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Full text of "A twentieth century history of Cass County, Michigan"

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977.401 
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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GEN-EALOGY COLLECTK>N 



1833 01074 8157 



A 

Twentieth Centiir\' Histor 



OF 



Cass County. Michigan 



L. H. GLOVER, 

Secretary Cass Cnunty I'inneeiN' Associ.ui.in, 
ELITOR. 



ILLLJSTR.V lElJ. 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO :: \H\V YCRK 

1906 



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HISTORY or CASS COUNTY 

1894—^. H. Honeyman, E. F. Lewis, \\". Carl Eogue. 

1895 — Chas. W. East, L. J. Reynoida, Jonas Ruple. 

1S96— L. L. Laveiiberg, Jolm i\". Coniuu, James ^J. Eoniiie. 

1897— Henry O. Deal, Chas. \V. East, Lot 15. James. 

1S98— Fred \V. Williams, John N. Curtis. 

1899— G. L. lioliister. Cl-.as. W. East, Chas. R. Dodge. 

1900— James ivl. Lonine, C. F. i'"ello\v5, John X. Ijoninc. 

1901— Fred G. Pollock, G. L. HoUister, C. IJ. Donir.e. 

1902— Lot B. James, E. F. Lewis, Edwin Ery. 

1903 — D. K. Thnrston, Geo. LungsdiitV, ilariy j. Keen. 

1904 — Wm. O.Kenford, Gen. Lonusdiitr, Lot I'.. Tames. 

190S— Flarry J. Keenc. F. \V. Harris, Geuruc Longsdiirf. 

1906 — F". D. Lewis, I'.. L. Evans, Lot L. Janie?. 



HON. THOMAS T. HIGGINS. 

For many years Hmi. Thuuias T. Higgins has been reganjed as a 
representalive ami piT.speruns fainier of Cass count}-, and at the present 
time he is making a notaijie record as a member of the general assem- 
bly, being ik'W for the second term representative from his district in 
the Michigan legislatnre. To tlie energetic natures and strong mental- 
ity of sucli men )s due t'le success and ever increasing prosperity of the 
RqjuVjIican party, in this state and in the hands of this class ..if citizens 
there is every :i?surance that the best interests and welfare of tlie party 
will be attended to, resulting in a successful culmination of the highest 
ambitions and expectations entertained Ln- its adherents. Throughout 
his life Mr. Higgins has been a loyal citizen, imbued with patriotism 
and fearless in defense of bis honest convictions, and be is now advocat- 
ing in legislative halls and before the people the principles which he be- 
lieves will best advance the welfare of the commonv.ealth. Such is the 
man whose life history forms the theme of this article. He makes his 
home on section 17. Jefferson township, and when not engaged witli the 
weighty duties of his olTice bis time and energies are concentrated upon 
the successful conduct of v,-hat is one of the best improved farms in 
Cass county. 

Mr. Higgins was born in Randolph countv, Indiana, on the TOth 
of February, 1844, and is of Irish lineage, the family having been 
founded in America early in the eighteenth century. The name Hig- 
gins was known in the old Emerald Isle as Higginson. but now is 
known as Higgins. The representatives of the name in America are 
descended from Thomas Higgins, an early settler of Delaware, and 
the family has furnished to various states prominent representatives, 
who have held important public positions. This number includes Gov- 
ernor Higgins. of New York, who is a second cousin of the subject 
of this review. His paternal grandfather, Joseph Fliggins. was a native 
of Ireland. His father. James T. Higgins, was born in Wilmington. 
Delaware, at the old hnn\e of the family in 1S07, and there -^pent the 



410 HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTY 

days of his b(jyhoud and \(iutli, while in the pubHc schools he acquired 
his educatior.. In 18J9, \\hen a young man of Iwenty-two years. Pres- 
ident Andrew Jackson gave him charge of the mail' route' frum New 
Castle to Foit Delaware. While still a young man he assumed the 
work of gradiiig the first interiirban railroad in the country, frnm Xcw 
Castle to Chesapeake Hay, wniking under Joseph Cannon. ?\Iuch of 
his life. howe\er, was d.evoted to agricultural pursuits. He was mar- 
ried in the east hut at an early day the spirit of the pioneer led him 
to the %vilrls of Indiana, and for some time he resided in Randolph 
county, whence in 1851^ he came to Cass county. Michigan, settling in 
LaGrange townslii)), where he purchased a tract of land and improved 
a farm. Pie \oted for McCIellan in 1864, but early gave his political 
support to the K'epublicaii jiartv. [h.wever. he cast his ballot f.ir Fre- 
mont, its first ])resi(;,'iitial candidate, and for Lincoln in 18^0. He wed- 
ded Miss I\[ary llig-iu-,. who was a native of Xew Jersey and was de- 
scended from the same ancestry. She lived to le hfty-nine years of 
age. while James T. Higgins. the father, reached the very venerable 
age of ninety-one years. In their family were eight children, three 
sons and five daughters, all (if whom grew to manhood or womanhood, 
hut only three are now living: Tlioma-^ T.. of this review; Ceorge; 
and Mary, the wife of Williaiii Ha.--;, of LaCr.an.^e t.iwii-hi]i. 

Hon. 'idiomas T. Higgins wa> the eldest son and tifth child in liis 
father's famil\'. He was reared in Richmond. Wayne county, and in 
Kandol]jh county. Indiana, and was a youth of sixteen year- when he 
came with his i^arents to Cass county. ^lichigan. His early education 
had been acquired in the <rhr,ols of Richmond, and he afterward con- 
tinued his studies in what is known as the ^lechanicsburg school in 
LaGrange township. He has largely been deiiendent ui)on his own re- 
sources from the a,c;e of sixteen \ears and his inherent force of char- 
acter, his utilization of opportunity and his unremitting diligence in 
everything that he has undertaken have constituted the basis of his 
success. When about twenty-one years of age he went south and was 
employed as government teamster for about dn-ee months. This was 
at the close of the war. He then returned to Cass county, wliere he 
began farming on bis own account and throughout his active luisincss 
career he has carried on general agricultural pursuits. 

In 1867 \{r. Higgins was united in marriage to 3>Iiss Caroline 
Rathbum. a daughter of Lucius and Sarah (Click) Rathbum and a 
native of Jefferson township, her iieople having located in Jefferson 
township. Cass county, at a ver>- earlv day. Mr. Higgins lived upon 
his father's farm f^r a time and afterward up<in his father-in-law's 
propertv. but in 1869 took up his abode upon the farm on which he 
nov^r resides on section 17. Jefferson township. At that time only 
twentv acres of land had been cleared and cultivated. He at once. 
however, continued the work of rlevelopment. placed the ereatcr part 
of the land uufler the plow and has put all of the improvements upon 



HISTORY OF CASS COCXTY 411 

tlie property, which is now a splendidlv cultivated fanii. comprising two 
hundred acres ot rich and arable land, from which he annually harvests 
arge crops. II, s first home was a log cabin, but this has long since 
been replaced by a more commodious and substantial modern resi- 
dence. In all of his farm work he is energetic and painstaking He 
tlioruughly uiulerstands his business, and in fact thoroughness is <ine 
of his marked characteristics, manifest in all that he has undertaken 
in every relation of life. He is also thoroughly reliable in his business 
-transactions, his name being a synonvm for integrity and straifditfor- 
ward dealing. ' " ' "'^ 

Unto Mr. and .Mrs. Higgins ha\-e been born five children: J. P.. 
who is now living in Dowagiac. wedded Mi^s Mabel I'almcr 
and is engageil in real estate: b'l.irence. who is the wife of bred 
Shurter. a resident fanner of Jefferson township: Claurle, who was 
a mail carrier on a rural route, but now an agriculturist: he wedded 
Leona Giffr-rd: Leila, the wife of Fred Whitmore, also living in Jef- 
ferson townshi]): ami Flsie. the wife of Hcnrv AtLee. of the state of 
^Vashinglon. 

In April. 1 87 1, ^Ir. Higgins ".a^ made a Ma=nn and is one of 
tlie oldest representatives of C-f^sopolis lodge. He also belongs to the 
Chapter at Cassopolis and is a prominent representative of the frater- 
nity here. In politics he has always been a stanch Republican, taking' 
•m active interest in the local work of the party and doing everything 
in Iiis power to insure its success. He has held various '^local offires, 
but still higiier ]iolitical honors awaited him. for in 1003 he was cho'^en 
to represent his district in the state legislature by a vote" of tw.-) hundred 
and fifty-two. He proxed an acti\e working member of the house and 
that his constitutents regarded favorably his efforts in their behalf is 
shown by the fact that in 1905 he was re-elected by a largely increased 
majority of nine hundred. He has deliverefl various campaign speeches 
and is a forceful, earnest speaker, and is today accounted one of tlie 
prominent representatives of the party in the county. He b.is also left 
the impress of his nuiividuality uivm state legislation. He has never 
pretended to lie an orator anr! tlie members of the house who at first 
were not inclined to pay much attention to the speeches of the farmer 
representali\-e soon found out that they had to cope with a force on 
which they liad little reckonefl. His earnestness and his honesty were 
not alone his strong characteristics, although these traits are most 
commendable. His fellow members found. t^H^, that he had been a 
student of the questions and issues of the day and that he had a keen 
and shrewd insight into matters which came up for discussion. A pub- 
lication of recent flate said: "He is always steady and honest and 
when he set himself the other day to oppose the attorney general's bill 
to allow the institution in Ingliam county of state cases against iiarties 
of all sections of the state he won a victory. The house voted the bill 
down. His speech on that occasion is regarded as bis best address to 



41-^ HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

the legislature." Mr. Higgins also won wide attention by a plan for 
the solution of tlie primary reform problem and his suggestion won 
approval Horn both wings in the reform fight. In regard to this meas- 
ure the reporter for the work of the house, 11. M. Xinriuo, said: "xici,- 
resentative Higgins of Cas? has come forward with a solution of the 
primary reform muddle that has already found favor with sexeral of 
the opponents of direct nominations, including Governor Warner. His 
compromise proposition is this: Retain the "state conventions to name 
candidates to be placed on tlie party ballots and give the people a chance 
to choose the nonu"nee by direct vote from among the candidates for 
Slate ohices so endorsed. Higgins has also accepted the suggestion tliat 
each candidate be endorsed by at least twenty-five per cent of the del- 
egates uf (he state convention Iicfore his name can go on the ballot. 
His measure has received the endr-rscment of manv men prominent in 
the ranks of the Reiniblican party, including Governor Warner, Chair- 
man Stone of tlie house elections committee, banking commissioner 
Moore and others." As stated. '\\v. Higgins has made himself felt as 
a forceful factor in the affairs of the commonwealth, and thnt he has 
won the confidence and support of his fellow citizens is indicated liy - 
the fact of his largely increased m;ijority at his 'second election. His 
career has been one of activitw full of incidents and results, and Iw 
his excellent public service and upright life he lias lionored the comnm- 
nity that has hon.ored him with ofilcial preferment. 

GEORGE W. JONES. 

George W. Jones, at one time closely, actively and heliifully con- 
nected with tlie substantial develoj)ment and progress of Marcellus 
and Cass county, was l-orn in Treble county. Ohio, on the t,vi\ of 
April, 1824, and died April 29, iRo'^i. He came to Michigan aliout 1830, 
in company with his ]jarents, Henry and Hannah Jones, who located 
on Young's Prairie. In the sprincr of iSiq, attracted by the discovery 
of gold on the Pacific sb pe, be made his way to California, where he 
turned his attention to nn'ning. After two years, learning that unless 
extraordinarv efforts \^■ere made the large possessions of his father — 
nine hundred acres — would be lost, he returned to his home to do his 
share toward sa^'ing the property. Six weeks after his return the father 
died, leaving the weight of heavy financial obligations on bis shoulder^. 
He was appointed administrator of the estate, which, however, was 
much encumbered, and capable financiers said that he would never be 
able to pav off the debts. Xnthing daunted, however, and with reso- 
lute spirit and determined energy, he set to work, .and with the assist- 
ance of his two younger brothers. P. J. and J. G. Jones, after eleven 
years, as the result of good financiering, economy and unfaltering labi.ir, 
he was enabled to divide twenty-two thousand dollars among the eleven 
heirs to the estate. Having purchased the interest of some of the other 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 413 

heirs in tlie home property, lie erected nn the farm tlie present fine res- 
idence now owned Isy his heirs. T\\() years subseqnent Georoe W. 
Jones, in company Avith Orson Riuld, inirchased two hundred and se\-en 
acres of land on which is now located the village of Wakelee and in 
18S2 he owned three- fourths of the original purchase. In all of his 
business underlaking-s he displayed remarkable foresight and sagacitv. 
With prophetic eye he seemed to see the line of the railroad and recog- 
nized that the present site of Marcellus would prove an eligible one for 
a village. Accordingly he bought two hundred and ele\en acres of 
land at what was then considered the extravagant price of thirteen thou- 
sand dollars. In 1S70 he began to lay out the village, and the success 
that attended his efforts rnay l:e readily learned by a visit to this enter- 
prising and prosperous town. In 1877. becoming impressed with the 
fact that ■Marcellus needed a bank, he opened such an institution, al- 
though he had had no previous experience in the banking business. 
He made his son. C. S. Jones, his cashier, and the new enterprise proved 
successful beyond his anticipation. He displayed marked business abil- 
ity, executive force and correct judgment, and whatever he undertook 
seemed destined to win success. The secret of his prosperitv. however, 
is found in his unremitting diligence, careful study of any plan which 
he formulated and his dctertninatiiiU in carrying it forward to com- 
pletion. 

On tlie 28th of December. 1S53, Mr. Jones was united in marriage 
to Miss Emma E. Sherman, a daughter of E. R. Sherman nf Cassopo- 
lis, by whom he had two sons. Frank S. and Carroll S., the latter the 
present cashier of the bank, which was incorporated as a state bank 
in 1897. Carroll S. Jones was married to I\Iiss Bessie E. Caul, a daugh- 
ter of Andrew F. Caul, one of the prominent farmers of Marcellus 
township, and they have two children, Donna V. and Carroll B. The 
senior brother, who is unmarried, is president of the bank. 

In 1S70 George \V. Jones was called u]^on to m<'urn the loss 
of his first wife, whu ilicd on the 20th cif Novemlier of that year. On 
the 15th of ^larch, 1876, he wedded ^liss Lizzie O.sborn, a daughter 
of Nathan Osborn, who was a real estate dealer and one of the pioneers 
oi St. Joseph county. ^lichigan. He was circuit judge of that county 
and held other positions of importance. His birth occurred in Con- 
necticut, but his daughter, ^il'-s. Jones, was born in St. Joseph county. 
Michigan, was educated there and became a resident of South Bend. 
She was one of eight children, being the fifth in order of birth. Her 
brother, Hon. James D. Osborn. was on the bench of the circuit court 
at Elkhart, Indiana, and another brother. Hon. George W. Osborn, 
represented St. Joseph county in the Michigan legislature. Unto jMr. 
Jones by his second marriage were born two children : Henry B., who 
is now a banker at Santa Rosa. New ^Mexico, and \"era :\Iay. the wife 
of Walter F. Smith, of Goshen. Indiana, a real estate dealer of that 
place. 



4U HTSTORV OF CASS COUXTY 

yh. Tones wa? reared in tiie faitli of the Society of Friend^ hnt did 
not Leconie a member of anv church, althoucrli he frequentiv attendcl 
reli-ious services and contrihnted liherallv to their snnnort l,pino- a 
firm beliexer in Jesus Christ and His tcachin-s. His political allc-iance 
was oiyen to the Democrncv. hnt lie was witliout aspiration for office 
preferrmcr to o.ve his time and his ener-ies to his business interest^' 
which were capably manarred, winnino- for him a i^ratifvin- measure 
of prosperity as the rears went bv. Tie died in 1806. honored and re- 
spected l)y all who knew iiim not onlv hv reason of the success he had 
achieved, but also because of the straiohtforward business nnlicv he 
bad e\-er followed. ' 

ALEXAXDFR TAYLOR. 

,_\lcxander Taylor. A\ho is q-jvin.e: Ii's attention to the manao-ement 
of a tarm m Cass countv and who in various offices has proved bis lov- 
alty to the seneral welfare, maintains his residence in Ararcelhis He 
was born in Scotland in 1845 -Tid is a .son of Alexander and Helen 
(Stuart) Taylor, both of whom were natives of Scotland. The father 
wlio was a cattle dealer, spent his entire life there. The mother was a 
descendant of the famous roval hou=e of Stuart. Pv thi<: marria-e 
there were iiine children, all of whom came to the United States, namelv • 
William, who died in Canada: Jane, who is the deceased wife of \\\]]. 
lam Mattbewson. a farmer of Will county, Illinois: Alexander, of this 
review: John, a stonecutter of Illinois: Ellen, the wife of loseph Thomp- 
son, a Cbicao:o mechanic: Jessie, the deceased wife of Walter Grave, a 
farmer of W'ill county. Illinois: Alarv A., the wife of Albert French' a 
capitalist of Chicago: Lsabella. who married Allen Fleminir. an agri- 
culturist of McHenry county. Illinois; and William An(lre\\\ who rbcd 
in early life. 

Alexander Taylor was reared upon a farm and attended school at 
Elgin,_ Scotland, his native place. The lalwr of the fields claimed bis 
attention in bis later youth and early manhood, and in 1866. hopinq- to 
enjoy better business privileges in the new world, he crossed the Atlan- 
tic to the United States and located in Will countv. Illinois, where he 
began contractin.s: for timber. In 1875 ^e came to Michi,?an. settling 
in Marcellus, and here entered into partnership with A. S. Hunt in 
the sawmill business, under the firm style of Hunt &: Tavlor. This 
was contimied for a year, at the end of which time he purchased bis 
•partner's interest and admitted Alexander Doig to a partnership. That 
association was also maintained for a year. The firm of Hunt & Tay- 
lor lost heavily through a fire before Mr. Taylor formed his partnership 
with Mr. Doig. whom he later bought out. continuing the business alone 
for al>out fifteen years. During bis partnership with Mr. Doig. bow- 
ever, a Ix^iler exploded, killing three men and injuring Mr. Tavlor. He 
purchased a farm of two hundred and forty acres at Marcellus. consti- 
tuting one of the best properties of the countv. and for a number of 



HISTORY or CASS COUNTY 415 

years liis attentii->n has been given to its supervisiun without otiier busi- 
ness interests, save that he is executor of the large estate of J. F. Gofif. 

In 1876 ^Ir. I'aylor was united in marriage to ^Miss Lvdia Beck, 
a daughter of Levi and Catherine Beck and a native of Indiana. Her 
fath.cr was a tailor by trade and was the owner of considerable land 
in Marcellus townshi]). Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have become the jia rents 
of four children: Belle, who married Arthur Pyne. a profes-^. jr of mu- 
sic in Geneva. Xew York: Grace, a school teacher in Minneapc/jis : Flor- 
ence, the wife of Earl B. Sill, a farmer and stock buyer nf Mavcellus; 
and Catherine, who is attending sclmnl in Marcellus, 

The parents are members (jf the ^lethodist Episcopal church, and 
Mr. Taylor belongs to the ^Vfasonic fraternity, while his political su]v 
port is gi\en to the Republican party. He was a])pointed bv the state 
land commissioner as appraiser of state lands, and for two terms he has 
served as president .if the village of Marcellus. During his incumbency 
in that office the waterworks were built and modern reforms and im- 
provements were inaugurated For sixteen years lie served on the city 
council and during that time was instnunental in establishing the village 
electric light plant. He has likewise Ijeen a memlx:r and d.irector of 
the village school board for two terms and has been chairman of the 
Ivlepublican township committee, being recognized as one of the leaders 
of his partv in this portion of the county. Coming to America when 
a young man, with laudable ambition to attain success, he has improved 
his opportimities and so directed his laliors as to win a place among the 
enterprising citizens of the community and is now in possession of a com- 
fortable competence that has been acquired entirely through his well 
directed efforts. 

J. V. BLOOD, :^I. D. 

Dr. J. V. Blood, who is engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgen,- in Jones, is one of ^klichigan's native sons, his birth having oc- 
curred'in Kent cotuUy on the 13th of February, 1879. Although a young 
man. he has met with envialile success equal to that of many a practi- 
tioner of twice his >ears. His father. J. M- Blood, was also a native of 
Kent county, :Michigan, and was a son of James Blood, who was born 
in New Yo'rk and became one of the early settlers of this state, taking 
up his abode in Kent county when it was a pioneer district. He was of 
English descent, his father having been born in England. He saw 
Grand Rapids grow from its infancy to its present state of development, 
and in the countv where he lived took an active and helpful^ part in the 
work of public progress and improvement. Reared in Kent county. 
J. M. Blood became a prominent fruit farmer of Oceana county, :Mich- 
igan. and carried on business successfully there for many years. He 
wedded IMiss Sarah Angell, a native of Ohio, and they became the par- 
ents of two children, the daughter b'eing Lena Rose, now the wife of 
Roy Morgan, of Shelby. Oceana county. ^Michigan. 



^IC HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

Dr. Blood, who was the elder of the two children, was but a young 
child when taken by his parents to Oceana count\-. wliere he was reared 
from the age of lour years. He began his education in the district 
schools and afterward attended the high school of Hart, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 189S. Having determined upon the 
practice of medicine as a life work, he prepared for the profession as 
a student in Hcring Homeopathic Medical College, in which he c(.m- 
pleted the regular course and was graduated. He has now been prac- 
ticing for about four years. He located in Jones in 1905 and has built 
up a good practice here, having demonstrated his abilitvto succes^tullv 
cope with the many intricate and complex problems which cnntinuall'v 
confront the physician in bis efforts to check the ravages of disease and 
restore health. 

Dr. Blood was married, in. 1905. to ^liss Marie Vcm Bokopf. a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Von Bokopf. She was l;orn and 
reared in Chicago, acquiring her education in the schools there. The 
young couple have gained many warm friends during tlieir residence 
in Jones and the hospitality of their own pleasant home is greatlv en- 
joyed by those who know them. Dr. Blood belongs to the Knights (jf 
the AlaccaJjces and to the }ibidern \\'oodmcn camp and is medical ex- 
aminer of the latter. He was assistant surgeon to Dr. R. H. Yun Kotsch 
for Swift & Company and for Liljljy, ]\IcNeill & Li];by, of Chicagcj. 
Dr. \'on Kotsch is now a resident of Cassopolis. Dr. Blood is a mem- 
ber of the International Homeopathic ]\Iedical Association and also of 
the State Aledical Society. He has a fine practice over the county and 
is making gratifying progress in his profession, where he has alreadv 
won a wide reputation and gained the respect and confidence of his pro- 
fessional luethren as Avell. 

DUANE WITHERELL. 

Duane W'itherell, whose residence in the county dates back to a 
period of early progress and improvement, Avas born on section 35. P.ik.-t- 
gon tow-nship, April 22, 1847. The traA'elcr of today, looking over the 
splendidly improved farms and noting the varied business interests of 
the county, can scarcely realize the great change that has been wrought 
within a half century, and yet it is within the memory- of Mr. Wither- 
ell and other native sons of the county when much of the land was un- 
cultivated and there w'as on every hand evidences of pioneer life. Hi^ 
father. Oilman \Yitherell, was a native of Xew ITampshire and in 1833 
arri\ed in Cass county, locating in Pokagon township abotit 1835. He 
was a cooper by trade and followed that business in the early days, 
manufacturing barrels, which he would then haul to the Chicago mar- 
ket on wagons. He afterward turned his attention to farming and con- 
tinued in the work of tilling the soil up to the time wdien his life's 
labors were ended in death. He passed away when about sixty-eight 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 417 

years of age. wliile liis wife died in i86S. She bore the maiden name of 
:\Iary A. Simpson and was born in Xew Hampshire in 1S12. By her 
marriage slie became the mcjther of five children, two of whom died in 
early youth, while Henry lost his life while defending his country in 
the Civil war, as a member of Company I, Fourth Michigan cavalry. 
George died in California, leaving lluane Witherell the onlv surviving 
member of the family. 

The youngest of the five cliildrcn. Duane Witherell was reared 
upon the old homestead and, like the others, acquired a common school 
education, while in the work of the farm he was carefully trained, so 
that he was well qualified to take charge of a farm of his own when he 
started out upon an independent business career. Fie has alwavs lived 
in this county, and the days of his youth were unmarked bv anv event 
of special importance until he was seventeen years of age, when he re- 
sponded to the country's call for aid. enlisting in 1S65 ks a member of 
the Twenty-fourth Alichigan Volunteer infantry. He continued with 
the army until tlie close of hcjstilities and then returned to his home in 
Pokagon township, continuing farm work there upon the old family 
homestead up to the time of his marriage. On June 24, 1873, he wed- 
ded Miss Dora Stansell, a daughter of William and !^Iargaret Stansell. 
Mrs. Witherell was born in the state of New A'ork .August 10, 1S52, 
and was brought to Cass county when about five years of age. At the 
time of their marriage the young couple located on a farm about a mile 
and a half cast of Pokagon. remaining there until 1901. when thev re- 
moved to their present home in Pol-cagon township. He has been a life- 
long farmer and in his work disjjlays a practical understanding of the 
business in all of its departments, combined with unremitting industr\- 
and energy that never flags. The farm comprises three hundred and 
fifty acres of rich and valuable lantl in Pokagon township, and in addi- 
tion to this property ■Mr. AX'itherell also owns one hundred and fiftv acres 
in Tennessee. He is now practically retired from the active work of 
the farm, which he has given over to the charge of others, while he is 
now enjoying a well earned rest. 

The home of Air. and Mrs. Witlierell has been blessed with two 
children; I\lorris G. and Clarence D. The family is well known in the 
county and the members of the h-niselnold nccup\- an en\-ialile pu^ition in 
the regard of friends and neighbors. Mr. Witherell belongs to the 
Masonic lodge at Pokagon and ]\Irs. ^^'itherell is a member of the Flast- 
ern Star of Dowagiac. Michigan, and he has been a life-long Republi- 
can. He has met with a fair measure of success in the business world 
and though he has never sought to figure prominently in public life 
his career is that of a citizen of worth who by tlie faithful performance 
of each day's duties contributes to the sum total of prosperity and 
progress. 



-ilS HISTORV OF CASS COUNTY 

JAMES McAllister. 

James ^rcAllister. one ..f tlie old settlers of Pokaq-nn to^nsliip 
living on section 29, ^vas bom upon this farm ^La^ch 12. 184S. and 
conies of Scotch lineage. His father, John .A[. AJcAlli^ter. was a native 
of Scotland, born in 18 14. and in tliat countrv he was married to :\Iiss 
IMarian Forsyth, who was al.so a native of the land f,f hills and heather. 
They remained in that ctmntry until 1S44, when, believing that he 
might enjoy better business opportunities in the new v.orlfl." :Mr. Mc- 
Allister came to tlie L'nited Slates and journeyed at (uice intn the inte- 
rior of the county, settling upiii tlie farm whereon his son Lames now 
resides. He secured here a wild and unimproved tract of land, but 
in the course of time he had dcvel..i)cd it into good fields and he re- 
sided thereon until about 1870. when he v/ent to Texas. Lie purchased 
land with the intention of locating there, but he was not long permitted 
to enjoy his new home, fnr his death occurred in 1875, when he was 
in his sixty-firstyear. His wi.I-w long survived him and lived to the 
advanced age of eighty-se\en }ears, spending her last davs upon the 
old homestead farm in Pokagon township. In the faniilv' were seven 
children, of whom the eldest two were born in Scotland, while the 
others were all born in Cass ciiup.t\-. 

James McAllister, the fitth child of his father's family, spent his 
boyhood and ycjuth upon the old linmestead and acquired a' good Eng- 
lish education in the district schools. Ilis training at farm labor was 
not meager and he has always given his attention to general agricult- 
ural pursuits. He now Ins ninety-two acres of land on section 2c>. 
Pokagon township, and two hundred and forty acres on section 20 of 
the same townshi]), so that his realty possessions are quite extensive. 
The land in this part of the state is rich and valuable and responds read- 
ily to cultivation, so that his fields are now quite productive. He votes 
with the Democratic ])arty, but has ne\er been an aspirant fdr office, 
preferring rather to give his attention to his business affairs. 

JAMES H. LEACH. 

James H. Leach is proprietor of an attractive summer hotel known 
as Shore Acres, which stands in the midst of a valuable farm of eightv 
acres de\oted to the cultivation of fruit and garden products. In his 
capacity of landlord he has become widely known and popular with 
many patrons and is meeting with gratifying success in his business 
affairs. Numbered among Penn trjwnship's native sons, he was born 
on the 25th of November, 1847, '^"d is a representative of one of the 
pioneer families of this part of die state. His parents were Joshua and 
]\latilda (Smith) Leach. His father was born in Vermont in 18 12 
and on leaving New England removed to Erie county. Pennsylvania, 
vhence he came to Cass county, Michigan, in 1833, casting in his lot 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 419 

among the enrly settlers who were reclaiming- the wild land and replac- 
ing the evidences of frontier life 1 y the conditions which indicate im- 
provement and progress. Pie settled in Penn township, where he 
purchased land, upon which he turned the first furrows. In course of 
time he had brok-en the fields, had planted seed and with autumn came 
good crops. He cleared up a great amount of land in the county and 
his efforts were beneficial in the reclamation of what was once a wild 
and unimproved district. He died in his seventy-ninth \cnr. His wife. 
who was a native of Ohio and a daughter of Eleazer Smith, of St. 
Joseph county, Indiana, was sixt}--fi\e }ears of age at the time of her 
demise. In their family were eis.:ht children, of whom four are now 
living, James H. being the fifth child. 

In taking up the personal history of James H. Leach, we present 
to our readers the life record of cue who is widel}- and favorably known. 
In retrospect one can see him a farm boy. trudging daily to scliool dur- 
ing the contiiuiance of the sessions and afterward su]ip!emcnting his 
early educatic^nal pri\ilegcs In- a course in the high school at Cassopolis. 
He worked in the fields upon the liome farn: through the summer 
months and after completing his education continued to assist in the 
farm work for some time. He afterward engaged in the grocery bus- 
iness in partnership with C. E. A'oorhis for five years and on the expi- 
ration of that period sold out to his partner and went to Florida, where 
he laid out an orange gro\-e of four hundred orange trees and also 
planted two hundred lemon trees, his place being in Hillsboro county, 
while his postofiice was Limona. For four years his attention was de- 
voted to the development of his fruit ranch in the south, and he then 
returned northward, locating in South Bend, Indiana, where he engaged 
in the operation of a planing mill and the conduct of a lumber yard, be- 
ing actively connected with the business for about thirteen years. On 
the expiration of that period he returned to Penn township, locating at 
his present residence on the n:irth shore of Diamond Lake. The place 
is known as the J. C. Moim farm and the house is called Shore Acres. 
He has a tract of land of eighty acres and he also owns other land in the 
old homestead farm. He conducts the summer hotel in connection witli 
his general farming interests and the raising of fnu't, having a fine 
orchard, while from his fields he annually harvests good crops of grain. 

On the 4th of April, 1S83. Mr. Leach was united in marriage to 
Miss Fannie Punches, a daughter of Moses and Jane Punches. Mr. 
Leach votes with the Democracy and is a member of the Woodmen of 
the World. The family name has long figured in this county, being 
indelibly inscribed upon the pages of pioneer history as well as of later 
clay progress and in-iproven-ient. yir. Lx;ach has been watchful of bus- 
iness opportunities pointing to success, and has wrought along modern 
lines of progress. He possesses a genial manner, courteous disposition 
and deference ior the opinion of others, which have rendered hini a pop- 
ular citizen. 



420 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 

CHAKiES C. RICKERT. 

Charles C. Rickcrt deserves mentiun among- tlie old settlers of 
Cass county, for during sixty years he has lived within its borders. 
This covers the entire period of his life, his birth having occurred upon 
the old family homestead where he now resides on the 31st of Januarv. 
1846. The farm is situated on section 7, Calvin township, and is well 
improved property, which in its excellent appearance indicates the un- 
tiring labor and well-directetl efforts of the Rickerts. The paternal 
grandparents of our subject were Abram and ]^Iagdalene Rickert, who 
on emigrating westward from Pennsylvania to ■Michigan settled in 
St. Joseph county. Their son, Leonard Rickert. father of our subject, 
was born in the Keystone state and accompanied his parents when they 
sought a home in the middie west. About 1S40 he came to Cass coun- 
ty, settling on the farm where his son Cliarles C. now resides. It was a 
wild and unimproved tract, but he at once began the work of trans- 
forming the raw prairie into productive fields. Plowing and planting 
were carried on and the summer sun ripened the grain and good har- 
vests were g.ithered in the autumn. He continued the work of cultivat- 
ing and improving his property until his death. He married ]\Iiss 
Margaret .Ann Crawford, a native of Ohio, who came with her parents 
to jMichigan in her girlhood days. By this marriage were born six chil- 
dren, one of whom died in early childhood, while five reached mature 
years. The father departed this life when about forty-two years of 
age and the mother died when fifty-six years of age. 

Charles C. Rickert, the second child and eldest son in the family, 
was reared on the farm where he yet makes his home. At the usual 
age he began his education as a student in the district schools of 
Calvin township, and he enjoyed the pleasures of the play-ground when 
not occupied with his book? or the farm work. He developed a self- 
reliance and force of character which have been strong elements in his 
career. On the 2Stli of 3\Iav, 1877. he was married to Miss Susanna 
Shaw, a daughter of Xathan and Marion Shaw and a native of Ohio, 
in which state her girlhood days were passed. At the time of his mar- ■ 
riage T^Ir. Rickert located upon the old homestead where he has since 
lived, giving his attention to general farming and stock raising. He 
here owns one hundred and two and a half acres of good land, most 
of which is under cultivation and in addition he has fifty acres of tim- 
ber land in the same township. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rickert were bom a daughter and son; El- 
len, who is now engaged in teaching in Porter township; and Charles 
Herman, at home, assisting in the work of the farm. 

Susanna, the daughter of Nathan and ^Mariam Shaw, was born in 
Columbiana countv, Ohio. October 2;th. 184;. In 1856 she came with 
her parents to ^Michigan, settling in St. Joseph count\-. afterwards mov- 
ino- to Cass county, where she resided up to the time of her death. May 



CHARLES C. RICKERT AND FAMILY. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY i-2l 

25th, 1897. On 'Slay 24th, 1S77. slie was united in marriage to Charles 
Rickert, \\lio with two children, Ellen S. and C. Herman, survive her 
She was ever a faithful and consistent Christian, always striving to 
do the will of her Alaster and ever thoughtful for the welfare of others. 
She was a thorough worker in whate\er she was engaged and her loss 
is greatly felt by all who knew her. 

For almost twent}- years did Mr. and ]\Irs. Charles C. Rickert 
travel life's pathway together, sharing alike the joys and sorrows of 
life. She was an amiable wife and a loving mother. She had always 
stood by the side of her husband, ever ready to aid him in advice and 
counsel in the building up of their comfortable home. She was a de- 
vout member of tb.e Friends' Church, known as Birch Lake Friends' 
Church, in Calvin township. Her remains are interred in the Reams 
and Norton cemetery, where a beautiful stone marks her last resting 
place. There is a vacant chair in the home circle, and a link in the 
mystic chain, which cannot be again filled. 

Mr. Rickert has continuously resided in Calvin township with the 
exception of nine months spent in Cassopolis, where he removed in 
order to give his children better educational privileges. His study of 
the political issues and questions of the day has led him to give his 
advocacy to the Democratic party. He is a memlx^r of the Friends 
church and his life exemplifies the teachings of that sect, which has 
always promulgated a spirit of kindliness, consideration, charity and 
righteousness. He has been identified with the upbuilding of the coun- 
ty through six decades, bearing his full share in the workof public 
progress and improvement, and is justly accounted one of the rep- 
resentative citizen? of Cass county. 

J. M. LAKE. 

J. M. Lake, living on section 7, Penn township, where he owns 
and controls ninety-seven acres of good land, his home being^known as 
"Stone Abutment' Farm," was born in Chenango county. New York, 
March 2^. 1842. Flis father, Richard Lake, was a native of the Empire 
state, as was the paternal grandfather of our subject, Joseph Lake, who. 
however, spent his last years in Michigan. He lived for some time in 
Cass countv. where his death occurred in Niles, this state. It was in the 
year 1844 that Richard Lake took up his abode in Cass county, locatmg 
on section iS. Penn township. As this fact indicates, he was a farrner by 
occupation, his life being given to that pursuit, wherein he provided a 
comfortable living for his familv. He married Miss PLannah Crandall, a 
daughter of Tanner Crandall, who was born in New York. In the family 
of Mr. and Mrs. Richard I^ake were seven children, three sons and four 
daughters, namelv: Harrison H. ; James M. ; Qiarles N.; Mary, wife of 
Bvron Sprague : Sarah J., wife of Cla^-ton H. Sigerfoos: Rosetta, wife 
of B. Frank Slipper; and Flmma, wife of Henry Ferrel. The father 



422 HISTORY OF C.VSS COUXTY 

died in the ei-Iity-seoind year of lii> age, while the nnjtlier lived to be 
about ?ixt}- years. 

J. M. Lake was Ijut two years old when brought bv his [jarents to 
Michigan and upon the Iiome taim in F'enn township he was reared. At 
the usual age he entered the pnl'lic sehools and when not busv with his 
text books his time was given to farm labor. After leaving schoul per- 
manent])- he gave undivided attention to farm work on the old home- 
stead up to the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1S73. the lady 
of his choice being Tsliss Anna Tripp, a daughter of Chester Tripp. 
She was bnrn in Barry couiitw Michigan, and <Iied in iSyj. leaving a 
little daughter, who died in iX()4. ^.W. L;tke has a farm of ninetv- 
seven acres, which he has im]>rovcd with modern equipments .and which 
he now rents. It is largely devoted to the production of fruit and he 
has five hundred trees of peaches and apples ujion the place. His trees 
produce quite alamdantly almost every season and the fruit shipped 
from his jdacc yields a good fmanci.al income. Mr. Lake has Ijeen a 
resident of Cass county for '-ixty-four years, with the exceiUion of (ine 
year, which he S])cnt in I'cnnsylv.ania. and is therefore well inlV.rmed 
concerning the history of the cor.nty and the progress it has made irum 
pioneer con<litions to its present advanced state of cultivation and im- 
provement, lie has been a lifed(jng Democrat, interested in the growth 
and success of his jnirty. ami ha-^ '^er\ed as school director. He for- 
merly belonged to the Indeiiendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

JOSFT'H C. KYLE. 

Joseph C. Kyle, a \eteran of the Civil war, who has been equally 
loyal to his country in the performance of duties that devolve upon 
him in conncctii n with civic (jffices to which he has been called, has 
for many years made his home in Union, wdiere he has long been en- 
gaged in painting and plastering. His birth occurred in Kosciusko 
count)-, Indiana, October 7, 1845, '"^'i'' is a son of Andrew- and Frances 
S, (Jones) Kyle, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of 
Virginia. They became the parents of four children, two sons and two 
daughters, all of whrmi reached adult age. Josejih C. and ]\Iary Cor- 
nelia are twins and the latter is now the w-ife of Henry Borne, of Bata- 
gor, IMichigan. A lirother, .Vb.n^o K. Kyle, is living in Ellsworth, 
Kansas, while the other daughter. Flora A., is the wife of Charles Xye, 
a resident farmer of Pokagon townshi]). On leaving the east Andrew- 
Kyle, the father, became one of the early settlers of Elkhart county. 
Indiana, and in 1S49 'ic went to California, attracted by the discovery 
of gold on the Pacific coast. He afterward returned to his native state. 
howex-er, and his last days were there passed. His wife lived to b*' sev- 
enty-tw-o years of age. 

Joscjih C. Kyle of this re\-iew has been a resident of Cass county 
from the age of three years, arrivir.g here in 1848. He was reared in 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 403 

P.^ter township n,i,l was onlv eighteen rears of a^^e uhen he 
enhsted for ser^■,ce m the Civil war. liecomin- a private of Comnan;- C 
iwent.;-^urth Mid.i^an Vohn.teer Infantrv.^ Ur serve.! until thcl.S 
of hostilities anri after the war returned to Union, where he en-ac^ed in 
pamtmo- ard phsterino-. He learned the trades and followed the hus- 
niess for thu'tv vears. Because of his excellent workmanship manv 
important contracts have hcen awarded him and his services have heer 
in constant demand, so tint he has won a -or^l livin- and secured a 
comtortahle Iiome. '^ .-, • . 

Mr. Kyle was married Seutemher -^ i<'^'').; to Miss :\raHssa Brown 
a daughter of Joshua and Sarah A. ( Tow) Brown, and a native of Tlk- 
hart county. Indiana. Mr. Kyle has resided in Cass countv for fiftv- 
six years and is one of its renresentati^•e citizens. His political alle-iance 
has loiio; been earnestly .qiven to the Repuhlican partv. and he is now 
servm^r as a member of the board of reviews. Fratcrnallv he is con- 
nected with Carter post. Xo. 96. G. A. R.. of Union, in which he has 
tilled some of the offices, and he also belongs to the Grange, while his 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Freewill Baptist 
c]nirch._ in which he takes a helpful part, serving as one of its deacons, 
and doing all in his power to promote the various cliurch activities and 
extend its iniluence. He is widely known in bis ].art of the county Iw 
reason of his interest and co-operati(jn in public affairs and also on ac- 
count of his business conrectinns. He has been found reliable at all 
times in his business career, faithfully executing his work in accordance 
with the terms of his contracts, and his energ-y, perseverance, laudable 
ambition and resolute purpose have been the strong and salient features 
of his life record. 

LESLIE C. WFTLS. 

Leslie C. Wells, residing on secti.m jG. Pokagon township, was 
born in Wayne township. Cass county, on the Sth of November. 1855. 
His paternal grandfather. Woden Weils, was a native of Connecticut, 
whence he removed to New York, and at an early .lay he came to Mich- 
igan, -taking up his abode in Kalamazoo county. 'Hc was of Welsh 
lineage. His son. Homer \\'ells. the father of our subject, was born 
in the Empire state and when a youth of ten years accompanied his 
parents on their reiiKjval to Kalamazoo county, wliere he remained until 
1849, when he came to Cass county, taking up bis abode in Wayne 
township, where he engaged in general farming. He was for many 
years a representative and leading agriculturist of this part of the state 
and his dealli occurred in 1904. when he had reached the advanced age 
of seventy-tliree )ears. In politics he was a stanch and earnest Repub- 
lican, interested in the W(jrk of the party and doing all in his power for 
its growth and success. He held a number of local offices, to which he 
was called by his fellow townsmen, wdio recognized his worth' and abil- 



-^24 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

ity and who f,)uiul in him a capahle official. In his earlv manhood he 
wedded Aliss Laura A. Reed, a native of Oliio and a dau.jjhter of A. 
H. and Maria (Jenninjjs) Rec^l. who went originally from Vermont to 
Ohio and thence came to Michigan, settling in W'a'vne township, Cass 
county. Mrs. Wells was at that time a voung girl'and she died' when 
but twenty years of age. 

Leslie C. Wells, the only child, remained with his father, who 
afterward married again, his second uniini l.ieing with Fannie Bever- 
stock. In the ])ublic schools y\r. Wells acquired his education and dur- 
ing the summer months aided in the farm work until seventeen vears 
of age, when he left home, starting out upon an independent business 
career. He entered the emi^l-.y of the Michigan Central Railroad Com- 
pany in connection with the construction gang and in the following 
year he began teaching scliod, which profession he followed for twenty 
years during the winter months. He attended the Vicksburg high 
school during that time and he continually broadened his knowledge by 
reading, observation and investigation. As an educator he was capable 
and eflicient, imparting readily to others the knowledge that he had 
acquired and maintaining good discipline, without whicli successful 
work is never done in the school room. During the summer months he 
worked at farm labor and he also spent some years in California, Wash- 
ington and Oregon. He likewise went to the soutli, passing one year 
in Alabama. 

In 1881 I\Ir. Wells was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. 
Shookman, a daughter of Otho and Elizabeth (Wright) Shookman. 
She was bom in Wayne township and for about fifteen years engaged 
in teaching school, being also one of the successful teachers of this 
part of the state. At the time of his marriage Mr. Wells located in La- 
Grange township, settling upon a part of the old homestead farm, ujwn 
which he lived for three years, when he took up his abode upon a 
rented farm in Silver Creek township, there living for two years. On 
the expiration of that period, with the money which he had managed to 
save from his earnings he purchased forty acres of land in LaGrange 
township and cultivated that place for three years. His present farm 
consists of one hundred and twenty acres in Pokagon township, where 
he has resided for the past eight years. His farm is the visible evi- 
dence of his well-directed thrift and energy, for when he started 
out on his own account he had no capital. He has worked per- 
sistently and the _\ears have brought him success, owing to his 
diligence and capable management. Goethe has said, "Merit and 
success go linked together," and the truth of this assertion is veri- 
fied again and again in the lives of such men as ^Ir. Wells, whose 
prosperity is attributable entirely to his own labors. In politics he is a 
stanch Republican, interested in the growth and success of his party. 
He was tureu-ian of the first grand jury that had been convened in the 



HISTORY OF CASS COl'XTY 425 

county in frrt\-six year?, actini:: in that capacity in iqo;. He is a 
member of the .ALascnic fraternity and also belontrs to the Modern Wood- 
men Camp. 

WlLLl.-VM H. GARWOOD. 

The arduous task of developing and cultivating new land is one 
familiar to William H. Garwood, a representative farmer of Pokagon 
township, who in the successful management of his business interest* 
has displayed excellent business aliility, keen discernment and unfalter- 
ing diligence. He was born in the township where he yet resides 
November 5, iS>\G. His father, Jesse Garwimd. was one of the old set- 
tlers of the county and was a native of \\^arren county, Ohio, where his 
birth occurred on the 15th of August, i8o5. There he was reared and 
educated, and on leaving the Buckeye state he removed to Terre Coupe 
Prairie, Indiana, in iSjj. Fie worked at the Indian mission for two 
summers and in 1829 he came to Pokagon township. Cass countv, Mich- 
igan, settling on his present farm. Pie had located this land in 1832. 
It was all raw and unimproved, but he cleared sixty acres. He had two 
hundred and forty acres in the original tract and the arduous task of de- 
veloping a new farm fell to him and was successfully carried vn. His 
marriage on the 6th of December. 1S44, to Miss Rachel Prather uas 
celebrated in this county. The lady was a native of Madison county. 
Indiana, born Se])tember 24. 1S08. and William H. Garwcmd was the 
only child born of this marriage. The father voted with the Republican 
party and was the champion of many progressive measures, especially 
those which contributed to substantial progress and improvement. Pie 
died September 11, 1889, while his wife passed away in 1885. 

In his youth William PI. Garwood worked upon the old farm 
homestead and cleared the entire place save the sixty acres which his 
father brought under culti\'ation. At his father's death he took posses- 
sion of the entire farm and lias since been one of the representative 
agriculturists of the community, giving undivided attention to the fur- 
ther improvement of his property. Everything about the place is neat 
and thrifty in appearance and the fields annually return to him golden 
harvests. 

On the 2 1st of November, 1866, Mr. Garwood was united in mar- 
riage to ]Miss Lucinda F. Demmons, a native of ^Michigan, born on 
the 23d of November, 1S44, ^"f' ^ daughter of Alanson Demmons, w^ho 
was a farmer by occupation. Unto Air. and Mrs. Garwood have been 
born nine children, of wdiom six are deceased. Those living are : Aman- 
son W., on his father's estate; Dwight, in Kansas City, ^Missouri ; and 
Blanch, wife of Charles Phillips, of Pokagon. All were born upon the 
old homestead farm. 

Mr. Garwood is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also be- 
longs to the Woodmen camp at Pokagon. In politics a Democrat, he 
takes an active part in the local work of the party, ser\-ed as supervisor 



426 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

for two vears and was also t<5\vnshii) treasurer f<ir two years. His ef- 
forts in behalf of public prog-ress have been effective and beneficial and 
his support can alwa}'S be counted upon to further any movement for 
the general good. He has spent his entire life in Pokagon township and 
as a native .son and pioneer settler of Cass county well deserves repre- 
sentation in this volume, while his genuine worth entitles him to the 
confidence rmd gnod will which are uniformly gi\'en him biy his fellow 
townsmen. 

C. DELIVAX AIcCOY. 

One does not have t<> carry his invcstigatirms far into tlic history 
of Cass coiuitv without learning that the IVfcCoy family became iden- 
tified with pioneer progress at an early day. Upon the nld fru-m home- 
stead C. Delivan AlcCoy was born on the 13th of Xnvemhcr. 1852. He 
is a son of Richard McCoy, who is represented on another page of this 
work. He was reared to the occupation of farming, early becoming 
familiar with the labors of the fields as he assisted in the work of plow- 
ing, planting and harvesting. Tn the public scb.ool system of the neigh- 
torhood he is indeliled for the eilucational privileges he enjoyed. 

In November, 1S75, he was married to JMiss Estella Hartzel. a na- 
tive of Pokagon, born July 2R, 1R59. She was reared in Prikagon 
township, and is a daughter of Simon Hartzel. one of the early settlers 
of Cass countv, who, coniing to ibis section of tlie state, gave his atten- 
tion to farming interests and aided in the work of public progress and 
impro\ement. JNIr. and Mrs. McCoy have become the parents of eight 
children, two sons and six daughters: Lena, now the wife of Henry 
Silvers; Ida and Charles, at Imme ; I^lla. the wife of AVilliam Stewart, 
of Dowagiac, Michigan: PTattie, the wife of Harry Walworth: ;Minnie 
•and Cecil, at home; and Clyde, deceased. 

When tb.e time came that 3.1r. :\IcCoy should make choice of a 
life work he determined to follov.- the pursuit to which he had been 
reared, and he has therefore always remained upon the old homestead, 
where he has one lumdred acres of land, the greater part of which is 
under cultivation. This ]il-'ce was cleared and improved by the Mc- 
Cov familv and the subiect of this review is carrying on the farm work 
in keeping with the general spirit of advancement that has been char- 
acteristic of the McCoys since the family home was first established in 
this countv. 

ALEX.\NDKR ROP.ERTSON. 

Alex-nfler Ro' ertsMi. following the occupation of fanning on sec- 
tion 27. Pokagon township, is a native of the Empire state, his birth 
having occurred in Argvle. Washington county. New York, on the 3d 
of March. 1826. His father, .Vrcbibald Rolwrtson. was likewise a na- 
tive of Washington county, born hi Cambridge in 1784, and in that 
state he was reared, beconiing a farmer by occupation. Pie was mar- 
lied ill Washington countv to :\Iiss .Amy Robertson, who was born m 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 427 

New "^'firk in 1787. and remained a resirlent of tliat state nntil iier 
death, wliicli occurred in 1852. Unto ]\[r. and Mrs. Arciiihald Rob- 
ertson were liorn nine children. fi\"e .sons and four daui^hters : William, 
Peter C, -\Iartlia. Mary, .Archibald. John, Joanna and Ehzalieth. all 
deceased: and Alexander, wlio is the youngest and only sun,-iving mem- 
ber of the family. All were born and reared in W'ashinc^ton countv, 
New York. The mother died in Onondacra county, that state. In Fel)- 
ruary. 1S54, the father emii^rated westward to Cass county, Alichigan, 
settliiig- in Pdkaq-on township cm the farm which is now the home of 
his son Alexander. Here he carried on general agricultural pursuits 
until his death, which occtUTed June 28, 1867. His early political alle- 
giance was given to the \\'hig party and upon its dissolutinn he joinef! 
the ranks of the new Republican party. 

Alexander Robertsori ob.tained his education in the public schotds 
of New York and worked ujion the home farm there until twenty-seven 
years of age, when he came with his family to Michigan. He had been 
married in the Empire state on the 13th of ^Nlarch, 1S50. to Aliss Mary 
E. Briggs, a native of Wayne county, Xew York, born June 20, 1827. 
She was reared in Xew York and was a daughter of \A'il!iam and Rrix- 
anna (Ely) Briggs, who -were farming peojjle. .\ftcr his marriage 
]\lr. Robertson remained for four years in X'cw York ami was a teacher 
in that state for a long period, becoming actively connected with the 
profession when seventeen years of age. After his arri\al in Michigan 
he taught school for two years at Summerville and was also a teacher in 
LaGrange township for two terms, while in the winter of 1874-5 be 
taught the village school at Pokagon. He was thus closely associated 
with the intellectual development of the community and ever upheld a 
high standard of education and public instruction. His fitness frir lead- 
ership being recognized by his fellow citizens he was elected to the state 
legislature in 1872 upon the Republican ticket and served as a mem- 
ber of the hou«e for tw(.i years. He has Ijeen a life-long Republican, 
.taking an active and helpful interest in the local work of the party and 
doing all in his power to promote its growth and insure its success. He 
has been a memlicr of die school hoard since living in the countv and 
the cause of ]niblic instruction has indeed found in him a warm and 
able champion. He was township supervisor for eight vears during 
the war and subseciuent to that time. At his father's death he tnok pos- 
session of the old homestead of eightv acres, to which he has since added 
a similar tract, so that he now owns and operates a valuable farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres, which annually returns to him an excel- 
lent income. 

By his first marriage Mr. Robertson had eight children, a son and 
seven daughters, namely : Eudorn, deceased : Ella Evangeline : Ida E. : 
Harriet and .\nn, both deceased: .\my L. ; ]\Iartha, who has passed 
away: anrl Erank A. Two of the children were born in Xew 
York and the others upon the old homestead farm in Pokagon town- 



4-2S HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ship after the reni'ival of the family u> this county. Tlie wife and 
mother died March jj, 1S74. and several years later, on the 24th of 
April, 18S3. Mr. Rohcrt.vin \va_-. married to ]\[rs. Uzziel I'utnam, the 
widow of L'zziel Putnam, the hrst while child born in Cass county, his 
natal day being in August, 1826. Airs. Robertson is a native of Gales- 
burg, Illinois. Both our subject and his wife are esteemed by a large 
circle of friends and he is numbered among the pioneer settlers of the 
county, having cast in his lot with its early residents. From that time 
to the present he has been a champion of progre5si\-e public measures 
and has rejoiceil in what has been accomplished in the county as the 
changes have lieen wrought that have transformed it from a i)ioneer 
region into one of rich fertility, bearing all the evidences of an ad- 
vanced civilization. 

JOSFPII LYBROOK. 

Joseph Lybrook is the owner of a valuable farm of one hundred 
and cigh'L_\-ti\-e acres on section 22, LaGrange to\s'nship, and in addi- 
tion to this property he also has forty acres on section t,- <^f the same 
township and is one of tlie stockholders in the creamery. His business 
interests are characterized l>y close application and unfaltering diligence, 
which constitute the basis of all desirable success. Fie seems to have 
realized fully that "there is no excellence without labor" and has ex- 
emplified this adage in his life wurk. It was upon the farm where he 
now- resides that he first opened his e\es to the light of day, his liirth 
occurring on the 22nd of November, 1S45. The name "Lybrook" as 
now si)elle<l \vas in the original German text spelled "Leibroch." The 
grandfather, Henry Leibroch, was Iwrn in Virginia, April 2, 1755, 
and died August 22, 1839. ^^ ^^''^ ^ soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
and many times saw General Washington. Mr. Lybrook has in his 
possession an old passport, dated Feliruary 27, 1787, gi\-en Flenry 
Leibroch. which is written in a beautiful copper plate handwriting. He 
also has four of the parchment deeds bearing the following dates of 
execution: two on November 10, 1S30. February 8, 183 1 and April 
I, 183 1, and these deeds are all signed by President Andrew Jackson 
and are valuable as relics. 

John Lybrook, father of Joseph, was a native of Giles county, Vir- 
ginia, born October 25. T798, and in 181 1 he accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Preble county, Ohio. In 1S23 he came to Mich- 
igan, making the journev in order to assist Squire Thompson in his re- 
moval to this state. When he made the start he intendefl going only 
fifty or sixtv miles, but he continued with him on the journey until 
Cass countv was reached. Ou the last day of December of the same year 
he started back on foot to Ohio accompanied by a young man of the 
name of Eaton. Thev first camped near where IMishawaka now stands, 
and from that point Mr. Lybrook continued on his way to Fort Wavne. 
where he procured assistance for the return trip. His partner had his 



"1 



^ ,' 



^s. 



. _. .^ 


■■■■- y\ 

'f :. 



Lu^U, iyU^e-^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 429 

foot frozen a1xn.it that time and y\r. Lybrook endured many hardships 
and much exposure in In's endeavor to reach his home, but eventually 
the journey was completed. However, he had become interested in 
the western country and its possibilities for development, and in 1824 
he came once more to Alichigan, bringing with him some cattle. In the 
spring of 1825 he planted eleven acres of corn in what was known as 
the Second b'ield below Xiles. He afterward returned to Ohio with 
a yoke ol oxen hitched to the back wheels of a lumber wagon. In 
the following spring, however, he returned to ^Michigan, bringing with 
him a barrel of wheat, which was the first wheat sown in southwestern 
Michigan. In the spring of 1828 he removed to the farm where Joseph 
Lybrook ni3w resides, and there continued to make his home until his 
death. It was wild and unimproved land when it came into his posses- 
sion and he turned the first furrows upon the place and planted the 
first crops. In course of time he had transformed this into a valuable 
properly, which he continued to cultivate with success for many years. 
He gave his support to the Democracy during the greater ])art of his 
life, sa\e that he voted for William Henry Harrison. ?Ie passed awav 
May 25, 1881, and the county thus lost one of its most prominent and 
honored pioneer settlers — a citizen who from the earliest epoch in the 
history oi this section of the state had been identified with its improve- 
ment. His wife bore the maiden name rif Mary Hurd and was a native 
of England, whence she came to America at the age of seven years. 
She was born in 1821, became a resident of jMichigan in 1836 and died 
January 25, 1903, at the very advanced age of eighty-two years. In 
the family of this worthy couple were two sons and a daughter, but 
Henry died in Oklahoma and Arminda is also deceased, leaving Joseph 
as the only surviving memlier of the family. 

Joseph Lybrook was the second child and has spent his entire life 
upon the farm where he now li\-cs, covering a period of more than six- 
ty years, ^^^len a boy he took his place in the fields, and as his age and 
strength permitted he assisted more and more largely in the work of 
the home farm and has since been identified wn'tli the growth and de- 
velopment of the county. He has in his home place one hundred and 
eighty-five acres of land, and also forty. acres on section 32. LaGrange 
township. His home farm is under a high state of cultivation and the 
fields are improved with modern machinery, while the work is carried 
on along the most progressive lines. He is also owner of stock in the 
creamery. His political support has been given to the Democracy. A 
worthy representative of an honored pioneer familv, he has carried for- 
ward the work whkh was begun by his father and the name of Lybrook 
has thus long been closely associated with the substantial improvement 
and development of Cass countv. 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTY 



CLIFFORD L. TAYLOR 



Clifford L. Taylor, a fanner and breeder of registered P(jland 
China hogs, being proprietor ut the Runnd Oak herd, makes his home 
on section 34, I'okagon township. He is a native son of the middle 
west and in his life has exemplified the enterprising spirit which has 
been the dominant factor in the rapid and substantial improvement of 
the upper }vlississippi vallew His birth occurred in Grant county. Wis- 
consin, on the 17th of April, 1852. His father, James W. Tayl. .r, also a 
farmer by occupation, was a native of Xew York state, born in 1S28, 
and about 1846 he l;ecame a resident of Wisconsin, settling on a farm 
there. In 1800 he left that state and with his family removed to Water- 
loo, Iowa, wliere lie was engaged in farming and al.so in operating a 
threshing machine. After three years he left Iowa and tcxok his family 
to Indiana, settling thirteen miles south of the city of South Bend. 
There he contracted with the v.ell known Studebaker firm and cleared 
•a farm of thirty acres of land. On leaving Indiana he tor.k up his 
ab<jde at Xiles, Michigan, where he was again engaged in farming, and 
in 187 1 he located in I'okagon township, Cass countv, where he rented 
the old Garrett Stancel farm of one hundred and five acres. Eventuallv, 
however, he removed to Xehraska. where he has remain.ed to the pres- 
ent time. In his political views h.e is an earnest Republican. Unto him 
and his wife were born nine children, four sons and five daughters, of 
whom Clifford L. is the elde-^t. Three of the number are now deceased. 
Clifford L. Taylor acconiiianied his jjarents on their various re- 
movals until ihey went to Xebraska. Continuing a resident of C.ass 
county he rented his present farm from the estate of Jacob White, hav- 
ing charge of one hundred acres of land. He remained upon this place 
for thirteen years, carrying on general farming, and in 1889 he removed 
to Dowagiac, where he became connected with the Colby Milling Com- 
pany, hauling fiour and feed. He remained for two vears. nfter which 
he returned to the farm on section 34, Pokagon township. In i8y8 he 
began raising registered hogs and has made a success of this venture, 
having to-dav some of the finest animals that can be found in the coun- 
try. 

On the 15th of October. 1874. Mr. Taylor was married to ]\Iiss 
Addie A. White, a native of Indiana, born August 15. 1856. and a 
daughter of Jacr.b and Julia A. White, who were farming people of 
Steuben county, Indiana. Her mother was a native of Pennsvlvania, 
born in 1838. Following the ren>oval of the family to Cass' county 
they remained upon the farm where Mr. Taylor now resides until the 
death of :\rr. White in 1889. Mrs. \\"hite is still living upon this place. 
In the family of this worthv couple were three children, a .son and two 
daughters, namely: I\Irs. Taylor; Chandler, who died in infancy: and 
Libbie May, who was torn in 1871 and is living in Pokagon township, 
the wife of Jonathan L. Dillman. ;\Irs. Taylor was nine vears of age 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 431 

when she accompanied her parents on tlieir lemoval to Cass county, and 
heie she was reared and educated. She has hecome the motlier of two 
children, but the d:iUL;hter. Bessie May. born January 30, i!^S6. died un 
tlie J2d of I"ehruar\, iSSS. The son, Carl |.. was born in this cnuntv 
May _', 1893. 

}dT. 'Jayliir has been a lifelong- Re]nibbcan, i^iviuL; unfaltering- .ad- 
vocac}' 10 iti men and measures. He beli>ui;s tn Iv'und (Jak camp. Xo. 
1 167, -M. W. .v.. at iiriwai^iac, and i^ a member of Cr\-t,d Springs. Xo. 
22S- I- ^^- <-'■ i'-- ;it Poka-MU. His business interots are capably cnn- 
ducted and. he i> numbered ;imMU!.> the substantial a,L;riculturi>ts ami 
breeders of I'olantl China hii^s in tbn part of the state. 

W1LLI.\^[ H. McCOY. 

William H. r^IcCoy. who follows farming' in Pukai^on township, 
was l)orn m Pulaski cimnty, \'ir;4inia. in that district then known as 
Montgomery county, on the 22d of April. 1S31. His father, Richard 
McCoy, was one of the old pioneer settlers of this state, and he, too, 
was a farmer by occupation. His liirth occurred in Virginia, and when 
he had reached manbonil he was married to Miss ^^laria Sifford. a na- 
tive of the Old Don.iiuion. Mr. ami ]Mrs. ^McCo}- came to Cass county 
when the work of progress and impro\-ement b.ad scarcely been begun 
in tliis portion of the state, and they shared with others in tlie hard- 
ships and jjrivations of pioneer life and aided in reclaiming this district 
for the use of civilization. In their family were .si.\ sons and six 
daugiiters. of whom William H. is the eldest^ 3<")n and third child. 
Four of the children are now deceased, two iiaving dieil in infancy. All 
were reared and educated in Cass cmuity, and those who still survive 
are farming people. The elder members of the household were students 
in the old-time log schoolhouses. The father first located with Henrv 
Sifford at Summerville, where he spent a few nion.ths, and in the fol- 
lowing spring he removed to a farm of aliout eighty acres on section 2/. 
Pokagon township. This was all raw and wild land, not a furrow hav- 
ing been turned nor an improvement made upon the place, but he at 
once began to clear and cultivate the fields and with the help of his 
sons brought the farm to a high state of culti\-ation. As his financial 
resources increased he also added to his original holdings, being th.e 
owner of a valuable farm property of three hundred and twenty acres 
in Pokagon township at the time of his death, upon which he resided 
until 1S32, when he started on the return trip to A'irginia, but wdu'le en 
route was taken ill and died within fifty miles of his destination. In 
politics lie was a lifelong Democrat, earnest and active in support of 
the i>arty. 

In his youth \\'illiam H. McCoy assisted his father in the work 
of the home farm and after the father's death remained with .his mother 
upon the old home place, supervising the jiropertv and the culti\'ation 



432 HISTORY 01- CASS COUNTY 

of the fields. His privileges and advantages in youth were such as the 
pioneer district altorded. In 1873 he was married to }iliss Mary J. 
Wilson, a native of Ohio, who was born August 25, 1S52, and is a 
dauo-hter of Isaac Wilson, one of the early settlers of Berrien county. 
The" father was a farmer by occupation. At the time of his marriage 
Mr. ?\IcCoy took up his abode upon his present farm, comprising eighty 
acres, and with characteristic energy began its further cultivation and 
development. He has one hundred and forty acres in Casco town- 
ship, Allegan countv, JNIichigan, which is partially a fruit farm. He 
built his present residence and has added many modern equipments to 
the place. Unto him and his wife have been born three children, a 
son and two daughters: Ellura, the wife of Orrin T. Moore, a resi- 
dent farmer of Pokagon township; John; and Edna Gertrude. All 
were born and reared upon the present farm. 

In his ix)litical views Mr. McCoy is a Democrat, but at local elec- 
tions usually casts his ballot without regard for party affiliations. His 
entire life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits, and he regards 
farm work as abundantly worthy of his best effects. His labors have 
been characterized by perseverance .and diligence, and his persistency 
of purpose has been one of the strong and salient elements in his life 
work. 

CHARLES II. KIMMERLE. 

Charles II. Kimmerle is one of the leading representatives of Dem- 
ocracy in Aliclngan. and his invested interc'^ts are so extensive and im- 
portant as to render him a leading business man of Cass county. Mure- 
over he deals to some extent in real estate, but finds that his time is 
largely occupied by the supervision of his property. He has long been 
recognized as a prominent representative of the Democracy in his coun- 
ty and moreover ha? a very extensive and favorable acquaintance among 
the leaders of the partv in the state. For many years he has been known 
for his sterling qualities, liis fearless loyalty to his honest convictions, 
his sturdy opposition to misrule in municipal and state affairs and his 
clear-headednes~. dibcretion and tact as manager and leader. 

Mr. Kimmerle is a native of Lagrange township, his life record 
having begun on the ulh of June, 1S60, upon his father's farm. He is 
a son of Idenry and Mary J. (Hain) Kimmerle and had two^ sisters. 
His public school course was supplemented b.y study in the Northern 
Indiana Normal College at Valparaiso, and thus well equipped he en- 
tered upon his business career. His father was one of the early Cali- 
fornia fortune seekers and, unlike many others, he met with splendid 
success in his efforts to achieve financial independence on the Pacific 
coast. At the time of his death in February, 1905, he was one of the 
wealthiest men In Cass county. Although Charles H. Kimmerle has 
inherited large propcrtv interests, such a condition of affairs has never 



HISTORY 01' CASS COUXTY 433 

fostered idleness with him, and, t>n the contrary, he is a busy man, his 
time Ijeing fully occupied with his private or public interests. 

Happy in his home lite, Air. Kimmerle was married in 18S2 to 
Miss Ella Dunning, and the_\- ha\'e five children, three sons and two 
daughters. 

From early manhood Mr. Kimmerle has Ijeen a student of the com- 
plex political problems before the people, and as an advocate of the 
Democracy is well known in Michigan. He has been honored with the 
candidacy of his party on various occasions, receiving the nomination 
for county clerk in 1S80. for judge of probate in 18SS and for the state 
legislature in 1903. the strong Republican majorities, however, render- 
ing election impossible. He has been a delegate to two national con- 
ventions of the Democratic party, 1S84 and 1900. In local affairs, wiiere 
party lines are not so strongly drawn, he has been a factor, serving for 
twenty-one years as supervisor of Lagrange township, while for the 
last fifteen years he has rei)resented Cass county at the state equaliza- 
tion at Lansing. For years he has ser\-ed as chairman of the county 
central committee and also as a memhier of the state central committee, 
and has thus been the associate and co-laborer of the most distinguished 
representatives of Democracy in ^lichigan. 

, Perhaps Mr. Kimmerle's most notable work has been in connection 
with his efforts to suppress unjust asses'^ment. In 1903 the state tax 
commissioners came to Cass county and raised the valuation of real 
property in every assessing district from seventeen to sixty-five per 
cent. Mr. Kimmerle questioned their authority' to do so and for a long 
time refused to surrender his assessment roll to them. They, however, 
finally succeeded, IMr. Kimmerle claiming that the commissioners made 
promises to him which were not kept, and raised his valuation sixt\-- 
two per cent on all real projierty assessments. The matter was taken 
into court and Mr. Kimmerle, with the other seventeen assessing offi- 
cers, w-ere enjoined from using the state tax commissioners' valuations 
ill apportioning the tax, but- directed to use the figures adopted by the 
supervisors and board of reviev*-. The next year the state ta.x commis- 
sion allied on "Mr. Kimmerle and asked him to make a general raise in 
tlie values. This he refused to do at their dictation, and because of this 
refusal the commission, through Governor Warner, cited him to appear 
and show cause why he should not be removed from office for wilfully 
undervaluing property. They also charged him with favoritism in 
making assessments. Between forty and fifty witnesses were called 
by the prosecution and examined. The commissioner designated by the 
governor to take the testimony reported that the prosecution had failed 
to make out a case. 

Before the governor acted on the report Mr. Kimmerle was elected 
for another term by an almost unanimous vote. The result of his op- 
position to the state authorities led to the repeal of some objectionable 
features of the law creating the commission and two of the commis- 



434 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

sioners who were so acting were legislated out of ofiice. Mr. Kimmerle 
is president of the state Supervisors' Association, composed of not less 
than sixteen hundred assessing ot^kers. He is at this writing (Septem- 
ber, [906,) the Democratic nominee for the office of governor, and has 
warm endorsement in \arious sections of the state. He is a man with an 
eye to practical results and not glittering generalities. It will be observed 
that his turn of mind is eminently judicial and free from the bias of 
animosity. Strong and positive in his Democracy, his party fealty is 
not grounded on partisan prejudice and he enjoys the respect and con- 
fidence of all his associates irrespective of party. Of the great issues 
whicli divide the two great parties, with their roots extending down 
to the very bed rock of the foundation of the republic, he has the true 
statesman's grasp. \\'d\ grounded in the political maxims of die 
schools, he has also studied the lessons of actual life, arriving at his con- 
clusions as a result of what may be called his post-graduate studies in 
the school of affairs. Such men, whether in otfice or out, are the natural 
leaders of whichever party they may be identified with, especially in 
that movement toward higher politics which is common to both parties 
and which constitutes the most hopeful political sign of the period. 

C. E. VOORHIS. 

C. E. Voorhis, a pioneer merchant of Cassopolis, is well deserving 
of mention in this volume, having made a creditable record in commer- 
cial circles and belonging to that class of representative American men 
who, while advancing individual interests, also contribute to the gen- 
eral prosperity. He was bom in Springfield township, Bradford county, 
Pennsylvania, on the 25th of Xovember, 1S28. His father, James 
Voorhis, was a native of New Jersey, was a carpenter by tratle and 
spent much of his life in Pennsylvania, where his death occurred. His 
wife, Mrs. Charlotte Voorhis. was a native of the Keystone state, and 
they became the parents of four sons and three daughters, of whom C. 
E. Voorhis is the youngest son. Only two children are now living, one 
sister, Lucinda Harkness, being a resident of Pennsylvania. 

C. E. Voorhis was reared in the state of his nativity, spending his 
boyhood days uikju the farm, and acquired his education in the public 
schools. In early manhood he chose a companion and helpmate for 
life's journey, being married in the east to Miss Emeline Crandall, a 
native of New York. AlxDut two years after his marriage he came to 
Michigan, settling in Cassopolis, where he began working at day labor, 
following any work that he could secure that would give him an hon- 
est living. In 1S63, with the capital that he had managed to save from 
his earnings, he established a restaurant. He also spent one year as a 
peddler, and alxiut 1865 ^^ embarked in the mercantile business, in 
which he still continues. His capital and stock were very limited at 
first, but he has built up a magnificent trade and now carries a very ex- 



;9i 



HISTORY or- CASS COUNTY 435 

tensive and well selected stock. He owns the fine building in which he 
is conducting his business and also has a fine home in Cassopolis, and 
his store would be a credit to a city of much larger size. 

Unto Air. and 'Sirs. Voorhis have been born two living children: 
William H., who is now in charge of the store; and Eva, the wife of 
Elmer Stamp. Mr. Voorhis votes with the Democracy, but has never 
sought or desired office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his 
business affairs. He is the pioneer grocery merchant of the city and 
has enjoyed a prosperous career in this line of business, his success be- 
ing attributable to his earnest desire to please his patrons, his close 
application and his reasonable prices and straightforward dealing. He 
has a vei-y wide acquaintance throughout the county, having lived here 
for half a centun.-, and not to know j\Ir. Voorhis is to argue one's self 
unknown in this section of the state. The prosperity of any commu- 
nity, town or city depends upon its commercial activits', its industrial 
interests and its trade relations and therefore the real upbuilders of a 
town are those who stand at the head of its leading enterprises. 

B. W. HA YD EN. 

The business interests of Cassopolis find a worthy representative 
in B. \V. Hayden, a hardware merchant, whose activity and enterprise 
have contributed in substantial measure to the commercial prosperity 
and upbuilding of the village. He was born in Calvin township, so that 
he is numbered among Cass county's successful native sons, his birth 
having occurred on the lOtb of August, 1850. He is the second son in 
the family of J<iseph and Hannah (Lincoln) Hayden, who were among 
the pioneer residents C'f Cass county, coming to this part of the state 
about 18 iS. Mr. Hayden was reared in the place of his nativity, spend- 
ing his youth upon the homestead farm in Calvin townshi]) and as- 
sisting in the work of fields and meadows as his age and strength per- 
mitted. In 187 1 he started out upon an independent business career, 
working at anything that he could find to do that would yield him an 
honest living. He entered the employ of the Redfield, Lacy & Bement 
Milling Company at Redfield, Michig-an, driving a team, and for three 
years was in the employ of that firm, on tJie expiration of which period 
he went to W'aukegan, Illinois, where he spent three years and three 
months. During five years' work he lost just one week's time. At 
Waukegan he learned the milling business with the firm of Warren S: 
George and afterward went to Elkhart, Indiana, where he entered the 
employ of the Beardsley Milling Company, with which he continued for 
three months. On returning to Redfield, Michigan, he took charge of 
the Redfield mills and continued 10 operate the plant for alwut two and 
a half years, when "Sir. Bement, one of the partners, died. At that time 
Mr. Hayden rented the mill and carried on the business on his own ac- 
count in connection with farming for five years. Following that period 



436 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

he returned to Cassopolis and \vit!i capital that he had acquired throug-h 
his own hibor and capable management he embarked in the hardware 
business, in which he lias since continued. He carries a full line of shelf 
and heavy hardware, also agricultural implements, vehicles and harness, 
and has a liberal patronage, his business being now large and profitable. 
Since 1SS4 iMr. Hayden has been in business in Cassopolis, and from the 
first month, January, 1SS4, up to the present time, 1906, he has kept 
a faithful and true file of the increase of his business, which has been 
steady and solid. In the months of January. February, INIarch and 
April of 1906 it was $1,867.54, $2,307.46, $3,046.31 and $4,447.23 re- 
spectively, which shows a phenomenal growtJi in a town of 1.500 pop- 
ulation. He has been agent for the Standard Oil Company for four- 
teen years and for seven years he was engaged in the ice business. He 
is also local treasurer for the Standard Savings & Loan Comjiany of 
Detroit, Michigan, having occupied the position for eleven years. It 
will thus be seen that his efforts iiave not been confined to one line, for 
he is a man of resourceful laisincss ability, energetic and enterprising, 
who has not only quickly noted his business opportunities but has also 
utilized them to good advantage and has thus gained a place among the 
successful representatives of trade relations in Cassopolis. 

In 1877 Air. Hayden was united in marriage to Aliss Tillie Ful- 
ton, a daugliter of William Fulton, of Waukegan, Illinois. This un- 
ion has been blessed with three daughters and one son: Joseph, who is 
associated with his father in business; Belle, the wife of Melvin Brown, 
who is also connected with Mr. Hayden in his business interests in Cas- 
sopolis; Stella and Bernice, both at home. 

In his political views Mr. Hayden is a Democrat, and has been 
called to several local offices. He was a member of the school board 
for nine years and a member of the village council for eight years, and 
has done much to bring to the city a public-spirited administration of 
its affairs that will result in permanent benefit. He holds membership 
with the Knights of Pythias lodge of Cassopolis and the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and his fraternal and church relations indicate the 
character of the man and his interest in those things which tend to ele- 
vate humanity and develop a strong and honorable character. What- 
ever he has accomplished in life is due to his own efforts. Early com- 
ing to a realization that energ\- and honesty are a safe basis upon which 
to build success he has worked }ear after year, carefully controlling his 
labors so liiat as the time has gone by his efforts have been crowned 
with the pnjsperity which is ever the goal of business endeavor. 

ROBERT SNYDER. . . ' . ' 

Robert Snyder, one of the early settlers of Cass county now living 
retired in Edwardsburg after long and active connection with farming 
interests in Ontwa township, was bom in Columbia county, Pennsyl- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 437 

vania, tlie 5th of July, 1S39. His father, ^\'illiam Snyder, was a native 
of New Jersey, born September i(). 1797, and in this state he was reared 
until nineteen years of age, when he removed to Pennsylvania. He 
"was a cabinet-maker by trade, and followed that pursuit in early man- 
hood, but in his later years turned his attention 10 farming. In 184S 
he remo'.-ed vrith his family to Indiana, settling in St. Joseph county on 
the 8th of June of that year. There he followed cabinet-making to 
'soine extent, but soon concentrated his energies upon agricultural pur- 
suits, and was thus engaged until his retirement from active farm work 
in 1879. He then removed tn Edwardsburg, where he lived until his 
death, which occurrerl Feliruary 9, 18S2, He was married in Pennsyl- 
vania to Miss Jerusha iiobbins, a native of the Keystone state, born 
June 26, 1797, They were the parents of ten children, four sons and 
six daughters, of whom Robert Snyder is the ninth child and fourth 
son. The family record is as follows: Hiram, Joseph and John, all 
deceased; I\Iary, Rachel, Kathcrine, Sarah and William, all nf whom 
have passed away ; Robert ; and Frances. All were born in Columbia 
county, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Snyder was educated in St. Joseph county. Michigan, and 
remained at home throughout his boyhood and youth, working with 
his father in the fields until he attained his majority. He was mar- 
ried April iG, 1863. to ^liss ^Mary Hess, a daughter of Joseph Hess, a 
pioneer settler of Ca.^s county, who is mentioned on another page of this 
work. jMrs. Snyder was Ixirn and reared in Ohio and with her parents 
came to Michigan. For four years after their marriage ^Ir. and ^Irs. 
Snyder lived in St. Joseph county, and then in 1867 came to Cass coun- 
ty, settling upon a farm of ninety-three acres of improved land in Jef- 
ferson township. To the further cultivation and improvement of that 
property Mr. Snyder devoted his energies until 187S, and there two of 
the children were born. Clara J., the eldest, born in 18(^)8, is 
the wife of J. H. Keel_\-. a dry goods salesman of Edwardsburg. 
Laura Etta, born ]\Iay 9, iS''x), is the wife of William Wade, an elec- 
trician of Edwardsburg. The youngest daughter, ^Nlary, was born 
September 5, 1888, and is still at home. 

Mr. Snyder has been a lifelong Democrat and active in the local 
ranks of his party. He served as treasurer of JefYerson township for 
one year and after the removal to Ontwa township acted as treasurer 
for six years at difl'erent times. He was also justice of the peace for 
about a year and a half and a member of the school board for a num- 
ber of years, and in these different ofifices labored earnestly and effect- 
ively for the general welfare. He belongs to the ^Masonic lodge at 
Edwardsburg and is well known throughout Cass county, having for 
many years been closely associated with its agricultural pursuits, mak- 
ing a creditable record in business circles and sustaining an excellent 
reputation in public office and in private life. The prosperity tliat he 
enjoys has been well earned and is justly merited. 



438 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

GEORGE EMAIOXS. 

George Emmons, who is classed among the leading and iniluential 
farmers of Porter township, his hume heing on section ij, is a native 
of Ohio. He was born in Lorain county on the 14th of September, 
184S, and is a son of Lucius and Sabrina (Adams) Emmons. His 
paternal grandfather was James limmons, who settled in Ohio at a 
very early day, having made his way to that state from Massachusetts. 
His maternal grandfather, William Adams, was also a native of New 
England and removed from Connecticut to Ohio, casting in his lot with 
the pioneers who aided in reclaimmg that state from the domain of 
the savages and con\erting it into the center of an advanced civiliza- 
tion. Lucius Emmons remained a resident of Ohio until 185S, wlien 
he was called to his final rest. Flis widow, however, still survives him 
and of their family of five children three were sons and two daughters. 

George Emmons, the second child and second son, was reared in 
the county of his nativity, S|)ending his boyhood days upon a farm and 
early becoming familiar witli all the duties and lalx>rs that fall to the 
lot of the agriculturist. X(i event of special importance occurred to 
vary the routine of farm life and he attended school and worked in 
the fields until twenty-three years of age. About that time he was 
married, having in 1S71 wedded ^liss Sarah Ann Locke who died 
three years later, in 1874. For his second wife, whom he married in 
18S0, Mr. Emmons cho'^e Mrs. 3.1ay Loynes, the daughter of Charles 
and Mary (Tubbs) Williams. She was born in Blount PLjlly, Rut- 
land county, Vermont, February 4, 1S47, and has one son born of her 
first marriage, Frank Loynes, v>ho is now living in Chicago. Mrs. 
Emmons came to [Michigan in 1874, making her way to Cass county, 
and took up her alxide upon the farm where she now resides. There 
has been one child born of this marriage. Zaida, who is attending school 
in Hillsdale, Michigan. The parents of ^Irs. Emmons were I)Oth na- 
tives of Vermont arid they had Imt two children, the other one is now 
deceased. Her mother was married a second time, becoming the wife 
of Spencer Arnold, with whom she removed to Michigan from Ohio 
in 1865, locating on a farm where I\Ir. and Mrs. Emmons now make 
their home. There was one child of the second marriage, William 
Arnold. 

Mr. Emmons has a farm of one hundred and eighty acres and has 
devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits but rents most 
of his place, thus leaving its care and improvement to others, while he 
is largely enjoying a well earned rest. He has ser\-ed as township 
treasurer for six years and has taken an active part in public affairs, 
laboring earnestly for the welfare and substantial improvement of the 
community. He is a menilicr of the Grange and is well known in Cass 
county, where lie has ]i\ed for twenty-six years. Li 1902 his home 
was de&tro^■ed bv fire but he at once erected another dwelling and now 



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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 439 

has a fine two-story house, wliicli is one of the attractive features of 
the landscape. There are also good bams and other outbuildings upon 
his place and all modern improvements and equipments in keeping with 
a model farm. Everything alwut his place is neat and thrittv in ap- 
pearance and Air. Emmons has long been regarded as one of the prac- 
tical, enterprising and respected farmers of his communitv. 

CASSIUS M DEXXIS. 

Cassius M. Dennis, at one time a factor in commercial circles in 
Edwardsburg, where he was engaged in dealing in hardware, but now 
giving his attention to the real estate and loan business, is a native of 
St. Joseph county, Indiana, born on the 24th of October, 184^. His 
father, Xathanicl B. Dennis, became one of the pioneer residents of 
Cass county. His birth occurred in Delaware-in March, 1813. He was 
a farmer by occupation and at the age of eighteen years became a res- 
ident of St. Joseph county, Indiana, taking up his abode upon a farm 
there. In 1847 he removed to Milton township. Cass county, jnirchas- 
ing a tract of land of eighty acres, which was partially improved. He 
at once began the further flevelopment and cultivation of the place, and 
there he resided until his death, which occurred on the Gth of February, 
1899. He was identified with the Republican party and was frequently 
called to fill township ofnces by his fellow citizens, who recognized his 
worth and fidelity. In this county he was married to Miss Margaret 
McMichael, who was a native of Pennsylvania and was of German 
lineage. In their family were four sons and two daughters, of whom 
Cassius M. Dennis was the second son and second child. Four of the 
family were born in Cass county. Of the others William, Mary Flor- 
ence and George are now deceased, while those living are Cassius IM., 
Cave J. and Martha E. All reached manhocjd and womanhood, how- 
ever, with the exception of George, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Dennis of this review was only two years old when his par- 
ents removed to ■\Iilton township, Cass county, and in the district 
schools he acquired his education, becoming familiar with the common 
branches of English learning, which fitted him for the practical duties 
of life. He was reared to farm work, early becoming familiar with the 
duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, and to his 
father he gave the Ijenefit of his services until twenty-two years of age. 
He >vas then married, on the 12th of December. 1867, the lady of his 
choice being Miss Alphonzy Hopkins, a native of Cass county, born in 
■ February. 1848, and a daughter of Xathaniel and Ann Hopkins. One 
child was born of this marriage, Orville, a native of Cass county. On 
the 5th of May, 18S5, Mr. Dennis was again married, his second union 
being with Miss Lenora Shoup. who was born in Burbank, Ohio. 

Following his marriage Mr. Dennis l:>egan farming on his own ac- 
count and in the spring of 1882 he removed to Edwardsburg, where he 



■ii" HISTORY OK CASS COUXTY 

eiitered the cnipl.-y uf .Mr. Dunning in the implement business, continu- 
ing with him until the death of Air. Dunning- in July, 1885. He was re- 
tained ill the sture, h(j\\e\er, by the management of the estate until 
J 886, when in that year he purchased the stock and bes^an business on 
his own account, so continuing until the spring of 1899. "^s a hard- 
ware merchant he enjoyed a large and profitable trade, which he secured 
by reason of his straightforward dealings, his practical methods and 
his unremitting diligence. At length, however, he sold his hardware 
stock and retired from mercantile fields, while at the present time he 
IS giving his attention to the real estate and loan business. 

Mr. Dennis is a Democrat in his political views and for six vears 
served as township clerk. He is numbered among the pioneers of'Cass 
county and with the exception of six years his entire life lias been passed 
within Its borders. He came t.5 the countv more than a half century 
ago, so that he has largely witnessed its growth and development from 
a primitive condition to its present advanced stage of civilization where- 
in every department of commercial and industrial activity is represented 
while the work of the agriculturist is seen in the splendid farms that 
surround the enterprising towns and villages. While there have fen 
no exciting chapters in his life record the history of Mr. Dennis may 
well stand as an example for worthy citizenship, 'upright manhood and 
hdelity to every trust. 

RUSSF.L D. MAY. 

_ Russel D. May, a retired farmer and earlv settler of Cass county 
living m Edwardsburg, is a native of the Empire state, his birth hav- 
ing occurred in Chautauqua countv. New York, on the 9th of Decem- 
ber, 1836. His father, Russel G. May, was born near Pittsfield, Mas- 
sachusetts, on the 8th of May, 1S04, and was reared in the place of his 
nativitiy. When about twenty-two years of age he removed to Qiau- 
tauqua county. New York, where he settled upon a tract of raw land, 
not a -furrow having been turned nor an improvement made upon the 
place. He began clearing the farm and continued its cultivation until 
1S37, making great changes in its condition as he placed acre after acre 
under the plow. He had been married in Massachusetts to :\Iiss Han- 
nah Stanton, a native of that state, born December 23, 1807. and there 
she spent her girlhood days. By this marriage Mr. and Airs. May be- 
came the parents of two sons and two daughters: Afartha Ann, de- 
ceased; Hannah S. and Oliver, who have also passed away; and Russel 
D._ The children were largely reared and educated in Cass countv, 
Michigan. In the year 1837 the parents left New York and came west- 
ward, settling m St. Joseph county, Michigan, where thev lived upon a 
rentedfarm for four years. In 1S41 thev came to Cass 'countv, taking 
up tlieir abode in r^Iilton township, where they remained for four vears. 
and m 1845 they settled on what is now known as Mav street,' near 
Edwardsburg. whicli was named in honor of the father.' The family 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 4-41 

home, l]uv,-e\-er, v>as a farm of eighty acres of woodland, which ^Ir. 
May cleared and cultivated with the assistance of his son Riissel. mak- 
ing all of the iniproxements upon that place. There he remained until 
1S83, when he remoxed to a farm upon which his remaining days were 
passed, liis 'death occurring on the 8th of October. 1886. His political 
allegiance was given to the Democracy in early life, hut upon the forma^ 
tion of the new Republican party he became one of its stanch champions 
and gave it his support until within four years of his death, when he 
voted the Prohibition ticket, believing the teniperancc cause one of the 
paramount is-^ues before the ]ieo]3]e. An earnest Christian gentleman. 
he held membershi]) in the Methodist denomination and assisted in 
building the first church of the town. 

Russcl D. May was a little lail of four years when his father came 
to Cass county and he was reared and educated in C)ntwa township. He 
early mastered the work- of the fields, taking his place behind the plow- 
when a young lad, and to his father he gave the ijenefit of his services 
up to the time of his marriage. That important event in his life oc- 
curred on the 27th of April, 1839, the lady of his choice being Miss 
Mary E. Adams, who was a nati\-e of New York, and a daughter of 
the Rev. S. C. .\dams. a local r^Iethodist minister. Her mother was 
Mrs. Britania Adam-, and both the parents were natives of Massachu- 
setts. In 1887 Mr. ]\Iay was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, 
who died on the 2d of November, of that year. They had become the 
parents of si.x children, all of whom reached adult age, although Ida is 
now deceased. The others are : Jesse E. is a resident of La Plata, 
Missouri, and is a horticulturist. He was educated in the district 
school. He wedded ]Miss ]\Iattie Bishop, and they have two living chil- 
dren, Winnie and Dwight. Henry K., a resident of Burr, Minnesota, is 
a grain dealer, and he is prosperous. He wedded Miss Henrietta Davis. 
Frank E., a resident of Edwardsville. ?^Iichigan, is a physician and 
surgeon, and graduated from Rush Medical College of Chicago. He is 
now a horticulturist. He wedded ]Miss Rose James and they have two 
sons, Leslie and Roy. Florence E. is the wife of Dr. J. J. Sweetland, 
a resident of ilottville, ^lichigan, and who has a good practice. He grad- 
uated at Cincinnati, Ohio. They have one son. Dennis. Floyd B., a resi- 
dent of HunnewelL Kansas, graduated at Barnes Medical Cullege of St. 
Louis. Adl were bom and reared upon the old homestead farm, for at the 
time of his marriage Mr. 3.1ay rented this farm from his father. After a 
few- years he became owner of the property, to which he added eighty 
acres, and subsequently an additional tract of one hundred acres, so that he 
had altogether three hundred acres of valuable land. Following the death 
of his first wife ]\[r. May was again married, on the i8th of June, 1SS9, 
his second union being with Mrs. M. Amelia Ray, a native of New 
York, born in Cato. Cayuga county, on the 28th of September, 1835. 
Her parents were James and Rebecca TPaine) Burns, the former a 
native of Washington county, b«rn in May, 1798, while the mother's 



i42 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

birth occurred in Vermtmt in May, iSoi. At an early day Mr. and 
Mrs. Burns removed to Orleans county, Xew York, settling at Albion 
in 1836. There they remained until called to their final rest, being 
respected and worthy citizens d that comnuuiity. In their family were 
five children, three sons and two daughters, of whom two died in in- 
fancy, while Mrs. May, the youngest of the family, is the only one now 
living. The others were Elias Freer, Oscar FitzAlan, James Edgar and 
Caroline .-Vnianda. ^Irs. May was first married in Albion, Xew York, 
in 1854, to David \\\ Ray, a native of Columbia county, that state, 
who was a journalist hy profession. In 1865 they removed to Detroit, 
Michigan, where they resided until the death of Mr. Rav in 1S67. In 
their family were three children: Ida A., a graduate of Phipps P'emale 
Seminary of Albion, Xew Yr)rk. in the class of 1870, wedded Charles 
R. Critchell, a resident of the city of Denver, Colorado. He was en- 
gaged in nisurance and loans in Chicago, and was successful. Thev 
have three children. Charles fvay, Dorothy I. and Mary Amelia. D. 
Willis Ray is a resident of Chicago, and with Farnum \\'illoughby Real 
Estate Company, which is one of the largest concerns of the city. He 
was educated in Cornell College at Cedar Rapids. Iowa. He wedded 
Miss Anna Burns. Minnie died at the age of eighteen months. 

'\\r. May has been a resident of Cass county for sixty years. He 
retired frnni acti\-e farming in 1883 to enjoy a well earned rest and has 
since lived in Fdwardsburg, where he has a pleasant home. FIc was for 
many years an active anti energetic agriculturist and acquired a compe- 
tence that now enables him to enjoy the comforts of life without re- 
gard for further labor. He was a member of the school board for over 
twenty years and he voted with the Repui)lican party for a long period, 
but since 1883 has been a stanch Prohibitionist. In his life he has dis- 
played many sterling traits of character, not the least of which is his 
loyalty to the temperance cause. He is a high type of manhood, believ- 
ing in those principles which develop an upright character and regard- 
ing his o\vn self-respect and that of his fellow men as infinitely of more 
value than wealth, fame or position. 

CHARLES C. AIKIX. 

Charles C. Aikin, representing the business interests of Edwards- 
burg as a successful and enterprising lumber merchant, was born in 
Summit county, Ohio, on the 27th of December, 1S46. His father, 
Nelson C. Aikin, a nati^-e of \'ermont, was bom in i8c8, and by occu- 
pation was a farmer. He, however, learned and followed the cooper's 
trade in Xew York state and in Ohio, and in Jul}', 1856, he came to 
Michigan, taking up his abode in Berrien county. There he purchased 
a farm and gave undivided attention to agricultural pursuits through- 
out his remaining days. He was married in the Empire state to ]\Iiss 
Abigail Van, a native of Xew York, and unto them were born eight 



HISTORY Ox^ CASS COUNTY 443 

children, lour sons and fnur dausjhters. Seven of the numljer are now- 
deceased, two having- died in inf;incy. Chades C. Aikin was the seventh 
child and third son and is the only survivinc; memher of tiie tamilv. 
The others were : Marcus. Lucretia, Mary, Sarah, Ahitrail, Calvin C. 
and Albert. The three eldest sons were born in New York and the 
other members of the family were natives of Ohio. Charles C. Aikin 
was a lad of ten years when he nccmpanied his parents on their removal 
from his native state to Eerrien county, Michigan. 

HON. JOHN F. COULTER. 

In tliis country, where no man is born to public office or to public 
honor or comes to either by inheritance, but where all men are equal 
before the law, where the race for distinction is over t!ie road of pul>- 
lic usefulness and is open to everyone who chooses to enter, it is a mat- 
ter of just pride when honors and distinction have been won. Among 
the prominent and influential residents of Cass county is Hon. John 
F. Coulter, -^vho has been a member of the state legislature in [Michigan 
and has also aided in framing legislation in Kansas and Nebraska. A 
man of distinct and forceful individuality, he has left and is leaving the 
impress of his public spirit and work upon matters of general moment 
and his influence has been a beneficial factor on various occasions. He 
now resides on sccti(-in 14, Howard township, his time and energies 
being given to general agricultural pursuits. His birth occured in this 
township on the 15th of November, 1S40. His father, James Coulter, 
was a native of Ohio, born near Cincinnati, and was reared in Clinton 
county, that state. He was married there in June, 1S36, and tlie same 
year came with an ox team across the country to Cass county, Mich- 
igan, locating in Howard township. His father, John Coulter, was 
bom in Ireland and had previously come to Michigan, making the jour- 
ney in 1834, in which year he took up five hundred and sixty acres of 
land in Howard township. On his removal to Cass county, James 
Coulter settled upon the farm which his father had located and there 
continued to make his home until his death, which occurred in 1874. 
He first built a log house, in which all of his family, numbering eight 
children, were bom. In 1855, however, he replaced this by a modem 
brick residence, which is still sitanding on the farm. He was active in 
public affairs and his efforts were always on the side of right, progress, 
reform and improvement. He was a stanch Rep-jblican after the organ- 
ization of the party and held various township offices, being faithful and 
loyal in the discharge of the duties that thus devolved upon him. He 
married .Miss Ann Wilson, a native of Clinton county, Ohio, and a 
daughter of the Rev. Amos Wilson, a minister of the Baptist church and 
a schoolmate of Henrv Clay. They were WHiigs together, stanchly 
supporting the principles of that party. Rev. ^Vilson was of Welsh and 
English lineage and displayed many of the sterling characteristics of 



.444 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

the anceslrv from which he was descended. His daughter, ^Mrs. Coulter, 
reached the advanced age of eighty-three years. In the family were 
eight ciiildrcn. of whom four reached manhood or womanhoofl. Mrs. 
Margaret White, the eldest, is now living on the old family homestead 
in Howard township. William H. makes his home in Cassopolis and is 
mentioned elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Sarah Douglas is living in 
Con\'erse, Indiana. 

John F. Coulter of diis review is the first living son. He was 
reared in Howard township and acquired his preliminary education in 
the district schools, after which he continued his study in the Niles 
high school. Suhscquently he engaged in teaching through twelve win- 
ter terms in Jefferson and Floward townships, while in the summer 
months his time and labors were devoted to farming. He was married 

■ in April, 1864. to Miss Sarah IJ. Vary, a daughter of B. O. and ]\Ieriha 
(Rogers) \"arv. who came to Cass county, Michigan, from New York 
in 18 ^8. Mrs. Coulter was horn in Chemung county, New York, .April 
23, 1842. and came to Michigan with her parents, since which time she 
has been a resident of this state. 

At the time of their marriage the young couple located on a farm 
in Howard township, where Mr. Coulter and his brother William were 
engaged in general agricultural pursuits together. In ^March, 1874, 
however, John F. Coulter went to the west, locating in Fillmore county, 
Nebraska, where he remained for eight and a half years, during which 
time he was engaged in farming and stock raising. He afterward re- 
moved to Kansas, living in Wilson county for three and a half years, 
when he went to Edwards county. Kansas, and later to Logan county, 
that state. There he was engaged in dealing in horses and cattle and 

■ was also publisher of the Logan County Republican for over two years 
in connection with his other business interests. In 1S98 he returned to 
Howard townshi]), locating on the farm where he now resides on sec- 
tion 14 and, at the same time he still retains the ownershipof property 
in Kansas. He has taken a very active and influential part in public af- 
fairs and his influence has been widely felt in behalf of the growth, devel- 
opment and success of the Republican party. In 1870 he was elected to 
the state legislature fi^nm the <;econd district of Cass county and served 
during the term of 1S70-71. In 1878 he was elected to the state senate 

.for the counties of Clay and Fillmore in Nebraska and was on the build-, 
ing committee to build the first wing of the present capitol at Lincoln, 
that state. He was also elected representative from ^\^ilson county, 
Kansas, in 1882. and in 1892 was chosen to represent Logan county, Kan- 
sas, in the state legislature, while in 1895 he was elected county commis- 
sioner of Logan county. He was chairman of the board, but resigned 
that office in order to return to :\Iichigan. He has long been active in 
politics and his labors have been of a practical character that_ accom- 
plishes results. At one time he was connected with the Knights of 
Pythias. He has been a popular factor on the political stage and his is 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 445 

a sturdy American character and a stalwart patriotism. He has the 
strongest attaclimcnt for free institutions and is ever willing to make a 
personal sacrifice for their preservation. He is a man of stern integ- 
rity and honesty of purpose and never uses unworthy or questionable 
means to secure success in any undertaking or for any purpose or to 
promote his own advancement in any direction whetlier political or 
otherwise. 

ALEXANDER COOPEK. 

Alexander Cooper, living en section 9, Ho\vard township, owns 
and operates a good farm and in his business management displays 
the qualities which eventually lead to success. A native of Ohio, he 
was born in ]\larion county on the 23th of December. 18^9. The Coop- 
er family was of English lineage. The grandfather, John Coo\ieT, was 
a native of England and came to America with the British troops in 
1776, but tradition has it that he deserted the British Army at the time 
of the battle of Bunker Hill. He constructed the first vessel that sailed 
on Lake Erie, being a ship carpenter by trade, and throughout his active 
business life he followed that pursuit. He went to Ohio at an early 
period in the development of that state, taking up his alxDde in ^^larion 
county, and was accompanied by his son, Benjamin Cooper, the father 
of our subject. They also came together to Cass county. Michigan, in 
1832, and here John Cooper made the first blinds that were manufac- 
tured in the state of jMichigan at Niles. They settled on a farm in 
Jefferson township, comprising two hundred acres of land, which was 
secured from the government. The father, Benjamin Cooper, was a 
farmer during much of his life, but in early manhood learned and fol- 
lowed the shoemaker's trade. He was born in -the state of New York 
and v\as there reared, remaining in the east until after his marriage. He 
was a member of the state militia of New York and was called out dur- 
ing the war of 1S12. When about twenty-two years of age he was 
joined in wedlock to Miss Clarinda Jones, also a native of the Empire 
state, where her girlhood days were passed. She was of Dutch descent. 

As before stated. Benjamin Cooper went with his father. John 
Cooper, to Ohio, and together they came to Michigan in 1832. Having 
secured a tract of land of two hundred acres in Jefferson township. 
Cass county. Benjamin Cooper began to clear and cultivate this place, 
soon transforming the wild land into productive fields. As a pioneer 
settler he contributed'in substantial measure to the progress and prosper- 
it\- of the county, his labors being of direct and permanent good. By 
his first marriage he had twelve children, eight sons and four daughters, 
namely: John and Benjamin, both deceased; Horace; .Alonzo. who has 
also passed away; Alexander; Daniel; Jefferson. Thomas. Cicero. Clar- 
inda. Almira. Ann and Alvira. all deceased. The wife and mother died 
in Jefferson township at the age of forty-four years and for his second 
wife Benjamin Cooper chose Miss Nancy Gothop. There was one child 



446 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

by this marriage. Jeanette. In early life Benjamin Cooper gave his po- 
litical allegiance to the Whig party and afterward became a stanch Dem- 
ocrat. He served as justice of the peace for many years and his deci- 
sions were fair and impartial, winning him "golden opinions'' from the 
general public. He died at the age of ninety-three years and three 
months, honored and respected by all who knew him because of his 
activity and success in business life, his devotion to the general good and 
his effective labor for the benefit of his adopted county. 

Alexander Cooper was only about three years old when brought by 
his parents to IMichigan and he remained under the parental roof until 
twenty-two years of age. aiding in the arduous task of developing and 
cultivating new land. After attaining his majority he removed to his 
present farm, which first comprised eighty acres. Of this he cultivated 
and cleared forty acres. He has since added twenty acres to the original 
tract and altogether has placed eighty acres under the plow, transform- 
ing it from the raw ]irairie into productive fields. His farm is now 
valuable, well equipped and rich harvests are annually gathered. 

As a companion and helpmate for life's journey Mr. Cooper chose 
Miss Elizabeth Garwood, to whom he was married on the 7th of Octo- 
ber, 185 1. They are the parents of two sons, Z. S. and William A. 
Cooper, 1»th born and reared on the old homestead farm in Howard 
township. Mrs. Cooper was liorn in Pokagon township May 12, 1S30, 
and was a daughter of Joseph and Marietta Ann (Burden) Garwood. 
Her father was a native of Pennsylvania, where he was reared and edu- 
cated, and at an early day he went to Ohio, whence he came to Cass 
county, Michigan, in 1829, settling on Pokagon prairie, where he se- 
cured three hundred acres of land from the government. Not a furrow 
had been turned nor an improvement made on the place, and with char- 
acteristic energy he began to till the virgin soil and cultivate the crops 
best adapted to the climate. His wife was a native of New Jersey, 
where she spent her girlhood. Mr. Garwood had conducted a grist 
mill in Ohio, but after coming to tlu's state his entire attention was de- 
voted to farming. In his family were nine children, five daughters and 
four sons, of whom se\en are now deceased, Mrs. Cooper having been 
the eighth child and fifth daughter. Her parents were worthy and 
honorerl pioricer residents here and their names are deeply engraved on 
the minds of the early settlers of the county. Mr. Garwood gave his 
political allegiance -to the Whig party until its dissolution and then be- 
came a stanch champion of Republican principles. He remained upon 
the old homestead farm throughout the period of his residence in Cass 
county and at the time of his death was the owner of six hundred acres 
of valuable land in addition to the home place. He passed away when 
about seventy-six years of age. Mrs. Cooper was educated in one of 
the old-time log school houses and like her husband is familiar with the 
history of Cass county from the period of its early development down to 
the present day, when all the evidences of later-day progress are seen. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 447 

Mr. Cooper has al\va_\s \-otetl with the Democrac}' and has liehl all 
the olTices in the township save that oi supervisor, heinsi^ continuously in 
official service for alxjut a quarter of a century. He is a member of the 
Free Baptist church at Pokagon. With one exception he is the oldest 
living settler in his township and he has a very \\ide acquaintance in 
the county, having lived here since early pioneer times and witnessed 
its entire growth and development. Like others he shared in tlie hard- 
ships and privations incident to the establishment of a home on the 
frontier, but as tlie years went by he was enabled to overcome all diftkui- 
ties and obstacles in his path and while promoting his individual suc- 
cess he also contributed to the general welfare l>y the active co-oi:>eration 
which he gave to all plans formulated for public progress. He can re- 
late many interesting incidents of pioneer days and is indeed a worthy 
citizen and honored early settler of Cass county 

S. M. HOWSER. 

On the roll of Cass county's honored dead appears the name of 
S. M. Hovvser, who at one time was an enterprising and prosperous 
farmer of Howard township. He came to this section of the state at an 
early period in its development and assisted in the work of general prog- 
ress and improvement. At all times he rejoicetl in what was accom- 
plished in the county, for he was public spirited in citizenship and had 
a deep and sincere interest in his adopted state. His birth occurred in 
Preble county, Ohio, on the 27th of June. 1S29, while his father, Henn,' 
Howser. was a native of Tvlaryland. bom in 1800. Having spent tlie 
days of his boyhood and youth in that state Henry Howser removed to 
Ohio, settling in Preble county. He was married to Aliss Mary Brown, 
a native of Ohio, and in 1836 they came to Cass county-, ^Michigan, tak- 
ing up their abode in Pokagon township, where Mr. Howser entered 
land from the government, l>ecominig owner of about two Iiundred and 
sixty acres. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made 
•upon this place, for the entire tract was covered with the native growth 
of timber, but he cleared the farm and in course of years made splendid 
improvements there, transforming the once wild land into a ven,- pro- 
.ductive tract. The Howsers were one of the oldest families in the 
county and upon the homestead the parents reared their family of sev- 
en children, five sons and two daughters. Henr\' Howser died in 
Dowagiac in his seventy-seventh year, having spent his last days in 
honorable retirement there after a long, active and sticcessful connec- 
tion with agricultural pursuits. He was a Republican in his political 
views and while he never sought or desired office he was always inter- 
ested in the work of public progress, and as a private citizen contributed 
in substantial measure to the task of reclaiming this part of the state 
for the uses of civilization. 

S. M. Howser remained upon the old homestead farm up to the 



44H HISTORY OI' CASS COUXTY 

time of his marriage. Me had sr.ciit about thirteen years in his native 
state and had then accompanied hi> parents to r^Iichigan. Here he not 
only shared in tiie hardshi])^ and trial- of pioneer Hfe but also assisted 
in the arduous task of developing a new farm, cutting down the trees, 
clearing away the I ■rush and ^tumps and I'reaking the first furrows in 
the fields. He not only cleared most of the place but he also split the 
rails with which to fence the farm and the early years of his manhood 
were fraught with earnest and unremitting toil. 

On the 24th of December, iSfio, was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Howser and Miss Minerva Kniglit, wlio was Iwrn at Eerrien 
Springs, Berrien county, .Michigan, December 29. 1S42, and was a 
daughter of Jonathan Knight, a farmer of Eerrien county, who was 
bom i_n Ohio on the 6th of June, 1S17. There lie spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth and about 1S39 he removed to Eerrien Springs, talc- 
ing up his abode upon the farm where he resided up to the. time of his 
death, wliich occurred in his eighty-third year. He endorsed Repub- 
lican principles and though be never sought office was always faitliful 
in friendship and interested in the public welfare. Unto him and his 
wife were Ixirn two sons and three daughters, ^Mrs. Howser being the 
eldest daughter and second child in the family. She was reared in 
Berrien county, where she remained up to the time of her marriage. 
Mr. and iSlrs. Howser removed to tlie homestead farm in Howard town- 
ship al>out 1S68, purchasing here two hundred and sixty-three acres of 
land, wdTich he cultivated and improved, transforming it into a valu- 
able and productive farm. At a laLer dale a portion of the land was sold 
but the farm still comprises one iiundred and eighty-two acres and re- 
turns a gratifying annual income for the care and labor bestowed upon 
it. As the years passed by three children came to bless the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Howser, but the elder daughter, Man,- Jane, is now deceased. 
The others are Hcr.r}' J. and Cora M}-rtle. who were Ixirn on the present 
homestead, while Mary was born in Berrien county. 

Mr. Howser voted with the Republican party but never sought or 
desired office, preferring to give his undivided attention to his business 
aflfairs. In this way he acquired a comfortable competence for his fam- 
ily and he also left to them an honorable name by reason of his straight- 
forward business dealings. He was widely known as an honored pioneer 
settler of the count}- and a man who merited and received the respect 
and good will of those with whom he was associated. 

PERRY \KIX. 

