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Full text of "Two hundred and five recipes tried and proven by Trinity's ladies"

TWO HUNDRED AND FIVE 



•••• RECIPES ■■■■ 



TRIED AND PROVEN BY 



TRINITY'S LADIES. 



66 



ECONOMY IS WEALTH. 



M 



BE WISE AND BUY 





st 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



' ^° 

®jpqr...\. ©apijrisJjt f 

Shelf ..'Ei.ll 

i 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 




■^ viS «taotta& x.v-c*^ '*•* 



B;i king- 
Baking Soda. 
Cream Tartar. 
Magnesia. 
Coffee, Angostura. 
Saleratus. 
Saffron, 
Celery Salt. 
Alum. 

Chamomile, German. 
Salt Petre. 
Pickle Spice. 
Sulphur. 
Nutmeg, 
Salts, Epsom. 
Salts, Rochelle, 
Mixed Spice. 
Beeswax. 

Kiax Seed, Ground. 
Camphor Gum. 
Borax, Powdered. 
Insect Powder. 

SPICES. 
Popper, Black. 
Popper, White. 
Popper, Cayenne. 

We Guarantee the Purity 



Cloves. 
Allspice. 
Ginger, Jamaica, 
Ginger, African. 
Mace. 
Mustard. 

TEAS. 
Young Hyson. 
Gunpowder. 
Japan. 
Oolong. 
Mixed. 
English Breakfast. 

EXTRACTS. 

Lemon. 

Vanilla. 

Almond. 

Wintergreen. 

Orange. 

Cinnamon. 

Ginger. 

Witch Hazel. 

Essence Peppermint 
^Spirits Camphor. 
7 of all our St 



ITS. 

GTS. 
<-,%tixxik, .»cm,cjhorn. 
Arnica. 
Bay Rum. 

OILS. 
Olive Oil 
Sweet Oil. 
Castor Oil. 
Sewing Machine Oil. 
Glycerine. 

SEEDS. 
Mixed Bird Seed. 
Canary " 

Rape " 

Millet 

Hemp " 

Colery " 

Coriander " 
Mustard " 

Anise " 

Caraway " 

HEKKS. 
Marjoram, Powdered. 
Savory, " 

Thyme, 
Sage, 



VAN DE CARR SPlCE CO., 



Spioes and the Excellency of every Article. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



3 

THE RECEIPTS CONTAINED IN THIS BOOK ARE 
WELL TRiED AND FULLY RECOMMENDED, BUT 
WITHOUT GOOD FLOUR YOU CANNOT EXPECT THE 
BEST RESULTS. USE NOTHING BUT THE BEST, 
SUCH AS MANUFACTURED BY 

J. A. HINDS & GO. 



Merchant Millers, 



Washington Roller Mills, 



Rochester, N. Y. 



j. A. HINDS. 

W H. DUFFETT. 



4 

ASK YOUR GROCER 
FOR 

DURNHERR 



HOME-MADE BREAD, 



Excelsior Butter Crackers 
and Cakes. 

BAKERY, 

185, 187 LYELL AVENUE, 

ROCHESTER, IV. Y. 



" Never, never, oh tuver .' Earth's luckiest sinner 
Hath unpunished forgotten the hour of his dinner ! 
He may live without love — what is passion hut pining ! 
But where is the man that can live without dining ? " 

- Lucile. 




Two Hundred and Five 



RECIPES 



/vT 



TRIED and proven 



'1 






TRINITY'SiLADIES. 




Copyrighted and Published by 

THE ST. PAUL'S BRANCH OF THE M. C. L. 
Of Trinity Parish, Rochester, N. Y. 



To 








r. 






In calling your attention to our Fancy Patent Flour, GRAN- 
ITE, we wish to answer the question so often asked, "Who 
makes the best flour, and where can we get it?" We would say, 
after an experience of over a quarter of a century in the manufac- 
ture of Flour, we flatter ourselves we are able to settle that question 
fairly. 

While we do not desire to obtain favor for our GRANITE 
Flour by disparaging any other brands, we do unhesitatingly 
say there is no other flour so reliable and uniformly good, that 
will make so white and puffy bread, biscuit and rolls as the 
GRANITE Flour. We guarantee every barrel. 

Now, having brought it to your notice, we hope you will give 
it a trial. Send to your grocer for it and take no other, or send to 
us if he does not keep it. By so doing you will be good to your- 
self m taking our advice, and make home happy. 

J. G. DAVIS & Co., 
Granite Flouring Mills, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Capacity 500 Bbls. daily. 

At western entrance of new Piatt Street 
Bridge now in course of 
construction. 



Two Hundred and Five Recipes. 



SOUPS. 



BOUILLON. 
For one gallon of soup use ten pounds good 
beef shank, five quarts of water, one large onion, 
one carrot, one slice of turnip, three blades of 
celery, or one tablespoon of celery seed, three 
doz. pepper corns, six cloves, stick of cinnamon, 
three teaspoons salt, two sprigs each of parsley, 
thyme, summer savoy, three bay leaves, one leaf of 
sage. Put the meat in a soup kettle with cold 
water. Heat slowly; when the water begins to boil 
skim carefully, after skimming move the kettle to 
the back of the range where it will be kept to a boil- 
ing point for six hours. A slight bubbling at the 
sides of the kettle is sufficient cooking. At the 
end of six hours, you add the salt, spice, vegetables 
and herbs; after adding these simmer one hour 
longer. Strain immediately and set away to cool. 
The next day remove all the fat from the stock 
(which should be in a firm jelly). Beat the whites 
of three eggs until light, and with shells add to 
the stock, let come to a boiling point for twenty 



8 

minutes. Strain through a napkin, and if not 
ready for use set away in a cold place. When 
ready to serve add a wineglass of wine. This 
stock will keep in winter a week. 

CORN SOUP. 
One pint grated corn, three pints boiling water 
or stock, one pint of hot milk, three tablespoons 
of butter, two even tablespoons of flour, yolks of 
two eggs, salt and pepper to suit the taste. Put 
the cobs into the water or stock and boil half an 
hour. Remove them and put in the corn and boil 
until soft (about twenty minutes). Let it simmer 
while you rub the butter and flour together; add 
this and stir until it thickens, and then put in the 
boiling milk and cool a minute, and add the 
beaten yolks and serve immediately. 

CELERY SOUP. 

Three roots of celery, one quart of milk, one 
tablespoon of butter, two tablespoons of flour, 
one pint of water ; small slice of onion. Cut the 
celery into small pieces, cover with the water and 
boil thirty minutes. Then press it through a 
colander. Put the milk on in a farina boiler and 
add to it the celery and onion. Rub the butter 
and flour together and'stir into the boiling soup 
until it thickens. Season with salt and pepper, 
and serve at once. 

BEEF SOUP. 

Boil a soup bone the day before wanting it ; 
skim the grease off next day, and melt the jelly. 
In this boil four or five potatoes and one or two 



onions ; add about one large table-spoonful of rice ; 
add salt and pepper to suit taste. 

POTATO SOUP. 
One dozen potatoes boiled in water, enough to 
cover them. When thoroughly done, rub through 
a sieve. Add as much milk as potato to the 
water in which they were boiled, and boil all 
together five minutes. Then add half a cupful 
of butter, a little salt and sprigs of parsley. 

TOMATO SOUP No. i. 
Three quarts of ripe tomatoes, one beet, 
one turnip, one onion, one carrot ; boil one 
hour. Chop the vegetables. When soft strain 
through a sieve. Rub three table-spoonfuls of 
flour, and butter the size of an egg, and stir in 
the kettle after straining the vegetables ; add salt 
and pepper to suit the taste. This may also be 
made by using one can of tomatoes, one quart of 
boiling water, and one-half of each of the 
vegetables. 

TOMATO SOUP No. 2. 
One quart can of tomatoes, one quart of water 
and one half cup of cream. Rub a small piece of 
butter full of flour, add cayenne pepper and salt. 

CREAM TOMATO SOUP. 
Boil four hours a knuckle of veal, with one head 
of celery. Strain, add part a can of tomatoes and 
boil slowly one-half hour longer, strain again. 
Mix one tablespoon of cracker powder with a cup 
of cream, add to it a little of the soup to prevent 



IO 

curdling, — mix thoroughly. Pour all back into 
the kettle, boil gently a few minutes, and serve. 
Season with pepper and salt to taste. 

MOCK BISQUE SOUP. 
One quart can of tomatoes, one quart of milk, 
one tablespoon of flour, butter the size of an egg, 
pepper and salt to taste, one half teaspoon of soda. 
Put the milk on to boil in a double boiler, mix 
the flour smoothly, and add to the milk. Warm 
the tomatoes then strain through a sieve fine 
enough to keep the seeds ; add butter, salt and 
pepper to the milk, and then the tomatoes. Serve 
immediately. Do not boil the tomatoes and milk 
together. 



W. H. Glenny & Co., 

190-194 E. MAIN ST., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

G. B. WATKINS, Manager. 

Cooking Utensils specialty 

Imported and Domestic. Such as u^ed by 
Mrs. S. T. RORER and other Cooking Experts. 



Do not fail to visit our HOUSE FURNISHING DE- 
PARTMENT, In the Basement. 

You will not be disappointed as to quantity, 
quality or prices. 



BREADS. 

CALLIE HILL MAN'S LIGHTING YEAST. 
Boil eight good sized potatoes, mash them fine, 
add one cup of sugar, one-half cup of salt, use the 
water the potatoes cooked in, adding enough more 
water to make one gallon. Have ready one pint 
of flour stirred into a thick batter, into which one 
yeast cake has been put, and when light stir into 
the potato mixture, taking care it is not hot 
enough to scald. Cover well and leave to rise ; 
when light, either put in glass fruit jars or in a 
tightly covered stone jar. One pint of this makes 
one loaf of bread or eighteen biscuits. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS No. i 
Makes thirty rolls. 
Two quarts of flour, measured after sifting. 
Mix with one tablespoon of sugar, one teaspoon 
of salt. Rub in one tablespoon of lard or butter. 
Boil one pint of milk and cool it; when it is luke 
warm add one half cake of compressed yeast, 
dissolved in half a cup of luke warm water or milk. 
Make a hole in the flour and pour in the milk and 
yeast, stirring in just enough flour to make a thin 
batter. Cover and let rise over night, and in the 
morning stir in the rest of the flour and knead for 
twenty minutes, using enough more flour to make a 
stiff dough. Let it rise again. When light, roll 
out half an inch thick and cut out with a biscuit 



12 

cutter, coat half of the top with melted butter and 
lap over. Let them rise again until very light. 
Bake ten to fifteen minutes in a hot oven. If 
not allowed to rise over night use a whole cake of 
yeast. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS No. 2 

One cup each of yeast and warm milk, two 
tablespoons melted lard, two tablespoons of sugar, 
a pinch of salt, and flour enough to make a dough 
as soft as can be kneaded. Let rise until light ; 
knead again and roll out half an inch thick. Cut 
out with a biscuit cutter, butter, lap over and let 
rise until light. Bake in a quick oven. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

Two cups of sweet milk, two tablespoons brown 
sugar, one teaspoon soda and two teaspoons cream 
tartar; a little salt and graham flour enough to 
make stiff. Bake in gem tins. 

TEA CAKES. 
Half cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, half cup 
butter, three cups flour, two eggs, two teaspoons 
baking powder. Beat well before adding baking 
powder. Bake in gem tins. 

GRAHAM GEMS No. 1. 

Three cups sour milk, one teaspoon soda, one 
teaspoon salt, one tablespoon^ brown sugar, one 
tablespoon melted lard and one egg. To the egg 
add the milk, then the sugar, then graham flour 
with soda and last the melted lard. Make stiff 



13 

batter so that it will drop from the spoon. Have 
greased gem pans very hot and bake fifteen 
minutes in a hot oven. 

MUFFINS. 
To each quart of sweet milk add two eggs well 
beaten, lump of butter, size of a small egg, and 
flour enough to make a stiff batter. Stir in half 
pint of yeast. Let them stand until very light, 
then bake on a griddle. If wanted for breakfast 
mix the night before, and if for tea in the morning. 

BROWN BREAD. 
Three cups Graham flour, one of flour, two of 
sour milk, one of sweet milk, half cup of molasses, 
two teaspoons of soda. Steam for three hours 
then bake half an hour. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 
One and a half pints sour milk, two-thirds cup 
molasses, half teaspoon salt, two teaspoons soda 
dissolved in a little hot water. Add as much 
Graham flour as can be easily stirred with a spoon. 
Bake an hour or more. 

POP OVERS. 
Two eggs, two cups of sweet milk. Beat the 
eggs separately and add milk, two cups of flour. 
two teaspoons baking powder and a pinch of salt, 
Bake in muffin tins and in a hot oven. 

CORN BREAD. 
Mix over night eight tablespoons corn meal, 
two tablespoons of flour, and one tablespoon corn 
starch, one teaspoon of salt, and milk to wet 



H 

thoroughly. In the morning, add one egg, one 
tablespoon of sugar, one tablespoon of melted 
butter, and one teaspoon of soda dissolved in a 
little hot water. Beat well and bake in a hot oven. 

