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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland, College Park"

MARYLAND 

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 




UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND 

AT COLLEGE PARK 

1989-90 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduateca1989univ 



MARYLAND 



\ 

CHALLENGE 

GROW 
ACCOMPLISH 

M 

LEARN 



PROGRESS 



uNivERsrrvoi- Maryland at college park 



Policy Statement: The University of Maryland is an equal opportunity institution with respect to both education and employment The University's policies, 
programs and activities are in compliance with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on nondiscrimination regarding race, color, religion, age, 
national origin, sex and handicap Inquiries regarding compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. as amended. Title IX of the 1972 Educational 
Amendments. Section 504. of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, or related legal requirements should be directed to 

Director. Oflice of Human Relations 

1107 Hornbake Library 

The University of Maryland 

College Park. MD 20742 
(Complete texts of the University Human Relations Code and the Campus Policies and Procedures on Sexual Harassment are printed in Appendix A 
and Appendix B of this catalog ) 

Inquiries concerning the application of Section 504 and part 84 of C F R to the University of Maryland. College Park MD may be directed to 
Disabled Student Services 
0126 Shoemaker Hall 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742. 

Disclaimer: The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as a contract between the student and the University of Maryland Changes are effected 
from time to time in the general regulations and in the academic requirements There are established procedures for making changes, procedures whicfl 
protect the institution's integnty and the individual student's interest and welfare A curriculum or graduation requirement, when altered, is not made 
retroactive unless the alteration is to the student's advantage and can be accommodated within the span of years normally required for graduation. The 
campus cannot give assurance thai all students will be able to take all courses required to complete the academic program of ttieir choice wiltiin eight semesters Additionally, 
because of space limitations in selective admission programs. College Park may not tie able to offer admission to all qualified students applying to these programs 

When the actions of a student are judged by competent authority, using established procedure, to be detrimental to the interests of the University 
community, that person may be required to withdraw from the University. (For the complete University of Maryland Code of Student Conduct, see Appendix 
C of this catalog ) 

Important Information on Fees and Expenses: Ail Students Who Pre register incur a Financial Obligation to the University Those students who pre-register and 
subsequently decide not to attend must notify the Registrations Office. Room 1 130A. Mitchell Building (formerly North Administration Building), in writing, 
prior to the first day of classes If this office has not received a request for cancellation by 4:30 p m of the last day tjefore classes begin, the University will 
assume the student plans to attend and accepts his or her financial obligation 

After classes begin, students who wish to terminate their registration must follow the withdrawal procedures and are liable forcharges applicable at the 
time of withdrawal. 

State of Maryland legislation has established a State Central Collections Unit, and in accordance with State law. the University is required to turn over all 
delinquent accounts to it for collection and legal follow-up. This is done automatically on a month-to-month basis by computer read-out 

Collection Costs: Collection costs incurred in collecting delinquent accounts will be charged to the student The minimum collection fee is 15%. plus any 

attorney and/or court costs 

Disclosure of Information: In accordance with "The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974" (P.L. 93-380), popularly referred to as the "Buckley 
Amendment," disclosure of student information, including financial and academic, is restricted. Release to anyone other than the student requires a 
written waiver from the student. (For complete University policy on access to and release of student data/information, see Appendix D of this catalog.) 

Gender Reference: The masculine gender whenever used in this document is intended to include the feminine gender as well 

Smoking Policy: It is hereby established as the policy of the College Park Campus to achieve a public environment as close to smoke-free as practicably 
possible (See Appendix E of this catalog for the complete "Smoking Policy and Guidelines") 

For the purposes of this publication the term University of Maryland refers only to the campuses existing prior to July 1 , 1988 This includes the campuses at 
Baltimore, Baltimore County, College Park, Eastern Shore and University College. 



Contents 



AcadAmic Calendar 4 

Guide to Information 4 

1. Ttie University of Maryland at College Park 5 

2. Admissions Requirements and Application Procedures 8 

3. Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 16 

4. Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 22 

5. Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 30 

6. University Studies Program 39 

7. The Colleges and Schools 45 

College of Agriculture 45 

School of Arcfiitecture* 48 

College of Arts and Humanities 49 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 50 

College of Business and Management* 52 

College of Computer, N/latfiematical, and Physical Sciences . . , 56 

College of Education 57 

College of Engineering 59 

College of Human Ecology 61 

College of Journalism' 62 

College of Library and Information Services+ 63 

College of Life Sciences 63 

College of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation 64 

School of Public Affairs+ 65 

'This College is not organized by departments Tfiis chapter includes all 
information on the College's program requirements. 

+Graduate Programs only. See the current Graduate Catalog. 

8. Departments and Campus-Wide Programs 66 

Note: Departments and Programs are listed alphabetically, regardless of 
College or School Undergraduate certificate programs and pre-professional 
programs appear at the end of the list The acronyms in parentheses 
represent course code prefixes 

Aerospace Engineering (ENAE) 66 

Afro-American Studies Program (AASP) 67 

Agricultural Chemistry (AGCH) 67 

Agricultural Engineenng (ENAG) 68 

Agricultural Sciences, General (AGRI) 68 

Agricultural and Extension Education (AEED) .69 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (AREC) .69 

Agronomy (AGRO) 70 

American Studies (AMST) 70 

Animal Sciences (ANSC) 71 

Anthropology (ANTH) 71 

Applied fulathematics Program (t\/1APL) 72 

Architecture (ARCH). See College listing 72 

Art (ARTT) 72 

Art History (ARTH) 73 

Astronomy Program (ASTR) 73 

Biological Sciences Program 74 

Botany (BOTN) 75 

Business (BlvlGT) See College listing 52 

Chemical and Nuclear Engineering (ENCH, ENNU) 75 

Chemistry and Biochemistry (CHEM, BCHI^) 77 

Civil Engineenng (ENCE) 78 

Classics (CLAS, LAIN, GREK) 79 



Communication Arts and Theatre (SPCH, RTVF, THET) 79 

Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 80 

Computer Science (CMSC) 80 

Counseling and Personnel Services (EDCP) 81 

Criminal Justice and Criminology (CRIM, CJUS) 81 

Curriculum and Instruction (EDO) ... 82 

Dance (DANC) 87 

Economics (ECON) 87 

Education Planning, Policy & Admin. (EDPA) 88 

Electrical Engineenng (ENEE) 88 

Engineering, General B.S 89 

English Language and Literature (ENGL) 90 

Entomology (ENTO) 91 

Family and Community Development (FMCD) 91 

Fire Prevention Engineenng (ENFP) 92 

Food Science Program (FDSC) 93 

French and Italian (FREN, ITAL) 93 

Geography (GEOG) 94 

Geology (GEOL) 95 

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures (GERf^, SLAV) 96 

Government and Politics (GVPT) 96 

Health Education (HLTH) ,97 

Hearing and Speech Sciences (HESP) 98 

Hebrevii and East Asian Languages and Literatures 

(HEBR, CHIN, JAPN) 98 

History (HIST) 99 

Horticulture (HORT) .99 

Housing and Design (HSAD, APDS) 101 

Human Development (EDHD) 102 

Human Nutrition and Food Systems (HNFS) 102 

Industrial, Technical & Occupational Ed. (EDIT) 104 

Jewish Studies Program (ARHU) 106 

Journalism (JOUR). See College listing 106 

Linguistics Program (LING) 107 

Ivlathematics (MATH) 107 

Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation (EDMS) 108 

Mechanical Engineenng (ENME) 109 

Meteorology (METO) 110 

Microbiology (MICB) 110 

Music (MUSC) 110 

Natural Resources Management Program (NMRT) Ill 

Philosophy (PHIL) 112 

Physical Education (PHED) 112 

Physical Sciences Program 114 

Physics Program (PHYS) 114 

Psychology (PSYC) 115 

Recreation (RECR) 116 

Romance Languages Program (ARHU) 116 

Russian Area Studies Program (ARHU) 116 

Science Communications , 117 

Sociology (SOCY) 117 

Spanish and Portuguese (SPAN. PORT) 118 

Special Education (EDSP) 119 

Statistics and Probability (STAT) 120 

Textiles and Consumer Economics (TEXT) 120 

Urban Studies (URBS) 122 

Women's Studies Program (WMST) 123 

Zoology (ZOOL) 124 



Undergraduate Studies 124 

General Honors Program (HONR) 124 

Individual Studies (IVST) 124 



Pre-Professional Programs 125 

PreOental Hygiene '. 125 

Pre-Dentistry 126 

Pre-Law 126 

PreMedical Technology 127 

Pre-Medlcine 127 



4 

PreNursing 128 

PreOsieopaihic Medicina 128 

PrePharmacy 128 

PrePhysical Therapy 129 

Pre-Podiatnc Medicine 129 

Campus- Wide and Undergraduate Certificate Programs 130 

Air Science (Air Force ROTC) 130 

Afro-American Studies 131 

Applied Social Science 131 

East Asian Studies 131 

Liberal Arts in Business 131 

Women's Studies 132 

9. Approved Courses 133 

10. University of Maryland and College Parle Administrators and 

Faculty 20i 



Appendices 

A University Human Relations Code 
B Campus Policies and Procedures on Sexual Harassment 
C Code ol Student Conduct 
D Policy on Disclosure ot Student Records 
E Smelting Policy and Guidelines 
F Resolution on Academic Integrity 
G Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure 
H Procedures (or Review o( Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious 
Grading 



Index 



227 
227 
230 
231 
237 
239 
239 
240 



Map 



245 



250 



1989-90 Academic Calendar 



Summer Session I, 1989 

First Day of Classes June 5 

Last Day of Classes July 14 



Summer Session II. 1989 

First Day of Classes July 17 

Last Day of Classes August 25 



Fall Semester. 1989 

First Day of Classes 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Last Day of Classes 
Final Examinations 
Comnnencement 



September 5 
November 23-26 
December 12 
December 14-21 
December 22 



Spring Semester, 1990 

First Day of Classes 
Spring Recess 
Last Day of Classes 
Final Exams 
Commencement 



January 22 
March 19-25 
May 14 
May 16-23 
May 24 



GUIDE TO INFORMATION 

Publications: 

Departmental Brochures: Small brochures describing many ot tlie 
departments and programs at College Park are available free Wnte to the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Mitchell Building, University of (Mary- 
land, College Park (MD 20742. or contact the department directly 

Graduate Catalog/Graduate Bulletin: For mtormation about obtaining 
the Graduate Catalog or Graduate Bulletin, call 301/454-3198, or write to 
the Graduate Office. Lee Building. University of (Maryland. College Park. 
(MD 20742 

Prelude: College Park publishes a free mini-catalog and application 
packet. Prelude, for prospective undergraduate students For a copy of 
this booklet, call 301/454-5550, or wnte to the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions. (Mitchell Building. University of Maryland, College l^ark. MD 
20742 

Schedule of Classes: The Schedule of Classes lists course offerings 
and class times and room assignments, registration dates and procedures, 
deadlines, fees, and general information The Schedule is published four 
times a year, twice each semester The first edition is available prior to early 



registration for the spnng and fall semesters The second edition, pub- 
lished a few weeks before the beginning of each semester updates course 
offerings and registration procedures The Schedule is availat)l€ to all 
students free of charge and can be (Mcked up at the Mitchell Building 
Stamp Student Union Hornbake Library and McKeldin Library 

Undergraduate Catalog: The Undergraduate Catalog is sent to all 
students admitted to College Park and is available free to all undergradu- 
ates and faculty at College Park with a valid ID Copies are available for 
consultation in libraries and in high schools in Maryland the District of 
Columbia, and Virginia Copies are on sale to the general public for S2 50 to 
cover postage and handling Send a check (payalsle to University Book 
Center) to the University Book Center Stamp Student Union. University of 
Maryland. College Park MD 20742 Write Catakjg on the check Please 
allow four weeks for delivery 

Frequently Called Numbers (The area code lor Marytand is 301 ) 



General Information 454-3311 

Undergraduate Admissions 

454 5550 
Student Financial Aid 454 3046 
Student Accounts 454-4832 

Advising 454-2733 



Campus Parking 

On-Campus Housing 
Off-Campus Housing 
Orientation 
Summer Programs 



454-4242 

454 2711 
454-3645 
4545752 
454 3347 



1 The University of 
Maryland at uollege 
Park 



The Goals of An Undergraduate 
Education at College Park 

An education at the University of Maryland at College Park strives to cultivate Intellect by teaching students to 
extend principles and ideas to nevi situations and to new groups of people It aims to provide students with a sense of 
identity and purpose, a concern for others, a sense of responsibility for the quality of life around them, a continuing 
eagerness for knowledge and understanding, and a foundation for a lifetime of personal enrichment It enlivens students 
to enlarge the common understanding, to develop humane values, to celebrate tolerance and fairness, to contribute to 
the social conscience, to monitor and assess private and collective assumptions, and to recognize the glory, tragedy, 
and humor of the human condition 

Specifically, undergraduate education at College Park seeks to enable students to develop and expand their use of 
basic academic and intellectual tools Students are educated to be able to read with perception and pleasure, write and 
speak with clarity and verve, handle numbers and computation proficiently, reason mathematically, generate clear 
questions and find probable arguments, reach substantiated conclusions, and accept ambiguity Students also study in 
depth and acquire a substantial competence in a coherent academic discipline 