Perr}- .-Xkin has had an eventful and interesting experience during 
a residence in California in the early period of its development and 
also by reason of his connection with Cass countv- in pioneer days. He 
is now the owner of the old homestead farm and resides in Jefferson 
township, where he has valuable landed possessions. He was bom in 







Mj^ 






OIL> fl^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 44'.> 

Montgomery county, Ohio, on the 17th of July, 1835, and traces liis 
anccsti}- hack to Ireland. His lather, William Akin, came to Cass 
county in 1839, tirst settling in Calvin township, where he purchased a 
sawmill, h'or a numher of years he was closely connected with indus- 
trial interests of the county ihrough the operation of this mill and the 
manufacture of lumber. He had a very wide acquaintance among the 
pioneer settlers and he belonged to that class of representative men who 
while promoting individual success also advance tlie general welfare. 
He died in this county in 1847. His wife. Miss Catherine Benner, was 
a native of Penns}lvania and was of German lineage. She li\ed to 
be about sixty years of age and was the mother of eleven children, 
nine of whom reached adult years. Perry Akin was the fifth in order 
of birth and the fourth son. He was only four years of age at the 
"time of the removal of the family to Michigan "and he was therefore 
reared amid the wild scenes of frontier life, sharing with the family in 
the hardships and trials incident to the establishment of a home in a 
frontier district far removed from the comforts and conveniences of the 
older east. He is today the owner of the old h.omestead property and the 
residence whicli was built by his father when he came to the county 
more than sixty-ti\e years ago. When about six years of age he be- 
gan his education in one of the old time log school houses common at 
that day. It was a little building seated with slab benches, while the 
writing desk was formed by laying a board upon wooden pins (lri\en 
into the wall. Reading, writing and arithmetic were the principal 
branches taught, and to some extent instruction was given in grammar 
and geography. When not busy with the duties of the school-room 
Perry Akin learned the value of industry and economy in the active 
affairs of life and worked earnestly and energetically to supixjrt his 
mother, to whom he gave the benefit of his services until twenty-seven 
years of age. Pie was married on the 27th of November. 1S62. to Miss 
Melissa Dan forth, who was liorn in Logan county, Ohio, on the 14th 
of June, 1842, and was a daughter of Samuel Danforth. a native of 
Vermont, while her mother, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth ^Ic- 
Donald, was born in Pennsyh-ania and was also of Scotch lineage. In 
' the Danforth family were eight children, six sons and two daughters, 
of whom Airs. .Akin is the eldest. She came to Cass county in 1854, 
when a maiden of twelve summers, in company with her parents, who 
settled in Calvin township, and there her father developed and im- 
proved a farm. Mr. and Mrs. Akin spent the first winter after their 
marriage in this county and in the spring of 1S63 Mr. Akin started for 
California, where he remained for seven years. He then returned and 
took his wife to the west with him. locating at Fish Lake, Nevada. 
There he was the owner of a valuable farm of eight hundred acres, 
upon which he resided tor fourteen years. His place was largely a 
hay and stock rar.ch and in connection with its cultivation he harvested 



450 HISTORY OI- CASS COUNTY 

and sold a large amount of hay. He also had considerable stock upon 
his place. After spending about twenty years in the west he sold his 
property in that part of the country about 1883 and returned to Cass 
county, locating on the old homestead, where he resided until 1902. 
In that year he took up his abode upon the farm in Jefferson township 
upon which he yet lives. 

Unto Mr. and iMrs. Akin have been born si.x children, three of 
whom are yet living: Alma, now the wife of R. H. Kidder, a resident 
of Montana; Clara, who was the wife of Charles Foreman and is now 
deceased; Charles E., residing upon the old homestead; and Ora B., 
who is the wife of Delbert Closson, of Redfield, Cass county. Two 
other children have also passed away. The family is one of prominence 
in the community and Mr. and Mrs. Akin occupy an enviable position 
in social circles, having the warm regard of many friends and acquaint- 
ances. They have an elegant collection of beautiful and valuable stones 
and ores from the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains in Nevada, 
and also have a lariat over twenty-three feet long made from the hair 
of Mrs. Akin's head, an instance not found in the entire county of 
Cass. This is a valuable souvenir. 

Mr. Akin has made eleven trips to California by rail and one by 
water and is thoroughly familiar with the western part of the country, 
the growth and development of which he has witnessed to a great ex- 
tent. He has always voted with tlie Republican party and has kept 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day, but has never 
sought or desired office, preferring to give undivided' attention to his 
business interests. Coming to Cass county in his early Iwyhood days, 
he still has many friends among those who have known hi'm from his 
youth to the present time, a fact which indicates that his life has l:ieen 
honorable and upright. Great changes have occurred here since his 
youth and in his farm work he has always kept abreast with ideas of 
modern progress and improvement. He has never placed his depend- 
ence upon any fortunate coml>ination of circumstances or waited for 
anything to turn up to assist him in his business career, hut has labored 
zealously and earnestly and has found that honesty and persistency of 
purpose constitute an excellent foundation ujwn which to rear the super- 
structure of prosi)erity. 

SAMUEL C. THOMSON. 

The fanning interests of Howard township find a worthy represent- 
ative in Samuel C. Thomson, who capably manages his business af- 
fairs and at the same time is efiiciently serving as supervisor. He was 
born in Scotland on the 28th of July. 1S42. his parents being Samuel 
and Lillian (Atkin) Thomson. The father was a native of Scotland. 
born April 22. 1798, and in his young life served as surveyor. Later 
he devoted his attention to merchandising. He was married in Scot- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 451 

land to Miss Lillian Atkiu, who was bora in tliat country in 1802, and 
there spent her girlhood da}s. Eight children were born of this union, 
of whom Samuel C. is the fifth in order of birtli. In 1844 the parents 
came to America, making their way direct to Berrien county, 3ilichigan, 
where the father purchased eighty acres of land and spent his remain- 
ing days in that locality, devoting his energies to agricultural pursuits 
and there rearing his family. He died in Uerrien county at the age of 
eighty-four years, while his wife passed away at the very advanced age 
of ninety-seven years. In politics he was a Democrat. 

Samuel C. Thomson was only two years old when brought by his 
parents to the United Stales. He worked upon the home farm until 
1S81, when he came to Cass county and settled at his present place of 
residence, clearing a farm of two hundred and sixty acres in Howard 
township. This is a valuable property, splendidly improved and giv- 
ing every evidence of the careful supervision of the owner, who is prac- 
tical in his methods, farsighted in his judgment and enterprising in all 
his labor. 

On the 20th of November, 1S84, Mr. Thomson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Caroline Gcrberich, a native of Berrien county, Michigan, 
born February 15, 1S4S, and a daughter of David P. Gerberich, who be- 
came a farmer of Cass county, where Mrs. Thomson was reared. jNIr. 
and Mrs. Thomson have become the parents of a son and daughter, 
Samuel and Josephine, Ixith born upon the present farm. In the midst 
cf an active and useful career as an agriculturist Mr. Th.omson has 
found time to devote to the general welfare and has co-operated in many 
measures for the public good. His fellow townsmen recognizing his 
worth and ability have called him to public office and he was elected 
and served for two years as supervisor, having also previously served 
eight years, which shows his efficiency, being chosen upon the Demo- 
cratic ticket. He has been a lifelong supporter of that party and is still 
unfaltering in his advocacy of its principles. Mr. and Mrs. Thomson 
are both devout members of the First Presbyterian church at Niles, 
Michigan, and he served for thirty years as elder and is now superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school in the society. 

FRED McINTYRE. 

Fred Mclntyre, who carries on farming in a practical, profitable 
and progressive manner on section 21, Lagrange township, was bom in 
Harrison county. Iowa, April 13, 1876. His paternal grandfather, 
Philester Mclntyre, came from New York to Cass county, Michigan, 
at an early period in the development of this part of the state. His son, 
Edward E. P. Mclntyre. father of our subject, was bom in the Empire 
state and accompanied his parents on their removal to the west. He was 
reared amid pioneer conditions in Cass county and in 1867 he removed 
to Harrison county, Iowa, where he located upon a farm. He is now 



452 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

living- in Harrison county in that state. His wife, who in her niaidcii- 
hood was Miss Sarah Parkins, was a native of Iowa and is now de- 
ceased. In their family were three children, namely : Fred, of this 
review; Aiay, the wife of James Poor, of Harrison county, Iowa; and 
Hugh, deceased. 

FYed Alclntyre is the t>nly represcntati\e of the family now in Cass 
county. He was reared in the state of his nativity, where he remained 
luitil i8ijj, when he came to Cass county and here four years later he 
was married, m 1S96, to ?^liss Sarah E. Ccirwin, a daughter of James 
and Xancy Corw in. She was 1jorn in Cass county, Michigan, and has 
spent her entire life here. From 1897 to 1899 Mr. Mclntyre was in the 
employ of Mr. Dodge in Pcnn township, and in 1900 he purch.nsed the 
farm upon whicli he nr)w resides, having here one hundred and fifty- 
nine acres of land, which is well cultivated. Fie carries on general farm- 
ing with gootl results and tlic well tilled fields indicate his careful super- 
vision hy reason of the neat and thrifty appearance which characterizes 
the entire place. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Mclntyre have hccn lx)rn three children; James 
E., Catiiarine D. aufl Lcnn. The parents are highly esteemed and oc- 
cupy an enviahle position in social circles. Mr. Mclntyre is a Democrat 
but without aspiration for ofiice. He is regarded as a well-to-do young 
farmer of the county, having achieved notable success for one of his 
years, as he has not yet attained the age of thirty. He has wrought 
along modern business lines, brooking no obstacles that could be over- 
come by persistent and earnest purpose, and his diligence has proved the 
salient feature in his prosperity. 

DAVID L. KINGSBURY. 

David L. Kingsbury, assistant ca.shier of the First National Bank 
of Cassopolis, was born in LaGrange township, Cass county, Michigan, 
on the gtb of July, 1867, and is the youngest son of Asa and Jane (Mon- 
roe) Kingsbury, who are mentioned on another page of this work. No 
event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life 
for David L. Kingsbury in his youth. He was reared in LaGrange 
township until sixteen years of age and attended the district schools in 
his early boyhood days. He afterward continued liis studies, however. 
in the high school of Cassopolis, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1 888. Suljsequently he attended the agricultural college at 
Lansing for one year and was also a student in Kalamazoo Business 
College for six months, being thus well equipped for life's practical and 
responsible duties. Subsequently be engaged in the dry goods business 
in Cassopolis in partnership with his brother, under the firm style of G. 
M. & D. L. Kingsbur}', which connection was maintained for five years, 
at tlie end of which time Mr. Kingsbury became assistant cashier of the 
First National Bank on the ist of April, 1S91. He has since occupied 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 453 

that position and is one of the popnlar, competent and trnstworthy rep- 
resentatives of this strung financial institution. 

In 1893 occnrred tlie marriage of David L. Kingsbury and Miss 
Francos Graham, a daughter of E. R. and Sabrina Graham. They have 
one son, Asa Joseph. Mr. Kingsbury has been connected with, the vil- 
lage board since attaining his majority either as its treasurer or presi- 
dent, having lieen elected president for live consecutive times. In the 
discharge of his duties he has been prompt and efficient and his labors 
have lieen \ery beneficial to the town. He is a Democrat in his political 
views, active in the work of his party, and his devotion t(j the general 
good is above question. Pmminent in Ma.sonic circles, he belongs to 
Kingsbury Chapter, R. A. ^I., and Xiles Commandery, K. T.. and he 
also holds membership relatinns with the Knights of Pythias of Cassopo- 
lis. For a number of years he has been classed among the prominent 
and progressive citizens of this ])lace and he has earned for himself an 
enviable reputation as a careful man of business, who in his dealings is 
known for his prompt antl honorable methods, which have won him the 
deserved and unbounded confidence of his fellow men. 

WARNER D. JONES. 

Abraham Lincoln has said, "'^'ou can fool some of the people all 
of the time, all of the people some of the time, but you can't fool all of 
the people all of the time." and tiie truth of this assertion is abundantly 
verified in the political system of the cnuntry, where iniblic office is con- 
ferred by public vote and is an indication nf trust reposed in the indi- 
vidual and a recognition of his merit. It is true that corruption exists 
to some e.Ktent, especially in tiie larger cities, but in smaller commu- 
nities where individual character and personal traits of the candidate are 
knov.n it is usually men of real worth and ability who are called to 
.serve in positions of public trust. This is certainly true in the case 
of Mr. Jones, who is filling the office of register of deeds. He was born 
in Penn township. Cass county. December 6, 1869, and as his entire life 
has been passed in this section of the state his life history is as an open 
lx)ok to the majoritv of citizens in the county. He is the third .son and 
fifth child of Nathan and Lydia ( Bonine) Jones, who are mentioned 
on another page of this work. He was reared in the township where 
his birth occurred and pursued his education in the schools of Vandalia 
and Cassopolis. He afterward entered college at Richmond. Indiana, 
and when he put aside his text Ivioks he concentrated his energies upon 
farm labor and was connected with agricultural interests in Cass county 
until he was elected register of deeds in 1904. This position he now 
fills, having been chosen to the oftrce as the candidate of the Republican 
party. He has alwavs taken an active and helpful interest in the work 
of that party and keep'; well informed on the questions and issues of the 
dav, so that he is able to support his position by intelligent argument. 



454 HISTORY 01- CASS COUNTY 

Ml. Jones was married in 1903 to Miss Viola Struble, who was 
bora in this county in 1873 and was educated in the common schools. 
Thus both Mr. and }vlrs. Jones are natives of Cass county and are wide- 
ly known, their circle of friends being constantly extended as the cir- 
cle of their acciuaintances increases. Mr. Jones has always been recog- 
nized as a reliable business man, possessing laudable ambition and en- 
terprise, and in office he is found loyal to the trust rei)osed in him, 
faithfully performing his duties to the best of his ability. In a fraternal 
sense Mr. Jones is a member of the K. of P., Castle No. 129, of Pierian 
Lodge of Cassopolis. 

A. N. ARMSTRONG. 

~ A. N. Armstrong, the popular and efficient jiostmaster of Cassopo- 
lis, was born in Redford. Wayne county, Michigan, on the 2d of No- 
vember, 1858. His father, Nathaniel A. Armstrong, was a native of 
Massachusetts, where he was reared, educated and married. Remov- 
ing to the west he located in Red ford, Wayne county, Michigan, in 
1S41. He was a farmer by occupation and improved a valuable tract 
of land, carr)iug on general farming throughout his entire life. He 
held membership with the Methodist Episcopal church and gave his early 
political allegiance to the Democracy, but afterward became a stanch 
Republican. ?le was of Scotch and Irish descent and in his life lie dis- 
played many strong and sterling characteristics which won for him the 
esteem of all with whom he was associated. He died at the age of sev- 
enty-t^vo vears, and is vet sur\i\-ed by his wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Harriet ]\Iacomber and is a native of IMassachusetts. A. N. .Arm- 
strong is the only child born of their marriage. Both the father and 
mother were previously married and the former had eleven children by 
his first union, while the mother had two children by her first marriage. 
A. N. Amstrong was reared in Redford. Michigan, until twelve 
years of age. The father had died when the son was only six months 
old and about 1870 the motlier removed to Farmington, Oakland coun- 
ty, Michigan, where Mr. Armstrong of this re-view remained until nine- 
teen years of age, when in 1874 he came to Cassopolis. He was educated 
in the public schools and also spent two years in the Ypsilanti State 
Normal School and at Green Busines'; College. He was likcwi'^c a stu- 
dent in Br\-ant & Stratton's Business College at Detroit in 1874. En- 
tering upon his business career, he secured a clerkship in a hardware 
store and in 1S77 '^^ embarked in the hardware busines- on his own 
account, in which line of trade be continued until 1892. He has been 
very active and prominent in political circles and was deputy superin- 
tendent of the department of collections at the World's Fair in Chicago 
in 1893. During the two succeeding years- he was clerk of the senate 
committee on finance and appropriation in the IMichigan leigslature and 
in 1896-7 was sergeant-at-arms in the general assemblv. On the ist 
of September, 1897, he took charge of the postoffice at Cassopolis. hav- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 455 

ing been apimintcd to the position in July of that year by President Mc- 
Kinley and reappointed in 1901 by President Roosevelt. He has been 
a lifelong Republican, taking an active and helpful interest in the party 
both in iucal and state politics, and has been called to various local of- 
fices, the dutie^ of which he has discharged with prumptness and fidelity. 
On March i. u;c6, he took charge .>f the IMichigan State Prison, hav- 
ing been ai'ix)inted warden of the institution by Governor Warner, who 
had known him intimately all his life. This is the oldest and largest 
penal institution in the state and is considered the most responsible of 
all appointive positions in the state government. 

In 1S80 Mr. Armstrong was united in marriage to Miss May S. 
Smith, a daughter of John and Adelia (Tielsort) Smith, who were 
natives of Cass county. " The father was a son of Major Joseph Smith, 
who was a prominent' Democrat and early settler of Cass county, while 
the maternal ancestors were also pioneer people in this section of the 
state, contributing in substantial measure to the progress and develop- 
ment of Cass county. Mrs. Armstrong was bom in Cassopolis. was a 
student in the imblic schools and was the first graduate of the high 
school of this citv. One child has been bom of this marriage. Kath- 
arine, whose birtli occurred in 1884. Mr. Armstrong is a member of 
the ISIasonic fraternity, belonging to the Blue lodge, the chapter and 
the commanderv. In 'the field of political life and commercial activity 
he has won distinction and is to-day numbered among the leading, influ- 
ential and honored residents of his' city. His worth is widely acknowl- 
edged and his unfailing courtesy, deference for the opinions of others 
and commendable characteristics have gained for him the respect of 
those with whom he has been associated. Honored and respected in 
every class of society, he has for many years been a leader in thought 
and action in the public life of Cass county. 

ANDREW^ F. CAUL. 

Andrew F. Caul, a prominent farmei residing on section 35. Mar- 
cellus' township, has from an earlv period in the development of Cass 
county resided within its borders. He was born in Chilhsquaque town- 
ship, Northumberland countv. Pennsvlvania. September 28. 1834. a son 
of Neal and Susannah (Fetzer) Caul, both also natives of Northuinber- 
land countv. From the Kevstone state they came to Micbigaii, taking 
up their abode in :Marcellus township, Cass county, where they spent 
the remainder of their lives, the father passing away at the age of fitty- 
seven years, while the mother sun-ived until she had reached the seven- 
ty-third milestone on the journev of life. They were the parents of four 
children namelv : Andrew F.. whose name introduces this review: hliz- 
abeth who became the wife of Norm-n Hoisington. and died m Marcel- 
lus township; Daniel, who laid down his life on the altar of his countr)- 
durincr the Civil war, in which he served in a carpenter s corps, retum- 



456 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

ing home with typl-.uid iever. from tlie effects of uiiich lie died; and 
Emehne, the wife of Highhmd Sweet, of Alarcellus tcwn-hip. 

Until eighteen years of age Andrew F. Caul remained in Chillis- 
quaque township, Xorthumherland county, Pennsylvania, the place of his 
nativitv, there receiving his education, and when not employed with the 
duties of the school room, worked on the canal. In 1S52 he came with 
his parents to St. Joseph county, rvlichigan, where for tliree years he was 
employed on his father's farm, and in 1856 the family took up their 
abode'within the horilcrs (jf Cas^ county, tlie lather here purchasing one 
hundred acres of wild land. Sn.ju after coming to his new heme, how- 
ever, the father died, and Mr. Caul antl his brother placed the farm un- 
der cultivation, and the former erected all the buiklings which now 
adom the place. He has also added to the original purchase until 
he now owns \.\\o hundred acres of fertile and well improved land on 
section thirtv-five. Marcellus township. When this pioneer family first 
located on this place their nearest trading point and postoftice was Three 
Rivers, while at the present time their mail is delivered to them at tiieir 
door from Marcellus. 

In 1S59 Mr. Caul was united in marriage to Lydia Stannanl, and 
after her death he married Hilary C. Cook. For his third wife he chose 
Ida Denio, and they have five children, namely: Bessie, wife of kit 
Jones, of Marcellus'; Harley, who conducts the home farm; Myrtle L., 
the wife of Charles Brittoii, of Ohio; Donald, who died at the age of 
nine years ; and Lamont, a resident of the state of Washington. In his 
political affiliations :\Ir. Caul is a lifelong Democrat, and his first presi- 
dential vote was cast for James Buchanan. In 1873 he was elected to 
tlie office of supervisor of }*Iarcellus township, in which position he 
served for ten terms. 

KLECKXER W. HARTMAX. 

Kleckner ^^'. Hartman, one of the early settlers of the county now 
located on section 34, Porter township, where he owns and operates 
one hundred and sixtv acres of land, dates his residence in this town- 
ship back to 183S. Thus sixty-eight years have been added to the cycle 
of the centuries since he took up his abode in Cass county. He is. 
however, a native of Michigan, his birth having occurred in St. Joseph 
county, February 22, 1836. His father. Jonas Hartman. was a native 
of Pennsylvania', liorn in 1796, and was reared in the Keystone state. 
He married Eliza M. Kleckner. who was born in Pennsylvania in 1795, 
their wedding being celebrated in that state in 1S17. They remained 
residents of the east until 1831. when they came westward to Mich- 
igan, settling in St. Joseph county, where ^Ir. Hartman Iniilt and 
operated a brewery. He there lived until 183S, when he disposed of 
his business interests in that county and came to Cass county, purchas- 
ing here a large tract of land. He then built a sawmill in Porter town- 



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MRS. ELIZA HARTMAN. 



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HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTY 457 

ship, which he cuiukicted for many years, and he was likewise engaged 
in tiie operation of a threshing machine. He had a very wide acquaint- 
ance in tlie early da}s, heing known to nearly all of the pioneer settlers 
of the county and he was closely identified with many movements and 
business interests that have contributed to its development and upbuild- 
ing. He conducted a hotel on the Chicago road in Porter township 
and was a man uf marked entcrjH-ise and energy, carrying forward to 
successful completion \vhate\er he undertook and readily recognizing 
and utilizing business opportunities. He died when about forly-l'i\-e 
years of age. His wife, long surviving liim, passed away in her 
eightieth year. She kept the children together after the death of their 
father and maintained a heme fnr them until they were able to care 
for tbem-elves. In the family were twelve children: Jefferson. John 
H., Hannah and Elias, all now deceased: David, a resident of Missouri; 
Emanuel and Edward, wlm huue passed away: Kleckner \V., of this 
review; Charles and Amelia, also deceased: Margaret, who was born 
in 1829 and now resides with her brother Kleckner; and Barbara, 
who is the widow of Samuel King and is living in Porter township. 
Kleckner W. Hartman was the eleventh in order of birth in this 
family and was only two }-cars of age when brought by his parents to 
Porter township. He was therefore reared on the old homestead farm 
here and at the usual age he entered the district schools, wiierein he 
mastered the branches of learning usually taught in such institutions. 
When sixteen years of age he won the consent of his mother to his 
leaving home. He then began earning his own livelihood and he sent 
his wages largely to his mother, in fact giving her all that he earned 
with the exception of enough to buy his clothing. He was em])loyed 
in this wa}- in the county until twenty-one years of age. when he re- 
turned to the old homestead, whereon he remained for a year. On the 
expiration of that period he went to the Rocky ^Mountains, his destina- 
tion being Pike's Peak, where gold had been discovered. He worked 
in the mines there for some time but later returned home and after- 
ward made his way to the territory of Idaho, where he spent about a 
year and a half. He then again came to Porter townsbij) and in con- 
nection with his younger brother, Charley Hartman. purchased the 
interest of the other heirs in the old homestead. Tliey worked tlie 
farm together, and in i860 built the house which is still standing here. 
They also improved the farm in many ways, built good barns and 
other outbuildings and continued in business together until the brother 
died. His sister ]\Iargaret became a partner with him in business and 
here they have been living and keeping house together for many years. 
Mr. Plartman has a farm of one hundrcfl and sixty acres and also 
owned another tract of one hundred and sixty acres in St. Joseph coun- 
ty, which he sold. He has lived in Porter township for si.xty-eight 
years, and bv his well directed business affairs and agricultural inter- 



458 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ests he has contributed to its substantial development and improvement. 
At one time he was quite successfully engaged in the stock business, 
buying and selling horses and shipping hogs. He has Ijeen identified 
with various business enterprises and is a stockholder in the Commer- 
cial Bank at Constantine, :\lichigan. He has been ver\- successful, 
making judicious investments and capably managing his 'business af- 
fairs, so that by hard work, unfaltering industry and close application 
he has accumulated a handsome competence and now owns valuable 
property and invested interests. 

E. S. COX KLIN. 

E. S. Conklin is the resident partner and manager of the :\Iarcel- 
lus Milling Company, in which connection he is a prominent representa- 
tive of industrial interests in the village of Marcellus. The qualities of 
a .successful busines'^ man are his — close application, unfaltering enter- 
prise and indefatigable diligence. A native of Wisconsin, he was bom 
in Waupaca on the 17th of :\Iay, iSr,.^. his parents being Sidney H. 
and Mary L. (McQueen) Conklin. the former a native of Geauga coun- 
ty, Ohio, born near Akron, and the latter a native of Paisley, Scotland. 
The mother came to the United States when thirteen years of age with 
her parents, who landed near Waukegan, Illinois, and in Waupaca. Wis- 
consin, she gave her hand in marriage to Sidney Conklin. Both died at 
Neenah, \\'isconsin. :\Ir. Conklin at the age of sixty-six years, and 
his wife when sixty-five years of age. He was a miller by' trade and 
followed that pursuit throughout his entire business life. In the fam- 
ily were two children, the elder being Elmer, who died at the age of 
twenty-one years. 

E. S. Conklin spent tlie days of his boyhood and youth in his par- 
ents' honie and when ten or twelve years of age accompanied them 
on their removal to Xeeiiah. Wisconsin. When Ins education was com- 
pleted he entered the milling business in connection with his father, who 
followed that pursuit for thirty-five years, and remained as his assist- 
ant until twenty years of age. when he removed to Green Bay, Wis- 
consin, where he was employed at milling by other parties. He took 
charge of the mill, which he managed for one and a half years, and on 
the ex])iration of that period he went to Ripon, Wisconsin, and was aft- 
erward in Berlin and Royalton, in the line of his trade, subsequent to 
which time lie returned to Neenah, where he remained for five rears. 
He next went to Antigo, Wisconsin, where he spent eight and a half 
years. He again located at Green Bay, where he took charge of the 
mills with which he had previously been connected when in that place 
before. Six years ago he purchased a half interest in the Marcellus 
Milling Company, the plant being owned jointly by the Colby Milling 
Company of Dowagiac, ^lichigan. and Mr. Conklin, who as resident 
partner and manager is in full control. He has the entire confidence of 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 459 

the comniLinily in whicli the mill is lucated, and to his careful manage- 
ment and entei prise the satisfactory business enjoyed by the companv is 
due. He has had charge of thirteen different mill's and' has thus gained 
broad practical experience, which now enables him to give capable man- 
agement to his individual interests. The equipment of the mill is un- 
usually .good for an establishment of this extent. The mill building, a 
substantial brick structure of three stories, with ten-foot basement and 
engine and boiler room, was erected in 1S91, and has an Allis equipment 
throughout for a daily capacity of two hundred barrels of flour. The 
main building is forty by fifty feet in size, with an addition thirty-six 
by forty feet in size, for oftke and storage purposes. The mill has fire 
protection from a .standjiipe to the top of the mill, with hose on ever}- 
floor, and connection with the village waterworks. It also is steam- 
heated throughout. The company enjoys a steady flour trade, both lo- 
cally and wholesale. Its brands are "Alpine" (full patent) and "Roval" 
(straight), while "Colby Patent"' and "Splendid" for the larger baker- 
ies are as well known as any flours in ^Michigan. Besides handling all 
kinds of grain, seeds, etc., the company sells annually quite an amount 
of hard and soft coal, with storage rooms for five hundred ton? each, 
the sidings and warehouses occupying an advantageous location con- 
venient for local trade and shipments. 

The manager, Mr. Conklin, is ver\- proud of his mill from every 
point of view. He particularly insists that the mill should be kept like 
a home, and he extends a welcome to callers and inspectors at anv and 
all times. He is a practical miller in all details, and came into charge 
of this plant from the milling section of central and northern \\'iscon- 
sin. 

On the 24th of August. 189R, was celebrated the marriage of E. S. 
Conklin and IMiss Katheryn Cornish, a native of \\'isconsin. They 
now have two sons, Roscoe S. and Horace F. The parents are widely 
known in Marcellus and the hospitality of the l)€st homes is freely 
accorded them. ]\Tr. Conklin is a valued member of the T^Iasonic fra- 
ternity, being identified with Ixith the lodge and chapter, and in his life 
he is most loyal to its teachings and tenets. He has made a creditable 
business record as a man of aliility and trustworthiness and is thorough- 
ly conversant with his trade, and added to a complete command of the 
technical side of the business is an executive ability and keen insight into 
trade relations and possibilities. 

CLIXTOX L. KESTER. 

Clinton L. Kester. the present postmaster of Marcellus. whose pub- 
lic-spirited citizenship "Stands as an unquestioned fact in his life, was 
born in Parkville. St. Joseph county, Michigan, December 14. 1861. 
He is a son of Adam H. and Emaline CBodmer) Kester. the former a 
native of Pennsvlvania. and the latter of Ohio. In earlv life thev became 



40U HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

residents n\ Mich'f^im ami were married in this state. Tlic father de- 
voted much of Ills tniie and eiier-ics .airing his Inisiness career to mer- 
cantile pursuits, save that the last fifteen vears of his life were spent up- 
on a farm in Mis^nuri, where he died i'ehruarv 14. 1906, at the age of 
seventy-four years. He had Imig survived his \vit"e. who pa.ssed away 
on the 14th of .\o\einlicr. iSji'k wlien thirty-nine vears of age. In his 
ixiliticai \iews Mr. Kester was a stalwart Kepul>lic;;n. In his familv were 
six children: :\Iillie. who is now living in Missouri; Clinton L.. of 
this review: Herman: Ada, the wife of O. F. Wilson, als,, of Missouri; 
Frank, whose home is in St. J.i.senh. Alis.souri: and Burton, of the same 
state. 

Clinton L. Kester was a youth of fourteen vears wdien he accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Marcellus. He worked in his 
father's store for about ten years, thus acquiring his earlv Inisiness 
training and ex]jerience. He aftcrwar.l went to Colorado.' wdiere he 
engaged in clerking for a time aii.l later he joined his father, who had 
removed to Missi^iri and was there engaged in farming. After an ah.- 
sence of two ) ears spent in the west. Clinton L. Kester returned to 
Marcellus, :\lichig,in, and again entered the field of business activity 
here as a general merchant of the firm of Kester & Arnold. This rela'- 
tion was maintained for four years, when Mr. Kester withdrew and 
afterward engaged in clerking in the general store of S. Sterns & Com- 
pany, in which capacity he served until appointed postmaster eight years 
ago. He has recently received his thirfl appointment in the office", the 
duties of which he has disch.arged with credit to himself and general sat- 
isfaction tc tlie public. He owns a fifty-acre vineyard, one mile east 
of the village, which he oversees and which is kept in e.xcellent condi- 
tion, yielding large cn.ps. His ^lolitical allegiance has always been giv- 
eii_ to the Republican jiarty and he is thoroughly in sympa'thv with its 
principles and iiolicy. Vor four years he served as treasurer of the vil- 
lage and was a faithful custodian of its funds, while at all times he is 
loyal to those interests which tend to promote public progress and im- 
provement. His social relations connect him with the Masons, the 
Knigiits of I'ythias and the Knights of the Maccabees, and he is re- 
garded as a valued representative of these orgajiizations, exem]ihfying 
in his life the beneficent sjiirit of the different orders which are based 
upon the idea of the brotherhood of man. 

JOSEPH O. CURRY. 

Joseph O. Curry is one of the native sons of Michigan, who has 
found in this state ample opportunity for the e.xercise of his native 
talents and has become fully cognizant of the fact that in Michigan 
earnest labor brings a sure and just reward, for through his close appli- 
cation and earnest efforts he has l>ecome one of the substantial resi- 
dents, of Cass countv. He now makes his home in Marcellus and was 



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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 401 

born in Decatur township. Van Bnren county, October 6. 1834, bving- 
retired alter many years of active, successful and honoraljie connection 
with agricultural interests. He is a son of Da\-id Curry, who was born 
in Pennsylvania in December, 1807. Tbe family removed to the vicin- 
ity of Columbus, Ohio, on lca\-ing' Pennsylvania, and ab-out iSjr> Da\-id 
Curry canie to Michigan with tbe family, who were journeying to this 
state. He afterward reUirned to Ohio, however, and with his brother 
John again made the trip to Michigan in 1830. He worked f(ir one 
year for Josephus Gard and was then married and entered upm an in- 
dependent business career. It was in the year 1832 that lie entered from 
the government his farm in Decatttr township. Van Buren county. The 
land which came into his possession was entirely wild and unimproved 
and all around liim stretclied the native forest and uncultivated tracts 
of land. For fourteen years he devoted his time and energies to the sub- 
jugation of the wilderness and to the development of his farm, and was 
then killed by being thrown from a load of straw in the year 1846, leav- 
ing an estate of two hundred and forty acres of land. He was em- 
ployed in \'alencia township, Cass county, when he first came to Mich- 
igan, hut the first and only home he ever earned was on section 34, De- 
catur township. Van Buren county. He had the finest cabin on the 
prairie at that time, it being eighteen by twenty feet, and it was the only 
one containing a sawed wood floor. There were no windows nor doors 
nor floor, however, when they moved into it. The Indians were fre- 
quent visitors and Joseph O. Curry remembers well the calls that tlie 
red men paid at tliat pioneer home. The father was a prominent and 
honored pioneer resiflent in the epochal events which form the early 
history of bis section of the state. He served in the Indian wars against 
the members of the Sac tribe and in recognition of the military aid 
which he rendered received a land grant. He married ]Miss Elizabeth 
Gard, who was born in Union township. Union county, Indiana, on 
Christmas day of 181 1. She long sun'ived her husband and passed 
away in Van' Buren county. Michigan, in 1878. She was a daughter 
of Josephus and Sarah Gard. The former entered from the govern- 
ment a farm now owned by Mr. Curry, and he bought three quarter-sec- 
tions of land. The homestead property of our subject comprises a quar- 
ter-section which was inherited by Mrs. Elizabeth Curry, who was one 
of the esteemed pioneer women of this section of the state. By her 
marriage she became the mother of nine children: Jonathan, who was 
born Mav 8. 1833. ^nd died in the Indian Territory Januan.- 4, 1905; 
Joseph O., of this review: Juliet, who was born April 5, 1836. and 
passed away in 1880: ^Marshall, who was born October 24. 1837. and 
has departed this life: David O.. who was born September 25. 1839. and 
died on the old boir.e farm :\Iarch 28. 1906; Elizabeth, who was born 
March 27. 1P41. and is acting as housekeeper for her brother Joseph: 
Mar>- Jane, who was born February 20, 1843. and was the only one of 
the fainilv that married, becoming the wife of Jacob High, of Park 



462 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

township, St. Joseph county, Alichigan; Nancy H., who was born ^larch 
26, 1844, and died at the age of three years; and John B., who was born 
November 6, 1845, ^^^^^ passed away January 2, 1865. Of this family 
David served as a soldier of the Civil war from 1S61 until 1SG5, as a 
member of the Fourth ]\Iichigan Cavalry. He was one of three hundred 
men who captured Jefferson Davis, and he retained as a souvenir of 
that e.xpedition the saddle bags taken from General Regan, who was a 
member of Davis' cabinet. These saddle bags are now in possession-of 
Joseph O. Curry. 

Joseph O. Curr}-, wlio.^c name introduces tliis review, remained 
upon the farm up<jn which he was born until sixty-two years of age and 
assisted in its development and cultivation as the years went by. He 
was early trained to th.e work of the fields and meadow and became a 
man of energy and industry, whose success is attributable to his own 
persistent efforts and capable business management. In 1S96 he re- 
moved to the farm which he now owns, and has made it his home for 
the past decade. It comprises one hundred and sixty acres of land on 
section 21, Marcellus township, and was entered from the government 
by his grandfather, Jcsephus Card, since which time it has Iieen con- 
tinuously in possession of the family. The land had been cleared and 
good buildings had been erected by 'Mr. Curry and his brother Jonathan. 
This is indeed a fine farm, being perhaps the best in the township, and 
eighty acres of the land lies within the corporation limits of IMarcellus, 
a half mile from tlie center of the village. He also owns two hundred 
and eighty acres of land in Decatur township and eighty acres in Park 
township, together with nfty-six acres near Cassopolis. Throughout his 
entire life Mr. Curry has devoted his energies to general farming and 
stock-raising and has become widely known as a breeder of trotting 
horses. He now has a team that has a record of 2:25, both animals be- 
ing raised on the home farm. This is the fastest team in the township 
and Mr. Curry may well be proud of these travelers. He is a representa- 
tive business man, ever watchful of opportunities, and in all his business re- 
lations he has been found reliable and straightforward. He has trav- 
eled quite extensively in the middle west, as has his brother. All of 
the family are advocates of the Democracy and Jonathan Curn,- has held 
a number of township offices, the duties of which he has discharged 
with promptness and fidelity. Mr. Curry is a worthy representative of 
a pioneer family, one that has been associated with Michigan's history 
from an early period in territorial days. He lived here at the time most 
of the homes were log cabins and these were widely scattered. Com- 
paratively few roads had been made through the forests, the land being 
still covered with the native timber. The streams were unbridged and 
it seemed that the work of impro\-ement had scarcely been begun. The 
Curry family have always borne their full sharein the development of 
the agricultural interests of this section of Michigan and deserve much 
credit for what they have accomplished. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 



HEXRY L. LOVERIDGE. 



Henry L. Loveridge, living ^n section 8, Marcellus township, is 
the pupular owner of Island Park, un which is a beautifnl lake, famous 
for its good fishing. Michigan, with its excellent climate, its fine parks 
and beautifnl lake regions, furnishes excellent opportunity for the de- 
velopment of attractive summer resorts, and !\Ir. Loveridge in connec- 
tion with the improvement of his agricultural interests has spent con- 
siderable time in promoting Island Park, wliich is now a most popular 
resort. He was Ixjrn at Paw Paw, in Van Buren county, Michigan, 
December 15, 1857, his parents being John and Kate (Hinkley) Lov- 
eridge, who were natives of New York. The mother came to Micliigan 
about sevent}' years ago, when only three years old, and Mr. Loveridge 
arrived in this state when about twenty-five years of age. They were 
married in Michigan and for a long period the father devoted his atten- 
tion to contracting. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade and 
for a considerable period was closely associated with building opera- 
tions in this section of the state. At the time of the Civil war he put 
aside all business and personal interests, however, and espoused the 
cause of the Union, serving as a member of Company A, Thirteenth 
Michigan Infantry, during the last of the war. He died in Cass county 
January 15, 1901. at the age of sixty-nine years, and is yet survived by 
his widow, who now resides in Marcellus. She is one of the esteemed 
pioneer women of this part of the state, having made her home in !Mich- 
igan for the allotted Psalmist's span of three score years and ten. 

Henry L. Loveridge, their only child, remained in his nati\'e coun- 
ty until fifteen years of age. when he went to Kalamazoo. Michigan. 
where he remained until twenty-two years of age. During that period 
he spent fi\e years as an employe in a store, and for two years was in 
the service of the American Express Company. He then returned to 
Paw Paw, and for five years remained upon the home farm following 
his marriage. In 1886 he removed to Marcellus and opened a store, 
which he conducted for fifteen years. carn,-ing on a prosperous bakery 
and grocery business. Pie also conducted a store at Schoolcraft for one 
"year, and four years ago he came to Fish Lake and took charge of the 
resort which his father had established three years previous. He has 
nine acres of ground situated on a peninsula, extending from the east 
shore into I'ish Lake. He has sold fourteen lots, and ten cottages have 
been built since he arrived. Mr. Loveridge has also erected a hotel and 
has a boarding house which his father built. There were also two cot- 
tages erected before Mr. Loveridge came to this place. Island Park is 
a natural forest of beech, oak. ash. maple, basswood and ironwood. 
In fact there are nearly all kinds of timber except black walnut. The 
fine fishing is one of the most attractive features of the district, there 
being a chain of nine lakes all accessible with a row boat. Mr. Loveridge 
has done much to develop and improve the resort, which is now indeed 



464 HISTORY O!' CASS COUXTV 

very popular, being annually visited by a large number of people wlio 
find in the shady forests a cool retreat from the heat of llie cities in 
summer, while the fisherman has every opportunitiy to enjoy his prowess 
with the finny tribe. 

Mr. L(jveridgc was mairicd in September. i.*^79. to Miss Rose 
Taylor, a native of this t'jwnshi]) ami a daughter nf Jolm Tayb^r. They 
now have mie sop,, Rert. who is ad\ance agent of the Forepaugh & Sells 
circus. Well known in this part of the state, Henry L. Loveridge has 
gainetl a wide acquaintance through his business interests as merchant 
and hotel prnpiietur, and his social, genial manner and consideration for 
others ha\ e g.-'incd liini wide and lasting popularity with those with 
whom he has been associated. 

DANIEL K. BYRXES. 

Dariiel K. Byrnes, a farmer and representative citizen of Pokagon 
township, was born and reared upon the i)lace which is yet his home, his 
natal day being June 28, 1847. His father, John Byrnes, was (jne of 
the pioneer settlers of Cass cf)unty, where he, too, carried on agricult- 
ural pursuits. He was born in county Cork, Ireland, in 181 5, and when 
about sixteen years of age went to Syracuse. New York, where he 
learned the carpenter's trade. The year 1S57 witnessed his arrival in 
Michigan, his de.stination being Niles, and there he followed carpen- 
tering until about twenty-six years of age, when he was married. Not 
long afterward he took up his ab(j(le upon what has since been known as 
the Byrnes farm on section 28. Pokagon township. He began there 
with eighty acres of timl)er land and he at once cleared away the trees 
and brush and grubbed out the stumps, after which he plowed the fields 
and culti\'ated crops. He married !Miss Arsula Clyburn, who was l>:>rn 
in Virginia in 181 7. The Clyburns were among the oldest settlers of 
Cass county and Mrs. Byrnes was reared and educated here. Unto the 
parents of our subject were born six children, three sons and three 
daughters, of whom Daniel K. was the second. The father gave his 
political support to the Whig party in early life, but afterward became 
an advocate of the Democracy, and still later joined the ranks of the 
Prohibition party because of his views upon the temperance question. 
He was also a local minister of the Methodist church in pioneer days. 
was a member of the Masonic fraternit}-, belonging to Pokagon lodge. 
No. 36. A. F. & .\. M.. and he served as master under dispensation. He 
took an active part in the organization of the lodge and he also labored 
untiringly for the advancement of church and temperance work, and in 
fact did everything in his power to promote the moral progress of the 
community and uplift his fellow men. He had a \tr\- wide acquaintance 
throughout Cass county and his memory is yet enshrined in the hearts 
of many who knew him. His death ocairred ]\Iarch 12. 1902, when he 
had reached the advanced age of eighty-seven years, and his example is 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 465 

one -well worthy of emulation, while his influence is still a potent fac- 
tor for good among- those who came under his teachings. 

Daniel K. Byrnes was reared in Pokagon township and worked 
upon the home farm of his father until the latter's death. On the ist 
of April, 1874, he was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary I'arker, who 
was born in Eerrien county, ^Michigan, December 6, 1855, and is a 
daughter of Henry C. and Mary Parker, who removed from Ohio to 
Berrien county at an early epoch in its development. Subsequently they 
came to Cass county when it was still a pioneer district and Mrs. Byrnes 
was reared upon the old Parker homestead in Pokagon township. Unto 
our subject and his wife have been born six children: Zulu, now de- 
ceased; Lewis K. ; Ella May, the wife of John INIcCoy ; Robert J. ; Lena; 
and Eliza Bell. All were born and reared upon the present Byrnes 
farm. This place comprises seventy-seven acres of land that is very pro- 
ductive and is now under a high state of cultivation. Mr. Byrnes has 
cleared and cultivated the greater part of it himself and it is the visible 
evidence of his life of thrift and enterprise. He has worked diligently 
and his labors have been resultant factors in winning for him a place 
among the substantial residents of the county. He belongs to Pokagon 
lodge. No. 136, A. F. & A. M., and to Crv'^tal Springs lodge. No. 325, 
L O. O. E. In politics a Democrat, he has ser\-ed for thirty years as 
justice of the peace, and no higher testimonial of capability could be 
given, for his long service indicates his fair and impartial decisions and 
his fidelity to duty under all circumstances. 

FRANK DUNN. 

Frank Dunn, who is now filling the position of supervisor in New- 
berg township and resides on section 22, is one of the native sons of 
this township, his birth having here occurred on the 8th of February. 
1867. He is a representative of one of the old and prominent pioneer 
families of the county. His paternal grandfather, Archibald Dunn, 
came to Michigan when this section of the state was a wild and unim- 
proved region and cast in his lot with the early settlers who were ex- 
tending the frontier and planting the seeds of civilization here. His 
son, Anson L. Dunn, w^as born in this state and was reared amid pio- 
neer environments and conditions. He pursued his education in the pub- 
lic schools and after arriving at years of maturity led a very busy, use- 
ful and active life. He was a prominent man. who held many offices in 
his township and proved himself at all times worthy of the trust and 
confidence reposed in him. He filled the position of county treasurer 
for four years and was a super\'isor for several terms. He made a close 
study of the needs and possibilities of the county and exercised his of- 
ficial prerogatives to advance every movement that he deemed would 
prove of public benefit. His acquaintance was a wide one and all who 
knew him entertained for him genuine respect and unqualified regard. 



4C6 HISTORY OV CASS COUXTY 

He wedded r^Iiss ^^lary Gil!, who is now a resident of Jones, but ;Mr. 
Dunn passed away in iSSS. In the family were three children. ' 

B'rank Dunn, the youngest of the children, was reared in his native 
township and at the usual age entered the puljlic schools, wherein he 
mastered the conmnjn branches of learning. In the summer months 
he assisted in the farm work and throughout his entire life he has oir- 
ried on general agricultural pursuits. He now has a farm of two hun- 
dred and thirty-seven acres, which he rents, while he is interested also 
in the ownership of the store in connection with his brother at Jones. 
He possesses good business qualifications, keen sagacity and enterprise, 
and his labors have been a source of gratifying income. Like his father 
before him, I\Ir. Dunn is recognized as a leading and valued member of 
the Republican party, working earnestly and effectively for its welfare. 
He has held many offices, serving as township clerk for nine years, while 
in 1899 he was elected supervisor, which position he has filled to the 
present time, covering a period of seven years. He is a worthy and 
capable ottkial, ne\-er faltering in the performance of any duty, and that 
he enjoys the public confidence is indicated by the fact that he has long 
, been retained in the office. He is popular in political, business and social 
circles in the county where his entire life has been passed. 

MAY ARNOLD OLDS. 

May Arnold Olds, interested in general farming on section 6, 
Mason township, was here born on the 4th of July, 1858, and thus 
the home place is endeared to him through the associations of his boy- 
hood as well as through the connections of later years when he has 
found in the old farm the source of a good livelihood gained through 
his untiring eft'orts to ci.dti\ate and improve 'the fields. He had two 
uncles, Harvey and Lester Olds, who were among the early settlers of 
the county and occupied the first store in Adamsville. They were ex- 
tensive grain dealers, conducting a very important business in that day. 
His father. Mdls Olds, was a native of Cayuga county. Xew York, 
and was there reared and married. He wedded Miss Mary Brown 
Arnold, wdiose birth occurred in Cayuga county in the year 1822. Be- 
ing early left an orphan, she was reared by her grandparents, but Joseph 
Arnold was her guardian. The Olds family comes of English and 
German ancestry. The parents of our subject were married at Sen- 
nett, New York, on the 24th of December. 1845, and began their 
domestic life in the Empire state, whence in 1849 they removed to 
Cass county, Michigan, locating on section 6, IMason township, where 
Mr. Olds paid five dollars per acre for a tract of land which was then 
unimproved. He built a log house and in true pioneer style began 
life in this district. He placed his fields under the plow, carried on 
the farm work until he had made excellent improvements upon the 
farm and converted it into a productive and arable tract of land. There 






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HISTORY OI' CASS COL-XTY 



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he continued to resi.le until Iiis death, wliicli occurred when he was in 
the sixty-eighth year of liis a-e. His poHtical alle<?iancc was crjven 
to the Democracy, and tliou-h lie never sou-ht office or attempted to 
figure in public lite in that way he was numbered among the pioneers 
of the county who were closely connected with its upbuilding and pro"-- 
ress, co-operating m the labors of those who have made^he county 
what It IS today. His wife died in her thirty-seventh vear. In the 
family were two sons, but the elder. Stephen S'. Olds, is now deceased. 
May Arnold Olds, whose name introduces this reconl, was hut 
SIX months old at the time of his mother's death, after which he was 
reared by his aunt, Harriet Olds. His education was acquired in the 
Adamsville schools and after putting aside his textbooks he entered 
business life in connection with the conduct of a meat market at Xap- 
panee, Elkhart county, Indiana. There he remained for four vears, 
but with this exception he has continuously been a resident of Ma^ori 
township, Cass county, from his birth to the present time. As a com- 
panion and helpmate for life's journey he chose :Miss Allie Thompson, 
whom he wedded on Christmas day of 1883. Her paternal great- 
grandfather ser\ed for more than seven years in the Revolutionary war, 
taking part in manv important engagements. He lived to enjoy the 
benefits of libert}'. passing away at the very advanced age of ninety 
years, at which time he was making his Ikmiic in Kentucky. Her grand- 
father, Samuel Thompson, was a soldier of the war of' 1812. She is 
a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Holmes) Thompson. Her father 
^vas born near Coventry in Orleans county. Vermont. Decemlier 16. 
1818, and came to Cass county. ]\Iichigan, in June, 1837. when in his 
eighteenth year. He located first at Adamsville. wheVe" he was em- 
ployed in a flouring mill and he afterward became a partner with Mr. 
Redfield in the milling business, conducting that enterprise for six 
years. In the meantime he had purchased eighty acres of land nn 
section 16, Mason township, and he turned his attention to farming 
after retiring from the milling business. He yoted with the Democ"^ 
racy, and held a number of local (offices, including that of town.ship 
supervisor, in which he served for many years, his long continuance in 
office standing in incontrovertible evidence of his ability and fidelity. 
He was also connected with the national Democratic paper at Cassop- 
oiis at an early day. and his interest in political affairs was that of a 
public-spirited citizen, who places principle before mere partisan meas- 
ures and desires the welfare of the community rather than personal 
aggrandizement. He was married in February, 1848, to Z^Iiss Eliz- 
abeth Holmes, a native of Rochester, New York, and thev became the 
parents of seven children, of whom two died in infancy, one of these 
being killed by lightning. Mr. Thompson was twice married, his sec- 
ond union being with Maria King and there were four children born 
to them. 



468 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Airs. Olds is the youngest child of her father's iirst marriage and 
was only about six months old when her mother passed away at the 
age of thirty-six years. Mrs. Olds was born on section i6. Mason 
township, September 27, 1858, and pursued her education in the schools 
of Elkhart and in the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso. 
She became a successful educator, teaching for eight and a half years 
in Jefferson, Calvin and Mason townships and also in the city of Elk- 
hart, Indiana. By her marriage she has become the mother of two 
sons': Henry Tliompson, who was born August 31, 1886, and is at 
home assisting in the improvement of the farm; and Carlton, who was 
born Scptemlx^r 14, 1S89, and is now a student in Elkhart. 

Following their marriage in 1883, Mr. and Mrs. Olds located in 
Nappanee and in 1S87 returned to the farm upon which they now re- 
side, having since made it their home, and the pretty country seat is 
known as "June Alede." Here Mr. Olds has one hundred thirty and 
a half acres of well improved land and is carrying on general farm- 
ing, having placed his fields under a high state of cultivation, so that 
he annually harvests good crops. He organized what is known as 
the Pullman Telephone Company, of which he is now president, its 
lines covering Mason township and also extending into Ontwa town- 
ship. He was the promoter of the telephone company and thus insti- 
tuted a business which has been not only a convenience but a source 
of direct benefit to citizens in this part of the county. His political 
support is given to the Democracy, and he has held the office of jus- 
tice of the peace, taking an active part in the administration of public 
afifairs and doing all in his power to promote tlie general welfare. He 
has been almost a life-long resident of the county, and in all relations 
has been known as a man of worth and reliability, enjoying in large 
mt^^sure tlie esteem of those with whom he has been brought in con- 
tact. Mr. and Mrs. Olds have in their possession some of the old 
continental scrip money to the value of seven dollars, a part of the money 
paid Airs. Olds" great-grandfather when a soldier in General Washing- 
ton's armv. 

NELSON A. HUTCHINGS. 

Nelson A. Hutchings is probably the oldest resident of Newberg 
township, for he has lived continuously within its borders for seventy' 
years, and he now makes his home on section 32. As one travels over 
the countv to-day and notes its thriving towns and cities, its highly cul- 
tivated farms, it's business interests, its excellent schools and other pub- 
lic insitutions, it is almost impossible to realize what was the condition 
of the countv during Air. Hutchings' boyhood. One looks to-day over 
broad but ri'chlv cultivated fields, but at that time there was an almost 
unbroken wilderness, the forest trees still standing in their primeval 
strength. Few roads had been laid out and only here and there was a 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 409 

little clearing to show that some progressive jjioneer had made his way 
into the forest and was endeavoring to establish a home. 

Mr. Hnichings was born in Portage county, Ohio, February i6, 
1833. and was the sixth in order of birth in a family (3f nine children, 
five daughters and four sons, who were born of the marriage of Samuel 
and Pohv M. (Van Curcn) Hutchings. The paternal grandfather also 
bore the name of Samuel Hutchings. The father was born in New York 
September i-l, 1796, and on leaving the Empire state became a resident 
of Portage county, Ohio, where he remained until 1835, when he re- 
moved to Cass county, Michigan, being one of its first settlers. He lo- 
cated in Newberg township and from the government entered a tract 
of land on section 31. It was entirely wild and undeveloped, but he at 
once began to clear and cultivate it, and in the course of time improved 
a good "farm, upon which he spent his remaining days, being long rec- 
ognized as one of the enterprising and successful agriculturists of the 
community. He died in his eighty-third year, respected by all who 
knew him'. His early political allegiance was given to the Whig party, 
and upon its dissolution he joined the ranks of the new Republican par- 
ty, with which he continued to affiliate until his death. He held mem- 
bership ui the Baptist church and was well known throughout the coun- 
ty as an upright, honorable man and a worthy pioneer, wlw aided in 
laying broad and deep the foundation for the present development of 
this part of tliC state. His wife, also a native of New York, was born 
on Christmas dav of 1798 and died in the eighty -third year of her age. 
She was a daughter of' Jonathan \'an Curen, who was of German de- 
scent. Of the nine children born unto Mr. and ^Vlrs. Hutchings one died 
in infancy, while the others all reached manhood or womanhood, while 
two sons and two daughters are yet living. 

Nelson A. Hutchings was only three years of age when brought 
by his parents to iSIichigan, since which time he has lived in Cass coun- 
ty. He was reared upon the old homestead farm in Newberg township 
and shared in the usual experiences and hardships of frontier life. Hi? 
educational privileges were limited. Fie attended one of the log school 
houses of the countv. wl-.ere he received instruction in the elementary 
branches of learning, but experience and observation in later years have 
greatly broadened his knowledge, making him a well informed man. 
During the spring and summer months he aided in the labors of the 
fields, taking his place at the plow almost as soon as old enough to reach 
the plow liandlcs. He remained at home until the time of his marriage. 
On the 17th of October, 1881. he was joined in wedlock to Mrs. Sarah 
Hartman,' the widow of Albert Bogert. She was bom in St. Joseph 
county. IMichigan, where .she was reared, her father being Reuben Hart- 
man, one of the earlv settlers there. In 1882 Mr. and Mrs. Hutchings 
removed to the farm upon which they now reside, it havmg been their 
home continuou'^lv since. They have become the parents of one son. 
Marvin Carlton, who married Jennie Faxton and has one daughter. 



470 HISTORY OU CASS COfXTY 

Wilda C. By her t'ornier marriage ]\Irs. Hutchings had a family of two 
children, Katie L. and Alhert J. Uugert. 

The home farm of Air. Hutchings comprises one hundred and 
twenty acres of good land, which is rich and productive, and he car- 
ries on general farming and stock-raising, having good grades of stock 
upon his place. He is a carpenter hy trade, however, and in earlier 
years assisting in building many structures in Cass county, includir.g 
the "Forest Half at Diamond Lake and other well known buildings. 
He has aKvays x-otcd with the Re[>ublican party, casting his Ijallot for 
each prcsidenti:d caudnlatc I'l that organization since attaining his ma- 
jority. He has held local offices in the township and is deeply inter- 
ested in the growth and success of his party. At one time he was a 
member of the ]\Iasonic fraternity. As stated, he is perhaps the oldest 
resident in the township in years of continuous connection therewith, 
having lived here for seventy years. His mind forms a connecting link 
between the primitive past and the present with all of its progressive- 
ness. He can remember when Indians occasionally visited the neigh- 
borhood, wlien \\\\d game was to be had in abundance and when most 
of the settlers lived in little log cabins. There was a spirit of gener- 
ous hospitality and helpfulness, hnwever, that existed, which coniiien- 
sated for the har(lshi])s and [irixations of pioneer life. He has always 
rejoiced in what has been acci'inijlished along lines of improvement, 
but \ct ha.s mail}- pleasant memnries of the early days. 

GEORGE STAXDERLIXE. 

Nature seems to have intended that man in the evening of life 
should enjoy a i)eriod of rest. In his youth he is full of vigor and enter- 
prise, is hopeful and ambitious. In his more mature years his efforts 
are tempered b.}- experience and soimd judgment resulting in successful 
accomplishment if he but uses his talents and jwwers to the best of his 
ability. If he does this he wins the competence that enables him later 
to put aside lousiness cares and enjoy a well earned rest. Such has been 
the career of ;Mr. Standerline, who after many years of active and hon- 
orable connection with agricultural pursuits is now living retired in 
Corey. He is a native of Lincolnshire. England, born on the 14th of 
Octoljcr, 1S30, and is a son of Thomas Standerline, whose l;irth oc- 
curred in the same locality. He was a farmer by occupation and thus 
provided for the support of his wife and children. He married Eliza- 
beth Graham, a native of Lincolnshire, who spent her entire life in Eng- 
land. In their familv were three daughters, George Standerline being 
the only son. Tlie days of his childhood and youth were spent in his 
native land and he is indebted to its public school system for the educa- 
tional privileges he enji.ved. In his Irayliood he became familiar with 
farm work and later engaged in genera! agricultural pursuits on his 
own account. 

Mr. Standerline was married in his native country in 1854 to Miss 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 471 

Jane Hollandlrick-, wlio was born in Lincolnshire. Enn-land. October 23, 
1835, a dar.giiler of U'iliiain and .Maria (Peck) Hollandtrick, wlio were 
also natives of tliat country and spent tlieir entire lives in England. 
Ten days alter tlieir n-.arriaoe Mr. and Mrs. Standeriine started for 
.\nierica, for tiity believed that they might enjoy better ojiixirtunities 
in the new wcrld. of which they had heard such favorable rejiorts. 
They were seven weeks on shiplviard crossing the Atlantic from Eng- 
land to Quebec, Canada, and thence proceeded up the St. Lawrence river 
to tiie lakes. They made their way first to Toledo, Ohio, where they 
spent one summer, after which they came to Michigan, making their 
way to W'hite Pigeon, St. Joseph county, Michigan. They resided on 
Pigeon prairie for thirteen years, on the expiration of which period Mr. 
Standeriine came to Newberg township, Cass county, and purchased a 
farm on section 25. He was the owner of tliat property until 190J, 
when he sold the farm. He had lived. Imwever. in Corey for twenty- 
two consecutive years, having retired fmm ;ictive business life to eniov 
in his comfortable home a well earned rest and the fruits of his former 
toil. 

Unto Mr. and ^Mrs. Standeriine have been lx)rn seven children, 
who are yet living, namely: Richard, at home; Thomas, a resident of 
Newberg town.ship: William and Gc<irge. who are living in Xewberg 
township; James, of Mishawaka, Indiana: Alice, the wife of Marshall 
Hughes, a resident of South Bend. Indiana: and Annetta. the wife of 
Frank Rockwell, of Newberg township. 

Mr. Standeriine is one 01 the leading and representative citizens of 
Cass county and has assisted in making it what it is to-day. He has 
been a Rcpuljlicaii since the organization of the party, never faltering 
in his support of its princijiles. He served as highway commissioner 
and school director and at tliis writing is a member of the board of re- 
view. He has always been interested in public affairs and has labored 
earnestly for tiic welfare of the county. He belongs to the Grange and 
he has many warm friends in that organization and throughout the com- 
munity in which be has so long lived. He displays in his life many 
sterling traits r)f character and his good qualities have won him the 
genuine and unqualified respect of his fellow men. 

\VILLIA:^I STAXDERLIXE. 

William Standeriine. townshiji clerk and a prominent farmer of 
Newberg township, resides on section 28. where he has a well im- 
proved and valualile farm of sixty acres. He is one of Michigan's na- 
tive sons and the enterprise and progressive spirit which have been the 
dominant factors in the u])building of the west find exemplification in his 
active busmess career. He was born in Florence township. St. Josepli 
county, ^Michigan, October 2-i. 1858. Ilis father, George Standeriine, 
was a nati'.e of England, in which country he spent the days of his boy- 
hood and voutbi and was married, the ladv of his choice being Miss Jane 



472 HISTORY OU CASS COUNTY 

Hollaiidtrick, also a native of that country. They bade adieu to friends 
and native land about 1854 and sailed for America, locating'first in 
Toledo, Ohio, whence they afterward removed to St. Joseph county, 
Michigan, settling there ujxon a farm. Tliey remained for about thir- 
teen years in that county and in iS()7 came to Cass county, locating in 
Newberg township, where Mr. Standerline purchased a tract of land. 
They are still living in this township and in 1905 they celebrated their 
fiftieth wedding anniversary, having traveled life's journey together 
for a half century, .sharing with each other its joys and sorrows, its 
adversity and prosperity. As the years went by they became the par- 
ents of ten children, of whom seven are now living. 

William Standerline is the third child and third son in this familv 
and was but nine jears of age when brought by his parents to Cass 
county. He spent his boyhood (la\s in their home, was educated in the 
district schools and through the summer months aided in the work of 
the fields, giving his father the beiiciit of his services in the work of the 
home farm until after he had attained his majority, when he started out 
in life on his own account. 

On the 1st of April, 1S82. Mr. Standerline was married to Miss 
Stella Arnold, a daughter of H. D. and Mary (Dunn) Arnold. Mrs. 
Standerline was born in Newberg township, where her parents located 
at an early period in the development of this county. By her marriage 
she has become the mother of three children, who are yet living: Del- 
la, the wife of Guy Harwood, a resident of Newl)erg township: Bert, 
who is attending school in Vandalia, Michigan: and Glenn, wlio is at 
home. 

The farm ujjon which the family resides comprises sixty acres of 
good land, and here IMr. Standerline is successfully carrying on general 
agricultural pursuits. He has placed his fields under a liigh state of 
cultivation and annually harvests good crops. Evers-tbing about his 
farm is kept in good condition and in his methods he is practical and en- 
terprising. He has been quite active in local politics, recognized as one 
of the strong and stalwart advocates of the Republican party. He was 
treasurer of Newberg township for two years and has been clerk for 
six years, holding the position at the present time. Having spent the 
greater part of his life in this county he is widely known and his prom- 
inence in jniblic affairs has made him a leader in his community. His 
long continuance in office is indicative of his faithful and capable service. 
In business matters he is found to be straightforwarrl and reliable, as 
well as energetic, and the success which he has enjoyed is well merited. 

GEORGE W. ROBBINS. 

G. W. Robbins, who carries on farming interests on section 27. 
Porter township, and is numbered among the prominent early settlers 
of the countv, was born Deceml)cr 16. 1840, on the place where he yet 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 473 

resides. The famih' name lias Imig been closely and honorably asso- 
ciated with the history i^f the county in the work of development and 
improvement, tlis father, Mioses K<jbl)ins, was a native of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, where he was reared to the age of eighteen years, when, 
in 1S31, he came to ^Michigan, settling in 1833 upon the farm which 
is now the home of G. \V. Robbins of this review. He was one of the 
earliest residents oi Porter township and he also took up land from the 
governuient in Ahjtville township. St. Joseph county, that he traded for 
the farm upon which our subject now resides. On the latter tract he 
built a log cabin on the bank nf what is now called Robbins Lake, hav- 
ing been so named in his lienor. Subsequently he built the log house in 
which G. W. Rolibins first opened his eyes to the light of day and sub- 
sequently he erected a brick residence that yet stands on the farm and 
is one of the old and prominent landmarks of this ixirtion of the county. 
He died in 1849 at the ciimparatively early age of forty-two years, yet 
during the period of his residence in the county he took an active and 
helpful part in reclaiming the district for die purposes of civilization and 
in laying broad and deep the found:ition for the present progress and 
prosperity. His wife bore tlie maiden name of Elizabeth Davison and 
was a native of Ohio. She lived to the age of seventy-five years. _ In 
their familv were live children: Lucinda J-. now deceased; William, 
who is living in F.lkhart. Indiana: George W., of this review: Mrs. 
Nancy Ellen Cundiff, whose home is in .Vledo, Illinois; and Mrs. :\Iary 
L. Speece, of Porter townshi]). 

Mr. Robbins was the third child and second son of the famdy and 
upon the old homestead farm he spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth, alternating h.is work in the fields through the summer months 
with attendance at the district schools in the winter seasons. His en- 
tire life has been passed upon this farm and thus its present stateof 
improvement and development is largely attributable to his persevering 
and diligent effort. As a companion and helpmate for life's journey he 
chose INIiss Sarah T- Rogers, to whom he was married on the 6th of 
Octo]>cr 1863. She is a daughter of Jesse and IMary A. (Bates) Rog- 
ers and 'was bcni in Yates countv. New York, on the 17th of October. 
1844. In her earlv childhood, when only about two years old, she was 
brought bv her parents to Cass county, the family home l>eing estab- 
lished in Porter township, where she has since lived. By her marriage 
she has l)ecome the mother of eight children: Lefy, now the wife of 
L C. Chadwick, a resident of Grangeville, Idaho: Linward G., a farmer 
who owns a good propertv in Constantine township, St. Joseph county, 
Michigan: !\I. L.. w^ho is engaged in the grocery business at Elkhart, 
Indiana: Leslie D.. a civil engineer, residing in ^lexico: Lvle M. C, 
now of Montana; Lena G.. who is attending the Hillsdale fMichigan) 
College; and two are deceased. 

Mr. Robbins has a farm of one hundred and sixty-three acres, 
which is supplied with modern equipments, and also owns another val- 



*7i HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

uable propeiiy of two hundred and niiie and a half acres on section 35, 
Porter township. His landed possessions in all embrace ihree luuKlred 
and sixty-three and a half acres, which property returns to hun a very de- 
sirahle niconie. His husmess is carefully conducted and everythiii;^ 
alxiut hl^ place is indicati\e nf a progressive spirit and practicalnicth- 
ods. He has voted with the Republican party since age gave to liini the 
right of franchise and has taken an active interest in political questions 
and issues of the day and the success of the party organization. He has 
held various local offices, including that of highway commissioner and 
town.diip treasurer, serving in the latter position for two terms. He 
has Ijeen a lifelong resident of the county and his mind bears the impress 
of its early historic annals. He can relate many interesting incidents 
of pioneer life and cx])eriences and he is a worthy representative of that 
class of citizens whose labors, while promoting individual success, have 
also been of benefit to the county in furthering its agricultural devel- 
opment and also in promoting its political status. 

CHARLES W. rOE. 

Charles W. Toe has been a resident of Xewberg township for filtv- 
three years and therefore justly .leser\es to lie classed with the old 
settlers. He has a farm of one hundred and forty-eight acres, which 
is carefully cullivate<l and iinpnned. his entire life having been devoted 
to agricultural jiursuits. This tract of land lies on section jt. Xewberg 
township, and is now a valur.ble property, owing to the care and labor 
which he has bestowed upon it. Mr. Poe is one of Michigan's native 
sons, for his birth occurred in Fabius township, St. Joseph countv, on 
the 5th of August. 1S53. Flis father. Charles R. Poe, was a native of 
Crawford cotmty, Ohio, and was the son of George Poe. who continued 
his residence in Crawford county until 1835 ^"<' then sought a home in 
Micliigan. making his way to Cass county, which was then a wild and 
unimproved region. Most of the land was raw and uncultivated and 
only here and there had a little settlement been made amidst the dense 
forest to show that the work of civilization and improvement had been 
begun. George Poe located on land on section 22, Xewberg township, 
entering the same from the government on the i6th of September. T835. 
Not a furrow had been turned, not an improvement made, and the ar- 
duous task of developing the land devolved upon Mr. Poe and his sons. 
He, however, possessed the spirit of the pioneer such as was displayed 
by his ancestor, Adam Poe. the famous Indian fighter. 

Charles R. Poe, the father of our subject, was reared amid the wild 
scenes of frontier life, sharing with the family in the usual hardships 
and trials incident to settling in the far west. He took part in the work 
of cutting the timber, clearing the land, and throughout his entire life 
he followed the occupation of farming. He was twice married, the 
first union being with Miss Cassie X'ewcll. who died leaving three chil- 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTY 475 

dren. one of whom yet survives, namclv : George W. Pue, who makes 
his lioiue near Jones. Alter losing liis first wife Mr. Poe was joined in 
weditjck tM Mi.-,s Julia Schall, a native of Pennsylvania, who came to 
A'Jichigan wuli her parents, the family home being estahlished in St. 
josepli cnunty. '1 iiere were two sons and four daughters born of this 
marriage and with one exception all are yet living. All were horn in 
this county with tiie exception of Charles \\'. and George W. Poe. who 
were young when their parents removed to Xewberg township. 

He was reared here to farm life and pursued bis educatiijn in the 
district sclionls, wherein he mastered the Ijranches of English learning 
usually taught in such institutions. During the summer months he 
worked in the fields and remained at home until twenty-two years of 
age. assisting in the task of clearing the farm and placing it under the 
plow. He gained practical knowledge of the best methods of tilling the 
fields, learned to know what was demanded in the soil for the various 
crops and the most favorable time of jilanting. so that he was well qual- 
ified to engage in farm work on his own account when he married and 
established a home of bis own. 

It was on the 25di of AugT.ist. 1875. that Mr. Poe was united in 
marriage to Miss Carrie Thomas, a daughter of William and Delight 
(Galpin) Thomas. Her father was a native of New York and on re- 
moving to ?\Iichigan settled in Macomb county. In his family were 
six children, two sons and four daughters, of whom ^ilrs. Poe was the 
second child. She was thirteen years of age when brought to the west 
and has since lived in Cass county. .\t the time of their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Poe began their domestic life on a farm on section 22. Xew- 
berg townshio, and there in the midst of the forest he cleared a tract 
of land. Th.eir first house was a log cabin eighteen by twenty-four feet, 
two stcjrics in height. ]Mr. Poe continued the work of cultivating the 
place for fourteen years, when he removed to bis present farm on sec- 
tion 21, X^'ewberg townsliip. Here he has one hundred and forty-eight 
acres of productive land, which he has brought under a high state of cul- 
tivation. Pie has been a hard-working man and has lived a busy and 
useful life, his labors resultirig in bringing him a comfortable compe- 
tence. 

Unto Mr. and ]\Irs. Vi'.e have been born four daughters: Lcjviso, 
the wife of Delbert Stephenson, who is living in X'ewberg township; 
Minnie, the wire of William Kahler, also of X^ewberg township; Mabel, 
the wife of William Meek, of Emmet county. ]Michigan; and Leon, at 
home. The name of Poe has been closely associated with the histor}- of 
the county through many long years, the grandfather of our subject 
taking a vcr_\- active and helpful part in the early pioneer development, 
and Poe cemetery was named in his honor. Tlie work of progress was 
carried on by the father and has been continued by our subject, who is 
an enterprising citizen, desirous of promoting the best interests of the 
county. In, his pi^litical views he is a Democrat, but without aspiration 



476 HISTORY OK CASS COUXTY 

for office, prcferrinij: to qive 1iis undivided attention to his business af- 
fairs. Tic is well Iviinwn in Cass cainty, where lie lias so long resided, 
liaving lived continuously on sections 21 and 22 in this township for 
fifty-three }ears. and has an exten.'^ive circle of friends. Both he and his 
wife are estimable people and well deserx'e mention in this volume 
among the representative citizens of the county. 

ALONZO P. BEEAIAX. 

Alonzo r. Beenian is a worthy and successful representative of 
agricultural interests, who has long been identified therewith in Cass 
county. He owns here a valuable property and in its control and man- 
agement displays excellent business ability and keen foresight. More- 
over he deserves mention in this volume because of the active and help- 
ful part which he has taken in matters of public interest, serving on 
various occasions in office, the duties of which he has performed with 
faithfulness, ability and fidelity. lie now resides on section 14, Xew- 
berg township. His birthplace was in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
his natal day being February C>. 1S41. His father, Myram Beeman, was 
a native of X^ew York and was a son of Gideon Beeman. whose birth 
occurred in Connecticut and who was of English descent, the family 
having been established in .Vmcrica in colonial days. In the stale of 
his nativity IVIyram Beeman was reared and educated, anrl thruugbout 
his entire life followed the occupation of farming. He was married in 
X'ew York to Miss Lucena Libhart. also a native of X'^ew Yurk. and of 
German descent, her father ha\'ing been born in Germany, while his 
death occurred during the infancy of his daughter. Myram Beeman 
removed from the Empire state to Pennsylvania about iS,^^. and there 
resided for twenty-two years, when in J^S? ^^ came to Michigan, set- 
tling in Cass county. Plere he also carried on farming and his death 
occurred in X^ewberg township when he was seventy-nine years of age. 
He held membership in the United Brethren church and was one of the 
ministers of that denomination. Efis acquaintance was a very wide and 
favorable one and his influence was ever a potent element for good in 
the communities where he lived. He stood for iustice. truth and right 
under all circumstances, and bv example as well as by precept taught 
the nobler principles which elevate mankind. His wife also passed 
away in X^ewberg townshi]-). being in her ninetieth year at the time she 
was called to her final rest. In their familv were eight sons and two 
•daughters, and of that number eight reached }-ears of maturity, while 
six are now living, being residents of various sections of the country. 

Alonzo P. Beeman is the onlv one now residing in Cass county. He 
is the seventh son and eighth child in the familv. His early vouth was 
spent in the state of his nativity, and he is indebted to the public school 
system of Xew York for the educational privilesres which he enioved 
and which prepared him for life's practical and responsible duties. \Micn 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 477 

a youtli of fifteen years, it being necessitous that he provide for his 
own support, he started out to make his way in the world, and chose 
the west as liie scene of his lab<jrs. Accordingly in 1856 he made his 
way to Centervillc, St. Joseph county, ^ilichigan, and in the fall of the 
same year came to Newberg township, Cass county. Here he worked 
at the carpenter's trade and assisted in building many houses in the 
township at an early day. In 1S63, in response to the country's call 
for troops, he enlisted for service in the Union army as a private of 
Company G, Nineteenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, and served 
throughout tlie remainder of the war with patriotic ardor and undimin- 
ished loyalty. He was wounded in the left side at the battle of Resaca, 
and was in the hospital for eight months, but as soon as possi!:)le returned 
to his regiment and served until the close of the war. He participated 
in many prominent battles which led up to the final victory that crowned 
the Union arms, and was always faithful to his duty under all circum- 
stances. When the war was over he participated in the grand review 
at Washington, D. C, the most celebrated military pageant ever seen 
on the western hemisphere, Avhere thousands of soldiers of the Union 
army marched by the reviewing stand on which stood the president and 
other high officials of the land, greeting the return of the victorious 
troops. 

Mr. Becman received an honorable discharge at Jackson, ?^Iichigan, 
on the 5th of August, 1865, and immediately afterward returned to his 
home in Cass county. He soon purchased a farm in Xewberg township 
which he cultivated for about two years and then sold. In 1867 he 
removed to Kansas, where he remained for a short time, after which he 
returned to Newlierg township, Cass county. Here he purcliased a 
farm upon which he has since resided, his residence here covering more 
than a third of a centur>-. There Avere no improvements upon the place 
when he took possession, but he has wrought a marked change in its 
appearance by adding good buildings, well kept fences, by tilling the 
soil and otherwise carrying on the farm work along modern, progressive 
lines. The place comprises one hundred and sixty acres of good land, 
which responds readily to the care and cultivation which he bestows 
upon it, the fields yielding golden harvests in return for the work which 
he puts thereon. 

Before leaving for the front at the time of the Civil war Mr. 
Beeman was married on the 14th of October, 1862, to Miss Nancy V. 
Bogert, a daughter of Thomas Bogert, and a native of Adrian, Michi- 
gan. She was brought to Cass county when but seven years of age 
and her girlhood days were passed in Newberg township. Unto this 
marriage have been born five children: Annie, the wife of Wiley 
Russie; Lewis, who married Ida O'Connor and is now living in New- 
berg township ; Stella, the wife of Sherman Poe, a resident of St. Joseph 
countv, ^Michigan : .A.lonzo Guy, who married Lura Waltz and is living 
in Newberg township: and Ned, at home. 



47 S HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 

Mr. Beemaii is a stalwart Republican, liclieving tirnily in the prin- 
ciples of his party, and he has been active in its support, doing all in 
his power to secure its success. His fellow townsmen have rewarded 
him for his party fealty by electing him to various positions of public 
honor and trust, the duties of which he has faith full} performed. He 
was township treasurer for two years, supervisor for fourteen consec- 
utive years, and then resigned that <-l"tice by reason of his election to the 
position of county treasurer in iSrjS. He ser\ed for two terms and was 
then re-elected in 1900, holding the oftice to the time limit, for no one 
is allowed to ser\e for more than two terms in this jKisition. He then 
retired from the office as he had entered it — with the confidence and 
good will of all concerned. He has been school director for eighteen 
years and the cause of education has found in him a warm friend. He 
is a member of May post, \o. 65, G. A. R., at Jones, in which he lias 
filled all of the chairs, including that of commander. In public ofllce 
as well as in the field of battle he has displayed his loyalty to his country. 
and in an active life has portrayed those sterling traits of character which 
win success and at the same time gain the respect and trust of one's 
fellow men. Starting out in life on his own account when but fifteen 
years of age be b.as steadily advanced through hi< own well directed 
efforts and may well be termed a self-made man. for be has been both 
the architect and builder of his fortunes. 

ORREX \'. HICKS. . 

Orren \'. Hicks. fol!o\\ing the occupation of farming and also 
serving as super\'i-;or in ^Idton township, was horn on the 27th of 
September, 1809, in the township which is still his home. He rep- 
resents one of the honored pioneer families, being a son of R. V. Hicks, 
who was a farmer by occupation and came to Cass county at an early 
epoch in its development. A nati\e of England, he resided in that 
country until 1S37, when he crossed the Atlantic to America and made 
his way at once to Michigan. He was alwut eighteen years of age at 
the time, his birth having occurred in Land's End, England, on the 
17th of November, 1819. Having heard favorable reports concerning 
the business opportunities of tlie new world he made the ocean voyage 
and joined his brother in Ontwa township, where he remained for a 
short time. He then located in Xiles, securing a position in a distillery 
owned and operated by John Dodge & Company, with whom he worked 
for a short time, becoming foreman of that place. Further mention 
of Mr. Hicks is made on another page of this work. 

Orren V. Hicks, whose name introduces this review, was reared 
upon the homestead farm and is indebted to the district school system 
of Milton township for the educational privileges he enjoyed. He 
pursued his studies through the winter months and in the summer 
months worked at the labors of the field. Wishing to have a home of 



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HISTORY OF CASS COL'X'IA' -t79 

his uwn lie ccim])lL-U'(l lii> aiTaii^Lnicut^ therefiir I'v hi.- iiianiatj;e nii 
tlie 13th of January, iSuj, tn MibS Dertha F. Thiinipsnn, a native of 
Ontwa tuwnship, bMin Dcccinl.cr 3, 1871. and a daughter df B. F. 
Thtimpsun, who fnllc^wed farming in Ontwa township. He scttleil in 
Cass county when it was emerging from pioneer conditions. ha\-ing 
come to the middle west from Delaware. Mrs. Hicks graduated in 
the High School of Edwardsburg, in the class of 1888, and entered 'the 
state normal at Ypsilanti, ^Michigan, taking the English course, spent 
one years there and meant to take a full graduating course, hut health 
forbade her. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hicks has been blessed 
with two daughters; Morcncc D.. who was born June 6. i8y6, and 
Vivian Leona. born .\pril 13, 1903. 

At the time of his marriage Orren V. Hicks removed to what 
was known as the Enos farm, comprising sixty-seven acres of land, 
and he has become the owner of forty acres adjoining, also eighty 
acres just north of his present farm, and forty acres of timber, mak- 
ing a total of two hundred and twenty-seven acres in Cass county. 
The eighty acres received only one transfer, and ]Mr. and ]\Irs. Hicks 
have in their possession the old parchment deed signed by President 
Andrew Jackson. It iiears the date of execution of April i, 183 1, and 
this is the fifth deed of the kind found in Cass county. He now has 
a well improved farm here, equipped with good buildings and ?ul> 
stantial impro\"ements. \\iiile well tilled fields return him golden har- 
vests for the care and labor be bestows upon them. For three years he 
filled tlie office of township clerk, having been ciiosen to that position 
on the Democratic ticket. In 1901 he was elected sui>ervisor and 
served in that office for five years, being the present incumbent. He 
has thus taken an acti\'e jiart in local political affairs and he keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He is a charter 
member of Edwardsiiurg tent Xo. 723, K. O. T. 'M.. and he enjoys 
the warm regard of his brethren in the fraternity as well as of the 
general public. His wife is also a member of the Edwardsburg Hive 
No. 345, L. O. T. M. He is witlely known in the county where his 
entire life has been passed and where he has so directed his labors 
as to win a gratifying measure of prosperity, and at the same time 
make for himself an honoralile name. 

FRANKLIN CHAPMAN. 

The agricultural interests of Newberg township find a worthy rep- 
resentative in Franklin Chapman, who is now hving on section 17, where 
he owns and operates one hundred and sixty acres of land, in connec- 
tion with which he is successfully engaged in stock-raising, making a 
specialty of St. Lam!:iert and Jersey cattle. He was born December 
18, 1S53. on the farm where he yet resides, in a little log cabin which 
was one of the typical pioneer homes of the county. He is descended 



480 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

from an old New England family, his paternal grandfather being Levi 
Chapman, who was a native of Vermont and was of Scotch lineage. 
The father, James M. Chapman, was born in Medina county. Ohio, 
Februar}' 3. 1818. He came to this state, however, at an early day, 
settling in Cass county in 1S44, being the first resident in this part of 
the county, his nearest neighbor being two or three miles away. There 
in the midst of the forest he cleared and developed a farm, cutting away 
the trees before he could plow and cultivate the land. As the years 
passed he wrought a marked transformation in the appearance of the 
place, which became a well develojied property, and he resided thereon 
until his death, which occurred when he was in the eighty-first year of 
his age. From the time of the organization of the Republican party he 
was one of its stanch supporters and took an active interest in its growth 
and success. His fellow' townsmen frequently called him to office and 
he served as supervisor for a long period, perhaps about fourteen years 
in all. He was lo},al to every trust reposed in him and his life was in 
entire harmony with his professions as a niember of the Baptist church. 
He took a very helpful part in church work, contributed generously of 
his means to its support, assisted in the various church activities and was 
a deacon for many years. He wedded Miss Mary Haggerty, who lived 
to be seventy-four years of age. In their family were two sons, the 
elder being Harvey Chapman, who died at the age of two years. 

Franklin Chapmnn, the younger son and the only representative of 
the family now living, was reared upon the old farm 'homestead in Xew- 
berg township, where he yet resides. At the usual age he began attending 
the district schools and as his age and strengtii permitted he assisted more 
and more largely in the work of the fann during the summer months, 
aiding in the plowing, planting and han,-esting. He was first married 
on the 1st of Alarch, 1873, the lady of his choice being Miss Lovina 
Cleveland, who died leaving two children: Mrs. Lulu Van Stallen, who 
is now a widow; and Verna, who is the wife of Arthur Pound, of New- 
berg townslnp. On the 20th of March, 1882, Mr. Chapman was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Minnie Williams, a daughter 
of A. H. and Julia A. (Marshall) Williams. Mrs. Chapman was burn 
in Suscjuehanna county, Pennsylvania, and was brought to Michigan 
when about five years of age, the family taking up their abode in St. 
Joseph county. She was fourteen years of age when they came to Cass 
county. She pursued her education in Colon, Michigan, and in the In- 
diana Normal School at Valparaiso, Indiana, and for five years was suc- 
cessfully engaged in teaching in Cass county. She spent two years as 
a teacher in the Vandalia schools and was an able educator, imparting 
readily and impressively to others the knowledge that she had acquired. 
Unto 'Sir. and ^Irs. Chapman have been born three children: Bion 
F., who is at home; Virginia, who is a graduate of the Dowagiac high 
school and of the Agricultural College and is now engaged in teach- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 4>,1 

ing; and Mildred J., the wife of Leonard R. Norton, a resident farmer 
of Newberg townbhip. 

Mr. Chapman is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of 
arable land on section 17, Newberg township. His farm is divided 
into fields of convenient size by well kept fences and he has good im- 
provements upon the place, including the latest improved machinery 
to facilitate the \\ork of the fields. In his farm work he is practical, 
is systematic in his methods and is accomplishing good results through 
his unremitting diligence. He is now making a specialty of raising 
fine cattle of the St. Lambert and Jersey breeds. In his political views 
Mr. Chapman has always been a stanch and earnest Republican, identi- 
fying himself with the party when age conferred upon him tlie right of 
franchise. He has served as township treasurer for four years, proving 
a capable ofiicer, but prefers to give his time and energies to his busi- 
ness afifairs, in which he is meeting with signrd success. 

GEORGE W. HARDY. 

George W. Plardy, the proprietor of the Clover Leaf Dairy Farm, 
situated -on section 17, Marccllus township, has prospered in his under- 
takings and is now conducting a successful business. He was born 
near Three Rivers, St. Joseph county, ^Michigan, on the 17th of Scp- 
teniber, 1S46, and is a son of George Hardy, Sr., who was a native of 
Yorkshire, England, and came to the United States with his parents, 
who were among the early settlers of St. Joseph county. Michigan, 
locating there when the Indians were numerous and when little was 
done to subjugate the wilderness and convert it into uses for the white 
race. There the fatlier of our subject spent his remaining days, his 
time and energies being given to the development of a farm in the 
midst of the forest and its further improvement as the years went by. 
He lived to the age of sixty years. He married Frances Arney, who 
was born in Pennsylvania, and died in St. Joseph county, Michigan, 
when seventy years of age. She was a daughter of John Arney, a 
native of England, who served in the Revolutionary war on the Ameri- 
can side and lost an arm on board ship while acting as a member of the 
navy. He received from President Jackson a leather deed to land wliich 
he entered from the government in St. Joseph county. Michigan, his 
farm lying in Lockport township. This was given him in recognition 
of his military service, and upon this place he remained until called to 
his final rest when he was eighty years of age. In his family were 
four children, including ]\Irs. Frances Hardv. the mother of our subject. 
In the family of Mr. and Mrs. George Hardy, Sr., were nine 
children : ]\Iarv, deceased : Joseph, now living in Kansas : Ruth, de- 
ceased : Mrs. Lydia Dickinson, of St. Joseph county, !^Iichigan: Mrs. 
Jane Fonda, living in Denver. Colorado: John, a resident farmer of 
this county; George W., whose name introduces this record: Giarles, 



482 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

who resides in Kalkaska county, this state, and Carrie, who died at tlie 
age of twenty-six years. 

George \V. Hardy spent the period of his minority upon ins 
father's farm and was trained to tlie labors of the fiekls, early becom- 
ing familiar throuyh actual experience. with all the duties that fall to 
tlie lot of the agriculturist. In 187S he was married to :\Iiss Lvdia A. 
Northrop, who was born in Fairfield, St. Joseph county, Michigan, June 
23, 1858, a daughter of John G. and :Maria (Fonda) Northrop, who were 
natives of New York and in their childhood became residents of Mich- 
igan. 

Following his marriage Mr. Hardy began farming on his own 
account, and after a short time he and his wife removed to the old 
home place near Three Rivers, where they resided until they took up 
their abode on their present place on section 17, Marcellus townsliip, 
twenty -five years ago. Here ]Mr. Hardy has one hundred and twenty 
acres of land which was partially improved when it came into his pos- 
session. He now has gfxjd substantial buildings upon the place, and 
the land has been brought under a high state of cultivation. For some 
years he carried on general farming, but for the past two years has 
made a specialty of dairyirjg, and his place is known as the Qover Leaf 
Dairy. He keeps fifteen Jersey cows and has a wagon from which he 
retails milk in Marcellus, having a good patronage because of the excel- 
lent quality of the milk which he furnishes and his honorable business 
methods. He has long been recognized as an acti^'e and enterprising 
business man, and his energy and capable management constitute the 
basic elements of his success. 

Mr. Hardy has five children, two by a previous marriage: Orin. 
now living in Chicago; ^linnie, the wife of Milo Vincent, of Porter, 
Michigan; Charles, at home: Elmer, also of Porter; and Lester, at home. 
The father and his four sons are all stanch, supporters of the Republi- 
can party, and Mr, Hardy is interested in general progress to the extent 
of giving hearty endorsement and co-operation to those mo\-ements 
•which are of direct benefit to the crimmunity at large and further the 
material, intellectual and political progress of the community. 

ALBERT J. SHAXXOX. 

Albert J. Shannon is the owner of one of the finest farms in !Mar- 
cellus township, situated on an elevation commanding a fine view of 
Fish lake. Moreover he is regarded as a progressive and popular resi- 
dent of this portion of Cass count}-, and is well known as a successful 
agriculturist and breeder of fine horses. He was born in Huron town- 
ship, about two miles east of Alton, in Wayne county. New York. 
January 22. 1S44. and is a son of Archibald Shannon, also a native 
of Wayne count}', spending his entire life in Huron township, where 
he died' when about seventv-?e-\-en vears of age. In early manhood he 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 483 

wedded Miss M:.ry H}ile, who was born in Rose. Wayne county, Xew 
York, and tlicre died, wlien about twenty-six years of age, a few days 
after the birtli of h.er son Albert, who was her only child. After losing 
his first wife the father married her sister, Miss jane Hvde. and there 
was one child to this marriage, Lester, who is now living in Huron, Xew 
York. 

Albert J- Shannon was reared in the place of his nativity and 
acqtiired his education in the public schools. He continued his stuilies 
in Wayne county until the fall of 1870, when he went to Iowa, spend- 
ing some time in Marshalltown and various other places. .\ few 
months passed in looking over a favorable location there, but not find- 
ing what he wanted he came to Cass county, Michigan, in the spring 
of 187 1, and bought one hundred and twenty acres of his present 
farm, of which thirty-five acres had been improved. Mr. Shannon 
cleared the remainder, placed it under the plow, and in course of time 
gatliered golden harvests. He also erected good buildings, and he bought 
eighty acres of land adjoining, so that he now has two hundred acres 
in his home place, which is situated on sections 5, 8 and 9, Marcellus 
township. He also bought sixty acres on section 4 of the same town- 
ship, and now has an excellently improved property. He has placed 
under cultivation altogether about one hundred and fifty acres of land, 
and his well developed farm is indicative of his care and lalx:ir, his pro- 
gressive methods and the determination with which he carries forward 
to successful completion whatever he undertakes. 

In 1862 occurred the marriage of Albert J. Shannon and Miss Jane 
Gatchell, who was born in Van Buren townsliip, Wayne county, Xew 
York, a daughter of Elisha and Margaret (Britton) Gatchell. They 
have one son, Herbert, who is now living in Calhoun county, Michigan. 
They have also reared an adopted daughter, Kate Moon, who is mar- 
ried and resides in Chicago. The home of the family is a beautiful 
farm, in fact harilly equalled in Marcellus township. The family resi- 
dence is situated on an elevation commanding a splendid view of Fish 
lake, the landscape presenting altogether a beautiful picture. In addi- 
tion to the cultivation and improvement of the farm he is well known 
as an extensive and successful breeder of fine horses, and has placed upon 
the market some splendid specimens of the noble steed. His political 
allegiance is given to the Republican party, and he was its candidate for 
supervisor. He is active in its ranks, and for two years he served as 
highway commissioner. For thirty years he has been a Mason and has 
served as master of the lodge and high priest of the chapter at Marcellus. 
He is a charter member of the chapter, having joined the organization 
when capitular IMasonry was first introduced into that town. ]\Ir. 
Shannon is both popular and progressive, a business man of enterprise 
and in his social relations he displays those qualities which win warm 
friendships and high regard. 



484 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTV 

EDGAR J. GARD. 

Edgar J. Gard is one of the extensive land o\\ ners of Cass county, 
having in one tract three luuidrcd and seventy-three acres, but half be- 
longs to his sister, Mrs. Fulton, upon ^vhich' he has lived since iSyS. 
This constitutes one of the valuable farms of the county. It is located 
.on section 20, Volinia township, and is improved with modern equip- 
ments and accessories, many of which have been placed thereon by the 
present owner. Mr. Gard is one of the native sons of the township, his 
birth having occurred here on the 9th of February, 1856. The family 
"name has figured long and prominently in connection with the develop- 
"ment an(l improvement of this portion of the state. His paternal grand- 
parents were Jonathan and Elizabeth Gard. who came from Ohio to 
Cass county in a very early day, locating in Volinia township, where 
Jonathan Gard entered land from the government. He was a typical 
'pioneer citizen, courageously meeting the hardships and trials of frontier 
life in order to establish a home for his family and his labor proved a 
factor in the substantial development and improvement which has fol- 
lowed the united and concerted labors of the early settlers. 

Isaac N. Gard. father of our subject, was born in Ohio, and with his 
parents came to Cass county, here being reared, educated and married. 
In fact he continued a resident of Volinia township up to the time of 
his death, which occurred when he was about seventy-six years of age. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Nancy Shaw, still resides in 
Volinia township. By her marriage she became the mother of one son 
and two daughters, namely: Julia, now the wife of Henry Hepworth, 
of Kansas; j\Irs. Orlcy Fulton, and Edgar J., of this review. 

The youngest of the family, Edgar J. Gard was reared in Volinia 
township and was given good educational privileges, pursuing his studies 
in the village school of Volinia, also in Decatur and later in the Indiana 
Normal School at Valparaiso. He was thus well equipped for life's 
practical and responsible duties by thorough mental training, which 
stimulated his latent talents and prepared him to meet the business 
duties and obligations that devolved upon him as he started out in life 
on his own account. He lived at home up to the time of his marriage, 
and then settled upon a farm on section 21. Volinia township, where he 
resided rmtil 1898, when he bought his present farm, the tract compris- 
ing three hundred and seventy-three acres of rich and valuable land 
all in one bodv, but half of this land belongs to his sister, Mrs. Fulton. 
He has since given his attention to general farming, raising the various 
cereals best adapted to soil and climate. He also has good grades of 
stock upon his farm and the buildings are in keeping with ideas of 
modern progress. He also owns a sawmill on section 21. Volinia town- 
ship, which'he operates in addition to his agricultural pursuit^. 

On the T4th of October, 1879. Mr. Gard married Miss Flora War- 
ner, a daughter of James H. and Rachel (Richl Warner. She was 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 485 

born in Cass county, !ier parents being pioneers of this part of the state. 
Mr. and Mrs. Card now have one son. Dana \V., who is pursuing his 
education in the schools of Decatur. Fraternally Mr. Card is connected 
with the Knights of the Maccabees, while politically he is a Republican, 
having never faltered in his allegiance to the party since he cast his first 
vote. All his life he has lived in this county and he is a typical western 
man, alert and enterprising. Fie [wssesses an indomitable spirit and 
strong will that have been factors in winning for him his present desira- 
ble success, enabling him to overcome all the difficulties and obstacles 
which checker ever}- business career. He is a man of strong convic- 
tions, cpiick to discern the best course to pursue. Difficulties vanish 
before him as mist before the morning sun and he is penetrative and 
practical in all that he docs. 

W. R. KIRBY. 

W. R. Kirby, filling the office of super\'isor in Volinia township, 
resides on section 21. and his attention is given to the development and 
improvement of his farm, which comprises a good trart of arable and 
productive land. Fie was born in Otsego county. New York, near 
Cooperstown, Dccenilier 31, 1S43, '^""^1 '^ of English lineage. His 
parents \veie John aiul Mary J. (Rou.se) Kirby, the former a native of 
England and the latter of New York. Mr. Kirby was born in York- 
shire, England, and was only about two years old when brought by his 
parents to Michigan, the family home being established in the Empire 
state, where he was reared. On leaving the east he came to I\Iichigan, 
settling in Flowerfield township, St. Joseph count}'. His wife spent 
her girlhood days in the Empire state and by her marriage she became 
the mother of eight children, three sons and five daughters, of whom 
seven reached years of maturit}-. 

W. R. Kirby, the second child and eldest son in the family, was 
only about three years old when l>rought by his parents to ;Michigan. 
His childhood and youth were therefore passed in Flowerfield town- 
ship, St. Joseph county, where he was reared in the usual manner of 
farm lads of that period, working in the fields through the summer 
months, while in the winter seasons he acquired a fair English educa- 
ition in the district schools. He continued a resident of St. Joseph 
county until 1865, when he came to Cass county, settling in Volinia 
township. He began keeping house on the farm where he now resides. 
and in 1877 he was married to Miss Marv' J. Mack, a daughter of 
William and Theressa (Wykoff) Mack. He brought his bride to the 
farm upon ^vhich they yet reside and here he has continuously^ carried 
on -general agricultural pursuits. Year by year he has tilled his fields. 
and through ~the rotation of crops and the careful management of his 
business affairs he has been able to secure good har^-ests and to find a 
ready sale for his products upon the market. 



4S6 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Mr. and Airs. Kirby have no children nf tlieir own, but have reared 
two adopted children, Joseph M. and Anna B. .Mr. Kirbv is deeply in- 
terested ir. political issues and questions of the dav. and has always'kcpt 
well informed on subjects of vital interest to the communitv, tlie state 
and the nation. He has voted with the Republican partv since attaining 
his majority and has heKl varicnis local offices, being f^'rst called to the 
position of path master. He has also been township treasurer for two 
years, was town clerk fnr twenty years, and in 1905 was elected super- 
visor un the Republican ticket. His official record has been credita'ble 
and commendable, and no public trust reposed in him has ever been 
betrayed m the sligiitest degree. He belongs to Volinia Lodge. No. 
227, A. F. & A. M., of which he is a charter member, and he is in 
hearty symjiatliy with the purposes of the craft. For more than forty 
years he has lived in the county and he has been found to be trustworthy 
in business and progressive in citizenship, while in social relations he 
is genial, companionable and entertaining. 

JOHN HUFF. 

John Huff, one of the ijionccr settlers of southern Michigan, is 
living on a farm of two hundred and sixty acres on section 17. Volinia 
township, and his life of activity and well-directed effort is indicated 
by his ownership of this pnjperty, for he started out in life emptv- 
handed and all that he now jmssesscs and enjoys has been gained through 
his persistent labor and capable management. His natal day was .August 
3, 1833, and the place of his birth near Springfield, in Clark countv, 
Ohio. His fadier, Amos Huff, was born in New Jersey, and in his 
boyliood days accompanied his jiarents to Pennsylvania. ' He was a 
son of James Huff, of German descent. On leaving the Kevstone state 
he removed to Clark countv, Ohio, and was there married to' Aliss Mar- 
garet Case, whose birth occurred in Nortlnimherland countv, Pennsyl- 
vania, but who was reared in Ohio. Her father was John Case, one of 
the pioneer settlers of Butler county. Ohio. Amos Huff came first to 
Michigan in 1833 but did not take up his permanent abode here at that 
time.^ In 1834. however, he returned with his family to Cass countv 
and identified his interests with those of the pioneer settlers. He 
secured land from the government, entering a claim in Volinia town- 
ship, and as the years passed his attention was directed to farm labor, 
his fields being placed under a high state of cultivation. Not a furrow 
had been turned nor an impro^•ement made when he took possession of 
his farm, but with characteristic energy he began the arduous task of 
ailtivation and development, and in the course of vears had a valuable 
property. His life was honorable and upright in all things and he was 
regarded as an exemplary and de\-oted member of the Alethodist Epis- 
copal church, in which he '=erved as class leader, while in the various 
departments of church work he took an active and helpful interest. He 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 487 

died in his eighty-fiftii year, while his wife passed awav when alxjut 
eighty years of age. Tliey were people of the highest 'respectahilitv, 
and in their death the county lost two of its worthy pioneer representa- 
tives. They had a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters, 
and with one exception all reached adult age, hut only three are now 
living, the hrothers of our suhject heing James Huff, a resident of 
Ah>untain \'iew, California, and Gark, who is living in \'olinia town- 
sliip. 

John Huff was only a year old when brought to Cass county and 
was reared in Volinia township, where he has spent his entire life. 
He has vivid recollections of pioneer conditions when the homes of the 
settlers were largely log cahins. There would be an immense fire-place 
which was used for heating purposes and also served to cook the meals, 
which were prepared in huge kettles hung from the crane or else in 
covered iron skillets which were placed among the coals. The first 
school house in Volinia township was built in 1S33 in the district in 
which Mr. Huff resided, and there he pursued his early education, 
mastering the tasks assigned in reading-, writing, arithmetic and other 
elementary branches. His training at farm labor was not meager, for 
his aid was needed in the development and care of the fields, so that he 
had practical experience when he started out as a farmer on his own 
account. He remained at home up to the time of his marriage, which 
occurred in 1S72, ]\liss Eliza J. Wright becoming his wife. She was 
a daughter of James and Sarah (Giffis) Wriglit, and was born in \^oIinia 
township. Her parents were pioneer settlers of the county and she was 
early trained to household duties. Air. and Mrs. Huff began their 
domestic life in a log house upon his farm, occupying it until the erec- 
tion of tlie present substantial and commodious frame residence in 1SS2. 
As the years went by three children were added to the family : Amy 
and Otis were born in the cabin home, and are still living; and Ilarley, 
who died in his second year. 

The home farm of Mr. Huff embraces two hundred and sixty acres 
of land, which thmugh care and cidtivation has become very productive. 
He has placed all of the buildings upon his property, including his 
modern home, his liarns and sheds. He has also fenced the place and has 
plowed and harvested crops which have found a ready sale on the mar- 
ket, thus bringing to him an enlarged income each yea.r. He has also 
been active in public affairs and for four years sensed as township treas- 
urer, while for eighteen years he was township supervisor. In all things 
pertaining to the good of the community he has taken an active and 
helpful interest, and he was formerly a member of the A^olinia Anti- 
Horse Thief Society, serving as its secretary for thirty years. He yet 
belongs to the Masonic lodge of Volinia and has the kindly regard of 
his brethren of the fraternity. A self made man. as the architect of his 
own fortunes he has budded wisely and well, and his life record proves 



4S8 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

what can be accomplished when one possesses laudable ambition and 
unfaltering determination. He started out in limited financial circum- 
stances but is now one of the prosperous residents of his township. 

GEORGE LOXGSDUFF. 

While "the race is not always to the swift nor the battle to the 
strong," the invariable law of destiny accords to tireless energy and 
indefatigable effort a measure of success which is gratifying and desir- 
able. The truth of this assertion is verified in the life record of such 
men as George Longsdult, who in his active business career has so 
directed his efforts that he is now enabled to live retired, making liis 
home in Yandalia. He was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 1 6th of [March, 1826, and has therefore long passed the psalmist's 
span of three score years and ten. His paternal grandfather, .Martin 
Longsduff, Sr., was a native of Germany, and in that country was 
reared and married. Crossing the Atlantic to the new world he b'ecarne 
one of the early residents of Fennsylvania. In his family were ten 
children, of whom 2\Iartin Longsduff, Jr., was the eldest. He was a 
native of the same state and was there reared and educated. He was 
married twice and in 1834 he removed from Pennsylvania to Ohio, 
taking up his abudc in Union township, Logan count}-, where he secured 
a tract of land and improved a farm. He lemained a resident of that 
state for almost four decades and came to Michigan in 1S72. Here he 
spent his remaining days, passing away at the age of eighty-five years. 
In his religious views he was a Lutheran, and he. exemplified in his 
life his belief in the teachings of holy writ. The mother of our subject 
bore the maiden name of Matilda Ouigley, and was a native of Hagers- 
town, New Jerse\-, where her girlhood days were passed. She was the 
second wife of IMartin Longsdufif, his fomier union having been with a 
Miss Searfoss, by whom he had one daughter, Elizabeth. By the 
second marriage there were born eleven children, one of whom died 
in early youth, while ten reached adult age and four of the number, 
two sons and two daughters, are still living and are residents of Cass 
county. 

Mr. Longsduff, of this review, is the fifth child and third son in 
the family. He spent the first eight years of his life in the state of 
his nativity and then accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Logan county, Ohio, where he remained until he was twentv-one vears 
of age. His educational privileges were those afforded bv tlie com.mon 
schools, and when not busy with his text-books he aided his father in 
tilling the soil, caring for the crops and performing such labor as was 
necessary- in the development and cultivation of the home farm. The 
3'ear 1S47 witnessed his arrival in Cass county, and he then started out 
upon an independent business career. He located first in Penn town- 
ship, and as it was necessarj- that he provide for his own support he 



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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 489 

began working In- the day, making rails. He also engaged in ditching 
and in other such work as would yield him an honest living and gain 
him a start in husiness life. At the time of his marriage he located on 
a farm on section 14, Penn township, his home l>eing a little log cabin 
to which he had to cut a road through the woods for two miles. Not 
a furrow had been turned or an improvement made on the farm, and 
in the midst of the green forest lie began the arduous task nf clearing 
and cultivating fields. In the course of time he had cut down the 
trees, grubbed out the stumps and plowed his land. The seed was 
then planted and in due course of time rich harvests were gathered. 
He also built a good barn and house, and remained upon his farm 
until October, 1872. He was practical in his methods, systematic in 
all that he did, and accomplished through energy and determination 
and assisted by his estimalile wife, an excellent work that has contribu- 
ted to the general agricultural progress of the county and at the same 
time brought to him a very desirable competence. In the year 1S72 
he left his farm and rcmo\ed to \''andalia. where he has since resided. 
He began with only eighty acres of land, to which he added forty 
acres. Subsequently he sold that projjerty and Iwugbt one hundred 
and eightv acres on sections 14. 24, 13 and 23, all, however, being com- 
prised within one tract. .After leaving the farm and locating in Yan- 
dalla he turned his attention to dealing in grain, fruit and stock, and 
conducted quite extensive operations in those lines of trade. ?Ie was 
e\-er watchful of opportunities jjointing to success and his diligence, 
well formulated plans and unremitting attention to his business won 
for him still further success. \Vithin the last two or three years he has 
given little attention to farming, simply .supervising his landed interests, 
for he has rented his farm. In connection with his other interests Mr. 
Longsduff was a promoter of the creamers- at Vandalia, and is presi- 
dent of the company. This has proved an important productive industry 
of the community, furnishing an excellent market for farmers keeping a 
large numlier of cows, and at the same time it has been a source of grati- 
fying income to the stockholders. 

On the 9th of Februarv, 185 1. was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Longsduff and !\Iiss Rachei S. Dodge, a daughter of Joseph and Ann 
(DePuv) Dodge. She was born in New York, near Baldwinsville. 
and was about eight years of age when she came with her parents to 
Michigan, the familv home being estalilished in Cass county. She has 
thus spent the greater part of her life here, and to her husband .she has 
been a faithful companion and helpmate on life's journey, ably assist- 
ing him bv lier encouragement and also by her careful management of 
the houseliold affairs. Unto them was born a son. Charles D., who is 
now deceased. He married Jennie Alulrine, and they had two daugh- 
ters. Lucile and Georgiana. both of whom have been well educated in a 
business wav. 



400 HISTORY 01-- CASS COUXTY 

Charles D. Longsduff, born January 27, 1861, died September 19, 
1892, and was buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery, Cassopolis, Michigan. 
The funeral was conducted by the Masonic order and was one of the 
largest ever held in the place, which was an evidence of the high esteem 
his life had merited, and in which he was held by the whole community. 
He was kind and obliging in all his business transactions with his 
neighbors, a kind ar.d indulgent father and husband, and is very much 
missed by the whole conimunit}-. At his death he left a wife, two 
daughters and a host of friends. • 

The daughter, Lucile, is well educated, having attended the Com- 
mercial College of South Lend, Indiana, and was there enii)lu}ed by 
one of the responsible firms of the city. She is a fine pianist. Georgiana, 
the second daughter, graduated in the Vandalia High School in the 
class of 1906, and was the leader of the class. She passed her teacher's 
examination in the studies before she was eighteen years of age. It is 
expected by her grandparents to fit her for the teacher's life. The grand- 
parents took these little girls and ha\e reared and educated them and 
cared for them as if they were their own children. Surely they liave 
fallen into good hands, when Grandfatlicr and Grandmother Longsduff 
have assumed the care and educatitin of them. 

George Longsduff is an earnest advocate of Democratic princi[)Ics, 
having supported the party since 1840 and taking an active interest 
in its work and progress. He has been called to various local offices, 
serving as super\-isor for two years, also as a member of the school 
board and president of the village of Vandalia for about seven terms, 
during whicl-. time iie has given to the village a public spirited anfl prac- 
tical administration, resulting beneficially along many lines. He has 
also been a member of the village l>oard for many years, and throughout 
his official service his course has been prompted by untiring devotion to 
the welfare of his community. He has long been an active member of 
the Masonic fraternity, with which he became identified in 1S52. He 
is now the oldest living Mason initiated in Cass county, being the fourth 
member received into the first lodge of the county. He acted as worship- 
ful master of Vandalia lodge for thirteen years, and has been very 
earnest and helpful in his work in connection with the craft. He be- 
came a charter member of the lodge at Vandalia, and both he and his 
wife are members of the Order of the Eastern Star, in which Mrs, 
Longsduff is now serving as chaplain, while :\Ir. Longsduff' is its treas- 
urer. She belongs to the Christian church, in which she is a very 
active and helpful worker, and although not a member Mr. Longsduff' 
has contributed liberally to the support of the church and has been 
active in all things pertaining to the good of the county. His residence 
in Penn township covers fifty-seven years, and he has lieen identified 
with the making of the county from an early epoch in its pioneer ex- 
istence down to the present era of progress and prosperity. There was 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 41)1 

only one public road in the township when he located here. He has 
ever favored good roads, good sciiools and in fact all interests that tend 
to advance the material, intellectual, political, social and moral welfare 
of the community. In a review of his life history is seen that he has 
ever been busy and acti\e, and u[Hjn the suljstantial qualities of persever- 
ance and diligence he has placed his dependence with good results. 

JOHN LEWIS ROEUECK. 

The farming interests find a worthy representative in John Lewis 
Roebeck, who is living on section 6, IMilton township. He has here 
one hundred and twenty acres of land that is arable and productive, 
responding readily to the care and cultivation which he bestows upon it, 
and he has made it a valuable property. Moreover his fidelity to the 
public good is manifest in various offices which he has ably filled. A 
native of Germany,- he was bom in the province of Posen on tiie i ith of 
December, iS-|0. His father, John Roebeck, was also a native of that 
country and came to America alxnit 1873. His last days were spent 
in Niks, Berrien county. Michigan, where he departed this life when 
about sixty-five years of age. In early manhood lie had married .Anna 
Kruger, who was also born in Germany and died in that country. There 
were three children in the family, two daughters and a snn. 

