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Full text of "A twentieth century history of Delaware County, Indiana"

A TWENTIETH CENTURY 



HISTORY 



Delaware County 
Indiana 



ILLUSTRATED 



G. W. H. KEMPER. M. D. 

EDITOR 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1908 



1390211 




^'^^^j'^L^.f.c^... ' 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 



JoHx C. JoHxsox. For twenty years the late John C. Johnson was a 
resident of Muncie, to the progress of which he was a large contributor. 
He came to the city in 1884 and became an interested partner in the lumber 
and saw-milling business of the firm of A. L. Johnson & Company, at the 
same time manifesting a keen interest in public affairs. 

In reviewing the career of this successful business man and prominent 
citizen, as he was, we note that he was a native of the state of New York, 
born on the 21st of May, 1843, 'f" Albany county, his parents being Henry I. 
and Eliza (Ferguson) Johnson, who were also natives of the Empire State. 
The father, who was an agriculturist, resided in New York until 1864, 
w^hen he moved to Ashtabula, Ohio, and in 1881 came with his family to 
Muncie, Indiana. 

When the subject of this review was seven years of age his parents 
removed from Albany county. New York, to Herkimer county, that state, 
where he received a fair common-school education. At the age of seventeen 
years he enlisted in the Union Army, Company K, Fortj'-fourth New York, 
known as the "Ellsworth Avengers," and served one year. On account of a 
wound received at the battle of Hanover Court House Mr. Johnson was 
sent first to Albany, New York, and from there to Lexington Avenue 
Hospital, in New York city, from hich he was discharged after recovery. 
Entering the quartermaster's df artment at City Point, Virginia, under 
Captain C. E. Jones, he remain*- 1 in that capacity until the close of the war. 
He had laid aside school books to render service in defense of the Union, 
and now having returned from the battle front with an honorable discharge 
he again entered the school room, for two years attending an academy for 
boys at Albany, New York, and then took a course at Brj-ant & Stratton's 
Commercial College. For some fifteen years thereafter he was in the 
employ of H. W. Sage & Company and others of Albany, his occupation 
being that of a clerk and bookkeeper. During that time he obtained a 
thorough knowledge of the lumber business in all its departments. 

In 1882 Mr. Johnson removed to Bridgeport, Connecticut, there 
organizing the Bridgeport Lumber Company, and was its secretary and 
treasurer. In 1884, selling his interest therein, he came to Muncie, and it 
was then that he became associated with his brother, A. L. Johnson, by 



544 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

purchasin.q; an interest in the A. L. Johnson & Company lumber firni. which 
for several years did an extensive business. But Mr. Johnson's activities 
were not confined alone to this firm, for he was an org'anizer 
of the Muncie Skewer Company. He was also a stockholder in the 
Indiana Bridge Company and the Live Poultry Car Conipanw and was 
extensively interested in real estate, especially in the Johnson and ]\IcCulIoch 
additions to the city of Muncie. He was also connected with the banking 
interests of this city, holding stock in several financial institutions of this 
city, antl at the time of his death was president of the Delaware County 
National Bank. He was one of the promoters and was president of the 
Commercial Club of Muncie for many years. 

Politically Mr. Johnson was a Republican, though he never sought 
political honors, but he served several years as a member of the ]\Iuncie 
city council. Fraternally he was a member of the Masonic Order, chapter 
and commandery, and also held membership relations with the George S. 
Dawson Post, No. 63, G. A. R., of Albany, New Y'ork. For many years 
he was an active member of the First Presbyterian church of Muncie, in 
which he served as a trustee, as an elder, and was a member of the building 
committee that erected the present fine edifice of the congregation in this 
city. For many years he was a member of the State Street Presbyterian 
church of Albany, New York. 

(Jn the 26th of October, 1870, Mr. Johnson married Miss Martha J. 
Plutchinson, a daughter of David and Mary (Chambers) Hutchinson, of 
Albany, New York. But one child was bom to them, Mary E. Mr. 
Johnson passed awa\' on the 13th of December, 1904, when past si.xty-one 
years of age. His had been a successful business career, characterized by 
honest dealing with his fellow-men, and he had lived the life of a public- 
spirited citizen and an upright, dignified Christian gentleman. In the hearts 
and esteem of his fellow-citizens he was endeared, and in his domestic 
relations he was kind, affectionate and thoughtful, ever mindful of the 
welfare and happiness of his wife and daughter, who survive him. 

The esteem in which ' C. Johnson was held by his business associates 
is best shown by the f .owing tribute, taken from the Record Book of the 
Delaware County National Bank : "J. C. Johnson became connected with 
this bank July 1 1. 1896. at which time he was elected a director and president, 
serving continually as such until his death, which occurred suddenly 
December 13, 1904, of apoplexy, at his residence in this city. 

"He filled the position assigned him with entire satisfaction to all 
concerned. .As presiding officer of the board of directors he was always 
courteou.s and considerate to all members, being careful in his deliberations 
and pcissesseti of a well-balanced character. He was generous and liberal 
in hi> views as a citizen, public-spirited anil ever ready to assist in all 
eutcrpriso tn jjenefit the city or the people among whom he had lived. I lis 
deeds of charit\. both public and private, were unnumbered. 'J'ruly it may 
be recorded tint he held no ill-will against a soul on earth. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTV oio 

"In his passing to the Great Beyond, it is possible no circle of friends 
will feel the loss more intensely than the officers, directors and employees of 
this bank, with whom he was daily associated, and we all desire to extend to 
the family our deepest sympathy in their sad affliction. 

"In conclusion — 

"Let us all strive to emulate his example and reverence the memory of 
his many virtues." 

Abdott L. Johxson. In the history of Muncie's manufacturing 
interests. A. L. Johnson is one of the very few whose activity in an important 
way goes back to the years before the natural gas boom. Having identified^ 
himself with the lumber business and manufacturing while Muncie was a 
cit\- of five thousand people, he has remained here during the subsequent 
quarter of a century, and the history of this period records his name and 
influence in connection with every important public undertaking by which 
the welfare of :\Iuncie has been promoted. Having a prosperous business 
of his own at the time natural gas was discovered, he at once joined in the 
public-spirited movement to secure outside capital and enterprise for Muncie, 
and was actively connected with all the organizations during the early 
years of iMuncie's industrial boom, including the Enterprise Company, the 
Real Estate Exchange, and later the board of trade. .In the historv of the 
last quarter century of Muncie, elsewhere in this work, Air. Johnson's name 
is often mentioned with the events of that period, and in this sketch of his 
career it is necessary only to summarize the main facts of his life. 

The family has been resident of Muncie since 1881, when the parents, 
Henry I. and Eliza (Ferguson) Johnson, who were both natives of New York 
state, came to this city, where the father lived until his death in 1881. The 
father was a farmer, but had lived retired in Ashtabula, Ohio, from 1864 
until coming to Muncie. Abbott L. Johnson was born in Herkimer county. 
New York, August 26, 1852, and spent most of his youth in Ashtabula, where 
he attended the public schools. His first experience in business was with a 
bent-wood works at Ashtabula, and in 1873, at the age of twenty-one, he 
was sent to Bluffton, Indiana, to erect machinery and put into operation the 
bent-wood works which was later acquired by J. H. Smith & Company, and 
a few years 1' er moved to Muncie. Mr. Johnson moved to Montpelier, where 
he remaine two years, having formed a partnership with J. T. Arnold in 
conductin' an extensive lumber business, under the firm name of A. L. 
Johnson k. Company. This firm established business in Muncie in 1878, and 
in this way Mr. Johnson became connected with Muncie both as a business 
man and as a resident. In 1883, in company with W. E. Hitchcock (now 
president of the Delaware County National Bank), he began the manufacture 
of skewers, and for many years this enterprise has been an important factor 
of Muncie's industrial resources. In 1885 Mr. Johnson entered into an 
active partnership with his brother, the late J. C. Johnson, and together 
thev conducted their lumber and other interests for many years. 



546 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

With the development of Muncie after the gas boom, j\lr. Johnson 
extended his connection to many other important interests. He is a 
stockholder of the Muncie Waterworks Company. In the real estate 
development of Aluncie, he is known as the owner of Johnson's first and 
second additions, and is also interested in Gray's addition, which is one of 
the best in Muncie. Mr. Johnson is a man of active and progressive 
citizenship, and as a member of the older group of successful business men 
is closely identified with the life and affairs of ]Muncie. His residence on 
East Washington street is one of the stately and elegant homes of Muncie. 
In social affairs and the various movements in the interest of culture and 
practical philanthropy he and his family have taken an active part. He is a 
prominent Mason, being a member of chapter, commandery. Alystic Shrine 
and Scottish Rite. The family are members of the Baptist church, in which 
he has served as deacon and trustee. Mr. Johnson married, in 1872, Miss 
Florence ]Merriman, a daughter of Charles Merriman, of Ashtabula, Ohio. 

H.\RRY R. Wysor. Many years have passed since the Wysor family 
became identified with the interests of Delaware county, and its various 
members have won for the name an enviable distinction by their true worth 
of character. One of the most important factors in the upbuilding of Muncie 
was Jacob H. Wysor, ^the father of Harry, who was connected with many of 
its leading enterprises, and at all times was a public-spirited, progressive 
citizen, whose support was never withheld from measures that advanced the 
public welfare. He was born in ^Montgomery county, Virginia, December 
6, 1819, of German ancestry, his father dying before his birth, and he was an 
only child. In 1835 he came to Delaware county, Indiana, where he received 
an excellent education, and in time became one of its foremost business men. 
In 1841 he embarked in the grocery and dry goods business at Muncie, and 
although many obstacles barred his path to success, his indomitable energy 
and perseverance enabled him to surmount them all, and with the passing 
years prosperity rewarded his efforts. In 1843 he turned his attention to 
the milling business, but in 1849 the glittering gold fields of California lured 
him to the Pacific coast, and, abandoning his business, joined the rush 
thither, meeting with many adventures in his journeyings and in his search 
for the precious metal, and finally returned to his home in Muncie in 1S52. 
Two years later, in partnership with John Jack, Mr. Wysor built the large 
grist mill which has ever since been one of Muncie's leading institutions, 
and after the death of his partner in 1858 the firm's name remained the same 
until 1868, when it became known as Wysor & Kline. As his wealth 
increased he employed it in the upbuilding and development of the city's 
interests, dealing largely in land. In 1872 he erected the Wysor opera house, 
while just twenty years later, in 1892, the Wysor Grand was built by him, 
and this is one of the finest theaters in tliis section of the state. Thus many 
of the finest buildings and leading institutions of Muncie stand as monuments 
to the wonderful al)ilit\ of this grand old man. whom death claimed in iix>5. 



I J! 1 





HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 549 

His memory' is enshrined in the hearts of those who knew him. In his early 
manhood he married Sarah Richardson, also a native of the Old Dominion of 
\'irginia. 

Harry' R. Wysor, a son of this honored Muncie couple, was born in 
this city on the i8th of April, 1858, and received an excellent educational 
training in its public schools and the Smithson College of Logansport. With 
his education completed he became associated with the Wysor & Hibbets 
Milling Company, while in 1881 he took charge of the old opera house, and 
now owns and manages the Wysor Grand. In addition he owns the Wysor 
Block, completed in 1906, and it is one of the finest business blocks in eastern 
Indiana. He ably superintends the many interests of his father. His 
business career thus far on the journey of life has also been crowned with 
success. He has made good use of his opportunities, conducting all business 
matters carefully and systematically, and at the same time he takes an active 
interest in the welfare of his native city and the city which his father was so 
instrumental in developing. He served as a member of its city council from 
1885 to 18S8, and from 1882 until 1884 was a member of its school board. 

In 1884 Mr. Wysor was united in marriage to Miss Jennie, a daughter 
of William Kemper, of Muncie. and they have two daughters, Sarah and 
Mary. Mr. Wysor has fraternal relations with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Independent Order of Red Men and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. 

Judge J. G. Leffler, a prominent attorney of Muncie, and well known 
throughout this section of the state in connection with his profession, is one 
of Delawa,re county's native sons, born in Hamilton township on the 26th of 
December, 1864, a son of Philip and Mary (Garick) Leffler, both of whom 
were born in Ohio. They were, however, brought to Indiana by their 
famiHes when children, the mother dying when her son, the Judge, was 
but a little lad of four years. Mr. Philip Leffler, as did his father, also 
named Philip, followed the tilling of the soil as a life occupation, the elder 
Mr. LefHer having purchased large tracts of land from the government, 
and in"" addition to its cultivation carried on the tanner's trade. He was 
very successful in his business operations, and both he and his son became 
prominent in the early life of their section of the Hoosier state. Mr. 
Leffler, the father of the Judge, was an active worker in the ranks of the 
Republican party, and served as a loyal and faithful soldier in the Civil war 
from 1863 until the close of the conflict. 

Judge Leffler was reared as a farmer's boy, receiving his primary 
education in the district schools near his home, this being later supplemented 
by attendance at the Danville Normal, but he is largely self-educated. At 
the age of eighteen years he began teaching, spending four years in the 
Center school of Hamilton township, and in 1884 entered upon the study of 
the profession which he had determined as his life occupation, his first 
legal reading being under the instructions of W. W. Orr and J. E. Mellette. 



550 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Four years later, in iSSS, he was admitted to the bar. and at once came to 
the front in his profession, for no dreary novitiate awaited him. and from 
that time to the present his name has been inseparably interwoven with tiie 
legal profession in Delaware county. In 1890 the Republican party, of 
which he has ever been an active and efficient worker, made him the county 
prosecuting attorney, to which ofifice he was returned in 1892, and later was 
elected to the high position of circuit judge, being its present incumbent. 
In 1890 the Judge was united in marriage to Laura, a daughter of 
Joseph Emerson. His fraternal relations connect Judge Letfler with the 
Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Red 
Men. and he is also a member of the Sons of \'eterans, while his religious 
affiliations are with the Baptist church, of which he is a valued member. 
Although in the main self-educated, he is a scholarly man, profound law \er, 
an able judge, and is an unassuming, genial and popular citizen. 

The B.\ll Brothers Gl.\ss Maxuf.acturing Comp.xny, like most of 
our largest manufacturing concerns, was started in a small way. and has 
been built up by hard work and untiring energy. 

The five brothers, founders and present owners of the -business, Ed- 
mund B., Frank C, William C, Lucius L. and George A., were all born 
on a farm in Trumbull county. (Jhio. \\'hile they were all young their 
father moved to Canandaigua. Xew York state, where he engaged in the 
mercantile business and where at the academy they all received their edu- 
cation. Soon after their father's death they all moved to EJuftalo and 
started into the manufacturing of sheet metal specialties, which, in time, 
called for the use of large quantities of glass, which for a time they pur- 
chased in the market. Being unable to get satisfactory service in their 
purchases, as their demand grew they decided to make the glass them- 
selves, and so erected a furnace in BufTalo, and were operating it when 
natural gas was first discovered in Ohio and Indiana. Appreciating the 
advantage that the gas for fuel would be to them, they built at Muncie 
a furnace, which they ran for awhile as a branch of their Buflfalo plant, 
but gradually they removed one department after another of the ButTalo 
plant to Muncie and finally abandoned the Buffalo factory entirely. They 
rapidly increased the capacity of the Munice plant and then acquired 
plants at other points, so they are now operating factories at Marion, In- 
diana, Belleville, Illinois, and ColTeyville, Kansas. 

The "Ball-Mason" fruit jar, known throughout the whole country, 
is made in all of these plants, and is shipped into every jobbing city in 
the union and many exported to foreign countries. As many as iio.- 
Cxx).ooo of these jars are turned out by this company in a single season, 
giving employment to 2,500 people. 

.A. F. F.\iTERSo.\. In the death of .-\. F. Patterson Muncie lost one of 
its founrlors and most valued citizens. What he did for his fellow-men 
miKlit. in a manner, he told in words, but in its far-reaching influence 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 551 

cannot be measured. Many business concerns and moral enterprises owe 
their excellence and progress largely to his influence. He was in touch 
with the people, and from a sincere and deep-felt interest in their welfare 
labored for all that would prove of public benefit until the busy and useful 
life was ended. 

A native of r>racken county, Kentucky, born in 1822, he in 1831, when 
a little lad of nine years, removed with his father, Anderson Patterson, to 
Clearniont count\-, Ohio, locating on a farm near the old Genera! Grant 
homestead, and there the little son developed and grew to sturdy manhood. 
In 1838 he entered upon a three years' apprenticeship at the tinsmith's 
trade, later removing to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he served a year at 
copper and bright work, and then during the following three years was 
employed as a journeyman. About this time Mr. Patterson engaged in 
business on Front street, Cincinnati, establishing the firm of Patterson & 
Conley, which continued to transact a large and important business until 
a fire destroyed their plant in 1847. Their insurance had e.xpired the day 
previous, and thus everything was lost, their loss amounting to about five 
thousand dollars. After all debts were paid Mr. Patterson went to St. 
Louis, there to begin anew the battle of life, and on the 15th of May, 1850, 
having accumulated eight hundred dollars from his hard-earned savings in 
St. Louis, came to Muncie and invested his capital, at the same time 
establishing the finn of Patterson & Sample, his partner being Charles P. 
Sample, and under their skillful management their interests grew and 
branched out until in 1855 they purchased the Neal McCullough hardware 
store, reorganizing it and enlarging the hardware department, also adding 
farm implements of all kinds. With the passing years they became very 
successful in their ventures, and in 1867 they sold their store to George 
Seitz, and, going to Indianapolis, fornreil a company and erected a large 
blast furnace at Pirazil, Indiana, Mr. Patterson superintending the 
construction of the plant, also sunk a coal shaft and built two miles of 
railroad, having during that time four hundred men under his direct 
supervision. After one and a half years had passed, however, he and Mr. 
Sample returned to Muncie, repurchasing the stock of Mr. Seitz, and they 
continued in the business until the death of Mr. Sample in 1873, while in 
the following year Mr. Patterson sold his interest in the business to Mr. 
Shirk and embarked in the brokerage and private banking business in 
partnership with Theodore J. Riley. After the latter's death Mr. Patterson 
devoted his attention to his real estate interests, building, developing, etc., 
and to his untiring eiTorts Muncie is largely indebted for much of her 
present prosperity. He held a -high position in business circles in the 
community for many years, and his activity in that direction justly entitles 
him to be numbered among the founders of the city, for it is those who 
promote commercial and industrial activity who are the real builders of a 
place. 

In 1855 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Patterson and Samantha 



553 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Collier, a daughter of Samuel R. Collier, a well-known citizen of Delaware 
county, and two children bless this union. The daughter, Cora P., is the 
wife of George F. McCuUouch. Although Mr. Patterson has passed away, 
many pleasant memories of him are enshrined in the hearts of his friends, 
and his influence for good remains with those who knew him. 

George H. Kooxs. The ancestors of George H. Koons emigrated from 
North Carolina to Indiana at an early day. They were farmers, honest, 
thrifty, and hospitable, possessing the common virtues of that class. 

George H. Koons was born in Blue River township, Henry county, 
Indiana, April 2, 1848. He is the son of Peter and Catherine (Rinard) 
Koons, and the eldest of a family of seven. His boyhood days were spent 
at home on the farm. His education was begun in the district schools 
and continued in the New Castle Academy and later in the Indiana 
University at Bloomington. He taught in the country schools during the 
winter while yet a student in the New Castle Academy. After completing 
his course of study there he accepted the position of superintendent of the 
schools of Middletown, Henry county, Indiana, where he demonstrated his 
thoroughness and capacity as an instructor and superintendent, raised the 
standard of the schools and made them a pronounced success. He read 
law with Brown and Polk, attorneys at New Castle, afterward entering the 
law department of the State University, from which, in a class of 
thirty-three, he graduated with honors, receiving his degree of LL. B. in 
1871. 

After leaving the university he continued the study of law under the 
instruction and guidance of Hon. Jehu T. Elliot at New Castle for a time, 
and then began the practice of law in Middletown, Henry county. In 1874 
he removed to Muncie, where he has since lived practicing his profession, 
with the exception of si.x years, during which time he served as judge of 
the Delaware circuit court. He is ranked among the best lawyers of the 
state. His success was not immediate, but came as a result of patient 
industry, painstaking, intelligent effort. 

In politics he is a Republican, with decidedly liberal and independent 
proclivities. He never in any way encouraged nor countenanced corrupt 
methods in politics and has steadfastly condemned all corrupt uses of money, 
often expressing the view that "the corruption of the ballot is a traitorous 
crime for which there is neither excuse nor palliation." In 1880 he was a 
candidate for the nomination by his party for the state legislature, but was 
defeated by the Hon. John W. Ryan. In 1892 he defeated the Hon. James |" 

N. Templer at the Republican primary election for the nomination of judge 
of the Delaware circuit court of Indiana, and was elected to that office, in 
which he served from 1892 to 1898, discharging his official duties with the 
diligence, ability, courage and dignity expected of him. He ranked high 
as a judge. Being conscientious in devotion to dut\ and just in judgment 
his decisions were well considered and r.irelv reversed. He declined to 




sm^^ 



&-ir>U 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 555 

accept "railroad passes" and never used nor traveled on one. He was 
defeated for renomination by the Hon. Joseph G. Leffler. the present 
incumbent. Since his retirement from the bench he has been diligently 
engaged in the practice of law in the circuit, appellate and supreme courts 
of the state, and in the federal courts. He has long been recognized as an 
able advocate and wise counsellor. 

He is a man of broad humanitarian views, thoroughly democratic in 
bearing, and in close sympathy with his fellow-men, a lover of all that is 
noblest and best in humanity, a Unitarian in belief and deeply imbued with 
the philosophy and teachings of Emerson, though a regular attendant at the 
Universalist church of Muncie. At college he belonged to the Phi Kappa 
Psi fraternity. He was a charter member of 'The Literary and Scientific 
Association" of Muncie, out of which ultimately was developed the Ethical 
Society, of which he was for a time president. For many years he has 
been a member of the State Bar Association of Indiana, and is a charter 
member of the Muncie Bar Association and its present president. 

He was married September 6, 1871, to Josinah V. Hickman, daughter 
of William H. and Clarissa (Williams) Hickman. Four children have 
^ blessed their home, three of whom are Clarissa K., Rebecca E. and George 

Hickman Koons. Mary Maud, the eldest, passed away at the age of 
fourteen months and ten days. He is a kind, indulgent husband and 
father. He is true to his friends and forgiving and forbearing toward all, 
knowing that "Kindness is a language the dumb can speak, and the deaf 
can hear and understand." 

Hon. George WashixctOxM Cromer, member of congress from the 
Eighth district of Indiana and a lawyer of much renown, was born in 
Madison county, Indiana, May 13, 1856, his parents being Josiah and Mary 
(Shultz) Cromer, who were natives of Maryland and Indiana, respectively. 
In 1857 they established their home in Salem township, Delaware county, 
Indiana, their son George being then a mere child, and on the home farm 
there, for his father was a farmer, he was reared. His early educational 
training was received in the schools of Salem township, where he also 
taught for three terms, and he then entered Wittenberg College of 
Springfield, Ohio. He next . matriculated in the State University at 
Bloomington, Indiana, from which he graduated in 1882 with the degree 
of A. M. 

During a short time after his graduation Mr. Cromer edited the Muncie 
Tiwcs. and he then read law and began the practice of his chosen 
profession in 1886 at Muncie, which city has ever since been his home and 
the scene of his activities. His political career began with his professional, 
for in the same year in which he began the practice of law he was elected 
prosecuting attorney for the Forty-sixth judicial circuit of Indiana, to which 
position he was re-elected in 1888. The duties of this office he discharged 



556 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

ill a manner highly creditable to himself and satisfactory alike to his friends 
and those who opposed him politically. In 1892 he was made the chairman 
of the Coimty Central Committee and a member of the State Republican 
Committee for the Sixth congressional district. Two years later, in 1894, 
Mr. Cromer was elected to the highest office within the gift of the people 
of the city, that of mayor, while his services were next called into requisition 
by an election, in i8g8, to the Fifty-sixth congress. He served with much 
ability in this high office, and two years later was re-elected to congress, and 
again to the Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth congresses. Thus Mr. Cromer 
has not alone attained prestige and success in the practice of his profession, 
but has been conspicuously identified with many interests which have 
subserved the material prosperity of Indiana, proving a valuable factor in 
the legislative and political councils of his state. 

He married, in 1895, Miss Fannie J. Soule. of Chicago, Illinois. 

CjEORGE W. M.vrixg. Concerning the glass manufacturing firm of 
Maring, Hart & Company, who were among the early manufacturers to 
locate in Muncie after the natural gas boom, much has been said on other 
pages of this history. The third member of this firm, George W. Maring. 
has been identified with Muncie as a citizen since 1888, and he belongs with 
that notable group of business men who, during the last twenty years, have 
built Muncie from a town to a city. Until the discontinuance of the window 
glass industry in this city, he was actively connected with those interests, 
and his company also conducted two bottle plants at Dunkirk. A few years 
ago he sold his interests, and though since retired from the industrial 
affairs of his city, he is active in financial and civic matters. He was one 
of the organizers of the Merchants National Rank of Muncie. 

liefore coming to Muncie in 1888 Mr. Maring had spent most of his 
life in his native state of Ohio, where, in Monroe county, he was born 
August 15, 1843. His parents, Peter and Edith (Davis) Maring, were 
also natives of Ohio and spent their lives in that state, the father being a 
carpenter. Reared in Somerton, Belmont county, George W. Maring was 
pursuing an apprenticeship in the harness and saddle-maker's trade when 
the war broke out, and finally unable to resist the call of duty, he enlisted, 
August 16, 1862, in Company B, One Hundred and Twenty-second Ohio 
Infantry, and served throughout the conflict until he received an honorable 
discharge on March 23, 1865, together with a surgeon's certificate of 
disability. At the time of his discharge he was serving as corporal and 
color guard of the regiment. He saw hard service, but was not 
incapacitated for duty until the battle of the Wilderness, when he received 
a severe wound in the leg, which caused his confinement in hospital for 
eleven months. That was the occasion of his discharge. After the war, 
having regained his health, he resumed his apprenticeship, and after working 
for awhile as a journeyman he established a business of his own at Flushing, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 557 

Ohio. Three years later he removed to ChiUicothe, Missouri, and engaged 
as clerk in the drug business. After about two years in the drug trade he 
engaged as traveling salesman for the wholesale glass firm of J. M. Maring 
& Company, in which occupation he spent about seven years. About this 
time the finii of J. M. Alaring & Company was reorganized under the tirm 
name of Maring, Hart & Company, the firm being composed of J. M. 
Alaring, T. F. Hart and George W. Maring. 

While engaged in this business he was located at Bellaire, Ohio, a 
flourishing center of the glass trade during the eighties. After the discovery 
of gas about Muncie, this town became well advertised to all the 
manufacturers of Ohio, especially the glass makers, who found in the Magic 
City a veritable Eldorado for their industry. Mr. Maring and his associates 
were among those attracted to this city, and his energy and enterprise were 
important contributions to the increasing greatness of the city. Mr. Maring 
married, in 1877, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. \'an Scoyoc of 
Pennsylvania. 

W. E. Hitchcock. The men of influence in this age are the 
enterprising, progressive representatives of commerce, and to such ones 
advancement and progress are due. Mr. Hitchcock has the mental poise and 
calm judgment to successfully guide and control large business aifairs, and 
at the same time he has a keen appreciation of the ethics of commercial life, 
so that he not only commands the respect of his fellow-men for his 
uprightness, but also excites their admiration by his splendid abilities. 

Mr. Hitchcock was born in Aleriden, Connecticut, January 30, 1859, 
one of the two children of E. A. and Mary A. (Greene) Hitchcock. 
Removing with his parents to Ashtabula, Ohio, he received a good practical 
English education in its public schools, and at the early age of fifteen years 
he became a teller in an Ashtabula bank, continuing to successfully discharge 
the duties of that important office for several years. From 1876 until 1879 
he served as a bookkeeper for the Meriden Britannia Company, and then 
returned to Ashtabula to assist his father in his large manufacturing 
enterprise, which in 1884 they removed to Muncie and formed a partnership 
with A. L. and J. C. Johnson. Mr. Hitchcock is now the sole manager 
of this extensive concern, and in discharging his duties he has displayed 
splendid executive power and keen discrimination, and is widely recognized 
as a most capable business man. His interests, however, are many and 
varied, and he is also serving as the president of the Delaware County 
National Bank, the Muncie Savings and Loan Company, and is a director in 
the Muncie Trust Company, the Muncie Electric Light Company, and an 
officer in several manufacturing corporations, and many others of the 
leading institutions of the city owe their existence and subsequent prosperity 
to his wonderful ability. His name is indissolubly connected with the public 
annals of Delaware countv, for he is an active worker in the ranks of the 



558 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Republican party, and as its representative has held many positions of 
honor and trust. He was for several years president of the Metropolitan 
Police Board of the city, and is known as one of the most honorable publi.c 
men in jNIuncie. His fraternal connections are with the Masonic order. 
He also served as colonel on the staff of Governor Durbin during his term of 
office. 

On the 30th of September, 1885, Mr. Hitchcock was united in marriage 
to Miss Estelle Morehouse of Muncie. 

Charles Hexry Church has been a resident of Muncie since March, 
1887, at which time he removed to the city from New London, Ohio, and 
soon thereafter assisted in organizing the Delaware County Bank, a state 
institution. He was chosen as cashier, and in that position continued until 
in 1892 it was succeeded by the Delaware County National Bank, when he 
was made its cashier, and has continued as such for the period of twenty 
years in the same location. His career as a banker dates from 1872, when 
he organized the First National Bank at New London, Ohio, and was 
selected as vice-president and manager, continuing until his removal to this 
city. In 1 888 Mr. Church became the organizer and charter member of 
the Muncie Savings and Loan Company, was made its treasurer, in which 
position he still remains. As an indication of his banking qualifications, he 
was invited to assist in the organization of the Indiana Bankers' Association, 
and was one of the charter members, numbering about twenty-five. It now 
numbers over four hundred members, and during the year 1906 Mr. Church 
was selected and served as president of the institution. 

Mr. Church is a native of New York, born in Chenango county, in a 
small hamlet called Church Hollow, named in honor of the Church family. 
A postoffice was established under that name, with William Church, his 
father, as postmaster, and who was also a merchant for many years in that 
section. Mr. Church received the usual academic education in his native 
county, and engaged in the mercantile business for several years, in fact, 
mercantile and banking interests have engaged his attention from boyhood, 
and throughout his active business career he has always enjoyed the deserved 
confidence of all with whom he has been associated. In the interests of 
Muncie he has always taken an active part and in various ways con- 
tributed to its progress and upbuilding. While an ardent supporter of 
the Republican party, having cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln, he 
has never sought political preferment. 

At the age of twenty-six he was united in marriage to Miss Lou Tyler, 
a daughter of Henry P. and Ann Tyler of Norwalk, Ohio. They have two 
children, William and Ernest, both of age, one engaged in bireiness at 
Muncie and the youngest, Ernest, at the University of Indiana. Mr. Church 
has been quite active as a Mason in the Masonic orders, and at present is 
treasurer of the Muncie Commandery of Knights Templar. 




James Boyce. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 561 

James Boyce, of Muncie, Indiana, was born near Belfast, Ireland, April 
7, 1833. His parents, Hugh and Margaret (Wilson) Boyce, of Scotch 
descent, were also born there. He received a common school education 
from six to twelve years and became very proficient in his studies, helping 
the teacher during the last year. After leaving school at that age he worked 
in a linen factory for four years at eight cents a day of twelve hours. At 
this time, October 8, 1848, he suffered the loss of his mother, leaving him 
virtually an orphan, owing to the destitution of his family, his father being 
a drunkard. He still continued to work in the same factory, receiving nine 
cents a day without board, and subsisting on commeal mush and buttermilk 
twenty-one meals per week. He was taken to France to educate the French 
boys in his line, starting at fifteen cents per day and rapidly advancing to 
eighty-three cents. After remaining there for twx) years he again returned 
to Belfast and stayed there for nearly two years. He was then solicited to 
take charge of a number of e.xpert girl linen spinners that were employed 
for a linen factory in Lile de Flanders, and so returned to France. Working 
at this for a few months and finding himself out of employment and longing 
to get back to St. Germains, where he first worked, he walked from Lile de 
Flanders to St. Germains, a distance of three hundred miles, where he was 
gladly welcomed by his old employer, who placed him to work. Arriving 
at the age of twenty-one, tired of his every-day work, he went to Havre 
intending to enlist in the British navy for the Crimean war, but providentially 
he was otherwise persuaded to go to the United States as a sailor. Obeying 
the advice of his good Samaritan he shipped as an ordinary seaman to New 
York, arriving there after a tedious voyage of nine weeks. There being no 
linen factories in this country he was compelled to accept any kind of labor, 
and his first job was driving a team on the Erie canal, but afterward he 
received employment in a fla.x mill at Little Falls, New York, which at 
twenty-three dollars per month led to his success. Having become an e.xpert 
in this new line in the flax business, he was engaged for one year at fifty 
dollars per month at Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. There Mr. Boyce became 
acquainted and married Miss Eliza ]\IcKennet, a lady of Scotch-Irish descent, 
April 5, 1857. Soon after his marriage he engaged in the flax business for 
himself in a small way, about ten miles from Cuyahoga Falls, but in a few 
weeks his dam washed away and not being able to build up again he went 
to Newton Falls, Ohio, and finding employment in his line remained about 
two years. At this time, taking Horace Greeley's advice, he started for 
Shakkoppee, Scott count}-, Minnesota, with his wife and child, and two 
hundred and fifty dollars in money. Not being able to find employment or 
buy a home he left his wife and child there for a time and went to 
Greenville, Mississippi, and working at ditching he cleared thereby three 
hundred and five dollars. He then returned to Minnesota and bought 
eighty acres of land and all the flaxseed obtainable in the drug stores in St. 
Paul and Minneapolis and sowed the first two acres of flax sown in 
Minnesota. But not being able to purchase machinery to scutch it in the 



563 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

fall he left hi> family airain temporarily and went to Xewton Falls and 
returned lnjme again in the early spring with two hundred and ten dollars 
to show for the winter's work, working fifteen hours a day five days in the 
week and nineteen hours on Saturday. On his arrival he sowed twenty 
acres and then proceeded to construct a breaking and scutching machine and 
horse power of his own invention, cutting the logs from his own woods, 
giving one-half of the lumber for sawing and one-half of the other half for 
the carpenter work. With this he scutched the twenty acres, and when 
ready for shipment it was valued at about twenty-five hundred dollars. The 
fire fiend destroyed the warehouse, together with all his farm product, dwell- 
ing, furniture and nearly all the family clothing, and, as he carried no in- 
surance, it left him nothing but his farm. But his misfortunes on the frontier 
had only begun. The next spring typhoid fever entered his family, taking 
his wife and one child, leaving him with two children to commence the 
world anew. Mr. Boyce then sold everything left and returned to Ohio 
and bought one-third interest in a flax factory in Alliance, and after two 
months purchased the other two-thirds, and later sold out for the sum of 
two thousand dollars. With this he moved his family to Wooster. Ohio, and 
purchased one-fourth interest in a flax factory, and later bought another 
fourth, making half interest, but at the end of two years fire wiped out the 
profits for the two years, there being no insurance. Building it up again, 
better than ever before, at the' end of the fourth year he sold out for ten 
thousand dollars. With this he moved his all to Muncie, arriving on the 
4th of July, 1870, being the first individual coming into town with that 
amount of money. Commencing the first factory in a small way, inventing 
and manufacturing labor-saving machines, he soon became the largest flax- 
bagging manufacturer in the world. He afterwards installed D. handle ma- 
chinery, and produced more of such handles than any other concern in 
the world. Mr. Boyce engaged in many other lines of legitimate and 
speculative enterprises, namely, the manufacture of shoe rivets, and baskets, 
oil and mining operations. During his first fourteen years he suffered many 
losses by fire. 

Mr. Boyce has found time, notwithstanding his business cares, to dis- 
charge official duties. His first office was chairman of the board of county 
commissioners of Scott county, Minnesota. He was three times elected 
councilman from the Fourth ward in Muncie. He has taken all the degrees 
of Odd Fellowship, passing through both chairs, and all in the ^lasonic fra- 
ternity up to the Shrine, and is now a member of the Elks and a charter 
member of the Commercial Club, being president part of the time. After 
seriously investigating man's future in all the orthodox creeds he could find 
absolute assurance of our .soul's happiness only in Spiritualism. He is in 
politics a Republican, but devotes little of his time to that. 

Mr. Boyce has always taken great interest in the city of his choice ; was 
a leader in all things for many years, always ready to say "Come, boys." 
when duty called him. He was president of the Citizens' Enterprise Com- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 563 

panv. capitalized, at two hundred thousand dollars, during its existence of 
eight years, whose history is elsewhere given. Mr. Boyce was first in every 
new improvement, putting in his residence the first bath tub, steam heating 
plant, street lighting, and also built the first electric light plant : had the 
first lawnmower, and many other minor matters too numerous to mention. 

Mr. Boyce's first wife died June i, 1865. He was married in Alliance, 
Ohio, January 7, 1866, to Mrs. Eliza Shaffer, who died April 18, 1875, leav- 
ing him with a family of seven children. He married July 10, 1875, Miss 
Margaret Mohler, by whom he has two children. Of hfs eleven children 
seven survive, three sons and four daughters. 

We seldom see such perseverance through difficulties, such buoyancy of 
spirit under such heavy afflictions and such fertility of resources in repair- 
ing losses. All advantages seem to have been withheld, and overtaken by 
many disasters, he has succeeded only, as it were, by wresting success from 
the grasp of fate. Through life his motto has been, great hope, no fear. 
The force of his character is manifest in the fact that while he manages his 
private affairs with such ability, he yet has sufficient mental power to act 
with eft'ect in other situations. While being retired from active business at 
seventy-five, he is physically and mentally sound and still takes a fatherlv 
interest in city affairs for the mutual interest. 

St.xfford B. Peri>il'e. the sheriff of Delaware county, is one of the 
most popular and efficient officials of the county, and is also a representative 
of one of the honored early families of this section of the state. His father, 
the Rev. Abner Perdiue was born, reared and married in Guilford county. 
North Carolina, there receiving his educational training, and was fitted for 
the Methodist ministry. When only seventeen years of age he began preach- 
ing, continuing his ministerial labors in North Carolina and Virginia until 
1 83 1, when he removed with his family to Indiana, stopping for a few years 
in Henry county and then removing to Delaware county. C)n his arrival 
here he entered land from the government two miles west of Muncie, where 
he improved an excellent farm, carrying on his agricultural labors in addi- 
tion to his ministerial work, and in his later life was also engaged in mer- 
chandising at Tabor and Gaston. After his removal to Indiana he trans- 
ferred his labors from the Methodist Episcopal to the Protestant Methodist 
church, and to him belongs the honor of having organized and started most 
of the churches of that denomination in Henry and Delaware counties. He 
also taught in the early schools of this county. Rev. Perdiue was an ex 
cellent orator, well versed in theology', and he officiated at more funerals 
and solemnized more marriages than any other minister in this section oi 
ttie state. Though many years have elapsed since his death in February, 
1875, the influence of his conscientious, just career, his kindly, generous 
heart and sympathetic manner abides. Mrs. Perdiue bore the maiden name 
ni Frances Finlay and was a native of Delaware county. 

Among the native sons of Delaware county is numbered Stafford B. 



564 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Perdiue, whose birth occurred in Monroe townShip on the 26th of Januar\-, 
1868, and in its public schools he received the educational training which 
fitted him for life's responsible duties. During the first years of his active 
business career he followed agricultural pursuits, but at the age of nineteen 
years engaged in the barber business in Muncie, and in November, 1905. was 
elected to the office of sheriff of Delaware county, the duties of which he 
has since discharged in a satisfactory and commendable manner. Since 
reaching mature years he has been a zealous worker in the ranks of the Re- 
publican party, and is at all times a loyal and public-spirited citizen, actively 
interested in all measures advanced for the good of the people. 

In 1888 Mr. Perdiue was married to Miss Hattie B. Kiger, a daughter 
of Charles Kiger, of Delaware county, and their only daughter is Charlotte 
F. Mr. Perdiue holds membership relations with the Delaware lodge of 
Masons, and is a worthy member of the Methodist church. 

Robe Carl White, believed to be the youngest postmaster that Aluncie 
has ever had, is a good example of what determination to win will do, and 
of how obstacles to progress may really be blessings in disguise. Truth to 
tell, hpwever, he was not bom in a log cabin, as persons who succeed in 
life are supposed to be, but instead he first saw the light of day in his par- 
ents' substantial frame dwelling in Delaware county, and during his early 
years pursued the common life of a Hoosier schoolboy. In his life thus far 
he has seen much of hard work and study, something of adventure and 
considerable of success. 

Mr. White is the son of Samuel S. and Mary (Andrews) White, both 
of whom were natives of Indiana and the former of whom is still alive and 
living north of Muncie, a respected pioneer of the county. His mother died 
in March. 1905. His father, who came to Delaware county in 1836, where 
he has lived most of the time since, once served as county commissioner. 

Robe Carl White was born on the old family homestead near Muncie 
on August 2j, 1869, and was not yet thirty-eight years old, therefore, when 
he became postmaster of Muncie in March, 1907. Previous to his becoming 
postmaster he had been city attorney of Muncie, resigning that position to 
accept the postmastership, and had been prominently identified with the Re- 
publican politics of the city, county and district before holding any public 
office. Mr. White attended the district schools of Delaware county and the 
city schools of Muncie until he was fourteen years old, at which time, in 
1883, he accompanied his parents to lola, Kansas. There he continued his 
education and was graduated from the lola high school after completing a 
four years' course of study. At this time, although he then entertained 
the ambition to pursue still further his education, it became necessary to 
abandon temporarily this plan. His first position on leaving high school was 
that of a teacher in the Allen county (Kansas) schools, where he taught 
for two vears. 




^v^^^^^^cr^ 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 567 

Tiring of this life, however, and being ambitious to succeed more rap- 
idly than he believed was possible as a country school teacher, he joined 
the great rush into Oklahoma in 1889 — the rush that has become historic. 
There was something dramatic and appealing in this rush as a result of 
which towns with thousands of inhabitants sprang up in a single night from 
barren prairies, and it fired Mr. White's imagination, as it did that of many 
another. The Scott brothers, friends of White, one of whom is now Congress- 
man Charles F. Scott, of Kansas, had resolved to start the first newspaper in 
Oklahoma, and White was asked to become a reporter for it, a position he 
accepted with alacrity. The rush into the territory began at noon one day 
and that same night the Scott brothers issued from a tent the first copy of 
the first newspaper in the territory, the Oklahoma Journal, on the site of 
Oklahoma City. In a few days the paper was in its own building, and for 
months, during which the Scott brothers fairly rolled in wealth, while their 
job presses ran night and day, !Mr. White acted as head reporter for the 
Journal. But after he had participated for a year in the strenuous western 
newspaper life the old desire to continue his education again took possession 
of him. He had managed to save a little money, and with it went to Chi- 
cago, where he took a course in Bryant & Stratton's Business College, from 
which he was graduated in the spring of 1890. It was the business experi- 
ence gained in Chicago that enabled him to realize his cherished aim, the 
taking of a college course. By means of it he was enabled to secure em- 
ployment as an accountant while he was taking a law course of four years 
in the University of Minnesota. He was graduated from the university in 
1896. Mr. White was then offered a scholarship in Hobart College, New 
York, but financial reasons prevented his accepting the offer. It had be- 
come necessary for him to do something to bring in a greater income than 
he had been receiving. 

For the three years following his graduation Mr. White practiced law 
successfully in St. Paul, Minnesota, and then came to Muncie, after his 
many years of absence, and formed a partnership with Ira J. Young, under 
the firm name W^hite & Young, this partnership continuing until 1906, when 
Mr. White became identified with the administration of Mayor Leonidas A. 
Guthrie as city attorney. Then he was appointed by the president to be 
postmaster of Muncie on the joint recommendation of Senators Beveridge 
and Hemenway, of Indiana, his appointment coming just before the dedica- 
tion of the handsome new federal building in Muncie, of which he is now, 
by reason of his office, custodian. 

But while Mr. White's life has largely been one of business activity, he 
has not neglected altogetlier the social side of it. He is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of the Independent Order of Red 
Men and of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

He was married in 1896 to Aliss Agnes L. McSorley, of Red Wing, 
Minnesota, where the marriage ceremony was performed. 



568 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

H. C. Hav.mond. One of the leading citizens and influential business 
men of Muncie is H. C. Haymond, who is now serving as vice president 
of the Delaware County National Bank and in many other ways is connected 
with the leading interests of the county. His birth occurred near Fairmont. 
West \'irginia, May 4, 1852, and in that commonwealth his parents, Octa- 
vius and Elizabeth ( Fleming) Haymond. were also born. The father died 
when his son H. C. was but nine months old, and when a lad of seventeen 
years, in 1869, he came to JMuncie to make his home with his brother, who 
was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Delaware county. Completing his 
education in the schools of this city, Mr. Haymond taught for nine years 
in the country schools, after which he abandoned the professional for a mer- 
cantile life and for a time was engaged in merchandising at Cowan, Indiana. 
He was next employed as a salesman for the firm of Chandler & Taylor, of 
Indianapolis, and a short time afterwards entered upon his long connection 
with the Indiana Bridge Company, with which he was associated for 
eighteen \ears. In 1905 Mr. Haymond was made the vice president of the 
Delaware County National Bank, which is regarded as one of the most re- 
liable financial concerns in this part of the state, and its constantly growing 
business attests its popularity. He is also interested in other enterprises, 
being a director of the Muncie Trust & Savings Company and the Mutual 
Home and Savings Association ; he is also the present city comptroller, and 
for seven years has served as a member of the city council, while for two 
terms he has been a member of the school board. He is progressive and 
resolute in all his transactions, and as the result of his capable management 
he has gained a place among the substantial citizens and most highly es- 
teemed business men of his county. 

Mr. Haymond was united in marriage in 1877 to Margaret A. Lou- 
thain, of Indiana, and they have four sons. He holds membership relations 
with the Masonic order in Muncie, with the Independent C)rder of Odd Fel- 
lows and the Knights of Pythias. 

Rev. J.vcob W. He.\th. One of the best-known citizens of Delaware- 
county was Rev. Jacob \V. Heath, nearly all of whose life was passed within 
the borders of this county. He was thoroughly earnest and sincere in all 
his thoughts, words and deeds, and his noble, manly life proved an inspiration 
to many of his friends and associates. Though he has passed to his reward, 
the influence of his conscientious, just career, his kindly, generous heart and 
sympathetic manner abides. 

His family was founded in this country by his great-grandfather, wno 
with two brothers came from London. England, and lived for some time la 
Maryland, where the grandfather Jacob was born and reared. In his young 
manhood, however, he moved to Guilford county, North Carolina, where 
Ralph Heath, the father of Jacob W.. was born, reared and married, Mary 
Tomlinson becoming his wife. After the birth of four children, three sons 
and a daujihter, they came to Indiana, making the overland journey by 




"Fair Acres 

CuLmtry Home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Fudge 




"Fair Acres 

in October 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 573 

wagTDn and arriving in Wayne county in October, 182S. In the following 
year, however, the husband and father came to Delaware county and en- 
tered land, this being at a time when the county's voters numbered less than 
two hundred, and much of the land where Muncie now stands was congress 
land, subject to entry at one dollar and a quarter an acre. Locating in 
Salem township, Mr. Ralph Heath erected a little cabin home, an(i Decem- 
ber 25. 1829, brought his family hither. This was then a lonely section, 
where the bears, panthers and other wild animals roamed at will through 
the dense forests, and the children of the family shared in the rugged pioneel 
life. Mr. Heath was a Christian man. and his cabin became the preaching 
place for the Methodist Episcopal missionaries for years. 

In this Christian home Rev. Jacob W. Heath learned the lessons of 
purity, gentleness of manner and integrity of character which characterized 
his after years, and he lived at home with his parents and attended the dis- 
trict schools until of age, also working on the farm during the summer 
months. During the years of 1848-9 he was a student in the Delaware 
County Academy, and after leaving that institution taught school for some 
time. Turning his attention from a professional to a business career, he 
was engaged in farming until 1868, when he came to Muncie and engaged 
in the grocery, real estate and life insurance business. At the early age of 
sixteen years Rev. Heath had joined the Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which he filled the offices of leader, trustee, steward, Sunday-school super- 
intendent, exhorter, and from 1877 ^'^'^^ ^ local minister. As would be ex- 
pected of such a man, true in all his relations to his fellows, he was loyal to 
his duties as a citizen and used his franchise in favor of all noble principles 
and upright candidates for public office, his sympathies being with the Re- 
publican party. He was an active and efficient worker in its campaigns, but 
at all times he was a strong temperance advocate. 

In 1850 Rev. Heath was married to Rhoda A., a daughter of Rev. Ab- 
ner Perdiue, and they became the parents of eight children, six sons and 
two daughters : John B., Frederick W., Perry S., Fletcher S., Cyrus R., 
Cassie E. and Mary A. Arthur B. W. died in infancy. Rev. Heath exempli- 
fied in his life the beneficent spirit of the Masonic order, of which he was 
long a faithful member, having become a member of Delaware lodge, F. 
and A. M., in 1856. Though he has been called to his home beyond, he 
is kindly remembered by his many acquaintances and friends of former years. 

C. B. Fudge, engaged in the clothing business, ranks today among the 
most successful and leading business men of Muncie. Nearly his entire life 
has been passed within the confines of Delaware county, and his advance- 
ment has been along the lines of the city's growth, due to progressive, reso- 
lute purpose and laudable ambition. His birth occurred in Xenia, Ohio, 
September 24, 1863, a son of Johri S. and Martha (Booths) Fudge, both 
also born in that commonwealth. In 1864, however, the family came to Del- 
aware county, Indiana, establishing their home in Xiles township, where the 



574 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

father was engaged in agricultural pursuits for many years, retiring to pri- 
vate life about ten years before his death, which occurred in 1899, aged 
sevent}'-one years. 

The district schools of Delaware county afforded C. B. Fudge with the 
educational training which he enjoyed in his youth, and after leaving the 
schoolroom he spent one year as a clerk in a store in Albany. Returning on 
'the expiration of that period to Muncie, he was for twelve years employed 
as a clerk, and in 1899 formed a partnership with G. W. Bliss in the clothing 
and gentlemen's outfitting business, the firm name being Bliss & Fudge. 
Purchasing his partner's interest, Mr. Fudge incorporated the business in 
1903, and under his skillful management it has now reached extensive pro- 
portions, placing its proprietor among the foremost business men of Muncie. 
Mr. Fudge has also many other interests, but his time is principally devoted 
to his clothing business. 

In June, 1892, occurred the marriage of Mr. Fudge and Nellie M. .A.rmi- 
tage. She is a daughter of Dr. D. R. Armitage, of Delaware county, and 
three children have been born to bless the union, Mildred Marie, Robert 
Armitage and Carl Sellers. Mr. Fudge has membership relations with the 
Masonic order, belonging to the Muncie lodge, chapter and commandery, 
and has passed all the chairs in the latter. His religious affiliations are with 
the Presbyterian church. Success has crowned his well-directed and enter- 
prising efforts, and it is the wish of his many friends that the master of 
"Fairacres," a beautiful country seat three miles from Muncie, may be 
numbered among the valuable citizens of Delaware county for many years 
to come. 

Hox. Leonid.-\s a. Guthrie, a distinguished member of the legal pro- 
fession, is honored and respected in every class of society and is a leader in 
the public life of his city and county. His name is a familiar one in political 
and professional circles, and by reason of his marked intellectual activity he 
is well fitted to aid in molding the public policy as the mayor of Muncie. 
For many years the Guthrie family have been closely associated with the 
progress and development of Delaware county, it having been in a very 
early day in its history that John Milton Guthrie, the grandfather of Leoni- 
das, took up his abode within its borders, but soon after the birth of his son 
James he moved to Iowa, where he spent the remainder of his life and be- 
came a prominent factor in the community in which he made his home, 
Guthrie county in that state having been named in his honor. Soon after his 
death the family returned to Delaware county, and James R. Guthrie, the 
father of Leonidas, is a well-known merchant of Muncie. He married 
Martha Inlow, whose father, Walter Inlow, came from Springfield, Ohio, 
in an early day and was numbered among the old and honored pioneers of 
this county. 

Leonidas A. Guthrie is a native son of Delaware county, his natal day 
being the i8th of April, 1875, and after completing his education in the 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 675 

public schools of Muncle he began the study of shorthand and bookkeeping. 
His first employment along that line was with the Muncie Glass Company, 
of Muncie, with which he remained until 1893, when he took up court re- 
porting and from 1894 until 1897 was the court reporter of Randolph 
county, Indiana. Going thence to Indianapolis, he served as stenographer 
of the appellate court until he was made the official reporter of the Delaware 
circuit court. In the meantime Mr. Guthrie had entered upon the study of 
law, his preceptors being Gregory, Silverburg & Lotz, and after his ad- 
mission to the bar in 1897 he served two years as probate commissioner of 
Delaware county, resigning that position to become mayor of Muncie, to 
which high office he had been elected in November, 1905. In this position 
he has been very efficient and faithful, making a most competent officer. 

In June, 1905, Mr. Guthrie was united in marriage to Ethel, a daughter 
of Robert Calvin Peterson, of Delaware county. In his political affiliations 
Mr. Guthrie has always been a zealous Republican, active in campaign work 
and laboring earnestly for the adoption of its principles. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Masonic and other orders, and is widely and favorably known 
in Muncie and Delaware counties. 

W. A. Thompson. The work of the legal profession is to formulate, 
to harmonize, to regulate, to adjust, to administer those rules and principles 
that underlie and permeate all government and society and control the 
varied relations of man. As thus viewed there attaches to the legal profes- 
sion a nobleness that cannot but be reflected in the life of the true lawyer, 
who, conscious of the greatness of his profession and honest in the pursuit 
of his purpose, embraces the richness of learning, the profoundness of wis- 
dom, the firmness of integrity and the purity of morals, together with the 
courtesy and the general amenities of life. A prominent representative of 
the bar of Delaware county is W. A. Thompson, who was born in Shelby 
county, Indiana, August 8, 1840, his parents having been among the early 
pioneers of that county, where they were also highly respected. Their son, 
W. A., who was one of fourteen children, spent the early years of his life 
on a farm, supplementing the instruction which he received in the district 
school near his home by attendance in the high school at Shelbyville, while 
later he spent two years in Moore's Hill College. At the age of eighteen 
he became principal of the graded school of St. Paul, Indiana, and later 
taught for some time in Shelby county. 

When seventeen years of age Mr. Thompson united with the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and in 1862, when a youth of twenty-two years, he en- 
tered its ministry, spending seven years in the Southeastern Indiana confer- 
ence. After the death of his first wife, which occurred in 1865, he returned 
to Moore's Hill College for one year, after which he again resumed his min- 
isterial labors, thus continuing until failing health caused him to abandon 
his chosen labor, and he retired from the ministry in 1870. Shortly after- 
ward he began the study of the law under the preceptorship of Judge Lamb, 



576 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

completing; his studies with the finn of Gordon, Browne & Lamb, of In- 
dianapoHs, and in 1871 began practice in association witli General Thomas 
Browne at Winchester, while from 1873 to 1874 he was with Judge J- J- 
Cheney, from 1874 to 1879 was associated in practice with Judge L. J. 
Monks, and afterward formed a partnership with Captain A. O. Marsh and 
his brother, J. W. Thompson, the firm name becoming Thompson, Marsh 
& Thompson. (In the 25th of December. 1889, Mr. Thompson came to 
Muncie and formed a law partnership with Judge Ryan, but he is now en- 
gaged in practice with his son, and the firm of Thompson & Thompson is 
well known in the legal circles throughout this section of the state. From 
the beginning of his career as a lawyer Mr. Thompson has met with success, 
his deep research and thorough preparation of every case committed to his 
care enabling him to meet at once any contingency that may arise. His ar- 
guments are strong, clear, decided, and follow each other in natural se- 
quence, forming a chain of reasoning that his opponents find difficult to over- 
throw. He is an active and ardent Republican, but has at all times refused 
to accept office, desiring rather to confine his entire attention to his legal 
practice. 

In 1863 Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Mary R. Wilkinson, 
whose death occurred in 1865, leaving one child, and in 1868 he married 
Elizabeth S. Lamb, the daughter of Judge Lamb, of Indianapolis. He ranks 
high at the bar of this section of the state, and Muncie numbers him among 
her influential and honored adopted sons. 

C.ALVi.N" S. W.ACHTELL. For over seventy years Calvin S. Wachtell has 
traveled life's journey, and now, in the evening of a long, useful and honor- 
able career, he is enjoying a well-earned rest, in a great measure relieved of 
the burdens of an active business life. He has been prominent in public life 
as well as in business circles, and is leaving the impress of his individuality 
for good upon many lines of progress and advancement in the city where 
he has so long made his home. He was born near Springfield, Ohio, 
December i, 1837, a son of Jonathan and Permelia (Baxter) Watchell. na- 
tives respectively of Pennsylvania and Maryland, and the father was of 
German descent. In 1839 the family came to Muncie, where the father was 
engaged in the manufacture of chairs and furniture, and his active life was 
brought to a close in 1850, while his widow survived until 1891. ilr. Wach- 
tell gave a lifelong support to Democratic principles, and both he and his 
wife were Presbyterians, they having been instrumental in founding the first 
church of that denomination in Muncie, in which he served as deacon and 
trustee. 

Calvin S. Wachtell, the TOungest of their si.x children, grew to years of 
maturity in this city, receiving his education in its early schools, and then 
learned the trade of harnessmaking. In 1874 he was elected the city clerk 
and auditor of Muncie, continuing in those offices for twelve years, but in 
the meantime, in 1879, he had embarked in his present business, dealing in 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 579 

wagon?, harness, hardware, etc., and from a small tjeginning he has advanced 
its interests to its present large proportions. His is not only one of the 
largest business concerns in this city, but also one of the oldest, and to him 
belongs the distinction of being one of the oldest business men in Muncie. 
At the present time, however, his interests are ably looked after by his son, 
F. L. W'achtell. the senior Mr. Wachtell thus being relieved of many of his 
former cares. His interests in this city have been many and varied, and he 
is now serving as the president of the Muncie Lubricating Company, and is 
a director and one of the founders of the People's National Bank. 

In 1862 Mr. Wachtell was united in marriage to Miss Su.san L. .Ander- 
son, a daughter of John Anderson, of Niles township, Delaware county. Mr. 
Wachtell has long been numbered among the prominent and progressive 
citizens of Muncie and has been called to many offices of trust in financial 
and business circles. He is a Republican in his political affiliations, and fra- 
ternally is a member of the order of Odd Fellows. The Christian church of 
Muncie numbers him among its valued members, and he has served as a 
clerk and deacon therein for many years. 

J.^MES W. Meeks, the eldest son of Robert Meeks. one of the best- 
known and most prominent business men of this city and county, whose biog- 
raphy appears on another page, was bom in Muncie on the 14th of Decem- 
ber, 1849. After completing his education in the city schools he learned 
cabinetmaking under his father's efficient supervision, and when twenty-two 
years of age he became interested in the firm. From that time forward he 
has devoted his talents and energies to the building up of the business, which 
with the passing years has constantly developed both in volume and impor- 
tance and has long been numbered among the leading business institutions 
of Delaware county. 

Mr. Meeks married, in 1876, Miss Louesa C. Hummell, who was born 
in Connersville, Indiana, the daughter of Joseph and Mary Hummell. Their 
children are Amelia B., the wife of Ollie J. Campbell: Sarah M., now Mrs. 
Alfred C. Danks ; and Robert H., who married Etta Payton. Mr. Meeks 
has membership relations with the Odd Fellows fraternity, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Red Men, and is identified with the Republican party. He 
is a member of and an active worker in the Methodist Episcopal church, in 
which he has served as treasurer for fifteen years, and during a similar 
period has also been treasurer of the Preachers' Aid Society of the Northern 
Indiana conference. 

Orlando J.\y Lotz. The name of Orlando J. Lotz is enduringly in- 
scribed on the pages of Indiana's political history in connection with the 
records of her jurisprudence. His superior ability won him marked suc- 
cess, he was crowned with high judicial honors, and in business and private 
life he won that good name which is rather to be chosen than great riches. 
He was one of Indiana's native sons, born on the 15th of January, 1852, 



580 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

the eldest of nine children born to Jeremiah C. and ^Vlelissa (Schuff) Lotz. 
In 1861 the father received an appointment under Lincoln in the treasurv- 
department and took his son Orlando with him to Washington, where the 
lad attended the public schools for four years. The father still holds the 
appointment given him in 1 861, being one of the oldest men in the service, 
and he has reached the age of eighty years. 

In i866 Mr. Orlando Lotz returned to his former home and entered the 
high school at Fort Recovery, Ohio, graduating therefrom in 1870. Two 
years later, in 1S72, he began the study of law, and in 1874 graduated with 
the highest honors in the National Law School in Washington, D. C. His 
preparation was thorough and comprehensive, and the favorable judgment 
which was passed upon him in his early years was never set aside or in any 
degree modified during his career at the bar and on the bench. In 1885 he 
was appointed judge of the Forty-sixth judicial circuit by Governor Gray, 
and at the election two years later he was returned to the office, although a 
Democrat in a district with a Republican majority of twenty-five hundred, 
which speaks volumes for his ability and the high regard in which he was 
held by his fellow citizens. For eight years Mr. Lotz continued to dis- 
charge the duties of that office, and in 1892 was elected a member of the 
appellate court of Indiana, in which he served until January, 1897, when 
he resigned the office to resume his private practice of law at Muncie, as a 
member of the -firm of Gregory, Silverburg & Lotz, thus continuing until 
his death on the 5th of February. 1902. He was a man of strong character 
and of great generosity and exemplary habits, and concerning his life there 
was never an evil report. He had a keen, analytical mind, quick to grasp 
and determine disputed questions, and his public opinions as preserved in 
the appellate court reports are logical and display deliberation and research, 
also showing a master mind in principles of law and equity. But death, 
untimely and unexpected, took from Delaware county one of its most prom- 
inent citizens, where he passed away in the prime of life, but left behind 
him a pure and noble record of honesty, industry and perseverance. A self- 
made man, in his efforts to reach the goal of his professional ambition he 
overcame the obstacles that lay in his path, and his high and splendid ex- 
ample has left a lasting impression upon the profession in which he won 
distinction and was universally esteemed. 

Mrs. Lotz bore the maiden name of Amanda Inlow and is a native of 
Delaware county. Her father, Walter Inlow, was numbered among the 
honored early pioneers of the county, and Inlow Springs, which were found 
upon his old farm, were named in his honor. Mr. Lotz was an honored mem- 
ber of both the Masonic order and the Methodist church. 

H.xRVEY Mitchell, AI. D. Over half a century of self-denying labor 
in the service of suffering humanity is, in brief, the summing up of the 
life of this beloved and venerable physician of Muncie. now the oldest living 
member of the medical profession in Delaware county. He was born in 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 581 

Greene county, Pennsylvania, July 21, 1S25, a son of Thomas and Sarah 
(Shideler) Mitchell, both natives of Pennsylvania, the father born in iSoi 
and the mother in 1802, and they were of Irish and German lineage re- 
spectively. Their marriage was celebrated in 1822, and in 1830 they re- 
moved from their native commonwealth of Pennsylvania to Miami county, 
Ohio, where the father followed agricultural pursuits and died in 1861. His 
widow afterward went to California, where at the home of her only daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Carl, she passed away in death in 1866. In their family were 
the following children : John A., deceased ; Harvey, whose name intro- 
duces this review; Isaac, deceased; ^Margaret, who married Wesley Carl; 
Shadrick; and David. 

On his father's farm in Miami county, Ohio, Harvey Mitchell was 
reared to years of maturity, in the meantime receiving his educational train- 
ing in the nearby log schoolhouse, and he taught and attended school alter- 
nately until his graduation from the academy at Troy, Ohio. For three 
years thereafter he pursued the study of medicine under a practicing physi- 
cian, whence he took two courses of lectures in the Starling Medical Col- 
lege at Columbus, Ohio, and in 1850 located for the practice of his chosen 
profession at Granville, Delaware county. During the long period of four- 
teen years Dr. Mitchell successfully pursued the practice of medicine in 
that city, removing at the close of the period, in 1864, to Muncie, where he 
has ever since remained. About 1900, after half a century of activit}', he 
retired from the profession because of advanced years and also on account 
of a broken hip. In these days of splendid highways who can recall what 
it meant to be a pioneer physician, riding far and near in all kinds of 
weather. On his patient, plodding horse the doctor often visited as many 
as si.xty patients in a day, traversing the muddy roads on many a dark, 
stormy night, courageously bearing cheer and comfort to the distant patient. 

On the 9th of October. 1853, at Granville, Indiana, Dr. Mitchell mar- 
ried Miss Catherine Ash. who was born in Greene county, Ohio, May 30, 
1837, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Driscoll) Ash, both of whom 
were also born in Ohio, from whence they removed to Delaware county, 
Indiana, in 1853. and later to Illinois. Two children were born to Dr. and 
Mrs. Mitchell, Sarah Florence, who died in 1866, aged eleven years, and 
Harriet B., the wife of Charles H. Anthony, of Muncie. They also have 
one grandchild. Harvey M. Anthony. Prior to the Civil war Dr. Mitchell 
allied his political interests with the Democracy, but since that time he has 
been identified with the Republican party. In his early life he became a 
member of the Christian church, but in later years has attended the Metho- 
dist Episcopal, of which his wife has long been a member. 

John W. Dr.xgoo, the secretary of the Western Reserve Life Insur- 
ance Company, is a member of one of the oldest and most prominent fam- 
ilies of Delaware county. His grandfather, Peter Dragoo, was one of the 
first to take up his abode within its borders, coming from W^est Virginia in 



583 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

1835 and entering from the government eighty acres of land in section 19, 
Perr\- township, Delaware oimntv. There he lived for many years, and 
there his death finally occurred at the advanced age of ninety-two years. He 
was torn in West \'irginia. but, as has been noted, came to Delaware county 
in a very early day in its history, when deer and other wild game roamed 
at will through its forests. Building him a little log cabin in the woods, he 
began life here in true pioneer style, and his time was thereafter devoted 
to clearing and cultivating his land. He married Martha Jones, and they 
became the parents of the following children : William, deceased ; Lemuel, 
a farmer of Perry township, this county; John, who died during his service 
in the Civil war; Sarah, now Mrs. Winget, and a resident of Liberty town- 
ship; Mary, Mrs. Kerns, of Monroe township, and Samuel J., on the old 
homestead farm. Mr. Peter Dragoo was a stanch and true pioneer, loved 
and honored by all who knew him, and he took an active part in the early 
history of his community. 

William Dragoo. Sr., a son of this honored old Delaware county pio- 
neer, was born in West \'irginia in 1828. and was seven years of age at the 
time of the family's removal to Delaware county. He followed the occupa- 
tion of farming throughout his entire business career, and his life's labors 
were ended in death in 1890. He married .Amelia Gibson, who was born 
in 1833, and her father, Robert Gibson, was one of the early pioneers of 
Delaware county. Unto Mr. and Airs Dragoo were born the following 
children: John W., whose name introduces this review; Laura B., now 
Mrs. Childs, and a resident of Benton township; Nancy J., Mrs. Clevenger, 
and a resident of Muncie. The Republican party received Mr. Dragoo's 
active support and cooperation, and he was a prominent and worthy member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Dragoo is yet living. 

Mr. John W. Dragoo was bom in Perr\- township on the 7th of May, 
185S. and the educational training which he received in the district schools 
near his home was supplemented by attendance at the Muncie High school 
and the State Normal at Terre Haute. This e.xcellent training was received 
by his own efiforts, and after its completion he taught until his twenty-sixth 
year. During the seven years which followed he was employed at farm 
labor, and then again entered the schoolroom as a teacher, spending two 
years in the schools of Center township and seven years as principal of the 
Roosevelt school in Congerville. During the following fourteen months 
Mr. Dragoo was paying teller of the Merchants' Bank, and in September, 
1899, was elected trustee of Center township, remaining as the incumbent 
of that position for four years. Previous to this time he had served his 
county as its assessor for one term. He is a Republican in his political af- 
filiations. On the organization of the Western Reserve Life Insurance 
Company in 1906 he was elected its secretary, his present position. 

Mr. Dragoo married, in 1884, Miss Frances R. Jump, a daughter of 
Dr. S. V. Jump, of Pern,- township. Mr. Dragoo is a member of the uni- 
formed rank of the Knights of Pythias fraternity, is also a Master Mason, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 583 

and is a member of the Methodist church, in which he is serving as superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school. He is also secretary of the Board of Chil- 
dren's Guardians, vice president of the Orphans' Home board and is a mem- 
ber of the town council of Riverside, where he resides. 

The Western Reserve Life Insurance Company was incorporated July 
27, 1906, as a mutual life insurance company, with twenty-one directors. 
It was later reorganized as a legal reserve company under the laws of In- 
diana, with the following officers : D. B. Campbell, president : J. W. 
Dragoo, secretar}- : D. A. JMcLain, treasurer; Dr. L. L. Ball, medical 
director, and H. H. C)rr. attorney. Its capital is over one million dollars, 
and it has offices in the Wysor block. 

Robert I. P.\ttersox, one of the best-known men in Delaware county, 
prominent in the Grand Army of the Republic and in politics, is a native 
son of Indiana. He was bom in the city of Muncie on the 28th of March, 
1843. His father, Samuel R. Patterson, who was born in the state of Ver- 
mont on the i6th of September, 1816, came to Indiana when a young and 
unmarried man, locating in Delaware county, where he followed his trade of 
a tin and copper smith in Muncie. He was at one time a tin and stove mer- 
chant at Chicago, and also at Ottawa and other points in Illinois. When 
the Civil war was inaugurated Samuel R. Patterson was residing near Win- 
chester, Indiana. He enlisted on the i6th of September, 1861, as a private 
in Company I, Thirty-sixth Indiana Infantry, and was in active service 
until after the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia, where he received a 
severe wound and died from its efifects in the United States general hospital 
at Jefifersonville, Indiana, September 24, 1864. He had married, Novem- 
ber 15, 1839, Miss Jane Turner, who was born in Lexington, Kentucky, Au- 
gi-ist 6, 1820, and is now, 1907, residing in Portland, Indiana. She is a 
daughter of Bevans and Percilla (Beswick) Turner, the former of whom 
was a native of Delaware and the latter of Maryland. They came to Indi- 
ana in 1823, first settling in Wayne county, but in the year of 1826 took up 
their abode in Delaware county, thus becoming numbered among its earliest 
pioneers. Unto Samuel R. and Jane Patterson were born the following 
children: Eliza, who married J. S. Martin; Robert I., the immediate sub- 
ject of this review ; Agnes, now Mrs. Elam Osborne ; Electa, the wife of 
E. P. Thomburg; Charles T., who died when twenty-eight years of age; 
Sarah E., the widow of J. P. Edwards ; Jennie, now Mrs. John P. Willis, 
and Lucinda B., ilrs. Reece Coulter. 

Robert I. Patterson received a common-school education, and on the 
29th of July, 1861, when but seventeen years of age, he enlisted in Company 
E, Nineteenth Indiana Infantry, as a private, and after serving the term of 
his enlistment he reenlisted in the field for three years more. He was 
wounded at the battles of Antietam and Gettysburg, and at the latter was 
also taken prisoner. His services were with the celebrated Iron brigade, 
it being the First brigade, First division of the First army corps of the 



584 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Army of the Potomac, also the first brigade organized in the Union army, 
and the official records show that it sustained a greater loss in actual killed 
than any other. Mr. Patterson has an individual record of fourteen general 
engagements, besides the minor battles and skirmishes in which the brigade 
took part. On the 21st of March, 1864, he received an abdominal injury 
by being thrown from a railroad car, and in consequence was discharged 
September 9, 1864, as a corporal. The date of his reenlistment above re- 
ferred to was December 31, 1863. 

Mr. Patterson has long been active in Grand Army affairs. He is a 
charter member of Williams Post No. 78, department of Indiana, G. A. R., 
of which he has been post commander. He has also been honored by his 
comrades by an election to the office of senior vice commander, Department 
of Indiana, G. A. R. In the Indiana legislature of 1876-7 Mr. Patterson 
was a clerk in the lower house, and from the e.xpiration of that period until 
1883 he was a railroad postal clerk. On the 7th of February, 1882, he was 
appointed postmaster at Muncie, continuing in the office to the 5th of 
March, 1887, when he took up the pension agency, and in 1889 was admitted 
to practice in the interior department as a pension attorney. This work he 
has ever since continued. In 1902 he was the successful Republican can- 
didate for clerk of the Delaware county circuit court, his term of office ex- 
piring on the 1st of January, 1908. Mr. Patterson is also the patentee of 
the "J. I. C." currycomb and a fruit jar fastener. But perhaps in allhis 
varied attainments he is best known as a poet, many of his poems having 
been extensively published in newspapers and periodicals, while many of 
them have become well known through their rendition at national and state 
encampments of the Grand Army of the Republic and other occasions by his 
daughter Pearl, who has earned a wide reputation as an elocutionist. 

In 1868 Mr. Patterson married Miss Mary E. LaFavour, who was born 
in Muncie, May 29, 1850, and they have reared the following named chil- 
dren: Arie Inez, the wife of Edwin H. Bath, a merchant of Muncie; J. 
Earl, deputy county clerk ; and Pearl, the wife of W. R. Bean, of Streator, 
Illinois. Mr. Patterson is a member of the Senior Order of American Me- 
chanics, and also affiliates with the Odd Fellows fraternity. 

Dk. \\'illi.\m a. Splirgeon, who for many years has been actively en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine in Muncie, Indiana, is one of the most 
talented members of the profession in the city, and has done as much to 
elevate the standard of the medical profession in the state as any other man. 
He was born at Salem, Washington county, Indiana, February i, 1852. He 
is the eldest son of Wiley and Mary F. (McKinney) Spurgeon, both also 
natives of Washington county. The paternal grandfather, Josiah Spurgeon, 
was born in North Carolina, November 13, 1777. He came to Indiana in 
181 1 and settled near Salem. James A. McKinney, father of Mary F. Spur- 
geon, was born in Tennessee, January 16, 1795 ; removed to Salem, Indiana, 
in 181 1. Wiley Spurgeon, the father, was educated in the common schools 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 5S5 

near Salem. He served under General Taylor in the Mexican war. He 
became prominent in the history of his locality in Indiana, holding many 
official positions of honor and trust. He has for many years been an active 
member and elder in the Christian church. His home, with his aged com- 
panion, is now (1908) on the farm near Becks Grove, Indiana, where they 
enjoy a competency gained by years of industry and economy. 

The early years of the life of Dr. Spurgeon were spent on a farm. He 
attended the common schools near his home until sixteen years of age. Dur- 
ing the following four years he was a student in the Clear Springs Academy, 
at Salem, Indiana, and at college in Bedford, Indiana. In 1871 
he began the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. George H. 
Chute, of Freetown, Indiana. The following year he entered the Physio- 
Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio. After one college year in this insti- 
tution he matriculated as a student in the Physio-Medical College of Indiana, 
from which he graduated in 1875. Pie returned to his former preceptor, en- 
tered into partnership with him, which relation continued until 1877. Soon 
after his graduation Dr. Spurgeon was elected to the chair of descriptive 
and surgical anatomy in the college from which he graduated. He con- 
tinued a member of the faculty, delivering a course of lectures each year 
until 1893, when he resigned his professorship in order to devote more 
time to his practice. In April, 1880, Dr. Spurgeon located in the city of 
Muncie, Indiana, his present home. He very soon took high rank in the pro- 
fession. He has been an active member of the Physio-Medical Association 
of Indiana since 1875, serving one year as its president and contributing 
largely to its literature. He is a member of the American Association of 
Physio-Medical Physicians and Surgeons and served as a delegate from 
that society to the World's Congress of Physicians and Surgeons which met 
in New York in 1891. He was selected as a delegate from the American 
Association to the International Congress of Physicians and Surgeons which 
met in Madrid, Spain, in 1905. He is also a member of the Indiana Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. He was appointed a member 
of tbe state board of medical registration and examination by Governor 
Mount in 1897, being twice reappointd to this position by Governors Durbin 
and Hanly, serving three years as vice president and three years as presi- 
dent of this body. He wrote the constitution and by-laws of the American 
Confederation of Examining Boards, and took active part in the organiza- 
tion of that body, which is made up of the state medical examining boards of 
the United States. For a number of years past he has served as president 
of this organization, in which position he now (1908) continues to serve. 

For the most part the Doctor has given his political support to the Re- 
publican party. In 1886 he became actively identified with the prohibition 
movement and made a number of vigorous campaigns in the interest of 
that party. In 1888 he was its candidate for the legislature ; in 1890 for the 
office of secretary of state. In 1892 he gave his political support to William 
McKinley and the Republican party, not being in sympathy with the free 



586 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

silver doctritie of the Prohibition and Democratic parties. He ii a forcible, 
fluent and dignified speaker whose honestv cannot fail to' impress his 
hearers. 

The doctor was married on August 29. 1872, to ^liss Elvira Chute, 
daughter of his preceptor and partner. Of this union were born three sons 
and one daughter. The eldest son, George Wiley, and the second son, Alva 
Osten, died in infancy. The third son, Orville Elmer, and daughter, Mary 
Alice, are living in Muncie. The son. Dr. O. E. Spurgeon, is the junior 
member of the firm of Drs. Spurgeon and Spurgeon and is actively engaged 
in the practice of medicine. The daughter. Alary, is the wife of Dr. J. M. 
Quick, of Muncie. Mrs. Spurgeon died at Freetown in the summer of 
1878. In the summer of 1883 Dr. Spurgeon was united in marriage to Miss 
Minerva A. Whitney, daughter of Lafayette Whitney, of Muncie. Of this 
union there were born five children, Xora June, Olive Fern, Kenneth Al- 
bertus, William Chase and Wiley W hitney, all now living in Muncie except 
the eldest daughter, Nora June, whose death occurred in the summer of 1905. 

The doctor early united with the Christian church (Disciples), and has 
given much time to church work. He was ordained an elder in the First 
Christian church of Muncie, Indiana, in 1881. It was very largely due to 
Dr. Spurgeon's efTorts that the present magnificent edifice of that denomina- 
tion was erected in the city of Muncie, he being at the time president of the 
board of trustees and chairman of the building committee. He drafted the 
plans and superintended the construction of this splendid edifice. 

John Seymour Ellis. One of the most interesting of the prominent 
characters whose worth and merit have graced the history of Delaware 
county is to be found in the personnel of John S. Ellis, at this date one of the 
three commissioners of his count}'. He is genial and entertaining in man- 
ner, bright and keen of intellect, his writings are entertaining, and his edu- 
cation has been supplemented by extensive reading and a wide and varied 
experience. 

The birth of Mr. Ellis occurred in Kno.x county, Ohio, August 15, 1839, 
his parents being Robert and Casander (Schweckard) Ellis. The father was 
born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 1 1, 1796, and died in Dela- 
ware county, Indiana, in December, 1864. He was a son of W'illiam and 
Eleanor Ellis, the former of whom was a native of Montgomeryshire, Wales, 
and was a soldier in the Colonial army during the American revolution. The 
maternal grandfather of Mr. Ellis. John Schweckard, was of German line- 
age, and his daughter, the mother of Mr. Ellis, was born in Rockingham 
county, \'irginia, in 1810, while her death occurred in Delaware county in 
1865. With her husband she now lies buried in Beech Grove cemetery at 
Muncie. They were married in Licking county, Ohio, and afterward lo- 
cated in Knox county, Ohio, where they resided until 1849, the year of 
their removal to Delaware county. In the spring of 1850 they took up their 





2^ J £^ 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 589 

abode in Hamilton township, from whence they removed to the township 
of Delaware, and there they spent the remainder of their lives. Mr. Ellis 
was reared a Friend or Quaker, and the mother was for many years a worthy 
and acceptable member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He gave his 
political support to the Republican party. During his early life he followed 
the trade of a stone mason, but his later and the greater part of his life was 
devoted to fanning. In their family were ten children, of whom one daugh- 
ter died at the age of three years, while the remainder grew to manhood and 
womanhood. 

When a little lad of ten years John Seymour Ellis accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Delaware county, Indiana, where he completed 
his educational training, and thereafter taught school for two terms. At the 
early age of thirteen years he began the battle of life for himself, and four 
years later he went to Iowa and engaged in herding cattle. One year later, - 
when he had reached his eighteenth year, he took up carpentering, thus con- 
tinuing for three years, and after his marriage, in i860, he located two 
miles south of Muncie and resumed the work of his trade. About four years 
afterward he moved into Muncie, where for several years he held clerical 
p<jsitiuns witii mercantile concerns, was also a traveling salesman for a time, 
served as deputy postmaster of Muncie, and has been prominently engaged 
in newspaper work. Mr. Ellis also served as a justice of the peace for four 
years, and in 1902 was elected to his present position as a commissioner of 
Delaware county, to which he was reelected in 1904, and is also vice presi- 
dent of the State Association of County Commissioners. The Republican 
party receives his active support and cooperation, and his fraternal relations 
are with the Masonic order, he having served as a member of the building 
committee during the erection of the Masonic Temple. 

Mr. Ellis has been twice married, wedding first, on the 28th of August, 
i8(5o, Sina E. Rickard, who was born in Delaware county, Indiana, April 20, 
1842, and her death occurred in the city of Detroit, Michigan, July 3, 1895, 
leaving two children — Fred M., who was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, Au- 
gust 3, .1870, and is now manager of a brewing company in Columbus, Ohio, 
and Charles H., who was born in Muncie, May 31, 1879, and is cashier of 
the People's National Bank of Muncie. December 17, 1896, Mr. Ellis mar- 
ried Mrs. Milla Sanders, the widow of John F. Sanders, an attorney of 
Muncie. She was born in this city, Jannuary i. 1845, ^ daughter of William 
Barnes, who was one of the first residents of Muncie. His wife, Evaline 
( Watchell) Barnes, was also a member of a pioneer family. 

As has been noted, Mr. Ellis is a writer of ability and note, and has 
contributed to the public much well-accepted poetry of various thought. He 
is the author of an interesting work entitled "Songs of St. Matthew," a met- 
rical paraphrase of the gospel of St. Matthew. He is also the author of a 
condensed history of Delaware county, Indiana. He is bright and strong in 
his writings, and is a member of the Association of Western Writers. 



590 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

J. Harv. Koontz, prominently identified with the agricultural develop- 
ment of Delaware county, was born in Fayette county, Indiana, December 
27, 1827. He obtained a good elementary education in tlie local public 
schools and later attended the academy. He is a son of Jacob and Debra 
(Combs) Koontz, both natives of Virginia. 

Jacob Koontz, the youngest of a family of four children, was reared in 
Virginia, and emigrated to Oliio in 1820, settling at Brownsville, where he 
remained for about five years. Following this he moved to Fayette county, 
Indiana, and located at Alquina. He moved next to Henry county and in 
1829 plotted the town of Middletown, which town developed into a pros- 
perous and successful business community. Mr. Koontz was intimately 
connected with the industrial and material development of that section of the 
state until 1850, when he died as a result of the milk sickness, at that time 
so prevalent. The mother of our subject, after the death of Jacob Koontz, 
was married to William Doherty, of Ohio. To the first union were bom the 
following children; Mary, Jane, Adison (deceased), B. Frank, Lorenzo D. 
and J. Harv., the subject of this sketch. To the latter marriage four 
children were born : Sarah, Mrs. Guthrie ; Isabell ; Debra. Mrs. Williams, 
and B. Frank. 

J. Harv. Koontz remained at home until he reached the age of sixteen, 
when he decided to strike out for himself, and began chopping wood on the 
banks of the Ohio river. He had a great variety of experiences on the river, 
devoting himself to several different lines of work, and in 1871 settled upon 
the farm where he now resides. 

His marriage occurred in 1855 to Aliss Anna Brown, a daughter of 
John B. Brown, a pioneer settler of Delaware county. Her death occurred 
in 1856. In 1857 he was married for the second time to Miss Amanda E. 
Shinner, who was born in Madison county, Indiana, in 1840. She was the 
daughter of Jacob and Catherine Shinner. To this second union five child- 
ren were born. Through a long residence Mr. Koontz has become well 
known and enjoys the respect and esteem of all who know him. 

Harv M. Koontz, secretary of the Muncie Trust Company and presi- 
dent of the Muncie police commission, is one of the best and most favorably 
known men in Delaware county, where he was born on the 14th of Novem- 
ber, 1863, a son of J. Harv and Amanda (Shimer) Koontz. among the oldest 
and most highly respected citizens of Mount Pleasant township. There 
they have spent many years of their active and useful lives, and the father is 
not only well and prominently known but is also a successful farmer and an 
ex-legislator, having represented Delaware county in the state legislature, 
and has been otherwise prominent in the political and public life of the com- 
munity. 

The early years of Harv M. Koontz were spent on his father's farm in 
Mount Pleasant township, and after graduating from the ^luncie high 
school he pursued a course in the Valparaiso University, of \"alparaiso. In- 




,C)^i^ 



. Giio-^i^^^ 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 593 

diana. Retuming thence to his home, he accepted the position of deputy 
count}- auditor in 1886, a position he held for one year, and after an inter- 
mission of short duration he was again made the deputy in this office, where 
he remained for about one year more. Mr. Koontz was then variously em- 
ployed for several years, during which time he was in the abstract and in- 
surance business for a period and was also connected with the Merchants' 
National Bank for one and a half years. In 1901, when the Muncie Trust 
Company was organized, he was elected secretary of the organization, and 
has since been the incumbent of the position. During Mayor Sheritt's ad- 
ministration he served as city comptroller for one and a half years. In pol- 
itics he has long been active as a Republican, and for two years was chairman 
of the county central committee, serving well his fellow men whether in 
political or professional life. His fraternal relations connect him with the 
order of Knights of Pythias. In 1888 Mr. Koontz married Miss Wynona 
Long. 

Joseph A. Goddard is an honored soldier of the Civil war and a man 
who for a number of years has held a representative place among the leading 
business men of Muncie. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio, December 17, 
1840, his parents being John Henry and Ann (Wilson) Goddard, both na- 
tives of England. They left their native land during their childhood days, 
coming to America, the mother with her parents and the father came when 
a boy alone, and for a time after his arrival, the father resided in Buffalo, 
New York, removing thence to Ohio, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. The mother died in 1847, aged thirty-seven. The father's labors were 
ended in death in 1882, aged seventy-one years. 

Joseph A. Goddard attended the public schools in his native state of 
Ohio until his thirteenth year, when he laid aside his text books and entered 
upon a six years' apprenticeship at the printer's trade in Ravenna, that state, 
but after two years gave up the idea of becoming a printer and instead was 
employed at farm labor until 1858. In that year he went to Cincinnati and 
entered his uncle's wholesale grocery store, with whom he remained until 
1862, when, believing that his country needed his services and putting aside 
all personal considerations he entered the Fourth Ohio Cavalry as a private 
soldier. He was promoted and commissioned after six months' service in the 
ranks, as second lieutenant, first lieutenant and then captain, and was 
assigned to Company D, the same regiment, on detached service. He con- 
•tinued as a soldier throughout the entire campaign, serving with the Army 
of the Cumberland and participating, in many of the historic battles of tlie 
war, including those of Chickamauga and Nashville. In Januar}-, 1864, he 
was made staff quartermaster and aide on General Elliott's staff, cavalry 
commander of the Army of the Cumberland, serving later with General J. H. 
Wilson, who succeeded General Elliott. In June, 1865, he was mustered out 
of the service as captain, his loyalty having won him his various promotions. 



694 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

and his military career is one of which he may be justly proud, covering as it 
does a long period of arduous service in his country's cause. 

Returning to his home in Cincinnati, Ohio, Mr. Goddard was there con- 
nected with the wholesale grocery trade until his removal to Muncie. Indiana, 
in 1874, where he began in the retail grocery business in a small way, becom- 
ing a member of the firm of Adamson & Goddard. This partnership con- 
tinued until 18S1, when Mr. Adamson took the retail department and Mr. 
Goddard the wholesale, the latter carrying on business in a little store on 
South Walnut street between ^lain and Jackson, ^^'ith the passing years 
his trade grew in volume and importance until it became necessary to enlarge 
its scope. He built and occupied the building southeast corner Walnut and 
Adams streets. This building becoming too small for his increasing business 
he removed to Mulbern,- and Charles streets. In 1905 the magnificent and 
commodious building on Se}TTiour street which he now occupies was erected. 
To him has come the attainment of a distinguished position in connection 
with the business interests of the citv". His is truly a successful life, but the 
success which he has achieved is but the reward of labor and integrity in 
business. 

In 1866 occurred the marriage of Mr. Goddard and Miss Man,- Hough, 
she being a daughter of William Hough, an honored pioneer of Wayne 
coixnty, Indiana. They have become the parents of three children, one son, 
W illiam H., who is now in business with his father, and two daughters, 
Grace and Anna, the former being the wife of C. M. Rich, of Mimcie. The 
family is connected with the Society of Friends, of which Mrs. Goddard is a 
lifelong member. Mr. Goddard is a member of Williams Post. G. A. R.. 
and the Loyal Legion. 

ToHX RoLux Marsh, secretary and chief engineer for the Indiana 
Bridge Company, began his business career in the employ of this firm August 
I , iSSj, as a civil engineer, and not long afterward was promoted to the posi- 
tion of chief engineer and later to the secretaryship also. He was bom in 
Miuicie, Indiana, January 13, 1863, his parents being John and Mary 
(Mitchell) Marsh. Mr. Marsh, the father, was born in Preble county, Ohio, 
Atigust 22, 181 1, and in his veins mingled the blood of the Anglo-Saxon with 
that of the Teutonic race. His father, Timothy Marsh, was the son of John 
Marsh, who came to this country from England and settled in what is now 
Germantown, Montgomery count}-, Ohio, afterward serving in the American 
army throughout the Re-\-Dlution. The mother of John Marsh bore the 
maiden name of Mary Clawson, and was born near the mouth of the Little 
Miami river, August 22, 1778, and is said to have been the first white child 
bom in the territory of Ohio. She 'died at the age of ninety years, at the home 
of her son, Searing Marsh, near Logansport, Indiana, September 15. 1877. 
Her father w as John Clawson, a German, who settled first in Kentucky and 
afterward in Ohio. He too took part in the American war for independence, 
and was noted for his sterling character. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 595 

John Marsh, the father of John Rclhn, was reared under the pioneer 
conditions of the early days, and therefore obtained but a limited educational 
training. At the age of seventeen he went to Eaton, Ohio, and ser\-ed as an 
apprentice of five years at the hatter's trade, while later he began his career 
as a business man at Camden, Ohio, as a hatter. He continued there with 
success up to 1847, when he entered the dry goods trade, and one year later 
was elected the treasurer of Preble county. He held the office by re-election 
for three terms, and in the fall of 1854 removed to Wayne county, Indiana, 
and became president of the Cambridge City Bank. In 1856 Mr. Marsh 
became a citizen of Muncie, and at the same time organized the Muncie 
branch of the State Bank of Indiana, becoming its president. In 1865 this 
institution was converted into the Muncie National Bank, and he remained 
its president until 1874, when he sold his interest and retired from business. 
It was only a short time, however, until he was induced by his friends to 
organize the Citizens' Bank, in November of the same year, which institution 
was on the loth of March, 1875, converted into the Citizens' National Bank, 
and being given his choice of positions he became its cashier, a position he 
held up to the time of his death, in 1887. He was one of the organizers of 
the Republican party, and his views were ever afterward in accord with the 
principles set forth by this party. He became a Master Mason in 1838, and 
rose to the rank of a Knight Templar, being always active in the order. In 
1854 he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and at the 
time of his death he had been for years a trustee of the organization. Mr. 
Marsh was twice married. On the 25th of May, 1835. he married Margaret, 
the daughter of Nathan and Jane (Carr) Mitchell, both natives of Mar\-land 
and pioneers of Ohio. Four children were born of this union, and the mother 
died of cholera in 1849. August 29. 1854, Mr. Marsh married for his second 
wife Mrs. Man,- Mutchner, nee Mitchell, who also bore him four children. 
She died in 1899. He was well informed, an excellent business man, a public 
spirited citizen, honest in his dealings, and kind and faithful as a friend, hus- 
band and father. 139021 i 

At the time of accepting a position with his present firm John R. Marsh 
had just graduated from the School of Mines, Columbia College, New York, 
as a mining engineer, in 1887, having pursued a four years' course. Pre\-ious 
to this, in 1879, ^^ had graduated from the Alimcie high school. After 
leaving the high school as a graduate he accepted the position of deputy 
clerk of the Delaware county circuit court, while later he became deputy 
county recorder, in both of which positions he served several terms under 
different officers, proving himself a ven." efficient and capable assistant. In 
his present position of secretan.- and chief engineer of the Indiana Bridge 
Company, he has attained a thorough and intricate knowledge of ci\-il 
engineering, having few equals in this line in the entire state, and he is well 
and favorably known among experts in his profession. 

On the 5th of August, 1889, Mr. Marsh married Miss Susie Ryan, 
daughter of John W. and Lida (Jenkins) Ryan, of Muncie. Both he and 



596 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

his wife are members of the Episcopal church, and in pohtics he is a Repub- 
lican. He was for some years a member of the "Library Board," and was 
secretary of the committee that had charge of the building of the elegant 
library building. He was also a member of the board of park commissioners 
at the time that Air. McCuIloch donated the AlcCulloch Park, and it was this 
board that developed the park and made all the improvements that have been 
made to the present time. 

Robert Meeks. Deeds are thoughts crystallized, and according to their 
brilliancy do we judge the worth of a man to the country which produced 
him, and in his works we expect to find the true index to his character. The 
study of the life of the representative American never fails to offer much 
of pleasing interest and valuable instruction, developing a mastering of 
expedients which has brought about most wonderful results. Mr. Meeks 
was long prominently identified with the business interests of Aluncie and 
Delaware county, and w'hile his varied affairs brought him success, they 
also advanced the general welfare by accelerating commercial activity. 

Among the many worthy characters whose careers have graced the 
history of Delaware county there is none more deserving of mention than 
the late Robert Meeks. He was born in Monongalia county. West Vir- 
ginia, July 8, 1822, and when seventeen years of age came to Delaware 
county with his parents, Amos and Nancy (Means) Meeks, who were 
also bom in West Virginia. In a wagon drawn by four horses they came 
all the way to Indiana in 1839. locating three miles north of what is now 
Parker City, in the dense forest, where they set about to erect a log cabin 
and to clear a farm. In this task the father was assisted by his son Robert, 
the eldest of the family, which consisted of eight sons, seven daughters and 
a son and daughter by the father's second marriage. 

During the five years succeeding the arrival of the family in Delaware 
county Robert remained with his parents on the farm, and then having 
arrived at the age of twenty-one years he began the battle of life for 
himself. Leaving the parental home with but a limited education, for 
only such had been afforded him in those early pioneer days, he began to 
serve an apprenticeship at cabinet-making with Nottingham & Swain, of 
Muncie. During the first year he received no wages, only his board, but 
he soon mastered his trade and was drawing a wage. Saving his earn- 
ings, he was able in 1846 to buy an interest in the firm, for which he paid 
four hundred and fifty dollars. His brother Isaac also served an apprentice- 
ship with the same firm and eventually, in the latter part of 1846, the two 
brothers became the sole owners of the business, the firm name being R. & I. 
A leeks. This style was continued for a series of years or to about 1871, 
when James W. Aleeks, eldest son of Robert, secured an interest, the name 
then becoming R. & I. Aleeks & Company. At this time a two-story brick 
building was erected on the southeast corner of Elm and Washington 
streets, in which were installed an engine, boiler and the latest improved 




Mrs. Robert Meeks. 




Robert Meeks. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 601 

machinen-, and the making of furniture was begun. The factory was con- 
tinued with success up to 1S90, when it was destroyed by fire, and altliough 
it was never rebuilt tlie firm continued dealing in furniture and as under- 
takers. In 1880 two other sons of Robert, William A. and Martin L. 
Meeks, joined the firm. Isaac Meeks retained his interest therein until a 
few months prior to his death on January 16, 1891, and the style of the 
firm was later changed to R. Meeks & Sons, the present style. On the 2d 
of January, 1892, Mr. Robert Meeks accidentally fell and broke his leg and 
hip, and from that time fonvard he was not active in the firm, his death 
occurring on the 24th of February, 1906, when in his eighty-fourth year. 
He was familiarly known as Uncle Robert, and was universally loved and 
respected. His business career was both long and useful, and in all his 
dealings he manifested a fairness that won for him the confidence of all 
alike. He led a quiet and unpretentious life, characterized by fidelity not 
only to his friends and family, but also to the public. 

In 1846 Mr. Meeks married Miss Sarah, the daughter of Jacob and 
Beersheba Jones, natives of West Virginia, where their daughter was also 
born in 1827, and was eleven years of age when her parents came to Dela- 
ware county. Unto Robert Meeks and his wife were born four sons: James 
W., William A., Martin L. and Jacob Arthur, all of whom are numbered 
among the most prominent business men of Muncie, and the three eldest now 
constitute the firm of R. Meeks & Sons. Mrs. Meeks survives her husband, 
and is now past eighty years of age. She is a member of the Methodist 
church. Mr. Meeks affiliated with the Odd Fellows' order and was a stanch 
Prohibitionist. On the 5th of March following his death Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Meeks would have celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of their mar- 
riage. They had arranged to commemorate the event by having a grand 
reunion of family, relatives and friends. 

Fr..\nk Ellis, an attorney in Muncie, Indiana, and well known in pro- 
fessional circles throughout the community, was born in Delaware county, 
February 12, 1842, a son of John H. and Phebe (Kirkpatrick) Ellis, both 
natives of Ohio, the former of Greene and the latter of Clark county, and 
both became early residents of Delaware county, Indiana. The mother was 
but a child when she came with her parents in the '30s, while the husband 
and father dated his arrival about 1835. becoming one of its leading con- 
tractors and builders, and his death occurred during the battle of Chicka- 
mauga in 1863. At the breaking out of the Civil war he organized Company 
B, Eighty-fourth Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, of which he was made the 
captain, and he was called upon to lay down his life on the altar of his 
country. 

After getting some education in the public schools of Delaware county 
Frank Ellis learned the printer's trade and also taught school. In 1862 he 
entered his father's company for service in the Civil war. participating in the 
entire campaign of three years, and was mustered out in June, 1865. He 



602 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

took part in all the engagements of his regiment, among whicli were Chicka- 
mauga, Franklin, Nashville, the campaign against Hood and the Atlanta cam- 
paign. During his army service, in October, 1864, he was elected the treas- 
urer of Delaware county, reaching home in time to enter upon his duties in 
August, 1865, and in 1866 he was re-elected to the office. On the expiration 
of his four years' term in the treasurers' office Mr. Ellis entered the mercan- 
tile business as a grain and lumber merchant. During his boyhood days he 
had read law, and on retiring from his mercantile venture he resumed its 
study and was admitted to the bar, and immediately afterward he began 
practice in Muncie. From 1883 for twenty years he was in partnership with 
John T. Walterhouse. From 1882 until Mr. Lotz's promotion to the bench he 
was associated in practice with Judge Lotz. the firm name being Lotz & Ellis. 
Since retiring from partnership with Mr. Walterhouse he has practiced alone. 
He has been connected with many important litigations, his practice reaching 
into the higher courts of the state. His activity in political lines has brought 
him repeatedly before the public, and for two terms he served as a member 
of the city council, while for four terms he was the mayor of Muncie and 
for two terms was the city attorney. At the present time he is serving as a 
United States commissioner, which position he has held for eight years. 

In 1870 Mr. Ellis was united in marriage to Mary E. Martindale, a 
native of Delaware county and a daughter of Benjamin F. Martindale. one 
of its earliest pioneers. Two daughters have been born ^f this union, Eliza- 
beth, the wife of W. M. Myers, of Terra Haute, Indiana, and Ethel Joy. 
'Mt. Ellis is a member of the Grand Army 'of the Republic, Williams Post, 
of the Sons of \'eterans, of Muncie Lodge, No. 433, of the Masonic order, 
and of the Chapter and Commandery, and is one of the oldest members of 
the Odd Fellows' fraternity in the city, having joined the order in 1865. 

J. H. Smith. It was in July of the year 1885 that Mr. J. H. Smith 
transferred his residence and business, conducted under the name of J. H. 
Smith & Company, from Bluffton, Indiana, where he had lived for fifteen 
years, to Muncie, and engaged in the manufacture of carriage woodwork. 
The business, however, has since been incorporated with the Pioneer Pole 
& Shaft Company, of which Mr. Smith is the largest stockholder and the 
vice-president. The consolidation occurred in 1903, and the plant at Muncie 
is now one of eleven. 

Air. Smith was reared at Freedom, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, 
where he was born on the 23d of April, 1843, a son of Andrew and Mar- 
garet (Homer) Smith, both of whom were born in Germany. They left 
their native land when children and were married in this country, the father 
for years serving as a hotel proprietor of Freedom, and there both he and 
his wife died. In their family were two sons and a daughter. After the 
death of her first husband Mrs. Smith married a Mr. Hartley, by whom 
she had three sons and a daughter. 

Mr. J. H. Smith was but two years of age when his father died, and 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 605 

he has made his own way in the world from an early age. The educa- 
tional training which he received in the common schools of Freedom was 
supplemented by attendance at a night school in Economy, Pennsylvania, 
and later he pursued a commercial course in bookkeeping at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. During the intervening period from his fourteenth to his 
eighteenth year he had learned coopering, and at the age of nineteen years 
he began the manufacture of oil barrels at Freedom. In the fall of 1863 he 
enlisted in Company A, Seventeenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, as a private, 
and was mustered out of the ser\-ice on the "th of August, 1865, after a 
long and arduous career in the service of the Union cause. Among the 
many engagements in which he participated may be' mentioned those of 
Cold Harbor, Hanover Court House, Travelian Station, Winchester (Sep- 
tember 19, 1864), Cedar Creek, Sailor Creek, and was at the surrender of 
Lee at Appomattox Court House. Mr. Smith now holds membership rela- 
tions with Williams Post, No. 78, G. A. R., of Muncie. 

Returning home to Freedom, Pennsylvania, from the war he resumed 
the making of barrels and in 1870 came to Bluffton, Indiana, where he con- 
tinued the business. 

In 1867 he married Catherine Schaufelberger, who was born and 
reared in Freedom, and they have had five children, namely : Lillian 
Elizabeth, now Mrs. Lone Franklin, of Muncie; Bertha Louise, now Mrs. 
J. H. Love. Jr., of New York cit}- : Margaret Winnifred, who became the 
wife of J. Edgar Johnson, of Muncie, and died leaving two children ; Xena 
Young Smith, a physician of Indianapolis ; and Huda May, the wife of 
Lloyd Kimbrough. of Muncie. Mr. Smith is a Thirty-second degree Mason 
and a member of the Knight Templars, the Mystic Shrine and Murat 
Temple of Indianapolis. He is also a member of the Commercial Club of 
Muncie, in which he holds the office of director. 

J.-\MF„s Ch.-\r.m.\.n'. .Among the citizens of Muncie to whom has been 
yielded an honored retirement from labor after many years of business 
activity is numbered James Charman. He has been a resident of this city 
for many years, being numbered among its earliest pioneers, and through an 
e.xtended period he w'as prominently identified with its business interests. 
His birth occurred in Surry, England, on the Wesley farm, September 
22, 1831, his parents being Arthur and Rebecca (Carton) Charman, both 
of whom were also born in the mother country of England, the father on 
the 23d of September, 1784, and the mother July 22, 1805. They were 
married at St. Paul's church at Convent Garden, London, June 23, 1823, 
and became the parents of the following children: Richard Garton, John, 
Thomas, James, Arthur, Frederick, Sarah Jane, George, Edward Ross, 
Ann, Louisa Emily and Joseph Albert, all of whom are deceased with the 
exception of James and Sarah Jane. In November of 1848 the family set 
sail for America, and after their arrival in this country located first at Cen- 
terville, Wayne county, Indiana, from whence they removed to Anderson, 



006 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Indiana, abmit 1S62. and in 1S77 came to INIuncie. Mr. Charman had fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits in England, but after coming to America he 
was not active in business owing to advanced age. His death occurred in 
this city on the nth of May. 1880, when he had reached the age of ninety- 
five years, and his wife passed away in death November 20, 1887. They 
were members of the Christian church at Anderson, Indiana, and were 
people of sterling worth and true nobility of character. 

James Charman accompanied his parents on their emigration to the 
United States and in their subsequent removals. During his two years' 
residence in Richmond, Indiana, he followed his trade of a baker, and 
removing to Muncie m the spring of 1853 he resumed the work of his trade 
here. In time he became the proprietor of one of the leading bakery and 
grocery houses in the city, and continued actively in business up to 1890, 
when he laid aside the active cares of life and has since lived in the enjoy- 
ment of the fruits of his former toil. 

Mr. Charman married. May 9, 1874, Caroline Rodman, born in Preble 
county, Ohio, March 29, 1842, a daughter of Job and Catherine (William- 
son) Rodman, who claimed Pennsylvania as the commonwealth of their 
nativity, and they were respectively of Irish and Scotch descent. They 
came to Indiana in the year of 1848, locating in Muncie, where they spent 
the remainder of their lives. The father was a gardener. In their family 
were ten children, namely : Samuel S., Mary Ann, Hannah, Joseph, Charles 
F., Edward, Hannah C, Elizabeth Ellen, Caroline and F"rancis Henry. 
Hannah C, Caroline and Francis Henry are the only surviving members of 
tliis once large family. Mr. Charman has been twice married, wedding on 
the 20th of February, 1S52, Mary Ann Rodman, who died in 1873, without 
issue. In 1880 Mr. and Mrs. Charman adopted a daughter, May, now the 
wife of John AlcPhee, an attorney. Since the early age of twenty-one years 
Mr. Charman has affiliated with the order of Odd F^ellows, joining the fra- 
ternity in February, 1853. During his early years he voted with tlie Whigs, 
casting his first ballot for General Scott, but since the organization of the 
Republican party he has been a member of its ranks, and in the early '60s 
he was a member of the city council of Muncie. Both he and his wife are 
members of the Universalist church. Her parents were Quakers. 

August Braux is the genial and successful proprietor of the Braun 
Hotel, of Muncie. He was born in the state of JN'evv York, near the village 
of Cochecton, Sullivan county, on the 26th of June, 1871. He is the only 
son of Andrew and Anna (Klopfer) Braun, and has but one sister, Aliss 
Mary Braun. His parents are of German stock, both having been born in 
Germany. They were married in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, and until their 
son was in his teens resided on a fann in Sullivan county, New York. Re- 
moving to Delaware county, Indiana, they soon afterward took up their 
residence in the citv of Aluncie. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 607 

Yotinsf Braiin had attended the common schools in his native state, and 
after coming to this city he resumed his studies, while later he entered the 
Mtincie Business College to pursue a course in bookkeeping and stenog- 
raphy. But he never followed either of the callings, for in the meantime his 
parents had entered the hotel business and required his assistance. The 
Braun Hotel was originally known as the Abbott House, it having been 
established in the '50s. and was an eight-room, frame building on the corner 
of Mulberry and Washington streets. In September, 1885, Mr. Braun, Sr., 
became the proprietor, and the name was then changed to the Braun Hotel. 
From the beginning the hostelry has been a success, so much so that nine 
years after taking charge an addition to the building was necessary to 
accommodate the largely increased patronage, while in the year of 1894 a 
brick addition was erected just to the east and joining the original frame. 
A larger and handsomer dining room was thus added, as well as several 
sleeping rooms, the addition being three stories high. In 1897 another addi- 
tion was built to the north of the original frame. This was also a three- 
story brick, and was another decided improvement to the hotel. In 1899 a 
third improvement was made in the erection of a two-story brick for the 
purpose of a kitchen, power and steam plant. This addition was built to 
the north of the first and east of the second addition. The original frame 
was not torn down until 1903, when it was replaced by a four-story brick 
so as to connect all the additions in one building of modern convenience, 
containing seventy-two guest rooms, a large and handsome office or lobby, 
together with a writing room, basement and other arrangements, easily Ten- 
dering the hotel one of the best and most conveniently arranged in the state. 
The Braun Hotel has more than a state reputation for being a splendid 
hostelry. Its success, 'however, has been largely due to the mother of Mr. 
Braun. In an early day she was the splendid cook that gave the hotel its 
enviable reputation for fine meals and cleanliness. Her son has for many 
years been the proprietor, but she has been of inestimable aid to him in mak- 
ing it one of the most successful hotels of Indiana. 

Mr. August Braun is well and favorably known in hotel circles and 
by the traveling public. He is regarded as an enterprising and thorough- 
going business man. In political matters he has never taken an active interest, 
but casts his ballot in the interests of the men and measures of the Repub- 
lican party. He sustains prominent relations in fraternal circles, holding 
membership with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Masonic 
fraternity. He is a Thirty-second degree Mason and also a member of the 
Mystic Shrine. 

While Mr. Braun is interested in Muncie real estate and also holds 
other interests, he has given nearly all of his time and attention to the in- 
terests of his hotel. Among his fellow citizens he is held in the highest 
esteem, and is numbered among the prominent and reliable business men of 
Muncie. 