A College Park education helps students to become aware of the variety of ways of knowing, the complexity of being 
human, and to understand their place in history and in the contemporary world Students learn to analyze and 
appreciate artistic creations, to identify and evaluate moral questions, to synthesize and integrate knowledge, and to 
become intellectually flexible, inventive, and creative 

From: Promises to Keep: The College Park Plan for Undergraduate Education. Approved by the Campus Senate 
ivlarch, 1988 



HISTORY 

Just after the American Revolution, the state of Maryland established 
its first two colleges at Chestertown and Annapolis By the 1850s, at least 
thirty little colleges had sprung up over the state, many with state support, 
but many of them disappearing within a few years Then, in 1859adif1erent 
kind of institution appeared at College Park-the Maryland Agricultural 
College, the third such college in the world, created mainly for farmers' 
sons 

The college was established by Charles Benedict Calvert, a wealthy 
planter from nearby Riversdale-now Riverdale -and later a congressman 
Calvert built a handsome Gothic dormitory-classroom structure located in a 
grove of trees near the present Morrill Hall, and he divided the land down to 
the Baltimore-Washington Turnpike into small plots where each of the 50- 
or-so students experimented with a different agricultural crop 

After the Civil War the institution became a land-grant college, with 
small appropriations from Washington The little college began to grow 
about 1900 when agricultural experiments began to bring prosperity to 
Maryland, and when the college expanded its offerings into engineering, 
business, and the liberal arts In 1912 the old Gothic building burned, and 
the state provided modern structures Women were admitted to the cam- 
pus, and graduate work began In 1920 the college combined with the long- 
established professional schools of Baltimore and changed its name to the 
University of Maryland 

Growth accelerated after 1935 when the politically astute football 
coach, H C "Curley " Byrd became president, added scores of new pro- 
grams, and won national football championships In the 1950s and 1960s, 
President Wilson H. Elkins maintained the rapid growth, and College Park 
became one of the largest campuses in the nation President Elkins, a 
Rhodes Scholar, transformed the institution's public image from that of a 
party school to one of academic integrity 

In the 1970s and 1980s, the University's graduate and research pro- 
grams have especially flourished In 1987. the General Assembly of Mary- 
land combined six state colleges with the five campuses of the University 
of Maryland, and specifically charged College Park with the role of leader- 
ship College Park recognizes its special responsibility as the flagship and 
the largest of the eleven institutions within the statewide university system 
to lead the University of Maryland's quest for excellence To this end. 
College Park offers broad coverage in the traditional arts and sciences as 
well as in a wide range of professional and pre-professional programs The 



institution IS organized into fourteen Colleges and Schools encompassing 
over 100 departments and campus-wide programs of study. A growing 
number of these departments and programs rank among the best in the 
nation Today the University of Maryland stands, by any measure, as one of 
the leading institutions in the world, 

RESEARCH AT COLLEGE PARK 

Opportunities for conducting research abound at College Park and in 
the surrounding area, both for faculty to advance their own expertise and 
bring their insights back into the classroom, and for students to begin the 
exploration of their special interests with hands-on expenence 

On campus, special facilities and a number of organized research 
Bureaus, Centers, and Institutes promote the acquisition and analysis of 
new knowledge in the arts, sciences, and applied fields A sampling of 
such facilities includes a computer vision laboratory, a full-scale low-veloc- 
ity wind tunnel, computer-assisted cartographic laboratories, a psychol- 
inguistics laboratory, a Superconductivity Research Center, the Laboratory 
for Plasma and Fusion Studies, the Developmental Psychology Laboratory, 
the Center on Aging, the Systems Research Center, the Engineering 
Research Center, the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies, and 
the Agricultural Experiment Station 

Off campus, UMCP scientists have placed a Low Energy Charged 
Particle experiment on board Voyager 2. which will pass Neptune in 
August, 1989; others are involved in the development of the world's largest 
array of radio telescopes housed at the Hat Creek Observatory of the 
University of California at Berkeley, UMCP is leading a multi-institutional 
excavation of the ruined city of Caesarea Maritima in Israel, where Pontius 
Pilate lived while serving as Roman governor of Judea Aided by the 
Maryland Sea Grant, UMCP zoologists and microbiologists study the fish- 
eries of the Chesapeake Bay 

College Park's unique location-just 10 miles from downtown Washing- 
ton, D C , and approximately 30 miles from both Annapolis and Baltimore- 
enhances the research of its faculty and students because of its access to 
some of the finest libraries and research centers in the country These 
include the National Institutes of Health, the Smithsonian Institution, the 
USDA Beltsville National Agricultural Research Center and National Agri- 
cultural Library, the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Folger 
Shakespeare Library, and many other academic and special libraries In the 



6 Undergraduate Programs of Study 



Baltimore area in addition to Itie University s own libraries at Baltimore 
County and on ttie professional campus in Baltimore City, are the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library and the Maryland Hisloncal Association Library The 
state capital at Annapolis is the site of the (Maryland Hall of Records 

THE LIBRARIES 

The seven libranes which make up the University of Maryland at Col- 
lege Park library system offer outstanding resources and services. The 
holdings of the Libraries include over 1 92 million volumes, approximately 
3 6 miNion microform units. 22.747 current periodical and newspaper sub- 
scriptions as well as over 622,000 government documents. 101.000 maps, 
and extensive holdings of phonorecords. films and filmstrips, slides, prints, 
and music scores The Libraries also feature a collection of over 1 3 million 
technical reports -one of the most outstanding collections of its kind in the 
nation 

Hornbake Library is the undergraduate library, providing reference, 
circulation and reserve services in all subject areas to undergraduate 
students A late-night study room is open 24 hours during the fall and 
spring terms Nonprint Media Services, located on the fourth floor of 
Hornbake. is the central audio-visual department for the UMCP Libranes 
The collection consists primarily of videocassettes, films, audiocassettes, 
and the equipment and facilities to use them 

The Theodore R McKeldin Library is the mam research library of the 
UMCP library system The combined online and card catalogs at McKeldin 
include records of holdings for the entire UMCP library system In addition. 
McKeldin's reference works, periodicals, circulating books, special collec- 
tions and other materials provide support for research and teaching 
throughout the University, with special emphasis on the humanities, the 
social sciences, and the life sciences 

The five specialized branch libraries on campus offer extensive 
resources which provide essential support for study, research, and teach- 
ing These include the Architecture Library, the Art Library, the Engineering 
and Physical Sciences Library, the Music Library, and the White Memorial 
(Chemistry) Library 

Included among the most outstanding special holdings of the Libranes 
are the International Piano Archives at Maryland, a world-renowned collec- 
tion of piano performance matenals; the National Trust for Historic Preser- 
vation Library, located in the Architecture Library, the Maryland Room-a 
major center for Maryland studies; the Gordon W Prange Collection of 
Japanese-language publications, 1945-49: the US Patent Depository 
Library: the Government Document and Maps Room, featuring US gov- 
ernment publications as well as publications of the United Nations, the 
League of Nations and other international organizations, maps from the 
US Army Map Service and the U S Geological Survey, the Katherine 
Anne Porter Collection: and the East Asia Collection. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

The Computer Science Center supports oncampus computing 
through a full range of quality computing services It offers many training 
courses in popular microcomputer and mainframe software packages, as 
well as consulting and "first aid" services The Center supports advanced 
workstation and microcomputer laboratories across campus for day and 
evening self-study and class projects. To support teaching and research, 
the Center offers networked computer resources, including IBM and 
Unisys mainframes and special purpose scientific computers Qualified 
researchers at College Park may also access off-campus supercomputers 
The Center also houses a Program Library and operates a computer store, 
which sells microcomputers and provides low cost service and mainte- 
nance to members of the campus community 

ACCREDITATION 

The University of Maryland is accredited by the Middle States Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools and is a member of the Associa- 
tion of American Universities In addition, individual colleges, schools, and 
departments are accredited by such groups as the American Association 
of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American Chemical Society, the 
National Association of Schools of Music, the Section of Legal Education 
and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar Association, the Accredit- 
ing Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications, the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, the Council on Dental 
Education of the Amencan Dental Association, the Committee on Accredi- 
tation of the American Library Association, the American Psychological 
Association, the Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Social 
Work Education, the Council on Medical Education of the American Medi- 
cal Association, the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accredi 
tation Board for Engineering and Technology (see College of Engineering 
for a listing of accredited engineering programs), the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education the National League for Nursing, and 
the National Architectural Accrediting Board In addition, all programs in 
the Department of Human Nutntion and Food Systems have been 
approved by the American Dietetic Association 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF 
STUDY 

College of Agriculture 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agriculture 

Agriculture/Veterinary (combined) 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agronomy 

Animal Sciences 

Food Science 

Horticulture 

Natural Resources Management Program 

School of Architecture 

Architecture 
Architecture/Urban Studies 

College of Arts and Humanities 

Advertising Design 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History 

Classical Languages and Literatures 

Dance 

East Asian Languages and Literatures 

English Language and Literature 

French Language and Literature 

Germanic Languages and Literatures 

History 

Housing 

Intenor Design 

Jewish Studies 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

RadioTelevision/Fllm 

Romance Languages 

Russian Area Studies 

Russian Languages and Literature 

Spanish Languages and Literature 

Speech Communication 

Theatre 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Afro-Amencan Studies 

Anthropology 

Criminal Justice 

Cnminology 

Economics 

Geography 

Government and Politics 

Hearing and Speech Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Urban Studies 

College of Business and Management 

Accounting 

Business/Law 

Finance 

General Business Administration 

Management Science and Statistics 

Marketing 

Personnel and Labor Relations 

Production Management 

Transportation 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physi- 
cal Sciences 

Astronomy 
Compoter Science 



Undergraduate Prog rams of Study 7 



Geology 
Mathematics 
Physical Sciences 

Physics 

College of Education 

Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Technology 
Secondary Education 

Art 

English Language Arts 

Foreign Language 

General Business 

Home Economics 

Marketing and Distribution 

Mathematics 

Music 

Science 

Secretarial 

Social Studies 

Speech and English 

Theatre and English 
Special Education 
Vocational/Technical Education 

College of Engineering 

Aerospace Engineering 
Agricultural Engineenng 
Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Engineering 

Fire Protection Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

College of Human Ecology 

Apparel Design 

Community Studies 

Consumer Economics 

Dietetics 

Experimental Foods 

Family Studies 

Foodservice Administration 

Human Nutrition and Foods 

Management and Consumer Studies 

Textile Marketing/Fashion Merchandising 

Textile Science 



College of Journalism 
College of Life Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Entomology 

Microbiology 

Zoology 

College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 

Health Education 
Kinesiological Sciences 
Physical Education 
Recreation 

Undergraduate Studies 

Allied Health Professions; 
Preprofessional Options 
Pre-Dental Hygiene 
PreMedical Technology 
Pre-Nursing 
Pre-Pharmacy 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

Pre-Dentistry* 

PreLavi^* 

PreMedicine' 

PreOptometry* 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine" 

PrePodiatnc Medicine" 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine* 

"Advising available 

General Honors Program 

Individual Studies 

Undecided Undergraduate Studies 

Campus-Wide Certificates 

Afro-American Studies 
Applied Social Science 
East Asian Studies 
Liberal Arts in Business 
Women's Studies 



2 Admissions Require- 
ments and Application 
Procedures 



Freshman Admissions Criteria 

The University of Maryland is a pubiicly-supporled land grant institution 
dedicated primarily to the educational needs of Maryland residents Within 
Its responsibilities as a State institution, the University attracts a cosmopol- 
itan student body and each year offers admission to a number of promising 
students from other states and lurisdlctions. Currently, fifty stales, the 
District of Columbia, two territories, and 100 foreign countries are repre- 
sented in the undergraduate population. Admissions policies for the 
upcoming semesters are determined by the Board of Regents 

The University of Maryland at College Park maintains a competitive 
admissions policy, with priority given to those students with the most 
outstanding academic credentials, and seeks to enroll students who 
demonstrate the potential for academic success That potential is typically 
assessed by examination of high school course work and SAT scores In 
general, all entering students should have completed four years of high 
school English; three years of history or social science: two years of sci- 
ence, both of which will involve laboratory work; and three years of mathe- 
matics courses equivalent at least to Algebra I, Algebra II, and Plane 
Geometry; and beginning in fall 1991, two years of a foreign language. In 
addition, students are strongly encouraged to take a fourth year of mathe- 
matics and prior to 1991, at least two years of a foreign language. 

Criteria for Out-of-state Applicants 

The University is committed to developing a cosmopolitan student 
body Therefore, applications from students residing in jurisdictions other 
than Maryland are welcome Generally, a successful out-of-state applicant 
must have higher than average SAT scores and high school grades 

Subjects Used for Computation of the High 
School Academic Grade Point Average 

Because of variations in course titles in the secondary school systems, 
this listing is not inclusive. It does, however, provide examples of the types 
of courses College Park utilizes in computing the high school academic 
grade point average 

English. Communications, Composition, Conversational Language. Crea- 
tive Writing, Debate, Expressive Writing, Journalism, Language Arts, Liter- 
ature, Public Speaking, World Literature 

Foreign Languages. French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Latin, Rus- 
sian. Spanish Other 

Mathematics. Advanced Topics, Algebra I, Algebra 11, Analysis (or Elemen 
tary Analysis), Analytic Geometry. Calculus, Computer Math, Functions, 
Geometry, Mathematics II. Mathematics III, Mathematics IV, Matrices 
Probabilities, Modern Geometry, Modern Math, Probability and Statistics, 
E AM (Rev Acad Math), S M S G , Tngonomelry. 

