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 



AND REPRESENTATR^E CITIZENS 



151 



M. I. May ii, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mench, Homer F., Priv. Co. C ; Res. Wil- 
liamsburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mentzer, Edward B., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Hollidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Metzger, William C, Sgt. Co. K; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Prom. Sgt. July 2},, 1898, G. 
O. 8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Meyer, Louis, Priv. Co. L ; Res. Munson, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Meyer, William, Priv. Co. D ; Res. Coke- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miess, Andrew, Priv. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mignot, Fernando J., Priv. Co. L ; Res. 
Karthaus, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Mikesell, Ira B., Priv. Co. D; Res. Kent, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Prom. Corp June 3, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miksitz, Charles J., Priv. Co. E ; Res. 
Clearfield. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2~, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Brooks E., Corp. Co. D ; Res. 
Cokeville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Bruce D., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (,N. G. P.): Enrd. April 2-j, 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Charles, Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Charles E., Priv. Co. M; Res. Orr- 
tanna. Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Dorsey G., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Edward C, Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 

27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Transfd. to 
Sig. Corps, 1st A. C. June 15, 1898, by S. O. 
140 A. G. O. 

Miller, George H., Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, George P., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 30, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov 7, 1898. 

Miller, Harry L., Corp. Co. C; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Harvey E., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 

28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Miller, Hayes W.. Priv. Co. D; Res. 

Apollo, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Miller, Herman A., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, James B., Priv. Co. I; Res. Stan- 



15S 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



ton Mills, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, James B., Priv. Co. A; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. L June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, John V., Priv. Co. L; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. June 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Sgt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Miller, Lloyd S., Priv. Co. A; Res. Ty- 
rone, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Merton R., Priv. Co. K; Res. Lib- 
erty, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. L July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Samuel M., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June I-/, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Miller, Thomas B., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Kent. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; AL O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Milliron, Ezra L.. Priv. Co. I; Res. Elk 
Lick. Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. L July 8, 
1898; Prom. Sgt. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Minnigh, John H., Mus. Co. E; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Mitchell, Bruce P., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Ad- 
dison, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. L July 
8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mitchell, Edsell N., Priv. Co. K; Res. Holi- 
day, Pa.: Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. L July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mitchell, Harold B., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield. Pa.: Enrd. June 20, 1898: M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mitchell, John H., Priv. Co. G; Res. 



Lewistown, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. L 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mitchell, Merle, Priv. Co. K; Res. Holi- 
day, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Monney, Stephen H., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Smicksburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 2^, 1898; M. 
I. June 23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Monks, Edward K., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Keeneyville, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. 1. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Monroe, Robert J., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blacklick, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Moore, Logan R., Priv. Co. D ; Res. 
Saltsburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-j, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Moorhead, Alexander R., Corp. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Aloorhead, Hugh M., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 2-, 1898: 
M. I. May 11, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Morrison, James, Corp. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa.; (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Sgt. May 13, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Morrison, John, Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa.; (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Morrison, Samuel, Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa.; (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Apptd. Artf. May 27, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



153 



Moser, Howard, Priv. Co. ]\I ; Res. York, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mostyn, John E., Priv. Co. L; Res. Osce- 
ola Milis, Pa.: Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mountain, Joseph C, Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. 
I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Mountain, Thomas H., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mourhess, Bert L., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Mansfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 23, 1898, 
G. O. 8 c. s. Regt; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Mullen, Walter R., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

IMuller, Henry G., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Somerset, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May i-i, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mumper, John H., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Waynesboro. Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. 
I. July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Mundorf, Hugh, Priv. Co. D; Res. Coke- 
ville. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

]\Iurphy, Francis, Chap., Res. Pittsburg, 
Pa. : Enrd. Aug. 8, 1898; M. I. Aug. 8. 1898; 
Comsd. as Chap. Aug. i, 1898: M. O. with 
Regt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Murphy, John B., Priv. Co. H; Res. 



Johnstown, Pa. ; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Murray, Clinton G.. Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Snow Shoe Intersection, Pa. ; Enrd. June 28, 
1898; M. I. June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Murray, James M., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Murray, William C, Priv. Co. H ; Res. 
Washington, D. C. ; Enrd. May 9, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Musselman, Charles T., Priv. Co. H ; 
Res. Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May g, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Musselman, Clarence J., Priv. Co. ]\I ; 
Res. Fairfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. 
I. July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Musselman, George W., Priv. Co. M ; 
Res. Fairfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 15. 1898; M. 
I. July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Mutcher, John H., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Somerfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; ]\I. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Myers, Albertus L., Priv. Co. F; Res. Ho- 
mer City, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Myers, Charles E., Mus. Co. H; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Myers, Edward W. Priv. Co. K ; Res. How- 
ard, Pa.; Elnrd. July 12, 1898; M. I., July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Myers, Harr\- E., Corp. Co. C; Res HoUi- 



154 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTV 



daysburg, Pa. (X. G. P.); Kurd April 27, 
1898; M L May 11, 1898; Prom. Sgt. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Myers, John S., Priv. Co. G; Res. McVey- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Naugle, Ehner L., Priv. Co. I; Res. Buck- 
stone, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Neff, Charles P., Priv. Co. I; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; U. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Neff, Harry H., Priv. Co. B; Res. Howard. 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. .\pril 27, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Nesbit, Arthur L., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. L June 24, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Newell, Ernest M., Sgt. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. l. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Nicholson, Israel R., Priv. Co. 1; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.: Enrd. July 5. 1898: M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Nightsinger, George H., Corp. Co. G; Res. 
Lewiston, Pa. ( N. G. P. ) : Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Nixon, John, Priv. Co. G ; Res. Mifflintown, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Noel, William J.. Priv. Co. M; Res. Gettys- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. L July 
20, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Noland, Elmer, Mus. Co. A; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Noll, James O. Priv. Co. B; Res. Miles- 



burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Noll, John S., Priv. Co. C; Res. Duncans- 
ville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898: 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Northcraft, Edward, Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; ^L O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Numer, David E., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Numer, Jesse H., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Nupp. Irvin H., Priv. Co. F; Res. Purchase 
Line. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Nupp, Orren O., Priv. Co. F; Res. Pur- 
chase Line, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

O'Dell, Benton, Priv. Co. E; Res. Mahaffey, 
Pa. ; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. L June 21, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Odell, Lawrence E., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lew- 
istown. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Ogden, Jerrad M, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

O'Hara, Thomas, Priv Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town. Pa.: Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
29, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Olewine. George, Sgt. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



155 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Olmes, Edward, Mus. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Onkst, WilHam, Priv. Co. C; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 189S; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Orner, Harry, Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewiston, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Osborne, Ray, Priv. Co. K; Res. Draper, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Osman, Ottis, Priv. Co. B ; Res. State Col- 
lege, Pa. ; Enrd. June 27, 1898 ; M. I. June 27, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Osmer, Clarence H., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Belief onte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Oves, Henry B., Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Owens, Alfred, Priv Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Owens, Harry M., O. M. Sgt. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Oyer, Joseph E., Priv. Co. K; Res. Lamb's 
Creek, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Page, George \V., Priv. Co. H; Res. Min- 
eral Point, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Palmer, Alonzo C, Priv. Co. E; Res. Wood- 



land, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Palmer, Mack M., Priv. Co. F; Res. Black- 
lick, Pa.; Enrd. June 2;^, 1898; M. I. June 23, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Parker, Harry, Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Parks, Isaac N., Priv. Co. H; Res. Cone- 
maugh. Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Parks, John K., Priv. Co. F; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Parr, Charles E., Priv. Co. E; Res. Olive- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Parsons, Edgar S., Priv. Co. K; Res. West- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Parsons, James H., Priv. Co. B; Res. Flem- 
ing, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Patrick, William O., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Patterson, Harry C, Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Saltsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May. 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Patterson, Howard, Priv. Co. D; Res. New 
Alexander, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Paul, David, Priv. Co. L; Res. Philipsburg, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
killed en route to Philadelphia Peace Jubilee 
Oct. 25, 1898, on railroad at Tyrone, Pa. 

Paul, William J., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 



156 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



Tearce, Reese B., Corp. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Pennell, Clarence B., Priv. Co. G; Res. Pat- 
terson, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Peters, Earl J. Priv. Co. K; Res. Osceola, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. L July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Peters, Harr}' A., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Peters, Ranlvin D., Priv. Co. L; Res. Cur- 
wensville, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; Reduced from rank of Corp. at 
his own request Aug. i, 1898; Detailed as 
Mus. Sept. I, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Mus. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Petrikin, Malcolm, Priv. Co. A ; Res. Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 189S. 

Pfahler, Frederick P., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Meyersdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; Prom. Q. M. Sgt. July 16, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Pfahler, Herhert H., Priv. Co. I; Res. Mey- 
ersdale. Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. L July 8, 
1898; Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Pier, Clarence E.. Priv. Co. K; Res. Corn- 
ing, N. Y.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. L July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Pierce, John M.. Priv. Co. F: Res. Am- 
brose, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Pierce, Joseph A.. Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. June 24. 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1S98. 



Pitman, William G., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lew- 
istown, Pa.; Enrd. May 3, 1898; M. L May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Piatt, Morse, Priv. Co. I; Res. Meyersdale, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. L July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Platter, George W., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Gar- 
rett, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. L July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Pluebell, John A., Priv. Co. L; Res. Osce- 
ola Mills, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Poorman, Lemuel R., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 
1898; May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Port. Vance J., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 
don, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Porter. Charles C, Priv. Co. A; Res. Alex- 
andria, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Portser, William J.. Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Saksburg. Pa.; Enrd. ]\Iay 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Potter, Henry C, Chief Mus.; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11. 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Potter. Ivan C, Priv. Co. K; Res. Man.s- 
field. Pa.; Enrd. July 12. 1898; M. I. July 14. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Powers, David, Priv. Co. G; Res. Reeds- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 29, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Pressler. Harris H.. Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 
1898; M. I. May 11. 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7. 1898. 

Price, John \\'., I'riv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



157 



town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; ]\I. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Price, Walter, Priv. Co. G ; Res. Lewistown, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Printz, Albert E., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Prothero, Harold N., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May II, 1898: Tranfd. to Reser\'e Amb. 
Corps June 27, 1898, per S. O. 5. 

Prough, Frank, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 
don, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Pugh, Charles, Priv. Co. I; Res. Somerset, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8. 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Pugh, Robert, Priv. Co. 1 ; Res. Somerset, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Pugh, Robert G., Priv. Co. I; Res. Somer- 
set. Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Purcell, James F., Priv. Co. G; Res. New- 
ton Hamilton, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. 
I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Quigley, Daniel F., Priv. Co. G; Res. Burn- 
ham, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Quimby. Charles M.. Priv. Co. K; Res. Del- 
mar, Pa.; Enrd. July i, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Radcliffe. Ralph. Priv. Co. F; Res. Horton, 
Pa. (N. G. P); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rambler, Thomas W., Priv. Co. A; Res. 



McVeytown, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Randolph, Scott E., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rathbun, Lee, Priv. Co. K; Res. Tioga, Pa.; 
Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. 1. July 14, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Read, Amos P., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Recknor, William B., Priv. Co. I; Res. Ad- 
dison, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Redding, Henry E., Priv. Co. B; Res. How- 
ard, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Redmond, James, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Reed, James C, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunting- 
don, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Reed.. Scott B., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clearfield, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Det. June 13, 1898, by S. O. 
26, 1st Corps Hdqts., dated June 13, 1898. 

Reed. Walter A., Sgt. Co. D; Res. Kent, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May I, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Reed. William G.. ist Sgt. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rees, William G.. Priv. Co. L; Res. Kar- 
thaus. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Reeser, John R.. Priv. Co. M; Res. York, 



158 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Repine, Charles B.. Priv. Co. F; Res. Ho- 
mer City, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. 
June 2^, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Resinger. Isaac L., Priv. Co. E; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 21, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rhoads, Harry Stoy, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rhoads, Philip S., Priv. Co. I; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 5. 1898: M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rhoads, Royal G., Priv. Co. I: Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rhoads, Samuel H., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Fleming, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May u, 1898: jM. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rhodes, Harry H., Priv. Co. F; Res. Ho- 
mer City, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. 
June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Rice, Ira N.. Priv. Co. K; Res. Draper, Pa.; 
Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; M. 

0. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Richardson. Joseph \V., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon. Pa.; Enrd. June 2^. 1898; M. I. 
June 27,, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Richardson, William R., Priv. Co. F: Res. 
Rochester Alills. Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. 

1. May II. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Richsten. John, Priv. Co. M; Res. Littles- 
town. Pa. ; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Riddle, John, Priv. Co. B; Res. Pleasant 
Gap. Pa.; Enrd. May 7. 1898: M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rightmire. Charles P.. Priv. Co. K; Res. 



Tioga, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ringler, Alfred F., Priv. Co. I; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Risbeck, Jacob A., Priv. Co. I; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ringler, Theodore O., Priv. Co. I ; Res. 
Elk Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rittenhouse. Lawrence. Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Phiiipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Robb. Milton. Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 
fonte. Pa.; Enrd. June 2j. 1898; M. I. June 
2y, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Robb, William C, Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Roberts, Edwin M., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
W'ellsboro. Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

I'lobcrls. Richard W., Corp. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown. Pa. (X. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11. 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7. 1898. 

Robins. George L., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 13. 1898: M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Prom. Corp. Sept. i, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Robinson, Joseph C. Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. June 21. i8g8; M. I. 
June 21, 1898; died at 3d Div. Hosp. Aug. 
15. 1898. 

Rol)inson, A\'illiam B.. Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Gettysurg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898: M. I. 
July 20. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rohrer. Ralph A.. Priv. Co. A; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 11, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



159 



1S98; Transfd. to Reserve Amb. Co. by S. O. 

26, Hdqts. I St A. C. 

Roller, William C, Priv. Co. C; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Rook, Frank, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clearfield, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 11, i8g8; 
Prom. Sgt. June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rook, William J., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898: 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Artf. 
Nov. 7, 1898 

Roop, Elmer K., Priv. Co. A; Res. New- 
ton Hamilton. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 

27. 1898; M. I. I\Iay II, 1898; Prom. O. M. 
Sgt. of Regt. Aug. 16, 1898; by Regtl. G. O. 
18; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rose, William T., Priv. Co. K; Res. Niles 
Valley, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Ross, James P., O. M. Sgt. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 
27, 1898; j\I. I. Alay II, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ross, Moses R., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Addi- 
son, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; Prom. Sgt. July 16, 1898; M. O. wath 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Roth, George H., Priv. Co. M ; Res. New 
Oxford, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898: M. I. 
July 20. 1898; Prom. Sgt. Aug. i. 1898; M. 
"0. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Rothrock, David E., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May n. 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
30, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rothrock, Percy B., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 



toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 

20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Rounsley, Thomas J., Priv. Co. L; Res. 

Houtzdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Roush, Harry, Priv. Co. C; Res. Roaring 
Spring, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rowe, Hall S., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville, Pa. ; Enrd. ^lay 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; Tranfd. to Reserve Amb. Corps. July 
3, 1898. 

Rowe, William A., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Reedsville, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rowles, Lewis C, Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; U. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rowles, Luther, Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. June 21. 1898; M. I. June 

21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Rowles, Perry A., Priv. Co. L; Res. 

Grampian, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ruble, Harry B., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1S98; M O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Rufifner, Lewis, Priv. Co. F; Res. Tan- 
oma. Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rummel, John F., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa. ; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Russell, Arthur J., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. June 

22, 1898; M. O. wn'th Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Russell, Evan, Capt. Co. M; Res. Wil- 
liam sport. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. July 21, 



160 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; M. I. July 21, X898; Apptd. Capt. July 
20, 1898; Assumed command of Co. July 21, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Russell, James S., Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Rutty, Wayne E., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Crooked Creek, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; 
M. I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Ryan, Harry H., Corp. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Sackett, David R., Sgt. Co. R ; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898 

Samuels, William ]., Priv. Co. C. ; Res. 
Hollidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. 
June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sandoe, James L., Priv. Co. B; Res. Cen- 
tre Hall, Pa. ; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sandoe, Ralph T., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Biglerville, Pa.; luird. July 19, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sansom, James B., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa.; Enrd. May 4, 1898; M. I. May 
II. 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sassaman, Robert F.. Priv. Co. C. ; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898: M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Saylor, Frank P., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898 

Saylor, George \\'., Priv. Co. H : Res. 
Listie, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



Saylor, William A., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Lull, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Scanlin, Thomas, Priv. Co. K ; Res. Del- 
mar. Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. 1. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schanbacher, Edgar M., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Forksville, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 23, 1898; 
G. O. 8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Schell, Walter S., Priv. Co. G; Res. Har- 
risburg. Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Schell, William P., 2d Lieut. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schiefer, Frankland H., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
27, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schluter, Henry L., Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; Died Sept. 3, 1898, in Hosp. 
at Pittsburg of typhoid fever. 

Schreck, Ai, Priv. Co. L ; Res. Kylertown, 
Pa.: Kurd. July 14, 1898: M. I. July 14, 
189S: M. (). with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schriver, Robert A., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Sept. i, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schrock, Calvin, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa. ; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 27, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schuldt, John C, Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



161 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schultz, George H., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Schwab, Fredrick, Priv. Co. K; Res. Ridg- 
way. Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Scott, Charles, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Bakers- 
ville. Pa.; Enrd. June 2-], 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sechler, James B., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Listie, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sechrist, John J., Priv. Co. M; Res. York, 
Pa. : Enrd. July 19, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Seibert, William D., Priv. Co. G; Res. Mc- 
Veytown, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898, M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Sell, Charles H., Priv. Co. M; Res. Littles- 
town, Pa. ; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sell, Jacob H., Jr., Priv. Co. M; Res. Han- 
over, Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Seynor, John M., 2d Lieut. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shadle, John W., Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shadle, William, Priv. Co. M; Res. Littles- 
town, Pa.: Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. whh Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shaffer, Charles S., Priv. Co. I; Res. Jen- 



ners, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shaffer, Clarence E., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shaffer, Frederick L., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Forksville, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shaffer, John W., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shaffer, William, Priv. Co. F; Res. Belsano, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 2-j, 1898; M. L June 27, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shakespeare, Noah, Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. whh Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shannon, Wesley M., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Brushvalley, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. 
June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Sharp, William, Priv. Co. L; Res. DuBois, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sharp, Wilmer A., Priv. Co. F ; Res. West 
Lebanon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shaw, Albert J., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Sheaffer, Alexander H., Corp. Co. A; Res. 
Mt. Union, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-j, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Sgt. July 
28, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shearer, Clarence S., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 



162 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shearer, Michael D., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sherbine, Alvin, Priv. Co. F; Res. Wil- 
more. Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sheriff, Elmer C, Priv. Co. B; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; Tranfd. to 3d Div. Hosp. Corps, 
I St A. C. July 20, 1898. 

Sheriff, Thomas M., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Cokeville, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sheriff, Wallace M., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Wig- 
ton, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 27, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sherlock, Thomas M., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Altoona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Tranfd. to 5th 
Regt. Hosp. Corps June 13, 1898. 

Shields, George E., Priv. Co. M; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shields, James A., Priv. Co. G; Res. Bum- 
ham, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Shilling, Ralph, Priv. Co. F; Res. Trade 
City, Pa. ; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. Jime 23, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shimel, Walter, Priv. Co. L; Res. Lajose, 
Pa.: Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shirey, Oscar A., Priv. Co. B; Res. Flem- 
ing, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Shirk, Lynn J., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 



field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shirley, William J., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shoemaker, John S., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shontz, Edgar, Priv. Co. L; Res. Wigton, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. L July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shoup, Samuel E., Mus. Co. B ; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Shove, Herbert D., Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro. Pa.: Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Showers, Ira M., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; Prom. Corp. June 27, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shufiflebotham, Joseph W., Priv. Co. C; 
Res. HoUidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. 
April 27, 1898; M. I. May 11. 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shugarts, Fred R., Priv. Co. L; Res. Luth- 
ersburg. Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898- M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Shultz, Noah C, Priv. Co. I; Res. Bakers- 
ville, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Simler, Arthur C, Priv. Co. B; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 2y, 1898; M. I. June 
27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Simpson, Charles R., Hosp. Stew. ; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Simpson, Warren B., Priv. Co. A; Res. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



163 



Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2"], 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Singer, Chester M., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Vinco, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. June 

27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sipe, Lawrence E., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; Dischd. from the Co. as Corp. Oct. 3, 
1898, per telegraphic order from \V. Depl., 
Washington, D. C. 

Sipes, Charles R., Priv. Co. M ; Res. York, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 19, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sixbee, Jay F., Priv. Co. K ; Res. Sylvania, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Slagle, Louis N., Capt. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Slater, John R., Priv. Co. C ; Res. Duncans- 
ville. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Shawley, Robert M., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M . O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Smith, Absalom W., Capt. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Albert M., Priv. Co. A; Res. Latta 
Grove, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Arthur G., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. June 

28. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Smith, Claude E., Priv. Co. M; Res. Em- 



mitsburg, Md. ; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Edward, Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Smith. Eugene F., Priv. Co. L; Res. Cur- 
wensville, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Frank A., Priv. Co. M ; Res. York, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Frank H., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Frank W., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Harry E., Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, James E., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 
20, 1898; M. O. wdth Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, James L., Priv. Co. G; Res. Yea- 
gertown. Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Smith, Jonas L., Priv. Co. A; Res. Mapleton, 
Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 23, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, Victor, Priv. Co. K; Res. Mains- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Smith, William R., ist Sgt. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snellings, James A., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Cross Fork, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 



164 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



July 14, iSy8; Prom. Corp. July 23, 1898, G. 
O. 8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snoke, Jay, Priv. Co. L; Res. Clearfield, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898 ;M. I.July 14. 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snook, Percy M., Priv. Co. G; Res. Cross 
Grove, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 
29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snow, Francis C, Priv. Co. D ; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May n, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snyder, Aaron, Priv. Co. E; Res. La Jose, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snyder, Carl E., Priv. Co. C; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snyder, Charles D., Priv. Co. C; Res. Roar- 
ing Spring, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. 
June 21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 

1898. 

Snyder. Charles P.. Priv. Co. M; Res. York. 
Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snyder, Charles W., Corp. Co. C; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snyder, Elmer D., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; Prom. Coqx June 27, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snyder, George B., Priv. Co. B; Res. State 
College. Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II. 1898; Prom. Corp. June 30, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Snyder. John F., Priv. Co. I; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sollenberger, Samuel B.. Priv. Co. M; Res. 



Baltimore, Md. ; Enrd. July 19, 1898: M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Somerville, Charles H., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sommers. David P., Priv. Co. A ; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Souders, Frank D., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 11. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Souders, Leo A., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Southeimer, Harry, Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Knights, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Spangler, Martin E., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
York, Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Spangler, Newton B., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Bellefonte. Pa. (N. G. P) : Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Speiciier. John E., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Conemaugh, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II. 1898: Prom. Corp. June 28. 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Speicher, Pius M., Priv. Co. I; Res. Mey- 
ersdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 5. 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; Prom. Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Spiglemyer. Milton, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Dormantown, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; 
M. I. June 29. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



165 



Spink, Alfred J., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Cherry twp., Sullivan Co., Pa. ; Enrd July 
12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Spotts, Jacob J., Priv. Co. B; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stackpole, James S., ist Lieut. Co. G; 
Res. Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. 
April 27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stage, James K., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, 1898 

Stailey, James H., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Everett, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Staley, Augustus E., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Kingsdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Staub, Louis R., Priv. Co. M ; Res. Mc- 
Sherrystown, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; 
M. L July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Stayer, Andrew S., Surg.; Res. Altoona, 
Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. I. 
May 5, 1898; M. O. with Regt. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Stayer, Edgar S., Battn. Adj.; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2y, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Regt. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stayer, Morrison C, Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. April 27, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; Tranfd. to 3d Div. Amb. 
Corps June 16, 1898, per S. O. 26. 

Steel, Robert M., Priv. Co. A.; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. 



June 28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov, 7, 
1898. 

Steffy, William M., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Sgt. Aug. i, 1898; 
Died Aug. 18, 1898. 

Stem, George A., Priv. Co. H. ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stephens, Harry W., Corp. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa., (N. G. P.); Enrd. A^ril 
2T, 1898; M. L May 11, 1898; Prom. Sgt. 
Sept. 10, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Stevens, Daniel G., Priv. Co. K: Res. 
Hammond, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Mus. Nov. 
7. 1898. 

Stevens, John R., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898 

Stewart, Harry M., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27,, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Tranfd. to Hosp. 
Corps June 23, 1898. 

Stewart, John E., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898 

Stiers, T. E., Priv. Co. L; Res. Ply- 
mouth, Pa.; Enrd. July 14. 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Stiffler, Charles, Sgt. Co. C; Res. Holli- 
daysburg. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898 

Stine, Harry P., Priv. Co. B; Res. Fill- 



166 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



more, Pa.; Enrd. June 2"], i8y8; AI. I. June 
2T, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stine, James A., Priv. Co. B ; Res. Pleas- 
ant Gap, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Stinson, Herbert E., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. 
I. June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Stitzel, John A., Priv. Co. M; Res. Ben- 
dersville. Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. L 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stonebraker, William F., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. L June 
23, 1898; Died at his home, Indiana, Pa. of 
typhoid fever, Sept. 29, 1898. 

Stonesifer, Joseph B., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 16, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Sept. i, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stratford, Thomas F., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Mt. Union, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. 
June 29. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Stratton, Charley, Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Streams, Harry B., Priv. Co. F; Res. Indi- 
ana, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Streevy, Walter H., Priv. Co. K; Res. Over- 
ton, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Strickler, George W., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
York, Pa. ; Enrd. July 20. 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; Apptd. Artf. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stnmk, Jesse P., Priv. Co. A; Res. Belle- 



ville, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 23, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stubbs, William H., Priv. Co. A; Res. Ma- 
pleton. Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. June 
23, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stuby, Valentine, Priv. Co. F; Res. Indi- 
ana, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stuchell, Harry \\'., Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stull, Elijah W'., Priv. Co. I; Res. Stony 
Creek, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 189S; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stumpf, Harry, Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
ville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Sturrock, Guy, Corp. Co. K; Res. W'ells- 
boro. Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; Prom. Corp. July 23, 1898; G. O. 8 c. s. 
Regt. : M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stutler. Otterbine G., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
jarvesville. Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 2-j, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Stutzman, Otto O., Priv. Co. I; Res. Lull, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 8, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sullivan, George A., Priv. Co. C; Res. Roar- 
ing Spring, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. 
June 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Sunday, George W., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sutton. James, Jr., Sgt. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Swain, Charles T., Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



167 



town, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Swartz, George C, Priv. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Swartz, George T., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Som- 
erset, Pa.; Enrd. July 8, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sweeney, Michael P., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. July 8, 1898; 
M. I. July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Sweet, Wesley, Priv. Co. K; Res. Mansfield, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Sweitzer, Samuel H., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tampsett, William, Priv. Co. M ; Res. West 
York, Pa. ; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tampt, William H., Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg. Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tate, Frederick M. ; Priv. Co. M ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15. 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tate, Rushmore Q., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Wellsboro, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Taylor, Charles J., 2d Lieut. Co. B ; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2-j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Taylor, Edward R, Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Bellefonte, Pa. (N. G. P.): Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11. 1898: Prom. Corp. 
May 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



Taylor, Frank H., Mus. Co. B; Belle- 
fonte, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Died in Div. 
Hosp. July 7, 1898. 

Taylor, Harris L., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. 
I. June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Taylor, Hugh S., Capt. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Taylor, Jacob C, Capt. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Taylor, James W., Priv. Co. D ; Res. 
Saltsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Taylor, LeRoy, Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. June 25, 1898; M. I. June 
25, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nqv. 7, 1898. 

Taylor, Royden J., Priv. Co. F; Res. In- 
diana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Teats, Martin L., ist. Sgt. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tebbs, Frederick T., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Howard, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Thomas, Blair A., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. April 2y, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Thomas. Charles B., Sgt. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27. 



168 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Thomas, Daniel, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk 
Lick, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Thomas. John, Priv. Co. B ; Res. Centre 
Hall, Pa.: Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. June 
28, 1898; Died at Div. Hosp. Sept. 18, 
1898. 

Thomas, Thomas, Priv. Co. I ; Res. Elk 
Lick. Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; M. O. at Fort Thomas, Ky., Dec. 
21, 1898. 

Thompson, Benton R., Corp. Co. F; Res. 
Glen Campl)ell, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Thompson, Earnest D., Corp. Co. A ; 
Res. Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. 
April 27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Thompson, Verden R., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. 
June 21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Thomson, Edgar, Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Frederick, Md. ; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Threlkeld, James E., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Throne, Charles G., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
East York. Pa.; Enrd. July 20. 1898; M. L 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tillburg, William, Priv. Co. K ; Res. 
Mansfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tipple, Lewis. Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro, Pa.; -Enrd. July 12. 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



Tomlinson, Stewart, Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Burnham, Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Toner, Samuel E., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Townsend, Harry N., Priv. Co. K ; Res. 
Tiadaghton, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Treese, Elhannan J., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Hollidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tressler, Franklin M., Priv. Co. I ; Res. 
Meyersdale, Pa.; Enrd. July 7, 1898; M.J. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Trimmer, Samuel P., Priv. Co. M; Res. 
Hanover, Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. L 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; M. 
b. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Trone, Maurice N., Priv. Co. M; Res. Han- 
over, Pa.; Enrd. July 20, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; Prom, ist Sgt. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Trout, Frank W.. Priv. Co. G; Res. Lew- 
istown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Troxell, Milton E., Priv. Co. E; Res. Clear- 
field, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May it, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Truxal, Albert L., Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. L July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. as Corp. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Tully, James, Priv. Co. G; Res. Yeager- 
town. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Turnev. Harr\' P.. Priv. Co. I; Res. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



169 



Marklesburg, Pa.; Eiird. July 6, 1898; M. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Twigg, Harry F., Priv. Co. L; Res. Phil- 
ipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Underwood, Jesse, Priv. Co. B ; Res. Belle- 
fonte, Pa.; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Uphouse, John F., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Van Allman, William A., 2d Lieut. Co. C; 
Res. Hollidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.) Enrd. 
April 27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Van Vliet, John A., Priv. Co. K; Res. Del- 
mar, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Van Zant, James S., Priv. Co. G; Res. Al- 
farata. Pa.; Enrd. May 10, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Varner, Stewart S., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 
24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wade, Joseph., Priv. Co. L; Res. Philips- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; Prom. Corp.; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Wagner, George E. ; Priv. Co. G ; Res. Lew- 
istown. Pa. (N. G P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. as Corp. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wagner, WilberL., Priv. Co. B; Res. Miles- 
burg, Pa. ; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. I. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wahl, Frederick W., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 
21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wakefield. George W., ist Lieut. Co. D; 
Res. Blairsville. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 



2-], 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Waksfiield, Louis A., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
New Florence, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Walker, Israel T., Priv. Co. F; Res. She- 
locta. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Walker, Lewis A., Priv. Co. B; Res. Re- 
bersburg. Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. L 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wallace, Frank, Priv. Co. B; Res. Miles- 
burg, Pa. ; Enrd. June 28, 1898; M. L June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Walsh, John, Sgt. Co. C; Res. Hollidays- 
burg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom, ist Sgt. June 28, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Walters, Lloyd W., Priv. Co. C; Res. Dun- 
cansville. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 2j, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Walton, Oliver T., Priv. Co. D; Res. Salts- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L May 11, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Waple, Charles R., Priv. Co. E; Res. Wal- 
laceton. Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L May 
Ti, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Warfel, George, Priv. Co. G; Res. Green- 
wood Furnace, Pa.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. 
L June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Warfel, William G., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Waring, Charles T., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Philipsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Warner, George N., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
New Oxford, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. 



170 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



L July 20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; 
Sgt. Sept. I, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Watson, Harry W, Corp. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N.' G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Watson, John L., 2d Lieut. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G."P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Watson, Robert W. K., Priv. Co. M; 
Res. Fairfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. 
L July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Waugaman, Milton R., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Saltsburg, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. L 
May II, 1898; Tranfd. to U. S. Sig. Corps 
July 12, 1898. 

Way, William C, Priv. Co. E; Res. Cur- 
wensville. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 2j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weatherby, Edmund S. J., Priv. Co. G; 
Res. Miilville, N. J.; Enrd. June 29, 1898; 
M. L June 29, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 
7, 1898. 

Weaver, Calvin, Priv. Co. E; Res. New- 
tonburg. Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. L 
June 21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Weaver, Edward W., Corp. Co. D ; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weaver, George D., Priv. Co. M : Res. 
Newry, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
^-Weaver, Hilarion C, Corp. Co. H ; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 



1898; M. L May 11, 1898; J^L O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weaver, Howard, Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Hopewell, Pa.; Enrd. July 6, 1898; U. I. 
July 8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weaver, John E., Priv. Co. F ; Res. 
Homer City, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; ^L L 
May II, 1898; Apptd. Wag. June i, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weaver, John F., Jr., Priv. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
2j, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weaver, John J., Priv. Co. E; Res. Fair- 
brook, Pa. ; Enrd. June 2j, 1898; M. L June 
27,1898; I\L O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weaver, Louis S., Priv. Co. M ; Res. 
Newry, Pa.; Enrd. July 18, 1898; M. L 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Sgt. Aug. i, 1898; 
reduced to Priv. Sept. i, 1898, at his own 
request; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weaver, Thomas M., Sgt. Co. D; Res. 
Blairsville, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. L May 11, 1898; Prom; to Q. M. 
Sgt. June 3, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Webb, Charles R., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Draper, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. L 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weber, Carl E., Sgt. Co. G; Res. Lewis- 
town, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. L May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 

7. 1898. 

Weber, Clarence, Priv. Co. L; Res. 
Clearfield, Pa.; Enrd. July 13. 1898; M. L 
July 14. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wechtenhiser, Isaiah, Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Berlin, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898: M. I. July 

8, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Weight, David W., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



171 



toona, Pa.; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 

20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Weimer, Benton H., Priv. Co. D; Res. 

Blairsville, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

W'einel, Aldis L., Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Paulton, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weirick, Frank X., Priv. Co. M; Res.. 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. 
July 20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Welch, Leon E., Priv. Co. K; Res. Elk 
Run, Pa.; Enrd. July 11, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; Apptd. Corp. July 23, 1898, G. O. 
8 c. s. Regt. ; M. O. with Co. Nov 7, 1898. 

Welch, Walter, Priv. Co. E; Res. Houtz- 
dale, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weld, John H., Priv. Co. E; Res. Glen 
Hope, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 

21, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Welshons, George E., Priv. Co. H ; Res. 

New Florence, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 
2-j, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp 
June 28, 1898; M. 6. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898 

Welty, Charles R., Priv. Co. M; Res 
Gettysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I 
July 20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

West, John H., Capt. Co. C; Res. Hol- 
lidaysburg, Pa. (N. G. P.) : Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov 7, 1898. 

West, Vickroy, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa.; Enrd. May 4, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

West, William S., Priv. Co. I ; Res. Lis- 
tie, Pa.; Enrd. July 7, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co Nov. 7, 1898. 



West, William W., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. wit h Co. Nov. 7, 

Westbrook, Edsal N., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Tioga, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; Prom. Corp July 23, 1898; G. O. 
8 c. s. Regt; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Weston, Forest M., Priv. Co. B; Res. 
Olivia, Pa.; Enrd. June 27, 1898; M. I. 
June 27, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Wetzel, Lewis G., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Marion Centre, Pa.; Enrd. May 9, 1898; M. 
I. May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

\\'heeler, Lewis A., ist Sgt. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Whipple, George, Priv Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 14, 1898; M. I. July 
14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

White, Joseph C, Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Crete, Pa. "(N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

White, Ray D., Priv. Co. A; Res. Pitts- 
burg, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

WHiite, William G., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Pittsburg, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Whittaker, Clarence H., Priv. Co. A ; 
Res. Huningdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Whittaker, Ralph R.. Priv. Co. A; Res. 



172 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Huntingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wiggins, Robert H., 2d Lieut. Co. D; 
Res. Blairsviile, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 
27, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898: Prom, ist 
Lieut. Co. L. 51)1 Regt., July 31, 1898; M. 
O. with Co. L. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wilcox, Charles C, Priv. Co. D; Res. 
Saltsburg, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898: M. I. 
June 24, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Wildes, Clayton B., Priv. Co. C; Res. 
Altoona, Pa.; Enrd. May 10. 1898: M. I. 
May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. i8g8. 

Wiley, Hugh R., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
viile, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 2y, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Dischd. May 2^. 1898. 
per S. O. 115 A. G. O. 

Wiley, Scott A., Corp. Co. D; Res. Black- 
lick, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. A^pril 27, 1898; 
M. L May II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 
1898. 

Wilkes, Roy, Priv. Co. K ; Res. Landruc, 
Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Willhelm, William V., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Indiana, Pa.; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. 
June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Williams, George W., Priv. Co. K; Res. 
Forksville, Pa.; Enrd. July 12, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7. 1898. 

Williams, Harrison G., Priv. Co. B ; Res. 
Howard, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Williams, Henry Clay, Priv. Co. L; Res. 
DuBois, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. 
July 14, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 189S. 

Williams, Lawrence O., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Kenwood, Pa.; Enrd. June 2, 1898; M. I. 
June 22, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



Williams, Maurice. Priv. Co. M ; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 

20, 1898; Prom Sgt. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Williams, Robert S., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. June 

21, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Williams, Willis, Priv. Co. B; Res. Belle- 

fonte. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. May 16, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Williamson, Richard W., Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Huntingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 1898. 

W^illard, George F., Priv. Co. L; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wilson, George H., Priv. Co. D; Res. Blairs- 
viile, Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Wilson, John D., Priv. Co. F; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. ; Enrd. June 22, 1898; M. I. June 22, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wingert, Samuel T., Priv. Co. F; Res. 
Marchand, Pa.; Enrd. June 23, 1898; M. I. 
June 23, 1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

\\'ise, James, Priv. Co. M ; Res. Gettys- 
burg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 20, 
1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. with 
Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Woleslagle, John A., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Wolf, Robert F.. Priv. Co. 11; Res. Johns- 
town. Pa. (N. G. P.); Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



173 



W'olf, William N., Priv. Co. H; Res. Johns- 
town, Pa. (X. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

W'omer, Francis M., Priv. Co. G; Res. 
Lewistown, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; Died in Hosp., 
Chickamauga, Ga., July 22, 1898. 

Woodend, J. \V. Priv. Co. D; Res. Indiana, 
Pa. ; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. June 24, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Woodruff, Lucian D., Jr., Priv. Co. H; Res. 
Johnstown, Pa. ( N. G. P. ) ; Enrd. April 27, 
1898: M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom. Corp. June 
28, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Woodward, Americas H., Capt. Co. E; Res. 
Clearfield. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 2-j, 
1898; M. I. May 11, 1898: M. O. with Co. 
Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wright, Charles F., Priv. Co. I; Res. Somer- 
set, Pa.; Enrd. July 4, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wright, Nelson A., Priv. Co. I; Re.s. Addi- 
son, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 8, 
1898: M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Wright, Roscoe M., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Wrye, Charles W., Priv. Co. E; Res. Mor- 
risdale Mines, Pa.; Enrd. June 21, 1898; M. I. 
June 21. 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 
Wyland, Daniel D., Priv. Co. G; Res. Burn- 
ham, Pa. ; Enrd. June 29, 1898; M. I. June 29, 
1893; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Yeagy, W^illiam F.. Priv. Co. M; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; Prom. Corp. Aug. i, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, I 



Yocum, George I., Priv. Co. A; Res. Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa.; Enrd. May 7, 1898; M. I. May 
II, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Yocum, Samuel F., Priv. Co. C; Res. Al- 
toona. Pa. (N. G. P.) ; Enrd. April 27, 1898; 
M. I. May 11, 1898; Prom Corp. June 28, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Young, Emil, Priv. Co. H ; Res. Johnstown, 
Pa.; Enrd. April 2^, 1898; M. I. May 11, ''^ 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Young, Hugh C, Priv. Co. K; Res. Wells- 
boro. Pa.; Enrd. July 13, 1898; M. I. July 14, 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Zeigler, Joseph D. E., Priv. Co. E; Res. Du- 
Bois, Pa. ; Enrd. June 20, 1898; M. I. June 20. 
1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. " 

Zercher, John W., Priv. Co. M; Res. Lit- 
tlestown. Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Ziegler, Charles T., Priv. Co. M; Res. Get- 
tysburg, Pa.; Enrd. July 15, 1898; M. I. July 
20, 1898; Dischd. July 30, 1898; per Par. 
45. S. O. W. Dept., dated Aug. 3, 189S; 
Dischd. to accept commission; Apptd. 2d 
Lieut. July 28, 1898; M. I. July 31, 1898, at 
Camp Thomas, Ga. ; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Zigler, Foster, Priv. C. H ; Res. Johnstown, 
Pa.; Enrd. May 4, 1898; M. I. May 11, 1898; 
M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 

Zimmerman, Edward, Priv. Co. A; Res. 
Birmingham, Pa.; Enrd. June 24, 1898; M. I. 
June 24, 1898; M. O. with Co. Nov. 7, 
1898. 

Zimmerman, Harvey J., Priv. Co. I; Res. 
Forward, Pa.; Enrd. July 5, 1898; M. I. July 
8, 1898; Prom Corp. July 16, 1898; M. O. 
with Co. Nov. 7, 1898. 



CHAPTER X 

THE PRESS 

A Sketch of Jour)wHsm in Clearfield County — The First County Paper — A Home-ntade Press — 
The "Banner" — CleaiHeld Republican — Clearfield Whig — Raftsman's Jour>uil — Clearfield 
Citisen — The Times-Monitor — Evening Herald — Clearfield County Times — Curwensuille 
Herald — County Revieiv — The Mountaineer — DuBois Morning Courier — DuBois Express 
— The Enterprise — DuBois Morning Journal — Houtzdalc Citisen — Osceola Reveille — 
The Leader-Courier — Coalport Standard — The Hustler, and Other Newspapers. 

It has been said that "the press is the attractive appearance, indeed being only a 
voice of the people," defending their causes, slight improvement over the first news- 
crying their needs and binding them to- paper of the world, printed four hundred 
gether. So in tracing the development, years before ! The original partnership 
both material and intellectual, of our county, was of short duration, Mr. Kratzer selling 
we find no greater factor than the county his share to Mr. Irvin after a few years, 
press. This was the first of a long list of changes 

During the first twenty-three years of in ownership, title and political adherence, 

our county's history, not one county paper for the first county paper. In all it has had 

was issued. As for other publications, they nineteen owners, five titles and has changed 

were often days old before they reached its politics four times. This pioneer paper 

their destination in this part of the coun- is now in its 83rd year, and is published in 

try. It can be understood, then, with what Clearfield by John F. Short, under the name 

enthusiasm and interest the establishing of of the Clearfield "Republican." in spite of 

the first county paper was greeted, in the the fact that it is radically Democratic. 



year 1827. Its founders were Christopher 
Kratzer and George S. Irvin, both residents 
of Philipsburg. Mr. Kratzer, a cabinet- 
maker by trade, built the press, while Mr. 
Irvin, who had some experience as a 
printer, furnished the type. 

The first issue of this paper was pub- 
lished at Clearfield about 1827, under the 
name of the "Pennsylvania Banner." It is 
said that the original "Banner" was not of 



The second county newspaper also made 
its first appearance in the county seat, 
about 1834. Ex-Governor Bigler edited 
this paper for about two years, but soon 
found that with his many other activities, 
it was not possible to continue this new un- 
dertaking. The "Democrat," therefore, 
was discontinued, after its very brief 
existence. 

Next came the "Clearfield Whig," 



174 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



175 



founded by John R. Edie, who was suc- 
ceeded by Samuel H. Tyson and Samuel T. 
Williams. This paper, also, was of about 
two years duration, being discontinued in 
1838. 

For the next twenty years the "Repub- 
lican" enjoyed an unrivaled existence, then, 
in 1854, "The Raftsman's Journal" was 
founded by Hon. H. Bucher Swoope. This 
was at the time of the dissolution of the 
Whig party, and Mr. Swoope was a strong 
advocate of the new American party dur- 
ing the two years in which he so ably edited 
this paper. In 1856, S. B. Row took charge 
of the "Journal," and with the organization 
of the Republican party, the "Journal" be- 
came a Republican paper. Since then it 
has changed hands several times, but never 
its political complexion and to-day is a Re- 
publican paper of wide circulation, imder 
the management of M. L. McQuown. 

The "Clearfield Citizen" was started in 
1878 by John R. Bixler, a strong advocate 
of the Greenback party. Later Air. Bixler 
saw fit to sever his connection with that 
party, and became just as ardent a Demo- 
crat. Still later the name of the paper was 
changed to the "Clearfield Democrat." 
Soon after, MattheAv Savage acquired its 
ownership, and renamed it "The Public 
Spirit." Under this name and management 
it has been continued, and is to-day one of 
the leading papers of the county, published 
both daily and weekly. 

About 1889, S. C. and J. P. Watts es- 
tablished a Prohibition paper at Clearfield, 
under the name of "The Monitor." In 
1905 this paper was purchased by R. M. 
Butler, formerly the local editor of the 
Curwensville "Mountaineer." Subsequent- 



ly, the "Karthaus Times," which had been 
started by Dr. Neveling a few years before, 
was consolidated with the "Monitor," and 
these papers are now known as the "Times- 
Monitor." 

In 1905 Mr. Butler started a daily paper 
called "The Evening Herald." Both papers 
are now published by S. V. Border and are 
independent in politics. 

In closing this list of papers published at 
the county seat some mention must be 
made of the "Multum in Parvo," a most ec- 
centric little paper published by Dr. Swee- 
ney about 1883. After a stormy, if brief 
career, during which time its editor was 
sued for libel, this paper ceased to appear. 

Previous to 1872 the county seat enjoyed 
the honor of publishing the only newspa- 
pers in this county. But during the sum- 
mer of that year a stock company, the mem- 
bers of which were W. and Z. McNaul, E. 
A. Irvin, Samuel Arnold, A. H. Irvin, W. C. 
Arnold, Faust & Goodwin, John P. Irvin, 
John Patton, T. W. Fleming, N. E. Arnold, 
J. R. Jenkins, Edward Livingston, J. F. Ir- 
win and L. B. V. Soper, was formed for the 
purpose of founding a weekly newspaper, 
in Curwensville. This paper was called the 
"Clearfield County Times," and was pub- 
lished by Tolbert J. Robison. Daniel Faust, 
W. C. Arnold, J. P. Irvin, John Patton. Jr., 
and Edward Livingston comprised the edi- 
torial committee. The "Times" proved a 
great success as a strong Republican paper 
during the Grant-Greeley campaign. 

The next year R. H. Brainard bought the 
"Times" and became its editor. He contin- 
ued as such for the next nine years. Whit- 
taker and Fee were the next publishers, 
and on account of political differences 



176 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



edited a paper neutral as to party. After 
several changes in its ownership John P. 
Bard purchased the "Times" in 1885, and 
renamed it "The Curwensville Herald." It 
now became a successful Republican paper 
once more, but this success soon failed, for 
in a year's time the "Herald" passed into 
other hands and abruptly ceased to l)e pub- 
lished. 

Curwensvilie's second attempt at a pa- 
per was a musical publication, called "The 
Ancillia" established and edited by Profes- 
sor C. C. McDonald, in 1881. A year later 
Professor McDonald changed the ".\ncil- 
lia" to a sixteen page monthly, under the 
name of "The County Review." This pa- 
per was bought in 1884, by R. H. Brainard, 
who became its editor, and continued as 
such until the time of his death in 1905. 
The paper was then purchased by V. King 
Pifer, who published it several years, after 
which it ceased to exist. 

On April 28. 1903, a four page weekly 
newspaper under the title of "The Moun- 
taineer" was established in Curwensville by 
Roland D. Swoope, Esq. and S. Arnold 
Helmbold. Five years later Mr. Helmbold 
sold his interest in this paper to Roland D. 
Swoope, Jr., who has since been its editor 
and publisher. Since its beginning the 
"Mountaineer" has been devoted to the 
cause of Republicanism, and is recognized 
as one of the foremost county papers in the 
state. 

"The DuBois Courier" first appeared in 
1879, under the management of Butler and 
Morton. Three years later J. A. Johnston 
became its manager, enlarging and improv- 
ing it so that it became one of the leading 
papers in the county. In 1884 E. W. Gray 



became a partner of Mr. Johnston, and two 
years after, the "Courier" was sold to R. L. 
Earle, who conducted it as a radical Repub- 
lican paper. Later the paper was again ac- 
quired by E. S. and E. \V. Gray, who have 
since published it as a Republican daily 
paper, under the name of "The DuBois 
Morning Courier." For several years a 
weekly edition of the "Courier" was pub- 
lished, but this has been discontinued. 

In 1883, H. C. Wilson, B. S. Hoag and 
Frank McMichael started an independent 
paper under the name of the "DuBois Ex- 
press." Later the members of the company 
were J. P. Wilson, C. A. Read, H. C. Wil- 
son and Frank McMichael. This firm was 
called the "Express Publishing Company." 
Still later, David Reams became the pro- 
prietor, but in a few years was succeeded 
by D. C. Whitehill, who remained its pub- 
lisher until 1909. Next A. E. Hasbrook 
assumed its control, and it is now published 
as an evening paj^er. ranking high among 
the independent papers of the state. 

Though scarcely a newspaper "The En- 
terprise" published in DuBois about 1875 
by P. S. Weber, is of interest in discussing 
the press of the county. This unique pub- 
lication consisted mainly of advertisements, 
and was issued gratis. Needless to say, 
this experiment did not last long, and was 
abandoned after three or four issues. 

The year 1904 marked the birth of an- 
other daily paper in the iMetropolis of 
Clearfield county. "The DuBois Morning 
Journal" made its first appearance at that 
time, under the supervision of W. J. and 
N. D. Hines. They are still its publishers, 
under the firm name of "The DuBois Print- 
ing and Publishing Company." The "Jour- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



177 



nal" has also a Sunday edition. This paper 
owes its allegiance to the Republican party. 

In 1881 in the enterprising town of 
Houtzdale a weekly newspaper was started 
by the "Observer Publishing Company," 
under the name of the "Houtzdale Ob- 
server." After many changes in its man- 
agement this paper was absorbed by the 
"Houtzdale Citizen," which is now owned 
and published by Hon. Harry Boulton and 
Ralph Richards. The "Citizen" is recog- 
nized as a loyal Republican weekly. 

In 1873 a newspaper was started in Os- 
ceola by George M. Brisbin and his two 
brothers. This paper was called the "Os- 
ceola Reveille," and was strictly independ- 
ent regarding politics. After three years 
the Brisbin brothers retired, and the "Re- 
veille" became "The Independent World," 
managed by O. E. McFadden. Less than 
a year later its name was changed to the 
"Campaign World," and then again to the 
original title — "Reveille," by J. B. McFad- 
den, who was manager until 1880, when it 
was discontinued. In 1888 J. B. McFad- 
den established the "Leader," and, pur- 
chasing the "Courier" three years later, he 
gave the paper the name of the "Leader- 
Courier," which it still retains. Strictlv 



neutral in politics this paper under Mr. 
McFadden's editorship has come to fill an 
indispensable place in the homes of the 
thrifty and industrious people of the Os- 
ceola section. 

Coalport was the fourth town to attempt 
a county publication. In 1885 G. P. Penne- 
aker started a small paper, which he called 
"Coalport Siftings." This proved such a 
success that Mr. Pennebaker enlarged the 
paper, changed its name to the "Coalport 
Standard" and started to publish a first- 
class weekly. The present publisher of this 
independent Republican weekly is Ezra 
Westover, who issues a clean and newsy 
four-page sheet. 

Synonymous with the progressive town 
of Madera is its recently established weekly 
publication, known as "The Hustler." This 
paper was founded in 1909 by B. F. Rhine- 
hart and promises to advance with the 
steady growth of that busy region. The 
"Hustler" is classed as a Republican paper. 

This completes our list of the newspapers 
of Clearfield county, of which there are now 
fourteen. Five of these are published daily, 
and the remainder weekly. Of the total 
number, seven are Republican, three Dem- 
ocratic and four Independent. 



CHAPTER XI 

THE BENCH OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 

Clearfield County's Judicial Connection idth Centre County Previous to 1822 — The Act of 
1822 Providing for the Holding of Courts in Clearfield County — Pofndation at That 
Time — Provision for Keeping Prisoners — Sketch of Hon. Charles Huston — Hon. Thomas 
Burnside, Hon. W. George Woodzvard, Hon. Robert G. White, Hon. John C. Knox, Hon. 
James T. Hale — The Tzventy-fifth District Formed — Sketch of Hon. James Btimside — 
Hon. James Gamble — Judge Linn — Hon. Joseph B. McEfwlly — Hon. Charles A. Mayer — 
Act of i8j4 Proiiding for an Additional Laze Judge — Hon. John H. Orvis Appointed — 
Clearfield County Created a Separate Judicial District — Hon. David L. Krebs — Hon. 
Cxrus Gordon — Hon. Allison 0. Smith. 



Although Clearfield county was organized 
by an act of the General Assembly approved 
March 26th, 1804, it was attached to Centre 
county for judicial purposes by the provisions 
of said act, and for all such matters it was prac- 
tically a part of that county, until 1822, despite 
the fact that by an act approved April 4th, 
1803 (Chapter 2598) the Legislature had ap- 
pointed Commissioners to fix the seat of jus- 
tice for the county and the same was estab- 
lished on the lands of Abraham Witmer at 
Chingleclamouche, and a town laid out and 
called Clearfield : yet it was not until the 29th 
of January, 1822, that tlie General Assembly 
passed a law making the county a part of the 
Fourth Judicial District and providing that the 
President Judge of said district should be the 
President Judge of the Courts of Clearfield 
county. Said act also provided for the hold- 
ing of Courts in Clearfield county, commenc- 
ing on the third Mondays of October, Decem- 



ber and March and the first Mondays of July 
in each year, which courts the act wisely pro- 
vided should each "continue one week if nec- 
essan,'" and that, in case the public business 
did not in the opinion of the judges of said 
court require the summoning of a jury to at- 
tend all the terms of Court, the Judges might 
dispense with juries not exceeding two terms 
in any one year. The act further provided 
that the first temi of Court should be held "at 
the Court House now erected in Clearfield 
town in said county of Clearfield." At this 
time the county had, according to the last U. S. 
census, a population of 2342 and a taxable 
population according to the state census of 1821 
of 584. No deaf and dumb persons and no 
slaves. The act of 1822 also made provision 
for the transfer to Clearfield county of all ac- 
tions in which both parties were residents of 
Clearfield county at the time of the passing of 
said act, and also for the making of copies of 



178 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



176 



all docket entries relating to such actions which 
with all the pleadings therein were trans- 
ferred to the Prothonotary of Clearfield county 
from Centre county. It seems there was in 
1822 no jail in Clearfield county as the act pro- 
vides for the keeping of prisoners in the Cen- 
tre county jail until a jail should be erected in 
Clearfield. 

Pursuant to said act of Assembly the first 
Court was held at Clearfield on the third Mon- 
day of October, 1822, and was presided over 
by Hon. Charles Huston. 

Charles Huston was born in Bucks County, 
Pa., on the i6th of January, 1771. He re- 
ceived his education at private schools and at 
Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., from which 
institution he was graduated in the class of 
1789. He taught school to maintain himself 
while he studied law, and was admitted to the 
bar in August, 1795. He first located at Wil- 
liamsport, Pa., but removed to Bellefonte, Pa., 
in 1807 where he resided and practiced law at 
the time of his appointment as President Judge 
of the Courts of the Fourth Judicial District. 
Judge Huston seiwed as President Judge of 
the district until 1826 when he was appointed 
one of the Justices of the Supreme Court of 
the state and served as such until 1845, when 
he retired. His death occurred November 
loth, 1849. Judge Huston was unusually well 
equipped to fill the important duties of the ju- 
dicial ofiice. He had the attributes of integ- 
rity, legal learning, sound understanding, and 
that habit of thought that enabled him to 
view the legal questions before him without 
bias or prejudice. As a judge of the Fourth 
judicial district he became unusually well 
versed in the intricacies of the land titles in the 
state, and after his retirement from the bench 
he prepared and published a valuable work, en- 



titled "History and Nature of Original Titles 
to Land in the Province and State of Penn- 
sylvania." 

Hon. Thomas Burnside was appointed in 
1826 to succeed Judge Huston. Thomas 
Burnside was a native of Ireland and was born 
July 22, 1782. He came to this country in 
1782 with his parents and his early youth was 
spent in Philadelphia. He read law with Hon. 
Robert Porter of Philadelphia and was ad- 
mitted to practice in 1804 and shortly there- 
after he located in Bellefonte, Pa. He took 
an active interest in politics and in 181 1 
was chosen as state senator and in 181 5 was 
elected to Congress. In 1816 he was appoint- 
ed President Judge of Luzerne County, but re- 
signed in t8i8. In 1823 he was again elected 
to the State Senate. He presided over the 
Courts of tb.e Fourth Judicial district until 
1 84 1, when he was appointed President Judge 
of the Seventh Judicial district, where he served 
until 1845, when he was promoted to the Su- 
preme Court of the state. He died March 
25th, 1857. Judge Burnside, while an able 
jurist and a man of more than ordinary ability 
in many lines, was noted for his eccentricities, 
and his fondness for a joke regardless of who 
might suffer. 

Hon. George W. Woodward succeeded 
Judge Burnside and served a full term and 
was afterwards made Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of the state. He was noted 
for his extreme courtesy and affability as 
well as for his legal learning and strict im- 
partiality. He was firm and final in his 
decisions upon legal questions, yet because 
it was always believed that he was strictly 
just as he recognized justice, he became one 
of the most popular judges in the state. 
Judge Woodward served on the Supreme 



180 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Court Bench until 1867, wlien he retired by 
reason of the expiration of his term. He 
died about 1868. 

Hon. Robert G. W liite was the next 
President Judge. Judge White came from 
Tioga County, Pa., and by reason of a 
change in the jiub'cial districts that was 
made by the Legislature, he only served as 
the Judge of this county for the period of 
one year. 

Hon. John C. Knox was the successor of 
Judge White. He served for a few months, 
when he was appointed as one of the Judges 
of the Supreme Court. He also served a 
term as Attorney Genera! of the State. In 
the latter years of his life his mind became 
impaired and he died in an asylum for the 
insane. 

Hon. James T. Hale succeeded Judge 
Knox as President Judge in April, 185 1. 
Judge Hale was born in Bradford County, 
Pa.. October 14th, 1810. He was admitted 
to the Bar in 1832 and located in Bellefonte 
in 1835. He served as President Judge un- 
til April, 1853. After his retirement from 
the bench he practiced law for a number of 
years, but devoted most of his attention to 
business pursuits and to the development 
of the lumber and coal industries in Clear- 
field and Centre counties and to the build- 
ing of the Tyrone and Clearfield railroad. 
He died in April, 1865. 

By an act of the General Assembly ap- 
proved April 9th, 1853, P. L. page 355. the 
counties of Centre, Clearfield and Clinton 
were erected into a separate judicial district 
to be called the Twenty-fifth District and 
the Governor was empowered to appoint 
a president judge of said district to serve 
until the first day of the December follow- 



ing the passage of said act. Governor 
William Bigler on the 20th of April, 1853, 
appointed Hon. James Burnside to be the 
president judge of the new district. All of 
the judges up to this date had been ap- 
pointed by the Governors, but by reason 
of an amendment to the Constitution of the 
state, which had been submitted to and 
adopted by the people, all judges afterwards 
commissioned were elected by tlie voters 
of the state for terms of ten years in case 
of Common Pleas judges and fifteen years 
for judges of the Supreme Court. Judge 
Burnside was elected at the October elec- 
tion of 1853 without opposition and pre- 
sided over the Courts of the twenty-fifth 
district until his death on July i, 1859, by 
being thrown from a buggy in a runaway. 
Judge James Burnside was generally known 
as Juflge Burnside the younger, to distin- 
guish him from his father. Judge Thomas 
Burnside. 

James Burnside was the eldest son of 
Thomas Burnside and was born at Belle- 
fonte, Pa., on February 22nd, 1807. He 
studied law in his father's office and was ad- 
mitted to the Bar in November, 1830. In 
1844 he was elected to the state Legislature 
and served two terms, having been re- 
elected in 1846. He was a man of force and 
a good legal education and made a fine 
record as a jurist. 

During the few months intervening be- 
tween the death of Judge James Burnside 
and the election of Judge Linn, Hon. James 
Gamble presided over the Courts of the 
twenty-fifth district. He was an able 
lawyer and worthily filled the important 
position, but owing to the brief period of 
his service in this countv, he did not have 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



181 



an opportunity to do much toward becom- 
ing acquainted with its people. At the Octo- 
ber election of 1859 Samuel I^inn was elected 
President Judge of the district and served until 
1868, when he resigned. 

Judge Linn was born in February, 1820, 
and was twenty-four years of age before he 
commenced to prepare himself for the legal 
profession. He was admitted to the Bar 
in 1847 and practiced law in partnership 
with James T. Hale, until 1851, when Mr. 
Hale was appointed to the Bench, and Mr. 
Linn then formed a partnership with W. P. 
Wilson which continued until Judge Linn's 
election as president Judge. After his re- 
tirement from the bench Judge Linn prac- 
ticed law until his death. Judge Linn tried 
many important cases in Clearfield county 
and some of his decisions on the questions 
of land titles were the foundations of sta- 
bility that settled disputed lines of boun- 
daries and interfering surveys that had 
proven a continual source of annoyance and 
litigation for years prior thereto. 

Hon. Joseph B. McEnally was appointed 
as the successor to Judge Linn in 1868 by 
the Governor and was the first citizen of 
Clearfield county to preside over the Courts 
of the county as president judge. Judge 
McEnally served until December, 1868, 
when he was succeeded by Charles A. 
Mayer, the latter having defeated Judge 
McEnally at the October election, at which 
Judge McEnally was the Republican and 
Charles A. Mayer the Democratic candi- 
date. The district at that time being 
strongly democratic McEnally was de- 
feated, although he polled a large compli- 
mentary vote. Judge McEnally was born 
in Lycoming county on January 25th, 1825. 



He was educated at Dickinson College, 
Carlisle, Pa., having been graduated in the 
class of 1845. He was admitted to the Bar 
in 1849. Shortly after being admitted to 
practice he came to Clearfield county and 
resided there until his death which oc- 
curred at the ripe old age of eighty-five. 
Judge McEnally was a man of beautiful 
character, sterling integrity and as a land 
lawyer he probably had no equal in Penn- 
sylvania. 

Hon. Charles A. Mayer, who succeeded 
Judge McEnally as president Judge, was 
born in York Co., Pa., December 15th, 
1830. At the age of twenty-three he was 
admitted to the Bar of Clinton County, Pa. 
He served as District Attorney of Clinton 
county for two terms. At the expiration 
of his term as president judge he was again 
a candidate and was re-elected in 1878. 
After Clearfield county became a separate 
judicial district in 1883 Judge Mayer be- 
came by virtue of the rearrangement of 
judicial districts made by the Legislature, 
the President Judge of the new twenty-fifth 
district comprising the counties of Clinton, 
Cameron and Elk, and held that office up to 
the time of his death. Judge Mayer was 
one of the best lawyers who ever occupied 
the bench in this county and his decisions 
were seldom reversed by the appellate 
courts. 

By the act of the General Assemblv ap- 
proved the 9th day of April, 1874. which 
was passed to carry out the directions of 
the new state Constitution the Twenty-fifth 
Judicial District was entitled to an addi- 
tional law" judge to be appointed by the 
Governor to serve until such additional law 
judge should be elected at the next general 



182 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



election. Pursuant to tlie authority con- 
tained in that act, Governor Hartranft on 
April loth, 1874, appointed Hon. John H. 
Orvis to be additional law judge of said 
district, and at the general election follow- 
ing he was elected to said office for the 
full term of ten years. Judge Orvis was 
born in Sullivan township, Tioga county. 
Pa., on February 24th, 1835. In February, 
1856, he was admitted to the Clinton county 
Bar, and in December, i86j, he moved to 
Bellefonte, Pa. Judge Orvis resigned in 
1868 and resumed the practice of the law 
in which he was actively and successfully 
engaged up to the time of his death. Judge 
Orvis was possessed of a tine intellect and 
a wonderfully retentive memory. In the 
trial of a case he seldom took any notes and 
yet when he came to charge the jury he 
could give every important item of testi- 
mony with exactness from his memory. 
His ability as a lawyer was very much 
against his success as a judge. He could 
grasp the very essence of a case, so much 
more quickly than the ordinary lawyer, and 
he was so impatient of technicalities and de- 
lays, and so an.xious that right should pre- 
vail, that he sometimes ran afoul of the red 
tape that hedges in the legal procedure, for 
the purpose of preventing a too hasty judg- 
ment, but his career on the bench and as a 
lawyer reflected great credit upon the pro- 
fession which he honored. He was partic- 
ularly kind to young lawyers and it was his 
delight to aid and assist them wherever he 
could and as a consequence he made many 
warm friends among the junior members 
of the bar. 

In the year 1883 Clearfield county by virtue 
of having acquired the necessary population 



of over 40,000, was in obedience to the Con- 
stitution created a separate judicial district, 
and became entitled to elect its own president 
judge. The first judge to be so elected was 
Hon. David L. Krebs. who was the Democratic 
candidate for the office at the November elec- 
tion of 1883, but was supported by many Re- 
publicans who believed that the judicial office 
should be non-partisan. Judge Krebs served 
a full term of ten years and was a candidate 
for re-election, but was defeated by Hon. Cyrus 
Gordon, Republican, after a spirited canvass. 

David Luther Krebs was bom in Ferguson 
township, Centre Co., Pa., on Oct. 5th, 1846. 
In the fall of 1864 he came to Clearfield county 
and taught school while preparing for the 
bar with the late Hon. William A. Wallace. 
About this time his elder brother was drafted 
to serve in the war of the Rebellion and David 
offered to take his place, which he did and 
ser\ed in the 98th Pa. Vols, until mustered out 
in 1865. In 1867 he returned to Centre Coun- 
ty and read law with the late Adam Hoy and 
was admitted to the Centre County bar in 1869 
and in June of the same year located in Clear- 
field, Pa. Upon the appointment by President 
Grant of the late Hon. H. Bucher Swoope as 
United States Attorney, in 1870, Judge Krebs 
in connection with John P. Irvin succeeded to 
his practice. In 1873 Judge Krebs became a 
partner with Hon. W. A. Wallace, which part- 
nership continued up to the time of his election 
to the bench. Since the expiration of his ju- 
dicial term Judge Krebs has been engaged in 
the practice of law at Clearfield and enjoys a 
large and lucrative practice and is recognized 
as one of the leading lawyers of the county. 

Hon. Cyrus Gordon, who succeeded Judge 
Krebs in January, 1894, served also a full 
tenn of ten years and was also a candidate for 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



183 



re-election, but was defeated by the present in- 
cumbent of the office, Hon. Alhson O. Smith, 
after what was probably the most bitter polit- 
ical contest the county has ever known. 

Judge Gordon was born December i, 1846, 
near Hecla Furnace, Centre County, Pa. He 
was educated at Pennsylvania State College in 
1866, studied law at the law school of the 
Michigan University, and in 1869 was admitted 
to the bar of Centre County, Pa. In 1870 he 
removed to Clearfield and began the practice of 
law. In 1874 he became a partner of Hon. 
Thomas H. Murray and this connection con- 
tinued until Judge Gordon's election to the 
bench. Since 1894 Judge Gordon has been 
engaged in the practice of law at Clearfield, 



and also holds the position of general counsel 
to the Pure Food Department of Pennsylvania. 
Hon. Allison O. Smith, who succeeded Judge 
Gordon and who is the present presiding judge 
of the county, assumed the duties of the office 
in January, 1894. Judge Smith was born Oc- 
tober 23rd, 1857, in Montour County, Pa., was 
educated at the University of Pennsylvania 
and was admitted to the bar of Philadelphia in 
June, 1882, and located in Clearfield in Sep- 
tember of that year. After Judge Gordon was 
elected to the bench. Judge Smith became a 
partner of Hon. T. H. Murray and was prac- 
ticing law in connection with him when elected 
judge. 



CHAPTER Xll 

THE BAR OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY— FORMER MEMBERS 

Character of the Clearfield County Bar — First Court — First Resident Member of the Bar- 
Sketches of the Leading Members of the Bar in Former Days. 