608 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

John Birkenstock. Although his residence in Muncie does not cover 
an extended period of time John Birkenstock has become well and favorably 
known here because of his genial spirit and active interest in the progress 
of the city. The title of Colonel, given him by friends because of his affilia- 
tions with certain organizations among the brewers in Philadelphia when 
on several occasions of public receptions and parades he served his associ- 
ates as their leader, is not wholly undeserved, for he served with gallantry 
in the Civil war. He enlisted in the early part of 1864, as a private in Com- 
pany D, Forty-sixth New York Infantry, and participated in seventeen 
engagements, having been mustered out of the service in August, 1865. 
Since 1879 he has been a member of the E. D. Baker Post, No. 8, G. A. R., 
of Philadelphia. 

John Birkenstock was born in Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, October 
12, 1845. His parents were Alartin and Marie (Ackerman) Birkenstock. 
The former, who was a dry goods merchant and also a judge of and dealer 
in wines, was three times married and was the father of seventeen children. 
He died in Germany when seventy-five years of age. He was of strong and 
sturdy build and a successful business man. The mother came to America 
after her husband's death, and died in Milwaukee at the age of eighty-six 
years. 

In the schools of his native land of Germany John Birkenstock received 
his educational training, and at the age of fourteen years he came alone to the 
United States, making the voyage on a sailing vessel to the New York har- 
bor, from whence he went to Philadelphia, where at the time he had seven sis- 
ters and a brother living. There he made his home until 1891, first working 
as a maker of the bodies of carriages, later at the cooper's trade, and finally 
entered upon his career as a brewer. During this time he drew an annual 
salary of five thousand dollars. In 1891 he went to Allentown, Pennsyl- 
vania, and rebuilt a brewery, but this did not prove a success, and in 1897, 
in company with Mr. Fred Horlacher, he built at Allentown, Pennsylvania, 
and this brewery was operated until 1902, when Mr. Birkenstock sold his 
interest and came to Muncie, here organizing the Vluncie Brewing Com- 
pany, and the venture has proved very successful. 

In Philadelphia, in 1868, he married Miss Elizabeth Scholl, who was 
born in the famous William Penn house, which has since been torn down 
and rebuilt in Fairmont Park, Philadelphia. It was the first brick house 
built in America, erected of English brick. When Fort Sumter was fired 
upon by the Confederacy she with her parents was living in Charlestown, 
South Carolina, and on account of the family's sympathy ft-ith the Union 
they found it well to remove to Savannah, Georgia. Here she carried food 
to the Union soldiers, and on account of this and the family > Union senti- 
ment the parents returned to Philadelphia, where her marrii."ge with Mr. 
Birkenstock afterward occurred. This has been blessed by the birth of 
three children, Gertrude, Jacob and John. Mrs. Birkenstock's parents were 
of German birth, and she is a well educated and cultured ladv. Mr. Birk- 




^^5V^. ^..'^^^^'^^^^^S^^-- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 611 

enstock is a member of Kenington Lodge Xo. 211. A. F. & A. 'M.. Phila- 
delphia ; the Ro}al Arch Chapter Xo. 233, Philadelphia ; Commandery Xo. 
20, Allentown, Pennsylvania ; ^Mystic Shrine. Lulu Temple, Philadelphia. 

RoLLix Warner. During a number of years past Rollin Warner has 
practiced at the bar of Delaware county. He was born in Blountsville, 
Henry county, Indiana. April 18. 1856. a son of Eli and Emily (Burch) 
Warner, natives of \^ermont and New York respectively. In about 1850 
they established their home in Blountsville, where for more than twenty 
3'ears the father was engaged in mercantile pursuits. His busy and useful 
life was ended in death in 1 87 1, when he had reached the age of fifty-one 
years, and Mrs. Warner lived to be si.xty-nine years old. dying in 1898. 

Mr. Rollin Warner spent the period of his youth in his native town of 
Blountsville, receiving his rudimentary education in its public school, and 
completing his literary training at the Xational Normal School of Lebanon, 
Ohio. During a brief period thereafter he taught school, but deciding upon 
the profession of the law as a life work he left the school room to prepare 
himself for his chosen calling, first studying in the office of Monks & 
Thompson, at Winchester, Indiana. In 1879 he was admitted to the bar in 
Henry, Randolph and Delaware counties, and at once entered upon the 
practice of law in Newcastle, where he remained for a period of ten years, 
removing at the close of that period, in 1889, to ]Muncie, which has since 
been his home and the scene of his activities. 

Mr. Warner has never been active in politics as a seeker for office, but 
has contributed much of his time and ability as a speaker to the interests 
of the men and measures of the Republican party. For several years he 
served as the city attorney of Muncie. and the records indicate that his 
services were of ability in that position. 

In October, 1879, Mr. Warner married Miss Mary V. Cecil, and they 
have six children. 

Fred Klopfer. "We build the ladder by which we rise" is a truth 
which is certainly applicable to Mr. Fred Klopfer, for he has been dis- 
tinctively the architect of his own fortunes, but has builded wisely and well 
and has made for himself a place in connection with the activities of life. 
Muncie, as well as Delaware county, has long numbered him among its 
leading business men. 

Mr. Klopfer is a native born German, his birth occurring in Wurtem- 
berg on the 21st of July, 1846, and in the fatherland his parents, Johanes and 
Katherine (Young) Klopfer, were born, lived and died. They sent their 
son to the public schools until he had reached the age at which children of 
his native country are excused under the compulsory school law from 
further attendance, and when scarcely more than thirteen years of age his 
father bound him out to learn the trade of a wood worker at carriage 
making. He served an apprenticeship of three years at the trade, working 



612 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

fourteen hours each day, without pay, and more than that his father had 
been required to pay the sum of one hundred dollars to the carriage maker 
to whom he was apprenticed. After the money had been paid the father 
said to his son, "This is all the money I ever intend to spend on you." 
With this understanding and under these conditions the youth began to 
learn his trade. By means of odd night jobs he managed to earn the means 
with which to clothe himself, and board was given him by the gentleman to 
whom he was apprenticed. For three years he thus battled earnestly to 
learn his trade, and having served the required time of indenture he was 
given a journeyman's certificate and the following three years were spent 
as a journeyman at his trade in Germany. Coming to the United States in 
iS66, Mr. Klopfer landed in New York city on the nth of July, and on 
the following day legally declared his intention to become an American citi- 
zen. It was at Tiffin, Ohio, in the year 1868, that he became a citizen of 
this country, with all the rights and privileges as such. 

The first sixteen months Mr. Klopfer spent in this country were de- 
voted to his trade in the city of New York, and during that time he had 
the opportunity to gain a thorough knowledge and training in the making 
of coaches, express wagons and heavy vehicles of similar kinds. In the 
latter part of 1867 he went to Tiffin, Ohio, and worked there until the spring 
of 1869, when he visited New York city for a short time, but desiring to 
learn the making of sleighs or cutters, went to the city of Milwaukee, 
where many of them were then manufactured. He remained there and 
worked at his trade from April 26, 1869, to the 27th of January, 1873, the 
date of his arrival in the city of Muncie. He has ever since continued his 
residence here, and during the first three months he was in the employ of 
the carriage and wagon firm of Bower & Gaston, Mr. Gaston being an old 
friend and fellow workman in Milwaukee, and who later sold to him his in- 
terest with Mr. Bower, the style of the firm becoming Bower & Klopfer, 
which continued for nearly eight years or until the 1st of January, 1881, 
when Mr. Klopfer sold his interest to his partner. Immediately afterward 
he began the erection of a business house at the southeast corner of East 
Main and Jefferson streets, in which he established his present business, that 
of carriage building, together with the making of all kinds of vehicles, 
including phaetons, runabouts, express and other wagons for the local trade. 
In 1897 he erected a building immediately south of the one above mentioned, 
where he has since carried on his extensive business. In his line Mr. 
Klopfer is the largest manufacturer and dealer in the city of Muncie. He 
began his business career on a very limited capital, the result of his own 
earnings working for daily wages, and to-day he is one of the most pros- 
perous business men of Delaware county, but his success has resulted from 
honest dealing, industrious habits, first-class workmanship and excellent 
management. He is a stockholder in both the Merchants' National Bank 
and the Muncie Trust Company, also a director of each, and the vice-presi- 
dent of the former. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY G15 

yir. Klopfer married Clarrie S. Hummell in 1SS4, and they have one 
living child, Caroline. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, is a Thirty-second degree Mason, and a member of the Commercial 
Club of Muncie. 

James M. Laboyteaux is numbered among the prominent business 
men and farmers of Center township. Although he has resided withm its 
borders for many years and has been prominently identified with its inter- 
ests, he is a native son of Ohio, born in Hamilton county, December 15, 
1833, a son of Peter and Phoebe (Davis) Laboyteaux. They were born in 
New Jersey, Peter, November 29, 1792, and Phoebe, September 26, 1800, 
but moved to Ohio in 1808, the family making the trip to the northwestern 
wilderness down the Ohio river in a keel boat. The maternal grandfather, 
Joshua Davis, was a slave holder in New Jersey, and when he removed to 
Ohio entered land which is now included in the site of the city of Middle- 
town, Butler county, there establishing his home and passing the remainder 
of his life, although after entering this tract he returned for a time to his 
New Jersey home. His name is among the honored patriots of the Revolu- 
tion, as is also that of the paternal grandfather of Mr. Labo>leau.x, who 
sacrificed his life to the patriots' cause. Seven children were born to Peter 
and Phoebe Davis Laboyteaux, but two of the number died in infancy, 
Lucinda passed away in early life, and Evaline, Hannah and Isaac are now 
deceased, leaving James M. the only surviving child. Peter Labo}teaux 
learned the tailor's trade, which was his business for some time, and later 
engaged in mercantile pursuits. He was classed among the pioneers of 
Mount Healthy, Hamilton county, Ohio. His death, however, occurred 
in New Castle, Indiana, October 16, 1872, where he had resided but a short 
time, and his wife spent her last davs in Ohio, where she died December 26, 
1885. 

At the outbreak of the Civil war James M. Labo\-teaux was living in 
Butler county, and in September, 1861, enlisted for service in the L^nion 
cause, joining Company C, Sixty-ninth Volunteer Ohio Infantry. After 
serving for two years he re-enlisted in the same command at Chattanooga, 
and, as a brave and loyal soldier, subsequently participated in the battles of 
Stone's River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga and other hard-fought and san- 
guinary engagements. He also marched with Sherman to the sea, and was 
a unit of the grand armies of the north which composed the historic review 
at Washington. He was discharged as an orderly of General Buell. 

At the conclusion of his military service Mr. Laboyteaux returned to 
his home in New Castle, and a short time thereafter went to Huntsville, 
Alabama, but has been a continuous resident of Hamilton and Center town- 
ships. In 1901 he located on the estate which he now occupies, located two 
and a half miles north of Muncie. Mr. Laboyteaux's wife was formerly 
Huldah Mullen, the three children born to them being all deceased. Id 
politics he is a Republican, and has always generously supported local enter- 



616 rllSTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

prises of a puolic and charitable nature, one of tlie latest marks of his gen- 
erosity in this regard being his donation of ten thousand dollars for the 
founding of a Delaware county (Indiana) liospital. 

Thomas \V. Warner, although numbered among the younger repre- 
sentatives of the industrial interests of Muncie, is one of its most prominent 
business men, whose enterprise and excellent ability have not only promoted 
his individual prosperity but has advanced the public welfare. As the 
organizer of the \\'amer Electric Company he is well known in business 
circles, and his connection with the Warner Gear Company has also placed 
his name high on the roll of the leading men of affairs of Delaware county. 

Mr. Thomas W. Warner was bom in Shelbyville. Tennessee, Septem- 
ber 13, 1874, a son of Thomas W. and Emma R. (Trail) Warner, both of 
whom also had their nativity in that commonwealth. He was reared and 
educated in his native town or city, and from an early age has had to depend 
upon his own resources for his success in life. In Cincinnati he served for 
several years as the manager of the Cincinnati Electric Light Plant, and it 
was there that he gained his first and his thorough knowledge of that form 
of business, while later he was in the electric business in the west. He 
came from Montana to Muncie in 1897, and here organized the Warner 
Electric Company, furnishers of electrical specialties and telephone 
apparatus, and in the large plant erected for this purpose employment is 
furnished to about twenty operatives. This is the only concern of its kind 
in Muncie, and the enterprise has had a wonderful growth from its incep- 
tion. In 1902 Mr. Warner organized the Warner Gear Company, the 
product of which are automobile parts or steering and transmission gear for 
automobiles. He is the manager of this large corporation. The business, 
which was begun on a limuted capital and in a small way, hag grown to ex- 
tensive proportions and now furnishes employment to about two hundred 
and twenty-five people, mostly skilled laborers. Their payroll is therefore 
very large. 

Mr. Warner married, in 1S97, Miss Nettie Moore. He is a Scottish 
Rite Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine, and also holds membership 
relations with the Knights of Pythias order, and with the First Baptist 
church of Muncie. He has earned for himself an enviable reputation as a 
man of business, and has been the promoter of many of Muncie's leading 
industrial interests. 

Thomas S. Guthrie, D. D. One of the best known and most generally 
loved citizens of Muncie and vicinity is Rev. Thomas S. Guthrie, many 
years of whose life have been passed in this city, and during a long period he 
has been an efficient laborer in the cause of Christianity as a minister in the 
Universalist church. Although now living practically retired, he is still 
active in the continuance of the work to which he dedicated his life. 

Rev. Guthrie is a native of Madison county, Ohio, born on the loth 



HISTORY OF DEI.AWARE COUNTY 617 

of August, 1S30, a son of John C. and Gency Jane (Glass) Guthrie, natives 
of Mrginia. The paternal grandfather was James Guthrie, who was also 
bom in Virginia, and he resided there until about 1820, when he removed to 
Highland county, Ohio, his death there occurring at the age of ninety-six 
years. He followed the occupation of farming. The Guthrie family is 
primarily of Scotch and English origin. The marriage of John C. and 
Gency J. Guthrie occurred in Campbell county, Virginia, and about 1826 
they moved to Highland county, Ohio, and a short time afterward to Mad- 
ison county, that state, where they settled in the woods. They lived there 
until about 1858, when they moved to Madison county, near Winterset, 
Iowa, and lived there until their death. The wife died in 1864 at the age 
of sLxty-five, and the husband died in 1875 ^t the age of eighty years. Mr. 
Guthrie was a man of varied attainments, working as a farmer, carpenter 
and school teacher, and was also chaplain of a militia company with the 
rank of captain. Although he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church he was strongly inclined toward the "New Light" faith of the 
Christian church, and he was a Democrat in politics. In his father's 
family there were eleven sons and one daughter. 

Rev. Thomas S. Guthrie, their seventh child in order of birth and 
now the only living representative of the family, was reared in the wilds 
of his native county of Madison, and in its early schools he gained a limited 
educational training. At the age of about twenty-one years, seeking to per- 
fect his earlier training, he entered a school in Mechanicsburg, Ohio, at 
his own expense, and soon after began teaching in the country schools. He 
was then about twenty-two years of age, and for twelve years he continued 
his educational labors and also worked at farming, carpentering or any 
honorable employment. When he had reached his fortieth year he had 
earned enough to enter college, and accordingly matriculated in the Theo- 
logical College of Canton, New York, a Universalist institution. He had 
preached some before this, having embraced the Universalist doctrine as 
early as 1850, when about twenty years of age. Spending two years at 
Canton, he then entered Lombard University of Galesburg, Illinois, in which 
he graduated with the degree of Doctor of Divinity at about the age of sixty 
years. During his work in the ministry Rev. Guthrie has been stationed at 
Miami City and Eaton, Ohio; Lafayette, Logansport, Indianapolis and 
Muncie, Indiana, and Cleveland, Ohio. He first came to Muncie on the ist 
of January, 1874, where he remained for four years, and in 1884 returned to 
this city and continued in the active work of the ministry for seven years. 
Since 1900, however, he has been practically retired. Throughout all these 
years he has earnestly labored for the Master by voice and pen, and is the 
author of a fine publication, a sermon on Immortality. 

Rev. Guthrie married Mary A. Comer on the 6th of March, 1856. Her 
death occurred on the 25th of July, 1906, after traveling the journey of life 
with her husband for fifty years. They had two children, J. Augustus, 
cashier of People's National Bank of Muncie, and Ruby, wife of I. A. 



618 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Westfall, a jeweler of Muncie, Indiana. In politics Rev. Guthrie was first a 
Democrat, but since 1856 has been identified with the Republican party, and 
in 1891-2 he represented Delaware county in the lower house of the state 
legislature. He was chaplain of the One Hundred and Fifty-second Ohio 
Infantry, has been chaplain of the Loyal Legion of Indiana, has been a 
member of the Odd Fellows' order since 1854, and is a Sir Knight Templar 
in Masonry. 

George W. Rowlett. There is perhaps no other young business man 
of Delaware county whose career has been marked by a greater degree of 
success tlian that of George W. Rowlett. He was born and reared in this 
county, his birth occurring in Harrison township on the 15th of November, 
1874, and from his own personal mention we turn to that of his father, 
David E. Rowlett, who was born in Wayne county, Indiana, June 28, 1849, 
and is an ex-soldier and a retired resident of the village of Gaston, this 
county. His parents were Edwin and Mary E. (Wright) Rowlett, natives 
of Indiana and Pennsylvania respectively. Edwin Rowlett, after residing 
for a considerable time in Wayne county and then in Jay county, Indiana, 
removed to Madison county, Nebraska, and died there. He was thrice 
married, and became the father of twenty-one children. 

David E. Rowlett was reared in Jay county, Indiana, receiving a common 
school education, and when only a little pver fourteen years of age he en- 
listed in the Union army. Company B, Eleventh Indiana Cavalry. Enlisting 
on the 4th of November, 1863, he served to the close of the war and received 
an honorable discharge on the lyth of September, 1865. During the time he 
participated in the battles of Nashville, but the greater part of his service 
was as a scout. On returning from the war he turned his attention to the 
grist and saw-milling business, and was thus engaged until the year 1872. 
He then transferred his activities to the shoemaker's trade, and removing 
to Gaston in 18S1 he conducted a shoe and harness store with success until 
his retirement from business in November, 1895. He married, in 1868, 
Esther A. Heaton, who was born in this county on the 23d of December, 
1851, and died January 5, 1879. They became the parents of five children: 
Mary J., Edwin jSI., George W., Ida B. and John. On the 9th of May, 
1880, the father married Samantha A. Brock, born in this county on the i6th 
of December, 1852, and they had three children: Orpha B., Arthur J. and 
Nettie E. Mr. Rowlett is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
also of the Order of Odd Fellows and in politics is a Republican. 

George W. Rowlett was reared in the village of Gaston, and after com- 
pleting his common-school education he learned the trades of harness and 
shoe making, gaining his first business experience in his father's store. In 
November, 1894, he became an equal partner with his father, and a year 
later the sole proprietor of the store. During his residence in Gaston he 
erected several buildings and to his already large stock of goods he added 
first that of buggies and then hardware and furniture, building up a large 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 621 

and extensive business in his lines and winning for himself a place among 
the leading men of affairs in Delaware coimty. In 1903 he sold his inter- 
ests there, and during the following six months was engaged in the furni- 
ture and storage business in Indianapolis. In 1904 he came to Aluncie, and 
in the spring of the same year entered upon his career as a merchant of this 
city. On the southwest corner of East Charles and South Mulberry streets 
he has a I'irge and well equipped store of four floors, sixty by one hundred 
and twent\- feet in dimensions, where he furnished employment to about 
thirty salesmen. He also has a branch store at 315 South Walnut street, 
known as "the Annex," where he makes a specialty of five and ten cent and 
racket store goods. This occupies three floors, with a frontage of thirty 
by one hundred and twenty feet in depth, and employment is furnished to 
upwards of twenty-five people. He carries a well selected stock of furni- 
ture, house furnishing goods, hardware, etc., having in all ten departments, 
and his is one of the leading business enterprises of Delaware county. 

In 1893 ^Ir. Rowlett married Miss Lillie Fallis, and they have one 
child, Fred. Mr. Rowlett has fraternal relations with the Odd Fellows' 
order, and is a member and trustee of the East Jackson Street Christian 
church. 

Thomas Bemox McCullgugh, a retired farmer and a resident of the 
city of Muncie, has been numbered among the citizens of Delaware county 
since March of 1882, at which time he and his wife came hither from Penn- 
sylvania, where they had previously resided for about fifteen years, and 
from which state they had gone from Wayne county, Indiana, in 1866, to 
care for two of his uncles in their declining years. 

Mr. AlcCullough was born in Wayne county, Indiana, ^larch i, 1839, 
and was reared on the parental homestead where he first saw the light of 
day. This fann was located about three miles east of Hagerstown. He 
was less than' two years of age when his father died, and he was the youngest 
of a family of ten children, all of whom save one lived to ages of maturity, 
were married and reared families of their own, but of this number only Mr. 
jNIcCullough and his youngest sister are now living. The father, John 
McCullough, was a native of Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, a son of 
James McCullough. who was born in Ireland. The motJier bore the maiden 
name of Elizabeth Elliott and was a native of Monongahela county, Penn- 
sylvania. She survived her husband many years, and died at the advanced 
age of eighty-one years. She was married to John McCullough in Penn- 
sylvania, and they moved from that state to Wayne county, Indiana, about 
1820, thus becoming pioneers of the commonwealth, for Indiana had but 
recently been admitted to statehood. In Wayne county they spent the re- 
mainder of their days. They were sturdy, honest people, and farming was 
the father's occupation. Death came to him early in life, for he was but 
forty-seven when he died, and he left a large family. The widowed mother 
struggled along against many odds and adversities to rear her children. 



622 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Such were the circumstances under which young Thomas B. AIcCul- 
lough was reared, and he was obliged to apply himself diligently to the work 
of the farm to assist in supporting the family. The schools of those early 
days were poor at the best, but he was not permitted full privilege to enjoy 
what advantages even they afforded for an education, for if permitted to 
spend one day in school perhaps the next two or three days he would be 
obliged to work on the farm or at odd jobs in assisting in the support of the 
family. So it is seen that he had little opportunity to gain an education in 
his youth, but throughout life he has been a close observer and thereby, to- 
gether with reading, he has become a well informed man. His life occupa- 
tion has been farming and stock-raising. In i860, when twenty-one years of 
age, he chose for his life companion Miss Lucinda Hammer, and she has 
been to him a most faithful helpmeet. They have journeyed together along 
the pathway of life for more than forty-seven years, together sharing many 
trials and hardships, and although their marriage has not been blessed by 
the birth of children, their lives have not been shorn of happiness and useful- 
ness, for they have led active careers and been not only devoted to each 
other but to others and to duty as citizens wherever they have chosen to cast 
their lot in life. During fifteen years they cared for two uncles of Mr. 
McCullough who resided in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, and out of 
appreciation for their services these uncles before death left them the small 
estate which they possessed in Pennsylvania. This Mr. McCullough sold 
and in 1882 came to Delaware county, Indiana, and purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in section 24, Hamilton township, and there they 
farmed and raised stock with gratifying success until the fall of 1904, when 
they removed to the city of Muncie and retired from the arduous and ex- 
acting duties of farm life, to which all their previous days they had been 
accustomed. 

He still owns the farm mentioned, as well as other real estate, and 
during the years of his industrious life he amassed a competency. Airs. 
McCullough was born in the same county as her husband, her natal day 
being the 13th of February, 1840, and both are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. In politics he is a Democrat, but has never been a par- 
tisan, but rather a supporter of the best men and measures as he has been 
able to determine. Both he and his wife enjoy the confidence and high 
esteem of a host of friends. 

J. W.XLTER Baird, one of the rising young lawyers of Muncie, was born 
in Jay county, Indiana, October 18, 1876, and for genealogy of the family 
see the sketch of his brother, M. B. Baird, in this volume. He received his 
elementary education in the Albany high school, of which he was one of 
the first three graduates, and in 1901 completed the course and graduated 
from the Indiana Law School. His studies were carefully directed, and, 
applying himself with great diligence to the mastery of the science of juris- 
prudence, gained a wide and accurate knowledge of the law. Immediately 



HISTORY OF DELA\\'ARE COUXTY 623 

after his graduation he engaged in the practice of law in Muncie, being 
first associated in practice with John Lewellen, but he is now in partnership 
with his brother, M. B. Baird, in his legal work and in the real estate busi- 
ness. They are popular and highly esteemed young men, noted for their 
high ideals of character, and are universally respected. In 1902 Mr. Baird 
organized the Great Northern Mining & Milling Company, its members con- 
sisting of some of Muncie 's leading business men, namely: T. H. Kirby, 
who is the president of the company : William Campbell, the vice-president, 
and C. M. Staigers, the treasurer. Under Mr. Eaird's able management the 
cpmpany has been very successful, and a still, brighter future undoubtedly 
awaits it. He is a member of the Masonic order, Anthony Lodge No. 171, 
of Albany, and also has membership relations with the Universalist church. 
In January, 1903, occurred the marriage of Air. Baird and Miss Mary 
J. Risher, she being a daughter of John W. Risher of Greene county. 

J. O. Potter, who is now serving in the position of city engineer of 
Muncie, was bom in Lynn, Indiana, August 18, 1877, a son of Octavious 
and Mary (Douge) Potter, the former a native of New Jersey and the lat- 
ter of Indiana. In 1852, however, the father made his way to the Hoosier 
state and took up his abode near Williamsburg, Wayne county, and he is 
now a resident of Randolph, this state, engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
During the Civil war he offered his services to his country, becoming a 
member of Company C, Eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he remained 
a loyal soldier throughout the entire campaign. 

The son, J. O. Potter, obtained an excellent educational training in the 
public schools of Randolph county and the Winchester high school, graduat- 
ing in the latter institution in 1896. Immediately thereafter he entered upon 
his career as a teacher, first in the schools of Randolph county and later in 
the Muncie high school. As an educator he stood in the front ranks, and 
his eminently practical methods were deserving of the high praise which 
was universally accorded by those in a position to judge wisely. While 
engaged in teaching he also attended the state university, where he pursued 
special studies in mathematics, physics and mechanics and was graduated 
in 1904. On the 1st of May, 1905, he was appointed city engineer of Mun- 
cie, a position he was so well qualified to fill, and his career therein is one 
of which he has every reason to be proud. He is a young man of splendid 
abilities, and a still greater success in the future undoubtedly awaits him. 

Mr. Potter was married on the 28th of August, 1900, when Myrtle E. 
Harriman, a native of Randolph county, Indiana, became his wife, and they 
have one daughter, Mary, bora February 17, 1903. Mr. Potter is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Elks 
and the Sons of Veterans. 

Marcus S. Claypool. For many years an active factor in the indus- 
trial interests of Delaware county, Mr. Claypool, through his diligence and 



6M HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

business abilit)-, has won success and placed his name high on the roll of 
leading men of the county. He was born in Wayne county, Indiana, August 
I, 1S51, his parents being Austin B. and Hannah (Petty) Claypool, both also 
natives of Indiana. IMr. Austin Claypool, whose birth occurred in Fayette 
county, became a prominent farmer and stock raiser, whose enterprise and 
sound judgment in industrial affairs not only promoted his individual pros- 
perity but also advanced the public welfare. He was foremost in all the 
large public enterprises in eastern Indiana, and to his untiring efforts was 
due in a great measure the securing of the Fort Wayne and tlie Chicago, 
Hamilton & Dayton railroads through the eastern section of the state. 
Much of his time was devoted to agricultural interests, and he was also a 
prominent factor in the fairs and live stock exhibits of his community, 
devoting his energies to the development and upbuilding of the resources of 
his section of the state until his useful life was ended, his deatli occurring on 
the 16th of January, 1906, when he had reached the eighty-diird milestone 
on the journey of life. j\Irs. Claypool, whose birth occurred in Wayne 
county, Indiana, is still living, and is a representative of a family who have 
been prominent in the history of eastern Indiana since a verj- early day. 

Alarcus S. Claypool attended the schools of Wayne county during his 
early boyhood days, later becoming a student in the high schools of Dublin 
and Connorsville, where at the latter place he studied under tlie preceptor- 
ship of Harvey Netting, a well known and efficient educator of that time and 
who had also taught Mr. Claypool's father. Being dius fitted for the higher 
institutions of learnmg, he then entered Asbury College, from which he was 
graduated in 1S72. Thus equipped with a splendid educational training 
and many natural gifts, ]\Iarcus S. Claypool entered the business world for 
himself. Coming thence to Muncie, he became associated with the 2\Iuncie 
Bank, which had been organized in 1S71 by A. J. Claypool, his uncle, where 
he remained for seven years. xAt this time the gold fields of Colorado 
attracted him, and he spent five years in that state in search of the precious 
metal, but the high altitude of that state proved detrimental to his health, 
and he returned to this city and associated himself with the Muncie Bank- 
ing Company and later with the Burson Banking Company. In 1886, how- 
ever, these banks retired from business. During all these years Mr. Clay- 
pool had been greatly interested in horses, having as early as the '60s 
engaged in their breeding, and in 1887 he went into the business extensively, 
having ever since been numbered among the largest and most successful 
breeders of fine trotting and light harness horses in the state, while to him 
also belongs the honor of being the oldest breeder in the state. Among 
some of his famous horses may be mentioned Sable Gift, with a record of 
2:10, and Alan, 2:11^4. During the long period of twenty-three years he 
has served as secretary of the agricultural fair, while for fourteen years he 
has been a member of the Board of Agriculture, and for six years has been 
a member of the Live Stock Sanitary Commission. He is also extensively 
engaged in farming east of Muncie. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY G25 

On the 14th of January, iSSo. Afr. Claypool was united in marriage 
to Elizabeth, a daughter of John \\'. Burson, a well known and prominent 
resident of Delaware county. Mr. Claypool's fraternal relations are with 
the Delaware Lodge of Alasons. He has always had an abiding interest 
in all matters that subserve the progress and well being of his fellow men, 
and he is recognized as a power for good in the community where his in- 
fluence has been directed. 

John A. Jackson. The present efficient and popular clerk of Muncie, 
John A. Jackson, holds and merits a place among its representative citi- 
zens. His birth occurred in Elmira, New York, July 7. 1869, a son of 
Willard C. and Catherine (Dalton) Jackson, also natives of the Empire state. 
In the earl>- years of the '70s the parents journeyed to Indiana, establishing 
their home in Noble county, where the father was engaged in farming and 
the lumber business. Their son John was but a small boy at the time of the 
removal from New York to Indiana, and his boyhood days were spent in 
Noble county, receiving his educational training in the Kendallville high 
school. His first occupation in that city was in the clothing business, and 
he also spent several years in the same line of trade in Chicago, coming 
from that city to Muncie in 1893 and associating himself with the Globe 
Clothing Company. He was thus engaged until his election to the office of 
city clerk in November, 1905, assuming the duties of the position in Septem- 
ber following, and his administration of its affairs has been one of honor and 
fidelity. In his political affiliations he ha? always been a zealous Republican, 
laboring earnestly for the adoption of the principles which he believes will 
best advance good government. 

In 1892 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Jackson and Miss Blanche 
Drake, she being also a native of Kendallville, Indiana, and a daughter of 
Nelson Drake, a prominent stockman of Noble county. One son, Lauren, 
has been born of this union, his birth occurring on the 29th of October, 
1893. In his fraternal relations Mr. Jackson is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Red Men and the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. 

\V.A.LTER J. LoTZ, 3. prominent although one of the younger representa- 
tives of the bar of Delaware county, is accounted one of the political leaders 
of this section of the state. He is a native son of Muncie, born on the 
17th of March, 1879, and the history of his parents will be found in the 
sketch of Judge Lotz in another portion of this work. The son received 
his education in the city's public schools, graduating from the high school 
in 1898, while on the 23d of May, 1900, he completed the course and gradu- 
ated from the Indiana Law School. He at once became a member of his 
father's law firm, and after the death of the latter was given his place, the 
firm then becoming Gregory, Silverburg & Lotz, and after the retirement of 
Mr. Silverburg it became Gregory & Lotz. Mr. Lotz has made a deep and 



626 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

thorough ^enrch into the science of jurisprudence, and his ability has 
enabled him to become a leader in the public life of his community. He 
was recently the Democratic candidate for the office of attorney general and 
made an excellent race. He ranks high at the bar and in political circles, 
and Muncie ma}- well be proud to number him among her native sons. 

foiix J. Hartley. One of the mi_-)st pn^minent citizens of Delaware 
county is John J. Hartley, whose history furnishes a splendid example of 
what may be accomplished through determined purpose, laudable ambi- 
tion and well directed efforts. Starting out in life for himself at the early 
age of twelve years he has steadily worked his way upward, gaining success 
and wiiming the public confidence, and his name is now a familiar one in 
the industrial circles of Delaware county. 

Air. Hartley was born in Freedom, Beaver county, Penns_\lvania, on the 
2ist of September, 1856. His father, Charles Albert Hartley, was a native 
of Baden Baden, Germany, but came to the United States when a young 
man, and after a short residence in Pittsburg removed to Beaver county. 
In his native land he had been educated for the ministry, but after coming 
to the United States engaged in teaching, for many years serving as presi- 
dent of Trevalin College in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. For generations in 
the fatherland the family had been well known educators, and it was in 
but natural sequence that Charles A. Hartley should inherit the love of the 
profession and become one of the noted educators in his eastern home. He 
was killed in a railroad accident in 1861. In his young manhood he had 
married Margaret Barbara Heffner, a native of Karlsrhue, Germany, born 
in i8i8, and when but a child she came with her parents to the United States, 
her death occurring in 1885. 

John J. Hartley attended the public schools of Freedom, Pennsylvania, 
during his early youth, but when only twelve years of age he began the 
battle of life for himself, having charge of the newspapers on a train, his 
employers being Riley & Sergeant, but a short time afterward he engaged 
in that occupation for himself. On reaching his twenty-first year he 
assumed the management of the Tremont House in Mansfield, Ohio, where 
he remained from 1877 until 1883, but in the meantime had engaged in the 
cigar business, while later the firm of Pertell, Hartley & Black, prominent 
cracker manufacturers, was established, which continued until 1884. In 
that year Mr. Hartley entered the real estate and insurance business in 
Mansfield, but in April, 1889, he left that city for Muncie, Indiana, where he 
has ever since been actively interested in all that pertains to its genera! 
welfare and advancement. Shortly after his arrival he formed a partner- 
ship with James Boyce in the real estate business, but after the burning of 
the Boyce block Mr. Hartley continued in business alone' until in June. 1906, 
when the firm was incorporated under the name of the John J. Hartley 
Agency. In 1887, in company with Samuel Lowenstein, Mr. Hartley pur- 
chased the P. W. Patterson tract, bounded b3' First. Willard, Penn and 




G. R. Gr 



HISTORY OF DEr.A\\'ARE COUNTY 629 

Ebright streets, and laid out the Hartley-Lowenstein Addition, on which he 
erected and sold many houses, and this has now become one of the valuable 
and beautiful sections of the city. In addition to serving as president of 
the John J. Hartley Agency, he is also vice president of the People's Home 
and Savings Company, organized for the purpose of enabling people to 
build homes at reasonable rates of interest and allowing settlement on easy 
payments. Thus for a long period he has been an active factor in the 
industrial interests of Delaware county, contributing to its general pros- 
perity through the conduct of large enterprises. Loyalty to all duties of 
citizenship and fidelity in the discharge of every trust reposed in him have 
been his chief characteristics, and through the passing years they have 
gained him the unqualified confidence and respect of his fellow townsmen. 

In June, 1877, Air. Hartley was united in marriage to' .Anna .A. Mc- 
Sherry, who died on the lOth of August, 1896, and two years later, on the 
22d of June, 1898, he married Sarah A., a daughter of Julius A. and Elizabeth 
Kirby Heinsohn, of Muncie. Four children have been born of this union : 
John Kirby, born September 2, 1899; Julius Andreas, born October 23, 
1901 ; Margaret Elizabeth, born April 17, 1905, and Robert Heinsohn, born 
March 7, 1907. In 1S94, accompanied by his wife. Mr. Hartley crossed 
the water to the old country, traveling over Europe. Egypt and the Holy 
Land. From 1891 to 1893 he was a member of the city council of Muncie, 
during which time he served as chairman of the committee on water works, 
and was also active in the establishment of the city's electric light plant. He 
is a member and an active worker in the Masonic order, affiliating with the 
blue lodge, chapter and commander,- of Muncie and with the Indiana con- 
sistory. His religious affiliation is with the Grace Episcopal cliurch, of 
which he is a valued member. 

G. R. Gree.n', M. D. For over twenty years Dr. Green has been 
engaged in the practice of Medicine in Muncie. and is thus one of the oldest 
representatives of the profession in Delaware county. During all this time 
he has not only maintained his position among the leaders of the medical 
fraternity but has taken part in much of the public and social life of Muncie, 
so that he is accounted one of her honored citizens. His birth occurred 
within the borders of Delaware county November 15, 1851, his parents 
being Andrew J. and Amassa (Johnson) Green. William Green, his 
paternal grandfather, was of English descent and moved from New York 
to Ohio. From there he came to Delaware county and settled in Niles 
township, where he became one of the earliest pioneers. His son Andrew 
was born in Athens, Ohio, and when a child accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Delaware county, where he received his education and 
developed into a man of varied attainments, having taught school, 
preached in the Christian church and practiced medicine for many years 
prior to his death, which occurred in 1885. His name stood exponent for 
the most sterling personal characteristics, the deepest appreciation of the 



630 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

rights and privileges of citizenship, and is inefl'acebly traced on the early 
history of Delaware county. 

Dr. G. R. Green completed his literary education in the high school of 
Muncie. after which he taught for several years, but failing health soon 
caused him to leave the school room and return to his home, where naturally 
he drifted into the study of medicine under the able instructions of his 
father, although he had had other views for his future life work. Graduat- 
ing from the Indiana Medical college in 1877 with high honors, he then 
went to New York and took a post-graduate course at the Polyclinic. He 
entered upon the practice of medicine at Royerton, Indiana, but in June, 
1885, came to Muncie, where he has attained distinctive prestige in the line 
of his calling and his success has come as the logical sequence of thorough 
technical information and skill. The doctor holds membership relations 
with the state, count}" and district medical societies, thus keeping abreast 
of the many new discoveries which are constantly being made in the pro- 
fession, and he has served as president of the County Medical Society. He 
is also president of the board of public works and fills the chair of history 
at the Medical College of Indiana. 

In 1878 Dr. Green was united in marriage to Mary E. Monroe, a 
daughter of Hugh Monroe, of Delaware county. Mr. Monroe is a Scotch- 
man of the celebrated Monroe clan. Three children have been born of this 
union, Dwight M., a graduate of Rush ]\Iedical College and now practicing 
with his father ; Earl, who is a graduate of the Indiana Medical College, his 
father's alma mater, and he is now in the government service as acting as- 
sistant surgeon at Fort Stanton, New Mexico, in the public health and 
marine hospital service ; and Bessie K. The Doctor's fraternal relatrons are 
with the Aluncie lodge of Masons, in which he has attained the Knight 
Templar degree and is also a member of the chapter. He has attained the 
thirty-second degree in the Scottish rite. He has long been a worthy and 
consistent member of the Presbyterian church and during the period of 
twenty years has served as an elder. Dr. Green is a leader in his profession 
in Delaware county, and his splendid characteristics both as a practitioner 
and a citizen make him worthy of the high regard in which he is held. 

Alv.\ C. Slrber. who has gained enviable prestige as one of the most 
able and successful of the younger practitioners of medicine in the city of 
Muncie, is a man of scholarly attainments, and has made deep and careful 
research into the science to which he is devoting his life. His birth oc- 
curred in Hillsboro, Ohio, November 3, 1871, his parents being John P. and 
Jennie M. (Davidson) Surber, both also natives of the Buckeye state. In 
his early youth their son Alva attended the public and high schools of Hills- 
boro, his studies therein being supplemented by attendance at the Hillsboro 
College, where he pursued preparatory work. During the following two 
years he was a student in the Butler University, after which he entered 
VVcK)^ter College at Wooster, Ohio, graduating in that institution in 1S92. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 631 

■ Thus with a most excellent literary education to serve as the foundation on 
which to erect the superstructure of his life work he began the study of 
medicine, spending the first year in the Western Reserve Medical College 
at Cleveland, and completing his course and graduating in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, in 1895. Dr. Surber received his A. M. degree from Loyola College, 
and for two years served as interne at the Maryland General Hospital, after 
which, in 1897, he began the practice of medicine in !Muncie. Although he 
follows a general practice he has made a specialty of chronic diseases, and 
the large patronage which he now enjoys is indicative of his skill and 
ability. Since entering upon his practice he has pursued a special course 
at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and thus it will be seen that he has been an 
earnest student, and accordingly he has gained distinction in the line of his 
chosen calling. 

In 1900 was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Surber and Miss .\bbie L., 
a daughter of Mathias Kuchmann, who is numbered among the honored 
old pioneers of Delaware county, having been a resident of ^luncie for 
nearly fifty years. Two sons have blessed their union, Alva C., Jr., who 
\\as born on the 17th of Aug^ust, 1901, and John Roger, born June 7, 1906. 
Dr. Surber is a member of the Masonic lodge of Muncie, also of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Red Men, and is a consistent and 
worthy member of the Christian church. 

Myrox FI. Gr.w. The man who wins prominence at the bar of Ameri- 
ca's thriving cities must have a thorough understanding of the law. All 
must begin on a common plane and rise to prominence by perseverance, 
industry and ability, or fall back into the ranks of mediocrity. In a like 
manner with all others, Myron H. Gray has started out to win a name and 
place for himself, and the success he has already achieved gives him a most 
promising future and assures him a place in the foremost ranks of the legal 
profession in Muncie. Mr. Gray is a representative of one of the old and 
honored families of the county. His grandfather, James Gray, was but a 
little lad of seven years when he came from Tennessee to Delaware county, 
where he located in Salem township, and later became a farmer and 
merchant. His son, Milton Gray, spent his early life on the farm, for a 
time engaged in the general merchandise business at Daleville and at Middle- 
town and finally moved to Muncie in 1889, where he has since resided 
ililton Gray is the secretary and treasurer of the Muncie Casket Company, 
and is well known in business circles throughout the state. In his early man- 
hood he married Miss Jeannettia Griffis, the daughter of Dr. Robert Griffis, 
of Henry county. 

Myron H. Gray, the son of Jvlilton and Jeannettia Gray, was born at 
Daleville, Indiana, September 17. 18S1. He received his training in the 
public ind high schools of Muncie, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1900. He then became a student at the University of Michigan at 
.A.nn Arbor, where he graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1904. Mr- 



633 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Gray's legal studies were further pursued at the Harvard Law School, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. \\'ith this excelleut training to begin his life 
work he was admitted to the Delaware county Iwir in September, 1904, and 
became associated in the practice of law with the law firm of gingham & 
Long, the connection continuing until December of 1906, at which time Mr. 
Gray formed a partnership with Frank J. Kent, of Washington, D. C, the 
firm name becoming Gray & Kent. Messrs. Gray and Kent devote their 
attention to real estate, probate and corporation law. in which particular 
lines tlie_\' have a large and favorable clientage. They maintain an office 
in the Ouray building at Washington, D. C, and are specially prepared 
to handle patent trade-mark and copyright cases and all matters before 
congressional committees and departmental boards. 

On July 31. 1907, Mr. Gray was married to Miss Marie Frances Smith, 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. X. Smith, of Muncie. Mr. Gray gives his 
support to the Republican party, in which he is a prominent and active 
worker. He belongs to the Jackson Christian church and is a member of 
the Masonic order and of the Beta Theta Pi collegiate fraternity. His 
many admirable qualities of heart and mind have gained him a large circle 
of friends and his future seems bright with promise. 

Arthur E. \'into.\, 'SI. D. One of the most exacting of all the higher 
lines of occupation tti which a man may lend his energies is that of the 
physician, and in the subject of this review is found one who has gained 
distinction in the calling. He has been an earnest and discriminating .student 
and now holds a position of precedence among the medical practitioners of 
eastern Indiana. He is, however, numbered among its younger representa- 
tives, for his birth occurred on the nth of February. 1874, in Marshalltown, 
Iowa, his parents being Delos D. and Emma E. ( Dobson) Vinton, the former 
a native of Cuyahoga county, Ohio, and the latter of Indiana. 

After attending the public schools of Marshalltown Arthur E. X'inton 
became a carriage painter, working at his trade for several years. In the 
meantime he had decided to de\x)te his life to the medical profession, and 
as a means to that end he began reading in the office of Dr. F. G. Jackson, 
of Muncie, in 1895, while later he entered the Louisville Medical College 
and graduated therein on the 25th of March, 1895. Immediately after his 
graduation Dr. Vinton opened his office in this city, continuing in the gen- 
eral practice of medicine until in March, 1906, when he specialized in the 
diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. In the early part of the same year 
he went to Europe to study in Berlin and Paris along the lines of his special 
department, and spent some time in the Royal C)phthalmic Hospital in Lon- 
don and the Rothschilds Hospital in Paris, while after his return he studied 
for some time in Philadelphia under private instruction. He has thus 
studiously, carefully and conscientiously increased the talents that were 
given him, and is gaining an eminent place among the practitioners of east- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 633 

ern Indiana, while he is also a recosjnized authority upon many questions 
affecting- the general practice of medicine. 

In 1904 Dr. \'inton was united in marriage to Mis? Florence L. Xixon. 
of Fountain City, Indiana. He is a member of the Delaware lodge. F. & 
.A. M.; Welcome lodge, K. P., and also holds membership relations with the 
county and state medical societies. In addition to discharging the duties of 
his large medical practice Dr. Vinton is also a member of the county board 
of health and deputy county health ofificer and examiner for the Prudential 
Life Insurance Company. In private life he has gained that warm personal 
regard which arises from true nobility of character, deference for the 
opinions of others, kindliness and geniality, while professionally he is a 
young man of splendid intellectual attainments, and a still brighter future 
undoubtedly awaits him. 

RoscoE C. Grii-fith. In reviewing the members of the Delaware 
county bar the name of Roscoe C. Griffith takes a prominent place among 
his professional brethren, and we are pleased to present to his numerous 
friends and acquaintances this review of his life. He was born in Hunting- 
ton, Indiana, December 15, 1863, his parents being William H. and Seraph- 
ina M. (Clark) Griffith, the former a native of Huntington county. Indiana, 
and the latter of Clark county, Ohio. 

Their son, Roscoe C. Griffith, received his early literary education in 
the schools of his native cit}' of Huntington, in which he graduated in June, 
1883, and in the following September he entered the law department of the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he completed the law course and 
graduated in January, 1885. Returning to Huntington, he entered upon 
the practice of his chosen profession, and during his residence there was 
appointed deputy prosecuting attorney, continuing in the position until 
March, 1888. It was in that year that he came to Muncie. where he con- 
tinued in practice alone until in May, 1904, when a partnership was formed 
with James A. Ross, and the firm of Griffith & Ross became well known 
over this section of the state. On October i, 1907, this partnership was dis- 
solved and since then Mr. Griffith has practiced his profession alone. Since 
1889 he has served as attorney for the Muncie Savings & Loan Company, 
and since that time the assets of the company have increased from twenty 
to eight hundred and fifty thousand, and he has also served as one of its 
directors. In politics he is a Republican and is an active worker in the 
party ranks. 

On the I2th of August, 1886, Mr. Griffith was united in marriage to 
Clara L. Marson, a native of Wayne county, Indiana, and a daughter of 
John Marson. Two daughters have been born of this union, Maurine, 
whose birth occurred on the 31st of August, 1893, and Helen, bom November 
I, 1899. Fraternally Mr. Griffith is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 
He is also a member of the Baptist church and is a contributor to all worthy 
enterprises. 



63J HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Walter L. Davis. One of the leading business men of Muncie is 
Walter L. Davis, the secretary of the JMuncie Savings & Loan Company, 
and who is ranked with the representative citizens of the county. His birth 
occurred in Youngsville, Warren county, Pennsylvania, October 21, 1850, 
his parents being Willard J. and Laura L. (Littlefield) Davis. The father, 
who is also a native of Pennsylvania, is a prominent farmer and bee keeper, 
owning the largest apiary in the Keystone state and one of the largest in 
the L''nited States. 

After completing his education in the public schools of his native 
county of Warren Mr. Davis became a student in the state normal school at 
Edinboro, Pennsylvania. In 1S69 he came to Muncie and joined his uncle, 
Philip F. Davis, in the agricultural implement business, but seven years 
afterward abandoned that business for the newspaper field, becoming a 
member of the staff of the Muncie Courier, a Democratic paper, in which 
he later purchased an interest. Later selling his interest in that journal he 
became associated with the Muncie weekly and daily Nezcs, and five years 
later, in company with Thomas McKillip, established the daily and weekly 
Herald, which is now known as the Muncie Press. He has ever been a 
writer of superior force and ability, but in 1893 ^^ severed his connection 
with the newspaper field to become secretary of the Muncie Savings & Loan 
Company, which was organized in 1889 with Mr. Davis as its director, and 
he has ever since served in that capacity. 

On the 8th of October, 1S79, ^^^- Davis was united in marriage to Isa- 
dore F. Morehouse, a daughter of Henry Alorehouse, of Delaware county, 
and one daughter, Ethel, has been born to them. Politically Air. Davis 
affiliates with the Republican party, while fraternally he is a member of the 
Masonic lodge and commandery of Muncie, and religiously is a worthy and 
consistent member of the Presbyterian church. As a newspaper man he has 
done much for Muncie. At the time of the discovery of gas in this locality 
he issued a special edition of his paper, of ten thousand copies, which he 
distributed for the purpose of advertising the great boon to Muncie, and in 
many ways he has proved a public benefactor to his city and county. 

Clarence G. Re.\, M. D., who has won distinction as one of the most 
able and successful of the younger medical practitioners in Delaware county, 
is a native son of Indiana, his birth occurring in New Castle on the ist of 
April, 1880, his parents being George N. and Ida B. (Galliher) Rea, who 
were also bom in the Hoosier state, the former in Henry county and the 
latter in Muncie. After the father's death in 1884 the remainder of the 
family, consisting of the mother, her son C. G. and a daughter, came to 
Muncie, where the son received his education in the public and high schools, 
graduating from the latter in 1899. He seems to have inherited a love for 
his profession, for his father was a leading physician in the community in 
which he resided, as was also his brother, and after completing his literary 
♦rainins: Clarence G. Rea entered the Jefferson Medical College, in which 



■j^ HISTORY OF DEL\'VaRE COUNTY 035 

he was <*iaJiiated in 1904. • Immediately following his graduation he opened 
an offic;viin jMuncie, where he has since -;een engaged in private practice 
and is attaining the success which his ski.\i and ability so well merit. In 
September, 1906, he was appointed presiden.^of the board of health, and is 
also a member of the State Medical Society, cbe American Aledical Asso- 
ciation, the County Medical Society and the t.~>elaware District IMedical 
Society. His fraternal connections are with the Alasonic order. Dr. Rea 
is a young man of promise, and although he has already gained an enviable 
position in the practice of medicine a still brighter future awaits him. 

Freherick W. He.\th. A native son of JMuncie, born on the 5th of 
May, 1854, and its oldest real estate dealer in point o' continuous service, 
Frederick W. Heath enjoys an enviable position, haviri^ by honorable and 
correct methods gained the confidence of his fellow to\nsmen. A review 
of the family history will be found in the sketch of his inther. Rev. Jacob 
Heath, elsewhere in this work. The son Frederick completed his education 
in the public schools of this city when seventeen years of age, and during 
the two years thereafter was engaged in the grocery business for himself. 
At the close of that period, when in his nineteenth year, he embarked in the 
real estate business, in which he has continued from that time to the 
present, and is now its oldest representative in Muncie. To him belongs 
the honor of originating the two hundred thousand dollar fund for encour- 
aging factories to locate in this city, and his firm subscribed ten thousand 
dollars to the amount. All of his varied business interests he has handled 
with skill and fidelity, and the splendid success which has attended his 
efforts is but a merited reward. 

On the 1st of January, 1885, Mr. Heath was united in marriage to 
Laura Bennett, a daughter of William Bennett, the largest land owner in 
Delaware county, and they have one son, Bennett. 

R. A. Bunch, M. D. An honored resident of Muncie during the past 
eighteen years. Dr. Bunch in that time has won distinction as a medical 
practitioner, and enjoys an extensive and remunerative practice. His birth 
occurred in Portland, Indiana, October 28, 1852, and after completing his 
education in its public schools he entered Liber College, at College Corners, 
twxi miles south of Portland, where he studied under Professors Tucker, 
Burns and Jones. With this excellent educational training to fit him for 
life's activities he entered the teacher's profession, thus continuing for eight 
years in Jay county. In 1870 he began the study of medicine under the 
preceptorship of Drs. Gillan and Allen, of Portland, and in 1881 he com- 
pleted the course and graduated from the E. M. I. Institute, of Cincinnati. 
He was then able to enter the field as a medical practitioner, and for a time 
practiced in Geneva, thence going to Portland and later to Desoto, Indiana. 
It was in 1889 that he came to Muncie, where he has won success as a general 
medical practitioner. He is progressive in his methods, constantlv reading 



636 ■ , IISTORY OF DfLAWARE COL'XTY 

r 

and studying. 'liiid thii5 keeps in c''je touch with the spirit of the limes. His 
membership with manv of the 1 i'ding medical societies also enables him to 
keep fully abreast of the mam- flew discoveries which are constantly being 
made in the science of medici •'• He is a member of the State and National 
Eclectic Medical Societ\-, U'ving served as president of the former for 
two terms, and is an honrary member of the Ohio State Eclectic Medical 
Society. 

In April, 1877, Dr Bunch married Mary A. Bair, whose death oc- 
curred on the 9th of Juie. 1906, leaving four children. The eldest, Rollin 
H., is a graduate of tie American College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Chicago, and is now associated with his father in practice. The second son, 
Fred L., is also a gnduate of that institution, and will soon join his father 
and brother in the /.edical profession. Morrell McKenzie will enter college 
in September of t'le present year, 1907, to pursue the study of medicine. 
The only daughtc, Bessie G., is the wife of Walker J. Lotz, the well known 
attorney of Aluncie. 

On June 12, 1907. Dr. Bunch was united in marriage with Miss Beulah 
L. Batey, of this city. They reside at 221 West Jackson street, Muncie. 
Dr. Bunch has offices at 215 South Mulberry street. 

J. D. MiLTEN'HERGER. One of the younger representatives of the busi- 
ness interests of Muncie, J. D. Miltenberger enjoys an enviable position. 
He is a leading real estate dealer and has that keen discrimination and 
sagacity in business affairs which, when combined with energy and industry, 
lead to success. He was born in Franklin, Ohio, March 12, 1876, a son of 
George W. and Permelia (Dearth) Miltenberger, both also natives of the 
Buckeye state. They came to Muncie many years ago and have long been 
numbered among its representative citizens. 

J. D. Miltenberger, their son, is of German and English descent. After 
completing his education in the Franklin high school he spent eight years as 
the publisher of the Franklin News, and on the expiration of that period, in 
1902, he came to Muncie and entered the real estate business with Jere 
Garrard, as a member of the firm of Jere Garrard & Company, while in 
1904 J. H. Leffler was admitted to a partnership, the firm name then becom- 
ing Garrard, Miltenberger & Leffler. In 1906 Mr. Garrard withdrew from 
the firm, since which time the business has been conducted under the firm 
name of Miltenberger & Leffler. They have been very successful in their 
ventures, handling large real estate transactions, and in the receivership, 
trusteeship and settlement of estates they have been unusually successful in 
the courts of the district. They are located in suite 106, ground fioor of 
the \'atet block. 

In 1897 Mr. Miltenberger was united in marriage to Anna M. Gable, a 
native of Middletown, Ohio, and a daughter of Lewis Gable. The onlv 
child of this marriage, a son, Mark D., was bom on the 6th of August, 1900. 
Mr. Miltenberger belongs to Silver Shield Lodge, K. of P., of which he is 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 637 

past chancellor, and the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorrasan. 
He is very prominent in the musical circles of Aluncie, being now the 
musical director in the choir of the First Christian church and a member of 
the Wysor Grand Opera House Orchestra. He is a young man of energy, 
enterprise and reliability, and has thus won the confidence as well as a liberal 
share of the patronage of the public. He has a beautiful home at 231 Xorth 
Nine street. 

J. H. Leffler. Many years have passed since the LefHer family be- 
came identified with the interests of Delaware county, and with the passing 
years its representatives have taken an active and prominent part in the 
development of this section of the state, while one of its members, J. H. 
Leffler, now occupies an enviable position in the business circles of Muncie, 
being well known in real estate and finance circles. His birth occurred in 
Delaware county, five miles north of Muncie, June 23, 1862. His father, 
Philip Leffler, was a native of Darke county, Ohio, but during his infancy 
liis parents established their home in Delaware county, Indiana, where the 
family has ever since been one of prominence, honored and respected in 
every class of society. In this county Philip Leffler married Mary Garrard, 
whose birth occurred within its borders, whither her father, Harvey Garrard, 
had come from Ohio in a very early day. Both the Leffler and Garrard 
families were numbered among the earliest pioneers of Delaware county, 
taking an active part in its subsequent development and aiding in transform- 
ing its wild lands into rich farms, and in other ways promoting the progress 
and advancement which made a once wild region the home of a contented, 
prosperous people. Mr. Leffler still resides on the old homestead in Dela- 
ware county, but the loving wife and mother has long since gone to the home 
beyond, her death occurring in 1868. 

After completing his education in the common schools near his boy- 
hood home J. H. Leffler became a student in the Danville normal, where he 
diligently pursued his studies until he was able to enter the school room as a 
teacher, following that profession during the winter months and farming in 
the summers for several years. Removing thence to Albany, he was for 
eight years engaged in the hardware business, after which he turned his 
attention to the manufacture of furniture, but a disastrous fire made it 
necessary for him to close out his business and he came to Muncie, landing 
in this city without money, friends or position. Beginning again at the 
very bottom round of the ladder of life, he has mounted step by step until 
he today ranks among the leading business men of Delaware county, the 
outcome of the honest reward of labor. His first occupation in this city was 
in the life insurance business, after which for six years he was deputy county 
clerk, was next with the Union Traction Company as a real estate and 
claim adjuster, and in 1904 entered the real estate, loan and fire insurance 
business as a member of the firm of Miltenberger & Leffler. They transact a 
laree and orofitable business and are important factors in the business lif? 



638 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

of Delaware ci:)iintv. Although an active worker in the ranks of the Repub- 
lican party Mr. Leffler has never sought office, but in 1906 he was elected 
to the position of clerk of the court, over which his brother is judge. His 
business -career has been crowned with a well merited success, for he has 
made good use of his opportunities, conducting all business matters care- 
fully and systematically, and in all his acts displaying an aptitude for suc- 
cessful management. 

On the :;3d of June. 188S, Mr. Leffler was married to Nettie A., a 
daughter of David W. Sloniker, of Delaware count}-, antl they have one 
child, Lucille, born on the 26th of November, 1896. In his fraternal rela- 
tions Mr. Leffler is a member of Delaware Lodge, A. F. & A. AL ; Welcome 
Lodge No. 37, K. of P., and of the Red Men. He is a past officer in both 
the Knights of Pythias and the Red Men lodge. He has membership rela- 
tions with the Sons of \'eterans, his father's services in the Forty-second 
Indiana during the Civil war entitling him to enter its ranks, and he has 
served as senior vice coniniander of the Indiana division of the order. 

Jere.mi.vh G.\kr.\rd. For a number of years past Jeremiah Garrard 
has been prominently identified with the business interests of Muncie, and 
in this tin;e has becom.e recognized -as one of its most valued and useful 
citizens. His birth occurred in Warren county, Ohio, January 29, 1845, 
his parents being Harvey and Hannah (Gustin) Garrard, both also natives 
of that commonwealth. The father, whose birth occurred ]\Iarch 22, 1S12, 
became a citizen of Delaware county, Indiana, on the ist of April, 1857, 
establishing his home eight miles north of Muncie. He became prominently 
identified with the agricultural interests of the county and continued to 
reside within its borders until his busy and useful life was ended. 

Jeremiah Garrard, the youngest son of his parents' eight children, was 
but a lad at the time of the inauguration of the Civil war, but with the other 
brave youths of his country he nobly offered his services to his country's 
cause in January, 1864, becoming a member of Company C, First Indiana 
Heavy Artillery, with which he served for two years, and on the expiration 
of that period was mustered out as corporal, having also served as the color 
bearer of his regiment. His military career was one of arduous service, 
participating in the battles of Mobile and Spanish Fort, and after the close 
of the conflict he returned to Delaware county and continued his studies, 
which had been interrupted by the war. After completing his education 
in the public schools Mr. Garrard spent two years in farming, and in 1872 
embarked in the mercantile business in Royerton, Indiana, where he con- 
tinued until his return to Muncie in 1880. Since 1890 he has been engaged 
in the real estate, loan and investment business. He has so directed his 
efforts that his business interests have grown apace tvith the progress which 
dominates the central west, and his extensive business interests in Delaware 
county make him well known to its citizens. 

In i86q occurred the marriage of Mr. Garrard and Miss Savannah 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTV 639 

(ireen. she being a sister of Dr. Green, so well known in Delaware county. 
In the social circles of the city Mr. Garrard is equally prominent and has 
membership relations with Welcome Lodge, Knights of Pythias; Energy 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Aluncie Lodge No. 433, Free 
and Accepted Masons ; Muncie Tribe of Red Men ; and Williams Post, 
G. -V. R. He is also a worthy member of the Christian church. 

E. W. Bishop is the leading insurance dealer of Delaware county. He 
possesses that keen discrimination and sagacity in business afi'airs which, 
when combined with energy and industry, always lead to success, and to 
him they have brought a handsome competence and have placed him among 
the leading business men of Muncie. He is a native son of Ohio, his birth 
having occurred in Worthington on the first of }ilarch, 1847, his parents 
being William and Charlotte (Wolcott) Bishop, the former a native of 
Poughkeepsie, New York, born in 1802, and the latter in Ohio. In 1818 
the father left the Empire state for Ohio, where for a time he was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, and then turned his attention to the harness and 
saddlery business, his life's labors being ended in death in 1S71. 

When but fifteen years of age E. W. Bishop offered his services to his 
country in her hour of need, joining in 1SG2 the One Hundred and Thir- 
teenth Cjhio Regiment, Company C, and his military career covered a period 
of three years, for he was honorably discharged in 1865 on account of dis- 
abilit)-. Although but a lad he was a brave and loyal soldier, and he now 
maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades of the blue by his 
merbership in Williams Post, of which he is a past commander. After return- 
ing from the army Mr. Bishop attended school for one year, and then engaged 
in mercantile business for two years. It was in 1866 that he came to 
Muncie, and during the first si.x months here was engaged in railroad service, 
after which he went to Winchester and served as the company's agent there 
for eleven years. Returning to Muncie in 1 88 1, he was in the employ of 
the Big Four and the Lake Erie & W'estern railroads as agent until 1890, 
when he turned his attention to the insurance business, representing many 
of the well known and reliable companies, and success has attended his well 
directed efforts. He is energetic, enterprising and reliable, and has the 
confidence as well as a liberal share of the patronage of the public. 

In 1869 Mr. Bishop was united in marriage to Elsa Dana, of Fostoria, 
Ohio, where her father, Dr. Dana, was a well known physician for many 
years. Three children have been born to them, Erville D., deceased ; Marcus S., 
who is associated with his father in the insurance business ; and Charlotte, 
the wife of D. M. Edgerley, of Omaha, Nebraska. Mr. Bishop is connected 
with the Masonic order, being a member of its chapter and commandery, in 
which he has filled all the chairs in both orders, and exemplifies in his daily 
life the beneficent spirit of the craft. He is also a worthy member of the 
Presbyterian church, and is a Republican in his political affiliations. Nearly 



G40 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

his entire lite has been spent in Muncie and lie is well known amnnc; her 
citizens and is held in uniform regard. 

Charlks r>. Kirk. Of the pioneer families which have materially con- 
tributed to the prosperity and advancement of Delaware county and particu- 
larly to Aluncic, the one represented by Charles E. Kirk occupies an im- 
portant place. The\- have been influential in the development of its business 
interests and the name is known far and near in connection with the city's 
industrial activities. The family on both the paternal and maternal sides is 
traced to the mother country of England, from whence the maternal grand- 
father, Benjamin Merriwether, came to the United States and established 
his home in Ohio, wdiere he followed his trade of harness making. His 
wife died during the voyage to this country. William N. Kirk, the father 
of Charles, was born in York, England, but during his boyhood days came 
with his father, Charles Kirk, to the United States, they making their way 
to Muncie in an early day, where the elder Mr. Kirk was employed as a 
harness maker. He taught this trade to his son William, but in 1865 the 
latter transferred his interests to the grocery business. About 1887 he 
merged his stock into a department store and two years later he moved to 
221 East Main street. 

Charles 11. Kirk, whose name introduces this review, was born in 
Muncie on the 24th of November, 1S65, and after completing his education 
in the city's public schools he learned the printing business. In 1S87 he 
left the printing office and joined his father in business, for his trade had 
grown to large proportions, and after the latter's death another son, Will E. 
Kirk also became associated therewith, and the two brothers organized the 
business under the firm name of Kirk Brothers. On July 24. 1898, Will E. 
Kirk died, and the business was then assumed by Charles B. Kirk. With 
the passing years his interests have grown and expanded to such an extent 
that he is now the proprietor of one of the largest stores in the city, where 
he carries a magnificent stock of sporting goods, small hardware, cutlery, 
etc., also a complete line of athletic goods, and his is one of the oldest as 
well as the most attractive store in Delaware county. 

Mr. Kirk was married in 1900, when Julia E., a daugher of one of the 
early pioneers of Muncie and Delaware county, Ed Wilson, became his wife, 
and their three sons are Ernest E., Robert W. and Edward C. Mr. Kirk's 
fraternal relations are with the Alasonic order, Delaware Lodge, the order 
of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. His many admirable qualities of heart 
and mind have gained him a large circle of friends, and he is widely and 
favorably known in Delaware county. 

O. W. C)v\'E.NS. Among those who have attained distinctive prestige 
in the practice of medicine in the city of Muncie and whose success has come 
as the result of thorough technical information and skill stands Dr. Owens, 
who is a man of scholarly attainments. His birth occurred in Venedocia, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 641 

\'an Wert county, Ohio, January 22, 1869, so he is numbered among the 
younger representatives of the medical profession. His father, David T- 
Owens, was a native of Anglesey, Wales, but when only six years of age 
was brought by his parents to the United States, the family home being 
established on a farm in Ohio, where David J. Owens is still engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He married Mary Jenkins, a native of Ohio, and 
both Mr. and Mrs. Owens are of Welsh descent. 

Their son, O. \V. Owens, received his elementary education in the pub- 
lic schools near his boyhood home, while later he attended a nonnal school 
in Ohio, and for five years was a valued member of the teachers' profession. 
Deciding to make the practice of medicine his life work he entered the 
Chicago Homeopathic Medical College, where he completed the course and 
graduated in 1897. During the three years following his graduation he 
successfully practiced his profession in his native city of \'enedocia, and on 
the expiration of that period, in 1900. came to ^luncie and opened an office, 
where he is now the leading representative of the Hahnemann or homeopathic 
school of medicine, whose methods and principles are becoming more highlv 
appreciated and approved year after year. He has made deep and careful 
research into the science to which he is devoting his life, and has gained an 
enviable prestige as one of the able and successful practitioners of medicine 
in Delaware county. 

In 1902 Dr. Owens was united in marriage to Mifs Elizabeth Davies. a 
(laughter of Evan Davies, of \'an Wert county, Ohio, and they have two 
little sons, David Wendell, born on the loth of August, 1903, and Walter 
Evan, bom March 20, 1907. By his membership in the Homeopathic Med- 
ical Society Dr. Owens keeps abreast of the many discoveries which are 
constantly being made in the medical science, and also has membership rela- 
tions with the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent 
Order of Red Men, while his religious affiliations are with the Presbyterian 
church. 

Fr.xnk Feely, one of the leading members of the legal fraternity in 
Delaware county, was born in Fayette county, Indiana, September 22, 1862, 
a son of Thomas and Mary (O'Brien) Feely, both of whom were born in 
the Emerald Isle. They came to the United States in their childhood days 
and for a number of years Mr. Feely followed agricultural pursuits in 
Fayette county, Indiana. In 1871 they came to Delaware county, later 
removing to Henry county, this state, but shortly afterward came again to 
this count)-, where Mr. Feely now resides. 

Frank Feely accompanied his parents on their various removals and 
received his education in the schools of Fayette, Delaware and Henry coun- 
ties, and after the completion of his education followed farming and agri- 
cultural pursuits. While at school he read law, and was admitted to the 
Delaware county bar in 1895. Immediately opening an office in Muncie, he 
has ever since enjoyed a substantial and growing practice, continuing alone 



642 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

in his profession until two _\i:ars ago, when he formed a partnership witli 
H. S. Redkey. They form one of the leading law firms of the city and 
their extensive practice connects them with much of the important litigation 
heard in the courts of Delaware county. Air. Feely is prominent in the ranks 
of the Democratic party, having been its nominee for the position of prosecut- 
ing attorney and has served as chairman of its county committee. His fraternal 
relations are with Delaware Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; Independent Order of 
Red Alen, the Alodem Woodmen of America and the Knights of Pythias. 

G. W. LucKLix, AI. D. For many years Dr. Bucklin has been actively 
engaged in the practice of medicine in Aluncie. Being of broad and liberal 
mind and having enjoyed the advantages of a superior education, he has 
always stood forth as the champion of progress, and his influence has been 
e-xerted at all times on the side of right and truth. His birth occurred in 
Princeton, Indiana, May 14, 1S50, a son of Horace AI. and Elmira (Alaxam) 
Bucklin, the former a native of Rhode Island and the latter of New York, 
and both members of prominent old eastern families. The father's death 
occurred in 1895, when he had reached the age of eighty-four years, but the 
mother survived until 1906, passing away at the age of eighty-nine years. 
Of their children two sons and two daughters are living.' On both the 
paternal and maternal sides the family were early pioneers of Indiana, the 
father having removed hither in 1S32 and located in Princeton, while the 
mother came with her parents when only a babe of two years. Her father 
was Sylvester Maxam. 

Dr. G. W. Bucklin, after completing his education in the Princeton high 
school, taught school for four years, and in 1876, entered upon the study of 
the profession which he had determined to make his life work, his preceptor 
being Dr. Munford, of Princeton. In 1879 he graduated from the Bellevue 
Medical College of New York, and immediately entered upon the practice 
of Medicine in New Harmony, Indiana, there remaining until 1892. In the 
meantime, in 1890, he pursued a course of study in the Polyclinic of New 
York, and in 1906 entered upon a course in the Chicago Polyclinic. The 
Doctor yet maintains many pleasant reminiscences of his early practice in 
Posey county, when he daily rode forty-five miles on horseback, and at that 
time the county was practically without roads. His practice extended across 
the river into Illinois, and he was often obliged to cross the Wabash at very 
late hours in a skiff, and at times when the river had been greatly swollen. 
Who can fully comprehend what it means, and how many of the present 
generation realize what it meant to be a pioneer physician, riding here and 
there, far and near, in aU kinds of weather, without regard to self, his sole 
thought being of others. In 1892 Dr. Bucklin came to Muncie, where he 
has since been a permanent and ever ready family physician. He holds 
membership relations with the County, State and American Medical Associa- 
tions, is an ex-president of the County Medical Society and for three years 
has been a county delegate to the State Medical Society. 



HISTORY OF DELA\\'ARE COUNTY 6-13 

The marriage of Dr. Bucklin was celebrated in 1879, when Emma 
Wright, a native daughter of \\'arwick county, Indiana, became his wife. 
The doctor is a worthy member of the IMasonic order, connected with Dela- 
ware Lodge and the Royal Arch Chapter No. 30, and is also a member of 
Muncie Commandery No. 18, K. T. He is a valued member of the Methodist 
church, with which he has been associated in the capacity of trustee for 
twelve vears. The record of a noble life is a man's best monument, and no 
words of eulogy can add luster to the name of Dr. G. W. Bucklin. 

D.wiD T. H.\iNES, Jr. No citizen of Muncie enjoys the confidence and 
high esteem of his associates and neighbors in a greater degree than does 
D. T. Haines, who is a native son of the county, born on the 12th of 
February, 1865. His paternal great-grandfather, John Haines, took up his 
abode in Ohio about 1770, locating first at Waynesville, but soon afterward 
moved to Greene county. His son. Stacy Haines, the grandfather of David, 
was born in Frederick county, Virginia, in 1795, and married Judith Terrell, 
by whom he had twelve children, the eldest being David T., Sr. The family 
were birthright members of the Society of Friends. 

David T. Haines, Sr., was born in Ohio on the ist of October, 1818, and 
there learned the trade of a miller. It was in the early year of 1848 that he 
came to Muncie, where he was engaged in a wholesale and retail grocery 
business until 1853. He was a public-spirited and enterprising citizen and 
he did much toward developing central Indiana and Delaware county. To 
him belongs the honor of securing the Fort Wayne & Southern railroad 
through this locality, and he served as secretary of the company from 1853 
until 1855, when it failed, and he later helped organize the company that 
built the Fort Wayne, Chicago & Louisville railroad, serving first as its 
secretar>' and treasurer and later as its vice president. He also helped to 
organize and build what is now the Fort Wayne & Cincinnati railroad, 
becoming the secretary and director of the company. Mr. Haines also 
embarked largely in the grain business during the early '60s, also speculated 
considerably in real estate in Kansas, and in 1875 became identified with 
the Aluncie Machine Works, of which he became the general manager. To 
him came the attainment of a distinguished position in connection with the 
great material industries of this section of the state, and his was truly a 
successful life, but the busy and useful career was ended in death in 1899, 
when he had reached the eighty-first milestone on the journey of life. In 
his early manhood he had married Deborah Sever, of Warren county, Ohio, 
who died in 1852, and he afterward wedded Elizabeth Dragoo, of West 
\'irginia. 

David T. Haines, Jr., received his educational training in the Muncie 
schools, and after some experience in the mercantile business he went to 
Kansas City, Missouri, in 1885, and was thus engaged *or nine years. In 
1893 he returned to his native cit}- of Muncie, where he hds since achieved 
wn-cess in the commission business. In 1896 he was united in marriage to 



644 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

ATartha Ritchey of Liberty, jNIissouri. His fraternal connections are with 
the Knights of I'\thias. 

Oliver Carmichael. One of the prominent old families of Delaware 
county is that of the Carmichaels, where they have been represented ever 
since the opening decades of its history. They have ever borne their part in 
the upbuilding and development of this region, and have invariably been 
exponents of progress and liberal ideas upon all subjects. One of its promi- 
nent representatives is Oliver Carmichael, whose name is also deeply en- 
graved on the pages of its history, for through many years he has been a 
most important factor in its varied interests. His birth occurred in Monroe 
township. Delaware county, January 20, 1841, his parents being Patrick and 
Louisa (Gibson) Carmichael, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter 
of Tennessee. Andrew Carmichael, the grandfather, was a native of Ireland, 
and after coming to the United States settled in Baltimore, Maryland, from 
whence he removed to the Carolinas and subsequently to Kentucky, where 
occurred the birth of his son Patrick. In the early year of 1827 Patrick 
Carmichael came to Delaware county, Indiana, being preceded two years by 
the Gibson family, and both settled in Monroe township. He became one of 
its most prominent residents and was the recipient of many public honors, 
having served as school trustee, also as township trustee and for years was a 
justice of the peace. 

When a lad of twenty years Oliver Carmichael offered his service to 
his country's cause during the Civil war, enlisting in July, 1861, in Company 
E, Nineteenth Indiana Volunteers, in which he served for three years. The 
Nineteenth was one of the regiments of the famous Iron Brigade, and as a 
member of the Army of the Potomac he took part in many of the noted 
engagements of the war, including those of Gainsville, second Bull Run, 
South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettys- 
burg. In the last engagement he received a gunshot wound and was mus- 
tered out of service on the 29th of July, 1864. 

With a military career which will ever redound to his credit as a loyal 
and devoted son of the republic Mr. Camiichael returned to his father's 
farm, where he remained until 1875, moving thence to Muncie, and during 
the following fifteen years was an invalid owing to the result of his wound 
and the severities of his military life. In 1900 he was elected to represent 
his county in the state legislature, and so well did he discharge the duties 
which devolved upon him in that important office that he received a re-elec- 
tion, and is now serving his fourth term. Among other bills he was the 
author and had passed the county hospital bill, and has at all times been true 
to his duty and the right. In April, 1907, he was appointed a member of 
the board of public works for the ensuing term, expiring January i, 1910. 

In October, 1864 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Carmichael and 
Martha Losh, she being a native of Delaware county and a daughter of John 
Losh, of Pennsylvania. Their children are : Otto, a resident of Muncie ; 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 645 

Milton, who makes his home in Detroit ; Wilson, of Illinois ; Jesse, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; and Mary, now Mrs. Lambertson and a resident of Indianap- 
olis. Air. Carmichael maintains his relations with his army comrades by his 
membership in Williams Post, G. A. R., of which he served as its commander 
in 1906. He is a member of the Christian church, in which he has officiated 
as a minister for many years. He is thoroughly earnest and sincere in all 
his thoughts, words and deeds, and his noble, manly life has proved an in- 
spiration to many of his old friends and associates. 

Frederick F. ]\IcClellan. In reviewing the prominent representatives 
of the Delaware county bar the name of Frederick F. McClellan is found 
among its younger members. His birth occurred near the city of Muncie 
on the i2th of August, 1875. His father, Frederick H. McClellan, a native 
of Greene countv, Ohio, took up his abode within the borders of Delaware 
county in the early days of the '40s, settling on a farm a few miles from 
Muncie, where his death occurred on the 28th of July, 1875, about two weeks 
previous to the birth of his son Frederick. After his arrival in this county 
he married one of its native daughters, Mary Jewett, whose birth occurred 
in 1848. Her father, Jeremiah Jewett, was one of the first to cast his lot with 
Delaware county, arriving within its borders as early as 1838. Three 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. McClellan, one son and two daughters, 
all of whom are yet living. 

Frederick F. McClellan received his literary education in the Muncie 
high school and the Georgetown University of Washington, D. C, and after 
the completion of this excellent training entered upon the study of law with 
Gregory, Silverburg & Lotz, and in the meantime was engaged in teaching 
school, serving as principal of the Jackson and Garfield schools. In 1904 
he graduated from the law depaitment of 'the Georgetown University, and 
immediately thereafter entered upon the practice of his profession in Muncie, 
in association with D. D. Hensel, the firm style being McClellan & Hensel. 
In the practice of his chosen profession Mr. McClellan is meeting with the 
success he so justly deserves, for he is a man of exceptional attainments and 
mental culture and one well calculated to assist in moulding the public 
thought and action of his community. He was appointed a member of the 
board of public works, entering upon the duties of that office in September, 
1906, and in April, 1907, was appointed the city attorney of Muncie. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. McClellan is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is also associated with the High Street Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, being one of its valued members, and during the past 
two and a half years he has served as superintendent of its Sunday-school. 

George N. McLaughlin, who is well known to the citizens of Delaware 
county as one of its native sons, born on the 23d of April, 1845, is now 
practically retired from the active cares of life. In former years he occupied 
a distinctive position in the educational and political circles of his com- 



646 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

miinity. always faithful to his conceptions of the duties of citizenship and 
ever striving to advance the interests of his fellow men. His parents, John 
and Rachel (Eeoler) McLaughlin, were both born in Ohio, and the former 
was of Irish and German descent. The grandfather, James McLaughlin, 
came to the Lhiited States from his native land of Ireland when a young 
man and located in the southern part of Ohio. Mr. John McLaughlin, who 
followed the tilling of the soil as a life occupation, came to Delaware county. 
Indiana, in 1834, locating in Mount Pleasant township, where he purchased 
one hundred and twenty acres of government land and there established a 
home for his family. He devoted the remainder of his life to the cultivation 
and improvement of his farm, and was an upright, popular and highly 
respected citizen. He vvas elected to the office of justice of the peace, and 
was a Methodist in his religious belief. In his family were five sons and 
three daughters, and all of the sons, William H., Orlando L., George N., 
James S. and Thomas J., served their country as soldiers during the Civil 
war, while one, James S.. was called upon to lay down his life on its altar. 
He was captured while tm picket duty in Georgia, and was shot to death by 
an enemy. 

George X. McLaughlin farmed and attended school during his boyhood 
da}s, but during the Civil war he laid aside all personal considerations and 
enlisted for service in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, for one hundred days. At the expiration of that period 
he re-enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Fortieth Infantry, with 
which he continued until his honorable discharge on the nth of July, 1865, 
with the rank of corporal. He took part in many of the hard fought engage- 
ments of the war, including the battles of [Murfreesboro, Town Creek, 
Goldsboro, Rolla and Greensborough, North Carolina, having been located 
at the latter place at the time of Lee's surrender. After the war he returned 
home and resumed his studies, while later he engaged in teaching school, 
continuing in that occupation for twenty-two years. With the exception of 
one year, all of that time was spent in Delaware county. His broad intelli- 
gence and scholarly attainments made him an able educator, and his name 
is inseparably interwoven with the educational interests of Delaware county. 
In 1888 he was elected the trustee of Center township, while in 1890 he was 
returned to that office by a very large majority. He takes a broad minded 
interest in the political situation of the country, and gives his support to 
the men and measures of the Republican party. In 1874 he practically laid 
aside the active cares of life and came to Muncie, where he is interested in 
real estate. 

In 1870 Mr. McLaughlin was married to Miss Orintha Kilgore, whose 
death occurred in 1904, and he afterward wedded Minnie M. Puntenney. 
Mr. McLaughlin has relations with the Masonic order, being a member of 
its chapter, commandery and the Scottish Rite, he having attained the 
Thirty-second degree in Masonry. He is also a member of the order of 
Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Red Men, the Grand Army of the 





■<#'< 



:^. 



HISTORY OF DELA\\'ARE COUXTY 649 

Republic, and is a worthy and consistent member of the Methodist church. 
He was an able educator, an efficient officer and is a representative and 
honored citizen. 

Ulysses G. Pol.\nd, AI. D. For eight years the official lists show that 
the office of coroner was filled by Dr. U. G. Poland. In addition to this 
unusual length of service for the county he has gained prominence in the 
profession as a regular practitioner of medicine, and has a successful 
practice in Muncie. Dr. Poland is a native son of Delaware county, born 
June 2, 1865, in the little community known as Sharon, in Delaware town- 
ship, on the banks of the Mississinewa. Nicholas Poland, his father, was 
born in Harrison county, Ohio, in 1833, was reared in Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and came to Delaware county in 1854, where for many years 
he followed his trade — that of a carpenter. In 1876 he moved with his 
family on a farm in Hamilton township, where he lived until his death, in 
1902. He led a busy, practical life, and was much esteemed by all who knew 
him. .In early manhood he married Martha J. Dickover, a native of Indiana, 
who died in 1875. 

During his youth the subject of this sketch worked on the farm and 
attended the neighborhood district schools, and later was a student for two 
years at the Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso and one year 
at Delaware, Ohio. The career of Dr. Poland includes seven years' 
experience in the teaching profession, and it was during this time that he 
decided to enter the medical profession. Dr. A. P. Murray of Albany was 
his first preceptor in medicine, later continuing with Dr. G. R. Green of 
Muncie, and in 1892 he entered the Medical College of Indiana, from which 
he graduated in 1895. Having begun practice at once in MJncie, the subse- 
quent twelve years have been marked by increased success as a physician. 
Dr. Poland is noted for the energy with which he pursues his vocation, for 
his enthusiastic research in professional subjects, and as a public-spirited 
citizen. He is a member of the Delaware County Medical Society, the 
Indiana State Medical Association and also of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. For eleven years he served as secretary and treasurer of the 
Delaware County Medical Society, during which time, largely through his 
influence, the society increased in interest and more than doubled in 
membership. 

Outside of his profession Dr. Poland is interested in various activities 
and organizations. He is a member of Silver Shield Lodge No. 403, 
K. of P., at Muncie, and is a past chancellor of the order. , In the First 
Presbyterian church he is an elder, and he and his wife are well known 
socially. He married, in 1896, Miss Grace E. McClellan, a daughter of 
Frederick and Mary F. McClellan, an old and well known family of the 
city and county. Prior to her marriage Mrs. Poland was a teacher in the 
public schools of Muncie. Her mother, who is still living, was one of the 
pioneer residents of the county. 



650 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

AI. B. Baird, a representative of one of Delaware county's most promi- 
nent families, and also one of its leading young lawyers and business men, 
is a native son of the Hoosier state, born in Jay county, Indiana, January 3, 
1879. The family home was founded in that county by his grandfather, 
John Baird, whose birth occurred in Warren county, Ohio, but in an early 
day he took up his abode within the borders of Jay county and became one 
of its most prominent citizens. His son and the father of our subject. Dr. 
J. V. Baird, was born in that county, and in 1881 he removed with his 
family to Delaware county, establishing his home at Albany, where he yet 
resides. He is one of the leading physicians of the county, as well as one 
of its foremost citizens, and the family is thus prominently represented in 
two of the leading professions, the medical and the legal. In his early 
manhood Dr. Baird wedded Amelia Meeks, a native daughter of Ohio. 

Their son, M. B. Baird, received an excellent literary education in the 
schools of Delaware county, and for a time thereafter was a student in the 
Columbia Law School of Washington, D. C. For two years after leaving 
that institution he taught school in Delaware county, after which he returned 
to Washington and during a similar period was in the government service. 
In 1903 he came to Muncie and entered the real estate field, where his 
thorough business ability and enterprise have won for him a well merited 
success. In both his social and business relations he is popular and influ- 
ential, and his future, judging by the past, may be forecasted as characterized 
by great activity in the important things that concern the interests of society 
and good government. 

In March, 1906, Mr. Baird was united in marriage to Emma Foster, a 
daughter of J. P. Foster, of Summitville, Delaware county. Mr. Baird is a 
member of the Masonic order in Albany, and also of the Presbvterian 
church. 

T. J. Bowles, M. D. One of the widely known and loved family 
physicians of Delaware county is Dr. T. J. Bowles, whose life has been filled 
with good deeds and labors of love toward his fellow men. He is yet a 
great student and endeavors to keep abreast of the times in everything 
relating to discoveries in medical science, and although progressive in his 
ideas and favoring modern methods as a whole, he does not dispense with 
many of the true and tried systems which have stood the test of years. 

The birth of Dr. Bowles occurred in Milroy, Rush county, Indiana, 
July 24, 1836, his parents being James and Sarah Ann (Smith) Bowles, 
both natives of Cynthiana, Kentucky, and the former of English and the 
latter of German descent. In 1830 the parents came to Indiana, first locating 
in Rush county, where the father became very prominent as an agriculturist 
and stock man, his death occurring on the i8th of September, 1892, at the 
age of eighty-three years. His wife preceded him in death a few years, 
passing away on the 28th of January, 1886, when seventy-five years of age. 

After completing his studies in the common schools of his home place 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTV 651 

Dr. T. J. Bowles pursued a special course under Professor A. R. Benton, the 
well known educator, at Fairview Academy, and he was then competent to 
enter the school room as a teacher, following the profession in Rush county. 
During this time he had determined on the practice of medicine as his life 
occupation, and accordingly began study under the preceptorships of Drs. 
John Wall and A. C. Dillon, after which he took courses at the Medical 
College of Ohio, his graduation taking place in i86g, after he had practiced 
a few years. This, however, did not complete his medical training, for he 
afterward pursued a course in medicine in Rush Medical College and a 
special course in Bellevue Hospital of New York. He then entered upon 
the practice of his chosen profession at Windsor, Randolph county, and in 
1874 came to Muncie, where he has ever since been actively engaged in 
professional work. 

In 1S60 Dr. Bowles was united in marriage to Miss Saphora E. 
Spangler, a daughter of Henry Spangler, of Delaware county, and they have 
five children living. One son, Herman S., graduated from the Medical 
College of Ohio, and is now practicing with his father, both having won for 
themselves prominent places in the professional life of Delaware county. In 
company with Dr. Kemper and otJiers, Dr. Bowles, Sr., organized the first 
county medical society in Delaware county, and he also served as pension 
surgeon under Harrison's administration for four years. He is independent 
in his political affiliations, not binding himself by party ties, for he is a man 
of original ideas and has the courage of his convictions. He is respected 
by all who know him as an honest, outspoken, warm-hearted gentleman, one 
whom it is a delight to honor. He is also an interesting conversationalist, 
for his mind is rich in pleasant reminiscences of his early life in Delaware 
county and his experiences as a medical practitioner of tjne early days. 

Ch.\rles E. Mir.[.F.R, AI. D. During the past ten years this representa- 
tive member of the medical profession of Delaware county has made his 
home in Muncie, where he enjoys an extensive and lucrative practice. He is 
progressive in all his methods, constantly reading and studying, and keeps 
in close touch with the spirit of the times. The birth of Dr. Miller occurred 
in Bellefontaine, Ohio, December i, 1869, his parents being A. T. and Mary 
Miller, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Maryland and of 
German descent. During his young manhood the father journeyed to Ohio, 
where he was for many years engaged in the real estate business, and he 
now resides in Bellefontaine. 

After completing his literary education in the public schools of his 
native city Dr. Miller entered upon the study of the profession which he hac* 
determined to make his life work, graduating from the Miami Medicai 
College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1898. After a few months spent in hospital 
work in Chicago he came to Muncie and located permanently here. A man 
of deep research and study, he is well informed on the general principles of 
medicine, but has specialized in the diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat 



652 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

giving much time and thought to his special branches. He has made deep 
and careful research into the science to which he is devoting his life, and five 
times he has crossed the ocean to the old world to further perfect himself 
in his practice, having studied in Vienna and London, and his scholarly 
attainments and broad knowledge have gained him the distinctive prestige 
which he now enjoys. 

In June, 1903, Dr. JMiller was married to May H. Sanders, a native of 
Cincinnati and a daughter of David Sanders. He holds membership relations 
with the Muncie lodge of Masons, being also connected with its council, 
chapter and commandery, and is a member of the county, state and district 
medical societies and also of the American Medical Association. His 
religious affiliations are with the Presbyterian church. In the city where he 
has so long resided he is held in the highest regard by his innumerable 
friends. 

J.\C0E Arthur Mf.eks. Prominent in the business circles of Muncie 
stands Jacob A. Meeks, whose life history exhibits a virtuous career of 
private industry, crowned with success. A community depends upon com- 
mercial activity, its welfare is due to this, and iti promoters of legitimate 
and extensive business enterprises may well be termed its benefactors. 
Numbered among the leading business men of Delaware county is Jacob A. 
Meeks, whose birth occurred in the city of Muncie January 5, 1856. A 
-sketch of his father, Robert Meeks, will be found elsewhere in this work. 
After graduating from the high school of his native city in 1873 the son 
Jacob A. became associated with the grocery firm of Maddy, Burt & Kirby, 
continuing at intervals with this firm for four years, and during that time 
he also took a commercial course at the Miami College of Dayton, Ohio. At 
the close of that period he secured the position of bookkeeper in a wholesale 
house in Toledo, and in 1880 came to Muncie and entered the employ of 
James Boyce as bookkeeper in his bagging factor}-, in the same year pur- 
chasing an eighth interest in the concern. In 1S85, however, they sold the 
plant to the Muncie Bagging Company, and in the same year Mr. Meeks 
purchased a half interest from ^Ir. Boyce in the Muncie Handle Company, 
they continuing its operation with ever increasing success until the plant was 
destroyed by fire in April, 1893. Six weeks later, however, the works were 
rebuilt, on a much larger and more complete scale, and in 1895 Mr. Meeks 
assumed charge of the handle, rivet and machinery department, which he 
has since continued to operate with marked success. He is also interested 
in a lumber business and operates two saw mills, one in Muncie and one in 
Laurel. Delaware county, as well as Muncie, thus numbers him among her 
most enterprising business men, and he has achieved that success which is 
but the natural sequence of intrinsic worth of character. 

In 1879 Mr. Meeks was united in marriage to Lydia J., a daughter of 
J. Milton Gray, of Delaware county, and they have one son, Elarl G. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 653 

^^'ILLIAM p. Kot-ixi. For a number of years past William P. Koons has 
been engaged in the practice of law in Muncie. He is able and well posted 
in his profession, clear and convincing as a speaker before judge and jury, 
painstaking and accurate in the preparation of his cases, and conscientiously 
adheres to the spirit as well as to the letter of the law. Indiana claims him 
among her native sons, his birth occurring in Henry county on the loth of 
December, 1862. His father was Peter Koons, whose histor}- will be found 
in the sketch of Judge Koons elsewhere in this work. 

William P. Koons received his early literary training in the public 
schools of Henry county, this being further supplemented by study in the 
high school of Muncie, Indiana, and for ten years thereafter he was a 
member of the teacher's profession, having taught his first school, the West 
Chapel school of ]\Ionroe township, when only fourteen years of age. After 
reading law for five years under the preceptorship of his brother. Judge 
Koons, he was admitted to th.e bar in 1891, and at once began the practice 
of his chosen profession in 3iluncie, where he has since built up a large and 
profitable practice. For two terms he served as assistant prosecuting attor- 
ney of Delaware county, but since that time has devoted his entire attention 
to his private practice, in which his superior ability has won for him marked 
success. 

;\Ir. Koons was married on the 28th of June, 1892, when Miss Jennie 
Downs became his wife, she being a daughter of Samuel Downs, of Henry 
county, Indiana. Their two children are Rhea Katharine, born on the loth 
of September, 1894, and Lillian Mildred, born February 10, 1903. 

Jon.\ W. Shafer. One of the first families to establish their home in 
Delaware county were the Sliafers, and its descendants are now numerous 
and scattered over many sections of the Cnited States, yet many of them 
still reside in Delaware county. The history of the family is one of more 
than ordinary interest, and in recording briefly its record in the history of 
Delaware county we deem it well to begin with the parent tree in America. 
He was John A. Shafer, who was bom in Wurtemberg, Germany, January 
15, 1775, and his death occurred in Hamilton county, Indiana, July 8, 1870. 
He was married in Germany to one of the fatherland's native daughters, 
Sabina Lieben, born December 2, 1772. They had the following children: 
George, born in Wurtemberg, Germany, February 25, 1800, and he became 
the father of John W. Shafer; Catherine, bom June 4, 1802, married Joseph 
Williamson ; Adam, born February 16, 1804, married Eleanor Graves, and 
came to Delaware county in 1831 ; Rosanna married Peter Williamson, who 
was numbered among the pioneers of Delaware county and concerning whom 
information may be obtained in the sketch of James Williamson in this work; 
Christena married James Williamson ; Sabina married first a Mr. Wilcoxson 
and afterward a Mr. Medsker; and Jacob, born October 18, 1814, married 
Rachael Frost. All of the children were bom in Wurtemberg, Germany, 
and t':o father and the entire family left the fatherland in the latter part of 



654 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

1819 for the United States. They were shipwrecked and the delayed arrival 
resulted in the spending of all their money, so that on reaching Baltimore, 
February 25, 1820, the father boiuid out three of his daughters for eighty 
dollars each in payment for their passage. The remainder of the family 
proceeded at once by wagon to Brownsville, Pennsylvania, and from there 
by flat boat down the Monongahela and Ohio rivers to Portsmouth, Ohio. 
They located in Sciota county, and there in the fall of 1822 the mother died. 
Three and a half years after their arrival in Portsmouth George Shafer 
walked the entire distance to Baltimore to bring his sisters to their western 
home. The two youngest returned with him, but the oldest remained still 
longer. In 1832 the father moved to Hamilton county, Indiana, where his 
death occurred in 1870. 

In the same year of the removal of the family to Hamilton county 
George Shafer came to Delaware county and entered from the government 
one hundred and sixty acres of land one and a half miles west of the then 
village of Muncietovvn, where he resided until his death on the i6th of 
September, 1891. On the 27th of September, 1827, he married Martha 
Wilcoxson, who bore him the following children: Margaret, Sabina Lieben, 
Levin \\'., John Willard, Louisa Ann, and her death occurred August 18, 
184S. Mr. Shafer married for his second wife, Alay 11, 1851, Catherine 
Bradrick. She died October 11, 1879. In his >-outh Mr. Shafer was reared 
a Lutheran but in 1849 ''^ became a Methodist. In politics he was a 
Democrat. 

John \V. Shafer, a well known citizen and farmer of Center township, 
was born within its borders June 2, 1842, a son of George and Martha 
(Wilcoxson) Shafer. He was reared as a farmer lad and received a com- 
mon-school education. At the age of twenty-two years he began the battle 
of life for himself as a farmer, and to this occupation he has devoted his 
life's activities. On the 24th of May, 1864, Mr. Shafer enlisted in Company 
G, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, for one 
hundred days' service in the Civil war, and was honorably discharged 
September 2, 1864. His homestead farm, where his father settled on coming 
to this county and which he has owned since his death, is located just west 
of Muncie, and is a valuable estate. 

Mr. Shafer married, November 22, 1874, Mary E. Howell, who was 
born in Delaware county, Indiana, April 21, 1853, and their children are 
George D., Bessie, Robie W. and Lina. Mrs. Shafer is a most excellent 
lady and a communicant of the Baptist church. She is a daughter of Daniel 
P. and Mary (McKinley) Howell, the former of whom was born in Miami 
county, Ohio, June 5, 1820. The mother was born in Ohio and was a 
daughter of Sarah and William McKinley. Daniel P. Howell was a son of 
John Howell, a Virginian and a pioneer of Delaware county, Indiana. 

WiLLL\M Heaton. The name of William Heaton is perhaps as closely 
associated with the early history of Randolph county as any other, and his 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY, 655 

valuable counsel and the activities of his useful manhood were of great 
moment to the advancement of the interests of his community. But the 
work of these brave pioneers is nearly complete, and among those who 
helped to build an empire and have passed to their final reward is William 
Heaton, who passed away at his home in this county September 19, 1888. 
He was bom in Virginia on the nth of February, 181 1. but when only 
fourteen years of age he came to Indiana, and after living for three years 
in Randolph county he came to Delaware county. He was married in the 
year of 1838 to Miss Experience Walbum, who was born in Ohio, near 
Xenia, in July, 1817, and her death occurred at their home in Center town- 
s'lip on the 4th of December. 1893. She bore her husband the following 
cl'ildren : Matilda, the wife of John Kiger, of Muncie ; Catherine, deceased ; 
Lydia, the wife of George Gates ; Robert, a resident of Missouri ; Joseph, of 
Muncie ; Jefferson, a resident farmer of Center township ; William, the 
subject of this review ; and John and Eliza, both deceased. Mr. Heaton, the 
father, began life for himself a poor man, but his indefatigable efforts and 
excellent business ability won for him the later success which was his to 
enjoy. He studied closely the issues and questions of the day and gave his 
political allegiance to the Republican party. During twenty years of his life 
he was a worthy and valued member of the Methodist church. Mrs. Heaton 
was also a member with that denomination. 

William Heaton, a prominent and well known agriculturist of Center 
township and a son of William Sr.t was born on his father's farm in Center 
township, October I, 1852, and agriculture has continued as his life occupa- 
tion. His estate now consists of one hundred and nineteen acres of rich and 
fertile land, on which he has made many valuable improvements. 

On the 28th of December, 1879, Mr. Heaton married Miss Adda Gibson, 
who was born in Monroe township, Delaware county, December 8, 1857, a 
daughter of .Andrew and Rebecca (Carmichael) Gibson. The father was 
born in Tennessee March 8, 181 1, and was married in 1836, their union 
being blessed by the birth of eleven children. For fifty-two years they 
traveled the journey of life together, but on the 28th of February, 1888, 
the husband and father was called to the home beyond, his wife joining him 
there on the loth of October, 1896. He was a Republican in his political 
affiliations and was reared in the Quaker faith. Mrs. Gibson was a member 
of the Christian church. Her daughter, Mrs. Heaton, is also a member of 
that denomination. The political affiliations of Mr. Heaton are with the 
Republican party, and in the community in which he has so long made his 
home he is honored for his true worth and ability. 

Xath.\n Anderson. One of the best known and most prominent 
families of Delaware county is the Andersons, many of whose representatives 
now reside within its borders and are prominently identified with its business 
and social interests, and to Nathan Anderson belongs the honor of platting 
the town of .Anderson ville in 1897, now a village of over one hundred 



656 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

people. Farming has been his Hfe occupation, and, in addition, he is ex- 
tensively engaged in the sale of the Page fence wire, which has proved 
a valuable accjuisition to his business interests, tie is a native son of 
Adinis county, Ohio, born on the 23d of July, 1S55, his parents being 
Daniel and Ann L. (Wallace) Anderson. The father spent his entire life 
within sight of the place of his nativity in Adams county, Ohio, dying 
there at the age of seventy-five years. His wife was also born in that county 
and reached the Psalmist's span of three score years and ten ere she 
was called to the home beyond. In their family were eleven children, eight 
sons and tliree daughters, of whom seven are now living and all residents of 
Delaware county, save one son. Mr. Anderson, the father, served as a 
brave and valiant soldier throughout the Civil war in an Ohio regiment. 

Xatlian Anderson attained to manhood's estate in the commonwealth of 
his nativit}-, but on the 13th of March, 1874, he left his Ohio home for Dela- 
ware county, Indiana, having ever since been identified with its farming 
interests, and Center township numbers him among its leading business 
men. As a representative of the Democracy he takes an active interest in 
public affairs, and he has fraternal relations with the Odd Fellows and the 
Red Men. He is a member of the United Brethren church.' 

On the "th of August, 1S77, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage 
to Alice A. Phillips, who was born July 24, 1S52, in Warren county, Ohio, 
a daughter of Isaac and Mary (Stewart) Phillips, both also natives of 
that county. The father, who was born on the 2d of .\pril. 1822, died 
in Delaware count}', Indiana, April 3, 1893, while the mother, born April 
17. 1S30, died here on the nth of August, 1881. The} were married in 
Ohio, and their union was blessed with one child, Mrs. Anderson. The 
family came to Delaware county, Indiana, in 1856, establishing their home 
first in Salem township, but in 1858 they took up their abode in Center 
township on the farm on which Mr. Anderson now lives. The first apple 
tree which he set out on this place is still standing, a sentinel over the 
old log barn which remains as a mute reminder of the early days in Dela- 
ware county. Mr. Phillips was a stanch and true pioneer, loved and revered 
for his many noble characteristics, and he gave to the Democracy his active 
support and co-operation. 

J.v.MES I. H.MXKS, one of the prominent and well known farmers of 
Center township, was born in Allen county, Ohio. July 19, 1841, a son of 
William and Phoebe (Fisher) Haines, natives respectively of Ohio and 
Virginia. In their family were three children, James I., Samuel (deceased) 
and Mary. The father died when his son James was a little lad of seven 
years, and the mother lived to the advanced age of eighty years. 

James I. Haines grew to mature years in the home of his grandfather, 
James Fisher, receiving a common-school education in his boyhood days. 
In 1849 he came to Delaware county with his grandfather Fisher and 
family, the journey being made with a team. The family settled in Mt. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 657 

Pleasant township, and at that time Muncie was but a villa-e and much of 
the surroundmg country was heavily timbered. On the 2d of Tune 1861 he 
enlisted m Company E, Nineteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry servino- as a 
private until the dose of the strug-gle, and during his military care'er he 
participated in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, the Second Bull 
Run Gettysburg, Fredericksburg and many others. He served in the Army 
of the Potomac throughout the entire period of his enlistment, and at the 
battle of Gettysburg he was wounded in the right leg. He continued as a 
brave and valiant soldier during the conflict, and at its close when his 
country no longer needed his services, he received an honorable dischar-e 
and returned to Delaware county. During the following two vears m" 
Haines worked as a farm hand, and he was then married and locaied on the 
farm which has ever since been his home, twentv-three vears havinc. elapsed 
since he took up his abode thereon. ' 

The marriage of Air. Haines was celebrated in 1S66, Miss Elizabeth 
Fisher becoming his wife, and they have had four children, one of whom 
died when SIX years of age, and the three living are: John, Thadeus and' 
Charles, all of whom are residents of Muncie. Mrs. Haines was born in 
the township of Muncie, a daughter of John and Marv (Henple) Fisher 
natives of Virginia and Ohio respectively and earlv settlers of Muncie' 
The Repubhcan party receives Mr. Haines' active support and co-operation' 
During his life time he has gained many warm personal friends, and all who 
know him have the highest admiration for his good qualities of heart and 
mmd. . 

. /°"'''. ]\- ^''^■''^- Perhaps no other citizen of Delaware countv has 
resided \v.thm its borders during a longer period than has Mr John R 
Hmes He was reared amid its pioneer scenes, and in the olden davs 
attended the primitive log school house with its greased paper windows, and 
they were known as pay or subscription schools. And even the limited 
advantages which these crude schools oi?ered he was permitted to enioy 
during only a few weeks throughout the year, for his services were needed 
at horne on the farm. But the privations, hardships and earnest labor of 
these brave pioneers of Delaware county have resulted in establishing one 
ot tlie foremost commonwealths in America. 

Mr. Hines was born in Randolph countv, Indiana, June 8 iS-8 his 
parents being John and Rachael (Branson) Hines. The father was bom in 
Wh Carolina March 17, 1789, and his death occurred in Monroe township 
ot Delaware county in 1865. He was married in Highland countv, Ohio, to 
a native daughter of Virginia, and her death occurred in 1838, when about 
orty-seven years of age. She bore her husband thirteen children, of whom 

f .V, W J ' '" ^'''^ °^ ^'""^ ""^ '^' °"'-^- -^"e now living. Her 
tather Robert Branson, was an early settler of Highland county. Ohio, and 
his wife before marriage was Beulah Painter. For his second wife Mr 
Hines married Rebecca Branson, a sister of his first wife, and they became 



658 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUKTY 

the parents of four children. From Highland county, Ohio, the family 
moved to Randolph county. Indiana, and in about 1830 came to Delaware 
county, casting in their lot with the first settlers of Perry township. After a 
residence there of about eight years the_\- came to Monroe township, where 
the father spent the remainder of his life, he having been throughout his 
business career a prosperous and well known agriculturist. He was a 
Democrat in his political affiliations up to 1844, when he transferred his 
allegiance to the Whigs and later became a Republican. 

John R. Hines was but a babe of two years when the family became 
residents of Delaware county, so that nearly tlie entire period of his long 
and useful life has been spent within its borders. Remaining in the parental 
home until the age of twenty-one. he then began the battle of life for him- 
self, working first as a farm hand for wages, and later farmed on rented 
land. During the western gold excitement of 185 1 he went to California, 
making the journey via Xew York and the Isthmus to San Francisco, 
spending three )ears in search of the precious metal in the Golden state and 
returning with a capital of three thousand dollars. He made the return 
journey by the same route and reaching Delaware county he purchased his 
present estate of two hundred acres, paying on an average of twenty dollars 
an acre, while the land is now worth at the least one hundred dollars an 
acre. Twenty acres of the tract was a dense woods at the time of the 
purchase, but with the passing years he cleared his land and placed it under 
an excellent state of cultivation, his being now one of the finest estates of 
Center township. 

In 1853 Mr. Hines married .A.bigail Mansfield, the daughter of Charles 
Mansfield, and her death occurred about nineteen years ago. The issue of 
this union was nine children, two of whom died in childhood, and a son, 
Charles, died at the age of forty-nine years. He had married Lydia 
Langdon, and at his death left three children, Chester, Alabel and Ruth. 
Those living are; Hannah, who married Oliver McConnell, and has five 
children, Frank, Jane, Jesse, John and Hendricks : Frank, a prominent farm- 
er of Center township, married Lucy Arniltage and has eight children, Ina, 
Claude. Berle. Grace. John. Nellie, 'Walter and Blanche; George, an agri- 
culturist in Kansas, married Ella Pearson and has five children, Eleanora, 
Edith, Henry L., Albert and Otto ; Eleanor married Eldon Canada and has 
two children, Abigail and Cora; Lucy married Oliver Williams and has two 
children, Walter and Evangeline ; and William, a resident of Muncie, mar- 
ried Catherine Neeley and has three children, Glendola, Hugh and Paul. 
Mr. Hines has eight great-grandchildren. Mrs. Hines was a faithful wife 
and a devoted mother and was a good and worthy member of the Christian 
church. The political affiliations of Mr. Hines are with the Republican party. 
He has devoted his entire business career to the work of the farm, in which 
success has attended his ef?orts, and since 1858 he has resided on the Hines 
homestead in Center township. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COrXTV 659 

A. H. Good, M. D. As a medical practitioner Dr. Good has won 
distinction, and though but a short time has passed since he became a 
resident of Aluncie, he enjoys an extensive and remunerative practice. 
He IS progressive in all his methods, constantly reading and studying and 
keeps in close touch with the spirit of the times. The family havrbeen 
identified with the interests of the Hoosier state during a long period for 
It Mas during his boyhood days that John W. Good, the father of' the 
Doctor, came with his widowed mother to Wayne county, where he 
continued to reside until advancing age made it necessary for him to lay 
aside the active cares of a business life, when he went to Selma and spent 
his remaining days there, his death there occurring in 1900, when he had 
reached the eighty-fourth milestone on the journey of life. In his youno- 
manhood he had married xMornin Howell, a native of Indiana, but oi 
North Carolina parentage. 

Dr. Alonzo H. Good, their son, was bom on the old family home- 
stead in Wayne county, Indiana, September 22, 1843, and was therefore 
but a lad of nineteen years when called upon to lay aside for a time the 
ambitions of his youth and serve his native land, enlisting in 1862 in 
Company D, Sixty-ninth Indiana Infantry, in which he ser\'ed for three 
years. During a part of that time he was a member of the medical 
department, for he had read medicine a short time before entering the 
service. After the close of the conflict Dr. Good found employment in 
a store, but shortly resumed his medical studies under the preceptorship 
of Dr. Clarke, of Economy, Indiana, with whom he remained for two 
years. During the following fourteen years he was engaged in the practice 
of medicine in Bloomingsport, this state, and from 1880 until September, 
1906, was a member of the medical profession in Selina, Indiana. It 
was in the latter year that Dr. Good came to Muncie, and the large practice 
which he has received in the short time which has since elapsed is indicative 
of his skill and ability. 