Science. Advanced Biology Advanced Chemistry, Biology, Chemistry, 
Earth Science, General Science, Genetics, Geology. Laboratory Science, 
Physical Science. Physics, Space Science, Zoology 

Social Studies. AfroAmencan Studies, American History. Ancient History, 
Anthropology, Child Development, Civics-Citizenship, Contemporary 
Issues (C I S S ), Cultural Areas, Cultural Heritage, Economics, Economic 
Citizenship, Ethics (if considered to be Religion, not counted), European 
History, European History and Survey, Family Living, Far East, Geography, 
Government, Humanities, International Affairs, Medieval History, Modern 
History, Modern Problems, National Governmenl. Pan American, Philoso 
phy. Political Science, Problems of Democracy, Problems of 20th Century, 
Psychology. Sociology, State History, U S History, World Civilization, 
World Cultures 



SAT Scores 

The SAT examination is required of all freshman applicants Test results 
must be submitted directly to College Park by the Educational Testing 
Service or be included on the high school transcnpt The applicant is 
strongly urged to include his/her social security number when registering 
for the SAT The social secunty number will expedite processing of the 
application for admission by College Park The reporting code for College 
Park is 5814 The University strongly recommends that the SAT be taken 
as early as possible The January test is generally the latest acceptable 
examination for fall applicants Further information on the SAT may be 
obtained from high school guidance offices or directly from the Educational 
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

While SAT's and GPA's play an Important role In the admissions pro- 
cess, they are not the sole factors In determining a candidate's admissibil- 
ity The Admissions Committee may review a student m light of his or her 
unique talents and abilities Students with accomplishments in other 
realms, such as fine arts, leadership, and athletics, should make this infor- 
mation available to the Admissions Office 

To help you evaluate your chances for admission to College Park, a 
profile of students enrolled in the Fall 1988 freshman class is provided 



SAT Score 



Total Freshman Class 



Enrolled (%) 



1200 or above 
1000 to 1199 
800 to 999 
799 or below 
No Scores 



Academic Grade Point 
Average 



Enrolled (%) 



3 5 or above 
3 to 3 49 
2.5 to 2 99 
2 to 2 49 
1 99 or tDelow 
No GPA 



High School Transcripts 

In general. College Park requires freshman applicants to earn a high 
school diploma prior to their first registration at the University Applicants 
should make sure Iheir final high school transcripts are sent to the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions prior to enrolling All offers of admission are 
contingent upon satisfactory completion of current work. 

Use of Mid-Year Grades 

The University will reserve a decision on the apF>lications of Maryland 
residents who do not meet the criteria outlined above until midyear grades 
are available for the senior year in high school College Park is unable to 
utilize the final high school marks in rendering decisions lor applicants who 
are applying for admission directly from high school 

If mid-year grades for the senior year in high sctKXSl are available wt>en 
an application is initially considered by the College Park admissions staff, 
they will be used in determining eligibility for admission 

Advanced Placement Credit (AP) 

General Statement 

The following AP examinations are accepted for credit at College Park. 
according to the criteria outlined below If Advanced Racement credits are 
already on a student record from an institution outside the University of 



Admissions Requirements and Application Procedures 9 



Maryland System, the score must be equivalent to a tninimum score the 
University accepts, otherwise, the credit will not be considered for transfer 
Students will be expected to provide the Advanced Placement score 
reports from Ihe Educaliona! Testing Service 



AP Examinations Accepted (or Credit at UMCP 

Art. For achievement of a score of 3. three hours of credit are granted for 
ARTH 100 For a score of 4 or 5. six hours of credit are granted for ARTH 
260 and 261 

Biology. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4. eight hours of credit are 
granted The student may not take BOTN 101 or ZOOL 101 for credit: the 
student may take any course for which BOTN 101 or ZOOL 101 is prerequi 
site For achievement of a score of 3. four hours of credit are granted 
Students who wish to go further in botany or zoology should consult with 
an advisor or the appropriate department head about their exact place- 
ment in their individual curricula 

Chemistry. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4, eight hours of credit are 
granted The student may not take CHEM 101. 102, 103. 105. 113. or 115 
for credit; the student may take any course for which CHEI^^ 113. is a 
prerequisite For achievement of a score of 3. four hours of credit are 
granted The student may not take CHEM 101 , 102, 103, or 105 for credit, 
but may take any course for which CHEM 103 or 105 is a prerequisite 
Students desiring to take additional courses in chemistry should consult 
with the Chemistry Department concerning their exact placement in a 
sequence appropriate to their programs 

Computer Science. Upon achieving a score of 5 on the AB examination, 
six hours of credit will be granted For a score of 4 on the AB examination or 
a score of 5 on the A examination, four hours of credit will be granted The 
student may not take CMSC 120 for credit 

English. For a score of 4 or 5 on the "Literature and Composition" exami- 
nation, six hours of credit will be granted (three for English 101 and three 
for English 102) For a score of 4 or 5 on the "Language and Composition" 
examination, six hours of credit will be granted (three for English 101 and 
three for English 291 ) For a score of 3 on the "Literature and Composition" 
examination, three credits (for English 102) will be granted, and for a score 
of 3 on the "Language and Composition" examination, three credits (for 
English 291) will be granted A score of 3 does nof exempt students from 
the USP freshman level requirement A score of 4 or 5 does not exempt 
students from the USP junior level requirement. A score of 600 on the SAT 
Verbal still exempts students from English 101. 

Government. American Government and Politics. Students achieving a 
score of 3 or higher will receive three hours of credit. The student may not 
takeGVPT 170 for credit. 

Comparative Government and Politics Students achieving a score of 3 
or higher will receive three hours of credit. The student may not take GVPT 
280 for credit 

History 

American History. Students who attain a score of 4 or 5 on the 
Advanced Placement examination in American history are given six hours 
of lower-level credit in history, they may not take HIST 1 56 or 1 57 for credit, 
but may take any courses for which these are prerequisites Students who 
attain a score of 3 on this examination are given three hours of lower-level 
credit in history: they may not take ftofftHIST 156 and 157 for credit, but 
may take any courses for which these are prerequisite. Elective credit only, 

European History. Students who attain a score of 4 or 5 on the 
Advanced Placement examination in European history are given six hours 
of lower-level credit in history: they may not take HIST 130. 131. 132, or 133 
for credit, but may take any courses for which these are prerequisite. 
Students who attain a score of 3 are given three hours of credit, they may 
not take HIST 130. 131, 132, or 133 but may take any courses for which 
these are prerequisites Elective credit only 

Language 

French. For achievement of a score of 3 on the French language 
examination, three hours of credit are earned The student may take either 
FREN 201 or 211 for credit For achievement of a score of 4 or 5 on the 
French language examination, six hours of credit are earned The student 
may not take FREN 201 or 21 1 for credit (Native speakers of French, i e , 
those whose language of instruction in elementary school was French may 
not earn credit by means of this examination ) 

For achievement of a score of 3 or better on the French literature 
examination, three hours of credit are earned The student may not take 
more than one of the following for credit FREN 251 . 252 For achievement 
of a score of 4 or 5 on the French literature examination, six hours of credit 
are earned The student may not take FREN 251 or 252 for credit 

Students who wish to continue in French must consult with the Depart- 
ment of French regarding placement 



German. For achievement of a score of 3 or better, six hours of credit 
are granted The student may not take GERM 111. 112. 114 or 115 for 
credit A student who wishes to continue with German should take GERM 
301 or 221 

Latin. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 on Ihe Virgil lest, six hours of 
credit are granted, however, only three of these may be applied toward 
meeting Ihe requirements for a major in Latin For achievement of a score 
of 3, three hours of credit are granted A student receiving credit on the 
basis of the Advanced Placement examination may not take LATN 305 or 
any lower numbered courses for credit A student who wishes to take 
further work in Latin should register for LATN 351 (No advanced place- 
ment credit IS given for perlormance on the comedy, lyric, or prose 
examination) 

Spanish. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 on the Spanish language 
examination, six hours of credit are granted If students wish to continue in 
Spanish, they must begin with courses on the 300 level, after consultation 
with a departmental advisor 

Mathematics. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 on the calculus BC lest, 
eight hours of credit are granted The student who wishes to take further 
mathematics will be placed (usually) in MATH 240 or 241 For achievement 
of a score of 3. either four or eight hours of credit are granted four hours to 
a student placed in MATH ill and eight hours to a student placed m 
MATH 240 

For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 in the calculus AB test, four or eight 
hours credit are granted four hours to a student placed in MATH 141 and 
eight hours to a student placed in MATH 250 For achievement of a score of 
3, either three or four hours of credit are granted, three hours to a student 
placed in MATH 221 and four hours to a student placed in MATH 141 

In any case, students may not take for credit any course of lower level 
than that of their placements However, students given permission to 
register in MATH 150 may do so without loss of the credit granted 

Actual placement will follow from a personal interview of each qualifying 
student with Ihe Chairman, Advanced Placement Committee of the 
Department of Mathematics 

Music 

Music Listening and Literature. Upon achieving a score of 3 or better, 
three hours of credit will be granted The student may not take MUSC 130 
for credit 

Music Theory. Upon achieving a score of 3 non-music majors on/y will 
be granted three hours of credit for MUSC 140 For a score of 4 or better 
non-majors only will be granted six hours of credit, and may not lake 
MUSC 140 and 141 Upon achieving a score of 4 music majors only v/iW 
receive three hours of credit and may not take MUSC 150 for credit For a 
score of 5 music majors on/y will receive six hours of credits and may not 
take either MUSC 150 or 151 for credit 

Physics. Placement in physics is necessarily related to Ihe student's level 
of mathematical sophistication, consequently, scores on the mathematics 
test are considered in conjunction with those on the physics test Specific 
placement and credit arrangements are: 

a. For achievement of a score of 4 or belter on the calculus BC lest anda 
score of 4 or better on each part of the physics course C test the 
student may receive credit for courses 161 262 or 141-142 For those 
interested in the physics major sequence 191-192. 293-294. eight 
hours of credit will be granted and students will be placed in courses 
appropnate to their level after consultation with an advisor 

b. For achievement of a score of 4 or better on the calculus BC test, and a 
score of 4 or better only on part I (II) of the physics course C test Ihe 
student may receive credit for courses 161 (262) or 141 (142) Those 
interested in the 191-192, 293-294 sequence will receive four hours of 
credit and be placed in a course after discussion with their advisors 

c. Three hours of credit will be granted for each part of the physics 
course C test passed with a score of 3 or better Six hours of credit will 
be granted for a score of 4 or better on the physics course B test In 
both these cases Ihe granting of credit is independent of the score on 
the calculus BC test 

d. A student with three or six hours of advanced placement credits in 
PHYS 121 or 122. but needing additional credits for Ihe laboratory 
work should contact the Associate Chair, Department of Physics, 454- 
3403 

e Physics and astronomy majors should consult with their advisors and 
all others with Ihe advanced placement advisor about how best to use 
advanced placement and credit. 

Special Admissions Options 

To serve students who are not typical freshmen. College Park has 
developed special options for admission 

Admissions Options for High Achieving High School Students 

1 Concurrent Enrollment. Talented high school seniors have the oppor- 
tunity to enroll at College Park for two courses, or seven credits, each 



10 Admissions Requirements and Application Procedures 



semester Successful applicants will have pursued a rigorous high 
school program and will have indicated exceptional performance and 
ability achieved over time To apply, students must submit (1) the 
completed application and fee, and (2) high school transcripts, (3) an 
essay explaining why they are interested in the program. (4) a letter of 
recommendation from the high school, and (5) a letter of permission 
from the parents or guardian Students must live within commuting 
distance. Tuition and fees are assessed on a per-credit-hour basis 

2. Summer Enrollment. High school students with a minimum 3 00 (B) 
average may enroll for courses during the summer preceding their 
junior or senior year. They must file a regular application and tran- 
scripts Tuition and fees are assessed on a per credit hour basis 

3 Early Admission. Although the University of Maryland at College Park 
generally requires applicants to earn a high school diploma prior to 
their first full-time registration. College Park will admit a limited number 
of well-qualified students without high school diplomas Successful 
applicants will have pursued a rigorous high school program and will 
have indicated exceptional performance and ability achieved over 
time. Students must be within two credits of high school graduation 
and have the commitment of the high school to award a diploma after 
successful completion of the freshman year at Maryland To apply, 
students must submit (1) the completed application and fee. (2) high 
school transcripts and SAT results, (3) an essay explaining how they 
will benefit from the program, (4) a letter of permission from the par- 
ents 01 guardian 

Early admission students are eligible for oncampus housing, merit- 
based scholarships, and the General Honors Program Early applica- 
tion is advised 

4. Gifted Student Admission. The University admits a limited number of 
gifted students who have completed at least the seventh grade, have 
an SAT combined score of 1200. or the equivalent on a nationally 
accepted college entrance exam, and have a superior academic 
record Students must have an initial admissions conference with a 
member of the Undergraduate Admissions staff The Admissions Staff 
may. if it is deemed helpful to the admissions decision, make referrals 
for further assessment to campus counseling services. 