The Bar of Clearfield County ranks high 
among similar bodies of the legal profession 
throughout the state. Many of its members 
have achieved place and fame by their ability 
and while it may be that occasionally one 
failed to realize the dignity and high standard 
of honor required of those who would acquire 
the true laurels of a real lawyer, yet such 
members were fortunately the exceptions and 
the general tone of the lawyers of the county 
has always been up to the mark of character 
and integrity called for by the ethics of the 
profession. 

Clearfield county was not organized for ju- 
dicial purposes until 1822 and the first Court 
in the county was held in October of that year. 
The first resident of the bar was Josiah W. 
Smith. Mr. Smith was bom in Philadelphia, 
but when only about 18 years of age came with 
his brother Lewis to this county and they set- 
tled on a farm about two miles below Curwens- 
ville, since known as the ^enjamin Spackman 
farm. He read law with Judge Thomas Burn- 
side of Bellefonte and was admitted to prac- 
tice in December. 1826, and at the same time 
was appointed deputy attorney general for 
Clearfield county, which office was equivalent 
to that of district attornev. Mr. Smith con- 



tinued to practice until 1856 when he removed 
to Philadelphia and resided there until 1862 
when he returned to Clearfield and resided 
there until his death March 22, 1882, at the 
age of 81. While not distinguished as a trial 
lawyer Josiah Smith was deeply read in the law 
and much given to mediation between litigants. 
He was a man of pure character and an upright 
and respected citizen. 

Lewis Smith, the brother of Josiah Smith 
to whom reference has already been made, read 
law with Josiah and was admitted to practice 
about 1830. He was a trial lawyer of 
considerable ability. Mr. Smith was en- 
gaged in nearly all the cases brought in the 
courts of the county during his practice, 
and was generally successful. He died in 

1847. 

Joseph M. Martin located in Clearfield about 
1830 and practiced law until the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1835. He was a law- 
yer of ability, but owing to the few years that 
he was at our bar not much data can be secured 
regarding him. 

\\'illiam Christie located in Curwensville 
about 1826. He was a man of unusual prom- 
ise and force, but although he had a fine prac- 
tice and was very popular, he indulged in ex- 



184 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



185 



cesses which soon ended his career by an un- 
timely death. 

James B. Marr located in Clearfield about 
1S39, after having read law with James F. 
Linn Esq. of Lewisburg, Pa., and being ad- 
mitted to the bar of Union County. He prac- 
ticed law for several years and was considered 
as fairly successful. He died a few years 
after coming here, but the exact date of his 
death has not been ascertained. 

Daniel G. Fenton was admitted to the bar 
about 1830. He came here from New Jer- 
sey and practiced with indifferent success until 
1836, when having become involved in finan- 
cial difficulties, he sold his property and moved 
to Iowa, after which no further data about 
him has been obtained. 

Elmer S. Dundy read law in Clearfield and 
was admitted to the bar here, but shortly after- 
wards removed to Falls City, Nebraska, where 
he became judge of the United States Court. 
It is believed that Judge Dundy never practiced 
law here. 

Lewis J. Crans came from Philadelphia and 
located at Curwensville. He read law with 
Joseph S. Frantz and was admitted to practice 
here. He had a large practice and was quite 
successful as a lawyer, but after about seven 
years from his admission to the bar he removed 
to Philadelphia and from there to Concordia, 
Kansas. 

Isaac G. Gordon came from Union County 
where he read law with James F. Linn Esq., 
of Lewisburg, and was admitted to practice in 
1843. He first located at Curwensville and 
subsequently formed a partnership with George 
R. Barrett, which continued for about three 
years, when he removed to Brookville, Pa. 
He became a Judge of the Supreme Court of 
the state and served a full term. He died at 
Brookville a few years ago. 



James Harvey Larrimer was born in Cen- 
tre County, Pa., read law with Judge James 
Burnside and was admitted to the bar of Cen- 
tre Co. about 1853. In 1854 he located in 
Clearfield and practiced law until 1858, when 
he became one of the editors and proprietors 
of the Clearfield Republican, his partner in the 
enterprise being R. F. Ward, Jr. In i860 Mr. 
Larrimer retired from the partnership and re- 
sumed the practice of the law. When the war 
of the Rebellion broke out he enlisted as a pri- 
vate but was made first lieutenant of Captain 
Loraine's Company of the Fifth Pa. Reserves. 
Subsequently he was promoted to Captain and 
then to Major and appointed aide on the staff 
of General Samuel W. Crawford. Major 
Larrimer was killed in a skirmish with guer- 
illas near Collett's Station, Va., February 14, 
1863. Larrimer Post G. A. R. of Clearfield 
was named in his honor. 

Joseph S. Frantz came to Clearfield about 
1850 from Kittanning, Armstrong Co., Pa. 
where he had been admitted to the bar. He 
remained in Clearfield about four years and 
then removed to the west, and was lost track 
of by his Clearfield friends. 

George Rodden Barrett was born in Cur- 
wensville on the 31st day of March, in the 
year 181 5. In the year 183 1 he was appren- 
ticed to Governor John Bigler, to learn the 
printer's trade. In 1833 he became editor of 
the "Brookville Jeffersonian," published at 
Brookville, Jefferson county, which he contin- 
ued for two years. He moved to Lewisburg 
in 1835 and edited the "Lewisburg Democrat." 
While there he read law with James F. Linn, 
and was admitted to practice in 1836, and in 
the same year came to Clearfield. The next 
year, 1837, he was made deputy attorney-gen- 
tral for Clearfield and Jefferson counties. Mr. 
Barrett was elected to the State Legislature in 



186 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1840, and re-elected the succeeding year. He 
served as a member of the judiciary cunimiitee 
when the law abolishing imprisonment for 
debt was passed. In 1852 he was chosen as 
one of the presidential electors. On account of 
his recognized legal ability he was selected by 
President Pierce for the purpose of codifying 
the revenue laws. He was appointed president 
judge of the Twenty-second Judicial District, 
comprising the counties of Wayne, Pike, Mon- 
roe and Carbon, in the year 1853. At the 
general election in the district in 1855, he was 
elected to the same position and re-elected in 
1865. He resigned in 1869, but was appointed 
to the same office by Governor Geary, and 
served one year. In 1872 Barrett returned to 
Clearfield and resumed the practice of the law, 
which practice he continued up to 1884, at 
which time he retired from the active duties 
of the profession, content to rest upon the well 
earned honors of nearly half a century. He 
died, March 9th, 1889. 

Robert Wallace was a native of Ireland, hav- 
ing been born in Barony Omagh, County Ty- 
rone, March 13, 1792. In the year 1819 he 
emigrated to America and settled in Mifflin 
County, Pa., where he taught school. He read 
law with E. Banks Esq. of Lewistown, Pa. 
and was admitted to the bar in 1824. After 
practicing a short time in Huntingdon, Pa. he 
came to Clearfield where he remained about 
one year and then again located in Hunting- 
don, but made regular trips to Clearfield to 
attend to the trial of cases. In 1836 he re- 
moved from Huntingdon to Clearfield where 
he remained until 1847, when he moved to 
HoUidaysburgh, Pa. In 1854 he again located 
in Clearfield. He died at Wallaceton, Pa., Jan- 
uary 2, 1875. 

Thomas J. McCullough was liorn in Pitts- 



burgh, Pa., July 10, 1828. His father was a 
Methodist minister and in the year 1840 
Thomas came with the family to New Wash- 
ington. He read law with Hon. G. R. Barrett 
and was admitted to the bar about 1855. In 
1868 and '69 he represented the county in the 
Legislature and after his ser\'ices in that ca- 
pacity he engaged in the oil business. Later 
he opened a law office in Philipsburg, Pa., 
still residing, however, in Clearfield. He died 
at Philipsburg, Dec. 27, 1885. 

William .A. Wallace was born in Hunting- 
don, Pa. Nov. 27, 1827. He came to Clear- 
field with his father, Robert Wallace, in 1836. 
He read law with his father and was admitted 
to the bar of Clearfield County in September, 
1847. Ii^ 1862 he was elected to the State 
Senate and re-elected in 1865, '68, '71 and '74, 
serving fifteen consecutive years. In 1871 he 
was elected Speaker of the Senate. In 1865 
he was chaimian of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee and was re-elected in 1866, '67 and '68 
and was again chosen in 1871. In 1875 he 
was chosen by the Legislature as a United 
States senator from Pennsylvania. He was 
for many years a power in the Democratic 
party, state and national. Mr. Wallace was a 
fine lawyer and until he gave up active prac- 
tice to engage in politics and the development 
of the coal interests of Clearfield county, he 
was one of the leaders of the bar and was rec- 
ognized as an opponent worthy of battle by 
those who contested with him in the Courts. 
He died in 1896. 

Joseph Benson McEnally was born January 
25th, 1825 and admitted to the bar in 1849 
(See sketch of his life in preceding chapter). 

John F. W'eaver was admitted to the bar in 
1844 after having read law with James Burn- 
side of Bellefonte, Pa. He came to Clearfield 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



189 



in 1845. In 1848 he was made deputy attor- 
ney general for the county and served three 
years, after which he became interested in the 
lumber business, which absorbed so much of 
his time that he gave up the practice of the law 
and devoted himself to business pursuits until 
his death. 

J. Biddle Gordon was born in Reading, 
Pa., being a son of Judge Gordon of that city. 
He located in Clearfield in 1853 and practiced 
law here for a number of years. He became 
involved by reason of his carelessness in busi- 
ness matters and being unable to settle his finan- 
cial affairs, committed cuicide. 

Henry Bucher Swoope was born in Hunting- 
don, Pa., in the year 183 1 and was a son of 
the eminent physician. Doctor William Swoope, 
of that place. He was educated at the Acad- 
emia Academy, read law with the late Hon. 
John Scott of Huntingdon and was admitted 
to the bar at Huntingdon in 1852. He came 
to Clearfield in 1853, where he resided and 
practiced law until 1869, when President Grant 
appointed him U. S. district attorney for the 
district of Western Pennsylvania, when he re- 
moved to Pittsburgh. He was reappointed by 
President Grant in 1874, and served until his 
death in February, 1874. H. Bucher Swoope 
was one of the leading lawyers of Pennsyl- 
vania and as an advocate had few equals. He 
was also prominent in politics, having been 
chairman of the American party when that or- 
ganization captured the state government and 
elected Pollock Governor. He was after the 
formation of the Republican party an active 
leader therein, a strong supporter of President 
Lincoln and the war to preserve the Union, 
organizing and commanding a company of sol- 
diers to assist in repelling the rebel invasion of 
Pennsylvania, and using his voice, pen and 



means at all times for the benefit of the Gov- 
ernment. Mr. Swoope was the founder and 
first editor of the Clearfield "Raftsman's 
Journal," which under his able editorship as- 
sumed an important place in the newspaper 
field. He was also the founder and editor in 
chief of the "Pittsburgh Evening Telegraph," 
(now the "Chronicle Telegraph"). As a pros- 
ecuting officer he became celebrated during his 
incumbency of the office of U. S. Attorney and 
his name was a terror to evil doers, as the ac- 
quittal of a defendant in a trial in which Mr. 
Swoope represented the Government was an 
almost unheard of event. Yet he was ever 
willing to aid the repentant criminal and use 
his influence and efforts to secure him a new 
chance in life. As a political orator he be- 
came famous and was one of the most eloquent 
and brilliant speakers of his time. He was 
also fond of literary pursuits and delivered 
many lectures and addresses upon such topics. 

John H. Fulford was born in Bedford, Pa., 
Feby. ir. 1838, read law with Fraiik Gordon 
Esq. of that place and with J. B. McEnally of 
Clearfield. He was admitted to practice at 
Clearfield about i860. While reading law he 
also taught school. He was an active and 
stanch Republican and took an active part in 
party affairs. He died at Clearfield, June 27, 
1877. 

John Lever Cuttle was born in Lan- 
cashire, England, June 22, 1809. He came 
to America in the year 1823 and located in 
Clearfield in 1839. He was a machinist and 
read law in his spare time, with Hon. G. R. 
Barrett. In 1853 he was admitted to prac- 
tice. In 1859 he was elected prothonotary 
and served one term. In 1882 he was 
elected one of the associate judges of the 
county and served one term. Prior to his 



190 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



admission to the bar. Mr. Cuttle served as attended Dickinson Seminary at Williams- 

a justice of the peace and as county sur- port, Pa., studied law with J. M. Carlisle 

veyor. He died 'at Clearfield a number of Esq. of Chambersburg, Pa., and was ad- 

vears a"^o. mitted to the bar of Franklin County in 

Robert J. Wallace, a brother of William June, 1S56. He located in Clearfield in 

A. Wallace, was born in Clearfield and read 1858. Mr. Test was possessed of the pe- 

law with his brother. He was admitted to culiar faculty of laughing a case out of court 

practice and served as district attorney of and this sense of humor soon gained him 



the county. He died about 1857. 

James Hepburn was born in Philadel- 
phia and came to Clearfield in 1822, where 
he was admitted to the bar and practiced 
law until his death. 

James Petrikin was one of the older 



the title of the wag of the bar. Although 
a man of considerale natural ability, he sel- 
dom practiced in the civil cases but de- 
lighted in the trial of criminal cases, where 
his ready wit stood him in good stead. 
Feather Test was very popular with the peo- 



lawyers but no data is obtainable in regard pie and with the members of the bar. He 

^Q him. died at Clearfield, Pa., August 12, 1886. 

Samuel M. Green came to Clearfield from William M. IMcCuUough, a brother of 

Centre county in October, 1822, and was Thomas J. McCullough, was born in Beaver 

admitted to the bar on that date. He was County, Pa., October i, 1837, and came to 

appointed deputy attorney-general for the Clearfield county in 1840. At an early age 

county and remained here a number of he entered the office of Hon. FI. B. Swoope, 

years. Subsequent to his removal from who instructed him in the necessary ele- 

this county he lived in Bellefonte, Pa., but ments of education as well as in the law. 

went- west and was lost trace of by his for- He was admitted to the bar in 1859. was 

mer associates. twice chosen district attorney of the county 

Frederick O'Leary Buck was born in and as a criminal lawyer he stood high. Mr. 
England. Mr. Buck practiced law in Clear- McCullough died at Thomasville. Ga.. Jan- 
field a short time in connection with William uary 26, 1884. 
McCullough. He went west and died a Walter Barrett was born in Clearfield, 



year or two ago. 

Joseph F. McKenrick was born in Adams 
County, Pa., May 9, 1845. He came to 
Clearfield in 1865, read law with Hon. Will- 



August 2. 1839, and was educated at the 
public schools and the University of Penn- 
sylvania. In the year 1853 he was appointed 
a midshipman in the V. S. Navy. He read 



iani A. Wallace and was admitted to prac- law with his father. Hon. G. R. Barrett, and 



tice June 24. 1878. In 1879 he was elected 
district attorney and was re-elected in 1882. 
Some years ago he removed to Ebensburg. 
Pa., where he now resides. 

Israel Test was bom in Philipsburg, Cen- 
tre county, Pa., September 28. 183 1. He 



was admitted to the bar in 1859. At the 
breaking out of the war of the Rebellion, 
Mr. Barrett was appointed major of the 
Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers and 
commanded the regiment after the death of 
Colonel William G. Murray at the battle of 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



191 



Winchester. At the battle of Fort Repub- 
lic he was made Lieutenant Colonel. At 
Cloud's Mills Colonel Barrett was injured 
by his horse falling on him at the time of 
the giving way of a bridge. He then re- 
signed from the army and in 1862 he re- 
turned home and resumed the practice of 
law in partnership with his father. Colonel 
Barrett died at Clearfield, Pa., in 1906. 

William D. Bigler was born in Clearfield, 
Pa., September 17, 1841. He was educated 
at the West Jersey Academy at Bridgton, 
N. J., and at Princeton College. He read 
law with William A. Wallace and was ad- 
mitted to. the bar in 1866 and afterwards en- 
tered into partnership with Mr. Wallace 
and Frank Fielding under the firm name of 
Wallace, Bigler and Fielding, and after- 
wards was a member of the firm of Field- 
ing, Bigler and Wilson. In later years Mr. 
Bigler gave up the active practice of the 
law and devoted himself to business inter- 
ests. He died at Clearfield, Pa., April 9, 
1907. 

Daniel W. McCurdy was born in Charles- 
ton township, Chester county. Pa., August 
30, 1841. He was educated at Freeland 
Seminary, Montgomery county, Pa., and at 
Dickinson College from which latter insti- 
tution he was graduated in 1862. He then 
taught school in Luzerne County about two 
years, when he came to Clearfield and 
taught in the old Academy for several years. 
In 1865 he entered the office of J. B. Mc- 
Enally as a law student. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1868 and in 1872 entered into 
partnership with Judge McEnally. Mr. 
McCurdy died on the 14th of February, 
1903. 

Alonzo A. Adams was born in Boggs 



township, Clearfield county, Pa., December 
3, 1847. He read law with Hon. H. Bucher 
Swoope and was admitted to the bar in 
June, 1869. Mr. Adams died about 1879. 

William C. Arnold was born in Luthers- 
burg. Clearfield county. Pa., July 15, 1851. 
He was educated at Millersville State Nor- 
male School and at Phillips Academy at An- 
dover, Mass. He read law with Hon. J. B. 
McEnally and was admitted to the bar in 
May, 1878. He located at Curwensville. 
In 1896 he was the Republican candidate 
for Congress in the 28th District and was 
elected and was re-elected for the following 
term. He also served his party as Chair- 
man of the Republican County Committee 
for several years. About the year 1892 Mr. 
Arnold located in DuBois where he resided 
and practiced law until his death, which 
occurred in 1906. W. C. Arnold was a 
lawyer erf ability, and stood well in his pro- 
fession. He was a man of fine presence and 
agreeable personality. As a public speaker 
he was at his best on the political platform 
and took an active part in the various cam- 
paigns from 1878 to the time of his death. 

Alonzo P. MacLeod was born in Clear- 
field May 29, 1861. He attended the Le- 
high University at Bethlehem, Pa., and the 
Columbia Law School at New York. Mr. 
MacLeod read law with Walter Barrett and 
was admitted to the bar in May, 1884. He 
first practiced at Coalport, Pa., and after- 
wards removed to Altoona, Pa., where he 
died about 1907. 

Alfred A. Graham was born at Clearfield, 
February 3, 1845. He read law with Will- 
iam A. Wallace and after his admission to 
practice formed a partnership with W^illiam 
M. McCullough. A few years prior to his 



192 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



death he removed to DuBois where he died 
on the 23rd of February, 1880. 

William Irvin Shaw was born at Clear- 
field March 20. i860, was educated at the 
pulilic schools and at Yale L'niversity, read 
law with Murray & Gordon and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in June, 1882. After his 
admission to practice Mr. Shaw located at 
Houtzdale and remained there until his ap- 
pointment as United States Consul at Bar- 
ranquilla. South America. Mr. Shaw was 
an active Republican and served as County 
Chairman for a number of years. He died 
in December, 1900. 

Joseph W. Parker was a native of Mifflin 
county, Pa., and was admitted to the bar of 
that county. About 1882 he came to Clear- 
field and practiced law here for a few years, 
but was more interested in politics. After 
his return to Mifflin county he resumed 
practice in that county and died th(?re a few 
years ago. 



George D. Hamor was born in Freeport, 
Armstrong county, Pa., June 21, 1855. He 
was admitted to the bar of Butler county 
in 1876 and practiced there until 1880 when 
he came to this county, locating in DuBois. 
He was admitted to the Clearfield county 
bar in March, 1880. Mr. Hamor remained 
in the county a few years and then moved 
to New Kensington, Pa. 

Truman Ames was born in Antioch, Lake 
county, 111., June 25, 1851. He read law 
with Hall & Ames of St. Mary's, Elk county. 
Pa., and with H, T. Ames Esq. of Williams- 
port, Pa., and was admitted to the bar of 
Lycoming county in May, 1880, and located 
in DuBois in February, 1881. 

George W. Easton was born in Clinton 
county. Pa., ]\Iay 16, i860. He read law 
with Wallace & Krebs and was admitted to 
the liar in June, 1883. Mr. Faston left 
Clearfield county shortly after his admission 
to practice. 



CHAPTER XIII 

CLEARFIELD COUNTY BAR— PRESENT MEMBERS 

Brief Biographical Notices of the Present Members of the Clearfield County Bar. 

Frank Fielding was born at Slippery afterward compelled to leave on account of a 

Rock, Butler county. Pa. He was educated severe illness. From this time until 1864 

at Saint Francis College, at Loretto, Pa., he remained at home, teaching school and 

and at Saint Vincent's at Latrobe, Pa., but working on the farm, when he returned to 

was not a graduate from either. He re- the seminary. During his course of study 

ceived further instruction from Rev. W. T. at the college Mr. Murray read law under 

Hamilton, of Mobile, Ala., while the rever- the direction of Robert Fleming, Esq. He 

end professor was in the Northern States, graduated in 1867. In the month of May, 

Mr. Fielding studied law with Hon. Wm. 1868, he entered the office of H. B. Swoope, 

P. Hill, at Marshall, Texas; continued his Esq., at Clearfield, where he completed his 

course with John N. Thompson, of Butler, course, and was admitted to the bar in May, 

Pa., and finished in the office of Hon. James 1869. The firm of Murray & O'Laughlin 

Bredin, of Butler, now of Pittsburg, Pa. In of which Thomas H. Murray is a member, 

1864, Mr. Fielding came to Clearfield to was formed a few years ago . 
practice. He became a member of the law David S. Herron was born in Center 

firm of Wallace, Bigler & Fielding. The township, Indiana county, Pa., April 24, 

firm was afterward changed to Wallace & 1844. He received an academic education, 

Fielding, and still later to Fielding, Bigler and afterward entered the Ohio University, 

& Wilson. Of late years, however, Mr. at Athens, O., from which he graduated 

Fielding has practiced without a partner, with the class of 1866: read law with Hugh 

He was elected to the office of District At- W. Weir, Esq., at Indiana, for two years, 

torney and served one term. and was admitted to practice at the Indiana 

Thomas Holt Murray was born in Girard county bar in June, 1868. He then located 

township, Clearfield county, on the 5th day in Clarion county and practiced until 1876, 

of April, 1845. His early education was at which time he embarked in the mercan- 

somewhat limited, being confined to such tile and oil business. In 1883 he came to 

branches as were taught at the "country DuBois, Clearfield county, and resumed the 

schools." In 1862 he entered Dickinson practice of his profession. In 1874 Mr. Her- 

Seminary at Williamsport, but was soon ron was admitted to practice in the Su- 

193 



194 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



preme Court of Pennsylvania, and in the 
year following was admitted to practice in 
the District and Circuit Courts of the 
United States. Since 1874 Mr. Herron has 
held the office of United States Commis- 
sioner for the Western District of Penn- 
sylvania. 

David Luther Krebs, born October 5, 
1846. (See ante, Bench of the county.) 

Hurxthal W. Smith was born in Clear- 
field county and was a son of Josiah W. 
Smith, one of the pioneer lawyers of the 
county. H. W. Smith read law^ in the of- 
fice of Hon. William A. \Vallace, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1869. 

Cyrus Gordon was born December i, 
1846, near Hecla Furnace, Centre County, 
Pa. (See Ante Bench of the County.) 

Aaron G. Kramer was born in Centre 
county, August 10, 1844. He came to 
Clearfield in the spring of 1866, and entered 
the office of Israel Test, Esq., as a student 
at law; was admitted to the bar of Clear- 
field county in September, 1871, and has 
since practiced in the county. In the fall 
of 1886, Mr. Kramer was elected member 
of Assembly to represent Clearfield county. 

Harry Frank Wallace was born August 
8, 1852, in Clearfield borough. He was edu- 
cated at Lawrenceville, N. J., entering 
school there in 1867 and graduated in 1869; 
entered Princeton College in 1869 and grad- 
uated with the class of '~2)- He then re- 
turned home and read law in the office of 
W^allace & Krebs until 1875; then entered 
Harvard Law School and attended lectures 
one year; was admitted to the Clearfield bar 
in 1876. Mr. Wallace then a member of the 
firm of Wallace & Krebs, and so continued 
until the election of Mr. Krebs to the ofifice 



of president judge. The firm then became 
Wallace Bros., Harry F. and William E. 
Wallace constituting the firm. 

William E. Wallace was born in Clear- 
field, February 24, 1855. After attending 
the common schools at Clearfield he entered 
Lawrenceville High School, from which he 
graduated in 1873; attended Harvard Law 
School two years ; read law with Wallace & 
Krebs three years, and was admitted to the 
bar in June, 1876. Mr. Wallace is now one 
of the members of the law firm of Wallace 
Bros., successors to ^^'allace & Krebs. 

Oscar Mitchell is a native of Lawrence 
township, born February 28, 1849. He was 
educated at the State Normal School at 
Millersville, Lancaster county, Pa., but did 
not graduate from there. In 1874 he com- 
menced the study of law with Frank Field- 
ing, Esq., and was admitted to the Clear- 
field bar in June, 1876. 

Smith Van Valzah Wilson was born in 
Clearfield, November 21, 1853. He at- 
tended the Clearfield school and afterwards 
took a two years' preparatory course at 
LawTenceville High School. From there 
he returned home and read law with Hon. 
William A. \\'allace nearly a year, when he 
concluded to attend college. In the fall of 
187 1 he entered Lehigh University for the 
regular classical course, and graduated in 
1874. Mr. Wilson then resumed his law 
studies with Senator Wallace, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in March. 1877. Smith V. 
Wilson was elected district attorney in No- 
vember, 1885. and served one term. 

Frank Graham Harris was born in Kar- 
thaus township, this county, November 6, 
1845. In the month of September. 1876, he 
commenced the study of law in the ofifice 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



195 



of Murray & Gordon, Esqs., and continued 
until 1879, when on June 14th of that year 
he was admitted to the Clearfield bar. He 
was elected Representative in the State 
Legislature and served two terms. He 
was elected State Treasurer on the Re- 
publican ticket in 1901 and served one 
term. 

William H. Patterson was born near War- 
rior's Mark, Huntingdon county. Pa., No- 
vember 14, 1851, read law with H. M. Bald- 
ridge, Esq., of Hollidaysburg, Blair county. 
and was admitted to the bar in April, 1878. 
Mr. Patterson came to Houtzdale, Clear- 
field county, in May, 1878, and has since 
practiced law at that place. A/lso at Clear- 
field and DuBois in connection with James 
Gleason, under the firm name of Patterson 
& Gleason. 

Roland D. Swoope, eldest son of Hon. 
H. Bucher Swoope, was born in Curwens- 
ville, Pa., August 26, 1856. He was edu- 
cated at the Clearfield Academy, Hill 
School, Pottstown, Pa., Phillips Academy, 
at Andover, Mass., and at the Western Uni- 
versity, Pittsburg, Pa., read law in the of- 
fice of Murray & Gordon, Esqs., at Clear- 
field, and was admitted to the bar Septem- 
ber, 1878. Mr. Swoope w'as chairman of 
the Republican County Committee for a 
number of years. 

\\'illiam A. Chase was born in Knox 
township, Clearfield county, July 24, 1847, 
was educated at the University of Michi- 
gan, at Ann Arbor, and graduated with the 
class of 1877, and admitted to practice in 
the Supreme Court of Michigan in March, 
1877. Mr. Chase was admitted to the bar 
of Clearfield county in 1879. and com- 
menced practice at Houtzdale, where he re- 



mained till 1886. He then moved to Jef- 
fries, this county, and later to Clearfield. 

John Franklin Snyder was born in Clear- 
field borough, June 2^, 1855. He was edu- 
cated at the common schools and at the 
Leonard Graded School of Clearfield, and 
when not at school worked with his father, 
Henry E. Snyder, in a blacksmith shop. In 
1876 he graduated from school and then 
resumed his place in the shop. He entered 
the law office of Hon. Augustus Landis, at 
Holidaysburg, Blair county, and studied law 
until 1878, when he w^as admitted to the 
bar. Mr. Snyder practiced alone until Jan- 
uary I, 1884, when he associated with Hon. 
John H. Orvis, and established an office at 
Clearfield under the firm name and style 
of Orvis & Snyder. After the death of 
Judge Orvis, Mr. Snyder removed to New 
York City where he now resides. 

W^illiam Alexander Hagerty was born in 
Glen Hope, this county, January 22, 1857. 
He attended the Free School at Lumber 
City, the academy and Leonard Graded 
School at Clearfield, and the Pennsylvania 
College at Gettysburg, Pa. He read law in 
the office of McEnally & McCurdy, and, 
after a course of study for three years was 
admitted to the bar in 1879. 

Arthur LeRoy Cole was born in Potter 
county. Pa., December 24, 1857, read law 
with Olmsted & Larrabee, Esqs., at Couders- 
port. Potter county, and was admitted to 
the bar in June, 1881. Mr. Cole located at 
DuBois in October, 1881. 

Allison O. Smith, born October 23, 1857, 
in Montour county. Pa. (See Ante Bench 
of Clearfield county.) 

W. Clarence Pentz was born in Brady 
township, Clearfield county. May 9, 1858; 



196 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



read law with Frank Fielding, Esq., of 
Clearfield, and was admitted to the bar in 
September, 1S82. Mr. Pentz began prac- 
tice at DuBois, August 15, 1883. 

Martin Luther McQuown was born in In- 
diana county, January 18, 1852; read law 
in the office of Murray & Gordon, Esqs., of 
Clearfield, and was admitted to the bar in 
June, 1883. Mr. McQuown was elected 
county superintendent in 1878, and re- 
elected in 1881. He was chosen chairman 
of the Republican County Committee in 
1886, and is now editor of the Raftsman's 
Journal of Clearfield, Pa., and was elected 
State Senator in 1895 and served four years. 

James Horton Kelley was born in Bell town- 
ship, Clearfield county, October 4, 1852. He 
attended the Dayton Union Academy in Arm- 
strong county, and the Tuscarora Academy in 
Juniata county ; read law in the office of Wal- 
lace & Fielding, and afterward with Frank 
Fielding, Esq., and was admitted to the bar in 
Januar}', 1884. Mr. Kelley is the present Dis- 
trict Attorney of the County. 

Singleton Bell, a grandson of the first white 
male child born in the county, was born in 
Ferguson township, February 12, 1862; read 
law in the oftice of Wallace & Krebs, and was 
admitted to the bar in January, 1884. Mr. 
Bell is senior member of the firm of Bell & 
Hartswick. 

Aniericus Hodge Woodward, bom in Lu- 
zerne county, Pa., May i, 1859; graduated 
from the State Normal School at Millersburg 
in July, 1878; entered the University of Mich- 
igan in 1881, and graduated in 1882; read law 
in 1882 in the office of McEnally & McCurdy, 
and was admitted to the bar in June, 1883. 
Mr. Woodward served two terms as District 
Attorney. 



George W. Zeigler, was born at Markles- 
burg, Huntingdon county. Pa., August 23, 
1861; read law with George B. Orlady, Esq, 
and B. G. Zeigler, Esq., and was admitted to 
the bar of Huntingdon county April, 1883. In 
1884 he was admitted to the Clearfield bar. 
After three months at Clearfield he removed 
to Houtzdale, where he practiced a number of 
years. He is at present located at Philipsburg, 
Pa. 

George M. Bilger was born at Curwensville, 
Clearfield county, September 15, 1861 ; was 
entered as a law student with William C. Ar- 
nold, Esq., of CurwensNalle, in 1883, while 
attending Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., and 
was admitted to the bar of the county March 
22. 1886. 

William I. Swoope was born in Clearfield in 
1862; educated at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and at Harvard University, Cambridge, 
Mass. He read law in the office of Roland 
D. SLwoope, Esq., and was admitted to the bar 
at Clearfield in December, 1886. He was 
twice elected District Attorney of the County. 

Alexander Patterson was born in Airdire, 
Scotland, December 19, 1857; came to this 
country in 1874; entered the office of McEn- 
ally & McCurdy in 1884, and was admitted to 
practice in 1887. 

Howard B. Hartswick was bom at Clear- 
field, Pa., on the 14th day of August, 1865. 
lie read law with Murray & Gordon and was 
admitted to the bar of Clearfield county Sep- 
tember 5, 1887. He is a member of the firm 
of Bell & Hartswick. 

William Clark Miller was born in Centre 
county on September 28th. 1864, was educated 
at the common schools of Unionville, Centre 
county, and the Lock Haven State Normal 
School. Read law with McEnally & McCurdy 



AND REPRESENTATR'E CITIZENS 



197 



and was admitted to the bar January 14, 1889. 
Mr. Miller served as County solicitor for seven 
years and is at present Referee in Bankruptcy. 

George M. Fulford was born at Clearfield, 
Pa., on the 2d day of January, 1870, and was 
admitted to the bar May 25th, 1891. 

Benjamin F. Chase was born in Woodward 
township, Clearfield county, February i, 1869. 
He was educated at the public schools, Clear- 
field High School and at the Law School of 
Michigan University, and was admitted to the 
bar of Clearfield county September 28, 
1891. 

George R. Bigler was born at Clearfield, Pa. 
He was educated at the public schools; read 
law with his father, W. D. Bigler, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Clearfield county. May 24, 
1893. 

Frederick G. Betts was born at Clearfield, 
Pa. He was educated at the public schools and 
at Princeton, and was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county August 2-j. 1892. 

Alfred M. Liveright was born at Philadel- 
phia, Pa. He was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county November 8, 1894. Mr. 
Liveright is at present County Solicitor and a 
member of the firm of Krebs & Liveright. 

Harry Byers was bom in Bell township on 
February 21, 1865. He was educated at the 
public schools and was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county December 8, 1896. 

John M. Urey was bom August 2y. 1870, 
in Banks township, Indiana county. Pa. He 
graduated from the State Normal School at 
Indiana, Pa., in the class of 1891, and was val- 
edictorian of his class. He was admitted to 
the bar of Clearfield county Septeml)er 7, 1896. 
1896. 

Hazard A. Murray was born at Clearfield, 
Pa. He was admitted to the bar of Clearfield 



county on September 5, 1899, and is a inem- 
ber of the firm of Murray & O'Laughlin. 

James P. O'Laughlin was born at Renovo, 
Pa. He was admitted to the bar of Clearfield 
county on September 20, 1900, and is a mem- 
ber of the firm of Murray & O'Laughlin. 

Leno W. Edwards was born at Smith's 
Mills, Clearfield county. Pa., and was admitted 
to the bar of Clearfield county on July i, 
1901. 

John W. McCracken was born in Ferguson 
township, Clearfield county, Pa., September 
17. 1873. He was educated in the public 
schools, at Bucknell University from which 
institution he graduated with the class of 1902, 
received the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
took a post graduate course and received the 
Degree of Master of Arts in 1903. After 
graduation he was a teacher in the University 
Law Department. He read law with E. F. 
Bower, Esq., at Lewisburg, Pa., and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Clearfield county on the 
14th day of November, 1904. 

J. K. Horton was admitted to the bar No- 
vember 28, 1904: practiced a short time at 
Clearfield, Pa., and is now located at Philips- 
burg, Pa. 

\Valter Welch was born at Plymouth, Pa., 
March 7, 1875. He read law with Murray 
& O'Laughlin and was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county, April 5, 1907. 

John C. Forsyth was born at Houtzdale, Pa., 
May 31, 1885. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and at Dickinson Law School and 
was admitted to the bar of Clearfield county, 
September, 1909. He is at present Republi- 
can County chairman. 

A. R. Chase was born in Boggs township, 
Clearfield county. April 2, 1883. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools and at Dickinson 



198 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Law School. He was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county September 14, 1909. 

Harr>' Boulton was born in West Hartle 
Pool, England, October 2, 1872. He was ed- 
ucated at the public schools and was admitted 
to the bar of Clearfield county September 6, 
1894. Mr. Boulton served two terms in the 
Legislature as one of the Representatives of 
Clearfield county, also as Chairman of the Re- 
publican County Committee for several years. 
Mr. Boulton resides at Houtzdale, Pa.; and is 
a member of the firm of Gordon & Boulton. 

John B. McGrath was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county on December 4, 1899. Mr. 
McGrath resides at Houtzdale, Pa. 

Frank Hutton was born in Burnside town- 
ship, Clearfield county, December 26, 1862. 
He was admitted to the bar of Clearfield coun- 
ty on February 2, 1891. Mr. Hutton resides 
in DuBois, Pa. 

George A. Lukehart was bom in Indiana 
county. Pa. He was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county in 1890. Mr. Lukehart re- 
sides in DuBois, Pa. 

Herbert A. Moore was bom at Luthers- 
burg. Pa. He was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county February 23, 1891. Mr. 
Moore resides in DuBois, Pa. 



Fred R. Scofield was born in Huston town- 
ship, Clearfield county. He was admitted to 
the bar of Clearfield county on September 3, 
1894. Mr. Scofield resides at DuBois, Pa. 
Mr. Scofield served two temis in the State 
Legislature. 

Louis E. Boyer was born at DuBois, Pa. 
He was admitted to the bar of Clearfield coun- 
ty November 6, 1899. Mr. Boyer resides at 
DuBois, Pa. 

W. L. Calkins was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield! county September 27, 1904. Mr. 
Calkins resides at DuBois, Pa., and is a mem- 
ber of the firm of Pentz & Calkins. 

James A. Gleason was bom at Houtz- 
dale, Pa. He was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county on September 6, 1897. 
Mr. Gleason resides at DuBois, Pa., and is 
a member of the firm of Patterson & 
Gleason. 

Earl G. Boose was born in Union township, 
Clearfield county, March 10, 1878. He was 
educated in the public schools, and read law 
witli D. S. Herron and S. V. Wilson, Esqs. ; 
was admitted to the bar of Clearfield county, 
Febmar}' 5, 1908. Mr. Boose practices at 
DuBois, Pa. 



CHAPTER XIV 



THE MEDICAL PROFESSION 

Early Physicians of the County — Registration Law of 1881 — Alphabetical List of Physicians 
who have Registered in the County from 1881 to the Present Time, with Biographical 

Mention. 

A great deal of mention and romance en- Troy, N. Y., came to Curwensville. Five 

shrouds the name of the first physician of years later a terrible epidemic of dysentery 

Clearfield County, so that it is impossible broke out in the county, and Dr. Alexander 

to obtain any facts concerning his life. McLeod, of Philipsburg, came to the aid 

This much is known, that Dr. Samuel of Dr. Hoyt. Together these two physi- 

Colman came to this county from Williams- cians struggled against the terrible disease, 

port in 1 80S, and cleared a farm near that which was wiping out whole families and 

of his friend, Joseph Boone, in what is now prostrating hundreds. During the time the 

Penn Township. He did not practice medi- epidemic raged Dr. Hoyt and Dr. McLeod 



cine regularly, only giving his services when 
they were greatly needed. 

Dr. Colman named his farm "Grampian 
Hills," because of the resemblance his land 



were in their saddles night and day travel- 
ling over the entire county to give what re- 
lief they could. 

Dr. Hoyt died March i, 1885. In 1843 



bore to the far-famed Grampian Hills of Dr. McLeod resigned from his profession 



Scotland. This name has since become as- 
sociated with that entire neighborhood and 
the thriving terminus of the Tyrone and 
Clearfield Railroad is now called Grampian. 
Although Dr. Colman never mentioned 
his early life, it was generally supposed that 
he was the son of an English nobleman. 



and entered the ministry of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. He died at Meadville, 
Pa. in 1877. 

Dr. A. T. Schryver, a native of Oswego 
county, N. Y., was the next physician to 
come into the county. He came to Clear- 
field in 1826, but did not practice medicine 



His superior education and apparent means until 1830. He was elected superintendent 

were the only grounds for this supposition, of the common schools at the first election 

Dr. Colman died in 1819, at the early age for that position held in the county. Dr. 

of forty. He never married and his name Schryver also practiced medicine at Glen 

and secret died with him. Hope. 

In 1819, Dr. John P. Hoyt, a native of Dr. Henry Lorain located as a physician 

199 



200 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



in Philipsburg in 1825. He did not confine 
his practice to that neighborhood, driving 
into tliis county very often. In 1835 lie 
came to Cleartielil, where he lived until the 
time of his death, March 3, 1859. Dr. Lo- 
rain possessed unusual opportunities for the 
study of his profession and used them to the 
best advantage. He was quick to decide 
and act and let nothing interfere with the 
pursuance of his practice. 

Dr. Lewis Iddings came to Curwensville 
in 1827, but mo\ed away after a few years. 

Dr. Perdue located at Clearfield in 1834. 
but remained there only a few years. 

Dr. Henry Houty practiced in Curwens- 
ville and Clearfield for a short time between 

1837-47- 

Dr. Matthew Woods, a native of Penn's 
Valley, came to Curwensville in 1844. 
Twelve years later he moved to Clearfield, 
where he practiced ten years. In 1866 he 
went to Mercer, Pa., where he remained 
until his death, December 16, 1868. 

Dr. William P. Hills, a native of Pratts- 
burg, practiced medicine in Clearfield from 
1846 to 1852, then went West, where he 
died June, 1885. 

Dr. John C. Richards located in Curwens- 
ville in 1846, where he practiced five years. 
Later he practiced in Bloomington, Glen 
Hope and Philipsburg. 

Dr. James Irvin, a native of Centre 
county, practiced medicine in Curwensville 
in 1847-8. 

Dr. R. V. Wilson, a native of Centre 
county, came to Curwensville in 1850. 
Soon after he moved to Clearfield where 
he lived the rest of his life. He was very 
well known as an intelligent and successful 
physician, and was often called in consul- 



tation with eminent doctors. He died Feb- 
ruary 13, 1878. 

Dr. Thomas R. Blandy, a native of Dela- 
ware, began to practice medicine in Osceola 
about 1851. He practiced throughout that 
region until 1881, when he moved to Hunt- 
ingdon, Pa. He died at that place April 21, 
1885. Dr. Blandy -was held in the highest 
esteem by all who knew him. 

Dr. Hardman Thompson, a native of 
Clearfield, came to Curwensville in 1851, 
licre he had a large practice and became a 
prominent citizen. He died September 19, 
1866. 

Dr. G. W. Caldwell began the practice of 
medicine at Beccaria Mills in 185 1. He 
afterwards moved to Glen Hope, where he 
died October 5, 1885. Dr. Caldwell's prac- 
tice extended over a very large area, and he 
is well remembered in that part of the 
county. 

Dr. Thomas J. Boyer, a native of Bern- 
ville. Pa., came to Luthersburg in 1853, 
where he practiced for fifteen years. He 
then moved to Clearfield where he remained 
until the time of his death October 23, 1882. 
Dr. Boyer was well known in political cir- 
cles, and represented this district both in 
the House of Representatives and in the 
State Senate. 

Dr. D. O. Crouch, a native of Washing- 
ton county. Pa., practiced medicine at 
Luthersburg in 1855-6. He moved to Cur- 
wensville, where he practiced until the time 
of his death, December 26, 1880. During 
the epidemic of diphtheria, which ravaged 
the town of Curwensville just before his 
death, Dr. Crouch was untiring in his strug- 
gle against the terrible disease, and his own 
death was the result of his labors. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



201 



Dr. D. A. Fetzer, a native of Clarion 
county, Pa., began to practice medicine in 
Lumber City in 1855. He continued to 
practice in that town until the time of his 
death October 20, 1903. Dr. Fetzer was a 
very successful physician, and his opinion 
at consultations was frequently sought and 
highly respected. Although a man of great 
culture and considerable wealth. Dr. Fetzer 
chose the hard life of a country doctor. At 
the time of his death he was president of 
the Curwensville National Bank. 

In 1864 the Clearfield County Medical 
Society was organized, in connection with 
the State Medical Society, and the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. Its Constitution 
states that "The objects of this society 
shall be the advancement of medical knowl- 
edge, the elevation of professional char- 
acter, the protection of the professional in- 
terests of its members, the extension of the 
bounds of medical science, and the promo- 
tion of all measures adapted to the relief of 
suffering, the improvement of the health, 
and the protection of the lives of the com- 
munity. This society recognizes as binding 
upon its members the code of medical eth- 
ics as established by the American Medical 
Association." 

By a law passed in 1881, physicians wish- 
ing to practice their profession in this 
county must register their name, place of 
nativity, place of residence, places of prac- 
tice, and the name of the college or univer- 
sity which conferred their degree. 

Below is given an alphabetical list of all 
physicians who were residents of the county, 
or who practiced in the county, who have 
registered from 1881 to the present time. 
Owing to the fact that many residents of 



the county who registered, never practiced, 
and that others have retired or are deceased, 
it is impossible to obtain a correct list 01 
the present practicing physicians of Clear- 
field county. Where information could be 
obtainedit has been added to the data given 
in the register. 

Below is also given a copy of an affidavit 
found in the medical register, which may be 
of interest. 

ALPH.\BETICAL LIST OF DOCTORS. 

Ackley, B. F., a native of Juniata County, 
Pa., place of residence, DuBois; attended lec- 
tures at Pennsylvania College, 1859-60, and 
JefTerson Medical College, 1862-3. 

Ake, N. F. K., a native of Reynoldsville. 
Jefferson County, Pa., place of residence, Cur- 
wensville, Pa., place of practice, Curwens- 
ville; degree M. D., conferred by the Medico 
Chirurgical College, May 18, 1897. 

Andrews, Warren W., a native of Lewis- 
burg, Pa., place of residence, Peale; place of 
practice, Peale; degree M. D. conferred by the 
University of Pennsylvania, May 2, 1888. 

Avery, James W., a native of Delaware, 
Ohio; place of residence, DuBois; attended 
Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Bailey, S. D., a native of Clearfield County; 
place of residence and practice, Clearfield; De- 
gree M. D. conferred by the Jefferson Medical 
College, March 27, 1884. 

Baird, J. A., a native of Houtzdale; place of 
residence, Houtzdale; places of practice. Sax- 
ton, Bedford County, Pa., and Houtzdale; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Baltimore, Md., March 6, 1878. 

Balliet, L. D., a native of Milton, Pa., place 
of residence, DuBois ; degree M. D. conferred 



202 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



by Hahnemann Medical College, March lo, 
1880. 

Barnfield, J. H., a native of Jersey Shore, 
Pa.; place of residence, Irvona; degree M. D., 
conferred by Jefferson Medical College, April 
,2, 1886. 

Bancroft, A. A., a native of Poltage, Ohio; 
place of residence, DuBois ; places of practice, 
Pittsburg, Scranton and DuBois; degree M. 
D. and Surgery conferred by Hahnemann 
Medical College 1869. 

Belcher, E. C, a native of Newark Valley, 
N. Y. ; place of residence, Morrisdale Mines; 
places of practice, Newark Valley, English 
Centre, Pa., Kylertown, Peale and Morrisdale 
Mines; degree M. D. conferred by the Cincin- 
nati College of Medicine, February 26, 1877. 

Bell, J. Finlay, a native of Aaronsburg, Pa. ; 
place of residence, Osceola; places of practice, 
Glen Hope and Osceola; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by the University of the city of New 
York March 13. 1873. 

Bennett, Ash D., a native of Linden, Lyco- 
ming county. Pa. ; place of residence. New 
Washington; degree M. D. conferred by the 
Pennsylvania Medical College, March 20, 
i860. Deceased. 

Bennett, Francis G., a native of New Wash- 
ington, Pa. ; place of residence, Clearfield ; 
place of practice, Clearfield; degree M. D. 
conferred by Jefferson Medical College, April 
3. 1889. 

Bershad, Leonard, a native of Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; place of residence, DuBois ; places of 
practice, Philadelphia and DilBois; degree M. 
D. and surgery conferred by the Jefferson 
Medical College 1904. 

Blair, H. A., a native of Bellefonte. Pa. ; 
place of residence, Curwensville ; place of prac- 
tice, Curwensville; degree M. D. and Surgery 



conferred by the University of Pennsylvania 
June 15, 1906. Degree B. S. conferred by 
State College June 15, 1902. 

Blockwell, Eunock, a native of Pennington, 
N. J. ; residence, Morrisdale, Pa. ; degree M. 
D. conferred by the Medico Chisurgical Col- 
lege, June 23, 1903. 

Bollinger, William E., a native of Hunting- 
don county. Pa. ; place of residence, Coalport ; 
places of practice, Cawper, Kansas, Mt. Ver- 
non, Pa., and Coalport; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by the Baltimore Medical College, 
March 8, 1886. 

Boyer, T. J., Jr., a native of Brady Town- 
ship ; place of residence, Jeannette, Pa. ; places 
of practice, Madera, Pittsburg and Jeannette; 
degree M. D. conferred by the Baltimore Med- 
ical College, March 8, 1886. 

Boyles, Robert M., a native of Clarion 
county, Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places 
of practice, Reynoldsville and DuBois ; degree 
M. D. conferred by Cleveland Medical Col- 
lege, Februarj' 4, 1869, and Western Reserve 
College, March 15, 1882. 

Brotherlin. H. H., a native of Hollidays- 
burg. Pa. ; place of residence, Hollidaysburg; 
places of practice, Curwensville and Hollidays- 
burg; degree M. D. conferred by Jefferson 
Medical College, April 2, 1883. 

Brockbank, John I., a native of Elk county. 
Pa. ; place of residence, Luthersburg ; degree 
M. D. conferred by the Baltimore University 
School of ^ledicine March 4, 1886. 

Bucke. Hiram A., a native of Ver- 
mont; place of residence, Winterberne; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by the Albany Med- 
ical College 

Bullock, J. O., a native of Columbia, Brad- 
ford county. Pa.; place of residence, Peale; 
places of practice. Canton, Mclntyre and 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



203 



Peale; degree M. D. conferred by University 
of City of New York March, 1872. 

Bunn, J. McGirk, a native of Shippensburg, 
Pa. ; place of residence, Altoona ; places of 
practice, New Washington and Altoona; at- 
tended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, 
1846. Deceased. 

Burchfield, James P., a native of Pennsyl- 
vania Furnace, Pa. ; place of residence, Clear- 
field; places of practice, Philipsburg, U. S. 
Anny and Clearfield ; degree M. D. conferred 
by University of Michigan March 26, 1862. 
Deceased. 

Burchfield, Samuel E., a native of Alle- 
gheny county. Pa. ; places of practice, Latrobe 
and Houtzdale; degree M. D. conferred by 
Homeopathic Medical Department of Univer- 
sity of Michigan June 30, 1881. 

Burkhard, S. P., a native of Blair county. 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places of 
pra;:tice, Altoona, Philipsburg and DuBois ; 
degree M. D. conferred by Eclectic Medical 
College 1859, and University of Pa. 1872. 

Burdick, W. P., a native of Sirleyburg, 
Pa. ; place of residence, DuBois ; degree M. D. 
conferred by University of Vermont. 

Buzard, A. M., a native of Westmoreland 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, Irvona ; degree 
M. D. conferred by ^^'estern Pennsylvania 
Medical College March 26, 1891. 

Calhoun, Grier O., a native of Armstrong 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, given as Ma- 
dera; degree M. D. conferred by Baltimore 
Medical College. 

Carlin, Robert G.. a native of Petrolia, Pa.; 
place of residence, Houtzdale ; degree M. D. 
conferred by Jefferson Medical College 1902, 
and degree Ph. B. conferred by Grove City 
College 1898. 

Chaapel, Victor P., a native of Leroy, Pa.; 



place of residence, Irvone; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Baltimore, April, 1892. 

Cherry, Emil T., a native of Altoona, Pa.; 
place of residence, given as Madera; places of 
practice, Indianapolis, Ind., Ansonville, Ma- 
dera; degree M. D. conferred by Medical Col- 
lege of Indiana, February 28, 1884. 

Clerk, Frank G., a native of Scotland; place 
of residence, Houtzdale; attended University 
of Edinborough, Scotland. 

Coe, B. F., a native of Gilleth, Pa.; place of 
residence, Gazzam; place of practice, Gazzam; 
degree M. D. conferred by College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, Baltimore, April 18, 1895. 

Cohen, Morris S., a native of London, Eng- 
land; place of residence, Karthaus Township; 
degree M. D. conferred by the Jefferson Med- 
ical College March 12, 1881. 

Cole, Webster W., a native of Allegheny 
county, N. Y. ; place of residence, Sabula; 
place of practice, Sabula. 

Collins, Howard A., a native of Williams- 
port, Pa.; place of residence, Wallaceton; 
place of practice, Wallaceton ; degree M. D. 
conferred by the Jefferson Medical College 
May 15, 1896. 

Coltman, Robert J., a native of Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; place of residence, Houtzdale ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical 
College March 12, 1881. 

Corey, Horace M., a native of Tioga county, 
N. Y. ; place of residence, Peale ; places of 
practice, Sayre, Pa., Waverly, N. Y., Pine 
City, N. Y. and Peale ; degree M. D. conferred 
by University of Michigan March 27, 1878. 

Cowdrick, Arthur D., a native of Clear- 
field ; place of residence. Clearfield ; place of 
practice, Clearfield; degree M. D. conferred 
by Medico Chi College June 4, 1909. 



204 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Covert, E. Douglass, a native of Jefferson 
county, Pa.; place of residence, Kernnoor; 
studied at Homeopathic Hospital, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Crammer, Carl B., a native of Bradford 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, DuBois ; place 
of practice, DuBois ; degree M. D. conferred 
by Jefferson Medical College May 13, 1898. 

Cresswell, A. E., a native of Missouri ; 
place of residence, near Ansonville; places of 
practice, Fairview, Cherr>' Tree and Anson- 
ville; attended lectures at Medical College of 
Ohio 1871-2; also at Medical Department of 
University of Michigan 1872. 

Currier, J., a native of Port Deposit, Md. ; 
place of residence, Grampian; places of prac- 
tice, Troutville and Grampian; degree iL D. 
conferred by Kentucky School of Medicine 
June 28, 1 88 1. 

Dale, David, a native of Lemont, Pa. ; place 
of residence, Bellefonte, Pa.; places of prac- 
tice, Curwensville and Bellefonte; degree M. 
D. and Surgery conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania June, 1904. Degrees B. S. and 
M. S. conferred by Pennsylvania College 
1900 and 1903. 

Dale, W. H., a native of Bradford Town- 
ship; place of residence, Ramey; degree M. D. 
conferred by College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Baltimore April 18. 1895. 

Davis, Thomas E., a native of Cambria 
county, Pa. ; place of residence, Bumside ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical 
College March 20, 1867. 

Dyson, \V. W., a native of Greensburg. Pa.; 
place of residence, Osceola ; places of practice, 
Chanibersburg and Osceola; degree M. D. 
conferred by Jefferson Medical College March 
20, 1882. 

Edwards, G. B., a native of Smith's Mills. 



Pa.; residence, Clearfield; degrees M. D. and 
Surgery and B. S. conferred by Washington 
and Jefferson College 1905 and 1901. 

Edwards, W. H., a native of Industry, Me., 
place of residence, Janesville; degree M. D. 
conferred by Bowdoin Medical College June 
8, 1868. 

Emigh, G. \\'., a native of Morris Town- 
ship; place of residence. Woodland; degree 
M. D. conferred by L'niversity Medical Col- 
lege of New York March 11, 1884. 

Elliott, C. B., a native of Mt. Savage, Md. ; 
place of residence, Utahville; places of prac- 
tice, Osceola, Altoona and Utahville; degree 
M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical College 
March 14, 1873. 

Erhard, E. S., place of residence, Xew 
Millport; place of practice, New Millport; de- 
gree M. D. and Surgery conferred by Western 
University of Pennsylvania June 12. 1906. 

Illegal, Irwin S., place of residence. Lumber 
City; place of practice. Lumber City; degree 
M. D. conferred by Western Pennsylvania 
Medical College March 22, 1894. 

Feltwell, John, a native of Chest Township; 
places of practice. Little Marsh, Pa., and 
Houtzdale ; degree M. D. conferred by Jef- 
ferson Medical College March 12, 1879. 

Free, Spencer M., a native of New Free- 
dom, Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; place of 
practice. Dagus Mines, Pa., Beechtree, Pa., 
and Helvetia ; degrees A. B. and A. M. con- 
ferred by Ohio Wesleyan Uni\ersity 1877, 
1880; degree M. D. conferred by College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, 1880. 

Gallagher, John A., a native of Osceola 
Mills : place of residence, Houtzdale ; places 
of practice. Madera, Loraine and Houtzdale; 
degree M. D. conferred by Jefferson J^Iedical 
College April 2, 1886. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



205 



George, S. F., a native of Perry county, 
Pa.; place of residence, Graham; places of 
practice, Ebensburg, Pa., Janesville, Graham 
and Reynoldsville. 

Gifford, Willis B., a native of Lee, Mass. ; 
place of residence, DuBois ; places of practice, 
Attica, Buffalo, N. Y., and DuBois ; degree 
M. D. conferred by University of Buffalo Feb- 
ruary 23, 1876. 

Gilliland, W. S., a native of Centreville, 
Pa. ; place of residence, Central Point ; places 
of practice. Central Point and Congress Hill ; 
attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College 
1865-66. 

Ginter, James E., a native of Troutville; 
place of residence, DuBois; place of practice, 
Tyler; degree M. D. and Surgery conferred 
by Medico Chi College June 4, 1908. 

Gold, James A., a native of Frankstown, 
Pa. ; place of residence, Brisbin ; degree M. D. 
conferred by Homeopathic College of Cleve- 
land March 23, 1887. 

Good, D. R., a native of Franklin county. 
Pa.; place of residence, Osceola; places of 
practice, Altoona and Osceola; degree M. D. 
conferred by Jefferson Medical College 1858. 
Deceased. 

Gordon, John W., a native of Clearfield; 
place of residence, Clearfield; places of prac- 
tice, Philadelphia and Clearfield ; degree M. 
D. and Surgery conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania May 14, 1903; degree B. S. 
conferred by State College 1900. 

Gourley, R. C, a native of Jefferson county. 
Pa.; place of residence, Troutville; place of 
practice, Big Rim ; degree M. D. conferred by 
Western University of Pittsburg, Medical De- 
partment, March 22, 1894. 

Graves, William B., a native of Point Pen- 
insula, N. Y. ; place of residence, DuBois ; 



place of practice, DuBois; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Baltimore, April 22, 1901. 

Gregory, John A., a native of Alexandria, 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places of 
practice, Luthersburg and DuBois ; degree M. 
D. conferred by Jefferson Medical College 
April 2, 1883. 

Griffith, Matthew M., a native of York, 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places of 
practice. Parsons, Pa., Irwin, N. Y., Bradford 
and DuBois ; degree M. D. conferred by Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania March 14, 1867. 

Gurnsey, Charles W., a native of Stuben 
county, N. Y. ; place of residence, Karthaus. 

Guthrie, Daniel W., a native of Armstrong 
county. Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; 
places of practice, DuBois and Beechtree; at- 
tended Baltimore University. 

Haines, Jeremiah, a native of New Cum- 
berland, Pa. ; place of residence, Woodward 
Township ; time of continuous practice, twelve 
years. 

Hancock, Edward C, a native of Phila- 
delphia; place of residence, DuBois; places 
of practice. Buck county, Montgomery 
county, Allegheny county, and Clearfield 
county. 

Hartswick, John G., a native of Boals- 
burg. Pa.; place of residence, Clearfield; 
places of practice, Hublersburg, Pa., and 
Clearfield ; degree M. D. conferred by Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania April i, 1854. De- 
ceased. 

Hartswick, Thomas Huston, a native of 
Clearfield; place of residence, Clearfield; 
places of practice, Philadelphia and Clear- 
field; degree M. D. conferred by University 
of Pennsylvania May 2, 1887. Deceased. 

Harper, Francis W., a native of New- 



206 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



berry, Pa. ; place oi residence, Glen Hope ; 
degree M. D. conferred by College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, April 15, 
1896. 

Hayes, S. E., a native of Luthersburg, 
Pa.: place of residence. Tyler; degree M. D. 
conferred by the Jiledico Chi College May 
13, 1896. 

Heddings, B. E., a native of Pennsylva- 
nia; place of residence, Morrisdale; degree 
U. D. conferred by University of Pennsyl- 
vania 1899; degree B. S. conferred by Dick- 
inson Seminary 1895. 

Henderson, James L., a native of Lewis- 
town, Pa. ; place of residence, Osceola ; 
places of practice, Pendleton, Ohio. Kar- 
ihaus and Osceola; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by Ohio Medical College March i, 
1882. 

Hennigh, George B., a native of Indiana 
county. Pa.; place of residence, Troutville; 
degree M. D. conferred by Baltimore Medi- 
cal College April 15, 1891. 

Hepburn, James H., a native of Jersey 
Shore, Pa. ; place of residence, Irvona ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical 
College April, 1886. 

Hern, C. D. P., a native of Olean, N. Y . 
place of residence, DuBois; place of prac- 
tice, DuBois; degree M. D. and Surgery 
conferred by College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Baltimore, June 3, 1907. 

Hilleary, Jesse G.. a native of Newark. 
Ohio; place of residence, DuBois; place of 
practice. DuBois; degree M. D. conferred 
by Ohio Medical College April 9, 1897. 

Hindman, Charles C, a native of Jeffer- 
son county. Pa. ; place of residence, DuBois ; 
places of practice. Clarion county, Jefferson 
county and DuBois; degree of M. D. con- 



ferred by Jefferson Medical College March 
II. 1876. 

Hogue, Herbert J., a native of Watson- 
town. Pa. ; place of residence, Coalport ; 
places of practice, DuBois and Coalport; 
degree M. D. conferred by College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, March i, 
1885. 

Hogue, Davis A., a native of Watson- 
town, Pa.; place of residence Houtzdale; 
places of practice. Glen Hope, Madera and 
Houtzdale; degree M. D. conferred by Jef- 
ferson Medical College March 11, 1875. 

Hoover, Percy L., a native of Ferguson 
township; place of residence, Mahaffey; 
place of practice, Mahaffey; degree M. D. 
conferred by Jefferson Medical College 
May 15, 1895. 

Hotchkin, Gurdon B., a native of Clinton, 
N. Y. ; place of residence, Morrisdale; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania March 31, 1855. 

Houck, E. E., a native of Indiana county, 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places of 
practice, Punxsutawney and DuBois; de- 
gree M. D. and Surgery conferred by Bal- 
timore Medical College May i. 1906. 

Hurd, M. E., a native of Clearfield county, 
Pa.; place of residence. Newburg; degree 
M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege April 2. 1883. 

Hunter, Elliott C, a native of Xewburg; 
place of residence, Newburg; place of prac- 
tice, Newburg ; degree M. D. conferred by 
Western Pennsylvania Medical College 
March 22, 1888. 

Hyskell, W. E., a native of Smicksburg, 
Pa. ; place of residence. Munson ; degree M. 
D. and Surgery conferred by Jefferson Medi- 
cal College May 28, 1903. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



207 



Irvin, George R., a native of Clearfield, 
Pa.; place of residence, Clearfield; degree 
M. D. conferred by University of Pennsyl- 
vania October, 1897. 

Jackson, Robert, a native of Philadelphia, 
Pa.; place of residence, Houtzdale ; place of 
practice, Houtzdale; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by Jefiferson Medical College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, Baltimore. 

Jenkins, George C, a native of Curwens- 
ville ; place of residence, Curwensville ; place 
of practice, Curwensville; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by University of Pennsylvania June 
14, 1878. 

Johnstone, Charles W., a native of Eng- 
land; place of residence, DuBois; place of 
practice, DuBois; degree M. D. and Sur- 
gery conferred by College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Baltimore, May 21, 1906. 

Johnson, James M., a native of Hunting- 
don, Pa. : place of residence, Coalport ; place 
of practice, Coalport; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Baltimore, April 15, 1896. 

Jordon, R. R., a native of Stewartstown, 
Pa.; place of residence, Tyler; degree M. D. 
and Surgery conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania June 17, 1903. 

Keflfer, Winter, a native of Westmore- 
land county, Pa. ; place of residence, Wil- 
liamsgrove ; place of practice, Williams- 
grove ; degree M. D. conferred by Georgia 
College March 12, 1888. 

Kelso, John Scott, a native of Jefiferson 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, W^oodland ; 
place of practice. Woodland ; degree M. D. 
March 26, 1896. 

King, H. O., a native of Jefferson county. 
Pa.; place of residence, Curwensville; place 
of practice, Curwensville : degree M. D. 



conferred by Jefferson Medical College 
May 2, 1893. 

Kline, D. D., place of practice, Clearfield; 
time of continuous practice, 36 years; at- 
tended Eclectic College. 

Kline, John H., a native of Centre county. 
Pa.; place of residence, Grampian; degree 
M. D. conferred by Eclectic Medical Col- 
lege January 24, 1867. 

Kirk, Ellis Irwin, a native of Clearfield: 
place of residence, Chester Hill; place of 
practice, Chester Hill; attended Eclectic Med- 
ical college, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Kirk, George B., a native of Luthers- 
burg; place of residence, Kylertown; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Baltimore Medical 
College April 21, 1898. 

Kirk, Charles H., a native of Luthers- 
burg. Pa. ; place of residence, New Wash- 
ington; degree M. D. conferred by Eclectic 
Medical Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Kirk, Joseph, Jr., a native of Luthers- 
burg; place of residence, Luthersburg; 
place of practice, Luthersburg; degree M. 
D. conferred by Eclectic Medical College, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, June 3, 1890. 

Lewis, Edward C, a native of Northum- 
berland, Pa.; place of residence, Grampian; 
degree M. D., conferred by Bellevue Hos- 
pital Medical College March 10, 1881. 

Lewis, Homer H., a native of Vandalia, 
Missouri ; place of residence, Jefferson Line ; 
place of practice, Troutville; degree M. D. 
and Surgery conferred by the University of 
Louisville June 30, 1900. 

Leipold, B. E., a native of Clearfield; 
place of residence, Clearfield; place of prac- 
tice, Clearfield; degree M. D. conferred by 
Jefiferson Medical College May 13, 1896. 
Litz, Jefferson, a native of Clearfield: 



208 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



place of residence, DuBois; places of prac- 
tice, Johnstown, Woodland and DuBois ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical 
College March, 1862. 

Logan, Samuel G., a native of Jefferson 
county. Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; 
degree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medi- 
cal College May 15, 1901. 

Lydic, Joseph M., a native of East Ma- 
honing, Pa.; place of residence, Troutville; 
places of practice, Smithport, Pa., and 
Troutville; attended Medical Lectures 
at University of Ann Arbor, 1868-9, 
1 869-70. 

Maine, Charles L., a native of Maines- 
burg. Pa. ; place of residence, Helvetia ; 
places of practice, Walston, Pa., and Hel- 
vetia; degree M. D. conferred by College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, April 
29, 1892. 

Maloy, John D., a native of Ireland; place 
of residence, DuBois; places of practice, 
Bradford, Emporium and DuBois; degree 
M. D. conferred by Medical Department of 
the University of Buffalo. 

Mangon, John M., a native of Ireland ; 
place of residence, Houtzdale; places of 
practice, Kansas and Houtzdale; degree M. 
D. conferred by University of Pennsylvania 

1857- 
Mank, G. E., a native of Claysburg, Pa. ; 

place of residence, Woodland; degree M. D. 

and Surgery conferred by Medico Chi. College 

June 5. 1909. 

Maxwell, J. A., place of residence, Cur- 
wensville; place of practice, Curwensville; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical 
College March 10, 1866. Deceased. 

MacKenzie, A. E., a native of Novia Sco- 
tia; places of practice, Clearfield and Lock 



Haven ; degree M. D. and Surgery conferred 
by Hahnemann Medical College May 2, 1898. 

McDowell, Samuel I., a native of York 
county. Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places 
of practice, DuBois and New Oxford; at- 
tended Jefferson Medical College. 

McKee, Thomas X., a native of Sherrett, 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; degree M. D. 
conferred by Western Pennsylvania Medical 
College March 2j, 1890. 

McXaul, Caleb G., a native of Pike Town- 
ship; degree M. D. conferred by Jefferson 
Medical College April 2, 1890. 

Mead, R. K., a native of East Brady, Pa.; 
place of residence, DuBois; degree M. D. and 
Surgery conferred by University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Means, W. A., a native of Punxsutawney ; 
place of residence, DuBois; places of practice, 
Luthersburg and DuBois; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by Cincinnati College of Medicine and 
Surger}' February 3, 1865. Deceased. 

Miller, S. J., a native of Clearfield county; 
place of residence, Madera; places of practice, 
Ansonville and Madera ; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by University of City of New- York 
1886. 

Miller. James A., a native of Clearfield 
county ; place of residence. Grampian ; place of 
practice, Grampian ; degree M. D. conferred 
by University of Pennsylvania March 2-,, 
1897. 

Mock. David C, a native of Pavia, Pa. ; 
place of residence, DuBois; degree M. D. and 
Surger)' conferred by the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons. Baltimore, May 18, 
1904. 

Mortimer, James I., a native of Clarion 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, DuBois ; 
places of practice, East Brady, Warren, Ohio; 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



209 



McKean county, Allegheny City and DuBois ; 
time of continuous practice, fourteen years. 

Mott, William S., a native of Clearfield 
county; place of residence, Wallaceton; degree 
M. D. conferred by Eclectic Medical Institute, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, June 2, 1885. 