CORN CAKE. 

Half cup sugar, one cup corn meal, one cup 
flour, one and a half teaspoons baking powder, 
one cup milk, two eggs not beaten, three table- 
spoons melted butter; bake in a square tin for 
twenty minutes. 

AUNTIE'S EGG BREAD or SOUTHERN 
CORN BREAD. 

Two eggs, one tablespoon lard, one pint butter- 
milk, half teaspoon soda, one pint corn meal, salt 
to taste. Melt the lard in the vessel for baking, 
and pour into batter leaving enough in the pan to 
keep from sticking. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 
One tablespoon of butter, two tablespoons 
sugar, one cup of sweet milk, one egg, one cup of 
flour, one cup of Indian meal, two teaspoons of 
baking powder. 

FRITTERS. 
One cup of milk, one egg, two teaspoons baking 
powder, a little salt, flour enough to make a stiff 
batter. Have ready a kettle with hot lard in it. 
Drop the batter by the spoonful in the hot fat, 
and fry quickly. Serve while hot with maple 
syrup. 



•5 

GRAHAMS GEMS No. 2. 
One tablespoon of molasses, a pinch of salt, one 
teaspoon of soda dissolved in a pint bowl of sour 
milk, about three fourths full ; Graham flour 
enough to make a stiff batter. Have gem irons, 
well greased and hot, fill with the batter and bake 
in a hot oven. 

SALLY LUNN. 

One cup of sweet milk, two tablespoons of sugar, 
one egg, butter the size of an egg, two teaspoons 
of baking powder, one pint of flour. Bake for 
lunch or tea in a round tin. 

GREEN CORN GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Twelve ears of boiled corn grated fine, one 
tablespoon of sugar, two eggs, two tablespoons of 
flour, one teaspoon of salt. Stir all together, and 
bake on a hot griddle. They must be well cooked. 
Serve hot with maple syrup or butter and sugar. 

KOOCHEN. A German Bread. 
One quart of milk, one yeast cake dissolved in a 
little warm milk or water, care being taken not 
to scald the yeast cake ; one-half teaspoon salt. 
Set same as bread over night. In the morning 
add one cup of sugar, one cup of currants, two 
tablespoons butter, two eggs, a little nutmeg, and 
flour enough to roll out, like biscuit dough. Put 
in pans, and set in a warm place, until light. 
When light cover the top with a coating of warm 
milk and apply a dressing made of two teaspoons 
sugar and one-half teaspoon cinnamon. Bake 
about fifteen minutes. 



i6 



Ml. E. U/oodbory 



- - LARGEST - - 



Grocery* House 



•in- 



WESTERN NEW YORK. 















RETAIL 


STORES 






AIN 


and Front Sts. 








La 


ke and Phelps 


Aves 




Monroe Ave 


West Ave. 










ROCHESTER, 


N. 


Y 



OYSTERS. 



ESC A LOPED OYSTERS. 

Put layer of rolled crackers in the bottom of a 
pudding dish, then a layer of oysters (drain the 
oysters and remove all pieces of shells) season 
with pepper and salt, and sprinkle with bits butter. 
So on until the dish in full, then pour over the 
whole one coffee cup of milk. Bake three-quar- 
ters of an hour. 

A BREAK EAST DISH OF OYSTERS. 

One pint of select oysters, a piece of nice break- 
fast bacon, cut into thin slices. Take one slice, 
place an oyster on one-half, fold the other over, 
and fasten with a wooden tooth pick. Place in a 
frying pan and fry without seasoning until the 
bacon is done. These are very nice served hot 
with buckwheat cakes for a winter breakfast. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Fifty shell oysters (or one quart of selects), one 
quart of milk and cream equal parts, butter, 
pepper and salt to suit the taste. Put the milk 
and oysters in separate kettles to heat (the oysters 
in their own liquid) and let them come to a boil. 
When the oysters are sufficiently cooked, skim ; 
then take them out of their liquid and put in some 
dish to keep warm. Put the milk and liquid 



together. Season to taste- and thicken with 
powdered crackers. When sufficiently thick stir 
in the oysters. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 
Drain the liquor from the oysters and to one 
cupful of the liquor, add the same quantity of 
milk, three eggs, a little salt and flour enough for 
a thin batter. Have ready in a frying-pan a few 
spoons of lard ; heat very hot and drop the oyster 
in by the tablespoon. Try a spoonful first, to 
satisfy yourself that the lard is hot enough and 
that the fritter is the right size. Take from the 
pan as soon as they are done, and serve while hot. 
You may chop the oyster and add them to the 
batter, or, the oyster may be whole, enveloped in 
the batter, one oyster in each fritter, in this case 
the batter should be a little stiffer. 

OYSTER STEW. 
Pour one quart of cold water over one quart of 
oysters, strain all the liquor off the oysters into 
the kettle and set over the fire. When it boils add 
salt, one-fourth pound of butter, a tablespoon of 
flour, mix in a little milk until smooth, boil again 
and add oysters. As soon as they boil, serve at 
once. If milk is prefered, cook as directed above, 
only, use one pint of cold water and have a pint 
of milk hot, in the tureen into which pour the 
oysters when boiled. 



Drug 



»9 

S. A. MERRIAM, 
DRUGGIST, 

5 and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES. 



HOMCEOPATHIC MEDICINES, 

SHOULDER BRACES AND SUPPORTERS. 



Sole Proprietor of DR. PALMER'S LUNG BALSAM. 
ALSO PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, PUTTY, ETC. 

Champion, Jones & Fay Trusses and Crutches. 
SUPERIOR FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 



Prescriptions carefully put up at all hours. 

561 State St., cor. Lyell Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

GEO. AMISH, JR., 



(Successor to J. E. MORGAN), 



-DEALER IN- 



Pure Milk 



AND CREAM. 



20 



In order to obtain the 
BBST results from these 
excellent recipes, it will 
be necessary to use one 
of the Celebrated 

AGORN RANGES. 



a 



ACPRN 
STWes 

RANGES 
WORLP 

0\/er one 
WJIULIo N 
">• "it 



ixzn 




I take pleasure 
in stating that the 
"Acorn" Range 
purchased of L. E. 
Mason in December 
last gives the best 
of satisfaction. I 
find it to be a quick 
baker and very eco- 
nomical in the con- 
sumption of fuel I 
cheerfully recom- 
mend it to any one 
wanting a first-class 
range. 

Respectfully, 
O. Hedges, 
i 8 Jennings Pk. 



FOR SALE BY 

1-- E- MASON, 

DEALFR IN 

STOVES, RANGES and HARDWARE, 

Cutlery, House Furnishing Goods, 

Window Glass, Paints, Oils, Etc. 

380 State St., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



CROQUETTES. 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 
Boil a large tender chicken, with an onion 
thrown in water. Season with pepper and salt. 
When cooked cut the chicken into small pieces, 
mince the half of a small onion, with two sprigs 
of parsley. Put an ounce of butter in a sauce pan. 
When hot put in the onion and parsley with half 
tea cup of flour ; stew until a light brown, then 
pour over a tea cup of soup stock and stir until a 
smooth paste is formed, add salt, pepper, a little 
grated nutmeg, and the juice of a small lemon. 
Mix well and put in the chicken, mould into 
croquette shape, dip in egg, then in grated bread 
crumbs, and fry in boiling lard. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 
Put two ounces of butter, in a sauce pan. Mince 
and fry one-half an onion in it, add two large 
cupsful of cold finely chopped veal, a slice of 
bread soaked in water, and squeeze dry, a little, 
thyme, chopped parsley, grated nutmeg, and 
lemon peel, with salt and pepper. When thor- 
oughly heated take from the range and add one 
tablespoon of cream, and a well beaten egg. Mix 
thoroughly and set away to cool. When cold 
make in little rolls, dip in beaten egg and fry in 
boiling fat. 



22 

RICE CROQUETTES. 
Half cup rice boiled in water until soft and 
thick and the yolks of two eggs mixed in right 
well ; after taking off the fire, salt, sugar and flavor 
to suit the taste, and a tablespoon of butter. 
When cold make into shape, and just before 
putting them into the hot fat, dip them in beaten 
e gg> an d then in bread crumbs. 

LOBSTER CROQUETTES. 
Chop lobster very fine, mix with pepper, salt 
and bread crumbs and a little parsley. Moisten 
with cream and a small piece of butter. Shape 
with the hands, dip in beaten egg and roll in bread 
crumbs, then fry. 

OYSTER CROQUETTS. 
Take one cup of cold chicken chopped fine, one 
saucerful of cold oysters also chopped, half cup 
rolled crackers or sifted bread crumbs, one egg 
beaten well, one tablespoon butter, over which 
pour a little hot water (four tablespoons), pepper 
and salt. Form into long rolls or small squares ; 
roll in cracker or bread crumbs and fry in very 
hot lard. 



23 
A. FERGUSON. J. LEWIS 



Whitney Roller Flooring Milk 

FERGUSON & LEWIS, 

CHOICE FAM I LY 
AND BAKERS' 

FLOUR 

MILL STREET, 



FOOT OF BROWN ST., 



R9GHESTER, N. Y. 



2 4 




FULTON MARKET. 



G. H.DAGGS, 



—DEALER IN— 



Ghoice Fresh arid Salt JVIeats, 

FISH, OYSTERS AND POULTRY 

IN THEIR SEASON. 



535 State St., 



Rochester, N Y. 



Fred'r H. Merlau. 



DEALER IN 



groceries ^ provisions, 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits and Oysters in Season. 
Fine Teas and Coffees a Specialty. 

Baled Hay, Straw and Oats, 

Coal and Wood, Flour at Mill Prices. 

Goods delivered free to anv part of the city. 



532 STATE ST., 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



MEATS. 



ROAST TURKEY. 

Carefully pluck the bird, singe it, and wipe 
thoroughly with a cloth ; draw it, preserve the 
liver and gizzard, and be particular not to break 
the gall bag, as no washing will remove the bitter 
taste it imparts where it once touches. Wash it 
inside well and wipe it thoroughly with a dry cloth. 
Cut of! the neck close to the back, but leave 
enough of the crop skin to turn over; break the 
leg bones close below the knee, and flatten the 
breast to make it look plump. Have ready your 
dressing of bread crumbs, mixed with butter, 
pepper, salt, one egg and one pint of oysters, 
straining the liquor off, fill the breast with this 
and sew the neck over to the back. Be particular 
that the turkey is firmly trussed. Dredge lightly 
with flour. Baste often. 

ESC A LOPED TURKEY. 
Moisten bread crumbs with a little milk, butter 
a baking dish and in it a layer of crumbs, then a 
layer of chopped (not very fine) cold turkey 
seasoned with salt and pepper, then a layer of 
crumbs, and so on until the dish is full. If any 
dressing or gravy has been left add it. Make a 
thickening of one or two eggs, half cup of milk, and 
quarter cup of butter and bread crumbs; season 



26 

and spread over the top, cover and bake half an 
hour, then remove the cover and let it brown. 

ESC A LOPED VEAL. 

Chop the remains of cold roast real fine, season 
with pepper and salt. Put a layer of cracker 
crumbs, rolled fine, or bread grated fine in the 
bottom of a baking dish, a few bits of butter, and 
another layer of meat, then another layer of 
cracker or bread crumbs, and so on until the dish 
is full. Turn over the whole, the gravy which 
has been left. This is a nice way of using the 
fragments of cold veal. 

CHICKEN LOAF. 
The meat of one or two chickens, boiled tender 
and chopped fine ; line a mold with hard boiled 
eggs sliced thin. Season the chicken well and 
moisten it with the liquor in which it was boiled, 
then press it into the mold. Serve in thin slices 
when cold. 

CHICKEN. PA 7 TIES. 

Chop finely cold chicken (boiled or roasted). 
Season with pepper, salt, parsley and onion, 
moisten with chicken gravy or cream. Make a 
rich pastry and mold in shape as for tarts. Fill 
the pastry with the chicken ; sprinkle cracker 
crumbs and bits of butter over the top and bake 
in a hot oven. 

FRIED TURKEY. 

Slice in thin pieces the remains of a roasted 
turkey. Make a batter of beaten eggs and bread 



27 

crumbs seasoned with pepper and salt ; dip the 
pieces into this and fry a light brown. Make a 
milk gravy and pour over them. 

FRIG U DEL. 
Three and a half pounds of chopped veal, five 
small crackers rolled fine, one tablespoon salt, one 
teaspoon pepper and five eggs. Chop the veal 
fine and add one quarter of the cracker crumbs 
with the other ingredients, and one tablespoon of 
cream. Mix with the hand. Strew the rest of 
the cracker crumbs over the top and spot thick 
with butter. Add one-quarter pound of salt pork. 
Put a little water over it and bake slowly for two 
hours. Cold baked veal may be used ; and in this 
case about three-quarters of an hour's baking will 
suffice. 

