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TYME 



MAN OF THE YEAR 



Tyme Magazine's Man of the 
Year for 1969-70 is Mr. Wallace 
E. Carets, chairman of the jour- 
nalism department at Texas Tech 
since 1956. 

Carets, nationally known as 
an innovator in the field of jour- 
nalism, is the man responsible 
for the magazine format which 
has been used by the La Ventana 
for the past twelve years. 

Tech will lose Carets in the 
fall. He will move to Long Is- 
land, N. Y., where he will be 
professor of journalism at Long 
Island University. 

Carets received his bachelor 
of science in 1938 and his mas- 
ter of science in 1947. Both de- 
grees were from the University 
of Idaho. 

The year after he received his 
master's degree, Carets founded 
the department of journalism at 
Idaho State University, where he 
remained until 1956. 



His memberships in journal- 
ism societies are as vast and var- 
ied as his work experience. 

He holds membership in the 
American Society of Journalism 
School Administrators, Associa- 
tion for Education in Journalism, 
American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors, Alpha Delta Sig- 
ma, Phi Mu Alpha and Phi Delta 
Theta. 

He is one of eight elected 
members of the American Coun- 
cil on Education for Journalism, 
a national accrediting agency. 

After coming to Tech, Carets 
founded the West Texas Profes- 
sional Chapter of Sigma Delta Chi 
and the West Texas High School 
Press Association. 

He is listed in the Who's 
Who in America, Who's Who in 
the South and Southwest, Who's 
Who in the West, and the direc- 
tory of American Scholars. 

Bill Dean, director of Stu- 




In 



Carets takes time out from his busy schedule to chat 
with one of his former students. 

dent Publications at Tech, was in 
his first year of undergraduate 
work when Carets took over the 
journalism department at Tech. 
He says, "Carets has built a sol- 
id department. Today the Tech 
journalism department is one of 
the fastest growing in the coim- 
try. We are one of only three 
state colleges in Texas with an 
accredited journalism depart- 
ment." 



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TYME 



Tyme Editor Anne Tilley 



LA VENTANA STAFF 

CO-EDITORS 

Sheila Looney 
Elaine Saul 



ART EDITOR 
Ray McWilliams 



SECTION EDITORS 

Anne Tilley, Tyme; Eren Johnson, Life; 
Amy Hammer, Esquire; Christy Chapman, 
Mademoiselle; Dave Ammons, Sports Illus- 
trated; Kathy Rhoads, Freshman View and 
Index; Tom Scott, Playboy; Joan Levers, 
To>^■n and Country; Beth George, Senior 
View; Patty McKinney, Sophomore View; 
Laurie Ingle, Junior View. 



STAFF 

Joni Lutz, Carolyn Keeter, Faye' Evans, 
Cindy Hudson, Jan Shaw, Chuck Bailey, 
John Baughman, Karen Jessup, Danny 
Smith, Barbara Metcalf, Joe Pareti, Susan 
Jenkins, Becky Dick, Cliff Willis, John La- 
Grone, Linda Shepherd, Becky Meason, 
Linda Barton, Sally Ann Darling, Jacqueline 
Miller, Debbie Douglas, Mary Ann 
McMahan, Becky Lacy, Ann Donegan, 
Stephanie Round, Janie Gunn, Beverly 
Brown, Juana Young, Beverly Willingham. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Darrell Thomas, head; Richard Mays, Mike 
Warden, Bob Darby, Jeff Lawhon. 



DIRECTOR OF 
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Bill Dean 



BUSINESS MANAGER 
Jean Finley 



A letter from the EDITOR 



(2/ri?7jt^^^iJAy 



The 1969-70 school year is now 
history. It was an exciting year, a 
busy year. It was a year marked by 
change, dissention and unrest. Yet it 
was also a year of increased peace, 
loving and understanding. It was a 
year of living. 

For Texas Tech it was also a 
momentous .year. The Red Raiders 
reached unprecedented heights in 
numerous areas. Tyme magazine has 
tried to give you, the reader, a«careful 
look at at least part of the action at 
Tech during the past year. 

This issue of Tyme includes a 
special feature on the "Catalyst," 
Tech's infant underground newspaper, 
in which the writer has tried to give 
some of the results of the ban on the 
"Catalyst," as well as a look at some 
of the staff members. 

Also in this issue of Tyme there 
is a look at some of the major honors 
that have been won during the year 
by Tech individuals and organizations. 

Texas Tech's chapter of Angel 
Flight, for instance, was judged the 
outstanding Angel Flight chapter in the 
nation, from a total of 139 chapters 
competing for the title. Corpsdettes 
won marching honors in San Antonio 
for the second year in a row. Phi Mu 
Alpha Sinf onia was selected as the best 
chapter in its province, and Tech's 
only competitive riflewoman, Marcy 
Wagner, won high point honors at an 
invitational meet at New Mexico 
Military Institute. 




Finally, our cover story, revealing 
the Man of the Year, Mr. Wallace E. 
Carets, is an especially meaningful 
one, not only for Tyme and the entire 
La Ventana staff, but for the whole 
student body, for it was Mr. Carets 
who first came up with the idea of the 
magazine format, used by the La 
Ventana for the past 12 years. In a 
sense, it is he who made this yearbook 
what it is today. 

These are only a few of the things 
that have helped to make the 1969-70 
school year a memorable one and have 
helped to furnish Tyme with the mate- 
rial to keep it alive for you. I hope 
you enjoy reading Tyme as much as 
we have enjoyed compiling it for you. 



INDEX 



Administration 6 

Board of Regents 4 

Letters 2 

Listings 3 

Military 21 



Music 41 

People 15 

President 5 

Press 10 

Religion 17 



Tyme—1 



LETTERS 



EDITORS NOTE: In an effort to preserve 
this past school year, let us not forget the 
students themselves, their feelings, their 
opinions. Here are a few samplings from 
over the year. All were printed in the 
University Daily, and all express viewpoints 
about problems that faced us sometime dur- 
ing the year. 

Black Power 

The Black revolution is progres- 
sing toward an ultimate climax. 

This progression is so intense, be- 
cause for the first time the Black man 
sees the totality of past and present 
injustices inflicted on him by the White 
race. The few true facts of past slavery 
days are horrible enough, but increas- 
ing evidence proves that the true hor- 
rors of slavery have been suppressed. 

Knowing that the White man hides 
the truth from the Black man, is only 
one of the facts that the Black man 
has discovered which infuriates the 
essence of his manhood. Black men are 
no longer willing to wait for the day 
when the white race will rid itself of 
its prejudicial idioms. This process 
goes along one by one, year by year. 

The hopes that one day soon the 
Whites will welcome the Blacks into 
their society with open arms has been 
tossed aside. 

From the beginning of slavery 
there has been a conspiracy to rob the 
Black man of his pride and dignity. 
The White man first stole his religion, 
forcing Christianity into his life. Next, 
they stole his rightful name, gave him 
his master's name. 

They then stole his ancestral in- 
heritance, telling the Blacks that their 
ancestry consisted of ignorant savages 
and that he was lucky to be where he 
was for his past was shameful. From 
ages of "psyching" the Whites ration- 
alized their treatment of Blacks by 
convincing themselves that Blacks were 
indeed inferior and deserving of such 
treatment. 

Objection to the current "Move- 
ment" is caused by fear of exposure. 
"The cat is out," Black men now see 
the White man for what he is: a mate- 
rialistic, avaricious nonentity who will 
do anything to get ahead and stay 
ahead. 



The Black man is aware of how he 
has been treated and how he is being 
treated now. He realizes now that the 
Constitution is just a collection of 
words written by Whites for Whites, 
and not even for them. He sees two 
set of laws, one white and one black. 
He knows now that he is a man and 
demands to be treated like one. 

The use of force is not out of the 
question, but this effort would be futile. 
Another solution must be found. 

Nevertheless, it is the duty of the 
oppressed to demand their human 
rights, not civil rights, for this nation 
was founded in a revolution and it 
may very well end in one. 

Catalyst 

Shabazz 

1307 Weymouth 

I was disappointed but not sur- 
prised to see that the Tech administra- 
tion has banned the latest issue of the 
Catalyst from campus distribution. 

It may surprise some to see a 
conservative Young Republican sup- 
porting a "liberal" publication, but I 
feel that all viewpoints must be avail- 
able to the public. 

This is not a new idea among 
conservatives. Sen. Barry Goldwater 
has stated, "I do not believe in cen- 
sorship. I don't want it, and I would 
not support it. It is a private matter 
involving free choice of seller and 
buyer, and so be it." (Los Angeles 
Times) 

Although I very rarely agree with 
the viewpoints expressed in . the 
Catalyst, I support them in their 
conflict because I believe in freedom 
of the press and I am glad to see stu- 
dents at this university who are 
interested enough to take a stand, 
whether they belong to the Catalyst 
staff, Young Republicans or YAF. We 
need more student involvement at 
Tech, and censorship is certainly not 
the way to accomplish it. 

Mark L. Bishop 

Texas Young Republican 

Federation 
Area III Chairman 
401 Murdough. 



I 



Why should we send soldiers to 
fight communism in Vietnam if we 
have the same type of dictatorship 
here! 

The Catalyst has been banned 
from the Campus. Each student should 
read this issue for himself and decide 
the worth of Dr. Caskey's accusations 
that this is in "poor taste" and "poorly ^k 
worded." ^0' 

Is the truth in "poor taste?" Must 
the truth be obscured so it will not be 
"poorly worded?" £ 

College students should have the 
right to view events of the campus and 
the nation from all angles. A college 
student is mature enough to gather 
information and form his own 
opinions. 

The administration must be terri- 
bly afraid of the Catalyst. Why? False 
rumor can be fought with truth. 

This ban on free speech, freedom 
of the press and TRUTH is a student 
issue. STUDENTS and our STUDENT 
SENATORS must act NOW! 
Fight for a free Lubbock! 

Robin Cash 
364 Weeks 



Moratorium 

I do believe that some clarification 

is necessary concerning my viewpoints 

on the Lubbock Vietnam Moratorium. 

I have stated that I recognize and 

support this situation. 

I support the Lubbock Vietnam 
Moratorium because of the following: 
this represents freedom of speech, 
thought and assembly. 

This concept is basically given to 
us as Americans. It cannot and should 
not be taken away. 

I recognize the Lubbock Vietham 
Moratorium because it is to be under 
the auspices of a peaceful assembly. 
It is duly recognized in regards to 
campus rules and regulations. Because 
of this, I think that it is my duty to 
recognize it out of respect for such an 
assembly only. I will condemn, how- 
ever, any action that falls out of ac- 
cordance with these rules and regula- 
tions. 

This is aimed directly at the Lub- 
bock, Vietnam Moratorium as well as 
outside forces. My major concern lies 
in what MIGHT happen, not what is 
SUPPOSE to lake place. 

This is where I stand; not so 
much for it, not so much against it, 
not liberal, not conservative, but 
CONCERNED. 

Brian T. Harrington, Sen. 
Arts and Sciences 



2— r^me 



LISTINGS 



It 



SEPTEMBER 



There was a greater hustle and 
bustle around Texas Tech in September 
than ever before, because of the fact 
that registration was already over and 
classes were underway. 

Some of the activities of Septem- 
ber included back to school events, 
welcoming parties for freshmen and 
new students, football fever and Fiji 
Olympics. 



OCTOBER 



During October every organiza- 
tion on campus was making plans for 
fall. Tech students attended and partici- 
pated in a wide variety of activities. 

Among others were Sigma Chi 
Derby Day, the fall Jazz Festival, the 
University Theater's production of 
"The Multi-colored Maze," Student 
Senate Elections, the Moratorium with 
candlelight march. Dad's Day, the 
changing of freshman dorm hours, and 
Texas Tech versus Oklahoma State, 
Texas A&M, Mississippi State and 
Southern Methodist. 



NOVEMBER 



November was highlighted by 
Homecoming and International Week, 
sponsored by the Tech Union and 
including such activities as dinners, art 
displays and a cabaret. 

Tech also received visits during 
November from the Fifth Dimension, 
and the Houston Ballet. 

The month was concluded with 
the game with TCU and the Best 
Dressed Contest. 



DECEMBER 



With the coming of December, 
Tech students begin to wrap up the 
all too quickly passing semester. 

News of the draft lottery had most 
Tech males biting their nails. 

Basketball season began to pick 
up momentum while students were 
picking up their things and heading 
for the hills — skiing that is. 

Also during December were the 
Miss Mademoiselle and the Miss Play- 
mate contests, sponsored by Sigma 
Delta Chi. 

The French departments presented 
an early nineteenth century melodrama 
entitled "Coelina." and finally finals. 
However, the coming of finals for most 
was less of a strain than before, be- 
cause with it came an extra-long, care- 
free holiday season. 



JANUARY 



The beginning of a new semester 
brought a rested atmosphere in which 
to begin again. When many Tech stu- 
dents returned to Lubbock, they found 
that Tech was boasting of a new foot- 
ball coach, Jim Carlen, formerly of 
the University of West Virginia. 

Members of the Catalyst staff 
even had their two cents to throw in 
about the appointment only to be 
banned from the campus by the admin- 
istration. 

During January the basketball 
race became a tight squeeze with the 
Red Raiders right in the middle of 
things. 

Other events during January in- 
cluded an explosive lecture by Ralph 
Nader, an in depth Comparative Lit- 
erature Symposium, and a visit to 
Tech of George Zoritch as guest ballet 
instructor. 



FEBRUARY 

With Valentine month. Miss 
Valentine was crowned, Ann Straw- 
horn of Phi Mu sorority. 

Also in February the Tech Annual 
World Affairs conference got under 
Way. This year's was Australia. 

Swimming season reached its 
peak and thousands packed the col- 
iseum to watch the Raiders finish off 
the basketball season. 

In the more intellectual domain 
the University theater presented 
"Euripides," "Bacchae" and Madalyne 
Murray O'Hair almost came. 

Finally during February, a racial 
forum was held to discuss the many 
aspects of today's radical problems. 



MARCH 



March blew in and almost blew its 
biggest event, the '70 Peace Festival 
away. The festival was rather a dis- 
appointment to most who attended. 

Also during March, Clark Terry 
was a guest performer with the stage 
band. He was sponsored by Phi Mu 
Alpha. 

The Lab Theater presented "The 
Boyfriend" and Johnny rivers sang to 
hundreds at a spring performance. 

Finally during March, the 
NACURH Conference was held at 
Texas Tech. Over 700 students from all 
over the United States attended the 
residence hall convention. 



APRIL 



April closed out the 1969-70 
school year except for final exams. 
Some of the activities of the waning 
days of the semester included golf, 
tennis and baseball, the Little 500 
Bike race, cheerleader elections and the 
Tech rodeo. 

Also during April, Bob Hope and 
the Three Dog Night paid visits. Earth 
Day, an environmental teach-in, was 
met with much interest. 

The end of April marked the be- 
ginning of finals and a time when the 
end of school was visible. 



Tyme — 3 



THE PRESIDENT 



LEADER IN SCIENCE AND EDUCATION 



Dr. Grover E. Murray, President 
and Professor of Geosciences, holds a 
philosophy of living that is shared with 
many people. He says, "My entire life, 
as I see it, has been motivated by a 
strong desire to do what I can, within 
my limitations, to improve and contri- 
bute to mankind and to make some 
small effort so that the world is better 
off for my having been here." 

Dr. Murray received his bachelor 
of science degree from the University 
of North Carolina and both his master 
of science and his doctorate from 
Louisiana State University. 

As a scientist. Dr. Murray has 
distinguished himself as the only per- 
son who has been elected president of 
the Society of Ecologists, Paleon- 
tologists and MineralogistTand also the 
American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists. 

He is listed in Who's Who in 
America, Who's Who in Science, Amer- 
ican Men of Science and Leaders in 
American Science. 

When Dr. Murray is not attending 
to professional duties, he enjoys col- 
lecting art, both contemporary and 
ancient. He has a large personal 
library and derives much pleasure 
from photography and gardening. 

He also enjoys travel and has 
visited most of the countries in the 
world both as a geologist and as an 
educator. Today his travels are, for 
the most part, related to his position 
as Texas Tech's principal ambassador. 







Texas Tech has as members of its 
administration a number of versatile 
and accomplished men. This is of im- 
portance in a time when school admin- 
istrators have often come under fire 
simply because of their positions, and 
often with little justification. 

Included among Tech's adminis- 
trators, for instance, are a former state 
representative and several nationally 
known educators. 



ADMINISTRATION 



Broad, Varied Experience 





ABOVE LEFT: Dr. Owen L. Caskey, 
vice-president for Student Affairs, has 
as his main responsibility the coordina- 
tion of the many activities, programs 
and services which Tech provides for 
its almost 20,000 studenU. 

Dr. Caskey completed undergrad- 
uate and master's degrees at Texas 




Tech and earned his doctorate at the 
Universitv of Colorado. 

He is listed in Who's Who, Who's 
Who in American Education and the 
Dictionary of International Biography. 



ABOVE RIGHT: Dr. S. M. Kennedy, 
vice-president for Academic Affairs, is 
the former Dean of the School of Arts 
and Sciences. 

He is a Tech graduate and joined 
the faculty as a member of the govern- 
ment department in 1946 upon the 
completion of his master's degree. He 
is listed in Who's Who in America and 
Who's Who in the Southwest. 



BELOW: Dr. Glenn E. Bamett, Execu- 
tive vice-president, received his doc- 
torate in education from the University 
of Missouri in 1943. 

He is nationally known as an ed- 
ucator, and in 1963 he served as a 
member of the special United States 
mission to Yugoslavia for a seminar 
on social and cultural problems. 



• 



6 — Tyme 




I 





ABOVE LEFT: G. C. Gardner is the 
vice-president for financial affairs. 
Since receiving his master's degree in 
accounting from Indiana University he 
has distinguished himself as an expert 
in his field. 




Before coming to Tech, Gard- 
ner held a number of positions with 
the Defense Department including 
that of Comptroller for the Defense 
Communications Agency and Dep- 
uty Comptroller for Internal Audit 
in the office of the Secretary of 
Defense. 



ABOVE RIGHT: Dr. Monty 
Davenport is the associate vice- 
president for research. He is con- 
cerned with information systems, 
research programs and clarifying 
school procedures. 

He holds a Ph.D. from Stan- 
ford in mechanical engineering 
and devotes much time to graduate 
students in this area. 



BELOW: Bill J. Parsley, vice-pres- 
ident for public affairs, is respon- 
sible for coordinating all activities 
of related groups outside the uni- 
versity. He has a law degree from 
the University of Texas and is a 
former state representative. 



PUBLICATIONS 

COMMITTEE 
High Standards 



The Publications Committee is 
composed of students and faculty mem- 
bers working together to insure that 
the highest literary and ethical stan- 
dards are maintained on Tech's student 
publications. 

Duties of the committee include 
selection of the editors for the Univer- 
sity Daily and the La Venlana, con- 
trolling of the budgets for both and the 
formulation of the codes of good jour- 
nalism to which each must adhere. 

Members of the 1969-70 committee 
were Dr. Bill Oden, chairman; Dr. 
John Wittman, Mrs. Dolores Kilchens- 
tein, Dr. Erwin Elias, Ralph Sellmeyer, 
Dr. Bill Lockhart, Bill Dean, director 
of student publications and Mrs. Jean 
Finley, business manager. 

Also serving on this year's com- 
mittee were John Simpson, junior; 
June Waggoner, junior; Bill Horton, 
sophomore; and Andy Kerr, junior. 

As Texas Tech grows, so grows 




# 



Publications committee members for 1969-70 were Dr. Bill Oden, Mrs. Jean Finley, Mrs. Dolores Kil- 
chenstein, June Waggoner and Dr. John Wittman, bottom row, and Ralph Sellmeyer, John Simpson, 
Dr. Erwin Elias, Dr. Bill Lockhart, Bill Horton, Andy Kerr and Bill Dean, top row. 



1 



INFORMATION 

SERVICES 
Propagandists 
For Tech 

the job of the Information Services, 
that is, the job of informing the state, 
the nation and the world of both news 
and progress being made a* Tech every 
day in every imaginable aiea, includ- 
ing, for instance, personnel, academ- 
ic development, physical development 
and, of course, sports activities. 

Publications of the Information 
Services include the campus directory, 
maps, "Tech Times," the "Icasals 
Newsletter" and 'Texas Tech Reports." 

The staff of Information Services 
is composed of Bicknell Beckwith, di- 
rector of development and Information 
Services; John Petty, deputy director 
of information; DeWitt Thompson, 
deputy director of development; Dan 
Tarpley, head of the news bureau; 
Jerry Kelly, head of the publications 
bureau; and Jim Childress, head of the 
photography bureau. 




Making up the staff of Information ■ Services for the past year were DeWitt Thompson, Jim Childress, 
Jerry Kelly, Bicknell Beckwith, Dan Tarpley and John Petty. 



8 — Tyme 



A 




Excitement mounts as contestants wait for the announcement of Miss Playmate for the 1969-70 school 
year. 



im 




SIGMA 

DELTA 

CHI 

Now Coed 

Sigma Delta Chi, national profes- 
sional journalism society was founded 
at Tech in 1958 by Mr. Wallace E. 
Carets, head of the journalism depart- 
ment. 

During the 1969-70 school year 
Sigma Delta Chi, heretofore strictly a 
male organization, opened its doors to 
women. 

Membership in Sigma Delta Chi 
is open to journalism majors and mi- 
nors maintaining a high grade point 
average. 

This year Sigma Delta Chi spon- 
sored the annual Miss Playmate and 
Miss Mademoiselle contests, in which 
Mary Beth Johnson was named Miss 
Playmate, and Pam Kirk was named 
Miss Mademoiselle. Proceeds from 
these contests go to a special scholar- 
ship fund for journalism students. 

At the end of the year Sigma Delta 
Chi published its annual honors edi- 
tion of the University Daily. In this 
honors edition Sigma Delta Chi honors 
outstanding students and faculty mem- 
bers. This year's honorees were Dr. 
Robert Baker, Bob Bass, Jim Boynton, 
Wallace Carets, Mrs. Maria Gay, Kent 
Hance, Steve Hardin and Lewis N. 
Jones. Also honored were Jim McNally, 
Harmon Morgan, D. N. Peterson, Dr. 
Robert Rouse, Dr. Reginald Rushing, 
Jay Thompson and Tom Walsh. 
Profits from this honors edition go 
to a senior scholarship fund which a 
journalism student may use as a low- 
interest loan during his senior year. 

During the spring semester mem- 
bers of Sigma Delta Chi journeyed to . 
Oklahoma City for the Region VHI 
Conference. Bill Horton served as dele- 
gate from the Tech chapter. 

Officers of Sigma Delta Chi for 
the 1969-70 school year were Burk 
Whittenburg, president; Tommy Love, 
vice-president; Dan Lammert, secre- 
tary; and Joe Kammlah, treasurer. 



Miss Playmate, Mary Beth Johnson, beams as she is given her title. 



Tyme—9 



PRESS 

THE UD 
Responsibility 

Its Key 

If only one word would be used 
to describe the University Daily, it 
would have to be responsibility. 

One Tech administrator has said 
that the most influential voice on 
campus is the University Daily. With 
this in mind this year's staff, under 
the leadership of editor Jimmy Snow- 
den, accepted the responsibility of 
informing the campus of local, state, 
national and international news. 

The prime responsibility lies 
within the campus itself. The Univer- 
sity Daily is the sole organ for re- 
porting campus happenings. Daily edi- 
torials and letters to the editor express 
opinions — both concurring and con- 
flicting. 

Filling out this year's staff were 
Lynn Williams, news editor; Lynn 
Green and Donny Richards, editorial 
assistants; Rebecca Young and Jim 
Davis, co-managing editors; Janet 
Wossum and Bill Moore, campus 
editors; Dave Burkett, feature editor; 
Casey Charness, fine arts editor; Tom- 
my Love, sports editor; Jerry Teague, 
assistant sports editor; Mike McMahan, 
Bob Brewster and Steve Eames, sports 
writers; Debbie Kennedy, Bobby Wil- 




lis, Cindy McCarty and Sarah Raney, 
copy editors; Bruce Ott, photographer; 
Steve Hames, advertising manager; 
Mike Warden, cartoonist; and Marian 
Wossum, proofreader. 

The University Daily's main re- 
sponsibility is covering the full scope 
.of the news. 

Page one carries major local stor- 
ies, as well as important state, national 
and international news taken from the 
Associated Press wires. The inside 
pages are divided between editorial 
comment, cartoons, features, fine arts 
and sports. 

Working on the University Daily, 
the staff and reporters gain invaluable 
experience in producing a daily news- 
paper. More important, however, they 
learn something that only a job of this 
nature can teach them — responsibility. 




I 





if 



CAMPUS EDITOR: Janet WoMum 
lO—Tyme 



SPORTS WRITERS: Steve Eames. Tommy Love, and Mike McMahan 



!• 



: 



Eun 



!!• 




Rosita Bloom, UD reporter, hurries to meet a rapidly approaching deadline. 





MANAGING EDITOR: Rebecca Young 



MANAGINC; EDITOR: James R. Davis, Jr. 




COPY EDITORS: Sarah Raney, Bill Moore, and Debbie Kennedy 




PHOTOGRAPHER: Bruce Ott 




ADVERTISING DIRECTOR: Steve Hames 




FEATURE EDITOR: David Burkett 

Tyme — 11 



LA VENTANA 

Twelve magazine formats com- 
prised one large publication and 
formed the 1970 edition of Tech's LA 
VENTANA. As the eventful year 
progressed, each magazine editor 
worked to complete his section by plac- 
ing students and campus activities 
into a layout format indicative of the 
twelve separate magazines. 

Celebrating its tenth year of us- 
ing the traditional magazine format, 
the LA VENTANA recorded, trans- 
lated, and pictured all aspects of the 
university campus life with the as- 
sistance of a combined effort by all 
staff members. 

Directing the progress of this 
year's LA VENTANA were co-editors 
Elaine Saul and Sheila Looney, who 
were selected on the basis of past 
experience by the Student Publica- 
tion's Committee. 

A new magazine Esquire, edited 
by Amv Hammer, was added to the 
LA VENTANA collection which 
covered student government, the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences and the 
Education College. 

Life magazine under the super- 
vision of Eren Johnson recorded every 
aspect of student life from dawn to 
dark. 

Dave Ammons was the editor for 
Sports Illustrated, which covered every 
Tech athletic event on or off campus. 

Playboy, the largest magazine was 
edited by Tom Scott and Christv Chap- 
man supervised Mademoiselle. Both of 
these magazines illustrate the indi- 
vidual men's and women's activities 
and organizations. 

Town and Country magazine 
represented the Colleges of Agriculture 
and Home Economics. Editor for this 
mazazine was Joan Levers. 





Co-editor Elaine Saul 

Included in Future magazine was 
the College of Engineering, the College 
of Business Administration, School of 
Law and the Graduate School. 

Ann Tilley edited Tyme, which 
included the administration and 
various music, religious, and military 
groups. 

The last section in the LA VEN- 
TANA are the class views. The editors 
were Kathy Rhoads, Freshman View; 
Patty McKinney, Sophomore View; 
Laurie Ingle, Junior View; and Beth 
George, Senior View. 

The art editor for the yearbook 
was Ray McWiMiams. Darrel Thomas, 
head photographer, supervised photog- 
raphers Richard Mays, Jeff Lawhon, 
Bob Darby, and Mike Warden. 

The Director of Student Publica- 
tions is Mr. Bill Dean, who served as 
the advisor for the completion of the 
1970 LA VENTANA. 





\ 



• 



I 



Life: Eren Johoson 



Playboy: Tom Scott 



Mademoiselle: Christy Chapnun 




Esquire: Amy Hammer 



12— Tyme 



(!• 




Town and Country: Joan Levers Sports Illustrated: Dave Ammons 



Tyme: Anne Tilley 




DIRECTOR OF STUDENT 
PUBLICATIONS: Bill Dean 




HEAD PHOTOGRAPHER: Darrel 
Thomas 








ART EDITOR: Ray McWiUiams 



PHOTOGRAPHERS: (clockwise) Jeff Lawhon, Mike Warden, 
Bob Darby and Richard Mays. 




Freshman View: Kathy Rhoads Sophomore View: Patty McKinney Junior Kieu; ; Laurie Ingle 



Senior View: Beth George 



Tyme— 13 



THETA SIGMA 
PHI 
Women 
In the News 

Theta Sigma Phi was founded in 
1909 by seven women students at the 
University of Washington in Seattle. 
The fivefold purpose of this fraternity 
for women in the field of communica- 
tions is to work for a free and re- 
sponsible press; to unite women en- 
gaged in all fields of communication; 
to recognize distinguished achievements 
of women journalists; to maintain high 
professional standards; and to en- 
courage members to greater individual 
effort. 



During the 1969-70 school year, 
the Alpha Upsilon chapter created a 
scholarship in addition to its Louise 
Allen Scholarship. The W. E. Carets 
Scholarship was created in honor of 
the chairman of the journalism depart- 
ment at Texas Tech. These two schol- 
arships are awarded each year to out- 
standing women in the communica- 
tions field. 

In the fall of this school year 
Theta Sigma Phi sponsored the Best 
Dressed Coed contest. Out of 150 en- 
tries, Mitzi Sutton was named Tech's 
Best Dressed Coed. 

In the spring, Miss Lloyd Stewart, 
National President of Theta Sigma 
Phi, was the guest speaker at the an- 
nual Matrix Table Banquet, sponsored 
in conjunction with the local profes- 



sional chapter. 

Christy Chapman, president of the 
student chapter, was named Woman of 
the Year in Journalism. Winners in the 
writing contest, sponsored by the 
organization, were also announced at 
this time. 

Other activities of Theta Sigma 
Phi members for the 1969-70 school 
year included a trip to Dallas for the 
annual Careers Clinic, sponsored by 
the Dallas and Fort Worth chapters, 
and the selling of red balloons for "All 
I See is Red Day" at one home foot- 
ball game. 

Officers of Theta Sigma Phi for 
this year were Christy Chapman, pres- 
ident; Rebecca Young, vice-president; 
Julie McCabe, treasurer; and Kathy 
Rhoads, secretary. 



• 




Claire Bluemel 
Page Calhoun 
Kathy Carpenter 



I 




Christy Chapman 
Caynell Doehne 
Lynn Green 
Carol Jones 
Katherine Jones 




Julie McCabe 
Diana Millin 
Stormy Newsome 
Clara Porter 
Cheryln Reast 




Kathy Rhoads 
Debbie Seguin 
Myra Setliff 
Rebecca Young 



14-Ty7ne 



PEOPLE 



(!• 



BEST-DRESSED 

COED 

Mitzi Sutton 



Texas Tech's Best-Dressed Coed 
for the 1969-70 school year was Mitzi 
Sutton, freshman, fashion merchandis- 
ing major, from Dallas. 

She was chosen the best-dressed 
coed in the annual fall contest, spon- 
sored by Theta Sigma Phi, from a 
field of 153 girls. 

Judging was based on three cat- 
egories. All 153 contestants modeled 
in the schoolwear division. Out of this 
number, 50 were selected to model 
sportswear. Then the 25 semi-finalists 
modeled formal apparel. 

From these students ten finalists 
were chosen and then the runners-up 
and Miss Best-Dressed Coed were 
named. 

First runner-up for the best- 
dressed title was Roma Sue Egen- 
bacher, freshman, from Knox City. 
Second runner-up was Janis Jones, jun- 
ior, from Raton, N. M. 



r 



y > 




r - 




MOST 

HANDSOME 

MAN 
Ken Kattner 



The Most Handsome Man 
contest was sponsored this year 
by Gamma Alpha Chi and Alpha 
Delta Sigma, advertising fraterni- 
ties, for the purpose of raising 
money to recruit minority groups 
to Texas Tech. The penny a vote 
balloting continued for three days 
and finally Ken Kattner was 
elected Tech's Most Handsome 
Man for the 1969-70 school year. 
Kattner was sponsored by Alphi 
Phi sorority and netted a total of 
$175.95 out of the nearly $600 
raised by the entire drive. 

Other candidates in the ballot- 
ing were Ken Foley, Robert Coker, 
Vince Baldino, Doug Hill, Ed 
Hughes and Curt Jones. Also in 
the running were Steve Knight, 
Ray Owens, Gerald Purdy, Jay 
Rigsby and Bill Thompson. 



Tyme — IS 



KAPPA 

TAU 

ALPHA 

Elite Society 

Kappa Tau Alpha is a na- 
tional honorary fraternity dedi- 
cated to the recognition of scholar- 
ship in the field of journalism. 
The society, active in almost 50 
colleges and universities across the 
. nation, is in its third year at Texas 
Tech. 

Members of Kappa Tau Alpha 
are selected by the journalism 
faculty and come from the upper 
ten per cent of journalism students. 

Activities include a spring 
luncheon and the presentation of 
the Minneapolis Star Scholarship 
to the journalism student with the 
highest grade point. This year the 
group presented a special award 
to its sponsor, Wally Carets, in 
appreciation for his work. 

Officers for 1969-70 were 
Claire Blumel, president; Kathy 
Weaver, vice-presi'dent ; and Peggy 
Tipton, secretary-treasurer. 




Ui 
Ff 

( 

ofCl 



Outgoing members of Kappa Tau Alpha, Virginia Balrh, Claire Blumel and Peggy Tipton, discuss 
plans for initiation of new members with their sponsor, Mr. Wally Carets. 



CATALYST AIMS AT STUDENT APATHY 



As unrest continued on cam- 
puses across the country, Tech 
remained calm. The Catalyst, in 
an attempt to present a different 
side from that of The University 
Daily — set out in September to re- 
port their side. 

The underground newspaper, 
in its last issue stated "we have 
managed to insult or alienate near- 
ly everyone. We apologize to 
anyone we might have spared." 

But, the Catalyst's criticism 
led them to trouble with the Tech 
administration when the new foot- 
ball coach, Jim Carlen, arrived at 
Tech early in 1970. Because of an 
article about the new coach that 
particular issue was banned from 
campus by the administration. But, 
the problem was left up to the 
ACLU and the courts. 

The tabloid newspaper, con- 
tained in-depth, informative stories 
on such things as the women's 
liberation front, marijuana, and 
the Greek system. The paper 
served "apathetic" students in 
presenting another side to Tech's 
problems. 




LuAnn Combs, junior, purchases the latest edition of the Catalyst from staff member and 
newsboy John McCIung at the intersection of Broadway and University. 



I 

Dili 
Bilk 



lii—TyrM 



RELIGION 



.» 



CAMPUS 
ADVANCE 

Unique Student 
Fellowship 

Campus Advance is a fellowship 
of Christian students on the campus at 



Texas Tech. The students all share in 
a unique fellowship which reaches out 
from the group to the campus and the 
community. Students find a more real 
meaning in their lives through Jesus 
Christ and strive to make it relevant to 
their lives now. 

Dorm and apartment devotionals 
have been set up during the school 
year which have helped increase the 
meaning in the lives of many students. 
Every Monday and Friday night devo- 




Mike Paden entertains with folk music at the Campus Advance International Banquet. 



I 



1 



• 




tionals are held for the students at the 
Texas Tech Bible Chair. This year a 
unique group session was initiated 
called "Fred." The purpose of this 
group was to open more real and mean- 
ingful communications between one an- 
other. 

An unusual opportunity was of- 
fered Campus Advance this year to 
work with the children at the Lubbock 
State School. The students realize the 
need to share with others around them 
and make their lives more meaningful. 

Campus Advance is students who 
share a common concern, work and 
play together under varied circum- 
stances, and most of all who want to 
grow closer to Jesus Christ while they 
study and prepare for the future. 




One Campus Advance member looks un- 
decidedly at the serving table during the 
International Banquet. 




c:£t.rr-tpLJs a.c/v.anc© 



Dave Woodruff and Karen Knieriem enjoy an evening meal in the fellowship of the Texas Tech 
Bible Chair. 



Tyme—17 



CHRISTIAN 

SCIENCE 

ORGANIZATION 

Students Seek 

God in Science 

The Christian Science Organiza- 
tion at Tech operates in a rather 
unique situation, completely indepen- 
dent of the branch church in Lubbock. 
It is entirely under the auspices of the 
Mother Church, the First Church of 
Christ Scientists in Boston, Mass., as are 
all university groups like it throughout 
the country, and is formed by in- 
terested students and faculty members. 

Members of the Christian Science 
Organization hold weekly meetings 
which consist of a student reader's 
selections from the Bible and Science 
and Health with Key to the Scriptures 
by Mary Blake Eddy. This is followed 
by testimonies from those present. 
Meetings are open to all interested 
persons. 




Officers of the Christian Science Organization this year were Susan Long, Susan Cobb and Jan 
Dowling, seated; also Chester Jaynes, advisor, and Carolyn Thomas, standing. 



Each year the organization spon- 
sors a free lecture for those interested 
in Christian Science. This year's 
speaker was Jules Cern of Scarsdale, 
N. Y. Cern is a member of the Chris- 
tian Science Board of Lectureship. 

The group also sponsored its an- 
nual workshop this year under the di- 
rection of Ronald Boulding, regional 



I 



assistant from the mother church. 

Officers of the Christian Science 
Organization for the 1969-70 school 
year were Susan Cobb, president; Jan 
Downing, vice-president; Carolyn 
Thomas, secretary; and Susan Long, 
treasurer. Chester Jaynes, associate 
professor of agronomy at Texas Tech 
is the group's sponsor. 






1| 



DISCIPLE 

STUDENT 

FELLOWSHIP 
Relaxed Study 

The Disciple Student Fellowship 
is a program that provides Tech Stu- 
dents from the Christian Churches a 
ready opportunity to meet for study, 
worship, service and fellowship. 

Home for the Disciple Student 
Fellowship is the Christian Student 
Center. The Center, furnished with a 
television room, game room, food 
service area and lounging area around 
a fireplace, provides good sounds, a 
friendly atmosphere, plus lots of in- 
formal relaxation. 

Challenge discussions provide the 
Sunday morning emphasis at the 
Christian Student Center, while Sun- 
day evenings center around important 
issues and interesting personalities. 
Members may also participate in var- 
ious ecumenical programs at this time. 

Officers for the 1969-70 school 
year were Don Wallers, president; 
Dennis Kimbrough, vice-president; and 
Pat Mayse, secretary. 



I8—Tym« 




M 



Members of the Disciple Student Fellowship are (front row) Pat Mayes, Dan Walters, Candy Clark, 
Janis Pruilt, Kay Sides, and Bill Richart. Also members are (back row) Nancy Rea, Margie Weingand, 
Claude Weingand, Walter Peters and Jay Davis. 



lict'i 
•Id 



IIW 



■ Scifflce 
'•"0 sdiool 
siiieDl; Jan 

Carolyn 

KuLon;, 

issociale 

'euiTecli 




Wesley Foundation members break bread together as an act of fellowship. 



WESLEY 
FOUNDATION 

Fellowship 
Its Aim 

The Wesley Foundation is a many- 
faceted ministry for the whole Tech 
campus. Its task is to make the gospel 
heard and to enter into an open discus- 
sion of ideas with all people, thus 
working toward individual and social 
wholeness. 

The group sponsors a number of 
activities to further its goals including 
Bible classes, theological seminars, 
encounter groups, experimental wor- 
ship, dialogue sessions, forums, tutor- 
ing and the Inner Ear Coffeehouse. 

One of the things of which the 
Wesley Foundation is most proud is 
its participation in the United Campus 
Ministry, an organization composed of 
groups of Presbyterian, Disciples of 
Christ, Lutheran, Episcopalian and 
Methodist denominations. This group 
sponsored the Symposium on Human 
Sexuality during the spring semester. 

Serving as sponsor of the Wesley 
Foundation is the Rev. Gene Sorely. 



H' 



• 








Wesley members take advantage of the Founda- 
tion's recreational facilities with a relaxing game 
of chess. 



Dr. Robert Gordon, Assistant Professor of Biology at Tech, lectures during the Sex Symposium, 
sponsored by the Foundation. 

Tyme—19 



BAPTIST 

STUDENT 

UNION 

Missionaries 

In the World 

The Baptist Student Union is a 
Christian organization that seeks to 
minister to the academic community at 
Texas Tech. It ranks among the most 
active and accomplished B.S.U.'s in the 
United States. 

A weekly schedule includes two 
evening programs, one probing the 
Christian faith as it relates to the issues 
of the world, the other developing the 
devotional life of its participants. More 
than 200 students each week work with 
children at thirteen missions in the 
city. Others present programs for the 
aged, tutor pupils in various subjects, 
and lead in recreation and crafts. 

Credit courses in Bible are offered 
by the Baptist Student Union through 
the department of biblical literature. 
Non-credit groups in Evangelism also 
have been a popular feature during the 
year. 

Among the most far-reaching 
events sponsored by the B.S.U. are the 
annual retreats, conventions and con- 
ferences. Outstanding programs and 
speakers draw several hundred students 
to the State B.S.U. Convention in 
October and the Leadership Training 
Conference in April. The highlight of 
the year for the Texas Tech students 
was the Mid-Winter Retreat at Glorietta 
Baptist Assembly in January. In 1970 
more than 200 students journeyed to 
New Mexico, to enjoy four days of 
fellowship, hiking, singing and snow. 

The mission emphasis of the Bap- 
tist Student Union continues into the 
summer. More than 50 students will 
spend this June, July and August serv- 
ing in churches and missions through- 
out the United States, and others will 




I 



LI 



Helping to further the total awareness of its members, the Baptists Student Union provides a 
relaxing, yet stimulating, atmosphere for group discussion. 



travel overseas as summer missionaries. 
A building and a staff of workers 
are provided to the Tech B.S.U. by the 
General Baptist Convention of Texas. 
The director, Calvin Zongker, and his 
associate director, Claude DoUinsj 
guide the work of the organization, as 



well as teach and counsel. 

An executive council of nineteen 
students are elected each year to act as 
the governing board for the Baptist 
Student Union. Robert Thrift served 
as president in 1969, and in 1970 the 
gavel was passed to David Horsley. 




I 



Fellowship, friendihip and an interett in one another prevail at any gathering of the Baptist 
Student Union. 



20—Trme 



<l(» 



kB«^ 




ARMY ROTC 

TOMORROW'S LEADERS 
TODAY 



KATHY GRIFFIS NAMED QUEEN 
ANNUAL ARMY ROTC BALL 




H—Tyme 



ARMY ROTC OFFERS 
VARIED ACTIVITIES 



The Army ROTC plays an active, 
important and well-received part in the 
many affairs and activities of Texas 
Tech. It offers students a wide variety 
of activities, including Counterguerrilla 
Unit, Tyrian Rifles and the Drum and 
Bugle Corps, in order that each indi- 
vidual has the opportunity both to 
receive public recognition and to 
develop himself to the fullest of his 
capabilities. 

The Counterguerrilla Unit is com- 
posed of selected students who have 



met the rugged physical requirements 
of the organization. The purpose of 
this unit is to develop outstanding 
cadets through the attainment of a 
high degree of physical stamina and the 
skills of the techniques of scouting, 
patrolling, land navigation, unconven- 
tional warfare, hand-to-hand combat 
and survival. 

The Tyrian Rifles, the precision 
drill team of Texas Tech, participates 
in parades, ceremonies, drill meets and 
other special events both on and off 



campus. This year the Tyrians attended 
a number of drill meets and brought 
back trophies from three of them. 

Membership in the MacKenzie 
Drum and Bugle Corps is open to any- 
one in the Army ROTC Cadet Corps 
who possesses skill in performing 
with a drum or bugle. The purpose of 
the drum and bugle corps is to enhance 
the esprit of the ROTC students by 
promoting camaraderie within the 
corps and to provide music when the 
corps is marching. 

Among the main projects of the 
year for the ROTC members are the 
canned food drive, the blood drive and 
the military ball. 




Kathy Griffis comforts cadet Hank 
Smith as he donates blood to the 
annual blood drive. 



Cadet Reagan Upshaw accepts the 
silver sabre from President Grover 
Murray, in recognition of his out- 
standing contributions to ROTC 
and to Texas Tech. 




Tyme—23 




TYRIAN 
RIFLES 

Precisioned 
Drill Team 

Tyrian Rifles, the Army ROTC 
Drill Team, is a student organization 
designed to develop the ROTC cadet 
for participation in competitive preci- 
sion drill. This elite organization par- 
ticipates in college level competition 
throughout the nation, representing 
Texas Tech at each event. Three factors 
contributing to the success of the Tyr- 
ian Rifles are discipline, teamwork, 
and enthusiasm. 

Tyrian Rifles began the fall sem- 
ester by capturing three of the five 
trophies given at the West Texas Invi- 
tational Drill Meet at Canyon. 

During the spring semester the 
Tyrian Rifles co-hosted a local drill 
meet, the first annual Southwest Invi-- 
tational, at Lowery Field. The meet 
was planned and conducted by the Mili- 
tary Science Department and the 



t 



One dadicated Tyrian member marches stiffly during a regular Thursday drill 
session. 





AI Buchanan 
Robert Clark 
William Daniel 
Pierce Doan 
Alan D. Hawkins 




J^Z^f 




Howard Johnson 
Russel McDonald 
C. Kelly Mathis 
Bill Norwood 
Wes Palmer 




Larry Pierce 
Thomas Puckett 
Kyler Reis 
Alvin Saathoff 
Pat Scarth 



24—Tyme 



led 



^ROIC 



tore oil 

Sititepred. 
lintion par- 



ttpresentiiij 
Unelactors 
oltheTyr- 
. leamwork, 

lieMieni' 
oltie h 
Teuslnvi- 
ton. 

OKSter ih 
Id drill 
tkwel Inri- 
. He meet 
bylixMili- 
I and the 



I 






Department of Aerospace Studies. Col- 
lege teams from Colorado State, Okla- 
homa, Rice, University of Texas at 
Arlington, Sam Houston State, New 
Mexico Military Institute and Texas 
A&I were among those to attend the 
meet. 

Tyrian Rifles also traveled dur- 
ing the year to LSU, for the largest 
drill meet in the south, and to Corpus 
Christi in early May to participate in 
the Buccaneer Days competition. 

Besides participating in drill 
competition, Tyrian Rifles also func- 
tions as an honor guard for Lubbock. 
The group is often called upon to fur- 
nish pallbearers for military funerals. 
The drill team also provides color guard 
personnel for all Texas Tech home 
football games and all local high school 
games. 

Drill Team commander this year 
was Cadet Captain Robert T. Clark. 
Robert Shaffer was the Executive Of- 
ficer, and Bill Norwood served as First 
Sergeant. Linda Guinn was fall semes- 
ter sweetheart, and Sandra Smithee was 
spring semester sweetheart. 



Robert Shaffer 
Mike Simpson 
William Spalding, Jr. 
Jeff Terry 




Forrest Ussery 
Stephen Wheeler 
Ronnie Wilson 
Jim Wright 




Linda Guinn 
Sandra Smithee 





Tyrians march past a reviewing stand, during a drill exercise, carrying rifles at present arms. 



T.yme—25 







Kerry Abington 
Stephen Barret 
Phil Black 
Terry Blake 
Rickey Bradford 




Byron Clark 
David Curry 
George Dillman 
Edward Farris 
George Fischer 




Michael Graver 
Douglas Guinn 
Bruce Holcomb 
Ronald Holt 
Jack Jansson 




One Counterguerrilla takes time for a quick snooze during weekend maneuvers. 



COUNTER 

GUERILLA 

UNIT 
Experienced 

Aggressors 

The mission of the Army ROTC 
Counterguerrilla Unit is to familiarize 
the members with conterguerrilla tac- 
tics and to instruct the members in the 
art of conventional small unit tactics in 
order to instill such professionalism, 
confidence and leadership abilities that 
they may be highly qualified combat 
leaders after further training in the 
active Army upon commissioning. 

In its sixth year on the Texas 
Tech campus, the unit has trained 
many cadets for careers or service as 
Army officers. 

Training is both mental and phys- 
ical. Members are given night lectures 
on the theory of small unit tactics, 
that is, battle drill, squad and platoon 
combat formations, ambush and 
counterambush, weapons, troop lead- 
ing steps and operations orders. 

This instruction is put to practical 
use on weekend field training exercises 
in which the unit is pitted against an 
experienced aggressor. Weekends are 
also used to practice map and compass 
work, rappelling and bayonet training. 



I 

i 




I^_ 



^t 



Two members of Counterguerrillas position themselves defensively for an aggressor attack. 



ii 



26—Tymt 



ced 1^ 



Each fall and spring the Counter- 
guerrilla Unit opens its membership 
to qualified Army and Air Force 
cadets, the Grunts, as they have been 
called, undergo a rigorous six-week 
trial period in which they are given 
lectures on tactics, which are put to 
use each weekend during field prob- 
lems. At the end of grunt training, the 
pledges must pass a highly technical 
written test as well as the Army combat 
proficiency test. They then appear be- 
fore a board of active members for 
a final interview. 

This spring the unit acted as ag- 
gressors for the annual MS III field 
problems and for the field problems 
of the Special Forces reserve unit in 
New Mexico. 

In the fall the unit hopes to ex- 
pand its operations to include a cadet 
skydiving club, to be formed by 
present members who are qualified 
parachutists. 

Officers of Counterguerriila Unit 
for the past year were Ronald Hoh, 
commanding officer; Kerry Abington, 
executive officer; Mike McGee, first 
sergeant; Byron Clark, operations of- 
ficer; and Buddy Foster, supply officer. 



Garry Kiljan 
Robbie Lynch 
Brad Magness 
Mike McGee 
Gary Moyer 



Bill Nichols 
Bob Osborne 
Kris King 
Johnny Lopez 
Randy Presley 



J. R. Rogers 
Gary Romero 
Clyde Seitz 
Ken Sprecher 
Gregory Teague 



Richard Weisheit 
Mike Westbrook 
Bill Wilson 
R. B. Woodard 

















Two weekend warriors hurry across an open field to avoid an enemy shelling attack. 



Tyme—27 




Army ROTC sweethearts for the 1969-70 school year all came from the ranks of the Corpsdettes. 
They were Ann Ashworth, Christy Chapman, Katy Criffis and Dinah Doty. 




Kathy Griffis says her final goodbyes from the bus steps as the Corpsdettes depart for 
a drill meet in Champaign, IlL 



Ann Ashworth 
Carol Ann Buchanan 
Julie Cates 
Vicki Cavin 
Karen Chandler 



^f 


^m^'h 






Christy Chapman 
Angella Clement 
Bonnie Craddick 
Cathy Crulchfield 
Dinah Doty 




Dani Eubanks 
Betty Carvin 
Kathy Griffis 
Linda Cuinn 
Susan Hancock 



CORPSDETTES 

In Service to 
Army ROTC 



The Texas Tech Army Corpsdettes 
is a women's auxiliary unit in associa- 
tion with Army ROTC. This group of 
girls has as its main purposes the sup- 
port of Army ROTC and the promo- 
tion of a sense of patriotism in all peo- 
ple. 

The Corpsdettes serve Army 
ROTC by helping with many of its 
activities, including the annual turkey 
shoot at the South Plains Fair, the 
Christmas food drive, field problems 
and other small jobs for the cadet 
corps. 

Other activities of the Corpsdettes 
during the past year included their 
marching in the Homecoming parade 
and helping in Dad's Day activities. 

In addition to their function as a 
service group, the Corpsdettes are a 
precision drill team. The Corpsdettes 
have captured many awards during the 
past year, including two first place rib- 




\ 



In Pocohontas, III., the Corpsdettes* don 
headgear and practice their marching. 



2S—ryme 



!§ 



bons from Fiesta Flambeau competi- 
tion in San Antonio. The Corpsdettes 
also journeyed to Champaign, 111. dur- 
ing the spring semester for competition 
there. 

Any organization is made up of 
outstanding individuals and Corps- 
dettes is no exception. Among the mem- 
bers of Corpsdettes are Barbara 
Specht, National Centennial Football 
Queen; Kathy Griffis and Betty Gar- 
vin, members of Who's Who in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities; Bonnie 
Craddick, newly elected secretary of the 
Student Association; Susan Hancock, 
homecoming queen finalist; and An- 
gella Clement, student senator. Also 
Betty Garvin was named Woman of 
the Year at the annual Association of 
Women Students Women's Day Ban- 
quet in the spring. 

Officers of Corpsdettes for the 
1969-70 school year were Kathy Grif- 
fis, commander; Buffy Moser, execu- 
tive officer; Dinah Doty, drill com- 
mander; Susan Hancock, personnel of- 
ficer; and Donna Maner, logistics of- 
ficer. 



Janeen Kalina 
Carolyn Keeter 
Sandra Korona 
Donna Maner 
Sharon Mclntyre 




Buffy Moser 
Toya Ohlrich 
Nell Parker 
Charlie Redding 
Barbara Reynolds 




Becky Schmidt 
Linda Schwab 
Sandra Smithee 
Ann Strawhorn 
Betty Supina 




Margie Torn 
Elaine Wilder 





MJ: 




:'i» 



For the Corpsdettes practice and long hours of drill add up to precision 
in performance. 



Tyme—29 




Mark Baird 
Robert Clark 
Randall Conner 




George Davenport 
Edward Farris 
David Foster 




John Jansson 
Mike Mocek 
Tim Norton 



SCABBARD 

AND 

BLADE 

Outstanding 

Cadet Officers 

Scabbard and Blade is a national 
honorary military society which was 
founded in 1904 and chartered at 
Texas Tech in 1954. Members in the 
society are chosen for a lifetime term 
by election only. Active members are 
selected from outstanding cadet offi- 
cers in the advanced courses of Army, 
Navy and Air Force ROTC programs 
at the various schools where they are 
offered. Since 1904, 190 companies 
have been installed in 47 out of 50 
states in the United States and Puerto 
Rico, bringing the total membership 
in all classes to approximately 115,000. 

Tech's unit of Scabbard and 
Blade is Company D of the 11th Regi- 
ment, composed of 25 members for 
the 69-70 school year. Faculty sponsor 




Barbara Specht, sweetheart of Scabbard and Blade, enjoys a regular business 
meeting of Scabbard and Blade. 







Industrious members of Scabbard and Blade put the finishing 
touches on decorations for the Military Ball. 



30—Trmr 



p 



of the group is Major Gilbert H. 
Schumpert, an alumnus of the Scab- 
bard and Blade Company at Oklahoma 
State University. 

Among Scabbard and Blade's ac- 
tivities are the Combat Ball, the Mili- 
tary Ball, the Cadet-Cadre Golf 
Tournament and the Army ROTC high 
school recruiting program. Some of 
D-ll's service projects are the annual 
Food Drive at Christmas and the Corps 
Blood Drive. 

In addition to championing proj- 
ects for the Cadet Corps and the com- 
munity, the members of the society try 
to promote its purposes and ideals. 
They hope to raise the standard of 
military education in American col- 
leges and universities; to unite in a 
closer relationship the military depart- 
ments; to encourage and foster the es- 
sential qualities of good and efficient 
officers; and to promote friendship 
and good fellowship among the cadet 
officers. 

The officers of Scabbard and 
Blade for 69-70 were David Foster, 
president; James Pfluger, vice-pres- 
ident, Robert Clark secretary; and 
Michael Mocek, treasurer. This year's 
sweetheart of Company D-11 of Scab- 
bard and Blade was Barbara Specht. 



Ill 





ROTC members and their dates enjoy the activities of the Military Ball, sponsored by Scabbard 
and Blade. 



Mark Paden 
James Pfluger 
David Powell 




Chris Roehl 
Robert Shaffer 
Danny Tarbox 




John Welch 
Roy Wilson 
Major Gilbert Schumpert 







^j. __ David Foster conducts a regular Scabbard and Blade 

^yan g business meeting. 



i^^fi^ 



Tyme — 31 



DOUBLE T 
RIFLE TEAM 

True Marksmen 

Texas Tech's Double T Rifle 
Team is an organization dedicated to 
those interested in marksmanship and 
its perfection. Although the group is 
sponsored by the ROTC program, it 
is open to anyone with an interest in 
riflery. 

Members of the Double T Rifle 
Team are active in rifle competition. 
They practice long hours and attend 
many tournaments at their own ex- 
pense. 



During the 1969-70 school year 
the team entered a number of meets 
including the University of Texas at 
El Paso Invitational, St. Mary's Invita- 
tional in San Antonio, the Southwest 
Rifle Association Invitational and the 
New Mexico Military Institute Invita- 
tional. The team won first place at the 
New Mexico Military meet and the 
team's only female member, Marcy 
Wagner, captured high point honors in 
the women's division there. Other hon- 
ors the team has won include first 
place at the South Plains Winter 
League Meet during the spring se- 
mester. 

Also during the spring semester 
Ray Boothe, team captain, along with 
Marcy Wagner, traveled to the Univer- 
sity of Texas at Arlington to compete 



in the state championships. Boothe 
once commented, "Many people don't 
realize it, but Marcy shoots as well 
as or better than any of the boys on 
the team. She beats me about half of 
the time." 

The rifle team does much of its 
practicing at the American Legion 
range, a small bore, 50 foot range. 

Officers of the Double T Rifle 
Team for the 1969-70 school year were 
Ray Boothe, president; George Dill- 
man, vice-president; and Marcy Wag- 
ner, secretary-treasurer. Sponsor was 
Master sergeant Robert Ruiz. 



Dawson Mabry fires from the standing position during a regular rifle team practice. 





Ray Boothe, Double T Rifle Team captain, demon- 
strates his skill with an Anschutz 22 caliber free 
rifle. 
Double T Rifle Team members are Bill Mize, Dawson Mabry, William Neill, Master Sergeant Robert Ruiz, Fred Bursey, George Dillman, Tetry 
Cantrell and Ray Boothe, top tow; also Clark Reed, Phil Snyder, Marcy Wagner, Phil North and Steve Grubbs, bottom row. 




32—Tyme 



AIR FORCE ROTC 
A Select Group 



The young man who enters college 
is in a select group which produces the 
majority of our national and interna- 
tional leaders. The top men in all of 
tomorrow's governmental, business and 
professional activities will come from 
today's college students. They will be 
the men who have the ability, will and 
opportunity to prepare for positions of 
responsibility and leadership. 

The Air Force Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps program at Texas Tech 
is specifically designed to give college 
men "on-Campus" training and ex- 
perience in the art of organizing, 
motivating and leading others. It in- 
cludes instruction to develop self- 
discipline, physical stamina, and bear- 
ing — qualities that are an important 



part of leadership and that contribute 
to success in any kind of career. 

Members of Texas Tech's ROTC 
are an especially active group. They 
spend long hours in preparation for not 
only military exercises, but also service 
projects and social events. During the 
year they have carried out numerous 
projects, both as a singular unit and 
divided into organizations such as 
Arnold Air Society, Angel Flight, 
Sabre Flight, or the cadet wing. 

In the realm of military activity, 
the Air Force ROTC has participated 
in numerous drill meets, both at home 
and on the road. Together with the 
Army ROTC they sponsored this year's 
first Annual Southwest Regional In- 
vitational Drill Meet. It was the first 



of its kind for the Lubbock area, and 
it drew high praise from both specta- 
tors and the sixteen drill teams that 
participated. Angel Flight members 
also participated in the Governor of 
Arizona Invitational Drill Meet, hosted 
by the Army ROTC of Arizona State 
University in Tempe. 

Other highlights of the year in- 
cluded the Air Force ROTC Ball, at 
which Cathy Anderson was named 
queen, and the annual field day, a day 
of games and fun for ROTC members. 

Air Force ROTC service projects 
for the year included the annual blood 
drive, sponsored by Arnold Air 
ciety, but participated in by all of Air 



"Ice Follies ' during the spring semes- 
ter. Proceeds from this show went to 
the Ballenger School. 

One highlight of the year was the 
Wing Dining-In held at Reese AFB. 
Guest speaker was Brig. Gen. Robert 
W. Malloy. 




ROTC CADETS ENGAGE IN 
SERVICE, SOCIAL EVENTS 



T 

4 





One cadet literally gets an eyeful at the egg toss 
during the annual Air Force ROTC field day activities. 



Susan Searls, homecoming queen nominee, waves to the spectators from her seat 
atop the Air Force ROTC float in the homecoming parade. 




An honor guard of Sabre Flight and Angel Flight greet Brig. Cen. Malloy upon his arrival at Reese AFB. 



34—Tyme 







Cathy Anderson accepts a bouquet of roses from Col. 

Haynes M. Baumgardner as she is named Air Force ROTC 
Cadet Douglas Speegle of the flight instruction program looks over his Cessna 150 Military Ball Queen for 1969-70. 

instruments and his checklist prior to take-off. 



Tyme — 35 




ARNOLD 
AIR 

SOCIETY 
Service-Minded 
Cadets 

Arnold Air Society is a profes- 
sional honorary of advanced Air Force 
ROTC and an invaluable service or- 
ganization dedicated to the betterment 
of Texas Tech, Air Force ROTC and 
the community. 

This year Arnold Air's biggest 
project has been the support of the 
Ballenger School, a home for mentally 
retarded but trainable children. Arnold 
Air members visited the children dur- 
ing their recess periods to help with 
their recreation program, and they co- 
sponsored the Ice Follies program 
along with members of Angle Flight, 
Sabre Flight and the cadet corps. 



( 



Arnold Air members clean the stadium after one of the Tech home football games. 




Lennol Absher 
Thomas Besley 
Wayne Boling 
James Bredewater 
John Conlin 



Michael Eck 
Robert Fleer 
Bruce Goodman 
David Cutheing 
Emanuel Honig 



Kent Hunter 
Richard Husen 
Tommy Keyton 
Steven Knight 
Carl Little 



Tim Luckenbach 
Brett Madison 
David Martin 
Donald McCullough 
Roy McKay 






36—Trme 



ed m 



As in the past Arnold Air So- 
city's main money-making project dur- 
ing the year was the cleaning of Jones 
Stadium after Texas Tech home foot- 
ball games. 

Another continuing project of the 
group is the blood bank for Tech stu- 
dents and faculty members. 

Arnold Air members were also en- 
gaged in two other noteworthy service 
projects during the spring semester. 
They assembled "ditty bags" and sent 
them to servicemen in Southeast Asia. 
These bags were filled with stationery, 
pens, combs and other luxury items 
for the men. Another project involved 
the cleaning of the Reese Chapel for 
an inspection. 

Also during the year five Arnold 
Air Society members attended the Na- 
tional Arnold Air Society and Angel 
Flight Conclave in Anaheim, Calif. 

Officers of Arnold Air Society 
for the past school year were Emanuel 
M. Honig, commander; Michael J. Eck, 
vice-commander; Steven J. Knight, 
operations officer; Thomas Sherley, 
administrative officer; Bruce D. Ott, 
information officer; Bruce R. Good- 
man, comptroller; and David Martin, 
chaplain. 



Terry McLean 
Ronald Miller 
James Moore 



Bruce Ott 
Ken Pribyla 
Larry Roseland 



Richard Segais 
Tom Sherley 
Jim Snowden 



Douglas Speegle 
Larry Stoemer 
Rick Sturdivant 



James Teigen 
Skip Valusek 
Jim Wimberley 



William Wright 
Charlie Yates 



Arnold Air Society members participate in Thursday afternoon retreat during Air Force ROTC's turn 
at flag duty. 





Tyme—37 



ARNOLD AIR 
SERVES MANY 




The marching precision of the Arnold Air Society pleases the spectators 
during the Homecoming Parade in the fall. 




Jim Wimberly, Arnold Air itiember, instructs boys at the Ballenger School 
in the art of handling a football. 




• 



The Angel Flight drill team execute* a fancy drill movement daring one of their exhibitions during the year. 



38 — Tyme 



Flying High 

Texas Tech's chapter of Angel 
Flight, drill team and honorary service 
organization is flying high, or has been 
ever since its return this spring from 
Anaheim, Calif., where it received the 
Purdue Cup, signifying the best Angel 
Flight chapter in the nation for 1970. 

The Angels were awarded the ti- 
tle at the National Angel Flight and 
Arnold Air Society Convention, where 
they competed with 139 other chapters. 
vThey were judged on their record of 
activities throughout the past year. The 
Purdue Cup is awarded to the chapter 
that best fulfills the mission of Angel 
Flight, that of service to the school, 
the community and to Arnold Air So- 
ciety. Last year's Purdue Cup winner 
was the chapter at Memphis State Uni- 
versity. Also at the convention Col. 
Haynes M. Baumgardner was named 
the best Angel Flight advisor in the 
country. 

The Angels' recognition was hard- 
ly unmerited. During the year they 
have served in numerous capacities for 
the betterment of Tech, Lubbock and 
Arnold Air Society. 

One of the main projects of Angel 
Flight during the past years was the 
co-sponsorship, along with Arnold Air 
Society, of the Ice Follies International 
Show. As a result of this show the two 
groups donated $1000 to the Ballinger 
School for the mentally retarded. 

Also during the year, the Angels 
helped with the Arnold Air Society's 
Blood Drive and assisted Arnold Air 
with its stadium clean-up after Tech 
football games in the fall. 

In service to the Air Force, the 
Angels often served as hostesses at 
Reese Air Force Base, either at pilot 
graduations or on the arrival of a visit- 
ing dignitary. 

In addition to its other honors the 
Tech Angel Flight chapter has been 
designated the area headquarters for 
the next two years and has acquired 
two permanent national offices. 




MARILYN 

DAVIES 
Commander 



KAREN 
JOHNSON 

Executive 



Kathryn Ann Baker 
Judy Barnett 
Susan Boone 
Brendy Browne 



Barbara Cain 
Judy Clark 
Cindy Dykes 
Susan Edwards 



Susan Glover 
Susan Gearing 
Peggy Guttery 
Debbie Hamilton 



Candy Haralson 
Ann Heam 
Beverly Jones 
Linda Lambert 



Lorraine Lievens 
Sharon Michie 
Diane Myers 
Laura Pohler 



Nancy Roebuck 
Linda Russel 
Marsha Shaver 
Shay Slack 



Connie Smith 
Tia Taylor 
Ann Trail 
Pam Whitley 



CATHY 

ANDERSON 
Administrative 



LAURA CYNTHIA 

MURRAY LEASURE 

Drill Instructor Comptroller 









Jo Whyman 
Dian Winans 
Linda Young 



Tyme—39 



SABRE 
FLIGHT 

Precisioned 
Drill Team 



Sabre Flight, the Air Force ROTC 
precision drill team, has as its main 
purpose the promotion of both Air 
Force ROTC and Texas Tech. 

The Sabres participate in numer- 
ous activities during the year, many 
of which are in collaboration with 
other Air Force ROTC groups. 

This year the Sabres served as an 
honor guard detail for both high school 
and Texas Tech football games. They 
also had a car wash, helped with the 
preparations for the Ice Follies and 
attended several drill meets. 

President of Sabre Flight for the 
1969-70 school year was Richard 
Neidert. Other officers were Patrick 
Werner, secretary; Steve Mild, opera- 
tions officer; and Stephen Dansby, 
treasurer. The group is sponsored by 
Col. George Backus, assistant profes- 
sor of aerospace studies. 




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irect 
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Texas 



Sabre Flight members demonstrate their skills in the Texas Tech homecoming parade. 




• [I 



Air Force Cadet* itaiid at ttrict attention in preparation for a parade ceremony. 



la-Tyme 



MUSIC 



THE CHOIR 
Fine Quality, Varied Repertoire 



The Tech choir has distinguished 
itself during the past years under the 
direction of Gene Kinney, not only for 
its fine musical quality, but also for 
its varied repertoire. 

During the past year the choir has 
performed a wide range of selections 
all over the state. 

Members of the choir are careful- 
ly selected. Each must appear in a 
private audition with Mr. Kinney some- 
time during the spring and summer 
months. The result is perfect harmony 
of voices that has won the group from 
Texas Tech high acclaim. 

Some of the activities of the choir 



during the past year have included con- 
certs in the Student Union building 
and a joint concert with the Monterey 
High School Choir. During the fall 
semester the choir presented Concert 
Americana along with the Tech 
symphony orchestra. Senator John 
Tower was the narrator. 

In January the choir presented 
Haydn's "Creation" with the Tech 
chamber orchestra. 

Also during the spring semester 
the choir presented its annual spring 
concert which was recorded and sold 
to the public. 

Within the body of the choir is 



a smaller group of eight voices, the 
Madrigal singers. These students are 
chosen to achieve the best blending of 
voices possible. They perform for 
various functions around Tech and the 
surrounding area without receiving 
any credit. Among the Madrigal's 
many performances this year was one 
in Odessa at the Festival celebrating 
Shakespeare's birthday. The perform- 
ance was given at Odessa's Globe 
theater, an exact replica of the one 
in Shakespeare's time. 

In the spring semester the choir 
went on a tour of a number of Texas 
cities to try to interest high school stu- 
dents in Texas Tech, the Tech music 
department and the Tech choir. Among 
the cities they visited were Fort Worth, 
Abilene, San Angelo, Big Spring, 
Midland, Odessa and Lamesa. 

Choir officers for the past year 
were Ron Williams, president; Danny 
Johnson, vice-president; and Mary 
Jena Rose, secretary-treasurer. 



f(» 




tyme — il 




"Now what was that step again?" 
wonders feature twirler, Theresa Low- 
rance during one particularly long and 
tiring practice session. 



g 




,_^ 






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3'^ 




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m 






The trombones blast out their melody 
to help give the Raider Band a certain 
sound all its own. 



BAND 
Spirit Booster 

Stepping high in formation, the 
Texas Tech Band sends chills down the 
spines of all who listen. It greatly 
encourages the traditional spirit of all 
Tech fans. 

The Tech band complex consists 
of a marching band, four concert 
bands, including the three varsity 
bands and the "Court Jesters" and the 
two stage bands. 

With drum majors, Chris King 
and Jim Irvin, the "Coin' Band from 
Raiderland" consisted of 394 marching 
members. Under the direction of Dean 
Killion, the Tech band was divided 
into two groups, one at both ends of 



the football field, to provide a "living 
stereo" effect. The band made its two 
out-of-town trips to the Tech-SMU 
game and to the Tech-Arkansas game. 
Another sensation during the Tech 
band performances at football games 
and during pep rallies are the Tech 
majorettes. Homecoming Queen, Miss 
Barbara Zimmerman, from Oklahoma 
City, was head majorette. Other twirlers 
were Sheila Watkins, from Waxa- 
hachie; Bobbie Specht, from Fred- 
ericksburg; Janis Jones, from Raton, 
New Mexico; Patsy Kempson, from 
Dumas; Debbie Wright, from Tahoka; 
Jeanine Hartnett, from Dallas; and 
Diane Lovelace, from Farwell. Feature 
twirlers were Theresa Lowrance, from 
Fort Worth, and Terry Stephens, from 
Stephensville. Their entertainment was 
highlighted with tricky baton ex- 
changes, fire baton twirling and high 




• 



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Dui 
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Ike coi 
spring I 
ictools 
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Lubbocl 
Til 
Tecli's 
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Union I 
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♦ ■ 



Perched high above the practice field. Dean Killion, band director calls out explicit instructiont 
to bandsmen below. 



42 



I 



baton tosses. 

During the spring, the marching 
band divides into four concert bands. 
The concert band took its annual 
spring tour to fifteen different high 
schools in Texas for concerts. They 
also held the annual spring concert in 
Lubbock this year. 

The other three concert bands, 
Tech's varsity bands, each have one 
concert in the spring in the Student 
Union Ballroom. The varsity band also 
played in two concerts, one for the 
First Christian Church, and the other 
for Dunbar High School. 

"Court Jesters" is the name given 
to the special concert band. The mem- 
bers are chosen by audition from the 
marching band. They played for each' 
home basketball game, as well as for 
the All-Sports Banquet in the Spring. 

Tech's two stage bands also pro- 
vide an important part of the band 
complex. This band plays for many 
various organizations for lab experi- 
ence. This experience also provides 
them with "on the job" training. 

This year the stage band had the 
honor to provide background music 
for the Bob Hope Special. 

The successful Tech band complex, 
after many hours of practice, has be- 
come the pride of the Southwest Con- 
ference. 




One section of the Tech band stops for that pause that refreshes during a hot practice 
session. 



t 




Tech twixlers perform with precision as part of the Goin' Band 



from Raiderland during the Tech Homecoming game in the fall. 



I» 



Tyme — 43 



ORCHESTRA 
Future Masters 

Under the conduction of Paul 
Ellsworth, the Tech Symphony Orches- 
tra, consisting of 70 to 80 members, is 
one of several performing organiza- 
tions. The Symphony is made up of 
students from all departments at Tech, 
but the central core is made up of 
music majors. The orchestra provides 
experience for applied music majors, 
who plan to play professionally, and for 
music education majors, who plan to 
teach after college. 

The Tech Orchestra has received 
much recognition within the past year, 
including an invitation by the Mexican 
Government to tour in eight major 
cities. It has also received an invita- 
tion for the past two consecutive years 
to appear at the Texas Music Educators 
Association during their annual meet- 
ings. 

The educational philosophy of the 
orchestra programs at Texas Tech is 
to provide experience and learning for 
performing musicians in traditional 
orchestral repertoire. Each year three 
major symphonies are performed along 
with three or four standard concert 



works, a major choral work and an 
opera. 

The orchestra also performs with 
soloists, including at least one nation- 
ally or internationally known visiting 
artist. This year's guest artist was clas- 
sical guitarist Ernesto Bitetti. 

Other activities for the orchestra 
included a tour to Dallas to perform for 
various high schools, a performance 
with the Tech Choir in a patriotic 



concert and four concerts in "Opera- 
tion Mad," a project co-sponsored by 
the federal government and Lubbock 
Chamber of Commerce to raise the 
cultural level in public schools by 
providing a concert with music, art, 
dance and drama. They also gave 
children's concerts in Lubbock, Plain- 
view and Snyder to aid the scholarship 
fund. Over half of the orchestra mem- 
bers are on scholarship. 



• I' I 




The string section of the orchestra plays as a unit, always in perfect harmony. 




The percussionist perforins his duties with precisnn and exact timing. 




I 



I 

i 



A lonely violinist carefully tunes his instrument be- 
fore the start of an important concert. 



44—Tyme 



w 



PHI MU 
ALPHA 
Best Chapter 
In Province 



Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is a na- 
tional professional music fraternity, 
which this year initiated its three 
hundredth chapter. Texas Tech's Ze- 
ta Sigma chapter is one of those 300, 
and an outstanding one at that. Dur- 
ing the 1969-70 school year, the chap- 
ter was selected to receive the Charles 
E. Lutton award, denoting the out- 



standing chapter in this province. 

Among the fraternity's many ac- 
tivities during the year was the fourth 
annual Texas Tech Stage Band Fes- 
tival. The festival featured Clark Terry, 
one of the foremost jazz trumpet 
artists of the day. Terry was a featured 
artist in jazz bands directed by such 
greats as Duke Ellington, Count Basic, 
Bob Brookmeyer and Skitch Hender- 
son. He is now under contract with 
NBC for the eleventh year and is a 
member of the Tonight Show or- 
chestra. Another guest clinician was 
Gary Edwards, a Chicago educator, 
who played formerly with Glenn Miller 
and Tommy Dorsey. Some thirty bands 
participated in the festival. 

Sinfonia and its sister sorority, 
Mu Phi Epsilon, met together in 



December for caroHng and serenaded 
many of the music faculty and their 
families. 

The fraternity took part also in 
the sponsorship of the University Sing 
in April, along with the Interfraternity 
and Panhellenic councils. 

Tech's Zeta Sigma chapter is now 
in its eighteenth year. Chapter officers 
for 1969-70 were Robert Mayes, pres- 
ident; Chris King, vice-president; Pat 
Metze, corresponding secretary; Mike 
Jacks, recording secretary; Gary Wal- 
voord, treasurer; Don Lagacy, execu- 
tive alumni secretary; Royce Coatney, 
historian; Jerry Caddell, warden; Ron 
Williams and Bobby Dillard, choral 
directors; and Vernay Coberly and 
Kenney Burnett, pledge trainers. 



Greg Beard 
Donnie Brasher 
Kenny Burnett 
Mike Burt 
Jerry Caddell 
Royce Coatney 
Vemey Coberly 

Rick Colvin 
Joe Dennis 
Bobby Dillard 
Randy Driver 
Gary Edwards 
Ron Enns 
Ken Fagerstrom 

Tommy Francis 
Gary Garrison 
Tommy Glazner 
Danny Haberer 
Mike Jacks 
William John Kibler 
Chris King 




!• 



jffli' 



II 



David Koy 
Lloyd Lebow 
Ronnie Mcllroy 
Gary McWilliams 
Robert Manly 
Danny Martin 



Robert Mayes 
Robert Meinecke 
Pat Metze 
Ray Owens 
Eliud Rios 
Ernie Rodriguez 



Mike Threadgill 
Richard Vaughn 
Bennie Walthall 
Gary Walvoord 
Boyce Wyrick 




KAPPA KAPPA 
PSI 

Brotherhood 
For Bandsmen 



The duties of the members of 
Kappa Kappa Psi, national honorary 
band fraternity, begin even before 
marching band rehearsals in the sum- 
mer and continue at a lightening pace 
until the start of final exams in the 
spring. 

Kappa Kappa Psi, along with its 
sister sorority, Tau Beta Sigma, is re- 
sponsible for training incoming tresh- 
man band members in the marching 
and playing styles unique to the Tech 
Band. 



Randy Armstrong 
David Bradshaw 
Billy Brock 
Richard Broyles 
Tony Clines 
John Collier 



Bob Cross 
Gregg Goodrich 
Jerry Gowler 
Randy Haggard 
Felix Hettler 
Steve Law 



Terry McClure 
David Payne 
Mike Pollard 
Gerald Purdy 
Joe Rackley 
Charles Reinken 



Cliff Rice 
James Richburg 
Jim Schutza 
Carl Spratt 
Terry Stephens 
Randy Stephenson 



Jim Stevens 
Homer Stewart 
Keith Washburn 
Bob Wood 
Jerry Wyatt 
Bob Zimmerman 



With the arrival of upperclassmen 
for band rehearsals, Kappa Kappa 
Psi turns its attention to the chores 
which keep the "Coin' Band from 
Raiderland" goin', such as main- 
tenance of the practice field and public 
address systems, emergency instrument 
repairs and supplying water to visiting 
bands and the Tech Band at all home 
football games. When the band takes 
a trip, the fraternity is responsible for 
the care and handling of all band 
equipment. 

Also in the fall, Kappa Kappa Psi 
organizes a trip to an out-of-town foot- 
ball game not attended by the Raider 
Band. The trip, open to all interested 
band members, is made aboard the 
"Blue Goose," the fraternity's bus 
which also supplies band members 
with transportation to pep rallies and 
basketball games. This year the group 
set out for Tech's game in Austin with 
the University of Texas. 

Various social activities are hosted 
throughout the year, highlighted by 



the Homecoming Banquet. The frater- 
nity also sponsors the "Outstanding 
Bandsman" and "Band Sweetheart" 
contests. 

One of the year's most important 
activities is the series of recruiting 
trips to area high schools to interest 
high school band members in becom- 
ing a part of the Tech Band. 

Kappa Kappa Psi carefully selects 
its members on the basis of their 
ability and desire to work for the Tech 
Band. Officers of the fraternity for the 
1969-70 school year were Tony Clines, 
president; Jerry Gowler, vice-pres- 
ident; Jerome O'Rear, corresponding 
secretary; John Collier, recording sec- 
retary; and Bob Cross, treasurer. 









[lit me 



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lioll of IB' 




^—Tyme 







WOMEN IN MUSIC 

MU PHI EPSILON 
Promotion of Music Their Goal 



Oh, tell us what this life would be 
If it were not for song. 

This is the attitude shared by the 
members of Mu Phi Epsilon. Realizing 
the true merit and value of music, 
members devote hours to the promo- 
tion of music in all facets of life. 

Mu Phi Epsilon is an interna- 
tional, professional music sorority for 
music majors, minors, and specialists. 
To become a member a girl must have 
completed at least twelve semester 



hours and have a 2.5 overall grade- 
point with a gradepoint of 3.0 in music 
courses. 

Epsilon Pi chapter was founded 
on the Tech campus in 1952. Since that 
time it has steadily grown into the 
active organization that it is today. 

The chapter participated in sev- 
eral varied activities during the year, 
including a Founders' Day Tea, a 
Welcome Reception for all women in 
music, a German Root Beer rush party. 





^^r^^p 




a recital and a joint caroling party 
with Phi Mu Alpha, men's music 
fraternity, and assisting with Univer- 
sity Sing. 

Members of Mu Phi Epsilon seek 
to serve. They usher at all events spon- 
sored by the Music Department during 
the year. Always open for new ways to 
promote music, the sorority is current- 
ly initiating a music therapy program, 
in which members hope to help the 
mentally retarded and the emotionally 
disturbed strengthen, restore and de- 
velop their minds by listening to dif- 
ferent kinds of music. 

Serving as president of Mu Phi 
Epsilon at Tech for the year was Sara 
Peek. Assisting her were Jolena Sch- 
loer, Janeen Drew, Julie Wyrick, Emily 
Sumner, and Judy Storm. 



Ann Ayes 
Joyce Allen 
Patty Ball 
Cheryl Bennett 
Suzanne Benton 



Susan Blinderman 
Patricia Burke 
Sarah Coleman 
Cathy Crossland 
Janeen Drew 



Beth Hayworth 
Lynne Hoffman 
Patricia Moore 
Susan Patrick 
Sara Peek 



Carol Redford 
Mary Ann Roberson 
Jolena Schloer 
Harriet Snider 
Terrie Stewart 



Judy Storm 
Emily Sumner 
Susan Wessels 
Susan White 
Julie Wyrick 



Tyme — i7 



TAU BETA 

SIGMA 
Sisters 
In Service 



Tau Beta Sigma is a national band 
fraternity for women. Members work 
with their brother fraternity, Kappa 
Kappa Psi, to serve and better their 
band, and to honor men and women 
in band everywhere. 



Tau Beta Sigma was founded at 
Texas Tech in 1946. Since then over 
one hundred chapters of the organiza- 
tion have been established over the 
United States. In the spring of last year 
a national Tau Beta Sigma convention 
dedicated a monument in front of the 
Music Building at Texas Tech in hon- 
or of its founders, Tech's Beta chapter. 

Tau Beta Sigmas at Tech help 
Band Director Dean Killion with the 
band's many and varied projects. They 
plan lodging and transportation for 
band members on out-of-town football 
games, organize band trips and social 
events, and work with all musical 
productions presented on the Tech 
campus. They also entertain visitors 



on the campus who are concerned with 
the band and music departments and 
are co-sponsors of an annual alumni 
banquet. 

Activities of Tau Beta Sigma dur- 
ing the 1969-70 school year include a 
party for freshman band members in 
the fall, a reception for parents foUow-^^ 
ing the Baylor football game, and a car^B 
wash early in the spring semester. ^^ 

Serving as officers of Tau Beta 
Sigma for the past year were Kay 
Hooper, president; Charlotte Duvall, 
first vice-president; Becky Peveto, 
second vice-president; recording sec- 
retary, Linda Vaughan; Val Moore, 
corresponding secretary; and Jean 
Ann Cannon, pledge trainer. 



Kelia Allen 
Marilyn Biehler 
Charlsa Boren 
Jeanne Brown 
Jean Ann Cannon 



Pam Cuddy 
Charlotte Duvall 
Pam English 
Jan Everett 
Linda Fowler 



Paula Gipson 
Linda Goodman 
Kay Hooper 
Sandra Ivie 
Karen Jent 



Patsy Kempson 
Leigh Ann Kilpatrick 
Mary Kay Level 
Diane Lovelace 
Val Moore 



Shirley Ferryman 
Becky Peveto 
Judi Pratt 
Laura Stout 
Debbie Street 



Linda Vaughn 
Sherry Walkowiak 
Kanda Washburn 
Shelia Watkins 
Barbara Zimmerman 




48—Tyme 



'*'' Sigma da,, 
yar inclnde a 
«<i ffleinliers in 
P«eiilsfoDo». 
•Me.aiiiia 



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ill 



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"f *fre Kay 
srlotte hi, 
^ Pemo, 
wording sec> ' 
; Val Moore, ] 
f: awl Jean 



Luxury For Less 



// 



INDIANA TERRACE 



Serving All Tech Students With 

Total Electric Kitchens 
Central Air Conditioning 
Furnish Danish 
I and 2 Bedroom Apartnnents 
Efficiency Apartnnents 
6 Laundries 
Archer Range 
Volleyball Court 
Picnic Area 
Heated Pool 




204 Apartnnents 
Furnished and Unfurnished 



763-8332 



223 INDIANA 

Between 3rd and 4th 

at Indiana 



"FIRST AT TECH" 

A COLLEGIATE MINISTRY 

of DISTINCTION 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Broadway and Avenue V 





DAVID RAY 
Pastor 



DAN YEARY 




AIR CONDITION 




J 



with modern 
economicaSsas 

■ Sold and Serviced by 

Pioneer Natural Bas Company 




Specializing in Quality Portraits 



LEON QUALLS 




AFTON BAXLEY 



WEDDINGS - COMMERCIALS 



^^valon Studio 

2414 BROADWAY 

LUBBOCK, TEXAS 

763-2044 



•fashions 

worn by 
campus beautie 



MEN in 
mademoiselle . . . 
notes, quotes, v<^es 





v-/ 





5.(7 , . TOaaemdisefi^.^i 



<^:arol\ivJiec*l^ jo 




CiV^X Cay'evaas ch/^stv i^inpiiiaiu editor 





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19 



MADEMOISELLE 



MADEMOISELLE 
Texas Tech University 
Lubbock, Texas 79406 
CHRISTY CHAPMAN 
Editor 

Staff: Fay Evans, JoniLutz, 
Carolyn Keeter 



DARREL THOMAS 

Head photographer 

Photographers: Richard Mays, 
Jeff Lawhon, 
Bob Darby, 
Mike Warden 



Fashions for the beauties contri- 
buted by Lathams Department 
Store. 



Special thanks to Elaine Saul and 
Sheila Looney, co-editors of the 
La Ventana for their patience, 
guidance and direction. 



Recognition is also due to Mr. Bill 
Dean, Director of Student Publica- 
tions for his dedication to this 
yearbook, his wrinkles due to 
missed deadlines and his smiles 
for every page turned in. Cer- 
tainly a person who deserves 
tribute is Mrs. Jean Finley, busi- 
ness manager, for her reassurance 
and confidence in the editor. 



Finally, additional thanks to the 
wonderful photography staff for 
their many hours of work taking, 
developing and enlarging the many, 
many pictures in "Mad." 




COVER: A perfect 
suntan-sheer and clear 
and even, a little 
rosiness glowing up 
under it, a little shine 
and dewiness. Pam 
Kirk, Miss Mademoi- 
selle, adorns her dark 
brown hair with 
threads of silver, off- 
set by a silver and 
ebony headdress and 
necklace. Hair fash- 
ioned by Vogue Hair- 
dressers. Jewelry fur- 
nished by the Tech 
Art Department and 
ICASALS. Photog- 
raphy by Darrel 
Thomas, head photo- 
grapher for Student 
Publications. 

Beauty / Fashion 

2 Pam Kirk — dashes of white on purple 

3 Kathleen Shannon — fashion action for evenings 

4 Sheila Paulson — lace, lace and more 

5 Diane Pounds — heyday of the long scarf 

6 Lynn Alderson — fabulous fur-trimmed turquoise 

7 Rhonda Lewis — jump-suit turnout 

8 Kandie Morcom — nifty summer gear 

9 Janis Jones — new Gypsies in fashion 

10 Beth Ryan — new pants look 

11 Marilyn Smith — touches of red on blue 

Honoraries / Clubs 

14 Spotlight on Women of the Year 

15 Alpha Lambda Delta — freshmen's honorary 

16 Junior Council — coeds recognized for scholastic 
achievement 

17 Mortar Board — final accomplishment for outstanding 
seniors 

18 Tech Dames: designed for married women 

19 Town Girls: has the commuter in mind 

20 WSO: service is the main objective 

23 Girl Scouts: lend a helping hand 

24 AWS: specially keyed for the coed on campus 

26 WRC: women's voice on dormitory policies 
40 Panhellenic: the Greek guide 

Dormitories 

27 Chitwood: soaring twelve stories high 

28 Clement: tops on campus mail call 

29 Coleman : lifts life for coeds 

30 Doak: girls on the move 

31 Gates: spins the wheel of excitement 

32 Horn: get in the swim and dive into action 

33 Hulen : imprisonment of fun, activity and friendliness 

34 Knapp: in the fore 

35 Stangel: spic and spangel 

36 Wall : smooth and memorable journey 

37 Weeks : loots 1970 for treasures of fame and glory 



Sororities 



42 Alpha Chi Omega — partial to the lyre 

44 Alpha Delta Pi — true to the violet 

46 Alpha Phi — twine of ivy 

48 Chi Omega — favors a white carnation 

50 Delta Delta Delta — trio of silver, gold and blue 

52 Delta Gamma — anchor clankor 

54 Gamma Phi Beta — dear to the crescent 

56 Kappa Alpha Theta — catchin' a kite 

58 Kappa Kappa Gamma — wearer's of the golden key 

60 Phi Mu — shades of rose and white 

62 Pi Beta Phi — displays the arrow 

64 Sigma Kappa — adorned with maroon and lavender 

66 Zela Tau Alpha — never without a crown 

Departments 

12 Tech's Own Boutique ... of facts, finds, and observations 
38 Men in Mademoiselle . . . Notes, Quotes and Votes 




Mademoiselle — 1 




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demoiselle— 9 



TECH'S OWN 

BOUTIQUE 

OF SITGGESTTONS. FTNnS. AND OBSERVATIONS 



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The short skirt, the tall boot . . . Persian 
silks, panne velvets — the classic, perfect, 
pure, clean-cut lines of the belled pants 
and the narrow tunics ... A complete 
new way of life . . . 





1. Musing on profound, romantic things 
is Pamela Cameron, who prefers the silk 
blouse worn with a buckeled woolen skirt. 

2. Olga Papaila's narrow tunic is made of 
forest-green, kitten-soft suede. 
.3. Resting after a day of studies, Patti 
Anderson sits under an oak in a silk scarf 
shift — a melange of oranges, odd greens, 
saffron and blues. 

4. Metal, brass, loops and buckles made 
the scene on purses this year. 

5. Carry a lot or carry little — this expandable purse of synthetic cottons 
comes in an array of colors to compliment any outfit. 

6. The soft and smooth velvet reaches the floor and is gathered slightly 
for the empire effect ... an innocent look for Dianne Myers.. 

7. A sharp outfit on or off the range is modeled by Lyn Cox. Red and 
white stretch western pants plus monogrammed shirt. Hat and boots proves 
this gal knows it takes more than a horse for the total western look. 



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Continued 

1. The real thing, an antique silk and velvet 
weskit. Judie Shade wears a blaze of copper 
crepe for the Romeo and Juliet blouse ef- 
fect plus polished satin pants. 

2. This long coat makes a clean sweep on 
any campus. Barbara Gray adds the "super- 
duper" Indian scarf to match. 

3. The half-boot — not high enough to reach 
the knee but high enough to keep feet out 
of mud troubles. It zips even. 

4. Smooth leather lopped off with a brass 
jewel sets the tempo for the new look in 
knee boots this season. 

5. Fake jaguar and cheetah pieced together 
with a hemline up to there with boots 
climbing up to reach it. For the total look, 
Jill Stansell adds a matching vest. 

6. Fran Long models an olive green knit 
pants suit with black knit French sleeves. 
Lace-up pants legs is a fantasy made of 
fringed suede. 



m 



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A. 







Mrs. Gwen Deardorff 

Atter only three short years at Texas Tech as instructor 
of Sociology and Anthropology, MRS. GWEN DEARDORFF, 
was named faculty Woman of the Year. This honor is 
bestowed on a faculty member and Senior woman each year. 
The announcement of the two honorees, highlights the dura- 
tion of Woman's Day, sponsored by AWS. 

MISS BETTY GARVIN, Student Woman of the tear, 
also earned this achievement after only three years at Tech. 
Betty transferred from Southwestern University after her 
freshman year. She is a member of Mortar Board, Corps- 
Dettes, Little Sister's of the Diamond and was named to 
Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. Mrs. 
Deardorff received her bachelor's and master's degrees from 
Tech. As an undergraduate, she received the honor of being 
named student Woman of the Year. She served as Secretary 
of the Student Body, Vice-president of the SUB, and was a 
member of Mortar Board. 





• 



WOMEN 

of the 

YEAR 





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Sponsor- 



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^^, H Miss Betty Garvin 



Alpha 
Lambda 
Delta . . . 



Alpha Lambda Delta, national 
honor society, extends membership to 
any freshman woman who has a 3.5 
grade average and 15 semester hours 
credit. If she does not qualify at the 
end of her first semester, a freshman 
may become eligible by attaining a 3.5 
overall grade average with 30 semester 
hours. 

Activities were many and varied 
for the Alpha Lambda Delta member. At 
the beginning of the fall semester, all 
freshman women were invited to a 
party to acquaint them with the ideals 
and requirements of Alpha Lambda 
Delta. After mid-semester, Alpha 
Lambda Delta hostessed a "Smarty 
Party" honoring freshman women 
who had attained a 3.0 grade average 
to encourage them to fulfill Alpha 
Lambda Delta requirements. In the 
spring, new members were honored at 
a banquet with Phi Eta Sigma, fresh- 
man men's honorary. 

Alpha Lambda Delta strives to 
promote intelligent living and a high 
standard of learning, and to encourage 
superior scholastic attainment. 

Officers for the year were: Pres- 
ident — Jean Hargrave, Vice-President 
— Roberta Albracht, Secretary — Terrie 
Stewart, Treasurer — Susan Blinder- 
man, Initiation Chairman — Amy Ham- 
mer, Reporter — Susan Cooper, and 
Sponsor — Dr. Beverly Brian. 



for young achievers 




Lou Ann Adams 
Robbie Albracht 
Barbee Anderson 
Jan Babcock 
Anne Baines 



Peggy Barney 
Susan Blinderman 
Niki Bournias 
Debbie Boyd 
Pam Bryan 



Kathleen Callan 
Jeanne Campbell 
Susan Clayton 
Anne Cocanaugher 
Debbie Dickerson 



Janeen Drew 
Joy Eubanks 
Sharon Frashier 
Carrie Genarlsky 
Barbara Gray 



Peggy Guttery 
Amy Hammer 
Jean Hargrave 
Jeanine Hartnett 
Dianne Henslee 



Lynn HoUoway 
Druscilla Hutton 
Evelyn Ireland 
Anne Jennings 
Nan Jones 



Kathy Looten 
Melinda Mackay 
Charlotte Manhoff 
Laura McElroy 
Gay Nell McGinnis 



Mary Sue Meneley 
Rosemary O'Brennan 
Sheila O'Hair 
Victoria Outlaw 
Pam Reeves 
Karen Rhew 



Kathy Robertson 
Karen Sadler 
Jean Smith 
Linda D. Smith 
Jan Stephenson 
Terrie Stewart 



Anne Tschoepe 
Barbara Upshaw 
Carol Usry 
Marcy Wagner 
Joanne Weis 
Debbie Wright 



Mademoiselle — 15 



Junior Council girls . . . 
Stand tall, look ahead 



T-^ 



One of the oldest junior honoraries recognizing out- 
standing junior women of the Texas Tech campus is 
Junior Council. Constantly seeking ways to serve Tech 
and the Lubbock community, this year's Junior Council 
sponsored a Junior Techsan Day in which orphans from 
Lubbock Children's Home and the State School were 
escorted to a Red Raider football game by various 
Tech couples. Another project of Junior Council was 
an all-school shoe shine in which Junior Council mem- 
bers shined the shoes of cowboys, professors, males 
and females. This day was filled with many laughs and 
good times, but also required hard work and effort. 

A red blazer with the distinctive Junior Council 
red and black insignia indicated a Tech woman who 



has received the highest honor which can be conferred 
upon a Junior woman. Junior Council chooses for mem- 
bership each year 25 outstanding sophomore women 
who have excelled in scholarship, leadership, and de- 
pendability. A future project is assistance in making 
tape recordings to be used by blind students at Tech. 
Junior Council is always ready to serve as hostesses 
for Texas Tech. 

This year's slate of officers were: President — 
Nancy Roebuck, Vice-President — Cindy Willoughby, 
Secretary — Jeanette Snelgrove, Treasurer — Bonnie 
Craddick, Social Chairman — Cathy Condrey, AWS — 
Gay Shamblin, Publicity — Janie Beddingfield. 



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Pi 



Junior Council member* pictured include: Nancy Roebuck, Gay Shamblin, Susan Ledbctter, AniU Bell, Marilyn Foster, Chickie Morgan, Kalhryn 
Baker, Nancy Hall, Cathy Condrey, Barbara Specht, Rosalyn Davis, Patty Owen, Bonnie Craddick, Katie Upshaw, Jeanette Snellgrove, Cindy Wil- 
loughby, Janet Heineman, Janie Beddingfield, Betsy Bond, Bretza Clark, Barbara Cain and Susan Goering. 



16 — Mademoiselle 




(Jt 



Members of Mortar Board include Cherry Cole Walker, Dianne Hatchett, Ruth Rucker, Karen Johnson, Judy Jenkins, Peggy 
Woolridge, Susan Morrissey, Judy Watkins, Lyn Cox, Jan Crudgington, Nena Huffaker, Charlene Mason Link, Grace Sigler, 
Jeanie Turnbow, Barbara Durham, Kate Gully, Marilyn Crawley, Cindy James, Carla Dunn, Eren Johnson and Betty Garvin. 

Contented Smiles for a fulfilled 

Pursuit - MORTAR BOARD 



Mortar Board is a unique experience for 25 senior 
women at Texas Tech. It begins with a regal tapping 
service in the spring, and continues through a hectic 
year of rewarding service. This organization is the 
only national honorary for senior women. Mortar 
Board, founded over half a century ago, now claims 
more than 47,000 members. Girls are selected on the 
basis of individual leadership, service, and scholarship. 

Tech's Mortar Board brings together the busiest 
of senior women, who continue to serve the cam- 
pus in various ways. The fall money -making project 
was a successful mum sale for the Dad's Day Football 
game. This money helped support Operation Senioritas. 
This project entails a visit from several young women 
from Mexico; Mortar Board served as hostess for 
this. 

Introduced by this senior honorary this year was 
Faculty Appreciation Week, whereby outstanding fac- 



ulty members were recognized with a book placed in 
their honor in the Tech Library. 

Mortar Board was founded in "1918 and has over 
117 college and university chapters in all parts of the 
United States. After many years of petitioning the 
national organization, Forum became Mortar Board 
in 1957. 

The Forum chapter of Mortar Board brings pride 
to the Tech campus with its active, outstanding chap- 
ter. Officers for the year included Diane Hatchett, 
President; Marilyn Crawley, First Vice-President; and 
Kate Gully, Secretary. Eren Johnson served as treas- 
urer, Jan Crudgington as AWS, and Lynn Cox as Mem- 
bership Chairman. 

It is quite understandable why the women in 
Mortar Board look content for it is an outstanding 
achievement for their final year at Tech. 



I 



Mademoiselle — 1 7 



TECH DAMES 



• • 



celebrate 



Tech Dames, celebrating its tenth anniversary this year, was founded 
in 1957 but did not become national until 1960 with the organization of 
the National Association of University Dames. 

The Dames recruit each semester inviting the wives of nearly 3,000 
married male students at Tech to join the organization. Ninety percent of 
the Dames are employed in the Lubbock area and upon their husbands' 



10th anniversary 

graduation, the wives receive a PHTS (Putting Hubby 
Through School) diploma in formal ceremonies. Wives 
of both undergraduate and graduate students are mem- 
hers. 

A Sweetheart Dance (pictured bottom left) was 
held Feb. 14 with 31 members — all of whom were 
married to 1970 graduation candidates^ — competing for 
the Dames' Sweetheart title. Mrs. William H. Tooker, 
president, was chosen Sweetheart (bottom right). 

In addition to monthly meetings, active interest 
groups are offered in ceramics, slimnasfics, sports, arts 
and crafts, and bridge. 

The organization provides for the dissemination 
of job, housing and campus information. It has provided 
scholarships for members' husbands. It is the only non- 
student organization recognized by the University. 

Mr. and Miss Tiny Techsan, an annual contest, are 
pictured below. 




I 



18 — Mademoiselle 



<# 



?1 



Because all Town 
Girls live off cam- 
pus within the city 
of Luhbock, they 
must commute back 
and forth to Tech. 
The parking area 
designated for these 
girls is the area 
around the coliseum. 
Above, Town Girl 
Nedree Riggs pre- 
pares to leave for 
a day of school. 




Out of 

Touch? 

Be a Town 

Girl! 



Town Girls Club, which was organized in 1953, 
is designed for a very special group of girls who 
live off campus and whose contact with Tech 
activities is often limited. The club offers friend- 
ships, various projects and parties, information on 
current campus events, and participation in campus 
activities. At the beginning of each year. Town 
Girls hold a get-acquainted party for new members. 
It also plans parties for the club members, has 
luncheons every other Wednesday, and has a Christ- 
mas project. Town Girls sing in the Carol of Lights 
and enter a float in the Homecoming Parade. Town 
Girls Club can be an important part of your col- 
lege life if you plan to live off campus. The club 
is a growing participant of Texas Tech. 




Representing Town Girls are three of the officers: Nedree Riggs — AWS Rep- 
resentative, Linda Usry — Vice-president, and Sharon Linker — Treasurer. 




At the first of the yeai, 
Town Girls held an egg 
sale for a money-making 
project. Before selling 
the eggs to a housewife, 
Linda Usry and Sharon 
Linker count them and 
check their quality. 



Mademoiselle — 19 





1 




Representing WSO on the executive council this year are Linda Morrison, parliamentarian; Di 
Doshier, pledge director; Juana Young, secretary; Ruth Rucker, president; Robbie Martin, 
activities chairman; Kay Marshall, projects chairman; Janet Wossum, treasurer; Claudia Hale, 
vice-president; and Nedree Riggs, AWS representative. 



Donna Allen 
Beverly Benham 



Mary Jane Blackstock 
Paula Bland 



Ceorgianna Brindie 
Alonda Buckingham 



Sherry Buman 
Carolyn Burp 
Lydia Buske 
Kathy Carpenter 
Eilleen Chambliss 
Brenda Cook 



Carol Cooper 
Barbara Crouch 
Shirley Cummins 
Cathy Danna 
Dana Dean 
Mary Dean 
Diana Doshier 




Since its origin as a committee of the Association of Women 
Students in 1959, Women's Service Organization has increased 
in size from the original seventeen members to almost a hundred 
at the present time. The women of the organization contribute 
over 1,500 service hours to the campus and community each 
semester. WSO gives the woman student an opportunity to be 
of service to the College while identifying herself with a respected 
group. 

The principles of friendship, service, and equality are 
stressed during the period of pledgeship as well as among the 
active members of WSO. During the ten week pledgeship, pledges 
become acquainted with activities through working on joint 
projects and signature appointments. The requirements for initia- 
tion are few: a 2.0 grade average; ten service hours; and, most 
important, a desire to service. 



<i 



20 — Mademoiselle 



Y tY 13 V-F • Organized for Service 



¥ 



Denise Eskridge 
Jeanne Floodberg 
Beth Gill 
Janet Gollnick 
Thais Gordon 
Kay Griffith 
Claudia Hale 




Sharon Harp 
Marilyn Harris 
Karen Hitchcock 
Lyndsay Holmes 
Becky Howell 
Margaret Howell 
Victor Gene Hughs 
Carol Jones 



lUlio; Di 

ie Mtttii, \ 



Linda Jones 
Charlene Kelley 
Francie Kinney 
Sharon Leach 
Joan Levers 
Kay Marshall 
Robbie Martin 



Marilyn Menard 
Linda Mitchell 
Betty Moldenhaver 
Judi Moore 
June Moosberg 
Linda Morrison 
Pat Palmer 



(l» 




Pat Mayse 
Bonnie McCall 
Carol McGowan 
Marilyn McGuire 
Pat McGuire 
Jan McManus 
Judy McNeil 
Connie Mc Williams 



Gail Pendleton 
Judy Powell 
Mary Rapier 
Cindy Reaves 
Kathy Rhoads 
Nedree Riggs 
Ruth Rucker 
Mary Rushing 



Jancy Sackett 
Susan Sawyer 
Alice Schurman 
Donna Schwertner 
Jan Shaw 
Denise Shiver 
Mary Simnacher 



Mary Skopinski 
Janice Small 
Margie Smith 
Mary Staudt 
Bonnie Stenis 
Carolyn Thomas 
Jane Todd 
Laura Vernon 



Gayle Vivian 
Jan Wall 
Sharon Warford 
Teresa Whitlow 
Marcella Williams 
Janet Wossum 
Juana Young 



li 



Mademoiselle — 21 



W S O 's Notebook 






There is nothing quite like a dashing young 
WSO girl to demonstrate the principles of friend- 
ship, service, and equality of their organization. 
The Texas Tech campus was the scene this year 
for a group of girls to be of special service to 
their university. Their striking maroon blazers 
and golden crests became common sights 
on campus as they worked on numerous 
projects. 

1. Ushering at University Theatre. 2. Com- 
forting the ill at the Infirmary. 3. Tape- 
recording stories for blind students. 4. Car 
bashing at Homecoming Bonfire. 5. Help- 
ing with Boy Scouts' Day. 6. Making 
leminorials for Carol of Lights. 7. Shin- 
ing results of leminorials. 8. Entering in 
annual bicycle race. 






n 



22— Mademoiselle 



Campus Girl 
Scouts 



A day in the 
life of . , . 




£'iL-**is,S-*j 




J» 




A day in the life of a Campus Girl Scout of 
Texas Tech is one of service and fun, and one 
which will always be recalled by happy memories. 
This campus organization is sponsored by the 
Caprock Girl Scout Council and provides days 
of work and play for its members as seen in their 
many projects and activities. 

These members act as leaders or special con- 
sultants to Girl Scout troops, conduct special activ- 
ities such as Playdays and Fairs, and give serv- 
ice to the Council Office. The major project is 
their numerous services to the West Texas Mu- 
seum and International Students. 

Being a worthwhile and working organization, 
the Campus Girl Scouts will be seeing many exciting 
and fulfilling days in their future at Texas Tech. 



Mademoiselle — 23 



WOMEN'S CREED 

I believe in the women of this college, in their 
ideals and sincerity of purjjose. 

I believe in my ability to use wisely the privileges 
of self government and will strive to accept 
its responsibilities. 

I believe that my purpose in college is to learn 
to think. I will present my best efforts in 
seeking what is true and will regard the class- 
room as a place for unquestionable honesty. 

I believe in myself. Recognizing both my strengths 
and weaknesses, I will strive to follow the 
Rule of Life — that of charity toward others 
and service to all. 




• 




Executive Council 




' 



\ 



The executive council, the governing body for the Association of Women 
Students, takes time out for a coffee break between business. Betsy Bond, 
treasurer, pours coffee for Beverly Johnson, president; Elizabeth Cavin, sec- 
retary; Barbara Specht, lAWS contact; Mariam Schmidt, 2nd vice president; 
Janie Beddingfield, Ist vice president and Anita Bell, 3rd vice president. 



24 — MademohelU 



J» 



I 



SPEAKING for 

and ACTING 

on behalf 

of the TECH COED 



When enrolling at Texas 
Tech, there is one organization 
with which every woman student 
automatically becomes aware. This 
is the Association of Women Stu- 
dents. The purpose of AWS is to 
help Tech coeds get the greatest 
benefits from college life by 
promoting unity and fellowship 
among women students and by 
providing opportunities for leader- 
ship in worthwhile activities on 
campus. 

The general Council, the or- 
ganization's governing body, is 
composed of one representative 
from each women's organization 
and a representative from the 
Freshman Class. 

AWS traditionally sponsors a 
Howdy Party, Penny-a-Minute 
Night, Dad's Day, and Woman's 
Day. In addition to these activities, 
this year AWS sponsored the elec- 
tion of a representative to the Sun 
Bowl in El Paso. 






Althea Allison 
Becky Baiton 
Ann Baiton 
Julie Gates 



Susan Clayton 
Ellen Glower 
Kathy Coleman 
Jan Crudgington 



Judy Forman 
Claudia Harrell 
Jeanne Hatcher 
Susan Haynes 



Diane Hensley 
Karen Hitchcock 
Dixie Howell 
Beverly Jones 




Julia Jones 
Joyce Kettle 
Sandy Korona 
Beth Kothman 
Diane Labus 
Kay Marshall 
June Mayo 



Melanie Montgomery 
Becky Peveto 
JoAnn Ratliff 
Gina Rayl 
Anna Riddle 
Nedree Riggs 
Kay Ryan 



Linda Schwab 
Gay Shamblin 
Darlene Sneed 
Jeanette Snelgrove 
Judy Storm 
Carol Usry 
Freda Walker 
Denise Westbrook 



Mademoiselle — 25 



W rvv>4— Communications 
Link for Women Residents 



If A 
% 




Kathryn Baker 



Beck Burnett 




Chickie Morgan 



Ann Neely 




The Women's Residence Council, 
composed of the presidents and vice 
presidents of each hall, is the policy- 
making organization for the women's 
residence halls and the Women's Resi- 
dence Hall Association. 

As an important communications 
link for women residents, WRC en- 
courages an effective cultural program 
and an atmosphere conducive to aca- 
demic learning. The Carol of Lights, 
a major fall project, has become an 
annual campus tradition marked by 
residence hall choirs singing Christmas 
carols and climaxed by the turning 
on the lights which decorate the 
campus during the holiday season. 
Other projects include Penny-a-Minute 
night and scholarship trophies given in 
the spring to the upperclass and fresh- 
man dormitory with the highest grade- 
point average. 

One of the more recent projects was 
the creation of the Marshall L. Pen- 
nington Loan Fund established in 1967. 
This loan fund, which establishes a 
short-term loan for second-semester 
freshman and u])perclass women in the 
residence halls, was increased by the 
1968 WRC. 

This year, the Tech WRC hosted 
the National Association of College and 
University Residence Halls Convention 
which was held in March on the Tech 
campus. This project, done in conjunc- 
tion with the Men's Residence Council, 
was the first of its kind to be under- 
taken by the two Councils at Tech. 



Judy Storm 



Sally Swalzell 



Amy Trail 




Katie Upsliaw 



Julie Wilkinson 





M 



fCia^ey 



nliwi 




The Chitwood legislators awaiting their departure for an exciting year are: Caryn Cameron, Stephanie Hutchinson, Sharon Owen, Jeanne 
Schlankey, Vicki Neelson, Betsy Munson, Pamela O'Neal, Sherry Paul, Sharon Cambern, Cynthia Jones, Laura Jo Turner, Ann Ashworth, 
Cindy Corini, Susan Massa, and Linda Schaal. 

Chitwood Soaring 12 Stories High 



( MOM 



« 



Chitwood is tops; Come be a Chitwood girl, and 
you will enjoy all the convenience of living in one of the 
newest womens residence halls on campus. 

Chitwood is connected with Weymouth, the newest 
hall for men. On the first floor, Chitwood and Weymouth 
share a snack bar with adjacent concession room and 
recreation room with a check-out room for game equip- 
ment. 

Girls at Chitwood are very active. Homecoming is 
highlighted by the planning of decorations with Coleman 
and Weymouth. The girls also participate in a canned 
goods drive for the needy at Christmas. Mixers, intra- 
murals, and the scholarship banquet all contribute to an 
exciting year at Chitwood. 



Mademoiselle — 27 



One huge special delivery was made to Clement Hall 
at the beginning of the year — 150 cute little packages 
called freshmen. Freshmen were included in scholarship 
banquets and also enjoyed the annual Halloween and Christ- 
mas parties along with upperclass women. 

Clement was postmarked as the site of the Carol of 
Lights Dinner, the girls having the privilege of dining 
with distinguished guests who helped with the "Lights." 

Besides spirit signs and activities, Clement girls host- 
essed receptions for Dad's Day and Homecoming. 

Clement girls were delivered an exciting year that 
was stamped a fulfilling success. Below, the legislators and 
officers performing mail inspection are, from left to right: 
Lana Lewis, Sharon Patterson, Beth Hooper, Bette Butler, 
Cindi White, Barbara Rinne, Shirley Flesher, advisory 
chairman, Dorothy Richards, Joan Levers, Margie Smith, 
Dickie Alston, Kay Ryan, Raeann Ried, president, Becky 
Burnett, vice president, Michelle Boutin, Bobbie Nesser, 
Beth Ryan ; Kneeling, Cindi Beckham, Nancy Eubanks, 
Peggy O'Neil, and Shirley Thomas. 



Clement Hall Girls 

Are Tops on 
Campus Mail Call 



« 



I 

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28 — Modemoiselle 



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:all 




Coleman Hall legislators and officers seen busily at work are: Bar bara Smith, advisory chairman; Gerry Holden; Judee Jack- 
son, vice-president; Diane Jaynes; Becky Barton, AWS representative; Diane Bryan; Gail Kay; Liz McGaughey, president; 
Sue Hunt; Kaki Tinsley, treasurer; and Carolyn Marshall. 



COLEMAN Lifts Life for Coeds 



1 



Coleman Hall is the place for coeds on the move. 
This year is the first time the hall has been opened to 
women. These women may live in the new high-rise hall 
which offers a lounge, typing room, luggage room, and an 
ironing room on each floor. Residents may also enjoy the 
color TV located in the theater room of the basement. 

As part of the Wiggins Complex, Coleman shares with 
the Chitwood-Weymouth coed buildings the dining hall, 
snack bar, and game room facilities. Coleman girls also 
participate in Homecoming decorations along with Chit- 
wood and Weymouth. Mixers and holiday parties add to 
the fun of dorm life in Coleman. 



Mademoiselle— 29 




m 



Doak legislators pictured from left to right are: Rosalyn Davis, Jeanne Campbell, Maria Fortunato, Carolyn Thomas, Cathy Wilkie, AWS represen- 
tative; Mary Pittman, president; Susan Sauther, vice-president; Vicki Outlaw, Susan Ritzingur, Paddy Noonan, Alonda Buckingham, and Lorna 
Binford. 



DOAK 
Girls 

On The 
Move 



The girls of Doak Hall are always oti the 
move, keeping abreast of campus jictivities. These 
lively coeds enjoy the dormitory's warm atmos- 
phere where events such as a "Howdy Party", 
all-senior caroling and tree-trim affairs are a way 
of life. Other functions include a Dad's Day Coffee 
and dorm mixers. 

The air conditioned study hall and the schol- 
arship banquet each semester encourages high 
scholastic achievement for the residents. The Doak 
girls also participate in intramurals and charity 
programs. 

This hall, named after Tech's first Dean of 
Women, is one of the oldest buildings on campus 
and houses approximately 300 upperclassmen. 

Doak officers for this year included Mary 
Pittman, president; Susan Sauther, vice-president; 
and Cathy Wilkie, AWS representative. 



30—MademoiseUe 



Gates Hall Spins the 



The spinning Gates girls are characterized by 
their beauty, charm, and personality. Not to be out- 
done, their enthusiasm is shown in various activities. 
They' sponsor mixers, elections, Halloween and 
Christmas parties, wing contests, and an Easter 
Bonnet Parade. Heading the dorm are: Janie Stone, 
president; Shelly Shelton, vice-president; Judy 
Clarke, AWS: and Sharon Michie, advisory chair- 
man. 



Wheel of 
Excitement 







Enjoying their ride on the wheel of action are Gates girls : Jan Babcock, Shelly Shelton, Betty Supina, Pam Chakos, Cindy Irvine, Carol Rivers, 
Martha Singleton, Linda Ward, Suzi Dorsey, Diane Byers, Debbie Goodykoontz, Cathy Norman, Peggy Barney, Jan Chafee, Becky Schmidt, Janie 
Stone, Anne Laux, Sharon Frasier, Jeanie Hatcher, Paula O'Brian. 



Mademoiselle — 31 




Diving into friendliness, enthusiasm, and activities 
are the girls of Horn Hall. They find that there is never a 
dull moment with activities such as boys' serenades, mixers, 
all-dorm parties, intramural sports, kidnap breakfasts, Hal- 
loween parties, Christmas parties, and picnics sailing by to 
make their first year at Tech just a little more enjoyable. 
Besides involving themselves in these extra activities, they 
also find time to bask themselves in learning and scholar- 
ship. Their reward is a scholarship banquet in the spring 
and an attitude of success and accomplishment. 



Gathering by the poolside are Horn Mermaids: Leah Squyrcs. Beth Hay worth. Sisan M.Clurc Laura MoElroy Jan Stevens^ ^ 
ney, Judy Kieschnick, Linda Trestle, Marsha Mills, Debbie Broth erton. Mary McKeevever President; Lou Plunk, Judiciar 
Campbell Advisory; Liz Ludwig, Vice-President; Janice James, George ne Bubany. Cathy Hoffman, Ann Rucker, and Karen 



Get in the Swim 

and Dive into Action 
With Horn Hall 



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32— Mademoiselle 



'" Klivilies 
' is never a 
"*■ Bisers, 
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ike sprinj 








Hulen Hall . . . 

An Imprisonment of 

Fun, Activity, and 

Friendliness! 




Behind the bars of happy Hulen Hall lies the friendly 
and contented atmosphere of a very active dorm. Locked 
within a world of gaiety and beauty, Hulen dwellers witness 
such events as the annual honor-roll banquets and gala 
festivities highlighting Christmas, Dad's Day, and Home- 
coming. Spooky movies create a scary Halloween atmos- 
phere for the Hulen cell-mates and such facilities as tele- 
visions, concession room, and study rooms provide oppor- 
tunities for fun and lasting friendships within the Hall. 

Needless to say, the sparkling faces behind the bars 
of Hulen Hall really have something to sparkle about . . . 



a beautiful dorm — in more ways than one! 

Holding the keys to Hulen Hall's happiness are the 
legislators and officers pictured above. Top row: Mary 
Ann Wiley, Cathy Staley, Peggy Tipton, Cary Gay Wil- 
liams, Judy Foreman, Barbara Ramsey, Beth Kothman, 
AWS representative, Barbara Rieck. Second row: Carolyn 
Rieck, president. Patsy Hathaway, advisory chairman. Bot- 
tom row: Vicki Waldron, Holly Huddleston, Susan Pat- 
rick, Susie Osnik, Dottie Cox, Susan Stephens, Ann Neely, 
vice president. 

Mademoiselle — 33 



KNAPP IN THE 'TORE" 




Helping keep Knapp in the "fore" and dorm legislatures: Sharon Ebanks, Karen Sadler. Shriley Leinen, Susan 
White, Susan Warner, Toni Burks, Cathy Crossland, advisory chairman; Susan Cooper, president; Diana Lsbus, AWS 
representative; Ruth Stunder, Judy Wilkinson, Vice-President; Sue Lynn Walker, Carol Schmidt, Anna Lou Baines, 
Pat Billingsley, and Linnie Gilbertson. 




""'-^r*.^j:'X: 



Amid Tech's new dorm complexes Knapp stands as one of 
the older halls — and that's the reason its freshmen coed resi- 
dents love it! Not only are traditions like the Knapp Doll 
House established and looked forward to, but large rooms and 
spacious halls lend a friendly, comfortable atmosphere to a 
dorm well-remembered by past residents. This year's sopho- 
more executive council has made a special effort to involve 
their freshmen representatives. The younger council look 
charge of the traditional Knapp Doll House and collected hun- 
dreds of dolls for a Christmas drive sponsored annually by' 
the Salvation Army and the Marines. They also brought new 
furniture from an older dorm which had been transformed 
into office space, and redecorated the Knapp lobby. In the 
Spring, the reps sponsored a dance for their coeds. 

The girls are a little saddened that Knapp will no longer 
be exclusively for freshmen in the Fall of 1970, for dorm par- 
ties and carols sung through the darkened halls at Christmas 
time are part of the pleasant memories the girls carry of their 
first dorm. 




9 



3¥ — MademoUeUe 



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Spic-N-Spangel Stangel 



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Adhering to all the con- 
veniences of home, Stangel houses 
over 400 upperclassman coeds nine 
months of the year. 

Formerly known as "Number 
Nine," the dormitory is connected 
to a men's residence hall, Mur- 
dough. The two dorms share a 
connecting cafeteria, snack-bar and 
recreational area. 

A scholarship is awarded an- 
nually to a resident at the Scholar- 
ship banquet in April. Mixers, with 
their neighbors, the men of Mur- 
dough, are a common occurrence. 

Officers for this year included 
Sally Swatzell, president; Sandy 
Korona, vice-president and Brenda 
Drake, judiciary chairman. 





Taking time out for Saturday chores include the following legislators; Toya Ohlrich, Donna 
Crandell, Dinah Doty, Peggy Araerman, Jane Morgan, Sharon Teesdale, Ann Benoit, and Christy 
Chapman. 



Mademoiselle — 35 



Make reservations now 



WALL EXPRESS Guarantees 
a Smooth and Memorable Journey 





All aboard for fun 
and excitement — this is 
the theme of Wall Hall, 
the home of 404 Hvely 
coeds. 

Life in Wall includes 
serenades, the scholarship 
banquet, mixers, the 
freshman representative 
program, and seasonal 
parties. Residents also 
participate in intramurals, 
the Carol of Lights, and 
dorm decorations. 



Legislators and officers for 
1969 were: (top row) Suzie 
Sterling; Pam Self; Ann 
Heam. judiciary: Kim Gil- 
breath; and Niki Brurnias; 
(bottom row) Gail Comett; 
Gayle Snure, president; Pam 
Hooser; Pam Davis; Linda 
Ottinger; Susan Clayton: Ree 
Calhoun; Lou Ann Adams; 
Mindy Mehalin; Koreen 
Pro<-hmon; and Joyce Allen. 



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for 



36 — Mademoiselte 



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Preparing to stage the biggest hold-up in all Tech's history are 
Weeks' bank robbers: Suzanne Blevins, Darlene Sneed, Gracie 
Sigler, Chickie Morgan, Suzy McCrary, Judy Durham, Jana 



Cooper, Anne McKinney, Barbara Hansen, Helene Loran, Donna 
Schwertner, Nell Parker, Judy Storm, Gwen Curry, Harriet Snider, 
and Emily Morrill. 



WEEKS HALL GANG Loots 1970 
for Treasures of Fame and Glory 



KortfH 



i 




Weeks Hall steals the gold and for the past ten years it's been 
the Scholarship Trophy; A Scholarship Banquet is the payoff for 
such hard work. In addition to scholarship. Weeks is known for its 
participation in many campus activities. Weeks Hall sponsored a 
Homecoming Queen candidate and entered the Homecoming Dec- 
oration competition. Also nominated from Weeks was a Miss 
Playmate candidate as well as a Miss Mademoiselle. During the 
Christmas season, Weeks held an Open House and participated 
in the annual Carol of Lights. The dorm Devotions held through- 
out the year served as the uniting bond of the Spirit of Weeks 
Hall. 



Mademoiselle — 37 



MEN IN MADEMOISELLE 



I 



NOTES, QUOTES, AND VOTES 



! 



Ti/aC/i, %UH on. ^u^ %ela.x: cfou eant mC^A {t — 



Or/ 0^ o{^ CdtMfxxS . . .^ 

QOOdi Mi^ tieOS ^ KOiM/ . . . 

Sam Slennis got the message of the 
great CPO shirt/chile, olive & white 
plaid combo. The new and stylish CPO 
idea can be worn as either a jacket 
or shirt. 




For formal wear, Robert Gossett, 
above, likes the look of homespun 
silk with satin peak collar and 
lapels and |>ocket trim. The slacks 
are bordered on the side with a 
silk strip. 



38 — Mademoiselle 





The mood is imaginative and daring. 
Bill Cornett, above, wears a 3-piece 
gray pin-stripe suit for the executive 
look. For the assurance of a totally 
impeccable appearance, the scarf adds 
highlight to any outfit. The long yel- 
low and black print scarf pictured 
below brings fashion to any neck. The 
silk scarf which comes in an array 
of colors, prints and designs is the 
latest addition in men's wear. 



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Go casual and be comfortable is the 
thought of Jack Stargel and Tom Sawyer, 
below. The wide-tie look in gold and black 
stripes brings out the print in the slacks. 
With or without a sports jacket, the shirt 
and tie duo is an appropriate attire for 
many occasions. In the sportswear cate- 
gory. Tech's quarterback shows off the 
new sweaters worn by the Red Raider 
team. The red double T is outlined in 
black to signify the University's colors. 




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i^ is Ike 
on Saner, 
il anii black 
iW <lacb. 
1. iW skirt 
f iBire lor 
wear cale- 
•1 off lie 
\ti HaiiJer 
outlined in 
i colors. 



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ttoiu 

Can you detect a cowboy by his walk, 
talk or by the fact he is wearing boots? 
Jack Kennedy, below, a westerner from 
Spur, gives it away by his boots, hat and 
saddle and spurs background. The coat 
trimmed in rabbit fur keeps the cowboy 
warm while branding cattle or roping 
steers. However, it's also dressy enough 
for Sunday outings. In contrast, the Joe- 
College type, Don Lookadoo, prefers the 
sweater and shirt duet. This cashmere 
classic trick is brown intertwined with 
green and orange stitchings. The guideline 
Don uses is: "In New York on the week- 
end, to be too "dressed" is to be badly 
dressed." 




For the man who likes the latest in 
the new mod look, Doug Walker, 
above, has the perfect idea. White 
bell bottoms by Male plus the Tom 
Jones shirt is offset by a double- 
breasted jacket. To complete the scene, 
Doug also wears a scarf, heeds and 
buckled boots. Notice the flowered 



helmet. Ready for the slopes in Aspen, 
Santa Fe or Ruidosa is Gregg Vaughn. 
This double-knit sweater with stripes 
encircling the waist and sleeves would 
be a hit on any trail. With poles in 
hand, water-proofed slacks plus skiis, 
Gregg is anxiously awaiting the cold 
weather and the snow flakes. 






Stop! Take off those shoes! You'd be 
better off tripping down Broadway 
barefooted than wearing yesterday's 
soles with the pointed toes. Trade in 
your V-toed footwear for the squared 
idea. Substitute the laces for buckles. 
Whether you prefer the classic and 
ever stylish smooth grained leather or 
the exquisite alligator, the gold buck- 
les are forever around. Give your 
foot a break — give in the new look 
in men's footgear before your iiext 
step outdoors. 



Mademoiselle — 39 




June 
Mayo 



Barbara 
Reynolds 



Janis 
Jones 



Carol 
Scarboro 



Panhellenic Council 




Carla 
Dunn 



Susan 
Elrod 



Lvnn 
Kirkpatrick 



Beverly 
Johnson 



Jacquie 
Jones 




Cracie 
Sigler 



40 — Mademoiselle 



tcpc 








Loretta Albright 
Secretary 



Dorel Payne 
President 





Karen Chamblee 
Treasurer 



Pat Neal 
Vice President 



To promote inter-sorority cooperation and strengthen 
sorority-community relations as a whole, the thirteen social 
sororities at Texas Tech are member groups of the College 
Panhellenic Association. The governing body of this organiza- 
tion, the Panhellenic Council, is composed of two representa- 
tives of each sorority. During the monthly meetings the council 
plans various activities and events sponsored by Panhellenic 
throughout the year. Because Panhellenic representatives have 
had an opportunity to discuss issues with their chapters, all 
sorority members have a voice in Panhellenic decisions. 

As a service project this year, the sororities along with 
the fraternities devoted time and money towards helping the 
Lubbock State School for the mentally retarded. Other activi- 
ties included organizing a tutoring system for the new pledges, 
sponsoring a Sing-Song with one-half the profit given to char- 
ity, and having Panhellenic pals to promote better relationships 
between the individual sororities. 

Greek Week, which was sponsored by the Panhellenic and 
Interfraternity Councils, celebrated such activities as leadership 
workshops, a faculty-students banquet, service projects, games, 
and a convocation. 

As the Panhellenic Council deepens its purpose each year 
and increases its high cultural, educational and social standards 
of sorority women, it will continue as its tradition has proven 
to uphold the sorority system at Texas Tech. 





Jill Tooley 

Junior Panhellenic 

Representative 



Anne Stout 

Social and AWS 

Representative 








Joan Mobberly 
Sponsor 



Marilyn Foster 
Scholarship Chairman 



Panhellenic 

Council 
Promotes 

Cooperation 
And Greek 

Spirit 



Mademoiselle — il 




Alpha Chi Omega in 1969- 

70 took its place in the 

Texas Tech University 

Greek community. The 

Gamma Rho Chapter of Alpha 

Chi participated ■^gain 

this year in the Annual 

Cerebral Palsey Easter 

Seal drive. A Chi Os 

also helped with the 

Lubbock United Fund Drive. 

Those that participated 
this year in the Student Sen- 
ate were Susie Bott. Susan 
Elrod and Ann Layden. Active 
participation in the intramur- 
al program was a key facet in 
the Alpha Chi jirogram. Alpha 
Chis took fir.st place in sorority 
volleyball, and second place in the 
all-school volleyball coed content. 
Alpha Chi's prize winning float in the 
Homecoming parade depicted the theme 
of Tech which was. "Do Your Own Thing.' 
Several Alpha Chi« participated in 
Student Union activities. Mona Reeves 
headed the Fine Arts Comniiltee wh'le 
Linda Logan lead the International In- 
terest Committee. Susan Cooper acted 

as president of Knapp Hall, while 
Sandy Korona was vice-president of 
Stangel Hall. Three Alpha Chis are 
involved in "little sister" activities 
of Phi Kappa Psi and Sigma Chi. 
Susan Elrod and Carol Snodgrass were 
chosen as members of Leadership Board. 
Two members of CorpsDettes were 
Julie Cates and Sandv Korona. Social 
events for Alpha Chi included a Foun- 
ders Day Banquet. Dinner Dance. Chap- 
ter and pledge retreats. Homecoming 
tea, and Paddle parly. 



Alpha 

Chi 
Omega 



42 — Mademoiselle 



Pam Adams 
Martha Albright 
Shellie Anderson 
Linda Austin 
Phyllis Austin 
Donna Becker 
Janie BeddingfieM 



Susan Bott 
June Bozeman 
Dianne Byrd 
Julie Gates 
Rhonda Chennault 
Susan Cooper 
Donna Cowen 



Julie Cullender 
Paula Davis 
Dinah Dewitt 
Susan Elrod 
Cathy Emery 
Debbie Fletcher 
Pam FortiDO 



Sally Foy 
Deb Gardow 
Kathy Garnett 
Michelle Graham 
Sahron Grassc 
Conni Gray 
Edwina Hall 



Nancy Hall 
Susan Hamilton 
Liz Hanslik 
Sue Hawkins 
Susan Jenkins 
Cathy Jones 
Debbie Jones 




Linda Jordan 
Jan Kelley 

Janice Kennedy 
Lynn Kirkpatrick 
Kathy Kolander 
Sandra Korona 
Linda Kraus 
Cissy Laird 



Joan Landrum 
Ann Layden 
Margi Layden 
Mirjam Lien 
Andra Lightfoot 
Linda Logan 
Stevie Manale 
Melissa McConnell 



Sandra McGinley 
Helen McGinnis 
Linda Moore 
Nada Neel 
Paula Kay O'Brien 
Becky Purcell 
Mona Reeves 
Debbie Reynolds 



Toni Gail Kiclierson 
Kay Ryan 
Mary Shelton 
Susan Sigmier 
Marilyn Smith 
Irene Stephenson 
Mary Stogdill 
Lou Thurman 



Francine Tippen 
Betty Tonde 
Nancy Waddell 
Dene Walters 
Myra Warren 
Kathy Webb 
Sallie Westbrook 
Linda Winston 



Mademoiselle — 43 



I • 



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if 




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1 



f^ ^ 



Hpi^gwEg 



B^HI^Ega 



Melissa A Ham 
Diane Anderson 
LeAnn Ayers 
Kathy Born 
Sherry Bradburry 
NanLeigh Briehn 
Nancy Brown 
LouPat Camp 



Cindy Cates 
Karen Chambleo 
Debbie Davis 
Carolyfl Flume 
Betty Garvin 
Claudia Garretson 
Debbie Goodykoontz 
Glynda Gillespie 



Linda Gilliland 
Marsha Guess 
Carol Hammit 
Lettia Harigel 
Marilyn Harigel 
Cindy Hathaway 
Palsy Hathaway 
Sharon Hawkins 



Tiana Hayslip 
Sandra Hazelwood 
Diana Hogue 
Donna Hooper 
Terry Hughes 
Lora Hunt 
Debbie Isom 
Cindy Jacoby 



Carol Jackson 

Eren Johnson 
Joyce Kettle 
Pam King 
Beth Kethmano 
Belinda Leftwich 
Lanthia Ligon 
Drew Lyckman 



Mary McMahan 
Debbie Madden 
Susan Meade 
•Sherrie Melinder 
Susie Merrick 
Jacalyn Miller 
Jill Miller 
Buffy Moser 



Leie Nash 
Kathy Normand 
Julie Nunn 
Sharen Owen 
Kristen Pederson 
Sherry Pederson 
Barbara Ramsey 
Peggy Keddy 



Linda Rice 
Sandra Rice 
Carolyn Kieck 
Beverly Robbina 
Janice Robbina 
Cindy Roney 
Linda Russell 
Barbara Schrag 



» 




Linda Schrag 
Kathy Schroeder 
Glenda Scott 
Gayle Settle 
Juuy Shipp 
Sue Smith 
Linda Sta-aton 
Pain Siarr 
Mickey Tattan 



Joan Wagner 
Vickie Walker 
Jean Webb 
Barbara Weems 
Marts Whitsel 
Elaine Wilder 
Melissa Wilkinson 
Cary Williams 
Lynn Williams 



Mademoiselle — 45 




The Gamma Iota Chapter 

of Alpha Phi completed 

another eventful year of 

the Tech campus. Kathv 

Griffis, Commander of 

Corpsdettes, was elected to 

Who's Who in American Colleges and 

Universities. Little Sisters serving 
campus fraternities were Toni Cook, 

Little Sigma: Susan Morris. Little 
Sister of the Maltese Cross and Carol 
Newton, Little Sister of Minerva. 
Angella Clement and Gaye Finnev were on 
the Student Senate. Margaret Conrad was 
lected to be among the Homecoming Court 
f Notre Dame while Angella Clement and 
san Morris were nominated for Tech's 
lecoming Queen. Pledges were kept busy 
ighout their pledgeship with serenades, pres- 
ion, and the announcement of six new members 
f the Ivy League. Initiation, retreat. Dinner 
nee, University Sing and Fraternity Mixers high- 
lighted the rest of the year. Alpha Phi was one 
of the first organizations to adopt "Heart" as a 
national philanthropy. Gamma 
Iota Chapter participates an- 
nually in collecting for "Heart" 
on Sundays or donating blood for 
the Cardiac Aid Fund. Other Ac- 

tiviles included the alumnae 
Christmas partv. kidnap break- 
fast, and Founders Day Banquet. 
Alpha Phi sorority was founded 

at Svracuse Universitv on 

October 10. 1872. On Mondays, 

members can be .«een wearing 

bordeaux blazers w ith sil- 
ver monograms symbolizing 
the sorority colors. The 
flowers of Alpha Phi are 
Lilies of the Valleys 
and Forget-me-nots. 






46 — Ufademouelle 





pmi 

Tin? 

LiQle 
:Ctn>i 



fTccl"j 




Cheryl Allen 
Jan Book 
Linda Boon 
Vicki Boone 
Pam Bryan 
Karen Bridges 
Bette Butler 
Page Calhoun 



Marti Cantrell 
Vicki Cavin 
Linda Chaplinsky 
Mary Chapman 
Angella Clement 
Connie Collins 
Margaret Conrad 
Rose Conrad 



Toni Cooke 
Linda Cottingham 
Cathy Crutchfield 
Janet Eickhorn 
Nancy Kay Eubanks 
Cayle Evans 
Debbie Daffin 
Betsy Davis 



Linda DeMaster 
Pat Felter 
Gaye Finney 
Ariel Foster 
Molly Gallagher 
Cheryl Garrison 
Martha Gaynier 
Robin Giddings 



Ellen Gorsuch 
Kathy Griffis 
Darlann Haley 
Sandra Hicks 
Jana Hix 
D'Nan Hobgood 
Jan Holloway 
Beth Hooper 



Linda Huffinee 
Sue Hunter 
Kathi Jones 
Patty Jones 
Nancy Laino 
Lana Lewis 
Carolyn Ligon 
Melissa Liles 



Sherry Lyall 
Kae McDonald 
Kalhie McWhortcr 
Susie Miller 
Kathy Mitchell 
Donna Morris 
Laurie Morris 
Susan Morris 



Nonya Pate 
Julie Peacock 
Dede Peeler 
Barbara Perkins 
Pie Pisano 
Phyllis Pitts 
Nan.y Poteet 
Diane Range 
Candy Ratcli££ 



Renee Raymond 
Marilyn Reed 

Janie Rogers 
Beth Ryan 
Judie Shade 
Kathleen Shannon 
Ellen Shepherd 
Bette Smith 
Jeanette Snelgrove 



Becky Stubhlefield 
Betty Taylor 
CebeSue Thompson 
Vicki Truly 
Paula Turnt-y 
Pamela Tynes 
Lynn Wharton 
Terry Whitlow 
Joyce Williams 



Mademoiselle — 47 




Cki 



Ohv^O/ 



In its eighth year at Texas 

Tech, Chi Omega is one of the 

youngest sororitifs on campus. 

For this reason, Chi Omega 

is very proud of her out- 
standing members. Four sis- 
ters were chosen this year 
for Who's Who in American 
Colleges and L niversities. 
Tliese sisters were Gracie 
Sigler, Marilyn Crawley, Rene 
Brooks, and Beverly Johnson. 
Rene Brooks was also a varsity 
cheerleader, Jeneane Hartnett 
served as a majorette of the 
"Going Band from Raiderland." 
Chi Omega. Beverly Johnson was 
president of AWS. The Kappa 
Zeta Chapter have varied interests as shown 
by its active members in Angel Flight, Corps- 
dettes, and other campus organizations. Even 
in the realm of beauties. Chi Omega has many 
such as Miss Wool of Texas. Jan Green, and 
first and second runners-up for Lubbock's 
Maid of Cotton: Susie Adier, and Pam 

English, respectively. There are also 
many activities within the chapter itself. 
The fall semester brought many events for 
Chi Omega's members such as its pledge 
presentation, the "Chicken and Beans" 
Banquet. Kidnap breakfast, Christ- 
mas Paddle Party. Homecoming 
brunch, and a Christmas Party 
for orphans. There is an annual 
state convention and a biennial 
national conventir)n. along with 
fall and spring Eleusinian ban- 
quets. In the spring the major 
events are dinner dance, chapter 
retreat. Faculty Banquet, Big- 
l.ittfe Sister Rantiuet. and sing 
song. Since being founded in 
1895 at the Universitx of Arkan- 
sas, the number of Chi Omega 
collegiate chapters total lrJ2. 
Cardinal and straw represent the 

colors of the sorority, while 
the white carnation is the flower. 



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Bid" 
19 IS 



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aity 

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loial 

with 

iian- 

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ipin 

fe- 

'in: 

!in 

[kail- 

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i 

illbe 




Susie Adler 
Janice Allen 
Patty Amermao 
Peggy Amerman 
Sharon Anderson 
Margaret Baird 
Lisa Baker 
Nancy Battle 



Pris Bell 

Barbara Blanltinship 

Judy Brian 

Rene Brooks 

Dianne Byers 

Jo Camion 

Cindy Chandler 

Carol Childers 



Cindy Clark 
Susan Collings 
Marilyn Crawley 
Jan Crudgington 
Debbie Daniel 
Kathy Dankworth 
Becky Dick 
Peggy Dillard 



Cathy Dykes 

Diane tffcnberger 
Elifle Eilenberger 
Pam English 
Marilynn Filley 
Gwen Garrett 
Syd Garrett 
Jan Green 



Darrah Grier 
Peggy Guttery 
Harriet Halbert 
Carolyn Hall 
Barbara Hansen 
Jeanine Hartnett 
Lynne Heard 
Debbie Hefner 



Mindy Hodges 
Dixie Howell 
Kathy James 
Joan Jennings 
Beverly Johnson 
Tricia Joboson 
Becky Jones 
Lynne Kelley 



Diana Lelley 
Lorrains Lievens 
Jaycile Little 
Helene Loran 
Ann Mckinney 
Gayle McLarty 
Muidy Meholin 
Barbara Metcalf 



Barbara Moore 
Margo Moore 
Jane Morgan 
Martha Morgan 
Emily Morrill 
Rosemary O'Brennan 
Toya Ohlrich 
Carolyn Palmer 
Kathy Patterson 



Cheryl Phillips 
Trudy Putteet 
Susan Reeves 
Karen Rickman 
Barbara Rieck 
Pat Rose 
Brenda Royal 
Ciiidy Siebert 
Grace Sigler 



Penny Sigler 
Barbara Smith 
JoAnn Snodgrass 
Connie Sterling 
Suzie Stevick 
Barbara Thompson 
Mary Tucker 
Sue VandergrKf 
Linda Vaughan 



Jan Waffle 
Genie Watson 
Paula Whelan. 
Glen Wilcox 
Val Wilcox 
Kay Williams 
Jayne Williston 
LaYunn Wilson 
Dian Winans 



Mademoiselle — 49 




The sisters of Delta 
Delta Delta are involved 
ill every area of campus 
life. Among the nation- 
al honors received by 
Tri Deltas were Susan 
Morrissey, Bobbie Specht. 
and Peggy Wooldridge as 
Who's Who in American 

Colleges. Bobbie also « 

represents Tech as Nat- 
ional Football Centennial 
Queen. Carol Buchanan was in the top ten 

in Lubbock's Maid of Cotton contest, 
while Rita Ischam was first runner-up for 
Sigma Chi Derby Doll. For outstanding 
scholastic achievement, Susan Morrissey 
and Peggy Wooldridge were members of Mor- 
tar Board and Jan Babcock, Lou Ann Adams and Laura McElroy 
were members of Alpha Lambda Delta. Members of Angel 
Flight, Susan Glover. Kathv Thomas, and Peggy Wooldridge 
members of Corpsdettes, Carol Ann Buchanan and Bobbie 

Specht, help to support and promote the Air Force and 
Army ROTC. Those in organizations aiding and supporting 
various fraternities were Loretta Albright. Little Sister 
of the Maltese Cross. Beth Sours, Carol Story, and Peggy 
Wooldridge, Little Sisters of Minerva, and Judy Henry, 
Little Sigma. Student Union committee members are Gail 
Stiles. Gayle Snure. Carol Buchanan, Betsy Bale^, Jeanne 
Brakehill, and Janet Lott. Anne Tschoepe, and Bobbie 
Specht on the Leadership Board. Among the other 
offices and honors, Loretta Albright. Susan 
Morrissey. and Bobbie Specht served as Presidents Hostesses. 
Bobbie also represented Tri Delta on Junior Coun- 
cil and as a Tech twirler. Jan Alexander was 
elected to membership on the Freshman Council 
Evens highlighting the Tri Delta 
calendar were the Founder's Day Ban- 
quet. Pansy Breakfast, and Delta 
Week. One of the most memorable mo- 
ments for the Tri-Delta pledge cla.ss 
was the Annual Presentation Dance. 
Chapter Retreat and Scholar- 
ship Banquets also filled 
up the Tri- Delta's busy sche- 
dule. The national sorority 
was founded in IHRcl at Bos- 
ton University. There are 
now a total of 112 collegiate 
chapters of Delta Delta 
Delta. Silver, golri and 
blue signify the ' 
this sororilN 



T>dta 
"Delta 
Delta 



I 



(i 




Lou Adams 
Loretta Albright 
Jan Alexander 
Ginny Allen 
Judy Anthony 
Susan Anthony 
Audrey Astoo 
Jan Babcock 
Vicki Barlow 



Betsy Bates 
Cindi Berkham 
Beth Berry 
Ginger Blon 
Jeanne Brakebill 
Carol Buchanan 
Stephanie Cagle 
Carlita Calhoun 
Sharon Cambern 



Cathy Campbell 
Deb Campbell 
Cristy Cathey 
Pam ChristiaD 
Susie Conkling 
Jackie Cook 
Betsy Cornelius 
Cheryl Coursey 
Dottle Cox 



Claudia Crowe 
Judy Dalrymple 
Debtee Douglas 
Debbie Duncan 
Patti Englerth 
Karen t'ortenberry 
Kay Galbraith 
Susan Glover 
Barbara Gray 



Kelly Guest 
Diane Hanley 
Susie Hartt 
Julie Hendrix 
Judy Henry 
Leslie Henslee 
Melinda Holli-ngsworth 
Lynn HoUoway 
Beverly Johnstone 



Julia Jones 
Ptggy Jones 
Kalhy Kingsbury 
Lynda Lawson 
Cathy Lolt 
Janet Lolt 
Karen McCulIoh 
Marsha McCurry 
Laura McElroy 



Elizabeth McGaughey 
Kay Mcl-ntosh 
Jana Mahon 
Diana Martin 
Judy Maxey 
Melinda Morgan 
Susan Morrissey 
Virtoria Myers 
Ellen Noble 



Jackie Power 
Debbie Reed 
Delise Rice 
Gretchen Rosa 
Rob^tie Ross 
Sharon Rushing 
Pam Self 
Betty Shaddix 
Gloria Smith 



Karen Smith 
Gayle Snure 
Beth Sours 
Barbara Spechl 
Susan Stephens 
Gail Stiles 
Carol Story 
Sharon Stout 
Patii Sullivan 



Annis Tassos 
Cathy Thomas 
Gayle Thompson 
Nancy Thompson 
Ann Tipton 
Becky Trirkey 
A'on Tschoepe 
Anne Tschumy 
Melinda Walker 



Sheryl Wall 
Jan Walsh 
Sue Ward 
Christy Warren 
Sheila White 
Pat Woodul 
Peggy Wooldridge 
Wynda Woolley 
Janet Wynes 



Mademo iselle — 51 





Wearing the traditional sailor 
suit or an "I are an anchor 
clankor" sweatshirt or a pin 
in the shape of an anchor is 
the Delta Gamma girl. The 
sorority Avas founded at Lewis 
School, Oxford, Mississippi, 
in December, 1873. Designated 
as the sorority flower was 
^^ the cream rose while the 
^^1^ colors of bronze, pink and 
blue were chosen. It is not 
uncommon to find a DG reading 
to the blind as part of their 
philanthropy program. Other 
evenU keeping DG's busy include 
the Pinafore Dinner Dance and 
Fall Presentation. The Paddle 
Party, Fall retreat, Anchor 
Week in honor of new initiates, 
Big Sister-Little Sister Break- 
fast and Pillow Party are tradi- 
tions down DG way. Senior, 
Susan Hancock, represented her 
sorority and Tech in the Sun 

Bowl at El Paso this year. 
Tia Taylor and Linda Young 
served as Air Force ROTC 
sweethearts while Linda Schwab 
and Dinah Doty were chosen 
Army ROTC sweethearts. The 
beginning of the school year 
pledges in shape practicing 
for Fiji Olympics and Sigma 
Chi Derby Day— yet the practice 
paid off for the sorority 
captured second place in both 
events. Barbara Horseman, 
Becky Smith, and Vicki Vannoy 
served on Freshman Council while 
Darla Duval, Sherry Hartman and 
Carol Carnes worked on Sub 
Committees. Little Sisters in- 
clude Debbie Worde. Ann Hartlett. 
Karen Kerr, Little Sigmas, and 
Tia Taylor, Sister of Minerva. 
,inda Lanier, Linda Young and 
Jharon Teesdale helped recruit 
[or Tech and Theresa Lowrance 
entertained as Feature Twirler 
at Tech games this year. 