Murray, Jno. A., a native of Hudson, Pa. ; 
place of residence, Mahaffey; places of prac- 
tice, Ansonville and Mahaffey ; degree M. D. 
conferred by University of Maryland, March, 
1885. 

Murray, V. A., a native of Jefferson county. 
Pa.; place of residence, Mahaffey; place of 
practice, Mahaft'ey; degree M. D. conferred 
by the Kentucky School of Medicine June 18, 
1892. 

Myers, J. G. L., a native of Huntingdon 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, Osceola ; 
places of practice, Burlington, Indiana, Hill 
Valley, Pa., Port Matilda, Pa., and Osceola; 
attended course of lectures at Ann Arbor Uni- 
versity 1887-8. 

Neveling, F. S., a native of Brownsville, 
Ind. ; place of residence, Clearfield ; places of 
practice, St. Lawrence, Pa., Glen Hope, 
Frenchville, and Clearfield ; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by Eclectic Medical College of Pennsyl- 
vania Januai-y i, 1870. 

New, Philip S., a native of Gemiany; place 
of residence, DuBois; places of practice, Mis- 
souri, Iowa, Indiana, Pa., Punxsutawney and 
DuBois ; time of continuous practice, 28 years. 

Park, Milo E., a native of Armstrong 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, Utahville ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Medical Department 
of Western Reserve University March 27, 
1884. 

Park, William C., a native of Whitesburg, 
Pa.; place of practice, Cochran Mills, Pa., and 
New Millport; degree M. D. conferred by 



Western Reserve University March 12, 1882. 
Deceased. 

Pettigrew, S. H., a native of Kittanning, 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places of 
practice, Kams City, Pa., and DuBois; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical 
College. 

Piper, William C, a native of Cypher, Pa.; 
place of residence, Clearfield; place of prac- 
tice, Clearfield ; degree M. D. and Surgery 
conferred by Hahnemann Medical College 
May 21, 1904. 

Potter, J. W., a native of Clarion county. 
Pa.; place of residence, Keewaydin; place of 
practice, Mulsonburg; attended lectures at Na- 
tional Medical College, Washington, D. C. 
Deceased. 

Prothers, William C, a native of Perry 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, Ramey ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical 
College April 27, 1892. 

Prowell, George F., a native of Lewisburg, 
Pa.; place of residence, Burnside; places of 
practice, Carlisle, Pa., and Burnside; degree 
M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege March 10, 1867. 

Purnell, Howard G., a native of George- 
town, Del. ; place of residence, Ansonville ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jeft'erson Medical 
College April i, 1892. 

Pussell, Edward W., a native of Fleming, 
Pa.; place of residence; Clearfield; degree M. 
D. and Surgery conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania 1902. 

Quigley, J. M., a native of Wallaceton; 
place of residence, Winbume; place of prac- 
tice, Winburne; degree M. D. conferred by 
Baltimore Medical College April 22, 1898. 

Quinn, L. W., a native of DuBois; place 
of residence and practice, DuBois; degree M. 



210 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



D. conferred by Western Pennsylvania Med- 
ical College March 26, 1896. 

Read, F. B., a native of Clearfield; place of 
residence, Osceola; places of practice, Wood- 
land and Osceola; degree M. D. conferred by 
Jefferson Medical College March 10, 1867. 

Reese, O. P., a native of Centre county; 
place of residence, Kylertown; degree M. D. 
conferred by University of Michigan March 
9, 1865. 

Rhoads, J. W., a native of Harrisburg, Pa. ; 
place of residence, Houtzdale; places of prac- 
tice, Danville, Tunkhannock and Houtzdale; 
degree M. D. conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania March, 1854. 

Richards, H. Preston, a native of Illinois; 
place of residence, Karthaus; degree M. D. 
conferred by University of Maryland April 
8, 1889. 

Ross J. Miller, a native of Morgantown, 
W. Va. ; place of residence, DuBois; places of 
practice, Lumber City and DuBois; degree M. 
D. conferred by Eclectic Medical College of 
Pennsylvania May 5, 1857. Deceased. 

Rowles, J. F., a native of Clearfield county ; 
place of residence, Kerrmoor; degree M. D. 
conferred by Medico Chi. College May 28, 
1904. 

Rowles, L. C, a native of Clearfield county; 
place of residence, Clearfield; degree M. D. 
and Surgery conferred by Medico Chi. Col- 
lege May 27, 1905. 

Ruley, W. E., a native of Hanover, Pa.; 
place of residence, Cleai-field county; degree 
M. D. and Surgery conferred by Southern 
Homeopathic College May 9, 1907. 

Russell, Edmund, a native of Brooklyn, N. 
Y. ; place of residence and practice, Houtz- 
dale; degree M. D. conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania June 15, 1904. 



Rutter, T. C, a native of Nottingham, Pa. ; 
place of residence and practice, Tyler; degree 
M. D. conferred by University of Pennsyl- 
vania June 13, 1900. 

Scheffer, Julius, a native of Germany; place 
of residence, Troutville; places of practice, Al- 
legheny, Butler, McKean, Warren and Jeffer- 
son counties, and Troutville; degree M. D. 
conferred by Medical College of Herford, 
Prussia, May, 1865; attended lectures at Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 1867-68. 

Scheurer, E. M., a native of Hanover, Pa.; 
place of residence, Clearfield; places of prac- 
tice, Bellefonte and Clearfield; degree 'SI. D. 
conferred by Hahnemann Medical College 
March, 1871. Deceased. 

Schneider, Charles, a native of Tyrone. 
Pa.; places of practice, Winterburn, Drift- 
wood and Karthaus; degree M. D. conferred 
by College of Physicians and Surgeons, Balti- 
more, March i, 1881. 

Schumacher, F. L., a native of Hazleton, 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; degree M. D. 
and Surgery conferred by University of Penn- 
sylvania June 19, 1908. 

Senn, W. W., a native of Holland, X. Y. ; 
place of residence, Munson; degree M. D. 
conferred by University of Pennsylvania June 
19, 1907; degree B. S. conferred by Bucknell 
University June 24, 1903. 

Sharbaugh, W. J., a native of Summitville, 
Pa. ; place of residence and practice, Houtz- 
dale; degree M. D. conferred by Kentucky 
School of Medicine June 18, 189 1. 

Shock, J. C, a native of X'^ew Washington; 
place of residence and practice, Ramey; degree 
M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical College 
1891. 

Smathers, W. J., a native of Jefferson 
county. Pa. ; place of residence, DuBois ; de- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



211 



gree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege March 12, 1873. 

Smead, J. J., a native of Clearfield; place of 
residence, New Washington; places of prac- 
tice, Chest Township and New Washington; 
time of continuous practice, twenty-three 
years. 

Smith, Joseph W., a native of York, Pa.; 
place of residence, Osceola; places of practice, 
New Oxford, Philadelphia and Osceola; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College March i, 1870. 

Smith, Reuben, a native of Tioga county. 
Pa. ; place of residence, Grampian ; places of 
practice, Elk county and Grampian; degree 
M. D. conferred by American Eclectic Col- 
lege February 18, 1886. 

Smith, N. \\'., a native of New Brunswick, 
Canada ; place of residence, DuBois, Pa. ; de- 
gree M. D. and Surgery^ conferred by Balti- 
more College of Physicians and Surgeons 
June 3, 1907. 

Spackman, R. V., a native of Bellefonte, 
Pa.; place of residence, DuBois; places of 
practice. Luthersburg and DuBois; degree M. 
D. conferred by Jeft'erson ]\Iedical College 
March, 1870. Deceased. 

Spackman, J. P., a native of DuBois ; place 
of residence and practice, DuBois ; degree M. 
D. conferred by Jefferson ?^Iedical College 
May 15, 1896. 

Sprankle, P. D., place of residence, Du- 
Bois; places of practice, Pittsburg, Punxsut- 
awney and DuBois ; degree M. D. and Sur- 
ge?}' conferred by Jeft'erson Medical College 
May, 1904. 

Stern. W. J., a native of Philadelphia ; place 
of residence. Woodland, Pa. ; degree M. D. 
conferred by Medico Chi. College 1902. 

Stewart, S. C, a native of Bradford Town- 



ship; place of residence, Clearfield; places of 
practice, Woodland and Clearfield; degree M. 
D. conferred by Jefferson Medical College 
March 12, 1881. 

Stitzel, J. W., a native of Ewensville, Pa.; 
place of residence and practice, Houtzdale; 
degree M. D. conferred by Hahnemann Med- 
ical College May 5, 1896. 

Strowbridge, H. P., place of residence, Du- 
Bois; places of practice. Oil City, Rouseville 
and DuBois; time of continuous practice, 
twenty-three years. 

Sullivan, J. C, a native of Armstrong 
county. Pa. ; place of residence and practice, 
DuBois; degree M. D. conferred by Western 
Pennsylvania College, March 27, 1890. 

Sweeney, D. H., a native of Penn Vil- 
lage, N. Y. ; place of residence, Clearfield; 
places of practice, New Bloomfield and 
Clearfield; time of continuous practice forty- 
four years. 

Sweeney, Barnabas, a native of Allegheny 
county, Pa. ; place of residence, DuBois ; 
places of practice, Brookville and DuBois; 
time of practice thirty-seven years. 

Sweeney, G. B., a native of Latrobe; 
place of residence, DuBois; degree M. D. 
conferred by Baltimore College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons ■March 15, 1886. 

Taylor, J. R., a native of Philadelphia; 
place of residence, ^Morrisdale ; places of 
practice, Breck, Colorado, Philadelphia and 
Morrisdale ; degree M. D. conferred by Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 1875. 

Thompson, PI. H., a native of Storms- 
town, Pa. ; place of residence and practice, 
Mahaffey ; degree M. D. conferred by Jeft'er- 
son Medical College April 3, 1889. 

Thorn, A. I., a native of Clearfield ; place 
of residence, Kvlertown ; degree M. D. con- 



212 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



ferred by University of Pennsylvania March 
12, 1872. 

Thorn, Paul, a native of Clearfiekl ; place 
of residence, Kylertown; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by Baltimore University School of 
Medicine March 16, 1867. 

Thorpe, W. P., a native of Curry Run, 
Pa.; place of residence, W'inburne; places 
of practice, Winburne and Straight : degree 
M. D. and Surgery conferred by Baltimore 
Medical College May 11, 1905. 

Thorp. J. D., a native of Greenwood 
township; place of residence, Curry Run; 
places of practice, Curry Run and McGees 
Mills; degree M. D. conferred by Columbus 
Medical College March 2, 1892. 

Tobin, Thomas, a native of Brockway- 
ville, Pa.; place of residence, Bigler; places 
of practice, Grampian, \\'allaceton and Big- 
ler; degree M. D. conferred by University 
of Buffalo. February 21, 1882. 

Todd, Fernandez, a native of Summit- 
ville. Pa.; place of residence. Houtzdale; 
degree M. D. conferred by University of 
Pennsylvania March 12, 1875. 

Torbert, J. S., a native of Williamsport, 
Pa. ; place of residence, Winburne ; places 
of practice. Driftwood and Winburne ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Jefiferson Medical 
College March 12. 1881. 

Tracy, E. M.. a native of Smithport. Pa.; 
place of residence and practice, Houtzdale ; 
degree M. D. and Surgery conferred by 
University of Pennsylvania September 28, 
1903. 

Twitmire, T. C, a native of Mileslnirg. 
Pa.; place of residence. Glen Richie; degree 
M. D. conferred by Western Reserve Uni- 
versity March 3, 1886. 

Ulbrich, Seth S.. places of practice. Wil- 



liampsort and Osceola; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by Jefiferson Medical College March 
14, 1881. 

Ulmer. Stephen E.. a native of Lycom- 
ing, Pa. ; place of residence, Wallaceton ; 
degree M. D. conferred by JefTerson Medi- 
cal College June 15. 1896; degree Ph. G. 
conferred by Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy. 

\'an Fleet, Walter, a native of Piermont, 
X. Y. ; place of residence. DuBois; places' 
of practice, Watsontown and DuBois ; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Hahnemann Medi- 
cal College March 10, 1880. 

Van Valzah, H. B., a native of Millheim, 
Pa. ; place of residence and practice. Clear- 
field ; degree M. D. conferred by Jefferson 
Medical College March 12, 1873. Deceased. 

Vaughn, J. E., a native of Madison, Me. ; 
place of residence. Houtzdale; degree M. D. 
conferred by University of Pennsylvania 
March 15. 1880. 

Wagoner, E. F., a native of York, Pa. ; 
place of residence, Osceola; places of prac- 
tice, York, jManchester and Osceola ; degree 
M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege March 29, 1884. 

Walters, J. L., a native of Loretto, Pa. ; 
place of residence, Houtzdale; degree M. D. 
conferred by College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Baltimore, March i. 1881. 

Waterworth. S. J., a native of Baltimore, 
Md. ; place of residence and practice, Clear- 
field ; degree M. D. conferred by College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, April 
8, 1893. 

Weida, Isadure J., a native of Berks 
county. Pa. ; place of residence. Peale ; de- 
gree M. D. confered by University of Penn- 
sylvania May I, 1890. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



213 



Weidemann, F. H., a native of Philadel- 
phia; place of residence and practice, Mor- 
risdale: degree M. D. conferred by Medico 
Chi. College May 20, 1899. 

Wesner, W. A., a native of Bald Eagle, 
Pa.; place of residence, Houtzdale ; places 
of practice, Loretto, Carlton and Houtz- 
dale; degree M. D. conferred by Jefferson 
Medical College March 11, 1876. 

Whittier, G. M., a native of Maine; place 
of residence, Houtzdale ; degree M. D. con- 
ferred by Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege March i, 1875. 

Wilson, Preston, a native of Clearfield ; 
place of residence and practice, Clearfield ; 
degree M. D. conferred by Jefferson Medi- 
cal College April 2, 1886. Deceased. 

Wilson, George, a native of Washington, 
Pa. ; place of residence, Luthersburg; places 
of practice, Big Run, Grampian, and Luth- 
ersburg; time of continuous practice thirty- 
six years. 

Wilson, A. G., a native of Juniata county. 
Pa.; place of residence. Glen Hope; places 
of practice, Osceola and Glen Hope; degree 
M. D. conferred by University of Pennsyl- 
vania May 10, 1876. 

Wilson, O. W., a native of Clearfield. Pa. ; 
residence and place of practice, Clearfield; de- 
gree M. D. conferred by Medico Chi. College 
May 24, 1902. 

Wilson, H. Sheridan, a native of Hunt- 
ingdon county. Pa. ; place of residence 
and practice. Smoke Run ; degree 
M. D. conferred by College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, Baltimore, April 18, 

1895- 

Winslow, Byron, a native of Elk county. 
Pa. ; place of residence, Curwensville ; 
places of practice, Philadelphia, Clearfield 
and Curwensville ; degree M. D. conferred 



by Jefferson Medical College March 12, 
1879. Deceased. 

Wood, Charles D., a native of Elmira, N. 
Y. ; place of residence, Coalport; degree M. 
D. conferred by College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Baltimore, 1880. 

Wood, G. W., a native of Wellsville, N. 
Y. ; place of residence, Houtzdale ; places of 
practice, Glen Hope and Houtzdale; degree 
M. D. conferred by College of Physicians 
and Surgeons March 1890. 

\A'oodside, H. L., a native of Clearfield 
county; place of residence, Wallaceton ; de- 
gree M. D. and Surgery conferred by Jef- 
ferson Medical College June 8, 1908. 

Woodside, Harry A., a native of Clear- 
field county; place of residence and prac- 
tice, Williamsgrove ; degree M. D. conferred 
by Jefferson Medical College May 14, 1897. 

Worrell, S. W., a native of Newburg; 
place of residence, Clearfield ; degree M. D. 
conferred by University of Buffalo May 3, 
1892. 

Wrigley, J. Kay, a native of Altoona; 
places of practice, Tyrone, Altoona and 
Clearfield ; degree M. D. conferred by 
Hahnemann Medical College, March 8, 
1887. Deceased. 

Yeaney, G. B., a native of New Maysville, 
Pa. ; place of residence. Clarion, Pa. ; places 
of practice, Clearfield and Clarion; degree 
M. D. conferred by Western University 
May 28, 1903. 

Yearick, G. W., a native of Madisonburg, 
Pa.; place of residence, Woodland; degree 
M. D. and Surgery conferred by Medico 
Chi. College 1903. 

Young, Robert J., a native of England; 
place of residence. Snow Shoe; degree M. 
D. conferred by College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, Baltimore, March 16, 1889. 



CHAPTER XV 

PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 
The Clearfield Hospital — The DuBois Hospital — The Clearfield County Home. 



THE CLEARFIELD HOSPITAL 

The Clearfield Hospital was incorporated 
in 1 90 1. The following year, it was consoli- 
dated with another hospital, which had been 
subsequently organized and the charter was 
amended and the corporation re-organized. 



The State Legislature, in 1907, appropri- 
ated $23,000.00; $15,000.00 toward paying 
the indebtedness on the building, and $8,- 
000.00 to assist in maintaining the Hospital 
for two years. This amount was reduced by 
the Governor, because of insufficient revenue, 
to $6,000.00 toward the indebtedness and $4,- 



Through the generosity of the heirs of Fred- 000.00 for maintenance for two years. The 



erick Mossop, deceased, and other charitable 
citizens, about four acres of land and $20,- 
000.00 in money were donated toward the lo- 
cation and erection of a new hospital, which 
was completed in July, 1905, at a total cost of 
$38,358-09, exclusive of the ground. The 
building is 157 x 113 feet. The central part 
known as the "Admini.stration Building," is 
two stories in height and the wings, in which 
the public wards are located, are each one 
story high. 

The hospital is well equipped and up-to-date 
in its appearance and appliances. It has ac- 
commodations for thirty-five patients, twenty- 
two in the public wards and thirteen in ])rivate 
rooms. During the year 1909, 371 patients 
were treated. Of these. 269 were entirely 
free, or paid but a fractional part of the cost 
of their care. A chartered training school for 
nurses is maintained under competent man- 
agement, the first class therefrom graduated 
during 1910. 



State appropriation for the years of 1909 and 
19 10 was $8,000.00 for maintenance and $2,- 
000.00 toward improvements for the two 
years. These appropriations by the State Leg- 
islature are insufficient to support the liospital, 
and the deficiencies have hitherto been pro- 
vided for by the generosity of the citizens of 
Clearfield and Curwensville, and other 
persons interested in the w'elfare of the 
institution. 

Harry M. Kurtz of Clearfield has recently 
donated to the hospital the sum of $5,000.00 
for the purpose of erecting a Nurses Home, 
which will be completed in 1911, and various 
other improvements are contemplated. The 
demands upon the Hospital are constantly 
growing and it is one of the most useful insti- 
tutions in the county. 

The following are the officers for 1910: 

H. B. Powell, President. 

l'"rank I'ielding, Vice-President. 

George R. Bigler, Sec. and Treas. 



214 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



215 



Directors. 

Geo. R. Bigler, Attorney at Law. 

H. F. Bigler, Pres. Clearfield Fire Brick Co. 

Frank Fielding, ^Attorney at Law. 

Frank G. Harris, Attorney at Law. 

Hugh j\I. Ir\-in, Pres. Curwensville Na- 
tional Bank, Curwensville. 

Fred B. Kerr, Treas. Clearfield Novelty 
■ Works. 

A. W. Lee, Pres. Central Penna. Light and 
Power Company. 

Thos. H. ]\Iurray, Attorney at Law. 

Rembrandt Peale, Pres. Peale, Peacock & 
Kerr, Inc. 

H. B. Powell, Pres. County National Bank. 

R. A. Shillingford, General Manager, 
Cleai-field Bituminous Coal Corp. 
Ladies Auxiliary. 

Mrs. Frank Fielding, President. 

Mrs. Alexander Ennis Patton, ist Vice- 
President. 

Mrs. A. R. Powell, 2nd Vice-President. 

Mrs. Pascaline Toner, 3rd Vice-President. 

Mrs. Blanche M. Biddle, Treasurer. 

Mrs. H. J. Hartswick, Secretary. 
Junior Auxiliary 

Miss Helen Murray, President. 

Miss Alice Bigler, ist Vice-President. 

Miss Delia Savage, 2nd Vice-President. 

Mrs. J. Lewis Irwin, Treasurer. 

Miss Isabel Powell, Secretary. 
Superintendent. 

Miss Jessie M. Durstine. 

Nurses Training School 

Mrs. A. H. Woodward, President. 

Mrs. Geo. R. Bigler, Secretary. 

THE DU BOIS HOSPITAL 

The Du Bois Hospital was organized in the 
year 1897, with a capacity of twenty-three 



beds, and at the end of the same year it was 
incorporated under the laws of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania, by a decree signed by 
the Hon. Cyrus Gordon, President Judge of 
Clearfield county. It is one of the class corpo- 
nations not organized for profit. It is not 
authorized to accumulate money, if it were pos- 
sible, excepting for necessary expenditures, nor 
to use its funds, however obtained, for any 
other purpose than the proper maintenance and 
improvement of the Hospital. The first mem- 
bers of the board of directors were : John E. 
Du Bois, A. L. Cole, M. Lundergan, S. Fu- 
gate and J.' C. Sullivan. These, as well as the 
Medical Staff, all serve without compensation. 

The management have constantly aimed to 
make the instituti(jn as nearly self-supporting 
as possible, and at the same time to be char- 
itably inclined to the poor and needy by not 
refusing to care for worthy poor; but, as in 
our community charges must necessarily be 
moderate, as the vast majority of our patients 
are really poor, the hospital has never been 
self-supporting. It has, since its organization, 
been dependent upon the charity of individ- 
uals, and the liberally disposed, as well as the 
State for appropriations. 

The charity of such individuals, etc., has 
been such that many poor, without means to 
help themselves, have been treated free of 
charge, and those whom poor districts, or in 
our own county, the county commissioners 
have met the ordinarv- expenses of, have had 
furnished them the advantages of hospital at- 
tention and nursing in medical and surgical 
cases at a rate below the actual cost of board 
and nursing. 

In November, 1909, the hospital building 
was badly damaged by fire. All patients were 
safely removed and provided for. 



216 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



April 15, 1910, the Du Bois Hospital, after 
undergoing thorough repairs, refurnishing, 
and the rest, was again opened to the public. 

Before this was done, a re-organization by 
the enlarging of the board of directors to its 
full capacity of fifteen, as provided for in the 
Constitution of the Du Bois Hospital Associa- 
tion, was effected. 

The present board of directors are as fol- 
lows: S. J. Schrecongost, President; James 
A. Gleason, Vice-President; D. E. Hibner, 
Frank Guinzburg, S. A. Eisenman, George 
JMinns, Jr., James Pifer, A. R. Van Tassel, E. 
W. Webster, H. E. Ginter, W. H. Cannon, A. 
L. Cole, M. Lundergan, Frank Hahne, Hon. 
A. S. Moulthrop, and J. C. Sullivan, secretary 
to the board. 

At the time of re-organization, the Sisters 
of Mercy were given the administrative charge 
of the Du Bois Hospital, and under their su- 
pervision, the hospital has prospered as in no 
other previous period. In fact, the work of 
the institution is limited by its bed capacity 
only. Mother M. Camilla is the present super- 
intendent. Since the opening of the institu- 
tion, April 15, 1910, there has been one hun- 
dred and thirty-one admissions. 

THE CLEARFIELD COUNTY HOME 

The handsome three-story brick building 
known as The Clearfield County Home is sit- 
uated in Lawrence Township on the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad, one mile below Clearfield. The 
County Home property comprises 180 acres of 
what were formerly known as the John F. 
W'eaver and Goon fanns. When the question 
of organizing the county into a jwor district 
was first submitted to the voters it failed to 
carry, but the second time it was voted on, at 
the spring election of Februar)' 20, 1894, the 



project carried, the vote being 4,944 for, and 
3,485 against — a majority of only 459. The 
county commissioners under whose direction 
the Home was built were James S. Read, Wil- 
liam T. Ross and A. E. Woolridge. Hon. 
Cyrus Gordon was on the bench at the time, 
and George E. Owens was clerk to the com- 
missioners. The contract was let October i, 

1894, to the lowest bidder, W. V. Hughes, of 
Pittsburgh, the price being $38,650.00. The 
architect was C. M. Robinson, of Altoona, 
who was chosen by the commissioners. Jacob 
Straddler, a skilled mechanic and builder, was 
the general superintendent of the building and 
work. From the opening day, December 30, 

1895, to the present time the ta.\ payers of 
Clearfield county have looked upon the Home 
as one of the best investments this county has 
ever made. Indeed, the wonder has always 
been since its erection, why there could have 
been so many votes cast against building this 
splendid institution, which has been a blessing 
to thousands of the sons of Clearfield county 
— an asylum for the poor and a home for the 
needy. There were 143 inmates in the Home 
in August, 19 ID. Besides furnishing the 
county's poor with all the necessities of life 
and solicitously caring for the sick and aged, 
the spiritual side of the inmate's nature has not 
been overlooked as a chaplain in the person of 
Rev. A. B. Williams, pastor of the United 
Brethren church of East End Clearfield, every 
Sunday holds preaching services in the well 
appointed chapel in the second story which is 
equipped with all the comforts of a modern 
church. Dining rooms are furnished for both 
the men and women, while the sleeping quar- 
ters on the second floor are similarly arranged. 
A large laundry and kitchen are at the rear of 
the first floor. Pure wholesome food is sup- 



vil 






— Z- 

?r - 







AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



219 



plied in abundance. In connection with the 
Home proper, a fine farm is carefully culti- 
vated under the supervision of the steward. 
Those male inmates who are able to assist in 
the work are pressed into service,' so there are 
not many idle men about the premises during 
tlie summer and fall months. After the larder 
is stocked with products of the farm and the 
barns and granary supplied the remainder of 
the crop is sold by the steward. The officials 
in charge of the Home are as follows : Stew- 
ard, J. Sumner Hoyt; Matron, Mrs. Hoyt; 
Physician, Dr. J. W. Gordon; Nurse, C. E. 
Wilson. The average weekly cost per capita 
is $2.31. During the year 1909 the number 
of days' support given inmates, including va- 
grants, was 63,067. At the present time only 
2^ mills are levied for County Home pur- 
poses. In the year 1909, the total current ex- 
penses for maintaining the Home were $19,- 
II 1.3 1. Viewed from every standpoint the 
Clearfield County Home is acknowledged to 



rank second in the State and no similar insti- 
tution is more efficiently managed. 

In addition to maintaining this institution, 
Clearfield county, in the year 1909, expended 
$5,265.51 for outdoor relief of its poor, while 
the sum of $15,469.09 was paid out of its 
treasury toward the support of its insane in 
the State hospitals. One thousand one hun- 
dred and sixty-one dollars and fifty-four cents 
was also expended by the county for the main- 
tenance of its feeble-minded in the training 
schools of the commonwealth, and $364.52 
was paid for the support of the poor in other 
institutions. Including other outside expendi- 
tures, amounting to $1,976.54, Clearfield 
county, in the year 1909, expended $48,357.12 
for the support of the poor, sick and insane 
within her borders. This record for public 
charity is most commendable and the heart of 
every true Clearfield countian should rejoice 
that this worthy benevolence is carried on on 
such a generous and far reaching scale. 



CHAPTER X\-I 



EDUCATION 



A History of the Schools from 18^4 to the Present Time — School Laiv of i8s4 — Compulsory 
School Law — Early Schools and Schoolhoiiscs — Schools and Academies of Cleariicld, 
Curwensvillc, DtiBois and Other Towns. 

In the jear 1834 a law, a section of which gan a new era in the educational history of 

follows, was approved for Pennsylvania by our State and county. The date and loca- 

Governor Wolf: tion of the first free school held in Clearfield 

Section I. "Be it enacted That the city county are not known, but it is probable 

and county of Philadelphia, and every other that it was held in the Clearfield Academy 

county in this Commonwealth shall each form building which had been completed in 1830, 

a school division and that every ward, town- or in the Curwensvillc Academy, opened 

ship and borough within the several school the following year. 

divisions shall form a school district . . . School had been held in the Clearfield 

and each of said districts shall contain a Academy in 1830-31 by Dr. A. T. Schrj'ver, 

competent number of common schools for but this was not a free school, 

the eilucation of every child within the limits The first common school for Pike town- 

thereof who shall apply, either in person, or ship was held in the Curwensvillc Academy 

by his or her parents, guardians or next about 1835, John Patton, Sr., serving as 



friend for admission and instruction." 

The next year an amendment was made 
providing that a township or district x'oting 
in the ne.gative should not be compelled to 
accept this system. 

It was not until many years later, in 1897, 
that the Compulsory School Law was 
passed, which requires that every child in 
the state who is physically able (with cer- 
tain exceptions), shall attend school regu- 
larly between the ages of si.\ and sixteen 
years. 
• With the adoption of the law of 1834, be- 



master at eighteen dollars per month. An- 
other common school of early date w^as that 
taught by John Carlisle in Brady township 
about 1836. In 1838 a school-house was 
erected at public expense on the Penfield 
Road, and here a free school was held for 
many years. 

Having given a general review of the early 
public and private schools, we will give a 
brief history of the schools in a few of the 
larger towns in the count)', and some sta- 
tistics which may be of interest. 

Clearfield Schools: — From 1830 until 



220 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



221 



1902 schools, both private and public, were 
held almost continuously in the Clearfield 
Academy. Here, in the early forties, came 
boys and girls from miles around to receive 
instruction. The Academy was the only 
source of instruction in French and Latin 
in the county. The girls were taught use- 
ful arts, such as needle work, and many 
grandmothers to-day show with pride, the 
neat "samplers" which they stitched during 
their Academy days. Later the building 
was used for various purposes, such as reli- 
gious meetings, kindergarten and even as a 
dwelling house. In 1902, the old grey 
walls, so closely associated with the early 
days of Clearfield county, were torn down, 
and on their ruins arose a splendid new 
building, with every modern equipment, 
typical of the new century, as the other had 
been of the old. 

The first building erected for the special 
use of public schools was the "Tbwn Hall," 
built in 1 85 1. Here the public schools were 
held until 1872, when the Leonard Graded 
School began to be constructed. The Leon- 
ard Graded School was so named in honor 
of James T. Leonard, a resident of Clear- 
field, who contributed over $14,000.00 for 
the erection and furnishing of this school. 
It was completed in 1874, and is a fine build- 
ing of red brick. It is situated at the east 
end of Market Street, and is still in use as 
a public school. 

The High School building was erected on 
the site of the old Clearfield Academy in 
1902. It is a splendid building of yellow 
brick, and contains eveiy modern conven- 
ience, including facilities for instruction in 
domestic science and manual training. 

In 1885 a school building known as the 



"Fourth Ward School," was built. This 
school originally contained seven grades, 
but additions have since been built, one of 
two rooms in 1903, and one of four rooms 
in 1908. 

Two years ago, in 1908, a brick building 
containing eight large school rooms was 
erected in West Clearfield, and is known as 
the Third Ward High School. 

Clearfield can also boast a fine Parochial 
School. This splendid structure of yellow 
brick stands on North Second Street, and 
is known as the St. Francis School. It was 
built in 1904. 

Curwensville Schools: — The educational 
history of Curwensville dates from the year 
1831, at which time John Irvin contributed 
ground for the erection of the Curwensville 
Academy. This building stood on Filbert 
Street, on the ground now known as the 
Samuel Taylor property. After a few years 
the building was turned over to Pike town- 
ship, and here a public school was held 
about 1835, by John Patton, Sr. The public 
schools continued to be held there until 
1852, when a schoolhouse was built on Wal- 
nut street. School was also held in the old 
Methodist church until 1869. Hon. John 
Patton presented two lots, adjoining the 
one they already owned on Walnut street, 
to the school board, and additional build- 
ings were erected. 

In 1854 W'illiam Irvin built a brick school- 
house on State street almost opposite the 
place where the B. R. & P. station now 
stands, and for several years it was used as 
a private school. Later it was rented by 
the borough and used for many years as a 
"High School." 

The Patton Graded School was built in 



222 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



1885. It was so named in honor of Hon. 
John Patton, who contributed $16,500 and 
a lot valued at $3,500 for its erection. It is 
a handsome building of grey sandstone, and 
originally contaiined eight schoolrooms. 
A wing has since been built, adding two 
large rooms to the original number. For 
many years the Patton Graded School 
was the finest school building in the 
county, and with its many and contin- 
ued improvements, still ranks among the 
best. 

In 1908 a substantial brick building of 
four rooms was built in the Second ward 
and these buildings, together with a school 
of two grades on the South Side, provide 
ample accommodations for the six hundred 
school children of Curwensviile. 

DuBois Schools: — Although the borough 
of DuBois is comparatively new it is the 
finest equipped of any in the county in re- 
gard to public schools. In 1883 the Central 
School building was erected, and another 
building, known as the Xevv Central School, 
was built in 1899. 

The First Ward School was erected in 
1892. An addition to this building became 
necessary in 1902, and in 1909 an entire new 
building was constructed. 

In 1895 a school building was erected in 
the Third Ward, and an addition built in 
1902. 

The Fourth Ward School was built in 
1892, and two additions have since been 
built, one in 1895 and one in 1907. 

A fine new High School building is now 
under construction. The capacity of the 
High School will be 400. 

The total number of ward schools is 
fifty-eight, with a capacity of 2,500. 



DuBois has also a fine Parochial school, 
one of four such schools in the county. The 
other three are situated at Clearfield, 
Houtzdale and I'renchville respectively. 

Private Girls' Schools: — Although a "fe- 
male school" was taught in connection with 
the Clearfield Academy as early as 1841, no 
separate school for girls was held until 
about 1867, when Miss Belle Welsh started 
a "select school" in the old Methodist 
church building in Curwensviile. This 
school was continued for several years with 
great success. 

About the same 3'ear, Miss K. S. Swan 
began a school for girls in the Keystone 
building in Clearfield. Miss Swan continued 
her school until the erection of the Leonard 
Graded School in 1874. 

Other Schools: — In the larger towns, 
such as Osceola, Houtzdale. Penfield, Kar- 
thaus, Ramey, Madera, Grampian and Ma- 
haffey, large and substantial school build- 
ings have been erected during the past 
twenty-five years, and to-day there are 538 
schools held in this county. The number 
of teachers employed in teaching these 
schools is 560, and the number of scholars 
enrolled 20,711. 

No words are needed to prove the mar- 
vellous growth in public education in our 
county. These figures speak eloquently of 
the interest and ambition of our citizens 
concerning education, and insure the intel- 
lectual advancement of our coming genera- 
tion. 

Following is a list of the county superin- 
tendents: 

1854-7 — Dr. A. T. Schryver. 

1857-60— L. L. Still. 

1860-3 — ^Jesse Broomall. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 223 

1863-6 — C. B. Sanford. 1884-90 — Matthew Savage. 

1866-72 — G. W. Snyder. 1890-6 — G. W. Weaver. 

1872-8 — J. A. Gregory. 1896-1902 — E. C. Shields. 

1878-84— M. L. McQuown. 1902— W. E. Tobias. 



CHAPTER XVII 

TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES 

Turnpike Days — Water Transportation — The Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad — The Pennsyl- 
vania & Northern — The Buffalo. Rochester & Pittsburg R. R. — The Karthaus R. R. — 
Tlie Beech Creek R. R. — The Cresson, Clearfield County & New Vorlc Short Route R. R. 
—The Philipsburg R. R.—The Clearfield Southern R.R.— The West Branch R. R.— 
The Cunvens'i'illc & Bower R. R. — The Buffalo &■ Susquehanna R. R. — The Franldin & 
Clearfield R. R. — The DuBois Street Raihway — The Philipsburg Street Railway Co. 



longer were men willing to be cut off from 
news of affairs which threatened our nation, 
and it was at this time that the citizens of 
Cleai-field count)- came to a realization of their 
need of quicker transportation. 

The proposed railroad was called the Ty- 
nmc and Cleai-field, a branch of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad. Alxjut i86j the track was 
l)uilt from Vail to Sandy Ridge — the top of 
the mountain, and a year later was extended 
to Philipsburg. It was not until six years 
later, and with the financial aid of citizens of 
broad Susc|ue]ianna afforded ample facilities Clearfield, that the track was extended to the 
for lumber transportation. .Although the vast county seat. Here it again rested from its 
stores of coal and fire clay were known to ex- labors, and six years passed before the rail- 
ist, there had been no need to develop them as road reached Curwensville, aided financially 
vet. This left little need for transportation, by citizens of that town. For many years Cur- 
and in those peaceful years, before the mania wcnsville remained the terminus of the Ty- 
for speed had seized our nation, people were rone and Clearfield railroad, but the coal in- 
content to live with no other communication terests farther west caused the road to be ex- 



In no case does the old proverb, "necessity 
is the mother of invention," hold more true 
than in the history of tiie development of rail- 
roads in Clearfield county. In the days when 
the lumbering stage coach traveled the "Erie 
Turnpike," carrying the government mails and 
the few travelers who ventured east or west, 
no better <ir faster means of locomotion was 
deemed necessary. 

Lumbering was the industry followed by 
the majority of Cleai-field county's citizens, 
and the many streams connecting with the 



with the outside world than that afforded by 
waterway and turnpike. 

But soon rumors of a great civil war stirred 
our country and quickened it to new life. No 



tended as far as Grampian in 1891. 

Several branches have been added to this 
road, the most important of which is the Mo- 
.shannon. The Mnshannon branch joins the 



224 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



225 



main line of the Tyrone and Clearfield rail- 
road at Osceola, and extends through the coal 
regions of that section, terminating at McCart- 
ney. Various branches, leading to the mining 
towns and coal operations in the vicinity of 
this line, have been added. 

The Pennsylvania and Northwestern Rail- 
road, formerly known as the Bell's Gap rail- 
road, extends from Bellwood in Blair county 
through the northwestern part of Clearfield 
county by way of Coalport, Irvona and Ma- 
haffey, having its terminus at Punxsutawney. 
This road was begun in 1871 and completed 
in 1887. 

The Low Grade division of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad was opened through the west 
and northwest portion of Clearfield county in 
1874. It enters this county at Tyler, mnning 
southeast to Du Bois and thence west into Jef- 
ferson county. 

The Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburg Rail- 
road was built through the -northwestern part 
of Clearfield county in 1883. It originally en- 
tered this county from the northwest, running 
southeast to Du Bois and then south to Stump 
Creek, below which it again entered Jefferson 
county. In 1893 a branch known as the Clear- 
field and Mahoning Railroad was constructed 
from Du Bois Junction, by way of Luthers- 
burg and Curwensville, to Clearfield, being the 
first and only railroad connecting Du Bois 
with the county seat. The opening of this 
branch was celebrated by a public meeting in 
the court house at Clearfield, June 6, 1893, at 
which representatives were present from vari- 
ous towns along the new railroad, as well as 
officials of the Buffalo, Rochester and Pitts- 
burg Railroad Company. 

The Karthaus Railroad, extending from 
Keating on the Philadelphia and Erie Rail- 



road to Karthaus in Clearfield county was 
completed in 1883. This road was operated 
by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company until 
1902, when it passed under the control of the 
New York Central and Hudson River Rail- 
road Company at the time of the completion 
of their West Branch Valley line, of which it 
is now a part. 

The Beech Creek Railroad was constructed 
in Clearfield county in 1884. It now extends 
from Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, through 
Clearfield county to Patton in Cambria 
county. This road has branches connecting 
with Philipsburg and Clearfield. 

The Cresson, Clearfield County and New 
York Short Route Railroad was built in the 
northern part of the county, between Cresson 
and Irvona in 1886. It is now operated by 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 

The Philipsburg Railroad extends from 
Philipsburg to Ferndale, by way of Osceola, 
Houtzdale and Ramey. 

The Clearfield Southern Railroad, com- 
pleted in 1908, extends from Dimeling station 
on the Beech Creek Railroad, up Clearfield 
Creek to Irvona, by way of Madera and Glen 
Hope. It is operated by the New York Cen- 
tral and Hudson River Railroad Company. 

The West Branch Valley Railroad was 
completed in 1902 and extends from Clearfield 
to Keating. It is operated by the New York 
Central and Hudson River Railroad Company 
and is known as the River Line. 

The Curwensville and Bower Railroad was 
constructed in 1903-4. It runs from Curwens- 
ville up the West Branch of the Susquehanna 
river to Bower Station, on the Beech Creek 
Railroad. It is operated by the New York 
Central and Hudson River Railroad Company 
as part of the Beech Creek system, the trains 



226 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



using the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Rail- 
road tracks between Curwensville and Clear- 
field. 

The Buffalo and Susquehanna Railroad was 
built in 1904 and extends from near Tyler 
through Clearfield county by way of Du Bois 
and its present terminus is Sagamore, Indiana 
county. 

The Franklin and Clearfield Railroad, now 
under construction, enters Clearfield county 
near Du Bois. It is a branch of the Lake 
Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad, and 
the trains now use the tracks of the Buffalo, 



Rochester and Pittsburg Railroad between Du 
Bois and Clearfield. 

Street Railways — The only town in Clear- 
field county having a system of street railways 
is DuBois. The lines are operated by over- 
head trolley. The company is known as the 
Du Bois Street Railway Company, and l)e- 
gan business in 1891. It has 21 milei of 
track. 

The Philipsburg Street Railway Company 
has a line extending to Morrisdale, Winburne 
and several other mining towns in Clearfield 
county. 



CHAPTER XVIII 

MANUFACTURES 

The Lumber Industry — Beginning of the Industry — Its Grozvth by 1S54 — Method of Operat- 
ing — Rafting — Log Drivers and Lumber Arks — Conflict with "Square Timber" Men — 
Marking the Logs — Small Profits of the Business — Erection of Saw-Mills — Decline of 
the Business — The Fire Brick Industry — Firms and Companies Engaged in the Business 
— The Tanning Industry 

LUMBERING INTERESTS mill Oil Andcrson Creek in 1808 and about 

the same time Robert Maxwell built one 

The traveler who now journeys over near Curwensville and William Kersey one 

Clearfield county for the first time and sees at the Kersey settlement, and James and 

the coal, fire clay and agricultural develop- Samuel Ardary soon afterwards built a 

ment and how little timber remains, can saw-mill near the old Clearfield bridge, it 

hardly realize that a century ago the whole was not until the year 1820 that lumbering 

territory was covered with seemingly operations assumed business proportions, 

boundless forests, the only cleared space at When the "Raftman's Journal" was 

that time being a few acres of land where founded in 1854, by the late Hon. H. B. 

the town of Clearfield now stands. The Swoope, lumbering had become such an im- 

work of the pioneers in clearing up the portant business in the county, that the 

wood-land and opening up roads through name of the paper was selected on that ac- 

these great forests, can hardly be realized count, and Mr. Swoope, himself, drew the 

by the present generation. design of the rafting scene, a copy of which 

The first lumbering in the county was is still used as a part of the heading of the 

not for the purpose of shipping the logs and "Journal." 

lumber as a business, but the trees were cut For many years lumbering was the chief 

into logs in order that land might be cleared occupation of nearly every resident of the 

to make room for homes for the early set- county. Agriculture was neglected and the 

tiers and sufficient fields to cultivate their magnificent forests were destroyed and the 

scanty crops, and the logs used for build- lumber made into "square timber" or logs, 

ing. Although Daniel Ogden and Freder- was floated down the river, and the pro- 

ick Haney had each built saw-mills as early ceeds built up the towns of Lock Haven, 

as 1805 and Daniel Turner erected a saw- Marietta and Williamsport where large 

227 



228 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



saw mills were erected to manufacture the 
lumber and great dams and booms con- 
structed to receive and hold the logs until 
they could be sawed. 

This "square timber" was made entirely 
with an axe, the trees were first chopped 
down and then squared by the use of a pe- 
culiarly shaped axe with which was cut ofi 
the branches, bark and sufficient of the tree 
to square it up. These great timber sticks 
were then hauled during the winter on sleds 
to the river bank where they were piled, 
ready to be made into rafts in time for the 
spring floods. These rafts were made by 
placing the great timber sticks side by side 
in the water and fastening them together 
across each end and in the center by long sap- 
lings laid across the timber sticks and fast- 
ened by hickory hoops held by wooden pins 
driven into holes bored into the timber 
sticks. The rafts were steered by immense 
oars, one in front and one at the rear of 
each raft. From two to four men operated 
each of these oars according to the size of 
the raft. Small cabins or "shanties" were 
built on the larger rafts in which the crew 
ate and slept during the trip down the river. 
These "shanties" were usually equipped 
with a lot of hay or straw, some blankets 
and a sheet iron stove, using wood as fuel. 
A trip down the river occupied from three 
to four days, and after delivering the rafts 
at Lock Haven, Marietta or W'ilHamsport, 
as the case might be. the sturdy raftsmen 
footed it back home in time, if possible, to 
make another trip during the same flood. 
In those days to be a "Pilot" on the river 
was the great ambition of every boy and 
young man in nearly every section of the 
county and, indeed, it required long expe- 



rience and considerable skill, to success- 
fully navigate the different streams and run 
the chutes at the dams or steer between 
the rocks at the "Falls" and at other dan- 
gerous points, and many thrilling stories 
are told of narrow escapes from destruction 
of both rafts and crews. 

This method of sending the timber to 
market continued until about 1857. when a 
new system was introduced by lumbermen 
from the New England States, who began 
floating the timber to market in the form of 
round saw-logs instead of in "square tim- 
ber." These saw-logs were not made up in- 
to rafts but were turned into the river and 
allowed to float down with the flood and in 
the rear of the "drive" of logs there fol- 
lowed the log drivers, who were equipped 
with "spiked" shoes and what are called 
"cant hooks" for handling the logs, and also 
had a number of teams of horses to haul 
the logs into the water. These log drivers 
lived in "arks," which were great cabins 
built on rafts and fitted up with bunks for 
sleeping, dining room and kitchen, and there 
was usually a separate ark for the horses. 

These log drivers were usually tlie men 
who had been working in the woods all win- 
ter, cutting the timber into logs and run- 
ning them down on the slides to the river 
bank. They were a hardy and picturesque 
lot of men and when after their winter's 
work and their log drive was finished, they 
landed in a town with their pockets full of 
money, they usually "painted the town red," 
and at their appearance, the peaceful citi- 
zens stayed close at home until the logmen 
departed. When the first attempt was 
made to float logs down the river, the 
"square timber" men fought the innovation 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



229 



vigorously ; some of them organized a party 
and attacked the log drivers on Clearfield 
Creek, with such effect as to drive them 
from the Creek. Although some of the at- 
tacking parties were arrested, tried and 
convicted for riot, it was many years before 
the driving of logs on Clearfield Creek was 
again engaged in. Both the "square tim- 
ber" and logs were marked on the ends by 
what was known as the owner's mark or 
stamp. This mark or stamp was put on 
with a stamping hammer, the metal head of 
which had the mark cast on it in sharp re- 
lief, so that when the head of the hammer 
was struck against the soft wood of the 
timber stick or log, it would leave a distinct 
impression, and thus the timber sticks or 
logs were easily identified. The law pro- 
vided for the registering of these log marks 
in the prothonotary's office, and it was a 
serious offense to use another owner's mark. 

Many million dollars w'orth of lumber 
was floated out of Clearfield county during 
the period referred to and the results were 
of comparatively little benefit to the own- 
ers of the timber, the hazard and expense 
of the lumber operations and the uncer- 
tainty of the market preventing the Clear- 
field county lumbermen from realizing the 
profit that they should have done, and so 
the mighty forests were sacrificed, and to- 
day there is comparatively little merchant- 
able timber standing in Clearfield county. 

Had this timber been manufactured at 
home instead of having been floated off to 
other points, some permanent advantage 
might have been obtained in the way of 
building up the various towns along the 
river in Clearfield county, but lack of rail- 
road facilities, want of capital to secure 



them and the necessity of the land owners 
selling their timber in order to make pay- 
ments on their lands, combined to prevent 
the manufacture of the lumber at home, 
with very few exceptions. John E. DuBois, 
who founded the borough of DuBois, was 
one of the men who saw the advantage of 
manufacturing the lumber at home and he 
erected large saw-mills and created an ex- 
tensive business, as one of the results of 
which DuBois is the largest town in the 
county, and Mr. DuBois accumulated, one 
of the few fortunes made in the lumber 
business in this section. 

The lumber business in Clearfield county 
is a thing of the past and while it had its 
proper place in the development of the 
county, the rapid cutting out of the forests 
was really a benefit, because with the de- 
parture of the timber it became necessary 
for the inhabitants to engage in some other 
occupation, and the result was that farming 
was again taken up, and the people of the 
county who owned the land, cleared the 
same up and those who devoted themselves 
to farming achieved substantial indepen- 
dence. The coal and fire clay was opened 
and the great mineral wealth of the county 
made available. 

THE FIRE-BRICK INDUSTRY 

From the time that man, in the progress of 
civilization, discovered the necessity of some 
material that would withstand the great heat 
necessary in the use of fire for the purpose of 
refining metals, many efforts were made to 
discover a substance suitable for this purpose, 
but it was not until fire-clay was discovered in 
Stourbridge, England, in the year 1555, that 
success crovN'ued the efforts of the experiment- 



230 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



ers. From that date, fire-clay has been exten- 
sively mined for the purpose of making a brick 
to be used as the lining of all receptacles re- 
quiring protection from the efifects of concen- 
trated heat. 

In a country like the United States, where 
such vast capital is invested in the iron, steel 
and kindred industries, the search for fire-clay 
commenced at an early date and the first large 
deposits were found near Alorgantown, West 
Virginia, and have been extensively developed. 

Fire-clay was known to exist in Clearfield 
county at an early period in its history-, but on 
account of the lack of railroad facilities, no 
steps were taken to open it up for commercial 
use until the extension of the Tyrone & Clear- 
field Branch of the P. R. R. in 1869, provided 
means of shipping the clay and its products to 
market, since which time this has become one 
of the leading industries of the county. As 
mentioned in the chapter on the geology of 
the county, large deposits of fire-clay of supe- 
rior quality have been found. The veins vary 
from two to six feet and over in thickness and 
the brick made therefrom have a high reputa- 
tion in the market. 

The Clearfield Fire Brick Company, organ- 
ized in 1 87 1, was the first corporation to un- 
dertake the development of tliis business, this 
company constructed works at Clearfield, 
which they operated for a number of years 
until they were taken over by the Harbison- 
Walker Refractories Company. 

The Harbison-Walker Fire Brick Com- 
pany, now the Harbison-Walker Refractories 
Company, was one of the first concerns to 
mine the clay and manufacture fire-brick on 
a large scale and their plant at Woodland was 
among the earliest erected in the county, and 
has also been one of the most sucessful. This 



company, on account of the excellence of its 
product and the consequent demand therefor, 
soon enlarged its operations and rapidly se- 
cured control of much of the best clay terri- 
tory, and finally of many of the other plants, 
so that at the present time, the Harbison- 
Walker Refractories Company is one of the 
largest producers of fire-brick in the United 
States. Their headquarters are in Pittsburg, 
Pa., and their present officers are as follows : 
President, H. W. Croft; vice-president, S. A. 
Walker ; , general manager of the works in 
Clearfield county, Xeil McQuillan. 

The largest independent company is the 
Bickford Fire Brick Company of Curwens- 
ville, Pa. This company has what is probably 
the finest, best equipped and one of the largest 
fire-brick plants in tliis country. The officers 
of the Bickford Fire Brick Company are as 
follows : President, Howard Janney ; Vice- 
President and General Manager, J. A. Bick- 
ford; Assistant Manager and Treasurer. S. 
M. Bickford. 

The following are the fire-brick plants in 
operation in the county at the present time: 

n.\RBTSON-W.\LKER REFR.-VCTORIES COMP.^NY 
PL.\NTS 

Clearfield Fire Brick Co. at Cleai-field. 

Harbison-Walker Plant at Clearfield. 

Woodland Fire Brick Works at Woodland. 

Mineral Springs Works at Mineral Springs. 

Wallaceton Fire Brick Co. at Wallaceton. 

Stronach Fire Brick Works at Stronach. 

The following are the plants not controlled 
by the Harbison-Walker Refractories Com- 
pany: 

Bickford Fire Brick Company at Curwens- 
ville. 
Wynn Brothers & Company at Blue Ball. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



231 



Osceola Silica Fire Brick Company at 
Osceola Mills. 

Karthaus Fire Brick Co. at Karthaus. 

Geo. S. Good Fire Brick Company at Lum- 
ber City. 

Irvona Fire Brick Company at Irvona. 

In addition to the foregoing plants manu- 
facturing fire-brick there are also a number of 
concerns whose business is the manufacturing 
of building and paving brick, in which fire- 
clay is largely used : 

Clearfield Clay Working Company at Clear- 
field. 

Paterson Fire Brick Company at Clearfield. 

Bigler Fire Brick Company at Bigler. 

Bigler Reed Fire Brick Company at Krebs. 

Wrigley Fire Brick and Tile Co., at River- 
view. 

The combined output of the brick plants of 
Clearfield is over 1,200,000 brick per work- 
ing day, and their products are shipped to 
nearly every state in the Union, as well as to 
foreign countries. 

THE TANNING INDUSTRY 

In the early days of the county's history, on 
account of the cheapness of bark, by reason of 
the abundance of timber, several small tanner- 
ies were built, two of these were at Curwens- 
ville, owned respectively by William McNaul 
and S. B. Taylor, the McNaul Tannery was 
built in 181 9, and the Taylor Tannery in 
1 85 1, and there was also a tannery at Clear- 
field, owned by M. Shirk. These tanneries 
were run without steain powder and tanned 
only "Upper Leather," but it was not until 
the extension of the Tyrone & Clearfield 
Railroad to the county, thus giving facilities 
for the shipment of leather to market, that 
tanneries were constructed on a large scale. 



In October, 1873, Messrs. WoosPer & 
Lull built a tannery in Osceola Mills, which 
they shortly afterwards sold to W. S. White & 
Son, who in turn sold to J. B. Alley & Com- 
pany of Boston, Mass., who conducted the 
tannery for a number of years, until it was 
finally abandoned. 

The Summit Tannery was built at Cur- 
wensville by W'. S. White & Son and was com- 
pleted in May, 1877. On April 3, 1878, it 
was purchased by J. B. Alley & Co., of Bos- 
ton, Mass., which firm was succeeded on Jan- 
uary I, 1887, by Alley Brothers & Place, who 
continued to operate the tannery until it was 
taken over by the U. S. Leather Company in 
1894. 

In the year 1879, Hoyt, Fairweather and 
LaRue erected a large tannery at Clearfield, 
which they conducted for a number of years, 
until it passed under control of the U. S. 
Leather Co., in the year 1894. 

In 1881 McKinstry & Clearwater erected a 
tannery at Penfield in Huston township, which 
they sold to Thomas E. Proctor in 1882. This 
tannery was operated until bark became scarce, 
when it was abandoned. 

In 1886 a large tannery was built in Ma- 
haffey. It is owned by A. B. Mosser & Coni- 
pany and is still in operation. 

In 1883 a tannery was built at Irvona by N. 
W. Rice & Company. This tannery is now- 
owned by the U. S. Leather Company and is 
still running. 

DuBois and VanTassel Brothers built a 
large tannery in DuBois in 1884. This tan- 
nery is now^ owned by A. R. VanTassel and 
does a large business. 

Wm. F. Mosser. now deceased, constructed 
a large tannery at West over in the year 1889. 
This tannery is still in operation and is owned 



232 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



by the Win. F. Mosser Company of Boston, 
Mass. 

In 1894, after the sale of the tannery of 
Alley Bros. & Place, at Curwensville to the 
U. S. Leather Company, that firm in connec- 
tion with Fred J. Dyer, erected a new tannery 
.at that place, which unfortunately was de- 
stroyed by fire in the year 1899, but the firm 
erected a still larger tannery on a new location 
in Curwensville, which tannery was subse- 
quently sold to the Penna. Hide & Leather 
Company, and is still operated on a large 
scale. 

The tanneries controlled by the United 
States Leather Company manufacture what is 
known as "Union Crop" sole leather. The 
tannery of the Pennsylvania Hide & Leather 



Company manufactures "Upper Leather," 
which is finished at their plant in Curwens- 
ville. 

Owing to the fact that the supply of bark, 
within a reasonable distance, has about given 
out, it is probable that the number of tanner- 
ies in Clearfield county will become less, as the 
years go by. 

At the present time, a large amount of 
"Extract," which is made at works in the 
Southern States, where available tinil)er is 
still plenty and cheap, is shipped to the tan- 
neries in this county and used in lieu of that 
much of the bark formerly required, but even 
advertisement states that the signers to the 
industry, it has passed its greatest develop- 
ment in this county. 



CHAPTER XIX 



FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 



Banking in the Early History of the County — Private and State Banks — Special Act of the Leg- 
islature Necessary to Incorporation Before i860 — The Act of i860 — Unreliability of the 
State Banks — Passage of the Nation-al Banking Law — Banks of Clearfield County — 
Officers and Directors. 



In the early history of the county, the bank- 
ing was done by the merchants who received 
the money of their customers for safe keeping 
and either sent it or took it to the eastern cit- 
ies, wliere they kept accounts and where they 
usually went once or twice each year to pur- 
chase goods. 

About the year 1858 Leonard, Finney & 
Company conducted a private bank at Clear- 
field, the partners in this enterprise being 
James T. Leonard, William A. Wallace, D. 
A. Finney and A. C. Finney. 

Prior to 1861, the banking business in 
Pennsylvania was transacted either by private 
partnerships or by banks chartered by the State 
by authority of special Acts of the Legislature, 
a separate Act of the Legislature being re- 
quired to authorize the incorporation of each 
bank. 

The "Raftsman's Journal," published at 
Clearfield, Pa., in its issue of August 31, 1859, 
contains an advertisement of an application 
for a bank charter for a bank to be called the 
"Cleai-field County Bank," to be located in the 
Borough of Clearfield, Pa., with a capital of 
one hundred thousand ($100,000.00) dollars 



with the privilege of increasing it to two hun- 
dred thousand ($200,000.00) dollars. This 
advertisement states that the signers of the 
application were J. F. Weaver, Thomas J. 
McCulIough, Isaac Johnson, C. D. Watson, 
D. F. Etzweiler, James Alexander, Jona Boyn- 
ton, M. A. Frank, Richard Mossop, A. K. 
Wright, W. F. Irwin and S. B. Row. 

The Pamphlet Laws of Pennsylvania do 
not contain any special Act of the Legisla- 
ture, incorporating the "Clearfield County 
Bank." The reason for this probably being 
because the Legislature, by an Act approved 
March 31, i860, to be found in the Pamph- 
let Laws of that year, at page 459, entitled 
"An Act to establish a System of Free 
Banking in Pennsylvania and to secure the 
public against loss from Insolvent Banks," 
provided that banks could be incorporated 
thereunder, without the necessity of having 
special Acts of the Legislature passed as 
had before been necessary. 

Under this Act of i860 and the supple- 
ments and amendments thereto, many state 
banks were organized, but they were prac- 
tically without supervision by the State and 



233 



231 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



their notes, except in tlie localities where 
the banks were located, could iisuall}' only 
be used at a heavy discount. 

W iih tlie passage of the National Bank- 
ing Law by the L'nited States Congress 
and its approval by President Lincoln, in 
1863, the banking business of the country 
was for the first time placed upon a substan- 
tial basis and Xalioual Banks were soon es- 
tablished at various points in the county. 
The first one being at Clearfield and known 
as the "First National Bank of Clearfield," 
and the next at Curwensviile. known as the 
"First National Bank of Curwensviile." 

With the growth of population and busi- 
ness of the county, various financial institu- 
tions have been established and at the pres- 
ent time (191 1 ) the following are in exist- 
ence, to-wit : 

County National Bank, ClearfieUl. Pa. 

Clearfield National Bank, Clearfield, Pa. 

Clearfield Trust Company, Clearfield, 
Pa. 

Farmers' & Traders' National Bank, 
Clearfield, Pa. 

Curwensviile National Bank, Curwens- 
viile, Pa. 

Deposit National Bank, DuBois. Pa. 

Union Banking and Trust Company, Du- 
Bois, Pa. 

DuBois National Bank, DuBois, Pa. 

Bituminous National Bank, W'inburne, 
Pa. 

Mahaffey National Bank. Mahaffey, Pa. 

Madera National Bank, Madera, Pa. 

First National Bank, Houtzdale, Pa. 

First National Bank, Osceola Mills, Pa. 

First National Bank, Coalport. Pa. 

These institutions have aggregate de- 
posits of nearly eight millions of dollars 



($8,000,000.00) and are conservatively and 
carefull}- conducted. 

The following is a list of the officers and 
directors of the financial institutions of the 
county from the latest information fur- 
nished to us, and an examination of the 
same will convince any one who is ac- 
quainted with the citizens of Clearfield 
county that these institutions are under the 
control of the leading business men of the 
several communities in which they arc lo- 
cated. 

The County National Dank of Clearfield, 
Pa. 

H. B. Powell, President: A. B. Shaw, 
Vice-President: J. L. Gilliland, Cashier. 

Directors — F. G. Betts, G. \V. Jose, W. 
A. Porter, A. B. Shaw, H. F. Bigler, H. A. 
Kratzer, \V. B. Potter, J. P. O'Laughlin, 
H. L. Forcey, H. J. Patton. H. B. Powell, 
A. K. Wright. 

The Clearfield National Bank, Clear- 
field, Pa. 

James Mitchell, President: H. S. White- 
man, Vice-President and Cashier. 

Directors — James Mitchell, H. A. Ken- 
nedy, John Dimeling, Thos. H. Murray, A. 
E. Lietzinger, W. H. Patterson, W. L 
Betts, W. P. Hopkins. 

The Clearfield Trust Company, Clear- 
field, Pa. 

R. A. Shillingford, President: A. W. Lee, 
Vice-President ; P. T. Davis, Treasurer. 

Directors— G. R. Bigler, H. W. Croft, F. 
G. Harris, F. B. Kerr, Chas. T. Kurtz, A. 
W^ Lee, R. A. Shillingford. Clement W. 
Smith. S. L Snyder, E. E. Lindemuth. 

Farmers' & Traders' National Bank, 
Clearfield, Pa. 

A. E. Woolridge, President; G. B. Pass- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



237 



more, Vice-President; Isaac Straw, Vice- 
President; E. O. Hartshorne, Cashier; A. 
K. Staver, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — A. E. Wooh-idge, E. C. Davis, 
D. R. Woolridge, G. B. Passmore, Jesse 
Wilhams, Dorsey Bailey, W. T. DeHaas, 
Isaac Straw, F. A. Walker, C. G. McNaul, 
M. D. 

The Curwensville National Bank, Cur- 
wensville, Pa. 

C. S. Russell, President; Hugh M. Irvin, 
Vice-President; L. W. Spencer, Cashier; 
Anthony Hile, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — C. S. Russell, Sam'l P. Ar- 
nold, J. S. Graff, C. A. Woods, Geo. L. Ben- 
ner, H. M. Irvin, Fred J. Dyer, Roland D. 
Swope, I. B. Norris, C. M. Porter, M. A. 
Caldwell, Peter Gearhart, H. J. Patton, Geo. 
F. Kittelberger, C. E. Patton. 

Deposit National Bank, DuBois, Pa. 

R. H. Moore, President; M. I. McCreight, 
First Vice-President: D. L. Corbett, Sec- 
ond Vice-President; B. B. McCreight, 
Cashier; J. Q. Groves, Assistant Cashier; 
W. D. I. Arnold, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — R. H. Moore, W. H. Cannon, 
Walter Hatten, D. L. Corbett, J. H. Pifer, 
C. P. Munch, Rembrandt Peale, Austin 
Blakeslee, R. W. Beadle, M. I. McCreight. 

The Union Banking and Trust Company 
of DuBois, Pa. 

A. R. Van Tassel, President; A. T. Spran- 
kle, Vice-President; B. M. Marlin, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer ; Jos. F. Sprankle, As- 
sistant Treasurer. 

Directors— A. R. Van Tassel, J. E. Mer- 
ris, B. M. Marlin, Thos. W. Kennedy, H. S. 
Knarr, A. T. Sprankle, J. B. Henderson, F. W. 
Prothero, C. L. Hav, William Osborn, F. G. 
St. Clair. 



The DuBois National Bank, DuBois, Pa. 

John E. DuBois, President; J. A. Greg- 
ory, Vice-President ; Geo. A. Lukehart, 
Vice-President; S. C. Bond, Cashier; W. G. 
Brown, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — John E. DuBois, J. A. Greg- 
ory, Geo. A. Lukehart, William Wingert, 
A. S. Moulthorp. F. A. Tozier, S. C. Bond. 

Bituminous National Bank, Winburne, 
Pa. 

James L. Sommerville, President; Berten 
Merritt, Vice-President: J. Malcolm Lau- 
rie, Cashier. 

Directors — Jas. L. Sommerville, A. O. 
Sommerville, Jacob Smutzinger, Berten 
Merritt, R. H. George, E. F. Harvey, R. H. 
Sommerville, Dr. H. G. Jones. 

Mahaffey National Bank, Mahaffey, Pa. 

A. B. Mosser, President; Thomas Bellis, 
Vice-President ; H. N. Widdowson, Cashier ; 
W. B. Clark, Assistant Cashier. 

Directors — Thomas Bellis, A. B. Mosser, 
Geo. L. Fletcher, B. W. McCracken, H. N. 
Widdowson, W. H. Thomson. 

Madera National Bank, Madera, Pa. 

J. E. Kirk, President; S. J. Miller, Vice- 
President; H. B. Swoope, Vice-President; 
E. B. Mahaffey, Cashier. 

Directors— S. J. Miller, W. C. Park, Jo- 
seph Alexander, J. H. Moore, H. B. 
Swoope, J. E. Kirk, Clark Hileman, J. C. 
Root, E. B. Mahaffey. 

First National Bank. Houtzdale, Pa. 

Lewis W. Beyer, President: Julius Vie- 
bahn, Vice-President ; Geo. W. Ganoe, 
Cashier. 

Directors — John Beyer, Samuel Kirk, 
John Benson, Julius Viebahn, Jas. H. Minds, 
Harry Boulton, Michael Burns, A. D. Stew- 
art, Lewis W. Beyer. 



238 HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 

Flirst National Bank of Osceola, Oeceola First National Bank of Coalport, Pa. 

Mills, Pa. Geo. D. Benn, President; A. L. Hegarty, 

John McLarren, President; H. W. Todd, Vice-President; A. P. Silverthorn, Cashier. 

Vice-President: E. C. Blandy, Cashier. Directors — Geo. D. Benn, J. E. Mc- 

Directors — John McLarren, Chas. R. Dowell, John McNulty, A. L. Hegarty, C. 

Houtz, E. C. Blandy, \V. A. Gould, Frank D. McMurray, W. H. Denlinger, W. W. 

Craig, James S. Moore, H. W. Todd. Hegarty, F. P. McFarland, F. V. Perry. 



CHAPTER XX 



AGRICULTURE 

The Patrons of Husbandry, "Grange" — Object of the Society — When Founded — The First 
Grange Founded in Clearfield County — Other Branches of the Society in CleaiHeld County 
— The Clearfield County Agricultural Society. 



pression from monopolists, unwise and unfair 
discrimination on the part of railroad corpora- 
tions, and the -exorbitant and needless charges 
of commission men in every department of 
trade. 

So rapid, indeed, has been the growth of 



THE PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY GRANGE 

At the city of Washington, D. C, on the 4th 
day of December, in the year 1868, O. H 
Kelley and William Sanders, both of whom 
were then connected with the national depart- 
ment of agriculture, took the initial steps and membership of the Grange throughout the 
laid the foundation for this vast organization, land that it now numbers among the millions, 
and brought into existence the National In the year 1875. the movement reached this 
Grange. In each State are societies subordi- county, and on the 13th day of April of that 
nate to the national order, and which are year, the enterprising farmers of Penn towm- 
known as State Granges. Auxiliary to the ship met at the residence of Samuel Widemire, 
State Grange, are County, Township and Dis- where, through the district deputy, O. S. Car}', 
trict Granges. of Punxsutawney, the first Grange organiza- 

As the name implies, the aim, object and tion was perfected. Although in point of sen- 
purpose of the society is to improve the condi- iority, Penn Grange is entitled to first men- 
tion and advance the interests of all persons, 
and their families as well, who may be en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits ; not only to im- 
prove their condition through a free inter- 
change of opinions in social gatherings where 
subjects pertaining to agriculture may be dis- 
cussed, but by thorough organization and hon- 
est, open, determined effort to bring about charter members : J. R.- Read, Mary W. Read, 
such action on the part of the general govern- William L. Read, O. D. Kendall, E. M. Ken- 
ment, and also that of each State, as will ef- dall. Catharine Davis, George Emerick, R. L. 
fectually and permanently overthrow all op- Reiter, Hettie Reiter, A. Rankin, M. C. Ran- 

239 



tion, it is but a district or township Grange, 
yielding to Pomona Grange the first place, as 
that although of more recent organization, is 
a county institution, to which the others are 
subordinate. 