HAM BALLS. 

Take half a cup bread crumbs and mix with 
two eggs well beaten ; chop fine some bits of cold 
boiled ham and mix them with the bread and eggs, 
make into balls and fry in a well buttered fryingpan. 

HOW TO ROAST A HAM. 
Select a choice ham. Wash thoroughly, and 
peel off thinly, all the smoky part. Place in pan 
(a covered roaster is best) with skin side down. 
Cover thickly with a dough of flour and water 
made as stiff as can be stired with a spoon. Bake 
slowly until tender. 

VEAL LOAF No. i. 
Three pounds of chopped veal, one dozen 
crackers rolled fine, two eggs beaten well, one cup 



28 

milk, one tablespoon salt, pepper to taste ; piece 
of butter the size of an egg, a little summer 
savcry. Mix all together, and press into a loaf. 
Bake one and a half to two hours; while baking 
baste frequently, with hot water and a little butter. 
VEAL LOAF No. 2. 

Two pounds of veal and one fourth pound of 
pork, chopped fine. One teaspoon black pepper, 
one teaspoon salt, one tablespoon sweet majoram, 
two large crackers rolled fine, one gill cream, two 
well beaten eggs. Mix egg, cracker, spice and 
cream, and add to the meat. Baste with butter. 
Bake two hours. 

JELLIED CHICKEN OR VEAL. 

Boil a chicken in as little water as possible, 
until the meat falls from the bones. Chop rather 
fine and season with pepper and salt. Put in a 
mold a layer of meat and then a layer of hard 
boiled eggs cut into slices. Boil down the liquor 
left in the pot one half; while warm add one- 
fourth of an ounce of gelatine, and when dissolved 
pour into the mold over the meat. Set in a cool 
place to jelly. 

MOCK DUCK. 

Have a round steak cut an inch thick. Make 
a dressing of bread crumbs well seasoned with 
pepper and salt, two small onions, chopped fine. 
Place in the center of the steak, roll up and sew 
together. Put in a dripping pan with pieces of 
butter, place thin slices of salt pork or breakfast 
bacon on the top of the meat. Bake in a mod- 
erately hot oven until brown, baste often. 



2 9 



Levi Hey & Co., 

313 State St., Rochester, N. ¥.. 

SELL THE FAMOUS AND CELEBRATED 

F. 8 W. Co. RANGE. 




THESE THIITG-S -A-ZE^E TBVE. 

Good work wins and it pays to buy good goods. Buy the FAM- 
OUS F. & W. Co. RANGE, witb wrought steel oven and oval flre 
box, with (haw center grate. These ranges have the only perfect 
svstem of oven ventilation in the world. Examine it and satisfy 
yourself. You will make no mistake if you buy the F. & W. Co. 
Range. 

People ask why the F. & W. Co. Range is the best. In' reply we 
beg to say : It has the 

BEST OVEN VENTILATION. BEST FIRE BOX, 
BEST GRATE, BEST FLUES, 

BEST RESERVOIR, and is the 

BEST BAKER, BEST COOKER, 

BEST FUEL SAVER, 

We also carry the largest stock of TINWARE AND HOUSE 
FURNISHING GOODS. Our Tinware is heaviest and best on the 
market. Call and examine our stock before purchasing elsewhere. 

LEVI HEY & CO., 313 State Street 



30 

C. T. CROUCH. C. H. CROUCH. 

C. T. Crouch & Son, 

DEALERS IN 

HARD AND SOFT WOOD 

L UMBER 

Shingles, Lath, Posts 
and Pickets, 



MOULDING OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



ENUE. 



YARD AND PLANING MILL: 

West Street, lyel T*« e 

Rochester, n. y. 

(Take Lyell Avenue 

Cars to West St. J 



POTATOES. 

ESC A LOPED POTATOES No i. 
Take boiled potatoes, chop them. Put in a 
pudding dish a layer of potatoes, then a thin layer 
of rolled crackers, season with pepper and salt, 
and sprinkle in three or four small pieces of 
butter; then add another layer of potatoes, 
crackers and continue, until the dish is filled. 
Over all pour a cup of cream or rich milk. Bake 
from one-half to three-fourths of an hour. 
PO TA TO PUFES. 
Two teacups of mashed potatoes, two eggs, 
one tablespoon butter. Salt and pepper to season. 
Beat until very light, then drop by spoonful into 
a buttered baking pan, or it maybe put into small 
individual dishes and served in the same. Bake 
in a hot oven until a delicate brown. 

L YONNAISE PO TA TOES. 
Cut one pint cold boiled potatoes into dice 
shapes, season with salt and pepper. Fry one 
tablespoon of onions in one very large tablespoon 
of butter until yellow. Add the potatoes and stir 
with a fork until they have absorbed all the butter, 
being careful not to break them ; add one table- 
spoon chopped parsley. Serve hot. 

ESC A LOPED POTATOES No. 2. 
Take six or seven large potatoes (raw) and peel 
them. Have ready a buttered baking dish and 



32 

into this put first a layer of potatoes sliced thin, 
then a layer of pepper, salt and butter and a little 
flour sifted over each layer. Thus proceed until 
the potatoes are all used, having for the top most 
layer one of pepper, butter, salt and flour. Fill 
the dish with milk poured over the whole. Bake 
an hour in a moderate oven. 

BAKED POTATO BALLS. 
Mold cold mashed potatoes into balls, having 
first seasoned and beaten up an egg in it ; roll the 
balls in flour, lay in a well buttered tin and bake 
to a good brown. 

DUCHESS POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into cubes, season 

with pepper and salt, dip in melted butter then 

lightly in flour; put in a dripping pan and bake 

fifteen minutes in a quick oven. Serve very hot. 

POTATO SURPRLSE. 
Scoop out the inside of a sound potato leaving 
the skin attached at one side of the hole, as a lid ; 
mince finely the lean of a juicy mutton chop with 
a little salt and pepper ; put it in the potato, 
fasten down the lid, and bake or roast ; before 
sewing (in its skin) add a little hot gravy if the 
mince seems too dry. 



33 
IF YOU WISH 

Extra Fine Coiiee 



WE CAW SUPPLY YOU 
WITH TWE SAME, 

— AS OUR COFFEES ARE — 



ROASTED DAILY, 

GROUND OR PULVERIZED, 
AS DESIRED. 



If you will try them once you will 
not buy elsewhere. 

J. A. SEEL, 

14, 18 and SO Lake Ave. 



J. B. MOSELEY, 

President. 



34 

C. E. ANGLE, 

Treas. & Manager 



G. MOTLEY, 

Secretary. 



Moseley-Motley lilliii 



i0.. 



ROCHESTER, N, Y. 




', U III 1 SJ L >l ultUJJ,V 

\ 4 PATENT W' 

V^ J^. m;<;is n:ni:i) ^t^¥ 



-MANUFACURERS OF- 



High Grade Flours, 

From State Winter Wheat and the Hard Spring 
Wheat of Dakota. 

SPECIALTY: BIG "B" PATENT. 



SALADS. 

CHICKEN SALAD No. i. 

Use the white meat of two chickens cooked 
until tender, cut into coarse bits, and add celery 
cut coarse, — a little more chicken than celery. 
DRESSING. 

Yolks of five eggs well beaten ; add two table- 
spoons of olive-oil, drop by drop, beating all the 
time. One tablespoon made mustard, one dessert- 
spoon of sugar, a teaspoon of salt, a little Cayenne 
pepper, the juice of three lemons. One cup of 
cream or milk is a great addition. 

CHICKEN SALAD No. 2. 
White meat of chicken; white part of celery, a 
little more chicken than celery. Cut coarse. 
DRESSING. 
Two raw eggs well beaten, one-half teaspoon of 
mustard, one teaspoon of sugar, a little Cayenne 
pepper, a little salt. One tablespoon butter, six 
tablespoons vinegar. Cook over boiling water to 
the thickness of cream. Add cream just before 

using. 

SALAD DRESSING WITHOUT OIL. 
Four eggs, one cup of butter, one-half cup sugar, 
one cup sweet cream, one tablespoon of salt, one 
tablespoon mustard, a little Cayenne pepper. 
Cook over boiling water until it thickens. Remove 
from fire and stir in slowly one pint vinegar. 
Very nice for lettuce. 



36 
LETTUCE SALAD. 

Take the yolks of three hard boiled eggs, add 
mustard to taste; mash it fine, make a paste by 
adding a dessertspoon of olive oil or melted butter 
(use butter always when it is difficult to get fresh 
oil) ; mix thoroughly, and then dilute by adding 
gradually a teacup of vinegar, and pour over the 
lettuce. Garnish by slicing another egg and 
laying over the lettuce. This is sufficient for a 
moderate sized dish of lettuce. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Four quarts of ripe cucumber rind chopped 
coarse, twelve medium sized onions, and four ripe 
peppers chopped fine. Six ounces of mustard 
seed, add three-fourths cup of salt to the chopped 
cucumber rind, onions and peppers, and let them 
remain over night. In the morning add the 
mustard seed and a little celery seed, and cover 
with cold vinegar, not very sharp. 

CABBAGE SALAD No. i. 

One quart of finely chopped cabbage, about one 
and one-half teaspoons of salt sprinkled over the 
cabbage. Let stand until water is drawn out. 

DRESSING. 

One cup of vinegar, one teaspoon of mustard, 
yolk of two eggs, half cup of cream, two table- 
spoons of sugar. Cook in a farina kettle until it 
thickens, then pour over the cabbage, while hot. 
Set away to cool. Very good without the cream. 



37 

CABBAGE SALAD No. 2. 
To a dish of chopped cabbage one bunch of 
chopped celery. Put in a bowl the yolks of two 
eggs, one teaspoon sugar, one teaspoon butter, 
one teaspoon mixed mustard, a little pepper and 
salt, one-half teacup of vinegar. Set the bowl in 
boiling water, letting it boil until the mixture 
thickens; and when cold pour over the cabbage. 

POTATO SALAD. 
Cut thin eight or ten potatoes steamed. Chop 
one half onion fine and mix with potato. Beat 
one egg well and stir in gradually, butter the size 
of an egg, half-cup of cream, one teaspoon of 
sugar. Season with red pepper, mustard and 
vinegar to taste. 



S.B.STUART & Co. 




ROCHESTER SAVINGS BANKBLDG. 



38 

For UTENSILS of any kind to use in Cook- 
ing the Different Recipes contained in this 
Book, call on 

F. B. CALLISTER, 

61 and 63 West Main St. 



THEY ALSO HAVE ON HAND A FULL LINE OF 

FURNACES, 

STOVES, 

RANGES. 

F. B. CALLISTER, 

61 and 63 West Main Street, 

and 185 State Street, cor. Allen. 

markham whitney. jas. wilson. 

SHAWMUT MILLS. 

Whiiney I Wilson, 

MERCHANT MILLERS, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



PIES. 

SUMMER MINCE PIES. 
Five crackers rolled fine, one cup of sugar, one 
cup of molasses, one cup of warm water, one half 
cup of vinegar or boiled cider, two eggs. Season 
with spice to suit the taste. One and one-half 
cups chopped raisins. 

BOILED CIDER PIE. 
Three tablespoons of sugar, three tablespoons of 
water, four tablespoons of boiled cider, two table- 
spoons of flour, one egg. Beat all together. 
Bake with upper and under crust. 

LEMON PIE No. i. 
One lemon, one cup water, one cup of sugar, 
three eggs. Grate the yellow part of the rind and 
squeeze the juice of the lemon, then add the 
other ingredients and boil until thick. Make a 
meringue of whites of two eggs and three table- 
spoons of sugar; spread over the top of the pie. 
Bake with under crust. 

LEMON CREAM PIE. 
One cup of powdered sugar, one tablespoon 
butter, one egg, one lemon, juice and grated rind, 
removing the seeds with care, one teaspoon boiling 
water, one tablespoon corn starch, dissolved in a 
little cold water. Stir the corn starch into the 
hot water, cream the butter and sugar, and pour 



40 

over them the hot mixture. When cool add 
lemon and the beaten egg. Bake in open shell- 
Cover with a meringue made of the beaten whites 
of two eggs and two tablespoons of powdered 
sugar. Bake a light brown. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 
One pint pumpkin, stewed and strained, two 
cuds sugar, one teaspoon ginger, one half teaspoon 
cinnamon, a little salt, four eggs, two tablespoons 
wine or brandy. Stir pumpkin, sugar, spice and 
salt together, then add one quart of milk scalding 
hot, in which one-fourth cup of butter has been 
melted. Lastly add the eggs well beaten. This 
recipe will fill three pies. 

CREAM PIE. 
One pint of milk, scalded ; two tablespoons of 
corn starch three tablespoons of sugar, yolks of 
two eggs. Wet the corn starch with a little cold 
milk ; beat the eggs and sugar until light, and 
stir the whole into the scalded milk. Flavor with 
lemon or vanilla and let cool. Line a plate with 
pie crust and bake ; fill it with cream, after each 
have cooled, and cover it with frosting made of 
the whites of the eggs, beaten with two table- 
spoons of sugar. Bake a light brown. 