In 1866 Dr. Good was married to \ancy Green, and after her death 
Miss Sadie B. Personette, a daughter of Dr. Personette, of Wayne county, 
became his wife. By the f^rst marriage there were four children, but only 
two are now living, Lillian May, the wife of Professor Bowers, of Muncie, 
and Edna Luella, now Mrs. Somers, and also a resident of this city. Dr.' 
Good is a member of the County, District, State and American Medical 
Associations. He was honored by the chairmanship of the county at 
different times and by the secretaryship and presidency of the District 
Society. He was appointed and served as a member of the United States 
Pension Board under the Harrison administration, and as an examiner 
for several life insurance companies. 

No.\H D. Berry. For many years Dr. Noah D. Berry has followed 
the practice of medicine in Muncie, and his name has become a household 
word in the homes of this community. His long identification with the 



660 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY • 

city and his prominence here entitles him to more than a passing notice in 
a work of this character, devoted as it is to the portrayal of the lives of 
representative men and women of the county. He was born in Darke 
county, Ohio, June lO, 1854, the son of Elisha and Jane (Perry) Berry, 
natives also of Darke county, Ohio, where the father was well known as a 
farmer and contractor, his death there occurring in 1897, when he had 
reached the age of seventy-four years, while the wife survived until 1902, 
passing away at the age of seventy-nine years. 

Noah D. Berry, the youngest son in a family of six children, tliree 
suns and three daughters, received his literary training in the schools of 
Darke county, and after his education was completed he taught school 
for two years. In that time he had formed the determination to engage 
in the practice of medicine, and as a means to that end began study under 
the preceptorship of Dr. J. E. Fackler, while later he attended the Ohio 
Medical College of Cincinnati. Thus with an excellent foundation on 
which to begin his life work he began practice at Losantville, Indiana, 
W'here for one year he was in partnership with Dr. Franks, now of Muncie. 
After leaving that city Dr. Berry practiced for nine years in Ohio, going 
thence in 1SS5 to Spartenburg, Indiana, and came to Muncie in 1898, and 
has remained here ever since engaged in the practice of his profession. 
His long professional career has been attended with marked success, and 
those who have known him longest esteem him most highly. He is a 
Democrat in his political views, having always taken a deep interest in the 
political and public affairs of his locality, and during his residence in 
Darke county, Ohio, he served for four years as the county coroner. 

In 1877 Dr. Berry was united in marriage to Annie M. Apple, also a 
native of Darke county, born in 1859, the daughter of William Apple, 
who was the father of four children, three sons and a daughter. Dr. Berry 
is deeply interested in the affairs of the city which has been his home for 
so many years, and in private life he has gained that warm personal regard 
which arises from tnie nobility of character, deference for the opinions 
of others, kindliness and geniality. He is a member of many of the city's 
social organizations, and fraternally is coimected with Harmony Lodge of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Red Men, Aknob 
Tribe No. 449, of Muncie, Indiana. 

QuixcE Walling. During a number of years past Mr. Walling has 
boen prominently identified with the public atTairs of Muncie. His entire 
life has been passed in the city and has been one of uniform honor in 
business and fidelity in places of public trust. Bom in the city of Muncie, 
June 1, 1865, he is a son of Joseph A. and Elizabeth (Wachtell) Walling, 
the latter a native of Delaware county. Mr. Joseph A. Walling came to 
Muncie with his father during his boyhood days and became one of the 
well known and prominent merchants of this city, spending the remainder 
of his life here. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTS 661 

After completing his education in the public schools of Muncie, the 
son. Quince Walling, was identified with the bakery business for two years, 
and then became connected with the artificial gas business. In 1886 he 
became associated with the water company, where he began at the verv bot- 
tom of the ladder, gradually working his way upward and familiarizing him- 
self with every detail of the business until he assumed his present high posi- 
tion of superintendent and manager, having discharged the duties of those 
offices during the past sixteen years. In that time many important 
improvements have been instituted in the works, the most recent of which 
is the new and up-to-date filter plant. He has been efficient and faithful 
in the discharge of his duties, making a most competent official and thus 
winning the regard of his fellow citizens. 

In 1889 Mr. Walling was united in marriage to Gertrude A., a 
daughter of Leonard Shick, one of the honored early residents of Delaware 
county, and they have three children, Helen E., Joseph C. and Martha G. 
The family are identified with the Presbyterian church,' and Mr. Walling 
also affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

G. R. Andrews, AI. D. During the years which mark the period of 
Dr. Andrews' professional career he has met with gratifying success, and 
though his residence in Muncie dates back but a few years, he has won 
the good AVill and patronage of many of the leading citizens and families 
of the place. Many years have passed, however, since the family became 
identified with Delaware county, for the paternal grandfather, Daniel H. 
Andrews, was one of its ear!}' pioneers and became well known within 
its limits as a physician. The great-grandfather. Goldsmith Gilbert, was 
also numbered among its earliest residents, and his daughter Mary was 
the first girl born within its borders ; also the first white child born in the 
township. John E. Andrews, the father of our subject, was a native son 
of Delaware county and is now a miller and a well known business man 
of Aluncie. He married Hannah Youngling, a native of Connersville, 
Indiana. 

Dr. Andrews was born in Noble county, Indiana, August 20, 1874, 
but his early literary education was obtained in the public schools of 
Muncie, and his medical training in the Medical College of Indiana, from 
which he graduated with the class of 1897. In 1905 he completed a post- 
graduate course. During seven years and a half he practiced his profession 
in Alount Summit, Indiana, coming thence in 1905 to Muncie, where his 
professional career has been attended with marked success. In April, 
1906, he established a private hospital for surgical cases, which is supplied 
with the most complete and modern appliances and is one of the valued 
institutions of the city. 

In 1897 Dr. Andrews was united in marriage to Elizabeth Haymond, 
a daughter of William Havmond, who was a native of \'irginia but an 



663 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

early resident of Delaware county and a gallant soldier of the Civil war. 
They have one son, Edwin, who was born on the 9th of December, 1899. 
The Doctor is a member of the county, state and national medical societies, 
and also of the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities. 

Lewis L. Perdiue. The Perdiue family is one of the oldest in 
Delaware county and since the I'uv.e of its foundation here its members 
have been noted for their sterling traits of character. Its founder, Rev. 
Abner Perdiue, was the father of Lewis L. and was one of the earliest 
ministers of the Methodist church in this section of Indiana. Fie devoted 
himself without ceasing to the interests of humanity and to the furtherance 
of all good works, and his power and influence upon the early history of 
Delaware county was of no restricted order. A more complete history of 
the family will be found in the sketch of S. B. Perdiue in this volume. 

When Lewis L. Perdiue was but eleven years of age he suffered the 
loss of his honored father, and he then went to live with his cousin, Harvey 
Heath, in Monroe township, Delaware county, where he was employed at 
farm labor. During that time he saved some money and when twenty-one 
years of age engaged in the mercantile business in Cowan, becoming the 
proprietor of a general store, also serving as postmaster under Harrison, 
as the agent for the Lake Erie «S: Western Railroad and also as an express 
agent. The year 1S92 witnessed his arrival in Muncie, where he has 
gained an enviable position in its business circles as a broker and real 
estate dealer, having by honorable and correct methods gained the confi- 
dence of his fellow townsmen. In politics he has been a Republican since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise, though not an active 
partisan and in no sense a politician. 

On the 23d of September, 188S, Mr. Perdiue was united in marriage 
to Laura A. Lykins, a daughter of Philip Lykins, who was born and reared 
in Delaware county. Two children have been born of this union: Lula V., 
whose birth occurred on the loth of December, 1891, and Clarence C, 
born July 25, 1895. The fraternal relations of Mr. Perdiue connect him 
with the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He keeps well informed on the 
issues of the day, both politically and otherwise, and at all times has 
manifested a commendable interest in everything pertaining to the welfare 
and advancement of the city of his adoption. He is a man of genial 
temperament and genuine worth and is popular and respected in all circles. 

Ci-AREXCE W'. De.vrth. Clarence W. Dearth, who recently served 
two terms as prosecuting attorney of Delaware county and is one of the 
leaders among the younger generation of lawyers in this county, was born 
near Lebanon, Warren county, Ohio, September 26, 1872. His parents moved 
to Royerton, in Delaware county, in the fall of 1879, and later to Aluncie. 
Born and reared on a farm, Mr. Dearth got the foundation of his education 
in the common schools of Ro\erton, where he completed the work at the 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 663 

age of fifteen. Among his earlier experiences, work as a farm hand and 
in the Ball Brothers factory at fift_v cents a day gave him the money with 
which he completed his education. By these means he saved a hundred 
dollars, after which he entered school at Valparaiso and pursued a com- 
mercial and scientific course. Now followed another interim during which 
he resorted to wage earning in order to accumulate enough to carry him 
further in the desired training for his profession. For two years he was 
bookkeeper for O. W. Crabbs, and in a similar capacity with T. J. Ault & 
Company for some time : also taught six terms of school in Union township 
and a normal school at Eaton. Returning to Valparaiso he laid the founda- 
tion for the study of law, and in May, 1897, entered the Indiana Law 
School at Indianapolis, where he was graduated in May, 1899. 

On receiving qualifications for practice he formed a partnership with 
George E. Cox, their office being at 2o6,'<2 E. Main street. In November, 
1899, he was elected to the office of prosecuting attorney and by re-election 
held that office four years. Mr. Dearth made a good record while in 
office as representative of the state and people, and as a part of his official 
duties he was called upon to prosecute twelve murderers. He has taken an 
active part in politics during the last ten years, having spoken in nearly 
every schoolhouse in Delaware county. Since retiring from the prosecutor's 
office he has resumed the practice of law, having an office in the Wysor 
block. 

Mr. Dearth married November 15, 1899. He is affiliated with several 
fraternal orders, and Mrs. Dearth is active in club work. 

Amos O. St.\.\lev. The name of Amos O. Stanley is inscribed high 
on the roll of the representatives of the legal profession. His superior 
ability has won him marked success, has crowned him with high judicial 
honors and has placed him among the leaders in his profession. His birth 
occurred in Marion county. West \'irginia, May 11, 1869, his parents 
being Henderson and Margaret ( Banner) Stanley, both also natives of 
that commonwealth. After completing his studies in the common schools 
of the county of his nativity young Stanley became a student in the Fair- 
mont State Normal, and later, in 1898, graduated from the law department 
of the West Virginia University with the degree of LL. B. From the time 
of his graduation until 1906 he practiced his chosen profession in Fairmont, 
West \lrginia, coming at the close of that period to Muncie, he having 
married one of Delaware county's native daughters. Since becoming a 
member of the legal profession Mr. Stanley has been the recipient of many 
political honors, having from 1903 to 1904 served as a representative from 
Marion county in the West Virginia legislature, while for three years he 
was also city attorney of Fairmont, having resigned that position to come 
to Muncie. 

On the 28th of June, 1899, Mr. Stanley was united in marriage to 
Mattic Shuttleworth, a daughter of Hezekiah and Elizabeth ( Felton) 



fiW HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXT\' 

Shuttleworth. and a representative of two of the honored pioneer families 
of Delaware count}'. One little son, ?\Iyron Dwight, has blessed their 
union, his birth occurring on the 8th of July, 1900. Air. Stanley holds 
membership relations with the Fraternal Order of Odd Fellows and is also 
a worthy member of the Methodist church. 

Ira J. YuUNG. An attorney at law, has been a resident of Aluncie 
since 1899, in which year he took up his abode in this city to engage in 
his chosen profession of the law, coming from Ripley county, Indiana, where 
he was born on his father's farm July 31, 1870. His parents were Joab 
and Alargaret E. (Mullan) Young, both natives of Indiana, where the 
father was a successful fanner, stock raiser and dealer. He is now 
deceased, but the wife and mother is living. They resided near the town 
of Osgood and there the son was reared, receiving his elementary education 
in the Osgood schools. Thereafter he was a teacher for four years, 
attending and teaching school alternately, and in the meantime was a 
student in the Danville (Indiana) Normal, from which he graduated in 
the literary department in 1891 and from the law department in 1896. To 
further prepare himself for the profession which he had chosen as a life 
work he entered the law department of the Indiana University, in which 
he graduated in 1889, and immediately thereafter he came to Muncie. 
During the intervening years of his residence here JMr. Young has gained 
an excellent clientage and is fast forging his way to the front in the line of 
his profession. 

He is a Master Masiui, a Red Man, a member of the Knights of 
Pythias fraternity, and in politics is a stanch Republican, active as a worker 
and forcible as a speaker in the support of the men and measures of the 
party. 

Beechek \\'. Bexxett. P'or many years Beecher W. Bennett has 
occupied a conspicuous place among the leading business men of Aluncie. 
He is prominently connected with its manufacturing interests and through 
the channels of trade has contributed not alone to his individual prosperity, 
but to the welfare of Delaware county as well. His birth occurred near 
Frankfort, in Clinton county, Indiana, April i, 1857, his parents being 
Samuel and Nancy (Kyger) Bennett, both also natives of that county. 

Beecher W. Bennett attended the public schools of Clinton county and 
also the \'alparaiso University, and after his graduation from that well 
known institution he taught for a number of years, finally engaging in the 
mercantile business. In 1882 he entered upon his manufacturing enter- 
prises, from that time until 1888 extensively manufacturing tiles in 
Hoopston, Illinois, in company with Byron C. Aloore, but in the latter year 
the firm sought a wider field for their endeavors and came to Aluncie. 
Here they enlarged their operations to include the manufacture of brick, 
and in 1892 Air. Bennett purchased Air. Aloore's interest, and from that 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 665 

time until 1906 was the sole proprietor of the large institution. His career 
has been that of an honorable, enterprising and progressive business man, 
and in all life's relations he has commanded the respect and confidence of 
those with whom he comes in contact. 

On the 19th of September, 1883, Mr. Bennett was united in marriage 
to ^linnie P. Payden, a daughter of William Payden, of Dayton, Indiana, 
and they have one child. Bertha Frances. JNIr. Bennett is prominent in 
the Masonic fraternity, holding membership relations with Muncie Lodge, 
No. 433, F. & A. M., Muncie Council No. 16, R. & S. AL, and Muncie Com- 
mandery, No. 18, K. T., and has filled all the chairs in the order. He is also a 
member of the Indianapolis Consistory, and his religious affiliations are 
with the Presbyterian church. He is a valued factor in business, church, 
fraternal and social circles, where his upright life and genial temperament 
make him a favorite. 

George W. Brooks is the well known proprietor of the Brooks 
Creamery. This prominent industrial institution of Muncie was established 
in June, 1887, and has been in continuous operation since that time. It is 
a modern establishment in all its appointments, furnishing a valuable 
addition to the business interests of Delaware county, and during his career 
it has gained a widespread reputation. The stations of the creamery are 
located at Parker and Gaston, to which milk is brought from a wide extent 
of territory, and' from there is brought to the creamery in Muncie. 

Air. Brooks is a native son of New Jersey, born in Cumberland county 
on the nth of September, 1850, but when only six years of age, at the 
time of his mother's death, he left his native county, and during the fol- 
lowing fourteen years he made his home with an uncle in Chester county, 
Pennsylvania. His parents were Lewis M. and Rachel (Wilson) Brooks, 
and the father spent his life in New Jersey, dying at the age of seventy-four 
years. He was twice married, and by his first wife, the mother of George 
W. Brooks, he had two sons and three daughters. 

During his boyhood days Mr. Brooks received a fair common school 
education, and in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, he learned the trade of 
a miller, but he never followed that calling and instead was engaged in 
agricultural pursuits from 1870 to 1886, first in Cumberland county. New 
Jersey, for two years. In 1873 he came to Delaware county, Indiana, 
where he worked for wages for a time, and after his marriage he bought 
land and lived in Hamilton township until 1885. In that year he took up 
his abode in Aluncie and in the following year established his creamery. 
Success has attended his efiforts from the start and with the passing years 
he has gained prominence in the business world until now he occupies a 
distinctive place among the leading men of affairs in Delaware county. 

Air. Brooks married, in 1880, Naomi, the daughter of Aaron Aloore, 
and her death occurred in 1884, leaving one child, Alary E. In 1894 Air. 
Brooks married Airs. Emma Howell, nee Aloore. He is a Republican in 



666 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

his political affiliations, has fraternal relations with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Red Alen, and both he and his wife are members 
of the High Street Methodist Episcopal church. 

Robert Eldridge Ste\ensox. Although one of the younger members 
of the Delaware county bar, Air. Robert E. Stevenson is fast forging his 
way to the front as an attorney, winning for himself marked distinction in 
one of the highest callings to which man can devote his energies. He has 
been a resident of Muncie since 1904, and during the intervening period 
has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession and has gained 
a desirable clientage. A native of Hendricks county, Indiana, Mr. 
Stevenson was born on his father's farm near North Salem, August 24, 
1874, his parents being Wesley and Mary C. (Dodd) Stevenson, both of 
whom were born in Indiana. The father has devoted his business career 
to farming, and during the Civil war he also served as a valiant soldier in 
the Union cause. 

Robert E. .Stevenson was reared on the homestead farm, attending 
the public schools and graduating from the high school of his native county. 
Predilection led him to the study of law, and after studying for a time 
under the preceptorship and in the office of a practicing lawyer he took 
a law course in the Central Normal School at Danville, Indiana. In 1902 
he was admitted to the bar and has since been admitted to practice in the 
Indiana state supreme court and also in the United States courts. ■ In 
politics he is a thorough Democrat. His fraternal relations connect him 
with the Masonic order, in which he has reached the thirty-second degree, 
and also with the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Stevenson by his own exertions 
and energy has forged his way to the front in all the relations of life. He 
gained his education at his own expense and from an early age has been 
thrown entirely upon his own resources. 

George R. Andrews. The Andrews family is one of the historic ones of 
Delaware county. Many years have passed since they became identified 
with its history and one of its honored representatives was Dr. D. H. 
Andrews, who in an early day practiced his profession here, and his name 
became a noted one in this section of the state. He married Mary J. 
Gilbert, whose father, Goldsmith C. Gilbert, was also numbered among the 
honored early pioneers of the county. 

G. R. Andrews, a son of Dr. D. H. and Mary (Gilbert) Andrews, was 
born in Delaware county, Indiana, on the 2d of Februan.-, 1855. His educa- 
tional training was received in the schools of his native county, and in the 
early part of his business career he became a bookkeeper. In 1879 he engaged 
in business in Muncie, where his efforts have been attended with success, 
and he is numbered among the public-spirited and progressive citizens of 
the olacc. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY (567 

In October, 1879, -^Ir- Andrews married Miss Emerica J., a daughter 
of James L. Daugherty, one of Delaware county's earliest and prominent 
residents. 

R. O. TiDRicK, jM. D. In the medical profession advancement is not 
easily secured; it comes only through true merit. And that Dr. Tidrick 
has secured a large patronage, although he is one of the younger prac- 
titioners, is indicative of his skill and ability. His birth occurred in Carroll 
county, Indiana. March 16, 1873, his parents being R. R. and Alice (Win- 
gard) Tidrick, both also natives of this commonwealth. During a period 
of over forty years the father was engaged in the practice of medicine, 
his name becoming a household word in the community in which he so 
long made his home, but he is now living quietly retired from the cares 
of active labor at his pleasant home in Carroll county. 

After completing his education in the country schools of his native 
county Dr. Tidrick of this review was engaged in teaching for one year 
and in 1891 was in Purdue University, engaged in the study of pharmacy. 
He then entered upon the study of medicine under the able instructions of 
his father, and later, in 1897, graduated from the Medical College of 
Indiana. In the same year of his graduation he entered upon the active 
practice of medicine with his father, continuing his connection with that' 
able and well known practitioner until his removal to Muncie in 1901. 
Here his professional career has been attended with marked success, his 
promptness, his sympathetic nature and his generosity being among his 
chief characteristics, and tho.se who have known him longest esteem him 
most highly. Although he is well versed in the general medical science, 
he makes a specialty of genito urinary diseases and is winning renown in 
his special department. 

L. L. B.ALL, M. D. As a medical practitioner Dr. Ball has won dis- 
tinction and throughout the period of his residence in Muncie he has 
enjoyed an extensive and remunerative practice. He is progressive in all 
his methods, constantly reading and studying, and keeps in close touch with 
the spirit of the times. His birth occurred in Greensburg, Ohio, March 
29, 1850, his parents being Lucius and Maria P. (Bingham) Ball, both 
natives of the Dominion of Canada. During the '30s the father removed 
to Ohio, where he became a prominent and well known contractor and 
builder, and he also spent several years in the South engaged in the same 
line of business. In 1866 he transferred his residence to Canandaigua, 
New York, where his life's labors were ended in death in 1876, at the age 
of sixty-four years. 

Dr. Ball, the eldest of the Ball brothers, who are so prominent and 
well known in the manufacturing and commercial circles of Muncie, 
received his literary training in the Canandaigua Academy, and he after- 
ward completed his medical education in the medical department of the 



66S HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

University of Buffalo, where he was graduated in i8SS. During the year 
following his graduation he practiced his chosen profession in that city 
and then spent two years as interne in the Adrian Hospital of Pennsylvania, 
from whence he returned to Bufifalo. In 1S95 Dr. Ball came to Muncie, 
where he has built up an excellent practice and has won the commendation 
of the public and his professional brethren. In order to keep abreast of 
the many new discoveries which are being constantly made in the profession 
he holds membership relations with the state and national medical societies. 
The marriage of Dr. Ball was celebrated in 1894, when Sarah Rodgers, 
of Buffalo, New York, became his wife, and they hold a high place in the 
social circles of Muncie. They have one daughter, Helen. The Doctor 
is a member of Muncie Lodge, No. 433, F. & A. M. ; of Muncie Com- 
mandery, No. 18, K. T., and Muncie Chapter, No. 30, R. A. M., and has 
taken the thirty-second degree. He is medical director of the Western 
Reserve Life Insurance Company, physician and surgeon to the Ball 
Brothers Manufacturing Compam, and a stockholder in that corporation. 

John McPhee, a prominent representative of the bar of eastern 
Indiana, has for a number of years past been engaged in the practice of 
his profession in Muncie. His birth occurred in Michigan on the 27th of 
January, 1868, his parents being Archibald and Mary (McDonald) McPhee, 
the former a native of Canada and the latter of Scotland. In the early '50s 
the father removed to Michigan, where lie engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
and both he and his wife still reside in that commonwealth. 

After graduating from the common schools of his native locality in 
Michigan, John McPhee, whose name introduces this review, was engaged 
in teaching for five years, and during that time was also engaged in the 
study of law. In 1895 he completed the course and graduated from the 
Detroit Law School, after which he began the practice of his chosen 
profession in Albany, Delaware county, Indiana, while in i8g8 he became 
a citizen of Muncie. His long identification with this city and his promi- 
nence therein has made his name a familiar one in legal circles. He spares 
neither time nor labor in his legal investigation and preparation, and he is 
known as a man of high attainments and practical ability as a lawyer and 
as one who has achieved success in his profession. 

For his wife Mr. McPhee chose May C. Charman, their wedding 
having been celebrated in June, 1903. She is a daughter of James Charman, 
one of the honored pioneers of Delaware county, and by a previous mar- 
riage she was the mother of one daughter, born on the 28th of December, 
1901. One son, John Charman, has been born to Mr. and Airs. McPhee, 
his birth occurring March 12, 1905. For many years Mr. McPhee has 
been a recognized leader in the ranks of the Republican party in Delaware 
county, taking an active part in the work of the campaigns, and he is 
numbered among Muncie's most honored citizens. His fraternal relations 
are with the Independent Order of Red Men. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 669 

Claytox E. Templlk. The prestige of Clayton B. Templer at the 
bar of Delaware county stands in evidence of his ability and his intrinsic 
worth of character. He has used his intellect to the best purpose, and his 
career has been based upon the assumption diat nothing save industry, 
perseverance, sturdy integrity and fidelity to duty will lead to success. 
The birth of Mr. Templer occurred near Portland, in Jay county, Indiana, 
June lo, 1850, a son of George W. and Hannah S. (Nedsker) Templer, the 
former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. It was during the 
pioneer days in the history of Indiana that the parents took up their abode 
in Jay county and the father became a man of prominence in his community. 
He was a leader in the ranks of the local Democracy and as its representa- 
tive served as a justice of the peace, county recorder, county treasurer, 
county commissioner, and in many other positions of trust and responsi- 
bility. He was also a prominent member of the Masonic order and in the 
faith of the Methodist church, of which he had long been a devout and 
faithful member, he passed away in death in 1S82. 

Clayton B. Templer, one of his parents' eight children, obtained his 
literary education in the country schools and the Ridgeville College. His 
highest ambition was to become a lawyer, and to perfect himself in the 
profession he began study under the preceptorship of his brother, James 
N. Templer, at Portland, later, in 1872, coming to Muncie and entering 
the office of Templer & Gregory. In the year of 1873 he was admitted to 
the bar and began the practice of his chosen calling in this city, where, by 
reason of his strong intellectuality, he has risen above the ranks of the 
many and become a leader in thought and action, his influence extending 
not only into the professional but to the political circles as well. 

In the year 1878 Mr. Templer was united in marriage to Clara J. 
Ireland, a daughter of A. C. Ireland, of Delaware county. 

Oscar W. Crabbs. Honored and respected by all, Oscar W. Crabbs 
has for a long period been prominently identified with the public affairs of 
Muncie, and for a number of years past has served as the superintendent 
of Beech Grove Cemetery. He was born near Dayton, Ohio, March 2, 
1852, a son of Benjamin F. and Louisa F. (Folkerth) Crabbs, both also 
natives of the Buckeye state, the paternal family having been founded in 
that commonwealth by the grandfather of Oscar W. Crabbs, Benjamin F. 
Crabbs, who removed thither from his native state of Maryland. It was 
there that the subject of this review received his educational training, and 
there he also followed the tilling of the soil until his removal to Muncie 
in 1884. Here he turned his attention to the grain and hay business, 
continuing in that line of trade for twelve years, on the expiration of 
which period he was made the superintendent of Beech Grove Cemetery, 
the duties of which position he has discharged with promptness and fidelity 
worthy of all commendation. Always an active worker in the interests of 
this city, he served for eight years as a member of its city council, and 



670 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

from 1893 until 1896 had charge of the city parks, while to him belongs 
the honor of instituting many of their most valuable improvements, such 
as the laying out of the drives and roads, etc. He has also made of Beech 
Grove a beautiful city of the dead, with its artificial lakes and excellent 
drives, its beautiful arch at the entrance and the mortuary chapel built of 
field boulders. Being a natural landscape gardener, he is particularly 
fitted for the position he now holds. 

In 1872 Mr. Crabbs was united in marriage to Alay E. Hosier, a 
daughter of Robert and Hannah (Lemon) Hosier, and they have three 
children : Claudia, now Mrs. Charles Parker Sample, Frank D. and 
Robert B. Mr. Crabbs is a member of the Knights of Pythias and Elks 
fraternities, and both he and his wife are worthy members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which he has served as trustee and was a member of 
the building committee when the present edifice was erected. 

Fr.\.\k D. Hai.mb.m'gh. Perhaps no enterprise to which man directs 
his energies brings one into closer touch with the people and the vital 
interests of the time than the labor of the newspaper correspondent. 
Through many years Mr. Haimbaugh has been connected with journalism, 
and he is now the editor of the leading paper of Delaware county, the 
Muncie Press, his labors advancing it to a foremost position in journalistic 
circles. He was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, in September, 1856, a son 
of David and Margaret (Leonard) Haimbaugh. In 1863 the family 
removed from the Buckeye state to Fulton county, Indiana, where the little 
lad was early inured to the duties of the farm. The early educational 
training which he received in the district schools was supplemented by 
attendance at the Rochester high school, in which he was graduated in 
1878. Two years later, in 1S80, he completed the scientific course and 
graduated from the Northern Indiana Normal College at \^alparaiso, 
Indiana, his excellent educational training then enabling him to enter the 
school room as ai teacher, which profession he followed for fifteen years, 
four of them being spent as principal of the Brookston Academy. In 1885, 
without his seeking the office, he was made the superintendent of schools 
for his home county of Fulton, his broad intelligence and full appreciation 
of the value of knowledge as a preparation for life's responsibilities 
enabling him to advance the intellectual status of the community, and he 
gained a high place in the educational circles of the state. Severing his 
connection with the profession, Mr. Haimbaugh in 1887 engaged in the 
insurance business in Iowa and Indiana, but this occupation not proving 
congenial to his tastes he purchased an interest in the Miami county, 
Indiana, Sentinel in 1889, but later sold his interest therein and came to 
Muncie. Here he purchased a half interest in the Herald, but he is now 
serving as editor and proprietor of the Press, one of the leading journals 
of the county. He is a man of scholarly attainments and is a most able 
writer, his style being fluent, his diction correct and his utterances clear. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 671 

Mr. Haimbaugh is also especially active in the support of the Demo- 
cratic party, his influence in political circles being most marked. In 1889 
he was elected doorkeeper for the Indiana house of representatives, to 
which position he was returned in 1891, an honor never before conferred 
upon any man. In 1893 he was elected by a unanimous vote to the office 
of secretary of the Democratic Editorial Association of State, which position 
he filled for a number of years, when he succeeded to one term as president 
of the association. He is now serving as a member of the police board of 
the city of Muncie. During five of the past six years he has been secretary 
of the Commercial Club of Muncie, to which organization he gives time 
and thought. 

The marriage of Mr. Haimbaugh was celebrated in May, 1890, when 
Emma Elginfritz. of Warsaw, Indiana, became his wife. He possesses a 
cordial, genial manner, is uniformly courteous and inspires friendships of 
unusual strength. 

Lf.wi.-; P.\yto.\, M. D. In the early settlement and subsequent history 
of Delaware county the Tayton family have been prominent, and during 
many years one of its representatives, Dr. Lewis Payton, has labored 
unceasingly in the medical profession, striving to do all in his power toward 
the amelioration of the "ills to which flesh is heir," and succeeding to a 
gratifying degree in his noble endeavors. His birth occurred near Aluncie 
Delaware county, on the 7th of September. 185 1, his parents being Gabriel 
and Mary E. (Hedrick) Payton. The father, who was a native of Wayne 
county, Indiana, came to Delaware county in the early year of 1833, first 
taking up his abode in Liberty township, and some time in the '40s moved 
■ to the old homestead, which has ever since been his place of residence, 
^frs. Payton was a native of the Old Dominion state of Virginia, but during 
her girlhood days she was brought by her parents to Delaware county. 
In their family were two sons and two daughters, all of whom are livino- 
in this county. '^ 

Dr. Payton received an excellent literary education in the public schools 
near his old home and in the National Normal School of Ohio, and with 
this valuable training to serve as the foundation for his future life work 
he began the study of medicine under the preceptorship of Dr. Schaub, 
by whom he was prepared to enter the Curtis Physio Medical Institute 
of Marion, Indiana, in which he was graduated in 1883. As he was then 
fully competent to enter the practice of his chosen profession he opened 
an office in Marion, but four years later, in 1885, came to Muncie, where 
he has smce made his home and carried on a general practice. His mem- 
bership in the District Physio Medical Societv enables him to keep more 
fully abreast of the many new discoveries which are constantly beincr made 
m the profession, and in his fraternal relations he is a member ''of the 
Independent Order of Red Men. 

In 1874 Dr. Payton was united in marriage to Agnes J. Beall, whose 



672 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

birth occurred in West Mrginia, but at the time of the close of the Civil 
war she came with her father, Samuel Beall, to Delaware county, Indiana. 
Dr. and J^Irs. Payton have become the parents of three children: Laura, 
now Mrs. Bowen ; Volney W. ; and Mary Etta, now Mrs. Meeks. 

Charles E. Lambert, the present trustee of Center township, has 
been a resident of Delaware county throughout his entire life, for his birth 
occurred near Daleville on the 20th of July, 1865, his parents being John X. 
and Nancy (Graham) Lambert, who in an early day in the history of the 
county took up their abode within its borders, and the name has hence- 
forth been prominently identified with its annals. After obtaining his 
education in the public schools the son Charles entered the teacher's pro- 
fession, continuing in the task of instnicting the young for seventeen years, 
his broad intelligence, scholarly attainments and his full appreciation of 
the value of knowledge making him one of the most able educators of 
the county. While thus engaged he was also for five years connected with 
the mail service in Aluncie, teaching school during the winter months and 
carrying the mail in the summer. Throughout his entire life he has been 
an efficient public worker and was made the township trustee, entering 
upon the duties of the office on the ist of January, 1905. In 1906 he 
became associated with T. G. Groman in the undertaking business under 
the firm name of the Lambert-Groman Company, and he is its secretary and 
treasurer. 

In 1887 Mr. Lambert was united in marriage to Olga Noftsinger, 
also a native of Delaware county, but after a happy married life of 
eighteen years the loving wife was called to the home beyond, leaving 
four children: Opal, who was born March 26, 1888; Inez, born May 31, 
1895; Nettie, born September 15, 1897, and Mark Beveredge, born 
November 9, 1899. JMr. Lambert married, February 28, 1907, Lisette A. 
Smith, of Indianapolis, who was for some years principal of Riverside 
school in Muncie. He is a worthy member of the Masonic order, affiliating 
with Delaware lodge, also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is a member of the United Brethren church. He is deeply interested 
in the affairs of the county, which has been his home throughout his entire 
life, has always advocated the measures which have advanced its welfare 
and has labored for its improvement and progress. 

Charles A. Van Matre. For many years the name of Charles A. 
Van Matre has been inseparably interwoven with the history of the educa- 
tional interests of Muncie. His broad intelligence, scholarly attainrjents 
and his full appreciation of the value of knowledge as a preparatiork for 
life's responsibilities make him one of the ablest educators who have pro- 
moted the interests of the schools of Delaware county. Born in Harrison 
township, Delaware county, December 31, 1869, he is a son of Oliver Perry 
and Amelia (Brandon) \''an Matre, both also natives of this countv. It 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 673 

was in the very earliest epoch in the history of the county that the Van 
Matre family was established within its borders, Grandfather \'an Matre hav- 
ing moved hither from Ohio in the late '20s and settled in Mt. Pleasant town- 
ship, where he became an extensive agriculturist. At the time of the 
organization of the county he was made its clerk and recorder, and his 
name was prominently associated with its early history. Oliver Perry 
spent his entire life in the county which his father had helped to organize 
and died in 1888. 

After attending the public schools of his native locality Mr. Charles A. 
Van Matre entered the state university, but previously had taught school, 
and after his return from college again entered the profession. In 1897 
he was elected the county superintendent of schools for Delaware county, 
where his ever broadening influence has been of incalculable value. He 
has been prominent in the movement for the consolidation of schools, 
whereby small schools shall be abandoned and wagons provided to convey 
the children to centrally graded or high schools. His labors are permeated 
by broad humanitarian principles, which render them a source of assistance 
to his fellow men, whereby he advances the scheme of our human existence, 
— the constant uplifting and betterment of the race. 

In 1904 jMr. Van Matre was married to Miss Wilmina Wallace, a native 
of Peru, Indiana, and their only child, a daughter, Amelia, was born on 
the 27th of February, 1906. ;\Ir. Van Matre is a member of Delaware 
lodge of the Masonic order, and of the Knights of Pythias and the Odd 
Fellows fraternities. He is also a member of the Delaware county bar. 

Ralph S. Gregory. Throughout his entire professional career, which 
covers an extended period, Mr. Ralph S. Gregory has practiced at the bar 
of Delaware county, and his high standing as a legal practitioner has been 
won through earnest labor. His reputation is a merited tribute to his 
ability. Delaware county is therefore proud to claim him among her native 
sons. His birth occurred on a farm February 28, 1846, his parents being 
Samuel and Mary (Braddock) Gregory. They were married in Pennsyl- 
vania and removed theiice to Indiana, becoming pioneer settlers of Xiles 
township, Delaware county, and the farm on which they located is yet 
owned by two of their sons, Ralph and Samuel. There the parents reared 
their children and lived for many years, the father dying when he had 
reached the sixty-ninth milestone on the journey of life, and the mother 
was sixty-five years of age when called to the home beyond. Their 
children were : William, of Kansas ; Margaret, of Albany, Indiana ; 
Samuel, a resident of Delaware county ; John ; Frank ; Ralph S. ; and Mary, 
who died in her youth. The father was a successful farmer, and in the 
early days voted with the Whigs, later transferring his relations to the 
Republican party, and both he and his wife were worthy members of the 
Methodist church. 



GH HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

r\Ir. Gregory of this review received his elementary education in the 
country scliools and when fifteen years of age entered the high school of 
Muncie, where he completed tlie course and then became a student in 
Wabash College. In 1862. however, his studies were interrupted by his 
call to war, and he entered the arni\- as a private in Compan}- B, Eighty- 
fourth Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, tlis enlistment took place on the 8th 
of August, 1862, and he remained in the service practically two years, 
when on account of failing healih he was honorably discharged at Shell- 
mond, Tennessee, having in the meantime attained to the rank of orderly 
sergeant. His health was regained soon after his return home and he 
re-entered W'abash College, remaining there through the junior year, when 
he matriculated in Asbury, now De Pauw, University, and graduated with 
honors in the class of 1S67. The year following this event Air. Gregory 
was made superintendent of the high school of Huntington, Indiana, and at 
the same time had charge of a classical school at Wabash, this state. While 
pursuing his profession of teaching, Mr. Gregory had determined on the 
practice of law as a life work and was admitted to the bar at Muncie in 
1868. Locating here he began what has terminated in a successful career 
as a law\er, so determined by his contemporaries and the general public. 
As a criminal lawyer he has won an enviable reputation. 

In his political association Mr. Gregory was a Republican up to the 
year of 1892, when on account of the tarifT issue, he believing the tariff 
laws should be revised, he withdrew his support therefrom. He has never 
advocated free trade, but "taritt for revenue" is a doctrine which has won 
his hearty approval. At one time he served as county superintendent of 
the Delaware schools, but beyond this he has never held an office of much 
importance. For many years he has been a prominent factor in the 
fraternal circles, being a Knight Templar Mason and a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men and other societies. 
He was elected at Detroit, Michigan, Great Incohonee of the United States. 

In 1880 Mr. Gregorv- married Miss Anna C. Madden, who was born 
in Piqua, Ohio, in 1863, receiving her educational training in the city of 
her nativity and becoming an accomplished musician. She is a daughter 
of Timothy C. Madden. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Gregory have been born 
two children: Walter Leon, a graduate of the Chicago L'niversity, and 
Florence Madden, the wife of Attorney William Thompson, of Muncie. 

Wedsiek S. Richev. For over thirty-five years Webster S. Richey has 
resided within the borders of Delaware county, and in that time has won a 
place among its best and most favorably known citizens. He is also con- 
nected with one of the leading industrial concerns of the county, the Ball 
Brothers Glass Alanufacturing Company. Mr. Richey was born in Preble 
county, Ohio, March 11, 1848, a son of Samuel W. and Sarah C. (Fleming) 
Richey, natives of Ohio, of the counties of Butler and Preble respectively. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 675 

llie father was for many years a prominent merchant of Xew Paris, Ohio, 
and his death occurred in iSSi, at the age of seventy-six years. 

^^'ebster S. Richey, the youngest of his eight children, and with his 
sister the only surviving members of the family, was reared in the village 
of Xew Paris, Ohio, there receiving a fair common-school education. When 
but sixteen years of age. on the ist of April, 1864, he enlisted for service in 
the Civil war, entering the Eighth Ohio Battery, Light Artillery, and at the 
close of his fifteen months" service he received a serious injury while mount- 
mg a cannon. This was about the time of the close of the conflict, and 
receiving his honorable discharge he returned home and for some time 
thereafter was engaged^ in the drug business in New Paris. In 1867 he 
accepted a position as bookkeeper with a wholesale grocery house in Rich- 
mond, Indiana, there remaining for three years or until 1870, when he came 
to Muncie and again entered the drug business, in which he formed a part- 
nership with his cousin, W. E. Richey, the firm name becoming Richey & 
Richey. From 1871 to 1876 he was agent for the American Express c'om- 
pan}- at Muncie, also joint agent for the same company and the United 
States Express Company from 1876 to 1880, from 1880 to 1881 served as 
freight agent for what is now the Big Four Railroad Company, for one year 
thereafter was bookkeeper for Mr. James Boyce, from 1882 to 1887 was 
route agent for the United States Express Company through Indiana and 
Ohio and from 1887 to 1889 was again the bookkeeper for Air. Boyce. 

In 1890 Air. Richey was chosen the Republican candidate for auditor of 
Delaware county, and elected to the office served satisfactorily for four years, 
but having made the race for the office on the one term promise did not 
become a candidate for re-election. In 1894 he was a prominent candidate 
for the Republican nomination for state auditor, and although he received 
votes from as many as fifty-one of the ninety-two counties in the delegate 
convention of his party he failed of nomination after a creditable race. For 
some five years thereafter he was an accountant for the Chosen Friends, a 
fraternal insurance order with headquarters at Indianapolis. In 1900 he 
accepted a position with the Ball Brothers Glass Manufacturing Company at 
Muncie as an accountant, of which he is the present incumbent. 

Mr. Richey married, October 15, 1872, Miss Julia Thomas, a daughter 
of Mr. J. Harvey and Jerusha Thomas, of Dayton, Ohio. Their three 
children are Albert S., Reba and Paul, the eldest being a graduate of Purdue 
University and now professor of electric railroad engineering in the Wor- 
cester (Massachusetts) Pohtechnic Institute. Both Mr. and Mrs. Richey 
are members of the Presbyterian church. He also has membership relations 
with Williams Post, Xo. 78, Department of Indiana, G. A. R., and with the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has reached the Thirty-second degree, and 
affiliates with the Knights Templar, the Scottish Rite and the Mystic Shrine, 
Murat Temple, Indianapolis. His fraternal relations also connect him with 
the order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 74, and with the Independent Order 
-rf Red Men, No. 30, and he is a member of the Commercial Club of Muncie. 



676 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

AxTOX C. Hei'el. perhaps best known as "Tony Hefel," is a civil engi- 
neer of wide and favorable reputation. He is a native son of Austria, born 
in the town of Feldkirk, province of Voralberg, April 8, 1844. After attend- 
ing the common schools of his native town and also pursuing a four years' 
course in a normal school, he entered the well known university of Munich, 
Bavaria, from which he graduated in 1864. Very early in life Mr. Hefel 
turned his attention to mechanics and for some time after leaving the 
university he was employed as a builder of water works in Bavaria, while 
for two years he also acted as superintendent of construction at Augsberg. 
In 1866, when he had reached the age of twenty-three years, he came to the 
United States, first locating in Cincinnati, Ohio, where for six years he was 
employed as draughtsman for the city water works, and during a similar 
period he served as engineer and assistant superintendent for the same. In 
1877 he transferred his residence to Vandalia, Illinois, where he was engaged 
as engineer in chief for the Kaskaskia bottom drainage district, his duties 
being to make surveys and estimates for dredging, draining and reclaiming 
a large tract of land. During the time he was thus employed, continuing 
until the year 1886, he was twice elected surveyor of Fayette county, Illinois. 

It was at the close of this period, in 1886, that Mr. Hefel came to 
Aluncie, at once accepting a position with the American Water Works & 
Guarantee Company, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, as superintendent of con- 
struction and engineer in building water works and plants at Xew I'hila- 
delphia, Ohio; Huntington, West Virginia; Sheboygan, Wisconsin; 
Aleridian, Mississippi ; and Wichita, Kansas. Thus in various cities of the 
country he has constructed water works, built race tracks and sewers, so 
much so that perhaps no other civil engineer in the entire country is wider 
or better known than he. He drafted the first map of the city of Muncie 
and vicinity in 1888, showing the location of oil wells, gas wells and other 
valuable points. In 1891 he entered the employ of the W'estern Improvement 
Company, of Rochester, New York, and for this company laid out and drew 
a map for West Muncie. In 1895 he built the Cambridge City, Indiana, 
Water Works, in 1896 the ^liddletown, Indiana, Water Works and in 1902 
he built the one-half mile race track at the State Fair Grounds, in 1903 the 
track at Montpelier and in 1905 the Arranum, Ohio, Water Works and 
Electric Light Plant. 

In 1868, in Cincinnati, Mr. Hefel married Miss Magdalena Good, who 
bore him two children, Carrie and Ermine. Carrie married Claude Beaton, 
of Nome, Alaska, and Ermine married George Whitehead, of Matthews, 
Indiana. The wife and mother died in 1881, and in the same year he mar- 
ried Miss Kate Boekley, one child, Hattie, being born of the second union. 
She married Albert Gough, of Muncie. 

John Osborn Lewellex. For many years the name of John Osbom 
Lewellen was inseparably interwoven with the history of the educational 
interests o'f Delaware county, and during the past seven years he has also 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 677 

been a careful member of the legal profession. Delaware county claims him 
among her native sons, his birth occurring in Smithfield on the 31st of July, 
1852. His father, Zerah M. Lewellen, was born in West Virginia, but when 
a lad came with his parents to Delaware county, the family home being 
established on Campbell's creek, that location having been chosen on account 
of the richness of the land. After his marriage he removed to Smithfield, 
where for several years he followed the wagon maker's trade, after which 
he was engaged in farming in Liberty and Harrison townships some years 
and then retired from agricultural pursuits. He spent his last years at 
Shideler, where he died at the age of seventy-two years. The mother of our 
subject was known in maidenhood as Sarah A. Truitt, and was a native of 
Delaware county. 

John O. Lewellen received an excellent literan.- education in the public 
schools of his native locality, which he attended until his twentieth year. 
After teaching one term of school he then entered the Methodist College at 
Xenia, Ohio, being subsequently a student in the Holbrook school at 
Lebanon, that state, and in 1877 a graduate from the scientific department 
of the Northern Indiana Normal College at Valparaiso, Indiana, from which 
he received the degree of B. S. He added to the thoroughness of his 
pedagogical education by taking a four years' course at the famous Chau- 
tauqua school. For a decade thereafter Mr. Lewellen taught in Delaware 
county and for fourteen years was its superintendent of schools, finally 
resigning the position named to enter the legal profession. His broad 
intelligence, scholarly attainments and thorough preparation for ever)- duty 
which fell to him made him a most able educator and honored citizen. 
Although he attained a brilliant and substantial position in the field of 
education, Mr. Lewellen finally chose the law as his life profession, pursuing 
his studies in the Indiana Law School of Indianapolis and being admitted 
to the bar in 1900. He is an earnest and tireless worker, and has applied the 
strength of an already mature and trained mind to the mastery of the 
various departments of the law, by which he has acquired high standing as a 
general practitioner. 

The marriage of Mr. Lewellen was celebrated on the 25th of December, 
1877, to Miss Huldah Eleanor Crampton, and the three children born to 
them have been Albert Ross, Harry Crampton and Wendell Gladstone. Mrs. 
Lewellen is a native of Harrison township, Delaware county, daughter of 
Mahlon and Ruth Jane (Crane) Crampton, who were born in Ohio and 
became early settlers of this county. Here, as well as in the schools of 
Franklin, Ohio, she received her education and also txx)k a four years' 
Chautauqua course, and before marriage taught several years in the public 
schools. Mr. and Mrs. Lewellen are both members of the High Street 
Methodist Episcopal church, the latter being a teacher in the Sunday school 
and also, for many years, an earnest and effective worker in the field of 
home and foreign missions. Mrs. Lewellen is, further, an influential member 
of the McRea Club, of which she has served as president. 



678 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Mr. Lewellen's political affiliations are with the Republican party, while 
fraternally he is a member of Delaware Lodge, A. F. & A. ^L, the Knights 
of Pythias and the Independent Order of Red Men. He has long served as 
a class leader in the Jvlethodist church, and is widely popular and highly 
honored in the count}' which has so long been his home, and of which he is 
so worthy a representative of the pioneer element. 

Cii.VRLE.'^ W'lLLARD Xeiswaxger. The gentleman whose name intro- 
duces this review and the leading artist of Muncie, possesses talent which 
places his name high on the roll of the foremost photographers of Delaware 
county. His birth occurred in Cambridge City, Indiana, September 3, 1S65, 
his father. George Neisw^anger, having removed hither with his father, 
Winson T. Xeiswanger, from his native state of Maryland. He established 
his home on a farm near Cambridge City, and was there engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits until his removal to Delaware county in 1873, settling two 
and a half miles northeast from Muncie. There he was engaged in the 
tilling of the soil until an advanced age, and he now resides in this city. 
His wife bore the maiden name of Mary A. Gebhart, and was a native 
daughter of Pennsylvania, from whence she removed to Wayne county, 
Indiana, with her father, John Gebhart. 

Charles W. Neiswanger, a son of these honored Indiana pioneers, entered 
the teacher's profession after completing his education in the county schools, 
thus continuing for three tenns. But that genius as an artist which he has 
displayed in later life to such a marked degree was early expressed, and 
learning the photographic art, opened a studio in 1889, where he has been 
very effective in placing the art on a higher plane. He is a member and 
trustee of the Daguerre Memorial Institute, at Winona Lake. Indiana, 
formed for the purpose of promoting the highest interest in photography, 
and in many ways he has proved a valued member of his profession. He is 
also president of the State Photographic Association. 

The marriage of Mr. Neiswanger was celebrated in 1896, ^liss Jennie 
F., a daughter of James McCormick, one of the early pioneers of Delaware 
county, then becoming his wife. Their only child is a son Robert, born 
November 8, 1897. Mr. Neiswanger has fraternal relations with the 
Knights of Pythias, of which he is the present chancellor commander, and 
is also a worthy member of the Methodist church. 

Walter F. Pie^rce. One of the leading and influential citizens of 
Muncie is Walter F. Pierce, whose birth occurred in Tipton county, Indiana, 
Alay 5, 1854. The Pierces are an old and honored family of English 
descent, the great-grandfather of Walter F. having been its founder in this 
country, and his son Thomas was-a-fuU-cousin of President Franklin Pierce. 
Calloway Pierce, a son of the latter and the father of Walter P., was a 
native of Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Virginia and in 1832 
to Delaware county, Indiana, where his father entered land from the gov- 




'^^n^-Mut 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COVXl'Y 681 

eriiment in Salem township. In 1850 Calloway Pierce removed to Tipton 
county, Indiana, where he was engaged in carpentering and contracting in 
partnership with E. M. Sharp, and to these gentlemen belong the honor of 
having built most of the town of Sharpsville. Returning to Delaware 
county in 1859 ^^r. Pierce resumed his farming operations in Salem town- 
ship, and is now living there at the good old age of eighty-five years. In 
his early manhood he had married Ruanna Goodpasture, a native of Ohio, 
and they occupy a prominent place among the early and honored pioneer 
citizens of Delaware county. 

After completing his education in the public schools of this county 
\\ alter F. Pierce turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, and was 
numl)ered among the leading farmers of Center township until 1900, in that 
year coming to Muncie and embarking in the real-estate business, in which 
his undertakings have been fortunate for the most part, and in 1906 he 
was elected a justice of the peace. He votes with the Republican party, 
and is an active worker in its ranks. 

On the nth of January, 1880, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Pierce and Miss Sarah Icenogle. She was born in Ohio, the daughter of 
John Icenogle, and has become the mother of five children : Donata. now 
Mrs. Kierstead, of St. Paul, Minnesota; Lena E., now Mrs. Keltner and a 
resident of Muncie : J. Otis, also a resident of St. Paul : Mattie F. : and 
Walter Stuart. In his fraternal relations Mr. Pierce is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias fraternities. 

F. L. W.\CHTELL. Occupying an enviable position in the business circles 
of Muncie, F. L. Wachtell is honored and respected by all, not alone on 
account of the success he has achieved, but also by reason of the honorable, 
straightforward business policy he has ever followed. His birth occurred in 
Winchester, Indiana, July 5, 1863, but during his early boyhood days he was 
brought by his father, Calvin S. Wachtell, whose sketch also appears in this 
work, to Muncie, where he obtained his education in the city public schools. 
After the completion of the training which was to fit him for life's activities, 
he engaged in business with his father, this being in 1882, and he now has 
practically the entire charge of the large concern, for the senior Mr. 
W'achtell has in the main retired from an active business life. Although he 
entered upon a business already established, in conducting this and enlarging 
its scope Mr. F. L. Wachtell has so directed his efforts that its interests 
have grown apace with the progress which dominates the central states, and 
he is numbered among the leading business men and public spirited citizens 
of Delaware county. 

In 1889 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Wachtell and Miss Leonora 
Deitsch. She is a daughter of Philip Deitsch, of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he 
served as superintendent of the police for eighteen years. Mr. Wachtell is 
a member of the order of Elks, the Odd Fellows and the Kriights of Pvthias. 



683 HISTORY OF DELAW^ATiE COUNTY 

Charles E. Xihart. When professional success is attained in any 
instance it may be taken as certain that such measure of success has been 
thoroughl}- merited. Dr. Charles E. Xihart, although one of the younger 
members of the profession, has gained distinction in the line of his special 
calling, that of an optician, has been an earnest and discriminating student, 
and holds a position of due relative precedence among the ophthalmic prac- 
titioners of Delaware county. The Doctor was born in Jay county, Indiana, 
July 15. 1872, a son of David H. and Diantha E. (Stansbur}-) Nihart, the 
fomier a native of Delaware county, born in 1840, and the latter of Jay 
county, Indiana. The paternal grandfather, Philip Xihart, was a native 
son of the fatherland, but in early life he left his German home and came 
to the United States, and for many years was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits four miles southeast of Muncie. There his son David also fol- 
lowed the tilling of the soil for a time, but later turned his attention to 
the drug business, and is now one of the leading druggists of Albany, 
Indiana. During the Civil war he oftered his services to his country's 
cause and served as a soldier in the Ninth Indiana Cavalry. 

After completing his education in the schools of Delaware county, 
Indiana, and Lima, Ohio, Dr. Charles L. Nihart entered upon the study of 
medicine, but a short time afterward decided to devote his entire attention 
to the diseases of the eye and accordingly entered the Indiana Ophthalmic 
School, in which he graduated in September, 1895. Coming thence to 
Muncie, he entered the professional circles of this city, where he has 
gradually worked his way into the front ranks. He has also found time 
to devote to the public life of his adopted city, and for four years served 
as a member of the city council. 

In 1895 occurred the marriage of Dr. Nihart and Dora A. Lykens, 
she having been born in Randolph, Indiana. Their only child, Bessie 
May, was born on the 4th of June, 1906. The Masonic fraternity finds in 
Dr. Nihart a valued and worthy member, his relations being with Delaware 
lodge, and he is also a member of Welcome lodge of the Knights of 
Pythias. His religious affiliations are with the High Street Methodist 
Episcopal church. The Doctor is a young man of exceptional attainments, 
and all who know him have the highest admiration for his many excellent 
characteristics. 

WiLLiA.M T. J.\XNEV, one of the leading merchants and business men 
of M'uncie, is a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of 
Delaware county, and his birth occurred within its borders, in Washington 
township, on the 17th of April, 1849. His father, Joseph Janney, claimed 
Ohio as the state of his nativity, his birth occurring in Stark county 
November 21, 181 1, but in the early year of 1837 he came with his father, 
Amos Janney, to Delaware county. They established their home in Wash- 
ington township, where Joseph Janney followed agricultural pursuits until 
his busy and useful life was ended in death, passing away on the 19th of 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 683 

November, 1S76. In his early manhood he had married Sarah Ha}den, 
who was born in Pennsylvania March i, 1S12. and her death occurred on 
the 19th of January, 1890. In their family were seven children, four sons 
and three daughters, of whom one is deceased, and the remainder all reside 
in Delaware county. One son, John H., laid down his life on the altar 
of his country during the Civil war. He served as a member of Company 
B, Thirty-sixth Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, his military career covering 
a period of four years. At the battle of Atlanta he was wounded and 
taken prisoner, suffering all the horrors of a seven months' confinement in 
Andersonville prison, and after his release was sent to Vicksburg, where 
he w'as a passenger on the fatal ship Sultana at the time of its terrible 
destruction. He was a brave and loyal soldier and bravely met his death 
at the post of duty. 

W. T. Janney, whose name introduces this review, is indebted to the 
public schools of Washington township and the Muncie high school for his 
educational training. With his education completed, he followed agri- 
cultural pursuits until 1893, when he came to Muncie and embarked in the 
mercantile business, in the sale of implements and buggies. He has built 
up a large and lucrative business, which places him in the front rank in 
the industrial circle of Muncie, and in addition he yet owns his farms in 
Washington and Harrison townships. 

On the 19th of June, 1873, ^I''- Janney was united in marriage to 
Hannah E. McCreery, a member of one of the oldest families of Delaware 
county, both her father, Thomas, and her grandfather, Samuel McCreery, 
having been numbered among its honored residents. Six children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Janney, three sons and three daughters, Carlton 
R., Stanton E., Florence E., Lester H., Beulah M. and Ada. Mr. Janney is 
a member of the order of Ben Hur, and both he and his wife are valued and 
consistent members of the High Street Methodist Episcopal church, as are 
also all of their children, with the exception of Stanton, who is a Baptist. 

J.\MES Emmett Eber was born on his father's farm in Center township, 
Delaware county, April 24. 1850. His father, Hener Eber, was a native 
son of the fatherland of Germany, but when twenty-eight years of age he 
came to America and took up his abode in Muncie, where for a short time 
he was interested in a distillery. He then purchased a tract of land on what 
is now known as the Hathaway pike, in the northwest corner of center 
township, and, moving to this place, turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, and ever afterward to the day of his death he was practically and 
successfully engaged in farming. He accumulated a good estate, and was 
numbered among the most prominent farmers and business men of Delaware 
county. It was his good fortune to be able to provide well for hi? children, 
whom at his death he left in very comfortable circumstances, for during his 
busy and useful life he had accumulated a valuable estate of upward of three 
hundred acres. 



684 HIST()RV OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

During his residence in Muncie Mr. Eber married Miss Susannah Clark, 
and they became the parents of the following children: Jane, deceased; 
William H., who died during his service in the Civil war ; Mary, the wife of 
Mr. A. Drunim, of California: John, deceased: James Emmett, the subject 
of this review : George : and Catherine. Mrs. Eber was called to the home 
beyond on the 20th of May, 1862, a communicant of the Catholic church and 
a lady of many estimable qualities of heart and mind. For a second wife Mr. 
Eber chose Nancy Leland, who died in 1879, without issue. Mr. Eber had 
preceded her in death about three years, dying on the 26th of January, 1876. 
His religious affiliations were with the Presbyterian church, and in politics he 
endorsed the principles of the Democratic party. 

James E. Eber, who has won a foremost place among the prominent ag- 
riculturists and best-known citizens of Delaware county, has followed farm- 
ing as a life occupation, and has resided in this county since the day of his 
birth. He grew to manhood on the parental homestead, and in the mean- 
time gained a limited educational training in the country schools. His boy- 
hood days were spent in assisting his father in the work of the farm, and 
he remained in the parental home until his father's death. He married 
Tabitha Scott on the 22d of June, 1872, and the lady of his choice was born 
in Adams county, Ohio, August 8, 1852, a daughter of David and Sarah 
(Ham) Scott, natives also of that commonwealth and respectively of Scotch 
and Irish descent. This union was blessed by the birth of the following 
children. Emma, who died in 1890; Ida, a bright young lady, who died 
July 7, 1907, while seeking renewed health in California ; Lee, a resident 
of Bridgeport, Illinois; Stella, Catherine, Pearl and Earl. The wife and 
mother was called to her final reward on the 14th of December, 1896. She 
was a faithful wife and a devoted mother and was loved by all who knew 
her. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is also Mr. 
Eber. He has membership relations with the Improved Order of Red Men, 
and in politics is a Democrat, but has paid little attention to party affairs. 
He has always been a diligent worker and has devoted his time and efforts 
to farming. His estate comprises one hundred and ninety acres of fine 
farming land, and the family residence is a modern and attractive home. 

LIoRTENCE L. Oliver, superintendent of the Aluncie Belt railroad, gen- 
eral yardmaster of the Lake Erie & Western and in charge of the opera- 
tions of the Muncie & Western railroad, has made his home in this city 
since 1896. Xo railroad man in this community is more generally known, 
and his relations with these large corporations have won him a high posi- 
tion in the business world. ■ His birth occurred in Athens county, Ohio, 
April 15. 1856, a son of Leven R. and Elizabeth (Adair) Oliver, both of 
whom also claimed that commonwealth as the place of their nativity. The 
father was a merchant and farmer near Athens, and the little son therefore 
devoted the early years of his life to the work of the farm and the store, 
in the meantime receivinsr his education in the common schools. When he 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 685 

had reached the age of eighteen years he started out in hfe for himself, going 
from his home to Texas, where for four years he was engaged in farming 
and stock-raising. At the close of that period he returned to Ohio and en- 
tered upon what has since terminated in a successful railroad career, this 
being in the year 1878, and his first employment was as a freight brakeman 
on the Hocking \'alley railroad. After eighteen months in that capacity he 
was promoted to the position of a freight conductor, and for eight years 
he continued his relations with that company. He then entered the employ 
of the Columbus & Eastern, now the Zanesville & Western railroad, with 
which he remained for about eight years, first as a freight and later as a 
passenger conductor and trainmaster, during all this time living in Colum- 
bus, Ohio. At the close of this period JMr. Oliver entered the employ of 
the Lake Erie & Western railroad in the capacity of general yardmaster 
at Tipton, Indiana, but shortly afterward, in October, 1896, he was trans- 
ferred to Muncie, which has ever since continued as the scene of his opera- 
tions, and where he is numbered among the best citizens, esteemed alike for 
his sterling worth of character and his activity in the business world. 

Mr. Oliver married, in 1886, Eannie Howell, of Fostoria, Ohio. He 
is a member of the Railroad Conductors' Fraternity and is an active factor 
in the social as well as the business life of Muncie. 

J. Monroe Fitch. In an enumeration of those men of Delaware 
county who have won honor and public recognition for themselves tlie name 
of J. Monroe Fitch takes precedence. As the record of a young man it is 
one of which he may be justly proud, for he has successfully surmounted 
obstacles and has gained recognition through intrinsic worth of character. 
He is a native son of the Southland, born in the Bluegrass state of Ken- 
tucky on the I2th of July, 1872, a son of Sampson and Dorcas (Daniels) 
Fitch, also natives of that commonwealth. When fourteen years of age J. 
Monroe left home, and before he had reached his twenty-first year had 
worked in eighteen states at various employments. Up to that time he had 
received but ten months of schooling, and thus he may be truly classed 
among the self-educated as well as self-made men. Realizing, however, the 
value of an education as the foundation for life's activities, he then went 
to \'alparaiso, Indiana, where he worked his way through the university, 
spending five years in school there, and during that time began the study 
of law. His legal studies were completed in the Chicago Law School, 
where he received his diploma, and in 1898 came to Muncie to actively en- 
gage in the practice of his chosen profession. He associated himself in 
practice with C. A. McGonagle, and the firm of McGonagle & Fitch has 
become well known in legal circles throughout this section of the state. 
From his early youth Mr. Fitch has been a politician, and in November, 
1mo6, he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature, and 
although his legislative career has been brief, it has been marked with dis- 
tinction, and higher political honors undoubtedly await him. 



686 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

On leaving the Chicago Law School Mr. Fitch joined the First Ilhnois 
Cavalry for service in the Spanish-American war. He was sent to Chicka- 
mauga, and was discharged on the 3d of November, 1898, with the rank 
of corporal. He is a member of Delaware Lodge No. 46, F. & A. ^L, of 
which he is a past master, and also of the Independent Order of Red Men. 

Mr. I'itch and Lula Parkison, of Yorktown, Indiana, were married 
November 21, 1907. 

George L. Haymond, assistant postmaster at Muncie, was born in 
Delaware county, Indiana, November 16, 1868, on his father's farm just 
south of Muncie. His parents were William A. and Mary (Louthain) 
Haymond, the former of whom was born near Palatine, West Virginia, in 
1840. He was a brother of Mr. H. C. Haymond, whose biography is re- 
ferred to for further family history. During his early manhood William 
A. Haymond came to Delaware county, arriving here only a short time 
before the outbreak of the Civil war. In the first year of that dreadful con- 
flict he tendered his services in defense of the Union, enlisting in the Second 
Indiana Cavalry, and served to the close of the war. During much of his 
army career he held the rank of orderly, and was present at all the engage- 
ments of his command. "Returning from the war at its close, he settled on 
a farm just south of Muncie, where he carried on agricultural pursuits 
with success up to the time of his death in 1880. His wife survives him 
and now resides in Muncie, where she removed soon after his death. Their 
marriage was solemnized in the year 1864, and they became the parents of 
the following named children : Warren G., who died at the age of twenty- 
three years; George L., the subject of this personal mention; and Elizabeth, 
the wife of George R. Andrews, M.D., also mentioned in this work. The 
father was well and favorably known as a practical farmer and public- 
spirited citizen, and in politics he was a Republican. 

George L. Haymond spent his early youth on a farm, and coming to 
Muncie with his mother soon after his father's death, he attended the Muncie 
schools and graduated from its high school. After spending a short time 
as a clerk in a hardware store he became a substitute letter carrier, and 
then for ten years was a regular letter carrier in Muncie. In 1899 he was 
appointed assistant postmaster, a position he held up to /\pril, 1903. During 
a short time thereafter Mr. Haymond was in ill healfh and visited Colo- 
rado, from whence he returned to this city and became the deputy county 
treasurer. In April, 1907, he was again appointed assistant postmaster, his 
present position. He is a Republican in politics, a Knight Templar Mason 
and a Knight of Pythias, and is a member of the High Street Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Haymond married, in 1891, Miss Carrie Robin- 
son, and their only child is a son, John. 

V.\LENTiNE Tayix)r, whose memory is revered and honored as one of the 
brave pioneers of Delaware county, was born in its township of Monroe 
on the 8th of August, 1836. and died on his farm on the northwest comer 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 687 

of Center township December 14, 1905. He was a son of Henry and Abi- 
gail (Gibson) Taylor, natives respectively of Maryland and Tennessee, and 
the paternal family is of English origin. Henry Taylor is numbered among 
the earliest of the Delaware county pioneers, establishing his home in Alon- 
roe township, and it was on his farm there that his son Valentine grew to 
manhood's estate and laid the foundation for his subsequent useful career. 
He enjoyed but poor educational advantages in the old-time schools of Dela- 
ware county, and his boyhood days were spent at farm labor on the old 
homestead. He was married in 1857, when twenty-one years of age, to 
]\Iiss Jane Sunderland, who was born in Salem township, Delaware county, 
Indiana, October 8, 1836, and died on the homestead in Center township 
January 6, 1907. She was a daughter of Samuel and Lavina (Kepper) 
Sunderland, who came from Ohio to cast in their lot with the early pioneers 
of Delaware county. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Taylor located on Belle creek, Salem 
township, where they maintained their residence for about five years, and 
then in about 1863 removed to a farm in section 31, Center township, where 
the remainder of their useful lives were spent. Farming continued as ^Mr. 
Taylor's life occupation, and at the time of his death his estate consisted of 
one hundred and twenty acres of fine farming land. He was a Republican 
in his political affiliations, but never cared for the honors of public office, for 
he was a quiet, unassuming man and was honored and revered by all who 
had the pleasure of his acquaintance. Both he and his faithful and loving 
wife were numbered among the county's most valued citizens. They had 
but two children, Henry^, a prosperous farmer of Salem township, and 
Samuel K., who resides on the old homestead farm in Center township. 

Samuel K. Taylor was born in Salem township, Delaware county, Jan- 
uary 8, i860, and farming has been his life occupation. After the comple- 
tion of his common-school education he began farming his father's land, 
and the old homestead farm has ever since continued as the scene of his 
activities. He married, in 1882, Miss Ella Hanshew, who was born Decem- 
ber 7, 1864, in Madison county, Indiana, a daughter of James R. and Martha 
(Clymer) Hanshew, of Madison county, where they have resided for many 
years. They were natives, however, of Rush county, Indiana, and of Ohio. 
Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have but one child, Celestia Lafern, born September 
16, 1894. Mr. Taylor exercises his right of franchise in support of the 
principles of the Republican party. 

Robert W. Monroe. The professionofthe law, when clothed with its true 
dignity and purity and strength, must rank first among the callings of men, 
and one of its representatives in Delaware county is Robert \V. Monroe, 
one of the practitioners of Muncie. His birth occurred at Xenia, Ohio, 
March 3, 1851. His father, Hugh Monroe, a Scotch Highlander of the 
Munro clan, came to the United States when a young man, locating in 
Xenia, Ohio, where he was married to one of Ohio's native daughters. Je- 



688 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

niima Steele. They afterward moved to Kansas, where the father's death 
occurred hi 1SS4, when he had reached the age of seventy-one years, but 
the mother survived until 1901. her death occurring when seventy-eight 
years of age. 

In the schools of Lebanon, Ohio, and Valparaiso, Indiana, their son, 
Robert W. ]\Ionroe, received his literary education, and after graduating in 
the training class of the latter institution he taught school for seven years. 
In the meantime he had decided on the practice of law as his life's work, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1877 2nd immediately entered upon his practice 
in ;\Iuncie. In 1882 he was appointed a deputy in the county auditor's 
ofifice, and after a deputyship of twelve years he was made the county auditor 
of Delaware county, being retained in that office for two tenns. On the ex- 
piration of that time he resumed the practice of law in JVIuncie, his ability 
soon winning him a distinctively representative clientage. In Xovember, 
1906, he was elected the prosecuting attorney, being the present incumbent. 
He has always been an active and ardent Republican, and as the representa- 
tive of that party has been the recipient of many public honors. 

In August, 1882, Air. Monroe was married to J. Alice, a daughter of 
John P. Reid, a plow manufacturer and one of the leading citizens of Mun- 
cie. Five children have been born to them — Hugh Reid, Agnes, Paul C, 
Donald G. and Bruce E. Air. Monroe has membership relations with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Independent Order of Red Men. 
He stands for principle in political circles, and Aluncie numbers him among 
her leading and influential citizens. 

John C. Russ, M.D. During thirty-two successive years Dr. John C. 
Ross has been engaged in the practice of medicine in Muncie, and is thus 
one of the oldest representatives of the profession in Delaware county. Dur- 
ing the time he has not only maintained his position among the leaders of 
the medical fraternity but has taken part in much of the public and social 
life of Muncie, so that he is accounted one of her honored citizens. His 
birth occurred in Randolph county, Indiana, May 10, 1845, whither his 
father, John Ross, had removed from his native state of Kentucky in 1838. 
He was a millwright and carpenter, and also followed agricultural pursuits 
until the inauguration of the Civil war, when he became captain of Com- 
pany D, Sixty-ninth Indiana Infantn.-, serving throughout the entire period 
of the conflict, and was wounded at the battle of Richmond, Kentucky. He 
continued his residence in Randolph county for a short time after the close 
of the war, and in 1876 came to Delaware county and entered the ministry 
of the Methodist church, continuing his ministerial labors therein until his 
life's work was ended in death, passing away in 1894 when seventy-eight 
years of age. He had been licensed to preach in 1867, and continued an 
active worker in the cause of Christianity until he was called to the home 
beyond. Mrs. Ross bore the maiden name of Eliza B. Hunt and was of 
English descent. Her father, William Hunt, was also a Methodist minister, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 689 

and was born in England in 1789. Emigrating with his father from his 
native land to \"irginia, he was ordained as a minister of the Methodist 
church and sent as a missionan.- to Indiana, having been the first Methodist 
divine to preach in this commonwealth. Mrs. Ross passed away in death 
in 1898 at the age of sevent3--six years. 

The early boyhood days of John C. Ross were spent on his father's 
farm in Randolph county, attending the district schools during the winter 
months, and later, completing the engineering course, continued in the pro- 
fession for eight years. While thus engaged he also studied medicine, and 
in 1876 graduated from the Indianapolis Medical College and began the 
practice of his chosen profession in Bethel, Delaware county. It was in 
1S77 that he came to ]\Iuncie, and he has remained here ever since engaged 
in the practice of medicine. His long professional career has been attended 
with marked success. His promptness, his sympathetic nature and his gen- 
erosity are among his chief characteristics, and those who have known him 
longest esteem him most highly. 

In 1872 Dr. Ross married Lucinda Stump, a native daughter of Dela- 
ware county, and they have five children living. The doctor has fraternal 
relations with the order of Odd Fellows, with which he has affiliated for 
forty-two years, and also with the Independent Order of Red Men. He is 
a consistent member of the church in which he was reared, the Methodist, 
taking an active part in its work, and in private life he has gained that warm 
personal regard which arises from true nobility of character. 

Cn.\RLE3 GwiNNCP. During a number of years past Charles Gwinnup 
has been a resident of Muncie, and has been identified with many of the 
interests that have contributed to its substantial development and improve- 
ment. He was born in Crawfordsville, Indiana, May 27, 1857, his parents 
being Samuel Gwinnup and Margaret (Kinney) Gwinnup. Their son was 
left an orphan at an early age and was reared by his grandfather, attend- 
ing school until he was fourteen years of age, when he started out to battle 
with the world for himself. Continuing agricultural labors until twenty- 
one years of age, he then began railroading, this being in the year 1879, 
and he was thereafter connected with several of the leading lines in various 
capacities, such as construction work, on the engineer's corps, as a brake- 
man and finally as conductor. During this time he was connected with 
the Monon, the Wabash, the Panhandle and the Louisville and Is'orthern 
railroads, always changing of his own accord, and was at all times a careful, 
painstaking and faithful employe. Finally on account of ill health Mr. 
Gwinnup severed his connections with railroad interests, and in 1894 came to 
Muncie, where he has ever since been numbered among its leading men of 
affairs. In 1901 he opened the Delaware Cafe and Restaurant, which under 
his competent management have become well known to the public, but he 
has not confined his attention to one line of trade, and in 1903 engaged in 
the oil business, assisting in the formation of the present Daniel Boone Gas 



690 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

& Oil Company, which owns eighty-two acres of land. They were the first 
company to strike deep-pay oil, having gone two hundred and ninety-four 
feet through rock, the company paying thirty thousand dollars dividends 
during the first year, and they now operate eighteen wells and are constantly 
making substantial improvements in the way of putting in new power, etc. 
Mr. Gwinnup is the treasurer of the company, and his excellent business 
ability has contributed not a little to the success of the company. He has 
also purchased the Record Oil Company, which he soon expects to place in 
successful operation, while in addition to these large interests he has also 
introduced a new electric sign, which promises to be a profitable investment. 
Thus in many fields of endeavor he has directed his energies, and his counsel 
and sound judgment have contributed to the success of many business inter- 
ests of ]\Iuncie and Delaware county. 

The marriage of Mr. Gwinnup was celebrated in 1901, Aliss Violetta 
Spangler, of Texas, becoining his wife. His fraternal relations connect him 
with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and to him belongs the honor of being 
the first Eagle in the state of Indiana. He also got up the charter list for 
Muncie Lodge Xo. 231. He is a worthy past president and is now serving 
his third term as its treasurer. 

J.\ML.s Warren Drissev. For a number of years past James \T. 
Brissey has practiced at the bar of Delaware county, and during that time 
his rise has been gradual, but he today occupies a leading position among 
the representatives of the legal profession in Muncie. His reputation has 
been won through earnest, honest labor, and his high standing is a merited 
tribute to his ability. Born in Owen county, Kentucky, October 7, 1864, 
he is a son of James Milton and Sarah fOsborn) Brissey, both also natives 
of the Blue Grass state of Kentucky. They were farming people, and in 
1S65 they removed to Fountain county, Indiana, where the father departed 
this life in 1904, when he had reached the eighty-ninth milestone on the 
journey of life. 

After completing his education in the public schools of Fountain county, 
Indiana, James \V. Brissey spent two years in the Ladoga Normal School, 
and while there David Starr Jordan became interested in the young lad and 
urged him to go through the state university, making arrangements whereby 
he was enabled to work his way through the institution. Mr. Brissey had 
but few opportunities during his early life, but was determined to obtain an 
education, and has resolutely overcome the obstacles which barred his path 
to success and today can look back with satisfaction on his struggles and 
triumphs over difficulties. When but a mere boy he went to western Kan- 
sas and worked on a cattle ranch as a herder or "broncho buster," but 
even there he continued his studies, carrying his books with him when out 
on the prairies. He also taught one term of school in that sparsely settled 
country, his little "temple of learning" having been twenty-five miles dis- 
tant from any town, and he experienced much of the life of the frontier 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 691 

west. On returning to Indiana he entered the state university, where he 
worked his way through and obtained his heart's desire, a university educa- 
tion. For a time thereafter he taught in the schools of Fountain county, 
and was later elected to the position of county superintendent, the duties of 
which he discharged with his usual promptness and fidelity. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Fountain county, and shortly afterward was elected 
prosecuting attorney for the twenty-first judicial district, containing the 
counties of Fountain, Warren and Benton, continuing as its incumbent for 
two terms. It was in the year 1901 that he came to Muncie, where for a 
time he practiced in partnership with Thomas E. Bracken, the firm name 
being Brissey & Bracken, while later he was a member of the firm of Brissey 
& Ethell, but is now alone in his practice. He is well informed on the sub- 
ject of jurisprudence in its various departments and he has won many 
notable forensic triumphs. In his political connections he is a Republican 
and takes a deep interest in the questions which affect the welfare of the 
state and nation and mold the public policy, while since attaining to mature 
age he has been an active factor in the local campaigns of his party. 

In 1889 Mr. Brissey was united in marriage to Anna Martin, a native 
of Warren county, Indiana, and a daughter of Jesse Martin. They have 
one daughter, Margaret, who was born on the 3d of February, 1897, and 
their daughter Ruth died in 1891, when a babe of six months old. Mr. 
Brissey has fraternal relations with the Knights of Pythias, and is also a 
member of the Presbyterian church. He is a broad-minded, progressive 
man and a public spirited citizen, and in all life's relations he is found true 
to the duties of professional and social life. 

Henry J. Keller belongs to the group of influential and enterprising 
merchants who during the last twenty years have made Muncie one of the 
principal retail centers of eastern Indiana. Especially in the line of dry 
goods and clothing, the business district of Muncie contains some of the 
finest establishments to be found in the state and patronized by increasing 
thousands both in the city and in the surrounding country, the importance 
of Muncie as a distributing center having been wonderfully increased dur- 
ing recent years by the interurban lines. One of the first of the large 
establishments that would be mentioned in a list of Muncie's retail firms is 
The Keller-Bryce Company, clothing merchants, who occupy the comer 
room of the Johnson block at Walnut and Charles. 

The history of the firm is part of the history of Muncie since the gas 
boom. On January 15, 1888, Henry J. Keller, who is now president and 
general manager of the firm, came to Muncie and formed a partnership in 
the retail clothing business with G. W. Bliss. During the preceding eight 
years he had been employed as salesman in various dry goods and mercantile 
establishments and was well equipped by experience and business gifts for 
the mercantile career upon which he entered. With the growth of Muncie 
in population and wealth the firm of Bliss and Keller had corresponding 



693 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

success, and continued in that style until November, 1895, when a reorgan- 
ization was ettected under the name of Keller, Bryce and Company. In 
jNIarch, 1905. the business was incorporated under the name The Keller- 
Bryce Company, and Mr. Keller has been president and general manager 
since that date. 

The president of the firm, who is now- one of the oldest business men in 
the city, was born in Winchester, Randolph county, where his father was 
long identified with farming and merchandising, and where the son also 
gained his first experience in business life. His father was George Godfred 
Keller, and he and his wife, Katharine Elizabeth (Kayser) Keller, were both 
natives of Germany and came to the United States in 1852, being married in 
the same year at Buc>rus, Ohio. In 1855 they moved to Winchester, In- 
diana, and there the father followed farming and mercantile pursuits until 
1881, since which year he has lived retired, being now eighty-one years of 
age. For man\- years he took an active part in church affairs. The mother 
passed away in December, 1905. 

Henry J. Keller was educated in the common schools at Winchester, 
and after leaving them at once began earning his own living and as a clerk 
began the career which has been so successful. In politics Mr. Keller is 
identified with the Republican party. A prominent ^lason, he is a member 
of Muncie Lodge No. 433. F. & A. M.. Muncie Chapter No. 30, Muncie 
Commandery No. 18, the Indiana Consistory, and Murat Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of Muncie Lodge No. 245 of the Elks, 
and Silver Shield Lodge No. 403, K. of P. April 2, 1885, he was married 
to Edna L. Haynes, youngest daughter of Jesse G. and Matilda (Cropper) 
Haynes, the former, deceased, of Randolph county. Indiana. They have 
three children, Esther, Nellie and Paul G. Mr. Keller and family are 
identified with the First Presbyterian church. 

Alfred Grixdle, one of Muncie's foremost citizens, possesses the talent 
which has placed his name high among the architects of this state. Persever- 
ingly he has pursued his way with one fixed ambition and goal ever before 
him, undaunted by the obstacles which he encountered, and now he has won 
for himself a name and place among the leaders of the profession. 

His birth occurred at Manchester, England, July 23, 1863, his parents 
being George and Elizabeth (Holmes) Grindle, both also natives of the 
mother country, the father born in Yorkshire and the mother in Manchester. 
They gave to their son an excellent literary and professional training, he 
having studied in the King Charles Public School, of Tuxford, in Notting- 
hamshire, also Owen's University in Manchester, in addition to architectural 
training in the Manchester School of Art, where he received a careful 
grounding, resulting in a knowledge of architecture in all its branches, 
which can only be obtained by such thorough and efficient means. He early 
displayed an aptitude for the profession of architecture and when quite 
young was fond of designing, so that the genius is inborn and not acquired. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 693 

With his education completed he served for five years as articled pupil in 
the offices of Bell & Roper, the famous architects of Manchester and Lon- 
don, while in 1886 he received the full certificate with honors at the Man- 
chester School of Art. As a result of overstudy his health became im- 
paired and he removed to Birmingham to recuperate, while in 1888 he sailed 
for the United States and spent the first two years in this country in the 
East. At the close of the period, in 1890. ^Mr. Grindle became a resident of 
Indiana, where for three or four years he held senior positions as chief 
draughtsman, commencing architectural practice in Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
in 1894. 

His residence in that city continued from 1894 to 1904, when he came 
to IMuncie, and has ever since been numbered among the city's most promi- 
nent residents. Among the most prominent buildings which he has designed 
since his removal from the East may be mentioned the Public Library at 
Fort Wayne, erected at a cost of one hundred thousand dollars ; the Jasper 
county court house, costing one hundred and fifty thousand dollars ; the 
Root Memorial building, of Fort Wayne ; also the J. B. Barnes building of 
Fort Wayne ; the McKinley school house, of Muncie ; the Terminal depot, of 
Muncie, and many others. During this time buildings amounting to over 
three million dollars have been erected under his supervision, including 
schools, churches, residences and public buildings. 

In 1886 Mr. Grindle was united in marriage to Miss Frances Alice 
Jones ; five children have been born to them, two only remaining with them, 
Alfred \'ernon Holmes, bom August 13, 1894, and Henry George West- 
brook, born July 6, 1900. Mr. Grindle's fraternal relations connect him with 
the Masonic order. In connection with his profession he has also a love for 
music, pursuing his studies on the organ during his leisure time, with the 
result that he is now a proficient musician, and during many years has been 
identified with the choirs of the Episcopal church, of which he is a member. 

Joseph A. Nelson. Among the men of affairs who have been dis- 
tinctively the architects of their own fortunes is numbered Joseph A. Nelson, 
who without advantages at the commencement of life has battled earnestly 
and energetically and is now numbered among the leading business men of 
Muncie. His birth occurred in Cumberland county, Kentucky, April 4, 
1863, his parents being Nicholas C. and Amanda A. (Ferquin) Nelson. The 
father, a native son of Kentucky, followed the millwright's trade, and while 
pursuing this occupation was severely injured, dying from the effects of his 
injury when his son Joseph was but fourteen years of age. Five years later 
the mother was also called from this life to the home beyxDnd, their large 
family of children then being left to battle for themselves. 

At the time of his mother's death Joseph A. Nelson was but nineteen 
years of age, and at that early age, with practically no educational ad- 
vantages, he was left to make his own way in the world, and not only was 
he obliged to care for himself but also for eight other children younger than 



694 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

himself. He farmed until his twenty-fifth year, and during the following 
five years was a resident of Indianapolis, Indiana, four years of the time 
being spent as a street car conductor and the remaining year in the ice 
business. It was in the year of 1893 that he came to Muncie, and from that 
time to the present he has been prominently identified with the ice business. 
During the first three years he served as manager of the Muncie Lake Ice 
Company, at the close of which period he organized the Crystal Ice Com- 
pany, his associate being Mr. Thornburg, but at the expiration of seven 
years Mr. Nelson sold his interest, and during the following two years 
harvested and shipped ice from Dawson, Ohio. During the following four- 
teen months he had charge of the Muncie Ice & Coal Company, and he has 
ever since remained a stockholder in this large and important industry. 

At the age of twenty years Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to 
Lillian Pace, whose death occurred about ten years later, and he subse- 
quently wedded Mrs. Emma Kerr, nee Thornburg. He has one son by his 
first marriage, Walter L. Mr. Nelson holds membership relations with the 
Knights of Pjthias fraternity, and although he is identified with the Democ- 
racy he votes for the man regardless of party affiliations. 

Francis A. Siiaw, son of Obed A. and Mary E. Shaw, was born 
on the sixth day of July, 1879, at Luray, Henry county, Indiana, where for 
more than twenty years his father was engaged in the merchandise busi- 
ness and operated a harness shop. The grandfather, Nicholas Shaw, was 
one of the early settlers of Wayne county, emigrating to that county from 
North Carolina with his family in September, 1826, where he resided on 
a farm near what is now Economy, and it was on this farm on the twelfth 
day of April, 1840, that the father of Francis A. was born. 

When Francis A. was six years old the father sold his store and 
harness shop to his eldest son, William R., and moved with his family 
upon a small farm west of Cowan, in Monroe township, Delaware 
county, Indiana, wher^ he has ever since and does now reside. 

The family of -Obed A. has consisted of ten children, of whom there 
is now living, William R., who is a farmer and lives upon the site of 
the old family homestead at Luray ; Enos L., who is a graduate of Pur- 
due University, a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers 
and is a consulting engineer in Chicago, having an office at 1105 Monad- 
nock building, Chicago; Francis A., the subject of this sketch; Orian L. 
and Orpha E. Shaw, a twin brother and sister, who reside at home with 
the parents. 

Francis A. Shaw attended and graduated from the common schools 
and high school of his township, and in the fall of 1898 began the study 
of law in the city of Muncie, in the law office of a local practitioner, and 
was admitted to the bar on his birthday, July 6, 1900, at the age of 
twenty-one, since which time he has gradually forged his way to the 
front by hard work and earnest effort until to-day he occupies a leading 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 695 

position among the representatives of the bar in Delaware county. He is 
in every sense of the word a self-made man, and is winning a reputation 
through earnest, honest labor, and his present standing is but the merited 
tribute to his ability. He has demonstrated his ability to successfully handle 
the intricate problems of jurisprudence and now has one of the largest 
and best clientages in his county. Mr. Shaw is a general practitioner, but 
is considered a specialist on insurance and municipal matters, and is admit- 
ted to practice in all of the state and Federal courts. 

Before his admission to the bar, Mr. Shaw took up the study of stenog- 
raphy and mastered its principles without the aid of a teacher and became 
so proficient that he has held the position for short i>eriods of both the 
Delaware and Randolph Circuit courts. 

Mr. Shaw, while an active, energetic Republican, has always stood for 
the rights of the people of his county first, and has refused to support 
nominees of his party on the county ticket when he considered them un- 
worthy of his support. He has always refused to be controlled by political 
bosses and has always stood for good citizenship rather than partyism in 
local affairs. He has for a number of years been identified with local 
Good Citizenship Leagues. 

Just a few days after his admission to the bar and on the i8th day of 
July, 1900, Mr. Shaw was married to Ivliss V'irgie E. Wright, only child 
of Charles F. and Mary J. Wright, of Richmond, Indiana. This union has 
been blessed by one daughter, Helen M., who was born on the 7th day 
of August, 1902. 

Mr. Shaw holds membership relations with the Delaware Lodge, F. 
& A. M., with the B. P. O. E., Knights of Pythias, and is a member of the 
Jackson Street Christian church of the city of Muncie. 

Josi.\H Huffman'. In reviewing the early and much of the subsequent 
history of Delaware county the name of Josiah Huffman will be found promi- 
nently recorded on its pages. He was born in Greene county, Ohio, in 1822, 
and his death occurred in Delaware county, Indiana, on the 7th of September, 
1897. He was a son of Aaron Huffman, who came to the United States 
from his native land of Germany and established his home first in Virginia, 
frx)m whence he later removed to Greene county, Ohio, and there his death 
occurred. 

When a mere child Josiah Hufifman was bound out, and thus his chances 
for gaining an education in his youth were extremely limited. He made his 
own way in the world from an early period in life, and was reared to man- 
hood's estate in Ohio, there also marrying Lettishia Bryan, who was born 
in Virginia. Mr. Huffman continued to follow his trade of wagon and 
carriage maker in Cedarville, Ohio, until the fall of 1880, when he came to 
Delaware county, Indiana, and located on a farm in Center township. Pre- 
vious to leaving his Ohio home he had purchased the shop in which he 



696 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

learned his trade, but after coming to this county he became identified with 
'its agricultural interests, and for seventeen _\ears he continued as one of the 
county's prominent business men and citizens. He was a Republican in his 
political affiliations, and both he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. She was called to the home beyond in 1885. In their 
family were five children, Ferdinand Jasper, Calaway F. (deceased), Wil- 
muth A., Josiah N. and one who died in infancy. 

\\'ilmutli A. Huffman was born in Cedarville, Ohio, July 24, 1857, and 
in that city he was also reared to mature years and received his educational 
training. It was there, too, that he learned his trade of carriage trimming 
in his father's shop, but after coming to Indiana with his parents he turned 
his attention to agricultural pursuits, and save for a period of nine years 
spent as a merchant he has since been prominently identified with the tilling 
of the soil. His nine years as a merchant were spent at Royerton. He is 
the owner of an estate of one hundred and sixty acres of excellent farming 
land, and Center township numbers him among her leading agriculturists and 
business men. His political support is given to the Republican party. 

Mr. Huffman married in 1884 Estella I. Clark, a daughter of Robert 
and Fannie (Kemper) Clark, and they have one child. Lulu Alay. Robert 
Kemper was a son of Arthur Smith Kemper, whose history will be found in 
that of Dr. Kemper. Woodson Clark was the grandfather of Mrs. Huft'man. 
Robert Clark is engaged in general farming and stock raising, making a 
specialty of Poland China hogs, and he also has both full blood and high 
grade Jerseys. Mr. Huft'man is a member of the fraternal order of the 
Knights of the Maccabees. 

H. R, G.xLLiv.w, chief of the fire department of Muncie and one of the 
city's most popular and trustworthy officials, is a native son of the Buckeye 
state, bom in Bellefontaine on the 6th of March, 1877, but his parents, 
Maurice and Mary (Kirby) Gallivan, were both natives of Ireland. The 
father came to the United States at the age of twenty-nine years, and twice 
he took up his abode in Delaware county, first in 1874 and again in 1892. 

After completing his education in the schools of Ohio H. R. Gallivan 
learned the plumbing business, and continued in that occupation for several 
years after his removal to Muncie. In 1900 he joined the fire department, 
and two years later became assistant chief, while in 1906 he was promoted 
to the high office of chief. When he assumed charge there were thirteen 
men in the department, while under his able administration the membership 
has been advanced to twenty and two new fire houses have been erected, 
furnished with all the modern appliances and they are thoroughly up to date 
in all their appointments. The department is very efiicient in every manner 
and Muncie may justly feel proud of its excellent fire department, while to 
its chief nuich praise is due. He is an unassuming, popular and reliable 
gentlemen, and a worthy representative of an honored family. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 697 

Har(jld C. R. Wall. The subject of this review, Harold C. R. Wall, 
has attained a marked success in business affairs, has gained the respect and 
confidence of his fellows, and is recognized as one of the distinctively repre- 
sentative citizens of Muncie. As a leading real estate dealer he has been 
energetic, keenly discriminating and sagacious, qualities which win success 
wherever applied to the practical afifairs of life. 

Mr. Wall is a native of Wadsworth, Medina county, Ohio, born on the 
26th of December, 1865, his parents being Paul and Isabella (Rothacker) 
Wall, both Ohioans and of German descent. The paternal family of Walls, 
or Wahls, was established in the United States in 1771 by the great-great- 
great-grandfather of Harold C. R. Wall, who was one of seven brothers 
and settled in northeastern Pennsylvania. In 1819 the great-grandfather 
migrated to Ohio, while the father, Paul Wall, became a farmer in that 
state. As a grain dealer and manufacturer he was afterward identified with 
the commercial and industrial interests of that section of the state, and thus 
continued until his retirement from active business in the early '80s. His 
death occurred on the 23rd of November, 1906, and he is still survived by 
his widow. Her family, the Geigers, were for two centuries apothecaries in 
Germany, and Harold seems to have inherited a taste for the profession. 

Completing his educational training in Oberlin College, from which he 
graduated in 1887, Mr. Wall engaged in the drug business at Akron, Ohio, 
where he remained for seven years. Going thence to Seattle, Washington, 
he again entered the drug business, being thus employed during the disas- 
trous fire which swept through the city. In this fiery casualty he had many 
e.xciting experiences, and he had the satisfaction of saving his employer's 
stock from destruction. Soon after returning to the East he resumed the 
drag business at Akron, advancing to the front ranks in this line before his 
retirement from the field in 1-893. ^^ then entered real estate, purchasing 
and reorganizing the Abstract Title-Guarantee & Trust Company, which is 
the only recognized authority on titles in the city. He also organized and 
became manager of the Permanent Savings & Loan Company, which is now 
one of the leading institutions of the city. Selling his interest in both of 
these companies Mr. Wall came to Muncie in 1900 and purchased the prop- 
erty of the Muncie Land Company, which was in the hands of a receiver at 
that time. In order to handle the property the Citizens Land Company, con- 
trolled by himself and family, was organized, and under his skillful manage- 
ment that organization has been largely instrumental in the improvement and 
upbuilding of the city. 

On coming to Muncie Mr. Wall identified himself with the progressive 
business element of the city, and became a member of the old Commercial 
Club, serving as vice president thereof for one year. He was one of the 
organizers of the new Commercial Club, of which he was vice president for 
three years and president for one year, while for two years he was also chair- 
man of the manufacturing committee. He is a man of keen foresight and 
sagacity, is energetic, enterprising and reliable, and therefore during the 



698 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

comparatively few years of his residence in Muncie has made many judicious 
and profitable investments, as well as earned the confidence of the public and 
a liberal share of its real estate patronage. 

In March, 1889, Mr. Wall was married to Miss Jilinnie S. Gilbert, of 
Cleveland, Ohio. Although, as stated, he has spent but comparatively few 
years in Muncie, he has made his mark in the city, and is widely known and 
held in uniform regard by its residents. 

DuxCAN Williams, whose death occurred January 3, 1892, had spent 
almost his entire life in Hamilton township, where he was known as a suc- 
cessful farmer, a man of integrity and trustworthiness in public and private 
life. His name has a place in the official affairs of his township, which he 
served as trustee. 

His active life was spent on a farm which his father had entered during 
the pioneer days of Hamilton township. Josiah D. Williams, the father, was 
born in Adams county, Ohio, October 21, 1800, and the same county was the 
birthplace of the son Duncan on November 9, 1832. Josiah D. Williams 
came to Delaware county in the fall of 1835, entering one hundred and sixty 
acres in Hamilton township, and a year later he brought his family to this 
new home, and both parents and children began the work of clearing the 
wilderness and making a home. Among the early settlers Josiah D. Williams 
was a prominent character, a man of uprightness and industry, serving his 
township in various offices, and his death in 1855 was a loss to the citizen- 
ship of the community. He had married, in 1821, Emily McCall, daughter 
of a Scotch settler of the Ohio valley, and of their union were seven chil- 
dren, namely : Maria, William McC, John W., Mar}-, Duncan, Martha and 
Sarah J. Of these Martha, wife of Amos Shafer, of this county, is the only 
one still living. 

Duncan Williams came to this county at such an early age that he may 
be considered to have passed his entire lifetime in the county. An education 
in such early schools as the country districts afforded was followed, in 1850, 
by his entrance in the Delaware County Seminary at Muncie, where he was 
a pupil during two years in what was then the highest educational' institu- 
tion of the county. When his father died he bought the interest of the other 
heirs in the old homestead, and as a farmer and stock-raiser he was one of 
the men who contributed substantial results to the rural development of this 
county. His name and influence were connected with various enterprises and 
movements, and as trustee he assisted the progress of education and the pub- 
lic schools. He was a Democrat in politics, and, with his family, was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mrs. Duncan Williams, the widow of this well known old citizen, who 
now makes her home in Muncie, was a daughter of Robert Clark, one of the 
earliest settlers of Delaware county. Robert Clark, son of Woodson Clark, 
was born in Madison county, Kentucky, January 27, 1816, and came to this 
county at the age of si.xteen, where he died April 22, 1895. By his marriage 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY G99 

to Frances Kemper he had the following children : Sarah J, William G., 
Mary A, Lucy B., John W., Margaret F., Carrie G., Thomas ]., Stella J.,' 
Ralph H.^ Sarah J. Clark married Duncan Williams September 23, 1858! 
Mrs. Williams has four living children, namely: Lucy, Emma, Gertrude and 
Robert J., while one, William K., is deceased. 

Hugh Alvin Cowing, physician and surgeon, was born near the 
city of Muncie July 28, i860, a son of Granville and Lucy (Moran) 
Cowing and a grandson of Joseph Cowing. After completing his edu- 
cation in the common schools of Delaware county and graduating from 
the Muncie high school with the class of 1882, Hugh A. Cowing taught 
school in this county for eight years, from 1879 until 1887. It was in 1886 
that he began the study of medicine, first under the supervision of Dr. G. 
W. H. Kemper, of Muncie, and later attended three courses of lectures 
at the Miami Medical College in Cincinnati, Ohio. He received his degree of 
M. D. from that institution March 11, 1890, and on the 24th of the 
same month entered into a partnership with his former preceptor, Dr. G. 
W. H. Kemper, at Muncie. This relationship continued until 1897, and 
since then he has continued alone in this city. 

Dr. Cowing is a member of the Delaware County (Indiana) Medi- 
cal Society, of which he was the secretary in 1893 and the president in 
1906; a member of the Indiana State Medical Society, of the American 
Medical Association, of the American Public Health Association; was a 
member of the Indiana State Committee of the International Congress on 
Tuberculosis, 1908 ; has been secretar)- of the Delaware County Board of 
Health since 1890; and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Dr. Cowing is also the president of the Delaware County Children's Home 
Association and president of the Delaware County Board of Children's 
Guardians. His contributions to medical literature are: "Tobacco; its Ef- 
fect Upon the Health and Morals of a Community"; "Diseases of the 
Cornea"; "Paracentesis Thoracis," Indiana Medical Journal, May, 1892; 
"A Case of Tetanus; Recovery," Ibid., January, 1893; "Fracture 
of the Skull ; Report of Two Cases, with Operation and Recovery," June, 
1894; "Report of a Case of Purpura," Cincinnati Lancet Clinic' 
January 27, 1894: History of the Small Pox Epidemic at Alunciej 
Indiana, in 1893, and "Management of an Outbreak of Small Po.x," Twelfth 
Annual Report of the Indiana State Board of Health, 1893 ; "How Shall We 
Solve the Tuberculosis Problem?" 1905; "The Adulteration of Food and 
Drugs," Delaware County Medical Society; "Twins and their Relation to 
Obstetric Procedures," 1901 ; "The Modem Sanatorium Treatment of Tuber- 
culosis," 1906, Indiana State Medical Society ; "Shall Indiana Improve Her 
Laws which Regulate the Practice of Medicine?" 1896; "The Tuberculosis 
Sanatorium," 1905. Health Officers' School, Indianapolis ; "The Relation of 
the Physician to the Tuberculosis Problem" ; 1906, American Public Health 
Association, Mexico City, Mexico ; "The Hospital and the Sanatorium a Ne- 



700 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

cessity in the Combat Against Tuberculosis," 1906; Tuberculosis Exhibit, 
IndianapoHs ; and "Six Hundred Cases of Labor in Private Practice," 1907, 
Delaware County Medical Society. 

Dr. Cowing married, June 23, 1892, Miss Alice E. Frey, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. They have two children, Kemper Frey Cowing and Rachel Cowing. 

Edw.JiRD Tuhev. The subject of this review, Edward Tuhey, is a 
worthy representative of that type of American character and of that pro- 
gressive spirit which promote public good in advancing individual pros- 
perity' and conserving popular interests. He has long been prominently 
identified with the business interests of Aluncie, and while his varied affairs 
have brought him success they have also advanced the general welfare by 
accelerating conmiercial activity. Mr. Tuhey is of Irish ancestr.-. his father, 
Edward Tuhey, having been born in county Cork, Ireland, but when twenty 
years of age he came to the United States, and like many of his country- 
men from the Emerald Isle, engaged in railroad work. He came to Indiana 
at the time of the construction of the Big Four Railroad, locating in Muncie, 
where his life's labors were ended in death on the ist of July, 1895. He 
became a loyal and patriotic American citizen, and during the Civil war 
served as a soldier in the Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry. 

In Muncie, on the 14th of January, 1856, occurred the birth of Ed- 
ward Tuhey, and after completing his education in its public schools he 
was engaged in teaching for twelve years in Delaware county. Leaving 
the professional for a business career, he engaged in contracting and 
building in Muncie, and to him belongs the credit of having built the larger 
part of the drainage system of this city. Four years later he erected the 
rolling mills and engaged in the manufacture of iron, as a member of the 
Muncie Iron & Steel Company, and thus he continued for about ten years. 
On the expiration of that period he organized the Tuhey Canning Company, 
this being in 1900, and since the time of its organization the enterprise 
has grown in volume and importance until it is now classed among the 
leading industrial institutions of Delaware county. They can only tomatoes, 
of which they ship from one hundred to one hundred and twenty-five car- 
loads annually. In addition to his extensive business interests Mr. Tuhev has 
also taken an active part in the public affairs of his native city, and for 
four years during Cleveland's administration, he served as its postmaster, 
while from 1898 until 1902 he served in the highest office within the gift 
of his fellow citizens, that of mayor, wherein he was active and earnest in 
his advocacy of all measures for the public good. 

On the i8th of October, 1876, Mr. Tuhey was united in marriage to 
Mary Edna McKinley, a daughter of Alexander McKinley, one of the hon- 
ored pioneer residents of Delaware county. Of the ten children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Tuhey all are living, and three are associated with their 
father in business. He has been an influential factor in the progress of 
Muncie, and, alone and unaided, he has carved his way to the high position 
he now occupies. 

D.Win A. L.\MBERT. One of the best known among men who have 
held public office in Delaware county is David A. Lambert. His first public 
position was that of deputy county treasurer, to which place he was appointed 
in 1891 by Mark Powers, who at the election in 1890 was made county 
treasurer. In 1894 Air. Lambert was nominated and elected county treas- 
urer, and at the expiration of his first term of two years was re-elected for a 
second term, retiring from this office on the 31st day of December, 1899. 
In 1903 Mr. Lambert was appointed by President Roosevelt as postmaster 
at the city of Muncie, which position he held for one term of four years. 




^^s-oLyiy~a^^ i/^t^Cou, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 703 

from April i, 1903, to April i, 1907. On the i8th of February, 1908, he was 
nominated by the Republicans of Delaware county as their candidate for 
state senator. For many years Mr. Lambert has been very much interested 
in agricultural pursuits, and takes much interest in the management of a 
fertile and well kept farm which he owns in Hamilton township. He has 
never been too busy in public life to neglect the affairs of the farm, and 
his success in agriculture has been fully demonstrated. 

Mr. Lambert was one of a family of nine children, having been born 
in Salem township, Delaware county, Indiana, on the 29th of June, 1861. 
His father was John N. Lambert, one of the pioneers in the settlement of 
Salem township. He was born in Ohio, near Cincinnati, December 26, 1829, 
and, after a few years spent in southern Indiana, came to Delaware county 
about the year 1852. Here, for almost a quarter of a century, he lived on 
rented land, enduring all of the hardships incident to those times in Indiana. 
Industrious, honest, of good habits, upright and kind-hearted, John N. Lam- 
bert was a noble example for his children, and all who came in contact with 
him. After a long period of renting, he purchased the farm which he had 
tilled so long, and began to work out his ideas of a home. At the time the 
farm was purchased, much of it was in woods. With his proverbial pluck 
and perseverance he went about clearing it for the plow, draining the soil 
and making such other improvement as his financial circumstances would 
permit. On the first day of June, 1907, he passed away, after a lingering 
and painful illness, at the age of seventy-seven years. The mother of David A. 
Lambert was Xancy J. (Graham) Lambert, who was the daughter of Joseph 
Graham and was born in 1830. She was a woman of rare virtue, intelligence 
and good sense, and, by reason of her teaching and righteous living, instilled 
into the minds of her children a desire not only to live pure and cleanly lives 
but to do something and to be somebody in the world. She died in 1879 
at the age of forty-nine years. 

David A. Lambert attended the schools of Salem township during his 
boyhood days, and later became a student in the Central Indiana Normal 
College, located at Danville, Indiana. When eighteen years of age he began 
teaching and continued to teach for twelve years, and it was at the close 
of that period that he entered upon his long and successful career as a public 
official. 

On September 3, 1889, Mr. Lambert was married to Elizabeth Kirklin, 
who was biirn in Delaware county on March 26, 1867. To this union were 
born two children — Marian, October 2, 1890, and Mildred, November 25, 
1891. The loving and faithful wife and mother died July 13, 1893, only 
living long enough to prove her worth to husband and daughters and leaving 
them a legacy of undying and unending love, and the influence of a coura- 
geous and devoted womanhood. Her life was pure and spotless, and her life, 
though short, a blessing to all who knew her. On July 29, 1896, Mr. Lam- 
bert was married to Miss Anna M. Meeker, who was the daughter of 
Chester C. Meeker and Ann (Johnston) Meeker, who were natives of the 
state of New York. Miss Meeker was born July 29, 1870. To this union 
were born three sons — Jean, born August 30, 1900; George, born February 
22, 1904, and David, born July 14, 1906. 

Air. Lambert is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of the Knights of Pythias, and of the Red Men. As stated before, he is a 
Republican and active in all movements having a tendency to better the 
conditions of his city or county. 

Fr.\nk L. G.^ss, judge of the city court of Muncie was born in that 
place on the 22d of March, 1872, and, with the e.xception of two years 
spent in Missouri, has resided therein all his life. He spent twelve years 



704 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

in the acquiring of an education, which was preparatory to his collegiate 
courses, entering one of the city schools at the age of six years and 
graduating from the high school when eighteen years old. In the fall 
of 1890 he became a student in the Indiana State University, and after 
completing a scientific course commenced the study of law, graduating 
from the latter department in 1895, with the degree of Bachelor of Law. 

Immediately after his admission to the bar Judge Gass commenced 
the practice of his profession in Muncie, but after five years of substan- 
tial success was induced to test the stories which came to him of the wealth 
being made in the lead and zinc mines of Missouri. In 1899-1900 he there- 
fore resided in Webb City, that state, and profitably conducted various in- 
terests in the field mentioned; but on account of the failing health of his 
father he returned to Muncie to assist him in the buggy business. His pro- 
fessional standing and his upright and able character as a man were about 
to be recognized by the community at large in his decisive election as judge 
of the city court in 1905. Although Judge Gass is a Democrat and Muncie 
is normally a Republican city by about two thousand majority, he was 
honored by a majority of five hundred and sixty-five. His term of service 
does not expire until January i, 1910, and as his record has already ma- 
terially advanced his legal and judicious name it is probable that greater 
public preferments are in store for him. The Judge is also one of the 
most prominent members of the Knights of Pythias in the state, and in 
October, 1907, was elected Grand Chancellor of the order for Indiana. 

Judge Gass is of German parentage and ancestry, his father, Charles 
Gass, having emigrated from the fatherland to the United States in 1865, 
being then a youth of eighteen. The mother is of German extraction, but 
was born and raised in Hancock county, her maiden name being Schrieber. 

In 1903 Judge Gass was married to Annie L. Burch, of Carterville, 
Missouri. 

L. T. LoAR, M. D. In the practice of medicine, in Muncie, Dr. Loar 
has demonstrated the fact that he is well informed concerning the prin- 
ciples of the medical science and their correct application to the needs of 
suffering humanity, and has therefore been accorded a liberal patronage. 
His birth occurred in West Virginia on the 12th of October, i860, a son 
of Harmon and Elizabeth (Workman) Loar, both also natives of that com- 
monwealth and descendants of prominent old southern families. They were 
married September 15, 1846. The father spent his entire life in the Pan- 
handle state, prominently identified with its agricultural interests, and he 
died at the old home place there September 27, 1892. His widow still re- 
sides there. 