Pomona Grange, P. of H., No. 33, was or- 
ganized January i, 1879, with the following 



240 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



kill, J. L. McPherson, Leander Denning, Eliza 
Denning, \V. P. Read, James Spackman, 
Mary E. Spackman, W . P. Tate, Martha C. 
Tate. At the time of its organization the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: Master, George 
Emerick; overseer, Elisha M. Davis; lecturer, 
Leander Denning; steward, A. Rankin; chap- 
lain, W. P. Read; treasurer, James Spack- 
man; secretary, W. P. Tate; assistant stew- 
ard, O. D. Kendall; gate-keeper, R. L. Reiter; 
ceres, Catharine Davis; pomona, Sister Spack- 
man; flora. Sister Kendall; lady assistant 
steward, Mrs. L. Denning. 

Penn Grange No. 534, P. of H., was organ- 
ized April 13, 1875, by District Deputy O. S. 
Cary, with twenty-five charter members. The 
first master was Samuel W'idemire; secretary, 
Miles S. Spencer. 

Lawrence Grange, No. 553, P. of H., was 
organized by Deputy O. S. Cary, on the 12th 
day of May, 1875, with twenty-one charter 
members. This Grange is located in Law- 
rence township, from which its name is de- 
rived. 

Goshen Grange, No. 623, P. of H., was or- 
ganized November 18, 1875, ^^'''i ^ charter 
membership of eighteen persons. Its first mas- 
ter and secretary were H. H. Morrow and J. 
A. Fulton, respectively. This Grange is lo- 
cated in Goshen township, on the road leading 
from Shawsville to Clearfield. 

Troutdale Grange No. 677, P. of H., was 
organized by Deputy J. B. Shaw, on the 15th 
day of March, 1876, with twenty-nine charter 
members. This is an organization of Bell 
townsliip. 

Greenwood Grange, No. — , P. of H., was 
organize<1 by Deputy J. B. Shaw, Mav 12, 
1876, liaving a cliarter membership of twenty- 
three persons. First master, C. A. Thorp; 



secretary, J. S. McQuown. It is located in 
Greenwood township. 

Bloomington Grange No. 715, P. of H. was 
organized by Deputy J. S. Reed on the 26th 
of June, 1876, with thirty-three charter mem- 
bers. First master, James R. Norris; secre- 
tary, Mrs. Ella M. Bloom: located at Bloom- 
ington, in Pike township. 

Sylvan Grove Grange, No. 765, P. of H., 
organized by Deputy W. P. Reed, October 24, 
1882. Number of charter members, twenty. 
First officers : Master, O. P. Reese ; secretary, 
B. F. Wiliielm; location of Grange, Kyler- 
town. Cooper township. 

Laurel Run Grange, No. 769, P. of H., 
was organized March 10, 1883, by Dep- 
uties Davis and Bloom, with a charter' 
membership of fourteen. Adam Kephart 
was elected its first master, and Elijah Reese, 
Jr., secretary'. This Grange is located in 
Decatur township. 

Fairview Grange, No. 783, P. of H., was 
organized May 2, 1884, by Deputies Elisha M. 
Davis and James C. Bloom, with twenty-three 
charter members. The first officers were : 
Master. W. A. Smeal; secretary, W. B. Bar- 
ger. The Grange is located on the Graham- 
ton and Deer Creek road, two and one-half 
miles south of Deer Creek bridge. 

Girard Grange, No. 788, P. of H., was or- 
ganized September 16, 1884, by Deputies 
Elisha M. Davis and James C. Bloom, with 
eighteen charter members. The first officers 
elected were: Isaac Smith, master, and Louisa 
Shope, secretary. 

Mount Foy Grange, No. 584, P. of H., was 
organized August 10, 1885, with twenty-five 
charter members. The first officers were : 
Master, J. B. Shaw ; overseer, Matthew Og- 
den; secretary-, J. B. Ogden. This organiza- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



241 



tion is formed mainly of residents of the north 
part of Lawrence township. 

Narrows Creek Grange, No. 796, P. of H., 
was organized by Deputy Ehsha ^I. Davis, 
January 2, 1886, with fourteen charter 
members. The first master elected was 
W. H. Liddle, secretary, Isaac Hess; loca- 
tion of Grange four miles east of DuBois and 
two miles west of Summit tunnel on A. V. 
Railroad. 

Union Grange, No. 802, P. of H., was or- 
ganized by Deputy E. M. Davis June 3, 1886, 
with twenty-one charter members ; first mas- 
ter, Henry Pentz; secretary, \\'illiam Welty; 
location of Grange, thirteen miles west of 
Clearfield, on turnpike leading to Luthersburg, 
at the village of Rockton. 

Du Bois Grange, No. — , P. of H., was or- 
ganized October 20, 1886, by Deputy Davis, 
with a charter membership of sixteen persons. 
Its first master was S. C. Liddle; secretary, 
William Woods. It is located in the south 



part of Sandy township, about two miles dis- 
tant from Du Bois borough. 

CLE.\RFIELD COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 

The Clearfield County Agricultural Society 
was incorporated January 14, i860. The pur- 
pose of this society is to encourage the devel- 
opment of agriculture in the county. 

Notwithstanding the fact that there was 
\ery little attention paid to farming in Clear- 
field county for many years of the county's 
earlier history, yet this society for a number 
of years held annual fairs at Clearfield that 
were well attended and gave indications of the 
development of this much needed branch of 
industry. For the last few years, however, 
the society has not been holding fairs but is 
now ofiiering prizes for the most successful 
efforts in various lines of agriculture, and in 
the breeding of fine stock. The present oflfi- 
cers of the society are: T. L. Way, presi- 
dent; R. E. Shaw, secretary. 



CHAPTER XXI 



COAL PRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT 



Early Coal Shipinoits — Early Coal Mines ami Railroad — Tlic Moshannon Branch of the T. 
& C. R. R. — Coal Covipauics and Proprietors — Description of the Mines — Statistics. 



The first shipments of coal from Clearfield 
county were made during the lumbering days, 
when the coal was loaded in what were called 
"Arks" and floated down the river to Lock 
Haven and W'illiamsport as early as the year 
1822. About 1830 a mine was opened on what 
w-as known as the Goss farm in Decatur town- 
ship, and the coal was hauled to Spruce Creek 
on wagons. The coal transported by these 
crude methods amounted to a very small ton- 
nage, and it was not until the opening of the 
Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad to Osceola 
Mills and Philipsburg in 1864. that the real 
development of the coal industry in the county 
commenced. When we remember that prior 
to that year not a pound of coal had been 
shipped by rail from Clearfield county ; that 
the production has grown from a few thou- 
sand tons to many million tons per year; that 
"Clearfield" bituminous coal is known wher- 
ever this product is used in this country, and is 
e.\j)orted to other countries, we can, in part, 
realize the great impetus that this industry has 
given to the progress and growth of the county. 

The Derby mine, about three-fourths of a 
mile west of Philipsburg, was opened in i860 
by George Zeigler, and the coal hauled on a 
tram road to Philipsburg and sold for local 
use. When the railroad reached that point in 
1864 this mine was ready to ship. Its chutes 
were located nearly opposite the depot, and it 

242 



was the first mine in the county to ship its coal 
to market by railroad. 

The Moshannon Branch of the T. & C. 
Railroad was commenced in 1864, and com- 
pleted as far as Moshannon in 1868, with a 
branch up Coal Run to the old Decatur mine. 
In June, 1866, a mine on the lands of the 
Moshannon Coal Company, on the south side 
of the railroad, was opened by the Moshannon 
Coal Company on the tract formerly known 
as the "John Anderson," and called "Mo- 
shannon." This mine ran until about 1880, 
when it was abandoned by its owners, a new 
one having been opened immediately opposite 
in 1876, and called "New Moshannon." Both 
of these mines were xexy successful ventures, 
.ind first brought to general notice the Clear- 
field coals. 

During the summer of 1868, the Moshannon 
Branch Railroad was extended about two miles 
further west, and in the summer of 1869 the 
rails were laid upon the ])nrtion graded, and 
Sterling No. i was commenced August 11, 
1869. to add to the production. This colliery 
was opened upon the lands of A. B. Long, 
formerly the Casper Haines tract, and in a 
very short time became the largest mine in 
the region. 

During the year 1870, the Moshannon 
Branch Railroad was extended a quarter of a 
mile further, and the "Eureka" colliery opened 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



243 



and commenced to ship coal March 14, 1870. 
This colHery was owned by White & Lingle, 
and was situated on the lands of Dr. Houtz, 
of Alexandria, Huntingdon county. The coal 
in this mine proved to be the purest of any 
that had been opened up to that time, and the 
mine itself was without a "fault" from the be- 
ginning to the end. In 1874 the mine passed 
into the hands of Berwind, White & Company, 
and from them to the Berwind-White Coal 
Mining Company. 

The Moshannon Branch was extended dur- 
ing the year 1875, three miles, to enable D. K. 
Ramey, of Altoona, who owned the lands at 
the then terminus, to get his lumber to market. 
The extension of this branch also opened the 
way to a very extensive coal field, and in the 
fall of 1874 William Kendrick commenced to 
sink a shaft two miles from Houtzdale, on 
lands of Mr. Ramey, for the purpose of prov- 
ing the "E Bed," which had dropped below 
water-level at that point. This shaft is sev- 
enty feet deep, and was the first in the region, 
if we except the Sackett shaft at Osceola Mills, 
sunk in 1866, to reach the "A" Vein, but 
which was never worked. 

John Whitehead, Harned Jacobs & Com- 
pany and other parties opened up a large num- 
ber of collieries in the Houtzdale region. Most 
of these operations were purchased by Ber- 
wind, White & Company, now the Berwind- 
White Coal Mining Company of Philadel- 
phia, and they became the largest shippers in 
that region and continued so for a number of 
years. 

In the year 1901, Roland D. Swoope, Esq., 
of Curwensville, in connection with other own- 
ers of coal lands near Madera in Bigler town- 
ship, constructed a branch railroad from the 
Moshannon Branch of the P. R. R. to their 



lands and opened up the "Bucher" Mine on 
the "B" Vein of coal. This proved to be a 
very successful operation and developed a new 
coal territory from which the largest ship- 
ments in the district are now made. 

The Morrisdale Coal Company also opened 
a mine ' near Madera, but subsequently sold 
their interest at that point to the Sylvania Coal 
Company. 

The White Oak Coal Company also opened 
up mines near Madera, and their mines were 
purchased by the Corona Coal & Coke Com- 
pany and arc now being operated by that com- 
pany. 

The coal near Karthaus, in the northeastern 
corner of the county was first operated by 
John Whitehead & Company in 1885. This 
mine was sold to the Berwind-White Coal 
Mining Coinpany, who also opened the "Cat- 
aract" Mine in the same year, about six miles 
below Karthaus. The Beech Creek Railroad 
was completed as far as Peale in July, 1884, 
and to Gazzam in July, 1885. At Peale a 
large coal operation was opened by the Clear- 
field Bituminous Coal Company, and the same 
company operates the coal at Gazzam, and 
also the Grass Flat mines. 

The Morrisdale Coal Company in 1885 
opened up a large colliery on the Hawk Run 
Branch. The Bloomington Coal Mining 
Company opened up their operations at Bloom- 
ington in 1885 and Rembrandt Peale, who 
was the manager of that company and of 
Peale, Peacock & Kerr, Inc., pushed their op- 
erations on a large scale at Bloomington, and . 
also near DuBois and at other points in the 
county. The Rochester & Pittsburg Coal 
Compan}^ have few operations in Clearfield 
county, the principal ones being at Helvetia 
and near Luthersburg. 



244 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Sommen-ille & Company opened up mines 
at W'inburne and many other smaller opera- 
tors developed coal properties along the new 
railroad. 

A list of all the coal operations in the 
county, shipping coal by rail, is given here- 
with. This list is believed to be as complete 
as it is possible to make it with the data avail- 
able. 

In 1862 the tonnage in the county of coal 
shipped by rail was 7.239 tons. Below will be 
found the report of the mine inspector of Dis- 
trict No. 18, showing the shipments in this dis- 
trict for the year 1910. There is also a large 
amount of coal sliipped over the Low Grade 
Division of the P. R. R., from the vicinity of 
DuBois and over the Pennsylvania & North- 
western Railroad, that is not reported in this 
statement, as those sections of the county are 
included in a different mining district and the 
counties are not kept separate in the reports of 
tonnage. 

REPORT OF THO.MAS S. LOWTHER, INSPECTOR, EIGHTEENTH 
BITUMINOUS DISTRICT, PA., FOR THE YEAR I9IO. 

COMPANY TONS 

Corona Coal & Coke Company, H. B. Swoope 

& Company, Madera 647,824 

Berwind-Wliile Coal Mining Company, Phila- 
delphia 4fi9.8,« 

Rockhill I. & C. Company, Robertsdale 305.765 

Carbon C. & C. Company, Saxton 255,467 

Clearfield C. M. Company, Clearfield 160,516 

Joseph E. Thropp, Saxton 155-309 

S. J. Mountz, Morann 144.380 

John Langdon. Huntingdon 1 10.367 

Colonial Iron Company. Riddlesburg 88.760 

Clark Brothers C. M. Company, Glen Campbell 87,010 

Bnlah Coal Company, Ramey 80,828 

W. .'\. Gould & Brother, Brisbin 80.472 

Bulah Shaft Coal Company, Ramey 79'i89 

Broad Top Coal & Mineral Company, Hunt- 
ingdon 74-097 

Whitney Coal Company, Philadelphia 7i>44' 

Betz Coal Mining Company, Philadelphia 69,248 



Madeira-Hill Coal Mining Company, Philips- 

bu'g 65,761 

James N. Mclntire & Company, Six Mile Run. 64,686 

Huntingdon Coal Company. Huntingdon 59.696 

Pemberton Coal Company, .■Mtoona 50.602 

E. Eichelberger & Company, Sa.xton 42,741 

Moshannon Coal Mining Company, Osceola 

Mills 41,700 

Centre C. & C. Company, Osceola Mills 39.262 

A. J. Black, Broad Top 38,413 

Decatur C. M. Company, Clearfield 37,368 

E. J. Walker & Company, Brisbin 34,678 

Leland C. M. Company. New York 32.836 

W. R. Gallagher & Brother. Smith Mill 30,292 

H. A. Munn and Reed Collieries Co., Dudley.. 30,250 

Atlantic C. M. Company, Philipsburg 30,224 

Miscellaneous Companies 304,254 

Total ..3>783,27i 

CO.AL MIXES IN CLEARFIELD COUNTY 

Buffalo, Rochester & Pittslnir,i,di Railway. 
Clearfield Collier}' Co., Clearfield, operates 
Bloom mine No. i at Curvvensville. Vein 
"D." Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 250 tons. Trade name "3C." 

Clearfield Steel & Iron Co., Pittsburg, 
operates mine at Hyde. Vein Moshannon. 
Thickness 33/2 ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 100 tons. 

I'alls Creek Coal Co., Buffalo, X. Y., ope- 
rates Falls Creek mine at Falls Creek. (Also 
P. R. R.) Vein Freeport. Thickness 5 to 
6 ft. Drift. Machine mine. Daily capacity 
1000 tons. Trade name "Falls Creek." An- 
alysis on file. 

Rochester & Pittsburgh Coal & Iron Co., 
Helvetia, operates Helvetia No. 2. Vein 
"D." Thickness.* Compressed air mine. 
Daily capacity 500 tons. 

Buffalo & Susquehanna Railroad. 

Buffalo & Susquehanna Coal & Coke Co., 
Buffalo. N. Y., operates DuBois shafts Nos. 
I and 2 at DuBois. Vein Lower Freeport. 



* Not reported. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



245 



Thickness 6 ft. Shafts. Machine mines. 
Daily capacity 4000 tons. 

Cascade Coal & Coke Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
operates Tyler mine at Tyler. (Also P. R. 
R.) Vein. Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. 
Erie Railroad. 

Northwestern Mining & Exchange Co., 
New York, N. Y., operates Eriton mine at 
Eriton. Vein "D" Lower Freeport. Thick- 
ness 54 in. Shaft. Machine mine. Daily 
capacity 2,600 tons. 

New York Central & Hudson River 
Railroad. 

Bellmore Coal Co., Burnside, operates 
Burnside mine at Burnside. Vein "D." 
Thickness 3>^ ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 75 tons. Analysis on file. 

Bulah Shaft Coal Co., Ramey, operates 
Bulah Shaft No. i at Ramey. (Also P. R. 
R.) Vein "D" or Moshannon. Thick- 
ness.* Shaft. Pick mine. Daily capacity 
1000 to 1200 tons. Analysis on tile. 

Barnes, Harry & Co., Philipsburg, oper- 
ates the Cater No. 15. Vein "D." Drift. 
Pick mine. Thickness.* Daily capacity 50 
tons. 

Carbon Coal & Mng. Co., St. Benedict, 
operates B. No. 12. Vein Lower Freeport. 
Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 100 tons. 

Clearfield Bit. Coal Corporation, Clear- 
field, operates Gazzam mine at Gazzam. 
Vein "D." Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. 
Daily capacity 250 tons. 

Same company operates Pleasant Hill, 
Grass Flat and Knox Run mines at Beale. 
Vein "B." Thickness.* Drifts. Pick mines. 
Daily capacity 1,985 tons. 

Clearfield Colliery Co., Clearfield, oper- 
ates Caldwell mine No. 2 at Curwensville. 



Vein "D." Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. 
Daily capacity 500 tons. Trade name "3C." 

Clearfield & Cambria Coal & Coke Co., 
Port Deposit, Md., operates Lee Hollow 
mine at La Jose. (Also P. R. R. ) Vein 
Upper Freeport or "E." Thickness 3 ft. 
Drift. Machine and pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 1000 tons. 

Corona Coal & Coke Co., Madera, oper- 
ates Shoff mine at Madera. Vein "B." 
Thickness 3 to 53^2 ft. Drift. Pick mine. 
Daily capacity 300 tons. Analysis on file. 

Graham Coal Co., Inc., Philipsburg, oper- 
ates Hartley mine at Graham Station. Vein 
"B." Thickness 2 ft. 10 in. Slope. Ma- 
chine and pick mine. Daily capacity 200 
tons. Trade name "Hartley." Analysis on 
file. Same company operates Phoenix mine 
No. 2 at Oak Grove. Vein Moshannon 
"D." Thickness 4 ft. 8 in. Drift. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 100 tons. Trade 
name "Phoenix." Analysis on file. 

Harbison-\\'alker Refractories Co., Pitts- 
burgh, operates Plane mine at Woodland. 
Vein "C." Thickness 2>4 to 3 ft. Drift. 
Pick mine. Daily capacity 10 tons. 

Holt, W. F., Philipsburg, operates Phoe- 
nix mine at Hawk Run. Vein "E." Thick- 
ness 3 ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily capac- 
ity 100 tons, .\nalysis on file. 

Irish Bros. Coal Co., Philipsburg, oper- 
ates Colorado mine No. 5 at Munson Sta- 
tion. Vein "B." Thickness 3 ft. 10 in. 
Drift. Machine and pick mine. 

Same company operates Jefferson mines 
Nos. I and 2 at Philipsburg. (Also P. R. 
R.) Veins "E" and Moshannon respec- 
tively. Thickness 3 and 4>4 ft. respectively. 
Drifts. Pick mines. 

Same company operates Cuba mines Nos. 



■ Not reported. 



246 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



I and 2 at Cuba mines. Veins "E" and Mo- 
shannon. Thickness 3 and 4^/2 ft. respec- 
tively. Drifts. Pick mines. 

Keiley, M. J. & Co., Olanta, operates 
Burnadette mines. Vein "B." Thickness.* 
Drift. Pick mine. Daily capacity 50 tons. 

Lee, Thos. J., Philipsburg, operates Davis 
at Hawk Run. Vein Moshannon. Thick- 
ness 4y> ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 150 tons. Trade name "Davis." 

Little Creek Coal & Coke Co.. Clearfield, 
operates O'Shanter mine at O'Shanter. 
Veins "D" and "E." Thickness ay; ft. 
Drift and incline. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 100 tons. 

Moshannon Coal Mining Co., Osceola 
Mills, operates Moshannon mines Nos. 7, 
8 and 9, Electric Nos. i and 2, Lenore Nos. 
I and 2 and Centre mine at Osceola Mills. 
(Also P. R. R.) Vein "D." Moshannon. 
Thickness 5 to 6 ft. Drifts. Pick mines. 
Daily capacity 2,700 tons. Trade name 
"Moshannon." Analysis on file.. 

Olanta Coal Mining Co., HoUidaysburg, 
operates Olanta mines Nos. i and 2 at 
Olanta. Veins "B" and "C." Thickness 3 
ft. 8 in. Drifts. Machine and pick mmes. 
Daily capacity 300 tons. Trade name 
"Olanta Steaming." 

O'Shanter Coal Co., Philipsburg. operates 
Manhattan mine at O'Shanter. Vein "B." 
Thickness 3 ft. Drift. Pick mine. 

Peale. Peacock & Kerr. Inc.. St. Benedict, 
operates Bloomington Nos. 3, 4 and 5 at 
Glenrichey. Nos. i, 3. 4, 7 and 8 near Phil- 
ipsburg. No. 19 Curwensville, Decatur. 
Ogle Nos. I, 6 and 9 at Winburne. Veins 
Lower Freeport. Thickness.* Pick mines 
and compressed air. Drifts and shafts. 
Daily capacity i.ooo tons. 



Peale & Hooten, St. Benedict, operates 
Ogle No. 8 at Munson Sta. Vein Lower 
Thickness.* Drift. Pick 



Kittanning. 
mine. 

Penna. Coal & Coke Co., operates Nos. 
45. 46 and 47 Winburne. Vein "B." Thick- 
ness.* Drifts. Pick and electric mines. 
Capacity 500 tons. 

Potter, Bigler & Potter, Inc., Clearfield, 
operates Horseshoe mine at Karthaus. 
Vein "B." Thickness.* Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 150 tons. 

Potts Run Land Co., Clearfield, operates 
Potts Run mines Nos. 2 and 3 at Boardman. 
\'ein "B" or Miller. Thickness 38 to 45 in. 
Drifts. Pick mines. Daily capacity 1,500 
tons. 

Red Jacket Coal Co., Philipsburg, operates 
Gearhart mine at Gearhartville. (Also P. R. 
R.) Vein "E." Thickness 3 ft. 4 in. Drift. 
Pick mine. 

Stage. Isaac, Clearfield, operates Karthaus 
colliery No. i at Karthaus. Vein "B." Thick- 
ness 3'/2 ft. Drift and incline. Pick mine. 
Daily capacity 100 tons. 

Victoria Coal Mining Co., New York, N. 
Y., operates Acme mine at Hawk Run. Vein 
"B." Thickness.* Drift and slope. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 1,000 ions. Trade 
name "Acme." 

PENNSYLV.\NI.\ R. R. (pENN.\. I.INES) 

Anda Coal Co., Houtzdale, operates the 
Mountain Branch mine, near Madera. Vein 
"D." Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 50 tons. 

Atlantic Coal Mining Co., operates Cross 
Keys mine at West Moshannon. Vein "D." 
Thickness." Drift. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 100 tons. 



' Not reported. 



AXD REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



247 



Berwind-White Coal Mining Co., Phila- 
delphia, operates "Eureka" Nos. 7, 16, 22, 27 
and 28. Vein '"D." Thickness.* Drifts and 
shafts. Compressed air and pick mines. Daily 
capacity 1,500 tons. 

Berwindale Coal & Coke Co., Philadelphia, 
operates Cheston mine near Irvona. Vein 
Moshannon. Thickness 4 ft. Drift. Pick 
mine. 

Betz Coal Mining Co., Philadelphia, oper- 
ates Betz mine No. 2 at Madera. Vein "B." 
Thickness 4j^ to 5 ft. Drift. Pick mine and 
machine mine. Daily capacity 500 tons. An- 
alysis on file. 

Blain Run Coal Co., Coalport, operates mine 
No. I at Coalport. Vein "B" or Miller. 
Thickness 4 ft. 8 in. Drift. Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 400 tons. Analysis on file. 

Blyth Coal Co., Clearfield, operates Blyth 
Shaft at Madera. Vein "B." Thickness 51^^ 
ft. Shaft. Machine and pick mine. Mine 
just developing. Analysis on file. 

Brisbin Coal Mining Co., Philadelphia, op- 
erates Mascot mine No. i at Houtzdale. Vein 
"B." Thickness 4 ft. Drift. Pick mine. 
Daily capacity 50 tons. 

Bulah Coal Co., Ramey, operates W'ebster 
mine No. 4 at Bulah. Vein "D" or Moshan- 
non. Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 600 to 800 tons. Analysis on file. 

Bulah Shaft Coal Co., Ramey, operates Bu- 
lah Shaft No. I at Ramey. (See N. Y. C. & 
H. R. R. R.) 

Burns, M., Brisbin, operates Penn mines 
Nos. 2 and 3 at Grampian. Vein Moshannon. 
Thickness 4 ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 250 tons. 

Cascade Coal & Coke Co., Bufifalo, N. Y., 
operates Tyler mine at Tyler. (See Buffalo & 
Susquehanna Ry.) 



Clearfield Coal Co., Madera, operates Be- 
carria mine at Becarria. Vein "D" or Mo- 
shannon. Thickness 2 5^ to 3 ft. Drift. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 50 tons. Trade name 
"King Cole." Analysis on file. 

Clearfield Coal Mining Co., Clearfield, op- 
erates Penn mine No. 4 at Osceola Mills. Vein 
Miller. Thickness 3^4 ft. Drift. Pick mine. 
Daily capacity 200 tons. Analysis on file. 

Clearfield & Cambria Coal & Coke Co., Port 
Deposit, Maryland, operates Lee Hollow mine 
at La Jose. (See N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R.) 

Cleamiont Coal Mining Co., Philadelphia, 
operates Clearmont mine at Houtzdale. Vein 
"E" or Cap. Thickness 3 ft. Drift. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 100 tons. Same com- 
pany operates Clearmont mine at Houtzdale. 
Vein "D" or Moshannon. Thickness 5 ft. 
Drift and slope. Pick mine. Daily capacity 
150 tons. Trade name "Clearmont." 

Corona Coal & Coke Co., Madera, operates 
Bucher mine at Madera. Vein "B." Thick- 
ness 3 to 5>4 ft. Drift. Machine mine. Daily 
capacity 600 tons. Analysis on file. 

Same Company operates Royal mine at 
Madera. Vein "B." Thickness 3 to 5>4 ft. 
Slope. Pick mine. Daily capacity 100 tons. 
Analysis on file. 

Same Company operates White Oak mine 
at Madera. Vein "B." Thickness 3 to sYz ft. 
Slope. Machine mine. Daily capacity 300 
tons. Analysis on file. 

Same Company operates Corona, Davis and 
Hegarty mines at Madera. Vein "B." Thick- 
ness 3 to sVi ft. Drifts. Pick mines. Daily 
capacity 800 tons. Analysis on file. 

Chestnut Hill Coal Co., Ramey. operates 
Chestnut Hill No. i. Vein "B." Thickness.* 
Drift. Pick mine. Daily capacity 50 tons. 

Clark Bros. Coal Mining Co., Philadelphia, 



* Not reported. 

16 



248 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



operates Falcom Nos. i and 2 Smoke Run, and 
3 and 4 McCartney. Vein "D." Thickness.* 
Drifts. Pick and electric mines. Daily ca- 
pacity 200 tons. 

Coaldaie Mining Co., St. Benedict, operates 
Coaldale No. 12 Munson Sta. Vein "A." 
Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 50 tons. 

Coalport Coal Co., Coalport. operates Su- 
perior Nos. I, 2 and 3 Coalport. Vein "C & 
B." Thickness.* Drifts. Pick mines. Daily 
capacity 100 tons. 

Dunbar Coal Mining Co., Altoona, operates 
Fairmont mines Nos. i, 2 and 3 at Osceola 
Mills. Vein "D" or Moshannon. Thickness 
7 ft. Drifts. Pick mines. Daily capacity 
450 tons. Analysis on file. 

Ellsworth-Dunham Coal Co., St. Benedict, 
operates Royal Mine, Munson, Pa. Vein "D." 
Thickness.* Slope. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 100 tons. 

Easton Coal Co., Easton, operates Easton 
mine at Mahaffey. Vein.* Thickness 4 ft. 
Drift. Pick mine. Daily capacity 150 to 300 
tons. Analysis on file. 

Falls Creek Coal Co., Buffalo. N. Y., oper- 
ates Falls Creek mine at Falls Creek. (See 
B. R. & P. R. R.) 

Franklin Cnal Co., Ltd., Brisbin, operates 
Sterling mine No. 2 at Clearfield. Vein Mo- 
shannon. Thickness ^Ys ft. Drift. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 100 tons. 

Gould & Bros., W. A., Brisbin, operates 
Midvale mines Nos. i and 2 at Brisbin and 
Midvale mine No. i at McCartney. Vein Mo- 
shannon. Thickness 454 to 5 ft. Drifts. Pick 
mines. Daily capacity 400 tons. 

Same Company operates Henderson mine 
No. 5 at Brisbin. Vein "B." Thickness 3>^ 

* Not reported. 



ft. Slope. Machine and pick mine. Daily 
capacity 200 tons. 

Ghem Coal Co., Osceola Mills, operate Ghem 
mine. Vein "B." Thickness.* Drift. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 100 tons. 

Hegartys" Sons, S., Coalport, operate Oak- 
land mines Nos. 2 and 3 at Coalport. Vein 
"B" or Miller. Thickness 4 to 5 ft. Drifts. 
Pick mines. Daily capacity 500 tons. Trade 
names "Black Hawk" and "Oakland." Analy- 
sis on file. 

Henrietta Coal Co., Ltd., Houtzdale, oper- 
ates Henrietta mines Nos. i, 2 and 4 at Houtz- 
dale. Vein Moshannon. Thickness 3 to 4 ft. 
Drifts and slopes. Pick mines. Daily capac- 
ity 200 tons. 

Industry Coal Mining Co., Philipsburg, op- 
erates Industry mine at Industry. Vein Mo- 
shannon. Thickness 4 ft. Drift. Pick mine. 
Same Company operates Niagara mine at Ash- 
land. Vein "B." Thickness 3 ft. Drift. Pick 
mine. 

Irish Bros. Coal Co., Philipsburg, operates 
Jefferson mines No. i and at Philipsburg. 
(See N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R.) 

Irvona Coal & Coke Co., Philadelphia, op- 
crates Ir\ona mines Nos. 3, 5 and 10 at Blain 
City. Vein "B." Thickness.* Drifts. Ma- 
chine mines. Daily capacity 1,500 tons. Trade 
name "Irvona." Analysis on file. 

Kelly & Shadeck, Karthaus, operates Mos- 
quito Creek mine at Clearfield. Vein.* Thick- 
ness 3 ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily capacity 
70 to 100 tons. 

King Coal Mining Co.. Ltd., Madera, oper- 
ates King mine at Smith Mills. Vein "D" 
Moshannon. Thickness 2^ to 3 ft. Drift. 
Pick mine. Daily capacity 100 tons. Trade 
name "King Cole." Analysis on file. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



249 



Mosier & Jose, La Jose, operates Wilson 
Run Mine. Vein "C." Thickness.* Drift. 
Pick mine. Daily capacity 50 tons. 

Madera Hill Coal Mining Co., Clearfield, 
operates Clover Run mines Nos. i, 2 and 4 in 
Bell township. Veins "D" and "C." Thick- 
ness.* Drifts. Pick mines. Daily capacity 
600 tons. 

Mohawk Coal Co., New York, N. Y., oper- 
ates Beaver mine at Philipsburg. Vein "C" 
and "B." Thickness 2,y2 ft. Drift. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 300 tons. Trade name 
"Mohawk." Analysis on file. 

Morrisdale Coal Co., The, Philadelphia, op- 
erates Morrisdale shafts Nos. i, 2 and 3 at 
Morrisdale mines. Vein "B." Thickness 4 ft. 
10 in. shafts. Machine and pick mines. Daily 
capacity 2,500 tons. Trade name "Morris- 
dale Bituminous." Analysis on file. 

Moshannon Coal Mining Co., Osceola Mills, 
operates Moshannon mines Nos. i and 4 at 
Osceola Mills. Vein "D" Moshannon. Thick- 
ness 5 to 6 ft. Drifts. Pick mines. Daily ca- 
pacity 600 tons. Trade name "Moshannon." 
Analysis on file. 

Same Company operates Moshannon mines 
Nos. 7, 8 and 9, electric Nos. i and 2, Lenore 
Nos. I and 2 Centre mine at Osceola Mills 
(SeeN. Y. C. & H. R. R. R.) 

Mountz & Co., S. J., Morann, operates Vi- 
ola mine at Janesville. Vein "B." Thickness 
IV2 ft. Slope. Pick mine. Daily capacity 
700 tons. Analysis on file. 

Same Company operates Whiteside mine 
No. I at Morann. Vein Moshannon. Thick- 
ness 2 ft. ID in. Drift. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 100 tons. 

Same Company operates Morann and 
Whiteside mine No. 2 at Morann. Vein Mo- 
shannon. Thickness 2 ft. 10 in. to 4J-2 ft. 



Drifts. Pick mines. Daily capacity 100 
tons. 

AIull, R. H., Philipsburg, operates Imperial 
mine No. i in Decatur township. Vein "D" 
Moshannon. Thickness 5 to 6j^ ft. Drift. 
Pick mines. Daily capacity 200 tons. Trade 
name "Imperial." .\nalysis on file. 

North Witmer Coal & Coke Co., Irvona, 
operates Wister Nos. i, 2 and 3. Veins "B" 
"D." Drifts. Pick mines. Daily capacity 
100 tons. 

Pemberton Coal Co., Altoona, operates 
Pemberton mines Nos. i and 2 at Osceola 
Mills. Vein "D" or Moshannon. Thickness 
5>4 to 8 ft. Drifts. Pick mines. Daily ca- 
pacity 500 tons. Trade name "Pemberton." 
Analysis on file. 

Penfield Coal Co.. South Bethlehem, oper- 
ates mine at Penfield. Vein "B." Thickness 
4 ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily capacity 1. 000 
tons. Analysis on file. 

Pine Hill Coal Co., Rosebud, operates mine 
at Rosebud. Vein "B." Thickness 4>^ ft. 
Drift and incline. Pick mine. Daily capacity 
50 tons. 

Red Jacket Coal Co., Philipsburg, operates 
Gearhart mine at Gearhartville. (See N. Y. 
C. & H. R. R. R.) 

Smith & Co., A., Dysart, operates Supe- 
rior mines Nos. i, 2 and 3 at Haverly. Vein 
"D." Thickness 3 ft. Drift and slope. Pick 
mine. Daily capacity 200 tons. Analysis 
on file. 

Standard Moshannon Coal Co., Wil- 
liamsport, operates Standard Moshannon 
mine at Smoke Run. Vein Lower Freeport. 
Thickness 3>4 ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily 
capacity 300 tons. 

Sw-oope Coal Co., Madera, operates 
Eighteen mine at Madera. Vein "D" or 



* Not reported. 



250 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Moshannon. Thickness 4 to 5 ft. Drift. 
Pick mine. Daily capacity 225 tons. Trade 
name "Eighteen." Analysis on file. 

Swoope & Co., H. B., Madera, operates 
Morgan Run miner at Madera. Vein "B." 
Thickness 4 fi. Drift. Pick mine. Daily capac- 
ity 300 tons. Trade name "Morgan Run." 
Analysis on file. 

Sylvania Coal Co., Madera, operates Syl- 
vania mine at Madera. Vein "B." Thick- 
ness 4 to 6 ft. Drift. Machine mine. Daily 
capacitly 600 tons. Analysis on file. 

Walker & Co., E. J., Brisbin, operates 
Troy mine No. i at Brisbin. Vein "B." 
Thickness 4 ft. Drift. Pick mine. Daily capac- 
ity 100 tons. Same company operates Stanley 
Colliery at Moran. Vein "D." Moshan- 
non. Thickness 5 ft. Slope. Pick mine. 
Daily capacity 200 tons. Analysis on file. 

Wilkinson, Roy, Philipsbnrg, operates 
Girard mine No. 3 at West Decatur. Vein 
"B." Thickness 3 ft. 8 in. Drift. Pick- 
mine. Daily capacity 50 tons. 



Whitney Coal Co., Philadelphia, operates 
the Whitney mine, Ramey, Pa. Vein "B." 
Thickness.* Drift. Pick mine. Daily ca- 
pacity 100 tons. 

Whitehead Coal Company, Osceola Mills, 
Operates Peerless i, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Vein 
"B." Thickness.* Drifts. Pick mines. 
Daily capacity 500 tons. 

Woolridge Coal Co., Woodland, operates 
Union No. 6. Vein "D." Thickness.* 
Drift. Pick mine. Daily capacity 50 
tons. 

Yorkshire Coal Mining Co., Madera, oper- 
ates Yorkshire mine at Banian Junction. 
Vein "B." Thickness 2>4 to 5 ft. Slope. 
Pick mine. Mine just developing. 

Philipsburg Railroad — (Penna. Lines.) 

Femwood Coal Co., Ramey, operates Mt. 
Vernon mine No. 10 at Fernwood. Vein 
Moshannon. Thickness 2>4 ft. Drift. Pick • 
mine. Daily capacity 150 tons. Analysis 
on file. 



♦Not reported. 



CHAPTER XXII 



RELIGIOUS DEVELOPMENT 



Pioneer Clergy of the County — First Services of the Different Denominations — Early 
Churches and Meeting-houses — Growth of the Various Churches — Y. M. C. A. 



It is l)ut another proof of the wisdom of 
the sturdy pioneers of Clearfield county 
that, hand in hand with the educational, 
went the religious development. 

Among the pioneer clergy of the county, 
in addition to the missionaries of various de- 
nominations, whose names are mentioned 
in the earlier history of the county, the first 
preachers who held services in the county, 
of whose names we have been able to find 
any record, were : 

Bishop Onderdonk of the Protestant 
Episcopal church, who held services in 1832, 
and again in 1838 in the old Court House. 
The Rev. Tiffany Lord, rector of the Epis- 
copal church at Philipsburg in 1843, he'd 
occasional services in the Old Court House, 
also Rev. George W. Natt of Bellefonte 
made periodical visits to Clearfield, but the 
first regular Episcopal minister was Rev. 
William Clotworthy, who was sent to 
Clearfield in 1847. 

The first Presbyterian ministers were the 
Revs. William Stewart and Henry R. Wil- 
son, who preached in Clearfield in 1803 and 
for several years thereafter. 

Rev. John Hammond was the first Meth- 
odist preacher and he preached in Clear- 



field in 1822 long before there was any regu- 
lar church. 

The first Catholic services were held 
about 181 5 by the Rev. Fathers Hayden, 
Reilly and Leavey, and about 1830 the first 
Catholic church was built. 

Rev. G. Phillip Geulich, known as Father 
Geulich, was the first Lutheran preacher, 
preaching in Luthersburg in 1832. 

Rev. Samuel Miles was one of the first 
regular Baptist preachers, preaching in 
Clearfield about 1842. 

As is the case with most of these early 
dates, that of the first church in Clearfield 
county is a much disputed question. One 
early chronicler states that the first meeting 
house was built in 1809, on the site of Mc- 
Clure's cemetery in Pike township. A later 
writer just as emphatically declares that the 
first church in Clearfield county was built 
in 1822, although he agrees with the earlier 
writer as to its location. 

It is impossible to obtain any facts con- 
cerning the first house of worship, but as 
religious meetings were held at homes and 
in barns before any church building was 
erected, it is probable that this caused the 
confusion in dates. 



251 



252 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Such otlier facts as we have been able to 
gather concerning the early religious his- 
tory of our county are set down in the fol- 
lowing history of the different denomina- 
tions : 

Presbyterian — In the first history of 
Clearfield county, published in 1878, we find 
the following lines : 

"The first meeting house in Clearfield 
county was built in the year 1809 and was 
located at the site of McClure's cemetery. 
It was of the Presbyterian faith." 

To the members of this denomination, 
then, must be conceded the honor of hav- 
ing erected the first house of worship in our 
county. 

A church building was erected in Clear- 
field several years later, and one in Cur- 
wensville in 1826. These charges were ad- 
mitted to the Huntingdon Presbytery, 
which at that time had a total number of 
558 communicants. 

There is now a church membership of 
3,111 in this county, and nineteen church 
buildings. 

These statistics prove in a most convinc- 
ing manner the marvelous growth of this 
denomination, and the powerful and thriv- 
ing condition of the Presbyterian church in 
Clearfield county at the present time. 

Methodist Episcopal — Methodism in 
Clearfield county had its beginning as early 
as 1814, in the days of the Huntingdon cir- 
cuit. This circuit covered nearly three hun- 
dred miles, and included in its thirty charges 
those of Clearfield and Centre. 

The first church building was erected at 
the latter charge between 1828 and 1834, 
and Rev. John McEnally appointed its pas- 
tor. 



A "meeting house" was erected at Clear- 
field about 1839 and one at Curwensville, 
one in Bradford township and one in the 
Grampian Hills a few years later. 

From this time on, the Methodist Episco- 
pal faith grew rapidly in power, and the 
Clearfield county charges became part of 
the Altoona District of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Conference. 

At the present date there are twenty 
thriving Methodist Episcopal churches in 
Clearfield county, with a total membership 
of about 5,000. 

Baptist Church — An early historian of 
Clearfield county states that the first ser- 
mon preached in this county was preached 
by Rev. Charles Pinnock. a Baptist clergy- 
man. 

The oldest Baptist church in the county 
is the one at Curwensville, founded in 1836. 

The largest Baptist church in the county 
is the Zion church, which maintains four 
places of worship — Ansonville, Marion, 
Bell's Landing and Kerrnioor. There are 
in all fourteen Baptist churches in the 
county. 

Clearfield county is not a Baptist strong- 
hold ; but commendable progress is being 
made, and only one church now reports a 
smaller membership than it did ten years 
ago. The average annual rate of increase 
is three per cent. There are today one- 
third more Baptists in Clearfield county 
than there were ten years ago. 

Evangelical Lutheran Church (English) 
— In the year 1832, Father Phillip Geulich, 
called the "Father of Lutheranism," in 
Clearfield county, began to preach monthly 
to the people of Luthersburg. in Brady 
township. Ten years later a Union church 



1 






ii\ 








AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



255 



was built by the German Lutherans and 
Reformers, and services were held there by 
all branches of the Lutheran faith. In 1S45 
the first English Evangelical Lutheran 
church in the county was built near Luth- 
ersburg. 

Since that time this denomination has 
grown greatly in membership, and there are 
now about twenty-two English Evangelical 
Lutheran churches in Clearfield county. 
They are united with the x\llegheny Synod. 

The Catholic Church — As early as 1815, 
priests of the Roman Catholic church visited 
this county for the purpose of saying mass 
for the few members of that faith who re- 
sided here. But it was not until 1830 that a 
church building was erected at Clearfield. 
Some years later, about 1841, another Cath- 
olic church was built at Frenchville. These 
were the only Catholic churches in the 
county for many years but when the min- 
eral resources of the county began to be 
mined, a foreign population, largely of the 
Catholic faith, came into this region, includ- 
ing many Greek Catholics. 

Since that time the number of the Catho- 
lics has steadily increased, until they have a 
membership of about twenty thousand, and 
thirty church edifices. 

Protestant Episcopal Church — Although 
services were held in this county as early as 
1832, no regular organization of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal church was made until 1849, 
when a church of that faith was established 
at Clearfield. 

In 185 1 a church building was erected, 
and named St. Andrews. For many years, 
this was the only Protestant Episcopal 
church in the county, but in 1884, two more 



churches were built — one at DuBois and 
one at Houtzdale. 

Although the growth of the denomina- 
tion has been very gradual its members are 
noted for their devotion and loyalty to their 
faith. 

Society of Friends — The first meeting of 
this Society in the county was held at the 
home of James Moore, in Penn township, m 
1813. Several years later a school-house 
was built in the vicinity, and here the 
Friends met for worship until 1824, when a 
meeting-house was built on a lot donated 
by James Moore. In 1833 this meeting was 
regularly established as a monthly meeting 
by Warrington Monthly Meeting in York 
county, and the name West Branch was 



now two Friends meeting-- 



There are 
houses in the county — one on the original 
lot near the town of Grampian, and one in 
Curwensville, built in 1878. 

African Methodist Episcopal Church — 
There are but two churches of this de- 
nomination in Clearfield county — one at 
Curwensville and one at Clearfield. The 
total membership of these two churches is 
thirty-two. Although they are few in num- 
ber they are strong in faith and untiring in 
their efforts to promote Christianity among 
their people. 

United Brethren Church. — This church has 
a large membership in various parts of Clear- 
field county. 

One of the earliest churches of this denom- 
ination was the Shiloh church, organized in 
1847. The services of this church were held 
in Shiloh school-house until 1886, when a 
large church building was erected. 



256 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



There are several other churches of this 
faith in the eastern townships of the county, 
and the total membership is very large. 

German Reformed Church. — Brady town- 
ship, with its large German population, is the 
stronghold of all branches of the Lutheran 
faith, and the Gennan Reformed Church in 
Clearfield county had its beginning in that lo- 
cality. In 1842 the German Lutherans and 
the members of the Reformed church com- 
bined forces, and erected a Union church, 
three miles from Luthersburg. But in 1851 
these two congregations could no longer agree, 
and in 1853, the Refonners erected a church 
of their own. 

A Reformed church was built in DuBois in 
1883, and another in Huston township in 

1884. 

The membership of the denomination is 
local, confined almost entirely to the north- 
western section of the county. 

Other Religious Denominations. — There are 
several other religious denominations in 
Clearfield county, the memberships of which 
are too small to support regular churches. 

.\mong these are the Dunkards, the Meth- 
odist Protestants and the Menonites. 

The Primitive Methodists, though not large 
in membership, have several churches through- 
out the county. 

The Salvation Army supports two barracks 
in the county — one at DuBois and one at 
Clearfield. 

YOUNG men's CHRISTI.^N ASSOCIATIONS 

There are three Young Men's Christian As- 
sociations in the county, one at Clearfield and 
two at DuBois. 

The Clearfiield Young Men's Christian As- 



sociation was incorporated February nth, 
1903. The officers at the time of organiz- 
ation were as follows: 

President, \V. D. Bigler; Vice Presidents, 
H. B. Powell and A. B. Reed; Secretary, 
H. E. Trout ; Treasurer, Andrew Harwick ; 
General Secretary, S. W. Smith. 

The association owns its building, situ- 
ated on Second street in a fine location, near 
the center of the business portion of the 
town. The building is well equipped with 
sleeping rooms, a fine bowling alley, a 
swimming tank, gymnasium, and assembly 
room. 

The association has about one hundred 
and fifty members and the present officers 
are as follows : 

President, Hon. A. O. Smith ; Vice Pres- 
idents, H. B. Powell, George R. Bigler; 
General Secretary, H. F. Beck ; Recording 
Secretary, William Bigler; Treasurer, A. 
Harwick; Assistant Treasurer, R. I. Fulton. 

Directors — Hon. A. O. Smith, C. T. 
Kurtz, A. Harwick. W. I. Betts. J. B. Xev- 
ling, W. P. Sheeder, Geo. R. Bigler, Wil- 
liam Bigler, A. B. Reed, James Mitchell, J. 
L. GilliJand, A. K. W'right. H. B. Powell, 
A. O. Campbell. F. B. Kerr. R. B. Thomp- 
son. Alfred Graham, Raymond C. Ogden, 
A. J. Musser, D. B. Lucas, C. B. Porter, 
Hugh Woodward. Scott McKelvy. 

Trustees — Thomas H. Murray, C. W. 
Smith, F. B. Row, H. J. Flegal, B. F. Chase, 
W. C. Miller. 

The DuBois Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation was incorporated Xo\ember 5th, 1894. 
Austin Blakslee is the president of the As- 
sociation and it has a board of directors, 
composed of prominent business men of 
DuBois. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



257 



The Association occupies a desirable 
building, well equipped for its purposes and 
it has about two hundred members at the 
present time. 

The Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburg Rail- 
way Young Men's Christian Association was 
organized by the officials of the Bufifalo, 
Rochester & Pittsburg Railway Company 
in order to furnish a suitable place of rec- 



reation and rest for their employees in and 
about DuBois. 

The Railway Company has been very 
liberal in the support (if the Institution. 
The Association has a ^ne building, well 
equipped with the neceskary facilities for 
carrying on its work. 

R. L. Bogardus is the secretary. The 
Association now has several hundred mem- 
bers. 



CHAPTER XXIII 

THE TOWNSHIPS 

Sketches of the Different toz<.'itshif>s — When erected — Boundaries — Population — Occupation of 
the Inhabitants, etc. 



BECCARIA TOWNSHIP 

This Township is situated in the southern 
part of the county, having for its southern 
boundary the dividing hne between Clearfield 
and Cambria counties, and being bounded on 
the east by Gulich Township, west by Chest 
and Jordan Townships and north by Bigler 
Township. 

This township was one of the earliest set- 
tled in the County, but was not created into a 
township until 1807. It was named in honor 
of the distinguished Marquis DeBeccaria. 
The township was erected by a decree of the 
Court of Centre County to which county Clear- 
field County was attached at that time for ju- 
dicial puq^oses. 

The principal industries of the townsliip arc 
the mining of bituminous coal and agriculture. 
The population, according to the census of 
19 TO was 3,095. 

The first settler in this township was un- 
doubtedly Captain Edward Ricketts. an old 
Revolutionary soldier, who in the latter part 
of 1798 or the spring of 1799, in company with 
a party of Indians, came to the place now 
known as Keaggy's Dead W^ater, on Clear- 
field Creek. His first stay was brief, but he 
subsequently returned, bringing with him his 
wife. He died not long after his settlement 
here, partly from the hardships he had en- 



dured and partly from an injury received 
while hunting. It is believed that he was not 
only the first settler in Beccaria township, but 
also in Clearfield county. In 1801 he was fol- 
lowed into the wilderness by his sons James 
and Edward, the former of whom afterward 
moved to what is now the site of Utah- 
ville. 

In 1830 when the township was erected it 
was so thickly covered with timber — chietly 
pine, hemlock and oak — that few pioneers were 
hardy enough to attempt a settlement. Many 
after a brief stay, allowed their lands to be 
sold for taxes and moved to other locations. 
The few uho remained permanently, however, 
in lime reaped a rich reward, or at least laid 
the foundation of an abundant prosperity for 
their descendants. Such among the pioneers 
were John Cree, the Carsons, James Ray, the 
Turners, John Hegarty, John and James Gill. 
Henry Dillen, Joseph Leonard, James McNeal, 
Edwin and James Ricketts and Samuel Smiley, 
all of whom paid taxes on farm land in 
1810-12. 

The first, or one of the first roads in the 
township was cut across the mountain to Ty- 
rone in 1813. This was for hauling shingles, 
the first product of the cut timber. About this 
time also the first saw-mills were erected, 
Samuel Turner putting up a saw-and grist-mill 
on Turner Run. Square timber then sold at 



258 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



259 



five and six cents per cubic foot, and the best 
pine boards brought but $6 or $7 per thousand. 

The first church was built at Mt. Pleasant, 
or Utahville, as it is now called, in 1813, 
though the township then had less than 75 in- 
habitants. It was of the Baptist denomina- 
tion and Dr. John Keaggy was its first pastor. 
This same Dr. Keaggy during the week was 
engaged in medical practice. He was killed by 
a fall from a horse in 18 19. 

In the next year after the building of the 
church the first schoolhouse was built, on the 
site of the building later known as the "Wil- 
liams schoolhouse." It was of course a log 
structure and had a clapboard roof. 

In 1810 John Gill made the first opening of 
bituminous coal in this township, discovering 
a vein 14 inches thick, which he used for black- 
smith purposes. Other veins were soon 
opened, Samuel Hagerty making the first 
opening for shipping purposes. Other inter- 
ests of the township — its transportation facil- 
ities, its boroughs, etc., will be found treated 
of under their respective headings, in other 
chapters of this volume. 

BELL TOWNSHIP. 

This township was organized by a decree of 
Court on May 4th, 1835. It is situated in the 
extreme western end of the county, having for 
its western boundary part of the dividing line 
between Jefferson and Clearfield Counties, and 
part of the dividing line between Indiana and 
Clearfield Counties. It is bounded on the 
north by Brady and on the east by Penn and 
Greenwood Townships and on the south by 
Burnside and Chest Townships. The princi- 
pal occupation of the inhabitants of this Town- 
ship is agriculture, although in the last few 



years some coal operations have been opened 
up in the township. 

The population, according to the census of 
19 10 was 1682. 

The township is well watered by various 
streams, chief among which are Chest Creek, 
which enters the township on the southeast 
and discharges its waters at or near the bor- 
ough of Mahaffey, on the south or southeast 
side of the river; North Run and Deer Run, 
which discharge their waters therein from the 
south; and Snyder Run, a small tributary of 
Chest Creek. The streams discharging into 
the river on the north side are Bear Run, 
Whiskey Run, Millers Run, and Laurel Run, 
all of which are small tributaries. The north- 
ern part of the township is drained by the head- 
waters of the east branches of the Mahoning, 
while Curry's Run has its source in the north- 
east part of the township. 

Bell township was settled somewhat slowly, 
as the tide of emigration came from the coun- 
try down the river, and from the east and 
northeast, and it was moreover somewhat dis- 
tant from the county seat. When the natural 
advantages of the location near the mouth of 
Chest Creek became better known, however, 
settlers came in abundance and today their la- 
bors and those of their descendants are visible 
in the present thriving borough of Mahaffey. 

The pioneer of the township was Johannes 
Ludwig Snyder, a Revolutionary veteran, who 
came to this country with his father's family 
about the time of the French and Indian war. 
Coming from Lewisburg about 1820, he set- 
tled on lands on Chest Creek. He died in 
i860 at the remarkable age of 115 years. His 
wife, it is said, lived to the age of 108 — a truly, 
venerable couple. 

He was followed soon after by John Smith, 



260 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



who built the first schoolhouse about 1827 
or 1828, it being succeeded in 1835 by a more 
pretentious building. 

Samuel Sunderlin and family came about 
1823, having previously resided in Union 
county. His improvement was made on the 
river above the site occupied by McGee's. He 
was a sterling citizen and the first class leader 
of the M. E. church. 

The McGees, \Vetzels and Johnsons came in 
1826, the Rev. James McGee coming from 
Center county. He erected a saw-mill and 
later a grist mill and in course of time made 
many substantial improvements in the town- 
ship, in which example he was followed by the 
younger member of the family. He died in 
1855. Later settlers were John Weaver, Peter 
Smith, William Ramsey, Thomas Campbell 
and Nathaniel Sabins. The last mentioned, 
who came in 1831. was the Nimrod of the set- 
tlement and many stories are still extant of 
his prowess in hunting. Mr. Campbell was on 
the first school directors after the organization 
of the township in 1835. his son, James A. 
Campbell being a successful teacher. 

Another old settler was .A^saph Ellis, who 
came about 1835, built a saw-mill on the river 
and engaged in lumbering. He was the first 
justice of the peace elected after the township 
was formed. 

The Bell family were the pioneers in the 
upper part of the county. Arthur Bell, Sr., 
was undoubtedly the second pioneer adven- 
turer up the West Branch, following Daniel 
Ogden, whom he assisted in the erection of his 
cabin. He was known as Squire Bell, being 
commissioned a justice of the peace by Gov. 
Thomas McKean. The township was named 
for A. Bell, Esq., and his son. Greenwood. 

There was no church edifice in Bell township 



until the year i860, when the Methodist Epis- 
copal society erected a house of worship. 
Their society had been formed, however, as 
early as 1830. The Protestant Methodists 
were also organized about that year, their early 
services being held in the house of John 
Weaver. 

Mention of the borough of Mahaffey will be 
found in the succeeding chapter of this volume. 

BIGLER TOWNSHIP 

This township is of recent formation, having 
been erected by a decree of court in 1883. The 
township was named in honor of Hon. Wil- 
liam Bigler, a former Governor of Pennsyl- 
vania and who was a citizen of Clearfield 
County. The history of its early settlement 
is contained in the histories of Beccaria, Geu- 
lich, Knox and Woodward townships, from 
which it was formed. 

The township is bounded on the north by 
Knox and Woodward Townships, on the east 
by parts of Woodward and Geulich Townships, 
on the south by parts of Geulich and Beccaria 
Townships and on the west by parts of Bec- 
caria and Jordan Townships. 

The principal business of the township is 
the mining of bituminous coal, which is carried 
on on a very large scale, the principal opera- 
tions being at Madera, in Bigler Township. 
This place, situated on the east side of Clear- 
field Creek, was originally called Puseyville 
after Charles Pusey who owned a large part 
of the lands upon which the town is built. 

The population, according to the census of 
1910 was 4013. 

BLOOM TOWNSHIP. 

This township was erected by a decree of 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



261 



court, dated January 14, i860 and was formed 
from parts of Penn, Pike, Brady and Union 
townships. This township is bounded on the 
north by Union Township, on the east by Pike 
Township, on the south by Penn Township 
and on the west by part of Brady Township. 
The principal occupation of the people of 
Bloom Township is agriculture. The popu- 
lation, according to the census of 1910, was 

451- 

The township was named in honor of one 

of its pioneer families, and the descendants of 

William Bloom are now scattered by hundreds 

all over the county and in various states. Its 

surface is generally hilly and mountainous. It 

is watered by Anderson and Little Anderson 

Creeks, the former flowing in a generally 

southeast direction through the eastern and 

northeastern part of the township, the latter 

being a tributary stream. 

The settlement of the township was slow, 
owing chiefly to its distance from the river, 
and also because it was heavily wooded, neces- 
sitating much labor in the clearing of farms. 
Among its first settlers were Isaac Rodden, 
who settled on lands along the line of the turn- 
pike in 181 5, and who had a numerous fam- 
ily. He was a man noted for his ceremonious 
transaction of business. James Bloom, son of 
William Bloom, the pioneer, was a prominent 
man in the affairs of the township and was an 
associate judge of the county. He was pro- 
prietor of the "Forest House," on the "pike," 
and also postmaster, his place being a post of- 
fice station. 

Jonathan Taylor, a blacksmith, was another 
pioneer, who lived for a time on the site on 
which the Forest house was built. He had a 
large family. Another man of large family 
was James McWilliams, who came about the 



same time, and lived about a mile south of the 
hotel. He was a great hunter and kept a num- 
ber of dogs of various kinds. 

John Ellinger settled in the eastern part of 
the township, coming from Brady. He was 
still living at an advanced age in 1887. Tlie 
turnpike to which reference has been made was 
the Susquehanna and Waterford Turnpike road, 
incorporated in 18 18. It was not long in use, 
however, being superseded by others. An- 
other turnpike company was incorporated in 
1828 and was known as the Snow Shoe and 
Packersville Turnpike Co. The town of 
Packersville, now- extinct, was named after 
Isaac Packer, a person of some prominence in 
the early days in this region. He built and 
operated a hotel at this place, which was torn 
down about 1777 by Henr>' Reams. John 
Neeper was the second proprietor of the hotel. 
Henry Reams was the first class leader of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, to which belonged 
also the families of Squire Smith, Joseph Whit- 
more, William Henry and others. 

The Methodist Protestants also held early 
meetings in the "Greenville" schoolhouse, 
James Cleary, who officiated for a time as a 
preacher, being a leading member of the so- 
ciety. Other members of this society were 
John Ellinger, John Bilger, Isaac Thompson 
(a local preacher), George Leech and others. 
The United Brethren, Baptists and Dunkards 
have also at different times mustered some 
strength in the township, but in view of the 
total population of the township, none of these 
societies have at any time been large or pow- 
erful. 

The township has adequate schools with effi- 
cient teachers, being as well provided for in 
this respect as any other township, in propor- 
tion to its size. The inhabitants are quiet and 



262 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



orderly and as a whole represent a good class 
of citizenship. 

BOGGS TOWNSHIP 

This township is situated in the eastern part 
of the County and is bounded on the north by 
Bradford and Lawrence Townships, east by 
Graham and Morris Townships and a part of 
Decatur Township, south by Decatur and 
Woodward Townships and a part of Knox 
Township, and west by Knox and Lawrence 
Townships. The townsliip is about nine and 
one-half miles from east to west by four and 
one-half miles from nortli to south. It was 
erected by a decree of court in 1838; the exact 
date cannot be given, because the original pa- 
pers have been lost or mislaid in the protliono- 
tary's office. 

The principal occupation of the inhabitants 
of this township is agriculture. The popula- 
tion, according to the census of 1910, was 1 1 54. 

The earlier history of Boggs township be- 
longs to Bradford township, of which it was 
formerly a part. George Shimmel made a set- 
tlement on lands about half a mile from the 
present borough of Wallaceton in the year 
1810. In the same year ^Wr Shimmel began 
clearing a farm on the old State road, near the 
point known as Maple Springs. Henry Shim- 
mel, another member of the same family, began 
improvements in the same year. 

Henry Folk began a clearing in the forest 
on the present site of Wallaceton in 1813. be- 
ing the pioneer in this work. In the same year 
Abraham Hess came from York county, set- 
tling on the east side of Clearfield creek. An- 
other pioneer of 1813 was Nimrod Derrick, 
who made a clearing on the old State road. 
Abraham Lits also began improvements in the 



same year on the banks of Clearfield creek, as 
also did George Wilson. 

The following year, 1814, saw the advent of 
Andrew Kephart and Jacob Haney, who be- 
gan clearing land on the old State road, George 
Wilson in the same year building a saw-mill 
near the mouth of Long Run. 

The first tavern in tlie township was built 
by Alexander Stone in 1820, on the line of 
the old Erie turnpike, William Lamadue 
building another on the pike about the same 
time, which would seem to indicate that there 
was then a fair amount of travel over the pike. 

The Millwood farm was matle in 1S20 on 
the road leading from Philipsburg to Clear- 
field, the road, however, not having yet been 
built : and in the following year Bresaler's 
tavern, on the Erie turnpike, was built. 

In 181 5 the Elder saw-mills and carding- 
machine were erected near the mouth of Little 
Clearfield Creek, and began operation. Abra- 
ham Elder's saw-mill, located a .short distance 
from Blue Ball, was built in 1828. The saw- 
mill of Jerry Smeal, at Blue Ball, was built in 
1838. These were the most important settle- 
ments and improvements made before the erec- 
tion of the township. 

The first election was held in 1838. with 
the following result : Supervisors, William 
Lamadue and Abraham Hess; constable, Geo. 
McCord: overseers, Jacob Haney and John 
Beers; school directors, George Wilson, George 
Turner, George Goss, George Shimmel, John 
L. Gearhart and Abraham Hess. 

In 1839 the township had a population of 
less than 225 persons. 

In 1840 Warren's saw-mill was built on 
Laurel Run. In 1860 Thompson's grist-mill 
was built on Morgan Run. 

The surface of Boggs township is hilly and 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



263 



rough, though it has less of the mountainous 
formation than may be found in some other 
locaHties in the county. The chief stream is 
Clearfield Creek, which forms the western 
boundary for a few miles, and which has a 
number of tributaries, the northern one of 
these being Long Run. Morgan Run is prob- 
ably the largest tributary of Cleai-field Creek- 
lying within the township, and as the lands ad- 
jacent have produced fine timber, many saw- 
mills have been erected on it. Other streams 
watering the township are Camp Hope Run, 
Sanborn Run and Raccoon Run. all of which 
discharge into Clearfield Creek. 

Boggs township is amply supplied with good 
schools and teachers. Several church socie- 
ties are represented, the United Brethren 
building their first church edifice in 1848, about 
two miles west of Walla cetown borough, from 
which parent society several others have since 
grown. The borough of Wallaceton will be 
found treated of in the succeeding chapter. 

BRADFORD TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of the 
court of Centre County made at August Ses- 
sions, 1807, Clearfield County being at that 
time attached to Centre County for judicial 
purposes. 

The township was named Bradford in honor 
of former surveyor-general. William Bradford 
of Pennsylvania. The township is bounded 
on the north by parts of Goshen Township and 
Girard Township, east by Graham Township, 
south by Boggs Township and west by Law- 
rence Township and part of Goshen Township. 

Many of the people of Bradford Township 
are employed in the fire brick works at Wood- 
land and Mineral Spring, and in addition to 
this industry, the principal business is farming. 



The population of the township, according 
to the census of 1910, was 2250. 

The course of the West Branch of the Sus- 
quehanna river, which separates this township 
on the north from Goshen and Girard town- 
ships, is very tortuous and winding. Clear- 
field Creek passes on the west side, just touch- 
ing the township and dividing it at that point 
from Lawrence. The largest stream having 
its course within the township is Roaring Run, 
which drains the whole southern and south- 
west portion and has several tributaries, name- 
ly Fork Valley Run and Forcey's Run, on the 
north, and Jake's Run on the south. The 
streams discharging their waters directly into 
the river are Abe's Run, Devil's Run, Millstone 
Run, Bear Run and Moravian Run. the last 
mentioned, however, running but a short dis- 
tance through the township. Grafiius's Run is 
a tributary of Moravian Run. 

The surface of the land generally is very 
hilly, but not mountainous, some of the best 
producing lands being classed as "hill fanns." 

The population of the township, as origin- 
ally laid out, did not exceed, in all probability, 
175 persons. There were 34 ta.xable inhabit- 
ants in 1809, besides three single fretmen. At 
that time there was neither saw nor grist mill 
in the entire township. The year 1812 showed 
a slight decrease in the number of taxables. 
Many whose names appeared on the early rolls 
resided in that part of Bradford, which was 
subsec|uently erected into the townships of De- 
catur, Morris and Boggs, among them being 
Robert Ross, formerly of Huntingdon county, 
who settled about 181 2 on the river, above 
the mouth of Trout Run. Many of his de- 
scendants are still living in this and other 
townships. 

Matthew Forcey came to Bradford from old 



264 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Chincleclainousche township, settling south of 
Clearfield town in the year 1804, and in Brad- 
ford about 1813 or 1814. His descendants 
have been numerous and some have been very 
prominent in the business life of the county. 

Among other early settlers were Robert Gra- 
ham, who came in 181 1 from Lawrence town- 
ship; Jacob Hoover, who settled in the eastern 
part of the township; two by the name of 
Samuel Turner, one coming in 181 2 and the 
other in 1824; the Hurd family, who settled 
early in the eastern part of the township; 
John Dale, a liatter, who sulisequently lived on 
the Hurd place; John Kyler, who located 
on the Susquehanna pike, between Wallaceton 
and Bigler; Absalom Pierce, who was the as- 
sessor of the township in 1812 and who lived 
in the vicinity of Bigler station; John Wool- 
ridge, a native of England, who located on the 
Cleai-field road, about two and a half miles 
from Woodland: John Shirey, who settled in 
the Graham neighborhood; Richard Shaw, a 
pioneer of the Mt. Joy Ridges; David Wilson, 
who owned a farm adjoining Graham's ; Archie 
Campbell. John Stewart, the Graffiusses, May- 
hews, the Burges and others. 

Owing to the numerous streams and the 
growth of the lumber industry, Bradford town- 
ship lands were taken up very rapidly about 
and subsequent to 1820. Numerous saw-mills 
appeared and the locality of Grahamton became 
thickly settled and manufactories were built 
there, largely through the enteqjrise of the 
Graham family. The construction also of the 
Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad gave rise to 
the towns of Woodland and Bigler, in the for- 
mer of which places the Woodland Fire Brick 
Company established an extensive plant. 

The township is well provided with churches 
and schools, the Methodists, Presbyterians and 



United Brethren being especially represented 
among the religious population. 

BRADY TOWNSHIP. 

This township was named in honor of Cap- 
tain Samuel Brady, a noted Indian fighter and 
a mighty hunter. The township was organ- 
ized in 1826 and is situated in the northwest 
corner of the county and about 2000 feet above 
the sea level. 

It is bounded on the north by Sandy Town- 
ship on the east by Union and Bloom Town- 
ships, on the south by part of Penn Township 
and Bell Township and on the West by part 
of the dividing line betw-een Jefferson and 
Clearfield Counties. The surface is somewhat 
hilly with a gentle slope to the westward and 
lliere are many excellent springs, some of 
which are mineral. There is considerable coal 
development in the township but the principal 
business of its inhabitants is agriculture. 
Much valuable timber was destroyed in the 
process of clearing the farms. The popula- 
tion, according to the census of 1910 was 
2823. The township is traversed by the B., 
R. & P. and the B. & S. Railroads. 