High School Equivalence Examination (GED) 

Maryland residents who are at least 16 years of age and who have not 
received a high school diploma may be considered for admissions, pro- 
vided they have earned the high school General Education Equivalency 
(GED) certificate In order to be admitted, the applicant must present an 
above average total score, as well as above average scores on each of the 
five parts of the test 

Non-Accredited/Non-Approved Maryland High School 

There are specific academic requirements for applicants from non- 
accredited/non-approved Maryland high schools Students from non- 
accredited/non-approved high schools who seek admission to College 
Park should contact the Admissions Office for information. 

Modified Rolling Admissions Plan 

The University of Maryland at College Park uses a modified rolling 
admissions process The following chart describes the notification proce- 
dures for fall 1990 applicants Spring 1991 applicants are handled on a 
rolling admissions basis and should submit their completed applications by 
December 15, 1990 

Important Dates for Fall 1990 Freshmen Applicants 
Date Action 



December 1. 1989 
Priority deadline for 
oncampus housing 
and scholarships 



Applications completed* by this date will be re- 
viewed for admission The most talented stu- 
dents will be admitted and others will be 
encouraged to send new SATs and 12A grades 
for further consideration. Decisions released on 
December 21. 1989 

February 15. 1990" Applications completed by this date and those 
deterred from December 1st will be reviewed for 
admission Admission, denial, or waitlist deci- 
sions will be released March 15, 1990 

March 15. 1990" Applications completed by this date will be re- 
viewed Decisions will be released on April 1. 
1990 

April 30. 1990" Estimated freshman application deadline All ap- 

plications completed between March 15 and 
April 30, 1990 will be reviewed on a on a rolling 
basis 

May 1. 1990 Enrollment confirmation deadline All admitted 

students must confirm intention to enroll in writ- 
ing with $100 deposit 

June 1 . 1990 Students who were initially waitlisted will be noti- 

fied of decisions no later than this dale 



' A completed application received by Undergraduate Admissions will 
include official high school transcript and SAT report, application and $25 
fee 

" Because of space limitations. College Park may not be able to accommo- 
date all qualified students who apply before the published deadlines We 
urge students to apply significantly earlier than the deadlines noted at>ove 

Transfer Admission Criteria 

A student who has attended any regionally accredited institution of 
higher education following graduation from high school and attempted 
nine or more credits will be considered for admission as a transfer student 
In calculating eligibility, the University will use the average staled on the 
transcnpt by the sending institution When an applicant has attended more 
than one institution, a cumulative average lor all previous college work 
attempted will be used Transfer applicants must be in good academic arKi 
disciplinary standing at their previous institutions to be eligible for transfer 
to College Park 

Where the number of students desiring admission exceeds the numt)er 
that can be accommodated on the campus, or in a particular professional 
or specialized program, admission will tie based on overall grade point 
average and the strength of the academic program the student has 
pursued 

Requirements 

Admission for transfer applicants is pnmarily based on the numlier of 
credits a student has earned and the cumulative grade point average for all 
college-level work To be considered, course work must have been com- 
pleted at a regionally accredited college or university The grade poinl 
average requirement can vary, depending on the availability of space, but 
should not be lower than 3 All students with grade point averages t)elow 
3 will be considered on a space available basis In accordance with 
Maryland Stale Board for Higher Education transfer policies applicants 
from Maryland community colleges are. in some instances, given special 
consideration, and, when qualified, can be admitted with a cumulative 
grade point average of 2 or better Students who were not admissible as 
high school seniors must complete at least twenty-eight semester hours 
with the grade point average as stated above 

Undergraduate Students Transferring from Within 
the University System 

A student seeking to move from one campus of the University to 
another must have been a regular degree-seeking student eligible to return 
to his or her original campus 

Students who were special or non-degree students must contact the 
admissions office of the receiving campus Undergraduate students wtio 
are not eligible to return to their original campus must be reinstated there 
before being considered for admission to College Park 

Students must comply with the normal deadlines and, where space is 
limited, admission to the new campus will be based on criteria designed to 
select the best qualified students 

Transfer Students from Maryland 
Community Colleges 

Currently. Maryland residents who attend Maryland public community 
colleges may be admitted in accordance with the cnteria outlined in the 
general statement above The University subscnt>es to the policies set 
forth in the Maryland State Board of Higher Education Transfer Policies 
Where the numtser of students desiring admission exceeds the number 
that can be accommodated in a particular professional or specialized 
program, admission will be based on critena developed by the University to 
select the best qualified students 

Transfer of Credits 

General Statement In general, credit from academic courses taken at 
institutions of higher education accredited by a regional accrediting asso- 
ciation will transfer, provided that the appropriate academic officials at this 
campus consider such courses fjarl of the student s curricular program 
and that the student earned at least grades of C in those courses An 
academic advisor will discuss this and other matters dunng ttie period of 
registration 

Maryland Public Colleges and Universities. Transfer of coursework com- 
pleted at Maryland public colleges and universities is covered by the 
Maryland State Board for Higher Education Transfer Policies 

Community College Articulated Programs. An articulated transfer program 
IS a list of community college courses that best prepare the applicant lor a 
particular course of study at College Park If the applicant takes appropn- 
ate courses that are specified in the articulated program guide, and earns 
an acceptable grade, he/she is guaranteed transfer with no loss of credit 



Admissions Requirements and Application Procedures 11 



Articulated career program guides help students plan ttieir now pro 

grams alter changing career objectives The guides are available at the 
iffice ot Undergraduate Admissions at College Park and in the transfer 
advisors office at each of the community colleges If the applicant checks 
this guide he/she can eliminate all doubt concerning transfer of courses by 
following a program outlined in the guide 

University of Maryland System. Credits for undergraduate courses will 
transfer to College Park from other University of Maryland campuses The 
applicability of these courses to the particular program chosen at College 
Park will be determined by an academic advisor/evaluator in the office of 
the dean (see section on Orientation Programs, below) 

Ottier Universities and Colleges. In most cases credit will transfer from 
institutions of higher education accredited by a regional accrediting asso 
ciation (e g , Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools: New 
England Association of Schools and Colleges; North Central Association of 
Colleges and Schools: Northwest Association of Colleges and Schools: 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools: Western Association of 
Colleges and Schools), provided that the course is completed with at least 
a grade of C and the course is similar in content and level to work offered at 
College Park The applicability of these courses to the particular course of 
study chosen at College Park will be determined by an academic advisor/ 
evaluator in the office of the appropriate dean 

Foreign Language Credit. Transfer of foreign language credit is usually 
acceptable in meeting requirements Prospective students should consult 
the appropriate sections of this catalog to determine the specific require- 
ments of various colleges and curricula 

Advanced Placement Credit. If Advanced Placement credits are already 
on a student record from an institution outside The University of Maryland 
System, the score must be equivalent to a minimum University score or the 
credit will not be considered for transfer. 

State Board for Higher Education Transfer 
Policies 

These policies are currently under review Students are advised to consult 
with the transfer coordinator or advisor 

The University of Maryland fully subscribes to the Maryland State Board 
for Higher Education Transfer Policies A complete text of the policy 
follows 

These Student Transfer Policies, developed by a special task force 
of ttie Segmental Advisory Committee, were adopted by ttie Maryland 
State Board for Higtier Education on November 1, 1979. In view/ of the 
Board's sensitivity to the need of the institutions and segment boards 
to have sufficient lead time to make these policies operational, the new 
policies shall be effective and applicable to students enrolling in Mary- 
land's public postsecondary education institutions in fall, 1980, and 
thereafter. At that time they will supersede SBHE student transfer 
policies in effect since 1972. 

Preamble 

The major objective of these policies is to relate in operational ways the 
undergraduate programs offered in the public sector of higher education in 
Maryland These policies aim at equal treatment of native and transfer 
students The effectiveness of these policies, since their promulgation in 
December 1972, has been confirmed by the minimal loss of credits exper- 
ienced by students transferring within the public sector, by the apparent 
satisfaction of these students, and by the absence of appeals concerning 
the transferring of credits 

The intended principal benefactor is the student, who is best served by 
current information about programs and protected by firm arrangements 
among the public segments of higher education in Maryland that permit 
him to plan a total degree program from the outset With successful aca- 
demic performance, he or she can make uninterrupted progress even 
though transfer is involved The measures of the effectiveness of the plan 
IS maximum transferability of college level credits within the parameters of 
this agreement Essentially, transfer and native students are to be gov- 
erned by the same academic rules and regulations 

In a complementary way the State's interests are served by having its 
higher education resources used optimally by reducing the time taken to 
complete a degree through the avoidance of repeated class experience 

The institutional Interests are protected also by the systematic 
approach: institutions are relieved of the uncertainties of unplanned articu- 
lation without becoming production line enterprises 

The dynamics of higher education preclude one-and-for-all tune curnc- 
ula and perpetual grading and retention systems However, within the 
general structure of this plan there is opportunity for continual updating of 
the details 

In more specific ways this document's purpose is (1) to recommend 
specific areas of agreement among the public two-year and four-year 
institutions of higher education pertaining to facilitating the transfer of 
students within these segments, (2) to provide for a continuous evaluation 



and review of programs, policies, procedures, and relationships affecting 
transfer of students. (3) to recommend such revisions as are needed to 
promote the academic success and general well-being of the transfer 
student, and (4) to provide a system for app>eals 

Policies 

1 Public four-year colleges and universities shall require attainment of an 
overall 2 average on a four-point scale by Maryland resident transfer 
students as one standard for admission if the student has attended 
two or more institutions, the overall 2 will be computed on grades 
received in courses earned at all institutions attended unless the 
student presents an Associate in Arts degree 

(a) Each public institution of higher education shall designate a person 
responsible for coordinating transferability to assist in accomplish- 
ing the policies and procedures outlinecj in this plan The State 
Board for Higher Education will support requests by a public insti 
tution of higher education to establish tfie position of transfer 
coordinator 

(b) Efforts shall be intensified among the sending institutions, based 
on shared information, to counsel students on the basis of their 
likelihood of success in various programs and at various institu- 
tions (See par 1 (c) and par 9) 

(c) Procedures for reporting the progress of students who transfer 
within the State shall be developed as one means of improving the 
counseling of prospective transfer students 

2 Admission requirements and curriculum prerequisites shall be stated 
explicitly in institutional publications Students who enroll at Maryland 
Community Colleges shall be encouraged to complete the Associate 
in Arts degree or to complete fifty-six hours in a planned sequence of 
courses that relate to general education and the selection of a major 
before transfer Subsequent graduation from the receiving four-year 
institution IS not assured within a two-year period of full-time study 

(a) Students from Maryland Community Colleges who were admissi- 
ble to the four-year institution as high school seniors and who have 
attained an overall 2 average in college and university parallel 
courses shall be eligible for transfer at any time, regardless of the 
number of credits Those students who have been awarded the 
Associate in Arts degree or who have successfully completed fifty- 
six hours of credit with an overall 2 average in college and univer- 
sity parallel courses in either case shall not be denied transfer to an 
institution If the number of students desiring admission exceeds 
the number that can be accommodated in a particular professional 
or specialized program or certain circumstances exist that require 
a limitation being placed on the size of an upper division program 
or on the total enrollment, admission will be on criteria developed 
and published by the receiving institution, which provides equal 
treatment for native and transfer students 

(b) Course semester hour requirements that students must meet to 
transfer with upper division standing shall be clearly stated by the 
receiving institution 

(c) The establishment of articulated programs is required in profes- 
sional and specialized curncula, 

3. Information about transfer students who are capable of honors work or 
independent study shall be transmitted to the receiving institution 

4 Transfer students from newly established public colleges that are 
functioning with the approval of the State Board for Higher Education 
shall be admitted on the same basis as applicants from regionally 
accredited colleges 

5 (a) Credit earned at any other public institution in Maryland shall be 

transferable to any other public institution provided 

(1) the credit is from a college or university parallel program: 

(2) the grades in the block of courses transferred average 2 or 
higher, and 

(3) the acceptance of the credit is consistent with the policies of 
the receiving institution governing students following the same 
program 

(b) Credit for the CLEP general examinations will be considered for 
transfer only for scores at the 50th percentile, and above, of the 
combined national men-women sophomore norms The exact num- 
ber of credits awarded, if any. in transfer will be determined by the 
same regulations that pertain to native students in the receiving 
institution The percentile needed to transfer credit for the CLEP 
subject examination will be determined by the receiving institution 
Segmental/lnstitutional governing boards shall submit to the State 
Board for Higher Education by December 1st of each year data 
collected from the institutions concerning the credit given, mini- 
mum scores and equivalent courses of the CLEP subject examina- 
tions This data will be distributed annually by the State Board for 
Higher Education to transfer advisors at all institutions To facilitate 
the transfer of Advanced Placement and CLEP credit, the achieve- 
ment score for Advanced Placement and the scaled score, percen- 
tile rank, and the type of examinations (General or Subject) for the 
CLEP shall be reported on the transcript when credit is awarded 

(c) The Associate in Arts degree shall serve the equivalent of the lower 
division general education requirements at the receiving institution 



12 Admissions Requirements and Application Procedures 



where the total number of credits required in the general education 
program in the sending institution is equal to or more than that 
required in the receiving institution and where the credits are dis- 
tributed among the arts and sciences disciplines 

(d) The determination of the major program requirements for a bacca- 
laureate degree, including courses in the major taken in the lower 
division, shall be the responsibility of the institution awarding the 
degree 
6 Transfer of credits from the following areas shall be consistent with the 