In the public schools of his native commonwealth of West Virginia Dr. 
Loar received his early literary training, and he was early inured to the 
duties of the fields. In 1878 he began farming for himself, and continued 
until 1884, when he engaged in the lumber business in Wayne county, West 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 707 

Virginia. Choosing the practice of medicine as his life occupation, in 1S89 
he entered upon a course of study in the Louisville Medical College, 
graduating therein in 1891, and immediately afterward he began practice 
in West \'irginia. After four years of practice in his native common- 
wealth Dr. Loar located in Pickaway county, Ohio, where for two years he 
was actively engaged in the practice of medicine, and in 1898 he came to 
Muncie, Indiana, and opened an office. His professional career here has 
been attended with marked success, and his name is fast becoming a house- 
hold word in the homes of the community. He has always taken a deep 
interest in the political and public afifairs of his locality, and votes with the 
Democratic party. 

On November, 28, 1895, Dr. Loar was united in marriage to Clara 
B. Dickason, a native of Jackson, Ohio, born July 18, 1869, a daughter 
of Charles Dickason, also of the Buckeye state. They have become the 
parents of two children, Ruth H., born on the 20th of January, 1897, in 
Pickaway county, Ohio, and Laban Theodore, born February 27, 1903, in 
Muncie, Indiana. In his fraternal relations the £>octor is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Order of Red Men, and is 
also a consistent member of the Presbj'terian church and of the Delaware 
Medical Society. 

Do what conscience says is right, 

Do what reason says is best. 
Do with all your might and mind. 

Do your duty and be blessed. 

Sidney A. Jewett, deceased, was born in the state of New York June 
16, 1833. His father, Jeremiah Jewett, was also a native of the Empire 
State, but he came to Muncie when his son Sidney was a little lad of five 
years, or in 1838. He was a burner of lime, and followed that occupation 
for many years, being a pioneer of that once important industry in Muncie. 
His death occurred in this city at the advanced age of eighty-four years. 

Sidney A. Jewett was reared and received his educational training in 
Muncie, and this city was the place of his residence during the remainder 
of his life. During the early years of his life he burned lime with his father, 
and when the Civil war was inaugurated he tendered his services in defense 
of the Union by enlisting in Company B, Sixty-ninth Indiana Infantry. He 
served three years in the army and took part in every battle and engagement 
in which his regiment was engaged. Returning home after the close of 
hostilities, he was for several years thereafter variously employed, and 
during the fifteen years preceding his death was the proficient superintendent 
of the Beech Grove Cemetery, of Muncie. His death occurred on the 3d of 
February, 1904. 

In the year of 1857 Mr. Jewett married Miss Sarah Conn, who survives 
him and yet resides in Muncie. She was born in Delaware county, Indiana, 
October 30, 1840, and her father, Mr. Simon Conn, was one of the early 



708 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

pioneers of the county, not only as a settler but also as the operator of a 
wagon freight line between Muncie and Cincinnati. Unto the union of 
Sidney A. and Sarah Jewett were born the following children; Ida, now 
Mrs. Fred Watson ; Charles E., deceased ; William M., deceased ; Fred E., of 
whom further mention will be found below ; and Nellie, unmarried and 
living with her mother. ]Mrs. Jewett is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and is a highly esteemed lady. Her life has been one of kind- 
ness and fidelity to home, church and neighbor, and she is loved and hon- 
ored by all who have the pleasure of her acquaintance. Her husband was 
a member of the Universalist church, was possessed of moral and praise- 
worthy habits, and many were his warm and faithful friends. He was a 
kind and loving husband and father, always ready to do all within his 
power to add to the comfort and happiness of his family. He was a mem- 
ber of Williams Post No. 78, Department of Indiana. G. A. R., and also 
of the Senior Order of United American jMechanics. 

Fred E. Jewett is the efficient superintendent of the Ball Brothers 
Glass Manufacturing Company, a position he has held for more than fifteen 
years, or since his graduation from the Muncie High school. He is the 
only son of the lately deceased Sidney Jewett, and is also a native son of 
Muncie, born July 15, 1874, and was reared in the city of his birth. 
In 1901 he married Miss LaRhue Dungan. Mr. Jewett is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of the Odd Fellows fraternity and is a Master 
Mason. In politics he supports the men and measures of the Republican 
party. 

George F. McCulloch. With the history of Muncie during its rapid 
progress after the discovery of natural gas, while a town was growing into 
a metropolitan center, no one individual is more closely identified than 
George F. McCulloch. His name is connected with the first efforts to in- 
crease the manufacturing interests. With the organization of the Enter- 
prise Company in 1892, he at once became an important factor in the 
success of that movement, which undoubtedly was the solid foundation for 
the permanent future welfare of the city. He was secretary of its soliciting 
committee, and his enthusiasm and downright hard work for the cause 
brought the subscriptions to an amount where the company became a posi- 
tive influence in promoting the manufacturing growth of the city. When 
the city became tired of its antiquated street-car service, Mr. McCulloch 
took a leading part in the promotion of a company to give the city electric 
service, and after he had built a system within the city he became foremost 
in the more recent undertaking to connect Muncie with other towns by inter- 
urban. He was treasurer of the original Union Traction Company, and 
was its general manager before the present incumbent, A. W. Brady. To 
many people Mr. McCulloch is perhaps best known because of his donation to 
the city (in May, 1901) of the tract of land now called McCulloch Park, 
which is destined to be a source of lasting benefit and value to the present 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 709 

and future generations of Muncie citizen?. As an illustration of Air. .McCuI- 
loch's business energy, we may mention what is told on other pages that 
he was the founder of the Muncie Star Publishing Company, and one of 
the prmcipal promoters of the newspaper syndicate that now publishes papers 
m two other cities, and that within five years' time brought the circulation 
of the Star up to nearly thirty thousand, eclipsing all other papers in the 
local field. Mr. McCulloch was a member of the Whiteley Land Com- 
pany, which, during the early nineties, promoted the sale of the Whitelev 
subdivision and established the suburb of ^^■hiteley. 

While this summary comprises what are probably the best known of 
Mr. McCulloch's achievements, it is by no means all, and many of his 
undertakmgs are noted at their proper place in the general history of tlie 
county. His busmess connections have also been with the Indiana Brido-e 
Company, the Nelson Glass Company, the Muncie Natural Gas Com- 
pany, and many other large enterprises. 

Thirty years ago Mr. McCulloch was only known to the people of town 
and county as a young man occupying the position of deputy countv clerk 
ambitious, energetic and politically popular, but had not yet achie'ved re- 
markable success. Bom in Lancaster, Ohio, September 25, 1855 a son of 
Dr. James McCulloch, who, from 1S56 to 1877, was a well known phy- 
sician of Muncie. George F. had attended graded and high school in 
Muncie, and then became a clerk for some of the merchants, amon- them 
the Casady Queensware Company; also delivered groceries for \\-illiam 
Stewart, carried the mail and handled baggage, and, in fact, did the 
things closest to him, and did them so well that he was early marked as 
a y-oung man of enterprise. In the early days of photography he learned 
that business in connection with Lon M. Neely, but abandoned that oc- 
cupation in 1872 to become deputy county clerk under G. W Greene 
and was retained in that office during the term of A. L. Kerwood In the 
meantime he had studied law and been admitted to the bar, and in 1881 he 
formed a law partnership with the late John McMahan. His active prac- 
tice was interrupted within two years, and the partnership dissolved on 
account of his election in 1882 to the office of county clerk. He was re- 
elected in 1886, and left the office at the close of his term to enter actively into 
the busy scenes that characterized the development of Muncie durin- 
he early nineties. Mr. McCulloch married in September, 1883 Cora"" 
the daughter of the well-known Muncie merchant and business man' 
Arthur Patterson. Mrs. McCulloch at her death left one daughter, Martha. 
T T7 n" ^^'^"'°'=h^ '"^ther, who, before her marriage, was Miss Caroline 
J Fou ke, daughter of Dr. George D. Foulke, was a woman of remarkable 
character and talents, and during the last thirty years of her life was the 
principal leader in the various movements to advance the moral, aesthetic 
and educational standards of the city. Her life and character were, it is " 

enlTi? ' TM "'° "^""^ '" ""'''' '' '""^ ^'^ ^-"dation of her pres- 
ent culture of Muncie. A deserved tribute to her work as a charter mem- 



710 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

ber of the Muiicie Woman's Club has been paid by a friend in connection 
with the history of that club, but not only in the worthy movements under- 
taken by this club, but in many others she was an enthusiastic and devoted 
worker and an inspiring leader for many years. In order to perpetuate the 
influence of her noble character and leave a permanent tribute to her de- 
voted work it is the purpose of her son, Mr. McCulloch, to build a memorial 
chapel as the home of the Episcopal church of Muncie (see history of the 
church). Mrs. IMcCuUoch died May 14, 1904. 

Ch.\rles Maberry Kimbrough. The name of Charles M. Kimbrough 
stands conspicuously forth on the pages of Indiana's political and industrial 
history. The nation is greatest which produces the greatest and most 
manly men, as these must constitute the essentially greatest nation. Pur- 
suing each his personal good by exalted means they wrought on lines of 
the greatest good. Thus it is that the safety of our republic depends not 
so much upon the methods and measures as upon that manhood from 
whose deep sources all that is precious and permanent in life must at last 
proceed. 

We are led to the foregoing reflections \n reviewing, even in a cursory 
way, the salient points which mark the career of him whose name appears 
above. He has not alone attained prestige in the pursuit of his extensive 
business interests, but has been conspicuously identified with many interests 
which have subserved the material prosperity of Indiana, has proved a 
valuable factor in the legislative and political councils of his state, and has 
been in constant sympathy and touch with the work of Christianity that 
stands as an earnest of effective and zealous personal labor. As one of 
the representative men of Delaware county Senator Kimbrough deserves 
consideration in this compilation. 

In the village of Clarksville, Clinton county, Ohio, on the 5th of No- 
vember, 1847, there was born to Ira and Clara H. (Howland) Kimbrough, 
also natives of Clinton county, a son to whom was given the name of 
Charles Maberry. After completing his education in the public schools the 
lad followed agricultural pursuits for a time, but his tastes and inclina- 
tions were toward mechanics and he accordingly learned the trades of a 
blacksmith and machinist. When he had reached the age of twenty-six 
years he entered the mercantile business in Connersville, Indiana, but 
seeking a larger field for his endeavors he came to Muncie in 1876 and 
opened the first exclusive book and paper store in this city. In 1887, how- 
ever, he retired from that business in order to become the manag;_er of the 
Indiana Bridge Company, which had been established one year previously, 
and after two years as manager he was elected the president and general 
manager of the corporation, which, under his able management, has grown 
to larger proportions. During the first year the output of the manufactory, 
was seven hundred thousand pounds of finished metal, but in the present 
year it will exceed ten thousand tons. It is needless to say that in this 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 711 

gradual rise Mr. Kimbrough has brought to bear his rare executive ability, 
his mature judgment and indomitable energy and enterprise in shaping the 
affairs of the company and gaining for it the object for which it is striving. 
In his political adherency Mr. Kimbrough has ever been arrayed in 
support of the Republican party and in its principles, and it was in but 
natural sequence that he should become an active worker in the cause 
and one of the leaders in political work. From 1882 to 1883 he served as a 
member of the city council; from 1S83 to 1S84 as a member of the school 
b<:>ard ; in November, 1890, was elected clerk of the circuit court; and was 
appointed by Governor Durbin, in 1902, a member of the board of control 
of the state prison. In 1904 he was elected to the state senate from Dela- 
ware county, where he represented his constituency in a manly and straight- 
forward maimer, and his success in that high official position affords the 
best evidence of his capabilities as a leader. Previous to this time he 
had served as a delegate to the convention which nominated JvIcKinley and 
Roosevelt. In 1895 he was appointed by Governor Hanley as delegate to the 
.Peace Conference in New York; in September, 1S96, was appointed by 
Governor Hanley to the Prison Congress in Albany, New York ; and in 
December, 1896, was appointed by the governor to the Des Moines con- 
vention, which was called to advocate the election of United States senators 
by popular vote, and he is now one of the five commissioners on that 
subject. As a strong opponent of capital punishment he has been heard 
in the press and on the platform, and in the senate he was a strong factor 
in its opposition. He is distinctively a man of broad human sympathy, 
clearly defined principles and high intellectuality, and these have so entered 
into his make-up as to render him a natural leader and a director of opinion. 
In 1870 Mr. Kimbrough was united in marriage to Margaret A. Curry, 
a daughter of James and Mary Curry, old residents of Clinton county, Ohio. 
Out of this union were born three sons : Hal C, Frank H. and James L. 
The eldest, Hal C, is president of the Kimbrough Hardware Company ; 
Frank H. is vice-president of the Indiana Bridge Company, and James L. is 
treasurer of the Indiana Bridge Company. Senator Kimbrough has mem- 
bership relations with the Masonic fraternity, connected with the chapter 
and commandery, and his services in the Civil war, as a member of Com- 
pany I, Eighteenth Ohio \'olunteer Infantry, entitles him to membership 
in Williams Post, No. 78, G. A. R. During the long period of forty 
years he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Energetic, 
patriotic, with high ideals and a strong advocate of purity in public as well 
as private life, his example is well worthy of emulation. 

Mark Powers. Few men in Delaware county are more widely known 
or have attained greater prominence in its business circles than Mark Pow- 
ers, the president of the Gaston Banking Company. He was one of the 
organizers of this prominent industrial concern, which had its inception on' 
the 15th of May, 1902, and to him belongs the honor of being its first presi- 



712 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

dt-nt. He is z\>u the president and treasurer of the Gaston Canning Com- 
pany, a director and stockholder of the Merchants' Bank at Muncie. is in- 
terested in the F'owers & Company hardware business at Gaston, and is also 
interested in a hardware firm in Muncie known as Powers & Thompson. 
His faithful service in public life, as well as his personal worth, make the 
following history of general interest not only to the readers of the present 
day but also to future historians of this section. 

Mr. Powers was born in Elizabethtown (named in honor of his grand- 
mother, Elizabeth \\'ilson), Delaware county, Indiana, June 4, 1S45, his par- 
ents being Uriah and Sylvania (Wilson) Powers. The father was born in 
West Mrginia, but during the early '30's he came with his father, John 
Powers, to Indiana, where he entered eighty acres of land in Grant county, 
while later on he opened a store in Wheeling. He also built the Elizabeth 
JMills in Elizabethtown, and continued their conduct up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in Marion, Grant county, Indiana, in i860, when he 
had attained the age of sixty-five years. In Elizabethtown, Delaware 
county, Mr. Powers married Sylvania Wilson, who was born in Ohio, and 
died in 1S5O at the age of forty-five years. Their union was blessed by the 
birth of eight children, but only two of the number are now living, Mark 
and George, the last-named a resident of Washington township, Delaware 
county. 

During his l)0\hood days Mark Powers was deprived by death of his 
father, anil he then went to live with his uncle, John Powers, in Henry 
county, Indiana, remaining with him for about four years. His district 
school education was supplemented by an attendance of two terms in the 
school of Muncie and one term in the Jonesboro select school. In 1S64 he 
offered his services to the Union cause in the Civil war as a member of 
Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment of Indiana Volun- 
teers, for one hundred days. In the spring of 1865, having served his term 
in the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth, he reenlisted in Company K, One 
Hundred and Forty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Regiment, for one year. His 
services continued until the close of the conflict, and returning to his home, 
he resumed his farming operations in Washington township, also buying 
and shipping stock to Buffalo and Pittsburg. In 1890 he was elected to the 
office of treasurer of Delaware county, taking the oath of office on the loth 
of August following, and he was reelected to that position in 1892. He also 
served eight years as a trustee of Washington township. He was true and 
faithful to every trust reposed in him, so that his loyalty is above question, 
being manifest in days of peace as well as in times of war. 

In February, 1867, Mr. Powers married Mary M. Ferguson, who was 
born in Washington township, Delaware county, in 1849, the only child of 
Isaac and Susan (Lewis) Ferguson. The father made the overland jour- 
ney to Califoniia in 1849, spending about one year in the Golden state, and 
his death occurred in St. Louis, Missouri, on the return journey home. 
Nine children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Powers, but two of the num- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 713 

ber died in infancy, and George died in September, 1S97, aged twenty-seven 
years and one month, and at the time of his death he was deputy treas- 
urer of Delaware county. The six now Uving are Bert, Webb, Susan S., 
Paul, Bruce and John. 

W.xsHiNGTON Mayn.^rd. Among those wdio assisted in transforming 
Delaware county from a wilderness to its present high state of development 
is numbered the JMaynard family, who established their home within its. 
borders in a very early day in its history. When but a little lad Washington 
Maynard assisted his father in the clearing and cultivation of his farm, in 
the meantime attending the public schools near his home during the winter 
months when his services were not needed at home. Wlien he had reached 
the age of twenty-one years he began farming for himself, purchasing forty 
acres of land, on which had been erected a little log dabin, built with a mud 
and stick chimney. As his means permitted Mr. Maynard bought more land, 
and in 1872 built him a hewed log house. Farming continued as his occu- 
pation until 1890, when he left the farm, and since that time he has been 
engaged in the practice of law in Gaston. His success in a professional way 
affords the best evidence of his capabilities in this line. He is distinctively 
a man of high intellectuality and clearly defined principles, and these attri- 
butes have naturally led him into associations aside from his professional 
and business life. 

Mr. Maynard was- born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, June 21, 1837, but 
his educational training was received in the schools of Washington town- 
ship in Delaware county. He is a son of Benjamin and Letha (Tracy) May- 
nard, both of whom were born in Mrginia, but the deaths of these honored 
Delaware county pioneers occurred in Washington township, the father 
when he had reached the age of seventy-five years and four months and the 
mother at the age of sixty-five years. They were married in Tuscarawas 
county, Ohio, and became the parents of seven children, four of whom are 
now living, namely: Nancy, Washington, Emily and James R., the last- 
named a resident of Washington township. 

Benjamin Maynard, the father, followed agricultural pursuits in Ohio 
until his removal to Delaware county, Indiana, in 1841, making the journey 
hither with team and wagon and locating in W^ashington township, three 
miles northwest of where Gaston now stands, where he first purchased forty 
acres of timber land in the dense wilderness. Building him a little log 
cabin, twenty by twenty-four feet in size, he took up his abode therein and 
began the work of clearing his land. After clearing a few acres, however, 
he sold that property and bought another tract in the wilderness, consisting 
of eighty acres. He succeeded in clearing and placing his land under an 
excellent cultivation, and was numbered among the prominent agriculturists 
of the township, as well as one of its earliest and most honored pioneer rcsi-. 
dents. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and voted with 
the Whig party. 



714 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Air. Washington Alaynard, whose name introduces diis review, mar- 
ried, September 24, 1859, Martha Jane Thompson, who was born in Wash- 
ington township, Delaware county, January 10, 1842, the daughter of David 
and Malinda (Davis) Thompson. The father was born in Butler county, 
Ohio, October 27, 1817, and is now living with Mr. Alaynard. He is the 
son of David Thompson, Sr., who came to Henry county, Indiana, in 1823. 
Mrs. Thompson was born in Licking county, Ohio, and died on the loth of 
September, 1904, On the 24th of August, 1837, in Salem township, Delaware 
county, Indiana, she gave her hand in marriage to David Thompson, and they 
became the parents of six children, three sons and three daughters — Alzina, 
Amanda (deceased), Martha, Reuben (deceased), George ^deceased), and 
Joseph P., living in Chicago. 'Sir. and Mrs. Thompson came to Delaware 
county in 1837, soon after their marriage, locating in Washington township, 
where Air. Thompson erected a little log cabin twelve by fourteen feet and 
cleared about three acres of timber land. He later bought one hundred arid 
sixty acres of heavily wooded land west of where Gaston now stands, which 
he also cleared, and in 1874 moved to Muncie. Since 1501, however, he 
has been a resident of Gaston, making his home with Mr. and Mrs. May- 
nard. He became a member of the United Brethren church when twenty- 
five years of age, and in his political affiliations he was first a Whig, then 
a Republican, and now casts his vote independent of party ties. He w-as 
elected a justice of the peace in 1872 and was the incumbent for twelve and 
a half years. 

L^nto Air. and Mrs. Alaynard have been born the following children: 
Alar\- A., Aggy L., George T., all of whom are deceased, and John, who is 
living in Whiteley county, Indiana, and David S., a resident of the old home- 
stead farm in Washington township. They also have five grandchildren. 
Mr. Maynard was made a Mason in Wheeling Lodge Xo. 324, A. F. & A. M., 
was also a charter member of New Corner Lodge No. 425, A. F. & A. M., of 
which he served as master for eight years, and was demitted to Delaware 
lodge of that order at Muncie. He is also a member of New Corner Lodge 
No. 524, I. O. O. F., at Gaston, and of the Methodist' Episcopal church, in 
which he is serving as trustee, and is superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
He is a firm advocate of the principles of the Prohibition party. 

Bexoni Beuoy was born in the little log house which his father had 
built on the old homestead farm, which the son yet owns and cultivates, in 
Washington township, Delaware county, Indiana, September 15, 1838, the 
youngest son of Thomas and Mary (Flart) Beuoy, the history of whose lives 
will be found in the sketch of their son, Randolph Beuoj. 

During his boyhood days Benoni Beuoy assisted his father in clearing 
and improving his farm, and later he and his brothers each received one hun- 
dred acres of land from their father, continuing to work together until 1884. 
when their interests were dissolved, and each has since been working for 
himself. In 1867 Mr. Beuoy of this review and four other men made the 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 715 

overland journey by rail to Omaha, and there purchasing four mule teams, 
passed en route Helena, Montana, and they spent sixty-six days on the road, 
Mr. Beuoy walking a good deal of the distance. Reaching Helena, they sold 
their mules and outfit and came back to Bozeman, where he remained for 
two years, going in 1879 to Ogden, thence to Leesburg and Grantsville, 
Idaho, for one summer, and was there connected with the Union Pacific Rail- 
road Company. In the following spring he went to Cassel Rock and took 
up a hay ranch, where he was engaged in sheep shipping until 1882, but in 
that year returned to his home in Delaware county, spending thirty days on 
the return journey. Mr. Beuoy subsequently went to the Wasatch moun- 
tains in Utah, where he was engaged in the sheep business for two years, 
and returning thence to his home, engaged in agricultural pursuits with his 
brother Randolph. Since then he has continued the work of farming and 
sheep raising, raising principally Merino and Cotswold sheep, and during 
this year he sheared two hundred and fifty head, usually shearing from two 
hundred' to three hundred head annually. His homestead farm consists of 
one hundred and eighty-nine acres of well-improved land, located in section 
10, Washington township. He is a stanch Republican in his political affil- 
iations. 

On the 17th of June, 1876, Mr. Beuoy was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Lydia E. Smiley, who was born in Henry county, Indiana, at Blountsville, 
July 25, 1845, the daughter of Lee O. and Unis (Templin) Hayworth. The 
mother was born in 1818 in Highland county. Ohio, and her death occurred 
in 1875 at the age of fifty-seven years. In Henry county, Indiana, she gave 
her hand in marriage to Lee O. Hayworth, and of their eight children four 
are now living : Rebecca, who married John Thompson, and he is deceased ; 
Mrs. Beuoy; Gerard, who is married and living in Los Angeles, California; 
and Hannon O. 

Mr. Hayworth, the father, was born in Kno.xville, Tennessee, March 
24, 1823, but during his boyhood days he came with his widowed mother 
to Indiana, residing during their first few years in this state in Greentovvn. 
Then until 1856 he resided in Blountsville, where he followed his trade of 
blacksmithing, and removing to Blackford county, Indiana, purchased a 
farm and carried on its work in addition to his blacksmithing business until 
1857, when he removed to New Cumberland, now known as East Mathews. 
In 1874 he removed to Fairmount, and a short time afterward to Bolivar, 
Missouri, where he made his home until 1903, and since that time has re- 
sided at Summittsville, Madison county, Indiana. He is a worthy member 
of the Christian church and is a Republican in his political affiliations. 

His daughter Lydia became the wife of Henry Smiley, February 18, 
1S74. His death occurred on the 8th of February, 1875, ^^'^ i" the follow- 
ing year, as mentioned above, she became the wife of Mr. Beuoy. Mr. 
Beuoy has in his possession one of the old deeds, bearing the date of execu- 
tion in 1837 and signed by President Martin \'an Buren. This is one of the 
old souvenirs of the county. 



:i6 IIIST(_)RY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Charles T. rjEUOV, a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Washinq;- 
ton township, is a member of one of the oldest and most honored famiHes 
of Delaware county, and it was within its borders, in Washington, township, 
that his birth occurred, May 2, 1870, his parents being George W. and 
Alzina (Thompson) Beuoy. The father, who was also a native son of this 
township, born (Jctober 19, 1833, spent his boyhood days in assisting his 
father t(i clear the farm from the wilderness, attending the district schools 
during the \\ inter months. Remaining with his parents until twenty-eight 
years of age, he then purchased eighty acres of school land, heavily tim- 
bered, and hewed the logs with which to erect his first cabin home, a little 
building eighteen by twenty-two feet in size. After residing on this farm 
for about fifteen years he returned to the old homestead and spent his re- 
maining days there, dying on the i6th of March, 1887. He was the owner 
of two hundred and thirty acres of rich and well-cultivated land, the larger 
part of which he had cleared himself. He never cared for the honors or 
emoluments of public office, and was a Jackson Democrat politically. In 
his native township of Washington, September 15, 1861, Mr. Beuoy married 
Alzina Thompson, who was born in Salem township, Delaware county, Indi- 
ana, C)ctober 12, 1838, and yet survives her husband. They became the 
parents of four children: Nelson R., born August 16, 1862, died June 21, 
1902; Amanda A., born September 4. 1863, is the wife of Isaac Parkison, of 
Washington township; Annie E., born December 14, 1868. flied at the age 
of three years ; and Charles T. 

Charles T. Beuoy remained with his father and assisted him with his 
fami work until his death. Aliout four years after his father's death he 
married, and in 1902 erected a pleasant and commodious residence, also a 
fine barn and other modern farm buildings, the farm being one of the most 
fertile and best-improved tracts in the community. In addition to his gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits he also breeds Duroc and Poland-China hogs, feed- 
ing from one to two carloads each year, and he also breeds fine draft horses. 

Mr. Beuoy married, February 4, 1892, Allie M. Milhollin, whose birth 
also occurred within the borders of Washington township, January 27, 1873, 
and she too is a member of one of the old and prominent families of Dela- 
ware county. She is a daughter of Nathan and Mary (Carmin) Milhollin, 
whose history will be found elsewhere in this work. One little daughter 
has been born of this union. Fern I., born October 18, 1892. Mr. Beuoy 
gives his aid and cooperation to the Democratic party. Mr. and Mrs. Beuoy 
have one of the old parchment deeds, executed under the hand and seal of 
President Martin Van Buren, and bears the date of August 12, 1838, one 
of the valuable souvenirs of the county and their home. This is the sixth 
deed of the kind found so far in the county. 

David S. Mavnwrd has made his home within the borders of Delaware 
county, the place of his nativity, throughout his entire life, and is now prom- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 717 

inentl}- identified w itli its farming and stock-raising interests. In the mean- 
time, however, he has been an extensive traveler, thus obtaining that thor- 
ough knowledge which travel alone can bring. In 1902 he visited Pueblo, 
Colorado Springs, Denver and Cripple Creek, and in 1903 traveled exten- 
sively through the west and northwest, spending some time in Kansas City. 
In 1904. with his wife, he again visited the northwest, attending the exposi- 
tion at Portland, also visiting Seattle, Spokane and other points, touring 
in all ten different states. In 1906 he visited northwestern Canada, and on 
that trip passed through Assiniboia. Saskatchewan and Alberta. 

Mr. Maynard was born in Washington township, Delaware county, In- 
diana. October 6, 1870, a son of Washington and Martha (Thompson) Alay- 
nard, whose history will be found elsewhere in this work; He remained at 
home with his parents until his marriage at the age of twenty-one years, 
after which he resided for two years in Muncie. Removing thence to Gas- 
ton, he spent a similar period there, after which he returned to his father's 
farm, and has since carried on its work with the exception of the periods 
spent in travel. He breeds full-blooded Jersey and Duroc hogs and also 
full-blooded Shorthorn cattle and a good grade of horses and Shropshire 
sheep. He is at the present time experimenting with the raising of Turkey 
Red wheat, he having brought his seed wheat from Washington, and he ex- 
pects to make of this a success. 

On the loth of October, 1891, Mr. Maynard was united in marriage to 
Ida May ^Marshall, who was born in Alexandria, Madison county, Indiana, 
May 2, 1872, a daughter of George and Mary (Rathell) Marshall. Mr. 
Marshall was born in Delaware county, Indiana, December 16, 1840. He 
was a farmer up to the time of his enlistment for the Civil war, in February, 
1862, in Company B, Thirty-sixth Indiana Regulars, and was discharged 
in December, 1865. He participated in the raid after Hood from Chatta- 
nooga to Nashville, from Frankton to Nashville, through Texas, and from 
Chickamauga to Atlanta. After his return from the army he resumed his 
agricultural labors in Madison county, but since 1907 he has resided at the 
Soldiers' Home in Marion. He is a stanch Republican in his political affilia- 
tions. i\Irs. Marshall was born in Ohio and died in 1875. They were mar- 
ried in Anderson, Anderson county, Indiana, March 12, 1867, and became 
the parents of three children: Charles E., who married Addie Bays and 
was killed in a runaway accident ; Ida May, the wife of Mr. Maynard ; and 
Mollie, who died in infancy. For his second wife Mr. Marshall married, 
in September, 1877, Miss Elizabeth Paugh, and their two children were 
Norah, the wife of C. Turner, and one who died in infancy. By his third 
wife, Mrs. Sarah Jane Grubb, he had one son, Frederick A. Two children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Maynard, George F. and Urbane V., bom 
respectively September 28, 1893, and February 19, 1900. The family are 
members of the United Brethren church, in which Mr. Maynard is serving 
as a trustee at the present time. 



71S HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Michael Corv, who has been identified with the business interests of 
Delaware county throughout many years of his life, is a representative of 
one of the honored pioneer families of the Hoosier state, who trace their 
descent to the land of Scotland. John and William Cory emigrated from 
that countr}- to the United States, and to them belongs the honor of estab- 
lishing the familv tree in the new world. The former, born October 9, 161 1, 
died March 7, 16S5. He was married at New London, Connecticut, July 
2, 1638, to Ann Solomon, who was born in that commonwealth February 
5, 1617, and died January 17, 1681. 

Daniel Cory, the father of ]\lichael, was Ijorn in Ross county, Ohio, 
July 7, 1S08, a son of Nathan and Sarah (Wright) Cory, the former a 
farmer and Baptist minister. Daniel Cory came to Indiana in the spring 
of 1826, entering one hundred and sixty acres of land in Blue River town- 
ship, Henry county, where he erected a little log cabin in the wilderness 
and became numbered among the commonwealth's earliest and honored resi- 
dents. He withstood all the hardships and privations which were the lot of 
the frontier settlers, but in time he built him a two-story hewed log house, 
in which the remainder of his life was spent. With the passing years he 
also purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Washington town- 
ship, Delaware county. He was recognized as one of the leading farmers 
of Henry county. His two brothers, Joseph and Abraham, located in that 
county in 1823, also purchasing land in Blue River township, and tliey were 
both soldiers in the war of 1812. Mr. Cory was a Jefferson Democrat po- 
litically and was a member of the Baptist church. 

On the 1st of December, 1826. in Ross county, Ohio, Mr. Daniel Corv 
married Mary Howard, who was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, 
August 22, 1800, and died on the 14th of September, 1872, while her hus- 
band survived her for one year, dying on the 29th of August, 1873. They 
became the parents of eleven children: Israel, who died December 13, 188S, 
and his twin sister died in infancy, January 9, 1827; John, born March 18, 
1828, died October 11, 1841 ; Henry C. who was born January 24, 1830, and 
died in July, 1892, in California, married Hannah Eller, also deceased; Na- 
than, born November 11, 1831, died September 2", 1893; Adam, born Janu- 
ary 15, 1834, died March 17, 1903; William, born January 2.2, 1836, died 
April 29, 1836; Michael, the subject of this review; David L., born February 
14, 1839, died October 30, 1884; Nancy L., born August 10, 1842, married 
William Earner, and is living at Keystone, Wells county, Indiana; and Solo- 
mon, born October 20, 1843, '^'^d December 3, 1846. 

Michael Cory was born in Henry county, Indiana, Februar\' i, 1S37, and 
received his eflucational training in its early public schools, which he at- 
tended only fri)m two to three months during the winter months, in the 
meantime assisting his father to clear the home farm and place it under cul- 
tivation. When he had reached the age of twenty years he engaged in 
teaching school, and also taught a singing school, using a melodeon, which 
he has owned f(ir over forty years. Coming to Washington township, Dela- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 719 

ware county, ]N[arch 20. 1861, he continued his residence here until 1867, 
when he removed to Sulphur Springs, Henry county, continuing mercantile 
pursuits there for one year. For two or more years thereafter he worked 
at carpentering, was also a justice of the peace, and for about five years 
served as the postmaster of Sulphur Springs. He was also engaged in 
the dry goods business there for one year, and was then in the grocery 
business for about eight years. On the 5th of February, 1878, he returned 
to W^ashington township and resumed his agricultural pursuits, and in 18S4 
he erected on his farm a commodious and substantial frame residence. 

Mr. Cory married, February 21, 1861, Miss Louisa Canaday, who was 
born in Wayne county, Indiana, December 8, 1842, a daughter of Enos and 
Flannah (Chamness) Canaday, the father born in North Carolina, Sep- 
tember 27, 1819, and now living with his youngest son, Emanuel Canaday, 
on the old homestead in the northwest corner of Wayne county ; but the 
mother, born August 8, 1812, died September 6, 1888. They were married 
near Hagerstown, Wayne county, Indiana, and became the parents of seven 
children : Louisa, the wife of Mr. Cory ; William, born June 22, 1S44, died 
February 9, 1866; Walter, who was born April i, 1846, married Ellen Roe, 
and is living in Henry county; Jesse, born December 13, 1847, married first 
Jane Wright and second Delia Brown, and is living in Winchester, Ran- 
dolph county, Indiana; Matilda, born May 6, 1851, married M. D. Harry, 
and is living in Henry county; Mary E., born September i, 1853, married 
O. Williams, their home being in Wayne county, Indiana; and Emanuel, 
born August 10, 1856, married for his second wife Catherine Milspaw, and 
is living on the old homestead farm in Wayne county. Mr. Canaday mar- 
ried for his first wife Luella Taylor, and she is deceased. Enos Canaday 
came to Indiana in an early day in its history and located in Wa_\Tie county, 
where he owned at one time over two hundred acres of land. He cleared his 
land from its dense growth of timber, placed his fields under an excellent 
state of cultivation, and replaced the little log cabin which first served as 
the home for the family with a large frame dwelling, beautifully finished 
in walnut, and in this pleasant residence he yet makes his home, surrounded 
by the many comforts and luxuries which years of past labor have brought 
him. He is a member of the New Light or Christian church, and since 1856 
he has been affiliated with the Republican party, to which he transferred his 
relations from the Whigs. 

Six children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Cory, namely : 
William L., Wesley (who died at the age of thirteen months), Mary H., 
Laura E., Ina I., and one who died in infancy. Mr. Cory has sensed as the 
trustee of his township for one term, representing the Democratic party, 
and he is a worthy and acceptable member of the Baptist church. 

Levi L. Carter. One of the oldest and most prominent of the early 
families of Indiana is now worthily represented in Washington township, 
Delaware county, by Levi L. Carter. His paternal grandfather, Isaac G. 



720 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Carter, a native of Xortliport, Waldo county, Maine, born September 6, 
1797, took up his abode in Grant count}-, Indiana, during a very early epoch 
in its history, where he built him a little log cabin home in the wilderness, 
and was thereafter prominently identified with the county's history. In 
Perry county, CJhio, on the i6th of December, 1819, he had married Hen- 
rietta Joslin, who was also a native of Waldo county, Maine, born June 9, 
1S02, but when a little lady of thirteen years, in 1815, she became a resident 
of Ohio. Ten sons were born of that union, and the parents both passed 
away in death in Grant county, Indiana, the mother on the ist of April, 
1863, and the father six years later, in 1S69. 

Ira J. Carter, a son of these brave and honored Indiana pioneers, was 
born in Washington county, Llhio, March 15, 1822, and during his early 
boyhood days he assisted his father in the clearing and cultivating of his 
farm in Grant county. He at one time was the owner of one hundred and 
sixty-nine acres of land, but this he divided among his children. During his 
younger days he taught school, and he also served as a justice of the peace 
and as the postmaster of Trask, receiving his commission as such in 1S65, 
and he held that important office for twenty-seven years, or until advancing 
age compelled him to resign. He was a devoted and worthy member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and politically was a Jackson Democrat. 
On the 25th of July, 1844, in Jefferson township, Grant county, Indiana, 
Mr. Carter was united in marriage to Eliza Ann Corn, who was born in 
Rush county, this state, June 5, 1825, and they became the parents of eleven 
children, seven of whom are now living: Joseph N., who married Jane 
Patterson ; Olive, the wife of John E. Kibbey ; Levi L., of this review ; Mary 
E., the wife of Elmer E. Hiatt; Isaac L., who married Margaret Fitch; 
Jerusha, the wife of John R. Grouse; and Amy A., the wife of Wilbert A. 
Helms. Mr. Carter, the father, died on the 21st of March, 1899, in Jeffer- 
son township. Grant county, and thus another of the brave and honored 
early residents of Indiana was called to his final reward. Mrs. Carter came 
to Delaware county in 1836, when Muncie had not over a dozen houses, and 
the hotel was a double log house, called an inn. 

Levi L. Carter was born in Jefferson township. Grant county, April 13, 
1855, and as a bo_\- he worked on his father's farm during the summer 
months and attended the district schools in tlie winters. As his father was 
in poor health, it devolved upon the son in his early years to take charge 
of the old homestead, which he conducted until his twenty-seventh year, 
also working sixty-seven acres during this time. In the spring of 1883 he 
came to Washington township, Delaware county, and began farming on one 
hundred and sixty-five acres, while at the present time he is superintending 
the work of two hundred and five acres. He carries on general farm work, 
and also breeds a good grade of stock, cattle, sheep and hogs. In 1895 he 
completed the erection of his attractive and modern farm residence, and he 
is numbered among the progressive and leading agriculturists and business 
men of Washington township. 



HISTORY OF DEI. AWARE COl'XTY 721 

On the 1st of October, 18S2, Mr. Carter was united in marriage to 
^lary Amanda Slater, who was born in Jefferson township, Grant countv, 
Indiana, May 5, 1858, a daughter of William and Alary T. (Marks) Slater, 
natives respectively of Richhill county, Ohio, and Loudoun county, Vir- 
ginia, the father born on the 12th of September, 1826, and died December 
15, 1S74, and the mother bom November 25, 1824, died on the i6th of Tan- 
uary, 1879. They were married in Guernsey county, Ohio, January 9, 1851, 
and of their six children, three sons and three daughters, four are now 
living: Uree Ann, the wife of Thomas F. Scott; Mary A., the wife of Mr. 
Carter; John William, who married Inez Horner; and George F., who 
married Cora Atkinson. 

William Slater came to Indiana in April, 1853, and located in Jefferson 
.township. Grant county, on the east bank of the Mississinewa river, where he 
had previously purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, and in time 
he added to this tract until he was the owner of four hundred and ninety 
acres, all in Jefferson township. His entire business career was devoted to 
agricultural pursuits, although when a young man he had learned the car- 
penter's trade. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
affiliated with the Republican party. 

One daughter, Dora Ethel, has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Carter. She 
graduated in the grammar school of district Xo. 4. Washington, township, 
when but twelve years of age, while later she completed the course in the 
Summitville high school of Madison county, doing four years' work in 
three, and for fifteen months thereafter she attended Hiron's Business Col- 
lege in Muncie, Indiana. She has since served as a stenographer for the 
Grant County Bank of Upland, and also teaches music on both the piano 
and organ. In his political affiliations Mr. Carter votes independent of 
party ties, and is an active factor in the work of the growth and upbuilding 
of his community. Mrs. Carter is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

George W. Huber, M.D. The Gaston Milling Company is one of the 
leading industrial institutions of Delaware county, and its manager. Dr. 
George W. Huber, is therefore well known to its residents. He has been 
identified with this business throughout his entire business career, having 
operated the mill for his father from 1882 until the latter's death, and since 
that time he has conducted it for himself. Gaston also claims him among 
her native sons, his birth occurring in this city on the 7th of May, 1867, 
his parents being Frederick and Susan (Boyle) Huber. 

Frederick Huber was born in Germany, eight miles from Stuttgart, 
in 1838, and his death occurred in Gaston in 1898. In Gaston he was mar- 
ried to Susan Boyle, who was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, in 1840, 
and of their ten children, eight sons and two daughters, seven' are now' 
living— George W., James F., William E., Amanda C, Albert L., Freder- 
ick, Jr., and Frank. The two last named are twins. Air. Huber, the father, 



722 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

came to the United States with his parents when sixteen years of age, mak- 
ing the journey on a sailing vessel, and they were two and a half months 
on the ocean, and from New York harbor they made their way to Darke 
county, Ohio. Mr. Huber continued to reside with his parents until i860, 
when he came to New Corner, Delaware county, Indiana, where he fol- 
lowed his trade of carriagemaking until his enlistment for the Civil war on 
the 1st of August, 1863. He was made a member of Company B, One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Indiana \'olunteer Regiment, and was discharged 
on the 1st of March, 1864, having served his full term of enlistment. He 
participated in the battles of Lookout Mountain, Walker's Ford, Strawberry- 
Plains, and was with his regiment in all of its battles and skirmishes with 
the exception of a short time which he spent in the hospital, his health hav- 
ing become impaired during his army service. Returning from the army, 
Mr. Huber engaged in the manufacture of wagons, to which in 1880 he 
added a saw and flour milling business, while later on he engaged in farm- 
ing and stock-raising, merely superintending the business, for his health 
would not then permit of active labor. He was an active member of the 
United Brethren church, and in 1873 he furnished the money, with the ex- 
ception of ninety-three dollars, with which to erect the United Brethren 
Church in Christ at Gaston. He was well and favorably known throughout 
Delaware county and also the state of Indiana, and was loved and honored 
for his many noble traits of character. In his early life he gave his political 
support to the Republican party, but later on became identified with the 
Democracy, although in local politics he voted for the inan rather than for 
the party. 

George W. Huber received an excellent educational training in his boy- 
hood days, first attending the high school and then the normal of Muncie, 
while later he became a student in the American Medical College at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, in which he graduated with the class of 1894, and with the 
class of 1907 graduated from the Eclectic Medical College at Indianapolis, 
Indiana. On the 2d of March, 1890, he married Miss Corrina May Barrett, 
whose birth occurred on the 24th of January, 1870, and her death on the 9th 
of December, 1898. She was the daughter of Samuel and Lana (Mclnterf) 
Barrett, both of whom were born in Delaware county, Indiana. Mr. Bar- 
rett served with Company B, One Hundred and Eighteenth Indiana Volun- 
teer Regiment, in the Civil war, and his chosen life occupation is farming. 
For his second wife ]Mr. Huber chose Miss Nannie Thompson, their wed- 
ding occurring December 25, 1900. She was born in Eaton, Ohio, October 
5, 1874, the daughter of Frank and Sarah (Shepard) Thompson, the former 
of whom was a farmer, born in Ohio, and was a soldier in the army during 
the Civil war. His last days were spent in Delaware county. Two children 
were born to Mr. Huber by his first marriage, Alfred W. and Beatrice B. 
JMr. Huber is a member of the State IMillers' Association. Since his boy- 
hood days he has held membership relations with the United Brethren 
chnrch, and his political affiliations are with the Democratic party. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COL'XTY T23 

Walter P. Mitchell, AI. D. Since 1899 Dr. Mitchell has been en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Gaston, and in addition 
to the large private practice which he has earned in this vicinity through 
his ability, his abiding sympathy and his earnest zeal, he is also the surgeon 
for the Chicago, Cincinnati and Louisville Railroad at this place. 

The Doctor is a native son of Indiana, born in Henry county on the 
2d of March,- 1862, a son of Samuel and Margaret (Swope) Mitchell, the 
former a native of Madison county, this state, born October 14, 1835, and 
the latter of Henry- county, Indiana, born March 6, 1842. They are now 
residents of Madison county. Their marriage was celebrated in Middle- 
town of this state, and the only child born of this union was Dr. Walter P. 
Mitchell. The father has followed milling and agricultural pursuits, and 
in 1S58 he and John Swope erected the Middletown mill, continuing 
as proprietors for a number of years, after which he turned his attention 
to farming. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company E, Eighih 
Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, for three months, and in that time was 
made the lieutenant of his company. At the expiration of his tirst term 
of service he re-enlisted for three years or during the war. At the close 
of the conflict he returned to the milling business, but selling his interests 
therein he engaged in farming, and in 187S retired from an active business 
life. Pie is a member of Middletown lodge of the Masonic order, and is 
identified with the Republican party. 

Dr. Mitchell, the only child of this well known resident of Delaware 
county, was born in Middletown, Henry county, Indiana, March 2, 1S62, 
and received his literary training in the Danville Normal College, of Dan- 
ville, Indiana, while his medical training was begun in Rush Aledical Col- 
lege of Chicago, in which he graduated with the class of 1886. In the 
same year of his graduation he located in Aladison county for the practice 
of his profession, but later moved to Charlottesville, Indiana, and in 1S8S 
pursued a post-graduate course in surgery in Cincinnati, Ohio. From 
1895 until 1899 he was engaged in general practice and railroad surgery in 
Wisconsin, and it was in the latter year that he located in Gaston, where 
he has ever since enjoyed a large and lucrative practice in both medicine 
and surgery. 

On die 13th of April, 18S9, Dr. Mitchell married Miss Carrie L. 
Smith, who was born in Hancock county, Indiana, July 16, 1867, the daugh- 
ter of Timothy F. and Dorzina (Roland) Smith, natives respectively of 
Virginia and Hancock county, Indiana. The mother still resides in the 
county^ of her birth, having attained the age of seventy-two years. Of 
their eight children six are now living.— Joseph, Olive, Elizabeth, Carrie, 
Rose and Bertha. Mr. Smith was a prominent and well known agri- 
culturist of Hancock county, where he owned many acres of land, and he 
was long numbered among the county's most influential men His death 
occurred at the age of forty-four years. He was also a prominent mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows' order, in which he held all the state offices He 



:5-i HISTORY OF DELA\^^\RE COUXTY 

was a menibei of the Christian church, and gave his political support to 
the Democratic party. One little daughter. Halcyon Margaret, has been 
born to Dr. and Mrs. Mitchell. The Doctor is a stanch Republican in his 
political affiliations, and i a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Thgm.xs L. Dunn was born in Washington township, Delaware 
county, February 4. 1S64. Flis father, John Dunn, one of the honored 
early residents of Delaware county, was born in Monroe county, Ohio, 
August 25, 1829. and his death occurred in Washington township of this 
county March 20, 1903. He was the son of John and Catherine (Knight) 
Dunn, the former of whom was bom in Monongalia county. West Virginia, 
and the latter in Monroe county, Ohio. Mr. John Dunn, St., went to Monroe 
county when a young man, remaining there until his marriage, and follow- 
ing this event he engaged in farming, continuing that occupation in Ohio 
until 1832, the year of his arrival in Delaware county, Indiana. Arriving 
here, he secured one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 15, 
Washington township, afterward purchasing a tract of two hundred and 
forty acres, but he remained on the first purchase until his death, which 
occurred in 1865. His wife died in 1863. both passing away in the faith 
of the Baptist church. Mr. Dunn gave his political support to the Democ- 
racy- until 1856, when he joined the Republican party. 

His son, John Dunn, Jr., remained obedient to his parents' will until 
twenty-one years of age, and he then rented his father's farm until the 
latter's death, when he inherited eighty acres of the homestead and bought 
an adjoining eighty acres, living upon this land for about ten or twelve 
years. He then purchased one hundred acres in section 10, where he spent 
the remainder of his life, at one time owning four hundred acres of fine 
farming land. He erected one of the handsomest residences in the town- 
ship and was numbered among the county's most prominent citizens. 

Mr. Dunn married, September 3, 1854, Serepta Littler, who was born 
in Grant county, Indiana, Februarv- 24, 1834, a daughter of Thomas and 
Susan (Fry) Littler, the former of vi'hom was born in Hardy county. West 
X'irginia, in 1802, and the latter in the same county in 1805. In 1829 they 
journeyed to Grant county, Indiana, where they entered one hundred and 
twenty acres of land and afterward purchased one hundred and thirty- 
eight acres. Mrs. Littler died in 1869, but her husband survived until 18S3, 
both dying in Iowa. They were members of the Methodist church, and 
were worthy and highly esteemed people. To Mr. and Mrs. Dunn were 
bom the following children : Rosetta, the wife of John Dorton ; Sylvester 
C., who married Angeline Richards; Thomas L., who married Ella Linder ; 
Alma Amanda, the wife of B. Frank Duling; and Emma May. Mrs. Dunn 
died on the 27th of August, 1893, and on the 20th of March, 1906, her 
husband joined her in the home beyond, their remains now resting side by 
side in the New Cumberland cemetery. He was well known and honored 
in the county in which he had so long made his home, and was a firm be- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 725 

liever in the principles of the Democratic party, giving to it his hearty 
support. 

Thomas L. Dnni\, a son of this honored pioneer couple, remained with 
his parents during the period of liis boyhood and youth, assisting his father 
to clear the farm from its dense growtli of timber, and they lived together 
until 1904 when the son removed to another part of the homestead. He 
carries on the general work of the farm and is also engaged quite exten- 
sively in stG.i:k-raising, handling a fine grade of Duroc hogs and other 
stock. His farm consists of eight}' acres of fertile and well improved 
land. 

On the 26th of February, 1896, ^Ir. Dunn married Miss Ella Linder, 
who was born in Grant county, Indiana. April 28, 1866, the daughter of 
James H. and iMartha E. (Watson) Linder. The father, who was born 
in Muskingum county, Ohio, April 5, 1833, came to Indiana with his 
parents, Jacob and Elsie Linder, when but six years of age, the family home 
being established in Grant county, Indiana, where Mr. Linder helped his 
father to clear and improve his farm. The first home which he owned was 
a little log cabin, but later on this was superseded by the fine brick house in 
which he spent the remainder of his days, passing to his final reward on 
the 27th of January, 1903. He was the owner of about three hundred 
acres of land, all of which he had improved, and he also bought and sold 
cattle, hogs and sheep, becoming- extensively identified with the stock-raising 
industry. During a number of years he served as a school director, was 
also a supervisor of his township, was a Whig politically, and was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. In 1859 Mr. Linder married Martha E. 
Watson, who was born in Grant county. Indiana, March 26, 1841, and is 
now living in Upland of that county. They had five children : Philena, the 
wife of Jacob Rogers, of Blackford county, Indiana ; Lemon M., who mar- 
ried Ella Walters; Ella, the wife of Mr. Dunn; Norah ; and Lettie, who 
married Eli Balenger. -Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dunn, 
namely: Ralph L., Carlos M., Clifford. Delores M. and Mary L. The 
youngest child died in infancy. Mr. Dunn gives his political support to 
the Republican party. 

James H. Wills was born in Licking county, Ohio, March 31, 1834, 
the only child of Samuel and Mary (Wills) Wills, both of whom were also 
born in the Buckeye state. The father spent his life in that commonwealth 
and there died, and the mother afterward married in Grant county, Indiana, 
Henry Richards, by whom she had five sons, three now living; Benjamin, 
William and Thomas. Mrs. Richards died in Grant county when she had 
reached the age of forty-four years. 

James H. Wills came with his widowed mother to Indiana when four 
years of age, spending their first two years in this state in Washington 
township, Delaware county, after which they removed to Grant county. In 
1864 he removed to Marion county, Iowa, and purchased a farm, remain- 



726 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

ing in that count)' until 1875, and from that year until i8Si he was a resi- 
dent of Cass county, Iowa. Going thence to Audubon county of that 
state, he remained there until 1891, when he returned to Grant county, Indi- 
ana, and in 1S94 came to Washington township, Delaware county. In 
1905 he retired from tlie work of the farm and now rents his land, his 
well directed labors in the past years having won for him an honored re- 
tirement. Air. Wills has membership relations with the Methodist Episcopal 
church and also witli the Odd Fellows' fraternity, becoming a member of 
Atlantic Lodge No. 80, of Atlantic, Iowa, in 1880, and is a member of 
Wheeling Encampment No. 125, of Wheeling, but the meetings are held at 
j\lathc\v2. He has held all the offices in this encampment. 

When he had reached the age of twenty-two years JNIr. Wills married 
Sarah L. Sanders, tlieir wedding having been celebrated on the 3d of June, 
1850. ihe was bom in Grant county, Indiana, November 24, 1838, a 
daughter of William and Rachel (_ Wharton J Sanders. The father, who was 
born in Virginia September ly, i8<jy, came to Indiana in 1820, thus becom- 
ing numbered among the commonwealth's earliest pioneers, and he estab- 
lished liis home in the then wilderness of Grant county. His first residence 
was a little log cabin on the banks of the Mississinevva river, but later this 
log cabin home was replaced by a frame dwelling, and subsequently the 
modern and substantial frame residence which is yet standing was built. 
iVIr. Sanders' farm consisted of one hundred and eighty acres, which he 
evolved from the wilderness to its present high state of cultivation. He 
was a member of the Aiethodist church, and was a Whig in his political 
affiliations. In Delaware county he married Rachel Wharton, who was 
born in Uhio April 2, 1812, and her death occurred at the advanced age 
of eighty-one years. Mr. Sanders passed away in death at the age of 
seventy-one years. In their family were five children, of whom three are 
now living: Nancy Jane, the widow of David Collins; Sarah L., who be- 
came the wife of Air. Wills; and John. Of tlie ten children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Wills three are now living, namely : John W., who married Alice 
Lacher ; Mary A., the wife of M. P. Allen, of Alathews, Indiana; and 
Charles L., who married Bertha Hayworth, now deceased. Mr. and Airs. 
Wills also have ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 

IsA.\c Newton Parkison was born within the borders of W'ashington 
township, where he has spent his subsequent life and is prominently identi- 
fied with its farming and stock-raising interests, Delaware county, Indiana, 
September 27, 1857. His father, Samuel Parkison, was a native son of the 
Buckeye state, born in Somerset county, Ohio, August 28, 1841, and in 
1853 he came with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Parkison, to Indiana, 
the family home being established on the banks of White river, where the 
little lad grew to mature years. Remaining under the parental roof until 
his marriage, he then engaged in farming for himself, and at one time was 
the owner of two hundred and twenty acres, the most of which he cleared 




/J)ythJ> c/-^^Mj:<Cy /)v. (yro^'i^t 



^^L^TT^z; 




J'-^iui^ A 9mi^ 



ff-T^ 



HISTORY OF DELA\\'ARE COUNTY 731 

hiiriself. On the first forty acre tract which he bought was located his log 
cabin home, but later on he sold his farm of eighty acres to the Western 
Improvement Company for one hundred dollars an acre, and built the 
brick house in which he spent the remainder of his life, dying on the 28th 
of Alarch, iSg6. With his agricultural pursuits he was also extensively 
engaged in buying hogs, which he shipped to the Butialo and Cincinnati 
markets. He was a good and worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and affiliated with the Republican party. His fraternal relations 
were with the Odd Fellows order, affiliating with Yorktown Lodge No. 
345, in which he filled all of the offices and acted as Noble Grand. He was 
also a member of the Encampment at Muncie. Mr. Parkison was married 
in Delaware county to one of its native daughters, Jane Neeley, whose 
birth occurred in Mount Pleasant township. She died at the age of forty- 
two years, in 1879. Five children were born of this union: Emma, who 
died at the age of thirty-one years; Isaac, the subject of this review; John, 
who married Melly Williamson ; Oliver, who died in infancy ; and Joseph, 
who married Melvina Humbert and is living in Yorktown. 

As a farmer lad Isaac N. Parkison assisted in the work of the home- 
stead farm, remaining at home until his twenty-fourth year, when he was 
married and engaged in farming for himself in Mount Pleasant township. 
In 1886 he removed to Washington township, but three years later re- 
turned to Yorktown, and it was in 1892 that he came again to Washington 
township and located on his present homestead farm in section 24, where 
he now operates one hundred and fifteen acres of rich and well-improved 
land, and on which in 1904 he erected a modern and commodious home. 
His church relations are with the Methodist Episcopal denomination, and 
he is a member of Yorktown Lodge No. 345, I. O. O. F., of which he is a 
past noble grand. He is also a member of Muncie Camp No. 30, and Mrs. 
Parkison is a Rebekah. 

Mr. Parkison married, September 7, 1882, Miss Amanda Beuoy, who 
was born in Washington township, Delaware county, September 4, 1863, a 
daughter of George W. and Alzina (Thompson) Beuoy. Six children have 
been born to them: Jessie Pearl, who died at the age of seventeen years; 
Samuel B., Ella J., Sallie M., Ralph R., who died in infancy, and Earl 
Thompson. Samuel B. and Sallie M. have both received their diplomas 
in the common schools. He received his with the class of 1902 and Sallie 
with the class of 1905. Samuel also took one year's high school work, and 
Sallie is now in her second year in the high school at Gaston, Indiana. 

John W. DeWitt. Distinguished for the honorable record he won 
for his services on the battlefield during the Civil war, and for his life record 
as an upright, honorable and valued citizen, John W. DeWitt, of Gaston, 
fully deserves the esteem and respect so generously accorded him by his 
neighbors, friends and associates. A native of Delaware county, he was 



732 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COl'XTY 

born in Monroe townj^hip August 24, 1846, a son of Elisha DeWitt, and in 
this part of the state he has hafl his home during his entire life. 

Born in Wayne county, Inchana, I )ctober 17, 1S20, Elisha DeWitt has 
now the distinction of being one of the oldest residents of Monroe township, 
The son of a pioneer settler of this county, he has seen wonderful changes 
take place in the face of the country during his long life, watching with great 
pride its gradual evolution from a dense wilderness to a superb agricultural 
region whose well-cultivated and well-stocked farms give sure indications 
of its general prosperity. He married Mary Gib-on. who spent her entire 
life in Indiana, dying at the age of seventy-nine years. They had a large 
family of children, fourteen in number, and of these eight are living, 
namely: Catherine, Cynthia, Rebecca, John W., Julia, Caroline, Patrick 
and Daniel W. He is a Republican in politics, having formerly been a 
Whig, and is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
he was class leader for many years. Socially he is one of the oldest members 
of Burlington Lodge, No. 485, A. F. & -\. M. 

Spending the days of his bo\-hood and youth at home, John W. DeWitt 
attended the district school during the winter seasons, and helped as much 
as he could to clear the land which his father-in-law, Harvey Heath, entered 
from the C.overnment. On July 29, 1863, when but sixteen years old, he 
enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Eighteenth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, at Muncie, and in March, 1864, his tenn of enlistment having 
.expired, he was honorably discharged. In May, 1S64, Mr. DeWitt again 
offered his services to his country, enlisting for one hundred days in 
Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
he, with twenty of his comrades, receiving for this patriotic act a eulogy 
signed by President Lincoln. At the end of the one hundred days he was 
honorably discharged, and in February, 1865, he re-enlisted in Company E, 
One Hundred and Forty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, from which 
he received his honorable discharge on the nineteenth anniversary of his 
birth. He was on the field at the Battle of Blue Springs, and at Walkers 
Ford was detailed from the line of battle to guard teams. ^Ir. DeWitt 
left home in 1863, a smooth-faced lad, with the thoughts and feelings of a 
boy, and came home a man, old not in years, but in experience, and in the 
years spent upon the battlefield and in camp he saw more of life in its sadness 
and Erlorv than manv men see in a life of three score and ten years. Since 
his return to civic life Mr. DeWitt has been extensively'engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits in Monroe and Harrison townships, carrying on general 
farming and stock raising in a most judicious manner. He owns a fine 
farm of eighty acres in Harrison township, and from this he removed 
August 20, lyo/, to the pleasant home that he now occupies in Gaston, 
intending now to lead a life of more leisure, if not of more pleasure. 

Mr. DeWitt married, C)ctober 13, 1867, Mary E. Heath, who was 
born in Monroe township, January 3, 1846, a daughter of Harvey Heath, 
who was l)i)rn in Guilford county. North Carolina, in 1814, and died in 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 



733 



Monroe townsliip, this county, in 1904, at the venerable age of ninety years. 
Coming to Indiana at an earl>- age, he worked by the month for Wilh'am 
Y. WilUams, one of the very early pioneers of Delaware count\-, toiling 
early and late in felling trees in the forests. Although wages were very 
modest in those days, he saved some money, and when desirous of taking up 
land walked to Indianapolis to the land office, and when he got there found 
that he had not money enough to pay the entry fee, lacking "the full sum by 
seventy-five cents. He tried to pawn his hat for that amount, but found no 
one willing to take it. His employer. .Mr. Williams, however, came to the 
rescue, lending him two dollars and fifty cents, enough to pay the fee and 
buy himself something to eat. Building a log cabin on the tract which he 
took up, Mr. Heath began the improvement of the property, and in course 
of time became one of the most prosperous and respected' farmers of this 
locality, at one time being owner of three hundred and sixty acres of 
valuable farming land and several town lots. He was a Whig in politics 
and for nearly half a century was a leading member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Heath married, in Putnam county, Indiana, Arminta 
Finlay, who was born in Guilford county, i\orth Carolina, and died in 
Delaware county, Indiana, in 1905. aged ninety-one years. Of the nine 
children born to them four survive, as follows: John T., Mary E. (Mr. 
DeWitt's wife), George P., and Lavina. Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt have two 
children, namely: Elza A. married Addie P.. Skinner, and Ora, wife of 
A. M. Kelley. Politically Mr. DeWitt is a stanch Republican. Fraternally 
he is a member of Bethel Lodge, No. 731, I. O. O. P., and both he and 
Mrs. DeWitt belong to Lincoln Lodge. Xo. 563, Daughters of Rebekah. 

John Dorton is one of the prominent business men of Washington 
township, and to his own energ>- and perseverance he owes the success 
which he has achieved thus far in life. He was born in Union county. 
Indiana, March 9, 1854, and traces his descent to the mother country of 
England. His grandfather, Ephraim Dorton, of English parentage, was a 
sea captain, and both he and his wife were natives of New Jersey. Their 
son, Henry Dorton, was born in Union county, Indiana, September 10, 
1826, and died on the 4th of July, 1895. In 1857 he located in Jefferson 
township, Grant county, three miles north of Mathews, where he followed 
agricultural pursuits until his removal to Washington township, Delaware 
county, in 1883. Here he spent the remainder of his life and won for 
himself a place among the prominent farmers and business men ot the ' 
township. He was well known as a breeder of good standard bred stock, 
principally Poland-China hogs and draft horses. He never cared for the 
honors or emoluments of public office, but voted with the Republican party. 
During the Civil war he enlisted as a soldier in one of the Indiana volunteer 
regiments, but was never in battle, principally doing guard duty in Indian- 
apolis. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a 
man of the highest standing in the community. In Union county, Indiana, 



734 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

November 28, 1849, Mr. Dorton married Phebe Rose, a native daughter of 
that county, born November 8, 1829, and she is now hving in Alathews, at 
the comer of East Eighth street. Of the ten children born to them six are 
now Hving: Alonroe, who married Samanthia Dunn and is Hving in Wash- 
ington township; John, the subject of this review; Harrison, who married 
iloUie Coleman and makes his home in Blackford county, Indiana; Albert, 
who married Alattie Leerd and lives in Delaware county ; Rachel, the wife 
of Albert jMoorman, of Grant county, this state ; and Katherine, who married 
Willard Secrest, of Mathews. 

John Dorton was but a little lad of four years when he went with his 
parents to Grant county, there spending his boyhood days in assisting in 
the work of the farm and in attending school during the winter months. In 
company with his brother iMonroe he engaged in the livery business at 
Dunkirk when twenty-one years of age, but after three years in that business 
he returned to the home farm and assisted in its cultivation during the 
following two years. At the close of this period he was married, and he 
then engaged in farming for himself in Washington township, Delaware 
county, while in 1904 he erected the fine modern home which now adorns 
the farm. He is operating two hundred and eighty acres of well improved 
land and he has made the larger part of his holdings by his own industry 
and unaided efforts. In addition to his farming interests he is also quite 
extensively engaged in the breeding of live stock, feeding about one hundred 
and fifty head of hogs each year, from thirty-five to forty head of cattle and 
from nine to ten horses. Mr. Dorton has ever taken an active interest in 
the public affairs of his community, voting with the Democratic party and 
he is a worthy and valued member of the iVIethodist Episcopal church. 

The marriage of ^Ir. Dorton was celebrated on the 3d of January, 
1878. Rosetta Dunn becoming his wife. She is a native daughter of 
Washington township, born August 15, 1855, and a sketch of her parents, 
John and Serepta (Littler) Dunn, appears elsewhere. Ten children have 
been born to bless this union : Florence B., Carl J., Walter H., who married 
Lucy McKinney ; Bertha M.. Zora Pearl, Harry C. Thomas A., Jesse M., 
Chleo M. and Pauline I. 

E. Fr.wk Duling is a member of one of the prominent pioneer families 
of Indiana, and within its borders, in Fairmount township. Grant county, 
Indiana, he was born on the nth of January, i86g, a son of William M. and 
Matilda J. (Wilson) Duling. and on the paternal side a grandson of Thomas 
and Nancy (Miskimens) Duling, both of whom were born in Ohio. In a 
very early day, however, they left the Buckeye state for Indiana, Mr. Duling 
walking the entire distance and establishing his home in Grant county, 
where he entered one hundred and sixty acres of timber land in the then 
wilderness of Fairmount township. After building him a little log cabin he 
returned to Ohio for his wife and two children, and the remainder of his 
life was spent on the land which he had entered during the early pioneer 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 735 

days of Indiana's history. He served as a trustee of Fairmount township 
and also served as one of its educators. He was a member of the Protestant 
Methodist church at Roanoke, Indiana ; Zehne, who married Vesta Hickson, 
this brave Indiana pioneer occurred at the advanced age of eighty-two years. 
Wilham JNI. DuHng spent his boyhood days in assisting his father to 
clear and improve his farm, and his first purchase of land consisted of fifty 
acres adjoining the homestead. This was heavily timbered, and he built him 
a two-room frame house, where seven of his children were born. After 
a time he bought a farm of one hundred and six acres in Jefiferson township. 
Grant county, his present homestead. With his wife he at one time owned 
six hundred and thirty-three and a half acres, but they gave one hundred 
and sixty acres to their children, owning the remainder, and in addition to 
his agricultural pursuits Mr. Duling deals quite extensively in standard bred 
stock. He is a member of the Protestant Methodist church and affiliates 
with the Republican party. Mrs. Duling was born in Jefiferson township, 
Grant county, Indiana, January 30, 1S44, and in that county she was also 
married, September 3, 1861, the union resulting in the birth of eight 
children : Mollie, the wife of Oscar Lewis ; John M., who married Lizzie 
Mann and is living in Fairmount township, Grant county ; Flora L., the wife 
of Calvin M. Jones, of Jefiferson township. Grant county; B. Frank, of this 
review; Nettie E., the wife of Rev. Charles Hobbs, a minister of the 
Methodist church at Roanoke, Indiana ; Zelme, who married \'esta Hickson, 
and is also living in Jefferson township; Effie May, the wife of Frank 
Wright, of Washington, D. C. ; and David G. 

C. Frank Duling was reared as a farmer lad, working on the farm 
during the summer months and attending the district schools in the winters. 
When he had attained the age of tv.enty-four years he was married and 
engaged in farming for himself, first renting one of his father's farms, but 
on the loth of December, 1900, he purchased forty acres of land and his 
father gave him another tract of forty acres, thus making him the possessor 
of eighty acres, which he yet owns. In June, 1906, he transferred his 
residence to Washington township, Delaware county, where he is now 
farming the old homestead of his father-in-law, John Dunn, Mrs. Duling 
having received eighty acres of this place as her inheritance. He breeds 
heavy draft Xorman horses, also high grade cattle, hogs and sheep, at the 
present time having one hundred and seventy-seven head of Duroc and 
Poland-China hogs ; also two hundred head or more of sheep. 

By his marriage to Miss Almira Amanda Dunn, a daughter of John 
and Saerepta (Littler) Dunn, Mr. Duling has become the father of two 
children: Kenneth L. and Marjorie Dephylis, born November 5, 1895, and 
June 22, 1899, respectively. Mr. Duling casts his ballot in favor of the 
Republican party. 

Joux A. H.M.L. Washington township numbers among its prominent 
farmers and stock raisers John A. Hall, who was born in Madison county, 



73G HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Iniliana. December i, 1861. His father, Tliomas B. Hall, was born in 
North Carolina, a son of John and EHzabeth (Parker) Hall. Mr. John 
Hall spent his life in North Carolina, engaged in blacksniithing and farming. 
At the age of twenty-two years his son Thomas came to Indiana and located 
at Alexandria, Madison county, where he secured employment in a chair 
factory, but later on worked at his trade of blacksniithing near Summitville, 
while still later he purchased fifteen acres of land. This tract he afterward 
sold and purchased another of forty-four acres, on which he built a log 
cabin home, and later added fifty-two acres to its boundaries. He subse- 
quently traded the fifty-two acres for forty acres near his first purchase of 
forty-four acres, making him the owner of a farm of eighty-four acres. 
In 18S0 he retired from the blacksniithing business and built him a new 
home, where he spent the remainder of his life and died in March, 1882, 
receiving the honors of an Odd Fellows burial. He was a member of the 
New Light Christian church, both he and his wife becoming members of 
that denomination soon after their marriage, and he was a Jackson Democrat 
politically. In Madison county, Indiana, Mr. Hall married Susan Hopis, 
a native daughter of that county, and they became the parents of four 
children: Mary E., who died in February, 1882, aged seventeen years; 
Ida B., the wife of John W. Montgomery, of Faimiount township. Grant 
county, Indiana; Sarah M., who died in March, 1882; and John A., the 
subject of this review. Mrs. ?Ial! died in August, 1872, and for his second 
wife Mr. Hall married Elizabeth Haskins, who is now living in Madison 
county, Infliana. They became the parents of five children : .Mmira, the 
wife of William Fowler, of Grant county; Retta, the wife of William 
Harvey, also of Grant county ; Amanda, the wife of James Price, of Wayne 
county, this state ; Thomas, who is married ; and Addie. 

After completing his education in the common and high schools John .A. 
Hall began the work of the farm, working for others after his father's 
death until his marriage, when he engaged in agricultural pursuits in section 
22, Washington township. This farm has ever since remained as his home- 
stead, and in 1887 he remodeled his residence, making it one of the modern 
and attractive ones of the community. In addition to his general farming 
he is quite extensively engaged in stock raising, breeding Shorthorn cattle, 
Poland-China and Chester White hogs, and Percheron draft and driving 
horses. 

Mr. Hall married, September 5, 1885, Oral L. Sharp, a native daughter 
of Washington township, born September 5, 1858, her parents being 
Thompson and Christena (Bowers) Sharp, whose history will be found 
elsewhere in this work. One daughter, Jessie G., has been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Hall. She graduated in the grammar school when thirteen years 
of age, and in the Gaston high school with the class of 1905, at the age of 
sixteen years, and she is now completing her fourth year in the Muncie 
high school. Mrs. Hall was first married to James A. Brady, November 
16, 1880. He was born in Harrison township, Delaware county, June t,. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 737 

1857, ana did on the 26th of August. 1883. One son was born of that 
union, Elhier. nho died in infancy. Mr. Hal! gives his poHtical support 
to the RepubHcan party, and has fraternal relations with the Red Men, 
Sioux Tribe Xo. 123. He is a prominent and worthy member of the 
Congregational church. 

Amos F. J.\.\.\i;v was born in Stark county. Ohio, May 5, 1837, a son 
of Joseph and Sarah (Hayden) Janney. His paternal grandfather' was a 
native son of Ohio and became one of the first settlers of Delaware county, 
Indiana, while later he removed to Harrison township of this county, but 
spent his remaining days in Washington township. His son Joseph was born 
in Stark county, Ohio, December 11, iSii, and from his native state he 
made the overland journey to Washington township, Delaware county, 
Indiana, in October, 1837, and purchased from the government four hundred 
acres of timber land. His name is recorded among the earliest pioneers of 
this county, and he was prominently identified with much of its early and 
subsequent history. Flis political affiliations were with the Whig party, 
and religiously he was a member of the Christian church. His death 
occurred in 1876. Mrs. Janney bore the maiden name of Sarah Hayden, 
and was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March i, 18 12. They 
became the parents of seven children, all of whom grew to vears of maturity 
and six are now living : Mary S., the wife of Joseph Thorn ; Jefiferson, who 
married Christian Myers ; Amos P., the subject of this review ; Annie, the 
wife of James T. Broyles ; Harriet, the wife of Isaac Gray ; and William T., 
who married Elizabeth McCreer}-. 

During his boyhood days Amos P. Janney assisted in the clearing of 
the homestead farm, attended the district schools during the winter months, 
and soon after his marriage he built him a log cabin and began agricultural 
pursuits for himself. He is now the owner of an estate of one hundred and 
sixty acres, and he has also given to each of his sons forty acres of land and 
to his daughters one thousand dollars in money. 

On the i2th of March, 1857, Mr. Janney wedded Miss Barbara Jane 
Roberts, who was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, November 16, 1835, 
and her death occurred on the loth of November, 1881. She was a daughter 
of Vincent and Dorcas (Roberts) Roberts, both of whom were bom in 
Dearborn county, Indiana, and they spent their lives in Dearborn and 
Delaware counties. Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Janney five 
are now living; Dorcas, the wife of Volney Reeves; Vincent R., who 
married Jane Woodring; John W., who married Anna Myers; Alice A., 
the wife of Nathan Brown ; and Jacob, who married Delia Dunlap. Mr.' 
Janney subsequently wedded Mrs. Cynthia A. (Weir) Love, who was born 
on the 4th of March, 1848, the daughter of James B. and Eliza (Slater) 
Weir, both of whom were born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. The father, 
born on the 4th of February, 18 18, died December 24, 1874, in Delaware 
county, Indiana, and the mother died on the 4th of December, 1864, aged 



738 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

forty-four years, one month and five days. They were married in 1839, and 
became the parent; of seven children, three of whom, James, Cynthia and 
Watson, are now Hving. Mr. Weir came to Delaware county with his 
parents, Thomas and Mary (Bradshaw) Weir, both of whom were born 
in I'enns_\lvania. the father January 8, 1789, and the mother August 31, 
1793. In an early day in its history they established their home in Warren 
county, Ohio, from whence they removed to Dearborn county, Indiana, in 
1828, and in 1837 they came to Delaware county and spent the remainder 
of their lives here. Mr. Weir dying on the 28th of August, 1863. As before 
stated, James B. Weir came with his parents to Delaware county, and soon 
after his marriage he erected the little log cabin which became later the 
birthplace of his daughter Cynthia. She was first married to Joseph Love, 
February 27, 1876, who died the same year of his marriage, aged twenty- 
seven years. Two sons and two daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Janney, but the daughters, Effie E. and LilHan, both died in infancy. The 
sons are Emerson and Everet. Mr. Janney and wife are prominent and 
worthy members of the New Light church, and his political affiliations are 
with the Democratic party. 

Lewis Bond. From an early period Lewis Bond has been proniinentlv 
identified with the history of Washington township, Delaware county, but 
his birth occurred in Hancock county, Ohio, January 22, 1841, a son of 
William and Elizabeth (Rusher) Bond, natives, respectivel\-, of ^ilaryland 
and Virginia, the father born on the 19th of December, 1786, and died 
January 16, 1S53. and the mother, born September 19, 1801, died December 
5, 1876. They were married in the Old Dominion state on the i6th of June, 
1836, and became the parents of three children — Mary A, Selina and Lewis. 
The father had been previously married to Catherine Thomas, who was born 
in Virginia ]\Iay 4. 1793, and died on the 31st of Alarch, 1835. Of the 
twelve children b<jni of that union the only one now living is Elizabeth. 

Mr. Bond, the father, accompanied his parents on their removal to 
V irginia during his boyhood days, and there both of his marriages occurred. 
He followed the trades of blacksmithing, wagon-making and carpentering, 
being a fine natural mechanic. In 1836 he removed from his Old Dominion 
home to Hancock county, Ohio,' becoming one of the county's first settlers. 
There he purchased and cleared one hundred and sixty acres of land, erected 
him a little log cabin home, and continued his residence in Hancock county 
during about eight years. At the close of that period, in 1844, he sold his 
land and removed by team to Miami county, Indiana. Here he entered one 
hundred and sixty acres of government land, on which had been erected a 
log cabin, and this was serving as the home of an Indian, Mr. Bond being 
obliged to pay him thirty dollars to leave the place. With the passing years 
he succeeded in clearing his land from its dense growth of timber, and in 
time erected the first frame house in this locality, where the remaining years 
of his Inisy and useful life were spent. He became one of the leading men 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 



739 



of ^liami county and was an incumbent of the office of justice of the peace, 
taking a very active interest in the public afi'airs of his county, state and 
country. He voted with the Whig party and was well known throughout 
the community for his many noble traits of character. 

Lewis Bond was but three years of age when the familv removed with 
team and wagon from Hancock county, Ohio, his birthplace, to JNIiami 
county, Indiana. His father died when he was but a lad of twelve years, 
and from that early age he helped support his widowed mother, continuing 
on the homestead farm until twenty-five years of age. He then began to 
work for himself in Miami county, and on the 23d of May, 1883, he left his 
boyhood's home for Delaware county, where he secured employment on the 
tarm of Jesse Xixon, in Union township. In the fall of 1883 he moved with 
his family into a small house of Mr. Nixon's, which continued as their home 
until the fall of 1885, when Mr. Bond came to Washington township and 
rented Mr. Nixon's farm in section 25 for ten years. During this time he 
had saved enough money to purchase one hundred and three acres of land, 
thirty-five acres of which was timber land, and in the little log cabin which 
stood upon this place he made his home until 1899, the year in which his 
present modern and commodious frame residence was built. The farm 
also contains many valuable and substantial outbuildings, the timber has all 
been cleared away, and the fields are fertile and under an excellent state 
ot cultivation. At the present time he is farming one hundred and twenty 
acres of as fine land as lies in Washington township. 

On the 15th of December, 1881, Mr. Bond married Miss Henrietta 
Wilson, who was born in West Virginia, February 4, 1850, and her death 
occurred on the 9th of December, 1906. She was the daughter of John 
M and Charlotte (Dotson) Wilson, both also natives of the commonwealth 
of West Virginia, the father born in 1806, and the mother in July, 1813. His 
death occurred when he had reached the seventy-fourth milestone on the 
journey of life, in 1881, but the mother survived until the 31st of March, 
1899. Of their twelve children, eight daughters and .four sons, seven are 
now living: Angeline, Almira, Man,', Jasper N., Frances, Charlotte and 
John. Mr. Wilson, the father, spent his life as a farmer in West Virginia. 
He was a member of the Methodist church and was a Whig in his political 
affiliations. Two .'ions were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bond, Larmer E. and 
Jesse C, both of whom are living with their father and assist in the work 
of the homestead farm. Air. Bond casts his ballot in favor of the principles 
of the Republican party, and his religious affiliations are with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

John- Bl'rgess, deceased, for many years a leading promoter of the 
industrial interests of Washington township, was bom within its borders 
September 19. 1842, and his death occurred on the 4th of August, 1897. 
He was a son of David and Elizabeth (Bryan) Burgess, natives respectively 
of Ohio and Virginia. It was during a very early epoch in its historv that 



740 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

David Burgess came to Indiana, entering land in Washington township, 
Delaware county, where he was numbered among the leading citizens and 
honored pioneers. Ten children were liorn to Mr. and Mrs. Burgess, of 
whom five are now living. — Xancy M., the wife of David Yannetta ; 
Rebecca, the wife of James McKinley; .Martha J., the wife of William 
Clements : Joseph, w ho married Elizabeth Moore ; and Ella, the wife of 
George Hedgeland. Mr. Burgess was a Jackson Democrat in his political 
affiliations, while his fraternal relations were with Gaston Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
and he was a member of the Methodist Protestant church. 

John Burgess, a son of this Delaware county pioneer, was identified 
with its agricultural interests throughout his entire life, the early years of 
his life having been spent in assisting his father to clear and cultivate the 
homestead. When twent\"-one >ears of age he engaged in that vocation 
for himself. During the period of the Civil war he enlisted in Company C, 
Thirty-eighth Regiment, for three years or during the war. but he became 
afflicted with smalipo.x, which so affected his eyes that he received an 
honorable discharge and returned to his home. His father gave him forty 
acres of timber land, on which had been built a log cabin, but he rented the 
land and therefore never resided upon it. His first home, however, was a 
little log house, in which he lived until the erection of his frame dwelling in 
Harrison township, but afterward he returned to Washington township anrl 
spent his remaining days here. He gave his support to all measures which 
he believed to be of public benefit, and exercised his right of franchise in 
support of the Democratic party, which he represented in the office of road 
supervisor at one time. He was a member of the Grand Army Post at 
New Corner, and was prominent in the church work of the Methodist 
Protestant denomination. 

The marriage of Mr. Burgess was celebrated on the 19th of March, 
1867, Miss Lydia Ann Haines becoming his wife. She was bom in Clinton 
county, Ohio, February 19, 1849, the daughter of Amos and Elizabeth X, 
(Hunt) Haines, natives respectively of Clinton county, Ohio, and Randolph 
county, Indiana, the father born on the 20th of April. 1823. and the mother 
on the 20th of February, 1829. They were married in Clinton county, 
December 2^, 1846, and of their four children two are now living, Lydia 
Ann and Stacy E. The son married Bettie Miner. Mr. Haines became 
a resident of Indiana in 1854, establishing his home in the then wilderness 
of Harrison township, where he built him a hewed log house and spent his 
remaining days here, dying on the 13th of February, 1866. He was a 
famous hunter in the early days, when game of all kind was plentiful in 
Indiana, and to him belong the credit of building the first puncheon ditch 
from Long Pond. He owned at one time one hundred and twenty-seven 
acres of land. His political affiliations were with the Whig party, and he 
served at one time as the supervisor of roads. He was reared in the faith of 
the Quaker religion. Mrs. Haines died on the 27th of October, 1863. Of 
the twelve children born to Mr. and Mrs. Burgess seven are now living: 




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HISTORY OF DELAW ARE COUNTY 747 

Elma E., the wife of Oliver Manjon : Xorah F... the wife of Frank Brown; 
Joseph E., who married Jessie Snider; Birdie, the wife of Edwin X'annatta ; 
Samuel, who married Dessie Wright; Leona C, the wife of Herman E. 
Gary, and Blanch H. Airs. Burgees has eleven grandchildren living. She 
has in her possession three of the old parchment deeds executed under 
the hand and seal of President \'an Buren, bearing the date November lo, 
1840. These deeds are valuable relics in her home. 

\\'iLLi.\M T. E.\STES, M. D. The medical profession plays one of the 
most conspicuous parts in the record of county, state or nation. As a class 
the twentieth century physician and surgeon is a gentleman of culture, 
refinement, philanthropy and character. The genial, sunny natured physi- 
cian ofttimes accomplishes as much in the sick chamber as his remedies. 
The subject of this review, Dr. Eastes, of Gaston, Delaware county, Indiana, 
is a gentleman who stands high in the social as well as the professional 
circles of his home town. He was bom at Mount Gomfort, Hancock county, 
Indiana, August 11, 1844. He is a son of Holman and Ruth (Webb) Eastes. 

Holman Eastes. the father, was born in Union county, Indiana, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1817, and passed to his reward February 27, 1880. Mrs. Eastes, 
his wife, was born in Rush county. Indiana, November 14, i8ig, and died 
April 8, 1901. They were married in Rush county, December 22, 1836, and 
had eleven children, viz., Lemuel F.. born June 3, 1838, and died aged fifty- 
seven years; Addison S., born December 5, 1839, and died September 21, 
1858; Lucinda A., born September 11, 1841, and died January 28, 1904; 
William T., subject of this sketch: Sarah Jane, born February 12, 1847, 
and now living at Marion, Indiana: Jasper N., bom December 20, 1848, and 
died August 4, 1849; Marshall T.. bom May 29. 1850, and now living in 
Kansas City Missouri; Albert O., born August 19, 1852, and died August 
13, 1862; Meridith P., born August 22. 1854, now living at Huntington, 
Indiana^ Jessie U., born August 25. 1856, now living at Marion, Indiana, 
and Jerome S., who was born August 24, 1861, and died March 11, 1863. 
The senior Mr. Eastes devoted his entire life to tilling the soil and removed 
from Union county to Hancock county, Indiana, when but a young man. 
Here he remained until 1856, when he removed to Madison county and in 
1878 to Grant county, where he spent the remainder of his days. He was a 
justice of the peace for eight years, which ofifice he held at the time of his 
death. He was a life long member of the Methodist Episcopal church ; 
belonged to Alexandria Lodge No. 235. of the Masonic order, and in politics 
was a Republican. 

Dr. Eastes received his education in the public schools and the Medical 
College of Indiana, Indianapolis, from which latter institution he received 
his degree March 3, 188 1. He taught school for six terms in Madison, 
Delaware, and Blackford counties, and then entered the mercantile business 
in Summitville, Indiana, in which he was engaged for about three years. 
When he began the practice of medicine he located in Washington town- 



748 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

ship, near Cologn postoffice, this being- in the spring of 1S7S. and in 1S90 
in Gaston, Indiana, later spending eight years in Aluncie, Indiana, and 
returning subsequently to Gaston, where he has been continuously since. 

On August 23, 1863, Dr. Eastes was united in marriage to jMiss Sarah 
C. Zedekar, born in Summitville, Indiana, March 16, 1846, and the daughter 
of John M. and Catharine (Noland) Zedekar. The father was born in 
Montgomery county, Ohio, in 1808, and died at the age of sixty-seven 
years: the mother was born in Ohio in 1812, and passed away at the age of 
eighty-four years. They had ten children, five sons and five daughters, of 
whom five are living at the present time: Mary Jane, Sarah C. (wife of the 
subject), Philip A., James N. and William D. Mr. Zedekar was a carpenter 
by trade but devoted the latter part of his life to farming in Madison county, 
Indiana. He was a member of Alexandria Lodge No. 235, of the Masonic 
order, and in politics was a Republican. 

Dr. and Mrs. Eastes are the parents of nine children and ten grand- 
children, the following being the names of their children in order of birth : 
Ida \'. wedded William L. Cory, who was one of the successful teachers in 
Indiana for twenty-five years. Arthur T., was educated at Danville Normal 
and was a teacher in Delaware county. He is assistant money order and 
stamp clerk in the Muncie postoffice and has held this position for twelve 
years. He is secretary of the Examining board of the Civil Service, a most 
efficient official, and the U. S. Department of the Civil Service gave him this 
praise, — that he was the only secretary in the United States who had 
invariably made immediate report of his examinations. He wedded Mrs. 
Nellie (Upton) Lane, a native of Wisconsin. They reside in Muncie, 
Indiana. Dora A. wedded A. C. Davis, who was also educated at the Dan- 
ville Normal. He was an efficient teacher in Indiana for fifteen years. He 
is an architect in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Drusilla J. wedded Isaac N. Miller, 
who is one of the successful farmers and stockmen of Washington township. 
Carrie E., wedded Norman E. Lesley, who is one of the successful merchants 
of Gaston, Indiana, a dealer in grain, coal, hay, seeds, wool, etc. He received 
a good business education in the Winchester public schools. Bessie A. 
wedded George T. Thorpe, one of the leading attorneys at law of Muncie, 
Indiana. Hattie E. wedded Andrew Grogard, who is a telegrapher and for 
eighteen years in the employ of the Texas & Pacific railroad at Fort Worth, 
Texas. Apphia M. wedded O. A. Shaw, who is in the employ of the U. S. 
mail department at Muncie, Indiana. Lydia E. wedded Samuel Taylor, who 
is foreman in the large glass factory of the Ball Brothers at Muncie, Indiana. 
Of this family six of the daughters and the son. Arthur, as well as the father, 
Dr. Eastes, were teachers, having taught sixty or more terms of school. 

Dr. Eastes is a member of the Univer.^alist church at Muncie, and 
belongs to the New Corner Lodge of the I. O. O. F., and the Red ^len 
Council at Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. He is independent in his 
politics. His wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 749 

Charles W. McIxtosh was born at iMarengo. Crawford county, Indi- 
ana, March 15, 1857, and is a son of George W. and Eliza (Wood) Mcin- 
tosh, both natives of Crawford county, and now residents of Sheridan, 
Indiana. George Mcintosh is a farmer and nurseryman and was a soldier 
in the war of the rebellion. The great-grandfather of our subject was an 
English soldier conscripted by his government to fight for the subjugation of 
the American colonies. He was captured by colonial troops, and coming to 
be better acquainted with the nature of the colonial struggle for freedom 
took the oath of allegiance to the United States and became an American 
citizen and a soldier. His birthplace w-as near Inverness, Scotland. 

Our subject received his education at a private school at Marengo, 
Indiana, and was under the tutorship of Professor J. M. Johnson. At the 
age of eighteen he began teaching school at Grantsburg, Indiana, and for 
two terms followed that vocation in the public schools of Crawford county. 
In the autumn of 1877 he removed to Orange county, teaching school during 
the winter, and canvassing for his father's nursery in the summer months. 
For three years immediately following 1890 Mr. Mcintosh taught in the 
city schools of Paoli, Indiana. Having had a more or less intimate acquain- 
tance with the editors of local papers in Orange county, he decided to go 
to Gaston, in Delaware county, and found a country newspaper. The first 
number of this paper, the Gaston Gazette, was issued September 2, 1897. 
The paper had entered a new field and was successful from the first. It has 
been doubled in size and now ranks among the best country papers in the 
state. 

Mr. Mcintosh is a Republican in politics, and has been postmaster at 
Gaston since September i, 1903. He has been a member of the I. O. O. F. 
since January 17, 1879, and of the Odd Fellows' Encampment since October, 
1892, having represented both branches of the order in grand lodges. He 
has been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church since 1876, 
and has acted in the capacity of Sunday school superintendent for many 
years. 

On May 20, 1877, Mr. Mcintosh was united in marriage to Miss Alice 
J. Paterson, of Marengo, Indiana, the eldest daughter of Dr. J. J. Paterson. 
This union has been blessed by four children, three of whom died in infancy. 
The oldest child, Frederic B., is associated with his father in the publication 
of the Gaston Gazette. 

Samuel E. Markle, engaged in the drug business in Gaston, comes 
from one of the sterling old pioneer families of Madison county, the name 
he bears being indissolubly connected with its early annals and subsequent 
prosperity. The ancestry is traced to Scotland, from whence John Markle, 
the great-grandfather of Samuel E., came to the United States before the 
Revolutionary war, and for seven years served as a soldier in Washington's 
army during that conflict, being twenty-one years of age when independence 
was declared. John D. Markle, a son of this Scotch highlander, was born 



750 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

in the state of Xew York, froin whence he removed to Darke county, Ohio, 
later to Wayne county, Indiana, and thence to Aladison county, this being 
a very early da\- in the histor_\' of the county and the town of Markleville 
was named in his honor. 

John D. Alarkle, Jr., a son of the above, was born in Wayne county, 
Indiana, near Milton, December i8, 1829, and he became a prominent and 
successful farmer of jMadison county, this state, whither he removed on 
the 17th of January, 1868, and purchased eighty acres of land three miles 
east of Alexandria. The county was but a wilderness at the time he took up 
his abode within its borders, and his first home was a little log cabin, but 
gradually he transformed his farm into fertile and well cultivated fields and 
added to its acreage. His death occurred on the 5th of May, 1S91, dying in 
the faith of the Baptist church, of which he had been long a member, and he 
was a Jackson Democrat in his political affiliations. Xear Markleville Mr. 
Markle was united in marriage to Sarah J. Adams, who was born in Madi- 
son county, Indiana, February 13, 1835, and her death occurred June 21, 
1888. Thirteen children were born to them, of whom the following nine are 
now living: Flenry H., David J., Samuel E., Charles C, Thomas B., Daniel 
C, Noah M., Luie B. and James A. 

During the early years of his life Samuel E. Markle assisted his 
father in the work of the home farm during the summer months, and in the 
winters attended the district schools until twenty-one years of age, after 
which he was employed at carpenter work for a time. His first knowledge of 
the drug business was obtained by studying pharmacy. He was associated 
with X. W. Edwards at Fairmount, Indiana, for a while. He then engaged 
at the carpenter's trade, at the same time keeping up his study of his chosen 
profession. He then entered the employ of Jesse S. Munsey at Gaston in 
1898, with whom he was associated from the ist of October until the 6th 
of February, following, the date of his employer's death. Mr. Markle then 
had charge of the business until the stock was purchased by Powers & 
Company, who retained his services until December 5, 1900, Mr, Markle 
then purchasing the business. He entered upon his proprietorship with but 
a small amount of money, but prosperity has attended his well directed 
efforts and the Markle drug store is now one of the leading establishments 
of its kind in Gaston. Mr. Markle is a practical pharmacist, having learned 
the details of the profession by actual practice. 

The marriage of Mr. Markle was celebrated on the 21st of November, 
1885, when Emma F. Painter became his wife. She was born in Madison 
county, Indiana, July 17, 1862, the daughter of William B. and Sarah J. 
(Smith) Painter. The father, who was born in Henry county, Indiana, near 
^liddletown, October 13, 1838, became a prominent and well known farmer 
of Madison county, this state, his death there occurring on the 28th of June, 
1863. He was honored by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance, and 
was a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was identi- 
fied with the Republican party. Mrs. Painter was born in Clinton county, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 751 

Ohio, February 5, 1835, and died October 16. 1S91. Mrs. Markle and 
William M. were the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Painter. Four children, 
three now living, have been born to }>Ir. and Mrs. Alarkle, — William E., 
S. Iva, Virgil T. and Anna F. Mr. Markle was made a Mason in Alex- 
andria Lodge No. 235, from which he was transferred to Lake City Lodge 
No. 73, at Warsaw, Indiana, and in the spring of 1907 was demitted to 
Delaware Lodge No. 46, at Muncie. The Democracy receives his political 
support and cooperation. 

WiCKLiFF B. HoLSCL.vw engaged in the livery business in Gaston, was 
born in New Castle, Henry county, Kentucky, January 12, 1853, a son of 
Joshua and Zerelda (Caplinger) Holsclaw. The father was born in Penn- 
sylvania December 25, 1825, and learning the saddle maker's trade he fol- 
lowed that occupation in Oldham county, Kentucky, from whence he 
removed to Louisville, that state, in the early "60s. During the three or four 
years in which he was engaged in work at his trade in that city he made his 
home in Orange county, Indiana, from whence he later removed to his farm 
in Bedford, this state, but his last days were spent in Orleans township, 
Orange county, Indiana, passing to his final reward on the 20th of March, 
1865. He was a member of the Missionary Baptist church, in which he 
served as a deacon for many years, and his political affiliations were with 
the Democratic party. Mrs. Holsclaw was born in Kentucky October 21, 
1829, and died in Chicago on the 23d of November, 1901. Both she and her 
husband lie buried in Paoli, Orange county, Indiana. They were married 
in Ballardsville, Kentucky, in 1843. s"'' of the eleven children born to them 
four are now living, namely : Wickliff B., the subject of this review ; Thomas 
P., who married Elizabeth Muller; Eliza, the wife of Emil Bruzenwitz, of 
Chicago; and Laura A., the wife of J. G. Straub, living in Pennsylvania. 

Wickliff B. Holsclaw was but a lad of fourteen years when his father 
died, and he thereafter worked out as a farm hand until the 3d of August, 
1872, the date of his enlistment for services in the U. S. Regulars, becoming 
a member of Company I, Eighth Regiment of United States Infantry, enter- 
ing the service for five years. He was mustered into the ranks under Colonel 
Dunham and went with his regiment to Fort Carman, Utah, where he 
remained for about two years, going thence to Fort Grant, Arizona, and was 
mustered out of service June 9, 1877, as corporal of his company. Mr. 
Holsclaw then re-enlisted in Company K, ist Regiment Infantry, U S. A., 
July 30, 1879, ^' St. Louis, Missouri, for five years, entering the ranks as a 
corporal. Going to Fort Mead, Dakota, he was there from September i, 
1880, until May 10, 1881, when he was ordered to Fort Davis, San Autcmio, 
Texas, and two years later to Holbrook, Arizona, to quell the Indiai. trou- 
bles. He was promoted to provost sergeant of his regiment at Fort Whipple, 
February 7, 1883, serving as such for about two and a half years, wnen 
he received his discharge at Fort Whipple July 29, 1884. Returning thence 
to West Baden, he served as a police officer tliere for about one year, and 



752 HISTORY OF DELA\\"ARE COUNl^Y 

in 1S89 embarked in the teaming and contracting business in that city, thus 
continuing until 1S95. In that }ear he sold his business, and on the iSth of 
October of the same year bought the Hvery business in Gaston which he 
has ever since conducted with such good success. He is also extensively 
engaged in the buying and selling of horses, and was formerly a director 
in the Gaston Oil and Mineral Company. 

Air. Holsc'aw married Miss Nellie J. Wilson September 29, 18S7. She 
was born near West Baden in Orange county, Indiana, October 8, i860, a 
daughter of Xuby and Elizabeth (Reel) Wilson, both also natives of this 
state, the father born near West Baden September 6, 1830, and the mother 
near Marengo, Crawford county, March 25, 1832. They were married in 
Orangeville township. Orange county, Indiana, in 1856, and became the 
parents of seven children, but only six are now living: John H., who mar- 
ried Belle Stackhouse and is living near West Baden ; Nellie J., the wife of 
Mr. Holsclaw : Mary P., the wife of John T. Johnson, of Orange county ; 
Albert, who n:arried Emma McFarlin and also makes his home in Orange 
county, and W'ilbert, twins, and the latter married Jennie Frazier and is liv- 
ing in Orange county ; and Delia, the wife of William Cook, of French Lick, 
Indiana. 

Mr. Wih:ii, the father, is the son of John H. Wilson, who was born 
in North Carolina but came to Indiana in a very early day in its history 
and became a pioneer resident of Orange county, where he bought his land 
from the InJi.^ins. Mr. Xuby Wilson erected for his first home a log cabin, 
in which all oi his chililren were born, and he transformed his farm from 
its primitive s:ite of a wilderness to its present high degree of cultivation, 
and here he i~ spending the declining years of his life. He enlisted in Com- 
pany C, Ninth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers for three years or during the 
war, and served his full term of enlistment. He now holds pleasant relations 
with his old army comrades by his membership in Decker Post, G. A. R., at 
West Baden. He was reared as a Quaker, but is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and his political affiliations are with the Republican party. 
Mrs. Wilson died on the 5th of July, 1907. 

Six children have been born to Mr, and Mrs. Holsclaw, Fred H., Maud 
E., Lucy C. (who died in infancy), Elmer C, Emmett P. and HoUis M. 
Mr. Holsclaw is a member of Paoli Lodge, K. of P., and his political affilia- 
tions are with the Republican party. 

John W. Foster was born in Washington township, Delaware county, 
Indiana, January 22, 1862, and is of German descent. His father, Henry 
W. Foster, was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, April 10, 1832, and is 
now living a retired life in Fairmount, Indiana. In 1852, when twenty years 
of age, he came with his parents, Thomas and Margaret Foster, to Wash- 
ington township, Delaware county, where he secured fifty acres of wild and 
unimproved land in section 12, but in time he cleared the land of its dense 
growth of timber and erected a hewed log house, which later was super- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 753 

seded by the frame dwelling in which he resided until the spring of 1907. 
He at one time was the owner of one hundred and sixty acres" but gave 
nmety acres of this to his children, leaving him the possessor of seventy 
acres at the present time. He built him a home in Fairmount in the sprin- 
of 1907, and there he is now living retired from the active cares of a business 
life, enjoymg the rest which former years of earnest labor has brought At 
her father's home in Washington township Mr. Foster was married to Mary 
Ann Hazelbaker, who was born in this township on the 17th of June 1842 
and her death occurred on the i6th of November, 1896, after becomino- the 
mother of twelve children, ten now living: John W., of this review ; Harriet 
L., the wife of James M. Lewis; William H., who married Emma Bennett- 
Clarencey, the wife of H. Mack Hazelbaker; Nancy E., the wife of David 
Paine ; Lenora, the wife of Charles Jones ; Fred A., who married Estia Cole • 
Jesse O., who married Nellie Sells; Eva, the wife of Joseph Zeller; and 
Mary. Mr. Foster married for his second wife, Mrs. Sarah J. Ice' nee 
Lewis. He cast his first presidential vote for John C. Fremont, and has 
since remained a stanch supporter of Republican principles, but has never 
cared for the honors or emoluments of public office. He is well known and 
highly esteemed throughout Washington township, where his name is en- 
rolled among the early and honored pioneers. 

The boyhood days of John W. Foster were spent in assisting his father 
to clear and improve his farm, and soon after his marriage he engaged in 
agricultural pursuits for himself. In 1888 he removed to Middletown Ohio 
residing there until 1896, when he returned to Washington township and 
has since been engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1896 his fine mod- 
em home was erected, and in 1903 the homestead was further improved by 
the erection of a commodious barn, his farm being one of the attractive 
places of the township, surrounded as it is by many shade and fruit trees 

On the 14th of October, 1886, Mr. Foster married Sarah H Corcoran 
who was born in Blueball. Warren county, Ohio, June 17, 1861, a daughter of 
Thomas and Mary (McCune) Corcoran, both of whom were born in County 
Mayo, Ireland, the father born in 1824 and the mother in 1836. They were 
married in Middletown, Ohio, and became the parents of nine children the 
three now living being: Sarah H.. the wife of Mr. Foster; Margaret' the 
wife of John Sibold, of Middletown, Ohio ; and James, also a resident of 
that city. 

Mr. Corcoran lost his father by death when he was a lad of twelve 
years, and one and a half years later he was made an orphan by the death 
of his mother. Being the eldest of their six children, the support of the 
family fell upon his young shoulders. He left Ireland when twenty years of 
age with his youngest brother, starting on the voyage to this countrv on 
a sailing vessel, but the brother died en route and was buried at sea. Alone 
a stranger in a strange land, Mr. Corcoran landed at New Orleans after a 
voyage of seven weeks, and after spending a short time in that citv he came 
up the river to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he secured emplovment as a pork 



754 in STORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

packer. Later on he reniuved ti.i Middletown, where his marriage occurred, 
and there he also worked at pork packing. In that city he spent the re- 
maining \ears of hfe. dving on the 6th of August, 1906. while in the employ 
of the Sorg Manufacturing Company. He deserved much credit for 
the success which he achieved in life, and not only did he care for himself 
and family and rise to a position of affluence, but he also cared for his 
brothers and sisters and sent them all money with which to come to the 
LTnited States. He was a member of the Roman Catholic church, and affili- 
ated with the Democratic party. Mrs. Corcoran came to this country with 
her parents when but si.x years of age, and her death occurred in the year 
1892. 

Mr. Foster has fraternal relations with the Masonic order, affiliating 
with Mathews Lodge, and he is a stanch Republican in his political views. 

IIf.xrv Swe-ANV. Numbered amoiig the progressive and prominent 
agriculturists of Washington township, Delaware county, Henry Sweany 
was born within the borders of the township February 6, 1842, a son of 
Samuel and Nancy (Hazclbaker) Sweany, natives of C)hio. In their native 
commonwealth they were also married, and their union was blessed with 
nine children, four of whom are now living: Henry, of this review; Daniel 
living at Summitville, Indiana; John W., who makes his home in Mathews; 
and Sarah, the wife of George Acker, of Marion, Indiana. Mr. Sweany, 
the father, came overland with team and wagon to Washington township, 
Delaware county, Indiana, in 1839, where he entered eighty acres of land 
in the dense wilderness. With the aid of his sons he succeded in clearing 
his land and placing it under an excellent state of cultivation, and there he 
spent the remainder of his life, dying at the advanced age of eighty-seven 
years. During his early life he was a Jackson Democrat in his political 
affiliations, but afterward voted with the Republicans. He was loved and 
honored by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance, for he was one of 
the grand old pioneers who assisted in paving the way for civilization in 
Delaware county. 

Henry Sweany was born in the little log house which first shelteri.-d the 
family on their arrival in Washington township, and during his boyhood 
days he assisted his father in clearing the homestead farm, his educational 
training having been received in the neighboring district schools, which he 
attended during the winter months. After his marriage he began farming 
for himself, and he is the owner of a fertile and well improved farm n 
section 19, where he is extensively engaged in general agricultural pursuits 
and the breeding of a good grade of stock. 

i\Ir. Sweany was first married to Nancy C. Jones, who was born in 
Delaware county, the daughter of one of its early pioneers, Jacob Jones, 
whose birth occurred in Ohio. The following children were born of this 
union: John W., who died at the age of twenty-six years; Jacob W., who 
married Sarah Hendricks ; Emerv E., who married Miss Gertrude 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 755 

Hendricks , Charles, who died when just past t\\enty-one years of age ; Arlie 
Otto, who married Bertha Grimes; Thomas E., who married Ethel Glass; 
Belle, who died after attaining to mature years ; and Bessie, who died in 
infancy. On the 28th of September, 1903, Mr. Sweany married Sarah 
Jojies, who was born in Salem township, Delaware county, Indiana, January 
24, 1852. a daughter of David \V. and Vesta (McLanahan) Jones. 

David W. Jones was born in Fayette county, Indiana, March 6, 1824, 
and died on the 25th of May, 1893, aged sixty-nine years, two months and 
nineteen days. He was a son of James M. and Mary Jones, the former 
of whom was born on the ist of Ma>', 1779, and died December 10, 1845, 
and the latter, born March 10, 1783, died December 31, 1873. They came 
from the Carolinas to Franklin county, Indiana, in March, 1809, and in 181 1 
they removed to Fayette county, the birthplace of their son David. C)n the 
6th of February, 1831, they arrived in Delaware county, where they lived 
on a farm during the remainder of their lives. David W., the youngest of 
their nine children, came with his parents to Delaware county in 183 1, and 
on the 4th of January, 1846, he married Jane Kepper, who died April 15, 
1848. On the 2ist of April, 1851, he married Vesta McLanahan, who was 
born in Randolph county, Indiana, August 20, 1826, and died June 20, 
1900. They became the parents of twelve children, of whom four are now 
living: Sarah, the wife of Mr. Sweany; Nettie, the wife of William 
Rozelle; John N., who married Louisa Fleming, now deceased; and Willis 
E., who married Ellen Dufif. iMr. Sweany is a member of the Christian 
church, and his political affiliations are with the Republican party. 

John M. H.'Xrris, one of the most prominent farmers and stock raisers 
of Washington township, was born in .Madison county, Indiana, on Fall 
creek, January i, 1838, a son of Samuel and Nancy E. (Copeland) Harris, 
both of whom had their nativity in the southland of North Carolina. They 
v/ere married in their native commonwealth, from whence with their two 
oldest daughters they journeyed in a two-wheel cart to Indiana, where the 
husband and father entered three eighty-acre tracts of land from the govern- 
ment in Fort Wayne, he having had to blaze his way to that city so he could 
find his way back to Madison county, where he had established his home. 
The first home which he erected was a little cabin of round poles, but later 
on he built him a hewed log house, which continued as his home during the 
remainder of his life, dying in Van Buren township at the age of thirty-five 
years. His wife survived him many years and died in that township at the 
age of seventy-two years. Of the seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Harris four are now living: John M., the subject of this review; George 
W., Delila and Martha. Mr. Harris was a Jefferson Democrat in his 
political affiliation. 

John M. Harris in early life became inured to the arduous labor of 
clearing and improving a new farm, he having assisted his father in the 
work of the 'old homestead from an early age, attending school only about 



756 HISTORY OF DELA\\'ARE COUNTY 

three months during the winter seasons. His father died when he was a 
little lad of nine years, and thereafter he helped to take care of his widowed 
mother and the other children. Soon after his marriage he took up his 
abode in Washington township, Delaware county, purchasing one hundred 
acres of wild and unimproved land in section 24, where he first erected a 
hewed log house, this continuing as the family home until the erection of 
their present dwelling in 1872. He has cleared all of his land with the 
exception of forty acres, and in addition to his general agricultural pursuits 
he is one of the largest stock raisers of Washington township, breeding 
Black Poland cattle, which he feeds and ships to Buffalo, New York, first 
purchasing in Chicago. At the present time he has a carload of fine cattle 
ready for market. He is also extensively engaged in the raising and 
shipping of hogs, marketing from forty to fifty carloads each year. In 1902 
the Chicago Gas Company built on Mr. Harris' farm one of the largest 
pumping stations in the entire state of Indiana. 

On the 1st of January, i860, Mr. Harris was married to Margaret 
E. Broyles, who was born in Washington township, Delaware county, 
October 25, 1841, the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Ann (Lyon) Broyles. 
Thomas Broyles, deceased, was born May 6, 1817, in \'irginia, and when a 
young man caine to Rush county, Indiana, and engaged in teaming, hauling 
goods from Cincinnati to Richmond. After his marriage he gave up that 
occupation and went to work on his uncle's farm by the month, thus con- 
tinuing for two years, when he came to Delaware county. This was in 
1830, and he located near his parents' farm in Washington township, 
entering forty acres of wild and unimproved land. He was obliged to 
borrow fifty dollars with which to begin life here, but by hard work and 
good management he made a success of life, owning at the time of his 
death four hundred acres of land. He was married on the 22d of February, 
1838, to Sarah .-\nn Lyon, who was born February 10, i8'i7, in Bourbon 
county, Kentucky, the daughter of John L. and Margaret (Sharp) Lyon^ 
both of whom were natives of Kentucky. They came to Rush county, 
Indiana, in an early day and entered eighty acres of land, and Mr. Lyon, 
who was a carpenter, worked at his trade in connection with farming. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mr. Broyles voted the Democratic ticket up to the beginning of the war, 
when he joined the Republican party and remained loyal to its principles 
until his death, which occurred a number of years ago, and Mrs. Broyles is 
also deceased. They were the parents of three children : Margaret E., 
the wife of Mr. Harris; Joseph W., who is also married; and John L., 
deceased. 