The first white settler of this township was 
James Woodside. a native of Chester county, 
Pa. He located on a tract of land situated on 
the head waters of Stump Creek, which was 
surveyed to him in July, 1785, which was 
known as the "Woodside" and later as the 
Luther place. Here for twenty-two years he 
had no neighbors but the Red men of the for- 
est. He was then cheered by the advent of 
a new white settler, Joab Ogden, who located 
a mile further down the creek — this was in 
1807, on the spot which afterwards became the 
site of Carlisle station on the B. R. & P. Rail- 
road. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



265 



In 1812 George, Michael and Frederick 
Scheffer settled on Sandy Lick Creek, George 
locating on land that is now a part of the site 
of DuBois. Fred and Michael located a few 
miles further up the creek. 

James, Benjamin and Thomas Carson came 
in 18 14. In 1820 Lebbeus Luther, a native of 
Massachusetts, bought and settled on a tract 
of land located where Luthersburg now stands, 
the place being named after him. He was ap- 
pointed by Messrs. Fox & Co., who owned 
thousands of acres in this section, as agent to 
dispose of their lands. He made his first sale 
to Benjamin Bonsall, who came from Perry 
county in 1824. About this time also Freder- 
ick Zeigler, came from Center county and set- 
tled on what was later known as the "Thomp- 
son" place. Mr. Bonsall was appointed first 
justice of the peace after the organization of 
the township in 1826. 

John Carlisle, who came from Lebanon coun- 
ty, was another settler on the site of Luthers- 
burgh. 

In 1830 Jacob Kuntz, a native of Germany, 
settled near where the Reformed church was 
later erected. The year 183 1 saw the advent 
of the Knarrs, Weisgerbers, Wingerts, Korbs, 
and Yoases, Jacob Trautwein coming in the 
following year. These settlers were soon fol- 
lowed by many others, whose names we have 
not space to record. Many of these early set- 
tlers "squatted" on land — that is, took posses- 
sion of it, without knowing to whom it be- 
longed, and by keeping undisputed possession 
of it for 21 years became the lawful owners. 

The first mill in the township was Ogden's 
(near Carlisle Station). Two famous hunters 
among the early settlers were Fred Zeigler and 
"Uncle Billy" Long. Another excellent 
marksman was Lebbeus Luther. All these 



men could tell great hunting stories and, as 
game was exceedingly plentiful, did not have to 
draw much on their imagination, as modern 
Nimrods are so often accused of doing. 

Luthersburgh was the first post oflice es- 
tablished in Brady township, dating back to 
the completion of the turnpike about 1820. 
David Irvin was the first postmaster. Trout- 
ville postoiifice was established in 1857 to 1858, 
the first postmaster being Jacob Kuntz. The 
town had been laid out three years previous to 
this time, and was named, it is said, by Rev. 
John Reams, in honor of Jacob Trautwein, the 
name as finally adopted being a contraction of 
Trautweinville, which was found to be incon- 
veniently long. 

Joab Ogden built the first grist mill in the 
township, some time previous to 1830, though 
the exact date is not now known. About 1849-50 
Jacob Kuntz built a grist mill on East Branch 
(of Mahoning) a mile and a half south of 
Troutville; this was later known as Rishel's 
mill. In 1854 Jeremiah built a .steam and 
water-power grist mill on the head waters of 
Stump creek, two wiles west of Luthersburgh. 
It was subsequently operated by his son Sam- 
uel, and afterwards passed through various 
hands. 

The first saw-mill was built, it is said, by 
Fred Zeigler between 1824 and 1830, Jesse 
Line's saw-mill being subsequently erected on 
the same site. The second saw-mill was built 
by Jeremiah Miles, it being later known as 
Zeigler's mill. 

The first minister who preached in Brady 
township was a Rev. Mr. Anderson, who came 
about 1822, and held services in the bar-room 
of Luther's tavern. He was a Presbyterian. 
In 1827 came Rev. David Kennison, being sent 
by the Baltimore conference of the Methodist 



266 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Episcopal church ; lie also preached in the tav- 
ern at Luthersburgh. About tlie same time 
came Rev. John AUhaus, a Reformed minis- 
ter from Armstrong county, who made occa- 
sional visits preaching to the German settlers. 
These early pastors and others who soon fol- 
lowed them were the men who organized the 
religious element of the township and laid the 
foundation of the moral and religious devel- 
opment and thriving church societies that exist 
today in the township, and which in union with 
good schools, have had so much to do in mould- 
ing the character of its inhabitants. 

BURNSIDE TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
court May 4th, 1835, and the township was 
named Burnside in honor of Hon. Thomas 
Burnside, the President Judge of the Courts of 
this county and the other counties then com- 
posing the Fourth Judicial District. The town- 
ship is situated in the extreme southwestern 
corner of the county. It is bounded on the 
north by Bell Township, on the east by Chest 
Township, on the south by part of the dividing 
line between Cambria and Clearfield counties 
and on the west by part of the dividing line 
between Indiana and Clearfield counties. The 
principal occupation of the people of this 
township is agriculture. 

The population, according to the census of 
1910, was 1435. 

The whole extent of tliis township was once 
covered with many varieties of timber — pine 
and hemlock, together with oak, chestnut, 
sugar maple, ash, beech and cherry. About 
1827 the early settlers commenced to hew and 
nm rafts of pine timber to market at Marietta, 
below Harrisburg. In later years it was cut 
into saw-logs and driven to the booms at Lock 



Haven and W'illiamsport, where it was manu- 
facturetl. 

The first settler was James Gallaher, who 
came in 1816, when Burnside was part,' of 
Beccaria township. He held the office of jus- 
tice of the peace and was legal authority for 
all the neighborhood for many years. He was 
a tall active man and retained his faculties to 
a great age. He died in 1854 aged ninety- 
five. 

Caleb Bailey came about 1820 and made a 
small impro\ement and patented about 400 
acres of land two miles east of Burnside. He 
removed in 1826 to Union township. He died 
about 1886. 

George Atchison, it is said, settled on the 
river bank above Burnside, in 1820, when there 
was no neighbor nearer than New Washing- 
ton. He was bom in County Roscommon, 
Ireland, about 1792, and came to this country 
to avoid prosecution for poaching under the 
oppressive game laws of his native land. He 
was a man of strong character, who did much 
to mould public opinion in the community in 
which he had cast his lot. He was a strong 
anti-slavery man and one of the conductors of 
the "Underground Railroad." He left the 
Methodist church and united with the W'es- 
leyan Methodists, because he would not recog- 
nize the fellowship of slave holders. He died 
at Ciierry Tree after the Civil war. Among 
later settlers were Samuel McKeehan, John 
Byers with sons Lemuel, John, Samuel and 
George, with daughter Helen, who married 
John Mahaffey; Jacob Lee, who came from 
Center county in 1822, whose house was an 
early preaching place for the Methodists; 
Hugh Riddle, a native of County Down, Ire- 
land, who came to America in 1798, at the time 
of the Irish Rebellion, and who married Re- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



267 



becca Lee; David Fulton, from Center county, 
who settled in 1823 along the river, below the 
upper Burnside bridge (he was a tailor by 
trade and died in 1874 aged 87 years) ; John 
Westover, John Rorabaugh, David Mitchell, 
Joseph Hutton (1826), John King, Jacob 
Neff (1828), Christopher and Henry Neff and 
others. 

The first preaching in the township was in 
Mr. Gallaher's cabin, in 1822, by Rev. John 
Bowen, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Members of the Evangelical church 
held meetings at an early day at the home of 
the Breths — Henry Adam and Peter — who 
came from Alsace, Gennany. Camp meetings 
were held by this society for many years after 
An account of the boroughs of Burnside and 
New Washington will be found in the succeed- 
ing chapter of this volume. 

CHEST TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
court dated October i6th, 1826. It is situ- 
ated in the southwestern part of the County 
and is bounded on the north by parts of Green- 
wood and Bell Townships, on the east by Fer- 
guson and Jordan Townships and part of Bec- 
caria Township, on the south by part of the 
dividing line between Cambria and Clearfield 
Counties and on the west by Burnside Town- 
ship. It is one of the oldest townships in the 
County. 

The principal occupation of the inhabitants 
at the present time is farming. The popula- 
tion of the township, according to the census 
of 19 10 was 872. 

Among the early settlers of this township 
were Daniel Snider and Lewis Snider, Jr., and 
Sebastian and Jacob Snider, John Rorabaugh, 



Jr., William Ramsay, John Lees, Henry Ross, 
Jacob P. Lingafelter, John Smith, James Mc- 
Ghee, Cyrus Thurstin, Elias Hurd, George 
Smith, Gilbert and Thomas Tozier, B. Tozier, 
David Rorabaugh, William Carson and Sal- 
mon T. Tozier, Joseph Michael, Nathaniel N. 
Sabin and Christopher Rorabaugh. 

Valuable timber was found by the early set- 
tlers, and upon a market being opened, the 
greater part of it was cut and floated down to 
market. The settlers in Chest township mainly 
devoted their attention to fanning, the growth 
of the villages being "slow but sure." 

The year 1887 saw the advent of the rail- 
road, in the extension of Bell's Gap Railroad 
from Irvona, in Clearfield county, to Punxa- 
lawney, in Jefferson county, by the Clearfield 
& Jefferson Railroad Company. A branch of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad now traverses the 
western part of the township in an almost 
northerly and southerly direction. 

From the southern boundary, through the 
whole length of the township, and to the north- 
western corner, flows Chest Creek, which has 
its source in Cambria county. Situated on this 
creek were some of the oldest lumber camps in 
the township. The creek is usually tortuous, 
and the difficulties attendant upon the float- 
ing of rafts on its waters, resulted in the sud- 
ren death of many an old time raftsman. 

Upon the banks of Chest creek, near the 
northern boundary of the county, a settlement 
was made in early days which was first called 
Hurd's Post office, deriving its name from the 
Hurd family which lived in the vicinity, and 
where the first dwelling was erected by Henry 
Hurd. This town was incorporated in 1885 
as Newburg borough, and further notice of it 
may be found in the chapter on Boroughs, 
which follows the present chapter. In the same 



268 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



chapter may also be found a notice of the other 
flourishing borough of Westover. 

COVINGTON TOWNSHIP 

This townsliip was erected by a decree of the 
Court of yuarter Sessions of Centre County, 
to which Clearfield County was at that time 
attached for judicial purposes, at April Ses- 
sions 1H17. The Township is situated in the 
iXorliieastern part of the County and is 
bounded on the north b)' part of the dividing 
line between the counties of Cambria and 
Clearfield, east by Karthaus Township, south 
by Cooper and Graham Townships and west 
by Girard Township. 

This township was largely settled by people 
of French descent, the principal occupation of 
its people has been agriculture and the township 
contains some of the finest farms in Clearfield 

County. 

Its population, according to the census of 

1 9 10 was 649. 

Tile surface of Covington township is hilly, 
broken and irregular. The township is well 
watered and drained, — on the south by the 
West Branch and its tributaries, Sandy Creek, 
Mowry's Run and Rock Run. Sandy is a 
stream of considerable size and has Bigleman 
Run as its main tributary, besides a number of 
smaller ones. Mosquitij Run forms the drain- 
age system for the whole northern part of the 
township, and has been an important factor 
in the lumbering trade of the upper region. 
Along the banks of Sandy Run are many fine 
farms. This stream has also been utilized for 
water purposes by many saw-mills. 

In 1817 Covington township had not over 
80 inhabitants. The list of its taxable inhab- 
itants in that year shows but seventeen names, 
and of these two were single freemen. They 



were as follow s : Jonathan Deckion, Freder- 
ick Geisenhainer, John Hanson, Jacob Michael, 
John Peters, Andrew Peters, Hugh Rider, 
William Russell, John Rider, Frederick Rider, 
Michael Rider, George Rider, J. F. W. 
Schnars, John Troutman, Harmon Young, the 
single freemen being John Neff and Michael 
Rider. Some of the above mentioned were 
residents of that part of Covington which was 
set off to the formation of Karthaus township 
in 1841. 

While the earliest settlements in the town- 
ship were made by the above mentioned per- 
sons, no active steps were taken towards im- 
provements, and no material growth in popu- 
lation was accomplished until some twelve or 
fifteen years later, at which time the French 
settlements were begun. 

One John Keating owned an extensive tract 
of land both in Clearfield and Clinton coun- 
ties, which he offered for sale. The first per- 
sons to locate on this land, as near as can be 
ascertained, were Nicholas Roussey and Irene 
Plubel, who took up lands in the year 1830. 
They w-ere followed in this vicinity by Francis 
Courdriet, in 183 1, and also by Claude !■". Rc- 
naud in the same year. Coudriet became a 
prominent person in the township and acquired 
a large estate. Soon after came many other 
French settlers, among them Peter Mulson, 
Hyacinthe Mignot, Francis Hugueney, Stephen 
Hugueney, Peter Brenool, Augustus Gaulin, 
John B. Fournier, P. Bergey, Alphonso Le- 
conte, and others. These French immigrants 
were, of course, unable to speak English, but 
were accompanied l)y an agent, Jacon Weis- 
kopf. The central point of settlement was in 
the neighborhood of Frenchville, by which 
name the locality has always since been distin- 
guished. Since the date of the French settle- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



269 



ment many other immigrants have arrived — 
French, German and American. 

Among the early lumber men were Bigler 
& Powell of Clearfield, Leon M. Coudriet, Au- 
gustus and Alphonso Leconte. Francis La- 
Motte built a saw-mill on the Keating lands 
on Sandy Creek about 1837, and afterwards 
erected a grist-mill a short distance further 
down the creek. As help was scarce at that 
time, his daughters went to work in the mills, 
and, it is said, turned out both excellent lum- 
ber and flour. The property afterwards 
passed into the hands of the Coudriets. 

Francis Coudriet built a grist-mill on Sandy 
about the year 1864. It was supplied with 
two run of French burr stones of fine quality. 
The property was purchased by Leon Coudriet 
at the time of his father's death. Another 
saw-mill was built on Sandy by Claude Bar- 
mont about 1845 and afterwards became the 
property of F. F. Coudriet. The Picard mill. 
one of the pioneer industries of the township, 
was built on Sandy Creek by John J. Picard, 
and was subsequently sold to Leon M. Cou- 
driet. The firm of L. M. Coudriet & Co. also 
had another saw-mill built on Sandy, on tract 
No. 1 89 1, and above this stood the saw-mill of 
Liegiey & Beauseigneur. * In 1839 Alphonso 
Leconte built a sawmill on tract 1892, it sub- 
sequently becoming the property of Augustus 
Leconte. 

Another pioneer industry of the township 
was the Flood mill, at the mouth of Sandy 
Creek, which was builtt when lumbering was 
in its infancy. One Lutz had an early interest 
in it, but it afterwards passed into the hands of 
Lawrence Flood. 

One of the first merchants of Covington was 
Mr. Alexander, who established a store near 
Frenchville about 1837. He was succeeded 



by the Maurers, who were in turn succeeded by 
Levi Lutz and others. 

A schoolhouse was established near French- 
ville about 1838, and it was followed by others 
at JMulsonburg, Fairmount, Mignot, Union and 
other places. The French settlers have always 
shown a disposition to educate themselves in 
English, rather than in their mother tongue, 
though French has been occasionally taught in 
the parochial school. The Rev. Father Leavey 
was the first priest in the township and said 
mass at the house of Irene Plubel. He was 
followed by other missionary priests, Father 
Oriack coming in 1841-42. About this time 
or soon after a log church was erected, which 
subsequently gave place to a more commodi- 
ous structure — a substantial stone edifice, a few 
rods north of the Clearfield and Karthaus 
road. The Evangelical Lutheran church was 
built at Keewaydin in 1869, during the pas- 
torate of Rev. Samuel Croft, a substantial par- 
sonage being also built. This was an offshoot 
from the Lutheran Church Society, whose house 
of worship was erected on Karthaus Hill. 

Other interests of the township may be 
found mentioned under their respective head- 
ings in other parts of this volume. 

COOPER TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected from Morris 
township by a decree of the Court of Quarter 
Sessions, dated the i8th day of January, 1884. 
The township was named in honor of the 
Cooper family, who were among the earliest 
settlers in the locality, Daniel Cooper having 
located near Kylertown, in 1828. 

The township is bounded on the north by 
Karthaus Township and part of the dividing 
line between Centre and Clearfield Counties, 
which line also constitutes its western and 



270 



IITSTORV OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



soutliern boundaries, it is bounded on the west 
by parts of Morris and Graham Townships. 

Valuable dejxjsits of coal have been found in 
this township and are being operated at the 
present time. There are also many fine fanns 
in the township. The population according to 
the census of 19 lo was 5713. 

Cooper is one of the youngest townships in 
the county and its earlier history therefore be- 
longs to Morris township, from which it was 
taken. It has had a considerable increase in 
population, as in the year 18S7 it contained 
but 375 taxables, the increase having been due 
to the development of its coal and other mineral 
resources. The village of Kylertown is 
named from an <j1(1 and iiigiily respected fam- 
ily that settled in the locality many years ago, 
substantial representatives of which are still 
living. The other settlements are West Cly- 
mer, W'inburne and Peale. 

DECATUR row. V .SHIP 

This township was ftjrmed in 1828, by di- 
%iding Bradford townsiiip, and was named in 
honor of Admiral Stephen Decatur. The 
township is bounded on the north by Boggs 
and Morris townships, on the east by part of 
the dividing line between Centre and Clear- 
field counties, on the south by Osceola Bor- 
ough and Woodward township and on the 
west by Woodward township. ' 

In the territory embraced in this township 
was one of the earliest settlements made in 
the county, Abraham Goss having located in 
the year 1797, at what is now called "Stump 
Town." There are also a number of coal op- 
erations in this township, also some well culti- 
vated farms. 

The population of the township, according 
to the census of 1910 was 3.562. 



This township, covered with magnificent 
forests of pine and hemlock, early attracted 
the attention of settlers. The greater part of 
the lands were owned by Hardman Philips, an 
Englishman, who settled in and gave his name 
to Philipsburg, a town in Centre county, where 
he also owned thousands of acres. 

Mr. Goss, above mentioned as the pioneer 
settler at Stump Town, had a large family of 
thirteen children, twelve of whom readied 
maturity and assisted in settling the township. 
Mis son. Abram. was living in 1887 at Osce- 
ola Mills, surrounded by numerous descend- 
ants. 

\'alentine Flegel came about 180Q, his farm 
occupying the site subsequently occupied by the 
Steiner estate. He was an M. E. local 
preacher, and held services at "Goss's" as early 
as 1815. 

A man named Crane bought a tract of land 
from Mr. Philips and established a colony of 
negroes, but the settlement was a failure, ow- 
ing to the ravages made among these dusky 
sons of toil by disease. 

Elijah Reece, an Englishman, settled on 
lands sul)sequently occupied by "Victor Xo. 3 
colliery," coming in 1816, accompanied by his 
young wife. They* had three sons and two 
daughters, one of the latter marrying Rev. 
Harvey Shaw, a Presbyterian missionary to 
Mexico. Mrs. Reece died in 1873 and her 
husband in 1883. 

Other settlers were James Reams, who lo- 
cated at the liead of coal run in 1834; Henry 
Kephart, who located two and a half miles 
north of Osceola Mills, before 1803, and who 
had a numerous family; John Crowell, whose 
farm was absorbed l\v the Logan and Logan 
Ridge collieries: and others, some of which 
settled in that part of Decatur which after- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



273 



wards became Woodward townsliip, their 
names being given in the remarks on that 
township. 

The reHgioLis and educational opportunities 
of tiiese pioneer settlers were very limited. 
Mention has already been made of tlie services 
held by Rev. Valentine Flegel. The second 
son of old Henry Kephart (Henry, Jr.) was 
ordained a minister in the United Brethren 
church, and acted as missionary for that de- 
nomination for a number of years. His sons 
all became ministers and one a bishop. 

For a long time the township had but two 
schools. What was probably the first was 
built near the spot subsequently occupied by 
the residence of Andrew Kephart. and Abram 
Goss. Jr., was the teacher. Many stories have 
been told of bis prowess with the rod, and the 
story tellers themselves were not slow to ad- 
mit that thev deserved most of the thrashings 
they got The other early schoolhouse was 
built on the Crane farm. The Crane and Goss 
farm houses were about the only houses in the 
southeast part of the township as late as the 
year i860. A sketch of Chester Hill borough 
may be found in the suceeding chapter of this 
volume. 

FERGUSON TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
court dated February 7, 1839, and named in 
honor of John Ferguson, one of the earliest 
settlers in the township. The township is 
bounded on the north by Lumber City bor- 
ough and Penn township, oi^ the east by part 
of the line of Pike township and part of the 
line of Knox township, on the south by Jor- 
dan township and part of Chest township, on 
the west by parts of Greenwood and Bell town- 
ships. The principal business of its inhabit- 



ants is farming. The population of the town- 
ship, according to the census of 1910 was 765. 

The first settlement within the present 
bounds of the township was made, in all prob- 
ability, by Robert McKee, some time previous 
to 18 19, on the farm subsequently owned by 
W. H. Smith. McKee made but little im- 
provement. Some time between 1806 and 
1819, James Rea and James Hagarty came 
with their families to McKee's to a wood- 
chopping. In the evening they all returned 
home except Hagarty, who lingered behind 
talking to Robert McCracken. He did not re- 
turn and at early dawn Mr. Rea went back to 
see what had become of his neighbor. He 
found him in the woods dead, a short distance 
below McKee's shanty. The surroundings in- 
dicated that he had been murdered, but by 
whom was never clearly proven. 

John Henry lived on the place a short time, 
but in 1836 John Miles, Sr., came to the town- 
ship and purchased 200 acres of land which 
included the McKee property. In 1838 he 
sold one-half of it to John S. Williams, and 
in 1857, a short time before his death, he sold 
the balance to his son-in-law, William H. 
Smith, who still occupies it. 

John Ferguson ( for whom the township 
was named), Thomas McCracken, John Hock- 
enberry, William Wiley and John Campbell, 
all came to the township about 1823. 

John Ferguson married Elizabeth Wiley, a 
sister of William Wiley. He built a saw-mill 
on the head waters of Little Clearfield Creek, 
where he lived several years, subsequently re- 
moving to Lumber City, where he engaged in 
the grocery business. He afterwards removed 
to Lockport, Pa., where his death occurred in 
1874. 

Tohn Hockenberrv lived on the farm later 



274 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



owned by David Read. He had several sons 
and daughters, two of whom — David and 
Marion — moved to the west, the others re- 
maining in this vicinity. 

William Wiley moved to Knox township 
and later to Wisconsin, where he died some 
time in the eighties. Thomas McCracken mar- 
ried Rebecca Bell, of Pike township, in which 
township he lived for a few years. He died 
in 1847, having had ten children, sons and 
daughters, most of whom grew up and mar- 
ried. 

Among other early settlers of Ferguson 
township were John Campbell (born 1797), 
who came from Juniata county, and who was 
still living on the mountain road between 
Janesville and Tyrone in 1887 (had a numer- 
ous family) ; David Ferguson, a brother of 
John, who came from the vicinity of Lumber 
City in 1839 (he was a civil engineer and 
school teacher, and married Rachel McKee, of 
Cumberland county, Pa., by whom he had six 
children) ; Grier Bell, son of Arthur Bell, and 
said to have been the second white child born 
in the county (he married Hettie Roll, of 
.Armstrong county) : Robert McCracken and 
George G. W'illiams, the latter coming from 
Center county. Most of these pioneers have 
numerous descendants now living in the 
county, some in this township and others else- 
where. They were a sturdy and energetic 
class of people, as were also most of those who 
followed them a little later, such as the Straws, 
Moores, and Tubbses. 

The first schoolhouse was built previous to 
1 84 1 on the John Ferguson farm, Ross Rob- 
ison being the first teacher. He was suc- 
ceeded by Joseph Moore, a prominent citizen 
of the township, who has long ago passed 
away. David Ferguson was the third teacher. 



Other schools were later erected, according to 
the needs of the community, and the town- 
ship's present educational facilities will com- 
pare favorably with those of almost any rural 
community of its size. 

One of the most terrible events that ever 
took place in this township was the burning of 
the Nicholas Tubbs residence in the autumn of 
1 86 1. Mr. and Mrs. Tubbs had gone to at- 
tend a meeting in the old schoolhouse at Mar- 
ron, leaving their four children, the eldest of 
whom was about twelve, at home. An alarm 
of fire was heard and when the congregation 
rushed out they found the Tubbs house in 
flames. Nothing could be done to save the 
children, who were roasted to death in sight 
of the frantic parents and neighbors. 

The village of Gazzam, located on both 
sides of the East Branch of Little Clearfield 
Creek, in the southern part of the township, 
was named in honor of Hon. Joseph M. Gaz- 
zam, of Philadelphia. Mines were opened here 
in 1884 by the Clearfield Bituminous Coal Co., 
and dwelling houses erected. This is chiefly a 
mining community, but there are stores and 
other industries, with good church and school 
facilities. 

Kerrmoor — This village was named in 
honor of its originators, Moore Bros. & Kerr, 
and is located at the forks of Little Clearfield 
Creek. It sprang into existence as a conse- 
quence of the building of the Beech Creek 
Railroad. The land was owned by Joseph and 
William Moore, two of the early settlers and 
prominent citizens of the township, and occu- 
pied by Ross McCracken, who lived here alone 
for many years in a shanty. In 1884 Robert 
and Milton (sons of William) Moore, and 
James Kerr, under the firm name of Moore 
Bros. & Co.. purchased the land and immedi- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



275 



ately laid it out in town lots. The Clearfield 
Lumber Co. built a large steam mill for the 
manufacture of lumber, while other business 
enterprises soon followed. The community is 
thriving and has church and school facilities. 

GULICH TOWNSHIP 

This township enjoys the distinction of hav- 
ing as part of its boundaries, portions of the 
lines of three other counties. The township 
was erected by a decree of court made in 1858. 
The township was named in honor of Peter 
Geulich, one of the early settlers in that sec- 
tion of the county, the official spelling having 
since been changed to "Gulich." 

The township is bounded on the north by 
Bigler and Woodward townships, on the east 
by part of the dividing line between Centre 
and Clearfield counties and part of the divid- 
ing line between Blair and Clearfield counties, 
on the south by part of the dividing line be- 
tween Cambria and Clearfield counties and 
on the west by Beccaria township. 

There is considerable coal development in 
this township, and also many fine farms. Its 
population, according to the census of 1910 
was 2,112. 

The surface of Gulich township shows great 
inequalities in altitude. At the mountain top 
known as Highland Fling, half a mile from, 
the head waters of Moshannon Creek, it 
reaches a height of between 900 and 1,000 feet 
higher than Bellwood or Bell's Mills in Blair 
county, while the channel of the Muddy Run, 
near Madera, in the northwest part of the 
township, the channel is cut deep into gullies 
and ravines. This Run forms the boundary 
between Gulich and Beccaria townships and 
originates in a number of beautiful springs 
but a short distance south of the countv line. 



It was for many years the only means of trans- 
porting timber to the eastern market. 

The first opening for coal in this township 
was made by George W. Davis in 185 1 on 
Muddy Run, blacksmiths and others coming 
to his bank from long distances for their sup- 
plies, since which time the coal industry has 
grown to considerable proportions. 

Amiong the first comers to Gulich township 
were the Geulichs, with old Peter Geulich be- 
fore-mentioned; the Glasgows, who were first 
known by Mr. John Glasgow moving in about 
1840; the Cresswells, headed by John Cress- 
well; John Nevling, John Hannah (about 
1854); Joseph Fr>' and family; David and 
Henry Alleman; Harry Hummell, from Dau- 
phin county; the Rameys, the Flvnns, the 
Coonrods, the Ganoes, the Kingstons, the Mc- 
Kiernans, the Davises, the Stevenses and 
others. 

Janesville, the first town in Gulich town- 
ship, was named from Jane Nevling, who 
afterward became the wife of Dr. Caldwell, of 
Glen Hope. When the postoffice was estab- 
lished it was given the name of Smith's Mills. 
In 1 85 1 Abraham Nevling, who had moved to 
this vicinity, built a house for his own use, 
and was soon followed in building by Westley 
and Mrs. Nevling. This was the origin of the 
town of Janesville and Smith's Mills. The 
postoffice was established in 1868, Joseph D. 
Ganoe being the first postmaster. 

Henry Alleman moved into the county and 
township in 185 1, taking possession of a 
shanty previously occupied by John Potter. 
He afterwards enlarged and rebuilt it. It was 
situated right on the division line between 
Cambria and Clearfield counties, so that, of a 
party at table, those sitting on one side were 
in Cambria and those on the other in Clear- 



276 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



field county. Around tliis place grew up the 
settlement of AIlenians\ille, where a postotifice 
was established in 1868, with Henry Alleman 
as postmaster. A Methodist church was built 
in 1 87 1 and a schoolhouse erected. Mr. Alle- 
man was for a number of years treasurer of 
the township. 

Ramey. in the northern part of the town- 
ship, is a borough and mention of it will be 
found in the succeeding chapter of this volume. 

GIRARD TOWNSHIP 

Tiie records of the quarter sessions court of 
Clearfield county do not show when this town- 
ship was legally erected, but it is believed to 
have been about the month of September, 
1832, because at the term of court held in Sep- 
tember. 1 832, it appears to have been recog- 
nized as a township in the returns made by 
the constables. 

The townsliip is situated in the northern 
part of the county, and it is bounded on the 
north by jjart of the dividing line between Elk 
and Clearfield counties, on the east by Cov- 
ington township, on the south by parts of 
Graham and Bradford townships and west by 
Graham township. The occupation of the 
people is mostly agriculture. The township 
had a population, according to the census of 
1910, of 606. 

The surface north of tiie river is generally 
rough, hilly, and in some parts quite moun- 
tainous. In the western part, at wiiat is known 
as "The Knobs," the hills reach a height of 
2,230 to 2,280 feet. The township is drained 
by the waters of Surveyor's Run, Bald Hill 
Run, Deer Creek, Buck Run, Sandy Creek, 
Mosquito Creek and some smaller streams. 

Girard township was first settled by Peter 
and Mordecai Livergood, brothers, who came 



from Chester county in i8i8, Peter making 
an improvement near the river, a mile east 
from the mouth of Sun-eyor's Run, not far 
from the old Indian path. Mordecai Liver- 
good commenced a farm near the mouth of 
Surveyor's Run, which stream was named 
from tlie fact that a party of sur\-eyors en- 
camped at an early date on its banks. 

John Irwin made the next settlement in 
1 82 1, a few miles east from Peter Livergood's 
clearing. Irwin, who was a native of Ireland, 
afterward moved to Wolf Creek, east of 
Clearfield. 

In 1 82 1 came also John Murray from Hunt- 
ingdon county, accompanied by his family. He 
died in the winter of 1824, leaving his widow 
with a number of small children to provide for. 

About 1824 John Spackman and Thomas 
Leonard, with their families, located in Gi- 
rard, and about the same time came William 
Irwin. Soon after came Peter Lamm, from 
Northumberland county. He was a millwright 
and built a mill at the mouth of Deer Creek. 
This mill was afterwards made into a com- 
bination saw- and grist-mill. It ground no 
wheat flour, however, but only feed for cattle 
and a small quantity of corn meal. 

Other early settlers were Abraham Jury, a 
potter from Dauphin county, who supplied the 
residents with earthenware; Zacheus Mead, 
who started a farm about 1826, and among 
the French settlers who overflowed into the 
township from Covington about 1838 were 
Alphonso and Augustus Leconte, Francis 
Grossanit, Francis Coudriet and Stephen liu- 
gueny. Their lands lay in the vicinity of the 
Leconte Mills settlement, as it was called. 
Francis Grossaint built a saw mill in 1844. and 
Francis Coudriet built one in 1846. The firsi 
steam mill was erected on the lands of Phelps 



AND REPRESENTATI\-E CITIZENS 



277 



and Dodge, who were extensive lumbermen, 
both here in the township and elsewhere. The 
second steam saw mill was built by Irwin & 
Sons, on Bald Hill Run, about 1867 or 1868. 
The third, known as the Burgett mill, was 
built on Deer Creek. 

Though it was not until nearly i860 that 
regular religious, services were held in the 
township, occasional meetings were held as 
early as 1827, when Rev. William McDowell, 
of the Methodist Society, preached at the 
house of the widow of John Murray. George 
P. Getilich would sometimes hold services at 
different houses. The Frenclil residents are 
principally of the Catholic faith and attend 
their own church at Frenchville. Through the 
efforts of John McCorkle, a Presbyterian 
church was erected in 1873. 

The first school in the township was taught 
by Cornelia Kincade. It was in the locality 
afterward known as Congress Hill. The ham- 
let of Lecontes Mills owes its origin to the ef- 
forts of Augustus and Alphonso Leconte, 
who built a mill and residence at the confluence 
of Deer Creek and Buck Run. A postoffice 
was afterward established there, of which Au- 
gustus Leconte was postmaster imtil 1872, 
when he was succeeded by Charles Mignot, 
who was followed by other incumbents. 

GRAHAM TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
court dated August 22, 1856. The township 
is situated in the eastern part of the county 
and is bounded on the north by parts of Cov- 
ington and Girard townships, on the east by 
Cooper township, on the south by Morris 
township and on the west by part of Boggs 
township and by Bradford township. 

The principal business of the people is farm- 



ing. The population, according to the census 
of 19 10, was 664. 

Graham township was named after John B. 
Graham, who came to the county with his pa- 
rents in 1822, but who did not become a resi- 
dent of this locality until some 14 or 15 years 
later. The town of Grahamton w"as named 
for him, he being one of its most enterprising 
residents. He built both saw and grist mills 
there and also engaged in the lumber business. 
In 1852 he removed to the borough of Clear- 
field, of which he became a prominent citizen. 
Jacob Hubler and Bassel Crowel, came to this 
locality about 1827 or 1828. Each reared a 
large family and cleared up a good farm. In 
1864 Jacob Hubler was 'arrested for a polit- 
ical offense and was imprisoned at Fort Mif- 
flin, but was subsequently released. He died 
in 1868. 

Conrad W". Kyler, who came here in 1843. 
cleared and developed a fine farm. He was 
made county commissioner in 1875 ^"^1 for ten 
years was a justice of the peace of Graham 
township. Other early settlers were Samuel 
Turner, the Monos. the Hitchins. the Kep- 
ples, the Smeals, and the Flegels ; while among 
the taxable inhabitants in 1857 (the year fol- 
lowing that in which the township was 
erected) were B. F. Ackley, M. D., Moses 
Boggs, William Burlingame, William Ben- 
nett, William Bagley. \\'illiam Burge, John 
Cook, William Cole, M. & S. Cathemian, Da- 
vid Chollar, Henry Colegrove. David Crow- 
ell, Israel Crowell, Basil Crowell, Patrick 
Curley, James Curley, Benjamin Chance, 
Frederick Conklin, Francis Colegrove, Sam- 
uel Davidson, Thomas Duncason, John Dixon, 
Robert Elder, William English, Thomas H. 
Forcey, Martin French, Francis Graham, Ira 
Green. William R. Green, Amos Hubler, 



278 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



George Hoover, Jacob Hoover, Jolin Holt, 
Michael Fink. Jacob Hubler, Simon Haucken- 
bury, Joseph Ishman, John H. Irvin, Edmund 
Jones, Henry Kyler, Conrad W. and Isaac 
Kyler, Peter Keppler, John M. Katon, Samuel 
Lonsbur}'. Benjamin and Abraliam Lons- 
bury, Rev. J. M. Mason, Mark McGuire, 
Gerge Moyer. Jolin Martin, Jacob Mack, 
George Xearhood, Henry Xearhood, William 
Phenix, Christian Pace. Jonas Powel. Harri- 
son Ross, F. W. Russell, William Rolston, 
Alexander Rolston, William P. Smeal, John 
Smeal. Samuel Smeal, George Stever. \\'iiliam 
Shimmel, Jr., John W. and David Turner, 
Joseph Thompson, Samuel L'lrich, John Um- 
merman, John and Jacob Wilhelm. William 
Woolridgc, James E. Watson. George W. 
Wells and others. This will serve to show 
who were the pioneers of Graham township, 
though some of the above mentioned were the 
sons or descendants of the original pioneers of 
this locality. 

GOSHEN TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
court of quarter sessions of Clearfield county, 
dated May 5. 1845. It is situated in the 
nortliern part of the county, being bounded on 
the north by part of the dividing line between 
Elk and ClearfieW counties, on the east by 
Girard township, on the south by parts of 
Bradford and Lawrence townsiiips and west 
by part of Lawrence township. 

Although a large part of the township is a 
comparative wilderness, containing only a few 
scattered inhabitants, the southern part is well 
cultivated and embraces in its limits some of 
the finest and most fertile land in the county. 
The people of the township are mostly en- 
gaged in farming. 



The population, according to the census of 
1910, was 514. 

The main streams of Goshen township are 
Lick Run and Trout Run, in the southern 
half, both of which discharge into the river, 
and Laurel Run, which drains the northern 
half, and which discharges into the Sinnama- 
honing, and finally into the West Branch. 

Among the pioneers of the township was the 
Bomgardner family, who took up lands near 
the mouth of Trout Run in the year 1820. 
Joseph Thorndyke, another old settler, located 
in the same neighborhood two years later. He 
was a trapper and hunter, without family, and 
made few or no improvements. John, Henry 
and James Irwin were sons of Henry Irwin, 
Sr., who lived at the mouth of Wolf Run, and 
afterward in Goshen. The sons were natives 
of the county, but the parents of Irish birth. 
John Irwin early claimed land in Karthaus 
township. 

William Ross improved land about a mile 
below the mouth of Trout Run. the place hav- 
ing been formerly owned by William Leon- 
ard, father of Abraham Leonard. The latter 
about 1835 made an improvement on the lo- 
cation subsequently owned by John Sankey. 

Another pioneer of the township was Jacob 
Flegel (brother of Valentine), who made a 
farm about 1842 or '43, not far from the head 
of Flegel's Run, in the southwest part of the 
township. He afterwards built a .saw mill on 
the Run. The Flegels were a numerous fam- 
ily and have many descendants yet living in 
the township. Other settlers were Isaac and 
Robert Graham, who later emigrated to the 
West; Matthew Tate, who bought lands on 
Jerry Run ; Robert C. Shaw, brother of Judge 
Richard Shaw, and son of Archie Shaw, the 
pioneer of Mt. Joy Ridges: Joseph Morrison. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



279 



William L. Shaw, Daniel Lewis, William L. 
Rishel, Merrick Housler, Horatio Hall, Henry 
Lewis, William Housler, Nathaniel Brittain, 
Thompson Read, James A. Read, John Jen- 
ton, Matthew Tate, Q. W. Graham, John 
Barr, Isaac Lewis. The above, with others, 
owned land or cattle within the township in 
1846, at the time the first enumeration of tax- 
ables was made, though possibly some of them 
may not have been actually residents of the 
township. There was then but one saw mill 
in the township — that of Bigler, Boynton & 
Powell, who were residents of Clearfield bor- 
ough. 

Ellis Irwin, a former merchant of Clear- 
field, moved to Lick Run in 1856, having 
previously purchased property there. This 
was the saw-mill erected on the run by Martin 
Nichols in 1845. M"". Irwin completed the 
mill and began lumbering, which business he 
followed for many years thereafter. In 1847 
he bought the uncompleted mill and dam erec- 
tion below him on the other side of the stream, 
which had been started by F. P. Hurxthal and 
James Irwin, together with adjacent lands, 
and completed the construction, thus acquiring 
a valuable water frontage. In 1852 he started 
a general merchandise store, which he man- 
aged in connection with his other extensive 
business interests. The Lick Run Mills post- 
office was established in 1872 and Mr. Irwin 
appointed postmaster. This office took the 
place of the previous one at Shawsville, fur- 
ther down the river, which was thereafter dis- 
continued. The latter place was named in 
honor of Judge Richard Shaw, who built a 
grist mill here, at the mouth of Trout Run in 
1852, on lands purchased from Stewardson, 
of Philadelphia. At his death the property 
went to Arnold B. Shaw of Clearfield. In 



1886 the machinery for making roller process 
riour was placed in the mill. A water-power 
saw-mill was built on Trout Run, above 
Shawsville, by Morrow and Smith, about 
1870, and afterwards became the property of 
H. H. Morrow. The Shirey saw mill, on the 
west branch of Trout Run, was built at an 
early date by William Mapes. It was rebuilt 
by A. H. Shirey and subsequently became the 
property of Frederick B. Irwin. 

The first school erected after the formation 
of the township was on the lands of Isaac 
Graham, and this was the starting point of the 
educational interests of the township, which 
are today well looked after, there being an 
adequate number of good schools and teachers. 

GREENWOOD TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected from parts of 
Bell, Ferguson and Penn townships, by a de- 
cree of court of quarter sessions of Clearfield 
county, dated the 19th day of March, 1875. 
The township is bounded on the north by 
Penn township, on the east by Ferguson town- 
ship, and on the south by Chest township, and 
on the west by Bell township. Agriculture is 
the principal occupation of the people of this 
township. 

The population, according to the census of 
19 10, was 590. 

The taxables embraced in the new town- 
ship at the time of its formation were as fol- 
lows : From Bell township, R. C. Thompson, 
E. B. Thompson, Charles Hullihan, John 
Mills, J. N. McCracken, D. W. McCracken, 
Eli Campbell, Jacob Fryer, J. 0. A. Johnson, 
G. W. Dickey, Jacob Uber, John W. Bell, 
Henry Sharp, Marion Sharp, William Bell, 
James Wiley, Nelson Young, Eli Passmore, 
J. N. Kester, William Kester, Frampton Bell, 



280 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Samuel Hullilian, James Framplon, G. M. 
Passmorc, John Cuniiingliam, William D. 
Beck, Thompson McLaughlin, G. D. Mc- 
Cracken, Thomas Thompson, C. A. Rora- 
baugh, H. D. Rowles, Frank Sawyer, A. T. 
Goldthread, John Robbins, William T. 
Thorpe, Charles Thorpe, David Mitchell, A. 
B. Tate, David McCracken, R. C. McCracken, 
William Tunblin, John W. Haslet, James K. 
Henr}-, Immanuel Hoover. 

From Ferguson township: Hon. John h. 
Hoyt, S. H. Vanhorn, George Ross, Wesley 
Ross, John F. W^iley, D. D. Wiley, John A. 
Rowles, William Rowles, Balser Hullilian, 
Matthias HuUihan, Conrad Hullilian, Thomas 
Tubbs. 

From Penn township: W. C. Hoover, Elah 
Johnson, William Smith, Albert Smith, James 
Johnson, John L. Johnson, David Johnson, 
Matthew W. Johnson, Wesley Horn, James 
Newcomer, Patrick Rafferty, Aaron New- 
comer, Josiah Newcomer, Job Curry, Jesse 
Kester, Frank Kester. 

The first election for township officers was 
directed to be held on the nth day of May, 
1875, at the public house of Samuel Hullihan. 
The first officers elected were as follows : Jus- 
tices of the peace, Isaac Kester and John ^V. 
Bell; constable, Aaron H. Newcomer; asses- 
sor, David Bell ; supervisors, G. D. McCracken 
and Conrad Hullilian ; overseers, George M. 
Passmore and Joseph Newcomer; auditors, 
Frampton Bell, three years, Z. L. Hoover, two 
years. Nelson Young, one year; school direct- 
ors, T. J. Thompson and John S. Johnson, for 
three years; John A. Rowles and John P. 
Hoyt, for two years; James Stevenson and J. 
Q. A. Johnson, for one year; treasurer, Wil- 
son McCracken: judge of election, David Lee. 

The Susquehanna River crosses Greenwood 



township in a general course from southwest 
to northeast, but its course is exceedingly tor- 
tuous and winding. The principal streams 
tributary to the river on the north are Haslet's 
Run, Curr^^'s Run, and Bell's Run ; on the 
south side are several rivulets of no mentiona- 
ble size. The country generally throughout 
the township is very hilly and mountainous, 
but along the valley of the river is much pro- 
ductive farming land. 

Among the first families to settle in this lo- 
cality was that of Greenwood Bell, a son of 
Squire Bell, who was one of the very first set- 
tlers of the county. In honor of Squire Bell 
and his son, Greenwood, Bell township was 
so named. The son. Greenwood, in the erec- 
tion of this township, comes before the court 
and public for still further honor, in the for- 
mation of this township, it being named in his 
honor. Mr. Bell lived on the river near the 
location of Belleville, one of the small towns 
of the township. Here he cleared a farm ami 
built a saw and grist-mill, they being among 
tlie first industries in this part of the county. 
The descendants of Arthur Bell are numerous 
in tliis section, and are recognized as being 
among the substantial men of the county. 
Greenwood Bell married Elizabeth Roll, by 
whom he had ten children: Arthur. Mary. 
Delilah, Jolin, William. David, Julia Ann. 
Harvey, Grier, and Frampton. He was a man 
highly respected in the county, and took an 
active part in every enterprise of public wel- 
fare. In 1 820- 1 he held the office of county 
commissioner. In 1822 he was appointed 
sheriff of the county, being the first incumbent 
of the office. He was again chosen in 1823, 
and served until 1826. 

The pioneer worker of Greenwood town- 
ship, he who took the burden of the labor in 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



281 



f 



its erection, was Dr. John P. Hoyt. In tlie year 
1846, then having had a residence in the 
county of nearly thirty years, Dr. Hoyt moved 
to a place on the Susquehanna River, about 
three miles above Lumber City, and in the ex- 
treme eastern part of the territory that, in 
1875, was erected into Greenwood township. 
Here he lived, and here he died at an ad- 
vanced age, surrounded by family and friends, 
and in the enjoyment of the comforts earned 
by a life of toil and perseverance. Dr. Hoyt 
was married, in 1820, to Mary, daughter of 
Thomas McClure, a pioneer of Pike township. 
From 1852 until 1857, Dr. Hoyt acted with 
Richard Shaw, as associate judges of Clear- 
field county. 

Another of the pioneers of this locality was 
William Haslet, who came here with his fam- 
ily, from what is now Clinton county, in the 
year 1828. He settled on lands later owned 
by William McCracken, the first farm west 
from the hamlet of Bower. He was a substan- 
tial resident of Greenwood, or the territory 
that was formed into that township, for twen- 
ty-five years. He died in the year 1853. 

The ]\IcClures were represented in pioneer 
days in this vicinity. "Squire" Thomas Mc- 
Clure first came to the county in the year 1799, 
from Cumberland county, but did not bring 
his family until the succeeding year. 

The McCrackens, who are to be numbered 
among the pioneers of the county, came to the 
then unsettled river country about the begin- 
ning of the present century, soon after the ad- 
vent of 'Squire Arthur Bell, to whom they 
were related. The pioneer of the McCracken 
family was James. He is remembered as hav- 
ing been a man of great physical strength and 
activity, a trait that was transmitted to his 
sons, and of which they made frequent use in 



all athletic sports. James, Thomas and John 
McCracken were sons of the pioneer James. 
The descendants of this family are numbered 
among the substantial residents of Greenwood 
township. 

Among the many familiar names of pioneer 
families, whose descendants now help to make 
the population of the township, are to be found 
some representing various localities or sec- 
tions of the river country. There are Thomp- 
sons, Johnsons, Young, Passmore, Kester; Hul- 
lihan, McLaughlin, Rowles, Robbins, Thorpe, 
Mitchell, Tate, Henry, Hoover, Ross, Wiley, 
Smith, Newcomer, Curry, Kester, and per- 
haps others wliose names have been lost. 

HUSTON TOWNSHIP 

This township was organized in 1839 and 
is bounded on the north by part of the dividing 
line between Elk and Clearfield counties, on 
the east by part of Lawrence township, on the 
south by Pine township and part of Union 
township, on the west by Sandy township and 
part of the dividing line between Elk and 
Clearfield counties. 

The township has some valuable coal depos- 
its which are now being worked, and also con- 
tains a number of well cultivated fanns. The 
population of the township, according to the 
census of 1910, was 2,653. 

Topographically speaking, Huston township 
lies in the Bennett's Branch watershed, form- 
ing a beautiful and fertile valley, eight hun- 
dred feet lower than the towering mountains 
guarding on either side. Bennett's Branch 
(creek), a tributary of Sinnamahoning, flows 
through the entire length of the township 
from west to east. 

The first settlement was made, according to 
the best authority, in 1812. Of the original 



282 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



settlers, John S. Brockway located where 
Schotield's Hotel now stands, Jesse Wilson 
where Franklin Hewitt now lives, and G. K. 
Hoyt where L. Bird's house now stands. Some 
time after J. S. Brockway sold to Jesse 
Wilson, and moved further north near where 
Brockwayville (Jefferson county) now stands. 
Other persons then settled above and below 
Penheld. Among these was Ebenezer Hew- 
itt, father of John and Thomas Hewitt. 

The early settlers depended upon the forest 
to supply their meat, and johmiycake was the 
legal lender everywhere. Making shingles was 
about the only means the people had to raise 
money. These were hauled to Clearfield and 
sold. 

Religious Services. — Religious services be- 
gan almost with the settlement. Neither were 
the educational interests neglected, for a 
schoolhouse was built at an early date near 
where the iron bridge crosses Bennett s 
Branch ( Penheld j. The first blacksmith shop 
was built in 1842 by E. D. Patterson. There 
was no important business done until the ar- 
rival of Hiram Woodward in 1854, who 
bought the interest of Wilson & Hoyt and be- 
gan lumbering. Some one had tried to "float" 
unpeeled logs a few years previous, but utterly 
failed. When Mr. Woodward informed them 
of the number he intended to "drive," to ex- 
press it in a more modern term, the people 
were greatly astonished, and, influenced by 
some "up-and-down" saw-mill proprietors, 
declared it utterly impossible, and threats 
were made on all sides against the undertak- 
ing; but nothing daunted, Mr. Woodward 
went on. The logs were put in and the peo- 
ple were forced to believe the truth. From 
that time forth lumbering has been the prin- 
cipal business of Huston township. 



Old "Uncle -Billy" Long, the great hunter, 
lived many years in this township. P. P. 
Bliss, the Gospel singer, was born in this 
township when it yet belonged to Elk county. 
L. Bird came in 1869, engaged in the real es- 
tate business and sur\'eying, prospered, own- 
ing considerable real estate in Penfield and 
vicinity. 

Penfield is a beautiful little town, having a 
population at the present writing of over 700. 
The beginning of tiie village dates from the 
settlement of Huston township. 

Winterburn is ne.xt in importance as a town 
in the township, is situated three miles south- 
west of Penfield, and ten miles east of Du 
Bois; it is surrounded on all sides by hills, 
which afiford wild and romantic scenery. Prior 
to 1873 ^^ ^^'^s a vast wilderness, but in 1873 
the railroad was built and with it the high 
trestle, which was named the "South Fork 
Trestle," after the small stream running 
through at this point. In the winter of 1873 
Mr. George Craig named it Winterburn. 

About this time Craig & Blanchard, who 
had been in co-partnership, dissohed by mu- 
tual consent and divided the timber tract, the 
small stream (South Fork) forming the boun- 
dary. In 1874 James Barton, foreman for 
Craig & Son, commenced clearing the land on 
the left bank of the stream, and getting it 
ready for Ixiilding. The mill was built, and 
in operation by May, 1875. 

Blanchard's mill, on the opposite bank, was 
begun in the fall of 1874, and commenced 
running the following July (1875). His 
planing-mill was not built until 1879. 

A schoolhouse was built in 1876, and the 
first teacher was .Mice E. Bird, of Penfield, 
but previous to this Mr. .\. H. Rosenkrans had 
taught a select school. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



283 



A Methodist Episcopal church was organ- 
ized in 1878 by Rev. A. B. Hooven, and a 
Presbyterian church in May, 1882, by Rev. J. 
V. Bell. 

In the fall of 1881 Messrs. McKinstry and 
Clearwater started a tanning plant in Penfield, 
near the station, but sold to Thomas E. Proc- 
tor before it was in running order; he com- 
pleted and stocked it in 1882. Its capacity was 
three hundred hides per day, between seven 
thousand and eight thousand cords of bark be- 
ing consumed annually. 

Hiram Woodward in 1854 built an old 
"flutter" saw-mill, which he supplemented in 
1870 with a steam saw-mill. In the fall of 
1882 Hoover, Hughs & Co. commenced their 
large mill on Wilson Run, one mile from Pen- 
field, which they had in running order in April, 
1883. 

In 1856 there were only three schools in 
Huston township. Teachers received from 
$12 to $15 per month of twenty- four days, 
and had to "board around." There seems to 
have been some "crookedness," as a member 
of the school-board, at about this time, burned 
the record and vouchers, to prevent investiga- 
tion as to the disbursement of money re- 
ceived from the county treasurer, on unseated 
lands. But later on the managament of 
schools passed into different hands, and began 
to prosper, and the educational interests of the 
township have since been in a healthy condi- 
tion. 

JORDAN TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected from Beccaria 
by a decree of the court of quarter sessions of 
Clearfield county, dated February 5, 1835, and 
was named in honor of Hugh Jordan^, a former 
associate judge of the county and an ex-sol- 



dier of the Revolutionary war. The town- 
ship is bounded on the north by Ferguson and 
Knox townships, on the east by Bigler town- 
ship, on the south by Beccaria and Chest town- 
ships, and on the west by Chest township. 

There is considerable coal development in 
this township and it also has many of the best 
farms in the county. The population of the 
township, according to the census of 19 10, was 
1,261. 

James Rea, the first settler of what is now 
Knox township, moved in 1819 to the land 
later owned by his sons, and thus became the 
first settler of the territory now embraced in 
Jordan township. He was the only son of 
Samuel Rea, who came from Ireland, and set- 
tled in York county, Pa. Samuel, his eldest 
son, married Lydia Ricketts, of Mount Pleas- 
ant, and located on a farm in Knox township, 
of which place he was a citizen until his death, 
January 5, 1887; Nancy married John Pat- 
terson; Thomas married Hannah Bloom; 
James married Jane, daughter of John Dillen, 
of Mount Pleasant. She died and he then 
married Mrs. Eliza Corrigan, of Columbia, 
Pa. 

About 1820 John Swan, Sr., a forgeman by 
trade, left his home in New York State, where 
he married Miss Phoebe Tubbs, and started 
to the State of Ohio. He stopped a while near 
where Tyrone now is, on account of some of 
his party being sick, but finally concluded to 
come over into what is now Clearfield county, 
where land was cheap. Accordingly, in com- 
pany with Truman Vitz, he came into what is 
now Jordan township, cutting his way through 
the forest all the way from Tyrone. He and 
Mr. Vitz purchased four hundred and thirty- 
three acres of land, the same land constituting 
the beautiful farms later owned by his son 



284 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



John, and Major D. W. Wise. Some time 
after this Mr. Vitz moved to Meadville, Pa. 
Mr. Swan commenced the manufacture of lye 
soon after his arrival. Kettles holding twenty 
barrels were produced at Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Large quantities of wood were cut and burned, 
the ashes were leached, and the lye boiled down 
and siiipped in barrels down the river on rafts. 
This made a market for wood ashes, and his 
neighbors for some distance around hauled 
their ashes to this immense lye factory. This 
was soon improved upon by building a large 
oven, and concentrating tlie liquid by intense 
heat into potash, which answered the same 
purpose, and brought better prices, with a re- 
duced cost of transportation. He also erected 
machinery for grinding rock oak bark for tan- 
ning purposes. This he boxed and shipped to 
Philadelphia on an ark, receiving si.xty dollars 
per ton for it. He also turned his attention to 
agriculture, which supplied tlie family with 
products of tliat kind, although in a commer- 
cial w ay it did not pay, for wheat brought only 
forty-five cents per bushel. Mr. Swan died 
here, and was buried at Zion Cemetery. An- 
son, the eldest son. for whom Ansonville was 
named, was never married, but lived with his 
friends at Ansonville. until his death in 1883; 
Sophronia married William Hartshorn, who 
is now dead ; Harvey moved to Ohio and mar- 
ried there. He died in 1857. Eliza married a 
Mr. Winslow, of New York State. John mar- 
ried Catherine Williams, a sister of David 
\\'illiams, and they resided on the old home- 
stead about one mile from .\nsonville. Henry 
married Lucinda, daughter of Benjamin 
Bloom, of Pike township. He kept the only 
store at Ansonville for many years. He was 
justice of the peace for many years. Mrs. 
Swan died at her home in .Ansonville, in 1883. 



Harriet, a twin sister of Henry, married Ed- 
mund Williams. They moved to Illinois, 
where she died in 1867. 

James McNeel emigrated from County Ty- 
rone, Ireland, when about twenty-one years 
old. and settled in Sinking Valley, where he 
married Elizabeth Crawford, of that place. 
He stayed there a short time, and then came 
to Jordan township, and purchased three hun- 
dred acres of land, the same being later owned 
by his sons James, Joseph and Isaac, his 
daughter Mary, his grandson Taylor McNeel 
and John Mays. The children of the first wife 
were Xancy. who married James Rainsey, and 
moved to Illinois ; Thomas who married a Miss 
Russell, died in Illinois. Ann married Wil- 
liam Atleman, and moved to Centre county, 
where she died. Ellen married William Speer, 
and lived in Johnstown until her death; Mar- 
shall, the youngest, died in California in 1883. 
His second wife was Man,' Ricketts. daughter 
of Isaac Ricketts, of Mount Pleasant, and to 
them eigiit children were born. Eliza, the eld- 
est, married John Hunter, and lives on a farm 
near Ansonville; John married Mary Jane 
Glasgow, of Blair county. James G. married 
Miss Jane Lynch, of Pike townsliip. Joseph 
married Mary Jane McCreight. Man,- mar- 
ried Frank McCormick, of Ireland. Lydia 
married Lance Root ; both are dead. Isaac 
married Man' Jane Davis, of Mount Pleasant, 
Pa. Caroline died when twelve years old. 
The parents lived to a good old age, the 
mother surviving her husband several years, 
died at the old homestead about 1883, and was 
buried by his side in Fruit Hill Cemetery. 

David Williams came here from Centre 
county in April of 1833. He purchased the 
large tract of land which was later owned by 
his sons. Tames G., and William, and Martin, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



285 



Nolen, and Mrs. Green, of Ferguson town- 
ship, from Shoemaker and Irvin. He built a 
shanty on the Spring Run, below the present 
residence, in the thick woods. He built a 
grist-mill on the run the same year, which was 
one of the first mills in this part of the county. 
The millwrights were Joseph, Michael, and 
Silas Solly. The bolting-cloth for this mill 
was purchased at Lewistown, Pa., and brought 
here by private conveyance. Mr. Williams 
also turned his attention to farming and im- 
proved the land mentioned above, but still kept 
the mill running until it was worn out. His 
widow, who was, previous to her marriage, 
Mary Glenn, survived him many years, living 
with her son William, who cultivated the 
farm. James G. married Matilda, a daughter 
of Alfred D. Knapp, who improved the farm 
now owned by James McKeehen, and after 
ward moved to Iowa, where he now lives. 
Martha married Alexander Henderson, and 
went to Illinois. Lucinda, John, and Austin 
are dead. 

Robert Patterson came with his parents 
from Ireland and settled first in Virginia. 
From there they moved to Maryland, and 
afterward to Centre county. Pa., where he 
married Elizabeth McCormick. Pie then came 
to what is now Clearfield county, and lived for 
some time in Lawrence township. From there 
he moved to Beccaria, afterwards Jordan 
township, probably about 1823 or '24, and 
took advantage of the offer made by Morgan, 
Rawles, and Peters, of fifty acres gratis, by 
buying the other fifty acres of a hundred acre 
tract, at four dollars per acre. The land m 
that vicinity is yet known as "Morgan's 
Land." Mr. Patterson possessed a knowl- 
edge of books, as well as of clearing land and 
cultivating it, and put his talents to use by 



farming during the summer season and teach- 
ing school in the winter. Of his children, Ag- 
nes married Thomas Witherow, and lived to 
an advanced age. Jane married Christian 
Erhard, and died in 1882 at her home in New 
Millport, leaving several sons and daughters. 
Joseph married Margaret Erhard, a sister of 
David, and lived on his farm in Ferguson 
township until his death, about 1884. His 
widow died in 1887, at the home of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. David Johnston, at the age of eighty- 
four years. Robert married Catherine, daugh- 
ter of John Thomson, Sr., of this township. 
John married Nancy, daughter of James Rea, 
mentioned elsewhere. She died in the early 
eighties, and he married Margaret, daughter 
of John Hunter, of Jordan township. She 
also died, and he then married Mrs. Nancy 
Bright. James married Rebecca McCormick, 
of Armstrong county, and lived on a farm in 
Beccaria township. Jemima married James 
Wilson and lived in Jordan township. 

Abram Bloom came from Northampton 
county, N. J., to Northampton county. Pa., 
and from there moved to Jordan township in 
1 83 1. He located on the land now known as 
the Lafayette Bloom Farm, near Fruit Hill 
church. He lived here a few years and re- 
turned to Northampton county. Several of 
his children remained in the township. 

The Johnstons in this township are de- 
scendants of Robert and James, two broth- 
ers, who came to this country from Scotland 
seventy-five or more years ago. Robert set- 
tled on the tract later owned by his son David. 
Robert M. married Priscilla Wise, a sister of 
ex-Treasurer D. W. Wise, of this township. 
John C. was in the mercantile business in An- 
sonville for many years. His first wife was 
Christina Curry, who died about 1882. He 



286 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



later married Mrs. Martha Witherow, widow 
of Henry VVitiierow, and daughter of Fred- 
erick Shoff, of Beccaria township. He was in 
partnership with John McQuilkin in a meat 
market in Ansonville. David married Martha 
Patterson, and lived on the old homestead. 
James married Mary Jane, daughter of John 
Witherow, of Knox township, and lived on his 
farm near Ansonville. Mary married Reuben 
Caldwell, and lived in Knox townsliip. Belle 
married Isaac Bloom, and Elizabeth married 
Samuel Witherow, both well-to-do farmers of 
this township. Mark was killed by a tree 
while chopping a clearing. William was killed 
by a runaway horse while returning from 
Charles Lewis's smith shop. James Johnston 
located near Johnston's school-house. Some 
thirty years ago he attended a meeting of the 
session at the I<"ruit Hill Presbyterian church. 
He had intended to go home by way of John 
Thomson's, having some business with Mr. 
Thomson, but for some reason changed his 
mind and concluded to go over a day or two 
later. He was riding horseback, and just 
after he passed the residence of R. M. John- 
ston, a dead chestnut tree that stood by the 
road side fell, mashing the horse and his rider 
to the ground. Two sons, James, Jr., and 
Robert sun'ived him, and one daughter, Mrs. 
John Glasgow, of Glen Hope. 

Joiin Thomson, Sr., came here from Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, in 1832. He purchased land 
and made an improvement not far from 
where Ansonville is now located. Soon after 
settling here he wrote to his only son, John, 
who had preceded him to this country about 
two years, and was living at Pottsville, Pa., 
that the Carsons wanted to sell their improve- 
ment. Young John at once packed his effects, 
came to Jordan and purchased the Carson 



place. He married Rebecca, daughter of 
Thomas Lord, and settled down to improve 
the farm, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. They had thirteen children. 

Ansonville is pleasantly located on the ele- 
vation or dividing ridge between the head- 
waters of the South Fork of Little Clearfield 
Creek and Potts Run. The land now occupied 
by the village was once owned by the Swans, 
and the place was named in honor of Anson 
Swan, a deaf and dumb brother of John and 
Henry Swan. The population of the place, in- 
cluding Strawtown or Bretzinville, is over 
three hundred. The first building in the place 
was built by a Mr. Singer, and was at first oc- 
cupied as a store by John Miles and James 
Foutz. 

In 1853 Henry Swan built a large store- 
room on the corner opposite the Ansonville 
Hotel, and occupied it as a general store until 
1874. Soon after this it burned down, and 
the lot remained vacant until 1884 or 1885, 
when Dr. A. E. Creswell purchased it and 
built the large store-rooms and dwelling later 
purchased by C. D. McMurry, and occupied 
by him as a general store, and by H. Gilliland 
as a clothing store. Other stores and mer- 
chants followed and enjoyed a steady trade. 

As near as we can learn, the Ansonville 
postofiice was established about 1857. Eliza 
Chase (later Mrs. W. T. Bloom) was post- 
mistress. Henry Swan had tlie office from 
1864 to 1868, and was succeeded by Joseph 
Thomson, and he by Arthur B. Straw. J. C. 
Johnston succeeded Mr. Straw, and had charge 
of the office several years until 1886, when 
C. D. McMurry was appointed. 

The first .schoolliouse built in the township, 
was erected in 1820, not far from where the 
Fruit Hill Presbyterian church was after- 





PiESIDEXCE .VXD BARN OF E. SCHXARS, LAWREXCE TUWXSIIU' 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



289 



wards built. The house was built of logs. A 
square pen-shaped arrangement was built in- 
side to do service as a flue. The windows 
were made by cutting one or two logs off in 
the side of the building and pasting greased 
paper over the hole to keep the wind and cold 
out. The writing desks were made by driving 
pins in the walls of the building and fastening 
thereto a slab with the flat side up. The seats 
were also made of slabs, with the round side 
up. The first teacher of this school was David 
Cathcart, who afterward located in Knox 
township, where he purchased a large tract of 
land, part of the timber of this land being sub- 
sequently sold by his sons for a considerable 
amount of money. He had a large family of 
children. 

Robert Patterson, Sr., also taught here, and 
some say, was the first teacher, but others, that 
Cathcart was the first. We find also that John 
Watson taught here. Some years after a lit- 
tle log schoolhouse was built near the subse- 
quent residence of Major Wise. Asil Swan 
was one of the first teachers. The house has 
long since gone the way of all old houses, and 
history fails to record any of the exploits of 
its graduates. The old log schoolhouse that 
stood near the old Zion church is also one ot 
the things of the past. Rev. S. Miles taught 
school and preached in this house as early as 
1843, and the house was built previous to that 
time. The school facilities have been im- 
proved as well as the land, and will now com- 
pare favorably with those of any similar com- 
munity. Mr. A. M. Buzard taught the first 
select school in Ansonville during the summer 
of 1884, with forty students in attendance. 
He also taught the two succeeding years with 
an increased membership, and was assisted by 
Harvey Roland. Mr. Buzard afterwards 



went into the drug business here, and the 
school was subsequently taught by J. F. Mc- 
Naul, of Curwensville. 

KARTHAUS TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected from the eastern 
part of Covington, by a decree of the court of 
quarter sessions of Clearfield county dated 
February 3, 1841, and was named in honor of 
Peter A. Karthaus, who was the owner of a 
large portion of the land in the township. 

The township is situated in the extreme 
northwestern corner of the county and is 
bounded on the north by part of the dividing 
line between Cambria and Clearfield counties, 
on the east by part of the dividing line be- 
tween Clinton and Clearfield counties and part 
of the dividing line between Centre and Clear- 
field counties, on the south and west by Cov- 
ington township. 

There are a number of coal operations in 
this township, also some good farms. The 
population, according to the census of 1910, 
was 1,332. 

The marked geographical and topograph- 
ical feature of Karthaus township is the 
Horseshoe Bend, at which the current tends 
directly south, then bends around and runs 
nearly direct north, all within a small area. Its 
greatest length, north and south, is not far 
short of eleven miles, while its average length 
is about seven miles. From east and west 
measurement the township extends a distance 
of about six miles, but the average in this di- 
rection is only about four miles. The surface 
of the township, generally, is hilly, broken, 
and mountainous, the altitude above tide-wa- 
ter averaging something like fourteen hun- 
dred feet. The township is well watered by 
the West Branch on the south, and the auxil-' 



290 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



iary streams, Mosquito Creek, Salt Lick and 
Upper Three Run, the first and last being fair 
sized mountain streams having several smaller 
tributaries. 

The pioneer history of Karthaus township 
was made many years prior to its separate or- 
ganization, and while it was still a part of 
Lawrence township. Before Lawrence was 
erected, the township of Chincleclamousche 
embraced the territory that subsequently 
formed Lawrence, Covington and Karthaus, 
excepting, however, a small tract taken from 
Lycoming, that was added to the county sub- 
sequent to its erection in 1804. 