State minimum standards and shall be evaluated by the receiving 

institution on a coursebycourse basis 

(a) Courses from technical (career) programs 

(b) Orientation courses 

(c) Remedial courses 

(d) Courses credited by a university or college that has no direct 
academic and administrative control over the students or the 
faculty involved in the courses 

(e) Credit for work experiences 

7. Credit earned in or transferred from a community college shall normally 
be limited to approximately half the baccalaureate degree program 
requirement, but in no case more than 70 credits, and to the first two 
years of the undergraduate educational experience 

8 Transfer students shall be given the option of satisfying graduation 
requirements that were in effect at the receiving institution at the time 
they enrolled as freshmen at the sending institution, subject to condi- 
tions or qualifications that apply to native students 

9 Institutions shall notify each other as soon as possible of impending 
curricular changes that may affect transferring students When a 
change made by one institution necessitates some type of change at 
another institution, sufficient lead time shall be provided to effect the 
change with minimum disruption 

10 Community college students are encouraged to choose as early as 
possible the institution and program into which they expect to transfer 

11 The Segmental Advisory Committee shall continue to review articula- 
tion issues and shall recommend policy changes as needed to the 
State Board for Higher Education 

12 In the event a transfer student believes he or she has not been 
accorded the consideration presented in this policy statement, the 
student shall have the opportunity to have the situation explained or 
reconciled 

Initially, differences of interpretation regarding the award of transfer 
credit shall be resolved between the student and the institution to which he 
is transferring If a difference remains unresolved, the student shall present 
his/her evaluation of the situation to the institution from which the student 
is transferring Representatives from the two institutions shall then have 
the opportunity to resolve the differences 

The sending institution has the right to present an unresolved case to 
the Segmental Advisory Committee through a written appeal to the State 
Board for Higher Education The SAC shall receive relevant documenta- 
tion, opinions, and interpretations in written form from the sending and 
receiving institutions and from the student The Segmental Advisory Com- 
mittee will send the written documentation to a pre-established articulation 
committee which, after review, will submit its recommendations to the 
Segmental Advisory Committee 

Copies of the recommendation shall be fonwarded by the State Board 
for Higher Education to the segments for distribution to the appropriate 
institutions 

A complaint on transfer status must be initiated by the student within 
one calendar year of his/her enrollment in the receiving institution. 

General Application Procedures 

Application Forms. Application forms may be obtained by writing to 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchell Building, University of Mary- 
land. College Park, MD 20742.or by calling (301 ) 454-5550 Also, application 
forms are available in many high school guidance offices 

Application Fee. A non-refundable $25 00 application fee is required 
with each application 

Application Deadlines. College Park strongly urges that all applicants 
apply early before stated deadlines to assure consideration for admission 
Because of space limitations, the campus may not be able to offer admis- 
sion to all qualified applicants 

For each term, applications will be processed on a space-available 
basis 

Fall 1989 Matriculation 

March 1, ?95d international students deadline for submission of applica- 
tions and all other required documents 

July 30. J9fl9-Transfer applicants deadline for submission of applications 
and all other required documents 



Spring 1990 Matriculation 

August 1, /d59-lnternational students deadline for submission of applica 
tions and all other required documents 

December 15, 7dd9-Undergraduate applicants' deadline tor receipt of 

applications and all other required documents 

Fall 1990 Matriculation 

December 1, f9fl9-Applicalions. transcripts, and SAT results (freshmen 
only) must be received lor freshman and transfer students wfio are eligible 
for admission and wish to receive first consideration lor housing within their 
own prionty group for Fall 1990' 

February 1, 7990-Architecture applicants must apply by this date to be 
assured of consideration 

March 1, /99&-lnternational students' deadline for submission of applica- 
tions and all other required documents 

April 30. /990-Eslimated freshman applicants deadline for receipt of 
applications and all other required documents Please note space may 
not be available to accommodate all qualified freshmen who apply by this 
date 

July 30, 799&-Transfer applicants' deadline for submission of applications 

and all other required documents 

'Transfer applicants who are enrolled as first semester freshmen during 
the Fall 1989 semester (enrolled in a college or university for the first time) 
are eligible to receive first consideration for housing wittiin their own prior- 
ity group if ( 1 ) the application and high school transcnpt are received in the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions by Decemtjer 1. 1989 and (2) the 
applicant's college or university transcript reflecting Fall 1989 grades is 
received in this office by January 1, 1990 

Admission to Selective Majors 

Certain colleges, schools and departments within tfie University twve 
taken steps to limit their enrollment to maintain quality programs These 
include School of Architecture. College of Business and Management. 
College of Engineering, Department of Computer Science Depanment of 
Economics. Department of Electrical Engineering Department of Housing 
and Design. College of Journalism. Department of Radio-Television-Film. 
Department of Special Education, and all teacher education majors Enroll- 
ment is competitive, and except for a select number of outstanding 
freshmen, students must complete a particular set of requirements 
before admission. 

Students not admitted directly as freshmen may still enroll on tlie 
campus as pre-busmess, pre-computer science pre-engineenng. or ottier 
pre-majors However, admission as a preprofessional student does not 
guarantee subsequent admission to any of the majors To assess your 
chances of t)eing admitted at a later date, contact an academic advisor 
within the appropriate program 

Students who do not meet the requirements for admission to a selec- 
tive major, but who are eligible for admission to the College Park Campus, 
must choose an alternate, non-selective major While enrolled m an alter- 
nate course of study, students may pursue requirements for eventual 
enrollment in the selective major 

For specific requirements not detailed in the following sections appli- 
cants are urged to contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions See 
also individual school, college or department entries in this cataksg 

Architecture 

Admission to the School of Architecture is generally limited to students 
who enroll as juniors 

To be considered for admission all applicants — wtiether tt>ey are cur- 
rently enrolled at College Park or transfer students — must sutxnit a portfo- 
lio The portfolio should t5e organized in an 8'/i" x 1 1" loose leaf rwlebook. 
and It must demonstrate strong creative ability In addition, students m aH 
level work should have at least a 3 grade point average overall They 
should have completed freshman English and appropnate courseworV in 
calculus and physics Architecture survey and history courses are 
recommended 

Business and Management 

Admission to the College of Business and Management is generally 
limited to students who enroll as juniors 

To be eligible lor admission to the college in the junior year students 
must satisfy the current comp)etilive GPA have completed 56 semester 
hours, and have completed the necessary coursework. including six hours 
each of Accounting and Economics, and three hours each of Calculus, 
Statistics, and Speech 



Admissions Requirements and Application Procedures 13 



Computer Science 

Admission to the Department of Computer Science is competitive A 
small number ol academically talented, entering freshmen will be offered 
admission, however, admission is generally limited to students who have 
met the following requirements 

a Successful completion of CMSC 112. CfViSC 113, MATH 140 and 

141, and 
b Completion of a minimum of 28 college credits, and 
c. Achievement of a grade point average that meets the competitive 
requirements in effect for the semester ol anticipated enrollment in 
the department 
Information on the current GPA requirements may be obtained from the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions 

A few potentially qualified students who are unable to meet these 
criteria will be considered on a case-bycase basis by a special committee 
within the department 

Applicants to the Department of Computer Science, who are eligible for 
admission to College Park but who do not meet the department s selective 
admission requirements, will be offered admission to the University as pre 
computer science majors Designation as a pre-computer science major 
does not assure eventual admission to the Department of Computer 
Science 

Because of space limitations. College Park may not be able to offer 
admission to all qualified applicants Interested students are urged to 
apply early 

Consumer Economics 

Direct enrollment in Consumer Economics will be limited to a relatively 
few highly qualified entering freshmen A small number of qualified fresh- 
men are admitted if they have a 2 6 cumulative grade point average in high 
school academic subjects and a combined SAT score of at least 1200 
Students will also be admitted to the College if they are National t^erit 
finalists, semifinalists, and commended. National Achievement finalists, 
semi-finalists, and commended, Francis Scott Key Scholars, Banneker 
Scholars or Maryland Distinguished Scholars, finalists, semi-finalists and 
honorable mention Transfer students wishing to major in Consumer Eco- 
nomics will encounter additional course requirements and should contact 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions 

Economics 

Direct enrollment in Economics is limited to a small number of academi- 
cally talented freshmen Generally, students are admitted who meet the 
following requirements: 

a Completion of 56 credits with a minimum cumulative grade point 
average of 2 6 (The grade point average is reviewed each semes- 
ter and IS subject to change.) 
b. Completion of three required courses with a grade of "C" or better 
in each; ECON 201 (Ivlacro-Econ), ECON 203 (IVIicro-Econ) and 
MATH 220 (Elementary Calculus I) 

Engineering 

The College of Engineering admits a larger number of qualified fresh- 
men than the other programs described in this section. Still, enrollment is 
limited and competition for available openings is stiff, especially in Electri- 
cal Engineering All applications will be reviewed on a space-available 
basis 

Freshmen will be considered on the basis of their academic grade point 
average and SAT score Particular emphasis is placed on the mathematics 
section of the SAT The requirements for direct admission to Electrical 
Engineering are more stringent than for other engineering majors 

All transfer students, as well as students presently enrolled at College 
Park, must meet the competitive grade point average (currently 3 0) in 
effect for the semester during which the student anticipates initial enroll- 
ment. In addition, applicants must have completed at least twenty-eight 
semester hours including eight hours each of calculus and chemistry and 
three hours of physics Engineenng science and statics are also strongly 
recommended 

Transfer students wishing to major in Electrical Engineering will 
encounter additional course requirements and a higher GPA requirement 
Prospective applicants to this major should contact the Office of Under- 
graduate Admissions (301-454-4(j09) or the Student Affairs Office in the 
College of Engineenng (301-454-2421) for details 

Housing and Design 

A change in admissions criteria for the Design major is currently 
under consideration. Students should check with the department for 
the latest information on the status of this proposed change. 

Admission to the programs of Interior Design and Advertising Design is 
competitive A small number of academically talented, entering freshmen 
will be admitted to these programs To be admitted, a freshman must have 



a 3 00 high school grade point average and a combined SAT score of 1200 
or above, or t>e a National Mont and National Achievement Scholarship 
finalist or semifinalist, or be a recipient of a Presidents Scholarship, Benja 
mm Banneker Scholarship, or a Maryland Distinguished Scholar Award 

Admission to these programs is generally limited to students who will 
enroll at the sophomore level and who have met the following 
requirements 

a Completion of a minimum of twenty nine college credits, and 
b Successful completion of four required courses (APDS 101A, 

APDS 102, APDS 103, and EDIT 160), and 
c Submission of a Design Work Portfolio lor review. Students with a 
grade of B or higher in each of the four required courses are 
exempt from the portfolio requirement 
All transfer students must submit a Design Work Portfolio A portfolio 
may be submitted to the department at the time of application for admis 
sion to the University or later, but no later than the application deadline set 
by the department 

Potentially talented students who are unable to meet the above criteria 
may be admitted alter special review by the department 

Eligible applicants who do not meet the selective admissions require- 
ments for the programs ol interior design and advertising design will be 
offered admission as pre-design majors While this designation does not 
assure eventual admission to the design major, pre-design students will be 
given preferential treatment when registering for departmental courses in 
which there is an enrollment limitation. 

Journalism 

Admission to the College of Journalism is competitive, and generally 
limited to students who enroll as sophomores A small number of academi- 
cally talented freshmen will be admitted directly into the College if they 
have a 3 00 cumulative grade point average in high school academic 
subjects and a combined SAT score of at least 1 200 Students will also be 
admitted to the College if they are National Ment finalists, semi-finalisis, 
and commended. National Achievement finalists, semi-finalists and com- 
mended. President's Scholars. Banneker Scholars, or Maryland Distin- 
guished Scholars, finalists, semi-finalists and honorable mention 

To qualify for provisional admission as a sophomore, students must 
a complete at least twenty-eight credits and achieve a cumulative 
grade point average that meets the competitive requirements in 
effect for the semester of anticipated enrollment in the College 
While the College has decided that the grade point average will be 
at least 2 30, the GPA to date has not been lower than 2 7. 
b complete ENGL 101 or its equivalent with at least a grade of C 

(unless students are exempt from ENGL 101). and 
c complete satisfactorily a standardized test of grammar 
To qualify for full admission to the major, students must 
a complete JOUR 201 with a grade of C or better 30 wpm typing 

ability IS required for this course) and 
b maintain at least the same cumulative grade point average 
required when they received provisional admission. 
Students whose applications for provisional or full admission have been 
rejected may appeal in writing to a faculty committee within the College of 
Journalism The same committee will also consider, on a case-by-case 
basis, applications from a few potentially qualified students who do not 
meet the above criteria but who show other evidence of ability 

Transfer students will be treated in the same way as native students 
However, if they have completed the equivalent of JOUR 201 at an institu- 
tion not included by ACEJMC a special proficiency exam will be required 
for admission to the major 

Radio- Tele vision-Film 

The Department of RadioTelevision-Fllm admits a limited number of 
academically talented freshmen Generally, enrollment is limited to stu- 
dents who have completed: 
a at least twenty-eight credits with a minimum grade point average of 
2 6 (GPA requirement is reviewed each semester and is subject to 
change), and 
b three required courses with a grade of C or better in each: ENGL 101 
(Introduction to Writing), MATH 1 10 (Introduction to Mathematics) and 
RTVF 222 (Introduction to Radio-Television-Film) 

Special Education 

Admission to the Department of Special Education is generally limited 
to students who enroll as sophomores 

To be eligible for admission, currently enrolled College Park students 
must have a 2 grade point average and have completed approximately 
thirty credit hours, including the following introductory psychology, sociol- 
ogy, statistics, mathematics, hearing and speech sciences, and six hours 
of specified education courses A minimum grade of C in EDSP 210 is 
required 

Applicants must submit an application specific tor the selective admis- 
sions program and each will be reviewed on the basis of academic record. 