Twelve children, seven sons and five daughters, have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris, of whom eight are now living: Emma, the wife of 
J. W. Richards ; John L., who married Nettie Janney ; Martha, the wife of 
Calvin Bookout ; Belle, the wife of Herber Thomas ; Omer O., who married 
Iva Keefer; Murley. who married Edith Marine; Otto O., who married 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 757 

Stella Sheilds ; and J. Clarence, who married Irena Spence. Mr. Harris 
is a stanch Republican in his political affiliations, and has served as a 
supervisor of roads. 

Asa B. S.^nders was born in Henry county, Indiana, near New Castle, 
December 28, i860, a son of Arthur and Elvira (Bogue) Sanders. The 
father, who was born in North Carolina in August, 1825, was brought by 
his parents to Indiana May 7, 1827, fifty-two days having been spent on the 
road, and the family located in Henry county, three and a half miles 
northwest of New Castle, where the little son spent his boyhood days. 
Attaining to young manhood he became owner of a part of his father's 
farm, he having previously assisted in clearing the old homestead, and in 
1873 he purchased a farm near Springport. After living there for a number 
of years he sold his possessions and returned to a farm near the old home- 
stead, which he purchased, and spent the remainder of his life there, dying 
August 4, 1S85, when past the sixtieth milestone of life. He devoted his 
entire business career to general agricultural pursuits, and was a Republican 
in his political affiliations. Near New Castle, in Henry county, Indiana, 
Mr. Sanders married Elvira Bogue, who was a native daughter of the 
Hoosier state, born in 1836, and her death occurred in 1895, at the age of 
sixty-one years. Six children were born to this couple : Ella, wife of 
Dr. Brown; Matilda, the wife of Thomas Jefiferson ; Mary A., the wife of 
Charles Cowgill ; Asa B., the subject of this review ; Margaret, the widow 
of Holcom Wright; and Nancy, the wife of William Cowgill. 

Asa B. Sanders was reared as a farmer lad, and soon after his marriage 
he engaged in farming for himself in Madison county, but in the spring of 
1902 he removed from there to Washington township, Delaware county. 
After three years spent in agricultural pursuits here he returned to Madison 
county, and two years later came again to Washington township, purchasing 
the farm where he now lives. At the present time he is remodeling his 
home, making it one of the attractive places of the township. 

The marriage of Mr. Sanders was celebrated on the nth of January, 
1890, Miss Mary E. Johnson becoming his wife. She was born near 
Summitville, Madison county, Indiana, June 24, 1871, the daughter of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Allen) Johnson, both of whom were also born in 
Indiana, the father in Randolph county, on the i6th of June, 1841, and the 
mother in Hancock county, August 9, 1845. They were married in Hancock 
county in 1861, 'and became the parents of ten children: Manson U. ; 
Minerva, the widow of William Beeson ; Jesse A., who married Laura 
Plackard ; Daniel M. ; Mary E., the wife of Mr. Sanders; Lewis W., who 
married Laura Cory, now deceased ; Etta, the wife of Ezra Webster ; 
Amanda, the wife of Otis Cramner; John C. and Delia M. 

Mr. Johnson, the father, was reared to years of maturity in his native 
county of Randolph, also following agricultural pursuits there eight years 
after his marriage. He then took up his abode near Summitville, in Madison 



:5,S HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

county, Indiana, ■ where he is numbered among the leading farmers of the 
community, as well as one of the largest stock raisers, he having shipped 
large quantities of stock to the Buttalo and New York markets. He upholds 
the principles of the Republican party, although as a Democratic repre- 
sentative served in the office of tow-nship trustee for two terms. Two 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sanders : Hallett A. and Hazel 
Pearl. Mr. Sanders casts .his ballot with the Republican party, and has 
fraternal relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge Xo. 
475, of Summitville, and also with the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall 
Lodge, No. 361, of Summitville. The family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, in which Mr. Sanders holds the office of trustee. 

D.\.\-iEL RiCH.XRDS was born in Grant county, Indiana, February 18, 
1839, a son of John and Effie (Roberts) Richards, natives, respectively, of 
\'irginia and Ohio, the father born in 1806, and died in March, 1863, in 
Grant county, Indiana, while the mother passed away in death in 1848. 
They were married in Ohio, but in a very early day in its history took up 
their abode in Grant county, Indiana, where Mr. Richards entered govern- 
ment land and became a prominent factor in the early history of that com- 
munity. The little log cabin in which the family first resided in time gave 
place to the frame residence in which he spent the remainder of his life. 
He erected two saw mills in that county and also had the distinction of 
purchasing the first McCormick reaper in Grant' county. He was a worthy 
and consistent Christian gentleman, a member of the old-school Baptist 
church, and he served as a minister in that denomination for many years, also 
donating the ground on which the church was built. He was a Jackson 
Democrat politically. Of the nine children born to Mr. and Mrs. Richards 
seven are now living : Henry, a resident of Oklahoma ; L. G., who is living 
on the line separating Grant and Delaware counties ; Abraham, Daniel, 
Jacob, Martha and Isaac. 

The early years of Daniel Richard's life were spent on the homestead 
farm and in his father's saw mills, and when he had attained the age of 
twenty-three years he began farming for himself on eighty acres of land. 
His farm was then a wilderness, but in time he placed it under a fine state 
of cultivation, and the frame house which he first erected gave place in 
1864 to his present dwelling. He carries on the general work of the farm 
and also raises a good grade of stock. 

On the 1st of August, 1863, Mr. Richards was united in marriage to 
Catherine E. Millspaugh, who was born on the 13th of September, 1844, 
and died on the 25th of November, 1878. She was the daughter of Gilbert 
C. and Lucy (Williams) Millspaugh, the former of whom was a minister 
of the old-school Baptist church, coming from Cincinnati, Ohio, to Delaware 
county, and his death occurred there. Of the nine children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Richards three are now living: Lewis E., who married Annata 
Cough, now deceased, and he afterward married Carrie Johnson, by whom 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 759 

he has four children ; Addie, the wife of Simon Leach ; and Clement E., 
who married Lillie Norton, and they have seven children. 

On the lyth of November, 1879, Mr. Roberts married Susaimah 
INIcConnick, who was born in Washington township, one mile west of 
Wheeling, September ig, 1S38, the daughter of William and Susannah 
(Woolverton) JMcCormick, both of whom were natives of Penns\dvania, 
the former born on the 27th of September, 1793, and the latter on the 
22d of January, 1795, but both died in Washington township. Delaware 
county, Indiana, the father October 14, 1868, and the mother December 27, 
1871. They came to Delaware cuunty in 1833 ^nd theirs were the only deaths 
on that farm. They were married in Preble county, Ohio, April 10, 1817, 
and to them were born ten children, all of whom are now deceased, with 
the exception of Mrs. Richards, who was the youngest of the- family. Mr. 
McCormick was taken to Ohio by his parents, John and Katherine 
McCormick, when but two years of age, attaining to years of maturity in 
that state, and there five of his children were also born. In February, 1832, 
he removed to Fayette county, Indiana, and on the 22d of March, 1833, to 
Delaware county, purchasing a farm of David Conner, one mile west of 
Wheeling, while later on he entered government land, becoming in time 
the owner of six hundred acres. There was a log house on the land he 
purchased from Mr. Conner, which contained port holes from which to 
shoof at the Indians. Later Mr. McCormick erected a house of hewed 
logs, and in the early '40s built the frame residence in which he and his 
wife spent the remainder of their lives. He served as a judge of the county 
court for many years, the court house in those days having been built of 
logs, and for a long period he was also a minister in the old-school Baptist 
church, he having united with that church during his boyhood days. He 
was one of the most prominent factors of the early life of Delaware county, 
and was a Jackson Democrat in his political affiliations. 

For over thirty years Mr. Richards has been a prominent and worthy 
member of the old-school Baptist church, and he is an earnest Christian 
man, his path having been marked by good deeds, by honest purpose and 
worthy motives. His wife is a member of the same church. His political 
support is given to the Democratic party. 

JoHX R. TuTTLE, M. D. Dr. Tuttle is one of the best known physicians 
of Wheeling and vicinity. He was well prepared to enter the ranks of this 
profession by a thorough training, which was received first in the Muncie 
Academy, graduating therein with the class of 1874, and with the class of 
1879 he graduated in the Methodist Episcopal College at Fort Wayne, 
Indiana. He then pursued a course in German in the German Concordia 
College, after which, in 1880, he matriculated in the Medical College of 
Indiana, at Indianapolis. In the following year he entered upon a special 
course of study with Dr. Gobrecht, while in 1883 he attended the Ohio 
Medical College at Cincinnati. During the intervening period from 1890 



760 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

to 1804 Dr. Tiittle attended the Medical department of the Chicago Uni- 
versity. He was thus ably prepared to become an active practitioner in the 
profession which he had chosen as his life work, and on the 2d of July, 
1883, he took up his abode in Wheeling, where he has ever since remained in 
practice with the exception of six months spent in Davenport, Iowa, and a 
similar period spent in Terre Haute, Indiana. He is a member of the Dis- 
trict and County Medical Associations. 

Dr. Tuttle was born in Monroe township, Delaware county, Indiana, 
April 5, i860, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth J. (Rose) Tuttle. The 
father, who was born in Ohio in 1829, was a farmer and local minister in 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and his death occurred in 1900, when he 
had reached the age of seventy-one years. His political affiliations were 
with the Republican party. The mother was born in Xorth Carolina in 
1835, and is now living, aged seventy-two years. Ten children were born 
to this couple, four sons and six daughters — Emma, Louisa, John R., Charles 
M., Drusilla, Belle, William W., Effie, Clay H. and Elizabeth. 

On the 20th of November, 1901, Dr. Tuttle married Zina Beuoy, who 
was born in Washington township, Delaware county, January 12, 1864, a 
daughter of Edward and Sarah (Milhollin) Beuoy. The father died on the 
loth of June, 1905, and for a further history of his life see the sketch of 
Edward Beuoy. Dr. Tuttle is a member of Wheeling Lodge No. 325, I. O. 
O. F., and also of the Wheeling Encampnient at Mathews. His fraternal 
relations also connect him with the Sioux Tribe of Red Men, Lodge No. 125, 
at Gaston. His political affiliations are with the Republican party. 

Dr. Tuttle is not only a successful physician and surgeon, but he is an 
original man in the way of ingenuity. His beautiful modern residence was 
planned by himself. It is beautifully finished in an up-to-date manner, and 
the interior decorations would do justice to a city home. The Doctor has 
a well selected library of choice literature, and every nook and comer of the 
pretty home betokens taste by him and his estimable wife. His grounds are 
laid out with flower beds and fountains, and he has his own private water 
works, as well as modern lighting. His bam or carriage house is a model 
of greatness and convenience, and it demonstrates that the genial Doctor is 
a busy man even when he is not pursuing his profession. His home is a 
haven for entertainment for his and his wife's guests, and all find a cordial 
welcome. His home is a credit to Wheeling as well as the township of Wash- 
ington. 

He.nry H.arrison Williams. Numbered among the agriculturists of 
Washington township, Delaware county, is Henry H. Williams, whose birth 
occurred in Preble county, Ohio, July 26. 1840, his parents being Joseph and 
Lucretia (Lanier) Williams, who both claimed the commonwealth of 
Kentucky as the place of their nativity, the father born March 20, 1803, 
and died April 21, 1865, in Washington township, and the mother born 
June 7, 1807, died .August 16, 1868. They were married in Preble county, 



rik=TORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 761 

Ohio, and became the parents of twelve children, of whom the five now 
living are: Margaret, Catherine, who married Robert L. Egnew and is living 
in Washington township; Henry Harrison; Martha Ann, who married 
Samuel Rench, and makes his home in Washington township, as does also 
David, who married Jane Campbell. Mr. Williams, the father, was a farmer 
in Ohio, and from that state in 1840 he journeyed with team and wagon to 
Washington township, Delaware county, Indiana, purchasing eighty acres 
of land in section 25. The country was then a wilderness, game of all kinds, 
including deer, wolf, bear and wild turkey, being plentiful, and with the other 
brave pioneers of Delaware county he reclaimed this vast wilderness for 
purposes of civilization. His first home was a little log cabin, and later on 
he added forty acres of timber land to his first purchase, but this he lost on 
account of illness in 1845. He was a member of the Old School Baptist 
church, and was a Whig in his political affiliations. 

When but a babe of six months Henry Harrison Williams was brought 
to Delaware county by his parents, so that nearly his entire life has been 
spent within its borders and he has been prominently identified with the 
early and subsequent history of Washington township. When he had 
reached the age of twenty-nine years he began farming for himself on forty 
acres of timber land, first erecting the little log cabin which yet stands near 
his present home, which was built in 1893, and is one of the pleasant and 
commodious residences of the township. He is now farming sixty acres of 
land. He cast his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln and has 
since supported the Republican party, serving for two years as its repre- 
sentative in the office of road supervisor. 

On the 2ist of September, 1869, Mr. Williams married Jane Russell, 
who was born March 27, 1846, and died on the 9th of November, 1883. She 
was a daughter of one of the early pioneers of Delaware county, Joel 
Russell, who cleared and farmed one hundred and seventy acres of land and 
spent the remainder of his life here. He was a Jackson Democrat. For his 
second wife Mr. Williams married Miss Lucinda Nixon April 24, 1890. 
She was born in Washington township October 20, 1846, the daughter of 
Benjamin and Man.- .\nn (Iseley) Nixon. The mother was born in Preble 
county, Ohio, and died February 21, 1885, aged fifty-si.x years, while her 
husband was fifty-nine years of age when called to the home beyond. They 
were married in Mount Pleasant tow'nship, Delaware county, and became 
the parents of eleven children, eight of whom are now living, namely : 
Lucinda, the wife of Mr. Williams ; Lewis, who married Catherine Worls 
and is living in Muncie ; Jennie, the wife of George K. Lewis, of Washington 
township; Martha, who married Thomas Batt, of Gaston ; Emily, who mar- 
ried John Cristy ; .\lice ; George, who married Emma Jones and is living in 
Marion, Indiana : and Bertha, who married Henry McCreery. Mr. Nixon, 
the father, was another early and honored Delaware county pioneer, where 
he owned one hundred and thirty acres of land which he had cleared from 
its dense growth of timber, and the remainder of his life was spent in the 



762 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

log house upon this land. He was a member of Wheeling Lodge, A. F. & A. 
M.. and affiliated with the Republican party. Of the five children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Williams only two are now living : Francis and Louisa. The 
daughter married Henry Broyles, and they have three children. Francis A. 
wedded Miss Ella June Parkison, a member of one of the prominent fami- 
lies, and he resides in Washington township. 

John W. Wills. A well-known and respected citizen and a practical 
and enterprising agriculturist of Washington township, John W. Wills is 
engaged in farming and stock raising to a considerable extent, and is con- 
tributing his full share towards developing and advancing the industrial in- 
terests of the community in which he resides. Energetic and observing, he 
never allows anything to escape his attention that might improve his methods 
of carr)ing on his work or increase the value of his land as a crop producer. 
He was born March 7, 1857, '^^ Grant county, Indiana, a son of James H. 
Wills. 

Beginning the battle of life for himself at the age of twenty-one years, 
Mr. Wills w^orked by the month for his father on the farm, the following 
year farming in company with his father. The next two years he farmed 
for himself on rented land, but desiring a change, then sold oE all of his 
stock, machinery, etc., and went westward to Colorado, where he spent one 
summer. Returning as far east as Iowa, he again began working for wages, 
after which he carried on farming with his father for a while in Audubon 
county, low^a. Marrying then, Mr. Wills farmed for himself for about four 
years, and then bought a home in Audubon, Iowa, where he resided a year. 
Coming to Delaware county, Indiana, in 1893, he bought his present farm 
in Washington township, and has carried on general farming in a most 
remunerative manner. He has one hundred and fifty-eight and one-half 
acres of land, which, under his intelligent care, has been highly cultivated 
and improved. In 1905 Mr. Wills built a -fine residence for himself and 
family, and his other buildings are convenient and kept in excellent repair, 
everything about the place bespeaking in no uncertain terms the thrift and 
good judgment of the proprietor. 

On March 17, 1887, Air. Wills married Alice A. Lacher, who was born 
in Marengo, Iowa, February 17, 1862, a daughter of John A. Lacher. Mr. 
Lacher was born in 1823, in Baden, Germany, and there lived until after 
his marriage, in 185 1, to Eva C. Castner, also a native of Baden. Soon after 
his marriage, accompanied by his bride, he left the Fatherland and came 
across the ocean to the United States in a sailing vessel, being thirty-three 
days on the water. Landing in New York city, he remained there four 
years, and then with the pioneers of 1855 migrated to Iowa, locating in 
Marengo. Following his trade, he worked at shoemaking for a number of 
years, at the same time being engaged in the grocery business. In order 
to buy the leather needed in making shoes, Mr. Lacher had to make fre- 
quent trips to Iowa City, eighteen miles away, and usually walked there and 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 763 

back, carrying his stock home on his back. Subsequently investing hi? 
money in land, he bought one hundred and sixty acres and into the three- 
room frame house which he erected moved with his family. He succeeded 
well in farming, and after a while built him a fine frame house, one of the 
best in the neighborhood, and there carried Dn general farming for several 
seasons. Returning after a time to Marengo he was there engaged in mer- 
cantile pursuits for five years, when, his health failing, he returned to his 
farm, and there spent his remaining years, dying in 1894. He was a man 
of honest integrity, a Democrat in politics, and a member of the German 
Lutheran church. His wife, now- a woman of eighty-two years, is still enjoy- 
ing life, being bright and active physically and mentally. She bore him ten 
children, of whom seven are living, as follows: Charles, John, Sophia, Lucy, 
Mrs. Alice A. Wills, Henry and Albert. Mr. and Mrs. Wills have had six 
children, namely: Harry H., who died in infancy; Bessie M., S. Eva, L. 
Gladys, L. Ernest and C. Dewey. 

James A. Brvax. The name of James A. Bryan is inseparably associ- 
ated W4th the history of Washington township, for here he passed nearly his 
entire life and was prominently identified with its farming and stock-raising 
interests. He was born, however, in the commonwealth of \'irginia, April 
27, 1831, a son of George and Nancy (Jones) Bryan, who were numbered 
among the earliest pioneers of Washington township. They came to this 
community during a very early epoch in its history, and they lived in their 
wagon until their little cabin home was erected. They were also among the 
first members of the Methodist Episcopal church here, and they lived lives 
of usefulness and helpfulness. They were both born in the old Dominion 
state of Virginia, and the father gave his political support to the Whig 
party. 

James A. Bryan was a lad of nineteen years when he suffered the loss 
of his father by death, and throughout his entire business career he was 
engaged in farming and stock-raising, breeding Jersey hogs and Polled An- 
gus cattle. He was numbered among the prominent business men of Wash- 
ington township, and when his busy and useful life was ended in death, 
October 17, 1900, the community mourned the loss of one of its truest 
and best citizens. He was a worthy and acceptable member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Wheeling, in which he served as a trustee for many 
years, and was one of the pillars of the church. His political support was 
given to the Republican party. 

Mrs. Bryan bore the maiden name of Sarah C. Hale. She was born in 
Delaware county, Indiana, south of Muncie, May 10, 1853, ^ daughter of 
John T. and Mary E. (Olum) Hale. The father was born in Ohio January 
25, 1829, but during his boyhood days he came to Delaware county, Indiana, 
and was here married, December 25, 1848, to Mary E. Olum, who was bom 
in Ohio November 31, 1831. Their two children are Sarah C. and Peter. 
The son married Viola ]\Iitchell, and is living in Washington township. The 



764 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

parents died on their old homestead farm in Delaware county, the father on 
the 6th of January, 1856, and the mother on the 29th of March, 1907. Mrs. 
Bryan has been twice married. On the Sth of April, 1876, she wedded 
Jacob Swain, who was born in Washington township, Delaware county, and 
his death occurred July 8, 1879, at the age of forty-three years. Two chil- 
dren were born of that union, Charles and Katy Ann. On the 28th of 
August, 1880, Mrs. Swain gave her hand in marriage to James A. Bryan. 
He had also been previously married, Rebecca Ginn becoming his wife, and 
they had eight children, of whom four are now living — Nancy J., Rachel A., 
Mary M. and Julia E. The wife and mother was bom March 29, 1836, and 
her death occurred on the 2d of October. 1S77. Her marriag'' was celebrated 
on the 20th of September, 1855. Three children were born t' Mr. Bryan by 
his second marriage: Carl E.. bom in 1881 ; Minnie A., born 
November 19. 1885, and Arab, born January 19, 1891, and died August 29 
of the same year. Mr. Bryan was a lover of music, and he seems to have 
imparted this love to his children. His son Carl is serving as the organist 
in the Methodist Episcopal church at Wheeling, having served in that posi- 
tion for about eight or nine years, and the daughter Minnie A. has been the 
organist of the Baptist church during a similar period. Mrs. Bryan has four 
of the old patent deeds, one executed under the date of March 3, 1853, by 
President Buchanan, and three executed April 24, 1820, under the hand 
of President Martin VanBuren, relics of the early settlement of Delaware 
county. 

Oliver E. Webster. Although prominently identified with the agricul- 
tural interests of Delaware county for many years Oliver E. Webster is 
a native son of Madison county. Indiana, born in its township of Boone 
November 12, 1864. His father, Daniel W. Webster, was born in Dalaware 
in 1848, a son of Robert W. Webster, who when his little son was only six 
months old started with the family on the overland journey to Indiana, 
coming with team and wagon to Rush county, which continued as their 
home for two years, when the journey was resumed to Madison county, 
Indiana. They established their home in Boone township, where Mr. 
Webster erected a log cabin in the wilderness, but in the early '60s he 
removed to \'an Buren township and spent the remainder of his days there, 
enrolling his name among its revered and honored pioneers. His political 
affiliations were with the Whig party. In this state Daniel W. Webster 
attained to mature years, and he has lived on the old homestead to the 
present time, building in 1873 his pleasant and commodious country home. 
He has served his township as its supervisor and during the early days 
he taught school. He has always been engaged in the breeding of graded 
stock and is a lover of fine horses, while on his farm he has a deer park. 
Mr. Webster also possesses mechanical skill of a high order, and with the 
aid of his sons he erected in 1892 and 1S93 a steam threshing engine. He 
is a member and for a number of vears a trustee in the First Methodist 




m^^ vfcU^ 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 767 

Episcopal church at Sumniitville, and is a Republican poHtically. JMrs. 
Webster, a native daughter of Indiana, died in 1876, aged thirty-six years. 
In their family were seven children, of whom four are now living: Oliver 
E., the subject of this review ; Robert E., who married Etta Johnson and is 
living in Madison county; Rebecca Jane, the wife of Thomas Cannup, of 
Van Buren township, Madison county ; and Daniel F., who married Bertha 
Dunham, and resides in Monroe township, Madison county. 

During the early years of his life Oliver E. Webster worked with his 
father on the old homestead farm, attending the neighborhood schools dur- 
ing the winter months, and he lived with his parents until his twenty- 
seventh year. He then bought the farm where he now lives in Washington 
township, Delaware county, and is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising. He has one of the finest roadsters in the county, and breeds from 
two to three fine draft horses each year. He has inherited from his father 
the love of mechanics, and has assisted him in much of his work. Mr. 
Web'ster had the misfortune to lose his home by fire in June, 1901, but he 
has now in the course of construction a fine residence, and his is one of the 
most valuable estates of Washington township. 

On the i8th of June, 1892, he wedded Cora B. Dickey, bom in Alexandria, 
Indiana, March 14, 1871, a daughter of William and Mary (Perdue-Groves) 
Dickey. Mrs. Webster is their only child, and her father, who was a farmer 
in Madison county, died when she was but six years of age, in 1877. Three 
children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Webster, — Gladys, born August 8, 
1894 ; Violet, born April 25, 1902 ; and Clarence, born January 23, 1905. Mr. 
Webster is a member of the order of Red Men at Summitville, Lodge No. 
149, also of the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hal! No. 361, at Summitville, 
and has membership relations with the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
votes with the Republican party. 

Oliver A. Brovles. The Broyles family is one of the oldest in Dela- 
ware county. The paternal grandfather of Oliver A., Anderson Broyles, 
was born in Greenbrier county, Virginia, and his grandmother, Harriet 
Broyles, in Bourbon county, Kentucky, one in January and the other in 
April of 1 81 2. They met in Rush county, Indiana, were wedded, and in 
1837 moved from Rush county to Delaware county and settled upon a tract 
of land in Washington township near what is known as Pipe creek. They 
started with their Virginia and Kentucky strain to conquer the forest and 
help to make a civilization on this tract of land. Gearing a spot of ground, 
they cut and drew together round logs enough to build them a log cabin of 
one room. In this room they cooked, ate, slept and lived. In the garret 
were beds for the boys who had attained the dignity of graduation from the 
trundlebed. This was accessible only by a ladder made from two saplings 
flattened and rounds put in about two inches apart. 

Such was the home of James Thomas Broyles, the father of Oliver A. 
He was the eldest of a large family of children and was born in the little 



768 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

log cabin just described January 25, 1840, growing to manhood amid the 
surroundings, privileges and privations incident to a life in the pioneer 
epoch of a country's history. At the inauguration of the Civil war he placed 
his name on the volunteer roll of Company B, Thirty-sixth Regiment of 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and had splendid opportunity to show his loy- 
alty at Pittsburg Landing and Shiloh. Failing health caused his discharge in 
1863, after two years of service, and he returned home to be a civilian. He 
was married to Miss Sarah A. Janney September 3. 1863, but becoming 
more and more desirous to assist in the quelling of hostilities at the front he 
in the spring of 1864 took an active interest in organizing Company G, One 
Hundred and Fifty-fourth Volunteer Infantry, and was chosen its first lieu- 
tenant. Again he went to the southland and remained until the war was over 
and the south partially reconstructed. In the fall of 1864 he returned home, 
and with his young wife returned to the farm and began the clearing, im- 
proving and beautifying of his home. His death there occurred November 
19, 1902, but his widow yet survives and is now residing at 119 West Main 
street, Muncie. In their family were the following children : Oliver A., 
Joseph R., Albert L., George W., Sherman A., Oren E.. Walter G., Nelson 
(who died in 1895), Mrs. Carrie B. Benbow, Hattie A. and Lula B. About 
thirty years before his death l\Ir. Broyles was made a member of the Odd 
Fellows' fraternity, and he also took an active interest in the G. A. R. Post. 
He united with the Methodist church in 1857, and served as its district 
steward, collecting steward, class leader, trustee and Sunday-school superin- 
tendent. He was also enterprising and public spirited and won the confi- 
dence of his fellow townsmen. He served as the assessor of his township 
for twenty years, and then became the county assessor, being the first in- 
cumbent in that office in Delaware county. 

The boyhood daj's of Oliver A. Broyles, the subject of this review, were 
spent as other lads on the farm, working in the fields during the summer 
months and attending the district schools during the winters, and he 
remained at home with his father until twenty-one years of age. During 
the following two years he was in his father's employ, and soon after his 
marriage he began farming for himself on his homestead in Washington 
township, his first home being a little four-room house. In 1900 the resi- 
dence which now adorns the homestead was erected, as was also a modern 
bam, and he is e.xtensively engaged in the breeding of graded cattle, hogs 
and horses in addition to his general agricultural pursuits. 

jMr. Broyles married Ida E. Thurston July 27, 1887. She was born in 
Van Buren township, Madison county, Indiana, August 19, 1868, the 
daughter of George R. and Almyra (Allen) Thurston, both residing in 
Madison county. The father, who was born in Franklin county, Indiana, 
May 14, 1846, was left fatherless at the age of nineteen years, and soon 
afterward he came to Madison county and located on eighty acres of land 
which his father had given him, first building him a little log cabin, which 
in 1881 was replaced by a more modern and commodious dwelling. He is 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 769 

at the present the owner of an estate of two hundred and fifty acres of rich 
and well improved land, and is one of the leading citizens of Madison county. 
Mrs. Thurston was born in Madison county June 26, 1848, and on her 
father's old homestead there she gave her hand in marriage to George R. 
Thurston March 21, 1867, and three children were born to bless their union: 
Ida E., Harrison S. and Alpheus L. Mr. Thurston is a member of the 
Christian church and votes with the Democratic party. Mr. Broyles sup- 
ports the principles of the Republican party, and has served his township as 
a member of its advisory board. For many years he has been a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and has served as president of its board of 
trustees and as one of its stewards. Mrs. Broyles belongs to the Christian 
church in Summitville, Indiana. 

JoiiN W. Gilmer. Numbered among the native sons of Washington 
township, Delaware county, is John W. Gilmer, who is a representative of 
one of its prominent early families. His birth occurred on the 19th of 
February, 1865, and he is a son of Abraham and Isabelle (Jones) Gilmer, 
both of whom were born in Rockingham county, Virginia, the father on 
the 4th of April, 1823, and the mother on the 22d of January, 1831.. They 
were married in their native county of Rockingham January 11, 1851, and 
in the fall of 1853 they made the overland journey with team and wagons 
to Indiana, spending about five weeks on the road and establishing their 
home in Washington township, Delaware county, where Mr. Gilmer pur- 
chased eighty acres of timber land in the dense wilderness, on which had 
been erected a little log cabin. After two years in this township they 
removed to Henry county, Indiana, where he followed his trade of wagon- 
making, which he had learned in \'irginia. Four years later they returned 
to Washington township, and here the husband and father spent the 
remainder of his life, dying on the 24th of May, 1874, when fifty-one years 
of age. Since his death Mrs. Gihner has built a frame house upon the 
farm, and she is now living with her son, John W. When age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise Mr. Gilmer joined the ranks of the Whig 
party, from which he transferred his allegiance to the Republicans, and he 
was honored and revered by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. 
Six children were born to him and his wife, three sons and three daughters, 
and all are yet living, namely: Elizabeth M., the wife of Conrad Lovet; 
Mary Jane, the wife of Henry Paxton; Sarah C, wife of James Linsey; 
William H., who married Emma Hamilton; John W., the immediate subject 
of this review ; and James M., who married Zina Thorn. 

John W. Gilmer was left fatherless when but a lad of nine years, and 
the period of his youth and early manhood were spent upon the old home- 
stead farm, which he assisted to clear and cultivate. In fact, his entire life 
has been spent upon these parental acres "with the exception of three years, 
from 1889 to 1892, when he was engaged in farming and stock raising in 
Illinois. 



770 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUxMTY 

On the nth of October, 1900, Mr. Gilmer was united in marriage to 
Miss Ida Haney, who was born November 19, 1871, the daughter of Bennett 
and Lydia (Owens) Haney, both of whom were born in Hancock county, 
Indiana, the father March 2, 1837, and the mother February 25, 1845. 
They were also married in Hancock county and became the parents of 
twelve children, seven now living : George, who married Goldie Cox ; Ida, 
the wife of Mr. Gilmer; Arthur E., who married Loretta Case; Cora A., 
Jesse H., Marshall G. and Fernie. Mr. Haney has devoted his entire 
business career to agricultural pursuits and is now living in Gaston. He 
casts his ballot with the Democratic party. Two children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Gilmer: James Paul Bennett and Jesse Leon. Mr. 
Gilmer is a member of the Christian church, and his political affiliations are 
with the Democratic party. 

Bexj-^.mix H. McKinley is numbered among the prominent and well 
known business men of Washington township. His birth occurred in Eden- 
burg, Pennsylvania, March 28, 1839, but his educational training was 
received in the schools of Nilestown, Ohio, where he was a schoolmate of 
the lamented President McKinley, his cousin. He is a son of John and 
Eliza (Boyle) McKinley, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania 
April 20, 1818, and died in Muncie, Indiana, August 22, 1896, while the 
latter was bom in Seclonesville, Ohio, August 12, 1818, and died on the 
8th of April, 1864. They were married June 27, 1836, in Ohio, and became 
the parents of the following children: James, born March 4, 1837, died in 
infancy; Susan, born February 28, 1838, also died in infancy; Benjamin H., 
the subject of this review; Alexander, born August 8, 1841, served nearly 
three years during the Civil war in the Ninth Regiment of Indiana Volun- 
teers, when he returned home on account of a broken arm, and re-enlisted 
in the One Hundred and Fortieth Regiment, serving until the close of the 
war, and his death occurred January 11, 1877; Mary, born June 6, 1843, '* 
the widow of Thomas Anderson and a resident of Jay county, Indiana ; 
John, born September 9, 1845, served his country in the One Hundred and 
Fortieth Regiment during the Civil war, married Rebecca Burgess, and 
their home is in Muncie; Louis B., born June 2, 1848, married Anna M. 
Brevvboker, and is a Baptist minister in Goshen ; William W., born August 
20, 1850, is married and lives in Muncie; Sara Elizabeth, born April 5, 1855, 
married John Putnam, who is a printer and lives at the Old Soldiers' Home ; 
Ira, born February 29, 1858, died November 12, 1861 ; and Henry, born 
December 12, i860, received his education in Earlham College, of Richmond, 
Indiana, and is a minister in the Friends church in Onoway, Michigan. 

Mr. McKinley, the father, came to Ohio during the boyhood days of 
his son Benjamin, where he followed his trade of a moulder until in 1852. 
when he made the voyage on a sailing vessel to California, spending three 
years in the Golden state in search of the precious metal and returning 
thence to Ohio. In 1855 he came to Indiana and located in what is now 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY ■ 771 

Gaston, then called New Corner, where he spent the remainder of his life 
as a minister in the Methodist church. He first gave his political support 
to the Whig party, from which he transferred his relations to the 
Republicans, and later became identified with the Democracy. 

Benjamin II. McKinley accompanied his parents on their removal to 
Delaware county in 1855, and as a boy he worked on the homestead farm 
here and attended the district schools. In i860, the year of his marriage, he 
engaged in farming for himself, continuing in that occupation until 1894, 
when he became identified with the general mercantile business at Stock- 
port, and was thus engaged until the 15th of January, 1907. He had sold 
his farm in 1893. 

Mr. McKinley married, October 25, i860, Arah Bryan, who was bom 
in West \'irginia June 11, 1835, the daughter of George and Nancy (Jones) 
Bryan, both of whom were also natives of that commonwealth, the former 
born February 11, 1800, and the latter August 19, 1801. The father passed 
away in death on the 2d of January, 1850, but the mother long survived him 
and passed away December 25, 1874. They were married in Virginia and 
became the parents of the following children : Samuel, Nathan and 
Abraham, all deceased; William, who lost his life while in the service of his 
country during the Civil war; Anthony, Betsy and Alfred, also deceased; 
Arah, the wife of Mr. McKinley ; and Rebecca, the wile of \\'illiam B. 
Woodring, of Gaston, Indiana. 

Mr. Bryan was born in Randolph county, West \irginia, but in the 
early year of 1839 came to Indiana and established his home in \\'ashington 
township, Delaware county, where the family lived in a wagon until their 
little log cabin home could be built. He cleared his land and made him a 
fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, having been long numbered 
among the leading agriculturists and business men of the .township. He 
was also a prominent member of the Methodist church, and affiliated with 
the Whig party. Nine children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McKinley, 
namely: Nancy Jane, born August 4, 1861, died in infancy; William I., 
born January 17, 1862, married Katie Driscoll, and is engaged in business 
in Stockport, Indiana; John W., born September 22, 1864, married Ethel 
Trowbridge, and is a merchant of Canon City, Colorado ; James A., born 
September 8, 1865, married Carrie Turner, and is engaged in the lampblack 
business in West Virginia; Samuel, bom February 11, 1868, married Ella 
Rarach, and lives in Union township, Delaware county; Thomas M., born 
September 12, 1870, married Millie Rarach, and is also living in Union 
township; Mary N., born September 13, 1871, married Creed Broadwater, 
of Stockport; George M., born March 8, 1873, married Pearl Melvin; and 
Robert N., born November i, 1875, married Minnie Adams, and is living in 
Muncie, Indiana. 

Mr. McKinley was made a member of Gaston Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
from which he was demitted to Oak Hill Lodge, of Oak Hill, Tennessee, 
and later transferred his membership to the home lodge. He is also a 



772 ■ HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

member of Wheeling Lodge, No. 325, L O. O. F., of Gaston Encampment, 
No. 424, of that order, of which he was one of the organizers, and is also a 
member of the State Grand Lodge. Flis religious affiliations are with the 
Alethodist Episcopal church, and he is a stanch Prohibitionist in his political 
affiliations. 

Samuel Milhollix. Throughout his entire life Samuel MilhoUin has 
been a resident of Washington township, prominently identified with its 
farming and stock-raising interests, and his birth occurred within its borders 
September 18, 1856. a son of Nathan and Mary (Carmin) Alilhollin. The 
father was born in Grant county, Indiana, in 1834, and his death occurred 
on the 25th of January, 1902. He purchased his brothers' and sisters' 
interest in his father's estate, and moved into the old log house which stood 
upon the homestead, there residing for about sixteen years. At the close 
of that period he bought a farm of George Beuoy, about three miles east 
of his former place, in section 24, Washington township, there spending the . 
remainder of his life engaged in farming and stock-raising pursuits. During 
a number of years he was extensively engaged in buying and selling stock, 
shipping to the Buffalo, Cincinnati and Cleveland markets. He first drove 
his stock to JMuncie or Eaton, and then shipped by rail, and he was also 
well known as a wool buyer for a number of years. Washington township 
numbered him among her most useful and prominent citizens and honored 
him with many of her public offices, he having served as a constable and 
also acted as an attorney for some of his neighbors, trying his cases before 
the justice of the peace. He was a member of the Farmers' Grange and 
affiliated with the Whig party. In December, 1854, Mr. MilhoUin married 
Mary Carmin, who was born in Washington township, Delaware county, 
January 29, 1836, and she now makes her home with her son Samuel. 
Four children were born to them : Samuel, William L., Anna, who died in 
infancy, and Allie, who married Charles Beuoy. 

Samuel Milhollin spent the early years of his life in assisting his father 
in the work of the home farm, and during his subsequent years they farmed 
in partnership until the father's death. Since then he has conducted his 
operations alone, and at the present time he is farming three hundred and 
three acres of land of his own and also superintends the work on two 
hundred acres belonging to his mother. In 1904 he remodeled his residence, 
making it one of the most modern and pleasant homes of the township. In 
addition to his general agricultural pursuits he breeds fine horses, both 
driving and draft horses, and in his pastures he keeps about twenty head or 
more all of the time. He also breeds Poland-China and Jersey hogs, 
crossing the breeds. Shorthorn cattle and Cottonwood and Merino sheep. 

On the i8th of September, 1883. Mr. Milhollin married ^liss Julia 
Smith, who was born in Muncie October 16, 1858, the daughter of Henry 
and Mary (Reeves) Smith. Mr. Smith was born in the state of New 
York February 14, 1830, and is now living retireil in Muncie. When but 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 773 

three years of age he came with his parents to Indiana, where his father, 
John M. Smith, followed his trade of coopering. During his younger davs 
the son Henry conducted a lime kiln near Muncie, but later purchased a 
farm in Center township and continued its cultivation for a number of years, 
later buying eighty acres of timber land in Hamilton township. This he 
cleared and improved and made his home there until 1901, when he moved 
to Muncie and has since lived retired from active labor. During his boyhood 
da}-s he assisted in driving stock through to New York city. During the 
Civil war he served as a dispatch carrier, serving as a member of Company I, 
Thirteenth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers. He has been both a Whig 
and Republican in his political affiliations, during a number of years hekl 
the office of school director, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mrs. Smith was born in Muncie November 2, 1831, and in that 
city they were also married, becoming the parents of seven children, of 
whom five are now living: Julia, Lydia E., E. James, Cordelia K. and 
William H. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Milhollin: 
Nathan H., Corna and Ralph. Where national issues are involved Mr. 
Milhollin upholds the principles of the Republican part), but locally votes 
regardless of party ties, and he is a worthy member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Thompson Sh.\rp, a prominent farmer of Washington township, 
Delaware county, is a native of Indiana, born in the county of Henry, 
November 12, 1827. His father, Edward Sharp, was bom January 4, 1801, 
in Tennessee, and his mother, who bore the maiden name of Anna 
Thompson, was a native of \'irginia, where her birth occurred on the i8th 
of January, 1808. 

Edward Sharp in an early day accompanied his parents, William and 
Elizabeth Sharp, to Ohio, this being in 1813, where they remained for a 
few years, and then came further west, locating in 1820 in Henry county, 
Indiana. Subsequently Mr. Edward Sharp purchased a farm in Salem 
township, Delaware county, where in time he became the possessor of a 
large tract of real estate, owning at the time of his death in 1855 six 
hundred and forty acres, the result of his own energy and thrift. In 
addition to the pursuit of agriculture he dealt quite extensively for a number 
of years in live stock, purchasing in various parts of Indiana and driving to 
Cincinnati, making of this a very profitable business. He was recognized 
as one of the leading citizens of the community in which he resided, was a 
member of the Christian church, and exerted a wholesome, moral influence 
upon all with whom he had business or other relations. His wife, a most 
estimable Christian lady and a member of the Protestant Methodist church, 
departed this life in 1862, and was laid to rest by the side of her husband 
in the Sharp cemetery on the old homestead in Salem township. Thirteen 
children were born of this union, all of whoijn attained to years of maturity, 



774 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

and those now living are: Thompson, William, Mar}-, Amanda, ^lartha, 
Kate and John. Mr. Sharp was a Whig in his political affiliations. 

Thompson Sharp remained under the parental roof until his majority, 
working on the farm during the summer months, clearing the wilderness, 
and attending school about three months of each year until reaching the 
age of thirteen years. Consequently he is not an educated man in the 
knowledge of books, but in the practical affairs of life possesses a knowledge 
such as institutions of learning fail to impart. Immediately after his mar- 
riage, which occurred on the 15th of November, 1849, ^^ removed to his 
present farm in Washington township, where he has since resided, actively 
engaged in the pursuit of agriculture. At that time the farm consisted of 
one hundred and twenty acres of timber land, with a little log house. He 
cleared the land and added to it until he had three hundred and twenty 
acres, while in 1868 he built him a fine brick house, in which he now lives, 
ami his improvements upon the farm make it among the best in the tow'n- 
ship and county. Mr. Sharp has surrounded himself with all the modern 
improvements and conveniences of agriculture and home life. He is recog- 
nized as one of the intelligent and substantial pioneers and citizens of the 
community, and he manifests a lively interest in everything that pertains to 
the material and moral well being of the township of which he has so long 
been a resident. As an active worker in the Republican party he is widel\- 
and favorably known through the community. As a reward of his party 
service he has been twice elected to the responsible position of county com- 
missioner, first in 1888 and second in 1892, the duties of which he discharged 
with ability and most commendable fidelity. 

His marriage, as already noted, was solemnized on the 15th of Novem- 
ber, 1S49, with Miss Christena Bowers, who was born March 20, 1828, 
the daughter of Jacob and Susannah (Andes) Bowers, who were natives 
of the state of Virginia, born respectively in the counties of Shenandoah and 
Rockingham. They became residents of Salem township, Delaware county, 
Indiana, in 1841, purchasing a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, upon 
which the remaining years of their lives were spent, the father dying at 
the age of sixty-two years, and the mother when she had reached the ad- 
vanced age of eighty years. They were members of the Presbyterian church, 
and he was a Jackson Democrat politically. In their family were seven chil- 
dren. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Sharp have been born the following children: 
Jemima A., Florence O., Otto, who married Kate Stradling, Ora L., the 
wife of John Hall, Noah, who married Amanda Prim, George, Nelson 
Grant, Dora, the wife of James Lewis, and Ozora T., who is a graduate of 
one of the leading literary and law schools of the county, and was admitted 
to the Federal and Supreme courts of Indianapolis in .June, 1893. He mar- 
ried Miss May White and at the present time superintends the work of the 
home farm. Mr. and Mrs. Sharp also have twenty-three grandchildren and 
seven great-grandchildren. His retentive memory recalls to mind many- 
pleasant reminiscences of the early days of Delaware county, when the deer 




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on^v-^yyvt^ 



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/^r^^x''^^<^<r^. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 779 

and other wild game were plentiful, and his mother saw two different droves 
of deer. Mr. Sharp cast his first vote for General Scott for president. 

John Cl.ark was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, February 19, 
1S47, ^ son of John and Susannah (Webb) Clark, natives respectively of 
Lincolnshire, England, and Camden, New Jersey, the father born on the 
loth of January, 1810, and the mother on the 17th of March, 1810. Both 
ended their lives at Indianapolis, Indiana, the mother dying there in 1872, 
aged sixty-two years, and the father survived until 1883. They were married 
in Camden, New Jersey, and became the parents of seven children, of whom 
six grew to years of maturity and four are now living : Hanna, 'the widow 
of Jacob Tressler and a resident of Johnson county, Indiana ; Susannah, the 
wife of William Owens, also of Johnson county ; Josiah, w^ho makes his 
home in California ; and John, the subject of this review. 

'Sir. Clark, the father, was a miller by trade, having learned that voca- 
tion in England. In 1831 he left the mother country for the United States, 
making the journey by sailing vessel and landing in the harbor of New 
York city after an ocean voyage of seven weeks. Making his way to Cam- 
den, New Jersey, he was there married, and after the birth of his two oldest 
children he moved to Ohio and followed agricultural pursuits for one year. 
Transferring his residence to Indianapolis, he resumed his trade of a miller, 
and thus he spent the remainder of his life with the exception of the two 
or three years when he was employed. as a retail grocery merchant. He had 
fraternal relations with the Odd Fellows' order, was a member of the Epis- 
copal church, and affiliated politically with the Whig party. 

When he was a lad of sixteen years Mr. John Clark removed from his 
native city of Indianapolis to near Franklin, in Johnson county, Indiana, 
where he learned the miller's trade under his father's able instructions, and 
continued that occupation until his removal to Washington township, Dela- 
ware county, in 1873. After his arrival he became identified with agricul- 
tural pursuits on a new and heavily timbered farm, where his first residence 
was a little log dwelling, but later on, in 1906, this was. superseded by a mod- 
ern and commodious home, the one in which he now resides. His homestead 
farm consists of two hundred and eighty acres of fertile and well improved 
land. He has never cared for the emoluments or honors of public office, 
preferring to give his time to his business interests, but he affiliates polit- 
ically with the Democracy. He is a member of Delaware Lodge No. 46, 
A. F. & A. M., at Muncie, and he is also a member of the Odd Fellows' 
order, joining Johnson Lodge No. 76, at Franklin, Indiana, from which he 
was transferred to Wheeling Lodge No. 325, and is a member of the 
Encampment No. 229, at Gaston, and the Rebekah Lodge No. 134, also 
of that city. He is a member of Canton Muncie No. 4, being major of the 
Third Battalion, Third Regiment, Patriarchs IMilitant. He is a member of 
the Grace Episcopal church at Aluncie. 

Mr. Clark married Miss Emma Thurston September 16, 1869. She was 



780 HISTORY OF DELA\\\\RE COUNTY 

horn in Shell)) countw Indiana. October 12, 1S51, and died September ji, 
i8i)('i. Her ])arents, David and Lurinda (Laing) Thurston, were born in 
Franklin ci.iunty, Indiana, the father Xovember 11. 181 1, and the mother 
August 29, 1S21. They died December 7, 1SS9. and January 25, 1891, 
respective!}'. They were married in their native county of Franklin July i, 
183S, and became the parents of twelve children, but only five are now 
li\ing: Mary, the widow of Enos Thurston and a resident of Gaston ; Arthur 
J., who married Mary J. Hackney and is living in Shelbyville, Indiana; 
Abner; Firman F., who married Zella Ross and resides in Shelby county; 
and George 11.. also a resident of that county. Mr. Thurston, the father, was 
a son of Flavial Thurston, a weaver by trade. The fonner became a farmer 
in Shelby county. Indiana, residing on his homestead tliere until about two 
years before his death, when he removed to Shelbyville and spent his 
remaining days retired from active business pursuits. He was a member of 
the Baptist church, and was a Jackson Democrat politically. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Clark were born three children : William Angus, born June 30, 1870, 
married Amy McRae; John Talbot, born September 5, 1871, married Edna 
Rector, and they have two daughters ; and Lucy Emma, bom September 
29. 1873- ^Ir. Clark also has two grandchildren. 

John Wesley McCreerv. Delaware county numbers among her 
native sons John W. McCreery, whose birth occurred in Harri.son township 
on the 24th of December, 1842. His parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (May- 
nard) McCreery, were natives respectively of \'irginia and Maryland, but 
were numbered among those brave pioneers who established their home in 
Delaware county in a very early day in its history and assisted in the reclaim- 
ing of its wild land for purposes of civilization. 

Samuel McCreery, whose natal day was thet)th of July, 1801, emigrated 
when a young man to Carroll county. Ohio, and purchased one hundred 
acres of land, continuing its cultivation and improvement until his removal 
to Delaware county, Indiana, in 1838. Here he entered three hundred and 
sixty acres of land at the government land office then located at Ft. Wayne, 
paying one dollar an acre. His farm was heavily timbered, and in fact the 
entire county at that time was but a wilderness, where wild game was found 
in abundance. His first home was the typical log cabin of the early days, but 
this in time gave place to a modern frame residence, the homestead was 
transformed into a fertile and well improved farm, and Mr. McCreery be- 
came one of the most prominent residents of Harrison township. He was 
an earnest Christian gentleman, a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and his political affiliations were with the Whig and Republican 
parties. His death occurred on the 23d of November, 1893. while his wife 
preceded him to the home beyond, dying February 2, 1889. They were mar- 
ried in Virginia, and of the nine children born to them four are now living — 
Hannah, ^^^Uliacn, John W. and Lavina. 

During his bovhood davs John Wesley McCreer\- assisted his father in 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 781 

clearing- tlie old home farm and placing- its fields un<ler cultivation, and in 
the meantime he received his educational training in the district schools. At 
the age of twenty-three years he began farming for himself on a tract of 
eighty acres which had been given him by his father, but previous to this 
time, on the 19th of December. 1863. he enlisted for service in the Civil war, 
becoming a member of Company G. One Hundred and Twenty-first Regi- 
ment of Indiana \'olunteers. This was the Ninth Cavalry Regiment, and 
he enlisted at New Corner for three years or during the war, receiving his 
honorable discharge on the 28th of December, 1865, at \'icksburg, Missis- 
sippi. His regiment left Delaware county with twelve hundred and forty 
men and officers, but at the return of this brave band its ranks had been de- 
])leted to three hundred and si.xty men and officers. During his armv career 
Mr. McCreery took part in the following hard-fought battles: Pulaski, Ten- 
nessee, September 25, 1864; Bentwood, November 7, 1864; Nashville, De- 
cember 15. 1864: Wilson's Pike, December 17, 1865, besides numerous 
skirmishes. 

When his country no longer needed his services Mr. McCreerv re- 
turned to his hoire and to his farming pursuits, and the little eighty acre 
tract which his father ga\e him at the commencement of his business career 
was increased by subsequent purchases until he became the owner of one 
hundred and seventy-si.x acres. In 1897, however, he put aside the active 
work of the farm and removed to Gaston, where he purchased a home and 
has since lived a quietly retired life, at the present time being a member of 
the town council. 

Mr. McCreery married September 25, 1865, Mar)- A. Trout, whose 
death occurred on the 9th of June, 1879. She was the daughter of Washing- 
ton and Carmilla (Christy) Trout, who were natives of Ohio, but became 
residents of Delaware county. Indiana, in a very early day, and Mr. Trout 
was prominent in the early history of this community, where he followed 
agricultural pursuits. He voted with the Whig party and was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Of the ten children born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Trout eight are now living. For his second wife Mr. McCreery married, 
March 17, 1881, Nannie J. Pond, whose birth occurred in Clinton county, 
Ohio, September 29, 1850. the daughter of David and Eleanor (Gregory) 
Pond. The father, who was bom in Ohio, died in Clinton county, that state, 
at the advanced age of eighty-four years, and the mother passed away in 
death at her home in that county March 3, 1885, aged sixty-nine years, seven 
months and four days. Mr. Pond was one of the rnost prominent men of his 
community, well known in both its professional and business circles, where 
he -was a school teacher, farmer and minister. He was a graduate from 
Harvard College and a fine Bible student. Two weeks before his death he 
preached in the Clarksville, Ohio. Methodist Episcopal church, thus con- 
tinuing an active worker in the cause of his blaster until his life's labors 
were ended. He served as president of the Old Settlers' Association of Ohio, 
and was a Whig politically. The following seven children were born to Mr. 



TSV HISTORY OF DELA^^■ARE COUNTY 

and :Mr-=. Pond: Mary C, Sylvester. Levi. Xannie. \'irg-inia and RoSa. Of 
the four children born to Mr. and ^Mrs. McCreery three are now living: Etta 
F., born October 20. 1866. married to David Cole, and resides in ]\runcie ; 
Osee C).. born January 14, 1870. married Leroy Hiatt ; and Dorsey O., born 
January 18, 1876. married Nellie Lawsoii. Mr. AlcCreery's political affilia- 
tions are with the Republican party, and both he and his wife are worthy 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

William Hiatt. A well-known farmer and stock-raiser, William 
Hiatt. residing' on section 24. Harrison township, has met with de- 
served success in his chosen vocation, and is to-day one of the prosperous 
and progressive agriculturists of this part of Delaware county. He comes 
from honored pioneer stock, his grandparents. John and Charity Hiatt, 
having been among the earlier settlers of Henry county. His parents, Solo- 
mon and Elizabeth (McCollester) Hiatt, spent their entire lives in Indiana, 
during their active years being identified with the agricultural prosperity 
of town and county. Further parental history may be found on another 
page of this volume, in connection with the sketch of Alexander Hiatt, 
brother of William Hiatt. 

A native of Delaware county, William Hiatt was born in Harrison 
township, April 24, 1S64, and acquired his preliminary education in the 
district schools. On the parental homestead he was early initiated into the 
work attendant upon agricultural pursuits, and when ready to begin the 
battle of life for himself chose the occupation of a farmer. In 1899 ^^ P"''" 
chased his first farm, and, having added improvements of value, sold it at 
an advantage in 1906. Mr. Hiatt immediately bought the land upon which 
he is now living, and has continued his agricultural labors. He has one 
hundred and ten acres of rich and fertile land, and in the prosecution of his 
independent calling is reaping a generous reward, being numbered among 
the successful farmers and stock-raisers of his community. 

On October 28, 1888, Mr. Hiatt married Addie M. Brunton, who was 
born in Decatur county, Indiana, ]\Iarch 2^,. 1866. Her father, Noah L. 
Brunton, was born May 5, 1828, in Jefferson county, Indiana, and died 
March 27, 1905, in Harrison township. The son of a pioneer of Jefferson 
county, Noah L. Brunton early became inured to the hardships and priva- 
tions incident to life in an undeveloped country, and as a boy and youth as- 
sisted his father in the arduous labor of clearing a homestead from the wil- 
derness. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war he enlisted, Septem- 
ber 18, 1861, in Company H, Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and 
served bravely for a little more than three years, receiving his honorable dis- 
charge October 2/. 1864. He was very faithful in the performance of his du- 
ties, and with the exception of the time that he was in the hospital at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, he actively participated in all of the battles and skirmishes in 
which his regiment was engaged. Locating in Decatur county on his return, 
he was there a tiller of the soil until 1884, when he bought forty acres of land 




-/^, /h^. 



'^lAjUlA-^^I^^ 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 78-5 

in Harrison township and came here to reside. The land was covered with 
brush and timber, but he cleared it, erected a house, and here spent his re- 
maining days, an esteemed and respected citizen. He was a member of 
Bethel Lodge No. 731, L O. O. P., and of the G. A. R. Post. On January 
II, 1853, ^^r. Brunton married in Decatur county, Louisa H. Bentley, who 
was born January 4, 1835, in Butler county, Ohio, and is now living in Dela- 
ware county. She bore him five children, of whom four are living, as fol- 
lows : Caroline, wife of William J. Colson ; James married Sarah E. House ; 
Addie ^L, wife of Mr. Hiatt, and Gilbert A., who married Larma J. Hutson. 
Five children have been born into the household established by Mr. and 
Mrs. Hiatt, namely: Carl, who died in infancy; Forest E., Clifford M., Gil- 
bert A. and a child that died in infancy. A Republican in politics, Mr. 
Hiatt is recognized as an honest man and good citizen, always ready to per- 
form his part in advancing the general welfare of the community, and is a 
member of the Cemetery Association at Bethel. Indiana, of which he is 
secretary and treasurer. Religiously he is a member of the New Light 
Christian church, belonging to Kings Chapel, and socially he is a member 
of Bethel Lodge No. 731, I. O. O. F., in which he has filled all the offices, 
and of the Tribe of Red Men at Gaston, Indiana. 

S.\MUEL J. McCreery, prominently identified with the business in- 
terests of Gaston, was born in Harrison township, Delaware county, Indi- 
ana, January 25, 1851, and received his educational training in the public 
schools of his native county. His father, Thomas McCreery, a son of 
Samuel and Elizabeth McCreery, was born in Carroll county, Ohio, Octo- 
ber 7, 1826, and departed this life on the i6th of March, 1906. When 
twelve years of age he came to Indiana with his parents and located on the 
farm now owned by his son William, one-half a mile south of Gaston. 
The county at that time was a dense wilderness. His father located on a 
claim of four hundred acres, eighty of which he gave to Thomas and he 
cleared it himself and helped to blaze the way from his father's house to 
a neighbor's, which was no small job. He endured the hardships and en- 
joyed the triumphs of pioneer days. When quite a >T)ung man he became 
a Christian, his father having been a charter member of the First Meth- 
odist Episcopal society in the neighborhood, which was organized in 1843, 
and about 1849 Thomas McCreery and his wife became members, joining 
the church in Levi Miller's house west of Gaston, and from that time on he 
was a faithful Christian. He was also very much interested in the public 
welfare and the country's civilization, and he helped to make the coun- 
try, highways and schools what they are now. There is scarcely a church 
around the country that he did not give of his means to build. 

In 1849 Mr. McCreery married Miss Catherine Brown, and they be- 
came the parents of nine children, four sons and five daughters, namely: 
Samuel J., James W., Nathan A. and John \\\, also Hannah E. Janney, 
Phoebe J. McCreery. Rebecca A. McMahan, Sarah L. Kirklan and Effie 



786 HISTORY t^F DEr.AWARE COUNTY 

Hannaii. On the 14th of April, 1SS6, his companion, who had been his co- 
wTirker in life, passed to her final reward. He was married to Margaret 
Anderson December 16, 1898, and on February 19, 1901, married Martha 
J. French, all of his companions preceding him in death, also two of his 
daughters, Phoebe J. McCreery and Rebecca A. McMahan. He lived 
alone during a portion of his life, but the last four weeks were spent with 
his son Samuel, where, after a continued attack of illness, he passed quietly 
away. He was a good husband, a kind and loving father, an affectionate 
brother, an energetic and noble man and a representative citizen. 

During his boyhood days Samuel J. McCreery, the immediate subject 
of this review, worked on the farm will: his father during the summer 
months, helping to clear the place from its virgin state, and attended the 
schools of the neighborhood during the winters. When he was twenty- 
one years of age he learned the painter's trade, but being the owner of 
eighty acres which his father had given him he abandoned his trade after 
nine months and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He was 
also married about this time, and his first home was a frame house of two 
rooms, but later on he built additions thereto until he had a good eight- 
room house on his farm, and in the meantime he also added to his land until 
he is to-day the owner of about two hundred acres, all of which is fertile 
and well improved, while in addition to his agricultural labors he was also 
quite extensively engaged in stock raising, breeding Poland China and 
Jersey hogs. In 1899 Mr. McCreery left the farm and removed to Gaston, 
where he erected a pleasant home and in 1902 engaged in the canning 
business with others, he being one of the directors of the business. In 
1893 he with others built the New Corner and Anthony pike, and was also 
one of the charter members of the Gaston IJanking Company, in which he 
served as one of the directors. 

On the 25th of December, 1873. Mr. McCreery married Martha Trout, 
whose death occurred on the 19th of January, 1903. She was born in 
Licking county, Ohio, November 21, 1847, the daughter of Washington 
and Carmilla (Christy) Trout, both of whom were also natives of the 
Buckeye state, but both passed away in death in Harrison township, Dela- 
ware county, the father when he had reached the age of sixty-five vears, 
and the mother at the age of seventy-five. Of the ten children born to 
this couple nine lived to years of maturity and four are now living: Henrv 
B., Francis M., Emma R. and Orlena. The parents came to Delaware 
county in the early '30s, locating in Harrison township. He was a mem- 
ber of the Alethodist Episcopal church, and gave his political support to 
the Republican party. On the 25th of December, 1905, Mr. McCreery mar- 
ried Martha J. Jackson. She was born in Hancock coimty, Indiana, the 
daughter of Andrew and Katura (Boulden) Jackson, both of whom were 
born in the commonwealth of Virginia, but the mother died when her 
daughter Martha was but three weeks old. The husband and father sur- 
vived until the loth of September, 1906, dying in Hancock county, Indiana. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 78? 

He was born in Wayne coniit\' of this state March lo. 1823, a son of Levi 
and Elizabeth Jackson. When he was seven years of age the family moved 
to Aladison county, Indiana, and in a very early day they established their 
home in Hancock county. He united with the Methodist Episcopal church 
during his boyhood days, and thereafter lived a true Christian life, becom- 
ing one of the leading members of his church and for many years served 
as its class leader. He became the father of five children by his first mar- 
riage, but only four are now living: Thomas J.. Sarah H., John W. and 
Martha J. By his second marriage, to Priscilla Haney, Mr. Jackson be- 
came the father of eight children, but only two of this large number now 
survive, Pearl E. and Lottie. On the 5th of August, 1885, Alartha J. Jack- 
son married Ivens P. Curtis, whose death occurred on the 1st of July, 1897, 
and to them were born two children, Annie E. and Roy E., the elder dying 
in infancy. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McCreery, but 
the first born died in infancy, Birdella, the second married George W. 
Miller, and died February 16, 1906, aged twenty-six, and Lloyd E. mar- 
ried Winona Manring and resides in Gaston. 

Mr. McCreery was made a Mason in New Corner Lodge No. 524, from 
which he transferred his membership to Muncie Lodge No. 334, and he 
was also a charter member of the order of Red Men, but is not now a 
member of that fraternity. He affiliates with New Corner Lodge No. 425, 
I. O. O. F., of which he is a past noble grand, and is also a member of 
Encampment Xo. 223, in which he has passed all the chairs and has been 
a representative to the Grand Lodge of Indiana. Since seventeen years 
of age Mr. McCreery has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in the meantime having assisted in the erection of two churches in 
Gaston, and for twenty years or more served in the office of steward, while 
at the present time he is the president of the board of trustees. He is a 
stanch Republican in his political affiliations. 

WiLLi.XM C. Hoffman. For forty years a resident of Delaware county, 
William C. Hoffman has been closely identified with its industrial and agri- 
cultural growth and progress, and is widely known as a citizen of sterling 
worth and integrity. A veteran of the Civil war, he is distinguished for 
his military record as a soldier, while in private life he is recognized as a 
true, upright man, one to whom will be said when "taps" are sounded for 
the last time, "Well done, thou good and faithful servant." A son of 
William H. Hoffman, he was born, March 8, 1846, in Montgomery county, 
Ohio, and there spent his early years. 

William H. Hoffman w'as born in Pennsylvania, in 1807, and died in 
1852, in Ohio, while yet in manhood's prime. With his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jacob Hoffman, he moved to Ohio, where he was reared and edu- 
cated. He began life on his own account as a merchant in Dayton, Ohio, 
but afterwards settled on a farm, and from that time until his death was 
actively employed in agricultural pursuits. He was a Whig in his political 



788 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

affiliations, and in religion belonged to the United Brethren church. He 
married in Ohio Alaria Camp, who was born in 1819 in Xew lersey, and 
died in 1893 in Delaware county, Indiana. Seven children were born to 
them, five of whom survive, as follows : \\'illiam C., the special subject of 
this sketch; Harriet, wife of J. J. ]\IcCarter; George \V. married Delia 
Bliss ; Lucetta, wife of Noah Sinks ; and Elizabeth, wife of Perry Wayniier. 

During the days of his boyhood William C. Hoffman worked on the 
home farm, attending the district schools during the winter seasons. When 
the tocsin of war rang throughout the land he was a beardless youth, but 
his patriotic blood was aroused, and on October 22, 1861, he enlisted for 
three years in Company F, Seventy-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. On 
July 25, 1864, he was honorably discharged with his comrades from serv- 
ice, and at once re-enlisted in the same company, becoming a veteran of the 
regiment in which he first enlisted. On February 8, 1865, he was made 
corporal of his company, and in that capacity served until receiving his 
final discharge, July 10, 1865. With the gallant heroes of the Seventy- 
fourth Regiment Mr. Hoffman participated in some of the more important 
battles and skirmishes of the war, taking part in more than twenty engage- 
ments, including among others the following named : Chickamauga, Look- 
out Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Stone River. Buzzards Roost, Resaca, 
Dallas, Jonesboro and Atlanta. Returning to his Ohio home at the close 
of the war Mr. Hoffman resumed farming, remaining there about two 
years. 

In 1867, following the trail established b\' the pioneers of old, Mr. 
Hoffman came to Delaware county, locating first as a farmer in Salem 
township and afterwards removing to Mount Pleasant township, where he 
was similarly employed for a number of years. Coming to Washington 
township in 1899, he purchased the farm which he now owns and occu- 
pies, and began its improvement by the erection of the substantial farm 
house, of modern structure, in which he is now living. He is not at the 
present time actively engaged in tilling the soil, but rents the land, deriving 
a good annual income from the rentals. 

Mr. Hoffman married, November 30, 1 871, Mary Lambert, who was 
born in Jefferson county, Indiana, January 10, 1S54, a daughter of John 
N. Lambert and a granddaughter of Noah and Elizabeth Lambert, who 
were among the earliest settlers of Ohio county, Indiana. John N. Lam- 
bert was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, December 26, 1830. and died June 
I, 1907, in Delaware county, Indiana. Coming with his parents to Indiana 
when a child, he was brought up in Ohio county, living there until 1854. 
Locating then in Delaware county, he bought fifty-six acres of land on 
which the timber was still standing, and ere long the steady swing of his 
axe might be heard as he cleared an opening in which to erect a log cabin. 
The country hereabout was then but sparsely populated, the wild beasts of 
the forest having scarce fled before the advancing steps of civilization. 
Working with courage and perseverance, he cleared a large part of the 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 789 

land, and in course of time added to the area of his farm by tlie purchase 
of forty acres of adjoining land, and replaced the log cabin with a sub- 
stantial frame house, in which he spent the remainder of his days, dying 
honored and esteemed by all. He became a man of influence in the county, 
and was an important factor in developing its resources. He was a Whig 
in politics, a member of the United Brethren church, and belonged to 
Delaware Lodge, L O. O. F. Mr. Lambert married, in Switzerland 
county, Indiana, Nancy J. Graham, who was born in that county July 12, 
1831, and died in Delaware county Febniar}- 16, 1S79. She bore him nine 
children, of whom eight are living, as follows: Mary, wife of Mr. Hoff- 
man; Joseph O. married Emma Cromer; John W. married EfBe Rader; 
David H. married Anna Meeker; Charles E. married Sarah Smith; Oliver 
P. married Sadie Bateman ; Oscar C. married Agnes Hupp ; and Josie B., 
wife of Charles Walker. 

Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman six children have been born, 
namely : \'ertie M., who died at the age of twenty-four years ; Milton B. 
married Ethel Oxley ; Bessie A., wife of Oscar O. Boxell, of whom a brief 
sketch appears on another page of this work; George A. married Gertrude 
Robbins; Harry E. married Fannie Smith; and Hattie L., wife of John 
Carmon. Politically Air. Hoffman is a stanch supporter of the Republican 
party. Fraternally he belongs to Lookout Mountain Post No. 140, G. A. R. 
Religiously he and his wife are conscientious members of the Methodist 
Protestant church. 

Jacob E. Sh.vrp. As a life-long resident of Delaware county and an 
important factor in the development of its mercantile, agricultural and in- 
dustrial prosperity, the late Jacob E. Sharp is specially deserving of honor- 
able mention in this biographical and historical work. As a successful 
business man, a trustworthy citizen, and a man of strict integrity and high 
moral principles, he had the sincere respect and esteem of his neighbors 
and friends. He was born in Washington tow-nship, this county, Novem- 
ber 2, 1854, and died near Gaston August 30, 1901, while yet in manhood's 
prime. He was of honored pioneer descent, being a son of Thompson and 
Christena (Bower) Sharp, of whom a brief account may be found on an- 
other page of this volume. 

Beginning life for himself as a merchant, Jacob E. Sharp had a gen- 
eral store in New Corner, now Gaston, for two years, carrying on quite 
an extensive business. Closing out then, he turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, for which he had a natural aptitude and liking. Locat- 
ing in Harrison township, he made substantial improvements on the farm 
which he purchased, including among other things the erection of a good 
frame house. He continued his occupation of a farmer until 1895, when he 
removed to a pleasant home in Gaston, where he resided until called to the 
better life. Although a stanch Republican in politics, Mr. Sharp never 



T90 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUiVlY 

sought public office, but he was prominent as an Odd Fellow, belongino- to 
Kew Canaan Lodge. No. 154, L O. O. F. 

On December 25, 1S75, ^Ir. ."^liarp married Florence A. Brady, who 
was born in Harrison township, this county, April 3, 1855. and into the 
home thus established four children were born, namely: Elmer Vernon, 
who died in infancy, Aver)' L., Lula May and Dora Hazel. i\Irs. Sharp's 
father, the late Aaron W. Brady, was born in Ohio September 25, 1822, and 
died in Delaware county, Indiana, September 13, 1S79. When a child 
he came with his parents to Indiana, his father taking up a government 
claim in the wilderness, and from it reclaiming a homestead. In the davs 
o'' his boyhood the wild beasts of the forest had not fled before the ad- 
vt-iicing steps of civilization, but with the dusky savage habited the vast wil- 
derness. While assisting his father in clearing a homestead he acquired a 
practical knowledge that was of much use to him in after years, and when 
ready to commence his career as an independent farmer he took up a tract 
of timbered land and began the improvement of a farm. He was ver>' suc- 
cessful in his undertaking, becoming the possessor of one of the most at- 
tractive and valuable homesteads in this part of the county. The humble 
log cabin which he reared in the forest was replaced by a comfortably built 
frame house, in which he spent his last years in comfort and pleasure. Fle 
was a Whig in politics until the formation of the Republican party, when he 
became one of its most ardent supporters, and belonged to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He was buried with Masonic honors b}- the New Canaan 
Lodge No. 425, A. F. & A. M., of which he was a prontinent member 
Mr. Brady married, in Indiana, Hannah Marshall, who was born in Clinton 
county, Ohio, January 13, 1821, and died January 13, 1875. She bore him 
eight children, of whom three survive, namely : Margaret, wife of Thomas 
Duncan ; William, who married Eliza Flannan ; and Mrs. Florence A. 
(Brady) Sharp. 

John W. Kikkli.v. one of the prominent and leading business men 
of Washington township, was bom in Henry county, Indiana, June 25, 1859. 
His father, John R. Kirklin, was a native son of North Carolina, from 
whence he removed to Illinois and later to Henry county, Indiana, where 
he followed his trade of coopering and farming until 1887, since which 
time he has lived a retired life, making his home in Perrv township, Dela- 
ware county. Fie has reached the eightieth milestone on the journey of life, 
and is loved and honored in the community in which he has so long made 
his home. He is a member of the German Baptist church, in which he 
has served as a minister during the past forty years, and his political 
affiliations have been with the Whig and Republican parlies. During his 
residence in Illinois Mr. Kirklin married Louisa Bruer, who was born in 
1829. and died in 1861. Of the si.x children born ot this union four 
are now living: Martha. William T., Jacob and John W. The father was 
a second time married, Mrs. Elizabeth Richardson, nee Holler, then be- 



HISTORY OF Dl'.I.AWAE'lE CoUXTY 7!)1 

coiiiinjj his wife, and they also had six chikh'en, the three now Hvincf being 
Eh, Susan and Charles. 

During three years of his early business career John W. Kirklin was 
engaged in general merchandising in Oaston. after which he turned his 
attention to farming on twelve acres of lann in Washington township. 
With the passing years he extended the boundaries of this little farm until 
he became the owner of two hundred and tliirty-five acres, all fertile and 
well improved land, and here he is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising. In addition to his extensive agricultural interests he is also en- 
gaged in the undertaking business in Gaston in partnership with Bert 
Powers, lie having been engaged in this vocation since 1892. He is a 
member of the order of Red Men, Sioux Tril>e Xo. 123, at Gaston, Indiana, 
and his political affiliations are with the Republican party. 

( )n the 29th of September, 1887, Mr. Kirklin married Sarah L. AIc- 
Creery. who was born in Harrison township, Delaware county, May 2^, 
1866. Her father, Thomas McCreery, was one of the prominent and suc- 
cessful farmers of Harrison township, being held in the highest esteem by 
all who knew him. He was born in Carroll county, Ohio, October 7, 1826, 
and died on the i6th of March, iQo'i. He came from Ohio at an early 
date with his parents, with whom he lived until twenty-four years of age, 
when he was married. After becoming of age he worked with his father 
until his marriage, the latter then giving him a contract to clear eighty 
acres of land, while in addition he worked his father's farm on the shares. 
He was the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Maynard) AlcCreery. The 
former, born in \irginia July 9. 1801, emigrated to Carroll county, Ohio, 
when a young man and bought one hundred acres of land, on which he 
farmed and made his home until 1838, in that year coming to Delaware 
county and entering three hundred and sixty acres of land in the wilder- 
ness. His wife died on the 2d of February, 1889, but he survived until the 
23fl of Xovember, 1893, passing away at the advanced age of ninety-three 
>ears. He was a member of the Methodist church, and was identified with 
the Whig party. 

Thomas McCreery added to the homestead farm at different times until 
he at one time owned four hundred and seventeen acres, while in addition 
he also owned a half interest in a large store room in New Comer, now 
Gaston, and other property in that city. Mr. McCreery married, October 
25, 1849, Miss Catherine Brown, a daughter of Samuel and Phebe Brown, 
natives of Clinton county, Ohio, but they became residents of the western 
part of Delaware county, Indiana, where the husband and father was en- 
gaged in farming. He was also a cooper by trade. Mrs. McCreery was 
born April 7, 1828, and died .April 15, 1886, her remains now jesting in 
the Cumberland cemetery, where a beautiful monument stands sacred to 
her memory. She was a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and enjoyed the esteem of all who knew her. By this marriage the follow- 
ing children were born : Samuel J., whose biography also appears in this 



793 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

work; Hannah E., the wife of Wilham Janney; Rebecca, deceased; James 
W. ; Nathan A. ; John W. ; Sarah L., the wif^ of John W. Kirklin ; and 
Mary M., the wife of Barney Hannan. Mr. McCreery married Septem- 
ber i8, 1888, for his second wife, Mrs. Margaret Ellen Anderson, the widow 
of O. Anderson and a native of Clermont county, Ohio. Mr. McCreery was 
a Republican in his political affiliations, and was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Five children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Kirklin, 
namely: Byrel R., born September 22, 1888; Floyd R., born June 2, 1891; 
Twily T., born December 23, 1893; Wayne L., born August 9, 1896; and 
Oren L., born April 29, 1903. 

Joseph A. Broyles was born in \\'ashington township, Delaware coun- 
ty, Indiana, August 5, 1852, a son of Anderson H. and Harritt (Wilson) 
Broyles. The father was born in Greenbrier county, Virginia, August 19, 
1812, but in 1834, when twenty-two years of age, he came to Rush county, 
Indiana, where he worked on a farm for about two years. Not being satis- 
fied with that location, however, he concluded to remove to another part 
of the state where he could procure a home of his own. It was in 1837 
that he came with his father's family to Washington township, Delaware 
county, which was then but a dense wilderness. He built him a little log 
cabin and started in life in very humble circumstances, but by energy, 
industry and excellent business ability he became numbered among the 
largest real estate owners in Washington township, as well as one of its 
leading citizens. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
for nearly fifty-five years, and when his good and useful life was ended in 
death, on the 29th of December, 1879, his funeral services w-ere held in 
Zion Chapel on the 31st, conducted by Rev. J. D. Croan. He gave his 
political support to the Whig party. On the 20th of February, 1835, during 
his residence in Rush county, Indiana, he was there married to Harritt 
Wilson, who was born in Kentucky April 9, 1812, and died in Washington 
township, Delaware county, Indiana, March 23, 1895. Of the eight children 
born of this union, four are now living; John W., William H., Lewis H. 
and Joseph A. 

Joseph A. Broyles remained at home with his parents until his mar- 
riage, in the meantime assisting his father in the work of the farm and 
pursuing his education in the district schools and in the high school of 
Muncie. Soon after his marriage he began farming for himself on forty 
acres of land, later on building him a log house which served as the family 
home until 1902, in that year erecting the modern frame dwelling which 
adds so much to the value and attractive appearance of the homestead. He 
has improved his farm of one hundred and thirty-nine and a half acres 
from its primitive state to its present high degree of cultivation, having 
been assisted in the work by his sons but in the spring of 1907 Mr. Broyles 
laid aside the active work of the farm and has since lived a retired life, his 
sons conductinar the work of the homestead. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 793 

The marriage of Mr. Broyles was celebrated on the 12th of August, 
1876, Eliza C. Reeder becoming his wife. She was born in Grant counts.", 
Indiana, December 25, 1850, the daughter of William H. H. and Elizabeth 
(Daily) Reeder. Mr. Reeder, who was born in Ohio, took up his abode in 
Grant county, Indiana, during the early '40s, entering government land, 
and on his farm he erected the hewed log house which now serves as the 
home of his son, William H. H., Jr. At one time he was the owner of one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, most of which he cleared himself, and 
his name is enrolled among the honored early pioneers of Grant countv. 
He served as a justice of the peace for a number of years, during which 
time he settled a number of estates, and during an extended period he was 
also a member of the teacher's profession. He was reared in the faith of 
the Presbyterian church, and his political support was given to the Whig 
party. The marriage of Mr. Reeder occurred in Decatur county, Indiana, 
whither his wife, who was a native daughter of Kentucky, had been 
brought by her parents when but six years of age. During her voung 
womanhood she united with the United Brethren in Christ church, and lived 
a beautiful Christian life during the remainder of her days. Mr. Reeder 
attained to the age of seventy-one years, dying in 1882. Five of their seven 
children are now living: Margaret, Eliza C, William H. H., Flora M. and 
Robert B. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Broyles have been born four children: 
Catherine R. is the wife of M. M. Schlenker, and they have three sons. 
William, bom October 2, 1879, has taught school every winter since he was 
eighteen years of age, having received an excellent training in the State 
Normal College at Angola, Indiana, in which he graduated August 10, 1895, 
and he graduated with the class of 1908 in the State University. He is now- 
attending the Bloomington, Indiana, University. Robert 'B., born Januarv 
19, 1882, attended the Indianapolis Business College. He married Maggie 
Rector. Charles M., born May 14, 1884, attended the Angola Normal Col- 
lege. He married Leora M. Fergus. The family are members of the Meth- 
odist church, and Mr. Broyles is a Republican politically. 

R.'\NDOLPH Beuoy, Gaston, Indiana, was born in Washington to\\,-n- 
ship, Delaware county, Indiana, August 14, 1834, and is the oldest living 
native of that township. He is a son of Thomas and Mary (Heart) Beuoy. 

Thomas Beuoy was bom in West Virginia, June 3, 1786, and devoted 
the major portion of his life to agricultural pursuits. He earned his first 
money by hunting and trapping in Ohio, having entered Ohio before it 
had become a state. He had the distinction of being one of those who saw 
the first steamboat which came down the Ohio river. When fifteen years of , 
age he helped to build the court house at Waynesburg, West Virginia. 
He later removed to Wheeling, Virginia, when there were but three, shops 
in the town. He suffered from a severe attack of fever when but a young 
man, and hope for his recovery was given up, but thanks to previous 

13 



794 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

sound liealth and careful nursing he recovered. He purchased his first 
land, an eighty acre timber tract, in Guernsey county, Ohio, with money 
which he had made by hunting and trapping. Later he added an addi- 
tional eighty acres to this tract, and built upon the property a double 
hewed log house. He made a trip, with his pony and dog, to Fort Wayne, 
Indiana, then down the Wabash river, and up the Mississinewa to the 
point where the city of Marion now stands. At this point he encountered a 
young man and his wife engaged in building themselves a log cabin. These 
were the first white people he had met on his trip. From this point he 
continued to W'heeling and then returned to Ohio, and in the spring of 1832, 
removed with his wife and children to Washington township, Delaware 
county, Indiana. He entered two hundred acres of timber land at the land 
office in Fort Wayne, and upon this holding erected the first frame house 
in Washington township, and before he died he presented to each of his 
sons tracts of land varying from eighty to one hundred acres. He belonged 
to the primitive Baptist church ; was originally a Democrat, next a Whig 
and finally a Republican. His death occurred August 27, 1865. The mother 
of our subject was born in Virginia in May, 1785, and is now deceased. 
She was the mother of twelve children, two of whom are living, Randolph, 
our subject, and Benoni. 

Randolph Beuoy as a boy worked upon his father's farm helping to 
clear the land and put it into condition for cultivation, and managed to 
get a couple of months' schooling in the winter months. When he reached 
the age of seventeen his father tunied the farm over 'to him and he man- 
aged the same until his father's death, when he and his brother Benoni 
farmed the land in partnership. In tlie fall of 1877 Mr. Beuoy built the 
attractive house in which he now resides. He has retired from active 
work and rents the farm but still maintains his residence on the place. 
He and his wife are among the organizers of their local primitive Baptist 
church. In politics he is a Republican and has voted for every Republican 
nominee for the presidency since the days of John C. Fremont. 

On January 14, 1858, Mr. Beuoy was united in marriage to Miss 
Eliza McVicker, who was bom in Blackford county, Indiana, January 9, 
1837. She is the daughter of Aaron and Elizabeth (Brunner) McVicker. 
The father was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, in September, 1810, and 
died March 18, i860, and the mother was born in Hampshire county, 
Virginia, May 4, 181 1, and died in September, 1875. Of a family of thirteen 
children but four are living: Eliza, wife of our subject, James, Harriet, 
and Eli. Mr. McVicker located in Blackford county in 1834. He was a 
member and a deacon of Primitive Baptist church, and a great Bible stu- 
dent. In politics he was a Jefferson Democrat. 

Air. and Mrs. Beuoy are the parents of three children: Alice, wife of 
Jacob Richards, Grant county, Indiana; Mack, who married Jennie Wat- 
son, and lives in Washington township ; and Jennie, wife of John C. Rich- 
ardson. Besides their own, Mr. and Mrs. Beuoy adopted and raised three 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 795 

children : William B. Jones, who lived with them until he was twenty-two 
years of age, Lizzie Leard, and Lulu Beuoy. There are eight grandchildren 
in the family. 

AIoNROE DoRTO.v, a prominent and well known business man of Wash- 
ington township, is a native son of the Hoosier state, born in its county 
of Union March 30, 1S52, and there his parents, Henry and Phebe (Rose) 
Dorton, also had their nativity, the father born on the loth of September, 
1826, and the mother November 8, 1S29. They were married on the 28th 
of November, 1849, in Union county, and the mother is now living in 
Mathews, having long survived her husband, who died on the 4th of July, 
1895. 

The boyhood days of Monroe Dorton were spent at work on his father's 
farm, attending the district schools during the winter months, and soon 
after his marriage he purchased a livery business at Jonesboro, Grant 
county, Indiana. After about one year there he sold his busir.ess and re- 
moved to Dunkirk, this state, where he erected a bam and continued the 
livery business about two years. Again selling, he came to Washington 
township, Delaware county, and bought forty acres of land of David HoUis 
in section 16, which he farmed, and later purchased fifty acres where he 
now lives. In 1892 he erected on this homestead a fine farm residence, 
while in 1902 was built his modern and commodious bam. During his 
business career Mr. Dorton has been connected with various lines of trade, 
having spent nine years with the Deering Harvester Company in selling 
their machines through Indiana and Ohio, while during one year he was 
also associated with the International Harvester Company at Richmond and 
two years at Fort Wayne. During the years of 1875-6 he was engaged in 
the construction of gravel roads throughout Washington township. 

Mr. Dorton married Samantha Dunn December 14, 1873. She is a 
native daughter of Washington township, born on the 31st of May, 1851, 
her parents being Thomas and Sarah (Reasoner) Dunn, natives respec- 
tively of \'irginia and Ohio, the father born on the 25th of July, 181 2, and 
the mother on the 26th of February, 181 5. They were married in Black- 
ford county, Indiana, July 19, 1838, and became the parents of nine chil- 
dren, the four now living being John C., who married Sarah Horner, 
deceased ; Mary H., the wife of Esla Stephenson ; Sarah Jane, the wife of 
Richard A. Watson; and Samantha, Mrs. Etorton. 

Mr. Dunn came from Ohio to Indiana with his parents in 1826, when 
but eleven years of age. He was the son of John and Catherine (Knight) 
Dunn, early and honored pioneers of the Hoosier state. Soon after his 
marriage the son built him a log house in section 16, Washington town- 
ship, where he had entered one hundred and sixty acres of timber land at 
the government office at Fort Wayne, while later on he entered forty acres 
more. During the early years of his business career Mr. Dunn worked at 
the carpenter's trade, and in 1864 he purchased of Mr. James Kisner a saw 



796 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

and flouring mill at New Cumberland, Indiana, which he conducted up to 
the time of his death, although he was not himself a miller. He served 
as the township trustee for twelve years, and in 1865 he sold his farm to 
remove to New Cumberland, and there his busy and useful life was ended 
in death on the 15th of October, 1881, his wife surviving him just ten 
years, and dying on the 19th of July, 1891. He was a worthy and accepta- 
ble member of the Presbyterian church, in which he served as a deacon 
during the long period of about thirty-five years. His political affiliations 
were with the Whigs until the dissolution of that party and the formation 
of the Republican in 1856, when he joined the ranks of the latter party. 
One son has blessed the union of IMr. and Mrs. Dorton, Charles C, who is 
engaged in farming in Douglas county, Missouri. He married Clara Rich- 
ardson, and they have three daughters, Clara I., Alary A. and Beatrice. 
Air. Dorton was a member of the Alethodist Episcopal church from the age 
of sixteen years until 1896, but since that time he has held membership rela- 
tions with the Presbyterian church. 

James Wesley McCarty. Throughout his entire business life James 
Wesley McCarty has been connected with journalistic work, and now as the 
editor and proprietor of the Nettj Gas Light he holds an enviable position in 
journalistic circles throughout the county. The paper was named from 
the first gas well discovered in Indiana, located at Eaton, and was purchased 
by Mr. McCarty on the loth of February, 1902. The journal has a large 
circulation and a splendid advertising patronage, and since coming under the 
supervision of Mr. McCarty it has more than doubled its patronage. 

James W, McCarty was born in Boxley, Hamilton county, Indiana, May 
22, 1871, but his parents. Air. and Airs. W'ilson AlcCarty, farming people, 
were born and reared in Brown county, Ohio. During his boyhood days 
their son attended the public schools of Boxley and graduated with the class 
of June, 1888. As soon as his education was completed he went to Sheridan, 
Indiana, and began wx)rk at the printer's trade, working as a journalist 
throughout the entire "gas belt," and, as above stated, he purchased the Neiv 
Gas Light in 1902, and has since continued as its editor and proprietor. In 
June, 1907, he was elected the secretary of the Eighth District Editorial As- 
sociation of Indiana, and he is also a member of the fraternal orders of 
Knights of Pythias and the Red Alen. He takes an active part in the work 
of the order of Red Alen, and is the past sachem of his lodge. 

In Tipton, Indiana, September 10, 1892, Air. AlcCarty married Aliss 
Alarinda Lawson, a daughter of Nathaniel Lawson, of near Gaston, Indiana. 
A daughter, Aliss Alyrtle Ruby, was born to them in Aluncie on the 25th of 
June, 1894, and she is their only child. Airs. AlcCarty was bom near Koko- 
mo, in Howard county, Indiana. The family are members of the Christian 
church. 

Taylor G. Gibson. A man who has made for himself a place in con- 
nection with the activities and honors of life, who has successfuUv sur- 




Mr. anJ Mrs. James W. McCarty and Daughter. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 799 

mounted obstacles and who has gained recognition for intrinsic worth of 
character is Taylor G. Gibson, one of the leading agriculturists of Delaware 
county. He was born in its township of Monroe December 5, 1859, and is a 
representative of one of the county's earliest pioneer families. His grand- 
father, Robert Gibson, a native of the Carolinas, established his home in 
jMonroe township, Delaware county, in a very early day, when this section 
of the state was a comparative wilderness. He built him a little cabin home, 
and there his son Taylor, the father of our subject, was born on the i6th of 
October, 1834, and there he spent his boyhood days. When he had reached 
the age of twenty-one years he engaged in farming for himself, following 
that occupation until his busy and useful life was ended in death, October 
13, 1866. During the period of the Civil war he offered his services to his 
country and became a member of Company B, One Hundred and Sixty-ninth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Muncie, and he was made the cap- 
tain of his company. He was a prominent and worthy member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he also served as a minister of the 
gospel, being an efficient worker in the cause of Christianity. In the early 
days he supported the principles of the Whig party, and after the formation 
of the Republican party he joined its ranks. 

In Monroe township, Delaware county, on the nth of September, 1852, 
Mr. Gibson married Miss Amanda Tuttle, who was born in Warren county, 
Ohio, April 18, 1835, and of their six children five are now living: Amelia 
E., who married Robert Williams and resides in Dayton, Ohio ; Robert R., 
who married Jane Perry and lives in Muncie ; Taylor G., whose name intro- 
duces this review ; John W., who married Christena McFail and lives in 
Muncie : Thomas F., who is married and lives in Indianapolis. After the 
death of the husband and father Mrs. Gibson married James A. Stafford, 
who was born in Giles county, Virginia, October 28, 1846, and they became 
the parents of three children: Emery W., who married Jessie Hoover, and 
their home is in Hammond, Indiana; Samuel H., a resident of Dunkirk, this 
state ; and Jennie F., the wife of William Rawson, of Shideler, Delaware 
county. 

During his boyhood days Taylor G. Gibson, of this review, attended the 
public schools of Monroe township. His father died when he was a little 
lad of seven years, and for one year thereafter he made his home with Mr. 
George W. Himes, and from that time until he was twenty-two years of age 
his home was with William Tuttle. From the early age of sixteen years he 
worked as a farm hand, and there are few men who can more justly claim 
the proud American title of a self-made man than Taylor G. Gibson. In his 
twenty-second year he engaged in agricultural pursuits for himself, and 
farming has continued as his life work, and he has won success in the call- 
ing. In 1893 he erected a pleasant and commodious residence on his valuable 
estate, which is under an excellent state of cultivation, and in addition to his 
general agricultural pursuits he is also engaged in stock raising, feeding 
about one hundred head of hogs and about one carload of cattle each year. 



800 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

The Republican party receives his active support and cooperation, and as its 
representative he has served in many local positions, including that of town- 
ship trustee, of which he was the incumbent from the 6th of November, 
1900, until the ist of January, 1905, and in the following year was elected a 
member of the county council, in which he is now serving. 

On the 22d of Februarj-, 1882, Mr. Gibson was united in marriage to 
Miss Rosetta Gumpp, who was born in Union township, Delaware county, 
July 4, 1859. a daughter of David and Susan (Younce) Gumpp, the former 
of whom was bom in Miami county, Ohio, December 25, 1833. The mother, 
who is now deceased, was a daughter of Andrew Younce, and of her four 
children two are now living — Rosetta, who became the wife of Mr. Gibson, 
and Sarah, the wife of Samuel Bassinger, of Union township. For his sec- 
ond wife Mr. Gumpp married Mrs. M. Younce, nee Shaffer, November 28, 
1902. In the fall of 1835 Mr. Gumpp came with his parents to Delaware 
county, Indiana, where the father, Jacob Gumpp, entered government land 
in Union township, having been one of its earliest pioneers. His son David 
grew to years of maturity in this then frontier settlement, and he was identi- 
fied with agricultural pursuits until in 1902, when he laid aside the active 
cares of a business life and removed to Eaton. During the long period of 
sixteen years he served as a supervisor, representing the Republican party, 
and he is a member of the German Baptist church. The union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gibson has been blessed with eight children, namely: Leora, born Feb- 
ruary 12, 1883, married Earl Horn, and they reside in Union township; 
Robert H., bom July 9, 1885; Leroy C., born January 28, 1886; Edith L., 
born September 15, 1887, died September 8, 1888; Bertha M., born April 24, 
1889 ; Warren R., September 5, 1893 ; Sarah I., August 8, 1896; and Martha 
A., July 20, 1899. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson are members of the Christian 
church, in which he has served as a trustee and deacon, and in the advance- 
ment of whatever is for the best interest of the community his influence can 
be safely relied upon. 

JoHX W. Long. One of the families which have been prominent in the 
histor>' of Delaware county from its early days is that now worthily repre- 
sented by the subject of this review, Mr. John W. Long, one of the leading 
business men of Eaton. For many years they have occupied a distinctive 
place in the affairs of city and county, and in the glorious labor of transform- 
ing the county from a wilderness to its present high state of prosperity they 
have been active and zealous. Mr. Long was born on the old homestead, 
, which now forms a part of the town of Eaton, April 19, 1846, a son of Wil- 
liam Austin and Anna (McLaughlin) Long, who were married on the 28th 
of October, 184 1, in Delaware county, Indiana. They were respectively of 
Scotch and Irish descent, and the father was bom in Clinton county, Ohio, 
November 16, 181 5, and died in Delaware county in 1883, while the mother 
was born in Logan county, Ohio, in 1823, and died at the age of forty-one 
years, in 1864. Seven children were born of this union, of whom five are 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 801 

now living: Lucetta, wlio married Joseph Hinton and resides in Washing- 
ton township, Delaware county; America D., the wife of William Cox, of 
Delaware county ; Martha J., who became the wife of John Morris and 
resides in Eaton, Indiana; Mary L., the wife of John Picksely, also of 
Eaton ; and John W., whose name introduces this review. 

It was in April, 1837, that Mr. William A. Long became a citizen of 
Delaware county, Indiana, making the journey hither with ox teams and 
in company with his father, they establishing their home in the then wilder- 
ness of Union township. The land was covered with a dense growth of 
timber, it having been necessary to clear a space sufficient to erect their 
little log cabin, and in 1844 the elder Mr. Long built a frame barn, forty- 
six by fifty-two feet in dimensions, hewing the lumber from the logs, and 
this building yet stands in good repair. Some of the girders in this barn 
are twelve by sixteen inches. Mr. William A. Long purchased one of the 
first McComiick reapers brought into Delaware county, and he was always 
among the first to adopt the new improvements and further the movements 
and measures which placed this county on a par with those of the older east. 
His path was marked by good deeds, by honest purpose, by commendable 
industry and worthy motives, and his name is recorded with the honored 
and revered pioneers of Delaware county. During his later life he became 
identified with the mercantile interests of Eaton, forming a partnership 
with his nephew. Lemon Long, in the hardware and grocery trade, but he 
closed out the business in June, 1880, after the death of his partner. Dur- 
ing the long period of forty-three years he was a worthy member of the 
Christian church, and in the early days he gave his political support to the 
Whig party, voting for William Henry Harrison in 1840. He was a promi- 
nent anti-slavery man and a supporter of the underground railroad. Dur- 
ing many years he was numbered among the leading citizens of Union 
township, a social, genial gentleman, with whom it was a pleasure to meet 
and converse. 

When twenty-one years of age Mr. John W. Long engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits for himself, having previously assisted his father in clear- 
ing the timber from the old homestead and placing the fields under culti- 
vation. He carried the chain used in the laying out of the town of Eaton, 
he being then a little lad of twelve years, and a part of this town was 
located on his father's first land purchase. In the spring of 1868 he made 
the journey by stage and rail to Omaha, thence up the Missouri river 
twenty-three hundred miles to Fort Benton, and from there drove a six-ox 
team to Helena, Montana. The country at that time was a wild and 
unbroken wilderness, and during the trip he saw many buffaloes and 
Indians, but no white men. During the summer of 1868 he worked in the 
gold mines of Helena, and at the close of the period made the return jour- 
ney with ox teams to Fort Benton. While journeying down the river to 
Omaha he saw a drove of many hundreds of buffalo, which they shot for 
meat and left the hides. In this long and perilous journey Mr. Long 



802 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

passed through about twenty states and territories, and witnessed much 
of the western life in the early days. He now owns a farm of two hundred 
and seven acres of land near Eaton, while his home place consists of 
twenty-five acres of the old homestead and located in the town of Eaton. 
His pleasant and commodious residence was built in 1886. He was one 
of the organizers of the Eaton Oil Company, and also of the Farmers 
State Bank, which opened its doors for business on the 26th of December, 
1894. From the time of its organization until the 7th of Januar}-, 1898, he 
served as the first vice president of the institution, but since that time has 
been its president. He was elected a member of the Advison,- Board of 
Delaware county in 1900, serving in that position for two terms. 

The marriage of Mr. Long was celebrated on the 13th of March, 1876, 
when Miss Rufina Smith became his wife. She was born in Iowa on the 
20th of April, 1854, a daughter of Stephen A. and Susan (Martin) Smith, 
both natives of Ohio, and both died in Indiana when forty-five years of 
age. They were the parents of fourteen children, ten of whom are now 
living : John, Rufina, IVlary A., Clark, Stephen, Martha, Louis, Lillie, 
William and Walter. The father, who was a life-long agriculturist, came 
to Delaware county during his early manhood and was married in Muncie. 
He afterward moved to Iowa and lived there for some years, returning 
thence to Delaware county, where he spent the remainder of his life. He 
was a Republican in his political affiliations, a member of the Odd Fellows 
fraternity, and was a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Three sons have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Long. The eldest, 
Austin, died at the age of eighteen years. Harry, born July 26. 1882, mar- 
ried Clara Davis, and they reside in Muncie, where he is a prominent and 
well-known attorney. The third son, Robert W., born October 28, 1884, 
attended the agricultural college of Perdue University at Lafayette, and is 
now conducting the farm. Mr. Long is a stalwart supporter of Republican 
principles, and is a member of the Christian church. 

Ja.mes AI. Atkinson, M. D. Delaware county, Indiana, has its full 
quota of skilled physicians and surgeons, and among them may be noted the 
subject of this review, Dr. James M. Atkinson. He was bom in War- 
ren, Trumbull county, Ohio, June 18, 1863, and traces his descent to 
the mother country of England, from whence his paternal great-grand- 
father emigrated to the United States to seek freedom and liberty, 
but for two years was held a prisoner in the New York bay on 
shipboard by the English government. He emigrated to this country 
prior to the Revolutionary war. His son and the grandfather of 
the Doctor, John Atkinson, was born in Virginia August 11, 1785, and 
died in Ohio on the 24th of June, 1865. It was in 1832 that he became a 
resident of the Buckeye state, establishing his home in Trumbull county, 
where he built a log cabin and cleared his land. He afterward removed to 
Henry county, that state, where a second time he cleared and improved a 




^J^^^t<H^-iyzA 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 807 

farm, the patent for this land having been signed by President WiUiam 
Henry Harrison and is still retained by the Atkinson family. He was a 
soldier in the war of 1812, participating under General Harrison in the 
battle of ^Monroe or Fort Meigs, and in that engagement his brother lost 
his life. 

James Atkinson, the father of the Doctor, was born in Virginia April 
16, 1825, and when seven years of age accompanied his father on his 
removal to Ohio. The remainder of his life was spent in Trumbull county, 
from whence he passed to his reward on the i8th of March, 1877. His 
business career was devoted to agricultural pursuits, and for a number of 
years he served as superintendent of the Trumbull County Infirmary. He 
was a great Bible student and became a local minister in his church, labor- 
ing faithfully and earnestly in the cause of Christianity. In Warren, Ohio, 
on the 14th of March, 1861, he married Lucy A. Fox, who was born in 
that state on the nth of February, 1836, and is now living in Youngstown, 
Ohio, with her daughter, Mrs. Mildred W. Baldwin, her time being divided 
with her daughter and two sons. She is a daughter of George Fox. who 
was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but in an early day removed with 
his parents to Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he married Miss 
Mary Defenbaugh, whose father was one of the first merchants in that 
county. Shortly after their marriage the young couple took up their abode 
in Trumbull county, Ohio, locating on the banks of the Mahoning river, 
where the country was then new and wild, Indians and game of all kinds 
being plentiful, but there were few white people in the community at that 
time. The subject of this review can well remember of his grandmother 
telling him of her life there, and of one story in particular when on a win- 
ter's day their big dog was barking on the ice on the river, and going to 
see why he was barking found he was guarding a large deer. Taking a 
butcher knife she went on the ice and killed the deer, which furnished the 
family with meat for some time. The last Indian which she saw in that 
section of the country was across the river, sitting on the bank lonely and 
sad, and she being alone in the cabin at the time had some fear for her 
safety, but he finally disappeared in the woods. She lived to the good old 
age of eighty-four years, and spent her last days on the old homestead. 
Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson three are now living: 
James M., whose name introduces this review; Mildred W., w^ho was born 
June 20, 1869, married Clayton L. Baldwin, and is living at Youngstown, 
Ohio, where he is serving as constable ; and Terry Smith, born December 
7, 1874, is agent for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company at Girard, 
Ohio. 

Dr. James M. Atkinson pursued the literary course in the Grand River 
Institute at Austinburg, Ohio, and graduated on the 4th of June, 1885, and 
he later entered the medical department of the Universitv- of Michigan at 
Ann Arbor, where he completed the course with the class of 1893. On the 
14th of September of the same year he came to Eaton, Indiana, and engaged 



808 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

in the practice of medicine. Here he has gained an eminent place among 
the medical practitioners, and has been accorded a large and representative 
patronage. On the ist of February, 1894, the Doctor was united in mar- 
riage to Indiaola Cross, who was born in Win slow, New Jersey, April 16, 
1864, the daughter of Samuel R. and Annie M. (Kichenbauer) Cross. 
Her great-grandmother, Rebecca Lee, was a cousin of the celebrated Gen- 
eral Robert E. Lee. Samuel R. Cross was born in Hammonton, New Jer- 
sey, December 2, 1839, and his death occurred in Muncie, Indiana, May 

12, 1901, while the mother was born at Bates Mills, New Jersey, January 
II, 1844, and is now living with her daughter, Mrs. R. P. Allaman, in 
Dayton, Ohio. They were married on the 14th of July, 1863, and became 
the parents of six children, of whom four are now living: Indiaola, the 
wife of Dr. Atkinson ; Ardana, the wife of F. C. Runyon, of Glendive, 
Montana; Decla, the wife of R. P. Allaman, of Dayton, Ohio; and Her- 
bert, who married Jaknia Racer and lives in Utica, Ohio. Mr. Cross, the 
father, remained on the farm with his parents until the time of his mar- 
riage, when he learned the glass cutter's trade and followed that occupation 
until four years of the time of his death. He was one of the village fathers 
of the borough of Cleveland, New York, where he lived for many years. 
In 1892 he came to Blackford county, Indiana, and in 1895 took up his 
abode in Muncie. His fraternal relations were with the Odd Fellows and 
the Masonic orders. He affiliated with Cleveland Lodge, No. 613, A. F. & 
A. M., but after his removal to Muncie he demitted from that lodge and 
became a member of Delaware Lodge, A. F. & A. M., receiving the honors 
of a Masonic burial at the time of his death. He was a stanch Republican 
in his political affiliations. Two children have been born to Dr. and Mrs. 
Atkinson, Indiaola, born April 24, 1895, and James M., Jr., born August 

13, 1897. 

Dr. Atkinson has membership relations with the following medical 
societies : the County, District, State and National, and he is also a charter 
member of Eaton Lodge, No. 606, A. F. & A. M. He joined the order at 
Hartford City and was demitted to the Eaton Lodge. He was one of the 
organizers of the Modern Woodmen of America in this city, of which 
he served as medical examiner, was also surgeon for the Indiana L'nion 
Traction lines, and has been medical examiner for a number of insurance 
companies. The Doctor is a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and is a valued factor in church, fraternal, professional and busi- 
ness circles, while his upright life and genial temperament have gained him 
many friends. 

Thomas Leaird. Noteworthy for his good citizenship and many 
excellent traits of character, Thomas Leaird is prosperously engaged in 
general farming and stock raising in Union township, Delaware county, on 
the homestead where his birth occurred February 26, 1866, being a son of 
the late William M. Leaird. He comes of pioneer stock, his grandparents, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 809 

Ephraim and Rebecca Leaird, having come from Ohio to Indiana at an 
early period of its statehood and here spent their remaining years, the 
grandmother dying February 9, 1855, '" the fifty-fifth year of her age, 
and the grandfather on February 15, 1862. at the age of sixty-three years 
and five months. 

William H. Leaird was born March 5, 1S36, in Ohio, and died August 
7, 1877, in Union township, this county, on the farm which he had cleared 
from the wilderness. A small boy when brought by his parents to Indiana, 
while growing to man's estate he was well trained in habits of industry, 
economy and thrift. Starting out in life for himself as an agriculturist, 
he bought one hundred and twenty acres of wild land lying in Union town- 
ship and began its improvement. Bears, deer, wolves and other beasts of 
the forest roamed unmolested at the time he began the arduous task of 
constructing a home for himself and family. Ambitious, persevering and 
hard-working, he succeeded in his efforts, and was here employed in profit- 
ably tilling the soil until his death. He was a highly respected man, a 
Whig in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He 
married, in Washington township, this county, Louisa M. Beuoy, who was 
born in the place August 19, 1836, and died on the home farm April 4, 
1877. Of the five children born to them but two are living: Mattie, wife 
of Albert Dorton, and Thomas, of whom we write. 

Being left fatherless when but six years old Thomas Leaird was taken 
into the home of Benoni Beuoy, with whom he remained until twenty-one 
years old. Taking affairs then into his own hands, he went to Wyoming, 
where he spent eighteen months on a cattle ranch. Returning to Wash- 
ington township, this county, he lived there a few months, and then made 
another trip to the West, going to Colorado, where he lived eight months 
with his sister Lizzie. During the following year Mr. Leaird; who married 
on his return from Colorado, remained in Washington township. Takino- 
possession then of the homestead farm on which he was born, he has since 
resided here, carrying on farming and stock raising after the most approved 
modern methods. His farm contains seventy acres of as good and pro- 
ductive land as can be found in the neighborhood, and under his wise care 
and management yields harvests of the grains and fruits common to this 
region. He is constantly adding to the value of his estate by improve- 
ments of a high character, in 1897 having put up a substantially built and 
comfortable house, this, with the other buildings, giving an air of thrift 
and prosperity of which any farmer might well be proud. 

Mr. Leaird has been twice married. He married first, March 27, 1893, 
Mrs. Minnie Heath, nee Shaffer, who was bom in Hamilton township, this 
county, in 1862, a daughter of Amos Shaffer. She died in early woman- 
hood, January 15, 1897, leaving two children. Wave and Mattie. On May 
30, 1898, Mr. Leaird married for his second wife Mary Cox, who was born 
in Howard county, Indiana, September 11, 1866, a daughter of Zimri and 
Cornelia (Jackson) Cox. A life-long resident of Indiana, Mr. Cox was 



810 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

born Augnst lo, 1818, in Hamilton county, and died August 23, 1869, in 
Howard county. He followed the trade of a blacksmith in his native 
county during his earlier life, but subsequently established a smithy in 
Howard county, and there spent his remaining days. He was a member 
of the Friends church, and was a Whig in politics until 1856, when he cast 
his presidential vote for the Republican candidate, John C. Fremont. Mr. 
Cox married, in Wayne county, Indiana, Cornelia Cox, who was born in 
Guilford county, North Carolina, August 16, 1828, and died in Delaware 
county, Indiana, ^May 6, 1895. She bore him five children, as follows : 
Laurinda, wife of L. Study; Ellen M., wife of Joseph M. Stafford, of 
whom a brief sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Charles; William B., 
deceased, married Belle Miller; and Mary, wife of JMr. Leaird. Mr. and 
Mrs. Leaird have a family of six bright and interesting children, namely : 
Esther, Margaret, William T., Helen, Dorothea N. and Maxine. Politi- 
cally Mr. Leaird uniformly supports the principles of the Republican party, 
and religiously both he and Mrs. Leaird are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

D.wiD Br.\ndt. Although the town of Eaton, Indiana, is but a small 
part of the county of Delaware, it has more than its portion of successful 
business men, and among these the gentleman for whom this sketch is 
written was well and favorably known. He was born in Fairfield county, 
Ohio, July 3, 1815. a son of David and Martha (Hamilton) Brandt, the 
former born in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, October 22, 1776, and the 
latter near Shippensburg, of the same state, July 27, 1775. The mother 
was called to the home beyond on the 17th of July, 1847, her husband 
surviving her about two years, and they became the parents of thirteen 
children : Adam, Barbara, Eve, Francis, Mary, John, George, David, 
Ruth, Samuel, Jacob, Martin and Isaac. During the early years of his life 
Mr. Brandt, the father, was connected with educational interests as a 
teacher, while at the same time he was engaged in the making of saddles 
and in farming, his interests being many and varied, and his name became 
well known in the professional and business circles of the community in 
which he made his home. When seventy-eight years of age he moved to 
DeKalb county. Indiana, and took charge of the postoffice there, con- 
tinuing to attend to his official duties until within two weeks of the time 
of his death. He was a German Baptist in his religious belief and was very 
devout in his Christian duties. His declaration to his sons that he would 
leave them a legacy of an unblemished life was carried out, and his memory 
is honored and revered by his descendants and all who had the pleasure of 
his acquaintance. In early life he voted with the Whigs, and on the 
formation of the Republican party he joined its ranks and remained true to 
its principles during the remainder of his life. Mrs. Brandt was a member 
of the Christian church and she, too, was an active worker in the cause 
of Christianity until her busv and useful life was ended in death. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 811 

David Brandt, Jr., was reared to manhood's estate in his native county 
of Fairtield, Ohio, and there he also learned and followed the shoemaker's 
trade until 1840. On the 17th of February of that year he left the Buckeye 
state and journeyed to Cass county, Indiana, where he was engaged in the 
manufacture of shoes until the 15th' of May, 1842, coming thence to Dela- 
ware county and resuming his trade in Union township. In 185 1 he took up 
his abode in the town of Eaton, with the commercial interests of which he 
was ever after prominently identified, and became one of its most prominent 
business men, owning a dry goods store and also dealing in boots and 
shoes. Mr. Brandt witnessed the growth of this section of the country 
from a wilderness to its present advanced state of civilization. At the time 
of his arrival here it was an almost unbroken forest, the site of his late 
place of business being then covered with brambles, and he would relate 
in a most interesting manner tales of those early times when all settlers 
stood upon the same social plane and good feeling and hospitality were 
universal. During his long residence here he witnessed many changes, 
some for the better, but others not so much so. He at one time owned 
four hundred acres of land, but sold all but eighty acres, which lies in 
Union township. 