One of the earliest settlers in Karthaus or 
the lands that were afterward embraced by it, 
was G. Philip Geulich, who located there dur- 
ing the month of April, 18 14. He first came 
to the county in 181 1, with Charles Loss, as 
representatives of the Allegheny Coal Com- 
pany, by whom they were sent to ascertain if 
the reports concerning an abundant supply of 
superior coal were true. They first came to 
Clearfield Creek, \vhere they remained during 
the winter. Upon their report the company 
purchased the land known as the Ringgold 
tract, on Clearfield Creek, and another tract 
comprising some three or four thousand acres 
on the Moshannon. After having fulfilled the 
object of his visit, Geulich was about to return 
to Huntingdon county, but was finally persu- 
aded to proceed to the lands on the Moshan- 
non. and make an improvement. In 18 13, in 
company with Joseph Ritchie, he attempted to 
ascend the West Branch, but finding the river 
filled with snow and ice. was compelled to re- 
turn. Another attempt, in company with John 
Frazer and James Bowman, was made suc- 
cessfully and at the end of a three days' jour- 
ney the party landed at Karthaus, on the bank 



of the Moshannon, on the 8th day of April, 
1814. Here they built a cabin, after which 
several weeks were spent in clearing lands for 
the future operations of the Allegheny Com- 
pany at that point. Geulich did not remain 
long in this vicinity, owing to a misunder- 
standing with one Junge. When about ready 
to leave, the families of Frederick W. Geisen- 
hainer, and John Reiter came to the neighbor- 
hood, and they urged him to return to the 
Ringgold tract on Clearfield Creek, which he 
did. Here he lived until 1818, acting as agent 
for the company, until their lands were all 
sold, after which he purchased the Kline prop- 
erty, and still later resided at the county-seat. 
In 1829-33 he was treasurer of the county. 

The early settlement of Karthaus township 
was materially hastened by the knowledge of 
her extensive coal and iron deposits. Bitum- 
inous coal was in great demand at the time, 
and this demand gave rise to the development 
of the Karthaus field and shipping therefrom, 
at a verv' earl}' day, considerable quantities of 
coal in arks down the West Branch to Colum- 
bia, where it sold readily at thirty-seven and 
one-half cents per bushel. The channel, how- 
ever, was obstructed with rocks and sunken 
trees, that proved fatal to many a cargo. 

In the year 181 5, Peter A. Karthaus, his 
son, and J. F. W. Schnars, under the guidance 
of one Green, a hotel-keeper from Milesburg, 
Centre county, came to the vicinity. Green 
was on foot, and the others had two horses 
between them. They followed the old Indian 
path, and, after leaving the Alleghenies, found 
but two habitations on the route hither: those 
of Samuel Askey and John Bechtold. Worn 
and tired, they arrived one evening at John 
Reiter's house. There they found David Dun- 
lap, a millwright, engaged in building a saw- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



291 



mill on the coal company's land, at the mouth 
of the Little Moshannon. Some years later 
this mill was arranged with country-stones, 
and the grinding for the settlement was done 
at this place. This proved a great convenience 
to the people, who had been compelled to con- 
vey all flour and feed, either from the Bald 
Eagle Valley or from Clearfield town, nearly 
twenty-five miles distant, with no thoroughfare 
other than the old Indian path. 

J. F. W. Schnars, who was the companion 
and friend of Peter A. Karthaus, was a Ger- 
man by birth, born in the year 1785. In the 
year 1810 he came to Baltimore, and found 
employinent with Karthaus, who was an ex- 
tensive merchant, engaged in foreign and do- 
mestic trade. In 1829 Schnars was chosen 
county commissioner, and still later county au- 
ditor. He was commissioned postmaster of 
his township in 1832, and held that office a 
score and a half of years. The family name is 
still extensive in the county, represented by 
the descendants of this old pioneer, 

Peter A. Karthaus and his son returned, 
after a time, to Baltimore, but again came to 
this vicinity, bringing his family. He became 
the owner of a large tract of land in the town- 
ship, and by his efforts and enterprise in busi- 
ness, did more toward the settlement and im- 
provement of it than any other person. 

In the year 181 5, Junge and Schnars pur- 
chased lands of Karthaus and Geisenhainer, 
and commenced extensive improvements and 
settlements thereon. About the same time 
several other families came in; among them, 
Hugh Riddle, Jacob Michaels, William Rus- 
sell and others, former residents of Bald Ea- 
gle, Centre county. They made purchases, and 
at once began improving the lands. 

Soon after the first settlements in the town- 



ship, a deposit of bog ore was discovered near 
the head of Buttermilk Falls, some four miles 
down the river from Karthaus. The lands 
were purchased from Judge Bowdinot, of 
Burlington, N. J., who owned them, by Geis- 
enhainer & Schnars. The tract comprising 
three parcels was conveyed to Peter A. Kar- 
thaus. In the year 1817 he, with Geisenhai- 
ner, built the old furnace at Moshannon Creek. 
The ore was conveyed up the river in flat-boats 
and canoes, and there made into iron. Con- 
nected with this a foundry was built, and hol- 
low iron wares, stoves, and other articles man- 
ufactured. The river was cleared of obstruc- 
tions that had proved fatal to the coal trans- 
ports, and the manufactured iron wares were 
shipped to market. The people interested in 
the enterprise lacked experience, the place of 
manufacture was so far distant from the mar- 
ket, and the expense and danger incident to 
river traffic was so great that the enterprise was 
finally abandoned. Many of the families in- 
duced to settle here on account of the fa- 
vorable reports concerning locality, became 
discouraged at the prospect and returned east. 
For a time, instead of an increase there seemed 
to be a general and sudden decrease in popula- 
tion, but after the excitement had died out 
and the agricultural advantages of the locality 
became established, the time of immigration 
and settlement again set this way, and the in- 
crease again became general and healthful. 

In the year 1845 Richard Coleburn, the as- 
sessor of the township, was directed to make 
an enumeration of each of the taxable inhab- 
itants then being residents. From the roll so 
made by him. the names of such taxables are 
made to appear, which will show who were the 
residents of the township at the time. George 
Bucher, a tailor; William Bridgens, George 



292 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Bearfield, Sr., Reuben Bearfield, laborer; Ja- 
cob Cooms, Levi Cofifin, fanner; Ann Cole- 
burn, George Conaway, Sr., Dickson Cole, la- 
borer; Richard Coleburn, farmer; Mark Cole- 
burn, laborer; Matthew B. Conaway, Benja- 
min Clark, sawyer; John Gaines, James Gun- 
saulis, Samuel Gunsaulis, fanner, having, in 
addition to his two tracts of land, one hun- 
dred acres bought of P. A. Karthaus's "plough 
deep;" Jeremiah Gaines, Robert Gaines, 
fanner; Lawrence F. Hariline. fanner; 
George Haun, farmer; Levi Harris, laborer; 
John Harris, laborer; James Hunter, laborer; 
Andrew Eisenmann, Jacob Eisenman, weaver; 
John Eisenman, farmer; Michael Eisenman, 
farmer; John Irvin. "lumberer," having a saw- 
mill; Peter A. Karthaus, no occupation, but 
having a saw-mill and grist-mill ; Robert 
Lowes, laborer, having one hundred acres of 
land bougiit of Keating; Ellis Lowes, farmer; 
Jacob G. Lebs, manager; Benjamin B. Lee, 
carpenter; Francis McCoy, "one saw-mill, 
burned down;" Elizabeth Michaels, John 
Michaels, farmer; Edward Michaels, laborer; 
William H. Michaels, farmer; Daniel Moore, 
farmer; James Meny, laborer; Thomas Mich- 
aels, fanner; John Price, farmer; Isaac 
Price, farmer; Joseph Rupley, farmer; J. F. 
W. Schnars, saw-mill; Charles Schnars, saw- 
yer; Gottlieb Snyder, fanner; Francis Soults- 
man, blacksmith; William Teets. laborer; John 
Vought, farmer; John Wykoff, carpenter; 
James White, farmer; Washington Watson, 
laborer; Joseph Yothers, farmer. The single 
freemen then living in the township were : 
Frederick Cofifin, William Carson, Thomas 
Moyers, John Haun, Charles Haun, John 
Hicks, Jr., Prudence Knyder. John Condly, 
John Uzzle. 

From this it appears that there v.ere resid- 



ing in the township in the year 1845, fifty-four 
property owners and nine single freemen. As 
further show-n by the roll, there were several 
who had formerly been residents, but who ap- 
pear to have gone away since the assessment 
next preceding 1845. Among those are found 
the names of Sarah Apple, Samuel K. Bevan. 
H. O. Brittain, Cornelius Conaway, Ciiarles 
Durow, Henry Harris, Simon Hall, Michael 
Mays, Jacob Miller, Peter McDonald, John 
Reiter, Matthew Savage, W'illiam Soults, all 
of whom were regular taxables, owning either 
real or personal property, besides a few single 
freemen, as follows : William Barefield, An- 
drew Kiem, and John Summerville. From 
these facts it can fairly be assumed that the 
population of Karthaus township, in 1845, did 
not exceed two hundred inhabitants. 

The great interest taken by all persons 
during the lumbering period in that produc- 
tion, materially increased the temporary or 
floating population, and after the tracts were 
exhausted and agriculture became the regular 
avocation of the inhabitants, many who had 
come with the intention of leaving as soon as 
the lumber districts were cleared, were in- 
duced to remain and permanently reside in the 
township. At that time, if the record is re- 
liable, there were in the township only four 
saw-mills and one grist-mill, owned as shown 
above. During the period of ten years, from 
1850 to i860, lumbering reached its maximum, 
after which it began gradually to decline. 

The original village of Karthaus was laid 
out on the map of the Keating lands which 
was made as early as 1827, or perhaps earlier. 
As shown it lay on a sharp bend of the river at 
the mouth of Mo.squito Creek, and on tract 
No. 1901. It contained nineteen hundred and 
one acres of land. The newer Karthaus lies 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



293 



further east, and was built up chiefly through 
the extensive coal and lumbering interests de- 
veloped there. 

The township has adequate school and 
church facilities. 

KNOX TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
the court dated the -i 9th day of May, 1854, and 
was named in honor of Judge Knox, one of 
the first judges, who presided over the courts 
of Clearfield county. The township is bounded 
on the north by Pike and Lawrence townships, 
on the east by Woodward and Bigler town- 
ships, south by Beccaria township and west by 
Jordan and Ferguson townships. 

The principal business of the people of the 
township is agriculture, although there are 
some coal deposits that are now being ope- 
rated. The population, according to the cen- 
sus of 1 910, was 1,064. 

The first settlement in Knox township, and 
one of the first in the county, was made by 
James Rea, in 1806, who came here from 
Huntingdon county. 

The nearest grist-mill at that time was be- 
tween Tyrone and Birmingham. Some time 
after a mill was erected at Moose Creek, and 
thither Mr. Rea transported his grist on the 
back of an ox. 

In a short time James Hegarty, who was 
murdered soon after, settled what is now the 
William Witherow farm. Thomas McKee 
improved the land later owned by Robert 
Witherow's heirs, and Thomas Jordan located 
where Thomas Witherow subsequently lived. 
John Carson, also one of the first settlers, pro- 
cured the premises made vacant by the death 
of James Hegarty. 



In 1824, Peter Erhard, who lived by the 
Susquehanna River, near Curwensville, was 
drowned while crossing the river on horse- 
back. About six or eight years previous to 
this time he had located some land in what is 
now Knox township. By the aid of Iiis four 
sons this land was improved, and shortly after 
the death of the father the sons moved to this 
land, and in connection with it bought the 
tract upon which grew up the village of New 
Millport. The three eldest sons. Christian, 
David, and Philip, were interested in the latter 
purchase, and soon erected a saw-mill, proba- 
bly the first improvement on Little Clearfield 
Creek. This first mill was built sometime be- 
tween 1820 and 1825, and after it had served 
its purpose and time, another w^as built near 
the grist-mill. 

Saw-mills did not pay the operators in that 
early day, for although surrounded by thou- 
sands of acres of immense pine forests, the 
facilities for transportation were so poor and 
the demand so limited, that lumber was scarce 
worth the cutting, and millions of feet that 
would now be worth forty to sixty dollars per 
tliousand feet, were rolled into heaps and 
burned. 

George, a younger son of Peter Erhard, im- 
proved a farni; was county commissioner 
from 1857 to i860. 

The first dwelling-house in New Millport 
village was built by David Erhard, Sr., about 
1834, near the mill-race. The town was of 
slow growth, but the building of the Beech 
Creek Railroad through it in 1885, gave it a 
new impetus. 

The first industries being mills, suggested 
the name — Millport, and the word New, was 
added when the postofifice was established here, 
to distinguish it from Millport, in Potter 



294 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



county, Pa. The first postmaster was D. E. 
Mokel, appointed in 1855 or 1856. 

The first schoolhouse in Knox township was 
located across the run from the residence of 
David Erhard. It was built in 1842. The 
first teacher was Benjamin Roberts, who af- 
terwards became a citizen of the township, 
and improved the farm later owned by Robert 
Patterson. The township is now well sup- 
plied with good schools and teachers; also 
churches. 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
the court of quarter sessions, to which county 
Clearfield was then attached for judicial pur- 
poses, at November sessions, 1813. 

The township is bounded on the north by 
part of the dividing line between Elk and 
Clearfield counties, on the east by Goshen, 
Bradford and Boggs townships, on the south 
by Knox township and on the west by Pike, 
Pine and Huston townships. 

There are a number of large coal operations 
in this township, also some fine farms. The 
population of the township, according to the 
census of 1910, was 4,025. 

No more accurate record of the early set- 
tlers of Lawrence can be made than by a full 
statement of the taxable inhabitants made by 
Samuel Fulton, assessor, under and by virtue 
of an order of the county commissioners, bear- 
ing date the 21st day of February, 1814, and 
signed by Hugh Jordon, Robert Maxwell and 
Willliam Tate, commissioners. 

The names of the taxables appearing on the 
roll are as follows: Elinor Ardery, John An- 
drews, Arthur Bell, Henry Buck, Samuel 
Beers, Arthur Bell, Robert Collins. George 
Conoway. Hugh Caldwell. Alexander Dun- 



lap, James Dunlap, Hugh Frazier, John Fra- 
zier, Thomas Forcey, Samuel Fulton, William 
Hanna, Jacob Haney, Martin Hoover, Sam- 
uel Hoover, George Hunter, Esther Haney, 
John Hall, John Hoover, Henry Irwin, Hugh 
Jordon, Samuel Jordon, Thomas Jordon, 
Thomas Kirk, Thomas Kirk, Jr., John Kline, 
Nicholas Kline, William Leonard, Rudolph 
Litch, Lebbeus Luther, David Ligget, Rich- 
ard Mapes, John Moore, Reuben Mayhew, 
Adatn Myers, Moses Norris, Matthew Ogden, 
Daniel Ogden, John Owens, W^illiam Orr, 
Joseph Patterson, Robert Patterson, Thomas 
Reynolds, Alexander Reed, Thomas Reed, 
Archibald Shaw, Elisha Schofield, John Shaw, 
Richard Shorter, Mar}' Shirrey, Robert Shaw, 
Ignatius Thompson, William Tate, Robert 
Wrigley, George Welch, Herman Young, Pe- 
ter Young. 

The single freemen were: Andrew Allison, 
Samuel Arder}% Benjamin Beers, Benjamin 
Carson, Jr., Alexander Dunlap, Christian 
Eveon, Jacob Hoover, Cffisar Potter, John R. 
Reed, Hugh Reynolds, W^illiam Shirrey, Hugh 
McMullen. 

The settlers living in the Sinnamahoning 
district were enrolled in a separate list. It will 
be remembered that the settlement down the 
river was made into an election district, and 
the voting place was fixed at the mouth of the 
Sinnamahoning, at Andrew Overdorf's house. 
The taxables of this district were : Stephen 
Barfield, Robert Barr, Daniel Bailey, Jacob 
Burch. Dwight Cadwell, Thomas Dent, Rich- 
ard Galat, Joseph Gaugey, Levy Hicks, Wil- 
liam T. Hardy, Ralph Johnston, Thew. John- 
ston, James Jordon, John Jordon, Henry 
Lorghbaugh, Jr.. Joseph Mason, Amos Mix, 
James Mix. William Nanny, John Overdorf, 
Andrew Overdorf. .\ndrew Overdorf, Jr., 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



295 



Samuel Smith, Charles Swartz, Curran Swee- 
sey, Benjamin Smith, Jacob Miller, Leonard 
Morey. 

The single freemen in the Sinnamahoning 
district were as follows : James Mix, Joseph 
Gaugey, James Sweezey, John Ream, John 
Biss, William Lewis, William Shepherd, 
George Lorghbaugh, William Calloway, 
George Derring. 

The first reduction of the territorial limits 
of Lawrence township was made by the for- 
mation of Covington and Gibson, in the year 
1817, by an order of the Centre County Court 
of Quarter Sessions. 

In 1845, at a term of court held Februar>^ 
4, Goshen township was erected from Law- 
rence, Girard, and part of Jay and Gibson 
townships. 

The early history of this township ante- 
dates, by many years, its civil organization. 
Within its boundaries there was located the 
old Indian town of Chincleclamousche, the re- 
mains of which were 'discovered by Daniel 
Ogden, the pioneer, at the time of his settle- 
ment, in 1797. Still further back than this we 
find the country overrun and occupied by a 
fierce tribe of Indians known to the first white 
adventurers as the Lenni Lenapes, who made 
their central station on the river Delaware, and 
whose descendants occupied this whole region 
for a hundred years or more. Later on came 
the Shawnees, a supposed branch of the Al- 
gonquins, whose language they spoke. Then 
again, during the seventeenth century, the 
confederated nation of Iroquois, or the Five 
Nations, as they were commonly known, 
swept over the entire province of Pennsyl- 
vania, as well as the countn,' north and south 
of it, driving out the occupants or completely 
subjugating them, and making themselves 



conquerors, and their chiefs and sachems rulers 
and monarchs of the entire country. 

During the progress of the French and In- 
dian war this vicinity was occupied by the 
French with view to erecting a fort, but this 
scheme seems to have failed. They did, how- 
ever, assemble at the village of Chinclecla- 
mousche and organize an expedition against 
Fort Augusta, the key to the whole north- 
western part of the province. Here it was 
that Captain Hambright came with orders to 
destroy the Indian town, and make battle 
against the inhabitants, but finding the town 
deserted returned to the fort with his men. On 
a subsequent visit the town was found to be 
destroyed, and the Indians fled to the protec- 
tion of the French forts on the western fron- 
tier. The Indian paths, several of which led 
through the township, were thoroughfares of 
travel to and from the points east of the AUe- 
ghenies. 

Daniel Ogden was the first permanent set- 
tler in this township, and made the first im- 
provement therein. The chief industry at that 
time was farming and clearing land, and as 
new residents followed, each in succession was 
compelled to make a clearing for a cabin and 
farming purposes. 

The necessity of lumber and material for 
building led to the erection of saw-mills at 
various places, and as the lands became cleared 
and crops gathered, grist-mills became a like 
necessity. 

According to the tax-roll made by Samuel 
Fulton, assessor for Lawrence and Pike town- 
ships, in the year 1814, there w€re several in- 
dustries already established in the township of 
Lawrence, some of which can be located with 
accuracy. Samuel Beers was assessed as hav- 
ing a tan-yard. Beers lived on Clearfield 



296 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



vjreek, and had a small lannery near his house. 
Ihis factory was so small that it was assessed 
as nominal only. Martin Hoover had a saw- 
mill on Montgomery Creek, and was assessed 
therefor fifty dollars, which amount would 
scarcely buy a ciieap saw- at the present day. 
J. L. McPherson's steam saw-mill was built 
near the same locality, which is one of the old- 
est mill locations in the county. 

Esther Haney, widow of Frederick Haney, 
was assessed this same year lor a saw and 
grist-mill on Montgomery Creek. The saw- 
mill was assessed at fifty dollars, and the grist- 
mill at thirty dollars. Thomas Haney, son of 
I-Vederick, had a saw-mill on Moose Creek. 

Reuben Mayhew was the local shoemaker, 
and his trade assessed at ten dollars. 

To Matthew Ogden attaches the credit of 
having built the first grist-mill in the county, 
on Moose Creek, about half a mile above its 
mouth. Some years later he built a saw-mill 
further down and movetl his grist-mill to that 
point, near the site now occupied by Shaw's 
mill. In 1 82 1 Ogden built another grist-mill 
on Clearfield Creek, which was operated for 
many years, but is now entirely destroyed. 

Thomas Reynolds had a tannery in Clear- 
field town, that was built about the year 1810, 
but no business of account was done there un- 
til some five or six years later. Another tan- 
nery was built by Jacob Irwin about 1820, just 
back of the Boyer residence on Second street. 

In 1814-15. the Elder mills were built on 
Little Clearfield Creek by James I. Thorn, who 
came to the county for that purpose. The 
building consisted of a saw-mill, a fulling or 
woolen-mill, and a tavern. The woolen-mill 
was the first of its kind in the county, and the 
tavern among the first. Elder never resided 
in the county, but was largely interested in 



lands at that place. He is remembered as e.\- 
ceedingly kind and generous. He had many 
cattle at his place, and frequently loaned un- 
broken cattle to fanners, and allowed them to 
break and use them for their keeping. 

In the Sinnamahoning district a record of 
taxables made in the year 181 5 showed a total 
of forty-one. The roll also mentioned two 
saw-mills, one assessed to Thomas Dent and 
the other to John Jordan. 

In 1813, a year after commissioners for the 
county were authorized to be elected therein, 
the population had increased sufficiently that 
a postoffice for the county was found neces- 
sary, and this was established at the house of 
Alexander Read, better known as "Red Alex." 
The neighborhood on the ridge where the 
Reads were numerous, was known as Reads- 
boro, and the office was designated by that 
name. It was continued there until about the 
year 1819. The old State road passed through 
the place, and it was then the most central 
point, notwithstanding the fact that the site 
for the county seat had already been estab- 
lished at the old Indian town some two or 
three miles distant. Before this office was es- 
tablished all mail matter came from Philips- 
burg, on the extreme east line of the county. 
once each week. 

At the time the county seat was fixed there 
was no improvement on the lands of Abraham 
Witmer, except such 3S had many years be- 
fore been made by the Indians. The old 
cleared fields remained grown up with weeds 
and buffalo grass. 

When Lawrence was made a township 
there were but few residents at the county 
seat proper, that is. Clearfield town. The first 
conveyances of town lots were made to Mat- 
thew Ogden. Robert Collins, and ^^'iIliam 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



297 



Tate, in the year 1807. The donation of lands 
for county building and other purposes was 
made at the time the county seat was fixed, but 
the deed was not executed until 1813. 

The court-house was erected about 18 14 by 
Robert Collins about this time. 

The township of Lawrence was declared, 
by an act of the Legislature passed April 2, 
182 1, to be a separate election district, and the 
freemen were directed to hold their elections 
at the court-house in Clearfield town. Hav- 
ing from this time a distinct and complete or- 
ganization, settlement became more rapid, and 
consequent upon such settlement and growth 
and the development of its resources, this has 
become one of the leading townships of the 
county. The surrender of lands for the for- 
mation of Covington and other townships, 
while it reduced its area and population, made 
it more compact and more readily improved. 
The seat of justice, located in the southern cen- 
tral part of the township, became the natural 
trading and distributing center for the coun- 
try roundabout. 

The chief pursuit followed by the people 
of the township for many years, outside their 
regular occupation as farmers, was lumber- 
ing. Among the early mill erections was that 
built by Hopkins Boone, John and Maxwell 
Long and William Porter, on Clearfield Creek, 
about a quarter of a mile above the old Clear- 
field bridge, in or about the year 1833. The 
proprietors were considerably involved and 
the property was sold to Lewis Passmore about 
ten or twelve years after its erection. The 
latter sold to John W. Miller, who removed 
the building and machinery for the erection of 
a saw and grist-mill on the creek opposite the 
old Elder mills, and were known as the Miller 
mills. They went to decay many years ago. 



The first erection in the vicinity of "Por- 
ter's Mill," was made about 1836, by Philip 
Antes and George Leech, with an interest 
owned by Christopher Kratzer. A saw-mill 
on the east side of the river was first built. 
The property went to James T. Leonard on 
forced sale, but was afterward deeded to the 
Antes boys, and by them to William Porter 
and Philip C. Heisy. Porter bought the 
Heisy interest. The first grist-mill on the 
place was erected by William Porter in 1877, 
at a cost of nearly ten thousand dollars. It 
burned in 1882. Another mill was immedi- 
ately erected in its place, larger and of greater 
capacity, at a cost of about seventeen thousand 
dollars. Subsequently the roller process ma- 
chinery was introduced into this mill and was 
purchased by W. R. McPherson. 

On the site of the Ferguson mills in the 
year 1842, George B. Logan and Thomas 
Read built a saw -mill on the south side of the 
river, and about 1850, built a grist-mill on 
the north bank. A division of the property 
was made by which Logan took the grist-mill, 
and Reed the saw-mill, but subsequently Lo- 
gan became the owner of the whole property. 
About i860 he sold to the Farmers' Company, 
but that was not a successful organization and 
the property came back to Logan again. In 
the early eighties George E. Ferguson became 
owner and proprietor. The dam across the 
West Branch was constructed at the time the 
first mill was built. 

On the site formerly occupied by Matthew 
Ogden's pioneer mill on Moose Creek, there 
was built by Alexander Irvin, in the year 
1830, a substantial grist-mill. Irvin sold to 
Richard Shaw, who operated it until his 
death, when it went to Richard Shaw, Jr. 

About the year 1842, William Bigler and 



298 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



William Powell built a saw mill in the south 
part of the township, and afterward christened 
it the "Doniphan Mill," in honor of Colonel 
Doniphan of Mexican War fame. After Mr. 
Bigler's election to the office of governor of 
the State, the property went to the firm of G. 
L. Reed & Co. It has also been owned by 
Weaver and Betts, William Brown, Daniel 
Mitchell and again by Weaver and Betts. 

The Ringgold Mill was built by George R. 
Barrett and Christopher Kratzer, in the year 
1847, on Clearfield Creek, about Iialf a mile 
from the railroad bridge, the cost being about 
seven thousand dollars. During the extremely 
high water on the creek that year, the mill was 
carried down stream to the river, and thence 
down to Karthaus bridge, where all trace of 
it was lost, no part ever being recovered. A 
ne\\ mill was immediately erected on the site 
of the former structure. Both of these were 
among the very best in the lumber country, the 
first being an unusually fine mill. It was a 
double mill, having two saws, and manufac- 
tured a large amount of lumber for that time. 
The dam built by the owners was very objec- 
tionable to raftsmen on account of its height, 
and many were the rafts and arks that went 
to pieces in attempting its passage. The prop- 
erty was afterward sold to W'ilson Hoover, 
and burned while he owned it. 

Although Lawrence is one of the pioneer 
.townships of the county, and in all matters of 
county progress and advancement, she is not 
entitled to first honor in matters of education 
so far as the first school erected is concerned, 
but from the best authority obtainable, the 
second schoolhouse was built in the township 
in the year 1806. This was located north and 
east from Clayville tow-n nearly opposite the 
mouth of Clearfield Creek. Here the redoubt- 



able Samuel Fulton taught, and was after- 
ward followed by Miss Davis and Miss Goon. 
An old school was built about twenty rods 
above the covered bridge at Clearfield town, 
on the west side of the river within the limits 
of the present borough of West Clearfield. The 
exact date of its erection is unknown. Among 
the early teachers there can be remembered 
the names of John Campbell, Miss Brockway 
and Benjamin Merrell. 

MORRIS TOWNSHIP 

This tow'nship was erected by a decree of 
the Court of Quarter Sessions of Clearfield 
Count}-, dated April 3rd, 1836, and was named 
in honor of the Hon. Robert Morris, a dis- 
tinguished patriot of the Revolutionary War. 

The township is bounded on the north by 
Graham Township, on the east by Cooper 
Township, and part of the dividing line be- 
tween Centre and Clearfield Counties, on the 
south by Decatur Township and on the west 
by Boggs Township. 

The Township contains fine coal deposits 
and many well cultivated farms. The popula- 
tion, according to the census of 1910, was 
4994- 

Morris township as laid out by the viewers 
was perhaps as irregular in conformation as 
any in the county, and at the same time it was 
numbered among the larger in superficial area. 
It extended from a point opposite and west of 
Philipshurg on the south, to the West Branch 
on the north, a mean distance of something 
like thirteen miles, and while it has no parallel 
sides, its average width was about six or seven 
miles. This, of course, is an estimate of its 
area before any of its territory was taken for 
the fonnation of other townships. The West 
Branch River formed the north, and the Mo- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



299 



shannon the east boundary. Having such ex- 
tensive water boundary, of course Morris town- 
ship was well cut by smaller streams tributary 
to the larger ones named above. Among these 
tributary to the Susquehanna were Big Run, 
Wilhelm Run, Alder Run, Rolling Stone Run, 
and Basin Run. Those that discharged their 
waters into the Aloshannon were Crawford 
Run, Weber Run, Moravian and Little Mora- 
vian Runs (neither, however, being the stream 
that is correctly so named). Grass Flat Run, 
Brown's Run, Big Run, Hawk Run. and Emigh 
Run. It will be seen that some of these names 
correspond with names of other streams in 
other townships, which is due to the fact that 
many of these names were applied at a more 
recent date bj' persons not thoroughly acquaint- 
ed with the county. 

In the year next succeeding that in which " 
Morris township was erected (1837), James 
Allport made an enumeration of the taxable 
inhabitants, the enumeration or assessment roll 
containing the following names: James All- 
port, Robert Ardery, Henn.' Beams. Abraham 
Brown, John Brown. David Cooper, John 
Coonrod, William Dillon, George R. Dillon. 
Joseph Denny, Samuel Davison, David Dale, 
William Everhart, Martin Flegal. Valentine 
Flegal, David Flegal, Samuel C. Hall, George 
Hoover. Thomas Hancock, Vincent Holt. Nich- 
olas Heister, John Hoover, William M. Hunter, 
John W. Irvin, Leonard Kyler, Jacob Wise, 
William Shimmel. George Shimmel, Sr.. Philip 
Shimmel. Jacob F. Runk, John Ready. Chris- 
tian Roubly, John Roubly, John Beams. Jacob 
Beams, Jonas Bumbarger, Henry Bumbarger, 
Jacob Gearhart, Valentine Gearhart. David 
Gearhart. Peter Gearhart, John L. Gearhart, 
David Gray, Peter Gray, Jeremiah Hoover, 
Samuel Hoover, Evans Hunter, Reuben Hunt- 



er, Abraham Kyler, John B. Kyler, Henry 
Lorain, John Merrj'man, Joseph Morrison, Ja- 
cob Pierce, William Ricord, Joseph Senser, 
Frederick Senser, Moses Thompson, Samuel 
C. Thompson, Samuel Waring. The total 
amount of the assessment for the year 1837, 
as shown by the roll made by Mr. Allport, was 

$14,318- 

In the year 1861, nearly twenty-five years 
after the above enrollment was made, John 
Rayhorn became the assessor of the township, 
and as such made a list of the persons residents 
of the township, who were subject to militia 
duty, the names being as follows : John Will, 
George Kehner, Michael Leibatt, Daniel Beams, 
Joseph Fulmer, Christian Hartle, Robert Ro- 
senhoover, John Miller. John Weaver, Adam 
Knobb, John Stipple. William McKee. David 
Wagoner, G. L. Clapland, George Steinca- 
richner. John Wait, Jacob May, John Steer, 
John Keen, Vincent Flegal, Miles Pelton, W. 
E. A\^illiams, George Wise, John Troy. Wil- 
liam Rothrock, David Shimmel, Harn,' Glea- 
son. Elwood Dehaven. Reuben Wait, Peter 
Munce, C. P. Wilder, Leonard Kyler, David 
Kyler, Zachariah Jones, David Cramer, Jesse 
Beams, George D. Hess, Daniel Zones, John 
Hoover. 

It is observed from the foregoing roll that 
there was a strong element of German settlers 
that came to the vicinity subsequent to the 
erection and prior to the year 1861. This lo- 
cality was. before this growth, largely popu- 
lated with Germans, or descendants from Ger- 
man parents. They were, and always have 
been a thrifty, energetic and progressive class 
of people, and make admirable citizens. 

Amongst the first settlers of the township 
was Captain Jacob Wise, who located in the 
southern part, cleared up a farm, and also car- 



300 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



ried on blacksmithing. The "Captain," as he 
was always called, was endowed with quite a 
military spirit, and figured conspicuously in 
military gatherings in his day, and many a good 
joke that came from him was enjoyed by his 
many friends. He lived to a good old age and 
his death was much lamented by his many 
friends and neighbors. He reared a large fam- 
ily of children. 

-\nodier of the old citizens of the township 
was Samuel C. Thompson, who located near 
to Captain Wise's, and cleared up a fine fami. 
He raised a large family. Being a man of 
good education and fine judgment, he was 
elected justice of the peace, and served in that 
capacity for fifteen years. His land being un- 
derlaid with a vein of excellent bituminous coal, 
he opened up the bed and supplied the home de- 
mand with coal ; the only coal that could be used 
for blacksmithing in tlie whole neighborhood 
for many years. He was also elected to the 
oftice of county commissioner, and filled it 
with credit to himself and the township. He 
subsequently sold his farm and timber land and 
removed to near Hublersburg, Centre county. 
Tlie land belonging to Captain Wise was sold 
to D. W. Holt & Co., who opened up the coal, 
commenced and carried on a very successful 
business for a number of years. Then they 
sold to R. B. Wigton & Co., who enlarged and 
increased the business. Mr. Holt was for- 
merly a citizen of Bradford township, this 
county, but as an enterprising lumbennan, 
came to this township and purchased a part of 
the pine timber known as the Allport timber. 
After the second year's operation in square 
timber, he built a large steam saw-mill and en- 
gaged in the manufacturing of sawed lumber 
for a few years. He married Miss Catharine 
.Mlport. Some time later he purchased the 



Captain Wise property, and commenced operat- 
ing in the coal business, and was the first to ship 
coal from Morris township. Shortly after he 
purchased a valuable property in Thilipsburg, 
and extended his coal and lumber operations 
in diliferent parts of the neighborhood very ex- 
tensively, being one of the foremost among the 
enterprising men in this vicinity. 

Another prominent citizen of old Morris 
township was James Allport, who contributed 
a great amount to the good of the citizens, and 
also to the general public. William Hunter, 
likewise, a very good citizen and kind neighbor, 
was among the pioneers of Morris township, as 
were also David Dale, George R. Dillen, and 
John \\ . Ir\in. 

We should also mention John Hoover, Sr.. 
a worthy and respected citizen, who came to 
Morris township from Union county at an 
early day. He raised a large and industrious 
family, the sons of whom were, or perhaps still 
are among the people of Cooper township (a 
part of Morris), which derived its name from 
David Cooper, one of the first settlers of that 
part of Morris township known at Cooper Set- 
tlement, and a stalwart pioneer who crossed' the 
Allegheny Mountains to make his home in 
Clearfield county. 

The sons of John Hoover, Sr., helped to 
clear up a farm near to the village of Allport, 
and then passed on northward in Morris town- 
ship to what is known as Hickor}' Bottom Set- 
tlement, where they purchased for themselves 
land in the woods, and by industry and sobriety, 
and fair dealing became the owners of excel- 
lent farms. 

.Among those who settled in that part of the 
township known as "Cooper Settlement," was 
Leonard Kyler, Sr., who, with David Cooper, 
settled at or near Kvlertown, where each of 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



301 



them opened for themselves large and produc- 
tive farms, part of which were later sold off in 
town lots. Leonard Kyler"s family consisted 
of two sons and three daughters. The sons 
were John B. and Thomas Kyler, the latter be- 
ing the founder of the village of Kylertown. 
John B. Kyler became the son-in-law of David 
Cooper, and purchased the Cooper farm. He 
divided a part of it into lots, which fomi a con- 
siderable part of the village site. John B. Ky- 
ler lived on the Cooper homestead, and reared 
a large family. He survived his wife several 
years, and died about 1883, much lamented by 
his many friends, as he was a kind and gener- 
ous neighbor and a consistent member of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

Another of the old and worthy citizens of 
Morris township was Abraham Kyler, famil- 
iarly called "Uncle Abraham." He was uncle 
of John B. and Thomas Kyler. He located, 
at an early day, in the southern end of the town- 
ship. He was for many years a successful 
farmer, an honest and upright man, and died 
an earnest member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Among the prominent citizens of Kylertown 
was James Thompson, eldest son of Samuel C. 
Thompson. His parents came from Centre 
county to Morris township in 1830. He lived 
with his father until he arrived at manhood, 
and while at home received a good common 
school education. He taught school for a 
number of years; then worked at the carpen- 
ter's trade. After that he was employed as 
clerk by Joseph C. Brenner, at the village of 
Morrisdale, in this township, where Mr. Bren- 
ner carried on the mercantile business for a 
number of years. He also started a branch 
store at Kylertown, and James Thompson 
took charge of the store and carried on the bus- 
iness for a time. Mr. Brenner closed his bus- 



iness in Kylertown and moved to Williams- 
port, where he engaged in the lumber business. 
From there he removed to Philadelphia, where 
he went into the notion business, and died in 
1886. 

E. C. Brenner, the eldest son of Joseph C. 
Brenner, was a citizen of Kylertown for over 
twenty years. He removed here to settle the 
business of his father. He was appointed 
postmaster at Kylertown during the adminis- 
tration of Abraham Lincoln, but, being a Re- 
publican in politics, was removed, and suc- 
ceeded by Peter Moyer, Democrat, under the 
administration of Grover Cleveland. E. C. 
Brenner was one of the best and most obliging 
postmasters that there was in the county; the 
loss of him as postmaster, and his estimable 
family, on his removal to Philadelphia, was 
much regretted. He was elected justice of the 
peace, and served in that office over two years. 
He made an upright and impartial officer, and 
was much respected by the general public. 

Another of the old citizens of Morris, now 
Cooper township, was James Hughes, who 
lived one half mile east of Kylertown. He 
came to this vicinity in 1841 or '42, and mar- 
ried a daughter of David Cooper, rearing a 
family of four children. After his wife died 
he married Mrs. Sarah J. Hall, a widow of 
Lancaster county. Pa., who, as well as her hus- 
band, had a family of children. Mr. Hughes 
was one of the early settlers who helped the 
old and noted surveyor, Joseph Quay, in sur- 
veying this and adjoining townships. 

In the year 1843, Frederick Neabel, a prom- 
inent German, came to the Cooper Settlement, 
bought land and commenced clearing up a farm, 
lumbering in the winter. He made the first 
timber road to the Susquehanna River, at a 
point known as the Big Basin, to which place 



302 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



he hauled his square timber to be rafted aud 
run to market. He lived and died a prominent 
member of the Catholic Church, and was great- 
ly lamented by a large circle of friends. 

Jacob Raymond, Sr., was an old pioneer 
of the German settlement, who came here in 
1844, bougiu land and settled near the Cath- 
olic Church, of which he was a member. He 
raised a large family of sons and daughters. 

Amongst the other old settlers of the Ger- 
man Settlement may be mentioned the names 
of Joseph and Michael Steindechner, Michael 
Kader, Christian Hartle, and Robert Rasen- 

hoover. 

In 1839 there were but four school-houses 
in Morris— one in the southern end, which was 
built on the farm of Abraham Kyler, and was 
used for a church as well as for school pur- 
poses; one at Old Morrisdale, now known as 
Allport ; one on the farm of John Brown, also 
occasionally used for church or religious meet- 
ings; one in the German Settlement, known at 
that time as Cooper Settlement. These houses 
were built before the common school system 
came into operation, and could be used in com- 
mon for school and religious purposes also. 
As the township became more thickly settled, 
and when the free school system became adopt- 
ed it became necessary to have more school- 
houses and at the present time the educational 
interests of the township are well cared for. 

PENN TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
the Court of Quarter Sessions of Cleai-field 
County, dated February 4th, 1834. It is 
bounded on the north by part of Brady Town- 
ship and by Bloom Township, on the east by 
Pike Township, on the south by Ferguson and 



Greenwood townships and on the west by 
Greenwood and Bell Townships. 

This township has many fine farms well 
cultivated and also valuable coal deposits. The 
population of the township, according to the 
census of 1910, was 936. 

The township contains some very high lands, 
especially in the northern and western part, 
where the summits rise in places to an altitude 
of two thousand feet above tide-water. From 
the river front, on the south, back for a short 
distance, there is considerable level land, but 
with a gradual inclination upward as a north 
or northwest direction is pursued. The town- 
ship is well watered, although not possessed 
of any streams of note except where the Sus- 
quehanna River skirts its south boundaiy. The 
creeks tributar}' to the river that have their 
course through the township are Curry's Run, 
in the extreme west part; Poplar Run, having 
its course about two miles east from Curr>'"s 
Run ; Bell's Run, which practically intersects 
the township, and runs a generally south 
course just west of the center; Little Ander- 
son Creek, the course of which is opposite to 
that of the other streams, running a north and 
east direction, and is tributary to the greater 
Anderson Creek, into which its waters are dis- 
charged in Pike township on the east. Be- 
sides these, there are other and smaller runs 
and rivulets incident to a mountainous district. 

At an early day, and less than ten years after 
the erection of the county, the lands along the 
river were nearly all taken up and occupied, 
so that subsequent pioneers turned to the most 
available of the hill, or ridge lands, whereon 
to erect their habitations and make their farms. 
In this locality, as elsewhere, there was but 
little to attract the notice of settlers, as the en- 
tire region w'as densely wooded, and every 





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AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



305 



efifort at improvement or cultivation was at- 
tended with great labor and considerable ex- 
pense, and ready cash was an exceedingly 
scarce article at that time. 

The locality known as the "Grampian Hills," 
was one of the first settled of the upland dis- 
tricts of the county. It may be said to have 
been divided, so far as settlement was con- 
cerned, into two localities, the one toward the 
river, on the lower lands, near the base of the 
"Hill," and that more remote from, and back 
of the bottom lands, or the "Hills" proper. 
The lowlands were occupied by the Bells, the 
Fergusons, and the Fentons, and was subse- 
quently taken up by John Bennett, Nun Eng- 
land, William Hepburn, Joseph Spencer, Fran- 
cis Severns. and Samuel Cochran. From 1805 
to 1808, a large tract here was claimed by 
Charles Smith, but his claim was without foun- 
dation, and therefore unsuccessful. 

The Bennett improvement was divided 
among his heirs. The England lands passed 
to the ownership of other parties, and most of 
his family left the county many years ago. 
Job and George England (sons of Nun), left 
and went to Ohio ; Isaac moved to Morris town- 
ship. William Hepburn, of Scotch descent, was 
a man possessed of many peculiarities, and yet, 
withal, a good citizen. He died leaving a fam- 
ily, John and Samuel C, sons, and Catharine, 
who married James Thompson, being his chil- 
dren. 

In the year 1808, Joseph Spencer came with 
his family, and took up lands that had been 
purchased from Benjamin Fenton, some four 
hundred and more acres in extent. He divid- 
ed his farming and wood lands into four parts, 
of one hundred acres each, and gave one to 
each of three sons, retaining one tract for his 
own use. Joseph Spencer, the pioneer, was of 



the Society of Friends, and a man highly re- 
spected in the county. His descendants are 
numerous in the county. 

Francis Severns and Samuel Cochran were 
descendants of African blood. The latter, 
Cochran, is described as being a light mulatto. 
His mother, as well as himself, were said to 
have been born in slavery. Several times Sam- 
uel escaped from bondage. Once he was cap- 
tured, and on the other occasions he volunta- 
rily returned to captivity, but eventually pur- 
chased his freedom and came north. Early in 
the present century he came to Clearfield from 
Lycoming county, and settled, about the year 
1804, on the south side of the river. Later he 
took up some three hundred acres of land in 
one of the best localities on the Grampian Hills. 
He cleared over one hundred acres, built a 
substantial log house, and a large, double log 
bam. He kept a number of horses and a 
large quantity of other live stock, and became 
one of the most thrifty and successful farmers 
on the "hills." His house was the popular re- 
sort for teamsters on the old Kittanning turn- 
pike. Cochran raised a family of several sons 
and was anxious that they receive a good edu- 
cation, such that he had not, nor was allowed 
to acquire during the days of his youth, and in 
the bonds of slavery. 

The name of "Grampian Hills" as applied 
to the locality heretofore mentioned, was not 
given until the time of the settlement here by 
Dr. Samuel Coleman, a person of supposed 
noble birth, who was of Scottish parentage, but 
who came to this county from the eastern part 
of the State in the year 1809. From a strik- 
ing resemblance the locality bore to the Gram- 
pian Hills of Bonnie Scotland, the doctor 
gave it this name in honor of his native coun- 
trv and home. 



306 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



The lands, or a very large body of them, in 
the townships now included by Bell Pike, and 
Penn, were surveyed in the name o£ Hopkins, 
Griffith, and Boone, and were afterward known 
as the Nicklin and Griffith lands. This com- 
pany gave to Dr. Coleman a tract of about 
tliree hundred acres as an inducement for him 
to settle thereon, wliicli lie accepted. In tlie 
year 1809, he commenced clearing, having the 
assistance of three men, one named Gibson, 
and one slave (colored), named Otto. They 
encamped for a time in an open shed, thatched 
with brush, and slept on ])ieces of chestnut bark 
in lieu of beds, and until better quarters could 
be constructed. 

Early in the summer of 1809, Joseph Boone 
and his family reached the home of Esquire 
McClure, having come up tiie West Branch 
from Williamsport by boat. The parly pro- 
ceeded to Coleman's camp in wagons, upon 
wiiich they slept on the night of their arrival. 
The next day a cabin was built of logs, and 
roofed with bark from tiie trees in the vicinit}'. 
Boone was a man of education and worth; a 
zealous Catholic, and devoted to his church. 
He commenced the erection of a grist-mill on 
Bell's Creek, but through some cause the enter- 
prise was abandoned. He afterward was 
chosen prothonotary and recorder of the coun- 
ty, and held other positions of public trust, all 
of which he most satisfactorily filled. He 
lived for several years at Clearfield town. 

James Moore, formerly a resident of Half 
Moon township, Centre county, came with his 
family to the "Hills" in the year 1810. and lo- 
cated on the site of the village of Pennville, 
and near which passed the Glen Hope, and Lit- 
tle Bald Eagle, and also the Punxsutawney 
turnpikes. This place w^as distant from the 



river about four miles. Mr. Moore and his 
sons Jeremiah, Andrew, and James, built a 
saw- and grist-mill at an early day. James, 
Jr., was for a time, agent for the Fox and Rob- 
erts land, so called, an exceedingly large tract 
owned by a wealthy Philadelphia family. 

The Moores were a prominent family in the 
affairs of the locality, always having at heart 
the interests of all who were around them. 
They were members of the Society of Friends, 
and actively participated in the welfare and 
progress of that society, shows strongly of the 
efforts of this family, as well as the other res- 
ident members of that society. Prior to the 
settlement of the Moore family there had been 
no regular religious services held in the vi- 
cinity, although, as early as 1806, Rev. Daniel 
Stansbury came and preached occasionally in 
the neighborhood. Rev. Stansbury was a 
tailor by trade, and his coming was a welcome 
one on that account, as he could clothe the outer 
man and provide for his bodily comfort as well 
as for iiis spiritual welfare. Rev. Linn, of 
Bellefonte, came to the vicinity and delivered 
an occasional sermon, but his visits were not 
frequent. In the year 1822 regular services 
were begun, and a log edifice was built on Es- 
quire McClure's land. After years of occu- 
pancy the old building was abandoned, and a 
more commodious one was built at Curwens- 
ville, in Pike township. 

Among the others of the old settlers of Penn 
township, and who came in about or soon after 
the vear 1810, were the families of Samuel 
Johnson, David Wall, Caleb Davis, Gideon 
Widmire, Jonathan Wall, Joseph Giddings, 
Jonathan Taylor, David Allen and others from 
time to time, down to the erection of the town- 
ship, in the year 1835, and later. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



307 



PIKE TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
the Court of Quarter Sessions of Centre Coun- 
ty, to which Clearfield County was then at- 
tached for judicial purposes, dated November 
Sessions 1813, and was named in honor of 
General Zebulon Pike, an officer in the United 
States xArmy, during the War of 181 2. 

The township is bounded on the north by 
Pine Township, on the east by Lawrence 
township, on the south by Knox Township and 
west by Bloom, Penn and Ferguson Townships. 

The township contains many fine and well 
cultivated farms, also many fine coal and fire 
clay deposits, which are now being operated 
on an extensive scale. 

The population, according to the census of 
1910, was 1 67 1. 

The land of Pike township is mostly of a 
mountainous character, interspersed with nar- 
row valleys and rolling plateaus, varying in 
elevation from eleven hundred to fifteen hun- 
dred feet above the sea level, and presenting 
many beautiful scenic effects. On the high 
table lands, and along the river valley, are lo- 
cated some of the most productive farms in the 
county, and despite the extensive lumbering 
operations of the past many fine bodies of tim- 
ber still exist. 

Paul Clover was probably the first settler in 
the township, having arrived in 1797, and 
built a house and blacksmith shop where the 
"corner store," in Curwensville, now stands. 
Thomas McClure, William AIcNaul, Elisha 
Fenton. the Blooms, Spencers, Moores, John 
Smith, Robert Ross, Samuel Caldwell, William 
Dunlap, the Hartshorns, Robert Maxwell, Dr. 
J. P. Hoyt, James McCracken, the Rolls, Hugh 
Hall, John and William Irvin, Arthur Bell, 



John Patton, Sr., and Daniel Barrett, were 
among the early pioneers. 

Dr. J. P. Hoyt came to Clearfield county 
from Halfmoon Valley, in Centre county, 
about the year 1814, and located at Curwens- 
ville. Here he remained for some years, and 
then removed to a property near Lumber City. 
He was a man of strict integrity, and by a long 
life of industry and excellent business abilities 
accumulated considerable property, which he 
lived many years to enjoy, dying at the ripe 
age of ninety-one years. 

John Patton, Sr., was born in Philadelphia, 
in 1783; moved to Curwensville in 1828; he 
served as associate judge of the county for five 
years; was justice of the peace for a number 
of years, and died in 1848, aged sixty-five 
years. 

Jason Kirk, Sr., came to Clearfield county 
about 1812; settled in what is now Penn town- 
ship, at that time in Pike, and was one of the 
most respected citizens, living to an old age, 
and leaving a large family. 

Samuel Caldwell was one of the first set- 
tlers, arriving about 1804. He was an influ- 
ential citizen, and left a considerable family. 

John W. McNaul and. his wife, Sarah, nee 
Ferguson, emigrated from the northern part 
of Ireland to this country in about 1793. Mr. 
McNaul was a Scotchman. On landing in this 
country they resided, for a short time, in Ches- 
ter county, thence removing to Lock Haven, 
and later living in Nittany Valley. Of their 
eight children, Margaret, James, John and 
Ann were born in Ireland, W^illiam, Alexander, 
Zachariah, and Mary, were born in this coun- 
try. WilliamMcNaul was a tanner, and first 
started business on his own account in Half- 
moon, Centre county, where he married Han- 
nah Way. In the fall of 1813. he, in compa- 



308 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



ny with Dr. John P. Hoyt (then a young phys- 
ician practicinjj in Halfmcx)n), started on horse- 
back, one snowy morning, to cross the moun- 
tains and see the famous new town of Cur- 
wensville, recently laid out by John F. Curwen. 
Early in the following spring William McNaul, 
witli liis family, moved to Curwensville, occu- 
pying a log house located on the lot where tlie 
residence of Mrs. Martha Thompson now is. 
He soon pnxeeded to erect a iiouse on the site 
of the present McNaul residence. He also 
built the tannery adjoining. His children 
were: Robert, Zachariah. Jane, Urbane, 
Lydia, John and Mary. The McNauls belong 
to the Society of Friends, and are most highly 
respected both at home and abroad. 

The Hartshorn family is one of the oldest, 
and is widely connected, and as a class are 
model, respectable citizens. Benjamin Harts- 
horn. Sr., was born in 1765. He married Is- 
abella McClure, and they emigrated from Mary- 
land to Centre county in the year 1796. In 
1806 he moved his family to Clearfield county, 
living on the land now known as the Jonathan 
Hartshorn farm. This was then notiiing but 
woods, and the family endured untold hard- 
ships before a home could be provided. The 
children were: Margaret, Anna, Jonathan, 
William, Benjamin, Nancy, Eliza and Mary 
Ann, all of whom married, and whose families 
reside in or near Curwensville. 

About the year 1750 the family of Spen- 
cers emigrated from England to America. In 
1808 Joseph Spencer, Sr., moved from North- 
umberland county to Clearfield county. His 
family consisted of three son.s — Samuel, Joseph, 
and Jesse — and three daughters. From Ben- 
jamin Fenton he purchased four hundred and 
forty acres of land, which was in its primitive 
state, excepting two acres which was cleared, 



and had a small log house upon it. The 
tract was situated between the present site of 
the village of Pennville and Susquehanna Riv- 
er, about one mile south of Pennville. This 
was divided into four farms, the father retain- 
ing one and .setting apart a fann of corre- 
sponding size for each of his three sons. Most 
of the family were and are consistent mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends, and are emi- 
nently respectable and prosperous citizens. 

The Blooms, as a class, are worthy citizens; 
almost all farmers, and are the largest or one 
of the largest families in Clearfield county. 
William Bloom, Sr., was born in Germany, in 
1752 and emigrated to this country at an un- 
certain time, reaching Clearfield county in 1801. 
Previous to this he had been in the State of 
New Jersey, also in Centre county. Pa. Dur- 
ing the Revolutionar)' War he ser\'ed for some 
time in the ranks. In 1778 he married Mary 
Metter, who was born in 1754. The pioneer 
Bloom came to Clearfield county alone, and 
settled one mile up the river from Cunvens- 
ville. Pike township is the stronghold of the 
Blooms. Probably two-thirds of the family 
are located here. 

Andrew Moore, Sr., emigrated to America 
from Ireland in 1688, and settled in Chester 
county. Pa. James, the second son of Andrew 
Moore, Jr., was born January 8, 1760, at Sads- 
Iniry, Chester county. He married in 1785, 
Lydia, daughter of Abram and Anna Sharpless. 
In 1795, they removed to Halfmoon, Centre 
county, and in 18 10, James, with his son Jer- 
emiah and daughter Lydia, started on foot 
across the mountains, and in due time arrived 
at the site of Pennville, in Penn township, 
Clearfield county. He purchased three hun- 
dred and seventy-five acres of land; built a 
cabin, and commenced clearing; the rest of the 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



309 



family following. He was a consistent mem- 
ber of the Society of Friends, and trained up 
his family in that religious faith. 

In 1809 Dr. Samuel Coleman settled on a 
tract of three hundred acres north of the site 
of Pennville. Dr. Coleman was a Scotchman, 
and had no family. He gave the name of 
"Grampian Hills" to his place, remarking that 
it reminded him of the renowned hills of the 
same name in Scotland. He held office about 
the time of the organization of the county, 
being clerk to the county commissioners. His 
grave is on the farm of Colonel Miller, of Penn 
township. At the last meeting of the "County 
Medical Association" a committee was ap- 
pointed to solicit subscriptions toward erecting 
a monument to the memory of the pioneer 
physician of Clearfield county. 

The first assessment of the township was 
made in 1814, and contains the following 
names : Robert Askey, David Allen, George 
Brown, Alex. Caldwell, Sam'l Cochran, Jesse 
Cookson, Wm. Bloom, Jr., Joseph Bloom. Ca- 
leb Bailey, Benj. Bloom. John Brink, Wm. 
Bloom, Peter Bloom, John Bloom, Isaac 
Bloom, John Bell, Arthur Bell, John Bennett, 
Benj. Carson, Dr. Samuel Coleman, Amos 
Davis, Wm. Dunlap, Nimrod Derich, D-avid 
Dunlap, Caleb Davis, Jonathan Evans, Peter 
Everhart, Joseph Edding, John Fullerton, Da- 
vid Ferguson, John Ferguson, Jonah Griffith, 
John Haughenberry, Hugh Hall, Benj, Harts- 
born, Wm. Hepburn, James Hayes, Saml.- 
Johnson, Mark Miller Jordon, John Kyler, 
Jason Kirk, John Kirk, David Liggit. Elijah 
Meredith, Sam'l Miller, Robert Maxwell, Jos. 
McCracken, Robert McGee, Robert McCrack- 
en, John McCracken, Thomas McClure, Thos. 
McCracken, James McCracken, Daniel Mc- 
Cracken, James Moore, Job Ogden, Job Par- 



ker, Merchant; Abraham Passmore, James 
Reed, Alexander Reed, Jr., Alex. B. Reed, 
Wm. Reed, John Rolls, blacksmith; Geo. 
Shaffer, Geo. Shaffer, Jr., Wm. Smith, 
Nicholas Shaw, John Stuggart, Philip 
Stuggart, Joseph Spencer, Joseph Spencer, Jr., 
Sam'l Spencer, Francis Severas, Wm. Tate, 
James Woodside, David Walls, John Wrigley, 
merchant; Geo. Williams, weaver; Gideon 
Widemire, Geo. Welsh, Jacob Wilson. Town 
lots in Cunvengville were assessed at $12.50; 
cows, $10; horses, $30; unimproved land, and 
timber at $1 per acre; farm land at $2 to $3 
per acre. The early settlers experienced many 
trials and privation. The roads were but little 
more than trails through the woods. Indians 
frequently visited the locality and usually en- 
camped on the bank of the river. An Indian 
burial-place was located at the mouth of An- 
derson Creek, and before the floods had made 
inroads on the lands, stone arrow-heads, and 
tomahawks were occasionally found. 

In 1819 Mathew Caldwell cut out the first 
road from Curwensville to Bloomington. The 
principal towns are Bloomington and Olanta. 
(For Curwensville borough see succeeding 
chapter). 

PINE TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by an act of the 
Legislature approved the loth day of April 
1873. It has practically no inhabitants and no 
separate township organization, but for the 
purpose of taxation, is annexed as a part of 
Lawrence Township. 

The township is bounded on the north by 
Huston Township, on the east by Lawrence 
Township, on the south by Pike Township and 
on the west by Union Township. It consists 
mostly of a vast wilderness. 



310 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



The population of the township, according 
to the census of 1910 was 32. 

SANDY TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected By a decree of 
the Court of Quarter Sessions of Clearfield 
County at September Sessions 1878. It is 
bounded on the north by part of the dividing 
line between Jefferson and Clearfield counties 
and part of the dividing line between Elk and 
Clearfield Counties, on the east, by Huston and 
part of Union Townships, on the south by 
Brady Township, and on the west by part of 
the dividing line between Jefferson and Clear- 
field Counties. 

The township contains valuable coal depos- 
its, which have been operated for a number of 
years, also many valuable fanns, and is one of 
the most prosperous townships in the County. 

The population, according to the census of 
1910 was 5695. 

Prior to 181 2 John Casper Stoeber had pre- 
empted some land in western Pennsylvania, 
which came in possession of Mr. Stoeber's 
daughter, who was married to a Mr. Scheffer, 
father of Michael, George, and Frederick 
Scheffer (now all dead), and ancestor of the 
present generations of Shafers — as they now 
write it — in Sandy township. 

In 181 2 the senior Scheffer left Dauphin 
county, Pennsylvania, with his family, and set- 
tled on the pre-empted land of his father-in-law. 
John Casper Stoeber, which was situated near 
the present limits of DuBois, then belonging 
to Centre county. They landed on May 12, 
181 2, and on the next day erected a "bark 
shanty," beside a cooling spring. There was 
no store nearer than "Old Town" — as Clear- 
field was then called. The merchants at the 
time "wagoned" their goods from Philadel- 



phia. The nearest mill was on the Clarion 
River, forty miles distant. In 1814, however, a 
mill was built at Curwensville, on the Susque- 
hanna River, nineteen miles distant. These 
early settlers subsisted chiefly on deer and 
bear meat, and other game. They lived here 
for ten long and lonesome years before they 
had any neighbors. Soon after this time some 
Gennans commenced to settle about Trout- 
ville, which section was long known by the 
local name of "Germany." 

J. P. Taylor and W. N. Prothero were elect- 
ed the first justices of the peace. 

After the incorporation of DuBois, 1879, 
J. A. Bowersox and J. R. Keel were elected 
justices; the latter resigned, and John Lank- 
ard was appointed until the next municipal 
election (February, 1884), when William Lid- 
del was elected to fill the regular term. J. A. 
Bowersox at the expiration of his first term 
was re-elected in February, 1886. Samuel 
Postlethwait was the first township treasurer, 
and served four years. He was followed in 
1883 by Michael Shaffer, who served four 
years, and was re-elected in February, 1887. 
The first constable in the township was Henry 
Raught. The population in 1880, estimated 
(including Du Bois), 3,700. (See borough of 
DuBois in succeeding chapter.) 

The first store in Sandy township at "West 
Liberty," as far as known, was opened by John 
Hoover, followed by Joseph Gathers, and he 
by S. Lobough. "Jerry" Heasly established 
a foundry about this time; John Heberling 
opened a general store, which he kept for about 
twenty years, he also was postmaster during 
this period at W^est Liberty — post-office name, 
"Jefferson Line." The post-office was re- 
moved in 1885 to the railroad "cut," at the 
point where the railroad crosses the "Water- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



311 



ford and Erie" pike, there being a regular sta- 
tion of the same name as the post-office, "Jef- 
ferson Line." 

The first practical mining in this township 
was commenced in 1874 or '75 by the "Centen- 
nial colliery," opened and operated by Messrs. 
Jones Bros, in 1876. This colliery, being lo- 
cated on disputed land, there was more or less 
litigation from the start, which culminated in 
the shooting of Montgomery, a representative 
claimant, by Peter Jones (of the firm of Jones 
Bros.) in self-defense, in May 4, 1878. The 
mines were shortly after abandoned. 

In 1876 the Sandy Lick Gas, Coal and Coke 
Company commenced to ship coal. They em- 
ployed about one hundred men, and shipped 
about five hundred tons per day. Mr. Miles 
B. McHugh was superintendent. This com- 
pany operated a few years, when trouble arose 
between it and Messrs. Bell, Lewis & Yates, 
on the question of royalty due the latter, which 
resulted in the closing of the "drift," when 
the Sandy Lick Company opened the "Hildrup" 
mine on the opposite side of Sandy Lick Creek, 
but it too was finally closed. 

The firm of Bell, Lewis & Yates began to 
develop its property in the year 1876 (con- 
sisting of about four thousand acres, lying prin- 
cipally in Sandy township), under the manage- 
ment of A. J. McHugh. They shipped their 
first coal from Rochester mines on March 2'], 

^877- , 

The early educational efforts and interests 
were identical and equally shared with Brady 
township, from which township the greater 
portion of Sandy was taken. At the time of 
the organization of the township in 1881, there 
were nine schools with two hundred and eighty- 
one pupils, male and female. The number of 
schools had grown to thirteen in 1887, with five 



hundred and ninety pupils. The educational 
interests are in a fair stage of development, 
and the public school fund in a healthy con- 
dition. 

UNION TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of the 
Court of Quarter Sessions of Clearfield Coun- 
ty, dated December Term 1848. It is bounded 
on the north by parts of Sandy and Huston 
Townships, on the east by Pine Township, on 
the South by Bloom Township and on the west 
by parts of Brady and Sandy Townships. 

Although a large part of this township is not 
suitable for agriculture, yet in the northern 
part of the township are many farms well cul- 
tivated, and very productive. The population 
of the township according to the census of 1910 
was 785. 

The main stream of the township is Ander- 
son Creek. Its source is in Huston, on the 
north, from whence it flows a generally south 
course, entirely across Union, enters Bloom, 
then bears to the east by south into Pike, and 
discharges its waters into the Susquehanna 
River, at the borough of Curwensville. An- 
derson Creek is a stream of considerable size. 
The runs auxiliary to the creek, and emptying 
into the same from the east, are Montgomery 
Run and Blanchard Run, each of which lay 
almost wholly within the township. On the 
west and having its entire course within the 
township, is Dressier Run, so named for the 
Dressier family, who were pioneers in this lo- 
cality, and one of the most respected of the 
early settlers. The stream known as Sandy 
Creek also has its head-waters in the western 
part of Union township, from which it flows 
a north and west course into Brady, thence 
across that township and into Jefferson county 



312 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



on tlie west. Sandy, although of less size than 
Anderson Creek, has been nearly as prominent 
as the latter, during the period of extensive 
lumber operations, for which both of these 
streams have been so noted. 

The settlers who were possessed of sufficient 
hardihood and determination to attempt an 
improvement in this remote locality at an early 
day, were indeed scarce, and, in fact, no such 
attempt was made until the river and bottom 
lands were well-nigh taken up. The only pos- 
sible inducement, even after the first quarter 
century of the county's history had been made, 
was the presence of Anderson's Creek, and its 
course through the township. This was then 
parts of Brady and Pike townships. Across 
the line in Brady there were a few straggling 
settlers, but generally, the country was a heav- 
ily w(joded district with hardly sufficient open- 
ing for the erection of a cabin. 

Caleb Bailey was born in Lycoming county 
in the year 1797, and came with his father to 
this county about the year 1809. .After hav- 
ing resided in the upper part of the county for 
about eighteen years, he moved to lands that 
were, in 1848, erected into Union township, 
the line being especially run so as to include 
the Bailey farm within the new township. 

Another of the pioneer settlers in this re- 
gion was John Laborde, a native of Lancaster 
county. He came to this county in the early 
part of the year 1828, and located in Brady 
township, but two years later moved to a point 
a short distance from Rockton village, where 
he made an improvement. His brother, David 
Laborde, lived nearly a mile west of this. 
They were the first settlers in the vicinity. 
Both had large families. The children of John 
Laborde were John, Peter, Jacob, David, 
Christopher, Polly, who married Henry Lin- 



inger: Peggy, Barbara, who married George 
Doney ; and Betsey, who married Lewis Do- 
ney. The early life in the township was at- 
tended with great privations and dangers, and 
the Laborde's seem to have had their full 
share of each. There was no store nearer than 
Curwensville, and no mill nearer than Penn- 
\ille. The country at times seemed full of 
panthers and other dangerous animals, and 
various members of the family occasionally 
came in contact with them. 

John Hollopeter came soon after and com- 
menced an improvement on the line of the pike 
leading to Luthersburg and west of Rockton. 
Matthias Hollopeter, brother of John, came 
to the county a year later and took up his res- 
idence with John. He soon began an im- 
provement, and by hard and steady work made 
a good farm. 

In the year 1839 John Brubaker came to 
the county and commenced an improvement on 
lands which he yet occupies about half a mile 
north of Rockton village. Mr. Brubaker was 
a native of Mifflin county, now Juniata county, 
and was born in the year 1810. In his family 
were nine children, viz. : Mary, Fanny, Dan- 
iel. Susan, Sarah, John, Joseph, Reuben and 
Jacob. About the year 1840 Mr. Brubaker 
built a still-house that the product of his fann 
might be utilized. This he was compelled to 
do as grain was then a drug in the market, and 
the merchants at Clcaiiicld would not receive 
it in exchange for goods. About 1843 o"" i844 
he commenced drawing shingles and boards to 
Clearfield town from a small mill he had built 
on Sandy Creek. This proceeding was looked 
upon by his neighbors as a piece of folly, but 
when they saw the good results of it, numer- 
ous other saw-mills were soon afterward 
erected, and lumbering became a leading pur- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



313 



suit, and agriculture was proportionately neg- 
lected. 

About this time, or possibly a little earlier, 
Jacob Burns came to the region. He built a 
cabin and commenced an improvement in the 
Dressier neighborhood. He remained here but 
a short time when he sold out to Dressier, and 
moved over on Anderson Creek, where he built 
a cabin and made a clearing, the first in that 
section. This was about a mile above the old 
mills at Lower Rockton. Burns soon found 
another opportunity to sell to good advantage, 
which he did, and moved still further east in 
the township, which was then a part of Pike. 
John Dressier, who is mentioned as having 
succeeded Jacob Burns, was born in Union 
county,, and came to Clearfield county in the 
year 1841. The farm he occupied is now reck- 
oned among the best in the county. At the 
time he purchased it there was no settlement 
nearer than three miles. The Dresslers have 
been among the most thrifty and enterprising 
people of the township. John Dressier died 
in 1856. He had a large family consisting of 
twelve children, seven daughters and five sons. 
David Dressier, his son, was the first justice 
of the peace elected in the township after its 
organization. 

Henry Whitehead was a native of England 
and came to this country nearly a half century 
ago. He took lands on the turnpike leading 
from Clearfield to Luthersburg, on the east 
side of Anderson Creek. By hard work and 
energy he made a fine fami, one of the best in 
the eastern part of the township. 

The Welty family came into Union town- 
ship in the year 1855, from Brady, where they 
settled in 1832, and was among the pioneers 
in the region north of Luthersburg. David 
Welty was the head of this family. He was 



born in Centre county in 1807. His first pur- 
chase in this township comprised about one 
hundred and sixty-five acres of land, but by 
subsequent purchases he acquired a tract of 
about five hundred acres. 

Incidental mention has been made of the 
fact that John Brubaker built a small saw and 
shingle-mill on Sandy Creek about the year 
1843, from which he hauled the first lumber 
and shingles to Clearfield, and there found a 
market. Within the short period of eight or 
ten years thereafter, other mills were built by 
David Horn, Joseph Lyons, John Dressier, 
John HoUopeter and Philip Laborde. The 
other early mills were owned by Samuel Arn- 
old and one Munn, the latter living at the 
mouth of Little Anderson Creek. 