14 Admissions Requirements and Application Procedures 



experiences with handicapped persons, and the appropriateness and clar 
ity of a professional goal statement An appeals process has been estab- 
lished for students who do not meet the competitive grade point average 
for admission but who are applying in connection witn special University 
programs such as affirmative action or selection for academic promise 

Transfer students from Ivlaryland community colleges or Northern Vir- 
ginia Community College should contact their transfer coordinator for spe- 
cific information Ail other students should contact the Department of 
Special Education 

Teacher Education 

Preeducatlon majors apply for admission to teacher education through 
the University of Ivlaryland College Park (UMCP) Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions (OUA) upon the completion of forty-five semester hours of 
credit Transfer students with forty-five or more semester hours of accept- 
able credit must apply at time of transfer Post-graduate certification stu- 
dents must apply at the beginning of their program Application forms may 
be obtained from the OUA, 

For admission into a teacher education program, a student must (1) 
complete the USP Fundamental Studies requirements (six credits): (2) earn 
forty-five semester hours with an overall cumulative grade point average of 
at least 2 5 on a 4,0 scale (granted by UI^CP or other institution) in all 
coursework prior to enrollment in EDHD 300: and (3) have satisfactory 
scores on the language and mathematics segments of the California 
Achievement Test Level 20 Individuals who do not initially meet the criteria 
for admission to teacher education will be given an additional semester in 
which to become eligible During that semester the student will follow a 
plan for attaining eligibility developed by the student and the department 
advisor New requirements for the elementary education teacher prepara- 
tion programs have been adopted For further information, please contact 
the College of Education 

Special Applicants 

Minority Students 

In keeping with the University Affirmative Action Program, special con- 
sideration will be given to minority students who demonstrate the potential 
for academic success Minority students are urged to contact both an 
admissions counselor and the Office of Minority Student Education 

Returning Students and Veterans 

Maryland residents who have not attended school for more than five 
years, or who have had military experience, may find that the published 
standards for freshman and transfer admissions do not apply to their 
situation To discuss educational plans, returning students and veterans 
should contact both an admissions counselor and the Returning Students 
Program 

Students returning to the College Park Campus after a separation of 
five calendar years may petition their appropriate dean to have a number of 
grades and credits from courses previously taken at College Park removed 
from the calculation of their cumulative grade point averages and from the 
credits applied toward graduation requirements For more information, 
consult the section on Academic Regulations and Requirements 

International Students 

General Requirements. The University of Maryland values the contribu- 
tion international students make to the College Park community Therefore, 
applications from the international community are welcomed However. 
due to the differences between foreign educational systems and education 
in the United States, international students will face a number of chal- 
lenges in adapting to study at the University Students who have received, 
throughout their secondary school and university level work, marks or 
examination results considered to be "very good" to "excellent" are those 
who are most likely to succeed at our institution Admission for interna- 
tional students is competitive and offered only to those who are considered 
by the University to be better than average in their own educational setting 
Students also have to demonstrate, in their secondary level studies, that 
they have successfully completed a diversity of subjects representing 
language, mathematics, physical or biological science and social sciences 
Because of the keen competition at the University of Maryland, we suggest 
applicants apply early 

Those who will hold the following visa types, A. E, F, G. H, I. J, and L, will 
be admitted on the basis of their academic backgrounds and must present 
records with marks of very good" to "excellent" However, non-immi- 
grants, other than F or J visa holders, who have completed four years of 
US secondary education (grades 9 through 12), will be evaluated on the 
same basis as U S Citizens and Permanent Residents/Immigrants Interna- 
tional applicants who present one full year of acceptable university level 
credit will be considered for admission as transfer students Those with 



less than one full year of acceptable credit must also meet the freshman 
admission requirements for international applicants 

International students applying for admission to undergraduate pro- 
grams at the University ol Maryland must submit (1)an application and fee 
for admission. (2) copies of official secondary school records (including any 
secondary external examinations, such as the GCE "Ordinary" level 
examinations, or the Baccalaureat); (3) transcripts of any university level 
studies completed in the United Stales or elsewhere Original documents 
written in a language other than English must be accompanied by certified 
English translations 

International students who have completed grades 10, 11. and 12 in a 
US high school must also take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and 
submit the results All freshman applicants to the College of Engineenng, 
regardless of where they have studied, must present SAT scores Admis- 
sion to selective majors (see Admissions to Selective Majors" for identifi- 
cation of these majors) requires international students to have marks of no 
less than "excellent" in previous education in order to be considered for 
admission into the selective major 

International students on F-1 Student visas accepted for admission to 
the University will receive the 1-20 form from the Office of International 
Education Services (lES), this form is needed to secure, transfer, and 
extend the Student visa after applicants have certified their financial sup- 
port and submitted evidence of satisfactory English proficiency to the lES 
Office. 

International students accepted for admission will be expected to plan 
their arrival sufficiently in advance of the registration period to secure 
housing and attend the special orientation program for international stu- 
dents that IS held the week prior to registration 

English Proficiency, ^//applicants must demonstrate a satisfactory level 
of English proficiency Such proficiency is necessary to pursue a full course 
of study at the University of Maryland at College Park All non-native 
speakers of English must submit a score report from the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) during the application process Non-native 
speakers who have received a degree from a tertiary level institution in the 
US, English-speaking Canada, IJnited Kingdom. Ireland, Australia. fJew 
Zealand, or Commonwealth Canbbean are exempt from the TOEFL 
requirement Native speakers of English are defined as those educated 
entirely in the US , English-speaking Canada, United Kingdom, IrelarnJ, 
Australia. New Zealand, or Commonwealth Canbbean Applicants who are 
unsure as to whether or not they need to take the TOEf^tl should contact 
the Office of International Education Services Non-native speakers of 
English who have graduated from US high schools must submit TOEFL 
examination results For information and a TOEFL application brochure. 
write to: TOEFL. Box 2896, Princeton, N.J. 08540 

Application Deadlines 
1 Those applicants who would be studyino under F (Student) or J 
(Exchange Visitor) visas must meet tne following application 
deadlines: 

Fall semester — March 1 
Spring semester — August 1 

2. Nonimmigrants (A. E. G. H. I. L visas) must have complete applica- 
tions submitted by the following deadlines (complete applications 
include all academic records and transcripts for work completed, and 
TOEFL scores if the applicant is a non-native speaker of English) 

Fall semester— March 1 
Spring semester — August 1 

3 All applicants must submit all foreign educational credentials, and 
certified English translations of such records in languages other than 
English at least three months in advance of the first day of classes to 
be given full consideration for admission 

Return of Foreign Records. Transcripts (records, marksheels) ol appli- 
cants with foreign credentials are maintained by the Office of Undergradu 
ate Admissions for two years If these documents are original copies, the 
student must request their return within two years ol application At ttie 
end ol this period, the records are destroyed 

Immigrant Students 

Immigrant applicants for admission at the undergraduate level are 
admissible under the same guidelines as U S citizens EXCEPT that appli- 
cants, including transler applicants, whose native language is other than 
English must /ti.SO demonstrate a satisfactory level of English proficiency 
to pursue an approved course of study 

Non-Degree (Special) Students 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do not desire to work toward a 
baccalaureate degree may be admitted as non-degree seeking (speoal) 
students 



Orientation Programs 15 



Special students who have received a baccalaureate degree are 
advised that no credit earned while enrolled as special students may be 
applied at a later dale to a graduate program These post baccalaureate 
students may enroll in undergraduate courses lor which they possess the 
necessary prerequisites, but may not enroll in courses restricted to gradu- 
ate students only Students who wish to take courses at the graduate level 
(600 and above) must contact the Graduate School lor information con- 
cerning admission requirements tor Advanced Special Student status 

Non-degree seeking (special) students who do not have a baccalaure- 
ate degree must submit transcripts and meet regular admission standards 
Transcripts are not required (rom students with baccalaureate degrees 

Because ol space limitation, several departments require permission 
be given in advance to enroll as a non-degree student Please contact the 
Otiice ol Undergraduate Admissions lor further information 

Preprofessional Programs and Options 

The University of Maryland at College Park offers preprofessional advis- 
ing in Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Law, Medical Technology. Medicine, Nurs- 
ing, Optometry, Osteopathy, Pharmacy Physical Therapy, Podiatry, and 
Veterinary Medicine This advising will guide the student to the best prepa- 
ration for advanced study and training in these fields For additional infor- 
mation, see the section on Campus-wide Programs in this catalog 

Participation in a preprofessional program at College Park does not 
guarantee admission to another branch of the University or to another 
institution 

The Radiologic Technology program previously offered at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB) is no longer available Students 
choosing the preprofessional program In this field will receive training that 
should prepare them for transfer to other institutions 

Students who have already earned more than thirty semester hours at 
another college-level institution, and who seek admission to preprofes- 
sional programs in Nursing, Pharmacy, Dental Hygiene. Physical Therapy, 
and Medical Technology, should contact the academic advisor for the 
preprofessional programs at College Park before filing an application for 
College Park Please address correspondence to the academic advisor of 
the specific preprofessional program to which you are applying; for exam- 
ple. Advisor for Pre-Nursing Program. 3103 Turner Bldg., University of 
Maryland. College Park. MD 20742 

Golden Identification Card Program. 

College Park participates in the University of Maryland's Golden Identi- 
fication Card Program The Institution will make available courses and 
various services to persons who are 60 years of age or older, who are legal 
residents of the State of Maryland, and who are retired (not engaged in 
gainful employment for more than 20 hours per week); or who are under 50 
years of age and are retired under a bona fide pension plan and disabled as 
defined by the Social Security or Railroad Retirement Act When persons 
eligible for this Program are admitted to the University, they register on a 
space-available basis for credit courses a regular or special students in any 
session, and receive a Golden Identificationcard Golden ID students must 
meet all course pre-requisite and co-requisite requirements Golden ID 
students are not eligible for Consortium courses with the waiver of fees 
College Park tuition and most other fees are waived Golden ID students 
may register for a maximum of three credits per term The Golden Identifi- 
cation Card will entitle eligible persons to certain academic services. 
Including the use of the libraries, as well as certain other non-academic 
services. Such services will be available during any session only to per- 
sons who have registered for one or more courses for that session Golden 
ID students also have the opportunity to become Involved with the Golden 
ID Student Association which provides cultural and social events, course 
recommendations, and peer advising Additional information may be 
obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchell Building, 
454-5550. or the Golden ID Student Program. Room 0119 Hornbake 
Library, 454-4767. 



this degree (as determined by UMCP) in another country will he considered 
lor admission to the Graduate School at UMCP Criteria are listed in the 
Graduate School's Application Brochure obtainable from the Graduate 
School Requests for information about graduate programs or correspon- 
dence concerning application for admission to The Graduate School. Col- 
lege Park should be addressed to the Admissions Office, The University o( 
Maryland Graduate School, South Administration Building, College Park, 
MD 20742. 



Orientation Programs 



Upon final admission to the University the new student will receive 
materials about the Orientation and Registration Program This program is 
offered by the Orientation Office, and alTentering students are encouraged 
to attend The primary goals of the program are to inform the student about 
the University and to help the student register for the first semester. 
Through this program the entering student receives a personalized and 
individual introduction to the University plus individual advising concerning 
course selection for the first semester During this Orientation Program, 
new students register for courses for their initial semester on campus 

Parents also have an opportunity to learn at)out University life through 
the Parent Orientation Program More information about this program may 
be found under "Orientation " elsewhere in this catalog 

For more information, contact the Orientation Office, 1195 Stamp Stu- 
dent Union, telephone: (301) 454-5752 



Determination of In-State Status for Admission, 
Tuition, and Charge Differential Purposes 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition, and 
charge-differential purposes will be made by the University at the time a 
student's application for admission is under consideration The determina- 
tion made at that time, and any determination made thereafter shall prevail 
in each semester until the determination is successfully challenged Stu- 
dents may challenge their classification by submitting a petition. Petitions 
are available in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions Ttie deadline for 
meeting all requirements for in-state status and for submitting all docu- 
ments for reclassification is the last day of late registration for the 
semester if the student wishes to be classified as an in-state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in 
completing the review process It is hoped that a decision in each case will 
be made within ninety days of receipt of a request for redetermination and 
all necessary documentation During this period of time, or any further 
period of time required by the University, fees and charges based on the 
previous determination must be paid If the determination Is changed, any 
excess fees and charges will be refunded 

Petitions, related documents and questions concerning the policy of 
the University of Maryland for the determination of In-state status should be 
directed to the Campus Classification Office, Francis Scott Key Hall, Room 
1116, the University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; Phone (301) 
454-3977 

Students Classified as In-State for Admission, Tuition, and Charge-Differ- 
ential Purposes. Students classified as in-state for admission, tuition, and 
charge-differential purposes are responsible for notifying the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions in writing within fifteen days of any change in 
their circumstances what might in any way affect their classification at the 
College Park Campus 

The written notice of change in circumstances or questions concerning 
the policy of the University of Maryland for the determination of in-state 
status should be directed to Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Ground 
Floor, Mitchell Building 



Graduate Student Admission 

Those who have earned or will earn a bachelor's degree at a regionally 
accredited college or university in the United States, or the equivalent of 



16 



3 Fees, Expenses, and 
Financial Aid 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



student Accounts Office, 

1103 Lee Building. 454-4832 

Tuition and fees for the University of Maryland at College Park are listed 
below Ttie University requires that all deposits and fees be paid by staled 
deadlines, or penalties must be imposed Many potential administrative 
difficulties can be avoided if students carefully follow published proce- 
dures and notify the appropriate office(s) of any changes that might affect 
their financial obligation to the University This includes notifying the 
University of changes of address, so that mail affecting the student's 
financial relationship with the University will not be delayed or returned 

The University of Maryland does not have a deferred payment plan 
Charges incurred during a semester are payable immediately Returning 
students will not be permitted to complete registration until all financial 
obligations to the University including library fines, parking violations, and 
other penalty fees and service charges are paid in full 

Payment for past due balances and current semester fees are due on or 
before the first day of classes Students who register in advance must pay 
their bills in full prior to the general registration period Students who 
register after the initial registration period are required to make full pay- 
ment by the close of business the following working day to avoid cancella- 
tion of their enrollment and loss of their classroom seats to other students. 