John Lewis Roebeck, of this review, was reared in his native 
coimlry and attended the common schools until fourteen years of age 
in accordance with the laws of that land. His youth was also given to 
farm labor and when about twenty-five years of age he entered the em- 
ploy of the government, being overseer of the government forest re- 
serve until i.Sji. Thinking that he would have better advantages in 
the new worUl and tliat business o])[)ortunities migbt more readily come 
to him here, he sailed for the United States in 1871, first locating in 
Michigan City. Indiana. He scorned no employment that would yield 
him an honest livirig and began here by chopping wood. For six years 
he remained in ^lichigan City, and then removed to Vandalia. Cass 
county, Michigan, where he entered the employ of the ^Michigan Central 
Railroad Companv as a section hand, .being thus engaged for three 
years. He was then appointed night watchman at the handle factory- 
in Vandalia. occupving that position for two and a half years, after 
which he purchased a farm in Penn township, comprising eighty acres 
of land. He then located upon this farm, which he sold after two years, 
at the end of which time he rented a farm in Calvin township. There 
he continued to. reside for about three years, when he went to Jeft'erson 
township, where he again rented land, living on three different farms 
in that township during a period of eight years. All this time he worked 
energetically and persistentlv. and as the result of his earnest labor 
and his industry he acquired tlie competence that enabled him to purchase 
the farm upon which he now resides on section 6. :Milton township. 
Here he owns one hundred and twenty acres of land which has been 



492 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

made arable and productive by reason of the cultivation which is be- 
stowed upjo it. Year after year he has worked hard in order to make 
his farm a valuable property, and is now enjoying the fruits of his toil 
in the ownership of richly cultivated fields which annually return to him 
good harvests. 

Mr. Roebeck was married in 1862 to Miss Amelia Hanke, also a 
native of the province of Posen, Germany. Unto this union have been 
born ten children: Charles, at home; Anson, a farmer of Berrien 
county; Frederick, at home; Flermann, of whom mention is later made; 
Emma, at home; Bertha, the wife of Y'ust Reum, of Milton township; 
Augusta, the wife of Wilhelm Reum, of Milton township; Minnie, the 
wife of Edward Geidemann, who is living in Xiles; Hattie, at home; 
and Catherine, who is engaged in teaching. The family circle yet re- 
mains unbroken by the hand of death, and five of the children were Itorn 
in Cass county. Hermann Roebeck, who was lx>rn in Penn township, 
January 6. 1S7S, took an active part in politics and was elected recorder 
of deeds in 1900. He held the office for four years, having been re- 
elected in 1902. He was township clerk of ^lilton township at the time 
he was chosen to the county office, and at all times he has been found 
faithful and loyal to the trust reposed in him. For one term he was 
school inspector. In the spring of 1906 he was elected supervisor of 
Milton township on the Democratic ticket. He now resides in Milton 
township, although he was engaged in the real estate business in Xiles, 
Michigan. Fraternally he is connected with the Elks lodge at Dowagiac. 

John L. Roebeck exercises his right of franchise in support of the 
men and measures of the Democracy, and has been called ujion to fill 
a number of iniljHc positions by those of his fellow townsmen who 
recognize in him a trustworthy and progressive citizen. He has been 
justice of the peace for two terms and his decisions were fair and im- 
partial. He was highway commissinner for one term and is now a mem- 
ber of the board of review. Mr. Roebeck has a wide and favorable ac- 
quaintance in this countv and with pleasure we present the histor\' of 
his life to the readers of this volume. 

JOHN MARCKLE. 

John ]\Iarckle, one of the leading and energetic farmers of :\Iilton 
township, wh.o resides on section 20, was Iwrn in Stark county. Ohio. 
Decem.ber 2;. 1841'. His father, Peter iMarckle. was a nativeof Ger- 
many, where he was reared and educated. He came to America prior 
to his marriasre and in Ohio was joined in wedlock to Miss Catharme 
Klein, who died during tlie early bovhood of her son John. There 
were three children in the family, of whom :\Ir. Marckle. of this review, 
is the second child and eldest son. 

He was only six vears of age when he accompanied his father on 
the removal from Ohio to Indiana, locating in St. Joseph county, where 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY i'J3 

he continued until al;uut twenty years of age. Xo event of special im- 
portance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for him in his hoy- 
hood days, as he worked in held and meadow during the greater part 
of the year, and in the winter seasons attended school. He then came 
to Cass county, r\lich.igan, making his way to Milton township, where 
he worked Ly the month as a farm hand until after the inauguration 
of the Civil war. He then enlisted for service in the Union army in 
1862 as a memher of Company F, Twelfth Michigan \'oluntccr In- 
fantry. He joined the army as a private, but after about si.x months 
was prom.oted to second sergeant and carried the colors for two years. 
He was in the battles of Shiloh, luka. Hatch's Run and many others, 
including the engagements at Vicksburg, Mechanicsburg and Little 
Rock, Arkansas. lie reported every day for .duty ajid was always 
faithful to the call made upon him for any ser\-ice that contributed to 
the interests of the army and thus led to the final result which crowned 
ithe Union arms. He was more than four years in active service, 
having enlisted on the 22i\ of February. 1862, while on the 6th of 
March, 1S66, he was honoralily di'^charged. He proved a brave and 
loyal soldier on many a southern battlefield and participated in the 
grand review in Washington, D. C, where the victorious Union troops 
marched through the streets of the city and passed the reviewing stand 
where they were cheered by the president and other distingin'shcd men 
of the nation as well as by thousands of northern people who rejoiced 
that the war was over and that so many soldiers had been spared. 

When the coiuitry no longer needed his aid !Mr. Marckle returned 
to Cass county and bought the farm upon which he now resides. He 
has added to this place until he has two hundred and six acres of land 
which is well improved. By following the rotation of crops and care- 
fully cultivating his fields he has made his farm very productive, and 
the rich land returns to him a gratifying annual income from the sale 
of his harvests. 

Mr. Marckle was married in 1867 to Miss Elizabeth Landgraf. 
a native of Germany and a daughter of Michael Landgraf, who was 
also born in that country. This union has been blessed with two 
children, a son and a daughter, Flora, who is now the widow of Qiarles 
W. Zeitter. ]\Ir. Marckle has always taken an active interest in public 
affairs and does even-thing in his power to promote the best interests 
of the community, displaying the same loyalty which he manifested when 
he followed the old flag on southern battlefields. He has always voted 
wn'th the Democracy and is firm in support of his honest convictions. 
He believes that the principles of that party contain the best elements 
of good government, and he has never wavered in his allegiance thereto. 
He" has been justice of the peace and township treasurer and has held 
all of the school offices. He served as highway commissioner in an early 
day and is interested in ever>' movement that pertains to the upbuilding 
of' the schools, the improvement of the roads or the substantial devel- 



^9i HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

opment of the county in any direction. He was also a member of the 
grand jury in 1905. In a review of his Hfe work we note many salient 
characteristics which are most commendable. Without extraordinary 
family or pecuniary- advantages at the outset of his career he has laljored 
energetically and persistently year after vear. He started out when 
a poor boy, having no capital save his strong determination and willing 
hands. Hiese qualities have constituted the basis of his success, and as 
the architect of his own fortunes he has buildcd wisely and well'. 

GEORGE W. S^HTH. 

In a history devoted to the early settlers and the men who in later 
years have been factors in the sul)stantial growth, progress and upbuild- 
ing of Cass county, mention should be made of George W. Smith, who 
at an early day in the development of this part of the state took up his 
abode in Cass county. He now resides on section 16, 'MWtnn township, 
where he has good farming interests, owning and operating one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land, which constitutes a neat and well kept 
farm. He was born in Kent county, Delaware, January 10, 183 1. His 
father, Manlove Smith, was also a native of that state, and was there 
reared, married, lived and died, passing away when about sixtv vears 
of age. His wife, who bore the maiden nan'ie of Mary M. McKnett, 
was a native of Delaware, and died when about fifty-eiglit years of age. 
In their family were seven children, of whom two passed awav ^'n 
infancy, while fi\-e reached manhood or womanhood. Only one daughter 
is now living. 

Mr. Smith is the youngest of this family and was only two years 
old when his father died, and a little lad of but six summers' at the'time 
of his mother's death. Thus left an orphan he was reared by his eldest 
brother, with whom he remained to the age of sixteen vears' on the old 
family homestead in the east. He then started out in life for himself 
and whatever success he has achieved is attributable entirely to his own 
enterprise and labors. He worked as a farm hand by the month or day 
and to some extent was employed in a store owned by his brother at 
Greenville. Delaware. The opportunities of the new and growing west, 
however, attracted him. and he resolved to seek his fortune in ]\[ich- 
igan. Accordingly he made hi.s way to this state in 1854. settling 
in Cass county, and for more than a half centurv he has resided here, 
being actively connected with its farming interests to the benefit of the 
county and to the promotion of his own individual resources. 

As a companion and helpmate for life's journey [Mr. Smith chose 
Miss Josephine B. Powell, to whom he was married on the i6th of 
December. 1856. her parents being Thomas and Mariam (Bowman) 
Powell, who were also natives of Kent county. Delaware. They came 
to Cass county in 1834. locating in ^Milton township, when there were 
few settlers in this part of the state. All around them was wild and 



HISTORY UF CASS COUXTV 4;t5 

unimproved. The timljcr was uncut and the land uncultivated, but 
they cast in their lot with the early settlers and aided in reclaiming this 
district for the uses of civilization. Mrs. Smith was less than a year 
old when liniUL;iit liy her parents to Milton township, and has alwavs 
resided in this county. 

At the time of their marriage Mr. and :\Irs. Smith located on the 
old family homestead in Milton township, where they remained for 
about four years, when they took up their abode upon the farm where 
Mr. Smith now resides. Here he has lived for forty-six years and the 
splendid appearance of the place with its well tilled fields, good build- 
ings and modern accessories, is indicative of the practical and enter- 
prising spirit of the owner. 

As the years went by six children were born unto Mr. and ;\Irs. 
Smith: Truman ]\I., who is now living in Houston, Texas; Thomas F., 
at home; Redora M., the wife of .\rza G. Griffin, who resides in Aurora, 
Illinois; William C., who married Pearl Clark and is living in Granger, 
Indiana; Robert G., deceased, and Clarence P., who married Miss (icr- 
trude Abbott and is living in Milton township. All were born in Milton 
township, Cass county. 

Mr. Smith has been a lifelong farmer and is now the owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres, constituting a well improved farm. He 
started out in life on his own account empty-handed, but has worked 
earnestly and persistently, and as the years have gone b\' has achieved 
both success and an honored name. He has been identified with the 
county from its early history, and while carrying on his individual busi- 
ness pursuits has at the same time promoted public progress along lines 
of substantial advancement. He has taken an active and helpful interest 
in matters pertaining to the general welfare, and for many years has 
supported the Republican party. For about sixty years he and his wife 
have been members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has 
held all of the offices, taking an active part in its work and doing all in 
his power to promote its influence and growth. He has been true to 
its teachings, and his close adherence to its principles has made his life 
an upright and honorable one. He has been straightforward in his 
business dealings, considerate of the rights of others and true to high 
and manly principles, and as one of the early settlers and successful 
farmers of the county he certainly deser\-es mention in this volume. 

WILLIAM! E. PARSONS. 

William E. Parsons, prominent among the old settlers of Cass 
countv. his home being on section 23. Milton township, has for more 
than a half century resided in tin's part of the state. He has seen the 
country de\-e]op from a wild region with only a few white inhabitants 
to a rich agricultural district containing thousands of good homes and 
acres of growing towns inhabited by an industrious, prosperous, en- 



496 HISTORY 01> CASS COUNTY 

lightened and progressiAc people. He, too, has participated in and 
assisted the slow, persistent work of development which was necessary 
to produce a change that is so complete that the county of todav bears 
scarcely any resemblance to the district in which he spent liis boyhood 
days. 

Mr. Parsons is, however, a native of rvlilton township, born Jan- 
uary i8, 1S51. His father, Benjamin Parsons, was a native of Dela- 
ware and came to Cass county, :\Iichigan, about 1845, settling in Milton 
township.^ He died when fnrt>--(i\e years of age and was long survived 
by his wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Abbott and was a na- 
tive of Delaware. Her death occurred in Ali'lton township in 1892, 
when she had reached the age of sixty-five years. They were the 
parents of seven cliildren. one of whom died in infancy, while all the 
others reached manhood or womanhood and are still living. 

William E. Parsons is the second child of the family and was 
reared in the usual manner of farm lads, no event of special'importance 
occurring to vary the routine of farm lalior and school work in his 
youth. He attended the cummon di^trict schools, thus acquiring a good 
practical education, and he has always followed the occupation to which 
he was reared, engaging in general farming. He has also carried on 
threshing for about twenty-five years in this county, and has thus be- 
come well known here. 

Mr. Parsons has taken an active and helpful interest in- public 
affairs, his progressive citizenship standing as an unquestioned fact in 
his career. He voles with the FJemocracy and has held many offices in 
his township. He was treasurer for two years and supervisor for six 
years, being elected to the latter office for several terms. His entire 
life has been passed" in this count}' and he is closelv indentified with 
.its farming interests. He now owns ninety-two acres of good land 
on section 23, Milton township, and has brought his farm under a high 
state of cultivation, adding to it modern equipments and so developing 
the fields that he now annually har\-ests rich crops. 

JOHN H. Y'OUNG. 

John H. Young, residing on section 9. ^Milton township, and now 
filling the position of township treasurer, was born in St. Joseph county, 
Indiana, September 2, 186 1. His father, Jacob Young, was a native of 
Germany and was brought to America when only nine years of age. 
the family home being established in Ohio. There he was reared to 
the age of sixteen vears, when he removed to Indiana with his parents, 
George and Catharine Y'oung, who located in St. Joseph county, being 
among the early families of that part of the state. Having arrived at 
years of maturity Jacob Young was married there to Miss Catharine 
Cocher, who was IxDrn in Pennsylvania but was reared in St. Joseph 
county, Indiana, where her people located upon a farm. Mrs. Young 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY r.)l 

passed away in Octul.er, 1903. l,ut Jacl, Young is still living. There 
were_ three children in the family: Millie, now the wife of Frank 
Kieffer. of South Lend, Indiana; John H., of this review, and Kittie, 
who is the wife of William Reaves, of South Bend, Indiana. 

John H. "S'dung, the only son of the family, was reared in the 
county fif his nativity, and pursued his education in the Harrison 
Prairie schools. He remained at home until twenty-eight years of age, 
assisting in the work of the farm, and the knowledge thus gained of 
the practical methods of tilling the soil and cultivating the fields enabled 
him to successfully carry on general farming when he secured a home 
of his own. 

Mr. Young was married in 1RS9 to ;Miss Cora Butts, a daughter 
of Mrs. Mary J. Butts, of Milton township, Cass county, in which 
locality Mrs. Young was horn. Mr. Young has been a resident of ^vlil- 
ton towmship for sixteen years, and has been active and influential in 
public affairs. He is a stanch supporter of the Democracv. holding 
office for a number of years. He was elected township treasurer in 190^ 
and has acted in other local positions. He was also elected highway 
commissioner hut refused to qualify. N^o public trust reposed in him 
has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree, for he is ever loyal to 
the general good and puts forth bis best efforts for the welfare and up- 
building of the community. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Young have been born two children. Charlie 
and Lloyd. The family home is on a farm of one Inmdred and seventy 
acres, all of which ^Ir. Young cultivates, giving his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits. In tilling the soil he has followed practical meth- 
ods and has secured excellent results, and he annually gathers golden 
harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon his 
place. Socially he is connected with the Knights of the 'Macaibees and 
with the jMasons. He is also a member of the Methodist church, anfl 
these membership relations indicate the character of the man and the 
principles which govern his conduct and are manifest in his daily life — 
principles wliich in every land and clime command respect and awaken 
confidence. 

LEWIS C. VAN ANTWERP. 

Lewis C. Van Antwerp, who is conducting a meat market in Ed- 
wardsburg, was born in Ontwa township. IMav 10, 1S56, Fli? father. 
Simon Van Antwerp, was a native of New York and became one of 
the pioneer settlers of Cass county, ^Michigan, his youth, however. 
being passed in the Empire state, further mention of whom is made 
in connection with the sketch of G. H. Redfield on another page of this 
work. 

Upon the old home farm in Ontwa township Lewis C. Van .Ant- 
werp spent the first four vears of his life. His father then remo-ved 
to South Bend, Indiana, where his death occurred when the son Lewis 



^9S HISTORY o|.- CASS COUXTY 

was but eleven years oi age. Tlic latter afterward returned to Ontwa 
township and has snice been a resident of Cass countv. He devoted his 
time and energies to agricultural pursuits between the'age'^ of eleven and 
thirty-six years, and also engaged in operating a threshing machine in 
his early manhood. About the time he attained his niajoritv he rented 
land from George Redfield and was engaged in farming 'for 'several 
years. Later he removed to Mason township, where he rented another 
farm of Mr. Redfield. When his financial resources made other purchase 
possible he added five acres from Mrs. Joy, and then twentv-six acres 
of land to the other tract, buying the latter of George Ketc'hnm. All 
of this was wild and unimproved, but he cleared and cultivated it, 
transforming it into productive fields. As the years went by his labors 
brought to him a good financial return and Iiis farm work resulted in 
the improvement of a splendid property. He resided thereon until 1892, 
when he removed to Cassopolis, where he embarked in the butcliering 
business, continuing in the trade there for seven vears. In 1899 he 
came to Edwardsburg, where he again opened a meat market, and has 
since been identified with the business interests of the citv in this way. 

Mr. Van Antwerp was married in 1883 to Miss Bertha L. Schut't, 
a daughter of A. S. and Lydia Schutt, and a native of Noble county. 
Indiana, Ixirn July 7, 1S58. She resided there with her parents unt'il 
about ten years of age when, in iS'lS, the familv removed to Elkliart 
county, Indiana, where :Mrs. \'an Antwerp lived until she reached 
womanhood. She has become the mother of two children : BIcnn, 
who was born in Mason township, April 19, 1885. and Haminn. born 
in Cassopolis. Decemlicr 9, 189.'^. The elder was graduated from the 
high school of Edwardsburg. 

Mr. Van Antwerji is a Republican and a m.ember of the W^oodmen 
camp at Edwardsburg. He has little desire for public office, preferring 
to give his attention to his business affairs, and whatever success he has 
attained is attributable to his close application, earnest purpose and 
honorable methods. 

E. F. LEWIS. 

E. F. Lewis, who for many years was engaged . activelv in farm 
work, but who now rents his lanrl and makes his home in Yandalia. 
where he took up his abode ahxit 189S. has been associated with e\-ents 
which have molded the pioneer history of the count}' and have contrib- 
uted to its later development. He is one of the older nati^-e sons of 
Cass county, his birth having occurred in Newberg township on the 
8th of November. 1847. His father. J. W. Lewis, was a native of New 
York, in which state he was reared, but was married in Ohio, the 
wedding taking place in Medina county, where he won the hand of ]Miss 
Emily Ferguson, a native of tliat county. In the year 1840 thev came 
to Cass county. ?\Iicliigan. and settled in Newberg township, where 
their remaining days were passed. Both had died at a comparativelv 



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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 4!i'j 

early age, the father in l.is forty-fifth year, wliile the motlier was about 
thirty-six years of age at the time of lier demise. In their family w 
five sons: Francis S., ^vho, enlisting for service in the Civil war a. 
defender of the Lnion in the Fourth ^lichigan Cavalrv, Company 
I gave his life for his country at the battle of Stone River in i86v 
James H., who also died at tlic battle of Stone River while serving as 
a member of the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, to which his brother also 
belonged; E. F.. of tliis review; ^lisacl B., now living in St. Tosenh 
county Michigan; and Charles E., who maintains his residence in 
Pennsylvania. 

No event of special imiwrtance occurred to vary the routine of 
farm life for E. F. Lewis in his boyhood days. He was reared in his 
native township and attended the common schools, his time bein<^ divided 
between the duties of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the play-crround 
and the work of the home farm. However, in 1S64. he respoirded to 
his country s call for aid. His two elder brothers had become soldiers 
and had given their lives in defense of the Union in the previous vear 
and_ E. F. Lewis, although only sixteen years of age, thrilled with the 
spirit of patriotism, offered his aid to his count^^•, being enrolled with 
the boys in blue of Company H, Nineteenth Michigan Volunteer In- 
fantr>-, as a private. He served until the close of the war, took part in 
the battle of Savannah, and went with Sherman on the celebrated march 
to the sea, and through the Carolina campaign. Although he enlisted 
during tlie latter part of the struggle he tasted fully the fortunes and 
experiences of war, and all of the hardships meted out to the soldier 
Following the fall of Richmond and the surrender of Lee he took part 
m the grand review in Wasiiington, D. C, where the victorious Union 
army marched past the stand upon which the president viewed the 
troops. It was a glad day for the soldiers, knowing that this meant the 
cIose_ of their military- service, which had been long and arduous, and 
that it also meant that victory had perched ilix>n the Union arms and 
that the country was not to be dismembered, to the dissatisfaction of the 
south. Mr. Lewis received his honorable discharge at Detroit Michi- 
gan, and was mustered out at W'ashington. 

Not long after he was again at his work in the fields in Newber^r 
township, being employed for some time as a farm hand by the month" 
He also engaged in grubbing stumps and anv other work neces<=arv for 
clearing and improving the land. In 1868 he married Miss Narcissus 
r. Pemberton a daughter of R. S. and ^largaret (^filler) Pemberton 
Reason S. Pemberton died at his son's residence in Marcellus 
April 27. 1896. after a long and painful sickness, aged seventv-four 
years one month and four days. He was born in Wavne countv.'Ohio, 
iNlarch 23, 1822. and came to Cass county, Michigan, in 1836. with his 
uncle, Joseph Pemberton. with whom he made his home, having been 
left motherless when very young. Like a great many of the early 



5<-'0 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

pioneers, liis advantages for getting an education ^vere very poor, and 
young Reason, like many a poor boy of those days, began to use the 
axe, the tool that has felled the forests of Alichigan, converting the land 
into vast fields for the present generation. Notwithstanding the meager 
chanches for obtaining an education, he always had a strong desire for 
learning. Having gained a copy of that important factor in pioneer educa- 
tion, Webster's elemeutarv spelling book, he soon learned to read and 
spell. That, with the Testament and a few books he borrowed, constituted 
young Reason's libraiy, which he read and studied by the light of the 
fireplace. Three months of schooling in an old log schoolhouse in 
Indiana, where he had gone from Michigan, completed his early educa- 
tion, during which time he put in good work learning to "ciplier." 
After having taught a few terms of school he was married, in 1840, to 
Margaret Miller, a German girl of thrifty parentage, and with his wife 
returned to ^Michigan, where they made their home and lived until 
the death of Mrs. Pemberton in 1SS5, ^t the age of sixty-four years. 
The hardships and trials of this couple were like those of' all pioneers. 
The log cabin, with its fireplace, the small piece of cleared land, sur- 
rounded by the deep tangled wildwood, with its deer, its wolves and its 
Indians, were all well known to the early pioneers. Twelve children 
were born to this couple, seven of whom are now living, and all were 
present at the time of his death but one, Mrs. J. A. Pmvell, living in 
Oklahoma. Air. Pemljerton and his wife united with tlie Christian 
church at Vandalia during the early days of its organization. In 1S55 
he became a charter member of the Vandalia F. & A. M., in which 
organization he remained an active and faithful member til! death. He 
has held, during his career, all the township offices, from supervisor 
down to constable, and for over twenty years held the important posi- 
tion of justice of the peace. "Uncle Reas," as he was known, had a 
remarkable memory for retaining dates and events and reproducing 
them with clearness. In his official capacity he was frequently consulted 
in matters pertaining to law, and although only self-taught on the sul> 
ject, his opinions on such matters have been a guide to a great many 
people. Being a life-long Democrat, he subscribed for and donated to 
the National Democrat during its early struggles for existence, and the 
paper was always a welcome weekly visitor, furnishing the literary 
matter for the family. 

The funeral services were held at the Christian churcli in Vandalia. 
conducted by Rev. George Barrows, and attended by a large number of 
relatives and friends. The F. & A. M. organizations of Marcellus and 
Vandalia, with visiting members from Cassopolis and Dowagiac, at- 
tended in a body, and with tlie ceremonies of their order interred the 
remains in the \"andalia cemetery, there to await the resurrection morn. 
In his death was lost an honored and respected neighbor, brother and 
father. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 501 

Wisdom and love have ordered all the past, 
All shall be blessedness and joy at last; 
Cast oft the cares that have so long oppressed, 
Rest, sweetly rest. 

Margaret I'emberton, wife of R. S. Pemberton, Sr., died at her 
residence in Vandalia, after a short illness. She was the daughter of 
Jacob and Barbara Miller, and was born in the German state of Hesse 
Darmstadt, ^larch lo, i8ji. In 1S32 she came with her parents to 
America, and tlie family (_ father, mother and six children), settled 
near Fredericksburg, ^^laryland, where they lived until 1S36, when they 
emigrated to near Cadiz, Henry county, Indiana, where her parents 
commenced the laborious task of making a farm in the wilderness, in 
the work of which she bore no small part. In 1840 she was married to 
R. S. Pemberton, and in 1842 she came with her husband to Penn town- 
ship, Cass county, ^Michigan, where she continued to live until her death. 
After their arrival in Michigan they moved from place to place for a 
time, but in 1847, they bought land a short distance northeast of this 
village and began in earnest the experience of the trials and vexations, 
the joys and freedom of pioneer life. They continued to live on the 
farm until 1877, when they mcivcd to this village, where they after- 
ward resided. She was the type of a class of pioneers that are fast 
passing away. Slie was tlie mother of twelve children, seven of whom 
are now living, and excc])ting one (Barbara), were with her in her 
last sickness. Traits of character — a cheerful disposition to do the work 
which fell to her lot, unceasing care for her family, active symiiathy for 
those in affliction — these she possessed to a high degree. The funeral 
was held at the Disciple church, of which denomination she was a mem- 
ber for forty years, having obeyed the gospel under the ministration of 
Ruben Wilson in 1845. '^"''^ burial took place at the graveyard near 
tlie village, Elder Brown officiating. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis began tlieir domestic life upon a farm which 
he had purchased in Xewberg township, and there he carried on general 
agricultural ])ursuits for aljout three years, after which he engaged in 
digging wells, giving about fifteen years of his time to that business. 
He then began following the more advanced methods of driving wells, 
and he has also engaged in farming in Penn township. He bought 
the property that he now owns about 1875, ^"^ he lived upon the place 
until 1890. He now enjoys a well earned rest in Vandalia. where in 
1898 he erected one of the finest residences of the village. He rents 
his farm and is practically retired from active business, although he is 
now one of the trustees and stockholders of the Vandalia creamery. 
He also loans money and in this has been quite successful. 

Unto IMr. and Mrs. Lewis have been born a son and three daugh- 
ters: Frank B., born August 12, 1870. wlio is now engaged in drilling 
wells in Cass countv; and Fancheon D., bnm October 11, 188;, is the 



502 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

wife of William D. Kimniick. who is living upon the old homestead. 
Two daughters are deceased. Birta 'SI., born April i8, 1S74, and died 
May 10, 1874: and Vadie E., born August 7, 1876, and died June 28, 
1879. The parents are members of the Christian church, taking an ac- 
tive part in its work and contributing generously to its support. Mr. 
Lewis has been a life-long resident of Cass county, and has rejoiced in 
the fact that this cnunty has won a place among the leading counties of 
the great commonwealth. The result is due to the aggregate endeavor 
of its many public spirited, energetic and enterprising citizens, in which 
class he belongs. In politics he is an earnest and unfaltering Republi- 
can, and his fellow townsmen have called him to various offices. He 
acted as supervisor of Penn township for four terms and he is now pres- 
ident of the village of Vandalia. sen'ing for the second term in that 
position, giving to the city an administration that is characterized by 
the utmost devotion to the general good and by practical and progressive 
methods for the benefit of the town. He belongs to the Grand Army 
of the Republic at Jones, ^Michigan, W. J. Maple Post, and thus main- 
tains pleasant relations with his old army comrades. Indolence and 
idleness have ever l)ecn utterly foreign to his nature, and whatever 
work he has undertaken, whether in his private business life or in be- 
half of the community, has been characterized by close application and 
an unfaltering purpose that has enabled him to carry forward to suc- 
cessful completion the task that has claimed his time and energies. 

ALLISON D. THOMPSON. 

Allison D. Thompson is numbered among the old settlers of Cass 
county and makes his home on section 16. Milton township, where for 
a long period he has carried on general agricultural piu'suits. He has 
attained the age of seventy-three years, his birth having occurred in 
Delaware, June 23, 1833. ^^'S father, Shelley Thompson, was also a 
native of Delaware, an(l in the year 1836 sought a home in the middle 
west, settling in Milton townsliip. Cass county, Michigan, where he 
took up land from the government, for at that time much of this 
portion of the state was still unclaimed by settlers or speculators. The 
virgin forests stood in their primeval strength, the streams were un- 
bridged and the land uncultivated. Shelley Thompson became one of 
the pioneers of Cass countv and was closely identified with its early 
history as it was reclaimed for the uses of civilization.- and its wild land 
was transformed into productive fields. 

Allison D. Thompson was but three years of age at the time of 
his parents' removal to the middle west, and was reared upon the old 
homestead in 'Milton township. The mode of life at that day wa= very 
different, for pioneer conditions existed on all hands, and invention had 
not brought about the revolution in methods of farm life that is now 
familiar. His education was acquired in one of the old log school 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY ju;j 

houses cominou lu thai clay, and he sliared with the family in the hard- 
ships of frontier life, assisting in the strenuous task of developing a new- 
farm, rie has always remained a resident of Cass county, and the 
dianges which ha\e occurred antl the events which have wrought its 
history ha\-e left their impress upon his memory, so that he is well in- 
formed concerning the county's development and progress. He has 
been married twice, his first uui(jn heing with Miss Julia Adams, by 
whom he had two children, a S(_in and daughter. The latter is Mrs. 
Belle Parvis, of South Bend, Indiana, and the son, Jesse, is now de- 
ceased. l"or his second wife, :Mr. Thompson chose Mary E. Parvis, 
whom lie wedded in 1870. She was born in Delaware, February 23, 
1849, ^n^J is :i daughter of Solomon and Ellen (Fowler) Parvis, who 
came to Berrien county, ^lichigan, in i860. 

For two years after his first marriage IMr. Thompson was a resi- 
dent of Howard township, and for twelve years lived in Pokagon town- 
ship, where he was engaged in farming, but the greater part of his life 
has been spent in ]\IiIton t(jwnsliip and he is well known as one of its 
leading settlers and representative agriculturists. Unto him and his 
wife have been born four children: Bertha, who is now the wife of 
Bert Kizer, of Niles. Michigan ; Arthur, who was Inirn in Berrien 
county, Michigan, where the parents lived for almut two years, his 
natal day being December 3. 187.1.. ^^^ ■^^•'■'^ reared, however, in Milton 
town.ship, Cass county, and was educated in the district schools of that 
township and of Pokagon township. He was married on the i^tli of 
May, 1895, to ]\Iiss !Marv E. Reid. a daughter of Alexander and Emma 
(Dupert) Reid. There is one child of this marriage who is yet living, 
Helen May. Two children of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Thompson are de- 
ceased. Arthur Thompson is now looking after the interests of the 
home farm, which comjiriscs one hundred and fifty-nine acres of rich 
land.. It is under a high state of cultivation and is improved with many 
modern ecpiipments and accessories. 

Mr. Thompson, of this review, is a member of the Gleaners and his 
political allegiance is given to the Democracy. He has a vers- wide 
and favorable acquaintance in Cass county, and through the years of 
his residence here ha? so lived as to win and merit the esteem and 
good will of all with whom he has been associated. He carried on 
farming actively for a long period and has now given over the super- 
vision of his farm to his son, while he is leading a more quiet life, his 
rest being well merited because of his activity in former years. 

HENRY ANDRUS. 

HenP)- Andrus, editor of the Erlwardsburg .\rgus and a prominent 
temperance worker of [Michigan, was born in \\'aterloo township. Lyon 
county, Kansas, near the town nf \\'i!min.gton, on the 26th of October. 
1S61.'' His paternal grandfather. Hazzard Andrus, was a native of 



504 - HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Kings county. Xew York, Ijorn Octoljer 3, 1788, and in 1835 came to 
Michigan witli his lainily. He had been married in tlic Empire state 
in 1824 to Miss Fannie Bishop, and they were the parents of nine 
children, five of whom are deceased. The hving are: James H., of 
Edwardsliurg; Mrs. I'orter Lyl)arker, of Mason townsliip, Cass county; 
Nelson, of Dayton, Washington; and Riley, who is living at Dayton, 
Oregon. The grandparents remained residents of Edwardshm-g until 
called to their final rest, Hazzard Andrus passing away on the 3fl of 
March, 1S62, while his wife, long surviving him, died Januarv 29, 1894. 

James H. Andrus, father of our subject, was born in Ontwa town- 
ship, at the U'lrtli bank of Eagle lake, July 30, 1837. and remained a 
resident of tins tnwnshi]) until iXdo, when he went to Kansas, where 
he was married on the 7th of October of that year to Miss Cylinda M. 
Haring, a daughter of irienry and Nancy Haring, who had also removed 
from Cass county to Kansas in that year. In 1S62 ^Mr. Andrus returned 
with his family to ^Michigan, and in the course of years there were born 
unto him and his wife four ciiildrcn, three sons and a daughter. The 
latter, Cora ^I.. died July 2. 1877. Those still living are: Henry; 
William. Riley, of ^Michigan City, Indiana; and George S., of LaCrosse. 
Wisconsin. The mother, who was a native of New York, bnrn Decem- 
ber 9, 1840, was but two years of age when brought liy her parents 
to Michigan, the Haring family being established in ^Mason township. 
Her death occurred October 4, 1903. 

James H. Andrus enlisted in Company L. Second Michigan Cavalry 
Volunteers, in 1864, and screed till the close of hostilities, when he 
received his honorable discharge and returned to don the civilian's garb. 

Henry i\ndrus was brought by his parents to Cass county in 1862, 
the family home being established in Edwardsburg, but after a short 
time a removal was made to Mason township, and later to Calvin town- 
ship. In the year i8(tc). however, the family returned to Edwardsburg. 
Henry Andrus attended the district schools of Mason and Calvin town- 
ships, and following the remov?;! to Edwardsburg continued his educa- 
tion in the high school of this city. At the age of eighteen years he 
began working in the ofRce of the Edwardsburg Argiua. then published 
by John B. Sweetland, and remained in the employ of that gentleman 
for nearlv twentv vears. or until the death of Dr. Sweetland on the iQth 
of Februarv, 1899. He then purchased the printing office of the heirs 
and has continued the publication of the paper to the present time. He 
is a well know newspaper man and his journal has a wide circulation. 
which makes it as well a good advertising medium. He therefore re- 
ceives a good patronage in that direction, and the Argus has proved a 
profitable investment. 

Mr. Andrus is widely known as a leading Prohibitionist of Mich- 
igan. Throughout his entire life he has been a strong advocate of the 
temperance cause, and since attaining his majoritv has given his ballot 
for the support of the party that embodies his views on this question. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 506 

In 1896 he received the Prohibition nomination for Heutenant governor, 
and in 1S9S was lionored hy his party witli the nomination for auditor 
general, \vliile in 1902 he was a candidate for representative to the state 
legislature. He is now servin.c: as a niemher of the board of education 
of Edwardsburg and for twelve years has held the position of director. 
Through the columns of his paper, and individually as well, he has 
co-operated in many movements for the general good, and is the cham- 
pion of every plan formulated and measure instituted for the develop- 
ment of his city along tlie lines of material. in<lividual and moral 
progress. 

On the 31st of December, iS.'-^j, Mr. Andrns was united in marriage 
to Miss Ida F.. Kitchen, a native of Columbia county, Pennsylvania, and 
a daughter of Xclson and Subrina (Eves) Kitchen, who removed with 
their family to Cass county in the spring of 1872. ^Ir. and Mrs. .\ndrus 
have become the parents of two sons: George R., born October 13, 
1883, and Charles H.. born June 14, 1894. 

GEORGE ITAM:\fOXD REDFIELD, 

George Hammond Rcdficid, who follows fanning and also oper- 
ates a cream separator l)usincs^ at Edwardsburg, is a native of Ontwa 
township, born August 21. 1S55. and in the years of an active manhood 
has made a creditable business record. His father. George Redficid. 
was a native of Connecticut. l>orn October 6, 1796. and in 1800 went 
with his parents to Ontario county. X'ew York, where he was reared 
and acquired his education. ITis youth was spent upon a farm about 
three miles from Qiftoii Springs. X'ew York, the famous hospital resort. 
In 1825 and 1826 he engaged in teaching school in Milledgeville, 
Georgia, which was then in the heart of the slave countr\'. He after- 
ward returned to his father's farm and aided in its further development 
and improvement up to the time of his marriage, which was celebrated 
in Ontario county, X^'ew York, on the 9th of January, 1835, the lady of 
his choice being IMiss Julia Mason, of Palmyra. New York. Tliey be- 
came the parents of three children. Ann Maria, Julia and Louis H., de- 
ceased. Coming to the west, they settled in Ontwa township. Cass county, 
Michigan, in 1835, and in August. 1848. George Redfield was called 
upon to mourn the loss of his wife. In September, 185 1, he was again 
married, his second union being with Jane E. Hammond, a daughter of 
Judge Hammond, of Essex county. New York. She was reared and 
educated in the Empire state and her death occurred in 1865. By this 
marriage there was one son and three daughters, the eldest being George 
Hammond, of this review. His sisters are: Bertha, now the wife of 
H. E. Bucklcn. of Chicago: Mvra J., the wife of W. C. Hewitt, a pro- 
fessor in the State Normal School at Oshkosh. Wisconsin, and the 
author of a work on political science: and Ahby, deceased at the age of 
twenty-six. All of the children of the second marriage were bom in 
Cass county. 



50C HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

On coming to :\Iichig-an George Redfield, Sr., took up his abode 
upon a farm, purchasing eight luuuh-cd and lour acres of raw land 
from tlie government. He cultivated this tract, which was located in 
the southeastern part of Ontwa township, and in the development of this 
property contributed largely toward the substantial improvement of the 
county. His attention was given to agricultural pursuits until his death, 
which occurred October 31. 1887. He was a lifelong Democrat, and 
in early life took an active part in politics. In 1S41 he was elected rei> 
resentati\e to the state legislature, and in 1842 and 1S43 served as 
state senat(ir. He was also presidential elector in 1844 and in 1845 he 
was appointed state treasurer by Governor Bany. In 1850 he was 
appointed secretary of state, and he was a member of the convention 
that framed the constitution of ^Michigan. Thus he was most active in 
public life, and left the impress of his individuality for good upon tJie 
measures which ha\e formed the political history of the state. He had 
a very wide and favorable acquaintance among the distinguished citi- 
zens of jMichigan, and his nan^e is engraved high on the roll of her 
honored luen. 

George Hamnuaul Redfield was reared upon the old farm home- 
stead, wlicre he remained until 1873. ^vhen he became active in the oper- 
ation of his father's grist mill in Jefferson township, there residing until 
1878. He then removed to Alason township, locating on a farm which 
lie recei\cd from his father, comprising nne hundred and si.xtv acres, 
which at tliat liiue was partially impro\'ed. 

Mr. Redfield had been married on the i8th of July, 1875, to Miss 
Julia A. Van Antwerp, a native of Ontwa township, horn December iS, 
1851. and a daughter of Simon and Louisa (Hewitt) Van Antwerp. 
The latter was a daughter of Dethic Hewitt, one of the honored [)ioneer 
residents of Cass county, who made his home in Edwardsbiirg and for 
forty vears filled the office of justice of the peace. Simon \'an .Ant- 
werp, father of ]\Irs. Redfield, was a native of the Genesee valley. New 
Y'ork, and his wife was born in Pennsylvania. Tliey' became pioneer 
residents of Cass county and tlie present home of Air. and Mrs. Redfield 
is the house in which they ate their first tneal after arriving in this 
county. Mr. Van Antwerp was a Republican and throughout his active 
business career carried on agricultural pursuits, but at the age of fifty- 
four years retired from farming and removed to South Bend. Indiana, 
where he remained until his death, which occurred in iS6ri. ^vhen he was 
sixty-one vears of age. They were the parents of six children, two sons 
and' four daughters, of whom Mrs. Redfield was the third in order of 
birth. The others were: Lynn: Elber. who died in infancy: Louis; 
Daniel : and Lucy. All were born in Cass county. Mr. Van Antwerp 
was twice married, his first union being with Nancy Halsted. a native 
of New York, whom he wedded in Scotchville, New Y'ork. They were 
the parents of three children : Louisa ; Jonas, deceased : and Llsie. The 
wife and luother died in Calhoun county, near Alarshall, Michigan, and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 507 

later Mr. Van Antwerp married Louisa Hewitt, who I'ccame tlie motlicr 
of Mr?. Redriel.l. 

Followin"; his niarriaqe Mr. Re.ItleUl settled in Jeffersun town- 
ship, where he lived for three years, and then removed to Mason town- 
ship, where he made his home until 1904, when he took up his aljode in 
Edwardsbur^. He has led a most husy and useful life, winning suc- 
success as a farmer by the capable manner in which he has cultivated his 
fields and cared for his crops. He has also operated a creamery, and 
both branches of his business have proved profitable. 

Unto ^Ir. and Mrs. Redfield have been born two sons, but I^^uis 
Harold, b(jrn August 18, 1877, died on the loth of December, iSSi. 
The surviving son, George Russell, was born January 8, 189 1. on the 
old homestead farm in Mason township. Mr. Redfield has never fal- 
tered in his allegiance to the Democracy, supporting that party since age 
gave to him the right of franchise. He was justice of the peace in Ma- 
son township for twenty-two years, was township clerk for six years 
and was also township treasurer. He has also been a member of the 
township board, has taken a most active interest in politics, has proved 
a capable ofiicer and has done everything in his power to promote the 
growth and insure the success of his party. He belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias lodge at Bristol, Indiana, and to the Maccabees tent at Un- 
ion, Michigan, and to the Michigan State Grange, and his wife also 
holds meml^ership relations with the last two. Mr. Redfield is a worthy 
and prominent re])resentati\-e of an honored pioneer famih' and has 
carried forward the work wdn'cb was instituted by his father, becoming 
through the careful direction of his business interests one of the sul> 
stantial citizens of this part of the state. 

ALFRED SIIOCKLEY. 

In a review of the history of the county back to pioneer times it 
will be found that Alfred Shockley was a resident here in the early days 
and he now makes his home on section 9. iMilton town.ship. wliere he has 
a- good farming property. He has passed the seventy-seventh milestone 
on life's journey, his birth having occurred in Sussex county. Dela- 
ware, on the 17th of June, 1829. His father, Littleton Shockley. was a 
native of JMarvland. where he was reared. By ocaipation he was a 
farmer, thus providing for his family. In the year 1833 'le came west- 
ward to IMichigan, settling in Milton township. Cass county, where he 
took up land froiri the government. ^Michigan was still under territorial 
rule, and there were more Indians than white peonle in the state. The 
greater part of the land was still unclaimed and the work of irnprove- 
ment and development had scarcely been be.gun. At long distances 
could be seen a pioueer cabin to show that an attempt was made to claim 
the district for the uses of civilization. :\Ir. Shockley cast in his lot with 
the earlv settlers and shared in the arduous task of reclaiming the re- 



^«* HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

gion and developing a new farm. When quite young he was left an 
orphan and he lust ah trace of his people, so tha't little is known con- 
cerning the ancestral history of the family. His death occurred in the 
'Sos, and thus passed away one of the \vorth\- pioneer settlers of the 
community. IJis wife, who hore the maiden name of Emily Alessick, 
was a native of Delaware and was there reared. She, too, reached an 
advanced age, passing away in her eighty-second year. There were 
eight children in the family, four of whom reached adult age. 

Alfred Shockley was the sixth in order of birth and was a little 
lad of five summers when hrMught to Cass county, Michigan, by his 
parents. He was reared in }.Iilion township and early became familiar 
with the experiences of pioneer life. The family had removed from 
Delaware to Richmond, Indiana, when he v>as only a year old, and in 
1833 they came to Cass county, since which time the family name has 
figured in the records of this part of the state and has been a synonym 
for good citizenship and for progrcssiveness. The Indians were numer- 
ous in this section of the state diuing his boyhood days and he has manv 
times seen wigwams and has had in his possession various things made 
by the Indians. He came to know much of tlieir manners and customs 
of living and in course of time saw them supplanted by the white race, 
while they sought reservations farther west. His education was acquired 
in one of the old-time log school houses, in which the methods of teach- 
ing were primitive, as were the furnishings of the little building. He 
assisted on the laim when he became old enough and remained upon the 
home place until his father died. On the i^th of September. 1861, in 
response to the country's call for aid. ^Ir. Shockley offered his services 
ancl was enrolled as a member of Company L. Second }ilichigan Cav- 
alry. He served as a private until August, 1865. having re-enlisted in 
the same company in 1862. continuing with the command until after 
the cessation of hostilities. He was offered a promotion but would not 
accept it, content to do his duty in the ranks. He drove a team most of 
the time and was with the Arrnv of the Cumberland. 

After receiving his final discharge at Jackson, Michigan. Mr. 
Shocklev returned to his old home in Milton township, Cass county, and 
engaged in general farming on the place where he now resides. He 
made further preparation for having a home of his own by his marriage 
on the 5th of November, 1865, to IMiss Victoria Bower, the only child of 
John and Mary (Gardner) Bower and a native of Goshen, Indiana. She 
was reared, however, in Niles. Michigan. Since the w-ar Mr. Shockley 
has resided continuously in the home which he now occupies, w^ith the 
exception of one year spent in Niles. His farm comprises one himdred 
and thirteen acres of land, which is rich and productive and which he 
now rents, thus leaving the active work of the fields to others. As the 
years went bv the marriage of :^Ir. and :^Irs. Shocklev was blessed with 
eleven children: Addie.'now the wife of James W. Brown, who re- 
sides in Clav township. Elkhart county. Indiana: Emily J., who has 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY M'J 

passed away; Elizabeth E., the wile of Jehu Huff, of Xiles; EHas J.; 
Alfred C. a member of the police of Xiles; Victoria j\[av, the wife of 
William Needles, of ]\lilton township; George B., who is living in 
Milton township; Sylvester W., of Niles, who served for three years 
with the regular army in the Philippines; Charles H., who is a rural 
mail carrier on route No. i from Niles; Eva E., the wife of Julius 
Leech, of Alilton township; and Cora A., who is at home. All of the 
family were born on the farm where Mr. and Mrs. Shockley now reside. 
In his political affiliations Mr. Shockley is a Democrat and has 
served as constable and as a school officer in an early day. He has lieen 
a resident of the county for seventy-three years and well may he be num- 
bered among its pioneers, having aided in making the county what it is 
to-day. He has been active in its upbuilding and development and has 
done much hard work in clearing land and promoting its agricultural 
interests, especially in his boyhood, youth and earlier manhood. He is 
now the oldest settler of Milton township and is well known in the 
county as a man of genuine worth, whose life has been well spent. He 
has always been busy and energetic and his life of usefulness has won 
for him the esteem and confidence of those with whom he has been asso- 
ciated. Almost three-quarters of a century have passed since Mr. 
Shockley caine to this county to cast in his lot with its pioneers. Peo- 
ple of the present time can scarcely realize the struggles and dangers 
which attended the early settlers, the heroism and self-sacrifice of lives 
passed upon the borders of civilization, the hardships endured, the dif- 
ficulties overcome. These tales of the early days read almost like a 
romance to those who have known only the modern prosperity and con- 
veniences. To the pioneer of the early times, far removed from the priv- 
ileges and conveniences of city or town, the struggle for existence was 
a stern and hard one and these men and women must have possessed in- 
domitable energy and sterling worth of character, as well as marked 
phvsical courage, when they voluntarily selected such a life and suc- 
cessfully fought its battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the 
ncrLhwest. 

M. H. CRISWELL, M. D. 

It is contended by manv that the practice of medicine is the most 
important work to which a man may direct his energies, and all accord 
the profession high rank. Not only must the successful physician pos- 
sess broad and accurate knowledge concerning the great principles which 
underlie the medical and surgical science, but he must also possess a 
broad humanitarian spirit, a ready SATnpathy and a cheerful nature 
which inspires hope and courage and proves a valued supplement to his 
technical knowledge. In these qualities Dr. Criswell of Cassopolis is 
well equipped. A native of Knox county, Ohio, he was bora on the 
lOth of August, 1S63, his parents being Benjamin F. and Marv E. 
(Walker) Criswell the former a native of Stark county. Ohio, and the 



510 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

latter of Fredericktf.wn, Kncx county. The fatlier was a merchant 
tailor by trade and devoted his life to that occupation, passing away 
at Akron, Ohio, when seventy-one years of age. He was of Scotcli 
lineage. His wife died when only forty-one years of age. In their 
family were six children, of whom one died in infancy. 

Dr. Criswell is the youngest of the surviving members of the fam- 
ily and his youth was passed in Canton. Ohio, where he acquired his 
literary education as a public school student. He began the study of 
medicine under the direction of Dr. A. V. Smith at Canton and subse- 
quently spent one term as a student in a medical college. He afterward 
devoted three years to the business of a traveling salesman, and in 1S87 
he resumed his medical studies and was graduated from the Home- 
opathic College in Chicago with the class of 1891. He then located for 
practice in Edwardsburg. Michigan, where he remained for about nine 
years, when he removed to Cassoiwlis in 1900. Here he has since 
been located, and his business has reached gratifying proportions, as he 
has demonstrated his ability to cope with the intricate problems which 
continually confront the physician in his efforts to check the ravages of 
disease and restore health. He is a member of the Northern Indiana 
and Southern Michigan Medical Associations and also the Amcriaui 
Medical Association, and through the reports of those bodies he keeps 
in touch with what is being done in the line of medical and surgical prac- 
tice. He is quiclc to adopt any new method or idea which he believes 
will prose of practical l>enefit in his work and at the same time lie is 
slow to discard the old and time-tried methods whose value has been 
proven. 

In iSgi occurred the marriage of Dr. Criswell and ]\Iiss Kate 
Stophlet, a daughter of David Stophlet. In social circles they occupy an 
enviable position, the hospitality of the best homes of Cassopolis and 
vicinity being extended them. Dr. Criswell is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, the Knights of the Maccabees, of the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and he gives his political support to those men who are pledged 
to support the principles of the Republican party. For fourteen years 
he has practiced in Michigan \vith constantly growing success, and in 
Cass county is accorded a position tjf prominence among the representa- 
tives of his chosen profession. 

LOT BONIXE. 

Few men are more prominent or more widely known in Penn ti nvn- 
ship than Lot Ronine, who has been an important factor in agricultural 
circles, having conducted extensive interests as a stock raiser, especially 
in the line of the sheep industr}-. In him are embraced the character- 
istics of an unbending integrity, unabating energy- and industry that 
never flags, and while capably conducting his business affairs he is at 
the same time recognized as a public spirited citizen, thoroughly inter- 









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HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 511 

csted in whatexcr tends tn jirMni'iie the welfare uf liis adopted county. 
He is a western man liy liirtli and trainint^, and in his life has exemi)liried 
the spirit which has led U> the rapid and suhstantial upbuilding nf this 
sectiijn of the countr}-. He lives on section 34, Penn township, and is 
numl>ered amoni^ the c'ld settlers of the county. His Iiirlh recurred in 
Richmond, Wayne county, Indiana, on the i8th of July. 1835. Flis 
father. Isaac Bonine. was a native of Tennessee, Ix^rn at the family 
home on the Holstein ri\er. The family is of French descent, and the 
paternal grandfather was Daniel Conine, who for many )ears resided 
in Tennessee. There Isaac Bonine was reared and it was suhseciuent to 
his marriage that he sought a home in Indiana, casting in his lot with 
the pioneer settlers of Wayne county. Again he took up his alwde 
upon the frontier, when in 1S40 he came to Cass county, Michigan, 
locating in Penn township. He then purchased a tract of land, a part 
of which had l>een improved, and he at once began the task of its fur- 
ther development and cultivation. In his work he prospered, and as 
his financial resources permitted he purchased more land from time to 
time, becoming the holder of extensive realty possessions. He was 
born and reared in the faith of the Society of Friends (Quakers) 
and was very active and earnest in the cnurch work. He manifested 
the kindly, considerate and gentle spirit so characteristic of the follow- 
ers of that sect, and he bore an unassailable reputation for integrity, 
not only in business, but in all life's relations as well. He voted with 
the Whig party until its dissolution, when he joined the ranks of the 
Republican party, continuing one of its stalwart supporters until his 
demise. He was called to the ofiice of highway commissioner, but wr'S 
never an aspirant for the h(~nors nor emoluments of office, content to do 
his public service as a private citizen. He married I\Iiss Sarah Tolbert, 
also a native of Tennessee, and, like her husband, a birthright Quaker. 
She was a daughter of Jacob Tolbert and was of Engli.sh lineage, so 
that there is an intermixture of French and English blood in the veins 
of our subject. Isaac Bonine lived to be about eighty-three years of 
age, while his wife reached the age of eighty-two years, and in the 
passing of this venerable cou])le Cass county lost two of its most es- 
teemed pioneer settlers. In their family were eleven children, eight 
sons and three daughters, of whom two died in childhood. 

Lot Bonine was the sixth in order of birth and is the only one now 
living. He was fifteen }-ears of age when he came to Cass county, 
Michigan, with his parents in 1840. He had gained his education in 
the schools of Richmond. Indiana, and after coming to Michigan he 
spent the winter months as a student in a little log schoolhouse. which 
was a typical "temple of learning"' of a frontier district. Throughout 
the remainder of the year his time and energies were given to farm 
Avork, as he took his place in the fields when the work of early spring 
planting was begun. In fact he assisted in the work of clearing and 



612 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

developing the home farm, upon which he remained until tlie time of 
his marriage, wiiich was celebrated in 1S45, this being one of the early 
weddings of the couid)-. The lady of his choice was Miss Susan Donnell, 
who died a nuir.bcr of years later. There had been six children born of 
that union, of whom five are still living, namely: Jonathan D., John N., 
Sarah L., James .M. and Rose E. The deceased daughter was Estella. 
After losing his first wife I\Ir. Boninc was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Amanda L Price, a daughter of James and Rose 
A. (Emery) Price. Her father was born in Clark county, Ohio, near 
Dayton, and came to Cass county, Michigan, in 1S.29, locating in what 
is now Penn township, as one of its pioneer settlers. Michigan was 
still under territorial rule at tliat period. It required men of considera- 
ble courage and determination to brave the dangers and hardships of 
pioneer life in a coinitry where the work of improvemeiit had as \et been 
scarcely begun. There were large bands of Indians still in the state, 
the forests were uncut, the streams unl)ridged. and the prairies unculti- 
vated. Mr. Price beio-.-iged to that class of honored pioneer residents 
to whom tlie state owes a debt of gratitude for what they accomplished 
in the early de\elo[)ment of the commonwealth. He gave his attention 
to farming and was recognized as one of the leading early residents of 
Cass county. His father was John Price, a carpenter by trade, who 
was born in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, but was reared in New Jersey, 
where he resided until his removal to Ohio, whence he came to Cass 
county in i8_'8. Mr. and Mrs. Bonine have become the parents of two 
daughters, but one. Effie I., is now deceased. The other, Arlie I. Bonine, 
is living in Penn township, and is the wife of James O. Graham. She 
graduated in the class of 1901 in the \'andalia High School. 

At the time of his marriage Lot Bonine and his bride began house- 
keeping in a little log cabin which stood upon a tract of land in Penn 
township. There he lived for about a year, devoting his time to , the 
cultivation of the farm and then removing to his father-in-law's farm, 
upon which he lived for two years. Following the discovery of gold in 
California he was attracted to that state by its mining and other Dusi- 
ness opportunities, and went via New York and the isthmus in 1S51, 
but after a vear spent in California he returned to Cass county and 
once more settled in Penn township, locating upon the farm on which 
he now lives in that vear — 1853. Again his home was a log cabin, 
but though it was of small dimensions it sheltered brave hearts and will- 
ing hands. With detennined courage to make the most of his oppor- 
tunities Mr. Bonine began clearing his land, which he had owned from 
the time that he was eighteen years of age. He now has a valuable 
farm propertv of one hundred and sixty acres, which he has trans- 
formed from a raw state into one of rich fertility and productiveness. 
He has added many modem improvements, including good buildings 
and fences and the latest improved machiner}'. In connection with 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY r,\?. 

the tilling of the S(jil he has been iarsely interested in the raisint,' of 
stock, making; a speciahy of sheep, iiaving had sheep upon his farm for 
over sixty years. 

Mr. Bonine votes with the Republican party, to which he has 
given earnest and stalwart support since its organization, while pre- 
vious to that time he was an old-line Whig. He has held a numljer of 
local offices including that of highway commissioner and lias opened 
up several roads in his township. In public affairs he has been deeply 
interested and his co-operation could always be counted upon as a help- 
ful measure. He has ever worked for the good of the county, in which 
he has now lived for sixty-five years, and he has paid large sums in 
taxes, whereby the work of pulilic improvement has been carried on. 
He assisted in l)uilding the school house at Vandalia and the cause of 
education finds in him a warm friend. He is also a member of the 
Friends church and his life has been in conformity with its teachings 
and faith. There have been many interesting chapters in his record be- 
cause of the connection with pioneer experiences, and also bv reason 
of his sojourn in the far west in the early days of mining excitement 
there. Throughout much of his life, however, his labors have been 
concentrated entirely upon agricultural and stock raising interests and 
he has found ample opportunity for the exercise of his talents in the 
every-day duties of life. Pie has won success through earnest and per- 
sistent labor, and moreover he is rich in the more desirable qualities of 
character — the integrity and justice and consideration which work for 
honorable manhood and have won respect and esteen in every land and 
clime. 

GEORGE W. G.\RD. 

Cass county figures as one of the most attractive, ]irogressive and 
prosperous divisions of the state of ^Michigan, justly claiming a high 
order of citizenship and a spirit of enterprise which is certain to con- 
serve consecutive development and maiked advancement in the material 
upbuilding of the section. The county has been and is signallv favored 
in the class of men who have controlled its aftairs in of^cial capacity and 
in this connection the subject of this review demands repre^cntatinn as 
one who has served the county faithfully and well in positions of distinct 
trust and responsibility. He is now filling the office of county treasurer, 
to which he has been elected for a second term. His birth occurred in 
Volinia township April 4, 1S48. and he is a representative of one of the 
honored pioneer families of this portion of the state. His paternal 
grandfather. Jonathan Gard, was born in Ohio and became a pioneer 
resident of Cass county. He had lived for some time in Indiana and on 
removing to Cass county settled on what is known to this day as Card's 
Prairie. There he entered land and improved a farm, remaining there 
up to the time of his death, which occurred when he was fifty-five years 
of age. His son, M. ]. Gard, was born in Indiana and came with his 



514 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

father to Cass county in iSmj. Ijciii- ahout seven rears of a"e at the 
time of the removal. He was therefore reared and educaie<rhere and 
almost his entn-e hie was passed in Volinia township, where he died 
when more tlian seventy-five years of a-e. He was a prominent citizen 
who neld ail the offices in the townshij). includinn- that of supervisor' 
while for many years he was township clerk. His'studv of the political 
issues and questions of the day led him to give a stalwart supiwrt to 
die Repuhhcan jjarty from the time of its organization until his death 
Prior to its formation he had voted with the Whit^ partv. In his fraternal 
relations he was a Mason. His wife bore the maiden name of Olive 
Green and her death occurred when her son Georg-e was hut three years 
of age. The family was well known in the countv and the name of 
Card has been closely interwoven with the historv of development and 
progress here from early pioneer times. George W. Card was the only 
child born unto M. J. and Olive (Green) Gard, but the father was a 
second time married, his second union being with Susan Fox, bv whom 
he had seven children. 

In taking up the personal history of George W. Gard we present to 
our readers the life record of one who is very widely and favorably 
known in this part of the state. He was reared and^educated in his 
native township and acquired his education in the common schools. He 
afterward engaged in teaching school, which profession he followed for 
one hundred aiul twenty-two montlis, devoting the winter seasons to 
that work, while in the summer months he engaged in farming. He had 
charge of the largest district school in the county. Tliere was an as- 
sistant teacher and an enrollment of ninety-seven pupils. His fitness for 
leadership and for public service also led to his selection for various of- 
fices. He served as supervisor for nine vears, was justice of the peace 
for fourteen years and also townslii]j clerk. In 1902 he was elected 
county treasurer and discharged his duties with such ability and fidclitv 
that in 1904 he was re-elected and is still holding the office. 

Mr. Gard was married in 1S72 to Miss Rachel Kirby, a daughter 
of the Rev. John and iMary (Rouse) Kirby and a native of St. Joseph 
county. ^Michigan. There is but one li\ing child of this marriage, 01i\'e, 
who is now acting as bookkeeper for Mr. Smith in Cassopolis. Tlie son, 
Manley B., died at the age of thirteen years. 

Mr. Gard in connection with his property in Cassopolis owns a 
farm of eighty acres and the income therefrom, together with his salary, 
enables him to provide a vers" comfortable living for his family. He is 
a stalwart Republican, unfaltering in his devotion to the principles of the 
party, and in addition to the other offices which he has filled he has 
served as secretary of the schools of the county in 188S-9. He is also 
prominent in ^lasonic circles, belonging to the Blue Lodge of Volinia, 
No. 227, also Kingsbury Chapter at Cassopolis, Xo. 78. and he was a 
charter member of the Knights of the :\Iaccabees lodge at Volinia. 
While acting as justice of the peace he settled more cases by compromis- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 515 

ing than in any other way, ahvay? advising- sucli a plan ratiier than 
recourse to tlie courts. In all of his public service he has been actuated 
by an earnest desire to serve his constituents faithfully and well and to 
promote the general good of the community which he has represented. 
Men know him as a gentleman of unfaltering honor and integrity, and 
witli pleasure we present the record of his life to our readers. 

e 

CHARLES O. HAR^IOX. 

Charles O. Harmon, who since i8oS has been numbered among tlie 
representative citizens of Cassopolis, where he is now engaged in the 
practice of law and also in the abstract business, was born in Porter 
township, Cass county, on the 6th of March, 1866. His father, John 
B. Harmon, was a native of Wabash county, Indiana, and came to this 
county with his parents when about six months old. He was reared in 
Porter township and became a teacher by profession, following that 
calling for a long period and contributing in substantial measure to the 
intellectual progress of his community. He was married in Porter town- 
ship to ^liss Catherine Khy, a native of Ohio and a daughter of Gabriel 
and Caroline (W'agner) Eby, who were early settlers of Porter town- 
ship, coming to Cass county in 1848. Her father still resides in that 
township, being one of the honored pioneer settlers and venerable cit- 
izens of his community. John B. Harmon, the father of our sul)ject. 
was deeply interested in politics and for about eighteen years served as 
supervisor of his township. In 1898 he was elected county clerk and 
served in that office for two years and one month, when his official serv- 
ice was terminated in death on the 28th of June. 1901. He was a most 
earnest and zealotis advocate of Republican principles, never faltering 
in his allegiance to the party. In the family were four children. 

Charles O. Harmon, the eldest, was reared in Porter township. 
where the family was established in early pioneer days, his grandfather, 
William Plarmo'n, having been one of the earliest settlers of Cass coun- 
ty, where he followed the occupation of farming throughout the re- 
mainder of his life. He was of German lineage. Mr. Harmon of this 
review acquired his earl\- education in the public schools and afterward 
attended the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso. Indiana. 
He taught school to a considerable extent between the ages of sixteen 
and twenty-two vears. being thus closely associated with intellectual 
progress in Cass'countv. His fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth 
and'' ability, called him' to public office and he was chosen register of 
deeds in 1888. He entered upon the duties of the position on the ist of 
Januan.-. 1889. when onlv twenty-three years of age, and capably ser\-ed 
until tlie ist of Tanuarv,'i893, when he retired from office as he had en- 
tered it — with the confidence and good will of all concerned. He then 
went to the department of state at Lansing and occupied a position m 
the compiling room until Julv, 1S96. During that time he devoted his 



516 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

leisure liouis to the itudy of law and was admitted to the har at Lansing, 
after which he resigned his position there and removed to Dowagiac, 
Michigan, where he opened an office and entered upon general law 
practice. In December of the same year he removed to .Marceiius, .Mich- 
igan, where he remained until November, 189S, and then came to 
Cassopolis, where he entered into partnership with Judge Harsen D. 
Smith. In December of the same year they bought the abstract books 
of Cass county. This partnership was continued until 1901, when Mr. 
Harmon purchased Judge Smith's interest in the abstract business. In 
April of that year he was elected county clerk to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of his father and served throughout the remainder of the 
term, or until the 31st of December, 1902, since which time he has 
devoted his attenliun to the abstract liusiness and the practice of law. 
He has thorougldy qualified himself for the legal profession and his 
labors have been attended with the success that results from close dil- 
igence, unrenutting effort and marked capability in handling the in- 
tricate problems that continually confront the lawyer and judge. 

On the 6th of ?i[arch, 1S89, Mr. Harmon was married to ;Miss 
Catherine Greenawalt. a daughter of Daniel S. and Rebecca C Planck) 
Greenawalt, who was born in Newberg township, Cass county. Her 
parents were early settlers of Cass county, Michigan. By her marriage 
Mrs. Harmon has become the mother of two children, but one died in 
infancy, while Charles jMaxwell is still at home. 

Fraternally Mr. Harmon is connected with the r^Iasonic lodge and 
chapter at Cassopolis and also the Knights of Pythias, Pierian Lr^dge, No. 
126, and in politics he has been an earnest Republican since age gave 
to him the right of franchise. He is likewise a prominent member of 
the Baptist church, active in its work and ser\'ing as superintendent of 
the Sunday-school. Its teachings have been a permeating influence in 
his life and he has done all in his power to promote the chiuxh work and 
extend its influence. His business integrity is above question and in 
citizenship and in social life he has displayed those sterling traits of 
character which in every land and clime command respect and confidence. 

ROBERT DOOL. 

Among the enterprising farmers of the county is numbered Robert 
Dool, living on section 3. Jefferson township. His birth occurred in the 
province of Ontario. Canada, near the St. Lawrence river, on the 21st 
of June, 1838. and he comes of Scotch descent. His father, William 
Dool, was a native of Scotland and was a son of Tliomas Dool. whose 
birth occurred in the same country. He was a freeholder of Scotland 
and a man of considerable prominence and influence in his community-. 
William Dool came to America. He married Miss Hester Dobson, and 
unto tliem were born ten children, nine sons and one daughter. 

Robert Dool, the fifth in order of birth in this family, was reared 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 517 

in his native land and acquired his education in the common schools. 
At the age of twenty-two years he went upon the lakes as foreman on 
an .\mericcan express Ixsat and was thus employed for two seasons. In 
1863 he came to Cass county, locating in Penn township, where he pur- 
chased a farm, upon whicli he resided continuously for about thirteen 
years, or until 1876, when he sold tiiat property and bought land on sec- 
tion 14, Jefferson township. His time and energies were devoted to its 
further impro\ement and development until about 1901, when he lo- 
cated upon the farm where he now lives, on section 3, Jefferson town- 
ship. His landed holdings are now extensive, comprising four hundred 
and seventy-two acres, ot which one hundred and sixteen acres arc in 
LaGrange township. He carries on the work of the farm himself and 
it is a splendid properly, the land being very productive and responding 
readily to tiie cultivation which he Ijestows upon it. His fields are well 
tilled and e\-crything aI:out tlie place is kept in good repair, showing the 
careful supervision and painstaking efforts of an enterprising owner. 

In 1S80 Mr. Dool was united in marriage to Aliss Georgiana 
Hafer, a daughter of Jacob Hafer. They have become the parents of 
ten children : Bert, Raymond, Theo, Fred, Charles, Ina May, Georgi- 
ana, Myrtle, Reo, and Robert. All were born in Jefferson township 
and were here reared. Bert is now a resident of Seattle, while Theo 
is married and resides in Vicksburg. The others, however, are still 
under the parental roof and most of them are attending school. 

Since age gave to Mr. Dool the right of franchise he has been a 
supporter of Democratic principles and has taken an active and lielpful 
part in the work of the party. He is, however, somewhat liberal in his 
viev>s, being never a bitter partisan. He was elected supervisor of Jef- 
ferson township in 1889 and filled the office for eleven years, his re- 
election being proof of the trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen 
and his fidehty thereto. He was also superintendent of the poor for 
three years. Forty-two years have come and gone since he arrived in 
this county, during which period he has directed his lalj<irs along well- 
defined lines of business activity. He has been energetic, prompt and 
notably reliable and has manifested a genius for devising and executing 
the right thing at the right time. Moreover he has an excellent fund 
of that quality of common sense, which is too often lacking, and which 
proves the reason of failure in many a life record. Added to this he has 
displayed keen perception and honesty of purpose, and thus as the years 
have gone by he has worked his way upward from an humble financial 
position to one of aflluence. 

HENRY' BLAKELY HICKS. 

Henrv Blakely Hicks is well known as a representative of farming 
interests in Jefferson township, bis home being on section 31. where he 
owns and cultivates two hundred and fortv acres of land. This consti- 



518 HISTORY 01- CASS COUXTY 

tutea a well improved and valuable farm, which in its thrifty appearance 
indicates his careful supervision and practiciil progressive methods. He 
realizes that diligence and close ai^plication are the basis of all desirable 
success and through this means he has won the prosperity which he is 
to-day enjoying. 

A native son of the county. Mr. Hicks was born in Milton township 
on die I5di of October, 1845, -^ri'l 's a son of Richard V. and Catherine 
(Ullery) Hicks. The father was a native of England and spent the 
first seventeen years of his life in that country, acquiring a good educa- 
tion there. Hearing favorable reports concerning opportunities and 
advantage-^ in the new world, he resolved to try his fortune here and 
crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1837, making his way direct 
to Cass county. Michigan, where he first located in (Dntwa township. 
He was married, hfiwever. in Shelby county, Ohio, and afterward tor.k 
up his abode in Milton township. Cass county. ^Michigan, wiiere he reared 
his family. He has iVir many years been a resident of Milton township, 
and now makes his home on sectirin 12. He has been closely identified 
with the upbuilding and progre-<s of the county, wdiere he has lived for 
almost seventy years, during which tinie great and important changes 
have occurred a- tlii- district <A Michigan has put aside all the evidences 
of frontier life and emerged iiU'i modern civilization, great improve- 
ment being shown in all lines of business development as well as in the 
intellectual ])rogress of the county. His wife, wdio bore the maiden 
name of Catherine Ullery and was bom in Ohio, lived to be seventy 
years of age. 

Unto this worthy couple were born nine children, of whom Henry 
Blakely Hicks is the scconrl in order of birth. He was reared in ]\Iilton 
township and at the usual age began his education, attending district 
school No. T in Milton township. There he mastered the elementary 
branches of learning, which well qualified him to meet the practical and 
responsible duties of his busines'^ career. Tlirough the summer months 
he aided in the farm work, remaining at home after he had attained his 
majority and carrying on the work of further development and progress 
here for seventeen years. He then purchased his present farm in 1880. 
and in iSgi he located thereon and has since made it his home. 

Februarv 10. i8qi. -\Ir. Hicks was united in marriage to Miss 
Kate L. ]Miller. a daughter of Anton and Elizabeth fHeralfn Miller and 
a native of Milton township. Cass county. She was born May i. t866. 
and was educated in the common schools, also a student at the Dowa- 
giac high school. She is a ladv of more than ordinary education and 
can speak fluently the English. Ceiman and French languages. She is 
a lady who loves good books anrl is by nature a poet. Her latest compan- 
ions are the best of literature. Her father. Anton L. Miller, was born 
in Ravensburg, \Vurtemberg. Ccrmany. June 16. 1821, and died June 
20. 1896. He was reared in Germany and educated in the national 
, schools. He was thirtv-five years of age when he came to .\merica. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY ol9 

He was a stonemason by trade. Init was also a successful agriculturist. 
He was a kind and generous man and a Roman Catholic in religion. 
Mother Miller was born September 26, 1833, and died October 14, 18S5. 
She was born in Schifferstadt. liavaria. tlermany. and was a young 
woman oi twenty when she came to America. She was a devout Cath- 
olic. Mrs. Hicks is a member uf the Royal Neighbors. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Hicks have been born a daughter and son: Hazel A., who is at- 
tending school in the eighth, grade and who takes vocal and instrument- 
al music; and Henry li.. who was seven years of age on the jud of 
October, 1905. 

The family have a pleasant and attractive home on scctiuu 31, 
Jefferson townsl-.ip. where ]\lr. Hicks owns two hundred and forty acres 
of land tiiat is rich and arable. He has placed excellent improvements 
upon the property and e\-ery thing about the farm is kept in good re- 
pair, while the latest improved machinery is used in tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops. A glance from the passerby would indicate that 
the owner is a man of progressive spirit, practical and systematic in his 
work. There is every evidence of aireful and painstaking supervision, 
and in his business ]\Ir. Hicks has prospered, being now one of the ener- 
getic men of his communit}-. v hose lalxDrs have been crowned with the 
acquirement of a valuable farm. He votes with tlie Democracy, keeps 
well informed on questions and issues of the day and has taken an active 
interest in the v.'ork of the ])arty, for he believes that its principles con- 
tain the best elements of good government. He was supervisor of [Mil- 
ton tov.nship for four years and in 1902 was elected supervisor of Jef- 
ferson township, to which office he was again elected in 1905. so that 
he is the present incumbent, while in Milton township he was also a 
highway commissioner. He has been a resident of Cass county through- 
out his entire life, covering a period of sixty years, and his labors have 
been a resultant factor in bringing about its present advancement. The 
character of "Sir. Hicks is indicated bv the fact that he is a Alason in good 
standing, his life being an exemplification of the teachings and tenets 
of the craft, which through many centuries has inculcated principles of 
mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness among its followers. 

WILUAM SALISBURY. 

Upon a farm on section 5. Jefferson township, resides William 
Salisbury, who is numbered among the old settlers and venerable citizens 
of Cass count}-. He has traveled life's journey for more than eighty- 
two vears and has been a resident of Cass county for more than the al- 
lotted psalmist's span of three score years and ten. having come to this 
countv se\-entv-two year? ago. Respected and honored by all who 
know him and with a wide acquaintance, his life record cannot fail to 
prove of interest to our many readers and with pleasure we present his 
historv in this volume. He was Ixim in Huron county. Ohio. August 



5-20 HISTORY OI- CASS COUNTY 

8, 18J3. His paternal srandtatlier, Emanuel Salisbury, removed from 
the east to Ohio, where his last days were passed. His father, Robert 
Salisbury , w as a native of New York, wliere he was reared and married, 
and in pioneer times he Ijecanie a resident of Ohio. Removing from the 
Buckeye state to Michii^an he settled in Howard township, Cass county, 
where he took up land from the government. Much of the county was 
still unclaimed and ho cast in his lot with those who have Ixorne the 
hardships and privations of a frontier existence and have planted the 
seeds of civilization and prosperity now enjoyed by the representatives 
of a later generation. He improved a farm and remained upon the old 
homestead u]) to the time of his death, which occurred about 1866. 
There was only one store and one grocery in Niles at the time of hi.s 
arrival here. It was a long distance to market and mill and the settlers 
had to depend largely upon what they could produce, not only for food 
but also for clothing. Luxuries were few and oftentimes comforts were 
denied, but it was a day in which hospitality reigned supreme, the latch 
string ever hanging out. while a cordial welcome was extended to friend, 
neighbor or stranger. Robert Salisbury was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha Olmstead, likewise a native of the Empire state. Her death 
occurred in Howard tfiwnship, Cass county, when she was abr/ut sixty- 
six years of age. In the family of this worthy couple were eleven chil- 
dren, four daughters and seven sons, all of whom grew to manhood or 
womanhood. 

William Salisbury, the sixth child and the only surviving member 
of the family, remained a resident of Ohio during the first ten years of 
his life, and then came with his parents to Cass county, the family home 
being established m Howard township, where they lived in a pioneer 
cabin, sharing in the hardships, privations and dangers incident to the 
establishment of a home in a frontier district. Only a short time before 
had the Indians been led to lea\'e their hunting grounds in this part of 
the state and seek new fields in which to range and ply their custotnary 
pursuits of hunting and fishing. In fact Mr. Salisbury has seen many 
specimens of the red men in this part of the state. There were also 
various kinds of wild animals, while deer and other kinds of wild game 
were to be had in abundance by the settler who was a good shot. Few 
roads had been laid out, and at certain seasons in the year these were 
almost impassable, especially during the time of the spring rains. It 
was consideretl a big undertaking to go to mill and market in those 
days and the time of the settlers was mostly given to the arduous task 
of clearing away trees or brush and improving and cultivating the fields. 
William Salisbury acquired his education in a log school house seated 
with slab benches and heated by a fire-place. Reading, writing, arith- 
metic and sometimes geography and grammar were taught and the ses- 
sion of the school was held for only a few months during the winter 
season wlien the children's aid was not needed upon the home farm, for 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 521 

crops had been harvested and tlie work of the farm wns nracticallv over 
until tlie coming of another ^princ::. Mr. Sahsbur}- remained at home 
until twenty-two years of age. doine: his share in the work of the fields, 
and tb.cn started ont in life nn hi^ own account. He was employed by 
the month as a farm hand for a time and then with the monev which 
he had sa\ed from iu's earninc^s he bouq;ht a tract of land in Jefferson 
township, which was entirely raw and undeveloperl. but lie at once l)e- 
gan the task of clearing', plowing and planting, and in due cour-^e of 
time had some well cultivated fields. He resided upon that pmpertv 
from 1845 until Tf-Ctft, when he purchased the farm ujiou which he now 
resides and vihich has l;een his home through forty consecutive years. 
A great change has been wrought in its appearance, as he has cleared 
the laud and placed it under cultivation, adding substantia! buildings 
and all modern equipments. 

On the 2 1st of October, 1S45, Mr. Salisbury was married to ]^Iis3 
Caroline J. Tylillinian, a native of Ohio, who came to Cass cnunty in 
1842. They ha\-e become the parents of four children, who are yet liv- 
ing: Anne, the wife nf Henry ^lessenger. of Cassopolis: Eliza, who 
is the wife of James H. I'anu'.m and also lives in Cassopolis; Arthena 
M., the wife of Willet Verry, who is living in California; and Guy L., 
of Chicago. After losing his first wife Mr. Salisbury was again mar- 
ried, his second union being with IMiss Anna Cissna, a daughter of Jo- 
seph Cissna, who was born in Detroit, Michigan, is of French de- 
scent and is now living at the \ery advanced age of ninety-seven years. 

Mr. Salisbury has been a resident of Cass county for seventy-two 
years and has aided in making tlie county what it is to-day, one of the 
leading sections of this great commonwealth. Fie has always ^■oted for 
men and measures rather than party and has held various local offices. 
He served on the school board for twenty-two \-ears and has always 
taken an active part in public affairs, doing everj'thing in his power to 
promote the work of general progress and improvement. He has lived 
peaceably with his fellow men. has ever been straightforward and hon- 
orable in all his dealings and would sacrifice his own interests rather 
than take advantage of another. Fie has never had a lawsuit in all his 
life and has long been recognized as a devoted, faithful and exemplar}- 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He has lived during what 
has been the greatest age of invention in all the history of the world, 
has seen the building of the railroads, the introduction of the telegraph 
and telephone, the construction of the interurban lines, while a revolu- 
tion has also been wrought in modes of living, both upon the farm and 
in the city, because of improved machinery and the introduction of 
steam and electric power. It is a marvelous age and Mr. Salisbury has 
been an interested witness of what has been accomplished and in his 
special department of life has kept in touch with uniform progress. 



in Sout 


li r.cn.l "U liiL' 7th 


Austin. 


was a nati\e of Cal 


who in 


her ni.ii.Icnliun.l wa; 


vania. 


'I'lic fornKT (lied wli 



522 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 



JESSE 11. AUSTIN. 

Jesse J I. Auslin. suiienntciv.leiU ni ilie Cass County Infirniary. is 
itive nf tiic nciyliliorin.ii' state ui lii. liana, his birth havin;^ occurfed 
II Nn\cn-,l;er. 1875. His father, \V. H. 
loua CMumy. Michigan, wln'le liis nioiher, 
Mary Hartscll, was a native of I'ennsyl- 
n fitly- four years of age. 

Jesse H. Austin, their only son. was reared in the city nf liis na- 
tivity until about thirteen years of age. wlien he came with bis father 
to Cass county, settling in LaCrange township upon a farm. His mctii- 
er had died during their residence in South Bend and the father after- 
ward married Agnes Townsend, subsequently removing to Grand Rap- 
ids, ^Michigan, where his last days were passed. Jesse H. Austin re- 
mained v.ith his father until he had attained his majority and was en- 
gaged in farniiiig through the period of bis youth when not busy with 
the duties of the schoolroom, wherein he acquired a good English edu- 
cation. He was appointed to bis present position in 1904 and has since 
been keeper of the poor farm, in which position he has displayed gocxl 
business ability and discernment. Under his guidance the farm is made 
a paying p''operty, the fields being well tilled, wb.ile good stock is raised 
and garden products arc also cultivated. 

In 190,5 Mr. Austin was united in m.arriage to Aliss Mau<le Reams, 
a daughter of George Albert and .Adella (Salisbury) Reams. In his 
political views }ilr. Austin is an earnest Republican, supporting the party 
since age gave him the right of franchise. He served as deputy sheriff 
in 1901, 1902, 1903 and a part of 1904. and during that time was a 
resident of Cassopolis. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias fraternity 
in the county seat and has recently united with Backus Lodge. No. 55, 
F. & A. M., and has taken all three degrees, making bim a blaster 
Mason and a member of the Blue Lodge. He has a wide circle of friends 
in this county, where be has lived from the age of thirteen years. Most 
of his life has been devoted to the public service and be is regarded l)oth 
as a capable officer and a popular citizen, having social, genial qualities 
which win him warm and enduring friendships. 

AMOS SMITH. 

Amos Smith, now deceased, was born in Erie county. Pennsylva- 
nia, August 7. 1829. and died in Battle Creek, Michigan, at seven o'clock 
in the evening of September iS, 1900. at the age of seventy-one years, 
one month and eleven days. He was a son of Charles F. and Emily 
(Leach) Snn'th. the latter a daughter of James Leach, one of the brave 
soldiers of the war of 181 2. who was killed at the battle of Niagara 
Falls on the 26th of July. 1814. 

Amos Smith acquired an academic education in the county of his 



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HISTORY OF CASS COU.NTV 523 

nativity and in tlie year 1848 came to Michigan, wliere his first work 
was teaching in the Geneva dibtnct school in Jr'enn township, being 
then about nineteen years ol age. Tlie following winter was devoted 
to teaching in Yazoo, .Mississippi, and upon his return to his native state 
he taugiit writing and hookkeeping lor a time and coniplelcd his own 
education in Clinton, Xew York. He iiad received instruction in writing 
from 1'. R. Spencer, the originator of the famous Spencerian system. 
In the fall of iti^2 he returned to Cass county and was once more en- 
gaged in teaching. He likewise extended his efforts to surveying, for 
he had made a study of that profession in the meantime, and he became 
assistant to the county surveyor. LiUer he was made deputy county 
surveyor, and 111 1854 was elected to the office of county surveyor, 
disdiarging the duties incumbent upon him in a very satisfactory 
manner. During the next fL>urtecn years his time was largely given 
to teaching and surveying, and so well did he discharge the duties of the 
different oftices entrusted to him, and so greatly were his services ap- 
preciated by the pulilic that he was recognized as well qualified for 
furtlier ^xjlitical honors, and in 1S6S was chosen by popular sutt'rage to 
the responsible position of state senator, being elected by the Republi- 
can party, to the principles uf which he was devotedly attached. He 
was also supervisor of his township and he was frequently appointed 
guardian and administrator of estates, performing the duties of those 
positions in connection with other official service. Ever alive to mat- 
ters of public importance, he was one of the most influential and promi- 
nent men of his county, and his eft'orts proved of far reaching value. 

On the 22nd of November. 1855, Mr. Smith was united in mar- 
riage to Miss ;\lartha Jane East, who was born in Wayne couniv, In- 
diana, and dictl at their home m Cass county in 18S2, leaving a family 
of three sons: C. I'., i~rc<l E. and George D. Smith. On the 4th of 
October, 1883, Air. Smith was again married, his second unicjn being 
with Aliss Sue B(_igue, who, with the sons, mourn the loss of a devoted 
husband, loving father and wise counselor. In the year of his first 
marriage he purchased forty acres of land, which he continued to make 
his home up to the time of his death, although he steadily increased the 
boundaries of his farm by additional purchase until he owned over three 
hundred acres of rich, productive and valuable land. In connection 
with the tilling of the soil and the production of the cereals best adapted 
to the climate he made a specialty of fruit raising, and some of the best 
fruit of ^Michigan was produced upon his place. He was ever a lover of 
the beautiful, especially a? manifest in flowers, and he had around him 
many superb specimens of floriculture. He took great delight and 
pleasure in working with his flowers and b.is study of conditions and 
needs of plants led to splendid results. 

Mr. Smith was a .member of the Masonic fraternity and several 
times served as worshipful master. At the time of his demise he was 



524 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

also a member of the Roj-nl Arcli cliapter at Cassopolis. The first 
master of his lodge, he was chosen on various occasions to act as its rep- 
resentative to the grand lodge, and at all times he was deeply interested 
in Masonry and in the work of the order, which finds the exemplification 
of its principles in the honorable manhood and stalwart devotion of its 
representatives. A man of much public spirit, Mr. Smith ever endeav- 
ored to advance the best local interests and perhaps labored for no 
other cause more efficiently than for the public schools of Vandalia, 
the upbuilding of wliich is due more to him than to any other man. His 
life was indeed of value to his fellow townsmen because of his reliability 
in business, his faithfulness in office, his devotion to the work of gen- 
eral progress and his strict regard for all the obligations and privileges, 
of friendship. He was highly esteemed wherever known, and most of 
all where best known, and while he ever displayed commendable char- 
acteristics, his best traits were reserved for his family and his imme- 
diate fireside. 

' ALAMANDEL J. TALLADAY. 

Alamandel J. Talladay. whose name is enrolled among the old set- 
tlers of the county, resides on a farm of one hundred and twenty acres 
on section 3, Jcffcrsnn township, and is one of the best known citizens 
of the community. He was for twentv-five years in charge of the coun- 
ty farm, and over the record of his public service there falls no shadow 
of wrong or suspicion of evil, for he was ever actuated b_\- fidelity to the 
general good and hy zeal in the faithful performance of the work en- 
trusted to him. He has always lived in the middle west, his birth hav- 
ing occurred in Osceola township, Elkhart county, Indiana, on the 31st 
of October, 1S45. -His father, Jesse Talladay, was a native of New 
York and became one of the early settlers of Indiana, whence he after- 
ward removed to Michigan, settling in Cass county in 1845. They set- 
tled in Mason township. Mr. Talladay was engaged in farming up to 
the time of his death, which occurred in his forty-ninth year in Jeffer- 
son township. He married Miss Sophia ]\Iechling, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, who went to Indiana with her parents and there gave her hand 
in marriage to Jesse Talladay. She lived to be about sixty-five years of 
age. In their family were ten children, seven of whom reached years 
of maturity. 

Alamandel J. Talladay. the third child, was about two weeks old 
when brought to Mason township. Cass county. He was reared upon 
the old familv homestead tliere until he reached the age of twelve years, 
when he became a resident of Jefferson township. His education was 
accpjired in a district school near the family home and through the va- 
cation periods he worked in the fields and assisted in the farm labor un- 
til after he had attained his majority. At the death of his father he was 
appointed administrator of the estate and managed the business in ca- 
pable arid energetic fashion. In 1874 he took charge of the county 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 525 

farm, continuiiis- in the position fur ei.^ht years, after which he be- 
gan farming on liis own account in Jeft'erson township, where he car- 
ried on the work- nf tilling the soil for five years. He then once more 
took cliarge of the county farm and was its superintendent for seven- 
teen years, so that his service in that position all together cr.vercd Iwentv- 
five years. His long incumbency stands in incontrovertible evidence of 
his capability and the trust reposed in Iiim by his fellow townsmen. He 
brought to bear in the discharge of his duties the same earnest purpose 
and indefatigable energy that have always characterized him in the man- 
agement of his private business interests, and he not only carefully 
looked after those who were dependent upon the county's bountv but also 
by his capable control made the farm a paying institution. 

On the iSth of September, 1877, Mr. Talladay was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Elizabeth George, a native of Monroe county, New York, 
born on the 14th of August, 1S57. Her parents were Luke and Maria 
(London) George, both of whom were natives of near London. Eng- 
land. Crossing the Atlantic, they became residents of the Empire state. 
and in 1S65 arrived in Cass county, Michigan, taking up their abode in 
Cassopolis. The father was a farmer by occupation, following that 
pursuit in order to provide for the needs and wants of his family. Un- 
to him and bis wife were born nine children. Mrs. Talladay being the 
eighth in order of birth. She was only eight years of age when brought 
to this state, so that the greater part of her life has been passed in Cass 
county. The marriage of our subject and his wife has been blessed with 
three sons : Gideon W., a successful merchant now engaged in the 
hardware and furniture business at Cassopolis, was educated in the com- 
mon schools and graduated in the Cassopolis city scliools in the class 
of 1895. He is also a graduate of the Valparaiso Normal in the class 
in the winter of 1896-97. He wedded Tvliss Jessie Bachelor and they 
have two little daughters. Lnween and Myni. He is one of the suc- 
cessful merchants of Cassopolis. Jesse L., who received a common 
school education and also graduated in the Cassopolis high school, has 
been on the lakes six or seven years as a sailor. Ray G.. who grad- 
uated in the eighth grade, and was in the eleventh grade of the Cassop- 
olis high school, was also a student at the Valparaiso Normal. He 
is at home. All were born in Jefferson township. Mrs. Talladay has 
an old oaken chest which her great-grandmother brought from England, 
and it is hand carved and over a century old. They also have an old 
almanac published in 183S. 

Mr. Talladay is the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land 
and carries on the farm work in energetic and able manner, so that he 
annuallv harvests good crops. He also has good grades of stock upon 
his place and his farm is divided into fields of convenient size by well 
kept fences. In his work he is svstematic and methodical and his 
sound business judgment is manifest in the excellent results which havo 
attended his labors. In politics he has been a lifelong Democrat where 



520 HISTORY 01' CASS COUXTV 

state and national questions are involved, but at local elections votes 
independently, considering only the efficiency of the candidate. He be- 
longs to Backus lodge, No. 55, F. & A. AL, of Cassopolis, also Kings- 
bury Chapter, R. A. AL, and his wife is a member of the Baptist church. 
They are highly esteemed in the communitiy where they reside, the 
hospitality of many of the best homes being cordially extended them. 
Mr. Talladay is one who is well known because of his fidelity to public 
trust and his many good qualities have gained for him a favorable 
position in the regard of all who know him. 

H. C. DAVIS. 

Among the thrifty and prosperous farmers of Cass county is num- 
bered 11. C. Davis, residing on section 35, Jefferson township. He dates 
his residence in the county from 1S40. being a voung lad of but four 
years of age at the time of his arrival here. His mind bears the im- 
press of many of the early historic annals of the state as well as of later 
day progress and de\elopment. He is familiar with conditions which 
existed when this county was a frontier district, when most of its res- 
idents lived in log houses and when the homes of the settlers were wide- 
ly scattered. Only here and tliere was a mill or Imsiness establishment 
which could furnish the settlers with needed supplies of wearing ap- 
parel or food products. Journeys were taken \'ery infrequently lie- 
cause of the poor condition nf the roads and the fact that the later 
of all the people was needed upon the farms in the reclamation of the 
wild land for the uses of civilization. 

Mr. Da\-is of this review, wdio for long years has successfully car- 
ried on farming, was liom in Clark county. Ohio, on the 13th of Novem- 
ber, 1836. His father, Reuben B. Davis, was a native of W^est Virginia, 
in which state he remained until early manhood. When alxn'.t twenty- 
two years of age, however, he removed westward to Clark county. Ohio, 
where he secured a tract of land and engaged in farming. He was mar- 
ried in that state to Aliss Susanna Smith, whose birth occurred in Clark 
county on the ist of February. 18 13. She was a daughter of Henry 
Smith, who was born in New Jersey and became one of the pioneer res- 
idents of the Buckeye state. His marriage, however, was celebrated 
in Virginia. He was of German descent, while tlie Davis family is of 
Welsh lineage. Reuben B. Davis lived to the advanced age of eighty 
years, while his wife passed away at the extreme old age of ninety years, 
her death occurring in Jefferson township. Thev had removed from 
Ohio to Cass countv about 1840 and became identified with pioneer 
interests, sharing in the arduous task of developing the land and estab- 
lishing a home in the midst of the forest. In their family were seven 
children, of whom onh- three sons reached adult age, these being: H. 
C. of this review: Tames, a resident farmer of Jefferson township; and 
Elijah P.. who is living in Boulder Citv'. Colorado. 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTV 527 

H. C. Davis, wlu) was the clflest son and second child of the fam- 
ily, was only fonr years of age when brought by his parents to Mich- 
igan. The family hnme was established in Cass county and he has re- 
sided upon bis present farm for sixty-five years. It is dear to him 
through the associati.'us of his lx)yhood and youth as well as of his 
later manhood. In early life he received loving care and attention from 
his parents, and in their declining days be gave to them filial affection, 
thus repaying them for their devotion in bis youth. At the usual age 
he entered the public schools and acquired a knowledge of the common 
branches of learning that equipped him for life's practical duties. His 
training at farm labor was not meager, for when not busy with his 
text-books be worked in the fields, assisting in plowing, planting and 
harvesting as crops were brought to their fruition. When be bad at- 
tained man's estate be chose a companion and helpmate for life's iour- 
ney, being married on the 15th of June. 1S63, to Miss Samantha Ros- 
brough, one of the native daugbter.s of Jefferson township, who has 
spent her entire life in this part of the county. Her parents were John 
and Mary (Richardson) Rosbrough, and the mother came of Irish 
lineage, while the father was of German descent. The home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis has been blessed with three sons and two daughters, name- 
ly: Charles E. : Henrietta, now the wife of H. K. May, of iVIinncsota; 
Fred S., a resident farmer of Jefferson township; Carrie, the wife of 
Dr. J. F. Condon, who is living in Breckenridge, Colorado, about one 
hundred and ten miles from Denver: and Pliny, of Dowagiac. 

Mr. Davis is now the owner of one hundred and sixty-nine acres 
of good land constituting a well improved farm. His entire life has 
been given to the occupation to which he was reared and he has found 
in this work a good source of income, resulting from his close applica- 
tion, capable management and straightforward dealing. His first home 
was a log cabin that is still standing upon the place. It was erected in 
1834 and is a mute reminder of tb.e great changes that have occurred. 
It was, however, a hospitable home, in which friends, neighbors and 
strangers were always made welcome. As the financial resources in- 
creased, however, this primitive dwelling was replaced by one of more 
modern architecture and also more commodious. There have also been 
great changes in methods of farming. In his youth the sickle was used 
in the harvest field and the sheaves were bound by hand, while the 
threshing was done upon the barn floor, the grain being tramped out by 
horses or oxen. Invention, however, brought improved farm machin- 
ery and Mr. Davis has kept in touch with the universal progress along 
such lines. He now has a splendidly improved farm, the products of 
which find a ready sale upon the market, and thus his income is mate- 
rially increased annually. 

In his political views ^fr. Davis is an earnest Democrat, active in 
the work of the party where issues are involved, though at local elec- 
tions be frequently votes independently, considering only the capabil- 



628 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTS' 

ily of the canditlate. In 18S5-6 he was township treasurer, and from 
1900 until 1904. inckisive lie was supervisor of his township. He was 
also school ofliccr lor t\venty-se\'cn years and the duties tliat have de- 
volved upon him in these connections have been promi)tly, faithfully 
and capably performed. lie is iie\'er remiss in citizenship nor negli- 
gent in business, and he has based his business principles and actions 
upon strict adherence to tlie rules which govern industry and unswerv- 
ing integrity. By constant exertion associated with good judgment 
he has raised liimself to the position which he now holds, having the 
friendship of the juan} and the respect of all who know him. 

NFXSON E. TH.\TCHER. 

The agricultural interests of Penn township find a worthy repre- 
sentative in Nelson E. Thatcher, who is living on section 20. Here he 
owns eighty acres of land and is carrying on farming along modern 
lines of progressive agriculture. He was born in Ontario county, New 
York, on the 30th of January, ii^5T, and comes of English ancestry, 
the family, however, ha\ing been founded in the new world at an early 
period in its colonization. His paternal grandfather, Israel Thatcher, 
was a native of Greenfield, Massachusetts, and removed from that i^tate 
to New York, where occurred the birth of Lyman Thatcher, father of 
our subject. He was reared to the ocaipation of farming in the Em- 
pire state, where he resided until about 18S3, when he came to Mich- 
igan, spending his remaining days within its borders. His death oc- 
curred in Lansing in 1900. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Annie E. Tremblcy, was born in Ontario county. New York, and there 
spent her girlhood days, her father being John Trembley. who was of 
French lineage but was born in Paterson, New Jersey. Mrs. Thatcher 
passed awav in the same year in which her husband's death occurred, 
being called to her final rest on the 2nd of Februar}% 1900. In their 
family were eleven children, five sons and six daughters, of whom 
one son and one daughter died in childhood, while the others grew to 
manhood or womanhood. 

Nelson E. Thatcher, who was the sixth in order of birth in this 
family of eleven children, was reared in his native countv and is in- 
debted to the public school system for the educational privileges he en- 
joyed in his vouth. During the summer months he assisted in farm 
labor and ren'iained at home until twenty-one years of age, when he 
started out upon an independent business career. He has since won a 
fair measure of success, wl.ich is attributable entirely to his own well- 
directed labor and unfaltering diligence. He was married in 1874 to 
Miss Mary E. Fenton, who died in March. 1884, leaving four sons, the 
youngest being about sixteen months old. These were : Sylvester F.. who 
is now a resident of Portland. Oregon; Nelson E., decea<:ed : Holester W.. 
also living in Portland ; and Ernest M., who was a soldier in the United 



HISTORY OF CASS COrXTV 5i'9 

States arniv and died in the Philippine Ishnnds. After losing his first 
wife Mr. 'riiatclier was r.gain married in 1896, his second union being 
with Lillian S. lii\<W. the widow of Frank White and a daughter of 
Hugh and Annie Bri-ily. Her parents and grandparents were pioneer 
residents of Cass ciunty an<l she was horn upon the farm on section 20, 
Penn township, where she has spent the greater part of her life. Mr. 
Thatcher came to Cass county in 1895. He afterward went to North 
Dakota, locating at Sheldon, where he accepted a clerkship in a general 
store. On the expiration of that period he returned to Cass countv and 
located on the farm where he now resides, purchasing the interest of the 
old Brody homestead from the other heirs. He has built a good barn, 
has improved the place in many ways and has now an excellent prop- 
erty, attractive in its ap'iearance and equiiipcd with all modern acces- 
sories. He has been offered a good price for his farm, showing that 
it is one of the valuable properties of the locality. In politics he is a 
Democrat and he belongs to the Masonic lodge at Vanclalia. Although 
his residence in Cass county covers a comparatively brief periorl he has 
become widely and favorably known and the circle of his friends is 
constantly growing. 

NATHAN JONES. 

Nathan Jones, a retired farmer and one of the rild settlers of Cass 
county, is living on section 21. Penn townshi]i. He has pas^cfl the 
eighty-first milestone on life's journey, his birth having occurred in 
Preble county. Ohio, April 6, 1824. His father, George Jones, was a 
native of Georgia and was a son of George Jones, Sr., whose birth like- 
wise occurred in the same state, whence he removed to Ohio on account 
of slavery in the south, establishing his home in Preble county. He. was 
a Friend or Quaker in his religious faith and he lived to lie about sixty- 
six years of age. After spending some years in Ohio he sought a home 
in Michigan, locating in F'enn township. Cass county, in 1829, which 
was se\eral years before the admission of the state into the Union. He 
was accompanied liy four of his sons and Ihey took an active and help- 
ful part in the development and early progress of the county. The fam- 
ily is of Welsh descent, Imt the first representatives of the name in 
America came from England to the new world. 

George Jones, the father of our subject, was a young man when his 
parents removed to Preble coimty, Ohio, and there he was reared to the 
ocaipation of farming, which he has made his life work. He came to 
Cass county, Michigan, at the same time his father and brothers sought 
a home in this state, and from the government he entered a tract of land 
in Penn township, upon which not a furrow had been turned nor an im- 
provement made. \Yiih characteristic energv-. however, he began till- 
ing the soil and planting crops and in due course of time had developed 
a good farm. He had lived for six years in the county before he could 
enter his land and he took a helpful part in the work of early improve- 



530 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ment and progress. He died when a comparatively young man, pass- 
ing away at the age of thirty-two years. His wife bore the maiden name 
of Mary Bogue and was born in North Carolina, where her girlhood 
days were passed. She removed with her parents to Ohio. Her father 
was Joseph Bogue, also a native of North Carolina, who was of Quaker 
faith, adhering closely to that religious denomination up to the time of 
his demise. Mrs. Jones reached the very advanced age of eighty-two 
years, thus long surviving her husband. In their family were si.K cliil- 
dren. 

Nathan Jones, the third in order of birth, was only five years of 
age when brought b)- his parents from Preble county, Ohio, to Cass 
county, Michigan, and he was reared in Penn township amid the wild 
scenes 'of pioneer life, sharing with the family in all the hardships, 
privations and trials incident to the settlement of the frontier. When 
a boy he pursued his education in a log school house, sitting upon a 
slab bench. In one end of the room was a large fire-place and the 
desks were made of slabs laid upon pins driven into the wall. The 
methods of instruction were also primitive and he frequently made 
his w--ay through the snow for three miles in order to attend school. 
The family were left in somewhat limited financial circumstances, so 
that his privileges were comparatively meager. He assisted his mother 
upon tl'.e old home farm up to the time of his marriage, which occurred 
in 1847, Miss Lydia Bonine becoming bis wife. She was a daughter 
of Isaac and Sarah Bonine, who settled in Cass county in 1S42. Mrs. 
Jones was born in Wavne countv, Indiana, and died in this county m 
1899 when about scvciity-one years of age. By her marriage she had 
become the mother of six children, namely: j\Iary E., Sarali Inda, 
Isaac B., George, Warner D. and one who died in infancy. In. 1900, 
Mr Jones was "again married, his second union being with Louisa Jones 
who was born in London. England, but was brought to the United 
States during her in fane v. 

Mr. Tones has been a resident of Cass county for seventy-six years 
and throughout that entire time has been connected with agncultura 
pursuits He owns three hundred acres of land in Penn township and 
his valuable farm with its excellent improvements and richly cultivated 
fields indicates a life of thrift and enterprise. He is a stanch Pro- 
hibitionist in political matters and formerly was a Republican, and 
for many years has served as township supervisor 01 Penn township. 
In his religious faith be holds to the churcli of his ancestors and is a 
Friend or Ouaker. His life has been ever honorable and upright and 
he has never been known to take advantage of the necessities of his 
fellow men in any trade transaction. Few of the citizens of the county 
have so long resided within its borders and his name is mde bbly en- 
graved upon the pages of its history. His memory goes back to the 
Le when there were few roads through the forests and the traveler 
often found his wav by means of a blazed trail. There were no rail- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 531 

roads, no telegraphs nor telcpliones and only here and there would be 
found a little clearing to indicate that the work of improvement had 
been begun. The few homes were mostly log cabins and similar struct- 
ures were used for school purposes or houses of worship. The farm 
machinery was very crude as compared to that in use at the present day. 
The mowing was done with a scythe or sickle, the grain bound by 
hand and was threshed out with oxen or horses. jMost of the cooking 
was done over a big hre-place and much of the clothing of the family 
was woven by the women of the household. Great changes have oc- 
curred and Air. Jones has kept in touch with the universal progress, 
rejoicing in what has been accomplished as Cass county has won a 
place among the leading counties of this great commonwealth. 

GILBERT WHITE. 

Gilbert White, a retired farmer living in Cassopolis, was born in 
Allegany county. New ^'ork, on the iSth of Septemlx-r, 1835, and in 
both the paleinal and maternal lines comes of Irish and English an- 
cestry. His parents were Albert and Rhoda (Castleman) White. The 
father was born in Seneca county, New York, and in the year 1S43 
emigrated westwartl to Cass county, Michigan, reaching his destina- 
tion on the loth of September. As a pioneer settler he was identified 
with the work of early progress and improvement and his aid could 
always be counted upon to further any measure for the local good. 
His time and energies were devoted to farming and he contributed to 
the agricultural prosperity of the community. He voted with the 
Whig party until its dissolution and then became a stanch Democrat. 
His death occurred November 25, 1S76, when he was in the seventy- 
fourth year of his age. His wife, also a native of the Empire state, 
died in Cass county when about fifty-five years of age. They were 
the parents of five sons and one daughter, all of whom reached years 
of maturity, but the daughter died when about twenty-two years of 
age, and the sons Iiave also passed away with the exception of Gilbert 
White and his brother. Nathaniel White, who is now living in Penn 
township. 

Gilbert White was the youngest son and fifth child in the family 
and was but eight years of age when he became a resident of Cass 
county. His youth was passed upon the old family homestead, where 
he early began work in the fields, aiding in the work of plowing, plant- 
ing and harvesting. The district schools afiforded h'm his educational 
privileges and he had to walk two and a half miles to the little old 
school house in Penn. His education was therefore acquired under 
.somewhat unfavorable circumstances. His training at farm labor, how- 
ever, was not meager and he remained at home assisting in the work 
of the farm until twenty-one years of age. when he started out in 
life on his own account. As a companion and helpmate for life's 



53i' HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

journey he chcisc ^liss Elizabeth Broner, whom he wedded in 1S57. 
She was born in New York city and was a daughter of Jacob and Mary 
Broner. She came to Cass comity in 1857 and the same year gave 
her hand in marriage to Mr. White. 

Following his marriage Gilbert White purchased his lrither"s farm, 
took up his abode thereon and was engaged in general farm work until 
the fall of 18S0, when he came to Cassopolis. He then retired from 
active business and enjojcd a well earned rest for a number of years, 
but in 1890 once more entered the field of business activity and has 
since been engaged in dealing in agricultural implements in addition 
to looking after his farm property in Penn town.sliip, comprising one 
hundred and forty acres of land. He carries a good line of farm ma- 
chinery of the be^t makes and his patronage is extensive and is con- 
stantly growing. 

Unto yiv. and Mrs. White have been born three children: Frank 
A., now deceased; Evadell. the wife of Aaron Reinhart. who resides 
upon the old family Iiumestcad; and Floyd B., who is living in Cassoj)- 
olis. Mr. White belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
with which he has been cnnuected for twenty-three years. FIc also 
holds member.ship relations with the Benevolent & Protective Order of 
Elks and smce attaining his majority has given his support to the 
Democracy. He has held the office of justice of the peace and other 
local positions and for about twenty years has been a iiienibcr of the 
school board, taking an active interest in the cause of public education 
and in various movements and plans for substantial advancement in 
the countv. He has lived in tlie county for si.xty-thrcc years and his 
position in pu.blic regard has been won through a strict adherence to 
high and nianlv principles. In his business dealings he has never been 
known to take' advantage of the necessities of his fellow men in any 
trade transaction, lint in the legitimate channels of trade has gained 
the competence which he now enjoys. He has traveled life's journey 
with his wife for almost a half century and they are regarde<I as a most 
estimable couple whose names should be engraved high upon the roll of 
honored pioneer settlers and who justly deserve prominent mention in 
the history of this part of the state. 

THOMAS J. LILLEY. 

Thomas T- Lilley is numbered among the early settlers of Cass 
countv who for many years has been an interested witness of the 
changes that have occurred here and the transition that has been wrought 
as time and man have brought the county to its present position of 
advancement and development. He lives on section iS. LaGrange 
township, and is the owner of four hundred and forty-six acres of ridi 
and valuable land, but leaves the work of tilling the soil to others, 
while he is now living retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTY 533 

His birth occurred in LaGrange township on tlie 13th of October, 1S44, 
and he is therefore among the older of the native sons of the county. 
His parents were David and Sarah (Simpson) Lilley, in whose family 
were four children. The father was a native of Ohio and emigrating- 
westward cast in lu's I'lt with the pioneer residents of Cass county. He 
entered a small claim from the government, was married in LaGrange 
township and reared his family upon his home farm here. He was 
identified with the making of Cass county, with its permanent improve- 
ment and stihslnntial development, and his fellow townsmen recognized 
in him a citizen of wurtli and value. His ]X)litical allegiance was given 
to the Democracy, it was in this county that he was married tt;) Miss 
Sarah Simpson, a native of \'irginia, who was brought to Michigan by 
her parents when al>nut four years of age. Her father was Thomas 
Simpson, one of the earliest settlers of this part of the state, living in 
LaGrange t<nvnship. where he aided in the reclamation of the wild 
land for the ])urposes of civilixation. Mr. and Mrs. David Lilley long 
traveled life's journey together, tlie former passing away when in his 
eighty-first year and the latter when ^eventy-nine years of age. Of 
their children three are now li\-ing, Thomas J. lieing the eldest and 
the only surviving -^on. His two sisters arc: Matilda, the wife of 
Austin Charles, of IX'catur. ]\licliigan; and Catharine, now the wife 
of Orville Wales, of Chicago. 

In taking up the personal history of Thomas J- Lilley we present 
to our readers tlie life record of one who has a wide and favorable ac- 
quaintance in Cass county, for during long years he has lived within 
its borders, shajiing his life in accordance with rules of upright conduct, 
of honor in business, loyalty in citizenship and devotion to all that is 
commendable in friendsliip and home life. In the period of his youth 
he assisted bis father in carrying on the work of the farm and in 
early manhood sought a companion and helpmate for life's journey, 
being married in i8(')7 to "Miss Xancy Hurdle, a daughter of Jacob and 
Catherine (Brown) Hurdle. Her father was born on the ocean while 
his parents were crossing from Germany and the mother was a native 
of Ohio. They became residents of Cass countv in 1833. settling in 
Wayne township, where they ca«t in their lot with the pioneer settlers. 
Mr. Hurdle did his full share in improving and developing this region 
and his value in the work of reclamation was acknowledged by all who 
knew of his career. IMrs. Lillev was born on the family homestead in 
Wavne township. June 20, 1848. and has lived all her life in Cass 
county. In their familv were three daughters: Lora, the wife of 
John Shepbard. who resides upon the old homestead in LaGrange town- 
ship; Birdie, at home: and Sadie, the wife of Dr. L. C. Simmons, of 
Shelbyville. Indiana. All were born in LaGrange township, where Mr, 
Lilley has spent his entire life. He has carried on farming throughout 
his entire business career, but leaves the more active work of the fields 
to others at the present time. His possessions embrace four hundred 



534 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

and forty-six acres of rich and arable land under a high state of culti- 
vation and \vell inipro\-ed with rnudern equipments. He lias prospered 
in his business affairs and he now rents his farm, resting in the en- 
joyment of the fruits of his former toil and in the compctctice which 
comes to him from the rental of his place. He has erected many build- 
ings in ;he county and has lived a life of untiring industry and enter- 
prise resulting in success. He votes with the Democracy but has never 
sought or desired oflice, preferring to give his undivided attention to 
his business affairs. He started out on his own account at an early age 
and has steadil_\- worked his way upward undeterred by the difficulties 
and obstacles that (luc always meets in a business career. These on the 
other hand seemed to serve as an impetus for renewed eff< 'rt and liis 
purposeful action and sound judgment have made him one of the ' 
prosperous residents of the community. 