On the 22d of October, 1842, Mr. Brandt was married to Miss Jane 
Long, born in Clinton county, Ohio, a daughter of Robert and Jane 
(Woodruff) Long, natives of Kentucky and of Irish ancestry. The fol- 
lowing children were born of this union : John, who enlisted in the Sixty- 
fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry September 20, 1863, for service in the 
Civil war. and died January 12, 1864, in Chattanooga Hospital No. 4; 
Robert, whose sketch will be found elsewhere in this work; Martha, the 
wife of Daniel Endee, of Eaton ; Alice, the widow of Mitchell Neff Way- 
man; Elmira, who married James Long and resides in Nebraska. ]Mrs. 
Brandt died April 15, 1861, and she was a worthy member of the Disciple 
church. On the 17th of April, 1862, Mr. Brandt married Mrs. Susan 
Sabin, who was born near Germantown, ^Montgomery county, Ohio, August 
27, 1827, a daughter of Beniah and Sarah (Shafer) Eshenfelder, of German 
descent. Five children blessed their union : Louise, Willie, Viola, Chloe 
and" Gertrude. For more than forty years Mr. and Mrs. Brandt were 
members of the Christian church, and he at last was the only one now left 
of the original organizers of the church in this locality and a member for 
sixty years. A Republican in his political affiliations, he voted for 
William Henry Harrison in 1836, and in 1892 for Benjamin Harrison. 
Fraternally he had membership relations with the Masonic order, and 
exemplified its beneficent principles in his every day life. 

Minerva McMahan. Of the pioneer families which have materially 
contributed to the prosperity of Delaware those represented by Mrs. 
McMahon occupy an important place. Her natal day was the nth of 
March, 1854, and her parents were Thomas and Ruth (Agnew) Johnson, 



812 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

who established their home in the wilds of Delaware county in an early 
day. The father was born in the western part of Pennsylvania January i, 
1816, and in an early day located in Ohio, while later he came to Delaware 
county, Indiana, and established his home in section 19, Union township. 
In the (iense wilderness he erected him a little log cabin, and with the 
passing years he performed his full share in transforming this region from 
a wild and frontier district to a fertile land of farms and villages, and to 
him also belongs the credit of assisting to cut the roads through the dense 
forests. He became the owner of four hundred and seventy acres of fine 
farming land, and during many years was numbered among the leading 
business men of the county, as well as one of its honored pioneers. His 
political affiliations were with the Whig party. In Union township Mr. 
Johnson was united in marriage to one of Delaware county's native 
daughters, Ruth Agnew, her birth occurrmg on the 17th of February, 
1824, and they became the parents of the following children: Andrew 
and John, twins, born July 10, 1843, but the latter died in infancy, and 
Andrew died February 17, 1906; Caleb, born October 17, 1844, died March 
29, 1905 ; Maria Jane, born March 20, 1846, married George Hedgland, and 
both are now deceased ; and Mrs. McMahan. The wife and mother died 
in 1874, and Mr. Johnson afterward married Susan Miller, who is now 
living in Eaton, and they had one son, Charles L. Mr. Johnson was called 
to his final rest on the 14th of October, iSSo, and thus ended the life of 
one of Delaware county's most honored pioneers and business men. 

Mrs. McMahan was first married to Benton Thompson, September 
19, 1875. He was born in Ohio in 1851, and after a life devoted to agri- 
cultural pursuits passed away in death on the 4th of March, 1884, a worthy 
member of the German Baptist church. On the 20th of September, 1888, 
she was united in marriage to Winfield W. AIcMahan, one of the county's 
prominent agriculturists and business men. He was born in Madison 
county, Indiana, June 23, 1853, a son of Joel McMahan, who for a number 
of years was a farmer and toll collector near Alexandria, Indiana. He 
gave to his son Winfield an excellent educational training and in time the 
latter became one of Delaware county's most prominent business men, while 
for four years he also served in the office of township assessor. He held 
fraternal relations with New Comer Lodge, No. 425, I. O. O. F., at 
Gaston, Indiana, and gave a stanch and unfaltering support to the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party. During a number of years he was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in its faith he passed away 
in death on the 19th of December, 1903. Throughout the period of his 
residence in this community he was ever true to the trusts reposed in him, 
whether of a public or private nature, and his reputation in business circles 
was unassailable. He commanded the respect of all by his upright life 
and engraved his name indelibly on the pages of Delaware county's history. 
To Mr. and Mrs. McMahan was born one son, Harry J., whose birth 
occurred on the 15th of March, 1894. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 813 

Harrisox Strong. Among the leading citizens of Union township, 
Delaware county, is numbered Harrison Strong, a representative agri- 
culturist. He was born in Greene county, Ohio, November i8, 1840, a son 
of George W. and Nancy (Hummer) Strong, respectively of Irish and 
German descent. When five years of age the father was taken from 
Vermont to Greene county, Ohio, where he grew to years of maturity 
and was married. During the long period of forty-four years he resided 
near Jamestown and at the close of that period, during the winter of 1844, 
he sold his farm and came to Blackford county, Indiana, where he pur- 
chased land and resided for twelve years. At the time of his arrival there 
the county was a comparative wilderness, and building him a little log 
cabin he began the arduous task of clearing his land from its dense growth 
of timber, having nearly succeeded in his task when he sold the farm and 
came to Union township, Delaware county, here purchasing one hundred 
and twenty acres of land, which had been nearly cleared, and the old log 
barn which he built is still standing in a god state of preservation, the 
board shingles which he split out of blocks still covering it. On this farm 
he sepnt the remainder of his life and died on the 27th of April, 1863, 
when he had reached the seventy-second milestone on life's journev. Mrs. 
Nancy Strong, his wife, died on the 6th of September, 1864, at the age of 
si.\ty-one years, and they now lie buried in the Ashenfeller cemeten.-, where 
a beautiful monument stands sacred to their memory. He had a sister, 
Elizabeth, the wife of William Galbraith, living in Grant county. 

JMr. George W. Strong was first married to Sarah Mindenhall and they 
became the parents of eight children : Martin, deceased ; Theophilas, now 
deceased, was a farmer in Iowa ; Moses, who was living in Ohio ; Jefferson, 
who was a farmer in Iowa ; Prudence, deceased ; Susanna, the widow of 
Osborn Lamar and a resident of Madison county, Indiana; Martha, the 
widow of David Glass and a resident of Greene county, Ohio; and Ben- 
jamin, deceased. The wife and mother, who was bom in Greene county, 
Ohio, died in the fall of 1835, and for his second wife Mr. Strong chose 
Nancy Hummer, by whom he had three children, two sons and a daughter: 
Elizabeth, deceased ; Harrison, whose name introduces this review ; and 
George W., also deceased. Mr. Strong, the father, was a worthy member 
of the Baptist church, and in early life gave his political support to the 
Whigs, but later became identified with the Democratic party. 

Harrison Strong spent his boyhood days with his parents, attending 
school during the winter months and assisting his father with the work of 
the farm until his marriage, when he settled upon the old homestead of 
one hundred and twenty acres of partially cleared land. By hard work 
and rigid economy he succeeded in making it one of the valuable estates 
of Delaware county, adorned with a pleasant and commodious residence 
and many outbuildings, and everything about the place shows Mr. Strong 
to be an excellent farmer. He is also extensively engaged in the raising 
of stock, his specialty being Shorthorn cattle and high grade horses and 



814 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

hogs. He was one of the organizers and is a stockholder in the Farmers' 
State Bank at Eaton, being also one of the directors in that institution. 
He has sunk four gas wells on his farm, which were in a prosperous con- 
dition, and in addition to his many other interests he is interested in gold 
mining in Colorado. 

On the 25th of August, 1863, Mr. Strong was united in marriage to 
Naomi, a daughter of Samuel and Jane (Haight) Ervin, who moved from 
Maryland to Pennsylvania, and after a short residence in the latter state, to 
Ohio. For a number of years that commonwealth continued as their home, 
and they then came to Union township, Delaware county, Indiana, where 
for about eight years they lived on one hundred and sixty acres of land. 
At the close of that period they removed to Blackford county, Indiana, 
there purchasing a farm of two hundred and eighty acres, and there they 
spent the remainder of their lives, the father passing to his final rest on 
the nth of October, 1878, and the mother on the 14th of July, 1849. This 
honored old couple now sleep in Mt. Zion cemetery. They had four 
children, three sons and a daughter: Naomi, who became the wife of 
Mr. Strong; William L., a farmer of Blackford county, Indiana; Robert, 
deceased ; and John B., also deceased. Six children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Strong, namely : ]Mary A., the wife of William Michael, of 
Union township; Samuel W., who died at the age of twenty-seven years; 
William A., who married Stella Smith and resides in Union township ; 
Nancy J., who died in 1872, aged three years; Emma E., who died at 
fourteen years of age in 1885 ; and Lizzie May, at home. Mr. Strong is a 
Prohibitionist in his political affiliations and he has served in many of the 
principal offices of his township, including those of deputy assessor for 
two terms, supervisor of roads, and as school director for a number of 
years. Mrs. Strong is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
although not a member, he is liberal in its support. They are estimable 
people who enjoy the warm regard of a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances. 

Alexander Dunx. During many years Mr. Alexander Dunn was an 
honored and esteemed citizen of Delaware county. He was long and 
prominently identified with its agricultural interests and he commanded the 
respect of all by his upright life. He was born near Somerville, Somerset 
county, New Jersey, July 6, 1823, a son of Simeon and Margaret (Dunn) 
Dunn, in whose family were six children, four sons and two daughters. 
The father was a farmer and stock buyer in New Jersey. 

Moving to Ohio, Mr. Alexander Dunn located in Hamilton township, 
Miami county, which continued as his home until 1863, in that year coming 
to Delaware county, Indiana, and establishing his home near Muncie. 
About three years later he purchased two hundred acres of land in Union 
township, where for about fourteen years he and his wife lived in a little 
log cabin which had been built on the land. The frame house which he 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 815 

then erected was burned, and in its place he erected a fine two-storv 
dwelling of modern style and architecture, and there he spent the remainder 
of his life and died on the 13th of July, 1904, being laid to rest in the 
Union cemetery, Rev. G. W. Martin officiating. He became one of the 
most prominent farmers of Union township, and was also extensively 
engaged in stock raising. His political affiliations were with the Democratic 
party. ^ 

On the 19th of Septernber, 1866, jMr. Dunn \vas united in marriage 
to Sabrina Williamson, who was born in Ohio July 30, 1831, a daughter 
of Peter and Rosanna (Shaffer) Williamson, the former a native of Scioto 
county, Ohio, and the latter of Germany. They became the parents of 
eleven children, five sons and six daughters, of whom five are now living: 
James, Adam, Sabrina, Stephen and Joseph. It was in 1835 that Mr. 
Williamson came to Indiana, locating three miles north of Muncie, the 
country at that time being on the borders of civilization. He erected a 
little log cabin home, which in time gave place to a hewed log house, and 
in after years he erected the large and pleasant residence in which the 
remainder of his life was spent, passing to his final reward when he had 
reached the age of sixty-eight years, while his wife was seventy-seven 
when called to the home beyond. Mr. Williamson was numbered among 
the early pioneers of Delaware county, and his name is honored and revered 
by all who knevvjiirn. He was a Jackson Democrat ip his. political affili- 
en were born to MVf'''and' j\lrs. ^t)unn. The 



ations^ Four children were born to Mr. ''and j\lrs. Dunn. The eldest, 
Delia, died when five years of age. Peter, W., born April 19, 1868, married 
first Miss Mary E. Langdon, a native of Blackford county, Indiana, and 
aftenvard Mrs. S. Ray, nee Ervin, and they have one daughter and reside 
on a part of the old Dunn homestead. James was the third child in order 
of birth, while Francis S., the fourth and youngest child, was born January 
26, 1875. He married Miss Ethel Horn, born December 23, 1881, and 
their two children are Mary and Marjory. Mr. Francis Dunn is farming 
the old homestead and his mother resides with him. He is a Democrat in 

•vl 

his political affiliations. Mr. Dunn,'^the father, gave his two sons each a 
farm before his death. He was at all times a public-spirited and pro- 
gressive citizen, who took a deep interest in everything pertaining to the 
welfare of the community, and in his death Delaware county lost one of its 
most valued citizens. 

Robert L. Br.andt. One of the leading citizens and influential 
business men of Eaton, Mr. Robert L. Brandt is now a member of the 
well known firm of Brandt & Armstrong, dealers in dry goods, groceries, 
notions, etc. He was born on his father's farm near Eaton, November 16, 
1846, and in the community where he has so long lived and labored he 
is highly esteemed. He is a son of David and Jane (Long) Brandt, the 
former of whom was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, July 3, 1815, and his 
death occurred on the 28th of December, 1904, and a more complete review 



816 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

of his life will be found elsewhere in this work. Of the seven children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. David Long only three are now living: Robert L., 
Martha J. and Mary Alice. 

Mr. Robert L. Brandt received his educational training in the public 
schools of the community and in 1868 he went to Helena, Montana, while 
ill the following spring he continued the journey to Hamilton, Nevada, 
traveling overland and remaining there about six months. At the close 
of the period he went to Treasury City, that state, which was then a wild 
mining camp, and he followed the varying fortunes of a miner both there 
and in Hamilton, witnessing the strange and varying scenes of the camp 
life, and during his mining experience he has seen lumber sell as high as 
five hundred dollars a thousand feet. In 1870 he returned to his old 
home in Eaton and began work for his father at a dollar a day, thus con- 
tinuing until in January, 1876, when he purchased the business and became 
a member of the firm of Brandt, Carter & Company. In 1902 Mr. Arm- 
strong purchased Mr. Carter's interest in the business, since which time 
transactions have been conducted under the firm name of Brandt & Arm- 
strong, this being one of the leading dry goods houses in the city. In 
addition to this large commercial interest Mr. Brandt is also promiuentlv 
connected and is the treasurer of the Eaton Mining & Gas Companv. 
During a long period he has been accounted one of the leading citizens 
of Eaton, and in all this time has given his aid and influence to measures 
which have promoted the public good. 

In January, 1882, Mr. Brandt married Miss Emma Yan Buskirk, 
whose death occurred six years later, in 1888. On the 6th of July, 1904, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Chalista Simonton. Mr. Brandt gives 
his political support to the Republican party, while fraternally he is a 
member of the Independent Order of Red Men, and his religious asso- 
ciations are with the Christian church. He commands the respect of his 
fellow citizens by his sterling worth, and Eaton numbers him among her 
honored sons. 

Henrv Hyer. Among the citizens of Eaton to whom is vouchsafed an 
honorable retirement from labor as the reward of a long, active and useful 
business career is Mr. Henry Hyer, who through an extended period was 
prominently connected with the agricultural interests of Delaware county. 
He traces his descent to the fatherland of Germany, from whence in 1786 
three brothers, Jacob, Rufus and Abraham Hyer, emigrated to the United 
States. Jacob, the great-grandfather of Henry Hyer, established his home in 
Virginia, while Rufus settled in Trenton, New Jersey, and Abraham located 
in Winchester, Pennsylvania. Nathan R. Hyer, a son of Jacob, was born 
in \'irginia, but was a strong Union man, as were the other members of the 
family. John Hyer, a son of Jacob and the father of the subject of this 
review, was born in Ohio, where he was reared as farmer's son, and he 
there remained until sixty-four years of age, coming thence to Henry 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 817 

county, Indiana, where he spent the remainder of his life and died at the 
age of seventy-two years. His business career was devoted to agricultural 
pursuits, and he also bought and shipped stock. He was a Jacksonian 
Democrat in his political affiliations, but voted for Lincoln and took an 
active part in the public affairs of his community, at one time serving as 
township supervisor and as school director. He was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. In his early manhood he married Elizabeth 
Straley, also a native of Ohio, and who died at the age of forty-six vears. 
They became the parents of eight children, four sons and four daughters, 
of whom six are now living, — Henry. Alary, Susan, Martha, Harvev and 
John. 

Henry Hyer, whose name introduces this review, was born in Ross 
county, Ohio, November lo, 1837, and he remained at home until in April, 
1861, when he enlisted at Chillicothe, Ohio, in Company C, Twentv-second 
Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for three months' service. In going 
from that city to western \'irginia he was in a wreck on the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad, receiving injuries which detained him in the hospital for 
some time, and he thereafter did detached duty until the expiration of his 
term of enlistment. After his discharge from the army he returned home, 
and after his marriage embarked in the lumber business in Highland county, 
Ohio, but in 1865 he removed from there to Missouri and engaged in farm- 
ing near Warrensburg in Johnson county. After the death of his wife he 
came to Delaware county, purchasing one hundred and six acres of low 
land in Washington township, which was covered with a heavy growth of 
timber and one-half of the land was under water. At the time of his arrival 
in this county Mr.. Hyer's cash capital consisted of but fifty cents. This 
was in the year of 1873, ^"^ after building his frame residence he began 
the arduous task of clearing his land and placing it under cultivation. 
With the passing years it became a valuable and well improved tract, and 
he sold the farm for a hundred and three dollars an acre. He owns other 
land at the present time, but in 1903 he removed to Eaton and laid aside 
the active cares of a business life, enjoying the rest which he has so truly 
earned. 

On the 19th of August, 1862, Mr. Hyer married Elizabeth E. Winegar, 
who was born in Highland county, Ohio, August 2j, 1839, and her death 
occurred on the 8th of December, 1872. She was a daughter of Richard 
and Elizabeth (Johnson) Winegar, both natives of North Carolina. During 
his boyhood days the father removed with his parents to Virginia, but a 
few years afterward they took up their abode in Highland county, Ohio. 
In 1866 Mr. Winegar removed with his wife to Marion county, Iowa, and 
after farming there for ten years he located on a farm in Nebraska, and 
his death occurred there just a few days after his arrival. Of the five chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. Hyer three are living: Lizzie, who married 
J. S. Mc Williams, and is a resident of Johnson county, Wyoming; Charles 
H., who also makes his home in the same locality; and Maud E., the wife 



818 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

of George Hoover, of Eaton. In iSSi Mr. Hyer wedded Mrs. Mary E. 
Harding, who was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, November 8, 1850, 
the daughter of Jesse and Mary (Ferron) Moore, who also claimed Mus- 
kingimi county as the place of their nativity. The mother died when her 
daughter Mary was but a babe, and her father was called to the home 
beyond in 1889, after many years devoted tii agricultural pursuits. Two 
children were born of this union, Harvey C. and Pearl, the daughter the 
wife of Roy Morris, of Eaton. Mr. Hyer has two children living in Wyo- 
ming, whom he visits every two or three years, and he also has ten grand- 
children. He has membership relations with the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic of Gaston, with Lodge No. 606, A. F. & A. M., in Eaton, and with 
\A^heeland Lodge, No. 325, I. O. O. F. He is unwavering in the support of 
Republican principles, and in all tlie walks of life he is found true to duty 
and the trusts reposed in him. 

Abr.ah.\m C. Young was born in Darke county, Ohio, July 17, 1854. 
and received his educational training in the public schools of Darke and 
Miami counties of his native state. He is a son of David and Mary (Min- 
nich) Young, the former of whom was born in ^Montgiomery county, Ohio, 
and died in August, 1906, at the age of seventy-eight years, and the latter 
was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1862. They were 
married in Darke county, Ohio, and became the parents of six children, of 
whom four are now living: Abraham C., Nancy, Isaac M. and Henry M. 
Mr. Young, the father, learned the shoemaker's trade, but he was princi- 
pally engaged as a stone mason and farmer. Coming to Union township, 
Delaware county, Indiana, he engaged in farming and also in the manufac- 
ture of sorghum molasses for about fifteen years, while for a number of 
years he was also identified with the poultry business, buying and selling. 
He was a worthy member of the German Baptist church, and in politics 
was a Republican, but took no active part in public affairs. He was at all 
times highly esteemed for his true nobility of character. 

Abraham C. Young lived at home only until eight years of age, 
when he went to the home of his uncle. Christian Landis, with whom he 
remained for seven years. At that early age he engaged in farming by the 
month in Ohio, continuing to work for others until 1877, when he engaged 
in agricultural pursuits for himself in Darke county, Ohio. He maintained 
his home in that county until 1893, and in 1887 he bought a farm near 
Lightsville, which he continued to own and cultivate until his removal to 
Union township, Delaware county, Indiana, in 1893. At that time he sold 
his land and bought a farm here, but this he also later sold and purchased 
his present homestead in section 26. Union township. During about seven 
years he also conducted a threshing machine and saw mill in Indiana. 

On the i6th of September, 1875, Mr. Young married Miss Minerva 
Landis, whose death occurred July 19, 1899. She was born in Montgomery 
county, Ohio, the daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Longenecker) Landis, 



HISTORY OF DEL-WVARE COUNTY 819 

both of whom were born in Pennsyh-ania. The father, who followed agri- 
cultural pursuits as a life occupation, moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, 
and there spent his remaining days. Mr. Young married secondly Mrs. 
William Pulley, nee Melissa C. Frank, who was born in Wabash county, 
Indiana, May 9, 1858, the daughter of Daniel R. and Sophia (Emerick) 
Frank, the father born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1820, 
and died November 13, 1899, in \\'aba5h county, Indiana, and the mother 
bom in Darke county, Ohio, June 20. 1830, and died October 20, 1898. 
Thirteen children were born to this couple, all of whom grew to years of 
maturity, and eight are now living, four sons and four daughters: Sarah 
A., Eliza J., Lovina C, Melissa, George M., John F., Norah W. and Wil- 
liam S. Mr. Frank, a farmer, came to Indiana, in October, 1853, and 
located in Wabash county, where he spent the remainder of his life. In 
addition to his agricultural pursuits, he also taught school during the win- 
ter months in Ohio and Indiana. He was a member of the German Bap- 
tist church, in which he was elected to th.e ministry in Indiana. His political 
support was given to the Republican party. Mrs. Young was first married 
to William L. Pulley, August 9, 1883. He was bom in Grant county, 
Indiana, and was identified with agricultural pursuits, while for many years 
he also served as a minister of the German Baptist church. He voted with 
the Prohibition party, ^[r. and Mrs. Pulley were the parents of three chil- 
dren : Walter A., Cora E. and Harry. The first-born, Walter A., died at 
the age of twelve years and five months, in Darke county, Ohio, and there 
the husband and father also passed away in death, January 4, 1897. 

In 1884 Mr. Young was made a deacon in the German Baptist church, 
and four years later, in 1888, he was called to its ministry, having ever since 
continued as a faithful servant in that high and noble calling. In 1901 he 
was advanced to the ofifice of elder, and during the past years has served 
as a bishop, in charge of the Mississinewa congregation. He has been a 
delegate to many national church conferences, and attended the conference 
held in Los Angeles, California, in May, 1907. At that time he and his 
wife made an extended tour, being absent from home two months, and 
visited among other places San Francisco ; parts of Arizona ; Portland, ' 
Oregon ; Seattle and Spokane, Washington ; Berthold, Carrington, North 
Dakota; and Grundy Center, Iowa. Mr. Young voted with the Republi- 
cans until he transferred his political relations to the Prohibition party, 
being an active worker in its ranks. 

William Henry Props. The history of northern Delaware county, 
throughout the Mississinewa valley, can be thoroughly told in the lives of a 
few pioneer families whose several generations have lived there since the 
days of first settlement. The annals of the Props family, one of whose prom- 
inent representatives at this time is John Cooper Props, of Eaton, involve 
many well-known names and important historical facts in the history of 



820 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Eaton and vicinity, and this family sketch will serve to supplement the gen- 
eral statements made in the history of that locality. 

John Props, the founder of the family in Delaware county, belongs to 
the group of \'irg^nia settlers mentioned elsewhere in this history. Bom 
Alay 13, i8o8, in Rockbridge county, near the Natural Bridge, of German 
descent, he became a blacksmith, and during his young manhood was 
employed in the arsenal at Harper's Ferry. On coming to Indiana he did 
work for the contractors who were building the Wabash canal. At Pendle- 
ton. Madison countv, marriage linked him with another pioneer family, 
when he took as wife Eliza Janes, on June 12, 1838. She was born in 
Logan county, Ohio, October 26, 1820, and died on her birthday in 1846. 
Her father, Zachariah Janes, was a soldier of the war of 1812, and a pioneer 
of Madison county, Indiana, settling near Pendleton while the Indians were 
there and building a log cabin with a dirt floor, he lived there until the latter 
fifties, when he moved to near Lexington, Missouri, and died there in 1867. 
By his wife. Xancy (George), who was born in Logan county, Ohio, in 
1796, and died in Madison county in 1834, he had the following children: 
Mrs. John Props, Mrs. Xancy Davis, Mrs. Mary Ann Hardman, Sarah 
Cravens, ]Mrs. Lucinda MauU and Mrs. Susanna Miller. Mr. and Mrs. 
John Props had the following children : John A., William Henry, James 
Madison and Lemuel Theodore. All these sons were soldiers in the Civil 
war, and John .A. died in the service. John Props, it is said, built the first 
blacksmith shop at Marion, in Grant county. Fie died in 1859. 

William Henry Props, late of Delaware county, son of John Props, 
was born at Marion, June 18, 1841, and losing his mother at the age of five, 
he was first cared for in the home of Burtney Ruley, and when seven years 
old went to live with Joel W. Long, who cared for him as his own child 
until he had grown to manhood. 

This is a proper place to mention the career of the family represented 
by Joel W. Long, so intimately related to William H. Props by ties of affec- 
tion, if not by blood. Robert Long, the founder of the family in Delaware 
county, and father of Joel W. Long, was born in Clinton county, Ohio, of 
Scotch descent. In 1836 he brought his family to Delaware county and 
settled a short distance east of Eaton, where he bought one hundred and 
si.xty acres entered by William Shearon several years before. A round- 
log house was their first home, later a two-story hewed-log house, and in 
1852 a brick house took the place of the pioneer dwellings, this last house 
having been occupied by William H. Props and family at the time of his 
death. When Robert Long settled on Easley creek, which flows by the 
farm, there were only a few settlers in this part of Delaware county, among 
them being William Easley, for whom the creek was named, Junius McMil- 
lan and a Mr. Harris, in the same neighborhood, while Aaron Mote lived 
a little to the north. The Shidelers lived west of Eaton. Robert Long was 
one of the most respected and substantial citizens of this vicinity, and his 
death in 1852, when he was seventy years old, was generally lamented. He 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 821 

helped organize tlie Christian church at Eaton. It was organized in his resi- 
dence in 1839. His son Joel W. accompanied the family to Delaware 
county, and later lived in Grant county, returning to the old homestead in 
1850. It is said that Joel W. Long possessed the best virtues of the typical 
pioneer citizen, mingling hospitality and kindness with a certain ruggedness 
and determination that caused undeviating pursuit of a line of action under- 
taken for sake of principle. Thus he was an ardent abolitionist, and the 
old homestead has added historical interest as having been a station on the 
"underground railroad," where he often sheltered slaves bound for Canada 
and freedom. Robert and William A. Long and Aaron Mote were for some 
time the only free-soil voters in Union township. Joel W. Long married 
Rachel Wilson, thus introducing another well-known pioneer name in Dela- 
ware county history. Her father, Amos Wilson, was a Revolutionary sol- 
dier, and is said to have been the first white settler on the site of Marion, 
Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Joel W. Long, having no children of their own, 
bestowed parental care and affection on several orphaned children, and 
were repaid b_\' the love and reverence since shown them by those who were 
tluis benefited. 

In the home of Joel W. Long, William H. Props grew to manhood, 
attending a log cabin school on the corner of the home farm, and later 
was a pupil in a school located where the town of Eaton now stands. 
August 5, 1862, when a little past his majority, he enlisted at Muncie in 
Company B, Si.xty-ninth Indiana \'olunteer Infantry, for three years' serv- 
ice. He participated in his first battle at Richmond, Kentucky, August 30, 
the same year, and was shot through the right lung. He was reported as 
dead by his captain and comrades, but had in fact been carried off the field 
by the nephews of James Yates, a slaveholder of the neighborhood, who 
disappeared on the approach of the LTnion army, and some negroes, and 
was carefully cared for in a negro cabin near by until he was able to return 
home, where he came as a joyful surprise to his friends, who had mourned 
him as dead, and were even then arranging a memorial service. He was 
honorably discharged from the army on account of disability, November 
25, 1862. 

He soon resumed the activities of civil life, and for many years was 
engaged in farming and stock raising. He was a successful man in busi- 
ness, and deserves recognition as one of the intelligent farmers who were 
leaders in the agricultural development of this county. His fine farm of 
one hundred and eighty-three acres near Eaton is still considered one of 
the most valuable properties in Union township. In politics he was an 
early Republican, and his early interest in politics recalls the incident that 
when he was only fifteen he and two other boy companions, John and Rob- 
ert L. Brandt, cut, hauled and assisted in raising the first Republican flag- 
pole in Union township, this being in the first Republican campaign, when 
Fremont was candidate for president. He supported Lincoln and Grant 
by his early votes, then turned Greenbacker, voting for Peter Cooper and 



822 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Weaver, became identified with the later organization of the People's party, 
and finally became a 'firm supporter of William J. Bryan. He was also 
active in G. A. R. matters, being a charter member of John Brandt Post 
at Eaton, which was named to commemorate the services of his old com- 
rade John Brandt, who died from the results of wounds received at Cliicka- 
mauga. Mr. Props had three brothers who also served in the war. 

William H. Props married, September 7, 1865, Sarah Lewis, who was 
born May 26, 1845, i" Niles township, a daughter of John and Mary 
(Babb) Lewis, her father being a pioneer of that township and one of 
those who entered land there. Mr. and Mrs. Props had the following chil- 
dren : Airs. ]\Iary AIcFee, deceased; Rachel Louella, who married, first, 
Reuben Estep, and second, George Pickerill ; Joel W., who died June 21, 
1905, aged thirty-si.x, leaving one son, Emil W'., a bright and promising 
student ; George Robert, who died at the age of nineteen ; John Cooper 
(see below) ; Nettie B., who married George Silers. \\'illiam H. Props, 
after a life of well-spent activity, honorable in business, respected and 
esteemed by family and friends, passed away in death June 8, 1907. Mr. 
and Airs. Props were both members of the Eaton Christian church, and 
lived a daily Christian life. They were charitable to a fault and many 
were the poor who were made happy by their gifts and acts of kindness. 
Mrs. Props died July 3, 1902. 

J. Cooper Props, a son of this honored Delaware countv resident, was 
born in L'oion township, March 20, 1S77, and received an e.xcellent educa- 
tion in the schools of Eaton and in the National Normal University at 
Lebanon, Ohio, after which he taught in the schools of Union township for 
five years. For a time he was also identified with newspaper work as a 
member of the staff of the Star Publishing Company, publishers of the 
Miincic Star, but in 1904 became interested in the real estate and insurance 
business at Eaton, where he has become one of the progressive business 
men. 

Air. Props married, April 9, 1902, Miss Beatrice McKeever, bora in 
Grant county, Indiana, February 14, 1876, a daughter of Albert and Elmvra 
(Dunn) McKeever, the former a resident of Jonesboro, this state, where he 
is a carpenter, while the mother died some years ago, leaving two children, 
Zelmar R. and Beatrice. Beatrice was reared and tenderly cared for bv her 
uncle, Oliver P. Dunn. Mr. and Mrs. Props have one child, Isabelle, born 
September 15, 1903. 

WiLLi.v-M Freem.\n. A gentleman of courteous and agreeable manners, 
of good intelligence and memory, William Freeman is a highly esteemed and 
respected citizen of Eaton, this county, and for many years was actively 
identified with its public afifairs. A native of this county, he was born in 
Hamilton township, October 14, 1837, a son of Isaac Freeman. 

A native of Adams county, Ohio, Isaac Freeman was born on Scioto 
Brush creek, January 25, 1802, and died on his home farm, at Jake's creek, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY -823 

Delaware county, Indiana, January 5, 1864. In 1835, accompanied by 
his little family, he started for Indiana, then considered the emigrant's Eldo- 
rado, a large part of the way following the trail marked by blazed trees. 
He located on Jake's creek, Delaware county, entered one hundred and 
ninety-four acres of government land, and ere long the ringing blows of his 
axe were heard as he felled the mighty giants of the hitherto unbroken for- 
est to make a space on which he might erect the humble log cabin of the 
pioneer. He succeeded well in his efforts, and on the homestead which he 
cleared spent the remainder of his laborious life in general farming. He 
was a Jacksonian Democrat in politics, and a faithful member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. On December 26, 1822, near Portsmouth, Scioto 
county, Ohio, Mr. Isaac Freeman married Jemima Moore, who was born 
on Blue creek, Adams county, Ohio, February 21, 1801, and died in 
Selma, in this county, February 15, 1871. Eight children were born to 
them, four of whom survive, namely: John; Mary Jane, wife of Andrew 
Hoover; Elizabeth H., wife of Dennie Lewis, of Iowa; and William, the 
subject of this sketch, who was the seventh child in succession of birth^ and 
the second son. 

William Freeman received excellent educational advantages for his 
times, and on the completion of his school life taught in the Gerard school, 
in Hamilton township, for a while. He subsequently learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed for a number of years, being actively identified 
with the building interests of this part of the county. He took a leading 
part in public matters, and for nine years was assessor of Union township. 
In 1887 Mr. Freeman was commissioned as postmaster at Eaton, and in 
1892 was again appointed to the same office, serving four and one-half years 
longer. He also served as township trustee part of one term, in each capac- 
ity performing the duties of his office with ability and fidelity. He is a 
strong Prohibitionist in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

On September 26, i860, Mr. Freeman was married, by Rev. Benjamin 
Smith, to Nancy Catherine Munsey, who was born in Shelby county, Ohio, 
July 8, 1837, a daughter of Skidmore Munsey. A native of Virginia, Mr. 
Munsey was born January 9, 1802, and died, in Hamilton township, this 
county, August 14, 1887. Reared in humble circumstances in his Virginian 
home, he early sought to improve his finances in a newer country, and 
when a }T)ung man migrated to Ohio, where he was employed in tilling the 
soil a number of years. In 1851, desirous of still further broadening his 
opportunities, Mr. Munsey came to Indiana, took up land in Hamilton town- 
ship, cleared a farm from the wilderness, but sold his land and died in Jay 
county, Indiana. He was quite prominent in the management of local 
affairs, being a Jacksonian Democrat, and served as justice of the peace 
several terms, and also as postmaster at Parker. He was a consistent 
Christian and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Munsey 
married, first, Maria Williams, who was born and bred in Virginia. She 



8-34- HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

died in Ohio, when but thirty-three years old, in 1839. She bore him six 
children, four of whom are living, namely: Jane, wife of David H. Jesse; 
Jeremiah ; Margaret, wife of William Collins ; and Nancy Catherine, wife 
of Mr. Freeman. With a love for Virginia maidens strong in his heart, 
Mr. Munsey returned to his native state some time after the death of his 
first wife, and there married for his second wife Rebecca Ewing, by whom 
he had six children, three of whom survive, namely : Samuel, David O. and 
Emma. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Freeman three children have been 
born, namely: Laura Bell, born August 24, 1862, died August 19, 1865; 
Charles S., born October 21, 1868, resides in Eaton; and Dottie Dell, born 
July 19, 1873, is the wife of Cyrus O. Mitchell, who was born in Frankfort, 
Indiana, and is now engaged in teaching school. 

Alfred Leslie Murr-\v, M. D. Conspicuous among the successful 
professional men of the town of Eaton, Delaware county, Indiana, was 
Dr. A. L. Murray, and in his death the community lost one of its most 
prominent and useful citizens. He was born in Henry county, Indiana, 
February 2^, 1845, "i son of James and Catherine (Taylor) Murray, the 
former born in Pennsylvania July 19, 1813, and the latter in Indiana on 
the 31st of March, 1817. James and Catherine Murray were married in 
Wayne county, Indiana, November 19, 1835, and immediately thereafter 
located in Henry county and engaged in farming. During the winter 
seasons Mr. Murray was also engaged in school teaching, continuing the 
profession for several years after his marriage. In 1880 he sold his farm 
and built a home in Blountsville, Henry county,. Indiana, there residing until 
his busy and useful life was ended in death in September, 1895, but his 
widow still resides there with her son, F. W. Murray. Mr. and i\Irs. 
Murray were numbered among the early pioneers of that county, he having 
bought his first forty acres of land in 1838, and during his farming life he 
accumulated some two hundred acres, becoming a very prosperous and 
successful business man. In 1855 he was stricken with paralysis and from 
that time until his death was not able to do much in any active line. In 
early life he was a Whig, but later joined the Republican party, and public 
affairs, particularly temperance and educational matters, interested him 
greatly, and he was always regarded as a man of intelligence and high 
moral character. Mr. and IVIrs. Murray reared the following children : 
F. W., who is engaged in farming in Henry county; S. T., a physician of 
Greentown, Howard county, Indiana ; Mary A., deceased ; Alfred L., the 
subject of this review ; Helen, Viretta and Alice, deceased ; and Laura, the 
wife of R. H. Johnson, of Hamilton township, Delaware county, Indiana. 

Dr. A. L. iMurray was reared on the home farm and received the 
advantages afforded in the common schools, remaining with his parents 
until he was nineteen years of age. At the age of eighteen he began 
teaching in Delaware county, this being in 1863, and he taught for six 
terms, or two years, later entering upon the study of medicine under the 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 825 

direction of Dr. John A. Windle, of Blountsville. He continued his reading 
with him for eighteen months and completed his preparatory course with 
Dr. D. X. Kendall, of the same place, while subsequently he passed one 
tern: in the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati. He began his practice 
at Economy, \\'ayne county, in 1867, at which place he remained one year, 
returning thence to Blountsville, where he practiced his profession until 
1873. In that year he located in Granville, Delaware county, Indiana, and 
in 1884 came to Eaton, where he continued in active practice until failing 
health in 1892 caused him to retire from practice, but in 1889 he engaged 
in the drug business with J. M. Motsenbocker. 

Near Blountsville, Delaware county, Indiana, December 24, 1870, 
Dr. Murray married Miss Viretta Jordan, of Delaware county, where she 
was born on the 30th of January, 1849, ^ daughter of William A. and 
America (Davidson) Jordan, of Irish and English descent, and both natives 
of Indiana. The father now resides near Blountsville, where he was well 
and prominently known as an agriculturist, but since 1897 he has lived 
retired. He is a Republican in his political affiliations and is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Jordan died at the age of forty- 
one years, in 1872. In their family were twelve children, nine of whom 
are now living: \'iretta, F. M., Mary C, Josephine, Seward \V., John R., 
Carrie, William and \oliie\-. Three children were born to Dr. and Mrs. 
JMurray: Bertha, the wife of C. K. \'an Buskirk ; Goldie and Cora, 
deceased. The Republican party received the Doctor's active support and 
cooperation, and he took an active interest in the public affairs of Delaware 
county, which numbered him among her representative citizens. Straight- 
forward in all his business dealings, loyal to his duties of citizenship, he 
commanded the respect and confidence of his fellow men, and by his death 
the community lost one of its valued citizens. He was accidentally killed 
on the 7th of June, 1906. He had been visiting his farm just south of 
Shideler and on returning started to walk down the tracks of the Hartford 
City Traction Company, but he was overtaken by a car and killed. Few 
men were so well or so favorably known in the county as was Dr. Murray, 
and for many years he was one of the foremost physicians in this section 
of the state. 

Henkv Witamyer. For many years Mr. Henry Witamyer has been 
an honored resident of Delaware county, Indiana. His probity, fidelity 
and sterling worth have won him the unqualified confidence of his fellow 
citizens, and now in the evening of his life his pathway is brightened by 
the veneration and respect which ever follow an upright career. He was 
born in Richland county, Ohio, May 14, 1833, a son of John and Elizabeth 
(Beachley) Witamyer, both of whom had their nativity in the common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania. The father's death occurred in Richland county, 
Ohio, at the remarkable age of nearly one hundred and one years, and the 
mother was eighty-one when called to the home beyond. They became 



826 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

the parents of twelve children, eleven, of whom are yet living, namely: 
Emanuel, Abraham, Mary, Henry, Harriett, Sarah, Isaac, Amanda, Eliza 
Jane, Rodema and Mahala. Mr. Witamyer, the father, was numbered 
among the honored pioneer residents of Richland county, Ohio, where he 
took up his abode in a very early day, and there spent the remainder of his 
life. He was a well known agriculturist, a Jackson Democrat in his 
political affiliations, and a member of the Baptist church. 

In November, 185 1, Henry Witamyer, whose name introduces this 
review, came to Indiana and located in Wabash county. He was a car- 
penter by trade, and he continued his residence in that county until in 
September, 1857, when he removed to Union township, Delaware county, 
and purchased him a home with ten acres west of Eaton and resumed the 
work of his trade. Not long afterward, however, he sold that place and 
moved to Hamilton township, where he purchased a farm and lived for 
some time, going thence to Muncie and entering the contracting and 
building business. He was thus employed for four or five years and 
during that time erected the city mills and many other large and important 
buildings. Purchasing him a farm near Shideler, he remained there until 
1872, when he sold and bought a farm in Union township, near Eaton, but 
in July, 1896, he again sold and purchased another place near Eaton, which 
he now rents. In October, 1906, he purchased a home in Eaton, and in 
February, 1907, took up his abode therein, where he is now living in quiet 
retirement, enjoying the comforts and luxuries which his former }ears of 
labor have brought him. 

On the 7th of September, 1857, in Wabash county, Indiana, Mr. 
Witamyer was married to Miss Nancy Younce, who was born in Miami 
county, Ohio, July 28, 1838, the daughter of Joseph and Amy (Fife) 
Younce, the former of whom died in Indiana at the age of sixty-six years, 
and the latter in 1838, when her daughter Nancy was but a babe. They 
had become the parents of five children, but only two are now living — • 
Margaret and Nancy. For his second wife Mr. Younce chose Mrs. Lydia 
Thayer, and of their three children two are living — Joseph and Minerva. 
Mr. Younce came to Indiana in 1857, locating in Union township, Delaware 
county, where he became a well known farmer and there spent the remainder 
of his life. His political views were in accordance with the Whig prin- 
ciples, and he was a member of the German Baptist church. Seven children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Witamyer, but only three survive: William 
E., who married Ella Lucas ; Ada L., the wife of Frank Wood ; and 
Rella L., who became the wife of Ross Thompson. They also have seven 
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mr. Witamyer is an active 
worker in the local ranks of the Republican party and has often been 
solicited to serve in the office of trustee, but he has never cared for the 
honors or emoluments of public office, although he has served as supervisor 
of Hamilton township. He and his wife are members of the Brethren 
church in Union township. His career has been an active, useful and 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 827 

honorable one, and by reason of his well spent life he enjoys the high 
regard of his fellow citizens. 

John E. Smith. This well known agriculturist and honored citizen 
of Delaware county has throughout his active business life been prominently 
identified with the farming interests of this community. He was bom in Mi- 
ami county, Ohio, January 28, 1869, a son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Rai- 
righ) Smith, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania April 18, 1832, 
and the latter in Bradford, Ohio. They were married in Covington, Aliami 
county, Ohio, and their union was blessed by the birth of one son, John E., 
whose name introduces this review. The father followed blacksmithing 
as an occupation until 1869, when he became identified with agricultural 
pursuits, and in 1875 he located two miles southwest of Covington, Ohio, 
which continued as his home until 18S5. It was in that year that he came 
to Delaware county, Indiana, establishing his home in Union township, 
where he purchased a farm and spent the remainder of his life, passing to 
the home beyond on the 21st of April, 1903. His wife preceded him in 
death, passing away November 15, 1899, at the age of fifty-nine years. 
He gave his political support to the Republican party, and was a member 
of the German Baptist church. 

The boyhood days of John E. Smith were spent on his father's farm, 
where he assisted in its work during the summer months and attended 
school in the winters. After his marriage he began farming for himself 
on the one hundred and thirty-six acres which form his present estate, 
and on which in 1903 he erected a pleasant and commodious residence, 
while three years later, in 1906, he doubled the size of his barn, making it 
one of the largest and best structures of its kind in the community. His 
land is fertile and under an excellent state of cultivation, and is adorned 
with many substantial and valuable improvements, all of which stand as 
monuments to his industry and ability. 

The marriage of Mr. Smith was celebrated on the 13th of September, 
1890, when Mattie Sala became his wife. She was born in Henry county, 
Indiana, October 4, 1868, the daughter of George W. and Elizabeth (Good) 
Sala, the father a native of Miami county, Ohio, and the mother of Henry- 
county, Indiana. She was born on the 5th of December, 1840, and is now 
living in Hartford City, Indiana. The father spent his early life as a 
farmer's son in Ohio and finally became a minister of the German Baptist 
church. When a young man he came to Randolph county, Indiana, and 
during his life he labored in many churches, his death occurring in Black- 
ford county, Indiana, on the 8th of July, 1895, when he had reached the 
sixty-second milestone on life's .journey. Of the six children born to Air. 
and Mrs. Sala five are now living, namely : William, who married Mrs. 
Sarah Underwood and is living in Wells county, Indiana ; Mattie, who 
became the wife of Mr. Smith; -Montana, the wife of Ananias Hinecker, 
of Grant county, this state; John B., who married Maggie Sherrette, and 



S2S HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

also resides in Wells count}' ; and Maggie, the wife of Charles Studebaker, 
who is living near Keystone, Indiana. .Mr. Sala gave his political support 
to the Republican party. Si.\ children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith: Freadus, Lois, Ruth, Eunice, Dorothy and Dalton. Mr. Smith 
upholds the principles of the Republican party, and he and his wife are 
valued members of the German Baptist church in Union twonship. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith have one of the old clocks, which is almost a century old 
and belonged to IMr. Smith's grandfather, Jacob Rairigh. Mr. Smith's 
father was a soldier in the Civil war, a member of Company I, One Hundred 
and Seventy-second Pennsylvania Militia, and he was a corporal when 
discharged. Mr. Smith has an old tent, mess spoon, fork and knife he 
used in camp. 

Albert W. E\'axs is a well known agriculturist of Delaware county, 
whose skill and ability in his chosen calling are plainly manifest in the 
well tilled fields and splendid appearance of his place. He was born in 
Guernsey county, Ohio, January 20, 1869, a son of John and Sarah (Rice) 
Evans. The father, a native of Ohio, was identified with the educational 
and farming interests of that state until his removal to Indiana in 1864, 
where he conducted a store in Hendricks county. He returned to his Ohio 
home in 1870, but came again to Hendricks county, Indiana, where he was 
engaged in teaching school until 1880, and in the fall of 1881 he purchased 
one hundred and si.xty acres of land in Delaware county, spending the 
remainder of his life here and dying in 1901, at the age of seventy-four 
}ears. He was a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mrs. Evans passed away in death at the early age of twenty-five 
vears, after becoming the mother of three children : Lydia, who died at the 
age of six years; Albert W., the subject of this review; and the youngest 
child died in infancy. 

When nineteen years of age ^Ir. Albert W. Evans entered the pro- 
fession of teaching, being a member of the faculty of the normal school 
of Eaton for two years, where he taught mathematics, and during one 
year he taught in Union township. Soon after his marriage he began 
farming on the old homestead, and in 1894 he purchased a part of the old 
DeLong farm, while in 1900 he became the owner of a tract of eighty acres 
on the north of the homestead, and at the present time he is farming about 
four hundred acres of rich and fertile land. He is also one of the leading 
men in Delaware county in breeding Poland-China hogs, of which he has 
a sale once a year, and he also breeds Plymouth Rock chickens, of which 
he is one of the largest breeders in the county. In 1892 he erected the 
pleasant and commodious residence in which he now resides, and his 
homestead with its many valuable improvements is one of the finest estates 
in this section of Delaware county. 

The marriage of Mr. Evans was celebrated on the 25th of December, 
1889. in IMuncie, Indiana, when Harriet E. DeLong became his wife. She 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 831 

was born in Union township jNIarch g, 1874, the daughter of Joseph G. 
and Mary A. (Karn) DeLong. The father spent his entire business 
career as a farmer, and his busy and useful hfe was ended in death at the 
age of forty years. He was a native son of Union township and was a 
member of the German Baptist church. Mrs. DeLong is still living and 
a resident of this township. In their family were two children, Harriet 
and Birdie, but the last named died in infancy. One daughter has been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Evans, Gladys Columbia, whose birth occurred on 
the 22d of June, 1902. Mr. Evans gives his political support to the 
Republican party, and he is a worthy and leading member of the Maple 
Grove Brethren church, in which he is serving as secretary. 

Hen'ry Smith has been identified with the agricultural interests of 
Delaware county during a long period, and while promoting the material 
welfare of the community he has also given an active and liberal support 
to those measures which tend to advance its intellectual and moral status. 
He is of German descent, for his paternal grandfather, Henry Smith, was 
born in the fatherland, from whence on a sailing vessel he emigrated to 
the United States and took up his abode in North Carolina. He lived 
there but a short time, however, and then removed to Ohio, where he 
spent the remainder of his life as a farmer, and he was numbered among 
the honored pioneers of that commonwealth. He also had the distinction 
of serving as a minute man during the Revolutionary war. His son and 
the father of our subject, David Smith, was born in Miami county, Ohio, 
April II, 181 1, and in 1842 he came to Delaware county, Indiana, and 
purchased eighty acres of timber land in section 8, Union township. This 
locality at that time was a wilderness, and he cut the timber and built him 
a log house, later performing the arduous labor of clearing his land from 
its growth of timber, while in i860 his little log cabin gave place to a 
modern and commodious residence. At the time of his arrival here there 
were no roads in the county, only the Indian trails, and he assisted in 
cutting the road through to his farm, and was numbered among the 
honored early pioneers of Delaware county. 

In his early life Mr. Smith married Catherine Roderick, who was 
born on the 17th of May, 1814, a daughter of John Roderick, who was 
born in Maryland of German ancestry. When quite young he removed 
to Virginia, and a short time afterward to Pennsylvania, from whence he 
journeyed to Ohio. Spending a short time in that state, he came to 
Indiana in 1846 and established his home in Union township, Delaware 
county, where he spent the remainder of his life as a farmer. Eight 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith, but only two are now living. 
Jonathan, the eldest child, lies buried in Union cemetery, while Nancy, 
Elizabeth and Sarah J. sleep beside their parents in the Roderick ceme- 
tery, and John and an infant child were buried in Miami county, Ohio. 
Mary A., the widow of John R. Lambert, resides in section 10, Union 



833 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

township. Both Mr. and Mrs. Smith spent the remainder of their lives 
in Union township, Delaware county, Indiana, where the father died 
on the 27th of March, 1874, and the mother on the 23d of November, 
1904, and both lie buried in the Roderick burying ground on the old 
Roderick homestead in Union township, on the banks of the Mississinewa 
river. The father was a Jackson Democrat in his political affiliations, 
and was a member of the German Baptist or Dunkard church. 

Henrj- Smith, their fifth child in order of birth, was born in Miami 
county, Ohio, December 3, 1839, but his educational training was received 
in Delaware county, Indiana, where during his boyhood days he also 
worked on the old home farm, working in the fields during the summer 
months and attending school during the winters. In 1863, by stage 
and rail, he made the journey to St. Joseph, ^Missouri, from where he 
started on the overland trip to Central City, Colorado, thirty-six days 
being spent en route, and there he was engaged in mining for about six 
weeks. Returning to Denver, he secured an outfit and spent forty-seven 
days in an overland journey to Virginia City, Idaho, which was a very 
rich mining country at that time, and there he spent the following three 
years. At the close of that period IVIr. Smith resumed the overland 
journey to Fort Benton, down the Missouri river about twenty-three 
hundred miles to St. Joseph, Alissouri, which consumed a period of three 
weeks, and thence by rail to his old home in Delaware county. Pur- 
chasing one hundred and sixty acres of timber land in Union township, 
he erected a little log cabin and began the hard and laborious work of 
clearing his land, while in 1881 his little cabin home was succeeded by a 
pleasant and commodious dwelling, and this valuable homestead is now 
known as Shadyside Farm. With the passing years Mr. Smith has added 
to his land until he now owns over four hundred acres, all of which is 
under an excellent state of cultivation, and he is extensively engaged in 
general farming and stock raising, dealing principally in Oxford sheep 
and the standard bred cattle and horses. He was also one of the organ- 
izers of the Farmers' State Bank at Eaton, in which he is a director and 
also a stockholder. 

The marriage of Mr. Smith was celebrated on the 22d of April, 
1869, when Miss Lucinda Hedrick became his wife. She was born in 
Madison county, Indiana, November 24, 1850, the daughter of Daniel and 
Annie (Thomas) Hedrick, the former a native of Maryland and the latter 
of Miami county, Ohio. The father was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
in Alaryland until his removal to Madison county, Indiana, in the '40s, 
and in 1850 he took up his abode in Union township, Delaware county, 
where he passed away in death at the age of sixty-five years. He was 
a member of the German Baptist church, and was a Jackson Democrat 
in his political affiliations. Mrs. Hedrick died at the age of thirty-two 
years. Mrs. Smith was their only child, and by her marriage to Mr. 
Smith she has become the mother of four children : Robert E., who 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY S3o 

married Minnie Pierce and resides in Union township; Dora, the wife of 
Roland Landis, also of Union township; Stella, the wife of William A. 
Strong, an agriculturist of this township; and Carlton, at home. Mr. 
Smith is independent in his political affiliations, reserving his right to vote 
for the men whom he regards as best qualified for public positions, and 
during one term he served as the township trustee. His life has been 
.spent principally in Delaware county, and he is well known among its 
residents and is held in uniform regard.' 

Alfred Miller, one of the pioneer agriculturists of Delaware county, 
has long been recognized as one of her best and leading citizens, while 
his straightforward, manly course through life may well serve as an 
example to the young. He was born in Brown county, Ohio, January i6, 
1820, a son of James and Sarah (Shery) Miller, the former of whom was 
born near Lexington, Kentucky, and the latter in Brown county, Ohio. 
In a very early day Mr. James Miller located in Ohio, and in 18 19 he 
remQved to Ripley county, Indiana, where he entered one hundred and 
sixty acres of timber land and built a little log cabin in the wilderness. 
Later this rude structure gave place to a hewed log house and barn, but 
after a time he left that place and came to De'laware county, where he 
purchased eighty acres of John W. Studebaker in Union township, cleared 
the land of its dense growth of timber and spent the remainder of his life 
there, dying at the age of seventy-three years. His wife was eighty years 
of age when she was summoned to the home beyond. They were married 
in Brown county, Ohio, and became the parents of nine children, of whom 
only three are now living: Alfred, whose name introduces this review; 
Mary Ann, the widow of William Brinson, and a resident' of Switzerland 
county, Indiana; and Sarah, the widow of John Rarick, and a resident of 
Union township. 

Mr. Alfred Miller was but a little babe two months old at the time 
of his parents' removal to Ripley county, Indiana, and during his voung 
manhood he worked in Kentucky, near Rising Sun, cutting cordwood, 
which he hauled to the river and loaded on his flat boats preparatory to 
selling to the steamers running up and down the river. He thus continued 
until 1838, when he purchased of David Chery forty acres of land in 
Union township, Delaware county, paying one hundred dollars for the 
timber tract. Building a little log cabin, he brought his bride to the new 
home, but after clearing fourteen acres of the land he traded with Robert 
Buckels for eighty acres of timber land. The little log cabin which he 
there built was in time replaced by a groat house, which continued as his 
residence until he erected the house in which he now lives. He is the 
oldest resident of the township, both in point of years and length of resi- 
dence, and during a long period he has served as its trustee. He has also 
settled as many as twenty-six estates, has been guardian for forty-three 
children, and the largest bond he has ever given was for forty thou'^and 



834 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

dollars. In the early days he cast his ballot in favor of Whig principles 
and since the formation of the Republican party he has been a member of 
its ranks, taking a prominent and active part in the public affairs of his 
community. 

On the 9th of April, 1839, ^Ir. JNIiller married Sophronia Yates, a 
native of iNIiami county, Ohio, and a daughter of Jonathan and Polly 
(Frazy) Yates, in whose family were six daughters and one son. Of 
the nine children born to this union' five are now living: Becky, I\Iary E., 
John, who is living in Michigan ; Jonathan, a resident of Muncie, and 
Joseph, who makes his home in Dakota. After the death of the wife and 
mother Mr. Miller married Mrs. George W. Jacobs, the wedding having 
been celebrated April 10, 1877. She was born March 2, 1842, at McKees- 

'port7~Penns\-lvania, but was reared in x\llegany county, Maryland. She 
b-3re the maiden name of Annie Wilhelm, and was first married to George 
W. Jacobs at Grafton, West Mrginia. He was born at JMorgantown, that 
state, was engaged in railroad work, and his death occurred at ]Muncie. 
Of the seven children born to them six are now living: Idonia, ]May, 
Dorothy, Elizabeth, Myrtle, Frank and Oteretta. Mr. Jacobs served for 
four years in the Civil war, enlisting on the 7th of August, 1861, in the 
First Regiment, West Virginia Light Artillery, and was discharged on the 
14th of September, 1S64. Mrs. JMiller saw' the body of John Brown 
after it had been hung at Harper's Ferry, and also saw his colored troops 

, pass through Newburg, West Virginia. Mr. Jacobs gave his political 
support to the Republican party, and was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Miller has given a stanch and unfaltering support 
to the Republican party, and prior to its formation he was identified with 
the Whigs. He has crossed the Missouri riv^er fourteen times into 
Nebraska, has never used tobacco, or whisky as a drink, and during his 
long and useful career he has been identified with many of the interests 
that have contributed to the substantial development and improvement of 
Delaware county. His probity, fidelity and sterling worth have won him 
the unqualified confidence of his fellow citizens, and now in the evening of 
life his pathway is brightened by the respect and veneration which ever 
follow an upright career. 

Liberty Ginn. Since he came to Delaware county over seventy-five 
years ago Mr. Liberty Ginn has been a witness of very important changes 
in this vicinity, and his reminiscences of the early days here are most inter- 
esting and entertaining to a listener. He was born in Morgan county, 
Ohio, February 28, 1824, a son of John -and Isabella (Gurthery) Ginn, 
both natives of Ireland, where they were also married, and in their family 
were eight children, of whom two are now living — Liberty and Sarah. 
The daughter became the wife of James Hinton, now deceased, and she 
resides in Grant county, Indiana. In 1818, in a sailing ship, Mr. Ginn, 
the father, made the voyage from Ireland to the United States, spending 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 835 

six weeks on the ocean and experiencing a stormy passage. Landing in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he purchased a small farm near Pittsburg, that 
state, but after seven years he sold the place and removed to Morgan 
county, Ohio. There he also purchased a farm and spent six years engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, on the expiration of which period, in 1830, he 
again sold and came to Indiana, locating in what is now Union township, 
Delaware county, although at that time that particular division had not been 
organized and the county was a comparative wilderness. He was obliged 
to clear a space from the dense timber to erect his little log cabin, which 
in time gave place to a more modern and commodious residence, and there 
he spent the remainder of his life and died at the age of fifty-seven years 
on the 29th of October, 1S41. His wife survived to the age of seventy- 
one years, also dying in Union township. Mr. Ginn gave his political 
support to the Whig party, and he was also a worthy member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Liberty Ginn, whose name introduces this review, was a little lad of 
seven years when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Delaware 
county, where he attended the district schools during the winter months 
and in the summers assisted his father in clearing the farm and placing it 
under cultivation. At that time the Indians still roamed at will over this 
section of the state, as did also the deer, and many a one he has killed 
during his boyhood days. When he had reached the age of seventeen 
years he engaged in farming for himself, but he continued to care for his 
widowed mother until she joined her husband in the home beyond. He 
is now the owner of eight hundred and fifty-four acres of land, six hundred 
and seventy of which lie in Union township and the remainder in Wash- 
ington township, and in addition to his general agricultural pursuits he 
was also extensively engaged in the raising of cattle and hogs. Mr. Ginn 
and Mr. Jesse Nixon were the first to deal in stock in this section of the 
state, they having begun in 1874 to buy and ship cattle and hogs, and 
continued the business during the long period of twenty-two years. In 
1904 Mr. Ginn rented his farm and has since been living in quiet retire- 
ment, this having been made necessary by an accident which he received' 
from a runaway horse in Eaton. 

In January, 1845, Mr. Ginn was united in marriage to Martha Ann 
Martin, who was born in Miami county, Ohio, and they became the 
parents of five children, but only two are now living — Susan and Mary. 
Mrs. Ginn was the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth (Wilson) Martin, 
both natives of Pennsylvania, and in their family were nine children. From 
Ohio the father came to Delaware county, Indiana, in 1829, securing gov- 
ernment land in Niles township, and he was numbered among the early 
pioneers of the community. He first erected a little log cabin and at once 
began the arduous task of clearing and cultivating his farm, continuing 
his labors there as an agriculturist until his busy and useful life was 
ended in death. He was a member of the Baptist church, and was a Whig 



836 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

in his political views. On the 14th of July, 1862. at the age of thirty-five 
years, three months and one day, Mrs. Ginn was called to the home beyond, 
and for his second wife Mr. Ginn chose Sarah Long, their wedding having 
been celebrated in 1S84. Two children blessed their union. Dollie and 
William, and Mr. Ginn also has two grandchildren. He upholds the 
principles of the Republican party, and for eight years he served as a 
justice of the peace, while for a similar period he was also county com- 
missioner, he having been first appointed to that office for one year and was 
then elected for two terms. He is a man of genial temperament and 
genuine wonh. and is respected and esteemed in all circles. 

William Crow. Among the best citizens of Delaware county, esteemed 
alike for hi? sterling worth of character and his activity in the business 
world, is Mr. William Crow, a worthy representative of one of its earliest 
pioneer families. In a very early day in its history the family home was 
established in Xoble county, Ohio, Michael Crow, the grandfather of the 
subject of this review, having been but three weeks old when they settled 
there. When he was a little lad of four or five years he was left alone in 
a deserted cabin in the depths of a dark forest while his two brothers with 
a company of men were in search of savage Indians who had murdered a 
man near their home. At night the little fellow would raise a puncheon of 
the floor, wrap himself in a blanket, and creeping under, manage to replace 
the puncheon. He thus felt secure from the wolves, and if the Indians 
found his hiding place he could crawl out and run away. During the day 
he would go to a moss-covered rock and quietly lie there watching for 
friends or foe. One of the most terrible murders ever perpetrated in that 
vicinity occurred in this family. Four of Michael Crow's sisters. Elizabeth. 
Susanna, Christina and Katherine, from ten to sixteen years of age, set out 
for pleasure, intending to visit the family of a friend. While amusing them- 
selves looking at the beauties of nature, a heartless man by the name of 
Spicer, whom the Indians had captured and raised, and two hideous sav- 
ages emerged from behind a large flat rock, which still stands some fifty 
feet from the banks of Wheeling creek. They led the captives hurriedly jiip 
the hillside a distance of six hundred yards to a secluded ravine. After 
making inquiries in regard to the location of the settlement, one of the 
Indians took a hand of each of two of the girls in one of his and with 
uplifted tomahawk prepared to deal the death blow. Christina, the young- 
est, had formed a resolution to make a break for liberty at the first oppor- 
tunity. Suddenly she gave a jerk and releasing herself from his grasp ran 
down the hillside. The Indian pursued, and when in reach he struck her 
with the muzzle of his gun. Thinking he had disabled her, he returned 
to aid in the bloody work. Looking back, Christina saw the Indian's 
retreating form, and speeding away with marvelous speed escaped to tell 
the awful ston,'. The next morning a company repaired to the place of 
death. There lav two of the girls, literally butchered, but the third sister. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTV 837 

Katherine, was not there. Traced b\- stains of blood, she was soon found 
near the creek, where she had crept for water. Reviving somewhat, she 
related what she remembered of the terrible affair, and after three daj^s of 
terrible agony the gentle spirit took its flight. A grave was prepared and 
lined with puncheons, and in this rude casket the three sisters were laid 
side by side. When John, another child and favorite son, had been cruelly 
murdered by the red men, the home of Jacob Crow, the father of Michael, 
was truly a house of mourning. 

William Crow, whose name introduces this review, was born in Wash- 
ington township, Delaware county, Indiana, near Wheeling, October 25, 
1841, a son of John and Xancy (Johnson) Crow, the former a native of 
Greene county, Pennsylvania, born January 15, 1813, and the latter of 
Guernsey county, Ohio, born January 31, 1817. They were married in the 
latter county on the 1st of September, 1836, and became the parents of 
ten children, four of whom are now living: William, of this review; Mary 
A., the widow of W. C. Braddock, of Muncie ; John, a resident of Cali- 
fornia ; and Jane, the wife of Frederick Wilhelm, of Grant county, Indiana. 
The father came to Delaware county the year following his marriage, in 
1837, purchasing of Mr. Johnson one hundred and si.xty acres of wild 
timber land near Wheeling, while later he bought a tract of four hundred 
and eighty acres and still later a tract of eighty acres. Delaware county 
at the time of his arrival was a wilderness, and he was numbered among its 
earliest and most honored pioneers. Building a little log cabin on his land, 
it continued as the family home for a number of years, finally giving place 
to a large and attractive frame residence. Game was plentiful in those early 
days, and the wolves proved very troublesome by killing their smaller stock. 
Mr. Crow subsequently purchased a farm near Cumberland, where he spent 
the remainder of his life and died on the 19th of July, 1891, his wife having 
preceded him in death, for she passed away on the 9th of December, 1887. 
They had the privilege of celebrating their fiftieth anniversary with their 
children, friends and neighbors. She united with the Presbyterian church 
at the age of twenty years and lived a consistent Christian life for a half 
century. Her home was ever a place of family and secret prayer, a place 
where the minister of the Gospel was always welcome, and her suffering at 
the last, though protracted and severe, was endured with patience and res- 
ignation to the Master's will. Mr. Crow united with the Presbyterian 
church when quite young, and was one of the organizers of the church of 
his denomination in Elizabethtown, under the pastorate of Rev. Robert Irvin. 
He gave his political support to the Whig party. 

During his boyhood days W^illiam Crow assisted his father in clearing 
the home farm and placing it under cultivation, and in the early days here 
he shot many a wild turkey. On the nth of August, 1862, he enlisted at 
Muncie for service in the Civil war, becoming a member of Company B, 
Eighty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Going to Richmond, 
Indiana, thev drilled for some time, and then went to Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. 



838 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Crow was with his regiment in ah its battles and skirmishes except that of 
Chickaniauga, when he was ilL He participated in the following engage- 
ments : Buzzard's Roost, Tunnel Hill, Rocky Face Ridge, Dalton, Resaca, 
Kingston, Pumpkinvine creek, I'ine mountain, Kenesaw mountain, Xeal 
Dow church. Peach Tree creek, in front of Atlanta, Sholes creek, Lovejoy 
Station, Franklin and Nashville. Thus with a long, arduous and faithful 
military record he was discharged from the service on the 25th of June, 
1865, at Camp Harker, Nashville, Tennessee. Returning thence to his 
home in Union townhsip, Delaware county, he started to make him a home 
in the wilderness, first building a log cabin and clearing the timber from 
the land. \\'ith the passing years his fields were placed under an excellent 
state of cultivation, and in 1S97 he erected a pleasant and commodious resi- 
dence, where he is now living retired from the active work of the farm, 
resting in the enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil. He is a stockholder 
in the Farmers State Bank at Eaton, Indiana, and on his farm is a gas well 
which furnishes fuel and light for his home. 

On the 25th of January, 186S, Mr. Crow was united in marriage to 
jMiss Mary Jane Beath, who was born in Blackford county, Indiana. Janu- 
ary 25, 1846, a daughter of John and .\nnie (Christian) Beath, early pio- 
neers of Delaware county. Five children were born to bless this union, of 
whom three are now living, George M., Harris L. and Carrie C. In 1S69 
Mrs. Crow united with the Presbyterian church of New Cumberland, and 
led a most humble, earnest and sincere Christian life to the time of her 
death, which occurred on the 8th of July, 1876. She was a most exemplary 
neighbor, indulgent mother, loving and devoted wife, striving to fulfill all 
her duties to the best of her ability. Her funeral services were conducted 
in the beautiful grove in the front of her residence. It was an impressive 
sight to witness those funeral ceremonies in a beautiful grove not more 
than fifty yards from the door of her home, under the same trees where she 
had sat and held sweet communion with her husband in her bridal days, and 
where at subsequent periods she had witnessed with a mother's fondness her 
little ones at play. It was in this grove where her husband and children, 
friends and neighbors, took their last look and bid their last farewell to her, 
who was beloved by all who knew her. Mr. Crow married Mrs. Martha 
Carmon, nee Geyer, April 4, 1877. She was born in Union township, Dela- 
ware county, September 8, 185 1, the daughter of Abel and Sarah (Flum- 
mer) Geyer, early settlers of this locality. They departed this life when 
their daughter Martha was married. Mr. Crow is a stanch Republican in 
his political affiliations, and he is a worthy member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He has given his aid in many ways to the upbuilding and 
growth of the community, and the course that he has followed in political, 
business, social and home circles commends him to the high esteem of all. 

Emil B.\t.TR. The name of Emil Baur is becoming deeply engraved 
on the pages of the industrial history of Eaton and Delaware counties, for 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE C( )L'XTV S39 

through many years he has been an important factor in its financial in- 
terests. His birth occurred in Toune, Switzerland, January 20. 1861, a 
son of Abraham and Anna (Streit) Baur. They were born and married 
in that country, and became the parents of seven sons and two daughters, of 
whom Emil was the fifth child in order of birth. Mr. Baur, the father, was 
engaged in business in the city of Berne, Switzerland, and he also graduated 
in law from the University of Berne. Coming to this country in 1872, 
he located in Toledo, Ohio, where his death occurred at the age of fifty- 
four years, and there his widow yet resides. 

Mr. Emil Baur was twelve years of age when with his parents he left 
his native land of Switzerland for the United States, and the educational 
training, which he had there begun, was completed in the city of Toledo. 
He there also became interested in the manufacture of window glass, and 
in 1891 he removed to Dunkirk, Indiana, where he became secretary and 
treasurer of the Gem Window Glass Company, and continued his residence 
in that city for two years. On the expiration of that period he came to 
Eaton, Delaware county, and took charge of the Eaton Window Glass 
Company, the business of which at that time had become greatly depreciated, 
but under his successful management it soon rose to its former high standard, 
and he contimied in charge for about three years. In company with Joel 
Hamilton. Mr. Baur then organized the Eaton Manufacturing Company, 
taking in the old Fort Manufacturing Company, and later Mr. Baur pur- 
chased his partner's interest and continued the business alone under the name 
of the Baur Window Glass Factory, for about eight years, in the meantime 
organizing the Standard Wash Board Company, the business of which had 
formerly been operated by the McCormick Brothers as a stock company. 
Mr. Baur became president and treasurer of the organization, and furnished 
the means with which to build up the business. He erected a thirty-blower 
furnace and tank house, the latter having been purchased from e.x-Governor 
Foster of Ohio, and moved from Fostoria, that state, to Eaton, and this was 
one of the very few houses of its kind in this country at that time. Mr. 
Baur is also interested in the hardware business in Toledo, Ohio, and has 
an interest in a glass plant at Morgantovvn, West \'irginia. His energetic 
nature, strong determination, sagacity and capable management have won 
him a leading place in the industrial interests of Delaware county, and his 
business methods have ever been in strict conformity with the ethics of com- 
mercial life. ' His political views are in accordance with the principles of the 
Republican party, and he has fraternal relations with the Knights of Pythias. 

Peter R. Sh.xfker. Wheeling, Indiana, numbers Mr. Peter R. Shaffer 
among its well-known and honored residents. He was born in Miami 
county, Ohio, October 15, 1832, and in that county his father, John Shaffer, 
also had his nativity, born on the same farm as his son, and there he spent 
the remainder of his life and died in 1890. He was a bon of one of the early 
pioneers of Miami county, Samuel Shaffer, who was born in Berks county, 



S40 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Pennsylvania, of German parentage, and moved to Miami count_y, Ohio, at 
a very early da>- in the commonwealth's history. He burned the brick and 
gave tlicm to the German Lutheran congregation for the erection of their 
church, and he also gave two acres of his land for church and burial pur- 
poses. He was the owner of four hundred and eighty acres, and he lived 
during the days of the log cabin epoch. 

During a very early day his son, John Shaffer, came with others to 
Indiana and bought one hundred and sixty acres of land ten miles north 
of Blufifton, but he later returned to Ohio, and there spent the remainder 
of his life, dying in 1890. He was a prominent man in Miami county, hold- 
ing many of its leading offices, and was a member of the German Reformed 
church. He affiliated politically with the Whigs until the dissolution of the 
party in 1856, and afterward voted with the Republicans. Airs. ShafTer 
bore the maiden name of Xancy Reed, and was born in Montgomery county, 
Ohio, and in Miami county of that state she died in 1884. To this union were 
born four sons and two daughters, namely : Peter R., of this review ; Da- 
vid, who married Sallie Swain and is living on the old homestead in Miami 
county ; Isaac, who married Kate Kniseley and also resides in Miami county ; 
Martha, the widow of Aaron Kniseley, and a resident of Ohio ; and two who 
are deceased. 

Peter R. Shaffer came to Indiana soon after the war, in 1866, first pur- 
chasing land in Washington township, Delaware count}-, but later located 
in Wheeling and began working at his trades of blacksmithing, carpentering 
and wagon-making, having thus continued up to the present time. He is a 
natural mechanic, and has achieved success in his various callings. 

( )n the I2th of June, 1859, Mr. Shafifer was united in marriage to Miss 
Angeline McFadden, who was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, April i, 
1834, and died on the i6th of July, 1907. She was the daughter of Samuel 
and Maria (Hatcher) McFadden. The mother died at the age of twenty- 
four years, but the father lived to the advanced age of eighty-three years. 
He was born in Pennsylvania, but in an early day located in Miami county, 
Ohio, where he became quite a large landholder, having cleared one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of timber land. During the early "30s he came lo 
Grant county, Indiana, and bought one hundred and sixty acres of timber 
land, but later returned to Ohio and ended his days in that commonwealth. 
He was a member of the German Reformed church. Of the nine children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Shaffer only three are now living : Florence, the wife 
of Charles Coton ; Elmer, who married Annie Shaffer and resides near 
Shideler ; and Arthur R., who married Rena Hoppins. He also has eleven 
grandchildren and three great-grandchildren living, he having lived to see 
seven generations of his family. Mr. Shaffer is a stanch Republican in his 
political affiliations, and is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Miles L. Hoover. During a number of years Mr. Miles L. Hoover 
has been classed among the prominent and influential citizens of Wheeling, 



HISTORY OF DKLAWVKE COL'XTY 8-11 

where he is well known as a merchant. He was born in Henry countv, 
Indiana, February 20, 1859, and is of Pennsylvania German descent. His 
father, William W. Hoover, was born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, July 
3, 1835, and was reared as a farmer's son. Coming to Indiana in an early 
day, he located in Washington township, Delaware county, where he pur- 
chased eighty acres of timber land, and his name is enrolled among the 
honored early pioneers of this community. Building him a little log house, 
he took up his abode therein and began the arduous task of clearing his 
land and placing it under cultivation, but gradually his well directed efTorts 
were attended with success. Later on he returned to Ohio and Pennsyl- 
vania, but again making his way to Washington township, he was married 
on the 3d of June, 1858, in Hagerstown, Henry county, Indiana, to Cath- 
erine Hoover, who was also born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, September 
2, 1834, and they became the parents of six children: Miles L., the subject 
of this review ; Estella, the widow of David Hoover ; George W., who mar- 
ried Aland E. Hyer; Alvin B., who married Margaret Barrett; Alta M., 
the wife of Denton Tomlinson ; and Benton, who died in infancy. Mrs. 
Hoover came to Indiana with her parents when but six years of age, and 
with her husband she now lives in Matthews, Indiana, they having retired 
from their farm in 1904. For one term Mr. Hoover served as the assessor of 
his township. He is one of the most prominent members of the Odd Fel- 
lows fraternity in the state of Indiana, affiliating with Lodge No. 325, 
Wheeling Encampment No. 125, Wheeling, Indiana, and is a past noble 
grand of his order. He also holds membership relations with the Grand 
Lodge of Indiana and with the Grand Encampment of the state. During 
the long period of twenty-five years he has been enrolled as an Odd Fellow, 
and he now wears a veteran's jewel. Mr. Hoover is also a member of the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, of the Progressive German Baptist church 
and of the Republican party. 

Miles L. Hoover received his educational training in the public schools 
of Delaware county, in the Lebanon, Ohio, National Normal University, and 
in the Danville Central Normal College of Danville, Indiana. He remained 
at home with hi; father until eighteen years of age, when he began teaching 
school in Jefferson township. Grant county, Indiana, entering upon the 
profession in the fall of 1877, and for three years he also taught in Wash- 
ington township, Delaware county. In 1881 he began teaching in New 
Cumberland, now known as Matthews, and after serving as principal there 
for three years he came to Wheeling in the spring of 1884 and entered the 
employ of J. H. Carter, with whom he remained for one year. For about 
four years thereafter he was associated with his former employer in business, 
and with his brother George he then bought Mr. Carter's interest, the firm 
being known as Hoover Brothers until 1893, when Mr. Hoover of this 
review purchased his brother's interest and has since been alone in business. 
In 1885 he received his commission as postmaster of Wheeling, and he has 
ever since filled this important office with the exception of four years during 



845 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

President Cleveland's first administration. During a number of years he 
was also a member of the Republican Central Committee, he being a stanch 
supporter of the principles of that party. In fraternal relations he too has 
attained distinction in the ranks of the Odd Fellows order, affiliating with 
the Wheeling Lodge and Encampment, and is also a member of the Grand 
Encampment of Indiana. He holds membership relations also with Sioux 
Tribe of the order of Red Men in Gaston. 

Mr. Hoover married Melissa Richards August 24, 1882. She was bom 
at Palo, Iowa, October 31, 1858, and died on the i8th of February, 1893. 
She was the daughter of Daniel and Sarah A. (Lewis) Richards, who were 
born in Ohio but came to Indiana in an early day in its history. They only 
lived here for a short time, however, and then removed to Linn county, Iowa, 
where they spent the remainder of their lives. Two children were born of 
this union, Mabel E. and Dan W. The daughter is a stenographer in Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, and the son is employed as a clerk in the treasurer's office 
in Muncie. Mr. Hoover married secondly, March 27, 1894, Miss Carrie A. 
Miller, who was born in Gilman, Indiana, March 2-j, 1871, the daughter of 
Samuel and Eliza (Milhollin) Miller. The father, who was born in \"\r- 
ginia, died in 1883, when forty-four years of age, and the mother born in 
Grant county, Iowa, died in 1880, aged forty-one years, both passing away 
in Gilman, Indiana. Of their four children tw-o are now living: Carrie, the 
wife of Mr. Hoover, and Edward, who married Ida Lewis, and is living 
in Delaware county, Indiana, near Stockport. Mr. Miller came to Indiana 
with his parents during his childhood days, and he spent the remainder of 
his life in Madison county, engaged in agricultural pursuits. At the time 
of his death he was the owner of three hundred acres of rich and fertile 
land, and was one of the prominent and successful business men of the 
county, honored and revered by all who knew him. He was a Democrat in 
his political affiliations. 

George W. Nixox, one of the boys in blue during the Civil war, has 
for many years been a prominent agriculturist of Delaware county. He was 
born in its township of Washington June 16, 1843, a son of Samuel arid 
Catherine (Husher) Nixon, the former born in Virginia April 25, 1786, and 
died September 12, 1849, while the latter was bom in Ohio July 30, 1799, 
and died September 15, 1848. They were married in Ohio, and became 
the parents of five sons : Benjamin, who was born on the 23d of September, 
1823, and died in 1879; Jesse, born March i, 1825, died October 9, 1894; 
John, born April 25, 1828, died September 15, 1894; Samuel, born July 19, 
1831, died in 1854; and George W., whose name introduces this review. 
It was at a very early day in its history that Mr. Samuel Nixon, the father, 
took up his abode in Ohio, living for some years in Perry county, and in 
1836 came to Washington township, Delaware county, Indiana, where he 
entered one hundred and sixty acres of land from the government. The 
country was a wilderness at that time, he having had to clear a sufficient 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 843 

space from the dense timber to build his Httle log cabin, and it was in this 
primitive structure that the son George was bom in 1843. I" time this rude 
structure gave place to a modern residence, and later Mr. Nixon secured 
eighty acres of land in Grant county, Indiana, where he kept a tavern for 
many years, and spent the remainder of his life there. His political support 
was given to the Whig party. 

George W. Xixon spent the days of his boyhood and youth on his 
father's farm, and on the ist of August, 1863, he answered the call to arms 
and enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Eighteenth Indiana \'olun- 
teer Regiment, for six months' service, his discharge taking place on the 1st 
of March, 1864, at Indianapolis. On the 25th of October, following, he 
entered the service for one year or during the war in the Twenty-fifth 
Indiana Battery, Light Artillery, from which he was discharged on the 
20th of July, 1865. During his militarj' career he was in all the skirmishes 
and battles in which his battery participated, principally in Kentucky and 
Tennessee, and included Walker's Ford and Nashville. xA.t the latter engage- 
ment, on the 14th of December, 1864, in Thomas' division, he was under fire 
for twenty-one days, during which time the harness w-as never off the horses 
or the knapsacks oti the men. They went into camp at Huntsville, Ala- 
bama, on January 6, 1865, and did detached duty until their discharge. 

With an honorable military record Mr. Nixon returned to his home on 
the 26th of April, 1866, but a short time afterward went to Atchison, Kan- 
sas, where he secured an outfit and crossed the plains, seventy-two days hav- 
ing been spent on the road, and his destination was Virginia City, Montana, 
where he was engaged in mining until the spring of 1867. Going thence to 
Salmon City, Idaho, he later returned to Deer Lodge, Montana, from whence 
he went to Cable City, that state, where he spent the winter of 1868. From 
that time until the following September he was engaged in mining about 
seven miles from Butte City, going at the close of that period to Oregon, 
where he spent the winter of 1868-9. I" ^^7° he went overland to Port- 
land, that state, where he took ship for British Columbia, and arriving at 
the mouth of the Fraser ri-^er, went to New Westminster in the spring of 
1 87 1, thence up the river one hundred and fifty miles to the Cariboo country; 
where he was engaged in farming during the summer of 1872. In 1877 Mr. 
Nixon was on the head waters of the Nation river, from whence he returned 
in the spring of 1878 to the Cariboo country, and in the following spring 
bought a pack train and went overland along the Fraser river one hundred 
and fifty miles to Deuse lake, British Columbia, wintering at Steamboat 
Landing. In the spring of 1881 he began mining in the Deuse lake country, 
but in 1882 came down into Alaska, there remaining until in September, 
1884, when he left for home and arrived here on the 29th of October, fol- 
lowing. From that time forward Mr. Nixon has been engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits in Delaware county, farming for a time with his brother Jesse, 
but since the latter's death he has been alone in the business. 

On the 23d of December, 1886, Mr. Nixon was united in marriage to 



S-14 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUxXTY 

Miss Mary E. Keller, who was born in Union township, Delaware county, 
Indiana, July 21, 1854, the daughter of Phillip and Sarah (Smith) Keller, 
the former a native of Gennany, and the latter of Ireland, born February 8, 
1822, but both died in Wheeling township, Delaware county, the father on 
the 9th of June, 1871, and the mother on the 20th of March, 1899. They 
were married in Ft. \\'a\ne. Indiana, and became the parents of ten chil- 
dren, of whom six are now living: Julia. !Mary, William, Jesse, Emma and 
Bell. The father came from his Gerrr.an home to the United States on a 
sailing vessel, and locating in Union township, Delaware county, in 1849, 
spent the remainder of his life there a? a fanner. He was a worthy member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a Whig in his political afifilia- 
tions. Three children have been bom to Mr. and Airs. Nixon: Frank 
Wade, Ada M. and Jesse E. Mr. Xixon gives his political support to the 
Republican party, and he holds pleasant relations with his old army comrades 
of the blue by his membership in Grand Anny Post No. 565. 

John W. McCreekv. Numbered among the native sons of Harrison 
township, Delaware county, is John W. McCreery, who was born on the 
25th of June, 1862, to Thomas and Catherine (Brown) McCreery. When 
he had reached the age of nineteen years he began farming for himself on 
eighty acres of timber land which his father had given him, and with the 
passing years he cleared and improved his place and in 1889 built thereon 
a residence. This was destroyed by tire on the' 5th of March, 1904, and 
he then erected his present residence, the finest home in Harrison township. 
He is now the owner of an estate of two hundred and thirty-five acres, his 
land being as rich and well improved as any in the township, and there he 
is extensively engaged in the breeding of high grade cattle, hogs and horses 
in addition to his general farming. 

On the 20th of November, 1880, Mr. McCreery was united in marriage 
to Martha A. Woodring. who was born in Washington township, Delaware 
county, Indiana, December 22, 1861, a daughter of Ezra and Lydia (Miller) 
Woodring, both of whom were bom in Ohio, tlie father on the 7th of Sep- 
tember, 1831, and the mother on the 2i5t of May, 1831. During his child- 
hood days Ezra Woodring came with his parents to Delaware county, and 
the remainder, of his life was spent within its borders. He followed both 
farming and carpentering, and was an important factor in the early days 
in the erecting of the homes of this community. He saw the country trans- 
formed from a wilderness to its present high state of cultivation, and assisted 
many of the early settlers to erect their log cabins. His first residence was 
a log cabin, but later he erected a frame house in Gaston, and subsequently 
removed to Muncie, where he spent the remainder of his life and died Feb- 
ruary 8, 1905. During the Civil war, on the 13th of August, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company D, Eighty-fourth Regiment of Volunteers, and was dis- 
charged on account of disability May 31. 1864. With his regiment he par- 
ticipated in the battles of Chickamauga, Buzzard's Roost, Tunnel Hill, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 845 

Rocky Ford, Dalton, Resaca, Kingston, Pumpkin Vine creek. Pine moun- 
tain, Kenesaw mountain and many skirmishes. He aided in the hanging of 
two spies in the army. He gave his political support to the Republican 
party, and was a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity. Mrs. Woodring 
died on the 27th of November, 1882. They were married April 14, 1853, 
near Gaston, Indiana, and had eight children, six now living, namely : Mary 
S., the wife of William W. Brown, of Muncie ; John C, who married Emma 
Jackson ; Alartha A., the wife of Mr. McCreery ; Nettie, the wife of L. H. 
LaRue; Delpha Jane, the wife of Vincent Janney; and Levi, who married 
Artie Maynard. Mr. Woodring was a second time married, .April 11, 1883, 
Ilattie E. Heavenridge becoming his wife, and their three children are all 
living, as is also Mrs. Woodring, who resides in jMuncie. 

Eight children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. McCreery: Clayton L, 
who married Osie Chalfant; Harry D., Fay N., Thomas H., Docia, Mar- 
garet, Watt and Hugh P. Mr. AlcCreery has membership relations with 
New Comer Lodge, Xo. 425, I. O. O. F., serving as vice grand at the pres- 
ent time. He votes with the Republican party. 

Ch.\rles W. Rector. The Rector family is one of the old and historic 
ones of Delaware county, well represented here since the early days of its 
history, and one of its prominent representatives in Harrison township is 
Charles W. Rector, who was born in the township of Perry September 9, 
1847, 3 son of Arthur and Mary (Cary) Rector. He was a student in the 
first school house erected in Perry township, later attending a special school 
in Selma, and as a boy he worked on the farm with his father. On attain- 
ing the age of nineteen years he began teaching school, continuing in the 
profession for twelve years, and soon after his marriage he began farming 
for himself on forty acres of land, going in debt for the property, which in 
time he cleared from its dense growth of timber, and in the log house 
which stood upon the land he and his young wife continued their residence 
until they erected their present commodious dwelling in 1886. He has 
added to his landed possessions from time to time and in addition to his 
general farming has been extensively engaged in the stock business, for a 
number of years being associated with W. L. Milhollin. They were the 
largest stock dealers in this section of the state, buying and shipping to the 
Buffalo, New York and Cleveland, Ohio, markets. 

The marriage of Mr. Rector was celebrated on the 4th of April, 1872, 
Miss Elizabeth Hedrick becoming his wife. She was born in Liberty 
township, Delaware county, Indiana, December 23, 1852, the daughter of 
Cyrus and Elizabeth (Richey) Hedrick. Cyrus Hedrick was bom in 
Pendleton county, Virginia, January 26, 1820, and died November 18, 1907. 
In 1836 he came with his parents, Phillip and Nancy (Shreeve) Hedrick, 
to Indiana, the journey having been made overland with teams and wagon, 
and en route they stopped in Ohio for some time. Continuing their journey 
they finally arrived in Delaware county and located on the Mississinawa river. 



846 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Cyrus was then sixteen years of age, and he lived with his parents until 
his marriage. Erecting him a little log cabin in the wilderness of Libert}^ 
township, he brought his bride to his new home, where they lived and 
labored for many years, and in time the little cabin home gave place to a 
more pleasant and commodious frame residence. They were married in 
Delaware county November 25, 1841, and became the parents of ten chil- 
dren, five now living, namely: Nancy A., the wife of Louis Goontz; 
Malinda E., the widow^ of Thomas J. LIudson ; Elizabeth, who became the 
wife of Mr. Rector; Julia E., the widow of Dr. Seth Allen; and Matilda M., 
the widow of J. A. Hudson. Mr. Hedrick yet resides on his old homestead 
farm three miles east of Muncie, but the wife and mother, who was born 
in Morgan county, Ohio, September 2, 1S24, died August 30, 1S97, aged 
seventy-three years, eleven months and twenty-eight days. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Airs. Rector : Vora D., who 
died at the age of nineteen years ; Cynis A., who married Charline Prutz- 
man, and they are the parents of Elizabeth Rector, born November 11, 
1907; Frank E. ; Laura, who died in infancy; Maggie M., the wife of 
Ro"bert B. Broyle; and Ivy F., who died at the age of eight }ears. Frank 
E. Rector married Lola C. Childs March 14, 1900. She was born in Dela- 
ware county, Indiana, May 8, 1880, and died April 23, 1907, after becoming 
the mother of one son, Chester C, who is of the fifth generation of the 
Rector family in Delaware county. Air. Rector is a life-long member of 
the United Brethren church, and for twenty years served as a minister, and 
has also filled most of the offices in his church. 

\\"iLLi.\M T. Dow^rI^'G. Since he came to Delaware county as a boy 
of eight years William T. Downing has been a witness of very important 
changes in this vicinity, and throughout his entire business career he has 
been identified with its agricultural pursuits. He was born in Logan 
county, Ohio, September 21, 1845, a son of James and Alaria (Rector) 
Downing, both of whom were also born in the Buckeye state, the father 
in 1819. In 1853, with his wife and children, he made the overland journey 
to Indiana with team and wagon, locating in Perry township, Delaware 
county, where he secured government land from a warrant issued in 
Pauling county, Ohio. Perry township was at that time a dense wilder- 
ness, and the family took up their abode in a little log cabin which stood 
on their land. Later they resided in Henry county, Indiana, for a number 
of years, and then took up their abode on a farm south of Muncie, where 
Mr. Downing spent the remainder of his life as a farmer and died in 
August, 1859, when but thirty-nine years of age. Mrs. Downing died in 
1846, when her sons, William T. and his twin brother, Israel J., were but 
eleven months old. Israel J. Downing died at the age of twenty-five years. 
For his second wife Mr. Downing married Mrs. Hannah (Murphy) Coats, 
who was born in 1818, and of their five children three are now living — 
Henry, Benjamin and Arthur. 



HISTORY (JF DKLAWWRE CtJl'XTY 8i7 

When he had reached his eighteenth year William T. Downing, the 
subject of this review, became a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting in 
Company G, Seventh Regiment of the One Hundred and Nineteenth 
Indiana Cavalry. He enlisted at Indianapolis, Indiana, August 25, 1863, 
and was discharged on the 16th of March, 1866, having been mustered out 
of the service at Austin, Texas. During that time he participated in the 
battles of Okolona, Guntown, Grand Gulf, Egypt and Oxford, JMississippi ; 
Big Blue, Missouri; Mine Creek, Kansas; Raleigh, Tennessee; Port Gibson 
and Verona, Mississippi ; Boliver, Tennessee ; Hurricane Creek, Inde- 
pendence and Osage River, Missouri ; Bastrop, Louisiana, and La Xavoo, 
Mississippi. After the close of hostilities Mr. Downing returned to Dela- 
ware county and to his farm labors, purchasing soon afterward, in 1869, 
his present homestead in Harrison township. From a wild and heavilv 
timbered tract he has transformed it into a beautiful and well cultivated 
farm, and in 1902 he built the pleasant residence which now adorns the 
homestead. 

On the 24th of March, 1870, Mr. Downing married i\Iiss Eliza Jane 
Brown. She was born in Clinton county, Ohio, November 6, 1847, the 
daughter of Joseph S. and Mary Jane Brown, natives, respectively, of 
Pennsylvania and Virginia. The father was born on the 20th of March, 
1819, and died March 7, 1905, and the mother, born August 20, 1809, died 
February 9, 1891. They were married on the 8th of September, 1841. 
Mr. and Mrs. Downing have three children-^Mary, Charles and Ethel. 
The eldest daughter is the wife of Nathan Dunn. The political affiliations 
of Mr. Downing are with the Republican party, being a stanch supporter 
of its principles, and he has membership relations with the Grand Army 
Post of Gaston. 

Mahlon Crampton is one of the honored pioneers who aided in laying 
the foundation on which to erect the superstructure of Delaware county's 
present prosperity and progress. Through the period of early develop- 
ment he was an important factor in the improvement and advancement of 
this section of the state, becoming identified with its interests when a young 
man of twenty-seven years. It was in the year of 1854 that he came to 
Indiana and cast his lot with the early residents of Harrison township, 
Delaware county, locating on the farm on which he now resides and on 
which had been erected a little log cabin. Into this cabin home he installed 
his family and they began life here in true pioneer style. All was then new 
and wild, but Mr. Crampton has lived to see his land cleared from the 
timber and placed under an excellent state of cultivation, and to him belongs 
the credit of having built the first ditch in this locality. He also took an 
active part in the building of the roads of Delaware county, assisting in 
building seven turnpikes in all, and many other equally as important public 
matters owe their origin to Mahlon Crampton. In 1870 his little cabin home 



848 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY .§: 

was replaced by a commodious and pleasant frame residence, and here he ,^^ 

is now spending the evening of his long and useful life. ' '^" 

Mr. Crampton was born in Ashland county, Ohio, Alarch 2, 1827, a 
son of Joel and Elenor (Ross) Crampton. The father was born in New 
Haven, Connecticut, November 20, 1802, and when a little lad of seven 
years, in 1809, he went with his parents to Ohio and there spent the 
remainder of his life, although his death occurred in Delaware county, 
Indiana, August 27, 1882. His entire business career was devoted to 
farming and stock raising, driving his stock to the Sandusky, Cincinnati 
and Toledo markets, and he became well and prominently known throughout 
the entire state of Ohio. His political affiliations were with the Whig party. 
In Ashland county, Ohio, Joel Crampton married Elenor Ross, born in 
Jefferson county, that state, March 14, 180S, and she died in Warren county, 
Ohio, September 20, 1861. Their marriage was celebrated on the 13th of 
April, 1826, and they became the parents of six children, three of whom 
are now living: Mahlon, the subject of this review; Charles C, born in 
Ashland county, Ohio, October 9, 1S38, married Mrs. Mary A. Benadum, 
nee Lincecum, and she is now deceased; and Hiram, who was born in 
Warren county, C)hio, May 2;^, 1842, married Rosa Lyons. 

When but a boy of nine years Mahlon Crampton entered upon a clerk- 
ship in a store in Richland county, Ohio, and from his Ohio home he 
journeyed to Indiana in 1854. Two years previously, on the 2d of Sep- 
tember, 1852, he had married Miss Ruth Jane Crane, who was born in 
Warren county, Ohio, April 3, 1829, the daughter of Abner and Hulda 
(Robinson) Crane, both of whom \\ere born in New Jersey, the former 
May 16, 1773, and died April 3, 184S, and the latter September 26, 1775, 
died on the 8th of December, 1835. They were married in Warren county, 
Ohio, and became the parents of nine children, five sons and four daughters, 
all of whom lived to years of maturity, but all are now deceased with the 
e.xception of Mrs. Crampton. Mr. Crane was numbered among the early 
Ohio pioneers and business men, he having conducted a cooper shop, and 
was also interested in the making of brick, pottery and crockery. He was a 
member of the New Light church and was a Jefferson Democrat politically. 
Of the seven children born to Air. and Mrs. Crampton five are now living;: 
Ira E., who married L. Beuoy ; Leroy R., who married Annie Smith, now 
deceased; Hulda E., the wife of John O. Lewelen; Isaac W., who married 
Nellie Thornburg; and Alfred S., who married Alta Reasnor. During the 
past fifty years Mr. Crampton has held membership relations with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and for many years has served as its trustee. As 
early as 1840 his father served as superintendent of a Sunday-school of that 
denomination in Ohio, and both the father and son taught classes in that 
school. Mr. Crampton has ever been deeply interested in any movement or 
measure tending to elevate or advance the interests of humanity, and his 
upright life commands universal respect. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 851 

William H. Lee. Delaware county has many prosperous and honor- 
able farmers who have reached their high stations through able individual 
effort, and prominent among the number is William H. Lee, residing on 
section 36, Harrison township. Coming to this locality nearly forty years 
ago, when a large proportion of the land -was still virgin, he became an im- 
portant factor in developing its rich agricultural resources, and by his energy 
and thrift improved a good farm. A son of Daniel Lee, he was born Janu- 
ary 20, 1834, in Rush county, Indiana. He is of English ancestry, his great- 
grandfather, Xathan Lee, having been bom in \'irginia of English parents. 
His grandfather, Hilliary Lee, a native of \'irginia, had five uncles in the 
Revolutionary army of patriots. 

A son of Hilliary Lee, Daniel Lee was bom in 1810 in North Carolina, 
and died in Monroe township, Madison county, Indiana, in 1877. He came 
to Rush county, this state, in 1832, making the overland journey with the 
typical pioneer teams. The country in which he located was then but 
sparsely settled, the wilderness being the home of deer, bears, wolves and 
other wild beasts. In 1836, after a four years" residence in this locality, he 
removed to Monroe township, Madison county. Entering one hundred and 
twenty acres of government land, he built for himself and family a log 
house, and after many years of incessant toil and skill evolved a good farm 
from the forest, and there spent the remaining days of his life. He was a 
man of strong personality, and a Jeffersonian Democrat in politics. His 
first wife was Mary Garner, who was bom in North Carolina and died in 
Indiana in August, 1847. Five children were born of this union, the follow- 
ing three of whom survive : William H., the subject of this sketch ; Isaac 
and Thomas. By his second marriage, with Nancy Cunningham, he also 
had five children, of whom Richard M. is the only survivor. 

William H. Lee assisted his father in his pioneer work of clearing and 
improving a homestead, remaining in Alonroe township until the spring of 
1 87 1. Coming then to Delaware county, Mr. Lee bought his present farm, 
lying in section 36, Harrison township, and at once set to work vigorously 
to improve it. He labored most diligently to add to its improvements and 
appointments, and in 1880 erected a good frame house. Subsequently he 
turned over to his son, John D. Lee, with whom he is now living, the entire 
management and control of the estate, and the younger Lee, a man of fine 
ability, has greatly added to the value and attractiveness of the homestead, 
one of his improvements being the modern bam built in 1902. 

William H. Lee has been married three times. His first wife, to whom 
he was married February 27, 1858, was Elizabeth Ann Broyles, who was 
born in Delaware county, Indiana, June 3, 1836. and died February 22, 1859, 
leaving one child, Mary C, who is now the wife of O. H. P. Goble. Mr. 
Lee's second marriage was to Carolina Lutz, on the 14th of November, 
1861 ; she was born February 14, 1842, and died October 26, 1865, leaving 
one child, George W. Lee. He reached maturit}-, married, became a police 
officer, and on December 8, 1899, was shot and killed by postofifice robbers, 



852 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

the tragedy occurring in Alexandria. He left a wife and four children. On 
March 19. 1867. yir. Lee married for his third wife Mrs. Sarah (Jones) 
Hinchman, who was born July 28, 1S29, and died February 14, 1900. She 
was a daughter of John D. Jones, born in Darke county, Ohio, and in 1829 
came with her parents to Indiana; locating in Delaware county, where they 
spent the remainder of their lives. To Mr. and Mrs. Hinchman was born 
one daughter. Mary J., October 17, 1854. By his third wife he had one 
child. John D. Lee, born August 13, 1870. Politically our subject is a 
Democrat, and has been a steadfast member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church since 1852. 

John D. Lee and wife are now the owners of the two hundred and 
twenty acres contained in the home farm, having bought out all who were 
interested in the same, and he is carrying on general operations and stock- 
raising on an extensive scale. On December 26, 1894, he married Nora A. 
Stanley, a native of Henry county, Indiana, born March 17, 1871. Her 
father, Philip Stanley, was born in JefTerson township, Henry county, Sep- 
tember 20, 1842, and there resides on the farm entered from the govern- 
ment by his father. He married Elmira Thornburg, born in Delaware 
county, May 13, 1S50, and of their union were born nine children, of whom 
eight are living, }ilrs. John D. Lee being the second child of the family. Mr. 
and Mrs. John D. Lee have three children, namely : J. Frank, William Rea 
and George H. Fraternally he is a member of Gilman Lodge No. 745, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellow's. He is justly proud of his substantial and 
honorable ancestors, and among the family relics which he most highly prizes 
is the old Longfellow clock, which is nearly a century old — a memorial of 
his mother's family, and which was originally hauled from Ohio, in one of 
the old \'irginia wagons. 

Jo.si.Mi Ferguson. A fine representative of the native-born citizens of 
Delaware county and a well-known farmer of Harrison township, Josiah 
Ferguson is an upright, honorable man, and one who ever uses his influence 
to promote the best interests of town and county. Coming from excellent 
\^irginian ancestry, he was born November 9, 1865, in Harrison township, 
a son of Josiah Ferguson, Sr. 

A native of \''irginia, Josiah Ferguson was born January 16, 1816, in 
Southampton county, and died in Harrison township, Indiana, October 30, 
1891. Left an orphan when a boy, he left his native state, going first to 
Ohio, where he worked as a tiller of the soil for several years. In 1848, 
following the trail of the pioneer, he came to Harrison township, and having 
bought ninety-six acres of heavily timbered land, moved on to it with his 
wife and children, spending his first summer in a rail pen. The following 
year he erected a log cabin, and in common with the other pioneers of this 
section endured all the privations and hardships of frontier life. He sub- 
sequently built a house of hewed logs and made many improvements of 
value on his place. He lived to see the country hereabout well settled and 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 853 

himself the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and eighty acres, the 
greater part of which he had in a good state of cultivation. A man of keen 
intelligence and good business ability, he was active in the management of 
local affairs, and served for many years as supervisor. He was a Whig in 
politics during his earlier years, but was afterwards identified with the 
Democrats. He was especially interested in everything pertaining to agri- 
culture, and belonged to the local Grange. He married Susan Oliver, who 
was born in Northampton county. North Carolina, January 9, 1823, and 
died December 25, 1904, in Harrison township. She bore him sixteen chil- 
dren, of whom six are living, namely : Lucinda, wife of Henry Hazelbakei ; 
Ruth, widow of the late L. A. Miller; Mary, wife of R. M. Miller; Silas D., 
married Rosetta Hazelbaker; Josiah, Jr., the subject of this sketch; and 
Joshua, who married Tillie Wiggins. 

Until sixteen years of age Josiah Ferguson worked on the farm sum- 
mers with his father, attending the district school during the winter terms'. 
From that time until his marriage he remained beneath the parental roof- 
tree, assisting in the management of the home farm. On the death of his 
father he purchased the interest of some of the heirs, and has since carried 
on the homestead property with great success. He is a skilled and practical 
agriculturist, and in his farming operations has met with most gratifying 
results, his land yielding extensive crops of hay, corn and oats, the cereals 
most common to this region. He is a man of much enterprise, and since 
1894 has run a threshing machine in connection with his farm labors, being 
kept busily employed during the threshing season. He has acquired other 
property of value and is one of the stockholders in the Gaston Tile Com- 
pany. Politically he is a sound Democrat. 

On December 3, 1890, Mr. Ferguson married Ida E. Carpenter, who 
was born October 12, 1872, near Summitville, Indiana, a daughter of the 
late William F. Carpenter. A native of Indiana, Mr. Carpenter was born 
in Decatur county January 17, 1835, and died on his farm in Harrison town- 
ship November 27, 1904. Losing his father by death when he was but a 
youth, he joined Colonel Walker's expedition and with it went to South 
America, where he spent five or six years, three years of the time being' 
confined as a prisoner. Returning home in 1850 in destitute circumstances, 
he was fortunate enough on arriving in New York city to fall in with a 
friendly old gentleman who fitted him out with suitable clothing and paid 
his railroad fare from there to Indiana. He labored diligently after his re- 
turn, invested his money in timber land in Jennings county, buying eighty 
acres, and for six years manufactured staves by hand. Removing then to 
Union county, he carried on farming for two or more years, and then pur- 
chased fort\- acres of heavily wooded land in Madison county. In the small 
log cabin standing upon the place when he bought it he lived for three years, 
when he replaced it with a good frame house, which he and his family occu- 
pied for three years. Disposing then of that property, Mr. Carpenter came 
to Delaware county, and in Harrison township bought eighty acres of land, 



854 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

on which was a log cabhi. Taking possession of it, he Uved in it until 1S9:?, 
when he built a substantial frame house, in which he spent the remainder 
of his life. He was a Whig in politics until the formation of the Republican 
party, when he became a supporter of its principles, and in i860 cast his 
presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. He was a man of strong religious 
convictions, and for a quarter of a century belonged to the Christian church. 
On October 18, i860, Mr. Carpenter married Annie Himelick, who was born 
October 14, 1842, in Jennings county, Indiana, and was there bred and edu- 
cated. Seven children were born to them, namely: Mary E., who married 
John Trice, died when but twenty-two years old ; Morton P., married Laura 
C. Ocker; Sarah A., married first John McLaughlin, and after his death 
became the wife of Frank Bryant; Joseph H. ; Ida E., wife of Mr. Fergu- 
son ; John W., married Laura Randolph ; and Ora, married Velma E. Need- 
ier. Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson have a fine family of seven children, namely: 
Ormal J. W., Archie F., Sylvia S. H., Elva R. H.. Lola R., Joshua P. and 
Lillian P. 

S.XMUEL P. McNett was born in Logan county, Ohio. November 9, 
1845, a son of Abram and Julia Ann (Downs) McNett, both of whom also 
claimed the Buckeye state of Ohio as the place of their nativity. The father, 
who was born in Greene county June 10, 1819, died on the ist of April, 
1899, and the mother, born in Champlain county in 1823, passed away in 
death on the 25th of August, 1867. They were married in January, 1844. 
and became the parents of nine children, but of this large number only two 
are now living, Samuel F. and Rose. The daughter, the youngest of the 
family, married George Bland, and after his death she became the wife of 
J. P. Wilson. Mr. AIcNett, the father, removed from his native county of 
Greene to Logan county, Ohio, when but seven years of age, and there he 
spent the remainder of his life engaged in agricultural pursuits. He was a 
member of the New Light Christian church, and his political affiliations 
were with the Whig party. Fie was a man highly respected by all who 
knew him. 