It IS the policy of the University not to defer payment on the basis of a 
pending application for financial assistance to an outside agency, includ- 
ing Veterans Administration benefits, bank loans, Stafford student loan 
programs, etc 

Although the University regularly mails bills to students, it cannot 
assume responsibility for their receipt Students are reminded that it is 
their responsibility to notify the University of any change in address, or to 
correct an address If a student bill is not received on or before the 
beginning of each semester, it is the student's responsibility to obtain a 
copy of the bill at Room 1 103, Lee Building, between the hours of 830 a m 
and 4 15 p m , Monday through Friday 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University 
of Maryland for the exact amount due Student name and student Social 
Security number should be written on the front side of the check. Univer 
sity grants scholarships, or workship awards will be deducted on the bill, 
which IS mailed approximately one month after the start of the semester 
However, the first bill mailed prior to ihe beginning of each semester may 
not include these deductions 

Students are urged to check their residence hall and dining service 
agreements for procedures for cancellation of reservations, and Tor dead- 
lines for receiving refunds of deposits Refunds cannot be made after 
these deadlines, even if the student decides not to attend College Park 

Students will be severed from University services and incur a late 
payment fee in the event of failure to pay a balance on their student 
account by its due date In the event that severance occurs, the individual 
may make payment during the semester in which services were severed 
and services will be restored A $25.00 severance fee and a late payment 
fee of $5.00 or 5%, whichever is higher, will be assessed in addition to 
payment for Ihe total past due amount 

Students removed from housing because of delinquent indebtedness 
will be required to reapply for housing after they have satisfied their finan- 
cial obligation Students who are severed from University services and 
who fail to pay the indebtedness dunng the semester in which severance 
occurs will iDe ineligible to preregister for subsequent semesters until the 
debt and the penalty fees are cleared 

In the event of actual registration for a subsequent semester by a 
severed student who has not settled his or her student account pnor to 
that semester, such registration will be cancelled and no credit will be 
earned for the semester 

The Slate has established, under legislative mandate, a Central Collec- 
tions Unit (CCU) within the Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning The 
University is required by Slate Law lo refer all delinquent accounts lo the 
Slate Collections Unit Please note that Maryland law allows the Central 



Collections Unit to Intercept slate income tax refunds (or Individuals with 
delinquent accounts, and that failure lo make timely payment in response 
to ecu collection efforts may impair a credit rating 

All Accounts Due from Students, Faculty, Staff, Non-Studenta, etc., are 
included within these Guidelines. 

Collection costs incurred in collecting delinquent accounts will be 
charged to the student. The minimum collection fee is 15% plus attorney 
and/or court costs 

No degree, grades, diploma, certificate, or Iranscnpl of record will be 
Issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his or her 
account 

An Important Fee Notice. Although changes in fees and charges ordinarily 
will be announced in advance, Ihe University reserves Ihe nghl to make 
such changes without prior announcement 

NOTE: Additional Information on Student Financial Obligations, Disclosure 
of Information. Delinquent Accounts, and Special Fees, can be found on 
page 2 

A. UNDERGRADUATE FEES 

1. Full-time Undergraduate Students 
1989-90 Academic Year 

a Maryland Residents 

Total Academic Year Cost 

Tuition $1,714.00 

Registration Fee 10.00 

Mandatory Fees (see Explanation of Fees below) . 37300 

Board Contract (FY 88-89)* 

1) Point Plan 1,784 00 

Lodging (FY 88-89)* 2.19400 

b Residents of Ihe District of Columbia, other stales, and other 
countries 

Total Academic Year Cost 

Tuition 5.371.00 

10 00 
37300 



Registration Fee 

Mandatory Fees (see Explanation of Fees below) 
Board Contract (FY88-89)* 

1) Point Plan 

Lodging (FY88-89)* 



1.784 00 
2.194 00 



•Increases in board and lodgino lor 1989-90 are under consideration by Ihe 
Board of Regents at the lime oflhis printing 

2. Fees for Part-Time Undergraduate Students 

Tuition (per credit hour) $99 00 

Registration Fee (per semester) 5 00 

Mandatory Fees (per semester) 88 50 

Note: The term part time undergraduate student is interpreted to mean an 
undergraduate student taking eignt semester credit hours or less Students 
carrying nine semester hours or more are considered to be lull-lime and must 

pay Ihe regular full lime lees 



a GRADUATE FEES 

1 Maryland Residents (fee per credit hour) 

2 Residents of the District of Columbia, other stales other 
countries (fee per credit hour) 

3 Registration Fee (per semester) 

4 Mandatory Fees (per semester) 

Full-time (9 or more credit hours per semester) 
Part-time (8 or less credit hours per semester) 



11700 



207 00 
500 



108 00 
80 00 



Fees and Expenses 17 



EXPLANATION OF FEES 

Mandatory Fees 

The Registration Fee (Non-Refundable): The Regislralion Fee is charged 
to all registrants each semester 

The Instructional Materials Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students lor 

instructional materials and or laboratory supplies lurnished to students 

The Student Activities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all undergraduate 
students at the request ol the Student Government Association It is used 
in sponsoring various student activities, student publications, and cultural 
programs 

The Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students This fee 
IS paid into a fund that is used for capital improvement, expansion, and 
construction of various campus facilities such as open recreation areas 
(tennis courts, basketball courts, etc ), transportation alternatives (shuttle 
buses), and the Stamp Student Union These capital projects are not 
funded or are funded only in part from other sources 

The Athletic Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all students for the sup 
port of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics All students are 
encouraged to participate in all of the activities of this department, or to 
attend the contests if they do not participate 

The Student Health Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all students for the 

support of the Health Service facility 

The Shuttle Bus Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all students for the 
support of the Shuttle Bus transportation system 

The Stamp Student Union and Recreational Fee (Non-Refundable): 

Charged to all students and is used to expand recreational facilities and 
Stamp Student Union services. 

Other Fees 

Payment of Fees: All checks, money orders, or postal notes should be 
made payable to the University of Maryland. The student's Social Secur- 
ity number must be written on the front of the check. VISA and Master- 
Card credit cards are accepted 

The Application Fee (Non-Refundable): $25.00. Charged to all new under- 
graduate students 

Enrollment Confirmation Deposit (Non-Refundable): $100.00. All newly 
accepted undergraduate students who intend to matriculate in the fall or 
spring semester must submit a $100 fee which is credited to their tuition 
charges when they enroll Should the student decide not to enroll for the 
specific semester of application the $100 fee is forfeited, and cannot be 
used to offset any charges the student may incur. 

Students admitted for the fall term by Apnl 1 must submit this deposit by 
May 1; students admitted for the spring term prior to December 1 must 
submit this deposit within 30 days. Students admitted after December 1 
for the spring term must submit this deposit within 14 days 

Pre-College Orientation Program Registration Fee: 

$72 00 (two-day program) 
$50 00 (one-day program) 
$25.00 (one parent) $50 GO (two parents) 

Late Registration Fee: $20.00. All students are expected to complete their 
registration including the filing of Schedule Adjustment Forms on the regu- 
lar registration days Those who do not complete their registration dunng 
the prescribed days must pay this fee 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in mathematics 
(MATH 001) per semester: $130.00. (Required of students whose curricu- 
lum calls for MATH 1 10 or 1 1 5 and who do not pass the qualifying examina- 
tion for these courses ) This Special Math Fee is in addition to course 
charge. Students enrolled in this course and concurrently enrolled for six 
or more credit hours will be considered as full-time students for purposes of 
assessing fees Students taking only MATH 001 pay for three credits plus 
$130 (X) A three-credit course plus MATH 001 results in a charge for 6 
credits plus $130 00 A full-time student pays full-time fees plus $130 00 
This course does not carry credit towards any degree at the University 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in Chemistry 
(CHEM 001) per semester: $100.00. CHEM 001 is recommended for stu- 
dents who do not qualify for MATH 110 or higher, or who have no high 
school chemistry and must take CHEM 103 This course does not carry 
credit towards any degree at the University. This Special Chemistry Fee is 
in addition to course charge 

Cooperative Education in Liberal Arts, Business and Science (CO-OP 
098-099) per semester: $65.00 



Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 098-099) per semester $65.00 

Fees for Auditors and courses taken lor audit are the same as those 
charged lui Luuises taken for credit at txith the undergraduate and gradu- 
ate levels Audited credit hours will be added to hours taken lor credit to 
determine (ulllime or part-time status for fee assessment purposes Spe- 
cial Students are assessed lees in accordance with the schedule lor the 
comparable undergraduate or graduate classification 

Change of Registration Fee: $2.00 lor each course dropped or added after 

the schedule adjustment period A $4 (X) lee is charged for each section 
change ($2 00 for the section added. $2 00 lor the section dropped) after 

the schedule adjustment period 

Qraduation Application Fee for Bachelor's Degree: $20.00. The Gradua- 
tion Application Fee is a one time, non refundable charge If a subsequent 
application is submitted for the same degree, the fee will not be charged a 
second time 

Special Examination Fee (Credit-by-Exam): $30.00 per course for all 

undergraduates and full time graduate students, credit-hour charge for 
part time graduate students 

Vehicle Registration Fees: Vehicles must be registered each academic 
year by all students enrolled for classes on the College Park Campus and 
who drive or park a vehicle anywhere or anytime on the campus For 
additional information, please refer to the entry for Department of Campus 
Parking in Chapter 4 of this catalog 

Textbooks and Supplies: Textbooks and classroom supplies vary with the 
course pursued, but will average $450 00 per year (2 semesters) 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checks: Payable for each check which is 
returned unpaid by the drawee bank on initial presentation because of 
insufficient funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn against uncol- 
lected items, etc 

For checks up to $100 00 $10 00 

For checks from $100.01 to $500 00; $25 00 

For checks over $500 00: $50 00 

When a check is returned unpaid, the student must redeem the check 
and pay any outstanding balance in the account within 10 days or all 
University services may be severed and the account transferred to the 
State Central Collection Unit for legal follow-up Additionally, a minimum 15 
percent collection charge is added to the charges posted to the student's 
account at the time the transfer is made When a check is returned unpaid 
due to an error made by the student's bank, the student must obtain a 
letter from the branch manager of the bank or a person of equivalent status 
admitting the error This letter must be submitted to the Office of the 
Bursar to have the service charged waived 

Library Charges: Fine for failure to return a book from General Library 
before expiration of loan period - $ 35 per day Fine for failure to return 
book from Reserve Shelf before expiration of loan period - first hour over- 
due on first day: $1 50, after first hour on first day $ 75 per hour for each 
hour open up to a maximum of $45 00 per item. In case of loss or mutilation 
of a book, satisfactory restitution must be made. 

Maryland English Institute Fee: Semi-intensive, $1,174.00: Intensive, 
$2,347.00: Students enrolled with the Maryland English Institute pay this 
fee in support of the Institute Students enrolled in the semi-intensive 
program may also enroll for regular academic courses and pay the tuition 
and fees associated with those offerings The program also offers non- 
credit courses English Pronunciation, $180 00, and Workshop for Foreign 
Teaching Assistants, $180 00. 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to prop- 
erty or equipment Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, the 
individual student will be billed for it; where responsibility cannot be fixed, 
the cost of repairing the damage or replacing equipment will be prorated 
among the individuals involved. 

Late Payment Fee: Students who fail to pay the balance due on their 
accounts are subject to a late fee of 5% of the outstanding balance or 
$5 00. whichever is greater 

Severance of Services Fee: $25.00. Students who fail to pay the balance 

due on their accounts will have their University services severed and will be 
required to pay the total amount due plus a $25 (X) severance fee 

Withdrawal or Refund Fees: Any student compelled to leave the University 
at any time during the academic year should secure a form for withdrawal 
from the Records and Registrations Office The completed form and the 
semester Identification/Registration Card are to be submitted to the 
Records and Registrations Office The student will forfeit his or her right to 
refund if the withdrawal action descnbed above is not adhered to The 
effective date used in computing refunds is the date the withdrawal form Is 
filed in the Records and Registrations Office Stop Payment on a check. 