Delta 
Qamma 



52 — Mademoiselle 



• 



Jane Ayera 
Ann Bartlett 
Lorrie Bartle 
Ami Benoit 
Janice Berry 
Terry Byerley 
Beverly Calhoun 
Cathy Callan 



Carroll Carnes 
Carolyn Collette 
Nancy Craig 
Dinah Doty 
Becky Dunlap 
Darla Duval 
Sharon English 
Dani Eubamks 



Gail Finch 
Naniy Flack 
Debbe Gibbe 
Paula Hale 
Jimmie Hall 
Kathy Hancock 
Susan Hancock 
Susan Harris 



Sherry Hartmao 
Julianne Hatt 
Gail Haueisen 
Susan Hayaca 
Susan Henderson 
Marilyn Herberger 
Barbara Horsman 
Cathy Hunley 



Ann Hybskmaon 
Debbie Justice 



Patricia Lambert 



Lynda Lanier 
Maurene Lloyd 
Theresa Lowrance 




LeAnn McMinn 
Dcbye Markham 
Debbie Medlin 
Debbie Morgan 



Nancy Newman 



Donna Patterson 
Patsy Patton 
Dawn Pemberton 
Beverly Peters 
Beth Pipkin 
Dthorah Pittman 
Diane Pounds 
Debbie Price 
Kay Rannefeld 



Carol Roberts 
Kit Robitison 
Georgann Rodgerg 
Jo Ann Riley 
Linda Schwab 
Sandra Scoggins 
Celeste Shelton 
Claire Shelton 
Becky Smith 



Jean Sosnowy 
Leah Squyers 
Jan Stephenson 
Janie Stone 
Julie Surrey 
Mitzi Sutton 
Vi..ki Swasey 
Tia Taylor 
Sharon Teesdale 



Suzy Terry 
Carroll Todd 
Vicki Vannoy 
Coni Virdeli 
Beverly Willingham 
Martha Woodall 
Karen Woody 
Debbie Worde 
Linda Young 



Mademoiselle — 53 







B^ 



Founded at Syraciis 

Nov. 11, 1874, Gaiiiina Phi Beta is a sisterhood 

of 96 hnks stretched across the L'.S. and 

Canada. The sorority owns and operates two 

summer camps for underprivileged girls at 

Vancouver, Brilish Columbia, and Indian Hills. 

Colo. Outstanding events on the Gamma Phi 

calendar ate Founder's Day Banquet. Pledjie 

Retreal. Fall Presentation. Spring Dinner 
Dance, Ski retreat. Paddle Partv. Christinas 
party, and monthly class-sponsored dinners. 
The Gamma Phis won the spirit trophy at Sigma 
Chi Derby Day in the fall. The group is represen- 
ted on lilt- legislative councils in Weeks. Gates, 
Stangel and Knajip Halls. Ruth Stiider is treasurer 
in Knapp. Members of CorpsDettes are Sharon Mclntyre. 
Chnstv Chapman. Carolyn Keeter and Betty Supina. 
Angel Flight members are f)ianne .\hers and Jackie 
Williams. Rebecca Young, president of the chapter. 
is managing editor of the I niversily Daily. Christy 
Chapman is Mademoiselle editor and Pallv McKinney 
is Sophomore Vieu editor of the La Veiilana. 
Eight other Gamma Phi's are yearbook staffers. 
Lilt 1 he Shield arc Marilyn Foster 

and Jeaii >ii bniin~. Lin Bowen and Jan Markhani are 
Little Sisters of Sigma Chi. Stephanie Rouiui is 
on the Presidi ' i tiiitlee. and Jackie Phillips 
is on II Committee. Lin 

Bowcii. I)ehbie Dver and Betty 
Supin^^ffiTf fill i|i-i- in rlif V-i--\ 

Dr^K. 

KendnB^^ nn,\ii.'-i in mi.-~ Ai.idc- 

moiselle. and Miss Wellingfon title 

holdei|?aiid \! ■ dd was runner- 

u|»t> Mi" I ite. Marilyn 

Foster received the Panhellanic 

Scholarship, and Rebecca Young 

won the Thela Sigma Phi Scholarship. 

Alpha Lambda Delta members are 

Marilyn Foster an<l Cunl 

llsry. and Marilvn is also 

a member of Junior Council. 

Women's Day Chairman is 

Cnroi Lsrv and Greek Week 

Cli linnan was Pa(t\ McKinney. 

("hristy Chapman was an 

Athletic Recruiter and 

International Hostess. 



f 







t 



I 



54 — Mademoiselle 




Efun?! 




Patti A^dersoD 
Elaine Baker 
Debbie Beadle 
Add Biehteio 
Lin Brown 
Barbara Bowenock 
Cell a Brow 



Jo Deane Brown 
Karen Carameroa 
Christy Chapman 
Fran Chatmas 
Christy Coffman 
Patty Crosby 
Cindy Davis 



Kalhey Denton 
Monte Dodd 
Katherine Dunn 
Judy Durham 
Debbie Dyer 
Fay Evans 
Mickie Evans 



Susan Evans 
Joyce Fischer 
Katby Fischer 
Marilyn Foster 
Jancy Ginn 
Carol Harrison 
Marilyn Horn 



Mary Irgens 
Betty Ruth Jackson 
Karen Jenkins 
Jedda Jones 
Mary Johnson 
SusftD Johnson 
Vicki Johnson 




Carolyn Keeter 
Mickye Kendrick 
Debbie Kerr 
Dianne King 
Kathy Knox 
Becky Lacy 
Linda Longacre 
Diane McArtbur 



Charlotte McClelland 
Jean McGinnis 
Sharon Mclntyro 
Carol McKinney 
Patty McKinney 
Liz McNeill 
Stormy Newsome 
Pam Parker 



Lee Perry 
Jackie Phillips 
Nancy Pinto 
Margie Plaeger 
Linda Rice 
Connie Richardson 
Sharon Riddick 
Susie Ries 



Stephanie Round 
Donna Schwertner 
Cindy Seybert 
Robbie Springer 
Jill Stansell 
Ruth Studer 
Betty Supina 
Susan Sword 



Sandy Thrash 
Carol Usry 
Susan Warner 
Jackie Williams 
Jo Anne Wilson 
Judy Young 
Rebecca Young 
Diana Zimmerman 



^ 



Mademoiselle — 55 








The year 1970 marks one hundred years for 
Kappa Alpha Theta. In Jujie 1970, represen- 
tatives of the Gamma Phi Chapter wiil anend 
the National Centennial Convention in Corona 

Del Mar, California. Thetas from tlic 08 
chapters in America and Canada will celebrate 
the centennial birthday of Kappa Alpha Theta. 
The Gamma Phi Chapter of Terh was initialed 

April 25, 1953. Some of th.- Thetas in Mor- 
tar Board, honorary for senior women, inclu- 
ded Cherry Walker, Nena Huffaker. Barb Dur- 
ham, social chairman: and Kate Gully, secre- 
tary; Bretza Clark. 
Katliryn Ann Baker, Bets\ 
Bond. Cathy Condrey, social 
chairman: Katie Upshaw, 
membership chairman: Gav 
Shaniblin, AWS representa- 
tive: and Bonnie Craddick, treasurer: were selected 
as member of Junior Council, honorary for junior 
women. Melinda Mackay, Anne Cocanougher. Barbara 
Upshaw. Karen Jessup, Susan Clayton, Kaye Milliard, 
and Amy Hammer, initiation chairman; are current mem- 
bers of the freshman honorary. Alpha Lambda Delia. 
Thelas were also involved in other aspects of univrr.-.ity 

life. Leadership in residence halU kepi Kiillir\ n Ann 

Baker busy as president of Chitwood, Evel>n Ne.^eslra. 

vice president Q|:,Chitwood: Sally Swatzell. president of 

Stangel: Shellv Shelton: \' Mont of Cale^. I. 

Pharr. advisorv < li;iirman of ' ': und Su«an ( 

AWS rep I .ofW;)ll:K!i ivin, who served 

as secret i Betsy f3ond, v, i. . ..,1 a.« treasurer, 

contributed to AWS goveniinji council. Kalhy Coleman was 

Maid of Cotton finalist. Student Senators that served for Terh 

Union was a characteristic of Flower Pring. Am\ Hammer. 

and Ton Wulfjen. .Sharon Moss was chosen .Signia Chi Derby 

Doll, while Sallv Rackets reicned as Pike Dream Girl. I.vn 

Eldridfre was selected Sigma Delta Chi Rose Queen. Pam Kirk was 

a homecoming queen finalist. Mar-ha Shaver represented the 

South Plains as Maid of Cotton and Barbara Drake was also a 

Maid of Cotton finalist. Student .Senators that served for Tech 

were Bonnie Craddick. Susan Clayton, and Shelly Shellon. 



c 



• 



' 



56 — Mademoisei 





ISIB 






i^iS^H 










Hie 



Kathryn Baker 
Neisha Bell 
Betsy Bond 
Betsy Brown 
Bonnie Brown 
Breody Browne 
Judy Bruyere 
Betty Bryan 
Elizabeth Cavin 



Susan Chenault 
Bretza Clark 

Susan Clayton 
Camilla Cobb 
Anne Cocanougher 
Kathy Coleman 
Cathy Condrey 
Lindy Cook 
Pat Cox 



Bonnie Craddick 
Shayne Curtis 
Elizabeth Denton 
Elaine Dilbeck 
Gay Dobbs 
Barbara Drake 
Barbara Durham 
Lynn Eldridge 
Becky Ellison 



Cindy Elwell 
Karen Ford 
Regina Gayle 
Jane Gulley 
Kate Gully 
Amy Hammer 
Suzie Hardin 
Rosemary Harrison 
Jeanne Hatcher 



Melody Hiatt 
Kaye Hilliard 
Peggy Holden 
Mari Huffaker 
Nena Huffaker 
Jim Jackson 
Karen Jessup 
Judy Kilcrease 
Beverly Kilness 



Pamela Kirk 
Patty Kleioknecht 
Tricia Kutner 
Jill Lanham 
Anne Leon 
Mary McDonald 
Patricia McNally 
Melinda Mackay 
Janie Mayfield 



Becky Meason 
Sharon Moss 
Carla Napier 
Evelyn Nesrsla 
Paula Norris 
Betty O'Brien 
Jean Pharr 
Flower Pring 
Koreen Prochnow 



Doodie Ramsey 
Pan Ann Reavis 
Betty Reeburg 
Linda Riek 
Aone Ritchie 
Betsy Rountree 
Pam Scale 
Rosemary Scale 
Gay Shamblin 



Marsha Shaver 
Shelly Shellon 
Harriet Snider 
Suzi Sterling 
Gayle Swatzell 
Sally Swatzell 
Susan Swatzell 
Melyna Trimmier 
Barbara Upshaw 



Katie Upshaw 
Katie Updike 
Cherry Walker 
Laurelyn Wallace 
Ginger Wheat 
Sarah Wheat 
Susan Wiggs 
Lou Wulfjen 
Gay Yamini 



Mademoiselle — 57 



kappa 
Kappa 



Qamma 



% 



The "girls who wear the 
key" look ahead in leader- 
ship, activities, and 
scholarship. 
Special annual chapter 
events include pledge 
presentation, ski retreat 
to Santa Fe, and Scholar- 
ship Banquets. This year 
bars served as presidents of many campus organi- 
tions: Tech Union-Jessica Jones, WRC-Judy Jen- 
tins, Mortarboard-Diane Hatchett, and Jr. Council- 
KCindy Willoughby. Presidents Hostesses were Susan 
Boone. Diane Hatchett. Carla Dunn. Jessica Jones, 
Cindy Willoughby. and Judy Jenkins. Kappas in 
Angel Flight included Susan Boone. Judy Clark, 
Cindy Dykes Susan Goering, Bev Jones, Sharon 
Michie, and Laura Murray. Althea Allison and Peggy 
Kincannon served as Senators. Busy Kappas are in- 
volved in many University honorary organizations. 
Carla Dunn, Diane Hatchett. Judy Jenkins, Jessica 
Jones, and Peggy Kincannon were recogniz- 
ed in Who's Who in American Universities. 
Those in Alpha Lambda Delia included 
Debbie Boyd, Mki Bowinias, Judy Clark, 

Anita Powell, Jeannie Smith. Jeannie 

Griffith, and Debbie Wright. Those chosen 

for Jr. Council were Susan Goering, Patty 

Owen, and Cindy Willoughby. Mortarboard 

members were Carla Dunn. Diane Hatchett, 

and Judy Jenkins. Penny White served 
as varsity cheerleader, and Debliie Wright 
was a Tech twirler. Kappas served 
as fraternity little sisters. Kappa 
Pickers sing and entertain at various 
functions. The Delta Psi Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma 
was honored witli their province's Scholar- 
ship Award and Carla Dunn, chapter presi- 
dent, was recipient of a city Panheilanic 
Scholarship, as well as a 
Kappa national scholarship. 
The Ka])pas at Texas Tech 
look back to a creative, 
active year and to 100 
years of a vital history, 
but most of all, they look 
ahead to years of new op- 
portunities to serve this 
University. 



58 — Madtmoiitttt 



m 



m 




i 










PBH^S 




* RSSiB 



Althea Allisoa 
Deanna Allison 
Cynthia Baitey 
Debra Bailey 
Hedy Bailey 
Caodace Baker 
Claudia Barclay 
Cecilia Blackwell 
Gere Blakeway 



Judy Blanchard 
Caroline Bog^ 
Susan Boone 
Ann Bostick 
Nike Boumias 
Deborah Boyd 
Beth Brownlesa 
Carolyn Byrd 
Judy Clark 



Paula Clements 
Gayle Condray 
Mary Conner 
Susan Crews 
Cheryl Decker 
Nancy Douglas 
Carla Dunn 
Cindy Dykes 
Judy Ellis 



Ann Farmer 
Beth Gibbons 
Susan Goering 
Bitsy Goforth 
Jeanie GriffiUi 
Judy Hamby 
Rebel Harper 
Mimi Haralson 
Diane Hatchett 



Marjorie Hodgson 
Susan Hord 
Holly Huber 
Pam Jarvia 
Judy Jenkins 
Barbara Jones 
Beverly Jones 
Jackie Janes 
Jill Jones 



Peggy KincannoD 
Chris King 
Janice King 
Nancy Langley 
Janet McCurtney 
Katfay McKissack 
Betsy McKinley 
Teri McKinley 
Melody McNeil 



Diane Martin 
Sharon Michie 
Sheryl Moffet 
Marcia Moran 
Coco Motley 
Linda Murfee 
Susan Murphy 
Laura Murray 
Barbara Newsome 



Linda Ottinger 
Patty Owen 
Trish Pinson 
Janis Plumlee 
Anita Powell 
Nancy Ridgeway 
Carol Rivera 
Mary Roark 
Darla Rose 



Nancy Runnioa 
Stephanie Shackelford 
Jeannie Smith 
Sally Smith 
Sharon Smith 
Cathy Spoon ts 
Cathy Vernon 
Betsy Walker 
Sid Wallingford 



Kay Ward 
Penny White 
Anne Whittington 
Patty Wight 
Julie Wilkinson 
Cindy Willoughby 
Deb Wright 
Debbie Wright 
Sandra Young , 



Mademoiselle — 59 




Since it was founded in 1? 
Phi Mu has continued to extenc 
her hand to girls in search 
5^ of sisterhood. Phi Mu encour- 
ages her members to get in- 
volved in the campus activi- 
ties that can mean so much to 
one's college memories. At 
state Convention last year. 
Alpha Chi Chapter won the 
award for Be.st Achievement. 
Why? Because each memher of 
Alpha Chi Chapter has worked hard to make 
her chapter the best in the stale. This 
can be readily seen hy the number of Phi 
Mus that are active in campus activities. 
In campus leadership Anita Bell served as 
Third Vice-President of AWS and Vice-Pres- 
ident of Girl Scouts. Anne Stout was Panhellan- 
ic delegate and was awarded Best Member of Pan 
j^ hellanic. the firs! time such an award was given, 
i June Mayo was Social Chairman and AWS Represen- 
tative for Panhelianic. Phi Mu participated in 
various other campus activilies and honoraries. 
Ann Ayres was a member of Mu Plii Epsilon. Anita 
and June were President's Hostesses. Anita was 
also on Student-Faculty Conimittee. Rosita Bloom 
and Carolvn Fralin were members of Gamma Alpha Chi. 
Mary Feagin served in Phi Gamma Nu and in the 
National Collegiate Association for Secretaries. 
Linnie Gilbertson was a legislator in Knapp. In 
Corpsdettes were Barbara Reynolds, Janeen Kaline, 
and Ann Strawhorn. Jnne Mayo and Laura Fohler 
were chosen hy the .Alpha Tau Omegas and the Phi 
Kappa P.sis. respectively, to be in their "Little 
Sister" organizations. Laura was also in Angel 
Flight. Laura Stout was in Tau Beta Sigma 
and five Phi Mu's were on Sub Committees. 
Project Hope was Phi Mu's philanthropy, 
and each year they give a Christmas party 
at Lubbock's State School. 




I 



i 



Phi 
Mu 




60 — Mademoiselle 






i 



lips. 




Cindy Adams 
Mary Sue Allcire 
Donna Allen 
Shelia Andrews 
Ann Ayes 
Gail Baker 
Janie Barrett 



Celia Bazar 
Anita Bell 
Rosita Bloom 
Cathy Brown 
Linda Crurapton 
Carolyn Dersch 
Barbara Faubion 




Mary Feagin 
Carolyn Fralin 
Linda Gitbertson 
Susie Glover 
Martha GoUihar 
Pam Hale 
Ida Hinchey 




Donna Johnson 
Janeen Kalina 
Nancy Kimbrough 
Lou LeBourveau 
Debby McCrachen 
June Mayo 
Jo Ann Merrill 




Lee Meshier 
Cindy O'Neil 
Victoria Outlaw 
Laura Pohler 
Anita Powell 
Barbara Reynolds 
Ana Riddell 



m 




Annette Rollins 
Sally Snedal 
Viveca Sonberg 
Cynthia Stevens 
Ann Stout 
Laura Stout 
Ann Strawhorn 



Sharon Sudburg 
Sandy Thornburgh 
Margaret Timmons 
Jane Todd 
Kay Walker 
Barbara Werckle 
Marilyn Wood 



Mademoiselle — 61 



I ^ 




62— Mademoiselle 




Pi ma Phi 



#1 



The girls that wear the "arrow" 
involved themselves in many 
campus organizations. The 
year began with many individu- 
al recognitions: Karon Johnson, 

as Student Body Secretary, 
Chris Mills and Barbee Ander- 
son as Student Senators. Rhonda 

Lewis as Varsity Cheerleader, 
and Pat Bland as freshman cheer- 
leader. Two seniors. Lynn 
Cox and Karen Johnson, were 
listed among Tech's Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities. Karen was also 
selected to be a President's Hostess. Dorel 
Payne served as president of Tech's Panhell- 
anic Council, while Barbara Zimmerman and 
Sheila Watkins twirled for football fans 
each week. Barbara also reigned as 
Homecoming Queen for Tech. Melaine Mont- 
gomery reigned as Angel Flight'* Miss Top 
Flight. Chickie Morgan served Weeks Hall 
a? president. In September, coinbined 
efforts by the pledges won first place in 
Fiji OKnipics and competition continued 
while building the homecoming float. 
Other activities included this fall were 
chapter retreat. Pledge Presentation, 
Founder's Day Banquet, Monmouth Duel, and 

spring dinner-dance. Members raised sup- 
port monev thi< year to support the Arrowmart 
Crafts Center in Gatlinburg. Tennessee. Pi 
Beta Phi also presents two girls with the 
Dianna Dor.sey Scholarship. The sorority was 
founded at Monmouth College, April 28, l')67. 
The Texas Gamma Chapter is |)roud to be one of 
the 11.? Chapters of Pi Beta Phi. The 

sororitv colors are wine and silver 
blue, while their insignia is a golden 
arrow with Greek letters inscribed on 
[• ilhers. The chapter philanthropy is 
contributing to the founding and main- 
tenance of the Pi Beta Phi 
Settlement School in Gatlinburg, 
Tennessee. 



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loneoi 



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Barbee Andertoo 
Trisha Bell 
Judy Barnett 
Debbie Barclar 
Jaoet Bell 
Martha BergmanD 
Jan Berry 
Pat Bland 
Cynthia Boyd 



Blaine Burton 
Barbara Cain 
Susan Calhey 
Anne Chambers 
Cynthia Clark 
Kathryn Clinton 
Gail Cornett 
Lynn Cox 
Nancy Craig 



Suzy Doraey 
Betty Duffield 
Suian Edwarda 
Patti Elder 
Susan Ferris 
Sharon Ford 
Kim Cilbreath 
JoAnne Gray 
Kathy Hale 



Marlane Handly 
Jill Hanna 
Candy Haralson 
Janice Harrod 
Jane Hastings 
Janis Hawks 
Claudia Haynes 
Ann Hearn 
Marjan Heek 



Karen Heffner 
Janet Heineman 
Kay Holmes 
Pam Hooser 
Karen Johnson 
Patsy Johnson 
Libby Kaelber 
Patii Kidwell 
Nancy Kupp 



Julie Lawson 
DeTora Lewis 
Gail Lewis 
Rhonda Lewis 
Loretta Lowe 
PeeWee Luke 
Linda McBrid 
Ellen McDaniel 
Diane McDougal 



Patty McFarland 
Devon McKlnney 
Lynn Mariner 
Barbara Martin 
Vicki Martin 
Carol Miksch 
Chris Mills 
Ann Monroe 
Diane Montgomery 



Dianne Montgomery 
Melanie Montgomery 
Chickie Morgan 
Janie Muenzler 
Dorel Payne 
Kathy Potts 
Mandy Proll 
Sue Ratliff 
Mary Jane Rose 



Susan Rosser 
Suzy Rutledge 
Maggie Scott 
Jo Sealey 
Phyllis Simmons 
Shay Slack 
Connie Smith 
Stephanie Stafford 
Bryce Stone 



Vicki Storseth 
Kay Suddutb 
Sue Sudduth 
Sallie Tarkington 
Kit Volkel 
June Waggoner 
Betty Waller 
Becky Wallace 



Sheila Watkina 
Janis Watts 
Pam Whitten 
Jo Wbyman 
Jan Wilson 
Penne Wilson 
Caria Wright 
Barbara Zimmerman 



MademoUgUe—^ 



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The Sigma Kappa Sororii 

founded at Colby College', - 

November 9, 1874. The violet 

was adopted as the official 

flower and the colors of 

lavender and maroon were chosen. 

The Sip;ina"s interest in |)hi- •; 

lanthropy was displayed this 
year as they helped sponsor 
the Tuberculosis Drive in Lub- 
bock. As a special project 
with Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity, 
Sigma Kappas took children from the Lubbock 
Children's Home to the movies on Saturday 
mornings. The October Presentation of 
Pledges was held at the Red Raider Convention 
Center, followed by a Gay Nineties Ball. 
Other highlights of the year included 
Scholarship Banquets, Founder's Day Banquet, the pledge 
Levi Party for all other Greek pledges, the Christmas 
party and the Big-Little Sister Paddle Party. The 
busy year was brought to an end with Sing-Song, Dinner 
Dance, Senior Breakfast and a Candy Party given by 
engaged seniors. Sigma Janis Jones represented the 
sorority as a member of the Homecoming 

Court this year. 
Other Sigmas engaged in campus organiza- 
tions include Claire Blumel, secretary of 
Sigma Tau Delta and president of Kappa Tau ^ - 
Alpha; Nancy McCarthy, member of both Pi 
Omega Pi and Phi Gamma Nu. Serving as 
legislators in their dormitories include 
Susan White, Jill Tooley and Sharon Ebanks. 
Rosalyn Davis is a member of Junior Council 
and Rosanna Banner represented the Freshman 
class on Freshman Council. Lynn Salsberry 
was selected for Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic 
honorary, as well as belonging to Mu Phi 
Epsiion and the Tech Choir. 



igma 
_ Kappa 



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Jan Adler 
Betsy Austin 
Debbie Baker 
Rosaoa Banner 
Claire Bluemel 
Cathy Bering 
Susan Berry 
LeLauri-n Brown 



Cherry Browning 
Jenny Browning 
Lanny Buck 
Becky Bui^eas 
Jan Causay 
Kathy Clapa 
Laura Cline 
Ellen Clower 



Johnelle Colluxa 
Celia Cooper 
Marcia Coulter 
Patty Craig 
Pam Curbo 
Rosalyn Davis 
Claudia Dedman 
Pam Dodd 



Kathleen Doherty 
Jane Ann Duncan 
Ann Dysart 
Sharon Eubanks 
Pat Godwin 
Carmen Creathouie 
Linda Cuber 
Jani Gunn 



Nancy Houghton 
Jan Jackson 
Nancy Jolly 
Janis Jones 
Betty Kearney 
Debbie Lawrence 
Carole Leifesto 
Linda Levens 



!!• 




Ellen Lewis 
Karen McBride 

Nancy McCarthy 
Susie McClure 
Susan McKinney 
Karen Matthews 
Charlotte Miller 
Elaine Minor 



Jodie Mishler 
Gerri Montgomery 
Melissa Morgan 
Jaiia Muller 
Debbie Neinast 
Laurie Nelson 
Sue Nichols 
Paula Patterson 



Mary Pearson 
Debbie Phillips 
Pam Pickens 
Susan Pickett 
Janet Pope 
Nora Powell 
Jai-kie Purkey 
Joyce Robertson 



GraceAnna Rowland 
Dinah Salyars 
Lynn Saulsbury 
Carol Ann Scarboro 
Sherry Shields 
Jan'et Shotion 
Nancy Shotton 
Debbie Smith 
Judy Smyers 



Debbie Sorrella 
Jill Tooley 
Debbie Waldrop 
Jackie Weise 
JoAnne Weis 
Ellen Welsh 
Susan While 
Dorothy Wildenatein 
Nancy Young blood 



Mademoiselle — 65 





Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority was 
founded Oct. 15, 1898, at Long- 
wood College, Farmville, Va. 
The Zetas on the Tech campus 
are involved in scholastic 
endeavors, civic work and campus 
activities. Zetas found in 
the Student Senate include 
Brenda Hill. froiTi the College 
of Home Economics, and 
Cameo Jones, from the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 
Lynn Hamilton serves as chairman of 
the Senate Government Operations 
and Relations Committee. Serving 
Union committees are Jan Jones, Jody 
Holder and Jeanne Campbell. Leslie 
Daniels, Brenda Drake, Pam Davis, 
Jeanne Campbell and Jamie Smith are legis- 
lators. Members of Freslmian Council are 
Robyn Brownlee and Cindy Conwav. Presi- 
dent of Horn Hall and a member of Alpha 
Lambda Delta is Mary McKeever. Other 
members of this freshman's honorary include 
Debbie Dickerson and Jeanne Campbell. 
Little Sisters of Minerva inrlude Jane 
Cornelison, Karen Peftigrew. Jan 
Milholland and Cameo Jones. Two Zetas 
are Little Sigmas. Rrenda Hill and 
Lynn Hamilton. Claudia Harrell is a 

Little Sister of the Shield. In 

civic work, Zetas collect for Cerebral 

Palsy drives, their national philan- 

thropv, and the March of Dimes. 

Thev also collect food for a needy 

family in Lubbock at Thanksgiving. 

Other honors won by Zetas include 

first place in Sigma Chi Derby Day 

and a finalist in the Mi«s Mademoiselle 

Contest, Candie Marcum. Cindy Saied 

is reigning as Miss Whealheurt of 

the Nation and Tera Nettles was a 

finalist in the >''-- '^"tlon pageant. 



Zcta 
Zau 



66 — Mademoiselle 



!• 




Suzie Allen 
Laurie Andenoo 
Carolyn Arlington 
Jane Aston 
Beth Atwood 
Debbie Bearden 
Diane Bernson 
Debbie Black 



Beckye Boase 
Janet Buchanan 
Claudia Campbell 
Jeanne Campbell 
Molly Cannon 
Mary Colaccino 
Patsy Colwell 
Cindy Conway 



Joan Cook 
Margie Cope 
Jane CorneJison 
Kathy Crawford 
Leslie Daniel 
Margie Dstu 
Paro Davia 
Debbie Dickeraoo 



Brenda Drake 
Debbie Duncan 
Margie Evaoa 
Laura Fender 
Cindy Finney 
Jan Griffin 
Debbie Hamilton 
Lyn Hamilton 



Pal Harper 
Claudia Harrel 
Lynn Hefflefinger 
Brenda Hill 
Debbie Houghton 
Judy Holder 
Jamie Hough 
Paula Howell 



Cameo Jonea 
Jan Jones 
Gail Johnson 
Keffie Keffe« 
Patsy Kfmpaoo 
Debbie Kisler 
Linda Lambart 
Leslie Liem 



Nancy Long 
Connie Lowry 
Karen McCulley 
Mary McKeever 
Betgy McLarly 
Debbie Meddert 
Jan Milholland 
Ka-ndie Marcum 



Janice Nelson 
Lera Nettlet 
Debbie Novelli 
Leslie Porter 
Judy Price 
J'Lynn froctor 
Sandy Ratnaejr 
Susan Kichards 




Cindy Saied 
Paula Salient 
Judy Schmidt 
Sherrun Schmidt 
Mary Schwartxkopf 
Jan Shepard 
Brenda Smith 
Jamie Smith 
Joan Stuaer 



Chris Tassos 
Jane Thompson 
Betsy Turcotlo 
Phyllis Watts 
Jane Whitfill 
Jane Williams 
Debbie Wilson 
Susan Wiseheart 
Betty Witcher 



Mademoiselle — 67 



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Only you have the motlier seed. Cherish it. 

You are GodV symbol of perpetuation — 

this is your gift. 
•Treasure it, for this is a prize of eternity. 

You are a woman — 

it is you first who are responsible 
•lor democracy, freedom of honesty, 

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1001 UNIVERSITY • ROBBY's NORTH 

FOR WOMEN 




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PLAYBILL 



A new addition 
to the 19 7 
PLAYBOY magazine is the article 
surveying "The Girls of Tech." A 
random selection of some of the uni- 
versity's most comely coeds is presented 
on pages 3-11. Head lensman Darrel 
Thomas, captured the innocent but eager 
personalities of the 15 beauties. 

Each year Sigma Delta Chi, the 
professional journalism society, spon- 
sors the Miss Mademoiselle-Miss Play- 
mate contest which brings out Tech's 
most poised and stunning women. As 
in the past, the event drew to a close 
with two winners, but we think you 
will agree that the nine runners-up are 
just as eye appealing on page 30. 

That Sonny and Cher are two of 
the most gracious entertainers in the 
rock field today is evidenced through 
the "Playboy Interview" on page 28. 
The duo enraptured an enormous home- 
coming audience after discussing several 
of their personal hang-ups with PLAY- 
BOY. 

Adorning PLAYBOY'S 1970 gate- 
fold is Miss Mary Beth Johnson, who 
captured the Miss Playmate crown. And 
don't pass up "Playboy After Dark," 
a two page run-down on the rambunc- 
tious world of the Tech male. 

Fraternities as well as other men's 
organizations have traditionally ap- 
peared in the magazine. The Interfrater- 
nity Council, which governs the social 
fraternities, and the Men's Residence 
Council, guardian of men's dorms, are 
reviewed on pages 33 and 14. 



Two interesting celebrities made 
whirlwind tours of the campus this 
year . . . Miss Roxanne Piatt, and An- 
drew Fabacher (John Holland). Miss 
Piatt appeared as Miss March of 1968 
in the national publication of PLAY- 
BOY, and she came to Tech for a guest 
appearance at a local men's shop. 
Fabacher, famed for his fight to change 
Jax beer to Fabacher, took many recruits 
during Greek Week, who sponsored his 
visit. Even though Lubbock has a 
rather dry reputation, Fabacher was 
willing to take on the entire thirsty 
population if the occasion arose. 



Many hours have gone into the 
publication of this magazine. Thanks to 
PLAYBOY magazine for graciously al- 
lowing us to follow their format. In- 
spiration goes a long way especially 
when the source generates from Sheila 



Looney and Elaine Saul, co-editors of 
the La Ventana. Quality photographs 
are the result of tedious hours spent in 
the darkroom. Richard Mays, Jeff 
Lawhon, Bob Darby, and Mike Warden 
came through in times of need. 

John LaGrone, Barbara Metcalf, 
Becky Dick, Cliff Willis, Joe Pareti, 
and Susan Jenkins supplied the section 
with the elbow-grease necessary to get 
the job done. 



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Tom Scott 




Joe Pareti 



Becky Dick 



Playboy — 1 



LA VENTANA 1970 

PLAYBOY. 

CONTENTS FOR THE MEN'8 ENTERTAINMENT • 

MAGAZINE 

Girls of Tech 3 

Men's Residence Council 14 

Men's Dormitories 15 

Cher 28 

Playboy Interview 28 

Playmate Runners-Up 38 

Miss Playmate 1970 40 

sr^^^s?? Interfraternity Council 30 

Dorms 15 Fratemlty Little Sisters 34 

Social Fraternities 32. 40 

>c^rMJ«H^^nM Alpha Phi Omega 66 

AX ' ^5f-l I Chi Rho 68 

"^ ^ ""^ Delta Sigma Pi 70 

Fraternitjes 40 

|^^Ha|^^^H Saddle Tramps 72 

J^p ^ ^H National Association of College 
^P^l^^^fl & University Residence Halls 76 

^^ 1^ Playboy After Dark 78 

Circle K 80 

Playmates }0 

Sheila Looney, Elaine Saul— co-editors Ray McWilliams, art editor 

Bill Dean, publications director Jean Finley, business manager 

Darrel Thomas, head photographer Janice Aldridgc, seaetary 

2—Pi(tihoy 





THE (alULS 
OF TEEH 



pproximately 330 miles 
west of Dallas, Texas, 
nestled between two 
mesquite shrubs and an 
infinite number 
of dust mounds, lies 
Texas Tech University. 
The climate is both 
semi-arid and 
conservative. 
Boasting few radicals, 
and even fewer hippies, 
the educational system 
churns out over 3,200 
graduates annually. 
"I came to Tech because 
of the atmosphere," 
quipped one sprite 
coed. A few leave 
for the same reason. 
Under a 98 degree 
umbrella of scorching 
West Texas sun 7,104 
women made the trek 
to Tech this August. 
They came from almost 
everywhere . . . Houston, 
Dallas, El Paso, Corpus 
Christi, Turkey (Texas), 
and Ankara (Turkey.) 
The Tech woman realizes 
her significance in 
the power of persuasion 
since 14 are student 
Senators of the campus 
government. She can 
operate on 1.3 cat 
cadavers, or 
sit through an hour 
lecture concerning 
the Malthusian 
Theory of Overpopulation. 
Budweiser, GPA, the 
Yellow Route, dorm 
food, and Charcoal 
Cody fulfill her 
deepest desires. 
But PLAYBOY prefers 
to take you on a pictorial 
rather than written sojourn 
with The Girls of Tech. 



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1. Carolyn Hyrd 

2. Lou Tliurm.in 

3. KcfficKtfftr 

4. Eli/abclh Suplna 





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Playboy— 7 



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1. Patricia Pinson 

2. Diana Ho/;ue 
J. Cynthia Saied 




8 -Playboy 



THE QIRLS 



Whether racing to class on a chilly 
autumn morning or sipping hot choco- 
late at the Tech Union, the girls of 
Tech have no problem in acquiring male 
companions. Approximately 11,759 men 
have the responsibility of satisfying the 
7,731 women that trek to Tech each fall. 

After the decision allowing women 
21 years or older to inhabit off campus, 
apartment life has taken an upswing as 
the liberated woman cashes in on the 
advantages of the new haven. Without 
the nuisance of time restrictions or 



turious dorm mothers, the girls of Tech 
enjoy ,1 ptTso-ial life with no side ef- 
fects. 

Although no st.itistlcs are available 
as to the effect this new system has had 
on grade points, it is certain that apart- 
ment life has contributed infinitely to a 
more m.iturc social life. 



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Playboy— 9 




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orms Enter New Era 






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Housing has become an issue with 
the Tech male. Approximately 3,4S'i 
men h've in the nine residence halls, 
while the remaining 7,737 inhabit off- 
campus. (This estimate includes all 
married men and graduate students.) 

The dorms have made se\eral efforts 
to entice men to stay on campus. 
Weight equipment, snack bars, and 
study areas are provided in many of the 
newer h.ills. 

Hach residence hall is organized into 
a student association which assists in ° 
the government of the dorm, and 
sponsors activities ranging from dorm 
mixers to tutoring services. Both intra- 
mural sports and scholastic competition 
are encouraged. 

Carpenter hall captured the scholar- 
ship trophy in 1968 and 1969, thus 
surpassing the other dorms for the 



highest grade point average. ^^^g0m^' 
ous study room is the newest addition 
to Wells Hall, provided by the Wells 
Foundation, and Gordon Hall installed 
its own library which includes past stu- 
dent test papers. Television sets have 
recently appeared in many dorm rooms 
due to administration compliance with 
residence hall requests. 

Part of the discipline and counseling 
problems are deligated to student wing 
advisors, who work as part-time em- 
ploye(^s in the dorm offices. 

"1 think there is a trend to move 
back to the dorms," commented Samuel 
Rhoads, coordinator of men's super- 
vision! "Students are finding apartment 
life less enjoyable and more expensive 
than the relatively low rates offered by 
the residence halls." 



PUirboy-}3 



Men's Residence Council Qets New Goals 



The Men's Residence Council 
exists as a product of individual male 
donns at Tech, and its purpose is to 
provide unity and leadership for hous- 
ing government. 

During the school year the Coun- 
cil hosted the National Association of 
College and University Residence Halls 
conference, (see page 76). The plan- 
ning of this convention involved well 
over a year's work and resulted in the 
attendance of over 800 residence hall 
officers from across the nation. 

Approval of a new constitution 
and the administration of a residence 
hall opinion pool have also been major 
tasks of the governing body. The opin- 
ion poll yielded results which the 
MRC will use as a basis for implemen- 
tation of a women's visitation program. 



Jim Lynch (right) and Doug Williams (far 
right) discuss new possibilities concerning 
the success or failure of ideas presented 
at Men's Residence Council meetings. 




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Member representatives and their dorm af- 
filiations are (from row) John Burch, sec- 
retary-treasurer; George A. Rhoads, spon- 
sor; Doug Williams, president. (Middle row) 
Joe Drane, Thompson; David Cowling, Wey- 



mouth; Jim Lynch, Weymouth; Phil Scott, 
Carpenter. (Back row) Dave Stearman, Gas- 
ton; Don Sluckey, Carpenter; Randall Rogers, 
Gordon; Glenn Williamson, Sneed; and Jeff 
Schultz, Bledsoe. 



14— Playboy 



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Bledsoe Hosts Annual 

Swim Meet 



To be a Bledsoe man is to inherit 
the traditions of excellence and respect- 
ability that have become synonymous 
with the name Bledsoe Hall. The trophy 
case mirrors the many activities enjoyed 
by the dorm's men. Trophies ranging 
from scholarship to intramural sports 
prove the wide expanse of extracurricu- 
lar action enjoyed. 

The energetic dorm also sponsors 
the William H. Bledsoe intramural swim 
meet every spring, and perform with 
merit in football, basketball, and base- 
ball. To maintain their high standard 
of quality is the goal of Bledsoe Hall. 



The dorm council and wing advisors are 
(front row) Glen Nicks, Craig Curlee, 
George Gandy, (back row) Gary Smith, Burt 
Bratcher, Bill Mueller, Charles Hodges, Mike 
Hawthorne, Tom Feitel. 




Playboy— IS 




Carpenter Hall officials are (lop row) Rick 
Notestine, Carroll Hughes, Tony Guess, 
Larry Owen, Ray Leach, David Sloan, Phil 
Scott, Paul McCright, (bottom row) Robert 
Louie, Clark Robertson, Jim Williams, 
Ernest Inmon, Gary Thompson, Don Stuckey, 
and Chris Roehl. 



Carpenter Men Instigate 
Big Brother Program 



Through cooperative and efficient 
guidance, Carpenter Hall embariced on 
a new path of dorm activities. Osm- 
munity and campus relations took on a 
new aspect as Carpenter residents rallied 
in support of a local branch of the 
Lubbock Boy's Club. 

A picnic at Mackenzie State Park, 
Thanksgiving dinner in the Carpenter 
Cafeteria, and individual activities with 
the boys culminated in a Big Brother 
program. 

Under the guidance of Tony Whit- 
tington, activities supervisor, the dorm 
sponsored car rallies, the annual Mistle- 
toe Mixer, and a ping-pong tourna- 
ment. With a high contingent of fresh- 
men living in the dorm, newcomers 
noted Carpenter's high bid for the best 
overall grade-point-average. 

Officers include: Phil Scott, presi- 
dent; Ray Leach, vice-president; Larry 
Owen, secretary; Paul McCright, treas- 
urer; and Gark Robertson, parlia- 
mentarian. 



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16— Playboy 



It 



Participation and diligence reflect 
the personality of Gaston Hall. When 
new residents check into the dorm, they 
find themselves enveloped in an at- 
mosphere of friendliness and active 
participation created by upperclassmen. 

Gaston men develop a high sense 
of honor and deportment, and are in- 
stilled with deep respect for Texas 
Tech. There are innumerable activities 
in which the residents may find an out- 
let to satisfy the need to get away from 
the books. Intra-dorm mixers between 
men and women residence halls allow a 
social and cultural facet of college life. 
For those interested in the athletic side, 
Gaston boasts the best intramural team 
in the University, as well as an excellent 
study atmophere. 



Gaston Hall Activates 
Allegiance Through 
Participation, Honor 




Officials for Gaston Hall are (back row) 
Marvin Lane, Bobby Urban, Randy Scott, 
Phil Foster, Don Jochen, Bob Millican, 
Garion Brunson, Bill Norwood, secretary; 
John Rivera, Lucky Duty, Donald Salm, 



Andy Brumley, (front row) Curtis Timmons, 
Dennis Wilde, Tim Davis, Kathy Kwilosz, 
sweetheart; Steve Ramey, vice president; Russ 
McDonald, president; Johnny Blau, and 
Walker Sims, treasurer. 



Playboy — 17 



Gordon Hall 

Installs 

Library 

Facilities 



Gordon Hall officers include Gary Hadley, 
Randell Rogers, Bruce Moilan, Larry Good- 
son, and Mark Moore. Representing Gordon 
in the Miss Playmate contest is Mary Beth 
Johnson. 




V 



1^— Playboy 



Thompson Hall is the men's 
dormitory on campus. Known for years 
for its superiority in athletics, Thomp- 
son also rates high in academics, since 
it ranked second scholastically last year. 

Adjacent to the dorm is the ath- 
letic playing field, competition track, 
and baseball diamond. This "middle- 
of-the-campus" location provides an 
energetic atmosphere for residents. 

The athletic side of Thompson 
consists of a wide participation in foot- 
ball, basketball, ice hockey, and many 
other individual and team sports. To 
keep in shape, residents utilize the 
weight room located in the basement. 
Besides participation in intramural 
competition, intra-wing competition is a 
favorite of Thompson men. 



Thompson affords each resident an 
active social life as well. Each year the 
dormitory Senate sponsors various social 
activities including dances, movies, and 
intramural sports. 

Thompson officers are: Joe Drane, 



Facilities 



Allow Numerous Activities 



president; David Pickett, vice-president; 
and Jim Chidester, secretary-treasurer. 
The Hall Senate strives to create a 
friendly atmosphere and strongly en- 
courages citizenship among the resi- 
dents. 



m 




Thompson council members are: (front row) 
Dan Groover, Johnny Knox, and Doyce 
Wright. (Back row) Abe Nayfa, Jim Chides- 



ter, Ken Sprecher, R. J. 
Brown, Larry Bowman, 
Davis, and Pete Sattler. 



Baumann, Dave R. 
Joe Drane, Robert 



Playboy— 19 



Murdough Hall 

Offers Comfort 

and Companionship 

in Multi-Dorm Facility 



Murdough Hall offers upper- 
middle class surroundings to the dis- 
criminating student. Housing 527 men 
in air-conditioned comfort year round, 
Murdough is an ideal place for enjoying 
the casual relationships which exist be- 
tween hall residents. 

The residents have consistently 
been enthusiastic in intramurals, placing 
the hall in the upper division throughout 
its history. Murdough has also been in- 
volved in the vital issues which con- 
cern the campus. 

Murdough was completed in 1964 
along with Stangel Hall, which became 
a women's dorm in 1966. The complex 
was the first of the large "multi-dorm" 
units at Tech. This symbiotic relation- 
ship offers unlimited opportunities for 
companionship and recreation. 



Ci 







Keeping Murdough in top running con- 
dition are (front) Kent Thompson, repre- 
sentative; Mark Love, wing governor; Wes 
Westerly, representative; Chris James, wing 
advisor; Jess Balew, intramural director; 
Joe Cochran; (back row) Chuck Feely, 
Men's Residence Council; Joe Mine, repre- 
sentative; Joe Simmons, president; Joe 
Pareti, social chairman; and Mel Harris, 
wing advisor. 



1, 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



Noel Ischy 
Chuck Feely 
Randy Kirk 
Bill Grubbs 
Steve Hamilton 
Chris James 
Jeff Hummer 
Bob Kellow 
David Field 
Joe Simmons 



11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 



Lee Roy Hoskins 
Joe Trevino 
Joe Parker 
Stan Gill 
Ben Florey 
Joe Pareti 
Louis Birdwell 
John Gully 
Bruce Hines 



30-PUtybor 




"oioying 
^ sot Ik. 



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Playboy— 21 



Qneed Qpirit 

Runs High 

at Pep Rallies 



Sneed Hall officers are Craig Jones, secretary; 
Joe Smith, president; Glenn Williamson, 
vice-president; J. W. Lundgren, athletic di- 
rector; and Dick Owens, treasurer. 



Sneed Hall, the oldest men's dorm 
on campus, brought out its spirit at the 
first of the year by winning the Saddle 
Tramp spirit stick given at pep rallies. 

The homecoming decoration done by 
Sneed was the world's largest "Double- 
T," standing 31 feet high and 21 feet 
wide. For their efforts the men won 
first place in inter-dorm competition. 
Athletically, Sneed's program is well 
rounded. Sneed finished second in 
football this year, and has an excellent 
baseball and cross-country team. 

Elected officers of the dorm are 
Joe Smith, president; Glenn William- 
son; vice-president; Dick Owens, trea- 
surer; Craig Jones, secretary; and Larry 
Robinson and Stan Smith, Men's Resi- 
dence Council representatives. 




22~Playboy 



L 



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■■'". ■•.fi ii ■»«'<>» 



Representing the Sneed A-team in baseball 
intramural competition are (left) Steve Alex- 
ander, John Moldenhauer, Tom Taylor, and 
Brian Edwards. The other positions (below) 
are held down by (hack) Joe Smith, Larry 
Roberson, captain; Rodney Bridges, Craig 
Jones, captain; (front) Randy McCann, and 
J. W. Laundgrun. 




Playboy— 23 



Wells officers are (front row) Don Masley, 
food representative; Tim Luckenbach, treas- 
urer, (back row) Jim Moore, MRC repre- 
sentative; Gordon Collier, MRC representa- 
tive; and Charlie Brown, president. 




Hill m 
Jnties c 
suimmii 

jkIIo, 
m) '. 



24- Playboy 



¥ 



Dwain Camp (right) sorts Wells 
Hall mail which is one of the 
duties of office help. The dorm 
swimming team includes (front 
row) Tom Salisbury, Johnny Ar- 
guello, and Charlie Gaines, (back 
row) Tom Roberts, and Steve 
Bonnell. 




• 




Wells Hall 
Mixes Fun 
With Qtudies 



Wells Hall comes on strong in all 
phases of dormitory life. In an effort 
to improve their living conditions, the 
men have built a new study room with 
money raised last year through partici- 
pation in various projects. 

Wells also has a program designed 
to orientate freshmen that emphasizes 
school spirit, full development of the 
individual, and helps the new Techsans 
in adjusting to the hectic way of life. 

Athletically, Wells is a well- 
rounded dorm. Upperclass-freshmen 
football games lead the way into intra- 
mural activities. Wells men excel in 
football, basketball, and baseball. For 
their own convenience, a room for 
weightlifting is located in the base- 
ment of the building. 

Social life at Wells includes mixers 
with women's dorms and an annual 
dance. Officers of the hall are Charlie 
Brown, president; Cy Cozart, vice presi- 
dent; Tim Luckenbach, treasurer; Don 
Masley, food representative; and Jim 
Moore and Gordon Collier, Men's Resi- 
dence Council representatives. 



Mixers with other dorms on cainpus (left) 
provide opportunities for JOCells men to meet 
new Techsans. Other members of the swim 
team include (above) Doug Wren, Mike 
Bausch, and Bert Bartman. 



Playboy— 25 




High-Rise Dormitory 
Pressures High Qpirits 



Innovation is the password for 
Weymouth residents. With a strong will 
for dormitory participation in campus 
activities, the dorm has continually been 
a motivating force at pep rallies and in 
the intramural program. 

Early in the football season, Wey- 
mouth sold "Beat Texas" T-shirts to 
spirited fans, and later in the semester 
entered the only dormitory sponsored 
float in the Homecoming parade. Plac- 



ing second in their float division is 
proof of the high degree of coopera- 
tion among Weymouth residents. 

In addition to these campus activi- 
ties, Weymouth sponsored intradorm 
tournaments, a Carol of Lights choir, 
and numerous mixers. TTie dorm also 
placed second m the B division of in- 
tramural football. 

Weymouth council officers «re: (front row) 
Jay Dudley, MRC representative; Coy Franks, 
Tom Mills, Larry Highlower, Scott Reed. Pat 
Graham, Mike Davis, and Randy Hall. (Mid- 
dle row) Mi liege Norton, Larry Holley, sec- 
retary; James Williams, athletic director; 
Tom Landers, food representative; Paul 
Garland, social chairman; and Tommy John- 
son. (Back row) Tommy Olive, Terry Martin, 
Billy Benton, Frank Faubian, Bubba Harri- 
son, Jim Lynch, MRC representative; Johnny 
Bob Corruth, the Red Raider; and Andy 
Norton, president and MRC representative. 



«|i 



26— Playboy 




Weymouth Hall wing advisors are (left) 
Terry Thomas, Mike Green, Chester 
Strunk, Bill Nunnally. (From row) Mike 
Evans, Clark Reed, Steve Williams, and 
Steve Dennis. Officers for the dorm are 
(below) Larry HoUey, secretary; Andy Nor- 
ton, president; W. C. Smith, hall super- 
visor; Mike Clark, assistant supervisor; and 
James Van Stavern, vice president. 



m 




I 



Playboy— 27 



90NNY 



Playboy Interview M IV L/ L/ H t K 

a candid session with Tech's homecoming stars 



EDITOR'S NOTE: An athletic dressing 
room was the setting of the PLAYBOY 
interview with Sonny and Cher, the 
famed huband-wife singing team. Af- 
ter completing their movie "Chastity," 
and the recent arrival of their first 
child, Chastity, the pair propounded 
several thoughts concerning their roles 
as parents and entertainers. 

Cher was literally dripping in fox, 
after a rain-soaked dash from their di- 
verted limousine to the coliseum. Sonny 
found the dressing facilities "groovy" 
and was quick to answer PLAYBOY'S 
questions. As Cher tried to dry her fur 
coat, Sonny had much to say about the 
contemporaries. 



PLAYBOY: Had you heard of Texas 
Tech before completing your tour 
schedule? 

SONNY: No. 

PLAYBOY: How are you accepting 
your role as a parent and fulfilling 
your career as an entertainer? 

SONNY: We take Chastity with us, 
and we are able to maintain both our 
careers and parenthood. It changes 
you as a person. You realize there is 
another responsibility, but you can 
maintain quite easily. Generally she's 
with us, but this is a short gig so we 
didn't bring her. 

CHER: When we take her with us it 
makes it more fun, but I don't think 
it has that much effect on you. It just 
adds another dimension. 

PLAYBOY: Do you think you will 
have problems as parents on the road, 
or do you plan to entertain ail of 
your life? 

SONNY: Yes, I plan to entertain, 
but it can be incorporated, I think. If 
you like your child enough and show 
it enough love, I don't think it will 
complicate your career at all. It hasn't 
so far. 

PLAYBOY: Have you found students 
more radical through your associa- 
tion with them on your tours? 

SONNY: We haven't been entertain- 
ing a lot of universities; mostly sup- 
per clubs and before that the movie 



"Chastity" for two years. I would say 
no. 

CHER: When you go to a university, 
students aren't looking for a riot. They 
just want to have a good time. 

PLAYBOY: Are either of you as- 
sociated with national youth move- 
ments like the Vietnam Moratorium 
Committee ? 

SONNY: No. I worked with the 
Bobby Kennedy campaign, but we 
don't belong to anything political. 

PLAYBOY: What is your evaluation 
of marijuana and the investigations 
of the government? 

SONNY: I don't think marijuana 
should be a legislation situation at 
all. It should be dealt with at home. 
Any kind of thing like that belongs 
at home, not in the legislature. 

PLAYBOY: Why haven't you re- 
corded more as a team recently? 

SONNY: The movie. We plan to 
take up recording again very soon. I 
became very obsessed with this movie 
because it is an untouchable thing 
with rock and roll artists, that is to 
make a serious and dramatic movie. 
It was totally unacceptable as far as 
the establishment is concerned. That 
made me all the more determined to 
make a movie, so I almost became an 
insane person, since I wrote and pro- 
duced the entire movie. 

PLAYBOY: Cher, was the movie 
character supposed to portray you? 

CHER: It was more or less my at- 
titude or my personality projected into 
that character. 

PLAYBOY: Do you plan to make 
another movie? 

CHER: I hope so, maybe next year. SONNY: No. 



have exploited the fact that they can 
be very liberal and they go so far 
that it doesn't mean anything. It is an 
art form, and you can abuse any art 
form. 

PLAYBOY: What is your appraisal of 
the film industry as compared to the 
recording complex? 

SONNY: The recording industry is 
contemporary and up to date, but I 
think the film industry is antiquated 
right now. 

PLAYBOY: Since you have been out 
of the recording mainstream for two 
years, do you foresee any problems in 
readjusting to that pattern of enter- 
taining? 

SONNY: This thing of, "When were 
you last on the charts?" and, "When 
was your last record?" doesn't mean 
a thing. I'll cut and cut, if a hit 
comes fine, if it doesn't fine. We still 
make the same money. Today's per- 
formers have to quit thinking in 
those terms. After a certain point, 
you've got to sell something else. 
That would be my one beef with con- 
temporaries today. I don't think they 
are thinking beyond their last hit 
record, and if you think in those 
terms, you are going to die with your 
last flop record. 

It has been seven years — we've 
had hits and we've had flops, but the 
point is you've got to sell something 
past that. At a certain stage you have 
to project a personality. But of course 
I'll keep recording, like Sinatra or 
Sammy Davis Jr. These people main- 
tain because they have a personality 
to offer. 

PLAYBOY: Do you ever plan to re- 
cord on your own? 



PLAYBOY: What are your feelings 
regarding sex liberation in today's 



movies .' 



SONNY: That doesn't impress me. I 
don't think that impresses anyone. I 
don't want that kind of freedom. I 
would rather have freedom to say 
other things rather than to have the 
opportunity to show a nude body. Al- 
though I had a nude scene in my 
movie, I thought it was stupid having 
that much censorship in the first 
place, but I think that a lot of people 



PLAYBOY: Do you plan to work in 
any other medias, for instance tele- 
vision? 

SONNY: What all of us as contem- 
poraries have to do is not to think in 
terms of music only and that is some- 
thing we seem to keep doing. I hope 
that the young people get out of that. 
Even in performances. If you watch 
very many contemporaries perform, 
they are about the same. If they are 
to sustain their image, they have to 
offer more diversification on stage. 



'I 



I 



2S-Playhoy 



II 



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Playboy— e9 



Fraternity Council Creates GtrongLiason 




Interfraternify 
Organization 

Establishing a vital link between 
individual fraternities is the Inter- 
fraternity Council. The organization 
perpetuates better relationships between 
chapters while working towards each 
fraternity's best interests. 

This year a new fraternity, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon, was initiated into the pro- 
gram in an effort to enable Tech men 
a wider opportunity to participate in 
the Greek system. 

Qiapter members of the IPC com- 
pete in scholarship, service projects, and 
intramurals year round. Phi Delta 
Theta was awarded the Intramural 
Blanket, an annual award, and the 
Ugliest Man on Campus contest helped 
to boost funds for the Lubbock State 
School. 

Officers included Gary Harrod, 
president; Mike Price, vice president; 
Larry Adams, secretary; and Greg Wim- 
mer, treasurer. 



c 




IFC representatives (above) include Mike 
Farrow, Larry Senkel, Bill Jones, Don Hill, 
Barry Brooks, Chuck Jennings, Craig 
Wright, Gary Biggen, Larry Vaughn, Mark 
Hall, John Gardner, Jearl Thorpe, Rick 



Helm, Mark Wright, Pat Hale, Robert Gos- 
sett, and David Martindale. Serving as IFC 
officers are (top) Gary Harrod, Greg Wim- 
mer, Mike Price, and Lariy Adams. 



30— Playboy 



Discussing fraternity relations are Dair Hile- 
man (right) and Mel Harris (jar right). 





Council Qeeks Campus Understanding 




Interfraternity Council members are Jim Hodgsen, Paul Horton, Dair Hileman, Bruce 
Lindley, Bob Fairchild, Fred Heaton, Chuck Wisdom, Ron Ramsey, Greg Duke, Roger 
Brosseau, Andy Kerr, Don Ladd, Sheldon Pendergrass, and George Robertson. 



Playboy— 31 





/ 



hirst place trophies in toofball. 
wrestling, bowling, and handball rep- 
resent Alpha Tau Omega's drive for the 
top-rung in university competition. 

ATO's distinguish themselves 
through campus participation and com- 
munity service. Taking underprivileged 
children to football games, work for the 
Lubbock State School, and fund drives 
are listed as projects supported by the 
men. 

Just as important to the ATO mem- 
ber is a wide social life. A Ruidoso ski 
retreat, Christmas Formal, Spring For- 
mal, and TGIF ice cream socials sup- 
ply ATO's with extensive entertain- 
ment. 

Outstanding members included 
Robbie Higgins, Student Senate; Larry 



Adams^' 
chief justice 
Hart and Jim Lvou^BB. Idle T imps. 
Alpha Tau (M^T xs the first 
national fraternity organized on the 
Tech campus and now claims 138 na- 
tional chapters. 



32— Playboy 




Lennol Absher 
Larry Adams 
Larry Anderson 
William Bagwell 
Ron Bahnmiller 
Steve Belt 
Gary Biggers 

Kent Bowerman 
Pete Broome 
Kip Boyd 
Rick Buferd 
Al Buron 
Scott Gate 
Bill Caughran 



Robert Chapman 
Wayne Clayton 
Mike Cole 
Bob Coker 
Joel Cook 
Doug Cordell 
Larry Crews 

Chuck Crowley 
Tom Currer 
Bob Cutshall 
Greg Dai ley 
Ken Dawson 
Jim Douglass 
Jody Durham 




Tony Evans 
Donnie Francher 
Ike Gingrich 
Mark Goettsche 
Rodney Gray 
Tom Green 
David Hall 

Les Harris 
Don Hill 
Doug Hill 
Robert Horton 
Randy Hughes 
David Humphries 
Richard Julsonnet 



\ 



|i 




Andy Keeton 
Tom Kennedy 
David Lamb 
Dale Marcum 
Tom Marsh 
Joe Bob Mayo 
David McClure 
Terry McCracken 

Bill Miller 
John Mills 
Robert Morris 
Mike Owen 
Brad Parrish 
Jim Phillips 
Doug Queen 
Richard Reed 

Lee Robinson 
Gary Rogers 
Mike Rogers 
Steve Rogers 
John Russell 
Dennis Sanderson 
Phil Sansone 
David Scarborough 

Brock Smith 
Bill Snyder 
Jearl Thorpe 
Chuck Waghorne 
David Watkins 
Marc Wolin 
Charlie Yates 
Jim Zachary 



Playboy — 33 




C}llene Boyle 

Carolyn Byrd 

Barbara Gun 

Tonl Cooke 

Lynn Hamiltoo 



Jill Hanna 

Judy Henry 

Brenda Hill 

Zelda Hull 

Linda Ottinger 



Nanqr Poteet 

Kathy Potts 

Ann Ritchie 

Diana Vessels 

Debbie Worde 



LITTLE 
9I6MA9 

Flag-Waving Patriots 
for 8igma Chi Men 



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34— Playboy 



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t 

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Loretta Albright 
Bev Beumeler 
Betsy Brown 
Jill Cole 



Kathy Durham 
Diana Hogue 
Karen Jenkins 
Janis Jones 



Helene Loran 
June Mayo 
Susan Morris 
Nanqf Nix 



Clara Porter 
Diane Pounds 
Kaki Tinsley 
Paula Neugebauer 



I 



LITTLE 8I9TER8 OF THE MALTESE CR088 



Alpha 

Tau Omega 

Pen-Pals Are 



m 




Noteworthy 



Playboy— 35 



DAUGHTER9 
OF THE 
DIAMOND 




Lindy Cook 
Marianne Fidelie 



Susan Gaye 
Cathy Leggett 



Meredith Piggott 
Kay Ryan 



Susan Trolinger 
Cathy Vernon 




Traffic-stopping 
Beta Theta Pi 

Little 9isters 
Groove on Greeks 



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36— Playboy 



Qigma Alpha Epsilon Girls Add Frosting to Cake 



LITTLE 




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SISTERS OF 
MINERVA 




Susan Boone 
Jane Cornelison 
Gail Cornett 
Jane Haynes 



Cameo Jones 
Diane Martin 
Kathy McKissack 
Jan Milholland 



Marcia Moran 
Carol Anne Newton 
Denise Roberts 
Rita Rozelle 



Shay Slack 
Carol Story 
Tia Taylor 
Jackie Williams 



Playboy — 37 




ri 



Ranking among the finalists of the Miss Playmate 
contest are (lop left) Marilyn Smith, Paducah 
freshman; (middle left) Hedy Bailey, Vancouver, 
Washington, senior; (middle right) Monte Dodd, 
Lubbock sophomore; (above) Cathy Anderson, 
Breckenridge senior; (right) Lora Hunt, Irving 
senior; and (far right) Francine Tippen, Paducah 
freshman. 



€) 



3S— Playboy 



^1 



m Nine Coeds Named Playmate Finalists 







Presented in conjunction with the 
Miss Mademoiselle pageant, the Miss 
Playmate contest is sponsored by Sigma 
Delta Chi, the professional journalism 
society, and by the La Ventana. 

Contestants are judged on photo- 
genic appeal and poise. Ten semi-finalists 
are chosen by a staff of judges from 
photographs processed by the La Ven- 
tana. The top-ten then appear in swim- 
suit competition before three profes- 
sional photographers for final judging 
at the annual event. 

The contest originated in 1959 when 
the La Ventana decided to utilize the 
magazine type of format, and provide 
the student body with an annual beauty 
contest. The ten finalists for this year's 
competition were selected from a field 
of 35 entries. 



Included in the top ten finalists of the Miss 
Playmate contest are (lop left) Kathy 
Kwilosz, Dallas freshman, (top right) Suzy 
McCrary, Burkburnett senior, and (below) 
Doneeta Hancock, Dallas sophomore. 



<l^ 



\ 




Playboy^ 





Committed though she Is to teach- 
ing elementary school children, 21- 
year-old Mary Beth Johnson, Tech's 
Miss Playmate for 1970, proves that 
not all future teachers are old-maid 
candidates. 

Flashing dark brown eyea, contrast- 
ed with long blonde hair. Miss Play- 
mate has captured many beauty contests 
including Miss Wheatheart of the Na- 
tion, Miss Astro of Lubbock, and Miss 
Top O' Texas. Boasting above average 
grades and figure to match, Mary Beth, 
who hails from Pampa, Texas, cap- 
tivated the Miss Playmate judges in 
November, assuring her the reserved 
space in the Playboy foldout. 

Accompanied by Bob Rafferty, 
Lubbock senior, Mary Beth surveys the 
Hub City's recreation areas on the ad- 
joining pages. She was sponsored by 
Gordon Hall in the Miss Playmate 
pageant. 



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. . . portfolio of a Tech playmate 





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PLAYBOY'S PARTY JOKES 



I he slightly gtoggy junior relaxed on the couch, 
enjoying a cigarette; his girlfriend lay beside him 
lost in thought. 

"Darling," she said unexpectedly, as girls are 
wont to do, "let's get married." 

The young man took a long drag on his cigarette 
and without turning, said, "Dearest, who would 
have us.'" 







ur sociology department has come up with the 
significant statistic that the average number of 
times a coed says no to temptation is once weakly. 



I he varsity swimming champ got married to a 
beautiful girl and, on their honeymoon, treated her 
to an exhibition of his swimming prowess. He leaped 
into the hotel f>ool, cleaved the water with expert 
strokes and came up on the opposite side in a matter 
of seconds. His proud smile faded slightly when his 
lovely wife dived in and repeated his feat in half the 
time. 

But, masking his bruised eqo, he took her in 
his arms and exclaimed, "Darling, you're wonderful! 
Why didn't you tell me you were a swimming 
champion, too.'" 

"I'm not," she replied. "I was a streetwalker 
in Venice." 



1 



"I 

I told my dropmate I didn't want to see him 

anymore," said the concerned frosh to her roommate, 
over lunch in the SUB. 

"What did he say?" the curious friend asked. 

"Nothing. He just pulled the covers over his 
head." 



f\n attractive young lady was having difficulty 
keeping her skirt down about her shapely legs while 
awaiting a bus on a windy comer near the Adminis- 
tration Building. She was aware of a man watching 
her discomfort with considerable interest and she ad- 
dressed him in an irritated voice: 

"It's obvious, sir, that you are no gentleman." 
With appreciation in his voice, the man replied, 
"It's obvious that you're not either." 



f^ business friend was trying to convince us the 
other day that sex is so popular because it's centrally 
located. 



lt> 



I o me," said one senior of a well known 
English professor, "he's a pain in the neck." 

"Strange," said the other classmate, "I had a 
much lower opinion of him." 



w. 



' e heard that an infamous stripper at the Waikiki 
Club in Juarez, Mexico, disappeared after an arousing 
number last week, and hasn't been obscene since. 



w= 



e have just been informed of the unanimous 
decision by the student body of Texas A&M, that 
the school bird for next year will be the fly. 



I he curvy little coed in the tight-fitting cashmere 
sweater wiggled up to the professor after class and 
murmured in a honeyed voice, "I'm afraid I didn't 
do very well on that zoology quiz today, professor. 
But I'll do anything to pass this course. Just ANY- 
THING " 

The professor raised an eyebrow. "Anything?" 
"Uh-huh," she cooed. "Anything you ask." 
"Then study," he said dryly. 



"T 

I here is no need for me to make a personal 
dorm call," the infirmary doctor told the worried 
caller. "I've checked my files and your roommate 
isn't really ill at all — he just thinks he is sick." 

A week later, the doctor telephones to make 
sure his diagnosis had been correct. "How's your 
roommate today?" he asked. 

"Worse," came the reply. "Now he thinks he's 
dead." 



playboy is a guy who never Mrs. one. 



/^ n elderly Tech-ex has catalogued the three stages 
of a man's life: Tri-Weekly, Try Weekly, and Try 
Weakly. 



fA lovely transfer student from Georgia we know 
is such a slow talker that by the time she gets through 
assuring a friend of ours that she wasn't that kind 
of girl, she was. 



II 







o you cheat on your wife?" inquired a probing 
psychiatry student. 

"Who else?" answered the patient. 



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mi 



Sigma Chi 
DERBY DOLL 

9haron Moss 



A branding, tricycle race, musical 
wash tubs, and Derby A-Go-Go ... all 
part of the l4th Annual Derby Day 
festivities. 

Sharon Moss, the Derby Doll, was 
selected on poise, beauty, and person- 
ality, and reigned over the two day 
event sponsored by Sigma Chi fraternity. 

The Derby A-Go-Go required con- 
testants to use a yard of material for 
a costume in which to dance, and were 
judged on the basis of appearance in 
the costume and dancing ability. 




A yard of material goes a long way for 
Derby A-Go-Go contestants, while other 
Derby Day participants had to settle for 
less appropriate attire in a costume contest 
entered by sororities. 



Playboy — 41 



Bill Barthelemy 

Gary Bennett 

Glen Beyer 

Merle Blosser 

Mike Bryant 

John Buchanan 
Dwain Camp 

Fred Chandler 

Phil Chisum 

Douglas Dry 

Bob Eudy 

Pete Garton 

Gary Gilliam 

Hank Granger 



Gary Grinsfelder 

Mark Hall 

Dair Hileman 

Bill Kattenbach 

Larry Kilgore 

Wayne LaGrone 

Fred Lockwood 

Fred Lundberg 

Gary Malone 

Michael Martin 

Richard Martin 

Randy McAnally 

Ray McWilliams 

Myron Mears 

Randy Nicholson 

Bill Petrelli 

Kenny Pirtle 

Mike Price 

Jim Rannefeld 

Pat Regan 

Mike Riek 



Bill Snuffer 

Dean Stalcup 

Dan Summerall 

Jim Swink 

Paul Tanner 

Richard Thomas 

Kenny Townsend 

Ron Williams 

Billy Wilson 

Steve Wren 

Dave Wylie 

Bill Young 

Bill Zimmerman 

R. W. Zipperly 





Beta Theta Pi 

Proves 

Campus 

Dynamism 

in '70 



^^^ 



In a world which is r4pidly be- 
coming highly technical, Beta Theta 
Pi fraternity offers an everlasting 
brotherhood of the highest aim dating 
back to its founding in 1839. 

Since that time, its many brothers 
have established a proud heritage by 
cherishing the ideals of mutual as- 
sistance, cultivation of the intellect, and 
unsullied friendship. In their second 
year on campus, the Betas proved them- 
selves as a dynamic brotherhood. Ful- 
filling their goals as a colony, they 
received their charter last spring, and 
became very active in intramurals. In 
the fall, the Betas formed the Daughters 
of the Diamond, a national organi- 
zation of girls promoting the goals of 
Beta Theta Pi. 



On the campus, the quality of the 
Betas rapidly took form. Lee Tynes 
played varsity basketball, while Mike 
Price served as vice president and rush 
chairman for the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil. Ray McWilliams participated in 
Saddle Tramps, a spirit organization. 

Working with Alpha Delta Pi 
sorority, the Betas took second place 
honors in the homecoming float com- 
petition, and captured second place in 
the Interfraternity Rodeo. 

The brotherhood of Beta Theta 
Pi at Tech has come a long way in a 
short time, but mote imp>ortant is the 
challenge of the future. The Beta 
brothers are meeting this challenge by 
making the fraternity bond stronger and 
farther reaching. 



42— Playboy 



{19 




fif 



Delta Tau Delta helped Tech usher 
in a new decade through campus 
politics, athletics, student affairs, and 
scholarship. Delts point to many ac- 
complishments in the year which illus- 
trate leadership in the Greek com- 
munity. 

After sweeping the ATO basket- 



Delta Tau Delta Capitalizes 
on Brotherhood 



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Bill Abel 

Jan Baumgardner 

Gary Bergman 

Trey Berry 

David Burket 

Craig Cannon 

Harvey Case 

Don Caywood 

Dan Clark 

Bulba Crutchfidd 

Alan Day 

Dennis Dodd 

Reed Duke 

Gary Etheredge 

Spencer Falls 

Bob Ferguson 

Ken Fields 

Brice Fowler 

Jim Gilbreath 

Rick Hall 

Blake Hansen 

Ike Harper 

Larry Harrwell 

Tommy Hawkes 

Bill Hawkins 

Mark Hefflefinger 

Jim Hill 

Joe Hill 

Jack Hightower 

Jack Kennedy 

Chuck Lewis 

Ben Loggins 

John Montague 

Jackie Moravcik 

Earl Norris 

John Norwood 

Philip Porter 

Chuck Rankin 

Jimmy Reed 

George Robertson 

Stephen Schulz 
Steve Shanklin 
Craig Skaggs 
Jim Stewart 
Robert Taylor 
Jay Thompson 
Larry Vaughn 
Doug Walker 



ball tournament, the Delt roundballers 
led the fraternity division in intra- 
mural activity, and shared the all-Uni- 
versity volleyball championship with 
Kappa Alpha Theta. Bill Abel is the 
all-University p a d d 1 e b a 1 1 doubles 
champ. 

Jay Thompson served as president 
of the Tech Student Association, with 
Billy Windsor, Greg Wimmer, and 



Jim Gilbreath as members of the Stu- 
dent Senate. Thompson and Wimmer 
were included in the Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities, and 
Wimmer was elected treasurer of the 
Interfraternity Council. Dave Burket 
served as Greek Week chairman, scho- 
lastic chairman of the IFC, and feature 
editor of the University Daily. 

Mike Nicolle and Harold Hurst 
represented Delts on the ^-arsity foot- 
ball squad, with Thompson and Nevil 
Manning cheering them on as Saddle 
Tramp members. 

Although campus activities play a 
large part in the total concept of a 
Tech Delt, the chapter stresses brother- 
hood through study, work, and social 
relationships. Epsilon Delta chapter of 
Delta Tau Delta is a fraternity dedi- 
cated to developing mature and re- 
sponsible men with a concern for 
others. 




Bobby Ware 

Tony Wilkins 

Robert Willis 

Greg Wimmer 

Billy Windsor 

Robert Woodum 

Gary Wright 




^^^^ 




Playboy — i5 



Kappa Alpha Order Provides 
Strong Source 
of Leadership 



Robin Anderson 

Jack Arrington 

Rich Barkley 

David Ban 

Ron Bertelson 

Stan Bower 

Jim Byrne 

John Carris 

Terry Casey 

Bias Catalan! 

Ben Chenault 

Dennis Cooper 

Warren Craig 

Clayton Devin 

Dave Edwards 

Chuck Ellis 

Eric Fox 

Ken Fucik 

Mike Garey 

Howard Garrett 

Trey Grafa 

Bucky Gross 

Marvin Harris 

Terry Henderson 

Bill Hill 

Skip Hill 

Neil Hilton 

Lee Hobbs 

Sheldon Hodgson 

Jerry Hoff 

Rusty Ingle 

Richard Johnston 

Marq Jones 

Joe Kelsey 

Keith Kisner 

Tom Kleuser 

Cuyler Lawrence 

Randy Mathews 

Larry Meyers 

Robert Millwee 

Bill Payne 

Ed Phillips 

Danny Pope 

Steve Ramsey 

Bill Reichardt 

Mike Scobee 

Fred Seal 

David Shine 

Mike Simmons 

John Simpson 

James Smith 

Jimmy Smith 

Lyndon Smith 

James Stevens 

Jim Stokes 

Gary Swindle 



Old South Weekend, Dinner 
Dance, Grubber's Ball, and the Ship- 
wreck Party are all synonymous with 
the swinging social life of Kappa 
Alpha Order. 

The Old South Weekend is 
marked by secession from the Student 
Body, a parade down Broadway, all 
night parties, and a Reconstruction Pic- 
nic. But KA is more than a social 
organization. 

KA is a "philosophy of life and 
a way of living." Founded in Lexing- 



ton, Virginia, the fraternity has inspired 
leadership, honor, and brotherhood for 
102 years. 

On campus KA provided a strong 
source of leadership with Larry Meyers 
as a Business Administration Senator, 
and John Simpson as chief justice of 
the Interfraternity Council court. 

Community projects included a 
clothing drive for the Salvation Army, 
United Fund collection drives, and help 
with the Lubbock State School. 

KA participated in all phases of 
Intramural activities, while Warren 
Craig was a member of the varsity 
tennis team, and Rick Fox headed the 
swimming team. 




€ 



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Robert Warren 

Bill White 

Carl Winfrey 

BUke Wynne 



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46— Playboy 



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48— Playboy 



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Brothers of Kappa Sigma 

In Memoriam 





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Kappa Qigma 9tHves for Participation 

in University 
Activities 



Kappa Sigma is one of the largest 
and oldest of American college fra- 
ternal organizations. Its long history is 
enriched by years of tradition, and its 
brotherhood is traced to the founding 
in the year 1400 at the University of 
Bologna in Italy. The ideals and teach- 
ings of Kappa Sigma were brought 
to America by the University of 
Virginia, December 10, 1869. Since 
that time, the fraternity has grown in 
prominence. At present there are 139 
active chapters and over 85,000 alumni 
throughout the world. 

Kappa Sigma is a well-rounded 
organization that participates in all 
forms of campus activities. The Kappa 
Sigs put a strong emphasis on social 



functions with the annual Black and 
White Formal Dinner-Dance, Home- 
coming Dance, Founder's Day Banquet, 
Senior Send-off, and parties with Phi 
Gamma Delta and Pi Kappa Alpha. 

Among other endeavors of Kappa 
Sigma is intramural sports, in which 
the fraternity usually finishes highly 
ranked. Campus leadership is very im- 
portant to the men of Kappa Sigma, 
and all members have a high regard 
for scholarship and educational values. 

Philanthropic projects included a 
Big Brother Day in which the members 
worked through the Big Brothers of 
America and took a group of boys to 
the Tech-Baylor football game. 





iff ^y , 



Lee Casstevens 
Paul Cowsert 
Buddy Deere 
William Dorsey 
Greg Duke 
Steve Earsley 



Gary Edstrom 
Mike Elliot 
Bill Grishaffl 
Russell Hatcher 
Tom Hix 
Ray HoUis 



Jimmy Howard 
Jeff Hunter 
Jim Hunter 
Bill Jay 
Herman Jordan 
Jack Journey 







Bruce Kattmann 
Mike Ligon 
Mike Lincoln 
Mike Lukert 
Mike Massey 
Mike McAfee 
John McCoy 

Ed McElroy 
David McGuffey 
David Molitoris 
Henry Mora 
Benlley Page 
Roger Pendergrass 
Robert Perry 

Richard Pittman 
Robert Priddy 
George Richardson 
Terry Rives 
James Roach 
John Romberger 
Danny Roycraft 

Michael Sheils 
Brian South 
Richard Steen 
Bob Suter 
John Terrill 
R. A. Tyler 
Bill Worley 



Playboy— SI 



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Pierce Abemethy 

Johnny Actkinson 

Mike Anderson 

Randy Andrews 

Rusty Andrews 

David Baker 

Johnny Ball 

Dan Barker 

Phillip Barney 

Robert Best 

Richard Black 

Tom Brown 

Gerald Brummett 

Fred Bryant 

Richard Ouley 

Jon Clark 



Mark Compere 

Leland Costley 

Bill Craig 

John Cronin 

Tony Cypert 

Jim Darnell 

Bill Dawson 

Paul Dawson 

Jim Dyer 

Marc Easoa 

Jay Evans 

Carl Ewert 

Terry Fields 

Dick Flesher 

Randy Franks 

Jim Furgeson 

Paul Gibbins 

Pat Gooden 

Robert Gossett 

Rick Gray 

Guion Gregg 

Leonard Griffin 

Dicky Grigg 

Jimmy Haggar 



David Hahn 

John Harding 

Larry Hargrave 

Joel Hayhurst 

Rod Hays 

Mark Hazel wood 

Chris Hicks 

Jim Houser 

Nick Houser 

Don Howe 

Rick Hurst 

Stan Hurt 

Steve Hurt 

Frank Johnson 

Roger Johnson 

George Keeling 

Robert King 

Steve Knight 

Louis Kowalski 

Miles Langehennig 

Mark Leaverton 

Rob Lewis 

Joe Little 

Sandy MacKenzie 



David Martindale 
Tommy Mclntyre 
Steve Meyers 
Robert Michie 
David Miller 
Bob Mooney 
Ronny Moore 
Don Morgan 

Sid Mueller 

Mike Nye 

John Opie 

Ken Perkins 

Steve Pitt 

Jimmy Poe 

Steve Rivers 

Max Scarborough 




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52— Playboy 




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The Texas Epsilon Chapter of Phi 
Delta Theta, the largest fraternity on 
campus, has acquired a record that can 
be pointed to with pride by each initiate. 
On the national scene, Texas Epsi- 
lon was honored as being the number 
one chapter of Phi Delta Theta for 
1969. This top ranking is symbolized 
by the group's cherished Harvard 
Trophy. In addition, the chapter re- 
ceived recognition as a Gold Star 
Chapter and was presented the Head- 
quarter's Trophy for management of 
chapter affairs. 

Locally, Texas Epsilon emphasizes 
the importance of student government. 
Byron Snyder served as vice president 
of the Student Association, with Mike 
Anderson, Rob Lewis, John Thomasson, 
Phil Sw^tzell and Louis Kowalski 
serving as Student Senators. 

Athletics, both varsity and intra- 
mural, play an important role in the 
brotherhood. Texas Epsilon won both 
A and B league football championships 
in the fraternity division, and took both 
the fraternity and all-college champion- 
ships in tug-of-war. 

Well represented on the football 
field, the chapter boasts 18 varsity per- 
formers including Phil Barney, Robbie 
Best, Jim Dyer, Randy Franks, Dicky 
Grigg, Larry Hargrave, Mark Hazel- 
wood, Dennis Lane, Miles Langehen- 
ning, Joe Matulich, Tommy Mclntyre, 
Bob Mooney, Sid Mueller, Ken Perkins, 
Tom Sawyer, Max Scarborough, Dickey 
Shilab, and Carrol Sullivan. 

Other varsity performers were 
Steve Hurt, baseball; Larry Wood, bas- 
ketball; Stan Wilemon, golf; Jay Set- 
tle, swimming; and Mike Nye, tennis. 
Tommy Wheat served as cheerleader. 





Dick Schilhab 
Jay Settle 
Bob Simmons 
Terry Joe Smith 
Byron Snyder 
Jimmy Stiles 
Mark Stowe 
Tim Sturm 

Carroll Sullivan 
Phil Swatzell 
Tommy Taylor 
Joe Thaggard 
John Thomasson 
Robert Thompson 
Jay Timmins 
Fred Underwood 

Clay VanLoozen 
Tommy Wheat 
Alan White 
Pat Wiggins 
Bill Windier 
Stan Wilemon 
Larry Wood 
Buz Ziegler 



Playboy— S3 



Phi Gamma Delta Means Qtrength 

in Qocial Prowess, Community Qervice 



Bill Andrews 

Don Barrett 

Otis Beauchamp 

Dana Beck 

Jimmy Bennett 

Larry Billingsley 

Don Botik 

Mike Brewer 

Dick Bufkin 

Tom Buol 

Jerry Don Burton 

Robert Cody 

Tom Cooke 

Davis Corley 

Craig Curlee 

Jeff Davis 

Ronald DeBusk 

John Estes 

Walter Ethridge 

Craig Evans 

Craig Fowler 

John Gaylord 

John Giles 

John Goode 

Gatland Goodwyn 

W. R. Gray 

Billy M. Grist 

Lee Gummett 

Pat Hale 

Gary Harrod 

Rick Helm 

John Huckabay 

Mike Hutchens 

Phill Ingram 

Ted Kingsbery 

Bill Kizer 
Sam Line 
Daryl Lowe 
Zane Noble 
O. L. Parish 
Mike Pearson 
Larry Perrin 

Robert Pigg 

Butch Purselley 

Norton Rainey 

Dennis Rawls 

Billy Don Rives 

Pat Rogers 

Douglas Ryland 

Johnny Sample 

Marshall Sutton 

Charles Swift 

Ted Sykes 

Chip Taylor 

Jim Triolo 

Bill Twyman 




m 



Greg Vaughn 

Bucky Weatherby 

Rob Wicker 

Bob Wood 

Gregory Wood 

Mark Wright 



54— Playboy 




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Brotherhood remains embedded in 
Phi Gamm a Afc^^Jbfe close-knit Fijis 

tealers a year 

in the field oF"^K«Btafcvice, uni- 
versity sponsoreJHl^S^End social 
functions. 

_ lis an outstanding con- 
' commun.iy service by the 
adquarter-. of Phi Gamma 
s and the city of Lubbock 
~.„.fed the local Fijis with the 1969 
immunity Service Award. Parties for 
phaned children during Thanksgiving, 
lid the Ballinger Retarded Children's 
School Christmas party indicates the 
strong participation in community 
projects . A daption of an orphan, col- 
"'-irican Cancer Society, 
i United Fund are 

hfien. Their annual 

cleah-Jp" /ay at Girlstown in Whiteface, 
Texis, again resulted in giving the 
home a refreshed look, 

Gary Harrod represents the Fijis 
on campus. A past student senator, 
Gary is now president of the Inter- 
fraternity Council, the third Fiji in a 
row to hold that office. 

In football, brothers Jimmy Ben- 
nett, Mike Brewer, Eddie Windom, Pat 
Rogers, Walter Ethridge, and Davis 
Corely played on the varsity squad. 
Mike Patterson has been hired as an 
assistant coach for Jim Carlen, Tech's 
new football head. Bill Andrews sup- 
ports the team through Saddle Tramps. 
With a reputaion for enjoyable 
parties, the Fijis marked down a social 
year including the Black Diamond For- 
mal, Purple Garter, the Cmsher, and the 
Fiji Islander. The colorful group wraps 
up each year with emphasis on brother- 
hood stemming from participation, fun, 



Phboy—55 




Phi Kappa Psi 

Represents 

Diversification 



Phi Kappa Psi fraternity is among 
Tech's most diversified organizations. 
Baseball, student government, and high 
scholastic standing represents Phi Psi 
strong points. 

Max Martin and Don McKee 
served as captains of the Tech varsity 
baseball team, while Barry Brooks per- 
formed the duties of a Student Senator. 
Saddle Tramp Dave Ammons promoted 
the athletic teams through the organi- 
zation and as editor of the Sports Il- 
lustrated magazine of the La Ventana. 

Larry Senkel, president; Bob Bay- 



less, vice president; Jerry Hennigah, 
secretary; and Brant McGlothlin, treas- 
urer, provided the leadership that made 
Phi Kappa Psi one of the leading fra- 
ternities on campus. 

Chairman of the Ideas and Issues 
committee in the Tech Union govern- 
ment was Coy Ballard. A Christmas 
food roundup heads the list of Phi Psi 
community projects, while outstanding 
parties included the Suppressed Desire, 
Evergreen Formal, and a G rover Mur- 
ray Bow-Tie Party. 



Barbee Anderson 

Cee Blackwell 

Cathy Oindrey 

Susan EIrnd 

Marilyn Foster 

Jane Gully 



Claudia Harel 

Joan Landrum 

Jean McGinnis 

Chickie Morgan 

Laura Pohler 

Nancy Roebuck 

Jo Whyman 




56— Playboy 










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(Mill, tieiS' 

1 tint mile 

lailto 
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Qiristmis 
ofPliiPsi 
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ma Mat- 



William Abernathy 
David Ammons 
Gary Anderson 
Dan Anthony 
David Archer 
Steve AtwooH 



Coy Ballard 
Richard Ballenger 
Bob Bayless 
Bart Blaydes 
Tommy Blackwell 
Mike Bolen 



Dick Bowen 
Barry Brooks 
Bob Carrothers 
David Cole 
John Col lings 
Roger Cunningham 



Randy Elkins 
David Fields 
John Galloway 
Hugh Harbert 
Tommy Hart 
Jerry Hennigan 



Jimmy Hurst 
Steve Joiner 
Kenneth Jones 
Don Koeninger 
Mike Leach 
Don Lookadoo 



Ben Luscomb 
Max Martin 
Brant McGlothlin 
Bill McClure 
Don McKee 
Tom McSpadden 





^^m 




Andy Merryman 
Bill Moore ' 
John Morris 
Kip Murray 
Charles Norman 
Robert Owens 
Mike Peden 



Steve Pendleton 
William Sattler 
Larry Senkel 
Barney Sisco 
Mike Slavin 
Claude Tatum 
David Thompson 



Don Voss 
Bill Weaver 
J. Webb 
Tony Wenk 
Jerry Wester 
Jimmy Wester 
Jack Wilkins 



Charlie Wilson 
Terry Winn 
Joe Wittenburg 
Skip Wobig 
Doug Womack 
Doug Woodburn 
John Yarbrough 



Playboy — 57 



Mike Addison 

Mike Albert 

Hank Anderson 

Jim Baker 

Tommy Bearden 

Melvin Billups 



Mike Bodine 

John Brock 

Gary Canteaux 

Buddy Capps 

Bill Carson 

Harry Case 



David Coburn 

Tom Cheney 

Tim Currin 

Bruce Dowdy 

Tom Durant 

Terry Duraso 




Mike Farrow 

Rusty Folk 

Stephen Foster 

David Frazier 

Roger Freeman 

Charlie Ganz 

Pat Garrard 

Ralph Garrett 

Dennis Graham 
David Hand 
Larry Hand 
Rodney Hays 
Randy Heye 
Robert Huff 
Kirk Hunter 

Chuck Jennings 



Mike Johnson 

Ronnie Johnson 

Bill Jones 

Bob Jones 

Steve Jones 

Dennis Jordan 

Trooper Keeton 

Terry Kingsbetry 

Tom Kirk 

Mike Koehler 

Orland Lasley 

Claude Leatherwood 

Kenneth Linxwiier 

Gary Little 

Eddie Louden 

Cliff McMichael 




Bob Mooty 

Dan Newbrf>ugh 

Jim Norman 

Tim O'Rourke 

John Parchman 

Ronald Pate 

Mickey Radenz 

Garon Rayburn 

Jesse Richardson 

Tom Roy 

Ted Rushing 

Ronnie Ryan 

Nick Sample 

Bryan Shadden 

Ronnie Shcrrod 

Lynn Shulllesworth 

Jack Slargel 

Tommy Turner 

Pete Vadcn 

John Vernor 

Tommy Ward 

Jerry Watson 

Bill Wright 

Alex Yokubaitis 




1 



S^-Playboy 



Pi Kappa Alpha Finishes 



High in Fraternity Gtandings 




The brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha 
stress unity. Accomplishing this ideal is 
the project of each member, and the 
Pikes have many opportunities to 
examine each other's goals at group 
functions. 

A Miniskirt Party, Toga Party, 
and Tramp Turn-out provide the en- 
vironment for brotherhood participation. 
Pike Playmate calendars added to the 
fraternity projects. 

Pi Kappa Alpha was well repre- 
sented on the football field with Bruce 
Dowdy, Jesse Richardson, Buddy Capps, 
Harry Case, Jerry Watson, and Tom 
Durant. John Vernon competed on the 
Tech swim team, and Gary Wimmer 
and Dennis Graham were Student 
Senators. 

Fall officers were Ronald Pate, 
president; Mike Albert, vice president; 
Eddie Louden, secretary; and Kirk 
Hunter, treasurer. Spring officers in- 
cluded Bill Jones, president; Garon Ray- 
burn, vice president; Tim Currin, secre- 
tary; and Pete Vaden, treasurer. 



Bill Abernathy 

Greg Abernathy 

Andy Adams 

Dan Alpern 

Tom Best 

Brusse Bevers 

Sammy Biggers 

Chuck Brosseau 

Joe Burns 

Johnny Carlos 

Curtis Carter 

Robey Clark 

Don Conley 

Ron Conway 

David Corley 

Bill Comett 

Craig Cosgray 

Ronnie David 

Randy Denton 

Jerry Dukes 

George Ellis 

Keith Fabling 

Harry Farley 

Mark Finley 



Bill Garrett 

Mike Gibson 

Greg Gunter 

Phil Hay 

Bryon Hill 

Mark Hodges 

Randy Jones 

Gary Justice 

David Kelley 

Andy Kerr 

Tom Kline 

Paul Knuckley 

Jimmy Kuehn 

Ernie Kyle 

Pete Kyle 

David Ledyard 



Michael Lewis 

Bob Livingston 

John Loudermilk 

Mike Looney 

David Lown 

John Lown 

Mike Lumsden 

Gary Marshall 

Rick Marshall 

Terry Mathews 

John McCul lough 

Don Mclntire 

Andy Miller 

Tim Miller 

Larry Morgan 

Waldo Morgan 



Dennis Morris 

Ke\in Ormes 

John Perrin 

Chris Rasmussen 

Mike Robbins 

Robbie Sargent 

Garry Scruggs 

Dick Shaw 

Ernest Sheppard 

Steve Simms 

Eric Simpson 

Stephen Smellage 

Jim Sowell 

Randy Surratt 

Gary Vaughn 

Tommy Walker 



^^SS 





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Lynn Wells 

Jo Ben Whittcnburg 

Dennis Wojtnwicz 

Danny W<M>d 

Gary Wixxl 

Jim Worley 

Jim Young 




60— Playboy 




With over 160 chapters and 
150,000 alumni, Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
represents one of the world's strongest 
fraternities. 

Texas Alpha won the national scho- 
larship for the third year in a row, 
and also holds the Leo S. Cade award 
for the outstanding chapter in Texas, 
Oklahoma, and Arkansas. 

SAF.'s excelled on campus as well 
as nationally when the men began the 
.r with the annual Watermelon Bust, 
'eriy Willingham was chosen queen 
oT the event. The Christmas and Spring 
Formals, along with the annual Paddy 
Murphy Weekend rounded out the so- 
cial calendar. 

Texas Alpha stood tall in intra- 
murals with the B team winning their 
league in football, and the A and B 
team teams took championship honors in 
basketball. Outstanding brothers were 
Bill Cornett, business manager for the 
"^dent body; Andy Kerr, member of 
' IFC court; and Gary Justice, senator. 

Sportsmen included Kevin Ormes, 
Ronny Mercer, Ernie Sheppard, and Phil 
Hay on the football team. Robbie Sar- 
gent and Jo Ben Whittenburg played 
varsity tennis, while Dick Shaw repre- 
sented the E's on the baseball squad. 
Ronny Mercer and Bill Garrett collected 
many first place medals in track, as 
David Ledyard and Ronnie David com- 
ted for honors in golf. Head cheer- 
mer was Bill Abernathy. 




Sigma 
Alpha 



psilon 



Playboy— 61 




Friendship, justice, and learning — 
are the three great aims of Sigma Chi 
fraternity. The Epsilon Nu chapter 
strives to maintain a purposeful living 
brotherhood through campus and social 
activities. 

This year the Sigs were visited by 
many distinguished guests from across 
the nation. Carolyn Keithly, Interna- 
tional Sweetheart of Sigma Chi, and 
Mike Ditka, of pro-gridiron fame, were 
among outstanding visitors. 

The annual Derby Day saw Zeta 
Tau Alpha sorority walk away with the 
high point trophy, while a determined 
group of Gamma Phi Beta's accepted 
the spirit trophy. 

A Halloween party for orphans, 
blood drives, and the March of Dimes 
are among Sigma Chi's service projects. 
Money also went to the Wallace Village 
School, a mentally retarded center na- 
tionally supported by the Sigma Chi 
men. 

Brian Harrington, Bill Scott, and 
Bill Sewell served as senators, and Arch 
Lamb was chief justice of the IFC 
court and president of IFC. Peppy Brat- 
ton and Arch Lamb were Saddle 
Tramps, and Bruce Mauldin and Jim 
McCassland won the SWC pole vault- 
ing championship and javelin champion- 
ship respectively in track competition. 

Sigma Chi was chosen by the Na 
tional Interfraternity Council as thi 
number one fraternity in the nation, 
and keeping up with the high standards, 
Tech's chapter has received the Nation- 
al Scholarship Award every year. 



6 



62— Playboy 



5fna 
Chi 



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Mike Allen 
Gregg Ballentine 
Mike Boteler 
Steve Bean 
Richard Benning 
Butch Bowen 



T. A. Boyle 
Peppy Bratton 
Barry Briscoe 
Bill Bryant 
Bob Gate 
Ronny Collier 



Lee Culver 
Craig Dearden 
Tom Downs 
Jim Eady 
Rob Fields 
Bob Fleming 



Ken Foley 
Doug Fuller 
John Gardner 
Larry Glover 
Chris Hale 
Eddie Hardesty 



* 




Brian Harrington 
Bob Hartley 
Steve Hartnett 
Larry Haskins 
David Hayden 
Babo Hester 
Mike Holland 

Jerry Holt 
Paul Horton 
Matt Howard 
Nick Jackson 
Steven Jarnigan 
Mike Kelly 
Robert Kizer 

Arch Lamb 
Pat Mackey 
Don Mask 
J. Bruce Mauldin 
Allen McGehee 
David Moore 
Larry Moorhead 



Crayton Nelson 
Tom Nelson 
Pat O'Donohoe 
Stan Owen 
Robert Palmer 
John Parlette 
Tom Powers 

Larry Poulain 
Tommy Rogers 
Bill Scott 
Don Seba 
Bill Sewell 
Pat Simek 
Glen Sirles 

Curley Stacy 
Jimmy Ward 
Milt Wilson 
Ted Wooldridge 
Larry Thomas 
Bob Tilson 
Roy York 



Playboy— 63 



Academic proficiency, athletic 
ability, community service, and a full 
social program outline the activities of 
Sigma Nu fraternity. 

The organization has consistently 
fared well in intramurals and boasts 



a hockey and soccer team in the com- 
petition. Academics receive emphatic at- 
tention since the Tech fraternity has 
ranked scholastically in the top five 
chapters out of 143 across the nation. 
Over 20% of Tech's Sigma Nu's 
posted grade points of 3.0 or better. 



9igma Nu Enjoys Social Galas 



Of course Sigma Nu is also known 
for social events, including Home- 
coming and Christmas parties, the 
Snake Steak Sizzle, and Swahili Rumble. 
Mixers with sororities, pledge cuts, and 
ski retreats add to the fun. 

The Reading-for-the-Blind pro- 



gram, March of Dimes campaigning, 
and a Christmas party for orphan chil- 
dren headline community service 
projects. 

Each year the brothers choose a 
White Rose Queen selected from White 
Rose Princesses of the month. 



James Anderson 

Bill Ansley 

Gus Beck 

Mark Bentzen 

Brent Blackburn 

David Bowen 

Gary Bridges 

Collie Camp 

Jon Choafe 

Ronald Clift 

James Curtis 

Mark Deeds 

Bob Fairchild 

Alvie Faulkenberry 




Jimmy Franklin 

George Fuson 

Robert Gill 

Terry Gragg 

Jeff Grey 

John Hathaway 

Mike Hatley 

Rob Hart 

Fred Heaton 

Steve Heitzman 

Robert Henderson 

John, Biggins 

John LaGrone 

Dan Legg 

Roy Leslie 

Jim Lindley 

Ken McCleery 

Fred Madden 

Jim Martin 

Sam Martin 

Jack Maxwell 




Charlie Mf-yer 
Tiber Nagy 
David ODell 
Jerry Rogers 
Bryan Sims 
Mike Spears 
Eddy Smith 

Michael Smith 

Wayne Steen 

Jeff Terry 

Ron Thrash 

Tom Webster 

Jim Weinberger 

Stanley Wright 




64— Playboy 





k 




Aghazadeh Fereydoun 

George Arpin 

Charles Askins 

Jay Bowden 

Dale Buckner 

Mike Buykemper 

Wallace Byers 

John Champion 

Genaro Chavez 

Tony Chok 

David Cory 

Randy Driver 

Larry DuBois 

Dale Elam 

Jerrell Fester 

Larry Fisackerly 

Edmund Fountain 

Greg Froman 

James Hamilton 

Don Hannabas 

Chris Harris 

Tom Head 

Joe Hilbun 

Gary Hudspeth 

Henry Jacobs 

Byron Johnson 

Phillip Johnson 

Larry King 



Gary Krause 

Lee Gordon 

William Lodal 

Ron Mahaffey 

Billy Martin 

R. B. McBryde 

Robert McCoy 

Monte McGlaun 

Roddy Mclver 

Sam McJunkin 

Bruce McKibben 

Jimmy Mebane 

Billy Mitchell 

Albert Moon 

Erie Mote 

Gerald Nixon 

Bill Page 

Frank Pendleton 

Jim Pendleton 

Joe Perez 

Walter Peters 

Gary Peltit 
Jim Phillips 
Larry Pittman 
John Rollins 
Bill Schnabel 
Larry Shelton 
Chuck Space 

David Swariz 

Alan Thomas 

Mike Wadzeck 

Tom Wagg<incr 

Charles Walters 

Gerald Welch 

Phil West 



Alpha Phi Omega: 
The All-Service Frafernity 



Ail 






itr, a 
loll 




ofloiffll 

Had 



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66— Playboy 




As a service fraternity, Alpha Phi 
Omega's realm of usefulness enfolds 
chapter, campus, community, and na- 
tion. In living the cardinal principles 
of leadership, friendship, and service, 
club members were noticed throughout 
the year. 

Smokers, steak fry outings, and 
dinner-dances keep social activities up. 
The homecoming parade, a lost-and- 
found service, campus elections, registra- 
tion, and infirmary help keep the men 
busy each semester. Sales from foot- 
ball programs make possible two schol- 
arships, and fund drives in the com- 



munity give aid to several disease cam- 
paigns. 

The expanding "blind project" 
took on new dimensions this year as 
permission to use a building on campus 
was granted to the group. A tape li- 
brary is but one step in giving blind 
students a unique program at Tech. 

Club officers were Joe Hilbun, 
president; Bill Lodal, first vice pres- 
ident; Byron Johnson, second vice pres- 
ident; Gary Hudspeth, secretary; Bill 
Schnabel, treasurer; and Rene Freeman, 
chaplain. 



Lending a helping hand to national cam- 
paigns against diseases is natural for Alpha 
Phi Omega men. This year the industrious 
group sold shamrocks on St. Patrick's Day 
for muscular dystrophy. 





(» 





Experimenting in a rewarding social life 
is a favorite pastime of Chi Rho men. A 
Purple-Passion party, goat roast, a Camp- 
fire party at Palo Dure Canyon, and other 
galas prove that the fraternity is always 
willing to further brotherhood ideals. 




68— Playboy 



Chi Rho Fraternity Offers 

Complete Religious 

Brotherhood 




Chi Rho is one of Tech's most 
unique and diversified fraternities. The 
group expounds service, athletics, re- 
ligious activities, and a complete social 
calendar to all members. 

The men of Qii Rho feel that 
brotherhood is their strongest attribute, 
and they recognize that the bond satis- 
fies the idealistic desires of college men 
to join together in making friends and 
developing themselves into whole 
beings. 

A semester retreat provides an op- 
portunity for the men to increase their 
brotherhood, and members attend the 
church of their choice regularly, wor- 
shiping as a group once a month. 

Rush activities always give Chi 
Rho men the impetus to increase their 
social life. The Olympiad, an annual 
event consisting of all-day sports con- 
tests, is a favorite during the spring se- 
mester. Sports of all kinds play an im- 
portant role in the development of fra- 
ternity members, and the entire program 
is aimed at giving members complete 
participation. 



Vincent Baldino 
Steve Chambers 
Stewart Carrico 
Jim Gray 
Alfredo Guzman 
Tim Hart 
Phil Hefner 
Ricky Jackson 

Bill Kendall 
Tom Kight 
Roy Kimball 
Jenci Kocsis 
EdKot 
Tony Kuehler 
Don Levings 
Nic Locascio 

J. D. MacArthur 
Steve May 
Joe Mino 
Raul Montemayor 
Jim Newman 
Arthur Opperraann 
Pat ORiley 
Robert Pettier 



%!^w: 




Rusty Powell 
Ken Pribyla 
Dan Shelley 
Tom Telia 
Richard Trevisan 



Playboy— 69 





Riverboat 

Party 

Scores 

Success for 

Delta Sigma Pi 



Delta Sigma Pi serves a dual pur- 
pose in instigating a social-professional 
program with a strong element of 
brotherhood. The Beta Upsilon chapter 
was founded on the Tech campus in 
1947, and has since established a 
unique organization promoting the study 
of business. 

An all-school Hell's Angels Dance, 
the Toga, Roaring Twenties, and River- 
boat parties are products of the Delta 
Sig's ingenuity. The group sponsors an 
annual Careers Conference for all Tech 
students, with businessmen throughout 
the nation attending the meet. 

Officers included John Wool- 
dridge, president; Tom Weaver, senior 
vice president; Barry Beeschman, junior 
vice president; and David Holiday, sec- 
retary. 

Gambling fever reaches a peak of excite- 
ment during the annual Delta Sig Riverboat 
Party, where members and dates shuffle 
from table to table in an effort to relieve 
inner tensions. 




i 



70—Piayboy 




Ronald Anderson 
Steve Beasley 
Mike Boyle 
Larry Bryant 
Barry Buschmann 
Harry Byers 
Tim Carrico 



()• 




Glynn Collins 
David Elliott 
Steve Fanning 
Jim Gill 
Jim Goodman 
Kenneth Hahn 
Randy Hendrix 
Rocky Hill 

Dave Holliday 
Joe Kelley 
Bill Lewis 
Tony McCurdy 
Philip McDonald 
Jim Morrow 
Allan Newsom 
Karl Sanders 

Tommy Selby 
Robert Smith 
John Smothers 
John Sublett 
Tommy Weaver 
Stephen Webb 
Woody Wilson 
John Wooldridge 




Playboy— 71 



Bob Adams 

Ronnie Agnew 

David Amnions 

Bill Andrews 

Bobby Ball 

Virgil Barber 



John Baughman 

Bobby Beard 

Jerry Beasley 

Burt Bratcher 

Peppy Bratton 

Clark Briggs 



Randy Brillhart 

Tom Qirter 

James Cooper 

Cyrus Cozart 

Dan Crone 

Travis Cummins 



Bob Damron 

Eugene Davenport 

Jim Douglass 

Frank Fekete 

Bob Fletcher 

Larry Foerster 

Mike Fox 

David Frashier 

Mike Gallagher 

Paul Graham 

Brooks Gunter 

John Hathaway 

Lee Nobbs 

Bill Hodges 



Richard Horridge 

Bill Horton 

Keith Ingram 

Kerry Jones 

Paul Kenley 

Andy Kerr 

Eddie Kleibrink 

Tom Landers 

Gary Lindsey 

Ricky Lunsford 

Randy Macurak 

David McDowell 

Michael McMahan 

Pat McMahon 



Ray McWilliams 

David Mooring 

Jim Murray 

Steve Myers 

Rick Price 

Gary Rider 

Mike Robbins 

Sandie Sandlin 

Steve Simms 

Danny Smith 

Sam Slennis 

Terry Stephens 

Ronald Stephenson 

Richard Sterling 



Jim Stinson 

Jay Thompson 

Richard Thornberry 

James Tompkins 

David True 

Everett Urech 

Richard White 





g^ag 



72 Playboy 




Qaddle Tramp 
Nerves Outlast 

1970 Season 

Frontier Texas history saw the 
saddle tramp as a man who rode from 
ranches to farms, helping families with 
their work. The Saddle Tramp of Texas 
Tech furthers this spirit while uphold- 
ing the traditions of the university. 

They spend man-hours by the 
hundreds leading cheers at sports events, 
escorting Tech and visiting athletic 
teams, guiding tours of parents and 
visitors on campus, and giving the red 
carpet treatment to visiting dignitaries. 
The 90 member group was born in 
1936 and has since developed into a 
strong spirit organization which offers 
constructive channels for the betterment 
of Tech. 

This year's officers were Randy 
Brillhart, president; Bill Horton, first 
vice president; Eddie Kleibrink, second 
vice president; Dave Ammons, secre- 
tary; Steve Simms, treasurer; Bill 
Hodges, and Danny Smith, sergeant at 
arms. 

The red-shirted Saddle Tramps continue to 
provide the spirit needed to motivate Tech 
athletic teams throughout the year. 



Playboy— 73 



Qigma Phi Epsilon Takes 
Pr-ide in Youthful Foresight 



Sigma Phi Epsilon social fraternity 
was founded in 1901 at Richmond, 
Virginia by 12 men who were seeking 
a .brotherhood based on Christian ideals 
and principles. Today Sig Ep's take 
pride in being the second largest fra- 
ternity in the nation with 191 chapters 
and colonies. 

The same foresight and ambitions 
have been evident at Tech this spring 
when the fraternity founded the 192nd 
branch. In the two months of the 
group's existence the colony boasted 
a 40 man membership, with the men 
participating in various campus-wide 
activities. 

I-our Sig Ep's represent the frater- 
nity in Saddle Tramps (including the 



president of that organization), several 
varsity athletes, the president of Wey- 
mouth Hall, and the vice president of 
the Fraternity Relations Council. 

The brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
were aware that the Greek system at 
Tech was in need of new ideas and 
programs. With the arrival of inde- 
pendent and mature freshmen, the fra- 
ternity established a new pledgeship 
based on constructive policies. 

The brothers are looking forward 
to greater involvement in campus issues 
in the coming yeafs, but the men feel 
they have a definite advantage with 
youthful and energetic plans for the 
present. 



Tech's Newest 
FraternHy 




Richard Alcantar 
Virgil Barber 
Patrick Bell 
Richard Brigham 
Randy Brillhart 
Rick Campbell 



Mike Chamblee 
Steve Chandler 
John Cook 
Dan Crone 
Dou^' Dorden 
Jody Gilles 



Rox Edgar 
David Hausler 
Steve Jantzen 
Winky Liles 
Mazel Merrill 
Myron Messner 



John Moore 
Roger Norwood 
Ronny Ramsey 
Ken Schneider 
Bryan Smith 
Dennis Stewart 



Kit Stewart 
Mark Stewart 
Don Taylor 
David Walker 
Jim Ward 
Travis Ware 



Larry Whatley 
Darrell Wilke 
Fritz Wisdom 



Playboy 75 



College Residence Hall Convention 
Discusses Dorm Housing Improvisationdi 



Texas Tech was the host school 
for the 1970 national convention of 
the National Association of College 
and University Residence Halls 
(NACURH). 

The purpose of NACURH is to 
integrate the ideals and to exchange the 
ideas of its member schools. There are 
124 member schools coming from all 
states except Alaska and Hawaii, and 
two member schools from Canada. The 
Tech convention site was the first ever 
held in the state. The five major areas 
chosen for discussion were judicial sys- 
tems, student Bill of Rights, visitation, 
co-ed housing, and architectural facili- 
ties. 

Tech planned activities for the 
delegates ranging from a rodeo to a 
mock gambling casino. A barbecue and 
formal banquet honoring the newly 
elected national officers helped dele- 
gates in getting to know other member 
school's policies. Co-chairmen for the 
convention were Katie Upshaw and Bill 
Hibbs. 




Included in the executive committee are (lop 
tif,hl) Tom Carter, Judy Storm, Pete Olfers, 
Kathryn Ann Baker, Jean Ann Cannon, 
Lloyd Jobe, and Nancy Hal). During the 
casino (rinhl) and dance (above) students 
from the representative colleges and univer- 
sities are able to discuss new ideas on 
solving housing problems. Members of the 
housing committee (holiom tight) are Ellen 
McDaniel, Amy Hammer, "Chickie" Morgan, 
Jean Spitler. (Back row) Sheila Poulson, and 
Bill Scott. 




•1 



16— Playboy 




r 




I 



fflJloid 
■Patht 



Deciding on subjects for research in the 
betterment of residence hall life is a major 
part of the national convention. Delegates 
(left) have an opportunity to discuss specific 
problems as well as beneficial programs in- 
stigated at their schools. Barbeque suppers 
(below) help delegates get acquainted with 
other members. 




At casino night (above) the delegates win 
and lose fortunes at the gambling tables set 
up in the Student Union. 



Other members of the executive committee 
are Lucy Casbeer, John Burch, Bill Hibbs, 
Terry . Serie, national president; Katie Up- 
shaw, and Janie Beddingfield. 



Playboy— 77 



Girls Wafch the Tech 



PLAYBOY AFTER DARK 



because its where the swinging 
college life begins! The Tech playboy 
enjoys all forms of revelry, ranging 
from midnight keg parties, to weekend 
trips via Juarez, Mexico. He plays host 
to every type of entertainment imagin 
able, but is just as active in academic 
produrtions. 

The college male finds self-ex 
pression in plays, athletics, fraternity 
functions, or a number of other worth- 
while and gratifying activities He places 
importance on grades, with no less at- 
tention given to drinking pleasure. 




Studml jpectalur pircicip^tion ranks hijth 
at T«h VfhHhcr voicin/{ opinions over 
$(«>»» or adminiitration policy. ih<r Tech 
pidyboy IS conlinually faced with a barra>!e 
of extracurricular functions to attend. 




78—Plarbor 



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1 



Whether he is crammed next to a band- 
stand for a closer look at Sonny and Cher, 
making-up for a lead role in a theater 
production, or "doing his thing" as a 
female impersonator at Derby Day, the Tech 
male is a symbol of personal freedom. 



Playboy— 79 



CIRCLE K: 



Promoting the image 
of the university 
on campus and 
in the community 
through service 




Circle K members include (front) G«iy 
Dixon, Norris Wucnche, Gerald Randies, 
(hack) Willard Raiffeisen, Paul Quinn, and 
Brad Warner. 



eO—Plarboy 




r\A/^Sybi)IMMING POOLS 
■COVERED DECK PARKING 







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FOR ENTERTAItSIINC 



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RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES _ 



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S & Q Clothiers 



THE QUICKSILVER CO 

1112 Broadway — Lubbock, Texas 

PO 3-2835 



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CAMPBELL, GRIGG 

AND DOWDY 

OF THE RED RAIDERS 





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Contents 



1969-1970 



Volume 15, No. 1 



2 Life Among The Giants 



1 6 A Taste of Success 



26 The Year's Finest 



32 Jump Long, Jump Tall 



36 Third Time Around Not So Charming 



42 A Rush For Third 



45 The Name of the Game Is Soccer 



46 Third Best in a Tough Loop 



48 Underwater Raiders 



The departments 

51 Dolphins 56 Jones Stadium 

52 Double-T Association 57 For The Record 

54 Intramurals 58 Faces In The Crowd 




The staff 



Editor: 

Dave Ammons 

Sports Information: 
Ralph Carpenter 
Bob Condron 



Staff Writers: 
Chuck Bailey 
John Baughman 
Karen Jessup 
Danny Smith 





Student Publications Director: 
Bill Dean 

Our thanks to the publisher 

of Sports Illustrated Magazine 

for allowing Texas Tech to 

use its name and format. 



Next year 



A new coach and an expanded, 
J7-game schedule await Red 
Raider football fans in 1970. 
Jim Carlen's gridders had a 
spirited, injury-free spring train- 
ing and should be ready for an 
explosive season of Southwesf 
Conference football. 



The Sob Bass Bra enters its 
second year on the Red Raider 
basketball court. Senior Steve 
Hardin will be gone, but All- 
SWC performers Gene Knolle 
and Greg Lowery should form 
the nucleus of an outstanding 
basketball team. 



Sports Illustrated — 1 



Sports Illustrated 



LIFE 

AMONG 

THE 

GIANTS 



Senior quarterback Joe Matulich (17 at right) 
was Tech's only returning letterman able to 
break into the Red Raiders' sophomore- 
studded backfield of 1969, spearheaded by 
first-year runningbacks Danny Hardaway 
(44) and Miles Langehennig (34). Even 
Matulich, however, was able to win only a part 
time role, sharing signal-calling duties with 
sophomore Charles Napper. Together, the duo 
guided the Raiders to a conference record of 
four wins and three losses — good for a third 
pltice tie with TCU in a Southwest Conference 
race dominated by the national champion 
Texas Longhorns and seventh-ranked Arkansas 
Razorbacks. by DAVE AMMONS 




2— Sports Itlustraud 




■m. 



^- 




TECH 38, KANSAS 22. It took the Raiders 28 minutes and 25 seconds of actual 
game-time in '69 before they began to roll — and the Kansas Jayhawks loved it. With 
only 1:34 remaining before halftime, the visitors from Lawrence enjoyed a 16-0 
lead. A 42-yard field goal by Jerry Don Sanders put the Raiders on the scoreboard 
near the close of the second quarter and Coach J T King's troops returned from 
intermission ready to play, especially linebacker Dennis Lane and defensive half- 
back Denton Fox. The keys to Raider victory were provided by 55-yard touchdown 
runs on pass interceptions by each, plus a second aerial theft by Fox (31 below, 
following the blocking of Bruce Dowdy.) Danny Hardaway (44 at right) carried 
the ball into the end zone once against KU and was well on his way to becoming 
Tech's most productive rusher with a season total of 483 yards. 




*»«** ▼'^JF Vr*-T 

1^ ^ ^ 



? ^ 



^9 5 Q (? 9 

9 5 5^, 




Phillip B»rney Kobbie Beif Scoff br»dy 

Bruce Bushong Rich»fd Campbe/I Ruddy Cappt 

Gary Doiron Marc Dove Bruce Dowdy 



Mike Brewer David Browning 

Marfy Cr/'swe// Don Crocker 

Jim Dyer Char/ei Evtr)t 




4— Sports Illustrated 




1 



Sports Illustrated — 5 







TEXAS 49, TECH 7. The Raider de- 
fensive forces, led by Richard Camp- 
bell and Dicky Grigg (putting pressure 
on Steer quarterback James Street 
above), found their backs to the goal 
line every time they took the field 
against the Longhorns. Enjoying ex- 
cellent field position on each posses- 
sion, the mighty Texas backs crashed 
into the Tech end zone seven times. 
The Raiders, meanwhile, mounted only 
one offensive drive, culminating in a 
nine-yard touchdown pass from 
Charles Napper to Johnny Odom in 
the final period of play. 



OKLAHOMA STATE 17, TECH 

10. The Cowboys of OSU overcame a 
10-0 deficit to down the Raiders by 
seven in a game played in Stillwater, 
Okla. Johnny Kleinerl (right) broke for 
the Raiders' longest kickoff return of 
the season on a 34-yard jaunt behind 
the blocking of a host of Redclads, in- 
cluding Ken Kattner (29). The crush- 
ing blow was dealt to the Raiders 
when Cowboy tackle John Ward car- 
ried a misfired punt to the Tech 22, 
setting up Oklahoma State's winning 
touchdown. 



6 — Sport* Illustrated 




fi 






f 9 § © C^ 

^ Q ^ 







Mark Fincannon 


Tom Finley 


Joe G/enewinlce/ 


Jamie Hahn 


Danny Hardaway 


Larry Hargrave 


Phil Hay 


Marie Haze/wood 


Jon Hill 


Mike Holladay 


John Howard 


Andy Hoyle 


Harold Hurst 


Ken Kaffner 


John Kleinerf 


Der)nis Lane 


Miles Langehennig 


Ted tavvson 


David May 


Doug McCufchen 



TECH 13, TEXAS A&M 9. Trailing 
the Aggies of A&M 9-6 with 7:36 left 
in the fourth quarter, the Red Raiders 
rnounted the only touchdown drive of 
the evening to claim their second 
win of the season. Until that time, the 
game had been a defensive battle with 
only faint glimmers of offense occas- 
sionally breaking through the barrage 
of tacklers and pass defenders. Tech's 
deep men, including Jerry Watson (23 
at left) and Bruce Bushong (22), held 
the Aggie aerial attack to 48 yards 
and teamed with the front wall to in- 
tercept three enemy passes and re- 
cover a fumble. Tech's defensive 
stamina kept the Raiders in the game, 
but it was a one-yard touchdown 
plunge by Danny Hardaway with a 
fourth down and 1:16 showing on 
the scoreboard clock that sewed it up 
for the Techsans. 



Sports Illustrated — 7 




MISSISSIPPI STATE 30, TECH 26, A game that had all the early 
signs of a catastrophe turned into a near-victory when the Red Raid- 
ers battled their old nemesis, the Bulldogs of Mississippi Stale Univer- 
sity. Behind by a 30-10 count, the Techsans charged back to narrow 
the margin to four points with first-and-10 on the MSU 12-yard line 
and two minutes remaining. Miles Langehenning (crashing through the 
Bulldog defense, above, with the help of Mark Hazelwood, 54) moved 
the ball to the eight to give the sophomore fullback a game total of 
114 yards. Quarterback Napper threw incomplete on second and 
scrambled inside the two on third, only to have the play called back on 
a penally. A fourth-down pass fell to the ground and it was all over for 
the Raiders. 



TECH 27, SMU 24. A 77-yard touchdown pass from Napper to 
end Johnny Odom (80 at right), a savage, fumble-producing tackle 
by All-American defensive back Denton Fox and a 36-yard field 
goal by kicker Jerry Don Sanders fueled the Raiders to a slim, 
three-point victory over SMU's Mustangs in a regionally televised 
game in the Cotton Bowl. Down 14-10, the Tech defenders launched 
their toughest goal line stand of the year when, facing an SMU first 
down at the Tech four, they threw the Ponies back six consecutive 
times, including two Raider penalties, to take over on the eight-yard 
line. 



RED RAIDER CAPTAINS 




:^ii\ri. 






rrvic Tvru 



^cn,.. TEXAS lf[R 



Jimmy Btnnttt Denton Fox Dicky Grigg 



Jot Mafu/ich 



8— Sports Illustrated 





^ 5 ^ © 5 

^ 9 ^ 

•J TEAS m mtEn ' rmsuiSA MMH-rms %ci^. 
^ #^ <f^i r^ r 

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^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 






i 



Wayne McDermand 
Tom Newton 
Ken Perkins 
Jerry Ryan 
Carroll Sullivan 



Ronnie Mercer 
Pete Norwood 
Dale Retold 
Jerry Don Sanders 
Tom Telia 



Larry Molinare 
Johnny Odom 
Jesse Richardson 
Tom Sawyer 
Lane Wade 



Bob AAooney 
Barney Oliver 
Pat Rogers 
Ernie Sheppard 
Mike Watkins 



Charles Napper 
Kevin Ormes 
Ronnie Ross 
Charles Stewart 
Jerry Watson 




TECH 24, RICE 14. The 

Rice Owls gave Tech's home- 
coming crowd a scare, storm- 
ing to a pair of early touch- 
downs to lead the Raiders, 
14-0. The Tech defense, how- 
ever, put the skids on the 
visitors and six-pointers were 
placed on the board by Danny 
Hardaway, Johnny Odom and 
Jimmy Bennett, with Jerry 
Don Sanders (left) adding 
the extra points and a 27-yard 
field goal. 



Sports Illustrated — 9 



WkF^ 



TCU 35, TECH 26. Tech's championship 
hopes were shattered by the powerful run- 
ning of TCU backs Marty Whelan, Norman 
Bulaich and Sammy Rabb (30 at right, 
being stopped by Raiders Mike Watkins, 
36; Bruce Dowdy, 91; and Dicky Grigg, 
56. ) The Frogs gained a total of 382 yards 
to throttle the Techsans, who took a half- 
time lead, 16-14, on a Reagan Young 
touchdown, a field goal, and a punt defen- 
sive end Richard Campbell blocked and 
recovered in the end zone. 




11 

« 

It 




TECH 41, BAYLOR 7. Eight sopho- 
mores started on offense for Tech and 
teamed with veterans Jimmy Bennett (41 
at right), Charlie Evans (87), Denton Fox 
(31 at right and below), John Howard 
(21), Dennis Lane (62) and Wayne Mc- 
Dermand and Richard Campbell (at left 
below) to demolish the winless Bears. A 
pair of field goals by Jerry Don Sanders 
set a new SWC record. They were his 
tenth and eleventh of the season. 






ARKANSAS 33, TECH 0. Tech played the Razorbacks of Arkansas on Thanksgiv- 
ing Day in Little Rock, Ark., before a national television audience — and for the first 
time all year, the Raiders were completely blanked. Twice the Techsans moved the 
ball within field goal range. Both times they gambled on fourth down, hoping for a 
six-pointer. And both times they lost. It wasn't the first time, however, that the 
Razorbacks had blocked their opponents' way to the end zone. The stingiest defense 
in the country had already placed Arkansas high in the national rankings. For 
Charles Napper (above) it was a long day, but the quarterback heir apparent man- 
aged to complete eight passes for 109 yards. Miles Langehenning (34 at right with 
Qiarlie Evans, 87) combined with Danny Hardaway for 102 yards rushing. 




eddy Windom 
J T King— 

Head Coach 
Ber/ Huffman 



Walter Yatbrough 
Jim Acree 
Elwood Kelller 



Heagan Young 
Burl Barlleit 
Bradley Miltt 



Cftuck Zeller 
John Conley 
Jeis Stilei 



P. Robijon— 

Alh Dir 
Gene Hendenon 
Tom Wilson 



12— Sports lllustraled 




THE PROMISE OF YOUTH 



The Picadors, despite a 1-3 season, characterized the potential and determination to be champions. 



In Jess Stile's first year as fresh- 
man head coach, the Pics compiled a 
1-3 record and showed some signs of 
great promise. 

The Pics in their first outing of 
the year lost a close one to the Arkan- 
sas Shoats in Jones Stadium by a score 
of 23-22. Dickie Ingram's last-second 
field goal try from 53 yards out was 
slightly off to the right and the game 
of inches told its story again. A missed 
point after touchdown earlier in the 
game however proved to be the mar- 
gin. 

An Ingram field goal from 40 
yards out led off the scoring in the 
contest after the Shoats fumbled in their 
own territory. Arkansas came back to 
go ahead 7-3 on a 65-yard scoring 
play, and widened the gap to 10-3 on 
a field goal after an interception of a 
Greg Waters pass. 



The Pics came back strong on a 
drive led by the strong running of 
halfback Ed Lee Renfro with the TD 
coming on a 1-yard plunge by quarter- 
back Waters. Ingram's successful extra 
point try knotted the score 10-10. Ar- 
kansas came back to score once more 
before the half on a 51-yard TD toss. 

The third quarter saw only 3 
points scored as Arkansas' kicker con- 
nected on a 36-yard field goal. The 
fourth quarter began with the Pics 
trailing 20-10, and the margin soon 
widened to 23-10 as a Shoat field 
goal was on the mark. 

The Picador offense got in gear 
again late in the 4th quarter with Wa- 
ters again scoring; this time from 
15 yards out. The conversion by In- 
gram failed and the score remained 
23-16. Another quick score on a 5- 
yard jaunt by Renfro brought the Pics 



to within one point, 23-22. A two point 
conversion failed, but the excitement 
wasn't over as the Pics' on-side kick 
was successful. Ingram's last second 
field goal try was off and the final 
tally remained 23-22 in favor of Ark- 
ansas. 

In their second game of the yea? 
the Picadors displayed a stunning com- 
bination of hard-nosed defense and 
brute running strength as they rolled 
over the UT at Arlington Rebels, 31- 
14. After a scoreless first period, the 
Pics broke the ice quickly in the sec- 
ond stanza on a 53 yard scoring march 
climaxed by Andy Lowe's 1-yard 
plunge. 

With 1:30 remaining in the first 
half it was Lowe again who reached 
paydirt, this time from 5 yards away. 
Ingram's second consecutive extra 
point made the score 14-7. 




1 



The 1969 Pictdort: (front row) Btty, Green, Slwnt, Renfro, Tucker, Wtters, Vtn loozen, Ingram, Gond; 
Shew; ( second row) Burnett, McClutkey, Binghent, Kintner, Reynolds, Boyd, Robinton, Jonet, Lyont, 
Lev/ton, Bleck, frempton. Little; (third row) Burnett, Napper, McCain, Kinman, Lowe, Miller, Boshar, 
Weaver, Hunter, Wingo, Fiveash, Johnton, Gamble, Coach Stilet; (fourth row) Swinney, Thomat, Wll- 
liamion, Kirkpatrick, Schaffner, Rivet, freeman, Henlhorn, Ingram, Cook, GriHith, Akin. 



Promising receivers characteiiied the Picadon' of- 
fensive power. Receptions like that of Harry Slrunc'a 
(49 above) were r>or uncommon. 



14 — Sports lllusfrated 



(li 



The Pic's Benny Akin widened 
the margin again on a 6-yard stroll and 
following Ingram's extra point the 
score read 21-7. Arlington scored once 
more on a seven point tally and the 
Pics retaliated with 10 more points 
late in the game. 

The Pic's final scoring strike oc- 
curred on a 32-yard bomb from Jack 
Fampton to Andrew Gonda. The sta- 
tistics told the story of the Pic's domi- 
nation in the game. They led in first 
downs 23-10, yards rushing 326-99, 
and total yards 433-210. 

The Picadors ran into stiff op- 
position on the road, losing to Okla- 
homa 50-12 and Texas A&M 35-0. 

Leading ground gainer for the 
Pics was Ed Lee Renfro. The strong 
running halfback crashed for a sea- 
son total of 282 yards on 75 tries. 
Greg Waters led the passing statistics, 
completing 51.7 per cent of his passes 
for 399 yards. 

Receivers were led by Roger Nap- 
per's eight receptions for 95 yards. 
Dickie Ingram, handling all the kick- 
ing chores, punted for a 40.2 yard 
average and scored a total of 11 
points. Total offense leader was Wa- 
ters with a total of 515 yards gained. 

Andrew Gonda was the leader in 
punt return yardage, while Andy Lowe 
led all the kick-off returners. Co-lead- 
ers in the scoring department were 
Waters, Lowe, and Renfro with 12 
points each. 




The Picadors' defensive and offensive squads showed great potential. A promising front line (top) 
composed of Ronald Rives, Ray Kintner, Joe Weaver and Cedric Jones dumps the UT-Arlington quarter- 
back, while freshman signal-caller Greg Waters (10 above) watches Bd Lee Renfro find paydirt against 
the Arkansas Shoats. Blocking for Renfro were a host of Red-dads, including Aubrey McCain (41 ) and 
Mike Hunter (52). 





Head Coach Jess Stiles poses with team captains Russell Ingram (64), 
Gaines Bary (32), Jerry Miller (53) and Steve Van Loozen (20). 



Kicking specialist Dickie Ingram (above) seems to be picking up right where 
recent Picador greats Kenny Vinyard and Jerry Don Sanders left off. Handling 
all the freshman kicking assignments, Ingram punted for a 40.2 yard average 
and scored a total of I ? points during the four-game season. 



Sports Illustrated — 15 



A 

TASTE 

OF 

SUCCESS 



The Red Raiders, up until the last two 
games of the '69-70 season, were in 
contention for the Southwest Confer- 
ence title. They came close . . . they 
had a taste of success. Picked to place 
seventh, the Raiders finished in a third 
place tie with an impressive 8-6 record 
— impressive not only in the sense of 
a respectable won-lost record, but also 
in the talent, desire and potential great- 
ness shown by the players and coaches. 
by JOHN BAUGHMAN 




16— Sports Illustrated 



r 



The Red Raiders began their '69- 
'70 season, the first under Coach Bob 
Bass, with an appearance in the Lub- 
bock Coliseum against Houston Bap- 
tist. Led by play-maker Steve Williams, 
a junior guard from Pampa, the Raid- 
ers combined the fast break and a 50.9 
percent shooting effort to bounce the 
Cougars, 76-66. Williams led the scor- 
ing with 16 points while Jerry Turner, 
Steve Hardin and Gene Knolle shared 
rebounding honors, each pulling seven 
off the boards. 

The Tulane Green Wave became 
the next home-court victim of the Raid- 
ers, with the Techsans holding off a 
last-minute effort by Tulane to preserve 
an 82-80 victory. Steve Miller and 
Gene Knolle sparked the scoring for 
the Big Red. Miller, celebrating his 
twenty-first birthday, pumped in 20 
points, while the amazing Mr. Knolle 
tossed 22 points through the hoop. 
Greg Lowery, a sophomore junior 
college transfer from Oklahoma Mili- 



tary Academy, added 17 points to the 
total. The Raiders' shooting percentage 
remained in the fifties, 5L8 percent 
to be exact, and their rebound total fell 
only three short of the taller Green 
Wave's effort. 

The next team to enter Tech's lion 
den was the Sooners of Oklahoma Uni- 
versity. Four Raiders scored in double 
figures — Knolle, Williams, Hardin and 
Lowery — but the game's outcome 
wasn't decided until the final minute of 
action. The Raiders inbounded the ball 
with 59 seconds left to play after OU's 
Scott Martin knotted the score at 64 
apiece. Utilizing a pair of time-outs, 
the Techsans retained control until, 
with three seconds left, Larry Wood 
screened the opposition and Gene 
Knolle ripped the cords from ten feet 
away. Leading 66-64 with only one 
second showing on the clock, the Raid- 
er victory was secure. 

The old saying "Go west, young 
man, go west" doesn't always prove so 



profitable. Misfortune struck the Red 
Raiders on their western road trip. In 
the first game of the tour, the Raiders 
kept pace with the nationally-ranked 
Colorado Buffaloes through intermis- 
sion, leading at one point by ten, and 
managed to take a 31-31 tie to the 
dressing room at halftime. 

Hopes for a fourth consecutive 
victory disappeared in the second half 
as three Raider cold spells coupled 
with the 27-point outburst of Colo- 
rado's Cliff Neely soon spelled the 
Raiders' demise, 75-56. Williams and 
Knolle led Tech's scoring with 13 
points apiece, while the latter also 
paced the squad in rebounds with 12. 

The Raiders carried a 3-1 record 
to Albuquerque where they battled the 
University of New Mexico Lobos. Play- 
ing without the services of virus-ridden 
Steve Williams, the Raiders failed to 
get their offense in gear and they 
tumbled to defeat, 87-65. 



^ 


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Senior forward Sfeve Hardin lays it in for two points against SMU. 
Hardin was instrumental throughout the season on defense and was a 
consistent offensive threat, hitting over .500 from the field. 



Steve Williams adds two more against the conferences' leading rebounder, Doug 
Boyd of TCU. Williams, a junior guard, seemed to have the knack of getting inside 
for layups despite the taller opposition. 



Sports Illustrated — 77 




Tech claimed its fourth win of 
the season against the University of 
Arizona, 85-80. The "tiny gianU" 
launched a deliberate second-half of- 
fense, making crucial baskets and re- 
bounds, to stun the heavily favored 
Wildcats. Holding only a slim 81-79 
lead with 46 seconds to go, Knolle 
connected on the final basket of his 
28-point performance and Hardin 
added a pair of free throws to ice the 
game. 

The next five Raider contests were 
at home — most of them during the 
Christmas vacation. Despite the ab- 
sence of students, 7,200 fans gathered 
to watch the Raiders lose to a much 
taller Brigham Young University 
squad, 88-81. Knolle was the leading 
Tech scorer with 24 points, while 
Turner led in rebounds with 12. 

Tech's second opponent in the 
final home-stand of the pre-season was 
California State. Paced by Kfiolle's 27 
points and 12 rebounds, the Raiders 
triumphed, 75-64. 

The Raiders took on Wyoming 
before a crowd of 9,145 and kept pace 
all the way, but lost a heart-breaker, 
63-62, on a last second Wyoming bas- 
ket. Williams was the leading scorer 
with 21 points and Knolle captured 
the rebounding honors. 

Tech once again met West Coast 
competition and downed the University 
of California-Santa Barbara, 69-57, 
behind the rebounding of Hardin and 
the scoring of Steve Miller. 

The Raiders closed their pre- 
season activity with an exhibition game 
against the Athletes-in-Action before a 
crowd of 6,375. The Techsans upped 
their non-conference mark to 8-3 as 
they handed the Athletes an 82-78 loss. 



# 



Rebounding ttnngth w$ found In Jttry Turner (top). Turner tvertged 10.7 rebounrfi 
per game, the highest per game average on fhe Reider squad. Greg Lowery (above) 
came alive during conference play to provide one of fhe hot scor/ng hartds for the 
Raiders. Averaging 17.6 poirtts per game, Lowery scored 35 against UT. 



Larry Wood (above) provided a spark for the Raiders when rhe offense 
wasn't clicking. Wood came off fhe bench several times to save the Tech 
victory. Gene Knolle (opoosite pape) was the "clutch man" for fhe 
Raiders, scoring a fotaf of 50) points for the season. 



18 — Sports Illustrated 






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RAIDERS 

VIE FOR 

THE CROWN 



The Raiders dropped their SWC 
opener to the Rice Owls ... by a 
single point. Before a crowd of 3,800 
in Houston, the Red Raiders saw a 15 
point second-half lead slowly melt 
away. With 17 seconds left. Rice guard 
Gary Reist hit a jumper from the 
lane to put the Owls ahead 86-85. The 
Raiders called time to plot their strate- 
gy. Williams got the call but his shot, 
with seven seconds left, was off the 
mark, and Rice held on to the victory. 
The game had a high point for Tech 
however, as Lowery came alive to put 
32 points through the hoop. 

Tech traveled back to Lubbock to 
face the Mustangs and All-SWC Gene 
Phillips. Jerry Turner, named honor- 
able mention All-SWC, held Phillips 
to a season low of 10 points and the 
Raiders ran away with it, 90-60. Knolle 
hit the hoop for 26 points, while Greg 
Lowery ripped the cords for 22. 

A televised day game caught the 
Raiders off guard in Fort Worth, and 
the Horn Frogs of TCU clinched a vic- 
tory, 81-73. The Big Red couldn't get 
their game going. They came close to 
winning several times during the sec- 
ond half but just couldn't pull it off. 
The conference record was now 1-2 
wilh a game coming up against the 
league-leading Bears in Waco. 

Coach Bass figured the Raiders 
couldn't keep up with the Bears in a 
running game so the Red and Black 
used a slow-down, deliberate offense. 
It almost worked. With 18 seconds to 
go, Tech had a one-point lead with 
Williams going to the line for a 1-1 
situation. The first shot was missed, 
Baylor rebounded and scored before 
Tech could get its defense set up. The 
game ended with a Greg Lowery shot 
which was just inches off the mark 
and the Bears danced off the court with 
a verv shaky one-point victory, 4746. 

Tech now owned a disappointing 
1-3 conference record, but they were 
still to be heard . . . they fought back. 

Arkansas' Razorbacks came to 
Lubbock the following Saturday night 
and found themselves going back home 
with a 50-48 lo?s. Again, however, 
the Raiders couldn't get their offense 
going. Larry Wood came off the bench 
to hit a series of crucial buckets which 
vaulted the Raiders into the lead. Tur- 
ner and Knolle turned in two key de- 
fensive plays in the closing seconds 
and the Raiders raised their mark to 
2-3. 

Tech broke even in the race as 




Pat McKean (45) and David Johnson (35) provided bench strength for the Raiders. Both men were 
at times called on to fill-in for members of the starting five. 




I 



Opf 
far 
ainii 

diji 



naid 

of 5 



A basketball team needs a quarterback who can run the team and keep the game plan going. Steve 
Williams (left) was such a quarterback. He was instrumental as the team leader on rhe courf. Mike 
Oakes (right) provided reserve rebourtd strength for rhe Raiders. Oalkes was a rough man to push 
around under the boards. 



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Kiel 
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20~Sports Illustrated 



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5 



Opposing feams gave a /of of credit »o the Raiders' defense. Steve Miller deserves credit 
for part of this defense. On offense Miller was a/so valuable to the squad, averaging 
a/most ^00 from the outside. Coach Bass does his /ob and does it well. Above, he ex- 
plains the strategy of the game to team rrtembers, and genera/// successful strategy 
characterized Raider game plans. 



The Raiders upped their shooting percentage rrom last year, 
Steve Hardin, a sen/or forward from Lubbock, helped boost this 
percentage with a "touch" from the outside. 



()• 



, SW 



the Aggies fell to a hot shooting Red 
Raider bunch before a roaring crowd 
of 9,400 fans. The key was a 50.8 
shooting percentage combined with a 
trapping defense which caught the Ag- 
gies by surprise. The Red Raiders put 
an 84-66 conquest into the history 
books. 

Turner again did a fantastic job 
on defense as he held Mike Heitmann 
(All-SWC) to 14 points. Lowery and 
Knollfs put up 23 and 17 points re- 
spectively. 