SQUASH PIE. 
One full cup of squash stewed and strained, 
one cup sugar, one pint milk, two eggs, two table- 
spoons melted butter, a little salt, ginger and 
cinnamon. 



4i 

PINEAPPLE PIE. 
One grated pine apple, its weight in sugar, half 
its weight in butter, five eggs, the whites beaten 
to a stiff froth, one cup of cream. Cream the 
butter and beat it with sugar and yolks of the 
eggs, until light ; add cream, pineapple and the 
whites of the eggs. Bake with an under crust. 

PIE-PLANT PIE. 

Line your pie plate with pie crust, cut fresh pie- 
plant into small pieces, filling the dish very full, 
as it shrinks in cooking. Lay in small pieces 
of butter, one cup sugar (heaping full) dredge a 
little flour over the whole, and cover with an 
upper crust. 

MINCE PIES No. i. 

One pint bowl of meat, two bowls of apples, 
one teacup of syrup, three teacups of cider, three 
teacups of sugar, one teacup of vinegar, six heaping 
teaspoons of cinnamon, one small teaspoon of 
cloves, one half teaspoon of pepper, three fourths 
of a nutmeg, four tablespoons of butter. Raisins 
and citron to suit the taste. Boil all together and 
let stand several days before using. 

MINCE PIE No. 2. 
Two bowls of meat chopped fine, one bowl of 
chopped suet, four bowls of apples, three and one- 
half pounds of raisins and one half-pound of 
citron, one dessertspoon of cloves, four tablespoons 
of cinnamon, one coffee cup of molasses, two bowls 
of sugar a little salt, one pint of brandy (less will 



42 

do) mix with boiled cider then cook ten or fifteen 
minutes. 

WHIPPED CREAM PIE. 
Bake with under crust, after the crust is baked, 
spread with jelly, quince is best. Whip a cup of 
thick cream, and add three tablespoons of powdered 
sugar. Flavor to suit taste. 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE. 
Three cups stewed apples, four eggs, one quart 
of milk. Mash the apples very fine, and make 
quite sweet ; beat the yolks of the eggs light, and 
mix well with the apple. Season with a little 
grated nutmeg. Stir milk in gradually, and lastly 
add the beaten whites. 



43 



The Great Bargain Sale 

IN FULL OPERATION. 



(~)UR surplus stock must be sold, in order to make room for the 
extensive improvement of our premises. It will pay you to 
anticipate your wants for six months. 

Visit the Following Departments 

in which you will find BARGAINS in desirable, new and choice 

goods : 

Carpets, Upholstery Goods, 

Millinery Goods, Vine Silks, 

Shawls and Saeques. Fine Dress Goods, 
House Furnishing Goods, Gloves and Hosiery, 

Laces and Embroideries, White Goods, 

Trimmings and Fancy Goods. 

This is a tare opportunity, and if we can judge from the numbers 
calling every day during the past week, we may expect a great rush 
for some time to come. 

Pease call early before the great crowd assembles. You can have 
your wants supplied on better terms than have ever been offered. 

Burke, FitzSimons, Hone & Co. 

WILLIAM BOYD & CO., 

Hat and Bonnet Bleaching. 



Old Straw and Felt Hats Dyed and Re-Shaped 
as good as New. 

Also Manufacturers of Straw and Felt Hits, 

Cleaning, Dying and Curling of Ostrich Feathers, 

14 Allen Street ROCHESTER, N, Y. 



44 

CHAS. A. BOWMAN, 



DEALER IN 



(general jHardware. 

English and American Pocket and Table Cutlery, 
Carpenters' Tools, House Furnishing Goods. 

Agricultural Implements, Iron, Nails, 
Paints, Oils, Glass, Etc. 

- - 543 STATE STREET. 

Henry D. Stone, 

Merchant 

Miller. 



Specialties: " H. D. Stone" Wheat Meal, W. W. Carr 
Graham Flour. 



IRVING MILLS, BROWN'S RACE, 

ROCHESTER, V. Y. 



" Irving Mills " 
Patent Rye Flour, Roller Process. 



PUDDINGS. 



ENGLISH PL UM PUDDING. 

One-fourth pound of suet, chopped fine, one- 
half pound of raisins, stoned and chopped, one-half 
pound currants, one-fourth pound mixed peel, 
shred fine ; one-half loaf stale bread, one grated 
nutmeg, three eggs, one-half pound brown sugar, 
one-fourth tumbler brandy, one teacup flour, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one-half 
pound almonds, a little salt. Soak bread over 
night, in milk or water, add raisins, currants, suet, 
sliced peel, &c, and mix thoroughly together. 
Grease a good sized bowl, fill with the mixture 
and tie a clean cloth tightly over the top ; put 
into a kettle of boiling water, and boil ten to 
fourteen hours. When ready to use, turn the 
pudding on a plate with a bowl still covering it, 
heat through, then serve with brandy sauce. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

To one quart of boiling milk add three table- 
spoons of Indian meal and one of flour, three 
tablespoons of suet chopped fine ; let boil until 
meal is cooked. When cool sweeten with brown 
sugar or molasses. Add two well beaten eggs 
and spice to taste. Bake until done. 



46 

APPLE CUSTARD. 
One pint of apple sauce, beaten fine, one pint of 
sweet milk, three eggs, one cup of sugar, and a 
little nutmeg. Bake slowly. 

5 TEA MED S UE T PUDDING. 

Four cups flour, two cups sour milk, four cups 
suet chopped fine, one cup molasses, one cup 
sugar, one cup each of currants and raisins 
(chopped), all kinds of spices; and before putting 
in the milk, dissolve in it one heaping teaspoon 
soda. Steam four hours, then put in the oven for 
about ten minutes. Remains good for any length 
of time. Before serving steam it until it is warm 
through. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Half pound of figs chopped fine, half pound of 
flour, two teaspoons baking-powder, two eggs, 
half pound suet chopped fine, one cup milk, one 
cup of sugar, flavor with wine, and spice to taste. 
Steam four hours. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Grate six ears of Green corn, in which drop a 
tiny pinch of soda. Three eggs, one-half cup of 
sweet milk, one tablespoon sugar, salt to taste. 
Pour into well buttered pudding dish. Bake one- 
half hour, and serve as a vegetable. 

APPPE DUMPLING DOUGH. 
Six good sized potatoes, boil until tender ; mash 
and run through a sieve, one-half teaspoon of salt, 
flour enough to loll out. Cover dumplings the 



47 

usual way, and steam. Dough prepared in this 
manner is delicious and will not distress the most 
sensitive stomach. 

BANANA PUDDING. 

Heat one and one-half pints of milk to near 
boiling; stir into it the beaten yolks of four eggs, 
one tablespoon corn starch dissolved in a little 
cold water, or milk; one-half cup white sugar; 
flavor with vanilla ; boil all together until like 
a custard. Lay pieces of sponge cake in a deep 
dish: slice four bananas over the cake, then turn 
the custard over it as soon as it is cold. Beat 
the whites of the four eggs to a stiff froth, sweetened 
with four teaspoons fine sugar; spread over pud- 
ding, and set in the oven until a delicate brown. 

KING GEORGE THE FOURTH PUDDING. 
One cup of molases, one half cup of sweet milk, 
one cup of suet chopped fine, one cup of raisins 
or any kind of fruit desired, one small teaspoon of 
soda stirred into the molasses, flour enough to 
thicken like pound cake. Steam four or five hours. 
Served with plain boiled sauce. This pudding is 
very nice made of canned sour cherries, using the 
juice for flavoring pudding sauce. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

One cup of New Orleans molasses, one cup sour 
milk, one cup Graham flour, one cup of stoned 
raisins, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in the sour 
milk. Steam one hour. To be served with brandy 
sauce, and eaten while hot. 



4 8 

PL UM PUDDING. 
One pound of suet, two pounds each of raisins 
and currants, one-half pound citron, one-half pint 
molasses, one teaspoon cloves, two teaspoons of 
cinnamon, one nutmeg, one cup sweet milk, one 
dozen eggs, two pounds- sugar, one loaf of stale 
baker's bread, crumbled with flour enough to make 
very stiff. Serve with brandy sauce. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Dissolve four tablespoons of corn starch in a 
little cold water ; stir into a quart of boiling 
water or milk, then add whites of four eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth, a little salt and two 
tablespoons of white sugar. Beat well and put 
into a mould to cool. For cream — one pint of 
milk, yolk of four eggs, two teaspoons corn starch, 
one cup of sugar. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 
One cup of sugar, three tablespoons melted 
butter, one egg, one cup of milk, one pint of flour, 
two teaspoons of baking powder. To be eaten 
with a boiled sauce. 

THE BISHOP OF EDINBORCTS PRUNE 
PUDDING. 

Stew gently a pound of French prunes in a pint 
of water; when nearly soft, add one and one-half 
teacups of sugar. When quite done remove the 
stones and cut each prune in small pieces. Have 
a scant quarter box of gelatine, dissolved in a gill 
of boiling water, strain into the prunes ; add two 



49 

tablespoons of brandy and the juice of a lemon ; 
pour into a mould and set on ice. Serve with 
whipped cream. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 
Take one pint of milk, and when nearly boiling, 
add two tablespoons of corn starch dissolved in 
cold water or milk, and a tablespoon of sugar. 
When ready take off the range, and stir in the 
whites of two eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, and 
put into a mould. Make a custard of a pint of 
milk and yolks of two eggs, and a tablespoon of 
sugar. Flavor with vanilla and pour over the 
pudding when cold. 

STEAMED PUDDEXG. 
Three-fourths cup sweet milk, two tablespoons 
melted butter, three teaspoons of sugar, one cup 
of flour, one and one-half teaspoons baking powder, 
a little salt. Put as much fruit as you like into 
cups, fill nearly full of batter, and steam twenty 
minutes. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Three tablespoons tapioca, one quart of milk, a 
little salt, one tablespoon of butter, two well 
beaten eggs ; sugar and flavoring to suit the 
taste. Mix tapioca in half the milk, cold, and 
with the butter ; stir on the range until it thickens 
or boils. Pour it into a dish, stir in the sugar and 
the remainder of the milk, and when quite cold 
add the eggs and flavoring, and bake one-half hour 
in a moderately hot oven. This pudding may be 
varied by adding raisins or citron. 



5o 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Fill a dish with apples, nicely pared and sliced, 
sweeten them, add spices to suit the taste, and a 
little lemon or vanilla ; set on the range and partially 
cook them. Cover with a crust, set on top of the 
stove until the crust is light, then bake a nice brown. 
Crust for pudding, — One pint of flour, one and 
one-half teaspoons baking powder, piece of butter 
nearly the size of an egg, a little salt and milk 
enough to mix a soft dough. Sauce for pudding — 
One egg, one cup of fine sugar beaten very light ; 
Pour a little boiling water over the beaten egg 
and sugar, until of the consistency of cream. 
Flavor with vanilla, or grate a little nutmeg over 
the top. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

One cup of bread crumbs, two cups of milk, two 
eggs, one-half cup of sugar, piece of butter size of 
an egg, half the rind of a lemon grated ; put the 
milk in a farina kettle; when it boils add the yolks 
of the eggs, beaten very light, with the sugar and 
butter, then add the bread crumbs, and let boil 
until it thickens, then pour into a pudding dish, 
and spread a layer of jelly over the top ; over all 
spread the beaten whites of the eggs and set in the 
oven until it is baked a light brown. This may 
be baked instead of boiline as directed. 



5i 



C. A Rockwell. 



i. H. Dewey. 



C. A. ROCKWELL & Co., 

(Successors in Eetail to I. E Dewey Furniture Co.) 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

f^T puncture, 

108 Slate am 75 Mill Sts.. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




I. HEDD 




DEALER IN 



Fresh, Salt and Smoked 



MEATS 

SAUSAGE, POULTRY, &c, &c, 

471 and 473 State St., - Rochester, N. Y. 



52 



|Y| ▼ 1 \^ AND :ts 




PRODUCTS, 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, at 



G. J. Minors' Creamery, 



40 LORIMER STREET. 



There you can buy New Milk, Sweet Cream, Buttermilk, 
Sweet Skim Milk, Cottage Cheese, and New Butter the year 
around, put in 5 lb. crocks for family use a specialty. 

ICE CREAM 

FROM PURE CREAM ONLY, in large lots at a liberal 
discount. We keep on hand also a stock of 

COOD GROCERIES, 

including New Laid Eggs, J. A. Hinds & Co.'s Patent 
Flour, Mild are 

Agents for J. A. Vanlngen's Coal and the 
Diamond Steam Laundry. 

Your patronage is solicited, and we will deliver your 
goods promptly. Thanking you for past favors, we remain, 
yours respectfully, 

C. J. MINOR. 



COOKIES. 

GINGER SNAPS No. i. 