At an early day and something like fifty 
years ago, Jason Kirk and Jeremiah Moore, 
two substantial residents of Penn township, 
came to the waters of Anderson Creek at the 
point now known as Lower Rockton, where 
they built a mill. The land hereabouts, to the 
extent of fifty acres, was given them for a 
mill-site, on condition that they make the im- 
provements. Here was built a saw-mill, and 
subsequently a grist-mill. A store was estab- 
lished here many years ago. 

There stood at Lower Rockton an old build- 
ing that was formerly occupied as a woolen- 
mill, the property of William F. Johnson, of 
Pennville. The saw and grist-mills, and other 
property at this point were owned by Joseph 
Seiler and sons, who became proprietors 
thereof in the year 1877. Upper Rockton was 
started through the efforts of John Brubaker, 
and others engaged in lumbering. A steam- 
power feed-mill, owned and operated by Jason 
E. and David W. Kirk was built during the 
year 1885. 



314 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



The first school in the township stood near 
this place. It was built prior to 1839, a log 
structure with a board roof. Some years later 
it was replaced with a more substantial and 
modern building. 

An enrollment of the taxable inhabitants of 
Union township, made by R. W. Moore, as- 
sessor, in the year 185 1. showed the following 
list of residents and landowners for that year, 
who were of the age of twenty-one years and 
upwards : Josiah Boomel, Jacob Burns, Peter 
H. Booze, Caleb Bailey, Daniel Brubaker, 
Roljert Britton, Henry Baily, John Brubaker, 
Josepii Cuttle, John Clowser, George Clowser, 
John Cunningham, Nicholas Doney, Lewis 
Doney, George Doney, David Dupler, Frank- 
lin Dutry, John Dupler, Sr., John Dupler. Jr., 
Enos Doney, Isaac Graham, Jacob Gilnett. 
Jolin Haze. David Horn, Jr., Matthias Hollo- 
peter. Elias Horn, Jr., Samuel Horn, Jr., John 
Hare, John Hollopeter. Jr.. Samuel Hare, 
Frederick Hollopeter. Jr.. David Irwin. John 
Kritzer. John Kiesigle. Hugh Krise, Jacob 
Laborde. John Laborde. Sr., Luther & Car- 
lisle, Joseph Longacre, Peter Laborde, Philip 
Laborde, David Laborde, Jr., Henry Lininger, 
John Laborde, Jr.. David Laborde, Sr.. Peter 
Laborde. Jr.. Abram Laborde. Christian La- 
borde, Nathan Lines, John Long, Moore & 
Whitehead, Samuel Miles. R. Moore. Jr., 
Moore & Kirk, John Nelson. Jr., Jolm Potter, 
Jr., John Potter. Sr.. John Pawley. Daniel 
Pawley. Henry Shull. William Shull. Alexan- 
der Schofield. Shaw & Lines, Joseph Scho- 
field. Henry Whitehead, Jonas Weller, John 
H. Reed and Samuel East. 

WOODWARD TOWNSHIP 

This township was erected by a decree of 
the court of quarter sessions of Clearfield 



county dated February 3, 1846, and was 
named in honor of the late Judge Woodward. 

The township is bounded on the north by 
Boggs and Decatur townships, on the east by 
Decatur township, on the south by Bigler and 
Gulich townships and on the west by Bigler 
and Knox townships. 

This township has some of the finest coal 
deposits in the county, and these have been op- 
erated on a large scale for many years. 

The population, according to the census of 
1910, was 2,535. 

The major portion of the lands in this town- 
ship were owned by Hardman Philips, and were 
settled upon by the same class of people who 
settled Decatur township, and w ho bought their 
lands from Mr. Philips. 

This gentleman sold his lands to these pion- 
eers on credit, and as they were very poor he 
never expected to get very much out of them in 
payment, but would take a sack of meal, a 
bushel of potatoes, or oats, or wheat, or any- 
thing they could spare in settlement of what 
they owed him. Or, if they could not pay any- 
tiiing, it was all the same. On his return to 
England he placed his accounts in the hands of 
Josiah W. Smith. Esq.. of Clearfield, who was 
as lenient as the owner. 

One of the oldest settlers in this township 
was Henry Cross, an Irishman, who settled 
on a farm now in sight of Beulah Qiurch. in 
1818. 

Another old settler was the father of Mathew 
McCully, who settled near Mr. Cross, in 1827, 
on a piece of land now immediately in front of 
Beulah church, and later owned by T. C. Heims. 
Mr. McCully was but two years old when his 
father carried him to that fann. or rather that 
spot in the forest, and he spent a long and 
happy life in the wilds of Clearfield county. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



315 



Robert Stewart moved into the Wheatland 
Settlement in 1829, having come from Chester 
county. He died during the year 1886, aged 
nearly one hundred and five years. 

In 1837 Hugh Henderson moved from Phil- 
ipsburg to a piece of land he had purchased 
from James Allport, one hundred and forty- 
seven acres, near what is now called the San- 
born Settlement. Mr. Henderson had emi- 
grated ten years before from the parish of 
Donahachie, County Tyrone, Ireland. He was 
the father of six children — Thomas, Robert, 
William, Samuel, James and Margaret. The 
boys of this family, being hard workers, soon 
acquired sufficient means to purchase additional 
lands, and marrying, they branched out for 
themselves, buying lands near the parent farni, 
and thus helping to clear this township. As 
proved afterwards, all the lands in this and 
Decatur township were underlaid with coal, 
though these old settlers never dreamt of such 
a thing, or at least if they knew it, did not sup- 
pose it would be of any value to them. Coal 
was opened and worked for smithing, and local 
consumption as early as 1804, on the Hawkins 
place, near Philipsburg, but was not accounted 
of much value to its owner. 

The fami bought by Samuel Henderson at 
the head of Goss Run, was sold in 1873 to 
John Whitehead, and the celebrated Ocean 
colliery was opened upon it. 

James Hegarty was another pioneer of this 
township, emigrating with his father from Ire- 
land when eleven years old, in 1808, and set- 
tling on lands later known as the "X Roads" 
farm, in 1820. He afterwards purchased three 
hundred acres in what is now known as Geu- 
lich township. Mr. Hegarty died on the 31st 
of May, 1846, leaving a family of four chil- 
dren. 



Rev. John M. Chase is another old settler, 
having early cleared a farm on Clearfield 
Creek, in Happy Valley. Mr. Chase was a 
minister of the Baptist Church, ha\'ing been or- 
dained a pastor of the church near his place in 
1871. 

Christian Shoff, of Osceola Mills, was 
another old settler of this township. Mr. 
Shoff's grandfather settled near the vil- 
lage of Puseyville, at the lower ford. That 
his father, Samuel Shofif, settled near Glen 
Hope in 181 1, is known, and Christian was born 
there in 1830. When five years old his father 
moved to Wheatland, now called Amesville. 
This, then, may be called the first settlement of 
the hamlet of Amesville. Shoff, the father, 
moved in company with Benjamin ^Vr!ight, 
Billy Myrtle, Abraham Kady, Robert Hag- 
gerty, and John Whiteside, the descendants of 
whom still inhabit the farms in and around this 
place. The Alexander family are later addi- 
tions to the township, but still can be styled old 
settlers. 

Lumbering occupied the time of these old 
pioneers as much as farming. The township 
being covered with a most magnificent pine and 
hemlock forest, they, in winter, felled the pine 
trees, squared them, rafted the timber, and ran 
it to market by way of Clearfield Creek and 
the Susquehanna River. Wages for hewers 
in those days was sixty-two and one-half cents 
per day of twelve hours. 

Logging, or cutting the trees into logs dif- 
ferent lengths, was not commenced for some 
time after the lumbering, or the making of 
square timber, and when the first logs were 
placed in the creek to be run out on the first 
flood, the anger of the lumbermen was so 
raised against the loggers that a number of 
them proceeded to chop the logs to pieces, while 



316 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



others drove nails and spikes into the logs so 
that they could not be sawed. A lawsuit was 
the result, which was gained by the loggers, 
and thereafter logs and rafts had equal rights 
to the water. William K. Dickinson was the 
f^rst man to run logs, and his logs were the 
ones destroyed. 

In 1847 a verA' heavy flofxl occurred in the 
waters leading from the county, the river be- 
ing ten feet higher than has l)een known since. 
In 1865 another flood occurred, but not so dis- 
astrous as the preceding one. 

Mills for the manufacturing of lumber were 
built as early as the forties, but it was not un- 
til 1854 that the first mill was built in the town- 
ship. This was Houtz, Reed & Co.'s mill at 
Houtzville (now Brisbin). Another mill was 
built above Houtzdale, about a mile, by Dull & 
Kessler, in 1867. The lumber from these two 
mills was hauled by tram-road to Moshannon 
mines in 1868, and shipped by rail. 

The Reeds built another mill in what is now 
Houtzdale, in 1869, and from that date on nu- 
merous mills were built, notably Heim's mill, 
in 1871, situated two miles west of Osceola 
Mills: Kephart & Bailey's "bill mill," in 1873, 
one mile west of the same place. Isaac Tay- 
lor also built a mill on Cual Run in 1869, and 
S. S. Kephart has a mill there yet. Jesse Dig- 
gins built a mill on Goss Run, a little below 
Houtz. Reed & Go's mill, in 1873, and a man 
named McOmber had a portable mill at the 
head of Goss Run as early as 1868. while J. A. 
G. White built the first shingle mill near Osce- 
ola Mills in 1867. 

Thomas Henderson also built a mill near 
his farm in 1S77, and a Mr. Allport one at the 
head of Coal Run the same year. McCaulley 
& Ramey built a mill at Stirling in 1870, and 
another one at a point now called Ramey in 



1874. The timber of this region was so fine 
that sticks squared one foot, and seventy-six 
feet long, were furnished for the Centennial 
buildings, and seventy-two feet long for the 
insane asylum at Norristown. 

Beyer & Kirk built a mill near Morgan Run 
in 1882, and another near Madera in 1885. 
Messrs. Fryberger & Fee had a shingle-mill in 
operation near Houtzdale in 1881, and Walker 
Brothers one on Morgan Run, and William Lu- 
ther one at Madera, while Frederick Ramey 
had another at Osceola Mills. 

There was another saw-mill one mile south 
of Osceola Mills, and another three miles west 
of the same place, and though these last two 
were in Centre county, just over the line, yet 
they helped to clear the forests of this side of 
the county line. 

Mr. Mays and John Hamerly built a plan- 
ing-mill one mile west of Houtzdale in 1874. 
This mill was afterwards sold to Samuel T. 
Henderson, and by him to Giles Walker in 
1885, but Mr. Walker re-sold the mill to Hen- 
derson in 1886. 

The shipment of luml)er from this region 
from 1867 to 1884 was 1,082,742 tons, aver- 
aging two tons per thousand feet, aggregating 
541,371,000 feet of lumber. This only rep- 
resents the amount manufactured in the town- 
ships under review. There was a large amount 
of logs cut and floated to market. Jacob Kep- 
ler logged the southern side of the A. B. Long 
tract as early as 1858, while Howard Matley 
and John Bordeaux logged the Moshannon 
Coal Company's tract in 1869. 

The Moshannon Branch Railroad was built 
in 1869, and from that time improvements 
have followed each other very fast. The pop- 
ulation in 1872, when Houtzdale was taken 
from it. was eighteen hundred, while in 188^; 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



317 



it was over ten thousand, by adding the bor- 
oughs and townships erected witliin its borders 
since the foraier date. 

A most sangiiinaiy battle, so tradition has it, 
was fought between General Anthony Wayne 
and the Indians, about half a mile south of 
Houtzdale, and the graves of the slain can 
be distinctly traced. Many relics, bones, ar- 
row-heads and other relics have been picked up 
around the spot, and the trees bore many a 
mark of the conflict. In fact, when these 
trees were felled and hauled to the mills to be 
sawed they often destroyed the saws and en- 
dangered the life of the sawyer by coming in 
contact with some stone implement or arrow- 
head imbedded in the wood. 

Before the advent of the railroad, however, 
Dr. Houtz, who had bought large tracts of 
lands in the township, and on which Houtz- 
dale, Brisbin, and a number of villages stand, 
determined to make a way to get his lumber 
to market, and, with this end in view, he dep- 
utized his son-in-law, George j\I. Brisbin, to 
come into the township and see what could be 
done. Mr. Brisbin came here, then, before 
the advent of railroads, though the Tyrone 
and Clearfield railway was talked about. He 
proposed and actually surveyed a route for a 
plank road from Osceola Mills to Jeansville, 
and Madera, about ten miles. This was to be 
supplemented by a tramroad, so as to enable 
them to haul their lumber to the railroad. This 



plank and tramroad was never destined to be 
built, however, for when Mr. Brisbin had 
everything ready to commence, the Messrs. 
Knight, who owned the extensive coal lands 
at ]\Ioshannon, came along and asked Dr. 
Houtz to join with them and build a railroad 
three miles long. The doctor agreed to this, 
as it would bring his lands within one mile of 
an outlet, and the road was built. This was 
the first of the Moshannon Branch. Mr. Bris- 
bin then built a tramroad from the mills at 
"Houtzville," as it was then called, to Moshan- 
non, one mile long, and hauled his lumber to 
that point and shipped it. 

The cause of the sudden increase of popula- 
tion was the opening the coal beds. It has 
not been all prosperity, however. The miners 
did not always work, but created an occasional 
■disturbance by striking. The first general 
strike occurred in January, 1869, but it did 
not last very long. Wages were advanced 
about fifteen per cent. Since then other strikes 
have taken place with varying success. 

Madera is a village situated on the east side 
of Clearfield Creek, four miles from Houtz- 
dale. It was fonnerly called Puseyville, after 
Charles Pusey, who owned the land upon 
which it was built, and who erected saw-mills 
and a large grist-mill near the town site. The 
town is surrounded with hills in which are nu- 
merous coal beds. (For Brisbin and Houtz- 
dale boroughs see succeeding chapter.) 



CHAPTER XXn' 



THE BOROUGHS 



Historical Sketches of the Boroughs of Brisbin, Bnrnside, Chester Hill, Clearfield, Coalport, 
Cunvensville, DuBois, Glen Hope, Grampian, Houtzdale, In'ona, Lumber City, Mahaffey, 
Newburg, New Washington, Osceola Mills, Ramey, Trouti'Ule, IVallaceton and Westover. 



BOROUGH OF BRISBIN 

The Borough of Brisbin is situated on lands 
formerly owned by Dr. Daniel Houtz of Alex- 
andria, Pa., and was named in honor of 
George M. Brisbin, Esq., of Osceola Mills, a 
son-in-law of Dr. Houtz. Mr. Brisbin had 
charge of what are known as the Houtz lands 
for Dr. Houtz, and located where the town of 
Brisbin now is in 1854 and erected a saw-mill, 
which was operated until 1869. In 1874 the 
Moshannon Branch of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road was extended to Brisbin and in 1880, 
Hoover, Hughes & Company having pur- 
chased a large quantity of timber in the neigh- 
borhood, erected a steam saw-mill at Brisbin 
and operated it until May 27, 1881, when it 
was burned and was immediately rebuilt and 
continued to be operated until the timber was 
manufactured. 

The borough was incorporated on January 
8, 1883, and (in June 20th of the same year, a 
postofiicc was established, John E. Vaughn 
was appointed postmaster. 

The coal operations in the neighborhood of 
the town were rapidly developed after the 
building of the railroad and the population 



continued to increase and the town prospered 
and was a thriving place until on the 2nd of 
May, 1884, it was totally destroyed by fire. 
The fire first started in the woods, west of the 
town, and spread so rapidly that the inhabit- 
ants were not able to save any of their prop- 
erty or personal belongings, but were forced 
to flee for their lives. One aged lady, who 
after reaching a place of safety, returned to 
try to save her cow, lost lier life. 

Although greatly discouraged by the de- 
struction of their town, the people of Brisbin 
went bravely to work to rebuild their homes 
and soon a new Brisbin sprang up and pros- 
pered until the timber on the adjoining lands 
was cut and manufactured and the coal under- 
neath exhausted, since which time Brisbin has 
not increased much in population or business. 
Tlie present population is about five hundred. 

The town has tlirce churches, good public 
schools and is supplied with water and electric 
light from the neighboring town of Houtzdale. 

BOROUGH OF BURNSIDE 

The Borough of Burnside was incorporated 
October 5, 1874. and is situated in Burnside 
township, in the southwestern corner of the 



318 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



319 



county, on the West Branch of the Susque- 
hanna River. The town is located on high ta- 
ble land and surrounded by a beautiful farm- 
ing country. It is reached by the Cambria & 
Clearfield division of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road. 

In tlie lumbering days of Clearfield county, 
Burnside was a thriving and prosperous com- 
munity, but since the cutting out of the timber 
in that section of the county, the borough of 
Burnside has been dependent for its prosperity 
upon the trade from the surrounding terri- 
tory. 

The town has three churches, and a good 
schoolhouse. 

The present population of the borough is 
four hundred and ninety-three (493). 

UOROUGH OF CHESTER HILL 

The Borough of Chester Hill is situated in 
Decatur township, on the western bank of the 
Moshannon Creek, which stream is one of the 
boundaries between the counties of Clearfield 
and Centre. The town was laid out by the 
late Jacob F. Steiner, who located there in 
1849 and engaged in the lumber business. The 
borough was incorporated in the year 1883. 
Although Chester Hill is in Clearfield county, 
it is practically a part of the borough of Phil- 
ipsburg in Centre county, Pa., and many of its 
citizens are engaged in business in that town. 

The principal industry upon which the town 
is dependent, is the Fire Brick Works of the 
Harbison-Walker Refractories Company, 
which gives employment to a large number of 
men. There are also several coal operations 
in the neighborhood. 

The borough is on the line of the Altoona 

& Philipsburg Connecting Railroad and it is 

also reached by the Tyrone Branch of the 
20 



Pennsylvania Railroad at Steiner's Station 
and by the New York Central and Hudson 
River Railroad, which latter company has a 
branch line from Munson to Chester Hill, but 
calls its station Philipsburg. 

The borough has two churches, water and 
electric lights, good schools, a number of busi- 
ness places and the present population is about 
five hundred. 

BOROUGH OF CLEARFIELD 

The early history of Clearfield is contained 
in a former chapter and in this article we will 
refer only to the historj' of the town since its 
incorporation as a borough, by an Act of As- 
sembly approved the 21st day of April, A. D. 
1840, which may be found in the Pamphlet 
Laws of Pennsylvania for the year 1840, at 

page 734- 

The boundaries of the borough, as given in 
said Act, are as follows: 

"Beginning at a point on the Susquehanna river about 
si.xty feet south of Walnut street, thence east until it 
strikes the West line of Hugh Levy's out-lot so as to in- 
clude the houses and lots now occupied by Dr. H. Lo- 
rain and John Powell, thence north along ssid lot of 
Hugh Levy until it again strikes Walnut street, thence 
east along the southern edge of Walnut street to Fourth 
street, thence north along the eastern edge of Fourth 
street to Pine street, thence west along the northern edge 
of Pine street .to the Susquehanna river, and along said 
river by its several courses to the place of beginning, to 
include the town of Clearfield, as at first laid out, ac- 
cording to the plan thereof, and the two lots south of 
said town now occupied by said Dr. H. Lorain and John 
Powell, as above described." 

The boundaries of the borough have been 
enlarged from time to time, and it now con- 
tains four wards and includes the former bor- 
ough of West Clearfield and the borough lim- 
its now coA'er a territory nearly two miles long 
by one mile wide on both sides of the West 



320 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Branch of the Susquehanna River. When the 
town was originally laid out, Abraham W'itmer 
donated certain lands for public buildings, 
and also two triangular pieces of land border- 
ing on the river to be used as public parks. 
These parks have been beautified by the plant- 
ing of shade trees and add greatly to the ap- 
pearance of the town. 

Having the advantage of being the county 
seat, Clearfield has rapidly grown in popula- 
tion and wealth, and many fine business blocks 
and beautiful private residences have been 
erected. 

Aside from the public buildings belonging 
to the county to which reference has been made 
in a former chapter, the Dimeling Hotel, 
Clearfield National Bank block, the County 
National Bank building, the Clearfield Trust 
Company building, the Keystone block and 
Leitzinger Brothers store building are the 
principal business buildings in the town and 
are all of modern architecture and fully up- 
to-date in every respect. 

The town has eight churches, a Young 
Men's Christian Association building and or- 
ganization, several fine school buildings, two 
daily and four weekly newspapers, several 
miles of brick paved streets, gas and electric 
light, a public steam heating plant and a 
splendid supply of pure mountain water. 

Next to DuBois, Clearfield is the most pop- 
ulous town in the county, it having, according 
to the census of 19 lo. 6,851 inhabitants. 

The railroad facilities are of the very best, 
the town being reached by three, to-wit : — The 
Tyrone division of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 
the Beech Creek division of the New York 
Central & Hudson River Railroad, and the 
Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railway, over 
which latter road, trains of the Lake Shore & 



Michigan Southern Railroad are also trans- 
ported. 

By means of these railroad connections, 
Clearfield is within three hundred miles by 
rail of Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Buffalo, Roch- 
ester, Baltimore and Washington. 

The principal manufacturing establishments 
are the two large fire brick plants of the Har- 
bison-Walker Refractories Co., the large sole 
leather tannery of the Elk Tanning Company, 
the Clearfield Toy Works, the Clearfield Man- 
ufacturing Company, the Clearfield Machine 
Shops, and the Clearfield Clay Working Com- 
pany. 

The social side of life is not neglected by the 
people of Clearfield. The Dimeling Hotel 
contains a fine ball room and the citizens of 
Clearfield and Curwensville maintain the 
Clearfield-Curwensville Country Club, whose 
grounds, club house, and golf links are sit- 
uated at Centre, half way between Clearfield 
and Curwensville. 

Tiie citizens of the town are progressive and 
awake to all the interests of their community, 
and Clearfield is in many respects typical of 
the results of the best efforts of American citi- 
zenship. 

BOROUGH OF CO.\LPORT 

Nearly all of the towns in Clearfield county 
are situated at points where the natural advan- 
tages are such as to draw population or busi- 
ness to the locality. The situation of the 
Borough of Coalport is a good illustration of 
this fact. It is located on Cleai-field Creek, in 
the southern part of the county and near the 
division line between Clearfield and Cambria 
counties, twenty-three miles from Altoona, and 
twenty-five miles from Clearfield. It is on the 
line of the Pennsylvania and Northwestern 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



323 



division of the Pennsylvania Railroad, which 
connects with the main line at Bellwood, and 
is also on the Cresson and Coalport division, 
which connects with the main line at Cresson, 
Pa., thus giving the town good railroad facili- 
ties. Valuable deposits of bituminous coal 
are found in the neighborhood and the various 
coal operations make Coalport the center for 
a large amount of business. 

The town was originally laid out by James 
Haines and S. M. and J. D. Spangle and was 
incorporated as a borough in 1883. It has five 
churches, one weekly newspaper, a National 
bank, and fine public schools. The present 
popuation of the borough is about fifteen hun- 
dred. 

CURWENSVILLE BOROUGH 

On December 10, 1798, John Curwen, Sr., 
of Montgomery county, Pa., obtained from 
the Commonwealth a patent for three hundred 
and fifty-one acres of land on the banks of the 
Susquehanna River, at the mouth of Anderson 
Creek, in what was at that time part of Lyco- 
ming county. On this property Curwen laid 
out a town, consisting of forty-eight lots, lying 
between what are now known as Thompson 
and Locust streets, which he named Curwens- 
ville. John Curwen, Sr., bequeathed this 
property to his son, George Curwen, from 
whom the greater portion of it was subse- 
quently purchased by John and W'm. Irvin. 
Up to the year 1812, not a single building had 
been erected on the town plot, although from 
the best infonnation now obtainable, it seems 
that there were at that time two dwellings on 
the Curwen lands. One of these was erected 
by Job England, near where the Patton home- 
stead now stands, and the other by a Mr. 
Weld, near the dwelling now owned bv the 



Misses Nannie and Alice Irvin. In 1813 Dan- 
iel Dale built the first house in the town proper, 
upon the lot corner of State and Filbert 
streets, where the Owens block is now located ; 
James Moore, James Young, Mark Jordon 
and Josiah Evans, Esq., built the next dwell- 
ings in about the order named. During the 
year 1818 William Irvin, Sr., the father of 
Colonel E. A. Ir\'in and John Irvin, Sr., the 
father of Colonel John Irvin, came to Cur- 
wensville. Jnlm Irvin erected a saw-mill, and 
a grist-mill near the present site of the Irvin 
flouring-mill. 

After the completion of the Erie turnpike, 
in 1824, the progress of the town was rapid, 
and by an act of the Legislature, approved the 
3rd day of February, 1851, it was incorpora- 
ted as a borough. 

The limits of the borough have been en- 
larged several times, first by an act of the Leg- 
islature, approved, the 21st day of March, 
1856, and again by an act approved the 24th 
of April, 1869, and the third time, in 1884, on 
application of the inhabitants of the adjacent 
territory, the boundaries were extended by the 
court so as to include what was known as 
South Curwensville, and all the property as 
far north as Hogback Run, and east as far as 
the eastern line of the Irvin farm, and west to 
near Roaring Run. 

In 1871, through the efforts of the citizens, 
subscriptions amounting to over $60,000 were 
obtained, and the extension of the T. and C. 
Railroad to the town, was secured. The road 
was finished and opened for traffic in 1874. 

The Cleai-field & Mahoning Branch of the 
Buftalo, Rochester & Pittsburg Railroad, 
which passes through Curwensville, was open 
for traffic in 1893 and the Curwensville & 
Bower Railroad, a branch of the New York 



324 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Central & Hudson River Railroad was con- 
structed in 1903-4, so that the town is well 
supplied with railroad facilities. 

Curwensvilie has seven churches, a weekly 
newspaper, a national bank, fine system of 
graded public schools, good water supply, 
paved streets and electric lights, and is one of 
the most thriving and progressive, as well as 
the most beautiful town in the county. 

The principal industries are two large tan- 
neries, the largest fire brick plant in the 
county, two stone quarries, besides other 
smaller industries. 

The present population of tiie borough is 
about three thousand (3,000). 

•BOROUGH OF DU BOIS 

The Borough of Du Bois is situated in the 
extreme northwestern part of the county, two 
miles east from the Jefferson county line. It 
is located on a part of what is known as the 
"Great Beaver Meadow." This "Beaver 
Meadow" is from five to six miles long and 
from one-half to three-fourths of a mile wide 
and Sandy Lick Creek flows through the cen- 
ter of it. The land for a distance of five miles 
along Sandy Lick Creek, is almost level, there 
being only a fall of twenty-one feet in the five 
miles. The town has extended far beyond the 
width of the Meadow and occupies a large 
portion of the adjacent hills. 

The site of Du Bois was settled as early as 
181 2 by the Stoebers, who came from Dau- 
phin county, Pa., but there was no indication 
of a town being located there until the open- 
ing of the low grade division of the AUeghenv 
Valley Railroad in 1872, when John Rum- 
barger surveyed a plot of lots and called the 
same Rumbarger. About this time John Du 
Bois appeared upon the scene and proceeded 



to erect large saw-mills for the purpose of 
manufacturing into lumber the many thou- 
sands of acres of timber in the neighborhood, 
of which he was the owner. He also con- 
structed iron works and laid out a town plot 
on the opposite side of the creek from Rum- 
barger and called his town EHi Bois. The 
railroad station was also called Du Bois and 
in 1876 the name of the postoffice was changed 
to Du Bois. 

The borough was incorporated in 1881 and 
has grown very rapidly in population until it 
is now the largest town in the county, having 
a population of about 12,000, and being the 
center of the bituminous coal industry of that 
section of the county, and, also of the mines in 
Jefferson county that are tributary to Du Bois. 

The building of the Buffalo, Rochester & 
Pittsburg Railroad to Du Bois in 1883 and the 
opening up of the large coal operations in Jef- 
ferson county, belonging to Bell, Lewis and 
Gates, and now owned by the Rochester & 
Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company, furnished a 
large amount of business to the town and more 
than made up for the loss of business caused 
by the closing of the Du Bois saw mills on 
account of the exhaustion of the lumber sup- 
plv. This railroad was extended to Clearfield 
in 1893, thus giving the first railroad commu- 
nication with the county seat. 

The Buffalo & Susquehanna Railroad was 
constructed to Du Bois in the year 1904. 

The industries of the town consist of saw 
mills, large tannery, glass works, iron works, 
coal mines and many other smaller industrial 
plants. 

The town has ten churches, three daily 
newspapers, two national banks, one trust 
company, paved streets, electric lights, water 
supply and an electric street railway system. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



325 



The business part of the town was ahiiost 
totally destroyed by fire in the year 1889, but 
with characteristic pluck, the business men of 
the town rebuilt on a larger scale than before. 

Du Bois is the metropolis of the county. Its 
people are energetic and progressive, and the 
steady growth in population and prosperity are 
the results of their enterprise. 

BOROUGH OF GLEN HOPE 

The Borough of Glen Hope is situated near 
the northern end of Beccaria township, on 
Clearfield Creek. 

The borough was incorporated in the year 
of 1878, but the settlement known as Glen 
Hope had existed for many years before that 
time, having been one of the earliest improve- 
ments in that part of the county. The town 
is well located and it has substantial buildings. 

The borough has three churches, good pub- 
lic schools and the population at the present 
time is about four hundred. It has no manu- 
facturing industries, but is the centre of good 
farming country, and its business men are 
prosperous and progressive. 

For many years the town had no railroad 
facilities, but it is now reached by the Clear- 
field Southern Branch of the New York Cen- 
tral & Hudsoil River Railroad. 

BOROUGH OF GRAMPIAN 

The Borough of Grampian was originally 
known as "Pennville" and was incorporated 
December 6, 1885, but on account of the con- 
fusion arising by reason of the similarity of 
the name with that of Penfield, another town 
in the county, the name of the borough was 
changed to Grampian by a decree of the court, 
dated May 6, 1895. 

The town lies among what are known as the 



"Grampian Hills" five miles from Curwens- 
ville, and is the present terminus of the Tyrone 
& Clearfield Branch of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road. 

The town has three churches, a fine school- 
house and an electric light plant, and is a pros- 
perous and progressive community. There 
are several bituminous coal operations near 
the town, and also a large fire brick plant, lo- 
cated at Stronach, about two miles from 
Grampian. These industries give employment 
to a large number of men. 

Grampian has long been known for the at- 
tention that its inhabitants have given to edu- 
cational and literary affairs. 

The present population of the town is six 
hundred and sixty-six (666). 

HOUTZDALE BOROUGH 

The town was named in honor of Dr. Dan- 
iel Houtz, of Alexandria, Pa., so often named 
m this history as owning a vast number of 
acres of land in this vicinity, and upon a por- 
tion of whose lands the town was projected, 
and is situated on the Moshannon Branch 
Railroad, six miles from Osceola Mills. It 
was made a borough on the 20th day of 
March, 1872. The borough is surrounded 
with numerous smaller towns, which join up 
to her limits, so that a stranger cannot tell 
where the town begins or ends. For three 
miles along the railroad the traveler is contin- 
uously passing through towns and villages — 
Stirling on the east. West Houtzdale on the 
west, Loraine joining West Houtzdale further 
west, and Atlantic joining Loraine still fur- 
ther west, while Brisbin borough's south line 
is Houtzdale's north line. 

The town grew very rapidly from the be- 
ginning. The coal surrounding the borough 



326 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



was proven to be the best then, or now, known, 
and therefore capital rushed in to secure tlie 
prize. As the coUieries niuhipHed, the popu- 
lation increased and houses went up as if by 
magic. 

A postofifice was granted the borough in 
1870, John Brisbin being the first postmaster. 

The first church building erected was on the 
corner of Charles and Clara streets, a union 
church, but it afterwards passed into the hands 
of the Metho<list Episcopal society. 

At present Houtzdale depends altogether 
for its business on the mining industry. The 
timber is all cut in and around the town, there- 
fore the saw-mills are abandoned. The old 
mill on the eastern side of the borough, near 
the Eureka Xo. i colliery, and which was 
built by E. X. Conn & Co., in 186S, after- 
wards sold to Frank, Liveright & Co., and 
which cut the major portion of the timber on 
Dr. Houtz"s land, was destroyed by fire in the 
summer of 1876. The site of the mill pond 
is now covered by residences, the Presbyterian 
church, the railroad repot and business places. 

Houtzdale has seven churches, a national 
bank, paved streets, a fine water supply, elec- 
tric plant, a weekly newspaper, and although 
the hustling town of Madera is pushing it hard 
as the center of the coal industry of the county, 
Houtzdale still does a large business in con- 
nection with the various coal operations in the 
neighborhood. The people of the town are 
energetic, and progressive. The present pop- 
ulation is about fifteen hundred. 

BOROUGH OF IRVONA 

The Borough of Irvona is situated in Bec- 
caria township, about two miles from Coal- 
port. It is located on the eastern side of 
Clearfield Creek. 



The town was laid out by the Witmer Land 
& Coal Company and was named in honor of 
Col. E. A. Irvin, of Curwensville, Pa., who 
was largely interested in that company. 

The borough was incorporated September 
2, 1890. 

The town is reached by the Pennsylvania & 
Xorthwestern division of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, and by the Clearfield Southern 
Branch of the New York Central & Hudson 
River Railroad. 

The borough is well laid out, with wide 
streets and the buildings are modern and sub- 
stantial. It has three churches, good public 
schools, and it has a hustling and wide awake 
population. 

There are several large coal operations in 
the neighborhood of the town, and also a large 
tannery. Irvona is also the trading center for 
a considerable section of Clearfield and Cam- 
bria counties. 

The present population is about five hun- 
dred. 

BOROUGH OF LUMBER CITY 

Lumber City is a pleasantly situated bor- 
ough on the north side of the West Branch 
River. It contains a number of fine resi- 
dences of brick and frame material. On the 
south side of the river is a steep bluft', or moun- 
tain, several hundred feet high; but the l)eauty 
of its slope is somewhat marred by the cutting 
out of its best timber. On the north and to 
the east of the town is a gradual ascent lead- 
ing back to and approaching the famous Gram- 
pian Hills. Fine farms surround the borough 
on all sides, save the south. Agricultural pur- 
suits are the leading industry of the vicinity. 

Lumber City was the third borough to be 
incorporated in Clearfield county and it was 



te^v<^ # ' 


p.. 




1 

i 









AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



329 



erected out of part of Penn township. The 
court records of this incorporation are so in- 
complete that the date does not appear thereon, 
but the borough was incorporated in the year 
1858. During the kimbering days the town 
grew rapidly, and on acount of its location 
was an important point for' the raftsmen. 

Although comparatively small in point of 
population, Lumber City is large so far as re- 
lates to area. When the borough was laid out, 
the school district from which it was taken 
was divided, leaving a considerable area with- 
out any established school district. To rem- 
edy this the borough limits were extended so 
that it is now very large in area, and includes, 
in whole or in part, several fanns in the neigh- 
borhood. 

The borough has two churches, fine school 
buildings, and is on the Curwensville & Bower 
Branch of the New York Central & Hudson 
River Railroad, six miles up the river from 
Curwensville. 

The forward movement in education in the 
borough dates from May, 1873, when the Rev. 
J. C. Greer established the Academy. The first 
public school building in the borough was, 
however, erected prior to 1857, and the gram- 
mar school building built in 1879 and 1880. 
A new public school building has recently been 
erected and was dedicated November 30, 1910, 
when appropriate exercises were held in the 
Methodist Episcopal church. This is a thor- 
oughly modern, brick-cased building, 63 x ~2 
feet, single story, four rooms. It is steam 
heated, has ample halls and cloak rooms, and 
individual seatings, and is well lighted. The 
faculty consists of S. LeRoy Bossard, prin- 
cipal ; Bessie J. Lehman, grammar school ; 
Elizabeth Hile, primary school. 

The principal industry of Lumber City, in 



addition to farming, is a large fire brick plant. 
The population of the borough is about three 
hundred. 

BOROUGH OF MAHAFFEY 

The Borough of Mahafifey is situated on the 
West Branch of the Susquehanna River, near 
the mouth of Chest Creek. The town was 
named in honor of the late Robert Mahafi'ey, 
who was its founder, having located on the 
site of the town and made an improvement 
there in the year 1841. Mr. Mahaffey called 
the place "Franklin," and it was so designated 
for man}' years. 

Mahaffey was incorporated as a borough in 
the year 1889. It has four churches, fine pub- 
lic schools and its industries consist of a large 
taimery and a grist-mill. 

Mahaffey is a junction of the Pennsylvania 
& Northwestern division of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad with the Beech Creek division of the 
New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, 
both roads having branches leading to the dif- 
ferent coal operations in the neighborhood. 

Mahaffey is a prosperous and growing town 
and its people are wide awake and progressive 
The present population of the borough is about 
five hundred. 
/ 

BOROUGH OF NEWBURG 

The Borough of Newburg is situated in the 
northern end of Chest township and is one of 
the oldest towns in the county. The town is 
located on the banks of Chest Creek and on the 
line of the Pennsylvania & Northwestern 
Railroad, and also on the line of the Clearfield 
& Cambria Branch of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road. 

The village was first called Hurd postoffice, 
after Henry Hurd, Esq., one of the oldest citi- 



330 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



zens of the locality, who erected the first 
dwelling on the site of the present town of 
Xewburg. 

After the construction of the Pennsj'lvania 
& Northwestern Railroad in 1887, the town 
grew ver}' rapidly and became quite a centre 
of business for that section of the county. 

The town was incorporated as a borough in 
1885. The name of the postoffice was changed 
from Hurd to La Jose in honor of George 
Jose, Esq., who is one of the prominent citi- 
zens. 

Near the town are several coal operations 
that materially assist its business prosperity. 
The population of the borough at the present 
time is about three hundred. 

It has good churches, good public schools, 
and the people are enterprising and progres- 
sive. 

BOROUGH OF NEW WASHINGTON 

The Borough of New Washington was in- 
corporated in the year 1859, and is situated 
on Chest Creek, one and one-half miles from 
La Jose. 

In 1835 the Methodist Protestants built the 
first church known as the "Mount Zion;" this 
church was built out of hewed logs, and about 
two years later the Methodist Episcopal de- 
nomination built a hewed log church near the 
location of their present building. Both of 
these old log churches have geen succeeded by 
handsome new buildings. 

In the New Washington cemetery are the 
graves of John Ludwig Snyder and his wife, 
Anna Maria, believed to have been the oldest 
people who ever lived in Clearfield county. 
John Ludwig Snyder was born in Ludwig. 
Germany, March, 1746, and died in Novem- 
ber, i860, at the remarkable age of one hun- 



dred and fourteen years, and his wife, Anna 
Maria, was bom in Philadelphia, in May, 
1752, and died in August, 1857, aged over 
one hundred and five years. 

In the lumbering days of Clearfield county. 
New Washington was an important point and 
a large business was transacted there, but it is 
now principally dependent upon the surround- 
ing farms for business. On account of its 
high altitude, a number of people from other 
places are in the habit of spending the sum- 
mer months in this town. The present popu- 
lation is about four hundred. 

BOROUGH OF OSCEOLA MILLS 

Osceola Mills was laid out in 1857 and was 
incorporated as a borough in 1864. It is lo- 
cated on the banks of the Moshannon Creek, 
four miles south of Philipsburg, and six miles 
east of Houtzdale. The town faces towards 
the south and is at the foot of the heavy moun- 
tain grade on the Tyrone & Clearfield Rail- 
road. It is the junction of the Moshannon 
Branch Railroad with the Tyrone & Clearfield 
Railroad. The Tyrone & Clearfield Railroad 
was extended to the town in 1863, but was not 
opened for business until January i, 1864. The 
railroad station of the Tyrone & Clearfield 
Railroad is in Centre county, the Moshannon 
Creek being the line between the counties of 
Centre and Clearfield. 

On May 20, 1875, the town was almost 
wholly destroyed by fire. One and one-half 
million dollars worth of property was burned 
up and nearly all of the inhabitants were ren- 
dered homeless. With the aid of contributions 
by other communities and their own energ}', 
the people of Osceola Mills soon recovered 
from the effects of this conflagration and on 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



331 



the ruins left by the fire there sprang a new- 
town more Ijeautiful than the old one. 

The town has five churches, a weekly news- 
paper, a national bank, paved streets and elec- 
tric lights. The industries consist of two foun- 
dries and machine shops, planing-mills and 
many other smaller industries. There are 
about fifteen coal operations in the vicinity of 
Osceola ^lills and on account of its situation 
at the junction of the Moshannon Branch with 
the main line of the Tyrone & Clearfield Rail- 
road a large railroad yard is located near the 
town, giving employment to many of the in- 
habitants of the place. 

The Altoona & Philipsburg Connecting 
Railroad also passes through the town and 
connects at Philipsburg with the Beech Creek 
Railroad. 

Osceola Mills is a thriving and progressive 
town and has a population of about two thou- 
sand. 

BOROUGH OF R.\MEY 

The Borough of Ramey is situated in the 
northern part of Gulich township and is 
reached by the Moshannon Branch of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, and also by the Phil- 
ipsburg Railroad. 

The borough was incorporated in the year 
1878. D. K. Ramey & Company of Altoona, 
who were the owners of a large amount of tim- 
ber land in the neighborhood, erected a large 
mill at this place for the purpose of sawing 
their lumber, and the town rapidly increased 
in population and business. After the timber 
was cut away, a number of coal operations 
were started in the neighborhood and upon 
these the town is largely dependent for its 
present business. 

Ramey has four churches, good public 



schools, a fine water supply and is a thriving 
place. A few years ago the town suffered a 
disastrous fire, which wiped out many of its 
best buildings, but better structures have been 
erected in their places, and Ramey is now one 
of the most progressive towns in the county. 
Its present population is about five hundred. 

BOROaGH OF TROUTVILLE 

Trout ville was laid out as a town in 1854. 
It was named after Jacob Troutwein. It is 
situated in Brady township in the northwest 
corner of the county. It was incorporated as 
a borough in 1890. Jacob Troutwein, after 
whom the town was named, had located there 
and built a building used as a hotel about the 
year 1845. -"^s a sign for this hotel, he had a 
large painting of a trout and many people 
called the place "Fish-Town" and it is com- 
monly supposed that the town was named on 
account of this sign, but as stated above this 
is an error. 

The land on which the town is located is 
nearly two thousand feet above the sea level 
and the surface gently slopes to the westward. 
There are many fine farms in the neighbor- 
hood and large coal operations have been 
opened up a few miles from the town. 

Troutville has two churches and good pub- 
lic schools. It is principally dependent upon 
the mining and agricultural interests, as it has 
no manufacturing industries. The present 
population of the borough is about two hun- 
dred. 

BOROUGH OF WALL.^CETON 

The Borough of Wallaceton is situated in 
the northeast corner of Boggs township and 
contains about four hundred and twenty-six 
square acres of land. It was incorporated as 



332 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTV 



a borough in 1873. The town is located on 
an elevated plateau about fifteen hundred feet 
above the sea level. The land on either side 
is rolling, giving the town good drainage. 

It is on the line of the Tyrone & Clearfield 
Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and 
also on the line of the Beech Creek division 
of the New ^'ork Central Railroad. 

The town has three churches and the prin- 
cipal industry is the large brick manufactur- 
ing plant of the Wallaceton Fire Brick Com- 
pany now owned by the Harbison-Walker Re- 
fractories Company. 

The town was named in iiunor of the late 
Senator Wm. A. Wallace of Clearfield, Pa., 
and has a population of about five hundred. 

Although the people of Wallaceton, as a 
general rule, are law abiding citizens, the little 
borough has the unfortunate distinction of 
having been the scene of three homicides, 
which gave the town a rather uncnvialile no- 
toriety. The first of these was the killing of 
Maria Waple, Xovember 3. 1876. Martin V. 
Turner, who was accused of this murder, was 
arrested and after a hotly contested trial, was 
convicted in the courts of murder in the first 
degree, but a new trial was granted by the Su- 
preme Court and the place of trial was 
changed to Lock Haven, in Clinton county. 



On the second trial, Turner was acquitted. 
The second was the death of Ida Douglas, July 
I, 1882. For this crime the perpetrator was 
arrested, tried, convicted and sentenced to five 
years in the penitentiary. The third tragedy 
was the murder of Ella Davis, who was shot 
by James McClain on August 6, 1886, the 
murderer immediately killed himself in the 
presence of the victim of his crime. 

BOROUGH OF WESTOVER 

Tile borough of Westover was incorporated 
September 6, 1895. 

The town is situated in Chest township, in 
the southern part of the county; it is reached 
by the Cambria and Clearfield division of the 
I'ennsylvania Railroad, and also by trains of 
the New York Central and Hudson River 
Railroad, which use the same tracks as the 
Pennsylvania. 

The principal industry of Westover is the 
large tannery of the William F. Mosser Com- 
pany. 

The town has two churches, a fine school- 
house and has a large trade from the sur- 
rounding territory. 

The present population is five hundred and 
sixty-nine (569). 



CHAPTER XXV 



STATISTICS 



Increase in Population Shown by Census Returns by Tow>iships — Wealth of the Coimty- 
Siiiiunary of Assessments for ipio. 



POPULATION 

The population of Clearfield county has in- 
creased rapidly since the opening up of its nat- 
ural resources, in the way of coal, fire clay and 
other products. The population of the county 
has increased from 875 as shown by the cen- 
sus of 1810, the first census after the county 
was organized, to 93,766. according to the 
census of 1910. 

\\'e give below the detail census returns for 
1910, and 1900, showing the difference in pop- 
ulation of the \arious townships and boroughs, 
according to the census returns. ""■ 



District 1910 

Beccaria township 3-095 

Bell township 1,682 

Bigler township 4-013 

Bloom township 451 

Boggs township 1.154 

Bradford township 2,250 

Brady township 2,823 

Brisbin borough 459 

Burnside borough 493 

Bumside township i>4.35 

Chest township 872 

Chester Hill borough 648 

Clearfield borough 6.851 



1900 
2,924 

1.583 

2.675 

570 

1,024 

2.075 

2,638 

666 

647 

1.695 

1,022 

710 

5,081 



Coalport borough 876 938 

Cooper township 5,713 4,629 

Covington township 649 695 

Curwensville borough 2,549 i,937 

Decatur township 3,5^2 3,810 

DuBois borough 12.623 9,375 

Ferguson township 765 914 

Girard township 606 570 

Glen Hope borough 237 220 

Goshen township 514 501 

Graham township 664 626 

Grampian borough 666 600 

Greenwood township 590 806 

Gulich township 2,112 1,071 

Houtzdale borough i,434 1,482 

Huston township 2,653 ^'974 

Irvona borough 800 J2^ 

Jordan township 1,261 1,284 

Karthaus township i,332 1,066 

Knox township 1,064 864 

Lawrence township 4,025 3.370 

Lumber City borough 363 224 

Mahaffey borough 754 741 

Morris township 4.994 4,460 

New Washington borough ... 174 213 

Newburg borough 274 314 

Osceola borough 2,437 2,030 

Penn township 936 840 



333 



334 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Pike township 1,671 

Pine township 32 

Ramey borougli i ,045 

Sandy township 5-695 

Troutville borougli 260 

Union township 785 

Wallaceton borough 324 

Westover borough 569 

\Voodward township 2.535 



i'575 
866 

■3^222 

308 

944 
289 

654 
3-169 



Total 93.768 80,614 

WEALTH OF THE COUNTY 

The statistics given below give but a very 
imperfect idea of the real wealth of the county, 
because the assessments for taxation do not 
average over two-thirds of the actual value of 
the property. They are, however, the most re- 
liable data that we can secure, as they are taken 
from the official figures of the Triennial As- 
sessment of Clearfield county for the year 
19 ID. The total amount of the valuation of 



all property in the county as shown by these 
figures is $26,836,604.75, adding one-third, so 
as to approximate the real value of the prop- 
erty, would give us a total value of $35,782,- 
139.66. The figures in detail are as follows: 

SUMMARY OF THE TRIENNIAL ASSESSMENT OF 
CLEARFIELD COUNTY FOR THE YEAR I9IO 

Number of registered voters. . 20,835 

Value of all real estate $20,557,520.00 

Value of all real estate exempt $2,464,776.00 
Value of all real estate taxable $18,092,744.00 
Number horses and mules.... 7.146 

Value horses and mules $328,445.00 

Number cattle 7-861 

Value cattle $1 19,655.00 

Occupations 2,095,109.00 

Agg. value of all property tax- 
able for county purposes. . .$20,635,953.00 
Total value personal property 
assessed for State purposes. 
Money at Interest, Livery 
Rigs, etc $3,735-87575 




HON. wii.i.iA.M i;i(;i.i:k 



Representative Citizens 



HON. WILLIAM BIGLER, deceased, 
who served the Commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania as its chief executive from 185 1 until 
1855, later represented his people with dis- 
tinction in the United States Senate, and for 
years responded to the call of public duty, 
often to the detriment of his private interests, 
which, from early manhood, were important to 
himself and to those associated with him. His 
useful life covered the most important years 
of his country's history and his name is indis- 
solubly connected with its making. Where his 
fellow citizens at times questioned his judg- 
ment but never his integrity, the present day 
conditions have vindicated many of liis 
thwarted plans and shown his wisdom. 

William Bigler came of sturdy Pennsyl- 
vania German stock. His parents were Jacob 
and Susan (Dock) Bigler, types of a class of 
honest, hard-working people, whose mental 
outlook is apt to be limited and whose ambi- 
tions are negligible. One of a large family, 
William Bigler was born January 13, 1813, at 
Shennansburg, Cumberland county. Pa., prior 
to the removal of the family to a pioneer farm 
in Mercer county. The father died there while 
the children were young. The home farm 
was small and the eldest son soon pushed out 
into the world beyond, and in 1829 he was 



ready to offer employment to his young 
brother William, in his printing office at 
Bellefonte. His name was John Bigler and at 
that time he was proprietor of the Center Dem- 
ocrat and later attained to gubernatorial hon- 
ors in California, and left an impress on that 
state no less indelible than did the younger 
brother on Pennsylvania. 

\\'illiam Bigler was mainly educated in the 
printing office, his advantages prior to 1829 
having been exceedingly limited. He re- 
mained with his brother until his apprentice- 
ship was completed and then, with characteris- 
tic determination, although practically with- 
out funds and at that time with absolutely no 
influential friends, went to Clearfield and 
there founded the Cleai-field Democrat. He 
was thus entirely dependent upon the ability 
with which he could interest an unknown con- 
stituency in his efforts to advance the princi- 
ples of Jacksonian Democracy. At first he 
was his own complete office force and his ini- 
tial efforts would have been more or less 
amusing had they not been tragic. However, 
it was this spirit of persistency and enterprise 
that first attracted the public, which later read, 
admired and bestowed confidence and what 
was then necessary, gave substantial support 
to the venture. This newspaper introduced 



337 



338 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



liini into public affairs and his manner of 
handling the grave questions of the day edito- 
rially aroused the political leaders and hence- 
forward until his final retirement, he was more 
or less in the public eye. 

Athough in 1^36, Mr. Bigler disposed of 
his newspaper in order to give his full atten- 
tion to large lumbering interests with wiiich 
he became connected in association with his 
father-in-law, A. B. Reed, he was not per- 
mitted to withdraw from public attention and 
he was more than once oflfered the nomination 
for the state legislature. Although he con- 
sistently declined these marks of public ap- 
proval for a time, in 1841 he accepted the 
nomination to the State Senate and was 
elected by a very large majority, and in 1844 
was re-elected and served two terms and was 
twice elected speaker. This period was one of 
great moment to the State of Pennsylvania 
and the speeches and efforts made by Senator 
Bigler for the passage of a law of taxation to 
meet the public indebtedness and pay the in- 
terest on the state debt, also for the procuring 
of the passage of a law for abolishing impris- 
onment for debt, and also for the passage of 
the laws regulating questions of internal im- 
provement, all testified to the public spirit, 
ability, arfd true conception of public duty, that 
marked him as a statesman and a sincere 
friend of the people. 

In 1848 Senator Bigler's name was pre- 
sented to the Democratic convention as a can- 
didate for governor, but internal conflicts of 
personal interests resulted in llie election of 
another candidate. In 1849 he was appointed 
revenue commissioner, and in 185 1 he was 
nominated by his party for governor, by ac- 
clamation, and was triumphantly elected, and 
this honor came to him before he had reached 



liis thirty-eighth year. It is an interesting epi- 
sode to record that his election as governor of 
Pennsylvania was simultaneous with the elec- 
tion of his brother, John Bigler, to the same 
high office in California. 

Governor Bigler's administration was just 
such as the acts of his public life had indicated 
prior to this. He believed in and advocated 
the old-time virtues of economy, efficiency, in- 
dustry and integrity in dealing with public af- 
fairs as with private interests and he had the 
support of all the people with the exception 
of a class that existed then as now, which 
sought special privileges and had counted on 
the executive granting them, and found out 
their mistake in their estimate of his charac- 
ter. The annals of the state tell how faith- 
fully and fearlessly he faced these private in- 
terests and how conscientiously and courage- 
ously he carried out the laws according to the 
constitution. In March, 1854, he was again 
unanimously nominated for goveronr, but the 
strain of public cares had told on him and he 
made no personal canvass and in the contest 
was defeated by the Know Nothing party. In 
January. 1855. he was elected to the United 
States Senate, where he served with great 
credit to himself and his state for six years, 
and it was during this period, in 1857, that, as 
a member of the committee on commerce, he 
made an elaborate report concerning the con- 
struction of a ship canal across the Isthmus of 
Panama, a scheme considered then by the 
country at large as dangerous and entirely 
\'isionary. In that, as in many other pul)lic 
projects. Senator Bigler was a man ahead of 
his times. In i860 he was a member of the 
Democratic convention that assembled at 
Charleston, where he opposed the nomination 
of Judge Douglas, and he was temporary 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



339 



chainnan of the convention at Chicago, in 
1864, which nominated George B. McClellan. 
In 1868 he was a delegate to the National 
Democratic Convention in New York, which 
nominated Horatio Seymour. In 1872, he 
was nominated a delegate-at-large to the con- 
vention for the revision of the constitution, 
but later lie voluntarily withdrew his name, 
but subsequently, for political reasons con- 
sented to fill the vacancy caused by the resig- 
nation of S. H. Raynolds, and took a leading 
part in the deliberations of that body. He 
was associated closely with party affairs of 
large importance up to 1875, after which he 
withdrew more or less in order to give his at- 
tention to local matters beneficial to his county 
and to his individual interests. 

On March 23, 1836, William Bigler was 
married to Maria J. Reed, who was born in 
Clearfield county. Pa., a lady well qualified to 
both advance his public prestige and to adorn 
his home and rear a happy family. Of their 
children but one survives, a son, Harry F. 
Bigler, who is president of the Clearfield 
Steam Company and a director in the Center 
County National Bank. 

Distinguished as were his public services, 
William Bigler's memory is tenderly pre- 
served by those who knew him best for the 
personal qualities which added to their pride 
in him and also made him generally beloved. 
His death occurred at his home on August 9, 
1880. 

A. B. SHAW, vice president of the 
County National Bank and one of its board 
of directors, is a member of one of Clear- 
field County's old and honorable families. 
He was born in Clearfield County, Pa., No- 
vember 12, 1830, and is a son of Richard 
and Mary (Irwin) Shaw. 



Richard Shaw was long a prominent citi- 
zen of Lawrence Township. Clearfield 
County, serving with honor in a number of 
public capacities, at times being a justice of 
the peace, and also associate judge. He was 
a native of Ireland, born in County Derry 
in 1792, one of seven children, and his par- 
ents were Archibald and Mary Shaw. Rich- 
ard Shaw was young when his parents emi- 
grated to America, settling first in Chester 
County, Pa., moving later to Mifflin County 
and in 1810, to Clearfield County. In 1816, 
Richard Shaw was married to Mary Irwin, 
a native of Philadelphia, and eight of their 
children reached maturity. The mother 
died in 1874 and the father in 1876. 

A. B. Shaw was reared in his native 
county and was educated in the district 
schools and the Clearfield Academy. He 
secured a business training under his fath- 
er's eye, becoming a clerk in the latter's 
store and later becoming also interested as 
was his father, in lumbering. In 1853 he 
opened up a general lumber and mercantile 
business at Shawville, which he continued 
for twenty-two years, returning to Clear- 
field in 1875. He became interested also in 
the coal industry to some extent and owns 
probably 1,000 acres of rich coal land in 
Clearfield and Cambria Counties. At dif- 
ferent times he has accepted stock and 
served on directing boards of successful 
commercial enterprises, his name, at all 
times, being a business asset. In 1882, he 
was elected vice president of the County 
National Bank of Clearfield, a financial in- 
stitution then of seventeen years standing 
and he has continued his association with 
it up to the present. 

Mr. Shaw was married in 1859, to Miss 
Agnes Aurand, who was born in Snyder 



340 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUXTY 



County, Pa., and eleven children were born 
to them, namely: Clara \V., Bertiia A.. Mary 
Jane, Edgar, Fannie G., Calvin B., Agnes 
E., Annie, Charles M., Mattie V. and Gussie 
E., who died in infancy. Mr. Shaw and 
family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In politics he is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

CLARK HILEMAN, one of the sub- 
stantia! business men of Madera, Pa., who 
is largely interested in the lunil^er industry 
in Clearfield County, was born in Indiana 
County, Pa., September 17, 1856, and is a 
son of William and Elizabeth (RufFner) 
Hiieman. 

William Hiieman was a son of John and 
Elizabeth Hiieman. His business interests 
throughout life were connected with lum- 
bering. He married Elizabeth Ruffner, a 
daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Ruffner, 
and the following children were born to 
them: Lorenza, who married Oliver Lewis; 
Ellen, who married Benjamin Tonkin; 
Joseph S., who is deceased ; Jane, who is the 
vfiie of Robert Smith; Clark; James S. ; 
Charlotte, who is deceased, was the wife of 
James Kethcarth ; William S. ; A. C. ; Scott ; 
Isabel, who is the wife of Russell Eaton ; 
and Liberty, who is the wife of William 
Ruther. 

Clark Hiieman obtained his education in 
the district schools which he attended 
through the winter sessions until he was 
eighteen 3'^ears of age, after which he went 
to lumbering and worked in the woods un- 
til 1887. He then embarked in the hotel 
business at Madera in which he continued 
for twenty-one and one-half years, dispos- 
ing of his interests in that line in August, 



1908. Since then he was given the main 
part of his attention to the lumber indus- 
try, owning a saw mill and lumber yards, 
and he also owns other property at Madera 
and additionally is a stockholder in the Ma- 
dera Water Works and a director of the 
Madera National Bank. 

On December 18, 1890, Mr. Hiieman was 
married to Miss Minerva Grove, a daughter 
of Benjamin and Hannah (Johnston) Grove, 
and a granddaughter of Andrew and Re- 
becca Grove and of William and Rebecca 
Johnston. The parents of Mrs. Hiieman 
are residents of Huntingdon County. They 
are members of the Lutheran church. Mrs. 
Hiieman is the fourth born child of her par- 
ents, the others being: Martha, who is the 
wife of James McElroy; Mary Alice, who is 
the wife of Jacob Smith; Elmira, who is the 
wife of Jeremiah Kyles ; Laura, who is the 
wife of Samuel Smith ; Maggie, who is the 
wife of William Blythe ; Martin Luther ; 
Ida, who is the wife of Harry Green ; An- 
drew Harvey; Dora E., who is the wife of 
Clarence Snare; Bessie Rebecca, who is the 
wife of Bert McCall ; Minnie, who is the 
widow of David Blythe ; Lydia. who is the 
wife of John Worth ; Henry Ellsworth, and 
\\'illiam Oscar. Mr. and Mrs. Hiieman 
have no children of their own hut they 
reared a little girl. Bertha May, born May 
8, 1891, from infancy to young womanhood, 
and she is now the wife of Albert Rung. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rung have one son, Harold 
Albert, who was born Feliruary 14, 1910. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hiieman attend the Presby- 
terian church. In politics he is a Republi- 
can, as was his father, and for four years 
he served in the office of township super- 
visor. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



341 



ELISHA M. DAVIS, dairyman and 
farmer, residing one and one-half miles 
southwest of Grampian, Clearfield County, 
owns 173 acres of finely cultivated land, ly- 
ing in Penn Township. He was born on an 
adjoining farm, in Penn Township, May 
26, 1838, and is a son of Joseph Davis, a 
grandson of Elislia Davis and a great- 
grandson of Caleb Davis. 

Joseph Davis, father of Elisha M., was 
born at Tyrone, Pa., January 6, 1790, a son 
of Elisha and Alice Davis, natives of Wales, 
who emigrated to America and settled at 
Tyrone. Joseph Davis was married Octo- 
ber 16, 1823, to Rebecca Moore, who was 
born December 5. 1798. a daughter of James 
and Lydia Moore. To Joseph and Rebecca 
Davis the following children were born : 
Lydia, June 13, 1824; Rachel, October 29, 
1825; Esther, June 30, 1826 (died July 16, 
1866); John, July 26, 1829; Eliza, Novem- 
ber 28, 1830 (died May 22, iSyy) ; James, 
October 6, 1832; Hannah, September 27, 
1834; Joseph, June 9, 1836; Elisha, May 26, 
1838; and Abraham, born September 10, 
1840 (died of fever while serving in the 
Civil War, October i, 1862, — the youngest 
of ten children). 

After marriage Joseph Davis, Sr., settled 
on a tract of 150 acres of wild land in Penn 
Township, Clearfield County, eighty acres 
of which he cleared. This farm is now the 
property of William Pentz. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis were members of the Society of 
Friends. Joseph Davis was never embroiled 
in politics, living a quiet, industrious, use- 
ful life and passing away May 12, 1868, at 
the age of seventy-eight years with the re- 
spect and esteem of all who had known him. 
His estimable wife survived but a few years, 



her death occurring February 23, 1871. 
They were buried in the Friends' cemetery 
near Grampian. 

Elisha M. Davis attended school in Penn 
Township until he was about eighteen years 
of age and then went to work as a teamster 
in the lumber regions in Penn Township. 
He continued thus engaged more or less 
for 20 years before and after his marriage, 
in 1861, when he settled on the home farm 
for a time and then purchased his present 
one of Thos. Hoover. He has 100 acres of 
his land cleared and under a fine state of 
cultivation, being one of the most progres- 
sive and one of the successful farmers in 
this section of the county. Mr. Davis also 
operates a dairy and keeps first class stock. 
He has made many improvements on his 
farm and these include the erection of all 
the substantial buildings now standing, and 
the arrangement of his attractive surround- 
ings. He is a stockholder and charter mem- 
ber of the Farmers and Traders Bank of 
Clearfield, Pa. 

On September 12, 1861, Mr. Davis was 
married to Katherine Hoover, who was 
born near Curwensville on the West Branch 
of the Susquehanna River, January 13, 1840, 
a daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Price) 
Hoover, her parents coming from old pio- 
neer families of this section. It is said that 
Grandfather Price was killed by the Indians. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Davis nine children were 
born, namely: William E., Elias C, Rebecca 
Ellen, Lydia Jane, Nathan Tliomas, Alice, 
Myrtle May, Vincent Pearl and Elisha 
Claire. William E. Davis was born lune 
14, 1862, and resides in Brady Township. 
He was married April 24, 1884, to Susanna 
Rishell and ihev have had six children : 



342 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Vida Hoyt, Oral, Salome, Katherine. Mar- 
garet and Leo, the last named dying at 
the age of eleven months. Elias C. Davis 
was born September ii, 1863. He was 
married October 22, 1890, to Edith Wag- 
oner, a daughter of Edw. Wagoner, of 
Ramey, Pa., and they have two children, 
Alton C. and Elisha W. Rebecca Ellen 
Davis was born November 10, 1864, and 
was married June 14, 1888, to George M. 
Rishell and they had the following children: 
O. Clifford, Hilda C, Frances Esther, Elisha 
B., Frederick, Corlus Arden, Joseph D. and 
Lydia Jane. The oldest and youngest are 
deceased and the mother of these children 
died July 26, 1906, and was buried at Trout- 
ville, Pa. Lydia Jane Davis was born 
October 11, 1867, and was married October 
3, 1887, to E. B. Albert. They reside near 
Woodland, Pa., and have one son, Edwin B. 
Nathan T. Davis was born August 12, 1869; 
was married June 25, 1896, to Mamie Cur- 
rier and has two children, Twilla Elizabeth 
and Elma Katherine. Alice Davis was born 
February i, 1871, and died March 26, 1873. 
Myrtle May Davis was born May i. 1874, 
and was married September 16, 1894, to 
R. P. Kester. a lecturer for the department 
of State Institutes of Pennsylvania. They 
have two children, Elisha Howard and 
Latricia Mott. Vincent Pearl Davis was 
born May 4, 1878, and was married June 16, 
1909, to Vadna Violet Warden, who was 
born October 8, 1888, a daughter of Clar- 
ence and Lottie Warden, of Johnstown, Pa., 
and they have one son, Edward Laverne. 
Elisha Claire Davis was born April 22, 1881, 
and was married July 26, 1905, to Gertrude 
May Slick, of Richmond, Ind. They have 
two children: Francis Everett and Alton 



Kenneth. Mr. Davis is a clerk in the 
County National Bank. 

For many years Elisha M. Davis has been 
prominent in the Grange movement, has 
assisted in the organization of a number of 
local granges and served two terms in the 
State Department of Agriculture of Penn- 
sylvania. He has also served as president 
of the Clearfield County Agricultural 
Society. He and his wife are members of 
the Society of Friends and he is superin- 
tendent of the sabbath school at Grampian. 

JERRY HEGARTY, of Bigler Town- 
ship, Clearfield County, Pa., a one-half 
owner of 250 acres of fine farm land, was 
born in Bigler Township, on the home farm, 
in July, 1846, and is a son of James and 
Jane (Boyle) Hegarty. The parents were 
natives of Ireland and came to Clearfield 
County when young married people and 
spent their lives here. 

Jerry Hegarty was the fifth born in his 
parents" family and with .his brothers and 
sisters attended the district school through 
boyhood. He has followed farming and 
lumbering during the greatest part of his 
life and there is a coal mine on the farm, of 
which he is half owner. In 1878 Mr. 
Hegarty was married to Miss Mary White- 
side, who is the youngest daughter of 
Robert and Nancy (Alexander) Whiteside. 
He was born in Ireland and she in Clear- 
field County and both were well known 
people. They had si.x sons and two daugh- 
ters : John D., William A., Isaac, Samuel, 
Robert, Boaz. Agnes and Mary. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hegarty have had five children: Vida, 
Vincent, Blaine. Dora and Verna. The 
eldest daughter died at the age of twenty- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



343 



one years. Mr. Hegarty and wife attend 
the Presbyterian Church. He votes with 
the Republican party. He is one of the 
representative men of Bigler Township and 
commands the respect of his fellow citizens, 
having always carried on his undertakings 
according to sound business principles with 
due regard to the rights of others. 

MICHAEL HURD, M. D.. a leading 
physician and surgeon at MahafTey, Pa., 
well known professionally over a wide ter- 
ritory in Clearfield County, was born in this 
county, at La Jose, in Chester Township, 
and is a son of Henry and Catherine Hurd. 

Henry Hurd, father of Dr. Hurd, was 
born in Vermont, and was a son of Elias 
Hurd. In 1842, Henry Hurd came to Clear- 
field County, where he taught school, after 
which he purchased a farm in Chester 
Township and engaged in farming and 
lumbering. They are both living on the 
homestead in Chester Township. 

Michael Hurd attended the Chester 
Township schools and those of La Jose, 
later spent three years as a student in the 
graded schools at New Washington and 
two years in the Curwensville Normal 
School. In 1879 he entered Jefferson Med- 
ical College, Philadelphia, and was gradu- 
ated there in 1883. Dr. Hurd located first 
at Newburg, not far from his birthplace, 
and continued to practice there until May, 
1909, when he moved to Mahafifey, where 
he has built up a very large practice and has 
been welcomed as a citizen of enterprise 
and worth. 

In 1878, Dr. Hurd was married to Miss 
Orie E. Curry, who is a daughter of Austin 
Curry, a well known farmer and lumber- 



man of Chest Township. Dr. and Mrs. 
Hurd have had nine children born to them, 
several of whom died when aged about 
three years. The survivors are: NelHe, 
who is the wife of Frank Markle, of Ma- 
haffey ; Lena, who is the wife of James 
Cardell, of \\'estover. Pa. (they have three 
children — Vernon, Paul and Clilfton) ; 
Vella, who is a popular and successful 
teacher in the graded schools at Mahafifey, 
being a graduate of the Lock Haven 
Normal School; and Denay, Curry, and 
Gard. Those deceased were Austin, Sue 
and Zoe. Dr. Hurd is a member of various 
medical organizations and belongs also to 
the P. O. S. A. at Newburg. 