JOSEPH H. JOHN SOX. 

Joseph H. Johnson, living on section 8. Penn township, is a native 
of Alonroe county. New York, his l)irth having occurred about six miles 
east of Roche-^ter on the _'rid of March, 1840. His father. Job John- 
son, was a native of England, and when a young man came to America, 
for he had heard favorable reports concerning business opportunities 
in the Um'tcd States and hoped to better his financial condition by emi-/ 
grating to the new world. When a young man in England he learned 
the blacksmith's trade and thus had a good foundation upon which to 
build the sui)erstructure of success after crossing the Atlantic. Being 
favorably impressed with his adopted land, he afterward returned to 
England for his bride and was married there to IMiss Andulusia Greg- 
of}', a native of England, whom he then brought with him to the United 
States, arriving here aliout 183S. They located in ?^Ionroc county, New 
York, where they resided continuously until the spring of 1852, when 
they came to Cass countv, Michigrui. Mr. John.son secured land about 
a mile south of Wandalia. where he was engaged in farming. There he 
died at the age of fiftv-three years, while his wife passed away in her 
fiftietli year. Bv the first marriage of Mr. Johnson there were born 
five children, and by his second marriage — ^vliss Fannie Doyle becoming 
his wife — th.cre were born three children. 

Joseph H. Johnson is the eldest of the first family, and in ^^lonroe 
county. New York, he spent the first twelve years of his life, h.ecoming 
a public school student tliere. Subsequently lie continued his studies in 
Cass countv following the remo\al of his parents to ^Michigan. His 
mother died, however, when he was only about thirteen years of age, 
and he then started out in life on iiis own account. He worked by the 
month during the summer sea=;ons and in the winter attended school. 
Desirous of gaining a good education and realizing its value as a 
factor in a successful business career, he attended Hillsdale College in 



■.^ 



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y^>' 



\/ 



\. 



^ 



h- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 535 

1S64, providing for the exjienses of the college course by his own lahor. 
After his marriage he rented the P.onine farm for six'years. and then 
with the capital which he had acquired through his own earnings he 
bought a tract of land fit eighty acres. Later he spent four years in a 
jewelry store at Columbus, Indiana, after which he returned to Cass 
county and purchased a second farm, Ijecoming owner of the property 
which he now- occujiic^. Later he again spent two years in Columbus as 
a bookkeeper in a large dnuring mill, hut once more he again took up 
his abode in Cass county, making his home with his brother. 

In 1867 Mr. Johnson married Miss Caroline Davis, a daughter 
of Allen and Hannah Da\-is. She died December 25, 1869, leaving one 
child that died in infancy. 

Mr. Johnson is now the owner of one hundred and thirty acres of 
land in Penn township and also forty acres in LaGrange township. He 
is likewise one of the directors of the First National Bank of Cassopolis, 
in which he has been a stockholder for over thirty years. In fact he is 
one of the oldest stockholders of the institution. In his business life 
he has been thoroughly reliable and all that he possesses is attributable 
to his energy and careful management. Since age gave to him the right 
of franchise he has lieen a Republican, actively interested in the work 
of the party and its success and doing all in his power for the extension 
of its local influence. He has served as township supervisor for one 
term and was also township treasurer for two years, and he is now a 
member of the comity central committee, with which he has been thus 
allietl for a number of years. Llis interest in behalf of public progress 
and impro\'ement has been manifest by active co-operation in many 
movements for the general good. Starting out in life for himself at the 
early age of thirteen years, he soon became acquainted with earnest and 
unremitting toil and gained a realization of the fact that only through 
close and persistent effort may honorable success be achieved. He has 
used his opportunities to the best jxDssible advantage, and as the years 
have gone by he has wisely invested in property that is now classed with 
the fine farms of Penn township. 

BENJAMIN F. GARWOOD. 

Among the earh- settlers who have long been witnesses of the 
growth and de\elopment nf Cass county is numbered Benjamin F. 
Garwood, who now makes his home on section 3. Penn township, where 
he owns a well improved farm of ninety acres. He still gives personal 
supervision to the property and the cultivation of the fields and his life 
record in this respect should put tr, shame many a man of much younger 
years, who, having grown weary of the struggles of a business career, 
would relegate to others the burdens that he should bear. ^Tr. Gar- 
wood has now passed the seventy-ninth milestone on life's journey 



530 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 

but is yet a factor in a.c;ricukural circles here, givinp: sui-crvision to tiie 
care of his farm. 

A native of L«iqan cnuiuy. Ohio, he was Iiorn on tiie I9tli of 
May, 1.S27, and was third in order of liirth in a family of eleven chil- 
dren, fi\c sons and si.K daui^hters. all of whnn with one exception 
reached adult a-e. Their jiarents were William and Elizabeth (Brown) 
Garw(JcHl, the father horn in Virginia and the mother in North Caro- 
Hna. The father was reared, however, in Logan county. Ohio, and 
was there married to Miss Brown. They resided for a long ]icriod in 
Ohio, whence they came to Cass county. Michigan, ah(iUt 1845. '"C^^t- 
ing in Jefferson township, hut Mr. Garwood soon afterward pt'irchased 
one hunrlred and twenty acres ,,\ land in I'enn township, to which farm 
he removed his family, hut afterward was a resident of Missouri for 
some time, contintn'ng there about two years, when he returned to 
Penn to\\nshi]i to reside up to the time of hi« demise. Ilis widow sur- 
vived him and died in ^ilissnuri. 

Benjamin F. Garwood was al)ont eighteen years of age when 
he came with his jiarents to Michigan. Fie bad attended the district 
schools of Logan county and he continued his studies in the district 
schools of Jefferson townsln"]). Cass county, which be attended thrrxigb 
the winter months, while during the remainder of the year be worked 
at farm labor. He continued to as'^ist in the cultivation of the fields 
and in harvesting the crops until bis marriage on the 27tb of October. 
1R53. to ^liss Catharine I^Tmb. There were four sons and four 
daughters born of that marriage: F.Ivirn. Mary Ann, William. Charles, 
Lvdia. \\'arren. Fucelia and fobn A. The mother passed awav Octo- 
ber 8. 1881. On the i-'th of April. 1883. :Mr. Garwood was again 
married, bis second tmion beinc;- with ^lalinda T. Bonine, who was 
born in Henry count}-. Indiana. December 2. 18-^5. and was a daughter 
of Simeon and Olive fFlliott) Thomas. Her first husband was Jacob 
Bonine and to them were born tw(T cb.ildrcn : Lot J. and Olive. ^Irs. 
Garwood came to ^Michigan aliont 1854. Both ^Ir. and IMrs. Garwood 
are old settlers of Cass county and are widely and favorably known. 
His first presidential vote wns cast for a Republican candidate. He is 
a member of the Friends' Church and bis life has been in svmpatby 
with that religious sect, whose folloAvers exctnplifv a spirit of Christian 
patience, consideratirm and virtue that has made them widelv known 
and has awakened a universal feeling of respect for the denomination 
which they represent. 

ULYSSES S. EBY. 

T'''Ivsses S. Ebv. engaged in the practice of law in Ca'=«opnlis. 
where his tboroueb understanding of iudicial principles and careful 
preparation of cases have been manifest in the able manner in which he 
has handled in the courts tbe litigated interests entrusted to his rare, 
was born in Porter town'^bip. this county, on tbe 7tb of August. 18^14. 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'X'JY 5:J7 

his parents being Gabriel and CaroHr.c (Wagner) Eby. The father 
came to this county in 184J and has remained on his farm ever since. 
He was born in Ohio, while his wife is a native of Germany, having 
been born near the Rhine. 

After attending the common schools U. S. Eby became a student 
in Valparaiso University at \'a!paraiso. Indiana, and was graduated in 
law in June, 1900. Prior to this lime he had successfully engaged in 
teaching schocjl in Cass county and following his admission to the bar 
he entered at once upon the active practice of his profession, in which 
he has continued since with a large and distinctively representative 
clientage. The true measure nf success is determined b^' what one has 
accomplished and, as taken in cnutradisiinciion to the old adage that 
a prophet is not without hi'\iiir -a\e in his own country, there is par- 
ticular interest attaching to the career of the subject of this review, 
since he is a nati\e son of the county where he has passed his active 
life and so directed his ability and efforts as to gain recognition as one 
of the rei)rcsentative citizens and able Iaw}-ers of Cassopolis. In ^S^qO 
he was elected county clerk and held the position for two years. In 
1900 he was chosen b_\- pojuilar suffrage to the office of ]-)rosecuting at- 
torney, in whicli ca];;u-i(\- lie also served for two years, while for three 
years he has been a mrmber (U' the board of education. 

On the 2r)th of Scptemlier. 1888, Mr. Eby was married at Union, 
Michigan, to Miss Clara .\. Loupcc. a daughter of Oscar Loupee, of 
Vandalia, ^Michigan, and they have one son. Ulysses Guy Eby. born 
August 25. 7889. Mr. Eby is a member of the Knights of the ^Modern 
Maccabees, -which he joined in i8oj as a charter member at Jones, 
Michigan. For two years be was commander of the tent. In politics 
he is a stalwart Democrat, although bis seven brothers are all Re- 
publicans. In 1890 he joined the Eree Baptist church at Union. Mich- 
igan, and is still identified therewith. He is a respected and worthy 
citizen of Cassojiolis. where his professional labors, his political service 
and his fidelitv to social and moral obligations have made him a man 
worthy of the high regard and esteem which is uniformly accorded 
him. 

PETER EBY. 

Peter Eliy, who for fifty-ei,Qht years has been a resident of Porter 
township, may well be termed one of the old settlers of the county and 
has demonstrated his right in many ways to rank with its represent- 
ative citizens, for he belongs to that class of men who in the faithful 
performance of each dav's duties of every public task devolving upon 
him, manifests his loyalty and interest in the general good. He re- 
sides on section 6, south Porter township, and is a native of Elkhart 
county, Indiana, born on the 9th of .\ugust. 1848. He is the eldest 
son of Gabriel and Caroline fWagner") Ebv, and was only about two 
months old when the parents reinoved from Indiana to Michigan, 



53S HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

settling in Torter township. He lias therefore been a lifelong resident 
of Cass cour.ty and yet resicks in the township where his Ijoyliood and 
youth were spent. lie reni.-iined at home until twenty-one vears of 
age and assisted in clearing u[> and improving the farm. \\'hcn he was 
about twenty-five years of age he bought the land upon which he now 
resides. In the winter seasons he attended the early schools of the 
township, spending about three months each year in school, while 
the remainder of the time was gi\en to the task of [ilowing, planting 
and harvesting. He continued to work in the fields for the benefit 
of his father until he attained his majority. 

Mr. Eby won a companion and helpmate for life's journey when, 
in 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss ^lary J. Carman, a daughter 
of Chauncey and Elsie J. (Adams) Carman, who was born in Win- 
nebago county, Illinois, and was there reared to the age of thirteen 
years, at which time she came to Porter township, Cass county, witli 
her parents. Mr. Eby has a farm of eighty acres, upon which he has 
made all of the improvements. There are now substantial buildings 
upon the place, good machinery and well tilled fields. He raises tlie 
cereals best adapted to soil and climate and also has some good stock 
upon his place, but his attention is chicflv given to the cultivation of his 
fields. 

Unto Mr. and I\Irs. Eby have been born three children : Florence, 
the wife of George Wagner, of Mason township; Raymond, who is 
upon the home farm and who married Lois E. Richardson, a daughter 
of Jesse and Clara Richardson, well known residents of Porter town- 
ship; and Ralph C, who is attending college in South Bend, Indiana. 
The attractiveness of Cass county as a place of residence is indicated 
by the fact that many of her native sons have remained within her 
borders and ^^Ir. Eby may be classed with this number, as he was but 
two months old when brought to ^Michigan. He early became familiar 
with the l)est methods o"f cultivating and improving land and on at- 
taining his majority determined to devote his life to the occupation to 
which he was reared. Not to the fact of any fortunate combination of 
circumstances has he prospered, but through his own unfaltering labor, 
perseverance and diligent effort — qualities which may be cultivated by 
all and which ever produce the best results. In his political views ?klr. 
Eby is a Republican, active in the support of the party, with which he 
has been allied since attaining his majority. He has never been away 
from his present farm for more tlian four weeks at a time and with 
persistent purpose has carried on his work, being today one of the 
representative agriculturists of the community. 

HIRAM SMITH. 

Hiram Smith, who is engaged in farming on section 20, Calvin 
township, was born in Genesee county. New York, Januar}- 5. 1S36. 
His father. Samuel Smith, was a native of the Empire state and came 



HISTORY Oi- CASS COUXTY 539 

to Cass ojunty in 1S35, locating his land in Calvin townsliip. He 
found here a pioneer district, but was pleased with its prospects and in- 
dications for future development and resolved to make his home here. 
He then returned to the Empire state and brought his family to :\Iich- 
igan, taking up his aliode upon the farm now known as the Tames 
Bullen place. He lived to be seventy-two years of age and his life was 
devoted ti-> agricultural pursuits, whereby he provided a comfortable 
living for his family. His wife bore the maiden name of l^annie Fore- 
man and was also a native of New York. She died in 1893. 

Hiram Smith of this review was the eldest of a fami'lv of thir- 
teen children, eleven of whom reached adult age and only' one was 
born outside of Cass county, that being the subject of this review, who 
was but six months old when he was brought to Michigan. The family 
home being established in Calvin township, he was reared under the 
parental roof and pursued his education in the public schools, the little 
"temple of learning" being a log building such as was common in the 
early days. He continued to make his home with his parents until 
twenty-one years of age, but in the meantime worked as a farm hand 
by the month or day. his earnings going to his father. He early 
learned the value of earnest, unremitting toil and upon that quality has 
builded his success in later life. 

Mr. Smith was married the first time in 1859. the lady of his 
choice being Mrs. Hannah J. H.idcn. a daughter of Samuel Lincoln 
and the widow of Joseph Haden. She died leaving three children who 
were born of her second marriage, while by her first marriage she 
had six children. These were: Esther Ann. Avho died when about 
two years old : George, also deceased ; Addie. the wife of Jesse Parker, 
of Qilvin township; \Villiam B., a hardware merchant of Cassopolis; 
James G., a prominent and distinguished citizen of this county, who is 
represented elsewhere in this work- : and Mattie, the wife of Jacob Keen. 
The children born unto ^Ir. and Mrs. Smith were: Charles, a resident 
of Cassopolis: Freddie, a farmer of Calvin township: and Edward, of 
Elkhart. Indiana, who is in die employ of the railroad company. After 
losing lu's first wife "Mr. Sniitli wedded ]\Iiss Alfretta Allen, a daughter 
of Jerry Allen, and unto them were born five children: Stephen: Dell, 
deceased : Harmon : Clark : and Frank. 

Mr. Smith has been a resident of Calvin township for seventy 
years and is its oldest citizen who was not horn in this county. He 
has a vers- wide and favorable acquaintance and has always taken an 
active and helpful part in measures and plans for the public good. His 
political allegiance has been given to the Republican party since its 
organization and he has held several school offices in the township, the 
cause of education finding in him a warm and stalwart friend. He be- 
longs to Mathews Artin Post. G. A. R.. at Calvin Center, being en- 
titled to membership therein by reason of the fact that he enlisted in 
1864 as a member of the Twelfth Michigan \'olunteer Infantry and 



540 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

served until the close of the war. He has been equally loyal to his 
country in days of peace, and local advancement and national progress 
are both causes dear Lo his heart. Tln'ough his business career he has 
carried on farming and is now the owner of ninety-two acres of good 
land under a high state of cuhivation. Everything about his place is 
neat and liuifty in appearance and his labors are attended with a 
measure of success that uidicaies his capable management and unremit- 
ting diligence. 

REV. \V.\LTER CLARK. 

Rev. Walter Clark is numbered aniuug the capable agriculturists of 
Penn township. living on section 5 and for many years he has also de- 
voted much of his time to the worlc of the ministry as a preacher of 
the Brethren clunch. His life record is indeed worthy of emulation, 
commanding fi r him the respect, conlidence and good will of all. He 
was born in Xew \t)vk. September 23. 1837. His grandfather. Kli 
Clark, was a native of the Empire state and died in OIiim. His father. 
William L. Clark, was a native of Xew York and remM\e.l to Cass 
coimty, Michigan, alxmt iS-M. -ettb'ng on section 4. Tenn township, 
where lie developed a tract (if lanc! liitlicni> wild and unimprnved. He 
turned the I'lr^t fnrniw> up^n vari<iu> tk-Ids. ])lantcd his seed and in 
due course of time gathered good crops. After residing there for a 
numl)er of years he remo\ed tio Bertrand townsln']>. Berrien cnunty, 
Michigan, but afterward returned to Cass county and settled in Silver 
Creek township. Tiiis wa'^ about 183.2. and in 1856 he remri\ed to 
Penn triwnsln'p. where lie resided until 1861. Tn that year he became 
a resident of Pipestone tinvusliip. Picrricn county, Micbiu;an, where his 
remaining days were passed, his death occurring ^vhen he had readied 
the age of about se\-enty-eiglit vears. The wife of \\'illiam L. Clark- 
was in iier maidenhood Miss Almira West and she. too, was born in 
the Empire state, while her death occurred in September, i860, when 
she was fortv-six years of age. Tn their family were eight children, of 
whom Walter Clark is the eldest son and also the eldest now living. 

When about scxxn years of age Walter Clark of this review re- 
moved witli his parents to Cass county and here he has since lived with 
the exception of the brief intervals spent in Berrien county when a 
small bov. He returned to Cass county in 1856 and was married here 
in 1861 to Miss ilaria Gould, wdio was born in the state of X^ew York. 
They began their domestic life upon the farm where they yet reside 
and their marriage was blessed with one daughter, .\lmira. now the 
deceased wife of Samuel Rice. There was one daughter by this mar- 
riage. Verna Rice. 

Rev. Clark has a farm of one hundred and fourteen acres situated 
on section 5. Penn t'-iwn«liip. and his land is productive, yielding good 
harvests annnallv. He has al«o added many modern improvements to 
his place and he uses good machinen,' in cultivatinfr the fields and 




WaU.'Vx Ucn^^ 



HISTORY Ol- CASS COUXTY 541 

cai-inii: i<jv the cr. .[js. lie also lias -ncd grades of st(Kk upon his 
farm and llic i>ri.i)erty is the visilile evidence of his well-directed labor 
and life d ihi-ift. He cleared the land, erected a residence and barns 
and has fenced the tract, lirst enclosin<i: it with a rail fence made of 
rails which he iiimself split. Industrv has Ijeen the dominant factor in 
his life and his Christian faith has been the keynote of his character. 
He has long been a member of the Brethren church, in which he has 
served as elder and minister and in the work of which he has taken a 
very active and helpful part, devoting- about forty years to the work 
of the ministry, during which time he has exerted a wide and beneficial 
influence in behalf of the religious development of the community. 
He has also been instrumental in erecting three bouses of worship in 
Cass county. In politics he is a stalwart Republican, casting bis bal- 
lot for Abraham Lincoln in iS6o and again in 1864 and for each presi- 
dential candiiiate of the party since that time. He has been officially 
connected with the schools, and while serving as a member of the kiard 
of education has flone all in bis power to promote the cause of ])ublic 
instruction in his locality. 

S.AMUEL P.. HADDEX. 

Samuel E. Hrulden, who is engaged in general agricultural pur- 
suits in Ontwa township, is a native son of X'ew '^'ork. his birth hav- 
ing occurred on the 5th of October. 1S37. His father. Charles D. 
Hadden. was born in \\'estche=ter county, New York, in 181 1 and be, 
too. was a farmer by occupation, devoting the greater part of his life 
to the work of tilling the soil. In early manhood he ^^■as married in 
Tompkins county. Xew York, to Miss X^'ancy Elythe. a native of Ire- 
land, who came to this criuntry when a little girl and was reared in 
New York. Mr. and r^lrs. Hadden became the parents of six children. 
four sons and two daughters. Mar}-. George M.. Charles A., deceased. 
Elizabeth and Tames G.. all of whom are natives cif the Enipire state. 
In the year 1867 the father left New York and came with his family 
to Cass county. ^Michigan, settling on section 7. Ontwa township, where 
he secured three hundred and ninety-seven acres of rich land, much 
of which had been improved. With characteristic energy.- he took up 
the task of further cultivating and developing this place and con- 
tinued to make it his home until his death. He took an active interest 
in political questions and in the work of the party, and was a «tanch 
Republican. While residing in X^'ew York be sen-ed as supervisor of 
his township for three years but he never sought office after coming 
to the west as bis time was fully occupied bv his business cares in 
relation to the farm. He died January 29. T87S. and was sun,-ived by 
his wife until December. 1887. when she. too. was called to her final rest. 

Samuel B. Hadden was reared in New York and was brought up 
as a farmer, assisting his father in the cultivation of the fields uporr 



542 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

the old homestead until the time uf his marria,o:e, which occurred Feb- 
ruary lo, 1870, the lady of his choice being Miss Matilda Hadden, a 
daughter of Gilbert and Harriet (Adams) Hadden, who came from 
Westchester, Putnam county. New York, to Michigan. She was 
reared, however, upon her father's farm in Putnam county. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hadden of this review liegan their domestic life upon the old 
farm homestead, where they lived for a year and then removed to 
JefYerson township, settling on a farm of eighty acres, wiiere they 
resided for four years. On the expiration of that period Mr. Hadden 
sold his property and returned to Ontwa township, locating on his 
farm here, and he l)uilt a pretty home on the seven acres just west of 
Edwardsburg. He owns all together one hundred and seventy-seven 
acres in this township, the greater part of which is well improved, 
constituting a productive property, from which he annually gathers 
rich harvests, that, finding a ready sale on the market, bring him a 
very gratifying income. 

Unto Mr. and r^Irs. Hadden have been Ixirn five children : Hen- 
rietta, who was born June 14, 1S73. is the wife of Frank Stophlett, a 
mail clerk of Cass county; John E., born May 12, 1B75; Carrie, born 
August 7, 1877: Fred. November 7, 1880: and Martha, Decemlwr 24, 
1882, all at home, and all were born upon the present farm in Ontwa 
township with the' exception of Henrietta, whose birth occurred in 
JefYerson township. 

Mr. Hadden is a Republican, activelv interested in the success and 
growth of his party, and he belongs to the Presbyterian church of Ed- 
wardsburg. Cuming to Cass county at an early period in its develop- 
ment he is numbered among its pioneer settlers and has been a wit- 
ness of the progress that lias been made as pioneer conditions have 
given way before the advancing civilization. He has done his full 
share for the improvement of the county along agricultural lines and 
in the careful management of his business affairs has won a just re- 
ward for his labor in a comfortable competence. 

DOX A. FLETCHER. 

Don A. Fletcher is numbered among the old settlers of the county, 
having for fifty-five vears resided within its borders, so that he has been 
a witness of manv great changes here. His memory goes back to the 
time when much of the land was still in its primitive condition, when 
there were no railroads or telegraph lines and when the now thriving 
towns and cities were but little villages or had not sprung into existence. 
Today the countrv has been divided up into many farms and the fields of 
waving grain and the well kept stock all indicate a population of pros- 
perous and contented people, while churches, schools and other evidences 
of culture are numerous. 

Mr. Fletcher is a native of \\'ayne county, X^ew York, born on the 



>>•,., 



/ 



ice! 



^J^A^ ^^ ^ t^^^-^Z. 



AND DAUGHTER. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 543 

jtli of April, 1837, and comes uf English, ancestry, the family having 
been established in Xew England at an early period in its colonization. 
His paternal gran<lparents were Russell and Rachel Fletciier, who re- 
sided for a number of years in Vermont and afterward removed to 
Wayne county, New York. In the year 1S46 Russell Fletcher made his 
way westward to Kalamazoo county, Michigan, and on to Cass county, 
where his last days were (lassed. William R. Fletcher, father of our 
subject, was born in the Green Mountain state, where he remained 
until eighteen years of age, when he accompanied his parents on tlieir 
removal to Xew York. He was married in Wayne county to Miss 
Sarah A. Stearns, whose liirth occurred in that county. Following his 
marriage \\'illiam R. Fletcher located on a farm in Wayne county, Xew 
York, and in 1846 he removed to Micliigan, journeying westward in 
the fall of that year. He spent the winter in Cass county, and in the 
following spring removed to Kalamazoo county, where he remained for 
three years. On the expiration of that period he returned to Cass 
county, settling in LaGrangc township, and for many years he was 
numbered among the agriculturists of this part of the state. In all of 
his work he was practical and enterprising, and he assisted in large meas- 
ure in the development and upbuilding of this part of Michigan. He 
died at the home of his son, D. A. Fletcher, in bis eighty-fourth year, 
respected and honored by all who knew him. He had been supervisor 
and commissioner of biglnva}-s, and whether in office or as a private citi- 
zen he was aKvays interested in tlie welfare of his community and could 
be counted tipon as a co-operant factor in measures for the general 
good. Fie voted with the Democracy. His wife lived to be ab<iut 
sevent3'-four years of age. She came of an old Canadian family of 
French ancestry. I'nto Mr. and Mrs. William Fletcher were born five 
children, three daughters and two sons, all of whom are living at this 
writing. 

Don A. Fletcher, the eldest of the family, was but nine years of 
age when he came to ^Michigan with bis parents, and he has resided con- 
tinuously in Cass county from the age of thirteen years. In his boy- 
hood days he attended the common schools and in the summer months 
was trained in the work of the fields. He remained with his parents 
until twenty-five years of age, when in 1862 he was united in marriage 
to Miss Sarepta D. Shurte, a daughter of Isaac and Tvlary (Wright) 
Shurte. She was born in LaGrange Prairie, in Cass county, October 
29, 1S38, her people having been pioneer settlers of this section of the 
statC; They came here when only a few homes had been established 
within the borders of Cass county, and were closely identified with its 
early development. The year following his marriage IMr. Fletcher 
located upon the farm where lie now lives and has resided here contin- 
uously since, although he spent one year in California. In 1864 he went 
across the plains with a horse train by way of Salt Lake City, traveling 



644: HISTORY UI- CASS COUXTY 

across tlie long, hot stretches of snikl and tlirougli tlie mountain passes. 
He returned, however, by way of tlic water route, crossing the Isthmus 
of Panama and thence sailing to New York City, after which lie jour- 
neyed into the interior of the country and ultimately reached his home 
in LaGrange township. He is today the owner of two hundred and 
sixty acres of valuable land in the old homestead and one hundred and 
twenty-six acres on section i6, LaGrange township. He has on his 
home property good improvements, ^\•hile the fields yield to him rich har- 
vests in return for the care and labor he bestows upon his lantl. Every- 
thing about his place is neat and thrifty in appearance, and his work 
has been characterized by the most practical and resourceful methods. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. l-dctcher liave been born three sons and a 
daughter. William Isaac is now a resident of Oregon. Mary Lyle, 
the wife of Byron Poor, of Dowagiac, [Michigan, is a graduate of the 
Dowagiac High School in the class of i8S6. She has been one of 
Cass county's successful teachers for over twelve terms, having taught 
six terms in one district. She received her diploma from the South 
Bend Comn'.ercial College in the class of 1890. Ross A. took a course 
in tlie Dowagiac High School and graduated in the South Bend Bus- 
iness College in the same year as his sister Lyle. C. Clare is a grad- 
uate of the CassnjKilis High Sch"nl in the class of 1895. Both are 
assisting in the culti\ation of the hume farm. ]\lr. Fletcher can look 
back into a remote era of the county's development and progress, having 
lor fifty-five years resided here, and he has taken an active part in the 
work of making the county what it is today. Pie can rememlier the 
time ^vhcn few of the roads hatl been laid out. when few bridges had 
been built and when unly here and there could be seen a settlement to 
indicate that the work of de\elopment and cultivation had been begun. 
He has always Aoted with the Democracy, and has served as road com- 
missioner and as a member of the board of reviews. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is well 
known in the coun.ty where he has lived so long and where he has so 
directed his efforts that signal success has attended his labors. 

SAMUEL J. LIXXOLN. 

Samuel T- Lincoln, wlio is filling the oMice nf township supervisor 
in Ptnn tuwnship and friljdws the nccupation of farming on section 13, 
was born upon the old homestead farm on this section May 23. 1S50. 
His father, Bela Lincoln, was a native of New York and became a resi- 
dent of Cass countv before ^Michigan was admitted into the Union, the 
year of his arrival being 1833. Pie came in company with his parents, 
i\Ir. and ]\Irs. Samuel Lincoln, who located near Vandalia. Samuel 
Lincoln was a scvthe maker and also engaged in shoeing oxen in the 
early days. .\n industrious man. he took an active and helpful part in 
the earlv de\-elopment of the county, performing much of the arduous 



HISTORY 01- CASS COUNTY 545 

task incident tu llie settlement of a fruntier district and its conversion 
to the uses of civilization. His son, Bela Lincoln, was only eleven 
years of age at the time of the arrival of the family in Michigan and 
was therefore reared amid the environments of pioneer life, sharing in 
the hardships and trials incident to establishing a home in a frontier 
district. Returning to Ohio, he was there married to Miss Achsah 
DeCou, who was born in Green county, Ohio. After their marriage 
they located for a short time on Young's Prairie in Cass county, but 
soon afterward removed to section 13, Penn township, Mr. Lincoln 
trading a horse for forty acres of land. He went in debt for the horse, 
paying for it at the rate of six dollars per month. For four years 
Mr. Lincoln was in the employ of Charles Jones at farm labor. He 
was a carpenter by trade and he built the Irrst union schoolhouse in 
Cassopolis. He also laid out the plan from draft and put in the founda- 
tion for the Custard House in Cassopolis and prior to that he built 
a sawmill in Penn township, after which he operated it for a number 
of years or until it was destroyed by fire. He thus figured promi- 
nently in industrial interests in the county. Rebuilding his mill he con- 
tinued in the manufacture of lumber for a few years, when he sold 
out and again resumed work at the carpenter's trade and at the same 
time followed the millwright's trade. In his business life he was very 
industrious and energetic, was reliable and trustworthy and his good 
workmanship and known honesty secured for him a liberal patronage. 
He was highway commissioner at one time and always gave his political 
allegiance to the Republican party, taking an active interest in its 
work and doing all in his power to promote its growth and insure its 
success. Living in Cass county from early pioneer days he was one of 
the best known citizens within its l>orders and at his death in 1881 the 
community lost one of its honored and representative men. In the 
family were two children who grew to adult age, the sister of our sub- 
ject being Mrs. Beulah Green, the wife of Elam E. Green, of Penn 
township. 

Samuel J. Lincoln, whose name introduces this review, was reared 
and educated in Penn township, attending the district schools, wherein 
he mastered the common branches of learning usually taught in such 
institutions. He then remained at home until twenty-four years of 
age, assisting his father in carpenter work and following that pur- 
suit for about thirty years. He was thus an important factor in build- 
ing operations in the countv and in many places are seen evidences of 
his skill and ability in that direction. He was always a thornngh and 
accurate workman and won an excellent reputation in that direction. 

In 1875. ^'T^- Lincoln was united in marriage to ]Miss Florence A. 
Tompkins, a daughter of Jabez Tompkins. Mrs. Lincoln was bom in 
Ohio and when about five years of age was brought to Cass county 
bv her parents. At the time of their marriage the young couple located 
on section 12, Penn township, where they lived for about four years. 



54G HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

when his father died and he returned to the old homestead to care for 
his aged mother, who is still li\ing, having reached the advanced age 
of seventy-nine years, her hirth having occurred in i8jS. Unto Mr. 
and Mrs. Lincoln have been born three sons and a daughter: Neva J.; 
Bela J., who is married and now studying law in Detroit; Clavton D., 
a stenographer now employed by the Dodge Pulley Company at Misha- 
waka, Indiana; and Raymond A., who is attending school. There is also 
one granddaughter, Mildred D. Barney. 

Mr. Lincoln now gives his attention to the produce shipping busi- 
ness at Penn and rents his farm, which returns to him a good income. 
Moreover he is actively interested in public affairs and his worth and 
ability are widely recognized by his fellow townsmen, wlio have there- 
fore called him to public office. He was elected supervisor of Penn 
township in 1903, and was re-elected in 1904 and again in 1905, so 
that he is the present incumbent in the position. He belongs to the 
Masonic lodge at Vandalia. and his life is in harmony with the teach- 
ings and tenets of the craft. 'He has always been an earnest Repub- 
lican and his public-spirited interest in the general welfare has led to 
hearty co-operation in mrmy plans and movements for the welfare of 
the community. I-"or fifty-five _\cars he has resided in Penn town- 
ship, either upon his present farm or within a quarter of a mile of his 
present home. His life has ])ccn one of untiring and well-directed 
activity resulting in gratif}-ing success. 

LEVI J. REYNOLDS. 

Levi J. Reynolds, residing in Vandalia. is well known because of 
an active and honorable business career and also by reason of capable 
and faithful service in public office in this county. He is numbered 
among the worthy citizens that Ohio has furnished to Michigan, and 
he has now passed the seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey. His 
birth occurred in Portage county. Ohio, July 18, 1830. His father. 
Edward Reynolds, was a native of Ireland and his parents were of 
the Catholic belief and liecause Edward Reynolds Avould not accept the 
faith he was driven awav fr(im home and came to America when a 
young lad of about fourteen }ears. He made his way to New York 
and in the Empire state was employed at farm labor. Eventually he 
became a resident of Cass county, Michigan, where he arrived in 
1847. He located on a farm on the liorders of Calvin and Porter town- 
ships and throughout his remaining days devoted his attention to gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits. He was truly a self-made man. for he 
started out in life amid unfavoring circumstances and with no influen- 
tial friends or inlieritance to assist him. He _ early developed a self 
reliant character, however, and determined spirit, and with these qual- 
ities to aid him in his business career he made steady advancement and 
won not onlv a comfortable competence but also an untarnished name 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 547 

by reason"t)f his genuine wortli of character. He married Betsv Miner, 
a native of Massachusetts, and both hved to be sixty-two years of age. 
Mrs. Reynolds was twice married and by her first husband, Mr. lies, 
she became the mother of six ciiildren, while by her marriage to Mr. 
Reynolds seven children were horn. Twelve of her thirteen children 
reached adult age. Mr. Reynolds being the third child of the second 
marriage. 

He was reared in Knox county, Ohio, until nine years of age, when 
he accompanied his parents to Steuben county, Indiana, and when a 
young man of seventeen years he left the Hoosier state for Cass county, 
Michigan, where he was employed at farm labor. In this way be made 
a start in life and when he had saved enough from his earnings to 
justify his purchase of a farm he invested in land in Calvin township. 
As an agriculturist he displayed practical methods, was systematic in 
all of his work, and in the tilling of the soil and also in his care of 
his stock, he showed himself to be an energetic farmer with good 
business qualifications. He was also an auctioneer for many years, 
met with success in that business and thus became one of the best 
known men of the county. 

Mr. Reynolds has liccn married three times. In Cass county in 
185 1 he wedded ^liss ^lartha A. East and they became the parents of 
two sons: Austin AI. and Albert. For his second wife Mr. Reynolds 
chose Sarah A. Story, the widow of Albert Kennicott. By this mar- 
riage there were two daughters. For his third wife Mr. Reynolds 
chose Marv A. Royer, and at her death the following lines were written; 

"Mary A. Rover was lK)rn }vlarch 20, 1S42, in Stark county, Ohio, 
and died March 17, 1905. in X'andalia, Cass county. Michigan, aged 
sixty-two years, eleven months and twenty-seven days. In early child- 
hood she moved with her parents to Indiana, where she resided a 
number of years. The latter part of her life was spent in Vandalia, 
Michigan, where she was united in marriage to Levi J. Reynolds in 
1886. In earlv vouth she became a Christian and has since been a 
consistent and faithful follower of Christ, having been identified with 
the Church of Christ since 1885 in Vandalia. She leaves a kind and 
affectionate husband and loving brodiers and sisters to mourn their 
loss. Her pastor frequently called to see her during her sickness and 
ever found her the same kind, patient and Christian sufferer, submitting 
her will to the will of the Divine. The night before the Angel of 
Death came to bear her Christian spirit home she left the following 
beautiful lines : 

" 'When the waiting time is over. 

When from sin and sorrow free. 
We shall meet be}-nnd the river. 
There to dwell eternally.' 



6i8 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

"In the death of 2\Iary A. Reynolds, Vandalia Chapter 235, O. E. 
S., lost an honored and greatly esteemed charter member." 

In his political affiliation Mr. Reynolds is a stanch and unfaltering 
Republican, who has taken an active interest in political affairs and 
keeps well informed on all the questions and issues of the dav. He 
served as sheriff of Cass county for two years and then owing to the 
ill health of hi? wife he would not accept a second nomination. As 
justice of the peace he rendered decisions which were strictly fair and 
impartial and during many jears' service as supervisor of Calvin town- 
ship he worked earnestly for the general good of the community. He 
belongs to the .Masonic fraternity, holding membership in the' lodge 
and chapter, and he is a most earnest and devoted member of the 
Christian church, in which he is now serving as elder, while in its 
work he takes an active and helpful part. His influence is ever given 
on the side of right, justice, truth and progress and at all times he 
has been found worthy of the confidence and trust which have been 
uniformly given him. 

Calvin K. East, who married th.e sister of Levi J. Reynolds, 
was born in Calvin township, Cass county, Michigan, October 7, 1S34, 
and died at his home in Vandalia, April 17, 1906, aged seventy-one 
years, six months and ten days. He was married December 25, 1834, 
to Mabel P. Reynolds. To this union were born seven children, five 
of whom are still living: Oscar J., of Muskegon; Rollie M., of Niles; 
Bertha Wright and Maiy Williams, of Traverse City; and Harley 
M., of Vandalia, all of whom were present to comfort their mother, up- 
on whom the affliction falls so heavily. He was a member of the 
Friends' church and a faithful attcnflant until disease laid its heavy 
hand on him, and had for a few months kept him confined to his home. 
He leaves besides a wife and five children, ten grandchildren and many 
other relatives and friends to mourn his loss. Rev. Stephen Scott of 
Peun conducted the funeral services. Interment in Birch Lake cemetery. 

JACOB McIXTOSH. 

On tlie roll of pioneer settlers of Cass county appears the name of 
Jacob McLitosh and his personal qualities and life of activity entitle 
him to the position of prominence that is uniformly accorded him. 
He resides on section 33, Penn township, not far from the place of 
his birth, which was on section 32 of the same township, his natal day 
being March 15, 1840. His paternal grandfather was Daniel ^fclntosh, 
a native of Scotland. He was a wagon-maker by trade and in early 
manhood emigrated with his family to the new world, settling at 
Baltimore. Maryland, where he carried on business for some time. He 
afterward took up his abode in Ohio and in 1832 came to Cass county, 
Michigan, locating on Young's Prairie in Penn township. He was one 
of the pioneer settlers of this section of the state and became identified 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY oil) 

with tlie territorial interests ui }vlichigan, for the state liad not at 
that time been organized. He purchased a ckiini of one hundred and 
sixty acres of land and at once began its improvement. At the time 
of the purchase there was a double log house upon the farm and this 
was the original home of the family in Cass county. As the years 
■passed he added more modern improvements and continued his farm 
work along progressive lines of agriculture. On one occasion he met 
with an accident while on his way to Tecumseh. He had a herd of horses, 
some of which got away, and he went to hunt them, becoming lost in 
the woods. For seven days and six nights he wandered around unable 
to find his way to a settlement. The horse which he rode also got away 
from him and he was in a severe snow storm and his feet were frozen 
so badly that they had to be amputated and for many years thereafter 
he walked uix)n his knees, but he possessed an indomitable spirit and 
unfaltering energy and lie did a man's work without feet. His death 
occurred when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-seven years. 
William ]\IcIntosh, the father of our subject, was born in Inverness, 
Scotland, and was only three years of age at the time of the emigration 
of his parents to America. He lived with them in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and eventually removed to Ohio, whence they came to >ilicliigan 
about the time of the removal of Daniel Mcintosh to this state. 
However, he afterward returned to Ohio and was there engaged in 
the operation of a sawmill for several years. Eventually, however, he 
returned to Cass count)- and was married at Three Rivers. St. Joseph 
county, to Miss Sarah IMcIntafter. who was a native of the Buckeye 
state and in her girlhood days was brought to Michigan by her father, 
Jacob ^Iclntaffer, who was of German descent. He settled in St. 
Joseph county, becoming one of the pioneers of that part of the state, 
and in connection with a man by the name of Buck he entered nine 
hundred acres of land, upon which the town of Three Rivers has since 
been built. He built the first log house and sawmill upon its site 
and took a verv active and important part in the work of early de- 
velopment and improveinent leading to the present prosperous condi- 
tion of that section of the state today. He died there from exposure 
and was buried at Three Rivers. His daughter. ]Mrs. William Mcin- 
tosh, died when ?e^■enty-five years of age. By her marriage she had 
become the mother of nine children, five daughters and four sons, one 
of whom died at the age of eight years and another when abnut six- 
teen years of age, while the remaining members of the family reached 
years of maturitv. 

Jacob Mcintosh is the eldest son and fourth child and was reared 
in Penn township in the usual manner of lads of pioneer times. He 
now resides upon a portion of the farm upon which his birth occurred. 
In his youth he enjoved the educational advantages afforded in a. log 
school house. But 'few branches of learning were taught and it has 
been largelv through reading, experience and observation in later years 



550 PIISTORY 01- CASS COUNTY 

that he has become a well iiiiL.nned man. He walked to school two 
miles in tlie winter seasons and in the summer months aided in the 
work of the farm, assisting liis father in the fields nntil twenty-one 
years of age. In 1861, liaxing attained his majority, lie responded to 
his country's call for troops and enlisted as a member of Company D, 
Sixth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, with which he went to the front 
but was afterward transferred to the lieavy artillery. He served for 
three years and was promoted from a private to the rank of corporal 
and afterward to sergeant. At the battle of Port Hudson on the 27th 
of May, i8()3, he was \voun<led in the upper part of the right leg 
by a minie ball. He was then detailed as assistant cook so that he 
would not be sent to the h(«pital. He participated in the entire siege 
of Port Hudson and was one of about forty who chargeil over the 
works on the 30th of June, 1863, a military movement that has be- 
come famous in history as Dwight's charge. When the siege was 
begun the troops were under command of General Butler, but at the 
time the charge was made o\-er the works General Banks was in com- 
mand. 

Following the close t)f the war ]\lr. IMcIntosh received an h.jnor- 
able discharge at Kalamazoo, Michigan, and with a most creditable 
■military record returned to his old home in Penn township, where he 
resumed farming. Throughout his active business career he has car- 
ried on general agricultural pursuits and as a companion and heliimate 
for life's journey, he chose Aliss Emily J. Rivers, to whom he was mar- 
ried on the 28th of November. i8r)5. She is a daughter of James and 
Delilah (Chase) Rivers. Her I'irth occurred in New York, in which 
state she remained until twelve years of age, when she accompanied 
her parents on their removal to Mokena, Illinois, whence they came 
to Cass count}'. Michigan, in 1S64. At the time of his marriage Mr. 
Mcintosh located on the farm where he now resides, but after a year 
removed to Cassopolis, where he followed the trade of carpentering, 
becoming a well known contractor and builder of that city. He was 
awarded a number of important contracts and continued his identifica- 
tion with building .operations until about 1S70. when he returned to 
.the farm. He has cleared his land here and erected all of the barns and 
outbuildings as well as the residence and in connection with the culti- 
vation of his fields and the improvement of his property he has also fol- 
lowed the business of moving and raising barns and other buildings for 
aboitt eight years. He is also the patentee of a ratchet gate and is 
quite extensively engaged in its manufacture, it being now in general 
use in this and adjoining counties of ^lichigan and also in Illinois. 
The gate is one of the most complete of the kind ever placed upon the 
market. It can be raised over a drift of snow and until 'Mr. Mcintosh's 
invention was perfected this was one of the great problems of the 
farmer, who would find that the snow would drift against the fences, 
making it almost impossible to open a gate. His farm comprises eighty 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 551 

acres of land, which responds readily to the care and cultivation placed 
upon it, for the land is arable and productive. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Mcintosh have been born the following named : 
Minnie D., now the wife of Dr. Don A. Link, of Volinia, Cass county; 
and J. Moward, of Chicago, who for three years -was located in Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, but is new engaged in the abstract business in the 
former city. 

Mr. ]\lcIntosh was reared in the faith of the Democratic party, 
but is now a stanch Repuldican and is deeply interested in the pulitical 
issues and questions of the day, keeping well informed upon all such, 
and at tiie same time putting forth every effort in his jwwer to promote 
Republican successes. He has been called to serve in several local 
positions, has been high\\ay commissioner, was township treasurer and 
in iS86 was elected sheriff of Cass county, in which [Kisition he dis- 
charged his duties with such promptness and fidelity that he was re- 
elected in iS8S. He was also justice of the peace and constable for 
seventeen years and his officia! service has ever been characterized by 
promptness, accuracy and thorL>ugh reliability. He is now undersheriff. 
He is a charter member of Albert Anderson Post No. 157, G. A. R., 
in which lie has filled several positions and is now officer of the guard. 
Through his association therewith he maintains pleasant relations with 
his old army comrades and greatly enjoys the reminiscences of the 
campfires. He likewise belongs to the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, both of Cassopolis. 
and he holds membership in the Baptist church at Brownsville and 
erected the house of worship there. He is president of the Anti- 
Horse Thief Association of Penn township. His son. J. Howard Mc- 
' Intosh, is a memljer of Backus Lodge No. 50, A. F. &: A. M.. and 
has attained the 32nd degree of the ScoUish rite in Chicago Consistory, 
S. P. R. S. At one time he was president of the \\'olverine Club at 
the University of Michigan for two }-ears. Sixty-six years have been 
added to the cycle of the centuries since Jacob IMcIntosh began his life 
record in Penn township, where he has lived almost continuously since. 
He has never made his home lieyond the borders of Cass county, so that 
he is widely known here. His best friends are those who have known 
him longest, a fact which indicates an honorable life and exemplar}' 
principles. His work has been of a character resulting beneficially to 
the county as well as to himself and he belongs to that class of rep- 
resentative American men who while promoting individual welfare also 
contribute in substantial measure to the good of the community with 
which they are connected. 

GEORGE M. KINGSBURY. 

G. ]\I. Kingsbury, president nf the Cassopoli? Manufacturing 
Companv and a^vell' known resident of Cassopolis. was for many 
vears a leading merchant of the city and was a valued and prominent 



551' HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

factor in its business interests because of his connection with its manu- 
facturing aft'airs and its banking business as a director of the First 
National Lank. He was born in LaGrange township, this county, on 
the 23rd of April, 1SG2, and represents one of the pioneer families. 
His father, Asa Khigsbury, was a native of Massachusetts, and came 
to Cass county, Michigan, during an early epoch in its development 
and progress. Establishing his home in Cassopolis, he became a prom- 
inent merchant and banker here, and was closely identified with the 
early upbuilding and progress of the village. He belonged to that 
class of representative American citizens who while promoting individual 
success also contribute in large measure to the general prosperitv. His 
fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability and his devotion 
to the general good, several times called him to the office of county 
.treasurer. His death occurred when he had reached the age of seven- 
-ty-six yars, and he left l>chind him the record of an honorable, upright 
and successful life. He was married twice, and in his family were 
fourteen children, G. M. Kingsbury being the ninth in order of birth. 
Under the parentr-l roof in Cissopolis Mr. Kingsbury of this re- 
view spent his boyhudd and youth, his time being divided between the 
duties of the schoolroom and the pleasures of the playground. He 
aftenvard attended the Jackson High School, from which he was 
graduated in the class of iSSi. and, returning to Cassopolis, he here 
embarked in merchandising, having become somewhat familiar with 
the business by assisting at odd times in his father's store. For eighteen 
years he was a representative of commercial life here, conducting a 
large and well stocked store which brought to him a good patronage 
because of his reliable inisiness methods and his earnest efforts to please 
his customers. In the spring of 1900, however, he sold his store to 
G. L. Smith, since which time he has given his attention to manufactur- 
ing interests, being president of the Cassopolis Manufacturing Com- 
pany, which was organized in the fall of 1899. He is also one of the 
directors of the First National Bank of Cassopolis, and his name is an 
honored one on all commercial paper. 

October 18, 18S2, ]Mr. Kingsbury was united in marriage to Miss 
Stella Powell, a daughter of Francis I. and Man,- (Huff) Powell and 
a native of LaGrange township. Her people were early residents of 
the county, the name of Powell figuring in connection with many of 
the early events which constitute the pioneer history of this part of 
the state. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Kingsburv^ has been born a daughter, 
Cliarlotte, who is now nt home. 

In his political views 'Mr. Kingsbury is a stalwart Democrat, un- 
faltering in his devotion to the party and active in its work. In 1892 
he was a delegate to the national convention at Chicago. He has 
several times served as a village officer, being president of the village 
board for four years, was treasurer for a number of years, had also 
been trustee and is a member of the board of trustees of the cemeter}'. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 553 

Whatever tends to promote tlie permanent improvement and material 
progress of the city receives his strong endorsement and hearty co- 
operation. He belongs to Backus Lodge. A. F. & A. ^M., of Cassopolis, 
has also taken the degrees of capitular and chivalric Masonr}- and is 
now a member of the Mystic Shrine. Prominent in the ranks of the 
craft, he is acting as grand scribe of the grand chapter. He is a 
member of the Benevolent and Protecti\-e Order of Elks and is widely 
recognized as one of Cassopolis' leading and influential citizens. 'He 
possesses keen business discernment and. an ability which enables him 
to readily comprehend a business situation and its possibilities. He 
has therefore wrought along lines that have led to affluence and is today 
one of the substantial residents of his community. 

Since the above was compiled, Mr. Kingsbury passed away and 
the following ^lasonic obituary is appended : 

"Grand Ch.m'ter Rov.\l Arch M.vsoxs of Michigax. 
"Jackson, ;\Iich., INIarch 2, 1906. 
"To all Royal Arch Masons zdicresocvcr dispersed: 

"For the second time within the year are we called upon to mourn 
the loss of one of the active officers of our Grand Chapter and to join 
the funeral cortege to pay the last sad homage to a beloved companion. 

"George I\I. Kingsbury, 
"r. e. grand scribe. 

Died at his home in Cassopolis. ^Mich.. Tuesday evening, Febniary 27, 
1906. Companion Kingsbury's failing health has been regarded with 
much anxiety by his friends for several years, but the dread scourge 
consumption secured too firm hold on his system and the inevitable 
has resulted. 

"George M. Kingsbury was born at the old family home in Cas- 
sopolis, April 23, 1862.' At the age of 14 he went to Jackson to 
finish his schooling, afterwards embarking in the mercantile business 
which he followed until 1900. At the organization of the Cassopolis 
Manufacturing Co. in 1899, he was made its president and general 
manager and continued in that office until a short time before his death. 

"Companion Kingsbury was always alive to the business interests 
of his home village, and many times was called to serve it in official 
capacities. He was president' for four years, treasurer for six years, 
member of the school board six years, and was member of cemetery 
board at the time of his death. In every position he gave his best 
"eflforts and his administration was always marked by a move in the 
line of progress. 

"October 18. 1882, he was united in marriage to Miss Estelle 
Powell, of Dowagiac, and to them was born one daughter. Miss Lottie, 
who with the devoted wife are left to mourn their irreparable loss._ 

"The Masonic record of Companion Kingsbury' has been a bright 



554 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 

one. • He was raised to tlie degree of Master Mason in Backus Lodge 
No. 55, F. & A. AL, Deceniljer lo, 1S83. He was exalted to tlie sublime 
degree of Royal Arch Mason in Kingsbury Qiapter No. 78, R. A. M., 
June 18, 1885, and first appeared in Grand Chapter as High Priest 
in 1892, serving his Chapter in that position for twelve years. He 
was elected Grand blaster of the Second Veil January 17, njoo. and 
has been steadily advanced by his companions until at his death he 
was acceptably filling the station of Grand Scribe. 

"He was Knighted in Niles Commandery No. 12, K. T., Novem- 
ber 20, 1885, and received the degrees of Royal and Select Master in 
Niles Council N(j. 19, R. & S. M., April 16, 190^ Fie was made a 
member of Saladin Temple, A. A. O. N. ^L S.. Octolier 18, 1895. 

"The funeral of Companion Kingsbury was held at his home 
March 2, 1906, and he was buried in Prospect Hill Cemetery with 
Masonic honors under the auspices of Backus Lodge No 55. Niles 
Commandery No. 12. headed by a military band acting as escort. The 
officers of the Grand Chapter of Michigan were in attendance to honor 
the memory of a beloved Companion. 

"As a token of respect to the memory of this distinguished Com- 
panion and of our affection for him it is ordered that this memorial 
be read at the first regular convocation after its receipt, and that it be 
preserved in the Memorial Record of the Cha])ter prepared for that 
purpose. It is furdier ordered that the Chapter and Altar be draped 
in mourning for sixty days thereafter. 

"TlIO.M.\S H. WlLLI.\MS, 

Grand Might Priest. 
"Attest : 

"ClIARLICS A. COXOVER, 

Grand Secretary. 

JUDGE C. E. CONE. 

The bench and bar have ever been a civilizing influence in the 
history of state and nation and Judge Cone is actively connected with 
a profession which has important bearing upon the progress and stable 
prosperity of anv section or community and one which has long been 
considered as conserving the public welfare by furtliering the ends of 
justice and maintaining individual rights. The present probate judge 
of Cass county is a gentleman whose superior educational attainments 
and understanding of the law have given him prominence in connection 
with his chosen profession and won him the position which he now 
fills through appointment of Governor Warner, who recognized his 
ability and merits. In his social and official relations he is well known 
in Cassopolis and Cass county. C. E. Cone has much to do with 
public interests in Cassopolis. He is director of the school lx>ard and 
has been a helpful factor in many movements for the general good. 



HISTORY or CASS COUNTY 555 

His business interests have been in the hne of law practice and he is 
recognized as one of the most able attorneys of the county, possessing 
in large measure the quaHties whicli contribute to success at the bar, 
including perseverance and an analytical mind, which is at the same 
time readily receptive and retcniivc of the fundamental principles and 
intricacies of the law. 

Mr. Cone is a native of the Empire state, his natal place being 
Oswego, New York, his natal day April 25, 1867. His father, Chester 
Cone, was also born in New York and was a cooper by trade. Emigrat- 
ing westward, he settled in \'an Euren county, Michigan, about 1868 
and afterward removed to Elkhart, Indiana. He has resided in south- 
ern ^lichigan and in northern Indiana since that time, making his 
home at present, in 1906, in Goshen, Indiana. His wife, who bore 
the maiden name of Maggie Rourk, was a native of Canada, where her 
girlhood days were passed. She died when her son, C. E. Cone, was 
about five years of age, leaving three children, namely: C. E. Cone; 
Mrs. Millie Keller, who died in Enid, Oklahoma; and William Cone, 
who is a resident of Elkhart. 

C. E. Cone, the eldest of the family, was only about a year old at 
the time of his parents' removal from the Empire state to Michigan. 
He began his education in Elkhart and continued his studies in the 
schools of Goshen and of Bristol. Indiana. He engaged in teaching in 
the village school at Bristol and for seven months in the district schools 
of the Hoosier state. Locating at Vandalia, he spent alx)ut fifteen 
months in a general store owned by \V. R. Merritt, after which he 
engaged in teaching for one year as assistant principal. During this 
year he studied and earned a first grade teacher's certificate and was 
elected principal the following year, which position he filled for four 
years. Under his guidance the schools made satisfactory progress, 
for he maintained a high standard of excellence and put forth prac- 
tical effort to improve the sciiools and worked for their permanent 
good. He attended the Agricultural College at Lansing, Michigan, 
where he studied chemistry, physics, geolog}- and astronomy. Follow- 
ing this work he took the state teachers' examination and won a life 
certificate in 1S91. He was elected county commissioner of sciiools in 
1893 and came to Cassnpnlis. For eight years he occupied that posi- 
tion and the cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart friend, 
■whose labors in its behalf have been efifective and far reaching. In 
1896 he began the study of law and was admitted to the bar in April. 
1899. Following the expiration of his term of office he entered at 
once upon the active practice of the law, opening an office in the Chap- 
man building rn the 8th of July. 1901. In his practice he is gifted 
with a spirit of devotion to wearisome details and is quick to com- 
prehend the most subtle problems, while in his conclusions he is en- 
tirely logical. He is also fearless in the advocacy of any cau^e he 
may espouse and few men have been more richly gifted for the achieve- 



556 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

ment of success in the arduous and difficult profession of the law. 
He has twice been elected circuit court commissioner and is filling 
that position at the present time. On the election of Probate Judge 
L. B. Des Voigncs to the circuit bench, j\lr. Cone was appointed by 
Governor Warner to fill the vacancy and entered upon the duties of 
the probate office September 7, 1906. He is also a member of the 
village council and has been found a co-operant factor in many move- 
'ments and plans for the promotion of the best interests of Ca'ssopolis. 
On the 1st of December, 1886, ;Mr. Cone was united in marriage 
to Miss Grace Forgus. a daughter of Wellington and Anna (Evans) 
Forgus and a native of New Jersey. Her father was a minister of the 
Episcopal church. Unto Mr. and I\Irs. Cone have been bom five chil- 
dren, the eldest, J. Gorton, being now eighteen years of age. The 
others are Grace, Muriel. Wellington and Esther. Mr. Cone is a prom- 
inent worker in Republican ranks and has been secretary of the Re- 
publican county central o aumiltec. He is secretary of Kingsbury 
Chai)ter Xn. 78, R. .A. ^I., and Iielongs to a number of other frater- 
nities. 

HON. JAMES M SHEPARD. 

Hon. James ^I. Shcparn, whose marked individuality rmd strength 
of character well entitle him to the position of leadership which is 
accorded him in Cass county, is now .\merican consul at Hamilton, On- 
tario, and has figured prominently in political and business circles in 
Cass county for many years. Fie is a native of X'ortli Erookfield, 
Massachusetts, where he was born on the 24th of November, 1840. 
The paternal grandfather. Jared Shepard. was a descendant of Thomas 
•Shepard, the founder of Ilarvard College. The family is of English 
lineage and among its members have been many who have figured prom- 
inently in public life in one way or another. Tliomas Shepard came 
to America in 1638. To this family belonged General Shepard. who 
put down Shay's rebellion. The father of our subject, Rev. James 
Shepard, was a native of Hampden county, Massachusetts, born in 
1802, and was a minister of the ^Methodist Episcopal church. He was 
graduated from Westfield .-\cademy and in his holy calling he e.xerted 
a wide and beneficial influence, contributing in substantial measure to the 
growth and development of his party and at the same time taking a pro- 
nounced stand upon the slavery que<;tion. his influence being far reach- 
ing in behalf of opposition to that institution of the south. At length 
on account of ill health he was forced to leave the ministry and his 
last davs were passed on Bunker Hill, Charlestown. ^Massachusetts, 
where lie died at the age of fifty-two years. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Lucv Bush, and was a native of Westfield, :\rassachusetts, 
born in 1808. She, too. was of English lineage and lived to the ad- 
vanced age of eightv vears. In the maternal line she was de.scended 
from the'iiobilitv'of England. By her marriage she became the mother 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 557 

of four children, one of whom died in infancy. Jared, the eldest, was 
at tlie head of what was known as the Foreign Aloney Department of 
the Suffolk Bank of Bostun, the original "Clearing House," but put 
aside business ambitions at the outbreak of the Civil war and joined 
the Union army as a lieutenant, his death occurring near New Orleans 
while he was in the service. Esther is the wife of Rev. Daniel Richards, 
of Sornerville, ]Massac!nisetts, her husband living a retired life there. 
Hon. James M. Shepard, the youngest of the family, was edu- 
cated in Cambridge, iMassachusetts, attending the Latin school, after- 
ward the Wilbraham Academy and subsequently tiie Weslejan Univer- 
sity. He studied medicine and dentistry in Boston and was connected 
with the medical department of the navy during the war of the rebellion. 
He went out first with the Mansfield guards, a regiment of Connecticut 
militia, and later joined the medical department of the navy, with 
which he continued until the cessation of hostilities. On the 3rd of 
September, 186S, Dr. Shepard came to Cassopolis. where he opened 
an office for the practice of dentistry, which he followed continuously 
until 1876, when he purchased the Vigilant and has been sole proprietor 
since 1S7S. As a journalist he is well known and through the publica- 
tion of his paper has done much to mold public thought and opinion. 
He is the champion of every progressive movement and his lah«rs 
have been eft'cctive in securing the adoption of many measures that 
have contributed largely to the public good. 

Mr. Shcpjard is even more widely known because ot his activity in 
political circles. He was elected to represent the twelfth district, com- 
prising Cass and Van Burcn counties, in the state senate in 187S, re- 
ceiving five thousand two hundred and fifty-seven votes against twelve 
hundred and eight cast for Josiah R. Hendryx, the Democratic can- 
didate, and four thousand two hundred and thirty for Aaron Dyckman, 
the candidate of the National or Greenback party. ^Vhile a member 
of the upper house of the general assembly Mr. Shepard was made 
chairman of the standing committees on the liquor traffic and printing 
and also a member of the committees on education, on mechanical in- 
terests and on engrossments. He proved an active working member of 
the senate and did all in his power to promote the welfare of the com- 
monwealth. In 18S2 he became clerk of the committee on territories in 
the house of representatives of the forty-seventh congress and he was 
private secretary to Senator Palmer during the sessions of the forty- 
eighth, fortv-ninth and fiftieth congresses. He was also clerk of _ the 
senate committee on agriculture during the discussion of the legisla- 
tive movements leading up to the formation of a department of agriciilt- 
ure and he was sccretan- to the president of the World's Columbian 
Conimission at Chicago fmm June, 1890. until the final official report 
was rendered in i8q6. He served as one of the commission of chan- 
ties and corrections for the state of ^lichigan under the administrations 
of governors Rich and Pingree, which position he resigned upon accept- 



558 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ing the appointment as American consul to Hamilton, Ontario, on the 
i6th of July, 1897. 

In 1S70, James M. Shepard \v;is united in marriage to Miss Alice 
Martin, the eldest daughter of Hiram and Margaret (Silver) ^Martin. 
They have two children. Alelville J., who was born November 18, 
1872, is assistant bookkeeper in the Ueckwith estate at Dowagic, Mich- 
igan. He married Pearl Lum, of Kalamazoo, Michigan, and has one 
son, James L., born .March 20, 1902. The daughter, Blanche, born 
November 2, 1S78, is the wife of Ernest W. Porter, of Newark, New 
Jersey. 

Dr. Shepartl is a meniljer of Albert Anderson Post, G. A. R., of 
which he is a past commander. He is also past chancellor commander 
of the Knights of Pythias fraternity, a member of the Knights of the 
Maccabees, and is a 32nd degree Mason. He has a very wide and 
favorable acquaintance among the prominent men of the state and 
nation, and has always kept in touch with the great and momentous 
questions which involve the welfare of the country. Moreover in local 
affairs he is deeply interested, and his influence and aid are ever given 
on the side of progress and improvement. While he enjoys the respect 
of many with whom he has come in contact in connection with imi>ortant 
pubhc service, in his home town where he has long lived lie has that 
warm personal regard which arises from true nobility of character and 
deference for the opinions of others. 

JASPER J. ROSS. 

Jasper J Rcss, filling the oftice of township supervisor in 2^Iason 
township and residing u|inn a farm on section 14, was born ,\pri! 2, 
1858, upon this i)lace which is yet his home. He therefore belongs to 
ore of the old families of the county. His father, Richard C. Ross, was 
a native of Stark county. Ohio, and at the age of fourteen years accom- 
panied his parents, Jacol) and Betsy Ross, to Cass county, settling first 
in Edwardsburg, in Ontwa township. There Jacob Ross took up forty 
acres of land, which was wild and unimproved, and began the devel- 
opment of a farm. Richard C. Ross also secured a claim from the 
government, and ]Mr. and }vlrs. Ross have in their possession one of the 
old parchment deeds bearing date and execution of September 10, 1838, 
and bearing the signature of President ^Martin Van Buren, the fourth 
deed of the kind found in Cass county. It is a valuable document and 
heirloom in the Ross household. This was in December, 1832. and 
they were among the (iriginal settlers of the county. The most far- 
sighted could not have dreamed of the development and progress which 
were soon to transform the district into a region of rich fertility and 
productiveness, and yet there were to be many years of arduous toil on 
the part of the pioneers and subsequent settlers before this result could 
be accomplished. The grandfather and father of our subject were both 



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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 559 

active in reclaiming the wild land for the purposes of civilization, and 
turned the first furrow uix)n many an acre. Having arrived at years 
of maturity, Ricliard C. Ross was united in marriage in 184S, in Mason 
township, to Miss Mehitable Eougart, who was born in Geneseo, Xew 
York, April i, 1S15, and was a daughter of John O. and Ivlehitable 
Bougart, who came from the east to Michigan' in 1829, settling in 
Edwardsburg. Cass county. Mrs. Ross was then a little maiden of 
eight summers, and was therefore reared in Michigan amid pioneer sur- 
roundings and environments. The homes of the settlers were largely 
log cabins and the furnishings were very primitive and meager as 
compared to the homes of the present day. Mrs. Ross proved to her 
husband a faithful companion and helpmate for life's journey and pos- 
sessed many excellent traits of character of heart and mind, which en- 
deared her to all who knew her. She reached the advanced age of 
eighty-five years and nine months, while Richard C. Ross departed 
this life on the 22d of April. 1901, at the very venerable age of eighty- 
seven years. His early political allegiance was given to the Whig party, 
and upon the organization of the new Republican party, formed to pre- 
vent the further extension of slavery, he joined its ranks and continued 
one of its stalwart advocates until his demise. He took a very active and 
helpful part in the settlement and upbuilding of Cass county, and his 
name is enrolled among those to whom the citizens of the later day 
owe a debt of gratitude for what the pioneers accomplished in the early 
period of development here. Unto him and his wife were born two 
daughters and a son, the sisters of our subject being Airs. Julia Ort, 
who is living in Mason township, and ]\Irs. Samantha Luse, whose home 
is in Elkhart, Indiana. 

No event of si3ecial importance occurred to vary the routine of 
farm life for Jasper J. Ross in his boyhood days. He was reared upon 
the farm where he now resides, and at an early age he took his place 
in the fields, aiding in the plowing, planting and harvesting. His edu- 
cation was obtained in the old brick schoolhouse in district No. 5. He 
has never been away from the farm for an entire week in his life, but 
has applied himself earnestly and faithfully to his farm labor, and is the 
owner of one hundred acres uf rich and productive land, which is de- 
voted to general farming. He has good grades of stock upon his place 
and is enterprising in his work, which has brought him the success which 
he to-day enjoys. 

On Christmas day of 18S7 ]\[r. Ross was united in marriage to 
Miss Nettie Cormany, a daughter of Jonathan and Lydia fdarl) Cor- 
manv, and a native of Elkhart county, Indiana, although her girlhood 
days' were largely passed in this state. Air. Ross cared for his parents 
until their deaths. By his marriage there have been born two daughters, 
Bessie M. and Shirlev M.. both at home. The family are held in high 
esteem in the communitv. having many warm friends. 



560 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Mr. Ross is an earnest Demucrat in his political views, active in 
the interests of the party, and has held all of the township offices to 
which he has been called by his fellow townsmen, who recognize his 
ability and his loyalty to the public good. He has served as township 
treasurer two terms, has been highway commissioner and in 1905 was 
elected township supervisor, being the present inamibcnt in the office. 
Mr. Ross is a member of the United Brethren church, in which he has 
served as trustee, and the cause of education finds in him a warm friend, 
who has done effective service in behalf of the school as a member of 
the school board during nine years incumbency in that office. He has 
been a life-long resident of the county, living for forty-eight years upon 
the same farm and has been closely identified with its development, its 
agricultural interests and its political welfare. 

JOHN H. rniLLII'S. 

John H. Phillips, an enterprising citizen and merchant of Pokagon 
township, who is also filling the office of township supervisor and exerts 
strong and beneficial influence in behalf of puljlic affairs, was born in 
the western part of Germany on the 12th of July, 1S41. His father, 
John Phillips, was a native of the same country and was a shoemaker 
by trade. He married ^liss Helen Hill, likewise a native of Germany, 
and they became the parents of five sons. John H. being the fourth in 
order of birth. In tlie year 1S56 the father crossed the Atlantic to 
America, locating first in New Buffalo, Berrien county, r^Iichigan. 
where he purchased forty acres of raw land. Tliis was covered with 
timber, which he cleared away, and as the years advanced he placed his 
farm under a very high state of cultivation and made it a productive 
property. There he remained until his death, which occurred in 1868. 
His political support was given to the Democracy, and he was a worthy 
and public spirited citizen. 

John H. Phillips spent the first fifteen years of his life in the land 
of his birth and then accompanied his parents on their emigration to the 
new world. Farm work early became familiar to him and he gave his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits until 1864, when, at the age of 
twenty-three" years, he enlisted as a member of Company F. Eighth 
Michigan Cavalry, in defense of the Union. He served with that com- 
mand until the close of the w-ar, being mostly engaged in scouting, and 
in October, 1865. he was mustered out. having made a creditable record 
by his faithful performance of every duty that was assigned him. 

When the country no longer needed his aid Mr. Phillips returned 
to Berrien countv and entered upon his active business career as clerk 
in the freighting office of the Michigan Central Railroad Company. _ He 
was there emploved until 1S72, when he came to Cass county, Michi- 
gan, settling in the village of Pokagon. Here he was also in the employ 
of the ?kliciiigan Central Railroad Company until 1885. when, with the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNT Y 5t;i 

capital he had saved from his earnings, he estabhshed a general store, 
which he has since conducted, being an enterprising merchant and meet- 
ing with very desirable success. His earnest efforts to please his patrons, 
his reasonable prices and his straightforward dealing constitute the 
basis of his prosperity since he became a factor in mercantile circles in 
Pokagon. 

Mr. Phillips had been married in Berrien county in 1865 to 
Miss Mary Raiza, a native of Germany, who was brought to America 
when four years of age, and was reared in Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
Phillips have become the parents of thirteen children, seven sons and six 
daughters. In his religious faith ]\Ir. Phillips is a Catholic, and in his 
political affiliation is a stanch Democrat. In 1897 he was elected town- 
ship supervisor and has since held the office by re-election. He has 
also been township clerk for a number of years. His fraternal relations 
are with the Odd Fellows and 3.1asons, and he is true to the teachings of 
these orders, exemplifying in bis life the beneficent spirit upon which 
the lodges rest. He has been found capable in public oflice, trust- 
worthy in his business relations and faithful in his friendships, and thus 
the consensus of public opinion concerning L. H. Phillips is most 
favorable. 

JAMES M. E:\IM0XS. 

James M. Emmons, who after long years of active connection with 
farming interests is now living retired in the enjoyment of a well 
earned rest, is one of the old settlers of Cass county, having from an 
early period been a witness of its development and progress as modern 
conditions have replaced those of pioneer life. He was born in Giles 
county, Virginia, on the 6th of April. 1S27, and has therefore passed 
the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey. His father, William 
Emmons, was also a native of the Old Donn'nion and was there reared, 
turning his attention to agricultural pursuits as a life work after he 
attained his majority. In the fall of 1828 he came with his family to 
^Michigan, settling in Pjcrrien county, which was then a largely unim- 
proved tract, the work of development and progress having scarcely 
been begun within its borders. All around stretched the native forests 
or the imbroken prairie land, and it remained for the pioneer settlers to 
convert tlie district into a productive region wherein agricultural and 
commercial interests might be profitably conducted. ;Mr. Emmons was 
a leading representative of industrial interests, operating a sawmill in 
Berrien county until 1834. when he removed to Cass county, settling in 
Pokagon township. ETere he took up fort}- acres of land from the gov- 
ernment, upon which not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement 
made, and he also bought eighty acres from Mr. Ritter. This place 
he improved, carrying on the work of the fields vear after year, or until 
called to his final rest. He was married in Virginia to Miss Elsie Kirk. 
a native of that state, and unto them were born eight children, three 



562 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

sons and five daughters, of whom James M. Emmons was the sixth 
child and second son. One of the numher died in infancy. Tlie fatlier 
voted with the Democracy and kept well informed on the questions and 
issues of the day, but had little desire for public office. 

James ]M. Emmons was about five years of age when his father 
came to Cass county, and here he was reared amid the wild scenes of 
frontier life. He acquired his education in one of the little old-time log 
school-houses, where the methods of instruction were almost as primi- 
tive as die building- in which the sessions of school were held. His train- 
ing at farm lalxir, however, was not meager, for he early began work in 
the fields and remained at home during his father's life, assisting him in 
the arduous work of the farm. I'here he remained until his marriage, 
when he removed to his present place of residence, comprising two hun- 
dred and seventeen acres of land in Pokagon township. He has since 
given his attention to the further development of this propertv. He 
built first a log cabin in which he lived until after the Civil war, when 
the pioneer home was replaced by a frame residence. He has also built 
barns and outbuildings and has added equipments that facilitate the 
farm work and make his labor more profitable. 

On the 22d of February, 1852. Mr. Emmons was married to Miss 
Phebe Hawkins, who came from Ohio to Michigan with her parents, 
Daniel and .Mvira Hawkins, who were early settlers of Cass county, 
where Mrs. Enimnns spent the days of her girlhood. She has had no 
children of her own, but out of the kindness of their hearts ]\[r. and 
Mrs. Emmons have given homes to four orphan children, two sons and 
two daughters: Emma, now the wife Cif Solon Straub and acting as 
housekeeper on Mr. Emmons' farm; Richard Parsons; Alvira; and 
Orson. 

Mr. Emmons has always been actuated by high and honorable prin- 
ciples, bv a conscientious regard for his obligations to his fellow men 
and by a loyalty to duty that is above question. For twenty-one years 
he has given earnest support to the Prohibition party because of his firm 
belief in temperance princii)les and his opposition to the liquor traffic. 
He is well known and for many years was accounted a leading farmer of 
Pokagon township, but at the present writing has given over to others 
the caYe and improvement of his farm, while he is enjoying a well earned 
rest. This is certainly as nature intended, and he is not only a retired 
citizen of Cass county, but also one of its respected and honored men, 
well known in this part of the state from pioneer times down to the 
present. 

JOSEPH FT.\RPER. 

In all those affairs which touch the general interests of society, 
which work for civic integrity and virtue and for loyalty in citizenship 
as well as for material pro.gress, Joseph Harper was deeply interested. 
and though he did not win national renown and was perhaps not widely 



HISTORY OF CASS COUxXTY 563 

known in the state, he uas in iiis iiome community a man of prominence 
whose mflucnce was ever found on the side of progress and improve- 
ment. A native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, he was born on 
the 19th of December, 1805, and when about thirty years of age came 
to Cassopohs, ]\lichigan, the year of his arrival be'ing 183^. Here his 
remaining days were passed, and on the 28th of August, 1894, wlien in 
the eighty-ninth year of his age. he was called to his final rest. By 
trade he was a carpenter and joiner, and fur nearly sixty years was a 
prominent figure at Cassopolis. He built the first courthouse and was 
one of the five contractors for the building of the second courthouse. 
Many evidences of his superior handiwork are seen in substantial 
structures in the county, for his work was of a most enduring character, 
and in business circles he sustained an unassailable reputation for relia- 
bility. The year following his arrival at Cassopolis Mr. Harper was 
married, in October, 1836, to Miss Caroline Guilford, whose birth 
occurred in Northampton, Massachusetts, September 4, 181 6. They 
traveled life's journey together for more than fifty-seven years, and 
Mrs. Harper survived her husband until the 29th of January, 1902. 
They were the parents of four daughters, all born in Cassopolis. Emily 
S., born March 31, 1838, was married August 20, 1857, to Jeremiah 
B. Chapman, and died January 7, 1902. Melissa C, born March 3, 
1841, was married ^larch 28, i860, to Joseph Graham, who was Ixirn in 
Erie county, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1838. and died May 23, 1905. 
Janette, born October 27, 1843. became the wife of Charles L. Morton, 
Febniary i, 1870, and died Febniary 27, 18S0. ]Mar\ette, born April 
12, 1846, was married October 3, 1865. to Lowell H. Glover, the his- 
torian. All of the deaths in tlie family occurred in CassopC)lis, and the 
marriages were here celebrated. 

Mr. Harper continued his building operations in the county seat 
and surrounding districts until the early days of the gold excitement 
in California, when he made his way to the Pacific coast and spent 
several years working in the mines. He aftenvard went to Pike's Peak 
and later to ^Nbaitana. where he remained for alx)ut three years, en- 
gaged in mining operations. At the time of the Civil war he left 
home to serve as captain of Company A, Twelfth ^Michigan Volunteer 
Infantr)', and with his command did valiant service in defense of the 
Union cause. 

Mr. Harper gave his political allegiance to the AVhig and then to 
the Republican party, and was one of the first justices of the peace 
elected after the admission of the state into the Union. At different 
times he was called to the office of register of deeds, treasurer and 
sheriff of the county, and following the election of General Grant to the 
presidency Mr. Harper was appointed postmaster at Cassopolis, and 
served for nine vears. His official duties were ever discharged with 
promptness and fidelity. He and his wife were among those who united 



504 HISTORY 01- CASS COUNTY 

with the Presbyterian church the clay foHowiiig its organization in 1842. 
He was a man of positive opinions and of incorruptible integrity and 
was respected by all with whom he held social or business relations'. 

LEANDER BRIDGE. 

Leaiider Bridge was for many years an enterprising and prominent 
farmer of Cass county, where he took up his abode in pioneer days 
and before the seeds of civilization had scarcely been planted in the 
western wilderness. He bore his full share in the work of development 
and progress and gained and retained the honor and respect of his fellow 
men as the years went by. He was bom in Angelica, Allegany county, 
New York, December 26, 1S27, a son of Samuel Bridge. His early 
boyhood and }Outh were spent in the Empire state, but when nineteen 
years of age he came to Cass county, Michigan, with his parents, and 
spent his remaining days upon what became known as the old Bridge 
homestead farm, the then site of the village of Marcellus. However, 
at the time of his arrival here there was no village, and the entire dis- 
trict was covered with the native growth of timber. At twenty-four 
years of age Leander Bridge was married. He started in life on his 
own account with forty acres of land, which he brought under a high 
state of cultivation, performing the arduous task of developing the fields 
and making the farm productive. .\s his financial resources increased 
he added to his property from time to time until within the boundaries 
of his place were comprised one hundred and sixty acres of good land. 
Throughout his entire life he carried on general agricultural pursuits, 
and for alsout six years he was also engaged in the grain business. For 
several years he devoted his energies lo the conduct of a grocery store 
and for two years was proprietor of a meat market. He was likewise 
express agent for a time, and in all these varied interests he conducted 
his business affairs with capability and enterprise, realizing that close 
application and unfaltering diligence constitute a sure and safe basis 
upon which to build prosperity. 

It was in 1852 that Leander Bridge was united in marriage to Miss 
Harriet A. Bair, who was born in Newberg, Cass county. ^Micliigan. on 
the 23d of January. 1835. His death ocairred August 11. 1S80, while 
his widow, surv'iving for more than two decades, passed away on the 
l6th of April, 1902. They were people of the highest respectability, 
enjoying in highest reganl the esteem and friendship of those with 
whom they came in contact through Inisiness or social relations. Mr. 
Bridge was a stalwart champion of Republican principles, and in his 
fraternal relations was a Mason. He was also a very active and help- 
ful member of the United Brethren church and assisted in building the 
house of worship at ^Marcellus. These connections indicate much of the 
character of the man and show forth the motive power that prompted 
his actions, making him a man whom to know was to respect and honor. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 505 

Unto Mr. and Airs. Bridge were born two children: William, 
who was born March 17, 1855, died in infancy, while Alary Alice, born 
March 20, 1S56, is the wife of Collins J. Joiner. Her husband was born 
in the western reserve of Ohio, on the 23d of January, 1850, and was a 
son of J. C. and Alary (Staitord) Joiner, in whose family were four 
daughters and three sons. He came to Alichigan with his parents in 
his boyhood days, and after acquiring a good education engaged in 
teaching school in early life for a number of terms. He was also for 
a number of years station agent and telegraph operator on the Michigan 
Central Railroad. In 1883 lie was married to Aliss Alary Alice Bridge 
and removed to Jonesville. where he engaged in merchandising for four 
years. He afterward went to Ouincy, Alichigan, where he edited and 
published the Ouincy Herald for five years, later conducting the dry 
goods store there for some time. On the first of April, 1S96, he entered 
into partnership with F. T. Ward and purchased the Hillsdale Standard 
of F. W. Rolston, continuing in charge of the paper until the time of 
his demise, which occurred December 17, 1898. He always published a 
thoroughly modern and up-to-date paper, devoted to general interests 
and the dissemination of local news, and he ever stood for public 
progress and improvement, using his influence as a journalist for the 
betterment of the communities with which he was connected. While 
living in Hillsdale he also conducted a lx)Ot and shoe store for a few 
months prior to his death. 

Mrs. Joiner has devoted her life to art for the past fifteen years, 
having been a student under Professor Knight, of Hillsdale, and Pro- 
fessor Harding, of Jonesville. She does now superior work in oil and 
water colors and pastel, and has produced some highly artistic work 
in landscape and marine views, flowers and portraits. She was also a 
teacher of music for many years, but now gives her attention to paint- 
ing and has gained much more than local reputation in her art. Airs. 
Joiner is well known in this part of the count\^ both by reason of per- 
sonal worth and the fact that she is connected with one of its most hon- 
ored pioneer families, and she deserves prominent mention in this 
volume. 

ARTHUR E. BAILEY. 

Arthur E. Bailev. editor and proprietor of the Alarcellus Ncrvs, 
was born in Liverpool, Aledina county, Ohio, in 1864, his parents being 
James E. and Hannah Sophia (Kirby) Bailey, both of whom were 
natives of the Buckeye state. The father was of English lineage, was a 
wagon maker by trade and died three years after the hirth of our sub- 
ject, passing awav in the faith of the Alethodist Episcopal church, oi 
which he was a consistent member. His wife, who was also of English 
lineage, survived her husband for but a brief period. She was a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. In their family were a daughter and a son, 
the former, Alice, being a resident of Alarcellus. 



566 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 

The son, .Vrlliur E. Bailey, largely acquired liis education in the 
schoo s oi Cassupohs for his n.othcr removed to the vicinky ol tlm 
city alter her husband's death, and the children were reared by relative's 
He mastered the branches taught in the high school of that place, after 
which he learned the printer's trade in the office of the fi^ilaiit of 
Cassopohs, under the direction of .Messrs. Shepard & Alanslield He 
entered the ollice ni the capacity of "devil" and gradually worked his 
way upward untd he had become manager of the paper. He was ap- 
ponited postmaster at Cassopohs under President Harrison, holding the 
position for tour and a half years as a successor of L. H. Glover After 
retiring from that i>osition he purchased the Marcellus A'czcs of C E 
Davis and is now its editor and proprietor. The paper was founded in 
1S77 and at present is a six-column quarto, published weekly. It has a 
large circulation, has a good ad\ertising patronage, is a non-partisan 
sheet and is ably edited. 

In October, 1892, .Mr. Bailey was married to Miss Fanchon Stock- 
dale, who was born in Jefferson township, Cass county, in February, 
1S72 and IS a daughter of Anthony and Jeanette (Smith) Stockdale'. 
Her father was one of the pioneer settlers of Jefferson township. Mr 
and Mrs.. Bailey have two cliil<lrcn : Agnes, who was born in August 
1893; and Harold, born in July, 1S96. The parents are consistent and 
faithful members of the Baptist church, in the work of which Mr. Bailey 
takes a very active part and is now serving as one of its officers. He 
belongs to the Masonic fraternity and in politics is a Republican. He 
has held village offices in Marcellus and is now serving as a trustee. Fie 
is the champion of everything pertaining to the welfare and upbuilding 
pf this part of the state, and his efforts in behalf of public improvemeiit 
in Marcellus have been far-reaching and beneficial. 

HENRY FI. BOWEN. 

Henry H. Bowen, one of the old settlers of the county, who has 
assistcil in clearing and developing four farms, and thus contributing 
in large measure to the agricultural improvement of this section of the 
state, is now the owner of one hundred and fifty acres of good and well 
improved land on section 16, Porter township. He is, moreover, one 
of the native sons of Michigan, his birth having occurred at Plymouth 
Corners, near Detroit, in Washington county, on the 20th of March, 
1839. Fle was the fourth member of a family of nine children bi^rn of 
the marriage of Joseph and Sallic .\nn (.\ustin) Bowen. both of whom 
were nati\cs of Xew Y'ork. In the year 1840 Joseph Bowen came with 
his family to Cass county, settling in north Porter township, and 
throughout his remaining days his attention was devoted to general 
agricultural pursuits, which indeed he made his life work. He passed 
aw'ay at the ad\anced age of seventy-nine years, respected and honored 
by all who knew him, and his wife, who was a most worthy and esti- 



HISTORY Ol- CASS COUNTY 5ti7 

mable lady, also departed this life in Cass county, her remains being 
interred in Porter township. 

H. H. Bowen, of this review, lacked eight days of being a year old 
when brought by liis parents to Cass county, and upon the old home 
farm in Porter township lie was reared. At\he usual age he began his 
education, the little '•temple of learning"' being a log building such as 
was common in the early days. Its furnishings were primitive, con- 
sisting of rude benches and a table, behind which the teacher sat ruling 
over the little kingdom. The room was heated with a large fireplace 
and the school work was ungraded, the pupils studying the branches 
that they wished. The larger pupils attended only through the winter 
months, for their services were needed upon the farms during the spring, 
summer and fall seasons. Air. Bowen remained continuously on the 
old farm until the age of eighteen. He has assisted in clearing four 
different farms in the county. In his youth he aided in the arduous 
task of developing new land, turning the first furrows on many an acre. 
His early boyhood was largely a period of strenuous toil, but he de- 
veloped thereby the practical knowledge, and gained the experience that 
enabled him to carefully and successfully carry on farming interests 
when he started out upon an active business career. He remained 
at home through his minority and when twenty-four years of age was 
united in marriage on the 6th of April, 1863, to Miss Diana Charles, 
a daughter of Rufus K. and Emeline (Joy) Charles, the former a native 
of North Carolina and the latter of Xew York. Mrs. Bowen, who was 
the eldest of their three children, was born in Porter township, Cass 
county, September 13. 1842. her parents having there located at an 
early day in the pioneer epoch of Michigan's history. The family home 
was upon the farm and she was trained to the duties of the household. 
so that she was well qualified to take charge of a home of her own at 
the time of their marriage. The young couple began their domestic 
life upon a part of the old Bowen homestead, where they yet reside, and 
Mr. Bo\ven devoted his time and energies to the tilling of the soil until 
the early part of 1865. when, in response to the country's call for further 
aid in the suppression of the rebellion in the south, he offered his serv- 
ices and was assigned to duty with Company A, of the Twenty-fourth 
Michigan Volunteers, serving with that regiment until the close of the 
war. He is now a memljer of William J. May Post, Xo. 64. G. A. R., 
at Jones, and thus maintain? pleasant relations with his old army com- 
rades. He has filled various offices in the post, including that of com- 
mander. His political allegiance has always been given to the Repub- 
lican partv. of which he "^is a stanch advocate, and he has labored 
earnestlv and effectively for the welfare of the party in this locality. 
His first presidential ballot was cast for Abraham Lincoln in 1860. and 
lie again voted for the martyred president in 1864. In fact he has 
assisted in electing every Reiniblican president of the nation. Called 
to public office, he has served as constable in the township, was also 



^*^« HISTORY UF CASS CUUXTY 

Ireasui-er and lillcd the ol'lice uf tuwnship clerk fur about seven years, 
the duties of the dhterent positions being disdiarged in a capable] 
prompt and able manner. 

Unto Mr. and Airs. JJowen ha\e been born three sons, two of whom 
are yet living, namely ; Barnard, of Constantine, Alicliigan, and Frank 
Raymond, who is living in Townsend, Montana, where for about ten 
years he has occupied a position as clerk in the employ of one firm, 
a fact which indicates his fidelity to duty. Rufus K. died at the age 
of nineteen years. The home farm comprises one hundred and sixty 
acres of land on section i6. Porter township, and he has a well im- 
proved property, equipped with many evidences of progress along agri- 
cultural lines. With the exception of his first year Mr. Bowen has 
resided continuously in Porter township throughout his entire life, and 
the farm upon which he yet resides is endeared to him through the asso- 
ciations of his boyhood as well as those of later manhood. He has 
always been a busy man, working persistently and earnestly, realizing 
that there is no excellence without labor. It has been said' that merit 
and success go lirJ<ed together, and the truth of this assertion is proven 
in the life history of such men as H. H. Bow^n, who has prospered 
by reason of his diligence and sterling worth, and he well deserves 
mention in diis volume as one of the representative early settlers. 

JAMES J. MINNICII. 

l"l:e Germans and their descendants have always been noted for 
their thrift and enterprise. To the German farmer the middle west is 
indebted for the beautiful and well-improved farms, in the states of 
Michigan, Indiana, Illinois and Iowa. Mr. Minnich is a true represen- 
tative of this class of citizens in Cass county, Michigan. lie comes 
from Pennsylvania German ancestry and is possessed of those requisites 
which go to make the successful stockman and farmer. He is a native 
of the Keystone state, born in Snyder county, October 3. 1856, and the 
third in a family of thirteen children, nine sons and four daughters, 
born to Elias and Sophia (Garman) Minnich. There are eight children 
living, namely : Peter, a resident of Three Oaks, Alichigan, is a fanner 
and fruit grower and is married. Mr. Minnich is ne.xt. Andrew, a 
resident of Mason township, Cass county, is a manufacturer of cider 
and jellies, and is prosperous. He is married. Carrie, wife of Rev. 
\V. C. Swcnk, a resident of Ida, Alichigan, ami is pastor of the Evan- 
gelical church. Charles G., a resident of Kalamazoo, Michigan. He 
is a composer and teacher of music. He graduated under Prof. A. P. 
Barlow. He is married. Ellsworth, a resident of Berrien Springs, 
Michigan, is a manufacturer of cider and jellies, the firm being styled 
the American Cider Company, and he is married. Jane is the wife 
of William Stover, a resident of Berrien county. John, a resident of 
Los Angeles, California, is a machinist and millwright, being foreman in 









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HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTY 509 

a box factory known as the California l'"ruit Association. He is the 
youngest living". 

Father iMinnich was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, in 
1834, and he is yet living at the age of seventy-two. He was educated 
in both the German and English languages, and was a teacher of writing 
in the early years of his manhood. He had great musical talent. His 
chosen vocation was that of a farmer. When he had reached man's 
estate, the age of twenty-one, he had no capital. He was about four- 
teen years of age when he came with his parents to Snyder county, 
Pennsylvania, and was reared and married there, May 20, 1S53, io Miss 
Sophia Carman. In 1866 he emigrated to the middle west and located 
at Bristol, Indiana. He purchased seventy-two acres of land in Mason 
township, Cass county, it being partially improved, and then traded it for 
one hundred and eighty acres in the same township. He there resided 
for fourteen years. an<l then -mIiI and invested in forty acres in I'crrien 
county, but later sold thirty-three acres and kept seven acres, and is now 
living retired in cotiifortable circumstances. Fie is a Republican in 
politics. , Fie and his wife are devout members of the German Evan- 
gelical Association. Mother Minnich was horn in Snyder county, I'enn- 
sylvania, May 20, 1835, and is living. She is a kind and affectionate 
mother, and has reared her children to lives of usefulness. 

Mr. Minnich, of this review proper, was alxjut nine years of age 
when he became a resident of Bristol, Indiana. liis parents being poor, 
he was called early in life to aid them in making a home. He remained 
with his parents and gave them his care and wage till the age of 
twenty-two, which indicates that he surely did a son's part in tiie care of 
his aged father and mother. Fie received a ven,' meager education, 
mostly obtained through the aid of his estimable wife. At the age of 
twenty-one he could not exhibit ten dollars as a foundation to begin life. 
He chose for his companion in life ^liss Eliza Kissinger, wlio has proven 
to be a wife who has aided him with her wise counsel and advice in the 
years past, in the building of their pretty home. They were married July 
30,' 1876. and when they liegan life for a short time they resided with 
his parents. Then, concluding to have a home of their own, they took 
twenty dollars of the fifty dollars which Mrs. Minnich had saved and 
purchased a little cheap outfit of furniture and set up a little home of 
their own, but after a short time they returned to reside with ^Ir. Min- 
nich's parents. They began ver\- modestly as renters, as is oftentimes 
said, began at the lowest round of the ladder of life, but they made a 
firm resolution to make a success of their lives. Tlie first land they 
purchased was thirteen acres near the village of Sailor, jMichigan, in 
1888, and they went m debt for most of it. There was not a sign of an 
improvement on the little place. They entered into the work with 
zealousness and erected a good residence and excellent outbuildings, 
and resided there two vears, then renting it, and removed to Berrien 



670 HISTORY OF CASS COl'XTV 

county, and there they lived four years, and then returned to Mason 
township, this being in i8(;j. and here resided till 1904, when they sold 
their little place. They then moved upon the farm where they now re- 
side, which comprises one hundred and ten acres of hue land, which at 
that time was terribly run down, — dilapidated fences, tumble-down 
buildings, and the whole place presenting a very discouraging proposi- 
tion. 

Air. and Mrs. Minnich set to wurk with that true German charac- 
teristic to make a model farm, which they surelv have done. They 
have erected a pretty country residence, fitted up in city style, with 
large and comniudious rooms, nicely and cosily furnished, and handy 
and homelike for the housewife, an excellent cemented cellar, the water 
piped through the house, and the grounds nicely laid out, which indi- 
cates hard and unremitting toil. New fences have been built, also a 
new windmill, the outbuildings have all been overliauled, and the sur- 
roundings now present the healthy, clean appearance of a model country- 
home, as the accompanying engraving indicates. Mrs. Minnich is one 
of the most careful and efficient wives, who Icnows how to manage and 
superintend her home. She is a native of Elkhart county, Indiana, born 
. Septemlier 2, 1858, and she is the eldest in a family of si.x chiklrcn. two 
sons and four daughters, born tu William and Caroline (Stoner) Kis- 
singer. There are five of the children living, viz. : r^Irs. Minnicli is 
the oldest; Frances, widow of Cullen Green, a resident of Elkhart, 
Indiana; Mary, wife of William Skeer, a resident of Elkhart, Indiana, 
and he is a mechanic; Charles A., a resident of Fllkhart, Indiana, and a 
moulder by trade, wedded Miss May Finch; John E., a resident of 
Mishawaka, Indiana, who owns property in that place and also in South 
Bend, Indiana, is a pit moukler and is a receiver of high wages. He 
wedded Miss Jennie Lintsenmcyer. He is the youngest. 

Feather Kissinger was born in Lancaster county. Pennsylvania. 
June 10, 1830. and died July 28. 1895. He was an agriculturist. He 
came to Stark county, Ohio, with his parents when but a Ix^y and was 
reared and educated in that county. He received a good education in 
the common schools, and also a short course in college. He was mar- 
ried in Stark county. He was a soldier in the Civil war, serving his 
country till he received his honorable and final discharge, and was an 
ardent Republican in politics. In the early years of his life he was a 
member of the Dunkard church. He came to Elkhart county in an early 
day and there died. ]Mrs. Kissinger was born in Stark county, Ohio, 
November 31, 1840, and died October 11, 1S78. in Elkhart county. 
She was reared in old Stark county. She was always known 
as a good and kind woman, good and charitable to the poor 
and needy. Mrs. Minnich was torn, reared and educated in 
Elkhart county, Indiana. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Minnich have been born three sons, all living, viz.: Charles W., wlio 



PIISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 571 

v/as educated in the common scliools. He is a practical stockman and 
farmer. He is now located at Gray's Harbor, Washington, near the Pa- 
cific ocean. He controls three hundred and eighty acres of land near 
there and owns one hundred and sixty acres in Idaho. He is a very 
prosperous young man. He wedded Miss Ida Traub, and they have one 
little son, Paul. Edwin J. is located in Aberdeen, Washington, and has 
four lots in the town and two hundred acres near Elma, Washington. 
He wedded ]\Iiss Myrtle Ullery. He was a soldier in the Philippine con- 
test, being there and on the ocean for eighteen months. He received 
his honorable discharge, and -was always true to the "Stars and Stripes." 
Herbert F. is the youngest and is also located at .\berdeen, Washin.gton. 
He is a young man who commands many friends by his open and frank 
disposition. Mr. and Mrs. Minnich may well be proud of their sons. 

Mr. Minnicli is a Republican, true and loyal to the principles of 
this grand old party, and cast his first presidential vote for Hayes, hav- 
ing always upheld the bvinner of Republicanism. Officially he served as 
highway commissioner for two terms. F'or his honesty of character the 
St. Louis & S. W. Railroad Company in the years 1900 and 1901 se- 
lected him as immigration agent in the states of Arkansas, Texas and 
the Southwest, and presented him quarterly passes over all their lines. 
For his efficiency they offered him a gonrl salary to take up the work, 
but he preferred to pursue his calling, that of a farmer. Fraternally he 
belongs to the Grange. Both he and his wife are members of the United 
Brethren church at Sailor, Michigan, and have always been active in 
the Sunday-school work. Pie is a lover of good stock and has the 
Duroc swine and good standard bred horses and cattle. 

In the years 1900 and 1901 ^Ir. and ]Mrs. ^linnich took an ex- 
tended journey to the Pacific slope to visit their children and meet their 
son Edwin on hi? return frnm the Philippine war. Tliey had a lovely 
trip, crossing the straits to Vancouver Island, and then returning to the 
east through Canada, via the Canadian Pacific, passing through some of 
the most beautiful scenery in the great northwest. We are pleased to 
present this review of this worthy omple to be recorded in The Twen- 
tieth Century History of Cass County, ^Michigan. 

ERNEST SHILLITO, ^I. D. 

Dr. Ernest Shillito, whose capability in the practice of his profes- 
sion is indicated by the liberal patronage accorded him and by the 
favorable mention made of him throughout the comnnmity in which 
he makes bis home, was horn in Espyville. Pennsylvania, in 1S64, his 
parents being George and Amanda (Slocum) Shillito. the former a 
native of Pennsvlvania and the latter of Vermont. The father, whose 
birth occurred in Espyville. was of Irish descent, his father having emi- 
grated from the Emerald Isle to the I'nited States in 1800. George 
Shillito was a farmer by occupation and became well-to-do through the 



572 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

careful management of his agricultural and stock buying interests. He 
held membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and gave his politi- 
cal support to the Republican party. He died in 1893, at the age of 
seventy years, and is still survived by Mrs. Sliillito, who is living in 
Grove City, Pennsylvania, at the age of seventy-four years. She is of 
English descent and members of the family served in the Revolutionary 
war. She belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and has been a 
devoted wife and mother and earnest Christian woman. In the family 
were the following children: Arthur M., attorney-at-law of Chicago'; 
Fred, a practicing physician at Kalamazoo; Amos G., who is engaged 
in the practice of medicine at Independence. Iowa; Georgiana, the wife 
of Edward Eithian. a manufacturer of gas engines of Grove Citv, 
Pennsylvania : Ernest, of this review, and Hosaih, deceased. 

Dr. Shillito, whose name introduces this record, was reared upon 
his father's farm and after attending the country schools became a high 
school student in Linesville. Pennsylvania, while subsequently he at- 
tended the Stale Normal School at Edinboro, Pennsylvania, and also 
Allegheny College in that state. In 1886 he entered the medical depart- 
ment of the slate university of ^Michigan at Ann Arbor, and was gradu- 
ated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Chicago in 18SS. 
He then entered upon the practice of his profession in Marcellus in 
July of that year, and has since followed his chosen calling here with 
•splendid success. 

- In 1897 Dr. Shillito was married to Miss Sadie I\I. Warsom. who 

was born in Sturgis, Michigan, in 1875. Her father was a pioneer 
farmer of Indiana. Dr. Shillito is a Republican in his political views 
but has never sought or desired office. He belongs to the Masonic 
fraternity and to the State ^ledical Association, and through his con- 
nection with the latter keeps in touch with the advanced thought of the 
medical fraternity. He has never sought activity outside of the regular 
routine of active practice, but with an ability that enables him to master 
the diflkult problems of medical and surgical practice he has gained a 
gratifying patronage. 

RAYMOND S. HALLIGAN, M. D. 

Although one of the vounger members of the medical fraternity 
in Cass county. Dr. Halligan, who is practicing in Marcellus, seems not 
to be limited by his years in the e.xtent of his practice or in the 
ability w^ith which he copes with the difficult probleins that continually 
confront the physician. He has been very successful in his work, and 
is now accorded a gratifying patronage. He was born in .\lbion, Ne- 
braska, in 1878. and is a son of John and Ellen Halligan, the former a 
native of Ireland and a farmer by occupation. 

After acquiring his literary education in the district schools. Dr. 
Halligan, of this review, having determined upon the profession of 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 573 

medicine as a life work, spent three years as a student in the medical 
department of the University of Miciiisjan, and was afterward a student 
in the meihcal department of the Northwestern University at Chicago, 
Illinois, in lyOJ. He then entered u[xjn the active work of his profes- 
sion in Sault Ste. IMarie. where he remained for eight months, and was 
then interne at a hospital at Saginaw, Michigan. While interne he 
graduated from Saginaw Medical College in 1903. On the ist of June, 
1903, he came to Marcellus, where he has since been remarkably suc- 
cessful in his chosen field of endeavor. In 1904 Dr. Ilalligan was 
united in marriage to Miss Anna Kalthoff, a daughter of Caspar Kal- 
thoff, of Erie, Pennsylvania. She died September 12, 1904, and Dr. 
Halligan wedded ]\Iiss Ethel Apted, of Marcellus, May 17, 1906. They 
have won many friends among the residents of Marcellus, the hospi- 
tality of the best homes of the city being extended to them. 

Dr. Halligan belongs to the Modern Woodmen camp and the Mac- 
cabees tent, and he is medical examiner for both orders. In politics he 
is a Republican, but witliout political aspiration, preferring to give his 
time and attention to his professional duties. 

FRANK ENGLE. 

The farming interests of Pokagon township have a worthy repre- 
sentative in Frank Engle, who is living on section 14, where he owns 
and operates a good farm that is equipped with modern conveniences 
and improvements. He is a native son of Michigan, his birth having 
occurred in \^an Buren county on the i6th of September, ■ 1855. His 
father, Benjamin Franklin Engle, was born in Allegany county. New 
Y^ork, on the 2nd of April, 1S33, and was the fifth in order of birth in a 
family of seven children. In June, 1S44, when a youth of eleven years, 
he became a resident of Van Buren county, Michigan, to which district 
he removed with his parents. There he spent about twenty-one years, 
and in 1S65 he came to Cass county, taking up his abode in LaGrange 
township. Upon this place he built a house and then with characteristic 
energy began the improvement of his eighty-acre farm, which he placed 
under a high state of cultivation. In addition to the tilling of the soil 
and the raising of cereals best adapted to soil and climate, he also devoted 
considerable attention to fruit culture. He was married on the 23d of 
December. 1854. to iliss Lovina Elliott, a daughter of Jonathan Elliott. 
This union was blessed with five children. Frank. May, Silas, Hattie 
and Laura, but the last named is now deceased. All were born in A^'an 
Buren county, but were reared and educated in Cass county. In the 
course of an' active business career Mr. Engle was always respected by 
reason of his genuine worth and fair dealing, never being known to take 
advantage of the necessities of his fellow men in any trade transaction. 
In politics he voted with the Republican party, but was without aspira- 
tion for office for himself. His wife passed away February 3, 1901. 



674 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Frank Engle spent the first ten years of his life in the county of his 
nativity and then with his parents took up his abode on what is' known 
as the old farm homestead in LaGrange township. He assisted in the 
arduous task of clearing the fields and planting tiie crops, and remained 
on the old home farm until 1896, when he removed to his present jjlnce 
of residence — a well improved farm of eighty acres in Pokagon town- 
ship. His time and attention have since been given to the further de- 
velopment of this property and through the rotation of crops, the use of 
modern machinery and the exercise of practical common sense in his 
work he has won a comfortable competence and made for himself a 
place among the substantial agriculturists of his community. Fie has 
set out a good orchard oa his place which yields its fruits in season, 
and he has also made other impro\ements in keeping with the modern 
spirit of agricultural progress. 

On the 28th of March. 1878, Mr. Engle was married to ■Miss Lou 
M. Tremmel, a daughter of Jacob and Martha (Woods) Tremmel. 
The Woods family were the thirfl white family to settle in Berrien 
county, Michigan, and they came to Cass county in 1S54, taking up 
their abode in Howard township. It was upon that place that Mrs. 
Engle was born and reared, being the third in a family of eight children, 
of whom two are now deceased. Her father died in December, 1879, 
and was sun-ived by bis wife until January, 1SS3, when she, too, 
passed away. ^Ir. and Mrs. Fugle have become the parents of three 
children, of whrjm two are living: Lena, born August 31, 1879; and 
Mable, born April 25. 1886. The youngest, Walter, was born January 
21, 1889, and died on the i^tb of June, ic)04. Mable and \\'altcr were 
born in Morgan county, Indiana, while Lena's birth occurred on the 
old home farm in this county. 

Mr. Engle is a stanch advocate of temperance principles, as is indi- 
cated by the fact that lie exercises bis right of franchise in support of 
the candidates of the Prohibition party. He belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows of Pokagon, and holds membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church at Dowagiac. In all life's relations he is found 
loyal to the trust reposed in him. and be earnestly espouses and sup- 
ports every cause in which be l^elieves. 

SAMUEL F. SKINNER. 

Samuel F. Skinner, who is successfully carrying on general farm- 
ing on section 12, Porter township, was bom October t6, 1853, in this 
county, his parents being Nathan and Sophia fDayhuff) Skinner. He 
is the' voungest in a familv of four children, one of whom died in in- 
fancy. ' His voutb was passed in bis native township and his education 
was acquired in the district schools, where he mastered the usual branches 
of English learning. He was trained to farm work and early learned 
the best methods and time of planting and cultivating the fields, so 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 575 

tliat when he began farming on his own account he had good practical 
experience to aid him. As a companion and helpmate for htVs journey 
he chose Miss Rachel .Maria Roof, a daughter of Daniel and Catherine 
(Eberhard) Roof, the parents being early settlers and well known farm- 
ing people of Porter township, where Mrs. Skinner was born. Her 
father is now deceased but her mother is still living, and has reached 
the very advanced age of eighty-seven years. ;Mrs. Skinner is the only 
daughter and the younger of two children, her brother being David 
Roof. One daughter has been born of this union, Mary R., who 
graduated in the high school at \\andalia in the class of 1895, and she 
spent almost two years in Albion College studying music, and is now 
a teacher of instrumental music. It was Xovember 26, 1874, that 
Raciiel AI. Roof gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Skinner, and they 
located upon the old homestead farm, where they lived for one year. 
On the expiration of that period they removed to section 2, Porter 
township, where he carried on general fanning, placing his fields under 
a high state of ailtivation. There he resided until he again located 
upon the old homestead farm, where he remained until 1890, when he 
removed to his present place of residence on section 12, Porter town- 
ship. Here he has a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, and the 
soil is rich and alku'ial, responding readily to the cultivation placed 
thereon, so that he annually harvests good crops. In addition to the 
raising of the cereals best ada])ted to soil and climate he is also engaged 
in stock raising, making a six?cialty of high grade hogs. In both 
branches of his business he has met with very gratifying success and is 
now one of the prosperous aiul enterprising agriculturists of Porter 
township. 

When age conferred upon Mr. Skinner the right of franchise he 
identified his interests with those of the Republican party, which he has 
continuously and loyally supported. As every true .American citizen 
should do, iie keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day 
and has taken an active and helpful part in the support of the party in 
which he belie\es. He was justice of the peace for several years, ren- 
dering decisions which were strictly fair and impartial. He was also 
constable, and in 1901 he was elected township supen-isor. to which 
position he has since been re-elected, so that he has held the office 
continuously for five years, being the incumbent at the present time. 
He has also served as school oft'icer since he attained the age of twenty- 
one years, and the cause of education finds in him a warm and helpful 
friend, for he does all in his power to advance the success of the schools 
through the employment of good teachers and upholding the standard 
of instruction. He belongs to Tent No. 805. Knisrhts of the Maccabees, 
at Jones, and Tvlrs. Skinner to the L. O. T. M.. Hive No. 353. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church in that village, and is very 
active and helpful in church work, sen-ing as one of the trustees and 
co-operating in various lines of church activity. During fifty-two years 



576 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

he has Hved in Porter township, and that his hfe has been honorable 
and upright is indicated by the fact that many of his stanchcst friends 
are numliered among those who have known him from boyhood to the 
present time. 

EDWARD T. AIOTLEY. 

Edward T. Motley is now the owner of a well improved farm 
comprising two hundred and thirty-one acres, situated on section lo, 
Porter township, and his careful sujiervision and practical labors are 
indicated in the neat and thrifty appearance of the place. He is one of 
the native sons of this township, his birth having here occurred on the 
7th of October, 1848. In the paternal line he comes of English lineage. 
His father, James Motley, was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 
August, 1805, was there reared and educated, and in that country was 
first married. He had one daughter. Elizabeth, who is now the wife 
of Samuel H. Gilbert, one of the early settlers and worthy citizens of 
Porter township. It was in the year ^STty that James Motley came to 
Michigan, settling fir?t in Washtenaw county, where he remained for 
three years, when, in 1840, he took up his abode in Porter township, 
Cass countv He was married a second time. Miss Bethesda McNicl 
becoming his wife in New York. She w^as born in New York and was 
a daughter of John McNiel, who w-as of Scotch descent. The parents 
of our subject took up their abode on section 23, Porter township, in 
1840, and there they spent their remaining days, both attaining an ad- 
vanced age, James ]\Iotley passing away at the age of eighty-five years, 
while his wife was in her eighty-first year when she was called to her 
final rest. Thev were the parents of nine children, six of whom reached 
maturity, while four of the number are yet living at this writing, in 1906. 

Edward T. Motley, the seventh child and fourth son of the family, 
was reared in the usual manner of farm lads in a pioneer locality. He 
had few advantages, no event of special importance occurring to vary 
the routine of farm life for him in his boyhood days. He lived with 
his parents on the old homestead and acquired his early education in 
the district schools, while later he enjoyed the benefit of a course in 
Kalamazoo College. He was engaged in teaching in the winter seasons 
for about ten years in Cass countv, and in Washington, near Walla 
Walla, while in the summer months he followed farming on the old 
homestead, and there resided continuously until about iqoi. 