One cup New Orleans molasses, one-half cup 
sugar, one-half cup lard, a little salt, one teaspoon 
of ginger, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in four 
teaspoons, of boiling hot water. Mix well and 
knead hard, roll thin and bake in hot oven. 

GINGER BREAD No. i. 

One cup light brown sugar, one and one-half 
cups New Orleans molasses, and one-half cup lard, 
stir to a cream, then add one cup sour cream with 
one small teaspoon soda dissolved in it. Stir all 
together and add a pinch of salt and one teaspoon 
of cinnamon and flour enough to mix well, care 
being taken not to get it too stiff. Bake in a 
moderately slow oven. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD No. 2. 

One cup of sour milk, half cup melted butter 
(melt slowly but do not heat it) one tablespoon 
ginger; dissolve two teaspoons of soda in as little 
warm water as will dissolve it, beat one-half the 
soda into the sour milk and one cup of flour, then 
the other half of soda into two cups molasses 
until it foams, when it should be poured into the 
batter and enough more flour added to make not 
quite as stiff as pound cake. 



54 
SOFT GINGER CAKE No. 3. 

Half cup sugar, one cup each of butter, molasses 
and boiling water, two teaspoons soda, one egg, 
spice or ginger to taste, and three cups sifted flour. 
Pour the boiling water on the soda. Mix thor- 
oughly and bake in a moderately hot oven. 

GINGER SNAPS No. 2. 

One cup molasses, one cup sugar. Put four 
teaspoons of boiling water into a cup and fill the 
cup with melted butter ; then add one teaspoon 
ginger, one of salt and one of soda. Roll as thin 
as possible, using as little flour as can be. 

MOLASSES COOKIES No. 1. 

One cup molasses, one cup brown sugar, one 
cup hot water, one cup shortening (butter and lard) 
one small teaspoon cream tartar, two teaspoons 
soda, one teaspoon each ginger, salt and cinnamon, 
half teaspoon cloves, one egg and four cups flour. 
Stir at night and set in a cool place. In the 
morning bake in a quick oven ; cut in shape after 
baking. Sprinkle granulated sugar over the top 
before baking to prevent sticking together when 
put away. 

SUGAR COOKIES No. 1. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter and lard mixed, 
one cup sweet milk, two eggs, three small teaspoons 
baking powder, flavor with nutmeg and use flour 
enough to roll. Sprinkle the tops with granulated 
sugar and bake. 



55 
SUGAR COOKIES No. 2. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one and a half 
eggs, half teaspoon saleratus dissolved in a little 
milk. Flour to roll. 

SUGAR COOKIES No. 3. 

One egg, one and a half cups sugar, one cup 
butter, one cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in the milk ; nutmeg to flavor, flour to 
roll. 

MOLASSES COOKIES No. 2. 

Three tablespoons shortening, three tablespoons 
hot water, small teaspoon saleratus then fill up the 
cup with molasses. Use in same proportion ac- 
cording to quantity desired. Stir in flour and roll 
out as soft as possible. 

COCO A NUT COOKIES. 

One cup of white sugar, one-third cup of butter, 
one egg, four tablespoons sweet milk, one heaping 
teaspoon baking powder, a little salt, one cup of 
cocoanut. Make just stiff enough to roll out ; roll 
thin. The cocoanut may be spread on the top, 
or, mixed in the dough. 

LEMON TARTS. 

Grated rind, juice and pulp of one lemon, one 
cup of sugar, four eggs, one tablespoon butter. 
Beat the lemon, sugar, butter and the yolks of the 
eggs together. Make a paste, as for pies, fill 
patty pans with it, and bake : after which fill with 
the above, using the whites beaten to a stiff froth 



56 

with powdered sugar, enough to stiffen ; spread 
over the top, and bake a delicate brown color. 

GINGER SNAPS No. 3. 

Two cups molasses, one cup butter, one cup 
sugar, two teaspoons soda, one each of cinnamon 
and ginger. Boil this mixture five minutes (after 
it commences) then, while the molasses is hot stir 
in flour enough to make a dough, which will roll 
nicely. 

OA T MEAL COOKIES. 

Two and a half cups fine oat meal, uncooked, 
two and a quarter cups flour, one cup butter, one 
cup sugar, two eggs, half cup milk, two teaspoons 
baking powder, one teaspoon cinnamon. Roll 
thin and bake in a quick oven. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One and a half cups molasses, one cup brown 
sugar, one cup lard, one tablespoon ginger, one 
teaspoon soda dissolved in three-quarters of a cup 
of boiling water ; flour, enough to make a soft 
dough. Bake in a quick oven. 

FRIED CAKES No. 1. 

Pint bowl of sugar, pint bowl of sour milk or 
butter milk, half a nutmeg, two eggs, two even 
teaspoons soda, one scant half cup butter. Mix 
two or three days, before using and keep in a cold 
place. The dough is quite as good if kept a week 
or ten days as cold as possible. 



57 

FRIED CAKES No. 2. 
Two eggs, one cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, 
three teaspoons baking powder, three teaspoons 
shortening, and one quart flour. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
One teacup sweet milk, one teacup white sugar, 
one tablespoon butter, two teaspoons baking 
powder, nutmeg and cinnamon. Mix with flour 
as soft as possible. 



KIMPTON'S 

(FORMERLY CHAMBER'S BRANCH), 

143 Lake Ave., cor. Lorimer St. 




The store is a place of convenience with 
the following. 

* SPECIAL FEATURES * 

An Extension of Business Hours ; Prescriptions a Specialty; 
Personal attention of Proprietor to all Orders; Night Bell ; 
Postal Facilities ; Laundry Agency ; Waiting Room ; Express 
Agency ; Money Order Department. 



Our Methods for Dispensing 
are the Best. 

We have every Appliance and do not tolerate guesswork. 
YOUR PATRONAGE IS SOLICITED. 



CAKES. 

LA YER CAKE. 

One and a half cups sugar and two tablespoons 
butter rubbed together, one egg, one cup sweet 
milk, two and a half cups sifted flour, three 
teaspoons baking powder. Flavor and bake in 
layers. 

FIG FILLING No. i. ' 

A quarter of a pound of figs chopped fine, seven 
tablespoons water, three tablespoons sugar. Boil 
until it thickens. 

ORANGE FILLING. 
One cup sugar, white of one egg. Grate an 
orange and stir in last. 

CREAM FILLING. 
One cup of milk, one egg, two teaspoons corn 
starch, two tablespoons sugar. Dissolve the corn 
starch in a little of the milk and mix the other 
ingredients with it. Heat the rest of the milk 
and when it is boiling add the corn starch and 
boil till it thickens. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING FOR CAKE. 
One pound granulated sugar, one cup milk, one 
ounce Baker's chocolate, grated ; butter the size 
of an egg, one teaspoon of vanilla. Boil fifteen 
minutes. 



59 

FIG FILLING FOR CAKE No. 2. 
Six figs, one cup raisins, chopped together. 
Mix one egg, two tablespoons sugar, one table- 
spoon currant jelly. Do not cook. Spread on 
the layers. 

BOILED FROSTING. 
One cup sugar, water enough to dissolve the 
sugar. Set on stove and boil without stirring 
until it begins to thicken. Beat the white of an 
egg very light and stir in the boiled sugar very 
slowly, beating constantly. 

CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE No. 1. 
Three-quarters of a cup of butter, three-quarters 
cup of milk, two cups sugar, the whites of four 
eggs beaten light, three cups of flour and three 
teaspoons of baking powder. Cream the butter 
and sugar together and stir in the other ingredients, 
the eggs last. Bake in jelly cake pans. 

FROSTING FOR THE ABOVE. 
Beat the yolks of four eggs and enough confec- 
tioners sugar to make a stiff frosting, together. 
To this add a quarter cake of Baker's chocolate, 
melted. 

LADY CAKE. 

Half cup butter, one and a half cups sugar, two- 
thirds cup milk, whites of six eggs, two cups flour, 
two teaspoons baking powder. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE No. 2. 
Large half cup brown sugar, large half cup 
sweet milk, one tablespoon butter, two eggs 



6o 

beaten separately, two-thirds cake chocolate, three 
teaspoons baking powder and one cup of flour, or 
more if needed. 

FILLING FOR CHOCOLA TE CAKE. 

Two-thirds cup milk, two cups white sugar, 
half tablespoon butter, boil ten minutes; flavor to 
suit the taste. Stir until cold. 

ALMOND CREAM CAKE. 
Two cups sugar, half cup butter, one cup cold 
water, yolks of three eggs and whites of six, two 
teaspoons baking powder and two cups of flour. 
Bake in layers. 

FILLING FOR CAKE. 

Half pint sour cream, one pound almonds, four 
eggs beaten separately. Beat four tablespoons 
sugar with the whites, four with the yolks, and 
four with the cream. Stir all together and boil 
until thick, then beat into it the almonds blanched 
and chopped and one cup of hickory nuts chopped 
fine. 

WHITE CITRON CAKE. 

Whites of four eggs, one and a half cups sugar, 
half cup sweet milk, half cup butter, two cups 
flour, half pound citron or currants. The eggs 
should be beaten and stirred in last. 

SPICE CAKE No. i. 
Three eggs, two cups sugar, one cup butter, one 
cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, spices and 
raisins ; flour enough to stiffen. 



6i 

FRUIT CAKE No. i. 
Two cups brown sugar, one cup butter, two 
eggs, one cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, two 
cups raisins, two cups currants, one tablespoon all- 
spice, one tablespoon cinnamon, one teaspoon 
cloves, one nutmeg. Flour enough to make quite 
stiff. Stir eggs, butter, sugar and spices together 

well. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 

One and a half cups sugar, one-third cup butter, 

one cup sweet milk, one egg, three cups flour, 

three teaspoons baking powder. Flavor with 

lemon. 

SPONGE CAKE No. i. 

Take the yolks of three eggs and a cup of 
pulverized sugar, beat together until very light ; 
then add three tablespoons luke warm water, 
one cup flour, one and a half teaspoons baking 
powder, one teaspoon vanilla, and lastly add 
beaten whites. Bake in a slow oven. 

ROLL SPONGE CAKE. 
One cup sugar, one cup flour, four eggs, two 
teaspoons vinegar, three teaspoons baking powder, 
a pinch of salt and flavoring extract. Spread with 
jelly or chocolate. Sprinkle pulverized sugar on 
a napkin and lay the cake on it before rolling. 

SPICE CAKE No. 2. ' 
Four cups flour, two cups sugar, one-half cup 
butter, one-half pound currants, two cups sour 
milk, one tablespoon mixed spices and one tea- 
spoon soda. 



62 

NUT CAKE No. i. 
Two-thirds cup of butter, two cups sugar, one 
cup milk, three eggs, three cups flour, three tea- 
spoons baking powder, one cup nuts chopped fine. 
Bake in shallow tins ; frost ; cut in squares, with 
walnut meat on each square. 

NUT MACAROONS. 
One cup chopped nuts, one cup sugar, one cup 
flour, three tablespoons water, one egg, lump of 
butter size of small egg. 

NO EGG CAKE. 
One cup sugar, one cup sour milk, one cup cut 
raisins, one and a half cups of flour, four table- 
spoons of melted butter, and one teaspoon of soda. 

FRENCH CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, three cups flour, two cups 
sugar, one cup sweet milk, three eggs, three tea- 
spoons baking powder. Beat yolks in milk, whites 
separately. Bake in dripping pan ; when cold 
cut in squares. 

PORK CAKE. 

One pound fat pork chopped fine, two cups 
brown sugar, two cups molasses, two cups hot 
water, two pounds raisins, three eggs, two tea- 
spoons soda, one wineglass of brandy. Spice 
according to taste. Bake slowly. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, half cup butter, three-quarters 
cup of sweet milk, three scant cups flour, whites 
of six eggs and three teaspoons baking powder. 



63 

SPONGE CAKE No. 2. 
Eight eggs, two cups sugar, two cups flour, six 
tablespoons cold water, four teaspoons ■ baking 
powder. Beat whites of eggs separately. Add 
flour last, and mix as lightly as possible. 

IMPERIAL CAKE. 

One cup sugar, half cup butter, half cup milk, 
two eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, one cup 
chopped raisins, half cup sliced citron, half pound 
blanched and chopped almonds. 

SAND CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup flour, 
one cup corn starch, eight eggs beaten separately 
and two teaspoons baking powder,. 

ANGELS FOOD. 

Whites of eleven eggs well beaten, one and a 
half cups sugar, one cup flour, three teaspoons 
baking powder sifted in flour. Add flour to the 
sugar and eggs, and mix as little as possible. 
Half teaspoon vanilla and lemon. Bake forty 
minutes. 

FRUIT CAKE No. 2. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, one pound 
butter, two pounds currants, two pounds raisins, 
half pound citron, nine eggs, four nutmegs, one 
tablespoon each of cloves, allspice and cinnamon, 
one teaspoon soda, half cup molasses, one tea- 
spoon vanilla. 



6 4 

NUT CAKE No. 2. 