The Orange and White of Texas 
put a man-to-man defense against the 
Raiders in Austin, but Tech tore it 
apart for an 81-69 victory, their first 
SWC conquest on the road. Knolle led 
the scoring with 20 points, but Hardin, 
Lowery, Miller and Turner were all in 
double figures. Miller hit key shots 
from the outside all night and Turner 
went wild on the boards and also 
racked up his season high of 18 points 
on offense. 

Things had changed since the 



Raiders were in Waco. Baylor had lost 
two straight and TCU was the confer- 
ence leader. This lead lasted only until 
the Frogs faced Tech on the Raiders' 
home court. TCU's "chip on the shoul- 
der" was knocked off and the Raiders 
put together a hot offense and good 
defense to take a 75-60 win to the 
showers. Knolle was high point man 
with 22 for the Raiders, Turner led 
in rebounds and Williams did an out 
standing job of ball control through 
out the game. The crowd was noisy 
very noisy; sometimes a little too ex 
uberant during parts of the poorly of 
ficiated game. The noise made by the 
Tech crowd, however, seemed to add 
a thrust to the Red Raiders' attack, 
for the Big Red was to lose only three 
games out of fourteen at home. After 
the win over TCU, the Raiders stood 
5-3. 

Texas came to the Coliseum for 
a second try but they met a man they 
didn't like, as Greg Lowery singed 
the hoop with a blistering 35-point 



performance. Before a television audi- 
ence and 9,238 fans, the Red Raiders 
used a devastating running game as 
their weapon and knocked the Long- 
horns to their knees, 90-71. Knolle 
was second in scoring with 25 points 
and Turner led in rebounds. 

A noisy Aggie court and a hot 
free-throw shooting Aggie team ended 
the Raiders' five-game winning streak 
on the following Tuesday. The Raiders 
played their game, but the shots 
wouldn't fall and the Aggies claimed 
an 82-74 victory. Tech's record fell 
to 6-4, two games behind Rice, tied 
with A &M and TCU. 

Arkansas in Little Rock posed a 
problem for the Raiders. Big Red blew 
a 19-point lead and came close to de- 
feat until Knolle hit several crucial 
baskets to put the Raiders into the lead 
in the last minute. Knolle was good 
for 30 points. Lowery hit for 26 and 
Turner owned the boards with 15 re- 
bounds. The record stood at 7-4, two 
games behind Rice, in second place. 



Sports Illustrated — 21 




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Jerry Turner (above) had his best year for the Raiders offensively. During SWC play, he h/f 56.5 per- 
cent from the field and 70 percent from the free throw line. Jerry was also the key defensive man 
for the Raiders. In a home game against SMU, Turner held the SWC's leading scorer Gene Phillips to 
ten points. AP's Sophomore of the Year Greg Lowery (opposite page) displayed against Rice the kind 
of cfefeffnination that typified the hustle and desire of the Raiders. 



m 




The '69-70 Red Raiders: Dan Shelley, Steve Miller, Steve Williams, Randy Sherrod, Larry Wood, David 
Johnson, Pat McKean, Charles George (manager), Steve Hardin, Lee Tynes, Greg lowery. Coach Bob Bass, 
Jerry Turner, Trainer Don Sparks and Gene Knolle. Not pictured are Mike Oakes, Mike Rogers and 
assistant coach Corky Oglesby. 



The Owls were in the lead, a 
position they would never relinquish, 
but the Raiders sliced the margin to 
one game by posting a 78-66 decisive 
conquest of the visitors from Houston. 
Knolle was the leading scorer with 27 
points and the leading rebounder with 
20. Turner came down with 15 re- 
bounds to his credit. Wood and Miller 
left the bench to score 10 points apiece, 
to keep the Raiders in the lead. The 
halftime score was 30-25 and Rice 
could get only two points closer 
throughout the second half. Turner got 
hot for 15 points and Williams again 
demonstrated good ball and game con- 
trol along with a 12 point performance. 

One game back of Rice with two 
games to play found the Raiders still 
in the running. A&M lost to Baylor 
and was dropped from a chance at 
the title. Rice still had to face the Ags 
in College Station. A victory by the 
Aggies and two more victories by the 
Raiders would have given Tech a piece 
of the championship. However, SMU 
and Baylor devastated the hopes as 
they dropped the Raiders 85-80 and 
80-72, respectively. The Big Red closed 
with an 8-6 conference mark (tied for 
third) and a season mark of 15-10. 
They came very close, but it just 
didn't happen. 

Tech returned to the fold of the 
SWC basketball powers. The reasons, 
undoubtedly, were a pair of outstand- 
ing coaches — Bob Bass and Corky 
Oglesby — and a talented, determined 
bunch of ballplayers. Many consider 
Bass to be one of the top basketball 
men around and Tech has good re- 
cruiting potential in the personage of 
assistant coach Oglesby. 

The Raiders, at the first of the 
season, were slated to finish seventh in 
the conference. They finished in a tie 
for third and they came very close, 
give or take a few points, to first. 

The effort was a team effort, 
sparked by individual performances 
throughout the season. Knolle broke 
the 500 point mark for the season 
and was unanimous first team All- 
SWC. Lowery became a hot shooter 
during conference play and landed a 
berth on the SWC's all-conference first 
team and was lauded as Sophomore of 
the Year by the Associated Press. Wil- 
liams had to be counted among the 
finest "quarterbacks" in the confer- 
ence. He made the Raiders do their 
thing. When Williams wasn't at his 
best, Wood or Miller picked up the 
slack and pulled through for the Big 
Red. Hardin was good on offense and 
defense. Turner was exceptional on de- 
fense. 

The crowds were fantastic and 
noisy. With the exception of three 
games, the Raiders couldn't lose at 
home. An all-time season record of 
116,780 fans watched the Raiders 
knock off the two conference leaders 
. . . and almost everyone else. 

Of the "starting seven" only Har- 
din graduated in '70. The Raiders were 
just getting started ... in fact, this 
was only the end of the beginning. 

Sports Illustrated — 23 



THE NEW BREED 




Led by the scoring and rebounding of Gene Kaberline, Coach Gerald Cop- 
pedge's Texas Tech Picadors broke even with a 6-6 record. A Colorado native, 
Kaberline paced a team consisting of four out-of-state players who made impressive 
showings during the season. From Hartford, Ky., high school teammates Everett 
Taylor and John Parker were joined by fellow Kentuckian Steve Smith and Eddie 
Combs from Arizona. Robbie Knight, Russell Arthur, John Meyers, Charles 
Williamson and Tom Malone rounded out the team. 

After losing to Lubbock Christian College, 79-69, in their opening game, the 
Picadors bounced back to defeat Wayland College, 66-65. Such was the beginning 
of an up and down season. A victory over McMurray, 79-71, a loss to West Texas, 
89-58, another loss to LCC, 66-64, and a win over Abilene Christian College, 75-74, 
ended the first half of the campaign. After a mid-season slump with successive 
losses to South Plains College, 92-85, West Texas, 90-69, and Cisco Junior College, 
82-63, the Pics struck back with three straight wins over ACC, 91-64, South 
Plains College, 86-84, and Wayland, 78-74. 

Although still untested against Southwest Conference teams, several Picadors 
showed promising talent for future varsity teams. Kaberline led the team with a 
17.3 scoring mean and an 11.1 rebounding average. Taylor, Parker and Smith 
followed with 16.3, 15.9 and 9.8 scoring averages, respectively. Smith, the second 
leading rebounder, averaged 7.1 caroms per game. 

With a strong finish, the Pics ended the year averaging 73.5 points per con- 
test, promising good things for future Red Raider teams. In his last season as 
head freshman basketball coach, Coppedge molded a team from talent en- 
compassing not only Texas, but other parts of the United States, as well. His teams 
have — and will for the next few years — serve as the backbone of the varsity 
squads. 



A leading scorer on the Picador squad, John Parker 
gets set against the ACC Wildcats. 




The 1969-70 Picadors: (bottom row) Robert Campbtll, Robb/e Knight, Rusull 
Arthur, John Meyers, John Parker, Everett Taylor, (top row) Co«ch Allen 



laker, Chatlet Williamton, Iddie Coirtba, Sfevt Smith, Gene Kaberline, Tom 
Malone and Coech Gerald Coppedge. 



24 — Sports llluitraled 



It 




Sporls Illustrated^25 



THE 
YEAR'S 
FINEST 



Headed by AU-American Den- 
ton Fox, six Red Raiders distin- 
guished themselves as the best in their 
own particular fields. 

Joining Fox in the all-star foot- 
ball category were Jerry Don Sanders 
and Richard Campbell, both of whom 
received All-Southwest Conference ac- 
claim. Similar honors were awarded 
to Gene KnoUe and Greg Lowery in 
basketball, while swimmer Paula Cle- 
ments stole the show in the feminine 
bracket. 

Fox, who was invited to three 
post-season all-star games — the Senior 
Bowl, the Hula Bowl and the Blue- 
Gray Game, was tabbed an All- 
American by the Football Writers As- 
sociation of America. During his three 
years as a Red Raider, Fox inter- 
cepted seven passes, including one he 
returned 55 yards for a touchdown 
against Kansas. 

Sanders received a bid to per- 
form in the Blue-Gray Game and 
Campbell was invited to the Hula 
Bowl. 

KnoUe and Lowery were both 
named to the All-SWC squad, with 
KnoUe also receiving honors as the 
Raiders' Most Valuable Player in all 
sports, while Lowery was selected the 
league's Sophomore of the Year. 

Miss Clement was the outstand- 
ing Tech competitor in spring sports. 
In competition against Texas-Austin, 
TCU, Tarrant County Junior College, 
TWC and the University of Texas-Ar- 
lington, she took first place in the 50- 
yard butterfly, the 100-yard back 
stroke, the 100-yard individual med- 
ley and anchored a winning effort in 
the 200-yard freestyle relay. 




JERRY DON SANDERS 

Kicking Specialist 

All-SWC 



GENE KNOLLE 

Forward 

All-SWC 



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26Sports Illustrated 



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GREG LOWERY %, 

Guard 

Sophomore of Year 

AII-SWC 



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DENTON FOX 

Defensive Back 

All-American 

All-SWC 



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Sports Illustrated — 29 




RICHARD CAMPBELL 

Defensive End 

AII-SWC 



PAULA CLEMENTS 

Swimmer 
Three-event Winner 



30 — Sports Illustrated 



i 



liner 
iner 




JUMP LONG, JUMP TALL 

Strong in field events, most Raider points throughout the season were earned in the long jump and pole vault. 

by KAREN JESSUP 





^ 



Despite the individual perform- 
ances of Zane Reeves, Bobby Blain, 
and Ken Ford, 1970 proved to be an 
off-year for the Red Raider cinder- 
men. 

More than once Reeves was high 
point man for Tech as he placed first 
in the 100-yard dash and earned ad- 
ditional points on both the mile and 
440 relays. Blain was often a winner 
in the pole vault, and Ford consistent- 
ly placed high in the long jump. 

In the Southwest Conference 
Meet held in Houston on May 1-2, 
the Raiders tied for a sixth place 
berth with SMU. Allen Schriewer, 
Walter Mason, Bill Garrett, and 
Reeves completed the 440 relay with 
a time of 41.5 to give Tech a third 
in that event. Blain's effort of 15 feet 
was fourth highest in the pole vault, 
and Archie Van Sickle placed third 
in the javelin. In a photo finish Reeves 
captured fourth in the 100-yard dash, 
while only an inch separated Ford's 24- 
feet-six-and-three-fourths-inches third 
place effort from the winning distance 
in the long jump. Additional points 
were earned for Tech by the mile relay 
team which came in fifth. 

The Raider cindermen began the 
season by attending the Fort Worth 
Indoor Meet on Dec. 6. Ford was the 
only Raider to place, taking a fourth 
spot in the long jump. 

In the Border Olympics held at 
Laredo, Blain placed fourth in the 
pole vault by clearing the bar at 14 
feet. Van Sickle's throw of 204-7 gave 
him a close second in the javelin, while 
Ford outdistanced all opponents to 
take first in the long jump. 

In the triangular meet against 
Baylor and the University of Texas, 
Tech won five events to take second 
place in the meet. Blain's jump of 15- 
8.75 not only took first place in the 
pole vault, but also set a new Tech 
record. Reeves' time of 9.5 in the 100, 
coupled with Garrett's lime of 9.9 gave 
the Raiders both first and fourth place 
spots in that event. 



Ztne Reeves crosses rhe finish lint first to win fh« 
100-yrd d»$h in rh« fri-meer at Arlington. 



32— Sports Illustrated 



;. 




1970 Tech Track Team: (bottom row) Bill Garrett, AUer\ Schriewer, Bob Blain, 
Maurice Brooks, (Cev/n McPea/t, Logan Lowe, Cra/'g tawhorn, and Walt Mason. 
(Middle row) Dave Cnerre, lance Harter, Sam Skinner, Francis Doyle, Dave 



Nelson, Ronnie Williams, Larry Schovasja, and Zane Reeves. (Top row) David 
McKinney, Ken Ford, Dennis Lane, Archie Van Sickle, Ronald Grisby, Norman 
Tanner, Mark Weeks, and Donnie Anderson. 



»»« 



41 



The Raiders almost swept the 120 
hurdles with Grisby taking first, Ford 
placing third, and Mark Weeks finishing 
fourth. In the 440-yard relay Schriewer, 
Mason, Garrett, and Reeves teamed up to 
take top spot. Ford took second in the 
long jump, and Reeves and Garrett placed 
third and fourth, respectively, in the 220- 
yard dash. 

The quadrangular meet between TCU, 
SMU, Texas A&M, and Tech was not held 
due to snow in Fort Worth. After a week's 
rest the Raiders entered the Tech Invita- 
tional, a non-scoring meet, and won a ma- 
jority of first place trophies. However, in 
the Texas Relays held in Austin the fol- 
lowing week, Tech failed to place and 
several Raiders sustained injuries. 

On April 11, Tech tied for second in 
the triangular meet against TCU and the 
University of Texas at Arlington. Scho- 
vajsa's time of 1 :54.6 was fastest in the 
880, and Blain's jump of 15-6 netted him 
first place in the pole vault. Reeves won the 
100-yard dash with a time of 9.6, and 
placed second in the 220. In the 120 hur- 
dles Grisby took second with a time of 
14.4, and Ford, who was .1 second behind 
him placed third. Schovajsa, Mason, Gar- 
rett and Reeves took second in the 440 
relay, and Van Sickle's hurl took third in 
the javelin. 




Sam Skinner harKis off to David McKinney as Tech takes second in the mile relay behind UT. 



Sports Illustrated — 33 




Bobby Blain shows in three easy lessons how to set « pole vault record as he stretches over the bar at 15-8.75 to break the old Tech record of IS feet. 




Archie Van Sickle hurls the lavelln 307-4 fo win that event In the meet against UT and Baylor. 



34 — Sports Illustrated 



On April 18 Tech placed second 
in a quadrangular meet between SMU, 
Baylor, Tech, and the University of 
Texas. Van Sickle's hurl of 208-1, his 
best of the season, won top honors in 
the javelin. The Raiders' only other 
winner in field events was Blain, who 
cleared 15-6 in the pole vault, ahead of 
all other opponents. 

The Raiders completely stole all 
the honors in the 120 high hurdes as 
Grisby, Ford, and Weeks, placed first, 
second, and third, respectively in that 
event. The mile relay team came in 
second with a time of 3:15.8, and 
Reeves' time of 9.6 gave the Red 
Raiders another second. Ford showed 
his versatility by taking second in the 
long jump and third in the 440-yard 
hurdles, in addition to his second place 
effort in the 120-yard hurdles. Scho- 
vajsa's time of 48.5 in the 440-yard 
dash was third best in that event. 

Due to injuries, the Raiders did 
not participate in the Colorado Re- 
lays held annually in Boulder, but in- 
stead entered the Wayland Invitational 
Meet in Plainview. Taking top honors 
in the meet were Van Sickle in the 
javelin. Reeves in the 100-yard dash, 
Grisby in the 120 high hurdles, and 
Ford in the long jump. A drop of the 
baton cost the Raiders a place in the 
mile relay, and also forced them to 
take second in the meet. 



I 



•rtJi 




Red Raider Kenneth Ford lumps 24-6.75 lo place third irt the SWC Meet. Haider Ronald Grisby wins first place ir> the 120 high hurdles with a time of 

14.6 in the SWC Triar)gular Meet against Baylor and the University of Texas. 



Sports Illustrated — 35 



>*^< 







# '''^- 




n 



THIRD TIME 

AROUND - 

NOT SO CHARMING 



Tech'i third time around the SWC circuit proved to be somewhat less charming 
than the old adage implies. Although the Raiders lost only two starters from a team 
that finished third in the conference the previous year, bad weather and bad breaks 
produced a poor season overall for Kal Segrist's baseballers. by DANNY SMITH 



It was a look of oprimism tliat 
infiltrated Kal Segrist's 1970 Red 
Raider baseball camp. Graduation the 
previous year had vacated only two 
positions in the entire starting lineup. 

Returning leltertnen in the out- 
field included the previous year's start- 
ing trio of Don McKec, Steve Hurt 
and Randy Walker. The infield boasted 
the likes of Johnny Owens, a two-year 
starter at third base, and power hitting 
first sacker Dickie Shaw. 

Max Martin would be handling 
the catching chores for the third 
straight season. A proven performer, 
Martin could be counted on both for 
his fine defensive play and dependable 
bat 



36 — Sports lUuatrated 



i 





15:0 R«i 

Jualioii iht 
I only two 
Mj liief 
a the out- 
,-ear'i start- 
5te,-e Hart 
(IJboaitK' 
J i»-o-yea' 
iwtibiltinj 



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wrfonM'- 



li 



The Raider pitching stables were 
staffed with two returning starters, 
Jack Pierce and Gary Washington; a 
promising junior college standout, Gil- 
bert Vasquez; and several impressive 
freshman moundsmen. 

The two remaining positions, sec- 
ond base and shortstop, were filled by 
the heralded keystone combination of 
John McGuire and Doug Thorley, re- 
cruited from Glendale Junior College 
in Arizona. How well these two men 
would be able to fill the shoes of the 
previous season's All-SWC perform- 
ers, Jerry Haggard and Jim Mont- 
gomery, was the main question in 
Coach Segrist's mind as the Raiders 
went through pre-season drills. 



The stage for the non-conference 
season seemed set. Then before the 
first game had been played, Johnny 
Owens suffered a fractured collarbone 
and Don McKee sustained a hair-line 
fracture in his right elbow. 

The season opener was a 10-inn- 
ing slugfest with the Raiders coming 
out on top, 15-10, over Hardin-Sim- 
mons. Max Martin and Dickie Shaw 
homered to lead all hitters. 

The next stop on the Raiders' 
road tour was Edinburg where the 
Techsans took on Pan American in a 
week-long series. 

The series opener saw Pan Am 
blank Tech, 3-0, but the Raiders came 
back in the nightcap of the double- 



header to take a 4-2 decision as right- 
hander Mike Muschalek extended his 
record to 2-0. 

Tech boosted its season mark to 
3-1 in the third game of the series by 
edging the Edinburg nine, 6-4, in a 
10-inning contest. Bobby Guerin 
picked up the win by relieving starter 
Gary Washington in the last of the 
ninth. 

The fourth game of the series 
proved disastrous for the Raiders as 
they outhit Pan Am, 9-7, but lost in 
the runs column, 6-4. A total of five 
errors, four in the bottom of the fifth, 
handed Tech its second loss in five 
games. Randy Walker's three hits and 
Monte Van Stravern's superb three- 



Sports Illustrated — 37 







Shortstop Doug Thorley (above), a second team junior college all-American in 1969, lays down a 
sacrifice bunt as co<aptain Don McKee (below) chases an ellusive drive deep in the right field comer. 




inning relief job were the Raiders' only 
bright spots. 

The Techsans closed out the series 
with a 6-0 loss. It was the second time 
Pan Am had blanked Tech in their 
five-game outing. The somewhat omi- 
nous trend of silent bats and poor de- 
fensive play that was established in the 
Pan Am games would continue to 
plague the Raiders throughout much 
of the season. 

The Raiders came from behind to 
nip UT-El Paso, 4-3, in their 1970 
home debut. A sparse crowd watched 
as John McGuire and Doug Thorley 
sparked rallies in the sixth and seventh 
frames. 

Trailing 3-0 going into the bottom 
of the sixth, McGuire worked UTEP's 
Harry Milner for a free pass. The little 
second sacker promptly stole second, 
setting the stage for Thorley 's run- 
scoring double. Successive sacrifice 
flies by Don Spain and Steve Hurt 
produced the second Raider tally. The 
score was tied on a UTEP error after 
Lenny Schenk had walked and ad- 
vanced to third on Dickie Shaw's 
single. 

Again in the seventh, it was Mc- 
Guire and Thorley who provided the 
winning punch as Thorley for the 
second time doubled home McGuire 
who had walked. 

On Saturday, Tech's weak-hitting 
Raiders gained a split with the Miners 
despite collecting only nine hits for 
the two games. In the first contest, 
the Raiders became the victims of a 
masterful three-hit shutout by lefthand- 
er Marc Bombard. 

The scheduled nine-inning night- 
cap saw a Tech hurler go the route for 
the first time during the season. Ruben 
Garcia, freshman from Brownfield, 
showed tremendous poise in his first 
collegiate win as he allowed only 
five hits and one run in 10 innings. 

Defense played a key role for the 
Techsans in boosting their record to 
5-4. First baseman Dickie Shaw was 
credited with a record 27 putouts for 
the day and backup man Jerry Ballard 
picked up nine assists from the hot 
corner in the second game. 

In a scheduled three-game series, 
abbreviated because of adverse weath- 
er, the Raiders recorded a tie and a 
loss against perennial rival New Mexi- 
co Highlands. 

Trinity handed Tech its final loss 
in non-conference play with a 10-9 
set-back. 



38 — Sports Illustrated 






It 



}> 



CONFERENCE 

EFFORTS FALL 

FAR SHORT 



The Raiders began their confer- 
ence play with many of the preseason 
questions still unanswered. Poor weath- 
er had hampered workouts invariably 
during the month of March. 

Disaster struck twice in the same 
day as the Techsans opened conference 
play in Houston. The streaking Owls 
upset the Raiders' first bid for league 
laurels, 7-0 and 6-4. 

The first game saw Rice's pitcher 
fashion a four-hitter with Doug Thor- 
ley collecting two of Tech's hits. Thor- 
ley had his best day in a Raider uni- 
form by banking out two more hits in 
the nightcap. 

A bases-loaded triple in the fourth 
inning erased a 3-1 Raider lead and 
proved too much for Tech as Rice 
went on to win, 6-4. 

The final contest was decided in 
the first inning when the Owls' center 
fielder made a circus catch of a 
Johnny Owens drive, robbing him of a 
three-run homer. Rice claimed a 2-1 
decision with Gary Washington ab- 
sorbing the loss for the Raiders. 

Tech swept its first twinbill of the 
year in an unscheduled pair of games 
with West Texas State the following 
week. Raider bats exploded for 14 hits 
in the first game and then followed 
suit with eight more in the nightcap, 
boosting Tech to a 13-0 and 4-2 sweep 
over the Buffs. Gilbert Vasquez and 
Doug Ham picked up wins in the ef- 
fort. 

In the Raiders' next conference 
outing against Texas, James Street's 
perfect game, the first in modern 
SWC history, proved too much for 
Tech's hitters and Texas captured a 
4-0 victory. The second game of the 
doubleheader extended Tech's winless 
streak in conference play to five 
straight games. The only bright spot 
in the 6-3 loss was a brilHant seven- 
and-one-third-inning relief job by Jack 
Pierce. 

The Tech-TCU series saw the 
Raiders win their first game of the 



Co-capfain Max Martin's bat proved to be in- 
valuable as he led the Raiders in hitting. 




I'mifijrJi 



Sports Illustrated — 39 






^^^^i^mS^^^^^^.' 




1970 Red Raiders: (sitting) Dan Smith, Mgr. (First row) Doug Thorley, John 
Owens, John McGuire, Randy Walker, Don McKee, Cecil Norris, Hal Holloway, 
Ruben Garcia, Lenny Schenk. (Second row) Coach Kal Segrist, Bobby Martin- 
dale, Bobby Cuerin, Gilbert Vasquez, Larry York, Donny Spain, Mike Mus- 



chalek, Steve Prinz, Jerry Ballard, Jim Montgomery, graduate assistant. (Third 
row) John Bickley, Stan Goode, Max Martin, Steve Hurl, Dick Shaw, Gary 
Washington, Jack Pierce, Monte Van Slavern, Lonnie Whitfield. 



season in conference play. After drop- 
ping the first two, the Techsans came 
back to take the third, 7-4. The extra- 
inning contest proved to be a mile- 
stone with Randy Walker setting a 
conference record with four sacrifices. 

The Raiders began the scoring 
with two runs in the third inning. The 
Frogs came back to score a pair in 
the sixth inning and that is the way 
things stood at the end of nine innings. 
The game was tied again at the end of 
the tenth after each team pushed 
across another run. 

The Raiders exploded for four 
runs in the top of the eleventh to 
put the game on ice and bring their 
record in conference play to 1-7. 

Tech fell victim to the Aggies in 
their next conference series. A&M 
swept both ends of a doubleheader, 
3-0 and 64, and the third game was 
not played because of bad weather. 
Doug Rau hurled a two-hit shutout in 
the short game to record his seventh 
straight win of the season. 

Slick-fielding third-baseman Johnny Owens pegs 
to first after coming up with the ball. 




40— Sports Illustrated 



Two unearned runs in the first 
inning on throwing errors by Gary 
Washington provided the winning 
margin in the nine-inning affair as 
A&M extended its league-leading 
mark to 11-0, while Tech dropped to 
1-9. 

The following weekend in a series 
again abbreviated to two games by 
adverse weather, the Techsans scored 
their second victory in SWC action. 
This time the victim was SMU, with 
the Raiders splitting a pair with the 
Mustangs, winning 11-2 and losing 
4-3. 

Ruben Garcia threw a three-hitter 
to take the win in the opening contest 
with the support of Tech batsmen who 
lashed out nine hits, three of them 
homeruns. Johnny Owens started the 
scoring with a 326-foot blast in the 
second and Jerry Ballard followed 
with a two-run slam in the fifth. Cecil 
Norris added a round-tripper in the 
sixth to top off Tech's power display. 

A three-game series sweep, Tech's 
first in conference play, marked the 
Raiders' homestand against Baylor's 
Bears. 

Kay Segrist's men put it all to- 
gether to romp the Green and Gold- 
clad men from Waco by scores of 
5-3, 4-2 and 14-2. 

In the first game Ruben Garcia 
picked up his third conference win 
of the year, giving up only six hits, 
while his teammates were blasting 
Baylor's chunker for eleven safeties. 

Gary Washington became the man 
of the hour in the second game by 




Freshman Ruben Garcia, the team's Most Valuable Player, uncorks one against Baylor. Garcia turned in a 
brilliant performance on the year with a 4-2 record to lead the Tech pitching staff. 



I 



II 




p?^^ 



limiting the Bears to five hits and 
two runs, both unearned. 

Randy Walker led things off in 
the third game with a homerun and 
the parade of Tech runners across 
home plate did not stop until 14 had 
made the circuit. Walker enjoyed the 
best day of his collegiate career at the 
plate, going three-for-five, while Doug 
Thorley was making history by becom- 
ing the third man in Raider baseball 
annals to collect 30 hits in a single 
season. 

Co-captain Max Martin garnered 
highest season batting average honors 
by rapping out two hits, while Jack 
Pierce chalked up his first win of the 
year. 



Johnny McGuire, the Raiders' firey little second- 
baseman, slides in under Baylor's catcher to 
score. The Baylor series saw Tech complete its 
first three-game-sweep since entering SWC base- 
ball action two years ago. 



Sports Illustrated — 41 



A RUSH FOR THIRD 



The likes of Rusty Powell, Joe Williams and Robbie iiargent gave Coach George Philbrick a sound team and a respectable season. 



Top seeded Red Raiders, Joe Wil- 
liams and Rusty Powell spearheaded 
1970's third place finish in the South- 
west Conference tennis race. Along 
with Robbie Sargent, Powell and Wil- 
liams at different times of the year, 
were all ranked number one on the 
Tech team. Powell and Williams also 
made up the top doubles team fol- 
lowed by freshman James Chisholm 
and Sargent. Other members of the 
team were Warren Craig, Joe Ben 
Whittenburg and Mike Nye. 

In early season matches, Tech lost 
to West Texas State 2-5, but defeated 
Hardin-Simmons 7-1, with all singles 
matches being won, except one, and 
victories in both doubles games. They 
were 7-0 in the Rice Intercollegiate 
Tournament with Powell, Williams, 
Sargent, Nye, Craig and both doubles 
teams winning over Kansas. In the 
Corpus Christi Tournament the Raid- 
ers beat Florida State 5-2 as Sargent, 



Williams, Whittenburg and the doubles 
team of Whittenburg and Sargent all 
won. 

At the other end of the state in 
the West Texas State Tournament, 
Tech defeated Oklahoma State 7-0, 
West Texas 4-3 and Arkansas 5-2 be- 
fore they lost to powerful Pan Ameri- 
can 2-4. In other non-conference games 
Tech defeated Oklahoma City 5-2 and 
lost to New Mexico 3-4. 

In Southwest Conference round- 
robin play Tech was 3-3 with victories 
over TCU, A&M and Baylor. Their 
losses were suffered at the hands of 
SMU, Texas and Rice. Arkansas did 
not participate in round-robin play. In 
the all important Southwest Confer- 
ence Tournament in Houston, Rusty 
Powell was defeated by Rice's Mike 
Estep in the quarterfinals and Powell 
and Williams were beaten in the semi- 
finals also by Rice who won the tour- 
nament. 



Against Rice only fourth-seeded 
Warren Craig won his set as the Raid- 
ers were defeated by the strong Owl 
team 1-5. Rebounding against A&M, 
the Tech team won all of their sets 
finishing a 6-0 victor. 

Next, the Raider netters played 
the Horned Frogs of TCU and took 
five of their six sets, Powell being the 
only loser. Against SMU, Powell came 
back to win his set as did Craig, but 
to no avail as the Mustangs won the 
match 5-2. With Baylor, Tech had 
little trouble, taking the match 6-0. 
Finally, only Sargent and the number 
one doubles team were able to win 
against powerhouse Texas. The Long- 
horns took the match 4-2. 

Under Coach George Philbrick's 
tutelage the Techsans faired well in a 
league of strong teams. With gradua- 
tion taking the top two players, Powell 
and Williams, the team suffered a 
great loss of talent. 




4-- 



The form of Robbie Sargent (above) often ceused the tetond-y*»r /etferman from Wichita Falli to be 
and Jot Williams (right) were even more potent at the Red Raidert' top doubles team. 



see<M number one. Top Individual start Kutty Powell 



42—SporU Illustrated 




I 

I 

• 



*.« 



Ill w> 
Noe n 
lielM 



Returning letterman Warren Craig (above left) 
was rarely defeated in conference play as the 
fourth-seeded Red Raider. Freshman James 
Chisholm from Midland (above right) moved 
into the fifth fjosition late in the season as a 
member of the number two doubles team. 
The 1970 Tech tennis team: (top row) Coach 
George Philbiick, Joe Williams, Mike Nye, 
Warren Craig; (bottom row) Joe Ben Whitten- 
burg, James Chisholm, Rusty Powell and Robb/e 
Sargent. 




44 — Sports Illustrated 



\ 



I: 




Bill Windier "heads" the ball to Car/os Pineda (above), white Harold Scholey and 
Noe Villarreal, kicking, move the ball downfield against Trinity en route to a 3-3 
tie (below). 



■J^ /^ 






■r 



« 



R 



THE NAME 
OF THE GAME 
IS SOCCER 



In only its second year of existence, Tech's newest 
varsity sport is soccer. Members of the Texas Collegiate 
Soccer League, the youngest Red Raiders are Tech's 
entry into the rest of the world's most popular spectator 
sport. 

The 1969 Techsans ended their regular season be- 
hind league-leading UT and St. Mary's of San Antonio. 
Led by the powerful scoring combination of Carlos and 
Pedro Pineda and Wolf Kreuzer, captain John Lam- 
berth's team gained victories over TCU and Schreiner, 
forfeits over Rice and Texas A&M, and a tie with 
Trinity. Losses came at the hands of Texas, St. Mary's, 
UTA and Houston. In non-league games, Tech defeated 
Webb AFB twice and Reese AFB once. 

Members of the team were John Lamberlh, Paul 
Kreuzer, Wolf Kreuzer, Jack Swatzell, Bill Windier, 
David Fordam, Pedro Pineda, Carlos Pineda, Howard 
Scholey, Harold Gopie, Noe Villarreal, Andy Kiryaka- 
kis, Edward Murray, Tom Vaughn, Steve Hatch, and 
Ramon Uranga. 



•>.?! /.'^Va*^'! 





Sports Illustrate' 



"^ 



THIRD BEST IN A TOUGH LOOP 



A balanced season and the play of Brad Wilemon and Jim Whilteker gave the Red Raiders third place, by CHUCK BAILEY 



Not to be different, the 1970 
Texas Tech golf team finished third 
as football, basketball and tennis had 
done before it. Lubbock golf pro Gene 
Mitchell served his fourth year as the 
coach of the team which was led by 
Brad Wilemon, John Shepperson, Ham 
Rogers and Jim Whitteker. Other 
members of the team were Chuck Lar- 
son, Stan Wilemon, Buddy Croom, 
Don Speckman, and Paul Burleson. 

In the Southwest Conference 
Tournament, Brad Wilemon tied for 
fifth place at 300 for 72 holes. Jim 
Whitteker finished seventh at 303. The 
team participated in several other 
tournaments outside conference play. 
Early in the year they placed third in 
Atascacita Intercollegiate Tournament 
in Houston. Wilemon jilaced tenth as 
Tech's low scorer. 

The following month, again in 



Houston at the Tejas Intercollegiate 
Tournament, Tech placed fourth with 
Whitteker as low man. In the Border 
Olympics in Laredo, Don Speckman 
led the team to a sixth place finish. 
Against New Mexico Slate, Wilemon 
again was low man, placing third. In 
the New Mexico Intercollegiate, Tech 
won first place. 

In conference play the Raiders 
batted five hundred, winning two, los- 
ing two and tying three. They lost to 
Baylor, Don Speckman being the only 
winner in a 1^/^-4^^ score. 

Against Arkansas Tech won 6-0. 
Rogers, Shepperson and Wilemon all 
won their individual matches while 
Whitteker-Wilemon and Shepperson- 
Rogers teamed up to win doubles. In 
the tournament with Rice the results 
were the same, 6-0 in favor of Tech. 
The same players won all of their 



matches. 

The Red Raider victory wagon 
was slowed but not stopped as they 
managed ties with TCU and SMU 
with 3-3 scores. The winners over 
TCU were Whitteker, Rogers and the 
doubles team of Whitteker and Wile- 
mon. At SMU Shepperson and Rogers 
won individually and as a team. 

A tie with A&M saw Whitteker 
and Rogers defeat single opponents, 
while a Wilempn-Whitteker team also 
triumphed. Closing against Texas, the 
Raiders were defeated 2-5. Shepperson 
won his match, then joined Whitteker 
to win their doubles game. 

The Red Raider stickmen were 
not out of the conference race until 
their last two tournaments. Had they 
won against A&M and Texas, a possi- 
ble first place would have made their 
being different desirable. 




The 1970 Red Raider golf team placed 
third in the conference race. The team 
was made up of (top row) Brad Wile- 
mon, Stan Wilemon, Jim Whitteker, Don 
Speckman, Buddy Croom, Coach Gene 
Mitchell; (bottom row) Ham Rogers, John 
Shepperson, Paul Burleson and Chuck Lar- 
son. Three top Tech performers are pic- 
tured at right. Jim Whitteker (above 
right) placed seventh at the Southwest 
Conference Tournament. In the same tour- 
nament Brad Wilemon (right) toolc fifth 
place as Tech's low man. John Shepper- 
son (far right) waj a continuous winrter 
for the Red Raiders on the conference 
tour. 



46 — Sports Illustrated 



I 







Sports Illustrated — *7 




Univen 
mersli 
vardf' 

vari n 
were 1 
stroke. 



Swimming team: (front row) Jay Settle, Bill Schrader, David Stephens, John 
Glennan, Marc Stearns, Rick Pajot, and Robert Murray. (Second row) Clay 
McCurley, Mike Mofiitt, Rick Fox, Mike Mogan, Robert Anderson, Rick Den- 



man, and Robert Irwin. (Third row) John Ellon, Don Carruthers, David Carter, 
Chris Schacht, Rick Selfe, Larry Ridge, Randy Fletcher, and John Vernor. 
(Top row) Jim Goodman, Gary King, Jim Cole, and Hugh McDowell. 



UNDERWATER RAIDERS 



In spite of the fact that this year's 
swim team was minus eight graduating 
seniors from the previous season, the 
Red Raiders compiled an admirable 
10-6 record and broke several meet 
and school records in the process. 

Beginning the season on Nov. 19, 
Tech's tankers dropped a close meet to 
Air Force 62'/j-50'/j- However, Chris 
Schacht and Clay McCurley took all 
the honors in both diving events, and 
the performance of Hugh McDowell, 
Rick Pajot, Rick Denman, and David 
Stephens in the 400-yard medley relay 
set a new school record. 

Tech's first win of the season was 
a strong one, 89-22 over New Mexico 
State, with the Raiders taking first in 



12 of 13 events. Rick Fox, team cap- 
tain, won the 200-yard butterfly, and 
John Elton took top honors in the 100- 
yard freestyle. Other individual win- 
ners were Jim Cole in the 200-yard 
backstroke. Bill Schrader in the 200- 
yard breaststroke. Rick Selfe in the 
500-yard freestyle, and Robert Ander- 
son in the 200-yard freestyle. Schacht 
was a double winner for Tech, captur- 
ing the highest scores in both diving 
events. 

As visitors, the Red Raiders de- 
feated Eastern New Mexico Univer- 
sity by a score of 74-3.3. Fox's time 
of 11:01.0 in the 1000-yard freestyle 
broke the existing meet record. Double 
winners for Tech were Cole, with the 



fastest time in the 200-yard individual 
medley and 200-yard breaststroke and 
Schacht, who scored highest on both 
boards. 

Continuing their winning form, 
the Raiders defeated New Mexico Uni- 
versity by a wide margin, 74-33. Fox 
won the 200-yard freestyle with a time 
of 1 :52.5, and McDowell's time of 
2:10.7 took first place in the 2(X)-yard 
backstroke. Jay Settle and Schacht 
were both double winners for the 
Raiders, with Settle placing first in 
the 1000-yard and 500-yard freestyle, 
and Schacht taking top place on both 
boards. A new meet record was set 
by Pajot in the 200-yard breaststroke 
with a time of 2:26.4. 



W»G| 



49 — Sports Illustrated 






The Raiders began the new year 
with a close 62-42 victory over the 
University of Colorado. Tech swim- 
mers had the fastest time in the 400- 
yard freestyle relay, as well as the 400- 
yard medley relay. Individual winners 
were Pajot in the 200-yard breast- 
stroke, Glennan in the 50-yard free- 
style, and Schacht, who scored highest 
on both boards. 

Colorado State University, which 
was rated among the top ten swim 
teams in the nation for the 1969 year, 
handed Tech its second loss of the 
season. However, the Raiders won the 
400-yard freestyle relay, and Schacht 
won both the one and three-meter div- 
ing events. 

The Raiders dropped their next 
meet 46-67 against Denver University 
before a Denver crowd on Jan. 16, 
but rallied to defeat Colorado State 
College 64-39 the following day. Fox 
was a double winner for Tech, placing 
first in the 1000-yard freestyle and 
the 200-yard butterfly. Selfe was first 
in the 500-yard freestyle. Cole won 
the 200-yard backstroke, and Pajot 
had the fastest time in the 200-yard 
breaststroke. The one meter board, the 



only diving event of the meet, was won 
by Schacht. 

The Raiders came home to win a 
big one over Oklahoma State Univer- 
sity, 86-27. Moffitt, Anderson, Fox, 
and Glennan teamed up to win the 
400-yard freestyle relay. Tech's time 
of 3:51.2 by McDowell, Glennan, Den- 
man, and Ridge won the 400-yard med- 
ley, making the Raiders victorious in 
both relay events. 

In individual events Glennan 
placed first in the 50-yard freestyle, 
Selfe won the 500-yard freestyle, and 
Pajot had the fastest time in the 200- 
yard breaststroke. In addition, three 
Raiders were double winners; Cole 
in the 200-yard individual medley and 
200-yard breaststroke, Fox in the 1000- 
yard freestyle and 200-yard fly, and 
Schacht on both boards. 

Tech's 74-39 defeat of John 
Brown University gave the Raiders a 
7-3 record going into conference play. 
In individual freestyle events, Glen- 
nan won the 50, McDowell won the 
100, and Settle placed first in the 500. 
Fox's time of 10:51.9 in the 1000-yard 
freestyle broke the existing school rec- 
ord for that event. 



Southern Methodist University, 
conference champs since 1957, 
squeaked by Tech 63-50 to begin con- 
ference action. Denman seized first in 
the 200-yard fly with a time of 2 :06.5, 
and Glennan's time of 49.8 was best 
in the 100-yard freestyle. Schacht was 
a double winner on the boards, de- 
feating the winner of the SWC in these 
events. 

The Raiders evened their confer- 
ence record at 1-1 with a 83-28 vic- 
tory over TCU. Tech swept the relay 
and diving events, with McCurley and 
Fletcher taking first and second, re- 
spectively, on both boards. Selfe's time 
of 11:19.8 was best in the 1000-yard 
freestyle, and Cole set a new meet 
record in the 200-yard individual med- 
ley with a time of 2:11.2. Additional 
winners included Anderson in the 200- 
yard freestyle, Mogan in the 100- 
yard breaststroke, and Fox in the 500- 
yard freestyle. 

The Raiders fell to the University 
of Texas by a score of 69-44, making 
the record stand 1-2 midway into SWC 
play. However, Schacht won both 
boards, and Denman set a new school 
record in the 200-yard fly. 



I 




II 



John Glennan (left) swims the 50 freestyle in 49.8 to win that event against SMU. Chris Schacht (right) dives undefeated in non-conference competition. 



Sports Illustrated — 49 




Texas A&M upset the Raiders 62- 
51 in a close meet at College Station. 
Glennan won the 100-yard freestyle, 
and Schacht was a winner on both 
boards, but Cole's best time of the 
season in the 200-yard individual med- 
ley, 2:06.5, earned him only second 
place in that event. 

The Raiders ended conference 
play on a strong note with a 77-34 win 
over Rice University. The medley re- 
lay team composed of McDowell, Den- 
man, Anderson, and Schrader came in 
first as did the freestyle relay squad 
of Ridge, Sterans, Settle, and Den- 
man. In addition to the points earned 
on both relay teams, Denman's time 
of 54.1 in the 100-yard butterfly netted 
him a first place in that event. Ander- 
son won the 50-yard freestyle and Selfe 
recorded a winning time of 5:17.1 in 
the 500-yard freestyle. Cole's time of 
4:32.3 in the 400-yard individual med- 
ley set a new school record, and Fox's 
time of 10:48.0 in the 1000-yard free- 
style broke the old Tech record he 
himself had set earlier in the year. 

The Raiders ended regular season 
competition by defeating Eastern New 
Mexico University 77-34, winning 11 
of 13 events. Selfe won the 1000-yard 
freestyle. Fox placed first in the 200- 
yard butterfly, and Settle's time of 
1:51.5 was fastest in the 200-yard 
freestyle. Other winners were Glennan 
in the 50-yard freestyle, Cole in the 
200-yard backstroke, Nestor in the 
200-yard individual medley, and Ridge 
in the 200-yard breaststroke. Pajot, 
McDowell, and Anderson swam with 
Fox in the 400-yard medley and with 
Selfe in the 400-yard freestyle to take 
first in both relays. Tech swept the 
boards, with Schacht placing first and 
McCurley taking second in both events. 

In the Southwest Conference Meet 
held in Dallas on March 12-14 Tech 
placed fifth. In the 500-yard freestyle. 
Settle and Fox placed 10th and 11th, 
respectively, with Glennan taking 9th 
in the 50-yard freestyle. In the one- 
meter dive Schacht placed 4th, Fletch- 
er 8th, and McCurley took 10th. The 
Raiders also took three places in the 
three-meter diving event as Schacht 
finished 4th, Fletcher 7th, and Mc- 
Curley 10th. 



Rick Fox (top) breaks his own $chool record (n 
the }00O-yard fnettyle. Clay McCurley (middle) 
wins borh boards ayainsf TCU. Jim Cole (bottom) 
ten a new Tech record in rbe indh/kluel medley 
with a time of 4:32 J. 



i 



SO—SporU Illustrated 



t 



m 



I 



{ 




DOLPHINS 
CONQUER 
DRY LAND 



• 



Tech's swim fraternity, the Dol- 
phins, proved their ability to conquer 
both land and sea as members ven- 
tured to Imperial, Texas to surf on the 
sand dunes. These water enthusiasts 
also came ashore to retain their title 
as winners of the Little 500 Bicycle 
Race, sponsored each year by Chi Rho 
and AWS. 



However, the Dolphins' main in- 
terest lay in the field of water sports. 
Under the faculty sponsorship of Coach 
James McNally, they conducted the an- 
nual Dolphin Relays, an invitational 
swim meet for area high school boys, 
kept time at home meets, and also 
aided with the recruiting program of 
Tech swimmers. 




Glenn Allison 


Robert Anderson 


Terry Brown 


Don Carothers 


Dave Carter 




Jim Cole 


John Elton 


Randy Fletcher 


Rusty Folk 


Steve Ford 




Eric Fox 


David Gaige 


John Glennan 


Patrick Hallisay 


Jim Haltom 


Marc Stearns 


Stan Harrell 


Jim Massey 


Clay McCurley 


Mike Morgan 


Robert Murray 




Richard Pajot 


Dennis Pfieffer 


Jimmy Reed 


Larry Ridge 


Chris Schacht 




Bill Schrader 


Jay Settle 


Dave Stephens 


Bob White 


Danny Wood 


Rick Denman 



Hugh McDowell 




Sports Illustrated — 51 



DOUBLET ASSOCIATION 



Richard Grigg 
President 




Ronnfe Mercer 
Vice-Preiidertt 




Mark Haze/wood 
Secrefary 




Royce Thigpen 
Treasurer 




Richard Bell 
Sponsor 




During the past year the Double- 
T Association has probably undergone 
more changes than any other organi- 
zation on campus. A close look at 
other lettermen's clubs provided ideas 
for a new constitution and along with 
it a new purpose for the organization. 

Among the Double-T's new plans 
were community service projects, one 



of which involved work at the Lubbock 
State School. A newer, more construc- 
tive pledge program was abo instituted 
by the organization. 

One of the main goals sought by 
the association was a sense of purpose 
among the lettermen of all sports so 
that mutual ties would go beyond the 
gridiron, court or diamond. 



li 




»E 



t 



Dicky Grigg fights through a would-be blocker to get to Rice's passer as Richard Campbell (88) and 
Pete Norwood (67) rush in to rr}ake the final stop in Tech's 24-14 victory over the Owls. 




Jim Arnold Jim Bennett Richard Campbell 

Mark fincannon Charles George W. R. Gray 



George Coon 
Ronald Grigsby 



Mike Currenc* 
Jamie Hahn 



Bruce Dowdy 

Larry Hargrave 



Jim Dyer 
John Howard 



\ 



52— Sports Illustrated 






'fclibock 

■iBWitiited *'~ 

"Is sought tv 
« ol purpose 
«11 sports so 
) beyond tie 
nd 




WWn' 



I 




Ken Katlner 
Dennis Lane 
Ted Lawson 



Pat McKean 
Don McKee 
Wayne McDermand 



Max Martin 
David May 
Bob Mooney 



Pete Norwood 
Mike Oakes 
Barney Oliver 



Kevin Ormes 
Johnny Owens 
Jesse Richardson 



Robbie Sargent 
Tom Sawyer 
Mark Stephens 



Charlie Stewart 
Carroll Sullivan 
Jerry Turner 



Lane Wade 
Jerry Watson 

Eddy Windom 




kepresentative of the Double-T Association are Jerry Turner (top) pulling down a rebound 
against Arkansas, Max Martin (center) forcing a TCU runrter at home plate, and George 
Coon (left) edging up on a contender in a tough distance race. 



Sports Illustrated — 53 



A Growing Thing . . . 



Texas Tech iiUramureUs continue to expand with more than 30 activities and 7,700 participants. 




rh« Moonrtkett tnd Dtlt» Tau OtIU bttiM for th* All Univnity ch»mpion$Mp. Ah*r » cfoM ifrugy'*/ 
fh* DtHt won th* tith. 



LEAGUE BOWLING-Fraternity, Al- 
pha Tau Omega "A"; Residence Hall, 
Weymouth; Open, Firehouse Five; All- 
University Champions, Firehou?e Five. 
TUGO-WAR— All-University Champi- 
ons, Phi Delta Theta. WATER POLO 
—All-University Champions, Phi Del- 
ta Theta. SWIMMING— 100-yard 
medley relay. Wells Hall; 50-yard 
breaststroke, Bartram, Wells Hall; 
50-yard freestyle. Wren, Wells Hall; 
50-yard butterfly, Haltom, Blue Team; 
50-yard back, RoberU, Wells Hall; 
100-yard freestyle, R e d w i n e , Phi 
Kappa Psi; 100-yard breaststroke, 
Bartram, Wells Hall; 100-yard free- 
style relay. Wells Hall; Diving, Sam- 
ple, Pi Kappa Alpha; All-University 
Champions, Wells Hall. CROSS 
COUNTRY— Team, Dolphins; Indi- 
vidual, Noe Villarreal, BSU. WRES- 
TLING— (123) Charles Yates; (130) 
Johnny Cooley; (137) David Lamb; 
(145) Howard Scholey; (152) Johnny 
Love; (160) Robert Brown; (167) 
Gary Prescott; (177) Steve Furlow; 
(191) Doug Hill; (UL) Archie Van 
Sickle; Team, ATO. TEAM GOLF 
(HANDICAP)— Be as ley, Carrico. 
TEAM GOLF (NON-H)— Copeland, 
Anderson. PADDLEBALL DOUBLES 
—Powell, Abel. HORSESHOE DOU- 
BLES— Petter, May. TENNIS DOU- 
BLES— Byrd, Sivage. BASKETBALL 
FREE THROWS— Frazier. TABLE 
TENNIS DOUBLES— Riddle, Palit. 
HANDBALL DOUBLES— McCracken, 
Hart. BADMINTON DOUBLES— 
White, McGuire. SPACEBALL DOU- 
BLES— P e 1 1 e r , May. SCRATCH 
BOWLING— Culpepper. SOCCER— 
Club, BSU; Fraternity I, ATO; Fra- 
ternity II, Phi Delt; Residence Hall, 
Bledsoe; All-University, Phi Delt. 
TOUCH FOOTBALL— Fraternity I, 
ATO; Fraternity II, Phi Dell; Frater- 
nity III, SAE "B"; Fraternity IV, Phi 
Delt "B"; Residence Hall 1, Thomp- 
son; Residence Hall II, Murdough 
"B"; Club I, Campus Crusade for 
Christ; Club II, AFROTC; Indepen- 
dent, Hookers; Champs, Thompson. 
BASKETBALL — Fraternity — SAE 
(I), Delts (II), SAE "B" (III), Fiji 
"B" (IV), Phi Delt "C" (V); Resi- 
dence — Gordon (I), Thompson (II), 
Weymouth (III); Open— Phi Dell; 
Club — BSU, Double-T; Independent — 
Moonrakers, Cowboys; Champs — 
Delta. 



54 — Sports Illustrated 



(!• 



CO-ED VOLLEYBALL — Fraternity- 
Sorority — Delta Tau Delta, Kappa Al- 
pha Theta; Open I — Screamers, Road- 
runners I; Open II — Baptist Student 
Union "A"; Residence Hall— Welk, 
Horn Hall "A"; All-University Cham- 
pions — Delta Tau Delta, Kappa Alpha 
Theta. LEAGUE BOWLING— Frater- 
nity — Alpha Tau Omega; Residence 
Hall — Weymouth ; Open — Firehouse 
Five; All-University Champions — 
Weymouth Hall. JUDO— Novice Divi- 
sion — Weaver ; Lightweight Division 
— Oliver; Heavyweight Division — 
Dobson ; Overall Winner — Dobson. 
ODD WEIGHTLIFTING— Stapper. 
SCRATCH BOWLING— Carter. BAD- 
MINTON SINGLES— Nye. PADDLE- 
BALL SINGLES— Hart. SPACEBALL 
SINGLES— Flournoy. TABLE TEN- 
NIS SINGLES— Palit. GOLF SIN- 
GLES (HANDICAP)— Ramsey. GOLF 
SINGLES (NONHANDICAP) — 
Moorehead. TENNIS SINGLES— 
Smith. HANDBALL SINGLES— Hart. 
HORSESHOE SINGLES— Opitz. ICE 
HOCKEY— Murdough Hall. SOFT- 
BALL — Fraternity I — Kappa Sigma; 
Fraternity II— Phi Delta Theta; Fra- 
ternity III— Delta Tau Delta "B"; 
Residence Hall I — Thompson; Club — 
Independent — Satraps ; All-University 
Champions— Phi Delta Theta. SLOW 
PITCH SOFTBALI^-Fraternity I— 
Kappa Alpha; Fraternity II — Sig- 
ma Chi; Open I — Screamers; Club 
1— Chi Rho "A"; Club II— Campus 
Crusade for Christ; Residence Hall — 
Sneed; All University Champions — 
Sneed Hall. CO-ED SLOW PITCH 
SOFTBALL— Fraternity-Sorority I— 
Alpha Tau Omega, Alpha Phi; Fra- 
ternity-Sorority II — Sigma Chi, Delta 
Gamma; Open I — Gaston, Knapp 
"A"; Open II— Phi Epsilon Kappa, 
Roadrunners; All University Champi- 
ons — Phi Epsilon Kappa, Roadrunners. 
VOLLEYBALL — Fraternity I — Phi 
Delta Theta; Fraternity II — Alpha 
Tau Omega; Fraternity III — Sigma 
Chi "B"; Open I— Air Force ROJC; 
Open II — Phi Epsilon Kappa "B"; 
Open III— Gaston; All University 
Champions— Delta Tau Delta. WRES- 
TLING— (134) Mo user; (142) 
Moore; (150) Love; (158) West- 
brook; (167) Prescott; (177) Fur- 
low; (190) Holcomb; (UL) Hill. 
TRACK AND FIELD— Thompson 
Hall; High Point Man— Davis, Thomp- 
son Hall. OUTSTANDING INTRA- 
MURAL TEAM — Fraternity — 
ATO's; Residence Hall— Gaston; Club 
— BSU; Independent— Hockers. OUT- 
STANDING INTRAMURAL PAR- 
TICIPANT — Fraternity- McCracken; 
Residence Hall— Opitz; Club— White; 
Independent— DuPont. MOST WIN- 
NING TEAM— Fraternity— Phi Delts; 
Residence Hall — Gaston; Club— Phi 
Epsilon Kappa. BEST UNIT PAR- 
TICIPATION TEAMS— Phi Kappa 
Alpha; Gaston; Chi Rho. 



. . . INTRAMURALS 




A tliding baserunner draws a crowd at second as he steals the bag in an intramural sohball game. 
All-University champions were Phi Delta Theta in fast-pitch and Sneed Hall in slow-pitch. 



Sports Illustrated — 55 



A NEW LOOK 

FOR JONES STADIUM 



On February 14, 1970, the Tech Board of Regents presented 
a package contract totaling $379,275 to a trio of companies for the 
installation of a synthetic playing surface in Clifford B. and Audrey 
Jones Stadium. 

The Kerr Construction Company received the contract for 
laying an asphalt base, while the Monsanto Corporation supplied 
the Astroturf and the 3M Company provided the tartan track sur- 
rounding the playing field. 

The first game played on Jones Stadium's synthetic turf was 
the tenth annual Coaches All- America Football Game, June 27, 
1970. 





',li .S/«lf/t ll/ll\lrillrtt 



FOR THE RECORD 

A roundup of the sports information of the year 



FOOTBALL— Tech 38, Kansas 22; 
Texas 49, Tech 7; Oklahoma State 17, 
Tech 10; Tech 13, Texas A&M 9; Mis- 
sissippi State 30, Tech 26; Tech 27, 
SMU 24; Tech 24, Rice 14; TCU 35, 
Tech 26; Tech 41, Baylor 7; Arkansas 
33, Tech 0. 

BASKETBALL— Tech 76, Houston 
Baptist 66; Tech 82, Tulane 80; Tech 
66, Oklahoma 64; Tech 56, Colorado 
75 ; Tech 65, New Mexico 87 ; Tech 85, 
Arizona 80; Tech 81, Brigham Young 
88; Tech 75, California State 64; 
Tech 62, Wyoming 63; Tech 69, UC- 
Santa Barbara 57; Tech 85, Rice 86; 
Tech 90, SMU 60; Tech 73, TCU 81; 
Tech 46, Baylor 47 ; Tech 50, Arkansas 
48; Tech 84, Texas A&M 66; Tech 
81, Texas 69; Tech 75, TCU 60; Tech 
90, Texas 71; Tech 74, Texas A&M 
82; Tech 76, Arkansas 71; Tech 78, 
Rice 66; Tech 80, SMU 85; Tech 72, 
Baylor 80. 

TRACK — Southwest Conference Meet: 
Tech tied for sixth; Tech-Baylor- 
Texas Triangular Meet: Tech placed 
second ; Tech-TCU-UTA Triangular 



Meet: Tech tied for second; Tech- 
T e X a s-SMU-B a y 1 o r Quadrangular 
Meet: Tech took second; Wayland 
Invitational Meet: Tech finished sec- 
ond. 



BASEBALL— Tech 15, Hardin-Sim- 
mons 10; Tech 0, Pan American 3; 
Tech 4, Pan Am 2; Tech 6, Pan Am 4; 
Tech 4, Pan Am 6; Tech 0, Pan Am 6; 
Tech 4, UT-El Paso 3; Tech 0, UTEP 
3; Tech 2, UTEP 1; Tech 1, New 
Mexico Highlands 4; Tech 1, NMH 1; 
Tech 9, Trinity 10; Tech 0, Rice 7; 
Tech 4, Rice 6; Tech 1, Rice 2; Tech 
13, West Texas State 0; Tech 4, WT 
2; Tech 0, Texas 4; Tech 3, Texas 6; 
Tech 0, TCU 1; Tech 1, TCU 2; Tech 
7, TCU 4; Tech 0, A&M 3; Tech 4, 
A&M 6; Tech 11, SMU 2; Tech 3, 
SMU 4; Tech 5, Baylor 3; Tech 4, 
Baylor 2; Tech 14, Baylor 2. 



SWIMMING— Air Force Academy 
62.5, Tech 50.5; New Mexico State 22, 
Tech 89; ENMU 33, Tech 74; NMU 
39, Tech 74; Colorado 42, Tech 62; 



CSU 81, Tech 32; Denver 67, Tech 46; 
Colo. State 39, Tech 65; Okla. State 
27, Tech 86; John Brown 39, Tech 74; 
SMU 63, Tech 50; TCU 28, Tech 83; 
Texas 69, Tech 44; A&M 62, Tech 51; 
Rice 22, Tech 89; ENMU 34, Tech 77. 

TENNIS— Tech 1, Rice 5; Tech 6, 
A&M 0; Tech 5, TCU 1; Tech 2, SMU 
5; Tech 6, Baylor 0; Tech 2, Texas 4. 

GOLF— Tech 1.5, Baylor 4.5; Tech 6, 

Arkansas 0; Tech 6, Rice 0; Tech 3, 

TCU 3; Tech 3, SMU 3; Tech 3, 
A&M 3; Tech 2, Texas 5. 



COACHES— J. T. King, John Conley, 
Jim Acree, Carlos Mainord, Berl Huff- 
man, Tom Wilson, Bradley Mills, Burl 
Bartlett, Gene Henderson, Elwood 
Kettler, Jess Stiles, Bob Bass, Corky 
Oglesby, Vernon Hilliard, George 
Philbrick, Jim McNally, Kal Segrist, 
Gerald Coppedge, Don Sparks, Gene 
Mitchell. 





CREDITS 






Darrel 


Thomas, Richard 


Mays, 


Jeff Lawhon, Bruce 


Ott, 


Mike 


Warden 


, Mike Davis 


and Bob | 


Darby. 









FACES IN THE CROWD' 






JIM CARLEN, the 

new Red Raider head 
football coach. as- 
sumed the position 
held by J. T. King after 
leading West Virginia 
to a Peach Bowl vic- 
tory, a 1 0-1 season 
end national football 
pronninence. King was 
promoted to the post 
of athletic director. 

ROBERT BISSELL, 

Tech's football trainer, 
joined Carlen's West 
Virginia staff after 
serving with the New 
Orleans Saints of 
professional football 
before which he was 
head trainer for two 
years at Eastern 
Illinois University. 



JACK FLIGG, Tech's 
offensive line coach, 
joined Carlen's staff 
at West Virginia after 
serving one year as 
freshman coach at 
Georgia Tech. Fllgg 
completed his playing 
days at Auburn in 
1954, and served as 
head coach at Grady 
High School in Atlan- 
ta. 






ART BAKER, offensive 
backfield coach, came 
to Red Raiderland 
from Clemson where 
he was an assistant 
for five years. He 
played football at 
Presbyterian (S. C.) 
College as a quarter- 
back and halfback, 
graduating in 1953. 

BOB BROWN, Tech's 
defensive Interior line 
coach, is a graduate 
of William and Mary. 
Brown was an assistant 
coach at Davidson 
College before join- 
ing Carlen at West 
Virginia and moving 
with him to a spot on 
the staff at Texas 
Tech. 

JIM RAGLAND, 

quarterback coach for 
the Raiders, was an 
All-Amerlcan for Car- 
len at C o o k V I I I e 
(Tenn.) High School. 
In three years, Rag- 
land set nine school 
records as varsity 
quarterback at Ten- 
nesse Tech before 
joining the coaching 
ranks. 






RICHARD BELL, a 

former star at the 
University of Arkan- 
sas, coached at Geor- 
gia Tech and West 
Virginia before leav- 
ing with Carlen to 
join the Red Raider 
staff. He serves as the 
head defensive coach 
for Tech, the position 
he also held at West 
Virginia. 

DALE EVANS, Car. 
len's defensive secon* 
dary coach, is a grad- 
ate of West Virginia 
where he made the 
Mountaineer team as 
a volunteer from the 
student body. Evans 
lettered at quarter- 
back and safety In 
1960-61 and joined 
Carlen's staff in 1967. 

MARSHALL TAYLOR, 

the Red Raiders' of- 
fensive end coach, was 
an All-Ohio Valley 
Conference end at 
Tennessee Tech. Taylor 
coached In high 
schools at Fayettevllle, 
Tenn., and Spartan- 
burg, S. C, before re- 
turning to Tennessee 
Tech in 1962 as end 
coach and head base- 
ball coach. 





SPA RESORTS 



ATHLETIC GUIS 

16th at Texas P039211 

• HANDBALL AND PADDLEBALL COURTS • 
HEATED SWIMMING POOL • FINNISH DRY SAUNA 




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LA VENTANA 1 970 
TEXAS TECH 
UNIVERSITY 
PRESENTS 



• f 



LIFE 

SPORTS ILLUSTRATED 

MADEMOISELLE 

PLAYBOY 

TOWN AND COUNTRY 

ESQUIRE 



TYME 
FUTURE 
SENIOR VIEW 
JUNIOR VIEW 
SOPHOMORE VIEW 
FRESHMAN VIEW 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS LUBBOCK, TEXAS 





Lile-I 



I came to li# 



cameij jcollege ~ knowing not even myself 




Lije~UI 



came 




Knowledge, life? 
And maybe -- love 



:ofLt 




i 



ly-Ufe 




I 



Life-V 



yi-Life 



Alone I stood on the 
threshold, unmixed 
as new cans of paint. 



Life-Vn 



Seeing only black and white, good 
and evil. Narrow, limited and 
very unsure of being sure. 





^ 



X-Lijt 





Full of advice 

But most of all full and tired 

of waiting 
Fresh and alone 
I began. 




Lile-n... 




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La Ventana 



m 



1969-70 



CONTENTS 
The Presidency by jessica jono 

A time of dissent, a time for decision 

New Fountain, New Name 
Registration 1969 

And so it begins 

B.A. Complex 

Formal dedication October 6th 

News Fronts 

1969-70 The Fantastic Year 

Moratorium Day 

Conflicts cause mixed feelings 

Homecoming 1969 

Techsans busy "Doing Their Thing" 

Varsity Cheerleaders 
Story of Tech Union 

People, events, and living 

WAC-Australia 

Conference — A Modern Happening 

Miss Mademoiselle 

Beauty queens crowned 

University Speakers Series 
Lubbock's Pop Festival 

Bummer of the century 

University Theater 

The World of Drama 

Graduation 1970 

And such it ends 



Miscellany 



3 
4 

6 

7 

12 
14 

18 
20 

26 

28 

30 
32 

34 
40 
44 



EDITOR'S NOTE 




V «■ 'vTr- 



1969-70, A Year of Leaving 

1969-70 is now history 
to be talked about as the in- 
tangible past. With this year 
went the years of a decade, 
as Tech moved from the 
Sixties into the Seventies. 

There were many 
things we had come to 
know. There was the new- 
ness of a college life and 
all the things that went with 
it . . . new people with dif- 
ferent meanings to the same 
thing, pages to turn, pic- 
tures to ponder, and deci- 
sions to be made. This was 
our world. Where students 
sought for ideas but realized 
their contributions could only be small. Where dissent was 
peaceful, organized and resulted in minor but definite changes. 
These things became the force that moved our lives as we 
lived the Sixties. 

And there were many things left to be known. What 
of this troubled world, torn with strife? Is there a reality to 
it all? Many of the ideas left to be learned were still un- 
formed questions hidden in the depth of our minds. 
This will be our world, what we make of it. Where the 
choice between apathy and involvement is no longer a prob- 
lem to face, but a dead issue that people have forgotten. 
Where students will plot the course of their lives unhindered 
by social pressures. Where college is not a separate little, 
protected world, and those in the mainstream of campus life 
also are in the mainstream of "life." These are the things 
that lay in the vastness of time to be decided and dealt with. 
Now, in the aftermath of a year, LIFE tries to paint the 
Techsan of '69-70. To capture this "life" as it is, is a diffi- 
cult thing. Without the aid and assistance of many people, 
this magazine would not be possible. To these people — thank 
you. But an even bigger thanks goes to you who made this 
magazine and this year possible, — ^YOU, the people of 



Texas Tech. 



(^.^AJl'-ri^^O-'^^'yi'^'i^P^^ 






Eren Johnson 
Editor 



Li/e—1 



The Presidency 



/ 



by Jessica Jones 



Editor's note: A new feature of Life '70 is 
"The Presidency." Each year the articles 
for this section will be written by the presi- 
dents of various campus organizatioos and 
the opinions expressed will not necessarily 
reflect those of this editor or the La Ventatu. 

Miss Jessica Jones is this year's featured 
president. Miss Jones served as president of 
the Tech Student Union. A junior from 
Lubbock majoring in Food and Nutrition, 
Jessica is also involved in Kappa Kappa 
Gamma social sorority and was elected to 
Who's Who in American Colleges and Uni- 
versities. Amid all this Jessica still finds 
time for the lighter side of life such as bus 
trips to Union Retreat. 

An Age of 

Dissent Ends, 

An Age of 

Decision 

Begins 

The last years of the 60's were 
filled with dissent on many fronts — 
from politics and pollution to university 
authority and drugs. ,Now in the first 
years of the 70's, the college student 
is going to be faced with personal 
decisions that will affect his life and 
society. The university has more forces 
calling for change and adjustment than 
any other human institution. The stu- 
dent can be a very positive force in 
changing the university and, consequent- 
ly, *x:iety; if, he will reinforce his 
concern with knowledge, make ap- 
propriate decisions, and then, accejjt the 
responsibility for these decisions. 

What can Tech students in the 70"s 
contribute to the changing trio of man, 
institution, and society? 

The university atmosphere chal- 
lenges us to find ourselves — to become 
aware that others are not exactly as we 
are. Thus begins the students' inde- 
pendent thinking. Texas Tech University 
has initiated many changes in the stu- 
dent's personal freedom during the last 
decade. Responsible acceptance of the 
changes of the 60's will indicate to 
administrators that students are capable 
of handling more freedom. By using 
freedom constructively we can insure 
achieving the "hat" in our lives. To 

2-Uje 



insure the "best" in the lives of others, 
we must be careful not to become selfish 
and complacent with our personal 
world. Though society's rules of right 
and wrong and ways of doing things 
seem very irrelevant to our generation, 
we must prevent our aspirations and 
expectations from becoming an authori- 
tarian idealism of the same nature. 

The cries that society was in- 
adequate occasionally filtered down to 
include student organizations. At Tech 
we heard much of the dissent from 
afar, but there is still a message in this 
discontent. It is easy for students to 
blarae the "older generation" for 
making a society that is irrelevant. It 
also seems easy for Tech students to let 
their organizations become stagnant 
while the}' complain that they are having 
trouble finding meaning in their stu- 
dent life. The members of a student 
organization must determine what is 
relevant to their needs, the group's 
purpose, the university itself, and 
finally, society. 

Communication and cooperation are 
necessary for group progress. The politi- 
cal "maneuvering plague" can be 
avoided by the student organization 
whose members are open with each 
other. 

College students want the chance 
to pursue many interests, but they do 
not want any one group to deinand 
too much devotion. For these reasons 
a special emphasis should be made on 
quality of meetings, parties, programs, 
and activities, not on quantity. We must 
find ways to avoid long meetings over 
small matters, oversocialization to the 
point of boredom, too many self- 
centered activities, and programs or dis- 
cussions that do not stimulate us to 
think. 

Students have verbally expressed a 
concern for major social problems, but 
our active involvement has been very 
limited. The mass media has helped us 
to seem very sophisticated about social 
conditions, but often we have no sub- 
stantial information or lack historical 
perspective. If this issue is truly im- 
portant to us, organizations must offer 
their members a chance to be more 
active and more aware. 

In the last couple of years, stu- 
dents concerned about the character of 



their education and student life have 
been given more responsibility in stu- 
dent government. The student govern- 
ment base has been broadened by com- 
mittees under the Student Association 
President which have provided more 
students with a realistic picture of 
change. 

At times there is a definite lack of 
communication and cooperation between 
students and administrators, faculty, the 
Board of Regents, and Ex-Students. 
The few students who want confron- 
tations and make demands on the basis 
of student rights find that this approach 
only elicits the old response of the 
"right to rule" by those in authority. 
The term "student's rights" becomes 
meaningful when students initiate co- 
operation. 

Since the student who wants to 
participate in university and academic 
management is a recent development, 
we must prove our capability. If we want 
to be part of the decision making pro- 
cess, we must listen, contribute new 
ideas, ask questions, seek answers, and 
take responsibility for our decisions. 

Some leaders feel that more could 
be done on committees if there was a 
majority of students or the chairman 
was a student, but this does not seem 
necessary. When students have good 
ideas and reasons, the faculty and ad- 
ministration will listen. Change, how- 
ever, requires decisions that students 
(we) must be able to live with. 




•» 






Entry Fountain Symbolizes New Name, 
College Gains University Status. 



Texas Technological Q)llege had 
come to the point of crisis. For ten 
long years the students had sought a 
new name. During these years, there 
were times when it seemed their goal 
was almost in reach. Then the faint 
light of hope would be snuffed out as 
the Texas legislature let the measure 
die like a match in the wind. The year 
'68-'69 saw a change. At last the time 
had come, the student was no more to 



was a college. New status had been at- 
tained. Texas Technological Gillege had 
become Texas Tech University. 

Thus the new entry fountain at the 
Broadway entrance to the campus is 
symbolic of the name change fight in 
many ways. In one way, just as the many 
campus organizations have worked so 
hard to collect the money needed to 
begin the fountain, so too, many people, 
both students and alumni, have worked 




be denied. 

Name diange bills were being pro- 
posed and debated, so students trecked 
to Austin to enter their plea. Tech 
would have a new name. Finally, as 
of September 1, 1969, Tech no longer 



hard to get Tech the name of Univer- 
sity. But even more significant is that 
just as the fountain has a long way to 
go before reaching completion, so too, 
Tech has a long way to go before being 
truly a University. 



me— 3 



And So It Begins: 




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people . . 




lines . . . 



and arrows. 



And so it begins: playing the game of arrows. 
19,470 students followed the signs and arrows of 
registration only to find: new housing clearance for 
those living off campus, long lines, many seven-thirty 
sections, closed sections, more forms to fill out, new 
I.D.s in two seconds, the usual fees, and finally the 
arrow pointing to the exit. Once more registration 
was over, but the game of the arrows would continue 
throughout the year. 

So began the year 1969-70. Changes had been 
made over the summer such that Tech students came 
back to find a new name, a new fountain, a new 
board of regents, and some new policies for housing. 
But there were questions still left to be answered. 
Would the board of regents change any of Tech's 
long standing policies? How would University status 
affect Tech? Would this be the year for the long 
needed Union expansion ? What would the year hold ? 
Only the LIFE of Tech knows the answer. 




Life — 5 



Business Administration Complex 

Formally Dedicated October 6th. 



Although classes in the Business Administra- 
tion building began in the spring of '69, the 
formal dedication ceremonies were Monday, Oc- 
tober 6, 1969. The College of Business Adminis- 
tration Complex includes nearly a quarter-million 
square feet of space in a 13 story office tower, 
a four level classroom building, and an octagon 
shaped auditorium which seats 460 persons. 

The principal speaker at the ceremonies was 
Dr. Charles F. Jones, president of Humble Oil 
and Refining Company. He stressed the role of 
business in solving the problems of rebuilding 
decaying cities, and helping minority groups to 
achieve economic betterment. Dr. Jones also em- 
phasized the importance of organization in busi- 
ness and the growing need for the fields of 
business and technology to unite their efforts 
for a more stable economic world. 



Charles F. Jones, president of Humble Oil and Refining Company, 
delivered the main address of the dedicatory service for the Business 
Administration complex, stressing the future problems to be faced 
in business. 




Saddle tramps conducted tours of the thirteen story office tower as well as the 
Business Administration auditorium and classrooms between the activities of the 
day. Dr. Dorothy Gregg (piclureJ tif,hl). assistant to the director of public relations 
at United States Steel, spoke on "Progress is Tomorrow" at the afterncxjn symposi- 
um held in the B. A. auditorium. 




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1969-70 was truly a fantastic year. As it began in September 
bringing new life and fresh ideas, it also signalled the end of a 
decade. 

It must end, taking the old, making room for the new. With 
the new comes change: old to new, irrelevant to relevant, un- 
challenging to challenging; for without change, the new life 
would die, struggling against the old. 

A university's value as an academic institution lies in its 
ability to continuously adapt itself to the needs of its students 
and to create new and greater challenges to prevent them from dy- 
ing in the stagnation of a rigid and unchanging system. Its worth 
can be measured by how meaningful its education is to the stu- 
dents and the world in which they live. A university must 
constantly reassess its goals and values and define them in terms 
relevant to the student's world. Last, a university must strive to 
keep its students in touch with the world, never hiding or shield- 
ing them from the realities of life. 

In this, the first year of the seventies, questions of what the 
new decade would bring filled the minds of Techsans. Would 
the beginning made in change continue as Tech grows into being 
a university? Only newsfronts knows the answer. 





.ocking at the Howdy Dance. 







.s 



Moving into the dorm 
earlier and starting classes 
on Sept. 2 began the new- 
ness of the year. Once 
again the Tech campus was 
a mass of students, luggage 
and clothes to be moved 
into the dorm, and confu- 
sion. Freshmen got ac- 
quainted, many rocked 
out at the Howdy Dance, 
and the long wait until 
football season was on. 
Then on Sept. 20, victory 
was sweet as the Jay- 
hawks limped out of Lub- 
bock, having lost 38-22. 
The Coffeehouse and the 
"Genesis I," underground 
films, were featured at 
the Union. On Sept. 28, 
many Techsans made a 
long sad trip home from 
Austin. UT had taken 
revenge. And the count- 
down began as the school 
year moved toward the 
new decade. 



The man behind the band. 




Waiting and practicing for football season. 




Kansas bonfire, burning 
brightly, ignites enthusi- 
asm for the football sea- 



Life—7 



8Qfe©beF 




It is going to be a long, hard season. 




Union's new Coffee House. 



Emotions were mixed 
as the year rolled on. 

Derby Day sparked 
strong competition among 
the sororities at Tech as 
each competed for the 
first place trophy. Brien 
Carney came to the Coffee 
House Circuit at the Tech 
Union. 

Conservatives and lib- 
erals clashed over the 
Moratorium Day activities. 
A silent vigil decorated 
Memoral Circle opposite 
a fence painted red, white, 
and blue. And in the midst 
of football season, students 
paused to honor their Dads 
on Dad's Day. 




Greeks go wild at the Derby Day activities. 



I 




Homecoming activi- 
ties, including a bonfire, 
a parade, a game, and a 
show, started November 
off. Barbara Zimmerman, 
Tech Twirler, won the 
crown of Homecoming 
Queen. 

With an internation- 
al flair, the activities of 
International Week turned 
the campus in an entirely 
different direction. From 
the International Dinner 
to the International Caba- 
ret, Tech students learned 
of foreign cultures. 

Football season came 
to an official close with a 
disastrous defeat by Ar- 
kansas on nationwide tele- 




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We don't have room to do our thing — Tech Union Float. 

And a much needed 
break came with the 
Thanksgiving Holidays, as 
the year moved on. 



Governor Preston Smith 
crowned the new Homecoming 
Queen, Barbara Zimmerman. 




BeQembeF 




ilim. 



Finals seemed to come earlier this semester. 

With a blaze of sparkling lights, the Christmas 
rush began. The Miss Mademoiselle and Miss Playmate 
contests added to a mounting tension and excitement 

as Pam Kirk was selected 
Miss Mademoiselle and 
Mar)' Beth Johnson w.is 
chosen Miss Playmate. 
Then, with the swiftness 
of doom, dead week quiet- 
ed the excitement and in- 
creased the tension. The 
midnight oil burned 
brightly during finals, and 
with a flurry of activity, 
the campus emptied as 
the first semester came to 
an end. A silent, empty 
campus remained over the 
long semester break while 
students spent their time 
skiing, working, or play- 
ing. 



Miss Playmate, Mary Beth. 




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Sparkling lights began the Carol of Christmas. 




January moved the 
university into the seven- 
ties, a new decade, a new 
year, and a new semester 
for Tech students to cope 
with. Once more registra- 
tion took students through 
the maze of arrows and 
even though the number of 
students decreased slightly, 
the games that are played 
during the semester began 
anew. 

The Union tried the 
unusual with Western 
Dances to teach the Greeks 
how it is done. 

Basketball season was 
going full blast. The Raid- 
ers rocked between first 
and second place as Bob 
Bass coached the team to 
new heights. T.C.U. was 
a mighty contender but 
Gene Knolle knew how to 
handle them. Rice seemed 
the only problem. 

And freshmen, now 
seasoned veterans with one 
semester under their belt 
started the second half of 
their new life at college 
while seniors moved into 
their last semester in the 
Hub. 




Basketball's in full swing. 




Greeks tried their hand at 
Western dancing. 




Back to playing the game of the arrows. 



Lije~9 





With registration the W. A. C. began its study. 



"Australia, a Mod- 
ern Happening" was the 
title of the study made by 
the World Affairs Con- 
ference. Students and fac- 
ulty from many states and 
colleges came to the cam- 
pus to learn about the 
country "down under." 

A five day run by 
the play, The Bacchae, was 
the third major production 
by the University Theater. 
Dionysus, the god of mer- 
riment, returns to Thebes 
to vindicate his mother's 
memory and eventually de- 
stroys the city. 

The new Law School 
officially got its home 
with the formal dedica- 
tion of the Law Building. 
Construction was on the 
move with both the Chem- 
istry building and the Art 
and Architecture building 
rising fast. 

And the weather was 
so warm that everyone 
thought that spring was 
in the air. 




The Kings speaks. 




ts a home. 




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Lubbock Rock Festival participants got the blues. 



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Tech's swimming team in aaion. 



Basketball s e a s u n 
came to a close and found 
the Raiders locked in a 
tie with the Horned Frogs 
of T.C.U. for third. 

While the round- 
ballers were finishing the 
Tech swimming team went 
to the Conference meet in 
Dallas. But the swimmers 
could only catch fifth 
place. 

Over the Easter holi- 
days some students tried 
to attend the Lubbock 
Rock Festival, but were 
either arrested or blown 
away. The festival was a 
real flop. 

And it couldn't be 
spring yet because there 
was still lots of snow on 
the ground. 



Snow in March? 




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Tennis star at work. 




Greek Week filled 
the Greek lodges with fra- 
ternity men and sorority 
women discussing the 
problems facing the Greek 
world. As a part of the 
week's activities, Sing-Song 
was held. The Delts won 
the fraternity division, 
while the ADPis and 
ATOs won the mixed 
division, and the Thetas 
won both the sorority di- 
vision and sweepstakes. 

The Little 500 Bike 
Race was held and the 
Dolphins and Pi Peddlers 
did a repeat performance 
winning first place again. 

The last major pro- 
duction of the University 
Theater, The Chalk Gar- 
den, had a five day run. 
Miss Madrigal was to be 
Laurel's governess, but she 
found the whole situation 
around the home some- 
what strange. 

Tornadoes struck all 
around Lubbock and did 
extensive damage to the 
towns of Plainview and 
Hale Center, but the cam- 
pus and Lubbock remained 
unharmed through the 
spring storms. 

And the sun worship- 
pers appeared everywhere. 



Pi Peddlers win again. 



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The Chalk Garden presented by the University Theater. 




2,500 plus receive degrees at graduation ceremonies. 

Second semester drew 
to a close and with it 
came the end of the year. 

All too soon the 
studying for finals was 
upon the campus and all 
the things associated with 
summer came into focus. 

The Red Raiders were 
out playing baseball and 
the track team was busy 
too with many end of sea- 
son meets. 

Every pool and bit of 
lawn was covered with the 
sun people out soaking up 
the rays. Students who 
were lucky finished up 
early and got on their way 
to whatever the summer 
held. 
Although graduation was 

cancelled due to the de- 
structive tornado of May^^ 
11, more than 2,500 stu- 
dents received their degrees 
and left Tech, perhaps 
never to return. 

And the Fantastic 
Year 1969-70 had come 

to an end. 

Kal's nine busy again. 





8 



There comes a summer to the campus. 



Life— 11 




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For two weeks prior to the actual day of the Viet Nam Moratorium, petitions 
were circulated protesting the war in Viet Nam. The Moratorium petition 
committee manned a table in the Tech Union and handed out petitions around 
campus such that the petitions were made available to any and all students 
and faculty members. The leaders of the Moratorium wore black arm bands 
all week in order to advance the movement. These pre-Moratorium activities 
culminated October fifteen with the silent vigil and a host of activities 
throughout the day. Students holding white crosses stood in Memorial Qrcle 
the entire day of the Moratorium in memory of the American war dead of 
the Viet Nam war and protesting the continuance of the war. They chose 
this spot due to the fact that Memorial Circle is dedicated to the American 
war dead of all foreign wars. 



Day-Long Moratorium Activities Cause 




In an afternoon symposium, a student panel comprised of Tom \X'alsh, 
student senator, Jay Thompson, student association presi^lent, John 
Hughes, chairman of the symposium, Arthur Yarish, observer for the 
Ainerican Civil Libettiet Union at Tech and Susan Preston, Mon- 



lorium. chairman, diHussid the topic "Student Involvement, What is 
Happening and Why.''". At this forum both students and faculty were 
given the opportunity to expresi their opinions on the Viet Nam war. 



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October 15, 1969, was the day set aside, not only 
nationally but also at Tech, for the Viet Nam Mora- 
torium. Supported by the veterans of the Kennedy ahd 
McCarthy campaigns, the purpose of the Moratorium 
was to show rejection of the war and to make more 
people aware of the Viet Nam war. The activities at 
Tech included a day-long Silent Vigil, a Viet Nam 
Symposium conducted by students and faculty at the 
Union, and an interdenominational service led by Lub- 
bock clergy. 

The agenda went rather smoothly until the service 
by the clergy. During the prayers, unidentified members 
of the crowd threw eggs. Coke bottles, and various other 
things at the speakers. The campus police, although 
summoned, were unable to subdue the crowd. 

The reaction to this kind of behavior was somewhat 
varied among Tech students. The people who were most 
active in the Moratorium proceedings were outraged by 
the actions of the counterdemonstrators. The group in- 
volved in the counterdemonstration viewed their partici- 
pation as a prank intended to disrupt the proceedings. 
The majority of Tech students, however, were able to 
soon forget or ignore the happenings and continue to 
casually walk to class. 



There were some antagonistic reactions to the Viet Nam War 
Moratorium. During the ceremony commemorating the American 
war dead, a rowdy element showed up, wavng the American 
flag in defense of their position. Words led to actions as the 
shouting of obscenities led to egg throwing and such. Managing 
to offend everyone including the conservatives, they broke up 
the peaceful atmosphere that had prevailed throughout the day's 
activities. 



Mixed Reactions Among Tech Students. 



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Professor Leon Blevins of the Tech government department was one of the faculty 
members to react to the day-long moratorium. He participated in the symposium 
held in the afternoon. Another reaction to the demonstrations was to repaint the fence 
with red, white, and blue stripes and pro-American slogans. This covered the solid 
blacic-white cross paint job of the previous day. 



Life— 13 



Homecoming Activities for 1969 Found 
Techsans Busy "Doing Their Thing." 



Preparations for the homecoming weekend began weeks 
before the actual day of activities. Centered around the theme 
of "Texas Tech, Doing Our Thing," plans were made for the 
giant bonfire, the parade, many teas, parties, and dances, as well 
as the big game. Also, prior to homecoming, voting was going 
on to elect a homecoming queen to reign over the 1969 activities. 
But when the night of the bonfire, Oct. 31, rolled around, things 
were all in order. 

Activities for the homecoming weekend were officially insti- 
gated by the homecoming bonfire on Friday night. This was 
followed by the parade on Saturday morning Nov. 1. That same 
afternoon Tech played Rice in the homecoming football game. 
After the game, many organizations held teas or parties for the 
alumni. To conclude the weekend there were dances for both 
the exes and the students. 

Before anyone knew it, another homecoming had come and 
gone. It had been a weekend of excitement and memories as the 
exes visited their alma mater in a brief flashback to days gone by. 



Building a float for the homecoming parade was no easy matter. First, an 
organization had to find a place which was large enough to accommodate 
a trailer and what was to go on it as well as work room. After these 
facilities had been secured, the actual work of float building began. 
Framing up the objects that were to be on the float and tacking on the 
chicken wire were only minor incidentals when compared to the hours 
which had to be spent glueing and stuffing chicken wire. All this work 
went on in the weeks before homecoming. But for some reason the final 
touches were not put on until the Friday night before the parade. When 
the parade rolled, the work was done, and a float was the result. 




^ 




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Friday afternoon and evening were the official beginnings of the Homecoming 
weekend. That afternoon, a team of judges surveyed all the dorm decorations 
and decided which was best in each division. Results were announced at the 
halftime ceremonies of the football game. Horn Hall (decorations pictured 
below) placed first in the Women's Residence Hall division, Sneed Hall 
was first in the Men's Residence Hall division, and Wiggins Complex won 
in their division. 

That evening the annual Homecoming bonfire was held. Built by the Army 
ROTC in the field north of the Wiggins Complex, the bonfire was as large 
as ever and produced the excitement which was to carry through the weekend. 
The cheerleaders (pictured above) led yells as the spirit of homecoming blazed 
with the fire. 

Saturday morning the homecoming parade was held with its many bands, cars, 
and floats. Also there were march groups from the ROTC drill teams. 
There was judging of the floats and the winners in each division were: the 
float built by Kappa Alpha was the first place winner in the fraternity 
division (pictured right), Alpha Chi Omega was the winning float in the 
sorority division, the Union float took first in the Campus Organization divi- 
sion, and the float built by the American Institutes of Architecture was the 
Sweepstakes winner for the parade. 



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Yoiivpunm a LOflGWay Tech 



Life~15 



A winning float, a winning queen, and a winning team 
were the combination which made homecoming such a 
success. Crowned during the halftime ceremonies at the 
game was the Homecoming Queen for 1969, Miss Barbara 
Zimmerman. Barbara is a senior secondary education major 
from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. She is also a member of 
Pi Beta Phi social sorority and head twirler for the "Going 
Band from Raiderland." Barbara was sponsored by Kappa 
Kappa Psi, the Band fraternity. Preston Smith, Governor 
of the State of Texas, also appeared at the game, and 
with the help of Miss Linda Baker, Homecoming Queen 
of 1968, he crowned Miss Zimmerman. 

The Queen's royal court consisted of: Rene Brooks, a 
senior from Hart; Pam Kirk, a junior from Borger; Janice 
Jones, a junior from Raton, New Mexico; and Susan 
Hancock, a senior from New Home. All the queen and 
her court were presented at the game. 

The Homecoming football game was a contest between the 
Red Raiders and the Rice Owls. Early in the game there 
was some question as to who would be the victor, but 
the Red Raiders managed to be as winning as their queen 
when the final score was taken. Moving to a 24 to 14 
victory over the Owls, the team was able to save the day 
and homecoming. 





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The anxiety and excitement of the homecoming crowd was very apparent at 
the football game. When the Rice Owls jumped off to an early lead and 
Tech could do nothing right, there was some concern by many as to whether 
or not the Raiders would be able to make this a victorious day. But after 
the half, the team came back fired up to win and the expressions of the 
crowd suddenly changed. The Raiders were going to win after all. 

To finish off the weekend there were dances for the exes and the students. 
Providing entertainment for the students was a dual show. Sonny and Cher 
were featured in a concert type performance prior to the actual dance and 
the Smith of California provided the music for the dance. 




f 



Life— 17 




^enny White 



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Bill Abernathy 



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Jhe Story of the Tech Union Is 



The story of the Tech Union is not the small building. Th^ JU 
is only the physical of this narrative. The real story is the people 
and what they cause to happen. Called the "melting pot" of the 
entire campus, every faction of Tech, hippie, cowboy, Greek, black, 
and ROTC, is represented in the Tech Union. There is a responsibility 
to the entire campus here, and everyone from the committee mem- 
bers to program council to the director join together to assume this 
responsibility. This is why events come off successfully. ^ 

At the head of all that went on at the SUB was Nelson Longley, 
Director. His staff consisted of Tom Morehead, assistant director; 
Kathy Durham, secretary; Jackie Beebe, bookkeeper; and Chet Whad- 
ford, night manager. But upstairs in the Union was where all the pro- 
gramming was done. Under the gentle influence of the Program Di- 
rector Dorothy Pijan, and with the aid of her secretary Virginia Faith 
and the graduate assistant Dennis Woolam, the Program Council 
scheduled, arranged, and presented programs. Again, it was the people 
of the council that made it work. Jessica Jones, president, spent hours 
working on events with each chairman. Mary Mallard, vice-president, 
and Ann Ashworth, secretary-treasurer, carried the paperwork end of 
programming. These were only the executive leaders of the Union. 
Without its followers, the Union would have been nothing. The in- 
dividual committee members each had his own responsibilities. Seeing 
that all the little details were taken care of and that all the pieces 
to the program puzzle fit were the Chairmen and Assistant Chairmen, 
who made up program council. They were Wally Saage, Rosie Seale, 
Art and Design; Rody Smith, Lucy Wuljen, Dance; Mona Reeves, 
Candice Rohr, Fine Arts; Barbara Drake, John Harding, Hospitality; 
Coy Ballard, Bill Scott, Ideas and Issues; Eren Johnson, Cathy Dykes, 
International Interests; Mike Anderson, John Gaylord, Leadership 
Board; Flower Pring, Amy Hammer, Public Relations; Kay Holmes, 
David Loutrel, Special Events; and Linda Logan, Mary Ellen Wyatt, 
World Affairs Conference. 

Making events happen is only a part of this story. This story is 
continued through these events . 





The people on the committees for the Tech 
Union were chosen during Union week by 
the committee chairmen. Coy Ballard and 
Bill Scott interviewed prospective Ideas and 
Issues committee members at a more con- 
ventional setting while Wally Saage of 
Art and Design chose the mystique of a 
veiled enclosure for his interviews. Amy 
Hammer of Public Relations Council also 
took the more traditional route for inter- 
viewing future members. 
Union Retreat was really the time when 
the people of the Uniott ^t to know each 
other better. Mary Malltid and Flower 
Pring, the Dynamic Duo, talked over de- 
tails with Mike Anderson, Chairman of 
Leadership Board, just prior to leaving. 
Jessica Jones, president, seemed only to 
be enjoying the fun. 

Brian Carney was one of the people who 
participated in the Coffee House Circuit. 



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W hen people think of the Tech Union, they remember some 
event which they have attended or some program which they have 
participated in. Whether it be a dance, ballet performance, fashion ^ 
show, lecture, fair, or concert, they remember what happened. This is 
why the Tech Union events tell the stor)' of its people. 

Each committee did its own thing for the Union. Art and Design 
made posters and decorations for everything and held the first "sculpt 
in" ever held on the Tech campus. 

Dance committee sponsored many free weeknight and weekend 
dances as well as their big extravaganza, the Homecoming Dance with 
the Smith. 

Ballet, concerts by guitarists, and art exhibits were just part of 
what the Fine Arts committee had to offer. 

Hospitality committee lived up to its name by having many 
receptions and teas for visiting speakers and they also sponsored the 
Union picnic. 

Ideas and Issues raised many eyebrows with their thought pro- 
voking programs and speakers. 

Adding an international flair, the International Interests Committee 
sold goods at their fair and sponsored such events as the French Riie 
Gauche Theater. 

Working with various campus organizations on retreats and con- 
ferences with a purpose of group dynamics, the Leadership Board 
was kept very busy. 'J 

Public Relations Council sought to keep the campus informed 
about what was going on at the Union .and they worked on the ever- 
present topic of Union expansion. 

Sonny and Cher, and such names as Brian Carney, Keith Sykes, and 
Leatherwood and Lisa on the Coffee House circuit, turned heads in 
the Special Events direction. 

Not to be outdone was the World Affairs Conference. Sponsoring 
"Australia, A Modern Happening" kept the members busy the entire 
year. 

People and events add up the main story of the Tech Union — 
just living. 



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Life— 23 



arid living 



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What is^ living ^l' the SUB^ Living ranges 

from a spades game in the snack bar to a 

movie planning meeting in the work room. 

It may mean being hit over the head with a 

fliop on Union retreat or singing folksongs 
C' inst for the fun of being together. 

Going to seminars and lectures is also part 
of life at the Union. Coy Ballard and Mona 
Reeves ran info each other at the World 
Affairs Conference seminars. 

Rody Smith lived it up at the dances 
sponsored by the Dance Committee, both 
modern dancing and country and western. 

Mary Mallard found living in just being in 
on all the action. 

Whatever each individual finds is really 

^ what life is at the Union. Thut, the Union 
story is told by the people, events, and life 
at the Tech Union. 






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Australia 
Conference 



Tech's third annual World Affairs 
Conference opened Thursday, February 5, 
with the topic "Australia: A Modern Hap- 
pening." The two day conference consisted 
of speeches, seminars, and a banquet at 
which Australian dishes were served. Top 
speakers on Australia spoke on everything 
from art to business opportunities. In his 
address on "Investment Opportunities in 
Australia," Harry A. Shetrone of Delhi 
Australian Petroleum Ltd. cited that "Aus- 
tralia is the keystone to the development of 
the Southwest Pacific." Australia, a new land 
of opportunity for all, is the last remaining 
frontier. 

Final registration took place Thursday morning 
just prior to the start of the opening speeches. 
Delegates from schools all over the state and 
many from Tech picked up their packets to begin 
the sessions. 




Gosing the final session of the World Affairs Conference was H. Neil 
Truscott (pictured center), Australian consul general for the Western 
United States, who spoke on the economic growth of Australia. Two of 



the seminar leaders were Peter Harley (pictured left), and Dr. Elizabeth 
Sasser (pictured right), both members of the Tech faculty. They spoke 
on the culture and architecture of Australia. 



26-Ufe 



*' 



i 



Explored as 
Progresses. 





The World Affairs Conference is sponsored by the Tech Union under the 
direction of the conference steering committee. Chairman, Linda Logan 
(pictured above), and Assistant Chairman, Mary Ellen Wyatt, arranged all 
the many details for this conference with the aid of the members of their 
committee. 

The Conference consisted of five plenary sessions and twelve seminars. Seminar 
topics included Australia's natural resources, its art, history, government and 
politics, military role in Southeast Asia, business opportunities, education, 
science and technology, archaeology, sociology, and geography. Seminar leaders 
were professors from many universities and members of the department of 
government, as well as social anthropologists and historical archaeologists such 
as Dr. A. R. Pilling (pictured left), who is an authority on the changes among 
the Australian aborigines. The lectures were open to the public, however, only 
students were allowed to attend the seminars. 

Gala event of the conference was the banquet which was held Thursday night. 
Serving such delicacies as kangaroo tail soup, barbequed lamb and beef, Dutch 
fried potatoes, fruit cabobe, sourdough bread, and wine trifle, the steering 
committee brought Australia to Tech for a detailed survey. 







Life— 27 




Most Beautiful Coeds 
Crowned in Pageants. 

Friday, December Fifth, was the night of the final judging for the 
Miss Mademoiselle and Miss Playmate contests sponsored by Sigma Delta 
Chi and the La Ventana. From a field of 25 finalists, Pamela Kirk, a 
junior from Borger was chosen Miss Mademoiselle. Miss Kirk was spon- 
sored by Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Mary Beth Johnson, a junior from Pampa, 
sponsored by Gordon Hall, was named Miss Playmate. 



m\ 



As the night of the final judging (or the Miss Mademoiselle and 
Miss Playmate contests arrived, tension filled the air. Twenty-five 
finalists for Miss Mademoiselle busily added final touches to their 
hair and make-up before putting on their gloves and starting their 
long walk down the runway. Likewise the ten finalists for Miss Play- 
mate made last minute adjustments and pinned on their ribbons before 
starling across the stage. After the girls had walked, smiled, arvd 
modeled, the waiting began. The judges were busy trying to dec'de 
which girls were the most beautiful. The suspense mounted as the 
seconds dragged into minutes. Then, the waiting was finally over as 
the judges announced the winner. Happiness reigned and congratu- 
lations were in order for the new Miss Mademoiselle, Pamela Kirk. 
The Playboy Bunny announced the new Miss Playmate, Mary Beth 
Johnson, who will appear on the foldout in the 1970 La Vtnlana. 
In a flurry of pictures, the search once more came to an end. The 
two most beautiful girls at Tech had been crowned. 



28~Life 







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Distinguished personages come to Texas Tech each year to deliver 
lectures under auspices of Tech's University Speakers Series. The purpose 
of this series is: "That to the crucible of the educational experience may 
be added the works of those who have thought best and performed ablest 
in our time." — University Speakers Committee. 

The first speaker of the series was Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski, director of 
the Research Institute of Communist Affairs at Columbia University. 

Dr. Lujo Toncic-Sorinj, Secretary General of the Council of Europe, 
was the University Series second speaker. Dr. Toncic spoke on the problems 
in the Far East and the need for American involvement. 

California's State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Dr. Max 
Rafferty, was to be the third speaker in the series. However, due to inclem- 
ent weather conditions, he was unable to come. 



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30— Life 



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Fourth on the list of speakers was Ralph Nader, a graduate of 
Princeton. Nader chose as his career a consumer crusader because he believes 
that the ethical standards in industry are distressingly low. 

Dr. Robert Weaver, president of New York City University's Bernard 
M. Baruch College, spoke on the problems of urban living. He was the 
first Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. 

The sixth speaker was Harry Golden, a well known social historian. 
His topic was "Only in America" in which he outlined the privileges of 
Americans. 

Award winning editor, of Harper's, Willie Morris, was the youngest 
speaker in the series. 

The main speaker at the Commencement Exercises was Dr. Philip 
Handler, president of the National Academy of sciences. 





The University 
Speal<ers Series 



Life— 31 





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Southwest 70 Rock 



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As the weather turned colder and the wind picked up, the 
dirt began to blow. Despite all these complications, some 
brave souls persisted in their efforts to attend the South- 
west '70 Rock Festival. Finding things even worse than 
they had expected, the enthusiasm of youth soon turned 
into a forlorn type of stubbornness that kept a few hardy 
souls there. To at least three of the participants, the 
dust made no difference. 

If the weather wasn't bad enough, the lack of entertain- 
ment added to the misery. Home-style performers tried in 
vain the keep things lively, but the soundlessness of the 
drums and the emptiness of the stage only magnified the 
total failure of the festival. 




32—Ule 




The Lubbock Rock Festival, sponsored by the Southwest '70 Rock 
Festival Corporation, was a real flop. After estimations of participa- 
tion anywhere from 25,000 to 40,000, the actual participation was at 
the most 2,500 at any one time. Thus the corporation lost a consider- 
able amount of money. 

Everything went wrong. First, when the early arrivals got to the 
field, they were forced to move at least three times to various loca- 
tions before even starting the festival. 

Then, the cold forced some to leave, and a few bands can- 
celled out. As the wind grew stronger, the dust became so bad that 
one could not see two feet in front of his face, a few more partici- 
pants left and still more bands cancelled out. 

Finally, only the true die-hards were left. They huddled around 
fires, wrapped up in blankets, and employed every means possible to 
keep warm and out of the dust. By this time there were more police- 
men there than festival people. 

Some hometown talent tried to entertain but in the end, the 
elements won out. Everyone left and what was to be the rock festival 
of the century turned into the bummer of the century. 

A great contrast existed between the enthusiasm of some participants and 
the misery of others. 




ENJOY 



i-uii^ 



Festival Bummer of the Century. 




Life— 33 



The world of the University Theater at 
Tech enraptures audiences throughout the 
year with its major theater productions as 
well as its lab theater productions. But the 
finished product seen by the audiences is 
only a minor portion of the involvement en- 
tailed in a dramatic production. 

The work in producing a major theater 
production begins long before ojjening 
night with tryouts. They are open to anyone 
who wishes to get involved. Not only are the 
actors and actresses chosen, but crew mem- 
bers and .ill the various assistants are signed 
up. The next step is casting which is the 
organizational meeting which really gets the 
play rolling. The cast is announced, crews 
are assigned, assistants and crew heads are 
picked, and all policies and rules are set for 
the theater. There are seven crews to which 
a person may be assigned. They are scenery, 
costume, make-up, lights, sound, publicity, 
and props. 

A chain of command also has to be set 
up. At the head of this staff are Mr. Ronald 
Schulfz, theater director; Dr. Clifford Ash- 
ley, technical director; and Larry Randolph, 
costume designer and publicity director. 
Under them are the assistants, such as tech- 
nical assistant, with the crc-ws themselves fol- 
lowing. After all this has been set up, 
then the work begins. 

Anywhere from a hundred to two hun- 
dred people work every afternoon for 
hours, and on crew nights getting the set 
ready, sewing costumes, and learning lines. 
Each student works from 50 to 100 hours 

on each individual production. 

As the opening date draws closer, 
final touches are added. One week before 
the performance, technicals are down pat 
and running crews are chosen. The later 
are the 20 to 30 people who actually run 
the show, not counting the cast. 

Dress rehearsals are held on Thursday 
nights as a final test before the opening 
night. 

The plays open on Friday nights and 
run through the following Monday. Five 
perform.mces arc the extent of most pro- 
duction runs. 

The set is then struck and the process 
starts all over again, moving toward an- 
other University Theater production. 




The Multicolored Maze 



The Multicolored Maze, a multimedia with books, lyrics, and music 
by John Gilbert, was commissioned by the International Center for 
Arid and Semi-Arid Land studies under a grant from the Texas Fine 
Arts Commission. The premiere performance of this play took place 
in October. Under the influence of musical theater, several of the 
media are brought together in an attempt to wed them into a uni- 
fied effect. Through the technological advance in electronics and 
visual devices, the possibilities open to musical theater were ex. 



The World of the University 



34 Lite 



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y- 7, 



panded and thus opened the door to a new format which can best 
he described as multi-media. Thus, The Multicolored Maze was a new 
innovation in play production. 

Being an experiment in multimedia the play was an attempt to re- 
late the content to the visual projections. This was a further en- 
deavor to use these multiple projections to enhance the plot and 
movement, and to aid the theatrical experience on several levels of 
interpretation simultaneously. The story of Dean Alexander stumbling 
onto Prospero's para<lisc quite by accident and his ultimate realization 
while in ihe land of enchantment is the main plot of the story. Tarot 



and his powers lead the initiates to learn that society eventually de- 
pends upon the strength of the individuals and even rebellion brings 
its own brand of conformity. 

In the paradise of Prospero, Tarot (Troy West) holds Miranda 
(Cathy Crossland) prisoner through the use of deceptions. 
Dean Alexander (Bobby Dillard), hero of the drama, kads Alicia 
(Bachie Horst) through the maze searching for the key to the 
mystery which will let them escape. 



Theater Enraptures Audience 



Life— 35 



Mister Roberts 



Thomas Leggen and Joshua Logan's Mr. Roberts is a 
comedy about men serving aboard a navy cargo ship in the 
South Pacific during World War II. This play has attained 
the status of a minor American classic and is frequently 
played in theatres across the country. It opened in November 
at the Tech University Theater. Mr. Roberts was a comedy 
noted for its lusty barracks-room humor. Known as a 
laugh-aminute farce, the play concerned itself with the 
problems that face men on the high seas. 

Briefly the story portrayed a frustrated crew forced to sit 
out World War II on a cargo ship stationed in a peaceful 
zone of the South Pacific. Mr. Roberts, the hero of the 
play, always stood up for the rights of his crew. He and 
Doc were constantly getting into trouble working on 
schemes to raise the crew's morale. The Captain, enthralled 
with his promotion seeking, denied the crew many of its 
customary privileges which caused numerous problems 
aboard ship. Desiring to become involved in the real fight- 
ing, Mr. Roberts requested a transfer to a warship, but the 
stubborn Captain refused to allow it. When Mr. Roberts 
finally secured his transfer, the crew returned to its slump 
of depression. A telegram announcing Mr. Roberts' death 
shocked everyone but the play ended on a lighter note. 
The crew, led by their new first officer, began arguing with 
the Captain again. 

Although the ship was stationed in a peaceful zone, peace 
did not always reign. A familiar sight was the Captain 
(Luther Williams), and Mr. Roberts (John Walker), 
arguing over the Captain's policies. 

Denied of the privilege of shore leave, the crew improvised 
as much as possible. Mr. Roberts (John Walker), and the 
Doc (Perry Langenstein), tried their best to mix up a brew 
all their own. 



/ 



4 









36- Li If 



The Bacchae 



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Euripides' The Bacchae, a classic Greek tragedy which dealt frankly 
and shockingly with the themes of mob violence and mass hysteria, 
opened a five performance run in February. Following the pattern 
set by the University Theater on previous plays, The Bacchae used an 
original approach. The Tech version featured electronic music based 
on ancient Greek instruments and sounds. The music was composed 
especially for the •production and created a mood appropriate for 
the setting of the play. Also, semi-modern costumes were employed and 
a stylized set reminiscent of a Greek temple added to the atmosphere 
created by the drama. 

The contents of the play were taken from Greek mythology, and told 
a story as contemporary today as when it was written some 2,000 
years ago. The problems the play concerned itself with fit the problems 
of today. Motivated by egotism and re\enge, Dionysus, the son of 
Zeus and a Greek princess, returned to his native city of Thebes to 
vindicate his mother's memory by proving his own divinity. Going 
against the established order, he organized a religious cult which 
excited his followers to a mad frenzy causing them to commit a 
ritualistic murder. This set in motion the machinery of destruction 
which led to the fall of Thebes. 

Dionysus (Mike Bearden), son of Zeus, after being thrown in 
chains by Pentheus (Pat Rogers), easily escaped his captors and 
returned to harass the young king (pictured on preceding page). 

The head of young king Pentheus cradled by mad Agane (Trudie 
Marchbanks), showed the desperation of the people after the death 
of their young king and represented the final episode in the story 
of the destruction of Thebes. 

One of the Bacchae (Linda Givens), expressed the urgency and 
emotion involved in the dance which preceded the death of Pentheus. 



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38-Lil 




Chalk Garden 



The Chalk Garden, a unique play in that it is a combination of 
comedy, mystery, melodrama, and drama, opened in April to close 
the University Theatre's rejjular season, Enid Bagnold combined these 
odd elements to form a play that portrays things like no other piece 
of dramatic writing in the modern theatre. Due to this combina- 
tion, the play makes a definite impression on each member of the 
audience whether it be unpleasant or unforgettable. 

The story was about an English gentlewoman who lived with her 
granddaughter and devoted her life to simple though somewhat 
eccentric purposes. Her chief concern was her garden, but as a 
diversion she advertised for a companion to her granddaughter and 
interviewed applicants with no intention of hiring them. But one 
candidate excelled all the rest. She was an excellent gardener and 
manager who could even control the butler, but there was some- 
thing strange about her — a hidden mystery concealed in her past. 

Miss Bagnold's vividly created characters captured the show. Mrs. 
St. Maugham, grandmother of Laurel, was a prime example of 
a proud, elderly, dowager queen of the estate. She had a great flair 
for living but could never quite make anything grow. Laurel's 
governess, the mysterious Miss Madrigal, never could figure out how 
life should be lived for the moment. Laurel, a frenetic 16-year-old, 
imitated her grandmother while secretly yearning for love. 

Working for control of the garden. Miss Madrigal (Mary Beth 
Bratcher) paused to consider how she could gain rank over the 
butler in her work. 

Disgusted with her drawing of a rose. Laurel (Deborah Burrows) 
decided it was a trite assignment, and that she was not going to do it. 



Tornado Smashes Into 

Lubbock Causing 150 

Million Dollars of 

Damage and 26 Deaths. 

Tech Lightly Hit. 




Monday, May 11, at 9:45 p.m. massive tor- 
nadoes smashed into the Lubbock area. The tornadoes 
rampaged across the town from south-southwest, 
skipping at rooftop level from 26th street and the 
vicinity of 19th and University and lowering its 
full blast, it smashed through downtown and the 
modest homes of scores of Latin-Americans in north- 
ern Lubbock. Approximately a 25-s<juare mile area 
was devastated. 

In the aftermath of the storm 26 persons were 
found dead and more than 500 were injured. Besides 
this loss of human life, there was an estimated 
loss of $100 to $150 million in damage done to 
property around the city. All of the downtown area of 
Lubbock was vertually destroyed. 

The Tech campus was on the fringe of the 
storm and thus very lightly hit. Trees were bent, 
broken, and uprooted and fences were blown over. 
A few windows were smashed out in the B.A. com- 
plex and a wing of the Home Ec. building was 
ripped open. The most costly damage was done to 
the light fixtures at Jones Stadium. Bent like a 
paper straw, all the light poles on the eastern side 
of the stadium were ruined. Tech students, most of 
whom had gone home for the summer, were un- 
harmed and safe such that many assisted Lubbock 
in her clean-up operation. 



I 

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I 



40—Ufe 




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Many Tech students preparing to move into apartments for the summer 
found they had nothing and nowhere to move. Apartments such as the 
Marlboro Apartments and the Varsity Apartments and University Arms 
Apartments were only shells of what had originally been standing. 
Included in the millions of dollars of damage which was done by the 
tornadoes were the many businesses in the downtown area and out around 
on the northern loop. 

Damage to the campus was relatively light. However the light poles at 
Jones Stadium were hit rather hard. The lights on the west side of the 
stadium were almost untouched, but the east side was a different story. 
Bent double to the ground, many of the lights were completely ruined. 



This damage caused the cancellation of many activities on campus. Be- 
cause homeless people were being sheltered in the coliseum until further 
housing could be provided for them, graduation ceremonies for the seniors 
were called off. 

Hardest hit was the area north of town. The West Texas Airport had 
some one hundred planes either flipped, damaged, or completely destroyed 
by the winds. Homes in the Mesa Road region were leveled to within 
three feet of the ground. Businesses, such as the Dr Pepper Bottling 
Company and the Anderson and Bigham Sheet Metal Works had nothing 
left from which to rebuild. Warehouses and supplies were blown all over 
the plains. 




Uh~41 




42— Life 





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College of Home Economics 
College of Agriculture 



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TOWN&COUNTRY 



ELAINE SAUL 
SHEILA LOONEY 
La Ventana Editors 



JOAN LEVERS 
T&C Editor 



LINDA SHEPHERD 

BECKY MEASON 

DARLA KAY 

Staff 



RAY McWILLIAMS 
Art Editor 



DARRELL THOMAS 

Director of Photography 



RICHARD MAYS 

BOB DARBY 
MIKE WARDEN 
JEFF LAWHON 
Photography Staff 



BILL DEAN 
Director of Publications 



JEAN FINLEY 
Business Manager 




Town and Country covers the 
College of Agriculture, the 
College of Home Economics, 
and their organizations. Coley 
White, agricultural economics 
major, strides his tractor while 
Diane Range, home ec major, 
poses in the foreground. 
(Fashions by Hemphill-Wells) 



10 
12 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
30 
30 
31 
38 
40 



2 

4 

6 

7 

8 

9 

16 

17 



19 
20 
21 
32 
34 
37 



CONTENTS 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Phi Upsilon Omicron 

American Home Economics Association 

Alpha Epsilon 

Alpha Zeta 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers 

Agronomy Club 

Block and Bridle 

Entomology Club 

Dairy Industry Club 

Future Farmers of America 

Rodeo Association 

Range and Wildlife Association 



DEPARTMENTS AND DEANS 



Introduction to Home Economics 

Dr. Willa Vaughn Tinsley 

Home and Family Life 

Clothing and Textiles 

Education 

Food and Nutrition 

Dean Gerald Thomas 

Ag Department Chairmen 



FEATURES 



Pig Roast 

Little International 

Milk Maid 

Judging Teams 

Rodeo 

Rodeo Queen 




T&C staff are Becky Meason, Joan Levers, and Linda Shepherd. 





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Town and Country — 1 




2 — Town and Country 





You've Come a Long Way, Baby 
To Get Where You've Got to Today 



Texas Tech's College of Home 
Economics takes pride in "the long 
way" its students have come, as 
well as its provisions for the way 
that lies ahead into responsible 
adulthood. Its well equipped class- 
rooms and laboratories aid in the 
guided daily learning processes. 

Home Economics as a disci- 
pline is a humanizing experience by 
emphasizing a personal approach 
to inter-relationships. When stu- 
dents study the life cycle, begin- 
ning with young children, they ob- 
serve and participate in the guid- 
ance of the activities of actual liv- 
ing pre-schoolers in child develop- 
ment laboratories. 

To broaden their understand- 
ing of differing socioeconomic lev- 



els, students go into and assist with 
local agencies, serving all facets of 
the community. Students experi- 
ence guided group living in small 
apartments and mobile homes 
as laboratories in management of 
time, money and human resources. 

In home economics, faculty 
members know students as individ- 
uals. To help new students to feel 
an important part of the tfemen- 
dous Tech family, the dean invites 
them in small groups into her 
home for a personal visit. 

Home Economics draws upon 
many other disciplines in synthe- 
sizing and defining its own area 
emphasis dedicated to the better- 
ment of personal and family living. 



Town and Country — 3 



Dr. Tinsley Guides 
Home Ec Expansion 



With an enrollment of 1,313, the 
G)llege of Home Economics is one of 
Tech's largest. Preparing women for useful 
and interesting careers in society with a firm 
foundation for family and community life 
is a main goal of the college. Training is 
offered in the fields of clothing and tex- 
tiles, home and family life, food and nutri- 
tion, and home economics education. 

Dean Willa Vaughn Tinsley heads the 
college, serving her sixteenth year in that 
position. An author, lecturor, and teacher. 
Dean Tinsley also takes time each year to 
meet each new home economic major. These 
students are invited into her home for a tea, 
while they are taking child development and 
family relations, a required course for home 
economic majors. Collecting colored glass 
and gardening provides Dean Tinsley's 
spare time enjoyment. 



Dean Willa Vaughn Tinsley (right) directs the 
College of Home Economics. (Opposite pagt) 
Dr. Margaret A. Sition (left) and Miss Billie 
Williamson (right) are assistant deans of home 
economics. 




4— Town and Country 



IJ9 




Town and Country — 5 



Home and Family Life 



Top left: Mrs. Estelle Wallace, 
chairman and professor of the 
Home and Family Life department, 
takes time from her busy day to 
help solve a puzzle in the pre- 
school laboratories. Top right: 
Two preschool children quench 
their thirst as Miss Val Moore 
watches. Bottom: Miss Josephine 
Turner instructs three coeds in the 
proper use of the vacuum cleaner 
in the home management program 
at Robby's Dorm. 




6 — Town and Country 




Clothing 
And Textiles 




!!• 




The department of clothing and textiles prepares 
the students for a career in the clothing and tex- 
tile industry. Students learn techniques of sewing, 
tailoring, textile identification, as well as having 
opportunities in research. 



Town and Country — 7 




I 



I 



8 — Town and Country 



'( 






The Food and Nutrition depart- 
ment, headed by Dr. S. P. Yang, 
left, teaches a variety of skills. 
Besides research with rats, those 
enrolled in the department learn 
cooking techniques in the experi- 
mental food labs. 



Town and Country — 9 



Phi Upsilon Omicron 



I 



Mary Alice Anderson 
Carolia Bass 
Cynthia Beene 
Mary Bigham 



Suzanne Blevins 
Ginger Blon 
Rosita Bloom 
Beth Bourland 
Margaret Briley 



Madeline Butts 
Gail Carter 
Janis Choate 
Bretza Clark 
Cynthia Coon 
Gladys Dennis 



Ethel Ellison 
Gwen Flache 
Beth Glass 
Bonnie Grabow 
Cindy Greener 
Kay Griffith 
Cindy Gruner 

Carolyn Haley 
Linda Harbin 
Marilyn Hathaway 
Patricia Henderson 
Karen Hitchcock 
Chloie Jan Huffaker 
Victor Gene Hughes 

Jana Jones 
Kitty Jungerman 
Barbara Lindley 
Mary Helen McNair 
Donna Maner 
Barbara Miller 
Marilyn O'Dowd 

Luanna Price 
Charlie Redding 
Paralyn Render 
Francis Leane Risley 
Pat Roberts 
Nancy Joe Roebuck 
Ruth Rucker 



Sara Sanchez 
Donna Schwertner 
Mary Kay Skopinski 
Doris Spraggins 
Mary Staudt 
Cynthia Stevens 
Lynn Taylor 

Freda Walker 
Sue Ward 
Sharla Wells 
Mary White 
Jayellen Wilson 
Carolyn Wossum 
Judy Wuensche 




10— Town and Country 



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Honorary 
Home Ec 
Fraternity 



Phi Upsilon Omicron is an honor- 
ar)' professional home economics fra- 
ternity which was founded in 1909 at 
the University of Minnesota. Tech's 
Omega chapter was granted establish- 
ment in June, 1937. 

Invitation to membership is given 
in the fall and spring. At these times 
teas and parties are held for the in- 
terested girls. 

Eligibility for membership consists 
of having completed 48 hours, a 3.0 



overall grade point, and selection based 
upon character, scholarship, interest, and 
professionalism. 

Officers for 1969-70 were Gail 
Carter, president; Punkie Dennis, vice- 
president: Bretza Clark, corresponding 
secretary; Carolia Bass, recording secre- 
tary; Cynthia Beene, treasurer; and 
Linda Huffhines, pledge trainer. 

Faculty sponsors are Mrs. Sherrell 
Foree and Miss Jo Marques. 



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Top: Officers for 69-70 were (from 
row) Mrs. Betty Wagner, next year's 
sponsor; Bretza Clark, corresponding sec- 
retary; Bonnie Graham, assistant social 
chairman; Jana Jones, assistant pledge 
trainer; Mrs. Margarette Harden, next 
year's sponsor; (hack row) Cynthia 
Beene, treasurer; Carolia Bass, recording 
secretary; Rosita Bloom, communications 
chairman; Punkie Dennis, vice-president; 
Gwen Flache, Candle reporter; Mary 
Staudt, social chairman; Freda Walker, 
publicity chairman; and Gail Carter, 
president. 

Lejl: Members held a tea for any girls 
interested in Phi Upsilon Omicron. 



Town and Country — 11 



AHEA Membership Tops State Chapters 



I 



Tech's American Home Economics 
Association provides opportunities for 
professional home economists and mem- 
bers from other fields to cooperate in 
the attainment of the well-being of in- 
dividuals, families, and American 
homes. This year the Texas Tech mem- 
bership in AHEA outnumbers all other 
student sections in the state of Texas. 

Activity and service characterize the 
organization in its establishment of a 
co-sponsorship of a foreign student 
from Taiwan, Aileen TZu-Chee Qiuang, 
who will begin graduate study this 
summer. Selling Red Raider stationery, 
serving for Vann's Catering Service, and 
assisting with the State Convention 
Workshop have provided financial aid 
and social activities for the members. 

Several active AHEA students have 
excelled on the state level. Ruth Rucker 
was State President and Home Econo- 
mist of the Year. Gail Carter was State 
Delegate to the Texas Nutrition Coun- 
cil from THESS and State Chairman for 
Student Involvement in the White 
House Conference. Diane Marshall was 
State Treasurer, and Betty Moldenhauer 
was Alternate for the State Nomination 
Committee. 




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* I 







Top: Gay Nell McGinnis, new president of AHEA is installed by the 
former president, Marilyn O'Dowd. Bollom: The newly installed officers 
are Gay Nell McGinnis, president; Mary Dean, vice-president; Diane 
Marshall, secretary; Suzanne Mack, treasurer; Gayle Medlock, mem- 
bership chairman; Linda Howe, publicity chairman; Betty Moldenhauer, 
projects chairman; Laura Wheeler, social chairman; Diane Range, AWS 



representative; Lyna Pitts, editor; Edith Chambers, chairman: home 
economics education; Marsha Dawson, chairman: home and family 
life; Kalhy Shaw, chairman: food and nutrition; and Kay Marshall, 
chairman: clothing and textiles. Opposite Page: One of AHEA's many 
projects was serving for Vann's Catering Service. 



\2 — Town and Country 



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Mary Staudt Named 

Home Economist of Year 

At Annual Banquet 



The Tech chapter of the American 
Home Economics Association and mem- 
bers of Phi Upsilon Omicron hosted the 
annual awards banquet for the College 
of Home Economics. Mrs. John J. 
Wilson, a home economist from Fort 
Worth who works in public relations, 
highlighted the evening with her version 
of "You've Come A Long Way, Lady." 

The newly installed officers of 
AHEA were introduced by Gay Nell 
McGinnis, president for 1970-71. A 
special acknowledgement went to Miss 

Ahoie: Marilyn 0"Dowd, outgoing president 
of AHHA. presents a gift of appreciation to 
Mrs. Johnnie Dorsey, sponsor. 



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14 — Town and Country 



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Mrs. John J. Wilson presents Mary Staudt with a silver tray for being selected as the Home 
Economist of the Year at • the annual home economics awards banquet. Mrs. Wilson, guest 
speaker from Fort Worth, talked on "You've Come a Long Way, Lady." 



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Opal Wood for her outstancJing contri- 
bution to the student chapter. Miss 
Wood then proceeded to recognize all 
scholarship recipients from the College 
of Home Economics as well as from 
other sources. Dr. Margaret Sutton 
recognized the scholastic achievers who 
had a 3.5 average or better. 

The major awards which came 
from the College of Home Economics 
went to girls who had shown out- 
standing service and contributed much 
to their profession and to the campus. 
Susan Herring was named Sophomore of 
the Year. Betty Moldenhauer was the 



recipient of the Ellen H. Richards 
Service Award and Ruth Rucker re- 
ceived the Sixtieth Anniversary Award. 

Four Helping Hands awards were 
presented to outstanding faculty and 
staff members. They were Dr. S. P. 
Yang, Mrs. Mary Jo Fickle, Mrs. 
Jeanette Jenkins and Mrs. Wanda Tol- 
bert. 

The evening was climaxed when 
Dean Willa Vaughn Tinsley named 
Mary Staudt as Home Economist of the 
Year for her outstanding contributions 
in AHEA and in other campus organi- 
zations. 



Top: Mrs. Mary Jo Fickle, State THESS Advisor, 
receives a Helping Hand Award from Marilyn 
O'Dowd, outgoing president of AHEA. Bottom: Claire 
Gillespie presents Dean Willa Vaughn Tinsley a scrap- 
book of items concerning the dean's portrait which 
was unveiled in October, 1968. 



Town and Country — 15 



I 



College Of Agriculture 



I 



The Dean of Agricultural Sciences, 
Dr. Gerald W. Thomas (right), has 
responsibihties in the area of teaching, 
research, and public services in agri- 
cultural sciences. This involves the 
supervision of farm operations at Tech 
and at the research farm in Amarillo. 

Dr. Thomas completed his under- 
graduate studies at Pasadena Junior 
College and the University of Idaho. 
His graduate work was done at Texas 
A & M University where his Ph.D. was 
conferred in 1954 in Range Ecology. 

The newly formed position of 
Assistant Dean for Research is filled 
by Dr. Samuel E. Curl (below). Dr. 
Curl is head of over 250 active research 
projects or preliminary investigations 
conducted in the eight departments of 
agriculture. An estimated one and a 
half million dollars went into the re- 
search. 

Dr. Curl received his education at 
Tarleton State College, Sam Houston 
State College, the University of Mis- 
souri and Texas A & M University. 




# 



i 




16 — Town and Country 





DR. H. E. DREGNE 



New to the Tech staff, but not new to agronomy 
is Dr. H. E. Dregne. Dr. Dregne attended Wis- 
consin State University, University of Wisconsin, 
and Oregon State University, where he received 
his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees, respectively. 
He has done much work in the area of soil con- 
servation. He has been a UNESCO consultant on 
the project on the utilization of saline irrigation 
water and he was also a U.S. delegate for 
UNESCO to the Latin American conference rel- 
ative to the study of arid regions. Dr. Dregrie 
heads the sixth largest agronomy department in 
the United States. 



DR. W. L. ULICH 



« 






Head of the Agriculture Engineering De- 
partment which trains students to apply 
their engineering knowledge to the prob- 
lems and benefits of the agriculture in- 
dustry is Dr. W. L. Ulich. Dr. Ulich 
attended Texas A & M where he received 
his B.S. and M.S. degrees. He received his 
Ph.D. from Harvard. The department's 
main purpose is teaching, but it is also en- 
gaged in public service and research work. 
Research includes projects in pollution and 
waste control, soil and water, economical 
agriculture structures, farm power and 
equipment, and animal environment control. 
Refresher conferences are sponsored by the 
department for the public. Enrollment in 
this department is an estimated 122 students. 




DR. J. W. BENNETT 

Dr. J. W. Bennett, associate dean of 
the College of Agriculture, performs 
the duties of the director of resident 
instruction. Among his duties are 
making changes in the program to 
keep up with new discoveries and 
advancements and also seeing that 
the correct number of classes are 
offered. Dr. Bennett is involved in the 
degree programs, curriculum, student 
organizations, and student counseling 
of the agriculture department. He 
came to Tech as a member of the 
faculty in 1948 after receiving his 
B.S. degree here. He received his 
M.S. and Ph.D. from Louisiana State 
University. He had been a member 
of the Tech faculty until his pro- 
motion to associate dean in 1963. 




DR. DALE ZINN 



Nine years of experience at Tech aids Dr 
Dale W. Zinn in his duties as chairman 
of the Animal Science Department. Dr. 
Zinn received his B.S. and M.S. degrees 
from West Virginia University and com- 
pleted his studies with a Ph.D. degree from 
Missouri University. His department offers 
students a B.S. degree in animal pro- 
duction, animal business and animal sci- 
ence. A masters degree may be obtained in 
the fields of animal breeding, animal nutri- 
tion, and meat science. Animal science is 
the only field, at the present time, in 
which a Ph.D. degree may be obtained. 
Presently, some 320 undergraduates and 
13 graduates are receiving training in the 
Department of Animal Science. 



Town and Country — 17 



MR. T. L. LEACH 



The department of agriculture education is 
headed by Mr. T. L. Leach. Mr. Leach graduated 
from Texas Tech in 1934 with his B.S. degree. 
He received his Master's degree from Texas Tech 
in 1939. During his education, Mr. Leach also 
attended Texas A & M and Iowa State University. 
The Agriculture Education Department provides 
professional training for high school teachers. It 
offers the B.S. and Master's degree to an enroll- 
ment of 160. Although instructors in vocational 
agriculture is the main goal, the department 
strives to prepare the student for employment 
with agencies such as the Soil Conservation 
Service. 





DR. W. F. WILLIAMS 



Dr. Willard F. Williams is chairman of the depart- 
ment of agricultural economics. Dr. Williams has 
been at Tech since 1963. He received his B.S. degree 
at Oregon University and a M.S. degree at the Uni- 
versity of California. Purdue University granted him 
his doctorate degree. His department provides training 
which deals with economic problems encountered in 
marketing, on farms and by non-farm agricultural 
business. Also available is instruction in research 
methods, statistical analysis, agricultural policies, and 
agricultural finance. 




MR. E. J. URBANOVSKY 

After receiving his education at Texas 
A & M and the University of Massachusetts, 
Mr. E. J. Urbanovsky came to Texas 
Tech in 1949 where he is now head of the 
horticulture and entomology department. 
The department is in charge of all the 
landscaping done on campus. One of the 
projects for this year was to develop 
small plants for the new chemistry and 
biology buildings. Urbanovsky has received 
several honors and awards for his land- 
scaping and architectural abilities, including 
the Pubsley Award and the Pro Excellsia 
Et Pontifice medal from Pope John in 1963. 



DR. J. J. WILLINGHAM 



An estimated 35 majors in the field of dairy 
industry are under the leadership of Dr. J. J. 
Willingham. Dr. Willingham came to Tech in 
1948 after receiving his B.S. degree from Texas 
A & M, and graduated with a M.S. and a Ph.D. 
degree in dairy bacteriology from Iowa State Uni- 
versity. Among the honors and awards he has 
received are the Lone Star Farmer Degree for 
outstanding service to vocational agriculture and 
F.F.A. He founded the Texas Dairy Conference 
and is coach of the Dairy Products Judging 
Team. The department covers all phases of dairy 
and food industry and operates the college 
creamery which supplies the dorms with milk and 
ice cream. 





DR. J. L. SCHUSTER 



Head of the recently formed range manage- 
ment and wildlife department is Dr. J. L. 
Schuster. Dr. Schuster began his education 
at Tarleton Stale, then attended Texas 
A & M where he received his B.S. degree. 
Colorado Stale University granted him his 
Master's degree, after which he relumed to 
Texas A & M to obtain his Ph.D. Dr. 
Schuster has been at Tech for six years 
and became head of the department formed 
on Feb. 1, 1969. Degrees are offered ip 
ranch and wildlife studies. Students are 
trained in range management and are re- 
quired to work on a ranch or for a federal 
agenq' before they obtain their degree. 
Total enrollment is 136 majors and IJ 
graduates. 



18 — Town and Country 



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Pig Roast Honors Winners 



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Dr. J. W. Bennett looks on as representatives of the Wichita Falls Farm and Ranch Club present 
a scholarship to Mike Mocek, president of the Student Agricultural council. 



More than 500 Tech aggies, faculty 
members and guests attended the annual Pig 
Roast in November. The event, which 
honors outstanding students and scholarship 
winners each year, was sponsored by the Stu- 
dent Agricultural Council and the College of 
Agricultural Sciences. 

Presentations were made by Dean 
Gerald W. Thomas and Asso. Dean J. Way- 
land Bennett. The ceremonies recognized 
outstanding students in the college, depart- 
mental team members, and 45 scholarship 
winners whose awards ranged from two $75 
winners to four who received four-year $700 
awards. 

L. D. Anderson, C. G. Scruggs, and 
John C. White were honored as "Outstand- 
ing Leaders in Texas Agriculture." Ander- 
son is immediate past president of Plains 
Cotton Growers, Inc. Scruggs, vice president 
and editor of "Progressive Farmer," was 
named chairman of the Joint Committee on 
Natural Fibers and Textile Development in 
1967. White, Texas Commissioner of Agri- 
culture, was head of the School of Agri- 
culture at Midwestern University prior to 
his election to state office. 



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Guests appear to 
have been well fed 
at the annual Pig 
Roast which 
honored 45 scholar- 
ship winners. 

Town and Country — 19 



li 



LRTLE INTEBETML 



Pig scrambles, calf dressing con- 
tests, Grand Champion Showman 
awards, a Milk Maid contest . . . these 
only highlighted the numerous events 
held at Tech's 36th annual livestock 
show — The Little International. 

Afternoon activities began with 
a noon barbeque. An auction was held 
with smoked hams being put up for 
bid. Ed Barkley, of Ed's Wagon Wheel, 
was named the highest bidder for the 
event. 

Three pigs were released in the 
greased pig contest. The first person 
to capture and hold a pig won. Calf 
dressing teams were in competition as 
they attempted to place a shirt, pants 
and halter on a calf. 

Contestants for the Milk Maid con- 
test added humor and excitement to 
the entire afternoon. Each girl was to 
milk a cow, using a coke bottle, for a 
period of three minutes. Barbara Beer 
acquired the most milk and was named 
Milk Maid 1969. 





Various events were included in Tech's 
Little International which is sponsored by 
the Block and Bridle Club. Exertion and 
expression were displayed throughout each 
event. Pictured above are portions of the 
calf dressing contest and pig scramble. 




20 — Town and Country 





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B&RSARA BEEB 



Freshman Barbara Beer proudly accepts the 
title of Texas Tech Little International Milk 
Maid, after her struggle to get the most 
milk into a coke bottle within a three min- 
ute time limit. 



Town and Country — 21 



Steve Dennis 
Delbert Lee Devin 
Billy C. Harbin 
Robert Kendrick 
Tommy Knowles 



Tony Kuehler 

Michael Mocek 

Sam Peterson 

Richard Reznik 

Glen Quebe 

Ronald Dwight Webster 



The purpose of Alpha Epsilon, 
the honor society of agricultural engi- 
neering, is to promote the ideals and 
goals of the profession. 

Ag engineering students whose 
scholarship places them in the upper 
eighth of their junior class or the upper 
fourth of their senior class are con- 
sidered for membership if they meet 
the qualifications of character, integrity 
and willingness to promote agricultural 
engineering. 

Officers for 1969-70 were Tommy 
Knowles, president; Tony Kuehler, vice- 
president; Richard Reznik, secretary; 
and Dwight Webster, treasurer. Dr. 
Eugene Foerster is the advisor. 




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Alpha Epsilon 




Honorary 

Ag Engineering 

Fraternity 



22 — Town and Country 



i 



The only honorary fraternity in the 
College of Agriculture, Alpha Zeta, 
promotes agriculture as a profession 
offering guidance and opportunities for 
developing leadership ability. Member- 
ship is open to all agriculture majors 
with 45 semester hours and a 2,75 over- 
all grade point. 

Sponsorship of the Texas Tech 
Agricultural Ex-Students Blood Account 
blood drive is an annual project of 
Alpha Zeta. Two drives are held each 
year, with an average total of 200 pints 
of blood collected per year. 

Officers for 1969-70 were Larry 
Emerson, chancellor; Whitney Rounds, 
censor; Rex Harris, scribe; and John 
Herring, treasurer. Dr. Gene Coleman, 
Dr. Louis Eggenbergcr and John R. 
Hunter are faculty advisors. 



Alpha Zeta 



Honorary 
Affriculture 



Ors^anization 



9i 




Pat Close 
John W. Conner 
Steve Dennis 
Larry Emerson 
Gary Fambro 



Michael Green 
Billy Ray Hallman 
Rex Harris 
Eric Hartzendorf 
Fred Hefley 



John Herring 
Ernest Inmon 
Joe Jennings 
Jim Kincaid 
Rob Lewis 



Kenneth Liggett 
Gary Louthan 
Haynes Melton, 
Bob Millican 
Michael Mocek 



Jerry Rice 
Ronald Rushing 
Ray Sorrel Is 
Jerald Stewart 
Richard Thornberry 
Ronald Thuett 



Town and Coantry — 23 




4 



The Texas Tech Student Branch of 
the American Society of Agricultural 
Engineers was organized in 1953. and 
admitted to the National Council of Stu- 
dent Branches in 1954. 

From its initiation to the Tech 
campus to present, it has promoted and 
fostered the interests of the Agricultural 
Engineering profession, through its 
several activities — social events, pro- 
grams, and campus-community projects. 

Activities this year included a 
watermelon bust, spaghetti supper, 
apple polishing banquet, awards ban- 
quet, and the building of playground 
equipment for B u c k n e r Children's 
Home. 




Officers of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers are Randal Drennan, secretary; 
Randall Conner, scribe; Tommy Knowles, vice-president; Bob Ferguson, treasurer; and Bill 
Harbin, president. 




Above: Members are (front row) Andy 
Anderson, Richard Reznik, Bill Harbin, 
Glen Quebe, Steve Dennis, Bob Fer- 
guson, Pete Gipson, Rocky Stevens; 
(second row) Sam Peterson, Kerry 
Jones, Alan Blackmon, Randall Birkel- 
bach, David Nelson, Bob Sheets. Bob 
Urban, Randall Conner; (third row) 
Dwight Webster, Terry Barton, Jim 
Barton, Hoyt Stephens, Gene Jeansonnc, 
Gary Hames. Randall Drennan. Vit 
Eggemeyer, Richard Hollis; (back row) 
Sam Harlan, Mike Mocek, Bill Snyder, 
Otto Schacht. Randall Ratliff, Tommy 
Knowles, Glen Shook, and Tony Kueh 
ler. Rif,ht: Bob Kendrick presents a 
polished apple to Dean Gerald Thomas 
at the Apple Polishing Banquet. 



24 — Town and Country 





i. sttmilj; 
It: ind Bill 




Jerry Bigham 

Aggie Council Representative 



Danny Cannon 
Sergeant at Arms 







Richard Crow 
Corresponding Secretary 




Rex Harris 
President 




Fred Hefley 
Reporter 




John Herring 
Vice President 




Haynes Melton 
Recording Secretary 




Jerry Rice 
Treasurer 



Agronomy Club wa 
tablishccJ to promote scholarship, leader- 
ship, and fellowship among those as- 
sociated with the agronomy department. 

Their activities include sponsorship 
of high school agriculture judging con- 
tests and an annual banquet and picnic. 

Officers this year are Rex Harris, 
president; John Herring, vice-president; 
Haynes Melton, recording secretary; 
Richard Crow, corresponding secretary; 
Jerry Rice, treasurer; Fred Hefley, re- 
porter; Danny Cannon, sergeant at 
arms; and Jerry Bigham, Aggie Council 
Representative. 

•Sponsors for the year were Dr. 
Eugene Coleman and Dr. William. 
Bennett. 



II 



Town arid Country — 25 






Block and Bridle 



The Texas Tech chapter of the 
National Block and Bridle Club is the 
largest and oldest departmental club 
on campus. Since its establishment in 
1934, the club has been sponsored by 
various men in the field of agriculture 
and business, such as Dean W. L. Stan- 
gel and Roy Wilson of the Texas State 
Fair. 

The club is one of the chief ties 
between research developments and 
practical application of these develop- 
ments in the livestock industry. 

At the beginning of each year, the 
club sponsors a Freshman Welcome for 
all agriculture freshmen. Also in the 
fall, the club sponsors the Little Inter- 
national Livestock Show. At the 22nd 
annual event, trophies were given for 
such events as a milking contest, a 
greased pig contest, and a calf dressing 
contest. 

The outstanding showman award 
this year went to Sammy Sagabiel. 

Block and Bridle sponsors a Fresh- 
man-Sophomore-Junior Judging Contest 
each spring. About 70 students partici- 
pated in the contest. Awards were 
given to the person with the highest 
score in the freshman, sophomore and 
junior divisions as well as the person « 
with the highest overall score. This 
year's overall winner was Larry Bryan. 

During Homecoming, the club 
sponsors a tour of the Animal Science 
facilities for the exes. 

The Annual Awards Banquet and 
Spring Steak Fry were the events that 
closed the year for Block and Bridle. 



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Officers for 69-70 are Nina Fox, ham sale chairman; Paula Wright, reporter; Bill Doherty, 
treasurer; Ralph Beal, president; Carol Garner, secretary; Sharon Bates, historian; Don 
Edwards, pledge marshall; and Delbert McCloy, pledge marshall. Below: An eager participant 
dresses a calf at Little International, sponsored by Block and Bridle. 



26 — Town and Country 




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officers for 1970-71 are George Kennedy, special events chairman; Millege Norton, vice president; Marvin Meek, 
president; Gail Hardin, reporter-historian; Denise Eskridge, treasurer; Randy Sutherland, pledge marshall; Marsha 
Mills, secretary; Eddie Holland, special events chairman; and Ron Kersh, pledge marshall. 



Jill DoW 
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Members of Block and Bridle are (front row) Ralph Beal, Dick 
Dickson, Paul Melton, Carl Jones, Jerry Bigham, Jim Crawford, 
Marsha Mills; (second row) Carol Garner, Denise Eskridge, Eddie 
Holland, Suzie Nelson, Sharon Bates, Delbert McCIoy, Peggie Hop- 
kins, Don Edwards; (ihird row) Max Stabel, Luke Etheredge, Willie 
Reneau, Jill Van Hoy, Nina Fox, Gail Hardin. Millege Norton, Susan 
Sadler, Beverly Boyd; (fourth row) Walter Conley, Jim Hammonds, 
Doug Bagley, Tom Walker, Mike Choat, Tony Mann, Lee York, 
Steve Groce; (fifth row) Tommy Haggard, Bill Brown, Ewing 



Downen, Bill Wright, Sandy Thornberry, Andy Norton, Randy 
Leifeste, George Kennedy; (sixth row) Buck Calvit, Cris Mason, 
Nancy Thompson, Larry Meadows, George Izzard, Tim Barton, Ron 
Kersh, Marvin Meek, (seventh row) Bernie Green, We'don Beasley, 
Phil Fletcher, Jim Mitchell, Lonnie McDonald, Brooks Gunter, Terry 
Kirkpatrick, Tommy Timmermann; (eighth row) Mr. John Baum- 
gardner, Paula Wright, Tom Martin, Jim Harden, Ernest Luker, 
Randy Sutherland, Jim Burnett, and Dr. Coleman O'Brien. 



Town and Country — 27 




28 — Touin and Country 



I 



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Annual Awards Banquet 
Ends Year Activities 



It 




Above left: Ron Kersh gives 
the best pledge award for 
the fall semester to Phil 
Fletcher. Above right: 
Gail Hardin presents a 
plaque to one of the 
winners of the Livestock 
Judging contest, Pat 
Barkley. Left: Ernest 
Luker, Ron Kersh, Gail 
Hardin and Pat Barkley 
are winners of the 
Livestock Judging Contest 



Town and Country — 29 



Dairy Club Makes Cheese 



Of the numerous agricultural or- 
ganizations on the Texas Tech campus, 
the Dairy Industry Club represents one 
of the smaller but more active organi- 
zations. The club conducts activities 
which acquaint its members with all 
facets of both the dairy and food in- 
dustries. 