Mr. Motley was first married in 1882. the lady of his choice being 
Miss Florence Sharp, and unto them was bom a daughter. Florence. 
The wife and mother passed away in 1885. and in iSQfS ^Mr. :Motley 
was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Sarah A. Driskel, 
a daughter of Peter Smith and the widow of Oscar P. Driskel. They 
resided on the old home place until TQOi. when Mr. Motley purchased 
the farm whereoti he now resides. It comprises two hundred and 
thirty-one acres of good land, and upon the place is a substantial resi- 



HISTORY Ol' CASS COUNTY 577 

dence, also barns and oulbuildinys for llie shelter of grain and stock. 
The larni^ is well fenced, there is good improved machinery, and in 
fact all of the equipments of a model farm are found uj^in this place 
and indicate the progressive spirit of the owner. He is practical in his 
methods and has therefore accomplished excellent results, being now 
one of the substantial agriculturists of his community. 

In his political views Mr. Motley is an earnes't and unfaltering 
Republiam, and has been called to various township offices. The first 
position which he ever held was that of township clerk, serving therein 
for two years. He was also township supervisor of schools and high- 
way commissioner for seven years, and for sixteen years he acted as 
_,ustice of the peace, in which office he was strictly fair and impartial, 
rendering decisions which were seldom reversed by the higher courts. 
He was also school inspector, was township treasurer for one year and 
has been supervisor. He was elected to the last named office in 1S79, 
and was re-elected in 1S86 and again in 18S7. Then after an interval 
of seven years he was chosen for the same office in 1S98, 1S99 and 1900, 
making his incuml:iency in the office cover a period of eight years. No 
higher testimonial of capability could be given than the fact that he has 
heen so many times chosen to positions of political preferment. He is 
a member of the Grange and at one time was connected with the Knights 
of the Maccabees. He has been a lifelong resident of Cass county and 
is a worthy representative of a prominent pioneer family. The name 
of Motley has ever stood for advancement and improvement, not only 
in agricultural lines hut also in general citizenship, and like the others 
of the family, Edward T. T^Iotley has given his allegiance and support 
to many movements which have had direct and important bearing upon 
the welfare and upbuilding of the count}'. 

BYRON FIERO. 

Byron Fiero is a prominent farmer residing on section 5, La- 
Grange township. His liirthplace was a little log cabin in this town- 
ship and his natal day September 8, 1853. ^^'^ father was Abram 
Fiero, and the famdy histoiy is given on another page in this work in 
connection with the sketch of John Fiero. a brother of the subject of 
this review. 

Byron Fiero was the second child and second son in his father's 
family and was reaied upon the old homestead farm, while in the dis- 
trict schools of LaGrange township he began his education, which was 
afterward completed in the high school of Dowagiac. Later he en- 
gaged in teaching school for seven terms, spending five terms of that time 
as teacher in district No. 6 and the remainder of the time in the Dewey 
and [Maple Grove districts. When still a youth he became familiar with all 
the work incident to the development and cultivation of a farm, and 
during the greater part of his life has carried on general agricultural 



578 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

pursuits. Ke ^va?. however, engaged for three years in tlie dairv busi- 
ness, dehvering: milk to Dowagiac. He has one hundred and'eiglUy 
acres of land, most of which is under cultivation, and the well' tilled 
fields return to him golden harvests for the lalior that he he-tuws ui)on 
the land. 

On the 24th of December. 1874, was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Fiero and ]\Iiss Emma Webster, a daughter of Nelson and Mary 
Weljstcr. She died leaving one child, Winnie, who is now the wife 
of Harry Larzalere, of LaGrange township. In 1888 Mr. I-'iero was 
again married, ]\Iiss Iva Wright, a daughter of Milton and FJizaheth 
Myers Wright, becoming his wife. They have a pleasant home in the 
midst of a good farm, and its hospitality is greatly enjoyed by their many 
friends. Mr. Fiero was reared in the faith of the Republican party, 
but for some time has given his political allegiance to the Democracy. 
He became candidate of his party for probate judge in 1896, but lost the 
election by twenty-one votes. He has filled the office of township treas- 
urer in LaGrange township for two terms, and in the discharge of all 
public duties has been prompt and faitliful, and is deeply interested in 
everything pertaining to general progress and improvement. He be- 
longs to the Modern Woodmen Camp at Dowagiac, and is well known 
in the county where his entire life has been passed. He has largely con- 
centrated his efforts upon the management of his farm, and has been 
found reliable ni business, at the same time ever manifesting those traits 
of character which have made him best liked where best known. 

SIL.-\S H. THOMAS. 

The connection of Silas li. Thomas with the interests of Cass 
county dates back to an early period in its development and settlement. 
He is now a resident of Wandalia, wdiere he is enjoying in well earned 
ease the fruits of his former toil. He was for many years closely asso- 
ciated with agricultural interests in the county and kept in touch with 
the onward march of progress along agricultural lines. His birth oc- 
curred in Grant county. Indiana, on the 14th of ]\Iay. 1S32. His pa- 
ternal grandfather was Elijah Thomas, a native of South Carolina, who 
removed from that state to Indiana, taking with him his family and 
casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers of Wayne county. He was 
the father of Samuel Thomas, who was also born in South Carolina and 
was a young lad at the time of his parents' removal to the west. He 
was therefore reared and educated in the Hoo=ier state and after arriv- 
in"- at vears of maturity was married there to Miss Sarah Bogue, a na- 
tive ofNorlh Carolina and a daughter of Benjamin Bogue. whose birth 
occurred in the same state. In religious faith they were Friends or 
Ouakers. Soon after his marriage Samuel Thomas located in Grant 
countv, Indiana, where the towTi of ]\Iarion now stands, and there he 
was engaged in farming until his removal to Penn township, Cass 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY oia 

county, in 1842. Here he located on a part of tlie land now comprised 
within the corporation limits of \'andaiia in the eastern part of the town. 
He readied the age of only forty-nine years and then passed away, leav- 
ing behind the priceless heritage of an untarnished name, for his entire 
life was in harmony with his professions as a member of the Friends' 
church. He took a \ery active part in its work and was very deeply 
interested in the cause of moral development as well as material prog- 
ress in his community. Flis wife long survived him and passed away 
wlicn about se\-enty-three years of age. In their family were seven chil- 
dren, si.N: sons and a daughter, and with one exception all reached adult 
age, while four are still living. 

Silas FI. Thomas of this review was the third chikl and third son 
of the family. He continued a resident of his native county during- 
the hrst ten years of his life, after which he accompanied liis parents 
on their removal to Cass county. He was reared in Penn township, 
sharing in the hardships and privations of existence on the frontier. 
When he was about seventeen years of age his father removed to St. 
Joseph county, ^Michigan, and there Silas H. Thomas remained for six 
years, after wliich he returned to Penn township. No event of special 
importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for him in his lx)y- 
hoofl days. He pursued his educatirju in the public schools and worked 
in the fields during the summer months, performing the farm lalxir with 
such primitive agricultural implements as then existed. The work of 
the farm was at that time nnich more arduous than at the present, when 
the agriculturist can ride over his fields upon the planter or mower and 
when impro\cd machinery of various kinds takes the place of hand 
labor. 

On the 7th of May, 1S56, ^Ir. Thomas was united in marriage to 
Miss l-llvina Bogue, a member of one of tlie well known and prominent 
pioneer families of southern I\Iichigan, her parents being Stephen and 
Hannah (East) Bogue. She was born in Penn township January ig. 
1836, and has spejit lier entire life in this township. Fler parents came 
to Cass county in 183 1, and took up their abode on Y'oung's Prairie 
when much of the land was still in its primitive condition. The break- 
ing plow had not yet turned the furrciws upon many a tract and it was 
only here and there in the edge of the forest that clearings had been 
made. The Piogues were pioneer settlers and the name is closely asso- 
ciated with the early anrl substantial development of this portion of 
Michigan. Mr. Bogue made the journey on horseback from Preble 
county, Ohio, and afterward returned in the same manner to his old 
home, where he then made arrangements to bring his family to the 
wilds of ]\Iichigan. IMrs. Thomas was the third in a family of six 
children. Fler father was married twice and Mrs. Thomas was born 
of the second marriage. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Thomas took up their abode upon a rented farm, on 



580 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

whicli they lived lor three years, after which they removed to the woods 
on section 34, Penn township, their home being a h'ttle log cabin twenty 
by twenty-four feet. In that house they resided until 1S71, when the 
present coninsodious and attractive good farm residence was built. As 
the years passed ^h: Thomas continued the work of clearing and culti- 
vating the land and he added to his original purchase until he now 
owns one hundred and sixty acres. He placed the fields under a high 
state of cultivation, fenced his land and added modern equipments and 
accessories. His time and energies were devoted to farm work until he 
retired from active business, locating in Vandalia in 1904. In the mean- 
time, however, he had lived in the village for seven years and had then 
again taken up his abode on the farm, where he continued, as before 
stated, until he came to occupy his present home in 1904. 

Unto Mr. and Airs. Thomas have been born six children : James 
Arthur, now deceased; Edwin F., who has also passed away; May E., 
the wife of Rev. R. \V. Gammon, of Pueblo, Colorado, a minister of 
the Congregational church now located in Decatur, Illinois; Blanche A., 
the wife of C. Al. Ratliff, an attorney at law of Marion, Indiana, and 
a leading worker in the ranks of the Republican party, now serving as 
chairman of the county central committee and a member of the commit- 
tee for the congressional district comprising Grant and Blackford coun- 
ties, but now retired from the practice of law and now a farmer; Flor- 
ence A., the wife of Re\'. Frank Fox, a minister of the Congregational 
church at Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and Cora A., who died in 1890. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas also have the following grandchildren, namely: 
Grace B., Carlton R.. Claude F., Genevra and Mark H. Ratliff, and 
Florence E., Harold W'., Clement S., Mary A. and Rachel Fox. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas reared their family in Penn town.sliip and the liv- 
ing children were all married there with one exception. Mr. Thomas is 
a stalwart Republican. His father and also his wife's father were iden- 
tified with the Abolition party and their homes were stations on the 
famous "underground railroad," whereby they assisted many a fugitive 
negro on his way to freedom in the nortli, being strongly opposed to the 
system of slavery. Both Air. and Mrs. Thomas are members of tlic 
Society of Friends or Quakers and he has been an elder in the church 
for twenty-five years and in its work has taken a very acti\-e and help- 
ful part. He is an honest man, fearless in defense of what he believes 
to be right, active in support of many measures and movements for the 
general good, and his personal worth of character has endeared him to 
a large circle of warm friends. 

Since the above was written Mr. Thomas lost his dear companion 
in life. They had almost passed a half century together as husband 
and wife, traveling together hand in hand, and had shared alike the joys 
and sorrows of this life as loving husband and wife. The family cir- 
cle is now broken, and the vacant chair is seen in the home. Tlie place 



HISTORY UF CASS COUNTY 5M 

of mutht-r and wile can never be filled again. We append the ohituarj 
of Mrs. Thomas, which appeared in The Cassopolis Vigilant April 19, 
1906: 

■' Elvira Bogiie was born in Penn township January 19. 1836, and 
married Silas H. Thomas, who survives her, I\Iay 7, 1S56. She died at 
her home in Vandalia April 12, 1906. Six children were bom to this 
union. 'Jdiree preceded the mother by many years and three, ^Irs. Gam- 
mon of Decatur, Illinois, Mrs. Ratliff of Fairmount, Indiana, and Mrs. 
Fox of Sioux F'alls, South Dakota, were with her the last few days of 
life to comfort and console her in her great suffering. There were also 
at her bedside her sister, ]Mrs. Amos Smith, and brothers, W. E. and S. 
A. Bogue. Mrs. James E. Bonine, another sister, was unable to be pres- 
ent. While her lite liad many shadows, there was much of sunshine and 
deep love for family and friends. A few more weeks would liave 
brought the fiftieth anniversary of her married life. Instead there is a 
grand reunion over yonder. A life-long member of the F'ricnds' church, 
and a faithful officer in the same, slie worked and prayed and overcame 
and now rests. Funeral services were conducted Ijy Rev. Stephen Scott 
at the Friends" church, Vandalia, Saturday at ten o'clock. Interment 
at Prairie Grove cemetery. iMfteen members of the Valentine Associa- 
tion attended the funeral and each one impressively placed a floral offer- 
ing on the casket of the departed member." 

DAN M. HARVEY. 

A valuable farm of two luni<lrcd ;ind twenty acres on section 3, 
Porter township, is the property of Dan M. Harvey, who is accounted 
one of the leading and represcntati\e agriculturists of his community, 
early gaining recognition of the fact that success is the outcome of in- 
dustry, determination and laudabile ambition, who has throughout an 
active life so directed his efforts that excellent results have attended 
his labors. His life record began on the i8th of February, 1842, in 
Constantine township, St. Joseph county, !\Iichigan, and he represents 
oue of the old and prominent pioneer families of the state. His paternal 
grandfather, Ejihraim Har\-ey, was a native of \'"ermont, and was a son 
of Philip Harvey, who was one of the heroes of the Revolutionary war, 
who came to America from the north of England, and when the colonies 
attempted to threv.- off the yoke of British oppression he fought for 
independence. Norman Harvey, father of our subject, was also a native 
of Vermont. In early manhood he heard the "call of the west." and 
imbued with the hope of enjoying better business privileges in this sec- 
tion of the country, he made his way to Michigan, settling in St. Joseph 
county in 1832. ' The entire district was largely wild and unimproved 
and he took up land from the government, after which he located upon 
his claim, where he \\\t<\ for some time. He was not onl}- connected 
with agricultural interests, however, but also became a promoter of 



582 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

industrial interests and built the first factory and was a partner in the 
first carriage foundry and woolen mills in that county, fie also built 
and operated a large grist mill and established the first hardware and 
tinware store in Constantine, Michigan. His activity and enterprise 
proved strong and potent elements in the development of his part of the 
state and he was recognized as one of the leading men of his community, 
who wielded a wide influence and left the impress of his individuality 
for good upon the work of upbuilding. As he prospered in his under- 
takings he i)laccd cimsiderable money in the safest of all investments — 
real estate — am! at one time owned more land than any other man in the 
county. He was extreincly successful in his business affairs in accumu- 
lating money and land, and his prosperity was well merited, not only 
by reason of the fact that he possessed keen discernment in business 
affairs and unfaltering diligence, but also l>ecause his methods were 
ever straightforward and honorable, and would bear closest investiga- 
tion and scrutiny. He also aided many others in buying farms, and in 
this way contributed to the settlement of the county. He was a good 
man, honest and honorable at all times, and was never known to take 
advantage of the necessities of another in any business transaction. He 
had a very wide and favorable acquaintance in the county, and his 
death was the occasion of deep regret, when at the age of sixty years 
he was called from this life. He laid out many roads in the county 
and otherwise contributed to its material improvement. He started the 
first bank in Constantine, and afterward organized the First National 
Bank. His business interests were of a character that contributed not 
only to individual success but also to the public prosperity, and his 
name is inscparalily interwoven with the history of St. Joseph county, 
where he lived and labored to such goodly ends. His early political sup- 
port was given to the ^\'hig party, but upon the organization of the new 
Republican party he joined its ranks and remained one of its stalwart 
advociites. He held manv township offices and he also figured in mili- 
tary circles, being captain in the .state militia. In early manhood he 
married Miss Rhoda Moore, a native of Rupert, Vemiont, and a 
daughter of Seth IMoore, who was also born there and was of \\'elsh 
descent. Mrs. Harvey passed away at the age of fifty-four years, and 
like her husband was held in warm regard, for she possessed many 
estimable qualities of heart and mind. This worthy couple became the 
parents of thirteen children, most of whom reached adult age. 

Dan M. Harvey, the eighth child of the family, was reared in Con- 
stantine township in St. Joseph county, and was educated in the Union 
schools at Constantine and in Hillsdale College. He also pursued a 
commercial course in Bryant & Stratton's College at Detroit. Mich- 
igan, and was thus well qualified for life's practical and responsible 
duties when he entered upon his business career. He was thus con- 
nected with the hardware trade at Constantine, where he established a 
store and conducted business for some time. On disposing of his hard- 



HISTORY or CASS COUNTY 583 

ware stock lie engai:;fcl in the lumlier business and also carried on farm- 
ing and stock raising. He remained a resident of St. Josei>li county 
until 1871, when he removed to his present farm on section 3. Porter 
township. He purcha.scd four hundred and fifty acres of land, hut in 
recent years, wishing to retire from active business life, has sold part 
of the place and now owns two hundred and twenty acres. All oi this 
land he operates himself. 

Oa the 2;-,th of July, 1S67, Mr. Harvey was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary E., daughter of Pliilo Hovey, and they have four children: 
Helen, died in infancy; Delia, now the wife of Rev. Charles Eastman, 
a Baptist minister: D. Elliert. living in Constantine: and Mary Alice. 
the wife of Rev. O. V. Wheeler, a minister of the Baptist denomination, 
who occupies the pulpit of a prominent church in Chicago, and his wife 
is also a worker in the church. The chihlren have all received collegiate 
training. D. Elbert, the son. is foreman in tlie Carbolite Factory in 
Constantine. Michigan. Mr. and ]\Ir.>. Harvey have several of the old 
parchment deeds executed under the hand and seal of President Andrew 
Jackson, which are valuable souvenirs in the family. 

Mr. Plarvey has always voted the Republican ticket. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and in his life exemplifies the benefi- 
cent spirit of the craft. He is well known in Cass county, where he 
has now lived for many years, and he has gained a large number of 
friends by reason of his cordial manner, kindly disposition and affability. 
In business life he has displayed excellent qualifications and now he is 
living retired, enjoying the fruits of former toil. 

BRUCE BEEBE. 

Bruce Bcebe is an honored veteran of the Civil war and a citizen 
well worthv of representation in the history of [Marcellus and Cass 
county, because be displays many sterling traits of character and the 
qualifications of good citizenship as \\ell. He was birn in Huron 
county. Ohio. August 27. 1840, and has been a resident of Marcellus 
since the spring of 1848, when he came to Michigan with his parents. 
Roswell R. and Man,- (Young) Beebe. The father was a native of 
Wilkesbarre. Pennsylvania, bom on the 3d of November, 1806. He 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Ohio. Both his father and 
mother were nati^■es of Connecticut, were of English descent and w^ere 
representatives of ancestry that was connected with Xew England his- 
tory from earlv colonial days. When a young lad Roswell R. Beebe 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Ohio, where he was reared 
and married. He devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits, thus 
providing for -his family. His political allegiance was given to the 
Whig partv until its dissolution, when he joined the ranks of the new 
Republican partv, continuing one of its stanch supiv^rters until his death 
in April, 1893. He had for more than a half century survived his wife. 



5Si HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

who passed away in 1840, wlien her son was only two weeks old. The 
father afterward married again. He had three children by his first 
marriage and two by the second, and the family record is as follows: 
Gideon T., now living in Marcellns; Sally Lee, deceased; Bruce, of this 
review; Byron R., who is also living in Alarcellus; and Mrs. Wealthy 
Currier, who is also living in JNIarceJlus. 

As previously stated, Bruce Beebe was a lad of eight years when he 
came with his father to ;Michigan. There was no village on the present 
site of Alarcellus, the entire tract being covered with the natural forest 
growth. The family home was established on section i. Marcellus 
township, on a farm of two hundred and sixty acres, from sixty acres 
of which the timh.er had been cut. Upon that farm Bruce Beebe aided 
in the arduous task of further developing the land and bringing it under 
a high state of cultivation. He .>bared in all the work of tlie fields and 
after he had attained his majority continued to engage in general 
agricultural pursuits. He resided upin the old home place until Sep- 
tember. 1S97, when he removed to the village of Marcellus. He still 
owns, however, eighty acres of the farm and his brother. Byron R., also 
owns eigluy acres of it. Bruce Beebe likewise has two acres within the 
corporation limits of ]Marccllus, and has a good residence which he 
erected. His entire life ihroughout his business career has been 'devoted 
to general farming pursuits with the exception of three years which 
were spent in the arm}'. 

It w^as on the iith of August, 1862, that ]\Ir. Beebe, prompted by 
a spirit of patriotism and loyalty, tendered his_ services to the govern- 
ment and became a member of Company D, Twenty-fifth Michigan 
Volunteer Infantry, under command of Colonel Orlando H. ]Moore. 
He participated in various important engagements, including the battles 
of Mumfordsville. Kingston. Tennessee, Mossy Creek, Tunnel Hill, 
Rocky Face, Georgia, Resaca. Cassville, Ottawa River, Altoona. Pine 
Mountain, Lost ^Mountain, Gulp Farm, Kenesaw. Atlanta, East 
Point, Otter Creek, the siege of Atlanta and the battles of Jonesboro, 
Rome and Cedar Bluff. He was thus in many hotly contested engage- 
ments and was often in the thickest of the fight, never faltering in the 
performance of any military duty assigned him, whether it called him to 
the firing line or stationed him on the lonely picket line. After about 
three years war service he became ill and was sent to the hospital, from 
which he was discharged on the 31st of March, 1865. He then rejoined 
his regiment and was honorably discharged from the army after the 
close of the war, on the 2fith of June, 1865, being at that time in North 
Carolina. He returned home with a most creditable military record, 
and he deserves the credit and praise which should ever be bestowed 
upon the loyal soldier who defended the L^nion. 

On die nth of October. iSi'-^Q. Mr. Beehe was married to Miss 
Gertrude Lutes, who was born in Marcellus. October tt. 1851. a 
daughter of William H. Lutes. Her father married Mrs. Eugene Sat- 



HISTORY Ol- CASS CUUXTY 585 

terlie, who was a widow and bore the maiden name of Schofield. She 
was a nalive of New York. iir. Lutes arrived m JMichigaii in 1844, 
and they were married in this state. Both died in Cass county, .Mr. 
Lutes at the age of eighty-one years, while his wife passed away when 
fifty-eight years of age. He was born in W'ayne county, Xew York, 
October 30, 1S24, and died in Marcelkis, JMarch 26, 1906. Wiien 
twenty years of age he removed with his parents to Cass county and 
largely made his iiome in the vicinity of :\IarceUus from that time' until 
his death. When twenty-four years of age he married Airs. Eugene 
Satterlie, who died September 7, 1S84, and on the i6th of October, 
1888, he wedded Airs. Emily Sweet, who survives him. He was the 
father of two children. Loth of whom are living, John and Airs. Bcebe. 
He also had an adopted daughter. Airs. Hattie Aloore, now of Chicago. 
An earnest Christian man he joined the United Bretlu-cn church in early 
life, and some years afterward he united with the Alethodist Episcopal 
church, of which lie wa.s c\cr afterward a devoted and faithful member. 
At the time of the Civil war, his sympathy being with the Union cause, 
he (iffered his services Ui the go\-ernnient but was rejected. In con- 
licction with Mr. Kester an^l Jnsepli Cromley he planted the three trees 
in fnait of the Alelhodi.-i Iipi^cupal church, which add so much to its 
beauty. 

. T.'nto Air. and Airs. Beebe have l^een born a son and daughter: 
William R., who is living upon his father's farm and is married and has 
one child, Olin: and Grace K.. the wife of Edward Bond, a resident of 
Marcellus. The family is widely and favorably known in this part of 
the count}-. Air. Beebe ha\-ing long lieen a worthy and prominent repre- 
sentative of agricultural interests. In politics he is a Republican since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise. In times of peace he has 
been as faithful to his country as when he followed the old flag upon 
southern battlefields, and in military service and in private life has made 
a creditable record. 

HENRY J. FRENCH. 

Henry J. Erench. proprietor of the Eagle Lake Resort, is a native 
of Ontwa township. Cass county, born on the i6th of December. i8('>3. 
The father, Caleb French, was one of the old settlers of this part of the 
state and contributed in substantial measure to the material development 
and progress of ihe community. He was a native of Lancastershire, 
England, born on the i6th of Alay, 1828. and in his native place was 
reared. After arriving at manhood he was married in England to 
Miss Alartha lies, also a native of that country, and- two children. 
Charles and Thirza. were born unto them ere they crossed the Atlantic 
to the United States. When they came to the new world thev settled 
in Baltimore. Maryland, where they lived for about a year, and in 1856 
arrived in Cass county. Alichigan. settling in F.dwardsburg. Tliere the 
father followed the mason's trade, which he had learned in his native 



580 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

country. After aljout a year spent in Edwardsburg he removed to near 
Eagle lake, where he purchased eighty acres of land, the greater part 
of which had been improved. His first wife died during the early period 
of his residence upon that farm, passing away in iS6i, and in March, 
1863, 'le was again married, his second union Iteing with Hannah Salm- 
onson, a native of Ohio, born March 8, 1S30. Her father was Richard 
Salmons(5n, one of the pioneer settlers of this part of the state, and she 
was reared in Ontwa township amid the conditions and environments 
of pioneer life. Henrv J. P'rench was the only child born of the father's 
second marriage. In his prpliiical views Caleb French was a Democrat, 
but never sought or desired public otTice, preferring to give his undivided 
attention to his business interests, and he died upon the old home farm 
in Eebruary, 18S2. He was well known and well respected in Cass 
count}- ami enjoyed in large measure the trust and guod will of his 
fellow men. 

Henry J. F'rench was reared upon the farm which is now his home, 
and worked with his father until the latter's death. He then rented the 
farm from the other heirs for ten years and in 1892 by purchase be- 
came ])ossessor of the propert}'. In 1S97 he converted the tract neaf 
the lalce into a summer resort, calling it the Eagle Lake Resort, and has 
many visitors here during the summer months. He has made this a 
very prnductix'e [)]afc, supplied with many of the accessories which add 
to the pleasure and comfort of the summer stijourner. In his general 
agricultural pursuits he has also met with a creditable measure of suc- 
cess, having conducted his interests so carefull\' and practically that be 
has gained very gratifying prosperity. 

On the 31st of October, 18S6, ]\Ir. FYench was united in marriage 
to Miss iMyrtIc D. Lowman, a nati\-e of Jefferson township, Cass county, 
born January jg, 1866, and a daughter of John Lowman, whose birth 
occurred in Ohio in 1844. He was brought to Cass county when ten 
years of age and was reared in Jefferson township. After arriving at 
years of maturity he wedded ]Miss Nancy Keene. who was born in 
Calvin township, Cass county, in 1844. ]\Irs. French was the eldest of 
four children, two sons and two daughters, and by her marriage she 
has become the moUicr of two sons: Ford, who was born September 
8, 1892; and Harry, who was born April 8, 1895, l)Oth on the old home- 
stead. 

In his political affiliation ^Nlr. I-'rench is an earnest Democrat and 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, but is with- 
out aspiration for public office. He belongs to the Woodmen camp at 
Edwardsburg and has many friends among his brethren of the fra- 
ternity. His entire life liaving been passed in Cass county he is widely 
knowii, and he has made an excellent reputation as a thoroughly relia- 
ble, energetic and progressive business man. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 587 

GEORGE M. HADDEN. 

George 'M. Haddcn, a practical and progressive farmer who is 
profitably conducting his business interests on section 13, Milton town- 
ship, is a native son of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in 
Wayne county on the 4th of Augxist, 1841. His father, Charles D. 
Hadden, was born in Westchester county, New York, in 181 1, and he, 
too, was a farmer by occupation, devoting the greater part of his life 
to the work of tilling the soil. In early manhood he was married in 
Tompkins county. New York, tn Miss Xancy Blythe, a native of Ire- 
land, who came to this country when a little girl, and was reared in 
New '^'I'rk. ]Mr. and Mrs. Hadden became the parents of the following 
children : ]Mary, George M., Charles A., deceased ; Elizabeth and James 
G., all of whom are natives of the Empire state. In the year 1867 the 
father left New York and came with his family to Cass county, Mich- 
igan, settling on section 7, Ontwa township, where he seaired three 
hundred and ninety-seven acres of rich land, much of which had been 
improved. \\'ith characteristic energy he took up the task of further 
cultivating and developing this place, and continued to make it his 
home until his death. He took an active interest in political questions 
and in the work of the party, and was a stanch -Republican. While re- 
siding in \"ew York lie served as supervisor of his township for three 
years, but he never sought othce after coming to the west, as his time 
was fully occupied by his business cares in relation to the farm. He 
died January J9, 1878, and was survived by his wife until December, 
1887, when she, too, was called to her final rest. 

George ■M. Hadden spent the days of his boyhood and youth in the 
east, acquired a good practical education in the public schools and when 
twenty-six years of age came with his parents to Michigan, the family 
home being established in Cass county. He settled with his father upon 
the farm in Ontwa township and helped to clear and cultivate that place. 
There he resided continuously until 1875, when he removed to his pres- 
ent farm in Milton township. Tlie place originally comprised one 
hundred and twenty acres of land, but he has since extended it« bound- 
aries by additional purchase until he now has a valuable property of 
two hundred acres. Here he carries on general farming and raises such 
stock as is needed for home consumption and for carrying on the work 
of the farm. In all his methods he is practical and diligent and his 
energy and per>e\erance have been the strong and salient factors in a 
successful career. 

On the 27tli of December, 1871, Mr. Hadden was united in marriage 
to ^Miss T<'^uc Foster, a daughter of Andrew Foster, who entered from the 
government the. farm which adjoins the homestead property of 'Mr. 
Hadden. Mr. Foster was one of the honored pioneer settlers of Cass 
county, coming to this state from Pennsylvania in 183J. Few were 
the residents in this localitv at that time. Occasionally in the midst of 



5SS HISTORY Ol'- CASS COUXTY 

the forest tlie smuke might be seen ascending from the fire in some little 
cabin home, but there were long distances between the farms and the 
greater part of the country was covered with its native timber growth. 
Mr. Foster took an active and liclpful part in reclaiming the region for 
the purposes of civilization and in the improvement of his business inter- 
ests, dcNcloping an excellent farm, which gave him a good income. He 
built the house and barn which are still standing upon his old home 
place. This is one of the landmarks of the county, having for long 
years been a mute witness of the changes that have occurred and illus- 
trating by contrast the rapid progress that has been made. In his polit- 
ical views i\Ir. l-'oster was an earnest and stalwart Democrat, and was 
one of the stockholders in the National Democrat. ]\Irs. Hadden was 
born and reared on the ok! farm homestead and was the youngest of 
eight children, six of whom were born upon this farm. Unto our sub- 
ject and his wife were born four sons and two daughters, namely: 
Charles 1!., ^lary, Andrew F., Robert A., Margaret, and George L., all 
natives of Cass county, fi\X' having been born on tlie old homestead farm 
in Alillon townsliip. The elder daughter is now the wife of Victor 
D. Hawkins. 

IMr. Hadden exercises his right of franchise in su])port of the men 
and measures of the Republican party and for one term was township 
treasurer, but has had little aspiration for office, although in citizenship 
he is always loyal and progressive. He belongs to the Woodmen camp 
at EdwarJsburg and is an acti\e and honored member of the Presby- 
terian church there, in which he is now serving as elder. 

J. FRED E^IFRSON. 

J. Fred Emerson, one of the early residents of Cass county, who has 
long witnessed the growth and development that ha\-e wrought many 
changes here and brought about an advanced state of civilization, was 
born in Ontwa township, wl:ere he still lives, owning and operating one 
hundred and twenty acres of rich land. His father, IMatthew Emerson, 
was a pioneer resident of Cass county, coming to Michigan when this 
portion of the state was largely a wild and unimproved district. He 
was born m Concord county. New Hampshire, on the nth of December, 
1808, and was there reared upon his father's farm, where he remained 
until twenty-one years of age.^ The paternal grandfather, Joseph Emer- 
son, was likewise a native of the Old Granite state and became a farmer, 
devoting his entire life to the tilling of the soil. He married Miss Su- 
sanna Harvey, a descendant of Dr. Harvey, the celebrated discoverer 
of the system of the circulation of the blood. Their son ]\Iatthew was 
tlie second in-order of birth in a family of five children and was reared 
and educated in Xew Hampshire, where he early became familiar with 
farm work, also giving a portion of his time to milling and school teach- 
in"-, following tile latter profession for two or three terms. He was 



HISTORY Ol" CASS COUXTY 581> 

also einplnycd in a hardwai'e store in Alliany, New York, and in 1839, 
attracted by the business opportunities of a new but rapidly developing 
western ct.untry, he came to Cass county, Michigan, taking up his abode 
near Edwardsburg. He there planted a crop of wheat on what is now 
the Harris farm. In 1841 he removed to the old farm homestead on 
section 13, Ontwa township, at first purchasing eighty acres of par- 
tially impro\ed land. He made most of the improvements upon the 
place, however, and converted it into a splendid property. In 1S4S, ow- 
ing to ill health, he was compelled to rent his farm, and he then entered 
the employ of M. G. & M. Sage, of Adamsville, remaining in their serv- 
ice for five years, when, his health being greatly improved, he returned 
to the farm in 1853. He was then engaged in its cultivation and further 
development until his life's laliors were ended in death on the 17th of 
March, 1877. He had prospered in his undertakings and at his demise 
left a valuable property of one humlrctl and twenty acres. In 1841. in 
Adamsville, he had married Miss Alzina Allen, who was born in Ver- 
mont January 27, 1823, and was twelve years of age when slie came 
to Cass county with her parents. She was a daughter of Reuben Allen, 
who came of the same stock as Ethan Allen, the noted hero of Ticon- 
deroga in the I\.e\-olutionary war. Mrs. Emerson was the eldest of 
three children, the brother being Joseph Allen, who died in 1889, and 
the sister Antinette, now the widow of ]\Iurry Morse, of Jefferson town- 
ship, Cass county. It was in the year 1835 that the .Allen family was 
established in Mason township. Mr. and Mrs. Emerson became the 
parents of three sons, of whom the second died in infancy. J. Fred is 
the eldest and Allen at present lives in Eucbanan, ^Michigan. Pie com- 
menced to learn the trade of coach and carriage making at seventeen 
years of age in the city of Buffalo, New York. In September, 1879, he 
went to Buchanan and worked at bis trade a number of years, while at 
present he is engaged in the furniture and vmdertaking business. He 
married Miss Ida Wea\cr, a member of an old and very highly respected 
family of the vicinitw The father was a Democrat in bis political views 
and served for' many years as justice of the peace, his decisions being 
strictly fair and impartial. His religious faith was indicated by his 
membership in the Baptist church. 

J. Fred Emerson was reared upon the old farm homestead, work- 
ing in the fields through the summer months, or until after the crops 
were harvested in the late autumn. The public schools afforded him his 
educational privileges. • He was married October 23, 1878. going to 
Vermont for his bride, who in her maidenhood bore the name of Delia 
A. Thomas. She was born January 27, 1847, and died November 24, 
1900. She was a daughter of Horace and Anna (\A''ainwright) Thomas, 
farming people of the Green ^.fountain state. With his young wife Mr. 
Emerson returned to Cass county, and the marriage has been blessed 
with two children: Ralph \V., who was born November 8, 1879. and 
is now a bookkeeper in Elkhart, Indiana ; and Fred Ray, who was born 



590 ^HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

February 14, 1885, and is at home, assisting- his fatlier in the operation 
of the farm. 

Tlirougliout liis entire hfe ]\lr. F.merson has devoted ln"s attention 
and energies to tlie occupation to which he was reared, and is to-day the 
owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land in Ontwa townsliip, all 
improved. L'pon the place aie sulistantial buildings, good farm machin- 
er>' and other modern equipments that facilitate the work of the farm. 
Mr. Emerson votes with the Democracy and like his father has served 
for a number of years as justice of the peace, "winning golden opinions 
from all sorts of people" by his "even-handed justice." His life has 
been laigely passed in a quiet manner, and yet he has displayed the 
sterling characteristics of an honoraljle manhood and loyal citizenship. 

CARLETON \V. RINEHART. 

Carleton W. Rinehart, county clerk of Cass county and a resident 
of Casso[)olis, was hiirn in Porter townshii> on the 22nd of Xovember, 
1869. His paternal grandfather was a native of Gennany and his mater- 
nal grandfather v.-as born in Scotland. The former, John Rinehart, be- 
came a pioneer resident of Cass county and entered from the govern- 
ment what is now known as the James Bonine farm in Penn township, 
selling it some years later to the gentleman whose name it bears. He 
then removed to Porter township and improved another farm. His 
son, Abraham Rinehart, was born in Virginia and when thirteen }ears 
of age remo\cd w ith his parents ti> the vicinity of Dayton. Ohio. Alxmt 
1S29 the fann'ly came to Cass county, and he was reared amid the wild 
scenes and environments of pioneer life. He was first married to I\Tiss 
Elizabeth Owen, of Illinois, who died about a year later, and he after- 
ward married Hannah F". Denton, who was born in the state of New 
York and was brought to Cass county in her girlhood days. ]\Ir. and 
Mrs. Rinehart then located in Porter township upon a farm, where he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits for many "years, his last days 
being spent upon the old homestead there. He died Septemlier 3, 1895. 
at the age of seventy-eight years, respected and honored by all who 
knew him. In politics he was a stanch Republican, and he was a prom- 
inent representative of the Baptist church, becoming a charter member 
of the Baltimore Prairie church. In its work be took an active and help- 
ful interest, and his life was ever characterized by honorable, strong and 
manly principles. In his family were eleven children, six of whom 
reached adult age. 

Carleton W. Rinehart, the youngest of the family, was reared in 
his native township, early becoming familiar with farm work in all of 
its departments, and when he was nineteen years of age he joined his 
brother Clarence in the purchase of all the stock and farming imple- 
ments of the old homestead, after which they carried on general farm- 
ing. The partnership in the management of the farm was maintained 



KISTORV OF CASS COUXTY ■,'.n 

for luur years, at ilie end nf wliicli time Carleton W". Rinehart bought 
his brother's interest and operated tlie farm alone for a year. On the 
expiralion of that period he removed to IMason township, 'wliere lie was 
engaged in farming until elected county clerk in 1904. In addition to 
the tilling of the soil he engaged quite extensively in raising, buying and 
shipping fruit, and his business was profitably conducted. "^ 

On tiie 25th of November, 1S91, :\Ir. Rinehart was married to Miss 
Grace iVlcKissick, a daughter of }v[oses and Clara (Wilkinson) McKis- 
sick. Air. Rinehart has been a lifelong Republican, active in the inter- 
ests of the party, and his efforts have been efl'ective and far reaching in 
its behalf. As a public ofiicer he is most loyal to his duty, and over'^the 
record of his public career and his private life there falls no shadow of 
wrong or suspicion of evil. He belongs to the b>eewill Baptist church 
at Union and is temperate in his habits. It will thus be seen that his 
years have bei;n characterized by upright manhood and by strict fidel- 
ity to a high standard of moral conduct. 

JOHN \V. AIECHLING. 

John W. Mechling is now living retired in the village of Union 
but for many years was closely identified with industrial interests, de- 
voting his time and energies to many business duties, with the result 
tliat success attended his work and now enables him to rest without 
recourse to further lalx)r. He was born in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania on the 2Sth of July. 1S2S. His father. Phillip Mechling. 
was a native of Pennsylvania and spent the days of his liovhood and 
youtli in that state. Removing to the west he took up his abode in 
Elkhart county. Indiana. He spent the first winter, however — that of 
i^3S — in South Bend. He then located four miles east of Elkhart and 
remained a resident of that locality until called to his final home, lack- 
ing but one month of being ninety years of age at the time of hi? demise. 
His wife, who bore the maiden name of Charlotte Shoemaker, died 
in 1844. In their family were thirteen children, of whom John W. 
was the youngest of a family of seven daughters and six sons, but all 
are now deceased with the exception of Mr. Mechling of this review 
and his sister. Airs. AIar\' Jones, who is now eighty years of age and 
makes her home in Porter township. 

John W. Alechling spent the first seven years of his life in the 
state of his nativity and then accompanied his parents on their removal 
to Indiana, where he lived for a decade. About 1845. ^^ came to Cass 
county, settling in Union, where he worked at any business that he 
could find to do. He was afterward engaged in the operation cf a 
sawmill and also gave his attention to buying and selling produce. Init 
in 1861 he put aside all business cares and personal considerations and 
offered his aid to his country, then engaged in the Civil war. He had 
watched with interest the progress of events in the south, had noted 



5t»2 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

tlie thrcaleniny attitude of the slave-lioldiiio^ community and determined 
that if an attempt was made to overthrow the Union he would strike 
a blow in its defense. He therefore enlisted as a member of Company 
A, Chandler's Horse Guard, servinij lor three months. He afterward 
carried the mail from Bristol to L'nion for eight years and subsequently 
was engaged for a numl;cr of \cars in blacksmiihing at Union. 

Mr. Mechling was marrie.i in iS6i to Miss Lovisa V. Dibble, and 
unto them were born two daughters and one son, but Lydia L. and 
I^ttie 1^. are both decea'^eil. The son, Joiin D., still resides with his 
father. 'I he wife md mother jias^eil awa-(- .\pril ii, 1904. .She was 
an estimai)!e lai!\-, liavnig niaii_\- good traits of character and hei loss 
was regrcttccl liy m.uiy fricmls. 

]Mr. Mecidiiig is now retired fr(^m active l.msiness after a busy 
and useful life. He receives a pension of seventeen dollars per month 
because of ill health incurred liy his service in the war. He is a member 
of the ]\Iasonic fraternity and has taken a very active and helpful part 
in public affairs, his political allegiance being given to the Democracy, of 
which, he is a stanch advocate. He served as deputy sheriff for si.x 
years, has been school director and also treasurer of school district No. 
9 for fourteen }-ears. He v/as likewise road overseer for manv years. 
He has been a resident of Cass county for six decades, and is well known 
in the county as one of its pioneer settlers. He has now y)asscd the 
seventy-seventh milestone on life's journey and is a \-encrable and re- 
spected man, ha\ing many friends in l'nion and through(^ut this por- 
tion of the state. 

H. SYLVESTER CHAPMAN. 

H. Sylvester Chapman, owner of one hundred and thirty acres of 
as fine land as can be found in Cass county, resides on section 17, Penn 
township. He was torn in Medina county, Ohio, December 5, 1839, 
and represents one of the old families of New England, his ancestors 
having been represented in this country- through various generations. 
His great-grandfather was Benjamin Qiapman, a native of Vermont. 
His grandfather, Levi Chapman, who was also bom in the Green jMcun- 
tain state. A\as a farmer by occtipation and removed to Ohio with his 
farr.ilv at an earlv date in the liiston' of Medina county, where he 
took up his abode. 

Amorv H. Chapman, his son, was born in Enosburg, Vermont, and 
was about five years of age at the time of his parents' removal to the 
Buckeve state. He v,-as reared and educated in IMedina county and was 
married there to ;Miss Lucinda Hastings, a native of New York and a 
daughter of Walter Hastings, who was likewise born in the Empire 
state. He was a lumber merchant, who engaged in rafting lumber down 
the Susquehanna river to Baltimore. Eor three years after their mar- 
riage Mr. and Mrs. Amory H. Chapman liA-ed in Ohio, and then came to 



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HISTORY OF CASS CorXTV .V.t3 

Cass couiuy, .Michii,^a!i. in 1S45. settling in Xewljerg townshi]). Mr. 
Chapman took u]) t'lc wuik ut farming, tilling the soil whicli hithcno 
was uncultivated ami unimproved. For many years he was an active 
factor in agricultural circles and his death occurred in Xewberg town- 
ship when he had attained the atlvanced age of eighty years. He was a 
man of gr^od principles, who fearlessly espoused any cause in which he 
believed and he left to his faiuilx- an untarnished name. When age gave 
to him the light of franchise he voted with the Whig party, which he 
supported until the (irganizati'm oi the Republican party. He was 
closely identified with the uphuilding of the county, settling in the 
midst of tlie forest upon his arrival here, making a clearing and in tlue 
course of time developing a good farm. He i^crformed all the arduiuis 
labor incident to such a task, shared in the hardships and trials of fron- 
tier life and aided in laying broad and deep the foundation for the pres- 
ent development and pmgress of this part of the state. In his faniilv 
were but two sons, the brother being Herman L. Chapman, of ]Mar- 
cellus, Michigan. 

H. Sylvester Cliapman, the elder son, was but five years old when 
his parents left Oliin and came to Cass county. In his early y(juth he 
attended scliiol in V'andalia and afterward pursued his studies in 
Cassopolis. 1 hrough the jieriods of vacation he aided in the farm work 
and be remained at home until nineteen years of age, when he began 
contracting and building, possessing considerable natural mechanical 
ingenuity that well cpialificd him for this work. He built what is now 
known as the Chapman school in Xewl)crg townshi]) and also other build- 
ings of the locality, and was thus identified with that line (jf business 
until the time of his marriage. 

Mr. Chapman has l>een married twice. In April, iSrio. he wedded 
Miss Mary Carrier and unto them were iKirn two children: Irma, now 
the wife of Professor Seth C. Wilson, of Spokane, Washington, who is 
princii)al of the schools nf that ]jlace: and Clif C. who is living upon 
the home farm. The daughter was a student in the Valparaiso Col- 
lege in northern Indiana, and has taken a course in the business depart- 
ment of the University. She is also educated in instrumental music. 
Following the death of his first wife Mr. Chapman was married to ^Miss 
Olivia E. Rudd, a daughter of Stephen and Lydia CGreen) Rudd. who 
were early settlers of Penn township. ]Mrs. Chapman was b.-irn in tiiat 
township December 29, 1S42. and was married first to John H. Under- 
wood, by whom she had one son. Hon. Fred Underwood, who is now a 
membei of the state legislature at Bismarck, X^'orth Dakota. Hon. Fred 
Underwood received his erlucation in the Cassopolis high school, and 
was a student in the \"alparaiso College, also in the Kalamazoo Bus- 
iness College. Pie has been located in Dakota since 18S1. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Chapman concentrated his ener- 
gies upon agricultural pursuits. He began farming in X^'ewberg town- 



694 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ship, where he remained until 1S71, when he went to California, whence 
he returned by way of the water route and the Isthmus of I'anama. On 
again reaching Cass county he purchased the farm upon whicii lie now 
resides. In 18S1 he went to North Dakota and improved a farm in Ran- 
som county, si)ending the summer months there during four years. He 
still owns that property, comprising three hundred and twenty acres of 
land, and in his home place he has one hundred and thirty acres of very 
rich and productive land, no finer farm property being found in the 
county. In the World's Columbian Exposition in 1S93 he exhibited 
six different varieties of his wheat grown on his farm, and was awarded 
a diploma and medal for the superiority of the cereal, which is an honor 
rare for old Cass county. He has erected a very attractive residence, 
which stands in the midst of a well kept lawn, and his barns and out- 
buildings are in keeping with ideas of modern agriculture. His fields, 
too, are well tilled and he is making a specialty of raising cattle, having 
a fine herd of thirty heiul of Jerseys, all being registered stock. He has 
never been a follower in business lines, but is a leader in the progress 
which results in successful accomplishment. He votes with the Dem- 
ocracv' and is in syriipathy with the platform promulgated at Kansas 
City.' 

Tlie beautiful home of ^[r. and !\lrs. Chapman, known as "Linden 
Lea," is beautifv.l'y finished in rare woods, and the entrance to the pret- 
ty home is artistically finished in sumach, showing the beautiful grains 
of the wood, while the libran,- is finished in red cedar, and the work was 
accomplished by Mr. Chapman himself. In fact, the residence is finished 
in different woods. 

EDWIN N. AUSTIN. 

Edwin N. Austin, who carries on general agricultural pursuits in 
a practical, progressive and profitable manner, is living in Pokagon 
township and is to-day the owner of one hundred and eighty acres of 
land, the greater part of which is under cultivation, giving proof in its 
excellent appearance of the careful supervision of the owner. A native 
of St. Lawrence county. New York. Mr. Austin was born on the 8th of 
August, 1S50. His father. John W. Austin, was also a native of the 
Empire state and was a farmer by occupation. Coming to the west he 
settled in Allegan county in 1863, taking up his abode upon a farm, 
which he cultivated and improved until he had acquired a handsome 
competence, when he retired from active business life and removed to 
the city of Allegan, where he spent his remaining days in the enjoyment 
of a well-earned rest, his death there occurring in 1893. He was mar- 
ried in the Empire state to Miss Lucinda Sage, who was born in New 
York and was there reared. This union was blessed with a family of 
four sons and two daughters, all of whom were natives of the Em- 
pire state. As the result of study and investigation concerning the po- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 595 

litical questions of the day and the attitude of the two parties Mr. Aus- 
tin gave his support to the Repubhcan organization, and at all times he 
commanded the respect and conlidence of his fellow men by reason of 
an honorable and upright life. 

Edwin N. Austin spent the first twelve years of his life in the 
county of his nativity and then accompanied his parents on their re- 
moval to Allegan, ^Michigan, where he resided until twenty-two years 
of age, during which time he actively assisted his father in the work 
of the home farm. He then left home and came to Cass county, tak- 
ing up his abode upon a farm in Pokagon township. Here he was 
married to Miss Rebecca Simpson, a daughter of Moses and Sarah 
Simpson, pioneers of Cass county, having settled within its borders 
when the white residents here were comparatively few. Mrs. Austin 
was born and reared in Pokagon township. 

Moses W. Simpson, deceased, one of the pioneers of Pokagon, 
was born in Pembroke, New Hampshire. ]May i6, i8oS. He was the 
eldest in the family of Sanuiel and Relx^cca (Dickerman) Simpson, 
which consisted of seven children, four sons and three daughters. The 
elder Simpson was a faniicr and was possessed of those elements of 
character that ha\e always distinguished the sons of the Granite state. 
Moses was reared on the farm, and the rugged hills and sterile soil 
aided in the development nf a robust constitution and manj' admirable 
traits of character. He early evidenced a desire for books, which 
was fostered by his parents, and he received a liljcral academical edu- 
cation. He remained under the parental roof until he was twenty-five 
years of age, and at that time he was married to Miss Sarah H. Rlais- 
dell, of Hopkinton, New Hampshire, where she was born September 
8, 1811. Her parents, Samuel and Dorothy (Straw) Blaisdell. were 
of English parentage and New England birth. In 1S36 ]\Ir. Simpson 
and wife came to Pokagon and settled on the farm which was ever 
afterward his home. He took an active interest in all matters pertain- 
ing to the advancement of the township, and largely identified him- 
self with its growth, and prosperity: his ability was soon recognized 
by his fellow townsmen, and he filled many positions of trust and 
responsibility with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of all. His 
death occurred on June 16, 1849. I" the accumulation of property 
Mr. Simpson was successful. His social qualities were of a high order 
and his generosity and hos]ntality were proverbial. He left two daugh- 
ters, Rebecca, now ?^Irs. Edwin Austin, and Lydia T. After the death 
of her husband. Mrs. Simpson assumed the management of the estate, 
which she conducted successfully until 1850, when she was again mar- 
ried, to John H. Simpson, brother of her first husliand. He was a 
native of" New Hampshire and a man universally esteemed. He died 
August 19. 1879. in the fifty-sixth year of his age. 

Mrs. Simpson resided upon the old homestead imtil her death, 
January 4. 1889. a lady veiy highly esteemed. 



596 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

For two years after his marriage Edwin X. Austin lived upon his 
father-in-iav/s farm and then removed to liis present place, first pur- 
chasing sixty acres of land, to which he has since added part of the 
old Simpson farm, so that his landed possessions now comprise one 
hundred and eighty acres, the greater part of which is under cultivation. 
He has built good buildings here and has improved the property until 
it is now one of the valuable and productive farms of the township. In 
its improvement :Mr. Austin has displayed good business ability, execu- 
tive force and keen discernment and in his business relations has com- 
manded the respect of those with w liom he has had dealings. 

GEORGE n. TOLBERT. 

George H. Tolbert, who is filling the position of township treas- 
urer and is accounted one of the representati\e and enterprising farm- 
ers of Porter township, his home being on section 28. was born in this 
township September 30. 1867. His father, Seth Tolbert. was a native 
of Xew York, where his childhood and youth were passed. He came 
to Michigan about 1845. niaking his way to Cass county, and here he 
was married in Porter township to ]Miss Sarah Loupee, a sister of John 
IvOupee and a representative of one of the old and well known pioneer 
families of the county, mention of whom is made on another page of 
this work, in connection with the sketch (jf John L(nii)ee. Seth Tolbert 
took up his alxide in Porter township, where he continued to reside until 
his death, which occurred when he was in his seventy-eighth year. He 
was a lifelong farn.er and was (.ne of the early representatives of agri- 
cultural interests in hi^ ci>mmunit_\', where he carried on the work of 
tilling the soil and raising crops until he put aside the active work of 
the fields in his later years. He was a memljer of the Bajitist churcii 
and his religious faith permeated his life and promoted his kindly and 
considerate relations to his fellowmen and his honorable dealir.gs in all 
trade transactions. Flis political allegiance was given to the Republi- 
can party from the lime of its organization until his demise. His widow 
is still living at this writing, in 1906, and yet resides u]»n the old 
homestead fann. In their family were ten children, of whom George 
H. was tlie seventh in order of birth. 

In his youth George H. Tolbert was rearcfl and to the ]uiblic school 
system of the countv lie is indebted for the educational privileges which 
he enjoyed. His attention was divided between the work of the school- 
room, the pleasures of the playground and the labors of the fields upon 
the home farm, and after he finished his education he gave his entire 
attention to general agricultural pursuits on the old homestead up to 
the time of his marriage. 

It was on Februarv 19, 1890. that he was joined in wedlixk to Miss 
Linda Harmon, a sister of Charles O. Harmon, wdio is mentioned else- 
where in this volume. ^Mrs. Tolbert was the third child and only daugh- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY o'.-T 

ter in a family uf four children, and was born in Porter township March 
I, 187J, where her girlhood days were passed. Their home is now 
on section -'8, Porter township, where ^Ir. Tolbert owns and operates 
sevenly-bix acres of land, which is productive and valuable. There he 
carries on general farming and stock-raising, keeping good grades of 
cattle, horses and hogs upon his place, while at the san":e time cultivating 
the cereals best adapted to soil and climate and annually harvesting 
good crops. He votes with the Republican party, ha\-ing" been reared 
in that faith, while his niatuicd judgment sanctioned its principles, so 
that he has given his allegiance tn its candidates from that time. He 
served as highway c«lmmi^sl(incr ..f his township, and in 1904 was elected 
township treasurer, the duties of which office he discharged so capably 
that he was re-elected in 1905 and is now filling the position. He and 
his wife belong to the Grange <jf which he is now master, and he also be- 
longs to the Abidern Woodmen cam]) at J<nies. Mr. and Mrs. Tolbert are 
both devoted members of the First Paptist church in Porter township, 
and they are butli intcre<tC(l in Sunday xhuul W(,rk. Mrs. Tolbert was 
superintendent of the Sunday scb. Mil far five years, and organist of the 
church for se\cra! years, and she was a successful teacher in F'orter town- 
ship for two years. 

JOHX D. ROCKWELL. 

Among the citip^ens of Cass county who have long been connected 
with its history, their residence here dating back to an early period, so 
that they are entitled to rank with the old settlers, is John D. Rockwell. 
now living on section J5, Porter township, where he owns a good farm. 
He was born in FTuron county, Ohio, Sei^tember 8. 1842. Flis paternal 
grandfather was Caleb Rockwell, of English descent. His father. Sam- 
uel R. Rockwell, was a nati\-c of Connecticut and was there reared. In 
early life he learned and followed the carpenter's trade and also carried 
on farming. The reports wbicli he lieard concerning business oppor- 
tunities in the west iiuluced him to seek a home in Michigan, and in 
the fall of 1844 he came to this state, taking up his abode uixm the fann 
in Porter township, Cass county, upon which his son. John D. Rock- 
well, now resides. He had. however, been a resident of Huron county 
for a brief period when he traded a farm of eighty acres in that county 
for t>ne hundred and sixty acres of land here without seeing the place. 
The tract was an unbmken wilderness, not a furrow having been turned 
nor an impro\emcnt made. There was not a single building and he 
built a small frame house in the midst of the forest and began to cut 
away the timber and clear and cultivate the land, Li the course of years 
where once stood the dense forest were seen waving fields of grain, 
promising rich harvests and as time passed he became one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of the community as the result of his carefully directed 
business affairs. He died December 16, 18S4. in his eighty-first year — 
one of the venerable, respected and honored citizens of the county. He 



598 . HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

was a resident of Ccnstantine for al)out twenty-two years, having retired 
from active business life, the even.nig of his days being spent in the 
enjoyment of a well earned rest. He was also justice of the peace in 
Porter township for about sixteen years and for a similar period in 
Constantino and his decisions were strictly fair and unbiased, neither 
fear nor fa\or swerving him in his application of the law to the points 
at issue. His political allegiance was given to the Democracy. ' He 
was an honest man, whose integrity was at all times above question and 
by reason of this and his ability he was called upon to transact many 
business interests fur other ])eciple. He was closely identitkd with the 
early history of Cass count}- and his labors contributed to its substantial 
progress and impnjvement. He married Mary Ann Bushman, a native 
of New York, who was Iwrn near Rochester and was a daughter of 
George Bushman. She died in 1S56 in the thirtj'-ninth year of her 
age, and Samuel R. Rockwell afterward married Celia Butler. There 
were five sons of the first union: George B., who died in 1904: Fran- 
cis jM., who is living in Three Rivers, Michigan; John D.. of this re- 
view; Henry O., who passed away February S, 1S60; and Edson \V., 
who is living in Porter township, Cass county. The children nf the sec- 
ond marriage are: Ralph, who died about 186S; and Lihby, who passed 
away the same year. 

John D. Rockwell was only two years of age when brought bv his 
parents to Cass county, the family home being established in Porter 
township, where he was reared. His education was acquired in the 
public schools, pursuing his studies in the little school-house which his 
father built. Throughout the period of his minority he remained upon 
the home farm, assisting in the labors of field and meadow and In the 
care of the stock. He was thus occupied until he attained his majority, 
after which he operated the home farm for one year. In 1864 he went 
to Virginia City, Montana, where he remained until 1S66. being engaged 
in mining in that locality. He then returned again to the old home- 
stead, where he has since resided, his attention being given in undivided 
manner to agricultural interests. 

On the 2 1st of February, i8''>7. was celebrated the marriage of 
John D. Rockwell and ]\Iiss Adelia ^Miller, a daughter of Charles F. and 
Rebecca (Odell) Miller, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the 
latter of Ohio. They became residents of iMichigan at an early day. 
settling in St. Joseph counts- in 1S36. when the work of improvement 
and development had scarcely been begun there. They established a 
home on the frontier, casting in their lot with the pioneer settlers and 
sharing in the hardships and trials incident to life in the far west — for 
Michigan was then a border state. ^Mrs. Rockwell was bom in St. 
Joseph comity, March 25, 1S43. and was there reared and educated. At 
"the time of their marriage they located on the old homestead farm, 
which has since been their place of residence. As the years went by 
Mr. Rockwell gave his undivided attention and energies to the develop- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 599 

ment and cultivation of his land and to the improvement of his farm, 
which is now a valuable property, supplied with all of the equipments 
and conveniences found upon a mo<lel farm of the twentieth ccnturv. In 
1S83 he built his present residence, and he now has two houses' upon 
the place, also commodious and substantial kirns and outbuildings, fur- 
nishing ample shelter for grain and stock. His place comprises two 
hundred and twenty-seven and a half acres of good land, the soil being 
alluvial and responding readily to the care and labor which are bestowed 
upon the fields and which return golden harvests. Mr. Rockwell per- 
sonally manages and operates the farm and is a wide-awake, ijrogressive 
agriculturist, meeting with very gratifying success in his chosen life 
work. 

Three children were l)orn unto our subject and his wife, namelv: 
Jennie G., who is nuw the wife of L. N. Ruch. of Chicago; Hattie L., 
the wife of Phar Stenberg, who resides upon the old homestead in 
Porter township; and Cora B.. who was born December 22, iiS-74, and 
died I'ebruary 16, 1S75. 

Mr. Rockwell votes with the Democracy, when national questions 
are involved, but at local elections casts an independent ballot, support- 
ing the men whom he regards as best qualified to take charge of the 
business interests of town or county. He has been school treasurer of 
his district for twenty years and could have held other oftices but would 
not accept, preferring to concentrate his time and energies upon his 
business affairs. He is a man of lilx^ral spirit and has contributed to 
many good causes. He belongs to the Grange and is intensely inter- 
ested ill all that pertains to the agricultural development of the county. 
He has been a resident of Porter township for sixty-one years and is 
one of its pioneer and representative citizens, helping to make the county 
what it is today. His name is closely intenvoven with its history and 
his successful career should ser^'e to encourage and inspire others, for 
His prosperity is largely due to his own well directed labors, capable 
business management and keen discernment. 

HENRY C. BENSON. 

Henry C. Benson makes his home on section 3. south Porter town- 
ship, and was born December 11, 1S45, on the farm where he now re- 
sides. His father, Joseph Benson, was a native of Livingston county. 
New York, and came to Alichigan in 1S43, making his way at once to 
Cass count}- and took up his abode upon the farm which is now owned 
and occupied by Henry C. Benson. He was married in Porter town- 
ship in 1S44 to Miss Harriet Weed, a daughter of Seth and Catherine 
Weed. Her father was for many years a justice of the peace and held 
the office of supen-isor and other local positions, the duties of which 
were always promptly, faitlifully and capably performed by him. He 
was a prominent man and teacher in the county and exerted a strong 



C"^" HISTORY OI-- CASS COUXTY 

ami beiiehcial intlucice iV,r the intellectual development aiul moral prog- 
ress ot his locality, also upholding- its legal and political status J,,seph 
Benson, tor many years an enterprising- and well known agriculturist 
of the county, died August 8. 1878, when sixtv-six vcars of aoc He 
was at one time a member of the .Masonic fraternity and at all times 
exemphhed m Ins lite the hencficenl spirit of the crai't. His wife lon^^ 
survived him, rcachnig t'nc age of eightv-eight vears. In their familv 
were two sons, Henry C. :ui(l Joseph, tlie latter still a resilient <if Portc'r 
townshij). 

Henry C. Bcnsnn spent the davs of his Ix-)vliof)d and v,)utli under 
the parental rn,,t. Ik was educated in the common schx.h and i,,r a 
short time contmucd his studies in South Bend. Indiana, becoming an 
apt student and readily mastering the common branches of learninc^ 
At the age ot seventeen years he began teaching, which profession he 
followed succes.stully lor five years in Cass. Berrien and St Joseph 
counties. He was at the same time engaged in farming and fruit-grow- 
ing, devoting the winter .-reasons to educational work, while the summer 
months were given t,. agricultural and horticultural pursuits. 

January 23. 1881. Air. P.ensnn was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha V. Roots, a ilaughter of Wind.sor and Marv Ann' (Bennett) 
Roots. Mrs. IJcnson was born December s. 1862, in DcKalb countv 
Indiana, but was reared in Porter township. Cass countv. and is tlie 
elder of two daughters. At the time of their marriage Mr. and Mrs 
Henry C. Benson began their ,l..nicstic life upon the old homestead 
farm, living with his father and m..tlier until thev were called from this 
life. Two children grace the marriage of the vounger couple, namely 
Ida May. now the wife of Lewis Arnold, of Porter township; and 
Jennie D.. who is at home. 

Mr. Benson owns a farm of more than two hundred acres which 
he IS carrying on. He has placed his land under a high .state of culti- 
vation aufl annually har\-ests good crops as a reward >or the care and 
labor he bestows upon the fields, and in addition to raising the cereals 
best adapted to soil and climate he also raises some stock, mostlv, how- 
ever, for his own use. Pie has a well improved place and a glance will 
serve to indicate to the passerby tht progressive and practical methods 
of the owner. In his political adherence he has alwavs been a stalwart 
Republican, interested in the partv and its success and his investigation 
into the questions and issues of the day has led him to believe that the 
Republican platform contains the best elements of good government. 
He has been twice elected to the office of justice of the peace, his second 
term expiring in July, 1906. He has filled the position for eight years 
and has ever been fair and impartial in his movements, basing his 'deci- 
sions upon the law and the equity of the case. After serving as justice 
of the peace for eight years, he has been importuned by the best element 
to again assume the onerous position, and without a dissenting voice 
from any party, which speaks volumes for his integrity and manhood. 



HISTORY Ol' CASS COUXTY Bui 

He has Ijccu nhicially oii^nt'Ctcd with tlie schonls tlin>ui:;li a loni^- periud, 
serving on the seho'il i).,ar(l fnr ahdiu nine years, and he Ix'Innsi^s t(_i tlie 
Grange. Hi.s entire life lias 1;een passed uixin the farm uiiich lie yet 
owns and occuiiies, iia\'ing- hverl here for sixty years. The place is en- 
deared to him througii tlie associations of his boyliood as well as those 
of later years, and th.e name of Benson has e\er stood for progress along 
agricnltnral lines, in which regard llenr_\- C. Benson fnlly sustains the 
reputation of the family. 

SAMUEL H. CTLBEKT. 

On the list of pioneer settlers of Cass county appears the name of 
Samuel H. Gilbert, wlio is now living on section 23. Porter township. 
He dates his residence in the county from 1835. Few, indeed, have 
longer lesided in this pnrtion of the state or ha\'e for a greater period 
witnessed the changes that ha\e heen wrought here. He is not only 
familiar with the history of the county from hearsay hut has been an 
active participant in the work that has led to its jirescnt dexelopment 
and upliuilding. The story cf piiuieer life is a familiar one to him. for 
he settled here in the da^'s when the homes were pioneer cabins, when 
much of the work of the fields was done by hand, when the sickle and 
scythe formed a part of the farm im]ilements. when the houses were 
lighted by candles and when the conking was largely dune over the np.cn 
fireplace. 

JNlr. Gilbert is a native of Onondaga county. Xew York, bis Ijirtb 
having occurred in Lysander township, on the i8th of .April. 18J4. His 
father, Stephen Gilbert, was born in Alassachusetts and there was reared. 
When a young man he left Xew England and went to X'ew York, wlience 
he came to Michigan in 1S35, making his \vay direct to Cass county. 
He located in Porter townsliip, and at once became engaged in the ardu- 
ous task of (le\-eloping a new farm, making his home thereon until bis 
death, which occurred when he was seventy-three years of age. His 
father, Samuel Gilbert, was a native of Huntington township. Fairfield 
county, Connecticut, born Alarcb 10, lyCM. and was a .soldier of the 
Revolutionary war. espousing the cause of the colonists when tbe_\" could 
no longer endure the yoke of British oppression. He saw Major Andre 
when he was lumged as a spy.' ivlr. Gilbert was under the command of 
General Washington for one year and three months and for thirty years 
of his life received a pension of twelve dollars per month from the gov- 
ernment in recognition of the aid which he bad rendered to his countrv 
in her struggle for independence. Fie was supposed to have been of 
English descent and he died September 10, 1849. The mother of our 
subject bore the maiden name of Almira Colgrove, was a native of Rut- 
land, Vermont, and a daughter of Calvin Colgrove. of English parent- 
age. She lived to a very advancerl age. passing away in her ninety-fifth 
year. By her marriage she became the modier of five sons and three 



602 HISTORY Ol' CASS COUNTY 

daughters, who readied adult age and all were married and reared 
faniihes. 

Samuel H. GilLert is the eldest living member of the family today. 
He was a lad of eleven years when his parents left the Empire state and 
came west to Michigan, locating in Porter township, where he pur- 
sued his studies in a log school-house. He was also educated in a sim- 
ilar schooldiouse in Xew York. The methods of instniction were very 
primitive, in keeping with pioneer times and conditions, and he pursued 
his studies only in the winter months, for throughout the remainder of 
the year he worked in the fields and assisted in clearing and cultivating 
the farm. He was an expert in handling a mall and wedge and was a 
very strong man in his younger days. All the farm work became famil- 
iar to him from actual experience and he assisted in the fields from the 
time of early spring planting until after crops were harvested in the late 
autumn. 

Mr. Gilbert was married on the 31st of October, 1847, to Miss 
Elizabeth Motley, a daughter of James and Fannie (Elkington) Motley, 
both of whom were of English lineage. The modier died in Montreal, 
Canada. }*Irs. Gilbert was born in England, July 5. 1S29. and was only 
.six mouths old when her parents bade adieu to friends and native coun- 
try and sailed for America. Her mother died when the daughter was 
but fourteen months old and the father afterward married Bcthe«da Mc- 
Neil, by wdiom he had nine children. At the time of their marriage Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert located on the farm where thev now reside, it having 
been their place of residence for fifty-nine years and he has owned it 
for a year longer. Full of hope and courage they began the task of 
establishing a home here in the midst of the wilderness, Mrs. Gilbert 
carefully managing the household affairs, wdiile Mr. Gilbert perfonned 
the work of the fields, transforming the raw and undeveloped land into 
a tract of rich fertility, from which he annually harvested good crops. 
In all of his work he has been practical and as invention has given to 
the world improved farm machinery he has introduced this into his work 
and thus facilitated his labors. There is little similarity in the methods 
of farming today, and those which were followed by the agriculturists 
a half century ago. Then the farmer walked back and forth across the 
fields, guiding his handplow. His grain was cut with a scythe and 
bound by hand into sheaves. Today he rides over the fields upon the 
plow and the cultivator and the han,-esting machine and thresher are 
familiar sights in all farming localities. 

Unto"]\Ir. and Mrs. Gill>ert have been born eight children, of whom 
four are now living: Ida, the wife of Frank L. Orr, who resides in 
West Pullman, Illinois; Orrin, a contractor and builder, carrying on 
business in Portland. Oregon: George, a farmer of Porter township: 
Arthur, a twin brother of George, who follows farming in South Da- 
kota : and Helen, who died at the age of twenty-eight years. She was a 
student in Hillsdale College, Alichigan, and after^vard engaged success- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 6(t3 

fully ill teaching school. ]\lr. Gilhert has led an honorable, useful and 
active life. He has always been a strong temperance man and is a Pro- 
hibitionist' in his political views, regarding the use of intoxicants as one 
of the most important questions today before the people. He has never 
used tobacco in his life and none of his sons is addicted to it. He and 
his family are members of the First Baptist church in Porter township, 
in which l:e has served as trustee for many years, while in the work 
of the church he has taken a most active and helpful part. He is today 
the oldest resident in Porter township, having for seventy-one years 
made his home within its borders and has seen the country develop from 
a wilderness to its present state of cultivation and improvement, while 
cross-roads villages have grown into thriving towns and cities. His 
life has been actuated by many noble principles and toward his fellow- 
men he has displayed consideration and fairness that have commanded 
uniform confidence and esteem. His record is indeed in many respects 
worthy of emulation, showing what may be accomplished through earn- 
est and persistent efifort in the business world and at the same time 
displaying sterling traits of character which work for development along 
the lines of truth, righteousness and justice. 

JOFIN LOUPEE. 

John Loupce, who for twenty-five years has resided upon his pres- 
ent farm on section 21, Porter township, where he owns one hundred 
and fifty-four acres of land, was born in Wayne count}', Ohio, August 
23, 1840. His father, George I^upee. was a native of Germany and 
the days of his boyhood and youth were spent in that country, where 
he was married to Miss \\'ilhelmina Steiner, also of German V;irth. 
Crossing the Atlantic to America with the hope of having improved 
business opportunities in the new world they located in Wayne county, 
Ohio, where tliey resided until coming to Michigan aboi:t 1841, at which 
time they took up their abode in Porter township, George Loupee enter- 
ing land from the government. He was not long permitted to enjoy 
his new home, however, and had scarcely begun the work of transform- 
ing the raw wild land into a cultivable farm when death claimed him. 
His wife lived to be about sixty-two years of age. There were eight 
children in the familv. all of whom reached manhood or womanhood. 

John Loupce. the seventh in order of birth, was only about a year 
old when brought by his parents from Ohio to Cass county, and he has 
been a lifelong resident of Porter township and is indebted to the public 
school system for the educational privileges which he enjoyed and which 
fitted him for life's practical and responsible duties. Owing to the death 
of his father he was early thrown upon his own resources, working by 
the month as a farm hand. FTe was thus emploved throughout the pe- 
riod of his youth and until his labors brought him capital sufficient to 
enable him to engage in farming on his own account. His boyhood 



C04 HISTORY Ol- CASS COL'XTY 

therefore was a period of earnest ami unreniittin<; toil with few advan- 
tages, educational or otherwise. 

In June, ]S(>J, .Mr. Loupee was united in niarria.L;e to Miss Eliza 
Ann Taylor, a daughter of [)r. Soniner Taylor, wlio hecanic a resilient 
of Cass county sixty years, ago and died September 22, 1S76. In his 
family were four children. Mrs. J^jupee was born in Huron county, New 
York, March 23. 1S35, and came to Cass county with her parents in 
1S45. Her father was one of the pioneer physicians of the county, who 
engaged in the [iractice of medicine here in the early days when it neces- 
sitated long rides over the country through the hot summer sun or 
winter's cold. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Loupee have been born three daugh- 
ters: Zella, now the wife of Charles Stearns living in Porter township, 
Cass county: bTances O., the wife of James Stage, living on the home 
farm; and Edith I., the wife of William Doane, a resident of Howard 
townshij), Cass comity. 

At the lime of his marriage Mr. Loupee located in south Porter 
township and for twent_\--t"i\-e \e:irs has resided on his jiresent farm, 
which ci.:mprises one hundred and fifty-four acres of land that is rich 
and arable. He now rents the land, leaving the active work- of the farm 
to others, while lie is largely living a retired life. Plis political views 
are in accord with the princii)les of Democracv, yet lie has never been 
an aspnant for ot^ice. preferring to leave office holding to others, while 
he gives bis time and energies to his liusiness affairs. He belongs 
to Siloam lodge. Xo. 35, V. & A. M., of Constantine. He has 
for sixty-five years made his home in this county and has been 
closely identified with its ui)building, es])ecially along agricultural lines. 
He is a self-made man anrl deserves much credit for what he accom- 
plished, for he started out in life in early boyhood empty-handed, 
having no assistance from inheritance or from influential friends, but 
depended entirely u]jon bis own labors, realizing that hard work is a 
sure fouridation upon which to build success. His life has been <.)ne of 
earnest toil, and as the years ba.ve gone b\- he has gained a fair measure 
of prosperity, due to his close application and diligence. 

JOHN O'DELL. 

John O'Dell. one of the iirominent and influential farmers and 
early settlers of Porter townshij). living on section ih. was l)om Octo- 
ber 30, 1836, in this t(jwnship and is therefore one of the oldest native 
sons of the countv. He is a son of Xathan and Sarah ( Drake) O'Dell. 
His paternal grandifather, X'atban G. O'Dell, Sr., was born in Virginia, 
November 4, 1772. The progenitors of this . family came originally 
from England, and although for many generations the ancestors of 
our subject lived in Virginia, not a single member of the familv ever 
ow-ned slaves, and so far as is known all were opposed to the institution 
of slavery. Nathan G. O'Dell, Sr., was married to Miss Rebecca Kife, 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTV 605 

who was born m tlie old Doniiniun in July, 1780. He was a miller by 
trade and owned a mill in X'irginia, where in connection witli the opera- 
tion of the plant he also carried on tarniiny. Karly in 1800. however, 
he removed with his family to Ohio, settling in Wayne countv, where 
he took up land from the government. It was entirely raw and unim- 
proved, but his strenuous lalwrs soon converted it into a productive 
farm. He likewise owned and operated a grist mill, and was fcjr twentv- 
eight years associated with business interests in the Buckeye state. In 
1828 he came to Michigan, taking up his alxjde in the eastern part of 
what is now Porter township, Cass county. Here. too. he was a ])inneer 
settler, living upon the frontier and sharing with others in the hard- 
ships and privations incident to life in a far western district. He con- 
tinued to make his home in Porter township until his death, which 
occurred in October, 18,^5, and his wife followed him to the grave two 
months later. In their family were nine chiklrcn: Thomas, the eldest, 
born June 22. i79^>. was for more than forty years a minister of the 
Methodist church. He went to Iowa, where he devoted his life to his 
holy calling and there died in ]S(>i. James, born Sci)teml)er I3. ij'jS. 
married Nancy Carr and in early life came to Michigan, his death 
occurring in St. Jose|)h count}', this state. Se])tember 24. 1835. John, 
born March 24, iSoi, died in Ohio. August 19, 1826. prior to the re- 
moval of the f.unily to Michigan. Xathan G.. father of John O'Dell 
of this review, was the next of the family. Elizabeth, born Mav 2:, 
1806, was married in Ohio, May 19, 1835, becoming Mrs. Metcalf. 
Enos P., Iwrn .August 7, t8o8, went to Illinois, where he followed 
farming until his death on the 22(1 of February, 1S52. Lorenzo Dow, 
born October 9, t8io, was a member of congress froin Ohio and died in 
that state about 1883. Rebecca, born May 17, 1812, married Thomas 
Burns, with whom .she came to Michigan, and her death occurred in this 
state in September, 1846. Silas P., born April 15, 1814, died at the 
age of two years, on the 29th of September, 1819. 

Nathan G. 0"Dell. Jr.. father of our subject, was born in Ohio, 
October i, 1803, was there reared and was married in that state in 1828 
to Miss Sarah Drake, whose birth occurred April 10, 1810. Imme- 
diately after their marriage they left Ohio, and with several other 
families came to Cass county. ^lichigan, settling in Porter township, 
w^here Mr. O'Dell and his father took up government land. He there 
began the development of a farm and in the course of years brought 
this land under a high state of cultivation. Unto him and his wife were 
born five children: James S.. was tern January 10, 1830. He married 
Jane Travers, who died about a year afterward leaving a child a few 
days old, who died when about nine years of age. On the 27th of Feb- 
luary, 1S59, James O'Dell wedded Caroline Loupee. who was born in 
Wayne county. Ohio. November 8. 1837. while her parents were natives 
of Germany. James O'Dell has four children: ^Martha. Iwrn .\pril 23. 
i860: Carrie M., IMay iS, 1865: Ida, December ir, 1870; and Ross. 



606 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

February 24, 1S75. Tliomas, bnrn June 30, 183 1, married Miss Lavina 
Travers. He was a farmer by occupation and was a leadinq- and in- 
fluential factor in local political circles, servincf as justice of the peace 
and as supervisor and also as a member of the state leijislature of Mich- 
igan. He died June 30, 1R92. Icavinq- a fam.ily of six children. David, 
born March 27. 1833. went to Iowa and there enlisted for service in the 
Civil war. After beincf honorably discharged he returned to Iowa and 
died soon aftenvard. Margaret M., born Novemljer 9. 1834, was mar- 
ried to Henry Brown, who died in 1884. She is still living in Porter 
township. John is the subject of this review. The mother of these chil- 
dren died in Octolier. 1836, soon after the birth of John O'Dell, and 
later Nathan G. O'Dell, Jr., was married to Miss Eliza Shivel. by whom 
he had two children. Sarah Wealthy, the eldest, born December 25, 
1842, became the wife of John Draper and died while her husband was 
serving in the Union army. Nathan Fben, bom December 27. 1843, 
went into the army \vhen but sixteen years of age and remained until 
the close of the war in 1864. He married Miss Nettie Motley, and 
they have three living children and two deceased. 

When John O'Dell was only nine years of age he was bound out 
to Jacob Lintz, of Constantine township, and lived with him for nine 
years, during which time he worked at farm labor in its various depart- 
ments. He afterward returned to Porter township. Cass county, where 
he has resided continuousU- since. The only educational privileges he 
enjoyed were those afforded by the district schools and be bad little 
opportimity for that, because he was only nine years old when his father 
died, and he Avas thus thrown upon his own resources and has since 
had to provide for his own support. He was married in Porter town- 
ship, Cass county, to Miss Jane .-X. Smith, a daughter of Deacon and 
Cornelia fHart) Smith. She was born in Porter township May 30, 
1842, and there spent her early girlhood days, her parents being old 
settlers of Cass countv. At the time of her marriage the young couple 
took up their aliode in a log house on a forty-acre farm on section 16. 
Later I\Tr. O'Dell sold that property for three thousand dollars and 
bought forty-three acres where he now lives. He has since added 
seventy-eight acres to this place, making a farm of one hundred and 
twenty-one acres. It is fine property, well improved with modern eqiu'p- 
ments. There are good buildings upon the place and excellent farm 
implements, and for many years ^Ir. O'Dell carried on the active work 
of the fields, but is now renting his land, leaving the practical fann 
work to others, although he still gives his supervision to the place. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. O'Dell have been born three children : Lucy, 
the wife of O. K. Har\-ey, of Constantine. Michigan: Lydia Grace, the 
wife of Charles Barnard, who is also living in that place; and Dr. John 
H. O'Dell. who is a practicing physician of Three Rivers. 'Mr. O'Dell 
is one of the old settlers of the county, and has been identified with its 
upbuilding and progress through a long period. He has always voted 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY ooT 

with the RepubHcan party, casting his ballot for Lincoln in i860 and 
again in 1S64, and for each man at tlie head of the ticket of that party. 
He and his wife belong to the h'irst Baptist church at Porter, and he has 
led a life of integrity and uprightness, worthy the regard which is 
uniformly given him. lie has now reached the psalmist's span of three 
score years and ten, and his entire life has been passed in this county. 
He can remember in his boyhood days of the forests which covered 
what are now some vi the best farms in the county. There were few 
roads laid out through the wilderness, and often one followed old 
Indian trails in making their way amnng the trees to a given point. The 
work of development and upbuilding seemed scarcely begun and Mr. 
O'Dcll shared in the task of improving the county. He became familiar 
with the arduous work of developing and cultivating new land, and for 
many years was closely associated with agricultural interests, but is 
now living retired, having a good property which returns him a gratify- 
ing income, thus supplying him with all of the comforts and many of the 
hixurics of life. He can tell many tales of pioneer days which show 
the onward march of progress, for Cass county has alwa3's kept pace 
with the work of improvement elsewhere, and has become one of the 
leading counties of this great commonwealth. Although it was once a 
heavily timbered region it is now one of the good agricultural districts of 
the state. 

E. W. BECKWTTII. 

E. \V. Beckwilli, formerly engaged in merchandising, but now de- 
voting his attention to farming on section 14, Jefferson township, rep- 
resents one of the pioneer fann'Iies of this part of the .state, the name 
of Beckwith having been interwoven with the historv of the county 
from 1833 down to the present time. It has always stood as a synonym 
for business integrity and for loyalty in citizenship, and the rec- 
ord of our subject is in harmony with that of others of the name. 
He was born in Cassojxilis, ^Michigan, October 12. 1847. His father, 
Walter G. Beckwith, was a native of West Bloomfield, Xew York, and 
came to Cass county, Michigan, about 1833. Few settlements had 
been made in this portion of the state at tlie time, and as far as the c\e 
could see there were uncut forests and uncultivated tracts of prairie. 
Only here and there had a clearing been made to show tliat the work of 
agricultural development had begun, while the now thriving cities were 
but small villages, or h.ad not vet sprung into existence. Mr. Beckwith 
took an active part in molding the early public policy of the county. He 
was one of the first sheriffs and his activity touched many lines that have 
led to permanent improvement and benefit here. He was president of 
the State Agricultural Society for about fourteen }'ears. a position wliich 
was indicative of the place which he held as a representative of farm- 
ing interests and of the high regard reposed in him by his fellow agri- 
culturists throughout Michigan. Far sighted, he extended his time and 



60S HISTORY Ol' CASS CUL'XTV 

energies net only ti_> his lusiness affairs but to public interests as well, 
and his efforts were far reachinsf and beneficial. He \-oted with the 
DenKjcrac}'. and he kept well infLirnied. ma only on political (juestiuns, 
but upon all issues and events relating to the progress and welfare of 
the country at large, in early manlmod he wedded Miss Eliza Lee. a 
native of West Bloomfield. Xew York. She lived to be about sixtv-five 
_\ears of age, while Mr. lieckwith reached the advanced age of seventy- 
six years. Tlu}- were the parents of only two children, who reached 
adult age, and E. W. I'.eckwith. of this review, is now the only sur- 
viving nicnibcr ot the faniilw 

Upon the eld houicste'id farm m Jefferson township ]•:. W. P,eck- 
with became familiar with the duties and lalx^rs that fall to the lot of 
the agriculturist. His early education was acquired in the district 
schools and was supplemented In- study in the Kalamazoo Baptist Col- 
lege. In iS68 he established a shoe store at Dowagiac, in which he 
continued for ten years. (.>r until 187S, since which time his attention 
has been given m undixidetl manner to hi< farm pursuits. He has ever 
laliored to produce maximum residts with minimum effort, which is 
the basis of all business success. 

In 1870 Mr. Beckwith was united in marriage to Miss Clara Sulli- 
van, who died leaving two sons : Charles, an electrician engaged in 
business in Ck\eland, Ohio; anrl Walter, at home. 

Mr. Beckwith \\as reared in the faith of the Democracy, and his 
mature judgment has led him to the Iselief that the party platform con- 
tains the best elements of gnorl go\-ernment. He has labored earnestly 
for its success and has filled a number of local offices, acting for eighteen 
years as sujicrintendent of the ])0'ir. He beli^ngs to the Knights of 
Pythias fraternity, and in that order and throughout the county as 
well he is esteemed as a valued citizen, wdiose interest in public affairs 
has been of an active and helpful nature. His co-operation can always 
be counted upon io further any mr.vement for the general good of the 
comnuinit}'. 

C. CARROLL XELSOX. 

Among the leading citizens of Cass county whose life record forms 
an integral part of die history of this section of the state is numbered 
C. Carroll Nelson, who is now living a retired life and whose position 
in the regard of other pioneer residents of the state is indicated by the 
fact that he is now serving as treasurer of the Old Settlers' Association. 
His career lias been a long, busy and useful one, marked by the utmost 
fidelity to the duties of public and private life and crowned with the 
respect which is conferred upon him in recognition of his genuine 
wortii. His name is inseparably interwoven with the annals of the coun- 
ty, with its best development and stable prosperity. He is one of Mich- 
igan's native sons, his birth having occurred in Washtenaw county on 
the 31st of July, 1835. His father, I. S. Nelson, was a native of ^las- 



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HISTORV Ol^ CASS C()L'XT\' tloO 

saclmsetts. l;(irn in Deerficlil. whence he came to Micliipan in 1830, lo- 
calintj in Waslitenaw cnunty, where his rcmainins^ days were passed, 
his death nccurriiiL;' in 1837. His wife, who hore the maiden name of 
EHza Arms, was Imrn in Cnnway, ?i[assachu-^etts. an<l fnllowincr tlie 
deatli of licr hr>t hu<baiul she gave her liand in niarriayc to Rnlef D. 
Crego. 

C. Can oil Nelson was brought to Cass county in 1842. when a 
youth of seven summers, the family home being estabhshcd in Xcwlerg 
lownsliip. where he was reared and educated. After attending the com- 
mon scliools he continued his studies in Hillsdale College for two vears 
and afterward engaged in teaching in the public schools through the 
winter months, while in the summer seasons his labors were devoted to 
the work of the farm. He was the only child born unto his parents tliat 
grew to mature years. He remained at home with his mother until 
twenty-one }-cars of age and then started out in life on his own account. 
With a full rcali.-^ation of the fact that advancement can be most ciuicklv 
seaircd through close application and unremitting diligence, he worked 
peisistently and energetically and in due course of time he gained a 
place among the representative agriculturists of his adopted countv. He 
\vas married on the loth of August. 1861. to }iliss Phebc Pegg. a daugh- 
ter of Reuben and Rebecca (Hinshaw) Pegg. who were pioneer settlers 
of Cass county. ^Irs. Xel.son was born in Penn township on December 
12, 1840. and has been a lifelong resident of Cass county. Her parents 
were natives of Randolph county. North Carolina, and came to Cass 
county in iSjS, and her father was also one of the earliest settlers with- 
in the borders of this county. They were married at what was then 
called Whitman\ille. liut is now LaGrange. and they located in Penn 
townshi]). where they continued to reside until called to the home be- 
3-ond. They were the parents of five children, three daughters and two 
sons, of whom \\'illiam and Sarah are now deceased. The others are: 
Mary, Abijah and ^^Irs. Phel:e Pegg Nelson. 

The young couj/le began their domestic life upon a farm in Penn 
township and in 1866 removed to Cassopolis. vvhere "Sir. Nelson estab- 
lished a sash and door factory in company with A. H. Pegg. in which 
business he continued until 1S77. theirs being one of the leading pro- 
ductive industries of the county. In that year ]\Ir. Nelson met with an 
accident, losing his left arm and also the sight of one eye. In the same 
year he was appointed postmaster and entered upon the duties of the 
office in 1878, filling the position for eight years and eight months in a 
most capable and satisfactory manner, gnving a public-spirited and 
progressive administration. He then handed over the keys to L. H. 
Glover, who is erlilor of tbu's volume, and in Jnly. 1887, he embarked 
in the undertaking and furniture business, in which he continued until 
Januar}-. 1904. With the capital he had acquired and which was suf- 
ficient to .supply him with the necessities and comforts of life through 



610 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

his remaining days, he retired from active business and is now enjoying 
a well earned rest. He has been a representative of agricultural, indus- 
trial and commercial life and in all departments of labor has displayed 
perseverance and industry combined with unfaltering Inisiness integ- 
rity. 

In politics JMr. Nelson is a standi Republican and in 1863 he served 
as supervisor of Peiin tov/nship. He was also superintendent of the 
poor from 1873 until 1S76 and was village assessor of Cassopolis for 
about fourteen \ears. Upon the organization of the Cassopolis Library 
Association in March, 1S71, Mr. and JMrs. Nelson took an active part in 
its work and have since done all in their power for the interests of the 
library. ]\Ir. Nelson acted as president of the association during the 
first eigiit years of its existence and Mrs. Nelson was one of its di- 
rectors, the first meeting being held at their home. In fact they were 
instrumental in establishing the library, and this institution, which is 
now a credit to the village and a matter of local pride, owes its existence 
and success in large measure to their efforts. For nineteen years Mr. 
Nelson has been treasurer of the Pioneer Society and active in its work. 
He is also connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and 
his wife holds membership in the Disciples church. Mr. Nelson has 
been a resident of Cass county for sixty-three years and his wife 
throughout hev entire life, and no couple are more deserving of esteem 
and confidence nr are more justly entitled to representation in this 
volume than C. Canoll Nelson and his estimable wife. His entire free- 
dom from ostentation or selk-laudation has made him one of the most 
popular citizens of Cass county, with whose history he has now been 
long and prominently identified. ]\lr. and Mrs. Nelson have some old 
and rare relics of "ye olden tyme." They have a linen table cloth which 
is over a century old, and it Vvas woven by Mr. Nelson's grandmother 
Nelson. They also have one of the most extensive libraries in the coun- 
ty of Cass. Mrs. Nelson has several rare bound volumes of collected 
views and engravings, which as a rare collection could not be found 
in southern Midiigan. 

ELBRIDGE JE\\"ELL. 

Elbridge Jewell, one of the thrifty, prosperous and enterprising 
farmers of LaGrange township, living on section 2C>. is a native son of 
Cass county, born on the 8th of January, 1838. His father. Hiram 
Jewell, was a native of New Jersey, and was a son of John Jewell. Tlie 
family was established in the east at an early period in the colonization 
of the new world. John Jewell, removing from New Jersey, became a 
resident of Ohio, and spent his last days in Butler county. Hiram 
Jewell came to Cass county in 1830, settling in LaGrange township, 
where he secured government land that was raw and unimproved. A 
part of Cassopolis now stands upon a portion of his farm. He improved 



HISTO]>^V OF CASS COUNTY Gil 

a tract of land on section 27, and there spent the greater part of his hfe. 
In the early days the family shared in the hardships and trials incident 
to the settlement of the frontier, but afterward enjoyed the comforts 
which came with an advancing civilization. In his work he was ener- 
getic and reliable, making for himself an untarnished name and enviable 
reputation in business circles. He lived to be eighty-two years of age, 
while his v;ife reached the age of sixty years. She bore the maiden 
name of Martha W'aldron, and is supposed to have been a native of 
Ohio. In this family were five children, two sons and three daughters, 
of whom two died in early life. Those still surviving are Elliridge and 
his sister, ]Mirani, wh'i is the widow of Henry S. Quick, of LaGrange 
township. 

Elbridge Jewell, the third child and second son in the father's 
family, was reared u])on the old family homestead on section 27, La- 
Grange township, and when a boy pursued his studies in a log school 
house, to which he walked a distance of a mile and a half through the 
woods. The school session was of comparatively short duration, for 
throughout the remainder of the year the services of the boys and girls 
of the neighborhood were needed at home, as there was much arduous 
labor incident to the development of a new farm. Mr. Jewell continued 
to assist in the cultivation of the fields upon his father's place until after 
his marriage, which important event in his life occurred in 1S57, the 
lady of his choice being JNIiss .Sarah J. Bonnel. They located on a farm 
on section 27, LaGrange township, there residing until i860, when they 
removed to another place. In 1861, however, they returned to the old 
homestead and in 1865 rcmovefl to Iowa, settling in Warren county, 
northwest of the city of Dcs r^Ioines. After a brief period, however, 
they again took up their abode upon the old home farm in Cass county, 
and there Mr. Jewell continued to engage actively in agricultural pur- 
suits until 1889, when he went to Cassopolis, where lie remained for 
five years, being engaged in the agricultural implement business. When 
he sold out he located on the home farm and then traded that property 
for the farm upon which he now resides on section 26, LaGrange town- 
ship. He has here one hundred and twenty-eight acres of land which 
is rich and arable and which he rents, so that he is relieved of the more 
arduous duties of farm life. He operated a threshing machine from 
1870 until 1887, covering much territory throughout the county and 
finding in the business a profitable source of income. 

In 1S80, Mr. Jewell was called upon to mourn the loss of his first 
wife, who died on the 12th of May of that year. On the 14th of No- 
vember, iSSo, he was married to Lucy A. Davis, a daughter of Charles 
F. S. and Susan (Batchelor) Davis. T\Irs. Jewell was tern in Dowagiac 
on the farm owned by Samuel .\aron=, January- 28. 1839. Her 
parents had come to Cas? county about 1857. from the state of Ohio. 
Mr. and 'vTrs. Jewell have become the parents of two sons: Hiram E.. 
a telegraph operator of Vicksburg, IMichigan; and Fred C. a telegrapher 



612 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

living at home. :\Ir. Jewell belongs to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen of Cassopolis, and he has many friends Imth in and out of 
the order. Having always lived in Cass cou.nty, his acquaintance ha.s 
grown as the years have gone by. and the circle of his friends has 1>cen 
extended as his genuine worth has won regard and confidence. 

He has swung the old "Turkey \\'ing" cradles from morn to night. 
Mr. and ]\lrs. Jewell have one of the "old Lnngfellow clocks."' which 
stands over six feet in height and it is over a centurv old, hut keeps 
perfect time. It is a rare specimen, and not such another relic will he 
found in the whole county of Cass. His father had the large frame 
made himself. They have a Eihle which was printed in 1839. 

WILLIAM! .AIcCxILL. 

William ^McGill, residing in Union, is a native of Canada, born on 
the 22(1 of August. 1830, and in his life has displayed many of the 
sterling characteristics of the Scotch race. His father. Andrew McGill, 
also a native of the land of hills and heather, was a farmer bv ocai- 
pation. He was reared, educated and married in his native land, and 
in 1831, accom]5anied by his family, he crossed the Atlantic to the new 
world, taking up his aborle near Troy, New York. There he spcn.t his 
remaining days, living to be about sixty-five years of age. His wife, 
Mrs. Magarct McCill, alsd a native >>i Scotland, died in her cightv- 
eighth }-ear. In their family were ten children, and no dc-atli occurred 
in the family circle until after all had reached mature years. There 
were four sons and six daughters. Imt only four are now living. 

William McGill, of this review, is the youngest son and is the only 
representative of the family in Cass county. He was about six months 
old when his parents left Canada and came to the United States, and he 
was reared in Rensselaer county. New York, pursuing his education in 
the schools of Stephentown. His youth was passed upon the home farm. 
and he assisted in its cultivation and improvement until about twenty- 
three years of age. He came to Michigan in iSCyC). locating in St. 
Joseph county, and Ixiught a farm in Motville township, where he 
remained for ten years, his time and energies being given to its devel- 
opment and cultivation. On the expiration of that period he traded the 
property for four hundred acres of land on the state line, three miles 
from Union. As his financial resources have increased he has extended 
his posessions by additional purchase from time to time, until he is one 
of the most extensive land owners of this part of the state, having about 
two thousand acres more, which lies across the border line in Indiana. 
but the greater part is in Cass county. He has also engaged in loaning 
money for many years and buys and sells horses, and frequently he 
rents out Ixith horses and cows. His business extends into St. Joseph 
county, 'Michigan, St. Joseph county, Indiana, to Van Buren. Cass and 
Berrien counties, and he is one of the most prominent and influential 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY t;i3 

residents of this part of the state. He lias been xcvy successful in his 
business, possessing keen foresioiit and broad capacity and carrying 
forward to successful conijjktinn whatexer he undertakes. He is seldom 
at error in matters of business judi^inent, and his enterprise, discrimina- 
tion and industry have been strong and salient features in his prosperity. 
Mr. McCiill is a stalwart Republican, but takes no active part in 
the work of the organizatiMU. He belongs to the Presbyterian church 
and he makes his home in Union. He is today tlie largest land owner 
of the county. His life record shows what may l)c accomplished through 
close applicaticin and unremitting (bh'gencc. He had no special ad- 
vantages when h.c startcil nut in life, Init he was not afraid to work and 
he possessed laudable ambitii n. He has made good u.se of his opportu- 
nities and has prospered fnim year to year, conducting all business mat- 
ters carefully and successfully, and in all his acts displays an aptitude for 
successful m.anagement. 

JOHX R. COTJJXS. 

Among the citizens of Mason township whose worth and fidelity 
to the general good are manifest in the faithful performance of public 
duties is numbered John R. Ci'llins. who is now filling the office of town- 
ship clerk. He resides on section i r. Mason township, and is one of the 
native sons of this locality, born on the 15th of July, iS-^t,. His father. 
William Collins, was a native of Ohio, and came to ^lichigan with his 
father, John Collins, who took uii their abode in Cass county in pioneer 
days, settling in IMason township in i'^3i. He found the district 
largely wiUl and unim])ro\cd. ^lucli of the land was still in possession 
of the government, and he took up a claim of eighty acres on section 
14. With characteristic energy he began the cultivation and develop- 
ment of a farm, and after clearing the land placed it under the plow. 
William Collins was a youth of twelve years at the time of the removal 
of the familv from Oliio to Alichigan, and was reared upon the old 
homestead on section 14. ATason township, where he early became famil- 
iar with the arduous task of developing new land. There were many 
hardships and trials to be borne in those days, for few roads had been 
laid out and manv of the now thriving towns and villages had not yet 
sprung into existence, so that the settlers had to go long distances to 
market and mill. Much of the fann work was done bv hand, andthe 
machinery then in use was verv crude and primitive. Having arrived 
at years of maturity William Collins was united in marriage in Wiscon- 
sin to Miss Marietta Peck, who was born in Connecticut, and was there 
reared to the age of fifteen vears. a dausrhter of Reuben Peck. She 
then came to the west and at the time of their marriage Mr. and 'M'rs. 
William Collins located in Mason township, where thev lived most of 
their lives. The father died on the 23rd of October, iqo2. which was 
the seventv-fifth anniversary of his birth, and the mother passed awav 
in 1867. Having lost his first wife, William Collins was again married, 



CU HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

his second union being witli Ellen Dokey. There were two sons of the 
former union: John R., of this review; and Fred \V., who is living in 
Minnesota. By tlie second marriage there was a son and daughter, 
William and Sylvin. The former is now living in Minnesota but the 
latter died in chikihood. 

John R. Collins was reared in INIason township and pursued his 
education in the distiict schools. He started out in life on his own 
account when fifteen years of age, working by the month as a farm hand 
in Mason township, being employed in that way for eight rears. He 
was married on die 30th of July, 1S73. to Miss Philonia Curtis, a 
daughter of Joseph A. and Deborah (Jordan) Curtis, a native of Mason 
township, where she has spent her entire life. Unto this marriage has 
been born one son, Nial J., •\\ho at the age of nineteen years is living 
at liome, assisting in the operation of the farm. 

John R. Collins is a carpenter by trade, having learned the business 
when a youth. He followed that pursuit for a number of years, but 
now concentrates his energies upon his farming operations, and is the 
owner of a good tract of land of fifty-five acres, which he has brought 
under a high state of cultivation, so that he annually harvests good 
cro])S. In his political views he is a Democrat, and has for many years 
served as township clerk, elected the last time in April, 1905. He has 
taken an active interest in public affairs and does all in his power to 
promote the material, intellectual and moral progress of the community. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Gleaners, and religiously with the 
United Brethren church, in which he is one of the trustees. He takes 
a most active and helpful interest in its work and is an advocate of all 
that is right and just in man's relations with his fellowmen. In his 
own business career he has never talcen advantage of the necessities of 
others in any transaction, and on the contrary has placed his dependence 
upon the safe and sure qualities of enterprise and unfaltering labor. 
Whatever prosperity he has enjoyed is due to his own persistent purpose 
and the course in life that he has pursued has gained for him the uniform 
respect and good will of his fellowmen. 

WILLIAM ARNOLD. 

William Arnold, a prominent old settler of the county, whose home 
is on section T2, iMason township, is classed with the worthy citizens 
that Ohio has furnished to Alichigan. He was born in Cuyalioga county, 
August 30, 1832, and is descended from an old New Fmgland family. 
His father, Henry Arnold, wa= a native of Massachusetts, born July 
25, 1807, and his vouth was passed in his native state, where he was 
married to ]\Iiss Maria Hewitt, who was also horn in Massachusetts. Re- 
moving to the west they took up their abode in Cuvahoga county. Ohio, 
in 1828, which was the year of their marriage. There they resided for 
about eight years, when, in 1835. they came with their family to Cass 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 615 

county, ^lichigan, and j\lr. Arnold entered a tract of land from tlie 
government ni what, is now Alason township. Not a furrow had been 
turned nor an impro\enieni made upon the place. In fact he had to cut 
his way through the woods to his claim, for no roads had been laid out. 
There were some old Indian trails through the forests, but tlie trees 
stood in their pruneval strength and there was little evidence of future 
development or impro\ement to be seen. Mr. Arnold built a little log 
cabin with a stick chimney. There was a large fireplace which occupied 
almost one entire side of the room, and this not only furnished heat for 
the little cabin, but cooking was also done over the tire, the pots and 
kettles hanging from the crane, while baking; was done by placing the 
iron pans amid the coals. The Arnold family is one of the oldest pioneer 
families of the county. Few indeed were the settlers living within its 
borders at the time they arrived, and there were many diliiculties to be 
met, owing to their remoteness from towns or villages, which would 
afford them the comforts and conveniences of life. The journey west- 
ward had been made with teams, for it was long prior to the era of 
railroad building in this part of the state. Mrs. Arnold was not long 
permitted to enjoy tier new home, but during the period of her resi- 
dence here proved a worthy pioneer woman, ably assisting her husband 
in his elforts to establish a home in the midst of the wilderness. She 
died in 1844, and was long survived by Mr. Arnold, who lived to tlie 
advanced age of eighty-two years. By that marriage there were born 
five children, three of w4iom arc natives of Ohio. For his second wife 
the father chose Lovica Dille, and they had six children. Flis third 
wife was Mrs. Jerusha Lake. 

William Arnold, whose name introduces this record, was the second 
child of his father's first marriage, and was only three years old when he 
was brought to Cass county, the family locating in Mason township. 
He was reared in this township, where he has now lived for seventy-one 
years. When a hoy he attended the district school, walking two miles 
to a little log school house, wherein he conned his lessons, sitting on 
a slab bench. There was a large fireplace in one end of the room, and 
the few pupils were arranged around the teacher's desk to receive the 
instruction in reading, writing, arithmetic and perhaps a few other 
branches of learningi but the curriculum was quite limited at that day. 
Mr. Arnold's training at farm labor, howe\-er, was not limited, as 
from an earlv age he was set to the tasks incident to the development and 
cultivation of tiic farm, and he remained at home until he had attained 
his majoritv. On the day that he became twenty-one years of age, he 
started out' in life on his" own account, and whatever success has come 
to him in later vears. is owing entirely to his persistent effort and honor- 
able labors. H'e first secured a situation as a farm hand at ten dollars 
per nionth for five months, and he worked in that way until he was able 
to carrv on farming on his own account. 

An important day in his life record was that of .\pril 5, 1S57, at 



610 HISTORY Ol- CASS COUXTY 

wliicli linic lie was united in marriage to Miss Ada Hntcli. a dauglitcr of 
Ezra and Sarah (Ailenj Hatch, linth uf whom were natives (it the state 
of New York, and in tlieir family were six cliildren. Mrs. Arnold heing 
the second. Her birth occurretl in Masun township in 1837, and the 
family <lid much for the de'.elnpment and imprc>\ ement of the cuntv. 

.\t the tunc of their marriai^e Mr. and IMrs. Arnold located upon 
the farm where they mnv resitle, livin.i,' at first in a little \o<^ cabin with 
its fireplace and primitise furni-^hins^s, and 'over that open fire Mrs. 
Arnold did her coukiny. They started with very little, and made all that 
they possessed by hard work and ;>trict attention to business. The im- 
provements upon the farm are the visible evidence of the life of thrift 
and industry which Mr. Arnold has led, all having been made bv him. 
As. the years have passed he lias pmspered and has erected here a com- 
fortable house, g(.<i(l barns and i.tlier outbuildings for the shelter of 
grain and stuck. lie has secured the latest imjiroved machinerv to facil- 
itate the work of the fields, and everything about his farm is neat and at- 
tractive in appearance. He began with only fifty acres and had to 
incur an indebtedness to secure that amount, but lie soon discharged 
his financial obligation, and in the course of years has added to his 
property from time to time until his farm now comijrises three hundred 
acres of excellent land, and ho gathers from the fields rich cmps an- 
nually. The lionie has been blessed with two children: Ruell C, 
who is a speculator; and Ailecn. who is at home. Mr. Arnold is the 
oldest continuous resident of I\Iason tdwnship. having lived here for 
more than the p.salmi.st's allotted span of three score years and ten. 
He has been identified with the growth and development of the county 
and is familiar with its history from pioneer times down to the present. 
He has watched each progressive movement that has had bearing u]ion 
the welfare and progress of this ]iortion of the state, and lias dfine his 
full share in the line of agricultural development. His political alle- 
giance has been given to the Democracy. His life has indeed been a 
useful one, and he has closely adhered to the golden rule as his life 
motto, doing unto others as he would have them do unto him. and thus 
living at peace with all men. being honest in his business dealings and 
considerate of those with whom he has come in contact. Such a course 
in life is well worthy of emulation, and his example might be profitably 
followed, for his life history proves the value of character and at the 
same time shows what may be acomplished through earnest labor, for 
j\Ir, Arnold started (3ut in life empty-handed and- has worked his way 
upward from a humble financial position to one of aftluence, with the 
aid of his estimable wife, who has aided him in counsel and advice in 
the rearing of their cliildren and the founding of their happy home. 
For almost a half century have ]\Ir. and Mrs. Arnold traveled life's 
journey, sharing alike the joys and sorrows of this life, and now in 
the golden eve of their lives they enjoy that peace and contentment 
which comes of a well spent life. 



HISTORY OK CASS COLWiV 017 

AIARIOX .McXEIL. 

Clarion MtXcii, uliu is now Si.-rving as towiiblup treasurer and 
resides oil becti(_!i 14, .Majun Inwnship, where he carries on genera! agri- 
cultural pursuit^, was horn on thi^ farm, his natid day being May 1, 
18O-!. His lather, H. L. .McXeil, was a native of Cayuga county, Xcw 
York, born August i, i8jj, and was a son of James AicXeil, who was 
born in the same county. H. C. McXeil was brought to Michigan by 
his parents uhen but twelve years of age, the family home being estab- 
lished in Cass ciuiiUy, up. ,11 the place where our subject now resides. 
This was in the \ ear i.'^35, and the pruiierty has since been in pos^ession 
of the family. The grandfather took, up the land from the government, 
thus coming into pobsession ol a claim which was entirely wild and 
uncultivated. Mr. and Mrs. McXeil have in their possessi(jn one of the 
old parchment deeds, wliicli dates September 10, 183S, and it is signed 
by I'resident Alartin \'an Bureii — the third deed of its kind found so 
far in the county. Jn the way of old relics they have an old bull's eve 
watch, which is one hundred and hfty years old'. It passed down from 
Air. McXeil's great-graiidfallicr, and it was gnen him by a soldier m 
the Irish rebellion nf Ireland, aluiut the seventeenth century. Air. 
AlcXeil at once began the ile\el"pmeiU and inniroxx'ment of the farm, 
but was not long iiermitled to enjoy his new home, for his death oc- 
curred a few years later, as he passed away in 1S41. 

H. C. McXeil was reared u|ion the home farm from the age r\i 
twelve years and shared with the family in the usual exiierieiices and 
hardships of life on the frontier. He early became familiar with tlie 
arduous task of developing a new farm, and for many )ears was closely 
associated with general agricultural juirsnits. On tlie ist of January, 
1849, l^c was united in marriage to Aliss Alartha A. Ives, who was bom 
in Lewis county, X"ew York, June 14, 1S29, and was a daughter of 
Samuel and Roxann (Hubliard) Ives, who were Ijorn in Xew York 
state. They removed to Calh(iun county, Alichigan. in 1835, and thus 
in both the paternal and maternal lines Air. AlcXeil of this re\-iew is 
descended from an honored pioneer ancestry, his mother having been 
but fourteen years of age when she came with her parents to Cass 
county. Air. and Airs. H. C. AlcXeil located on the old family home- 
stead at the time of their marriage, purchasing the interests of the other 
heirs in the property. By trade he was a carpenter and joiner, and fol- 
lowed that business in connection with farming, erecting many buildings 
in his townsliip. He was well known in the county by reason of his 
activity in business life, his capable service in public office and his de- 
votion to high and honorable princij^les in his social and home relations. 
His political allegiance was given to the Democracy, and he held many 
local offices, the duties of which he discliarged with absolute loyalty and 
fidelity. He was township clerk for fifteen \ears and treasurer for 
two years, while for a long period he acted as justice of the peace, ren- 



618 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

dering dccisi<jiis which were strictly fair and unbiased and wliicli "won 
him golden opinions from all sorts of people." He was a member of 
the Masonic fraternity and in his life exemplified the beneficent and 
helpful spirit of tiie craft. He died October 4, 1S97, and thus the 
conimunily lost one of its honored and representative pioneer settlers 
who for almost two-thirds nf a century had lived in the county. There 
w-ere seven childreti in the family : Harriet Emma. Mary Adelaide. 
Carrie Ellen, Lennra. Annctta, Marion and Sherman, all of whom are 
now living-, and were born upon the farm which is now the home of our 
subject. 

Marion McXeil is the eldest son and sixth child in bis fatlier's 
family, and was reared upon the old family homestead to farm work, 
devoting' his time and energies to the laly^rs of field and meadow through 
the summer months. He was educated in district school No. 5, in 
Mason township, and has always continued to reside upon the farm 
which his grandfather entered from the government with the exccjition 
of a brief period of one year spent in the northern peninsula of Michi- 
gan. He was married on the i^'ith of T^Tarcb. 1892, to ]\Tiss Mabel 
Bement, a daughter of George and ^Tary (Walker) Bement, and a 
native of Ontwa town.ship, Cass county. 