One and a half cups brown sugar, half cup butter, 
two cups flour, three quarters cup sweet milk, one 
and a half teaspoons baking powder, whites of 
four eggs, a pint of nut meats. Bake in a moder- 
ate oven. 

CARAMEL CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one scant cup of butter, one 
cup of milk, three cups of flour, two eggs, three 
teaspoons baking powder. Into this dough stir 
the following mixture, first allowing it to cool. 
One half cake grated chocolate, one cup sugar, 
one-half cup milk, yolk of an egg, boiled together 
until thick. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One-half pint water, one-half cup butter, two 
cups flour. Boil butter and water together and 
stir in the flour by degrees while they are boiling. 
Let this cool ; then add five eggs well beaten, one- 
quarter teaspoon soda. Drop the mixtures in 
tins, and bake in a quick oven. 

CREAM FOR THE PUFFS. 
One pint of milk, one-half cup flour, one cup 
sugar, three eggs. Beat eggs, sugar and flour 
together, and stir into the milk when it is boiling. 

BREAD CAKE. 

Two ounces butter, two ounces sugar, eight 
ounces currants. Warm the butter in a cup of 
good milk. Add cinnamon and ginger to taste, 
one egg and a half teaspoon soda. Mix all with 



65 

a cup and a half of bread dough (light), carefully 
stirring out all lumps. 

DRIED APPLE CAKE. 
A heaping cup of dried apples. Soak them 
over night in cold water. In the morning chop 
them and simmer in a cup of molasses four hours. 
Then add one-half cup butter, one-half cup sour 
milk, one-half teaspoon soda, two cups of flour and 
one cup each of seeded raisins and English cur- 
rants. Spice to taste ; bake slowly. Improves 
with age. 

FIVE MINUTE CAKE. 
Two-thirds of a cup of granulated sugar, a piece 
of butter the size of an egg, two scant cups flour, 
whites of two eggs, half cup water, two teaspoons 
baking powder. Mix all these together by stirring 
well for five minutes. 

BRIDGET'S BREAD CAKE. 

Three cups bread dough, very light, three cups 
sugar, one cup butter, one cup raisins, three eggs, 
one nutmeg, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in a 
little hot water. Rub butter and sugar together, 
add the beaten eggs and spice ; mix all thoroughly 
with the dough. Let it rise a short time before 
baking. 

COLD WATER CAKE. 

Three cups flour, two cups sugar, one cup cold 
water, whites of four eggs, half cup butter and two 
teaspoons baking powder. 



66 

JUMBO CAKE. 
Rub one cup sugar and half cup butter to a 
cream, the beaten whites of three eggs, half cup 
sweet milk, two cups flour, two teaspoons baking 
powder. 

FROSTING FOR THE SAME. 

Yolks of three eggs, and a half cup powdered 
sugar, one teaspoon vanilla, beat for fifteen 
minutes and spread between the layers and over 
top of the cake. 

JELLY CAKE. 
Two cups sugar, three-quarters cup butter, one 
cup sweet milk, three cups flour, two teaspoons 
baking powder. Bake in layers and spread with 
jelly between the layers. 



JELLIES AND CUSTARDS. 



LEMON JELL Y No. I. 
Turn one pint of cold water over one box of 
gelatine and two lemons cut up, let it stand three 
hours. One and one-fourth pounds of sugar and 
one quart of boiling water, add one pint of wine and 
strain into moulds. If you like, grapes may be laid 
into the moulds, and the jelly turned over them 
when it is just cool. 

LEMON JELL Y No. 2. 
One-half box Coxe's gelatine, soaked in one- 
half pint cold water one hour; add one pint boil- 
ing water, and one and one-half cups of sugar and 
three lemons, using the juice and grated rind. 
It may be cooked or not as one pleases, it is just 
as well not too. Strain into moulds and set in a 
cold place. 

COFFEE JELL Y. 

One cup ground coffee boiled in three cups of 
water slowly one-half hour, one box of Coxe's 
gelatine, one cup of sugar. Strain the boiling 
water on the gelatine, when perfectly dissolved, 
put into moulds to form. Before serving turn 
the jelly on a dish and pour around it one pint 
of cream whipped, and one-half cup of sugar; 
flavor with vanilla. Bits of currant jelly may be 
added to the whipped cream. This makes a very 
nice dessert. 



68 

GERMAN CREAM. 
One-half box of gelatine, one quart of milk, 
yolks of three eggs. Dissolve the gelatine in the 
milk, add the beaten yolks. Put in a farina boiler, 
and place on the range, cook until it becomes a 
soft custard, stirring all the time. Beat the whites 
of the eggs to a stiff froth, add six tablespoons of 
sugar and flavoring to suit taste. When the 
custard is cold add the beaten whites. 

APPLE JELLY. 

Use good, tart apples, cut them up without 
paring, and cover with water; cook until soft. 
Squeeze out the juice and use one-half pound of 
sugar to one pint of juice; boil fast for twenty 
minutes or until it jellies. Too much boiling 
makes it hard and dark color. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE No. i. 
Beat one quart of sweet cream to a stiff froth. 
Put one-third of a box of gelatine in a new tin cup 
with seven tablespoons of cold water and set on 
the stove until it dissolves. While warm stir into 
the whipped cream very slowly; add a cup of 
pulverized sugar and three teaspoons of vanilla. 

ORANGE FLOAT. 
One pint of milk, one tablespoon corn starch, 
three eggs, saving the whites of one egg for frosting. 
Pare and remove the seeds from three oranges, 
cover these with fine sugar. Let them stand until 
ready to use, then stir the custard and oranges 
together. 



6 9 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Twelve sweet oranges and three lemons. Cut 
the fruit across the grain in the thinnest slices pos- 
sible. Lay them in four quarts of water for thirty- 
six hours. Then boil gently for three hours; and 
lastly add eight pounds granulated sugar and boil 
for a half hour, or until it jellies. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE No. 2. 

Dissolve half a box of gelatine in a pint of milk. 
Let it stand a half hour. Make a custard of one 
pint of milk, yolks of four eggs, and one cup of 
sugar. First, cream the eggs and sugar, and put 
them on to boil with the milk. Add the gelatine 
and again let them come to a boil. Whip one 
pint of cream. When the custard is cold and 
beginning to thicken, stir in a little at a time and 
and alternately the beaten whites of the eggs and 
cream. Line a dish with lady fingers and pour in 
the mixture and set in a cold place. 

RUSSIAN CREAM. 

Cover one ounce of gelatine with cold water, 
and let stand fifteen minutes; then add one cup 
of sugar and the beaten yolks of four eggs, and 
stir into one quart of scalding milk. Let it cook 
two or three minutes, and then cool while beating 
the whites of the eggs ; add the beaten whites. 
Flavor and pour into moulds. Serve with whipped 
cream. 



70 

ICING. 

Whites of four eggs, four cups of sugar; pour 
one-half pint of boiling water over the sugar. 
Boil until, when dropped in water it is very stiff, 
but not brittle, pour over the beaten whites of the 
eggs, While warm add one-half teaspoon citric 
acid. One tablespoon of vanilla. 

Icing may be colored yellow by putting the 
grated peel of an orange or lemon in a muslin bag, 
straining a little juice through it and squeezing it 
hard into the beaten egg and sugar. Strawberry 
juice colors a pretty pink. 

MERINGUES. 
Whites of six eggs, one pound confectioner's 
sugar. Flavor to suit taste. Beat the whites very 
stiff stirring the sugar in gradually (sift the sugar). 
Beat until thick, add the flavoring. Butter slightly 
sheets of white paper and lay upon pieces of hard 
wood boards. Drop the mixture on the paper a 
spoonful at a time, in oral form rounded, and thick 
at the top. Bake in a slow oven, remove from 
the paper, and join by the under side two by two, 
the inside will be soft and creamy. These are 
very nice placed in a dish of floating islands singly, 
not joined. 



7» 



HENRY L1KLY <f CO., 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



TRUNKS, 



TRAVELING BAGS, 



Articles for travelers, 



AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



SAMPLE AND THEATRICAL TRUNKS 
A SPECIALTY. 



96 State Street, 
ROCHESTER, N- Y 
TRUNKS AND BAGS REPAIRED. 



- 72 

NICHOLSON 

Moist Water Colors, 

UNEQUALED FOR FINENESS, BRILLIANCY 
AND PERMANENCY. 



A full list of Colors of guaranteed uniform tint, and put up in 

a variety of forms to meet the requirements of Artists, 

Decorators, Architects, Lithographers, Schools 

and the Toy Trade. 



METALLIC WATER COLORS, FOR LUSTRE PAINTING ON Silk, 
Velvet, Wood, Paper, &c, a Specialty. 

Artists' Casss, Porcelain Ware, Toy Boxes, &c. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE, 



THE NICHOLSON COMPACT, 



ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




ELLERY A. BANDY 

DEALER IN 

Watches? 

Clocks, 
Jewelry. 

Eye Glasses, Etc. 

518 State Street, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Special Attention 
Paid to Repairing. 



Drop me a postal and I 
will call for your clock. 



PICKLES. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES No i. 
For five hundred very small cucumbers. First 
wash clean, removing all black specks; put them 
in a stone jar, add one teacup of salt and enough 
water to cover, and let them remain all night. In 
the morning drain them carefully, and put into 
a preserving kettle and cover with vinegar, letting 
them stand on the stove until the vinegar is at 
boiling heat, then remove the cucumbers to glass 
jars; add a few pieces of cinnamon, two or three 
cloves and one cayenne pepper, to each jar; fill 
the jar with the hot vinegar and screw on the top. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES No. 2. 

Select small cucumbers, of uniform size. Wash 
the cucumbers in cold water, taking care to re- 
move specks ; then put them in a stone jar. Make 
a weak brine (strong enough to bear up an egg) 
of salt and water. Pour the brine over the 
cucumbers, boiling hot : then let them remain one 
day and one night. The next day pour off the 
brine, scalding it, and pouring over the cucumbers 
again, let them remain another day and night. 
The third day, pour off the brine and wash the 
cucumbers thoroughly in cold water. Put them 
in a jar and pour over them cold vinegar. Add 
a few small pieces of alum and horse- radish root, 
and spice to suit the taste. 



74 

CHOPPED CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
One peck cucumbers, one-half dozen onions ; a 
few green peppers. Peel and slice cucumbers, and 
sprinkle with salt. Next day, chop and squeeze 
them dry, add a little mustard or mustard seed. 
If neither be convenient, omit the mustard without 
detriment to the flavor. In filling your jars, let 
them be half full of cucumbers, and fill up with 
good strong vinegar. Cucumbers absorb a good 
deal, and the jars should be examined often to see 
that they are well covered with vinegar. This is 
a delightful pickle. 

GREEN TOM A TO PICKLES. 

One peck green tomatoes sliced thin, one-fourth 
peck onions; put in a stone jar and after sprink- 
ling salt over them, let them remain all night. In 
the morning drain, then boil for one hour in a 
weak solution of vinegar. Drain this off and take 
one gallon of vinegar, one-half pound brown sugar, 
one-half pound white mustard seed, one ounce of 
mace, one teaspoon of cloves ; put these on to 
boil. To the tomatoes add one box of mustard 
mixed with vinegar, and one teaspoon cayenne 
pepper. Pour the boiling vinegar over the toma- 
toes and then when quite cool add nearly a bottle 
of olive oil. 

MUSTARD PICKLES No. i. 

Two quarts of very small onions, two quarts 
of very small cucumbers, three medium cauli- 
flowers, six green peppers. Wash the onions and 
cucumbers in cold water. Separate the cauli- 



75 

flowers in small parts, wash in cold water. Make 
a weak brine of salt and water, put the onions, 
cucumbers and cauliflowers in a jar, and turn the 
brine over them, covering them well with the 
brine. Let stand twenty-four hours. Scald the 
onions and cauliflower in the water they have 
stood in, until tender, but don't let them lose 
their shape. Drain well and put in a jar; turn 
'over them the paste while it is hot, covering them 
well ; if this quantity will not cover pickles, make 
as much more as is needed. 

THE PASTE. 
Six tablespoons mustard, six tablespoons tur- 
meric powder, one cup of flour, one-half cup brown 
sugar, two quarts of vinegar. Mix the mustard, 
turmeric powder, and flour together with a little 
cold vinegar, and stir them into the boiling vinegar. 
Add a little celery seed and a little white mustard 
seed (about one teaspoonful of each). 

CHILI SAUCE No. 3. 
One peck of ripe tomatoes, six green peppers, 
six onions, two teaspoons of ground allspice, two 
teaspoons ground cloves, two cups brown sugar, 
five cups vinegar. Scald and skim the tomatoes; 
chop the onions and pepper. Boil all together 
slowly three or four hours. Bottle while hot. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 
To one gallon of tomatoes, after straining, add 
one and one-half cups of sugar, two cups of vine- 
gar, one tablespoon of allspice, one tablespoon of 
cloves, one tablespoon of cinnamon, one-half table- 



7 6 

spoon of cayenne pepper, one-half tablespoon of 
black pepper, one lemon grated rind and juice, 
one tablespoon of mustard. Salt to taste. Boil 
five hours slowly. Bottle tightly while warm. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 
Five pints of grapes, simmer, then strain ; add 
two pints sugar, one pint of vinegar, two table- 
spoons mixed spices. Salt and pepper. Boil 
until thick, and bottle while hot. 