The making and selling of a 
specially processed hot jalapena cheese 
is one of the club's main activities. This 
cheese-making business helps finance 
other club activities such as an annual 
banquet. The club also helps in con- 
ducting both local and regional FFA 
dairy products judging contests. 

The officers for the spring semes- 
ter were Qiarles Askins, president; 
Mark Compere, vice-president; Judy 
Jenkins, secretary-treasurer; and Terrell 
Castellaw, Aggie Council representative. 




•I'd 



Members and sponsors of the Dairy Industry Club are (back row) Dr. Milton Peeples, Jade 

Harris, Paul Drager, Dr. J. J. Willingham, Robert Selman, Judy Jenkins; (jront row) Billy 
Freeland, Mark Compere, Terrell Castellaw, Terry Darrow, and Charles Askins. 




Entomology Club 

The Texas Tech Entomology Club is 
used to promote fellowship and understand- 
ing within the entomology department. It 
is concerned with improving relations be- 
tween faculty and students to establish an 
atmosphere where learning will be interest- 
ing and enjoyable rather than just necessary. 

Speakers from the field of entomology 
and related fields often present the program 



at the meetings. The club also helps sponsor 
the blood drive each year with the Texas 
Tech Agricultural Ex-Student Blood As- 
sociation (TTAESBA). The group also holds 
an annual steak-fry. 

Members and sponsor for the Entomology Club 
this past year were (front row) Kenith Polk; 
Curtis Schaefer; Legett Garrett; Richard Shaw, 
Aggie Council representative; Larry Wade; Jim 
Campbell; Kenneth Pitts; Richard Howard; Harry 
Howell; (bad row) Dr. Charles R. Ward, spon- 
sor; Ronald Kirby, president; Allan Lange, secre- 
tary; Gene Richardson; Gary Phipps, vice-presi- 
dent; and Larry Jordan. 



30 — Town and Country 




i 





The Texas Tech chapter of Future 
Farmers of America is composed of 
students training for a future as teachers 
in vocational agriculture. This club's 
purpose is to raise the standards of 
agriculture education. 

One of the major activities during 
the year is the Vocational Agriculture 
Judging contest, which draws high 
school students from all over the state 
to the campus. Other facets of the pro- 
gram included the annual steak fry 
which is held for members in the 
spring. The chapter also helps sponsor 
the Pig Roast in the fall. 

Regular meetings include programs 
and speakers in areas related to the field 
of agriculture. 



Officers of FFA are Tony Shawver, sentinel; Billy Hallman, treasurer; Kenneth Bennett, presi- 
dent; Tommy Hancock, vice-president; Mike Sweatt, reporter; Bobby Shofner, secretary; and 
L. M. Hargrave, advisor. 



s sponsor 
klHis 
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ilso holds 





Members of the agriculture education block of FFA are (front row) Douglas Hollar, Tommy Taylor, Billy Hallman, 
Wilson Stewart, Kenneth Bennett, Tommy Hancock, Mike Sweatt, Ronald Floyd, Ronald Bertrand and Max Stabel; 
(second row) Benny Minor, James Richie, Mike Sutton, Gene Legg, Homer Jones, Tony Shawver, Jack Birdwell, 
Robert Wink, Herbert Sievers, Dickie Turner, Tommy Pepper and Denny Belew; (third row) Billy Shofner and Bobby 
Shofner. 



Town and Country — 31 



Teams Place 
In Contests 



Each year the six judging teams travel to different 
places or stay at home to be host to the various 
judging contests. This year the Soil Team was host to 
five other schools in the regional contest. Although 
the Tech team won first place and Jerry Bigham was 
the high individual, they were not eligible to receive 
these awards since Tech was the host. Sophomores 
and juniors made up the team this year. They will 
be eligible to be on the team again next year and the 
team will also be eligible to receive awards. 

The Collegiate Crops contest held in Kansas 
City presented no problem for the Tech team. They 
had an individual and high team in each of the three 
phases of the contest as well as 1st, 2nd, and 3rd 
high individuals in the entire contest. 

Third out of 11 teams at Houston and 9th out 
of 21 teams at Ft. Worth was the record for the Live- 
stock Judging Team. They also received a 2nd high 
in Quarter Horses, 4th high in swine, and 4th high 
in sheep. 

National champions for six years, the Range 
Judging team traveled to Denver City for their con- 
test. They received 2nd place competing against 13 
schools and Jim Neaville received first place as high 
individual. 

Wilson's Maurer-Neuer Plant in Kansas City 
hosted the Meat Judging Team contest. The Tech 
team received an 8th overall, 4th in beef judging, 
6th in beef grading, 10th in lamb judging, and 
Jerry Bigham was the high individual in lamb 
judging. At international contest in Madison, the 
Meat Judging Team was I6th overall, 9th in beef 
judging, and Randy Lewis received 3rd in pork 
judging. 

The Meat Animal Evaluation Team Contest was 
held in Omaha, Nebraska, at AKSARBEN. This 
contest involved both live animal and carcass evalu- 
ation as well as pricing of both. The team received a 
12th overall, 9th in carcass evaluation, and 12th in 
market animal. 




Members of the Meat Judging Team are Steve Groce; Jerry Bigham; Keith Lind, coach; 
Jim Crawford; and Randy Lewis. 




\ri 



Members of the Range Judging Team are Joe Bob Watson; Jim Neaville; James George; 
John Baize; and Don Klebiniow, coach. 

Members of the Meat Animal Evaluation Team are Berry Cribbs; Larry Meadows; Gary 
"Cotton" Flatt; Larry Bryan; Jerry Bigham; Eddie Holland; Randy Lewis; and Keith Lind, 
coach. 





Uod, (Mdi; 





Top: Members of the Livestock Judging 
Team are Jerry Smith; Bill Doherty; Eddie 
Holland; Carl Jones; Lonnie McDonald; and 
Allen McCloy, coach. Dale Chote is not 
pictured. Middle: Members of the Soil 
Judging Team are Dr. B. L. Allen, coach; 
Terry Whigham; Jerry Bigham; Alex Sears; 
Allen Smajstrla; and Steve Spain. Bottom: 
Members of the Collegiate Corps Team are 
Jerry Bigham; Jerry Rice; Cecil Ayers, coach; 
Rex Harris; and John Conner. 



Town and Country — 33 



Cowboys' Grit 
Challenged in World's 
Largest Indoor Rodeo 



After truck loads of dirt were 
hauled in and chutes were erected by 
members of the Rodeo Association, the 
Lubbock Gsliseum was turned into the 
largest indoor rodeo April 16, 17, and 
18. RCA stock provided by Butler 
Brothers Bold and Cervi proved to be 
a match for the cowboys and cowgirls 
who came from 21 schools and uni- 
versities to compete with their strength 
and skills against the strength and wit 
of the stock. 

All performances over and the 
slack completed, Texas Tech came out 
in third place. Aiding in placing Tech 
in third were Chuck Frede, first in bull 
riding; Bill Overton, first in calf roping; 



Pow Carter, first in ribbon roping; Rex 
Rash, first in bareback bronc riding; 
and Gladys Pinkert, first in barrel 
racing. 

Others who placed were Terry 
Childers, third in bull riding; Ken 
Welch, fifth in bull riding; Annette 
Duncan, fourth in barrel racing and 
third in breakaway roping. 

Entertainment was provided by the 
Sons of the Pioneers with Roy Rogers 
and Dale Evans as the guest stars. Also 
app>earing with them was Pat Grady. 

During the opening performance 
Joe Max Edmisfon received the Dub 
Parks Award and Phyllis Ramsey was 
crowned Rodeo Queen. 




« 



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34 — Town and Country 




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25,000 Attend 
Tech Rodeo 



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Competition was rough in all rodeo events, 
but one of the roughest was saddle bronc 
riding. Other events pictures are calf roping, 
girls' goat tying, steer wrestling, and girls' 
breakaway roping. 



Town and Country — 35 




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Above left: Cowboys work hard in the ribbon 
roping competition. Above right: Roy Rogers 
thrills old and young alike in his guest ap- 
pearance at the rodeo. Right: Members of the 
Tech Rodeo Team are (bottom row) Rex 
Rash, Suzie Threadgill, Guy Homey, Diana 
White, Pow Carter. Annete Duncan, Anita 
Ramsey, Louis Brooks, Phyllis Ramsey, Ken 
Welch; (top row) Allen McCloy, Bill Over- 
ton, Hank Sory, and Ted Taylor. 




36 — Town and Country 



II !• 




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Rodeo Queen 

Phyllis Ramsey 




Town and Country — 37 



Rodeo Association 




The Texas Tech Rodeo Association 
is the largest organization on campus, 
with a total of 486 members. It was 
established in 1947 by a group of stu- 
dents interested in rodeo activities. 

The main event each year for the 
association is the sponsorship of the 
NIRA rodeo, the largest indoor inter- 
collegiate rodeo in the United States. 
The group also sponsors the all-school 
rodeo and a barbecue each fall. Other 
activities include the annual Cowboy 
Christmas Ball and western dances at the 
Tech Union. 

The officers for 1969-70 were 
Jade Thorn, president; Ted Taylor, vice 
president; Joyce Sims, secretary; Terry 
Childers, treasurer; and Bill Overton, 
reporter. 

Sponsors are Dorothy Pijan, Jerome 
Scheutzeberg and Frank Hudson. 

Top lefl: Members of the Board of Directors 
are Ken Welch; Rex Rash; Jo Ann Smith; 
Bill Cornett, chairman; Joe Max Edmiston; 
Jack Thorn; and Gary Porter. Top right: A 
student helps himself at the Rodeo As- 
sociation barbecue held in the fall. Rinhl: 
This cowboy is out to get his calf at the 
Dub Parks all-school rodeo. 




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3S — Town and Country 



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officers were Bill Overton, reporter; Joyce Sims, secretary; and Terry Childers, 
treasurer. 



Jack Thorn, 
president 



Ted Taylor, 
vice president 




II 



Town and Country — 39 




Members and sponsors are (front row) Bill Huser, Gene Cayton, Ray 
Hinnant, Jerry Stewart, Jerry Wakesfield, Pat Close; (second row) Dave 
Keeling, Bobby Blaylock, Joe Poe, Tony Dean, Roy Wilson, Mike Bodine; 
(third row) Anthony Smith, James Roach, Larry King, Ron Coker, Rick 



Pudney, David Hungerford; (fourth row) Albert Miller, John Baize, Jerry 
Williamson, Mike McMurry, Dale Seagraves, Wendell Holder; (fifth row) 
Dr. Bill Dahl, Dr. Ron Sosebee, Dr. Russ Pettit, and John Hunter. 



•n 





Officers of the Range and Wildlife Management Association are Steve Taliaferro, secretary; 
Rick Pudney, vice-president; Bill Huser, Ag Council representative; Bobby Blaylock, treasurer; 
John Baize, historian; Roy Wilson, Ag Council representative; and Tony Dean, president. 



40 — Town and Country 



The objectives of the Range and 
Wildlife Management Association are 
to stimulate interest and activity in, and 
to strengthen, improve, and perpetuate 
the professions of range and wildlife 
management. Membership is open to 
any student having an interest in range 
and wildlife management. 

Activities of the group include 
onthly meetings, spring and fall bar- 
becues, and sponsorship of individuals 
and teams that represent the range and 
wildlife management depailment. Out- 
side speakers who discuss different 
aspects of management are featured at 
meetings. •The Texas Tech Range Plant 
Identification team, sponsored by the 
association, has won the National Range 
Plant Identification contest for six con- 
ecutive years. 

Much work is planned in the fu- 
re for the association to enable them 
effectively perpetuate range and wild- 
life management. 



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From This Angle . . . 
or Any Other Angle 

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Use and Enjoy 

BUFFALO SPRINGS LAKE 

Located 5 Miles Southeast of Lubbock, Texas 

Administered by: 

LUBBOCK COUNTY WATER CONTROL & IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 1 



P. O. Box 521 747-3353 



Boating • Fishing • Horseback Riding • Refreshments • Kiddie Land 

Picnic Grounds • Trailer Camping Area • Paddle Boats 

Excursion Boat Rides 



TECH 1969-1970 



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CONTENTS FOR TECH, 1969-1970 
THE LEADERS 

WHO'S WHO IN AMlmCAN COLltOtS AND UNIVaaVlS 2 

SlNATl '70 AND THE lEADERS i 

CO0«T, CAilNf r AND COUNCIl • 

DEAN lO»«IN KENNAMEK M 

D£AN GORDON lEE M 

THE COLLEGES 

COUIOC Of ACTS AND SCKNCCS 10 

COUtOC Of EDUCADON 27 

SERVICES 

SmviClS SHOCTEN EVEf-nKSENT KB TAH 22 

AN HONORED FEW 

OarA «l KATPA 20 

PHI ETA SKSMA II 

BETA BETA BETA M 

SIGMA TAU DEITA 3« 

AlfHA EPSJION DEITA 42 

KAffA MU EPSKON 44 

THE PROFESSIONALS 

mi tmiON KAFfA 34 

MAJOB-MINO* ClUB J5 

SOCK AND BUSKIN J4 

ntE-MED SOCIETY ,7 

lOS TBtrUUANOS M 

UISON DEBATE SOCIETY ff 

NAnONAl A«T EDUCATION ASSOCMTION 40 

AMEBICAN INSTITUTE Of DESIGN 4| 

STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 4j 

ASSOCUnON Of CHIIOHOOD EDUCAHON 44 

SIGMA AlfHA ETA .... 45 

AMY HAMMER Editor 

CINDY HUDSON. . . . Staff Assistant 
CINDY MEADOWS . . Staff Assistant 
JAN SHAW Staff Assistant 

Campus life, 1 970 has been a year of change — change not only on the 
Tech campus, but in universities around the country. Each student finds 
himself in a transitory period during his college years — and if he doesn't 
— the university has failed. Tech is a school of labels — labels that don't 
always fit — but labels that stick. We have our brains, our hippies, our 
cowboys, our Greeks, our GDI's . . .but all are Texas Tech University. This 
magazine is labeled Esquire, a new label to appear in La Ventana. Hope- 
fully it represents the fluctuating spirit of Tech, 1970. 




The p 



sionals 



Esquire — i 



Who's 
Who . 





'Top Soeakcr 
.nctit. <MI^ 




In American 
Colleges and 
Universities 





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/d^oticcte 70 ••• • 



"You can start a new 
year with so many plans, 
but you never know how 
they are going to turn 
out." Jay Thompson said 
no truer words when he 
opened the student gov- 
ernment year in September. 
Though the improved ath- 
letic seating and credit 
by examination failed to 
materialize this year, 
academic recruiting 
achieved success. The 
Senate lowered salaries 
of the executive officers 
and removed se\'eral sen- 
ators for lack of atten- 
dance. When budget time 
came, the majority of the 
money went to three or- 
ganizations: the University 
Theatre, KTXT-FM and For- 
ensics. The Senate re- 
ceived general criticism 
from the campus media and 
genera! apathy from the 
student body as a whole. 
The spring elections left 
two candidates running 
unopposed and showed few 
studc-nts turning out to 
vote. Bi-weekly, Byron 
Snyder led the Senate 
through meetings which 
lasted longer than ever 
before. Adjournments 
seldom came before 1 1:30 
p.m. At least a part of 
Tech's 30 senators spent 
a year hard at work. 



Allhea Allison 

Education 

Barbee Anderson 

Artj and Sciences 
Mike Anderson 

Engineering 
Barry Brooks 

Art J and Sciences 
Susan Clayton 

Home Economics 

Angella Clement 
Arts and Sciences 

Bonnie Craddick 
Arts and Sciences 

Lynn Eldridge 

Agriculture 

Gaye Finney 

Business Administration 
Jim Gilbreath 

Business Administration 



6 — Esquire 




Dennis Graham 

Arts and Sciences 
Dickie Grigg 

Arts and Sciences 
Lynn Hamilton 

Arts and Sciences 
Brian Harrington 

Arts and Sciences 

Brenda Hill 

Home Economics 
Cameo Jones 

Arts and Sciences 
Peggy Kincannon 

Education 
Louis Kowalski 

Business Administration 

Rob Lewis 

Agriculture 

Larry Meyers 

Butineu Adminiitration 
Chris Mills 

Education 

Bill Scott 

Buiintii Adminhtration 

Bill Sewell 

Bkiinest Admirtniration 
Allan Soffar 

Cradkait 
Phil Swatzcll ^. 

Business Administration ^' 
John Thomasson 

Aril and Scirncti 

Gary Wimmcr 

Eni^inetrini^ 
Greg Wimmcr 

Business Administration 
Billy Windsor 

Bu tines I Administration 
Margaret Ann Wolf 

Home Economics 



( 



i 





Business Manager 
Bill Cornett 



Vice President 
Byron Snyder 



President 
Jay Thompson 



Secretary 
Karen Johnson 



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Esquire — 7 



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Cabinet members (upper left) are (top row) Joe Hilbun, Jeffrey Whit- 
worth, Carol Anne Buchanan, Keith Williamson, Bill Comett; (bottom 
row) Andy Bray, Randy Brillhart, Mike Robbins and John Simpson. 



Supreme Court justices are (lower left) Sam Slennis, Allan Murray, 
Barbara Drake (upper ri|;ht) Rick Hamm, and (lower right) Jeanetle 

Nathan. 



hi 



8 — Esquire 



(:!• 



Effectiveness of this 
year's Student Association 
was enhanced by the 
performance of the Presi- 
dent's Cabinet and the 
Supreme Court. Members 
of the Cabinet appointed 
by the president help 
administer bills passed by 
the Senate. Relieved of 
this duty, the president has 
time for consideration of 
other problems. The 
judicial power of the Stu- 



dent Association is vested 
in the Supreme Court. 
Chief Justice Alan Murray 
and his court, composed of 
one associate justice 
from each of the academic 
schools, rendered advisory 
opinions to the Senate, 
considered appeals from 
decisions of the Election 
Committee and settled 
disputes arising under the 
Constitution. 
Under the leadership 



of President Joe Parker, 
the Freshman Council 
organized the freshman 
cheerleader elections and 
the freshman march to the 
Homecoming Pep-rally. 
Advisors Jim Boynton and 
David Shine helped the 
members set up goals and 
purposes for the Council. 
During spring semester, 
council members planned 
an all school dance. 



* I 



!<• 




Freshman Council works in fields such as sponsoring class cheerleadei 
elections. President Joe Parker (right) introduces Lynn Alderson and 
Earl Farrell (left). "The Council (below) sponsors a freshman march at 



homecoming. Officers (far right) are vice president Buddy Warren, AWS 
Denise Westbrook, treasurer Mickey Jarrett, Parker and secretary Barbara 
Horsmann. Larry Wharton is president protempore. 



Esquire — 9 



M 



ajor emphasis was placed on expansion of the 
Arts and Sciences Honors Program during the 
1969-70 school year. Dr. Peder Christiansen, 
associate professor of Classical and Romance 
Languages, assumed leadership of the program. 
Adding the needed impetus for improvement, 
Christiansen brought more students actively 
into the program giving them an opportunity to 
direct formation of new courses. Two honors sem- 
inars were offered each semester and a third 
seminar is being planned. An individual studies 
program is tenuously set to begin this summer 
and continue full force in the fall. Honors 
students may take up to 12 hours, working with 
professors on a one-to-one basis. 
The Speech and Theater Arts department, headed 
by Dr. William Ickes, played a large part in the 
collegiate year. Cramped for space, the depart- 
ment is located in five different buildings. 
The new theater provides modern equipment needed 
for play production. It also contains a clinic 
for pathology and audiology. Four major produc- 
tions were presented under the direction of 
Ronald E. Schulz, head of the theater; Clifford 
Ashby, designer and technical director; and Lar- 
ry Randolph, costume designer. This year "The 
Multi-Colored Maze," "Mr. Roberts," "Bacchae" and 
"The Chalk Garden" were produced by the depart- 
ment. In addition to the four major plays, lab 
theater productions and Operation MADD keep the 
department busy. Operation MADD (music, art, dance 
and drama) is sponsored by the Lubbock Chamber 
of Commerce and the National Endowment on the Arts. 
The group tours high schools presenting the vary- 
ing phases of the arts. 
Work was done this year to combine the current 
Department of Journalism with the advertising 
and telecommunications field. Dr. Billy I. Ross, 
was named new head of the department in March. 
Ross was formerly a professor of marketing in 
the College of Business Administration. Ross 
hopes "to start phase one of an expanded program 
for mass communications." 
One department in Arts and Sciences does not 
meet on campus, but rather in buildings adjacent 
to the campus. The Biblical Literature Depart- 
ment offers up to 12 hours in elective courses. 
Classes meet at the United Bible Chair, First Church 
of Christ and the Baptist Student Union. In 
state schools teaching of Biblical courses is 
left up to the churches who staff and fund Jie 
courses. Seventeen courses are offered by the 

department. 

It takes the work of many to meet the needs 

of the 6,000 students in the College of Arts and 

Sciences. 



I 



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^1 



10 — Esquire 



I s a typical rehearsal 
sets in, Prof. Paul 
Ellsworth exhibits the 
frustration which goes 
with a musical group's 
practice session. Hours 
of rehearsal are neces- 
sary for the annual series 
of concert events pre- 
sented by the Music De- 
partment. These presen- 
tations feature major 
student musical organiza- 
tions, student soloists, 
faculty chamber music 
groups and faculty solo- 
ists. Five bands, four 
choirs, two orchestras 
and other music ensembles 
present 185 concerts per 
year. The department 
also sponsors a spring 
career day for outstand- 
ing music students from 
West Texas. Last spring, 
the department was accept- 
ed as a member of the 
Manhattanville Music Cur- 
riculum Project which in- 
volves a three year study 
of the music curriculum. 



■■ ndgame was only one of 
several productions pre- 
sented by the lab theater 
in conjunction with the 
Speech and Theater Arts 
Department. The depart- 
ment, headed by Dr. Bill 
Ickes, presented four ma- 
jor productions in the 
University Theater: The 
Multi-Colored Maze, Mr. 
Roberts, The Bacchae, 
and The Chalk Garden. 
Students make all scenery 
and costumes, and any 
Tech students may try out 
for cast or stagework. 
Wednesday night is "crew 
night," the time when all 
technical details are 
worked out. The theater 
finishes each season with 
three successive plays during 
the first six week of the 
summer, organized by guest 
directors. 




M 




larjorie Lerov, Lynn 
Sullivan, Jane Hastings 
and Debbie Hefner demon- 
strate a modern dance 
technique. Modern dance 
is only one aspect of the 
Department of Health, 
Physical Education and 
Recreation for Women 
headed by Dr. Margaret 
Wilson. The steady 
growth of the department 
is reflected by the 320 
professional majors in 
physical education, dance, 
recreation and elemen- 
tary specialization. To 
meet the needs of these 
students the department 
announced a new curricu- 
lum which involves a rec- 
reation major with areas 
of specialization in art, 
music, park administra- 
tion, physical education 
or theatre arts. Women's 
vanity teams now repre- 
sent Tech in badminton, 
basketball, bowling, golf, 
gymnastics, swimming, 
tennis, track and field 
and volleyball. 



■ ech's Art Department, 
headed by Dr. Bill Lock- 
hart, is one of the 
largest in the southwest. 
It offers a Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor's and 
Master's degrees of Fine 
Arts. Jewelry making is 
one of many art 
courses. Students form a 
wax pattern with a hot 
spatula and f>our an invest- 
ment around it. After 
eight hours in a kiln 
the pattern is put in 
a centrifuge and cast. 
The desired metal replaces 
the wax, and the ornament 
is finished with abrasives. 
ICASALS jewelry compe- 
tition and "Colorprint 
USA," national exhibitions 
sponsored by the depart- 
ment, are high points of the 
year. 



12 — Esquire 




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Esquire — IH 



Studying 

mind, 

matter 




^ ournalism major Steve 
Eames has the opportuni- 
ty of doing practical 
■work towards his major 
working on the University 
Daily staff. Editing 
and reporting students 
are required to put in 
lab work on the UD to 
supplement their lecture 
sessions. The journalism 
department will be headed 
by Dr. Billy I. Ross 
next year. Mr. Wallace 
E. Carets resigned his 
position as head of the 
department first to draw 
the administration's at- 
tention to lack of funds 
in the department and 
later to move on to an- 
other job. The department 
will be facing reaccredi- 
tation in 1972-73. The 
department will next year 
be combined with the 
advertising and telecom- 
munications department to 
form an expanded 
program of study. 



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I van Little demonstrates 
the use of symbols in ex- 
plaining different 
schools of logic. The 
philosophy department 
hopes to emphasize logic 
and the philosophy of 
science. A Master's De- 
gree of Philosophy and a 
minor at the doctoral 
level are being planned. 
Chairman Little aims at 
offering a supporting 
graduate program for 
other areas This de- 
partment began operating 
as a separate department 
in 1966. 



14 — Esquire 




I 




I 




■ he biology department, 
led by Dr. Earl D. Camp, 
involves a combination 
curriculum of lecture- 
lab as it introduces 
students to basic plant 
and animal science. 
Twenty-three full-time 
and thirty-one part-time 
faculty members teach 
courses in microbiology 
and medical technology 
as well as the required 
freshman botany and zo- 
ology sections. The de- 
partment boasted 350 
undergraduate students 
and 69 students 
in graduate work this year. 



■ hil Genure conducts an 
experiment in his grad- 
uate physics research. 
As a new approach to 
undergraduate teaching, 
the chemistry department 
appointed senior staff 
members as coordinators 
of organic chemistry labs 
and physical chemistry 
labs. These appointments 
have already resulted in 
improved lab facilities 
and atmosphere. An 
experiment in team teach- 
ing was employed in gen- 
eral chemistry this year. 
The objective of the ex- 
periment is to develop 
a course suitable parti- 
cularly for non-science 
majors with relevance to 
their needs. Dr. Henry 
J. Shine, a Horn profes- 
sor of chemistry, was ap- 
pointed as the new chair- 
man of the department. 
Professor Charles W. 
Shoppee from Australia 
became the first Welch 
professor of chemistry 
at Tech. 



Esquire — 15 



Learning 

— Mffid 

and 

Body 



^# an Shaw demonstrates 
the usual format of 
lecture, study and 
test encompassed in 
most history courses. 
Dr. James Harper lec- 
tures while Jan listens 
attentively. After 
preparation, Jan takes 
the exam. A new history 
course, the History of 
the American Negro, 
taught by Dr. Alwyn Barr, 
was offered for the 
first time during the 
fall semester. Another 
recent development in 
the department involves 
a graduate program in 
conjunction with park 
services. A student 
majors in paric manage- 
ment. 



■% ats are employed in up- 
per level psychology 
courses so students may 
see the actual development 
of the learning process. 
The rat in the picture has 
learned to hit the metal 
bar specified numbers of 
times to obtain water. 
This is only one of the 
animals of a colony used 
by the psychology depart- 
ment for research and 
training. During the past 
two years the out-of-state 
graduate applicants have 
exceeded the Texas appli- 
cants in the department. 



16 — Etquire 





M 



ike Gan 



participates in his 
weight training class, 
warming up with a bench 
press. The goal of this 
class and others offered 
by the Department of 
Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation for 
Men is to keep Tech men 
physically fit and encour- 
age them to maintain fit- 
ness in post-college years. 
A Master's in P.E. was ap- 
proved. The department 
is currently developing 
and seeking approval of 
a doctoral program. 




D 

i^ one lab specimans, 
such as this skull, 
provide valuable re- 
search material for an- 
thropology students. 
Included in the anthro- 
pology program are arche- 
ology, primitive cultures, 
physical anthropology 
and linguistics. For the 
first time the department 
offered a major in social 
welfare for people plan- 
ning a related career. 
This major is aimed at 
developing sociology 
teachers and social re- 
searchers. Dr. Dennis 
Poplin and Mrs, Gunseli 
Tamkoc teach the core 
classes in this social 
welfare program. During 
the current year, the 
department fulfilled a 
contract to offer univer- 
sity credit courses for 
the Lubbock Police De- 
partment. A similar set 
of courses is available 
for students planning a 
career in law enforcement. 



Esquire — 17 



ech's physics depart- 
ment, directed hy Dr. 
Henry ('. Thomas since 
1958, draws a number of 
international students 
to Lubbock. The depart- 
ment has gained a reputa- 
tion for research in 
molecular, atomic, solid 
state and nuclear physics, 
X ray spectrocity, infra- 
red spectrocity, quantum 
mechanics, thermodynam- 
ics and low temperature 
experimentation. 

Next fall a non-techni- 
cal physics course with- 
out a lab will be offered 
as an elective. 

Four doctorate degrees 
have been conveyed since 
1965. 



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rot. B. T. Smith 
exhibits his binarv 
computer, .in elementar)- 
version of today's most 
complex machines. Other 
electronic learnint; 
equipment is also being 
used by the math depart- 
ment. The idea is to 
teach more effectively 
by matchint; a person's 
wit to the machine. 
During the year the 
department participated 
in several high-level 
research projects. 
Prof. Badin Komkov was 
added to the depart- 
mental staff this year 
to teach applied math 
and optimum control. 



Enter — 

the 

Machines 



r. James Craig dem- 
onstrates a machine which 
identifies and analyzes 
minerals. This machine 
went into operation last 
spring with Craig in 
charge and Bill Lees, 
doctoral student, as an 
assistant. The Geo- 
sciences department is 
involved in various types 
of research including 
in-depth studies for the 
space program, the ground 
water problem of this 
area, copper deposits in 
New Mexico and Arizona 
and saline deposits. 
Dr. Alton Wade made his 
seventh trip to Antarc- 
tica during the fall 
semester to conduct 
geological research. 



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r. Gordon Hender- 
son and I^red Marsh process 
important information con- 
cerning federal govern- 
ment decisions and opera- 
tions obtained from data 
machines. As a member of 
the Consortium, an inter- 
university group for 
political research, Tech 
receives this valuable 
information which is 
available for study by 
members of the government 
staff and graduate stu- 
dents. Every summer, the 
Government Department 
brings an outstanding 
visiting professor to the 
Tech campus. Dr. James 
Havard, state and IcKal 
government authority, 
served as visiting pro- ., 

fessor this summer. ' 

During the spring semes- 
ter the department 
attempted to add courses 
in political theory, 
public administration 
and judicial behavior. 
The department is explor- 
ing the extension of the 
Honors Program. 



Esquire — 19 



H 



elen McGinnis faces 

a chronic illness of 

the freshman year — 

monster class neurosis. 

Often the lower level 

English courses provide 

much reading material 

and little personal 

identification. The 

English department 

anticipates a change in 

the freshman English 

requirement. The new 

plan would require 

three hours of freshman 

English and three hours 

of junior English. This 

would eliminate three 

hours at the freshman 

level. The department is 

headed by a new 

chairman, Dr. William 

Gillis. 




M 



I rs. Jean Koh teaches 
one of the newer classes 
in the department of 
Germanic and Slavonic 
languages — Chinese. Dr. 
Carl Hammer heads the 
department which also of- 
fers courses in German and 
Russian. An annual Ger- 
man play has been 
produced since 1947. This 
year "Der gute Mensch 
von Sezuan" by 
Bertolt Brecht was adapted 
for the stage. 
Kinderschule, an intro- 
ductory German course on 
the junior high level, 
and a bilingual-secretary 
program were also spon- 
sored by the department. 
The Slavic Club, Der Lie- 
derkranz and Delta Phi 
Alpha are organizations 
sponsored by the depart- 
ment. 



Tongues 
of many "^ 
fought 




20 — Esquire 



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D 

■% osalba y los Llaveros" 
by Emilio Carballido was 
the play presented by 
the Spanish classes this 
year. Spanish, however, 
is just one of the lan- 
guages offered by the 
department of Classical 
and Romance Languages. 
The curricula includes 
Arabic, Classics, French, 
Greek, Italian, Latin, 
Linguistics and Portu- 
guese. Directed by Dr. 
Harley D. Oberhelmann, 
the department has 225 
majors. The department 
trains Peace Corps volun- 
teers for projects in 
South America and is 
conducting the NDEA 
Summer Language Insti- 
tues for Spanish teachers. 
Sigma Delta Pi is the 
Spanish honorary. 



m 




I melodrama "Coelina 
ou I'enfant du Mystere" 
was the fall project of 
the French classes in the 
department of Classical 
and Romance Languages. 
This department sponsors 
the Bilingual Secretarial 
ProgranTTn French and 
Spanish and participates 
in the Latin American 
Area Studies major. 
Tech has chapters of 
Pi Delta Phi, French 
honorary; Eta Sigma Phi, 
Latin and Greek; and 
II Circolo Italiano, 
Italian. 



Esquire — 21 




A Traffic Security officer tidcets a violator 
of a campus traffic regulation. 



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Services 
ever-presenf 
red fape 






22 — Esquire 




Traffic Security hired two new 
officers last year to work only with 
criminal investigation on the Tech 
campus. The department also 
added to and modernized its radio 
systems. Chief B. G. Daniels said 
campus police had been given 
training in riot control though no 
equipment was purchased. The 33 
uniformed officers found parking 
to be a major problem last year. 
Reserved parking stirred as much 
dissension among faculty members 
as the first-come-first-serve method. 
Visitors also required more ex- 
plicit instruction because of the 
restrictive parking. Entry station at- 
tendants had to be more alert and 
informative. 

Bill D. Haynes, coordinator of 
Room Reservations; Ron Harris, as- 
sistant; and their staff are responsi- 
ble for the reservations of those in 
residence halls, "room and board" 




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payments and room damages. 

Haynes worked with the adminis- 
tration in an attempt to gain off- 
campus approval for those turning 
21 during the school year. 

Extension Services offer over 
200 courses to the students away 
from campus. Eighteen hours of 
college work may be taken through 
correspondence; over 10,000 stu- 
dents enrolled in last year's courses. 
J. H. Milliken heads the depart- 
ment. 

Tech's infirmary is staffed by 
four full-time doctors and regis- 
tered nurses. Infirmary facilities 
include a 32-bed hospital and an 
out-patient clinic. Students are en- 
titled to seven days per semester in 
the infirmary without charge, ex- 
cluding special medicines, x rays 
and laboratory tests. Having 
opened in 1947, the infirmary 
served its 23rd year as a Tech stu- 
dent service. The infirmary is 
staffed around the clock. 



Lynn Cox, Lubbock senior, (above) pays her monthly room check. J. H. Milliken (right) heads the 
Division of Extension Services. An infirmary nurse (below) checks a student's temperature. 



Esquire — 23 



Services 
smile' 



Tech services this year at- 
tempted to shorten and streamUne 
the red tape so often associated 
with campus life. 

Registrations and Admissions 
set a new record this fall by regis- 
tering 19,490 students in three 
days. Use of computers and spe- 
cific registration times speeded the 
out-dated processes. Between regis- 
tration seasons D. N. Peterson, the 
new registrar, and Don Wichard, 
the new assistant registrar, have 
their staff processing records, post- 
ing grades, and attempting to meet 
die general needs of the student. 

The Admissions Office, headed 
by Dean Floyd Boze, worked with 
some 10,000 new applications this 
year. Communication with high 
school students and counselors is 
conducted through the admissions 
office. 

The Placement Service continued 
to develop through extension of 
information to students concerning 
job opportunities. Placement seeks 
to provide a suitable atmosphere 
for employer-student contact. The 
service also directs students to 
part-time employment and attempts 
to place graduating seniors and 
alumni in full-time positions. Mrs. 
Jean Jenkins, director, and Mrs. 
Floy Morrison, assistant director, 
organize the fall and spring inter- 
views. This staff scheduled over 
17,000 job interviews over the 
past school year. Approximately 
600 organizations are represented 
at the center in the various fields 
of business, education, industry and 
government. 




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Not even computers (above) could break the old registration /srind for these students. M«. Jean 
Jenkins (below) confers with Tech seniors concerning future job placement. 



24 — Esquire 



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Other services include (clockwise) KTXT-FM; KTXT-TV; Ex-Students Association headed by 
David Casey; the Tech library; and information services with Mrs. Emil Carmichael. 



Tech's television system, 
KTXT, is more than an educa- 
tional channel. It broadcasts chil- 
dren's programs and entertainment 
programs as well as closed circuit 
chemistry and English lectures. 
Guided by program manager John 
Henson, station manager D. M. 
McElroy and chief engineer Pat 
Pattillo, KTXT included a series 
on urban problems. 

KTXT TV is promoted by 
KTXT radio, Tech's FM radio 
station, operated exclusively by in- 
terested students. Educational pro- 
grams and commentaries supple- 
ment the daily music and hourly 
international news. Jim Finch, pro- 
gram director, hopes to switch to 
an all-cartridge system soon. 

The Division of Information 
Services handles all Tech publi- 
cations except the catalogue. It 
mails pamphlets about Tech to 
prospective students and to cities 
all over the nation. It merged with 
the Development Office in Jan- 
uary, thus becoming the Develop- 
ment and Information Service. 

In September, Tech's library 
reached a milestone, adding the 
millionth volume to its vast amount 
of information. Although the li- 
brary seats only five per cent of 
Tech's students, as many as 5,000 
enter this cultural center daily. It 
occasionally has chamber music, 
concerts and traveling art exhibits. 
The Ex-Students Association plans 
an extensive scholarship program 
for prospective students. It honored 
Governor Preston Smith at the 
Homecoming luncheon for dis- 
tinguished alumni. 



Esquire — 25 



£ 



m 



ducation came to meet the student on the junior 
college level at Tech last year! The College of Ed- 
ucation helped organize a program for training 
teachers at the junior college level. This Junior 
College Faculty Development Program is under 
administrative jurisdiction, but the graduate 
and education schools are participating in the 
project. Dr. Kenneth Freeman headed the project 
this year. 

The College of Education, headed by Dr. Gordon 
C. Lee, also instigated a special project to pre- 
pare counselors to work with Mexican-American 
children. The project was in conjunction with 
•several Southwest Universities, but Tech was 
the central location. Dr. Drage H. Watson was in charge of 
this program. 

A Spanish bilingual kindergarten was put underway 
and a new prograrri for educating kindergarten 
teachers was also introduced. Mrs. Dorothy 
Filao studied the program for kindergarten tea- 
chers in New York through a national fellowship. 

Thomas Livingston of the elementary educa- 
tion department, was on leave in Nicaragua for 
the year. Elementary Education involves its 
1300 undergraduate majors and 100 graduate level 
students in tutoring positions, the Association 
of Childhood Education and the National Education 
Association. Several college textbooks have 
been produced by members of the 17-man 
elementary education staff. 

Guided by Dr. Holmes Webb, the department of 
secondary education boasts a versatile faculty. 
The department worked on a joint project with the 
English, speech and journalism departments in 
an experiment with techniques of teaching English. 
Research papers, books and magazine articles pro- 
duced by staff members were also published during 
the year. 

Spurts of growth in other departments expanded 
the College of Education, the youngest College on 
campus. Four new courses in higher education com- 
bined with the regular curriculum in the graduate 
department. A new addition to the faculty. Dr. 
Elmer Ellis, aided the 24 doctoral graduate stu- 
dents with their certification programs. 

Three hundred and fifty students enrolled 
in the special education department directed by Dr. 
Bruce D. Mattson last year. They were trained to 
aid exceptional children in reaching their mental 
and physical potentials. Certificates or degrees 
are offered by the department in four areas: men- 
tal retardation, physical handicap (including min- 
imal brain dysfunction), deafness and speech- 
hearing therapy. Special education majors usually 
receive from 10 to 20 job offers upon graduation. 



Esquire — 27 



r. Alex Crowder uses 
a videotape machine in 
his student teaching 
sections to broaden 
each potential teacher's 
knowledge of instruction 
techniques. Small 
classes, not more than 
16 students per profes- 
sor, allow group discus- 
sion and an open forum 
for new ideas or specif- 
ic problems. Students 
are expected to apply 
this knowledge in their 
student teaching in the 
various public schools. 




c 

^^ tudent teacher 

Su2anne Lindsey listens 

to individual students 

at the master control 

board in Monterey High 

School's language lab. 

Through individual 

monitoring, she is able 

to offer constructive 

criticism on the weak 

points of each student. 

Miss Lindsey's practice 

teaching it evaluated by 

a professor from the 

department of secondary 

education. Student 

teaching is one of the 

final requirements in 

receiving a teacher's 

certificate. 




28 — Esquire 



I 





■ he development of motor 
skills is an important 
factor in furthering 
the coordination of ex- 
ceptional children. 
Lynn Ross demonstrates 
one of the exercises 
performed with children 
in the "motor room" at 
Milam Training Center, 
where equipment is pro- 
vided for working with 
each individual child. 
Emphasis lies on assis- 
ting each child to mas- 
ter his own problems, 
enabling him to live 
with others harmonious- 
ly as an independent, 
successful adult. 




r. Len Ainsworth uses 
a peg board to demon- 
strate one of the new 
techniques in working 
with elementary school 
children. The current 
trend is to employ more 
visual aids. Graduate 
students in elementary 
education realize that a 
young student can have a 
more meaningful learning 
experience if he can 
visualize the informa- 
tion. The graduates are 
introduced to various 
methods of visual aids 
to aid them in their 
teaching fields. 



Esquire— 29 



r. Nancy Boze, Pro- 
fessor of Secondary 
Education, instructs 
students involved in a 
joint pilot project which 
experiments with the 
teaching of English. 
The departments of secon- 
dary education, English, 
speech and journalism 
are participating in this 
program. New methods 
and new techniques of 
teaching English were 
evolved from the project. 



c 



indy Davis, special ed- 
ucation major, supervises 
the artwork of a student 
at the Lubbock State 
School. The opening of 
the school last year pro- 
vived a unique opportuni- 
ty for sp)ecial education 
students to receive prac- 
tical training working 
with the handicapped in 
their special fields. 
Their assistance is also 
an asset to the staff of 
the state school located 
on North University Ave. 
Special education majors 
do student teaching in 
their field just as their 
peers in the other 
education fields. 




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30— Esquire 



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II 



Members (above) of Delta Psi Kappa are Dr. Doris Horton, Kay Shelton, 
Jani Beddingfield, Connie Bellinghausen, Mary Sue Meneley, Ann Barton, 
Peggy Barney, Katie Upshaw, Marilyn Crawley, Susan Searls, Mina McDonald, 
Jean Gorrell, Sally Tarkington, Nancy Turner, Jeannie Smith and Karen Johnson. 
Outgoing officers of Phi Eta Sigma (left) are Monte McGlaun, Randy Macuralc, 
Sam Stennis, Darryl Garret and Dair Hileman. Incoming officers (lower right) 
are Larry Wharton and Bob Craig and (upper right) Paul Stapp, Ralph Grimmer 
and James Bain. 



Delta Psi KappaWi 
^H Phi Eta Sigma 



Delta Psi Kappa is a 
national professional fra- 
ternity for women in 
health, physical education 
and recreation. In its 
service projects, the 
Beta Iota chapter provides 
speakers for local high 
school Career Days, com- 
piles a physical education 
handbook and sells conces- 
sions at athletic events. 
A Founder's Day Banquet 
and initiation of pledges 
are two yearly functions. 
Phi Eta Sigma, national 
scholastic honorary, is 
open to all freshman men 



who attain a 3.5 
grade point with 1 5 hours 
during the first semester. 
This year Phi Eta Sigma 
moved into the area of 
academic recruiting, in- 
stituting their "How to 
Study" program in area 
high schools and dorm 
orientation programs. 
The year ended with the 
Alpha Lambda Delta-Phi 
Eta Sigma Annual Spring 
Banquet featuring speaker 
Dr. David Mullins, 
University of Arkansas 
president. 



Esquire — 31 



Beta 



Beta 
MBeta 



Cindy Banker 
Ann Barton 
Cecilia Blackwell 
Mary Boren 
David Cheatham 



Angella Clement 
Larry Emerson 
Kathy Griffis 
Jeanie Griffith 
Rod Houghton 



Jimmie Johnson 
Roger Johnson 
Robert Jordan 
Karen Knieriem 



Genaro Lopez 
Patty McFarland 
Pat ODonohoe 
James Rannefeld 



• I 




William Robnett 
Sam Stennis 
Chester Strunlc 



} 



I 



Thisbui 



32 — Esquire 



f 



Earth Day, the Envi- 
ronmental Teach-in, was 
sponsored by Beta Beta 
Beta, biology honorary, this 
year. The program was a 
series of ecological stu- 
dies and involved some 13 
speakers and related 
movies April 22. Tri- 
Beta brings together 
people who have shown 
high potential in biology 
for an intellectual exchange 



of ideas. Guided by fac- 
ulty advisor Dr. John 
George, the society tutors 
freshman biology students 
and presents programs to 
communicate to the public, 
the deteriorating quali- 
ties of our environment. 
This year the 60 mem- 
bers spent a weekend in 
Kermit, Texas, painting an 
extension of the biology 
department. Beta Beta Beta 



officers are Genaro Lopez, 
president; Robert Jordan, 
first vice president; 
Wanda Smith, secretary; 
Billie Jo Mitchell, sec- 
ond vice president; 
Cindy Banker, treasurer; 
and. Angela Clement, his- 
torian. The members must 
maintain a 3.0 G.P.A. in 
biology and an overall 
of 2.8. 





Dr. Donald Longworth, Dr. J. P. Kennedy and Dr. Donald Ashdown 
(upper left) were among the three speakers for Earth Day April 22. 
This button (upper right) was among several displayed across campus 



during the day. Students (below) listened attentively to what the 
various authorities had to say. Their basic message: "Now is the time 
for all good men to come to the aid of their planet." 



What we don't know about this Earth 
we live on may not only hurt us — 

it can kill us. 



Esquire — 33 




mmphi 

Epsilon 
Kappa 



Bill Blum 
Robert Bolton 
William Brooks 
Edsel Buchannan 
Rodney Bunch 
Billy Carter 



Billy Childers 
Jimmy Childress 
George Coon 
Gerald Coppedge 
Larry Curcoe 
Ron Dill 



Jim Elliot 
Dennis Friedrich 
Bubba Grigsby 
Rod Hays 
Will Holsberry 
John Lamberth 



Eddie Lang 
Larry Long 
David May 
Don McDonald 
Pat Mouser 
Boyce Paxton 



Rusty Pippin 
Ray Quintano 
Gary Reeves 
Steve Richardson 
Bobby Rountree 
Robert Schlinlcman 



Phi Epsilon Kappa is 
the only national pro- 
fessional fraternity for 
men in the department of 
Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation. 
Tech's Beta Gamma chapter, 
installed in I960 as the 
first chapter in Texas, 
was the outgrowth of the 
Tech Sports Club. Cur- 
rent officers are James 



C. Elliott, president; 
Billy E. Carter, vice 
president; Gary L. White, 
secretary; and Robert E. 
Bolton, treasurer. Over 
75 percent of the faculty 
of the department are mem- 
bers of Phi Epsilon Kappa. 
Co-sponsois of the Beta 
Gamma chapter are Edsel 
Buchanan, Will Holsberry 
and Gerald Coppedge. 




Hugh Shotwell 
Bob Spencer 
Terry Szafranski 
Danny Walling 



Jim Wheat 
Gary White 
Grady Williams 
Scolt Williams 



\%miihdtf 




34 — Esquire 



The Major-Minor 
Club for women physical 
education majors seeks to 
instill in its members 
an appreciation of the 
importance of responsi- 
bility in life and guides 
them toward profession- 
alism. This year the 
190 members sponsored 
Play Day for the Lubbock 
Public Schools and parti- 
cipated in the Tech 



Olympics. An annual 
spring banquet was held 
and the club honored 
alumni with a home- 
coming coffee. Major- 
Minor officers were 
Carolyn Childers, presi- 
dent; Kay Shelton, 
vice president; Connie 
Bellinghausen, secretary; 
and Sandra Foster, trea- 
surer. 



Ma/or- 
Minor 
Cfubl 



Major-Minor Club members participate in all 
sorts of recreational activities to stay fit. The 
sports include golf, field hockey, gymnastics 
and tennis. 



i m 




Esquire — 35 



Sock and 
Buskin 




B Sigma 
Tau Delta 



Sock and Buskin, dra- 
ma club, has the distinc- 
tion of being the first 
organization established 
at Tech. Its members 
strive to promote excel- 
lence in theater through 
participation in the Uni- 
versity Lab Theater pro- 
ductions. Members pro- 
vide coffee in the Green 
Room following play per- 
formances. The name 
Sock and Buskin comes 
from the Greek terms for 
comedy and tragedy. A 



sock was footwear worn 
in Greek comedy, and a 
buskin was a boot worn 
in Greek tragedy. Sock 
and Buskin officers are 
Sharon Smith, president; 
Marjorie Leroy, vice presi- 
dent; Phyllis Preston, 
secretary; and Jimmy 
Odom, publicity. 
The Psi Delta chapter 
of Sigma Tau Delta is a 
member of a national 
English honorary. Stu- 
dents with a 3.2 average 
in English and a 3.0 



overall are eligible for 
membership. Sigma Tau 
Delta, sponsors the pub- 
lication of The Harbin- 
ger, a collection of stu- 
dent writings. This pub- 
lication gives all stu- 
dents the opportunity to 
have their literary ef- 
forts published. Officers 
of the club are Jan Crud- 
gington, president; Bon- 
nie Stennis, vice presi- 
dent; Claire Bleumel, sec- 
retary; Lucy Casbeer, 
treasurer. 



•Hi 










I 



Jane Ann Jones (upper left) presents a pledf;e skit; members of Sock 
and Buskin participate in campus plays, here Mary Beth Bratcher (right) 
and Betsy Bickley (far right). Sigma Tau Delta members (below) 



working on Harbinger are Carolyn Smith. Jim Spear, Arliss Champlin 
and Charlene Linke; their work (lower right) is represented from art- 
work to finished product. 



36 — Esquire 



Miytf- 

dOfficm 

ftJfflCnid- 



pttsi- 



Oiett, 




John T. Armstrong 
Douglas K. Brown 
David Cheatham 



Jeri Clements 
David Cook 
Ron DeBusk 





B^A 




Lawrence Green 
Eric Hartzendorf 
Gary Hilton 



Tom Kleuser 
Linda Myers 
Charles Schlecte 



a' 
/. 







The monthly meetings of 
the Pre-Med Society offered 
programs and speakers 
from area physicians and 
representatives of med- 
ical schools. Stimulat- 
ing interest in pre-med 
students in fields of 
medicine, dentistry, op- 
tometry, pharmacy and 
other allied health 
sciences is the purpose 
of the society. No aca- 
demic requirements are 
necessary for joining 
the club, only interest. 
Even though the group is 
not a service organiza- 
tion, the members helped 
in the heart fund drive 
and make presentations 
to various civic groups. 
The main function of the 
society is the spring 
Pre-Med Banquet. This is 
a special dinner where 
students consult with the 
faculty and representa- 
tives of other schools. 






Esquire — 37 



w 



Johnny Arguello 

Gloria Armenta 

Anicato Botello 

Tony Botello 

Art Chaves 

Sister Margaret G>rtese 

Daniel Gistella 

Brigido DeLeon 
Rene DeLeon 
Sister Regina Foppe 
Armando Garcia 
Armando Garcia 
Jaime Garcia 
Valvia Garcia 

Mary Giles 
Alexander Gonzalez 
Ramon Guajardo 
Carlos Guirino 
Catalina Gutierrez 
Antonio Hernandez 
Oliva Hernandez 

Rafael Herrera 
Gracie Hinojosa 
Maricela Hinojosa 
Sonny Holguin 
Sylvia Huron 
Marian Jacobo 
Alice Lara 

Celeste Lopez 
Gloria Lopez 
Elena Marez 
Sammy Medina 
San Juana Medrano 
Linda Mendoza 
Eusebio Morales 

Beatrice Ortiz 
Mary Ortiz 
Pat Rivera 
Lupe Rodriguez 
Monico Rodriguez 
Carmen Salazar 
Lupe Salazar 

David Salinas 
Tommy Salinas 
Reynaldo Sanchez 
Joe Trujillo 
Vincent Vecchio 
Noe Villarreal 
Pete Ybarra 



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Los 



Tertulianos 



Mexican-Af.ierican stu- 
dents at Tech compose the 
majority membership of 
Los Tertulianos. The ma- 
jor project sponsored by 
Los Tertulianos was the 
annual Seminar-Workshop 
for Educational Opportu- 
nities. Three hundred and 
fifty students were 
present for the first 



session. To help sponsor 
the workshop, members 
planned a Mexican supper. 
Los Tertulianos sponsored 
a Homecoming Queen con- 
testant and entered a 
float in the annual Pa- 
rade. The club also com- 
peted in intramural 
sp>orts in the independent 
division. 



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38 — Esquire 




I 



I, It 




At the annual South- 
west Conference Debate 
Tournament, the P. Mer- 
ville Larson Debate and 
Interpretation Society 
captured the majority of 
the awards. This organi- 
zation earned 40 trophies 
during the '69-'70 school 
year. Headed by David 
Bawcom, president; Don 
Cage, vice president; 
and Betsy McKinney, sec- 
retary-treasurer; the 
debate team traveled some 
23,000 miles. The senior 
team of David Bawcom and 
Tom Walsh qualified as 



one of the top 44 teams 
in the nation. They re- 
ceived an invitation to 
the National Debate Tour- 
nament. As one of the 
top SO teams in the nation 
they also received a 
bid to the Tournament of 
Champions in Bloomington, 
III. Dr. P. Merville 
Larson was awarded the 
Distinguished Alumni 
Award by the Delta Sigma 
Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha 
honorary debate frater- 
nity for his outstanding 
achievements in the field 
of speech. 



Working in the debate society requires varied and co- 
ordinated work on the part of the members. Don Cage and 
Camilla Cobb prepare for a debate tournament. Assistance 
is given by debate Coach Vernon McGuire. The car is 
loaded for the trip. At destination's end the debators 
compete, and with a victory, bring home another trophy 
for their showcase. 



Larson 

n Debate 
DSoc/efy 



Esquire — 39 



The National Art Edu- 
cation Association brings 
students together who 
want a teaching career 
in any area of art. 
An interest in art 
education is the 
only requirement for 
membership. This year 
cartoonist Jack Tippit 
was one of various speak- 
ers at the NAEA monthly 
meetings. Talks concern- 



ing student teaching 
were also presented to 
the 26 members. NAEA 
officers are Laurie 
Dowell, president; Debbie 
Sloan, vice president; 
and Jeanne Vehr, treasurer. 
Dr. C. E. Kincaid 
sponsors the organization. 
Most members are also 
affiliated with the 
Texas Art Education 
Association. 



Nationall 

Art Education 

Zl Assoc/ af f on 



NAEA members meet informally in Dr. Kincaid's home. Pictured (below) are 
Jeanne Vehr, Billy Heath, Kincaid, Justine Bisanko, Laurie Dowell and Michael 
Hortman. Snacking (left) are Justine Bosanko, Jeanne Vehr and Bonice 
Hambleton. Heath (right) admires one of Dr. Kincaid's paintings. 




40 — Esquire 



li (IkIow) art 
llttlKdild 

' ni Bmitt 

IS 



P ' 







Coy Ballard 
Pam Chakas 
Ann Cody 
Judy Dalrymple 



Donald Dykes 
Sharon Ebanks 
Cecelia Foote 
Martha A. Foster 



Johnnie Gillespie 
Jeanine Grantham 
Linda Hodges 
Evelyn Ireland 



Kathy Kingsbury 
Stephanie Longino 
Linda Mahlmann 
Dennis McNabb 



Jon Montgomery 
Ronald Nelson 
Sue Nuckols 
Cindy O'Neal 




Wallace Saage 
Gloria Smith 
Sandra Smith 



Linda Spaeth 
Anne Stout 
Sharon Sudsbury 



mi American 
Instifute of 
Designers 



American Institute 
of Interior Designers is 
a national organization 
of professional interior 
designers. One of the 
goals of the national 
AID chapter is to promote 
collegiate interest in 
the profession. The 
Tech chapter is a stu- 
dent affiliation of the 
national professional ' 

chapter. This year's 
officers were President 
Coy Ballard, Vice Presi- 
dent Wallace Saage, Sec- 
retary Ariel Foster, 
Treasurer Anne Stout and 
Sponsor Paul Roseland. 
The campus chapter has 
monthly meetings. The 
meetings are geared to 
supplement the learning 
experiences of the class- 
room; hence, the programs 
are varied and informa- 
tive. 



Esquire — 41 



Alpha 

EpsilonW 

Deltal 



Alpha I-|isilon Delta, 
the national honorary 
for pre-medical students, 
binds together students 
with scholastic txccllcnce 
and a sincere interest 
in nudiciiie. Membership 
rci)uircnients are 4*5 se- 
mester hours or more with 
1 3.1 grade point aver- 
ige. Heading the organiza- 
tion are Lawrence Green, 
president; Gary McWill- 
iams, vice president; 
Jari Clements, secretary; 
antl ("anilicc Rohr, treas- 
urer. Alpha l-psilon Delta 
and the Pre-Mcd Society 
sponsor a biennial Pre- 
Mcd Day, during which 
lectures and seminars 
are oiicn to interested 
high school and Tech ^ 
students. 



Tom Armstrong 
Kirk Brown 
David Cheatham 



Jeri Clements 
Ron DeBusk 
Lawrence Green 



Eric Hartzendorf 
Gar>- Hilton 
Ro'l Houghton 




John Loudermilk 
Mac McWilllams 
Charlotte Pace 



Ondice Rohr 
Robert Sears 
Chester Strunk 





12~Etquire 



The Siiidcnt N.itidii.il 
Education Association is 
an orij.inization of stu- 
dents |ircp.irint; to enter 
the teaching profession. 
The 2'S8-memher chapter 
opened its year with an 
introduction to ST:. A,, 
emphasizing to members 
the importance of being 
active. The monthly pro- 
grams uicluded a visit 
from st.ite |->resident 
James Melton, .i tliscus- 
sion of Teachers lihu-. 
and IVolessional Stan- 
dards, and \.iri(ius tilms. 
Members serxeil .is teach- 



ers aides in the Lubbock 
schools, participated in 
the Homecoming Parade, 
gave a Christinas party 
at the Lubbock State 
School, and acted as 
host for Operation Scnor- 
ita. Tech sent delegates 
to the State Cionvention 



March. Officers are 
President David Baker, Vice 
President Richard Luttrell, 
Secretary Janice Pruett, 
Historian Flizabeth Cdark 
and Sponsor Dr. Panzic 
Kimmel. 



Student 



Education 
AssociationM 




T\\L Sliulcnt Fulucation Association hnstcJ Operation Texas S.E.A. president |,inus Metto 
.Seniirita, only after many well-planned officer meetings. best reach their pupils, 'Tlu- j^rnph 



nslr.iud how lie felt teachers niiglit 
lo understanding." 



Esquire — 13 




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1 



Kappa Mu Epsilon members (above) are (top row) Keith Williams, Kelia 
Allen, Krys Miesak, Pat McGuire, Kathryn Wood, Sue Bizagdon, David Lewis 
Smith, Michael Kamp; (second row) Charles Hendryx, Ronald Shinn, Paul 
McCright, Donald McCullough, Roy Enoch, Ken Penrod, Ken Shorlk, John 
Harris, David Wheat, Edward Goswell, Steve Simms, Lee Hobbs; (seated) 
Wayne Gilbert, Diane Montgomery, Tena Hendryx, Karen King, Peggy Becknal 
and Dennis Morris. ACE officers are Linda Clayton, Sharon Mauldin, Cindy 
Wright, Margaret Speck, Pat Tennison, Donna Tucker and Caroly Rieck. 

MAssociation of 
^^■■Chf/dhood 

MKappa Mu Epsilon 



Kappa Mu Epsilon, 
national math honorary, 
holds monthly meetings 
which feature speakers 
in related math fields. 
There is a pledge program 
for new initiates each 
semester. An annual ban- 
quet features the initia- 
tion of pledges and a 
guest speaker. The hon- 
orary also holds picnics 
and get-togethers for 
fun and relaxation. "Get- 
ting Ready for Children" 
was the theme chosen by 
the Association of Qiild- 
hood Education. Through 



art, music and social 
studies programs, panel 
discussions; and tours of 
the Lubbock State School, 
the 180 elementary educa- 
tion majors accjuire a 
background for teaching. 
Officers of ACE are Presi- 
dent Linda Clayton, 
First Vice President Sha- 
ron Mauldin, Second Vice 
President Pat Tennison, 
Third Vice President, Qro- 
lyn Rieck, Secretary 
Donna Tucker, Treasurer 
Margaret Speck and Pam 
Holmes, state executive 
board representative. 



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44 — Etquire 




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Sigma Alpha Eta, the 
speech pathology and 
audiology professional 
honorary, is the student 
affiliate of the American 
Speech and Hearing Asso- 
ciation. The purpose of 
Sigma Alpha Eta is to 
encourage professionalism 
by providing learning ex- 
periences not offered in 
class work; to inspire 
high levels of achieve- 
ment in clinical activi- 
ties; to foster a spirit 
of unity among faculty 
and students; and to sti- 
mulate interest in speech 
pathology and audiology. 



Officers for '69-70 are 
Cherry Strech, president; 
Jennifer Plasek, vice 
president; Kent Krumm, 
secretary; Mike Donohoo, 
treasurer; and Dr. William 
Ickes, sponsor. Sigma 
Alpha Eta activities in- 
clude fund-raising pro- 
jects, festivities for 
children in the Tech 
Speech and Hearing Clinic, 
and a spring invitational 
banquet where members 
are honored for scholar- 
ship and service. Monthly 
professional meetings in- 
clude various speakers. 



Members (above) of Sigma Alpha Eta are (top row) Cynthia Boyd, Cheryl 
Wood, Phyllis Letz, SuSie Knox, Lori Thurman, Roger Fagan, Mike Donohoo, 
Kent Krumm, Donna Knight, Linda Barbee, Sherri Bryant; (second row) 
Phyllis Carter, Carol Haire, Kathy Parkman, Nancy Prosk, Beth Killip, Anne 
McKinney, Susan Gum, Emily Morrill, Barbara Hansen; (third row) Tom 
Hyso, Willie Hyso, Gloria Collins, Euna Harbert, Linda Horton, Becky Bar- 
nett; and (front row) Jennifer Plasek, Jerry Irvin, Bonnie Brookshire, and 
Steve Edwards. Also members (below) are (back row) Jay Holland, Suzanne 
Badger, Jan McKee, Paige Phillips, Sharon Parrel, Sandra Whitworth, Meredith 
Pigett, Sharon Jo McCarroll, Mary Helen Hamm, Pam Christian, Dottie Cox, 
Kathryn Ann Baker; (second row) Beth Schofield, Judy Nobles, Betty Lawlis, 
Barbara Lawlis, Paiila Donley, Pam Copenhaver, Dichelle Burrows, Cristy 
Cathey, Mary Ewing; (third row) Ernees Brownfield, Marilyn Briggs, Alice 
Hampton, Betty Inman, Lee Rhodes, Kenneth McGee; (fourth row) Debbie 
Bearden, Linda Bednar, Lynda Powell, Roseanna Davidson, Judy Cooper; 
(front row) Eileen Fiat, Sharalee Pierce and Cherry Strech. 



Sigma Alpha Eta 




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SOUTHWESTERN 

Public SERVICE Company 




CLOTHES FOR 
TODAY'S MAN 
ON THE MOVE 



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2420 BROADWAY LUBBOCK, TEXAS 



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FUTURE 

1970 



CO-EDITORS: Sheila Looney and Elaine Saul 
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY. Darrel Thomas 
DIRECTOR OF STUDENT PURUCATIONS: Bill Dean 
SECRETARY: Jean Finley 



Future — 1 



Today's society cries of the impartiality of the modern, 
technical world. Since the material aspects of the world 
can now he expresse<l in terms of x. y or z. each variahle 
hecomes just one more unknown in a world that doesn't 
always add up. Though large sections of the Tech cur- 
ricula deal with technology, the goal is not one of mere 
mathematics. College life offers the opportunity to take 
th" equations, put them together and create, just as any 
otiier artist in his own medium. 





2— Future 



1^^ 



IW 



I 

I 



CONTENTS 




GRADUATE SCHOOL 


6 


LAW SCHOOL 


8-10 


Phi Alpha Delta 


11 


COLLEGE OR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. . . 


12-15 


Beta Gamma Sigma 


16 


National Collegiate Association of Secretaries . . . . 


.17 


Gamma Alpha Chi 


18 


Alpha Delta Sigma 


19 


Phi Gamma Nu 


20 


Delta Phi Epsilon 


21 


Texas Tech Accounting Society 


22 


Texas Tech Finance Association 


23 


Alpha Kappa Psi 


24 


Phi Nu Epsilon 


25 


Beta Alpha Psi 


26 


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 


27-31 


American Civil Engineering Association 


32 


American Society of Chemical Engineers 


33 


Alpha Pi Mu 


34 


Tau Sigma Delta 


35 


Eta Kappa Nu 


36 


Industrial Electrical and Electronic Engineers 


37 


Sigma Iota Epsilon 


38 


Pi Tau Sigma 


39 


American Institute of Architects 


40 


Tau Beta Pi 


IBC 





Future — 3 




'ii 



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t 



^ 



& 



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Just as the gears of a macliine 
mesh, so must our mind devel- 
op an integration of tlie many 
concepts presented. Learning 
is the assimilation of facts, hut 
education is the applied use of 
those facts. Through education 
we create for the hetterment of 
mankind, whether it l)e a 
source of light or a huilding in 
which to educate others. 



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future— 5 


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6— Future 



As interim dean for the past two 
years, Dr. Lawrence L. Graves has 
commanded an expansion era of the 
Graduate School. A "blue ribbon" 
committee appointed by Graves is in 
the process of evaluating future doc- 
toral programs. The group will formu- 
late and examine possible additions to 
graduate curricula, with the informa- 
tion to be forwarded to Dr. Grover 
Murray, Tech president, for further 
consideration. 

Graduate work has been offered at 
Tech since 1927. In 1937 the graduate 
program became a separate unit 
under its own dean and council. The 
school requires evidence of an appli- 
cant's special ability for admission to 
its degree programs. In addition, the 
school makes its facilities available to 
a wide variety of students, who are not 



eligible or do not wish to become ap- 
plicants for degrees. 

The dean of the school acts as a 
general advisor for all graduate stu- 
dents, but, so far as the particular 



Graduate School Sets Eye 



courses are concerned, a student is 
counseled by the chairman of his major 
or minor department. The Graduate 
Council, assisted by the graduate 
faculty, is charged with the res- 
ponsibility of formulating the policy 
of the school and the requirements for 
degrees. 



on Future 






IW 




Keeping graduate records is a full time 
task for (from row) Irene Temple, Clenda 
Martin. (Back row) Frances Prude, and 
Glynda Schickedang. 



IL 



Future— 7 




8— Future 



/ 



New Facilities 
Completed for 
School of Law 




Future — 9 



November 19-20, 1969 marked 
the official date for the ac- 
credidation of Texas Tech's 
School of Law by the Ameri- 
can Bar Association. Pictured 
is David Bourland, Student 
Bar Association President, 
Professor Justin Smith, As- 
sociate Dean of Law School 
and Millard H. Ruud, Ad- 
visor to Counsel of Section on 
Legal Education and Admis- 
sion to the Bar, all of whom 
participated in this momen- 
tous occasion. 



Although instruction began in the fall 
semester of 1967 with a first year class, 
actual completion of the Law School build- 
ing facilities was not until the fall of 1969. 
Architects of the new structure, Harell and 
Hamilton of Dallas, have created an im- 
pressive design concept, culminating in an 
extremely functional building. Approxi- 
mately 575 students and 30 faculty mem- 
bers can be accommodated in the class- 
rooms, library, faculty and administrative 
office space. 

1969 marked not only the opening of 
newly constructed facilities, but the gradu- 
ation of the first entering class who were 
eligible to receive the Doctor of Juris- 
prudence. 

The Texas Tech School of Law pays 
particular attention, especially in research 
and public service, to problems involving 
arid and semi-arid regions of the nation 
and the world in connection with the 
ICASALS program. 




i 




J 



AsmK iate Dean and Professor of Law Justin C. Smith (lelt) and Kichard Amandes, Dean of the 
School of Law, survey the courtroom of the newly constructed Law School Building. 



Quiter, 
'«:En, 



10— Future 



*! 




I 




I 



^.- 



\V 




Charter members of the Sam Raybum Chapter of Phi Alpha Delta, first 
row: Errol Friedman, Ralph Belter, David Casey, John Abbott, John 
Seymour, Scott Bush, David Segrest, Alan Murray, James Whittington, 
Troy Hurley, and Henry Rohr. Second row: Ray Phillips, Raymond Judice, 
Raggie Reeves, Jerry Kolander, Phillip Lam, Alan Johnson, W. T. Martin, 
Cecil Puryear, Robert Williams, Gene Gaines, Earl Wentworth, Richard 
Amandes (Law School Dean). Third row: Jeff Wentworth, Ralph Gallini, 



Bruce Magness, Fred Lover, Marvin Marshall, Michael Fostel, Ernest 
Finney, Preston Stevens, Robin Green. Fourth row: Jack Driskill, Duane 
Neill, Hershel Barnes, Charles Genrty, John Weber, Charles Adams. Fifth 
row: Mike Hubbard, Mike Miller, Carey Boethel, Keno Henderson, Martin 
Cude, Edgar Craighead, James Bobo, Tom Womble, William Weem, 
Buford Terrell, Ben R. Smart. 



Future — 11 



I 




"T 



Business Administration Continues Growth 



im 



Few universities can compare with the exceptional growth — both 
academically and physically — of Texas Tech University since its founding in 
1932. Growth has been rapid and continuing for the College of Business 
Administration. With 4,459 undergraduates and 338 graduate students, the 
College of Business Administration is one of the largest in the world. 

Attesting to the quality of education provided, the College is accredited 
by the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business and holds 
membership in the National Association of Business Teacher Education. 
Bachelor's degrees are offered in six major areas: accounting, business educa- 
tion, economics, finance, management and marketing. Nineteen undergraduate 
degree programs are offered leading to the Bachelor of Business Administra- 
tion degree. 

The honor studies plan is designed to enable qualified students to pursue 
any of the programs offered but attend special classes and receive special 
instruction and guidance in order that they may better realize and develop 
their capabilities. The College of Business Administration offers study leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Business Administration. Candidates may con- 
centrate in the area of their specific interest. 

The College employs an instructional staff of 168 made up of full and 
part time teachers plus teaching assistants. Dr. Reginald Rushing has acted 
as interim dean since June 1, 1968. Beginning in the summer term Dean 
Rushing will be replaced by Dr. Jack D. Steele. Dean Steele was the former 
general manager of New York operation of Xerox Education Group, professor 
of business administration at Stanford University, the University of Kansas 
and Texas A & M University. Dean Steele has also had teaching assignments 
in Costa Rica, Switzerland, Australia and Singapore. Steele has done consulting 
work with more than 15 corporations and institutions of higher education and 
has published several technical and professional books and articles. Dr. Rush- 
ing will return to his position of Chairman of the accounting department. 




Dr. Reginald Rushing discusses with Dr. Jack D. Steele, 
the new business administration dean, about several areas 
of the operation of one of the largest business colleges in 
the world. 



Future— 13 



Business Administration 
Chairman, Directors 




# 



Students Work, Study 



m 



The College of Business Administration building com- 
plex provides excellent physical facilities. The fully air- 
conditioned three building complex, completed in 1969, 
contains a thirteen story office tower with administrative 
offices on the lower levels and faculty on the upper levels. 
Connected to the office tower is the four level classroom 
building designed and equipped to provide the finest edu- 
cational environment possible. Adjacent and connected are 
the octagon auditorium that seats 460 and on the ground 
floor, a spacious study and reading room. 






X 





) 






Beta Gamma 



ma 



The business honorary is Beta Gamma Sigma. Member- 
ship in the organization is the highest scholastic honor that 
a student in business administration can receive. The of- 
ficers for the past year included Gamewell Qjint, Sam 
Chisholm, Robert Amason and Charles Wade. 

The qualifications for a prospective member include a 
scholastic ranking in the top 10% of his senior class or the 
top % of his junior class, while graduates must be in the 
highest 20%. The annual spring banquet was held in April. 
At this time new members were initiated. 



(Top picture) The old officers of Beta Gamma Sigma were Gamewell 
Ganit, Sam Chisholm, Robert Amason and Charles Wade. (Middle 
picture) New officers included Sam Chisholm, Beverly Davis and 
Charles Wade. (Bottom picture) Members were (first row) Teresa 
Dawkins, Janet Williams, Rebecca Teague, Carolyn Cross, Kathy 
Baldwin, Diana Doshier, Randy Brillhart. (Second row) Beverly 
Davis, Jack Frith, Kenny Burnett, Thomas Hall, Jim Darnell, Jerry 
Danterive, Dennis Sanderson, Roger Thompson. (Third row) Phil 
Hall, Gene Morris, Carol Storbeck, William Beauvais, Lynn Herpich, 
Ella Kinsey, Andy Kerr, Jeanette Snelgrove, Don Lookadoo, Bill 
Waltrip. (Fourth row) Marie Arend, Ronnie Owens, Dennis Jen- 
nings, Robert Weatherley, Lary Snodgrass, Ronald Stephenson. 
(Fifth row) M. P. Imke, Roger Troub, Doyle Williams, Gamewell 
Gantt, Sam Chisholm, Betty Chapin, Wayne Draper, Jack Sprawls, 
Lorenzo Penafiel, Marvin Johnston, R. D. Amason, and (sixth row) 
Rues Byington, Doleres Kilchenstien, Reginald Rushing, John Ryan, 
J«hn Gilliam, Charles Wade. 





16 — Future 



National Collegiate 
Association Hi 
for Secretaries 



111* 



The National Collegiate Association 
for Secretaries is a national organization 
for college students majoring in secretarial 
administration and business education. 

Officers for the organization were Rita 
Kell, president; Janelda Hays, vice presi- 



Judy Andrews 
Susan Anthony 



{\% 




dent; Laura Austin, secretary; Rebecca 
Lowrey, treasurer; Cathy Stooksberry, 
publicity chairman; Camilla Nash, histo- 
rian; Jeanette Ehler, deputy national trea- 
surer; Dr. Irol Balsley, sponsor; Dr. 
Ronald Johnson, sponsor and national trea- 
surer. 

Activities included the fall and spring 
initiation, the NCAS national convention in 
New Orleans, joint meetings with the Tech 
Finance Association, the Spring Banquet, 
and the Tax Institute Service project. 



Laura Austin 
Arlene Bailey 
Jeanette Bednarz 
Maria Brockett 
Dianne Byrd 



Karen Chamblee 
Marlene Chandler 
Barbara Cocanougher 
Diana Doshier 
Jeanette Ehler 



Mary Feagin 
Linda Hampton 
Mary Hand 
Janelda Hays 
Melody Hiatt 



Barbara Holder 
Joan James 
Cindy Jones 
Rita Keel 
Betty Kelley 



Rosemary Lee 
Rebecca Lowrey 
Marilyn McGuire 
Donna Mize 
Camilla Nash 



Vicky Outlaw 
Linda Stanton 
Vicki Swasey 
Sally Swatzell 
Peggy Switzer 



Collen Vitek 
Vera Ward 
Sharon Wimmer 
Donna Woodward 
Elizabeth Wynn 



Future — 17 



Gamma Alpha Chi is the women's advertising sorority, 
endeavoring to promote the advertising profession. GAX 
members were active in several projects this year. GAX 
along with Alpha Delta Sigma sponsored the "Most Hand- 
some Man" contest, Advertising Recognition Week and 
various professional meetings. 

Officers were Sheila Looney, president; Carol Storbeck, 
vice president of Ad Week; Joan Bush, vice president of 
programs; Gaynell Doehne, secretary; and Marilyn Clark, 
treasurer and pledge trainer. 

The final event of the year was an Awards Banquet. 
Students and faculty were presented awards for achieve- 
ment in advertising. Both groups attended the national 
convention of ADS-GAX at St. Louis in November and the 
regional convention at Arkansas in March. 

Pictured right is Gene McCoy, district governor of the 
10th district AAF, presents Mr. R. B. MacAlister the Silver 
Medal Award for advertising man of the year while Carl 
Minor looks on. 




Gamma Alpha ^, . 

Chi 



Janie Barrett 
Claire Bluemel 

Rosita Bloom 

Michelle Boutin 

Diana Brannon 



Christy Chapman 

Marilyn Clark 

Suzi Click 

Kay Corn 

Dana Dean 




Monte Dodd 

Lynn Herpich 

Carolyn Keeter 

Lynn Krohn 
Sheila Looney 



Linda Lynch 

Julie McCabe 

Diana Millen 

Kathy Rhoads 

Carol Roberts 



Myra Setliff 

Carol Storbeck 

Peggy Tipton 

Elizabeth Walton 

Donna Woodward 




"Ef^T^ 



18 — Future 




Alpha Delta 



ma 



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Alpha Delta Sigma is the national professional advertising 
fraternity for men. The purpose of this organization is to build 
interest in advertising and to better the field in advertising. This year 
ADS met jointly with Gamma Alpha Chi, its sister organization. 
Both fraternities participated in Ad Week using the theme "Advertis- 
ing '70: Good News In Media." 

Officers were Bob Fly, president; Bill Andrews, vice president 
of programs; Tom Coughlin, vice president of Ad Week; Steve 
Armstrong, secretary; Dan Brown, treasurer; and Rolf Wigand, 
pledge trainer. ADS awarded several scholarships at the awards 
banquet to aid its students in advertising. 

Pictured left is a special guest, Ralph Sellmeyer who takes a 
copy of the UD from a newsboy. At the right guests and speakers for 
Ad Week were presented citizenship papers to Lubbock by Mayor 
Rogers. 





Members of ADS were (first 
tow) Don Toland, Gunter 
Sprattler, John Carris, Gary 
Anderson. (Second row) Rob- 
bie Pigg, Phil Jobe, Pat 
Gonong, Marshall Reddick, 
Tom Coughlin, Steve Gray. 
(Third row) Bill Andrews, 
Rolf Wigand, Chris Riefler, 
Bryne Smith, Charles Led- 
better, Don Shive, Bill Beauvis, 
Larry McKinney. (Fourth 
row) Eddie Windom and Vern 
Johnson. 



Future— 19 



Phi Gamma Nu 



It's a woman's world, at least it is for 
the members of Phi Gamma Nu, profes- 
sional business sorority for women. The 
two prime goals of these business women 
are to promote professional ethics and busi- 
ness practices and to associate with ex- 
perienced people in related business areas 
outside the realm of college lifie. 

Phi Gamma Nu has bi-monthly meet- 
ings, a business luncheon and the other a 
professional meeting at which guest 
speakers appear. Founder's Day is cele- 
brated in February by a special breakfast 
meeting. Each fall and spring, the members 
hold rush parties for prospective members; 



members must have a 2.5 G.P.A. and must 
have completed at least six hours of busi- 
ness courses. 

Officers for the school year were 
Karen Swann, president; Di Doshier, vice 
president; Carol Schmidt, secretary; Ja- 
nelda Hays, treasurer; and Jeanette Bed- 
narz, pledge trainer. The faculty advisor is 
Mrs. Edna Gott, professor of economics. 



Marcia Alexander 
Judy Andrews 



Deidra Ash 

Kathy Baldwin 

Christine Barton 

Jeanette Bednatz 

Cathy Bering 

Ann Betzel 

June Bozeman 

Maria Brockett 

Julie Cates 

Margie Cope 

Teresa Dawkins 

Diana Doshier 

Priscilla Grace 

Linda Hampton 

Janelda Hays 

Cindy Jones 

Betty Keely 

Ella Kinsey 

Donna Knox 

Rosemary Lee 

Barbara Martin 

Nancy McCarthy 

Donna Mize 

Rosemary Monaco 

June Morris 

Victoria Outlaw 

Theresa Pohlmeier 

Jo Ann Ratliff 

Kathy Ray 

Nedree Riggs 

Delynne Ross 

Carol Schmidt 

Mary Lou Simpson 

Nancy Simpson 

Sandi Sivage 

Sherry Snodgrass 

Cathy Spencer 

Linda Stanton 

Karen Swann 

Martha Taylor 

Becky Teague 

Jill Toojpy 

Carolyn Tunnell 

Laura Turner 

Vera Ward 

Snaan Weatherly 

Gail White 

Sharon Wimmer 




30— Future 




Delta Phi Epsilon 



Being a member of Delta Phi Epsilon 
means more than a fraternity, it's brother- 
hood. As a brotherhood, the members en- 
joy mutual interests of the brothers. The 
sharing of knowledge is one facet but also 
the uniting in a common interest, foreign 
service. Many brothers aspire to go into the 
foreign service, some have an interest in 
the Peace Corps, and others are interested 
in international trade. Rounding out the 
membership are members in other major 




areas of study from English to engineering. 
This year Delta Phi Epsilon brought 
to Tech Ambassador Timberlake of the 
state department, Dr. P. K. Nambiar who is 
India's host national recruiter for the Peace 
Corps. Some of the projects were sponsor- 
ing and participating in the World Con- 
ference, International Week, and a Christ- 
mas party for the children of Neighbor- 
hood House in Lubbock. 



Wynne Blake 
Brett Clark 
Dan Duke 



Dr. James Harper 
Mel Harris 
Gary Heald 



Jal Jobe 
Bill Lowery 
Sam Ponder 



Jim Preston 
Bill Schrader 
Phillip Spiegel 



Garry West 
Dong Soo Whang 
Bill Womack 



Future — 21 




Tech Accounting Society 



Richard Breedlove, vice-president; Rodney 
Gryder, president; Doug Sewell, treasurer; 
Mike Richardson, publicity chairman; Larry 
Meyer, secretary; Dr. Belverd Needles Jr., 
sponsor; were the officers and sponsor for 
Tech Accounting this year. 



A career oriented group, the Tech 
Accounting Society is the medium 
through which its members learn of 
new developments in all fields of ac- 
counting, and become acquainted with 
prominent local and national account- 
ing practitioners. Varied activities, in- 
cluding a field trip to modern computer 
installations, enable Tech Accounting 
Society members to prepare for careers 
in professional accounting. 



Members seated are: G. DuPont, C. Caugh- 
ron, D. Elam, J. Keating, J. Bozeman, J. 
Hogan, Jo Ratliff, S. Feital, M. Walker, H. 
McCowen. Standing are: J. Clifton, G. 
Boroughs, J. Kimbrough, B. Brown, D. Cook, 
R. Michels, W. Osborne. 





TEi 



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Siiiia. 
Cnitis! 
Ntuson 



lion ik 
Dukes, 
Qaodt 



Members seated are: C. Cross, K. Baldwin, 
M. Taylor, R. DeRieux, K. Leyd, M. Maples, 
B. Grier, D. Black, and P. Glover. Standing 
are: D. Jones, E. Bush, W. Watson, J. 
Sanders, O. Allen, G. Jones, F. Allen, T. 
Oliver, and R. Green. 



22 Future 



< 



TECH FINANCE ASSOCIATION 



^■.Ut, 



•■■lliity 
IMnJr, 




The l%9-70 Tech Finance Association members are: Front row: Charles R. Dickey, W. P. Dukes, Judy Andrews, Byron 
Snyder. Second row: Bodyd Milner, Steve Gray, James, Lail, Daphn Middleton, Wcodson Huges. Third row: Orland Lasley, 
Curtis Brown, John Murray, Alan Basinger, Bob Parker. Fourth row: Lloyd Blackwell, Robert Graves, Don Pharr, Weldon 
Newson, Cliff Blanchard, George Bush. Fifth row: Laura Austin, Jim Sowell, Eric Fox, Bob Shepherd, Standing are: 
Louis Birdwell, Gamewell Gantt, Neil Duffy, James Collins, Claude Leatherwood, John Stephenson, Edwin Fowler. 



Officers for the Tech Finance Associa- 
tion this year were Dr. William P. 
Dukes, Louis Birdwell, Gamewell Gantt, 
Claude Leatherwood, and Joe Bob Mayo. 



9 



tBil** 
IS*** 




Future — 23 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



The objectives of Alpha Kappa Psi are 
to further the individual welfare of its 
members, to foster scientific research in 
the fields of commerce, accounting, and 
finance, to educate the public to appreciate 
and demand higher ideals therein, and to 
promote and advance in institutions of col- 
lege rank, courses leading to degrees in 
Business Administration. 

Officers for Eta Theta chapter's fourth 
year at Tech were Doug Sewell, president; 
Scott McGregor, vice president; John 
Wright, secretary; and Bobby Dean, trea- 



surer. 

In addition to the many professional 
activities of the chapter were its partici- 
pation in intramural football, basketball, 
and Softball games and several scheduled 
social events throughout the year. A large 
delegation of members attended the region- 
al convention of Alpha Kappa Psi in Dallas 
during April. Members also conducted a 
public relations project to acquaint both 
local businessmen and faculty with Alpha 
Kappa Psi and its objectives. 



il 



Jerry Goodwin 

Donald Gosling 

Mike HaU 

Steve Hall 

Jim Jamieson 

Ronny Jordon 



Don Lookadoo 

Scott McGregor 

Guy Milbum 

Joe Newsom 

Bill Outlaw 

Philip Payne 



Don Pharr 

Dan Rutledge 

Jim Sandidge 

Thomas Sawyer 

Larry Scarborough 

Carl Schieffer 



Douglas Sewell 

Mike Skeen 

Gary Smothers 

Brent Sparks 

Jim Stuart 

Jack Thornton 



Ellis Tredway 

Ken Vestal 

Fred Wadhams 

Bill Waltrip 

Dan Webster 

Guy Wester 



Pete Weston 

Larry Williams 

Ray Williams 

Dennis Woolam 

David Wright 

John Wright 



Bill Abemathy 

Robin Anderson 

Gary Ashcraft 

Kenneth Bain 

Robert Bayless 



John Bowling 

Steve Brown 

Bill Burton 

Gerald Carter 
Bobby Dean 




I 



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24—Futurt 



I 



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Unia 
Kbodi 



Phi Nu Epsilon 



Phi Nu Ep^iloii. the national foreign service sorority, 
is one of the newest orjianizations at Tech. It was founded 
at American University in 1^68. Texas Tech is the home of 
Beta Chapter, second in the nation. 

The purpose of Phi Nu Epsilon is to promote a role for 
women in foreign service. It is open to all women who have 
an interest in international affairs, regardless of their major 
fields. 

Their activities include working on the World Affairs 
Conference and International Week. The group also promotes 
the Host Student Program and an annual International Wo- 



man s award. 



SHH 



Debbie Baker 
Linda Barton 
Tanya Bird 




Sandra Boney 
•Mary Butler 
Barbara DeGarmo 
Barbara Chambers 
Margaret Chan 
Carol Childress 



Margaret Clements 
Vicki Cofer 
Ann Cody 
Cathy Cone 
Kathy Dobbs 
Christie Kennedy 



Julie King 
Delyn Moore 
Mary Miller 
Lou Ann Misek 
Kathy Richards 
Claudia Rigsby 



Susie Sims 
Diana Smith 
Ann Slrawhom 
Tena Thompson 
Linda Vinson 
Vicki Zwiacker 



Future — 25 



Beta Alpha Psi 



Beta Alpha Psi members included (front row) 
David Jennings, Paula Mathews, Jerry Goodwin, 
Lary Snodgrass, Roxie Dippel, Paula Book, Hal 
Reneau. (Middle row) Bob Corbin, Roger Pickett, 
Ray DeRieux, Larry Bowman, James Holland. 
(Back row) Wayne Chapin, Kenneth Patterson, 
Johnny Standlee, Ronnie Owens, Karl Irvin, 
Robert Weatherly, Mack Hoel, Mike Killman, 
Jim Davis, Scott Cook, Allen McGehee and 
George Gowan. 



• f 




Beta Alpha Psi is the national honor- 
ary and professional accounting fraternity. 
The purposes of the fraternity as expressed 
in its constitution are: "To instill in its 
members a desire for continuing self im- 
provement; to foster high moral and ethical 
standards in its members; to encourage and 
give recognition to scholastic and profes- 
sional excellence; to cultivate a sense of 
responsibility and service in its members; 
to promote the collegiate study of account- 
ing and to provide opportunities for as- 
sociation among its members and practicing 
accountants." 

Beta Alpha Psi was founded in 1919. 



There are presently 70 chapters; the total 
number of persons initiated is in excess of 
30,000. The membership includes virtually 
all prominent accountants in public prac- 
tice, industry and government. Minimum 
scholastic requirements for election to mem- 
bership are maintained. In the fall semester, 
Mr. Don Dorman of Main LaFrentz & Co., 
a public accounting firm, was entered as 
an honorary member. 

Officers for the fall semester were 
James Davis, Scott Cook, Sandra Stark, 
Robert Corbin and Robert Weatherly. 
Spring officers were Lary Snodgrass, Den- 
nis Jennings and Mack Hoel. 



) 



26— Future 



T 



In this modern world, filled with 
problems of technology, ecology, and 
the relationship that is to evolve be- 
tween these two fields, the College of 
Engineering seeks to meet the challenge 
of these problems. The purpose of this 
college is to educate its students in the 
basics of fundamental engineering, as 
well as a specialization. There are eight 
departments from which a student may 
choose. 

The architecture department chal- 
lenges its students with problems in 
analysis and design such as a bus ter- 
minal or a millionaire's hunting lodge. 
This department is to move into a new 
twelve story building in the fall. 

Chemical engineering centers on 
chemical processing, process controls, 
and the thermodynamics of multi- 
phase and multi-component systems. At 
present, this department is doing re- 
search for NASA, Dupont, Mosher, and 
the National Science Foundation. 

Structural mechanics is a major 
area of research within the Civil En- 
gineering department. Also, the Water 
Resource Institute at Tech, a study of 
hydrology and water quality is in- 
cluded under this title. 

The Electrical engineers are doing 
research in solid state electronics, net- 
work and system theory, and physical 
electronics. An experimental laser and 
its associated equipment have now been 
installed in this department for ex- 
perimentation in quantum electronics. 
The Industrial Engineering depart- 
ment does research in four areas; bio- 
mechanics and human performance, 
production and process design, quanti- 
tative technology, and management 
science. 

Research in thermal processes, 
dynamics systems and material be- 
havior are part of the Mechanical 
Engineering department. A project on 
environmental conditioning is cur- 
rently under development in this 
department. 

Reservoir mechanics and perfor- 
mance, gas engineering, and produc- 
tion technology are part of the depart- 
ment of Petroleum Engineering. Future 
research is planned on the problem of 
irreversible thermodynamic aspects of 
recovery of petroleum. 

The Textile Engineering depart- 
ment viewed the dedication of the new 
multi-million dollar textile center 
recently developed on the Tech cam- 
pus. This center includes a testing labo- 
ratory where studies relating to the 
length, strength, elongation, color, and 
other qualities of fibrin are con- 
ducted. 



Engineering Meets 
The Changing Challenge 






Jack F. Maddox, Chairman 
of the Board and President 
New Mexico Electric Service. 



Lester L. Kirkpatrick, 
Chairman of the Board and 
President Cal. Computer. 



M. Roger Clapp, President, 
Chief Executive Officer 
Lubrizol Corporation. 



DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI 



Future— 27 




28- Fulurr 



Wr 




Lee J. Phillips 
Assistant to the Dean 






Robert L. Newell 
Associate Dean 



Arnold J. Gully 
Associate Dean 



30 




William L. Ducker 
Petroleum Engineering 



Ernst W. Kiesling 
Civil Engineering 



I 



Russell H. Seacat 
Electrical Engineering 

George F. Meenaghan 
Chemical Engineering 



Louis J. Powers 
Mechanical Engineering 

Richard A. Dudek 
Industrial Engineering 



31 







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American Society 

of Civil 

Engineers 



The officers and faculty of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers were (top) Cliff Keho, in- 
structor; Glen Hinckley, guest speaker; Bobby 
Chenoweth, president; Dr. G. A. Whetstone, 
faculty advisor; Greg Arthur, treasurer; Jim 
DeCastro, secretary; and James Vogt, vice presi- 
dent. Members included (bottom) Walter .McCul- 
lough, Kenneth Price, John Mandel, Robert Dunn, 
Glenn Galbraith, James Harder, David Dork, Doa 
Shipman, Van McEIroy, Charles Spence, Will 
Hagood, David Read, and Larry Rawlings. 

The members of the J. H. Murdough 
Student chapter of American Society of 
Civil Engineers began a year of hard work 
this October by hosting the joint meeting 
of the Texas and New Mexico sections of 
ASCE. The meeting was held for the stu- 
dent chapters which attended the con- 
vention. Speaker for the banquet was State 
Representative Bill Clayton. 

Chapter meetings are held twice a 
month with guest professional engineers 
speaking to the organization. The chapter 
sponsors field trips, intramural sports 
teams, a spring banquet and the annual 
student-faculty softball game. 



32— Future 



American 

Institute of 

Chemical 

Engineers 



Members of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers were 
(first row) Larry Anderson, John Massie, David Thomas, Richard 
Green, Don Miller, Doug Northcutt, Vincent Evans, A. G. Oberg, 
Duane Evans. (Second row) Dennis Kimbrough, Leland Tate, James 
Frazier, Robert Garvert, Jimmy Boyd, John Locke, John George, 
Don Davis, Larry Young, Lorry Lott. (Third row) G. F. Meenaghan, 
John Carter, Larry Payne, Horace Winningham, Troy Watson, Michael 
Commons, David Frashier, Greg Weeter. (Fourth row) Joe Cannon, 
Jeff Brown, Larry Anderson, Robert Walker, Randy Brown and 
Nicholas DeLoUis. 



The Student Chapter of the American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers was formed in 1938 and is sponsored by 
Dr. Aaron G. Oberg. Officers for AICE were Don Miller, 
president; Joe Cannon, vice president; Gary Winningham, 
secretary, Ric Massie, treasurer. 

Special activities for the year were a plant trip to chemi- 
cal plants in Corpus Christi area ; a trip to Amarillo to hear 
the National AICE president speak; a plant trip to the 
Midland-Odessa area chemical plants; and a basketball team 
made up of AICE members. 



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Future— -33 






Alpha Pi Mu is the national industrial engineering hon- 
or society. Since its founding in 1949 at Georgia Tech, it 
has grown to a total of 37 chapters. In 1953 the Tech chapter 
acquired its charter. 

The purposes of the organization are to confer recogni- 
tion upon the student of industrial engineering who has 
shown exceptional academic interest and leadership abilities, 
and to encourage him to strive for the highest level of 
ethical conduct in his profession. 

Officers for this year were Rob Michie, president; Jim 



Lokey, vice president; Amr Mortagy, treasurer; Skip 
Valusek, recording secretary; and Brant McGlothlin, cor- 
responding secretary. 



Alpha Pi Mu 



tf» 







(Top picture) Members were (front row) Russell White, Al Wagner, 
Viji Murthy, Mike Anderson, Amr Morlagy, R. Rajaraman. (Back 
row) Dr. Charles Burford, Doug Young, Gary Hornberk, Jim^ Lokey, 
Skip Valusek, Rob Michie, H. MacKenzie and Jim Thomas. (Bottom 

34— Future 



picture) Pledges were (front row) Pat Wiggins, Cale Courtney, Dr. H. 
Martz, Khalil Taraman, J. Prasad, Rich Wideman, Olan Abrahamson, 
Lee Philips. (Back row) Phil Rosar, Roi>ert LaRobidiere. Don Couture, 
Creg Moorhead and Jim .Slinson. 



Tau Sigma Delta 



^ cor. 



I 



m 



Tau Sigma Delta was established to 
provide a national collegiate honor society 
open to students of all American colleges 
and universities wherein an accredited col- 
lege or department of architecture, land- 
scape architecture and allied arts is pro- 
vided. 

To be considered for membership a 
student must be at least a second semester 
junior and have a 2.8 overall and a 2.8 in 
architecture. Scholastic achievement and 



Robert Batson 
Ronald Bertone 



n 



!!• 




Jim Boydston 
Mark Cordray 



James Crandell 
Norman Hallock 



Vance Liston 
Carl Little 



David Lown 
Hugh McCromick 



Stephen Souter 
Ned White 



enrollment in the school of architecture are 
the only prerequisites to belong. 

The national organization of Tau 
Sigma Delta was founded in 1913 at the 
University of Michigan. At present there 
are 25 chapters throughout the United 
States. The Upsilon chapter here was 
formed in 1964 and presently has 14 ac- 
tive members. Mr. Walter Calvert was the 
faculty advisor. David Lown served as pres- 
ident; Ned White as vice president. 

The chapters' activities have been 
limited due to its restricted membership 
with pledgeship and initiation conducted 
annually in the Spring. Looking forward 
to the move into the new facility in the 
fall of 1970, a new program of activities 
is planned. 



Dr.H. 



jlBUi 



■I 

ll 



Construction began on the new art architecture 
building with the completion date set at Fall of 
1970. 




Future — 35 



Eta Kappa Nu 



The purpose of Eta Kappa Nu is to "make in an out- 
standing manner those who, as students in electrical engineer- 
ing, have conferred honor on their alma mater by distin- 
guished scholarship, activities, leadership and exemplary 
character and to help these students progress by association 
with alumni who have attained prominence." 

Junior students in the upper fourth of their electrical 
engineering class and senior students in the upper third of 
their class are further considered for membership on the 
basis of character, ability and personality. A grade point 
average of 3.00 is required for membership. 

Each year the chapter presents an outstanding electrical 
engineering professor award and an outstanding sophomore 
award. Currently a high school visitation program is being 
compiled by the members of Eta Kappa Nu. 

Officers were Paul Lambert, president; Ken Penrod, 
vice president: Emanuel Honig. treasurer; Larry Roselaijd, 
corresponding secretary: Charles Schleete, recording; and 
Robert David, bridge correspondent. The faculty advisor is 
Dr. David K. Ferry. 



ironit (11 
uenl !«' 
wereCb 



John Harris 

Emanuel Honig 

Paul Lambert 

Howard Louie 



Richard Loyd 

Erie Mote 

Ken Penrod 

Larry Roseland 



Charles Schleets 

Kenneth Shorck 

Steven Ward 

Calvin Woods 




36 — Future 



I 



(Left) John Welch and Larry Rushing complete an elec- 
tronic experiment. (Right) David Smith checks his equip- 
ment before completing his research. (Bottom) Officers 
were Charles Schlecte, Howard Louie, Lee Patella, William 
Stephens, Erie Mote and Dr. David Ferry; faculty advisor. 




The Institute of Electrical and Elec- 
tronics Engineers was founded in 1884 as 
the professional organization for electrical 
engineers. The student branch of the IEEE 
was established in 1902 so that under- 
graduate engineers might maintain contact 
with professional engineers in industry. 

Each spring IEEE sponsors a student 
paper contest. Students are encouraged to 
do research projects on fields of interest 
to them and present a technical paper on 
the research that they have done. Erie Mote 
was the first place winner this year with 
research that he did on "Mirow ave Mixing 
with IMPATT Diodes." David Smith was 
second and Larry Roseland came in third. 

The officers this year were Chairman, 
Charles Schlecte; vice-chairman, Bill 
Stephens; secretary, Howard Louie; treas- 
urer, Lee Patella; and publicity chairman. 
Bill Cummings. The faculty advisor was Dr. 
David K. Ferry. 




Future — 37 



Sigma Iota Epsilon 





(Above) Officers were Dr. Vincent P. Luchsinger, 
Robert Owens, Linda Wald, Gene Morris, and 
John Wright. (Left) Members were (bottom row) 
Guy Lovelace, Otis Jones, Stanley Joosse. (Sec- 
ond tow) Kenneth Lokey, Robert Kerber, Ralph 
Inman, Duane Ireland, Frank Traver. (Third 
tow) Dr. Carlton Whitehead, Robert Owens, 
Gene Morris, James Tracy, Daniel Little, Don 
Grainger, John Rodgers, Michael Hitt, John 
Wright, Linda Wald and W. H. Campbell. (Be- 
low) John Wright conducts the formal pledge 
ceremonies. 



Sigma Iota Epsilon chapter of the Na- 
tional Honorary and Professional Manage- 
ment Fraternity had fifty-four active mem- 
bers during the fall semester, with twenty- 
three of these being new initiates. They 
instigated and participated in many 
academic and professional activities during 
the year. Robert Owen, personnel and 
public relations officer, participated in the 
organization of the new Business Adminis- 
tration Student Council and several mem- 
bers of SIE Chapter heljjed plan and 
organize, for the benefit of all business stu- 
dents, the Business Student's Library. Also, 
an information and employment service 
was organized to help graduating members 
find desired employment. All of these 
activities were aimed at stimulating scholar- 
ship and professionalism in business stu- 
dents. 

Guest speakers for the semester in- 
cluded Mr. Ray Garcia, representinc the 
General Electric Aerospace Planning Group 
of Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, and Dr. Lai 
Sardana, Tech Management professor, who 
discussed with all interested his ideas and 
background in International Management. 



38— Future 



Pi Tau Sigma 



The Texas Tech Sigma Epsilon chap- 
ter of Pi Tau Sigma, the national honorary 
fraternity for mechanical engineers was 
organized on the Tech campus in April, 
1966. The purpose of Pi Tau Sigma is to 
foster the high ideals of the engineering 
profession, to stimulate interest in co- 
ordinate departmental activities, to promote 
the mutual professional welfare of its mem- 
bers, and to develop in the students of 
mechanical engineering the attributes 
necessary for effective leadership and the 
assumption of the responsibilities of a 



citizen in a democracy. 

This year Pi Tau Sigma instituted a 
Big Brother program for electees so as to 
further promote the Brotherhood. Pi Tau 
Sigma also was responsible for the Fall 
Engineers Banquet which is held for 
campus engineering honoraries. Also the 
first annual Purple Shaft Award was pre- 
sented to professor R. E. Martin. The 
award cites those professors who are con- 
spicuous in the cause of academic better- 
ment of mechanical engineers. This year's 
sponsor was Dr. J. H. Lawrence. 



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The members of Pi Tau Sigma were (front row) 
Michael McMahan, Paul Dyer, Lee Hobbs, Larry 
Taylor, Ronald Pate, Hayden Griffin, Tommy 
Keyton. (Middle tow) Jim Nail, Blake Heitzman, 
Joe Thacker, Alan Holley, Carl Johnson, Jim 
Ince, Steve Werner. (Back tow) Douglas Robert- 
son, George Scott, Larry Tinkler, and Paul 
Hodges. 



Future — 39 



Members of A.I. A. ar« : James Al- 
derfer. Jmtnes Ardrey, Chris Alkias, 
Morris Ballew, Deborah Bacon, Gail 
Banks. Jim Barnett. K. R. Barnett, 
Dales Barnes, Noel Barrick, Robert 
BatsoD, Ron Beard, Danoy Bellan, 
Vernon Berry, Ron Bertone, Mike 
Besedick, Larry Birchfield. Ronald 
Birrell, Lewis Blackburn, Thomas 
Boehm, Dan Boone, Glem Borland, 
Gary Bosz, Ray Boothe. Jim 
Boydstoo, Thomas Boyrtt, Oia 
Bouchord, Mike Brady, Brad 
Braune, Stephen Bricks, Ronnie 
Brookfield, David Brown, Dennia. 
Brown. Jeff Brown, Wayne Brown, 
James Burran, Danny Butka. Paul 
Camp, Bruce Carter, David Caw- 
thron, David Christian, Johne Cule, 
Bob Conolly, James Cook, George 
Cooley, Mike Coppedge, Mark 
Cordray. James Crandflll , Glenn 
Cramer, Gary Currie, Jim Dallas, 
Panayiou Dallis, Joe Daniels, Robert 
Darby, Charles Davis, Tom Da via. 
Mike Dickson, Henry Dirks, Jamea 
Dirks. Dan Dobbe, Mark Dooatdaon. 
Jack Douglas, Joe Drain. Chris 
Draper, David Driskill. Dickey Elliott, 
Mike Elliott. Mark Eubank, Robert 
Eudy. Frank Evana, Steve Faulk, 
Bill Finley. Ron Forrest. Crai| 
Frank, Brian Frees, Robbie Fuchs, 
David George, Tommy Gibbs, Terry 
Golda, Andy Goodson, Charlea 
Graham, Hank Granger, Robert 
Gregonia. David Grubbs. Jamea Hall, 
Steve Hamilton, Edwin Hamlyn, 
Jack Harkins. Roger Hays, Carla 
Heil. Steve Henderaon, John Hill, 
Bruce Hobba, Charlea Hodgea, 
Andrea Holman. Howard Holmea, 
Roger Holmes, Glem Hopkina. 
Wayne Huff. Jon Irwin. Carol Jack- 
son, Steve Jackson, Chris Jamea, 
Sigroond Jazwiecki, Wayne Jen* 
nings, Richard Johnson, James 
Johnston. Harold Joiner, Mareua 
Jonea, Jeryl Jordan, Alan Kent, 
Mike Koen, John Koone, John Lam* 
mers, Kent Lawhorn. Marvin Lans- 
law, James Leiand, Billy Lester, 
Don McClendon, Tom McCormick, 
Laird McDonald. Brian McGauIey, 
Eric McKnight, Gary McMinn, Jay 
Macaulay, Wayne Mandel, Larry 
Marley, Bruce Masters, Robert May, 
John Mayet, David Messersmlth. 
Mike M<^an, Jeane MoUer, Robert 
Monroe. Chria Moore, Mike Moore, 
Mike Morris, Woody Mosby, John 
Hyatt, Ronny Nims. Danny Nor* 
ria, Timothy Norton. Paul Odea. 
Don Oelfke. James Osborne, Larry 
Parr. Ralph Perkins. Bill Petrelli, 
Ray Pinkerton, Gran Porter, Randy 
Prealey, Paul Presaon, Jerry Quick. 
James Rawlinga, John Read, Bill 
Reichardt, Skeeter Reid. Belinda 
Renteria, Herbert Reaves, David 
Reaae, Craig Robertson, Bart 
Robioett, Harold Rolette. Alan 
Rouah, John Rowland. Richard 
Ruby, Victor Ruii, Thomai Ryan, 
Patrick Sandlin, Howard Scholey, 
Steve Shaw, Herschel Sikea, Loula 
Sloan, Charlea Smith, Gary Smith, 
Steve Souter. Steve Sparks. Ed 
Talley, Patricia Templeton, Norman 
Tiodell, Roger Travis. Leiand Turner, 
George Vaughn, David Vincent, 
Glenn Waghorn, Don Walters, Ron 
Weaver. Philip Welch, Ronnie 
Whatley, Steve Whadey, Jell 
Whitaker, Dicky White, Ned White, 
Jim Williams, Edward Wilson, Gary 
Wilson, John Wilson, Bill Willis, 
Jamea Wimberley, Robert Wiltner, 
Jamea Wood, Roger Zeiterllind, 
Richard Zipperly. 



American Institute 
of Architects 



American Institute of Architecture is a 
professional organization designed to 
orient students toward entering the profes- 
sional chapter after graduation. Any archi- 
tecture major is eligible for membership. 

Officers were as pictured to the right 
(back row) Chris Moore, secretary; Steve 
Souter, treasurer; (front row) Woody 
Mosby, vice president ; Bart Robinett ; pres- 
ident; Nolan Barrick, department head; 
and Ralph Spencer, guest speaker. 

AlA members took field trips to local 
architects' offices and heard well-known 
speakers at their meetings. 



40— Future 




Tau Beta Pi 



Tau Beta Pi is the national engineering honor society, 
founded in 1885 to offer appropriate recognition for 
superior scholarship and exemplary character to engineering 
students. Tau Beta Pi was one of the founding organizations 
in the Association of College Honor Societies. 

Twice annually the Texas Beta Chapter, which was es- 
tablished on the Tech Campus in 1937, elects to member- 
ship seniors from the upper one-fifth of their class and jun- 
iors from the upper one-eighth of their class. Majors eligible 
on the Tech campus are agricultural engineering, chemical 
engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, en- 
gineering physics, industrial engineering, mechanical, petro- 
leum, and textile engineering. This year 42 were elected to 
membership. 

The chapter officers were Don Davis, president; Charles 
Crisp, vice president; Ken Penrod, corresponding secretary; 
John George, recording secretary; Mike Mocek, treasurer; 



Rovert David, cataloguer; and electee trainers Clarence 
Albus and Skip Valusek. Faculty advisors were Dean Arnold 
Gully, Dr. W. 0. Portnoy, Dr. Magne Kristiansen, and Mr. 
Marvin Dvorcek. 

Pictured were (jirst tow) Don Davis, Mike Schall, Gary 
Winningham, Richard Elton, David Schrodt, Don McCul- 
lough, Richard Wideman, Hayden Griffin, Hal Young, Alan 
Abrahamson, Jim Stinson. (Second tow) John George, Steven 
Ward, John Harris, Bob Gate, Mike McMahan, William 
Sokora, Steve Werner, Russell White. (Thud tow) Ken 
Shoick, Larry Lott, Ken Penrod, Tom Marsh, Bob Coker, 
Jim Brown, Don Rauschubey, Jerry Traylor, Tony Kuehler, 
and (fourth tow) James White, William Anderson, Robert 
Walker, Joe Cannan, William Bringhurst, Freddy Baker, 
Clarence Albus, Mike Mocek, Robert Davis, James Burkes, 
Edwin Kieschnich, Alan HoUey, Stan Cone, Robert Lane, 
and Larry Young. 




tP^C%»10)pO 




SUPER 
MARKETS 



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PRICES 

COURTEOUS SERVICE I 
WIDE SELECTION 
GOLD BOND STAMPS! 









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History 







i 





I 



< 




Beth George, editor 
Linda Barton 
Sally Ann Darling 
not pictured: 
Clara Porter 
Laura McMillan 



LA VENTANA 1970 VOLUME 45 



Sheila Looney 
Elaine Saul 

co-editors 
Ray McWilliams 

art editor 




THE CAMPUS SCENE 



Darrell Thomas 
. director of photography 
Richard Mays 
Jeff Lawhon 
Bob Darby 
Mike Warren 
photography staff 



2 Law Students 

4 Graduate Students 

6 Senior Students 



STAFF 



Bill Dean 

director 
Jean Finley 

business manager 
Janice Aldridge 

secretary 
Taylor Publishing Company 

printers 



Beth George 

editor 
Linda Barton 
Sally Ann Darling 
Laura McMillan 
Clara Porter 

staff 



MORE THAN 11,000 CIRCULATION 



A special thanks goes to the Senior View staff 
for hours of alphabetizing, typing, and indexing, 
and to Look magazine for use of its format. 
Beth George 



Senior View — 1 



Law School: 



The First Graduates 



i 



J. PERRY ABBOTT, Lubbock 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta 
CHARLES W. ADAMS, Lubbock 

Doctor of Jurisprudence: Phi Alpha Delta 
PHIL L. ADAMS, Gainesville 

Second Year Law; Delta Theta Phi 
LEOTA HEIL ALEXANDER. Lubbock 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Texas Tech Law Review 
ROBERT W. BAKER, Fort Stockton 

First Ye«r Law; Phi Alpha Delta 



THOMAS A. BANKHEAD, JR., San Diego, 
California 

First Year Law 
RALPH E. BELTER, Wichita Falls 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta; Student 

Bar Association Election Committee 
JOAN BLANSCET, Midland 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Student Bar Association 
MARY BOBBITT, Lubbock 

Second Year Law 
JAMES A. BOBO, Fort Worth 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta; Associate 

Justice of Judicial Council 



J. DAVID BOURLAND, Fort Worth 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Student Bar Association 

President; Who's Who in American Colleges and 

Universities; Phi Alpha Delta 
MARWIN B. BRAKESBILL, Ralls 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Texas Tech Lau/ Review 
PAT CAMPBELL, Uvelland 

Second Year Law; Delta Theta Phi 
BUFORD A. CATES, Dallas 

Second Year Law; Delta Theta Phi 
J. EDGAR CRAIGHEAD, Channing 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta; Student 

Bar Association Election Committee Chairman; Law 

Bachelors 



MARTIN C. CUDE, JR., Dallas 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Student Bar Association Vice- 
President; Phi Alpha Delta; House of Delegates; 
Honor Code Committee Chairman 

MIKE DE GEURIN, Austin 
First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 

DAN V. DENT, Houston 

Second Year Law; Delta Theta Phi Bailiff 

DONALD DEE DOZIER, Lubbock 
First Year Law; Law Bachelors 

JANE L. EDMISTON, Weatherford 
First Year Law 



ERNEST R FINNEY, JR., Amarillo 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Texas Tech Law Review: 

Phi Alpha Delta; Student Bar Association; House of 

Delegates 
MICHAEL FOSTEL, Irving 

Doctor of Jurisprudence: President of Student Bar 

Association; Phi Alpha Delta; Delta Tau Delta 
A. GENE GAINES, Lubbock 

Second Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 
FRED L. GLOVER, Aledo 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta; Law 

Bachelors 
AARON GOLDBERG, San Angela 

Second Year Law 



TERRY HAGIN, Garland 

Second Year Law; Law Bachelors 
CLAUDE W. HARLAND, Lubbock 

Second Year Law; Delta Theta Phi; Student Bat 

Association Awards Committee Chairman 
TROY C. HURLEY, Smyer 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta 
JOHN L. HUTCHINSON. Spearmtn 

First Year Law 
RUTH KIR BY, Littlefirld 

Doctor nl Jurisprudence: Texas Tech Law Review 

Articles Editor 




I 
I 

i 



I 



I 



2 — Senior View 



" 



H 




The newly-erected law school building 
opened its doors to the Tech campus during 
the spring of 1970. 



t 




CHARLES ELLIOTT KNOTT, McKinney 

First Year Law; Law Bachelors 
JERRY M. KOLANDER, Amarillo 

Second Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 
PHIL LAM, Wichita Falls 

Second Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 
MARK W. LANEY, Hale Center 

First Year Law; Delta Theta Phi 

RANDELL W. LIVINGSTON, JR., Chicago, 
Illinois 
First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 



MICHAEL LADELL LOYD, Petersburg 
First Year Law; Student Bar Association 

WILLIAM BRUCE MAGNESS, Lubbock 

Second Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta; Dictum Editor- 

in.Chief; Student Bar Association Public Relations 

Committee Chairman 
C. GERARD MILLER, JR., Corpus Christi 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Delta Theta Phi; Law 

Bachelors 
MICHAEL R. MILLER, Plainview 

Second Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 
JAMES T. MULLIN, JR., Turkey 

First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta; Pi Kappa Alpha; 

House of Delegates 

ALAN L. MURRAY, Dallas 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta President; 

Tech Supreme Court Chief Justice; Interfratemity 

Council President; Delta Tau Delta Vice-President; 

Texas Tech Law Review; Dean's List 
LYN McCLELLAN, Gruver 

First Year Law; Dean's List; Men's Number Nine 

President; Saddle Tramps Vice-President; Student Bar 

Association; Phi Alpha Delta 
DAN R. McNERY, Rancho Cordova, California 

Second Year Law; Delta Theta Phi; House of 

Delegates 

W. SAM OATMAN, Llano 

First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta; House of Delegates 
RICHARD L. PALMER, Lubbock 

First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta; Law Bachelors 

RANDY REESE, Abilene 
First Year Law; Delta Theta Phi 

JOHN L. SEYMOUR, Lubbock 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta 
WILLIAM G. SHAW, Brownwood 

Doaor of Jurisprudence; Texas Tech Law Review; 

Moot Court Team; Student Senate; Delta Theta Phi 
LEON STAVLO, Sunray 

First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta; Law Bachelors 
PAUL L. SMITH, Plainview 

First Year Law; Delta Theta Phi 



Senior View — 3 



BEN P. STEPHENSON, Baird 

First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta; Student Bat 
Association; Law Bachelors 

PRESTON STEVENS, ChiUress 

Doaor of Jurisprudence; Phi Alpha Delta 
JOHN STEWART, Irving 

First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta; Law Bachelors 
MACON STROTHER, Cisco 

Second Year Law; Delta Theta Phi 
WILUAM C. TERRY, Bonham 

Doctor of Jurisprudence 



WALTER MOLLIS WEBB, JR., Big Spring 

First Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 

JOHN A. WEBER, El Paso 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Texas Tech Law 
Business Manager; Moot Court; Phi Alpha 
Student Bar Association 

WILLIAM Z. WEEMS, Lubbock 
Second Year Law; Phi Alpha Delta 

JEFFREY WENTWORTH, San Antonio 

Second Year Law; Student Bar Association Vice- 
President; House of Delegates President; Student- 
Faculty Committee Chairman; Student Bar Association 
Attorney General; Law Bachelors President; Moot 
Cfian Team; Dictum: Phi Alpha Delta 

JAMES R. WHITTINGTON, Fort Worth 

Doctor of Jurisprudence; Student Bar Association 
Treasurer; Phi Alpha Delta 



Review 
Delta: 



DON E. WILLIAMS, Lubbock 
First Year Law 





£»ij 



i 




Graduate School: 

A Further Step 






I 



SULIMAN F. ALISSA, Buraida, Saudi Arabia 

Master of Science in Agricultural Economics 
WILLIAM R. BERTRAND, Floydada 

Master of Science in Agricultural Education 
DONA CASEY, Shallowater 

Doctor of Education in Special Education 
DON C. COX, Midland 

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
C. RINN CLEAVELIN, Oklahoma City, 
Oilihoma 

Doctor of Philosophy in Physics; NASA Fellowship 



ELIZABETH CRAVEN, Pennington 
Master of Science in Clothing and Textiles 

STEVE AUSTIN DENNIS, GmI 

Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering; Student 
Branch of the American Society of Agricufturat 
Engineering; Alpha Epsilon; Tau Beta Pi; Alpha 
Zeta; ROTC Cadet Captain; Aggie of the Year; 
Student Branch Award of the ASAE 

PHILLIP DEE DETTLE, Stratford 

Master of Business Administration in Finance; Delta 
Tau Delta; Finance Association 

ROBERT B. DOYLE, Cave City, Kentucky 
Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology 

WILUAM C. DOYLE, EJinburg 

Master of Arts in Guidance and Counseling 

KAY FIELDS, Claude 

Master of Education in Guidance tod Coutueling 
STEVE HAINES, Dallas 

Master of Business Administration in Marketing; 

Alpha Delta Sigma; Phi Kappa Psi; Dean's List 
WILLIAM G. HARPER, Plainview 

Master of Aits in Sociology 
KARL IRVIN, Merkel 

Master of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Beta Alpha Psi; Accounting Society; Society for the 

Advancement of Management; Men's Residence Council 
VERN JOHNSON, Omaha, Nebraska 

Master of Business Administration in Marketing and 

Advertising 




I 



4 — Senior View 




BELVA L, JONES, Westlake, Louisiana 

Master of Science in Management 
ELLEN M. LATTA, Groom 

Master of Science in Home Economics 
MANUEL V. LAZARO, Manila, Philippines 

Doctor of Business Administration; Graduate Students 

Society 

MAX McCULLOCH, Coleman 

Doctor of Education; Phi Delta Kappa 
MARY L. MIZE, Beaumont 

Master of Science in Home Economics 



ROBERT A. OLSON, JR., Minneapolis, 
Minnesota 

Master of Science in Park Administration 
LESTER L. PAYNE, Del Rio 

Master of Science in Counseling; Dean's Honor List 
MARY ANN PAYNE, Lubbock 

Master of Science in Education 
LORENZO V. PENAFIEL, Manila, Philippines 

Doctor of Business Administration; Beta Gamma 

Sigma; Graduate Students Society 
SAM H. PETERSON, Dallas 

Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering 



BETTY PINKERTON, Tyler 

Master of Science in Guidance and Counseling 
SUPORN PREMSRIRAT, Bangkok, Thailand 

Master of Business Administration 
TERESITA PREMSRIRAT, Manila, Philippines 

Master of Business Administration; International 

Students Organization 
CAROLYN KATHLEEN RAMAGE, Spade 

Master of Music; Dean't Honor List 
DONALD W. ROBERTS, Lubbock 

Master of Science in Civil Engineering 



ALLAN JARRELL SOFFAR, Houston 

Doctor of Philosophy; Student Senate; Phi Alpha 

Theta; Omicron Delta Kappa; D. D. Tompkins 

Historical Association 
SUSAN TRAYLOR, Lubbock 

Master of Education 
LYNETTE WESTERFIELD, Crawford 

Master of Science in Home Economics 
DENNIS L. WOOLAM, O'Connell 

Master of Science in Psychology; Alpha Kappa Psi; 

Phi Kappa Phi; Beta Gamma Sigma 
JIMMY DON YEAGER, Stephenville 

Master of Quantitative Management; Pi Kappi 

Alpha 




The completed first phase of the Amon G. Carter Memorial Plaza stances at the Broadway entrance to the campus. 



Senior View — 5 



Seniors: 



TTU's First Graduates 



i 



JANICE AARON, Ultlefield 
Bachelor of Arts in English 

LINDA F. ABBOTT, Lockney 

Bachelors of Science in Clothing and Textiles and 
Home Economics Education; American Home 
Economics Association; Secondary Education As- 
sociation; Campus Girl Scouts 

VICKI ABBOTT. Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List; Association of Childhood Education; Student 
Education Association; Advisory Council 

DAVID W. ABBOTT. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts; Sociology Club; Sigma Delta Pi 

ALAN DEAN ABE, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Park 
Administration and Horticulture Club, President; 
Dean's List; Carpenter Hall Association 

ARNOLD PHILLIP ACKER, Dimmitt 

Bachelor of Science in C-vil Engineering; Tau Beta 
Pi; American Society of Civil Engineers 

PAMELA GAY ADAMS, Hobbs, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Alpha 
Chi Omega ; Association of Child Education 

ROBERT T. ADAMS, Lake Jackson 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Manaeement 

ROBERT ADCOCK, Oiiessa 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics 

JOEL ADKINS. Dalhari 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanized Agriculture; 
American Soc-ety of Agricultural Engineers; Mechan- 
ized Agriculture Club 

TANIA DAY ANDRASKO, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Gamma Phi 
Beta. Rush Chairman 

MARGARET AHO, El Paw 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Alpha Lambdl Delta; 
Phi Kappa Phi 

MARELIN AINSWORTH, Luhhock 

Bachelor of Arts in English 

CLARENCE JOHN ALBUS, JR., Pep 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Tau 

Beta Pi; Phi Kappa Phi; American Institute of 

Chemical Engineers 
RON ALEXANDER, UvalJe 

Bachelor of Science in Physics; Dean's List 

SCOTT ALEXANDER, Dallas 
Bachelor of Bus ness Administration in Banking 

STEVEN ALEXANDER. Waco 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Student Action 
Organization; Ideas and Issues Committee 

MICHAEL ALLEN, Bonier City. Louisiana 
Bachelor of Science in Economics; Sigma Chi 

JUDITH EVELYN ALLIS, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; American 
Home Economics Association 

LEANNA ALLEN, Vemon 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

SHARON ALLEY. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Dean's 
List 

CAROLYN ALLISON, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles 

JUDY ALLRED. Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Art; Chitwood AWS Repre- 
sentative; Advisory Council; Union Dance Committee; 
National Art Education Association 

DICKI ALSTON. Utingston 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Alpha 
Chi Omega; Sociology Club; Student Education As- 
sociation; Sigma Alpha Eta; Clement Legislator; Young 
Republicans 

ARMANDO AMARO. O'Donnell 
Bachelor of Business Administration 

PEGGY ANN AMERMAN. Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Chi Omega; Neiman- 
Marcus Fashion Board; Stangel Legislator 

CHESTER CARL ANDERSON. Abilene 
Bachelor of Arts, PreMed 

JULIE ANDERSON, Oiiessa 

Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutrition; American 
Home Economics Association; Lubbock Dietetic 
Association 

UNDA E. ANDERSON. Hermleigh 
Bachelor of Science in Home and Family Life 

MARY ALICE ANDERSON. EJen 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Mortar Board; Junior Council, Phi Upsilon Omicron; 
Drane Hall President; American Home Economics As- 
sociation; Women's Residence Council; AtlCollege 
Recognition Service 




I 



6 — Senior Viev) 



H 



I 



I 




CATHY JEAN ANDERSON, Breckenridge 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Angel Flight: 
Administrative Officer; Air Force ROTC Sweetheart: 
Dean's List 

MAX L. ANDERSON, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic 

Management; Delta Nu Alpha; Dean's List 
PAUL W. ANDERSON, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Alpha Phi Omega; 

Baptist Student Union; Interreligious Council; KTXT- 

FM 
VICKI ANDERSON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 

List 

CAROLINE ANDREWS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 

DEBBIE ANDREWS, Wichita Falls 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

JUDY ANDREWS, Brownwood 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business 
Education; Phi Gamma Nu; National Collegiate As- 
sociation of Secretaries; Student Education Association 

SUSAN KAY ANTHONY, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation ; Alpha Lambda Delta ; Delta Delta Delta ; 
Beta Gamma Sitjma; Pi Omega Pi; National Collegiate 
Association of Secretaries 

CYNTHIA APPEL, Ozona 

Bachelor of Science m Geology; Dean's List; Sigma 
Gamma Epsilon 

JOHN THOMAS ARMSTRONG, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Alpha Epsilon Delta; 
Pre-Med Society. President; Dean's List; Beta Beta 
Beta 

RANDY ARMSTRONG, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Kappa Kappa Psi; 

Sigma Delta Chi 
STEPHEN FRED ARMSTRONG, Pecos 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Texas Tech Rodeo Club; Alpha Delta Sigma 
GREGORY FLOYD ARTHUR, Comoe 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Civil Engineering 

PAMELA ARTHUR, Conroe 

Bachelors of Science in Home Economics Education 
and Art; American Home Economics Association; 
Dean's List 
DEIDRA L. ASH, Abilene 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cit'on; Phi Gamma Nu; Outing Club 

GARY ASHCRAFT, Sherman 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management; Alpha Kappa Psi 
LINDA AUSTIN, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Alpha 

Ch= Omeea, Corresponding Secretary 
RONNIE AUSTIN, Odessa 

Bachelor of Fme Arts in Advertising Art 
RON AWTREY, Friona 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics: Rodeo 

Association; Agricultural Economics Club 
SANDRA L. AWTREY, Friona 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Gamma 

Phi Beta; Sigma Tau Delta 
DANIEL AYLOR, Corpus Chrisli 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; Baptist 

Student Union, Chairman; American Society of Civil 

Engineers 

BETTY BACON, Roswell, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Arts in English 

RONALD BAHNMILLER, El Paso 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising: 
Alpha Tau Omega; Alpha Delta Sigma 

ARLENE BAILEY, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business 
Education; Delta Delta Delta 

GEORGE BAILEY, Medina 
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

HEDY A. BAILEY, Vancouver, Washington 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma; Gamma Alpha Chi; Union Committee; 
Freshman Legislator; La Venlana Staff; American 
Home Economics Association 

ROBERT F. BAILEY, Slaton 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

CLAYTON D. BAIRD, JR., Houston 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 

DAVID MAXIM BAKER, Childress 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Texas 
Student Education Association. President; Phi Alpha 
Theta; All-College Recognition Service: Dean's List 

JOHN L, BAKER, Roswell, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

PATRICIA ANN BALL, Houston 

Bachelor of Music in Organ; Mu Phi Epsilon, Cot- 
responding Secretary and Magazine Chairman 

BARRY BALZEN, Knippa 
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

VIRGIL R. BARBER, Hereford 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Saddle 
Tramps; Park Administration and Horticulture Club, 
Vice-President; Union Committee; Dean's List 

STEVEN S. BARHAM, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Pre-Med Club 

VIRGINIA BARKLEY, Huntington Beach, 

California 
Bachelor of Arts in English 



Senior View — 7 



VICKI BARLOW, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Delta 
Delta Delta; American Home Economics Association 

BILLY BARNES, Lubbock 

Bachetor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

JOHN ALLEN BARNETTE. Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; Sigma Alpha 
Epsiion, Treasurer; Dean's List; American Society of 
Civil Engineers 

CARL A. BARRICK, Lovelock, NevaJa 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Society 
of Petroleum Engineers of AIME 

NOEL BARRICK. Sherman 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architecture 

THOMAS G. BARTLETT, MfMand 

Bachelor of Busmess Administration in Administrative 
Management; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 

ANN BARTON, Cofton Center 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Major- 
Minor Club; Delta Psi Kappa; Association of Women 
Students; Beta Beta Beta 

GERALD BARTON, Lubboci 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
MARILYN BARTON, Abernathy 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Alpha Lambda Delta; 

Dean's List 
TERRY BARTON, Abernathy 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 

American Association of Agricultural Engineers 
THOMAS EVAN BARTON, Baird 

Bnchclor of Business Administration in Marketing 
ROSEMARIE C. BASALDUA. Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Science in Home and Family Life; 

Association of Childhood Education; Spanish Club; 

American Home Economics Association 
CAROLIA BASS, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Sc ence in Home Economics Education; 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; American Home Economics 

Association 
GINGER BATES, Nacogdoches 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Alpha 

Chi Omega; American Home Economics Association; 

Fash'on Board; Fashion Fair Mam'selle 
MARION KAY BATEY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Tau Beta Sigma; Tech 

Dames; Tech Band 
THOMAS O. BATEY, JR., Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; ROTC 

Drill Team Sabres 
THOMAS A. BATH, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
ROBERT N. BATSON. Irving 

Bachelor of Architecture; Phi Eta Sigma; Tau Sigma 

Delta; Phi Kappa Phi; Dean's List; American 

Institute of Architects 
BOB BAYLESS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Minauement; Freshman Council; Alpha Kappa Psi; 

Phi Kappa Psi. Secretary. Vice-President; Sigma Iota 

Epsiion; Dean's List 
BARBARA BAYLIS. Edinburg 

B.ichelor of Science in Home Economics 

SHEILA BEADLE, Lubhoct 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

LINDA ELLEN BEADLES, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Association of Home Economics; Dean's 

L'« 
HUGH BEALL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Physics 

JERRY WELDON BEASLEY, Memphis 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Saddle Tramps; Dean'i 
List 

JOE BEATY, Henrietta 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Kap- 
pa Alpha; Tech Finance Association; Dean's List 

PAMELA BEAVER, Fluvanna 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Ameri- 
can Association of Home Economics; Dean's List 

JACK TILTON BEAVERS, Memphis 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Kappi 
Mu Epsiion; Phi Theta Kappa; American Institute 
of Chemical Engineers 

PEGGY BECKNAL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; Alpha Lambda 

Delta; Kappa Mu Epsiion. Secretary; Dean's List 
SUE BEDNARCZUK, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Dean's List 

JEANNETTE BEDNARZ, Slaion 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 

Administration; Phi Gamma Nu; National Collegiate 

Association for Secretaries 
CYNTHIA BEENE, Hereford 

Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutrition; Phi 

Upsilon Omicron 
DENNIS BURL BELEW, Fluvanna 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 
STEVE BELT, Lockney 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Alpha Tau Omega; 

Circle K; Union Special Events Committee; Rodeo 

Association; PteMed Society 

LEON C. BENDER, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

FREDERCK OWEN BENN, SR., Abernalhy 
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 




4 



\ 



I 



» 



S—SenioT View 



I 




Italian 



Future 



KENNETH P. BENNETT, Gail 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 
Farmers of America. President; Aggie Council; Rodeo 

Association 

DIANE M. BENTLEY, Burkburnett 

Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutrition 
MICHAEL RANDY BENTON, Midland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 

Finance Association 
SUZANNE BENTON, Pampa 

Bachelor of Music in Voice; Mu Phi Epsilon; Music 

Theatre; Choir 

JON P. BERNIER, Montgomery, Alabama 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Scabbard and Blade; 
Army ROTC 

RONALD p. BERTONE, Atlantic Highlands, 

New jersey 

Bachelor of Architecture; Tau Sigma Delta; National 
Architecture Honor Society; American Institute of 
Architects; Dean's List; Second Place Feathetlite 
Competition 

MARY RUTH BIGHAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising; Phi UpS'Ion 
Omicron; Gamma Alpha Chi; American Home 
Economics Association 

LORNA DIANE BINFORD, Gainesville 

Bachelor of Arts in English 

MELISSA ANNE BLACK, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Theatre 
BOPBY RAE BLAYLOCK, Robert Lee 

Bachelor of Science in Range Management; American 

Society of Range Management; Tech Range and 

Wildlife Management 
NORMA ELEANOR BIGGER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
JIM BILLINGS, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administratior 

Manaccment 
BRUCE BILLINGSLEY, Parwell 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personne 

Management 

MADALYN BINGER, WakepeU, Nebraska 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Gamma 

Delta; Fashion Fair 
GLENN GRAVES BINGHAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Society 

of Petroleum Engineers of AIME 
TANYA D. BIRD, Houston 

B-c'iclo'- of Arts in French; French Club; 

Club; Dean's List; Phi Nu Epsilon 
JACK BIRDWELL, Coleman 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Education; 

Farmers of America 
LOUIS L. BIRDWELL. JR., O'Donnell 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking and 

Finance: Men's Residence Council; Weymouth Hall 

Association, President; Finance Association, Treasurer; 

Tecli Rodeo Association 
DAVID BLACK, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Tech Accountine Soc'ety 
THOMAS H. BLACK, El Paso 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics; Phi Eta 

Sigma; Tech Band; Kappa Mu Epsilon; Sigma Pi 

Sigma 
CLAUDE W. BLACKWELL, Roswell, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Park 

Administration Club 

LLOYD M. BLACKWELL, Stamford 

Bachelor of Business Administration; Finance As- 
sociation 

ROBERT LAWRENCE BLAIN, Yorktown 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education- Track 
Letter 

ROBERT MICHAEL BLANK, Perryton 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Association of 

Architects 
SUZANNE BLEVINS, Tucson, Arizona 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles 
MERLE N. BLOSSER, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration 

Management; Beta Theta Pi; Society 

vancement of Management 
JIMMY T. BLOUNT, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Beta Alpha Phi 
CLAIRE HOGG BLUEMEL, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and Advertising; 

Sigma Kappa; Kappa Tau Alpha; Sigma Tau Delta; 

Alpha Lambda Delta 
GLEN BLUEMEL, El Paso 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Industrial Engineers 
MARY K. BLUNTZER, Goliad 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Student Education 

Association 
SCOTT E. BOASE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Insurance and 

Real Estate; Phi Kappa Psi 
HERSHEL RAY BOCKMAN, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration 
MYRNA RHEA BOLCH, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As 

sociation of Childhood Education; Major-Minor Clul 
FRED WAYNE BOLING, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Economics; Arnold Air Society 
BETTY A. BONNER, Dumas 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Delta 

Psi Kappa; Pi Beta Phi; Major-Minor Club 

Senior View — 9 



in Industrial 
for the Ad- 



NORMAN E. BONNER, Dumas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting: 
Delta Tau Delta; Army ROTC; Tech Accounting 

PAULA BOOK, Saa Angela 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Beta Alpha Psi 
DAVID R. BOONE, Mineral Wells 

Bachelor of Business Adounistration in Marketing 
ROBERT BOONE, Seymour 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Production; Rodeo 

Association 
SUSAN BOONE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Kappa 

Kappa Gamma. Pznhcllenic Representative; Little 

Sisters of Minerva; President's Hostess; Angel Flight; 

National Archives 
GARLAND BOOZER, JR., Shallowater 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Agri- 
cultural Econom'cs Club 
WAYNE BORCHARDT, Lometa 

Bachelor of Science in Range Management; American 

Society of Range Management; Rodeo Association 
WARREN BORDERS, Uvelland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business 

Education 
GUY E. BOROUGHS, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Accounting Society 
SUSIE BOTT, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 

and Fashion; CorpsDettes; Army ROTC. Sweetheart; 

Alpha Chi Omega, 1st Vice-President, Activities 

Chairman; Tech Mam'selle; Fashion Board; Student 

Senate 

SHARON BOTTS, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in German 
M. BETH BOURLAND, Clarendon 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Phi Upsilon Omicron, Vice-President; American Home 

Economics Association, AWS Representative; Home 

Economics Student Council, Secretary 
RICHARD BOURLAND, JR., Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance- 
Banking; Finance Association 

DON BOUSE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; American 
Society of Civil Engineers 

MICHELLE BOUTIN, Odessa 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Arts; Gamma Alpha 
Chi 







October Brings Moratorium to Tech 



i 
I 



DAVID BRUCE BOWLIN, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Phi Epsilon 
LINDA BOWLIN, Ackerly 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
ELAINE BOWMAN, Lamesa 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Town Girls; 

Association for Childhood Education; Women's Service 

Organization 
LARRY T. BOWMAN, Uvelland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Dean's List 
SANDRA LVNNE BOWNDS, Corpus Chrisli 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business 

Education; Pi Omega Pi 
CYNTHIA BOYD, Houston 

Bachelor of Arte in Speech Therapy; Pi Beta Phi, 

Spirit Chairman; Weeks Hall Advisory Council: Sigma 

Alpha Eta; Union Committee; Dean's List 
DIANNE RUTH BOYD, Winmboro 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Doak Hall, President: 

Dean's Honor List; Women's Residence Council; 

Baptist Student Union Executive Council 

MARY C. BOYD, Loremo 
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

JIMMY W. BOYD, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

JUNE BOZEMAN. Amari'lo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Alpha Chi Omega; Phi Gamma Nu; Clement Hall 
Advisory Council; Tech Accounting Society 

HUGH BRADBERRY, Wink 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
RICHARD GLENN BRADLEY. Snyder 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
DUANE L. BRADSHAW, Utbhock 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 

Architects; Dean s List 
DIANA BRANNON, B/g Spring 

Bachelor of Business Administration in AdTcrtising 
HOLMES C. BRANNON, Shamrock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 




II 



I 



I 



ofUj 



10— Senior View 



k 




MIKE BRANNON, Vernon 

Bachelor of Science 
JERRY C. BREED, Van Horn 

Bachelor of Science in Math 
RICHARD W. BREEDLOVE, Uttlefield 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Tech Accounting Society 
ERVIN BREWER, Crosbyton 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics 
CLARK W. BRIGGS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Geology; Saddle Tramps 



BILL BRINGHURST, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Tau 
Beta Pi; American Institute of Chemical Engineers 

LARRY RAY BRITTON, Center 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Dean's List 

RALPH H. BROCK, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Tech Band 

WILLIAM M. BROCK, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 

MARLA REES BROCKETT, Bronte 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 
Administration; Phi Gamma Nu; National Collegiate 
Association for Secretaries; Dean's List 

SUSAN BROGDON, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutrition; American 
Home Economics Association 

JAMES RICHARD BROKENBECK, Amarillo 
Bachelor of Arts in History 

DEBBIE BROOKE, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education 

C. RENE BROOKS, Hart 
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design; Varsity 
Cheerleader; Chi Omega; President's Hostess; Student 
Senate; American Association of Interior Designers 

ALAN DOUGLAS BROWN, Vernon 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 

BILLY GLENN BROWN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Tech Accounting Society 

DAVID BROWN, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Sigma 
Nu; Baseball; Ideas and Issues Committee 

FLOYD I. BROWN, JR., Farmers Branch 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architecture; Thompson Hall Council, 'Vice-Presi- 
dent; Men's Residence Council; Dean's List; Screamers- 
Student-Faculty Relations Board 

GARY DON BROWN, Lamesa 
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 

JEFFREY J. BROWN, Portales, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architects 



pip 




Opponents of the 'Vietnam war held a ■watch service in Memorial Circle while supporters 
of U.S. policy expressed themselves in other ways. 