Mr. !McXeil is a Democrat, with firm faith in the principles of the 
party, and has taken an active and helpful interest in its work. In 
1899 he was elected township treasurer and was re-elected in 1904, 
since which time be has filled the office. He is well known in the 
cotmty where be has always resided, representing a pioneer family, the 
name of McNeil being inseparably associated with the history of devel- 
opment and progress since 1835. The work which was instituted by 
his grandfather and carried on by his father, has been continued by 
bim. and be is now a leading agriculturist of his community with a val- 
uable farming property which be keeps imder a high state of cultivation 
and well improved with modern equi]iments. 

SIDNEY J. nR.\HAM. 

Sidnev T- Crabam, a prominent farmer living on section 2. Mason 
township, was born in Medina county, Ohio, !\Tarcb iS. 1842. His 
father, Lv-man Graham, was a native of Vermont, and after leaving 
New England took up his abode in the middle west. He settled in 
Cass county, Michigan, in 183;. and as much of the land was still in 
possession of the government, be entered a claim and began the devel- 
opment of the farm upon which his son Sidney now resides. It was 
in the year 18-I5 that he reinoved bis familv to this place. His atten- 
tion w-as given to its cultivation and development, and as the years 
passed, be transformed the land into rich and productive fields. He 
was of Scotch descent and displayed in bis life and character manv of 
the sterling traits of the Scotch ' people. His political allegiance was 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY ' 619 

given to the Dcinocracy, and he (hcd in Union, Michi<;an, at the age 
of sixty-seven years. Jn early manhood he had married Miss Sarah 
Knapp, a native of Ohid. 

Sidney J. Graiiam is the only child of their marriage, and was 
three years of age when his parents took up their abode in Mason town- 
ship, Cass count}-, so that he was reared upon the farm where he now 
lives, early becoming familiar with the practical methods of tilling the 
soil and caring for the crops. He was only nineteen years of age when 
in response to the country's call his patriotic spirit was aroused, and 
he offered his aid to the government, becoming a member of Company 
H, Twenty-first Ohio Volunteer" Infantr}-. He joined the service as a 
private for three months, and on the expiration of that period, it being 
seen that the war was to he a prolonged and bitter contest, he re-enlistcd 
on the I2th of August, 1861, fnr three years' service, or during the 
continuance of hostilities. At this time he became a member of Com- 
pany E, Torly-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served as a private 
until the close of hostilities. He once more enlisted in 1S64 as a mem- 
ber of the same company and regiment, and continued with the army 
until the 9th of June, 1864, when he was wounded at the battle of 
Buzzard's Roost by a gun shot in the left arm. On the 20th of June, 
because of his injuries, he received an honorable discharge after a 
faithful and valorous service of over four years. His military record is 
one of which he has c\'ery reason to be proud, and he is numbered 
among the brave Iwys in blue to whom tlie countrv- owes a debt of 
gratitude that can never be repaid for what they did in support of the 
Union cause. He was with the Army of the CuiTiberland and partici- 
pated in all of the battles of that militar}' organization until he was in- 
jured. 

In the spring of 1866. Mr. Craham located on his present fann. 
which is the old family homestead that was taken up as a claim by his 
father. He made further arrangements for having a home of his own 
bv his marriage on the first of June, 1866. to Miss Elizabeth Eagley, 
a daughter of Knapp Eagley. She was born in Ohio and has been to 
him a" faithful companion and helpmate on life's journey. They have 
become the parents of two daughters: Lulu, the wife of George Rus- 
sell, who is living in ^^lasnn township: and Myrtle, who married .-Mbert 
Keelev, their home being in Calvin township, Cass county. 

Mr. Graham owns one hundred and sixty-five acres of well im- 
proved land and now rents his place, thus leaving the active and arduous 
work of the fann to others, while he is enjoving a well-earned rest. 
He is a member of Carter Post, No. q6, G. A. R., at Union, and is also 
a member of the :Masonic lodge at Edwardsburg. His political alle- 
giance has alwavs been eiven to the Republican party, and he has taken 
an active and helpful interest in its work, doing all in his power to 
secure its success. AVith the exception of a period of about four years 
spent in Ohio, he has resided continuously in Cass county for six dec- 



C-'o HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ailes, ami at all tinier lia-? liecii lnyal in his citizcnslii]x di^^iilayin"^ the 
same dexDtinn in the ijuhlic welfare that he manifested when at the out- 
break of the Civil war he domed the hlue uniform of the nation and 
entered his country's ser\ice. His farniin"' interests have h.een carcfulh' 
conducted and his lahors have resulted in hrinj^iuL; to him a poddly nicas- 
ure of success. 

GABRIKL F.r.Y, 

No history of Cass county would he complete ^\■ithout mention 
of Gabriel Flhy. who is the oldest livings resident of Porter township, 
having- passed the eighty-eighth milestone on life's journey. His resi- 
dence is on section 6. South Porter township, and from pioneer times 
he has remained upon this farm, an interested witness of the changes 
lliat have occurred and the transformation that has been wrought as the 
county has been developed from a wild and unimproved region into one 
of rich fertility, becoming a center of agricultural development in ^^lich- 
igan. Mr. Ebv was b<^rn in Stark county. Ohio. fi\'e miles east of Can- 
ton, on the 27th of July, t8i8. His paternal grandfather, David Eby, 
was born on the ocean while his iiarents were en route from Germany 
to America and the family b.nmc was established in Virginia in early 
colonial days. His father, the Rev. ]c,hn lihy. was a native of A^irginia 
and was a miiu'ster of the United Ihethrcn church, who fIe\'oted bis en- 
tire life to the cause of preaching the gospel. He exerted a wide and 
beneficial influence in behalf of moral develojmient and where\'er he went 
labored earnestly for tlie welfare of the people among whom he located. 
He became a pioneer settler of Stark county, Ohio, and there he died 
in the sixt\ -second year of his age. leaving behind an honored name and 
a memory that has been cherished by all who knew him. His wife bore 
the maiden name of IMary ^L Dague and was of Pennsylvania Dutch 
descent. She died at a comparatively earlv age. being but forty years 
old when called to her final rest. Rev. Eby afterward married again, 
his second union being with Miss ^Iar\- Hamger, and by the two mar- 
riages he became the father of seventeen children, all of whom reached 
adult life. By the first marriage there were nine cliildren. eight sons and 
a daughter, while of the second union four sons and four daughters 
were born. 

Gabriel Eby was the se\entb child and sixth son of the first mar- 
riage, and was reared fn Stark county. Ohio, amid the wild scenes and 
environments of pioneer life. The work of improvement and cultiva- 
tion had scarcely been beg^m in that section of the state in his early 
youth. Only here and there was a little cabin to show that some ad- 
venturous settler was endeavoring to found a home in the wilderness. 
He was sixteen years of age when the first schoolhouse was built in his 
district and in consequence liis educational privileges ^^■ere limited, but 
through experience and observation he has gained a good practical bus- 
iness knowledge. He was nineteen years of age when he left Ohio and 









AND LITTLE GRANDSON. 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTY 021 

made his way to Elkliart count}-. Iinliana. Init later lie returned tu tlie 
county of his nativity and was there married in 1S46 to Miss Caroline 
Wagner. With his bride he returned to Elkhart county, where he re- 
sided for a Ijrief period, when, in 1848. they removed to Cass county, 
Michigan, settling in Porter township. They took up their abode upon 
the farm where Mr. Ehy yet resides and their first home was a little 
log cabin sixteen by eighteen feet, in which they lived for fifteen years. 
He had up to this time always lived on the frontier, first in Ohio, later 
in Indiana antl now in Micliigan. and the hardshi])S and privations in- 
cident to settlement in a pioneer country were familiar to him and were 
courageously borne in his attempt to establish a good home for his fam- 
ily. He lived in his first house for fifteen years, during which period 
it was roofed three different times. Later he built a brick house, manu- 
facturing the brick on his own farm. His life has been one of earnest 
and unremitting toil, and it has only been in recent years that he has 
left the work of the farm to others. He secured one hundred and sixty 
acres of land on coming to the county and resolutely began the task of 
clearing and cultivating this, placing it in the course of time under a 
high stale of cultivation. He still owns eighty acres of the original 
tract, having sold the remaining eighty acres to his son. 

L'nto Mr. and Mrs. Eby were born eight sons and one daughter, 
and the lann'ly circle remained unbroken until after all had attained years 
of maturity. The record is as folliiws: Catherine, the widow of John 
B. Harmon and a resident of Cassopolis; Peter, who is mentioned on 
another page of this work; Christian, who is living in Antrim county, 
Michigan; William, wlio is engaged in the grocery business in Union, 
Cass county; Samuel, a resident of Jones: Daniel, a teacher and farmer 
living in Porter town.ship; Gabriel, who is devoting his attention to 
fruit-raising in the same townshi]); Ulysses S., who is engaged in the 
practice of law in Cassopolis; and David, who is devoting his time and 
energies to the profe^^sion of teaching. In 1S91 the family were called 
upon to mourn the loss of the wife and mother, who died on the 7th of 
November of that year. In 1893 Mr. Eby was again married, his sec- 
ond union being with ^lelissa I\Iorse. who was born in Xewark. Wayne 
county, Xew York, in the vear 1S44. and was brought to ^Michigan in 
1853 by her father, E. Z. Morse. 

Mr. Eby cast his first presidential ballot for William Henry Harri- 
son in 1840. and contimied to support the AVhig party until its disso- 
lution, when he joined the ranks of the new Republican party, voting 
for Lincoln in 1S60 and again in 1864. Since that time he has not 
voted a straight ticket, but has voted for the men whom he has tlionglit 
to be best qualified for office, lieing fearless in support of his honest 
convictions. Eor about forty years he has been a member of the Erec- 
will Baptist church and has always taken an interest in the material 
progress, educational development, moral advancement and political 



622 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

standing of his community. In fact lie gives his approval and in many 
cases his co-operation tt) tlie various movements which have been of di- 
rect and serviceable benefit to the county, where for fifty-eight years he 
has lived, watching its development from a pioneer district to its pres- 
ent advanced state of progress and prosperity. He is now th.e oldest 
living settler in Porter township and is remarkably well preserved for 
one of his yeais. He has led a busy, useful and active life, living at 
peace with his fclltiwmeu, faithfully i>erforniing the duties tliat have 
devolved upon him. and now in the evening of his days he can louk back 
over the past witliout regret. He has won the regard and friendship 
of all who know him and is indeed worthy of representation in the his- 
tory of this county. 

K A. PLAXCK, M. D. 

He whose name introduces this review has gained recognition as one 
of the able and succesful phvsicians of Cass county, and by his labors, 
his high professional attainments and his sterling characteristics has 
deserved the respect and confidence in which he is held by the medical 
fraternity anrl the local public. He resides in Union, where he is jirac- 
ticing his profession, and he is also serving as county coroner. 

Dr. Planck is a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred in 
LaGrange county on the 27th of September, 1S69. flis father, C. K. 
Planck, was a native of Pcnn'-ylvania. and a miller liy trade. He fol- 
lowed that pursuit in Indiana fi>r a num1>er of years, and in 1S77 crossed 
the border into ^lichigan, settling in Porter township, Cass county, 
where he is still living, devoting his attention to agricultural pursuits. 
He married IMiss Emma Dueslcr, a native of Ohio, born in Sanduslcy 
countv. She. too, is yet living. In their family were si.K children, three 
sons and three daughters, and Dr. Planck, who is the eldest of the num- 
ber, was a vouth of thirteen years when the family came to Michigan. 
He attended school in I'nion. living during that time with Dr. Bulhand, 
and at the age of sixteen years he began teaching, which prnfcssinn he 
followed successfully and capably for «even years in the district schools 
of the countv. He afterward continued his studies in the Northern 
Indiana Normal College at Valparaiso, and in the University of Illinois, 
and thus gained broad, general information, which ser\'ed as an excel- 
lent basis for his professional knowledge. Determining upon the prac- 
tice of medicine as a life work he matriculated in the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons at Chicaen, and completed the regular course, being 
graduated there in the class of 1804. Immediately afterward he located 
in Union, where he has since been successfully engaged in practice, 
and that he is capable and skillful is indicated by the liberal patronage 
extended to him. 

Dr. Planck was united in marriage in 1892 to Miss Grace E. Hart- 
man, a daughter of Joseph and Eliza TRinehart) Hartman. Three 
children have graced "this marriage, Joseph W.. George E. and Lena, 



HISTORY OF CAS? COl'XTY 0-23 

but the latter died at the aqc of fifteen mcmth^. Dr. Planck votes with 
the Republican party and is servinc^ for the third term as county coroner, 
having- been elected in i8oS. ac-ain in 1002 and a third time in 1904. 
He has held various local offices in his township and his duties have 
been promptly and faithfully performed. He belongs to the Knii,'-hts of 
the Maccabees and to the Masonic fraternity, and in bis life work finds 
ample opportunity to exemplify the spirit of beneficence and helpfulness. 
which is the basic clement in the craft. Tn addition to a larg-e private 
practice he is examining physician for many insurance comoanies and 
he belongs to Cass County >,Tcdical Sncictv. the Michigan State Med- 
ical Society, the Mississippi A^nllev !\Icdical .^ssociat^on and the .Amer- 
ican Medical Association. He thus keeps in touch with the advance 
thousjht of the profession, and by reading and research is continually 
broadenin.c: his knowledcjc and promotinq- his efficiency. He is widely 
reco.s^ized as an able physician, not only by the g^eneral public, but also 
by the medical fraternity. 

CHART.KS OUDKRKTRK. 

Charles Ouderkirk. a representative asrriculturist, thorouc^hly 
familiar by reason of practical experience with the best methods of 
carrA'incf on farm work, resides on section 4, ATason township, where he 
no^v owns and operates ninety-six and a half acres of land. He was 
bom in the nci.c:bborinc: state of Indiana, his birth bavin.sf occurred on 
the banks of the St. Jo^jcpb river on the site of the present city of Elk- 
hart, in Elkhart countv. October R. tF^43. His .grandfather, :\dam 
Chiderkirk. was b^irn in Scnfland. where he spent his boyhood and youth, 
and in early manhood, seekinc: better bu=;iness opportunities and advan- 
tac:e.s, be crossed the Atlantic, locatincf in New York citv. His father. 
John Ouderkirk. is a native of Onondacra countv. New York, where he 
was reared and educated. Remoyincr westward, be settled in F.lkhart 
countv. Indiana, in 1S4.T, upon a tract of land upon which the citv has 
since been partially built. He first rented land and afterward removed 
to a farm three miles northeast of Elkhart, where he continued to make 
his home and carry on general a<rricu!tural pursuits up to the time of 
his death, which occurred when he was in bis seventv-ninth vear. His 
life was a busy and useful one, and his unfalterinc: diliqence constituted 
the key which unlocked for him the portals of success. In hi? political 
allegiance he was a Detnocrat, and ser\-ed as township tmstee. John 
Ouderkirk was united in marna<:re to Miss Mar\- Wilkes, a native of 
New York, whose father was a native of En,G;land. T^Irs. Ouderkirk 
also lived to a ven- advanced aee, passing away in her eiErhtieth^ year. 
She .shared with her husband in the hardships and privations of pioneer 
life, and was a worthy assi-t.ant and helpmate to him on life's iournev. 
Tn their family were five children, three dauchters and two sons, all of 
whom reached mature vears, the family record bein.e: as follows: Elma 



624 HISTORY OK CASS COUXTY 

Jane and Andrew 11., both now deceased; Elizabeth, the wile of J. ;M. 
McDonald, of South P.end ; Charles, of this review; and Amelia, who is 
the wife of Orlando Babcock, of W'averly, Iowa. 

Charles Ouderkirk was the fourth in order of bivth in this family 
and was reared in the county of his nali\it_\-, acquiring a common school 
education, after which he assisted in the work of the home farm until 
he had passed his twenty-first birthday. In 1865 he enlisted in respon.se 
to his country's call for troops, and served with tlie L'nion army as a 
member of Company .\, One Hundred and Fifty-second Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry, until the close of the war, acting as duty sergeant. 
When hostilities had ceased lie returned to Elkhart and was engaged 
in fanning on tlie old Imniestead. 

On the 22d of Jaiuiary. iSjj. .Mr. Ouderkirk was united in mar- 
riage to Miss L..ui-a Dickeiim. ,f, a dau-liler of Samuel and Al>i,L;ail 
(Gearhart) Dickerho'if. the former a native of Ohio and the latter of 
Pennsyh'ania. .She bail a twin sister, Lo\-ina, and they were burn in 
Portai;e county, Ohio, .\ugu>t 2. 1S47, ''i-'ing only two years old when 
taken bv tbtir ]iare!:t.-n to Indiana, tlieir girllioijd davs being passed near 
Elkhart'. 

In the year i8(;j Mr. and Mrs. Ouderkirk removed U< Mason 
towtiship, Cass coiintw locating on the farm where he now resides. 
He is a general farmer and stuck man. who has placeil his fields under 
a high state of cultisatiwn and raises good grades of stock which find 
a ready sale on the market. There has lieen nothing especially e.xciting 
in his life history, which has been characterized, however, by faithfulness 
to duty in all life's relations. Unto him and his wife have been born 
three children, but all have passed awav. He votes with die Democnicy, 
and has served as a member of the lioanl of review. He is a memlier of 
Elmer Post, G. .A. R., at Elkliart, In.liana, and in fnitcrnal and social 
circles is esteemed for his genuine worth. His attention is gi\cn to his 
farm, which, comprising ninety-six and a half acres of land, has been 
placed under a high state of cultivatiou and is now an excellent tract, 
returning golden harvests for the care and labor bestowed upon it. 

G. H. DENIKE. ^I. D. 

Dr. G. H. Denike. who is engaged in tb.e practice of medicine an<l 
surgery in Union, was born in Ottawa. Canada, on the 15th of Decem- 
ber, 1S64, and is a son of .-Vndrew J, and Delilah f Snider") Denike. 
who were also natives of Canada. The paternal grandfather was a phy- 
sician in England, and on c(^ming to the new world settled in Canada 
at an early clav, there practicing his profession up to the time of his 
death, which occurred when he was in his sixty-seventh year. The 
mother of our subicct was of Irish lineage, and her father came to 
Canada from Ireland also at an early period in the development of the 
northern country. 



HISTORY 01' CASS COL'XTY 625 

Dr. Deilike was the fifth in onler nf birth in a family ui three 
sons and three daughters. He was reared and educated in his nativ.e 
country, attending the common and high schools and also Ale.Kander 
University, from which institution he was graduated on completing a 
classical course. Determining upon the practice of medicine as a life 
work he took up study in Queen's Medical College at Kingston, On- 
tario, with broatl general learning to serve as a found;ition upon which 
to rear the superstructure of his knowledge. He completed his col- 
legiate course by graduation in the class of 1882, and immediately after- 
ward located for practice at Camplx^llsford, Ontario. He was afterward 
upon the road for alrout four years as examiner for insurance companies, 
wiien, in 1S98, he came to Union, where he has since engaged in the 
practice of medicine and surgery. In order to still further perfect him- 
self in his chosen calling he pursued a course in 1904-05 in Hahnemann 
^Medical College and Plospital of Chicago. Afterward he resumed his 
professional labors in Union. He is well versed in the principles of 
practical science, and that he possesses skill and ability is indicated by 
the exccllenf results which have followed his efforts. 

Dr. Denike was married in 188S to ^liss Ida A. Wilson, a daughter 
of George \\'ilsnn. of Sterling, Ontario, in which place she was born 
and reared. This uiiirm has been graced with three daughters. Pearl, 
Nellie May and Ollie. The family occupies an enviable position in 
social circles, the ho-^pitality of the be.st homes of Union and the sur- 
rounding district being freely accorded them. Dr. Denike is a mem- 
ber of Elkhart ^ledical Association, of Elkliart. Indiana. He is well 
known as a physician and citizen, and is prominent and popular, both 
socially and professionally. He has given undivided attention to his 
professional duties since entering upon the active practice of medicine, 
and a liberal patronage is now accorded him. 

CFIARLES A. RITTER. 

Charles A. Ritter, cashier of the Eirst National Bank of Cassopolis, 
was biirn in Cassopolis. September 19, 1S58. His paternal grandfather, 
John Ritter, was a native of Virginia, and came to Michigan in 1828. 
first locating in Berrien county, but the following year he removed to 
Cass county, and located on the prairie in LaGrange townslu'p. He 
had but recently completed his cabin when one morning, while standing 
in the door, he was struck by lightning, his death occurring in the year 
of his arrival in this county. He left a family of three sons and one 
daughter, including Joseph K. Ritter. the father of our subject. He 
was the voungest anrl was reared upon the old homestead farm in La- 
Grange township. In 1S51 be came to Cassopolis and engaged in 
the dry goods business. In 1862 T\Ir. Ritter was elected county treas- 
urer, and ser\'ed in that capacitv four years. In 1865 he again went into 
business, and continued in active mercantile life until 1875. He was 



C2rt HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

one of the original stijckhnKlers and a director in tlie First Xatii.mal 
Bank of Cassopolis, and was made president in 18S4, wliich ]3osition he 
held at the time of his death, which occnrred July 30. i.Scji. Joseph 
K. Ritter was married to Miss Amanda V. Kingsbury, a native of 
Needham, Massachusetts, and a daughter of Asa Kingsliiu'y, who is rep- 
resented on another page of this work. [Mr. and Mrs. Ritter became 
the parents of four children, one died in infancy and one daughter at 
the age of thirteen years, the other daughter, Mrs. Dr. I'unk, is living 
in Cassopolis. 

Charles .\. Rilter is the second child of the family and \v;is reared 
in Cassopolis. On the 1st of Jul}-, if^JJ. he entered the b'irst National 
Bank of Cassopolis as bookkee]ier. Soon afterward he was made assist- 
ant cashier, continuing in that capacity until 1891, when he was cho'=en 
cashier, which position he is now filling. Flis connection with the bank 
covers a period of more than twenty-eight years, and the success of the 
institution is attributable in no small degree to his efforts. 

On the 13th of December. 1881, was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Ritter and ^[iss Mary E. Davis, a daughter of William and Eliza 
F, (Saunders) Davis. Mrs. Ritter was born in Trenton, Michigan, 
but was reared and educated at South Bend, Indiana. They have one 
son, Joseph K., who is yet at home with Iiis parents. 

Mr. Ritter was a tnistee of the village of Cassopolis for a number 
of years and abso president of the village lioard for two terms, and he 
exercised his official prerogatives in support of all movements which 
he deemed of puljlic benefit. 

WILLIAM H. STRETCH. 

William IT. Stretch is one oftlie old settlers of Cass county, and as 
such deserves representation in this volume, for through many years he 
has lived within its borders, his mind bearing the impress of the early 
historic anna's of this part of the state. He resides on section 27, 
LaGrange township, and is ntmibered among the native sous of Pokagon 
township, his birth having occurred upon the old Tayl.ir homestead 
there on the 21st of April, 1846. Flis father, John Stretch, was a native 
of W'ayne countv. Indiana, and came to Cass county when only six 
years of age with his parents, Joseph and Sarah Stretch, who were 
among the 'first settlers of the county. They received the first deed to 
a farm in their locality. The grandfather cultivated and improved a 
tract of land, spending his entire life upon the farm which he entered 
from the go\ernment, his efforts contributing in substantial measure to 
the material improvement of this part of the countv. 

John Stretch was reared in Cass county amid the wild sceties and 
environments of pioneer life. The primitive home of the family was 
a loo- cabin, and the members of the household shared in all the hard- 
ships and trials incident to life on the frontier. All around them was 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY G27 

unbroken prairie ^r stretches of tinilier land, and the work of cultivation 
seemed scarcely beg-un. Only here and there would be seen a little 
cabin to indicate that the seeds of civilization had been planted which 
were in due time to briuij forth onod fruit. John Stretch assi-ted in the 
arduous task of develnpins' new land and chose as his life wnrk the 
occupation to which he was reared, always giving much of his time and 
attention to farming. However, he was likewise a preacher of the Ger- 
man Baptist chmxli, and in this connection was well known in the 
county, his influence and efforts being of no restricted order. Both by 
precept and example he led many into the better way of life and his 
memory is still cherished by a large number of those who were his 
friends and neighbors in his lifetime. He lived to be about sixtv-five 
years of age. His early political support was given to the Whig party, 
and upon its dissolution he joined the ranks of the new Repuljlican 
party. He married Miss Emily V. McCoy, a native of Virginia, who 
came to Cass county with lier parents when about five years of age, 
and was here reared. She is still living in her eighty-first year, one of 
the most highly esteemed f>ld ladies of the county. In their famil_\- were 
five sons, all of whom reached mature years, and they also reared an 
adopted daughter. Mrs. Anna Scheline.. ^Ir. Stretch, of this review, 
is the eldest of the five children, and four of the sons are now living in 
Cass county, while George is a resident of Berrien c(junt\-, Michigan. 
The others are: Jo'^cph, who resides in Pokagon township; Isaac, who 
is foreman in the drill shop at Dowagiac; and Ira. who is living ui^n 
the old homestead. 

William H. Stretch was reared in Pokagon townshi]-) and pursued 
his education in the cummon schools. He assisted in clearing the farm 
in his lioyhood days and in performing the various duties incident to 
the work of the old homestead. He continued under the parental roof 
until twenty-four years of age. when he was married. He first wedded 
Miss Margaret J. Collins, who died leaving one son. Clyde L. After 
losing his first wife, IMr. Stretch was married to Mrs. Edith ("Jewell) 
Goodrich, who was killed by lightning. His present wife liore the 
maiden name of Emma Grace White, and at the time of their marriage 
was the widow of W. W. \^an Slyke. ^Ir. Stretch made his home in 
Pokagon township until about eight years ago. when he sold his property 
there and removed to EaGrange township, settling on section 27, where 
he yet resides. He has been a life-long resident of Cass county, having 
made his home here for fifty-nine years. Any movement or plan for 
the public good receives his earnest attention and endorsement, and his 
aid can alwavs be counted upon to further any movement that promises 
to result beneficially to the county. Pie is a member of the Tvlethodist 
Episcopal church of Cassopolis. and his life has ever been honorable 
and upright, in harmony with his professions. He has had a full realiza- 
tion of his duties of citizenship, and also of his duties to his fellow men. 
and has never been known to take advantage of the necessities of others 



6.28 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

in any trade Iransaclion. In fact his life is in many respects worthy of 
emulation and his lellow tuAvusnien speak of him in terms of regard 
and esteem. 

JOSEPH HESS. 

Joseph Hess, inllucntial and enterprising, has found in his intense 
and well-directed energy the key that has unlocked the portals of suc- 
cess. Without special advantages to aid him at the outset of his career 
he has nevertheless persevered in his work and has today valuahlc land 
holdings in Cass county. He resides on section 34, Jefferson town- 
ship, where he has eigiity acres of land and in addition to this he owns 
eighty acres of the old family homestead, ninety-three acres on section 
21, Jefferson township, and ninety-two acres in Ontwa township, so 
that his landed possessions now comprise two hundred and sixty-five 
acres, some of which he rents. Ohio has furnished a number of repre- 
sentative and valued citizens to Cass county, including INIr. Hess, who 
was born in Huntington township, Ross county, of the Buckeye state, 
on the 1 6th of August. 1846. His parents were Joseph and Belinda 
(Staines) Hess, both of whom have now passed away. The father 
was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he spent his youlh, 
subsequent to which time he removed to Ohio, locating in Ross county 
about 1838. There he lived for more than a decade, when with his 
family he came to ]\Iichigan in 1S49, settling in Cass county. He then 
located in Jefferson townshiii, where he purchased a farm, his land lying 
in both Jefferson and Ontwa townships. It was largely raw and unim- 
proved when it came into his possession but his labors soon wrought 
a transformation in the appearance of the property and the once uncul- 
tivated tract began to yield him good harvests as a reward for the care 
and labor he bestowed upon the fields. His entire life was devoted to 
farming and he kqit in touch with modern progress as the primitive 
machiner}' was replaced by improved agricultural implements and large 
and comm<-i<lious buildings were erected to supercede the small log cabins 
of pioneer days. In all matters of public progress he was deeply inter- 
ested, rejoicing in what was accomplished in the county and giving his 
active co-operation to any plan or measure for the public good. His 
study of the political issues and questions of the day led him to support the 
Democracv and upon that ticket he was elected supervisor and also to 
other local offices, the duties of which he discharged with promptness 
and fidelitv. As a member of the school board he proved his interest in 
the cause of education by his advocacy- of measures that tended to raise 
the standard of public instruction. He was a member of the old school 
Baptist church and his life was characterized by integrity that was un- 
assailable, while his business reputation would bear the closest investiga- 
tion and scrutinv. He was twice married, his first union being with Miss 
Belinda Staines', who was a native of Pennsylvania and was of Ger- 
man and Swiss descent. She died at the age of sixty-two years, after 



HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY iJJ'J 

which Air. Hess was again married, his second union heing with a ]\Irs. 
Lewis. There were eight children born of the first marriage and one 
son by the second marriage. Of tiiis number four are still living: 
Sarah, who \\as the wife of Richard Turner, a resident of Chillicothe, 
Ohio; Anna, who was born in Pennsylvania, Alay 3, 1S38, and is now 
keeping house with her brother upon the old homestead farm; Joseph, 
of this review; and John, of Chillicothe, Ohio. The father reached the 
very venerable age uf eighty-live years and in his death the county 
mourned the less of one of its representative pioneer settlers. 

Joseph Hes.s, the youngest member of his fatlier's family, was a 
young lad when he came with his parents to Ohio. In fact he had 
scarcely attained his third year. His sister Anna, too, was a young 
child and both were reared in Jefferson township uix5n the farm where 
they have been keeping house for many years. Mr. Hess was educated 
in the district schools and receiscd :inii>]e training at farm labor under 
the direction of his father, \\(irking at the plow from an early age and 
performing ah such farm work as his years and strength permitted. He 
afterward jjurchased the interest of the other heirs in the old home prop- 
erty. Botli he and his sister Anna own eighty acres of land in Jeffer- 
son township, to the cultivation arid improvement of which he gives his 
energies and his close application and strong purpose are winning for 
him success that increases year by year. He also has ninety-three acres 
of land on section 21, and ninety-two acres in Ontwa to\vnship. so that 
his farm property covers two hundred and sixty-five acres, some of 
which he rents. He is likewise one of the stockholders in the creamen,' 
at Edwardsluirg, a productive industry which is of value to the com- 
munity, furnishing a market to tlie farmers who keep a large number 
of cows and who sell their milk to the institution. 

■i\Ir. Hess has been a lifelong Democrat, giving inflcxiljle support 
to the principles of his party. He belongs to Edwardsburg camp. No. 
1492, M. \Y. A. If one could sec a picture of the county as it appeared 
fifty-six years ago when Mr. Hess was first brought here there would 
be large tracts of fore,=^t in which not a tree had been felled, while upon 
the prairie would be seen the native grasses, as the land had not yet 
been broken. No bridges had been built across the streams and few 
roads had been laid oiit and it seemed that the work of development 
and improvement lay entirely in the future. The Hess family tore their 
full share in the work of upbuilding and the name has ever stood ap a 
synonym for progressive citizenship and reliability in business during 
tile long connection of the family with Cass county. 

GEORGE M. FIELDS. 

George M. Fields, tlie prosecuting attorney of Cass county, is pos- 
sessed of legal learning, an analytical mind and a readiness Ingraspmg 
the points in an argument— qualities which combine to make him a cap- 



630 HISTOKV OF CASS COUXTY 

able lawyer of the Cass county bar. While his professional duties call 
him largely to Cassopolis he continues to make his home in Dowagiac 
His natal day was December 14, iSCiS, and his birtli occurred upon a 
farm in Ottawa o.unty. Ohin. [lis father, Edward Fields, was also a 
native of that county and is a farmer. by occupation. He still resides 
upon the old h.-niestead where his entire life has been passed. His 
parents died A\lieii lie was only ten years of age, and he then started 
out in Hte im his own account, since which time he has been de])endent 
entirely upon iiis own resources. He was a soldier of the Civil war, 
serving for ab..ut fr.ur years, and he lust his left arm while participating 
in the battle of Kcncsaw Mountain. He married Miss Louisa Hunt, 
a native of Seneca county. Ohio, who is also living. In their family 
wcic two s<,iis, the elder being llosea, who is an attorney by professi(jn 
but a farmer by occupation. 

George ^I. F'ields, reared upon the old family homestead, began his 
education in the country schools and afterward continued his stmlies in 
the high .-cl-,ool at Monroeville, Huron county, Ohio, where he com- 
pleted his course in i8Sq. He then engaged in teaching school for one 
year in the Buckeye state, after which he entered the ilichigan State 
University at .\nn .\rl nr f, ir the study of law and was graduated from 
the law department in the class of 1893. He was then admitted to 
practice at Columbus, Ohio," and opened a law office in Toledo, that 
state, in 1894. In June, 1895, he came to Dowagiac, where he enteral 
into partnershi;-) with Charles V.. Sweet, which connection was con- 
tinued for one year, since which time he has been alone in business. He 
was elected circuit ci.uirt cummissioner in 1900 and prosecuting attor- 
ney in 1902. since which time he has been re-elected, so that he is now 
serving frjr the second term. He was also city attorney of Dowagiac in 
1900. 

In 1895 occurred the marriage of George M. Fields and Miss Emily 
F. Bond, of Dowagiac, by whom he has one son, Harold B. In polit- 
ical affairs Mr. Fields is deeply interested, keeping well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day and giving his aid to every legitimate 
■ measure which he believes will promote the success of the party and 
thereby advance the good of the state and nation. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Elks Lodge, Xo. 8S9 at Dowagiac, and he has per- 
sonal characteristics which make him popular with his fellow tn\yns- 
men, gaining for him wide friendships and favorable regard. Since 
locating in Dowagiac his practice has been quite exten.sive and of an 
important character and he prepares his cases with provident care and 
wide research. 

WILLLA^I F. PUTEREAUGH. 

William F. Fnterbaugh, supervisor of Calvin township and living 
on section 18, is a native of the neighboring state of Indiana, his birth 
havine occurred in Concord township. Elkhart county, on the 25th of 



i 


A .^ 








'"^ ■/ 




































J 






HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 631 

September, 1852. He is a son of Joseph and Sarah (Patterson) Puter- 
baugh. His paternal grandfather, George Puterbaugh, was a native of 
Pennsyhania, and tlie great-grandfather, a native of Gennany, 
was the only repre>einati\e ff this family that ever came to Amer- 
ica as far as the knowledge of his posterity extends. George 
Puterbaugh was reared in the Keystone state, learned the millwright's 
trade in early life and built many mills. He was also a farmer and was 
quite a successful business man, providing lil)erally for his family. He 
was also a minister of the German ilaptist church and took an active 
part in the moral development of the communities in which he \i\cd and 
labored. 

Joseph Puterbaugh, father of our subject, was born in Ohio and 
in the year 1849 removed to Elkhart county, Indiana, where he en- 
gaged in farming. For many years he followed that pursuit, but eventu- 
ally put aside business cares and in the enjoyment of a well earned rest 
made his home in the city of Elkhart during the last ten years of his 
life. He also lillcd the ot'lice of justice of the peace and was assessor 
of Concord townshiii. Local progress and nati<:)nal advancement were 
both causes dear to his heart ami his active co-operation could be counted 
iijwn for the beneht of any plan or movement intendeil for the general 
good of his county. He married Mi.^s Sarah Patterson, who was born 
in central Indiana and died in Elkhart county in her sixty-fifth year. 
She was of Scotch lineage and was a daughter of William Patterson, 
who was born in the state of New York. He left home when a small 
boy under peculiar circumstances and therefore little is known con- 
cerning the ancestral history of the family. 

William F. Puterbaugh, \\ho?e name introduces this record, is the 
eldest in a family of three sons and two daughters. He was reared in 
Concord township, Elkhart county, Indiana, and at the usual age en- 
tered the district schools, wherein he mastered various branches of 
learning that qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties. 
He afterward remained at home until abdut twenty-six years of age 
and assisted in the work of the farm from tlie time of early spring plant- 
ing until crops were harvested in the late autumn. Thus he gaineil 
practical knowledge of the business which he has made his life work and 
which now claims his time and energies. 

March 17, 1S78, occurred the marriage of ^ilr. PuterViaugh anil 
Miss Ida M. Doilge. a daughter of Eliphalet and Sarah J. (Riggs) 
Dodge. Mrs. Puterbaugh was a native of Elkhart county, where her 
j)arents located at an early da}-, and there her girlhood days were passed. 
She, too. w^n^ a student in the pulilic schnnls and in her faUicr's home 
she vv-as trained to the duties of the hr.usehold, so that she was well 
equipped to caic lox a home of her own at the time of her marriage. 
Supplementing her training in the common schools she took a full 
teacher's course at the Cii-:shen Normal, at Goshen, Indiana, graduating 



032 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

in the class of 1874, and was a successful teacher in her native county 
of Elkhart, Indiana, from 1872 to 1S78. ^Ir. and Mrs. Puterbaugh 
began their donie.-tic life in Concord township, Elkhart county, where 
he engaged in farming. He lived in three different townships of that 
count}', remaining f < t fi>ur years in Concord township, two years in 
Osolo township and nne year in Caugo township, tie then removed to 
California, in 188 _|, and spent one year on the Pacific coast, crossing 
the continent each time by rail. 'When he again came to the middle 
west he established his home in Calvin township, Cass county, where he 
purchased the farm upon which he has since resided. Here he has one 
hundred and seven acres of good land, which be has improved in many- 
ways. He has brought his fields under a high state of cultivation and 
annually h.'ir\-e,n- therefrom good cn^ps. He also has good grades of 
stock upon his place and the improvements are in keeping with the mod- 
ern farm properties of the twentieth centur}-. He votes with the Re- 
publican part}-, and in T905 was elected to the office of township super- 
visor, which position he has since filled. He has also been officially 
connected witli the «cbnols of this community, and he is a valued and 
exemplary member of the Masonic Uulge at Cassopoli's and of the Odd 
Fellows lodge at Rcdfield, Cass county. His residence in the county 
covers about twent}--t\vo years, and his record has ever been such as 
would bear close in\estigation and scrutiny, for he has conducted his 
business affairs honorably, has lived at peace with his fellow men and 
has wrought along lines contributing to individual success and to the 
public good as well. 

JOHN LONGSDUFF. 

~'''' Long a resident of Cass county. John Longsduff has therefore wit- 
nessed much of its growtli and de\-cIopment as the vears ha\-e gone by 
Jmd changes have been wrought that have transfonned it from a frontier 
district into one of the leading cou.nties of this great commonwealth. 
He lives on section 8. Calvin township, where he has a good farm prop- 
erty comprising one hundred and twenty-eight acres of rich and arable 
land. Here he took up his abode in 1865 and in partnership with his 
wife he owns this property and gives his attention to its further develop- 
ment and cultivation. 

His life record began in Pennsylvania on the 20th of Augir^t. 1836. 
He is a son of INIartin Longsduff, also a native of Pennsvlvania and a 
brother of George Longsduff. one of the enterprising citizens of this 
county. His paternal grandfather, Martin LnngsdnfY, Sr.. was a native 
of Germany and in that countn.' was reared and married. Crossing 
the y\tlantic to the new world be became one of tlie earlv residents of 
Penns\dvania. In his familv were ten children, of whom 'Martin Longs- 
duff, Jr.. was the eldest. Fie was a native of the same state and was 
there reared and educated. FTe was married twice and in 1834 re- 
moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio, taking up his abode in Union town- 



HISTORY Oi' CASS LUL'XTV 033 

ship, Logan count}-, where he secured a tract of land and improved 
a farm. He remained a resident of that state for ahnost four decades 
and came to ^Michigan in 1872. Here lie spent his remaining da)s, 
passing away at the age of eighty-fi\-e years. In his religious views he 
was a Lutheran and he exemplihed in his life his Ijelief in the teach- 
ings of holy writ. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name 
of Matilda Oniglcy and was a native of Hagerstown, New Jersey, 
where !ier girlhood days were passed. She was ihe second wife of Mar- 
tin Longsduff, his former union having been with a Miss Searfoss. by 
whom he had one daughter, Elizalieth. By the second marriage there 
were horn eleven children, one of whom died in early youth, while ten 
reached adult age and fnur of the number, two sons and two daugh- 
ters, are still living ar.d .-ire residents of Cass county. 

John Longsduft" was only abnut a year old when his parents removed 
to Logan county, Ohio, where lliey remained \<'V eleven years, and he 
then accompanied them on their renin'.al t<> Michigan. The family 
home was established in Cass county near A'andalia and he grew to man- 
hood upon the farm from the age of twelve years. His educational 
privileges were those afforded by the public schools of the different 
localities in \\hich he resided. The period of his minority was spent 
upon the oM family hdmcslead and he assisted in the operation of the 
farm and in the support of hi'; mother, .^fter attaining his majority 
he purchased land and imprmed a farm in Penn township. On the 9th 
of February, iSd^. he was married to Miss Martha li. Hull, who was 
born on the farm where she now resides. Her parents were Isaac and 
Maria Hull, who came from Ohio to Cass county at an early day. In 
the year of their marriage Mr. and Mrs. I.x>ngsduff located where they 
how reside and his labors have fmlher improved the property until ft 
is now a splendidly cultivated farm. In connection with the tilling of 
the soil he engaged in buying and shiiijiing hogs for a number of years 
and found this a profitable source of income. 

Mr. Longsduff exercises his right of franchise in support of the 
men and measures of the Democracy and is regarded as an enterprising 
citizeri of the county, who has taken an active interest in public affairs, 
his efforts proving far reaching and beneficial. He is connected with 
one of the prominent old families of this part of the state and is justly 
entitled to mention among its representative citizens. 

BARAK L. RUDD. 

Barak L. Rudd, proprietor of the Forest Hall Hotel, at Diamond 
Lake, near Cassopolis, was born in Newburg township, October 21, 
1846, and belongs to that class of citizens who find in the faithful per- 
formance of each day's duties opportunity for the exercise of their tal- 
ents and energies and gain through their industr>', perseverance and 
diligence the success which is the desired goal of all business endeavor. 

Mr. Rudd is descended from New England ancestrs'. His father. 



634 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Barker F. Rudd, was a native of Rutland, \'ermont, born in iSio, and 
in 1834 he came to Cass county, being- then a young- man of twenty- 
four years. Fie found iiere a district largely wild and miimproved, and 
he estabHshed liis home in what is now Newberg township, being one 
of the hrst settlers of the county, and aiding in its primitive development 
and progress. Fie assisted in organizing the township, in formulating 
its plan of government and he was afterward called to the offices of 
•justice of the pcice and sui/crvisor. In politics he was originally a 
Whig, and upon the organizalinn of the new Republican party joined 
its ranks, continuing to give it his supi)ort until his death, which oc- 
curred when he was seventy years of age. In early manhood he mar- 
ried Lucinda Brakeman. a daughter of Lewis Brakeman, who was cap- 
tain of a schooner and was lost on Lake St. Clair. The Rudds were of 
Scotch and Irish descent. In the father's family there were four daugh- 
ters and four smis. 

Barak L. Rudd. the second son and fourth child, was reared upon 
the old family homestead and in his youth attended the common schools, 
while in the siuumer months his attention was devoted to the work of 
plowing, planting and harvesting. He was a young man of but seven- 
teen years v.hen in response to his country's call for aid he enlisted in 
1863 as a member of the Fourteenth Michigan Battery of light artillery. 
He joined that command as a private and served for two years, or until 
the close of the war. being largely engaged in duty in the vicinity of 
Washing-ton. Following- the cessation of ho.stilities he returned to his 
nati\c township, where he was engaged in farming. He continued to 
til! the soil until 1S80, when he turned, his attention to commercial 
pursuits, opening a store in Vandalia. where he carried on business for 
six years, or luitil 1886. The same year he was elected supervisor of 
Penn township, and was also chosen to the office of county clerk, which 
position he held for four years, or two terms. In 1891 he purchased the 
Forest Hall Hotel, which he has since been conducting. It is a well 
known hostelry, containing about forty rooms, and is pleasantly situ- 
ated on the north shore of Diamond lake. A liberal patronage is ac- 
corded, the hotel having bccon-ie a favorite summer resort, and in con- 
nection with its conduct ^Ir. Rudd also maintains a boat livery. He 
closely studies the needs and wishes of his patrons, and docs everything 
in his power for the comf'irt, welfare and happiness of his guests. At 
the same time he manages the business interests of the house with capa- 
bility and is meeting with good success. 

In 1880 ]\Ir. Ivudd was united in marriage to 'Miss Alice G. Gep- 
hart, a daughter of Jacob and Margaret Gqihart. and unto them has 
been born a son. Leo B. Rudd, who died when eleven years of age. 
When age gave to Mr. Rudd the right of franchise he acknowledged 
his belief in the principles of the Republican party, and has since been 
one of its stalwart advocates. He is a member of the Albert Anderson 
Post, No. 157, G. A. R., and maintains pleasant relationships with his 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 035 

old army comrades at the camp fires and in the work of the organiza- 
tion. His devotion to his country is manifest in the same loyal spirit 
of helpfulness and progress which he displayed when upon southern hat- 
tlefiekls lie fearlessly defended the old Hng and the cause which it rep- 
resented. He iias always lixecl in Cass county and the fact that many 
of his stanchest friends are riumhered among those who have known him 
from his boyhood days down to the present is an indication of an hon- 
orable and upright life. 

HENRY CL.VY WALKER. 

Henry Clay \\'alker is one of the prominent old settlers of Cass 
county and a \'ctcraii of th.e Civil war. He resides on section 5, Cal- 
vin townsiiip, being owner of Brooksidc farm, which is a well improved 
property. His birth occurred in LaGrange township, Elkhart county, 
Indiana, on the 13th of September. 1S41, and he is descended from an 
old New England family. His fatlier, Lucius Walker, was a native of 
Vermont, in whicli state he sjjeiit the days of his Iwyhood and youth. 
He became a farmer by occupati(ni and has devoted his entire life to 
that atiling. About 1846 he removed to Indiana, establishing his home 
in Elkhart county. He married Miss Lydia S. Sanborn, who was also 
a native of New England, born either in \'erniont or New Hampshire. 
They became the parents of elc\cn children, nine of whom reached man- 
hood or womanhood, while five are living at this writing in 1906. 

Henry Clay Walk'er. the ninth in order of birth in his fat]ier"s 
family, spent his youth in the county of his nativity. In 1S58 Iiis par- 
ents removed from the farm to I'.ristol, Elkhart county, and he remained 
at home ur.til the time of his erJistment for service in the Civil war. 
His patriotic spirit was aroused by the continued attempt of the south 
to destroy the Union, and in August. 1862, he enrolled his name among 
the boys in blue of Company I. Eighty-eighth Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry.' He joined the army as a private and served until the follow- 
ing Januarv. when he was honorably discharged on account of phy-ical 
disabilitv occasioned bv illness. 

Following his return to Bristol. Mr. Walker continued his educa- 
tion by pursuing a course of study in the Northern Indiana College at 
South' Bend, where he remained "for one year. He afterward entered 
business life as a merchant at \'andalia. Michigan, opening a general 
line of goods there. He was also postn-.aster of the town for nine years 
and discharged the duties of the position in connection with the man- 
agement of the store, in which he met with a fair measure of success. 
enjoying a growing trade by reason of his fair dealing and his earnest 
desire to please his patrons! In 1S73. however, he retired^ from com- 
mercial life and took up his abode upon the farm on which he now 
resides on section :;, Calvin township, and has since given his attention 
to o-cneral farmino-. His fields are well tilled and the place is equipped 



<i3t; HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

witli many iimdern improvements, including tiie best machinery for 
plowing, piar.ting and harvesting. In his work he is practical and me- 
thodical and his labors have been so carefnlly directed that a gratifying 
measure of jirosperity has attended him. His farm comprises two Inm- 
dred acres, the greater part of which is tmder a high state of cultivation 
and it is appropriately nan^ed Bmok^ide farm. 

In 187J Mr. \\'alkcr was united in marriage to Miss Olive M. Hull, 
a daughter nf Isaac and T^Iaria Hull. They have become the jjarcnts 
of one daugliter and one sun, but the former, ?ilinnie, died when only 
three years of age. The son, T. ^McKinnon Walker, an accoiuplished 
pianist, is at home. 

Mr. Walker has taken an active interest in public affairs and his 
fellow townsmen, recognizing his fitness for positions of public trust, 
have called him to a number of oft',ccs. He has served as township 
clerk, occupying that position while in Vandalia and for three terms 
has been township treasurer in Calvin township. The cause of edtica- 
tion finds in him a stalwart friend and all matters for the general good 
receive his endorsement and co-operation. He has been justice of the 
peace for about sixteen years, rendering decisions wb.icii are strictly 
fair and impartial and he always votes with the Republican party. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with Albert .\ndcrson Post. No. 258, G. A. R., 
at Cassopolis, and has filled srime of the offices in that order. Through- 
out his entire life be has manifested the saiue spirit of loyalty which 
prompted his enlistment for service in the Civil war. 

WILLIAM H. COULTER. 

William II. Coulter, a grain dealer of Cassopolis. was born in 
Howard township, this county, on the loth of October, 1842. He is a 
son of James Coulter and a grandson of John Coulter, the latter a native 
of Ireland, who served as a soldier in the Irish rebellion. He came to 
America in 1798, becoming the founder of the f'miily in the new world, 
establishing his re.'^idence in Cincinnati, where he was married. At a 
later date he removed to Clinton county. Ohio, and in 1834 he came to 
Cass county. INIichigan. locating over seven hundred acres of land in 
Howard township. The journey was made with an ox team and Tohn 
Coulter cast in his lot with the pioneer residents of this part of the 
state. Few iiriprovements had been made as yet. the greater part of the 
land being still in its primitive condition, while the forests were uncut, 
the streams unbridged and the sod unturned upon the prairies. 

James Coulter, father of our subject, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and on coming to Cass county in 1835 located in Howard township. 
He was then a young man and be l-w^re his full share in the work of 
early improvement and progress here. After two vears be returned to 
his native state and was then married, after which be brought his bride 
back to Howard township, where he spent his remaining days, there 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 63T 

developing and improving- a goijd farm. He was an active supporter 
of the Republican party and held various local offices. His early politi- 
cal allegiance, however, was given to the Democracy, and he voted for 
Franklin Pierce, but in 1856 he cast his ballot for John C. Fremont, 
the first presidential candidate oi the new Republican party. In the 
Methodist Episcopal church he was a very earnest and active worker 
and in Howard township he erected a house of worship, which is still 
standing. He died in his sixty-sixth year, and his loss was deeply re- 
gretted by many friends, for all with whom he had come in contact 
knew him to be a man of sterling integrity, of steadfast purpose and of 
unquestioned lienor. He married Miss Ann Wilson, a native of Clin- 
ton county. Ohio, and a daughter of Amos Wilson, also of the same 
county. Her father was a Baptist minister and was of Welsh descent. 
Mrs. Coulter lived to be eighty-three years of age. In the family were 
seven children, all of whom were born in Howard township, Cass enmity. 
and of this number two sons and two daughters are yet living, namelv: 
Margaret, the wife of Ephraim White, who is living upon the old Coul- 
ter homestead in Howard township: John, a prominent politician and 
farmer, w^lio resides in the same township; William H.. of this review; 
and Sarah A., the wife of James Douglas, of Marion. Indiana. 

Mr. Coulter is the sixth child and youngest son in the family. No 
event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life 
for him in his youtli. He was reared upon the old family homestead 
in Howard township and early became familiar with the best methods 
of tilling the soil and caring for the stock. Fie resided upon the farm 
until 1892, when he was elected sheriff of Cass county and the same 
year took up his abode in Cassopolis. Following the expiration of his 
term of service he made a trip to California, where he remained from 
January until April, enjoying the mild climate and the beauties of that 
sunny land. Fie then returned to his farm in Howard township, where 
he again lived for two vears. ^^■hen he once more took up his abode in 
Cassopolis. Flere he turned liis attention to the grain trade in company 
with James Johnson, which partnership continued for a year, since which 
time Mr. Coulter has had different ])artners. He is now associated with 
John Atkison under the firm style of Coulter & Atkison, grain ship- 
pers. Fie has done quite a large business and has thereby provided an 
excellent market for local producers. He deals in grain, produce and 
coal and has a large patronage, so th.at he makes extensive sales an- 
nually. He also owns a farm of one hundred and sixty-seven acres in 
Jefferson township, which is valuable and productive land and returns 
to hirn a good income. 

Mr. Coulter was united in marriage on the 4th of January, 1866, 
to Miss Abigail Vary, a daughter of Benjamin and Mary fRogersI 
Vary, who was born in Oneida count}-. New York, near Rome and came 
to Cass county in i86o when she was t^^•eIve years of age. She died in 
1893 during her husband's incumbency in the office of sheriff, and on the 



63S HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

3r(l of January, 1895, Mr. Coulter was again married, his second unirm 
being with Addic Smith, a daughter of D. B. and Cliarlotte Smith. Tliey 
have no cliildrtn of tiieir own, but have adopted a daughter, ;\hiria W. 
Mr. Coulter ha.s ever manifested the interest of a public spirited citizen 
in all matters relating to the general welfare, and he exercises his right 
of franchise in support of the men and measures of the Republican 
party. He desires general advancement and improvement along lines 
of permanent good, and in his views relating to the public welfare he 
is practical as well as progressive. He holds membership in the M^cth- 
odist I'.piscnprd church, of which he is a trustee and in the work of 
which he takes an arti\'e and helpful part. 

DAVID CLAREXCE THICKSTUN. 

David Clarence Thickstun, a well known dealer in lumber and coal 
in Cassopolis, was born in Cassewago, Crawford county, Pennsylvania, 
on the 2r)th of May, 1850. His father, David Thickstun. was a native 
of the same locality anrl was a farmer by occu]iation. His death oc- 
curred at the ])1ace of l-.js nativity when he was about sixty years of 
age. His wife, who Icire the maiden name of Nancv Erwin, was also 
a native of Crawford county, where .she died when fifty-seven years of 
age. In their family were six children, who reached adult age. 

David C. Thickstun, tlie youngest, was reared under the parental 
roof, remaining at home until twenty-three years of age, when, think- 
ing that be might ha\'e better business opportunities hi the middle west, 
he made bis wav to I^apcer, .\Iicbit.'an, v.diere he secured a pisition as 
bi^^kkee()er in the emi^Iov of J. T. r.eringer & Company, dealers in lum- 
ber. He continued with that house until his removal to Cassopolis to 
take charge of a branch lumber }-ard here. After two vears lie was 
admitted to a partnership in the business in Cassopolis by Mr. P.eringer, 
this relationship being maintained for about two years, when he pur- 
chased his partner's interest, being alone in business until 1905. wdien 
he admitted his son-in-law, Frank F,. Arnold, to a partnership under the 
firm style of Thickstun S: .-\rnold. ?^rr. Thickstun has now been engaged 
in the lumber business in Cassojxilis for twcnty-sc\-en vears and is one 
of the best known and most prominent business men of the town, hav- 
ing a liberal patronacre, which is accorded him in recognition of his 
straightforward and honorable dealing, his reasonable prices and bis 
earnest efforts to please his customers. 

Mr. Thickstun married Miss Hattie May Rogers, a daughter of 
Stilman !\r. Rogers, who was born in Mexico, New York. Her mother 
liore the maiden name of Sarah Runkle and was a native of Paterson. 
New Jersev. . ^Tr. Rogers departed this life at the acre of fiftv-seven 
\-ears and liis wife when fifty-eight years of age. Tliev were the par- 
ents of ten children, five sons and five dauehters. of whom-^Irs. Thick- 
stun is the youngest. Unto our subject and his wife have been bom two 



HISTORY OF CASS COL'XTV 030 

daughters ; Elnora. the wife <>f I'Vaiik K. Arnold, who is engaged in 
business witli her father; and ]rnia. the wife of \'ernon Tourje. wlio is 
abstract clerk in the Grand Trunk ireight ottice at Durand, [Michigan. 

In his political affiliation .Mr. Thickstun is a Democrat, while fra- 
ternally he is a prominent Mason. He has taken the degrees of the 
lodge, cha))ter and commandcry. is also a member of the ^Iv?tic Shrine 
and belongs tn tlio Ik'iicvnlent & I'mtective Order of Elks and also to 
an organization of hnnl crmcn. the Hoc Hoos. He has been a rejiresen- 
tative of the lumber trade in .Michigan for over thirty years and is thor- 
oughly informed concerning the business in all its departments. He 
has fii.ni the beginning of his residence in Cassopolis enjoyed a con- 
stantly increasing trade and his excellent business qualihcations and en- 
terprise combined with strong purjKise and unfaltering diligence have 
constituted the source of his prosjierity. He found in the middle west 
the business oijporlunities he sought, and by the improvement of his 
advantages made steady progress until he is now classed with the sub- 
stantial and prosperous residents of Cass county. 

JON.VTHAX H. RENCH. 

Jonathan IT. Rench, formerly identified with agricultural interests 
and now a well known resident of Casso])olis. was Ixirn in Clark county, 
Ohio, January lo, 1842. His father, Daniel Rench. was a native of 
the Buckeye state and came to Cass county in i83(>. Two years after- 
ward he removed to Callimm crmnty. Michigan, where his remaining 
days were passed. He was a farmer and miller, devoting his entire life 
to the milling business, while in Ohio and in Michigan he gave his atten- 
tion to the tilling of the soil. His father w-as of a Pennsylvania Dutch 
family. Daniel b'ench reached the advanced age of seventy-seven years 
ere he was called to his final rest in Calhoun comity. His wife bore 
the maiden name of }klary Williams, was a native of Ohio and died in 
Calhoun county. Michigan, in the eighty-fifth year of her age. In their 
family were twelve children, of whom two passed away in childhood, 
wdiile ten reached mature years and seven are now living. 

Jonathan H. Rench is the ninth child in his father's family and 
was sixteen years of age when he came to Cass county. Here he began 
working by the month as a farm hand and he has since been dependent 
upon bis own resources, so that he may well be termed a self-made 
man, who as the architect of his own fortunes has builded W'isely and 
well. It was about the- time of his arrival in Cass county that he cast 
his first presidential vote supporting the Democratic nominee for presi- 
dent and he has never failed to vote at a presidential election since that 
time. 

In 1863 Mr. Rench was united in marriage to ;Miss Percilla T- 
Thorp, a daughter of Lalien and Lydia CReams) Thorp, who came to 
Cass countv at an earlv epoch in its development. ]\frs. Rench was 



640 HISTORY OF CASS LOU.XTY 

born in Jefferson township, Cass county, on the 4th of January, 1S46, 
and ha? spent her entire hfe here. At the time of their marriage Mr. 
and Airs. Rencli located on a farm in Jefferson township, their home 
being a log house in which tliey lived in pioneer style. He continued 
farming there for about ten years, \\hen he removed to Cassopolis and 
for a time was in the employ of the Michigan Central Railroad Com- 
pany. Later, however, he turned his attention to the butchering busi- 
ness, which he followed for eleven years, at the end of which time he 
invested his capital in fifty-five acres of land about a mile and a quarter 
south of Cassopolis. There he carried on farming, but at a more recent 
date he sold the property and now lives just outside the corporation 
limits of Cassopolis. His life lias been active, his years characterized 
by enterprise and diligence and he is now in possession of a comfortable 
competence which has come to him through bis own laliors. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rencli Iia\-c been liorn four children: Capitola. 
now the wife of H. D. Badgley. of Cassopolis; Grant, who is living in 
Battle Creek, Michigan; Verna, tlie wife of S. S. Albright, of Sacra- 
mento, California; and Dcljiba. who is at home. Mr. Rench has been a 
lifelong Democrat, and for fourteen years he has filled the office of 
supendsor of roads. He belongs to the Knights of Alaccabccs fratern- 
ity, and has a wide acquaintance in Cass county, where for forty-m'nc 
years be has made bis home, taking an active and helpful interest in its 
public affairs. He has rejoiced in what has been accomplished as the 
conditions of pioneer life have been done away with thmugli the efforts 
of the enterprising citizens in behalf of general improvement and ad- 
vancement. He has never sought to figure prominently in official cir- 
cles, but has been content to perfonn bis daily duty and found in labor 
the reward which lias made him one of the substantial citizens of his 
community, now enabling him to live a retired life. 

ZADOK JARVLS. 

Few residents of Cass county have resided longer within its bor- 
ders than has Zadok Jarvis. who for almost seventy-three years has been 
a citizen here, watching with interest its growth and development as 
great changes have occurred. He has been a witness of its various 
transition stages as the evidences of pioneer life were replaced by the 
indications of a more ad\-anced civilization and as the county has taken 
on all of the improvements of our modern day prosperity and progress. 
His mind goes back to the time when Cassopolis was but a small village 
and other cities of the county bad not yet sprung into existence or were 
but mere hamlets. He remembers where there were great stretches of 
forest where now are seen fields of waving grain, for much of the land 
at that time was still in possession of the government and only here 
and there was a little cabin to indicate that the work of clearing and 
development had been begun. There was much hard labor to be done 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY tUl 

in tlio?e early days, for tlie improved farm machinery of tlie present 
time was unknown and mucii nf the work iiad to he dime liv hand. Few 
of the liou-^chold CMmfi'rts now so common were tlien enjmed, hut 
there was a spirit of hos])itahty ahroad in pioneer districts tliat made 
those early liomes n. tahk-. As a representative pi<-)nccr settler Mr. Jar- 
vis certainly desen-es mention in this volume. 

He was horn four miles south of Richmond in Wayne county. In- 
diana, on the i-,ih of L^ecemher. 1S27, a son of Zadok and Lucv 
(Owens) Jarvis. JKith of whom were natives of North Carolina, horn in 
Rowan county. After livinc^ for some time in Indiana the father came 
with his family to Cass county in 1833, locating: first in LaGrange town- 
ship. He was a lifelonn: farmer, always following- that occupation in 
order to provide for those dependent upon him for support. In many 
ways he was identified with the im])rovement and upbuilding of the 
county and aided in laxing broad and deep the foundation ujjon which 
has been builded the present superstructure of progress and prosperity. 
He voted with the Democracy, was fearless in support of his honest 
convictions and was regru'ded as a man whom to know was to respect 
and honor. His death occurred in his sixty-eighth year, while his widow 
reached the very advanced age of ninety-seven years, being |x?rhaps the 
oldest citizen of Cass county at the time of her demise. In tlie family of 
this worthy cou]ile were seven children, four sons and three daughters, 
all of wliom reached mature years, married and reared families of their 
own with the exception of one sister, who was married Ijut had no 
children. 

Mr. Jarvis of this review was the sixth child and youi-.gcst son. 
and was a little lad of six summers when he came with his parents to 
Gass county, Michigan. Fie can remember many incidents of those early 
days — incidents which became important factors in the history of the 
county. 11 is education \\'as obtained in the pioneer schools and he re- 
ceived ample training at farm labor, taking his place in the fields as 
soon as old enough to hiandle the plrjw. He remained with his father 
until the latter's death and in fact he is the only surviving member of 
the family. In 1S51 he was married to Miss Rebecca Simpson, whose 
birth occurred in Cass county, her parents being Elias and Rachel 
Simpson, who were pioneer settlers of this part of the state. 

Immediately after his marriage Mr. Jarvis located upon the farm 
upon which he now resides, and it has been his home almost continuously 
since, save that he spent about three years in Dowagiac. The farm was 
covered with timber or stunijis at the time it came into his possession 
and he entered upon the difficult task of preparing the fields for the 
plow. He has cleared most of the farm himself and for fifty-four years 
has lived in I^Grange township, working earnestly and persistently year 
after year and gaining through his unfaltering purpose and capable man- 
agement the reward of all well-directed labor. He now owns one bun- 



642 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

dred and twenty acres nf good land and in 1905 he gave to his son 
John eighty acres of land. 

Unto Mr. Jarvis by his first marriage were born fi\e children, 
namely: Henry, Helen, Francis, Almanson and Almira, the last two 
being twins. Flaving lost his first wile 3*Ir. Jarvis was again married, 
his second union being with Margaret Cudderback. They became the 
parents of four children: Zed. John and two who are now deceased. 

Mr. Jarvis voted with the Republican party until 1872, when he 
became a JJemocrat. Fie has served as a member of the township board, 
was at one time a member of the ]\iasonic fraternity and belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Dowagiac. An honorable and straight- 
forward life characterized by recognition of the rights of others in busi- 
ness has made Mr. Jarvis one of the esteemed and prominent old settlers 
of LaGrange township. He can rememlier the days when the pioneers 
had to go long distances to market or mill and often over roads that in 
certaiir seasons of the year were alinnst impassable. There were no 
railroads and all communication witli the outside world was made by 
private conveyance or by stage. The most far sighted would not have 
dreamed that there would one day be a rural mail route and thai there 
would be telephonic connections between the towns and the farm homes. 
As we look back and think of the conditions that existed in those early 
days the change seems man.'clous, and yet it has resulted from the care- 
ful, laborious eft'ort of the settlers who have been men of enterprising 
spirit and have kept pace with the uniform progress and improvement 
here. Mr. Jarvis has made continual advancement in his business ca- 
reer, keeping in touch with ideas of modem farming and as the years 
have gone by he has prospered in his undertakings. 

WILLIAM H. C. HALE. 

William H. C. Flale, county commissioner of schools and a resi- 
dent of Cassopolis, was born in Wells county. Indiana, on the 6th of 
July, 1853. In the paternal line he comes of Scotch and English ances- 
try. His grandfather. Henry Hale, was a native of 'Maryland, born in 
1787, whence he removed to Jefferson county, Ohio, there devoting his 
lime and energies to farming until his later years, when he put aside 
active business cares. He died in the ninety-fourth year of his age. 
Stephen Flale, father of our subject, was born in Jefferson county. Ohio, 
was reared to the occupation of farming and made that pursuit his life 
work. Removing westward, he became one of the early residents of 
Wells countv Indiana, ■\^■here he settled about 1840, and in Januarv, 
1864, he removed to Cass county. ^Michigan, taking up his abode in Cal- 
vin township, where he was engaged in general agricultural pursuits up 
to the time c>i his death, Avhich occurred when he was sixty-six years of 
age. Realizing the value of education, he was deeply interested in the 
cause of oublic instruction, and for some years served as a school di- 
rector. In politics he was a lifelong Republican. He wedded Miss 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 643 

Nancy Reed, a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Arthur Reed, 
who was bom in Ireland. Mrs. Hale passed away at the age of sixty- 
five years. By her marriage she had become the mother of eleven chil- 
dren' seven daughters and four sons, of which number seven reached 
adult age. 

Professor William H. C. Hale of this review was the third son and 
tenth child. lie was reared in his native county until ten years of age, 
when he came with his parents to Cass county, and after acquiring his 
preliminary education in the district schools he entered the State Nor- 
mal College at Ypsilanti, JNIichigan, completing the common school 
course in 1S78. He then engaged in teaching school for several years 
in Cass county, after which he returned to Ypsilanti in 1S89 and com- 
pleted the regular normal course by graduation in 1S91, having finished 
the assigned work in the literary and scientific departments. lie re- 
ceived a teacher's life certificate for the state of Michigan and for three 
years he was principal of the Ouinnesec school, after which he returned 
and taught in Cass county for about four years. He was then elected 
county commissioner of schools in 1901 and was re-elected in 1903, so 
that he is still holding ihe office. He has made a close and earnest study 
of the needs and possibilities of the schools and his efforts in this direc- 
tion have been attended v.iih gratifying success, for under his guidance 
the standard of the schools has been raised and good work has been 
done. 

Other political offices and honors have been conferred upon Pro- 
lessor Hale, who for four years sen.-ed as justice of the peace in Cal- 
vin tov.-nship. His decisions were strictly fair and impartial and he 
proved a capable officer. He was also school inspector in the same 
township for six years and in 1900 he took the United States census 
in Calvin township. In 18S4 lie was the Republican candidate for coun- 
ty clerk, but that year witnessed a Democratic landslide and he failed 
of election. He is now and for some years has been a member of the 
Republican county central committee and does all in his power to pro- 
mote the growth and insure the success of his party. His entire life 
has been devoted to educational work and official duties, and over the 
record of his public and private career there falls no shadow of wrong, 
for his labors have been characterized by an unquestioned fidelity to 
duty. Earnest efifort, close application and the exercise of his native 
talents wen him prestige as an educator, while his personal characteris- 
tics have made him a popular citizen. 

ALLEN M. KINGSBURY. 

Allen M. Kingsbury, resides on section 29, LaGrange township. 
where he owns and controls valuable farming interests and in addition 
to carrying on agricultural pursuits he is also acting as vice-president 
of the First National Bank of Cassopolis. He represents one of the 



644 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

oldest and most prominent pioneer families of Cass county. The stu- 
dent of history cannot carry his investijrations far into llie annals of 
this county without learning of the close, valual)le and hoiioralile con- 
nection of the Kingsburys with the events which have molded the pol- 
icy and shaped the development of this part of tlic '=late. His father 
was Asa Kingslnn-y, a native of ^Massachusetts, who came to Michigan 
when much of this district was wild and unimproved. In his family 
were thirteen children, seven sons and si.K daughters, of whom Allen 
M. Kingslmry is the third child and second son. He was liorn upon the 
old homestead farm in LaGrangc township and was there reared to 
manhood, acquiring his education in the schools of Oak Grove, Cass- 
opolis and Jackson townships. When not busy with his tc.xt-liiwks he 
aided in the work of field and meadow and continued to assist his father 
in the operation of the home farm until twenty-one years of age, when 
he started out in life on his own account, following the pursuit to which 
he had been reared. He became an energetic agriculturist of LaCrauge 
township and as tiie years have gone by has carefully conducted his 
farming interests. After his marriage he located upon the old home- 
stead for a year and then removed to the farm upon which he now 
resides and which has since been bis place of residence. It comprises 
two hundred acres of rich and arable land, which responds readily to 
the care and cultivation that is bestowed upon it. He is both practical 
and progressive in his methods, is methodical and systematic in bis work 
and keeps in touch with the most advanced ideas of modern farming. 
He is also numbered among the stockholders of the First National Eank 
of Cassopolis and is now serving as its vice-president. 

In 1S77 Mr. Kingsbury was united in marriage to Miss May L. 
Haynes, who was born and reared in Jackson county, ^licbigan, and 
by this marriage five children have been born: Floy, who is now the 
wife of Fred B. Lamb, a resident of Perth .-\mboy. New Jersey : Jessie 
who is engaged in teaching in Lewistown, Montana: Alberta, who is a 
teacher in New Jersey-; Allen W.. who is assisting his father in the work 
of the home farm: and Catharine, who is attending school in Cassopolis. 
All are natives of Cass county and were reared upon the old family 
homestead. 

Mr. Kingsbury has likewise spent his entire life in Cass county 
and is a worthv representati\'e of one of its most honored and promi- 
nent pioneer families, and bis lines of life have been cast in harmony 
therewith. He has always stood for good citizenship and for all that 
is straightforward in man's relations with his fellow men, and he re- 
ceives and merits the confidence and good will of those with whom he 
has been associated. Since age conferred upon him the right of fran- 
chise he has voted for the men who are pledged to support the princi- 
ples of Democracv. He served as township treasurer of LaGrange 
township and has also been justice of the peace, rendering decisions in 
that office that were strictly fair and impartial. In the ^lasonic fra- 



HISTORY OF CASS COL-.\TV 645 

temity he lias attained the Kiii^lit Templar degree and he is e\'er true 
to the teacliings of the craft whnsc |irinci])les make fur gu' id citizenship 
and for iionorable manhood. 

REV. O. r. MILLER. 

Rev. O. P. Miller i5 active in Iwth church and temperance work 
and his influence has ever lieen fur the uplifting and hcuclit of his fel- 
lowmen. There is in him an abiding sympathy and charity which have 
won for him the deserved contklence and good will of his fellow towns- 
men and liis efforts have been a moving force in the moral development 
of the community in which he lia>; long made his home. He was born 
in Jefferson township, Cass county, Michigan, on the 20th of Febru- 
ary, 1847, his parents being the Rev. John P. and Mary fShrum) Mil- 
ler, prominent and honored residents of this part of tlie state. In their 
family were tlie following named: ]Mrs. Sarah Garvy; Adam, de- 
ceased ; jVIartha, the widow of Jeremiah Keneston and a resident of Jef- 
ferson township, Cass county: JMrs. Lydia \\'eaver, who died in 1S9S; 
Rev. B. R. Miller. \vho is living in Goshen, Indiana; Susan, wdio died 
at the age of thirteen years; O. P., of this review; and Leandcr, de- 
ceased. 

As die above record indicates. Rev. O. P. Miller is next to the 
youngest of the family. His l>oyhood days were quietly passed in the 
usual manner of farm lands. He was reared in Jefferson township and 
his education was accjuired in the common schools. When not busy 
with his text-books he often aided in tlie work of the fields, and he re- 
mained with his father up to the time of his marriage, which event was 
celebrated on the 20th of N<)veml)er, 1S64, Miss Jane Wade becoming- 
his wife. She was born in Canada but was reared in Illinois and Mich- 
igan, her parents being William B. and Anna (Gilmore) Wade, who 
removed from Canada to Illinois and afterward came to this state. Mr. 
and Mrs. Miller began their doijiestic life upon a farm in Jefferson 
township, where they resided until 1881. in wdiich year they took up 
their abode in LaGrange township, two miles west ofCassopoIis. There 
Mr. Miller carried on farming until 1891. in which year he was ordained 
to the ministry of the Christian church and he has since devoted his 
life to preaching the gospel. Fle is now located in Cassopolis. He 
comes of a family of ministers, there having been many clergymen 
among the Miller family. In the father's family there were four broth- 
ers who became preachers of the word, most of them being connected 
with the Church of the Disciples or Christian church. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. !vliller have been born three children: Edwin, 
who is living in Cassopolis: Anna O., now the wife of Lewis Cays, 
of the same citv: and Alva, who is at home. Thev also reared two 
adopted children, Charles ^^'ade and Addie Miller, both of whom be- 
came members of the household in infancy. 



64G HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

At one time Mr. Miller was a stanch advocate of Democratic prin- 
ciples but in later years has been associated with the Prohibition party, 
whicii embodies his views on the temperance question. He has done 
all in his power to promulgate temperance principles and has been very 
active in the work of the church. He is an earnest and conscientious 
minister of the gospel, laboring untiringly for the adoption of the relig- 
ious principles in which he believes and liis efforts have carried consid- 
erable weight and inlluence in the community. All who know him re- 
spect him for his fidelity and for his courageous expression of the views 
which he entertains and he has won the love and confidence of many 
by his sympathy and his earnest work in behalf of those who have 
needed not only spiritual but material aid as well. 

NELSON J. CROSBY. 

Nelson J. Crosby, one of the widely known citizens of Cass county, 
who has figured quite prominently in political affairs and is now engaged 
in dealing in horses in Cassopolis and is also a well known real estate 
agent, was born in Lenawee count}-, IMichigan, on the 3rd of February, 
1847, ''""^1 is descended frum Irish ancestry. The family, however, was 
founded in America at an early day, the grandfather, William Crosby, 
having been a native of New York. The father, Asaph Crosby, was 
also born in tliat state and settled in Lenawee county in 1835, becoming- 
one of its pioneer residents. He was a farmer by occupation, devoting 
.his entire life to that pursuit, and on his removal to Cass county in 
1856 he located upon a farm in Penn township, which he greatly im- 
proved, bringing it imder a high state of cultivation and transforming' 
it into a valuable tract. He lived a life of well-directed energn,' and 
unfaltering enterprise. In early manhood he wedded Julia Holmes, who 
was a native of New York and was also of Irish descent. She died in 
1852 in Lenawee county and Mr. Crosby survived for twenty years, 
passing away in Cass county in 1S72 when more than sixty-six years 
of age. 

Nelson J. Crosby was the sixth in order of birth in a family of 
eight children, five sons and three daughters, all of whom reached man- 
hood or womanhood. He was about nine years of age at the time of 
the removal of his father to Cass county, and upon the old family home- 
stead in Penn township he spent the days of his boyhood and youth, 
acquiring his education in the schools of Vandalia. He has largely been 
dependent upon his own resources from the age of seven years. He 
was only five years old at the time of his mother's death, and about two 
years later he began working, since which time he has provided largely 
for his own support, doing any labor for which his age and strength 
permitted him upon the farms of the neighborhood. Thinking that he 
would find other occupation more coneenial, when eighteen years of 
age he began learning the cooper's trade, serving an apprenticeship of 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 647 

one year, during which time he received only his board in compensa- 
tion for his services. He afterward worked for a year as a journey- 
man and then purchased the sliop in which he had learned the trade, 
thus becoming a factor in the business life of Vandalia. He carried on 
the business liiere for aljout t\\el\e years, meeting witii good success, 
after whicii he disposed of his shop and resumed farming operations, 
becoming an agriculturist of Penn township, where he engaged in till- 
ing the soil for seven years. On the expiration of that period he re- 
moved to Cassopolis and was appointed undersheriff under Sheriff Mac- 
intosh, occupying that position for four years, at tlie end of which time 
he was elected village mnrshal and served for two years. He then 
again became tmdersheriff under Sheriff W. H. Coulter and after two 
years was elected sheriff in 1896, filling the office for one term. His 
previous experience as undersheriff had well qualified him for the posi- 
tion, the duties of which he discharged with promptness and fidelity. 
Since his retirement from office he has been engaged in dealing in 
horses and has also engaged in real estate operations, handling consid- 
erable valuable property. 

In June, 1S72, I\Ir. Crosby was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Snyder, a daughter of Peter Snyder. He has been a stanch Republican 
and served as constable in Penn township for a number of years in 
addition to the offices previously mentioned. His fraternal relations 
are with the Odd Fellows and the Masons. He has taken the degrees 
of the lodge, chapter and commandery, in which he has filled some of 
the offices, and he is also a member of the Mystic Shrine, having crossed 
the sands of the desert with the nobles of that ancient Arabic order. 
Through much of his life he has resided in Cass county, being identi- 
fied with its interests and giving h.elpful co-operation to many move- 
ments that have been of direct and permanent good to the community. 

WILLIAM C. ^IcCUTCHEON, M. D. 

By the consensus of public opinion Dr. William C. McCutcheon 
is accorded a creditable position as a representative of the medical fra- 
ternity of Cass county. He is practicing successfully in Cassopolis, 
where he is accorded a liberal patronage, and in the conscientious per- 
formance of his duties he is rendering valuable aid to his fellowmen. 
while his fellow members of the medical fraternity recognize his de- 
votion to a high standard of professional ethics. 

Dr. McCutcheon \vas born on Seeley's Bay in the province of Onta- 
rio. Canada. December 29, 1870, and is tine eldest in a family of three 
children, whose parents were James and Sarah fCollinson) McCutch- 
eon. the former a native of Scotland and the latter of .\merica. Dr. 
McCutcheon was reared in the place of his nativity and continued his 
education in the Sydenham High School and at the Gananoque Collegi- 
ate Institute, from which he was graduated in the class of 1S8S. The 



648 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

following year he matriculated in Queens University for the prepara- 
tion for the medical fraternity and after completing the prescribed 
course in medicine and surL;ery he was graduated with the class of 
1894. He then came to Cassopnlis, opening an office here on the i8th 
of June of the same year, and has continuously practiced. He is also 
a licensed physician of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Kingston and he helongs to the Cass County Medical Association, 
the Michigan State ]Medic;d Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, thus keeping in touch with the onward march of the profession. 
In 1897 Dr. McCutcheon was united in marriage to ^.liss Bertha 
Kingsbury, a representative of a prominent family of Cassopolis, her 
father being the late C. H. Kingsbury, who was one of the pioneer 
settlers of this county and a son of A.sa Kingsbury. I\Irs. McCutcheon 
was born in this countv and lias many warm friends among those who 
have known her from her girlhood days as well as among the acquaint- 
ances of her later years. Dr. McCutcheon is a valued rejiresentative 
of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the Knight Tem- 
plar degree. In politics he is a Republican, but is without aspiration 
for office, preferring to concentrate his energies tipon Iris professional 
duties. He is now local surgeon for the Grand Trunk Railroad, and 
he is recognized as a leading member of his profession in Cassopolis, 
W'hich is indicative of the large measure of confidence reposed in him 
by his fellow townsmen. There is perhaps no profession which calls 
for greater care, ]-ii-ecision and accuracy than does th? practice of med- 
icine, where the issues of life and death are in the hands of the physi- 
cian. He must make no mistake in his administration of remedial 
agencies and his efforts must be founded upon broad and comprehensive 
knowledge of the scientific principles which underlie his work. Dr. 
McCutcheon, with a keen sense of conscientious obligation, follows his 
chosen calling, rendering valued service to his fellow men and finding 
in his chosen work the desen-cd financial reward of his labor. 

HUGH P. GARRETT. 

The people of the vounger generation cannot realize the conditions 
which were met and the work which has been done by the early settlers 
of the county. The traveler of today noting the enterprising towns and 
•villages and improved farms, the substantial homes and other evidences 
of prosperity and culture, cannot realize that scarcely more than a half 
century has' passed since the greater part of Cass county was an unde- 
veloped wilderness. It requires stout hearts and willing hands to sub- 
due the wilderness and plant the seeds of civilization in a wild district, 
and early settlers certainly desenx the praise and gratitude of those 
who follow later and enjoy the benefits of their labors. Mr. Garrett 
is numbered among the early and honored residents of Cass county, 
and at his pleasant home on section 31, LaGrange township, is enjoying 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV G49 

the fruits of ills f„nncr iMil. His mind forms a connecting link be- 
tween il-.e pnmiUve past and the progressive nresent. He was bom in 
Montgomery cunty, Ohio. l,is natal place being in Miami township 
and the date .d h,s birth October 26. 1S30. His' father, John Garrett, 
was born near Beltast, Ireland, and when twenty rears of age crossed 
the Atlantic to America, thinking that he might e'njov lietter business 
opi>ortnnities and privileges in the new world 'than con'ld be secured on 
the green Isle of Erin. He landed at I'hilaflelphia and made the jour- 
ney on foot across the Alleghany mountains to Cincinnati, Ohio, whence 
he afterwar.l went t.. Mont.gomerv county, that state. He had no 
money and he ^unkcd at anything that he could get to do that would 
yield hnn an honest hvmg. He was thus employed up to the time of 
his marriage to ^Iiss Rosa Pctticrcw, a native of Montgomery county, 
Ohio. He then turned his attention to farming, and in partnership 
^Vlth an uncle cstaMislied what was a large di-^tillerv for tlmsc days in 
Montgomery c..uiU\-. They conducted quite an extensive business not 
oidy in the maiuifacture of whiskey, but also engaged largely in the 
raising of cattle and hogs, which they fed upon the refuse '~of' the dis- 
tillery ._ They shipped their stock by canal to Cincinnati and for a num- 
ber of years conducted a prosperous business. At length, h.-wever, 
Mr. Garrett disposed of his interests in Ohio and came to Michigan! 
arriving in Cass county on the 2nd of April. 1S48. He afterward re- 
moved to Vannurcr. cnunty, this state, where he remained until called 
(o his final home in the sixty-third year of his age. His widow contin- 
ued to reside upon the old iiomestead farm there until her death, which 
occurred in 1S78. when she was in her seventy-third \ear. This worthy 
couple were the parents of ten chiMren. three sons and seven daughters. 
all of whom reached adult a.ge before there was a death in the flimilv! 
Five of the number, three sons and two daughters, are vet living at th'is 
•writing, in 1906. 

Hugh P. Garrett, the eldest. s])ent the first seventeen vears of his 
life in his native state and during that period worked with his father 
and attended the common schools. He then accompanied his parents 
to Michigan, locating in I^aGrange township. Cass countv. and when 
about twenty years of age lie started out upon an independent business 
career, since which time he has relied entirely upon his own efforts for 
a living. He was first employed as a farm hand by the month and he 
also spent two years in a commission warehouse at'Lockington. Shelby 
county,* Ohio. Following that interval he returned to Cass county and 
here he sought a companion and helpmate for life's journey, being mar- 
ried on the 15th of November. 1854. to Miss Elizabeth Wiilte. Losing 
his first wife, he was married October 22, 18.^7, to :\Iiss Julia A. Dunn, 
and unto them were born two sons: John "S., who is now a resident 
farmer of Haniilton township. VanBuren county. ^Michigan : and David 
E., who makes his home in Fillmore countv. Nebraska. The wife and 
mother died October 9. 1874, and on the loth of April. 1876. Mr. Gar- 



650 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

relt was again married, Miss Phoebe Crawford becoming his wife. 
She died leaving three children: Charles \V., who was bom in 1877 
and is living in Howard township; Ralph F., who also resides in How- 
ard township; and Rosa A., who was born ]\Iay 14, 1885, and died 
August 21, 1903. Mr. Garrett's second wife had a son and daughter by 
a former marriage: \\'illiam H. Garrett, who is living in Nebraska; 
and Emma J., now the wife of James ^McCarty, of Owosso, ^Michigan. 
His third wife had one daugther by a former marriage, Mrs. Viola F. 
Jones, the wife of Warner D. Jones, of Cassopolis. 

At the time of his first marriage Mr. Garrett rented land in Wayne 
township, whereon he resided for a year. He afterward lived at vari- 
ous places and he found liis second wife in Franklin county, Indiana, 
where he resided until 1865. In that year he returned to ^Michigan and 
bought the farm where he now resides. In 1S80 he sold this property 
and removed to F""i!lmorc county, Nebraska, settling on a farm of one 
hundred and si.xty acres. In the fall of 1883 he sold this farm and 
returned to Cass county, where he jiurchased the old homestead upon 
which he now resides. He rents his land at the present time, but 
gives his personal supervision to the property, having one hundred 
and five acres which constitutes a valuable farm that returns him a 
good income. He has been a Republican since the organization of 
the party "under the oaks" in Jackson. ^lichigan. in 1854. Previous to 
that time he had voted with the Whig party and he cast his first presi- 
dential ballot for General Winfield Scott. He voted twice for Lincoln 
and twice for Grant, also for ]\IcKinley, and in fact has supported 
each presidential nominee of the Republican party. He has kejit well 
informed on questions and i'^sues of the day and has never faltered in 
his allegiance to the principles which he espouses, but he has never 
sought or desired political preferment for himself. He was reared in 
the faith of the Presbyterian church. His life has been straightfor- 
ward, characterized bv honesty in all his business dealings, and he is 
well known in Cass county for his genuine personal worth. 

K J. RUSSEY. 

On the roster of county officials in Cass county appears the name 
of E. J. Russev% who is serving as sheriff and who makes his home in 
Cassopolis. His birth occurred in Howard township on the 13th of Oc- 
tober, 1866. His father, ^^'illiam Russey. was a native of Winchester. 
Tennessee, born in iSii. His paternal grandfather, William Rus«ey, 
was of French lineage and the name was originally DeRussey. .'\bout 
182 1 the grandfather removed with his family to Muncie, Indiana, where 
William Russey, then a vouth of ten years, was reared and educated. 
He continued a resident of that state until about 1856. when he came 
to Cass county, settling at Vandalia. Here he was- engaged in the hotel 
business for a time, but later removed to Howard township, locating 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 051 

on a farm, where he resided until 1S77, when he removed to Newberg 
township. Th.ere he cnricd on general agricuhural pursuits, and his 
death occurred there on the iStii of March, 1892. He was a Repubhcan 
m politics and was justice of the peace. His interest in community af- 
fairs was deep and sincere and arose from an earnest desire for public 
progress and improvement. He was one of the active workers of the 
Republican party and never missed an election. His fraternal relations 
were with the Masons, and his life e.Kemplified the beneficent spirit of 
the craft in its teachings concerning mutual helpfulness and brotherly 
kindness. He lived to be eighty years of age and since his death his 
memory lias been enshrined in the hearts of many who knew and re- 
spected him. His wife bore the maiden name of Mary Brakeman. and 
she was a native of St. Clair county, IMichigan, born IMarch 25, 1S3C, 
and in 1836 she came to Cass county with her mother. Her father, 
Captain Lewis G. Brakeman, was drowned in Lake St. Clair while 
commanding a vessel. The mother, Mrs. Candace Brakeman. afterward 
removed to Cass county, settling in Newberg township, where ]\Irs. 
Russey was reared, the family being among the early pioneer residents 
of that locality. Mrs. Russey has watched almost the entire growth 
and development of this part of the state, watching its transition from 
a wilderness to its present state of cultivation and improvement. She 
is now seventy-five }-ears of age and she makes her home with her son, 
E. J. Russey. She was married in this county and became the mother 
of five sons, two of whom are now deceased. The three yet living are: 
William B., a resident of Owosso, IMichigan; Wiley, who is a twin 
brother of William and follows farming in Newberg township, Cass 
county; and E. J. of this review. 

The last named was reared on the old homestead farm in Newl:>erg 
township and acquired a common-school education. He worked at farm 
labor during the period of his youth and remained a resident of his 
native township until 1900. when he came to Cassopolis to accept the 
position of uudcrsheriff. which he filled for four years. In 1904 he_was 
elected sheriff by the Republican party of Cass county, wdiich position 
he is now filling. He was married in December, 1891, to ^^liss Carrie 
Har\vood, a daughter of William and Clarissa (Easton) Harwood, 
who was born in Newberg township and there was reared, her parents 
being pioneer settlers of the countv. I\Tr. and Mrs. Russey have four 
children: Lena, born June 3. 1894; ^Tabel, May 10, 1897; :Mark Han- 
na, August 9, 1S99 ; and Hazel, Januan.' 3, 1902. 

Mr. Russey is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. He 
has been a lifelong resident of Cass county, being connected with agri- 
ailtural pursuits until called to public office, wherein he has discharged 
his duties with promptness and fidelity. Realizing fully the responsi- 
bility that devolves upon him. he has displayed neither fear nor favor 
in the exercise of his duties, and his course has made him a menace to 



all 


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65-2 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

hile those who hold them- 
lart defender of life, liberty 

ISAAC S. POUND. 

Isaac S. I'ound is one of the leading oltl settlers of Cass county and 
a veteran of the Civil war. Coming to southern Michigan at an early 
day he has assisted in making the county what it is, the labors of the 
early settlers winning for it a place among the leading counties of this 
great commonwealth. His mind bears the impress of the early historic 
annals of southern ]\Iichigan and he can relate many interesting inci- 
dents of the early days when the land was largely unimproved and the 
work of development had licen scarcely begun. He was born in Ontario 
county, New York, September 22, 1837, and is of English lineage. His 
paternal great-grandparents came from England, settling in New Jer- 
sey. The great-grandfather, Thomas Pound, served as a soldier of 
the Revolutionary war, becoming aide-de-camp on the staff of General 
Washii^gton and acting for a part of the time as staff quartermaster. 
Pie had three sons, Thomas, Isaac and John. The second was the grand- 
father of our subject and he, too, manifested his loyalty to his coun- 
try by serving in the war of 1S12 as a private. The family record is 
notable because of the mduslry. integrity and high, principles of its 
representatives. There has never lieen a drunkard, a pauper nor a crim- 
inal among the Pounds and such a record is one of \\hicli any man 
inight well be proud. 

Tliomas Pound, father of our subject, was a native of Orange 
county, New York, in which locality he was reared and educated. He 
was married in that county to I\[iss Sallie Smith, also a native of that 
county ancl a daughter of Isaac Smith, who likewise served as a pri- 
vate in the war of 18 12. He was supjjosed to have been of Irish lineage. 
Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Pound removed to 
Chemung county. New York, and afterward became residents of Ontario 
county, that slate, where they resided until 1844. Hoping to enjoy 1)et- 
ter opportunities in the west they then started for Michigan and, as this 
was before the era of railroad transportation, they traveled by wagon, 
inaking their way direct to Newberg township, Cass countv, where jMr. 
Pound had secured one hundred and sixty acres of land. The tract was 
entirely wild and uncultivated, not an improvement having been made 
on the place. He first built a log house about sixteen bv twentv-four 
feet and then began to clear the land, performing the arduous task of 
cutting away the timber, taking out the stumps and preparing the fields 
for the plow. In due course of time, however, his land w-as placed under 
cultivation and brought forth rich harvests. He was a hard working 
man, energetic and enterprising, and was regarded as one of the lead- 
ing and representative early citizens of his community. His political 
allegiance was given to the Whig party until the organization of the 



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HISTORY OK CASS COUXTY 653 

Republican parly, wlicn lie joined its ranks and continued one of its sup- 
porters until his death, lie served as highway commissioner and acted 
as a member of the grand jury that held a session in 1856. His re- 
ligious faith was indicated by his membership and loyalty to the Protest- 
ant Methodist church. ll<: died upon the old homestead November 2G, 
1863, and was lor some years survived by his wife, who reached the 
advanced age of eighty-three }-ears. In their family were eight chil- 
dren, seven sons and a daughter, of which number five reached adult 
age, while four are still living. 

Isaac S. Pound, the second child and the first son born of this mar- 
riage, was a lad of seven summers when ijrouglu by his parents to Cass 
county. His education was acquired in one of the old-time log school- 
houses of the township, with its slab seats and other primitive furnish- 
ings. The building was heated by a large fireplace, occupying almost 
one entire end of the room. His educational privileges, however, were 
very limited, for his services were needed upon the farm and he assisted 
in the development of the fields until about twenty-one years of age. 
He afterward took charge of the old homestead property, which he 
farmed for three ) cars, when he purchased the place upon which he now 
resides. For a year thereafter he kept ■"bachelor's hall," but in March 
1862, won a com])anion and helpmate for life's journey, being married 
at that time to Miss Elizabeth, llinchnian, a daughter of J. K. and 
Panena (Whitej Hinchman. ]Mrs. Pound was born in Boone county, 
West Virginia, and was se\en years of age when she came to Cass 
county with her ])arents, wlm settled in Silver Creek township. She 
was the yriun.L;(,-i in a family of eleven children. At the time of his 
marriage ]\Ir. I'uund brought his bride to the farm upon which he now 
resides, having livcil here for forty-five consecuti\'e years with the ex- 
ception of a brief period of four years spent in Van Buren county and 
his term of service in the war of the Rebellion. In August, 1864. he 
responded to the country's urgent need for troops, enlisting as a mem- 
ber of the iMjurteenth }*iicliigan Battery of Light Artillery, and served 
until July, 1865, when, the war having closed, he was nuistered out as 
a private and returned to his home. The marriage of ^Ir. and IMrs. 
Pound has been blessed with six children, who are vet living: Ella, 
now the wife of Fred W. Timm. a resident of CassopoHs; Fred J., a 
mail carrier living in Marcellus, Michigan; Eva E., the wife of Andrew 
J. Poe, whose home is m Newberg township; Carrie, the wife of Thomas 
G. Barks of Vandalia ; Arthur \V., who is living upon the old home 
farm; and Jane, the wife of \\'. Butler of Newberg township. 

Throughout his entire life Mr. Pound has followed the occupation 
of farming, and is now the owner of one hundred and twentv acres of 
arable land, which he has brr)ught under a high state of cultivation, 
and it is kn^nvn as " The Maple Grove Farm." There are good build- 
ings upon the place and lie has divided the land into fields of convenient 



65i HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

size by well kept fences. He lias secured many of the late improved 
farm implements and in all of his work is progressive and enterprising. 
He votes with the Repuljlican party and is unfaltering in his advocacy 
of its principles. He has attended the county conventions for forty 
years or more, usually as a delegate, and his opinions have carried 
weight in the party councils. He held some minor offices, and at all 
times is loyal and progressi\e in his citizenship. He belongs to W. J. 
May post, No. 65, G. A. R., in which he has filled all of the chairs save 
that of chaplain, and he has been a member of the Grange for more than 
thirty vears. Hi? residence in the county covers a period of sixty-one 
years, and he has been closely and helpfully identified with its develop- 
ment and progress. When the family located in ;Michigan there were 
only about twenty-five voters in Newberg towmship, and now there are 
about five hundred. There were a number of wilcl animals and consid- 
er.-^ble wild game, including bears, wolves, deer and turkeys and prairie 
chickens, so that it \\as not a difficult task for the pioneer settler to 
secure game for his table. This was largely a timber region, the for- 
ests having as yet been micut, but to-day there are seen waving 
fields of grain where once stood the native trees. The little pioneer 
cabins have long since given place to commodious and substantial farm 
residences, while here and there towns and villages have sprung up, 
containing excellent industrial and commercial interests. IVtr. Pound 
rejoices in wdiat has been accomplished, and at all times he is regarded 
as a citizen whose aid can be counted upon to further every movement or 
measure for the public good. 

C. H. FUNK, D. D. S. 

Dr. C. H. Funk is engaged in the practice of dentistry in Cassop- 
olis, wl'cre he has a well equipped office, and in his work he keeps in 
touch with modem scientific research and with the most advanced ideas 
and methods of the profession. He was born in Elkhart, Indiana. May 
I?' 1^55- I^'^ father. William Funk, was a native of Pennsylvania 
and became one of the early settlers of Elkhart county, Indiana, where 
he carried on farming and milling. He was of German descent, as 
was his Avife, who bore the maiden name of Catherine flyers. In their 
family were four sons and five daughters, all of whom reached adult 
age and are still living with but two exceptions. 

Dr. Funk is the third child and eldest son. He was reared and 
educated in Elkhart county, pursuing his studies in Goshen. Indiana, 
after which be engaged in teaching school for four years in that county. 
The vear 1878 witnessed his arrival in Cassopolis. He had previously 
studied dentistry under the direction of Dr. Cumm.ins. of Elkhart, and 
he practiced for four years in Cassopolis. He afterward attended the 
Indiana Dental College, from which he was graduated in the class of 
1883, when he once more resumed practice in Cassopolis. where he has 



HISTORY Ol^- CASS COLWTY G55 

remained continuously since. By reading, investigation and study he 
has kept in touch witii the progress made by die dental fraternity and 
he has the mechanical skill and ability without which no member of the 
profession attains the highest success. His work has given a uniform 
satisfaction and his patronage is large and growing. He is also inter- 
ested in real estate, has negotiated some important property transfers 
and has contributed to the improvement of the city through the build- 
ing of the Ritter & Funk block and the postofTice block in Cassopolis. 
He is also interested in farming in connection with Mr. Ritter, so that 
the extent and scope of his activities have made him a prominent busi- 
ness man of Cassopolis. 

Dr. Funk was married in 1S90 to Miss Ellen R. Ritter, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph K. and Amanda F. (Kingsbury) Ritter. She was born 
and reared in Cassopolis and has become the mother of two sons, Le- 
land R. and Cyrus R. 

Dr. Funk is a well known Mason, having taken the lodge and chap- 
ter degrees in the craft. He is an honorarv' member of the Indiana 
State Dental Society, a member of the 3.1ichigan State Dental Society 
since 1885, and is president of the Southwest Alichigan Dental Society. 
He supports the Republican party, giving his ballot to those men who 
are pledgefl to upliold its principles, and in the work of the organization 
he has taken an active and helpful part, ser\'ing as secretary of the Re- 
publican county central committee. His residence in Cassopolis covers 
twent)^-eight years, during which time he has sensed for five years on 
the school board and for three years as its treasurer. The cause of edu- 
cation finds in him a warm and stalwart friend and he is also the cham- 
pion of every progressive movement that tends to prove of practical 
and permanent good to the county. He is wide-awake, alert and enter- 
prising, and is a typical representative of the citizenship of the middle 
west productive of the rapid and substantial advancement of this sec- 
tion of the countr}-. 

JOHN ATKINSON. 

The growth and substantial progress of a community do not de- 
pend upon the efforts of a single individual but are the result of the 
aggregate endeavor of many who have due regard for opportunity and 
exercise tlieir powers for the general improvement and progress. To 
this class belongs John Atkinson, a dealer in carriages, wagons, farm 
implements, hay and grain in Cassopolis. He possesses the enterprising 
spirit which has been the dominant factor in the upbuilding of the 
west. He is a western man by birth, training and preference, having 
first oper.ed his eves to the light of day in Mason township, Cass county, 
on the 8th of ^lav, 1858. His father. Thomas Atkinson, was a native 
of England, and in an early day crossed the Atlantic to the new world. 
settling in the state of New York, whence he afterward removed to 
Elkhart, Indiana. On leaving that locality he came to Cass county. 



656 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Michigan, where he met his death, being killed when forty-five years 
of age. His wife, who here the maiden name of Jane Ann Ingiedo. 
was a native of England and also Lecame a resident of New Castle, 
Indiana. She long survived her husband and died in Cass county at 
the ripe old age of sevenl\-eight years. In their family were thirteen 
children, eight of whom reached adult age, while seven are now living. 

]Mr. Atkinson is the tenth in order of birth in the family of thirteen 
children. He was reared in his native township and remained at home, 
assisting in the work of the farm in his early youth and when twelve 
years of age beginning work as a farm hand in the neighborhood by 
the month. The first pair of boots which he ever owned were paid for 
by a month's wages at farm labor. The money which he made during 
his minority went to support the family. He was only about five years 
of age when his father was killed, leaving a family of seven children, 
one of whom was born after the fatlier's demise. The family were left 
in limited financial circumstances, so that the boys had to support the 
mother and the siiialler children. Mr. Atkinson early came to a real- 
ization of the value of earnest and persistent endeavor and by his close 
application and stalwart purpose he made good progress in the business 
world. After working by the month for eleven years Mr. Atkinson 
went to Manistee county, Michigan, and engaged in lumbering in the 
midst of the forests of that district. He worked for a part of the time 
by the month, spending about two >-ears in the lumber trade. Leaving 
the lumber woods he came to Cass county, Michigan, where he engaged 
in the manufacture of ties for the Michigan Central Railroad. He also 
devoted a portion of his time to farm labor, spending two and a half 
years in this way, on the expiration of which period he came to Cassop- 
olis and engaged in shipping wood and in baling hay. He also traded in 
My and wood, getting in exchange wagons and buggies from the Stude- 
baker Company of South Bend. Indiana. He also traded for the brick 
which was used in the coristruction of the first hotel in the town. He 
has now one of the largest business enterprises of Cassop<jlis, his trade 
representing one hundred thousand dollars per year. He is in the grain 
business in addition to the agricultural implement business, and in the 
various departments of trade with \^hich he is connected he has secured 
a Hberal p.atronage. He shipped one hundred and sixty car loads of 
hay, straw and grain in 1900. He has likewise extended his efforts to 
the field of real estate operations, buying and selling farms. He makes 
a specialty of heavy farm machiner\- and has sold threshing machines 
to the value of fifteen thousand dollars since the ist of February, 1905. 
He also handles sawmill machinery, boilers and engines and does all of 
the trade in this line in the county. In the year 1905 he sold sixty- 
seven head of horses. He has a farm comprising about two hundred 
acres of land, and as has been indicated his business interests are of a 
varied and important nature, bringing to him gratifying .success by rea- 
son of his careful control, capable management and keen insight. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 057 

On the 151!] of June, iSSS, ^Ir. Atkinson was united in marriage 
to Miss Ida Belle Hunt, who was born in Ontwa township, Cass county, 
and was reared by .Mr. and .Mrs. Wesley Hunt. ]Mr. and Mrs. Atkin- 
son have become the parents of five children, but lost their daughter, 
Zerl. The others are: .Maud, Lucile, Louis and Cyrus. 

Mr. Atkinson is a lifelong Republican, who has worked earnestly in 
behalf of the party but has never sought or desired ofhce, nor would he 
accept any political preferment. He is a member of the ]^Iodern Wood- 
men camp and is well known in the county as a liberal man who has 
contributed generously to the support of many measures for the general 
good. He is also a stalwart advocate of the temperance cause, working 
earnestly in behalf of the party. An analyzation of his life record shows 
that energy and strict attention to business have been his salient char- 
acteristics and have constituted the secret of his success. He has sought 
to live honorably and peaceably with his fellowmen, practicing the golden 
rule in daily affairs and at all times he has enjoyed in full measure the 
confidence, good will and trust of those with whom he has been brought 
in contact. 

HARSEN D. SMITH. 

Harscn D. Smith is a prominent attorney of Cassopolis equally well 
known because of his activity in political circles. He has chosen as a 
life work a profession in which success results only from individual 
merit, from comprehensive knowledge and close application, and his high 
reputation is well deserved because he has manifested all of the salient 
characteristics demanded of the successful and able law^'er. .'\ native 
of Albion. New York, he was born on the 17th of ilarch. 1845. and is 
a son of E. Darwin and Maria (.Arnold) Smith, the former a native of 
Connecticut and the latter of New "^'ork. The paternal grandfather, 
Moses B. Smith, was a minister of the Universalist church and had a 
very wide and favorable acquaintance in the western part of the Empire 
state, to which he removed from New England. He was of Scotch line- 
age, his father, Moses Smith, Sr.. having emigrated from the land of 
the hills and heather to the new world. E. Darwin Smith, father of our 
subject, was a manufacturer of agricultural implements. Following his 
removal to New York he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits. 
He married Miss Maria .\rnold. a native of the Empire state and a 
daughter of Benjamin .Arnold, who was of English descent. They be- 
came the parents of three children, two daughters and a son. 

Harsen D. Smith, who was the second in order of birth, acquired 
an academic education at Newark. Wayne county. New York, where he 
was graduated. He afterward engaged in teaching school in that state 
for a short time, and in 1862 he went to Iowa. locating at Eldora, where 
for one year he acted as principal of the Eldora Union Schools. He 
then became a teacher in the Iowa Lutheran College at .\lbion. Iowa. 



658 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

bein.sf professor of matlienmtics. In the Tnenntimc he hnd tnkcn up tlie 
study of law and for a period was a student in tlie oftire of C.-,vcrnor 
Eastman, of Iowa, Suliscqncntly lie \vcnt to Roclicstcr. Xew York. 
where he entered the law office of Jndqc Ceorce F. Dan forth, a mem- 
ber of the court of ap[icals of the Fmpire state. For ahout t\\M vear^ :\fr. 
Smith remained in that office and v.ms then admitted to the Xcw York 
bar, after which he removed to Coldwater. Michigan, and spent about 
six months in the office of F. C. Fuller. He afterward removed to 
Jackson. Michican. and entered the office of Hon. W. K. Gibson. In 
Auq-ust. 1870. he removed to Cassopoli';, where he formed a partner- 
ship with Hon. Charles "W. Clishee. with whom he continued for two 
years. He then practiced bv himself for a year, after which he formed 
a partnership with Jtidcre .^ndrcw J- Smith, that connection beinq- thus 
continued until Andrew J. Smith was elected circuit jud2:c. since which 
time Harsen D. Smith has been alone in practice. He has for thirty-five 
years been a representative of the Cassopolis bar and is therefore num- 
bered amonpf the pioneer attorneys of the county. He has crradually 
worked h.is way upward, dcmonstratinp: his ability to cope with intricate 
problems of jurisprudence and in the handlinc;- of his cause he displays 
great stren.trth. while his devotion to his clients' interest is proverbial. 

In October. 1873. ]\Tr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Sate 
R. Read, who was horn in this county in 18^3, and is a daughter of S. 
T. and Rhoda R. ainvdcn") Read. 

In his political views 'Mr. Smith is a stalwart Republican, thor- 
oughly in sympathy with the principles of the party. He v.as elected 
and served as chairman of the Repnl>lican County Central Committee 
for ten years, was a member of the State Central Committee for six: 
years, and for four years a member of the execiitive committee. He is 
widely recognized as one of the foremost Republicans of Michigan, and 
his effoits in beh.alf of the organization have been far reaching and bene- 
ficial. In 1876 be was elected prosecuting attorney, filling the office for 
four years, and in i8q8 he was appointed by the governor to tlie posi- 
tion of circuit judt;e to preside over the bench of a new circuit until an 
election could he held. He served in that capacity for one year. He 
was a member of the state pardon board for about seven years, but 
when appointed judge resigned that position. Following his retirement 
from the bench he was reappointed on the pardon board. lie was nom- 
inated for state senator in 1884. but that Avas the year of the Demo- 
cratic landslide. Fraternally he is connected with the lodge, chapter 
and commandcr\- in the ^fasonic fraternity and also with Saladin Tem- 
ple of the iMystic Shrine at Grand Rapids. He has been very success- 
ful in his practice, beine connected with the greater number of the im- 
portant cases tried in his district and his broad intellectuality, great 
strength of character and determined purpose have made him a valued 
factor, not only as a legal practitioner but also in .social, fraternal and 



HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY G59 

political circles. He has done much to mold public thought and opinion 
in his community and is justly classed with the prommenl and represen- 
tative citizens of Cass county. 

JOHN ¥. SWISHER. 

John F. Swisher devotes his time and energies to agricultural pur- 
suits. More than a century ago George Washington said that '"agri- 
culture is the most honorable as well as the most useful occupation of 
man," and the truth ot tiiis assertion has been abundantly verilicd in all 
the ages. Mr. Swisher has given his entire life to farm work and now 
has a good projierty on Section 8, Silver Creek township, which is the 
farm upon which he was born, his natal day being March 7, 1S5S. His 
father, John T. Swislier, was a native of Virginia, born in 1812, and 
with his parents he removed to Ohio when seventeen years of age. the 
family home being established in I'reble county. There he grew to man- 
hood and was married there to Aliss Millicent Elliott, a native of South 
Carolina, 'alio was brought to Treble county, Ohio, during her infancy 
and was there reared. Her parents died when she was a small child. 
She remained in Preble county until after she gave her hand in marriage 
to Mr. Swisher. About 1849 they removed to Cass county, iMichigan, 
settling in Silver Creek township, where their remaining days were 
passed. Mr. Swisher departed this life in his seventy-ninth year and 
left behind him that j)riceless heritage of an untarnished name, because 
he had always been loyal in citizenship, straightforward in business and 
honorable in private life. He took an interest in political questions and 
situations an<l was a stanch Republican who held various township of- 
fices, the duties nf which were capably and promptly performed. He 
was a devoted member of the Christian church and was a leader in the 
work of building the house of worship, while in the various church 
activities he took a helpful part. His wife, who was a faithful com- 
panion and helpmate to him 'ui life's journey and who displayed many 
sterling traits r.f heart ami mind, also passed awav in Cass cnunt\'. In 
their family were nine children, four sons and fi\'e daughters, all of whom 
reached adult age. 

John F. Swisher, the youngest of this family, was reared upon the 
old homestead farm, where he now lives. His early educational priv- 
ileges were afforded by the district schools of Silver Creek township and 
later he continued his studies in Battle Creek high school. During the 
periods of vacation he worked in the fields, assisting his father in the 
task of developing and improving his land, and he thus gained good 
practical knowledge of the best methods of farm work. He was mar- 
ried in 1883 to ]\Iiss Alice G. Calvert, and unto them have been born 
two cb.ildren, Clarence and Erma, but the latter died Januar\- 9. 1891. 
She won the first premium as the prettiest girl among tliirt_\'-tliree con- 
testants at the Dowagiac fair in 1890. Her loss was deeply felt by 



660 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

her parents and many friends. Her mother survived her for only a few 
months, passing away August 23, 1891, at the comparatively early age 
of thirty-three years. In 1S93 Mr. Swisher was again married, his 
second union being with Emma J. Bcnner, the widow cf George Nor- 
ton. There is one child of tiiis marriage, Neal, who is now eight years 
of age. 