Until reaching the age of twenty-one years Mr. McNett remained in the 
parental home, and he afterward taught school for eight years during the 
winter months and farmed in the summers. In October, 1873, he came to 
Indiana and established his home on the Wheeling pike, where Stockport 
now stands, and his first winter here was spent in teaching school in Wash- 
ington township. He continued his residence on his farm here until the 
spring of 1 877, when he exchanged the land for the farm where he now 
lives in Harrison township, section 6, and in 1899 he built the pleasant and 
attractive residence which now adorns the homestead. He is farming one 
hundred and seven acres of as fine land as lies within the borders of Harri- 
son township, and in addition to his general agricultural pursuits he is also 
extensively engaged in stock-raising, breeding Percheron and coach horses, 





A y^/fd/^U^ ■ 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY S59 

Shorthorn and Jersey cattle and Poland-China hogs, having attained a high 
degree of success in both branches of his business. 

On the 25th of December, 1873, was celebated the marriage of Mr. 
McNett and Mary A. Shawver. She was born in Logan county, Ohio, De- 
cember 24, 1853, the daughter of Daniel and Hannah (Foust) Shawver. 
The father, who was born in Carroll county, Ohio, April 9, 1827, accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Logan county, that state, when twelve 
years old. He was the eighth son in order of birth of a family of thirteen 
children, and he received his educational training in the district schools of 
Harrison township, Logan county. He was confirmed in the Lutheran 
church at Bellefontaine, Ohio, on the 25th of October, 1845, thus becoming 
a member of the church of Christ when eighteen years of age. He was 
held in universal esteem by all who knew him, and he at all times mani- 
fested the most noble traits of manhood, passing to his final reward on the 
nth of May, 1902. Mrs. Shawver, who is now living on the old homestead 
in Logan county, Ohio, was born in Portage county of that state June 7, 
1834. They were married on the 27th of January, 1853, and became the 
parents of nine children : Mary A. the wife of Mr. McNett ; Malinda, the 
widow of John Hemphill ; George L., who married for his third wife Mary 
Worth ; John W., who died in infancy ; Lucinda M., the widow of Sylvester 
Morris ; Rebecca E., the wife of Frank Cockrell ; David E., who married 
Effie Piper; Dora; and Mattie E., the wife of David King. Nine children 
have also been born to Mr. and Mrs. McNett : Augusta E., the wife of Walter 
Bennett; Ida L. M., the wife of John Ray; Daniel A., who married Anna 
Cluff, and resides in Dayton, Ohio; Ira J. E.,,who died at the age of four- 
teen years, eleven months and eighteen days ; Pearl I., who died at the age 
of three years and three months ; Guy T. ; Ralph S. ; Esta Hannah ; and Dor- 
othy I. Mr. McNett exercises his right of franchise in support of the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party, and he is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

WiLLiA>[ Clinton Thom.\s. Prosperously engaged in the free and 
independent occupation upon which the stability and prosperity of out 
country so largely rest is William Clinton Thomas, a well-known and suc- 
cessful agriculturist of Harrison township, Delaware county. A son of the 
late Charles S. Thomas, he was born August 24, 1862, in Hancock county, 
Indiana. He comes of Welsh ancestry, his grandfather, Rease Thomas, 
having been born in Wales, while his wife, whose maiden name was Sarah 
A. Thomas, was bom in Pennsylvania. 

Charhs S. Thomas was born October 31, 1832, in Pennsylvania, and 
when but two years old was taken by his parents to Ohio, and three years 
later ca'ne with them to Indiana, locating first in Martin county. When 
old enrugh to use an ax he assisted in the pioneer labor of clearing a home- 
stead. He subsequently removed to Hancock county, where he purchased 
lar d and began fanning on his own account. In 1875 he came with his 



860 HISTORY OF DELA\\"ARE COUNTY 

family to Delaware county, and for a quarter of a century was here em- 
ployed in improving a farm, laboring faitlifully and ably. Removing to 
Alexandria, JNIadison count v, in 1 900, he resided there until his death, De- 
cember 7, 1902. He was a pioneer in the true sense implied by the term, 
and in the different places that he lived became fully acquainted with all 
phases of frontier life. Little do the people of this generation realize the 
hardships and trials endured, the great ambition required and the physical 
endurance demanded to secure the homes established by the early settlers 
for themselves and their descendants. On May 11, 1858, Charles S. Thomas 
married Sarah A. Morgan, who was born in Madison county, Indiana, Alay 
II, 1843, ^ daughter of John and Phebe (Rash) Morgan, natives of Xorth 
Carolina. Coming as a pioneer to }iIadison county, John Morgan bought 
a tract of forest-covered land, and in the years that ensued worked with 
courage and perseverance to clear and improve a homestead. He first 
cleared a space in which he might build a log cabin, which with its puncheon 
floor and shake-covered roof was the family domicile for several years. 
Game of all kinds was plentiful, and the family larder was kept well sup- 
plied with turkey and venison. Wolves and bears were also troublesome, 
necessitating a frequent use of firearms on his part. Meeting with success 
in his labors, he cleared a good farm, and was there a resident until his 
death. Of the union of Mr. and 'Sirs. Morgan ten children were born, two 
of whom survive, namely, William Morgan, and Sarah A., widow of Charles 
S. Thomas, who makes her home with her children. Five children blessed 
the union of Charles and Sarah A. Thomas, three of whom are living, as 
follows: \\'illiam Clinton, the subject of this sketch; Isaac Oscar, and 
Stephen Oliver. 

Beginning a farmer's life on his own account in early manhood, Wil- 
liam C. Thomas commenced on a modest scale, at first having but twenty 
acres of land in Harrison township. Succeeding from the first, he has grad- 
ually enlarged his operations, and has now a farm of fifty acres, on which 
he has made almost every improvement, having taken possession of it when 
it was in its virgin wildness. He has met with unquestioned success, having 
his land in a good state of tillage, and in 1904 erected his present modern 
farmhouse. He is a steadfast Democrat in his political views and is a mein- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Thomas married first, October 16, 1886, Lydia S. Carter, who was 
born in Ohio April 11, 1863, and died September 4, 1894, leaving two chil- 
dren, Callie S. and Dora A. Mr. Thomas married second, December 24, 
1896, Cynthia E. Haney, who was born in Hancock county, Indiana, May 
II, 1874, and died October 27, 1903. Four children were born of their 
union, three of whom are living, namely, Edna O., Rena S. and Ruth L. 

John- F. J.\ckso.\. Among the sturdy, energetic and successful farm- 
ers of Delaware county, who thoroughly understand the vocation which they 
follow, and consequently are enabled to carry on that calling with profit to 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 861 

themselves, is John F. Jackson, of Harrison township. Well and favorably 
known throughout the community in which he resides, he is numbered 
among its best and most active men politically and socially, being prominent- 
ly identified with the advancement of its best and highest interests. A son 
of the late Jeremiah S. Jackson, he was boni May 19, 1853, in Henry county. 
His grandfather, Jesse Jackson, located as a pioneer in Delaware county. 

Coming when a boy to Delaware county, Jeremiah S. Jackson knew 
the seamy side of pioneer life, its hardships, trials and tribulations. By 
experience he learned to wield the ax with dexterity, and assisted his father 
in clearing a homestead from the dense forest. Selecting farming for his 
own life work, he first located as a farmer in Henry county, but subsequently 
came to Perry township, Delaware county, to live. Purchasing eighty acres 
of timber land, he erected a log house in the clearing, and at once began 
the improvement of a homestead, laboring with the ambition and zeal char- 
acteristic of the brave pioneers who so cheerfully spent their lives in un- 
ceasing toil in order that their descendants might have the comforts, if not 
the luxuries, denied to them. He was successful in his labors, making im- 
provements of value on his place. The log house which he built was sub- 
sequently completed by the putting on all around of a siding of black wal- 
nut, which he cut from his timber and had sawed in the neighboring mill. 
In this house he spent the remainder of his life, dying September 25, 1870. 
During the Civil war he offered his services to his country, but on enlisting 
was rejected on account of poor health. He was a Whig in politics in his 
younger days, and belonged to the United Brethren church. He married iu 
1839, in Indiana, Keziah Cary, who was born near Sidney, Shelby county, 
Ohio, March 31, 1818, and died February 25, 1894, in Delaware county. 
Eleven children blessed their union, six of whom are now living, namely : 
Minerva, wife of J. Harold; Tabitha, widow of the late Albert Gates; Zer- 
ilda, wife of George Chalfant ; John F., the subject of this sketch ; Boyd 
E., who married Emma Dorothy ; and Melissa, wife of John Masterson. 

The early life of John F. Jackson was spent after the manner of tha 
majority of the sons of the early pioneers, in a comparatively uneventful 
manner, attending school winters and making himself useful around the 
homestead as his years increased. When he was twenty-one years old his 
father died, and the following two years he worked out by the month, giving 
to his widowed mother a part of his earnings. Assuming then the care of 
the parental homestead, he managed it for five years and took care of his 
mother. Taking upon himself then the responsibilities of a married man, 
Mr. Jackson worked for a while as a brick manufacturer, in the meantime 
carr}-ing on farming on rented land. Prudent in his expenditures and wise 
in his savings, he accumulated money, and in 1894 bought his present home 
in section 13, Harrison township. He has thirty-six acres of land, the greater 
part of which he has brought to an excellent state of culture, and is pursuing 
his independent vocation in an able and skillful manner, having a substan- 



862 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

tial set of buildings on the place and ample, machinery to facilitate the other- 
wise slow and tedious work of the modern farmer. 

On September 25, 1881, Mr. Jackson married Laura M. Williams, 
who was born in Madison county, Indiana, December 12, 1862, a daughter 
of Dr. John Williams. Dr. Williams was born in Madison county, Indiana, 
and there grew to manhood. Fitting himself for the medical profession, 
he was first located at Fisherburg, from there coming to Delaware county 
and settling at McCowan Station, where he remained as a leading physician 
until his death at the age of forty-nine years. He was a man of influence 
in the community, identified with the Republican party in politics, and was 
a member of Newcastle Lodge, A. F. & A. 'Si. Dr. Williams married Em- 
eline Ford, who was born in Madison county, and died in Delaware county 
at the early age of thirty-seven years. Seven children were born of their 
union, six of whom are living, namely : James, who married Matilda Tay- 
lor; Isaac, married Priscilla Hutchings ; Jasper, married Mary Graham; 
John, married Jane Clevinger ; Laura M., wife of Mr. Jackson; and Leroy. 

Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Jackson, namely; James 
A., engaged in teaching school ; Bertha, wife of P. Jarrett ; Grace, wife of 
Earl Lawson ; Elzie; and Addie, who lived but six years. Mr. Jackson has 
always identified himself with the interests of this part of the county, and 
has proved himself a worthy and valuable citizen. In 1884 he was elected 
assessor, and ser\-ed ably for five years. He is a Republican in politics, and 
an active worker in party ranks. Fraternally he is a member of Bethel 
Lodge No. 731, I. O. O. F., which he has served as noble grand and which 
he has represented as a delegate in the Grand Lodge of Indiana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jackson are members of Lincoln Rebekah Lodge No. 563, at Bethel, 
Indiana, and both are active members of the Christian church, belonging 
to King's chapel. 

Gilbert A. Bruntux. Numbered among the intelligent, active and 
enterprising agriculturists of Harrison township is Gilbert A. Brunton, who 
is successfully engaged in general farming on the old Hutson homestead. 
Intimately associated with the agricultural and industrial prosperity of this 
part of the county, he is especially deserving of mention in a volume of this' 
character. A native of Decatur county, he was born June 10, 1868, a son of 
Noah L. and Louisa H. (Bentley) Brunton. A more extended history of 
his parents may be found elsewhere in this work in connection with the 
sketch of his brother-in-law, William Hiatt. 

Living on the home farm in Decatur county until 1884, Gilbert A. 
Brunton obtained his nidimentary education in the district schools, while 
under his father's instructions he was well drilled in the various branches 
of agriculture. Coming with his parents to Delaware county, he continued 
an inmate of the parental household until after attaining his majority. At 
the age of twenty-three years Air. Bnmton began farming on his own ac- 
coufit, assuming management of one hundred and fifty acres belonging to 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 867 

the Hutson estate. He is now carrying on eighty-five acres of his own land, 
and farms forty-one acres besides, with much success. His land is now in 
an admirable state of culture, and, owing to the sound judgment and per- 
sistent energy with which he has devoted himself to its care, is a valuable 
piece of property. 

Mr. Brunton married, August 21, 1892, Larma J. Hutson, who was 
born in Harrison township December 28, 1870, a daughter of the late Enos 
Hutson. Enos Hutson was born in this township September 22, 1840, and 
died on the home farm March 16, 1906. He spent the larger part of his life 
m Delaware county, although he lived for two or three years as a young 
man in the west. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war, when the 
call came for more troops, he enlisted for a term of three months in Com- 
pany B, Thirty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was with his com- 
rades in several engagements, at one time being severely wounded on the 
field of battle. At the end of three months, his patriotic ardor and enthu- 
siasm still undimmed, he reenlisted, and served until the close of the war, 
taking an active part in some of the most important and closely contested 
engagements of the conflict. Discharged from the service with an honorable 
record as a brave and faithful soldier, he returned to his native county, 
settling in Harrison township. Purchasing sixty acres of wild land, Air. 
Hutson cleared the brush and timber from it, erected first a log cabin, which 
was subsequently replaced with a frame house, and from that time until his 
death was engaged most successfully in farming and stock-raising. He was 
for many years one of the substantial and reliable citizens of the community, 
and for many terms served as school director. He was a Republican in 
politics and a member of the Christian church. 

On March 18, 1868, Mr. Hutson married Melvina Garner, who was 
born in Harrison township April 21, 1 85 1, and died in this township March 
19. 1906, sur\-iving him but three days. Five children were born to them, 
as follows: Eleanor H., wife of Borter Simpson; Larma J., wife of Mr. 
Brunton; John, died in infancy; William V., married Hattie Clevinger; and 
Sylvia E. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brunton have three children, namely, Ray F., Lulu May ' 
and Perry M. Fraternally Mr. Brtmton is prominent in the organization of 
Odd Fellows, belonging to Bethel Lodge No. 731, I. O. O. F., of which he 
is past noble grand, and has for four years been the secretary. He is also 
a member of Oilman Encampment No. 30, and both he and his wife belong 
to Lincoln Lodge No. 563, Daughters of Rebekah. Politically Mr. Brunton 
is a Republican, and religiously he and Mrs. Brunton are valued members 
of the Christian church. 

Jonathan A. Hiatt. A valued and esteemed resident of Harrison 
township, Jonathan A. Hiatt is the owner of a fine farm of seventy-three 
acres which is under fine culture and is well improved. The buildings upon 
the place are of a neat and substantial character, betokening thrift and pros- 



868 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

perity, and in his agricultural operations he is meeting with merited suc- 
cess. A native of this county, he was born September i6. 1846, in Monroe 
township, a son of the late William J. Hiatt. 

A son of John and Charity Hiatt, early pioneers of Henry county, \\'il- 
liam J. Hiatt was born in Ohio and came with his parents to Indiana when 
a small boy. Following the occupation in which he was reared, he was em- 
ployed as a tiller of the soil in Henry county for a number of years. Mov- 
ing with his family to Delaware county, he located on a tract of timbered 
land and, having cleared a space, erected for his first dwelling a log house, 
which is standing today. Farming wisely and well, he accumulated con- 
siderable property, at one time owning two hundred and twenty acres of 
good land. He built a frame house when he had sufficient means to war- 
rant him in so doing, and there spent his last years in comfort, dying May 
3, 1886, aged seventy-two years, five months and seventeen days. He was 
an able assistant in aiding public improvements, helping cut the timber for 
the public highway, and being one of the contractors in the building of the 
Newcastle, Wheeling and Bethel pike. He was also, in company with his 
son Jonathan, one of the contractors in the building of the Bethel pike, and 
the Muncie, Lafayette and Bloomington railroad, now known as the Lake 
Erie railway. He was a Whig in politics, and a member of the Quaker 
church. William J. Hiatt married Charlotte Adamison, who was born in 
Kentucky and died October 30, 1885, on the home farm, aged seventy-three 
years and twenty days. Of the nine children born of their union four are 
living, as follows : Jonathan A., the subject of this sketch ; Annie, widow 
of the late William West ; Simon, of Muncie ; and Charity, the widow of 
David Jackson. 

In that primitive pioneer dwelling of his parents Jonathan A. Hiatt 
grew to manhood, assisting in the farm labors, and gleaning his early edu- 
cation in the rude log schoolhouse with its puncheon fioor and slab seats. 
He remained at home with his father until twenty-eight years of age, as 
previously mentioned, helping, as a contractor and builder, to build differ- 
ent pikes and railways. Going to Kansas in March, 1878, ^Ir. Hiatt re- 
sided in Osage county about three years and then returned to Delaware 
county, locating in Monroe township, where he remained two years. Since 
that time he has been engaged in farming in section 24, Harrison township, 
where he has improved a fine farm of seventy-three acres. He is continu- 
ally adding to the improvements which he first established, and in 1906 en- 
tirely remodeled his house, transforming it into a modernly equipped home, 
in which he and his family entertain their many friends most hospitably. 

Mr. Hiatt married first, August 13, 1874, Melissa Steel, who was born 
in Ohio June 5, 1855, and died in Delaware county October 20, 1S84, leav- 
ing four children, namely: Nettie, wife of Alvin Hesslenger; Bessie, wife 
of George Mabitt ; Edmund C, who married Catherine Gibson ; and Lavina, 
wife of Watson Biddle. Her parents, Ulysses and Elizabeth Steel, were 
both natives of Ohio. Mr. Hiatt married second, January 19, 18S7, in 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 869 

Osage county, Kansas, Nancy E. Harris, who was born in Washington 
county, Ohio, December 1 1, 1857, a daughter of WilUam S. Harris. Mr. 
Harris was born in Washington county, Ohio, July 24, 1832, and was there 
engaged in farming until the time of his enlistment as a soldier in the Civil 
war. He died in 1867. He married Louisa Lukins, who was born in the 
same county July 24, 1840, and died in 1 886 in Osage county, Kansas. Six 
children were born to them, and four are now living, as follows : Nancv 
E., wife of Mr. Hiatt; Anna, wife of Wesley Harris; George W., married 
Etta Bunder; and William, married and living in West Virginia. Air. and 
Mrs. Hiatt are the parents of three children, namely : James V., who mar- 
ried Zenia L. Millspaugh : C. C, deceased ; and Larma S. In his political 
relations Mr. Hiatt is a sound Republican, and religiously he belongs to 
the Christian church. He is a prominent member of Bethel Lodge No. 731, 
I. O. O. F., in which he has passed all the chairs, serving as noble grand 
and as a delegate to the Grand Lodge of Indiana. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt 
are members of Lincoln Rebekah Lodge No. 563. 

LuciAN Aloxzo Johnson. The agricultural community of Harrison 
township is composed of live, energetic and persevering business men, con- 
spicuous among whom is Lucian A. Johnson, an intelligent, well-informed 
man and a successful farmer. A native of Indiana, he was born January 
15, 1863, in Madison county, a son of William Johnson. 

William Johnson was born and bred in North Carolina, his birth oc- 
curring April 3, 1833. Coming to Indiana when young, he was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in Madison county until after the breaking out of 
the Civil war. Enlisting in the One Hundred and Fortieth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, he took part in various engagements, serving until the term of his 
enlistment expired, when he received his honorable discharge. Returning 
then to his home, with his health impaired from exposure and privations, 
he never recovered his former physical vigor, but on November 25, 1865, 
died from disease contracted in the army. He was an honest, industrious 
man, upright in his dealings w'ith his fellow men, and in politics supported 
the principles of the Republican party. He married Elizabeth Sexton, who' 
was bom in Indiana July 28, 1839, and has here spent her life, her home 
now being in Summitville. Three children were born of their union, as fol- 
lows : Hannah )., wife of Leander Williams; Frank, married Mary E. 
Myers ; and Lucian A., the subject of this sketch. 

Beginning the battle of life for himself when but thirteen years old, 
Lucian A. Johnson, who ten years before had been left without a father's 
care, went to work on a farm, and until attaining his majority labored for 
wages. Marrying then, he began farming on his own account, continuing 
thus employed for nearly ten years. In 1895, wishing a change' of occupa- 
tion, Mr. Johnson opened a store of general merchandise at Bethel, Indiana, 
which he managed successfully until 1904, when he sold out. In the mean- 
time he served as postmaster at the Stout postoffice until the establishment 



STO HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

of rural free delivery service in the Bethel district. On retiring from mer- 
cantile pursuits ;Mr. Johnson resumed his agricultural labors, and is now 
engaged in farming and stock-raising on the old Stout homestead of eighty- 
five acres, which has come into the possession of himself and wife. This 
property formerly belonged to Jeremiah Stout, Mrs. Johnson's grand- 
father, who took it up from the government on August I, 1837. It was 
in 1903 that Mr. and Mrs. Johnson erected their modern residence. 

In 1900 Mr. Johnson was elected the trustee of Harrison township, the 
most important office in the township. He erected the Beech Grove school- 
house, and had thirteen schools under his jurisdiction, and the affairs of 
the office were administered in an able and efficient manner. His adminis- 
tration began at the finishing of the Bethel high school building. 

Mr. Johnson married February 24. 18S4, Junnie E. Stout, who was 
born in this township December 31, 1866. Her father, the late Isaac Stout, 
was born in \\'ayne county, Indiana, and died in Harrison township July 
16, 1891, aged sixty-four years. He came to Harrison township, this county, 
when eight }-ears old, with his parents. Jeremiah and Sarah Stout, and on 
the farm which they cleared from the wilderness he grew to manhood. 
Learning the carpenter's trade, he followed that in connection with farming 
for many years, being kept busily employed until the breaking out of the 
Civil war. I lis patriotism being then aroused, he offered his services to 
his country and fought valiantly in her defense. He afterwards established 
himself in the mercantile business at Bethel, and until his death was one of 
the leading general merchants of the place. He was also postmaster at the 
Stout postoffice, which was named in his honor. He was a stanch Republi- 
can in politics, and a member of Delaware Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Mun- 
cie. He married Gincie A. Doty, who was born in Ohio and died in Dela- 
ware county, Indiana, February 27, 18S6. aged forty-nine years, eight 
months and thirteen days. They were the parents of seven children, three 
of whom are living, as follows : Daniel \V., married Lucy Roe ; Junnie E., 
wife of Mr. Johnson; and James Cari. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have four 
children, namely: Minnie A., wife of Frederick Van Laningham ; Grace 
B., wife of Burt Clock ; Lola Maud ; and \'irgil Glen. Minnie completed 
the common school course and received her diploma, and she then took a 
three years' course in the Bethel high school with the class of 1903. She 
also received instrumental music. Lola received her diploma with the class 
of 1907 and is now taking her first year's high school work at Muncie, Indi- 
ana. She has also taken instrumental music. 

Politically Mr. Johnson invariably upholds the prihciples of the Re- 
publican party. Fraternally he is a member of Bethel Lodge No. 731. I. O. 
O. F., of Muncie, and of Gaston Encampment No. 229, of Gaston. He and 
his wife are members of Lincoln Lodge No. 563 of the Rebekahs, and both 
are members of the Christian church. They have in their possession one 
of the old parchment deeds for land entered by Mrs. Johnson's grandfather, 
James Stout, and it bears the signature of execution of President Martin 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 871 

Van Buren. Its date was August I, 1837, and it is one of the valuable heir- 
looms of the county. 

John M. Conner. Indiana numbers the Conner family among its early 
residents. During his boyhood days Daniel Conner, who was born in Ken- 
tucky March 20, 1813, came with his parents, Rubin and Nancy Conner, 
to the Hoosier state, the family locating seven miles south of Connersville, 
in Fayette county, where the little son grew to years of maturity and was 
married. On the 6th of September 1832, he wedded Eliza Green, and they 
shortly afterward came to Delaware county, Indiana. In 1850 they pur- 
chased land in Harrison township to the amount of two hundred acres, about 
forty acres of which had been cleared, and they moved into a little log cabin 
which had been built on the land. In time this cabin home gave place to 
a more commodious frame residence, and there Mr. Conner spent the re- 
mainder of his busy and useful life, dying on the 8th of January, 1868. His 
wife, who was bom in Fayette county, Indiana, July 21, 1814, died on the 
2ist of June, 1868. Their union was blessed by the birth of eight children, 
but only two, John M. and his sister Margaret, are now living. The daugh- 
ter is the widow of Simon Miller. Mr. Conner was a good and devoted 
church member, and he transferred his political allegiance from the Whigs 
to the Republican party. 

John M. Conner was born in Fayette county, Indiana, August 9, 1842, 
and his boyhood days were spent on the farm with his father, working in 
the fields during the summer months and attending the district schools in 
the winters. On the 9th of August, 1862, he enrolled his name as a de- 
fender of the Union in Company B, Eighty-fourth Regiment of Indiana 
Volunteers, and with his regiment he participated in many of the hard- 
fought battles of the conflict, including Chickamauga, Buzzard's Roost, Tun- 
nel Hill, Rocky Ford, Dalton, Resaca, Kingston, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Pine 
Mountain, Kennesaw Mountain, in front of Atlanta during that engagement, 
Shoales Creek, Lovejoy Station, Franklin and many skirmishes. He was 
mustered out of service at Camp Harker, at Nashville, Tennessee, June 20, 
1865, with a brave and honorable military record as a defender of the stars 
and stripes. 

After the close of the war Mr. Conner returned to his home in Harrison 
township, Delaware county, Indiana, and resumed his former occupation 
of farming and stock-raising. In 1902 he erected the pleasant and com- 
modious residence where he now lives, and his homestead is one of the val- 
uable estates of Harrison township. 

On the 4th of October, 1869, Mr. Conner married Sarah E. Darter, 
who was born in Harrison township, Delaware county, Indiana, July 21, 
1 85 1, to Alexander and Margaret (McKinley) Darter. The father was 
born in Fayette county, Indiana, April 5, 1821. • On the 8th of February, 
1865, he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Forty-seventh Regi- 
ment of Indiana \'oIunteers, for service in the Civil war, receiving his dis- 



872 HrSTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

charge on the 4th of the following August. He moved to Butler county, 
Kansas, in JMarch, 1877, and there his death occurred on the 6th of Janu- 
ary, 1S98. He received the honors of a veteran's burial, for he was an hon- 
ored member of the G. A. R. post at Douglas, Kansas. During his resi- 
dence in Delaware county he served for two terms as a county commissioner, 
also held the office of trustee, and was a Whig and a Republican in his po- 
litical affiliations. He was a member of the New Light church. On the 
22d of January, 1846, 3Mr. Darter wedded Margaret McKinley, who was 
born :\Iarch 20, 1820, and died on the 22d of October, 1868. They be- 
came the parents of seven children, but only two are now living, Mrs. Con- 
ner and Thomas. On the 3d of June, 1869, Mr. Darter married Aliss Sarah 
Ackaman, and of their four children, two sons and two daughters, three 
are now living, Esley, Addie and Roy. Mrs. Darter is now living in Kan- 
sas. Four children have been born to Mr. and Airs. Conner: Willis D., 
who married Eva Stephenson ; }ilargaret E., who died at the age of four 
years; and Ozro and Olive, twins. Olive is deceased, and Ozro married 
Maggie Shirk. The fraternal relations of ]\Ir. Conner are with Lodge No. 
731, L O. O. F., and his political affiliations are with the Republican party, 
of which he is a stanch and active supporter. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. 

John A. Sites. One of the aged and venerable citizens of Delaware 
county is John A. Sites. His probity, fidelity and sterling worth have won 
him the unqualified confidence of his fellow townsmen, and now in the even- 
ing of life his pathway is brightened by the veneration and respect which 
ever follow an upright career. He has been prominently identified with 
the interests of Delaware county during the past twenty-two years, but he 
is a native son of Grant county, West Virginia, born on the i6th of Octo- 
ber, 1819, to John and Marie (Smith) Sites, both also natives of that com- 
monwealth. John Sites was prominently identified with the farming and 
stock-raising interests of West \^irginia for many years, there owning five 
hundred acres of land, and he also served as a justice of the peace during 
an extended period. He was a member of the Dutch Reformed church, a 
Whig in his political aflnliations, and he lived to the age of seventy-seven 
years. His wife reached the remarkable age of one hundred and three 
years, while her mother was one hundred and nine when called to the home 
beyond. Thirteen children, seven daughters and six sons, were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Sites, namely: John A., Jacob, James, Izar, Sampson, 
Charles, Scott, Aaron, Jacob, two that died in infancy, Arthur and Ray 
Grant. 

John A. Sites, the eldest child, offered his services to the Union cause 
during the period of the Civil war, enlisting in 1861 for three years, and 
was made a member of Company I, Seventh Regiment of West Virginia 
Volunteers. Returning home on a furlough, he was reported to the rebels 
by his own neighbors and was captured and taken to Montura prison, from 



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HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 875 

whence four weeks later he was transferred to Staunton prison in Rocking- 
ham county, Virginia, there remaining for six weeks, when he was taken 
to Castle Thunder prison at Richmond and thence to the famous Libby 
prison. During eight months he was held as a prisoner of war in that hor- 
rible prison pen, and at the close of the period the United States gave up 
three rebel prisoners for j\Ir. Sites, who was taken to Salisbury, North 
Carolina, and placed on parole. From there he was taken with others to 
Richmond, Virginia, and thence with thirteen other prisoners to a parole 
camp in Maryland, from whence after six weeks they were sent to head- 
quarters at Wheeling, Virginia. But as the officer in charge there could not 
read their papers, they having been made out by a drunken man, they were 
told to return in ten days for their discharge. Returning home, Mr. Sites 
was again taken prisoner, but succeeded in making his escape, and he then 
came to Greene county, Ohio, and turned his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits. From there in the spring of 1S85 he came to Indiana and estab- 
lished his home in Harrison township, Delaware county, where he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land, putting his all, one thousand 
dollars in money, in this little home. He lost the entire amount, however, 
and he then became the owner of forty acres of land where he now lives, 
to which he added another forty-acre tract in 1903, and in the following 
year he erected his pleasant and comfortable home. For six years Mr. 
Sites represented his fellow townsmen in the office of road supervisor. His 
first presidential vote was cast for William H. Harrison, and when Abraham 
Lincoln made his race for the presidency Mr. Sites fought his way to the 
polls to cast his vote for the famous statesman. During William McKin- 
ley's presidential race the family, including Mr. Sites, his brothers and sons, 
cast thirty-six votes for the Republican candidate. Although born and 
raised a Dunkard, he is a member of the Friends church. 

Mr. Sites first married Elizabeth Bond, who was born in West Virginia 
and died in 1844 after becoming the mother of six children : Jane, Samuel, 
Mary, Frances, John and George F. In 1855 Mr. Sites married Miss Mary 
A. Howland, who was born in Brown county, Ohio, the daughter of Ravvlson 
and Rebecca J. (Gilliand) Howland, the former a native of Adams county, 
Ohio, and the latter of Ireland. Of their family of two sons and four daugh- 
ters five are now living: Elizabeth, Martha, Gilmer, Armstrong and Mary. 
The wife and mother reached the Psalmist's span of three score years and 
ten, and the father was seventy-three when death claimed him. Twelve 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sites : Albert, Emma, Eve, James, 
Tessie, Harvey, Minnie, Josephine, Arthur, Drah, Ray and Sibble. The 
career of Mr. Sites has been an active, useful and honorable one, and to 
his children he will leave the priceless heritage of an unblemished record. 

Morton F. Carpenter. Holding a position of considerable promi- 
nence among the more progressive and successful agriculturists of Dela- 
ware county is Morton F. Carpenter, a widely and favorably known general 



876 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

farmer and stock breeder and raiser of Harrison township. He was born 
in Jennings county, Indiana, Xovember 5, 1864, a son of William F. and 
Annie (Himelick) Carpenter. His father was born in Decatur county, 
Indiana, January 17, 1835, and died in Harrison township November 27, 
1904, and his mother, who was born in Jennings county, Indiana, October 
14, 1842, still lives on the homestead farm. Further parental history may 
be found elsewhere in this volume in connection with the sketch of Josiah 
Ferguson, who married Mr. Carpenter's sister. 

But ten years of age when his parents removed to this county, Morton 
F. Carpenter was here bred and educated. On attaining his majority he 
began farming on his own account, at first locating in Harrison township, 
not far from the old family homestead. Four years later he went to Mun- 
cie, where he resided for three years, after which he lived for nine years 
in Washington township. Returning December 23, 1902, to Harrison town- 
ship, Mr. Carpenter has since been actively employed in farming and stock 
breeding and raising, having now one hundred and thirty-seven acres of 
land, the most of which is in a good state of culture. He takes great pride 
in his stock, keeping a fine grade of cattle and horses, at the head of the 
latter herd being the famous Belgian stallion "Rubis," an imported draft 
horse, whose registered number is 2648. His cattle are Durhams and short- 
horns, the finest grades raised in this part of the state. 

Air. Carpenter married September 25, 1886, Laura C. Ocker, who was 
born in Wells county, Indiana, January g, 1866, a daughter of John and 
Annie M. (Wean) Ocker. John Ocker was a A'irginian by birth, having 
been born in Rockingham county in 1821. Left fatherless when a boy, he 
came with his widowed mother to Henry county, Indiana, the slow journey 
being made with teams. The mother entered land in Henry county and 
with the help of her twelve children cleared and improved one of the finest 
homesteads in that vicinity, having at one time title to two hundred acres of 
land. She was a woman of rare courage and ability, and in the log cabin 
which she erected in the wilderness brought up her children wisely and 
well. Soon after starting in life for himself John Ocker opened a store 
near his mother's home, and after a few years in that place sold out and 
removed to Wells county, where he carried on farming for a number of 
years. Going then to Mount Summit, he erected a building for a store 
and residence, and for a while was there employed in mercantile business, 
and was likewise station agent for the Fort Wayne, Muncie and Richmond 
Railroad Company, the road being today known as the Lake Erie and 
Western railroad. Removing from there to Sulphur Springs, four miles 
west, he remained there as a merchant for four years. Coming from there 
to Delaware county, Mr. Ocker resided eight months in Gaston, and then 
removed to his farm, lying four and one-half miles southwest of Gaston, 
where he spent the remainder of his long and useful life, dying November 
10, 1895. Mr. Ocker married Annie M. Wean, who was born in 1824 in 
Henry county, Indiana, and died July 7, 1868. Seven children were born 




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HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY SSI 

to them, two of whom are living, namely, Sarah, wife of Edward Myers, 
and Laura C, wife of Mr. Carpenter. The father was a Democrat in poli- 
tics, and both he and his wife were members of the United Brethren church. 
Five children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter, one 
of whom, Omer, died at the age of seventeen years, and four are living, 
namely, Delia May, John W., Roxanna and Charley B. Mr. and Mrs. Car- 
penter belong to the Christian church and pay liberally toward its main- 
tenance. In his political views Mr. Carpenter is a straightforward Repub- 
lican. 

Ambrose A. Manring. Prominent among the substantial representa- 
tives of the farming community in Harrison township is Ambrose A. Man- 
ring, who has been here engaged in his chosen vocation for twenty vears, 
as a farmer meeting with most encouraging success. Throughout his years 
of residence in this vicinity he has ever evinced a warm interest in local 
progress and improvements, and has heartily endorsed all enterprises cal- 
culated to benefit the public. A native of Indiana, he was born Setpem- 
ber 21, 1850, in Bartholomew county, a son of the late James H. Alanring. 

Born in Kent county, Delaware, December 9, 1823, James H. Man- 
ring came with his parents to Franklin county, Indiana, in 1835, they, Am- 
brose and Nancy Manring, being among the earlier pioneers of that part 
of the state. He subsequently assisted his father in clearing the land, 
learning to wield the axe most dexterously, thus aptly illustrating the poet's 
description of the transformation that so rapidly followed the advent of 
the pioneer : 

''The beech and elm and maple, and e'en the sturdy oak. 
All bowed beneath the power of the axe's cleaving stroke ; 
The red man moved afar, the forests disappeared. 

And the prosp'ring pale-faced people their pleasant homesteads reared." 
Finding farming a congenial occupation, he selected that as his life 
work. After becoming the head of a household he removed to Madison 
county, Indiana, bought land that was still in its virginal wilderness, built 
a log house, and again began the pioneer work of clearing and improving 
a homestead for himself and his growing family. A man of resolute will 
and determination, he met with success in his untiring efforts, and having 
placed a goodly portion of his homestead in a state of cuIti\-ation, erected 
a frame house, in which he spent his remaining days in comfort and pleas- 
ure, passing to the life beyond June 6. 1906. As a young man he was identi- 
fied with the Democratic party, but during his 'later years was a strong 
Prohibitionist. He was a true Christian and a valued member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. For a number of years he was connected with 
Alexandria Lodge No. 235, A. F. & A. M., and at his death was buried 
with Masonic honors. 

In Franklin county, Indiana. December 25, 1845, James H. Manring 
married Mary Hammond, who was born January 8, 1830, in that county, and 



883 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

died April i6, 1902. Six children blessed their union, as follows: Xathan- 
iel, who married \'irginia Garrison; Ambrose A., the subject of this sketch; 
Martha C, wife of John Spears: James W., who married Ellen Miller for 
his first wife, and married second Mrs. Alta (Blacklidge) Melburn ; Ella 
N., wife of Sylvester Parker: and Edwin B., who married Emma Wise- 
heart. 

Coming from thrifty Scotch ancestry on his father's side and from 
English ancestry on the Hammond side, his mother's earlier ancestors hav- 
ing migrated from England to Xew England, Ambrose A. Alanring inherited 
many of the family traits of both parents. Industrious, active and energetic, 
he worked on the farm as a boy, obtaining his early education in the win- 
ter terms of the district school, remaining an inmate of the parental house- 
hold until twenty-eight years old. Taking upon himself then the responsi- 
bilities of a married man, he embarked in general farming in Alonroe town- 
ship, Madison county. On October 13, 1886, he took up his residence in 
Harrison township, and having purchased eighty acres of land, took pos- 
session of the log cabin standing upon it and has since been here engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. With the Scotch thrift and English persistency 
of his ancestors he has labored unceasingly, and in the management of his 
property has met with substantial rewards. In 1899 Mr. Manring erected 
a modernly built frame house, and this, with the barn and outbuildings pre- 
viously built, has added essentially to the value of his improvements. He 
is a general farmer, raising grain, fruit and stock of a good grade, his or- 
chard containing one hundred and fifty trees which he has set out. 

On October 2, 1878, Mr. Manring married Angelina Alabbitt, who was 
born June 2, 1855, in Madison county, Indiana, a daughter of Anthony 
Mabl)itt. Mr. Mabbitt spent almost his entire sixty-three years of earthly 
life in Madison county, although his birth occurred in Union county, In- 
diana, December 28, 1824, and his death. May 4, 1888. When a young 
man he took up government land, and in the pioneer labor of clearing and 
improving a homestead met with phenomenal success. The small log cabin 
which he reared in the wilderness, and in which he and his bride began 
housekeeping, was replaced by a commodious frame house, equipped and 
furnished to meet the needs of the family, and he became one of the lead- 
ing farmers of Madison county, at one time owning and managing two 
hundred and fifty acres of land. He was a Jefifersonian Democrat, very 
prominent in public affairs, and for eight and one-half years served as a 
justice of the peace. He was a member in good standing of the Baptist 
church, and generously contributed towards its support. He married Sarah 
J. Caulgan May 6, 1847, who was born December 19, 1827, and she bore 
him twelve children, of whom si.x survive, as follows : Granville, who mar- 
ried Nancy Long; Angelina, wife of Mr. Manring; Amanda; Rebecca, 
wife of Davis \'ermillion ; Caroline, wife of Alfred Morris; and William, 
who married Laura Miller. 

Mr. and Mrs. Manring are the parents of six children, namely: Hubert 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 883 

D.. who married Dora E. Lewis; Homer \\'.. who married Carrie Beck; 
Lenna; Winona, wife of Lloyd McCreery ; Mary J., and Eric Hammond. 
Hubert D. completed the common school course and received his diploma 
in 1895, and he also spent one term in Valparaiso College. Homer W. 
completed the common school cciurse in the year of 1897 and received his 
diploma. Lenna completed her course in the common schools with the 
class of 1900, and then took two years' high school work in Bethel High 
school. She has taken both vocal and instrumental music. Winona com- 
pleted her common school course with the class of 1900, and also received 
the same course in the Bethel High school as her sister Lenna. Mary com- 
pleted her course with the class of 1904, and she also finished the Gaston 
high school course with the class of 1907. Eric is in the seventh grade of 
the public schools. He is a lover of history. Mr. Manring is prominent in 
local fraternal organizations, and does much to promote the good of the 
orders to which he belongs. He was formerly a member of Alexandria 
Lodge No. 235. A. E. & A. M., and now belongs to Bethel Lodge No. 731, 
L O. O. F., and to Lincoln Rebekah Lodge, No. 563, of Bethel, of which 
his wife and two of his daughters, Lenna E. and Mary Jane, are also mem- 
bers. In this lodge Miss Lenna E. Manring has held all of the offices. Mr. 
and Mrs. Manring are both faithful members of the Christian church. 

Hexrv Cleve.n-ger. a life-long resident of Delaware county, well 
known as a citizen of wortli, Henry Clevenger has been closely identified 
with the advancement of its agricultural interests, and is now one of the 
most highly respected and prosperous farmers of Harrison township. A 
son of the late Thomas Clevenger, he was born September 26, 1850, in 
Mount Pleasant township, this county, and was there brought up and 
educated. 

A native of Ohio, Thomas Clevenger was born in Licking county in 
February, 1824. Coming with his parents to Indiana, he was one of tlie 
early pioneers of Delaware county, and ably assisted his father in his brave 
efforts to reclaim a homestead from the wild land which he took up from 
the government. Embarking in life as a farmer, he was at first located in 
]\Iount Pleasant township, but some time in the early seventies removed to 
Gaston, this county, where he carried on general farming until his death, in 
1897. He was patriotic and public spirited, and during the Civil war served 
in the Union army for a year. He was a Democrat in politics, and a valued 
member of the New Light Christian church. He married Mary Myers, 
who was born in 1832, in Licking county, Ohio, and died on the home farm 
in Gaston in 1895. Seven children were born to them, and six are now 
living, namely: Henry, the subject of this brief sketch, James, Johanna, 
Martha, Christina and David. 

Brought up on a farm, Henry Clevenger received the many advantages 
of a rural occupation, and while yet a young man chose to become a tiller 
of the soil, earning his living by the sweat of his brow. Industrious and 
ambitious, and having been reared to habits of prudence and economy, he 



884 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

saved enough money to warrant him in purchasing land on his own ac- 
count, and with that object in view came to Harrison township to locate. 
Buying a farm on section twenty-two, Mr. Clevenger has since been busily 
engaged in its management, meeting with signal success in his undertakings. 
It was in 1906 that he erected his comfortable residence and splendid barn, 
at a cost of $3,000. Laboring with earnest purpose, he has secured a com- 
petence, being well rewarded for his years of toil. He is now in the prime 
of life, active, energetic, with a clear head for business, and is a prominent 
factor in the industrial interests of this part of the county. 

On October 27, 1876, Mr. Clevenger married Martha E. Branson, who 
was born in this township December 29, 1861, a daughter of the late John 
H. Branson. A native of Delaware county, Mr. Branson was born Febru- 
ary ID, 1S31, and for many years of his active life was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits in Flarrison township, having cleared and improved a 
homestead from land which he took up from the government. One of the 
early and practical farmers of this township, he was largely instrumental in 
advancing its growth and prosperity, and his death, -May 10, 1902, was a 
great loss to the community. He married, in Harrison township, Mary A. 
Fox, who was born in Kentucky iNLirch i6, 1S36, and died in Cammack 
Xovember 19, 1899. They became the parents of thirteen children, of whom 
seven are now living, namely: Elizabeth, wife of Charles St. Clair: Sarah, 
wife of John Conner; Martha E., wife of Mr. Clevenger; George \\'., who 
married Emma Murphy; Joseph, who married Emma Coplinger; Edward, 
who married Myrtle Cunnigum, and Flora, wife of Robert Van Buskirk. 
Mr, Branson was identified with the Whigs in early life, but after the or- 
ganization of the Republican party stanchly supported its principles. Both 
he and his wife belonged to the New Light Christian church, in which he 
was for many years a deacon. Seven children have been born into the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Clevenger, namely : Wesley, who died when but thirteen 
years old, John, who died in infancy, Jesse. Clinton, Mary, Joseph and 
Bessie. True to the political and religious faith in which he was trained, 
Mr. Clevenger is a Democrat and belongs to the New Light Christian 
church. Fraternallv he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Eaton, 

Spexcer H, Ben'.\du.m. In reviewing the early history of Delaware 
county it will be found that one of the first men to seek a home within its 
borders was Allen Benadum, the father of Spencer H. It was in the fall of 
1840 that he first came here, but after looking the county over he returned 
to his native commdnwealth of Ohio, where his birth had occurred on the 
5th of October, 1819, in Fairfield, Lancaster county, but two years after his 
first visit he came again to Delaware county, Indiana, this time purchasing 
eighty acres of timber land in Harrison township. Returning later to Ohio, 
he for the third time made the journey west. This was in the fall of 1S48, 
;md he made the trip to Delaware county with team and wagon, accom- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 885 

panied by his wife and six children. They established their home in 
Muncie and Mr. Benadum resumed his trade of blacksmithing, on High 
street. In the spring of 1883 he erected a brick shop on East Main street, 
and there he diligently worked at his trade until he purchased in the fall 
of 1856 eighty acres of land in Harrison township, adjoining his first pur- 
chase, and later he added one hundred and sixty acres more to the bound- 
aries of his estate. In the fall of the same year he transferred his residence 
from Muncie to his farm, their first home being a little log cabin, but later 
on this gave place to a frame residence, which was destroyed by fire on 
the 4th of ;\Iarch, 1866. A log house was then built in its place, and during 
all this time Mr. Benadum and his sons were actively engaged in clearing 
the land and preparing it for the plow. In addition to his general farming 
Mr. Benadum was also extensively engaged in the breeding of Chester 
White and Poland China hogs. He was successful in his business operation, 
and Delaware county numbered this pious Christian man among her most 
honored pioneer residents. For over fifty years he was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and was also an active worker in the Sons of 
Temperance. He gave his political support to the Whig party and cast his 
vote for the first presidential candidate of its successor, John C. Fremont. 
In his native city of Fairfield, Ohio, February 15, 1838, Mr. Benadum mar- 
ried Susannah R. Ebright, born in Fairfield December 18, 1816, and they 
became the parents of nine children, seven sons and two daughters, but only 
four are now living: Spencer H., the subject of this review; Almira O., 
the widow of Dillard Drake ; Mary E., the wife of John Gerard, and Will- 
iam E., who married Rosa Green. The death of Mr. Benadum occurred on 
his homestead farm in Harrison township January 9, 1893, and on the i8th 
of December of the same year his wife joined him in the home beyond. She 
too was a worthy member of the Methodist church, her name having been 
on its membership role during the long period of fifty-nine years. 

Spencer H. Benadum was born in Fairfield coimty, Ohio, June 21, 
1846, and as a boy he worked with his father, assisting him to carry the 
brick for the erection of the little building in which he so long carried on 
his trade, and after the removal of the family to Harrison township he as- 
sisted in clearing the homestead from its dense growth of timber, working 
on the farm during the summer months and attending school in the winters. 
Soon after his first marriage he engaged in agricultural pursuits for him- 
self, but later left the farm and from the fall of 1878 until the fall of 1879 
he was engaged in the meat business in Osborn City, Kansas. At the close 
of that period he returned to Muncie, and after his second marriage re- 
moved to his farm in Harrison township, this being in the year of 1880, and 
he has since devoted his entire attention to its cultivation and improvement 
with the exception of two years, from 1886 to 1888, when he resided in Mun- 
cie. During the period of the Civil war Mr. Benadum put aside personal 
considerations and offered his services to his country's cause, becoming a 
member on the 13th of December,. 1863, of Company G, One Hundred and 



886 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Twenty-first Regiment of the Ninth Indiana Cavalr)-, enlisting for three 
}ears or during the war. During his niihtary career he participated in the 
battles of Pulaski, Tennessee. September lo and 28, 1864; Wilson's Pike, 
December i, 1864; Granny White Pike, December 16, 1864; Nashville, 
Tennessee, December 15, 1864; Franklin. Tennessee, December 17, 1864; 
Little Harper on the night of December 17, 1864, and also in many skir- 
mishes. His brave and loyal service as a defender of the Union now en- 
titles him to membership in Lookout Post, No. 140, G. A. R., of Gaston, 
and he is a stanch Republican in his political affiliations. 

On the 22d of October, 186S, Mr. Benadum married Miss Alice Conner, 
who was born in Harrison township and who after a happy married life of 
eleven years was called to the home beyond in 1879. Of her three children 
only two are now living, Hattie, the wife of James Barker, and Stella, the 
wife of David Flora. On the 20th of June, 1880, Mr. Benaduin wedded 
Miss, Cora E. Milhollin, who was born in Shelby county, Ohio, June 22, 
1861, a daughter of Edward J. and Jennie E. (Holmes) Milhollin. Six chil- 
dren have been born of this union : Jennie, the wife of Marion Drumm ; 
Susan, who became the wife of Arthur Brown ; Minnie, the wife of Ralph 
Cecil; Clarence E., Allen and \\'alter. Mr. Milhollin, the father of Mrs. 
Benadum, was born in Fairfield county, C^hio, March 19, 1830, and after 
entering upon his business life he spent some time in farming and contract- 
ing in Sidney of his native state. In 1876 he came from Ohio to Indiana and 
located in ]Muncie, where he became a contractor on the Lake Erie & West- 
ern Railroad. On the 2d of May, 1864, he enlisted for service in the Civil 
war, becoming a member of Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-second 
Ohio Volunteer Regiment, with which he served until his discharge Sep- 
tember 10, 1864. After returning from the army he began contracting in 
ditches, thus continuing until his return to Ohio, and after a sojourn in that 
state of five years he came again to Indiana. In Shelby county, Ohio, he 
married Jennie E. Holmes, who was born in Fairfield county of that state 
December 14, 1834, and her death occurred on the loth of June, 1881. Mr. 
Milhollin survived his wife until the 6th of July, 1899. They became the 
parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters, and the four now living 
are Thomas, Cora E., Minnie, the wife of William Case, and Samuel, who 
married Pearl Fry. Mr. Milhollin, the father, was a member of the United 
Brethren church, while his wife was a life-long member of the Methodist 
denomination, and in his political affiliations he was a Jackson Democrat. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Benadum are members of prominent pioneer families of 
Delaware count\-, and worthiI\ they bear the name of an honorable ancestry. 

Em MITT MuLUN was born in Henry county, Indiana. November 30, 
1849, a son of John S. and Margaret (Emmitt) MuUin. John S. Mullin 
was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, June 3, 1797, and departed 
this life at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. M. \'estal. in Newcastle, 
Henry county, Indiana, July 12, 1887, aged ninety years, one month and 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 887 

nine days. He moved from Pennsylvania to Hamilton county, (Jhio, with 
his parents in the year of iSii, at the age of fifteen, where he continued his 
home until the year of 1823. In that year he was joined in marriage to 
Hulda Struble, and they had four children, one son and three daughters. 
From Ohio he removed to Indiana in the year of 1830, and on the 29th of 
March 'of that year entered eighty acres of land east of Newcastle and 
moved onto it on the 29th of the following April. On the 3d of November 
following his wife died, leaving him with four children and in a wilderness 
home. He was again married Februarv 14. 1833, to Margaret Emmitt, who 
was born in Ohio and died October 5, 1S85. Of their ten children, six sons 
and four daughters, two sons and one daughter preceded him to the home 
bc3'ond, and five are now living: Jane, the widow of M. M. Vestal; David, 
who married Laura Williams ; Annie, the wife of Charles Ball ; Emmitt, the 
subject of this review ; and Ruam.y, the wife of John W. Abbott. 

Mr. Mullin continued his home on the farm entered in 1830 until he 
went to live with his son James in the city, October 7, 1885, and just one 
year later he went to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Vestal. As a husband 
and father he was kind and tender, and those who were the objects of his 
care in their infancy and youth will ever cherish the memory of a kind 
father. As a citizen he was honest in all his dealings and generous as a 
neighbor. He never formally connected himself with any church but was 
a great reailer of the Bible and accepted it as a revelation from God. He 
assisted in erecting the first courthouse in Henry county, and he also burned 
the brick with which to erect his residence, this superseding the old log 
house erected in the wilderness. Henry county numbered him among her 
most honored pioneer residents. He was a Jefferson Democrat politically. 

During his bovhood days Emmitt Mullin worked with his father on 
the farm, laboring in the fields during the summer months and attending 
school in the winters. Thus he continued until 1885, when he purchased the 
farm where he now lives and continued his agricultural labors until his 
removal to Muncie to embark in the grocery business. This was in 1897, 
and for about seven months he continued that business with his son Arthur. 
In 1905 he became interested in the dairy business, and has but recently 
closed out his business as a dairyman. 

On the 1st of October, 1871, Mr. Mullin was tmited in marriage to 
Sarah Bicknell, who was born in Newcastle, Henry coimty, Indiana, Oc- 
tober 10, 1851, the daughter of Darhng and Frances (Anderson) Bicknell, 
both of whom were born in North Carolina, the father on the 19th of March, 
1817, and the mother in July, 1812. They were married in Newcastle, Indi- 
ana, and of their eight children all are now deceased with the exception of 
Mrs. Mullin, the youngest of the family. Mr. Bicknell, the father, came with 
his parents, Randolph and Mary Bicknell, to Indiana in 1822, when five 
years of age, the family home being established three miles south of New- 
castle, where the little lad grew to years of maturity and engaged in the 
mercantile business. In 1876 he sold his interests in Newcastle and went 



88S HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

to Nashville, Tennessee, there resuming his mercantile business, and he died 
there at the age of eighty-eight years. Mrs. Bicknell died February 21, 
1900. He was a member of Newcastle Lodge, L O. O. F., a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and was a Jefferson Democrat politically. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. MuUin — John A. and 
Floyd. The elder is engaged in the meat business in Muncie, and he mar- 
ried Ophia Chalfant. Mrs. JMullin is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and her husband of the United Brethren, and he is a stanch Repub- 
lican in his political views. 

Fr-Vncis H. Ben.\du.m. When Francis H. Benadum passed away on 
the 15th of July, 1902, one more name was added to the list of honored dead 
of Delaware county. He was a member of one of the county's oldest and 
most prominent families, but his birth occurred in Fairfield county, Ohio, 
April 26, 1844, a son of Allen and Susannah Benadum. He remained at 
home with his parents until eighteen years of age, and then with all the 
ardor of youth he offered his services to his country's cause in her Civil 
war, enlisting for three months, and at the close of that period he veteranized 
on the 9th of March, 1864, for three years or during the war as a member 
of Company F, First Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, heavy artillery, and 
was discharged at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, January 5, 1866, for his term 
of enlistment had expired and the war had closed. Coming thence to 
Muncie, Indiana, Mr. Benadum engaged in the teaming business, but later 
selling his interests in that occupation he embarked in the restaurant busi- 
ness and continued as the proprietor of an eating house for six years. At 
the close of that period he removed to a farm of fifty-three and a third acres 
in Harrison township, on which he erected a valuable residence, and there 
spent the remainder of his life. He was honored and revered in the county 
in which he so long made his home, and in his death the community 
mourned the loss of one of its best known citizens. In political matters he 
voted with the Republican party. 

On the 29th of April, 1866, Mr. Benadum was united in marriage to 
Ellen Sullivan, the ceremony being performed by the Rev. Irvin in Muncie. 
She was born in County Kerry, Ireland, August 10, 1846, a daughter of 
Michael and Ellen (Moriarity) Sullivan, both of whom also claimed that 
county as the place of their nativity. The father died in 1849, when his 
daughter was but three years of age, and in 1854, when she was but a little 
maiden of eight years, her mother was called to the home beyond, dying in 
Muncie, Indiana. She came to the United States in a sailing ship in 1850, 
and, landing in New York city, she spent a short time in the metropolis, 
and then continued her journey to Newport, Rhode Island. There, strange 
as it may seem, she again married a Michael Sullivan, and of their two 
children only one, a son, John, is now living. Mr. Sullivan, the father, lost 
his life in a railroad accident in Indiana. By her first marriage Mrs. Sulli- 
van became the mother of two children also, Marv, the deceased wife of 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 8S9 

Michael Quinland, and he is now hving in Indianapolis, Indiana, and Ellen, 
who became the wife of j\Ir. Benadum. She made the voyage to the United 
States by sailing ship in 185 1, when but five years of age, in company with 
a cousin. Four weeks were spent on the ocean, and after landing in the 
harbor of New York they went to Newport to join her mother. With her 
mother and stepfather Mrs. Benadum came to Muncie, Indiana. She there 
gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Benadum, and they became the parents of 
three children : Minnie, who died at the age of twenty-two years ; Charles 
E. ; and Don H., who married Mary Johnson. 

Oscar O. Boxell. Occupying a position of prominence among the 
leading agriculturists of Harrison township is Oscar O. Boxell, a man of 
energetic determination and excellent business qualifications, who readily 
puts his best efforts into everything he undertakes. He was born October 
21, 1872, in Michigan, Indiana, a son of the late Rev. George W. Boxell. 
He is descended from an honored pioneer family, being the grandson of 
Joseph Boxell, who came from Virginia to Indiana in 1836, locating in Van 
Buren township. Grant county, where he was the fourth householder, there 
having previously been but three log cabins erected in that vicinity. 

Born in Virginia January 16, 1833, George W. Boxell was but three 
years old when he was brought across the country to this state. Although 
bred in the wilderness, he had a natural aptitude for books, and took ad- 
vantage of every opportunity offered for adding to his knowledge. He as- 
sisted his parents in the tedious work of clearing a homestead from the 
forests, which at that time were inhabited by Indians, bears, wolves, and 
wild beasts of every description. As a youth he became interested in re- 
ligion, and at the age of nineteen years entered the ministry of the Methodist 
Protestant church. Beginning his duties as an itinerant, he traveled over 
long stretches of territory, making his way through the wilderness from 
place to place by the means of blazed trees, the modes of traveling in those 
days being in strange contrast to those now employed. In this capacity he 
led a busy and useful life for nearly a quarter of a century, by his ministry 
giving comfort and good cheer to hundreds of people, and extending and 
advancing the Master's cause. Receiving a call from the First Methodist 
Protestant church of Indianapolis in 1876, Rev. Mr. Boxell remained there 
four years, and then went to Muncie, where he held a pastorate eight years. 
Going then to Elwood, he remained there until 1892, when he accepted a 
call to Anderson. In 1896, his health failing, he retired from the ministry, 
locating in Harrison township, on the farm which he had purchased in 1859. 
Turning his attention to outdoor pursuits, Mr. Boxell carried on general 
farming to some extent, and althoughnot able to preach regularly was often 
called upon to conduct funeral services, in the course of his life preaching 
more than seventeen hundred funeral sermons. In politics he was a Jeffer- 
son and Jackson Democrat, and served one term as trustee of Harrison town- 
ship. He died December 5, 1905, loved and respected by all. 



890 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Rev. George Eoxell was twice niarrieil He married first January i6, 
1S58, Rhoda }^IcKeever, who was born near Marion, Grant county, Indiana, 
in 1836, and died January 10, 1880, in Muncie. She bore him six children, 
of whom Oscar O., the special subject of this sketch, is the only one living. 
He married second, July 26, 1882, Emma Thompson, who was born Oc- 
tober 18, 1862, and is now living in Muncie. They had but one child, Estella 
L., now the wife of Carl Rees. 

Brought up on the home fanii, Oscar O. Boxell was given excellent edu- 
cational advantages, and when ready to embark upon an active career ac- 
cepted a position with the Prudential Life Insurance Company, with which 
he was associated until 1905, for four years being superintendent of the 
office at iMuncie, and also having charge of other branch offices of that com- 
pany. Locating in 1905 on the old homestead, Mr. Boxell at once erected 
the fine, modernly equipped and furnished home that he now occupies, and 
has since devoted his energies to agriculture. He makes a specialty of stock 
raising, keeping Duroc hogs, and a good grade of horses and cows. On the 
15th of October, 1907, he lost his barn by fire, and is now erecting a new 
barn thirty by sixty feet and covered with sheet steel. 

On Alay 13, 1893, Mr. Boxell married Bessie Hotfman, who was born 
in Salem township, this county, May 9, 1875. a daughter of William C. and 
Mary (Lambert) Hofliman, of whom a brief sketch may be found elsewhere 
in this volume. Three children have come to bless this union, namely: 
Wilbur l^., who died in infancy: Lois E. and George W. Politically Air. 
Boxell supports the principles of the Democratic party by voice and vote. 
Religiously he belongs to the Methodist Protestant church, of which his 
wife is also a member. Fraternally he is a member of Welcome Lodge, No. 
37, K. of P., of Muncie. 

N.\TH.\N A. McCreekv is a member of one of Delaware county's promi- 
nent pioneer families and is a native son of its township of Harrison, his 
natal day being the 25th of September, 1S59, and his parents Thomas and 
Catherine (Brown) AlcCreery. His boyhood days were spent in assisting 
his father to clear the homestead farm from a wilderness, working in the 
fields during the summer months and pursuing his educational training in 
the district schools in the winters. Thus his time was employed until he 
reached his twenty-first year, when he began farming for himself on a part 
of the old home farm, receiving eighty acres of timber land from his father. 
With his young wife he took up his abode in a little log cabin which stood 
upon the place, and he began the arduous task of clearing his land and plac- 
ing it under cultivation. This little cabin home continued to shelter them 
for eleven years, when it was burned and they lost their all in the fire. The 
pleasant and commodious dwelling which now adorns the homestead was 
soon built, and w ith the passing years Mr. McCreery has succeeded in clear- 
ing his land with the exception of ten acres, and his fields are under ail 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 891 

excellent state of cultivation. He follows general farming and stock rais- 
ing. 

On the 27th of December, 18S3, Mr. AlcCreery married Xettie V. 
Trout. She was born in Washington township, Delaware county, Indiana, 
July 29, 1864, the daughter of Hannibal and Barbara (Wharton) Trout, 
both natives of Licking county, Ohio, the father born January 24, 1830, and 
the mother April 17, 1834. They were married on the 4th of April, 1853, 
and became the parents of eleven children, six now living : Leroy S., who 
is married; Derilus, who married Martha Miller; William L., who married 
Emily McCreery ; Nettie \'., the wife of Nathan A. McCreery ; Lois A. ; 
and Frank O. Air. Trout, the father, came to Indiana in 1851 and secured 
a farm of heavily timbered land in Harrison township, of which he cleared 
about forty acres, and later removed to Washington township and there 
purchased ninety acres of land. After residing there for about five or six 
years he sold the land and in 1891 came to Gaston, his present home. He 
is a Democrat in his political affiliations and has served as a road super- 
visor. Mrs. Trout died on the 30th of May, 1907. Six children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. AlcCreery: William C, Delrey, EfRe F., Ina C, Edna 
E. and George Washington. The eldest son, William C. McCreery, married 
Elsie Rector, the daughter of James A. Rector, and they have one daughter, 
Thelma Fern. The fifth child in order of birth, Edna E., died in infancy. 
Mr. McCreery votes with the Republican party, and is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, as is also his wife and their two daughters, 
Efifie and Ina. 

Alex.\nuer Hi.-mt. a representative agriculturist of Harrison town- 
ship, Alexander Hiatt has met with excellent results in his farming opera- 
tions, his fine and well appointed estate giving substantial evidence of the 
good care and skill with which it is managed. A native of Indiana, he was 
born August 25, 1857, in Henry county, which was likewise the birthplace 
of his father, the late Solomon Hiatt. 

A son of John and Charity Hiatt, Solomon Hiatt was bom December 
20, 1833. In his boyhood days he assisted in the pioneer labor of clearing 
and improving a homestead from the wilderness, and as a young man en- 
gaged in farming on his own account. Soon after choosing his life com- 
panion he bought land in Delaware county, and from that time until his 
death, which occurred July 17, 1906, he carried on general farming ably 
and successfully. He was influential in public affairs, and for eight years 
served as a justice of the peace. In his earlier years he was a Whig, but in 
1856 he cast his presidential vote for John C. Fremont, and from that time 
was identified with the Republican party. For thirty-nine years he was a 
Mason, belonging to the lodge in Alexandria. On November 10, 1856, he 
married Elizabeth AlcCollester, who was born in Delaware county, October, 
13, 1839, and died on the home farm July 31, 1906, surviving him but two 
short weeks. She was a woman of many virtues, and one whose daily life 



892 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

was in harmony with the Master's teachings, as a member of the Christian 
church, with which she united at the age of seventeen years, being true to 
the faith which she professed. Of the eleven children born of their marriage, 
four daughters have passed to the higher life, and five sons and two daugh- 
ters are now living. She had, also, at the time of her death twenty-eight 
grandchildren living, and four great-grandchildren. 

Brought up on the home farm, Alexander Hiatt, in common with his 
brothers and sisters, attended the district school winters, and during the 
days of his youth and young manhood was practically educated in the work 
of general husbandry. At that time the toils of the field were arduous and 
almost endless, the labor-saving machinery of today being unknown, and 
to successfully manage a farm required incessant industry, energetic perse- 
verance and good judgment. Proving himself possessed of all these re- 
quirements, Mr. Hiatt chose farming as his occupation, and, with the ex- 
ception of four years spent in the glass factory of Ball Brothers, manufac- 
turers of fruit jars, has been employed in agricultural pursuits. From the 
thrifty appearance of his farm it is evident that he takes pride in his busi- 
ness, his land being finely improved, and amply supplied with all the acces- 
sories of a first-class estate. 

j\lr. Hiatt married, October 4, 1883, Sarah A. DeLong. who was born 
March 16, 1865, in Washington township, Delaware county, a daughter of 
the late Chauncey DeLong. Mr. DeLong was born February i, 1831, in 
r)hio. As a young man he came to Indiana, located in Delaware county, 
where he took up land in pioneer days, and from that time until his death, 
December 14, 1879, was engaged in tilling the soil. Fie was a man of much 
worth, a patriotic and loyal citizen, and during the Civil war served as a 
.soldier, valiantly performing his duty in camp and field. His second wife, 
whose maiden name was Sarah Ann Hayden, was born in this county Janu- 
ary 18, 1837, and here spent her life, passing away January i, 1880. She 
bore him five children, four of whom are living, namely : Sarah A., wife of 
Mr. Hiatt; Minnie, Ollie and George. By his first wife, Margaret Hiatt, 
who was born in Ohio and died in Indiana, Mr. DeLong had five children 
also, and of these four survive, as follows : Orson, Frances, Samantha and 
John. Mr. and Mrs. Hiatt are the parents of four children, namely: Minnie, 
wife of Thornton E. Hadden ; Charles F., Flossie V. and Reba M. Politi- 
cally Mr. Hiatt is a stanch Republican and fraternally he was a charter mem- 
ber of Muncie Tribe, No. 144, I. O. R. M., and now belongs to Caux Tribe, 
No. 123, I. O. R. M., of Gaston. 

J.\MES A. Rector. Prominent among the substantial, practical and 
progressive agriculturists of Harrison township is James A. Rector, who by 
his own efforts has become owner of one of the most desirable farming 
estates to be found in this section of the country. A native of Delaware 
county, he was born in Perry township, March 6, 1852, a son of Arthur and 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 893 

Mary (Cary) Rector. Further parental and ancestral history may be found 
elsewhere in this work, in connection with the sketch of Arthur Rector. 

As a boy, while working with his father, James A. Rector became fa- 
miliar with all the hard labor connected with the clearing and improving of 
heavily timbered land. At this he worked during the summer seasons, while 
in winter he attended the district school, the longest term that he ever regu- 
larly attended having been one of four months. When twenty-two years 
old he began the battle of life for himself, taking charge of thirty acres of 
his father's farm. He planted two acres of potatoes, devoting the remainder 
to corn, and one-third of all he raised belonged to him, while his father had 
two-thirds. His father gave him a colt, and he bought another, and the 
following year he carried on forty acres of land. In 1875 ^Ir- Rector bought 
forty acres of his present farm, moved into the log cabin that stood upon it, 
and continued his agricultural labors. In 1880 he added to his original tract 
by the purchase of twenty acres of land, and in 1882 bought an additional 
twenty acres, his purchases showing the good success with which he had 
met as a tiller of the soil. In 1902 he erected the fine house which he now 
occupies, this with the other substantial improvements which he has made 
upon the place rendering it one of the most valuable and attractive of any 
in Harrison township. 

Mr. Rector married, December 30, 1873, Cordelia J. Cary, who was 
born in Perry township, Delaware county, October 29, 1855. Her father, 
John W. Cary, came to Delaware county from Ohio, where he was born, in 
early manhood, being a pioneer settler of this section of the state. He 
clea;red a farm from the wilderness, and also worked at his trade of a stone- 
mason and manufactured brick to some extent. He was a man of versatile 
talents, possessing great mechanical ability, and while working at his trade 
took contracts and erected many buildings in this county, including among 
others several school houses and also the church at Philadelphia, Hancock 
county. He was a man of sterling integrity, a member of the United 
Brethren church from his boyhood, and in politics was a Republican. He 
married Elizabeth Hutchins, who was born in Delaware county. Eight 
children were born to them, seven of whom are living, namely : Cordelia, 
J., wife of Mr. Rector; John, who married Stella Rector; Charles, who mar- 
ried Alta Chalfant ; Franklin, who married Sarah Backsley ; Cory, wife of 
George Benadum; Samuel, who married Ota McCreery; and Hester, wife 
of Walter Bryan. Neither Mr. or Mrs. Cary are living, he having passed 
to the life beyond in October, 1888, aged fifty-two years, and Mrs. Cary, 
who survived him, having died August 3, 1898, aged sixty-two years. Of 
the union of Mr. and Mrs. Rector ten children have been born, namely : Ida 
F., wife of Edmund Rowlett; Edna P., wife of John T. Clark; Dorsy C, 
who married Edith Vanmeter ; Curtis V., who married Bessie Jenning ; 
Dott E., wife of William McCreery ; Opal B. ; Chad ; Bertha B., who died 
at the age of twelve years ; Glennie, who died at the age of six years ; and 
Virgal, who died at the age of four years. In hearty sympathy with every 



894 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 

practical effort made to promote and advance the welfare of town or county, 
Mr. Rector never shirks the responsibilities of office, and for eight years 
has served as supervisor. Politically he is a firm adherent of the Republican 
party. Religiously he is a member of the United Brethren church, as is 
also his wife, and is very active in the organizati.:.n, in 1S91 joining the Con- 
ference, and in 1894 being ordained as minister. 

Arthur Rector. The life history of Arthur Rector is closely identified 
with the history of Delaware county, which has been his home for three score 
years and ten. When he was but a little lad of ten years his parents with 
their family came from Ohio to Delaware county, Indiana, making the jour- 
ney with team and wagon, and throughout the years which have since come 
and gone he has been closely allied with the interests and upbuilding of the 
count}'. 

Mr. Rector was born in Clark county, Ohio, near Northampton, June 
12, 1827, a son of Jonathan and Mary (Downing) Rector, both of whom 
were also born in Clark county. There they were married, and their union 
was blessed with eleven children, but only two of this large number are now 
living, Arthur, the eldest of the eleven children, and Eliza, who has been 
three times married, but her husbands are all now deceased and she is living 
in Oklahoma. About 1837 Jonathan Rector came with his wife and children 
to Delaware county, and as above stated located seven miles southeast of 
jMuncie, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in the 
wilderness, his nearest neighbors in those early days being the Indians and 
wild animals. The first home of the family was a little log cabin, but this 
in time gave place to a modern frame residence, the first frame house of the 
locality, but Mr. Rector later sold this homestead and purchased the farm 
where his son Arthur now lives. There he spent the remainder of his life 
and died at the age of seventy-four years. He inscribed his name high 
on the roll of Delaware county's pioneers, and his name is honored and 
revered as one of its foremost founders. He was a member of the United 
Brethren church, and politically was a Jeft'erson Democrat until he cast his 
vote for John C. Fremont and the Republican party. Mrs. Rector died at 
the age of seventy-four years. 

The boyhood days of Arthur Rector were spent with his father on the 
home farm, assisting in its clearing and cultivation and at the same time 
pursuing his educational training in the district schools. The first work 
which he performed after his marriage was the splitting of three thousand 
fence rails, receiving in compensation twenty-five cents a hundred, and at 
the time of his marriage his cash capital consisted of but fifty cents, his 
possessions now representing earnest and unceasing labor. After working 
for others about four or five years he purchased forty acres of timber land, 
erecting in the dense woods a little log cabin of the most primitive kind. 
Its furnishings were equally as crude, and its first bedstead was built by 
boring holes in the side of the cabin, in which were inserted poles with 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 895 

uprights, while stripped hickory ehn was tied across the poles to support 
the straw mattress. The farm was located in Perry township, and with 
the passing years he added to his original purchase until he became the 
owner of one hundred and sixty acres, which he sold in 1882 for eight 
thousand dollars. Coming thence to Harrison township he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, later adding sixty acres thereto, thus 
making him the owner of two hundred and twenty acres. In 1883 he 
erected the pleasant and commodious residence which now adorns the 
homestead. In 1906 he laid aside the cares of an active business life and 
is now living retired. In 1862 Mr. Rector entered the ministry of the 
United Brethren in Christ, and has ever since been an active laborer in 
the cause of Christianity. During twenty-seven years he traveled a circuit 
in the interests of his church. His first presidential vote was cast for 
jMartin Van Buren, and since then he has supported the principles of the 
Republican party. 

On the 3d of December, 1846, Mr. Rector married Mary Cary, who 
was born in Sidney, Ohio, March 7, 1S31, a daughter of William and 
Hannah (Jackson) Cary, and her death occurred on the 25th of July, 1903, 
after becoming the mother of eleven children, the nine now living being 
Charles W., Marcus C, James, Mary E., Barbara C, Annis, John E., 
Elmetta F. and William A. Mr. Rector married for his second wife Mary 
Amanda Dines, who was born in Wayne county, Indiana, February 14, 
1842, a daughter of William and Rebecca (Wadman) Johnson, the former 
of whom w^as a native of Wayne county, Indiana, and the latter of Mary- 
land. Their deaths occurred, respectively, in 1842 and August 26, 1851, 
the mother being but twenty-eight years of age when death claimed her. 
Mrs. Rector is their only child, and she was first married to John L. Dine 
March 15, 1873. He was born in Wayne county, Indiana, October 28, 
1850, and died on the 27th of October, 1S90. One daughter, Elva R., was 
born of this union, and she died at the age of seventeen years, August 
20, 1892. 

W^iLLiAM H. Brown bears an honorable record for service in the Civil 
war and Delaware county also numbers him among her prominent agri- 
culturists and business men. He was bom in Clinton county, Ohio, March 
12, 1844. His father, Joseph S. Brown, claimed Pennsylvania as the 
commonwealth of his nativity, born March 20, 1819, but when a boy of 
fourteen years he accompanied his parents on their removal to Ohio. He 
continued as a fanner in that state until his removal with his family to 
Indiana in 1852, first purchasing forty acres of timber land in Harrison 
township, and in the little round log cabin which stood upon the land the 
family began their pioneer life in the Hoosier state. The country was 
then new and wild, without roads and the other improvements of the present 
day, but as the years grew apace and the country became more thickly 
settled conditions changed, and in the meantime Mr. Brown cleared his 



896 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

land and added forty acres to its boundaries, while in time the little log 
cabin gave place to a more commodious frame residence. There this Dela- 
ware county pioneer spent his remaining days and died on the 7th of 
March, 1905. He was a lifelong farmer and for a number of terms served 
his fellow townsmen as a supervisor. He upheld the principles of the 
Democratic party and was a member of the New Light Christian church 
for about thirty years. During his residence in Ohio, on the 8th of Sep- 
tember, 1841, Air. Brown married Mary (Jones) Taylor, who was born in 
Virginia August 20, 1809, and she died in Harrison township February 9, 
1891. She was twice married, first wedding James Taylor, by whom she 
had six children, and two are now living — Sarah, the widow of James 
Goodrich and a resident of Hartford City, and George W., who married 
Susan Clevenger. Of the three children born to Mr. and Airs. Brown 
two are now living, \Villiam H., the subject of this review, and Eliza Jane, 
the wife of \V. T. Downing, of Harrison township. 

William H. Brown was but a lad of eight years when the family home 
was established in Delaware count}-, and during his boyhood days he 
assisted his father in the work of the home farm, attending school during 
the winter months. In his eighteenth year, on the ist of August, 1863, 
he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment of 
Indiana \'oIunteers, for six months, and was discharged at Indianapolis, 
Indiana, March i, 1864. Re-enlisting in Company D, Sixteenth Regiment 
of Mounted Infantry, October 21, 1863, he was later transferred to Company 
I, Thirteenth Regiment of Indiana Cavalry, October 24, 1864, and was dis- 
charged at Jackson, Mississippi, October 2^^, 1865, by reason of the expira- 
tion of his term of service. During his military career he participated in the 
battles of Walker's Ford, Blue Spring, Greenville and in many skirmishes, 
and after his return from the war he resumed his agricultural labors and 
soon located on the farm where he now resides in Harrison township, promi- 
nently engaged in general farming and stock raising. In 1897 he remodeled 
his residence and his homestead is now one of the best in the locality. 

On November 13, 1871, Mr. Brown married Miss Rachel M. Coft'en, 
who was born in Harrison township, Delaware county, September 13, 1849, 
a daughter of Isaac and Mary (Reed) Coffen. The father was bom in 
Fayette county, Indiana, November 21, 1812, from whence he removed to 
Delaware county, Indiana, in 1845 or 1846, purchasing land from his father, 
Samuel Coffen, in Harrison township. This land had been formerly entered 
from the government. The little log cabin in which Mr. Coffen first made 
his home in Harrison township was later replaced by a frame residence, 
and there his death occurred at the age of seventy-eight years. His entire 
business career was devoted to agricultural pursuits, his political affiliations 
were with the Whig and Republican parties, and he was a member of the 
United Brethren church. Mrs. Coffen, who bore the maiden name of 
Mary Reed, and was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, January 10, 1813, died on 
the 15th of October, 1892. They were married March 12, 1847, and became 





1^t 




-^y(L 



Hi'STORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY S09 

the parents of five children, of whom two are now Hving — William H. and 
Mrs. Brow'n. Four children have been born to j\lr. and Mrs. Brown: 
]\Iary A., the wife of James jMcCreery ; Martha S., the wife of George 
Stinson ; Arthur, who married Susan Benadum ; and Ralph. The Repub- 
lican party receives Air. Brown's active support and cooperation, and he has 
membership relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Grand Army Post in Gaston. He and his wife are members of the United 
Brethren church. 

John McKnight Bloss, deceased, patriot and educator of national 
reputation, was a native of Indiana, born in Washington county, near New 
Philadelphia, on the 21st of January, 1839, and his death occurred April 26, 
1905, at his late home in Hamilton township, Delaware county, Indiana. 
He was the only son of Isaac Scott and Agnes (McKnight) Bloss, but he 
had two sisters, Elizabeth J. and Margaret A., and also four half-brothers 
and two half-sisters by the father's second marriage. In tracing the lineage 
of Mr. Bloss it is found that the progenitor of the family in America was 
Edmund Bloss, who came from England about 1634, and was one of the 
founders of Watertown, Massachusetts. He had a son, Richard, the father 
of Richard, Jr., and the last named was the father of Samuel, who had a 
son Samuel, and he became the father of Dorman Bloss, the grandfather of 
John M. Bloss. Dorman Bloss and his son Isaac were pioneers of 
Washington county, Indiana. ' 

In his youth John M. Bloss assisted his father on the farm and in the 
tannery, and was permitted to spend a few months each year attending 
the early pioneer schools, which did not afford the best of educational 
advantages, but with indomitable energy and courage he applied himself 
to his books, making his own way so rapidly that at the age of sixteen we 
find him teaching, beginning at that early age the work of his hfe. In 
the year of 1854 he entered upon his college course and six years of his time 
were spent at Hanover, teaching his way when necessary to defray expenses 
in college. He graduated in i860 with honors, receiving the degree of 
A. B., and at once entered upon the regular work of his life as principal 
of the public school at Livonia, Indiana. 

Soon after Fort Sumter was fired upon by the South young Bloss 
tendered his services with other youths of Livonia to Governor Morton, 
who could not accept their services for the reason that the state's quota had 
already been more than filled. However, in the following summer he 
again tendered his services in the defense of the Union and was accepted. 
He enlisted as a private in Company F, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, and was sworn in on the 9th day of August, 1861. His regi- 
ment was sent directly to the Potomac and placed in McClellan's army. 
In the dreadful conflict that followed between the states young Bloss took 
part in the battles of Ball's Bluff, Winchester, Bull Run, Antietam, Chan- 
cellorsville, Gettysburg, Resaca and others. After the battle of Antietam 



900 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

he was made first lieutenant of his company, and six months later was placed 
in command of the first division, Twelfth Army Pioneer Corps. After this 
he was for a time inspector on General Ruger's stafT, and on the 12th of 
May, 1864, he was promoted to the captaincy of his company, which went 
west under Hooker and took part in the engagements at Resaca and Atlanta. 
While in the ser\-ice Captain Bloss was wounded four times, once each at 
the engagements of Antietam, Winchester, Chancellorsville and Resaca, 
the last time so seriously that he was compelled to resign and return home. 
His resignation was dated October 17, 1864, and thus it is seen that he 
served nearly through the war, having been exposed to fire in no less than 
fifteen engagements. 

The most noted event in the military career of Captain Bloss was the 
finding of the "Gen. Lee's Special Order No. 191," or Lee's Lost Dispatch. 
In this dispatch General Lee directed General D. H. Hill to move from 
Frederick to South Mountain, and informing him that General Stonewall 
Jackson had been sent to capture Harper's Ferry, also disclosing General 
Lee's plans in the Maryland raid. General Lee had designed not only to 
hold "heroic }ilaryland," but also plant the war in the "wheat fields" of 
Pennsylvania and take Washington city. The entire plan was drawn out 
in detail and a copy given to each of his corps commanders, one of which 
was General D. H. Hill, who was so displeased with the place given him in 
the plans that in a fit of ugly temper he threw the dispatch on the ground, 
c\'en overlooking two cigars contained in the envelope, and of cigars, too, 
he was very fond. This dispatch was written on the 12th of September 
and found on the following day. Sergeant Bloss was in command of a 
skirmish line in the advance upon Frederick, and as a short pause in the 
march was ordered the soldier boys threw themselves down on the ground 
for rest. It was about nine o'clock in the morning of a fair day, and nothing 
indicated that only a few hours before the command of General Hill had 
left the scene in obedience to General Lee's orders. Sergeant Bloss noticed 
at the feet of a comrade some papers and said, "What is that paper?" "An 
envelope," was the reply. "Eland it to me," said the sergeant. Taking it, 
the soldier noticed the two enclosed cigars and playfully divided them, but 
to Bloss he handed the envelope containing General Lee's dispatch. Ser- 
geant Bloss learning its import knew that it was a valuable find and at 
once forwarded it to General McClellan, who by these means became aware 
that General Hill alone was in his front and General Jackson was advancing 
on Harper's Ferry. He accordingly pushed on to South Mountain, defeated 
Hill and drove him across Antietam, and then, unfortunately, instead of 
pushing forward, waited two days for Lee to collect his forces, as the "lost 
order" showed he would do. This order was used as one of the evidences 
against General McClellan during his investigation by Congress and was 
probablv the cause of his being removed froiu the command of the Potomac, 
while General Hill was severely denounced throughout the south. 

The columns of the press and pages of history have been devoted to 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY . 901 

this lost dispatch, and at one time Harper Brothers published an authentic 
stor}- of its finding, crediting Private Mitchell for finding it, but the story 
as here told is authenticated not only by Mr. Bloss, but by several trust- 
worthy affidavits now in possession of Mr. Bloss' widow. In this regard, 
while there can be no reasonable doubt as to who found the "Lost Dis- 
patch," the writer, after having made full investigation, would observe that 
had Private Mitchell been the actual finder of the dispatch, credit is due 
Mr. Bloss for interpreting its import and forwarding it to his chief 
commander. 

Official Documents in the Case. 
Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, September 9, 1S6-. 
Special Orders, 

No. 191. 

The armr -n-ill resume its march tomorrow, taking the Hagerstown road. General 
Jackson's command will form the advance, and, after passing Middletown, with 
such portion as he may select, take the route towaid Sharpsburg, cross the Potomac 
at the most convenient point, and, by Friday night, take possession of the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad, capture such of the enemy as may be at Martinsburg, and intercept 
such as may attempt to escape from Harper's Ferry. 

General Longstreet's command will pursue the same road as far as Boons- 
borough, where it will halt with the reserve, supply, and baggage trains of the army. 

General lIcLaws, with his own division and that of General E. H. Anderson, 
will follow General Longstreet. On reaching Middletown he will take the route to 
Harper's Ferry, and by Friday morning possess himself of the Maryland Heights, 
and endeavor to capture the enemy at Harper's Ferry and vicinity. 

General Walker, with his division, after accomplishing the object in which he is 
now engaged, will cross the Potomac at Cheek's Ford, ascend its right bank to 
Lovettsville, take possession of Loudoun Heights, if practicable, by Friday morning. 
Keys' Ford on his left, and the road between the end of the mountain and the 
Potomac on his right. He will, as far as practicable, cooperate with General McLaws 
and General Jackson in intercepting the retreat of the enemy. 

General D. H. Hill's division will form the rear guard of the army, pursuing 
the road taken by the main body. The reserve artillery, ordnance, supply trains, 
&c., will precede General Hill. 

General Stuart will detach a squadron of cavalry to accompany the commands 
of Generals Longstreet, Jackson, and McLaws, and with the main body of the 
cavalry will cover the route of the army and bring up all stragglers that may have 
been left behind. 

The commands of General Jackson, McLaws, and Walker, after accomplishing 
the objects for which they have been detached, will join the main body of the army 
at Boonsborough or Hagerstown. 

Each regiment on the march will habitually carry its axes in the regimental 
ordnance wagons, for use of the men at their encampments to procure wood, &c. 

B. H. CHILTON, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 

MAJ. GEN. D. H. HILL, 
Commanding Division. 

Lee 's Special Order, No. 191. 

As a member of Co. A. 27th Eegt — Indiana Volunteers I wish to make a state- 
ment about the finding of The Lost Dispatcher "Lee's Special Order No — 191" 
found near Fredrick Maryland, Sept. the 13th, 1862. 

That morning Company "F" and Company "A" of the 27th, were on the 
skirmish line. John M. Bloss was then the first or Ordily Seargeant" of Company 
"F". We moved forward but discovered no enemy and halted near the citj' limits 
in a meadow; it was a warm morning and when we halted we threw ourselves on 
the groumi to rest. I was one of the smallest of Company "A" and my position in 
the ranks of the Company formation was on the extreme left and this would place 
me immediately at the extreme right of Company "F" and very near the position 
of "Ordily Seargeant" Bloss of Company "F''. 

We were in the position indicated when my attention was called to an envelope 
which was picked up near me. I saw Seargeant Bloss with the envelope in his 
hand drawing a paper or papers out of it, he then and there read the contents of the 



902 . HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

papers aloiul to us. of what proved to bo Lee's Special onler Xo — Iftl. Sergeant 
Bloss remarkeil "This is of great importanee if genuine,'' he then started to the 
rear with the papers in his hand, there was no one with him when he left the Com- 
pany to take the order to the officers. I distinctly remember seeing Bloss hand the 
envelope to Col. Colgrave who drew out the papers and then went through the 
motion of reading them; Col. Colgrave then mounted his horse and disappeared from 
my sight. At no time did I see anyone have the envelope or papers in his hands 
except Bloss until I saw him place them in the hands of Col. Colgrave. 

My position of the left of Company "A" and the position of Sergeant Bloss on 
the right of "F" brought us near together and when we halted we were not more 
than four or five feet apart, and when he began to read aloud those who were near 
all clustered about him. WILLIAM H. HOSTETTER. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this the IS dav of December 1906. 

SALATHIEL I. GILLAM, Notary Public. 

A STATEMENT IN REGARD TO LEE'S "LOST DISPATCH." 
Special Order No. 191. 

I wish to make the following statement in regard to the celebrated lost dispatch. 
Special Order, No. 191, found near Frederick City, Maryland, September 13, 1S62. 
I was a private soldier in Company "F", 27th. Indiana volunteers. On the morning 
of September 13, 1862, about nine" o 'clock, Co. A and Co. F. were sent forward as a 
skirmish line near the city of Frederick, our Company being in charge of John M. 
Bloss, who at that time was Ordily Sergeant of the Company. We advanced across 
a field to where there had been a fence, but at that time only a row of weeds, grass 
and some small shrubs or buslies. The men lay down. Sergeant Bloss at the head of 
the Company, Barton W. Mitchell next to Bloss, and on Bloss 's left; I next to 
Mitchell, and so on down the line. Just after we lay down I saw a large envelope 
to my left, lying in the grass and weeds, and was in the act of reaching for it with 
my left hand when at the same moment Bloss said "What is that paper?" I had 
got the package in my hands by this time and read the address, "Gen. D. H. Hill. 
Commanding," etc. Bloss said "Hand it to me." As I passed the paper to him 
over Mitchell's body, two or three cigars fell out of the package. Mitchell picked up 
one of the cigars and said "I know what this is." Bloss took the package and 
took the order out of the envelope and read it, or a part of it aloud, and remarked 
"Boys this is an important matter (or important paper) if genuine. I will take it 
to Captain Kopp. " Bloss went to the rear with the order, to where Captain Kopp 
was, and later on I saw him and Captain Kopp talking to Col. Colgrave. 

I make this statement, feeling that Captain John M. Bloss, has not had the 
recognition in this matter that is due him. B. F. Mitchell did not see the paper 
Until after Bloss spoke to me about it, and did not have it in his hands, and did not 
accompany Bloss to the rear when Bloss took it to Captain Kopp. Bloss being in 
iharge of our Company on the line, none of the men could retire to the rear where 
Captain Kopp or Col. Colgrave were, without Bloss 's permission. 

DANIEL B. VANCE. 
Brownstown, Indiana. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15 day of September 190.5. 

M. H. PEACOCK, 

Notary Public. 

My Commission will expire April 19, 1906. 

As Stated above Captain Bloss on accoitnt of a disabling wound received 
at Resaca resigned and returned to his home. In the winter of 1864 he 
pursued post-graduate courses, and the next year taught in New Phila- 
delphia. His rise in the profession of teaching was rapid. For four years 
he was principal of the academy at Orleans, Indiana, and then, 1870, was 
chosen principal of the Female High School at New Albany, Indiana. 
While at Orleans as principal of the academy there Mr. Bloss also ser\'ed 
for three years as county superintendent of schools of Orange county. 
His stay at New Albany covered a period of five years, and then, in 1875, 
he was advanced to the superintendency of the city schools of Evansvilie, 
the second largest citv in Indiana, and by reason of whicli, mulor the school 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 903 

law, Mr. Bloss became a member of the state board of education. He 
remained at the head of the city schools of Evansville for five years, and in 
1880 became the Republican nominee for the office of state superintendent 
of public instruction, and was elected to the office. He held the position for 
two years, or one term, was renominated by his political party as its candi- 
date for the office, but with all his colleagues shared the defeat of his party 
at the polls in 1882. At the expiration of his tenn of office Mr. Bloss was 
called to the superintendency of the city schools of Muncie, Indiana, which 
position he held from 1883 to 1886. In the latter year he was chosen 
superintendent of the city schools of Topeka, Kansas, where he remained 
five years, and was then made president of the State Agricultural College 
of Oregon at Corvallis. There he remained until 1896, when on account 
of failing health he resigned and returned to Delaware count}-, Indiana, 
where he spent the remainder of his days on a farm in Hamilton township. 

The thirty-second report of the superintendent of public instruction, 
state of Indiana, dated 1884, states that Mr. Bloss at the head of the state 
department displayed high ability in every phase of his work, and from 
that same report we take the following excerpt: 

"For years he had been an eminent and practical worker in the insti- 
tute. On entering the office of state superintendent of public instruction 
he gave direction to his work throughout the state by issuing an outline for 
institute work or instruction, the first in this state. This increased the 
value of institute work beyond measure. The financial statistics of the 
department received the most careful and patient attention. Many needed 
reforms were inaugurated, and a system of issuing and distributing lists 
of questions for teachers' licenses was adopted, by means of which was 
weeded out the evil of selling the list to applicants for teachers' licenses. 

"During the term of Superintendent Bloss there w^as no great educa- 
tional exhibit, neither was there any material change in the school system, 
but everywhere was there growth and prosperity, and the department was 
administered to with justice, skill and magnanimity." 

The writer was a teacher in the public schools of Indiana at the time 
Mr. Bloss was superintendent of public instruction and remembers that he 
introduced questions for examining candidates for teachers which called 
for the diacritical marking of words. This was altogether new and led to a 
special study of diacritical markings to the extent that the dictionary was in 
great demand and practically became a text book in the schools. I hold 
that in this way Mr. Bloss put in motion the influence that led to the use 
of school readers in which words were diacritically marked, and by reason 
of which the pronunciation of the Hoosier schoolmaster and his pupils has 
become wonderfully improved. 

Mr. Bloss was an educator of national reputation and shared the honors 
of being the district school teacher, the village principal, city superintendent 
of schools in three large cities, president of a state college, county super- 
intendent of schools and state superintendent of public instruction, all of 



904 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

which positions he filled with remarkable ability. On account of failing 
health he retired but he could not remain idle. So while residing on his 
farm in Hamilton township there came to him another honor in his election 
to the office of township trustee of his township. While filling this position 
he advanced many ideas which have done much to make a better adminis- 
tration of township affairs in Indiana. During the time he was president 
of the state township trustees for one term and was particularly well and 
favorably known among the trustees. He was the father of the consoli- 
dated school system in Hamilton township, a plan which has since been 
adopted in many townships of the county. While trustee of Hamilton 
township he built at Royerton a handsome and modern school building, 
and here the pupils of the township under the consolidated system have all 
the advantages of an education from the primary work to high school work. 
A[r. Bloss was the primal factor in establishing the township high school 
on a successful basis. The object of this concentration of the township 
schools into one centralized building and school was to afford or give all 
pupils in the township the same curriculum of study as in the city schools 
of Indianapolis, !Muncie or any city in the state of more than minor popu- 
lation. This plan of centralizing the township schools is being carried out 
in a number of the counties in the state of Indiana. 

During his term the public roads were so improved that not a mile of 
unimproved roads are to be found in the township. In this township he 
developed and improved one of the best farms of Delaware county. He 
was never idle and his life was in the advance of the time, for with much 
wisdom he foresaw the future and anticipating it so planned for the con- 
stantly new changes as they came and was prepared for them. 

In 1S65 Mr. Bloss married Miss Emma McPheeters, a daughter of 
Colonel AlcPheeters, of Livonia, Indiana. Two children were the fruit of 
this marriage: William H., of Indianapolis; and Minnie, the wife of 
Mr. Dumont Lotz, of Royerton, Indiana. While Professor Bloss was 
superintendent of schools at Topeka. Kansas, his wife died there, and in 
1893 he married Miss Mary A. Woods, who was a teacher in the Topeka 
schools, and who survives him, residing on the homestead in Hamilton 
township. Politically Professor Bloss was a supporter of the men and 
measures of the Republican party. He was a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic and the Loyal Legion. He was a thirty-second degree 
Mason and was given burial according to the rites of the JMasonic order. 

First of all John M. Bloss was a patriot who fought for his country. 
He was an educator of prominence and worth, not only in his native state, 
but also in others. Broad in his views, a scholar, possessed of high domestic 
virtues and kindness, and fair and just, he was beloved in his own family 
and esteemed by all who were fortunate to have known him. He may well 
be termed a Christian warrior, for he fought to maintain morality, and 
though always active, honored and in the forefront of life, discharging his 
duties with fitting zeal, he was modest and unostentatious. The following 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 



907 



clipping from a newspaper editorial at the time of his death well illustrates 
the esteem paid him by his friends and the public : 

"The many warm friends he made in many localities, the neighbors 
he fraternized with, the Masonic brethren he knew in lodge room the 
soldiers he fought with, the family he left with a noble heritage, all classes 
of people, including thousands of young people whom he taught and 
tramed in habits of beauty and honor— all mourn his death and pay tribute 
to his memory. Rest in peace, John M. Bloss." 

John Snider, Sr. During many years the Snider family have been 
closely associated with the progress and development of Delaware countv, 
and none of her citizens have manifested greater public spirit or more 
earnest interest in the reduction of the country from a wilderness to a 
fertile land of fine farms, with its flourishing towns and settlements One 
of Its leading representatives, John Snider, Sr., was born in Miami county 
Ohio, April 25, 1829, his parents being Joseph and Catherine ( Studebaker)' 
Snider, both natives of Pennsylvania. They were also married in the state 
of their nativity and became the parents of twelve children, eight sons and 
four daughters, but only three are now living, namely: Alexander John 
and Abraham. In the fall of 1835 Air. Joseph Snider drove across the 
country with horses to Union township, Delaware county, Indiana, entering 
-ighty acres of land in what was then a dense wilderness, and later on he 
added a tract of forty acres to his original purchase, in the meantime clearing 
his land and placing his fields under an excellent state of cultivation. In 
1844, with the brick of his own manufacture, he erected the residence which 
still stands upon this old homestead, and many other substantial improve- 
ments assist in making it the valuable estate which it now is. For many 
years Mr. Snider served in the office of school director, and in the earlv 
days he assisted in making the roads through the timber. He was also 
one of the organizers of the German Baptist Brethren church, of which he 
was one of the leaders for many years, and his political affiliations were 
with the Whigs. The death of this honored old Delaware county pioneer 
occurred on his homestead near Eaton, and his wife was called to the home 
beyond when she had reached the age of seventy-five years. 

When a little lad of six years, in 1835, Mr. Snider came with his parents 
to Indiana, and until his twenty-first .war he remained with his parents 
and assisted in the work of the home farm. After his marriage he estab- 
lished his home on eighty acres of timber land, but later he received seventy- 
two acres of his father-in-law's, Mr. Cunkle, estate, and he is now the 
owner of one hundred and sixty acres of fertile and well improved land 
His first residence was a little log cabin, and this primitive dwelling still 
stands as a mute reminder of the pioneer's early life in Delaware county. 
In 1868 he erected the pleasant and commodious residence in which he now 
makes his home. During his boyhood days Mr. Snider witnessed the life 
of a frontier settler in all its phases, wild game, such as deer, bear and wild 



90S HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

turkey, being then plentiful, and his father killed many a deer in this com- 
munity. During many years Mr. Snider was the incumbent of the office 
of school director, the cause of education always finding in him a warm 
and helpful friend, and he is a stanch Republican in his political affiliations, 
voting for John C. Fremont. Since 1854 he has been a valued and worthy 
member of the Brethren church, now the German Baptist, and since 1855 
he has served as one of its deacons, he and his brother being the two oldest 
members of this church now living. 

On the 28th of August, 1854, Mr. Snider married ^ilargaret Cunkle, 
whose death occurred on the loth of July, 1893, and of the four children 
born of this union two are now living : William, who married Ellen Isgregg 
and lives in California ; and Mary, the wife of Samuel Dulinsky. On the 
25th of December, 1894, Mr. Snider married Mrs. Man,- J. Cartright, who 
was born in Mason county, Kentucky, January 14, 1839, a daughter of 
John and Elizabeth (Dodson) Craig. She was first married to Charles 
Cartright, who was born in North Carolina April 22, 183 1, and died June 3, 
1894. They were married on the 14th of February, 1856, and became the 
parents of five children, of whom two are now living: Francis, who mar- 
ried Rosa Gump and is living in California; and Alice, the wife of James 
Hickman. Mr. Snider has four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, 
while ]Mrs. Snider has six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 
They have just returned from a trip to California, visiting their children, 
and en route they stopped at Los Angeles and San Francisco, passed 
through Grand Canon and around Mount Hebron by stage, and returned via 
Portland, Seattle. Tacoma, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Peoria. 

Arthur L. Lf.wellen. In the history of the business interests of 
L'nion township the name of Arthur L. Lewellen cannot be omitted, for 
through a number of years he has been one of the leading agriculturists of 
the community, progressive, enterprising and persevering. His birth 
occurred in Smithfield, Liberty township, Delaware county, July 28, i860, 
a son of Zerah M. and Sarah Ann (Truitt) Lewellen. The father was born 
in West Virginia, but when a little lad of nine years he came with his 
parents, Philip and Mary Ann Lewellen, to Indiana, locating in the then 
wilderness of Liberty township, and in time he became a well known wagon- 
maker in Smithfield, following thai occupation in connection with Hubbard 
Feclder. He continued that vocation throughout his entire business career 
and in 1864 he purchased a farm near Smithfield, in Liberty township, 
which he operated in connection with his trade. Later he traded that 
property for a farm in Flarrison township, Delaware county, which con- 
tinuefl as his home until 1870, in that year trading his land for property 
in Iowa and moving to Eaton. He subsequently traded his Iowa farm for 
land near Eaton, where he resided for six years, while during the following 
two years he was engaged in the farm implement business in Spiceland, 
Indiana, and at the close of that period removed to Selnia, this state, which 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 909 

continued as his place of residence until his removal to Shideler. Here he 
spent the remainder of his busy and useful life, passing to the home beyond 
on the 2d of February, 1900, when seventy-one years of age. He served 
as the assessor of Union township, was a life-long member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and held membership relations with the Masonic order. 
He became a member of that fraternity at Selma, from which he was 
demitted to the Muncie lodge, and he received the honors of a Alasonic 
burial. He was identified with the Republican party. Mrs. Lewellen 
was born in Delaware county, Indiana, and her death occurred on the 4th of 
June, 1893, when she had reached the age of sixty-two years, three months 
and twenty-six days, dying at Selma. Of the seven children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Lewellen five are now living: John O., who married Hulda E. 
Crampton and resides in Muncie ; Mary E., the wife of William Bosman, of 
Eaton; Arthur L., whose name introduces this review; Elizabeth, the wife 
of Tabor Allis, of Eaton ; and Emen,- W., who married Lena Cook, and is 
living in Detroit, Michigan, where with H. G. Elliott he is engaged in the 
drapery and carpet business. 

The early boyhood days of Arthur L. Lewellen were spent in assisting 
his father during the summers, while in the winter months he attended 
school, and when he had reached the age of twenty-two 3-ears he engaged 
in farming for himself in Niles township, where he remained about three 
years. During the following seven years he resided near Eaton, in Union 
township, while from the close of that time until in January, 1896, he made 
his home in Hamilton township, and then purchased his present farm in 
Union township. Throughout the period of his residence here he has been 
numbered among the leading agriculturists, and during the last ten years he 
has made a specialty of the raising of potatoes, having from eight to forty 
acres planted to that commodity each year, and he has raised as high as 
seven thousand bushels in a year. He was the first man in Delaware county 
to make the raising of potatoes a paying investment. He farms from seventy- 
five to eighty acres, and in 1904 he built the pleasant and commodious resi- 
dence which now adorns his valuable homestead. 

On the 1st of March, 1883, Mr, Lewellen was united in marriage to 
one of Delaware county's native daughters, Alena E. Modlin, whose birth 
occurred in Indiana on the 2d of March, 1863. Her father, David Modlin, 
born in Wayne county, Indiana, February 16, 1827, became a well known 
miller in Delaware county, Indiana, and he was a worthy member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. On the 27th of February, 1865, he enlisted 
for service in the Civil war, becoming a member of Company I, One Hun- 
dred and Forty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he received his 
honorable discharge on the 7th of August following at Harper's Ferry, by 
Special Order No. 11 of the war department. His death occurred in Union 
township, Delaware county, May 8, 1897. At the old homestead of her 
parents, .Adam and Arminda Kendall, in Delaware county, Mr. Modlin 
n\arried Celia Kendall, who was bom in Wayne county, Indiana, and her 



910 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

death occurred at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lewellen, June 22, 1904, 
when she had reached the age of seventy-two years. Four children were 
born to them, namely: Afelissa, the widow of Charles Heath and a resi- 
dent of Iowa; Rachel, who became the wife of Calwell Johnson, now- 
deceased, and she resides in McCowen, Indiana; Mary, who died when 
twenty-four years of age; and Alena, the wife-of Mr. Lewellen. Of the 
seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Lewellen six are now living ; Hattie 
M., Edna E., Bertha H., Mary R., Elsie L. and Eunice C. In his political 
affiliations Mr. Lewellen is a Prohibitionist, while fraternally he has mem- 
bership relations with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he is a 
valued and wortliy member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Samuel O. Burris, M. D., a practicing physician of Shideler, was born 
near Carlisle, Xicholas county, Kentucky, May 30, 1847, a son of James D. 
and Rebecca (Miller) Burris, natives, respectively, of Maryland and Penn- 
sylvania. The father, born in 1812, died in 1873, and the mother, whose 
birth occurred in 1818, passed away in death in 1878. Ten children were 
born to this couple, seven sons and three daughters, of whom seven are now 
living: Albert, who married Margaret Crull and is living in Grant county, 
Indiana ; John W., who is married and living in Kansas ; Samuel O., the 
subject of this review ; William, who married Allie Cook and is living in 
Waynetown, Montgomery county, Indiana ; Isaac, who married Nancy 
Jones; George; and Rachel, the wife of Jacob Kindall, living in Chicago. 
Air. Burris, the father, removed from Kentucky, where he had followed 
agricultural pursuits, to Huntington county, Indiana, in 1862, and there he 
spent the remaining years of his life, becoming one of the county's promi- 
nent and influential citizens, and at one time serving in the office of town- 
ship trustee. He was a member of the United Brethren church in Ken- 
tucky, but after his removal to Indiana he joined the New Light 
denomination. 

Dr. Samuel O. Burris received his professional training in the Indian- 
apolis Medical College, where he completed the course and graduated with 
the class of 1880. In the spring of the same year he located for practice 
in Clinton county, Indiana, but after a residence there of six years he trans- 
ferred the scene of his operations to Terre Haute, this being in the year 
of 1886, and he continued in practice in that city until 1902. He then 
located in Marion, Grant county, this state, where he enjoyed a large and 
lucrative practice until his removal to Shideler in 1907. He is a member 
of Monatcha Tribe, No. 183, at Terre Haute. 

On the i8th of November, 1882, Dr. Burris married Miss Mattie 
Black, who was born in Kentucky October 8, 1863, and her death occurred 
on the 5th of May, 1903. She was the daughter of Mathew D. and Zerelda 
(Berry) Black, both also natives of the Blue Grass state of Kentucky. 
Of their family of ten chiUlren, seven sons and three daughters, all are 
now deceased, with the exception of one son, William R., who is a ministei 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUXTY 911 

in the Christian church in Chicago. Mr. Mathew D. Black was a promi- 
nent farmer in Putnam county, Indiana, from whence he removed to Green 
Castle, Indiana, and after a residence there of a number of years located 
in Terre Haute, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was a 
member of Green Castle Lodge, A. F. & A. M., the Chapter, R. A. M., and 
the Commandery, K. T., at Indianapolis, and also of the Consistory of that 
city, attaining to the thirty-second degree in Masonry. Two children were 
born to Dr. and Mrs. Burris, but the first born, Frank, died at the age of 
twenty-two years. The younger son, Dayton A., a graduate of the 
Polytechnic College of Terre Haute, is a resident of that city. 

Dr. Burris holds and merits a prominent place in the professional circles 
of Delaware county and he also bears an honorable war record, having 
enlisted during the Civil war in Company I, One Hundred and Thirty- 
eighth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, and served his full term of enlist- 
ment. The Republican party receives his active support and cooperation. 

Samuel W. Stafford. An active, esteemed and thriving member of 
the agricultural community of Hamilton township, Samuel W. Stafiord is 
prosperously engaged in his independent vocation on section 5, his well 
improved and judiciously cultivated farm being a model one in its appoint- 
ments and equipments. A native of this township, he was born Januan,- 9, 
1852, a son of the late Thomas Stafford, Jr. His paternal grandfather, 
Thomas Stafford, Sr., was one of the early pioneers of Indiana, coming 
here from Ohio. The journey through the wilderness was made with 
teams, that being the most expeditious mode of traveling in those primitive 
days before the country was spanned by the network of railways that now 
render journeying so rapid and pleasant. Settling in the woods, the father 
cleared the land and was actively employed in tilling the soil the remainder 
of his years. 

Thomas Stafford, Jr., was born January i, 1819, in Clark county, Ohio, 
and died in Delaware county, Indiana. A child when he was brought here 
by his parents, he grew to manhood on the parental homestead, as a youth 
taking kindly to agricultural pursuits. Prudent and economical, he saved 
his earnings, and when ready to establish a household of his own purchased 
a tract of land that was still in its original wildness, cleared a space, and 
on it erected a log cabin as his first dwelling. As a farmer he succeeded 
beyond his most sanguine expectations, in course of time becoming the 
owner of four hundred acres of good land, which he had earned through 
his own sturdy efforts. He added to the size of his cabin by additional 
rooms and in it lived until his death. He was a man of honor and 
integrity, a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in 
politics a Whig. On January 20, 1846, he married Matilda J. Black, who 
was born in Clinton county, Ohio, and died on the home farm here. Of 
the five children born to them three survive, as follows : Sylvester, living 



912 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

in Muncie, married Clara Gerard; Joseph AL, of whom a brief sketch may 
be found elsewhere in this work ; and Samuel \\ . 