Senior View — 11 



LINDA BRO>XTsj, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Ganuna Alpha 

Chi; National Art Education Association 
NANCY BROWN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles 
RANDY BROWN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers 
SUSAN L. BROWN, Mountain Home Air Force 
Base, Idaho 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Women's 

Service Organization 

ERNEES BROWNFIELD, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Pathology; 
Sigma Alpha Eta 

JANE BRYANT, Jjorenzo 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
SHERRI BRYANT, Dalharl 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Speech and Hearing Pathology; 

Sigma Alpha Eta; Rodeo Association 
JOHN W. BUCHANAN, JR., Dumas 

Bachelor of Science in Geology 
JAMES J. BUCK, JR., Winter Park, Florida 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration 
NINA BUDDINGTON. El Paso 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Kappa Alpha 

Theti; Block and Bridle 



JUDY BUESCHER, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Therapy; Sigma Alpha 

Eta; Dean's List 
MARIE LOIS BUFKIN, Conroe 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Dean's 

List: American Home Economics Association 
ROBERT MICHAEL BUIE, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Pre-Med Club; 

Campus Advance; Wells Hall Association 
DENNY B. BULLARD, Estancia, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Pi 

Epsilon Tau; Society of Petroleum Engineers 
TERRY BUMPASS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics and Studio Art 




M 







CAROL BURBANK, Wichita Palls 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Young Republicans 

JOHN R. BURCH. Dickinson 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics; 
Men s Residence Council. Secretary-Treasurer; Carpen- 
ter Hall Association. Treasurer; Lutheran Student 
Movement 

CHARLOTTE E. BURDICK, Ventura, California 
Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Ameri- 
can Home Economics Association 

CHARLES S. BURKS, Knott 
Bachelor of Science in Sociology 

JAMES M. BURLESON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
WILLIAM GUY BURNETT, San Angela 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; American 
Society of Civil Engineers; Men's Residence Council; 
Bledsoe Hall Association, Treasurer; Alpha Alpha, 
President 

BARBARA BURNS, Eden 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Stu- 
dent Education Association 
DAN B. BURROWS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Architecture 
RICHARD M. BURTON, Colorado Springs, 
Colorado 

Bachelor of Science in Biology; Beta Beta Beta 
MICHAEL S. BUSHELL, Ubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Physics; Sigma Pi Sigma 
GARY E. BUSHOVER, Austin 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Ail 

Force ROTC; Army ROTC; Carpenter Hall As 

soctation, Secretary; Dean's List 
SAMUEL E. BUTLER, Carrizo Springs 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
WALLACE BYERS, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking; Alpha 

Phi Omega; Young Republicans 
RUSSELL C. BYINGTON, Fori Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Beta 

Gamma Sigma 
JAMES E. BYRNE, JR., Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in History: Kappa Alpha Order, 

Recording Secretary; Interfratcmity Council; Pte-Law 

Society; Pre-Med Society; Dean's List 
GLENDA JOYCE CADDEL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Music Education 
STEPHANIE SUE CAGLE, Lawton, Oklahoma 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Delta 

Delta Delta; Ld VtnUmt; Association of Childhood 

Education; Dean's List 
JOHN CALLAHAN, Marlin 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 

CARYN ANN CAMERON, Pampa 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising; Young Re- 
publicans; Home Economics Association; Fashion 

COLLINS CAMP, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
Sigina Nu; American Marketing Association; MciTi 
Residence Council; Murdough Hall Association 



( 



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12— Senior View 



I 




■.■.to 



(!• 




MARSHALL LLOYD CAMP, Spur 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Society for the Advancement of 

Management 

SANDRA KAYE CAMPBELL, Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
DANIEL RAY CANNON, Hale Center 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy 
JANICE ELAINE CANNON, Rule 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

JOE R. CANNON. Rule 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers. Vice-President; 
Tau Beta Pi; Phi Kappa Phi 

YOLANDA CARELOCK, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Interior Design; American 
Institute of Interior Designers 

MACKOLENE CARGILL, Carlsbad, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Science in Microbiology 

SUSAN CARMICHAEL, Corsicana 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association; Dean's List 

DON R. CARROLL, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

SANDRA JEAN CARSON, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry; Kappa Mu Epsilon; 
American Chemical Society; Alpha Lambda E>elta 

GAIL CARTER, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutrition; Phi 
Upsilon Omicron, President, Project Chairman; 
American Home Economics Association, Executive 
Secretary; West Hall Advisory Council; Faculty 
Evaluation Committee of Student Senate; Home 
Economist of the Year; American Dietetic Association 
Scholarship; Union Hospitality Committee, Secretary; 
Leadership Training Board 

MARIELLEN CARTER, Port Arthur 

Bachelor of Arts in Home and Family Life; Chi 
Omega; Alpha Lambda Delta; American Home 
Economics Association; International Interest Commit- 
tee; Dean's List; Wall Legislator, Vice-President 

MIKE CARTER, Floydada 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Marching Band; Concert Band 

RANDAL E. CARTER, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management; 
Society for the Advancement of Management 

TOM CARTER, Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
Saddle Tramps; American Marketing Association, 
President; Sneed Wing Advisor 



Residence 
Treasurer; 



Personnel 



in Business 

Pi; National 

Panhellenic, 



Mesi 



EMILY L. CARVER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
LUCY CASBEER, Umpasas 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Women's 

Council, Vice-President; Sigma Tau Delta, 

Association of Women Students 
JERRY CASS, Friona 

Bachelor of Business Adroinistration in 

Management; Society for the Advancement of Manage 

ment; Dean's List 
SUE CASTLEBERRY, Friona 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
BARBARA CATES, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
DOUG CAVINESS, Carlsbad, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

American Marketing Association; Dean's List 
KAREN CHAMBLEE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration 

Education; Alpha Delta Pi; Pi Omega 

Collegiate Association of Secretaries; 

Treasurer 
MICHAEL A. CHAMBLEE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Architecture 

CHRISTINE M. CHAPMAN, Washington, D. C. 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Theta Sigma Phi, 
President; l^ Venlana, Freshman View Editor, 
Mademoiselle Editor; CorpsDettes; AWS Representative; 
University Daily,- Army ROTC Sweetheart; Gamma 
Alpha Chi, Reporter; Scabbard and Blade Sweetheart; 
Gamma Phi Beta. Rush Chairman; Advisory Council; 
Dean's List; Athletic Recruiter; International Hostess 
DAVID L. CHAPMAN, Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; Phi Eta Sigma- 
Dean's List 

ERIC CHASE, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
DAVID M. CHASTAIN, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
JON L9WELL CHEEK, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Zoology 
ERNEST CHESSHIR, Morton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 
WESLEY W. CHING, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Bachelor of Scrence in Civil Engineering; American 

Society of Chem'cal Engineers 
MARILYN CHITWOOD, Idalou 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Dean's 

List; Student Education Association; National Council 

of Teachers of English 
DAVID L. CHRISTIAN, Clopis, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 

Architects 

KATHLEEN M. CLAPS, Kettering, Ohio 

Bachelor of Science in Range Management; Sigma 
Kappa 

CHARLES CLARK, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Real Estate 
and Insurance 

CYNTHIA CLARK, Carrizo Springs 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising; Chi Omega 
Social Chairman; Panhellenic. Rush Advisor; Student 
Senate Committee; Legislator; American Home 
hconomics Association; Fashion Board Member 




Senior View — 73 




14 — Senior View 



LINDA CLAYTON, Amhersf 

Bachelor bf Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List. Association of Childhood Education, President 

ANGELLA JOYCE CLEMENT, Carrollton 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Alpha Phi; Coips- 
Dettes; Military Ball Queen; Little Sigma; Scabbard 
and Blade Sweetheart; Playmate Finalist; Student 
Senate; Phi Kappa Phi; Beta Beta Beta; Tech Band; 
Homecoming Queen Nominee; Miss Mademoiselle 

JERI EARLENE CLEMENTS, Andrews 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology: Dean's List; Alpha 
Epsilon Delta, Secretary; Pre-Medical Society, Secre- 
tary 

JAMES C. CLEMMER, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

WILLIAM STERLING CLEMMONS, Waco 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Tech Rodeo As- 
sociation; Sabre Flight Drill Team 

RONALD H. CLIFT, Childress 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Sigma 
Nu; Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; 
Tech Band 

JOHN R. CLIFTON, Fritch 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Tech Accounting Society 

KATHRYN JANE CLINTON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Interior Design; Horticulture 
Festival Princess; Pi Beta Phi; Dean's List; Home- 
coming Queen Nominee; American Institute of In- 
terior Designers 

DOYLE GENE CLOSE, Vernon 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Student 
Educat'on Association; Dean's List 

PATRICK R. CLOSE, Carrizo Springs 

Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management; Alpha 
Zeta; American Society of Ranee Management 

WINSTON DWIGHT CLOWER, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club; 
Tech Rodeo Association 

BARBARA COCANOUGHER, Idalou 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Natonal Collegiate Association of Secretaries; 
Business Education Association 

ANN CODY, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Interior Design 

VICKI COFER, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Texas 
State Teachers Association; Association of . Child- 
hood Education; Phi Nu Epsilon 

ROBERT B. COKER, Spring Lake 

Bachelor of , Science in Agricultural Engineering; 
Alpha Tau Omega; American Society of Agricultural 
Engineers; Alnha Epsilon; Army ROTC; Dean's List 

SUE KATHRYN COLE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising; American Home 
Economics Assoc-at-on; Young Reoublicans; Association 
of Women Students; Fashion Board 

DOREFN E. COLEMAN. Arvada, Colorado 
Bachelor of Scence in Education 

JAMES KEITH COLEMAN, Monahans 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management 

JANICE COLEMAN, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List; Association of Childhood Education 

JAMES THOMAS COLLINS. San An^elo 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 

PATRICIA MARIE COLLYER, Fort Worth 
Bachelor of Arts in Engl-sh; Sigma Delta Pi 

CAROLYN N. CONARD. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Educatioa; Major- 
Minor Club; Association of Childhood Education; 
Student Education Association 

CATHIE J. CONE, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

GINGER CONE, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Student Edu- 
cat'on Associat'on; National Art Education Association 

JOHN CONLIN. San Antonio 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Arnold Air Society 

JOHN W. CONNER. Seymour 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Agronomy; American Society 
of Agronomy; Alpha Zeta; Scabbard and Blade; Ameri- 
can Society of Agricultural Engineers; I!>can's List 

MARGARET ANN CONRAD. Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Alpha 
Phi; Student Education Association; Dean's List; 
Recognition Serv-ce 

LYNN COOKSEY. Hartley 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Dean's List; American Home Economics Association; 
Legislator 

GEORGE COOLEY. Alpine 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architects; ROTC 

CYNTHIA COON. Megargel 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education ; 
Phi Upfilon Omicron; AflieficAn Home Economics 
AssM'ation; Student Education Association 

GEORGE B. COOPER. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

JANA K. COOPER, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Baptist Student 
Union, Executive Council; Legislator; Weeks Hall 
Association. Secretary 

JENNIFER COOPER, Denmark, fowa 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association 

MICHAEL DENNIS COPPEDGE. Hobbs, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Archilectutt; Amcricin Inttitute of 

Architects 

MICHAEL K. CORBELL, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Educatioa 



I 



!l 



II 



¥ 



' 



I 



DAVID PAUL CORLEY, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Society for the 

Advancement of Management; POETS 
JANE D. CORNELISON, San Angelo 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Zeta 

Tau Alpha; Little Sisters of Minerva; Sigma Alpha 

Epsilon 
DAVID COWAN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Tech Accounting Society; Beta Alpha Psi 
JUDY MARGARET COWELL, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Rodeo 

Association; Association of Childhood Education; 

Young Republ'cans 
SUSAN COWEN, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Education; National Art 

Education Association; Dean's List 
DAVID LEE COX, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Chem'stry 
DWAYNE M. COX, MarUn 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

Sigma Nu Fraternity 
GALE ANN COX, Temple 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
JOHNNY MILTON COX, Mitkiff 

Bachelor of Science in Economics 

JAMES EUGENE CRANDELL, JR., Dallas 

Bachelor of Architecture; Tau Sigma Delta; Dean's 

List 

CHARLOTTE E. CRAVEN, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 

Administration 
JOSEPH V. CRAWFORD, Brownfield 

Bachelor of Business Adm-'nistration in Personnel 

Management; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Pre-Law Society, 

Vice-President; Dean's List 
MARILYNN CRAWLEY, Lamesa 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Chi 

Omega; Mortar Board; President's Hostess; Delta 

Psi Kappa; Tau Beta Sisma 
CHARLES HAYLE CREAMER, Kerrville 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics 
POLYEEN ALICE CRESS, Pueblo, Colorado 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish 

BARRY C. CRIBBS, Albany 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Production; Rodeo 
Assocation 

BRENDA GAY CROCKER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
CAROLYN KAY CROSS, Brownwood 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accountine 
RICHARD CHARLES CROW, Baird 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club 

Correspondmg Secretary 
JAN CRUDGINGTON, Claude 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education- 

Omega; Mortar Board; Sigma Tau Delta ' 
SANDRA J. CRUMP, Ralls 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development 

Fatnily Relations; American Home Economics 

sociation 

DWIGHT CUMMINGS, Floydada 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 
Societ"""^'' Electronics Engineers; Arnold Air 

SHIRLEY CUMMINS, Dumas 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Women's Service 
Organization; Psi Chi 

TRAVIS CUMMINS, Dumas 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Saddle 
I ramps -Treasurer; Institute of Electrical and Elec- 
tronics Engineers 

CONNIE CUMPTON, Whiteface 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
PAULA CUNBIE, Snyder 

Teac'hts' t^S^ '" ^""'"'"^ ^''"""-= National 
ALTON PApICK CUNNINGHAM, Amarillo 

Rnd,n A Bl'si^ss AdministraUon in Marketing; 
A^rPI A rtTm,",'.,A":T,"" Marketing Association 
ANGELA CUNNINGHAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art; Tech Union 

r«AB?,cV'^r.r,l?"'«"' '^«'="'"' Chairaan ■ 

CHARLIE CUNNINGHAM, Putnam 

At"*!-'" xi ,B"?''n«s Administration in Marketing- 
American Marketing Association '»"iicung, 

PENNY CUNNINGHAM, Amarillo 

•rau''Afpha°' ^"'"" '" El^^'n'ary Education; Zeta 

DWIGHT H. CURRIE, Happy 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science 
JORJA CURRIE, Tulia 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 
GWEN CURRY, San Angelo 

Bachelor of Arts in Speech; Sigma Tau Delta- P 

toi^"ctpert,°«^/1: """ '""'^''""°° "-'^ 

D^Ua'Thet"/ ^'"" '" ^S""""" Education; Phi 
DAVID PARK, Springtown 

o^f^CivlrEngin^rT" '" ^"«"'«""8: ^^""n Society 



Chi 



and 
As- 




J. 



Senior View — 15 



j 



WAYNE EVAN DAUGHERTY, Miami 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
GLENN H. DAUGHTRY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic Man- 
agement 
JERRY DAUTERIVE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics; 

Dean's List; All-CoIIcge Recognition Service 
MITCHELL DAVENPORT, Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
MARILYN DAVIES, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; Freshman Council; 

Gates Hall Legislator: Dean's List; Angel Flight, 

Commander and Drill Instructor; Ait Force ROTC 

Sweetheart 

AL T. DAVIS, SeagoviUe 
Bachelor of Science in History 

CHARLES G. DAVIS, JR., San Antonio 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 

CYNTHIA H. DAVIS, Midland 
Bacheloi of Science in Education 

DIANNE BLAND DAVIS, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Major- 
Minor Club; Dean's List; Student Education As- 
sociation; Association for Childhood Education 

DONALD C. DAVIS, Hale Center 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management; Society for the Advancement of 
Management; Dean's List 

EDWINA DAVIS, Corsicana 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Phi Alpha Theta; Stu- 
dent Education Association; Dean's List 
JAMES L. DAVIS, Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Accounting; Beta Alpha Psi; 

Beta Gamma Sigma; Phi Kappa Psi; Phi Eta Sigma 
ROBERT E DAVIS, Wichita Falls 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Phi 

Eta Sigma; Eta Kappa Nu 
TOM W. DAVIS, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Architecture 
MARTHA E. DAWES, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Student 

Education Association; Association of Childhood 

Education; Tech Singers; Dean's List 




New Buildings Open on Campus 



RONALD WAYNE DAY, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management 
BOBBY DEAN, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 

Management; Alpha Kappa Psi, Treasurer: Sigma 

Iota Epsilon; Dean's List 
TONY ED DEAN, Robert Lee 

Bachelor of Science in Range Management: Range 

Management Society, President; Men's Residence 

Council 

JAMES D. DE CASTRO, Texariana 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering: American 

Society of Civil Engineers 
CHERYL DECKER, Childress 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Kappa Kappa 

Gamma 

DONALD W. DEERING, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Range Management; Phi Eta 

Sigma; American Society of Range Management 
MARY DE LOACH, Texariana 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Student Education 

Association 
NANCY MARIE DE LOACH, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Alpha Lambda Delta; 

Sigma Delta Pi 

GLADYS HENDREN DENNIS, Sherman 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development and 
Family Relations; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Phi Kapp* 
Phi 

JAMES GARY DENNIS, Sherman 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

RAY T. DE RIEUX, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting: 

Tech Accounting Society 
CALVIN C, DESMOND, Roswell 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 
MICHAEL EMERSON DEVANEY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
LAWRENCE JOSEPH DIBB, Waco 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics 
CHARLES RAY DICKEY, Litbbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration io Finance; 

Texas Tech Finance Association 



16— Senior View 



^^ '^^ vh *T ^^ ^B 




«f 



I 



r 

II 



It 




Construction ; American 



SHARON ELAINE DICKSON, Whiteface 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
ELAINE DILBECK, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Therapy; Kappa Alpha 

Theta 
RONALD DILL, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Bnchelor of Science in Chemistry; Phi Epsilon Kappa 
TOMMY DILLARD. Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 
F. DARLENE DISRUD, Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Econom-cs Association 

TOMMY DITTBERMER. White Deer 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Phi Mu Alpha; 

Band 
CHARLIE LESLIE DIVINE, JR., Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering; Saddle Tramps 
TERRY KATHRYN DIVINE, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Phi 

Kappa Phi; Women's Service Organization; Student 

Education Associat'on 
JIMMY TODD DOAN, Stamford 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
M. KATHLEEN DOBBS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Town Girls; 

Phi Nu Epsilon 

BOBBIE DOBSON, Morton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management; Judo Club 

SUSAN JAN DOHERTY, Port Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in French and Spanish- Dean's List- 
West Hall Legislator 

LARRY C. DONHAM, Santa Anna 
Bachelor of Architecture 

SUANNE DOWDY, Fort Worth 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

LAURIE DOWELL, Fort Worth 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Alpha Lambda Delta; National Art Education As- 
sociation, President 

BARBARA DRAKE, Austin 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Kappa 

Alpha Theta; Union Hospitality Committee; Union 

Public Relations Committee; Associate Justice, Tech 

Supreme Court 
DAVID DRISKILL, Tulia 

Bachelor of Architecture ii 

Institute of Architects 
CORNELIUS ARTHUR DUFFY, III, Amherst 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 

Dean's List; Finance Association 
DORA DUNCAN, Abilene 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
JACK C. DUNCAN, Cedarburg, Wisconsin 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Park 

Administration and Horticulture Club 
DOROTH DUNHAM, Woodsboro 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Student Education 

Association; Rodeo Association; Major-Minor Club 
BECKY DUNLAP, Floydada 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Delta 

Gamma 

CARLA DUNN, Alpine 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Kappa Kappa 
Gamma. President: Mortar Board; President's Hostess- 
AWS Secretary; Knapp Hall, President; Junior Coun- 
cil; Leadership Board; Women's Residence Council 
Treasurer; Alpha Lambda Delta; Phi Kappa Phi 

HERMAN JAMES DUNNING, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing- 
American Marketing Association 

GLENN THOMAS DUPONT, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 

BARBARA LYNN DURHAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Kappa 
Alpha Theta. President; Mortar Board; President's 
Hostess; Student Senate; Forensics Union 

JOSEPH C. D'URSO, Nutley, New Jersey 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Mechanical Engineering- 
Amercan Society of Mechanical Engineers 

THOMAS R. DURST, Mason 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 

CATHEY DYKES, Da'las 

Bachelor of Arts in History; International Interests 
Committee. Assistant Chairman; Phi Alpha Theta- 
Dad s Day Committee 

DARWIN L. DYKES, Kitleen 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
Amer-can Marketing Association 

BOBBY EBELING, DimmitI 
Bachelor of Arts in History 

WILLIAM W. ECHOLS, III, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Architecture in Architecture; American 
Inst'tute of Architects 

MICHAEL J. ECK, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in Art; Arnold Air Society, Vice- 
i^°51'?'!;«r: Sabre Flight; Dean's List; Air Force 
KUIC; Vice Commandants Award 

LANA BURKETT EDENS, Andrews 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education- As- 
sociation of Childhood Education 
GARY EDWARDS, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Phi 
Mu Alpha ' 



Senior View — 17 



STEVE EDWARDS, Rotan 

Bachelor of Science in English 
MICHAEL VICTOR EGGEMEYER. Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in International 

Trade 
DALE B. ELAM, Wooti River, Illinois 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Alpha Phi Omega 
JAMES DAVID ELUOTT, Irving 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management 
LARRY ELLIOTT, EsteWne 

Bachelor of Arts in Finance 

MARY ELLIOTT, Canadian 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

CINDY ELLIS, Kerrville 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 

LONNIE ELLIS, Priona 

Bachelor of Science in Education 

RHEA ELLIS, Menard 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

ETHEL MABRY ELUSON. Petersburg 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; Dean's List; 
Phi Upsilon Omicron; Alpha Lambda Delta; All- 
College Recognition; American Home Economics As- 
soc-at-on. President; Home Economics Student Council 

MIKE ELLISON, Ralls 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management; Phi Kappa Psi; Dean's List 

WILLIAM JAY ELMS, Amherst 
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

SUSAN LYNN ELROD, B4laire 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Alpha Chi Omega, 
President; Leadership Board; Pannellenic Council; 
Student Senate; Little Sister of the Shield of Phi 
Kappa Psi 

CYNTHIA B. ELWELL, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Fashion and Design; Kappa 
Alpha Theta; SUB Committee; Young Republicans; 
Fashion Board 

LARRY EMERSON, O'Donnell 

Bachelor of Science of Entomology; Alpha Zeta. 
Chancellor; Beta Beta Beta; Dean's List; Entomology 
Club; Aggie Council 



BENNO WILLIAM ENGLE, JR., Luckenbach 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 

Education Association 
PATTI ENGLERTH, Arlington 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Delta 

Delta Delta; Rodeo Association 
ALBERT H. EPPERSON, JR., Levelland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic 

Management 
CARLA J. EPPERSON, Uttlefield 

Bachelor of Science in General Home Economics 
HAROLD L. EPPERSON, Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Alpha 

Phi Omega; American Institute of Industrial Engineers; 

Homecoming Committee 



JAN IE SUE ESCOBAR, Knox City 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; American 

Home Economics Association 
KAREN JO ESTES, Bovina 

Bachelor of Arts in Art Education 
VIRGINIA ESTES, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Microbiology 
JEAN ANN ESTILL, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology; Women's 

Service Organization 

TAYLOR DAVID ETCHISON, Garden City 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

LARRY EUDY, Van Horn 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 
ROBERT JIM EUDY, Houston 

Bachelor of Architecture: Beta Theta Pi; American 

Institute of Architects 
BRIAN EVANS. Borger 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking; 

Society for the Advancement of Management; Finance 

A<sociation; American Marketing Association; Young 

Republicans 
DONALD RAY EVANS, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 

Education Association 
JAMIE EVANS, HedUy 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Women'! 

Service Organization 

SUSAN EVANS, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Gumna 
Phi Beta 

JAN EVERETT, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Science in Elementarr Education; Tau 

Beta Sima. Treasurer; Tech Band; Baptist Student 

Union Executive Council 
ROBERT E. EXUM, Pecos 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

American Marketing Association 

ALVIE F. FAULKENBERRY, III, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Sigma 

Nu 

RICHARD FATHEREE, Pampa 
Bachelor of Science in Education 




•4 



18— Senior View 



!• 






GARY L. FAULKENER. Richardson 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

Delta Sigma Pi; American Marketing Association 
KAREN FEAZELLE. Brady 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Rodeo 

Association; Texas State Teachers Association; National 

Education Association; La Ventana Staff 
STANLEY C. FIETEL, II, Dailas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Tech Accounting Society 
FRANK FEKETE, Richardson 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Saddle 

Tramps; American Institute of Industrial Engineers; 

American Institute of Mechanical Engineers 
BENITA LEE FENTER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Alpha Lambda Delta; 

Young Republicans; Dean's List 
ROBERT G. FERGUSON, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Treasurer; 

Aggie Club 
SHARON FERRELL, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology; Campus Girl 

Scouts; Newman Center 
JERRELL B. FESTER, Port Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry; Alpha Phi Omega 
JOY FEWELL, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; State Edu- 
cation Association ; Campus Advance 
ROBERT A. FIELDS. Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Sigma 

Chi; Interfraternity Council; Athletic Committee; 

Dean's List 
MARILYNN FILLEY, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
JACK DOUGLAS FINCH, Texarkana 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 

of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; Program and 

Music Director of KTXT-FM 
CAROLYN FINLEY, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
FRED R. FINLEY, Snyder 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management 
MARGARET WAGES FINLEY, New Deal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Rodeo 

Association 

TOYA FINLEY, Eldorado 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Rodeo 

Club; Gamma Theta Upsilon; Fashion Board; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education 
SUSAN FLACK, Odessa 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Dean's List; Sigma 

Tau Delta 
LESLYE VAN NAME FLEER, Port Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Delta Gamma; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Dean's List 
ROBERT D. FLEER, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management; Arnold Air Society 
PHILIP L. FLETCHER, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business; Rodeo As- 
sociation 
DORIS FLOOD, Roswell 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 

Administration; Delta Gamma 
DARLENE FLORENCE, Grapevine 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
DAVID A. FLORENCE, Grapevine 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Phi Eta Sigma 
MIGUEL I. FLORES, Laredo 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics 
LARRY C. FLUKINGER, Hempstead 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry; Dean's List; Outing 

Club; Tags; American Chemical Society 

CAROL FOGLE, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
RUSSELL H. FOLK, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Pi 

Kappa Alpha; Dolphins, Pledge Trainer; Swimming 

Team 
ROGER B. FOLTZ, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 
JERRE LYNN FORBES, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Math 
KENT FORREST, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration In General 

Business 

JAMES L. FORTENBERRY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Spwcial Education 

DAVID W. FOSTER, Sterling City 

Bachelor of Business Administration in General Busi- 
ness; Scabbard and Blade, Captain 

LINDA FOSTER, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

MARTHA ARIEL FOSTER, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Interior Design; Alpha Phi, 
Corresponding Secretary; American Institute of In- 
terior Designers. Secretary 

BETSY FOUTS, Haskell 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 




Senior View~19 




A. EDWIN FOWLER, JR., Santa Monica, 

California 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 
Finance Association; Soccer Team; Red Raider Fly- 
ing Club. Vice-President; Dean's List; Accounting 
Society 

WENDY JANE FOWLER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Major- 
Minor Club; Town Girls; Red Raider Flying Club; 

Texas Association of Health, Physical Education, and 

Recreation; American Association of Health, Physical 

Education, and Recreation 
PAMELA KAYE FOX, Brownfield 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Tech 

Singers; Association of Childhood Education; Baptist 

Student Union; Dean's List 
RONALD G. FOX, Clovis, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Architecture 
SUSAN FOX, Burnet 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Merchandising; 

Tau Beta Sigma 
EDWARDO B. FRANCO, JR.-, Rocksprings 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
MARGARET FRASER, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Alpha 

Chi Omega; Mam'selle 
MARTHA FRASER, How ton 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Alpha 

Chi Omega; Mademoiselle; ROTC Sweetheart 
PAT FRASHIER, Pampa 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
PAMELA FREEMAN, Seminole 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish; Alpha Lambda Delta; 

Sigma Delta Pi; 'Voung Republicans; Dean's List 
JACK F. FRITH, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
ANN FULLINGIM, Petersburg 

Bachelor of Science in . Child Development and 

Family Relations 
GLENN E. GALBRAITH, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; AFROTC 

DrijI Team; Drill Team Commander; Arnold Air 

Society, Chaplain; American Society of Civil Engineers; 

Dean's List 

JIMMY L. GALEY, Colorado City 
Bachelor of Science in Geology 

MADALYN GALT, Goodland 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Major- 
Minor Club; Association of Childhood Education; 
Student Education Association 

MARTHA ANNE GAMBRELL, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education 

GAMEWELL D. GANTT, III, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Phi 
Eta Sigma; Finance Associat'on. Secretary; Beta 
Gamma Sigma, Vice-President; Rodeo Association 

GARY GARDNER, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

LARRY C. GARDNER, Roy, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 
Finance Association: Rodeo Association; Accounting 

GAIL GARNER, Corsicana 

Bachelor of Science in Business Education; Student 
Education Association; Texas Business Education As- 
sociation 

LYNNE GARNETT, Spearman 
Bachelor of Arts in English 

CARL E. GARRETT, JR., Ingram 

Bachelor of Science in Math; Kappa Mu Epsiloq 

DONNA GARRETT, RichUnd Springs 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Baptist Student 
Union 

KATHLEEN GARRETT, O'Donnell 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology: Alpha Delta Pi; 
Dean's List; Psi Chi. Treasurer; Special Events Com- 
mittee: Tech Rodeo Association 

MALCOLM GARRETT, Lubboci 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Beta Gamma Sigma; Dean's List 

SYD GARRETT, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; Chi Omega; 
Dean's List: American Home Economics Association 

GARY L. GARRISON, Monahans 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 
Education Association; Tech Band; Phi Mu Alpha; 
Dean's List 

JAN GARRISON, Hillshoro 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List; Student Education Association; Texas "Tech As- 
sociation of Childhood Education; Alt College 
Recognition Service 

JUNE K. GARRISON, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Fine Aits in Art; Double T Rifle Team, 
Secretary; Lm Vmltnt Staff MtJimohiUr: Tech Rodeo 
Associat'on 

PETE GARTON, JR., Roswell, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Beta Theta Pi. Pledge Trainer; Dean's 

JUDY GATEWOOD, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
GATTIS. HOMER L . Pottsboro 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanized Acticultuxe; 

Mechanized Asriculture Club 
HOYT GATTS, Electra 

Bachelor of Business Admlnistrttion in Traffic 

Manatcemcnt 
BARBARA GAY, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Dean's List; 

Drane Legislator 
DENNIS GENSMAN, Darrouzett 

Bachelor of Science in Cvil Engiocering 



• 




30—Semor View 



JOHN E. GEORGE, Coleman 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Tau 

Beta Pi, Recording Secretary; American Institute of 

Chemical Engineers 
JOHN A. GERHARDT, Rising Star 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
LINDA KAY GFELLER. Tulia 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Dean's List; 

National Art Education Association 
RONALD W. GFELLER, Oklaunion 

Bachelor of Science in Entomology; Entomology Club 
MICHAEL GHOLSON, Haskell 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
GEORGE GIBSON, Richland Springs 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering ; Ameri- 
can Institute of Industrial Engineering 
JAMES ARLIN GIBSON, Vernon 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
JENNIFER GIBSON, Trinity 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development and Family 

Relations; American Home Economics Association; 

KAREN RUTH GIBSON, Spearman 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Student 
Education Association 

ROBIN GIDDINGS, Georgetown 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Alpha Phi; Union Dance 
Committee, Legislator; Dean's List; Italian Club 

GEORGE GILBERT, Fort Worth 
Bachelor of Business Administration 
Campus Crusade for Christ 

JAMES M. GILBERT, Big Spring 
Bachelor of Architecture; American 
Architects 

MARY GILES, Wichita Palls 
Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology 

JUANICE GILILLAND, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in 
Administration 

CLAIRE GILLESPIE, Temple 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 
Alpha Lambda Delta; Phi Kappa Phi 
Home Economics Association, Projects Chairman; Phi 
Upsilon Omicron, Pledge Trainer; Union Fine Arts 
Committee, Chairman; Model United Nations. Under- 
secretary; World Affairs Conference Steering Com- 
mittee; Mortar Board, AWS Representative; Union 
Trophy Award 



Banking; 



Institute of 



Secretarial 



Education; 

American 





JUDY GILLIAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Therapy; Sigma Alpha 

Eta; Union Committee; National Teachers Association 
DONNA GILMORE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; American 

Home Economics Association 
PETE GIPSON, Lockney 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers 
CARLEY C GLASS, Levelland 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Park 

Adm-nistratfon Club 
CHERI GLASS, Vega 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Major- 
Minor Club 
BETH GLASS, Levelland 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Phi 

Upsilon Omicron 
CAROLYN GLENN, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Women's 

Service Organi2ation; Association of Childhood Edu- 
cation; Student Education Association 
PATSY GLOVER, Pampa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Tau Beta Sigma; Accounting Society; Phi Gamma Nu 
MARYLYN GODWIN, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Baptist Student Union. Executive Council; American 

Home Econom'cs Association 
BARRY GOETZ, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Industrial Engineers; Wing Advisor 
ROBERT E. GOFF, JR., Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in German; Baptist Student Union; 

Der Liederkranz; Delta Phi Epsilon; Le Circle 

Francais; Dean's List; Men's Residence Standards 

Board; Sneed Hall Council, Secretary 
TERENCE GOLDA, Union, New Jersey 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 

Architects; Army ROTC 
ZANDY GOODE, Welch 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management 
BRUCE GOODMAN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology; Arnold Air Society; 

Pi Delta Phi 
JOHN N. GOODPASTURE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Sc'cncc in Mechanical Engineering 
CAROLYN GOODSON, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Therapy 
CRAIG GOODYEAR, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
LINDA GORHAM, Bellaire 

Bachelor of Arts in Special Education; Women's 

Serv'ce Organization 
TEENA GORKA, Richmond 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Phi Alpha Theta; La 

Venfana Staff 
GLYNDA JEAN GORRELL, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Gamma Phi Beta; 

Major-Minor Club 



Senior View — 21 



EDWARD GOSNELL, Andrews 

Bachelor of Science tn Mathematics 
ANNA MARIE GOTTSCHALK, Winters 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; Association 

of Interior Designers: Rodeo Association 
ARTHUR E, GOULD, Dumas 

Bachelor of Sc ence in Elec^rical Engineering; Institute 

of Electrical and Electron-cs Engineers 
GEORGE GOWAN, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Dean's List 
BONNIE E. GRABOW, Brenham 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Phi Upsilon 

Om^cron: Dean's List: All-College Recognition 

MARK GRAHAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Sc'cnce in Sociology; La Ventana Staff 
RUSSELL R. GRAHAM. San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Government 
TERRY TOWNLEY GRAHAM, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; American 

Home Economcs Association; Finance Association 
WILLIAM L. GRAHAM. Mineral Wells 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Secondary Education 
JILL GRANGE, Spearman 

Bachelor of Arts in English 



ROBERT W. GRAVES, Houston 

B.ichelor of Business Administration in Banking 
STEVE GRAY. Ralls 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Delta Tau Delta; Dean's List; Alpha Delta Sigrxu; 

Soc ety for the Advancement of Management 
TERRY LEE GRAY, Rankin 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Geology 
BERNARD JOSEPH GREEN, Clarendon 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business; Block 

Bpdie 

DOUGLAS M. GREEN, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; 
Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu 




EVA B. GREEN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in General Home Economics; 

American Home Econom'cs Association; Dean's List 
LAWRENCE GREEN, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Arts in Zoology; Alpha Epsilon Delta; 

Italian Club: Pre-Med Society 
MERIKAY GREEN, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Texas 

State Teachers Association; National Education As- 
sociation 
MICHAEL A. GREEN, Levelland 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics 
MICHAEL J. GREEN. Denver, Colorado 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 
RICHARD GREEN, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; American 

Institute of Chemical Engineers 
SHIRLEY A. GREEN. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
MARTHA JANE GREEN. Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
BARBARA GRIER, Texarkana 

Bachelor of Business Administration ir 

Accounting Society 

GDIS HAYDEN GRIFFIN. JR.. Meriel 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Dean's 
List; American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
Treasurer; American Society of Metals; Pi Tau 
Sigma 

KATHY GRIFFIS, Austin 

Bachelor of Arts in Zoology: Alpha Phi; CorpsDettes; 
Beta Beta Beta; Sigma Tau Delta; President's Hostess: 
Leadership Board; Army ROTC Brigade Sweetheart 

RICHARD LEROY GRIMES, Santa Fe, New 

Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management: Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment 

LINDA K. GRISSOM, Shallowater 

Bachelor of Arts in History: Dean's List 

CINDY G. GRUNER, Canyon 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Phi Upsilon Om-cron; American Home 
Association: Women's Service Organization 

RODNEY A. GRYDER, McCamey 
Bachelor of Business Administration in 
Accounting Society. President 

RAMON GUAJARDO, Whiteface 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Econofiiics: 
Eco Club; Los Tertulianos 

LYNN C. GUIDI, Huntington, New York 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; (trant- 
fer student) Freshman Cheerleader; Student Repre- 
sentative 

KATE GULLY, Lubboci 

Bachelor of Arts in Microbiology: Kappa Alpha 

Theta; Mortar Board; Union Special Events Committee; 

Tomn Girls: Beta Beta Beta; Phi Kappa Psi Sister of 

the Shield 
JOE D HADLEY. Plainview 

Bachelor of Business Administration In Finance 
RANDALL HAGGARD. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education; Kappa Kappa 

Psi 



Wan 

BvU, 

It TO.\ao 



22— Senior View 



"f 






Ro bison, King Move Up 



CECELIA RUTH HAGOOD, Dallas 

Society of Civil Engineers; Dean's List 
WILLIAM B. HAGOOD, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; American 

Society of Civil Eneineers; Dean's Lst 
RAY HAIDUK, Panha^Me 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
RAMON HAILE, Hamilton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics; 

Dean's List; Om-cron Delta Epsilon 
NORMA HALBERT, BurkevHle 

■Bachelor of Science in General Home Economics 



MARY ELLEN HALE, Shallowater 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List 

E. MIKE HALL, Stanton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Alpha 
Kappa Psi; Finance Association 

WILLIAM I. HALL, Mountain Home 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Agri- 
cultural Economics Club; Rodeo Association 

BILLY ROY HALLMAN, Roscoe 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Agricultural Education; Alpha 
Zeta; Future Farmers of America; Dean's List 

DONNA KAY HALLMAN, Roscoe 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 

NORMAN EVERETT HALLOCK, Tampa, 
Florida 

Bachelor of Architecture; Tau Sigma Delta; Dean's 

List 
JUDY HAMBY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
GARY HAMES, Ranger 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 
DWIGHT HAMILTON, Seagraves 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Real Estate 

and Insurance 

GARY PAT HAMILTON, Brownfietd 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; In- 
stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 

GLYNDA R. HAMILTON 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Sock 
and Buskin 

LYNN HAMILTON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish; Zeta Tau Alpha, 
Standards Chairman; Student Senator; Student Senate, 
Chairman; Sigma Delta Pi; Tech Beauty; Good Will 
Ambassador; Little Sigma Honorary; Dean's List 

LONNIE HAMILTON, Monton 

Bachelor of Arts in Finance; Tech Finance Association 

MART HAMILTON, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Science in Industrial Marketing; 
Society for the Advancement of Management 

PATTEN ANNE HAMILTON, Spearman 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

WILLIAM N. HAMILTON, Harlingen 
Bachelor of Arts in Math 

LINDA HAMPTON, Crowley 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Phi Gamma Nu; National Collegiate As- 
sociation for Secretaries; Dean's List 

SUSAN DEE HAMRICK, Arlington, Virginia 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

JUDY HANCOCK, Seminole 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

LOYD BURNAM HANCOCK, Abernathy 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; In- 
stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 

SUSAN HANCOCK, New Home 

Bichelor of Arts in Spanish; Delta Gamma, Rush 
Chairman; Army CorpsDettes, Personnel Officer; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; Sigma Delta Pi; Dean's List; All 
College 

TOMMY HANCOCK, Gail 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 
Farmers of America. President 
MARY ANN HAND, Midland 

Baclielor of Business Administration in Business 
Education 

BILLY C. HARBIN, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

LINDA HARBIN, Muleshoe 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 




Senior View — 23 




DENNIS HARDEE, Tulia 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 
JAMES W. HARDER, Borger 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
DAVID HARDGRAVE, Sa-derson 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
RONNIE HARDIN, Munday 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business 
PAT HARGRAVE, Luhhock 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
MARILYN HARIGEL, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association: Lubbock 

Detetics Association; American Marketing As- 
sociation; Alpha Delta Pi 
KAYE F. HARKEY, San Angela 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; American 

Home Economics Association; Dean's List 
SAMUEL G. HARLAN, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers 
JACK HARRIS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 
JOHN E. HARRIS. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Phi 

Eta Sigma; Phi Kappa Phi; Eta Kappa Nu; Tlu 

Beta Pi; Kappa Mu Epsilon. President; Air Force 

ROTC 

REX HARRIS, Colorado 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Alpha Zeta 
ROBERT W. HARRIS, Denton 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Rodeo Aj- 

socation 

CAROL HARRISON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education: Gamma 
Phi Beta; Major-Minor Club; Town Girls; Dean's 
List 

GEORGE A. HARRISON, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; In- 
stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
JERRY DWAIN HARRISON, Idalou 

Bachelor of Science in Horticulture; Park Administn- 
tion and Horticulture Club; Rodeo Association 



Bass, 



Carlen Take Over 
New Tech Positions 




WALTER J. HART, III. Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Psychology; Alpha Tau 

Omega, Vice-Pres-dcnt 
DON R. HARTSFIELD, Ranker 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Enfiineertng; American 

Institute of Chemical Enitineers; Scholarshop 
ERIC HARTZENDORF, JR., Sinton 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business; Alpha Zeta; 

Phi KapDa Phi; Pre-Med Society; Alpha Epsilon Delta; 

Phi Eta Sigma 
JOSEPH LESTER HASSELL, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering; American Society 

of Mechanical Engineers 
DIANE HATCHETT, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Mortar Board, President; 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; President's Hostess 
GARY BILL HATFIELD, Hooker, Oklahoma 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Mechanical Engineering 
JUDY HAYDON. Austin 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
ELOISE HAYNES, Sanderson 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development 

Family Relations; American Home Economics 

soc-ation 
KERMIT DWAIN HEATON, Perrjton 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Detn's 

I.st; ROTC; Institute of Electrical and Electronics 

Enitineers 

FRED HEFLEY, Tulia 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; 

Agronomy Club 
CARLA HEIL, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Architecture; American 

Architects 
SHERRY HELGREN, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Tech Band; Tau Belt Sigma; American HooM 

Econom'cs Association 
CAROLYN HENDERSON. Childress 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Ameri- 
can Home Economics Association 

KATHLEEN P. HENDERSON, San Anionio 
Bachelor of Science in French 

PATRICIA HENDERSON. Mors* 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association; Phi Upsilon 
Omicron; Dean's List; Alpha Lambda Delta; All- 
Col Icse Recognition 



and 
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24 — Senior View 



Ill 



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BARBARA HENDRICKS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Campus Crusade for Christ 
JOHN A. HERBERT, Waco 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
JANICE HERELL, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Stu 

dent Education Association 
JAMES L. HERMAN, III, Stamford 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Society 

of Petroleum Eneineers; Phi Epsilon Tau 
LYNN HERPICH, Midland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Phi Gamma Nu; Dean's List 
RAFAEL HERRERA, Weslaco 

Bachelor of Sc-cnce in Mathematics 
JOHN HERRING, Tulia 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Alpha Zeta; 

Agronomy Club; Phi Eta S'Vma; Beta Beta Beta 
JOHN D. HERVEY, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering 
KAROL HERVEY, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in English : Pi Delta Phi 
DIANNE UNDERWOOD HETTLER, Idalou 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
JOHN WAYNE HIGGINS, Eunice, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administra- 
tive Management; Sigma Nu, Lodge Manager; Society 

for the Advancement of Management 
LYNCH HIGHTOWER, Stanton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

Amer-can Marketing Association 
SHIRLEY HILLBURN, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
MARK M. HILEMAN, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 

Architects 
JOE D. HILL, fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

KATHY P. HILL, Brownfield 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
ROY B. HILL, Levelland 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
SHERRY LINDA HILL, New Braunjels 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; American 

Home Economics Association; Rodeo Association, 

Reporter. Secretary; Milk Maid '68; Rifle Team 
SHIRLEY HILL. Rotan 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 

List 
RONALD L. HILLIARD, Haskell 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Education; Rodeo 

Association 
GARY JOHN HILTON. Freeport 

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry; Dean's List; Pre- 

Med Club; Alpha Epsilon Delta; Air Force ROTC; 

Residence Hall Council; Intramural Athletics 
CAROL ANN HINDS, Charlotte 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development and 

Family Relations 
GRACIE HINOJOSA, Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Los TcrtuHanos 
AARON J. HINSLEY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 

Farmers of America 
KATHY HINSON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Advertising Art 
ROBERT CHARLES HINTON, JR., Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science: Dean's List 
JORJANNA HIPES, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry; Delta Phi Alpha; 

Dean's List 
DALTON G. HOBBS, Pharr 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 
JAN BARBARA HOBBS, Albuquerque, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Ameri- 
can Home Economics Association; All-College Recogni- 
tion 
MARK HODGES, Paris 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Circle K 
PAUL K. HODGES, JR., Waxahachie 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Phi 

Tau Sigma 
JOHNNY MACK HOEL, Gruver 

Bachelor of Busmess Administration in Accounting 
THEODORE C HOFFMAN, JR., Sacramento, 
California 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
American Marketing Association; Soccer Team; Rodeo 

Association 
JIMMY A. HOGAN, Snyder 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Accounting Society 

CAROLYN E. HOLCOMB. Sati Mateo, 
California 
Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles 



, 




Senior View— 25 







SUSAN HOLCOMB, Sulfur Bluff 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

BARBARA ELAINE HOLDER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation: National Colleeiate Association of Secretaries; 
Business Education Association; Student Education 
Association 

DANNY G. HOLLAND, Turkey 
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

DAVID R. HOLLAND, Floydada 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Dean's List 

JOHNNIE M. HOLLAND, Denver City 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 

DOUGLAS HOLLAR, Whileface 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 
JOSEPH ALAN HOLLEY, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering: Pi 

Tau Sigma; Kappa Mu Epsilon; American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers 
SHIRLEY HOLLOWAY, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
EMANUEL M. HONIG, Hondo 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Arnold 

Air Society. President; Tau Beta Pi; Eu Kappa Nu. 

Treasurer; Phi Eta Sigma, Historian; Kappa Mu 

Epsilon; Phi Kappa Phi 

ANITA L. HOPKINS, El Paso 
Bachelor of Arts in Music 

RICHARD H. HOPPER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

RICHARD LEIGH HORRIDGE, Houston 
Bachelor of Architecture; Saddle Tramps 

JOHN A. HORTON, Texas City 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; In- 
stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 

NANCY HORTON, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Pi Beta Phi 

ROBERT HORTON, Abilene 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
Alpha Tau Omega; Alpha Kappa Psi; American 
Marketing Association; Honors Program; E>ean's List; 
Pre-Law Society 

PHILIP C. HOUSTON, JR., Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Society 

ot Petroleum Engmeers 
CHARLES HOWELL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 
REBECCA HOWELL, Knox City 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Women's 

berv.ce Organization; Rodeo Association; International 

Student Host 

RICHARD L. HOWELL, Temple 
Bachelor of Science in Math 

DAVID WALTER HOXWORTH, Dallas 
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 



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DAVID M. HUBBARD, Midland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
LINDA GAYLE HUBBARD, Pampa 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
DIANE HUDDLESTON, Childress 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Elementary Education; Tech 

Singers; Baptist Student Union 
WAYNE HUDNALL, Texico, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club 
ELIZABETH K. HUDSON, Coleman 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; Dean's List 



GLENDA HUDSPETH, Hamlin 

Bnchelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Chitwood Legislator; Dean's List 

RICHARD T. HUFF, DaUas 

Batchelor of Business Administration in Insurance and 
Real Estate 

MIKE HUFFAKER, Tahoka 

Bnchelor of Science in Agricultural Education 

CARROLL T. HUGHES, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; In- 
stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 

LINDA HUGHES. Abilene 
Bachelor of Arts in Speech 

LINDA G. HUGHES, Mineral Wells 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
VICTOR GENE HUGHES, Morenci, Arizona 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; American Home Economics As- 
sociation; Rodeo Association 
MARY ANN HULSE, Meadow 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
MICHAEL CAL HULSEY, Seagraves 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management 

ELISE HUNNICUTT, Sunray 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 

MARY SUE HUNT, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Art History; Horn Legislator, 
Training Chairman 

PATRICIA HUNT, Dallas 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation in Childhood Education 

CATHRYN ELAINE HUNTER, ]al, New 

Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Stu- 
dent Education Association; Association of Childhood 
Education 

JIMMY HURST, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management; Phi Kappa Psi; Dean's List; Sigma 
Iota Epsilon 

RONALD C. HURST, Wellington 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Inst'tute of Chemical Engineers 

GREG REESE HURT, Odessa 

Bachelor of Arts in Geology 
BETTY HUTCHINS, Post 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
SHERRY ANN HUTCHINS, Maypearl 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
RONNIE HUTCHINSON, Roswell, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Architecture 
JO LINDA HUTCHISON, RaUs 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

WILLIAM TERRY HUTTON, Muleshoe 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics 

ANN HYBSKMANN, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in General Busi- 
ness; Delta Gamma. President; Wall Legislator; Fresh- 
man Representative 

HAROLD D. HYMAN, Clovis 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

JIM INCE, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Pi 
Tau Sigma; American Society of Mechanical Engineers 

RHODA MARGARET INGRAHAM, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Pi Omega Pi; Phi Kappa Phi; Beta Gamma 
Sigma 

JON E. IRWIN, Odessa 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 

Architects; Phi Mu Alnha Sinfonia; Dean's List 
ANN JANELLE IVY, Crosbyton 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish; Sigma Delta Pi 
DANNY C. IVY, Crosbyton 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 

Farmers of America 
GEORGE M. JACKS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Phi 

Mu Alnha; Kanoa Kappa Psi; Tech Band 
NICK JACKSON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Sigma Chi, Sergeant- 

at-Arms; Dean's List 




Senior View — 27 




DIANNA JACOBS, Odessa 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and English 
PAM JARVIS, San Marcos 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
GENE T. JEANSONNE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; Chi 

Rho 

JUDITH GAY JENKINS, Hamlin 

Bachelor of Science in Dairy and Food Industry 

MICHAEL L. JENKINS, Roswell, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Science in Park Administration 

GRADY L. JENNINGS, Abilene 

Bachelor of Architecture in Design; American In- 
stitute of Architects; Dean's List 

JOE BRYAN JENNINGS, Uzbuddie 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Production; Aggie 
Council; Alpha Zeta 

MARSELLA JENNINGS, Uzbuddie 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Phi Gamma Nu; Pi Omega Pi; National 
Collegiate Associafon of Secretaries 

ANITA JERNIGAN, Goldthwaite 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association; Alpha Lambda 
Delta 

HARLAN JERNIGAN, GoUthwaite 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Block and 
Bridle; Aegie Council; Rodeo Association 

BRUCE JOBE, Dumas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

JAL J. JOBE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
American Marketing Association 

BYRON JOHNSON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance: Alpha 
Phi Omega; Army ROTC 

CARL F. JOHNSON, Pampa 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Eneineering. President; Pi 
Tau Sigma, Treasurer; Aronid Air Society; Dean's 
List 

DAVID J. JOHNSON, Morse 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Agri- 
cultural Economxs Club 

DON JOHNSON, Plainview 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Manaeement; Youne Reoublicans; Society for Ad- 
vancement of Management 

JIMMIE W. JOHNSON, Borger 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 

KAREN LEE JOHNSON, Houston 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Education; Pi Beta Phi; Delta 

Psi Kappa; Student Body. Secretary; Angel Flight; 

Mortar Board: Major-Minor; Women's Residence 

Council; Association of Women Students 
MILES E. JOHNSON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Varsity Basketball 
PHILLIP JOHNSON, Friona 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture; Alpha Phi Omega; 

Rodeo Association; Agricultural Economics Club 
RICHARD JOHNSON, Austin 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management 

Admmistration 
RITA IRENE JOHNSON. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in History and English; Gamma 

Phi Beta; Dean's List; Wall Hall, Legislator and 

Secretary; Town G'rls 

WARREN H. JOHNSON. Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Paik 

Administration and HTticulture Club 
EDMUND JOHNSTON, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management 
GERRE GRADY JOINER, Lorenzo 

Bachelor of Mus'c Education; Tech Choir; Madrigals; 

Tech Music Theater 
JO ANN JOINER, Pampa 

Bachelor of Music Education; Tech Choir; Madrigal 

S'ngers; Tech Music Theater; Mu Phi Epsilon; Dean's 

Lit 

ARDENA JONES, Amaril'o 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 
Administration 

BERNIECE JONES, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Alpha Lambda Delta; 
Sigma Delta Pi 

HOUSTON DAVID JONES, Luiboci 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Park 
Administration and Hort'culture Club 

ISAAC B. JONES, Big Spring 

Bacheloi. of Science in Textile Technology and Man- 
aeement; Phi P^i. Vice-President; Student Award 

JACQUIE JONES, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
Public Relations and Panhellenic Representative; Sigma 
Delta Pi 

JOAN CAROL JONES, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; lulian Club; Young 
Republicans 

KATHERINE JONES, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Theta Sigma Phi: 

Dean's List 
MARJORIE POST JONES, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design 
MICKEY JONES, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business 

Finance 



41 



2S— Senior View 



r 



STANLEY JONES, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Alpha Phi Omega 
THOMAS LOWELL JONES, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Architecture in Architecture Design 
WILLIAM T. JONES, Marble Falls 

Bachelor of Arts in Finance and Banking 
ROBERT G. JORDAN, Albuquerque, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Phi Eta Sigma; 

Freshman Honorary; Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society; 

Beta Beta Beta. Vice-President; Dean's List 

DONALD GLENN JOYCE, Ralls 

Bachelor of Arts in Zoology 

GARY WELDON JUDD, EJna 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers; Men's 
Residence Council; Dean's List 

RICHARD B. JULSONNET, El Paso 

Bachelor of Business Administration ir 

Alpha Tau Omega; Finance Association 
KITTY JUNGERMAN, Lake Jackson 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; 

Upsilon Omicron; American Home Economics 

sociation 
JOAN JURICEK, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
JOSEPH KAMMLAH, Fredericksburg 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Sigma Delta 

Treasurer; Dean's List 
RONALD KAPALKA, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in Geography; Gamma Theta Upsilon, 

Vice-President; Dean's List 
HERBERT KAUFFMAN, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 
RITA KEEL, Childress 

Bachelor's of Business Administration in Business 

Education; Pt Omega Pi, Business Honorary; National 

Collegiate Association for Secretaries, President; Dean's 

List 
ANN KELLER, Carlsbad, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Arts in Math 
JERRY KEMP, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture; Dean's 

List; Rodeo Team 



Economics; 



Phi 
As- 



Chi. 




!!• 



Homecoming '69: Doing Our Thing 




The float designed by the American Institute of Architects captured the Homecoming Sweepstakes. 



Senior View — 29 




Sonny and Cher entertained at the 
Homecoming Concert and afterwards 
spoke with reporters from Tech publi- 
cations. 



aut: 




ROBERT A. KENDRICK, Groom 

Bachelot of Science in Agricultural Engineering; Tau 
Beta Pi; Phi Kappa Phi; Kappa Mu Epsilon; Alpha 
Epsilon; American Society of Agricultural Engineers; 
Phi Eta Sigma 

PAUL KENLEY, Tahoia 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Saddle Tramps; Dein's 

List; Tech Singers 
KEMP KENYON, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Alpha Delta S'gma 
KAREN KEOWN, Temple 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Eduotion; Dean's 

list 
DANA KERBY, Toi/0 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Alpha 

Delta Pi; Delta Psi Kappa; Major-Minor Club 
JIMMY KIMBROUGH, Levelland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
ANN R. KINCAID, McCaulley 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
JIM KINCAID, Hamlin 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration 
PEGGY KINCANNON, Pasadena 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Kappa 

Kappa Gamma; Top Techsan; Student Senate; Dean's 

List 
ALFRED L. KINCER, III, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in History; (transfer student) Armr 

ROTC; Varsity Ba<t"t-,ir 

LARRY KING, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Management 
MARY ELAINE KING, Umesa 

Bachelor of Arts in Applied Music: Dean's List; 

All-School Recognition; Music Scholarship 
PAMELA JOYCE KING, Denver City 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
RONALD KIR BY, Idalou 

Bachelor of Science in Entomology 
SAMMY KISER, Plainview 

Bachelor of Arts in Economics; Delta Phi Epsilon; 

Young Republicans: Capa y Espada 

R" EDWARD KLEIBRINK, While Deer 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Saddle 

Tramps: Football '65-'67 
JUDY PAULETTE KLESEL, Post 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
DONNA KNIGHT, Dalhatt 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Therapy; Sigma Alpha 

Eta 
ELIZABETH KNIGHT, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in General Home Economics; 

American Home Economics Association: Knapp Legis- 
lator 
RITA JOYCE KNIGHT, Mineral Weill 

Bachelot of Science in Elementary Education 



30— Senior View 



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TOMMY KNOWLES, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Alpha Epsilon; American Society of 
Afir-cultural Engineers 

DONNA KNOX, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Phi Gamma Nu 

LINDA KNOX, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Dean's List 

SANDRA KNOX, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Women's 
Service Organization; Association of Childhood Edu- 
cation 

JALEEN KOLINSKY, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Psi Chi 

EDWARD C. KOTIS, JR., Monahans 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers 
SALLYE KOIT, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
MARY LOUISE KRAUSE, Freeport 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising 
KENT M. KRUMM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Speech Pathology; Sigma Alpha 

Eta 
LEONARD W. KUNKEL, Seymour 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 



PATRICIA DIANE KUNTZ, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish; Dean's List; Sigma 

Delta Pi; II Circo lo Italiano, Vice-President 
BOBBIE KYLE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Sigma 

Tau Delta 
MARGARET KAY LACKEY, Roswell, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
JERRY W. LACY, Rankin 

Bachelor of Science in Geology 
RAYMOND C. LAIN, JR., Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

ARCH KARL LAMB, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Sigma 

Chi, President; Interfraternity Council, President; 

Sigma Chi of the Year; Rodeo Association; Agricultural 

Economics Club 
JOHN EDWARD LAMBERTH, Kemah 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
GEORGE LAMBKIN, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Mechani2ed Agriculture; 

American Society of Agricultural Engineering; Rodeo 

Association 
DANNY LAMMERT, Old Glory 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Sigma Delta Chi 
GERALD LANDRUM, San Francisco, California 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 
CAROLYN LANE, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
LINDA JEAN LANE, Ohey 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Baptist 

Student Union; Student Education Association 
DANNY L. LANG, Italy 

Master of Science in Mechanized Agriculture; Ameri- 
can Society of Agricultural Engineers; Mechanized 

Agriculture Club; Aggie Council 
JAMES W. LANGFORD, JR., Roswell, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Society for Mechanical Engineers; Dean's List 
DONALD M. LANGHORNE, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics 
MARY LANGHORNE, Brookshire 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology 
LINDA LANIER, Austin 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Delta 

Gamma 
MARIANN LA PAGLIA, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Young Republicans; 

Alpha Lambda Delta; Dean's List 
ALICE LARA, Lamesa 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
ROBERT D. LA ROBADIERE, Bellaire 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering: Dean's 

List; American Institute of Industrial Engineers; Alpha 

Pi Mu 

LARRY S. LARIMORE, Olney 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 
GENE LATHAM, Tulia 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics 
RICK C. LATSON, Abilene 

Bachelor of Arts in Telecommunications; Alpha 

Epsilon Rho; KTXT-FM; KTXT-TV; Tech Band; 

Dean's List 

JIMMY D. LAVENDER, Tulia 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business; 

National Business Education Association 
THOMAS J. LAWLESS, III, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business; 

Society for Advancement of Management 




Senior View — 31 





m^ 







THOMAS JATOUGHN LAWRENCE, JR.. 

Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; In- 
stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; 
Campus Advance 

ANN LAYDEN, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Alpha Chi Omega; 
Student Senate; Kappa Alpha Rose; Alpha Lambda 
Delta; Dean's List; Texas State Teachers Association 

MICHAEL R. LEA, Shallowater 

Bachelor of Business Administration; Alpha Phi Omega 

J. PERRY LEACH. JR., Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Dean's List; 
Rodeo Association 

CLAUDE B. LEATHERWOOD, Bonbam 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 
Finance Association, Vice-President; Pi Kappa Alpha 

DANIEL LE CRONE, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 

FORREST LEDLOW, Waring 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management 

JAMES ARTHUR LEE. JR., New Orleans, 

Louisiana 

Bachelor of Arts in History 

LINDA SIMPSON LEE, Brady 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Educttioo; 
American Home Economics Association ; Student Edu- 
cation Association; Dean's List 

JAMES GLENN LEECH, Albany 

Bachelor of Sc'cnce in Agricultural Education ; Rodeo 
Association; Tech Future Farmers of America 

WALTER EUGENE LEFLER, Abilene 
Bachelor of Arts ; Dean 's List 

JAMES DANIEL LEGG, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment. Facilities Manager; Sigma Nu. Vice-President 

RANDY L. LEIFESTE, Mason 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Block 
and Bridle; Agricultural Economics Club; Livestock 
Judging Team 

GAIL LEWIS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in Latin; Pi Beta Phi; £u Sigma 
Chi; Little Sisters of Minerva 

RONALD LEWIS, Naples 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 



Alpha 



KENNETH E. LIGGETT, Bellevue 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Block and 

Bridle: Alpha Zeta 
SANDRA LOUISE LIGGETT, Joy 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Pi Omega Pi; Phi Gamma Nu; Tech Girl's 

Basketball Team 
DANNY LIGHTFOOT, Welch 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Management 
MICHAEL J. LIND, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in Advertising Art; Chi Rho; Alpha 

Delta Sii;ma 
BARBARA LINDER, El Paso 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 

Administration 

CAROL ANN LINDER, El Paso 

Bachelor of Arts in German; Sigma Delta Pi; Dean's 

List 
BARBARA E. LIIsTDLEY, Brownfield 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; 

Lambda Delta; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Tech Singers; 

American Home Economics Association 
DEE CARTER LINDLEY, Ropesville 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Accountinf; Society: Dean's List 
NATHAN H. LINDLEY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

ManaKCment 
BRENT LINDSEY, Lovington, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
LINDA LISTON, Wills Point 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychoio^; Speleological Society: 

Tech International Club: Tech Outdoor Club 
VANCE WARREN LISTON. Lorenzo 

Bachelor of Architecture in Design; Phi Eta Sigma; 

Tau Sigma Delta; American Institute of Architects 
CARL S. LITTLE, Fabens 

Bachelor of Architecture: Tau Sigma Delta; Arnold 

Air Society: American Institute of Architects 
CAROLYN L. LIVELY, Perryton 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Elementary Education 
TOM H. LOCKHART, Pampa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management: Alpha Phi Omega 
JACK LONDON, Men/one 

Bachelor of Science in Entomology 
FRAN LONG. Big Spring 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; National Art 

Education Association: Union Fine Arts Committee 
LARRY LONG. Southland 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Phi Epsilon 

Kappa: Texas Association of Health, Physical Edu- 
cation, and Recreation 
CAROL ANN LONGWELL, Hargill 

Bachelor of Business Admtn*stration 
DONALD E. LOOKADOO, Grand Prairie 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking: Phi 
Kappa Psi: Alpha Kapna Psi; Leadership Board; 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Finance Association; Inter- 
fraternity Council; Dean's List 



32— Senior Vitw 




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SHEILA LOONEY, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 
La Ventana. Co-Editor; Gamma Alpha Chi, President 

TERRY LOPAS. Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

GENARO LOPEZ, Brownsville 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Lee C. O'Nei! Scholar- 
ship; Beta Beta, Beta. President; Dean's List 

HELENE LORAN, Levelland 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Chi 
Omega; Little Sisters of the Maltese Cross; Weeks 
Legislator; Dean's List; Student Education Association 

KATHY LORENZ, San Marcos 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Der Liederkranz; Stu- 
dent Education Association 

KAREN HANSEN LOTT, Seattle 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development and 
Family Relations; Phi Mu; Young Republicans; Texas 
Education Association; American Home Economics 
Association 

LARRY R. LOTT, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

HOWARD W. LOUIE, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 
of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; Eta Kappa 
Nu 

TOMMY LOVE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Journalism 

MARY KAY LOVEL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in General Home Economics; 
Tech Band; Tau Beta Sigma; Women's Service Organi- 
zation; Dean's List; Tau Beta Sigma Scholarship 

JO ANN LOVELACE, Abernathy 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education; Student Education 
Association^ Dean's List 

LORETTA D. LOWE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Pi Beta Phi 

DAVID J. LOWN, Ungley Air Force Base. 

Virgin/a 

Bachelor of Architecture; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Vice- 
President; Tau Sigma Delta, President; Dean's List; 
American Institute of Architects 

RANDY M. LOWRANCE, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers 

KENNETH EDMUND LOYD. El Paso 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Speleological Society; Young Republicans; Accounting 
Society 




New Housing Policy Put Into Effect 



LINDA KAY LUKE, Merkel 

Bachelor of Science in Applied Art 

RICHARD LUTTRELL, Pearsall 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 
Education Association, Secretary; Campus Advance 

JAY EDWARD MACAULAY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architects; Dean's List 

MARGARET K. MAGEE, Demon 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma; Association of Childhood Education 

JANA MAHON, Fori Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Delta Delta Delta: American Home Economics As- 
sociation; Sigma Chi Derby Doll '68 

ELAINE MALLOW, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Student Education 
Association 

GARY DON MALONE, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 
Management; Beta Theta Pi 

DONNA MANER. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Scence in Home Economics Education; 
CorpsDettes, Treasurer; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Ameri- 
can Home Economics Association; Dean's List 

LA QUINTA JOY MANUEL, Wellington 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 

JOHN B. MARCH, Corpus Chritti 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic Man- 
agement 

JUDY MARCH. Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting: 
Dean's List 

RICHARD A. MARCUM, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

LYNN MARINER, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Pi Beta Phi; In- 
ternational Interest Committee; Phi Nu Epsilon; Host 
Student Program 

THOMAS C. MARSH, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Alpha 
Tau Omega; Tau Beta Pi; Phi Mu Alpha; Phi Eu 
Sigma; Tech Band; Ideas and Issues Committee 

GARY MARSHALL, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing- 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




Senior View — 33 




KEN B. MARSHALL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 

LINDA MARSHALL, Bovha 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development 

BILLY MARTIN, Slaton 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Alpha 
Phi Omega 

DAVID V. MARTIN, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Arnold 
Air Society, Operations Officer and Chaplain; Ameri- 
can Institute of Industrial Engineers; Dean's List 

CAROL F. MARTINSON, Austin 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles 

BERNADFTTE MASEK, Sierra Blanca 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary and Special Edu- 
cation; Student Education Association; Council for 
Exceptional Children 

MICKEY ANN MASON, Southland 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

PAULINE B. MASON, Southland 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

CHARLES A. MASONER, III, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 

LINDA M. MASSEY, Dora, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 



JOHN R. MASSIE, JR., Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers, Treasurer 

ROBERT R. MASTEN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

BETTY DRAYTON MATHEWS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Home and Family Life; 

Legislator; Dean's List 
H. DOWELL MATTHEWS, III, Mundaj 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business 
KENZEL R. MAY, Sudan 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 



Seniors Experience Ordeal of Interviews 




RHONDA MAY, Carlsbad, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Psi Chi; Legislator 

STEPHEN M. MAY, Silver Spring, Maryland 
Bachelor of Science in Eneineertng 

JOHN WAYNE MAYES, Plainview 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architects 

GWENDOLYN GAY MAYES, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Ameri- 
can Institute of Architecture Wives 

HARDY J. MAYS, Natasota 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

MARY MARTINE MAYS, Odessa 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

PAT MAYSE, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Women's 
Service Organization; Disciple Student Fellowship; 
Student Education Association 

LARRY MEADOWS, Briscoe 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Young 
Republicans 

DIANNE MECCA, Crystal City 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Rodeo 
Association; Student Education Association 

MAC L. MEDLEN. Nocona 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers 
DONNIE MEDLEY, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 

HAYNES L. MELTON, Ulllejield 

Bachelor of Science in Crop Science; Alpha Zeta; 
Agronomy Club 

J. THOMAS MELTON. Fori Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Public Ad- 
ministration; Phi Kappa Psi; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
World Affairs Conference. Assistant Director; Dean's 
List; Univenity Speakers Committee; Ideas and Issues 
Committee. Chairman 

PAULA JEAN MEREDITH, Motiahans 

Bachelor of Science in Special Education and Speech 
Therapy; SPURS; Dean's List; Legislator; Texas 
Tech scholarship; Speech Scholarship 

JOHN C. MERRITT, JR., Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineen 



34 — Senior View 



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ANDREW MERRYMAN, League City 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Phi 

Kappa Psi; Army ROTC 
JOHN W. MICHELS, Munday 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 
RICHARD H. MICHELS, Munday 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Tech Accounting Society 

ROBERT EDWARD LEE MICHIE, JR., Fort 

Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Phi 
Delta Theta; Alpha Pi Mu, President; American 
Institute of Industrial Engineers, Secretary-Treasurer 

KRYSTYNA T. MIESAK, Southington, 

Connecticut 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Kappa Mu Epsilon 

GEORGE J. MIKOSZ, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management 

W. GUY MILBURN, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Alpha Kappa Psi; Thompson Hall Social 
Chairman; Finance Association 

DONALD G. MILLER, Garland 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Phi 
Eta Sigma; Tau Beta Pi; American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers 

KATHY MILLER, Clayton, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development and 
Famrly Relations 

DALE MILNER, Friona 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration 

MYRA MINZENMAYER, Winters 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association 

JODIE MISHLER, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Sigma 
Kappa; Baptist Student Union, Social Chairman; 
P""'s List; Drane Legislator; Association of Child- 
hood Education 

NEIL L. MITCHELL, Lockney 

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration; Delta 
Tau Delta 

REINE ELIZABETH MITCHEL, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Baptist Student 
Union 

HOLLIS COY MIZE, JR., Colorado City 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 

Farmers of America ; Rodeo Association 
GRACIE MARIE MOCEK, Seymour 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 

Education Association; National Council of Teachers 

of Enel'sh 
MICHAEL J. MOCEK, Seymour 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Agricultural Engineering; Tau 

Beta Pi; Scabbard and Blade 

JODY ANNE MONTGOMERY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
JOLENE MONTGOMERY, Houston 

Bachelor of Music in Music Education; Tech Choir; 

Mu Phi Epsilon; Chi Omega 
KATHIE L. MOODY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education; Angel Flight, 

Historian; Young Republicans 
ALBERT EDWARD MOON, Provincetown, 
Massachusetts 

Bachelor of Arts in Geography; Alpha Phi Omega, 

Secretary; Gamma Theta Upsilon, President- Dean's 

List 
DAVID EDD MOORE, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Math Club 
ELIZABETH MOORE, Wimbledon, England 

Bachelor of Science in Art; Gamma Alpha Chi 
GAIL MOORE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management 
GORDON H. MOORE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology 
MICHAEL R. MOORE, Uredo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Alpha Delta Sigma 
PATRICIA RUSSELL MOORE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Music Education; Mu Phi Epsilon 
PAULA MOORE, Canadian 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Dean's List 
VERNIE D. MOORE, JR., Floydada 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Rodeo As- 
sociation 
WILLIAM N. MOORE, El Paso 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; University Daily 

Sigma Delta Chi. President 
GREGORY MOORHEAD, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Industrial Engineers; Student Senate- 
Dean's List; Saddle Tramps 
WILLIAM W. MOORHOUSE, JR., Munday 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic 

Management; Alpha Phi Omega 
JUNE MOOSBERY, Marianna 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Campus 

Advance: Student Education Association; Women's 

Service Organization 

SUE MOREL, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education- As- 
sociation of Childhood Education; Student Education 
Association 

MARGARET MORGAN, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 




Senior View — 35 




DENNIS MICHAEL MORRIS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon; Kappa Mu Epsilon; Sigma Pi Sigma; Gordon 
Hall Wing Advisor 

KATHY MORRIS, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

SUSAN MORRIS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in English and Speech; Alpha Phi, 
President 

MARC MORRISON, Abilene 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management; Tech Band; E>ean's List 

WILLIAM GENE MORRIS, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Sigma Iota Epsilon 

GARY CORBETT MORTON, Fori Worth 
Bachelor of Arts in Zoology 

BUFFY MOSER, Menard 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Alpha 
Delta Pi; Delta Psi Kappa; CorpsDettes; Major- 
Minor Club 

FOY E. MOSS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
American Marketing Association 

MARLENE ANNA MOSS, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Student Education 
Association 

LINDA MOUDY, Brownjield 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Educatioa 

PAT MOUSER, New Home 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

WOODY MOSBY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architects 

MARGARET MOYER, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association 

JANIE MUENZLER, Denison 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Accounting Society; Phi Gamma Nu; Pi Beta Phi 

DORIS F. MULLIGAN, Canyon 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Major- 
Minor Club; Student Education Association 

GLEENA MULLIN, Turkey 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles Mer- 
chandising 
JOE DON MURMAN, Ballinger 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
JAMES O. MURRAY, Mehin 

Bachelor of Science in Microbiology; Saddle Tramps; 

Baptist Student Union 
WILLIAM LEE IvIYERS, Eleclra 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Alpha Phi Omega; 

Army ROTC 

DON DOUGLAS McBRIDE, Raymondville 
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics 

PHYLLIS McBRIDE, SacuU 

Certification in Education 
ALBERT E. McCALL, Lovington, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 
Architects 

CHANDLER Y. McCLELLAN, IV. San 

Antonio 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic 

Management; Scabbard and Blade; Counterguerilla 

Unit 
KEN McCLEERY. Pampa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Retailing; 

Sigma Nu 

WILLIAM KENNETH McCLUER, JR., Graham 
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 

PAT McCLURE, Morton 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Rodeo 

Association 
PATRIQA ANN McCLURE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
JOHN McCOY, Sherman 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 

of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
J. ROBERT McCOY, Tyler 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics; Alpha Phi 

Omega; Young Republicans; Dean's List 
MICHAEL L. McCRARY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engioceting; 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 

KAREN McCULLOH, Brady 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Delta Delta Delta 
DONALD T. McCULLOUGH, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics; Arnold 

Air Society; Kappa Mu Epsilon 
ANTHONY W. McCUDY, Irving 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administnti'ra 

Management; Delta Sigma Pi 
SHARON McDOUGLE, Crosbyton 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
TERRY O. McELDOWNEY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 






36— Senior View 



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CHRISTINE McELROY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
VAN M. McELROY, Cedar Hill 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; American 

Society of Civil Engineers 

RICHARD McGEE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Dean's List; Campus 

Crusade for Christ, President 
SANDRA McGINLEY, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Alpha Chi Omega; Gamma Alpha Chi; Dean's List; 

American Home Economics Association; Fashion Board 
BRANT McGLOTHLIN, Tucson, Arizona 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Air 

Force ROTC; Alpha Pi Mu; Phi Kappa Psi; ROTC 

Scholarship 

DENNIS McGONAGILL, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management; Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement 

PATRICIA L. McGUIRE, Irving 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Young Republi- 
cans; Women's Service Organization; Kappa Mu 
Epsilon; Speleological Society; Sigma Sigma 

ROBERT E. McGUIRE, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Zoology; Baptist Student 
Union; Hospitality Committee 

ROGER GENE McGUIRE, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Pre-Law Society; Accounting Society 

PATTY McKINNEY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Gamma 
Ph' Beta; Assoc'at-on of Childhood Education; Pan- 
hellenic Greek Week Chairman, Intramurals Chairman; 
Freshman Representative; ROTC Sweetheart; La Ven- 
tana, Editor of Sophomore View; Student Education 
Association; Dean's List 

LINDA JUNE McLARRY, Sante Fe, New 

Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List; Student Education Association 

KAREN LEE McCARTY, Levelland 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Alpha 
Lambda Delta; Student Education Association 

RANDY C. McLaughlin, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry; American Chemical 
Society; Alpha Phi Omega 

BARBARA JANE McLEAN, Houston 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Clothing and Textiles 

MICHAEL C. McMAHAN, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Saddle 
Tramps: Pi Tau Sigma; Arnold Air Society; Dean's 
L'St ; Men "s Residence Council 

GARY A. McMillan. Waco 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management; Army ROTC; Scabbard and Blade; 
Tyrian Rifles, Commander 

SUSAN BURNDRETT McMILLAN, Dickinson 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List 

SUSAN McPHERSON, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List 

SUSAN McVICKER, Muleshoe 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Clothing and Textiles 

CHERYL McWILLIAMS. Port Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education; Student Education 
Association; Dean's List 

GARY McWILLlAMS. Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry; Phi Mu Alpha; Alpha 
Epsilon Delta; Phi Eta Sigma; Tech Band 

MARIE NAGLE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Baptist Student 
Union. Freshman Council; Town Girls; Theta Sigma 
Phi; Louise Allen Award; Avalanche-Journal Scholar- 

CARLA NAPIER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Kappa 
Alpha Theta; Panhellenic. Secretary; Legislator; 
Sigma Tau Delta; Association of Childhood Education; 
Dean's List 

DI ANN NAPPER, Umesa 
Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 

CAMILLA NASH, Hereford 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business 
Education; Angel Flight, Material Officer, Comptrol- 
ler; National Collegiate Association of Secretaries; Pi 
Omega Pi; Dean's List 

MARY FRANCENE NEAL, Paint Rock 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Chitwood 

Legislator; Dean's List 
DON NEEDHAM, Cross Plains 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Golf Team 
ALAN F. NEEL, El Paso 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; In- 
stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
ANN NEELY. DJlas 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Hulen Hall Vice-President; American Home l^conomics 

Association ; Dean's List 
KEN NEEPER, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
ROGER NELSON, Friona 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanized Agriculture; 

Mechanized Agriculture Club - 
PAULA NEUGEBAUER, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Little Sisters of the 

Maltese Cross 
EDWIN NEUSCH, Panhandle 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club 
BARBARA NEWSOM, Brownfield 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Kappa 

Kappa Gamma, First Vice-President 
WELDON JOE NEWSOM, Morton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Phi 

Kappa Psi; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Eta Sigma; Beta 

Gamma Sigma ; Finance Association 




Senior View — 37 



? 




STORMY NEWSOME, Abilene 

Bachelor of Sc'tnce Education; Gamma Phi Beta; 
Theta Sigma Phi; Secondary Education Association; 
Association of Childhood Education 

DANNIELLE NEWTON, Goldthwaite 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education: Student 
Education Association; Association of Childhood Edu- 
cation 

UNDA NEWTON, Terrell 
Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 

JANICE NICHOLS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Campus Christian 
Women, Co-Leader; Theta Rho Social Club. Vice- 
President; Meisterninger Chorus, Sectetarr 

FRED B. NIES, Perryton 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 

ROGER NOLAN NITSCHE, Brenham 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Tech 
Finance Association 

MICHAEL GLENN NIX, Sudan 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
THOMAS A. NOAH, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Geology 
PATRICIA ANN NOONAN, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio Art; Sock and 

Buskm 

JO ANN NORTHCUTT, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Pi Beta Phi; 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 
WILLIAM ANDREW NORTON, Texarkana 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Production; Weymouth 

Hall, President 
PAM OAKES, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Alpha Lambda Delta; 

Sigina Tau Delta; Phi Alpha Theta; Advisory Council. 

Legislator; International Interest Committee; Italian 

Club; Student Education Association; All College 

Recognition; Dean's List 

PATRICIA ANN MARTIN OATS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Latin; Eta Sigma Phi. Secre- 
tary; Optimates; Texas Student Teachers Education 
Association 

BARRY O'BRIEN, Lamesa 

Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management; Tech 

Union; Bapt'st Student Union 
DONALD FRED OBRIEN, Paris 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Student 

Action Organization; American Institute of Industrial 

Engineering; Tech Speleological Sodety 
MARILYN ODOUD, GoJley 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; American 

Home Economics Association. President; Phi Upsilon 

Om'cron 

DALPHIA RAYE OGLE, Piano 
Bachelor of Arts in Enop'sh 

THOMAS EDWIN OLIVE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accountiag; 

Tech Accountine Society; Dean's List 
NONA GAIL ONEAL, Plains 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics: American 

Home Economics Associat'on 
PATRICIA ONEILL, El Pato 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Alpha 

Lambda Delta; Sigma Tau Delta; Dean's List 
DANNY CARL OPITZ, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering: American 

Society of Civil Engineering 
BABARA ORR, Tyler 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
SALLY ANN ORTIZ. Del Rio 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Special Education 
GARY BERNHARD, OSTBY, Fori Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
BRUCE C. OTT, Universal City 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management; Arnold Air Society. Information Officer 
CYNTHIA J. OTT, Unipersal City 

Bachelor of Arts in Joumalisni 
UNDA OUTLAND, Friona 

Bachelor of F'ne Arts in Painting 
MICHAEL OWEN, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Alpha Tiu Omegt. 

Public Relat'ons Committee ; Pre-Med Society; Band 
JANIS OWENS. Rankin 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
ROBERT WILLIS OWENS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management: Phi Kanna Psi; Beta Gamma Sigma; 

Srema Iota Epsilon: Dean's List 

SAMMY D. PAIR, Whilbarral 

Bachelor of Science in Entomology; Entomology 
Club 

KENNETH PATTERSON. Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting' 

Beta Alpha Psi; Dean's List 
JOHN GRIFFIN PALMER, Pampa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 

PATRICIA ANN PALMER, Uvellend 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Home Economics; Women's 
Service Organiiation; American Home Economics At- 
soc'itton 

CYNTHIA ANN PARKER, A/hens 

Bachelor of Science Education; Horn Legitlitor; Maior- 
Minor Qub 



38 — Senior View 









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NELL PARKER, Vernon 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Leader- 
ship Board; Dean's List; CorpsDettcs; Baptist Student 
Union, Vice-President; Weeks Legislator; Association 
of Childhood Education; Student Education As- 
sociation 

ROBERT EVANS PARKER, Paris 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

TOM PARSONS, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management 

CHARLOTTE PATE, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 
Administration 

RONALD OLTON PATE, Memphis 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Pi 
Kappa Alpha; Pi Tau Sigma; American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers 

EDWARD LEE PATELLA, Port Arthur 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Dean's 
List; Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 
Treasurer 

CHARLES JERRY PATTERSON, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 

LINDA SUE PATTERSON, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List 

MARQUITA PATTERSON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles Mer- 
chandising 

SHARON PATTERSON, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Clement 
Legislator 

BOYCE PAXTON, Abernathy 
Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Epsilon Kappa ; La Ventana Staff 

BILLY FRANKLIN PAYNE, Kaufman 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Kappa Alpha Order, 
President, Secretary; Inter fraternity Council, President's 
Cabinet 

DOREL PAYNE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and 
Beta Phi; Christian Science Student 
Panhellcnic, President 

RUSSELL PAYNE, Odessa 
Bachelor of Arts in Zoology 

RALPH MICHAEL PAYTON, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Alpha Kappa Psi 



Education ; Phi 



Textiles; Pi 
Organization: 




New Schedule Brings Early Finals 



Economics; 
Intramurals 

Accounting 



Alpha Lambda 
Vice-President, 



!«*« 



toof- 



KAREN PEARCE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in English 
RICHARD C. PEARCE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 

Finance Association; Distinguished Military Student 
CAREN ANN PEARSON, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Special Education and 

Physical Education; Major-Minor Club, Lt Ventana 

Staff 
CHARLES R. PEAVY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 

Finance Association 
PAMELA PEDEN, Kermit 

Bachelor of Science in General Home 

American Home Economics Association; 
ROBERT RANDALL PEDEN, Boerne 

Bachelor of Business Administration ir 
SARA PEEK, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Music in Applied Voice; 

Delta, Secretary; Mu Phi Epsilon, 

President; Dean's List 
MICHAEL N. PEEPLES, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
DONNA PELZEL, San A*?gelo 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 
ANTONIO S. PENAFIEL, Manila, Philippines 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers 
PAM PENDERGRAST, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 

Education Association 
ANITA GAIL PENDLETON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; Women's Service 

Organization 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN PEDEN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Sc-ence in Engineering Physics; 

Phi Omega, First Vice-President; Sigma Pi 
KENNETH RAY PENROD, Wichita Falls 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Tau 

Beta Pi, Corresponding Secretary; Eta Kappa Nu, 

Vice-President, Corresponding Secretary; Institute of 

Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
TOMMY DALE PEPPER, Shamrock 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 

Farmers of America 



Alpha 
Sigma 




Senior View — 39 




BARBARA PERKINS, Henderson 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting: 

Alpha Phi; Young Republicans; Accounting Society 
ROSS EUGENE PERRY, Albany 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

American Marketing Society 
CAROLYN PETERS, Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 
ROBERT PETTER, Bastrop 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Chi 

Rho; American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
MALCOLM G. PETTIGREW. Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
DON W. PHARR, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 

Baptist Student Union; Alpha Kappa Psi; ROTC; 

Finance Association 
JEAN PHARR, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science m Food and Nutrition; Kappa 

Alpha Thcta, Vice-President; Assistant Rush Chair- 
man; Phi Upsilon Omicron; American Home 

Economics Association; Chitwood Legislator 
DIANE PHILLIPS, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
JAMES W. PHILLIPS, Euless 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Alpha Phi Omega 
PAIGE PHILLIPS, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology; Dean's 

List; Sigma Alpha Eta 
JAMES JOSEPH PHIPPS, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistrr; American Chemical 

Society; Arnold Air Society 
GARY PHIPPS, Idalou 

Bachelor of Science in Entomology; Aggie Council; 

Entomology Club, Vice-President 
DAVID F. PICKARD, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management; Society for Advancement of Management 
REBECCA M. PICKETT, Brownfield 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education: Student 

Education Association; Baptist Student Union 
GARY PIEPER. Roscoe 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy 

ANITA PIERCE, Jayton 
Bachelor of Arts in English 

GEORGE F. PIERCE, IH, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management; Alpha Phi Omega: Wesley Foundation; 
Campus Christian Fellowship. Vice-President: Chair- 
man of Homecoming Queen Election 

STEPHEN J. PIMLOTT, Bedford 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering 

JOHN H. PINKERTON, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club; 
Army ROTC 

ANN PIPER, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Tau 
Beta Sigma; E)ean's List; Student Education As- 
sociation 

RONNEY DAVID PIRTLE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

PIE PISANO, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education: Alpha 
Phi; Rodeo Association; Hospitality Committee of 
Tech Union; National Teacher's Association 

JAMES H. PITTS, Earth 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business 

BECKY SHOEMAKER PITZER, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Education; National Education 
Association; Texas State Teacher's Association; Dean's 
List; Association for Childhood Education 

JIMMY POE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Management 

GARY PORTER, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Rodeo 
Association. Board of Directors 

PHILIP B. PORTER, JR., Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Delta 
Tau Delta; American Institute of Chemical Engineers 

RICHARD STEPHEN POTTER, Midland 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 

BOB POWELL. Abilene 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 
Management 

JAMES E. POWELL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
MARVIN DEAN POWELL. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Wesley Foundation; 

Outing Club. Vice-President 
IDA MAY POWERS. Xfhile Deer 

Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education; Mn Phi 

Epsilon; Dean's List 
PHILLIP JEFFREY POYNOR. Corpus Chrisli 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering: Institute 

of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; American 

Institute of Industrial Eneineers; Tech Amateur Radio 
. 1ftv.^'w"''.Pt""*' Manager and Chief Engineer 

of KTXT-FM; Alpha Epsilon Rho 
CINDY PRESLEY, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in ElcnKntary Education 
LINDA RAE PRICE, Dallat 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Management: 

Society for Advancement of Management 



40 — Senior View 



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RICK PRICE, £)«r»dj 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 
Saddle Tramps, Second Vice-President 

JUDY PRICHARD, Sherman 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Tech 
Singers; Women's Service Organization; Baptist Stu- 
dent Union, Executive Council 

FLOWER PRING, St. Louis, Missouri 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Kappa 
Alpha Theta; Union Dance Committee Chairman; 
Union Public Relations Chairman; Society for the 
Advancement of Management; Finance Association 

SARA PURCELL, Abilene 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business 
Marketing 

MYRA QUEBE, Lockney 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Dean's 

List; Legislator 
MARCIA QUESENBERRY, Crane 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Tech Union Ideas 

and Issues Committee; Society for the Advancement 

of Management; Young Republicans; Baptist Student 

Union; Dean's List 
JERRY A. QUICK, Palestine 

Bachelor of Architecture in Design; American Institute 

of Architects; Committee for the Blind 
BARBARA QUILLIN, Crane 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
ANN RACKLEY, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 
ANITA RAMSEY, El Campos 

Bachelor of Science in Child Relations and Family 

Relations 

MARY TAYLOR RAMSEY, Coleman 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture; Dean's List; 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Rodeo Association 

RONNY RAMSEY, Houston 
Bachelor of Arts in Government 

SHARI DIANE RAMSEY, Lovington, New 

Mexico 

Bachelor of Music Education; Music Educator's 
National Convention 

ROBERT RANCK, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking and 
Investments 

GERALD DWAIN RANDLES, Carrolllon 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Circle 
K, President; Pre-Law Association 

SARAH LEE RANEY, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Theta Sigma Phi, 
Treasurer; University Daily, Copy Editor 

JAMES W. RANNEFELD, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Geology; Beta Theta Pi 

JO ANN RATLIFF, San Saba 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Phi Gamma Nu; Accounting Society; Association of 
Women Students 

MELBA RAY, Morton 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 
Education Association 

JOHN E. REAGAN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Sabre 
Flight; Dean's List; Park Administration and Horti- 
culture Club 

LINDA REAGAN, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Dean's List; Legislator 
of Horn Hall 

ROBERT F. REAM, JR., Roswell, New Mexico 
Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering 

JAMES R. REARDON, International Falls, 

Minnesota 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 

HELEN S. REASOR, Beaumont 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
American Marketing Association 

RONALD W. REASOR, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management; Society for the Advancement of Manage- 
ment; Dean's List 

PAT ANN RE AVIS, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List; Union Dance and Hospitality Committee; Fresh- 
man Council; Gates Legislator; Kappa Alpha Theta 

CHARLIE K. REDDING, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles and 
Home Economics Education; CorpsDettes, Activities 
Officer; Association of Women Students; Academic 
Admissions Council; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Dean's 
List; American Home Economics Association 

GEORGEANNE REDING£r, Plainview 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Pre-Law Club; Young 
Republicans; Sociology Club 

CAROLYN FRANCES REED, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Student Education Association; As- 
sociation for Childhood Education; Phi Gamma Nu; 
Dean's List 

KAREN REEDER, Newport News, Virginia 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Sigma Tau Delta 

KENNETH REEVES, Dalhart 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Agri- 
cultural Economics Club 

PATSY REEVES, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 
Education Association 

SUSAN L. REEVES, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in ' History; Chi Omega; Phi Alpha 
Theta; Sigma Tau Delta; Dean's List; Student Union 

JAMES HAL RENEAU, Ballinger 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi 

DIANE RESCHKE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising; American Home 
Economics Association 




Senior View — 41 




BILLY B. REYNOLDS, Trent 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
RONALD JOSEPH REYNOLDS, Yeso, New 
Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management; Rodeo Association; Society for the 

Advancement of Management 
RICHARD REZNIK, Dumas 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; Xi 

Alpha Epsilon, Secretary 
KATHRYN JANE RHEA, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Educatioo 
KATHY RHOADS, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Women's Service 

Organization; Theta Sigma Phi. Secretary; Gamma 

Alpha Chi; Legislator; Young Republicans; La 

Ventana, Editor of Freshman View 

SANDRA T. RICE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry; Alpha Delta Pi; 
Campus Girl Scouts; Alpha Lambda Delta 

KATHLEEN RICHARDS, Bandela 

Bachelor of Science Elementary Education; Texas 
State Teachers Association; Association of Childhood 
Education 

BRUCE RICHARDSON, Throckmorton 
Bachelor of Science in Animal Business 

CONNIE RICHARDSON, Dallas 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Home Economics Education; 
Gamma Phi Beta; American Home Economics As- 
sociation 

JOHNNY MACK RICHARDSON, Texarkana, 
Arkansas 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business; Rodeo Qub; 

Rodeo Team 

LINDA LEA RICHARDSON, Wellington 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Rodeo 

Association 
WARREN RICHARDSON, Fort Stockton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Penonnel 

Management 
GARY DALE RIDER, Santa Anna 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Saddle Tramps- 
Student Education Association 
LLOYD E. RIDDLES, Wichita Falls 

Bachelor of Science in Elemenlary Education 
KIMBERLY RIDLEHUBER, Pharr 

Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutrition 
KRIS RIEFLER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 
MARY JANE RIGSBY, Sweetwater 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Stu- 
dent Education Association; Association of Childhood 

Education; Dean's List 
FRANCIS LEANE RISLEY, Clarendon 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Dean's List; Phi Upsilon Omicron; American Home 

Economics Association 
DENA E. RITTINGER, New Braunfels 

Bachelor of Arts in Speech; Theta Sigma Phi; Alpha 

Epsilon Rho. Secretary; West Hall Association. 

President 
JERRY DE ROACH, Bovina 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Rodeo 

Association; Agricultural Economics Club 
DONNA LYN ROBERSON. Lockney 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Music 

Educator's Conference; E>ean's List 
RANDY ROBERT. Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Architecture 
CAROL K. ROBERTS, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Delta 

Gamma; American Home Economics Association; 

Stangel Legislator, Scholarship Chairman; Ten Best 

Dressed; Fashion Board; Fashion Committee 
GAYLA SEATON ROBERTS, Lazhuddie 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
JOHN MIKE ROBERTS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering 
MARIAN ROBERTS, Tulia 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; Americin 

Hom e Economics Association 
PATRICIA L. ROBERTS. San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
RONNIE D, ROBERTS, Hereford 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management; Saddle Tramps; Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management 
DOUGLAS H. ROBERTSON, Graham 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Pi 
Tau Sigma 
MAX DALE ROBERTSON. Lorenzo 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration; Psik 

Administration and Horticulture Club 
PAMELA DIANE ROBERTSON. Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Sigma Delu Pi; 
Dean's List 

BARTON L. ROBINETT, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Architecture 
CAROLYN ANN ROBINSON, Uhbock 

Bachelor of Arts in English 
ROBERT ROBINSON, Charlts Town, West 
Virginia 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic 

Management 
JAMES ROBISON, Turkey 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 



f: 



42— Senior View 






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CANDICE ROHR, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry; Alpha Lambda Delta; 

AU-CoUegc Recognition; Dean's List; Alpha Epsilon 

Delta. Treasurer: Ideas and Issues Committee; Fine 

Arts Committee, Assistant Chairman 
RICHARD B. ROONEY, Breckenridge 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Saddle Tramps; Beta Alpha Psi 
VIC ROPER, Deer Park 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
PHILIP N. ROSAR, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 
SHIRLEY ROSE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Town 

Girls; Student Education Association 



LARRY GENE ROSELAND, Wichita Falls 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Tau 

Beta Pi; Eta Kappa Nu; Aronld Air Society; Phi 

Kappa Phi; Kappa Mu Epsilon 
BOBBY ROSS, Denison 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
DELYNNE ROSS, Hale Center 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
GREGORY DON ROSS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Adm-nistration in Finance; Army 

ROTC; Scabbard -and Blade 
MARY K. ROSS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Education 



MIKE ROUNTREE, Hamlin 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
DONA ROUSH, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Dean's List 
EDDIE CARROLL ROWLAND, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Caving Oub; Outing 

Club; Tech Band; Dean's List 
JOHN D. ROWLAND, Dallas 

Bachelor of Architecture 
DWIGHT W. ROYE, Ralls 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy 



ALLEN RUBIN, Midland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Retailing; 
Retailing Club 

RUTH ANN RUCKER, Pampa 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Alpha Lambda Delta; Phi Upsilon Omicron, Chap- 
lain; Women's Service Organization, President; Presi- 
dent's Hostess; American Home Economics Association, 
President; Mortar Board; Who's Who in American 
Colleees and Universities; All-College Recognition; 
Phi Kappa Phi 

DOAK T. RUNBERG, Borger 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
PHILLIP H. RLTSINELS, Lovington 
WILLIAM B. RUPERT, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Tyrian Rifles 
JUDITH JAY RUPLEY, Mineral Wells 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 

List 
ANITA SHERRON RUSHING, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Delta Delta Delta 
LARRY DAVID RUSHING, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
RONALD R. RUSHING, Sabina 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Alpha 

Zeta; Agriculture Economics Club 
JOHN A. RUSSELL, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

Alpha Tau Omega; Tech Scuba Club; American 

Marketing Association 

JANE ANITA RUTLEDGE, San Antonio 
Bachelor of Arts in English 

BETH RYAN, Roswell 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 
Education Association; Clement Legislator 

BARBARA SUSAN SADLER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Scitnce in Animal Science; Rodeo As- 
sociation; Pre-Vct Society 

BILL SALISBURY, Conroe 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Gymnastics; Inter- 
national Relations Club; Debate Society; Sophomore 
Representative; Historical Society 

LINDA SALISBURY, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; American 
Association for Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation; Dean's List; Major-Minor Club; Intra- 
murals 

PERRY E. SALISBURY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
DONALD W. SALM, U Grange 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Wing Advisor; 

Agronomy Club; Baptist Student Union, ExecutiTC 

Committee 
SHARELYN SALTZMAN, Denver 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
SHARON SALYER, Crane 

Bachelor of Aits in English 
JIM SAMPLES, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 




Senior View — 43 




BILL SAMPSON, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management 

ROBERT C. SAMPSON, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Dean's List; Society for the Advancement 
of Management 

SARA A. SANCHEZ, Eagle Pass 

Bachelor of Science in Home and Family Life; Ameri- 
can Home Economics Association; Phi Upsilon Omi* 
cron 

NANCY SANDERS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; La 
Verne Noyes Scholarship; Association of Childhood 
Education 

DENNIS C. SANDERSON, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Alpha 
Tau Omega. Rush Chairman; Finance Association; 
Army ROTC; Dean's List; Presidential Committee on 
Intramural Expansion, Chairman 

LINDA JO SANDERSON, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association 

JOE G. SANDOVAL, JR., Dalhart 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management; Society for the Advancement of 
Management 

PHILIP SANSONE, III, Corona del Mar, 

California 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 
Alpha Tau Omega 

CHARLOTTE SASSMAN. Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education: Student Education 
Association; Dean's List; Intramurals 

ELAINE SAUL, Houston 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education: La Ventana, 
Co-Editor; Theta Sigma Phi; Dean's List 

THOMAS MICHAEL SAWYER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Alpha Kappa Psi; Society for the 
Advancement of Management 

ROSEMARY LEE SAXON. Richardson 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education; Dean's List 

CAROL ANN SCARBORO, Galena Park 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Sigma Kappa. Presi- 
dent; Dean's List; Fashion Board; Psi Chi 

JULIE SCARBOROUGH, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Major- 
Minor Club; Town Girls 

OTTO B. SCHACHT, Lockney 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers 

MICHAEL DEAN SCHAFFNER. Slaton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Accounting Society 

MICHAEL DAVID SCHALL, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Tau 
Beta Pi; Pi Epsilon Tau; Society of Petroleum Engl* 
neers. President 

CARL B. SCHIEFFER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Financial 
Administration; Alpha Kappa Psi; Finance Association; 
American Marketing Association; Society for the 
Advancement of Management; Accounting Society 

M. CHARLES SCHLECTE, Austin 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 
of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, President; 
Eta Kappa Nu, Secretary; Pre-Med Club; Outing Club 
KENNETH GENE SCHMIDT, Lamesa 
Bachelor of Science in Animal Business 



Techs number 43 races toward six potoU 
during the Homecoming game. 




44— Senior View 



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KATHY SCHMOEREL, Lubbock _ 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary* Education 

RONALD D. SCHENIDER, Lipscomb 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management 

TIM SCHWAGER, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 

ROBERT C. SCHWARTZ, JR., Lubbock 
Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry 

DONNA SCHWERTNER, San Angelo 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Gamma Phi Beta; American Home Economics As- 
sociation; Phi Upsilon Omicron; Women's Service 
Organization; Dean's List; Legislator, Weeks Hall 

PATRICIA MARIE SCHROEDER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Alpha Lambda Delta; 
Pi Delta Phi 

KENNA M. SCOTT, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Science in Heme Economics 
MICHAEL ROY SCOTT, Paducah 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; American 

Society of Civil Engineers; James H. Murdough 

Scholarshin; Dean's List 
PAM SEALE, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Kappa Alpha Theta 
ROBERT EARL SEARS. Andrews 

Bachelor of Arts in Chem-'stry 
DONNY SEAY, O'DonneH 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Office Manage- 
ment 
CHERYL SEBASTIAN, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Dean's List; Hulen 

Hall. Legislator 
LARRY H. SENKEL, Port Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Phi 

Kappa Psi 
KENNETH J. SESCIL, Rolan 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 
JAMES LE'WIS SETTLE, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Park Administration 

ROGER Q. SETTLER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Student Senate; 'Young 
Republicans. President; Sock and Buskin; Student 
Action Organization. Speakers Chairman; Prc-Law 
Society 

DOUG SE'WELL, Brownfield 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 
Alpha Kappa Psi, President; Tech Accounting Society. 
Treasurer; Dean's List; Beta Alpha Psi 

GRACIE SEXTON, Pampa 

Bachelor of Science in Education 

GARY SCHACKELFORD, Tulia 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 
and Speech; Alpha Delta Sigma; Dean's List 

MARTHA SHACKELFORD, Cotton Center 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List 

ROBERT L. SHAFFER, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Scabbard and 
Blade; Tyrian Rifles Drill Team 

CHERYL SHARBUTT, Andrews 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Dean's List; Student 
Education Association; Baptist Student Union 

JAMES L. SHAW, El Segundo, California 

Bachelor of Business Admin-stration in Administrative 
Management; Air Force ROTC; Society for the 
Advancement of Management; Dean's List 

LARRY ALLEN SHELTON, Carlsbad, New 

Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics; Alpha 
Phi Omega; Tech Scuba Club 

LINDA KAYE SHELTON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation for Childho-^d Education 

ROBERT H. SHEPHERD, Di'las 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Financial 
Admin'Stratrnn; Tech Finance Association; Society 
for Advancement of Management; Intramural Ice 
Hockey 

JIM D. SHEPPERD, Burnet 

Bachelor of Science in Wildlife; American Society 

of Range Management 
BRAD SHIFLET, Abilene 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
JACK W. SHIRLEY, McKinney 

Bachelor of Architecture 
PAULA SHIRLEY, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Dean's List; American Home Economics Association 
DON SHIVE, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising- 
Alpha Delta Sigma 
BILLY CHOLICE SHOFNER, Lamesa 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Block 

and Bridle; Future Farmers of America 
BOBBY SHOFNER, Lamesa 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 

Farmers of America; Block and Bridle 
KENNETH A. SHORCK, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Eta 

Kappa Nu; Phi Eta Sigma; Kappa Mu Epsilon; 

Gamma Delta, Food Chairman; Voung Republicans 
SANFORD LE'WIS SHORES, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 




Senior View — 45 




BOBBY L. SHORT, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 
Management 

ALLEN JACKSON SHRADER, Cisco 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
GRACE SIGLER, Waco 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Association of Women 

Students, Second Vice-President; Junior Council- 

Baptist Student Union; Mortar Board; Chi Omega 

President 
JIMMY GAY SIMCO, O'Donnell 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Educatioa 
CHARLES H. SIMONS, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
MEREDYTHE SIMONS, San Angelo 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles 
D'ANN SIMPSON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Child E>evelopment 
MARY LOU SIMPSON, Midland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting- 
Campus Girl Scouts; Alpha Lambda Delta; Phi 

uamma Nu; Dean's List 
R. BRYAN SIMS, Houston 

Bachelor of Architecture in Architectural Engineering- 

Srema Nu; Dean's List; Wini; Advisor; Union 

txecutive; Men s Residence Council 
LINDA SINGER. Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles 

Merchandising 
STEPHEN J. SINGER, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 

of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
BEVERLY SIX, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Dean's List; Sigma Tau 

Delta 

ROBERT LEN SKINNER. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; Double T As- 
sociation Vice-President; Dolphins. Vice-President 
Tech Choir. Vice-President; Swim Team. Co-Captain 
Assistant Coach 

MARY CATHERINE SKOPINSKI, Seabrook 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

rhi Upsilon Omicron; Women's Service Organization 

Corresponding Secretarv; American Home Economics 

Le"SaVd?"' ^'°^"*^ Chairman; Sigma Sigma; Drane 
SHAY SLACK, Petryton 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Pi 

Beta Phi; Angel Flight; Little Sisters of Minerva 
ALLEN G. SMAJSTRLA, Victoria 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy 
A. J. SMITH, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Traffic 

Management; Rodeo Association. President; Sneed 

Hall Association. Secretary 
BRUCE SMITH, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Alpha Delta Sigma; Dean's List 
DANNY SMITH, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Dean's List' 

Tramps; Agronomy Club; Baptist Student' 

executive Council 
DAVID N. SMITH, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
JAMES HOWELL SMITH, Corsicana 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management; Kappa Alpha Order; Society for the 

Advancement of Management 
J- PAT SMITH, BUnburx 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 
JUDI SMITH, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
MICHAEL DAVID SMITH, Sudan 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Educatioa 
NANCY K. SMITH, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 

RONALD BRUCE SMITH, Dumas 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Education; Rodeo 

Association; Future Farmers of America 
RONN D. SMITH, Farwell 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Sigma Delta Chi 
RONNIE SMITH, Ode'-a 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics 
RONNIE CHRIS SMITH, Lamesa 

Bachelor of Busin-ss Administration in Mirkeling 
SANDRA J- SMITH, Pa-handle 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics; 

Alpha Chi Omega 



SARAH SMITH, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Educatioa; Kippi 
Kappa Gamma 

SHARON SMITH. DalUs 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education 

SHARON ELIZABETH SMITH, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Pi Omega Pi; Dean's List 

SUE SMITH, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Sigma Kappa 

WILLIAM DENZAL SMITH, O'Donnell 
Bachelor of Arts in History 



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46 — Senior View 



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DARLENE SNEED, Winters 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Baptist 

Student Union, Executive Council; Dean's List 
CHARLES RICHARD SNODDY, Fort Stockton 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
WILLIAM H. SNYDER, Clovis, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers; Rodeo 

Association 
KURT SOKOLOWSKI, Holden, Massachusetts 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management; Golf Team 
WILLIAM SOKORA, Pep 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
RAY SORRELLS, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Alpha 

Zeta; Dean's List 
JACKSON BENJAMIN SOSEBEE, JR., Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry; American Chemical 

Society 
MARILYN KAY SOSEBEE, Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
JEAN SOSNOWY, Texas City 

Bachelor of Science in General Home Economics; 

Delta Gamma, Rush Advisor; Angel Flight; Fashion 

Fair; American Home Economics Association; Fashion 

BETH SOURS, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology; Delta Delta 

Delta; Little Sisters of Minerva; Sigma Alpha Eta 
STEPHEN R. SOUTER, El Paso 

Bachelor of Architecture; Phi Eta Sigma, Treasurer; 

Tau Sigma Delta; Deseret Club, Vice-President; 

American Institute of Architects, Treasurer 
CHUCK SPACE. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Young Republicans, 

President; Alpha Phi Omega; Dean's List 
EVERETT SPAETH, Longview 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 

Architects 
JOHN BYNUM SPARKS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
JOHN R. SPARKS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Alpha Delta Sigma 




Students Protest Dormitory Conditions 



JERRY D. SPECK, Albany 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
SANDRA SPEED, Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
DOUGLAS D. SPEEGLE. Hobbs, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Dean's List; Sigma Aloha Epsilon; Alpha Delta Sigma; 

Arnold Air Society; Distinguished Cadet 
CHARLEY SPENCE, Sherman 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering; American 

Society of Civil Engineering 
WAYNE SPENCE, Perryton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management 

CATHY SPENCE, Sulphur Springs 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Phi Gamma Nu: National Collegiate As- 
sociation of Secretaries; Dean's List 

JAMES M. SPIVEY, Denver City 

Bachelor of Arts in History: Pi Kappa Alpha 

DORIS ANN AHRENS SPRAGGINS, 
Fredericksburg 

Bachelor of Science in Food and Nutritions; American 

Home Economics Association; Phi Upsilon Omicron; 

Agricultural Engineering Student Wives; Dean's List 
JACK SPRAWLS, Denver City 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Accounting Society; Phi Eta Sigma; Beta Gamma 

Sigma; Phi Kappa Phi 
ROGER ALAN SPRINGER, Arlington 

Bachelor of Architecture 

STEVE SPRINKLE, Temple 

Bachelor of Arts in Advertising Art 
ROBERT L. STAAB, San Gabriel, California 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
MAX STABEL, Booker 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 
DAVID STAGGS, Big Spring 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
ROBERT E. STALNAKER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration, Alpha Delta 

Sigma 




Senior View — 47 




JACK STARGEL. Memphis 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Pi Kappa 
Alpha 

SANDRA STARK, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting: 
Union. Secretary -Treasurer; Beta Alpha Psi, Vice- 
President; Model United Nations, Under-Secretary 

SHARON STARKEY, WeWn^on 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development; American 
Home Economics Association 

LINDA STARNES, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Student 
Education Association; Association of Childhood Edu- 
cation 

SUE ST. CLAIR. Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education: Delta 
Delta Delta; Angel Flight; Student Education As- 
sociation 

ROBERT PRITCHARD STEPHENS, Stamford 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

SUSAN STEPHENS, Wichita Falls 

Bachelor of Science in Special Education; Delta Delta 
Delta, Pledge Trainer 

JOHN R. STEPHENSON, JR., Kress 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Money and 
Banking; Finance Association 

RONALD J. STEPHENSON, Dumas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management: Saddle Tramps; Sigma Iota Epsilon; 
Varsity Basketball; Wing Advisor; Dean's List 

RICHARD STERLING, Ira 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Dean's 
List; Saddle Tramps; Eco Club 

CYNTHIA STEVENS. Roswell, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
Phi Mu; Phi Upsilon Omicron; American Home 
Economics Association 

LESLIE RAY STEVENS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration tn Personnel 
Management; Sigma Iota Epsilon; Dean's List 

PAULA STEVENS, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

BOB STEVENSON, Southlake 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 
of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 

WILLIAM G. STEVENSON, Fort Worth 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 

JERALD F. STEWART, Waco 

Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Manaeement; Ameri- 
can Society of Range Management; ROTC 

JIM STEWART, Deer Park 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Financial 
Administration; Delta Tau Delta; Pre-Law Society; 
Dean's List 

SHERI L. STEWART, LMbbock 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
WILSON L. STEWART, Tarzan 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education ; Rodeo 

Association; Future Farmers of America 
SHARON LEIGH STIGER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Women's 

Service Organization; Phi Nu Epsilon 
JIM STINSON, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Phi 

Eta Sigma; Dean's List; American Institute of In- 
dustrial Engineers, Vice-President; Saddle Tramps 
KATHRYN L. STOCKDALE. Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Dean's 

List: Student Education Association 
JAMES D. STOKES. Ralh 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management; Kappa Alpha Order, Historian; Air 

Force ROTC; Dean's List 
CAROL STORBECK. Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Baptist Student Union; Gamma Alpha Chi. Treasurer, 

Vice-President; Miss Advertising 1969; Dean's List; 

All-College Recognition Service 
STEPHEN R. STORM, Brownwood 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; Tech Choir; Tech 

Band; Dean's T.ist 
VICKI STORSETH, Tulsa 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising; Pi Beta Pht; 

Special Events Committee; Neiman-Marcus Mam'selles, 

Chairman: American Home Economics Association; 

Dean's List 
CAROL STORY. Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Delta Delta Delta; 

Phi Kappa Phi 
KAREN STOWE. Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Delta 

Gamma; CorpsDettes 
RICHARD MARK STOWE, Abilene 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Phi Delu Tbeta; Am 

and Sciences Senator 
DELBERT L. STREET. Vemom 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking and 

Investments; Army ROTC * 

CHESTER LEE STRUNK. JR.. Houston 

Bacheloi of Arts in Chemistry; Alpha Epsilon Delta; 

Phi Eta Sigma 
HORTON STRUVE. Abernaihy 

Doctor of Philosophy in Physics; Sigma Pi Sigma 
LANETTE STURGESS. Tulia 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Student 

Education Association 

JERRY WAYNE STUTH, XTaco 

Bachelor of Science in Range Manajtetncnt; American 

SiKiety of Ranite Management; Range and Wildlife 

Association; Dean's List 
JOHN L SUBLETT, Alpint 

Bachelor of Arts in HistofT; Delta Sifnu Pi; Tech 

Track Team 



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4SSenior View 



LARRY DOUGLAS SULLENGER, Dermott 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics 

CYNTHIA SULLIVAN, Fort Worth 
Bachelor of Arts in English 

CARMEN SUTTON, Ozona 

Bachelor of Science in Clothing and Textiles; Pi 
Beta Phi; Rodeo Association; American Home 
Economics Association 

JO ANNE SUTTON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education; National 
Council of English Teachers; Student Education As- 
sociation; Bowling Team 

DAVID C. SWARTZ, Denver, Colorado 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; 
American Society of Mechanical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Society for Metals; Alpha Phi Omega 

VICKI SWASEY, Miami, Florida 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 
Administration; Freshman Council; International In- 
terest Committee; Hosoitality Committee; Delta 
Gamma; Phi Gamma Nu; National Collegiate As- 
sociation for Secretaries 

SALLY SWATZELL, Canyon 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Kappa Alpha Theta. Pledge Trainer; Stangel 
Hall, President; Women's Residence Council; As- 
sociation of Women Students; National Collegiate 
Association for Secretaries: Dean's List 

MARY ANN SWINBURN, Tulia 

Bachelor of Arts in Latin; Eta Sigma Phi; Rodeo 
Association 

EDWINA M. SYX, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 

TERRY SZAFRANSKI, San Antonio 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

RICHARD TALBOT. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management 

ROBERT MACON TALBOT, El Paso 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Financial 
Administration: Finance Association 

GUY E. TALLEY, Odessa 

Bachelor of Architecture in Architecture; American 
Institute of Architects 

PRESLEY DENNIS TALLEY, Canadian 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing; 

American Marketing Association; Dean's List 
DIONECIA P. TATE, Denver City 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education and 

Clothing and Textiles; Dean's List; American Home 

Economics Association 
LELAND TATE, Denver City 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Dean's 

List; Tau Beta Pi; Pi Epsilon Tau 
GARY KEITH TATUM, Brownjield 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club; 

Dean's List 
DONNA JANE TAYLOR, Paducah 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 

List 
LARRY LYNN TAYLOR, Athens 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering; Pi 

Tau Sigma; Tau Beta Pi; Dean's List; American 

Society of Mechanical Engineers 
LEONARD TAYLOR, Perryton 

Bachelor of Science in Physics 
MARTHA GAYLE TAYLOR. Denver City 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Accounting Society; Phi Gamma Nu, Assistant 

Treasurer; Doak Hall, Legislator 
MARTHLYN TAYLOR, Pampa 

Bachelor of Sc'ence in Home Economics Education and 

Clothing and Textile; Phi Upsilon Omicron; American 

Home Economics Association 
TOM TAYLOR, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management 
LARRY L. TEAFF, Merkel 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science 
GARRY WAYNE TEAGUE, Midland 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
REBECCA JO TEAGUE, Throckmorton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Phi Gamma Nu 
KENNETH TELCHIK, O'Donnell 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
PATRICIA ANN TENNISON, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; As- 
sociation of Childhood Education; Student Education 

Association; Disciple Student Fellowship 
SHERRY TYLENE TERRY, Odessa 

Bachelor of Music Education 
SUZY TERRY, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Delta 

Gamma; Dean's List; Miss Mademoiselle Finalist; 

Miss Lubbock Finalist 
KAREN KAY THERWHANGER, Stanton 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
DAVID M. THOMAS, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
DIANNE THOMAS, Spearman 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Gamma Alpha Chi 
MICKEY ALLEN THOMAS, Claude 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers 
SHIRLEY THOMAS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Major- 
Minor Club; Intramurals; Legislator 




Senior View — 49 




ROBERT EDWARD THOMAS, Abernathy 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club; 
Rodeo Association 

HARRY W. THOMPSON, Singer 

Bachelor of Science in Range Management 

LINDA JANE THOMPSON. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Child Development and Family 
Relations and Home Management; American Home 
Economics Association 

TOMMY JACK THOMPSON, Iowa Park 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Banking 

JACK D. THORN, JR., Kerrville 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Agri- 
cultural Economics Club; Rodeo Association 

RICHARD THORNBERRY, Clarendon 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Agri- 
cultural Economics Club; Alpha Zeta; Saddle Tramps; 
Aggie Council 

ROBERT THRIFT, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in Speech; Tyrian Rifles; Baptist 
Student Union 

SHARON THURMAN, Arlington Heights, 
Illinois 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
LARRY E. TINKLER, Mereta 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
DINAH G. TILSON, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Dean's List; Clement 

Legislator; II Circolo Italiano 

ANN S. TIPTON, Richardson 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Delta 
Delta Delta 

PEGGY TIPTON, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Kappa 
Tau Alpha; Theta Sigma Phi; Student Education As- 
sociation; La Ventana 

RONALD WILLIAM TIPTON, Grand Falls 
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics 

KAREN TISDALE, Phillips 
Bachelor of Arts in English 

JEFFRY TOLLETT, Borger 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

GARY TOOMBS, Maple 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanized Agriculture; 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers; Mechan- 
ized Agriculture Club 

PEGGY TONROY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Music in Voice; Tech Choir; Phi Kappa 
Phi; Dean's List 

MARGARET J. TORRENCE, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 
American Home Economics Association; Student 
Education Association: Gates Hall. Chaplain 

KENNETH MARSHALL TOWNLEY, Dallas 
Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting: 
Kappa Alpha. Treasurer; Tech Accounting Society; 
Dean's List 

TED R. TRAUTNER, McAllen 
Bachelor of Arts in Architecture 

JERRY TRAYLOR, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 
WILLIAM D. TREDENNICLE. Abilene 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
ELLIS E. TREDWAY, O'Donnell 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Finance Association 
GEORGE STANLEY TRENFIELD. Polleti 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics 
SCOTT L. TRENTON, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Psi Chi; Army 

ROTC; Dean's List 

JOE TREVINO. PUinview 

Bachelor of Science in Microbiology 
KAY MELYNN TRIMMER, Hale Center 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Kappa 

Alpha Theta 
DAVID TRUE. Plainview 

Bachelor of Business Administration in I>ublic 

Administration; Saddle Tramps 
MARSHA TRUE. Abilene 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Kappa 

Alpha Theta 

DONNA TUCKER, Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Special Education; Women's 
Service Organization: Association of Childhood Edu- 
cation 

KARA FRANCES TUNE. Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Elemcntarjr Education: Dean's 
List: Town Girls; Student Education Association 

CYNTHIA TURNER, Beaumont 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Young 
Republicans; Student Education Association: Dean's 
List 

DICKIE RAY TURNER, New Home 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education: Future 
Farmen of America; Rodeo Association 

GARY I. TURNER, San Angela 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics: Agri- 
cultural Economics Club 

LAURA JO TURNER, Pala Pinto 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Business Edu- 
cation; Phi Gamma Nu; Chitwood Legislator; Chit- 
wood Hall, Treuuier 



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50— Senior View 



JERRY TURRENTINE, Fredericksburg 

Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management; Ameri- 
can Society of Range Management 

CAROL UNDERWOOD, Garland 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; Young 
Republicans; Dean's List; National Art Education 
Association 

GLENDENE UNDERWOOD, Fredericksburg 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Tech 
Union; Association of Childhood Education 

LARRY UNDERWOOD, Cilmer 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 

EVERETT M. URECH, Bellaire 

Bachelor of Arts in History; Saddle Tramps; Sicma 
Chi; Student Senate; Union Program Council; Special 
Events Committee, Chairman; Men's Residence Coun- 
cil 

SKIP VALUSEK, 5/. Louis, Missouri 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Arnold 
Air Society; Tau Beta Pi; Alpha Pi Mu; Phi Kappa 
Phi; American Institute of Industrial Engineers 

EMILY VAN STAVERN. Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Dean's 
List 

MONTE C. VAN STAVERN. Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Varsity 

Baseball 
MICHAEL JACK VAUGHAN, Irving 

Bachelor of Science in Geology 
ROBERT E. VENEZIANO, San Diego, California 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management 
PHILLIP L. VICK. San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology; Phi Kappa Psi; 

Psi Chi; Baptist Student Union 
WAYNE VICK, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Gordon 

Hall, Vice-President; Rodeo Association, Photographer; 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
SYDNA MONTGOMERY VINEYARD, 
Lampasas 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 
J. BOB VINSON, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance; Ac- 
counting Soc'ety: Finance Association 
RONALD VISSER, Colorado City 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
JO COLLEEN VITEK, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 

Administration; National Collegiate Association of 

Secretaries 
LESLIE M. VOLKMANN, Menard 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Sigma 

Delta Pi; Dean's List 
FREDERICK B. WADHAMS, Coral Gables, 
Florida 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management; Alpha Kappa Psi 
JAY G. WADSWORTH, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management 
MELISSA LEE WAFER. El Paso 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Horn Legislator; Baptist 

Student Union, Executive Council 
MARGARET F. WAGNER, Fort Worth 

Bachelor- of Arts in Zoology 
MARY JEAN WAGNER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in French; (Transfer Student) Ski 

Club; Wesley Foundation 
CATHARINE E. WALDMANN, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
VICKI WALDRON, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Hulen 

Legislator; Hospitality Committee; Texas State 

Teachers Association 
BETSY LU WALKER, Stamford 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. Public Relations; Dean's List; 

American Home Economics Association 
FREDA WALKER, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Phi Upsilon 

Omicron; Association of Women Students 
MARY L. WALKER, Plainview 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
PENNY WALKER, Goldthwatte 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Dean's 

List; Women's Service Organization; Clement Legis- 
lator 
ROBERT C WALKER, JR., Lake Jackson 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Tau 

Beta Pi; Phi Eta Sigma; American Institute of 

Chemical Engineers 
RONALD B. WALKER, Plainview 

Bachelor of Arts in Advertising Art 

THOMAS L. WALKER, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Real Estate 

and Insurance; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; POETS 
SHERYL WALL, Brady 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Delta 

Delta Delta, Sponsor Chairman; La Ventana Staff; 

Student Education Association 
BETTY WALLER, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Arts in Latin; Pi Beta Phi, President; 

Mortar Board 
GRETCHEN WALLING, Abilene 

Bachelor of Arts in French 
MIKE WALSH, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; American 

Institute of Industrial Engineers 




Senior View — 51 




DON WALTERS, Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Architecture; American Institute of 

Architects; American Society of Civil Engineers; 

Disciple Student Fellowship. President; Dean's List 
WILLIAM R. WALTRIP, Lake Jackson 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics; 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Omicron Delta Epsilon; Dean's 

List; Ideas and Issues Committee 
GARY WALVOORD, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Phi Mu Alpha. Treasurer; Tech Band; Tech Singers; 

Tech Brass Choir 
SHERI WALVOORD, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in Music Education; Mu Phi Epsilon; 

Alpha Delta Pi; Tech Choir; Tech Madrigals: Dean's 

List 
JIMMY T. WARD, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Financial 

Administration and Accounting; Sigma Chi. Treasurer; 

Dean's List; Finance Association; Accounting Society 
STEVEN M. WARD, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Eta 

Kappa Nu; Institute of Electrical and Electronics 

Engineers 
SUE CROCKETT WARD, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Delta Delta Delta; American Home Economics As- 
sociation; Phi Upsilon Omicron 
DIANNE WARE, Sundown 

Bachelor of Arts in English 
WILLARD W. WARE, Morton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 

Management 
CHARLOTTE WARREN Tahoka 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association; Baptist Stu- 
dent Union; Student Education Association; Tech 

Mam'sellcs; Fashion Board 
DELIA WARREN, Corpus Christi 

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish; Dean's List 
WILLIAM WARD WARREN, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
BARBARA LYNN WATKINS, Eden 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
JUDY WATKINS, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts in English; Mortar Board; Junior 

Council. Treasurer; Phi Kappa Phi; Women's Service 

Organization; Mu Phi Epsilon; Sigma Tau Delta; Pi 

Delta Phi; Association of Women Students 
SHEILA A. WATKINS. W^axahachie 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Tech Band; 

Tech Twirler; Pi Beta Phi; Tau Beta Sigma 
LARRY WAYNE WATSON, Woljforth 

Bachelor of Business Administration; Accounting 

Society 
WILLIAM G. WATSON, Midland 

Bachelor of Arts in Geology 
BARRY KENT WATTS, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in PreMed; Phi Eta Sigma; 

Phi Kappa Phi 
GEORGE WEAR, JR., Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
MICKEY E. WEATHERMAN, Piano 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Institute 

of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; Tech Singers; 

Men's Glee Club 
ROBERT WEATHERLY, Carlsbad 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Beta Alpha Psi. Treasurer; Accounting Society; Bled- 
soe Wing Advisor 

LANCE WEATHERSBY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting 
CHRISTOPHER R. WEAVER. Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Men's 

#9. Secretary; Society of Petroleum Engineers of 

AIME 
HELEN JANET WEAVER. Odessa 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 
JAMES MILTON WEAVER, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management 
ALICE S. WEBB, Brownuood 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
KAREN S. WEBB, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Student 

Education Association; Association ci Childhood 

Education; Dean's List 
CYNTHIA WEBSTER, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology: Sigma Alpha 

Eta; Dean's List 
RONALD DWIGHT WEBSTER, Crosbyton 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering; 

Alpha Epsilon 
SUZANNE WEEDON, Granbury 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Rodeo Association; 

Association of Childhood Education 

JOHN WILLIAM WELCH, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Scabbard 

and Blade; Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engi- 

neen 
JAMES TOM WELLS, Tahoka 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Science; Block uti 

Bridle; Aggie Council 
SHARLA WELLS. Post 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

Phi Upsilon Omicron; Dean's List 
FRED L. WERNER, Wichita Falls 

Bachelor of Business Administrabon in Finance 
JAN R. WERNER, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in Zoology 



«) 



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52 — Senior View 






BENNIE D. WEEKS, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administrafion in Accounting 
JIM WEEMS, Levelland 

Bachelor of Arts in Government 
REGAN WEEMS, Carlsbad, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting; 

Accounting Society 
JAMES R. WEINBERGER, JR., Arlington 
Heights, Illinois 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics; Sigma Nu, 

Treasurer 
BEVERLY WEINGARTNER, Houston 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

NORMA WERNER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Fashion Design 

BOYD W. WEST, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance 

GARY LEE WEST, Brownsville 

Bachelor of Business Administration in International 
Trade; Delta Phi Epsilon; Dean's List 

PETER W. WESTON, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Industrial 
Management; Alpha Kappa Psi; Society for .the 
Advancement of Management 

CYNTHIA WHEAT, Deer Park 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Stu- 
dent Education Association 

DAVID WHEAT, Deer Park 

Bachelor of Arts in Government; Phi Eta Sigma; 

Phi Kappa Phi 
JIM WHEAT, Kilgore 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Phi Epsilon 

Kappa; Dean's List; Varsity Football 
CYNTHIA ELLAN WHITE, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Arts in History 
DANIEL JOE WHITE, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising 
GARY L. WHITE, Willington 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Education; Phi Epsilon 

Kappa 

JAMES H. WHITE, Artesia, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Architecture in Architecture; Dean's List; 

American Institute of Architects; Wing Advisor 
JAMES ROY WHITE, O'Donnell 

Bachelor of Science in Entomology 
MARY WHITE, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Merchandising; Phi Upsilon 

Omicron; Chi Omega; Tech Dames 
NED K. WHITE, Greensboro, North Carolina 

Bachelor of Architecture in Design; American In- 
stitute of Architects; Tau Sigma Delta 
ROBERT C. WHITE, Santa Rosa, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics; Tech 

Finance Association; Rodeo Association; Agricultural 

Economics Club 
RONNIE M. WHITE, Wichita Falls 

Bachelor of Science in Range Management; Agronomy 

Club; Rodeo Association 
RUSSEL WHITE, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering; Alpha 

Pi Mu; Kappa Mu Epsilon; American Institute of 

Industrial Engineers 
WILLIAM R. WHITE, Houston 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Advertising; 

Kappa Alpha; Alpha Delta Sigma 

MARILYNN TURNER WHITMORE, Fort 

Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Education: Student Education 

Association 
SANDRA KAY WHITWORTH, San Antonio 

Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Pathology; 

Sigma Alpha Eta 
JIM WHITTEKER, Sweetwater 

Bachelor of Arch itectur e; Golf Team 
ROBERT R. WHITTEKER, Sweetwater 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Personnel 

Management; Rodeo Association 
JOHN G. WHITTLE, Idalou 

Bachelor of Science in Botany; Tech Band 

CHARLES RICHARD WIDEMEN, Dallas 
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 

SANDRA WIKE, Slaton 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Student 
Education Association; Association of Childhood Edu- 
cation; Dean's List; National Art Education As- 
sociation 

ELAINE WILDER, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Alpha 
Delta Pi; CorpsDettes; Student Education Association; 
Association of Childhood Education; La Ventana Staff 

JIM WILDER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in International Trade; Delta 
Phi Epsilon; Baptist Student Union; Dean's List 

DELTON EUGENE WILHITE, Farwell 

Bachelor of Science in Agronomy; Agronomy Club 

PETER B. WILKINSON, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering; Society 
of Petroleum Engineers of AIME 

DIANA WILLIAMS, Andrews 

Bachelor of Science in Speech Therapy; Sigma Alpha 
Eta; Baptist Student Union 




Senior View — 53 




AROLD G. WILLIAMS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Administrative 

Management; Circle K 
JOE M. WILLIAMS. San Angela 

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education; Tennis 

Team, Captain 
LARRY ROBERT WILLIAMS, Arlington 

Bachelor of Science in General Business and Sociology: 

Alpha Kappa Psi 
LYNN ELLEN WILLIAMS, Houston 

Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; Alpha Del'a Pi; Theta 

Sigma Phi; Dean's List; Vnivtriity Daily, Copy Editor, 

News Editor 
MARK WILLIAMS, Us Vegas, Nevada 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
STEPHEN L. WILLIAMS, Midland 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology 
TERRY W. WILLIAMS, Odessa 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing 
TOM WILLIAMS, Amarillo 

Bachelor of Architecture 
KEITH WILLIAMSON, Meridian 

Bachelor of Science in Entomology 
RITA DIANE WILLINGHAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association. Home and 

Family Life Chairman; National Home Economics As- 
sociation; Dean's List; Freshman Council; Baptist 

Student Union ; Lubbock Symphony Orchestra 
JOYCE WILLIAMS, Floydada 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education; 

American Home Economics Association 
WINSTON D. WILLIAMS, JR., Lubbock 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Office Manage* 

ment; Society for the Advancement of Management 
RONALD J. WILLINGHAM, Lubbock 

Masters of Business Administration in Marketing; 

Alpha Kappa Psi, Treasurer; Dean's List 
WILUAM F, WILLMON, Borger 

Bachelor of Business Administration in International 

Trade 
JANET KAY WILSON, Abernalhy 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education; Pi Beta 

Phi 

THOMAS A. WILSON, Denton 

Bachelor of Science in Animal Business 
WINIFRED MAE WIISON, Paxton, Illinois 

Bachelor of Arts in Art History; Gamma Alpha Chi; 

Sigma Sigma: TAGS: Dean's List 
FRED H. WIMAN, Snyder 

Bachelor of Science in Zoology; Honors Council 
GARY L, WIMMER, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering; Pi Kappa 

Alpha; Student Senate; Dean's List; Institute of 

Electrical and Electronics Engineers 

SHARON MARIE WIMMER, Slaton 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Secretarial 
Administration; Phi Gamma Nu; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Phi Beta Sigma; National Collegiate Association of 
Secretaries 

ROBERT L. WINK, Robert Ue 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education; Future 
Farmers of America; Freshman Baseball; Dean's List 

JAMFS Y. WINN, Lubbock 
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 

HORACE GARY WINNINGHAM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering; Ameri- 
can Institute of Chemical Engineers, Secretary; Tiu 
Beta Pi 

BILL WISCHKAEMYER, Samnorwood 

Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics 

SHIRLEY WITHROW, Ropesville 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Educitioa: Dean's 
List 

MARGARET ANN WOLF, Windthorst 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; Senator; 
Vice-President of CSC; Legislator; Presidential Cabinet: 
W.S.O.; Assistant Pledge Trainer 

DAVID G. WOMACK, Abilene 
Bachelor of Business Administration 

DOUG WOMACK, Abil-ne 
Bachelor of Arts; Phi Kappa Psi 

DON WOOD, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration 

MARILYN L. WOOD, Los Alamos, Ntw 

Mexico 

Bachelor of Science; Phi Mu; Gamma Alpha Chi; 
Fashion Board; A.H.E.A. 

TERRY WOOD, Dallas 

Bachelor of Arts; Kappa Sigma: Delta Phi Epsilon, 
Secretary; Alpha Epsilon Rho. Charter President; Alpha 
Delta Sigma; Tech Debate; KTXT, Staff; Dean's Honor 
List; Tech Scuba; Mock Political Convention, Be«t 
Delegate 

LINDA WOODARD, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science; Dean's List; Association for Child- 
hood Education; Student Education Association 

TOMMY JOE WOODARD. S'mmole 
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

PEGGY WOOLDRIDGE, Claude 

Bachelor of Science in Education; Delta Delta Delta, 
Chaplain; Angel Flight. Administrative Office; SAB 
little Sister of Minerva. Treasurer; Mortar Board, 
Chaplain; President's Hostess: Sigma Tau Delta 

HELEN WOOLLEY, Morton 

Bachelor of Science; SEA; Dean's List 



il 



54 — Senior View 




DEBORAH WORDE, Austin 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics; Delta 

Gamma; Little Sigraas; Legislator; Sub Committees 
CATHY WORKMAN, Slamon 

Bachelor of Science; Knapp Hall Legislator; Dean's 

List 
DONNA WORKS, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science; Young Democrats; National 

Teacher's Association; Dean's List; S.E.A.; Rodeo 

Association 
CALVIN WORLEY, Clovis, New Mexico 

Bachelor of Science; ASCE 
CAROLYN WOSSUM, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science; Dean's Honor List; Phi Upsilon 

Omicron; AHEA 
STANLEY MARCU WRIGHT, Dallas 

Bachelor of Business Administration; Dean's List 
MARY ELLAN WYATT, Tahoka 

Bachelor of Science; AHEA; Assistant Chairman, 

World Affairs Conference; Baptist Student Center, 

First Baptist Church 
JAMES DREW YAGGY, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Science; AIIE; American Society of Heat- 
ing. Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers; 

Tech Scuba 
ROGER L. YANDELL, Fort Worth 

Bachelor of Science 
JANE YATES, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science; Student Education Association; 

Association of Childhood Education 
JEAN YATES, Dallas 

Bachelor of Science; Student Education Association; 

Association of Childhood Education 
EDDIE YETTER, Saint Jo 

Bachelor of Business Administration; Kappa Alpha 

Order 
LARRY C. YOUNG, Irving 

Bachelor of Science; A.LCh.E., Tau Beta Pi 
REBECCA YOUNG, hiding 

Bachelor of Arts; Managing Editor of The University 

Daily; Gamma Phi Beta, President; Theta Sigma Phi, 

Vice-President 
WILLIAM MICHAEL YOUNG, Fort Worth 

Bacheloc of Business Administration; Intramural Tennis 

1966; Intramural Tennis Doubles 1968 

KAREN ZICKLER, Bandera 

Bachelor of Science; Student Educators Association; 
Band 2 

RUSSELL L. ZICKLER, JR., Bandera 

Bachelor of Science; National History Honorary; Stu- 
dent Education Association 

BARBARA ZIMMERMANN, Oklahoma City, 

Oklahoma 

Bachelor of Arts; Band; Pi Beta Phi; Tau Beta 
Sigma; Tech Majorette 1, 2, 3, 4; Head Twirler 4; 
Homecoming Queen 

VICTORIA J. ZWIACHER, Lubbock 

Bachelor of Arts; Phi Nu Epsilon, President; Pi Delta 
Phi; Town Girls; Dean's List; International Club; 
International Interest Committee 



College life has its moments of quiet thought- 
fulness. 



Senior View — 55 




i. a: - 



v,*^ 



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LA VENTANA • 1970 
JUNIOR . 





^•^T"'/!'^'^. 




^ 



LA VENTANA • 1970 • VOLUME 45 






Elaine Saul 
Sheila Looney 

co-editors 
Ray McWilliams 

art edilOT 
Darrel Thomas 

director of photography 
Richard Mays 
Jeff Lawhon 
Bruce Ott 
Bob Darby 
Mike Warden 

photography staff 
Bill Dean 

director 
Jean Finley 

business manager 
Janice Aldridge 

secretary 
Taylor Publishing Co. 

printer 




A sincere thank you goes to 
my staff who worked very 
hard on this magazine with 
enduring patience. Co-editors 
Elaine Saul and Sheila Looney 
deserve a big thanks for their 
helping and understanding. A 
special thank you goes to 
Darrel Thomas and his staff 
for the encouraging words and 
excellent photography work. 
A final thank you goes to 
Look magazine for allowing 
us to adapt its format. 

Laurie Ingle 



THE CAMPUS SCENE 



2 Junior Class 



STAFF 




Smiling from the Victory Tower is the junior staff Fran Chatmus; 
Laurie Ingle, editor, Carol McKinney, and Julie Nunn. Not pictured 
are Patty Amerman and Ann Moore. 



Barbie Adams, Et Paso 

John Adams, Harlingen 

Kathleen Adams, Evant 

Marcia Adams, Brownfield 

Dwayne Agnew, New Deal 

Fereydoun Agha Zadeh, 

Rezaieh, Iran 

Wesley Ahrens, Olton 

Greg Akins, Odessa 

U>retta Albright, Wichita 

Falls 

Harrel Alcorn, Amarillo 

Jim Alderfer, Dallas 

Joe Aldridge, Odessa 

Mary Sue Alkire, Lubbock 

Glynn Allen, Sweetwater 

Steve Allen, Lamesa 

Vicki Allen, Houston 

Clay Almon, Ft. Worth 

Steve Almon, Ft. Worth 

Phyllis Alsobrook, Odessa 

Ralph Aman, Kilgore 

David Ammons, Ft. Worth 

Byron Anderson, Winters 

Earl B. Anderson, Midland 

Gary Anderson, Sherman 

Hal Anderson, Lubbock 

Holly Anderson, El Paso 

James Anderson, San Antonio 

Sharon Kay Anderson, 

Lubbock 

Steven Anderson, Appleton, 

Wisconsin 

Tommy Anderson, San 

Antonio 

H. W. Andridge, San Antonio 

Anita Apperson, Ft. Worth 




"^S^^Sli^ 



• l) 









Stealing pennies from Tech'* library Mem* to be one of Pat Mackey'* pleaaure*. 




J 



Zeta Tau Alpha pledge* *adly reflect the despair of a last place 
finish in one of the many games played during the Sigma Chi 
Derby Day. 



i— Junior View 



Tommy Armstrong, Kress 

Harold Ashman, Houston 

Mack Ashmore, Whitejace 



Charles Askins, Lubbock 

Margaret Attebury, 

Abeinathy 

Betsy Austin, Lubbock; 



Laura Austin, Bonham 
Ann Ayres, Lamesa 
Bob Bacon, Abilene 



Deborah Ann Baeuchle, Fort 

Leavenworth, Kansas 

Chuck Baiiey, fort Worth 

Sandie Bailey, Dallas 



Thomas Bailey, Houston 

Jane Baird, Abilene 

John Baize, Gatesville 



Barbara Ann Baker, Midland 

Charles Baker, Austin 

Kathrjn Ann Baker, San 

Angela 



Mae Baker, Floydada 
Patty Baker, Floydada 
Kathy Baldwin, Tulia 



Maria Ballew, Lubbock 

Cindy Banker, San Antonio 

George Barker, Dallas 

Patty Barnard, Brownwood 

Lee Ann Barnett, Lubbock 

Gail Barnhart, Amarillo 

AJan Barrett, O'Donnell 



Janie Barrett, San Antonio 

Christine Barton, Victoria 

Debbie Barton, Earth 

Alan Basinger, Ennis 

Earl Bateman, Cleburne 

John Baughman, Dallas 

Richard Bauman, Lubbock 

Rudolph Baumann, Loraine 

Alice Baumgardner, 

Plainview 

Sharon Bayless, Lubbock 

Irene Bean, Lockney 

Kevin Bean, Killeen 

Joyce Beck, San Antonio 

J. W. Beckum, Amarillo 

Russell Bedall, Amarillo 

Kenneth Ray Beebe, Anton 

David Beeson, Houston 

Jimmy Belk. El Dorado 

Anita Bell, Lubbock 

Niesha Bell, Lubbock 

Ray Bell, Odessa 






5ip»^ 




Junior View — 3 









Jeff Benefield, Amaritlo, 

Beverly Benham, Lovington, New Mexico 

Cheryl Bennett, Shallowater 

George Bennett, Lubbock 

Ann Benoit, Houston 

William Benson, Bellville 

Mark Bentley, Lubbock 

Richard Bemer, Kress 

Jan Berry, Dallas 

Trey Ben7, Midland 

Robert Best, Dallas 

Ann Betzel, North Brook, Illinois 

Beverly Beumeler, Midland 

Kay Bible, Odessa 

Krista Bielland, Houston 

Ann Bielstein, Dallas 

Judi Biggs, Brownwood 

Barry Bingle, Katy 

Randy Kirkelbach, Littlejield 

Mike Bimbaum, Corpus Chrisd 

Ronnie Birrell, Big Spring 

Kenneth M. Bisbee, Andrews 
Elaine Black, Amherst 
Cecilia Blackwell, LaPorte 
R. W. Blanar, Lubbock 
Paula Bland, Amarillo 
Ginger Blon, Lubbock 
Janie Bloodworth, W eatherford 

Rosita Bloom, Amarillo 

Erwin Gordon Blum, Monahans 

David BIythe, Austin 

Robert Bolez, Dallas 

Bruce Bonick, Comanche 

Mary Boren, Big Spring 

Mike Boster, Lubbock 



Tony A. Botello, Jr., Alice 

Ralph Bowen, Lubbock 

Donna Bowles, Houston 

Sandi Bowlin, Houston 

Jim Boyer. Southlake Tahoe, California 

Ken Bradford, Fort Worth 

Rick Bradley, Muleshoe 

Diana Brakebill, Dallas 

Linda Brandon, Anahuac 

Andy L. Bratcher, Lamesa 

Burt Bratcher, Vera 

James Bredewater, New Braunfels 

Glenn Breisch, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

Beverly Bridge, Afton 





4 — Junior View 



Sunbathing is one of the more popular subjects studied in the spring term. 



".Jail 

to 



ISwii 






HW 






.Uiftmi 






I9P*. 



i 



I* 



i 



Karen Bridges, Dallas 

Marilyn Briggs, Houston 

S. M. Briggs, Carlsbad, New 

Mexico 



Richard Brigham, Ft. Worth 

Randy Brillhart, Perryton 

Vikki Brinson, Lamesa 



Barry Briscoe, Lubbock 

Jeannie Brock, Haltom City 

Sandra Brock, Odessa 



Chuck Brosseau, Dallas 

Beth Brown, Richardson 

Charles Brown„ Louisville, 

Kentucky 



John R. Brown, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 

Kelton Brown, Lubbock 

Peggy Brown, San Antonio 



Phyllis Brown, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 

Robert Brown, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 

Ronnie Brown, Roscoe 



Sylvia Brown, Phillips 

Brandy Browne, Dallas 

Jeff Browne, Huntington, 

New York 

Bob Browning, Paducah 

Garion Brunson, Dallas 

Dianne Bryan, Whitney 

Bobby Bryant, Lubbock 

Debbie Bryant, Muleshoe 

Carol Ann Buchanan, 

Plainview 

John Buchanan, Sherman 

Alonda Buckingham, Ft. 

Worth 

Gary Buesing, Arlington 

Randall Bullard, Lubbock 

Rodney Bunch, Lubbock 

Rick Bunting, Austin 

Becky Burgess, Irving 

Roger Burgess, Dallas 

Brenda Burk, Tulia 

Patricia Burke, Midland 

Becky Burnett, Port Arthur 

Kenney Burnett, Odessa 

Carolyn Burp, Amarillo 

Jerry Burrell, Slaton 

Dachelle Burrows, Dallas 

George Bush, Lubbock 

Lydia Buske, Friona 

Terry Byerley, Amarillo 

Dianne Byrd, Krest 

Don Cage, McCamey 

Barbara Cain, Ft. Worth 

Geraldine Caisse, San Angela 

Cindy Caldwell, Lamesa 

Deborah Caldwell, Ft. 