SWEET GREEN TOMATO PICKLES No. 2. 
Scald, peel and slice the tomatoes. Make 
strong ginger tea, drop the tomatoes in and scald 
well. To every two pounds of fruit add one-half 
pound of sugar, and one-half pint of vinegar. 
Make a syrup of this, put in the fruit and boil 
till clear, adding stick cinnamon and whole cloves. 

MUSTARD PICKLES No. 2. 
Two gallons of best vinegar, four and one-half 
pounds of sugar, four ounces of coarse salt, one- 
fourth pound ginger, one-half ounce ground cloves, 
one-fourth ounce ground all-spice, one-fourth 
pound mustard seed, small piece of alum. Boil 
all one-half hour. Mix one-half pound ground 
mustard and one-fourth pound turmeric powder 
with a part of the vinegar till it is smooth, then 
mix with the pickles and let it come to a boil ; put 
in string beans, cauliflower and small onions dry, 
having first soaked them in salt water over night. 

TOM A TO PICKLES No. 3. 
One peck green tomatoes (sliced). Sprinkle 
with half cup of salt and let stand twenty-four 



77 

hours. Drain them and boil in vinegar; when 
cooked put in a jar, draining off the vinegar. 
Then to half gallon of fresh vinegar add four 
pounds brown sugar and three ounces stick cinna- 
mon ; boil, pour over the tomatoes and cover them 
closely. 

CHILI SAUCE No. i. 

One dozen ripe tomatoes, four onions, and three 
green peppers. Chop finely. Then add one pint 
of vinegar, two teaspoons salt, two grated nutmegs 
and two pounds brown sugar. Boil till tender, 
bottle and seal tightly. 

CHILI SA UCE No. 2. 
Twelve ripe tomatoes, two large onions, four 
green peppers, two tablespoons salt, two table- 
spoons brown sugar, one tablespoon ginger, one 
tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon ground 
mustard, one nutmeg grated, four cups of vinegar. 
Chop peppery fine and peel tomatoes. Boil all 
together until tender. 

PICALILLI. 

One peck green tomatoes, one head cabbage, 
three onions ; chop fine and add half a pint of salt. 
Let it stand over night; in the morning drain off 
the brine and scald in weak vinegar, then drain 
this off and stir in ground spices to suit the taste. 
Chop three green peppers and stir them with a 
little horse-radish root into the pickles. Pack 
them closely in a crock and cover with strong 
vinegar. 



78 

PICKLE PEACHES. 
To one quart of good cider vinegar, add three 
and one-half pounds of sugar, two ounces of cin- 
namon, one ounce of cloves, one ounce of allspice. 
Wipe the peaches with a dry cloth, (selecting 
choice fruit) place in a steamer over a kettle of 
boiling water, until soft enough to pierce with a 
fork; taking from the steamer place them care- 
fully in a stone jar. Boil the spice and vinegar 
together ; before adding the sugar, after all have 
been boiled an hour, pour over the peaches. The 
next day pour the syrup off the peaches and scald 
the syrup, again pouring over the fruit luke warm ; 
the following day repeat again, pouring the syrup 
over the fruit after scalding. The nicest way to 
fix the spice is to make small bags of unbleached 
muslin, one bag for each kind of spice. 

SPICED PEARS. 
Six pounds of pears, four and a half pounds of 
sugar and one quart of vinegar. Boil the sugar 
and vinegar together until they make a nice syrup. 
Meanwhile steam the pears until soft, then put 
them in the syrup and let all come to a boil, add- 
ing whole cloves and cinnamon. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 
Six pounds of currants, three pounds of raisins, 
two tablespoons allspice, two tablespoons cinna- 
mon and one tablespoon cloves. Make a syrup 
of three pints of sugar, to one of vinegar, skim if 
necessary; then add fruit and boil until it is 
thick. When almost done add spices. 



79 

TOM A TO SA UCE. 
Take one peck of ripe tomatoes. Pare, chop 
fine, and let them drain through a sieve over night. 
Throw away the juice and to the pulp add one- 
half cup of salt, one-half cup of sugar, one-half 
cup of mustard seed, one ounce of celery seed, 
one teaspoon allspice, two tablespoons black pep- 
per, one quart of vinegar. Do not cook. It is 
not necessary to use as much black pepper; suit 
the taste. 

TOMATO PRESERVES. 
Five pounds ripe tomatoes, ten pounds sugar, 
six lemons, one ounce green ginger. Pare the 
tomatoes, slice the lemons and ginger very thin. 
Remove all seeds of the lemons. Boil all together 
until quite thick, then add sugar, and boil until 
the syrup looks clear and rich. Watch closely as 
tomatoes burn easily. 



CANDIES. 



MOLASSES CANDY. 
Three cups yellow coffee sugar, one-half cup 
molasses, one cup of water, half teaspoon cream 
tartar, butter size of a walnut. Flavor with 
vanilla. Boil till it hardens in water. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 
Three cups molasses, one cup sugar, butter the 
size of an egg, and half teaspoon soda. Boil till 
it hardens when dropped in water. 

TAFFY. 
Six tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons butter, 
and three tablespoons of molasses. Boil ten or 
fifteen minutes, and cut in squares when cool. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
One cup grated chocolate, one cup molasses, 
one cup of sugar, half cup milk, ten drops of 
vanilla, and butter size of an egg. Boil molasses, 
sugar, chocolate and milk, twenty minutes ; when 
nearly done add butter and vanilla. When done 
pour on buttered tins, and when quite cool mark 
in squares with a knife. 

KISSES. 

One cup fine white sugar, whites of two eggs. 
Drop on paper and bake in a quick oven. 



8i 



WM. EASTWOOD, 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

Fine Foot Wear. 



Largest Assortment, All Widths of Feet Fitted, 

Spring Heel Shoes for Children. 

Fine Goods and Custom Work a Specialty. 



ORDERS BY MAIL WILL RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 



BiC EAST MAIN, 

SHOE AND- 

STORE, NORTH ST. PAUL NO. 



4 



AMBROSE GOOMBES, 



DEALER IN 



DRY GOODS 

Carpets, Oil-Cloths and Gent's Furnishing Goods, 

FINE MILLINERY, 

SCHOOL BOOKS, STATIONERY, ETC. 

203 LYBLL AVB. 

Branch of the Star Steam Laundry. 



82 

W. D. SCOFIELD & CO., 

Dress Goods Specialty 

Black and Colored Silks, Satins, 
and Velvets. 

Plain and Fancy Wool Goods, Mourning Goods. 
LATEST NOVELTIES IN 

Buttons and Trimmings. 
170 East Main St., Rochester, N.Y. 

OPPOSITE STONE STREET. 

Mc Farlin's, 

•• •■ Main and St. Paul Streets, 

TA.KB THE LBA.T* FOR- 

QUALITY, STYLE, 
AND PERFECTION OF FIT. 



Prices are always i*iglit. 



JVIen's, Boys' X Children's Clothing. 



SUNDRIES. 



FOR AN OMELET. 
One egg, one tablespoon milk, beaten thoroughly- 
together. Fry in very hot butter, brown on one 
side, then turn over and brown on the other side. 

QUAKER OMELET. 
Three eggs, one-half tablespoon corn starch, 
one-half cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoon salt. 
Beat yolks of eggs and corn starch together, add 
salt and milk, stir well. Have a frying pan 
very hot, butter well and pour in the mixture and 
cover. Place on a moderately hot part of the 
stove. Cook until it begins to set in the center, 
then pour in the whites of the eggs, beaten to a 
stiff froth. Cover closely and cook six or eight 
minutes. Turn over carefully if preferred brown. 

APPLE JOHN A THAN. 
One cup water or milk, one egg, piece of butter 
size of an egg, two teaspoons of baking powder, 
and flour enough to make a batter. Have ready 
a few apples, pared and sliced, put them in the 
bottom of a baking dish and pour the batter over 
them. Bake about half an hour, or until the 
apples are done. Serve while hot with sauce. 

FIVE O'CLOCK TEA CRACKERS. 
Grate cheese on as many crackers as you need, 
and just before serving, place in a hot oven until 
the cheese is melted. Very good. 



8 4 
WELSH RAREBIT. 

One-half pound rich cream cheese, one-fourth 
cup of cream or ale, one scant teaspoon mustard, 
one-half teaspoon salt, a little cayenne pepper, 
one egg, one teaspoon butter, four slices of toast, 
cut in large squares. Break or grate the cheese, 
add to milk and put on the range in a double 
boiler. Toast the bread and keep it hot. Mix 
mustard, salt, and pepper, add the eggs and beat 
well ; when cheese is melted, stir into the egg and 
seasoning, add the butter; cook until it thickens. 
Don't let it curdle. Pour over the toast and serve. 

TO BAKE A LARGE FISH WHOLE. 

Cut off the head and split the fish down nearly 
to the tail. Prepare a nice dressing of bread, 
butter, pepper and salt, moisten with a little 
water. Fill the fish with this dressing and bind 
it together with fine cotton cord, so as to hold 
the dresssing. Bake a large fish about an hour, in 
a dripping pan, and pour around it a little water 
and melted butter. Baste frequently. Serve with 
the gravy of the fish. 

TARTAR SAUCE. 

FOR BAKED OR BOILED FISH. 
One-half cup of butter, juice of one-half lemon, 
yolks of two eggs, a speck of cayenne pepper, one- 
half cup of boiling water, one-half teaspoon of salt. 
Beat butter to a cream, add the yolks little by 
little, lemon juice, pepper and salt. Cook over 
boiling water. Beat with egg beater while cook- 



85 

ing until it begins to thicken (about one minute) 
then add boiling water, beating all the time. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

Put the codfish in cold water, set on the back 
part of the range ; when the water gets hot, pour 
off, and put on cold water again, until the fish is 
freshened, then pick it in small bits. Boil pota- 
toes, mash them, and while hot, mix the fish and 
potatoes together, using two-thirds potatoes and 
one-third codfish. Put in plenty of butter. Make 
into balls, and fry in plenty of hot lard. The 
lard must be hot before putting the balls into it. 

TO BOIL FISH. 
Put the fish in a kettle with cold water sufficient 
to cover it, having first rolled it in a floured cloth. 
Allow five minutes for every pound of fish, count- 
ing from the time it begins to boil. 



86 

FRAGMENTS. 



FLUID FOR CLEANING GLOVES. 
One gallon deoderized benzine, one-half gallon 
chloroform, one-half ounce ether, one ounce of 
alcohol, one ounce oil of cologne. Dip the gloves 
in the fluid and wash. 

FLUID FOR CLEANING SILVER. 
One-half pint alcohol, one-quarter of pound pre- 
pared chalk, one ounce camphor gum, four ounces 
aqua ammonia, one-fourth pound paris white. 
This is splendid. 

JEFFLA WATER. 
One pound of sal-soda, one-half pound of chloride 
lime, dissolved in two quarts warm water; add 
two quarts more. Strain and bottle. Make in 
an earthen crock. Use one tablespoon of the 
fluid to one quart of water. This is splendid for 
removing stains from table linen. 



87 



The 




• SUCCESSORS TO R. S. KENYON & CO.) 

IMPORTERS 
AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Ladies' Fine Furs. 



■•ft?" 



SEAL GARMENTS TO ORDER A SPECIALTY. 



S HOULDER CAPES FROM $3.50 TO $1 00. 
MUF FS COLLARS, C OLLARETTES. &c. 

Gents' Stylish Hats, and Childrens' 
Fine Hats, 

THE LARGEST LINE IN WESTEEN NEW YORK. 

140 EAST MAIN ST., 

Next door to Sibley. Lindsay & Currs. 




88 

THE PLACE 



TO BUY YOUR 



M 



C. P. SEELS Popular Market, 

60 LAKE AVENUE, 

Where you can get the best meats to be found in 
the city. Everything in Meats, Poultry, Fish, Canned 
Goods and Vegetables, to be had in a first-class 
market, can be found at 

SEEL'S MARKET. 



^I-KE, just want to REAIIJXD you that the 
VIA!/ success of these recipes depends entirely 
on the use of the best 

always to be found at 

J. A. WAD IDGEH'S, 

91 and 93 Smith Street. 



TELEPHONE 245 D. 



izdstideix: 



BREADS. Page. 

Auntie's Egg or Southern Corn Bread — Miss Van Inqen.14. 