Air. Swisher has been a general stock farmer and in addition to till- 
ing the soil has raised high grades of stock, finding both branches of 
his business prolltablc. He has led a busy and useful life, characterized 
by thorough understanding of his work, by diligence m all that he does 
and by straightforward dealing at all tin;es. His political allegiance is 
given to the Republican party, and he is a firm advocate of its prin- 
ciples and does all in his power to promote its growth and extend its 
influence. In 1902 he was elected to the office of supervisor, and his 
capable service during his hrst term of service led to his re-election in 
1903. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Chris- 
tian church, in which he is now serving as deacon, and for twelve years, 
with the exception of a brief interval of two years, he has been con- 
tinuously superintendent of the Sunday-school. His efforts in behalf 
of the church have been far-reaching and beneficial and he is most earnest 
and zealous in his labors to promote religious instruction among the 
young, realizing the beneficial effects upon one's after life. He has 
always lived in this county and is a valued representative of a worthy 
pioneer family. The circle of his friends is extensive because he has 
ever displayed those sterling traits of character which in every land and 
clime command conlidence and regard. 

CHRIS A. HUX. 

Chris A. Hux, well kuwwn in financial circles in Cass county as the 
cashier of the Lee Brothers & Company bank at Dowagiac, is a native 
son of Michigan and seems imbued with the spirit of enterprise and 
energy which have been the dominant factors in the upbuilding of the 
middle west. His birth occurred in Grand Haven on the ist of June. 
1868. His father, Christian Hu.x, was a native of Germany, and in 
that land spent his youth and acquired his education in the schools of 
Wurtemberg. Crossing the Atlantic to America, he made his way into 
the interior of the country, locating at Lansing. Michigan, where he 
followed the machinist's trade, which he had mastered in his native 
country. He later was engaged in similar work at Grand Rapids, and 
subsequently took up his abode in Grand Haven in 1866. There he 
carried on business as a machinist until his removal to Owosso, Alich- 
igan, where his last da}S were passed, his death occurring when he was 
in the fifty-ninth year of his age. He had married subsequent to his 
arrival in the new world Aliss Frederica Lambert, a native of Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, who came with her parents to the Cnited States, the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 661 

family settling in Lansing, Michigan, about 1S64. She is still Hving 
and now makes lier home in Dowagiac. The members of the family are: 
Chris A., of this review; Lizzie, the wife of William Elliott, of Owosso, 
Michigan; Fred, who is residing in Durand, Michigan; Emma; and 
Charlie, who is also living in Owosso. 

Chris A. Hiix, the eldest of his father's family, spent the greater 
part of his youth in Owosso, whither his parents removed in his early 
boyhood days. He spent five years as a student in the Flint school and 
was afterward sent to the Fenton public schools. After putting aside 
his text books he secured a position in the employ of the Michigan 
Central Railroad Company in the freight department at Owosso. Later 
he was transferred to Jackson, '^ilichigan, and subsequently sent to 
Grand Rajiids, to Augusta and to Dowagiac, whence he went to Chi- 
cago Heights, Illinois, on the 13th of October, 1892. In 1896, however, 
he returned to Dowagiac and became cashier in the private bank of Lee 
Brothers & Company, in which capacity he has since remained. He has 
thoroughly acquainted liimscll with the banking business in every de- 
partment and has rendered faithful and capable service to the house 
which he represents. .At the same time he has become popular with its 
patrons by reason of the uniform courtesy which he extends to them 
and the promptness and ability with which he discharges the business 
which he transacts for them. 

Mr. Hux is a memlx'r of the Tslasonic fraternity, in which he has 
attained high rank. He is nuw a past eminent commanrlcr of Niles 
Commandcry Xn. 12. K. T., has also attained the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish rite and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. He is one 
of the youngest Masons in ^lichigan to have advanced thus far in the 
craft and is a worthy exemplar of the order, being in hearty sympathy 
with its principles of brotherly kindness and mutual helpfulness. Al- 
though lie usually gives his political support to the Republican party, 
he does not consider himself bound by party ties and often casts an in- 
dependent ballot in support of the candidates whom he thinks best qual- 
ified for office. He is very widely and favorably known in his part of 
the county, having been a resident of Dowagiac for thirteen years, 
his business and social relations bringing him into contact with many 
people, and he easily wins their friendship and regard by reason of the 
possession of those sterling traits of character which everywhere com- 
mand respect and confidence. 

ANDREW BARNHART. 

Andrew Barnhart is one of the old settlers of Cass county now liv- 
ing on Section 18, Silver Creek township. Many are the changes that 
have occurred since he took up his abode in this portion of the state 
and the traveler of today can scarcely realize that it has been within 
only a few decades that this county was covered with a dense growth of 



CG2 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

forest trees and that the work of clearing and developing had scarcely 
been begun. Air. Barnhart is nioreo\er one of the most venerable cit- 
izens of the county, having reached the eighty- fourth milestone on life's 
journey. He was born iri Preble county, Ohio, about 1822 and was one 
of a family of ten cliildren. six sons and four daugiitcrs, who wcie l>orn 
of the marriage of Davul and Sarah (Shoemaker) Barnhart, b<Ah of 
whom were natives of Indiana, while their respective parents were of 
German birUi. Botli Mr. and Airs. David Barnhart lived to a good old 
age and all of tiieir ten children grew to years of maturity, although but 
one sister of our subject is now living, Airs. Hulda Young, who yet re- 
sides in Preble county, Ohio. 

Andrew Barnhart remained at home during his boyhood and youth 
and assisted in the farm work. His education was received in a log 
schoolliouse in Preble county and he attended school for only a brief 
period during the winter months, while during the remainder of the 
year he woiked at farm labor, taking his place in the fields at the time 
of early spring planting and continuing to assist in their cultivation until 
the crops were har\cstcd in the late autumn. Farm work was also more 
difficult than at the present time. ff>r the machinen,- was crude and much 
of the labor was done by hand. Air. Barnhart started out in life on 
his own account at the age of twenty-one years, coming to Michigan on 
foot. He made his way direct to Cass county and settled in Silver 
Creek township, where he purciiased the farm upon which he now lives, 
paying two dollars per acre for a tract of one himdred and sixty acres, 
which was all covered with trees. In the midst of the green trees he 
began clearing the land. There were no improvements whatever upon 
the place and he had to ait dnwn the timber and grub out the stumps 
before he could plow and plant the tields. His first home was a little 
log cabin about sixteen by sixteen feet and containing only one room. 
When he had macle arrangements for having a home of his own he re- 
turned to Ohio and was married in Preble county to Aliss Alary Ann 
Fraze, who was b<irn in Preble county, Ohio. He returned to Cass 
county with a team and wagon bringing his bride. He also drove two 
cows. In true pioneer style the young couple began their domestic life 
on the western frontier, and for many years they traveled life's journey 
together, sharing with each other its joys and sorrows, its adversity 
and prosperity, but in 1891 Air. Barnhart was called upon to mourn the 
loss of his wife, who died on the 28tii of Januarv- of that vear. They 
had no cbiildren of their own hvt a<lnptcd three: AA^illiam Aloit, who 
died at the age of thirteen years: Airs. Sarah E. Strackangast, also de- 
ceased ; and Alary E. Fraze. who is the only one now living. She was 
born in Winchester, Indiana, and is the wife of C. A. Green. Thev 
reside upon the old homestead with Air. Barnhart. 

From the age of twenty-one years to the present time Air. Barn- 
hart has continuously been a resident of Cass county and is therefore 
numbered amLmg its pioneer settlers. He is now the owner of one hun- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 603 

dred and eighty acres of goxl land, which he rents. He started out in 
life practiadly enipty-handed biU he possessed strong delerniinalion and 
unfaltering enterprise and upon this as a foundation has builded his 
success. . After working for a time at farm labor he was enabled to 
make purchase of his land at the very low price at which property 
sold in those days, and through the intervening years he has improved 
his farm, converting it into a valuable place. As the years have gone by 
he has prospered in his undertakings and is now in comfortable financial 
circumstances. Such a life record should serve a.* a source of inspiration 
and encouragement to others, showing what may be accomplished by 
unfaltering energy, diligence and perseverance. For long years he gave 
his political allegiance to the Republican party, but because of his pro- 
nounced views on the temperance question and his belief that it is one 
of the dominant issues before the people, he joined the ranks of the 
Prohibition parly, and has since done all in his power to promote its 
growth and insine its success. He has for many years been a member 
of the Christian church, has served for a long period as one of 
its elders, and has lalxired effectively and earnestly for the inter- 
ests of the denc^mination. His life has indeed been honorable 
and upright characterized by devotion to those principles which work 
for righteousness, justice and tiiith, and now in the evening of his days 
he can look back over the past without regret, knowing that he has never 
taken advantage of the necessities of his fellowmen in any business trans- 
action nor favored any movement or measure that would prove det- 
rimental to his town or county. He has on the contrary supported all 
plans for the public good and is justly classed with the. representative, 
respected and honored pioneer citizens of Silver Creek township. 

MARK JUDD. 

Mark Judd, a pioneer lumberman and sawmill operator of Dowagiac, 
was born in Fairfield county, Connecticut, June i8, 1833. The family 
is of English lineage in the paternal line and William Judd, the father 
of our subject, was also a native of Fairfield county, Connecticut, where 
in early life he learned and followed the cooper's trade. Emigrating 
westward in 1844, he took up his abode in Silver Creek township, Cass 
county, Michigan, where he located upon a farm, giving his attention 
to its cultivation and improvement for a number of years. His last 
days, however, were spent in Dowagiac. where he died at the age of 
ninety-three vears. His wife, Abigail Beardsley, was also a native of 
Connecticut, and died in New York when her son Mark was only about 
four years of age. In the family were four sons and four daughters. 
After losing his first wife the father was again married. 

]\Iark Judd, the voungest of the eight children, came to Cass county, 
Michigan, when about twelve years of age. and when a young man of 
seventeen years started out in life on his own account, working as a 



664 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

farm liaud by the niontli. He was thus employed for three years, wlien, 
thinking that he miyiit find other occupations more congenial, he began 
learning the carpenter's and join-er's trade, which he followed for sev- 
eral years, becoming intimately associated with building operations in 
Cass county. Watchful of opportunities p<jinting to success, he was 
enabled, in 1S59, as the result of his enterprise, diligence and frugality 
in former years, to establish a planing mill, of which he became one- 
tliird owner and which was conducted under the firm style of Ashley, 
Case & Company. The firm had an existence of about four years in its 
original form and then became Case & Judd, business being carried on 
in that way for some time, when JNIr. Judd became sole owner. This 
is the oldest enterprise of the kind in the county, or in fact in any of 
the adjoining ci.nintics, having a continuous existence" of almost a half 
century. The planing mill was the first built in this part of the state, 
there being none nearer than Kal.amazoo. The mill has been in i;pcra- 
tion throughout all these years an<l its manufactiu'ed product represents 
an enormous amount of lumber. 

Mr. Judd was married in 1S64 to Aliss Amanda Stillwell, a native 
of Michigan, and the_\' now have three sons: William, whu is living in 
Porter township; Allic, the wife of Arthur Jewel, of Ddwagiac; and 
I^na, the wife of Dr. George W. Green, a practicing pliysician of 
Dowagiac. 

In his political affiliation Mr. Judd has been a life-long Rei)ublican, 
joining the party on its organization. He has held several oftices, act- 
ing as alderman for two years and in other connections has done effec- 
tive service for the welfare and progress of his home town. He is a 
member of Dowagiac L<Ddge, No. 214, A. F. & A. M., in which he has 
attained the degree of Master Mason, and he is also connected with the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. A pioneer business man of Dow- 
agiac, he has spent the greater part of his life in Cass county and has 
been identified with its interests Ixjth in behalf of public progress and 
^hrough his business relations. He stands today as one whose success 
is the fitting crown of earnest and honorable lal^or. Realizing that work 
— earnest, persistent work — is the basis of all desirable prosperity, he has 
in his business career spared not that laborious attention- to detail which 
is one of the chief elements of success and as the otttcomc of his clear 
judgment, his enterprise and diligence lie is today classed with the sub- 
stantial residents of his adopted county. 

HON. JAMES G. HAYDEN. 

Hon. James G. Harden, elected to the state senate of Michigan in 
1904, is one of the distinguished and honored citizens of Cassopolis and 
in public life has won attention and esteem by reason of his devotion to 
duty and his masterful grasp of every problem that has Ijeen presented 
for solution. His life record began in Calvin township, Cass county, on 



















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i 






























J 














<2-^-^ 





/ii^-^ 



.^^^^^^^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 6.;5 

the loth of November. 1S54. His father, Joseph G. Hayden, was a na- 
tive of New York and a pioneer settler of tliis part of the state, con- 
tributing- in substantial measure to the early progress and improvement 
of Cass county. He was of Irish lineage and died when his son James 
was only three years of age. The mother, who bore the maiden name 
of Hannah Lincoln, was a native of Ohio and was brought to Cass 
county during lier early girlliood, so that she was married here. She 
died when sixty-six years of age, and of her six children one died in 
infancy. 

Plon. James G. Hayden, who was the f(jurth member of the fam- 
ily and the third son, was reared by an uncle in Cassopolis until eight- 
een years of age, when, desirous of providing lor his own support, he 
engaged to work on a farm by the month. He was thus employed for 
two years, after which he returned to Cassopolis and again attended 
school for six months. He then entered commercial life as a clerk in 
a general store, where he remained for three years, after which he pur- 
sued a course of study in Bryant & Stratton's commercial college in 
Chicago, spending a }ear in that institution. Following his return 
home he engaged in farming in LaGrange township, devoting his ener- 
gies to general agricultural pursuits for seven y«i.rs. Whatever he 
undertook was carried forward to successful completion by means of 
his unremitting diligence and strong purpose. 

Jn 1S79 Mr. Hayden was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Ruth T. 
Kingsbury, a daughter of Asa and Mary (Monroe) Kingsbury. r^Irs. 
Hayden was born in Cassopolis, her people having been early settlers 
of the county. In 1886 Mr. Hayden returned to Cassoixilis and en- 
gaged in the grocery business. In Noveral)er of the same year he was 
called by popular suffrage to the office of county treasurer, which posi- 
tion he filled for four years and then retired in 18SS, enjoying the same 
confidence and trust which w-as given to him when he entered oflice. In 
the meantime he continued in the grocery trade, which he successfully 
conducted for seven years, and then gave his attention to the hard wood 
lumber business for two years. When that period had passed he re- 
turned to the home farm, whereon he continued for seven years, when 
in 1902 he once more took up his abode in Cassopolis, this time giving 
his attention to the real estate and insurance business, in which he has 
since continued, having now a good clientage. He handles a large 
amount of valuable realty each }ear and he is thoroughly informed con- 
cerning property in this part of the state. All through the period of an 
active business career Mr. Hayden has also maintained a deep interest 
in political questions, and has done much effective work for his party. 
In 1904 he was elected state senator and is now in 1906 a member of 
the upper house of the Michigan legislature. His first office was that of 
township treasurer, and although the township had a normal Demo- 
cratic majority of one hundred and twenty he was elected on the Re- 



6<iC HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY 

publican ticket. Over tiie recnril of liis ofticia] career there falls no 
shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, and he has proved himself an 
active working member of the liduse, unfaltering in his supixjrt of any 
measure or movement which he deems of public value or general utility. 
He has also been president of the Cass County Agricultural Society and 
of the Farmers" institute, occupying the latter position for three years. 
Dee])ly interested in the agricultural development of the county, his la- 
bors in those positions proved effective and far reaching. At the pres- 
ent writing he occupies the iiositimi of county superintendent of the 
IXXH-, and he assumed the duties of postmaster at CassMpolis March i. 
190(1. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hayden have become the parents of five children. 
Asa, who was born in 1881, is a graduate of the high school of Cassopo- 
Hs and of the law department of the state university at Ann Arbor and 
is now engaged in the practice of his chosen profession in the count)' 
seat. Vera is a graduate of the state normal school at Ypsilanti, Mich- 
igan, and is now engaged in teaching in Kalamazoo. Jay G. is now a 
student in the stale university. Hazel, who is a graduate of the high 
school at Cassopolis and now a student of the Western State Normal 
School, is now at home. Robert is a student in tiie schools of Cassopo- 
lis. 

Mr. Havden lielongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
taken the Ro_\a] Arch degree. He is likewise connected with the 
Knights of Pythias and with the IModern Woodmen of .America, and 
his activity is uianifcst m many lines. He is president of the Creamery 
Association and connected with other local affairs, and his efforts in 
behalf of progress along agricultural and commercial lines, of intel- 
lectual development and of general progress have been effective and 
beneficial. He lost his father when only three years of age and was 
left with no inheritance. He educated himself and he had some hard 
knocks when a boy, but he developed self-reliance and force of charac- 
ter atid has steadily worked his way upward, gaining a prominent po- 
sition in public regard and honor, his course reflecting credit upon those 
who have honored him. 

JOHN BILDERBACK. 

When the tocsin of \\ar sounded in 1861 men from all walks of 
life flocked to the standard of the nation. They came from the counting 
houses, the offices, the shops and the farms and representatives of all 
classes nn'ngled and met together with the one common purpose of de- 
fending the Union. There has been on the pages of the world's history 
no greater record of loyalty and patriotism than was displayed by the 
sons of the nrirlh when the supremacy of the Federal government wa= 
threatened. Mr. Bilderback, now living retired in Dowagiac. was among 
the numiber who followed the stars and stripes, making a creditable 
militarv record on various battlefields of the south. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 667 

A native of Preble county, Ohio, he was born on the i8th of June, 
1843, ^n<^ \^^s of German hneage. His father, Wihiam Bilderback, 
^vas a native of New Jersey, and when a young man went to Preble 
county, Ohio. Throughout iiis entire Hfe he carried on farming, and 
removed frcni Olho to Miciiigan in 1846, setthng in Berrien county, 
where he remained until 1850, when he came to Cass county. Here 
he located in Silver Creek township, about three miles from Dowagiac, 
and as the years came and went he worked in the fields, bringing his 
land under a high state of cultivation and annually harvesting good 
crops. While his attention was chiefly directed to his business interests 
he yet displayed a commendable and patriotic citizenship and was ever 
loyal to the public good, giN'ing his co-operation to many movements for 
the promotion of the general welfare. He served as highway commis- 
sioner, and as justice of the peace rendered decisions which were strictly 
fair and impartial. In early life he became a member of the United 
Brethren church and afterward joined the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He lived as a worthy Christian gentleman and died at the age of sixty- 
nine years, respected and honored by all who knew him. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Sarah Nye, was born in Preble county, 
Ohio, in 1818, and spent her last days in Cass county, where she passed 
away in 1S89, at the age of seventy-one years. She was devoted to her 
family and was ah\ays faithful to the ties of friendship, and her death 
was deeply regretted by many who knew her. Unto Mr. and 'Mys. Bilder- 
back were born three sons and three daughters. Peter, who in response 
to the country's call for aid became a private in the Twelfth Michigan 
Infantry, died at Pittslnirg I^anding while in the service of his country, 
his death being occasioned by arduous militar}' duty and the exposures 
and hardships incident to war. William W. was but sixteen years of 
age when he enlisted and was Ijut a boy when he laid down his life upon 
the altar of his country. Mary, the eldest daughter, is now the wife of 
D. W. Sammons, a resident farmer of Silver Creek township. Martha 
A. is the wife of James H. Momany, also living in Silver Creek town- 
, ship. Sarah R. is the wife of Elias Smith, a resident farmer of Pokagon 
township. 

John Bilderback, who was the second son and second child in the 
father's family, was only two years old when the parents left Ohio and 
came to Michigan, making the journey westward with teams after the 
primitive manner of travel in those days before the advent of railroad 
transportation. They first lived in Berrien county and Mr. Bilderback 
of this review was a lad of six summers at the time of the removal of 
the family to Cass county. He was then reared in SiK-er Creek town- 
ship and pursued his studies in a log schoolhouse such as was common 
on the frontier. In one end of the room was a large fireplace and the 
furnishings were primitive and the methods of instruction were very 
crude as cnmparcfl with modern idei? oi education. The family lived, 
in a log cabin and shared in the usual hardship? and privations of pioneer 



668 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

life, li was not until 185S that the father built a frame house. John 
Bilderback remained at home through the period of his youth and as- 
sisted in clearing up the farm, working in the fields through the summer 
months, while in the winter seasons he pursued his study. He was thus 
•engaged until August, 1S61, when at the early age of eighteen }cars 
he responded to the country's call for aid, enlisting for service as a 
private of the Tirst ^Michigan Cavalry. "He was with that command for 
about four and a half years and was then honorably discharged as first 
-duty sergeant, at which time he was attached to the Army of the Po- 
tomac. He took part in many of the principal battles and a number of 
the lesser ones of the war. He was never wounded nor captured and 
his experience in the hospital covered only three days. With the ex- 
■ception of that \eiy brief period he was continuously on active duty 
during the fuiir and a half }ears of his connection with the Union army. 
His last ser\icc was in the west at Camp Douglas, Salt Lake City, and 
he participated in the Grand Review in Washington, D. C, where "wave 
after wave of bayonet crested blue" swept by the reviewing stand on 
-v\-hich stood the president and other dignitaries of the nation cheering 
the return of the victorious army, whose brilliant efforts, heroism and 
patient cmlurance had saved the Union. Mr. Bilderback received an 
honorable discharge at Salt Lake City and returned home b}- way of 
San Francisco, the Isthmus of Panama and Xew York City, making his 
way to Dowagiac. 

When he again arrived in Cass county ^Nlr. Bilderback tocjk up his 
abode in Silver Creek township, purchasing a tract of land adjoining his 
father's farm. As a companion and helpmate for life's journey he chose 
Miss Cynthia A. Becraft, to whom he was married on Christmas day 
■of 1S66. She is a daughter of Isaiah and Caroline (Wallace) Becraft, 
the former born May 2, 181 1, and the latter on the 4th of December. 
1817. They became the parents of four children, of whom Mrs. Bilder- 
back was tlie youngest. She has one brother living, ^^^ F. Becraft, who 
resides in Augusta, Kalamazoo county, ^Michigan. After losing his first 
wife Mr. Becraft was again married. Of this union there were five 
-children, of whom three sons are living: Julius O., ]\I. C. and I. W. 
Becraft. !Mrs. Bilderback was born near Detroit, but in Alacomb count}-, 
Michigan, on the ist of Noveinher, 1843, and came to Dowagiac with 
her father in June, 1S49, since which time she has been a resident of this 
county. Her father was prominent in public affairs in an early day, 
serving as postmaster of Dowagiac. also as deputy sheriff and as provost 
•marshal during the period of the Civil war. He was closely identified 
with the early history of Cass county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bilderback at the time of their marriage located on 
a farm in Silver Creek township, where he engaged in general agri- 
cultural pursuits until 189Q, when he retired from active business cares 
and removed to the city. While famiing his place displayed every evi- 
dence of careful supervision and painstaking effort. The land was trans- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 66^ 

formed into productive fields and lie annually harvested good crops, and 
in all of his work he was practical and energetic. Unto him and his 
wife were horn two sons and two daughters: Ella Grace, who is now 
the wife of 1). J. Stilwell; Jesse X., a mail carrier of Dowagiac; Verna 
C, who is the wife of i. C. Scattcrgood, who is living in Harrishurg, 
Pennsylvania; and William R., who is a molder residing in Dowagiac. 

Mr. Bilderback has a farm of eighty acres which is well improved 
and this yields to him a good financial return. He is a Republican, hav- 
ing given inflexible support to the party since age conferred upon him 
the right of franchise. He has been called to various positions of public 
trust, serving as justice of the peace, as supervisor, as township treas- 
urer of Silver Creek township and treasurer of the school district for 
thirty-two years, resigning the last named position when he removed to 
Dowagiac. He is and has been supervisor of the second ward of 
Dowagiac. Every public duty has been faithfully f>erformed and the 
trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen has been well merited. That 
he occupies an honored position in Grand Army circles is indicated by 
the fact that he has been commander of H. C. Gilbert Post No. 47, 
G. A. R., for about twelve years. He has been a meml^er of the Baptist 
church for thirty years, and ■Mrs. Bilderback also belongs to this church 
and has taken a most active and helpful part in its work. They contribute 
generously to its support and do everything in their power to promote 
its activities and extend its influence and for about a cjuarter of a century 
Mr. Bilderback served as superintendent of the Sunday-school. He has 
no business interests now save the administration of estates, but various 
trusts of this nature have been given to him. He has been a resident 
of Cass county for fifty-six years and in looking back over his history it 
will be seen that there are many commendable elements in him, as dis- 
played in his patriotic service in defense of the Union, in his straight- 
forward and honorable business life, in his devotion to duty in civic 
office and his fidelity to the ties of friendship and of the home. He is 
one of the best known citizens Of the county and it is with pleasure that 
we present the record of his career to our readers. 

EDD W. E ASTON. 

Edd W. Eastun operates and occupies a fine farm of two hundred 
and twenty acres, pleasantly situated on section 21, Silver Creek town- 
ship. It w-as upon this farm that his birth occurred on the 17th of Febru- 
ary, 186 1. Throughout his entire life he has lived in Silver Creek town- 
ship and has become widely recognized as an enterprising, progressive 
agriculturist, whose business interests are capably conducted and who in 
all his dealings is upright and reliable. His father, Thomas Easton, was 
a native of Kentucky and came to ^Michigan with his parents when a boy. 
locating in Berrien county, where he was reared amid pioneer surround- 
ings. When a young man he removed to Cass county and was married 



6'0 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

here to Miss Emily Hincliman, a native of Virginia, who came with her 
parents to this state iu lier early girlhood days. Following their mar- 
riage JMr. and Airs. Thomas Easton located on Section 21, Silver Creek 
township, where the husband devoted his time and energies to general 
agricultural pui suits, placing his land under a high state of cultivation 
and developing an excellent farm. He continued in active farm work 
until his lile's labors were ended in death, when he was in his seventy- 
fifth year. He is still survived by his wife, who is one of the worthy 
pioneer women of the couiitv. In their familv were four children three 
sons and a daughter, namely: Dr. W. \\^' Easton, who is living in 
Dowagiac; Jennie, the widow of William Allen, also a resident of 
Dowagiac; Dr. J. AI. Easton, of Decatur; and Edd W., of this review. 

The youngest of the family, Edd W. Easton, was reared under the 
parental roof upon the farm Avhere he now resides, and pursued his edu- 
cation m the common schools of the township. When not busy with his 
text-books or engaged with the pleasures of the plavground his atten- 
tion was given to the work of the farm, and in early life he lx;came 
familiar with the best methods of cultivating the soil and caring for the 
crops. He remained at home until his marriage, which was celebrated 
on tlie 14th of October, 18S3, the ladv of his choice being Aliss Florence 
Mason, a daughter of A. H. and Temi>erance (Cross) Mason, the former 
a native of New York and the latter of Canada. Tliev amie to Cass 
county 111 an early day, lieing among the first settlers of Dowagiac. The 
father is a carpenter by trade but has conducted a hotel and jjianing mill 
and has been closely associated with the business development of his 
adopted cit\-. Airs. Easton was Iwrn in Dowagiac August 7, 1862, and 
is the seventh in order of birth in a familv of nine children. She re- 
mained with her parents during the days of 'her girlhood and is indel)ted 
to the public school sxstem ..t her native citv for the educational priv- 
ileges which slie enjoyed. At the time of their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Easton located upon the farm where he has since resided with the excep- 
tion of a brief period spent in Dowagiac. He has here two hundred 
and twenty acres of land belonging to his mother. He has placed the 
farm under a high state of cultivation and it richly repavs his efforts 
in splendid crops which the fields annually yield. Evervth'ing about the 
place is kept up in good condition and its 'neat and thViftv "appearance 
indicates the careful supervision of a practical and progressive owner. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Easton have been born two daughters. May. 
who finished the eleventh grade in the Dowagiac citv school, took the 
normal course in 1906, and also has taken instrumental music. She will 
take charge of District Xo. Six in Silver Creek. Alma, the vnungest, 
IS in the fourth grade. The family is well known in the comnumity 
and have many warm friends here. Mr. Easton is an earnest Repub- 
hcan in his pohtical views, and in 1904 was elected to the office of 
supervisor of his township, in wliich capacitv he served for a year. He 
has been a school director for a number of years, and the cause of edu- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 071 

cation finds in him a warm friend. In fact he is a recognized supporter 
of all proj;;rc5si\e movements, and his co-o])eration has heen of value in 
measures for the public good. He belongs to the Ivnights of the Mac- 
cabees at Dowagiac. He has known no other home than Cass county 
nor has he wished to change his place of .residence. The lives of such 
men are an iiulication of the attractiveness of the county as a place of 
residence and of the opportunities here afforded to the citizens, for were 
conditions otherwise enterprising men like Mr. Easton would seek homes 
elsewhere. On the contrary the}- recognize that they ha\-e good ad- 
vantages here and they are always laboring to promote the welfare and 
progress of the county, while at the same time carefully conducting pri- 
vate business interests. 

HON. HENRY B. WELLS. 

Hon. Hemy R. Wel'.s. wliose position in public regard has long been 
a creditable and enviable one and who has been entrusted with various 
duties of a public nature, showing the confidence reposed in him by his 
fellow townsmen, makes bis home on Section 28, Wayne township, wiiere 
he conducts and cultivates a farm of two hundred acres. Its excellent 
improvements are indicative of liis progressive spirit, which has been 
manifest in all the associations of public and private life. 

Mr. Wells is a native of the state of New York, his birth having" 
occurred in Otsego county on the 4th of February, 1S29. His father, 
Werden Wells, was a native of Rhode Island and a son of Joshua Wells, 
who was a son of one of seven brothers who came fror.i England and, 
settling in Rhode Island, established the town of Wellsville. When a 
young lad Werden W^ells accompanied his parents on their removal frorrf 
New England to Otsego county. New York, where he acquired his edu- 
cation and was married. In early life he learned the trade of a harness- 
maker and continued in that business for a number of years. He wedded 
Miss Julia Baker, a daughter of Henry Baker and a native of Otsego 
county. New York, wliere they began their domestic life, remaining there 
for a number of years. In 1835, however, the father brought his family 
to Michigan, making his way to Kalamazoo county, where he took up 
government land in Charleston township. It was wild and unimproved, 
but he at once began its cultivation and developed therefrom a good farm, 
which he made his place of residence until he was called to the home l)e- 
yond, when about eighty-five years of age. His first w^ife died when 
forty-five years of age and he afterward wedded Mrs. Elipha Filkins. a 
widow. There were ten children born of the father's first marriage and 
two of the second marriage. Of the first family only three are now living. 

Henry B. Wells, tlie second child and second son horn of that 
union, was a youth of seven years when he accompanied his parents to 
Kalamazoo county, where he remained until nineteen years of age. He 
then came to Cass county in 1848 to enter upon an independent business 



672 HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY 

career here. He had mastered the branches of learning taught in the 
little log schoolhoiisfs of llie early days and feeling the necessity of 
providing for his own support, following his removal to this county, 
he at once began working for the Alichigan Central Railroad Company 
at or near Duvvagiac. He was employed as station hand at Dccalur, and 
about 1 85 1 he took the contract for loading piles for the railroad com- 
pany, which supplied him with an engine and train. He afterward made 
arrangements to run a construction train for tlic company and continued 
in that department of the railroad service until 1854, when he was called 
upon to take charge of the construction of the St. ^lary ship canal, which 
was to be completecr by the following ]May. He pushed the work for- 
ward so vigorously that he had fulfilled the terms of the contract by 
December of the same year. In 1905, fifty years after the work was 
completed, he made a visit to the canal. Following its building he re- 
turned to the Michigan Central Railroad Compan}-, which he repre- 
sented as wood and lumber inspector for a number of years. He was 
afterward made conductor on a regular train of that line running from 
Marshall to Chicago, in which capacity he served for about fifteen years. 
Each step in his career has been a forward one. He has eagerly watched 
his opjKirtunitics for advancement and his capable ser\'ice, unflagging in- 
dustry and promptness in the discbarge of his duties won him recog- 
nition and gained him promotion. Ambitious, however, to engage in 
business on his own account, he at length left the railroad comjjany 
and witii the money which he had saved from his own earnings he em- 
barked in merchandising at Dowagiac, opening a general store in 186G. 
He continued in that business for four years and was then in the grain 
trade for about six years. In 1876 he located upon the farm which he 
had purchased in 1849 ^'"''^ which he had carried on in connection with 
the management of his other business interests from the time that it had 
come into his possession. During a part of that period he had also made 
his home upon the farm. He is now giving his undivided attention to 
agricultural pursuits and is the owner of two hundred acres of land which 
is rich and productive. The fields annually return good harvests and 
there are modern improvements upon the place which indicate a pro- 
gressive spirit. 

In December, 1S54. Mr. Wells was married to Miss Pliebe Carr, 
a daughter of Cary and Eliza (Hazlett) Carr. ]\Irs. Wells was born 
in the Empire state but was brought to Cass county when eleven years 
of age and has resided here continuously since. They now have two 
living children, a son and daughter: Alice, the wife of Judge Harry 
B. Tuthill, of ^Michigan City, Indiana, ; and Elbert C. who is in the 
mail service on the railroad and makes his home in Grand Rapids. 

Mr. Wells is a stanch Republican, having supported the party con- 
tinuously since its organization. He voted for Fillmore in 1852. for 
Fremont in 1856 and Lincoln in i860 and he has since supported each 
presidential nominee of the party. He has been township treasurer and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 673 

supervisor fur six. years and held other local ot'tices. in iHiAj he was 
elected to the leyislalure to represent the northern district of Cass 
county and in ihat position as ni local oflices lie was found worthy the 
trust reposed in him, discharging his duties with credit to himself and 
satisfaction to his coubtitutcnts. In tlie Congregational church at Dow- 
agiac in which he holds membership he has tilled most of the offices, 
acting as treasurer, trustee and in other positions and co-operating in 
many movements for the extension of the influence of the churcli and 
Its power as a moral force m the community. He has been a continuous 
resident of Cass county for hfty-seven years, active ni all things per- 
taining to its good, and now in the evening of life, for he has passetl 
the seventv-seveiith milestone on life's journey, he receives the venera- 
tion and respect whicli should ever be accorded those of similar j'ears 
whose career has been characterized by all that is honorable and straight- 
forward. 

¥. H. ROSS. 

The German poet, Goethe, has said, "JMerit and success go linked 
together," and this statement finds verification in the life record of T. H. 
Ross, who by his diligence and unabating energy acquired the compe- 
tence that now enables him to live retired in the enjoyment of well- 
earnetl ease at his pleasant home in Dowagiac. He was born in Essex, 
New York, August 3, 1S34, a son of Henry H. Ross, wlu) was also a 
native of that county. The paternal grandfather, Daniel Ross, was born 
in Rossiure, Scotland, and following his emigration to the new world 
became a manufacturer at Essex, New York, where he was connected 
with the operation of iron works and also the conduct of a lumber indus- 
try. Henry H. Ross followed the acquirement of his literary educa- 
tion by the study of law and became a practicing attorney in the village 
of Essex, New York, where his last days were passed. He was one of 
the electors on the presidential ticket when Zachary Taylor was chosen 
chief executive of the nation. His ability in the trial of important law 
cases won him prominence and enabled him to command high fees. For 
a single case he received ten thousand dollars. His mind was keenly 
analytical, logical and inductive and he had comprehensive knowledge 
of the principles of jurisprudence and displayed great accuracy in their 
application to the points at issue. He filled the office of judge of the 
circuit court in New York and was also a general of the state militia, 
serving as aid-de-camp on the staff of General McComb at the battle of 
Plattsburg. Fie lived to be sevciit_\'-two years of age and was regarded 
as one of the most prominent and honored men in his jxartion of the 
Empire state. His wife bore the maiden name of Susanna Blanchard. 
and was a daughter of Judge Blanchard of Salem. New York, who was 
of French Huguenot descent and became a distinguished attorney of the 
Empire state. Mrs. Ross was also a representative of the family of Dr. 
Proudfoot, who was a noted Presbyterian minister. She was reared and 



674 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

educated in Salem, which was tlie place of her birth and she lived to be 
seventy-two years of age. In the family were seven children, two daugh- 
ters and five sons, all of whom reached adult age. while the daughters 
and two of the sons are yet living, namely : John, who resides in Platts- 
burg. New York, where he is connected with manufacturing interests ; 
Frances Ellen ; and one daughter who is living in New York City. 

¥. H. Ross of this review was the third in order of birth of the 
seven children. He acquired a common school education in Essex and 
was graduated at Burlington College. He studied law l^ut on account 
of his eyesight was compelled to relinquish the plan of following the 
profession and came west to Detroit, where he entered upon his business 
career as a clerk in a hardware store. In i860 he removed to Dowagiac 
and established a hardware business on his own account, conducting the 
.«ame with success until 1886, when he disposed of his stock and turned 
his attention to the real estate, loan and insurance business, in which he 
soon secured a good clientage, continuing in that business until 1901, 
when he retired altogether from active connection with commercial or 
industrial interests. Fie won a fair amount of prosperity in his under- 
takings and in fact accumulated capital sufficient to now enable him 
to rest in the enjoyment of his fruits of his former toil, having all of 
the necessities and comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 

Mr. Ross was married in 1S59 to Miss Frances Dixon, daughter of 
Captain William Dixon, of Burlington, Vermont. She was born in that 
city, where her girlhood days were passed and her education was acquired. 
Two children have blessed this union: Frances Minnie, at home; and 
Susanna D., who became the wife of R. W. Sheldon and died, leaving a 
son, Frederick R., who is the only grandchild of Mr. and Mrs. Ross. 
In his political affiliation IMr. Ross is independent, voting for the candi- 
dates whom he regards at best qualified for office. He has served as 
president of the village board, but has never been an office seeker and 
has refused to become a candidate. Fie l>elongs to the ^lasonic frater- 
nity, in which he has attained the Royal Arch degree. For many vears 
he has been identified witli the interests of Dowagiac, his residence here 
covering four decades. The town contained only about seven hundred 
inhabitants when he arrived, and from that time to the present he has 
been closely associated with its business interests and its material, in- 
tellectual, moral and social progress. His life has been actuated bv no 
mad rush for wealth, for he has been content with a fair share of the 
world's goods and is now enjoying life in well-earned rest. 

CHARLES T. AMSDEN. 

Charles T. Amsden. the secretary- of the Dowagiac Cas & Fuel 
Company and also partner in a grocers- enterprise of this citv, possesses 
excellent business and executive ability that have gained him prominence 
and won his success in his business operations. He was bom in Red 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 675 

Wing, iMinnesota, on tlie 31st of October, 1856. The ancestral home 
of the family in this country' was in New York and one of its representa- 
tives ser\ed as a soldier in the war of 1812. The Amsdens came of 
English hncage. George W. Amsden, the father of our subject, was born 
in New York and came to ^Michigan m 1857, while at the present writ- 
ing, in 1905, he is living in Baldwin. Kansas. Following the occupa- 
tion of farming throug-hout his entire business career, he located on a 
farm in Wayne township when he took up his abode in Cass county 
and while residing here served as supervisor of Wayne township for 
a number of years. He was at one time an active and valued member 
of the ^lasonic fraternity and his political support has long been given 
to the Republican party. He now makes his home in Baldwin, Kansas, 
at the age of eighty years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Caroline Turner, is a native of Ohio. She belongs to the Congregational 
church. In their family were seven children: Israel, deceased; Charles 
T., of this review; Israel, the second of the name, who has also passed 
away; Lois, the wife of Roland E. Alorse, a grocery merchant of 
Dowagiac: Clr.ra, the wife of William Stillwell, a farmer of Ocosto, 
Washington; Ida, the wife of A. C. Vaughan. who is also a farmer of 
Ocosto; and Daniel C, who is engaged in the hardware business at 
Dinuba, California. 

Mr. Amsden of this review was reared to farm life and e;u-ly became 
familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agricult- 
urist. Fie was only about a year old when brought by his parents 
to Michigan and he pursued his education in the schools of Cassopolis, 
after which he engaged in teaching school for four years. He then 
became connected with mercantile interests as a clerk in the employ 
of Mosher & Palmer, grocers of Dowagiac, with whom he remained 
for four years. He then embarked in the grocery business on his own 
account in association with James P. Bond, and that partnership was 
maintained for four years. In 18S8 Mr. Amsden and Julius Becraft 
purchased the Dowagiac Republican and in the second year thereafter 
Mr. Amsden retired and embarked in the grocery business in connection 
with Roland E. ^lorse. with whom he is still associated, their business 
being a profitable enterprise of the city. In 1891 the Dowagiac Gas & 
Fuel Company was organized and the following year the plant was 
installed. Mr. Amsden has been secretary and manager since that time 
and devotes the greater part of his attention to the duties of this office 
in connection with the management of the interests of the gas company, 
which has given to its patrons good service and is a valued industrious 
enterprise of the city. 

In 18S2 Mr. Amsden was united in marriage to Mrs. Susan E. Jewel, 
a native of Cass county and a daughter of John N. and Mary A. 
(Bonnell) Jewel. Her father was a farmer by occupation. In his 
fraternal relations ]Mr. Amsden is a IMason, having attained high rank 
in the craft, for he is now a Knight Templar and a Shriner. He also 



676 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

belongs to the Elks lodge, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Legion of 
Honor and the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is an unfaltering 
Republican, and has ber\-ed for two terms as city treasurer, as city clerk 
for one term and as alderman for the second ward for two temis. In 
the discharge of his official duties he displays the same fidelity and care 
which arc manifest in the management of his private business interests 
and in Dowagiac he has a wide and favorable acquaintance resulting 
from a genial manner and an upright life. 

THEODORE F. WILBER. 

Theodore F. Wilber, an honored veteran of the Ci\il war, who 
enlisted in defense of the Union when only seventeen years of age, 
is now living in Dowagiac. He was born in Seneca county, New York, 
at the family home on the west bank of Cayuga Lake, June 12, 1846. 
His father, Gideon S. W'ilber, was also a native of Seneca county, 
where he resided until 185.1, when with his family he came to the 
middle west, settling first on a farm in Wayne township, Cass county, 
where he lived for about a year. In the spring of 1S55 he lx>ught a 
farm in L-a Grange township, removed to that property and continued 
to make his home there throughout his remaining- days. His entire 
life was devoted to general agricultural pursuits and he tilled the fields 
and cultivated the crops until his life's labors were ended, being a dili- 
gent, energetic man. He was also a public-spirited citizen and his 
fellow townsmen, reci^gnizing his worth and loyalty, frequently called 
him to positions of trust and responsibility. He held niany offices 
during the years of his residence in this county. He was superintend- 
ent of the poor for about fifteen years and was deputy sheriff for two 
years. He gave his political allegiance to the Republican party from 
the time of its organization, watched with interest the progress of 
events in the south prior to the Civil War and when the Republican 
party was formed to meet existing conditions, he joined its ranks and 
was one of its most loyal advocates. For forty years he was a reader 
of the semi-weekly New York Trihiiiic and at one time was the only 
subscriber to the paper in this part of the countiy. He was well known 
in the county as a man of public spirit, interested in everything relating 
to the material, intellectual and moral as well as political progress of 
the comnnmity, and he assisted in building three different churches, 
although he did not ally himself with any denomination. He was, how- 
ever, a man of high moral principles and genuine worth who was re- 
liable in business afTairs and at all times commanded and merited the 
confidence and esteem of those with whom he came in contact. He 
married Miss Louisa M. Hause, also a native of Seneca county, New 
York, and a daughter of John Hause, whose birth occurred in the Em- 
pire state and who died in Cass county at the age of eighty-three years. 
The death of Gideon Wilber occurred when he had reached the vener- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY G7T 

able age of eighty-five years. In his family were five children, one daugh- 
ter and four sons, all of whom are living with one exception. 

Theodore V. Wilber, the second child and eldest son, was about 
eight years of age when brought by his parents to Alichigan and has since 
remained a resident of Cass county. He began his education in the 
public schools of New York and continued his studies in the district 
schools of LaGrange township. Through the summer months he aided 
in the work of the fields and remained at home until seventeen years of 
age, when, ni response to his country's need, he enlisted as a private 
of Company yi. First ^Michigan Cavalry, in 1S63. With that command 
he served until the close of the war and was then sent among the Indians 
on tiie frontier to aid in the suppression of the uprisings among the red 
race, lie thus did duty in the far west until March, 1866, after serving 
for nearl\- three years, lie was ever a faithful and loyal soldier, never 
faltering in the performance of any duty that devolved upon him whether 
it led him to the firing line, stationed him on the lonely picket line or 
called him to the frontier. 

When the war ended IMr. Wilber returned to his old home in La- 
Grange townsliip and resumed farming on his father's place. Fie gained 
intimate knowledge of the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for 
the crops and v.-as thus well qualified to carry on farm work on his own 
account when he estal^lished a home for himself. Fie was married on the 
24th of Decemlx^r, 1868, to JNIiss Fannie Jennings, a daughter of Milton 
and Margaret ( Burns) Jennings. Fler father was born in Connecticut. 
Her mother died when Mrs. Wilber was only two years old. There 
were three children in the family, the eldest being Charles, who en- 
listed for service as a soldier in the Civil war and was killed in battle. 
The elder daughter. Martha, is now deceased, leaving Mrs. Wilber, the 
youngest member of the family, as the only one now surviving with the 
exception of a half sister, for the father was married twice. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilber have one son, Fred J., who is a civil engineer, who was 
graduated on the comjiletion of the engineering course in the Michigan 
state university at Ann Arbor in 1900 and is now located in Buffalo, 
New York. 

Mr. Wilber is executor for the father's estate, comprising two hun- 
dred and si.xtv acres of land, and in the management of this property dis- 
plays good business ability and executive force. He belongs to H. C. 
Gilbert Post, G. A. R., of Dowagiac. and is now senior vice commander. 
He has always taken an active part in the work of the Grand Army of 
the Republic and is a stalwart advocate of the principles upon which 
this order is based. Fle enjoys recounting- incidents of army life around 
its campfires amid tlie genial companionship of his old army comrades. 
He was but seventeen years of age when he enlisted and twenty years 
of age wlien honora1>ly discharged and was therefore not a \-oter until 
one year after he had completed his term of military sendee. His first 
presidential liallot wa"^ cast for General Grant and he has always been 



678 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

an advocate of tlie Republican party. He has resided in this county for 
a hall century and is now the only \\'ilher here representing- his father's 
descenclants. He is well known and his strong and salient character- 
istics have been such a.^ have won for him favorable regard from his 
lellowmen. Great changes have occurred since he came to the county 
as the work of improvement has been carried forward and i\Ir. Wilber's 
mind reverts liack to the time when much of the land was still unculti- 
vated, when there were considerable stretches of fort-^t }et uncut and 
when several of the towns which are now the centers of business and com- 
mercial enterprise had not yet been founded. He has ever been flcep'y 
interested in the work oi development and has borne his full share in 
this ta.'ik, mauifestir.g at all times the same loyalty which he displayed 
when upon southern battlefields he followed the stars and stripes. 

H. A. CREGO. 

H. A. Crego, known tlirougbout Cass county as Squire Crego, has 
for thirty-six years been justice of the peace, and no stronger evidence 
could be given <if ca])able service and impartial decisiijus than the fact 
that he has so long been retained in the ofifice. He has lived in Cass 
county from an earl)- day and imw makes his home on section 29, Vol- 
inia township. Aloreover he is entitled to representation in this volume 
as a native son of Michigan, his birth having occurred on the 2nd of 
August, 1S40, in Lenawee county, at the junction of the Chicago and 
Monroe turnpikes. His parents were Rulef D. and Eliza (Arms) 
Crego. The father was iMirn in the jMohawk valley of New York and 
there remained until about thirty years of age, when, believing that he 
might enjov better business opportunities in the new but growing west, 
he made his way to Michigan, settling in Lenawee county. He had 
been married in New York. His first wife was Mary J. Strannahan 
and there were ten children born of that marriage. Following the 
death of the mother the. fatlier married again. His wife was a native 
of Conway, Franklin county. Massachusetts, and was there reared. She 
first married Ichabod Nelson, and it was subsequent to his death that 
she gave her hand in marriage to Rulef D. Crego. By this marriage 
there were born three children, nf whom Squire Cregn is the second. 
The other two, however, died in infancy, so that the subject of this 
review is the only surviving member of the entire family. 

When only two years old Squire Crego was brought to Cass coun- 
ty by his parents, the family locating in Newberg township, where he 
was reared in the usual maimer of farm lads of that period and locality. 
He was educated in the district schools and shared with the family in 
the pioneer experiences incident to the establishment of a home on the 
frontier. The father died when the son was eighteen years of age and he 
and his mother remained in Newberg township for about four years 
thereafter, when Mrs. Crego also passed away. Squire Crego, how- 





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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 679 

ever, continued to reside in the same township for some time there- 
after and was married there rm the 14th of Februaiy, 1S63, to Miss Mar}- 
Lyncli, a daughter of George and Rebecca Lynch, who lived in Adams- 
ville, New York, and came from the Empire state to Michigan. The 
birth of Mrs. Crego occurred in Adamsville, and at her death she left 
one son, Charles C. Crego, who is now a salesman in a department store 
in Washington. In 1S69 Mr. Crego was married to Miss Phebe Hin- 
shaw, who died leaving one son, Frank R., now a resident of Volinia 
township. In 1897 occurred the marriage of Squire Crego and Mary 
Jane Newton, who was Ixirn upon the farm where she now resides Jan- 
uary I, 1853, her parents being George and Esther (Green) Newton, 
who came to this county in pioneer days, the father in 1831 and the 
mother in 1S34. The name of Xewton has since been associated with 
the history of progress and development here and has always stood as 
a synonym of good citizenship. 

Squire Crego has been a life-long farmer and is now following 
agricultural pursuits on section 29, Volinia township. He has voted 
witli the Republican party since age gave to him the right of franchise, 
and has been honored with a number of local positions of public tmst, 
having served as constable and as township clerk in Newberg township, 
as highway commissioner of Volinia township and as justice of the 
peace for about thirty-six years. His positions were strictly fair and 
impartial and have "won golden opinions from all sorts of people." 
He belongs to the Methodist Protestant church and is a meml)er of the 
Masonic lodge at Volinia and also the Knights of the Maccabees. He 
has been a resident of the county for sixty-four years and in 1905 was 
elected president of the Pioneers' Association. 

C. L. SHERWOOD. 

C. L. Sherwood is the pioneer druggist of Dov.agiac and has been 
connected with this line of commercial enterprise in Michigan and else- 
where for fifty-two years. The consensus of public opinion is altogether 
favorable regarding his business qualifications, reliabilitv and enterpri.^e 
and no history of the commercial development of Dowagiac would be 
complete without the life record of Mr. Sherwood. He was born in 
Erie county, Pennsylvania, on the 4th of September, 1S3S. and is of 
English lineage, the family having been founded in .Ajuerica by three 
brothers of the name who came from England to the new world at an 
early perif>fl in its colonization. One .of the brothers located in New 
York, one in the south and the other in New England. The grandfather 
of our suljject was John Sherwood, a resident of the Empire state. His 
son, P. W. Sherwood, was born in Tompkins county. New York, and 
became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. lie was reared 
and educated in Pennsylvania and. determining to devote his life to the 
work of the gospel, he prepared for the ministry and for forty-five years 



680 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

labored earnestly in advancing the cause of the church in Pennsylvania. 
Xew \'(irk and Ohio, where lie tilled various pastorates. His intluence 
was a potent element t'^r gond in every community in which he lived 
and his iiicnuu'v remains as a blessed benediction to many who knew 
him and came uniler his teaching-. His last days were spent in Ohio, 
where he jiassed away at the age of eighty-three years. In early man- 
hood he wedded Miss Orilla Frye, a native of Vermont, who. however, 
was renretl in Eric county, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of 
John l''rye, who was of English descent. Her death occurred in 1S62 
when she was almut forty-five }erir*.,of age. Four children had been 
born of tliat marriage, twn sons and ! a' • daughters, of whom C. L. Sher- 
wood of this review i« the eldest, 'iiic 'others are: Lucy, the wife of 
Gibson J. Straniiahan, >>{ Liir \, Ohio, where he is engaged in Inisiness 
as an enipl(.i}'ec of th.e Standard Oil Company; Mary, the wife of P. T. 
Mowry, an insurance alent of Chiaago, Illinois; and Oscar M., who 
died when about thirty-sTx y-Mi s "of age, was a resident of Dowagiac, 
and was a druggist. 

C. L. Sherwood spent the first thirteen years of his life in the state 
of his nativity and then moved to Xew York. In 1859 he returned to 
Pennsylvania, settling at Union City, and in 1S6S he came to Dowagiac, 
Michigan, where he has since made his home. He entered the drug 
business at Holley, Xew York, and continued in the drug trade at 
Union City, Pennsylvania. On coming to Dowagiac he purchased the 
drug store of IToward & Halleck and he also purchased the stores of 
M. B. Hollister and .Asa Huntington. He has since continued in busi- 
ness and is today the oldest druggist of the city. He has a well equipped 
establishment, neat and attractive in its arrangement and he carries a 
large and well selected line of drugs and sundry goods. His trade has 
constantly- grown with the dex'elopment of the town and surrounding 
country and almost from the beginning the business has proved a pro.fit- 
able one, so that as the years have passed Mr. Sherwood has become 
one of the substantial citizens of his community. 

In 1862 Mr. Sherwood was united in marriage to ^liss Mary W. 
Wood and unto them were lx)rn two children, but both died in child- 
hood. Mr. Sherwood is identified with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the Knights 
of Honor. He is also a very prominent Mason, having attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish rite, while with the X'obles of the 
Mystic Shrine he has crossed the sands of the desert. Plis political 
allegiance has long been given to the Republican party and he ser\'ed 
as postmaster in Pennsylvania under appointment of .\braham Lincoln. 
He has also been postmaster of Dowagiac for eleven years under the 
administrations of presidents Grant and Hayes and he was mayor of 
Union City, Pennsylvania. X'o public trust reposed in him has ever 
been betrayed in the slightest degree, hi? official service being character- 
ized by unfaltering devotion to duty. He has been in business in Dow- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 681 

agiac for tliirty-eight years, tlie firm being now Sherwood & Burlinganie, 
and in addition to liis store he owns valuable property interests here, 
including' two business blocks, houses and lots. All that he possesses 
has been ac(juired thmugh hi> own enterprising efforts and his life rec- 
ord slious what may Ijc accomplished by unremitting diligence and 
energy that never llags. He has not made the accumulation of wealth, 
however, his sole end and aim in life, for he has had due regard to the 
duties of citizenship, of home life and of social relations and is recog- 
nized as a man of genuine personal worth. 

GILEl' RT .COXKLIN. 

Gilbert Conklin. a prominent farmi.»- living in Silver Creek town- 
sliip who-e capable management " Hs business interests is indicated by 
the success that follows his ei ■ • . was.' born in Otsego county. New 
York, March 17, 1830. He i;, i.c eldest child'of Abram and Belinda 
(Gilbert) Conklin. Tlie family is descended from three brothers, who 
came from England to .Anierica in early colonial days. The paternal 
grantlfalher, Simeon Conkbii. was a native of New York, born in Otsego 
county. There he devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits, spend- 
ing his last days upon his farm. 

Abram Conklin, father of our subject, was l)orn in Otsego county, 
and in 1851 canie to Michigan, locating first upon a farm known as the 
Hess property in LaGrange township. The following year, however, 
he removed to Silver Creek township and took up his abode on tlie east 
shore of Indian lake, where he developed and improved a farm, giving 
his attention to its cultivation for many years thereafter. In fact he 
resided upon that property until his death, which occurred when he was 
in his seventy-sixth year. He married IMiss Belinda Gilbert, a native 
of Herkimer county. New York, and a daughter of William B. Gilbert 
of the same county. He was of French descent. ]Mrs. Belinda Conk- 
lin died upon the home farm in Silver Creek township at the age of 
fifty-two vcars. There were eight childreii in the family, one of whrmi 
died in infancy. The others are: Gilbert, of this review; Simeon; 
Abram; Jane; George, who died at the age of fourteen; Charles: and 
Lydia. 

Gilbert Conklin was reared in the county of his nativity and ac- 
quired his education there in the district schools. He came to Cass 
county, jMichigan, with his pareiits and remained with them until his 
marriage, in the meantime assisting in the work of the fields and the 
development of a new farm. On the T3th of February. 1862. he was 
joined in wedlock to Miss IVTaria Bedford, a daughter of George and 
Ann (Smith) Bedford, both of whom were born in Lincolnshire. Eng- 
land. They spent their childlmod there in that country, were married 
there and in 1835 crossed the .Atlantic to America, locating near Syra- 
cuse, New York, v/here thev remained for about six years. In 184 t 



682 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Ihey came to JNIichigan, settling in Silver Creek township, Cass county, 
where they spent their remaining days, both attaining an advanced age, 
the father passing away wlien he IkuI reached the age vi seventy-tive 
years, while the mother's death (icciuTed when she was seventy-four 
years of age. In their family were six daughters and two sons, of 
whom three died in infanc}-. Two of the number were born in New 
York, while the others were natives of Silver Creek township. There 
are four daughters and a son living. Mrs. Conklin, who was the third 
child and second daughter, was torn in Silver Creek township, June 5, 
1842, and has been a life-long resident of this part of the county. At 
the usual age she began her education in the district schools and after- 
ward she engaged in teaching, which profession she followed success- 
fully up to the time of her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Conklin began 
their domestic life upon the farm where they now reside, living first in 
a small frame house which was practically nothing more than a little 
shanty twelve by twenty feet. .As the years passed by, three children 
were added to the family: William G., who was born in 1863 and died 
in 1893 at the age of thirty years; Linda, who is an artist now living 
in Chicago, Illinois; and Dr. Alice I. Conklin, a practicing physician 
residing in Chicago. 

Mr. Conklin has extensive and valuable landed interests in this 
county, his farm comprising three hundred and forty-eight acres of rich 
land which responds readily to the care and cultivation he bestows upon 
the fields, bringing forth rich and abundant harvests. He has long 
been recognized as an enterprising agriculturist of his community and 
be has a well improved farm, using good machinery to facilitate the 
work of the fields, lie has been almost a life-long resident of the 
county, coming here in his boyhood days and his residence here now 
covers more than a half century, during which time he has witnessed 
the greater part of the development and improvement of this portion 
of the state. He has been a stanch champion of the cause of temper- 
'ance and is an earnest prohibitionist, working eagerly for the success 
of his party. At one time he was supervisor of his township. He is 
a member of the ^Methodist Episcopal church and is district trustee. 
His life has been honorable, his actions manly and sincere, for at all 
times his conduct has been actuated by Christian principles and devo- 
tion to truth, justice and right. 

/ - ' ALBON C. TAYLOR. 

Albon C. Taylor, supervisor of the first ward of Dowagiac, w^as 
born in Franklin count}-. New York. April 8, 1861. His father, Mar- 
shall W. Taylor, was also a native of that .state and during the period 
of the Civil war espoused the L^nion cause, donned his country's uniform 
and went forth to defend the stars and stripes. He died while serving 
as a soldier. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Jane Abbott, was 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 683 

a native of Toronto, Canada, and was taken by her parents to the state 
of New York when only four years of age. By her marriage she be- 
came the mother of three sons: Arthur J., who is now residing in 
Malone, Franklin county, New York; George E., who makes liis home 
in Kalamazoo, Michigan; and A. C, of this review. 

Mr. Taylor, the youngest of the family, was reared in the place 
of his nativity until sixteen years of age and during that period acquired 
his education in the district schools. He then left home and made his 
way westward to i\Iichigan. settling in Allegan county, where he was 
employed at farm labor until about the time he attained his majority. 
He then entered upon railroad work' in the employ of the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railroad Company, securing a position in the freight department 
at Kalamazoo. He came to Dowagiac about 1892 as foreman of the 
freight house for the Michigan Central Company, spending six years 
in tliat capacity, after whicli he iUMgncJ his position and became con- 
nected with the Dowagiac ^Manufacturing Company in the molding 
department. He has since been with the Round Oak Stove Company, 
with which he occupies a good position. 

Mr. Taylor was married in February, 1891, to I\Iiss Irma Thomp- 
son, a daugliter of Dr. W. C. and Kate Thompson. She was born in 
St. Joseph county, ^Michigan, and has spent her entire life in this county. 
By her marriage she has become the mother of two sons, Curtis and 
Glenn. 

Mr, Taylor votes with the Repu])lican party and has taken an active 
and helpful interest in its work and in promoting its success. He was 
also supervisor of the first ward in 1904 and again in 1905 and is now 
filling the position. In the spring of 1906 he was elected as city treas- 
urer of Dowagiac, Michigan, and is the present inannhent of this office. 
He is vice-president of the Round Oak Relief .Association and was one 
of its charter members and organizers. He also belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen camp. Coming to Michigan when but a youth, he has re- 
sided here continuously since, alid his life history is well know to the 
citizens of Cass county among whom he has now lived for many years. 

JOHN MATER. 

Among those to \\hnm fate has vouchsafed an honorable retire- 
ment from labor in recognition of former toil and activity, is John 
Mater, a retired farmer li\-ing in Dowagiac. He was born in Parke 
county, In<liana, June 7, 1S3S. His father, George ]\Iater, was a native 
of Pennsylvania, wliere he spent the days of his youth. The paternal 
grandfather was George ]\rater. Sr., who for seven years was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary war under General Washington and valiantly 
fought for the independence of the nati'.m. On leaving the Keystone 
state George ^Mater, father of our subject, remc'ved to Ohio and after- 
ward to Indiana, whence, in 1844, he came to Michigan, settling in 



«8i HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Pokag-on townsliip. Cass cminty. about three miles south of Dowagiac. 
At a later day he returned to Indiana but again came to Alichigan, and 
then once more went to Indiana, while his death occurred in Illinois 
in 1S75, when he was seventy-four years of age. His wife, who in 
her maidenhood was Elizabeth Crum, was a daughter of Zachariah 
Crum, who was also a Revcjlutinnan,- soldier, being with the army under 
command of General Antliony Wayne. The Mater family is of Ger- 
man lineage, while the Crum family is of Holland descent, i^ii's. Mater 
died when forty-five years of age. By her marriage she had become 
the mother of thirteen children. 

John Mater of this review was the seventh child and third son. He 
remained under the parental roof until fourteen years of age, when his 
mother died. It was not long after this that he started out in life on 
his own account, working at farm labor or at anything he could find 
to do which would yield liim an h(jnest living. When al)oul fifteen 
years of age he returned to ^vlichigan. where he has since made his 
home. He was \-arinusly employed liere until after the outbreak of the 
Civil war. when, on the 12th of August, 1861. he enlisted as a member 
of Com])any B, Xinth Michigan X'ulunteer Infantry, joining the army 
as a private. He served until October 7, 1862, when he was honoralily 
discharged on account of disability. On the 4th of Januar\', however, 
he re-enlisted in the same company and regiment to which he had for- 
merly belonged ami served until the close of the war. He was appointed 
coqioral six months after his first enlistment and was made sergeant in 
the fall of ^i^('^. He was altogether for about three years in the serv- 
ice and pro\-ed a lirave soldier, being a worthy reprcsentati\c of an 
ancestry that furnished several heroes to the Revolutionary war. His 
regiment was talvcn prisoner at Murfreeslx>ro, Tennessee, on tlie 13th 
of July, i8r>2, and was sent to Camp Chase, there remaining until ex- 
changed in the fdllowing Scptcmlier. Mr. Mater became ill anfl for 
this reason was discharged. The regiment was under command of Gen- 
eral Thomas, acting as guard at headquarters, and remained as such 
from the battle of Strme River during the war. Mr. }\[atcr recei\-ed 
his second discharge at Jackson, ^Michigan, and was mustered out at 
Nashville, Tennessee, after wln'ch he returned to his home. 

On the 29th of October, 1865. occurred the marriage of ]\Tr. Mater 
and Miss AH^ina Dewey, a daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Griffin) 
Dewey, both of whom were nati\-es of Indiana and became pioneer set- 
tlers of Cass county, locating in Pokagon township April 21. 1839. She 
is a granddaughter of PTenn,- Dewey, who was also one of the pioneer 
residents of this cr>untv and took up land from the government in Pok- 
agon township, where be de\-eloped a new farm. .\t the time of their 
marriage j\lr. and Mrs. Mater located on a farm in Pokagon township, 
and there resided until about 1890, when he put aside business cares, 
then removing to Dowagiac. For many years !\Ir. Mater successfully 
and ablv carried on the work of the fields, producing good crops and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY Obi 

secm-mg a graiifjino- tiaaiicial income as he placed his grain on the 
market. He was practical and enterprising in all his farm work and 
tlie neat ami thrifty appearance of his place indicated his careful super- 
vision. Unto Air. and Mrs. Alater were born two children : Dr. Elmer 
Lincoln Mater, who is a graduate of the Ciiicago Medical College and 
is now a practicing physician in Dowagiac; and Mary Grace, a teacher, 
who is living in South Haven, Alichigan. 

Air. Alater still owns a farm of eighty-nine acres of rich and pro- 
ductive land, and this returns him a good income. He is a member 
of H. C Gilbert Tost, No. 47, G. A. R., in which he has filled nearly 
all of the offices, including that of commander. He is also a Alason, 
belonging to the Blue lodge and the chapter at Dowagiac. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Alethodist Episcopal church, 
in which he has also held office, taking an active and helpful part in its 
work. He has been a life-long Republican, and has done much for the 
party in tliis community, serving as a delegate to all of the countv con- 
ventions since his return frum the army and doing everything 'in his 
power to promote the growth and insure the success of' the political 
principles in which he believes. He represents an old pioneer family 
of the county, having for sixty-two years resided within its borders and 
at all limes and under all circumstances he has been as loyal to his coun- 
try and her welfare as when he followed the stars and st'ripes on south- 
ern battlefields. Fidelity to duty has ever been one of his strong and 
salient characteristics and his integrity in business, his loyalty in citizen- 
ship and his honor in all life's relations have made him one o'f the repre- 
sentative men of the county. 

ALONZO J. HARDY. 

Alonzo J. Hardy, who after many years" connection with farming 
interests in Alichigan is now living retired in Dowagiac. certainly de- 
serves the rest which is now \-ouchsafed to him and his life record brings 
to mind the lines of the poet: 

"How blest is he who crowns in shades like these 
A youth of labor with an age of ease."' 

Air. Hardy was born in Otsego county. New York. June 6. 1S43. 
His paternal grandfather, William Hardy, was of English lineage, but 
the family was established in America in colonial days and William 
Hardy was born in New Y'ork. His son. Peter Hardy, was a native 
of Otsego county, that state, was reared to the occupation of farming 
and made that pursuit his life work. He continued to reside in the 
east until 1S62, when, thinking tliat he might enjoy better business op- 
portunities in the middle west, he came to Alichigan, settling in La- 
Grange township. Cass cnunty, where he secured a tract of land and 
engaged in farming until 1S69. He then removed to Dowagiac and 



680 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

retired from active business, spending- his remaining days in the enjoy- 
ment of a well-earned rest. He lived to he seventy-two years of age. 
In the Methodist Episcopal church he held membership and in its work 
was deeply interested, doing all in his power to promote the various 
church activities. His life was ever upright and honorable and com- 
mended him to the good will and trust of his fellow men. Prior to the 
Civil war he was a stanch opponent of the system of slavery and advo- 
cated the cause of aliolition, and when the Republican party was formed 
to prevent the further extension of sla\-ery he joined its ranks. He was 
well known in the county as a man of the highest respectability and 
worth. He married Miss Tydia Huntington, also a native of Otsego 
county, New York, and a daughter of Benjamin Huntington, who came 
of New England ancestry, removing from Vermont to the Empire 
state. Mrs. Hardy died in Cass county when seventy-nine years of 
age. In the family were but two sons, A. J., and George Hardy, 
who live together in Dnwagiac. 

■ Mr. Hardy of this review spent his boyhood days in the place of 
his nativity. At the usual age he entered the common schools and 
therein mastered the elementary branches of English learning. He was 
nineteen years of age when in TRr)2 he responded to the countr\-'s call 
for aid, enlisting as a member of Company D. One Ihuulred and Fifty- 
second regiment of New York volunteers as a private. He served for 
three years and took part in a number of hotly contested engagements, 
including the battles of Cold Flarlmr, Reams Station and Petersburg. 
He was with the army as it followed Lee up to Appomattox, where the 
Confederate forces .surrendered. I\Tr. Hardy then went with his com- 
mand to Washington and participated in the Grand Review in that city. 
which was the most celebrated military pageant e\'er seen on the western 
hemisphere, thousands of soldiers passing in review before the stand 
upon which stood the President watching the return of the victorious 
army, whose efforts and bravery had saved the Union. Mr. Hardy was 
mustered out at .Albany, New York, having made an excellent military 
record. 

After receiving an honorable discharge he came to Michigan in 
1865, making his way direct to Cass county, at which time he located 
upon the farm in LaGrange township that he still owns. For many 
years thereafter he was engaged in general agricultural pursuits and as 
a companion and helpmate for life's journey he chose ^liss Eina E. 
Elliott, to whom he was married in this countv on the 2d of September, 
1868. She is a daughter of the Rev. G. C. and Calesta (ElliotC) Elliott. 
!x)th of whom were natives of the Mohawk valley of New York, whence 
they came westward to Michigan in 186S. settling in LaGrange town- 
ship, Cass county. Mrs. Plardy was born in Otsego coimty. New York, 
May 15, T845, ^"cl was the third in order of birth in a family of five 
children, two daughters and three sons. Her father was a minister of 
the ]\Tethodist Episcopal church and she was reared in a household char- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 6S7 

acterized by culture, refinement and high prmciples. She acquired her 
literary education at Cazenovia Seminary. Xew "^'ork, and, like the 
others of the family, enjoyed excellent educational privileges. 

At the time of his marriage Mr. Hardy took his bride to his farm 
and there lived ci.intinuou.sly until 1S85, when he removed to Dowagiac. 
He continued to engage in the cultivation of his farm, however, until 
about 1899, when he retired from active business life. He has a valu- 
able tract of land of one hundred and ninety acres, well improved. The 
entire place is under the plow save but about fifteen acres, which is 
covered with timber. He brought his fields under a high state of culti- 
vation, built good fences and added modern improvements to his farm 
and as the }ears passed he harvested g(jod crops. Thus he added an- 
nually to his income year by year until he has accumulated a gratifying 
competence that now makes it possible for him to rest from further 
labor. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hardy have been born two children, a daughter 
and son. The former, Grace, is now the wife of Dr. H. T. Cole, a 
practicing physician located in the Champlain Building, Chicago. The 
son, Dr. F. C. Hardy, is a jiracticing physician of Kendalville, Indiana. 
Mrs. Cole has a son, Gordon Hardy Cole, and Dr. Hardy has one child, 
Flint Weidla Hard)'. 

In his political views A. J. Hardy has been a stanch Repulilican 
from the time age conferred upon him the right of franchise and he has 
done all in his power to promote the growth and insure the success of 
his party. He belongs to A. C. Gilbert Post, G. A. R., and thus main- 
tains pleasant relations with his old army comrades. He has also taken 
the third degree of the Blue lodge in ilasonry, while his wife is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. For forty years Mr. Flardy 
has resided in this county and his wife for almost a similar period. 
They are a highly esteemed couple, having many warm friends, while 
the hospitality of their own home is greatly enjoyed by those who know 
them. Mr. Hardy has led a busy and useful life, has won success 
through earnest effdrt at farming and is now living at ease in a pleas- 
ant home m Dowagiac. 

DEXTER GUSHING. 

Dexter Gushing was numbered among the old settlers of Cass 
county who aided in making it what it is today. His strenuous labor 
and progressive spirit contributed to die result that has been accom- 
plished in the way of general improvement and progress. He resided 
on section 19, Silver Greek township. He was born in Oneida county. 
New York, near the town of Deerfield, April 17, 1828. His father, 
James H. Cushine, was a native of Massachusetts, in which state he 
spent his boyhood and youtli. His father. ^lathew Gushing, is sup- 
posed to have been a native of England and at all events it is known 



6SS HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

tliat the family was established in America in early colonial da}s. The 
mother oi our subject bore the maiden name of Amy Dewey. She was 
born in ^Massachusetts and was of Scotch-English lineage. In New 
York she gave her hand in marriage to James H. Cushing and they 
resided for some time in Oneida county or until 1S51, when they came 
to Michigan, making their way direct to Cass county. Tiiey then set- 
tled in Sihxr Creek township, where Mr. Cushing jnirchased a farm 
upon which few improvements had been made. He began the further 
development of this place and continued to carry on agricultural pur- 
suits here with excellent success, transforming his property into a well 
developed farm, upon which he lived until called to his final rest in his 
seventy-fifth year. His wife was in her eighty-ninth year \vhen she 
passed away. Their family numlicred ten children, five sons and five 
daughters, all of whom reached manliood or womanhood with one ex- 
ception. Three of the sons are yet living at the time of this writing, 
nanicl)- : George, wlnj makes'his home in Dowagiac; David, who is liv- 
ing in Silver Creek t(.\\nship; and Dexter. 

In taking up the i-.crsonal history df Dexter Cushing we present 
to our readers the life record of one who was widely and favorably 
known in this community. He was the third son and sixth child in his 
father's family and was reared in Oneida county. New York, to the age 
of nine years, when his parents removed to Oswego county, that state, 
there residing until 1S52, when they came to Cass county, Michigan, 
and ]\Ir. Cushing nf this review t(j(ik up his alwde in Silver Creek town- 
ship. He was then about twenty-four years of age and he remained 
with his father, assisting him in the work of the home farm until he 
married and establisnecl a home of his own. 

It was on the 31st of January. 1856, that Mr. Cushing was united 
in marriage to Miss Jane Gilbert, a daughter of William B. and Cynthia 
(Sammonds) Gilbert, who came to Cass county in 1S38 and were there- 
fore among the early settlers. They located in Silver Creek township, 
establishing a home in the midst of the wilderness and sharing with 
other frontier settlers in the various hard.ships and trials which go to 
make up the life of the pioneer. Mrs. Cushing was born in Otsego 
county. New York, at the family home in the town of Springfield on 
the 23d of September, 1835. and was therefore a little maiden oi three 
summers when she was brought to ^Michigan ISy her parents. She was 
reared under the parental roof with a family that numliered three sons 
and three daughters and she was trained to the duties of the household, 
so that she was well qualified to take charge of a home of her own at 
the time of her marriage. Her education was obtained in the district 
schools. After their marriage the young couple located on a farm on 
section 20, Silver Creek Jtownship, their first home being a little frame 
house eighteen by twenty-two feet. It soon won a wide reputation for 
its generous, cordial and warm hearted hospitality and there were always 
visitors there. Thev lived in this house for about twelve vears and dur- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 689 

ing that time Mr. CushiiiQ cleared and developed one hundred and 
twenty acres of land which \\as all covered with heavy timher when he 
took possession oi that ];lace. In the forest, however, he developed the 
fi.elds and the sunlight soon shone down upon the iil.>wed land an.d 
ripened the harvests. Later Mr. CnshinL;' remi"i\cd from his ori,2;inal 
place to the present hnme not far from the old homestead. He lived 
in the county t( -r about fifty-five years altogether and always gave 
his time and energies to general agricultural pursuits. Me was also 
engaged in the stock husincss. huying, selling and shipping stock for 
about thirty years and finding this a profitable .source of income. At 
the time of his death he owned two hundred acres of land situated on 
sections 19 and 20, and the fanu is a \-aluahle and profluctive one, in- 
dicating in its well ini])ro\-ed appearance the aarcful supervision, practi- 
cal methods and unfaltering energy of the owner. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs, Cushing were 1)om two children: William C., 
who is a merchant at Cushing Corners in this county ; and Jennie, the 
wife of Wallace Trowbridge, a resident farmer of Silver Creek town- 
ship. ^Ir. Cushing always voted with the Democracy after the organi- 
zation of the party and believed that its principles contained the best 
elements of good government. He belonged to the Methodist Epis- 
copal church of Silver Creek township, c<intributed generously to its 
support, took an active part in its work and did all in his power to 
advance the various church activities. He passed the seventy-eighth 
milestone on life's journey and his was a useful and active life that won 
for him the unqualified regard and confidence of his neighlxjrs and 
friends. He could look back to the time when this county was largely 
unimproved. The uncut forests showed that the white man had scarcely 
penetrated into llie interior, for only here and there was to he 
seen smoke rising from a little cabin to show that a home had been 
established in the midst of the wilderness. IMany ccjuditions of life 
were very crude as compared with those of the present day and much 
of the farm work was done by hand. The people depended uprm what 
they raised for the comforts of life and much of the clothing was not 
only made at home l)ut was spun and woven by hand. There has been 
a great transformation in the methods of farming and as the years passed 
by Mr. Cu.shing kept abreast with the progress along agricultural lines. 
On the occasion of his death the following lines appeared in one of the 
local papers : 

"Dexter Cushing, a pioneer of Cass county, died at his home in 
Silver Creek la.st Saturday, September 8. and funeral services were held 
Monday, conducted by Peninsular Lodge F. cS: .'\. M of Dowagiac, of 
which he was one of the oldest members. 

"Mr. Cushing was the son of James Cushing. and was seventy- 
eight years of age. He was both a county and township pioneer, hav- 
ing spent almost his entire life as a tiller of the soil in Silver Creek. 

"He is survived bv a wife and two children. The latter are Will 



6;>0 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Cushingf. storekeeper at Cnshine^ Corner?, and Mrs. Wallace Trri\vl)rid2;e, 
of Indian Lake. One brother. Gcorije, of Dnwac^iac. also 'survives him. 
Another brother, Dave, died last spring;:. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Cushinsj early this year celebrated the fiftieth anni- 
versary of their wedding." 

PIIILO n. BF.CKWITII. 

At the time of his death in iSSq Philo D. Bcckwith had .c:iven 
Dowacfiac its two most important industries — the drill works and the 
stove works. He had given them to the city and the world in the sense 
that he had invented them. But it was even a greater accomplishment 
when he cstabli'^hcd the manufacture of the perfected machinery' on a 
permanent business basis. It is the privilege of few small cities to 
possess institutions of nati<Mial fame. To say that "Dowagiac is the 
home of the Round Oak sto\e" would establish an immediate rclatinn- 
ship between many thou.^ands of homes and this little city in the valley 
of Dowagiac creek. To the millions who dwell beyond the range of 
Dowagiac's influence as a city, there comes an increasing association of 
the name nf city with the name of Round Oak stoves and furnaces. In 
so far as l>-iw:igiac"s dc\clr>pment is the result of her largest iiulustn,' 
—and citizens never fail to ascribe first i)lacc to the stove works in the 
factors of ujibuilding — the late Mr. Bcckwith was a founder of the 
city. Thirty-five years of unremitting industry and business judgment 
and application of singular inventi\-e g-enius built a business that is a;^ 
inseparalilc from Do^^■an■iac's prosperity as the railroad itself. 

The history of the origin and growth of the Round Oak works 
and Mr. Eeckwith's early labors and struggles in establi.shing In's manu- 
facturing enterprises here is recounted in the general history of manu- 
facturing" on other pages. It is ho]ied that in this article the biographer 
may weave together the details of a life which meant so much for 
Dowagiac and the world and satisfy the interest which is everywhere 
felt in the career of a successful man. 

When Mr. Bcckwith came to Dowagiac in 1854, only Iialf a dozen 
years after the founding of the village and when the nnnufacturing 
along the banks of the creek and the few stores on Front street con- 
tained in themselves little promise of the future, he himself had hardly 
made a fair start on his career, although he was nearlv thirtv vears of 
age and doubtless had stored up in mind and body the possibilities of 
the future. His early life could hardly be described as years of oppor- 
tunity. .Mthoudi a descendant of New Fngland ancestors who<;e names 
were associated with events '^ince the landing on Plymouth Rr.ck, he 
was not born in aflluence. and New England hardihood and rusrged 
honesty and thrift were a full total of his inheritance. Ple^.wa^— horn 
in 1825. in what is now the town of F.agle in \\''yoming countv. New 
York. A few vears later his father died, leaving to the widowed mother 






\/ 



2^2^^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 091 

the care and brinsriiig up of the son and a youn.q'er sister. It was hard 
labor with the needle by which she endeavored to eke out her slender 
mean? and provide for herself and children till they should be self- 
supporting. Under such circumstances, and the opportunities of pub- 
lic school education not yet having- been supplied in that part of New 
York, the son Philo lacked the training which we now consider so 
essential to the intrr:duction of hoys into serious life. 

At the age of fourteen he began work in a woolen mill at Eagle, 
owned by a maternal uncle. ITc learned a great deal about the busi- 
ness during the ne.xt two years, but received little pay. He then went 
to live with another uncle, near the city of Rochester, and here had the 
good fortune of attending a district school several months. Many suc- 
cessful men have made such a brief period of education worth as much 
as an entire college course. Thougli his school days ended there, the 
develo])ment of his mental culture and appreciation of the world and the 
best in it continued all his years. .As iiis keen business instinct led him 
step by step to material success, so he was noted for his thorough valua- 
tion of men and affairs, and his culture was of the practical kind that 
is entirely foreign to the superficial veneer laid on by academic training. 

IMr. ljeck\\ith was eighteen years oUl when he married ^liss Cath- 
erine Scott, a gii'l ^vho \\as alsr. born anrl brought up at Eagle, New 
York, and who was his companion and helper throughout the strug- 
gles of his early career and the .success of later years. In 1S44 Mr. 
Beckwith and wife became residents of ^lichigan. He became a jour- 
neyman in a woolen mill at Eattle Creek and later became a workman 
in a machine shop. Practical in his ideas, thrifty and always looking to 
future advancement, he managed, from wages of a dollar a day, to 
save six hundred dollars as the basis for subsequent enterprises. When 
he came to Dowagiac in 1854 he had this amount of capital and the 
accumulated skill and experience of the previous years. It is a A\ell 
known story, and told in detail on other pages, how Mr. Beckwith built 
his first small foundry on Eront street, and with one assistant began 
making plo\vs and doing general repair work, at first relying on horse 
power to run his machineiy : how he next de^•eloped the water power 
on the creek and with the first manufacture of a primitive form of the 
roller grain drill entered upon the first series of the larger mainifactur- 
ing with wlu'ch his name and eiiforts were thereafter associated: how 
he invented and after many discouragements succeeded in making a 
market for a new type of stove, which, in all its later improvements 
for durability and general excellence has not been surpassed ; and finally 
how his factory was remo\-ed to its present site and has grown and 
been enlarged to a mammoth Imsiness institution, which, under the title 
of "P. D. P.eckwith Estate." is a worthy monument to the life and 
Vv-ork of any man. But that the city might not lose the memoiy of 
the man in the material and presen.t business of which he was the founder. 



6ti2 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

his grateful family erected and dedicated to his memor)-, in January, 
1893, the lieautiful Beckwilh INIemorial Theatre, where the expression 
of art and the uplittins' inthiences of life may always he encouraged, 
thus heautifully linking- the aspirations for the artistic and nohle with 
the results of material and practical accomplishment. The theatre, as 
one of the impr>rtant institutions of Dowagiac, has been described on 
other pages. It is not inapt in this connection to quote some of the 
sentences with which Col. R. Q. Jngersoll dedicated the building- to its 
worthy uses, in memory of one "who livetl and labored here and left 
to those who knew hin-i best the n-iemory of countless loving deed.s — the 
richest leg^icy that man can leave to man. We are met to dedicate 
this monument to the memory of I'liilo 1). Beckwilh, one of the kings 
of men. This monument, this perfect theatre, this beautiful home of 
cheerfulness and joy, this home and child of all the arts, this theatre 
where the architect, the sculptor and the i»inter united to build and 
decorate the stage \\hereon the dran-ia, with a thousand tongues, will 
tell the frailties .and the virtues of *hc human race and where music 
with its thrilling voice will teach the source of happiness — this is a 
fitting monument to a m;ui whose memory we honor and one who had 
outgrown the cnicl creeds ;ui(l heartless dogmas of his time, 01-ie who 
had passed from su])erslitir>n to science, from religion to reason, from 
slavery to freedom, from the shadow of fear to the light of knowledge, 
and to one whose heart and hands were in partnership, constituting the 
firm of intelligence and industry, and whose heart divided the profits 
with his fellowmen: to one who fought the battle of his life alone and 
whose heart grew i-iobler and gentler with success ; to one who tried to 
make a heaven here, who believed in the blessed gospel of cheerful- 
ness, of happy lives, of laughter and love." 

In the strong light thrown by his business career and his jjcrsonal 
character it is hardly necessary to mention, what will be found stated 
on other pages, that Mr. Beckwith was closely identified with' many 
matters of citizenship and community interest— as mayor of his city 
in which he took deepest interest, as a school official, as head of the 
library association and donor of the lot on which the public library 
stands, and in all movements during his lifetime which afYected the 
progress of his city. He wrought not for the present }-ears nor for his 
lifetime, but his life work will remain the cornerstone of Dowagiac 
when much that now seems enduring has passed entirely away. 

JOHN CLEXDEXEX. 

John Clendenen. who is engaged in fanning in Silver Creek town- 
ship, owns and operates one hundred and ninety-five acres of land, and 
in connection with the tilling of the soil carries on stock raising. He 
was born in the township where he yet resides, his natal day being De- 
cember 22, 1860. His father, Oscar Clendenen. was a native of Vir- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY ^-93 

ginia. born Dcceiiilicr jo. iSjcj, and came to Miclii<;an as one c.i the early 
settlers of Cass cmuily, arriving in 184S. He settled in Silver Creek- 
township, v.here he carried on general farming and there his death 
occurred March 7. jSjo. when he was about forty years of age. He 
was well kniiwn m tlie cnmnninity. held a number of local offices and 
took an active and heli)ful part in the work of general improvement antl 
development. In early manhuod he wedded ]Miss Harriet Swisher, who 
was born February 28, 1S39, in Ohio, in which state her girlhood days 
were passed. She came with her parents to Michigan aui.l is still living 
jn this state. By her marriage she Iiecame the mother of three children: 
John, of this review : Frank ; and I-'Iorence. who was Ixini October 7, 1870, 
and died No\-eml)er 3, Ujoo. 

John Clentlenen was reared upiin tiie old homestead farm and was 
educated in the district .schools. He has lived all of his life in Silver 
Creek township and remained at home up to the time of his marriage, 
which important event in hi^ life was celebrated in 1883, the lady of 
his choice being Miss lunma Oyler, a d;iughter of Daniel and Catherine 
(Robinson) Oyler. The father, who was born December 25, 1827, 
died September 22, 1888. and the mother. Iwrn October 14, 1826, died 
March 3, 1S86. Mrs. Clendenen was born in Pokagon township, Cass 
county, and spent her girlhood days in her parents' home. Mr. Clen- 
denen took his bride to the old farm homestead, where his entire life 
has been passeil. He has always given his attention to general agri- 
cultural pursuits and is now the owner of one hundred and ninety-five 
acres of rich and productive land, on which he carries on general farm- 
ing and also raises stock. Fverything about his place is kept in good 
condition. The fields arc well tilled, the buildings are in good repair 
and he uses the latest improved machinery to facilitate the work of the 
fields. As a business man he is progressive and enterprising and his 
well directed labors are bringing him gratifying success. 

Mr. Clendenen has always been deeply interested in matters per- 
taining to the general welfare and his fellow townsmen recognizing 
his loyalty to American institutions and his interest in local welfare 
have called him to various public offices. He served as clerk of his 
township for two years, was treasurer for two years and highway com- 
missioner two )ears. He was also justice of the peace for many years 
and his decisions were strictly fair and impartial, so that he "won gold- 
en opinions from all sorts of people." In 1905 he was elected suj^ter- 
visor of his township, which position he is now filling and in this ofiice 
as in all of the others he is found as a faithful and capable ofhcial. 

Unto Mr. and ^Irs. Clendenen have been Iwrn five children, of 
whom four are now living, Neil, the third child, being deceased. He 
was born November i, 1890, and died September 22. 1892. The others 
who still survive are Bessie. Lulu. Earl and Thelma. In his political 
views Mr. Clendenen is a Democrat, deeply interested in the success 
and welfare of his party. Fraternally he is connected with the Master 



694 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Workers and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the 
Methodist lipiscopal church in Silver Creek township. He takes an 
active and helpful part in church work and is one of the church trustees. 
His entire life has been pa^^sed in this county and that he has ever mer- 
ited the support and regard of his fellowmen is indicated by the fact 
that many of his stanchest friends are numbered among those who have 
known him from his boyhood days down to the present time. 

GEORGE D. JONES. 

Among the representative and energetic business men of Dowagiac 
George D. Jones is numliered, being engaged in the conduct of a grocery 
store. He was born in Preble county, Ohio, August 2, 1827. His 
father, George Jones, was a native of Georgia and was a son of another 
George Jones, who was of Welsh birth and in 1S29 became a resident 
of Cass county, Michigan, locating on Young's Prairie in Penn town- 
ship, the family being the first settlers of that township. George Jones, 
Sr., grandfather of our subject, had eleven children, all of whom were 
married when they came to Cass county and took up their abode here. 
The family tn which George D. Jones belonged was the smallest numeri- 
cally of the eleven families, there being but six children, two daughters 
and four sons. In early manhood George Jones, father of George D. 
Jones, had removed from his native state to Ohio, where he married 
Miss Mary Bogue, who was born in North Carolina. They located in 
Preble county, Ohio, where he engaged in milling and also in farming. 
In the year 1829 he removed to Cass county, Michigan, and entered 
land in Penn township, on what is now known as Young's Prairie. He 
was thus one of the first settlers in this part of the state. He began the 
improvement and develijimient of the farm there but died after a four 
years' residence in this state, passing away in the thirty-second year of 
his age. His children were Annie. Stephen, Nathan, Sarah, George D. 
and Charles, but the last named died in 3'outh. 

George D. Jones is the only one oi his father's family now living 
and was but two years of age when brought by his parents to Michigan. 
He was reared upon the old homestead in the midst of the green woods 
and attended an old log school house of the early days. He assisted in 
the arduous task of developing and improving a new farm and remained 
with his mother until twenty-six years of age, when he was married, in 
1853, to Miss Sarah Pegg. She died a few years later leaving two 
children: Flora E., who is now the wife of William Doling, a conductor 
on the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad now living in Galesburg, 
Illinois; and George Elbert, deceased. For his second wife ]Mr. Jones 
chose ]\Iiss Ella O. Rice. 

Remaining a resident of Penn township, he carried on general 
farming uniil iSr)4. when he located in Dowagiac and the following 
year he engaged in the shipping of live stock, in which business he con- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 6!t5 

tinued successtiilly for a numlier of years. In iSSo, however, he estab- 
lished a grocery store and is the pioneer grocers-man of tliis place. He 
was also the tirst stock shipper at this point. ,He has for seventy-seven 
years been a resident of the county and its history is to him a famihar 
story, not because he has heard related the events of the early days but 
because he has been an active participant in the work of improvement 
and in the conditions which have formed its pioneer annals. His early 
political support was given to the Whig party, and upon its dissolution 
he joined the ranks of the new Republican party, of which he has since 
been an earnest advocate, voting for each presidential candidate of the 
party from 1856 down to the present time. He has filled the office of 
township cltrk for several terms, was supervisor of Penn township and 
justice of the peace. He has likewise been a member of the village 
board of Dowagiac and a member of the school board, and the cause 
of education finds in him a warm and stalwart friend, while each move- 
ment that has for its basic element the welfare of the community receives 
his endorsement. There is perhaps in Dowagiac and his section of the 
county no man more widely known than George D. Jones, and no his- 
tory of the community would be complete without the record of his life. 

ABNER I\I. MOON. 

Abner M. Moon, editor of the Dowagiac Herald, also filling the 
office of justice of the peace, was born near Paw Paw, Michigan, in 
1849. His father, Ambrose F. Moon, was a native of Canandaigiia 
county, New York, and came of Danish ancestry. According to tra- 
dition it was at a time when there was a war in progress between the 
English and the Danes that three brothers of the name came to the 
United States and settled in New York. This was about the time of 
the war for independence in this country-. In the '30s Ambrose F. Moon 
left the Empire state and removed to \^an Buren count}-, Michigan. 
He owned a farm hut was particularly well known as a bee keeper 
and traveled all o\er the country- in the interest of a patent bee hive. 
He was a Democrat in politics, was a man of modest unassuming man- 
ner, but of genuine worth, and died in Rome. Georgia, to which place 
he had remrived. and there started a Beekeeper's Magazine, in 1872. 
His death occurred in 18S4, when he was seventy years of age. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Emily R. ^Vlack, was born in Ohio 
and is now living in Redlands. California, at the age of seventy-six 
years. She is of Scotch descent and bv her marriage she became the 
mother of two children, hut the daughter, Eva. is now deceased. 

Abner M. ]\Ioon, the only son. \\as a student in the public schools 
C'f Paw Paw. and was reared to farm life, early becoming familiar 
with die labors of the old honiestead faruT. \\'hen twenty-one years 
of age he purchased th.e I^wton Tribune, which he published for a 
year and then went to New York city, where he edited the National 



O'JG HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Bcc Keepers' Joiiriuil. After a lirief period lie returneil to r*a\v Paw 
and a \x'ar later went to Rrmie. (ieorsia, where he joined his father 
ajid Ix'gan the pnhh'cruion of a heekcepcr's iournal. called the Moon's 
Bee ll'orliL There he remained for four years, after whicli he spent 
six nionth> in Xew \'ork city, and returning to Michigan, established 
the Marcellu^ A'rt^-.s-. which he published for four years. In i88i he 
came to i")o\vagiac and began the publication of the Dowagiac Times, 
which he practically omducted until 18.S5. when he was appointed 
jjostmaster under Cleveland and sold the pa])er. He conducted the 
office for foin" yern's and during tlial time, in 18S7. was appointed 
justice of the peace, and ere the expiration of his term in that office 
was appointed city clerk. In 1890 he was elected county clerk and 
retained the ut'ficc for one term, after which he returned to Dowagiac 
and was re-elected justice of the peace, which position he has since 
filled, 'with the exception of twi_> years. lie has also Iield the oftice 
of city clerk two term^. and in all these different ptisitions has been 
a capable ofticial, carefullv. systematically and efficiently performed the 
\-aried duties that have thus devolved ujion him in connection with the 
business of the office. In April. 1903, he purchased the Dowagiac 
Herald, a weekly paper of large circulation, of which he has since been 
editor and i>roi)riclor. It is a Democratic organ, of wide influence, 
recognized as vne of the leading jijurnals of this part of the state, and 
Mr. Moon is classed with the leading representatives of journalism, with 
e.Kcellent business discernment, combined with editorial skill, as is mani- 
fest in the illtere.■^ting columns of the Herald. 

In 1878 Mr. .M. 1^)11 wa^ united in marriage to Miss Dora E. Ellis, 
who was born in Ililbdale county, Michigan, in i860, a daughter of 
Joseph and Emeline Elli-. n.atives of Ohio. Mr. [Moon had been mar- 
ried previously to Miss Marian E. Guild, and his second wife was 
Rachel Thompson, by whom lie had three children: Kittie, now the 
widow of C. A. Caldwell and a resident of Chicago; Emmet, who is 
a fruit grower of Lawton. [Michigan; and Hallie. deceased. The cbil- 
dren of the present marriage are Ethel, Don and lima, the .son being his 
father's assistant in business. By reason of his activity in Democratic 
circles and his championship, through the columns of his paper and 
as a private citizen, of many interests for the public good, Mr. Moon 
is regarded as one of the foremost and valuable residents of Dowagiac. 

ISAAC WELLS, Sr. 

Isaac Wells. Sr.. is one of the old settlers and representative citi- 
zens of Dowagiac and for eighteen years has been connected with the 
Round Oak Ste've Company as inspector and molder (.)f clay, a business 
record which is certainly creditable, for his long retention in one posi- 
tion indicates his capability and fidelity. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTV 697 

Mr. Wells is a nati\e 'A (Ireen county, Ohio, Ixirn July 15, 1830. 
His paternal grandfather. Felix W'e'ls. was a native of Wales, in which 
countn- he was married, anil alj(nit 1778 or 1779 -he crossed the Atlantic 
to the new wurld. Tiiere were three hroihers who made the journey, 
one of whom Iicated in \'ii,-inia. .ino in Kentucky and one in the east. 
It was the hraiich nf the family fnon which Isaac Wells is descended 
that estahlished its hi»me in Kentucky and in that state Charles Wells, 
father of our subject, was bom F-ebrnary 23. 1790. The family had 
been located there in early ])ioneer times when Kentucky was not far 
removed from that iierind which, because (>f the always constantly waged 
Indian warfare, wdu fur it the title of "the dark and bloody groinid." 
On leaving his native st.-ite Charles Wells became an early settler of 
Green county, Ohio, and from that place made his way direct tf) Cass 
county. ATichigan, xirrivin-- at I'.dward.sburq- on the 28th of October, 
183 1. He was a black■'^mitIl by trade and was the first representative 
of that rccupation in Cass county. He made all of the irons for the 
first sawmill in the county and the settlers came for miles around to 
secure his service in the line of his chosen trade. In 1835 he removed 
to Berrien county, Michigan, settling on what is called the Indian re- 
serve. There he pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land, which 
he began to cultivate and imiirove, devoting his attention to his farm- 
ing interests until his death, which occurred in 1S38. He was one of 
the early settlers t>f Cass coimty and also of Berrien county and he 
aided in reclaiming the region for the purposes of civilization. His 
political allegiance was gi\cn to the Democracy. Fie had been married 
on the 24th of ]\Iarch, 18 14, to Miss Susan Briggs, who was born on 
the Potomac river in Virginia, January 7, 1795. She survi\-ed her hus- 
band until April 16, 1866. In their family were nine children: Livona, 
born in 1S15; Eliza, born in 1816; Maiy, in 181S; Joseph B., in 1820; 
Francis. October 15, 1S23; ^lary. in 1825: Lewis, in 1827: Isaac, in 
1830; and llzra, January 5, 1S34. Of this family only one is living, 
Isaac. Lewis, a resident of Iowa, died April 20, 1906. 

Lsaac Wells, Sr., was the eighth in order of birth an<l was a little 
more than a year old when brough.t to Cass county by his parents in 1835. 
He afterward was taken by them to Bertram township, Berrien county. 
Michigan, where he remained until 1859. when he returned to Cass county 
and here engaged in farming and hlacksmithing. He located on ]\IcKin- 
ney's Prairie in LaGrange township, where he engaged in general agri- 
cultural pursuits from 1859 until 18S0. placing his fields under a high 
state of cultivation and harvesting therefrom good crops. In the latter 
year he removed to Dowagiac and was engaged in the dairy business 
for two years. He then farmed for three years at Silver Creek and 
Pokagon townships and for eighteen years has been connected with the 
Round Oak Stove Works as inspector and molder of clay. Fie is one 
of the oldest settlers of Cass county and this part of ]Michigan, having 



698 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

spent his entire lite in tin's section of the state, with tlie exception of 
his first year. 

On the i6th of Deccnil.'cr. 1857, Mr. Wells was united in niarriaf^e 
to Miss Sarah J. Herkimer, a daucjhter of Jacob and Marv' (Swobe) 
Herkimer and a native of MontL,'-nmen- county. New York, born Oc- 
tober 22. 1837. Her parents removed to Berrien county, ^Michi^an. in 
1851. Ry her mnrriape she has become the mother of three children: 
Emma Z., the wife of Gienn ]\Iead, of Dowag-iac; William R., who 
married Man." Stciner and is livinpf in Dowa,G;iac; and Isaac H., who 
married Nellie Melcher and is livinp;' in the same city. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Wells 
has been a stanch advocate of the Democracy, its principles and its pol- 
icy. He was township treasurer of LaGrange township for four years, 
was also highway commissii':ner for six years and has held other local 
offices. He has been officially connected with the schools and is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity and of the Alcthodist Episcopal church. 
Few men have such an intimate or accurate knowledge of the history of 
this section of the state as has ^Ir. Wells, who, as before stated, has 
spent almost his entire life in this part of Michigan. When the family 
located on the Indian reserve in Bertram township, Berrien county, 
there were i\ye \vhite families and four hundred and eighty Indians 
living in that neighborhood. When he was in his eighth year he acted 
as interpreter for Topen Bey and went down to Tippecanoe on the 
Kankakee river, being gone ten days on the expedition. He could speak 
the Indian tongue as readily as the English language, ^^■hen he re- 
turned home he received as a present a fawn skin filled with honey, 
and also a pipe given him by Topen Bey. the war chief's son. This pipe 
is now in the museum at Cassopolis. Mr. Wells is one of the charter 
members of the Pioneer Association of Cass county, was its president 
for one term, vice-president for one term and a member of the Report 
Committee for the last ten years. His life history if written in detail 
would present many interesting pictures of pioneer life. To the traveler 
of today, viewing the fine farms, attractive homes and enterprising 
towns and cities of southern Michig-an, it is impossible to realize that 
it is within the memor\- of any living man when the red men were 
more numerous here than the representatives of the white race, but 
such is the case with Mr. Wells. He can remember when all this 
region was covered with a native growth of timber, when the stream? 
were unbridged and the land uncultivated. It required much arduous 
toil to bring atxiut the changes that have brought the county up to its 
present high state of cultivation, development and improvement and 
the pioneers bore many hardships, trials and privations while perform- 
ing this task. ]Mr. Wells has always home his full share in the work 
of development and as an honored pioneer settler of southern Michigan 
well deser\'es mention in this volume. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 



OTIS HUFF. 



Otis Huff, one of tlie youngest mcml)crs of the bar of Cass county 
engaged in active practice in Marcellus. was liorn in \'()!inia township 
on the 1st of August, 1S75. His fatiier, John Huff, was a native of 
Clark county, Ohio, being born in 1833 near the present city of Spring- 
field. The following year he came witli his parents, Amo? and Marga- 
ret Huff, to \'olinia township, Michigan, who settled on a tract of land 
en the edge of Card's prairie, whicli the father (grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this sketch) had entered from the government the previous year, 
and then went back to Ohio after his family. The ancestry of the 
Huffs can be traced back to the early days of Penns}-lvania. Originally 
they were of German lineage. The grandfather was a farmer and 
mechanic by occupation. 

The father, Jojm Huff, is a self-made man. In his younger days 
he helped to clear the wilderness and hue the way for civilization as 
well as taking every advantage in those early days of securing an edu- 
cation from the meagre school system. As a reward he became a teacher 
in the district schools, an occupation which he pursued successfully for 
many years afterward. Later he became the owner of a farm adjoining 
the old homestead, which he still retains and by adding to the same he 
is the possessor of a handsome property which yields to him a gratify- 
ing income. 

Very few men follow the ups and downs of life and live for over- 
seventy years continually in sight of the place where their childhood 
days were spent and yet such is the case with ]\Ir. Huff. Becoming 
prominent in political life, for over twenty years he was supervisor of 
his townsliip and was several times elected chairman of tlie board of 
supervisors. At one time he was also nominated by his party for state 
representative, and although running ahead of his ticket he was defeated 
by a small majority. On May 12, 1873. he married Eliza Wright, who 
was born in Volinia township and was the daughter of James and Sarah 
Wright, pioneers of Cass county. To this union were born three chil- 
dren : Amy, Otis, and Harle}', but tlie last named is now deceased. 

Otis Huff, being born on the farm, early became familiar with the 
duties that fall to the lot of die agriculturist. He attended the district 
schools and later tlie A^alparaiso Normal School. At eighteen he became 
a teacher and after teaching a year, in the fall of 1895 he entered the 
law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from 
which he graduated in the class of 1S9S. While in college he became 
quite prominent as an orator. On January 9, 1899, he began the practice 
of law in Marcellus, where he has since met with good success, having 
been connected with much important law business, wherein he has dis- 
played his ability to successfully cope with the complex problems of 
jurisprudence. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen Camp at Marcel- 



TOO HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

his, of which he is clerk and lie is also a memlier of the Cass County 
Bar Association. Politically he is a Republican. 

He lias ne\'er licen an otTice seeker hut has preferred to de\T)te his 
time to the practice of his profession. His law office is a model of neat- 
ness and one of the finest in the c ninty and is hard to excel even in 
the large cities. He is a L;reat reader and literary student, fond of 
books and is himself an ahle writer, as well as an athlete and fond of 
outdoor sports and contests. Being an expert with a rifle, for a vaca- 
tion of three or four weeks nothing pleases him better than to take a 
trip during the beautiful autumn days of November into the north woods 
in quest of deer and hear and other big game. 

In one respect at least he is like President Roosevelt. He enjoys 
strenuous life, travel and adventure and more than one has remarked 
that if he goes any place something is sure to happen. On April last, 
going on a business tri]) to California, he had only nicely arrived there 
and was only a few miles out of San Francisco at the time of the great 
earthquake and fire on that memnrable nmrning of April i8, and lieing 
in the city when the contlagration was at its height he lent his assist- 
ance in Iieli)ing save life and property. 

On June t,o. 1906. the amiiver'^ary of his graduation from the Uni- 
versity of ]\Iichigan, he was married to ^'liss Irene Cropsey, the only 
daughter of George and ICIsie B. Cropsey of Volinia, who are among 
the most substantial re^iilents of that township. Miss Crojisey acquired 
• her early education in the schools of that township and is a graduate of 
the jMarccllus high school. Later she became one of the successful 
teachers of the count}'. She is a charming and accomplished lady and 
the subject of our sketch was fdrlunate in securing such an able and 
loving comj)anion to assist in briglUeniiig his pathway through life. 

CFIARLES STARRETT. 

On the roster of officials in Dowagiac appears the name of Charles 
Starrett, who is now serving as city treasurer. He was born in Ovid, 
New York, February i, 1834. and represents an old family of the east. 
In the paternal line he is of Scotch antl Welsh descent. His grand- 
father, Charles Starrett. was a native of Pennsylvania, while hi<; wife, 
jVIrs. Rachel Starrett, was a native of Connecticut. Their son, James 
Starrett, father of our suliject, was born in New York and was a farmer 
by occupation. He spent his entire life in his native state, where he 
died at the age of sixty-five years. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Amy Stout, was reared by her grandmother. Mrs. Amy Blue, 
who was a native of Xew Jersev. Her grandfather Blue was a soldier 
of the Revolutionarv war, serving in immediate command of General 
Wasliington. while by him he was mustered out at the close of hostili- 
ties. John Cavwood. a great-grandfather of our subject, was also a sol- 
dier of the Revolutionary war, so that the military history of his ancestry 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 701 

is one of whicli lie has ever}- reason to be proud. Tliere were seven cliil- 
dren, tour daughters and tliree sons, born unto Mr. and Mrs. James 
Starrett, of wliom the youngest daugliter died wlicn thirteen years o£ 
age and the eldest son when liut two years of age. Those still living are: 
Airs. Jane Runyan, who is li\ing in Clinton, Michigan; Charles, of this 
review; JNIrs. J. S. Ford, of Chicago; Henry, who resides in Clinton, 
Michigan; and Mrs. F.lizabeth Vaudemark, of Clinton, Michigan. 

Charles Starrett was the third child and second son of the family 
and was reared in his native county until about eighteen years of age, 
the public schools afl'ording him bis educational privileges. He came 
to Michigan in October, 1S52, settling first at Clinton, where he secured 
employment in a grist mill. He was also engaged at different times in 
farm work and in the railroad business, while for a time he was connected 
with railroadin.g on the Jackson branch. He spent the following year 
in the service of the Michigan Southern & Xorthern Indiana Railroad, 
first as brakeman and later as conductor, l-'or eleven years he continued 
in railroading and during the last two and a half years of that time he 
was train master and locomotive dispatcher at Wiiite Pigeon, Michigan. 
He came to Dowagiac in February, 1865, and engaged in the hardware 
business for a short time. He then built a planing mill and sash and 
blind factory in company with Devcndorf & Mason. After about five 
years he sold his interest in this lousiness and about 1872 he engaged 
with the Oliver Chilled Plow Works as traveling salesman, representing 
the comfiany for about ten years on the road. He was for about four 
years with the Cale Manufacturing Compan\' of Albion, ^lichigan, and 
one year with the Snu.th I lend Chilled Plow Company. On the expira- 
tion of that period he became a salesman for the Round Oak Stove Com- 
pany of Dowagiac, with which he continued for aliout nine years, when, 
on account of poor health, he retired from business in 1904. He had 
led a busy, useful and active life and his rest from labor is well merited. 

Mr. Starrett has filled a number of public offices, the duties of 
which he has discharged with promptness and fidelit)". He was elected 
city treasurer of Dowagiac, has licen alderman for two }ears and a 
member of the board of education for nine years. He has ever been 
found reliable and trustworthy in public office, discharging his iluties 
with promptness as well as ability. 

In 1857 Mr. Starrett was married to ]\Iiss Elizabeth IMcCollester, a 
daughter of TlKnnas ?vIcCollestcr. She was born in White Pigeon, [Mich- 
igan, and was reared in that city. Two children grace this marriage. 
Fannie and Lena. In his political views ]\Ir. Starrett is a stalwart Re- 
publican, having given his support to the party throughout his entire life. 
He belongs to the Masonic fraternity of Dowagiac, his memberslfip being 
in Peninsula lodge No. 214, F. & A. 'SI.. Keystone chapter Xo. ,36, 
R. A. M., Niles commandery Xo. 12, K. T., and Saladin temple of the 
Mystic Shrine at Grand Rapids. He was master of his lodge for one 
year and for three years was higli priest of the chapter. He is an 



702 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

exemplary member of the craft and is in hearty sympathy %vith its tenets 
and teachings. \\''el! known in Dowa.cfiac wlierc he is now filling the 
office of city treasurer, he is respected hv all with whom he has come 
in contact, for he has displayed in Iiis life record many sterlinc:^ charac- 
teristics. 

AMOS KNAPP. 

Retired farmers constitute a cnn?idcra1:)Ic portion of the population 
of Dowasjiac. men who in active business life have capably directed 
their efforts along' well defined lines of labor, managing their interests 
with ability, carefully husbanding their resources and thus securing a 
competence for later life. To this class belongs Mr. Knapp. who was 
born in Columbia county. Xc\\- York. August 24, 183 1. In the paternal 
line he comes of Englisb-TIolland Dutch descent. His father. William 
B. Knajip, was a native of Dutchess county, Xew York, and after re- 
maining in the ea^t until 1843 sought a Imme in the middle west, taking 
up his abode in \''olinia township. Cass county. ^Michigan. He there 
remained for about five years, giving bis attention to the task of devel- 
oping' and improving the farm, at the end of which time he removed 
to Silver Creek township, where his death ocairred. when be was about 
seventy-seven vears of age. Tlis p.nlitical allegiance was given to the 
Republican party for a number of -scars but prior tr> this time he was a 
Jacksonian Democrat. .At the outbreak of the Civil war. however, be 
espoused the cau^e of the Republican party, which proved the real de- 
fense of the Union in the Civil war. He married !\Tiss Mary Finch, a 
native of CoUnnbia county, New York, and she. too, died upon the old 
home farm in Silver Creek township at the age of seventy-seven years. 
In the family of this worthy cmple were five children, three daughters 
and two sons, all of whom reached adult age. 