Stockton 

Beverly Calhoun, Baytown 

Cathy Callaway, Wichita 

Falls 




Junior View — 5 



f 



Mike Caldwell, Panhandle 

Clinton Callaway, Haskell 

Cheryl A. Cameron, San Antonio 

Jim Campbell, Hereford 

Rick Campbell, Dallas 

Jeane Ann Cannon, Hale Center 

Paul Canup, Childress 



Tom Capps, Pampa 

Katherine Carpenter. Bryan 

Shailene Carpenter, Arlington 

Lewis Carson, Dallas 

Dave Carter, Amarillo 

Gerald Carter, Amarillo 

Jimmie Carter, Galveston 



Phyllis Carter, Andrews 

Russell Carter, Breckenridge 

Tom Carter, Lubbock 

Jane Carroll, Snyder 

Terry D. Cash, Crosbyton 

Bias Catalani, San Antonio 

Nic Catalani, San Antonio 

Gary Gates, Spearman 

Elizabeth Gavin, Roswell, New Mexico 

Don Caywcod, Odessa 

Margaret Lee Gelum, Corpus Christi 

Kenneth Chaffin, Lubbock 

Scott Chamberlain, Irving 

Barbara Chambers, Lubbock 



Edith Chambers, Rule 

John Champirn, Perryton 

Jane Chaney, Abilene 

Karen Chaney, Elgin, Illinois 

Karen Chandler. San Antonio 

Linda Chandler, Throckmorton 

Marlene Chandler, Throckmorton 



Stephen Chandler, Midland 

Art Chavez, Midland 

David Cheatham, Dallas 

Karen Cheek, Bedford 

Beverly G. Chick, Denison 

Carolyn Childers, Dalhart 

Jon C. Choate, New BraunfeU 

Pam Christian, Abilene 

Richard Christian, Lubbock 

Connie Church, Houston 

Lana Church, Irving 

Joan Claiborne, Lubbock 

Bretza Clark, Lubbock 

Candy Clark, Amarillo 

Marilyn Clark. Houston 

Glenn Clayton, Houston 

Chris Clements, Lubbock 

Paula Clements, Longview 

Ginger Cochran, Odessa 

Joe Cochran, Houston 

James Coffin, Corpus Christi 



Larry Cohom, Lamesa 

Gloria Noll Collins, San Angela 

Michael Combs, Houston 

Kathy Condon, Vernon 

Cathy Condrey, Newton Square, Tennessee 

Robeit Conner, Winters 

David Cook, Levelland 

Gary Cron, Megarget 

Carol Cooper, Dallas 

Mac Cooper, Lubbock 

Margie Cope, Lubbock 

Sandra Cope, Olney 

Pam Copenhaven, Lubbock 

Maureen Corcoran, El Paso 



Cheryl Coursey, Lubbock 

Dean Cowan, Lubbock 

Jeff Cowan. Valley MiUt 

Dottie Cox, San Angela 

John Cox, San Antonio 

John Cox, Borger 

Bonnie Craddick, Midland 



6 — Junior View 




SS^B 




l^PSSSSS 




1 1 



) 




sEmM 



Future Graduates of 1971 




f* 




SSii*^ 





Jennifer Craig, Stamford, 

Nancy Craig, Houston 

Wade Cramer, Amarillo 

Susan Crews, Ennis 

Donna Crisp, Amarillo 

Dan Crone, West Des Moines, Iowa 

Mac Crone, Childress 

Leslie Crooks, Spearman 
Linda Crossland, Plainview 
Gary Crow, Silverton 
Barbara Crowell, Big Spring 
Deborah Cunningham, Dalhart 
Larry Curcoe, Miles 
Hoyle Curtis, Petersburg 

Jerry Cutbirth, Clyde 
Cathy Danna, Dallas 
Richard Dark, Amarillo 
Christine Davidson, Austin 
Rex Davidson, Amarillo 
Barbara Ann Davis, Lubbock 
Cindy Davis, San Antonio 



Cynthia Davis, Arlington 
Donna Davis, San Angela 
Leslie Davis, Amarillo 
Mary Davis, Ft. Worth 
Teresa Dawkins, Midland 
Dana Dean, Houston 
Larry Dean, Tyler 



Mary Dean, Amarillo 

Norma Deavours, Lubbock 

Mike Deets, Wichita Falls 

Barbara De Garmo, Baylown 

Mike Dehollis, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Claire Denney, Ennis 

Ann Denton, Lovington, New Mexico 

Randy Denton Dallas 

Cliff DeuUey, Topeka, Kansas 

Lee Devin, Tulia, 

Debbie Dick, Tyler 

Henry Dirks, Big Spring 

James Dirks, Seminole 

Gay Dobbs, Houston 



Richard Dollinger, Borger 
Diana Doshier, Vega 
Larry Doss, Palestine 
Dinah Doty, Midland 
Debbie Douglass, Big Spring 
John Douthit, Mexia 
Joe Drane, Houston 



Jackie Driskill, Tulia 
Steve Driskill, Dallas 
Randy Drive, Cross Plains 
Debby DuBose, Dallas 
Debbie Duncan, Big Spring 
Robert D. Duncan, Roscoe 
Eddie Dunn, Midland 



Frank Dunn, Corsicana 
Patsy Dunn, Southland 
Judy Durban, Borger 
Lloyd Duty, Houston 
A. J. D'Voyer, McLean 
Tomi Beth Dycus, Floydada 
Don Dykes, Lubbock 



Suzanne Eakin, Lubbock 
Benitakay Easley, Odessa 
Susan East, San Antonio 
Debra Edwards, Houston 
Milton Edwards, Tahoka 
Victor Eggemeyer, Tulia 
Jeanette Bhler, Idalou 

Junior View — 7 















Marie Ellinger, Kansas City 
Gar> Ellis, Lubbock 



Linda Ellison, McLean 
Vicki Ellison, Slaton 



Elaine Ely, Hearne 

Dick Emmons, Hobbs, New Mexico 



D. W. England, Slaton 
Pamela English, Claude 



Carol Enloe, Paris 
Sherre Enninga, Dallas 



Laura Epperson, Corpus ChrisU 
Pam Estes, Monahans 



Susan Etchison, Big Spring 
Bob Evans, Perrylon 




Shirley Evans, Lubbock 
J. D. Faircloth, Baird 









Hey girls, get a look at that expres- 
sion up there . . . and they say that 
we're honking geese! 



Gary Fambro, Breckenridge 

Glenn Fant, Quanah 

David Farley, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Floyd Farnsworth, Lubbock 

Randell Fan, Friona, 

Greg farrar, Lubbock 

Tree Farrow, Houston 

Roger Favor, Jaylon 

Mary Foagin, Richardson 

Chuck Feely, Uvalde 

Jo Carole Felton, Childress 

Susan D. Fenn. Dallas 

Jant-t KiTgus( n. Dallas 

Susan Ferris, Houston 

Missy Finok, San Antonio i 

Eddy Finley, Alanreed \ 

Shirley Flesher, Houston 

Bob Fletc her, Wolfforth 

(^arolxn Flelclier, I'aducah 

Tom Flournny, San Antonio 

Jo Lynn Flowers, Miami 

Charles Floyd II, Colorado Springs, 

Colorado 
Jack Flynt, Uimmill 
Larry Foerster, Beaumont 



8 — Junior View 




ilotlttbiEipn' 
...ddiqiarthil 



ii,t«W 

KIU, 

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(WW 

St 

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Jeanic K(irl)us, Level land 

Cynthia Ford, Sherman 

Don Foreman, Idalou 

Judy F(]rc]iian. Idiilou 

liuddy Foster, Lubbock 

Maril>n Foster. Irving 

Edmund Fountain, Houston 

Kay Foust, Ft. Worth 

Candy Fowler, Ventura, 
California 

David L. Fox, Seagraves 

Mike Fox, Ft. Worth 

Sall> Foy, Dallas 

Donna Franklin, Garland 

Cen Franklin, /Vp 

Ronald Franks, Amarillo 

Aureo C. Freitas, 
Rio de Janeiro 

Pat Freitas, Dallas 

Peter Freitas, Brazil 

Janett Frentress, Lubbock 

Allan Frizzel, Denver, 
Colorado 

-Micliael Froildiili, Dallas 

Gref: Froinan. Dallas 

.Shirley Fryman. Dallas 

Kay Galhraith, Abilene 

Suzanne Gallagher, 
Breckenridge 

Carolyn (ialletly. Dallas 

Roliert Gallman. Lazbuddie 

George V. (Janily. Houston 

Sandra Gandy, Morton 

Don Gann, Lubbock 

.Armando Garcia. Lubbock 

Carolyn (Jardncr. l.lydel 

Carol Garner, Houston 

Steve Garg, Oroville, 

Kohert Gates, Denver, 
Colorado 

Ross (iaulding. Houston 

Ronald Gee, Odessa 

Bol) (Gentry, Hrrejord 

David Gentrv, Lubbock 

Debra Ann Gentry, 
Browmcood 

Gail Geoffrey, Amarillo 

Philip Gerig. .'>hallowaler 

Jerry Gershach, Salado 

Thomas (iihlis, Athens 

Gloria Gihson. Ft. Worth 

Lane Goher, Bovina 

Robert Godeke, Corpus Christi 

Johnnie (iillespie, Borger 

liruce Gilliam. Lubbock 

Sandra Glass. Tampa. 

Gerald Glasscock, Borger 
Victor Glenn, Amarillo 

Susan Glover. .Arlington 

Leona Goad. Levelland 

Lane (iober, Boving 

Robert Godeke, Corpus Christi 

.Mark Goen. Floydada 

Frederick Goenne, San Angela 

Susan Goering, San Juan, 
Puerto Rico 

Richard Gi ertz. Lubbock 
John (foforth. Irving 

Patrick (Jonnng. El Paso 
Leigh (.'. Goode. Boerne 
Jon Goodman, McKinney 
Diana Goodwin. Wichita Falls 
Robyn Goodwin, Paducah 
James Grace. Lubbock 
Priscillc Grace. Odessa 
Steve Grace, Petersburg 
Judy Cranberry. San Antonio 
Jeannine Grantham. Lubbock 
Mike Gravender. Brounjield, 

Colorado 
Freddy Gray, Lubbock 
Nancy Gray, Monahans 
Steve Gray, Croicell 
David Green, Siveetuater 
Gary Green. Brounuood 
Jan (Jreen. Ballinser 
Lynn Green, Big Spring 
Marajzaret Green. Waco 
Wayne Green. Pep 
Cindy Greener. Lubbock 
Jill Gregg, Decatur 
Douglas Greif. Lubbock 
Arnold Gresham, Vernon 
.Mary Lynn Gresham. Levelland 
Vicki Gresham, Quanah 
Kay Griffith. .Abilene 

Junior View — 9 



Jim Grimes, Crane 

E. Dane Gruben, Kermit 

Susan Gum, Lubbock 

Brooks Gunter, Claude 

Kay Haas, Pasadena 

Danny Haberer, Earth 

Keitn tlackfe.d, Lorame 

Gary Hadley, Odessa 

David Hahn, Brownfield 

Diane Haines, Abilene 

Carol Haire, Muleshoe 

Ginny Haiiston, Gatesville 

Carolyn Haley, San Antonio 

Rickie Haley, Lubbock 

Dennis Hale, l\ew Home 

Eugene Hall, Sherman 

Jinunie Hall, Lubbock 

Mary Lynne Hall, Lubbock 

Roberta Hall, Midland 

Tim Hall, Sweetwater 

Martha Hallman, Ft. Worth 

Bill Hamilton, Cleburne 

Don Hamilton, Odessa 

Steven Hamilton, Bowie 




I 



I 



Barbara Hansen, Ft. Worth 

Carla Hanshee, Darrouzett 

Joan Hanson, Dallas 

Paul Hanson, Lockhart 

Candy Haralson, Houston 

Euna Harberst, Hartley 

Anna Jane Hardy, Lubbock 

Danny Hargrove, Stamford 

Jack Harkins, Stamford 

Sharon Kim Harp, Dallas 

Carole Harper, Sudan 

Edward Harrell, Lubbock 

Go« Harrell, Waco 

Roger Harrington Odessa 

Chris Harris, Lubbock 

Mel Harris, El Paso 

Shyrle Harris, RopesvUle 

David Hart, Ft. Worth 

Mitzie Hartman. Wellington 

Dowell Hartsfield, Ranger 

Deborah Harvis, Plainview 

Judy Harwood. Cuero 

Russell Hatcher, Amarillo 

Kirby Hatley, Lakeview 

Lynn Hatten, Irving 

Marilyn Hataway, Cisco 

Jane Haynes, Dallas 

Janelda Hays, Dallas 

Mark Hazelwood, Amarillo 

Dee Head, San Antonio 

Pat Head, Carrollton 

Sheila Head, San Angela 

Donald Heard, Jal, N. Mexico 

Jody Heath. Hale Center 

Marjan Heck, Plainview 

Alvarado Hector, Houston 

Mike Hedgpeth, Ft. Worth 

Dorothy HedMrk. <m; n 

John Hefner, Sweetwater 

Phil Hefner. Allen 

10 — Junior View 



Lynn 



i 







w^m 




I 






Janet Heineman, Lubbock 

Ronny Helberg, Abilene 

Rick Helm, Dallas 



Lee Helms, Lubbock 

Don Helton, Clarendon 

Dennis Henderscn, Kitgore 



Cynthia Henry, Lubbock 

Robert Henteges, Corpus Christi 

Betsy Herman, Houston 



David Hess, Lubbock 

Richard Heyden, Dallas 

Melody Hiatt, Vernon 



Football is an active sport all through the campus. 



Biel Hibbs, Synder 

Brenda Hill, Ft. Worth 

Jan Hill, Atlanta, Georgia 

Rocky Hill, Austin 

Marty Hillam, San Angela 

Steve Hihpold, Mildand 

Ida Hinchey. San Antcnio 

Gaynelle Hines, Dallas 

Larry B. Hines. Olton 

Linda Hodges, Lubbock 

Sue Hedges, Irving 

Lynne Hoffman, Jolict, Illinois 

Gerry Holden, Gainesville 

Eddie Holland, Llano 

Melinda Hollingsworth, Ft. 

Worth 

Sam Hollingsworth, Lubbock 





Sf^SSBB 




Gerald Hollis, Lubbock 
Kay Holmes, Lubbock 



Roy Holmes, Perryton 
Bobbie Holsberry, Lubbock 



Aubrey Holt, Loc/rney 
Karen Lou Holze, Ft. Worth 



Sallie Homan, El Paso 
Nancy Honig, Pasadena 



Marilyn Horn, Andrews 
Gary Home, Midland 




Student Union Committee members are able to take time out 
from the meetmgs to get to know one another a little better. 

Junior View — 11 



Bill Horton, Lubbock 

Rod Houghton, Dallas 

Tyra Houston, Amarillo 

Cathy Howard, San Antonio 

Randy L. Howard, Plainiiew 

David C. Howe, Atlanta, 

Georgia 

Joe Howell, Levelland 

Phil Huchton, Midland 

Dennis Hudgens, Dallas 

Wayne Huff, Dallas, 

Cheryl Hughes. Lubbock 

Lurk Hueh;s, Dallas 

Nancy Hulse, San Antonio 

Judy Humphreys, Lancaster 

Mike Hunnicult, Amarillo 

Bill Hunt, Lubbock 

Kent Hunter, Devine 

Rita Hunter, Borger 

Cathy Hurley, Austin 

Mac Hurley, Abilene 

Nabeth Hurley, Throckmorton 

Richard Husen, Borger 

Stephanie Hutcheson, 

Midland 

Susan Hutchison, Durango 

Carolyn Hutton, Ft. Worth 
Deirdre Ibanez, San Antonio 

Jerry Intel, Amarillo 

Qeoplas Ingram, Tennessee 

Colony 

Keith Ingram, Cotton Center 

Viviin Ingrain, Dallas 

Ernest Inmon, Paris 

Paul Irlheck, Tulia 

Noel Ischy, Midland 

Steve Jackson, Abernathy 

Henry Jacobs, Houston 

Douglas Jacobson, Houston 

Don James, Ft. Worth 

Joan B. James. Ira 

Mary Linn James, Odessa 

Jimmy Jairell, Lubbock 

Dianne Jenkins, Galveston, 

Dennis Jennings, Burkett 

Janet Jennings, Roswell, 

New Mexico 

Patti Johns, Arlington 

Susan Johns, Houston 

Beverly Johnson, Dallas 

Bill Johnson, San Antonio 

Dexter Johnson. Andrews 

Clynda Johnson Borger 

H. L. Johnson, Houston 

Judy Johnson, McCamey 

Margaret Johnson, Hamlin 

Mary Beth Johnson, Pampa 

Roger Johnson, Burkburnett 

James Johnston, Lubbock 

Janetia Johnston, Lubbock 

Thomas Johnston, San Angela 

Robert Joiner, Lubbock 

Bruce Jones, Amarillo 

Bill Jones, Amarillo 

Cindy Jones, Hereford 

Jana Elaine Jones, Matador 

Jerry Jones, Houston 

Linda C. Jones, Houston 

Vakia Jones, Otlon 

Eddie Jordan, Crosbyton 

Ronny Jordon, O'Donnell 

Gary Justice, Lubbock 

Michael Kamp, Irving 

James Karcher, Vernon 

Richard Kawazoe, San 

Antonio 

Jan Kellev. Corpus Christi 

Mike Kelley, Ft. Worth 

Betty Kelly, Dallas 

Debbie Kennedy, Amarillo 

George Kennedy, Atlanta 

Andy Kerr, Lubbock 

Karen Kerr, Henrietta 

Mike Kerr, Austin 

Louise Kiesling, San Angela 

Beth Killip, League City 

Walter Kilroy. Dallas 

Allen Kinchelve, Odessa 

James Kav King, Mulrshoe 

Julie King, Carmington, 

New Mexico 

Karen King. Plainiirw 

Larry King, Lubbock 

Kathy Kingnburg, Michigan 

l2~-]uruor View 




I) 



ilSS 




IfifeifiL 



II 



n 




^SSSIli 




: 




Ella S. Kinsey, Lamesa 
Diana Kinslow, Lubbock 
Lou Ann Kinsolving, 

Crossroads, New Mexico 
Pamela Kirk, Borger 
Sherry Kirkland, Seabrook 
Gene Klaes, El I'aso 
Peggy Klatt, Abetnathy 
Lynda Gayle Klattenhoff, 

Miles 
Katliy Klein, Kingsville 
Linda KIcinknecht, Seabrook 
Donna Klous, Lubbock 
Bobby Knight, El I'aso 
Karen Knieriem, San Antonio 
Steven James Knight, Dallas 
Joe Kocurek, Seymour 
Barbara Knester, Lubbock 
Charles Kramme, San 

Antonio 
David Krause, Abernathy 
Gary Krause, Dallas 
Annette Krisller, Houston 
Moyian Kritser, Amarillo 
Lynn Krohn, El Paso 
Tony Kuehler, Seymour 
Karen Kunkel, Irving 
Nancy Kupp, Dallas 
Linda Kuttlitz, (Toco 
Becky Lacy, Midland 
Linda Lambert, Houston 
Larry Landusky, Hobbs 
Janice Lang, Plainview 
Allan Lange, Rowena 
Landra Laning, Uvalde 
Michael Lankford, Tahoka 
Freddie Larez, Midland 
Barbara Larkin, Lubbock 
Cindy Laseil, Galveston 
Don Laseter, Ft. Worth 
Sharon Lashley, Houston 
Billy Lasiter, Brownjield 
Rol>ert Lawrence, Houston 
Robyn Lawry, Mineral Wells 
Lyda Lawson, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 
Mickey Leach, Plainview 
Nedra Leach, Lubbock 
Ray Leach, Hurst 
Sharon Leach, Montpelier, 

Vermont 
Jamie Ledbetter, Goldthwaite 
Susan Ledbetter, Waco 
Jay Lee, Uvalde 
Susan Lehmann, Bellaire 
Rose Mary Lee, Hart 
Ray Lehman, Amarillo 
Cheryl Leinen, Dimmitt 
Larry Leonard, Pampa 
Linda Lepard, Knott 
Robert Leshmski, 

Sacramento, California 
Ann Lesok, Ft. Worth 
Betty Lester, San Antonio 
Alan Levin, Houston 
Rhonda Lewis, Litllejield 
Rob Lewis, Buffalo 
Emily Liang, Hong Kong 
Kenneth Lihxwiler, Dallas 
John Linder, Lubbock 
Nancy Lindsay, Abilene 
Gary Lindsey, Ft. Worth 
Carrie Line, O'Donnell 
Alexa Linnevold, Midland 
Barbara Linxwiler, Dallas 
Jaycile Little, Amarillo 
Donna Livingston, Dallas 
Fred Lockwood, Brownwood 
William Lodal, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 
Linda Logan, San Angela 
Richard Logan, Kermit 
Becky Lomax, Van Horn 
Judy London, Mentone 
Mary Jane Long, New 

Braunjels 
Mike Long, Silverton 
Mike Lnoncy, Dallas 
Cathy Lott, Georgetown 
Peggy Loudder, Odessa 
Robert Louie, San Antonio 
James Gary Louthan, Hale 

Center 
Donna Love, San Antonio 
Horace Lowler. Lubbock 
Rebecca Lowrey, Knox City 
Nancy Luck, Andrews 

Junior View — 13 



Outside School Activitie 



•s M 





Juniois Ben Turner and Ellen Noble take time out from studying to enjoy themselves with theii hula hoops. 



Jack Luke, Amarillo 
Linda Luker, Galveston 
Ricky Lunsford, Farwell 
Carol Lyde, Dallas 
Linda Lynch, Hereford 
Linda McAteer, Jaylon 








Julie McCabe, Hampton 



Nancy McCarthy, Houston 

Delbert McCloy, Sunray 

Cristi McComiick, Wilson 

William McCormick, RopesviHe 

Bobby iMcCowen, Lubbock 

Marcia McCoy, Carlsbad, New Mexico 

Cheryl McCrary, Burkburnett 



Tom McCrary, Hobbs 
Paul McCright, Hooks 
Lesjy McCuigton, Lubbock 
Walter McCullough, Comanche 
Gary McCurry, Boulder, Colorado 
MeKa McCulcheon. Ifhiteface 
Cheryl McDaniel, Morion 



14— Junior View 



^vitieExtended in All Directions 



m 



i 




These two juniors take time out, from a tiring game of tennis. 



itsci 



i\ 





John McGuire, Phoenix, Arizona 
Mairilyn McGuire, Irving 
Bill Mcintosh, Amarillo 



Roddy Melver, Wink 

Bruce McKibben, Nacogdoches 

Anne McKinney, Houston 



Elaine McLaughlin, Lubbock 
Mary Helen McNair, Beeville 
Diana McNamara, Spring Lake 



Bruce McNeil, Ft. Worth 
Judy McNeil, Ft. Worth 
Marsha McNutt, Lovington 



Mina McDonald, Lubbock 
Warren McDougall, Kerrville 
Jim McEvoy, Dallas 
Patty McFarland, Dallas 
James McGee, Lubbock 
Carol McGehee, Piano 




McKenzie Park is a popular spot for feeding the ducks. 

Junior V-iew — 15 



Connie McWilliams, Midland 

Melinda McWilliams, 

Seminole 

Karen MacAllister, Lubbock 

Pat Mackey, Midland 

Jerry Macba, Bomarton 

Linda Mahlmann, Georgetown 

Don Malcik, Lubbock 

Dave Malone, Ft. Worth 

John Mandel, Ft. Worth 

Thomas Mandry, Odessa 

Bill Mannino;. Houston 

Joanne Mansfield, Dallas 

Marilvn Minxes, Kermit 

Woodi Marchbanks, 

Brownjield 

Jack Marr, Lubbock 

Terry Marr?, Crane 

Kay Marshall, Aledo 

Martha Marshall, Dallas 

Danny Martin, Sudan 

Diane Martin Dnll s 

Glenn Martin, Odessa 

Martha Martin, Friona 

Max Martin, Lu66ocA; 

Roberta Martin, Dallas 

Susan Martin, Houstcn 

Terry Martin, Seymour 

Dan Martindale, Austin 

Diane Maruganie, Lahue, 

Hawaii 

Susan M;!ssa, Houston 

Philip Massie, Pampa 

Charles Mathis. Chandler 

Terry Matthews, Austin 

Bob Mattiele, Amarillo 

Rob Matson, Lubbock 

Sharrn Mauddin Spearman 

Bill Maxwell, Temple 

William Mayne, Lubbock 

June Mayo, Petersburg 

Joe Meacham, Turkey 

Ronnie Meador, Odessa 

Jimmy Jay Mebane, Dumas 

Gill Medina, S'ln Antonio 

Richard Melvills, Midland 

Marilyn Menard, Seabrook 

Bnbbi Mes^er, Houston 

David Messersmith, Lubbock 

Robert Metzger, Brownlield 

Diane Meyer, St. Louis, 

Missouri 

Deana Millen, Dallas 

Albert Miller, l^alentine 

Barbara Miller, Bay town 

Dan Miller, Lazbuddie 

Hal Miller, Baird 

Bob Millican, El Paso 

Carolyn Mills, Andrews 

Chris Mills, Roswell New 

Mexico 

Boyd Milncr. Tulia 

William Mitchell, Lamesa 

William E. Mitchell, Trent 

Donna Mize, Colorado City 

William Mize, Odessa 

Betty Moldenhau^r, 

Fredericksburg 

Rosemary Monaco, San 

Antonio 

Mary Montague, Galveston 

Jon Montgomery, Wuxahachic 

Kathy Montgomery, San 

Antonio 

Melanie Montgomery, 

Houston 

Dianne Mooney, Lockney 

U. E. Moore, Lubbock 

Thomas Moore, Olney 

John Moravcik, Odessa 

Charles Morello, San Antonio 

Chickie Morgan, Ft. 

Clayton-Panama 

Jane Morgan, Kilgore 

Michele Morgan, Bonham 

Ronnie Morgan Midland 

Emily Morrell, Ft. Worth 

Beverly Morris, Brownjield 

Deanna Morris, Big Spring 

Laurie Morris, Houston 

M. R. Morris, Houston 

Susie Miirri?, Beeville 

Linda Morrison, Pasadena 

Shcri Morrison, Hart 

William Moss, Lubbock 

George Mostad, Winters 

C.Dcn Motley, Beaumont 

Linda Muillin, Lubbock 

lb—Junior Vien 




« 



2~™Si^!^ 




i 




fm 










Wmm 



Rodney Vance Mullin, 

Turkey 
David .\lurphy, Dallas 
Gayla Murphy, San Antonio 
Susan Murphy, Richardson 
John Murray, Kress 
Laura Murray, Dallas 
Muff Musgrave, Lubbock 
Real Musgrave, Lubbock 
Robert Mussehnan, 

Texarkana 
John Myatt, Lubbock 
Dianne Myers, Rockwell 
Gary Lynn Myers, Amurillo 
Steve Myers, Lubbock 
Jimmy Nahors, Amarillo 
Tina Nance, Silverlon 
Lesle Nash, Lubbock 
Phil Nash, Seagraves 
Ralph Navarino, Dallas 
Maltha Naylor, Littlejield 
Pat Neal, San Angela 
Gail Neely, Amarillo 
Miles Neely, Amarillo 
Henry Neff, Borger 
Laurel Nelson, Houston 
Nancy Neujahr, Midland 
Nancy Neumeyer, Liberty 
Susan Newell, Robert Lee 
Sally NewKirk, Ft. Worth 
Joe Newton, Lubbock 
Pat Nickell, Lubbock 
Glen Nicks, Odessa 
Sandra Nix, Sudan 
John Nixon, Mineral Wells 
Ken NorthcutI, Tulia 
Thelnia Nowlin, Perrylon 
Jay Oakley, Amarillo 
Mike O'Brien, Morion 
Jackie O'Connor, San Jose, 

C.alijornia 
Patti Odell, Liberty 
Greg Odom, Dallas 
James Odom, Alvarado 
Pat O'Donohoe, Wichita Falls 
Jan Ogilvie, Borger 
Toya Joan Ohlrich, New 

Braunjels 
Michael Oliphant, Ft. 

Hancock 
Michael Oliver, Midland 
Cynthia Olmsted, Ft. Worth 
Gayla Olson, Levelland 
Judith A. Olson, Panhandle 
Tricia O'Malley, Richardson 
Pam O'Neal, Texarkana, 

Arkansas 
Shannon O'Reilly, Odessa 
Dennis Oshorn. Amarillo 
Kellah Osborn, Seagraves 
Susan O^nik, Dallas 
William Louis Outlaw, 

Clifton 

Patty Owen, Tyler 
Ross Owen, Midland 
Sally Owen, Midland 
Sharon Owen, Lubbock 
Ray Owens, Galena Park 
James Oyler, Lubbock 
Charlotte Pace, Wellman 
Jo Ann Palazzolo, Denton 
Bovley Palit, Calcutta, India 
Carolyn Palmer, Midland 
Celeste Pardee, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 
Terry D. Parham, Muleshoe 
Doyle Parker, Brownjield 
Samuel Parker, Lubbock 
Ronnie Parnell, Odessa 
Susan Patrick, Farwell 
Kathy Patterson, Austin 
Stephen Patterson, Bedford 
Gerald Paulk, Lubbock 
Harold Paulk. Lubbock 
Carl Payne, Houston 
Jeffrey Payne, Friendswood 
Lorraine Pa\ne, Harlingen 
Phillip Payne, Stanton 

(^amlvn Pearie, Midland 
B'Ann Peek. Midland 
Rcnnii- Pcnn. /•'(. Worth ■ 
Patricia Perkins, Lubbock 
R(ig( r Petersen, Philips 
Phil Pharies, Levelland 
D(iini< Phillips. Lubbock 
Don Pies. Dallas 

junior View — 17 



Gladys Pinkert, RopesvilU 

Nancy Ruth Pinto, Amarillo 

Mike Pitner, Odessa 

Phyllis Pitts, Lubbock 

John M. Poe, Clifton 

Laura Pohler, Baytown 

Manny Pointer, Stanton 

Bill PoUey, Austin 

Clara Porter, Menard 

Shelia Poulson, Lorenzo 

Anita Powell, Marshall 

Jane Powell, Spur 

Judy Powell, Midland 

Cecil Preas, Coleman 

Beverly Price, Leveltand 

Renee Price, Lubbock 

Nancy Prosk, San Antonio 

Janice Pruett, Dallas 

Norma Pumphrey, Amarillo 

Bruce Purdy, Muleshoe 

Sherri Purdy, Dalhart 

Trudy Putteet, Lubbock 

Michael Pyron, Hillsboro 

Glen Quebe, Lockney 

Kenny Ragland, Snyder 

Steve Ramsey, Dallas 

Ronnie Randolph, Lubbock 

Bob Rascoe, Midland 

Bruce Ray, Lubbock 

Cathy Ray, Odessa 

Kathy Ray, Artesia, New 

Mexico 

Dyra J. Reasonorver, 

Seagraves 

Sandy Reat, Lubbock 

Cathy Reaves, Ft. Worth 

Clark Reed, Paris 

Jack Reed, San Angela 

Janet Kay Reed, Lubbock 

Paul Reed, Lubbock 

Scott Reed, San Antonio 

Harold Reese, Byers 

Gary Reeves, Dalhart 

James Patton Reeves, El 

Paso 

Steve Reichmuth, Wichita 

Falls 

Raeann Reid, Deer Park 

Paralyn Render, Dimmitt 

Barbara Reynolds, 

Brownwood 

Clinton Rhea, Plaintnew 

Suzanne Rboads, Lubbock 




I 




\ 



UnjE 
tkRii( 



IS — Junior View 



During final* Tech itudents wonder ii it is all worth it. 









Jerry Rice, Abernathy 

Linda Rice, Irving 

Dorothy Richards, San Antonio 



Phil Richards, Paducah 
Belva Richardson, Hurst 
John L. Richardson, Lubbock 



Mark Richardson, Cisco 
Thomas Richmond, Chicago, 

Illinois 
Janis Rickard, Temple 



Ann Riggs, Midland 
Nedree Riggs, Lubbock 
Claudia Rigsby, Fabens 



Andy Riley, Dallas 
Barbara Rinne, Dallas 
Nadine Rittimann, Houston 



Linda Ritzinger, Andrews AFB, 

Washington, D. C. 
Steve Roach, Odessa 
Alice Roark, Roswell, New 

Mexico 



Beverly Robbins, Dallas 
Guy Roberson, Lockney 
Marcy Roberts, San Antonio 



Sam Roberts, Lubbock 
Linda Robertson, Odessa 
Eddie Robinson, Lamesa 



Elizabeth Robinson, Killeen 
Mike Robinson, Dallas 
William Robnett, Midland 



Monico Rodriquez, Earth 

Jane Roe, Ft. Worth 

Jo Ellen Roe, Anton 

Nancy Jo Roebuck, Waxahachie 

Janie Rogers, Amarillo 

Patti Rogers, Lubbock 

Randall Rogers, Ft. Worth 



Rosemary Rogers, Phillips 
Darla Rose, Lubbock 
Jane Rowland, Big Spring 
Joe Dan Rowland, Big Spring 
Barbara Runge, Houston 
Kathie Rushing, Shamrock 
Charles Rutan, Richardson 



Junior View — 19 



Dan Ruth, Dallas 

Kay Ryan, Arlington 

Wallace Saage, Slalon 

Michael Sadler, Littlejield 

Maria Lupe Salazar, Lubbock 

Dinah Salyars, Lubbock 

John Sanders, Austin 

Judy Sanders, Tulia 

Vicki Sanders, Earth 

Harliss Sandlin, Lubbock 

Patrick Sandlin, San Antonio 

Sandy Sandlin, Lubbock 

Paula A. Savage, Lubbock 

Sharon Schmidly, El Paso 

Marian Schmidt, Brookshire 

Sara Schmitt, Saint Jo 

Bill Schnakel, Dallas 

Linda Schrag, San Antonio 

David Schrodt, Lubbock 

Lina Schwab, Ft. Worth 

Steven Schwartzkopf, 

Houston 

Phil Scott, San Antonio 

Mike Seabolt, Rockwall 

Carol Dean Seaborn, 

Muteshoe 

Rosemary Scale, Amarillo 

Larry Scales, Levelland 

Hayden Seay, Ft. Worth 

Deborah Seguin, Lubbock 

Aunie Sellers, Ralls 

Myra Setliff, Plainview 

Sandee Sewell, Lubbock 

Joanie Seymour, Amarillo 

Susan SchackcHord, 

Midland 

Betty Shaddix, Midland 

Jeanine Shaffer, Ft. Worth 

Gay Shamblin, Midland 

Eddie Sharp, Dalhart 

Gina Sharp, Lubbock 

Billy Edward Shaver, Odessa 

Marsha Shaver, Rochester 

Kathy Shaw, Big Spring 

Shea Lynn Shaw, Brownwood 

Len Sheets. Texline 

Lynnette Sheffield, Brenham 

Nadene Shelnutt, Clyde 

Wayne Shelton, Lubbock 

Gretchen Sherk, Houston 

Linda Ann Shenell, El Paso 

Judy Shipp, Dallas 

Elton Shires, Childress 

Jo Shiric, Brownwood 

Charlotte Shively, Port 

Lavaca 

Clinton Shoemaker, 

Beaumont 

Mike Shoesmith, Waco 

Steve Short, Kerrvilte 

Nancy Shotton, Jal, New 

Mexico 

Newton Shrader, Midland 

Christy Sibley, Calsbad, New 

Mexico 

Kay Ann Simek, Seymour 

Roi Sue Simmons, Odessa 

R. S. Simms, Houston 

Mary Simnacher, Pep 

Steve Simcneau, Lancaster 

John Simpson, Midland 

Ronald Sims, Houston 

G. R. Sirles, Houston 

Pam Sisson, Dumas 

Mary Skoog, Emernon, 

Nebraska 

Sydnea Slingerland, Corpus 

Christi 

Harold David Sloan. Jermyn 

Mike Small, Dallas 

Vicki Smart. Houston 

Carolyn Smelley, San 

Antonio 

Barbara Smith, Longville 

Byrne Smith, Houston 

Charia Smith, Olton 

Cheryl L. Smith, Odessa 

David Lewis Smith, Friona 

Diana Smith, Houston 

Gloria Smith, Lubbock 

Jimmie Smith, Llano 

Lawrrni c Smith, Seagraves 

Linda Lee Smith. Lubbock 

Nancy Jo Smith. Knox City 

Rick»-y Smith. Sweetwater 

Sharon Smith. Grand 

Jolenr Sncll. Lnmesa 

Harriett Snider, Seguin 

20— Junior View 




iiSS 



#!if3 



\ 



•Li 





i^i^s 





Jimmy Snowden, Lubbock 
Bill Snuffer, Houston 
Beveny Socha, San Angela 
Phillip Spalding, Kerrvitle 
Barbara Specht, 

Fredericksburg 
Bob Spencer, Bartlesville, 

Oklahoma 
Johnny Spencer, Lubbock 
Sarah Spill, Winters 

Michael Spinks, Kermit 
Jeanne Spitler, Richardson 
Eldon Stapp, Lubbock 
Mary Staudt, Arlington 
Pam Stavlez, Sanderson 
John Stearns, Abilene 
Ruth Stell, Houston 
Sam Stennis, Amarillo 
Gary Stephens, Ft. Worth 
Cheryl Stevens, Lockney 
Beth Steward, Comanche 
Dale Stewart, San Antonio 
Robert Stoerkel, Houston 
Mary Stogdill, McKinney 
Kathlynn Stone, Ft. Worth 
David Stordal, Grand Saline 



Judy Storm, Brownwood 
Ann Strawhorn, Stephenville 
Thomas Strayhorn, Snyder 
Mike Stroebel, Rising Star 
Mary Carol Stuard, Stanton 
James Stuart, Lamesa 
Lee Stubbs, Corpus Christi 
Jerry Sullivan, Marshall 

John Summers, Lubbock 
Emily Sumner, Amarillo 
Patsy Swafford, La Mesa 
Karen Swann, Wilson 
Jack Swatzell, Canyon 
Peggy Switzer, Floydada 
Janice Sword, Houston 
Terry Tarkenton, Mineral 

Wells 
Sallie Tarkington, Lubbock 
Donald Taylor, Dallas 
Tia Taylor, Ft. Worth 
Debbie Tergerson, Midland 
Wanda Teston, Hobbs, New 

Mexico 
Dwayne Thacker, San Angela 
Michael Thigpen, Gilmer 
Royce Thigpen, Amarillo 

Cathy Thomas, Dallas 
Linda Thomas, Lubbock 
Stephen, Thomas, Pampa 
Cebe Sue Thompson, Houston 
Gayle Thompson, Snyder 
Sandi Thompson, Burleson 
Tina Thompson, El Paso 
Craig Thomson, Abilene 




^-^ 'Min . All 





Richard Thornesberry, Bowie 
Mariann TTiornton, Houston 
Ronald Thuett, Post 
Stephen Thurmond, Houston 
Kathy Tillman, Houston 
Margaret Timmins, San 

Angela 
Kaki Tinsley, Lamesa 
Gloria Tipton, Midland 
Sharon Tipton, Imperial 
Don Toland, El Paso 
George Tom, Andrews 
James Tompkins, Rotan 
Cathy Townsend, Roscoe 
Amy Trail, Dallas 
Terry Travis, Gilmer 
Michelle Traynor, 

Woodbridge, Virginia 

Edwina Trimble, Hamilton 
Doug Triplet!, Abilene 
Charlie Troncale, Houston 
Nancy Tuck, Lubbock 
James Tucker, Allen 
Carolyn Tunnell, Cross 

Plains 
Nancy Turner, Brownjield 
John Ulmer, Odessa 

Junior View— 



21 



Juniors Continue Pushing Tc 



Katie Upshaw, Canyon 

Ramon Uranga, El Paso 

Marsha Urbanczyk, 

Panhandle 

James Van Stavem, 

Levelland 

Audette Vaughn, Saint Joe 

Judye Vaughn, Verhalen 

Kenneth W. Vaughn, 

Lubbock 

Laura Vernon, Bartlesville, 

Oklahoma 

Roger Vest, Midland 

Shirley Jean Vincent, Lafors 

Ann Vogler, Amarillo 

James O. Vogt, Houston 

Kit Volkel, Houston 

Shayesleh Vossoupht Ernn 

Mike Wadzeck, Plainview 

Kathey Wafford, Irving 



Tom Waggoner, Amarillo 
Don Walker, Waxahachie 
Kathy Walker, Grand Prairie 
Lucille Walker, Lamesa 
Sharon Walkowiak, Lubbock 
Janice Wall, Guarah 
Greg Wallace, Greenville 
Teari Wallace. Houston 
Francis Walsh, Amarillo 
Charles Walters, Houston 
James Ward, Childress 
Suzanne Ward, Amarillo 
Vera Ward, Odessa 
Travis Ware, Ralls 
Mark Warren, Denver City 
Ross A. Washam, Dallas 
Michael Watkins, 
Stephenville 
Barbara Watson, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Genie Watson, Dallas 
Michael Watson, New Castle 
Oran Watson, Tulia 
Janis Watts, Navasota 
John Watts, Odessa 
Susan Weatherley, Carlsbad, 
New Mexico 
Jim Weathers, Petersburg 
Tommy Weathersbee, 
Floydada 
Jean Anne Webb, Seagraves 
Theresa Webb, Denver City 
Dan Webster, San Franciso 
Travis Weems, Floydada 
James Welch, Crowell 
Vela Moore Welch, Ft. Worth 



Richard Wells, Marshall 

Barbara Werckle, San 

Antonio 

Barbara West, Lubbock 

Monte Weslfall, Floydada 

Glenna Westmoreland, 

Corpus Christi 

Larry Whatlcy, Denver, 

Colorndo 

Laura Wheeler, Olton 

Lvnette Wheeler. Amarillo 

Dicky White, San Angela 

James White, Plainview 

Joe White, Odessa 

Karen White, Knox City 

Richard White, Tahoka 

Ronny White, Hereford 

Sue While, Anna 

Paula Wilcox, Dallas 




IJ 




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} 



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^^Sf^ 1 



22— Junior View 



T 



hin 



g [ Towards Higher Ideals 




Melissa Wilkenson, Lubbock 
Cathy Wilkie Pampa 
Tony Wilkins, Amarillo 
Keith Willerton, Borger 
BiU Willey, Hobhs, New 

Mexico 
Donna William, Gilmer 
Ruth Ann William, Spur 
Anita Williams, Brownjield 
Esther Williams, Ozona 
Grady Williams, Hamilton 
Gregg Williams, Dallas 
Joe Williams, Jr., Plainview 
Kathryn J. Williams, 

Eastland 
Marcella Williams, Muleshoe 
Quinn Williams, Lubbock 
Ray Williams, Dallas 



Roslyn Williams, Dallas 
Susan Williams, Waco 
Chris Willistonj, Austin 
Cindy Willoughby, Ft. Worth 
Danny Wilson, Burleson 
Jo Ann Wilson, Ft. Worth 
Lindell Wilson, Muleshoe 
Mark Wilson, Colorado City 



IJI 




A Saturday afternoon at the Fiji Olympics entails an exciting time for the participating sororities. 



Junior View — 23 



Sharon Wilson, Stratford 

Dian Winans, Lubbock 

Kathy Windrow, Dallas 

Terr>' Winn, Seabrook 

Orrin Alden Wobip, Seabrook 

Linda Wolf, Wink 

Alan Wolff, Ft. Worth 

Diane Wood, Crosbyton 

VaDonna Wood, Lamesa 

Mike Woodruff, Midland 

Don Woodward, Austin 

Donna Woodward, Austin 

Cheryl Wooldridge, Hedley 

Linda Wooten, Lockney 

Stephen J. Wren, Decatur 

Cynthia Wright, Amarillo 



Dan Wright, Lubbock 

David Wright, Midland 

John Wright, Lubbock 

Paula Wright, Port Neches 

Richard Wrieht, Littletield 

Judy Wuensche, Fredericksburg 

Lou Wulfjen, Richardson 




Jerry Wyatt, Petersburg 

Elizabeth Wynn, Houston 

Paula A. Wynn, Amarillo 

Blake Wynne, Abilene 

Sally Yamini, Dillas 

Charlie Yates, Ft. Worth 



w 



Lee York, Marba 

Jean Marie Young, Hamlin 

Juana Young, Bula 

Margie Young, Coleman 

Gordon Zeigler, Plainview 



Mkjiul 



John Zihlman. Ft. Worth 

Marsha Zintgraff, San Antonio 

Bruce Zoller, Midland 

Robert Zuitgraff, San Antonio 




Juniors Marty Critwell, Jo VanClenwinkle, and Richard Hodge seem to have the tables turned as they try to tow the campus cops* car away! 
24 — Junior View 



Ill 




"IT 
JLI®I171 




JDS^ 

Featuring All Name 

Brands of Sporting 

Goods 

Across From Jones Stadium 
601 University 

762-0151 



WACO 

I4IS North Fourth Strtct, Bo< 32i 
Waco, T«as 7i703 (I7-7S2-25II 

AUSTIN 

3fOI Guadalupe, Boi IMM 
Austin, Texas 7<7i7 5I2-454-3M3 



McALLEN 

1100 East Highway K 

McAllen, Texas 7580r SI2-U2-i33l 

LUBBOCK 

Ul University, Box 1497 

Lubbock, Texas 7?408 aOi-7i2-OI5l 



VICTORIA 

308 East Stayton. Box 223a 

Victoria, Texas 77?0I 5l2-575-0t5l 

HOUSTON 

7110 Harwin Drive, Box 3U72 
Houston, Texas 770U 7I3-785-5M0 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

Serving Tech With Complete 
Photographic Service for 
38 Years . . . 

• Charming Porirai+s 

• Placement Pictures 

• Sorority and Fraternity 
Composite Pictures 

• Party Pictures 

2222 BROADWAY 

762-8755 

1311 UNIVERSITY 

763-3191 

All class and organization 

pictures 

are on pernnanent file — reorder 

any tinne by name and year nnade 



f ar i»>!' 



TEXAS TECH 
CHAIR 



MADE OF NORTHERN YELLOW BIRCH 

AU Black Chair 

With 

College Seal 

39.25 

Black Chair With 

Cherry Color Arms 

With 

College Seal 

40.00 




Ideal for a Gift 
Handsome Addition to Home 

Office or Den 
Will Conform With Any Trend 



SHIPPED TO ANY ADDRESS - FREIGHT COLLECT FROM FACTORY 



THE OFFICIAL* CLASS RING FOR 

TEXAS TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY 

This Handsome Richly Symbolic Ring 
Was Selected as the Official Ring for 
Texas Technological University. 

The Quality and Craftsmanship 
of This Distinctly Beautiful Ring 
Reflect the Fine Traditions 
of the University. 

* Copyrighted 

WRITE FOR DESCRIPTIVE FOLDER AND CONVENIENT ORDER BLANK 

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY 
BOOKSTORE 




ON CAMPUS 



LUBBOCK, TEXAS 79409 



P. O. Box 4398 Tech Sution 
Phone 743-3262 



LA VENTANA • 1970 
SOPHOMORE 





*1 



i 



VIEW 



LA VENTANA • 1970 • VOLUME 45 



Sheila Looney 
Elaine Saul 
Co-editors 

Ray McWilliams 
Art Editor 




THE CAMPUS SCENE 



Barrel Thomas 

Director of Photography 

Richard Mays, Head 
Bob Darby 
Jeff Lawton 
Mike Warden 

Photography Staff 



For Every Action There Is 
... A Reaction 



STAFF 



!• 



Bill Dean 

Director 
Jean Finley 

Business Manager 
Janice Aldridge 

Secretary 
Taylor Publishing G). 

Printer 



Patty McKinney, editor 



Beverly Brown 
Ann Donegan 
Jani Gunn 
Becky Lacy 
Stephnie Round, staff 



MORE THAN 11,000 CIRCULATION 



m 



Sophomore View — i 



For Every Action, There Is a . . 



m' -. 



»». 




^ 



2 — Sophomore View 



!• 




. . . Reaction 



Newton's law, "For every ac- 
tion there is a ... reaction," ap- 
plies not only to science but also 
to people. Life is composed of 
actions and reactions. There are the 
actor's actions and the audience's 
reactions of applause and laughter; 
the action of a touchdown and the 
reaction of cheers from the stands; 
the action of construction workers 
and the reaction of having a new 
academic building; and many 
others. The story of Tech Sopho- 
mores, 1970, can be read not only 
in the actions or events of the year 
but also in the faces of the students. 



I 



m 




Sophomore View — 3 



Half Time Action Begins 




Dean Killon directs the "Going Band Ftom Raiderland" for fantastic 
half time performances on the field. 



Suzie Allen, Ft. Worth 

Althea Allison, Childress 

Dorothy Allison, Temple, Oklahoma 

Alfred AUred, Wellington 

Donna Alspaugh, Slalon 

Ray Alverson, Burnett 

John M. Amfflons, Rohy 

Alan Anderson, Lubbock 

Barbee Anderson, Ft. Worth 

Deborah Anderson, Lubbock 

Diane Anderson, Richardson 

Donoie Anderson, Lubbock 

Robert Anderson, Arlington 

David Andrae, Plainview 

Billy Armstrong, Kress 

Michael Armstrong, Wichita Falls 

Mitchell Armstrong, Wichita Falls 

Carolyn Arnett, Lubbock 

Virginia Arnett, Clayton, New Mexico 

Anita Arnold, El Dorado, Arkansas 

Cheryl Arnold, Snydtr 

Mike Arrington, Dallas 

Gwendolyn Ashba, Brady 

Dennis Ashby, Hereford 

Linda Ashford, Muleshoe 

Dennis Ashby, Hereford 

Susan Atteburg, Dallas 

Rick Austin, Lubbock 



Susan Abbott, Temple 

Thomas Abbott, Red River, 

New Mexico 

Charles Abraham, Amarillo 



Lou Ann Adams, Ft. Worth 

Susie Adler, La Feria 

Ronnie Agnew, New Deal 



Future Akins, Lubbock 

Don Alana, Lubbock 

Roberta Albracht, Hereford 



Adrian Alexander, Waxahachie 
Priss Alexander, Midland 
Wes Alexander Jr., Cuero 



Mary Allan, Pecos 

Martha Allbright, San Marcos 

Gary Allen, Bronte 



Ginny Allen, Houston 

Karen Allen, Aransas Pass 

Steve Allen, Houston 




I 



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y 






4 — Sophomore View 




On the Practice Field 





Linda Ayers, Carrizo Springs 
Kathy Baer, Shallowaler 
Jan Babcock, Houston 
Steven Baggerly, Spearman 
Anna Bains, Brookshire 
Jacquelyn Baird, Arlington 
James Baird, White Oak 

Debbie Baker, Dallas 

Jim Baker, Hartley 

Nathaniel Baker, Plaintiew 

Rebecca Baker, Wichita Falls 

Vince Baldino, Dallas 

Bobby Ball, Slalon 

Susan Ballantyne, Liberal, Kansas 

Gregg Ballentine, Ft. Worth 
Mike Ballentine, Ft. Worth 
Jesse Ballew, Rye, New York 
Robert Ballew, Lubbock 
Gail Banks, Dumas 
Pat Barenkamp, Dallas 
Judy Barnett, Perryton 

K. R. Barnett, Midland 
Peggy Barney, Crockett 
Ricky Bartell, Plainview 
Becky Lou Barton, Victoria 
Linda Barton, Dallas 
Dee Ann Bass, Nacogdoches 
Vina Bass, Muleshoe 

Debbie Bates, San Antonio 
Nancy Battle, Dallas 
Danny Battles, DimmitI 
Pat Beal, Corpus Christi 
Tim Beasley, Merkel 
Cynthia Jane Beck, Sylvester 
Danny Beck, Seymour 

Cindi Beckham, Arlington 

Kenneth Bednarczuk, Lebanon, Ohio 

Pansy Been, Earth 

Mary Beeson, Spur 

David Bell, Dallas 

Eugene Bell, Abilene 

Janet Bell, Port Isabel 

Richard Bell, Ft. Worth 
Martha Bellah, Richardson 
Carol Bellew, Ft. Worth 
Carol Bennett, Clifton 
Cathy Bering, Bellaire 
Paul Berner, Houston 
Landa Berry, Lakeview 

Rebecca Berryhill, Quitaque 
Joan Besly, Amarillo 
Tom Besly, Amarillo 
Diane Besnette, El Paso 
Ray Bigbee, Lubbock 
Pat Billingsley, Clyde 
Barbara Bingham, Slaton 

Wendy Biro. Odessa 
Dudley Birdwell, Jourdanton 
Richard Black, Lubbock 
Jennifer Blackburn, Bowie 
Charles Blachlock, Rockdale 
Dale Blackstone, Muleshoe 
Judy Blanchard, Ft. Worth 

Dana Bland, Haskell 

Kris Blankenship, Greenville 

Diane Blasingame, Dallas 

Johnny Blau, Houston 

Susan Blinderman, Amarillo 

Doug Bobo, Houston 

Tom Bogart, Atlanta, Georgia 



Sophomore View — 5 



Classes, Labs, Partying Get 



Pat Bogan, Richardson 

John L. Boney 

Charlotte Book, Miles 

Jan Book, Lufkin 

Paul Borders, Dallas 

Charlsa Boren, Austin 

Ann Bostick, Odessa 

Gary Bounds, Abilene 

Niki Bournias, San Antonio 

Jay Bouden, San Antonio 

Pat Bowen, Ft. Worth 

Charlotte Bowers, Houston 

Sharon Bowman, Tomball 

Deborah Boyd, Brownuood 

Amy Bradford, Los Angeles, California 

David Bradley, Hurst 

Michael Brady, Rapid City, South Dakota 

Scott Brady, San Benito 

James Branch, Aspermoni 

G. Brassovan, Midland 

Sucey Brendle, Lubbock 

Gwen Briggs, Dallas 

Barbara Brigham, Lubbock 

Jeff Briley, Odessa 

Dorothy Brinell, Stamford 

Louis Britten, Conway 

Billy Brock, Lubbock 

Melodie Brock, Earth 

Barry Brooks, Lubbock 

Debby Brotherton, Lockney 

Gary Browder, Lubbock 

Barbara Brown, Louisville, Kentucky 

Betsy Brown, El Paso 

Betty Brown, Baytoun 

Betty Brown, San Antonio 

Bill Brown, Cornona 

Bonnie Brown, El Paso 

Candace Brown, Slaton 

Charlie Brown, Hobbs, New Mexico 

David K. Brown, Jefferson 

Douglas Brown, Brown field 

Karen Brown, Dallas 

Michael Brown, Lubbock 

Susan Brown, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Tommy Brown, Paducah 

Rebecca Brownfield, Lubbock 

Beth Brownless, Abilene 

Jenne Bruce, Eslelline 

Ann Bruffey, Lubbock 

Betsy Bryant, Slaton 

Nancy Bublis, Plainview 

Dale Buckner, Lubbock 

Jean Buller, Lubbock 

Tom Bunch, Ft. Worth 

Tesi Bundick, Victoria 

Cynthia Burdette, Vernon 

Sherry Burk, Andrews 
Sherry Burnam, Iraan 

Ruth Burney, Midland 

David Burns, San Antonio 

Nancy Burns, Odessa 

Fred Bursey, Cleburne 

Kathie Bush, Lubbock 



Donna Butler, Odessa 

Nancy Butler, Belletut 

Michael Buykemper, Slaton 

Dara Bybee. Lockney 

Dianne Byers, Ft. Worth 

Marianne Byers, Amarilto 

James Caddell. Ralls 




V 



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wSm 




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6 — Sophomore View 



Equal Time From Sophomores 







Bill Caldwell, Bovina 
Kathleen Callan, Abilene 
Donna Callaway, Ft. Worth 



Sharon Cambern, Pampa 
S. J. Campbell, Midland 
Deborah Campbell, Floydada 



Jeanne Campbell, Laredo 
Dave Cantrell, El Paso 
Marti Cantrell, Monterey, 
California 



Keith Carlisle, Ralls 
Carroll Carnes, El Paso 
Ferman Carpenter, Corpus 
Chrisli 



Rohnie Carpenter, '1 hrockmorton 
Sherry Carroll, Eastland 
Paul Carson, Merkel 



Bill Carter, Amarillo 
Wayne Caswell, Pampa 
Julie Cates, Dallas 



Anne Cemenka, Bronte 
Pam Chakos, San Angela 
Steve Chambers, Eunice, 
New Mexico 





Patty McKinney, top, editor of Sophomore View, and her staff, Becky 
Lacy, Ann Donegan, and Beverly Brown create their own actipn 
when working on copy for the pages of La Ventana. 



Patricia Chamberlain, Odessa 
Marc Chandler, Richardson 
Carol Chapman, Midland 
Susan Chenault, Houston 
Jim Chidester, Ft. Worth 
W. D. Chipman, Lubbock 
Michael Choaf, Hagerman 

La Nelle Christian, Farwell 
Sue Church, Olton 
Sara Clack, Dallas 
Jerry Clanton, Odessa 
Johnny Clark, Baytown 
Judy Clark, Temple 
Karen Clark, Abilene 

Kay Clark, Baytown 

Pam Clark, Hurst 

Sally Clark, Dallas 

Susan Clayton, Waco 

Danna Cleardy 

Margaret Clements, Andrews 

Gerald Cleveland, Plainview 



Sophomore View — 7 




Denton Fox has the practice action that it takes to become an American All-Star. He did become an All-Star during the 1969 football season. 



Polly Cleveland, Canadian 

Anne Cocanougher, Lubbock 

Mike Cocanougher, Lubbock 

Jerry Cochran, Snyder 

Mary Coers, Austin 

Sandy Coker, San Antonio 

Cheryl Coldazer, Big Spring 

Carol Colhoun, Brenham 

Paula Colker, Lubbock 

June Collier, Amarillo 

C. M. Condray, Big Spring 

Kris Conlon, Midlothian 

George Conner, Seymour 

Kathy Conover, Dallas 

Brenda Cook, Amarillo 

James Cook, Midland 

Joan Cook, Pasadena 

Lindy Cook, Midland 

O. L. Cooper, Snyder 

Susan Cooper, Houston 

Ellen Copenhaver, Lubbock 

Davis Corley, Bronte 

Betsy Cornelius, Fort Worth 

Gail Cornett, Knox City 

David Cory, Lubbock 

Jerry Cottle, Morah 

Martha Couch, Big Spring 

Robin Courtney, Denton 

Kent Cowan, Midland 

Philip Cox, Ollon 

Cyrus Cozart, Fritch 

Nancy Craig, Houston 

Donna Crandell, Dallas 

Kathy Crawford, Albuquerque 

David Creecy, Midland 

Marty Criswell, Houston 

William Cross, Dallas 

Cathy Crossland, Plaintiew 

Barbara Crouch, Chappaqua, Sew York 

Cynthia Crow, Fort Worth 

Karen Crowe, Midland 

Cathey Crowell, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Aurelio Cucvas, Muleshoe 

Lee C. Culver, Midland 

Terri Cummings, Friona 

Roger Cunningham, Lubbock 

Candacc Curlee, Colorado City 

Craig Curlee, Temple 

Barbara Curnctt, San Antonio 

8 — Sophomore Viev 




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R 



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Jan Curry, Hale Center 
Randell Curry, Wolfforth 
Kristy Cusack, Cuero 
Mary Dale, Lerelland 
Judy Dalrymple, Lubbock 
Shari Damron, Hereford 
Alan Daniel, Floydada 

Debbie Daniel, Ft. Worth 
Kathy Dankworth, Ballinger 
Sherri Dannelley, Austin 
Mike Danner, Ft. Worth 
Levi P. Dardar, Houston 
Bobbie Darden, Lorenzo 
Doug Darden, Borger 

Randy Dauley, Grand Prairie 
Patsy Daves, Cortez, Colorado 
Ronnie David, Corpus Christi 
Bandy Davis, Stamford 
David Ralph Davis, Olney 
Johnna Davis, T hrockmorton 
Margie Davis, Ft. Worth 

Ruth Davis, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Sheryl Ann Davis, Shreveport, Louisiana 

Sterling G. Davis, Shamrock 

Wiley Davis, Lubbock 

Glen W. Daws, Dartmouth 

Debbie Day, Houston 

Alan Day, Lufkin 

Franklin Polk Dennison, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 

Susan Denton, Ft. Worth 

Carol Derryberry, Dallas 

Paulette Dewees, Odessa 

Dinah Dewitt, Dallas 

Debbie Dickerson, Silverton 

Peggy Dillard Ft. Worth 

George Dillman, Canadian 

Gary Dixon, Sanla Fe, New Mexico 

Danny Doak, Lubbock 

Marianne Dodd, Ft. Worth 

Kathleen Doherty, Folsom, New Mexico 

Mark Donaldson, Corsicana 

Sandra Donhaiser, Houston 

Margaret Donnell, Eliasville 
Suzy Dorsey, Lubbock 
Tharran Doss, Brownfield 
Gordon Douglass, Lubbock 
Nancy Douglass, Plainiiew 
Andrew Dow, Huntsville 
Joe Don Drain, Corsicana 

Janeen Drew, Lubbock 
Susan Driskill, Uttlejield 
Janis Duckworth, Odessa 
Joy Dudley, League City 
Tommy Duffee, Houston 
Steve Dukes, Perryton 
Cathy Duncan, Abilene 

F. C. Dunlap, Midland 
John Dunlap, Floydada 
Katherine Dunn, Dallas 
Zelma Dunn, New Deal 
Deborah Dutton, Fieldton 
Charlotte Duvall, Lockney 
Nelson Dwyer, Samnorwood 

Chester Dye, Roaring Springs 

Richard Dyer, ]al. New Mexico 

Cindy Dykes, Dallas 

Lindam Eck, Amarillo 

Roy Edgar, Austin 

Eha Jo Edwards, Tahoka 

Susan Edwards, Stowell 

James Eggleston, Booker 
Fred Ehmann, Miami 
Lynn Eldridge, Port Arthur 
Jane Elliott, Port Arthur 
Kathy Elliott, San Angelo 
Randy Ellis, Friona 
Douglas Ellison, McLean 

Sophomore View — 9 



Fall Semester Offers Excitement 




Pony halfback, Daryl Doggett, had a hard time keeping 
his jersey on when the Red Raiders took action on 
the field. 

Kathy Fischer, Garland 

Kay Fisher, Mullin 

Andy Florence, Big Spring 

Cecelia Foote, Waco 

Gary Ford, Bellaire 

Pat Foreman, Spur 

Gary Forrester, Lubbock 



Shannon Forrester, Fort Worth 

Karen Fortenberry, Lubbock 

Brenda Foster, Tyler 

David Foster, Lubbock 

Gary Foster, Snyder 

Phil Foster, Abilene 

Don Fowler, San Antonio 

Timmy Fox, San Benito 

Carolyn Fralin, Lubbock 

Craig Frank, Big Spring 

Jan Fraser, Dallas 

Sharon Frashier, Pampa 

Zelika Freeman, Post 

Douglas Fuller. Midland 

Ann Gage, Austin 

Jacqueline, San Antonio 

Mike Gallagher, Breckenridge 

Dcnise Galle, Houston 

Tim Galleghy, Dal hart 

EliTabeth Gampe, El Paso 

Eddie Gann, Burkburnelt 

Judy Gantt, Andrews 

Randy Gardner, Plainview 

Kathy Gamett, Fort Worth 

Bill Garrett, Stamford 

Darryl Garrett, Lubbock 

Lynn Garrett, Amarillo 

Phil Garrett, Lubbock 

Tillie Garrett, Lubbock 

Richard Garriges, Richardson 

Jim Gaspard, Port Arthur 

Robert Gavos, Dallas 

Charles Geist, Lubbock 

Jeanne Gentry, Dallas 

Patricia Gerth, San Antonio 



Sharon English, Dallas 

Roy Enoch, Odessa 

Charles Escobar, Knox City 

Rpverly Fails, Meadow 



Michael Farrow, Seattle, 

Washington 

Teri Ferguson, Carrizo Springs 

Thomas Ferguson, Borger 

Hal Petty, Texariana 



Marianae Fidelie, 

Wichita Falls 

Dennis Fiedler, Houston 

David Field, Dathart 

Ken Fields, Shamrock 



Lorin Fife, Lubbock 

Margaret Fike, Dalhart 

Larry Fisaekerly, Smyrna 

Joyce Fischer, Pampa 









S^BEi 










WBM 



^ ■) 





H^i^f^ 



10 — Sophomore View 



I 



Entertainment of Football 





^TM 



!• 



Ill 




Chuck Gesting, Corpus Chrisli 

Joan Giconi, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

David Gibson, Lubbock 

Linda Gilbertson, Plainview 

Marihelen Giles, Lubbock 

A. J. Gillen, Grand Prairie 

Bob Githens, Perryton 

Bob Glasscock, Quanah 

Harriet Ann Glaze, Muleshoe 

David Glenn, Bronte 

Larry Glover, Arlington 

Susie Glover, Graham 

David Godfrey, Spur 

Martha Goelihar, Toronto, Canada 

Jerry Golden, Valley Mills 
Mark Golden, Hereford 
Janet Goodman, Dallas 
Gregg Goodrich, Lubbock 
Wayne Gossett, Mercury 
Pat Graham, Grand Prairie 
Paul Graham, Knox City 

Shirley Graham, Ft. Worth 
Barbara Gray, Dallas 
Cathy Gray, Lubbock 
Conni Gray, Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Darryl Gray, Ft. Worth 
Gary Greene, Lubbock 
Britt Gregory, Floydada 

Alfred Griggs, Lubbock 
Cara Sue Griffin, Lorenzo 
Deborah Griffin, Staton 
Jeanie Griffith, Lubbock 
Gary Grinsfelder, Dallas 
Patsi Grisak, Dallas 
Skip Grisham, Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Peggy Groening, Ft. Worth 
William Groll, Albuquerque, 
New Mexico 

Ronald Groves, Hale Center 
Richards Grubbs, Hereford 
Jeri Lea Gryder, Lubbock 
Charles Guess, Millsap 
Kelly Guest, Sweetwater 

John David Gulley, Muleshoe 

Jani Gunn, Farmington, New Mexico 

Glenda Gunter, Dallas 

Catalina Gutierrez, Lubbock 

Peggy Guttery, Seguin 

Denise Eskridge, Richardson 

Gaylene Etchison, Big Spring 

Mark Eubank, Abilene 
Ingrid Eubanks, Garland 
Joy Eubanks, Maple 
Galen Evans, Hereford 
Tony Evans, Borger 
Vic Evans, Amarillo 
John Ezell, Snyder 

Larry Hagan, Lubbock 

Barbara Hagerman, Pasadena 

Kathy Hale, Lubbock 

Patsy Hale, Midland 

Carolyn Hall, Lubbock 

Steve Hall, Stanton 

Lana Hall, Capitan, New Mexico 

James Hallman, Lubbock 
Gary Hamilton, Lubbock 
Jim Hamilton, Lubbock 
Sheila Hamilton, Dimmitt 
Steven J. Hammack, Ft. Rucker, 
Alabama 

Amy Hammer, Lubbock 
Susan Hammond, Lubbock 



Sophomore View — 11 



Vicki Hammond, Ft. Worth 

Doneela Hancock, Dallas 

Kelly Hand, Roaring Springs 

Lynn Haney, Letelland 

Pat Hanks, Denver City 

Diane Hanley, Ft. Worth 

Nan Hardeman, San Antonio 

Jimmy Harden, Lubbock 

Mike Harder, Plainiieiv 

Larry Hardy, Perryton 

Levon Harman, H.ippy 

Shirley Harmon, Lubbock 

Rebel Harper, Eagle Pass 

Don Harrell, Abilene 

Chuck Harris, S.m Angela 

David Harris, H.irt 

Marilyn Harris, Dallas 

Deborah Harrison, Denver City 

Alan Hart. Lubbock 

Lance Harter, Denver, Colorado 

Jeanine Hartnett, Dallas 

George Han-ick, Throckmorton 

Anne Hatch, Lamesa 

Jeanne Hatcher, Ft. Worth 

Linda Hauser, Dallas 

Tommy Havens, Lubbock 

Linda Haverstock, Ft. Worth 

Grace Hawes, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

Bill Hawkins, Midland 

Kathy Hawkins, Commerce 

Sharon Hawkins, Hamlin 

Sue Hawkins, How/on 

Kathy Hawkinson, Houston 

Mary Lou Hawthorn, Lubbock 

James Hayes, LaPorle 

Linda Ann Hayes, Dallas 

Carol Hayhurst, Ft. Stockton 

Mary Ruth Haynes, Plainvieu 

Susan Haynes, Abilene 

William D. Hays. Midland 

Elizabeth Hayworth, Big Spring 

Lynne Heard, Houston 

Roger Hearron. Fritch 

Janie Hefner, Lubbock 

Kay Hefner, Lubbock 

Janis Helton, Olney 

Candy Helweg, Miles 

Ronda Helton, Clarendon 

Alva Henderson, Morse 

Robert Henderson, El Paso 

Sherrill Hendricks, Garland 

Julie Hendrix, Ft. Worth 

Randy Hendrix. Tylet 

Judy Henry, Midland 

Dianne Henslee, Omaha. Nebraska 

Candy Herbelin, New Braunfeh 

Jeffrey Hemrichs. Ft. Worth 

Kri'ty Hess. San Angela 

Tony M. Hester, Spearman 

Wayne Hibbs, Andrews 

Edward Hile, Kemah 

Kathy Hill, Brounwood 

Kaye Hilliard, Waco 

Mary Hillis, Lubbock 

Richard Himmel, Dallas 

Mark Hinlon, El Paso 

Phyllis Hobart, Seabrook 

Virginia Hobbs, Ft. Worth 

D'Nan Hobi;<><Kj. Wolfforih 

Cathy R. Hoffman, McGregor 

Dorecn Hogan, Dallas 

Diana Hogue, Dallai 

Charlie Holland, Tahoka 

Kay Holliday, Brownwood 

Dorothy Hollie, Houston 

Brenda Hnllingshead. Brounwood 

Mary Elaine Holmes, Pampa 





B"™ 










Tesjs 
hik 



12 — Sophomore View 





Texas A&M's Twelfth Man" arrives on campus a few days before the 
Raiders have a chance to show the Aggies where the action really is. 





^SiSSS 




Sharon Holmes, Midland 
Cassandra HoUoway, Lubbock 
Lynn Holloway, Fort Worth 
Steve Holloman, Houston 
Janice Honea, Tyler 
Dwayne Hooper, Plainview 
Jeff Hopkins, Houston 

Richard Horner, Santa Anna 
Bill Horton, Port Arthur 
Debbie Horton, Midland 
Paul Horton, Texas City 
Robin Hough, Fort Worth 
Jim Houser, Lubbock 
Matt Howard, Houston 

Linda Howe, Smithfield 

Diane Howell, Lubbock 

Dixie Howell, Clovis, New Mexico 

Edward Howell, San Antonio 

Jan Hudson, Melrose, New Mexico 

Gary Hudspeth, Lubbock 

Hally Huber, Dallas 

Mark Huckabee, Lubbock 
Robert Huff, Golden, Colorado 
Jeff Huemmer, Dallas 
James Hughes, Somenille 
Terry Hughes, Celina 
Vickie Hulne, Austin 
Dave Hungerford, Lubbock 

Sue Hunt, Lubbock 
Jeff Hunter, Odessa 
Sue Hunter, Dallas 
Beth Hutchison, Houston 
Rebecca Hutchison, Spearman 
Druscilla Hutton, Muleshoe 
Dann Ingels, Houston 

Laurie Ingle, San Antonio 
Cyndy Irvine, San Antonio 
Glenda Irvine, Laredo 
Nancy Ivie, Big Spring 
Judee Jackson, Paris 
Marjorie Jackson, Greenville 
Ricky Jackson, Lubbock 



Sophomore View — 13 



Raiders Trounce Kansas 



Jan Jacobsen, Lubbock 

Judith Jacobson, Lubbock 

Christopher James, Farmington, 

New Mexico 

Dean Jameson, Dallas 

Carol Jamail, Houston 

Janean Jarratt, Houston 

Diane Jaynes, Slaton 

David Jenkins, Midland 

Jerry Jenkins, Amarillo 

Anne Jennings, Whitejace 

Joan Jennings, Denver, Colorado 

Pat Jennings, Kerrtille 

Karen Jent, Lubbock 

Verna Jernigan, Lubbock 

Karen Jessup, Arlington 

Billy Jobe, Groves 

Bob Johnson, Plainview 

Patsy Johnson, Nacogdoches 

Becky Jones, Snyder 

Burl Jones, Lubbock 

Carol Jones, Lubbock 

Oaig Jones, Ft. Worth 

Gail Johnson, Arlington 

Helen Jones, Idalou 

Jimmie Jones, Stanton 

John A. Jones, Midland 

Julia Jones, Ballinger 

Nan Jones, Rule 

Sue Jones, Level land 

Terry Jones, Lubbock 

Luke Kahlich, Lubbock 

Steve Kalinec, Dallas 

Tana Karnel, Goliad 

Dan Karr, S/i«f 

Gayle Kay, Grandvieu 



P'^ISIMI 




38TECH 003 KU i 

MIN SEC-aaaiK ^» 

O €> QUARTER «) ®,rt^^^ 

BALLON 




Three ... two . . one the Raiders win the first game of the season. 

The Raider action on the field created the reaction o. a scoreboatd that 



14 — Soohomore View 



the fans like to see. 



i 



- 




2 


•m 








^m^ 





1 

r 



n 



II 



In Season Opener 




SE21 



()• 








Laurie Kayem, Houston 
Carolyn Keeter, Dallas 
Jon Randall Keeney, Dumas 
Karan Keenan, Houston 
Michael Kellen 
Gary Kelley, Earth 
Lynne Kelley, Burkhurnett 

Wade Kelley, Lubbock 
Joan Kelly, Eastland 
Linda M. Kemp, Dallas 
Melinda Kemp, Dallas 
Melissa Kemp, Dallas 
Jane Kennedy, Lubbock 
Thomas B. Kennedy, Bedford 

Chris Kenney, Pampa 
Alan Kent, Beaumont 
Gary Ketchum, Longview 
Sharman Key, Lubbock 
David Khiebuer, Phillips 
Rhonda Kidd, Lubbock 
Patti Kidwell, Houston 

Jan Killian, Floydada 
Beverly Kilness, Rosuell 
Nancy Kimvrough, Monahans 
Cynthia K. King, Houston 
William King, San Antonio 
Mark Kinslow, Lubbock 
Donna Kirk, Faruell 

Daryl Kirkpatrick, Bofina 
Lynn Kirkpatrick, Houston 
Mary Beth Kiser, Tahoka 
Harry Kleinman, San Antonio 
Tom Kleuser, Ft. Worth 
Karen Knight, Lubbock 
Patsy Knoll, Slaton 

John Knox, Graham 
Mark Stephen Knox, Medina 
Cheryl Koenig, Boerne 
Judy Kocurek, Houston 
Kathy Kolander, Amarillo 
Sima Koonar, Lubbock 
Karlene Koonce, Ft. Worth 

Jeff Krauss, Ft. Worth 

Kerry Krauss, Dallas 

Sue Kulpaca, Laredo 

Dennis Kusenberger, Fredericksburg 

Martha Lacek, Paris 

Ronald Lackey, Longvieiv 

Jack Ladd, Midland 

Melissa Laird, Rockdale 
Donna Lairsen, Richardson 
David Lakey, Austin 
Genie Lamb, Gainesrille 
Jerry Lambright, Lubbock 
Mary Ellen Lambright, Lubbock 
Leslie Lamont, Dallas 

Marvin Lanahan, Houston 
Rue Landon, Amarillo 
Rick Lane, Dallas 
Vicki Lane, Lubbock 
Tom Landers, Anton 
Susan Langford, Kerrville 
Jill Lanham, Grand Prairie 

Lucille Larmer, Lubbock 
Lon Larsen, Pasadena 
Charles Larson, Dallas 
Johnny Lasita, Brownfield 
Ted Latham, Tulia 
Jill Latson, Tyler 
Anne Laux, Ft. Worth 



Sophomore View — 15 




Action of Tech divers aid in the reaction of a 
winning Raider swimming team. 



16 — Sophomore VUm 



Pat Lawlor, San Antonio 

Cuyler Lawrence, Dallas 

Debbie Lawrence, Dallas 

Jim Lawrence, V^aeo 



•Glenn Lawson, Stanton 

Susan Lawson, Houston 

Kenny Laye, Pampa 

Cheryl Leach, Fort Worth 



Ernestine Leather, Midland 

Margaret Ledbetter, Morion 

David Ledyard, Amarillo 

Carry Lee, Pampa 



Cathy Leggett, Fort Worth 

Shirley Leiner, Dimmitt 

Debbie Leland, Dallas 

Joe LeMay, Coleman 



Charles Leo, Odessa 

Marjorie Leroy, Dallas 

Patricia Leshinski, Eglin 

A.F.B., Florida 

Billy Lester, Lubbock 



Ernest Leuker, Lubbock 

Joan Levers, Roswell, New 

Mexico 

Phil Lewellen, Plainview 

David Lewis, Lubbock 



Don Lewis, Dallas 

Jeanee Lewis, Bridgeport 

Michael Lewis, Olney 

Miriam Lien, Houston 



Lorraine Lievens, La Teria 

Randell Liles, Midland 

Mike Lincoln, Richardson 

Barbara Lindley, Lubbock 



Linda Lindsey, Shallowater 

Terry Lindsey, Dallas 

Sharon Linken, Lubbock 

Nancy Lipscomb, Dallas 



Mark Logan, Houston 

Jerry W. Long, Abilene 

Susan Long, Houston 

Stephanie Longino, Sulphur 

Springs 



Kay Looney, Truscott 

Kathryn Looten, Panhandle 

Michael Lorino, Magnolia 

Johnny Louder, Stanton 




EilS 





Michael B. McGee, Pt. Worth 
Marilynn McGill, Dallas 
GayNell McGinnis, Lulibock 
Kay Mcintosh, Dalhart 



Tena Mcintosh, Amarillo 
Sharon Mclntyre, Poteet 
Diane McKenzie, Goldthwaile 
DeAnn McKinley, ft. Worth 



H. L. Lovell, Water Valley 
Sherlyn Loveli, Water Valley 
Carolyn Lucas, Matador 
Rocky Lucas, Canadian 
Abigail Lucero, Lubbock 
Tom Luckenbach, Hawaii 
Mary Lucky, Beaumont 

Rick Luders, jemez Springs, 
New Mexico 

Elizabeth Ludwig, El Paso 
Sherry Lyall, Lubbock 
Sara Lyford, Grapevine 
James Lynch, Odessa 
Catherine Lyon, Spearman 
Jo Lyon, Wichita Falls 

Suzanne Mack, Amarillo 

Cathy Sue Mackie, Spearman 

Melinda Macray, Lubbock 

Randal Macurak, Dallas 

Fred Madden, Sherman 

Brett Madison, Del Rio 

Greg Mahaffey, Bartlesville, Okla. 

Kyle Mayor, Groom 

Charlotte Manhoff, San Antonio 

Robert Manly, Abilene 

Tony Mann, Ralls 

Pam Mars, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Carolyn Marshall, San Angela 

Diane Marshall, Bogata 

Barbara Martin, Spur 
Diana Martin, Ennis 
Mary Beth Martin, Clairette 
Robert Earl Martin, Shamrock 
James Mason, Mt. Pleasant 
Kelly Mathis, Midland 
Elizabeth Lynn May, Amarillo 

Janie Mayfield, Arlington 
Ronald Jay Mayfield, Lazbuddie 
Patsy Mayo, Dallas 
Cynthia McAteer, Spur 
Diane McArthur, Garland 
Linda McBride, Sonora 
Ronnie McBryde, Victoria 

Don McClendon, Lubbock 
Susie McClure, Prairie Village, 
Kansas 

Gary McConkle, Gatest'ille 
Cathy McCoy, Ft. Worth 
Frank McCoy, Esperanza 
William McCuI lough. Ft. Worth 
Ellen McDaniel, Pampa 

Janie McDonald, Bellevue 

Russ McDonald, Amarillo 

David McDowell, Medford, N. Y. 

John McDuffie, Houston 

Jame Wayne McElgunn, Houston 

Edo McElroy, Sherman 

Laura McElroy, Ralls 




w 



Red Raider, Johnny Bob Carruth, creates much 
emotion and enthusiasm among Tech fans. 

Sophomore View — 17 



k 



Ten McKinley, El Paso 

Joe McKinney, Midland 

Susan McKinney, Housloti 

Kathy McKissack, Dallas 

Danny McLarty, Levelland 

Melissa McLean, Goldthwaite 

Terry McLean, Lampasas 

Laura McMillan, Breckearidge 

LeAnn McMinn, Lubbock 

Dennis IvIcNabb, Ropesville 

Cindy Meadows, Richardson 

Deborah Mebane, Snyder 

Gayle Medlock, Lorenzo 

Mindy Meholin, Waco 

Paul Melton, Abilene 

Michael Menefee, Lubbock 

Mary Sue Meneley, Pasadena 

JoAnne Merrill, Odessa 

LeeAnn Meshier, Dallas 

Sharon Michie, Vernon 

Betty Middleton, Shallowater 

Barbara Miller, Lubbock 

Bonnie Miller, Odessa 

Joe Miller, Scotl A.F.B., 

Illinois 

Mary Miller, Petersburg 

R. J. Miller, Houston 

Suzanne Miller, Lubbock 

Marsha Mills, Alpine 

Terrylyn Mills, Abilene 

Janet Milne, Houston 

Karen Mince, Ranger 

Joseph Mino, Houston 

Joanna Mitchell, San Antonio 

Larry Mitchell, Bovina 

Clarice M. Mocelc, Seymour 

Nancy Mohn, Dallas 

Bruce Moilan, £/ Paso 

Kathy Monahan, Odessa 

Diane Monson, Paducah 

Diane Montgomery, Wichita Falls 

Linda Montgomery, Amarillo 

Barbara Moore, Ft. Worth 

Cheryl Ann Moore, Roaring Springs 

James Moore, Odessa 

Mark Moore, Baytown 

Mike Moore, Uvalde 

Sheryl Moore, Plainview 

Val Moore, Muleshoe 

Vicki Moore, Abilene 

Marilyn Moorehead, Conrot 

Marcia Moran, Dallat 

Bill Morgan, Aspermon, 

Jerry Morgan, GatesvilU 

Joyce Morgan, Seymout 

Bill Morris, Dallas 

Dale Morris, Colorado City 

Diane Morris, Ft. Worth 

June Mortis, Garland 

Linda Morris, Dallas 

Don Mosley, San Antonio 

Carl Dean Moss, Lubbock 

James Moss, Lubbock 

Juiynn Mott, Lubbock 

Danny Mounce, Sweetwater 

Marcia Mounts, Perryton 

William Mullen, AspermonI 

Stella Mumme, Hondo 

Beverly Murphy, Lubbock 

Linda Myers, Monahans 

Diana Mzrick, Dallas 

Brent Nail, Lubbock 

Tom Nail, Ft. Worth 

Cinda Nance, Lewisi/ille 

David Nance, Haslet 

Paul Nash, Hereford 

Marinel Naylor, El Paso 

Cameron Neal, Dallas 









78 — Sophomore View 



!!• 




T E C H is the name of the game when the ROTC sponsors the card 
section at the Homecoming and Dad's Day football games. 



I|l« 




Susan Neilon, Abilene 

Briggs Nesmith, Lubbock 

Don Newman, Dalhart 

Terry Newman, Dalhart 

Vera Newsome, Snyder 

Jeff Nixon, Mineral Wells 

Ken Niesman, Naperville, Illinois 

Charles Nieman, Gainesville 
Sam Nichols, Hobbs, New Mexico 
Millege Norton, Texarkana 
Charles Norman, Odessa 
Clyde Nolen, Big Spring 
John Noah, Gainesville 
Ray Nuss, Ft. Worth 

Rosemary O'Brennan, El Paso 

Paula O'Brien, Ft. Worth 

Sheila O'Hair, Lubbock 

John O'Mara, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

Robert O'Neill, San Diego, 

California 

Diane Gates, Grand Prairie 

George Odom, Gruver 

Marianne Odom, Tyler 
Steve Oler, Pampa 
Puggy Olive, San Angelo 
Rae Olson, Austin 
Sharon Olson, Kenai, Alaska 
Sheila Ortiz, San Antonio 
Scott Osborne, Pampa 

Richard E. Osmon, Burleson 
Linda Ottinger, Pasadena 
■Vicky Outlaw, Clifton 
John N. Owens, Tahoka 
Scott Owens, Dumas 
Brent Palmer, Roby 
Beck Parish, Springlake 

Jo Ann Park, Dallas 

Pam Parker, Pampa 

Ronnie Parker, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Lynn Passmore, Brady 

Lomet^ Pate, Memphis 

Sharon Patrick, Dallas 

Cecillia Patterson, Houston 



Sophomore View — 19 



Campus Campaigns 



Leon Patterson. Spur 

Sherry Paul, Stminole 

Linda Pearson, Frisco 

Mike Peden, Boenie 

Dawn Pemberton, Lubbock 

Armando Pena, Lubbock 

Bob Pendleton, Midtaml 

Stephen Pendleton, Roy, New Mexico 

Dou^ Pennin^t<in, Lubbock 

Ellna Perkins, Lubbock 

Ron Perkins, Abilene 

Jan Perry, Temple 

Lee Perry, Hobhs, Neu- Mexico 

Mark Peterman, Celir/a 

John Petree, IJatou 

Roger Alan Pettit, Crane 

David Pharries, Fl. Worth 

Mary Phelan, DMas 

Ann Phillips, NeU' Cnslle 

Cheryl Phillips, Fl. Worth 

Cindy Phillips, Muleshoe 

Kerry Phillips, Lubbock 

J. D. Pickering, Ealoniouri 

David Pickett, Fl. Worth 

Rebecca Jean Pierce, Dallas 

Stan Pisano, San Antonio 

Larry Pittman, Kress 

Lyna Pitts, Earth 

Donna Plott, Lubbock 

Theressa Pohlmeier, Nazareth 

Judi Pollard, Lubbock 

Sam Ponder, Midland 

Janet Pope, Dallas 

Scott Porter, Big Spring 

Terri Poteet, Hawaii 

Nancy Potter. Los Alamos, 

New Mexico 

Kalhy Potts, Amarillo 

C. Lewis Pounds, Ranger 

Diane Pounds, Lubbock 

Anita Powell, Lubbock 

Danny Powell. Seahrnok 

Mary Powell, Texarkana 

Patrick W. Powell, B/> S/)r/«,(! 

Judi Pratt, Bayloun 

Cynthia Preas, Odessa 

Gary Presfott, Amarillo 

Gary Prescott, Decatur 

Libby Preston. £y Dorado 

Bill Price. F/. iror/A 

Debbie Price, Dallas 

Rickie Prichard, Aspermoni 

Susan Pritchett. Lubbock 

Ken Probst. Amarillo 

Koreen Prochnow, Fredericksburg 

Patti Purcell, Plainiieu 

Helen Purpear, Briscoe 

Pam Pylant, Muleihot 

Dan Queen. San Antonio 

Malinda Rainer, Odeis.i 

Bobby Ralston, Arlington 

Betty Ramsey. Lubbock 

John Ramsey, Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Michael Ramse)-, El Paso 

Mickey Ramsey. Limpasas 

Mary Rapier. Lubbock 

Shelley Rardin. Liuisiille 

Mickie Ratcliff. Lubbock 

Karen Ratliff. Denier Cit\ 

Suzzan Rattan, Midland 

Gwen Ray, Lubbock 




20 — Sophomore View 



Dominate Early Autumn 



w 





@ 




Richard Roffino, Dallas 
Gary Ropers, Houston 
Martha Rogers, Midland 



Evasue Rollans, Vernon 
Charles Rollins, Houston 
Eddie Roper, Odessa 



Shelia Rose, Snyder 

M. A. Rosenberg, Houston 

Steve Rosselle, West Point, 

Georgia 



Susan Rosser, Abilene 
Mary Roten, San Antonio 
Janet Rottman, Dallas 



Gina Rayl, Lawton, Oklahoma 
Cherlyn Reast, Liltlefield 
Debbie Reed, Sterling City 
Marilyn Reed, Amarilto 
Susan Reed, Floydada 
Gail Reeder, Midland 
Rodney Reese, Henderson 

Russell Reeve, Pampa 
Cynthia Reaves, Lubbock 
Debbie Ree\es, San Antonio 
Elaine Reeves, Lockney 
Mona Reeves, Bandera 
Pam Reeves, Haskell 
Ruth Reid, Andrews 

Melanie Reneau, Houston 
Karen Rhew, Lorenzo 
Scarlett Rhoads, Corsicana 
Shary Rhodes, San Antonio 
Vikki Rhodes, Lubbock 
Brian Richards, Bronte 
Otis Richards, Abilene 

Stephen Richards, San Angelo 

George Richardson, Roswell, New Mexico 

Delise Rice, Amarillo 

Jayme Rico, Lubbock 

Ana Riddel, Aspermont 

Nancy Ridgeway, San Antonio 

Barbara Rieck, Brownfield 

Pat Riley, Lujkin 

Patti Riley, Brownsville 

Mitchell Ritter, Odessa 

Susan Ritzinger, Washington, D. C. 

Carol Rivers, Elgin 

Ken Roberts, Abilene 

Sherry Roberts, George West 

Clark Robertson, Waco 

Karen Robertson, Dallas 

Ben Robinson, Ft. Worth 

Diane Robison, Sunray 

Roberta Robison, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Pat Robnett, Midland 

Carol Rabon, Houston 




Bill Scott's active campaign brought the reaction of students electing 
him to the Student Senate. 



Sophomore View — 21 



The Actor Indeed 



Stephanie Round, San Angela 

Rita Rozelle, D.illai 

Diana Rozzell, Clovh, New Mexico 

Ann Rucker, Abilene 

Daria Rucker, Fort W^otth 

Michael Ruff, Pam\>a 

Mary Rushing, Breckevridge 

John Rutledjje, S.;» Antonio 

Beth Ryan, Fort Worth 

Karen Ann Sadler, Snyder 

Ron Saikowski. Wichita Falls 

John Salmon, Snyder 

David Salter, Port Arthur 

Larry Sanders, Weinert 

John Sanderson, Aniiirillo 

Don Savage, Lubbock 

Susan Sawyer, Fort Worth 

Chris Schacht, Irving 

Ronnie Schaffner, Slaton 

Linda Schantz, Lubbock 

David Schaub, Pampa 

Marcia Schibler, Gruier 

Patricia Schindler 

Jeannie Schlankey, Calreston 

Carolyn Schmedes, Austin 

Annette Schmidt. Fredericksburg, 

Becky Schmidt, Mineral Wells 

Carol Schmidt, Brookshiri 

Carolyn Schneider, Wilson 

Lyndon Schoenhals, Darrouzett 

Ann Schoppe, Houston 

Bob Schratz, Reno 

Lathy Schroeder, Killeen 

Larry Schuessler, Fort Worth 

Herman Schultz, Wichita Falls 

Rick Schulz, Lubbock 

Stephanie Schwarz, Boerne 

Nancy Schwedler, Lubbock 

Elaine Schwertner, Wilson 

Bill Scott, Houston 

Glen E. Scott, Dallas 

Tana Scott, Artesia, New Mexico 





Jeanne Seay, Dallas 

Camellia Sechrist, Lorenzo 

Stephanie Seekamp, Garland 



Richard Segars, Lubbock 

Cynthia Seibert, Fort Worth 

Susan Seifert, Hondo 



Pam Self, Fort Worth 

Melissa Sellmeyer, Lubbock 

Carol Severe, Lubbock 



f"^,^ 


id 


«• 


^ 


•* 



22— Sophomore View 



Possesses a Spirit 



ti» 





Richard Smith, Texas City 
Robert Smith, Sweetwater 
Ronald Smith, Lubbock 



Shirley Smith, Rising Star 
Teresa Smith, Corpus Christi 
Thomas Smith, Ft. Worth 



Wynnette Smith, Lubbock 
W. A. Smylie, Houston 
David Snellings, Dallas 



Sherry Sniodgrass, Lubbock 
Gayle Snure, Midland 
Sandra Sosenko, Lubbock 



Larry Shackleford, Cotton Center 
Shelly Shapiro, Dallas 
Larry Shaw, Morton 
Shelly Shelton, Lubbock 
Linda Shepherd, Tuli^t 
Ronnie Shields, Snyder 
Missy Shockey, Dallas 

Rosalou Short, DeLeon 

Judy Shorter, Flomot 

Brenda Shoup, Independence, Missouri 

Randy Shuffield, Lubbock 

Gordon Sidwell, Ft. Worth 

Susan Sigmier, Arlington 

Kay Sikes, Plainview 

Nancy Simek, Seymour 
Joe Simmons, Midland 
Jim Sims, Amarillo 
Walker Simms, Amarillo 
Gloria Simpson, Al, New Mexico 
Nancy Simpson, Memphis, Tex. 
Stephen Simpson, Floydada 

Glenda Sinclair, Lubbock 
Debbie Sinclaire, Houston 
Martha Singleton, Houston 
Bryan Smith, Childress 
Carla Marie Smith, Amarillo 
Diane Smith, Houston 
Carroll Smith, Gainesville 

Charles Smith, Dallas 
Connie Smith, Harlingen 
Elizabeth Smith, Houston 
Gary Smith, Refugio 
Gary Wallace Smith, Spur 
Gerilyn Smith, Carrizo Springs 
Janet Smith, Dallas 

Jean Smith, San Antonio 

Jeannie Smith, Alpine 

Linda Smith, Amarillo 

Linda Smith, Lubbock 

Margaret Smith, Dallas 

Mike Smith, Poteet 

Paul Smith, Lake City, Colorado 




Sophomore View — 23 




A world of understanding searched for ... a unity of peace wanted 
... as students march in the National Fall Moratorium. 



Terri Stanton, Fort Worth 

Linda Stein, Dallas 

Irene Stephenson, Siraljord 

Jan Stephenson, Claude 

William Stephenson, Claude 

Carole Sterling, Ira 

Connie Sterling, Snyder 

Suzanne Sterling, Lubbock 

Susan Stevenson, Memphis 

Susan Stevick 

Jerry Steward, Dallas 

Jamie Stewart, Houston 

Terrie Stewart, Amarillo 

Stephen Stine, Midland 

Carolyn Stokes, Ralls 

Donald Stokley, Dallas 

Barbara Stoms, Los Alamos, 

New Mexico 

Laura Stout, Odessa 

Marcy Stover, Lamesa 

Tony Street, Amarillo 

Paula Stroud, Lubbock 

Bertha Stubbe, Pampa 

Donald Stuckey, Hobbs, New Mexico 

Ruth Studer, Fori Worth 

Chris Stull, Alius 

Charles Sturdivant, Hale Center 

Brenda Sullivan, Weatherjord 

Gale Sullivan, Houston 

Patti Sullivan, Lubbock 

Dan Summerall, Midland 

Susan Sundby, Abilene 

Betty Supina, Pampa 

George Sutton, Uvalde 

Rodney Sutton, Arlington 

Jesse Swagerty, Clayton, New Mexico 

Cynthia Swimy, Fort Worth 

Martha Talbot, Lubbock 

T. L. Talcott, San Antonio 

J. Paul Tanner, Abilene 

Norman Tanner, Post 

Annis Tassos, San Antonio 

Christina Tassos, San Antonio 

Hank Tate, Houston 

Jay Taylor, Gruver 

Ronald Taylor, Mineral Wells 

Steven Taylor, Atlanta, Georgia 

Ted Taylor, Decatur 

Sharon Tcesdale, Amjrilto 

Jim Tcigen, Wichita Falls 



Susan Souther, Amarillo 

Jameree Southward, Ralls 

Steve Spain, Olton 



William Spalding, 

Fort Leonardwood 

Connie Spefk, El Dorado 

Don Speckman, Dallas 



Judy Speer, New Deal 

Jerry Spiegel, Victoria 

Karen Spivey, Piano 



Mike Spradling, Costa Mesa, 

California 

Leah Squyres, Denver City 

Linda Stanton, Houston 




^SIE 




B^SS^SE 



24— Sophomore Vievi 




Patricia Tweedy, San Angela 
Allen Teireil, Lubbock 
Don Terry, Dallas 



Jeffrey Neil Terry, San Antonio 
John Thacker, Roaring Springs 
Alison Thoman, De Berry 






f^^ 



Fall semester begins with football "fever," and the entrance fountain 
becomes Tech's newest attraction for football action. 



Carolyn Thomson, Odessa 
Sandy Thornbugh, Fort Worth 
Pamela Thornton, Odessa 
Charles Tiner, Dallas 
Cindy Tipps, Hereford 
Brenda Tipton, Crane 
Pat Tipton, Crane 

Carroll Todd, Hereford 
Gary Todd, Plainview 
Jan Toliver, Plainview 
Micki Tracy, Fort Worth 
William Tracy, Kermit 
Carol Jo Trible, Dallas 
Anne Tschoepe, San Antonio 

Don Tubbs, Lubbock 
Kathy Tobin, Richardson 
Kay Turner, Lockney 
Allen Underwood, Slalon 
Bobby Urban, Dumas 
Adela Vazquez, Odessa 
Linda Vaughn, Lubbock 

Vicky Vaughan, Silverton 
Guillermo Velez, Mexico City 
Velvet Verhalem, Knox City 
Janet Vineyard, Amaritlo 
Gayle Vivian, San Antonio 
Jim Wade, Houston 
Dale Wagner, Houston 

Jan Waffle, Richardson 
Dennis Wainwright, Grand Prairie 
Carolyn Walker, Plainview 
Lela Walker, Jal, New Mexico 
Sue Lynn Walker, Brownfield 
Richard Walker, Plainview 
Rosemary Walker, Goliad 

Sandy Walkowicz, Garland 

Becky Wallace, Dallas 

Bob Wallace, San Antonio 

Hal Wallis, Nocona 

Bess Walsh, Dallas 

Bruce Walter, Houston 

Linda Walter, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

Peters Walter, Houston 

Dina Walters, Corpus Christi 

Kathy Walters, Midland 

Linda Ward, Mineral Wells 

Mary Lou Ward, Lubbock 

Sharon Warford, Baytown 

Brad Warner, Santa Fe, New Mexico 

Sophomore View — 25 



Action Equals 



: 




Gwen Warnolk, 

Fori Stockton 

Gaiy Warren, Lubbock 



Steve Warren, Amarilto 
Tom Warren, Amarillo 





Sandra Waters, Dallas 
Robert Watson, Odessa 



Gary Weatherman, 

Mercury 

Bill Webb, Pampa 




Louise Weems, Garland 
T. R. Weeter, Midland 



Shirley Weilcel, 

' Baytown 

JoAnne Weis, Higgins 






Andrews Wells, Lubbock 
Billy Wells, Lubbock 





Karen Wells, Lubbock 
Sharon Wells, Bedias 



Patridc Werner, Edwards, 

California 

Judy West, Sudan 



Guy Wester, Panhandle 
Trisha Wetsel, Dallas 









•1 



II 



26 — Sophomore View 



Reaction 



m 






n 






I 




Susan Wessels, San 

Angela 

Jeanelle Whatley, Odessa 






Sarah Wheat, Abilene 
Brenda Wheeler, 
Spearman 



Janie Wheeler, Dallas 
Karen Wheeler, Baytown 



Wayne Whitaker, 

Lubbock 

Cindy White, Ft. Worth 



Connie White, Lubbock 
Eileen White, Scarsdale, 
New York 




John White, Vernon 
Sheila White, Ft. Worth 



Susan White, Hereford 
Robert Whitehead, 
Ft. Worth 




Pam Whitley, Arlington 
Steven Whitney, Dallas 





Sonia Whittington, 

Big Spring 

Teddy Wiley, Lubbock 



Gerald Wilhelm, Vernon 
Brenda Williams, 
Gruver 




Sophomore View — 27 




To wait, and sometimes to receive, that is hope. Hope of receiving reserve 
parking privileges is a hassel that encounters waiting in just another 



Carolyn Williams, Odessa 

Dale Williams, While Deer 

Frances Williams, Speer 

Jimmy Williams, Littlefield 

Kathy Williams, Midland 

Lindalyn Williams, Dallas 

Pam Williams, Stanton 

Peggy Williams, San Antonio 

Robert Williams, Albany 

Ron Williams, Wichita Palls 

Stephanie Williams, Dallas 

Sue Williams, Fort Worth 

Terrell Williams, Plainvieu' 

Roy Willis, Coleman 

Jayne Williston, Austin 

Donald Wilson, Abilene 

La Vunn Wilson, Denver, 

Colorado 

Mark Wilson, Plainiieu- 

Wanda Wilson, Lubbock 

Woody Wilson, Monahans 

Greg Wimmer. Ft. Worth 

Lyda Winkenhower, San Antonio 

Alan Winstead, Dallas 

Larry Winton, Lubbock 

Fritz Wisdom, Ft. Worth 

Susan Witten, Amarillo 

Charles Wittenburg, Rocksprings 

Donna Wodaver, Henrietta 

Bill Womack, MidLina 

Danny Womble, Spearman 

Jacque Workman, Odessa 

Michael Wortman, Lubbock 

Dixie Woodard, Wellman 

Barbara Woods, Bay town 

Joyce Woods, Pecos 

Anita Woody, Ft. Stockton 

Linda Woody, Wichita Falls 

Donna Woodworth, Lubbock 

David Wright, Amarillo 

Debbie Wright, Tahoka 

Doyce Wright, Gatespille 

Tim Wyatt, Tell 

Marijon Wylie, Floydada 

Janet Wynes, El Paso 

Inez Yarbrough, Dallas 

Everett Young, Ft. Worth 

Harriet Young, Decatur 

Linda Young, Dallas 

Sandra Young, Plainvieu 

Jim Zachary, Lubbock 

David Zeman, Lubbock 

Galene Zelms, Vernon 

Bill Zimmerman, Burkburnett 

Bob Zimmerman, Oklahoma City, 

Oklahoma 

Mary Sue Zimmerman, Plaintiew 

Cindy Zorns, Brownfield 



ine through rain or shine. 




BiPiilRIII^ 





\ 



•19 



28 — Sophomore View 



^ 



f' 



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MORE EFFICIENT ELECTRIC SERVICE ! 



Especially when it comes to Electricity in Lubbock . . . you 
get more for your money with your Big "E" utility . . 

Lubbock Power and Light! We provide the EFFICIENT electric 
service needed to keep a growing city going. Our recently- 
ordered 19,000 kilowatt turbine generator is another evi- 
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EFFICIENT UTILITY . . . Lubbock Power and Light. 



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k Wk ^_ LA VENTANA - 1970 
m^^^ FRESHMAN 




;«fc- 



, . ■ •fc.,- -i y£ 



FRESHMAN 
CHEERLEADERS 




V tr -Tii-^i,',; 



T-BO PAT EARLE LYN JIM 

SMITH BLAND FARREL ALDERSON WINDLER 

NICK PAPAILA ( 







h» 




Elaine Saul 
Sheila Looney 

Co-editors 
Ray McWilliams 

Art Editor 



Darrel Thomas 

Director of Photography 

Richard Mays 

Head Photographer 
Jeff Lawhon 
Bob Darby 
Mike Warden 



Bill Dean 
Director 

Jean Finley 

Business Manager 

Janice Aldridge 
Secretary 

Taylor Publishing Co. 
Printer 



VIE 



LA VENTANA 1970 VOLUME 45 



THE CAMPUS SCENE 



Freshman Cheerleaders 
Campus Life 
Freshman Students 



STAFF 



Kathy Rhoads, Editor 

Juana Young 
Beverly Willingham 
Leo Wells, Staff 



MORE THAN 11,000 CIRCULATION 





»l 



t 





— **>-sc 



Tris 



Cbui 



im 



(i» 



Bob Abbott, Hobbs, New 

Mexico 

Sharron Acker, Lubbock 

Robert Acuff, Dallas 

Jan Adair, Lubbock 

Connie Adams, Lubbock 

Judy Adams, Lubbock 

Steve Adcock, Lamesa 

Tommy Adkins, Anson 

Judy Agnew, Lubbock 

Josephine Aguirre, Fl. Worth 

Zanda Akins, Lubbock 

Johnny Albin, Spur 

Stan Alcott, Lake Jackson 

Lynn Alderson, Lubbock 

Carolyn Alexander, Midland 

Earletta Alexander, While 

Deer 

Jan Alexander, Abilene 

Kay Alexander, Eastland 

Carrie Allen, Biownuood 

Charles Allen, Dallas 

Gary Allen, San Angelo 

Janet Allen, Garland 

Janice Allen, Canyon 

John Allen, Piano 

Kathy Allen, Stratford 

Michael Allen, Ro/an 

Dana Allison, Lubbock 

Deanna Allison, Childress 

Steven Almond, Richardson 

Kathy Aired, Lamesa 

Patty Amerman, Houston 

Clinton Amstead, Austin 

Dana Anders, Hearne 

Daryl Anderson, Houston 

Judy Anderson, Lubbock 

Kathy Anderson, Paris 

Kay Anderson, Lubbock 

Laurie Anderson, Crosbyton 

Patti Anderson, Lubbock 

William Anderson, 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Sally Andrews, Dallas 

Jenny Angeley, Earth 

Judy Anthony, San Antonio 

Ira Antonoff, Killeen 

Richard Archer, Paducah 

Gloria Armenta, Lubbock 

David Armistead, Lubbock 

Jim Armstrong, Comanche 

Kay Arnett, Midland 

Charlyce Arnold, Brownfield 

Charlotte Arthur, Lubbock 

Vickie Asher, Plainview 

Jerry Aslin, Anson 

Audrey Aston, Roswell, New 

Mexico 

Tom Aubrey, Abilene 

Karen Auld, Ft. Worth 

Alan Austin, Odessa 

Jim Avis, Henrietta 

John Ayer, Tahoka 

Jane Aylers, Chillicothe 

Deborah Bacon, Dallas 

Douglas Bagley, Hawley 

Shelly Bagwell, Lubbock 

Susan Bagwell, Claude 

Barry Bailey, Los Alamos, 

New Mexico 

Debra Bailey, Vancoter 

Gilbert Bailey, Midland 

Teresa Bailey, San Antonio 

Margaret Baird, Dallas 

Candace Baker, Lubbock 

Charles Baker, San Angelo 

Dale Baker, Floydada 

Floyd Baker, Lubbock 

Gail Baker, Graham 

Kathy Baker, Dallas 

Kenneth Baker, Dallas 

Roddy Baldree, Lubbock 

Kenton Bale, Houston 

Larry Balko, Robstown 

Cindy Ball, Euless 

Claire Ball, Dallas 

Don Ball, San Angela 

Trisha Ball, San Antonio 

Vicki Banks, Midland 

Donna Banta, Brownfield 

Becky Barbee, Abilene 

Lanny Barbee, Jayton 

Claudia Barelax, Midland 





WIEm 



iirnKi 




Debbie Barclay, Harlingen 

Vickie Barcomb, Lubbock 

Andy Barfield, Sweeny 

Steve Barfoot, Dallas 

Patricia Barker, Lamesa 

Steven Barker, Lockney 

Harvey Barkowsky, Lamesa 

Stephen Barnhart, Graham 

Tex Barnhart, Merkel 

Don Barnhill, Pampa 

Bonnie Barnes, Cincinnati, 

Ohio 

James Dale Barnes, 

Whilewrij>ht 

Jim Barnett, Lake Jackson 

Marilyn Barnett, Muleshoe 

Pam Barnhart, Kress 

Beverly Barrett, Cotton Center 

Beverly Barrett, Lubbock 
Bradley Barrett, Dallas 
D'Laine Barrett, Ft. Worth 
Gary Barrick, Amarillo 
Jerry Barrier, Meadow 
Wayne Bartel, Welfare 
Lorrie Bartlett, Lubbock 
Jimmy Barton, El Paso 

Bertrand Bartram, Dallas 

Denise Batehelor, Irving 

Charles Bateman, Cleburne 

Clay Baten, Beaumont 

Betsy Bates, Washington, D. C. 

Janice Bates, Dallas 

Richard Bates, Wichita Falls 

William Bath, San Antonio 

Bobby Baucum, Lubbock 

Martha Baulch, Midland 

Carol Bauman, Lubbock 

Robert Baumgardner, 

Brownjield 

Mike Bausch, Ft. Worth 

Debbie Baxter, Friona 

Sam Baxter, Anson 

Debbie Beadle, Lubbock 

Brenda Beal, Ackerly 

Kae Beal, Corpus Christi 

Kenneth Bean, Tulia 

Mike Beaudry, Midland 

Kathy Bebinger, San Antonio 

Cozette Beck, Vera 

Jannette Beck, Andrews 

Candace Becker, Follett 



Freshman cheerleader candidates "do their thing" as the silent majority 
looks on. 





David Bentley, White Deer 
Bill Bergstrom, Austin 
Sandi Berrier, Amarillo 



Janice Berry, Dickenson 
Linda Betton, Midland 
James Sever, Longview 



Danny Beyer, Tafi 
John Bickley, Lockney 
Connie Biddy, Paducah 



^—Freshman View 



I 




Bruce Billings, Dallas 
Mike Bingham, Lubbock 
Dixie Black, Lubbock 
Sherry Black, Idalou 
Vicki Black, El Paso 
Gere Blackeway, Garland 
Terry Blacklock, Rockdale 
Mary Blackstock, Brownjield 

Ann Blackwood, Dallas 
Debby Blair, Lubbock 
Joan Blair, Hohbs, New 
Mexico 

Gregory Blake, Borger 
Terry Blake, Plainview 
Russell Blakeley, Odessa 
Jacklyn Blancett, Olney 
Pat Bland, Ft. Worth 

Nancy Blankenship, San 
Antonio 

Mark Blaquiere, Richardson 
Dris Blaskievich, Houston 
Betty Boddie, San Antonio 
Tommy Boehm, Houston 
Greg Boggs, Kress 
Lori Bohannon, Killeen 
Bruce Boland, Jayton 
Beth Bond, Dallas 
Judy Bonifield, Amarillo 
Steve Bonhell, Ft. Dodge, 
Iowa 

Miller Bonner, Hurst 
Brian Booker, Corpus Christi 
Lucinda Boone, Seymour 
Valerie Boone, Fabens 
Kay Born, Lubbock 
Marc Bosaw, Ft. Worth 
Mike Bos worth, Tyler 
Anicto Botello, Tulia 
Janice Bourbon, Arlington 
Heights, Illinois 
Nita Boverie, Lubbock 
Mike Bowen, Lubbock 
Lee Bowermon, Pampa 
Lauren Boyd, Brownwood 
William Boze, Lubbock 
Nancy Bozeman, Perryton 
Vicki Bozeman, Midland 
Rita Brabay, Lubbock 
Judy Brian, Del Rio 
Robert Brake, Houston 
Sharon Braly, El Paso 
Dianne Brame, Irving 



With hair tossled and both feet forward, sorority pledges try to reach 
the finish line standing up at the Fiji Olympics. 



Georgiane Brindle, Fritch 
Barbara Britain, Waco 
Ronald Britten, Groom 



Gary Brock, Lubbock 
Morris Brooks, McCamey 
Ronnie Brooks, Dalhart 




Freshman View — 5 



Gail Broussard, McAllen 

Adele Brown, Odessa 

Amy Browne, Dallas 

Becky Brown, Ft. Worth 

Beverly Browne, Morton 

Curtis Brown, Grand Prairie 

Dennis Brown, Waco 

Eric Brown, Haukins 

Fenton Biown, Roby 

Jacky Brown, Andrews 

John Brown, Graham 

Joseph Brown, Presidio 

Kim Brown, Lubbock 

Le Laurin Brown, Houston 

Robert Brown, Vernon 

Susan Brown, Lubbock 

Tom Brown, Lubbock 

Tom Brown, Meadow 

Wayne Brown, Houston 

Wendell Brown, Plaintiew 

Wilburn Brown, Lubbock 

Roby Brown lee, Lubbock 

Cherry Browning, Lubbock 

Rickey Browning, Odessa 





aiUiiliii Sii.i.iii.'iiS 




James Bruce, Dallas 

Robert Bruce, Dallas 

Andy Brumley, Vernon 

Linda Brunson, Corpus Chrisli 



Judy Bruyere, Snyder 

Betty Bryan, Dallas 

Cindy Bryant, Hamlin 

Rax Bryant, Plaintiew 



Ronald Bryant, San Antonio 

Marsha Buchanan, Odessa 

Don Buckholz, San Angela 

Janet Buford, Hobbs, New 

Mexico 



Almeda Bunton, Lubbock 

Gaile Buntzel, Houston 

Bobby Burge, Muleshoe 

Trumanell Burgess, Abilene 



John Burges, San Antonio 

Rita Burkes, Odessa 

Charles Burkett, Andrews 

Karen Burnett, Port Arthur 



Bonnie Burris, Houston 

Mark Burroughs, Houston 

Blaine Burton, Pecos 

Debbie Burrows, Muleshoe 



Debbie Busby, Slaton 

Clark Butts, Christoial 

Diana Butts, Littleton Color 

Mark Butz, Texas City 







A new type of architecture brings a new look to the 
campus. 




6 — Freshman View 



{ 




Ricky Byers, Spriii}ilake 
Donna Bynum, Dullas 
Carolyn Byrd, Lockiiey 
Sonny Byrd, Brouuuood 
Cindy Ca^ie, Lubbock 
Sherry Cade, UtaUe 
Harlan Cain, Ropest ille 
Yolinda Calfin, Lubbock 

Mary Ann Calhoon, 
AspertnonI 
Brian Calhoun, Pecos 
Carlitta Calhoun, Paheiis 
Cathy Callan, Amarillo 
Larry Calvert. Muteihoe 
Kathleen Camp, Dullas 
Cathy Campbell. Claude 
Claudia Campbell, Dallas 
Harriet Campbell, ?l. 
Stockton 

Rand Campbell, D.dlas 
Sioux Campbell, Houston 
Steven Campbell, Ah/letie 
Karen Canipsey, Azle 
Carl Canjjelosi, Staljord 
Chris Caniin, MidLiitd 
Dou^ Cannon, Flo) dad a 



\\ 



7 




Jo Cannon. Hale Center 
Sue Cannon. Hale Center 
Carol Canon. Midland 



Matt Caplin, Lubbock 
Gene Carney, El Paso 
Janice Carow, Lubbock 



Bill Carpenter, Richardson 
Cathy Carr, Lubbock 
Margaret Carr, KingsiUle 



Timothy Carrico, 5/. Louis, 

Missouri 

Linda Carson, Friona 

Bruce Carter, Amarillo 



Christy Carter, Croshyton 
Debbie Carter, Lubbock 
Gary Carter, Dallas 





Sigma Chi Derby Day brings with it many thrills and ex- 
citement for the sorority pledges as well as the on-lookers. 



Gary Cartwright, Plain: iew 
Chris Car\er, Dail.ts 
Rickey Case, PLtimieif 
Cathy Casey, Wichita Falls 
Sandra Casey, Lubbock 
Leigh Caskey, Lubbock 
David Cason, Ft. Worth 
Bcb Cass, Lubbock 
Richard Castellana, Dallas 
Cynthia Catcs, Rosuell, New 
Mexico 

Jan Causey. Houston 
Margaret Cavenagh. Houston 
Vicki Cavin, Odessa 
Darla Caviness, Phillips 
Eileen Chambliss, Lubbock 
Jeff Chancellor, Abilene 



Freshh 



Cynthie Chandler, Midland 

Julie Chapman, Dallas 

Rhonda Chennault, ft. Worth 

Alice Childers, Houiton 

Ronnie Childress, Carlsbad, 

New Mexico 

Tom Chorn, Snyder 

Connie Chrestman, Lubhock 

Candace Christensen, Lubbock 

Carolyn Christian, Harlingen 

Kathy Christopher, Wilson 

Cheryl Clark, Ft. Worth 

Karen Clark, Hutchins 

Karen Clark, Lubbock 

Susan Clark, Lubbock 

Cynthie Clarke, Amarillo 

Kathy Clawson, Quanah 

Cheryl Clayton, Mentone 

Onnie Clem, Dallas 

Greg Clemmer, Midland 

Richard Clemmer, 

Burkburnett 

Ray demons, Dallas 

Russell Clepper, Corpus 

Chrisli 

Greg Clifford, San Antonio 

Laura Cline, Houston 




WMF^ 




William Clopton, Childress 

Violet Close, Lubbock 

Carolyn Clothier, Plainview 

Caron Cloud, Rule 

Debne Clouse, Houston 

Kenneth Cluley, Wichita Falls 

Cathy Cobb, Houston 

Cindy Coble, Lubbock 

Richard Coffey, Sulphur 

Springs 

David Cogdell, Floydada 

Mike Colburn, Ft. Worth 

Carole Cole, Temple 

Cynthia Cole, Lubbock 

Donnie Coleman, Lubbock 

Carolyn CoUette, Dallas 

William Collien, Childress 

Centon Collier, Lubbock 

Jon Collier, Brownfield 

Don Comedy, Throckmorton 

Raul Colon, Puerto Rico 

Charlie Comstock, Midland 

Gayle Condray, Dallas 

Susie Conkling, Navasota 

Walter Conley, Quanah 

James Connor, Abilene 

Mary Jane Conner, Spur 

Nell Conner, Seymour 

Cindy Conway, Ft. Worth 

Linda Lee Cook, McAllen 

Johnnie Cooley, Santa Cruz, 

Bolivia 

Joe Cooper 

Lyn Cooper, Dallas 





i:kmk 




Jaynell Cope, Sterling City 

Jana Copeland, Midland 

Debbie Cornelius, Midland 

Cathy Coryell, Richardson 

Connie Cosly, Tulia 

Laura Costlow, Stanton 

Brett Cotham, San Antonio 

Joe Cotten, Robstown 

Deborah Cottrell, Lubbock 

Donna Cowen, Dallas 

David Cowling, Kermit 

Thomas Cowper, Amarillo 

dry Cox, Idalou 

Joette Cox, Lubbock 

Karen Cox, El Paso 

Nancy Cox, Midland 

Pat Cox, Plainview 

Robert Cox, Houston 

Shotti Ciabtree, Colorado City 

Beth Craig, Hamlin 

Bob Craig, Brownfield 

Dan Craig, Pampa 

Patty Craig, Houston 

Patsy Oannell, Dallas 

i— Freshman View 




New Year Brings New Excitement 



n» 




The Tech Band, under the direction of Detn Killlon, imizei the crowd with its peiformance at pte-game ceremonies. 









I IteOH!! 




David Cravens, Lubbock 

Lee Cramer, Odem 

Carolyn Crawford, Big Spring 

Wayne Crawford, O'Donnell 

Johnny Creek, Hagerman 

Terry Creek, Odessa 

Tim Crellin, Dallas 

Tom Crensliaw, San Antonio 

Stephen Crooks, Spearman 
Claudia Crowe, Dallas 
Tom Crouch, Arlington 
Bill Crout, El Paso 
Steve Crownover, Lamesa 
Myrna Crum, Spearman 
Pam Cunningham, Longview 
Debra Currie, Happy 



David Curry, Lubbock 
Kathy Curry, Lubbock 
Mark Curry, Houston 
Brad Curtis, Lubbock 
Shayne Curtis, Amarillo 
Bill Cyrus, Ft. Worth 
Deborah Dail, Eden 
Cissy Dailey, Lufkin 

Kathleen Dale, Levelland 
MacKenzie Dampeer, Kermit 
Bob Daniel, Lubbock 
Tim Daniel, Wichita Falls 
William Daniel, Cleburne 
Brenda Daniels, Lubbock 
Sally Ann Darling, Childress 
Mike Darsey, McLean 

Linda Daugherty, Fluvanna 
Marie Davenport, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Marsha Davidson, Dallas 
Bill Davis, Lubbock 
Charles Davis, Plainview 
Cynthia Davis, Odessa 
James Davis, Dallas 
Jim Davis, San Antonio 

Freshman View — 9 



Construction and art work 




Texas A&M came to Lubbock. 




Tech prepares for a new look with a new Art and Architecture Building. 
10 — Freshman View 



Marty Davii, Lubbock 
Mirilynn Dtvii, MidUnd 




Mike Dtvii, Ft. Wotih 
Nancy Davit, MidUnd 



Phil Davit, Hurl 
Robert Davit, Plainvhui 




Rutty Davis, Richardson 
Sally Davit, Dallaj 



Sharon Davit, Lubbock 
Veronica Davis, Snydtr 



Zachary Davis, Lamesa 
Deborah Dawson, Kermit 




Marsha Dawson, Springlake 
Barbara Day, Lubbock 



John Day, Dallas 
Ann Dearmore, Liberty 



Jane Deitch, Simon 

William De Lo Garza, 

BrownsvilU 



Gary Demand, Borger 

John DcMore, Loi/inglon, 

New Mexico 




l"i 



A 



fU 



provide many new looks 




I 



Bi^i 




George Dennis, San Antonio 
Elizabeth Denton, Galveston 
Kathey Denton, Dallas 
Laura Detzel, Dallas 
Paul Devers, Dallas 
Rich DeWolfe, Houston 
Benton Dibrell, Dallas 
Becky Dick, Tyler 

Glen Dickerson, Lubbock 
Polly Dickey, Lubbock 
Jane Dickson, Lubbock 
Mike Dicksin, Borger 
Debbie Dieb, Ft. Worth 
Sherry Diegel, Lubbock 
Nancy Dillard, Lubbock 
Linda Dillon, Amarillo 
Lynnetta Dillon, Amarillo 
Kathryn Dirks, Big Spring 
Monya Dixon, Abilene 
Morris Dixon, Slaton 
Sue Dixon, Midland 
Daniel Dobbe, Amarillo 
Janette Dodson, Lockney 
Michael Doherty, Folson, 
New Mexico 

Tom Dole, Millard, Nebraska 
Coleen Donahoe, Dallas 
Ann Dorsett, Lubbock 
Deborah Douglas, Midland 
Judy Douglas, Midland 
Kara Dounen, Odessa 
Yvonne Dowdy, Pampa 
David Neal Doyle, Abilene 

Dick Doyle, Lubbock 
Ava Dozier, Ft. Worth 
Chris Draper, Longview 
Betty Drew, Lubbock 
Susie Driggers, Lubbock 
Fred Driscoll, Dallas 
Mac Drvin, Tulia 
Roy DuBose, Muleshoe 

Wayne DuBose, Brownfield 
Pat Duffy, Amherst 
Bruce Dugger, Robstown 
Charles Dugger, White's City, 

New Mexico 
Larry Duke, Abilene 
Len Dunahoo, Ft. Worth 
Larry Dunbar, Rock Springs 
Debbie Duncan, Arlington 

Glenn Duncan, Ft. Worth 
Jimmy Dunlap, Lubbock 
Susan Dunlap, Dallas 
Dayneen Dunn, Southland 
Edward Dunn, Amarillo 
Brentie Dutton, Lockney 
Daria Duval, Lubbock 
Gary Dybuig, Dallas 
Bert Dycus, Lamesa 
Janis Dye, Lubbock 
Debbie Byer, Lubbock 
Renee Dyer, Muleshoe 
Lynn Dyess, Kerrville 
Ann Dysart, Temple 
Katy Dysart, Roswell, New 
New Mexico 
W. T. Dyson, Lewisville 

Jack Eades, Dallas 
Judy Eargle, Ft. Worth 
Kathy Eastering, Waco 
Kenny Ebeling, Dimmitt 
Betty Eberle, Lubbock 
Judi Edgington, Amarillo 
Michael Edmiston, Midland 
Ray Edwards, Lubbock 

Richard Edwards, Tulia 
Diane Effenberger, San 
Marcos 

Sue Egenbacher, Knox City 
Janet Eichhorn, Amarillo 
Orinda Eikman, Childress 
Elise Eilenberger, Palestine 
Johnny Eklund, Panhandle 
Marc Elder, Dallas 

Freshman View — 11 



Karen Elle, Lubbock 

Michael Eller, Lubbock 

Carolyn Ellis, Ft. Worth 

Judy Ellis, Dallas 

Kathy Ellis, Snyder 

Susan Ellis, Dallas 

Vicki Ellis, Lubbock 

Becky Ellison, Lubbock 

Betty Elmore, Lubbock 

Betty Elms, Amherst 

Melynda Elrod, Dallas 

Alyson Ely, Lubbock 

Jim Eppler, Lubbock 

Allan Erwin, Andrews 

Kathy Estes, Bovina 

Benny Eubank, Midland 

Douglas Eubanks, Plaintiew 

James Eubanks, Santa Anna 

Karen Eustace, Sonora 

Fred Evans, Tulia 

Mickie Evans, Lubbock 

Robert Evans, Dallas 

Ron Evans, Lake Jackson 

Beccy Evatt, Ralls 

Kelly Ewen, Tulia 

John Ewing, San Antonio 

Robert Fairly, Abilene 

Paul Faivor, Ft. Stockton 

Sherry Falkenberg, Dallas 

Steve Farmer, Lubbock 

Susan Farnsworth, Lubbock 

Kathleen Farr, Uralde 

Earle Farrell, Odessa 

Vicki Farren, Amarillo 

Melinda Fassel, Dallas 

Steve Feagan, Hamlin 

Don Fearing, Richardson 

Beth Fees, Lamesa 

Mary Feeser, Houston 

Tom Feitel, Dallas 

Laura Fender, Sweeny 

Brenda Ferguson, Ralls 

Linda Ferguson, Dallas 

James Ferguson, Amarillo 

Karen Fernandes, Kermit 

Jerry Ferrell, Pampa 

Stephen Field, Dalhart 

William Fields, Ft. Worth 

Cary Finney, Stinnett 

George Fischer, Plainview 

Michael Firmin, Perryton 

Kathy Risher, Austin 

Pam Fitzzibbon, Lubbock 

J. B. Fiveash, Ballinger 

Nancy Flack, Wichita Falls 

Mari Flanagan, Austin 

Teiiy Flanery, Temple 

Robert Flatters, Breckenridge 

Scott Fleming, Houston 

Susan Flenniken, Lubbock 

Debbie Fletcher, Dallas 

George Fletcher, Houston 

Gary Flynt, Garland 

Karen Ford, Dallas 

Jeanice Froeman, Idalou 

Ladonna Forman, Decatur 

Patricia Fortenberry, 

Manassas, Virginia 

Suzanne Fortenberry, New 

Deal 

Pam Fortino, Lubbock 

Michele Fortunate, Dallas 

Cynthia Foster, Lubbock 

Goria Foster, Wilson 

Nedda Foster, Farwell 

Ronnie Foster, Midland 

Steve Foster, Muleshoe 

Thomas Foster, Emory 

Larry Fountain, Dallas 

Daza Fox, Houston 

Ladonna Frady, Abilene 

Cenci Franks, Amarillo 

Paul Frantz, Ft. Worth 

Patty Franz, Dallas 

Philip Frazee, Burkburnett 

Brian Frees, Clearwater, 

Florida 

Sheliah Freitag, Odessa 

Paddy Frost, Lubbock 

John Fry, Amarillo 

Danny Frye, San Antonio 

12 — Freshman VUw 




BB^iiSS 




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"Our's is a growing thing," is the caption on this Homecoming parade float of Kappa Alpha which was 
awarded first place in the Fraternity Division. 



ut 




Craig Fuller, Hereford 
Michele Fuller, Euless 
Sue Fuller, Hmlingen 
Janice Furry, Brownwood 
David Gadbury, Carlsbad, 
New Mexico 
Charles Gaines, Lubbock 
Diane Galbraith, Abilene 
Linda Galloway, Calveston 
Don Gamer, Hereford 
Ginny Gampe, El Paso 
Valvin Garcia, Snyder 
Caria Gardner, Houston 
Charles Gardner, Lubbock 
Deb Gardow, Houston 
Cindy Garey, Irving 
Becky Garlmgton, Houston 
Charlotte Garner, Seminole 
Timothy Garner, Aitesia, New 
Mexico 

Grady Garrett, Lubbock 
Gwen Garrett, Marlin 
Linda Garrett, Pampa 
Cheryl Garrison, Garland 
Regina Gayle, \if^est Columbia 
Sally Gaylord, Belair 

Melva Gentry, Latnesa 
Cindy Gibbins, Corpus Christi 
Mike Gibbon, Midland 
Beth Gibbons, Dallas 
Bonnie Gibbs, Ft. Worth 
Byron Gibson, Ft. Worth 
Gary Gibson, Pampa 
Gill Gibson, Dallas 

Mark Gibson, Sherman 
RaDonna Gideon, Lubbock 
Kathy Gilbert, Flomot 
Koleta Giles, Littlepeld 
Maria Gilger, El Paso 
Beth Gill, Brownwood 
Rebecca Gill, Raymondvitle 
Stanley Gill, New Home 



Freshman View — 13 



Judy Gilles, Amarillo 

Linda Gilliam, Hondo 

Sherry Gil lock, Lubbock 

Ray Given, Amarillo 

Evelyn Glaspie, Midland 

Jeanette Glass, Haskell 

Scott Glass, Tampa, Florida 

Becky Gober, Denver City 

Gayle Godley, Lubbock 

Marrijo Godwin, Dallas 

Morton Gold, Georgetown 

Margaret Good, Paris 

Mary Ellen Goode, Welch 

Dave Goodrich, Lubbock 

Charles Goodson, Midland 

Gail Gordon, Waxahachie 

Thais Gordon, Lubbock 

Betty Gorman, Amarillo 

Janis Gosnell, Wellington 

June Gould, Lubbock 

Danny Gowen, Littlefield 

Ann Graham, Breckenridge 

Charles Graham, Kerrville 

John Graham, Dallas 

Paula Graham, Lubbock 

Randy Graham, Lubbock 

Roger Graham, Rotan 

Carol Grannis, Killeen 

Carmen Greathouse, 

Richardson 

Billy Jack Greaves, Waco 

Joe Green, Snyder 

Mary Green, Dallas 

Michal Green, Dallas 

Paula Green, Big Spring 

Robert Green, Rockville, 

Maryland 

Doug Greeson, Hereford 

Daryl Gregg, Dallas 

Darrah Grier, Texarkana 

Janell Griffith, Abilene 

Christy Griffin, Ft. Worth 

Alva Griffis, New Deal 

Ralph Grimmer, Borger 

Mary Grizzaffi, Corsicana 

Gary Grote, San Antonio 

Marsha Guess, Rogers 

Margaret Guidry, Lubbock 

Don Guion, Dallas 

Karen Lee Gupton, Houston 

Sophia Haberner, Ralls 

Ida Hadley, Paint Rock 

Mike Hagan, Dallas 

John Hagar, Dallas 

Kathy Hagen, Houston 

Kathy Hager, Weinert 

Carrol Haggard, Abilene 

Susan Hagood, Lubbock 

David Hajek, Seymour 

Harriet Halbert, Crowell 

Mike Halbrooks, Ft. Worth 

Paula Hale, Dallas 

John Halet, San Antonio 

Earl Hall, Beeville 

James Hall, Houston 

Jennifer Hall, Houston 

Nancy Hall, Littlefield 

Randy Hall, Ft. Worth 

Richard Hall, Lubbock 

Billy Hamilton, McGregor 

LaNelda Hamilton, Lubbock 

Lee Hamilton, Houston 

David Hammer, Gainesville 

Frances Hammond, 

Goldthwaile 

Joe Hammonds, DimmitI 

James Hammonds, Crowell 

Kathy Hancock, New Home 

Bobby Hannan, Perryton 

Jill Hatma, Bryan 

Cheryl Hannabas, Lubbock 

Karen Hanson, Kemah 

Larry Hanson, Houston 

Maiy Jo Hanson, Plainview 

Jon Hartke, Killeen 

Paul Happel, Pittstown, New 

Jersey 

Mimi Haralson, Amarillo 

Gary Hardee, Big Spring 

Pamela Hardin, Rotan 

Chris Harding, San Antonio 

Regina Hatgus, Ft. Stockton 

14 — Freshman View 




WSSB^ 




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Letitia Harigel, Houston 
Jack Harle, Mineola 
Kay Harp, Dallas 
Elmer Harper, Ft. Worth 
Britt Harrington, Ft. Worth 
James Harris, El Paso 
Mike Harris, Odessa 
Pat Harris, £/ Paso 
Bill Harrison, Wharton 
Bubba Harrison, San Angela 
Bob Hart, Eastland 
David Hart. Kress 
Rick Hart, Baytown 
Dennis Hartley, Plainview 
Sherry Hartman, Richardson 
Susie Hartt, Marshall 
Katherine Harvard, Kermit 
Ron Haskins, Dallas 
Ann Hasskarl, Brenham 
Jane Hastings, Waxahachie 
Julianne Hatt, Ft. Worth 
Don Hawkins, Via Cuna, 
Mexico 

Janis Hawke, Amarilto 
Vickie Hawkins, Bovina 
Claudia Haynes, Dallas 
Donna Haynes, Pampa 
Mike Haynes, McLean 
Verdonna Hays, Aspermont 
Karen Heatley, Lubbock 
Karen Heffner, San Mateo, 
California 

Debbie Hefner, Odessa 
John Hefner, Allen 
Mike Heinritz, Pampa 
Susie Hefner, Lubbock 
Steve Heinsch, Carlsbad, New 
Mexico 

Carolyn Helm, Ft. Worth 
John Heltom, Dumas 
Marion Hemphill, Kermit 
Albert Henderson, Lubbock 
Audrey Henderson, Pecos 
Doug Henderson, Amarillo 
Janet Henderson, Bowie 
Lynn Henderson, Ft. Worth 
Steve Henderson, Houston 
Susan Henderson, Dallas 
Kristi Hendley, Amarillo 
Anna Hendon, Welch 
Debbie Hendrix, Colorado 
City 

William Hendry, San Antonio 
Marguerite Hengst, San 
An gel o 

Mark Henley, Dallas 
Daniel Henly, New Deal 
Gary Hennersdorf, Ft. Worth 
Greg Henry, Lubbock 
Russell Henry, Seabrook 
Leslie Henslee, Roswell, New 
Mexico 

Marilyn Herberger, Midland 
Antonio Hernandez, Midland 
Ricki Herrin, Anton 
Deborah Herring, Grand 
Prairie 

Patricia Herring, Broumjield 
Janet Hertzler, El Paso 
Carla Hester, Stratford 
Robert Hicks, El Paso 
George Higginbotham, Dallas 
Larry Hightower, New 
Conaan, Connecticut 
Kathy Hilbun, Dallas 
Camilla Hill, Midland 
Greg Hill, Lubbock 
Janice Hill, Sweeny 
Mike Hill, Aspermont 
Patricia Hill, Hereford 
Patti Hill, Ft. Worth 
Sammie Lou Hill, Seminole 
Vicki Hill, Brownfield 
Robert Hindman, Willspoint 
Randy Hinds, Perryton 
Marcia Hines, Houston 
Howard Hinkle, Burkbumelt 
Sammie Hitt, Ft. Worth 
Stephen Hoback, Odessa 
Pam Hockstra, Houston 
Don Hodges, Ft. Worth 
Charles Hodges, Dallas 
Debbie Hodges, Lubbock 
Johnny Hodges, Anton 
Marjorie Hodgson, Ft. Worth 
Bill Hoffman, Eastland 

Freshman View — 15 



SPIRIT UNENDING 



Tom Hoffman, Slaton 
Chuck Hofian, Abilene 
Clare Hogan, Dallas 
Wade Howard, Kermit 
Tim Ho^sett, Carlsbad, New 
Mexico 
Joe Hoing, Piano 
Doris Holahan, Dallas 
Peggy Holder), Corpus Christi 
Paul Holland, Amherst 
Becky Holleman, Lubbock 
Linda Hollingsworth, 
Am aril I o 
Margie Hollingsworth, 
Lubbock 
Billy Holmes, Da/Zaj 
Bruce Holmes, Perryion 
Julia Holmes, Wichita Falls 
Lyndsay Holmes, Borger 
Roger Holmes, Los Alamos, 
New Mexico 
Sally Holmes, Lubbock 
Steve Holmes, Lewisville 
Paul Holzmer, Houston 
Leamon Hood, Levelland 
Jeff Hooker, Houston 
Susan Hord, Lubbock 
Valerie Home, La Canada, 
California 
Nancy Horner, Uvalde 
Barbara Horsman, Lubbock 
Larry Horst, Lubbock 
Barbara Horton, Houston 
Lee Roy Hoskins, Georgewest 
Jamie Hough, Lubbock 
Janice Hough, Lubbock 
Debbie Houghton, Mineral 
Wells 
Claudia Houp, Ft. Worth 
Katy House, Turkey 
Donna Howard, Lubbock 
Helen Howe, Smilhjield 
Dwayne Howell, Lubbock 
James Howell, Dangerjield 
Margaret Howell, Knox City 
Douglas Hubert, Dallas 
Tony Hubly, Houston 
Diane Huckaby, Amarillo 
Cindy Hudson, Dallas 
Michael Huerera, Stratford 
Donna Huffaker, Abernathy 
Laura Huffman, El Paso 
Steven Hugg, Goldsmith 
Dalton Hughes, Rising Star 
Don Hughes, Midland 
Lana Hughes, Ptainview 
James Hughs, Morensi, 
Arizona 
Tamora Hunt, Garland 
) lary Ann Hurn, Arlington 
Craig Hurst, Beaumont 
John Hurster, Alvarado 
Janie Hyatt, Litilefield 
Terry Ihrke, Houston 
Dickie Ingram, Amarillo 
Orie Irby, Clotis, New 
Mexico 
Nancy Irwin, Lubbock 
Gary Jackson, Dallas 
Gerald Jackson, Amarillo 
Michael Jackson, Houston 
Susan Jackson, Lubbock 

Judy Jacobs, Dallas 

Mark Jacoby, Sonora 

Tonya James, Lubbock 

Betsy Jarman, Houston 

Mickey Jarrett, Lockney 

Sarah Jasslet, Brownfield 

Lynda Jeanis, Seminole 

Donna Jenkins, Lubbock 

Karen Jenkins, Galveston 

Susan Jenkins, San Antonio 

Gordon Jennings, Midland 

Sherry Jewell, El Paso 

Don Jochen. Houston 

Brenda Johns, Lazbuddie 

Beverly Johnson, 

Albucjuelrque, New Mexico 

Bruce Johnson, Houston 

16 — Freshman View 





W!M!M^ 




^BS!S 









Catherine Johnson, El Campo 
Debbie Johnson, Abilene 
Debra Johnson, Burnet 
Howard Johnson, Lubbock 
Jan Johnson, Dalhart 
John Johnson, Pampa 
Karron Johnson, Whitharral 
Rob Johnson, Dallas 

Shirley Johnson, Friona 
Steven Johnson, Dallas 
Thomas Johnson, Burnett 
Tricie Johnson, Conroe 
Billy Johnston, Water Valle) 
Dee Johnston, Artesia, New 
Mexico 

Tandy Johnston, Lockney 
Beverly Johnstone, El Paso 

Ann Jones, Livingston 
Barbara Jones, Lubbock 
Bruce Jones, Lubbock 
Diane Jones, Houston 
Hal Jones, Anson 
Jane Ann Jones, Dallas 
Jill Jones, Tyler 
lanny Jones, Lubbock 




Spirited students tum out in large numbers to help boost the Raiders to a victory over the Aggies. 





Linda Jones, Lubbock 
Martha Jones, Lubbock 
Mike Jones, Anson 
Peggy Jones, Ft. Worth 
Richard Jones, Seminole 
Rita Jones, Ft. Worth 
Ronnie Jones, Ptainvieuy 
Sydrey Jones, San Antonio 

Ted Jones, Houston 
Tom Jones, Ruidoso, New 
Mexico 

Vickie Jones, El Dorado 
Bob Jordan, Dallas 
Debbie Justice, Odessa 
Libby Kaelber, Dallas 
Jan Kay, Alpine 
Karen Kay, Plainview 

Kavid Keast, Dalhart 
James Keele, Garland 
James Keener, Belton 
Kathy Keener, Vernon 
Ann Kellett, Midland 
Kathy Kelley, Lubbock 
John Kelly, Corpus Christi 
Mary Kemp, Midland 

Freshman View — 17 



Robert Kemp, Ahemathy 

Mickye Ann Kendrick, 

Wellington 

Jane Kennedy, Folsom, New 

Mexico 

Pat Kennedy, Uniontown, 

Pennsylvania 

Todd Kephart, Dallas 

Kathleen Kersey, Orange 

Gary Dick Keyton, Lubbock 

Beverly Kidd, Roscoe 

Tom Kidwell, Houston 

Robert Kilby, San Antonio 

Judy Kilcrease, Dallas 

Bob Kilduff, Killeen 

Garry Kiljan, Houston 

Maxine Kimmel, Lubbock 

Eddie Kincaid, Eastland 

Carole Kin^ Midland 

Chris King, Abilene 

Diane King, Des Moines, 

Iowa 

Janice King, Ft. Worth 

Marta King, Bandera 

Vicki King, Eastland 

Joe Kinman, Lovington, New 

Mexico 

Frances Kinney, Dallas 

Freida Kinney, Seagraves 

Betty Kinsey, San Angela 

Ron Kinslow, Barstow, 

California 

James Kirby, Lubbock 

Martha Kirchhoff, Mason 

Randal Kirk, Borger 

Marty Kirkham, Waco 

Terry Kirkpatrick, 

Burkburnett 

Stacy Kiser, Houston 

Patty Kleinknecht, Seabrook 

Bill Kleman, Tulia 

Gary Klepper, Piano 

Randall Klose, Stanford 

Kathi Knight, San Antonio 

Kay Knight, Wichita Falls 

Robbie Knight. Dallas 

Michael Koen, Edinburg 

Debbie Korbach, Baytown 

Ken Kratch, Sherman 

Linda Kraus, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 

Jim Kruss, Ft. Worth 

Kathy Kwilos, Dallas 

Debbie Labenske, Midland 

Jacarol Laborde, Amarillo 

Kathy Lack, Lubbock 

Pete Ladd, Dallas 

John La Duke, Houston 

Denise Lalla, Dallas 

Daniel Lane, Childress 

David Lange, Ballinger 

Patricia Lambert, Abernathy 

Patricia LangdaJe, Houston 

Sherry Larsen, Baytown 



Gary Larson, Dallas 

Cheryl Lasiter, Little field 

Jame Latham, Houston 

Vee Latimer, Memphis 

William Lavato, San Antonio 

Juday Law, Lubbock 

Tom Laws, Lubbock 

Julie Lawson, Lubbock 

Linda Lawson, Dallas 

Steve Lawson, Memphis, 

Tennessee 

Cheryl Layake, White Deer 

Margi Layden, Dallas 

James Lee, Mesquite 

Johnnie Lee, Houston 

Martin Lefevere, McCamey 

Merle Lei leer, Kermit 

Dianne Lelley, Houston 

Sandra LeMay, Dallas 

Robert Lemmons, Fort Rucker, 

Alabama 

Apne Leon, Petersburg 

Mary Leonard, Bella/re 

Buddy Lerch, Comfort 

Kenneth Lester, Rankin 

Dan Lewis, Hereford 

18— -Freshman View 





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Debbie Lewis, Wellington 
Devora Lewis, Pla/nv/ew 
Donna Lewis, Arlington 
Gary Lewis, Peco 
Homa Lea Lewis, Midland 
Lowry Lewis, Muleshoe 
Andra Lightfoot, Anthony, 
New Mexico 

Sam Ligon, Dallas 
Bob Liles, Palestine 
Melissa Liles, Dallas 
Richard Lindberg, Dallas 
Connie Lindner, Comjort 
Ann Lindsey, Biownfield 
Vicki Listen, Lorenze 

Harold Little, Sweetwater 
Ken Little, Mesquite 
Maurene Lloyd, Dallas 
Bruce Locke, White Deer 
Eddie Locke, Rockport 
France Locklear, Garland 
Sharon Logan, Ozona 



Students have an opportunity right 
on campus to register to vote. 