Brown Bread— Mrs. J. F. White 13 

Callie Hillman's Lighting Yeast — Mrs. Wm. Boyd 11 

Corn Bread — Mrs. J. H. Padley 13 

Corn Cake — Anon 14 

Flitters — Mrs. John H. Kinne 14 

Graham Bread — Mrs. Sprague 13 

Graham Gems No 1. — Mrs Clias. Richards 12 

Graham Gems No. 2 — Anon 15 

Graham Muffins — Mrs. Chas. Richards 12 

Green Corn Griddle Cakes — Anon 15 

Johnny Cake — Mrs. J. H. Kinne 14 

Koochen — Mrs. John Wallace 15 

Muffins — Mrs. Sprague 13 

Parker House Rolls No. 1— Miss Cora Clark 11 

Parker House Rolls No. 2 — Mrs. Chas. Yates 12 

Pop Overs — Mrs. W. H. Armstrong 13 

Sally Lunn — Anon 15 

Tea Cakes — Mrs R. J. Allen 12 

CAKES. 

Almond Cream Cake — Miss Kate Allen 60 

Angel's Food — Mrs. Jos. Harrison 63 

Boiled Frosting — Mrs. Wm. Armstrong 59 

Bread Cake — Mrs. Innis Allen 64 

Bridget's Bread Cake— Mrs. F. E. Day 65 

Caramel Cake — Mrs. Ilervey 64 

Chocolate Layer Cake No 1 — Mrs. I. P. Allen 59 

Chocolate Cake No. 2 — Mrs. Chas. Richards 59 

Chocolate Filling for Cake — Miss Van Ingen 58 

Cold Water Cake— Mrs. F. E. Bay 65 

Cream Filling — Mrs. Wm. Armstrong 58 

Cream Puffs — Mrs. Herwy. .' 64 

Delicate Cake — Mrs. Henry Attridge 62 

Dried Apple Cake— Anon 65 



9° 

CAKES— Con tinued. Page. 

Fig Filling No. 1 — Mrs. Wm. Armstrong 58 

Fig Filling for Cake No. 2— Mrs. J. H. Kinne 59 

Five Minute Cake — Anon 6i 

French Cake — Mis. J. M. Brown 62 

Fruit Cake No. 1 — Mrs. Bowerman 61 

Fruit Cake No. 2— Mrs. Jos. Harrison 63 

Imperial Cake — Mrs. Wm. Cross 63 

Jelly Cake— Mrs. A. T. Leggett 66 

Jumbo Cake— Mrs. F. E. Bay 66 

Lady Cake — Mrs. James Kelly 59 

Layer Cake — Mrs. Wm. Armstrong 58 

No Egg Cake— Mrs. J. M. Brown 62 

Nut Cake No. 1— Mrs. Wm. Cross 62 

Nut Cake No. 2— Mrs. H. W. Bavis 64 

Nut Macroons— Mrs. R. J. Allen 62 

One Egg Cake — Mrs. H. W. Bavis 61 

Orange Filling — Mrs. Wm. Armstrong 58 

Pork Cake — Mrs. Henry Atlridge 62 

Roll Sponge Cake— Mrs. J. H. Cooper 61 

Sand Cake — Anon 63 

Spice Cake No. 1 — Mrs. Sprague 60 

Spice Cake No. 2— Mrs. J. H. Cooper. 61 

Sponge Cake No. 1 — Mrs. Wm. Creelman 61 

Sponge Cake No. 2 — Mrs. Wm. Cross 63 

White Citron Cake — Mrs. Sprague 6 

CANDIES. 

Butter Scotch — Anon 80* 

Chocolate Caramels— Mrs. Chas. Richards 80 

Kisses — Mrs. Chas. Richards 80 

Molasses Candy — Mrs. W. II. Cross 80 

Taffy— Anon 80 

COOKIES. 

Cocoanut Cookies — Anon 55 

Doughnuts — Mrs. J. II. Cooper 57 

Fried Cakes No. 1— Mrs. W. II. Cross 55 

Fried Cakes No. 2— Mrs. Sprague 57 

Ginger Cookies— Mrs. Geo. Niclwlson 56 

Ginger Bread No. 1— Mrs. J. II. Kinne 53 

Ginger Snaps No. 1 — Mrs, J. II. Kinne 53 



9i 
COOKIES— Continued. P AGE . 

Ginger Snaps No. 2 — Mrs. W. II. Creelman 54 

Ginger Snaps No. 3 — Mrs. Innis Allen 56 

Lemon Tarts — Anon 55 

Molasses Cookies No. 1 — Mrs. Wm. Creelman 54 

Molasses Cookies No. 2 — Mrs. J. M. Brown 55 

Oat Meal Cookies— Mrs. Ceo. Nicholson 56 

Soft Ginger Bread No. 2 — Mrs. Chas. Raymond 53 

Soft Ginger Cake No. 3— Mrs. F. A. Clark 54 

Sugar Cookies No. 1 — Anon 54 

Sugar Cookies No. 2 — Mrs. J. M. Brown 55 

Sugar Cookies No. 3 — Mrs. J. M. Brown 55 

CROQUETTES. 

Chicken Croquettes — Mrs. F. O. Ranney 21 

Lobster Croquettes — Mrs. T. Bowerman 22 

Oyster Croquettes — Mrs. F. C Ranney 22 

Rice Croquettes — Mrs. Levi Hey 22 

Veal Croquettes — Mrs. F. 0. Ranney 21 

FRAGMENTS. 

Fluid for Cleaning Gloves — Mrs. F. Q. Ranney 86 

Fluid for Cleaning Silver— Mrs. F. O. Ranney 86 

Jeffla Water — Anon 86 

JELLIES AND CUSTARDS. 

Apple Jelly — Anon 68 

Charlotte Russe No. 1— Mrs. F. O. Ranney 68 

Charlotte Russe No 2 — Mrs. Innis Allen 69 

Coffee Jelly— Mrs. Wm. Boyd 67 

German Cream — Mrs. F. II. Merlau 68 

Icing — Anon 70 

Lemon Jelly No. 1—Mrs. F. G. Ranney 67 

Lemon Jelly No. 2— Miss Kale Allen 67 

Meringues — Anon 70 

Orange Float — Anon 68 

Orange Marmalade — Anon 69 

Russian Cream — Miss Van Ingen 69 

MEATS. 

Chicken Loaf — Anon 26 

Chicken Patties — Anon 26 

Escaloped Turkey— Anon 25 



92 

MEATS — Continued. Page. 

Escaloped Veal — Anon 26 

Fried Turkey — Anon 26 

Frigudel— Mrs. I. P. Allen 27 

Ham Balls — Anon 27 

How to Roast a Ham — Mrs. C. A. Bowman 27 

Jellied Chicken or Veal— Mrs. Bowerman 28 

Mock Duck — Anon 28 

Roast Turkey — Anon 25 

Veal Loaf No. 1— Mrs. F. G. Ranney 27 

Veal Loaf No. 2— Mrs. F. H. Merlau 28 

OYSTERS. 

A Breakfast Dish of Oysters— Mrs J. II. Padley 17 

Creamed Oysters — Mrs. Innis Allen 17 

Escaloped Oysters — Mrs. Henry Likely 17 

Oyster Fritters — Mrs. John Kinne 18 

Oyster Stew — Mrs. Heberling 18 

PICKLES 

Chili Sauce No. 1— Mrs. Robert Reilly 77 

Chili Sauce No. 2— Mrs. F. G. Ranney 77 

Chili Sauce No. 3— Mrs. D. J. Sadden 75 

Chopped Cucumber Pickles —Miss Van Ingen -4 

Cucumber Pickles No 1 — Mrs. F. A. Clark 73 

Cucumber Pickles No. 2— Mrs. John H. Kinne 73 

Grape Catsup — Mrs. Sprague 76 

Green Tomato Pickles — Mrs. Hervey 74 

Mustard Pickles No. 1 — Anon 74 

Mustard Pickles No. 2 — Mrs. Hervey 76 

Picalilli— Anon 77 

Pickle Peaches — Mrs. J. II. Kinne 78 

Spiced Pears — Anon 78 

Spiced Currants — Anon 78 

Sweet Green Tomato Pickles No. 2 — Mrs. Hervey 76 

Tomato Catsup — Mrs. D. J. Sadden 75 

Tomato Pickles No. 3— Mrs. Robert Reilly 76 

Tomato Preserves — Mrs. F. G. Ranney 79 

Tomato Sauce — Mrs. F. G. Ranney 79 

PIES. 

Apple Custard Pie — Anon 42 

Boiled Cider Pie— Mrs. Hervey 39 



93 



Page. 



PIES— Continued. 

Cn-am Pie— Mrs. Henry Attridge 40 

Lemon Cream Pie— Mrs. Levi Hey 39 

Lemon Pie No. I— Mrs. B. J. Allen 39 

Mince Pie No. 1— Mrs. W. H Gross 41 

Mince Pie No. 2— Anon 41 

Pine Apple Pie— Mrs. Hervty 41 

Pie-Plant Pie— Anon 41 

Pumpkin Pie— Mrs. H. W. Davis 40 

Squash Pie -Anon ™ 

Summer Mince Pies— Mrs. Ilerrey 39 

Whipped Cream Pie— Mrs. Win. Boyd 42 

POTATOES. 

Baked Potato Balls— Anon 3 '^ 

Duchess Potatoes— Anon j»* 

Escaloped Potatoes No 1— Mrs. Henry Likely 31 

Escaloped Potatoes No. 2 -Mrs. Tunis Allen '.31 

Lyonnaise Potatoes— Mrs. W. H Duffett 31 

Potato Puffs— Mrs. J. H. Padley 31 

Potato Surprise— Anon 3v 

PUDDINGS. 

Apple Custard— Mrs. Ghas. Bichards 4o 

Apple Dumpling Dough— Mrs. John Heberling 46 

Apple Pudding— Mrs. W. H. Duffett o0 

Banana Pudding— Mrs.. G. L. Baymond 47 

Corn Pudding— Mrs. John Heberling 46 

Corn Starch Pudding— Mrs. Levi Hey 49 

Cottage Pudding— Mrs. F. G. Banney 48 

English Plum Pudding— Mrs. Win. Duffett 45 

Fig Pudding— Mrs. Robert Beilly 4 ^ 

Graham Pudding— Mrs. Ghas. Bichards 47 

Indian Pudding— Mrs. F. G. Banney 45 

Kin- George the Fourth Pudding- J/>*. F. 67. Banney At 

Plum Pudding— Mrs. A. T. Leggett 48 

Queen of Pudding -Anon ,(l 

Snow Pudding— Mrs. F. E. Day 48 

Steamed Pudding— Mrs. Chas. Yates 49 

Steamed Suet Pudding— Mrs. Innis Allen 46 

Tapico Pudding— Mrs. F. E. Day 49 

The Bishop of Edinhoro's Prune— Mm Van Lngen 48 



94 

SALADS. page- 

Cabbage Salad No. 1— Mrs. Wm r Boyd 36 

Cabbage Salad No. 2— Mrs. Sptygve 37 

Chicken Salad No. 1— Mrs UhOs^Yates 35 

Chicken Salad No. 2 — Mrs. Jo's. Harrison 35 

Cucumber Salad — Mrs. Jq,mes Kelly 36 

Lettuce Salad — Mrs. J. U. Kinne 36 

Potato Salad — Mrs. D. J. Sadden 37 

SOUPS. 

Beef Soup — Mrs. J. H. Kinne 8 

Bouillon — Miss Van Ingen 7 

Celery Soup^* Mrs. Jas. Kelly 8 

Corn Soiip-7-Mrs. Jas. Kelly 8 

Cream Tomato Soup — Mrs. J. H. Padley 9 

Mock Bisque Soup — Miss Van Ingen 10 

Potato Soup — Mrs. R. J. Allen 9 

• Tomato Soup No. 1—Mrs. R. J. Allen 9 

Tomato Soup No. 2 — Mrs. James Kelly 9 

SUNDRIES. 

Apple Johnathan — Anon 83 

Codfish Balls — Anon 85 

Five O'clock Tea Crackers — Mrs. Wm. Boyd 84 

For an Omelet — Mrs. Sprague 83 

Quaker Omelet — Mrs. Bowman 83 

Tartar Sauce — Mrs. James Kelly 84 

To Bake a Large Fish Whole— Mrs. F. H. Merlau 84 

To Boil Fish— Mrs. R. J. Allen 85 

Welch Rarebit— Mrs. W. H. Duffett 84 



WHY NOT? 



SEND A. 



pioBTAL CARD TO 

JOHN RbWHITE, 






Care of Lawyers' CfrlWaijje Publishing Company, 




Asking him to call for your Booksjr^&gazines, &c., 
show samples and give you prrc^?T)2- 



y; 



Exceptional Facilities for work of this class. Work done 
promptly, and delivered. 





TIPS. 



There is only one place in the 
city 



FOR YOU 

to find G-oodger & Co.'s Ladies' 
Fine Shoes. They will suit you 

IN STYLE 

and please you in all respects 

AND COMFORT 

which you have not had will be 
yours. All styles for spring are 
found at 

CARROLL, READLE & CO.'S 

144 to 154 East Main St.