Brought up on die parental homestead, Samuel W. Stafford had such 
educational advantages as were afforded by the pioneer schools of his 
district, which he attended three months each winter. On attaining his 
majority his father bought him eighty acres of heavily timbered land, built 
a two-room frame house for a domicile, and he began his career as an inde- 
pendent farmer. Meeting with encouraging success in his labors, Mr. 
Stafford has added by purchase to his original acreage, and has now a 
finely improved farm of one hundred and twenty acres, all but twenty of 
wliich he has himself cleared from its pristine wildness. In 1904 2\lr. 
Stafford erected his present substantial frame residence, and is continuing 
his energetic labors as a tiller of the soil, carrying on general farming and 
stock raising with exceptionally good pecuniary results. 

Air. Stafford married first, in 187 1, Annie Flinn, who was born in this 
county, and here spent her entire life, dying in 1894. Her parents, James 
and Melissa (Taylor) Flinn, were born, bred and married in Aliami county, 
Ohio, from there coming to Indiana and locating in Union township as 
pioneers. Mr. Flinn was a man of much force of character, a Jettersonian 
Democrat in politics, and, wdth his wife, belonged to die Christian church. 
On January 6, 1898, Mr. Staft'ord married for his second wife Susan Oral 
Gable, who was born in Blackford county, Indiana, February 2, 1S62, a 
daughter of William H. Gable. Air. Gable was born in Pennsylvania 
eighty-two years ago and is now residing in Hartford City, Indiana, a 
strong and vigorous man for one of his years. He learned die trade of a 
cabinet maker when young, and followed it for a time in his native state. 
Of a daring and venturesome spirit, he started for California in 1844, going 
in a sailing vessel by way of the Isthmus of Panama. Arriving at his point 
of destination, he was engaged in mining until 1850, when he returned east- 
ward as far as Indiana. Two years later, in 1852, Mr. Gable located in 
Flartford city, his present place of residence, as a cabinet maker. In those 
early days he used to make coffins by hand from black walnut and had to 
go to Muncie to buy the linings for the coffins, oftentimes making the round 
trip on foot in twelve hours. He is now living retired from active pursuits', 
enjoying a well earned leisure from business cares and troubles. During 
the Civil war Air. Gable served valiantly in the Thirty-fourth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry. He was identified with the Whig party until 1856, 
when he joined the Republican ranks, and for many years he has been a 
valued member of the Alethodist Episcopal church. He is prominent in 
social organizations, belonging to both the Independent Order of Odd 
I'^Uovvs and to the Ancient Free and .Accepted Order of Alasons. 

Mr. Stafford has three children, all born of his first marriage, namely: 
Cora, wife of Frank AlcClain ; Harry, and Viola. He is a man of sterling 
qualities and has always enjoyed the fullest confidence and esteem of his 





y/ ^^^ j?7.^ 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY . 915 

neighbors and friends. In politics he is a Prohibitionist, and in religion 
is a member of the United Brethren church. 

James W. Arnold, M. D. The medical profession of Delaware county 
nunibers among its younger but most prominent members Dr. James W. 
Arnold, who has been an earnest and discriminating student and has gained 
distinction in the line of his chosen calling. He was -born at Valley Station, 
Jefferson county, Kentucky, September 23, 1873, a son of William Z. and 
Prudence (Moore) Arnold,' the father a native of Louisville, Kentucky, born 
in 1837, and the mother of JMoor's Hill, that state, born in 1845. Seven 
children were born to them, but only three are now living : Charles B., who 
is living in Illinois; Lillian A., the wife of Dr. Albert Arnold, of Louisville, 
Kentucky, and James W., the subject of this review. The father was a 
teacher in Eardstown Academy, of his native state, for many years, while 
later on he became a successful farmer and stock raiser, but at the present 
time is living retired, residing with his wife in Louisville, Kentucky. He is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and supports the Democratic 
party. 

Dr. Arnold received his literary training in the National Normal Uni- 
versity at Lebanon, Ohio, in which he graduated with the degrees of B. S. 
and B. E. with the class of 1899. He then matriculated in the Illinois 
Medical College at Chicago, where he completed the course and graduated 
with the class of 1903. Soon after this he came to Shideler, Indiana, where 
he has ever since been engaged in the practice of his chosen profession, and 
to keep abreast with the many new discoveries which are constantly being 
made in the science he has become a member of the Delaware County ^led- 
ical Association. 

Dr. Arnold married, October 21, 1902, Lillian E. Reasnor. who was 
born in Blackford county, Indiana, and her death occurred on the 14th of 
June, 1906. She was the daughter of John and Mahala (Jones) Reasnor, 
both also natives of the county of Blackford. The father, who was bom in 
1846, and now living on the old homestead on which he was born, became one 
of the most prominent farmers of Blackford county. He is a member of the 
Presb>terian church. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Reasnor: Alta, William, Nell, Fred, Earl, Homer and Benjamin, the last 
two being twins. To Dr. and Mrs. Arnold were born two sons, John L. and 
Charles. The doctor is a member of the Brethren church, and in political 
matters he casts his ballot in favor of the men and measures of the Demo- 
cratic party. 

Isaac H. Shideler. The name of Shideler is a familiar one to resi- 
dents of the northern half of Delaware county, Indiana, and the beautiful 
town of Shideler owes its name to William Shideler, the father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, who was a storekeeper for the Fort Wayne and Louis- 



916 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

ville Railroad in the northern part of Hamilton township. The town was 
founded about 1S71. 

William Shideler was born in ]Mianii county, Ohio, ]\Iay 8, 1S12, and 
came to Delaware county for the first time in 1834. Two years later he re- 
turned to Indiana with his family and entered eighty acres of timber land 
in the government land office. By energy and thrift he accumulated four 
hundred acres of fine farming land in that section and was known throughout 
the county as a man of honor and integrity. He served as trustee of his 
township for three terms, and was president and -superintendent of the Stude- 
baker turnpike from 1S67 until his death, which occurred on November 13, 
1872. 

William Shideler's wife was a Miss Sarah Little in her maiden days. 
She was born in Pennsylvania J\lay 12, 1812, and passed to her reward Oc- 
tober 28, 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Shideler were married in Miami county, Ohio, 
in December, 1834, and became the parents of thirteen children. Three of 
these died in infancy, while the remainder lived to become the heads of 
families. Five of these are now living, viz., Isaac H., Henry H., John S., 
Margaret E., wife of B. K. Burt, and Thomas. Both parents are sleeping 
their last sleep in the little graveyard at Granville. They were members of 
the Christian church at Granville, which society they helped to organize. 
Later Mr. Shideler assisted in the organization of the Eden Christian church 
near Shideler. 

Isaac H. Shideler was born on his father's farm in Hamilton township, 
July 7, 1839, and helped to clear the timber from the land and place it in con- 
dition for cultivation. When he reached his majority he struck out for him- 
self, and his first purchase of land was an eighty-acre tract on which was a 
small log cabin. This was replaced later by a more commodious structure 
of hewed logs, in which our subject and his family resided until 1867, when 
he constructed a neat and comfortable frame house. This was the family 
home until 1896, when Mr. Shideler purchased a beautiful residence in the 
town of Shideler, where he has since lived, retired from active business. 

On September 27, 1862, Mr. Shideler was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Lewis, who was born in Union township, October 9, 1843, and 
was a daughter of William Lewis, a pioneer settler in that section of the 
state. Mr. Lewis was born in Virginia, June 4, 1805, and died October 20, 
1865. His wife, Dora (Hedrick) Lewis, also a native of Virginia, was bom 
February 25, 1808, and died March 9, 1865. Of their thirteen children four 
are living: Julia Ann, Mar}- E., Mrs. Shideler and William H. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shideler are the parents of three children: Lydia A., 
Louis and Lee Roy, all of whom are married and reside near their parents. 
Our subject and his wife became mcml>ers of the Christian church at Gran- 
ville in 1862, and in 1881 became members by letter of the Eden church near 
Shideler, where they have since been active workers. Mr. Shideler is a 
deacon of his church, and in his political affiliations is a Democrat. 




Mrs. James W illiamson. 




James >A' illiamson. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 921 

James Williamson, one of the oldest citizens of Delaware county, in 
which he has spent more than seventy-three years of his long and useful life, 
was born in Portsmouth, Sciota county, Ohio, June 14, 1828. His parents 
were Peter and Rosanna (Shafer) Williamson, and his paternal grandfather 
was Joseph Williamson, who removed from his native state of New Jersey 
to the Sciota Valley, Ohio, at a very early date. He was a farmer by occu- 
pation, and was among the sturdy pioneers of the Buckeye state, where he 
died at an advanced age. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Williamson, 
Adam Shafer, was a native of Germany and came to America in 1819. He 
was accompanied by his wife, Sabina, three sons and five daughters, all of 
whom were natives of Wurtemberg. They began the voyage in December, 
18 19, and landed in Baltimore in February, 1820, having been so long on the 
journey that Mr. Shafer was compelled to spend all of his means. So upon 
arriving in this country he was compelled to bind out three of his oldest 
■ daughters in order to pay their passage, which amounted to eighty dollars 
each. The remainder of the family proceeded immediately by wagon to 
Brownsville, Pennsylvania, and thence by flat boat to Portsmouth, Ohio, 
where the wife and mother died in 1821, only a short time after reaching 
their destination. After a little over three years had elapsed George Shafer 
went to Baltimore, walking the entire distance, to bring his sisters to their 
western home. Two of them returned with him, but the oldest remained 
longer and at last joined the family. In later years the father came to Dela- 
ware county, Indiana, and located in Hamilton township, where he died in 
1870, aged ninety-five years. 

Peter Williamson was born in New Jersey in 1802, and with his parents 
removed to Sciota county, Ohio, where in 1827 he married Rosanna Shafer, 
who was born in Germany in 1805. From Sciota county they came to Dela- 
ware county, Indiana, in 1834, and established their home in section 25, Ham- 
ilton township, where he bought lands and built a log cabin home, at once 
beginning the arduous labor of clearing and developing his farm. Some 
Indians were yet here at the time. He was a sturdy character, a successful 
farmer and in politics was a Democrat. His death occurred at the age of 
fifty-seven years, while his wife, who was a life-long member of the Metho- 
dist church, survived him several years and died at the age of seventy-seven. 
They had a large family of children, as follows : Adam, of whom mention is 
made elsewhere in this history ; Sabina, the widow of Alexander Dunn, of 
Union township ; Lovisa, deceased ; Stephen, a resident farmer of Illinois ; 
Joseph, also a farmer in Illinois ; and Mary, Martha, Albert, Sarah and Mar- 
garet, who are deceased. 

James Williamson was but six years of age when his parents removed 
to Delaware county, and he has ever since made his home within its borders. 
The eldest of his parents' children, he aided in the early toils of developing 
the farm and raising the crops, receiving only the educational advantages 
obtainable in the old-time log school houses. He has devoted his time and 
energies through life to farming, and few if any of Delaware county's 



923 HISTORY <)1' DFJ.AWAKE COUNTY 

pioneers have witnessed more trying times and performed more hard work 
than he. He has been very successful in his business affairs. When he 
started in hfe for himself as a young married man his father gave him an 
uncleared and undeveloped tract of land of fifty-three acres, and this he 
cleared and placed under a high state of cultivation, applying himself under 
difficult circumstances so diligently and with such success diat he was able 
to add to his acreage and at one time was the owner of three hundred and 
twenty acres of fine land, which he has since divided among his children. 
As was his father, he is a Democrat in his political affiliations, and both he 
and his wife have been faithful members of the Methodist church for many 
years. 

On December 5, 1850, Mr. Williamson married Hannah Shafer, who 
was born in Ohio, October 24, 1830, and they became the parents of the fol- 
lowing children : John M., Stephen Wesley and Lewis M., all prosperous 
farmers of Hamilton township, and the only daughter is Mar}- C, the wife 
of William Y'oung, a hardware merchant of ^luncie. Mr. Williamson has 
one of the old deeds executed by President \'an Buren, dated March 20, 
1837. This is the twelfth deed found in Delaware county. 

Ad.\m Williamson. Among those who are honored and revered as 
pioneers of Delaware county none has borne a more active part in the devel- 
opment of its resources than Adam Williamson, an honored resident of Ham- 
ilton township. He has been a witness of the vast changes which have been 
brought to pass in this region, and in many ways he has proved himself an 
enterprising and public-spirited citizen, ever an.xious to promote the good 
of the majority and to maintain all institutions which have made our country 
what it is today. 

Mr. W'illiamson is the second child of Peter and Rosanna (Shafer) Wil- 
liamson, and was born in Sciota county, Ohio, December 3, 1829. In the 
biographical sketch of his older brother, James Williamson, will be found 
reference to the ancestral history. When he was but five years of age Adam 
Williamson was brought by his parents to Delaware county, and this has 
ever since been his home and the scene of his operations. Reared amid the 
scenes of pioneer days, he assisted his father in clearing the farm from its 
primeval condition, and in the meantime he received a limited educational 
training in the neighborhood schools, which he attended about three months 
during the year. He remained in the parental home until his marriage, April 
12, 1853. to Miss Sarah ]\Ioore, the daughter of Lewis and Patience (Truitt) 
Moore, and they became the parents of the following children : \\'illiam 
Albert, Flora Belle, Mary Theresa, Hattie, Emma and Effie, all of whom are 
living and are married. The wife and mother died on the 6th of November, 
1880, and on the 8th of March, 1882, Mr. Williamson married his present 
wife, Mrs. Nancy J. Hurtt, born in Delaware township, August 15, 1847, 
the daughter of Daniel and Eleanor (Jones) Pittenger. There were nine 
children in the Pittenger family, and there are si.x living. Mrs. Wil- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUxXTY 9:23 

liamson was reared and educated in Delaware township. By her mar- 
riage to Thomas AI. Hurtt two daughters were born. Cora is 
the wife of John Norris, of ]\Iuncie, Indiana, a contractor and builder, and 
they have two children, Reba and Carroll. Mae is the wife of Arthur 
Crampton, a teacher in the city schools of Muncie. The father of these chil- 
dren died August 25, 1873. 

In 1853, on the 14th of April, Mr. Williamson took up his abode on his 
present farm, which is a valuable tract of one hundred and sixty acres. He 
cleared his original purchase of eighty acres from its primitive state, w'ork- 
ing early and late in the task of clearing the forest-covered homestead and 
in later years at the cultivation of the soil, and here he and his wafe are 
spending the remainder of their long and useful lives. They are members 
of the Grace Methodist Episcopal church in Hamilton township. ]Mr. Wil- 
liamson has membership relations with the Order of Odd Fellows. 

Milton Hamilton. In a very early day in the history of Delaware 
county, in 1830, Stephen Hamilton, who was born near Alorgantown, in 
West Virginia, wended his way to this county and established his home on a 
farm in section 35, Center township. Since that early period the name has 
been inseparably connected with the history of this section of the state, and 
the memory of Stephen Hamilton is honored and revered with others of the 
brave pioneers of Delaware county. After a time he left his first purchase 
and bought land just west in section 35, where the remainder of his long and 
useful life was spent. 

Stephen Hamilton became the father of Henry Hamilton, who also won 
a name and place among the prominent business men and leading citizens of 
Delaware county. He was born in West Virginia in 1820, just ten years 
before the removal of his father to this community, and his death occurred 
on the farm now owned and occupied by his son Milton in 1884. He married 
a native daughter of Henry county, Indiana, Mar\- J. Coe, born in 1830, and 
they became the parents of four sons : Milton ; Millard Filmore, a resident of 
Idaho ; William Henry, familiarly known as Harry, who died at the age of 
thirty-four, and Carl E., who makes his home in the state of Washington. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton were married in Henry county, Illinois, and after 
residing there for a short time they returned to the old Hamilton homestead 
in Delaware county, Indiana, and fifteen years later they took up their abode 
on the farm now owned by their son Milton. The husband and father de- 
voted his business career to agricultural pursuits and stock-raising, and he 
won success in the callings. His political affiliations were with the Repub- 
lican party. 

Milton Hamilton was born in Center township, Delaware county, Janu- 
ary 3, 1853, and within its borders he grew to years of maturity and con- 
tinued his residence until the age of twenty. Becoming imbued with the 
western fever, he spent twelve years in the states of California and Wash- 

19 



924 HISTORY ol' DELAWARE COUNTY 

ington, where he was engaged in mining and farming. He homesteaded and 
preempted land in Washington, and did well in a business way in the west, 
but in 1884 returned to his old home here. When his father's estate was set- 
tled he secured the homestead farm, and his estate comprises four hundred 
acres of rich and well cultivated land. A pleasant and attractive residence 
adorns the homestead, and many other substantial improvements add to its 
value. 

Mr. Hamilton married, in 1885, Hattie C. McArdle, of the state of 
Washington, and their three living children are Hazel, Louise and Mary. 
Mr. Hamilton holds membership relations with the fraternal order of Elks 
and endorses the principles of the Republican party. 

Thomas J. Mansfield, ]\L D., one among the most successful and 
favorably known physicians of Delaware county and residing at Royerton, 
has been a member of the medical profession in the county since he grad- 
uated from college. He is also a native son of Delaware county, born on 
his father's farm in Hamilton township, April 24, 1862, a son of Riley and 
Delilah (Johnson) Mansfield. The father was a son of Charles IMansfield 
and was a native of Greene county, Ohio, and the father also claimed Ohio 
as the commonwealth of his nativity, later becoming a pioneer of Delaware 
county. Charles Mansfield was a farmer by occupation, was prominent 
in politics, serving at one time in the state legislature as a representative 
from Delaware county, and his death occurred in the city of Muncie when 
he had reached the age of seventy-six years. Of his six children, three 
sons and three daughters, all are now deceased. Riley Mansfield was 
three times married, the mother of the Doctor being his second wife, and 
they had three children, while by the first marriage there were born four 
children, the third marriage being without issue. He, too, was a farmer 
and lived for many years in Hamilton township, where he was prominently 
and favorably known. He was a Republican in his political views and was 
a member of the Christian church. 

Dr. Mansfield was reared as a farmer lad, attending the country schools 
during his early boyhood days, and later he taught for two terms. Still 
later he matriculated in the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana, 
where he pursued a preparatory course in medicine, and then received a 
course of lectures in Barns' Medical College, St. Louis, after which he 
entered the American Medical College of Cincinnati, graduating therefrom 
in 1890. Immediately after his graduation Dr. Mansfield located at Roy- 
erton and entered the ranks of the medical profession, while in 1905 he 
pursued a post-graduate course in the Post-Graduate Medical School of 
Chicago. He is a member of the County and State Medical Societies and 
of the American Medical Association, and is a Republican in politics. 

Dr. Mansfield married, in 1890, Miss Mary E. Knox, a daughter of 
John Knox, a prominent resident of Delaware county, and three sons have 
been born to Dr. and Mrs. Mansfield. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 925 

Alexander Snider was born in Miami county, Ohio, on a farm, 
January 6, 1826, a son of Joseph and Catherine (Studebaker) Snider. Mr. 
Snider, Sr., was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, but moved to Ohio 
as an orphan boy of eighteen years. He was there married to one of the 
commonwealth's native daughters, Catherine Studebaker,. and soon after 
their marriage they moved to Miami county, Ohio, where they made their 
home until the fall of 1834. Selling their farm of eighty acres there, they 
came to Indiana and established their home in Union township, Delaware 
county, where the husband and father entered eighty acres of land and also 
bought a tract of forty acres. His home was located on the entry tract, 
and there he lived and labored for many years, dying at the age of sixty- 
eight years. His wife survived him for eight years, and in their family 
were twelve children, one of whom died in infancy and one when nine years 
of age, and the remainder grew to years of maturity, although only three 
are now living — Alexander, John and Abraham. 

Alexander Snider was a little lad between eight and nine years of age 
when his parents came to Delaware county, and thus the scenes of its 
pioneer epoch as well as those of its subsequent development are familiar 
to him, while at the same time he has performed his full share in the won- 
derful transformation which has been wrought here. His advantages for 
obtaining an education during his younger years were extremely limited, 
but he has improved the advantages of reading and observation in later 
years and has become a well informed man. When he had reached the age 
of twenty-two years, January 15, 1849, he married Nancy J. Shary, who 
was born in Rush county, Indiana, August 30, 1828, a daughter of Solomon 
and Rachel (Breezly) Shary, who claimed Ohio as the commonwealth of 
their nativity. The first home of Mr. and Mrs. Snider was a little log 
cabin on his father's farm, but after a time they moved to a farm northeast 
of Eaton. Shortly afterward they sold that place and in 185 1 took up 
their abode on a farm in Hamilton township, their present homestead. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Snider have been born two children : John A., a 
prominent and well known farmer in Hamilton township ; and Rachel, the 
wife of Jacob Rarick, of Union township. Mr. Snider cast his first presi- 
dential vote for John C. Fremont, and has since supported the principles 
of the Republican party. He is a prominent and worthy member of the 
German Baptist church, 

William Campbell. Among the prominent agriculturists of Hamil- 
ton township, Delaware county, is numbered William Campbell, whose name 
is also familiar to its residents in connection with its educational interests. 
In 1896 he began the work of consolidation of the schools of Hamilton 
township, and Professor John M. Bloss has perfected the work so effectively 
begun by Mr. Campbell. He has always been a stanch Republican in his 
political affiliations, and in 1889 he was made its representative in the office 
of trustee, to which he was returned in 1895, ^^'^ t^hus he served for two 



926 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

terms in that important office with an interruption of one term in the 
interim. 

Mr. Campbell was born in Greene township, Randolph county, Indiana, 
July 28, 1846, a son of John and Rebecca J. (Gibson) Campbell. Mr. 
Campbell, St., was born in Nashville, Tennessee, May 10, 1810, and his 
death occurred in Greene township, Randolph county, September 26, 1863. 
His name was enrolled among the early pioneers of that county, he having 
taken up his abode within its borders in 1838, removing thither from Greene 
county, Ohio, where the family home had been established when he was five 
years of age, in 1815. He was a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (English) 
Campbell, the former born near Dublin, Ireland, and the latter in Edin- 
burgh, Scotland. They were married in Ireland, and in the following week 
started on the voyage to the United States. Their first home was in 
Charleston, South Carolina, they having landed at that point, where they 
remained for five years, and from there removed to Nashville, Tennessee, 
remaining there seventeen years, and their deaths subsequently occurred in 
Greene county, Ohio. Mrs. John Campbell was born near Charleston, 
South Carolina, but during her early womanhood she moved with her 
parents to Greene county, Ohio, the family home being established near 
Cedarville, where she and her husband met and married, and resided there 
two years. She was born on the i6th of January, i8i6, and died Sep- 
tember 23, 1875, in Randolph county, as did her husband in 1863. In their 
family were seven children, four daughters older and two sons younger 
than William Campbell, the subject of this review. 

On the old home farm in Greene township, Randolph county, William 
Campbell grew to manhood's estate, in the meantime pursuing his educa- 
tional training in the neighborhood schools. When he was a lad of sixteen 
years his father died, and he thereafter remained with his mother in charge 
of the farm until he was twenty-two, he being her eldest son. He was 
then married, October 8, 1868, to Eliza C. St. John, who was born in 
Greene coimty, Ohio, November 23, 1851, and they have had three children: 
Ida Elnora, deceased; Frances May, the wife of Henry Bell, of Hamilton 
township ; and Nella Forest. 

After his marriage Mr. Campbell took up his abode on a farm in 
Greene township, Randolph county, Indiana, where he made his home for 
nine years, and at the close of that period moved to Dunkirk, Jay county, 
Indiana. Soon afterward he sold his farm and bought his present home- 
stead in Hamilton township, where he has resided since 1877. His estate 
consists of one hundred and sixty acres of rich and well cultivated farming 
land. His possessions, however, are the result of his own industry and 
excellent business ability, for he began the battle of life for himself without 
means and has been the architect of his own fortunes. Although reared 
in the Presbyterian faith, to which denomination his parents belonged, he 
is a worthv and valued member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which 
Mrs. Campbell also belongs. Both enjoy a wide circle of acquaintances 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 927 

and are widely and favorably known, their host of friends esteeming them 
highly for their genuine worth. 

Samuel Poland. Samuel Poland, a prominent farmer and stock- 
raiser of Hamilton township, where he is the owner of a valuable estate of 
eighty acres, was born on his father's farm in Liberty township, Delaware 
county, Indiana, November 15, 1858, a son of Nicholas and Martha J. 
(Dickover) Poland. He was reared, however, on a farm in Delaware 
township, to which his father had removed when he was but a babe of two 
years, and when he had reached the age of seventeen the family came to 
Hamilton township. His entire life save the one year spent in Blackford 
county, Indiana, has been spent within the confines of Delaware county, 
and his long identification with its business interests has won for him 
prominence and influence. 

Remaining at home until the age of twenty, Mr. Poland then worked 
by the month for other farmers for a few years or until the establishment 
of a home of his own by his marriage on the 25th of April, 1880, to 
Florence A. Smith, a daughter of George and Eliza (Carnathan) Smith. 
Her father was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, August 16, 1827, and 
is now making his home with his daughter Florence. He arrived in this 
county during an early period in its epoch, becoming identified with the 
farming interests of Liberty township, but he later transferred his residence 
and his operations to Hamilton township. Mrs. Smith was born in Clarion 
county, Pennsylvania, in Febrtiary, 1838, and died on the nth of July, 
1894. In their family were the following children: William T., of Detroit, 
Michigan ; George Albert, a resident of Mississippi ; Florence, the wife of 
Mr. Poland ; Michael Harvey, of Arkansas ; Ida, who died at the age of 
nine years ; Anna, who died aged fourteen ; James E., of Royerton ; Viola, 
the wife of Alvin Moody, of Harrison township, Delaware county ; Milton, 
a prominent agriculturist of Liberty township ; May, the wife of Harvey 
Campbell, of Randolph county, Indiana ; Orville, of Illinois ; and Benjamin 
Franklin, a resident of Washington, D. C. Mr. Smith, the father, followed 
farming during the greater part of his active business life. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Poland have been born eight children : Bertha M., William Ralph, 
Albert Earl, Carl S. and George Raymond (twins), Harry Edgar, Fred- 
erick Arthur, and Ernest Cecil. Mr. Poland is a member of the fraternal 
order of the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall Lodge, No. 37, of Muncie, 
Indiana, and gives his support and cooperation to- the Democratic party. 
Both he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church. 

Ludlow K. Burt, of Shideler, Indiana, was born in Union township, 
Delaware county, Indiana, July 22, 1851, and received his education in the 
public schools. He is a son of Joseph and Minerva (Kane) Burt. Joseph 
Burt, the father, was born in Pennsylvania, and came to Indiana with his 
father when but a mere boy. They located in Union township, three miles 



928 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

southeast of Wheeling, and were among the first of the hardy band of 
pioneers who settled that section. Joseph Burt died July 12, 1852, in his 
thirtieth year. Mrs. Burt, the' mother, was born in Ohio February 5, 
1828, and was the mother by this marriage of two children: Amanda, wife 
of Clarkson Gates, and Ludlow K., subject of this sketch. Mrs. Burt was 
married, for the second time, to David Simonton, and became the mother 
of five children, but one of whom is now living, Mary E., the wife of the 
Rev. George L. Studebaker. Mrs. (Burt) Simonton passed to her reward 
September 15, 1903. 

Our subject during his boyhood days worked on his father's farm and 
after his marriage engaged in farming for himself on a forty-acre tract of 
land, to which he later added eighty acres adjoining, and subsequently two 
hundred and twenty acres more. Here he resided until 1899, when he 
removed to the place where he now resides, which is the old homestead where 
his wife was born. The house, though built in 1866, is in a remarkable 
state of preservation and has been remodeled to make a fine modern farm- 
house. The barn of the premises was built in 1847 and has been in con- 
tinuous use since. This homestead property comprises seventy acres and is 
as fine a farm as there is in the township. Mr. Burt is a member of the 
Christian church and in politics is a stanch Republican. 

On September 28, 1872, ■\Ir. Burt was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret E. Shideler, who was born in Hamilton township, Delaware 
county, Indiana, November 11, 1850. She is the daughter of Isaac and 
Sarah (Little) Shideler, and a sister of Isaac H. Shideler, an account of 
whose life appears elsewhere in these pages. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burt are the parents of nine children, seven of whom are 
living ; Edward W., who married Bertha Martin ; Rolvin, who died in his 
twenty-second year ; Lemon W., who married Bessie Hurt ; Sarah ; David F., 
who married Martha Wingate ; Minerva, who died in infancy ; Lola, Millie 
E., and Ora. 

John Freem.vn. Among the oldest and most highly respected citizens 
of Delaware county there is none more deserving of mention in the history 
of the county than John Freeman, of Hamilton township. He was born 
January 26, 1825, in Adams county, Ohio, and came to Delaware county 
with his parents as early as 1835, when he was but ten years of age. Since 
that early day he has maintained his residence in the county, and as he has 
now passed the eighty-second milestone on the journey of life, his residence 
here covers a period of seventy-two years or more. 

Mr. Freeman's parents were Isaac and Jemimah (Moore) Freeman, 
both of whom were born in Scioto county, Ohio, and of their eight children 
John was the second oldest in order of birth. The family came to this 
county in 1835, and in the following year settled in the dense forests of 
what is now Hamilton township, where in section 30 the father entered gov- 
ernment land, and in the log cabin, which he there built, he established 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 929 

his famih'. This Httle cabin home, although long since deserted, still stands 
on the land, a mute reminder of the days of long ago. The father set about 
to clear the heavy timber from the land, eventually developing a fine farm, 
and in the work of clearing and developing he was assisted by his son, John, 
to whom was given title to fifty-five acres and on which he has continued 
to reside and farm during all these years. The father died in 1864, aged 
sixty-one years, and the mother survived until 187 1, passing away at the 
age of seventy years. They were life members of the Methodist church, 
and the father affiliated with the Democracy, and in religious and political 
matters the son has followed in the footsteps of his parent^. When they 
came to Delaware county, Muncie ' was a mere village and known as 
Munceytown, a few Indians being still here, and deer, turkey and other 
wild game were plentiful. 

Amid these pioneer scenes John Freeman was reared. His advantages 
for an education were such as the old-time log schoolhouses afforded, 
and during his boyhood days he assisted his father on the farm and remained 
under the parental roof until he was twenty-four years of age, and then 
marrying, he settled down in life as a farmer, on the farm where he now 
and has always lived, following a quiet and unpretentious life. His mar- 
riage was solemnized in 1849, Mary J. Weir becoming his wife, and they 
were devoted companions for fifty-five years, when the faithful wife was 
called away in death, in 1905, aged seventy-five years. She was born in 
Ohio, and from that state came with her parents to Delaware county in 
1836, when she was a girl of but six years. Her parents were Thomas and 
Mary Weir, natives of Pennsylvania. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Freeman were 
born three children : Paulina, the wife of Fernando Storer, of Muncie ; 
Thomas J., on the farm with his father, and he is one of the most enter- 
prising and successful farmers of the county, and James B., the first born, 
who died when eleven months old. When seventeen years of age Mr. Free- 
man united with the Methodist church, and his wife was also a worthy 
member of that denomination from a very early age. Peaceful, quiet, honest 
and industrious, Mr. Freeman has won and retained the friendship of a 
host of acquaintances, and all honor and revere him for his sterling worth 
and true nobility of character. 

John Venable Baird, M. D. Prominent among the leading physicians 
of Albany is John V. Baird, M. D., a man of wide professional experience 
and one who has given much time and thought to the study of diseases 
and their cause. He is especially fitted for the work in which he is engaged, 
and the respect bestowed upon him by his fellow men bespeaks the eminent 
success that he has attained. A son of the late John Baird, he was born 
June 13, 1850, in Jay county, Indiana, and there grew to manhood. His 
paternal grandfather, Britton Baird, came to this country in 1790, locating 
first in New York state, but subsequently removed to Warren county, Ohio, 
where he resided the remainder of his life. 



930 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Born November 8, 1808, in York county, New York, John Baird was 
brought up on the farm which his father cleared and improved. Moving 
with his family to Indiana in August, 1839, he became a pioneer settler 
of Jay county. Taking up a tract of timbered land he improved a good 
homestead, on which he was engaged in general farming until his death on 
October 25, 1859, while yet in manhood's prime. He married, January 27, 
1 83 1, Eliza Staley, who survived him a number of years, passing away 
July 10, 1870. Of the nineteen children born of their union three are now 
living. 

Spending his earlier years on the home farm, John Venable Baird 
obtained his elementary education in the district schools of his native town, 
subsequently attending Liber College. At the age of seventeen he began 
teaching, and while thus employed began the study of law. At the end of a 
year, deciding to make a change of studies, Mr. Baird traded his law books 
for medical works, and the following two years read medicine with Dr. E. 
W. iVIoon. Going to Cincinnati in 1879, he entered the Eclectic Medical 
Institute of that city and was there graduated in 1881 with the degree 
of M. D. Upon receiving his diploma Dr. Baird located in the village of 
Albany, where he has since been actively and successfully engaged in the 
practice of his profession, his skill and ability as a physician being recog- 
nized and appreciated. For twenty-seven years a resident of Albany, the 
Doctor is well known throughout this section of the county, and his genial 
manner and pleasant words make him a welcome visitor to the well and 
strong as well as to the sufferer to whom he ministers. 

On August 26, 1875, Dr. Baird married Mrs ' arelia J. Hays, by 
whom he had two sons, John W. and Morris B., both of whom are now 
living in Muncie, Indiana. Mrs. Aurelia J. Baird died February 28, 1890. 
The Doctor was married secondly, Jtme 30. 1892, at Poplar Bluff, Missouri, 
to Miss Mary McGarvey, who was born August 14, 1857, a daughter of 
Peter and Margaret (McGrail) McGarvey, natives of Ireland. A woman 
of culture and ability, Mrs. Baird has earned the degree of M. D., having 
been graduated from the Indiana College of Physicians and Surgeons. She 
has a fine knowledge of the profession in which she is most successfully 
engaged, and her papers on medical subjects are widely read by the medical 
fraternity and are considered of much value. 

A stanch Republican in his political views, Dr. Baird represented his 
district in the state legislature in 1902, doing excellent service to his con- 
stituents. Fraternally he is a member of Anthony Masonic Lodge No. 171, 
at Albany, and is also a member of the Red Men. Dr. Baird has two of the 
parchment deeds bearing the signature of President Van Buren, bearing 
the dates of August 20, 1838, and November 10, 1840; the sixth deed of 
the kind found in the county. He is also a collector of curios and as 
a collector of rare coins stands second to none in Delaware county. He 
has an Arabic coin dated 1388 and the L'^nited States coins from 1790 to 
the last coinage. Besides coins he classes as an archfeologist and has some 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 931 

rare specimens of ores, stones, minerals and Indian relics. He has a valuable 
library of about one thousand volumes. 

Albert M. Poland. Among the well known and respected citizens 
of Albany Albert M. Poland, an able and successful attorney-at-law, holds 
an assured position. A native of Delaware county, he was born February 
12, 1870, at Sharon, Delaware township, being one of a family of seven 
children. His father, Nicholas Poland, was here engaged in agricultural 
pursuits for many years, and was held in high respect as a man of honor 
and integrity. 

Spending the days of his boyhood and youth on the parental home- 
stead, Albert M. Poland early became familiar with the different branches 
of farming, and while engaged in this health-giving occupation developed 
a fine physique. Laying a substantial foundation for his future education 
in the district schools, he afterwards turned his attention to the study of 
law, and in 1893, in Muncie, was admitted to the bar. He has since that 
time been actively engaged in the practice of his chosen profession in 
Albany, devoting the greater part of his time to his legal work. Mr. 
Poland was married, January 9, 1895, to Miss Leatha Leavell, who was 
born in Delaware county, Indiana, a daughter of James and Laura (Worley) 
Leavell. One child, a -daughter named Opal, has blessed the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Poland. 

Politically Mr. Poland is a stanch supporter of the principles promul- 
gated by the Republican party and for two years rendered the city of 
Albany valuable service as a member of the town council. His wife is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and she takes an active interest 
in the Sunday School connected with it. Mr. Poland is a cultured and 
highly talented man, well versed in the intricacies of the law, and has filled 
the positions of trust and responsibility to which he has been called with 
great fidelity and ability. 

Albert P. Murray, M. D. Occupying a place of prominence among 
the skillful and successful physicians of Albany is Albert P. Murray, M. D., 
who has built up a large and lucrative practice in this part of Delaware 
county. A son of the late Cornelius B. Murray, he was born October 18, 
1846, near Blountsville, Henry county, Indiana. He comes of substantial 
stock, his paternal grandfather, William Murray, having served as a soldier 
in the war of 1812. The grandfather was born in Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, where he lived until after his marriage with Mary Boles. 
In 1826, following the march of civilization westward, he moved with his 
family to Ohio. In 1833 he came to Indiana, settling first in Wayne county, 
but subsequently removing to Henry county, where he resided until his 
death, in 1856. 

Cornelius B. ?\Iurray was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
December 22, 1812, and there spent the first few years of his life. At the 



D32 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

age of sixteen he came with his parents to Indiana and assisted in the 
pioneer labor of clearing and improving a homestead. Becoming a farmer 
from choice, he was engaged in agricultural pursuits in either Wayne or 
Henrv counties until his death, at the venerable age of eighty-three 
years. He was also a teacher for twenty years in Henry. Wayne and Dela- 
ware counties. His wife, whose maiden name was Lucinda Burroughs, 
died May 6, 1872, leaving ten children, namely : John C, William H., 
R. v., Martha E., Albert P., Orin, Orilla, Marcus L., C. C, and Julia. 
The father was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of 
the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. The mother was a consistent 
Christian woman and a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Brought up on the home farm, Albert P. Murray laid a good founda- 
tion for his future education in the common schools of his neighborhood!. 
In 1864, on February 8, he offered his services to his country, enlisting in 
Company K, Nineteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he served 
until after the close of the war, being honorably discharged at Indianapolis, 
Indiana, July 18, 1865. With his brave comrades he took pan in many 
important battles and campaigns, including the engagements in the Wilder- 
ness, and was present at the surrender of General Lee April 9, 1865, at 
Appomattox, Virginia. Returning home, Mr. Murray resumed his studies, 
first attending the Hagerstown Academy, and then pursued a course in 
Earlham College at Richmond. ' Beginning then the study of medicine 
with Dr. A. McElwee, of Hagerstown, Indiana, he remained with him until 
1867, when he entered the Medical College of Ohio, from which he was 
graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1869. Locating immediately in 
Sharon, Delaware township. Dr. Murray began the practice of his pro- 
fession, remaining there two years. In 1871 he settled in Albany, and 
with the exception of the time that he was in Keokuk, Iowa, where he took 
a post-graduate course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, he has 
since remained. A man of much ability, progressive and studious, the 
Doctor keeps himself in touch with the modern metliods of diagnosing and 
treating diseases, and as a general practitioner is meeting with well deserved 
success. 

On January 25, 1872, Dr. Murray married Martha L. Orr, who was 
born in Liberty township July 30, 1850, a daughter of Col. Samuel and 
Jane (Moore) Orr. Her father was a distinguished soldier, having served 
as colonel of the Eighty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 
Five children have blessed the union of Doctor and Mrs. Murray, namely: 
Edgar C, Gertrude D., Leo, Weldon E., deceased, and Nellie. Politically 
the Doctor is a strong advocate of the principles of the Republican party, 
and as an honest, public-spirited man works at all times for the interests 
of his fellow men. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic, John 
H. Wilson Post No. 419, and to the Knights of Pythias, Castle Hall Lodge 
No. Tij8, at Albany, Indiana. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 933 

James M. Vanderburg, M. D. Noteworthy among the popular and 
prominent physicians of Albany is James 'SI. Vanderburg, M. D., who has 
gained an extended reputation in the practice of his profession, his studies 
and experience giving him a knowledge and skill that have won for him 
the confidence and esteem of his patients and an assured position among 
the leading medical men of Delaware county. A native of Indiana, he 
was born near Winchester, Randolph county, April 9, 1869, a son of 
Arthur B. Vanderburg. His paternal grandfather, George W. Vanderburg, 
migrated from New York, becoming a pioneer settler of this state and one 
of its foremost agriculturists. 

Reared on the homestead, Arthur Vanderburg selected farming as his 
life occupation, and in the various branches of general farming met with 
undisputed success. Tie married, at Economy, Indiana, Eunice Ross, 
whose parents removed from Kentucky to this state, which was her birth- 
place. Of their union two children were born : Clara, who married S. D. 
Hunt and died at Muncie, Indiana, in January, 1907; and J. M., the special 
subject of this brief biographical sketch. Both parents united with the 
Methodist Episcopal church when young. 

After leaving the district school J. M. Vanderburg continued his studies 
in Indianapolis, attending the Eclectic College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
from which he was graduated in 1893. Subsequently entering the Kentucky 
School of Medicine at Louisville, Kentucky, he was there graduated with 
the class of 1898, and has since that time been established at Albany, where 
he has built up a large and remunerative practice and has become identified 
with the best interests of the city. 

On August 2, 1893, Dr. Vanderburg married Nora, daughter of J. W. 
and Hester (Rees) Wilson, of Albany. Politically the Doctor is affiliated 
with the Republican party, and has rendered the city excellent service as a 
member of the school board. Fraternally he is a Mason, an Odd Fellow and 
a Knight of Pythias. Religiously both the Doctor and Mrs. Vanderburg are 
conected by membership with the Methodist Episcopal church, in which they 
are faithful workers and towards the support of which they are willing con- 
tributors. 

L'LYSSES Grant Powers, AI.D. As a successful physician and a repre- 
sentative of one of the old and honored families of Delaware county Dr. 
Powers is especially worthy of representation in a work of this kind. A son 
of the late Dr. James H. Powers, he was born March 12, 1864, in Albany, 
which has always been his home. He comes from a family of culture and 
talent, his Grandfather Powers having been one of the earliest school teachers 
of this part of the state, while his descendants for three generations have 
been noted as successful teachers. 

A native of southern Indiana, Dr. James H. Powers was born in Law- 
rence county, near Paul, and received his early education in Greene county, 
Ohio. Taking up the studv of medicine, he was graduated from the Starling 



934 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

?\Iedical College at Columbus, Ohio, and in 1850 began the practice of his 
profession at Albany, Indiana, and was here numbered among the able and 
successful physicians until his death in March of 1884 at the age of sixty- 
five years. He married, in Albany, Miss Lucinda Mann, who is still living 
in this city, an honored and beloved woman of seventy-five years. He was 
a member of the Masonic order, and with his wife belonged to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. To him and his wife a family of five children, four sons 
and one daughter, were born. Two children, inheriting the ability of their 
ancestors, were for many years among the most successful educators of 
Albany and Delaware township, teaching in the public schools of the city. 
The sister, Laura M., is now one of the most successful teachers in the 
county, she having been in charge of the primary department of the Albany 
public school for twenty years. 

Endowed by nature with scholarl}- talents, Dr. Powers completed the 
course in the Albany grammar school and then entered the Northern Indiana 
Normal School at Valparaiso, Indiana, and later studied at Delaware, Ohio, 
after which he entered the Indiana Medical College in Indianapolis, from 
which he was graduated with honors in the class of 1894. For seven years 
previous to entering this institution, however, he had taught school most suc- 
cessfully, being especially popular as an instructor. Since his graduation the 
Doctor has been located in Albany, and, following in the footsteps of his 
father, has built up an extensive practice and now enjoys the reputation of 
being one of the most skillful and faithful physicians in the city of Albany. 

In Albany, June 26, 1901, Dr. Powers married Miss Laura H. Stafford, 
a daughter of James E. Stafford. Mrs. Powers was a successful teacher in 
instrumental music, being a student at Creencastle, Indiana, and the Chi- 
cago Conservatory of Music. 

Into their home one child, Carroll Lucille, has been born. Energetic 
and progressive, the Doctor is a man of inlluence in his community and is 
held in high esteem by his fellow men. Fraternally he is a member of 
Anthony Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at .\lbany, Indiana; 
of the Knights of Pythias, No. 378, of Albany, Indiana, and of the Knights 
of the Maccabees. 

JOH.v A. DowELL, M.D. Conspicuous among the successful physicians 
of .\lbany, and noteworthy for his keen intelligence and his high mental at- 
tainments, is John A. Dowell, M.D., who is meeting with signal success in 
the practice of his profession. A native of Ohio, he was born April 18, 1857, 
in Urbana, a son of William H. Dowell, and comes of substantial Scotch an- 
cestry. His grandfather, John Dowell, served as a soldier in the war of 18x2. 

William H. Dowell was born in Virginia, but in early life moved to 
(. thill and was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Champaign county until his 
death in 1889. He was a man of sterling worth, an active member of the 
Republican party, and in his religious beliefs was a Methodist. He married 
Harriet McConncll, who was hcjrii in Fcnnsxlvania and died in 1907 in 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 935 

Toledo, Ohio. Thirteen chidren were born of their union, nine sons and 
four daughters. One son, Wilham H., Jr., was graduated from the same 
medical institution as the subject of this sketch, the Eclectic Collegiate In- 
stitute at Cincinnati, Ohio, and is a prosperous practitioner. 

Receiving his diploma at the Urbana high school when but sixteen years 
old, John A. Dowell immediately began teaching school, and was thus em- 
ployed for eight consecutive years. Desirous of entering upon a medical 
career, he entered the Cincinnati Eclectic Collegiate Institute, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1881. Settling then in his native state, Dr. 
Dowell first engaged in the practice of medicine at Urbana, Ohio, going from 
there to Springfield, Ohio, where he met with excellent success. In 1903 
the Doctor took up his residence in Albany, where he is meeting with flat- 
tering results in the exercise of his profession, having gained a good repu- 
tation as a practitioner of skill and has won a fine patronage. 

In Champaign county, Ohio, in 1878, Dr. Dowell married Belle 
Harper, a daughter of Hugh C. Harper, and they are the parents of two 
children, namely : Ethelyn, who married Dwight Hinckley, a son of Dr. H. 
Hinckley, of the Cincinnati Medical College; and Blanche. In pohtics the 
Doctor is a Republican, and active in party ranks, having served as a dele- 
gate to different conventions. He is a member of the Albany board of 
health, and socially belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men. As his 
great-grandfather, John Hamilton, was in the Revolutionary war, the Doctor 
and his family are eligible to become members of the order The Sons and 
Daughters of the Revolution. The Doctor traces his lineage to the bonnie 
Scotland Highlanders. 

John L. Tulley. Conspicuous among the enterprising, practical and 
progressive business men of Albany is J. L. Tulley, superintendent of the 
Albany waterworks. Possessing excellent mechanical and executive ability, 
he has won well-deserved success in his various undertakings by his thor- 
ough mastery of his calling, his fidelity to his trusts and by his honest deal- 
ings with all with whom he comes in contact. A native of Indiana, he was 
born February 12, 1S71, ni Jay county, where his father, Joseph Tulley, 
was a pioneer settler, migrating there from Pennsylvania. 

Brought up in Jay county, Indiana, J. L. Tulley acquired the rudiments 
of his education in the public schools. He subsequently took a course in 
civil engineering, and as a local surveyor obtained a practical experience 
that has since been of great benefit to him. He afterwards assisted in build- 
ing light and water plants in different places, and for three years was con- 
nected with the management of the Consolidated Water and Light Plant of 
Chicago, Illinois, serving as engineer and erecting their plant. Coming from 
Chicago to Indiana, Air. Tulley worked in the same capacity in several 
towns and cities, for awhile being the builder of the V'incennes Light Com- 
pany's plant, erected in 190 1. Exercising his mechanical ingenuity to some 
purpose, he has made inventions of permanent value, one being a gauge for 



936 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

measuring oil. Mr. Tulley was also instrumental in having one of the lead- 
ing industries of the city established here, the Albany Automobile Works, 
of which he is president. This plant is well equipped with modern ma- 
chinery and gives employment to twenty men. The runabouts manufactured 
are sold throughout the Union, their reputation as easy-running, strong and 
durable machines being well established. 

On October 3, 1891, Mr. Tulley was married in Red Key, Indiana, to 
Miss M. R. Hastings, a daughter of Newton Hastings, of that place. The 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Tulley has been brightened by the birth of three chil- 
dren, namely, Leonard, Dora and Raymond. Politically Mr. Tulley sustains 
the principles of the Independent party, and religiously he and his wife are 
members of the Christian church at Albany, Indiana. Fraternally Mr. Tulley 
is chancellor commander of Castle Hall Lodge No. 378, Knights of Pythias, 
and he is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle, No. 12, at Albany, 
Indiana. 

Walter P. McCormick. Standing prominent among the foremost 
business men of Albany is Walter P. McCormick, who as a dealer in hard- 
ware, furniture and undertaking goods is actively identified with its mer- 
cantile industries, and as a member of the common council is as far as pos- 
sible promoting its highest and best interests. He is a member of the firm 
of McCormick Brothers, which in the spring of 1907 succeeded the firm of 
McCormick & Sons, the latter firm locating in this city in 1900. This firm 
is advantageously located in the Odd Fellows' block, and in its three large 
store rooms carries an immense stock of goods, and also has a large tinner's 
room for working purposes. The original firm, the Standard Manufactur- 
ing Company, was for many years located at Eaton, Delaware county, and 
was among the largest and most prosperous manufacturers of that place. 
In 1900 the firm transferred its business to Albany, continuing under the 
same name for seven years before it was changed to its present form. 

A son of R. B. McCormick, Walter P. McCormick received excellent 
educational advantages, and was early trained to habits of industry, honesty 
and thrift. His immediate ancestors were for many years residents of Ohio, 
removing from there to Indiana in pioneer days. As a young man he was 
admitted to the firm of McCormick & Sons in Eaton, Indiana, and later, in 
1907, became a member of the firm of McCormick Brothers, of Albany. He 
married, in Delaware county. Miss Bessie M. Nixon, a woman of much cul- 
ture, and they have two children, namely, Robert and W. Myron. In his 
political views Mr. McCormick is a stanch Republican, and for the past two 
years has served as alderman. Socially he is an important member of the 
Masonic fraternity, being master of the Albany Blue Lodge No. 171-, A. F. 
& A. M. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
Lodge No. 361 at Albany, Indiana, and of the Encampment. He holds his 
state certificate as an embalmer, and he carries a fine and complete line of 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 937 

caskets. He has a two thousand dollar funeral car. His certificate number 
is 1035. 

Edwin R. Pugh. Prominent among the respected and honored men of 
Delaware township is Edwin R. Pugh, who is a noble type of the citizen 
soldier, equally true to his country on the battlefield or in the peaceful sur- 
roundings of his home, and his fpmily and friends may well be proud of his 
honorable and manly record during the Civil war. A son of the late Ben- 
jamin Pugh, he was born May 2, 1841, at Blountsville, Henry county, In- 
diana, of excellent patriotic ancestry. 

A native of Ohio, Benjamin Pugh was born and bred in Warren county. 
He subsequently settled as a tailer in Blountsville, Indiana, and there resided 
until his death, at the age of seventy-six years. He married Lavinia Dough- 
erty, who was born in Ohio, a daughter of Edwin Dougherty, who rendered 
gallant service in the war of 1812. Eight children blessed their union, 
namely : William, who served during the Civil war in the One Hundred and 
Thirteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and died at Parker City, Indiana ; 
Catherine ; Edwin R., the subject of this sketch ; Rebecca ; Elizabeth ; Oscar, 
who enlisted as a boy of sixteen years in the One Hundred and Thirteenth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry and was killed in Mississippi ; Sarah and Jane. 

Brought up in Henry and Delaware counties, Edwin R. Pugh remained 
with his parents until seventeen years of age, when he went to Illinois. At 
the breaking out of the Civil war all of the patriotic blood flowing through 
his veins was aroused, and on April 22, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, 
Twentieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Captain George Walster and 
Colonel C. C. Marsh. With his comrades he went first to Joliet, Illinois, 
thence to Alton, and from there to St. Louis, Missouri. He was subse- 
quently stationed for a time at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, from there being 
transferred to Birdpoint. With his regiment he was next sent to Cairo, 
Illinois, where he remained until February, 1862. He was then sent with 
his regiment to the front and saw service on the battlefield at Forts Henry 
and Donelson, and took part in the siege of Corinth, the engagement at 
Pittsburgh Landing and in other battles of minor importance in Tennessee, 
including the skirmishes at Denmark, that state, and at Britts Levee. In 
the fall of 1862 Mr. Pugh marched with the troops commanded by General 
Grant to Memphis, thence to the Mississippi river, which he crossed just be- 
low Vicksburg. In that state he took an active part in the battles at Magnolia 
Creek and Raymond's Mines, and was afterwards present at the siege of 
Vicksburg, and at a battle fought under the command of General John A. 
Logan, being also with that gallant hero at the engagement at Black River. 
After the surrender of Vicksburg Mr. Pugh was for two or three months 
stationed with his comrades at Black River bridge, going from there to 
Meridian. For a time he was with General Sherman, with him returning to 
Vicksburg, where he was given a furlough of thirty days, and returned to 
Springfield, Illinois, thence home. At the expiration of his furlough Mr. 



938 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Pugh joined his regiment at Cairo, Illinois, and was ordered to accompany 
General Sherman to Atlanta, Georgia, being attached to the division com- 
manded by General Frank P. Blair, and took part in the many engagements 
during the famous march to the sea. At one of the hardest fought engage- 
ments the brave General McPherson lost his life. Subsequently with the 
remaining members of his regiment Mr. Pugh was present at the grand 
review in Washington, D. C, after which he received his honorable dis- 
charge from service, July i6, 1865, at Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illlinois. 

Shortly after the close of the war Mr. Pugh settled at Parker City, In- 
diana, remaining there until 1893, when he removed to Desoto, Delaware 
county. For the past twenty years he has been prosperously employed ii> 
agricultural pursuits, and as mentioned above has cleared and improved a 
beautiful and valuable farm, on which he resides, contented and happy. 

In Parker City, Indiana, Mr. Pugh married Carrie Beverl)', who was 
born in Wayne county, Indiana, near Fountain City, a daughter of Thomas 
Beverly, who married Sarah Aldre, by whom he had a family of fifteen 
children, two sons and thirteen daughters. Of this large family but three 
children survive, namely : William, the oldest son, Mrs. Elizabeth Pitts, of 
Hagerstown, and Mrs. Pugh. Both Mr. and Mrs. Beverly were born in 
North Carolina, and both died in Wayne county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pugh are the parents of two children, namely : Mrs. Ethel Ault, of Desoto, 
and Harry. Politically Mr. Pugh is a decided Republican, and socially he 
is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Eben L. Lewis. Among the wideawake, energetic and prosperous 
business men of Albany Eben L. Lewis holds high rank, having been here 
successfully engaged as a dealer in real estate for the past ten years. He 
is widely known througiiout Delaware county, and at the present time is 
making a specialty of selling Southern Texas lands, dealing largely in lands 
lying in the southwestern part of that state. A son of Abraham Lewis, he 
was born in Hartford City, Blackford county, Indiana, November, 22, 1868. 
He is of pioneer ancestry, his paternal grandfather. Job Lewis, having emi- 
grated from Pennsylvania, his native state, to Indiana in 1835. 

Abraham Lewis spent a large part of his life at Hartford City, living 
there until his death in 1875. His wife survives him and is still a resident 
of that place. He was a faithful member of the United Brethren church, 
he and his wife joining when young. They were the parents of three 
children. 

Attending the public schools of his native city when \X)ung, Eben L. 
Lewis wa-s a bright, ambitious student, and easily won a reputation for 
ability and intelligence. He subsequently studied pharmacy, and after leav- 
ing Hartford City was for several 3'ears engaged in the drug business at 
Kokomo, Indiana. Coming from there to Albany, Mr. Lewis was for two 
years connected with a mill, after which he engaged in the sale of real 
estate in this vicinitv. From vear to year he has enlarged his operations, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 939 

and is now dealing chiefly in Texas lands, with which he is well acquainted, 
having traveled extensively in that state. As a man of honor and integrity, 
upright in all of his dealings, he has the respect and esteem of his fellow 
men and as a valued citizen is held in high regard. 

In Carroll county, Indiana, Mr. Lewis married iVIary Dunn, a daughter 
of Isaac Dunn, of Kokomo, and they have one child, Esther. Mrs. Lewis is 
a pleasant, accomphshed woman, and a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. Lewis takes an intelligent interest in public matters 
and has rendered the city valuable service, having for two years been a 
member of the common council and a member of the Albany school board 
for the same length of time. Socially he is a member of lodge No. 171, A. 
F. & A. M., and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which is is a 
past grand. 

Claude A. Burdick. A man of superior business qualities, intelligent 
and capable, Claude A. Burdick is intimately associated with the advance- 
ment of those interests which so largely assist in promoting the welfare of 
Albany and add to its attractions as a business and residential city. He is 
officially connected with one of the important organizations of the place, be- 
ing secretary and treasurer of the Wheeler Gas & Oil Company, which fur- 
nishes light and fuel to the people. A son of C. A. Burdick, Sr., he was 
born March 17, 1879, at Smethport, McKean county, Pennsylvania, in the 
heart of the oil region, where his father was for thirty-five years engaged in 
mercantile business. He comes of honored colonial ancestry, being de- 
scended from an old and well known New England family. His great-great- 
grandfather, Hazard Burdick, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, which 
entitles Mr. Burdick, of this review, as well as his father and brother to be- 
come members of the great order in America known as the Sons and Daugh- 
ters of the Revolution, an honor few can claim. His brother, Ralph E. Bur- 
dick, is a successful business man of Smethport, Pennsylvania, holding the 
position of treasurer with the Hamlin Bank and Trust Company. 

Growing to manhood in his native county, Claude A. Burdick received 
a practical common school education, and at the age of fourteen years began 
working in the oil fields. During the Spanish-American war he served for 
eight months as a member of Company B, Fourteenth Minnesota Volunteer 
Infantry, under command of Captain Bartlett. He subsequently spent some 
time in the oil regions of West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana, there 
becoming familiar with the details of the oil industry. In February, 1906, 
Mr. Burdick came to Albany, and since making this city his home has been 
an important factor in advancing its business and financial enterprises. In 
February, 1906, when the Wheeler Gas and Oil Company was incorporated, 
with H. A. Wheeler as president and John R. Brown as vice president, he 
was made its secretary and treasurer, positions that he is filling with ability 
and fidelity. After its organization this company purchased the gas plants, 
the Cooperative Gas Light, Fuel and Petroleum Mining and Exploring Com- 



940 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

panv, and other gas wells in this vicinity, and has established business on a 
substantial foundation. It has since put in pipes and lines to all parts of the 
town, and partially to Delaware and Niles townships, and is giving general 
satisfaction to its many patrons, in the management of its plant being ably 
assisted by Mr. Burdick, who is experienced in all matters pertaining to the 
oil and gas business, and is an exceptionally good mechanic. The Wheeler 
Gas and Oil Company has become a fixture and one of the stable enterprises 
of the pretty town of Albany, as well as its contiguous territory, and is prov- 
ing a blessing to the citizens or patrons. Politically Mr. Burdick is identified 
with the Republican partv, and socially he is a member of Bethel lodge, No. 
731, I. O. O. F. ' ■ 

Benjamin J. Zehner. Occupying a prominent position among the 
leading agriculturists of Delaware township is Benjamin J. Zehner, who is 
prosperously engaged in his free and independent occupation on section 12, 
where he has a good farm of one hundred and one acres. His land is under 
a most excellent state of tillage, and he is paying considerable attention to 
stock interests as a general farmer, working intelligently and ably. He is in 
the prime of life, his birth having occurred June 5, 1867, on the homestead 
farm of his father, the late Daniel Zehner. His grandfather, Benjamin Zeh- 
ner, was a pioneer settler of this township, and soon after his arrival here 
built a grist mill, which he operated for many years, carrying on an extensive 
milling business. 

Born and bred on a farm. Daniel Zehner continued a farmer during his 
entire life of fifty-six years, living in Delaware township. He married 
Sarah Bantz, by whom he had three children, namely : Orry M., of Athens, 
Alabama ; Benjamin J., the subject of this brief biographical sketch ; and 
Eli A., of Bloomington, Indiana. The mother died when but twenty-five 
years of age, leaving her little family desolate, indeed. She and her husband 
were both sincere and faithful members of the Lutheran church. 

Left motherless when a small child, Benjamin J. Zehner was brought 
up in his Grandfather Zehner 's family, receiving his early education in the 
common schools. He assisted as a boy in the labors of the farm, thus receiv- 
ing a training in agricultural pursuits that has since been of inestimable 
value to him. Starting in life on his own account, he purchased land lying 
in section 12 as before stated, and by dint of energy, perseverance and wise 
management has brought it to an excellent state of culture, it being, now one 
of the most fertile and productive of any in the neighborhood. Among other 
improvements of value which he has placed upon it is a handsome two-story 
house, containing eight rooms, and substantial outbuildings, these, with their 
pleasant environments, standing to-day as a monument to his good manage- 
ment and fine business qualities. 

On May 25, 1899, Mr. Zehner married Amy E. De Haven, their mar- 
riage being celebrated on the old De Haven homestead. Her father, Abijah 
De Haven, was bom and bred in Virginia, but when a young man came to 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 941 

Delaware county in search of fortune, and here married Martha C. Strong, 
a daughter of John W. Strong, of whom further ancestral history may be 
found elsewhere in this wxirk in connection with the sketch of George R. 
Strong. Mr. and Mrs. De Haven reared four children, namely: John W., 
living on the parental homestead: Frank L.. of this township; Amy E., wife 
of Mr. Zehner; and Jesse O., of this township. Three children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Zehner, namely : Frances P., Martha W. and a son 
that died in infancy. Both Mr. and Mrs. Zehner are highly esteemed and 
respected members of the society which surrounds them and enjoy the 
confidence and regard of all who know them. As an enterprising and pro- 
gressive farmer Mr. Zehner has no superior in this part of the state. Mrs. 
Zehner is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Their pretty home- 
stead is known as "The Catalpa Avenue Farm." 

D.wiD Michael. Prominent among the representative agriculturists of 
Delaware township is David Michael, proprietor of Oakland Farm, which is 
finely located on section 15, two and one-half miles from Albany. He is 
a man of energy, enterprise and good business capacity, and has ever been a 
useful member of the community, ably assisting in developing and promoting 
its best interests. A son of Adam Michael, he was born August 12, 1847, 
in Clark county. Ohio. He comes of loyal and patriotic stock, his Grand- 
father Michael, a native of Pennsylvania, having fought under General Wil- 
liam H. Harrison in the war of 1812. 

Bom and brought up in Ohio, Adam Michael early turned his attention 
to fanning pursuits, in 1851 taking up land in Delaware county, Indiana, 
whither he had moved with his family. By dint of persevering labor he 
cleared a large tract of wild land and improved the comfortable homestead 
on which he spent the remainder of his life, dying at the age of fifty-six 
years. He was twice married. By his second wife, whose maiden name was 
Catherine Over, he had six children, two of whom are now living, namely: 
David, with whom this sketch is chiefly concerned, and Emma, wife of Joseph 
Zehner, of Albany. By his first marriage he had two children, one of whom, 
George Michael, of Niles township, served as a soldier in the Civil war. 
Both parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

But four years of age when he came with his parents to Delaware town- 
ship, David Michael was here bred and educated. In his boyhood days fine 
school buildings, spacious church edifices, costly residences and substantial 
barns were things unknown in this locality. Neither telegraph nor telephone 
lines spanned these broad acres, nor were the luxurious railway trains of 
this day known. In strange contrast to the well-equipped school buildings of 
today was the rude log cabin, with its slab seats and desks, in which -he ob- 
tained the rudiments of his education, and in which his half-brother, William 
Michael, for a time wielded the birch. On the paternal homestead while 
yet a boy Mr. Michael obtained a practical insight into the mysteries of agri- 
culture, and has since made this his principal occupation. Profiting by his 



942 I-II STORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

father's knowledge and experience, he has been very successful as a general 
farmer, his estate, known far and wide as "The Oakland Farm," having its 
one hundred and eighty acres of choice land under excellent cultivation and 
management. It is amply supplied with the best machinery for carrying on 
his work after the latest approved modern methods, while his residence is 
comfortable and conveniently arranged, the place being one of the most at- 
tractive in the community. On this farm there have been about twenty oil 
wells, mostly in operation at present. 

Mr. Michael married, October 31, 1878, Catherine Zehner, a daughter of 
Benjamin and Hester (Hoppis) Zehner, pioneer settlers of this township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael are the parents of three children, namely: Samuel 
Wilbur, of Delaware township, who married Miss Nellie Simmons ; Hester, 
living at home, and Joseph W., who married Miss Hazel Bartlett and owns 
and occupies a farm near his old home. In his political views Mr. Michael 
is independent, using his own best judgment in casting his ballot. Religiously 
he belongs to the Christian church of Albany and Mrs. Michael is a member 
of the Lutheran church. 

George Seward Sheller. Delaware township is a rich and fertile 
agricultural center and among the enterprising and self-reliant men who are 
ably conducting its farming interests is George Seward Sheller, owning and 
occupying a good homestead on section 20. He was born in Delaware town- 
ship this county, September 5, 1854, a son of Adam Sheller, a pioneer settler 
of that place. 

A native of Ohio, Adam Sheller was born and reared in Clark county, 
jnd there learned the rudiments of farming as carried on in those early days. 
Soon after taking upon himself the cares and responsibilities of a married 
man he migrated westward, coming to Delaware county in search of land 
that he could afford to buy. Taking up a tract of land that was still in its 
virgin wildness, he erected a small log cabin, and at once began the improv- 
ing of a homestead. He was an earnest and honest tiller of the soil, and by 
dint of persevering labor succeeded in making his one hundred and sixty 
acres of land one of the best farming estates in the locality. He acquired an 
assured position among the foremost farmers of the community, living there 
an honored and respected citizen until his death at a venerable age. He 
married, when but nineteen years old, Mary Pittenger, who was born in 
Pennsylvania but was reared and educated in Ohio. Of their union ten chil- 
dren were born, namely : Airs. Barbara Lake, of Minneapolis, Minnesota ; 
Jacob H., who was killed by a railroad accident in 1907, at the age of sixty- 
three years, leaving a widow and three children ; Elizabeth, deceased ; John 
B., of Dunkirk, Indiana; George Seward, the subject of this sketch; Mary 
Nancy, Harriett, Henry M. and Isaiah, all deceased ; and Ner P., a resi- 
dent of the old homestead in Delaware township, who married Miss Margaret 
Boyd, and they have two children living and one dead. The parents were 
both good. Christian people, belonging to the Methodist Episcopal church, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 943 

contributing generously towards tlie support of public worship, and the father 
was for many years an officer of the church, serving as trustee and steward. 

Reared on the home farm, George Seward Sheller attended the district 
school as a boy, and as soon as old enough began to assist his father in the 
management of the homestead, working with true pioneer courage. Starting 
in life for himself he continued his agricultural pursuits, and nearly a quar- 
ter of a century ago purchased the land on which he now resides. The soil 
was rich, yielding readily to cultivation, and under the judicious manage- 
ment of Mr. Sheller has become one of the most productive farms in the 
township. Maple Grove, as he has named his estate, is well improved and is 
furnished with a substantial set of farm buildings and plenty of machinery 
of the most approved kinds for carrying on agricultural work. 

At Granville, Delaware county, September 27, 1883, Mr. Sheller mar- 
ried Harriet Crooks, who was born in that town January 16, 1863, a daugh- 
ter of Calvin Crooks. Mr. Crooks moved from Huntington county, Indiana, 
to this county, becoming a pioneer of Niles township. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Harriett Becker, was born in New York state, and died in 
Indiana, at the early age of twenty-seven years, leaving two children, George 
M., who died when forty-five years old, and Mrs. Sheller. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sheller are the parents of ten children, namely : Mary E., wife of Ira Madill, 
of this township ; Glen, Adam, Gertrude, Rose, Paul, Robert, Lettie, Arthur 
and Calvin. Politically Mr. Sheller supports the principles of the Democratic 
party by voice and vote. Religiously Mrs. Sheller is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

John W. Marsh. Prominent among the representative agriculturists 
of Delaware township is John W. Marsh, who is busily engaged in the prose- 
cution of his independent calling on one of the most valuable and attractive 
estates in this part of the county, the farm being widely known as "The 
A'laples." He is a son of the late Charles Marsh, and a grandson of one John 
Marsh, who was born in old Virginia, of Irish ancestry, and died in Indiana 
at the age of seventy-eight years. 

A native of Virginia, Charles Marsh was born February 25, 1819. At 
the age of seventeen years he migrated with his parents to Ohio, locating in 
Greene county, where he assisted in the pioneer labors of clearing and im- 
proving a farm. Following in the footsteps of his ancestors, he selected 
agriculture as the occupation to which he should devote his energies, and for 
a few years was employed in tilling the soil in Ohio. In 1866 he came with 
his family to Delaware township, purchased a tract of land and began life 
in this state in the small log cabin which stood upon the estate. Industrious, 
energetic and farsighted, he labored untiringly, and in his agricultural labors 
met with eminent success. He made valuable improvements and was amply 
repaid by fortune for all the trials and privations that he endured in his early 
days. In 1876 he erected a large and commodious frame house, and in course 
of time had a fine set of farm buildings on his place, which was named "The 



9i4: HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Maples." The home farm consists of one hundred and ten acres of grain, 
pasture and wood land, and in addition to other improvements has a fine 
bearing orchard. In the care of this homestead he took great pleasure and 
delight, living upon it until his death, which occurred April ii, 1904, at the 
venerable age of eighty-five years. He was everywhere respected as a man 
of sterling worth and honesty, and as a citizen occupied a place of influence. 
He was a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican part)', and 
was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Charles Marsh married, in 1857, in Greene county, Ohio, Jane 
Maxey, who proved herself a worthy wife and helpmate to her husband. She 
was born in Xenia, Greene county, Ohio, October 14, 183 1, a daughter of 
Martin and Martha (Scarff) Maxey, both of whom were born in Virginia, 
from whence they removed to Ohio, where they spent the remainder of their 
lives. Of the children born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Marsh 
four are living, namely : Martha E., wife of Henry S. Pittenger, of Black- 
ford county, Indiana ; Laura L., who lives mostly on the home farm ; James 
M., of Smitlifield, and John W., the subject of this sketch. One daughter, 
Mrs. Mary C. Pittenger, died at the age of thirty-five years, leaving two chil- 
dren, .\lcia C. and Wayne G. 

William L. Cory. Closely identified with the manufacturing interests 
of Albany is William L. Cory, secretary and treasurer of the Albany Auto- 
mobile Works. A man of sterling integrity, honest and upright in all of his 
dealings, he is held in high regard throughout the community in which he re- 
sides not only as an able business man but as a useful and valued citizen. A 
son of Michael Cory, he was born in Delaware county, Indiana, April 6, 
1862, coming from substantial pioneer stock, his grandfather, Daniel Cory, 
a native of Ohio, having migrated from that state to Indiana at a very early 
day. 

Michael Cory was born in Henry county, Indiana, and there received 
his early education, attending the pioneer school of his time. Becoming a 
farmer, he was successfully employed as a tiller of the soil, teacher and mer- 
chant during his active career, and now, at the age of seventy-one, is living 
on the old homestead near Matthews, Indiana. He married Louisa Canada, 
who was born in Wayne county, Indiana, the descendant of a prominent 
Quaker family of that county. 

After leaving the public schools where he received his rudimentary edu- 
cation W. L. Cory continued his studies at Danville, Indiana, after which he 
attended the State Normal School at Terre Haute. At the age of nineteen 
years he embarked upon a professional career, and during the time that he 
was engaged as a teacher won an excellent reputation as an educator and 
disciplinarian. He taught in various places in this state, being in Tipton two 
years, at Middletown three years, at Sheldon three years, and for six years 
served most acceptably as principal and superintendent of the Albany schools. 
When, on September 28, 1906, the Albany Automobile Works were organ- 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 945 

ized, with about t\venty of the city's most enterprising men as stockholders, 
Mr. Cory became the secretary and treasurer of tlie company, the other of- 
ficers being J. L. Tulley, president, and Walter Bryan, vice president. Mr. 
Tulley, the head of the firm, is a man of much mechanical and executive abil- 
ity, and is patentee of the machine here made. 

The plant of the Albany Automobile Works is advantageously located, 
the main building being a fine, two-story brick, ninety by one hundred and 
twenty-five feet, and its various departments, including the macliine shop, the 
power house, assembling, paint and test rooms, are thoroughly equipped with 
all modern machinery and appliances used in an automobile factory. Since 
its establishment this factory has built up a prosperous business, its cars be- 
ing sold all over the country, from Maine to California. In July, 1907, seven 
cars were shipped to different states of the Union. 

Mr. Cory was married, March 29, 1886, to Ida Eastes, a daughter of Dr. 
W. T. Eastes. She is a talented and cultured woman, and prior to her mar- 
riage was a very successful teacher in the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cory are the parents of two children, namely : Edith M. and Harold A. 
Fraternally Mr. Cory is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Religiously he is a consistent 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

James W. St. Clair. Numbered among the skilful and successful agri- 
culturists of Delaware county is James W. St. Clair, whose well-managed and 
well-kept farm is located on section 10. Enterprising and progressive, he 
holds high rank among the useful and influential men of his community, 
and as a citizen is eminently worthy of the respect and esteem so generously 
accorded him. He is a man of striking presence, tall and well proportioned, 
standing six feet high, weighing two hundred and twenty-six pounds, and is 
of good muscular development. A son of the late Thomas St. Clair, Jr., he 
vvas born July 11, 1855, in Grafton, Taylor county, West Virginia, and there 
was bred and educated. He comes of distinguished ancestry, being a lineal 
descendant of General Arthur St. Clair, who served as an officer in the Revo- 
lutionary army, and subsequently won laurels as an Indian fighter, being 
the hero of several engagements with the savages in both Ohio and Indiana. 

A son of Thomas St. Clair, Sr., Thomas St. Clair, Jr., was born in West 
Virginia, and spent the larger part of his active career as a tiller of the soil, 
although for a while he was in the employ of the government as a wagon 
master. He married Drusilla Shaffer, who was born in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, of German ancestry, being the daughter of Jacob Shaffer. 
She died September 10, 1906, esteemed and beloved for the strength and 
simplicity of her character and the purity and uprightness of her life. He 
was a man of fine character, a sturdy supporter of the principles of the Re- 
publican party, and, with his wife, belonged to the United Brethren church. 
Six children were born of 'their union, namely : Loretta Finley ; James W., 
the special subject of this sketch : Arlington, of Benwood, West Virginia : 



946 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

Ossa, of Simpson, West Virginia; Samuel, who is in the employ of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad Company as foreman and superintendent of the 
bridge department, and Arminda Bartlett, of Webster, West Virginia. 

Among the rugged hills and pleasant dales of his native state, James W. 
St. Clair spent his early life, obtaining such education as he could in the com- 
mon schools, subsequently supplementing the knowledge thus acquired by 
extensive reading, observation and experience. While at home he assisted 
in the labors incidental to farming, and has since been almost entirely en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. Soon after beginning his active career Mr. 
St. Clair came to Indiana in order to verify the glowing reports that he had 
heard in regard to the richness and fertility of its soil, and was so pleased 
with the land and its possibilities that he remained here. Buying his present 
farm of one hundred and twent)^ acres in Delaware township, he has spared 
neither time nor expense in its improvement, and has now one of the most 
comfortable and attractive farming estates to be found in that part of the 
county. A systematic and thorough farmer, his land has been highly culti- 
vated and improved, and everything about his premises indicates in a marked 
degree the care and supervision of a wise manager. 

In Muncie, Indiana, April 14, 1875, Mr. St. Clair married Anna E. 
Markwell, a daughter of Samuel and Catharine (Over) Markwell, both na- 
tives of the Buckeye state. Mr. Markwell was a life-long farmer and a 
member of the Lutheran church. To him and his wife two children were 
born, one being Mrs. St. Clair and the other Henry, a resident of Delaware 
county. Mr. and Mrs. St. Clair are the parents of the following children, 
viz. : Dora Gebhard, of Muncie, Indiana ; Clara Calhoun, of Fair View, and 
Carrie Bader, of Red Key, Indiana, are twins ; Minnie Nenstiel ; Asa E., who 
is married and lives in Delaware township ; Glennie Mabel ; Addie ; Lovema ; 
and Okay R., the eighth child in order of birth, who died, aged eighteen 
months. Mr. St. Clair is a stanch advocate of the temperance cause and 
takes high ground on that issue, and in his political affiliations is a strong 
Prohibitionist. He and his wife and family are members of the Christian 
church at Albany, and he is one of its active workers, serving as clerk in the 
official board. He takes an intelligent interest in public affairs and while a 
resident of Albany served three years as city marshal. One of the progenitors 
of the St. Clairs being an officer in the Continental army during the Revolu- 
tionary war makes him and his posterity eligible to the order of the Sons and 
Daughters of the Revolution. 

Wycliffe W. Ross. A residence of fourteen years in the city of Albany 
has rendered Wycliffe W. Ross familiar to the majority of the people of this 
vicinity, his business as one of the leading livery men of the place bringing 
him in contact with men from all parts of the county. Energetic, intelligent 
and observing, he has made the most of his opportunities in life, keeping his 
eyes open to what is going on around him, and in his chosen occupation has 
met with genuine success. A son of M. L. Ross, he was born in Winchester, 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 947 

Randolph county, February 22, 1877. His paternal grandfather, Rev. Wesley 
D. Ross, a preacher in the Christian church, was one of the pioneer circuit 
riders of Randolph county, and in the pursuance of his pious duties traveled 
over an immense stretch of territory to reach his appointments. In wide 
contrast to the modes of travel by the clergymen of the present day these 
long trips were oft-times laboriously made in rude lumber wagons, and very 
frequently over heavy and almost impassable roads. He was a man of strong 
personality, and for many years was a faithful worker in the Lord's vine"^ 
yard. 

M. L. Ross was born in Parker City, Randolph county, and for upwards 
ot thirty-five years has been engaged in the livery business in his native 
county. He is numbered among the substantial citizens of his home town 
and is one of the earnest supporters of the Republican party. He married 
Sabma J. McNess, a daughter of John B. McNess, of Randolph county and 
into their household eight children were born, namely : W. W., the subject 
of this sketch ; Bertha, deceased ; Marion A., Grace E., M. C Rose E 
Ralph McNess and Jesse S. . , ., 

Attending the public schools during his earlier years, Wvcliffe W Ross 
obtained a substantial education, and as soon as old enough to begin the 
battle of life on his own account embarked in the business followedV his 
father. In 1903 he located in Albany, at the corner of Broadway and State 
street, where he has a large, two-story brick building, admirably adapted for 
a hvery stable. He keeps a fine stock of horses, good roadsters, gentle and 
speedy, and has a good supply of up-to-date carriages and surreys Thor- 
oughly acquainted with the business in which he is so successfully employed 
Mr. Ross has won a large and lucrative patronage in Albany and vicinity' 
and is known as one of the most accommodating and popular liverymen of 
this section of the state. 

In Albany, Indiana. December 12, 1901, Mr. Ross married Rosa B 
Wroughton, daughter of John H. and Mary E. (Starr) Wroughton. John 
H. Wroughton died September 29, 1907, and is interred in Muskogee, Indian 
Territory. John F. McNally was the great-grandfather of Mrs. Ross and 
her grandfather, Cyrus L. Wroughton, was one of the earliest settlers of 
Delaware township, Delaware county. Four children have been born of the 
umon of Mr. and Mrs. Ross, namely: Lafe E., Lelia E., Naomi Grace and 
Vivian Pearl. 

Cyrus J. Stafford. Among the wideawake, energetic and progressive 
agriculturists of Delaware county who have attained success from a financial 
point of view is Cyms J. Stafford, a well-known farmer and stock raiser 
who has won an extended reputation as a breeder and raiser of fine horses' 
He was born July 3, 1869, in Delaware township, which was likewise the 
birthplace of his father, George A. Stafford. He comes of good old Irish 
stock, his great-grandparents, George and Catherine (Fair) Stafford havin- 



948 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

emigrated from Ireland, where they were born and bred, to the United States, 
locating in old Virginia. 

Ralph Stafford, the grandfather of Cyrus J., was born in 1806 in Giles 
countv, Virginia. In early manhood, desiring to try the hazard of new for- 
tunes, he crossed the country to Indiana, at times following an almost track- 
less path through the dense forests. Locating in Delaware township, he 
purchased a tract of wild land, on which his first improvement was the erec- 
tion of a log cabin for a dwelling. He was a hard-working, persevering 
man, and as a farmer met with success, living on the homestead which he 
cleared until his death. He married Jane Black, who was born May 30, 
1815, in Clark county, Ohio, a daughter of Andrew and Susan (Ross) Black, 
and into the household thus established five children were born, namely: 
George A., James E., John H., William H. and Susan M. 

George A. Stafford was born on the parental homestead, in this town- 
ship, November 23, 1835, and has here spent his entire life. When old 
enough to labor he assisted his father in the labors of the farm, watching with 
gratification its gradual transformation into a rich and productive estate. 
He subsequently embarked in agricultural pursuits on his own account, and, 
profiting by the lessons learned in the days of his youth, became very pros- 
perous as a farmer, acquiring much wealth, and early becoming a citizen of 
prominence and influence. He married Sarah A. Zehner, who was born 
June 14, 1844, in Wayne county, where her parents, Bert and Heste! 
(Hoppis) Zehner, were early settlers. Of their union four children were 
born, namely: David R., who died in February, 1898, at the age of thirty- 
one years; Cyrus J., the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Emma C. Brammer, 
and Roy J. 

Brought up on the home farm, Cyrus J. Stafford acquired a good com- 
mon school education, and while yet a youth became familiar with farm 
work. Having a natural aptitude for farming, it followed as a matter of 
course that he should specially study its various branches and make this in- 
dustry his lifework. As he accumulated money Mr. Stafford wisely invested 
it in land, and has now a finely-improved farm of one hundred and fifteen 
acres, well located in a rich agricultural region. He makes a specialty of 
raising hackney horses, having on his stock farm some of the finest horses 
of that grade to be found in this part of Indiana. A young man of ambition, 
energy and excellent business ability, he is making a grand success in his 
operations, his life record thus far being such as to reflect credit on the place 
of his nativity. 

In 1892, in Delaware township, Mr. Stafford married Cora Marquell, 
who was born here, a daughter of James Marquell, a well-known resident 
and one of its representative men. Mr. Marquell is a native bom citizen, his 
birth occurring January 7, 1844, on the homestead improved by his father, 
Nason Marquell. Of English ancestry, Nason Marquell was born and reared 
in Virginia. Migrating from there to Ohio, he lived for two years in Greene 
county, from there coming to Delaware county in 1832, as a pioneer settler. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 949 

and was here employed as a tiller of the soil until his death, at the age of 
seventy years. He married Elizabeth Selvey, a daughter of Samuel Selvey, 
who came from Virginia to this township at an early day. She died on the 
home farm, at the age of sixty-five years. She was a true Christian and a 
faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Of the children born 
of their marriage three survive, namely : William, who served in an Ohio 
regiment for four years during the Civil war and is now in the Soldiers' 
Home at Da)ton, Ohio ; Mrs. Lucinda McGallier and James. James Mar- 
quell has been engaged in agricultural pursuits the greater part of his active 
life, and by thoroughgoing, systematic methods and keen foresight in the 
management of his affairs has met with unquestioned success in his opera- 
tions. On September 12, 1865, he married Louisa Godlove, who was born in 
Delaware township, a daughter of Abram and Laura (Sellers) Godlove. 
Four children were born into their home, of whom Cora, wife of Mr. Staf- 
ford, is the only one living. One child died in infancy ; a son, William, died 
when seventeen years old ; and a daughter, Eliza Jane, who married James 
Selvey, died at the age of thirty-two years, leaving one child. 

Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Stafford four children have been born, 
namely : Ethel E., Cloyd C, Irvine E. and Lottie. 

Lewis H. Stoner. Distinguished as a native born citizen of Delaware 
county and as an enterprising and progressive business man of .A-lbany, L. H. 
Stoner is eminently worthy of representation in this biographical volume. A 
son of Frederick Stoner, he was born October 12, 1857, in Delaware town- 
ship, not far from Albany, and there spent the days of his boyhood and 
youth. 

Coming from Ohio to Lidiana at an early day, Frederick Stoner settled 
as a pioneer in Delaware township. Purchasing a tract of wild land, he built 
a rude log house for himself and family, and with characteristic industry and 
courage began the improvement of a homestead. For many years he carried 
on general farming successfully, and at the same time followed his trade of a 
brickmason. Li this capacity he assisted in the building of many of the sub- 
stantial residences of the place, including among others the home of J. B. 
McKinney. A man of sterling integrity and worth, he was held in high re- 
spect throughout the community in which he resided, his death, which oc- 
curred at the age of seventy-nine years, being a loss to the town and county. 
He married Jane McKinney, who died at the age of sixty-eight years. Nine 
children were bom of their union, three of whom are living, namely: Jeffer- 
son, of Des Moines, Iowa; James; and Lewis H., the special subject of this 
brief sketch. 

Growing to man's estate on the home farm, Lewis H. Stoner attended 
the pioneer schools of the neighborhood, and under the wise tuition of his 
parents was trained to habits of industrj' and economy, thus in youth laying 
the foundations for hfs subsequent success in life. Soon after embarking 
in business on his own account Mr. Stoner turned his attention to the manu- 



950 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

facture of cement posts, and in recent 3'ears has made such improvements in 
the admixture of sand, gravel and cement that the products of his plant are 
well known throughout the middle west, the Stoner cement posts finding 
a ready market in Indiana, Illinois, Canada and other places of importance. 
He is the first person who ever made the cement telegraph or telephone poles 
of Portland cement. In the manufacture and sale of posts Mr. Stoner has 
acquired a competence, and in addition to owning a handsome residence in 
Albany has other property of value. 

In Jay county, Indiana, September 13, 1877, Mr. Stoner married Ida 
Rees, who was born in Ohio, but was brought up and educated in Jay county. 
Five children have been born of their marriage, namely : Ethel, Glen, Pearl, 
Lora and Robert. In politics Mr. Stoner is independent, working for the 
best men and measures regardless of party prejudices. Socially he is a mem- 
ber of the Improved Order of Red Men. 

Columbus L. Friddle. Conspicuous among the many energetic, pro- 
gressive and practical farmers of Delaware township is Columbus L. Frid- 
dle, who is successfully engaged in his independent vocation on one of the 
most pleasant and desirable homesteads in this part of the state. He is an ex- 
cellent representative of the native born citizens of this place, his birth hav- 
ing occurred August 30, 1859, on the farm which his father, John W. Frid- 
dle, cleared from its original wildness. His grandfather, Moses Friddle, 
was born in South Carolina, being the descendant of a family that emigrated 
from Germany to the United States in early colonial times. He lived in 
Charleston, South Carolina, many years, but in, or about, 1836, accompanied 
by his family, he journeyed to Greene county, Ohio, crossing the intervening 
country with ox teams and carrying with him all of his worldly possessions. 

John W. Friddle was bom in 1823 in South Carolina, where he lived 
until fourteen years of age. Going then with his parents to Ohio, he re- 
mained in Greene county until 1846, when, following the trail of the pioneer, 
he came to Indiana, locating in Delaware township. Taking up land that 
was in its primitive condition, he labored unceasingly and ere many years 
had elapsed had a good farm, much of which was under cultivation and 
producing good crops each year. Thus successfully employed in tilling the 
soil he spent the remainder of his long life, dying in February, 1905, at the 
advanced age of eighty-two years. He married Mrs. Mary J. (Campbell) 
Boots, a widow, who by her first husband had three children, namely : Daniel 
D. Boots, xA.dam Boots and Anna Boots. Of Mr. Friddle's union with 
Mrs. Boots four sons and two daughters were born, namely: James C, Levi 
M., Elizabeth C, George B., Columbus L. and Mary E., but she died when 
fourteen years old. The parents were valued members of the Christian 
church. The mother preceded her husband to the better world, dying in 
1886. aged sixty-eight years. 

After leaving the district school Columbus L. Friddle continued his 
studies for a time at a select school, remaining at home until 1886. Reared 




ffl 



u 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 953 

to agricultural pursuits, he found pleasure as well as profit in the occupa- 
tion, and when ready to establish himself as a householder he took possession 
of his present property, which is finely located, and has since continued the 
improvements previously started. By persistent energy, well-directed toil 
and exceptional business ability on his part he has as good and productive a 
farm as can be found in this vicinity, consisting of grain, grass, pasture and 
woodland, and in addition to this has two large oil producing wells, which 
add greatly to the value of the estate. 

On February ii, 1888, Mr. Friddle married, in Delaware township, 
Mary M. Cartright, who was born in this township November 8, 1863, a 
daughter of Henry Cartright. Mr. Cartright, one of the substantial farmers 
of this neighborhood, was born in Cambridgeshire, England, and there lived 
until twenty-eight years old, when he emigrated to America, locating first in 
Ohio, from tliere coming to Indiana. He married Barbara Fulhart, a daugh- 
ter of John and Mary (Fulhart) Fulhart, and they became the parents of 
tliree children, namely: Mrs. Mary M. Friddle, wife of the subject of this 
sketch; Mrs. Oma J. Saunders, of Delaware township; and Sarah A., who 
married Levi H. Hollaway, and died, leaving one son, Everett Hollaway. Mr. 
and Mrs. Friddle are the parents of three children, namely: John C, in the 
senior class of the Albany High school; Herschel B., in the Albany High 
school, a member of the fresliman class ; and Clarence G., in the sixth year 
of the school. Politically Mr. Friddle is a sound Democrat. Fraternally 
he is a member of Heart and Hand Lodge, No. 361, I. O. O'. F., of Albany ; 
of Fair View Encampment, No. 92, of Albany ; 'and both he and his wife 
belong to Rebecca Lodge, No. 433, of Albany. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. 
Friddle are faithful members of the Christian church, and in their daily walks 
of life exemplify its teachings. Mr. and Mrs. Friddle have one of the old 
parchment deeds which was executed by President Martin Van Buren and 
dated August i, 1837. This is the twelfth deed of the kind found in the 
county. 

Levi Booher. Numbered among the enterprising farmers of Delaware 
county who have met with success in their chosen occupation and are now 
enjoying a comfortable competency, acquired chiefly by their own exertions, 
is Levi Booher, living near Albany. A son of the late Daniel Booher, he was 
born July 4, 1850, in Randolph county, Indiana. His paternal grandfather, 
John Booher, was bom in Pennsylvania, of German ancestors, but after his 
marriage moved to Darke county, Ohio, where he and his wife spent their 
remaining years. 

Born and educated on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, Daniel Booher 
grew to manhood beneath the parental rooftree. Although poor in pocket 
when he started in life on his own account, he was blessed with strong 
hands, a willing heart, indomitable courage, and a never failing energy that 
enabled him to cope successfully with all difficulties that arose. De dding to 
try life in a newer country, he walked from Darke county, Ohir,' to Ran- 



954 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

dolph count}', Indiana, and locating in what is now Farmland, took up land 
from the government. Laboring with characteristic industry, he improved 
a good homestead, on which he resided until his death. He married, first, 
Susanna Booher, who died on the home farm in Farmland at the early age of 
thirty-three years, leaving five children, namely : Catherine, John Wesley, 
Josiah, Levi and George R. He married for his second wife Mary Shank, by 
whom he had three children : Manuel, Elizabeth H. and Henry. He was a 
man of fine character and a member of the German Baptist church. He 
attained the venerable age of eighty-six years, and during his long life was 
honored and respected as an honest man, a good citizen, and a kind neighbor 
and friend. 

Brought up on a farm, Levi Booher developed an aptitude for agricul- 
tural pursuits, and at the age of nineteen years began the battle of life for 
himself as a tiller of the soil, an occupation in which he has since been most 
prosperously employed. 

At the age of twenty-two years, September 26, 1872, Mr. Booher mar- 
ried Amelia G. Campbell, who was born in Randolph county, June 29, 1852, 
a daughter of Samuel Campbell and a granddaughter of James Campbell, 
a pioneer settler of this place, and the original owner of the homestead now 
owned and occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Booher. Samuel Campbell was born 
in Ohio, and there married Paulina Gibson. They subsequently came to 
Delaware township as pioneers, and here spent the remainder of his long 
life, dying when eighty-one years old. She is living, at the age of eighty- 
six years. They reared six children, namely : Eliza, William D., Amelia 
G., now Mrs. Booher, Amanda, Elizabeth and Thomas H. The two latter 
died, both leaving families. Mr. Booher has one hundred and five acres of 
rich and arable land in his estate, and is carrying on general farming with 
undisputed success. He has made substantial improvements on the place, 
having erected new buildings of modern construction, his barns and out- 
buildings being commodious and convenient, and his farm well supplied 
with the requisite appliances for carrying on agricultural operations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Booher are the parents of seven children, namely: Myrtle 
lola. Forest Violet, Samuel C, Thomas E., Ivy Dell, Naomi V. and War- 
ren Waldo. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Booher are earnest and valued mem- 
bers of the Christian church in Delaware. Their daughter Naomi, who was 
an invalid for many years, was cured by faith and prayer, her recovery 
becoming completed on January 18, 1906. 

Isaac Mann. Noteworthy among the active, enterprising and pro- 
gressive men who did so much towards the development and advancement 
of the various interests of Albany was the late Isaac Mann, who was prac- 
tically a lifelong resident of this part of Delaware county, coming here 
with is parents when a child of two years. He was born in Highland 
county^ Ohio, near Leesburg, June 12, 1834, a son of Warner Mann and 
a grand.?on of Joseph Mann. 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 955 

Joseph Mann was born in Delaware, and there married EHzabeth 
Blades. He subsequently migrated to Ohio, locating in Highland county, 
from there coming to Niles township, Indiana, where both he and his wife 
spent the closing days of their lives. He was a man of strong character, 
honest and upright in his principles, and an excellent representative of the 
honored Quaker family from which he was descended. 

A native of Delaware, Warner Mann was taken to Ohio by his parents 
when a small boy, and there grew to man's estate. A man of much push 
and energy, he saw unlimited possibilities in the uncultivated lands of 
Indiana, and in 1836 came to Niles township, bringing with him his family 
and all of his worldly goods. He subsequently took up land in Delaware 
township, and within the limits of Albany cleared and improved a large 
tract of land, rendering his homestead one of the best in point of improve- 
ments and equipments of any in the locality. He married, in Highland 
county, Ohio, Nancy, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Pavy, and they 
became the parents of the following named cliildren : Elizabeth, deceased ; 
Mary, deceased ; Mrs. Rhoda W^right, of Delaware township ; Joseph, who 
settled in California ; Isaac, the subject of this biographical sketch ; Mar- 
tin, of Dunkirk ; and Thomas, who died at the age of three years. Warner 
Mann died in manhood's prime, being but forty-four years of age, but his 
wife, who survived him, attained the ripe old age of four score and four 
years. Politically he was a stanch Abolitionist, and with his keen knowl- 
edge of public affairs foresaw the Civil war. Both he and his wife were 
faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

But two years of age when he was brought to Niles township, Isaac 
Mann attended the pioneer schools of his day, and in the log cabin erected 
by his father spent his early years. Subsequently assisting his father in 
the improvement of the homestead in Albany, he became skilled in the vari- 
ous branches pertaining to agriculture, and selected farming as his life occu- 
pation. Energetic and capable, he made a success in his chosen career, his 
farm being well managed and improved, while his farm buildings were 
models of convenience and comfort. Politically Mr. Mann has been. promi- 
nently identified with the Republican party since casting his first presidential 
vote, in 1856, for John C. Fremont, and has served his fellow-townsmen in 
many offices of trust and responsibility, performing the duties devolving 
upon him with ability and fidelity. 

Mr. Mann married, in 1859, Mary L. Krohn, who was born in Albany, 
a daughter of William F. Krohn. ]Mr. Krohn was born in Germany, but 
when a boy came to the United States, locating first in Ohio. He there mar- 
ried Maria Pendray, after which he migrated to Delaware county, becom- 
ing an early householder of Albany, where he spent the remainder of his 
years. Of the children born of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Mann, seven 
grew to years of maturity, namely : Carson M., of Niles township ; Marj-, 
wife of James Maynard ; Anna, wife of R. St. John ; William, of Muncie ; 
Ameldam, wife of George R. Story, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this 



956 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

volume ; Gustave E., deceased ; and Thomas P., of ?kliincie. Mr. Mann 
has been an Odd Fellow for thirty-three years, belonging to Heart and 
Hand Lodge, No. 361, L O. O. F. Mrs. Mann is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

William John Burden. Noted as a native born citizen of Delaware 
township, and as one of the most able and prosperous agriculturists of this 
part of the county, William John Burden is eminently worthy of representa- 
tion in a work of this kind. He holds high rank among the intelligent and 
able farmers of his neighborhood, and is everywhere respected as a substan- 
tial man of business, honor and worth. A son of the late Nehemiah Burden, 
he was born on the homestead where he now resides, March 10, 1851. He 
is the descendant of an old family of prominence in New Jersey, and is 
the grandson of William Burden, formerly an influential citizen of Ohio. 

A native of Ohio, Nehemiah Burden grew to manhood on a farm, and 
finding the life congenial to his tastes, adopted the occupation of his ances- 
tors. Coming when a young man to Delaware county in pursuit of a favor- 
able location in which to locate permanently, he took up eighty acres of 
government land, selecting what he deemed the most desirable tract in the 
vicinity of Albany. Clearing an opening he built the typical log house of 
the pioneer, and for many years afterwards was one of the foremost in 
advancing the settlement of his adopted town. Deer, wild turkeys and 
other game was plentiful at that time, frequently visiting the clearing. 
Meeting with good results in his agricultural labors, he subsequently bought 
other land from time to time, becoming owner before his death, which 
occurred December 14, 1892, at the age of eighty years, of a farm contain- 
ing nine hundred acres of land. He married ^Margaret Campbell, who 
was born in Ohio, a daughter of James Campbell, a pioneer settler of Dela- 
ware township. She died at the age of fifty-three years, leaving seven 
children, namely : Christiana, Elizabeth, Augustine, William John, Cath- 
erine, Julia and Mary J. 

Having completed his early education in the district schools, William 
John Burden, choosing farming for his occupation, made a practical study, 
under the instructions of his father, of the various branches of that industry, 
becoming proficient in the science and art of agriculture. Succeeding to 
the ownership of the homestead, he has made improvements of a marked 
character, his dwelling house, barns and outbuildings being substantial, well 
built structures, admirably adapted for the purposes for which they are 
used. He is busily and successfully engaged in general farming, and has his 
farm, which is a model in its appointments, well stocked with a good grade 
of cattle, horses and hogs. Mr. Burden married, October 12, 1872, Orilla 
M. Wasson, who was born in Blountsville, Indiana, a daughter of Theophi- 
lus and Sarah Wasson, early settlers of Henry county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Burden have one child living, namely: Catherine, wife of Charles May, 
who lives on the home farm. Their other child, Roby, died when but two 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 957 

years old. Mr. and Mrs. May have three children, namely: Anna, Alma 
and Leffler. Politically, Mr. Burden uniformly supports the principles of 
the Democratic party at the polls, and religiously both he and his wife are 
consistent members of the Christian church. 

George R. Strong. Among the native born citizens of Delaware 
township who have spent their lives within its precincts, and have in every 
possible way aided its growth and development, stands George R. Strong, 
whose birth occurred on the homestead where he now resides October 30, 
1854. He is a son of the late Alfred B. Strong and a grandson of Reuben 
Strong, an early pioneer of this place, and the original owner of the home- 
stead property. 

Born in Pennsylvania. Reuben Strong moved to Ohio in early man- 
hood, and there married Barbara Boots. Subsequently coming with ■ his 
family to Delaware township, he took up land from the government on 
. sections 2 and 12, and in course of time, by dint of hard and persistent labor, 
he had title to a good farm of three hundred acres. The small log cabin, 
which was his first dwelling place, was replaced by a substantial frame 
house, in which he and his worthy wife spent their remaining days in com- 
fort and peace. 

A native of Ohio, Alfred B. Strong was born, in 1816, in Greene county, 
where he was bred and educated. In 1832 he came with his parents to 
Delaware county, and assisted in the pioneer work of clearing a farm from 
the primeval woods. Industry, economy and integrity were the first and 
last lessons of his early days in this locality, and were his guiding principles 
through life. He was the third child in a family of seven children, and 
succeeded to the ownership of the old homestead, on which he was pros- 
perously engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1895, at the 
venerable age of seventy-nine years. Generous and liberal, he was always 
an encourager and supporter of everything calculated to advance the wel- 
fare of his community, intellectually, socially or morally, and was an active 
and valued member of the Methodist Episcopal church, which he served as 
clerk and class leader for many years. He was a liberal supporter of the 
church, and gave to the society the ground on which the church edifice was 
erected, and also gave the ground for the cemetery, to the addition of which 
George R. Strong, the subject of this sketch, has promised to give addi- 
tional lots. Under the management of the officers of the Strong Cemetery 
Association, consisting of Harry Waller, president; Elmer Ferguson, sec- 
retary, and R. A. Maxwell, treasurer, the cemetery is admirably kept, resem- 
bling in its appearance a beautiful park. 

Alfred B. Strong married Mary Shearon, who was born in Greene 
county, Ohio, the birthplace of her father, George Shearon, who was also 
an early settler of this part of Delaware county. She died in January, 1872, 
at the comparatively early age of fort>'-three years. Six children blessed 
their union, namely : Reuben, deceased ; Nancy, deceased ; John, deceased ; 



95S HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

George R., with whom this sketch is chiefly concerned ; James A., of Red- 
key, Jay county ; and Mrs. Laura Smith, of Arkansas. 

Brought up and educated on the home farm, which adjoins the city of 
Albany, George R. Strong spent the days of his childhood and youth in 
very much the same manner as most farmers' boys, attending the district 
schools and helping in the harvest fields. He obtained a practical knowl- 
edge of the science and art of agriculture, and, as he reached maturer years, 
decided on farming as his life occupation. Becoming owner of the ances- 
tral homestead and also of a magnificent stock farm, he has since been 
extensively engaged and profitably employed in general farming and stock 
raising. He makes a specialty of keeping poultry, his Barred Plymouth 
Rocks being among the best grade of chickens to be found in the county. 
His large farm is under excellent cultivation, and with its substantial set 
of buildings and their tasteful surroundings, invariably attracts the atten- 
tion of the passer-by, and indicates to what good purpose j\lr. Strong has 
employed his time and means. 

On August 7, 1895, Mr. Strong married Amelda Mann, who before 
her marriage was a successful, and popular school teacher of this locality. 
Her parents, Isaac and Louisa (Krohn) Mann, were early and honored set- 
tlers of Albany. To Mr. and Mrs. Strong three children have been born, 
namely: James Walter, Thomas Lloyd and Alfred Robert, but the last 
named died at the age of fourteen months. Politically Mr. Strong is a 
steadfast adherent of the Republican party, and religiously both he and his 
wife are conscientious members of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Albany, Indiana. Mr. Strong has three of the parchment deeds executed 
under the hand and seal of Presidents Andrew Jackson and Van Buren, 
one dating August 5, 1834, and another February 10, 1835, and the Van 
Buren deed was executed September 20, 1839. This makes eleven deeds 
of the kind found in the county. 

JoHx M. Monroe. Among the substantial business men of Albany no 
one holds a more assured position than John M. Monroe, a well-known 
contractor and builder, his specialty in building materials being cement. 
With this material he takes contracts for building walks, cellars, houses or 
their foundations, and bridges, in his work meeting with great success. A 
son of the late John W. Monroe, Sr., he was born, December 31, 1856, in 
Sidney, Shelby county, Ohio, of old Virginia ancestry. His great-grand- 
father, James M. Monroe, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and this 
entitles Mr. Monroe and his descendants to become members of the great 
order in the United States of the Sons and Daughters of the Revolution. 
Mr. Monroe is also a lineal descendant of the President Monroe. 

John W. Monroe was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, coming from 
an early and honored family of the Old Dominion state. As a young man 
he moved to Ohio, and there, in Shelby county, married Marian Benson, 
the daughter of a well-to-do farmer. Of their union seven children were 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 959 

born, four sons and three daughters, all of vvhoin received good common 
school advantages. 

After completing his early education, John M. Monroe, then a youth 
of seventeen years, began learning the trade of a plasterer and stone mason, 
which he subsequently followed for many years. Since coming to Albany, 
in 1893, Mr. Monroe has worked almost entirely in cement, filling large 
and valuable contracts, among others being the putting in of six hundred 
and forty feet of cement at the Enlow Springs bridge, and one hundred 
and seventy-six yards at the strawboard plant, both expensive pieces of 
work. The twenty-seven years of experience that he has had in his line 
of business has rendered him proficient, and he is kept busy all of the time, 
his honesty, trustworthiness and the durability of his work being fully 
appreciated throughout this part of the state. 

j\Ir. Monroe was married first when but twenty-one years of age, in 
Shelby county, Ohio, to Tryphena Spencer. She died in early womanhood, 
leaving three sons, namely : Harley R., a druggist in Valparaiso, and 
Forest and Fred, who are associated in business with their father. Mr. 
Monroe married, second, October 21, 1891, at Bluft'ton, Ohio, Mary E. Mur- 
ray, a native of that place. In the course of his active career Mr. Monroe 
has accumulated considerable property, and aside from the pleasant home 
that he owns and occupies in Albany, has acquired title to many valuable 
house lots in that vicinity. As a neighbor, friend and citizen he is held in 
high respect. Politically he is an earnest supporter of the principles of 
the Democratic party. Socially he is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows in Albany, to which his three sons also belong, and he is 
likewise a member of the Encampment and has served as a delegate to the 
Grand Lodge. Mrs. Monroe is a faithful and valued member of the Pres- 
byterian church, toward the support of which Mr. i\Ionroe is a generous 
contributor. 

Alexandeir H. Andeirson. Among the sturdy, energetic and able men 
who assisted in developing and advancing the industrial and agricultural 
interests of Delaware county was Alexander H. Anderson, late of Delaware 
township, who was well known throughout this locality as a man of sterling 
worth and integrity, an enterprising and skillful farmer, a patriotic citizen, 
a kind neighbor, a loving husband and father, and his death, which 
occurred January 10, 1907, at the homestead where he had so long resided, 
was a cause of general regret. A native of old Virginia, he vvas born 
March 14, 1842, near Staunton, a son of William Anderson, of thrifty 
Scotch ancestry. 

William Anderson was born and spent the earlier part of his life in 
Virginia. In 1848 he migrated with his family to Indiana, locating in 
Delaware township. He subsequently moved to Edgar county, Illinois, 
where, a few months later, his death occurred. His widow, whose maiden 
name was Jeannette Murray, returned with her family to this township, 



960 HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 

which she made her permanent home while living. She had four children, 
namely: Alexander H., the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Calvin Wachtell, 
of JMuncie; Airs. Nathan Spence; and Mrs. Dorcas Crowley, of Vincennes. 

But a child when he came with his parents to Indiana, Alexander H. 
Anderson was practically a lifelong resident of Delaware township. In 
the small log school house of his day, with its slab seats and puncheon 
floor, he acquired his first knowledge of books, and on the old home farm 
he became thoroughly initiated into the mysteries of farming. During the 
Civil war he enlisted, in September, 1864, in Company G, Thirteenth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, and was sent with his regiment to join Sherman's 
troops in Atlanta, and there met in battle the Confederate soldiers who 
were under the command of General Joseph Johnston. At the end of a 
year's service he was honorably discharged at Indianapolis, and returned 
home to more peaceful pursuits. Resuming the carpenter's trade, which 
he had previously learned, Mr. Anderson followed it for a number of sea- 
sons, as a builder doing much of the carpenter work in this locality. Wise 
in his savings and prudent in his expenditures, he accumulated money, 
which he invested judiciously. Buying land from time to time, he became 
owner in the course of a few years of a large and finely improved home- 
stead, on which he had a substantial set of fann buildings, and all of the 
machinery and appliances for carrying on his chosen occupation. His home 
farm contained one hundred and ninety-six acres of choice land, well 
adapted to the raising of the cereals common to this section of the country, 
and in its management he met with most gratifying results. He had like- 
wise other real estate of value, being the owner of a fine and productive 
farm in Monroe and Perry townships, that farm containing one hundred 
and twenty acres. Air. Anderson was a man of exceptionally good business 
ability, and possessed in a high degree those sterling traits of character that 
won for him the respect and esteem of all who knew him. He was an 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, which he served as a 
trustee, and belonged to Ira J. Chase Post, G. A. R., of De Soto, Indiana. 

In Delaware township, March 10, 1866, Mr. Anderson married Rhoda 
C. Hatfield, who was born December 31, 1847, 3- daughter of Jacob and 
Hannah (Thompson) Hatfield. He died in early manhood, leaving his 
widow with four young children, namely: John, who served during the 
Civil war as a member of the Fifty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and 
was killed at the battle of Kenesaw mountain ; Mrs. Mary Pittenger, of 
Delaware township ; Mrs. Malissa Myers, of this township ; and Mrs. 
Rhoda C. Anderson. Mrs. Hatfield subsequently married for her second 
husband Abram Cline, by whom she had three children, namely : Emory L., 
Martha Riley and Florence Curry. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Anderson 
nine children were born, two of whom died in infancy, and one child, Ches- 
ter, died Alarch 8, 1902, aged fifteen years. Six are living, as follows: 
Charles S., living on the homestead ; John G., of Walla Walla, Washington ; 
Mrs. Mary J. Ketterman, Frank A., Mrs. Nora M. Jones and Flora Madill. 



( 



HISTORY OF DELAWARE COUNTY 961 

During their years of happy married life Mrs. Anderson well assisted her 
good husband in all the cares and burdens of life, encouraging and coun- 
seling him in times of trouble, at all times proving herself a true helpmate 
and a loving companion. She is a woman of high principles, and a con- 
scientious member of the Methodist Episcopal church, with which she 
united when but th