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Debbie Lohman, Plainview 
Linda Lomax, Dallas 
Dudley Long, Austin 
Linda Longacre, Richardson 
Donna Loomis, Houston 
Celeste Lopez, Plainview 
Gloria Lopez, Lubbock 



Robert Lotridge Dallas 
Thomas Loper, Clyde 
Anita Lott, Houston 
Gary Lott, Plainview 
Janet Lott, Houston 
Thomas Louthan, Hale Center 
Catherine Lovelace, Groves 



Mike Lovelace, Kermii 
Jeff Loving, San Antonio 
Rusty Lowe, Midland 
Theresa Lowrance, Ft. Worth 
Anita Loyd, Silverton 
Tony Luckie, Dallas 
Jan Lumdgrew, Austin 



Freshman View — 19 



Joe Lupardus, Midland 

Ann Lutz, Houston 

Joni Lutz, Vernon 

Nancy Lux, Eldorado 

Betsy Lyde, Sherman 

Robbie Lynch, Borger 

Linda Lynn, Midland 

Sandra McAllister, Lubbock 

James McAteer, Joyton 

Bennie McBride, Luhoock 

Carolyn McCaine, Houston 

Bonnie McCall, Odessa 

Franny McCammon, San 

Angela 

Barbara McCann, Corpus 

Christi 

Mike McCann, Ft. Worth 

James McCartney, Snyder 

Janet McCartney, Greenville 

Rick McCarty, San Antonio 

Donald McClenan, Houston 

Charles McCleskey, Dallas 

Debbie McClintock, Lubbock 

Richard McClure, Lubbock 

Charlotte McCluskey, Aiken 

Joe McCluskey, Brownwood 

Bruce McClymond, 

Breckenridge 

John McCollum, Lubbock 

Susan McCollum, Dallas 

Barbara McComas, Albany 

Melisse McConnell, Houston 

Danny McCord, Lubbock 

Fred McCord, Dallas 

Mitzi McCox, Farmington, 

New Mexico 

Daniel McCright, Midland 

Diane McCuUoch, Lubbock 

Kathie McDaniel, Monahans 

Nancy McDearmon, Midland 

Laird McDonald, Dallas 

Mary McDonald, Lytle 

Randy McDonald, Dallas 

Chris McEntire, Amarillo 

Barry McGaughy, Crosbyton 

Larry McGenee. Lubbock 

Patty McGill, El Paso 

Helen McGinnis, Dallas 

Sherilyn McGlaun, Snyder 

Marlon McGough, Commerce 

Kerma McGuire, Lubbock 

LouAnn McHargue, Dallas 

Robert Mclntire, Houston 

Carolyn lAcKin\ey, ,Pampa 

Eric McKnight, Dallas 

Betsy McLarty, Arlington 

Leslie McLaughlin, Dallas 

Janet McManus, Crane 

Diana McMillan, Midland 

Sheryl McMillan, Houston 

Roxanna McMurry, Dumas 

. Para McNabb, Dallas 

Patricia McNally, Roswell, 

New Mexico 

Melody McNeil, Richardson 

Kevin McPeek, Ft. Worth 

Jerry McWhorter, Archer City 

Ciftdy McWilliams, Midland 

Craig Maddox, Aledo 

Sharon Maddox, Pampa 

James Madison, Wolfforth 

Richard Maggie, Panhandle 

Susan Mallard, Ft. Worth 

Randy Marchman, Graham 

Steven Marin, San Antonio 

Jan Markham, Lubbock 

Sheila Marlow, Denver City 

Cindy Martin, Lubbock 

Dennis Martin, Dallas 

Martha Martin, Rockville 

Mike Martin, Dalhart 

Sharon Martin, Plainview 

Steve Martin, Dalhart 

Steve Martin, Sudan 

Terry Martin, Graham 

Roque Martinex, Dallas 

Cris Mason, Des Moines, Iowa 

Mike Mason, Southland 

Sheryl Mason, Muleshoe 

Danny Matcrn, Dallas 

Jayne Mathes, Houston 

Robert Mathews, Wichita 

Palls 

Mickey Matthews, 

Waxahachie 




I I I 



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20 — Freshman View 



!• 




Judy Maxey, Lorenzo 

Debbie May, Luhhock 

Judy Mays, Perryton 

Bert Mayse, Mertzon 

Becky Meason, Carrollton 

Jeanne Meckler, El Paso 

Alexa Medlock, Crosbylon 

Mark Meek, Brisco 

Vickie Mefford, Sail Lake 

City, Ulah 

hairy Meinecke, Lubbock 

Len Meinecke, Luhhock 

Adair Melinsky, Amarillo 

Linda Mendoza, Plainview 

Antonia Meredith, Terrell 

Hershel Meriwether, Lubbock. 

Mike Merrell, Carlsbad, New 

Mexico 

Susan Merrick, Weatherjord 

Mazel Merrill, Dallas 

David Merrinnan, Jacksboro 

Brock Merritt, Dimmitt 

Barbara Metcalf, Houston 

Kathy Middlebrook, Ft. 

Worth 

Carol Miksch, Belton 

Floyd Milla, Ft. Worth 



Today's youth — seeking out 
tomorrow's decisions 




Faces at a rally — this is the look of today's youth — interested, disgusted, puzzled, happy, sad, but still caring. 



!!• 




Bobbie Miller, Los Angeles, 
California 

Charlotte Miller, Ft. Worth 
Gary Miller, Garland 
Gary Miller, Lubbock 
Jack Miller, Panhandle 
Juanita Miller, Groom 
Les Miller, Lubbock 
Susie Miller, Richardson 

Debby Millican, El Paso 
Rob Millikan, Lamesa 
Deana Mills, Abilene 
Tom Mills, Midland 
Dianna Mims, Stanton 
Kathy Mitchell, Lubbock 
Mollie Mitchell, Slaton 
Ronnie Mize, Lubbock 

Freshman View — ^21 



Dwayne Modisette, Lubbock 

Larry Moffett, Hamlin 

Sammie Moffett, Deltas 

Sheryl Moffett, Wichita Falls 

Susan Moffett, Dallas 

Terry Moffett, Hamlin 

Don Moilan, El Paso 

William Moltz, San Antonio 

Kent Monahan, Odessa 

Everett Monroe, Clarendon 

Dale Montgomery, Lubbock 

Deborah Mooney, Lockney 

Ann Moore, Lubbock 

David Moore, Lubbock 

Debbie Moore, El Paso 

Janet Moore, Houston 

Judi Moore, Houston 

Margaret Moore, Midland 

Margo Moore, Texarkana 

Richard Moore, Seminole 

Robert Moore, Winters 

Sheri Moore, Midland 

Terrie Moore, Brownfield 

Don Mooring, Clarendon 

Kevin Moran, Dallas 

Evelyn Moreman, Dalhart 

Debbie Morgan, Dallas 

Kathy Morgan, San Antonio 

Pam Morgan, Dallas 

Martha Morphis, Grand 

Prairie 

Donne Morris, Dallas 

Marian Morris, Ajton 



Laura Murray, Dallas 

Madeleine Muse, Dallas 

Nancy Nell Musk, Lytle 

Jamie Musselman, San 

Antonio 

John Mustard, Phillips 

Tom Mustard, Phillips 

Barbara Murray, Melvin 

William Murray, Anson 

John Myatt, Lubbock 

Karen Myatt, Lubbock 

Patrice Myers, Houston 

Ronnie Myers, Kemah 

Victoria Myers, Arlington 

James Nader, Ft. Worth 

Jan Naglee, Midland 

Linda Nance, Downer's Grove 

Martha Nash, Waxahachie 

Claudia Nawrocki, Houston 

Jesus Navarro, McAllen 

Charles Neas, Perry ton 

Debi Nedders, San Benito 

Debbie Neinast, Lubbock 

Lera Nettles, New Home 

Steve Ncwberg, Houston 

Jerrie Newmann, Pearland 

Debbie Newsom, Odessa 

Elizabeth Newsome, Bedford 

James Newton, Lubbock 

Bill Jack Nichols, Pampa 

Bruce Nichols, Lubbock 

Laurie Nipper, Dallas 

David Nicklas, Springtown 




Richard Moser, El Paso 

Sharon Moss, Dallas 

Johnnie Mosser, Slalon 

Marianne Mostia, San Benito 

Stephanie Mowery, Houston 



Tommy Mrazek, Aspermont 

Patti Mullins, Albuquerque, 

New Mexico 

Linda Murfee, Lubbock 

David Murphy, Pampa 

Barbara Murray, Melvin 




•I' 



22 — Freshman View 



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^!^SS 




Karen Parker, Kerrville 

Karen Parker, Carlsbad, New 

Mexico 

Margaret Parker, Ft. Worth 

Nick Parker, Killeen 

Richard Parker, Scotch Plains, 

New Jersey 



Pam Parmer, Garland 
Rosemary Parsons, Houston 
Theresa Patrick, Dallas 
Cheryl Patterson, Dallas 
Donna Patterson, San Antonio 



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Tim Nix, Sudan 
Trisha Nix, Greenville 
Ginger Nobles, Midland 
Gerald Nobles, Midland 
Lynn Nommenser, Houston 
Liny Norman, Ft. Worth 
Pamela Norris, Houston 
Paula Norris, Brownwood 

William North, Singapore 
Claire Norton, Terrell 
Arleen Norwood, Dallas 
Debbie Novelli, Galveston 
Angel Nunez, Midland 
Cynthia Nutt, Rowland 
Heights, California 
Suzanne Oakley, Lubbock 
Betty O'Brien, Austin 

Andrea Odom, Crosbyton 
Vicki Lynn Ogle, Dalhart 
Lisa Oktavec, Lubbock 
Rebecca O'Neal, Sherman 
Holly Osborn, Houston 
James Osborne, Arlington 
David Owen, Lubbock 
Jane Owen, Tahoka 

Mary Ann Ozanne, Dallas 
Donald Pace, Willman 
Larry Page, Lamesa 
Toinette Page, Lubbock 
Karla Ann Pannell, Abilene 
Olga Papaila, Midland 
Joseph Pareti, Midland 
Joe Parker, Byers 



Kristen Pederson, Dallas 
David Perez, Dimmitt 
Dennis Perkins, Prosper 
Glen Perkins, San Antonio 
Paula Perns, Dallas 
Debbie Perry, Ft. Worth 
Linda Perry, Eastland 
Tommy Persons, Tulia 
Miles Peterson, La Porte 
Wayne Peterson, Lubbock 
Jerry Petty, Lubbock 
Jim Pfanmiller, Amartllo 
Sara Pfeiffer, Wichita Falls 
Benay Phillips, Houston 
Craig Phillips, Farwell 
Deborah Phillips, San Angela 

John Phillips, Houston 

Niki Sue Phillips, Corpus 

Christi 

Gene Pickens, Canadian 

Cheryl Pickett, Lubbock 

Pam Pickett, Lubbock 

Susan Pickett, Dallas 

Jearl Pierce, Gallup, New 

Mexico 

Pris Pierce, Georgetown 

Steve Pierce, Floydada 
Debbie Pierson, Dallas 
Jan Pinkert, Lubbock 
Rob Pirtle, Lubbock 
Deborah Pittman, Lubbock 
John Pitts, Mules hoe 
Janis Plumlee, Cleburne 
Paul Plundet, Greenville 

Freshman View — 23 







Charcoal Cody, boosting the spirit at one of the many pep rallies, 
sees the Red Raiders to third place in the Southwest Conference. 



David Poff, Lubbock 

Benton Poole, Garland 

Sandra Ponder, Richardson 



Leslie Porter, Hurst 

Sheridan Porter, Lubbock 

Richard Portwood, Lubbock 



Jackie Poteet, Lubbock 

Jackie Power, Idalou 

Mandy Prall, Lubbock 



David Prehn, Ft. Worth 

Bill Price, Clayton, New 

Mexico 

Frank Price, Sterling City 



Thaxter Price, Lilllejield 

Linda Priddy, Brady 

Debbie Pritchett, Dallas 



Cheryl Proctor, Dallas 

Logan Puckett, Muleshoe 

Vicki Sue Plyant, Muleshoe 



Joyce Quinn, Lubbock 

O. B. Raburn, Andrews 

Rosemary Rachael, Cedar hill 



Giles Rainwater, Snyder 

John Rainwater, Vernon 

Pennye Ralston, Spearman 



William Ramirez, Dalhart 

Robert Ramos, Lubbock 

Phyllis Ramsey, El Campo 



John Rangel, Ft. Worth 
Cindy Rankin, Lockney 
Kay Ranncfeld, Snyder 



Walter Ransom, Claude 

Marcus Rasco, Amarillo 

Candy Ratcliff, Lancaster 
















24 — Freshman View* 



JL I 




^S 




Kathy Ratcliff, Irving 
Sue Ratliff, Lubbock 
John Rawlings, Borger 



Vicki Ray, Seminole 

William Reason, Juarez, 

Mexico 

Chipper Redus, Lubbock 



Susie Redus, Lubbock 
Bobby Redwine, Lazbuddie 
Betty Reeburgh, Port Arthur 



Jed Reed, Garland 
Jimie David Reed, Kress 
Judy Reed, Lorenzo 



Linda Reed, El Paso 
Bob Reese, Sherman 
Jim Reese, Lubbock 



Johnny Reese, Littlejield 
Nancy Reese, Borger 
Debbie Reetz, Des Moines, 
Iowa 



Jerry Reid, Sherman 
Scott Reid, Dallas 
Skeeter Reid, Abilene 



Theresa Renner, Texhoma 
Belinda Renteria, El Paso 
Linda Reuter, Livingston 



David Reynolds, Midland 
Debbi Reynolds, Midland 
Larry Rhea, Amarillo 



Mike Rhoderick, Lubbock 
Karen Rhyne, Lubbock 
Donna Rice, Lubbock 



Richard Rice, Lubbock 
Jacquelina Rich, Post 
Kelly Richards, Garland 




Danny Hardaway, Tech sophomore halfback, is credited with 483 
yards running in the Raider's '69 season. 



Freshman View — 25 



Kenny Richardson, Lamesa 

Tonie Gail Richerson, 

Shamrock 

Debbie Richie, Dallas 

Linda Ricic, Midland 

Bruce Riegel, Artesia, New 

Mexico 

Susie Ries, Midland 

Susan Ri^s, Midland 

Joan Riker, Lamesa 

Cynthia Riley, Ft. Worth 

James Riley, Plainview 

Anne Ritchie, Mineral Wells 

Terry Rivers, Dallas 

Ronald Rives, Wheeler 

William Roach, Odessa 



Mary Ann Roark, Victoria 

Mike Robberson, Houston 

Adele Robbins, Dallas 

Bill Robbins, Pampa 

Janice Robbins, Dallas 

Joe Robbins, Idalou 

Steve Robbins, Hereford 



Darlene Roberts, Lubbock 

Debra Roberts, Dallas 

Ellen Roberts, Lubbock 

Linda Roberts, San Antonio 

Melanie Roberts, Ft. Worth 

Patricia Roberts, Friona 

Randy Roberts, Lamesa 



Tom Roberts, Dallas 

Willie Roberts, Throckmorton 

Beverly Robertson, Lubbock 

Craig Robertson, Midland 

Loy Roberson, Dallas 

Randy Robinett, Lamesa 

Claud Robinson, Turkey 




William Robinson, Lubbock 

Elaine Robinson, Houston 

Kathy Robinson, Dallas 

Kenneth Rochen, Ft. Stockton 

Guadalupe Rodiguez, Lubbock 

Frances Roehrig, Dallas 

Mary Roesner, Houston 



James Rogers, Ft. Worth 

Kenneth Rogers, Mineola 

Monte Rogers, Sudan 

Michael Rohr, Lubbock 

Fred Rolke, Dallas 

David Rollin, Plainview 

Annette Rollins, Borger 

Scott Rombokas, Lubbock 

Gary Romero, Sun Antonio 

Mick Rooney, Ft. Dodge, Iowa 

Gene Rook, Amarillo 

Pat Rose, Ft. Worth 

Steve Rose, Andrews 

Tim Rose, Floydada 



Donella Ross, Odessa 

Robbie Ross, Dallas 

Steven Rossler, Houston 

Susan Rothe, D'Hanis 

Betsy Rountree, Comfort 

Nina Rowan, Lubbock 

Graccanna Rowland, Anson 



A Sudden Growth, 1 B 



^^S^ 





Kiekitk 




iiSS^ll 




26 — Freshman View 



p 



p 



^ 




L. A. Royal, Plainview 
Teresa Rudd, Hereford 
Joyce Rumsey, Cleburne 
Nancy Runnion, F/. Worth 
Al Rush, Odessa 
Kerri Rust, Varing 
Suzy Rutledge, Lubbock 

Patti Ryan, Pluiiipiew 
Cindy Saied, Wellington 
Carmer Salazer, Lubbock 
Deborah Salge, New 
Braunjels 

Christine Sallese, Kermit 
Vickie Salmon, Dallas 
Alfred Sammann, Dimmitt 

Clark Samson, Lubbock 
Rudy Sanchez, Midland 
Debbie Sarosdy. San Antonio 
Hyman Sauer, Eldorado 
Art Sava.^e, Amarillo 
Ron Sawall, Dallas 
Pat Scarth, Stratford 



Kurt Schaal, Dallas 
Jamilou Schaffer, Pampa 
Barbara Scheffel, Lubbock 
Larry Schtlter, Burkburnett 
Barbara Schrag, San Antonio 
Jerry Schutza, Ft. Worth 
Lee Schuehle, Hondo 

Tina Schuetur, San Marcos 
Gail Schmicker, Houston 
Bob Schneider, Richardson 
Kenneth Schneider, Houston 
Rodney Schoppa, Lubbock 
Mona Eileen Schrank, 
Hamilton 
Candy Schroeder, Boys Ranch 



Brings A New Tomorrow 




n^^FB 




Douglas Schuetz, Houston 
Bill Schweitzer, London 
Bebe Scott, Lancaster 
Karen Scott, Houston 
Maggie Scott, Billings, 
Montana 

Randall Scott, Austin 
Dan Scrivner, Aguilla 

Jo Sealey, Dallas 
Sandra Seaman, Dallas 
Barbara Searls, Lubbock 
Larry Sears, Plainview 
Ralph Seaver, Lubbock 
Shirley Settlemyre, Houston 
Claudia Seward, Kermit 



Shirley Sewell, Crowley 
Suzzanne Sewell, Midland 
Mike Shannon, Abilene 
Tracy Sharber, Borger 
Prissy Sharp, Lubbock 
David Shaw, Aledo 
Deborah Shaw, Irving 

Janet Shaw, Midland 
Penny Shaw, Mineral Wells 
Steve Shaw, Los Alamos, New 
Mexico 

Mike Sheaffer, Dallas 
Celeste Shelton, Amarillo 
Claire Shelton, Marlin 
Jaye Shelton, Ft. Worth 



Freshman View — 27 



TTU 



ON THE GROW 



Sharman Shelton, Garland 

Eileen Shepard, Dallas 

Ellen Shepherd, Levelland 



Kathy Shields, Ft. Worth 

Shirley Shimek, Lubbock 

Mark Shipley, Seabrook 



Barbara Shipp, Slephenville 

Denise Shiver, Amarillo 

Hayden Shockley, Plainview 



Vicki Showalter, New Deal 

Karen Shuffield, Lubbock 

Jim Shute, Lubbock 



Barbara Sicking, Houston 

Kay Sides, Midland 

Bill Sieling, Richardson 

Nancy Sifford, Lubbock 

Penny Sigler, Waco 

Harriet Sikes, Houston 

Herschel Sikes, Houston 

Jeri Simmons, Odessa 

Karon Simmons, Ballinger 

Margaret Simmons, 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Phyllis Simmons^ Dallas 

Sharon Simmons, Ballinger 

Scott Simpson, Floydada 

Byron Sims, Midland 

Debbie Sims, Snyder 

Robert Sims, Ft. Worth 

Martin Sisk, Lewisville 

Garry Sitz, Vernon 

Jon Six, Garland 

Kenneth Sjogren, Kress 

Janet Skaggs, Midland 

Donald Skinner, Childress 

Candie Sloan. Ft. Worth 

Louis Sloan, Dallas 

Becky Smith, Lubbock 

Clare Smith, Paris 

Billie Smith, Andrews 

Curtis Smith, Houston 

Debbie Smith, Dallas 

Garry Smith, Perrylon 

Gene Smith, Lubbock 

Glenda Smith, Lubbock 

Jan Smith, Los Alamos, New 

Mexico 

Janet Smith, Bellville 

Janice Small, Dallas 

Jetty Smith, Dallas 

Jot Smith, Lubbock 

Karen Smith, Lubbock 

Kathy Smith, Lubbock 

Lori Smith, Dallas 

Margaret Smith, Sea/Crapes 

Marilyn Smith, Paducah 

itry Nelle Smith, Amarillo 

Richard Smith, Midland 

Richard Smith, Borger 

Roger Smith, Kerrville 

Sally Smith, Houston 

Shellie Smith, San Antonio 



2i—Preskman View 




JayTl 
to the I 



I I 



\ 



II 



ON THE KNOW 



ifalloo. 




Steve Smith, Maraciaibo, 

Venezuela 

T. L. Smith, Wichita Falls 

Sandra Smithee, Ralls 



Sharon Snapp, Anchorage, 

Alaska 

Sandie Snider, San Antonio 

Chris Snodgrass, Paris 



Jo Ann Snodgrass, Arlington 
Ralph Snowden, Odessa 
Katherine Sohns, Cross Plajm 



Kay Soules, Sundown 
Dina Sousley, Ljtbbock 
Steve SptKjnemoie, Spi 



Cathy Spoonts, Ft. Worth 
Mark Spurgeon, Amarillo 
Sherry Spraberry, Lamesa 
Sylvia Spraberry, Bellevue, 
Nebraska 

Debbie Spradlin, Lubbock 
Barrel 1 Spraggins, Sherman 
Steve Sparks, Dallas 
Ronnie Spratt, Irving 
Ken Sprecher, Garland 
Mary Springborn, London 
England 

Marjorie Sue Springer, West 
Columbia 

Robbie Springer, Mineral 
Wells 

Richard Spurgeon, Ft. Worth 
Jill Stansell, Floydada 
David Stapp, Lojora, 
Columbia 

Jan Stapp, Midland 
Clark Stegal, Dallas 
Steve Stegall, Abilene 
Jamie Stehley, Snyder 
Troy Steinbock, Lubbock 
Robert Stell, Houston 
Bruce Stephens, Graham 
Bred Stephens, Abilene 
Debbie Stephens, Cleburne 
Hollis Stephens, Hamlin 
Hoyt Stephens, Petersburg 
Judy Stephens, Pampa 
Terry Sterling, Ira 
Tom Sterrett, Amarillo 
Becky Stewart, Uvalde 
D. R. Stewart, Lubbock 
Mike Stewart, Lamesa 
Harvey Stiegler, Lubbock 
Debbie Still, Littlefield 
Elizabeth Stippich, Warner 
Robins, Georgia 
Eddie Stock, Dallas 
Harla Stone, Brownfield 
Stephen Stone, Corpus Christi 
Terry Stone, Amarillo 
Billie Storey, Clarkville 
Sharon Stout, Tulia 
Jim Strader, Lubbock 
Robert Strayhom, Burkburnett 
Durward Strickland, Dimmilt 
Janet Stringer, Midland 
Johnny Stringer, Plainview 
Cherie Strother, Ft. Worth 
Harry Struve, Ennis 



Freshman View — 29 



Gotdon Stuart, Lamesa 

Katherine Stucky, Ft. Worth 

Susan Studebaker, 

Raymondville 

Sue Ann Sublett, Kermit 

Kay Sudduth, Lubbock 

Lairy Sullivan, Burkburnett 

Pat Sullivan, Dallas 

Wayne Sullivan, Lubbock 

Chris Sumrow, Ft. Worth 

Grace Surguy, Houston 

Birdie Sutherland, Dallas 

Mitzi Sutton, Dallas 

Johnny Swanson, Electra 

Nancy Swaringen, Brownfield 

Susan Swatzell, Canyon 

Steve Sypert, Pampa 

Johnny Tabor, Waco 

Richard Talley, Yuheat River, 

Colorado 

Linda Talley, Ft. Worth 

Rosane Tarpley, El Paso 

Richard Tarter, Grand Prairie 

David Tate, Lubbock 

Dennis Taubert, Rio Hondo 

David Taussig, Houston 

Becky Taylor, Farwell 
Bonny Taylor, Brgzoica 

Don Taylor, Lubbock 

Pam Taylor, Lancaster 

Prissy Taylor, Andrews 

Randy Taylor, New Home 

Robert Taylor, Midland 

Malva Teague, Anton 

Rebecca Teel, Tulia 

Steven Tennison, Wellington 

Grady Terrill, Dallas 

Carol Terry, Bonham 

EunaVee Terry, Lubbock 

Bobby Thomas, Childress 

Keith Thomas, Dallas 

Linda Thomas, Irving 







BfSSI 





rasR 




c 



Texis Tedi plays host to Goveroor Preston Smith at the annual Dad's Day luncheon where Goveniot Smith spoke to dads from all over the country. 
30 — Freshman View 




!f 




BHiS 










^i&i! 




Para Thomas, Amarillo 
Robert Thomas, Plainview 
Teresa Thomas, Dallas 
William Thomas, Pampa 
Barbara Thompson, Dallas 
Gary Thompson, Dalhart 
Gary Thompson, Odessa 
Jan Thompson, Charlotte 

Jeannine Thompson, Snyder 
Larry Thompson, Odessa 
Pamela Thompson, Houston 
Suzanne Thompson, Conroe 
Tony Thompson, Bonham 
Sandy Thornberry, Clarendon 
Frank Thornesberry, Bowie 
Bruce Thornton, Lubbock 

Kathy Thornton, Lockney 
Marguerite Thornton, San 
Antonio 

Gail Thorp, Midland 
Kay Thrash, Ft. Worth 
Suzan Threadgill, Taft 
David Tiemann, Dallas 
Quin Tillery, Longview 
Terri Timmon, Abilene 
Norman Tindell, Abilene 
Francine Tippen, Paducah 
Debbie Tipton, Midland 
Karen Titsworth, Liberty, 
Nikki Tisdale, Phillips 
Montana 

David. Todd, Lubbock 
Jessamy Todd, Georgetown 
Verma Todd, Lubbock 

Patti Toland, Taft 
Susan Tomlin, Dallas 
Betty Tonde, Midland 
Charlotte Toombs, Flupanne 
John Toone, Pecos 
Judy Townsen, Hale Center 
Janice Trachta, Hobhs, New 
Mexico 

Stanley Trammel Aspermont 
Barbara Trant, Conroe 
Elizabeth Travis, Dallas 
Terry Travis, Farwell 
Joel Trevino, Plainview 
Melvin Trice, Lamesa 
Becky Trickey, Abilene 
Betsy Triplett, Wink 
Patsy Tripp, Richland Spring 
Jane Trostel, Houston 
Jim Truett, Lubbock 
Rhonda Truett, Lubbock 
Vicki Truly, Luhbock 
Anne Tschuray, Dallas 
Jack Tunnell, Cross Plains 
Helen Turner, Big Lake 
Janna Turner, Austin 
Para Turner, Ft. Worth 
Pamela Turner, Friona 
Randy Tyler, Lubbock 
Ernest Underwood, Lubbock 
Jacqueline Underwood, 
Lubbock 

John Upchurch, Italy 
Katie Updike, El Paso 
Roseann Urbanczyk, 
Panhandle 

Dee Valder, Ft. Worth 
Gary Vance, Panhandle 
Sue Vandergriff, Midland 
Vicki Vannoy, Lubbock 
Thomas Vaughn, Tulia 
Joseph Veanueva, Lubbock 
Aline Velez, Mexico City, 
Mexico 

Thomas Verkler, Luhbock 
Tom Vernor, Bellaire 
Rhandi Vincent, Rockdale 
Edward Vinsor, Lubbock 
Coni Virdell, Llano 
Lesly Virgil, Odessa 
Debbie Visage, Lubbock 
John Vise, Wheeler 
Wallace Vogel, Von Ormy 

Vaunie VonStorch, Hurst 
Beverly Wade, Perryton 
George Wages, Grand Prairie 
Linda Wagner, Brownfield 
Terry Waldrura, Dallas 
Ann Walker, Merkel 
Judy Walker, Plainview 
Melinda Walker, Dallas 

Freshman View — 31 



BfS^E 




Michael Walker, Lubbock 

Pat Walker, Lubbock 

Tom Walker, Omaha, 

Nebraska 

Vickie Walker, Dallas 

Victoria Walker, Pleasanton 

Claudia Walkup, Lubbock 

Ben Wallace, Richardson 

Jean Wallace, Lubbock 

Lairelyn Wallace, Killeen 

Susie Wallace, Archer City 

Roberta Waller, Midland 

Sid Wallingford, Dallas 

Richard Walner, Odessa 

Diane Walsh, Lubbock 

Jan Walsh, Texarkana 

Sarah Walton, Midland 

Kay Ward, Lubbock 

Richard Ward, Lubbock 

Stephen Warminski, White 

Deer 

Buddy Warren, Ft. Worth 

Christy Warren, Corpus 

Christi 

Edwin Warren, Floydada 

Tom Washburn, Panhandle 

John Watkins, Eden 

Kathy Watson, Anchorage, 

Alaska 

Rich Weathersby, Lubbock 

Audrey Weaver, Lubbock 

Dan Weaver, Albany 

Johnnie Weaver, Silverton 

Don Weber, Eunice, New 

Mexico 

Steve Webster, Houston 

Marsha Wedel, Dalhart 

Jan is Wedgeworth, Amarillo 

Barbara Weems, Lubbock 

Ellen Weems, Houston 

Walter Weir, Amarillo 

Jan Welch, Crowell 

Jacque Weldon, Clayton, New 

Mexico 

Galileo Wells, Boys Ranch 

Jerry Lynn Wells, Lubbock 




Students ponder over schedules and wait in long lines to register. 



32 — Freshman View 



<i 



j I 




Leslie Wells, Stratford 
Mary Wells, Lubbock 
Robert Wells, Lubbock 
Anne Wendt, Odessa 
Gary Wendt, Houston 
Margie West, Ft. Worth 
Mike West, Garland 
Denise Westbrook, Lubbock 

John Westbrook, Midland 
Richard Wetzel, Houston 
Stephen Wheeler, Chillicothe 
Susie Wheelock, Corsicana 
Randy Whelan, Dallas 
Dina Whighajn, Perryton 
Cary White, Grand Prairie 
Ellen White, Midland 

Nancy White, Ft. Worth 
Pat White, ia^^of,^ 
Rodney White, Dalhart 
Gerald Whitehead, Dallas 
Donald Whitley, Midland 
Gerald Whitson, Lubbock 
Anne Whittington, f/. Worth 
Kerry Whitworth, Lubbock 

Wayne Wideman, Kerrville 
Suzan Wiggs, £/ Paso 
William Wigley, Lubbock 
Debra Wilburn, Wichita Falls 
Mark Wiley, Decatur 
Nancy Wiley, Wheeler 
Darrell Wilke, Southland 
Julie Wilkinson, Midland 
Roland Wilkinson, Carlsbad, 
New Mexico 
Tom Wilkinson, Lubbock 
Charles Willemson, Lubbock 
Randy Willett, Midland 
Alicia Williams, Amarillo 
Annette Williams, Muleshoe 
Beth Williams, Dallas 
Brad Williams, Idalou 











Dianna Williams, Plainview 
Freddie Williams, Montague 
James Williams, Robstotvn 
Jim Williams, Spur 
Kathy Williams, Muleshoe 
Kathy Williams, Sunray 
Larry Williams, Amarillo 
Martha Williams, Hamilton 
Nick Williams, Plainview 
Peggy Williams, Muleshoe 
Ronnie Williams, Dallas 
Susan Williams, Ft. Worth 
Charles Williamson, 
Plainview 

Danny Williamson, 
Lovington, New Mexico 
Lee Williamson, Dallas 
Vicki Willimon, Dallas 
Beverly Willingham, Dallas 
Caroline Wilmeth, Plains 
Barbara Wilson, Lubbock 
Debbie Wilson, Ft. Worth 
Edward Wilson, Houston 
Glen Wilson, Houston 
Jeannie Wilson, Sherman 
John Lee Wilson, Dallas 
Lavenia Wilson, Plainview 
Marcia Wilson, Los Alamos, 
New Mexico 
Mike Wilson, Lubbock 
Mindy Wilson, Ft. Worth 
Retha Wilson, Lubbock 
Robert Wilson, Ft. Worth 
Ronnie Wilson, Kermit 
William Wilson, Stanton 
Warren Wimmer, Orvada, 
Colorado 

Jim Windier, Sweeney 
Judy Winningham, Lubbock 
Linda Winston, Dallas 
Carolyn Winter, Denison 
Jane Winton, Ft. Worth 
Mark Wise, Artesia, New 
Mexico 
Susan Wise, Lubbock 



Freshman View — 33 



Jane Witkowski, Hereford 

Becky Witt, Perryton 

Ron Witten, Colorado City 

Robert Wittiver, Houston 

Becky Wold, Lubbock 

Candance Wolf, San Antonio 



Vickie Wolf, Dallas 

Cindy Wolfe, Midland 

Judy Wolff, Ft. Worth 

Chris Wolffarth, Lubbock 

Juanita Womack, Lubbock 

Martha Womack, Tahoka 



Bob Wood, Ft. Worth 

Johnny Wood, Midland 

Susie Woodall, Amarillo 

Karen Woody, Hurst 

Wynda Woolley, Lubbock 

Marion Wossura, Amarillo 



Doug Wren, Dallas 

Carla Wright, Abilene 

Christine Wright, Amarillo 

Deb Wright, Midland 

]efhey Wright, Lubbock 

Jim Wright, Corpus Christi 



Jimmy Wright, Ft. Worth 

Mary Wright, Houston 

Patty Wright, Ft. Worth 

Susan Wright, Richardson 

Lileesa Wyatt, Tell 

Ann Wyckoff, Plainvieui 



Loretta Yandell, Lubbock 

Marilyn Yankouck, Carlsbad, 

New Mexico 

Joyce Yarling, Rosenberg 

Mary Yates, Garland 

Kaye Yates, Houston 

Gary Yee, Midland 



Biff Yocham, Rankin 

Connie Young, Coleman 

Deborah Young, Madison, 

New Jersey 

Dianne Young, Eastland 

Mark Young, Shamrock 

Ronny Young, Ft. Worth 

Sharon Young, Lubbock 

Wanda Young. Lubbock 

Nancy Youngblood, Ft. 

Worth 

Polli Zahn, Hobbs, New 

Mexico 

Walter Zanek, Houston 

Larry Zeagler, Richardson 

David Zeeck, Plainview 

Chris Zelens, Dallas 

Cindy Zemis, San Antonio 

Mary Ann Zickler, Bandera 

Diana Zimmerman, 

Richardson 

Cathy Zintgraff, San Antonio 









34 — Freshman View 



WHO THEY ARE AND WHERE TO FIND THEM 

KEY TO INDEX 



€-J 



Life L 

Tech Union 
University Theater 

Sports Illustrated SI 

Inter-collegiate Athletics 
Outstanding Athletes 
Intramurals 

Mademoiselle M 

Sororities 

Women's Dormitories 

Tech Beauties 

Playboy PB 

Fraternities 



Men's Dormitories 
Tech's Playmates 

Town & Country TC 

Agriculture 
Home Economics 

Esquire Esq 

Arts and Sciences 
Education 
Who's Who 

Tyme T 

Administration 
Military 
Music 
Religion 



Future F 

Business Administration 

Engineering 

Graduate 

Law 

Senior View SrV 

Senior Class 

Junior View JrV 

Junior Class 

Sophomore View SoV 

Sophomore Class 

Freshman View FrV 

Freshman Class 



INDEX 



Administration T 6 

Agronomy Club TC 25 

Alpha Chi Omega M 42 

Alpha Delta Pi M 44 

Alpha Delta Sigma F 19 

Alpha Epsilon TC 22 

Alpha Kappa Psi F 24 

Alpha Lambda Delta M 15 

Alpha Phi M 46 

Alpha Phi Omega PB 66 

Alpha Pi Mu F 34 

Alpha Tau Omega PB 40 

Alpha Zeta TC 23 

ACEA F 32 

AHEA TC 12 

AIA F 40 

ASAE TC 24 

ASCE F 33 

Angel Flight T 39 

AWS M 24 

Band T 42 

BSU T 20 

Beta Alpha Psi F 26 

Beta Gamma Sigma F 16 

Beta Thcta Pi PB 42 

Bledsoe PB 15 

Block and Bridle TC 26 

Board of Regents T 4 

Campus Girl Scouts M 23 

Carpenter PB 16 



Cheerleaders L 18 

Chi Omega M 48 

Chi Rho PB 68 

Chitwood M 27 

Circle K T 80 

Clement M 28 

Coleman M 29 

Corpsdettes T 28 

Counter Guerrilla Unit T 26 

Dairy Club TC 30 

Daughters of the Diamond PB 36 

Delta Delta Delta M 50 

Delta Gaimna M 52 

Delta Tau Delta PB 44 

Delta Phi Epsilon F 21 

Delta Sigma Pi PB 70 

Doak M 30 

Dolphins SI 51 

Double T Association SI 52 

Double T Rifle Team T 32 

Entomology Club TC 30 

Eta Kappa Nu F 36 

Fraternity Council PB 31 

Future Farmers TC 31 

Gamma Alpha Chi F 18 

Gamma Phi Beta M 54 

Gaston Hall PB 17 

Gates Hall M 31 

Gordon Hall PB 18 

Horn Hall M 32 



Hulen Hall M 33 

IEEE F 37 

Junior Council M 16 

Kappa Alpha Order PB 46 

Kappa Alpha Theta M 56 

Kappa Kappa Gamma M 58 

Kappa Kappa Psi T 46 

Kappa Sigma PB 49 

Knapp HaJl M 34 

La Ventana Staff T 12 

Little Sigmas PB 38 

Little Sisters of the Maltese Cross PB 
35 

Little Sisters of Minerva PB 37 

Mortar Board M 17 

Mu Phi Epsilon T 47 

Murdough Hall PB 20 

NACURH PB 76 

NCAS F 17 

Orchestra T 44 

Panhellenic M 40 

Phi Alpha Delta F 11 

Phi Delta Theta PB 52 

Phi Gamma Delta PB 54 

Phi Gamma Nu F 20 

Phi Kappa Psi PB 56 

Phi Mu M 60 

Phi Mu Alpha T 45 

Phi Nu Epsilon F 25 

Phi Upsilon Omicron TC 10 



Pi Beta Phi M 62 

Pi Kappa Alpha PB 58 

Range and Wildlife Club TC 40 

Rodeo Association TC 38 

Scabbard and Blade T 30 

Sigma Chi PB 62 

Sigma Iota Epsilon F 38 

Sigma Kappa M 64 

Sigma Nu PB 64 

Sigma Phi Epsilon PB 74 

Saddle Tramps PB 73 

Sneed Hall PB 22 

Stangel Hall M 35 

Tau Beta Pi F IBC 

Tau Beta Sigma T 48 

Tau Sigma Delta F 35 

Tech Accounting Society F 22 

Tech Dames M 18 

Tech Finance Association F 23 

Tech Union L 20 

Thcta Sigma Phi T 14 

Thompson Hall PB 19 

Town Girls M 19 

Tyrian Rifles T 24 

University Daily T 10 

Wall Hall M 36 

Weeks Hall M 37 

Wells Hall PB 24 

Wesley Foundation T 19 

WRC M 26 

WSO M 20 



FACULTY 



i] 



Acree, Jim SI 12 
Ainsworth, Dr. C. Len Esq 29 
Allen, B. L. TC 33 
Aihdown, Donald Esq 33 
Ayers, Cecil I. TC 33 

B 

Bartlett, Burl SI 12 
Baumgardner, John H. TC 27 
Beebe, Mrs. Jackie J. L 20 
Bennett. Dr. J. Wayland TC 17. 19 
Blevins, Leon W. L 13 
Boze. Dr. Nancy S. Esq 30 



Carmichael, Mrs. Emil B. Esq 25 



Conley. John SI 12 
Coppedge, Norman G. SI 24 
Craig. Dr. James R. Esq 19 
Crowder, Dr. Alex B. Esq 28 
Curl, Dr. Samuel E. TC 16 

D 

Dahl, Billie E. TC 40 
Dorsey. Mrs. Johnny L. TC 14 
Dregne, Dr. H. E. TC 17 
Durham, Mrs. Kathy D. L 20 



Ellsworth, Paul R. Esq 12 

F 

Faith, Mrs. Lucy V. L 20 



Fickle, Mrs. Mary J. TC 15 

H 

Harden. Mrs. Margarettc L. TC 11 
Hargrave, Levi M. TC 31 
Harley, Peter L 26 
Henderson, Gene SI 12 
Henderson. Dr. Gordon G. Esq 19 
Horton, Dr. Doris A. Esq 31 
Huffman. Berl SI 12 
Hunter, John R. TC 40 

J 

Jenkins, Mrs. Jean A. Esq 24 

K 

Kennamer, Dr. Lorrin Esq 11 



Kettler, Elwood SI 12 

Kincaid, Dr. Clarence E. Esq 40 

King, J. T. SI 12 

Klebenow, Dr. Donald A. TC 32 



Leach, T. L. TC 18 
Lee, Dr. Gordon C. Esq 26 
Longley, Nelson H. L 20 
Longworth, Dr. Donald S. Esq 33 

M 

Marsh, Fred Esq 19 
MiUiken, J. H. Esq 23 
Mills, Bradley SI 12 
Moorhead, Tom N. L 20 



Freshman View — 35 



o 

Oberg. Dr. Aaron G. F 32 
O'Brien, Dr. Coleman A. TC 27 



Peeples. Dr. Milton L. TC 30 
Pettit. Dr. Russ D. TC 40 
Philbrick, George R. SI 44 
Pijan, Mrs. Dorothy M. L 20 



Aarnio, Kathy L. 

Aaron, Janice, SrV 6 

Abarca, Ramon S. 

Abe, Alan D., SrV 6 

Abbott, David W.. SrV 6 

Abbott, John P., SrV 2 

Abbott. Linda F.. SrV 6 

Abbott, Robert W., FrV 3 

Abbott, Susan G., SoV 4 

Abbott, Thomas W., SoV 4 

Abbott, Vicki R., SrV 6 

Abel, Lee W., PB 46 

Abemathy. Gregory R., PB 60 

Abernathy, William G.. F 24; PB 57 

Abraham, Charles N., SoV 4 

Absher, Lennol K.. PB 41 

Acker, Arnold P., SrV 6 

Acker, Sharon, FrV 3 

Actkinson, Johnny W., PB 52 

Acuff, Robert M., FrV 5 

Adair, Jan M., FrV 3 

Adams, Barbara L., JR 2 

Adams, Charles W., SrV 2 

Adams, Connie J., FrV 3 

Adams, Cynthia L., M 49 

Adams, John H., JrV 2 

Adams. Judy A.. FrV } 

Adams, Kathleen R., JrV 2 

Adams, Larry C. PB 33 

Adams, Larry J., PB 41 

Adams. Lou A., SoV 4; M 15; M 36 

Adams. Marcia J., JrV 2 

Adams, Pamela G., SrV 6; M 43 

Adams, Phil L., SrV 2 

Adams, Robert T.. SrV 6; PB 72 

Adcock. Robert O.. SrV 6 

Adcock, Stephen E.. FrV 3 

Addison. Michael. PB 25 

Adkins, Joel, SrV 6 

Adkins. Tommy R.. FrV 3 

Adler. Jan. M 65 

Adler. Susan A.. SoV 4 

Aghazadeh. Fereydoun. JrV 2 

Agnew. Dwayne, JrV 2 

Agnew, Judith A., FrV 3 

Agnew, Ronnie L., SoV 4; PB 72 

Aguirre. Josephine. FrV 3 

Aho. Margaret. SrV 6 

Ahrens. Wesley A.. JtV 2 

Ainsworth, Marelin E.. SrV 6 

Akins. Future R.. SoV 4 

Akins, John G., JrV 2 

Akins. Zandra S.. FrV 3 

Alana. Donald H.. SoV 4 

Albert. John M.. PB 25 

Albin. John L., FrV 3 

Albracht. Roberta A., SoV 4; M I) 

Albright, Benny 

Albright, Loretta K., PB 35: M 41; 
JrV 2 

Albright, Martha. M 43 

Albus. Clarence. SrV 6 

V> Frethman Vieu 



R 

Robison, Polk F. SI 12 



Sasser. Dr. Elizabeth S. L 26 
Schuster, Dr. Joseph L. TC 18 
Segrist, Kal H., Jr. SI 36. 40 
Sitton, Dr. Margaret A. TC 5 
Smith, B. T. Esq 19 
Stiles. Jess SI 12 



Thomas. Dr. Gerald W. TC 16, 24 
Tinsley, Dr. Willa Vaughn TC 4. 15 
Turner, Josep TC 6 

U 

Ulich. Dr. Willie L. TC 17 
Urbanovsky, Elo J. TC 18 

w 

Wagner, Mre. Betty S. TC 11 



STUDENTS 



Alcorn, Harrel R., JrV 2 

Alcott, Robert S., FrV 3 

Alderfer, James A.. JrV 2 

Alderson, Lynn E., Esq 9; FrV 3; PB 
5 

Aldridge, Joe D.. JrV 2 

Adrian, Alexander, SoV 4 

Alexander, Carolyn S., FrV 3 

Alexander, Earletta, FrV 3 

Alexander, Janet L., FrV 3 

Alexander, Leota H., SrV 2 

Alexander, Marcia J., F 20 

Alexander, Marilyn K.. FrV 3 

Alexander. Priscilla A.. SoV 4 

Alexander. Ronald G.. SrV 6 

Alexander, Scott. SrV 6 

Alexander. Stephen Q.. PB 23 

Alexander. Wesley B.. SoV 4 

Alissa. Suliman F.. SrV 4 

Alkire. Mary S.. M 49; JrV 2 

Allam, Melissa B., M 45 

Allbright, Martha J., SoV 4; JrV 2 

Allen. Ginny, SoV 4 

Allen, Carrie L.. FrV 3 

Allen, Charles T., FrV J 

Allen. Cheryl S.. MAD 47 

Allen. Donna M., M 49 

Allen. Forest W.. F 22 

Allen. Gary D., SoV 4 

Allen, Gary L.. FrV 3 

Allen. Janet. FrV 3 

Allen. Janice L.. FrV 3 

Allen. John R., FrV 3 

Allen. Joyce M., T 47; M 36 

Allen, Karen L., SoV 4 

Allen. Kathy N.. FrV 3 

Allen. Kelia L.. Esq 44; T 48 

Allen, Leanna, SrV 6 

Allen, Mary E., SoV 4 

Allen. Michael E.. FrV 3 

Allen, Michael G.. SrV 6; PB 63 

Allen, Orlin, F 22 

Allen. Richard G.. JrV 2 

Allen. Stephen M.. SoV 4 

Allen. Steven. JrV 2 

Allen. Suzanne E.. SoV 4; M 67 

Allen. Victoria L.. M 30 

Allen. William G. 

Allen. Vicki. JrV 2 

Alley. Sharon A.. SrV 6 

AJlis, Judith E.. SrV 6 

Allison. Althea G.. M 25; Esq 6: M 
59; SoV 4 

Allison, Carolyn, SrV 6 

Allison, Dana D., FrV 3 

Allison, Deanna J., M 59; FtV i 

Allison, Dorothy J.. SoV 4 

Allison. Glenn L.. SI 51 

Allted. Alfred L., SoV 4 

Allred. Judith K.. SrV 6 

Almon, Edward C. JtV 2 

Almon. John S.. JrV 2 

Almond, Steven T., FrV 3 

Alpern, Daniel M.. PB 60 

Alsobrook. Phyllu L., JtV 2 



Alspaugh. Donna K.. SoV 4 

Alston, Dicki L., SrV 6; MAD 28 

Alvarado. Hector R., JrV 14 

Alverson. Raymond R.. SoV 4 

Aman, Ralph D., JrV 2 

Amaro, Armando, SrV 6 

Amerman, Margaret, SrV 6 

Amerman, Patricia M., FrV 3 

Amerman, Peggy. M 35 

Amerson. Dale L. 

Ammons. David N.. PB 57: JrV 2: 
PB 72 

Ammons. John M.. SoV 4 

Amstead. Clinton R., FrV J 

Anders, Dana L., FrV 3 

Anderson, Alan, SoV 4 

Anderson, Andy L., JrV 24 

Anderson, Barbara S., M 15: SoV 4; 
Esq 6; PB 56; M 63 

Anderson, Byron M., JrV 2 

Anderson, Cathy J.. PB 30; JrV 7 

Anderson, Chester C, SrV 6 

Anderson, Daryl, FrV 3 

Anderson, Deborah, SoV 4 

Anderson. Diane K., SoV 4; M 45 

Anderson, Donald C. SoV 4 

Anderson, Donald E., SI 33 

Anderson, Earl B., JrV 2 

Anderson, Gary A., PB 57; JrV 2 

Anderson, Hal S., PB 25; JrV 2 

Anderson, Holly B., JrV 2 

Anderson, James F., JrV 2 

Anderson, Judy D., FrV 3 

Anderson. Julie R., SrV 6 

Anderson. Kathy, FrV 3 

Anderson. Kay A.. FrV 3 

Anderson. Larry G.. F 32 

Anderson. Larry J., PB 41 

Anderson. Laurel. FrV 3; M 67 

Anderson, Linda E., SrV 6 

Anderson, Mary A.. TC 10: StV 6; 
Esq 4 

Anderson. Max L., SrV 7 

Anderson, Michael, L 20: F 34: Esq 
2; Esq 6 

Anderson. Patricia F.. M 12 

Anderson. Patti K.. FrV 3 

Anderson. Paul W.. SrV 7 

Anderson. Robert D.. SoV 4 

Anderson. Robert E.. SI 51. 48 

Anderson. Robin L., PB 46; PB 71; F 

24 

Anderson. Sharon K.. JrV 2 

Anderson. Shellie. M 43 

Anderson, Steven M., JrV 2 

Anderson. Thomas H.. JtV 2 

Anderson. Vicki A.. SrV 7 

Anderson, William FrV 5 

Andrae, David H., SoV 4 

Andrasko, Tania D., SrV 6 

Andrews, Caroline S., StV 7 

Andrews, Debra D., SrV 7 

Andrews, Judy B., F 23; StV 7; F 20; 
F 17 

Andtews. Sally A., FtV 3 

Aadtcwi, Sbelii A., M 49 



Wallace. Mrs. Estelle H. TC 6 
Ward. Dr. Charles R. TC 30 
Williams, Dr. Willard F. TC 18 
Willingham, Dr. Juddie J. TC 50. 18 
Wilson. Tom SI 12 



Yang. Dr. Shiang P. TC 9 

z 

Zinn, Dt. Dale W. TC 17 



Andrews, William L., PB 59; PB 72 
Andridge, Herbert W., JrV 2 
Andron, Merrily F. 
Angeley, Jennifer R.. FrV 3 
Ansley, William A., PB 64 
Anthony. Dan R.. PB 57 
Anthony. Judy C. FrV 3 
Anthony, Susan K., SrV 7; F 17 
Antonoff, Ira, FrV 3 
Appel, Cynthia, SrV 7 
Apperson, Anita C, JrV 2 
Archer. David A., PB 57 
Archer, Richard E.. FrV 3 
Arguello, Johnny D., PB 25; Esq 318 
Arlington, Carolyn, M 67 
Armenta, Gloria, FrV 3; Esq 38 
Armistead, Jay D., FrV 3 
Armstrong, Billy D.. SoV 4 
Armstrong, James R., FrV 3 
Armstrong, John, SrV 7; Esq 37 
Armstrong, Michael L., SoV 4 
Armstrong, Mitchell L., SoV 4 
Armstrong, Randy L., SrV 7; T 46 
Armstrong, Stephen, SrV 7 
Armstrong. Thomas J., Esq 42 
Armstrong. Thomas L.. JrV 3 

Arnctt. Carolyn J.. SoV 4 

Arnett. Kay. FrV 3 

Arnett. Virginia K.. SoV 4 

Arnold. Anita C. SoV 4 

Arnold. Charlyce L.. FrV 3 

Arnold, Cheryl J., SoV 4 

Arnold, James P., SI 52 

Atpin, George, PB 66 

Arrington. Jack K.. PB 46 

Arrington. Michael P., SoV 4 

Arthur, Charlotte A., FrV 3 

Arthur. Gregory F.. SrV 7 

Arthur. Pamela G.. SrV 7 

Arthur, Russell W., SI 24 

Ash, Deidra L., SrV 7; F 20 

Ashba, Gwendolyn. SoV 4 

Ashby. Dennis L., SoV 4 

Ashcraft. Gary L.. F 24 

Ashcroft. Linda K., StV 7 

Asher. Vickie L.. FtV 3 

Ashford. Linda C. SoV 4 

Ashman. Harold E., JrV 3 

Ashmore. Diane L.. SoV 4 

Ashmorc. Dolphus M.. JtV 3 

Ashraf. Abdul A.. L 20 

Ashworth, Ann. M 27 

Askins, Billy R. 

Askins. ChaHes L.. PB 66; TC 50 

Askins, Charles R.. JrV 5 

Aslin. Jerry D., FrV 5 

Aston, Audrey A., FtV 5 

Aston. Jane A.. M 67 

Attebury. Margaret A.. JrV 5 

Attebury. Susan A.. SoV 4 

Alwood. Eliaabeth A.. M 67 

Atwood. Stephen L.. PB 57 

Aubrcg, Tom. FrV 5 

Auld. lOuea. FtV ) 




Austin, Alan D., FrV 3 

Austin, Betsy A., M 65; JrV 3 

Austin, David L. 

Austin, Laura L., F23: JrV 3; F 17 

Austin, Linda J., SrV 7; M 43 

Austin, Phyllis A., PB 38; M 43 

Austin, Richard D., SoV 4 

Austin, Ronald D., SrV 7 

Avis, James D., FrV 3 

Awtrey, Ron D., SrV 7 

Awtrey, Ron D., SrV 7 

Awtrey, Sandra B., SrV 7 

Ayer, John G., FrV 3 

Ayers, Ann, JrV 3 

Ayers, Jane, FrV 3 

Ayers, LeAnn, M 45 

Ayers, Linda K., SoV 5 

Ayes, Ann, M 49; T 47 

Aylor, Daniel A., SrV 7 

Ayres, Cynthia A., JrV 4 

B 

Babcock, Janet I., M 15; SoV 5; M 

31 
Bacon, Deborah A., FrV 3 
Bacon, ElizaWth A., SrV 7 
Bacon, James R., JrV 3 
Badger, Suzanne, Esq 45 
Baer, Kathy J., SoV 5 
Baeuchle, Deborah A., JrV 3 
Baggcrly, Steven C, SoV 5 
Bagley, Douglas A., FrV 3; TC 27 
Bagwell, Shelly D., FrV 3 
Bagwell, Susan A., FrV 3 
Bagwell, William P., PB 41 
Bahnmiller, Ronald D., SrV 7; PB 41 
Bailey, Arlene A., SrV 7; F 17 
Bailey, Barry H., FrV 3 
Bailey, Charles C, JrV 3 
Bailey. Cynthia A., M 59 
Bailey, Debra J., M 59; FrV } 
Bailey, George B., SrV 7 
Bailey, Gilbert R., FrV 3 
Bailey, Hedy A., PB 30; SrV 7; M 59 
Bailey, Robert F., SrV 7 
Bailey, Sandra, JrV 3 
Bailey, Teresa M., FrV 3 
Bailey, Thomas O., JrV 3 
Bain. James A., Esq 31 
Bain, Kenneth W., F 24 
Baines, Anne, M 15 
Bains, Anna L., SoV 5 
Bains, Julia K., SoV 7 
Baird, Frances J., JrV 3 
Baird, Jacquelyn K., SoV 5 
Baird, James E., SoV 5 
Baird, Margaret, FrV 3 
Baize, John C, TC 32; TC 40; JrV 3 
Baker, Barbara A., JrV 3 
Baker, Candace L., M 59; FrV 3 
Baker, Charles R., JrV 3 
Baker, Charles W., FrV 3 
Baker, Dale, FrV 3 
Baker, David M., SrV 7 
Baker, Deborah A., M 65; SoV 5 
Baker, Deborah A., F 15 
Baker, Floyd D., FrV 3 
Baker. Freddy L. 
Baker. Gail. FrV 3: M 49 
Baker, James E.. SoV 5 
Baker. James J., PB 25 
Baker, John L., SrV 7 

Baker, Kathryn, JrV 3; M 16; M 26; 
M 57; Esq 45 

Baker, Kathy, FrV 3 

Baker, Kenneth O., FrV 3 

Baker, Linda, L 16 

Baker. Mac, JrV 3 

Baker, Nathaniel T., SoV 5 



Baker, Patty, JrV 3 

Baker, Rebecca C, SoV 5 

Baker, Roger L., SrV 2 

Baldino, Vincent J., SoV 5; PB 69 

Baldree, Milton R.. FrV 3 

Baldwin, Katherine M., F22; JrV 3; 
F 20 

Bale, Kenton A., FrV 3 
Balko, Larry G., FrV 3 
Ball, Bobby, SoV 5 
Ball. Claire. FrV 3 
Ball. Cynthia J.. FrV 3 
Ball. Don G.. FrV 3 
Ball. Patricia A.. FrV 3 
Ball. Patricia A., SrV 7; T 47 
Ball. Robert S.. PB 72 ' 
Ballantyne. Susan J.. SoV 5 

Ballard. Coy L.. PB 57; L 20. 24; Esq 
41 

Ballenger. Richard B.. PB 57 

Ballentine. Gregg M.. PB 63; SoV 5 

Ballew. Jesse L.. SoV 5; PB 20 

Ballew. Maria A.. JrV 3 

Ballew. Robert P.. SoV 5 

Balzen, Barry M.. SrV 7 

Banker. Cynthia A., JrV 3 

Bankhead, Thomas A., SrV 2 

Banks, Gail L., SoV 5 

Banks, Vicki L., FrV 3 

Banner, Rosana, M 65 

Banta, Donna K.. FrV 3 

Barbatoe. Janice R. 

Barbee. Becky J.. FrV 3 

Barbee. Lanny C, FrV 3 

Barbee, Lynda J., Esq 45 

Barber, Virgil R., SrV 7; PB 72 

Barclay, Claudia J., M 59 

Barclay, Deborah S., FrV 4; M 63 

Barcomb, Vickie J., FrV 4 

Bareiax. Claudia Midland. FrV 3 

Barenkamp. Patricia A., SoV 5 

Barfield, Andelia, FrV 4 

Barfoot, Stephen L., FrV 4 

Barham. Steven S., SrV 7 

Barker, Dan H., PB 52 

Barker, George S., JrV 3 

Barker, Patricia L., FrV 4 

Barker. Stevan W.. FrV 4 

Barkley. Patrick F.. TC 29 

Barkley. Rich. PB 46 

Barkley. Virginia. SrV 7 

Barkowsky. Harvey L., FrV 4 

Barlow. Victoria E.. SrV 8 

Barnard. Patty E.. JrV 3 

Barnes. Billy C. SrV 8 

Barnes. Bonnie S.. FrV 4 

Barnes. James D.. FrV 4 

Barnett. Becky. Esq 45 

Barnett. James D.. FrV 4 

Barnett. Judy K.. M 63; SoV 5 

Barnett. K. R.. SoV 5 

Barnett. Lee A.. JrV 3 

Barnett. Marilyn A.. FrV 4 

Barnett, Robert. SrV 8 

Barnette. John A., SrV 8 

Barney. Peggy S.. SoV 31; M 15; M 
31 

Barney, Phillip E., PB 52; SI 4 
Barnhart, Arthur L., FrV 4 
Barnhart. Linda G.. JrV 3 
Barnhart. Pamelia O.. FrV 4 
Barnhart. Stephen L.. FrV 4 
Barnhill. Donald E.. FrV 4 
Barr. David H.. PB 46 
Barrett. Alan D.. JrV 3 
Barrett. Beverly A.. FrV 4 
Barrett. Beverly J., FrV 4 
Barrett, Bradley G.. FrV 4 
Barrett. Donald C. PB 54 



Barrett, Jane E.. M 49; JrV 3; F 18 

Barrett. Melinda D., FrV 4 

Barrick, Gary L., FrV 4 

Barrick, Noel. SrV 8 

Barrier. Jerry L.. FrV 4 

Bartel. Wayne C. FrV 4 

Bartell. Ricky J., SoV 5 

Barthelemy, William C, PB 42 

Bartlett, Lorrie J., FrV 4 

Bartlett. Thomas G., SrV 8 

Bartley, Sheryl M. 

Bartman, Bert, PB 25 

Barton, Ann, SrV 8; M 25; Esq 31 

Barton, Becky L., M 29; M 25; SoV 
5 

Barton, Charlotte D., JrV 3 

Barton, Christine, F 20 

Barton, Deborah L., JrV 3 

Barton, Gerald C, SrV 8 

Barton, Gerald R.. FrV 4 

Barton, Jim, TC 24 

Barton, Linda C, SoV 5; F 15 

Barton, Marilyn T.. SrV 8 

Barton. Terry J.. TC 24; SrV 8 

Barton. Thomas E.. SrV 8 

Barton. Timothy H.. TC 27 

Bartram. Bertrand W.. FrV 4 

Basaldua. Rosemarie C. SrV 8 

Basinger. Alan L.. F 23; JrV 3 

Bass. Carolia M.. TC 11; TC 10; SrV 
8 

Bass, DeeAnn, SoV 5 
Bass, Vina J., SoV 5 
Batchelor, Denise E.. FrV 4 
Bateman. Charles L.. FrV 4 
Bateman. Earl G.. JrV 3 
Bates, Deborah A., SoV 5 
Bates, Ginger, SrV 8 
Bates, Janice, FrV 4 
Bates, Richard S., FrV 4 
Bates, Sharon Y., TC 26, 27 
Batey, Marion Kay, SrV 8 
Batey, Marion M.. SrV 8 
Bath. Thomas A.. SrV 8 
Bath. William R.. FrV 4 
Batson, Robert N.. SrV 8; F 35 
Battle. Nancy J.. SoV 5 
Battles. Danny L., SoV 5 
Baucum, William R.. FrV 4 
Baughman. John T.. JrV 3; PB 72 
Baulch. Martha J., FrV 4 
Bauman, Carol A., FrV 4 
Bauman, Richard P., JrV 3 
Baumann. Rudolph J.. PB 19; JrV 3 
Baumgardner,. Alice C. JrV 3 
Baumgardner. Jan B.. PB 46 
Baumgardner. Robert W.. FrV 4 
Bausch. James M.. PB 25; FrV 4 
Bawcom, David R. 
Bawcom. Frances S. 
Baxter. Debra E.. FrV 4 
Baxter. Robert J. 
Baxter. Sammy E.. FrV 4 

Bayless. Robert F.. PB 57; SrV 8; F 

24 

Bayless. Sharon L.. JrV 3 

Baylis. Barbara L.. SrV 8; PB 38 

Bazar. Celia. M 49 

Beadle. Deborah L.. FrV 4 

Beadle. Sheila. SrV 8 

Beadles. Linda E.. SrV 8 

Beal. Mary B.. FrV 4 

Beal. Nancy K.. FrV 4 

Beal. Patricia A. SoV 5 

Beal. Ralph D.. SoV 5: TC 27; TC 
26 

Beall. Hugh P.. SrV 8 

Bean. Kenneth R.. FrV 4 

Bean. Kevin R.. JrV 3 

Bean. Matlie I.. JrV 3 



Bean, Stephen C, PB 63 

Beard, Gregory A., T 45 

Beard, Robert M., PB 72 

Bearden, Deborah, Esq 45; M 67 

Bearden, Michael B., L 38 

Bearden, Thomas C, PB 25 

Beasley, Jerry, SrV 8; PB 72 

Beasley, Stephen A., PB 71 

Beasley, Tim, SoV 5 

Beasley, Weldon J., TC 27 

Beaty, Joe A., SrV 8 

Beauchamp. Otis L.. PB 54 

Beaudry. Donald M.. FrV 4 

Beaver, Pamela S., SrV 8 

Beavers. Jack T.. SrV 8 

Bebinger, Betty K., FrV 4 

Beck, August H., PB 64 

Beck, Ava C, FrV 4 

Beck, Cynthia J., SoV 5 

Beck, Dana L., PB 54; 

Beck, Danny L., SoV 5 

Beck, James F., FrV 4 

Beck, Jannerte L., FrV 4 

Beck, Joyce A., JrV 3 

Becker, Candace L., FrV 4 

Becker, Donna L., M 43 

Beckham, Cynthia, SoV 5; MAD 28 

Becknal,Jerry M., FrV 4 

Becknal, Peggy J., SrV 8; Esq 44 

Beckum. Jesse W.. JrV 3 

Becton. Jerry M.. FrV 4 

Bedall. Russell. JrV 3 

Beddingfield, Janie S.. M 16; M 43; 
Esq 31 

Bedell. Harold R.. JrV 4 

Bednar. Mary L.. Esq 45 

Bednarczuk. Kenneth T.. SoV 5 

Bednarczuk. Sue O.. SrV 8 

Bednarz. Jeanette A.. SrV 8; F 20; F 

17 

Beebe, Kenneth R.. JrV 3 

Been, Pansy R., SoV 5 

Beene, Cynthia A., TC 11; TC 10; 
SrV 8 

Beer, Barbara K., TC 21; FrV 4 

Beeson, David T., JrV 3 

Beeson, Mary, SoV 5 

Belew, Dennis B., TC 31; SrV 8 

Belk. James F., JrV 3 

Bell, Anita L, JrV 3; M 16; M 30; 

M 49 

Bell, Charles R. 

Bell, David W., SoV 5 

Bell. Frederick J. 

Bell. Eugene. SoV 5 

Bell. Janet S.. SoV 5; M 63 

Bell. Kenneth R. 

Bell, Niesha R., JrV 3; M 57 

Bell. Ray. JrV 3 

Bell, Richard I., SoV 5 

Bell. Trisha. M 63 

Bellah. Danny C. FrV 4 

Bellah. Martha A.. SoV 5 

Bellamy. Dana D. 

Bellamy. Robert D. 

Bel lew. Carol A.. SoV 5 

Bellinghausen. Connie J., Esq 31 

Belt. Steven D.. PB 41; SrV 8 

Belter. Ralph E.. SrV 2 

Benefield, Malcolm J., JrV 4 

Benham, Beverly K., JrV 4 

Benn, Frederick O., SrV 8 

Bennet, Cheryl G., T 47; JrV 4 

Bennett, Carol S., SoV 5 

Bennett, Gary D.. PB 42 

Bennett, George E.. JrV 4 

Bennett. James N.. SI 8. H. 52 

Bennett. Kenneth P., TC 31; SrV 9 

Bennett. Terry H.. FrV 4 

Benning. Richard B,. PB 63 



Freshman CiVu'— 37 



Benoit, Ann. M }5; JrV 4 

Benson. DarU J., FrV 4 

Benson. William C, JrV 4 

Bentley. David O.. FrV 4 

Bentley, Diane M.. SrV 9 

Bentley, Mark E., JrV 4 

Benton, Billy K., PB 26 

Benton, Michael R.. SrV 9 

Benton. Suzanne J., T 47; SrV 9 

Bentsen. Mark. PB 64 

Bergman. Gary C. PB 46 

Bergmann. Martha A.. M 63 

BerRstrom. William L.. FrV 9 

Bering. Catherine E.. M 65; SoV 5; F 
20 

Berner. Paul C, SoV 5 

Bemcr. Richard C, JrV 4 

Bemier, Jon P., SrV 9 

Bernson, Diane L., M 67 

Berricr, Sandra, FrV 4 

Berry, Jan. M 63 

Berry. Janet. JrV 4 

Berry, Janice A.. FrV 4 

Berry, Landa B., SoV 5 

Berry, Susan, M 65 

Berry. Trey. JrV 4 

Berry. Trey. PB 46 

Berryhill. Rebecca R.. SoV 5 

Bertelsen. Albert. PB 46 

Bertone. Ronald P.. SrV 9; F 35 

Bertrand. Ronald. TC 31 

Bertrand. William R.. SrV 4 

Besly. Joan D.. SoV 5 

Besly. Thomas D.. SoV 5 

Besnette. Diane M.. SoV 5 

Best, Robert J.. JrV 4; SI 4; PB 52 

Best. Thomas H.. PB 60 

Betton. Linda D.. FrV 4 

Betzel. Ann L.. JrV 4; F 20 

Beumeler. Beverly S.. JrV 4; PB 35 

Bever. James H.. FrV 4 

Bevers. Brusse N.. PB 60 

Beyer. Dan A.. FrV 4 

Beyer. Glen R.. PB 42 

Bible, Carolyn K.. JrV 4 

Bickley. John F.. FrV 4 

Biddy. Connie D.. FrV 4 

Biehler. Marilyn M., T 48 

Bielstein, Ann, JrV 5 

Bigbee. Raymond R.. SoV 5 

Bigger. Norma E.. SrV 9 

Biggers. Gary W.. PB 41; PB 35 

Biggeis. Samuel C, PB 60 

Biggs. Judith A.. JrV 4 

Bigham. Jerry D., TC 33; TC 32; TC 
25; TC 27 

Bigham. Mary R.. TC 10; SrV 9 

Billings. James R.. SrV 9 

BiUingsley. Bruce L.. SrV 9 

Billingsley. Patricia A., SoV 5 

BiUingsley. Robert L.. PB 54 

Billups. Mclvin B.. PB 25 

Binford. Loma D,. SrV 9: MAD 50 

Bingcr, Madalyn S., SrV 9 

Bingham. Barbara A.. SoV 5 

Bingham, Glenn G.. SrV 9 

Bingham. Michael 

Binglc. Barry B.. JrV 4 

Bird, Tanya D., F 15; SrV 9 

Birdwell, Dudley R.. SoV 5 

Birdwell. Jackie D.. TC 3«: StV 9 

Birdwell. Louif L.. F 23; SrV 9: PB 
20 

Birkelbach. Randal N.. TC 24; JrV 4 

Bimbaum. Michael W.. JrV 4 

Biro. Wendy E.. SoV 5 

Birrell. Ronald W.. JrV 4 

Bisanko. Justine. Ek) 40 

Bisbee. Kenneth M.. JrV 4 

Bi2i(doa, Sue, Esq. 44 



Bjelland. Krista. JrV 4 

Black. David. F 22;' SrV 9 

Black. Debra J.. M 67 

Black. Donna E., JrV 4 

Black. Melissa A.. SrV 9 

Black. Richard D.. PB 52; SoV 5 

Black. Thomas H.. SrV 9 

Blackburn, Jennifer R.. SoV 5 

Blackburn. Lewis B.. PB 64 

Blacklock. Charles W., SoV 5 

Blackmon. Alan W.. TC 24 

Blackstone. Dale. SoV 5 

Blackwell. Cecilia J.. JrV 4; M 59; 
PB 56 

Blackwell, Claude W.. SrV 9 

Blackwell. Lloyd M.. F 23; SrV 9 

Blain. Robert L.. SrV 9; SI 33, 54 

Blake. Wynne, F 21 

Blakeway, Jere. M 59 

Blanar. Reuben W.. JrV 4 

Blanchard. Clifton C. F 23 

Blanchard. Judith K.. M 59: SoV 5 

Bland. Dana. SoV 5 

Bland. Patricia A.. M 63 

Bland. Paula K.. JrV 4 

Blank. Robert M.. SrV 9 

Blankenship. Kris. SoV 5 

Blanscet. Joan, SrV 2 

Blasingarae, Beverly. SoV 

Blau, Johnny L.. PB 17; SoV 5 

Blaydes. Barton D., PB 57 

Blaylock, Bobby R., TC 40; SrV 9 

Blevins. Suzanne. SrV 9: TC 10; M 

37 

Blinderman, Susan L., T 47; M 15; 
SoV 5 

Blon, Virginia E., TC 10; JrV 4 

Bloodworth. Jane A.. JrV 4 

Bloom. Rosita L.. TC 11; TC 10; JrV 
4; M 49; F 20 

Blosser. Merle N.. SrV 9 

Blount. Jimmy T.. SrV 9 

Blucmel. Claire, F 18; M 65; SrV 9 

Bluemel. Glen A.. SrV 9 

Blum. Ervin G.. JrV 4 

Blum. William H.. Esq 34 

Blunuer. Mary K.. SrV 9 

BIythe. David J.. JrV 4 

Boase. Beckye A.. M 67 

Boase, Scott E.. SrV 9 

Bobbitt. Mary R.. SrV 2 

Bobo, James A.. SrV 2 

Boccella. John A.. SrV 5 

Bockman. Hershel R., SrV 9 

Bodine. Michael C. TC 40; PB 25 

Bogart. Thomas B.. SoV 5 

Boggs, Carolyn B.. M 59 

Bolch, Myrna R., SrV 9 

Bolen. Michael R.. PB 57 

Bolez. Robert. JrV 4 

Boling. Fred W.. SrV 9 

Bolton. Robert E., Esq 34 

Bond, Betsy R.. M 57; M 16 

Bonerman. Kent. PB 41 

Boney. John L.. SoV 6 

Boney, Sandra K.. F 15 

Bonick. Bruce W.. JrV 4 

Bonnell, Steven. PB 25 

Bonner. Betty A.. SrV 9 

Bonner. Norman E., SrV 10 

Book. Charlotte J., SoV 6 

Book. Janice L.. M 47; SoV 6 

Book, Paula M.. SrV 10 

Boon, Linda S.. M 47 

Boone. David R.. SrV 10 

Boone. Robert. SrV 10 

Boone, Susan C. SrV 10; M 59; PB 

37 

Boone, Vicki L., M 47 
Boour, Richard G.. SrV 10 



Bogan. Pat, SoV 6 

Borchardt. Robert W.. SrV 10 

Bordcns. James W.. SrV 

Boren. Charlsa L., T 48; SoV 6 

Boren. Mary L.. JrV 4 

Bom. Kathryn A.. M 45 

Boroughs, Guy E., SrV 10; F 22 

Boster, Michael L.. JrV 4 

Bostick. Jo A.. M 59; SoV 5 

Botcler. John M.. PB 63 

Botello, Aniceto. Esq 38 

Botello. Tony, JrV 4; Esq 38 

Botik, Donald R., PB 54 

Bott. Susan E., M 43; SrV 10 

Botts, Sharon A., SrV 10 

Bouden, Jay, SoV 6 

Bounds, Gary, SoV 6 

Bourland. Beth. TC 10 

Bourland. David. Esq 2 

Bourland. J. D.. SrV 2 

Bourland. Mina B.. SrV 10 

Bourland. Richard. SrV 10 

Bournias. Niki L.. M 36; SoV 8; M 
59; M 15 

Bouse. Donald E.. SrV 10 

Boutin. Michelle. SrV 10; M 28; F IS 

Bowden, Jay D., PB 66 

Bowcn, Dathyl J., PB 64 

Bowen, Linda J.. PB 38 

Bowen, Patricia A.. SoV 6 

Bowen, Ralph R.. JrV 4 

Bowen. Richard M.. PB 57 

Bower. Stanley A., PB 46 

Bowers. Charlotte P., SoV 6 

Bowles. Donna J.. JrV 4 

Bowlin.. David B., SrV 10 

Bowlin, Linda L.. SrV 10 

Bowlin. Sandra H.. JrV 4 

Bowling. Johnny R.. F 24 

Bowman, Larry T.. SrV 10; PB 19 

Bowman. Ruth E.. SrV 10 

Bowman. Sharon L.. SoV 6 

Bownds. Sandra L.. SrV 10 

Boyd. Beverly J.. TC 27 

Boyd. Cynthia M., SrV 10; M 65; 

Esq 45 

Boyd. Deborah K.. M 59; SoV 6; M 

15 

Boyd. Dianne R.. SrV 10 
Boyd. Jim K.. PB 41 
Boyd. Jimmy W.. F 32; SrV 10 
Boyd. Mary C, SrV 10 
Boydstun. Don A.. F 35 
Boyer. James R.. JrV 4 
Boyle. Collene. PB 38 
Boyle. John M.. PB 11 
Boyle, Thaddeus A., PB 63 

Bozeman. June N.. M 43; SrV 10; F 

22; F 20 

Bradberry, Hugh D.. SrV 10 
Bradberry, Sherry A.. M 45 
Bradford. Amy M.. SoV 6 
Bradford. Kenneth C, JrV 4 
Bradley, David G.. SoV 6 
Bradley. Richard G.. SfV 10 
Bradley, Rickie D., JrV 4 
Bradshaw. David A.. T 46 
Bradshaw. Duane L., SrV 10 
Brady. Michael G.. SoV 6 
Brady. Scott T.. SoV 6; SI 4 
Brakebill. Diana L.. JrV 4 
Brakebill. Marwin B., SrV 2 
Branch, James I.. SoV 6 
Brandon. Linda S.. JrV 4 
Brannon, Diana S., SrV 10; F It 
Brannon. Holmes C. StV 10 
Brannon. Michael D.. SrV 10 
Brasher, Donald A.. T 45 
Brauovan, George, SoV 6 
Bratcher. Andy L.. JrV 4 



Bratchcr. Burtly R.. JrV 4; PB 72 

Bratcher. Mary B.. Esq 36 

Bratton, Peppy, PB 65. 72 

Bray. Andrew A.. Esq 8 

Bredewater. James. JrV 4 

Breed. Jerry C. SrV 11 

Breedlove. Richard W.. SrV 11; F 22 

Breisch. Glenn. JrV 4 

Brendlc. Stacey. SoV 6 

Brewer. Ervin L.. SrV 11 

Brewer, Johnnie M.. SI 4 

Bridge. Beverly A.. JrV 4 

Bridges. Gary. PB 64 

Bridges. Karen G.. M 40; JrV 5 

Bridges. Rodney. PB 25 

Brichn. Nan L.. M 45 

Briggs. Clark W.. SrV 11; PB 72 

Briggs. Gwcn. SoV 6 

Briggs. Marilyn A.. Esq 45; JrV 5 

Briggs. Stephen M.. JrV 5 

Brigham, Barbara A.. SoV 6 

Brigham. Richard R.. JrV 5 

Briley. Jeffrey L.. SoV 6 

Briley. Margaret E.. TC 10 

Brillhart. Randall W.. JrV 5; PB 72; 
Esq 8 

Brinell. Dorothy, SoV 6 

Btinghuisl, William L.. SrV 11 

Brinson. Vikki L.. JrV 5 

Briscoe. Barry B.. JrV 5; PB 65 

Britten. Louis. SoV 6 

Britton. Larry R.. SrV 11 

Brock. Billy C. T 46; SoV 6 

Brock. Elma J.. JrV 5 

Brock. John H.. PB 25 

Brock. Melodie, SoV 6 

Brock, Ralph H., SrV 11 

Brock, Sandra K.. JrV 5 

Brock. William M., SrV 11 

Brockett, Maria L.. SrV 11; F 20; P 

17 

Brogdon. Pamela S.. SrV 11 

Brokenbek. James R.. SrV U 

Brooke. Deborah G.. SrV 11 

Brooks. Barry. PB 57; SoV 6; Esq 6; 
PB 33 

Brooks. Renee. Esq 4; SrV U; L 16 

Brooks. Louis L., TC 56 

Brooks. Morris. SI 55 

Brooks. William C. Esq 54 

Brookshire. Bonnie, Esq 45 

Broome, John A. 

Broome. Pete. PB 41 

Brosseau. Charles. PB 60; JrV 5 

Brotherton. Deborah. M 52; SoV 6 

Broussard. Gail E., FrV 6 

Browder. Gary A.. SoV 6 

Brown. Adele M.. FrV 6 

Brown, Alan D.. SrV 11 

Brown. Barbara. SoV 6 

Brown. Barbara. SoV 6 

Brown. Betsy. PB 35; M 57; SoV 6 

Brown. Betty. SoV 6 

Brown. Betty W.. SoV 6 

Brown. Bill M.. SoV 6; TC 27 

•Brown. Billy. SrV II; SoV 6 

Brown. Billy B.. F 22 

Brown, Bonnie, PB 11; SoV 6; M J7 

Brown, Candace C. SoV 6 

Brown. Catherine A.. M 49 

Brown. Charles A.. PB 24; SoV 6 

Brown. Charles, JrV 5 

Brown, Curtis L.. F 25; FrV 6 

Brown, David E., SrV 11 

Brown, David F., SoV 6 

Brown, David R.. PB 19 

Brown. Dennis D.. FrV 6 
Brown. EXouglas K.. Esq 37; SoV ( 
Brown. Elizabeth. JrV 5 



38 — Freshman View 



m 



Brown, Eric G., FrV 6 
Brown, Roby, FrV 6 
Brown, Floyd I., SrV 11 
Brown, Gary D., SrV 11 
Brown, Harry W., FrV 6 
Brown, Jacky Andrens, FrV 6 
Brown, James 
Brown, Jeanne Z., T 48 
Brown, Jeffrey, F 32; SrV 11 
Brown, John H., FrV 6 
Brown, John R., JrV 5 
Brown, Joseph, FrV 6 
Brown, Karen K., SoV 6 
Brown, Kelton W., JrV 5 
Brown, Kirk, Esq 42 
Brown, Kim, FrV 6 
Brown, LeLaurin, FrV 6; M 65 
Brown, Linda L., SrV 12 
Brown, Margaret S., JrV 5 
Brown, Michael, SoV 6 
Brown, Nancy, M 45 
Brown, Nancy, SrV 12 
Brown, Phyllis E., JrV 5 
Brown, Randell, F 32; SrV 12 
Brown, Rebecca E., FrV 6 
Brown, Robert D., FrV 6 
3rown. Robert E., JrV 5 
Brown, Ronnie R., JrV 5 
Brown, Sharon P. 
Brown, Stephen, F 24 
Brown, Susan, SoV 6 
Brown, Susan L., SrV 12 
Brown, Susan M., FrV 6 
Brown. Sylvia K., JrV 5 
Brown, Terry, SI 51 
Brown, Thomas, SoV 6 
Brown, Tommy F., FrV 6 
Brown, Tommy R., FrV 6 
Brown, Wendell L., FrV 6 
Brown, Wilbcrn O., FrV 6 
Browne, Amy A., FrV 6 
Browne, Beverly S., FrV 6 
Browne, Brendy A., JrV 5; M 57 
Browne, Jeffrey W„ JrV 6 

Brownfield, Ernees R., Esq 45; SrV 

12 

Brownfield, Rebecca E., SoV 6 

Browning, Bob M. JrV 5 

Browning, Cherylyn A., M 65; FrV 6 

Browning, Jenny, M 65 

Browning, Rickey V., FrV 6 

Browning, Robert D., SI 4 

Brownlee, Robyn K., FrV 6 

Brownless, Beth, M 59; SoV 6 

Broyles, James R., T 46 

Bruce, James M., FrV 6 

Bruce, Jenne, SoV 6 

Bruce, Robert J., FrV 6 

Bruffey, Sarah A., SoV 6 

Brumley, Andy L., FrV 6; PB 17 

Brummett, Gerald W., PB 52 

Brunson, Garion D., PB 17; JrV 5 

Brunson, Linda S., FrV 6 

Bruton, Jerry D., PB 54 

Bruyere, Judy K., FrV 6; M 57 

Bryan, Betty D., JrV 5; M 57 

Bryan, Diane, M 29 

Bryan, Elizabeth, FrV 6 

Bryan, Larry W., TC 32 

Bryan. Pamela A., M 47; M 15 

Bryant, Betsy A., SoV 6 

Bryant. Bobby D.. JrV 5 

Bryant. Cindy C. FrV 6 

Bryant. Deboral L.. JrV 5 

Bryant. Frederick. PB 52 

Bryant. Larry L.. PB 71 

Bryant. Michael C. PB 42 

Bryant. Norma J.. SrV 12 

Bryant. Ray B.. FrV 6 



Bryant. Ronald. FrV 6 
Bryant. Sherri L.. Esq 45; SrV 12 
Bryant. William E.. PB 63 
Bubany. Georgene. M 32 
Bublis. Nancy L.. SoV 6 
Buchanan. Carol. JrV 5; Esq 8 
Buchanan. Freddie. Esq 34 
Buchanan. Janet. M 67 
Buchanan. John W.. SrV 12 
Buchanan. John Y.. JrV 5 
Buchanan. Marsha K., FrV 6 
Buchholz, Donald B., FrV 6 
Buck, James J.. SrV 12 
Buck. Lansfred L.. M 65 
Buckingham. Alonda L.. M 30; JrV 5 
Buckner, Dale E.. PB 66; SoV 6 
Buddington. Nina J.. SrV 12 
Buescher. Judith A.. SrV 12 
Buesing. Gerald R.. JrV 5 
Buferd. Richard M.. PB 41 
Bufkin. Marie L., SrV 12 
Bufkin. Richard L.. PB 54 
Buford. Janet L.. FrV 6 
Buie. Robert M.. SrV 12 
Bullard. Denny B.. SrV 12 
Bullard. Randall W., JrV 5 
Buller, Seah S., SoV 6 
Bullock, Barbara A. 
Bumpass, Terry L., SrV 12 
Bunch, Rodney D., JrV 5; Esq 34 
Bunch, Thomas, SoV 6 
Bundick. Theresa J.. SoV 6 
Bunting. Richard JrV 5 

Bunton, Almeda M.. FrV 6 
Buntzel. Gaile L.. FrV 6 
Buol. Thomas A.. PB 54 
Burbank. Carol A.. SrV 12 
Burch. John R.. SrV 12 
Burdctte. Cynthia A.. SoV 6 
Burdick. Charlotte E.. SrV 12 
Burge. Bobby A.. FrV 6 
Burges. John P.. FrV 6 
Burgess. Rebecca. JrV 5; M 65 
Burgess. Roger M.. JrV 5 
Burgess. Trumanell. FrV 8 
Burk. Brenda K.. JrV 5 
Burk. Sherry L.. SoV 6 
Burke. Patricia D.. T 47; JrV 5 
Burkes. Rita S.. FrV 6 
Burket. David. PB 46; T 11 
Burkett. Charles W.. FrV 6 
Burks. Charles S.. SrV 12 
Burleson. James M.. SrV 12 
Burnam. Sherry K.. SoV 6 
Burnett. Becky. M 28; JrV 5 
Burnett. James. TC 27 
Burnett. Karen J.. FrV 6 
Burnett. Kenny E., T 45; JrV 5 
Burnett. Rebecca J.. M 26 
Burnett. William G.. SrV 12 
Burnett. William G. 
Burney. Ruth L.. SoV 6 
Burns. Barbara A.. SrV 12 
Burns. Bruce A. 
Burns. David K.. SoV 6 
Burns. Joe A.. PB 60; SoV 6 
Burns. Nancy E.. SoV 6 
Buron. Alfred B.. PB 41 
Burp. Carolyn A.. JrV 5 
Burrell. Jerry, JrV 5 
Burris, Bonnie J.. FrV 6 
Burroughs. Mark. FrV 6 
Burrows. Dachelle. Esq 45; JrV 5 
Burrows. Daniel B., SrV 12 
Burrows, Deborah J.. FrV 6 
Bursey. William F.. SoV 6 
Burt. Michael E., T 45 
Burton. Blaine C. FrV 6; M 63 



Burton. Richard E.. SrV 12 

Burton, William. F 24 

Busby, Deborah J., FrV 6 

Buschmann, Barry E., PB 71 

Bush, Eddie R., F 22 , 

Bush, George T., F 23; JrV 5 

Bush, Kathie S.. SoV 6 

Bushell. Michael S.. SrV 12 

Bushong. Bruce W.. SI 7; SI 4 

Bushover. Gary E.. SrV 12 

Buske, Lydia A., JrV 5 

Butler, Bette J., M 28 

Butler, Donna K., SoV 6 

Butler, Mary M., F 15 

Butler, Nancy. SoV 6 

Butler. Samuel. SrV 12 

Butts. Diana L.. FrV 6 

Butts, Madeline, TC 10 

Butts, Rayburn C, FrV 6 

Butz, Mark S., FrV 6 

Buxkemper, Michael L. 

Buykemper, Michael, SoV 6; PB 66 

Bybee, Dara D., SoV 6 

Bybel, Jimmie W. 

Byerley, Terry L., JrV 5 

Byers, Dianne S., SoV 6; M 31 

Byers. Harry N.. PB 71 

Byers. Marianne. SoV 6 

Byers. Ricky R.. FrV 7 

Byers. Wallace. SrV 12; PB 66 

Byington, Russell. SrV 12 

Bynum. Donna S.. FrV 7 

Byrd. Carolyn M.. FrV 7; PB 6; PB 
38; M 59 

Byrd. Dianne. JrV 5; M 43; F 17 

Byrd. O. B.. FrV 7 

Byrne. James E.. SrV 12; PB 46 



Caddel. Glenda Joyce. SrV 2 

Caddel. Jerry D.. T 45 

Caddell. James O., SoV 6 

Cade. Cynthia G., FrV 7 

Cade, Sherry S., FrV 7 

Cage, Don H., JrV 5 

Cagle, Stephanie, SrV 12 

Cain, Barbara J., JrV 5; M 16; M 63; 
PB 38 

Cain, Harlan R., FrV 7 

Caisse, Geraldine R., JrV 5 

Caldwell. Bill. SoV 7 

Caldwell. Cynthia C. JrV 5 

Caldwell. Deborah. JrV 5 

Calfin, Yolinda, FrV 7 

Calhoun, Mary Ann, FrV 7 

Calhoun, Beverly, JrV 5 

Calhoun, Brian S.. FrV 7 

Calhoun. Carlitta L.. FrV 7 

Calhoun. Ruth E.. M 36 

Callahan. John P.. SrV 12 

Callan. Cathy S.. FrV 7 

Callan. Kathleen L.. M 15; SaV 7 

Callaway. Cathy K.. JrV 5 

Callaway. Clinton W.. JrV 6 

Callaway. Donna M.. SoV 7 

Calvert. Larry C. FrV 7 

Calvit. Philip J.. TC 27 

Cambern. Sharon. M 27; SoV 7 

Cameron. Caryn A.. SrV 12; M 27 

Cameron. Cheryl A.. JrV 6 

Cameron. Pamela J.. M 12 

Camp. Collins. SrV 12; PB 64 

Camp, Ernest D., PB 42; PB 25 

Camp, Kathleen A.. FrV 7 

Camp. Louise P.. M 45 

Camp. Marshall L.. SrV 13 

Campbell. Cathy A.. FrV 7 

Campbell. Claudia J.. FrV 7; M 67 

Campbell. Dale P., SrV 2 



Campbell. Deborah F., M 32; SoV 7 

Campbell, Harriet A., FrV 7 

Campbell, James A., TC 30 

Campbell, James T.. JrV 6 

Campbell. Jeanne M., M 67; M 32; 
SoV 7; M 15 

Campbell, Rand G., FrV 7 

Campbell, Richard E.. SI 6; SI 10. 4. 
51, 30. 52 

Campbell, Richard T. 

Campbell, Ricky L., JrV 6 

Campbell. Robert L.. SI 24 

Campbell, Sandra K.. SrV 13 

Campbell. Sioux. FrV 7 

Campbell, Steven A. 

Campbell, Steven L., FrV 7 

Campbell, S. J., SoV 7 

Campsey, Karen I., FrV 7 

Cangelosi, Carl A., FrV 7 

Cannon, Craig E., PB 46 

Cannon, Daniel R., TC 25; SrV 13 

Cannon, Doug, FrV 7 

Cannon, Janice E., SrV 13 

Cannon, Jean A., JrV 6; T 48 

Cannon, Jo D., FrV 7 

Cannon, Joe R., F 32; SrV 13 

Cannon, Molly, M 67 

Cannon, Sue, FrV 7 

Canon, Carol J., FrV 7 

Canon, Christopher J., FrV 7 

Canon, Gerald R. 

Canteau, Joseph G., PB 25 

Cantrell, David A.. SoV 7 

Cantrell, Martha J., SoV 7 

Canup, Paul E. JrV 6 

Capka, Theodore J. 

Caplin, Matt, FrV 7 

Capps, Tom C, PB 25; JrV 6; SI 4 

Carelock, Yolanda C. SrV 13 

Cargill. Mackolene A., SrV 13 

Carlisle. Keith E.. SoV 7 

Carlos. Johnny D.. PB 60 

Carmichael. Susan C. SrV 13 

Carnes. Carroll L.. SoV 7 

Carney. Gene S., FrV 7 

Carothers. Donald W.. SI 51, 48 

Carow. Janice M.. FrV 7 

Carpenter, Ferman L.. SoV 7 

Carpenter. Katherine M.. JrV 6 

Carpenter. Ronald J.. SoV 7 

Carpenter. Shailene. JrV 6 

Carpenter. William E.. FrV 7 

Carr. Catherine A.. FrV 7 

Carr. Margaret E.. FrV 7 

Carrice. Tim, PB 71 

Carrico, Harold S., PB 69 

Carris, John D., PB 46 

Carroll, Don R., SrV 13 

Carroll, Jane, JrV 6 

Carroll, Sherry L., SoV 7 

Carrothers, Robert D., PB 57 

Carson, Lewis D., JrV 6 

Carson, Linda K., FrV 7 

Carson, Paul N., SoV 7 

Carson, Sandra J., SrV 13 

Carson, William A., PB 25 

Carter, Billy E., SoV 7; Esq 34 

Carter, Bruce E., FrV 7 

Carter, Christy, FrV 7 

Carter, Curtis K., PB 60 

Carter. David R.. JrV 6; SI 51. 48 

Carter. Deborah J.. FrV 7 

Carter. Gail B., SrV 3; TC 10; TC 11 

Carter, Gary W., FrV 7 

Carter, Gerald L.. F 24 

Carter, Jimmie. JrV 6 

Carter. MaricUen S.. SrV 13 

Carter. Mike. SrV 13 

Carter. Phyllis L., Esq 45; JrV 6 



Freshman View — 39 



Carter, Powhatan, TC 36 

Carter, Randal. SrV 13 

Carter, Russell T., JrV 6 

Carter, Thomas G., PB 72; SrV 13 

Carter, Thomas T.. JrV 6 

Cartwright, Gary C, FrV 7 

Carver, Christine A.. FrV 7 

Carver, Emily L.. SrV 13 

Casbeer, Lucy C. SrV 13; M 26 

Case, Harry £., PB 25 

Case, Harvey, PB 46 

Case, Rickey R., FrV 7 

Casey, Catherine, FrV 7 

Casey, Dona D., SrV 4 

Casey, Sandra K., FrV 7 

Casey, Terry, PB 46 

Cash, Terry D., JrV 6 

Caskey, Leigh A., FrV 7 

Cason, Joseph D., FrV 7 

Cass, Bob N., FrV 7 

Cass, Kenyth J.. SrV 3 

Casstevens. Michael, PB 51 

Castellano, Richard J., FrV 7 

Castellaw. Terrell R., TC 30 

Castleberry, Kathryne S., SrV 13 

Caswell, Wayne, SoV 7 

Catalan!, Bias S.. JrV 6; PB 46 

Catalani, Nic. JrV 6 

Cate, Robert L., PB 63 

Cate, Scott, PB 41 

Cates, Buford A., SrV 12 

Cates, Barbara, SrV 13 

Cates, Cynthia, M 45; FrV 7 

Cates, Gary C, JrV 6 

Cates, Julia A., M 25; SoV 7; M 43; 
F 20 

Cathey, Cristy, Esq 45 

Cathey, Susan, M 63 

Caughran, William, PB 41 

Caughron, Charles, F 22 

Causey, Jan, FrV 7; M 65 

Cavenagh, Margaret, FrV 7 

Cavin, Elizabeth L., JrV 6; M 57 

Cavin, Vicki L., FrV 7 

Caviness, Darla L., FrV 7 

Cavincss, Thomas, SrV 13 

Cayton, Cecil E., TC 40 

Caywood, Don, JrV 6; PB 46 

Celum. Margaret L., JrV 6 

Cervenka, Anne, SoV 7 

Chaffee, Janis E.. M 31 

Chaffin, Kenneth W., JrV 6 

Chakos, Pamela SoV 7; Esq 41; M 31 

Chamberlain, Patricia A., SoV 7 

Chamberlain, Scott D., JrV 6 

Chambers, Anne M., M 63 

Chambers, Barbara J., JrV 6; F 15 

Chambers, Edith C, TC 12; JrV 6 

Chambers, Stephen C, SoV 7; PB 69 

Chamblee, Karen R., SrV 13; M 45; 
M 41; F 17 

Chamblee, Michael A., SrV U 

Chambliss, Mary E.. FrV 7 

Champion, John E., JrV 6 

Champlin, Arliss M., Esq 36 

Chan, Margaret, F 15 

Chancellor, Jeffrey, FrV 7 

Chandler, Cynthia A., FrV 8 

Chandler. Fredrick H.. PB 42 

Chandler, Karen A., JrV 6 

Chandler, Linda, JrV 6 

Chandler, Marc S.. SoV 7 

Chandler, Marlene, JrV 6; F 17 

Chandler, Stephen L., JrV 6 

Chancy, Jane, JrV 6 

Chaney, Karen L., JrV 6 

Champion, John, PB 66 

Chapman. Carol J., SoV 7 

Chapman. Christine M.. ScV 13: Ml; 
M 35; F 18 



Chapman. David L.. SrV 13 
Chapman, Juliann G., FrV 8 
Chapman, Robert W., PB 41 
Chase, Eric W., SrV 13 
Chastain, David M., SrV 13 
Chavez, Arthur, JrV 6; Esq 38 
Chavez, Genaro, PB 66 

Cheatham, David A., JrV 6; Esq 42; 

Esq 37 

Cheek, Jon L., SrV 13 

Cheek, Karin A., JrV 6 

Chenault, Benjamin, PB 46 

Chenault, Susan, PB 5; SoV 7; M 57 

Cheney, Tommy G., PB 25 

Chenault, Susan, SoV 7; M 57; PB 5 

Cheney, Tommy G., PB 25 

Chennault, Rhonda, FrV 8; M 43 

Chesshir, Ernest G., SrV 13 

Chick, Beverly G., JrV 6 

Chidester, James, PB 19; Soph. 7 

Childers, Alice A.; FrV 8 

Childeis, Billy J., Esq 34 

Childers, Carol S., JrV 6 

Childers, Terry, TC 39 

Childress, Carol S., F 15 

Childers, Jimmy L., Esq 34 

Childress. Ronald S., FrV 8 

Ching, Wesley W., SrV 13 

Chipman, William D., SoV 7 

Chisholm, James E., SI 44 

Chisum, Phillip E., PB 42 

Chitwood, Marilyn A., SrV U 

Choat, Michael C, TC 27 

Choatc. Jon C. PB 4; JrV 6 

Choate. Janis. TC 10 

Choate. Michael L.. SoV 7 

Chok. Anthony K.. PB 66 

Chorn, Thomas H., FrV 8 

Chote, Nelton D.. TC 33 

Chrestman, Connie J., FrV 8 

Christensen, Candace L., FrV 8 

Christian, Carolyn, FrV 8 

Christian, David L.. SrV 13 

Christian, LaNelle, SoV 7 

Christian, Pamela E., Esq 45; JrV 6 

Christian, Richard D., JrV 6 

Christopher, Kathryrt J., FrV 8 

Church, Connie S.. JrV 6 

Church. Lana. JrV 6 

Church. Sue, SoV 7 

Clack, Sara M., SoV 7 

Claiborne, Joan C, JrV 6 

Clanton, Jerry S.. SoV 7 

Claps, Kathleen, M 65; SrV 13 

Clark, Brett A.. F 21 

Clark. Brctza G., TC 11; TC 10; JrV 
6; M 16; M 57 

Clark. Candace E., JrV 6 

Clark. Charles A., SrV 13 

Clark, Cheryl R., FrV 8 

Clark, Cynthia, M 63; SrV 13 

Clark, Dan, PB 46 

Clark, John B., SoV 7 

Clark, Jon W., PB 52 

Clark, Judith M.. M 59; SoV 7 

Clark. Karen D., FrV 8; SoV 7 

Clark, Karen R., FrV 8; 

Clark, Karen, SoV7 

Clark, Kay. SoV 7 

Clark, Marilyn E., JrV 6 

Clark, Marilyn, F 18 

Clark, Pamela J., SoV 7 

Clark, Robey A., PB 60 

Clark. Sally, SoV 7 

Clark, Susan K., FrV 8 

Oarke, Cynthia, FrV 8 

Clawton, Kathy J.. FrV ( 

Clayton, Cheryl FrV 8 

Clayton, Glenn H., JtV 6 



Clayton, Linda C, Esq 44; SrV 14 

Clayton, Susan. M 25; M 57; M 36; 
Esq 6; SoV 7; M 15 

Clayton. Wayne A., PB 41 

Cleardy, Danna, SoV 7 

Cleavelin, Cloves, SrV 4 

Clem, Onnie E., FrV 8 

Clement, Angella J., SrV 14; Esq 6 

Clements, Chris, JrV 6 

Clements, Jeri. SrV 14; Esq 42; Esq 

37 

Clements, Margaret R., SoV 7; F 15 

Clements,Paula. JrV 6; M 59; SI 31 

Clemmer, Gregory. FrV 8 

Clemmer, James C. SrV 14 

Clemmer. Richard L.. FrV 8 

Clemmons. William. SrV 14 

demons, Newell R., FrV 8 

Clepper, Russell S., FrV 8 

Cleveland, Gerald E., SoV 7 

Cleveland, Polly R., SoV 8 

Click, Suzanne, F 18 

Clifford, Gregory A., FrV 8 

Clift, Ronald H., SrV 14; PB 64 

Clifton, John R., SrV 14; F 22 

Cline, Laura L., FrV 8; M 65 

Clines, Tony A., T 46 

Clinton, Kathryn J., SrV 14; M 63 

Close, Doyle G., SrV 14 

Clopton, William, FrV 8 

Close, Patrick, TC 40; TC 23: SrV 
14; 

Close. Violet, FrV 8 

Clothier, Carolyn J., FrV 8 

Cloud, Caron, FrV 8 

Clouse, Debne A., FrV 8 

Clower, Ellen, M 25; M 65 

Clower, Winston D.. SrV 14 

Cluley, Kenneth D., FrV 8 

Coatney, Royce R., T 45 

Cobb, Camilla H., M 57 

Cobb, Catherine E., FrV 8 

Coberly, Vemey W., T 45 

Coble, Cindy D., FrV 8 

Coburn. David A., PB 25; SoV 8; M 

57 

Cocanougher, Anne, M 15 

Cocanougher, Barbara, SrV 14; F 17 

Cocanougher, Michael, SoV 8 

Cochran, Jerry W., SoV 8 

Cochran, Joe D., JrV 6; PB 20 

Cochran, Virginia, JrV 6 

Cody, Ann H., SrV 14; Esq 41; F 15 

Cody, Robert C, PB 54 

Coers, Mary A., SoV 8 

Cofer, Vicki A.. SrV 14; F 15 

Coffey, William R., FrV 8 

Coffin, James E., JrV 6 

Cogdell, David H., FrV 8 

Cohorn, Larry W., JrV 6 

Coke, Michael D. 

Cokcr, Ron, TC 40 

Coker, Robert B., SrV 14; PB 41 

Coker, Sandra L., SoV 8 

Colaccino, Mary, M 67 

Colburn, Michael J.. FrV 8 

Colclazer, Cheryl A., SoV 8 

Coldwell. Mike, JrV 6 

Cole, Carole F., FrV 8 

Cole, Cynthia M., FrV 8 

Cole, James W., SI 51. 48. 50 

Cole, Jill, PB 35 

Cole, Mike, PB 41 

Cole, Sue K., SrV 14 

Coleman, Donnie E., FrV S 

Coleman, Doreen E., SrV 14 

Coleman, James K., StV 14 

Coleman, Janice, SrV 14 

Colenun. Katherine M.. M 2); M }7 

Coleman, Sarah M.. T 47 



Colhoun, Carolyn, SoV 8 
Colker, Paula, SoV 8 
Collette, Carolyn A., FrV 8 
Collier, Clenton E., FrV 8 
Collier, Gordon L.. PB 24 
Collier, John, T 46 
Collier, Jon C. FrV 8 
Collier, June, SoV 8 
Collier, Ronald, PB 6} 
Collier, William T., FrV 8 
Collings, John B., PB 57 
Collins, Gloria Y., Esq 45; JrV 6 
Collins, Glynn C, PB 71 
Collins, James T., SrV 14; F 23 
Collura, Johnelle M., M 65 
Collyer, Patricia M., SrV 14 
Colon, Raul C, FrV 8 
Colvin, Richard S., T 45 
Colwell, Patricia L., M 67 
Combs, Charles E., SI 25, 24 
Combs, Michael P., JrV 6 
Comedy, Billy D., FrV 8 
Commons, Michael C, F 32 
Compere, Mark A., TC 30; PB 52 
Comstock, Chalres A. FrV 8 
Conard, Carolyn N., SrV 14 
Condray, Charles M., SoV 8 
Condray, Gayle, FrV 8 
Condon, Kathren H., JrV 6 

Condrey, Catherine, JrV 6; PB 56; M 

12; M 57 

Cone, Cathie J., SrV 14 

Cone, Cathy D., F 15 

Cone, Virginia L., SrV 14 

Conkling, Susan, FrV 8 

Conley, Donald B., PB 60 

Conley, Walter H., TC 27 

Conley, Walter M.. FrV 8 

Conlin, John, SrV 14 

Conlon, Kristina R., SoV 8 

Conner, George L., SoV 8 

Conner, John W., TC 33: TC 23; 
SrV 14 

Conner, Mary J., M 59; FrV 8 
Conner, Nell M., FrV 8 
Conner, Randall, TC 24 
Connor, James R., FrV 8 
ConoUy, Robert R., JrV 6 
Conover, Kathleen, SoV 8 
Conrad, Margaret A., SrV 14 
Conway, Cynthia J., M 67; FrV 8 
Conway, Ronald V., PB 60 
Cook, Brenda S., SoV 8 
Cook, David A., JrV 6; Esq 37 
Cook, Dwight C, F 22 
Cook, James E., SoV 8 
Cook, Joan E., M 67; SoV S 
Cook, Joel L., PB 41 
Cook, Linda L., FrV 8 
Cook, Lynda C. SoV 8: M 57 
Cook, Lindy, PB 36 
Cooke, Thomas L., PB 54 
Cooke, Toni G., PB 38 
Cooksey, Lynn, SrV 14 
Cooley, George W., SrV 14 
Coolcy, Johnny L., FrV 8 
Coon, Cynthia C, TC 10; StV 14 
Coon, Gary A., JrV 6 
Coon, George B., Esq 34; SI )2, S) 
Cooper, Carol D., JrV 6 
Cooper, Celia A.. M 65 
Cooper, Dennis V., PB 46 
Cooxr, Harvey M., JrV 6 
Cooper, James B., PB 63 
Cooper, Jana K., SrV 14; M 37 
Cooper, Jennifer, SrV 14 
Cooper, Joe B., FrV 8 
Cooper, Judy K., Esq 45 
Cooper, Lyn, FrV 8 



40— Freshman View 



Cooper, Owen L., SoV 8 

Cooper, Susan SoV 8; M 43; M 26 

Cope, Jaynell, FrV 3 

Cope, Marjorie A., M 40; M 67; JrV 
6; F 20 

Cope. Sandra J., JrV 6 

Copeland, Jana K., FiV 3 

Copeland, Judy A. 

Copenhaver, Ellen, SoV 8 

Coticnhavet, Pamela L., Esq 45; JrV 
6 

Coplin, Wayne M. 

Coppedge, Gerald, Esq 34 

Coppedge, Michael D.. SrV 14 

Corbell, Michael K., SrV 14 

Corcoran, Maureen A., JrV 6 

Cordell, Douglas H., PB 41 

Cordray, Gayle L., M 59 

Cordray, Mark H., F 35 

Corley. David P.. PB 60; SrV 15 

Corley, Davis H., PB 54; SoV 8 

Corn, Vonda K., F 18 

Cornelison, Jane D., M 67; PB 37; 
SrV 15 

Cornelius, Betsy, SoV 8 

Cornelius, Debra K,, FrV 8 

Cornett, Gail, M 63; M 36; PB 37; 
SoV 8 

Cornett, William H., TC 38; PB 60; 
M 36; Esq 7, 4 

Cortese, Margaret, Esq 38 

Cory, David L., PB 66; SoV 8 

Coryell, Catherine, FrV 8 

Cosby, Connie S., FrV 8 

Cosgray, Craig H., PB 60 

Costanzo, Nancy A. 

Costella, Daniel, Esq 38 

Costley, Leland G., PB 52 

Costlow, Laura J.. FrV 8 

Cotham, Brett C, FrV 8 

Gotten, Joe S., FrV 8 

Cottle, Jerry L., SoV 8 

Cottrell, Deborah S., FrV 8 

Couch, Martha E., SoV 8 

Coulter, Marcia, M 65 

Coursey, Cheryl, JrV 6 

Courtney, Robin, SoV 8 

Cowan, David T., SrV 15 

Cowan, Dean W., JrV 6 

Cowan, Jeffery, JrV 6 

Cowan, Kent G., SoV 8 

Cowell, Judy M., SrV 15 

Cowen, Donna G., M 43; FrV 8 

Cowen, Susan M., SrV 15 

Cowling, David E., FrV 8 

Cowper, Thomas H., FrV 8 

Cowsert, Paul M.. PB 51 

Cox, David L., SrV 15 

Cox, Gary 

Cox, Don C, SrV 4 

Cox, Dorothy J., Esq 45; JrV 6; M 
33 

Cox, Dwayne M., SrV 15 

Cox, Gale A., SrV 15 

Cox. Joette, FrV 8 

Cox, John C, JrV 6 

Cox, John S., JrV 6 

Cox. Johnny M.. SrV 15 

Cox, Karen, FrV 8 

Cox. Linda C. Esq 23 

Cox. Lynn 

Cox, Mary L., M 17; Esq 5 

Cox, Nancy A., FrV 8 

Cox, Patsy A., FrV 8; M 57 

Cox, Philip D„ SoV 8 

Cox, Robert C, FrV 8 

Cozart, Cyrus H., PB 72; SoV 8 

Crabtree, Mattilea, FrV 8 

Craddick. Bonnie S.. JrV 6; M 12; 
Esq 6; M 57 

Craig, Beth, FrV 8 



Craig, Dan A., FrV 8 

Craig, Jennifer A., JrV 7 

Craig, Kent C, SoV 8; M 63 

Craig, Nancy L., JrV 7 

Craig, Patricia M., FrV 8; M 65 

Craig, Robert L., FrV 8; Esq 31 

Craig, Warren G., SI 44; PB 46 

Craig, William E., PB 52 

Craighead, J. E.. SrV 2 

Cramer, Lee B., FrV 9 

Cramer, Wade L., JrV 7 

Crandell, Donna J., M 35; SoV 8 

Crandell, James E.. SrV 15; F 35 

Crannell, Patsy J., FrV 8 

Craven, Charlotte E.. SrV 15 

Craven. Mary E., SrV 4 

Cravens, David B., FrV 9 

Crawford, Carolyn, FrV 9 

Crawford, James L., TC 27; TC 32 

Crawford, Joseph V., SrV 15 

Crawford, Kathryn, M 67; SoV 8 

Crawford, Wayne, FrV 9 

Crawley, Marilynn, SrV 15; M 17; 
Esq 2; Esq 31 

Creamer, Charles G., SrV 15 

Creecy. David A., SoV 8 

Creek, Johnny D.. FrV 9 

Creek, Terry L., FrV 9 

Crelia, Linden B., FrV 9 

Crenshaw, Thomas, FrV 9 

Cress, Poiyeen A., SrV 15 

Crews, Larry F., PB 41 

Crews, Susan J., JrV 7; M 59 

Cribbs, Barry C, TC 32; SrV 15 

Crisp, Donna D., JrV 7 

Criswell, Martin E., SoV 8; SI 4 

Crocker, Brenda G., SrV 15 

Crocker, Charles D., SI 4 

Crone, Dan, JrV 7 

Crone. M. L., JrV 7 

Crone, Robert D., PB 72 

Cronin, John A.. PB 52 

Crooks, Leslie A., JrV 7 

Crooks, Stephen H., FrV 9 

Croom, William S., SI 46 

Cross, Carolyn K., SrV 15; F 22 

Cross, Robert G., T 46 

Cross, William L., SoV 8 

Crossland, Cathy A., SoV 8; L 35; T 

47 

Crossland, Linda S., JrV 7 

Crouch, Barbara A., SoV 8 

Crouch, Tommy W., FrV 9 

Crout, William B., FrV 9 

Crow, Cynthia, SoV 8 

Crow, Gary L., JrV 7 

Crow, Richard C. TC 25; SrV IJ 

Crow, Sue H. 

Crowe, Claudia B.. FrV 9 

Crowe. Karen B., SoV 8 

Crowell. Barbara A., JrV 7 

Crowell. Cathey, SoV 8 

Crowley, Charles W.. PB 41 

Crownover, Steven, FrV 9 

Crudgington, Jan, SrV 15; M 17; M 
25 

Crum, Myrna M., FrV 9 

Crump, Sandra J., SrV 15 

Crumpton, Linda, M 49 

Crutchfield, Buba. PB 46 

Cuddy. Pamela M., T 48 

Cude, Martin C, SrV 2 

Cuevas. Aurelio. SoV 8 

Cullender. Juliana P.. M 43 

Culver, Lee C, PB 63; SoV 8 

Cummings, Dwight V., SrV 15 

Cummings, Terri S., SoV 8 

Cummins, Larry J, 

Cummins, Shirley J., SrV 15 

Cummins. Travis L.. SrV 15; PB 72 



Cumpton. Connie J., SrV 15 

Cunbri, Paula, SrV 15 

Cunningham, Alton P., SrV 15 

Cunningham, Angela B., SrV 15 

Cunningham, Charlie E., SrV 15 

Cunningham, Deborah, JrV 7 

Cunningham, Pamela E., FrV 9 

Cunningham, Penelope D.. SrV 15 

Cunningham. Roger K,, PB 57; SoV 
8 

Curbo, Pamela J.. M 65 

Curcoe, Laurence B., JrV 7; Esq 34 

Curlee, Candace, SoV 8 

Curlee, Craig F., PB 15, 54; SoV 8 

Curnett, Barbara S., SoV 8 

Currence, Michael R. SI 52 

Currer, Thomas M., PB 41 

Currie, Debra J., FrV 9 

Currie, Dwight H., SrV 15 

Currie, Jorja K., SrV 15 

Currin, Timothy L., PB 25 

Curry, David H., FrV 9 

Curry, Gwenda L., M 37 

Curry, Gwen. SrV 15 

Curry, Jan, SoV 9 

Curry, Kathryn N., FrV 9 

Curry, Mark J., FrV 9 

Curry, Randell D., SoV 9 

Curtis, Bradley G., FrV 9 

Curtis, Hoyle L.. JrV 7 

Curtis. James R.. PB 64 

Curtis. Shayne. M 57; FrV 9 

Cusack. Anna K.. SoV 9 

Cutbirth. Gerald W.. JrV 7 

Cutshall. Robert W.. PB 41 

Cypert. Tony M.. PB 52 

Cyrus, William B., FrV 9 



Dail, Deborah K.. FrV 9 

Dailey. Celeste C. FrV 9 

Daily, Gregory L., PB 41 

Dale, Kathleen A., FrV 9 

Dale, Mary E.. SoV 9 

Dalrymple, Judith A., SoV 9; Esq 41 

Dampeer, William M., FrV 9 

Damron, Robert N., PB 72 

Damron, Shari J., SoV 9 

Daniel, Alan W., SoV 9 

Daniel, Deborah J., SoV 9 

Daniel, Leslie, M 67 

Daniel, Robert N., FrV 9 

Daniel, Timothy A.. FrV 9 

Daniel. William O. FrV 9 

Daniels, Brenda K., FrV 9 

Dankworth, Kalhy, SoV 9 

Danna, Cathy, JrV 7 

Dannelley, Sherrilee, SoV 9 

Danner, Michael J., SoV 9 

Dardar, Levi P., SoV 9 

Darden, Bobbie J., SoV 9 

Darden, Jerry D., SoV 9 

Dark, David F., SrV 15 

Dark, Richard G., JrV 7 

Darling, Sally A., FrV 9 

Darnell, Jim B.. PB 52 

Darrow. Terry. TC 30 

Darsey. Michael A.. FrV 9 

Daugherty. Linda M.. FrV 9 

Daugherly. Wayne E.. SrV 16 

Daughtry, Glenn H.. SrV l6 

Dauley, Randy D., SoV 9 

Dauterive, Jerry W.. SrV 16 

Davenport. Marie. FrV 9 

Davenport, Marvin E., PB 72 

Davenport, Mitchell G.. StV 16 

Daves. Patricia J.. SoV 9 

David, Ronald L.. PB 60; SoV 9 



idson, Christine H., JrV 7 
idson, Marsha J., FrV 9 
dson. Rex L., JrV 7 
dson, Roseanna C, Esq 45 
:es, Marilyn E., SrV 16 

Allie T., SrV 16 

Bandy, SoV 9 

Barbara A., JrV 7 

Charles G., SrV 16 

Charles R., FrV 9 

Cynthia A., JrV 7 

Cynthia A., FrV 9 

Cynthia A., JrV 9 

Cynthia H., SrV 16; Esq 30 

David R., SoV 9 

Deborah A., M 45 

Dianne B., SrV 16 

Donald C, SrV l6 

Donna J., JrV 7 

Edward T. 

Edwina, SrV 16 

Howard D., F 32 

James L., SrV 16 

James M., FrV 9 

James M., FrV 9 

James R., T U 

Johnna S.. SoV 9 

Leslie A.. JrV 7 
Marjorie R.. M 67; SoV 9 

Marty. FrV 10 

Marilynn. FrV 10 

Mary C. 

Mary E., JrV 7 

Mayna 

Mike, FrV 10 

Nancy K., FrV 10 

Pamela G., M 67; M 36 

Paula L., M 43 

Phillip. FrV 10 

Robert D.. PB 19; FrV 10 

Robert. SrV 16 

Rosalyn A.. M 30; M 16; M 



Davi 
Dav: 

Davi 

Dav 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Dav 

Davi 

Dav) 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

Dav 

Davi 

Dav 

Dav 

Davi 

Dav 

Davi 

Dav 

Davi 

Davi 

Davi 

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Davi 
65 

Davis, Rusty. FrV 10 

Davis. Ruth. SoV 9 

Davis. Sally M.. FrV 10 

Davis. Sharon S., FrV 10 

Davis. Sheryl A., SoV 9 

Davis, Sterling G., SoV 9 

Davis, Thomas W., SrV 16 

Davis, Timothy G., PB 17 

Davis, Veronica A., FrV 10 

Davis, Wiley F., SoV 9 

Davis, William H., FrV 9 

Davis, Zachary F., FrV 10 

Dawes, Martha E., SrV 16 

Dawkins, Teresa A., JrV 7; F 20 

Daws, Glen W., SoV 9 

Dawson, David, PB 52 

Dawson, Deborah L., FrV 10 

Dawson, Kenneth E., PB 41 

Dawson. Marsha L., TC 12; FrV 10 

Dawson. William E.. PB 52 

Day, Barbara J., FrV 10 

Day. Deborah J.. SoV 9 

Day, George A. SoV 9 

Day, Alan, PB 46; SoV 9 

Day, John W., FrV 10 

Day, Ronald W., SrV 16 

Dean, Dana C, JrV 7; F 18 

Dean, Larry A., JrV 7 

Dean, Mary K., TC 12; JrV 7 

Dean, Robert M., SrV 16; F 24 

Dean, Tony E., TC 40; SrV 16 

Dearden, Craig L., PB 63 

Dearmore, Ann, FrV 10 

Deavours, Norma, JrV 7 

Debusk, Ronald F., PB 54; Esq 42; 

Esq 37 



^1 



Freshman View — il 



Decastro, James D.. SrV 16 

Decker, Cheryl E., M 59; SrV 16 

Dedman, Claudia L.. M 65 

Deeds. Mark R., PB 64 

Deere, Michael, PB 51 

Deering, Donald W., SrV 16 

Deets, Mike. JrV 7 

Degarmo, Barbara, JrV 7; F 13 

DeGelirin, Mike, SrV 2 

Dcitch, Jane A., FrV 10 

Dehollis, Mike, JrV 7 

Deleon, Brigido. Esq 38 

DeLeon. Rene. Esq 38 

DeLoach, Mary E.. SrV 16 

DeLoach, Nancy M., SrV 16 

DeLoGarza, Willaim, FrV 10 

DeLollis, Nicholas J., F 32 

Demand, Gary W., FrV 10 

DeMore, John V., FrV 10 

Denman, Richard T., SI 51, 48 

Denney, Claire, JrV 7 

Dennis, Gladys H.. TC 11; TC 10; 
SrV 16 

Dennis, James G., SrV 16 

Dennis, Joseph C, T 45 

Dennis, Steve, SrV 4; TC 23; TC 24; 
TC 22 

Dennison, Franklin P., SoV 9 

Dent, Neleen L., SrV 2 

Denton, Ann, JrV 7 

Denton. Elizabeth. M 57 

Denton, Lowell R., PB 60 

Denton, Mary S. 

Denton, Susan, SoV 9 

Denton. Randy. JrV 7 

Derieux. Raymond T., F 22; SrV 16 

Derryberry, Carol J., SoV 9 

Dersch, Carolyn E., M 49 

Desmond, Cavin C, SrV 16 

Deitle, Phillip D., SrV 4 

Deulley, Clifford D., JrV 7 

Devaney, Michael E., SrV 16 

Devin, Clayton E., PB 46 

Dcvin. Delbert L., TC 22; JrV 7 

Dewees, Paulette, SoV 9 

DtWitt, Dinah A., SoV 9; M 43 

Dibb, Lawrence J., SrV 16 

Dick, Deborah L., JrV 7 

Dickerson. Deborah M., M 67; SoV 
9; M 15 

Dickey. Charles R.. SrV 16; F 23 

Dickson, Dick D.. TC 27 

Dickson, Sharon E., SrV 17 

Dilbeck. Elaine M.. SrV 17; M 57 

Dill, Ronald L., SrV 17; Esq 34 

Dillard, Bobby F., T 45; L 35 

Dillard. Peggy. SoV 9 

DiUard. Thomas M.. SrV 17 

Dillman. George D., SoV 9 

Dirks, Henry B., JrV 7 

Dirks. James H., JrV 7 

Disrud, F. Darlene. StV 17 

Dittberner. TommV L., SrV 17 

Divine, Charlie L.. SrV 17 

Divine. Terry T., SrV 17 

Dixon, Gary J,, SoV 9 

Doan, Jimmy, SrV 17 

Dobbs. Gay. JrV 7; M 57 

Dobbs, Kathy, F 15 

Dobbs, Milta K.. SrV 17 

Dobson, Bobbie P.. SrV 17 

Dodd, Dennis J.. PB 46 

Dodd. Marianne, SoV 9 

Dodd. Monte S.. F 18; PB 30 

Dodd, Pam. M 65 

Doherty. Kathleen M.. SoV 9; M 6) 

Dohetty. Susan J., SrV 17 

Doherty, William, TC 26; TC 3} 

Doiron. Gary L. SI 4 

Dollinger, Richard E., JrV 7 



Donaldson, Mark, SoV 9 
Donhaiser, Sandra A., SoV 9 
Donham, Larry C, SrV 17 
Donley, Paula K., Esq 45 
Donnell, Margaret A., SoV 9 
Donohoo, Richard M., Esq 45 
Dorscy, Su2y, SoV 9; M 31; M 63 
Dorsey, William D., PB 51 
Doshier. Diana L., JrV 7; F 20; F 17 
Doss, Larry A., JrV 7 
Doss, Tharran, SoV 9 
Doty, Dinah K., M 35; JrV 7 
Douglas, Nancy, M 59 
Douglass, Deborah K., JrV 7 
Douglass, Gordon S.. SoV 9 
Douglass. James, PB 41. 72 
Douglass. Nancy L., SoV 9 
Douthit. John R., JrV 7 
Dove. William M.. SI 4 
Dow, Andrew, SoV 9 

Dowdy, Bruce W.. PB 25; SI 10; SI 

4. 52 

Dowdy. Suanne E.. SrV 17 
Dowell. Laurie M.. Esq 40; SrV 17 
Downen. Ewing J.. TC 27 
Downs. Thompson H., PB 63 
Doyle, Francis L., SI 33 

Doyle, Robert B., SrV 4 

Doyle, William, SrV 4 

Dozier, Donald D., SrV 2 

Drager, Paul J., TC 30 

Drain, Joe D., SoV 9 

Drake. Barbara. Esq 8; M 57; SrV 17 

Drake, Brenda J., M 67 

Drane, Joe B., JrV 7; PB 19 

Drennan. Randal R.. TC 24 

Drew. Janeen, M 15; SoV 9; T 47 

Driscoll, David M., SrV 17 

Driskill, Jackie K.. JrV 7 

Driskill, Steve, JrV 7 

Driskill, Susan D., SoV 9 

Drive. Randy. JrV 7 

Driver. Randall W., T 45: PB 66 

Dry. Douglas F.. PB 42 

Dubose. Deborah, JrV 7 

DuBose, Roy L., PB 66 

Duckworth, Janis, SoV 9 

Dudley. Jay A., PB 26 

Dudley, Joy, SoV 9 

Duffee, Tommy W., SoV 9 

Duf field, Betty S., M 63 

Ehiffy. Cornelius A., SrV 17 

Duffy, Neil, F 23 

Duke, Dan C, F 21 

Duke, Gregory Q., PB 51 

Duke, Reed, PB 46 

Dukes, Jerry A., PB 60 

Dukes, Stephen C, SoV 9 

Duncan, Annette, TC 36 

Duncan. Catherine C, SoV 9 

Duncan, Deborah D., JtV 7; M 67 

Duncan, Dora A., SrV 17 

Duncan, Jane A.. M 65 

Duncan, Robert D.. JrV 7 

Dunham. Dorothy F., SrV 17 

Dunlap. Becky H., SrV 17 

Dunlap, Francis C, SoV 9 

Dunlap, John R., SoV 9 

Dunn, Caria F., M 59; SrV 17; M 
17, Esq 3; M 40 

Dunn, Eddie W., JrV 7 

Dunn, Frank W., JrV 7 

Dunn, Katherine E., SoV 9 

Dunn, Patsy A., JtV 7 

Dunn, Zelma J., SoV 9 

Dunning, Herman J.. SrV 17 

DuPonl. Glenn T.. StV 17; F 22 

Durant, Thomas R., PB 25 

Durato, Terry, PB 2) 



Durham, Barbara L., M 40: SrV 17- 
M 17; Esq 3; M 57 

Durham, Jody, PB 41 

Durham, Judith A., M 37 

Durham, Kathy, PB 35 

Durham, Judy, JrV 7 

Durso, Joseph C, SrV 17 

Durst, Thomas R., SrV 17 

Dutton, Deborah, SoV 9 

Duty, Lloyd H., JrV 7; PB 17 

Duvall. Charlotte K., T 48; SoV 9 

DVoyer, A. J., JrV 7 

Dwyer, Nelson, SoV 9 

Dycus, Tomi B., JrV 7 

Dye, Chester H., SoV 9 

Dyer, Deborah L.. M I 

Dyer, James H,, PB 52; SI 4, 52 

Dyer, Paul D., F 39 

Dyer, Richard M., SoV 9 

Dykes, Cathey A., SrV 17 

Dykes, Cynthia L., M 59; SoV 9 

Dykes, Dar»in L., SrV 17 

Dykes, Donald P., JrV 7; Esq 41 

Dysart, Ann J., M 65 

E 

Eady, James A., PB 63 
Eakin, Suzanne, JrV 7 
Eames, Steven M., T 10 
Earsley, Stephen L., PB 51 
Easley, Benita K., JrV 7 
Easoo, Marc A., PB 52 
East, Susan. JrV 7 
Ebanks, Sharon L., Esq 41; M 65 
EbcJing, Bobby L., SrV 17 
Echols, William W., SrV 17 
Eck, Linda M., SoV 9 
Eck, Michael J., SrV 17 
Edens, Lana B., SrV 17 
Edgar, Roy. SoV 9 
Edmiston. Jane L., SrV 2 
Edmiston. Joe M.. TC 38 
Edstrom, Gary E.. PB 51 
Edwards. Brian L., PB 71 
Edwards, David M.. PB 46 
Edwards, Debra L., JrV 7 
Edwards, E>onald G., TC 27; TC 26 
Edwards, Elva J., SoV 9 
Edwards, Gary E., T 45 
Edwards. Gary M., SrV 17 
Edwards. Milton C. JrV 7 
Edwards, Stephen F., Esq 45; SrV 18 
Edwards, Susan, SoV 9; M 63 
Eggemeyer, Michael V., SrV 18 
Eggemeyer, Victor B., TC 24; JrV 7 
Eggleston. James E., SoV 9 
Ehler, Jcanette. F 17 
Ehler, Mildred J., JrV 7 
Ehmann, Fredrick W.. SoV 9 
Elam, Dale B., SrV 18; F 22; PB 66 
Elder, Patricia J., M 63 

Eldridge, Sally L., SoV 9; Esq 6; M 

57 

Elkins, Randall C, PB 57 

Elle. Karen P., FrV f2 

Eller, Michael G., FrV 12 

Ellinger, Marie A., JrV 9 

Elliott, James D., SrV 18; Esq 34 

Elliott, Jane C, SoV 9 

Elliott, Kalhryn E., SoV 9 

Elliott, Larry. SrV 18 

Elliott. Mary A.. SrV 18 

Ellis, Carolyn, FrV 12 

Ellis, Cynthia. SrV 18 

Ellis, Gary D., JrV 9 

Ellis, George H., PB 60 

Ellis. Judith A., M 59; FrV 12 

Ellis, Kathy. FrV 12 

Ellis, Lonnie D., SrV 18 



Ellis. Randy B., SoV 9 

Ellis, Rhea. SrV 18 

Ellis. Susan J.. FrV 12 

Ellis, Vicki E., FrV 12 

Ellison, Becky, FrV 12; M 57 

Ellison, Ethel Mabry, TC 10; SrV 18- 
Esq 3 

Ellison. Linda G., JrV 9 

Ellison, Michael E., SrV 18 

Ellison, Douglas, SoV 9 

Ellison, Vicki A., JrV 9 

Elmore, Betty E., FrV 12 

Elms, Betty M., FrV 12 

Elms. William J.. SrV 18 

EIrod. Melynda J.. FrV 12 

EIrod. Susan L., SrV 18; PB 56; M 
40; M 43 

Elton, John A., SI 51, 48 

Elwell. Cynthia B.. SrV 18; M 57 

Ely, Alyson A., FrV 12 

Ely, Elaine, JrV 9 

Emerson, Larry V., TC 23; SrV 18 

Emery, Catherine L., M 43 

Emmons, Dick. JrV 9 

Engel, Benno W., SrV 18 

England, D. W., JrV 9 

Englerth, Patricia M., SrV 18 

English. Pamela S.. T 48; JrV 9 

Enloe, Carol, JrV 9 

Enninga, Sherre A., JrV 9 

Enns, Ron, T 45 

Enoch, Roy L., Esq 44 

Epperson, Albert H., SrV 18 

Epperson. Carla J., SrV 18 

Epperson, Harold L.. SrV 18 

Epperson. Laura E., JrV 9 

Eppler, James A., FrV 12 

Erwin, Allan C, FrV 12 

Escobar, Janie S., SrV 18 

Eskridge, Denise E., M 21; TC 27 

Estcs, John E., PB 54 

Estes, Karen J., SrV 18 

Estes. Kathy A.. FrV 12 

Estes. Pamlyn, JrV 9 

Estes, Virginia A., SrV 18 

Estill, Jean A.. SrV 18 

Etchison, Susan B.. JrV 9 

Etchison, Taylor D., SrV 18 

Etheredge, Gary W., PB 46 

Etheredge, Luke M., TC 27 

Ethridge, Walter C, PB 54 

Eubank, Benny C, FrV 12 

Eubanks, Douglas F., FrV 12 

Eubanks, James, FrV 12 

Eubanks, Joy R., M 15 

Eubanks, Nancy K., M 28 

Eudy, Urry M., SrV 18 

Eudy, Robert J., SrV 18; PB 42 

Eustace. Karen J., FrV 12 

Evans. Anthony E.. PB 41 

Evans. Bob, JtV 9 

Evans, Brian H., StV 18 

Evans. Charles T., SI II, 13, 4 

Evans, Donald R., SrV 18 

Evans, Duane L., F 52 

Evans, Fay. M I 

Evans, Fredrick E.. FrV 12 

Evans, Jamie L., SrV IS 

Evans, Jay C, PB 52 

Evans, Mariorie A., M 67 

Evans, Mickie J., FrV 12 

Evans, Robert W., FrV 12 

Evans. Ronald G., FrV 12 

Evans, Shirley R., JrV 9 

Evans, Susan L.. SrV 18 

Evans, Vincent H., F 32 

Evalt, Beccy D., FrV 12 

Everett, Carol J., T 48; SrV 18 

Ewen, Kelly B., FrV 12 



cl 



42 — Freshman Vieui 



Ewert. Carl F., PB 52 
Ewing. John N.. FrV 12 
Ewing, Mary, Esq 45 
Exum, Robert E., SrV 18 



Fabling, Haywood K., PB 60 

Fagan, James R., Esq 45 

Fagerstrom, Kenneth L., T 45 

Fairchild, Robert W., PB 64 

Faircloth, James C, JrV 9 

Fairly, Robert C. FrV 12 

Faivor, Paul J.. FrV 12 

Falkenberg. Sherry L,, FrV 12 

Falls, Earl S., PB 46 

Fambro, Gary W., TC 23; JrV 9 

Fanning, Stephen F., PB 71 

Fant, Glenn R., JrV 9 

Farley, David W., JrV 10 

Farley, Harry D., PB60 

Farmer, Ann, M 59 

Farmer, Stephen E., FrV 12 

Farnsworth, Floyd F., JrV 10 

Farnsworth, Susan, FrV 12 

Farr, Kathleen, FrV 12 

Farr, Randell T., JrV 10 

Farrar, Gregory L., JrV 10 

Parrel, Sharon, Esq 45 

Farrell, Earl, Esq 89; FrV 12 

Farren, Vicki L., FrV 12 

Farrow, Michael R., PB 25; PB 33 
Farrow, Tree, JrV 10 
Fassel, Melinda M., FrV 12 
Fatheree, Richard E., SrV 18 
Faubion, Barbara S., M 49 
Faubion, Franklin H., PB 26 
Faulkenbery. Alvie F., SrV 18; PB 64 
Faulkner, Gary L., SrV 20 
Favor, Roger M., JrV 10 
Feagan, Stephen W., FrV 12 
Feagin, Mary L., M 49; JrV 10; F 17 
Fearing, Donald L., FrV 12 
Feazelle, Karen, SrV 19 
Feely, Charles G., JrV 10; PB 20 
Fees, Beth, FrV 12 
Feeser, Mary F., FrV 12 
Fcitel, Stanley C, SrV 19 
Feitel, Thomas E., PB 15; FrV 12 
Fekcte, Frank W., SrV 19; PB 72 
Felton, Jo C, JrV 12 
Fender, Laura R., M 67; FrV 12 
Fenn, Susan D., JrV 12 
Fenter, Benita L., SrV 19 
Fereydoun, Aghazadea, PB 66 
Ferguson, Brenda K., FrV 12 
Ferguson, James W., FrV 12 
Ferguson, Janet A., JrV 10 
Ferguson, Linda L., FrV 12 
Ferguson, Robert B,, PB 46 
Ferguson, Robert G., TC 24; SrV 19 
Fernandcs, Karen L., FrV 12 
Ferrell, Jerry D., FrV 12 
Ferrell, Sharon V., SrV 19 
Ferris, Susan J., JrV 10; M 63 
Fester, Jerrell B., SrV 19; PB 66 
Fewcll, Joy D., SrV 19 
Fidelie, Marianne B., PB 36 
Field, David D., PB 20 
Field, Stephen L., FrV 12 
Fields, David J., PB 57 
Fields, Kay, SrV 4 
Fields, Kenneth W., PB 46 
Fields. Robert A., SrV 19; PB 63 
Fields, Terry S., PB 52 
Fields, William M., FrV 12 
Filley, Marilynn, SrV 19 
Fincannon, Howard M., SI 7, 52 
Finch, Gail P., M 40 



Finch, Jack Douglas. SrV 19 

Finck, Missy, JrV 10 

Finlay, Charles M., PB 60 

Finley, Carolyn K., SrV 19 

Finley, Eddy. JrV 10 

Finley, Fred R., SrV 19 

Finley, Margaret Wages, SrV 19 

Finley, Thomas D., SI 7 

Finley. Toya J., SrV 19 

Finney, Cary N.. FrV 12 

Finney. Cindy, M 67 

Finney, Ernest R., SrV 2 

Finney, Gage, Esq 6 

Firmin, Michael D., FrV 12 

Fisackerly, Larry L., PB 66 

Fischer, George L., FrV 12 

Fisher, Katharine L., FrV 12 

Fitzgibbon, Pamala S., FrV 12 

Fiveash, J. B., FrV 12 

Flache. Gwendolyn J., TC 11; TC 10 

Flack, Nancy A.. FrV 12 

Flack, Susan K., SrV 19 

Flanagan, Mari, FrV 12 

Flanery, Terry, FrV 12 

Flatt, Gary H.. TC 32 

Flatters, Robert A., FrV 12 

Fleer, Leslye L., SrV 19 

Fleer, Robert D., SrV 19 

Fleming, Robert W., PB 63 

Flesher, Richard E.. PB 52 

Flesher, Shirley K., JrV 10; M 28 

Fletcher, Bob, JrV 10 

Fletcher, Carolyn A., JrV 10 

Fletcher, Debora A., M 43 

Fletcher, Philip L., TC 27; TC 29; 
SrV 19 

Fletcher, Randall L., SI 51, 48 

Fletcher, Robert H., PB 72 

Flood, Doris L., SrV 19 

Floodberg, Jeanne E., M 21 

Florence, Darlene, SrV 19 

Florence. David A., SrV 19 

Flores, Miguel, SrV 19 

Florey, Ben C. PB 20 

Flournoy, Thomas G., JrV 10 

Flowers, Jo L., JrV 10 

Floyd, Charles M., JrV 10 

Floyd, Ronald C, TC 31 

Flukinger, Larry C, SrV 19 

Flume, Carolyn E., M 45 

Flynt, Jack W., JrV 10 

Foerster, Larry L., JrV 10; PB 72 

Fogle, Carol E., SrV 19 

Foley, Kennard T., PB 63 

Folk, Russell H., SrV 19; PB 25; SI 

51 

Foltz, Roger B., SrV 19 
Foote, Cecelia L., Esq 41 
Foppc, Regina, Esq 58 
Forbes, Jerre L.. SrV 19 
Forbus, Jeanie, JrV 9 
Ford, Cynthia A.. JrV 9 
Ford, Karen L.. M 57 
Ford, Kenneth E.. SI 33, 35 
Ford, Sharon A., M 63 
Ford, Stephen R., SI 51 
Foreman, Donald G., JrV 9 
Foreman, Judy A., JrV 9; M 33 
Forman, Judy, M 25 
Forrest, Kent D., SrV 19 
Fortenberry, James L., SrV 19 
Fortino. Pamela J., M 43 
Fortunato, Maria L., M 30 
Fostel, Michael L., SrV 2 
Foster, Buddy G., JrV 9 
Foster, David W., SrV 19 
Foster, Linda A., SrV 19 

Foster, Marilyn, PB 56; M 16; JrV 9: 

M 41 
Foster, Martha A., SrV 19; Esq 41 



Foster, Nedda A., FrV 12 

Foster. Philip L.. PB 17 

Foster. Ronald F.. FrV 12 

Foster, Steven E., PB 25; FrV 12 

Foster, Thomas P., FrV 12 

Fountain, Edmund M., JrV 9; PB 66 

Fountain, Larry G., FrV 12 

Foust, Kathryn A.. JrV 9 

Fouts, Betsy A., SrV 19 

Fowler, A. E., SrV 20; F 23 

Fowler, Brice W., PB 46 

Fowler, Candace M., JrV 9 

Fowler, Craig B.. PB 54 

Fowler. Linda K.. T 48 

Fowler, Wendy J., SrV 20 

Fox, David L., JrV 9 

Fox, Daza A., FrV 12 

Fox, Denton, SI 4; SI 10; SI 11, 8, 
51, 29 

Fox. Eric L., SI 51, 48, 50; F 23; PB 

46 

Fox, Michael H.. JrV 9; PB 72 
Fox, Nina, TC 26; TC 27 
Fox, Pamela K., SrV 20 
Fox, Ronald G., Sr.V 20 
Fox, Suzan C, SrV 20 
Foy, Sally V., JrV 9; M 43 
Frady, Ladonna J., M 43; FrV 12 
Fralin, Carolyn, M 49 
Francis, Thomas E., T 45 
Franco, Edwardo B., SrV 20 
Franklin, Donna G., JrV 9 
Franklin, Gery A., JrV 9 
Franklin. Jimmy D.. PB 64 
Franks, Leldon C, PB 26 
Franks, Randy P., PB 52 
Franks, Ronald G., JrV 9 
Franks, Van E., FrV 12 
Frantz, Paul H., FrV 12 
Franz, Patricia L., FrV 12 
Eraser, Margaret E., SrV 20 
Eraser, Martha P., SrV 20 
Frashier, David G., PB 72; F 32 
Frashier. Pat. SrV 20 
Frashier, Sharon S., M 15; M 31 
Frazee, Philip J.. FrV 12 
Frazicr. David P.. PB 25 
Frazier, James, F 32 
Frceland, Billy B., TC 30 
Freeman, Pamela, SrV 20 
Freeman, Roger D., PB 25 
Frees, Brian B., FrV 12 
Frcitag, Sheliah G., FrV 12 
Freitas, Aureo B., JrV 9 
Freitas, Patricia A., JrV 9 
Freitas, Pedro H., JrV 9 
Frentress, Janett, JrV 9 
Friedrich, Dennis W., Esq 34 
Frith, Jack R., SrV 20 
Frizzell, Allan D., JrV 9 
Froehlich, Michael S., JrV 9 
Froman, Gregory R., JrV 9; PB 66 
Frost, Patricia L., FrV 12 
Fry, John M., FrV 12 
Frye, Daniel P., FrV 12 
Fryman, Shirley A., JrV 9 
Fucik, Kenneth W., PB 46 
Fuller. Douglas G., FrV 13: PB 63 
Fuller, Michele A., FrV 13 
Fuller, Sue C, FrV 13 
Fullingim, Joretta A., SrV 20 
Furgeson, Jim A., Esq 36; PB 52 
Furry, Janice A., FrV 13 
Fuson, George E., PB 64 



Gadbury, David A., FrV 13 
Gaige, David, SI 51 
Gaines, Autry G., SrV 2 



Gaines, Charles C, FrV 13; PB 25 

Galbraith, Diane, FrV 13 

Galbraith, Glenn E., SrV 20 

Galbraith, Kay, JrV 9 

Galey, Jimmy L., SrV 20 

Gallagher, Stephen M., PB 72 

Gallagher, Suzanne E., JrV 9 

Galletly, Carolyn K., JrV 9 

Gallman, Robert M., JrV 9 

Galloway, John N., PB 57 

Galloway. Linda G., FrV 13 

Gait, Frances M.. SrV 20 

Gambrell. Martha A., SrV 20 

Gamer, Don, FrV 13 

Gampe, Virginia J., FrV 13 

Gan, Michael J.. PB 15; Esq 17 

Gandy, George V., JrV 9 

Gandy, Sandra R., JrV 9 

Gann, Don M., JrV 9 

Gantt, Gamewell D.. SrV 20; Esq 2 

Ganz, Charlie D., PB 25; Esq 38 

Garcia, Armando, Esq 38 

Garcia, Armando, JrV 9; Esq 38 

Garcia, Jaime D., Esq 38 

Garcia, Ruben, SI 40, 41 

Garcia, Valvin P., Esq 38; FrV 13 

Gardiner, John W., PB 63 

Gardner, Caria J.. FrV 13 

Gardner, Carolyn L., JrV 9 

Gardner, Charles L., FrV 13 

Gardner. Gary R., SrV 20 

Gardner, John L., PB 33 

Gardner. Larry C., SrV 20 

Gardow, Deborah L.. M 43; FrV 13 

Garey, Alan M., PB 46 

Garey, Cynthia J., FrV 13 

Garlington, Rebecca J., FrV 13 

Garner, Carol M., TC 27; TC 26: 
JrV 9 

Garner, Charlotte R., FrV 13 

Gamer. Linda G.. SrV 20 

Garner, Timothy D., FrV 13 

Garnett, Kathy, M 43 

Garnett, Lynne, SrV 20 

Garrard, Patrick A., PB 25 

Garretson, Claudia J., M 45 

Garrett, Carl E., SrV 20 

Garrett, Darryl N., Esq 31 

Garrett, Donna S., SrV 20 

Garrett, Grady M., FrV 13 

Garrett, Gwendolyn. FrV 13 

Garrett, John H.. PB 46 

Garrett, Kathleen, SrV 20 

Garrett, Legett, TC 30 

Garrett, Linda G.. FrV 13 

Garrett. Malcolm E., SrV 20 

Garrett, Ralph J., PB 25 

Garrett, Sydney A., SrV 20 

Garrett, William M., SI 33 

Garrison, Cheryl, FrV 13 

Garrison, Gary L., T 45; SrV 20 

Garrison, Jan, SrV 20 

Garrison, June K., SrV 20 

Gartland. Paul E.. PB 26 

Garton, Pete, SrV 21 

Garvert. Robert M.. F 32 

Garvin, Elizabeth, M 17; Esq 4; M 
45; M 40 

Gary, Steve, JrV 9 

Gates, Robert D., JrV 9 

Gatewood, Alta J., SrV 20 

Gattis. Homer L.. SrV 20 

Gatts. Homer. SrV 20 

Gaulding. Ross E,. JrV 9 

Gautt, Gamewell, F 23 

Gay, Barbara G., SrV 20 

Gay, Barbara J., M 30 

Gay, Susan M., PB 36 

Gayle, Regina K., M 57; FrV 13 



Freshman View — 43 



Gaylord. John M.. PB 54 
Gaylord, Sally W.. FrV 13 
G«e, Ronald N., JrV 9 
Genaflsky, Carrie L., M 15 
Gensman, Dennis K., SrV 20 
Gentry, Bob, JrV 9 
Gentry. David W., JrV 9 
Gentry, Debra A., JrV 9 
Gentry, Mclva L., FrV 13 
Genure, Phil, Esq 15 
Gcoffroy, Gail. JrV 9 
George, Charles E., SI 23; SI 52 
George. James P., F 32 
George, John E., F 32; SrV 21 
Gerhardt. John A., SrV 21 
Gerig. Philip L.. JrV 9 
Gersbach, Jerry W., JrV 9 
Gfeller, Linda K., SrV 21 
Gholson, Fredrick M., SrV 21 
Gibbins, Cynthia S.. FrV 13 
Gibbins, Paul A., PB 52 
Gibbon. Michael D., FrV 13 
Gibbons. Beth, M 59; FrV 13 
Gibbs, Bonnie L., FrV 13 
Gibbs, Thomas M., JrV 9 
Gibson, Byron, FrV 13 
Gibson, Gary M., FrV 13 
Gibson, George B., SrV 21 
Gibson, Gill E., FrV 13 
Gibson. Gloria J.. JrV 9 
Gibson, James A., SrV 21 
Gibson, Jennifer K., SrV 21 
Gibson, Karen R., SrV 21 
Gibson, Mark, FrV 13 
Giddings, Robin L., SrV 21 
Gideon, Radonna J., FrV 13 

Gilbert, George R., SrV 21 

Gilbert, James M., SrV 21 

Gilbert, Jerc M.. JrV 9 

Gilbert, Kathy L., FrV 13 

Gilbert, Wayne, Esq 44 

Gilbertson, Linda A., M 49 

Gilbreath, James H., PB 46; Esq 6 

Gilbreath, Kimberly, M 63; M 36 

Giles, John G., PB 54 

Giles, Koleta J.. FrV 13 

Giles. Mary C, SrV 21; Esq 38 

Gilger. Maria L.. FrV 13 

Gililland, Juanice, SrV 21 

Gill, Beth, M 21; FrV 13 

Gill, James H., PB 71 

Gill, Rebecca. FrV 13 

Gill. Robert, JrV 9; PB 64 

Gill. Stanley M.. PB 20; FrV 13 

Gillespie. Claire S., Esq 4; TC 27 

Gillespie, Glynda, M 45 

Gillespie, Johnnie L., JrV 9; Esq 41 

Gilliam, Bruce A., JrV 9 

Gilliam. Gary B., PB 42 

Gilliam, Judy L., SrV 21 

Gilliland, Linda K., M 45 

Gilmore, Donna G., SrV 21 

Gingrich. Isaiah W., PB 41 

Gipson. Pete. SrV 21; TC 24 

Gipson, Paula C, T 48 

Glass, Cariey C, SrV 21 

Glass, Chen, SrV 21 

Glass, Beth, SrV 21; TC 10 

Glas5, Sandra L., JtV 9 

Glasscock, Gerald L.,JrV 9 

Glaaner. Thomas H., T 45 

Glenewinkel, Joseph E., SI 7 

Glenn, Carolyn J., SrV 21 

Glenn. Victor B., JrV 9 

Glennan, John H., SI 51, 48. 49 

Glover, Fred L., SrV 2 

Glover, Larry M., PB 63 

Glover, Patsy A., F 22; SrV 21 

Glover, Susan L., M 49; JrV 9 



Gnerre, Frank D.. SI 33 

Goad, Leona J., JrV 9 

Gober, Lane L., JrV 9 

Godeke, Robert F., JrV 9 

Godwin, Marylyn E., SrV 21 

Godwin, Patricia L., M 65 

Goetz, Barry, SrV 21 

Goen, Mark T.. JrV 9 

Goenne, Frederick R., JrV 9 

Goering, Susan G., JrV 9; M 16; M 
59 

Goert2, Richard A., JrV 9 

Goettsche, Carl M., PB 41 

Goff, Robert E., SrV 21' 

Goforth. Bitsy. M 59 

Goforh, John A., JrV 9 

Golda, Terence A., SrV 21 

Goldberg. Aaron S., SrV 2 

Gollihar, Martha L., M 49 

Gollnick, Janet E., M 21 

Gonong, Patrick M., JrV 9 

Gonzales, Alexander, Esq 38 

Goode, John P., PB 54 

Goode, Leigh C, JrV 9 
Goode, Zandy D., SrV 21 
Gooden, Patrick H., PB 52 
Goodman, Bruce R., SrV 21 
Goodman, Jimmy P., SI 48 
Goodman, Jimmy R., PB 71 
Goodman. Jonathan D., JrV 9 
Goodman, Linda R., T 48 
Goodpasture, John N., SrV 21 

Gregg, Goodrich, T 46 

Goodson, Carolyn K., SrV 21 

Goodson, Lawrence, PB 18 

Goodwin, Diana J., JrV 9 

Goodwin, Jerry D., F 24 

Goodwin, Robyn J., JrV 9 

Goodwyn, Robert G., PB 54 

Goodyear, Craig A., SrV 21 

Goodykoontz, Deborah J., M 45; M 
31 

Gordon, Kearby L., PB 66 

Gordon, Thais. M 21 

Gorham, Linda J., SrV 21 

Gorka, Teena E., SrV 21 

Gorrell, Glynda J., SrV 21; Esq 31 

Gosnell, Edward E., SrV 22 

Gossett, Robert H., PB 52; PB 33; M 
36 

Gosting, Donald L., F 24 

Goswell, Edward, Esq 44 

Gottschalk, Anna M., SrV 22 

Gould, Arthur E., SrV 22 

Gowan, George T., SrV 22 

Gowler, Jerry D., TC 10; T 46 

Grabow, Bonnie E., SrV 22 

Grace, James, JrV 9 

Grace, Priscilla E., JrV 9; F 20 

Grace, Steve, JrV 9 

Grafa, Trey, PB 46 

Gragg, Teriy N., PB 64 

Graham, Dennis N., PB 25; Ejq 6 

Graham, Mark C, SrV 22 

Graham, Michelle M., M 43 

Graham, Paul W., PB 72 

Graham, Russell R., SrV 22 

Graham, Terry T.. SrV 22 

Graham, William L., SrV 22 

Granberry, Judy M., JrV 9 

Grange, Frankie J.. SrV 22 

Granger, William H., PB 42 

Grantham, Jeannine, Esq 41 

Grasse, Sharon, M 43 

Gravender, Michael C, JrV 9 

Graves, Robert W., F 23; SrV 22 

Cray, Barbara J., M 15 

Gray. Constance H., M 43 

Gray, Freddy L., JrV 9 

Gray, Jim S.. PB 69 



Gray, Joanne P., M 63 

Gray, Nancy R„ JrV 9 

Gray, Richard A., PB 52 

Gray, Rodney P., PB 41 

Gray, Steven W., JrV 9; F 23; StV 
22 

Gray. Terry L., SrV 22 

Gray, Winton R.. PB 54; SI 52 

Greathouse, Carmen V., M 65 

Green, Bernard J., TC 27; SrV 22 

Green. David L., JrV 9 

Green, Douglas M., SrV 22 

Green, Eva, SrV 22 

Green, Gary E., JrV 9 

Green. Jan E., JrV 9 

Green, Lawrence E., SrV 22 

Green, Lawrence E., Esq 42; Esq 37 

Green, Lynn A., T 10; JrV 9 

Green, Margaret A., JrV 9 

Green, Martha Jane, SrV 22 

Green, Merikay, SrV 22 

Green, Michael A., SrV 22 

Green, Michael E., TC 23; SrV 22 

Green, Richard H., F 32 

Green, Richard K., SrV 22 

Green, Robert F., F 22 

Green, Shirley A., SrV 22 

Green, Tom H., PB 41 

Green, Wayne F., JrV 9 

Greener, Cynthia A., TC 10; JrV 9 

Gregg, Guion, PB 52 

Gregg, Jill, JrV 9 

Greif, Douglas E., JrV 9 

Grcsham, Arnold E., JrV 9 

Grcsham, Mary L., JrV 9 

Gresham, Vicki J., JrV 9 

Grey, Jeffrey D., PB 64 

Gtier, Barbara, F 22; SrV 22 

Griffin, Hayden, F 39 

Griffin, Jan, M 67 

Griffin, Leonard B., PB 52 

Griffin, Odis H., SrV 22 

Griffis, Kathleen, SrV 22; Esq 3 

Griffith, Jean V., M 59 

Griffith, Kay, M 21; JrV 9; TC 10 

Grigg, Richard A., PB 52; Esq 3: Esq 
6; SI 7; SI 10; SI 8, 52 

Grigsby, Ronald D., Esq 34; SI }3, 
35, 52 

Grimes, Jimmy R., JrV 10 

Grimes, Richard L., SrV 22 

Grimmer, Ralph J., Esq 31 

Grinsfelder, Gary S., PB 42 

Gfisham, William V., PB 31 

Grissom, Linda K., SrV 22 

Grist, Billy M., PB 54 

Groce, Stephen R., TC 32; TC 27 

Groover, Daniel E., PB 19 

Gross, George B., PB 46 

Grubbs, Willaim R., PB 20 

Gruben, Eddie D., JrV 10 

Gruner, Cindy G., TC 10; SrV 22 

Cryder, Rodney A.. SrV 22; F 22 

Guajardo, Ramon, SrV 22; Esq 38 

Guber. Linda, M 65 

Guess, Marsha A., M 45 

Guidi, Lynne C. SrV 22 

Cuirino, Carlos, Esq 38 

Gulley, John D.. PB 20 

Cully, Jane, M 57; PB 56 

Gully, Kilharine. SrV 22; M 17; M 

57 

Gum, Susan J., Esq 45; JrV 10 
Gummett, Lee, PB 54 
Gunn, Jani, M 65 
Gunter. Brooks, PB 72; JrV 10 
Gunlef, Gregory J., PB 60 
Gunter, Hatley B., TC 27 
Gutierrez, Catalina M., E>q 38 
Cutlenr, Peggy E., M 15 
Guzman, Alfredo E., PB 69 



H 

Haas, Kay, JrV 10 

Haberer, Daniel R., T 45; JrV 10 

Hackfeld, Keith A., JrV 10 

Hadley, Gary S., JrV 10; PB 18 

Hadley, Joe D., SrV 22 

Haggar, James J., PB 52 

Haggard, Randall S., T 46; SrV 22 

Haggard. Tommy L.. TC 27 

Hagin, Charies T., SrV 2 

Hagood, Cecelia Y., SrV 23 

Hagood, William B., SrV 23 

Hahn, David, PB 52; JrV 10 

Hahn, Jamie C, SI 7, 52 

Hahn, Kenneth R., PB 71 

Haiduk, Raymond H., SrV 23 

Haile, Ramon L., SrV 23 

Haines, Diane M., JrV 10 

Haines, Steve, SrV 4 

Haire. Carol D.. Esq 45; JrV 10 

Hairston. Gcnelda, JrV 10 

Halbert, Norma C. SrV 23 

Hale, Chris J., PB 63 

Hale. Claudia L.. M 21 

Hale, Kathy, M 63 

Hale, Mary E., SrV 23 

Hale, Pamela G., M 49 

Hale, Patrick R., PB 54; PB 33 

Haley, Carolyn A., TC 10; JtV 10 

Haley, Ricky D., JrV 10 

Halez, Dennis, JrV 10 

Hall, David W., PB 42 

Hall, Edwin M., SrV 23 

Hall, Edwina A., M 43 

Hall, Eugene, JrV 10 

Hall, Jimmie V., JrV 10 

Hall, Mark C. PB 42; PB 33 

Hall, Mary L., JrV 10 

Hall, Mike. F 24 

Hall. Nancy A., M 16; M 43 

Hall, Randy J., PB 26 

Hall, Richard S., PB 46 

Hall, Roberta A., JrV 10 

Hall, Steve, F 24 

Hall, Timothy D., JrV 10 

Hall, William T., SrV 23 

Halliscy, Patrick F., SI 51 

Hallman. Billy R.. TC 23; TC 31; 
SrV 24 

Hallman. Donna K.. SrV 23 

Hallman, Martha A., JrV 10 

Hallock, Norman E., SrV J3; F 35 

Haltom, James E., SI 51 

Hambleton, Bonice, Esq 40 

Hamby, Judy R., M 59; SrV 23 

Hames, Gary L., TC 24; SrV 23 

Hames, Steve W., T 11 

Hamilton, Bill, JrV 10 

Hamilton, Dan W., JrV 10 

Hamilton, Deborah J., M 67 

Hamilton, Dwight D.. SrV 25 

Hamilton, Gary P., SrV 2J 

Hamilton, Glynda P., SrV 23 

Hamilton, James E., PB 66 

Hamilton, Jimmie L.. SrV 23: Biq 3; 
Esq 6 

Hamilton, Lonnie, SrV 23 

Hamilton, Lyn, M 67; PB 38 

Hamilton, Mart, StV 25 

Hamilton, Patten A., SrV 25 

Hamilton, Steven L., JrV 10; PB 20 

Hamilton, Susan E.. M 43 

Hamilton. William N.. SrV 23 

Hamm. Mary H., Esq 45; JrV 10 

Hamman, Gary L., JrV 10 

Hammer, Amy R.. M 15; L 20; M 57 

Hammers, Cheryl, JrV 10 

Himmil, Carol E., M 45 



44 — Freshman View 



r 



1 



Hammonds, James R., TC 27 
Hammood, Ray, JrV 10 
Hampton, Alice, Esq 45 

Hampton, Linda K., SrV 23: F 20; F 

17 

Hamrick, Susan D., SrV 23 
Hancock, Doneeta A., PB 31; PB 5 
Hancock, Judy K., SrV 23 
Hancock, Loyd B., SrV 23 
Hancock, Randolph P., JrV 10 
Hancock, Susan, L 16; SrV 23 
Hancock, Tommy J., TC 31; SrV 23 
Hand, David L., PB 25 
Hand, Larry W., SrV 23; PB 25 
Hand, Mary A., F 17 
Handly, Marlane, M 63 
Hanna, Lou, PB 38; M 63 
Hanna, Michael E., JrV 10 
Hannabas, Donald T., PB 66 
Hansen, Barbara A., M 37; JrV 10 
Hansen, Barbara A., Esq 45 
Hansen, Blake, PB 46 
Hanshee, Carla, JrV 10 
Hanslik, Elizabeth J., M 43 
Hanson, Joan, JrV 10 
Hanson, Paul, A., JrV 10 
Haralson, Candace J., JrV 10; M 63 
Haralson, Mimi, M 59 
Harbert, Euna M., Esq 45; JrV 10 
Harbert, Hugh, PB 57 

Harbin, Billy C, TC 22; TC 24; SrV 

23 

Harbin, Linda N., TC 10; SrV 23 

Hardaway, Danny, SI 2, 5, 9, 7 

Hardee, Dennis R., SrV 24 

Harden, Jimmy R., TC 27 

Harder, James W,, SrV 24 

Hardesty, Edwia M.. PB 63 

Hardgrave, David, SrV 24 

Hardgrave, William D., SrV 24 

Hardin, Gail E., TC 27; TC 29 

Hardin, Ronnie R., SrV 24 

Hardin, Stephen D., SI 17, 21 

Hardin, Susan O,, M 57 

Harding, John E., PB 52 

Hardy, Anna J., JrV 10 

Hargrave, Eunice J., M 15 

Hargrave, Larry D., PB 52; SI 7, 52 

Hargrave, Patricia R., SrV 24 

Hargrove, Danny N., JrV 10 

Harigel, Letitia A., M 45 

Harigel, Marilyn J., M 45; SrV 24 

Harkey, Kaye F., SrV 24 

Harkins, Jack W., JrV 10 

Harlan, Samuel G., SrV 24; TC 24 

Harland, Claude W., SrV 24; TC 24 

Harp, Sharon K., JrV 10; M 21 

Harper, Carole A., JrV 10 

Harper, Patricia R., M 67 

Harper, Rebel. M 59 

Harper, William G., SrV 4 

Harrel, Claudia B., M 67; PB 56 

Harrcl, Edward A., JrV 10 

Harrell, Claudia, M 25 

Harrell. Gus C, JrV 10 

Harrell, Stanley J., SI 51 

Harrington, Brian T., PB 63; Esq 6 

Harrington, Roger P., JrV 10 

Harris, Christopher T., JrV 10; PB 66 

Harris, Jack E., SrV 24 

Harris, Jack W., TC 30 

Harris, John E., SrV 24; Esq 44 

Harris, Leslie N,, PB 41 

Harris, Marilyn, M 21 

Harris, Marvin L., PB 46 

Harris, Melton C, JrV 10; PB 20; F 
21 

Harris, Rex G., TC 33; TC 25; TC 

23; SrV 24 

Harris, Robert W., SrV 24 



Harris, Shyrle A., JrV 10 

Harrison, Carol, SrV 24 

Harrison, George A., SrV 24 

Harrison, Hunter S., PB 26; 

Harrison, Jerry D., SrV 24 

Harrison, Rosemary, M 57 

Harrod, Gary W., PB 54; PB 33 

Harrod, Janice D., M 63 

Hart, David R., JrV 10 

Hart, John T., PB 57 

Hart, Timothy P., PB 69 

Hart, Walter J., SrV 24 

Harter, Lance L., SI 33 

Hartley, Robert E., PB 63 

Hartman, Mitzie L:, JrV 10. 