J. E. GEARHART, a progressive, enter- 
prising and representative business man of 
Clearfield, Pa., manager of the Gearhart 
Knitting Machine Company and of the Key- 
stone Vacuum Cleaner, is a member of one 
of the old settled families of the county. 

His great grandfather, John Gearhart, 
emigrated from Germany about the middle 
of the seventeenth century. He served as 
a soldier in the Revolutionary war, after- 
ward settled at Buffalo Run, Centre Co., 
Pa. He married Miss Catharine Gray, who 
lived to the age of 97 years. To John and 
Catharine were born ten children, whose 
names were as follows, — Jacob, John, 
Adam, Christ, Elias, Peter, Susanna, Eve, 
Betsey and Catharine. These have all died 
long ago. 

John Gearhart, the second in order and 
grandfather of J. E. Gearhart, was born in 
1789. He married Miss Lydia Shivery. He 
served in the War of 1812 and was there 
when his eldest son David was born. He 



344 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



moved to Clearfield County in 1820. He 
died in 1871 having lived to the age of 82, 
and his wife Lydia died at the age of 90 
within a few days. To John and Lydia 
Gearhart were born eleven children, one 
dying in infancy, the other ten living to a 
ripe age, whose names were as follows, — 
David, Sarah, Catharine, who is yet living 
at the advanced age of 95, John S. the father 
of J. E. Gearhart, Susanna, Andrew, Jane, 
Enoch, Hannah, and Jacob, who is yet 
living. 

John S. Gearhart was born April 20th, 
1818, on his father's farm near Philipsburg, 
Clearfield Co. He also was an agriculturist 
and spent the greater part of his life on his 
farm situated in Boggs Township, two miles 
northwest of Blue Ball, in Clearfield 
County, where his death occurred Mar. 26, 
1903, at the age of eighty-four years. He 
was twice married, first to Lydia Showalter, 
whose death occurred July 3, 1850, when 
their youngest son, J. E. Gearhart, was 
fifteen months old. J. E. Gearhart was 
born April 22, 1849. There were three 
other children born to this union, namely: 
William, who was a gallant soldier in the 
Civil War, a member of Co. E. 45th Pa. 
Vol. Inf., and who died of starvation in the 
Confederate prison at Salisbury, N. C, 
December 10, i8()4; Ellis, who died at the 
age of twenty-one years ; and Lloyd, who 
is a resident of Clearfield. The second 
marriage of John S. Gearhart was to Eliz- 
abeth Smith, whose death preceded that of 
her husband by four years, she dying Feb. 
14, 1898. Eight children were born to this 
marriage, namely: George S., who lives in 
Clearfield; John W., who owns the home 
farm in Boggs Township; A. Clark. 



who lives in Blair County; Samuel, whose 
business is carried on at Clearfield; Lydia 
J., who is the wife of Charles Rickets, of 
Altoona; James, who is a resident of Brad- 
dock, Pa. ; Charles, who died when seven- 
teen years old; and Lewis, who lives at 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Joseph Emery Gearhart grew to man- 
hood on the home farm and obtained his 
education in the country schools. After he 
reached manhood he went to work for the 
lumber firm of Hoover, Hughes & Co., at 
Bellefonte, Pa., with operations near Phil- 
ipsburg, and remained with them for nine 
years, and during that time shipped the 
most of the lumber that was used in the 
erection of the buildings for the great Cen- 
tennial Exposition. From youth Mr. Gear- 
hart has been more or less interested in 
mechanics and has invented many devices 
and utensils of practical use, some of which 
having been patented, are now manufact- 
ured in large numbers. He worked on a 
knitting machine until he perfected every 
part of it and received a patent and in 1889 
opened a small shop at Blue Ball for its 
manufacture. The machine was so well re- 
ceived that by 1890 the business had out- 
grown his quarters at Blue Ball and he then 
moved to Clearfield and erected his present 
plant on Nichols Street, and also a factory 
in Canada. Under the name of the Gear- 
hart Family Knitter, with ribbing attach- 
ment which produces seamless hosiery, Mr. 
Gearhart's invention is sold in all countries 
and with its attachments has been patented 
in the L'nited States and in thirteen foreign 
countries. In connection with knitting ma- 
chines, Mr. Gearhart manufactures and has 
on the market, The Kevstone Vacuum 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



345 



Cleaner, and this invention promises to 
equal his others in popularity. Mr. Gear- 
hart is a natural mechanic but he attributes 
a measure of his success to the instruction 
he received from his father-in-law, the late 
John Middleton, who was an expert ma- 
chinist and gunsmith as his father before 
him had been, the latter manufacturing 
guns during the Revolutionary War for the 
Patriot army. 

Mr. Gearhart was married July 6, 1871, to 
Miss Mary E. Middleton, a daughter of 
John Middleton, who came to Clearfield 
from Cambria County. Eight children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Gearhart, 
namely: Sophia, who is the wife of James 
Gleason, a leading member of the Clearfield 
bar, residing at Du Bois, and they have one 
son, James Joseph; Leonard A.; Ada B., 
who married Dr. George R. Irwin, of Clear- 
field and they have four children — Robert, 
Dorothy, George and Joseph; John R., who 
resides in Clearfield, married Blanche 
Cardon and they have one son, William ; 
Edna, who married B. R. Freer of Chicago 
and they have one child, Marjorie ; Jessie 
P., who is the wife of George A. Cardon, of 
Pittsburg; May, who married J. Enimett 
Harder, of Clearfield and they have one son, 
John Emmett; and Emery J., who is con- 
nected with an advertising house, at Chi- 
cago, III. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gearhart are members of 
the M. E. Church in the work of which he 
has been very active for years. 

LUTHER H. WILLIAMS, who has been 
a lifelong resident of Clearfield County, Pa., 
has made his home at Osceola Mills smce 
October, 1891. He was born in Bradford 



Township, December 16, 1843, ^"d is a son 
of Edward H. and Elizabeth (Smale) Wil- 
liams, and a grandson of Edward Williams. 

Edward Williams was born in Wales and 
when he came to the United States, located 
in Lancaster County but subsequently 
moved to Bradford Township, Clearfield 
County, where he lived until his death. He 
followed farming and was interested some- 
what in lumbering. The record preserved 
of this ancestor shows that he was a man of 
industry and perseverance and that he 
reared a family that was creditable in every 
way. 

Edward Hurd Williams, father of Luther 
H., was probably born in Lancaster County 
but was quite young when his parents came 
to Clearfield County. He became a farmer, 
as was his father, and later embarked in 
storekeeping, being a merchant from 1853 
until the close of his life. For several terms 
he served in the office of justice of the peace 
and was a school director for many years. 
In all that pertained to public life he was 
an upright citizen. He married Elizabeth 
Smale, who was born in Graham Township, 
Clearfield County, a daughter of Benjamin 
Smale, an old settler. To Edward H. Wil- 
liams and wife the following children were 
born : Margaret, deceased, who was the wife 
of Robert Livengood, of Bradford Town- 
ship; Elizabeth, deceased, who was the wife 
of Benjamin Carr, of Pike Township; 
Catherine, who is the wife of George ^^'ash- 
ington Graham, of Douglas County, Wash.; 
Henry Ellis, deceased, who was a resident 
of Bigler, Pa. ; Isaiah, deceased, who spent 
almost all of his life in Pike Township; 
Mary Ellen, deceased, who was twice mar- 
ried, first to Elijah Smale and second to 



346 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Frederick Campman ; Sylvester, deceased, 
who lived in Lawrence Township, Clear- 
field County; W ilson R., deceased, spent his 
life in Bradford and Graham Townships; 
Edward Johnson, who lives in Graham 
Township; Luther H., who resides at 
Osceola Mills; Henrietta, deceased, who 
was the wife of William Ogden, of Clear- 
field County; Martha, who married William 
Lease, of West Clearfield ; and John L., who 
was a resident of Pittsburg, at the time of 
his death. The parents of this family were 
members of the Lutheran church. 

Luther H. Williams was reared in Brad- 
ford Township and obtained his education 
in ilic country schools. He followed farm- 
ing until he came to Osceola Mills, in 1891, 
since which time he has been connected as 
an employe with the Car Shops of the Ber- 
wind-W'hite Company. Mr. Williams has 
witnessed many changes in this section dur- 
ing the twenty years since he came here 
and he has borne his part, as a good citizen 
in making Osceola Mills a pleasant, law- 
abiding town, one in which business enter- 
prises prosper and comfortable living is 
possible. He is not very active in politics, 
having never been anxious for political 
office, and casts his vote with the Republi- 
can party. 

On September 21, 1865, Mr. Williams 
was married to Miss Belinda A. Waple. who 
was born on Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, 
May 17, 1843, a daughter of Henry and 
Mary (Wunder) Waple. Henry Waple 
was born in Charles County, Md., Decem- 
ber II, 1816, and for a time engaged in the 
manufacture of fancy whips, in Philadelphia. 
In June, 1843, he moved to Boggs Town- 
ship, Clearfield County, and thereafter until 



Aj^ril, 1862, conducted the hotel known as 
the Half-Way House, which was situated 
between Phillipsburg and Curwensville, 
after which he moved to Fairfax County, 
Va., just outside the city of Washington, 
D. C. and resided there until his death on 
March 18, 1906. Henry Wa|)le married 
Mary Wunder. who was ijorn at German- 
town. Pa., and died when Mrs. Williams 
was six years old. The Wunder family is 
an old one in this country, of Holland an- 
cestry, and it was established in .America 
prior to the Revolutionary War. \\ illiam 
Wunder, the great-grandfather of Mrs. 
Williams, was an officer in Washington's 
army and being a butcher by trade he pre- 
pared meat for the soldiers and was aso a 
lay reader to them during the fearful winter 
at Valley Forge. His son, William Wun- 
der, was a soldier in the War of 181J. In 
1808 he built the first stone house in Ger- 
mantown. Pa., a picture of which Mrs. Wil- 
liams prizes very highly. To Henry and 
Mary (Wunder) Waple the following chil- 
dren were born: Catherine, who is the 
widow of Henry Shimmel, of Cumberland, 
Md. ; Emily, who died at the age of two 
years; Belinda A., who is the wife of Luther 
H. Williams; Julia, who is deceased, was 
the wife of Isaac Richardson ; and two 
daughters who died unnamed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Williams have had five chil- 
dren, namely: Harry Edward, who is a con- 
ductor in the railroad service, married 
Annie Baker, of Phillipsburg, and they have 
had five children— Oral, Harold, Robert, 
Marian and Dorothy; Lawrence S., who is 
a resident of Newton, Centre County, mar- 
ried Mary Thomas, of Phillipsburg, and 
they have two sons and two daughters — 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



347 



Violet May, Adaline. Harvey and Leo; 
Melvin C, who married Edna V. Hoyt, and 
they have had three cliildren — Clayton 
Hoyt, Luther Sherman and O. Blanche; 
Oral Blanche, iX^ho died in October, 1906, 
aged almost thirty-one years ; and Ernest 
A., who resides at Osceola Mills, adjoining 
his parents, married Carrie Estep and they 
have one son, Edward Luther. Mr. Wil- 
liams and family are members of the Epis- 
copal church. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Knights of Malta and the Mystic 
Chain. 

WALTER H. WOODWARD, a prom- 
inent citizen of Huston Township, has been 
identified with public matters for some 
years, and is the proprietor of Oakmont 
Farm, a well cultivated tract of 147 acres 
situated one and one-half miles west of Pen- 
field, Pa. Mr. Woodward was born at the 
present site of Pine Forest, Luzerne 
County, Pa., February 2, 1855, and is a son 
of William D. and Anna L. (Thompson) 
Woodward. 

The Woodward family originated in Eng- 
land, and the first of the name came to 
America in the early part of the seventeenth 
century. Daniel and Nancy (Eike) Wood- 
ward, the grandparents of Walter H. 
Woodward, were early settlers of Luzerne 
County, where the grandfather was a well 
known lumberman, and they were the 
parents of seven children : Mary, Sarah, 
Hiram, William D., Martha, Frances and 
Dennis, all of whom are deceased except 
Frances, who is the widow of Charles 
Sutton. 

William D. ^^'oodward was born in 
March, 1829, in Luzerne County, Pa., and 



there spent his boyhood. As a young man, 
with his brother Hiram, he came to Clear- 
field County with his wife, Ann L. (Thomp- 
son) Woodward, who was born in New 
Jersey ab(5ut 1856. He located at Penfield, 
where he purchased a hotel property, and 
operated this hostelry until 1864, when he 
sold out and removed to Minnesota. He 
remained there but two months, however, 
at the end of that time returning to Clear- 
field County, Pa., and engaging in the 
lumber business. In the spring of 1865 he 
bought eighty-eight acres of the present 
farm of Walter H. Woodward from Jeffer- 
son Bundy, and later, in 1868, added to this 
property by purchase from John Du Bois, 
and at one time had 316 acres. He retired 
five years previous to his death, which oc- 
curred April 3, 1907. His first wife had 
died in 1884, at the age of fifty-two years, 
and his second marriage was to a widow, 
Mrs. Clemantine Iddings, who by her first 
union had six children. To Mr. Woodward 
and his first wife there were born the fol- 
lowing children: Amorvin, who is operating 
the farm adjoining that of Walter H. Wood- 
ward; Stanley, also a resident of Huston 
Township; Walter H. ; Mattie, who married 
George Marsden; Americus H., who is a 
prominent attorney of Clearfield ; Anna A., 
who is the widow of T. B. Buoy; and Ida 
E., who is the widow of George R. Camp- 
bell. 

Walter H. 'Woodward's early childhood 
was spent in Luzerne County, where his 
father was operating a sawmill, and he was 
still a lad when the familv removed to 
Clearfield County. He attended the town- 
ship schools, and started helping his father 
in the lumber business when quite young. 



348 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



In 1880 he went West in the interest of the 
Thompson Consolidated Mining Co., and 
after his return spent four years as fore- 
man of the factory of P. C. Thompson & 
Co., at Philadelphia. He has had'charge of 
his present farm since 1898, and on the set- 
tlement of his father's estate he was given 
possession of it. The residence was erected 
by Mr. Woodward's father in 1875, but the 
other buildings have been put up by Mr. 
\\'oodward, who in many ways has im- 
proved the farm, making it one of the most 
valuable in Huston Township. The Ben- 
nett's Branch division of the Pennsylvania 
and B. & S. Railroads run through this 
property. 

Mr. Woodward is a Republican in pol- 
itics, and he has always been an active 
worker in support of the principles of that 
organization. He served for some time as 
township auditor, and is at present acting 
in the capacities of township assessor and 
president of the school board. 

SOLOMON McCULLY. postmaster at 
Ramey. Clearfield County, Pa., in which 
office he has officiated since February 13, 
1909, is a well known citizen of Gulich 
Township, where the family has been estab- 
lished for many years. He was born March 
23. 1855. '" Gulich Township, Clearfield 
County, and is a son of Matthew and Sarah 
(Beyer) McCully. 

Matthew McCuily was born in County 
Derry, Ireland, March 20, 1816. and was the 
youngest child of George and Isabella Mc- 
Cully. His father died in Ireland and 
when but 18 months old he came to this 
country' with his mother and seven other 
children, all of whom have long since passed 
awav. 



The little band arrived in Philadelphia, 
remained there a few weeks and then 
started for Clearfield County on foot with 
nothing but an Indian path to guide them. 
They arrived at their destination and made 
a home near the mouth of Muddy Run. 
From there Mr. McCully went to Tyrone 
forges and worked on the canal and about 
the furnaces where he grew up to manhood, 
becoming the main support of his mother, 
whom he cared for until her death in her 
84th year; her remains repose in Mt. Pleas- 
ant Cemetery, this county. 

Having been born in foreign land and his 
father being dead, made it necessary for Mr. 
McCully to take out naturalization papers, 
which were granted by the court of this 
country Dec. 6, 1848. Henry Hagerty and 
Lisle McCully were the witnesses and the 
prothonotary at that time was Wm. C. 
Welch. 

On December 30, 1841, Matthew Mc- 
Cully was married to Sarah Beyer, a native 
of Ohio, Rev. M. Betts of Clearfield, being 
the officiating clergyman. They settled on 
his farm at Beulah and began life work to- 
gether. She "sleeps the sleep of the just," 
preceding him to the grave in August, 
1901, he having died April 28, 1902, in his 
86th year. They had the following chil- 
dren : Isabel, who is deceased ; Christiana, 
who is the widow of H. P. R. Blandy; 
David, who is deceased; Caroline, who is 
the wife of Alvin Frederick; Eliza and 
George, who is deceased; Solomon; La- 
vina, who is the wife of J. B. McFadden; 
Lewis, deceased ; Edith, deceased, who was 
the wife of H. B. Brown ; and Frank H. The 
parents were members of the Presbyterian 
church. 

Solomon McCully followed farming until 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



349 



1887 and then came to Ramey and for 
twenty years followed the carpenter's trade 
here and was engaged in other lines of busi- 
ness until 1909, but since then has devoted 
himself to his official duties. Although he 
is an independent voter he is a man of such 
reliable character that he has been chosen 
many times for township and borough 
offices, without reference to party connec- 
tion. For fourteen years he served as con- 
stable and also as school director, was a 
county commissioner for two years and 
borough treasurer for two years. 

Mr. McCully was married in 1879 to Miss 
Ella Croyl, a daughter of Henry and Cath- 
erine Croyl, residents of Huntingdon 
County, Pa. To the parents of Mrs. Mc- 
Cully the following children were born : 
Margaret Victoria, who is the wife of D. T. 
Kantner; Martha, who is the wife of Hugh 
Stoddard ; Samuel A. ; Ella : William ; 
Robert; Henry; Ada, who is the wife of H. 
V. Stevens; and June, who is the wife of 
Frank Johnston. 'Mr. and ]Mrs. McCully 
have five children, namely : Bertha, L. K., 
H. H., M. W., and P. S. The family at- 
tends the Presbyterian church. 

GEORGE W. BOUCH, who is engaged 
in farming in Bell Township, Clearfield 
County, Pa., where he is one of the repre- 
sentative citizens, was born December 27, 
1840, in Armstrong County, Pa., and is a 
son of George and Sarah (Daugherty) 
Bouch. 

George Bouch was born in Armstrong 
County, Pa., and moved from there to 
Clearfield County in 1859, settling at Clover 
Run. Four years later he moved his family 
to Jefiferson County, where his accidental 



death took place in 1864, at the age of fifty- 
five years. He married Sarah Daugherty, 
who died in March, 1892, when in her 
seventy-fiftl;i year. The maternal grand- 
father was of Irish extraction, but the 
paternal grandparents, Oxinas and Rachel 
(Yont) Bouch, were natives of Germany. 
Seven children were born to George Bouch 
and his wife, and. of these the survivors are: 
George W. ; Sarah, who is the wife of J. 
Weilick, of Altoona, Pa. ; Jane, who lives at 
Sinking Valley; Hannah, who is the wife of 
John Weilick ; Angelina, who lives in Clear- 
field County, and Florence, who lives at 
home. 

George V. Bouch had very few early ad- 
vantages and after boyhood found employ- 
ment away from home, and after coming to 
Clearfield County worked at lumbering and 
in the woods until after his marriage, when 
he settled on his present farm in Bell Town- 
ship. He is still interested in lumbering to 
some extent but gives his main attention to 
agricultural pursuits. During the Civil 
War he served one year as a member of Co. 
K, 105th Pa. Vol. Inf., under Captain Mc- 
Knight, in the Army of the Potomac. His 
regiment was encamped near Washington, 
D. C, in the closing months of the war, and 
he was honorably discharged and mustered 
out at Pittsburg. 

In 1862 Mr. Bouch was married to Miss 
Catherine Peace, who was born January 23, 
1844, in Center County, Pa., a daughter of 
Solomon and Mary (Donmire) Peace, and 
a granddaughter of Adam and Barbara 
Donmire. Mr. and Mrs. Bouch had the 
following children born to them : William, 
who lives in Bell Township, married Emma 
McGinnis, and they have five children; 



350 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Joseph, who lives in Bell Township, married 
Mary Yont, and they have four children; 
Lizzie, who is the wife of William W'eirick, 
of Altoona, Pa., and they have four chil- 
dren; Ellen, who is the wife of E. Hender- 
son, of Bell Township, and they have three 
children; James, who lives in Bell Town- 
ship, married Mary Harklerood. and they 
have two children ; Edward, who is in bus- 
iness at Westover, Pa., married Lulu 
Snyder, and they have three children ; Miles, 
who lives at McGee's Mills, married Lizzie 
Snyder and they have one child ; Clyde, who 
lives in Bell Township, married Jennie 
Davis and they have one child; Arthur, who 
lives with his father, married Elinor Wolf, 
and they have two children. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bouch are members of the Methodist Prot- 
estant church, with which he united forty- 
five years ago. He is a Democrat in his 
political views and has served one term as 
township supervisor. He takes a justifiable 
amount of pride in his large family of vigor- 
ous descendants. 

W. I. WALL, miller, owner and propri- 
etor of the Grampian Mill, at Grampian, 
Pa., is a well known business man and re- 
spected and representative citizen of this 
borough. He was born June 26, 1861. in 
Penn Township. Clearfield County, one 
mile south of Grampian, and is a son of 
Isaiah and Rosanna (Danver) Wall. 

Isaiah Wall was born in the eastern part 
of Pennsylvania and was a small boy when 
he accompanied his father, Jonathan Ball. 
to Penn Township, where the larger part of 
his subsequent life was passed. He en- 
gaged in farming and lumbering and be- 
came a man of ample estate, owning, with 



his son-in-law, the land on which stands 
Coalport. He was twice married, first to a 
Miss Widemyer, and second to Rosanna 
Danver. and seven children were born to 
the first marriage and one, \\ . I., to the 
second. The following children were born 
to the first union : Eliza, Jennie, Hannah, 
Mary Ann, T. E., Aquilla (a soldier in Civil 
War who died while serving his country), 
and an infant son, deceased. After his first 
marriage, Isaiah Wall lived on the Thomas 
E. Wall farm, on which Thos. E. Wall now 
lives, and continued there until after the 
death of his second wife, when he moved to 
Grampian and l^ter to Tyrone and after- 
ward to Coalport. There he operated a 
coal bank and a saw-mill during his remain- 
ing active years and then retired to his farm 
in Penn Township, on which his death oc- 
curred when aged eighty-three years. This 
farm of 125 acres he had cleared and im- 
proved, coming to it when it was little but a 
wilderness. In politics he was a Republi- 
can and at one time served as constable of 
Penn Township. He was a member of the 
Society of Friends and his burial was in the 
Friends' Cemetery. His second wife was a 
member of the Catholic church and she was 
buried in the cemetery belonging to that 
church, at Grampian. 

W. I. Wall was educated in the schools 
of Penn Township and the Grampian Nor- 
mal School, after which he engaged in farm- 
ing in Penn Township, operating on fifty 
acres of land. Later he moved to Gram- 
pian and bought his present mill, which is 
a grist-mill well fitted with modern ma- 
chinery for producing flour, buckwheat and 
chop. He operates the same with the as- 
sistance of one man and does a safe and 




Al.l.lSU.N I in- SMlllI 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



353 



satisfactory business. He is an intelligent 
and earnest citizen and has served in the 
borough council, elected on the Republican 
ticket. He is a stockholder in tlie Penn 
Township Rural Telephone Company. 

On June 26, 1884, Mr. Wall was married 
to Miss Sarah A. Davis, who was born in 
Penn Township, a daughter of Joseph 
Davis, and they have had five children, 
namely: Earl J., who married Maude E. 
Bloom, a daughter of Edward Bloom, of 
Penn Township, and they have had one 
child, Sarah Elizabeth, now deceased; Lena 
E., who is a school-teacher; Eva Mildred, 
who attends the Grampian High School ; 
Carl W., who is also at school ; and Kenzie 
Lovelle, who is deceased. Mr. Wall is a 
member of the Society of Friends. He be- 
longs to the Penn Grange, to the Odd Fel- 
lows and the P. O. S. of A. 

ALLISON OPP SMITH, president judge 
of the Forty-sixth Judicial District of Penn- 
sylvania, comprising Clearfield county, was 
born in Limestone township, Montour county, 
Pennsylvania, on October 23, 1857; second 
child of Simpson and Charlotte Opp Smith, 
both natives of Lycoming county, of pioneer 
stock and of families identified with the early 
and successful lumbering and agricultural de- 
velopment of the Susquehanna Valley. His 
grandfather Jonathan Smith was a native of 
Philadelphia county, and his great-grandfather 
Col. George Smith was a soldier in the Revo- 
lutionary war and represented Philadelphia 
county in the General Assembly of the State. 
His grandmother Ann Simpson, of Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania, a great aunt of General 
U. S. Grant, married Jonathan Smith in 1796 
and they went direct to Lycom.ing county, 



where they lived the rest of their lives. The 
parents of Judge Smith moved to Northum- 
berland county in 1867 and settled on a farm 
near Watsontown, where they lived until 1879, 
when they moved into Watsontown. 

The subject of our sketch attended the 
common district schools of the neighborhood 
and also attended academies at Dewart, Mc- 
Ewensville and Watsontown, also assisting 
on the farm until about sixteen years of age. 
He then spent one year clerking in a country 
store at Dewart, and afterwards went to 
Bloomsburg State Normal School and pre- 
pared for entrance to State College, Center 
county, which he entered in January, 1876, 
and graduated with the honors of his class in 

1879. During the winter of 1879-80 he was 
elected principal of schools and taught the 
High School at Watsontown, after which he 
began reading law in the office of Oscar 
Proust, Esq., of that place. In September, 

1880, he entered die Law Department of the 
L^niversity of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, 
as a student at law, from which institution he 
graduated two years later in the Law Class of 
1882. During said period he was also regis- 
tered as a law student in the office of William 
A. Redding, J. Levering Jones and Hampton 
L. Carson, Esquires, of Philadelphia, and 
after his graduation, in June, 1882, on mo- 
tion of J. Levering Jones, Esq., one of his 
preceptors, he was admitted to practice law in 
the several courts of Philadelphia, and later 
in the same month was admitted to practice 
law in the Northumberland County Court. 

In September, 1882, he located in Clearfield 
and was admitted to practice the law in the 
several courts of Clearfield county on the 8th 
day of January, 1883. For several years he 
successfully practiced his profession alone, 



354 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



during which time he served as solicitor for 
Sheriff R. X. Shaw and Sheriff E. L. Mc- 
Closkey, and later as county solicitor. In 
1894, after the elevation of Hon. Cyrus Gor- 
don to the Common Pleas Bench, he formed 
a partnership with Thomas H. Murray, Esq., 
under the style of Murray & Smitli, and this 
partnership continued until the junior mem- 
ber was elected to succeed Judge Gordon on 
the Common Pleas Bench, which honor was 
won at the November election in 1903 by a 
majority of 2,016. 

In politics Judge Smith has been a Demo- 
crat all his life and took an active and earnest 
interest in party affairs from the time of ar- 
riving at man's estate. He served as secre- 
tary of the Democratic County Committee for 
several years beginning in 1886, and in 1890 
was elected county chairman and had the dis- 
tinction of polling the largest majorities for 
his party candidates that year ever given in 
the county. In 1896 he was appointed and 
served as councilman from the First Ward of 
Clearfield borough, and in 1897 was elected to 
the office of burgess of Clearfield and served 
three years in that position. In 1900 he was 
elected school director and was filling that po- 
sition when elected to the bench. 

As a lawyer Judge Smith soon won his way 
to the front at the Clearfield bar. He was 
recognized as possessing a clear, keen, logical 
mind, which combined with his industry and 
high character won him the respect and con- 
fidence of his clients. While a member of the 
firm of Murray & Smith he had a wide expe- 
rience in the practice of corporation law, as 
that firm represented nearly all the railroads 
of the county and they also represented a large 
number of the leading mining corporations. 
Since going on the bench Judge Smith has 



gained much prominence in judicial circles all 
over the State. At his first license court he 
created a precedent in the conduct and control 
of the court over the granting of liquor li- 
censes, first, by largely reducing the number 
of licenses and refusing nearly fifty per cent 
of the applicants and, second, by establishing 
what is believed to be wholesome rules for 
governing the sales of liquor and the main- 
tenance of licensed hotels. Similar rules have 
since been adopted by a considerable number 
of the judges of the State and the wisdom of 
their establishment is apparent to anyone who 
has occasion to patronize the hotels of Clear- 
field county. Since he went upon the bench 
the criminal business has largel)' decreased, 
notwithstanding a large increase of popula- 
tion, composed of the people of southern Eu- 
rope who know little of the laws and customs 
of this country. This decrease in the criminal 
business is popularly believed to be largely due 
to the strict enforcement of the law in both the 
license and criminal courts as administered by 
Judge Smith. The general business of the 
courts under Judge Smith has been conducted 
with great promptness and dispatch and no one 
can complain of any delay in the administra- 
tion of justice. Four times a year all cases at 
issue, whether in the civil or criminal courts, 
whether in equity or on the argument list, by 
order of the court are listed for trial and hear- 
ing and a prompt disposal of the same enforced 
so far as can be done by an early trial and 
decision. 

Judge Smith is a member of the Presbyte- 
rian church and has for many years been on 
the board of trustees. He also belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity of Clearfield and has gone 
through all the chairs of the Blue Lodge and 
is a member of the Chapter. Although al- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



355 



ways busy with his professional duties, he has 
at all times been closely identified with move- 
ments intended to advance the interests of the 
community, commercially and morally. In 
1889 he was an organizer and the first secre- 
tary and treasurer, as well as director, of the 
Electric Light Company at Clearfield, with 
which he was connected until soon after he 
went upon the bench. He was also an organ- 
izer, director and president of the Paterson 
Clay Products Company, manufacturers of all 
kinds of paving and building brick. He was 
one of the organizers of the Clearfield Y. M. 
C. A. and on its board of directors ever since 
its organization and is now president of that 
body, to the maintenance of which worthy in- 
stitution he gives largely of his time and 
means. In 1904 he was chainiian of the 
Clearfield County Centennial Association 
Committee, which conducted to a successful 
conclusion the celebration of the one hun- 
dredth anniversary of the formation of Clear- 
field county. He has been a member of the 
Pennsylvania Bar Association since its organ- 
ization in 1894, and is now one of the vice- 
presidents of that body. He is also a non- 
resident member of the Pennsylvania Society 
of New York. 

Judge Smith was married in Clearfield, on 
October 17, 1888, to Margaret Helen, young- 
est daughter of the late Senator William A. 
Wallace. They have one son, William Wal- 
lace, and three daughters, Charlotte, Margaret 
and Rebecca. 

WILLIAM M. SHAW, deceased, for 
many years was one of Clearfield's promi- 
nent and substantial citizens, and from 1891 
until the date of his death, was cashier of 
the County National Bank. He was a 



member of an old settled family of Clear- 
field County and was born on the paternal 
homestead on November 28, 1832. His 
parents were Richard and Mary Shaw. 

William M. Shaw's boyhood and youth 
were spent on the home farm and in attend- 
ance at the district schools and he continued 
the home farm for six years following his 
marriage. He then established himself as 
a merchant in Cedar County, Iowa, but on 
account of the financial stringency occa- 
sioned by the Civil War, he soon closed out 
his business venture there and returned to 
Pennsylvania and enlisted as a volunteer 
in the Federal Army. Shortly afterward 
he was appointed hospital steward, and 
during his term of service was stationed at 
Helena, Ark. He later engaged tentatively 
in business at other points prior to entering 
the office of Dr. A. M. Hills, at Clearfield, 
where he studied dental surgery and later 
became skilled in that profession, in which 
he continued until 1886, when he became 
identified with the County National Bank, 
first as teller and later as cashier. 

Mr. Shaw was married in 1853 to Miss 
Martha Jane Irwin, a daughter of Jacob 
Irwin, of Clearfield County. Mr. Shaw's 
death was preceded by that of his wife. 

G. R. McMURRAY, owner and propri- 
etor of a meat market at Beulah, Clearfield 
County, Pa., was born in Bigler Township, 
Clearfield County, April 5, 1880, and is a 
son of J. A. and Sophia (Young) McMur- 
ray, and a grandson of John McMurray. 

The parents of Mr. McMurray are well 
known residents of Beulah and Bigler 
Township, where the father formerly was a 
farmer and lumberman. He is still quite 



356 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



active and is janitor of the public school 
building at this place. He married Sophia 
Young and the following children were 
born to them : Mary, who is the wife of S. 
B. Echard; John; William; Emma, who is 
the wife of John McLaughlin ; Margaret, 
who is the wife of Paul Lindenburg; Bertha, 
who is the wife of John Forsythe ; Sadie, 
who is the wife of Cloyd Moss; Pearl, Ruth, 
Orvis, and Sylvester, deceased. 

G. R. McMurray attended the common 
schools and then followed farming until in 
September, 1910, when he went into the 
butchering business at Beulah, having pur- 
chased his stand in the previous month. 
He is an excellent business man and is 
prospering. 

In 1907 Mr. McMurray was married to 
Miss Hannah Beyer, who is a daughter of 
John and Emma E. (Ross) Beyer, and a 
sister of Lewis W. Beyer, who is a merchant 
and postmaster at Smoke Run. Mr. and 
Mrs. McMurray live at Smoke Run, where 
Mrs. McMurray owns a fine residence. 
They have had one son, George, who was 
born May 5, 1910, and died in the following 
August. They attend the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He is a Democrat in his 
political views but takes no very active part, 
being much more interested in developing 
his business. 

ISAAC KNEPP, owner of a farm of 226 
.acres in Bradford township, Clearfield 
County, Pa., has resided on this farm for 
35 years, and comes of one of the early fam- 
ilies of the county. He was born in 1851 in 
Bradford township, and is a son of Ben- 
jamin and Sarah Knepp. His father was 



born in Juniata County, Pa., and at an early 
age came with his parents to Clearfield 
county and settled on the David Dale farm 
in Bradford township. He spent the re- 
mainder of his life in this township and 
died on the John Murray farm. 

Isaac Knepp was reared in Bradford 
township and obtained his education in the 
local schools of the county. After his mar- 
riage he located on his present farm of 226 
acres, which is located about five miles east 
of Bigler. and has since carried on general 
farming. He has made many improve- 
ments on the place during the past 35 years, 
and has erected a large frame house and a 
fine barn. A prominent citizen of his town- 
ship, he has served as school director for 
two terms, as steward of the U. B. church, 
and as supervisor of the township. 

In 1875 Mr. Knepp married Jane Hubler, 
b(irn in 1857, a daughter of Levey Hubler, 
who during his life was one of the promi- 
nent farmers of Graham township, and the 
following children have been born of their 
union: Otis married Miss Zella \\'ilson, and 
they have two children, Esther and Mary 
Ellen; he resides in Clearfield, and is em- 
ployed in a furniture store. Ashley Knepp, 
married to Miss Minnie Eshelman, resides 
at Bigler, employed as a farmer. Florence, 
married to Mr. Thomas Luzier, resides at 
Sliiloh. Etta died in 1882. aged 2 years. 
Hector is employed as a miner. Seymour 
married to Miss Ruth Lansberry, resides at 
Caro, Michigan, employed as scientist. 
Ray resides at Pittsburg, employed as a 
stenographer. Merlin is attending college. 
Pearl is employed as teacher in public 
schools. Verva is attending Normal school. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



357 



SAMUEL BLAIR ECHARD, owner and 
proprietor of a blacksmith shop and a dealer 
also in agricultural machinery and farm 
implements, at Ramey, Pa., is one of the 
representative men of the borough which 
he has served officially on numerous occa- 
sions. He was born November 2, 1866, in 
Freedom Township, Blair County, Pa., and 
is a son of John and Salome (Stiffler) 
Echard. 

John Echard was born in Blair County 
and was a son of George Echard. He was 
a farmer in Blair County and spent his life 
there. He married Salome Stiffler, who is 
also deceased, and they had the following 
children born to them : James F. ; Catherine, 
who is the wife of Samuel Stiffler; Henry 
M. ; Samuel B.; Joseph C. ; Mary A., who is 
the wife of David L. Semple; Peter W. ; 
and Anna B., who is the wife of Calvin 
Fleming. 

Samuel Blair Echard obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Blair County 
and then worked on the home farm until 
he was twenty-one years of age, after which 
he spent one year in the woods. He came 
to Clearfield County when he was twenty- 
one and worked for eight years at the car- 
penter trade and then turned his attention 
to blacksmithing and dealing in farm im- 
plements. Mr. Echard is considered an 
expert mechanic and has proved the justice 
of this reputation by his successful efforts 
in both trades. He is an intelligent and 
active citizen and one who commands the 
confidence of his fellow citizens. He served 
in the borough council for two and one-half 
terms, was borough treasurer for one term 
and for seven years has been a member of 
the school board. He is also a member of 



the board of trustees and treasurer of the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Ramey. 

On November 2, 1894, Mr. Echard was 
married to Miss Mary J. McMurray, a 
daughter of Alexander and Sophia McMur- 
ray, and they have three children: John A., 
Vida May, and William McKinley, all of 
whom are very satisfactory pupils in the 
Ramey schools. In politics Mr. Echard is 
a Republican. 

CHRISTIAN B. HAAG, a lifelong resi- 
dent of Clearfield County, Pa., who is a 
representative citizen of Troutville. where 
he has been in the undertaking business 
since 1878, also devotes some attention to 
farming in Brady Township. He was born 
on the family homestead in Brady Town- 
ship, September 17, 1853, and is a son of 
Christian and Catherine (Weise) Haag. 

Christian Haag was the eldest of five chil- 
dren born to his parents, the other four 
being: Elizabeth, who was the wife of Jacob 
Dunmeyer (both deceased) ; Mary, who is 
the widow of Moses Ireily ; Philip, who lives 
at Punxatawney, Pa., whose twin brother, 
Hanry, is deceased. His family live in 
Akron, O. Christian Haag, father oi 
Christian B., was born in Germany, in 1823, 
and was nine years old when the family set 
sail for America, a country he almost failed 
to reach, as one one occasion, he fell from 
the deck of the vessel and but for the quick 
action of a sailor, would speedily have been 
drowned in the Atlantic Ocean. He lived 
to become a man of large estate and one of 
Brady Township's most respected citizens. 
He grew to manhood in JefTerson County, 
Pa., but later bought fifty acres of land one 
mile south of Troutville, in Clearfield 



358 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



County, subsequently adding two more 
tracts of fifty acres each. He devoted him- 
self exclusively to agriculture and remained 
interested in his crops and stock during all 
the rest of his active life. His death oc- 
curred in 1890, in Brady Township. He 
was twice married, first to Charlotte Knarr 
and they had three children: Mary, who is 
deceased, who was the wife of Henry W. 
Weber; and Henry and Adam. The mother 
of these children died in 1847. Mr. Haag was 
married second to Catherine W'eise, who died 
in 1889, having been the mother of nine chil- 
dren, namely: Christian B., John, Catherine, 
Philip, Frederick, August, William, Jacob and 
Joseph. Catherine is the wife of William Mc- 
Connell, and Frederick is deceased. Christian 
Haag. the father of Christian B. Haag, died 
in 1890. 

Christian B. Haag spent his boyhood on the 
home farm but later learned the carpenter's 
trade and followed the same for many years. 
In 1876 he moved into Troutville, where he 
lived ten years, afterwards residing ten years 
on the farm and then returning to Troutville, 
where he now lives and where he has a fine 
residence and office adjoining, having resided 
here for the last fifteen years. He went into 
the undertaking business in 1878, having re- 
ceived his diploma in embalming at the Pitts- 
burg College of Embalming, where he was 
under the instruction of Prof. Sullivan, and 
where he has returned several times in order 
to take post graduate work. He has since 
been continuously engaged in this work, a pe- 
riod of 33 years. He is well equipped for 
funeral directing, having a handsome black 
funeral car and a team of horses that are very 
generally admired, being well matched blacks, 
with white star foreheads. He has all the ap- 



purtenances required for either an elaborate 
funeral, or for the quieter ser\'ice that many 
families prefer. 

In September, 1876, Mr. Haag was married 
to Miss Sarah M. Bonsall, who died April 8, 
191 1. She was a daughter of Amos Bonsall, 
a prominent citizen of this section. A family 
of five children has been born to them, namely : 
Amos, who is manager of the railroad com- 
pany's farms at Helvetia, Clearfield county, 
married Florence London and they have one 
child, Arthur; Orpha, married M. A. Zimmer- 
man, of Troutville, Pa., and they now live in 
Warren, O. (they have two children — Mar- 
garet and Donald) ; Morris, who is a grad- 
uate of the dental department of the Balti- 
more Medical College, is practicing dentistry 
at Meriden, Conn., and married Belle Han- 
ney; Vina, is the wife of Allen R. McHenry, 
of Sagamore, Pa., who is general manager for 
the B. & O. people of that place. Miss Hul- 
dah resides at home. Mr. Haag and family 
belong to the Lutheran church. In his polit- 
ical views he is a Democrat but he has never 
accepted any public office other than school di- 
rector, and only that from a sense of duty. 
He has been a very active member of Mingle 
Lodge, No. 753, at Troutville, for many years 
and belongs also to the auxiliary society, the 
Rebeccas, and in 19 10 he was sent as a rep- 
resentative to the Grand Lodge at Williams- 
port, which is considered a signal honor. 

C. B. ELLIOTT, M. D., physician and 
surgeon, who has been located at Coalport, 
Clearfield county. Pa., since 1892, was born 
near Cumberland, Md., April 23. 1854, and is 
a son of John and Catherine (Miller) Elliott. 

John Elliott was born near Ligonier. Pa., 
a son of John Elliott, who came to America 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



359 



from Ireland, in 1792. The history of the 
Elhotts, or, as originally written — Eliot or 
Ellis — dates back to the nth century. Wil- 
liam H. Eliot was a leader under, and princi- 
pal adviser of William, Duke of Normandy 
during the Conquest, 1066. It was a John 
Eliot who held the fort at Gibraltar, against 
Spain, at that time being a commander in the 
British Navy. The family is traced to the 
north of Britain and the name Eliot perhaps 
was thus written when the family had estates 
near Eliot, Dundee, Scotland. The old Eliot 
stronghold is at Port Eliot, St. Gennans, 
Cornwall, England. It was purchased by 
John Eliot, son of Edward Eliot, of Cutland, 
Devonshire. The arms of the Eliot family 
are thus mentioned in heraldy : Argent ; a 
fesse gules, between double coutises wavy az- 
ure; Crest: an elephant's head, argent, plain 
collared gules; Supporters: two eagles, re- 
guardent wings displayed and inverted proper, 
each charged on the breast with an emiine 
spot sable. The motto: "Proedentibus insta" 
is freely translated as "Press close upon those 
who take the lead." 

Sir John Whitaker Ellis, or Eliot, descended 
from two chiefs: Charles Ellis, of Abbots 
Bromley, and George Ellis, who was at the 
conquest of Jamaica in 1656. The latter's 
grandson, Charles Rose Ellis, of Claremont, 
,Surrey, was, on July 15, 1826, created Baron 
Seaford. It was from this branch of the fam- 
ily came Charles Augustus Ellis, the sixth 
Baron Howard De Walden; while from the 
Abbot Bromley branch, one of its members, 
Sir John Whitaker Ellis, represented the City 
of London as Lord Mayor. The crest of this 
family is thus described : A female figure ppr. 
vested or, holding in the dexter hand a chap- 



let of roses gules, and in the senister a palm 
branch slipped vert (Middlesex). 

The progenitors of the American Ellis fam- 
ily can be traced to Wales. Richard Ellis was 
born in Dublin, Ireland, August 10, 1704. His 
father, a native of Wales, died when Richard 
was about thirteen years of age and the next 
authenticated record is of his appearing at 
Plymouth, Mass. His descendants are almost 
without exception people who have achieved 
importance in some way. Included in these 
are: O. W. Ellis, of Chicago. Ill; Rev. 
Charles H. Ellis, of Kingston, N. Y. ; Stewart 
H. Elliott, of New York City; C. B. Elliott, 
M. D., of Coalport, Pa.; W. Dixon Ellis, of 
New York City; Marshall Elliott, of Balti- 
more, Md., born at Wilmington, N. C, Jan- 
uary 24, 1846, a son of Aaron E. Elliott — 
Harvard, 1868, Ph. D., Princeton, 1877, LL. 
D., Wake Forest, N. C, 1891 Modern Lan- 
guages, Associate of the American Philogical 
Society and the Maryland Historical Society; 
and John Whittaker Elliott, M. D., of Boston. 
Mass., born at Keene, N. H., in October, 1852, 
son of John Henry Elliott, a member of the 
Maryland University Alumni, the Johns Hop- 
kins and the Rolland Park Country Club. 

John Elliott, father of Dr. Elliott, of Coal- 
port, resided at different places during life, 
for many years being engaged in lumbering 
and having his home alternately or succes- 
sively at Mt. Savage, Southampton, Tipton 
and Tyrone, in 1880 moving from the latter 
place to Coalport, where he opened the first 
store in the place, the old building where he 
conducted it still being in evidence. He died 
here in 1890 at the age of seventy-four years. 
He married Catherine Miller, who was born 
at Addison, Somerset county. Pa., and died in 



360 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



19 lo, aged about eighty years. They had 
three children: C. B. ; Jack M. and Laura B. 
Jack M. Eihotl was active in Republican pol- 
itics and at one time was the nominee of his 
party for sheriff, and while the county had a 
large normal Democratic majority, he came 
within 200 votes of winning the election. He 
resides at Coalport. Laura B. Elliott became 
the wife of J. C. Weller. county superintendent 
of schools of Somerset county. They reside 
at Gebhart. 

C. B. Elliott was educated at Tipton Acad- 
emy, where he w^as a student for five years. 
In 1 87 1 he entered Jefferson Medical College, 
Pliiladelphia, where he was graduated in the 
class of 1874. He located at Osceola Mills and 
practiced there for one year, when the place 
was practically destroyed by fire and he then 
settled at Altoona and four years later moved 
to Indianapolis, Ind.. but one year later came 
back to Pennsylvania and was established for 
five years at Utahville, in Clearfield county. 
He suffered a second loss by fire and in 1884 
located again at Altoona, where he was in 
practice until 1892, when there appeared to be 
a particularly good professional opening at 
Coalport. and he has been in active practice 
here ever since. He is one of the county phy- 
sicians. Dr. Elliott makes a specialty of dis- 
eases of the eye and in treating these delicate 
organs he has been more than usually success- 
ful. 

Dr. Elliott was married in 1880 to Miss 
Laura M. Cherry, a daughter of John W. 
Cherry, who fomierly was an undertaker at 
Altoona. Mrs. Elliott died in 1891. Dr. El- 
liott takes a great deal of pride in his ances- 
tral histor}'. although some of the later rec- 
ords are not complete, family annals havini^ 
been lost with other important documents, in 



the fire that destroyed his effects while in prac- 
tice at Altoona. 

GEORGE MINNS, JR., a representative 
citizen and prominent business man of DuBois. 
Pa., a successful coal operator and interested 
additionally in other enterprises, was born 
August 4, 1873, at Renovo, Pa., and is a son 
of George T. and Alice (Hunter) Minns. 

George T. Minns was born in England in 
1845 ^"*^ became a miner at an early age, his 
experience in this direction covering many 
years. He was married in England to Alice 
Hunter and they remained there until after 
the birth of two children and then came to 
America. Mr. Minns was led to settle at 
Renovo, Clinton county. Pa., because it was 
a fine mining district and after working for 
coal companies there for a time he leased and 
operated a mine of his own. He removed then 
with his family, to Butler county, Pa., contin- 
uing in the coal business and during his pe- 
riod of residence there sold coal to the oil 
fields at a profit. In 1880 he came to DuBois 
and here entered the employ of John DuBois, 
for whom he opened up mines and from whom 
he later bought a farm in the Clear Run neigh- 
borhood. This land Mr. Minns cleared and 
it is tlie present place of residence of the fam- 
ily. Mr. and Mrs. Minns had twelve children 
born to them, namely : Bessie, who is now de- 
ceased, was the wife of Oscar Long; Sarah, 
who was the wife of Wm. Guntrum; Cather- 
ine, who is the wife of Edward Trude; 
George; John; William; Robert: .Mice, who 
is the wife of George Whii)ple: Abbie. who is 
the wife of W. B. Johnson; Martha, who is 
the wife of Everett Case; Henry, youngest, 
at home. 

George Minns attended school as circum- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



361 



stances permitted, during boyhood, but by the 
time he was fifteen years of age he had become 
very useful to his fatlier on tlie newly pur- 
chased farm. Four years later he went to 
lumbering and continued to farm and to work 
in the woods until 1896, when, with his father, 
he leased a tract of coal land from A. C. Hop- 
kins, of Loch Haven, Pa. There was one 
mine already on the place and they started 
their drift on the left of it and began produc- 
ing coal. In a short time the younger part- 
ner bought out the entire interest and ever 
since has operated this mine alone. It has ful- 
filled every expectation and has proved a val- 
uable investment. Mr. Minns runs three 
wagons and sells coal to the local trade and 
supi)lies the larger numl>er of the factories at 
DuBois. He has other business interests and 
owns a large amount of valuable real estate, 
including a farm in Sandy township and the 
Hotel Logan, at DuBois, which he leases, hav- 
ing previously remodeled the building. In 
1900, Mr. Minns erected his handsome brick 
residence at No. 601 First Street. 

Mr. Minns was married to Miss Ella Bair. 
a daughter of William Bair, of Falls Creek, 
Pa., and they have four children: Earl, Mary, 
Alice and Ruth. Mr. Minns and family are 
members of the Episcopal church. In politics 
he is a Republican and is an active, interested 
and public-spirited citizen. Since 1905 he has 
been a member of the borough council of Du- 
Bois and has been sincere in his efforts to se- 
cure and regulate beneficial measures for the 
people. He belongs fraternally to the Elks 
and the Knights of Pythias and socially to the 
/(.corn Club. Mr. Minns is a stockholder in 
the Union Banking and Trust Company of 
DuBois. 



E. B. MAHAFFEY, cashier of the Madera 
National Bank of Madera, Pa., is one of the 
younger business men of this place and his 
whole business experience has been with bank- 
ing institutions. He was born in Indiana 
county. Pa., March 14, 1881, and is a son of 
John and Mary Jane (Ake) Mahaffey. 

John Mahaffey was born in Clearfield 
county but died in Indiana county, having been 
engaged for a number of years in the livery 
business at Hillsdale. He married Mary Jane 
Ake, who was born in Blair county. She sur- 
vives and resides at Burnside, Clearfield 
county. They had three children: J. L., E. 
B., and Nellie. In politics John Mahaffey was 
a Republican. His father was Thomas Ma- 
haffey and was born in Snyder county. Pa., 
and farther back the ancestry can be traced to 
Ireland. John Mahaffey and wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church ai 
Hillsdale. 

E. B. Mahaffey was educated in the public 
schools of his native county and at Purchase- 
line Academy, after which he entered the First 
National Bank at Glen Campbell and came 
from there to the First National at Madera, 
in 1907. He is interested in property here 
and is a representative citizen along all lines. 

In 1905, in Indiana county, Mr. Mahaffey 
was married to Miss Beulah Long, who is a 
daughter of Charles and Sarah (Jamison) 
Long. Mrs. Mahaffey has one older sister, 
Zonie, who is the wife of C. C. Williams, and 
a younger sister and brother, Goldie and New- 
ell. Mr. and Mrs. Mahaffey have one daugh- 
ter, Sarah Jane. They attend the Presbyte- 
rian church. In politics Mr. Mahaffey is not 
very active but casts his vote with the Repub- 
lican party. 



362 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



MICHAEL CRAIG, senior member of the 
firm of M. & F. Craig, coal operators, at pres- 
ent particularly interested in the Industry 
mine, at Xew Castle, Clearfield county, Pa., 
has been a resident of Brisbin for many years 
and is one of the prominent men of this bor- 
ough. He was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, 
October ii, 1866, and is a son of James and 
Bridget (Rooney) Craig. 

Michael Craig accompanied his parents to 
America and to Brisbin in 1881 and has al- 
ways since been connected with the coal in- 
dustry. He 'began operating Sterling mine 
No. 2, October 11, 1888, and leased the prop- 
erty until 1897, when he bought it, and also 
has a lease on Sterling No. 3: and the firm 
owns extensive coal lands wliich they lease to 
Berwind White Co., Kelly Bro. Co., and also 
P.lythe Coal Company, and are in the gas and 
oil business also in West Virginia. Mr. Craig 
is a stockholder in the Osceola Bank. He has 
been a very active and public spirited citizen 
and has frequently served in the borough coun- 
cil and has twice been borough treasurer. 

Mr. Craig was married on June 4, 1Q07, to 
Miss Susan McPhilomy, who was born at 
Snow Shoe, Center county, and was one month 
old when she was brought to Brisbin by her 
parents, John McPhilomy and wife. Mr. and 
Mrs. Craig have one daughter, Catherine. 
They are members of the Roman Catholic 
clnirch. He is identified with the Knights of 
Columbus at Clearfield. He casts his vote with 
the Democratic party. 

GEORGE W. OAKS, a retired farmer and 
well known citizen of Burnside township, 
Clearfield county. Pa., is a native of New Eng- 
land, born October 31, 1831, at Dover, Maine, 



and is a son of Stephen L. and Sally (Ames) 
Oaks. 

Stephen L. Oaks was born in Maine, in 
1796, a son of Abel and Mehitabel (Jewett) 
Oaks, and died in Cambria county, Pa., in 
1875. He married Sally Ames, who was born 
in 1799, and died in 1877. In 1838 they 
moved from New England to Blairsville, Pa., 
wliere Mr. Oaks followed his trade of mill- 
wright, at a later date moving into Cambria 
county, where he lived until his decease. 

George W. Oaks was seven years old when 
his parents came to Pennsylvania. He had 
but meagre school opportunities and as soon 
as old enough worked at farming and provided 
for himself. He continued to follow agricul- 
tural pursuits in Pennsylvania until he was 
twenty-nine years old and then went to Sioux 
county, la., where he entered land and devel- 
oped a farm. He has been retired from active 
farn; work since 1903. 

Mr. Oaks married Miss Elizabeth Mock, 
who was born in Bedford county. Pa., June 
12, 1833, and died January 26, 1897. They 
had the following children born to them: 
Phineas, who lives in Iowa, married Alice J. 
Stanton; Amanda, who is deceased; Mary C, 
who is the wife of Irwin Jones, lives in Iowa; 
Joseph E., who lives at Hawarden, la. ; John, 
wliose home is also at Hawarden ; Charles, 
who resides at Chatsworth, la. ; and William, 
who lives at Hawarden. Mr. Oaks has grand- 
children as follows: Walter, Ray and Ar- 
thur, sons of Phineas, and of these, Walter 
lias three children and Arthur has two; eight 
children of his daughter Mary (two sons of 
this family are married, Orald has two chil- 
dren and Norton has one child) ; one son of 
bis son Joseph E., one of his son John, one of 




i;ni,AM> i>A\ IS swoori; 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



365 



his son Charles, and five of his son, Wilham 
Oaks. The family is an unusually vigorous 
one and all its members are prosperous and 
representative people of the section in which 
they live. 

M. J. KELLY, proprietor of the Aberdeen 
Hotel, at Grampian, Pa., where he is one of 
the leading citizens, was born October 27, 
1871, at Bellefonte, Center county. Pa., and is 
a son of Thomas F. and Mary (Hehir) Kelly. 

Mr. Kelly was educated at Bellefonte and 
other points and has been a resident of Gram- 
pian since 1902, when he succeeded McMillen 
& Ryan, as proprietor of the Aberdeen Hotel, 
a modern, hot-water heated building, having 
twenty bed-rooms and catering to transient 
trade. Mr. Kelly makes a specialty of his fine 
table, the best the market affords being placed 
before his guests. His charges are very mod- 
erate, being $1.50 per day. His patronage is 
dependable, travelers making it convenient to 
return on their trips so that they may enjoy 
the comforts of Mr. Kelly's house at Gram- 
pian. In addition to his hotel business, Mr. 
Kelly has other interests, being the owner of 
a coal mine at Fernwood, which is operated 
under the name of the Fernwood Coal Com- 
pany. He owns sixty acres and leases 100 
more, the vein here being two feet and thirty- 
two inches thick. He gives employment to 
thirty-two or more men. 

Mr. Kelly married Miss Elizabeth Smith, a 
daughter of Edward Smith, of Snowshoe, 
Pa., and they have two children, Mary and 
Katherine. Mr. Kelly and wife are members 
of the Catholic church. In politics he is a 
Democrat but has never accepted any office 
except that of school director of the borough. 
He is identified with the Elks at Clearfield, 



and is numbered with the honest, upright and 
useful men of Grampian. 

ROLAND DAVIS SWOOPE was born 
at Curwensville, Clearfield county, Pa., Au- 
gust 26, 1856, and is the eldest son of the late 
Hon. Henry Bucher Swoope and Susanna Pat- 
ton (Irvin) Swoope. On the paternal side he 
is a lineal descendant of Colonel Jacob Mytin- 
ger, who served in the War of the Revolution, 
as second in command of "VonHeer's Battal- 
ion of Light Dragoons" which regiment was. 
the personal escort of General George Wash- 
ington, between whom and Colonel Mytinger 
a warm personal friendship existed. Colonel 
Mytinger was also one of the charter mem- 
bers of the "Society of the Cincinnati." On 
his maternal side, the subject of this sketch is 
a lineal descendant of Colonel John Patton, 
who was also actively engaged in the struggle 
for National Independence, as colonel of the 
Sixteenth Regiment of Pennsylvania Troops, 
and for a time had charge of the defenses of 
Philadelphia. Colonel Patton was one of that 
noble band of patriots in Philadelphia, who 
raised, on their own personal responsibility, 
two hundred and sixty thousand pounds to 
aid the Revolutionary army in the greatest 
crisis of that memorable struggle. He was 
also a member of the "Society of the Cincin- 
nati." 

Hon. Henry Bucher Swoope, the father of 
the subject of our sketch, was one of the most 
brilliant and distinguished lawyers of Penn- 
sylvania, also famous as a political speaker 
and as one of the leaders of the Republican 
party of his State. His mother Susanna Pat- 
ton (Irvin) Swoope was a daughter of Wil- 
liam Irvin, one of the pioneer lumbermen and 
business men of Clearfield county. Roland 



366 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



Davis Svvoope spent his boyhood days in 
Clearfield, where he attended the public 
schools and the old Clearfield Academy. In 
1869 his father, having been appointed by 
President Grant, United States Attorney for 
the Western District of Pennsylvania, the 
family removed to Pittsburg, Pa., where they 
continued to reside until the death of Hon. H. 
B. Swoope, in February, 1874, when they re- 
turned to Curwensville. 

In addition to the Clearfield schools, Mr. 
Swoope also attended die High School, Potts- 
town, Pa., Ayers Latin School at Pittsburg, 
Pa., Phillips Academy at Andover, Mass., and 
the Western University of Pennsylvania. 
While a student at Andcjver he founded and 
■was the first member of the "K. O. A." So- 
ciety, a famous school fraternity, member- 
ship in which is the highest ambition of every 
Phillips Andover student. This society num- 
bers among its alumni, many of the most dis- 
tinguished men in the country. 

In 1876 he entered the law office of Murray 
& Gordon, a firm, at that time, composed of 
Hon. Thomas H. Murray, who had pursued 
his legal studies in the office of Hon. H. 
Bucher Svvoope, and Hon. Cyrus Gordon, af- 
terwards president judge of the courts of 
Clearfield county. In order to support him- 
self, while reading law, Mr. Swoope engaged 
in the insurance business, building up a suc- 
cessful business which he disposed of after his 
admission to the bar, and devoted himself to 
his profession. After passing a successful ex- 
amination, he was admitted to the bar of 
Clearfield county in 1878. He is also a' mem- 
ber of the bar of the United States courts, and 
of the Supreme and Superior Courts of Penn- 
sylvania. 

He has always taken an interest in public 



affairs and served as cliairman of the Repub- 
lican County Committee for several years, be- 
ing first elected chairman in 1888, which was 
the year of the presidential campaign when 
Benjamin Harrison was elected president over 
Grover Cleveland. So efficient was the organ- 
ization and work of the Republican party un- 
der Mr. Swoope's chaimianship, that he re- 
duced an adverse plurality of 1,501, which the 
Democratic candidate had received in the pre- 
vious gubernatorial election, to 869 and in rec- 
ognition of his efforts he received a medal of 
honor and a resolution of thanks from the 
Republican State Committee. Mr. Swoope has 
also taken an active part in many political 
campaigns as a stump speaker for his party, 
not only in his own county but throughout the 
state. 

As a lawyer, Mr. Swoope has a large and 
successful practice and has Ijeen engaged in 
many important and interesting cases. He ar- 
gued the case of Jackson vs. the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company before the Supreme Court 
of Pennsylvania and though opposed by John 
G. Johnson. Esq., the leader of the Philadel- 
phia bar, and other eminent counsel, Mr. 
Swoope succeeded in having affirmed a ver- 
dict against the railroad company for treble 
damages for discrimination in failing to fur- 
nish coal cars to his client, thus sustaining the 
constitutionality of the Act of Assembly of 
1883, gving the right to recover treble dam- 
ages in such cases. 

Among other important cases in which he 
has been concerned, was that of the Central 
Trust Company of New York vs. the Clear- 
field Creek Coal Company, an action to fore- 
close a mortgage by a minority in number and 
amount of the holders of the bonds secured 
by said mortgage, although the mortgage con- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



367 



tained a provision that it could only be en- 
forced upon the written request of a majority 
in number and amount, of the holders of the 
bonds. This case raised a novel legal ques- 
tion in Pennsylvania, but after a vigorous con- 
test, the plaintiffs were successful in obtaining 
a decree of foreclosure of the mortgage and 
a judgment for $540,000.00 against the coal 
company, thus establishing, for the first time 
in the courts of this state, the right of a mi- 
nority of the bond-holders secured by a cor- 
poration mortgage, to compel a foreclosure. 
As a lawyer, Mr. Swoope has always refused 
to represent liquor license applications, and has 
been active in the cause of temperance, having 
been one of the officers of the Constitutional 
Prohibition Amendment Association of Clear- 
field county, when that question was submit- 
ted to the voters of Pennsylvania, and, al- 
though the amendment was defeated in the 
state, it carried Clearfield county by a large 
majority. ,„ 

Mr. Swoope is also largely interested in the 
development of the coal business of Clearfield 
county. In connection with other owners of 
coal property near Madera he was active in 
securing the construction of railroad e.Kten- 
sions and he and his associates built part of 
the necessary railroad branches to reach their 
lands at their own expense and thus opened 
up the largest coal territory now being oper- 
ated in Clearfield county. In the conduct of 
the numerous coal operations in which he is 
interested Mr. Swoope has always insisted on 
recognizing organized labor. Mr. Swoope is 
a stockholder and one of the directors of the 
Curwensville National Bank and is also inter- 
ested in other financial institutions. 

Mr. Swoope was one of the founders of the 
Curwensville "Mountaineer," which is recog- 



nized as among the leading Republican coun- 
try newspapers of the state. He is fond of 
literary pursuits. He is the owner of a fine 
library and has prepared and delivered many 
lectures and patriotic addresses. 

Mr. Swoope is an official member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Curwensville, 
Pa., he is also a member of the Pennsylvania 
Bar Association, the Union League of Phila- 
delpia : the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science; the Historical Society of 
Clearfield county; the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Clearfield-Curwensville 
Country Club and other organizations. 

In May, 1880, Mr. Swoope was married to 
Miss Cora Arnold, daughter of the late Sam- 
uel Arnold, of Curwensville, Pa. To this un- 
ion five children were born, of whom three 
survive, namely: Henry Bucher Swoope, coal 
operator, Madera, Pa., Roland Davis Swoope, 
Jr., editor of the Curwensville "Mountaineer," 
and also editor of the Clearfield County His- 
tory, and Miss Mary Swoope of Curwensville, 
Pa. 

REV. JOHN MITCHELL CHASE, de- 
ceased, who, for a number of years officiated 
in various parts of Clearfield county as an or- 
dained minister of the Baptist faith, was long 
one of the best known citizens of Woodward 
township and became one of its largest land 
owners. He was, however, a self-made man, 
and his accumulations were the result of in- 
dustry', frugality and sound judginent, while 
his liberal disbursements came freely, inspired 
by a kind, charitable and generous nature. He 
was bom in Cuyahoga county, O., March 11, 
1820, and was a son of Benjamin and Eliza 
(Swan) Chase. 

In early boyhood John M. Chase was left 



368 



HISTORY OF CLEARFIELD COUNTY 



fatherless, one of a family of five children be- 
reft of one parent to become burdens on the 
other. The devoted mother had no means 
either to care for them. At that time the fam- 
ily lived in Broome county, N. Y., having 
moved there in 1825, and the mother kept her 
little ones with her as long as possible. The 
inevitable parting came, however, when John 
M. was seven years old, at which age he left 
home to earn his own living. The mother mar- 
ried again but did not much improve her finan- 
cial status. It is recorded in the family, as 
showing the loving, generous and unselfish 
nature of the youth, that in all his lonely wan- 
derings in search of paying employment, he 
never forgot to send messages to his mother 
and as soon as he had secured his first land, a 
little tract on Little Clearfield Creek, he sent 
for her and his step-father and gave them filial 
respect and care as long as they survived. 

In 1845 Mr. Chase was married and in 
1852 moved to the northwest part of Wood- 
ward township and there engaged in lumber- 
ing. That was his main business during his 
active life and he accjuired extensive tracts of 
some of the finest timber land in Clearfield 
county. His home continued to be in Clear- 
field county. 

On August 14, 1862, he enlisted for service 
in the Civil war, entering Company B, 149th 
Pa. Vol. Inf., of which he was elected lieuten- 
ant, but later, through the intervention of his 
personal friend. Governor Curtin, he was ap- 
pointed regimental quartermaster. Army ex- 
posure brought on a disability which resulted 
in his honorable discharge, after nineteen 
months of service. He returned to his home 
and in the course of time resumed his former 
activities. Subsequently he invested in land 
that was rich in coal deposits. From youth 



Mr. Chase had been serious-minded, probably 
in part made so by the heavy responsibilities 
so early placed upon him, and in early man- 
hood had united with the Baptist church, in 
which he was ordained a minister in 1870. 
Prior to the Civil war he was an Abolitionist 
in his political creed and subsequently became 
a Republican, but late in life he associated him- 
self with the Prohibitionists. 

On September 18, 1845, M^"- Chase was 
married to Miss Tabitha Williams and eleven 
children were born to them. Of these, one 
son, John M. Chase, formerly postmaster of 
Cleai-field but now retired, lives at No. 22 S. 
Fourth street, Clearfield. Another son, B. F. 
Chase, now American consul at Leeds, Eng- 
land. For many years he was a very promi- 
nent business man of this city. 

DANIEL RICHARDS, who has devoted 
the larger part of his business life to farming 
and lumbering in Clearfield county, Pa., is one 
of the substantial men of Boggs township and 
a highly respected resident of Wallaceton. He 
was born in Boggs township, February 8, 
1853, and is a son of James and Susan (Dick- 
son) Richards. 

James Richards was one of the old and rep- 
resentative farmers and lumbermen of Boggs 
tow^nship, coming to this section in his youth. 
He married Susan Dickson, and they had the 
following children born to them: Howard, 
John, George, James, Sarah and Tarner, twins. 
Myrtle, Cyrus, Daniel, Kirt, Emma, and 
Velma. Of these, John, James, Sarah and 
Tamer, are all deceased. Sarah was the wife 
of Alexander Gwynn; Tamer was the wife of 
Jacob Ulrich; Myrtle was the second wife of 
Alexander Gwynn; Emma is the wife of Rob- 
ert White, and Velma is the wife of Mat hew 



AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS 



369 



Askey. James Richards and wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Daniel Richards obtained the usual amount 
of schooling that was afforded boys in the sec- 
tion in which he was reared, the most of them, 
like himself, being needed early to assist on 
the home farms. Mr. Richards owns a val- 
uable farm of ninety acres situated in Boggs 
township, together with two houses and four 
lots in the village of Wallaceton, all excellent 
property. He has served six years as a mem- 
ber of the Wallaceton School Board, and 
served also for six years on the borough coun- 
cil. He was reared in the Republican party, 
his father always having given it support after 
its organization, and he has continued his af- 
filiation with the same. 

In 1877 Mr. Richards was married to Miss 
Amelia Sloan, who died December 6, 1901. 
She was a daughter of Charles and Barbara 
(Stoner) Sloan, who came from Lancaster 
county to Clearfield county. They had two 
children: Amelia and Elizabeth, the latter of 
whom married Jacob Dimling. Mr. Richards 
was married, second, February 24, 1904, to 
Mrs. Mary A. (Wetzel) Turner, widow of 
George Turner, and a daughter of Daniel and 
Susannah (Cowder) Wetz