Amos Knapp. the second child and eldest son in his father's fam- 
ily, spent the first eleven years of his life in the countv of his uati\-ity 
and then came with his parents to Cass county. jNIichigan. The first 
five vears of his resif'ence here were spent in \''o1inia township and be 
afterward removed to Silver Creek township, remaining at home and 
assisting in the development of his father's farm, which was reclaimed 
for the purposes of cultivatiop and improvement. He was married there 
in i8;8 to TvTiss Abbie "M. Farnam. a daughter of Joseph and .Abigail 
Famam. She was born near Batavia. New York, and came with her 
parents to Michigan about 184=;. so that the Farnam family were also 
early settlers of this state. Thev took up their abode in Van Buren 
countv. 

.K[ the time nf hi^ marriarc Air. Knapp settled in Silver Creek 
township, where be devoted his attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits. He cleared up a farm in the midst of the wilderness, cutting out 
the hea-\-A" timber, grubbing v.r> the stumn'^. clearing away the brush and 
thus preparing his land for the plow. He bought his land at four dol- 



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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 703 

lars per acre. As tlie years passed liis i)Iace was transformed into very 
rich and prodnctive tields and he annually harvested good crops. For 
inany years he carried on oeneral agricultural pursuits, in which he 
met with gratifying success, but eventually he sold his farm and re- 
moved to Dowagiac in 1895. He also has' property in the town. He 
is one of the old settlers of Cass county, having resided within its bor- 
ders for si.xty-three years and he has been identified with the making of 
the county along lines of substantial improvement and progress. He 
was township clerk in Silver Creek township for many terms and no 
public or private duty reposed in him has ever been betrayed in the 
slightest degree. He has always talcen an active part in public affairs, 
doing ever}-lhing in his power to make the county on a par with the 
older counties of this great commonwealth. His worth is widely 
acknovdedged and all who know him esteem him for his man}- sterling 
traits of character. 

GEORGE W. HUNTER. 

Cass county with its rich lands offers splendid opportunities to the 
agriculturist and the ?tnck-rai«cr and l\Ir. Hunter is numbered among 
those who are successfully devoting their energies to general agricult- 
ural pursuits. He makes his home on section 34, Wayne township, 
where he owns and cultivates a good tract of land. He was born in 
Cassopolis, Michigan, on the 30th of September, 1843. ^"^ is a son of 
M. V. Hunter. At that time the father purchased eighty acres of land 
from one of his brothers and afterward added an additional tract of 
eighty acres. He partially cleared the first eighty and G. \V. Hunter 
of this review has cleared seventy acres of the second eighty, having 
led a life of intense and well directed energy. He was educated in what 
is known as the White school in Wayne township and therein mastered 
the common branches of English learning. During the periods of vaca- 
tion he worked in the fields and after permanently putting aside his 
text-books gave his undi\ided attention to the further cultivation and 
development uf this projierty. 

On the 7th of November. 186''). Mr. Hun.ter was united in 
marriage tn Miss Eveline \'an Hise. who was l.;orn in Decatur 
township. \'an FUircn cmmtv. ^lichigan. and is a daughter of 
William O. and Eliza ( Ikll) A'an Hise. The mother came to 
Cass county aliout 1831 and here lived up to the time of her marriage. 
They were among the pioneer settlers of the county and Mrs. Hunter 
was ten years of age wlien she acc'U.ipanied her parents on their removal 
to Wayne township. Unto our subject and his wife have been born se\-en 
children : Ina, now the wife of Fred B. Wells, a resident farmer of La- 
Grange townshi]-); Lizzie, the wife of Isaac Schurte; Ada. the wife of 
Darv.-in Garrett, of Dowagiac. Michigan: ^ilinah V.; Plicle. the wife 
of Arthur Rudolph, of Dowagiac; 'Millard wedded Iva Swisher, a resi- 
dent of Dowagiac; Clara, at home. All were born and reared upon the 



704 . HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

farm where the parents still reside and Phebe engaged in teaching 
school in Dowagiac and Cass county for about six years. 

Mr. Hunter has l^een a life-lung Democrat, and his fellow towns- 
men, recognizing his worth and aliility, have called him to office. He 
served for two terms as townsliip treasurer and was justice of the peace 
for one tern; and in Iioth offices discharged his duties with promptness 
and fidelity. In his farm work he has been equally faithful and in his 
business life has never I;cen known to take advantage of the necessities 
of liis fcllowmen in any trade transaction. Mr. Hunter's father was a 
man who was highly respected by all in his time. He was the first 
slieriff of old Cass county and was appointed by General Cass before 
Michigan was a state. 

DAXII^L S^IITH. 

There is much said at the ]jresent time about corruption in pulilic 
office and abinU the infidelity of those in whom public trust has been 
reposed. This may be true to a great extent in the larger cities, but it is 
certainly not true in smaller cities and towns where the residents of any 
community have oppi^rtunity to investigate tiie records of a ])ublic official 
and where his life historv is as an open Ixjok to which all have access. 
Daniel Smith is among the office holders of Dowagiac and his devotion 
to public service has been of Ijenefit to the community which has en- 
trusted him with the care of its interests. He is well known and enjoys 
in full measure the regard of his fellowmen. 

A native 'if I'cnnsylvania. Mr. Smith was born in Lancaster county 
on the 28t]i nf ^larcli. iS_)o. His father, John Smith, was a native 
of Gcnnany and remained in that country during the period of his boy- 
hood and youth, being reared to the occujjation of farming. He heard 
favorable reports, however, concerning America, its business opp<:)rtuni- 
ties and advantages along r)ther lines, and when twenty-one years of 
age he resolved to try his fortune in the new world and crossed the 
Atlantic. He located in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he re- 
sided for a number of years, coming tb.ence to Michigan in 1S57, at 
which time he took up his abode in Berrien county, where he resided for 
six months. On the expiration of that period he removed to Pokagon 
township, Cass county, where he was engaged in farming. His remain- 
ing days were given to the work of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops, and he was active in bis farm work until si.xty-nine years of age, 
when his life's labors were ended in death. In early manhood he had 
wedded Frances Fulton, a native of Lancaster county. Pennsylvania, 
who died in Cass county in the sixty-fifth year of her age. Eleven chil- 
dren were added t(T the household as the years ])assed by. six sons and 
five daughters, and of this number seven reached years of maturity. 

Daniel Smith, who was the fourth child and second son. was seven- 
teen years of age when he came to Cass county. He had previously 
begun his education in the schools of Pennsylvania and after coming to 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 70o 

JNJicljigari lie wc-rked uj)! ai the hnnic farm with his father in its de- 
velopment and impnivemciii until twenty-one years of age, when he 
felt that his lirst duty was to his cuuntry, which at this time was en- 
gaged in the Civil war. His patriotic spirit was aroused and he could 
DO longer content hniiself at the plow, so putting aside business cares 
he offered his services to the g<ivernnient, enlisting on the 21st of Au- 
gust, 1861, as a private of Company M, First Michigan Cavalry, tie 
remained with that command until J'ebruary 8, 1S62, when he was 
honorably discharged on account of disability, after which he returned 
to his liome. He remained in .Michigan until September, 1S63. when 
he once more went to Pennsylvania and there he enlisted in the Twenty- 
first Pennsylvania Ca\alry on the Slh of February, 1S64. He partici- 
pated at the battle oi Wehlnn Railroad and in the military movement 
in front of Petersburg he was w<innded in the left leg, whicli necessi- 
tated the amputation of that member Ijelow the knee. When he had 
reco\-ered his health he was lionoraijly (hscharged December 26. 1865. 
and again came to }ilichigau, settling upon a farm in Pokagon township, 
Cass county. 

On the ist of December, iSr,-, '^]^. Snn'th was united in marriage 
to Miss Sarah A. }>lcLoy, a daughter c.\ liichard and .Maria AlcCoy, who 
were early settlers ..f (.'a-> couni). ami their daughter. ]\Irs. Smith, was 
born in Pokagon town-^bip, wlieie her girlhood days were passed and her 
education \vas obtained. 

.\t the time of his marriage ?\Ir. Smith located in Dowagiac and 
was employed as a salesman in a store for abmit sixteen years — a fact 
which indicates his entire capability and trustworthiness. He has been 
supervisor of the third ward for ten years and this fact stands in incon- 
tHiverlible e\-idcnce of bis lo\ah\- in oi'tice. At one time he was alder- 
man of the city from the third ward and his personal popularity is indi- 
cated by the fact that he was elected on the Democratic ticket in a ward 
which usuall}' gives a strong Republican majority. !Mr. and Mrs. Smith 
]ia\-e no chikh-en of their own. but have reared an adopted daughter, 
Ruth, who is now the wife of Xatlian J. White. Almost a half century 
has Come and g'Mie since ]\lr. Smith came to Cass county and be is 
therefore numbered rip.ung the old settlers. He is familiar with its 
liistory in man}- of iis plias.'s. having been a witness of (jr participant 
in the events which ha\x shaped its policy and promoted its development. 
In all matter? '.'f citizenshiji he has been the embodiment of loyalty and 
in public olTice as well a=: in military service has rendereil va.lualile aid 
to the count\'. He has a dee]i and sincere attachment for the stars and 
strii)es an<! is indeed a patriotic .\merican citizen. 

willta:\[ j.\rvis. 

I'he farm which is the place of residence of \\'illiain Jarvis was also 
liis birthplace. It is situated on Section 34. Wavne townshi]). and there 
Mr. Jarvis first opened his eyes to the light of day on the 5tli of De- 



706 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

cember, 1S44. He is a son of Norman Jarvis, who was one of the early 
settlers of this county, following the occupation of farming for many 
years. He was born in North Carolina in 1819, and was a son of Ecf- 
ward Jarvis, likewise a native of the old North state. The grandfather 
was a farmer and about 1S23 settled in Cass county, Michigan, being 
one cf the first residents within its borders. The family home was es- 
tablished in LaGrange township, where the grandfather purchased some 
land, becoming owner of about two hundred acres, most of which was 
raw and unimproved. He cleared the tract, however, and reared his 
family upon this place. 

Norman Jai"V'is was only f<iur years of age when brought by his 
parents to Michigan and amid the wild scenes of frontier life he was 
reared upon the old homestead, the family living in a log cabin, while his; 
education was acquired in a log schoolhouse. He shared with the other 
members of the family in the hardships and privations incident to pioneer 
life and also assisted in the arduous task of developing new land. When 
about twenty-one years of age he bought land in LaGrange township, 
coming into possession of about two hundred acres that was partially 
improved. He had been married a short time previous to Miss Margaret 
Simpson, a native of OIn'o, born in the year 1823. She was rearcfl in 
her native state and with her parents came to Cass county, Michigan, at 
an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis became the parents of ten children, 
seven daughters and three sons, all of whom are living. In his polit- 
ical views the father was a Democrat and kept well informed on the 
questions and issues ol the day. He prospered in his business under- 
takings and at the time of jiis death was the owner of two hundred and 
seventy acres of rich and producti\'e land, the greater part of which 
had been impro\efl by him. He passed away in 1903 at the age o? 
eighty-three years, respected and esteemed by all who knew him. 

U]X5n the old homestead in I^aGrange township William Jarvis 
spent the days of his lioyhood and youth, there remaining until his 
marriage, which occurred on the 22d of February, i8f)S. He then re- 
moved to the farm adjoining the old homestead — a tract of land of one 
hundred and forty acres, a part of which he improved during the two 
years which he sjient there. In 1S72 he went to Dowagiac, where he 
turned his attention to the butchering business, remaining there for about 
seven months. On the expiration of that period he bought a fami of 
eighty acres east of Decatur, in Decatur township, and cleared ten acres 
of that place, living thereon for seven months. In the fall of 1S73 he 
came to his present farm which then comprised eighty acres of land to 
which he has since added a tract of forty acres, so that his place now 
comprises one hundred and twentv acres, which is rich and productive. 
Here he has made his home for thirty-two years and has gained a good 
living by his careful management of his liusiness and by his practical 
and progressive methods in cultivating the fields and caring for the crops. 

Mr. Jarvis was united in marriage to ~\Iiss Arbesta Park, a native 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 707 

of •Medina couiUy, Ohio, born December lo, 1849, and a daughter of 
John and Fannie Park, who removed to Dowagiac in 1865, there spend- 
ing their remaining days. Air. Park was a stock buyer and a well known 
business man, carrying on active work in the cultivation and develop- 
ment of the fields. Mrs. Jarvis was reared in Ohio, being aljout seven- 
teen years of age when the parents came to Cass county. By her mar- 
riage she has become the mother of two sons and a daughter: John 
P., who was born at Dowagiac on the 21st of jMay, 1S72; William, who 
was born upon the present home farm April 17, 18S2; and Bessie, who 
was born June 22, 188S. .Ml were educated in the schools of Wayne 
township. The wife and mother was called to her final rest February 17, 
1903, and her death was deeply regretted not only by her immediate 
family but also by many friends. Mr. Jarvis exercises his right of 
franchise in support of the Democratic party. Through sixty-one years 
he has lived in Cass county and has witnessed many changes here during 
that period. From his early yuutli he has followed farming save for a 
brief interval and for almost a third of a century has lived upon his 
present place which shows in its excellent improved condition the care- 
ful supervision of a careful and painstaking owner. 

SOLOAION CURTIS. 

Solomon Curtis, who has reached the age of four score years, is 
one of the pioneer settlers of Cass county. Xo writer has ever given 
adequate description of the conditions which are met on the frontier. 
When one faces the elements of nature in their rude and rougl: out- 
lines they are removed from the comforts of an older civilization. This 
Mr. Curtis has done and his labors have been a valued factor in reclaim- 
ing this district for cultivation and improvement. He was born in 
the town of Springfield, Otsego county, New York, January 26, 1S26. 
His father, Stephen Curtis, was a native of the Empire state and died 
when his son Solomon was but thirteen years of age. The mother, 
Mrs. Edna (Thorn) Curtis, was also a native of New York and died 
when the subject of this review was only two weeks old. The father was 
three times married and had a family of twelve children. By the first 
union there were nine children, by the second two and Ijv the third mar- 
riage one child, the mother of our subject being the second wife. The 
daughter of that marriage died in early childhood. 

Following the death of his father Solomon Curtis came to Mich- 
igan, making his way to Cass county in 1839 in company with one of 
his half brothers. He located in Pokagon township, living with his 
brother until about eighteen years of age, when he continued his edu- 
cation in the schools of Niles and also attended the semlnarv at Albion, 
Michigan. He worked by the month in the summer seasons and care- 
fully saving his earnings he was at length enabled to purchase a tract 
of land in Rockford township, F^ton county, Michigan. Fie afterward 



7US HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

traded that prupcity fur suine land in Berrien tuwnship, Berrien connty, 
Michigan, which he eventually sold hut bought another farm in the same 
township on the Cass county line, where he lived for twelve years. In 
his farm work he was determined and energetic, carrying forward to 
successful completion whatever he undertook. He was practical in 
his mediods, yet progressive in all that he did and as the years passed 
by he converted his places into well develope<l ami highly improved 
farms. 

Mr. Curtis was married in 1S51 to :\Iiss Louisa W. Wilson, a 
daughter of Samuel Wilson. n\ Oron. ike township, r.errien countv. 
Mrs. Curtis \\a~- horn ni Xvw V^^vk hut was reared in Massacluisett^ and 
her death occurred in this state. November 2", 1900. There uere three 
children of diat marriage, all oi whom died in early life. 

After living for twelve years upon his second farm in Berrien 
connty 'Mr. Cmtis sold that jiropcrty and houQht a farm in Silver Creek 
township, Cass county, whcrcon he lived for thrvc year>. Tie then 
again disposed of his f.arm and at that time bought land in Pcnn town- 
ship, Cass county, where he lived for nineteen years. After disposing of 
that property to a purchaser he remo\ cd to l)ow;igiac in TS85 and for 
twenty-one years has resided in this cit\-. He is one of the oldest set- 
tlers of Cass Count) and has been identihed closely v.ith its growth and 
development. He has seen tlie county emerge from the period of its in- 
fancy to that of latter day piM-rcss and civilization. That he located 
here at an early day is indicated Iv the fact that he paid only five dollars 
per acre for n.incty acres of land, which is today worth at least fifty 
dollars per acre. He is well known throughout the county, having taken 
an active interest in public aff.airs and in .all that ]iertains to the welfare 
and progress of his community. He voted for General John C. Fremont 
and for Abraham Lincoln l>oth times, also for Carfield, and was a stal- 
wart Republican from the organi'/ation of the party until 1884. His first 
presidential ballot, however, was cast for Zachary Taylor. In 1884 ?iTr. 
Curtis severed his allegiance with the Republican party, and jriincd the 
ranks of the Prohibition party. He has since cast his b.allot for its jires- 
idential candidates, while at local elections he votes independentlv. He 
u-as a candidate for justice of the peace on the Prohibition ticket. He 
has been a member of the ?^Iethndi?t Fpiscopal church for sixtv years 
and lias 1;een deeply interested in chmxh work in its var!nu<= departments. 
His life has ever been honorable and upright, characterized bv fidelitv to 
all that tends to elevate mankind and to promote bis moral nature. He 
has been a champion of temperance and of Christianity and now in the 
evening of his life he can look back over the past without regret and 
forward to the future without fear. He is respected by all who know 
him because of his fidelity to the right and by rca=on of his honorable 
character and long residence in this county we take pleasure in iire^ent- 
ing the record of his career to our readers. 



William \i. I'.'jj.'iK', a \>v- 


inline 


townshii), resides I'li Secliun 


-'y. V 


Lorn on the KjIIi vi March, 


1S41 


nati\c of rerquimaus cuiiiit 


y, X. 


October, 1790, ami there he 


■ rer.i 


He was twice married, the 1 


nothe 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY T09 

WTLLIA.M E. LOGUE. 

lit and represcntati\-e farmer uf Pcnn 
diich is the farm upon wliich he was 
His father, Stephen Bogue, was a 
'ith Carolina, born on the 17th of 
ained until twenty-one years of age. 
r of our subject being Mrs. Hannah 
(East) Bogue, a native of Grayson county, Virginia, born on the i6th 
cf DeceniLcr, 1798. It was in 181 1 that Stephen Bogue left the south 
and removed to Ohio, taking up his abode in Preble county, where he 
was married. The ye\-u- 1831 witnessed his arrival in Cas.s county. 
Michigan was still under territurial rule at that time and the work of 
improvement and pin>gress w.is just being begun in various sections. In 
1829 he had entered land iruin the government, having made a trip 
across the country on li'ii^eback tn this locality and when he brought his 
family to ^Michigan .->ettled upon the land and began the improvement of 
the farm, which hitherto was entirely wild and uncultivated. For 
many years he bucce-.sfully carrietl on general agricultural pursuits theic 
and died at the aiivanced age of seventy-eight years. His wife lived 
lety-three years and was identified with 
^ni 1831 until her demise. ^Ir. Bogue 
dalia. laid out the town and gave to it 
liiieiit and influential man, active in the 
li he anil his wife were numbered among 
: this portion of the state. 
y can be traced still farther back. It 
representatives of the name in America 
- wurlfl and that the family was found 
ly epoch in the colonization of that state. 
;. was horn in North Carolina. There 
the family of Stephen Bogue, who are still living, 
d in order of birth. The others are: 
'homas, a resident of \'andalia. r\Iichi- 
gan; Sue B., the wi<low of Amos Smith, who was a prominent citizen of 
the county; and Stephen A., living in \'andalia. 

William E. Bogue is the eldest son and was reared upon the home 
farm, wdiere he has spent his entire life with the exception of three years 
passed in Chicago, wlien he was in the employ of the International Har- 
vester Company. In his boyhood days he attended the pub.lic schools 
and also worked in the fields through the summer months, early becom- 
ing familiar with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the 
agriculturist. As a companion and helpmate for life's journey be cho^e 
Miss Elenora Sigerfoos, whom he wedded in St. Joseph county. ^^lichigan, 
in 1S63. She dierl several years later, leaving three children: M\rt;i. 
now the wife of B. II. Fowler, of Chicago; William Carlton, in the 



to the very ad 


\-anci 


.•d age of nil! 


the interests 0: 


f Ca: 


-s eounlv fro 


built the fust ; 


.^ri>t 


mill at '\';iu. 


its name, ile 


\\;l^ 


:\ \er\' jironi 


work of pubdic 


jjrog 


ves., andbotl 


the honored ]){' 


I J nee 1 


; residents of 


The ances 


,try ( 


i>\ the f;niiil\ 


is definitely kir 


ijwn 


ihat the first 


came from Sc( 


.tlair 


d to the new 


in North Carol 


ina i! 


luring an earl; 


The grand fath 


n-. J 


o>eph Bogue, 


were four chili 


Ireii 


in the famih' 


of whom \\"\\\ 


i:ini 


v.. is the tbi' 


Elvira B.. the 


wife 


of Sihis H. ■ 



710 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

erAploy of the International Harvester Company of Chicago; and Ralph 
F., a druggist of the same city, who married Bernice ]M. AIcKinney. 
The elder son, William C. Llogue, wedded ^liss Bertha Arnold, of Porter 
township, Cass county. After losing his first wife JNIr. Bogue was mar- 
ried to Lena Cladding, the widow of Joseph ]McKinney and a native 
of Ohio, where her girlhood days were passed. By her former marriage 
she had two children : J. Wayne iMcKinney, who is with the International 
Packing Company of Chicago; and Bernice AI., the wife of Ralph 1*". 
Bogue, son of our subject. Mr. Bogue has four grandchildren : Cecil 
M., Max A. and Gerald U. Bogue, who are children of William C. 
Bogue; and Kenneth Carlisle, the son of Ralph l<\ Bogue. 

Throughout the greater part of his life William E. Bogue has car- 
ried on general agricultural pursuits and is the owner of a valuable and 
productive farm of one hundred and sixty acres located about tliree 
miles east of the courthouse in CassoiXDlis. He now rents the lantl, but 
still gives supervision to the farm. For many years he was active in its 
cultivation and management and he added to it many modern equip- 
ments and accessories, while his labors were energetic and resourceful, 
so that he won thereliy a good financial return for his work. He ex- 
ercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of 
the Republican party, and for one year he was clerk of the township, 
for two years township treasurer and for some years justice of the 
peace. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity and to the F'riends' 
church, in which he was reared. His life has ever been actuated by 
unfaltering fidelity to the princijiles which govern strict and unswerving 
integrity, and in public ol'fice his course was characterized by prompt- 
ness and capability in the discharge of his duties. Having lived all of 
his life in this county, he is familiar with many of the events which 
have shaped its history and formed its policy and he is classed today 
with the leading and representative pioneer settlers. 

JOHN P. FIERO. 

John P. I'iero, having chosen agricultural pursuits as a life work, 
is giving his time and energies to the task of tilling the soil, caring for 
the crops and raising stock on section 26, Wayne township. His birth 
occurred in Sandusky county, Ohio, on the ist of November, 1850, and 
he is the eldest in a family of three sons and three. daughters whose 
parents \\ere Abram and Fannie (Thorp) Fiero. The paternal grand- 
father, Peter Fiero, was a native of the state of New York, was of Hol- 
land Dutch descent, and spent his last days in Branch county, ^Michigan. 
The maternal grandfather, John Thorp, was also a native of the Empire 
state, and it was in the same state that Abram Fiero and Fannie Thorp 
were born. After residing for some time in Ohio they came to Cass 
countv, 3>Iichigan, in the spring of 1853, locating in LaGrange township, 
where the father engaged in farming. His entire life was devoted to 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 711 

* agricultural pursuits, and he gave to the work of the fields his undividerl 
attention until his life's laljors were ended in death, when he was sixty- 
six years of age. At the time of the Civil war he was a stanch ailvo- 
cate of the Reimblican part\-, which stood as the defender of the Uninn 
cause during that dark hour in our country's history; hut later he he- 
came liberal in his political views. .\.t one time he served as super- 
visor of his township and he was always active in public affairs, giving 
hearty support and co-operatitm to any movement which tended to bene- 
fit his comnumity. In his family were three sons and three daughters, 
namely : John P. ; I'yron : William ; Samantha, who died at the age of 
five years; and Caroline and Lucy, both of whom are deceased. 

John P. Fiero was in his third year when he was brought by his par- 
ents to Alichigan, and upon the home farm in LaGrange township he was 
reared. His early educational privileges afforded by the district schools 
were supplemented by study in Dowagiac and in Kalamazoo Commer- 
cial .College, which he attended for seven months. He afterward en- 
gaged in clerking for a time in Dowagiac in 1873. but later resumed 
farming in LaGrange township, where he remained for about a year. 
He then located on the farm where he now resides and he has resided 
here continuously since. The improvement of the property is due to his 
care and lalx)r and to his progressive spirit. As his financial resources 
have increased he has extended the boundaries of his property and his 
landed possessions now aggregate one hundred and eighty acres in 
Wayne township. His home farm comprises one hundred and eighty 
acres, which is well impro\-ed. The fields have been brought under a 
high state of cultivation and are surrounded by well kept fences. He 
uses modern machinery in the care of his crops, and everything about his 
place is neat and thrifty in appearance, showing the owner to be a prac- 
tical man, who in his care i^f his farm is painstaking and energetic. He 
is also one of the stockholders of the Dowagiac creamery. 

In 1S75 Air. Fiero was imited in marriage to Miss Samantha Root, 
a daughter of Eber and Eliza (Wells) Root, who were early settlers 
of Cass county. The mother was the first landlady of Cassopolis. In 
pioneer times thev took up their abode in this county and Mr. Root ser\-ed 
as one of the early sheriffs, and his name was associated with other events 
relating to the county's history and its development. !Mrs. Fiero was 
born in Cassopolis on the 8th of October, 1847. and by her marriage has 
become the mother of four children: Ray, who is living in Louisiana; 
Cecil, deceased; Charles, who has also passed away; and Eliza, the wife 
of Frank McMichael, of LaGrange township. 

Mr. Fiero votes with the Democratic party and he was elected to the 
office of supervisor of Wayne township in 1890. He was also chosen 
town clerk and filled that position for several terms in Wayne township. 
He was treasurer of the Farmers' JNIutual Fire Insurance Company for 
four years and is well known in the county, where in his varied relations 
he has ever been found worthy the trust and confidence reposed in him. 



HISTORY OJ' CASS C-QUXTY 



His'aclivit 


y has ever let 


.Ml lif a 


He sees to 


the center df t 


.hiiiU'- a 


most ciicr.i 


r.lereiice ut [>' 


.SMhlHf 


false positi' 


111 : has mi mi 


tried ~t: 


tions wliicli 


1 he earnestK : 


iiiainiaii 



[iraetlcal nature cnnvneil witli results. 
'1 he sees fniiii the center to the outer- 
He looks ui)on tlie world from no 
idards and is a man of stronsr convic- 



BURGETTE L. DEWEY. 

Burgette L. Dewey, the senior representative of mercantile inter- 
ests in Dowagiac and the comity in years of continuous connection with 
commercial interests, was horii in Oneida oounty, New York, October 
T3, 1845. tlis paternal grandfather, Harry Dewey, was a native of 
Vermont, in which state he spent his boyhood and acquired his educa- 
tion. He was of French and Irish lineage and on lea\-ing Xew I'^ng- 
land became a resident of Xew "S'ork. His father. Lambert B. Dewey, 
was a native of Oneida county, born en the jtli of May. 1816. He was 
reared to the occujjatiiin of farming and followed that pursuit in Xew 
York until 1859, when he removed to Marcellus, Cass county, Michi- 
gan, where he engaged in general agricultural pursuits. Later *he made 
his home for a time in \'an lUireii county, this state, and subsequently 
came to Dowagiac, where liis last days were passed, his death occurring 
July 15, i8(j9, when be was in his eighty-fourth year. He was a mem- 
ber of the Christian church and lived an exemplary life in harmony 
with his professions. Lambert B. Dewey was married in the Empire 
state to Miss Delia A. Stoi-y. a native x^f Oneida county, Xew York, 
who is now living in her eighty-third year. She is of Irish lineage. 
Her grandfather. Captain Enoch Story, was a Revolutionary soldier 
who won his title by ser\ice in the colonial army during the war for 
independence. It is suiipo-^ed that be was a native of Ireland. 

Burgette L. Dewey, an only child, came with his ]iarents to IMich- 
igan in 1859 when a youth of fourteen years. He had begun his educa- 
tion in the district schools of X'ew York and later he attended a high 
school in Michigan, while in 1865 he pursued his studies in Eastman's 
Business College at Poughkecpsie, Xew York. Being graduated on the 
completion of a Inisiness course, be returned to Michigan and in 1865 
came to Dowagiac. since -which time he has been connected with the 
commercial interests of this place. He began here as a clerk and in 
1873 he embarked in business on his own account as a dealer in dry 
goods and carpets. He has since continued in this line and is now the 
oldest dry goods merchant in the town. He has a well appointed esta1> 
lishment, carrying" a good line of merchandise, and he is also inter- 
ested in other business enterprises outside of the city. He has been 
verj' successful as the years have gene by. During his first year in 
Dowagiac he worked for nothing, but gradually he advanced and his 
capable service was recognized by a iiljeral wage. Saving his earnings, 
he was at length enabled to start in business on his own account and 




"^^-^^^^^^^ ^.SWt^£^, 



HISTORY Ol' CASS COUNTY 713 

is today a iimspc-mus incrc!i:int, eiijovinpf in lari^-'e measure tlie confi- 
<lence and support of the public. 

On the I3tli of Octolier, 1867, .\[r. Dewey \vas united in marriage 
to Miss Sarah E. Green, of Battle Creek, Micliig-an, a daug-hter of 
W'illiani II. (,recn. She was bom in Poughkeepsie. New York. Fel> 
luary 13. 1844. and has bea^nie the mother of three children: Harry 
B., now deceased: Harriet, the wife of W. C. Porter, of Buchanan, 
_Michig-an; and I'red L., wh,, is a i>artner with his father in the conduct- 
ing of the business. 

Mr. Dewey lias been a life-lon.i;- Republican, having- firm faith in 
the principles anil ultini;ite iruinii>h of his party. He was the second 
mayor of Downgiac, and whether in office or out of it has been a co- 
operant factor in 'lumy measures for the general good. He is a promi- 
nent Mason who has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish 
rite and he likewise belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He has ln?en engaged in business in Dowagiac for forty years, 
is proprietor of the largest store here and has a very wide acquaintance 
throughout the city and surrounding country. His gocxl qualities are 
many and his genial disposition and unfailing courtesy to his patrons 
as well as his honorable dealing have been factors in his success. 

H.\MILTOX SHELDON McMASTER, M. D. 

Dr. Hamilton Sheldon ?\IcMaster, the oldest practicing phvsician of 
Dowagiac, who has also taken an active and helpful part in the advance- 
ment of the city's welfare and inii)rovement, was born in \\'est Sparta, 
Livingston county. New York, in 1K42. His father. Robert McMaster, 
also a native of West Sparta, was of Scotch-Irish lineage. The paternal 
grandfather, Ebenezer McMaster, was born in Morristown, New Jersey, 
and was the son of Edward McMaster, who was born in Dublin, Ire- 
land, and came to the United States with his father, Richard McMaster, 
a sea-faring man, before the Revolutionary war. Edward McMaster. 
then a boy, spent his youth in this country and at the outbreak of hostil- 
ities with the mother country enlisted in the continental arniv. serving 
throughout Hie war \\liich won independence for the nation. He was 
held as a prisoner on c^ne of the British warships for a time. His father, 
Richard [Mc^Master. sailed in a privateer during the conflict and died at 
sea. The three generations l^efore our subject were farmers. The 
grandfather, Ebenezer ]\Ic^Iaster, lived to the advanced age of ninetv- 
five years, dying at ^\'est Sparta, New York. Robert McMaster. his 
son, and the father of Dr. I\IcMasier, became a well-to-do agriculturist 
and prominent citizen in his home locality. His political allegiance was 
given to the old-line \Vhig party until its dissolution, when he advocated 
the Republican cause and supported Lincoln. His business affairs were 
carefully conducted and he became a well-to-do farmer. His death oc- 
curred January 13, 1866, when he was fifty-five years of age. His wife, 



7^^ HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

who bore the mai.lui name of Liicv L. Hamilton, was born near Rut- 
land, \ ermont, and died in .Missouri, November 22, 18S2, at the a.^e of 
sixty-six years. She was of Scotch lineage, the Hamiltons coming to 
this country soon after the arrival of the .Mayflower in Plvmouth harijor. 
Rejjresentatives of the name settled in Vermont and the familv furnished 
soldiers U, the Revolutionary war, Mrs. McMaster's "randfather having 
been one of the heroes wlu. f, ught f(M- libertv. Tl'ie parents nf Mrs. 
McMastcr were Stoddard and .Marv (Sheldon)' Hamilton, who livc<l for 
a time in Vermont, hut afterward removed to New York. Mrs. Ham- 
ilton died at the advanced age of ninety years, while her mother passed 
away in Rochester, New York, at the very veneralde age of one hun- 
dred and two years. Mrs. McMaster was' a Baptist in'religious faith, 
holding membership in the church at Dowagiac. P.v her marriage she 
became tlie mother of eight children, namely : Hamilton S. ; William 
Henry, a farmer residing in Shelby ville, Missouri; Marion E.. who 
follows farming near Monroe, Missouri, and is an inventor of note; 
Mary E., the wife of Myron L. Ward, a fruit grower of Alvin, Texas; 
Emerson P., an agriculturist residing at Machias, New York; Albert C. 
and Gilbert C. twins, wlio died when about five years of age; and Rolv 
ert P., also deceased. 

Dr. McMastcr. the eldest of the family, was reared upon the old 
homestead farm and attended the district scliools during their yearly 
sessions until ten years of age. Afterward he worked through the sum- 
mer months in the fields and continued his education only tiirough the 
winter seasons. He remained in the district schools until eighteen years 
of age, after which he attended the Dansville and Lima seminaries, Ixith 
in New York, and in the latter institution was a pupil under I'Yanccs 
E. Willard, the famous temperance reformer. He also attended Albion 
(Michigan) College for two years, having come to this state in 1S67. 
His preparation tor the practice of medicine was begun in the office and 
under the direction of Dr. H. L. Baker at Blissfield, Atichigan, and he 
attended medical lectures at Eclectic Medical College in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
previous to entering Bennett Medical College of Chicago, from which 
he was graduated in the spring of 1S71. 

Dr. McMaster located for practice at Battle Creek, [Michigan, but 
after a few months came to Dowagiac, where he entered into partner- 
ship wither. Cyrus J. Curtis in the office which he still occupies. This 
partnership continued for two years, after which he spent eighteen 
months at Grand Rapids, when he returned to Dowagiac. where he still 
remains. He is the oldest physician of the city and although a general 
practitioner, makes a specialty of chronic diseases, in whicli he has been 
very successful. Well qualified by thorough preliminary training for 
his chosen life work, he has continually promoted his efficiencv throufih 
reading, investigation and experiment and has thus kept in touch with 
the march of the profession. 

At the time of the Civil war Dr. IMcMaster responded to the coun- 



HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY 715 

try's call for aid, enlisting on the 6th ol August, i86j, when but twenty 
years ot age. He enrolled his name at West Sparta, New York, in 
company with his brother, William H. AIcAlaster, and they were assigned 
to duty with Company B, One Hundred and Thirtieth New York Vol- 
unteer infantry, with which both served until the cessation of hostilities. 
After a year's service the regiment was changed to cavalry in 18O3 and 
became known as the Nineteenth New York Cavalry and also as the 
P'irst New York Dragoons. This regiment was included in Fox's "three 
hundred lighting regiments." it was engaged in si.\ty-six battles, not 
including various skirmishes, and formed a part of General Wesley Mer- 
ritt's brigade of Devon's division and General Phil Sheridan's corps. 
He was mustered out at Clouds Mills, Virginia. His brother was 
wounded in a skirmish in the Shenandoah valley. Of five farmer boys 
who enlisted together Dr. Alc]\iaster and his brother were the only ones 
to return to their homes. The doctor lay in a hospital at Washington 
witii typhoid fever for some time and while still there he was made 
nurse and ward master. While thus engaged he conceived the idea of 
reading medicine, a determination which he carried out upon returning 
home. 

In 1S72 Dr. Mc^Iaster was married to I\Iiss Mary i'lorence Steb- 
bins, wiio was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1S48 and is a 
daughter of Edward Sawyer and Harriet (Goddard) Stebbins," the for- 
mer a native of Vermont and the latter of Massachusetts. Her uncle, 
Delenor Goddard, was editor of the Boston Adzxrtiscr for a number of 
years and the Goddards were a very prominent family of Massachusetts, 
w^hile the Stebbins were descended from Ivevolutionary stock. Unto Dr. 
and Airs. ^Ic^NIaster have been born three children: Gertrude Louise, 
now the wife of William li. Sweet, a plumber of Dowagiac; Edward S., 
who is head bookkeeper for the Dowagiac Manufacturing Company; and 
Robert P., who was a bookkeeper and died in April, 1904, at the age of 
twenty-seven years. 

ibr. and Mrs. r\lc]\iasler hold membership in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and are people of the highest respectability, who have long 
occupied a prominent and enviable position in social circles in the city 
where they reside. The doctor belongs to the Ancient Order of United 
"Workmen and to the Grand Army of the Republic, while in the line of 
his profession he is connected with the State Eclectic Medical Associa- 
tion, of which he was chosen the first secretary, being honored with the 
office for twenty years. I"Ie has also been a member and vice-president 
of the National Eclectic ^Medical Association. He was a Lincoln Repub- 
lican and afterward became a Prohibitionist. He also voted twice for 
William Jennings Piiyan and is now a socialist. In community affairs he 
has taken considerable interest and his labors have not been without bene- 
ficial effect. Pie has been a member of the school board of Dowagiac 
and was the first health officer of the city. At one time he was the owner 
of a farm north of the city, one-half of which lay within the corporate 



Tlt5 HISTOliY OF CASS COUNTY 

liinits and this has Ijeen sulxlividcd and platted and is now known as Dr. 
McMaster"s first and scc*>nd ;idditions to tlie citv of Dowagiac. In con- 
nection with his practice he and his sons cultivate q-inseng and are devel- 
oping a lin-ine-^s of o msideraMe importance in thi<; line. Or. Mc.Master 
is very widely known in Cass county and has had a notahlc and honor- 
able life history. A man of push and progress, difficulties have van- 
ished hefore him as nn'st before the morning sun. He has no untried 
stantlards and he is a man of strong convictions, quick to discern the 
right and unfaltering in his maintenance thereof. He is a lover of soci- 
ety and of his friends and association with him means pleasure, expan- 
sion and ele\ation. 

WILLIAM M. FROST. 

\\'illiam M. Fro?t. who has jjassed the Psalmist's span of threa 
score years and ten, l;eing now in his seventy-fourth year, makes his 
home in Dowagiac, but for many years was an active factor in agricult- 
ural circles. A native of New York, he was born in Otsego county on 
the 13th of October, 1832. and was the eldest in a family of five children, 
two daughters and lln'ce sons, all of whom readied adult ;ige. Their 
parents were Fiijah and l^udcnce .Ann (Cory) Frost, both of whom 
were natives of New York. The paternal grandfatlier was Dru-id I'Vost, 
^\ho became one of the early settlers of Otsego county. New York. He 
married Jane Gilbert and reared a family of twelve rjiildrcn. His death 
occurred ui>mi the old homestead in the east. 

Elijah Frost, father of our subject, was b.orn in Otsego county 
and early became familiar with farm lal>or as he worked in the fields 
for his father, following the ])low anrl harvesting the crops. Believ- 
ing that the west furnished good business oppcn-tunities he startetl for 
Michigan in 1844 and made his way direct to Cass county, locating on 
Pokagon prairie in Pokagon townshi]). He purchased a farm on which 
he lived f(3r about tv.elve years, when he sold that pro])erty and crossed 
the line into Berrien county, where he lived two years. He then re- 
turned to Cass county, settling in Silver Creek township, where he 
died at the age of se\enty-se\cn years. Throughout his entire life 
he followed agricultural pursuits in order to provide for his family 
and the success which he enjoyed was due entirely to his enterprising 
efforts and capable management. In early life he was an old-line Wliig, 
supporting the party until its dissolution, when he joined the ranks 
of the new Republican partv' upon its organization. Coming to Cass 
county in pioneer days he found here what was practically a wilderness. 
The few homes of the early settlers were widely scatteretl. the forests 
largely stood in tlieir primeval strength and the streams were un- 
bridged. In fact the work of development had been scarcely begun 
and he bad am])le opportunity to aid in the work of early improve- 
ment and progress. Fie married Prudence Ann Cory, also a native of 
New York and a daughter of Samuel and Rachel Alallory) Corv, who 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 717 

located in the Emjiire slate at an early day, coming to New York from 
Connecticut. Mrs. Imosi was a granddaughter of a Revolutionar_\- 
soldier. She stnvi\ed iier inisband for a number of years and died in 
the ninetieth year of iicr age in Silver Creelv township, Ijeing one of 
tlie oldest settlers of the cnunty in age and also in years of residence 
here. Of her family nf fi\-e children rnily two are now living, the other 
being Kenyon D. Frcst. a\!iii resides in Cass county. 

William M. I'mst siicnt the tlr-~t twcUe years of his life in the 
state of his nati\ity anrl then crune with his parents to Michigan, ar- 
riving here im the first of Ortolier, 1844. lie ac([uired his education 
in comnton and select schools nf Xiles and when not busy with his 
textbooks remained at liome. assisting in the work of the farm. The 
family experienced manv of the \isual hardships and trials of picneer 
life and with the others nf the family Mr. Frost worked in the fields. 
converting the once wild and raw land into a producti\e tract. At 
the age of twentv years he began teaching school, holding his first 
schonl in a little log cabin in Silver Creek township. He fnllnwed the 
profession for about nine years, having the a1)i]ity to ini])art clearly 
and readily the knowledge to others that he had acc|uired, so that he 
was recognized as one of the capable educators of this part of the state. 
He was in the schoolroom during the winter months, while in the 
summer seasons be follnwcil the plow. 

He first was married in 1856 to 3>ri?s ^lary Jane Dalton. a 
daughter nf John and Catherine f Cooper) Dalton. She was l3orn 
in the city of Rochester, New York', ]\Iay 2. ii'^36, and came with her 
])arents to "Michigan, locating at Three Rivers, whence they afterward 
removed to Cnss county, Mrs. Fnist lieing about fourteen years of age 
at that time. Upon his marriage ^Ir. Frost rented a farm which he 
cultivated for about three \cnrs. this being located in Niles townsliiii. 
P.errien connt\'. He li\ed frugally and economically during that period 
and as the result of his indu'^try was enabled in the spring of i8f.o 
to purchase a farm in Silver Creek township, whereon he took up his 
abode. The farm was all co\ered with timber at the time of the pur- 
chase, and in the midst of the forest he began developing the field-; and 
clearing away the trees, grubbing nut the stumps and burning un the 
brush. In the course of time the '^unshine flooded the fields and ripened 
the grain. In all of his farm work he kept abreast widi the progress 
incident to agricultural life, using good improved machinen- and fol- 
lowing modern methods in all that he did. Owing to his careful 
direction of his business interests and liis unfaltering ener2:\- he ac- 
quired a gratifying cnnipetence an.d in 1889 removed to F)- wagiac. 
where he has since reniained. For -nn'c }'ears he continued to give 
personal supervisirn tc his farm and the idice is now carried on through 
the work of a man whom he emplovs bv the rear. He has one hun- 



71 S HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

dred and eighty acres of well improved land all under the plow save 
about fifteen acres and good crops are annually harvested. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Frost have been born three children : Fmily 
C, the eldest, who died at age of ten years; Elizabeth, now the wife 
of E. E. Aliger, of Dowagiac; and Carrie Lucilc, at home. Air. Frost 
in early manhood proudly cast his first presidential ballot for John C. 
Fremont, the first candidate of the Republiain party. He voted also 
for Abraham Lincoln and has supported each presidential nominee at 
the head of the ticket from that time. He has held a number of local 
ofifices, to which lie has been called by his fellow citizens, who recognize 
his worth and his fidelity to imblic duty. He has been superintendent 
of Silver Creek township public school, which position he held for 
twelve years and was supervisor of Silver Creek township for seven 
years. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church for 
a half century and has taken an active and helpful interest in its work 
and upbuilding, filling various official positions in connection there- 
with. His house was always called the preacher's home, its hospitality 
being extended to all ministers visiting the neighborhood. I^ooking 
back into the past it will be found that Mr. Frost has for si.xty years 
lived in this county and he is therefore largely authi^rity on matters 
relating to its history. Creat changes have occurred and a wonderful 
transformation has been wrought since those early days when the 
forests were uncut, land uncultivated and homes unbuilt. The work 
of progress has been made by slow but stead}' stages and those who 
have contributed to the ui)i)uil(ling and development r)f the county de- 
serve much credit, es])ecially those who have shared in the trials and 
hardships of frontier life as ]\Ir. Frost has done. 

CLYDE W. KETCHAAL 

Clyde W. Ketcham, one of the younger members of the Cass county 
bar who is making rapid advancement, resides at Dowagiac and is a 
native son of the county, his birth having occurred in Volinia township 
in 1876. Fie is a son nf Dr. \\". J. Ketcham. well known in the count}. 
and was a student in the public schools of Dowagiac, being graduated 
from the high school with the class of 1894. When it came to the time 
when he should decide upon a choice of work as a life occupation he de- 
termined ujion the practice of law and entered the law- department of the 
Michigan State University at Ann Arbor in 1899. Completing the regu- 
lar three years' course, he was graduated in the class of 1902 and entered 
upon the active work of the profession in Dowagiac in partnership with 
Charles E. Sweet. After a year he opened an independent office, pur- 
chasing the practice and the law library of F. J. Atwell, one of the pio- 
neer attornevs of Cass county. He has been eminently successful and 
bids fair to become a leading member of the bar, having already attained 
success and prominence that many an older practitioner might well envy. 



HISTORY 0['' CASS COUNTY 719 

Imjuirtant litioated interests liaxc l;een entrusted to liis care and his care- 
ful handling of these lia^ led to the winning of decisions favijrahle to his 
clients. 

On the 6th of Scptcmher, 1S99, Mr. Ketcham was married to Miss 
Clarice Bushnell. a natixe of Grand Rapids and a daughter of Asa Bush- 
nell, a wood car\er and worker in wocid in that city. Mr. Ketcham he- 
longs to the ^lethodist Episcopal church and his wife to the Congre- 
gational church. I'Vaternally he is connected \\illi the Masons and the 
^laccahces, while in the line of his profession he holds mcmhership rela- 
tions with the Cass Comity Bar Association. In his political views he 
is a Rcpuhlican, and from 1897 until 1S99 served as justice of the peace. 
His energies are now concentrated tipon his professional duties and he 
is well known as a sincere and earnest practitioner, having comprehen- 
sive knowledge of the principles of both civil and criminal law. 

SIMEOX COXKLIX. 

Dowagiac has among its inhabitants many men who in success- 
ful business careers have won tlie competence that now enables them to 
live retired. To this clas.s belongs Simeon Conklin, who at one time 
was actively and successfully engaged in general fanning in Cass county 
but is nOAV living in a pleasant home in Dowagiac. surrounded by 
many of the comforts which go to make life worth living, having put 
aside further business cares. He was born in ;Otsego county, Nev/ 
York, February 15. 1841. His father. Abram Conklin. also a native of 
that county, was there reared and married and in an early day came 
westward to Michigan, wlicre he in\-ested in property, purchasing land 
in Lagrange township, \\hcre he lived for a short time. He afterward 
removed to Silver Creek township, where he died when seventy years 
of age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Malinda Gilbert, was 
also born in Otsego county, New York, and lived to be about fifty 
years of age. In the family were eight children, three daughters and 
five sons, six of whom grew to manhood and womanho<"jd. There 
are now living four sons and a daughter, namely : Gilbert, who is 
residing in Silver Creek township; Simeon, of this review; Abram, 
who makes his home in Dowagiac: Jane, also a resident of Silver Creek 
township; and Charles, living in Dowagiac. 

Simeon Conklin was the second of the eight children and was 
but a small bov when brought by his parents to IMichigan, so that he 
was reared and educated in Silver Creek township, attending the Indian 
Lake school in his bovhood days. When not busy with his textbooks 
he remained at home, assisting in the work of the farm imtil he had 
passed his twentv-first birthday. He was married in 1869 to Mi.ss 
Charlotte Swisher, a daughter of John and Melissa Swisher. Mrs. 
Conklin was bom in Preble county. Ohio, and was but a small girl 
when brought to this county by her parents. Upon coming to this 



720 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

county they located m i'ukagon township. During that time Mr. Con- 
klin gave his attention and energies to the further cultivation of the 
fields which he brought under a high state of cultivation, so that he 
annually harvested good crops. Pie used the latest improved machinery 
and conducted his work along modern lines of agriculture until 1895, 
when he put aside business cares and took up his abode in Dowagiac. 
He still owns, however, his farm, comprising two hundred acres of 
good land, which he rents. 

Unto Mr. and Airs. Conkliii ha\-e been born four children but 
Myrtle and Cora arc now deceased, while the odier daughters, Lillie 
and Xora, arc at home. Mr. Cnnklin has spent nearly his entire life 
in Cass county and has always voted the Republican ticket since age 
gave to him the right of franchise. lie has a wide and favorable ac- 
quaintance and has been successful in a financial way. His friends 
are many and tlie number is constantly increasing as the circle 01 his 
acquaintance widens. 

HEXRY G. ROSEWWRXE. 

Henry G. RMScwame, acting as townsbii> clerk, his hume being 
in seclicm 7, MiliMU t(iwn>liip, was burn, upon this farm Februarv 17, 
i8r,7. T'ur family 1- ^f b'.nglish lineage, and the grandfather was 
Dr. John \'. RoM.'\\;iriic. wliri became one of the jjioncers of Cass 
county, reaching ?\lihon townshii) in 1834, anj w.as identified will) 
many events which <;hai'eii the early ainials of this part of the state. 
He was born in the piri-h of Ciwincar. county of Cornwall. England. 
in the year 1781;. lie was .a i)U])d of the celebrated- Sir Astley Cooper, 
and from him received the early teaching' which made him so success- 
ful in after lilo as a pliysician and surgeon. In tlie countv of Corn- 
wall he enjoyed for many years an c.\tensi\e and lucrative practice, 
living in the township of '\\"adcbridge until he rcmovetl to this countrv. 
Jn the year 1829 he emigrated to America with his family and settled 
upon the shore of Canandaigua Lake. X'ew York, where he lived in 
quiet retirement until 1832. In that year, cholera ha\ing made its first 
appearance in this county, lie was ref]ucstcd by the citizens of Canan- 
daigua to ^o to the city of Xew York while it was raging there to in- 
vestigate the causes of tb.it new ])lague and determine the prriper treat- 
ment of it in all its phases. Among' the eminent physicians of X"'ew 
York he achieved a liigli reputation, not only for the skillful treatment 
of that disease, but also for eminence in his profession generallv. Aft- 
er coming to this country. Dr. Rnsewarne did not practice his profes- 
sion iti the ordinary acccjvtancc of that term, but for more tlian thirtv 
years he chcci'fully and gratuitously g'ave his services whenever re- 
(|uested with like assiduity to the rich and the poor, and there were 
few' families in the o:immuriity that were not at some time benefited 
by his professional skill. .V lover of nature, he enjoyed the seclusion of 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 7-_'l 

the lake shore where he ?(■ long chveh. and aUhough not seeking gen- 
eral society, he was cminenily sociahle and hospitable. His coming 
was always welcome. whellKr to assuage the pains of sickness or re- 
ceive the lM^;)i^allty ..f liis friends. He had passed so much ni his life 
in that locaHty. devriiing liis talc-nts and acquirements to the relief of 
others, and h.ad proved himself so kind and true and so generous in his 
friendship that his loss was so keenly felt by the community as to se- 
cure among them an enduring and affectionate remembrance. He died 
at Canandaigua, New York, Aur;ust 19, 1863, aged seventy-six years. 

Charles F. Rosewarnc, father of our subject, was a native of Corn- 
wall, England, and was only nine years of age when he accompanied 
his father, Dr. John \'. Rosewarne, to .America. He was reared in 
New York, and with the family came to Michigan in 1834. He re- 
mained for about ten years, after which he returned to New York, 
where he engaged in business as railroad contractor through the suc- 
ceeding decade. He built man}- railroads in the east, and was thus 
closely associated with the substantial improvement and develoymient 
of that section of the cuuntry, for it lias been said that railroad build- 
ing is the most important agency in the settlement of a comnnmity, 
furnishing the means whereby the natural resources of th.e county that 
have been tran'^formed into marketable commodities can be placed in 
trade circles. In 1S41") Mr. Ivosewarne returned to Cass county and 
settled upon the farm where his son. Hcnn- G., nc-iv resides. His f.ath- 
er owned a sawmill and Charles F. Rosewarne was also engaged in the 
manufacture of lumber. He continued an active representati\'e of in- 
dustrial interests in this county for a number of years, and died at the 
advanced age of eighty-one. His political allegiance was given to the 
Democracy, and he held various local offices in the township, including 
that of township treasurer. He was well known in the community, 
and was a recognized leader in public afl'airs, leaving the impress of 
his individuality and activit\- upon many measures for the public good. 
He was united in marriage to r\Iiss Sarah A. Smith, a native rif Con- 
necticut and a daughter of Ilezekiah Smith, who was descended from 
Alayflower ancestiy, the family having been established in [Nlassachu- 
setts during the perind of early colonization in New England. Mrs. 
Rosewarne still survives her husl)and and is now se\'enty-seven years 
of age. In the family were eight children, five sons and three daugh- 
ters, and with the exception of one .son all are yet living. 

Heni-y G. Rosewarne is the youngest of the family and the only 
one who now resi<les in Cass county. He was reared upon the old fam- 
ily homestead and acquired his education in the common schools, devo- 
ting his time to the laljors of the field when not occupied with his text 
books. In 1 888 he went to Chicago, and for four years was engaged in 
the hardware business in that city. In i8q2 he returned to the old home- 
stead in Cass county, where he has since been engaged in general farm- 



(■-^2 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ing. Everything- about his place is in keeping with the ideas of modern 
farming, there being fair buildings, the latest improved machinery, 
well kept fences and highly cultivated tields. .Mr. Rosewarne realixes 
that diligence is the basis of all success, and by his unremitting effort 
has won a creditable place among the substantial agriculturists of the 
county. The farm comprises one hundred and sixty-five acres, :nid 
Mr. Rosewarne is engaged in general agricultural pursuits and dairy- 
ing, having a good business in both departments. 

On the jth of September, i8<j8. was celebrated tlie marriage of 
Henry G. Rosewarne and ]\liss Eva I. Dinan, a daughter of John 'M. 
and Ellen (Smith) Dinan, who became pioneer settlers of Cass county, 
Michigan. They are still living, and yet remain residents of this coun- 
ty. Their daughter, }vlrs. Rosewarne, was born in Jefferson townsliip, 
Cass county, was educated in the home school and in the Ferris Indus- 
trial School. Prior to her marriage she successfully engaged in teach- 
ing for three years. Mr. Rosewarne has taken an active jjart in poli- 
tics and has liekl various oHices, to which he has been called by his 
fellow townsmen, who recognize his worth and ability. He was treas- 
urer of Milton towii.ship in iS'j6-y, has been justice of the peace, and in 
1900 was ajipoinleil to fill the vacancy in the office of township clerk. 
He \\a>> tlien ek-cled in ux>i. and has been elected each succeeding year, 
so that he is still tlie incumbent in this position. His entire life has 
been passed in Cass county, and his record is -as an open book which 
all may read. He has never attempted to take advantage of the neces- 
sities of his fellownien, but has lived so as win their respect and con- 
fidence, and has made a creditable recxird in business and political cir- 
cles. Mr. and Mrs. Ro-ewarne have a copy of the parchment deed 
which was execuied June J5. iJ^^.U- ^"^1 beans the signature of I'resi- 
dent Jackson, this liL-ini; one di the valued documents of the county. 

^IALCO:\I A. CAMPBELL. 

Malcom .A. Camiibell is serving as alderman from the third ward 
in Dowagiac and is closely associated with industrial interests here 
through his conduct of a blacksmith and wagon shop. Pie is also en- 
gaged in the sale i>f buggies and wagons and has a business which is 
proving profitalile. Morcuver he deserves the success which comes to 
him because his life has been characterized by close application and un- 
faltering;- diligence. "Thr'aigh struggles to success" is the usual rule 
of the business world and this axiom finds verification in the life of iMr. 
Campbell, who has worked his w-ay upward, winifing a fair n-ieasure 
of prosperit\- and at the same time making a record for business in- 
tegrity that any man might be proud to p<5ssess. 

A native of Canada. Mr. Crunpbell was born in Lampton countv, 
Ontariij, on the 16th of September, 1861. His father. Duncan Camp- 
bell, is supposed to ha\-e been a native of SexJtlanil and settled in 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY T-i3 

Canada in early lite. There he cleared a tract of land and followed 
farming until his death, which occurred when he was ahout fifty-seven 
years of age. He had married Sarah McCalpine, also a native of 
Scotland, who still resides ujicn tlic old homestead in Canada. By 
her marriage she hccanie the mother of eight children, five daughters 
and three sons, all of whom reached adult age. 

Maicom A. Camiihell. who name introduces this record, was 
the fourth child rmd sccmikI sim in that family, and was reared upon 
the old homestead farm in his nati\-e enunty. At the usual age he en- 
tered the C'luntry -ehiw.ls ;i;i,l therein ;ici|uire(l a fair English educa- 
tion, and when not liusy with lii^ text Ixmks he aided in the work of 
tlie fields, hut, thinking that he wmihl prefer a trade rather than to 
follow the ])ln\v, he hcgan le;irniiig hlacksmithing when sixteen years 
of age at a small town called Aughrim. He served an apprenticeship of 
three years, and after comi)leting his term of indenture started (jut to 
work as a journcymnn, fi'llowing hlacl<smitl'.ing at flifferent jilaces in 
Canada and the United States. His first work in the states was in i8S6 
at Saginaw, ^lichigan. lie was afterward empkiyed in other jxiints, 
and sithsequently he returned to Canada, where he remained frir ahout 
three years, on the expiratioii of whicli period he went to Xehraska. 
locating at Plum Creek, where he resided for a short time. lie then 
again went to Canada, an<l the period of his residence at this time cov- 
ered ahont six years. .Again crossing the hui-dcr int(.) the United 
States, he settled at Detroit, Alichigan, and afterward removed to Ply- 
mouth, this state, whence in i8<)4 he came to Dow.agiac. where he lias 
since made his liome. Tie was em])lo}'ed at j(iurne_\nian work hy the 
man that owned the shop which is now Mr. Crnnjiheirs projierty. heing 
thus engaged for two years, at the end of which time he embarked in 
business on his own accmmt on Peimsyl\-ania a\'enuc. where he re- 
mained for one year. Tie was also iu Inisiness on Front street for four 
years, at the end of which time he removed to his present location. 
having purchased the ]iroperty here about two years before. This is 
the shop in which he first worked on conn'ng to Dowagiac, and here lie 
carries on black.^^mithing and tlie manufacture of wagons, doing all 
kinds of repair work as well, and at the same time he engages in the 
sale of wagons and buggies. Tie likewise has the agency for the Ala- 
mo gas and gasoline engines. PTis business has reached considerable 
extent at the present time, and his energ-\' and watchfulness of all de- 
tails pointing to success have contributed to a ver\- gratifying pros- 
perity. 

IMr. Campbell was married in t8R6 to ^liss Julia Brown, a iTnugh- 
ter of Dugald and Alary rATcCullum) Brown. Airs. Campbell was 
also born in Canada, and In- tlii'^ marriage there are three children ; 
Gordon Idovd. Tohn Harvey and Grace. 

Mr. Campbell has been interested in public affairs to the extent 



724 HISTORY 01- CASS COLW'i V 

of becoming' a co-opcrant factor in many plans formulated for public 
progress and practical improvement. He is a stanch and earnest Re- 
publican, and is now serving as a member of the city council, repre- 
senting the third ward, in which connection he exercises his ofticial 
prerogatives to promote mea-nrcs of reform and improvement. He 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Order of For- 
esters and the National Protective Legion. There have been no excit- 
ing chapters in his life record, but he possesses those sterling traits 
which work for good citizenship, for activity and honor in business 
and for fidelity in private life. 

WILLIS M. I'ARR. 

Willis ~\1. I'arr, a well known representative of industrial inter- 
ests in Cass county m^w living in Dowagiac, was born at New Haven 
in Macomb county, 3.1ichigan, August i, 1844. His father, Henry F. 
Farr, was a native of New York and in his boyhood days came to 
Michigan with his father, Samuel Farr, who was a pioneer of this 
state. The grandfather traveled westward with an ox team and located 
first in I\Iacomb county, where in the midst of the forest he built a log 
cabin and improved a farm, giving his attention to the cultivation and 
develojjment of his land up to the time of his death. Henry F. Farr 
was but a small lad v.hcn the family toi>k up their- abode upnn the old 
homestead pro])crly in Macomb county anc] the occupation to which 
he was reared he made his life work, carrying on farming in that 
county until he, too, was called to his final rest. He married Julia Ann 
Clemens, a nati\-e nf Xew ^'mk-. in which state she rem.aincil uiuil 
about twenty years of age. when she came to Michigan with her par- 
ents, who settled in iMacomb county. There her remainirig days were 
passed. iNIr. and ]\Irs. ITenry Farr had a family of four sons, of whom 
two died in infancy. The brother of our subject, 'M. S. Farr, is a 
stock raiser and ranchman of A^cnango, Nebraska. He there owns eleven 
square miles under fence in Perkins county and is one of the leading 
stock-men of his part of the country. 

W^illis ]\I. Farr, the eldest of the four children, was reared in the 
place of his nativity until eighteen years of age, when he went to New 
York, where he spent the succeeding year in teaching school. He then 
returned to !\[ichigan and attended school in Mount Clemens, after 
which he resumed teaching. In the spring of 1S64 he went to Chicago 
and after tramping the streets of the city for two weeks in search of 
employment he secured the position of bundle boy in a wholesale and 
retail store. Lie was thus engaged for about six months, at the end of 
which time he responded to the country's call for aid, enlisting as a 
member of Company C. Fifty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantn- as a 
private. He served for thirteen mrntlT^ and participated in the cam- 
paign under General Thomas from December, 1864, until June. 1865. 






V,- - 






U /TlM^ 4^ c/'jv-iyL 



\ / 



OaJlMaI, Pu ^coi 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY T25 

He was never excused irdni duty during tlie service on account of ill- 
ness or frciu' any ntlicr cause, but always faithfully remained at his post 
anfl at the close of the war received an honorable discharge at San 
Anton in, Texas. 

\\'hen the cuuntrv no h'V.<:^c\- needed his aid Mr. Farr returned to 
Chicago and soon afterward went uimn the road as a commercial trav- 
eler, spending two and a In'f years in that way in Illinois, Indiana and 
Michigan. Flis next venture was as a wholesale merchant, dealing in 
notions, and at one time he utilized three wagons in the trade. He 
continued in that business for about ten years, meeting with very grat- 
ifying success. After disiiosing of his stock of notions he purchased 
a fourth interest in the business of the firm of Warner, Tuttle, Farr & 
Company, the original manufacturers of the shoe grain drill at Dowagiac. 
He remained with the house for about a year and 'then sold out his in- 
terest, after which he f. -rmcd a partnership with ;Mr. Stark for the 
manufacture of the common sense sand band. Later he bought out Mr. 
Stark's interest- and is now sole proprietor of the business, which is rec- 
ognized as one of the productive industries of diis part of the state. 

Mr. Farr was married June 26, 1873, to ]\Iiss Sarah Doolittle, a 
daughter of Lorin and I'lvicbe (AW.rth) Doolittle. She was born at 
Hun^n, Wayne county. Xc\v ^'"rk. and was there reared. ]Mr. Farr 
is a member of H. C. Cilbert Post. Xo. 47, G. A. R.. and he has taken 
an active and helpful part in its work, "^n iSSo he served as a member 
of the city council of Dowagiac. He is well known in the county and 
his co-operation has been given to many movements wdiich have had 
direct and important bearing upon the welfare and progress of the county. 
He has been greatly interested in the promotion of the movement for 
the erection of a srildicr's nuMiument and but for him this movement 
wnidd never have succeeded. In all matters of citizenship he manifests 
the same loyal and patriotic s^pirit that characterized his sen-ice as a 
soldier upon the battlefields of the south. 

ABRAM COXKLIN. 

Abram Conklin. who after long and close connection with farming 
interests in Cass countv is now- living retired in Dowagiac. is one of the 
worthy citizens that the Fmpire state has furnished to southern Michi- 
gan. He w-as born in Otsego county. X'ew York, August 18, 1845, 
and is the third son of Abram and Belinda (Tlilbert) Conklin. of w-lmm 
mention is made on another page of this work in connection with the 
sketch of Simeon Conklin. The 'subject of this review was but a small 
bov ^vhen he came to Cnss county with his parents, and on the old 
homestead farm, in Silver Creek tov.-nship he was reared. He attended 
the Indian Lake school, thus acquipng a fair education, as he mastered 
the branches of learning there taught. He also spent one season as 
a student in Dowagiac. Through the summer months he assisted in 



7i.'t; HISTORY Ol' CASS COUNTY 

the labors of the field ami meadow ami became familiar with the best 
metiiods of tilling- the scjil and carini:^ for stock. He continued to .give 
his father the hcntit ui his services ur.til the time of his marriage, 
which important e\cnt ii; his life occurred m iSjS. the lady of his 
choice beiny; Miss Xellie l-'lickinger, a daughter of Tcter and Mary 
(Smith) Flickinger. Mrs. Conklin was born in [Medina county, Ohio, 
and became a resident oi this county when a young lady of about nine- 
teen years, her parents locating- on a farm in Silver Creek township. 
At the time of her marriage Mr. Conklin took her as a bride to a farm 
in the same township, an.l he was there afterward engaged in farming 
until 1900. when he put aside the work of the fields anfl tuok up his 
abode in Dowagiac, liut still owns a good farm property, comprising 
one hundred and forty-eight acres of land, which is well improved, 
being supplied with gcmd buildings and modem equipments. It is all 
under the plow with the exception of eight acres. He has improved 
this place and made it what it is today — a valuable farm pro])erty — 
Mr. Conklin personally clearing all of it with the excei>tion of twenty 
acres. 

Unto our subject and his wife has been born a son, Lee A., who 
is attending business college at Battle Creek, Michigan, and who for 
two years was a student in the Consen-atory of Music at Oberlin, 
Ohio. He also spent two years in the Musical Conservatory of Chica- 
go, and has thus been provided with cxcrllent privileges for the culti- 
vation of his talent in the line of his art. Mr. Conklin has been a resi- 
dent of Cass count v for a half century, and his mind bears the impress 
of many of the historic events which have occurred here. He has al- 
ways voted the Republican ticket, and is known as a man fearless in de- 
fense of his honest convictions, politically or otherwise. The family 
is a representative pioneer one of the county, and ]Mr. Conklin wears 
worthily the honored family name. 

JOHN A. LIXDSLEY. 

The luml)er interests of :\licln'gan have always been an important 
source of the state's revenue and have formed one of the leading ele- 
ments in its business development and commercial progress. The vast 
forests have furnislied excellent opiiortunities for the lumlierman, and 
in every community in the state men of enterprise have been connected 
with the trade in its various branches and its kindred industries. ]\Ir. 
Lindsley is a well known lumberman of Dowagiac. where he is also 
operating a planing mill. He was born in .-\llegany county, Xew 
York. Tanuarv' 15, li^^S. His father, Leman Lindsley, was also a na- 
tive of the Empire state and was a farmer by occupation. He came to 
Michigan in 1F63. locating in Hartford, Van Buren county, where he 
carried on general agricultural pursuits up to the time of his death, 
which occurred when he was forty-five vears of age. He was of Scotch- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 727 

Irish descent and displayed in liis life many of the sterling characteris- 
tics of his ancestry. He wedded Miss Mary Engle, also a native of 
New York, who died in Michi;L;-aii when sixty-five years of age. In 
the family were three children, of wlmni John A. is the eldest. The 
sectind .'^on, Edwin M., is a jjartner (jf our subject in the manufacture 
and sale of lumber in Dowagiac, while Washington, the youngest son, 
is a resident of Deaitur, Indiana. 

John A. Lindsley spent the first hve years of his life in the state 
of his nativity and then came to Michigan with his parents, the family 
settling in \'an lUn-en county, where he was reared and (jbtained his 
education. He ]>ursued his education in the schools of Hartford and 
later jnirsued a business course in the Northern Indiana Normal School 
St Valparaiso. Returning to Michigan, he entered ui>on his business 
career in 1880 as a luml>er merchant at Hartford, where he continued 
until 1885, when he sold out there and removed to Dowagiac. Here 
he established a lumber yard and has continued in business for more 
than twenty years. He also owns and operates a planing mill, and his 
trade has long since reached extensive proportions, making his business 
one of the profitable enterprises of the city. This is due to individ- 
ual energy and careful management, ]Mr. Lindsley jiossessing in large 
measure the qualities of success, which are earnestness, diligence and 
perseverance. 

In 1880 was cclebrritcii the marriage of John .\. Lind^ley and 
Miss Mary Spalding, a d.iughter of A. N. Spalding of Hartford. They 
have a family of five children: Mrs. Eula Estell; Jvjhn X'ictor, who is. 
manager of the mill work department for the extensi\-e hiiuse of Sears, 
Roebuck &• Company of Chicag(^: Augustus R., who is clerk in The 
Fair at Chicago: Leman O.. who is attending a business college at 
South Bend. Indiana : and William. 

Mr. Lindsley exercises his right of franchise in support of the 
men and measures of the Republican jiarty and is deeply interested in 
its success and growth, doing all in his power to promote its influence 
and secure the adnjition of its principles. He served as supervisor of 
the first ward and lias lieen alderman several times. He is recognized 
as one of the leading men of his town and county. He has garnered 
in the fullness of time the generous harvest which is the just recom- 
]iense of indomitable energv", spotless integrity and unflagging enter- 
prise. 

PETER HANNAN. 

ig retired in Dowagiac, dates his residence 
lie was in former years closely associated 
u-;d jiursuits. and is still the owner of a 
I Silver Creek township. He was bom in 
New York. (-)n the 12th of ^\ny. 18-^9, 
ciur suns and two daughters, whose parents 



Pet. 


er Hannan. mnv 


in Cass 


onint}- fr( m 18 


with in< 


lustrial and agr 


valualile 


farming proper 


Geneseo, 


Livingston c >i 


and was 


one of a famil}" 



rjs HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

were Peter and ?ilarv llannaii. the t( inner (if Iri-h lineage and the lat- 
ter of French descent. I'etcr Hnnnan. Sr.. was a native <:if Ireland, 
and came to America at the time of the rehelhuii in his own country 
in company with three lirothers. 'Idiey lucatcd in Livingston county, 
New York, and Peter JIannan, Sr., tliere followed the occupation of 
farming for a number of years. While living in the east his wife died 
during the early boyhood of their son Peter. The father afterward 
disposed of his interests in the Pmpire state and removed to Wiscon- 
sin, where he spent bis remaining days, reaching, however, the ad- 
vanced age of seventy-nine years. .\11 of the children grew to man- 
hood or wnmanborid. but rnfy two i,f the family are now living, Will- 
iam Hannan being a resident of Wisconsin. 

Peter Hannan. whose name introduces this record, was the fourth 
metnber of his father's family and the second son. He was reared in 
the state of his nativity, spending tb.c first eighteen years of his life 
under the parental roof, when be left home and has since been depend- 
ent upon his own resources for a livelihood and for the success that 
he has achieved. He had acquired a fair knowledge of the common 
branches of English learning in the public schools, and through the 
summer months had worked in the fields upon bis father's farm. WHien 
he started out for himself be was employed as a farm band by the 
month, and in this wav made bis start in life. As a companion and 
helpmate for life's iourncv be cluise >iTiss 'Mary McStravich, whom be 
wedded in 1S32. Thev located on a farm in Livingston county. Xew 
York, where they resided for about t\ro years, wdien. in 1854, they 
came direct tr> Cass aiunty, Michigan, settling in Dowagi.ac. PTere 
Mr. Hannan turned his attention to the manufacture of baskets, which 
he followed successfully for alj. ut seventeen years, developing a large 
and imiHirtant industry. On the expiration of that period be turned 
his attention to farming in Silver Creek township, Cass county, and 
continued in active agricultural work for a number of years. He still 
owns this projierty, which is a well developed farm. Although his at- 
tention was given to the work of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops, be continued to reside in Dowagiac, and has lived in the same 
house for over fortv years. It is situated in what is known as Ham- 
ilton's addition t(-> the city, and the deed which be holds was signed by 
Patrick Plamilton and bis wife. L'nto :\Ir. and :\Irs. Llannan have 
been born three sons, who are \-et living: \\\ W., of Detroit, who is a 
prominent real estate dealer of that city; Charles R., of Boston, ]\[assa- 
chusetts, who is representative for Swift and Armour at a salary of 
twentv-five thousand dollars per year: and Frank L.. who is engaged 
in the real estate business with liis bmther. W. W. PLannan. There 
were two children, John and :\lary. who passed away. Mr. and IMrs. 
PTannan celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary- in 1002. The 
occasion was a most delightful one and will long be remembered by 



HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY T2U 

their many friemls wliu participated therein. To their children they 
have given excellent educational advantag'es, and their sons are o^llege 
graduates, W. W. Hannan having cciniplcted a course of study in the 
Michigan University at Ann Arbor, Charles in Yale College, at New 
Haven, Connecticut, while h'rank completed his education at Orchard 
Lake, Michigan. The two older sons are millionaires and their jjrcsent 
enviable juisitions in business circles are attrilnitable to their uwn efforts 
and capability. 

Mr. Hamian has been a resident of Dowagiac and Cass county 
for more than a half century and has been closely identified with its 
growth and development. He has supported both the Democratic and 
Republican parties. In early manhood he was a Douglas Democrat, 
but ill 1S64, when the country was involved in the Civil war, he be- 
lieved in sustaining the policy of the president and cast his ballot for 
Abraham Lincoln, since which time lie has supported each nominee at 
the head of the ReiJuLIican ticket, while his sons have followed in his 
footsteps in this resjject. lie is a member of Dowagiac lodge, No. 214, 
A. F. & A. M., and is well kmnvn in the county as a man of 'genuine 
personal worth, whose life has lieen gtu'ded by high and manly princi- 
ples, characterized by consideration for the rights and privileges of 
others. He has likewise upheld his honest convictions unswervingly, 
and now at the age of seventy-seven years he receives the respect, ven- 
eration and regard of all with whom he has been l)riaight in cf'iitact. 

FRANK AT WOOD. 

Frank Atwood, a retired farmer who has held \arious offices and 
in the faithful performance of his'duty has manifested his devotion to 
the general welfare, was born in ^Vayne township, Cass county. Aug- 
ust 12, 1852, and now lives in Dowagiac. His paternal grandfather 
was Wells H. Atwood. a jiioneer of this county, who anne to ^Michigan 
in the summer of 1836. Few were the settlements that had been made 
in this portion of the state. The forests were largely uncut and the land 
uncultivated, and it remained to such sturdy and brave pioneer residents 
as Mr. Atwood to reclaim the region from the domain of the red man 
for the uses of civilization. He established a farm, upon which he 
reared his family, including Lafayette Atwood, the father of our sub- 
ject. He was born in Cattaraugus county. New York, and was brought 
to Cass county by his parents in 1836. being reared upon the home 
farm in \Vayne township. He \vas only about tweh-e years of age at 
the time of the arrival here, and his youth was passed upon his father's 
farm, where he assisted in the arduous task of developing new land and 
cultivating the fields as his age and strength permitted. In Wayne 
township he was married to Miss Adaline Allen, a nati\-e of New "*i"ork, 
who came to Cass county witli her parents in an early day. the family 
home being established in "Wayne township. Following their marriage. 



780 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Mr. ami Mrs. Lnfayctte AtwuiKl located u]^<m a farm in Wayne town- 
ship, where ihey h\'C(l fur many '/cars. He was a rehal)le. enertjetic 
and enterprising at;'riciiltr.ri-i nf the cumnuinity and was well known 
as a leacHng- rejiresentatixe of farming' interests. He continued to give 
his supervision to his farm until iqoj, when he removed to Downgiac 
and made his home with his S(in Frank until his death March 18, 1906. 
He was one of the honore<l and \'eneralile pioneer settlers of the com- 
munity and his residence in the cnnnty covered the allotted psalmist's 
span of three score years and ten. His memory formed a connecting 
link hetwecn the jM'inu'tive [last and the progressive present, for few 
men hail mere intimate knowledge of the liistory of the county from 
the days of its early de\'elopment to the periiid of later day progress 
and prosperity than liad Lafayette .\twood. Flis wife died in 1862, 
and of their children two died in infanc}'. 

Frank .^twood is now the ouly memhcr of the family living. He 
was reared and educated in Wayne townshi]\ and in Dowagiac also 
attended school. When not busy with his text l)ooks he worked in the 
fields upon the old homestead and assisted his father in the develop- 
ment and improvement of the farm for many years. Tn 1874 he was 
married to Miss l"!elle Ingling. a daughter of Samuel and Jane Ingling 
and a native of Penn townshi]), Cass county, where her parents had 
located in pioneer times. At their marriage the young couple took up 
their abode on the old homestead farm and Mr. Atwood was actively 
and successfidly engaged in general agricultural pursuits until T902, 
when he removed to Dowagiac, where he is now living retired. His 
business affairs were ca]xably and successfully ci^nducted foi- many 
years, and. thus annually he was rdile to add to his capital, which is 
now sufficient to su])p!y him with all of the necessities and comforts 
of life without recourse to further business. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. .\twood have been born three children: Fred, 
wdio is now li\-ing in Wayne township; Fay, wdio resides upon the old 
liomestead; and Cora, the w^ife of Glenn Chainberlain, of Dowagiac. 
The old homestead projierty comprises two hundred and sixty acres 
of valuable land, and is now being o]ierated by Mr. Atwood's second 
son. In affairs relating to the progress and improvement of the com- 
munity Mr. Atwood has always taken a deep interest and helpful part. 
He was township clerk for six years, school inspector for two years, 
and supen-isor for nine years. In his political affiliatinn he is a Dem- 
ocrat. He has been treasurer of the Farmers' INIutual Fire Insurance 
Company of Dowagiac since 1902, and is now secretary, and has been 
administrator of several estates. He is well known in the county as 
one who is ever true to a tnist reposed in him, and in all the fifty-three 
years of his residence in C.iss county he has maintained a high stand- 
ard of conduct, both for public and private life. Fie is connected with 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 731 

the IModcrn Woodmen cam]) at Dowagiac, and at all times and under 
all circnmstances has been found worthy of the regard and esteem of 
his fellinv men. 

NORRIS RICHARDSON. 

Norris Richardson, an honored veteran of the Civil war. resides in 
Cassopoiis. He has fi2T.n'ed. pr(iminentlv in ex'ents relatinj^ to the wel- 
fare and substantial im])ro\-ement of the county, was at one time county 
treasurer, and is numbered among the old settlers. There are few na- 
tive sons of the county who have resided long-er within its borders, for 
his birth occurred in Calvin township on the 25th of December, 1835. 
His father, Hiram Richardson, was born in Hardin county, Ohio, was 
there reared and came to Michigan, a single man, in 1827. Much of 
the land was still in possession of the gx)vernment at that time, and he 
entered a claim in Calvin township, upon which not a furrow had been 
turned or an improvement made. In fact, there were few settlers in 
the township and only here and there was seen a clearing, in the midst 
of which would be found a log cabin, to indicate that the seeds of civili- 
zation had been sown which were in due time to bear rich fruit. He 
was married in Cahin township to Miss Catharine Reed, whose birth 
occurred in either Hardin or Logan county, Ohio. Her father was 
John Reed, who came to Cass county al)out 1S26 or 1S27 and took up 
his abode in Peim township adjoining Diamond lake. He, too. secured 
a claim, but he did not improve it, selling it soon afterward to Mr. 
Macintosh. ]\[rs. Richardson was quite yoimg when brought to this 
county by her parents, and at the time of her niarriage she located 
with her husband in Calvin township upon the farm which he had en- 
tered from the government and on which they resided until about 1S53. 
They then removed to Allegan county, ^Michigan, where ^Ir. Richard- 
son departed this life at the age of sixty- four years, while his wife 
lived to be about fifty-four years of age, she dying on the homestead in 
Calvin township. Following her death. Hiram Richardson was mar- 
ried to Mrs. Nancy Eastman. By his first marriage there were nine 
children, five of whom reached adult age, while of the second marriage 
there were three children, of whom two gained years of maturity. 

Norris Richardson is the third child of the first marriage. He was 
reared in Calvin township and pursued his education in one of the old- 
time log school houses such as were common in pioneer districts. The 
furnishings of such an institution were very primitive and the methods 
of instruction were almost equally crude. His mother died when he 
was only thirteen years of age and he then started out in life for him- 
self, working by the month a= a farm hand. In this way he gained a 
livelihood until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when his patriotic 
spirit was aroused by the attempt of the south to overthrow tlie Union, 
and he joined a ^Tichigan regiment. Init was not accepted. The com- 



732 HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY 

iiaiiy. however, (li'-l);in(le(l and he went t" Jnhet. lUinnis. wliere he en- 
listed a? a nieniljer nf Ciinii)an\ F, Twentietli JUinuis Vvilunteer Infan- 
try, and witli that company served as a private for two years, after 
which lie was honorahly disch.arged on account of physical disaljility, 
receiving: his dischar.i^c from General Grant. When he liad soincv.-hat 
recovered his health, however, he re-enlisted in 1863 as a memher of 
Company L, Ninth Iowa Cavalr_\-, with which he served until the 3rd 
of February. 1S66, when he was oiice more honorably dischars^ed. He 
was commissioned as an officer, holdinjj the rank of first lieutenant of 
Company L, and was also adjutant of the re,i:^inient. His military serv- 
ice covered more than four years and was frauc;lit with much danger, 
while -his course was characterized h.y unfaltering fidelity to duty. He 
was at Frerlerickstown. Missouri, in 1S61, and the same year the regi- 
ment went down the Mi — i-^ipin' river, landing at Cajje Girardeau. He 
afterward participated in the -^iege of Columbus, Kentucky, and under 
General ( Irant returned up the Ohio river, participating in the liattle 
of Fort Henry in 1S62, also in the engagement at Fnrt Donaldson and 
the battles of Shiloh and Corinth. His first siege was at the last named 
place, and after the cajiitulation (jf that citv he went with his regiment 
to Jackson, Tennessee, where he mad.e a raid. S-ion afterward he was 
honorably discharged, and during tlie second term of his enh'stmer.t 
he participated in hut few battles, operating with the movements of the 
armv in Arl--an=as. He was never in the hns])ital. hut was on active 
dutv all ',( the time with v.-hich he was connected with the army. Dur- 
ing both terms of enlistment he h.-rd charge of the records of the com- 
panies and at the close of the war he was sent on an official mission 
to St. Louis to do special duty by order of the general commander of 
the department. He received his second discharge at Little Rock and 
returned home with a most creditable military record. No man could 
ever say aught against his bravery or his loyalty, and he deser\-es the 
gratitude which the nation will never cease to feel for all the brave 
boys in blue who fought for the defense of the Union. 

When the war was r.ver Mr. Richardson returned to Cass county, 
Michigan, and v.a'; married in iSrif) to :Mi';s Susan Adamson, a daugh- 
ter of Tohn and Sarah (Erwin) .\damson. who removed from Colum- 
biana ccuntv, Ohio, to Ca=s cnuntv in 1853. Tier father purchased a 
farm from Hiram Richardson and the wife of our subject, who was 
bom in Columbiana county. Ohio, \\-as reared upon the old family 
homestead in this county. Following his marriage Norris Richard- 
son removed to \\',-irren county. Towa. wdiere he remained for three 
vears and th.en returned to Cass county, locating on the old homestead. 
He bought land in Porter township and afterward sold that property 
and bought anotlier farm. He continued actively in fanning until 
1895. when he put aside the more arduous duties of the fields, having 
been elected to the position of county treasurer. Fie then locateil at 



HISTORY Oi- CASS COUXTY T33 

Cassopolis and filled the oliice for four years, having been re-elected in 
1S97. He was also called to various township positions, and at all 
times discharged his duties with promptness and hdelity. At the same 
time he has cuniinuetl the ownership of his farms in I'ortcr and Xew- 
berg townships. 

Unto Mr. and Airs. Richardson have been Lorn a son and daugh- 
ter: Carmi Claud, who is now a resident farmer of Porter township; 
and Ethel Frances, who died in October, 1S99. 

Mr. Richardson has been a lifelong Republican, as was his father 
before him. He is now the commander of AUiert Anderson Post, No. 
157, G. A. R., having been honored with this position for about ten 
years. He has taken a ver\' active and helpful interest in the work of 
the post and has dune an able and valuable service in looking after the 
interests of the soldiers in this county. He has likewise attained the 
chapter degree in Masonry, and in his life exemplifies the benelicent 
spirit of the craft. His acti\-ity has touched upon many lines of general 
interest, and he has never been found remiss in any duty of citizen- 
ship. Moreover, his business career has been commendable, for at tlie 
early age of thirteen years he started out in life on his own account, 
and he may therefore be truly called a self-made man. Through the 
exercise of his native talents and energies and the careful utilization 
of his opportunities he has become the owner of valuable property in- 
terests which now enable him to live retired. His life record is in 
many respects worthy of emulation, for he has displayed splendid qual- 
ifications in milit.'u-}' and ])olitical service: and in the business interests 
which have brought him in contact with iiis fellow citizens. 

LAURENCE B. PATTISON. 

Laurence B. Pattison, a farmer and representative citizen of Poka- 
gon township living on section 25, was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
March 5, 1838, a son of Daniel H. and Alrina (Davis) Pattison, both 
of whom were natives of the -state of New York, the motlier having 
been born in Allegany county. The father was a shoemaker by trade, 
and after learning and following that business for some time became a 
shoe merchant. Unto him and his wife were born four daughters and 
four sons, of whum Laurence was the second son and second child. 
The family record is as follows: Edwin, deceased; Laurence; Rosella, 
who has also passed away ; Harriet : Daniel : ]Mary ; Eunice : and Will- 
iam, deceased. All reached adult age, although three have now passed 
away. The death of the father occurred in 1868. 

Laurence B. Pattison was reared to manhood in ]\Ianchester, 
Michigan, acquired a public school education and there became famil- 
iar with farm work in all Us departments. Thinking that he might 
have better business opportunities in the west, he came to Cass county 
on the loth of February, i860, and entered the employ of Henr>- 



734 HISTORY or CASS COUNTY 

Stretch, for wlioin lie worked as a farm hand for about two years. 
In the latter part of iSOi he left tliat einpl(jy and went to Dowagiac, 
Michigan, where he spent a part of the winter, and in the spring of 
1862 he located on Liiile Prairie, being eniphiycd by Jasi)er \'aiicuren 
until January, 1S64. 

On the 19th nt that niuiuli .Mr. Pattison was married to Miss 
Hannah \'an \'lear, a nati\e of Pokagon township, Cass county, born 
September 16. 1844. Iler parents were George and Kate (Ferris) 
Van Vlear, pioneer settlers of Cass county, who took up their abode 
here in 1833, coming to Alichigan from Ohio. They were married in 
Ohio, and on leaving that state settled upon a farm which is now the 
home of Mr. Patti.M.n. In their family were five clnklrcn, three of 
whom were Kirn in the I'.uckeye state, while two were born in Cass 
county. John and Phebe, twins, are deceased, and Lewis, the fourth 
child, has also passed away. The <jthers are Katherine and Hannah. 
Mrs. Pattison was educated in Pokagon township, pursuing her studies 
in an old log school hnusc. At the time of Ins marriage Mr. Pattison 
rented one hundred and ten acres of land, uiKin which he lived for 
twenty-two years. He then, in 18S6. removed to the farm which he 
recently owned, having inirchascd the i)lace some years before from 
Mrs. Pattison's father. It comprised one hundred and twenty acres 
of land, wliich is ricli and arable, and the well tilled fields annually re- 
turned to him excellent hnrvests. while his crops found a ready sale 
on the market. He reccntl\- sold this place, however, and bought a 
farm in Wayne townsliip c insisting oiVone hundred and forty acres, 
formerh' knuwii as the •.I'pl)' larm. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. I'af is.m have been born two sons and a daug'h- 
ter: Estelle. born December 4, 18(14: Wilbur, who was born January 
16. 1866, and died Janu'uy to, 1883: and .\delbert. born December 
27. 1871. All are natives uf Cass county. In his jjolitical views Mr. 
Pattison is a Democrat where national issues are involved, but at local 
elections votes independently and has taken an active part in political 
interests in his heme localit}-. He belongs to Pokagon lodge, Xo. 36, 
A. F. & A. 'SI., and is also connected with the United Workmen of 
Dowagiac. Flis residence in Cass county covers a period of fortv-five 
years, during which time he has worked persistently and energetically 
and all the success that he has achieved is attributable ent'irelv to his 
own efforts, his jiresent farm lieiiig the visible evidence of his life of 
thrift and industry. 

L. L. LAWRENCE. 

L. L. Lawrence, well known as a representative of agricultural 
circles in A'olinia Iriwnship, resides on section 11. He was born in this 
township Tvlav i ^. 1853. and was the eldest of the three sons who=:e par- 
ents were Levi B. and Esther (Copley) Lawrence. The father arrived 





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HISTORY OI'- CASS COUNT V T35 

in Cass county cilmul iS.V- when the wnrk ut impnneinent and prog- 
ress had scarcely licen Ixi^uii here. He took up kind from the govern- 
ment, and fur a long peri.ul earned cm general agricultural ])ursuits. his 
life's lali.rs lioing ended in dcaLii when he was about scvent_\--six _\-ears 
of age. 

When a youth of al'uut six years L. L. Lawrence enlerc<l the pul)- 
lic schools and attended as > ipp.irtunity offered until he had mastered 
the branches of learning taught therein. He also early accpiainted him- 
self with farm lalK^r, taking his place in the fields almost as soun as old 
enough to handle the jjIuu. He continued to assist in the work of cul- 
tivating crops upon the old homestead up to the time of his marriage, 
whicli occurred, in iSjg. He wedded Miss Rosa Emmons, and the_\- have 
three children. Jvala, Esther and a little infant son, John K. 

The home farm coniprises two hundred and thirty-five acres of 
good land dc\otcd to general agricultural pursuits, and in addition to 
the tilling of the soil and the care of his crops Mr, Lawrence followed 
carjientering for a numl>er of years. Lie possesses good mechanical 
skill anrl ingemiity, and is thus enabled to keep everything about his 
place in excellent condition, his buildings, fences and farm implements 
all being in good repair. He is somewhat independent in his political 
views, but perhaps favors more largely the principles of the Republican 
party. He bclnngs to the ^lasonic lodge at Marcellus and is a support- 
er of all measures that have for their object the general welfare. In 
manner he is geni.al and the circle of his friends embraces many who 
have known him from his boyhood days down to the present time, which 
is an indication that his life has ever been worthy of the regard of those 
with whom he has been associated. 

JOHN J. RITTER. 

John J. Ritter. treasurer of the Farmers' IMutual Fire Insurance 
Company, of Dow-aq-iac. was bom in LaGrange. Cass county, on the 
ftth of July 1848. His father. David ^L Ritter. was born in Indiana 
in 1828, and was only five years of age when brought to ^Michigan by 
his father, John S. Ritter. who made his way to Berrien countv and 
afterward settled in Cass county when David jM. Ritter was only six 
years of age. He v,-as therefore reared here amid the wild scenes and 
environments of pioneer life, and was educated in the old-time schools. 
He spent his youth and also the years of his manhood upon the same 
farm, thus living for many vears in LaGrange township. His entire 
life was devoted to agricultural pursuits, and he passed away in .\ngust, 
186;, respected bv all wlm knew him. His wife, who Ijore the maiden 
name of Malinda A. Reneston. was a native of Indiana and came to 
Cass countv in early girlhood with her father, William Renc'^ton. who 
operated the first carding mill in the county. Mrs. David Ritter died 
when sixtv-two vears of age. In the family were three sons: Jrihn J.. 



"'■i^' HISTORV OF CASS COUNTY 

of this review: 'Wil!i;;ni R.. who v.as a resident of Berrien county. 
Michit^-an, and died June i8, ior,6; and Josepli A., who (hed at the 
age of nine years. 

John J. Rittcr is now the < nly representative of tlie family in Cass 
county. lie was rern-cd in LaGrang-e townsliip upon the farm which 
he now owns and wln'ch was the property of his father at an early day. 
His preliminary education was acquired in tlie district schools and he 
also attended school in Dowagiac. ITc was hut sixteen years of ap;e 
at the time of his father's death, when he took charge of the h-mie 
farm and assumed the care of liis mother. The management of the 
property was a great responsibility for a youth of his years, but he ably 
performed the task clevol\-ing up.on him and displayed excellent ability 
and keen discriminatii n in the management of his affairs. lie was 
first niarrieil in 1870 to ]\Iiss Cynthia A. Bucklin, a daughter of Will- 
iam P. and Alary A. Bucklin. She died May 5, 1S97, leaving one son. 
Dr. Jesse \\'. Ritter. who is engaged in the practice of dcntistiw in 
Charleston. Illinois. For his second wife Wx. Ritter chose Christiana 
Norton, the widow u\ Abraham .Ackcrman. They w^ere married in 
1898. r.y her lirst marriage Mrs. Ritter had two children: F,stella. 
the wife of Charles Schnu'tt, a hardware mercha;it of Dowagiac. car- 
rying on husine='^ as a member of the firm of Schmitt Brothers: and 
Abe. who died when twenty-one years of age. 

Leaving the farm, Mr. Rittcr located in Dowagiac about 1887 and 
engaged in the grocery business, which he carried on for about nine 
year^. Abrmt kjoo. however, he disponed of his store. He has held 
various official positions, including that of road commissioner, in which 
position he did very capable service in the improvement of the roads 
in the county. He has been one of the trustees of the cemetery about 
twelve years, and president of the association about three years. He 
was elected treasurer of the Fanners' Mutual Fire Insurance Company 
in Dowagiac January 9. 1906. and is now filling the position in a most 
capable and able manner. He still owns a valuable farm comprising 
two hundred and forty acres of well improved land in LaGrange town- 
ship, which he rents. Ilis political allegiance is given to the Democ- 
racy where national issues arc involved, but at local elections he casts 
an independent ballot. He is a member of the Alodern \\'oodmen 
camp, and he contributes to the support of the Alethodist Episcopal 
church, although not a member of the organization. He has been a 
hfelong resident of Cass county, living here for fifty-seven years, and 
has taken an active interest in its progress and development. He is in- 
deed a rei)reseniative of one of its oldest families, the name of Ritter 
having long fig-ured honorably in connection with agricultural interest^, 
business lite and public affairs. Wherever known. Mr. Ritter command- 
the esteem and confidence of many friends, and Dowagiac numbers 
him among her representative citizens. 



HISTORY 01' CASS COUNTY 737 

I'XiAS pardi-:e. 

Elias I'anlee. imw luiiiy retired in Dii\vai::iac alter a life (if Inisiness 
activity ami u^-efuliiLS^ that lia> hnui^ht liiin well merited success, was 
bom in Kimx county. Ohio, October 7, iSlG. His father, Isaac Pardee, 
was a native of Xew York, born in 17S1. The paternal grandfather 
of our suliject was a native of I'rance and in early life became a resident 
of the Kmpire state, beini;' accompanied by two brothers on his emigra- 
tion to the new world. All of the Pardees in this country are repre- 
sentatives of families founded b,}' these three lirothers. It was abjout 
the closing period of the Revolutionary war that Isaac Pardee was born 
and in the place of his nativity he was reared and educated. In early 
life he learned and followed the shoemaker's trade and in 1S16 he re- 
moved to Knox county. Ohio, locating about twelve miles west of Mount 
Vernon in Blo'jnifield township. There he engaged in general farming 
until his remo\-aI to }ilichigan in 1850. at wdiich time he located in Ber- 
rien county, where he died on the 31st of August, 1S50. Plis wife. 
Lucy Dickerman, was a native of New Haven, Connecticut, and died 
in Berrien count}', ^Michigan, Septemlier 5, 1850. In the family were 
two sons and two daughters, who reached adult age. Of this number 
Smith Pardee lived to be eighty-five years of age and passed away in 
Clayton county. Iowa. ?\Iary is the widow of Andrew Foster and is 
now living in Brooking. Iowa, at the age of eighty-six years. Susan 
died in Middlcbiu'y. Elkhart county. Indiana, at the age of seventy- 
nine years. 

Elias Pardee, the youngest of the family, spent the days of his 
boyhood and youth in his nati\-e place, remaining on the home farm 
until eighteen >ears of age and acquiring his education in one of the 
old-time log school houses of that day. In 1844 he started out in life 
on his own account, making his way to Berrien county. Michigan. 
There he worked as a lumberman, chopping cord wood and grubbing 
white oak grubs. lie was employed by the day and his life was a strenu- 
ous one fraught with unremitting and arduous toil. In 1850 be came 
to Dowagiac, where he entered the employ of the Michigan Central 
Railroad Company as a laborer at the freight bouse. Tie was thus en- 
gaged until 1838. when he was promoted to the position of freight and 
express agent, in which capacitv he served for four years. Saving his 
money, he at length, through his diligence and frugality, had acquired 
sufficient capital to enable him to invest in farm lands and he bought 
a place in Pokagon township, Cass county, near Dowagiac. He then 
rented the farm but retained the ownership thereof tmtil 1865, when 
he disposed of all of his farming interests. In 1876 he purchased the 
Sister Lakes summer resort, paying one himdred dollars per acre for the 
property. He at once began its improvement and converted the place 
into a resort for the entertainment of summer visitors, building cottages. 
a hotel, a dance hall and skating rink. In fact, he made all of the im- 



738 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

provements at the rest.irt. wliich he conducted successfuUy until January, 
1886, when he disposed of this interest. Since that time he lias hved 
retired from the active management of husiness affairs save for the 
supervision of his in\-estments. 

Mr. Pardee was married in 1853 to Miss Lydia Rice, a daugliter 
of Moses and Annis Rice, and a native of New Y'ork, in which state 
her girlhood days were passed. Her death occurred /Vpril 4, 1901. In 
his political views I\Ir. Pardee was a Republican until the Cleveland 
administration. He has served as assessor of the city and was alderman 
in 1870. He has a wide acquaintance in the count}', where he has now 
resided for fifty-four years and has taken an active and helpful interest 
in its growth and the promotion of its welfare. He occupies a fine resi- 
dence, which was built in 1861 and is one of the best homes in Dowagiac. 
During the forty years of his connection with Cass county he has trav- 
eled in all of the western states, making fourteen trips to the Dakotas, 
Montana and the northwest. He has traveled altogetlier more than one 
hundred thousand miles on hunting trips, wdiich was the occasion of his 
many visits to the northwest. He has seen the Rocky mountains and 
the bad lands of Dakota, has crossed the plains about six times and 
hunted buffaloes on the western prairies until they were extinct. He 
began making these western trips in 1872 and continued to do so each 
year until 1883. His experiences have been of a varied and interesting 
nature and have to some extent been fraught with the hanlshijis, rlangers 
and privations incident to western frontier life. He has carefully man- 
aged his business affairs, however, as the years have gone by and his 
labors are now crowned with success, which make? it possible for him 
to enjoy well-earned ease amidst the fruits of his former toil. 

EUGENE B. GILBERT. 

Eugene B. Gili;ert is numbered among die early settlers of Cass 
county. The storv of pioneer life has never l>een adequately written 
and only those who have eone through such experiences can really know 
of the conditions that exist upon the frontier, which has little or no 
railroad communication with older points and must therefore be deprived 
of many of the aflvantages and comforts that are found in districts 
which have long been settled. Mr. Gilbert's memory forms a connecting 
link between the progressive present and the primitive past when the 
settlers were denied many of the comforts and conveniences which are 
now enjoved bv the citizens of Cass county. He lives on section 29, 
Silver Creek township, where he owns a good farm. His birth, how- 
ever, occurred in the town of Springfield in Otsego county. New York. 
September 21, 1833, and he is a son of W. B. Gilbert, better known as 
"Uncle Tommy" Gilbert. His paternal grandfather was a sea captain 
and the owner of the ship on which he sailed. The vessel, however, 
was confiscated and he was thrown into an English prison at the time 



HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 739 

of the Revolutionary war. He lost all his wealth and died while being 
held as a prisoner of war. Mis wife afterward returned to England, 
where her last days were spent. ^\r. Gilbert, however, was of French 
birth but had become a citizen under the English government. 

W. B. Gilbert was born in New York state and was reared by an 
uncle, Jimniie BeGau, in Otsego county, New York. When a young 
man he engaged in teaming to ^Michigan from Albany and Buffalo, 
New York, prior to the era of the building of the canal. He also en- 
gaged in burning lime, furnishing all of the lime for George Clark on 
Lake Otsego and for many buildings of that period. His children were 
all born in Otsego county. He served in the war of 1S12, enlisting as 
a private, but became an officer, and later he was granted a pension and 
given eighty-six acres of land in ^Michigan in recognition of the aid 
which he rendered the government during the second military struggle 
with England. On leaving the cast he came to Michigan in 1S38 and 
in 1S39 removed his family to Cass county, settling in Silver Creek 
township when there was not t\A'elve acres of land cleared in the entire 
township. He bought five eighty-acre tracts, all wild and unimproved, 
and at once began converting the raw land into productive fields. He 
had to clear away the timber and upon his farm he built a log house. 
Nearly all of the homes in the county were thus constructed in that 
early day. The task of developing and improving a farm was a very 
arduous and strenuous one, but he carried on his labors unfalteringly and 
in the course of time his land became rich and productive. The trading 
was done at Niles and at St. Joseph, ^lichigan, which were then the 
nearest commercial centers. ^Ir. Gilbert continued a resident of this 
county up to the time of his death, which occurred when he was in his 
seventy- fourth year. He was justice of the peace for many years and 
his decisions Viere characterizecl by the utmost fairness and impartiality 
— a fact which is indicated by his long continuance in office. He was 
one of the prominent and influential men of his day, and his efforts! 
for the community and its development were far-reaching, effective and 
beneficial. Fie engaged in speculating in land to a considerable extent, 
buying and selling property and making his money in that way. He 
became very familiar with land values and was seldom at error in mat- 
ters of business judgment. In politics he was a Whig in early man- 
hood and upon the dissolution of the party he joined the ranks of the 
new Republican partv, of which he became a stanch advocate. He 
was, moreover, a well-read man and had a library of fifteen hundred 
volumes in New York. He was interested in everything pertaining to 
his country and her welfare and his reading not only embraced social, 
economic and political problems but also took in much of the literature 
of the past and present. He married Miss Cynthia Sammons, a native 
of New York, who was born on the banks of Sharon Springs, her father 
clearing a place there. He was Casey Sammons, and was of German 
birth, while her mother belonged to an old Prussian family. IVIrs. Gil- 



740 HISTORY OF CASS COUXTY 

bert was in her seventy-third year at the time of her death. She was a 
worthy pioneer woman who bravely shared with her husband in tlie 
hardships and trials incident to frontier life and did her l)e^t to cart: 
for her family and provide a comfortable home for them. She became 
the mother of six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom 
reached years of maturity, but only two of the number are now livnig, 
namely: Mrs. Jane Lushing, who'is mentioned on another page of this 
work; and Eugene U. 

In taking up the personal history of Eugene B. Gilbert we present 
to our readers the life record of one who is widely and favorably known 
in this countv. He was the fifth child in his father's family and the 
third son, and was in his sixth year at the time of the removal from 
New York to Ca^-s county. He began work when a very young lad, for 
his services were needed upon the home farm and he was fourteen 
years of age before a school was built in this township. To a limited 
extent he pursued his studies in a log schoolhouse, but his educational 
privileges were meager and it has been through his own efforts, his 
reading, observation and experience that he has broadened his knowl- 
edge, becoming a well informed man. He assisted in clearing the land 
which his fatlier secured on coming to the county and has resided con- 
tinuously upon the okl homestead from the age of fi\e years. 

On the ^oth of bcbruary, 1S64, I\Ir. Gilbert was united in marriage 
to Aliss Susan Ticc, a daughter of Isaac and Sallie Ann (Lockwood) 
Tice, both of whom were natives of the state of New Y^ork, her mother 
having been born in Xewberg. They came to Michigan about 1850, 
settling in Niles, and afterward removed to Silver Creek township.. Mrs. 
Gilbert was born in Albany, Xew York. i\ugust 9, 1843, ^ik^' came with 
her parents to Cass cunty when about seven years of age. She was 
here reared in a pioneer home in the midst of the forest and thus became 
acquainted with the conditions of frontier life. Unto :\Ir. and Mrs. 
Gilbert have been born a tlaughter and son: ]\Iary L., who is now the 
wife of Louis Rudolph, of Dowagiac; and William L, who resides upon 
the home farm. He married ]\Iiss Lizzie Bissett, a daughter of Alex- 
ander and l<;abclle (Barker) Bissett. Unto Mr. and Airs. William 
Gilbert has been born a little daughter. lone. 

As stated, Eugene B. Gilbert has followed farming throughout his 
entire life and is todav the owner of about five hundred acres of valu- 
able land, of which one hundred and sixty acres is located in Berrien 
county and the remainder in Cass county. His house is on the east bank 
of Indian Lake and is known as Gilbert Castle. _ It is one of the land- 
marks of the county. l;eing the second house built on the banks of the 
lake. Few men have more intimate knowledge of the history of the 
countv and events \vhich have formed its annals. He can remember 
when' the Indians were verv numerous in this part of the state and 
remembers seeing the chief "Lo Pole" Pokagon. Flis father assisted in 
removin"- the Indians to Kansas under government contract. Air. Gil- 



HISTORY 01-" CASS COUNTY 741 

bert has li\eil in tins part oi the state for sixty-seven years, lias been 
closely idcntitieiJ with its interests and has dune niuch for its substantial 
development anil iniiMuvenient. In politics he is a Republican, but he 
would never accept ofiice, although he could untloubtedh' ha\e tilled 
public positions very crc'litably had he consented to became a candidate. 
He is a man of indepcnder.t spirit, not bound b} any creed, belief or 
fraternal ties. He forms his ov.n opinions and is honest in upholding 
them and his life has been characterized liy principles of integrity and 
honor, while his business career has displayed unfaltering diligence and 
perseverance. 

MYROX 'STARK. 

Myron Stark, living retired in Dowagiac, although for many years 
he was a leading and enterprising merchant here, was born in New 
\''ork, May 30, 1836. He represented an old family of the Empire 
state, as it is dellnitely known that his great-grandparents lived in New 
York, for it was there that his grandfather, John Stark, was born, reared 
and made his home. Erastus Stark, his father, also a native of New 
York, came to Cass county, Michigan, in 1838, locating at Summer- 
ville, and in 1840 he purchased a farm in Silver Creek township, where 
he cultivated and improvcil his land. He was one of the first settlers 
of that township and aided in jubduing the wilderness and extending 
the frontier. As the years passed he developed a good property, his 
fields being \ery producti\'e, and be remained ui)on that place until his 
death, which occurred when he was fifty-four years of age. He also 
built a sawmill and engaged in the manufacture of lumber in connection 
with farming interests. He fillctl the office of justice of the peace for 
many years and liis decisions were strictly fair and impartial. He held 
membership in the [Methodist Episcopal church, taking an active part 
in its work, and he was also an exemplary IMason. He married Matilda 
Cook, a native of New Y'ork, who died in 1839, when about twenty- 
seven years of age. There were three sons by that marriage. Philander 
died in 1850. John K., who was born in central New York in October, 
1833, came to ^Michigan with his parents in 184S and assisted in clear- 
ing and developing die home farm, now known as the Robert Bielby 
property. In the winter seasons he cut and hauled logs and in the 
summer months engaged in the active work of tilling the fields and 
caring for his crops. He married Eliza J. Cushing. a daughter of Otis 
and Clarissa Cushing, in the year 1855, and in 1857 removed to Mis- 
souri, but in 1S59 returned to ^Michigan. In June. 1S61. he enlisted 
for service in the Civil war as a member of the Second IMichigan Cav- 
alry and a year later received an honorable discharge on account of 
disability. In 1869 he joined the Michigan Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and has l^ecome one of the most prominent church 
builders of that denomination. His first charge was the Paw Paw 
church, and since that time he has served various churches, both on the 



742 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

countn- circuit and in large cities, becoming one of tlie strong divines 
representing Methodism in this state. His wife died in 1884. Six chil- 
dren were born unto them, three sons and three tlaughters, all of whom 
are now living with the exception of the youngest, who died in 1902. 
Rev. Stark was again married in 1895. He is now cliaplain in the 
Soldiers' Home at Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

M_\ron Stark, whose name introduces this record, was the youngest 
of the three sons nf his father's family and was only two years old 
when hrouglit tn Cass county by his parents. He remained at home 
imtil nineteen years of age, assisting in the sawmill and in the fann 
work. He tlicn went to I.xindon, Canada, in 1S55, remaining for a 
year in that locality, after which he returned to Cass county and en- 
gaged in farming in Silver Creek township. In 1S62 he established a 
wagon and blacksmithing shop at Cu.shing Corners, where he remained 
until 1877. In 1876 lie patented what is known as Stark's Common 
Sense Sand Band, and reniovefl to Dowagiac the following year, after 
which he devotefl five years tn handling this patent, which he sold in 
every state in the Union, and also in Canada, France and Germany. 
He started without capital, but he built up a fine business and in 1883 
sold his interest and retired with a handsome competence. The business, 
however, is still Ijcing carried on. In that year Mr. Stark purchased 
the grocery store of Mart Green in Dowagiac and was identified with 
commercial interests in the city until 1888. when on account of ill health 
he sold his store, since which time he has been retired from active busi- 
ness cares. His inventive mind is continually reaching out along new 
lines of thought and progress, and in 1900 he patented a tire machine, 
which is being manufactured on a royalty basis at Lansing, Michigan. 
The machine is for taking off and replacing tires on heavy wheels. 

On Christmas day of 1857 was celebrated the marriage of Myron 
Stark and Miss Sarah Harris, a daughter of Alvin and Peggv (Sliull) 
Harris. She was born in New York and by her marriage has become 
the mother of six children: Henry, now deceased; Matilda, the wife of 
Chester Southwork, of Dowagiac; Ida, Almira and Amanda, all de- 
ceased; and Jessie, the wife of Wiley ^Messenger, of Dowagiac, who is a 
traveling man. 

Mr. Stark has been a life-long Republican and has taken an active 
interest in the party, holding various official positions through many 
years. At the present time he is county agent for the state board of 
corrections and charities, is game warden for Cass county and the ad- 
joinintr counties and is superintendent of the poor for the city of Dowag- 
iac. He is also superintendent of the humane society of the countv and 
his official labor? have been of a far reaching and beneficial nature. 
He has been a Mason since 1860 and for several years served as master 
of the Dow-agiac lodge. His residence in Cass county covers a period 
of sixty-eight years and no man has been more closely or honorablv 
identified with its interests and development. He has made a creditable 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 743 

name in business circles, has manifested his loyalty and patriotic spirit 
in oflice antl in private life has displayed those