Hartnett, Jeanine E., M 15 

Hartnett, Steve P., PB 63 

Hartsfield, Don R., SrV 24 

Hartsfield, Dowell O., JrV 10 

Hartwell, Larry G., PB 45 

Hartzendorf, Eric, TC 23; SrV 24; 
Esq 42; Esq 37 

Harvis, Deborah L., JrV 10 

Harwood, Judy A., JrV 10 

Haskins, Lawrence J., PB 63 

Hassell, Joseph L., SrV 24 

Hastings, Jane, M 63; Esq 12 

Hatcher, Jeanne A., M 25; M 31; M 

57 

Hatcher, Russell L., JrV 10; PB 51 

Hatchett, Diane F., SrV 24; M 59; M 
17; Esq 5 

Hatfield, Gary B., SrV 24 

Hathaway, Cynthia A., M 45 

Hathaway, John S., PB 64, 72 

Hathaway, Marilyn S., TC 10; JrV 10 

Hathaway, Pat, M 33; M 45 

Hatley, Kirby J., JrV 10 

Hatley, Michael E., PB 64 

Hatten, Leila L., JrV 10 

Hawkes, Samuel T., PB 45 

Hawkins, Bill, PB 45 

Hawkins, Sharon K., M 45 

Hawkins, Sue E., M 43 

Hawks, Janis, M 63 

Hawthorne, Mike, PB 15 

Hay, Phillip T., PB 60; SI 7 

Hayden, David L., PB 63 

Haydon, Judy M., SrV 24 

Hayhurst, Joel R., PB 52 

Haynes, Claudia V., M 63 

Haynes, Eloise, SrV 24 

Haynes, Jane, JrV 10 

Haynes, Margaret J., PB 37 

Haynes, Susan N., M 25 

Hays, Janelda L., JrV 10; F 20; F 17 

Hays, Roderick R., PB 52; Esq 34 

Hayslip, Tiana, M 45 

Hayworth, Elizabeth R., T 47; M 32 

Hazelwood, Mark L., SI 5, 8, 52; PB 

52 

Hazelwood, Sandra K., M 45 
Hazelwood, Mark, JrV 10; SI 7 
Head, Denise A., JrV 10 
Head, Patricia L., JrV 10 
Head, Sheila A., JrV 10 
Head, Thomas V., PB 66 
Heald, Gary R., F 21 
Heard, Donald W., JrV 10 
Hearn, Ann B., M 36; M 63 
Heath, Jody, JrV 10 
Heath, William A., Esq 40 
Heaton, Fred W., PB 64 
Heaton, Kermit C, SrV 24 
Heck, Marjan, JrV 10 
Hector, Alvarado, JrV 10 
Hedgpeth, William, JrV 10 
Hedrick, Dorothy L., JrV 10 
Heek, Marjan, M 63 
Hefflefinger, Mark W., PB 45 



Heffner, Karen L., M 63 

Hefley, Freddie A., TC 25; TC 23 

Hefner, Deborah A., SrV 24; Esq 12 

Hefner, John C, JrV 10 

Hefner, Phillip F., JrV 10; PB 69 

Heil, Carla L., SrV 24 

Heineman, Janet M., JrV 11; M 16; 
M 63 

Heitzman, Stephen E., PB 64 
Heitzman, William B., F 39 
Helberg, Ronald L., JrV 11 
Helgren, Sherry L., SrV 24 
Helm, Richard E., JrV 11; PB 54; PB 

33 
Helms, Lee B., JrV 11 
Helton, Donnie G., JrV 11 
Henderson. Carolyn A., SrV 24 
Henderson, Dennis J., JrV 11 
Henderson, Kathleen P., SrV 24 

Henderson, Patricia A., TC 10; SrV 
24 

Henderson, Robert E., PB 64 

Henderson, Terry L., PB 46 

Hendricks, Barbara J., SrV 25 

Hendrix, Randal R., PB 71 

Hendryx, Charles M., Esq 44 

Hendryx, Tena, Esq 44 

Hennigan, Jerome S., PB 57 

Henry, Cynthia L., JrV 11 

Henry, Judy B., PB 38 

Henslee, Dianne L., M 15 

Hensley, Diane, M 25 

Hentges, Robert N., JrV 11 

Herbert, Toni P., SrV 25 

Herell, Janice K., SrV 25 

Herman, Betsy, JrV 11 

Herman, James, SrV 25 

Hernandez, Antonio L., Esq 38 

Hernandez, Olivia, Esq 38 

Herpich, Lynn H., SrV 25; F 18 

Herrera, Rafael, Esq 38; SrV 25 

Herring, John W., Esq 5; TC 23; TC 
25; SrV 25 

Hervey, John D., SrV 25 

Hervey, Karol H., SrV 25 

Hess, David A., JrV 11 

Hester, James A., PB 63 

Hettler, Dianne U., SrV 25 

Hettler, Felix, T 46 

Heyden, Richard L., JrV 11 

Heye, Randall G., PB 25 

Hiatt, Melody S., JrV 11; M 57; F 17 

Hibbs, William R., JrV 11 

Hicks, Christopher J,, PB 52 

Higgins, John W., PB 64; SrV 25 

Hightower, Jack D., PB 45 

Hightower Larry R., PB 26 

Hightower, Lynch, SrV 25 

Hilbun, Joseph B., Esq 8; PB 66 

Hilburn, Shirley J., SrV 25 

Hileman, Dair L., Esq 31; PB 42 

Hileman, Mark M., SrV 25 

Hill, Bill. PB 46 

Hill, Brenda L., M 67; JrV 11; Esq 
6; PB 38 

Hill, Byron S., PB 60 

Hill, Donald C, PB 41; PB 33 

Hill, Douglas, PB 41 

Hill, James W., PB 45 

Hill, Jan, JrV 11 

Hill, Rocky, JrV 11; PB 71 

Hill, Joe D., SrV 25 

Hill, Joe E., PB 45 

Hill, Jon W., SI 7 

Hill, Kathryn P., SrV 25 

Hill. Roy B.. SrV 25 

Hill, Sherry L., SrV 25 

Hill, Skip, PB 46 

Hill, Shirley A., SrV 25 

Hillam, Marty, JrV U 



Hilliard, Kaye, M 57 

Hilliard. Ronald L., SrV 25 

Hilton, Gary J., Esq 42; Esq 37; SrV 
25 

Hilton, Neil M., PB 46 

Hiltpold, John S., JrV 11 

Hinchey, Ida J., M 49; JrV 11 

Hindes, Carol A., SrV 25 

Hines, Gaynelle, JrV II 

Hines, Larry E., JrV 11; PB 20 

Hinnant, Ray T., TC 40 

Hinojosa. Gracie, Esq 38; SrV 25 

Hinojosa. Maricela H.. Esq 38 

Hinsley, Aaron J.. SrV 25 

Hinson. Kathy M., SrV 25 

Hinton. Robert C, SrV 25 

Hipes, Jorjanna B., SrV 25 

Hitchcock. Karen G.. TC 11; TC 10; 
M 25; M 21 

Hix. Thomas R.. PB 51 

Hoback. Robert S., FrV 15 

Hobbs, Dalton G., SrV 25 

Hobbs, Jan B., SrV 25 

Hobbs, Lee D.. Esq 44; PB 72; PB 
46; F 39 

Hockstra, Pamela A., FrV 15 

Hodges, Charles M., FrV 15; PB 15 

Hodges, Deborah S., FrV 15 

Hodges, Johnny L., FrV 15 

Hodges, Linda B., JrV 11; Esq 41 

Hodges, Mark, PB 60; SrV 25 

Hodges, Paul K.. SrV 25; F 39 

Hodges. Sue A.. JrV 11 

Hodges. William L.. PB 72 

Hodgson. Edward S.. PB 46 

Hodgson, Marjorie W., FrV 15; M 
59 

Hoel, Johnny M., SrV 25 

Hoff, Gerald L., PB 46 

Hoffman, Cathy R., M 32 

Hoffman, Lynne R., T 47; JrV U 

Hoffman, Theodore C.,SrV 25 

Hoffman, Thomas A., FrV 16 

Hoffmann. William H.. FrV 16 

Hogan. Charles F.. FrV 16 

Hogan, Clare M., FrV 16 

Hogan, Jimmy A., F 22; SrV 25 

Hoggard, Carl W., FrV 16 

Hogsett, Timothy W.. FrV 16 

Hogue, Diana F.. M 45; PB 8; PB 35 

Hoing, Joe L., FrV 16 

Holahan, Doris J., FrV 16 

Holcomb, Carolyn E., SrV 25 

Holcomb. Susan M.. SrV 26 

Holden, Gerry L., JrV 11; M 29 

Holden. Peggy; FrV 16; M 57 

Holder. Barbara E., SrV 26; F 17 

Holder. Judy. M 67 

Holder. Wendell, TC 40 

Holguin, Sonny F., Esq 38 

Holladay, Michael L., SI 7 

Holland, Danny G., SrV 26 

HoHand. David R.. SrV 26 

Holland. Eddie R., TC 29; TC 33; 
TC 32; JrV 11 

Holland, James P., FrV 16 

Holland, Jay W., Esq 45 

Holland, Johnnie M., SrV 26 

Holland, Michael M., PB 63 

Hollar, Douglas W., TC 31; SrV 26 

Holleman. Becky. FrV 16 

Holley, Joseph A., SrV 26; F 39 

Hollcy, Larry J., PB 26 

Holliday, William D., PB 71 

Hollingsworth, Linda A., FrV 16 

Hollingsworth, Margie E., FrV 16 

Hollingsworth, Melinda, JrV 11 

Hollingsworth, Sam T,, JrV 11 

Hollis, Gerald, JrV 11 

Hollis, Ray A., PB 51 

Hollis, Richard G., TC 24 



Freshman View — 45 



"W 



Holloman, Stephen C. SoV 13 

Holloway, Cassandra, SoV 13 

Holloway. Lynn, SoV 13; M 15 

Holloway, Shirley J., SrV 26 

Holmes. Bruce L.. FrV 16 

Holmes. Julia E.. FrV 16 

Holmes. Kay. M 63; JrV 11 

Holmes. Lyndsay. M 21; FrV 16 

Holmes, Roy L., JrV 11 

Holmes, Sally J., FrV 16 

Holmes, Sharon B.. SoV 13 

Holmes, Stephen L., FrV 16 

Holmes, William B., FrV 16 

Holsberry, Bobbie R., JrV 11; Esq 34 

Holt, Aubrey L., JrV 11 

Holt, Jerry D.. PB 63 

Holze. Karen L.. JrV 11 

Holzmer. Paul J.. FrV 16 

Homan. Sallie A., JrV 11 

Honea. Janice K., SoV 13 

Honig, Emanuel M., SrV 26 

Honig, Nancy E., JrV II 

Hood, Leamon, FrV 16 

Hooker, Jeffrey B., FrV 16 

Hooper, Beth, M 28 

Hooper, Donna G., M 45 

Hooper, Dwayne, SoV 13 

Hooper. Kay L., T 48 

Hooser, Pamela J., M 63 

Hopkins, Anita L., SrV 26 

Hopkins, Jeffrey, SoV 13 

Hopkins, Margaret A., TC 27 

Horner, Richard E., SoV 13 

Hord, Susan J., FrV 16; M 59 

Horn, Marilyn K., JrV 11 

Home. Gary A., JrV 11 

Home. Valerie, FrV 16 

Horner, Nancy, FrV 16 

Homer, Richard E., SoV 13 

Horney, Guy W., TC 36 

Horridge, Richard L., SrV 26; PB 72 

Horsman, Barbara A., FrV 16; Esq 9 

Horst, Beckie J., L 35 

Horst, Larry R., FrV 16 

Hortman, Michael. Esq 40 

Horton, Barbara E., FrV 16 

Horton, Billy D., JrV 12; PB 72 

Horton, Debra S., SoV 13 

Horton, John A., SrV 26 

Horton, Linda F., Esq 45 

Horton, Nancy C;, SrV 26 

Horton, Paul G., PB 63; SoV 13 

Horton, Robert L., SrV 26; PB 41 

Hoskins. Lee R.. PB 20; FrV 16 

Hough. Jamie K.. FrV 16; M 67 

Hough. Janice L.. FrV 16 

Hough. Robin L., SoV 13 

Houghton. Deborah A.. FrV 16; M 
67 

Houghton. Nancy M.. M 65 

Houghton. Rodney A.. JrV 12; Esq 

42 

Houp. Claudia. FrV 16 

House. Katy V.. FrV 16 

Houser. Gerald N., PB 52 

Houser. James P.. PB 52; SoV 1} 

Houston. Philip C. StV 26 

Houston. Tyra L.. JrV 12 

Howard. Cathy S.. JrV 12 

Howard. Donna, FrV 16 

Howard, Jimmy K., PB 51 

Howard, Johnny L.. SI 7, 11. 52 

Howard. Matt E.. PB 6); SoV 13 

Howard. Randal L.. JrV 12 

Howard. Richard E.. TC 30 

Howe. Uivid C. JrV 12 

Howe. Don J.. PB 52 

Howe. Helen. FfV 16 

Howe. Linda J., SoV 13; TC 12 



Howell. Charles C. SrV 26 

Howell, Diane, SoV 13 

Howell, Dixie L.. M 25; SoV 13 

Howell. Dwayne, FtV 16 

Howell, Edward, SoV 13 

Howell, Harry, TC 30 

Howell, James L., FrV 16 

Howell, Joe, JrV 12 

Howell, Margaret A., M 21; FrV 16 

Howell. Paula, M. 67 

Howell. Rebecca L.. SrV 26; M 21 

Howell, Richard L.. SrV 26 

Hoxworth. David W., SrV 26 

Hoyle, Andrew N., SI 7 

Hubbard, David, SrV 27 

Hubbard, Linda G., SrV 27 

Huber, Holly, M 59; SoV 1} 

Hubert, J. D., FrV 16 

Hubly. Anton. FrV 16 

Huchton, Thomas P., JrV 12 

Huckabay. John M., PB 54 

Huckabee. Mark E.. SoV 13 

Huckaby. Diane. FrV 16 

Huddleston. Diane C. SrV 27 

Huddleston. Wendell E.. M 33 

Hudgens. Robert D.. JrV 12 

Hudnall, Wayne H., SrV 27 

Hudson. Cynthia R.. FrV 16 

Hudson. Elizabeth K., SrV 27 

Hudson. Janice A.. SoV 13 

Hudspeth. Gary B.. PB 66; SoV 13 

Hudspeth. Glenda S.. SrV 27 

Huemmer. Jeff. SoV 13 

Huereca. Michael. FrV 16 

Huff, Richard T., SrV 27 

Huff, Robert C, PB 25; SoV 13 

Huff. William W., JrV 12 

Huf faker, Chloie J.. TC 10 

Huffaker, Donna C. FrV 16 

Huffaker. Man. M 57 

Huffaker, Mike J.. SrV 27 

Huffaker. Nena R.. M 57; M 17; Esq 
2 

Huffman. Laura S.. FrV 16 

Hugg. Steven B.. FrV 16 

Hughes. Carroll. PB 16; SrV 27 

Hughes. Cheryl L.. JrV 12 

Hughes. Dalton. FrV 16 

Hughes, Don G., FrV 16 

Hughes. James R., SoV 13 

Hughes. James W., F 23 

Hughes. John C. L 12; FrV 16 

Hughes. Lana K.. FrV 16 

Hughes. Lark. JrV 12 

Hughes. Linda. SrV 27 

Hughes. Linda G.. SrV 27 

Hughes. Randy, PB 41 

Hughes, Terry L., M 45; SoV 13 

Hughes, James E., FrV 16 

Hughs, Victor O., SrV 27; TC 10; M 
21 

Hull. Cathryn Z.. PB 38 

Hulne. Vickie. SoV 13 

Hulse, Mary Ann. SrV 27 

Hulse, Nancy R.. JrV 12 

Hulsey. Michael C. SrV 27 

Hummer. Jeff. PB 20 

Humphreys. Judy A.. JrV 12 

Humphries. David. PB 41 

Hungerford. David M.. SoV 13; TC 
40 

Hunnicutl. Elise. SrV 27 

Hunnicult. Michael A.. JrV 12 

Hunt. Billy W.. JrV 12 

Hunt. Jimmie. SrV 27 

Hunt. Lota L.. PB 30; M 4) 

Hunt. Mary S.. SrV 27 

Hunt. Patricia V.. SrV 27 

Hunt. Sue. SoV 13 

Hunt. Tamora. FrV 16 



Hunter. Cathryn E.. SrV 27 
Hunter, James S.. PB 51 
Hunter. Jeffrey T.. PB 51; SoV 13 
Hunter. Kent D.. JrV 12 
Hunter. Kirk E.. PB 25 
Hunter. Rita G.. JrV 12 
Hunter. Sue, SoV 13 
Hurley, Cathy, JrV 12 
Hurley, Mac L., JrV 12 
Hurley, Nabeth. JrV 12 
Hurley. Troy C, SrV 2 
Hum. Mary A.. FrV 16 
Huron. Sylvia A.. Esq 38 
Hurst. Craig E.. FrV 16 
Hurst, Harold L., SI 7 
Hurst, James D,, PB 57 
Hurst, Rickey L., PB 52 
Hurst, Ronald C. SrV 27 
Hurster. John G.. FrV 16 
Hurt. Gregg R., SrV 27 
Hurt. Stanley. PB 52 
Husban. William B.. PB 32 
Husen, Richard L.. JrV 12 
Huser, William G.. TC 40 
Hutchens, Michael C. PB 54 
Hutcheson. Stephanie S., JrV 12 
Hutchins. Betty. SrV 27 
Hutchins. Sherry A.. SrV 27 
Hutchinson. Beth SoV 13 
Hutchinson. John L.. SrV 2 
Hutchinson. Ronnie L.. SrV 27 
Hutchison. Jo Linda. SrV 27 
Hutchison. Rebecca F.. SoV 13 
Hutchison. Susan L.. JrV 12 
Hutton. Carolyn K.. JrV 12 
Hutton. Dmscilla J.. M 15; SoV 13 
Hutton. William T.. SrV 27 
Hyatt. Jane N.. FrV 16 
Hybskmann. Ann. M 40; SrV 27 
Hyman, Harold. SrV 27 
Hyso. Oscar T.. Esq 45 
Hyso. Wilnette E., Esq 45 



Ibanez, Deirdre A., JrV 12 
Ihrke. Terry R.. FrV 16 
Imel. Jerry C. JrV 12 
Ince, Jim. SrV 27; F 39 
Ingels. Donn F.. SoV 13 
Ingle. Laurie. SoV 13 
Ingle. Roger I.. PB 46 
Ingraham. Rhoda M.. SrV 27 
Ingram. Cleophas L.. JrV 12 
Ingram. Dickie G., FrV 16 
Ingram. Keith E.. JrV 12; PB 72 
Ingram. Phillip C. PB 54 
Ingram. Vivian B.. JrV 12 
Inman. Betty L., Esq 45 

Inmon, Ernest C, TC 23; JrV 12; PB 

16 

Irby. Carie L.. FrV 16 
Ireland. Evelyn. M 15; Esq 41 
Itlbeck. Paul L.. JrV 12 
Irvin. Jerry L.. Esq 45 
Irvin. Karl ?.. SrV 4 
Irvins. Cynthia. M 31; SoV 15 
Irvine. Glenda. SoV 13 
Irwin. Jon E., SrV 27 
Irwiii. Nancy J.. FrV 16 
Irwin, Robert. SI 48 
Ischy. Noel D.. JrV 12; PB 20 
Isom. Deborah K.. M 45 
Ivie. Nancy E.. SoV 13 
Ivie. Sandra C, T 48 
Ivy, Ann J., SrV ^7 
Ivy, Danny C. SrV 27 
burd, Gcorxe E.. TC 27 

J 
Jtcks. Gcoffe. SrV 27; T 4] 



Jackson, Carol, M 45 

Jackson, Gary A., FrV 16 

Jackson. Gerald G.. FrV l6 

Jackson. Janice J.. M 65 

Jackson. Jim. M 57 

Jackson. Judee C. M 29; SoV 13; M 
26 

Jackson, Matjorie. SoV 13 

Jackson. Michael. FrV 16 

Jackson. Nicholas. SrV 27; PB 63 

Jackson, Ricky, SoV 13 

Jackson, Phillip G.. PB 69 

Jackson. Steve P.. JrV 12 

Jackson. Susan. FrV 16 

Jacobo. Maria C. Esq 38 

Jacobs. Henry. SrV 28; PB 66 

Jacobs. Judith A.. FrV 16 

Jacobsen. Douglas L.. JrV 12 

Jacobsen. Jan K.. SoV 14 

Jacobson. Judith E.. SoV 14 

Jacoby. Cynthia N.. M 45 

Jacoby. Mark A.. FrV 16 

Jamail. Carol A.. SoV 14 

James. Christopher B.. PB 20; SoV 14 

James. Cynthia C. M 17 

James. Don R.. JrV 12 

James. Janice E.. M 32 

James. Joan B., F 17; JrV 12 

James. Mary L.. JrV 12 

James. Tonya R.. FrV 16 

Jameson, Dean G., SoV 14 

Jamieson, James R., F 24 

Jarmon, Elizabeth L.. FrV 16 

Jarnigan. Steven, PB 63 

Jarratt. Janean. SoV 14 

Jarrell, James L., JrV 12 

Jariett, Mickey, Esq. 9; FrV 16 

Jarvis, Pamela R., M 59; SrV 28 

Jay. William L., PB 51 

Jaynes. Diane C. M 29; SoV 14 

Jeanis, Lynda N., FrV 16 

Jeansonne, Gene T., SrV 27; TC 24 

Jenkins, David, SoV 14 

Jenkins. Diana. JrV 12 

Jenkins. Donna R.. FrV 16 

Jenkins, Jerald F.. SoV 14 

Jenkins. Judith G., M 26; M 17; Esq 
5; M 59; SrV 28; TC 30 

Jenkins. Karen G.. PB 35 

Jenkins, Karen J.. FrV 16 

Jenkins, Michael L.. SrV 28 

Jenkins. Susan K.. FrV 16; M 43 

Jennings, Anne, SoV 14; M 1) 

Jennings, Curtis W.. PB 25; PB 33 

Jennings. Dennis R., JrV 12 

Jennings. Gordon G.. FrV 16 

Jennings. Grady L., SrV 28 

Jennings. Janet L., JrV 12 

Jennings. Joan. SoV 4 

Jennings. Joe B.. SrV 28; TC 23 

Jennings. Marsella. SrV 28 

Jennings, Patrick L.. SoV 14 

Jent. Karen R,. SoV 14; T 48 

Jernigan. Anita L.. SrV 28 

Jernigan, Harlan B.. SrV 28 

Jernigan. Verna L.. SoV 14 

Jessup. Karen S.. M 57; SoV 14 

Jewell. Sherry L., FrV 16 

Jobe. Billy C, SoV 14 

Jobe. Jack P.. SrV 28 

Jobe. Lloyd P.. SrV 28; F 21 

Jochen. Donald R.. FrV 16; PB 17 

Johns. Brcnda C. FrV 16 

Johns. Patti. JrV 12 

Johns. Susan, JrV 12 

Johnson. Beverly A.. FrV 16 

Johnson. Beverly S.. M 40; JrV 12 

Johnson, Billy W.. JrV 12 

Johnson. Bruce A.. FrV 16 

Johnson. Byron E.. PB 66; SrV 2S 



tl 



46 — Freshman View 



E!l 



*t 



Johnson, Carl F., SrV 28 
Johnson, Carl J., F 39 
Johnson, Catherine C., FrV 17 
Johnson, David J., SrV 28 
Johnson, David S., SI 20, 23 
Johnson, Debra J., FrV 17 
Johnson, Deydcr, JrV 12 
Johnson, Donald L., SrV 28 
Johnson, Donna G.,'M 49 
Johnson, Eren, M 17; M 45 
Johnson, Frank M., PB 52 

Johnson, Gail F., M 67; SoV 14; Esq 

2 

Johnson. Glynda H., JrV 12 

Johnson, Harry L., JrV 12 

Johnson, Howard N., FrV 17; T 24 

Johnson, Janet L., FrV 17 

Johnson, Jimmie W., SrV 28 

Johnson, John A. FrV 17 

Johnson, Judy O., JrV 12 

Johnson, Karen L., T 39; M 17; Esq 
7, 5, 31; SrV 28 

Johnson, Karen M., M 63 

Johnson, Karron S., FrV 17 

Johnson, Margaret A., JrV 12 

Johnson, Mary B,, JrV 12; L 28 

Johnson, Michael B., PB 25 

Johnson, Miles E., SrV 28 

Johnson. Patricia SoV 14 

Johnson, Patsy M., M 63 

Johnson, Phillip N., PB 66; SrV 28 

Johnson. Richard P., SrV 28 

Johnson, Rita I.. StV 28 

Johnson, Rob. FrV 17 

Johnson, Robert A., SoV 14 

Johnson, Roger D.. JrV 12 

Johnson. Ronnie, PB 25 

Johnson, Shirley C, FrV 17 

Johnson, Steven L., FrV 17 

Johnson, Thomas M.. FrV 17 

Johnson, Tricia A.. FrV 17 

Johnson. Vern F.. SrV 4 

Johnson. Warren H., SrV 28 

Johnston, Billy D., FrV 17 

Johnston. Dee, FrV 17 

Johnston, Edmund, SrV 28 

Johnston, James H., JrV 12 
Johnston, Janett, JrV 12 

Johnston, Richard, PB 46 

Johnston. Tandy. FrV 17 

Johnston, Thomas R.. JrV 12 

Johnstone. Beverly A.. FrV 17 

Joiner. Gerre G.. SrV 28 

Joiner. JoAnn. SrV 28 

Joiner. John S.. PB 57 

Joiner. Robert C. JrV 12 

Jolly. Nancy E.. M 65 

Jones. Ann E.. FrV 17 

Jones. Ardena. SrV 28 

Jones. Barbara R.. M 59 

Jones. Barbara Y.. FrV 17 

Jones. Belva L.. SrV 5 

Jones. Bernicc E.. SrV 28 

Jones. Beverly A.. T 39; M 25; M 59 

Jones. Bill F.. PB 33; JrV 12 

Jones. Billy F.. PB 25 

Jones. Bobby B.. PB 25 

Jones. Bruce. FrV 17 

Jones. Bruce W.. JrV 12 

Jones. Burl J., SoV 14 

Jones. Camille A.. Esq 6; PB 37; M 

67 

Jones. Carl D.. TC 27; TC 33 
Jones. Carol A.. SoV 14; M 21 
Jones. Cathy. M 43 
Jones. Cindy. JrV 12 
Jones. Craig A.. PB 22; PB 2} 
Jones, Cynthia D., F 20; F 17; M 27 
Jones, Debra A.. M 43 
Jones, Diane. FrV 17 



Jones. Doyle D.. F 22 

Jones. Gary. F 22 

Jones. Graig. SoV 14 

Jones. Hal C. FrV 17 

Jones, Helen, SoV 14 

Jones, Homer E., TC 31 

Jones. Houston C. SrV 28 

Jones. Isaac B., SrV 28 

Jones. Jacqueline C, M 59; M 40; 
SrV 28 

Jones. Jan. M 67 

Jones. Jana. TC 11; TC 10; JrV 12 

Jones. Jane A., FrV 17 

Jones, Janice G.. M 40 

Jones, Janice K., L 16 

Jones. Janis L.. PB 35; M 65 

Jones, Jerry D., JrV 12 

Jones, Jessica A., L 2. 20 

Jones. Jill, FrV 17; M 59 

Jones, Jimmie A., SoV 14; Esq 4 

Jones, Joan C, SrV 28 

Jones, John A., SoV 14 

Jones, Julia E., M 25; SoV 14 

Jones, Katherine E., SrV 28 

Jones, Kenneth W., PB 57 

Jones. Kerry H.. TC 24; PB 72 

Jones. Lanny D., FrV 17 

Jones, Linda C, JrV 12 

Jones, Linda K., M 21 

Jones, Linda L., FrV 17 

Jones, Marcus E., PB 46 

Jones, Marjorie R.. SrV 28 

Jones, Martha C, FrV 17 

Jones, Mickey, SrV 28 

Jones, Mike, FrV 17 

Jones. Nan. M 15; SoV 14 

Jones, Peggy J., FrV 17 

Jones, Randy P., PB 60 

Jones, Rebecca, SoV 14 

Jones, Richard L.. FrV 17 

Jones. Rita B.. FrV 17 

Jones. Ronald G.. FrV 17 

Jones. Stanley R., SrV 29 

Jones, Stephen P., PB 25 

Jones, Susan K., SoV 14 

Jones, Sydrey, FrV 17 

Jones, Ted S., FrV 17 

Jones. Terry L.. SoV 14 

Jones. Thomas L., SrV 29 

Jones, Tom W., FrV 17 

Jones, Valda G.. JrV 12 

Jones. Vickie, FrV 17 

Jones, William T., SrV 29 

Jordan, Bob, FrV 17 

Jordan, Dennis, PB 25 

Jordan. Eddie. JrV 12 

Jordan, Herman, PB 51 

Jordan, Larry B.. TC 30 

Jordan. Linda J.. M 43 

Jordan. Robert G.. SrV 29 

Jordan. Ronny J.. JrV 12; F 24 

Journey, Jack R., PB 51 

Joyce, Donald G., SrV 29 

Judd, Gary W., SrV 29 

Julsonnet, Richard B., SrV 29; PB 41 

Jungerman. Kathryn L.. SrV 29; TC 
10 

Juricek. Joan. SrV 29 

Justice. Deborah S.. FrV 17 

Justice. Gary L.. PB 60; JrV 12 

K 

Kaberline. Eugene. SI 24, 25 
Kaelber, Margaret E.. FrV 17; M 63 
Kahlich. Luke C. SoV 14 
Kalina. Janeen M.. M 49; T 29 
Kalinec. Steve. SoV 14 
KammJah. Joseph A.. SrV 29 
Kamp, Michael C, JrV 12; Esq 44 



Kapalka, Ronald W., SrV 29 

Karcher. James H.. JrV 12 

Karnel. Tana S.. SoV 14 

Karr. Dan C. SoV 14 

Kattenbach. William C, PB 42 

Kattmann, Bruce, PB 51 

Kattner, Kenneth R., SI 6; SI 7; SI 
53 

Kauffman, Herbert L., SrV 29 

Kawazce, Richard L., JrV 12 

Kay, Gayle. SoV 14 

Kay. Jan. FrV 17 

Kay. Karen S.. FrV 17 

Kay. Marilyn G.. M 29 

Kagem. Laurie J.. SoV 15 

Kearney. Betty A.. M 32. 65 

Keast. David G.. FrV 17 

Keating. John E., F 22 

Keel. Rita J., F 17; SrV 29 

Keele. James D.. FrV 17 

Keeling, David. TC 40 

Keeling. George R., PB 52 

Keenan, Karan G.. SoV 15 

Keener. James W.. FrV 17 

Keener. Kathy A., FrV 17 

Keeney, Jon R., SoV 15 

Keeter, Carolyn, T 29; SoV 15; M 1; 
F 18 

Keeton, Andy H., PB 41 

Keeton, David, PB 25 

Keffer, Kathlyne, PB 6; M 67 

Kelen, Michael, SoV 15 

Keller. Ann M.. SrV 29 

Kellett. Ann. FrV 17 

Kelley. Charlene S.. M 21 

Kelley. David. PB 60 

Kelley. Gary D.. SoV 15 

Kelley. Janet M.. M 43; JrV 12 

Kelley. Joseph T., PB 71 

Kelley. Kathleen L.. FrV 17 

Kelley. Lynne. SoV 15 

Kelley. Michael W.> JrV 12 

Kellow, Robert C, PB 20 

Kelly. Betty C, JrV 12; F 20; F 17 

Kelly, Joan F., SoV 15 

Kelly, John C. FrV 17 

Kelly. John M., PB 63 

Kelly. Wade, SoV 15 

Kelsey, Joe C, PB 46 

Kemp. Jerry L.. SrV 29 

Kemp. Linda M.. SoV 15 

Kemp, Mary A., FrV 17 

Kemp. Melinda P., SoV 15 

Kemp. Melissa R., SoV 15 

Kemp. Robert D.. FrV 18 

Kempson, Patsy A.. T 48; M 67 

Kendall. William F.. PB 69 

Kendrick. Mickye A., FrV 18 

Kendrick, Robert A., SrV 30; TC 22; 
TC 24 

Kenley, Paul D.. SrV 30; PB 72 

Kennedy, Christie A., F 15 

Kennedy, Deborah L., T 11; JrV 12 

Kennedy, George S., TC 27; TC 28; 
JrV 12 

Kennedy, Jack D., PB 45; M 39 

Kennedy, Jane K., SoV 15 

Kennedy, Jane, FrV 18 

Kennedy, Janice D., M 43 

Kennedy. Pat. FrV 18 

Kennedy, Thomas B., SoV 15; PB 41 

Kenney. Christopher L.. SoV 15 

Kent. Alan D.. SoV 15 

Kenyon. Edward K.. SrV 30 

Keown. Karen A., SrV 30 

Kephart. Todd N.. FrV 18 

Kerby. Dana B.. SrV 30 

Kerr, Andrew L., PB 60; JrV 12; PB 

72 
Kerr, Karen K., JrV 12 
Kerr, Michael D., JrV 12 



Kersey. Kathleen A.. FrV 18 

Kersh. Ronald C. TC 27; TC 29 

Ketchum. Gary, SoV 15 

Kettle. Joyce D., M 25; M 45 

Key, Sharman L., SoV 15 

Keyton. Gary D.. FrV 18 

Keyton, Glenn T., F 39 

Khubuer, Davaid, SoV 15 

Kibler, William J., T 45 

Kidd, Beverly S., FrV 18 

Kidd, Rhonda E., SoV 15 

Kidwell, Patricia A., SoV 15; M 63 

Kidwell, Thomas P., FrV 18 

Kieschnick, Judy G., M 32 

Kiesling, Louise E., JrV 12 

Kight, Richard T.. PB 69 

Kilby. Robert J.. FrV 18 

Kilcrease, Julia H.. M 57; FrV 18 

Kilduff. Robert J., FrV 18 

Kilgore, Larry W., PB 42 

Kiljan, Garry J., FrV 18 

Killian, Jan M., SoV 15 

Killip, Elizabeth A., Esq 45; JrV 12 

Kilness, Beverly J., SoV 15; M 57 

Kilpatrick. Leigh A.. T 48 

Kilroy. Walter R., JrV 12 

Kimbal, Roy G., PB 69 

Kimbrougii, Dennis R.. F 32 

Kimbrough. Jimmy, SrV 30; F 22 

Kimbrough, Nancy B.. M 49 

Kimbrough. Nancy. SoV 15 

Kimmel. Maxine. FrV 18 

Kincaid. Ann R., SrV 30 

Kincaid, Eddie, FrV 18 

Kincaid, James G., TC 23; SrV 30 

Kincannon, Peggy R.. Esq 5; Esq 6; 
M 59; SrV 30 

Kincer, Alfred L., SrV 30 

Kinechelve. Allen, JrV 12 

King. Carcle J.. FrV 18 

King. Chris. FrV 18, T 45 

King, Chrystina C. M 59 

King. Cynthia K., SoV 15 

King. Diane S.. FrV 18 

King. Gary M.. SI 48 

King. James R.. JrV 12 

King. Janice E., FrV 18; M 59 

King. Julie A.. JrV 12; F 17 

King, Karen L., Esq 44; JrV 12 

King, Larry, SrV 30; PB 66 

King. Larry G., TC 40 

King. Larry R.. JrV 12 

King. Marta L., FrV 18 

King. Mary E.. SrV 30 

King. Pamela E.. M 45 

King. Pamela J., SrV 30 

King. Robert R.. PB 52 

King. Vicki M.. FrV 18 

King. William E.. SoV 15 

Kingsbery. Teddy R.. PB 54 

Kingsbery. Terry C. PB 25 

Kingsbury. Kathy L.. JrV 12; Esq 41 

Kinslow. Mark. SoV 15 

Kinman, Frankie J.. FrV 18 

Kinney. Frances A.. M 21; FrV 18 

Kinney. Freida K., FrV 18 

Kinsey, Betty J., FrV 18 

Kinsey, Ella S., JrV 13; F 20 

Kinslow, Diana K., Jr 13 

Kinslow, Ronald C, FrV 18 

Kinsolving, Mary L., JrV 13 

Kirby, James W., FrV 18 

Kirby, Ronald C, SrV 30; TC 30 

Kirby, Ruth, SrV 2 

Kirchhoff, Martha, FrV 18 

Kirk, Donna K., SoV 15 

Kirk, Pamela J., M 57; L 16; JrV 13; 
L 28 

Kirk. Randal B.. PB 20; FrV 18 

Kirk, Thomas B.. PB 25 



Freshman View — 47 



Klrkham. Margaret M., FrV 18 

Kirkland. Sherry E.. JrV 13 

Kirkpateidc. Daryl L., SoV 15 

Kirkpatrick. Lynn, SoV 13: M 40; M 
43 

Kirkpatrick, Terry, TC 27; FrV 18 

Kiser, Mary B., SoV 15 

Kiser, Sammy C, SrV 30 

Kiser. Stacy, FrV 18 

Kisler. Deborah A., M 67 

Kisner, Keith E., PB 46 

Kiaer. Robert D., PB 63; PB 54 

Klaes, Eugenia F., JrV 13 

Klatt, Peggy J., JtV 13 

Klattenhoff, Lynda G., JrV 13 

Kleibrink. Royal E.. SrV 30: PB 72 

Kleinman, Harry, SoV 15 

Klein, Katherine A., JrV 15 

Kleinert, John Z., SI 7; SI 6 

Kleinknecht, Linda M., JrV 13 

Kleinknecht. Patricia A.. M 57; FrV 
18 

Kleman, Billy J., FrV 18 

Klepper, Gary D., FrV 18 

Klesel, Judy P., SrV 30 

Kleuser, Thomas M., SoV 15; PB 46; 

Esq 57 

Kline, Thomas J., PB 60 

Klose, Randall M., FrV 18 

Klous, Donna D., JrV 13 

Knieriem, Karen M., JrV 13 

Knight, Bobby, JrV 13 

Knight, Donna E., SrV 30: Esq 45 

Knight, Elizabeth W., SrV 30 

Knight, Karen S., SoV 15 

Knight, Kathleen M., FrV 18 

Knight, Kay L., FrV 18 

Knight, RiU J.. SrV 30 

Knight. Robbie. FrV 18 

Knight, Robert T.. SI 24 

Knight. Steven J., JrV 13: PB 52 

Knolle, Gene, SI 23, 19, 27 

Knoll, Patsy, SoV 15 

Knott, Charles E., SrV 3 

Knowles, Tommy R., SrV 31; TC 24; 
TC 22 

Knox, Donna J., SrV 31: F 20 

Knox, John A., PB 19: SoV 15 

Knox. Linda L.. SrV 31 

Knox. Sandra K.. SrV 31 

Knox. Stephen O.. SoV 15 

Knox, Susan K., Esq 45 

Knuckley. Albert P., PB 60 

Kocsis, Jenci J., PB 69 

Kocurek, Joseph E.. JrV 13 

Kocurek, Judith E.. SoV 15 

Koehler, Mike, PB 25 

Koen, Michael E., FrV 18 

Koenig, Cheryl L., SoV 15 

Koeninger, Don W.. PB 57 

Koester. Barbara H., JrV 13 

Koester, Barbara H., JrV 13 

Kolander, Jerome M.. SrV 3 

Kolander, Kathy. SoV 15: M 4} 

Kolinsky, Jaleen M., SrV 31 

Koonar, Sinia, SoV 15 

Koonce, Karlcne A.. SoV 15 

Korbach. Debra A., FrV 18 

Korona, Sandra M.. M 26; M 43: M 

25; T 29 

Kot. Edward J., PB 69 

Kothman, Beth, M 33; M 25; M 4) 

Kotis, Edward C, SrV 31 

Kott, Sallye D., SrV 31 

Kowaliki, Louis D., PB 52; Efq < 

Koy, Darid, T 45 

Kramme, Charles K.. JrV 13 

Kratch. Kenneth. FrV 18 

Kraus, Linda K., M 43: FrV 19 

Kraiue. David M.. JtV 1) 



Krause, Gary R. JrV 13: PB 66 

Krause, Mary L.. SrV 31 

Krauss, Jeffrey A., SoV 15 

Kiauss, Kerry L., SoV 15 

Kristlcr, Annette, JrV 13 

Krister, Moyan, JrV 13 

Krohn, Lynn, F 18: JrV 13 

Krumm, Kent M., Esq 45; SrV 31 

Kruss, Jim, FrV 19 

Kuehler, Anthony D.. PB 69; TC 22; 
TC 24: JrV 13 

Kuehn, James H.. PB 60 

Kulpaca. Sul. SoV 15 

Kunkel. Karen L., JrV 13 

Kunkel. Leonard W., SrV 31 

Kuntz, James E. 

Kuntz, Patricia D., SrV 31 

Kupp, Nancy M.. M 63: JrV 13 

Kusenberger. Dennis D.. SoV 15 

Kutner. Patricia K.. M 57 

Kuttlicz. Linda. JrV 13 

Kwilcsz. Kathryn A.. FrV 19; PB 31; 
PB 17 

Kyle. Bobbie B., SrV 31 

Kyle, Peter W., PB 60 

Kyle. William E.. PB 60 



Labenske, Deborah S., FrV 19 

Laborde. Jocarol. FrV 19 

Labus. Diane S., M 25 

Lacek. Martha A.. SoV 15 

Lack, Kathy M., FrV 19 

Lackey. Margaret W., SrV 31 

Lacy. Jerry W.. SrV 31 

Lacy. Rebecca A., JrV 13 

Ladd, Peter C, FiV 19 

Laduke. John C, FrV 19 

UGrane. Wayne. PB 64; PB 42 

Lacrone, John, PB 64 

Lail, James M.. F 23 

Lain, Raymond C, SrV 31 

Laird, Melissa. SoV 15: M 43 

Lairsen, Donna G., SoV 15 

Lakey. David J., SoV 15 

Lalla, Denise C. FrV 19 

Lam, Phillip N.. SrV 3 

Lamb. Arch K.. PB 63: StV 31 

Lamb, David F.. PB 41 

Lamb, Genia, SoV 13 

Lambert, Linda A., M 67; T 39; JiV 
13 

Lambert, Patricia A.. FiV 19 

Lamberth, John E., SrV 31; Esq 34 

Lambkin. George J.. SrV 31 

Lambright. Mary E.. SoV 15 

Lammert. Danny R.. SrV 31 

Lamont. Leslie A.. SoV 15 

Lanahan, Marvin J., SoV 15 

Landers. Thomas L., SoV 15; FB 26, 

72 

Landon, Dea R., SoV 15 
Landnmi, Gerald L., SrV 31 
Landrum, Joan E., PB 56; M 43 
Landusky, Urry J., JrV 13 
Lane, Carolyn K., SrV 31 
Lane, Daniel L., FrV 19 
Lane, Dennis R.. SI 11. 7, 33. 53 
Une. Linda J.. SrV 31 
Lane, Marvin J., PB 17 
Lane, Ricky D., SoV 15 
Une, Vicki M., SoV 15 
Uney, Mark W., SrV 3 
Lang, Danny L., SrV 31 
Lang, Eddie M.. Esq 34 
Lang, Janice G.. JrV 13 
Langdale, Patrice, FrV 19 
Lange, Allan J., TC 30; JrV 15 
Lange, David M., FrV 19 
Lange, Dennis A. 



Langehennig, Miles P., SI 13: SI 8; 
SI 2; PB 52: SI 7 

Langenstcin, Perry W., L 56 

Langford, James W., SrV 31 

Langford, Susan, SoV 15 

Langhome, Donald M., SrV 31 

Langley. Kathleen D., SrV 31 

Langley, Nancy A., M 59 

Lanham, Jill, M 57: SoV 15 

Lanier, Lynda D., SrV 31 

Laning, Landra K., JrV 13 

Lankford, Michael H., JrV 13 

Lapaglia. Mariann E., SrV 31 

Lara, Alice, SrV 30: Esq 38 

Larez, Freddie A., JrV 13 

Largcnt, Debra E. 

Larimore, Larry S., SrV 31 

Larkin. Barbara A., JrV 13 

Larobadiere, Robert D., SrV 31 

Larsen, Sherry K., FrV 19; SoV 15 

Larson, Charles J., SI 46; SoV 15 

Larson, Gary J., FrV 19 

Lasetcr, Donald L., JrV 13 

Lashley, Sharon L., JrV 13 

Lasiter, Cheryl D., FrV 19 

Lasiter, Johnny, SoV 15 

Lasiter, William O., JrV 13 

Lasley, Orland D., F 23; PB 23 

Latham, Gene, SrV 31 

Latham, James W., FrV 19 

Latimer, Lydia V., FrV 19 

Latson, Dana J., SoV 15 

Latson, Rickey C, SrV 31 

Latta, Ellen M., SrV 5 

Laundgrun, J. W., PB 2} 

Laux, Anne M., SoV 15: M 31 

Lavato, William, FrV 19 

Lavender, Jimmy D., SrV 31 

Law. Judy. FrV 19 

Law. Robert S., T 46 

Lawhorn. Milton C, SI 33 

Lawless, Thomas J., SrV 31 

Lawlis, Barbara L., Esq 43 

Lawlis, Betty S., Esq 45 

Lawlor, Pat, SoV 16 

Lawrence, Cuyler C, PB 46; SoV 16 
Lawrence, Gary D., SoV 16 

Lawrence, Robert L., JrV 13 
Lawrence, Thomas J., SrV 32 

Lawry, Mary R., JrV 13 

Lawston. J., FrV 19 

Lawson, Glenn H., SoV 16 

Lawson, Julia J.. FrV 19: M 63 

Lawson, Linda, FrV 19 

Lawson, Lynda B., JrV 13 

Lawson, Steven J., FrV 19 

Lawson, Susan L., SoV 16 

Lawson, Ted S., SI 7, 53 

Uyake, Cheryl, FrV 19 

Layden, Ann, M 43 

Uyden, Margi, M 43; FrV 19 

Layden, Patricia, PB 48; SrV 32 

Lazaro. Manuel V., SrV 5 

Lazell, Cindy, JrV 15 

Lea, Michael R., StV 35 

Leach, Carol S. 

Leach, Cheryl D.. SoV 16 

Uach, James P., SrV 32 

Leach, Michael N., PB 57 

Uach, Nedra L., JrV 13 

Uach, Ray, JrV 13 

Uach, Sharon, M 21: JrV 13 

Uach, Terry R , PB 16 

Uasure, Cynthia K.. T 59 

Uatherwood, Oaudc B.. PB 25; ScV 

32; F 23 
Ubourvcau, Louanne M., M 49 
Lebow, Curtis L., T 43 
Lecrone, Paul D. SrV 32 



Ledbetter, James W., JrV 13 

Udbetter, Margaret L., SoV 16 

Ledbetter. Susan L., M 16; JrV 13 

Udlow, Forrest L., SrV 52 

Udyard, David W., SoV 16; PB 60 

Ue, Cary V., SoV 16 

Lee, Charles D. 

Lee, James A.. SrV 32 

Lee, James R. FrV 19 

Lee, Jay R., JrV 13 

Ue, Johnnie B., FrV 19 

Lee, Linda S., SrV 32 

Lee, Rosemary J., F 20; F 17; JtV 15 

Leech, James, SrV 32 

Ufevere, Martin, FrV 19 

Lefler, Walter E.. SrV 32 

Uftwich. Belinda M.. M 45 

Ugg. Gene. TC 31 

Ugg. James D.. SrV 32; PB 64 

Lehman. Ray. JrV 13 

Uhmann. Susan F.. JrV 13 

Leifeste. Carole. M 65 

Uifeste, Randy L.. TC 27; SrV 32 

Uiker, Merle E.. FrV 19 

Uinen. Cheryl. JrV 13 

Uiner. Shirley, SoV 16 

Uland, Deborah A., SoV 16 

Leiley, Dianna J., FrV 19 

Lemay, Joe D., SoV 16 

Umay, Sandra J., FrV 19 

Ummons. Robert W., FrV 19 

Leon, Anne, FrV 19 

Leon, Margaret A., M 57 

Leonard, Larry D., JrV 13 

Uonard, Mary K., FrV 19 

Upard, Linda F.. JrV 13 

Lerch, Buddy, FrV 19 

Leroy, Marjorie E., SoV 16; Esq 12 

Leshinski, Patricia G., SoV 16 

Leshinski, Robert 

Ushmski, Robert, JrV 13 

Uslie, Ernest C. 

Uslie, Roy F., PB 64 

Lesok, Margaret A., JrV 13 

Lester, Betty J., JrV 13 

Lester, Billy R., SoV l6 

Uster, Kenneth G., FrV 19 

Uq, Phyllis A., Esq 45 

Luker, Ernest, SoV 16 

Levens, Linda D.. M 65 

Uvers, Joan L., M 28; SoV 16; M 21 
TC 1 

Uvin, Alan R., JrV 13 

Levings, Donald J., PB 69 

Uwellen, Phillip C, SoV 16 

Uwis, Charles E., PB 45 

Uwis. Dan C, FrV 19 

Uwis, David, SoV 16 

Lewis, Deborah G., FrV 19 

Lewis, Devora A., FrV 19; M 63 

Uwis, Don E. 

Uwis, Don W., SoV 16 

Uwis, Donna J., FrV 19 

Lewis. Ellen E.. M 65 

Lewis. Gale. M 63 

Uwis. Gail. SrV 32 

Lewis. Gary D.. FrV 19 

Uwis. Homa L., FrV 19 

Uwis, Jeanee, SoV 16 

Uwis, Una R., M 28 

Uwis, Lowry L.. FrV 19 

Uwis. Michael. SoV 16 

Uwis. Randall N.. TC 32 

Uwis. Rhonda G., M 63. JrV 15 

Uwis, Richard A. 

Lewis, Richard V. 

Lewis, Robert D.. TC 23: JtV 15; 
Esq 6: PB 32 

Lewis. Ronald. ScV 52 



I 



■W — Freshman View 



Lewis. William E., PB 71 

Leyd, Kenneth, F 22 

Leyh, Karen J. 

Liang, Emily W., JrV 1} 

Licm. Leslie A., M 67; SoV 16; M 43 

Lievens, Lorraine S., T 39; SoV 16 

Liggett, Kenneth E., SrV 32; TC 23 

Liggett. Sandra L., SrV 32 

Lightfoot. Andra J.. FrV 19; M 43 

Lightfoot. Danny C. SrV 32; PB 51 

Ligon. Lanthia L., M 43 

Ligon, Samuel L., FrV 19 

Kihxwiler. Ken, JrV 13 

Liles, Melissa V.. FrV 19 

Liles. Robert L., FrV 19 

Lincoln. Michael D., SoV 16; PB 51 

Lind. Keith, TC 32 

Lind. Michael J.. SrV 32 

Lindberg. James R. 

Lindberg. Richard E.. FrV 19 

Linder. Barbara A., SrV 32 

Linder, Carol A.. SrV 32 

Linder. John R.. JrV 13 

Lindley, Barbara B.. SrV 32; TC 10 

Lindlcy, Barbara J., SoV l6 

Lindley, Dee C, SrV 32 

Lindley. James L.. PB 64 

Lindley. Nathan H., SrV 32 

Lindner. Connie B.. FrV 19 

Lindsay, Gary. JrV 13 

Lindsay, Nancy L.. JrV 13 

Lindsey, Ann, FrV 19 

Lindsey. Brent N., SrV 32 

Lindsey, Gary L.. PB 72 

Lindsey. Linda L.. SoV 16 

Lindsey, Suzanne, Esq 28 

Line, Carrie G.. JrV 13 

Line. Samuel W.. PB 54 

Link. Charlene M.. M 17; Esq 36 

Linker. Sharon C, SoV 16 

Linnevold. Alexia. JrV 13 

Linxwiler. Barbara, JrV 13 

Linxwiler, Kenneth E., PB 25 

Lipscomb, Nancy J., SoV 16 

Listen. Linda J.. SrV 32 

Liston. Vance W., SrV 32; F 35 

Liston, Vicki L., FrV 19 

Little, Carl S., SrV 32; F 35 

Little. Gary L.. PB 25 

Little, Harold D., FrV 19 

Little. Jaycile. JrV 13 

Little. Joe E.. PB 52 

Little. Ken D.. FrV 19 

Lively, Carolyn L.. SrV 32 

Livingston, Donna G., JrV 13 

Livingston, Randell W., SrV 3 

Livingston, Robert L., PB 60 

Lloyd. Maurine L.. FrV 19 

Locasc.o, Nicolas T., PB 69 

Locke, Bruce D.. FrV 19 

Locke, Eddie, FrV 19 

Locke, John G., F 32 

Lockhart, Thomas H., SrV 32 

Locklear, Frances L.. FrV 19 

Lockwood, Fred C. JrV 13: PB 42 

Lodal. William C. JrV 13; PB 66 

Logan, Larry D. 

Logan, Linda L.. JrV 13; M 43; L 27 

Logan, Mark G.. SoV 16 

Logan, Richard D.. JrV 13 

Logan. Sharon L.. FrV 19 

Loggins. Bennie E., PB 45 

Lohman, Deborah D.. FrV 19 

Lokey, James E., F 34 

Lomax, Eunice R., JrV 17 

Lomax, Linda C, FrV 19 

London. Jack J.. SrV 32 

London, Judy. JrV 13 



Long. Dudley R., FrV 19 

Long, Frances L., SrV 32 

Long, Jerry W., SoV 16 

Long, Larry G., SrV 32; Esq 34 

Long, Mary J. JrV 13 

Long. Michael D.. JrV 13 

Long, Nancy K., M 67 

Long. Susan J., FrV 19 

Longacre. Linda A.. FrV 19 

Longino, Stephanie B., Esq 41; SoV 
16 

Longwell, Carol A.. SrV 32 

Lockadoo. Donald E.. PB 57; M 39; 
SrV 32; F 24 

Loomis. Donna L.. FrV 19 

Looney. George M., PB 60; SoV 16 

Looney, Mike, JrV 13 

Looney. Sheila L.. T 1; SrV 33; F 18 

Looten. Kathryn B.. SoV 16; M 15 

Lopas. Terry N., SrV 33 

Loper, Thomas C. FrV 19 

Lopez. Celeste, Esq 38; FrV 19 

Lopez, Genaro, SrV 33 

Lopez, Gloria G., Esq 38; FrV 19 

Loran. Hazel H.. PB 35 

Loran. Helene. M 37; 
SrV 33 

Lorenz. Kathy S.. SrV 33 

Lorino, Michael J., SoV 16 

Lotridge, Robert D., FrV 19 

Lett. Anita B.. FrV 19 

Lott. Cathy G.. JrV 13 

Lott. Gary B., FrV 19 

Lott, Janet M., FrV 19 

Lott, Karen H., SrV 33 

Lott. Larry R.. F 32; SrV 33 

Loudder. Peggy M.. JrV 13 

Louden. Edgar W.. PB 25 

Louder. Johnny M.. SoV 16 

Loudcrmilk, John W., Esq 42; PB 60 

Louie, Howard W.. SrV 33 

Louie, Robert S., JrV 13; PB 16 

Louthan, James G., TC 23; JrV 13 

Louthan, Thomas K., FrV 19 

Love, Donna M.. JrV 13 

Love. Mark L., PB 20 

Love. Thomas C. T 10; SrV 33 

Love, William C. 

Lovel, Mary K.. T 48; SrV 33 

Lovelace, Catherine S., FrV 19 

Lovelace, Diane. T 48 

Lovelace, Jo, SrV 33 

Lovelace, Mike, FrV 19 

Lovell, Harvey L., SoV 16 

Lovell. Sherlyn W.. SoV 16 

Loving. Jeffrey S.. FrV 19 

Lowe. Daryl L.. PB 54 

Lowe. Logan. SI 33 

Lowe. Loretta D.. M 63; SrV 33 

Lowe. Rusty. FrV 19 

Lowery. Gregory J., SI 18, 19. 23, 28 

Lowery. William C. F 21 

Lowlere. Horace. JrV 13 

Lown. David J.. SrV 33; F 35; PB 60 

Lown. John F., PB 60 

Lowrance, Randy M., SrV 33 

Lowrancc. Theresa J.. FrV 19 

Lowrey, Rebecca K., F 17; JrV 13 

Lowry, Connie F., M 67 

Loyd, Anita F.. FrV 19 

Loyd. Kenneth E., SrV 33 

Loyd, Michael L., SrV 3 

Lubsen, Bruce R. 
Lucas, Carolyn. SoV 17 
Lucas. Rocklynn D.. SoV 17 
Lucero, Abigail A., SoV 17 
Luck, Nancy J.. JrV 13 
Luckenbach. Timothy E.. PB 24 
Luckenbach, Tom, SoV 17 



Luckie. Tony. FrV 19 

Ludwig, Elizabeth A., M 32; SoV 17 

Luke. Jack L.. JrV 13 

Luke. Linda K., SrV 33 

Luke. Pee Wee, M 63 

Luker. Linda S.. JrV 13 

Lukert, Paul M.. PB 51 

Lumdgrew, Jan, FrV 19 

Lumsden, Michael R., PB 60 

Lundberg. Frederick G.. PB 42 

Lundgren, James W., PB 22 

Lunsford, Ricky D., JrV 13; PB 72 

Lupardus, Joseph T.. FrV 20 

Luscomb. Benjamin R.. PB 57 

Luttrell. Richard A.. SrV 33 

Lutz, Ann M.. FrV 20 

Lutz. Joni, FrV 20, M 1 

Lux, Nancy B., FrV 20; SoV 17 

Lyckman, Claudia D., M 45 

Lyde, Betsy R., FrV 20 

Lyde. Carol D.. JrV 13; SoV 17 

Lylc. Corinne P. 

Lynch. Henry A. 

Lynch, James M., PB 26; SoV 17 

Lynn, Linda K.. FrV 20 

Lynch, Robert W., FrV 20 

Lynn. Linda K.. FrV 20; SoV 17 

Lyon. Jo E.. SoV 17 

M 

MacAllister. Karen E.. JrV 16 

MacArthur. John D.. PB 69 

MacAulay. Jay E., SrV 33 

Macha, Jerry E., JrV 16 

Mack, Stephen A. 

Mack. Suzanne, SoV 17; TC 12 

Mackay. Melinda. M 57; M 15 

Mackey. Patrick E., JrV 16; PB 63 

Mackie, Cathy S., SoV 17 

Macurak. Randal B., Esq 31; PB 72; 
SoV 17 

Macray. Melinda, SoV 17 

Madden, Deborah E., M 45 

Madden, Fred W., PB 64; SoV 17 

Maddox, Craig, FrV 20 

Maddox. Sharon L.. FrV 20 

Madison, Brett E.. SoV 17 

Madison, James R.. FrV 20 

Magee, Margaret K.. SrV 33 

Maggi. Richard A.. FrV 20 

Magness. William B., SrV 3 

Mahaffey, Gregory L.. SoV 17 

Mahaffey, Ronald E.. PB 66 

Mahlmann. Linda G.. JrV 16; Esq 41 

Mahon. Jana R.. SrV 39 

Malcik, Don R.. JrV 16 

Mallard, Mary V.. L 20 

Mallard, Susan L.. FrV 20 

Mallow, Elaine, SrV 33 

Maloch. David T.. JrV 16 

Malone, Gary D.. SrV 33; PB 42 

Manale, Stevie L.. M 43 

Mandcl. John D.. JrV 16 

Mandry. Thomas W.. JrV 16 

Maner, Donna J., TC 10; SrV 33; T 
29 

Mancy. John H. 

Manhoff, Charlotte N., M 15; SoV 

17 

Manly, Robert L., T 45; SoV 17 
Mann. Tony B.. SoV 17; TC 27 
Manning. Bill, JrV 16 
Mansfield. Joanne, JrV 16 
Manuel, Laquinta J., SrV 33 
Maples, Marilyn N.. JrV 16; F 22 
March. John B.. SrV 33 
March. Judy A.. SrV 33 
Marchbanks. Woodi K., JrV 16 



Marchman. Randolph E.. FrV 20 

Marcum, Howard S. 

Marcom, Kandle. M 67 

Marcum. Richard A., SrV 33 

Marez. Elena. Esq 38 

Marin. Steven N.. FrV 20 

Mariner. Lynn E.. M 63; SrV 33 

Mariner, Timothy J. 

Markham, Jan, FrV 20 

Marlow, Sheila J., FrV 20 

Marr. Jackie W,. JrV 16 

Marrs, Terrell W., JrV 16 

Marsh, Thomas C. SrV 33; PB 41 

Marshall. Carolyn. M 29; SoV 17 

Marshall. Diane, V 17; TC 12 

Marshall, Gary L., SrV 33; PB 60 

Marshall, Kay, TC 12; M 21; JrV 16; 
M 25 

Marshall, Kenneth B.. SrV 34 

Marshall, Linda J.. SrV 34 

Marshall. Martha D.. JrV 16 

Marshall. Ricky. PB 60 

Martin. Barbara K., SoV 17; M 63; F 
20 

Martin. Billy D.. SrV 34; PB 66 

Martin. Cynthia C, FrV 20 

Martin. Danny A.. T 45; JrV 16 

Martin. David SrV 34 

Martin. Dennis. FrV 20 

Martin. Diana K.. SoV 17 

Martin. Diane, PB 37; M 59; JrV 16 

Martin, Glenn R., JrV 16 

Martin, Martha A., FrV 20; JrV 16 

Martin, Max R., JrV 16; PB 57; SI 
53. 39 

Martin. Michael R. FrV 20 
Martin. Roberta. M 21; JrV 16 
Martin. Sharon L.. FrV 20 
Martin. Steve J.. FrV 20 
Martin, Steven E.. FrV 20 
Martin, Susan G., JrV 16 
Martin, Terry R., FrV 20; PB 26 
Martin, Vicki C, M 63 
Martindale, Dan, JrV 16 
Martindale, David L., PB 33 
Martinez. Roque M.. FrV 20 
Martinson. Carol F.. SrV 34 
Marugame. Diane H.. JrV l6 
Masek, Bernadette. SrV 34 
Mask. Donald B., PB 63 
Masley, Donald L., PB 24 
Mason. Cristine L., TC 27; FrV 20 
Mason, James M., SoV 17 
Mason. Mike FrV 20 
Mason, Mickey A.. SrV 34 
Mason, Pauline B., SrV 34 
Mason. Sheryl A., FrV 20 
Mason, Walter L., SI 33 
Masoner, Charles A., SrV 34 
Massa, Mary S., JrV 16; M 27 
Massey. James L.. SI 51 
Massey. John M.. PB 51 
Massey, Linda M., SrV 34 
Massie, George P., JrV 16 
Massie, John R., F 32; SrV 34 
Mastcn, Robert R., SrV 34 
Matern, Danny FrV 20 
Mathes, Jayne L.. FrV 20 
Mathews, Betty D., SrV 34 
Mathews, Robert J.. FrV 20 
Mathews. William R.. PB 46 
Mathis, Charles K., JtV 16; T 24 
Mathis, Kelly. SoV 17 
Matthews, Henry D., SrV 34 
Matthews. Karen A., M 65 
Matthews, Mickey R., FrV 20 
Matthews, Terry P., JrV 16 
Matthews. Wendy S. 
Matthiesen. Dennis L. 
Matice. Bob. JrV 16 



Freshman View — 49 



Mattson. Robert W., JrV 16 

Matulich, Edward J.. SI 2; SI 8 

Mauldin. Johnnie B., PB 63 

Mauldin, Marvin M. 

Mauldin, Sharon. Esq 44; JrV 16 

Maxey, Judy A., FrV 21 

Maxfield. James W. 

Maxwell. William. JrV 16 

May. Deborah K., FrV 20 

May. Kenzel R.. SrV 34 

May. Rhonda, SrV 34 

May. Stephen M., SrV 34; PB 69 

Mayes. Eloise W. 

Mayes. Gwendolyn G., SrV 34 

Mayes. John W.. SrV 34 

Mayes. Robert B.. T 45 

Mayne. William H., JrV 16 

Mayo. Joe B., F 23; PB 41 

Mayo. June, M 49; M 40; JrV 16; PB 
35; M 25 

Mayo, Patsy E., SoV 17 

Mayer. Kyle. SoV 17 

Mays, Hardy J., SrV 34 

Mays, Jane W. 

Mays. Judy G.. FrV 20 

Mays. Mary M.. SrV 34 

Mayse, Bert, FrV 20 

Mayse. Patricia A., SrV 34; M 21 

McAfee, Michael, PB 51 

McAteer, James O., FrV 20 

McAteer. Linda D., JrV 14 

McBride, Bennie B., FrV 20 

McBride, Don D.. SrV 36 

McBride, Linda A.. M 63 

McBride, Nancy L., SoV 17 

McBride. Phyllis. SrV 36 

McBryde. Ronnie B.. SoV 17; PB 66 

McCabe, Julia, JrV 14; F 18 

McCaine, Carolyn J., FrV 20 

McCall. Albert E., SrV 36 

McCall, Bonnie. M 21; FrV 20 

McCammon. Frances L.. FrV 20 

McCann, Barbara. FrV 20 

McCann. Michael J.. FrV 20 

McCann. Randy M., PB 23 

McCarroll. Sharon J., Esq 45 

McCarthy. Nancy, JrV 14; M 65; F 
20 

McCartney, James S., FrV 20 

McCartney. Janet. FrV 20 

McCarty. Karen. SrV 38 

McCarry, Richard H.. FrV 20 

McClcery. Kenneth L.. PB 64 

McClellan. Bryan L.. SrV 3 

McClellan. Chandler Y., SrV 36 

McClenan, Donald R.. FrV 20 

McClerry, Ken. SrV 36 

McCleslcey. Charles A., FrV 20 

McClintock, Debbie, FrV 20 

McCloy. Alfred D.. JrV 14; TC 26; 
TC 27 

McCloy. Allen W.. TC 35; TC 36 

McCluer. William K.. SrV 36 

McClure, Bill. PB 57 

McClure, Patricia A.. SrV 36 

McClure. Patricia A.. SrV 36 

McClure. Richard D., FrV 20 

McClure. Susan A., M 32; SoV 17: 
M 65 

McClure, Terry L., T 46 

McCluskey, Charlotte B., FrV 20 

McCluskey. Joe A., FrV 20 

McClymond, Bruce W.. FrV 20 

McCollum. John B., FrV 20 

McCollum, Susan. FrV 20 

McComas. Barbara A.. FrV 20 

McConnell. Melissa A.. FrV 20; M 
43 

McCord. Danny C. FrV 20 

McCord. Danny, FrV 20 



McCorkle, Gary S., SoV 17 
McCoimick, Cristi, JrV 14 
McCormick. Hugh T., F 35 
McCormick. William C. JrV 14 
McCowen. Horace W., F 22 
McCowen. Robert A., JrV 14 
McCor. Mitzi, FrV 20 

McCoy. Cathy. SoV 17 

McCoy. Frank E., SoV 17 

McCoy. John C. SrV 36 

McCoy. John L. 

McCoy. John R.. SrV 36; PB 66 

McCoy. Marcia L., JrV 14 

McCracken. Debera M., M 49 

McCracken. Robert T., PB 41 

McCraight, Paul. JrV 14 

McCrary. Cheryl S., PB 31; JrV 14; 
M 37 

McCrary. Michael L.. SrV 36 

McCrary. Thomas A., JrV 14 

McCright, Daniel H.. FrV 20 

McCright. Paul. PB 16; Esq 44 

McCuiston. Lesly K.. JrV 14 

McCulley, Karen L.. M 67 

McCulley, Stephen J. 

McCulloch. Diane, FrV 20 

McCuUoch. Max P.. SrV 5 

McCulloh. Karen E.. SrV 36 

McCullough. Donald T., Esq 44; StV 
36 

McCullough. John H.. PB 60 

McCullough. Walter G., JrV 14 

McCullough. William P., SoV 17 

McCurdy. Anthony W., SrV 36; PB 

71 

McCurley, Clay D., SI 51, 48 
McCurry. Gary W.. JrV 14 
McCurry, Marsha J., M 40 
McCurtney. Janet, M 59 
McCutchen, Douglas, SI 7 
McCutcheon. Melva J.. JrV 14 
McDaniel. Ellen. SoV 17; M 63 
McDaniel. Katheryn G.. FrV 20 
McDaniel, Mayme C, JrV 14 
McDearmon. Nancy C, FrV 20 
McDermand. Ernest W., SI 10, 9, 53 
McDonald, Don C. Esq 34 
McDonald, Janie, SoV 17 
McDonald, Laird, FrV 20 
McDonald, Lonnic W.. TC 27; TC 33 
McDonald. Mary H.. M 57; FrV 20 
McDonald. Mina A., JrV 15; Esq 31 
McDonald. Randy, FrV 20 

McDonald, Russel, SoV 17; PB 17; T 

24 

McDougal, Linda D., M 63 

McDougall, Warren S.. JrV 13 

McDougle. Sharon P.. SrV 36 

McDuffie, John W., SoV 17 

McEldowney. Terry O., SrV 36 

McElgunn, James W.. SoV 17 

McElroy. Christine, SrV 37 

McElroy, Edgar H., PB 51; SoV 17 

McElroy. Laura, M 32; SoV 17; M IJ 

McElroy, Van M.. SrV 37 

McEntire, Christine M., FrV 20 

McEvoy, James P., JrV 14 

McFarland, Cynthia K., SoV 17 

McFarland, Patricia C, M 63; JrV 1) 

McGaugh, Rhonda K.. SoV 17 

McGaughey. Mary E.. M 29 

McGaughery. Elizabeth, SoV 17: M 
26 

McCaughy. Barry, FrV 20 

McGee. James R.. JiV 15 

McGee. Kenneth D., Esq 45; SoV 17 

McGee. Richard L.. SrV )7 

McCehee. Allen E.. PB 63 

McGehee. Carol A.. JiV IJ 

McGenee. Larry. FrV 20 



McGill, Patty, FrV 20 

McGinley, Sandra M.. M 43; SrV 37 

McGinnis. Gay N.. TC 12; M 15- 
SoV 17 

McGinnis. Jean. M 40; PB 56 

McGinnis. Helen. FrV 20; M 43 

McGlothlin, William B., PB 57: SrV 

37 

McGonagill, Dennis D., SrV 37 
McGough, Marlon D., FrV 20 
McGregor. Scott. F 24 
McGuffey. David W., PB 51 
McGuire, John T.. SI 40. 41 
McGuire. Kerma L., FrV 20 

McGuire, Marilyn L., JrV 15; M 21: 

F 17 

McGuire, Patricia L.. M 21; Esq 44: 
SrV 37 . >H . 

McGuire, Robert. SrV 37 
McGuire, Roger G.. SrV 37 
McHargue, Lou A.. FrV 20 
Mclntire, Donald D., PB 60 
Mclntire, Robert B., FrV 20 
Mcintosh. Tana. SoV 17 
Mcintosh, William, JrV 15 
Mclntyre, Sharon L., T 29; SoV 17 
Mclntyre, Thomas C, PB 52 
Mclver, Roderick D., PB 66; JrV 15 
Mcjunkin. Samuel W., PB 66 
McKean, Patrick J., SI 20, 23, 53 
McKee. Don A., PB 57; SI 53, 38, 40 
McKeei Janis A.. Esq 45 
McKeever, Mary R., M 67; M 32 
McKenzie. Diane, SoV 17 
McKibben, Bruce W.. PB 66; JrV 15 
McKinley. Betsy. M 59 
McKinley, Carolyn A.. FrV 20 
McKinley. Deann, SoV 17 
McKinley, Teri D., M 59; SoV 18 

McKinney, Anne S., Esq 45; JrV 15; 

M 37 

McKinney, Carol A.. JrV 24, 25 

McKinney. David M., SI 33 

McKinney, Devon, M 63 

McKinney, Joe S., SoV 18 

McKinney, Patricia A., SrV 37; M 40 

McKinney, Susan L., SoV 18; M 65 

McKissack. Kathy A., SoV 18; PB 
37; M 59 

McKnight, Eric L., FrV 20 

McLarry, Linda J., SrV 37 

McLarty, Betsy L., FrV 20; M 67 

McLarty, Danny D.. SoV 18 

McLaughlin, Elaine. JrV 15 

McLaughlin. Leslie D.. FrV 20 

McLaughlin, Randy C, SrV 37 

McLean, Barbara J., SrV 37 

McLean, Melissa L., SoV 18 

McLendon, Terry, SoV 18 

McLennan, Lan R., SoV 18 

McMahan, Mary A., M 45 

McMahan, Michael C. T 10; SrV 37; 

PB 72; F 39 
McMahon. Michael D., F 
McMahon, Patrick L., PB 72 
McManus. Janet F., M 21; FrV 20 
McMichael, Clifton L.. PB 25 
McMillan. Diana, FrV 20 
McMillan, Gary A., SrV 37 
McMillan, Sheryl A., FrV 20 
McMillan, Susan B., SrV 37 
McMinn. Leann, SoV 18 
McMurry, Michael G.. TC 40 
McMurry, Roxanna, FrV 20 
McNabb. Dennis C, Esq 41; SoV 18 
McNabb. Pamela E.. FrV 20 
McNair, Mary H.. JrV 15 
McNally, Patricia J., M 57; FrV 20 
McNamata, Diana K., JrV 15 
McNara. Mary Helen, TC 10 
McNeil. Bruce H.. JrV 15 
McNeil, Judith M.. JrV 15 



McNeil. Melody L., FrV 20; M 39 
McNery, Dan R., SrV 3 
McNutt. Marsha G., JrV 15 
McPeak. Robert, SI 33 
McPeek, Kevin W.. FrV 20 
McPherson, Susan S., SrV 37 
McSpadden. Thomas, PB 57 
McVicker. Susan L., SrV 57 
McWhorter. Jerry D., FrV 20 
McWilliams, Connie M., JrV 16; M 

McWilliams. Cynthia M., FrV 20 

McWilliams, Gary M., SrV 37: Esq 
42; T 45 

McWilliams, Margaret C, SrV 37 

McWilliams, Melinda K., JrV 16 

McWilliams. Raymond R., PB 42, 72 

McWilliams, Sheldon T. 

Meacham. Joe B., JrV 16 

Meade. Susan L.. M 45 

Meador. Ronald M., JrV 16 

Meadows, Cynthia B., SoV 18 

Meadows. Larry R.. TC 27; TC 32; 
SrV 34 

Means. Myron R. 

Mean. Myron. PB 42 

Meason. Rebecca J.. M 57; FrV 21; 
TC 1 

Mebane, Deborah M., SoV 18 

Mebane, Jimmy J., JrV 16; PB 66 

Mecca. Dianne L., SrV 34 

Meckler, Jeanne L., FrV 21 

Medders, Deborah. M 67 

Medford, John C. 

Medina, Gilbert R., JrV 16 

Medina. Samuel A., Esq 38 

Medlen, Mac L., SrV 34 

Medley, Donnie N., SrV 34 

Medlock, Alexa A., FrV 21 

Medrano, San, Esq 38 

Meek, Mark S.. FrV 21 

Meek. Marvin D., TC 27 

Mefford, Voctoria L., FrV 21 

Meholin, Melinda L., M 36; SoV 18 

Meinecke, Larry D., FrV 21 

Meinecke. Len. FrV 21 

Meinecke. Robert S., T 45 

Melinder, Sheryl G.. M 45 

Melinsky, Adair R., FrV 21 

Melton. Haynes L.. SrV 54; TC 25; 
TC 23 

Melton. J. Thomas. SrV 34 

Melton, Paul. SoV 18; TC 27 

Melville. Richard C, JrV 16 

Menard. Marilyn G.. M 21; JrV 16 

Mendoza, Linda, Esq 38; FrV 20 

Menefee. Michael W.. SoV 18 

Meneley. Maty S.. SoV 18; Esq 51; 
M 15 

Mercer. Ronald L.. SI 9, 52 

Meredith. Antonio, FrV 21 

Meredith. Paula J.. SrV 34 

Meriwether, Hershcl S.. FrV 21 

Merrell, Michael J., FrV 21 

Merrick. Susan V., FrV 21; M 45 

Merrill. Jo A.. M 49: SoV 18 

Merrill. Mazel M.. FrV 21 

Merriman. David S.. FrV 21 

Merritt. Brock L.. FrV 21 

Merritt, John C, SrV 34 

Merryman, Andrew, SrV 55: PB 57 

MeKhkat. Larry P. 

MeKhko. Dolores M. 

Meshier. Lee A.. SoV 18; M 49 

Mcsser. Bobbi. JrV 16 

Messenmilh, David R., JrV 16 

Metcair. Barbara K.. FrV 21 

Metie. Patrick S.. T 45 

Metzger. Robert T.. JrV 16 

Meyer. Chailes L.. PB 64 

Meyer. Diane B., JrV 16 









50 — Freshman yiew 



m 



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Miller, Gary L,. PrV 21 

Miller, Gary M„ PrV 11 

Miller, Hireld H„ JrV II 

Miller, Jiealyn, M 49 

Millet, Jill S„ M 4} 

Miller, Jse V., SeV Ig 

Miller, Juanlla K„ PrV 21 

Miller, Xathryn A„ SrV I) 

Miller, Leilie A„ PrV 21 

Miller, Mary M„ SeV Hi P II 

Miller, Michael R., SrV I 

Miller, Suian A„ PrV IS 

Miller, Tlmathy L„ PS 16 

Milliean, Dsborah L., PfV II 

Millican, Robert L., TC 23; JrV 16; 
PB 17 

Millilcan, Robert G., FrV 21 

Mills, Carolyn G., JrV 16 

Mills, Chris. M 63; JrV 16; Esq 6 

Mills, Deanna, FrV 21 

Mills, John B., PB 41 

Mills, Marsha L., M 32; SoV 18; TC 

27 

Mills, Thomas N., FrV 21; PB 26 

Millwee, Robert A., PB 46 

Milne, Janet L., SoV 18 

Milner, Boyd, F 23; JrV 16 

Milner, Dennis B. 

Milner, Harlan D., SrV 35 

Mims, Dianna J., FrV 21 

Mino, Joseph J., SoV 18; PB 20; PB 
69 

Minor, Benny M., TC 31 

Minor, Elaine, M 65 

Minzenmayer, Myra C, SrV 35 

Misek, Lou A., F 15 

Mishler, Jodie L., SrV 35; M 65 

Mitchell, James W., TC 27 

Mitchell, Kathy, FrV 21 

Mitchell, Larry W., SoV 18 

Mitchell, Linda K., M 21 

Mitchell, Mollie M., FrV 21 

Mitchell, Neil L., SrV 35 

Mitchell, Reine E., SrV 35 

Mitchell, William D., JrV 16 

Mitchell. William E., JrV 16; PB 66 

Mize, Donna A., JrV 16; F 17; F 20 

Mize, HoUis C. SrV 35 



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Menahan, Kent, FrV II 

Menree, Ann, M II 

Manftte, Everett H„ PfV 31 

Menien, Diane, IsV 18 

Montagne, Mary H„ JrV II 

Menlaiue, Jehn M., PS 41 

Mtmtefflayef, Paul, PS 19 

Mentiefflery, Dale K„ PrV 22 

Msnliemery, Diane, SeV ill M III 
Ei^ 44 

Mantiseinery, Diannt D,, M II 

Mentiemery, Gerrianne, M I) 

Menlgemefy, Jedy A,, SrV II 

Mefltgemery, Jelene K., SrV II 

MoBtgemery, Jan C., JrV Hi 8iq 41 

Mantgamery, Kathy JfV II 

Mantganaery, Linda K,, SaV II 

Mentgefflefy, Melanie, JtV 111 M 3I| 

Moody, Kathie L., SrV 35 
Moon, Albert E. SrV 35; PB 66 
Mooney, Deborah, FrV 22 
Mooney, Dianne, JrV 16 
Mooney. Frank R., PB 52; SI 9, 53 
Moore, Ann, FrV 22 
Moore, Barbara J., SoV 18 
Moore, Bill R., T 11; PB 57 
Moore, Cheryl A., SoV 18 
Moore, Daniel E., JrV 16 
Moore, David C, FrV 22 
Moore, David E., SrV 35; PB 63 
Moore, Deborah S., FrV 22 
Moore, Delyn, F 15 
Moore, Elizabeth S., SrV 35 
Moore, Gail R., SrV 35 
Moore, Gordon H., SrV 35 
Moore, James W.. PB 24; SoV 18 
Moore, Janet K., FrV 22 
Moore, Judith A., M 21; FrV 22 
Moore, Linda, M 43 
Moore, Margaret A., FrV 22 
Moore, Marguerite, FrV 22 
Moore, Mark E., PB 18; SoV 18 
Moore, Michael G., SoV 18 
Moore, Michael R., SrV 35 
Moore. Patricia R., T 47; SrV 35 
Moore, Paula D., SrV 35 
Moore, Richard H., FrV 22 
Moore, Robert J., FrV 22 
Moore, Ronald L., PB 52 
Moore, Sheri L.. FrV 22 
Moore. Sheryl J., SoV 18 



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aimmm, Kandie ft,, M 48 
Mafella, ghafles L„ JrV II 
MefemsB, SvelyB K,, PfV %l 
Mafgan, Billy, geV 18 
MsHan. picliie, JrV ili M III K 



Bebra J„ PfV II 
Margin, Banald L„ Pi II 
Margin, BileeB 8„ M l?i M II 
Mergan, Jane L„ M Hi JfV II 
MargjB, Jerry »„ 8eV II 
Mergan, Jaieph C, 
Mergan, Jey«, 8eV II 
Mergan, KaihleeB B„ PrV 31 
Mergafl, Larry A„ PB 16 
MergiB, Margaret, SrV II 
MergaB, Meli§8a, M II 
Margan, Michele, JrV II 
Mergan, Pamela J„ PrV 33 
Margan, ftannie L,, JrV il 
Merphii, Martha A„ PrV 13 
Merflll, Emily C„ Esq 4li JfV il| M 

Merris, Beverly A., JrV II 
Merfis, Bale, SaV 18 
Meffis, Deanni K., JrV H 

Morris, Dennis M., Esq 44; PB 60- 

SrV 36 

Morris, Diana J., SoV 18 

Morris, Donna F., FrV 22 

Morris, John R., PB 57 

Morris, June M.. SoV 18; F 20 

Morris, Kathy A., SrV 36 

Morris, Laurie, JrV 16 

Morris, Linda J., SoV 18 

Morris, Marian, FrV 22 

Morris, Marvin R., JrV 16 

Mortis, Robert L., PB 41 

Morris. Susan C. JrV 16; SrV 36: M 
40; PB 35 

Morris. W. A.. FrV 22 

Morris. William G.. SrV 36 

Morris. William M., SoV 18 

Morrison, Kathleen, FrV 22 

Morrison, Linda, JrV 16; M 21 

Morrison, Patricia, FrV 22 

Mortison, Marc, SrV 36 

Morrison, Sherilyn, JrV 16 

Morrissey, Susan D., M 17; Esq 2: M 

40 

Morrow, James D., PB 71 
Mortagy, Amr K., F 34 
Morton, Gary C, SrV 36 
Mosbey, Patricia K., FrV 22 
Mosby, Matthew W., SrV 36 
Moseley, Lee, FrV 22 
Moser, Buffy, M 45; T 29 
Moser, Elizabeth, SrV 36 
Moser, Richard S., FrV 22 
Moser, Sammy J. 



M%i\?f, g9H, §8V \% 
M8IS, gjfl §:, §8V 18 

Mef§, fsy i:, §fV §« 
Msss, Jafflfs 8:, §8V 18 
Umi, MarlfRf A.-, §fV M 
Mes!, §hafeH, Pi Wi U If; fiV ii 
M8S§, Williaffl §:, JfV H 
M8§§ff, JehflHif, PfV ii 
U%»ii, §f8fis A:, JfV }« 
Meitia, MafianHf, PfV ii 

Mm, Mt N:, Pi ^« 

Metify, g8f8, U ih JfV H 

M8(t, jHJyHB, §8V 18 

M8udy, IJRda, §fV i$ 
Meun», Banfly, §8V 18 
M8«Bts, Mareia t.-, §eV 18 
Meusif, iilly P, £s^ |4 
M8y§«f, Pat, 8fV II 
M8*ffy, gl«^haBif, PfV II 
Mdysf, Mafgaret, gfV II 
MfMsk, Tifflffly J.-, PfV ii 
Mutllff, 8JdBey W,, Pi H 
Myelin, Williaffl g,, Pi l| 
MueBilif, Edith I, gfV Hi M II 
MylleB, William M.., geV 18 
Myller, Jana B:, M II 
Mylli»B, Berii P:, §fV II 
MvllJB, eiecfla €„ gfV II 
MullJB, jMis T„ 8fV } 
MuliiB, LJBda P„ JrV II 
MylliB, ftedBey V„ JfV 17 
MylliB§, Patfifia A:, PrV II 
Mymme, Stella L„ 8eV 18 
MyBSBB, Betsy T„ M 11 
Murlee, LiBda P„ M %9\ PfV 33 
MurmaB, Jee B„ SrV II 
Myrphy, Beverly J„ SaV 11 
Myrphy, Bavid S„ JrV 17 
Myrphy, Bavid M„ PrV 33 
Murphy, Qayla J„ JrV 17 
Myrphy, SyiaB K„ M I9i JfV 17 
Myrray, AUb L,, l^ 8i ifV I 
Murray, Barbara L;, PfV 33 
Myrray, James B,, 8fV Hi ffi 73 
Myffay, Jahn 6,, P Hi JrV 17 

Murray, ^ip, Pfi 57 
Murray, Laura, M 59; JrV 17; T 39 
Murray, Laura E., FrV 22 
Murray, Robert P., SI 51. 48 
Murray, William, FrV 22 
Murthy D. J., F 34 
Muse, Madeleine, FrV 22 
Musgrave, Muff, JrV 17 
Musgrave, Real, JrV 17 
Musk, Nancy Nell, FrV 22 
Musselman, Jamie B., FrV 22 
Musselman, Robert. JrV 17 
^lustard. John M., FrV 22 
Mustard, Thomas W., FrV 22 
Myatt, John M., FrV 22 
Myatt, John T., JrV 17 
Myatt, Karen S., FrV 22 
Myers, Carolyn D., T 39 
Myers, Diane, JrV 17 
Myers, Gary L., JrV 17 
Myers, Linda S., Esq 37; SoV 18 
Myers, Patrice, FrV 22 
Myers, Ronald L.. FrV 22 
Myers. Steven C, JrV 17; PB 72 
Myers, Victoria, FrV 22 
Myers, William L.. SrV 36 
Myrick, Diana N., SoV 18 

N 

Nabots, Jimmy R., JrV 17 
Nader, James R.. FrV 22 
Nagle. Verna M., SrV 37 
Naglee, Janet S., FrV 22 



Freshman View — 57 



NifflF, Titef P., n M 
Ntil, JiiBM A„ F 19 
Nill, Bftnl i„ l§V |g 
Kill, T§ffl, lev il 
SihH, einii L„ leV II 
NiflH, B«vid, IsV tl 
NifKt, Lindi l„ FrV ii 
N»B«, Tim, JfV I? 
Hipiu, Cifla L:, IfV |7j M )7 
NOPtF, ehiflH K., SI Hi gi » 
Nl^^«F, Siinn A„ IfV 17 
Null, eiffljili A:, 9 Hi kV il 
Nifh, L(l(, M 4) 
Huh, t«li J;, JfV i? 
Null, MiFthi N:, FfV 21 
Niih, ?iul S„ geV 11 
Nish, Phillip T„ JfV I? 
Nii(tMR, jMflettt, Es^ g 
NivulRs, Ralpt), JfV 17 
Niviffs, Jufiis, PfV 12 
N)WFe«iii, eiiydii, FfV 22 
tiiifi, AbFihiffl P:, PB 19 
NiylsF, MiFind, IsV Ig 
NiylsF, MiHhg J„ JfV 17 
Nnl, eifflffgf), SeV II 
N«al, Mm f:, gfV 17 
NhI, PatFifii, M 4lj JfV 17 
Ncii, ehifici M:, PfV 22 
KHvillt, Jiffl, Te II 
NfddfFS, Btbi, PfV 22 
Nftdhiffl, Sen M:, gfV }7 
NmI, Aim f:, gfV 17 
NhI, Nidi I:, M 41 
NhIif, Ann, M 21 
Nwl^ @>il R„ JfV 17 
Nnif, Milts R„ JfV 17 
Sitif, Pimii A:,i(V ifiU a 
tiimi, Ktnnftl) W„ IfV 17 
Niff, H«Bf» W:, JfV 17 
Niill, WilllM }:, T Ii 
Nnlsn, gyfin L:, ggV 19 
StiMit, Sftefih A„ FfV i2i M «! 
Neis6fl, Sivid §„ T€ 24j g| || 
Ncisen, Hcfftl T:, PB «| 
NclMR, JifllH, U 67 
NdiSfl, laufcl A., M iij JfV if 
NtlMR, ftegtf A:, gfV 17 
NcImr, JlsRiid W:, Ei9 41 
Nflien, gtuifl H., T€ 27 
NdwR, Williin e„ PB «| 
NMfBiih, Bfigiii V:, iiV 19 
Nhfiu, gvdjffl M:, M Hi H 17 
NtiWF, Bebbie, M 21 
NcHlH, kfi, PfV 22i M 17 

Htmbim, Piyii J:, gfV i7i ra }} 

NtyjihF, Niflfy J„ JfV 17 
Nfyffliyff, NiR€y t„ JfV 17 
Htmt), IdwiR J„ IfV 17 
Niwtefi, g|(V( H:, PfV 21 
Ntwbfgy/)h, SiRR7 K„ fS i) 
Ntwdl, gyiiR N„ JfV 17 
NwkiFfc, gilly, JfV 17 

NCWiiiFli, glFl M; 

NcwffliR, SsRild P„ geV 19 

NtWRMR, JifflM H„ PB M 

Niwfflitfl, Je A. 
NtwHMR, Tcffi H„ geV 19 
NfWffiiRR, Jtffic, PfV 22 
NtwMffl, AlliR L, PB 71 
Ntwien, Bifbifi l„ gfV 17 
N(wi8fHi Sctafiti i„ PfV 22 
NN|ie(H, W(ld«fl i:, r 24i 9 i|, liV 

Nf«iMt, Biftoi, M )9| PfV Ii 
Nt«ww, ll«mf e„ IfV H 
NmsM, Vifi B„ g«V 19 
Htmm, BiRRidlt, gfV Hi n If 
Ni«i«a, JiiMi B„ PfV ii 
NfwteA, )m B„ JfV 17 

^=fM'»hmtn Vitm 



Niwten, LiRdi V„ gfV II 
Ncwten, Thsmii B„ g| 9 
Nifhels, Bill J„ PfV 22 
Nifheli, BFyfi, PfV 21 
Nisheli, JiRift p„ IfV II 
Nifhols, liffl E:, liV 19 
Niehsis, gy», M «$ 
Nichelien, KiRdy, PB 41 
Ni«lj»ll, Paififii M,. JfV 17 
Nl€lilis, Savid, PfV 22 
Niffcs, eijR p., JfV I7i ra 1} 
Ni«ffliR, ehiflc!, geV 19 
Nifi, Pftd 8„ gfV |g 
NiHffiiR, KtRRcth M:, geV 19 
NipptF, LiiyFit L:, PfV 21 
Nitsfht, tlggtf, gfV II 
Hi*, MiEhid Q., gfV |g 
Nix, Hma i:, PB H 
Nix, liRdfa L., JfV 17 
Nix, TiiB§«hy W:, PfV 21 
Nix, Tfijhj, PfV 21 
NixsR, Stfiy K:, fi U 
NixeH, Jdffi7 J„ i§V 19 
Nix8R, JihR M:, JfV 17 
Neil), JshR i„ geV 19 
Nsah, ThsiBM A:, ifV |l 
Nsblf, hiiif i:, n M ' 
NeblH, gffald €.., PfV 21 
Neblcs, Jyd7, Ss^ 41 
N§blM, VifiiRii, PfV 21 
Nel(R, §ifit S:, geV 19 

N§fflfMRMR, tyHH g:, PfV 21 

N88RJH, Pitfidi Am IfV Hi M le 
NeffSiR, ghiflfi, PB ii 
Nefman, Jin, PB ti 
Namu, Mathy, M 4$i M 11 
Niffflan, taffy 8,, PfV 21 
Neffi!, Eafi B:, 9S ii 
Nsffis, Pafflda J„ PfV 21 
Neffis, Payla J,, U I7i PfV 21 
NeHh, William P:, T Hi PfV 21 
N8fth»lt, Beyglas K:, P 12 
NyffheyH, Js A„ IfV |g 
Nirthfytt, M«R, JfV 17 
Ngftefl, glaiK M:, PfV 21 
N^^.^Millw B„ IsV i9i Tg 27i 

N^^,^ William A„ IfV Hi fg 27i 

N8f*88d, AflHR A:, PfV 21 

Nsfwwd, Bill A„ T 24i PB 17 
HanmA, JehH I,., PB 41 
N8fW88d, PdCF W:, II 9, II, 12 
N§t(»iRr, Ri^hafd g„ n il 
Nsvtili, Sftofat) A:, M 67i PfV 21 
NewliR, TtKlma J., JfV 17 
Nydisli, ViFgiRia, isq 41 
NyflH, ARdd §„ PfV 21 
NyRR, Jylia 6,, M 4;i JfV 24, 21 
Nyji, Aay W-., IsV 19 
Nyii, gyflihia J:, PfV 21 
Hn, Mifhad N„ II 44| PB H 


§akH, MithatI S,, II is, )} 
§iltH, Pamdi J„ IfV H 
eakliy, Jay P, JfV 17 
§ilil(y. lyiaRflf, PfV 21 
6ain, JifliH S„ IsV 19 
SatnaR, W, I;, IfV I 
§a(i, Patfitia A„ IfV H 
e'BFtRnaR, llswfflafy A:, M Hi g«V 

e'Bfiffl, Bafff, IfV H 

e'BfiM, Btlty J:, M I7i PfV 1} 

e'BficR, SsRald P„ gfV II 

SBfifR, Mfkf, IfV 17 

e'j^KR, Paula M„ i8Vl9i M 4li 

@'(<SHRW, JacqwIiM M:, JfV 17 



eddl, Savid, ffi $4 
Od«ll, Patti g„ JfV 17 
©dem, ARdFfi e„ PfV 21 
©deia, Sterw i„ IsV 19 
©dem, ©rc^aFy ©„ JfV 17 
©dsifl, Jaffl«§ H„ JfV 17 
©dsffl, Jehnny K,, il gj H 9 
©deffl, MiFianRt, ieV 19 
©dsRshM, JsHph P„ JfV I7i n II 

^ iirife*iif'ip/i'i^^ ''' '"^ '*' 

©gilvi», JaRit A„ JfV 17 
©gl(, Balphia X„ IfV 19 
©III, Viflii L:, PfV 21 
©'HaiF, ihfila l„ M lli leV 19 
©hlFifh, Tsya J., M Hi JfV 17| T 

©kfavff, Li!b(lh M„ PfV 21 
@l«f, ll«pl)(R 8„ IsV 19 
©liphaRF, Mifhad 1., JfV 17 
©livt, Thsffli! %:, IfV Hi ra Ii 
©live, P«My, IsV 19 
©li¥M, BiFRiy g;, II 9, fi 
©livM, Mifhad M„ JfV 17 
©livcF, Thsmas i„ P 22 
©lm««d, gyRihia J„ JfV 17 
©IssR, eayla B„ JfV 17 
©IssR, Jydith A., JfV 17 , 
©liSR, ilsbtit A„ IfV I 
SliSR, IhaFSR I:, IsV 19 
©'Malliy, PatFifla, JfV 17 
©'MaFa, JshR, IsV 19 
©'Ncal, NsRa 6:, IfV |g 
©'Nial, PafMla I,, JfV }7i H 27 
©'Ntal, 9tm A„ M 21 
©'Nial, R(b(€«a ft,, PfV 21 
©'Ndl, gyRihia A„ M 49i S^ 41 
©'Nfill, Paifi§ia A,, IfV H 
©'Ndll, Rehtft B„ IsV 19 
©pit, Alfffd J„ PS ii 
©pill, SaRRy g„ IfV H 
©pptffflaR, Aflhyf g:, PB i9 
S'iUilly, IhaRRSR M:, JfV 17 
©'Riley, Bsflald 
©'Bilty, Pat, PB «9 
©Ffms, NsFviR K:, ¥S iSi II 9, }| 
©'ftsyfkf, Saflid T:, 9S 21 
©Ff, Barhafa A:, IfV H 
©ftii, Smiia, Es^ H 
©flii, Mafy P„ E^ H 
©ftii, lally A:, IfV H 
©Ftii, iKlla &;, IsV 19 
©itoffl, StflRif, JfV 17 
©ihsfR, Hullii P:, PfV 21 
©ihsfR, Kdlah, JfV 17 
©fhsfRf, SsRald I:, IsV 19 
©sbsfRj, JafflH B., PfV 21 
©ihsFRC, Wycth J:, P 22 
©unsR, Rl€haFd E,, IsV 19 
©SRlk, luiaR A„ JfV 17i M II 
©>Ay, ©ary B„ IfV H 
©tl, gyRthia J„ IrV H 
6», BnccS, T Hi irV II 

©yllaRd, LiRda, IrV H 

^ftWp'ivW*'"' 

©yllaw, Willian L, JfV 17i 9 14 
©vfFtsR, Williaffl fi:, Tg Hi TS M 
©wifl, ©avid N„ PfV 21 
©w(R. PfaR#M I:, M 27 
©«<R, JaR(, PfV 21 
©wtfl, Jtffy B, 

©wtn, Mifhail, IfV Hi PB 41 
©wfR, Palfidi B„ M }9i JfV If 
©«m, RsM 6„ JfV 17 
©vffl, lally J„ JfV 17 
©•m, lianlty B<, M 4)i PB II 
©wffl, IhaHR, JfV If 



©wtni, Jtnli B„ irV M 
©wMi, JetiB C„ SI JJ, 40 
©««ns, Jehn N„ ieV 19 
©w»fM, J§hB i„ leV 19 
©wfBi, Ray, T 4}i JfV 17 
©wmi, Jkobtit W„ ifV Mi ra Jf 
©ylif, J>fM§ l„ JfV 17 
©asBBt, Miiy A„ PfV ]| 



Pact, gbaflsttt L„ 81^ 4)i JrV If 
Paff, Benald R,, PfV 21 
Pan, 8«ntl(y H„ Pi Jl 
Paw, Lafiy 1„ PfV 21 
Pag«, Tsifltitt, PfV 21 
Pitt, Williiffl A„ PB l£ 
Pair, lafflffly B„ IfV II 
Paist, Rifhafd, II il 
Palaiifis, Js, JfV 17 
Palit, Bshby. JfV 17 
Palffl«f, gifslyR, JfV 17 
PaifflCF, JshR @„ IfV II 
PalRMF, Palfida, IfV Hi M 21 
PalRMF, Rifhafd, IfV I 
PalfflCF, RshtFt, T I4i PB 1} 
PaRRfll, Karla A„ PfV 21 
Papaiia, ©Iga, M lli PfV 2| 
Paf^hfflaR, JshR S, PB 21 
Pafdw, g«l«t«, JfV 17 
PaFcti, Jswph, PB 2e, PfV 21 
PaFham, TiFFy B„ JfV 17 
Parish, ©viftsR l., PB 14 
Parish, %t^u N„ IsV 19 
PaFk, Js A:, IsV 19 
Pafliff, gynthia A„ IfV II 
Pafkif, Bsylt I:, JfV 17 
PaFiitf, Jst fi„ fisq 9 
PaflwF, J8« J„ PB 20, PfV II 
PariuF, JshR R„ II 24 
PaFWF, KaFtR A,, PfV 21 
PaFlwf, KaftR M., PfV 21 
Paflwf, Mafgafti, PfV 2| 
PafkcF, Ndl, M |7i T 29i ifV H 
ParlifF, Nichsis P., PfV 21 
PaflMf, Pafflda J„ IsV 19 
Parliff, Richard, PrV 21 
Paflwr, Rshcft 8„ IrV Hi 9 » 
Parlwf, RsdRiy B„ IsV 19 
PiAtf, lafflud g., JrV 17 
PafkfflaR, Kaihy, Es^ 41 
Pariitl« JshR R:, ra II 
Parffltr, Panda g,, PrV II 
ParRdI, RsRaid H„ JrV If 
Parrish, Brad A„ PB 41 
ParssRS, Rss«fflary J„ PrV II 
ParssRS, Thsnas W„ IfV H 
Passnsff, LfRR ©„ ieV 19 
Palt, gharlslt* L:, IrV 19 
Pati, Lsfflfia K„ IsV 19 
Patf, RsRald ©„ P Hi PB Hi IrV 

Patdia, Edward L„ irV H 
Palridt, IharsR S„ IsV 19 
Palridi, lusan L., T 47 1 JrV lf| M 

Pairifli, ThfFHa A„ PrV 11 
Palimsfl, gfdllii A„ g«V 19 
Palt«rssR, ghariM J„ IrV 19 
PaiKHHR, ghtryl W„ PrV II 
PatttrssR, BsHRa R,, PrV II 
PallirssR, Kalhy B„ JrV If 
PaiWFSsR, KtRRfth R.i IrV |9 
PaltfTssn, Linda g„ grV 19 
PitWiMi Mii^uila, IrV 19 
PallffiSfl, Nathan L„ IsV 10 
PattffMR, Paula A„ M Ii 
Paiitrwn, iharsn W„ IrV Hi M II 
Palitrisn, iMpiMR L,, JrV 17 
Pallsn, (Msrgt A., PrV II 



f 



Patton, Lucy, FrV 23 

Paul, Sherry L., SoV 20, M 27 

Paulk, Gerald R., JrV 17 

Paulk, Harold J., JrV 17 

Pixton, Boyce. SrV 39 

Payne, Billy F., SrV 39: Esq 34 

Payne, Carl J., JrV 17 

Payne, David, T 46 

Payne, Dorel S., M 41; SrV 39; M 63 

Payne, Jeffrey L., JrV 17 

Payne, Larry W., F 32 

Payne, Lester L., SrV 5 

Payne, Lorraine C, JrV 17 

Payne, Mary A., SrV 5 

Payne, Mary P. 

Payne, Philip M., JrV 17; F 24 

Payne, Russell V., SrV 39 

Payne, Vickie D., FrV 23 

Payton, Ralph M., SrV 39 

Peacock, Julie C, FrV 23 

Pearcc, Carolyn S., JrV 17 

Pearce, Karen R., SrV 39 

Pearce, Richard C, SrV 39 

Pearcy, Glenda C, FrV 23 

Pearson, Caren A., SrV 39 

Pearson, Linda A., SoV 20 

Pearson, Mary J., M 65 

Pearson, Michael A., PB 54 

Peavy, Charles R., SrV 39 

Peden, Michael P., SoV 20; PB 57 

Peden, Pamela, SrV 39 

Peden, Robert R., SrV 39 

Pederson, Kristen D., FrV 23; M 45 

Pederson, Sherry S., M 45 

Peek, Beatrice A., JrV 17 

Peek, Sara A., T 47; SrV 39 

Peeples, Michael N., SrV 39 

Pelzel, Donna J., SrV 39 

Pemberton, Dawn E., SoV 20 

Pena, Armando R., SoV 20 

Penafiel, Antonio S., SrV 39 

Penaficl, Lorenzo V., SrV 5 

Pendergrass, Roger D., PB 51 

Pendergrast, Pamela J., SrV 39 

Pendleton, Anita C, SrV 39 

Pendleton, Gail, M 21 

Pendleton, Robert W., SoV 20 

Pendleton, Stephen R., SoV 20; PB 

57 

Pendleton, William F., SrV 39; PB 
66 

Penn, Ronald W., JrV 17 

Pennington, Douglas S., SoV 20 

Penrod, Kenneth R., Esq 44; SrV 39 

Pepper, Tommy D., TC 31; SrV 39 

Perez, David, FrV 23 

Perez, Jose, PB 66 

Perkins, Barbara J., SrV 40 

Perkins, Dennis R., FrV 23 

Perkins, Ellna F., SoV 20 

Perkins, Glen W., FrV 23 

Perkins, Kenneth R., PB 52; SI 9 

Perkins, Patricia C, JrV 17 

Perkins, Paula A., FrV 23 

Perkins, Ronald A., SoV 20 

Perrin, John S., PB 60 

Perring, Larry, PB 54 

Perry, Deborah D., FrV 23 

Perry, Janice D., SoV 20 

Perry, Lee, SoV 20 

Perry, Linda A., FrV 23 

Perry, Robert D., PB 51 

Perry, Ross E., SrV 40 

Ferryman, Shirley M., T 48 

Persons, Thomas L., FrV 23 

Peterman, Mark D.. SoV 20 

Peters, Carolyn L., SrV 40 

Peters, Walter L.. PB 66 

Peterson, Miles R., FrV 23 

Peterson, Roger L., JrV 17 



Peterson, Samuel H., TC 22; TC 24; 
SrV 5 

Peterson, Wayne E., FrV 23 

Petree, John A., SoV 20 

Petrelli, John W., PB 42 

Fetter, Robert A., SrV 40 

Pettigrcw, Malcolm G., SrV 40 

Pettit. Gary M., PB 66 

Pettit, Roger A., SoV 20 

Pettier, Robert, PB 69 

Petty, Jerry W., FrV 23 

Peveto, Rebecca L., T 48; M 25 

Pfanmiller. James D., FrV 23 

Pfeiffer, Dennis K., SI 

Pfeiffer, Sara J., FrV 23 

Pharics, Philip E., JrV 17 

Pharr, Donald W., F 23; F 24; SrV 
40 

Pharr, Jean I., SrV 40; M 57 

Pharries, David, SoV 20 

Phelan, Mary F., SoV 20 

Phillips, Benay, FrV 23 

Phillips, Cheryl V., SoV 20 

Phillips, Craig D., FrV 23 

Phillips, Cynthia A., SoV 20 

Phillips, Deborah Y., M 65; FrV 23 

Phillips, Dennis H., JrV 17 

Phillips, Diane S., SrV 40 

Phillips, Edmund P., PB 46 

Phillips, James R., PB 41 

Phillips, James W., SrV 40; PB 66 

Phillips, John B., FrV 23 

Phillips, Kerry L., SoV 20 

Phillips, Merrilyn A., SoV 20 

Phillips, Niki S., FrV 23 

Phillips, Paige, SrV 40; Esq 45 

Phipps, Gary C, TC 30; SrV 40 

Phipps, James J., SrV 40 

Fiat, Eileen M., Esq 45 

Pickard, David F., SrV 40 

Pickens, Gene FrV 23 

Pickens, Pamela K., M 65 

Pickering, Jerry D., SoV 20 

Pickett, Cheryl A., FrV 23 

Pickett, David A., SoV 20 

Pickett, Pamela J., FrV 23 

Pickett, Rebecca M., SrV 40 

Pickett, Susan, M 65; FrV 23 

Pieper, Gary M., SrV 40 

Pierce, Anita F., SrV 40 

Pierce, George F., SrV 40 

Pierce, Jack W., SI 36, 40 

Pierce, Jearl R., FrV 23 

Pierce, Larry D., T 24 

Pierce, Priscilla A., FrV 23 

Pierce, Rebecca J., SoV 20 

Pierce, Shatalee R., Esq 45 

Pierce, Steve, FrV 23 

Pierson, Deborah K., FrV 23 

Pies, Donald B., JrV 17 

Pigg, Robert A., PB 54 

Pigett, Meredith, Esq 45; PB 36 

Pimlott, Steve J., SrV 40 

Pineda, Carlos R., SI 45 

Pinkert, Gladys M., JrV 18 

Pinkert, Janice D., FrV 23 

Pinkerton, Betty J., SrV 5 

Pinkerton, John H., SrV 40 

Pinson, Patricia D., PB 9; M 59 

Pinto, Nancy R., JrV 18 

Piper, Ann E., SrV 40 

Pippin, Rusty, Esq 34 

Pirtle, Kenneth D., PB 42 

Pirtle, Robert B., FrV 23 

Pirtle, Ronney D., SrV 40 

Pisano, Pie, SrV 40 

Pisano, Stanley J., SoV 20 

Pitner, John M., JrV 18 

Pitt, Stephen M.. PB 52 



Pittman, Deborah K., FrV 23 
Pittman, Larry E., SoV 20; PB 66 
Pittman, Mary A., M 30 
Pittman, Richard C, PB 51 
Pitts, James H., SrV 40 
Pitts, John W.. FrV 23 
Pitts, Kenneth D., TC 30 
Pitts, Lyna G.. TC 12; SoV 20 
Pitts, Phyllis A., JrV 18 
Pitzer, Betsy Shoemaker, SrV 40 
Plasek, Jennifer, Esq 45 
Plott, Donna J., SoV 20 
Plumlee, Janis R., FrV 23; M 59 
Plunk, Mary L., M 32 
Plunket, Paul W., FrV 23 
Poe, Jimmy R., SrV 40; PB 52 
Poc, John M., TC 40; JrV 18 
Poff, David P.. FrV 24 

Pohler, Laura L., T 39; JrV 18; PB 
56; M 49 

Pohlmeier, Theresa M., SoV 20; F 20 

Pointer, Manny H., JrV 18 

Polk, Kcnith L., TC 30 

Pollard, Judith L., SoV 20 

Pollard, Michael L., T 46 

Polley, William H., JrV 18 

Ponder, Sam L., SoV 20; F 21 

Ponder, Sandra L., FrV 24 

Poole, David R., FrV 24 

Poole, George D. 

Pope, Danny M., PB 46 

Pope, Janet M., SoV 20; M 65 

Porter, Clara L., JrV 18; PB 35 

Porter, Gary L., TC 38; SrV 40 

Porter, Leslie L., M 67; FrV 24 

Porter, Philip B., PB 45; SrV 40 

Porter, Scott C, SoV 20 

Porter, Sheridan A,, FrV 24 

Portwood, Richard M., FrV 24 

Poteet, Jackie M., FrV 24 

Poteet, Terri, SoV 20 

Potter, Nancy, SoV 20 

Potter, Richard S., SrV 40 

Potts, Kathy L., SoV 20; PB 38; M 
63 

Poulson, Sheila K., JrV 18; PB 63 

Pounds, Cecil L., SoV 20 

Pounds, Diane L., SoV 20; PB 35 

Powell, Anita F., SoV 20 

Powell, Anita S., M 49; M 59; JrV 
18 

Powell, Bob, SrV 40 

Powell, Daniel R., SoV 20 

Powell, James E., SrV 40 

Powell, Jane, JrV 18 

Powell, Jared R.. SI 43, 44 

Powell, Judy G., JrV 18; M 21 

Powell, Lynda, Esq 45 

Powell, Marvin D., SrV 40 

Powell, Mary L., SoV 20 

Powell, Nora L., M 65 

Powell, Patrick W., SoV 20 

Powell, Rusty, PB 69 

Power, Jacqualine, FrV 24 

Powers, Ida M., SrV 40 

Powers, Thomas D., PB 63 

Poynor, Phillip J., SrV 40 

Frail, Mandy, FrV 24 

Prasad, Janniah S., F 34 

Pratt, Judith L., T 48; SoV 20 

Prcas, Cecil G., JrV 18 

Preas, Cynthia A., SoV 20 

Prehn, David W., FrV 23 

Premsrirat, Suporn, SrV 5 

Premsrirat, Teresita, SrV 5 

Prenevost, Phyllis A. 

Prescott, Gary F., SoV 20 

Prescott, Gary R., SoV 20 

Presley, Cynthia, SrV 40 

Preston, Jimmy D., F 21 



Preston, Libby, SoV 20 
Preston, Margaret S., L 12 
Pribyla, Kenneth R., PB 69 
Price, Beverly G., JrV 18 
Price, Bill, FrV 24 
Price, Debbie L., SoV 20 
Price, Frank S., FrV 24 
Price, Judith R., M 67 
Price, Linda R., SrV 40 
Price, Luanna, TC 10 
Price, Michael L., PB 42; PB 33 
Price, Renee, JrV 18 
Price, Rick, PB 72; SrV 41 
Price, Thaxter D., FrV 24 
Price, William D., SoV 20 
Prichard, Judy J., SrV 41 
Prichard, Rickie L., SoV 20 
Priddy, Linda C, FrV 24 
Priddy, Robert E., PB 51 
Pring, Flower, M 57 
Pring, Madeline, SrV 41; L 20 
Pritchett, Deborah K., FrV 24 
Pritchett, Linda S., SoV 20 
Probst, Kenneth W., SoV 20 

Prochnow, Korecn L., SoV 20; M 36; 

M 57 

Proctor, Cheryl A., FrV 24 
Proctor, Jlynn 8., M 67 
Proll, Amanda R., M 63 
Prosk, Nancy K., Esq 45; JrV 18 
Pruett, Janice C, JrV 18 
Puckett, Logan F., FrV 24 
Puckett, Thomas F., T 24 
Pudney, Richard A., TC 40 
Pumphrcy, Norma J., JrV 18 
Purcell, Patti S., SoV 20 
Purcell, Rebecca S., M 43 
Purcell, Sara L., SrV 41 
Purdy, Bruce D., JrV IS 
Purdy, Gerald W., T 46 
Purdy, Sherri L., JrV 18 
Purgear, Helen, SoV 20 
Purkey, Jacqueline A., M 65 
Purselley, Lee R., PB 54 
Putteet, Trudy S., JrV 18 
Pylant, Pamela L., SoV 20 
Pylant, Vicki S., FrV 24 
Pyron, Michael D., JrV 18 



Quebe. Glen H., JrV 18 
Quebe, John M., TC 22; TC 24 
Quebe, Myra S., SrV 41 
Queen, Daniel M., SoV 20 
Queen, John D., PB 41 
Quesenberry, Marcia A., SrV 41 
Quick, Jerry A., SrV 41 
Quillin, Barbara, SrV 41 
Quinn, Joyce J., FrV 24 
Quintana, Ramiro, Esq 34 



Rabon, Carol A., SoV 21 
Raburn, Ollie B., FrV 24 
Rachael, Rosemary, FrV 24 
Rackley, Ann, SrV 41 
Racklcy, Joe R., T 46 
Radenz, Michael, PB 25 
Ragland, Kenny. JrV 18 
Rainer, Malinda A., SoV 20 
Rainey, Norton, PB 54 
Rainwater, Giles, FrV 24 
Rainwater, John C., FrV 24 
Rajaraman, Manjeri, F 34 
Ralston, Pennye, FrV 24 
Ralston. Robert, SoV 20 
Ramage, Carolyn K., SrV 5 
Ramey, Steven H., PB 17 



Freshman View — 53 



Ramirez. William E., FrV 24 
Ramos. Robert G., FrV 24 
Ramsey. Anita K., TC 36; SrV 41 
Ramsey, Barbara, M 33: M 4} 
Ramsey, Betty L.. SoV 20 
Ramsey, Doodie, M 57 
Ramsey. John E.. SoV 20 
Ramsey, Mark Taylor, SrV 41 
Ramsey. Michael. SoV 20 
Ramsey. Mickey. SoV 20 

Ramsey. Phyllis. FrV 24; TC 37; TC 

36 

Ramsey. Ronald D.. SrV 41 

Ramsey. Sandra L.. M 67 

Ramsey. Shari. SrV 41 

Ramsey, Stephen, JrV 18; PB 46 

Ranck, Robert R.. SrV 41 

Randies, Gerald, SrV 41 

Randolph, Ronnie, JrV 18 

Raney. Sarah L.. T II; SrV 41 

Range, Diane, TC 12; TC 1 

Rangel. John A.. FrV 24 

Rankin. Charles. PB 45 

Rankin, Cindy, FrV 24 

Rannefeld. James. SrV 41; PB 42 

Rannefeld. Kay. FrV 24 

Ransom. Walter N.. FrV 24 

Rapier, Mary K., SoV 20; M 21 

Rasco, Marcus S., SoV 20; FrV 24 

Rascoe, Robert L., JrV 18 

Rash. Rex I.. TC 38; TC 36 

Rasmussen. Christopher K., PB 60 

Ratcliff. Candace S.. FrV 24 

Ratcliff. Kathleen A., FrV 25 

Ratliff. Jo A., SrV 41; F 22; M 25; 
F 20 

Ratliff, Karen, SoV 20; M 32 

Ratliff, Mickic, SoV 20 

Ratliff. Randall, TC 24 

Ratliff, Sue, M 63; FrV 25 

Rattan, Su22an, SoV 20 

Rawlings, John D., FrV 25 

RawU, Dennis, PB 54 

Ray, Cathy L., JrV 18 

Ray. Gwendolyn. SoV 20 

Ray. James B.. JrV 18 

Ray. Katherine. F 20; JrV IS 

Ray. Melba J.. SrV 41 

Ray. Vicki M.. FrV 25 

Raybum, Garon, PB 25 

Rayl, Gina, M 25; SoV 21 

Reagan, John E., SrV 41 

Reagan, Linda. SrV 41 

Ream. Robert F.. SrV 41 

Reardon. James. SrV 41 

Reason, John, FrV 25 

Reasonover. Myra. JrV 18 

Rcasor. Helen S., SrV 41 

Reasor, Ronald, SrV 41 

Reast, Cherlyn A., SoV 20 

Real, Sandra F., JrV 18 

Reaves. Cathryn, JrV 18 

Reaves. Cynthia, SoV 21; M 21 

Reavis, Patricia A., SrV 41; M 57 

Rcbnid. Louis D., SI 9 

Reddick. Marshall. F 19 

Reddmg. Charlie K., SrV 41; TC 10; 

T 21 

Reddy. Peggy, M 45 

Redford. Carol. T 45 

Redinger. Georgeanne, SrV 41 

Redus. Chipper, FrV 25 

Redus. Susan. FrV 25 

Rceburgh. Elizabeth L.. M 57; FfV 
25 

Reed. Carolyn F., SrV 41 

Reed. Clark. JrV 18 

Reed. Deborah A.. SoV 21 

Reed, Jack. JrV 18 

Reed, Janet K.. JrV 18 

Reed. Jed N.. FrV 25 



Reed. Jimie D.. FrV 25; PB 45; SI 51 

Reed. Judy M.. FrV 25 

Reed. Linda M.. FrV 25 

Reed. Marilyn H.. SoV 21 

Reed. Michael, PB 26 

Reed, Paul W., JrV 18 

Reed. Richard L.. PB 11 

Reed. Scott. JrV 18 

Reed. Susan. SoV 21 

Reeder. Gail. SoV 21 

Reeder. Karen K.. SrV 41 

Reese. Harold. JrV 18 

Reese. James. FrV 25 

Reese. Johnny. FrV 25 

Reese. Nancy J.. FrV 25 

Reese. Randall. SrV 3 

Reese. Robert. FrV 25 

Reese. Rodney L.. SoV 21 

Reetz. Debra K.. FrV 25 

Reeve. Russell C. SoV 21 

Reeves. Deborah. SoV 21 

Reeves. Evelyn L.. SoV 21 

Reeves. Gary L., JrV 18; Esq 34 

Reeves. James, JrV 18 

Reeves, Kenneth, SrV 41 

Reeves, Mona R., SoV 21; M 43; L 

24 

Reeves, Pamela E., SoV 21; M 13 

Reeves, Patsy F.. SrV 41 

Reeves. Susan L.. SrV 41 

Reeves. Zane A.. SI 32. 33 

Reichardt. William D.. PB 46 

Reichmuth. Stephen D., JrV 18 

Reid. Jerry. FrV 25 

Reid. Raeann. JrV 18; M 28 

Reid. Ruth A.. SoV 21 

Reid. Skeeter. FrV 25 

Reinken, Charles, T 46 

Render. Paralyn S., TC 10; JrV 18 

Rcneau. James H., SrV 41 

Reneau. Melanic. SoV 21 

Reneau. Willie. TC 27 

Renner. Theresa A.. FrV 2} 

Renteria. Belinda A.. FrV 25 

Reschke. Diane. SrV 41 

Reuter. Linda J.. FrV 25 

Reynolds. Barbara K., JrV 18; T 29; 
M 60; M 40; M 49 

Reynolds. Billy, SrV 42 

Reynolds. Debra K.. M 43 

Reynolds. Ronald J., SrV 42 

Reznik. Richard G.. TC 22; TC 24: 

SrV 42 

Rhea. Clinton. JrV 18 

Rhea. Kathryn J.. SrV 42 

Rhew. Karen L.. SoV 21; M 15 

Rhoads. Kathy. SrV 42; M 21; F 18 

Rhoads. Scarlett. SoV 21 

Rhoads. Suzanne. JrV 18 

Rhodes. Ann L.. Esq 45 

Rhodes. Shary L., SoV 21 

Rhodes. Vikki C, SoV 21 

Rice. Clifford R., T 46 

Rice. Delise. SoV 21 

Rice. Jerry. TC 25; TC 23; TC 33; 
JrV 19 

Rice. Linda K.. M 40; JrV 19 

Rice, Linda, M 45 

Rice, Sandra T., SrV 42; M 45 

Richards, Brian, SoV 21 

Richards, Dorothy, JrV 19; M 28 

Richards, Kathryn D., F 15 

Richards, Kathleen. SrV 42 

Richards. Otis H.. SoV 21 

Richards. Phil. JrV 19 

Richards. Stephen. SoV 21 

Richards. Susan. M 67 

Richardson. Belva. JrV 19 

Richardson. Bruce. SrV 42 

Richardson. Connie, SrV 42 

Richardson. George S.. SoV 21; PB 
51 



Richardson. Gene. TC 30 
Richardson. Jesse N.. PB 25; SI 9. 53 
Richardson. John L.. JrV 19 
Richardson. Johnny M.. SrV 42 
Richardson. Kenneth O.. FrV 26 
Richardson. Linda L.. SrV 42 
Richardson. Mark. JrV 19 
Richardson. Michael R.. F 22 
Richardson, Steve. Esq 34 
Richardson. Warren D.. SrV 42 
Richburg. James L.. T 46 
Richerson. Toni. M 43; FrV 26 
Richie, Debra S.. FrV 26 
Richie. James R.. TC 31 
Richmond. Thomas G.. JrV 19 
Rickard. Janis A.. JrV 19 
Rick. Linda. FrV 26 
Rico. Jayme. SoV 21 

Riddel. Ana M.. M 49: SoV 21; M 

25 

Riddles. Lloyd. SrV 42 

Rider. Gary D.. SrV 42: PB 72 

Ridge. Larry J.. SI 51. 48 

Ridgeway. Nancy. SoV 21; M 59 

Ridlehuber. Kimberly. SrV 42 

Rieck. Barbara, SoV 21; M 33 

Rieck. Carolyn S.. M 33: M 45: M 
26; Esq 44 

Riefler. George C. SrV 42 

Riegcl. Bruce. FrV 26 

Riek. Linda L.. M 57 

Riek. Robert M.. PB 42 

Rics. Kyler L.. T 24 

Riggs, Ann H.. JrV 19 

Riggs. Nedree K.. JrV 19: M 25; M 
21: F 20 

Riggs. Susan L.. FrV 26 

Rigsby. Claudia. F 17; JrV 19 

Rigsby. Mary J.. SrV 42 

Riker. Joan E.. FrV 26 

Riley. Andy. JrV 19 

Riley. Cynthia. FrV 26 

Riley. James. FrV 26 

Riley. Patricia A.. SoV 21 

Riley. Patricia D.. SoV 21 

Rinne. Barbara J.. JrV 19; M 28 

Rios. Eliud. T 45 

Risley. Francis. TC 10; SrV 42 

Ritchie Anne L.. P 38; M 57; FrV 26 

Ritter. Mitchell R.. SoV 21 

Rittinger. Dena E.. SrV 42 

Rittimann, Nadine R.. JrV 19 

Ritzinger. Linda. JrV 19 

Ritzinger. Susan A.. M 30; SoV 21 

Rivera. John C. PB 17 

Rivera. Pat. Esq 38 

Rivers. Carol D.. SoV 21; M 59; M 

51 

Rivers. Steven D.. PB 52 

Rivers. Terry L.. FrV 26 

Rives. Donald F.. PB 54 

Rives. Ronald L.. FrV 26 

Rives. Terry H.. PB 51 

Roach. James W.. PB 51; TC 40 

Ro.nh. Jerry D.. SrV 42 

Roach. Steve. JrV 19 

Roach. William. F 26* 

Roark. Alice E.. JrV 19 

Roark. Mary A.. M 59: FrV 26 

Robberson. Michael. FrV 26 

Robbins. Adele J.. FrV 26 

Rohbins. Beverly A.. M 45: JrV 19 

Robbins, James M.. PB 72 

Robbins. Janice. M I5 

Riibhins. Joe. FrV 2(i 

Robbins. Kamose. FrV 26 

Robbins. Mike. Eiq 8 

Robbins. .Stephen W.. FrV 26 

Robbins. Willum C. FrV 26 

Rnhersun, Donna, StV 42 



Roberson. Guy L.. JrV 19 

Rob