18 Financial Aid 



failure to pay the semester bill, failure to attend classes, does not consti- 
tute withdrawal A request tor a refund must be processed by the student 
with the Office of the Bursar: otherwise any credit on the student account 
will automatically be earned over to the next semester 
Cancellation of Registration - Submitted to the Withdrawal/Reenroll- 
ment Office before ttie official first day of classes entitles tt)e student to 
a full credit of semester tuition. 

Undergraduate students withdrawing from the University will be 
credited for tuition in accordance with the following schedule: 

Prior to classes beginning 100% 

After Classes begin: 

Between one and two weeks 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No Refund 

Prior to the first day of classes, if a full-time undergraduate student drops 
a course or courses, thereby changing the total number of credits for which 
the student is preregistered to eight or less, charges for the semester will 
be assessed on the basis of the per credit hour fee for part-time students 
However, if the student later adds a course or courses thereby changing 
the total number of credits for which the student is registered to nine or 
more, the student will be billed for the difference between per credit hour 
fees paid and the general fees for full-time undergraduates 

If during the first five days of classes a full-time undergraduate drops a 
course or courses thereby changing the total number of credits for which 
he/she is registered to eight or less, charges for the semester will be 
assessed on the basis of part-time charges plus 20 percent of the differ- 
ence between the full-time fees and appropriate part-time charges. After 
the first five days of classes, there is no refund for changing from full-time 
to part-time status 

A student who registers as a part-time undergraduate student and 
applies for a refund for courses dropped during the first week of classes 
will be given a refund No refund will be made for courses dropped 
thereafter 

No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
the student officially withdraws from the University or when he or she is 
given permission by the appropriate officials of the University to move from 
the residence halls and/or to discontinue dining hall privileges In these 
cases, the room refund will be computed by multiplying the number of 
periods remaining times the pro rata weekly rate after adjusting for a 
service charge Refunds to students having full board contracts will be 
calculated in a similar manner. No room and/or board refunds will be made 
after the fourteenth week of the semester Students are reminded that 
reservations for room and board must be cancelled by the date published 
in the residence hall and dining services agreement(s). 

In computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of 
scholarships and loans from University funds, the computation will be 
made to return the maximum amount to the scholarship and loan accounts 
without loss to the University 



FINANCIAL AID 



Office of Student Financial Aid 

2130 Mitchell Building, 454-3046 

Applying for financial aid, receiving financial aid, and keeping your 
financial aid do not happen automatically 

YOU HAVE TO MAKE IT HAPPEN! 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) provides advice and assis- 
tance in the formulation of student financial plans and, in cooperation with 
other University offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships and 
grants to deserving students The primary responsibility of financing 
attendance at the University of Maryland at College Park lies with the 
student and the family Scholarships, grants, loans, and work study posi 
tions are awarded on the basis of academic ability and financial need 
determined by a federal needs analysis system It is the intent of the 
committee on Financial Aid to provide awards to those qualified students 
who might not otherwise be able to pursue college studies 

Financial aid funds are limited: therefore, all new, readmitted, and 
returning students must follow these steps to receive priority consideration 
for financial aid 

1 Submit admissions applications and all necessary supporting docu- 
ments to the Office of Admission by the appropriate deadlines 

2 Complete a Financial Aid Form (FAF) after January 1 FAF forms are 
available from OSFA 



New students should not wait to be adinltted before filing ttM FAF. A 

financial aid application has no t>earing on a student s admission applica- 
tion However, a student will not receive final consideration for aid until he 
or she is admitted to a degree program 

3 fvlail the form to the College Scholarship Service no later than Janu- 
ary 15, so that the Service s analysis of the FAF is received in the Office of 
Student Financial Aid by February 15 Income tor the previous year may 
be estimated initially, and corrected later on the Student Aid Report. 

Applications received after February 15 1989 will t>e reviewed alter on 
time applications in order of receipt as long as funds are available 

All transfer and new graduate students must provide a financial aid 
transcript from all post-secondary schools attended, whether aid was 
received or not. 

General Rec|ulations Applicable to All 
Forms of Aid 

Full-time Status. For most types of aid, students must register for and 
maintain at least 12 credit hours each semester in order to receive the full 
financial aid award and maintain that award 

Citizenship Status. Students must be United States citizens or eligible 
non-citizens in order to be eligible for Federal, Stale, or University financial 

assistance 

Default/Owe Refund. To receive Federal financial aid, you cannot be in 

default on an educational loan, nor can you owe any refund on a Pell Grant 
or Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously 
awarded at any post-secondary institution 

Degree Seeking. To receive Federal financial aid, you must t>e working 
toward a degree or certificate 

Satisfactory Progress. To receive Federal financial aid, you must be 
making satisfactory progress toward a degree or certificate according to 
the Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress printed at the end of 

this chapter 

Selective Service. To receive Federal financial aid. you must be regis- 
tered with Selective Service if you are a male who is at least 18 years old 
and born after December 31 1959. unless you are not required to be 
registered Compliance with the registration requirement will be verified by 
the Federal Government The names of those students whose status 
cannot be verified will be referred to the U S Department of Justice for 
possible prosecution 

Receiving a Non-University Award. If you receive assistance (scholar- 
ship or loan) from a non-University source, the University will normally 
reduce the financial aid awarded by the University It is the student's 
responsibility to notify the Director of Financial Aid of all outside awards 
Unless otherwise directed by the donor, outside non-University awards will 
be credited to your account, one half each semester of the academic year 

Change in Financial Situation. It is your responsibility to notify the 
Office of Student Financial Aid of any changes in your financial situation 
during the year 

Reapplication Requirement No form of assistance is automatically 
renewed from year to year All students requesting aid must reapply by 
submitting a new FAF annually Such reapplication must indicate contin- 
ued financial need as well as Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Award Policy. Financial aid is normally a combination of grant funds, 
loan funds, and employment The financial aid "package" is determir>ed 
by the availability of the vanous types of financial aid and the individual 
circumstances of the students It is not necessary to make any special 
application lor University grants The Office of Student Financial Aid will 
determine awards which t)est fit the needs and qualifications of the 
candidates. 

Estimating Educational Cost 

A budget of average educational costs is used in determining how 
much aid a student is awarded during the academic year The typical 
budget for an in-state undergraduate at the University of Maryland for the 
1988-89 academic year was as follows 

Dependent Student Living on Campus 

outotstate $529200 



$1103500 



Tuition (instate) 


$1906 00 


Room 


2194 00 


Board 


1784 00 


Incidentals 


1400 00 


Books 


365 00 


Travel 


000 



$7649 00 



Financial Aid 19 



Notes: 1 The above budget is subject to change (or the 1989-90 aca 
demic year 
2 To determine 1989-90 budget, add approximately 4%-5% to 

costs 

MERIT-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Scholarships 

There is an increasing number of merit-based scholarships available to 
academically talented students attending the University of ly^aryland at 
College Park The following is a list of such awards, several of which are 
dependent upon a particular major, academic standing, and/or in some 
cases, financial need, as determined by the Financial Aid Form (FAF) 
Individual students applying for fvlerit awards may be eligible for more than 
one of these scholarships For more information about these awards, the 
student is encouraged to contact the department or office responsible for 
the selection 

Benjamin Banneker Scholarship. Merit awards are available to academi- 
cally talented black students Awards are made to entering freshmen and 
are renewable for up to four years of undergraduate study The award 
provides funds to cover full-time, in-state tuition and fees December 1 is 
the deadline for receipt of both the application for admission and awards 
Automatic consideration is given to all National Achievement Finalists 
Banneker Scholars are also admitted to the General Honors Program If they 
choose to participate Contact Office of Admissions Awards are made in 
March or early April 

Full University Scholarship. This four-year award covers the recipients 
room, board, tuition, and mandatory fees charged at UMCP Those eligible 
for consideration must be incoming freshmen with a grade point average of 
3 5 or better, combined SAT scores of 1100 or higher, and must demon- 
strate extreme need as determined by the Financial Aid Form (FAF) and 
the Office of Student Financial Aid Approximately 15 Full Scholarships are 
awarded each year Candidates will be selected from among those eligible 
freshmen who are admitted by March 1st Contact Office of Student 
Financial Aid Awards are made in early April 

Francis Scott Key Scholars Program. Scholarships, renewable for four 
years of undergraduate study, are awarded on the basis of merit to incom- 
ing freshmen The awardees are known as Key Scholars The awards 
provide funds to cover full-time, in-state tuition and fees. In addition. Key 
Scholars receive preferential housing Recipients are designated by the 
President upon the recommendation of a committee which screens nomi- 
nations submitted by high school guidance counselors and administrators 
of the University For consideration, students must submit an application 
for admission to the University and be nominated for this award by Decem- 
ber 1st Automatic consideration is given to all National Merit Finalists and 
Semi-Finalists, all Distinguished Scholar Finalists and Semi-Finalists, and 
Honorable Mentions Contact the Office of Admissions, Awards are made 
in March or early April 

Regents Scholars Program. Each year, the University of Maryland selects 
from the brightest high school graduates in the nation a small number of 
Regents Scholars to continue their education at the College Park. Balti- 
more County, or Eastern Shore campuses of the University The President 
of each campus selects from among the applicants his or her nominees for 
consideration by the Chancellor and Board of Regents of the University. 
Scholarships are based on academic achievement and leadership poten- 
tial Each scholar will receive an annual award to cover in-state tuition, 
mandatory fees. room, board, and books over a four-year baccalaureate 
program. Final selection and official appointment to the Regents Scholars 
program is by the Board of Regents Contact the Office of Admissions 
Awards are made in early spring. 

University of Maryland Scholars. Similar to the Regents Scholars Program, 
the University of Maryland Scholars are chosen from the brightest high 
school graduates in the nation to continue their education at the University 
of Maryland at College Park The Chancellor's Scholarship Committee 
selects from the applications their nominees for consideration by the Chan- 
cellor of the University Scholarships are based on academic achievement 
potential. Each scholar will receive an annual award to cover in-state 
tuition, mandatory fees, room, board, and books over a four-year baccalau- 
reate program Contact the Office of Admissions. Awards are made in 
early Spring 

University Sponsored Scholarships. Most scholarships are awarded to 
students before they enter the University However, students who have 
completed one or more semesters and have not received such an award 
are eligible to apply Each applicant will receive consideration for all 
scholarships administered by the Office of Student Financial Aid, for which 
he or she is eligible Students must submit an FAF by February 15, includ- 
ing all supporting documents, and must submit a scholarship application 
by May 1st, in order to be considered for scholarship assistance for the 
ensuing year Contact the Office of Student Financial Aid Scholarship 
awards will be made by July 1st. 



Regulations and procedures for the awarding of scholarships are for 
mutated by the Committee on Financial Aid All recipients are subject to 
the academic and non-acadomic regulations and requirements of the 
University 

The Committee reserves the right to review the scholarship program 
annually and to make adjustments in the amounts and the recipients of the 
awards in accordance with the funds available and the scholastic achieve- 
ment of the recipients 

College and Departmental Scholarships. Questions atx>ut any award that 
IS recommended by a college/school or department should be directed to 
the chairperson or dean Refer to the department or college section of this 
catalog, or contact the department or college directly 

Maryland State Scholarships. The General Assembly of Maryland has 
created several programs of scholarships for Maryland residents who need 
financial help to obtain a college education The undergraduate programs 
include (1) General State scholarships, (2) Senatorial scholarships, and (3) 
House of Delegates scholarships High school seniors wishing to apply for 
these scholarships should contact their guidance counselor Students 
presently attending the University of Maryland should contact the Office of 
Student Financial Aid Students who are entering college for the first time 
must take the Scholastic Aptitude test in November or Decemt>er of their 
senior year A Maryland State Financial Aid form must be mailed to the 
College Scholarship Service in Princeton, New Jersey The deadline for 
applying for these scholarships is March 1st each year For additional 
information, contact the Maryland State Scholarship Board, 2100 Guilford 
Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21218, telephone (301) 344-6420 

Local and National Scholarships. In addition to the scholarships provided 
by the University of Maryland, a student should give careful consideration 
to scholarship aid provided by local and national scholarship programs 
The University maintains a database of these scholarships and will perform 
a scholarship search for students Contact the Office of Student Financial 
Aid for details. 

Out-of-State Scholarship Programs. Several states have scholarship and 
grant programs which permit students to use the state scholarship or grant 
at an out-of-state institution Contact the awarding agency in your home 
state. 

NEED-BASED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 
Grants 

Students at the University of Maryland will be considered for grant 
funds when they complete the Financial Aid Form by our pnority deadline 
Grant awards are made to undergraduate students from the federal Pell 
and SEOG programs and from limited University funds. These awards are 
generally based on financial need and vary in value. 

Pell Grant. The Federal Government provides grant assistance to eligible 
students who need it to attend post-secondary institutions Each applicant 
receives a Student Aid Report (SAR) from the Federal Pell Grant office 
Students must submit the SAR to the institution in which they plan to 
enroll Eligible students may receive a Pell Grant for each year of under- 
graduate study, provided they enroll in at least six (6) credit hours per 
semester Eligibility for the program ends once the first undergraduate 
degree is received 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG). The Federal SEOG 

program is administered by the University and provides grants to students 
who have exceptional financial need Eligible students must enroll in and 
maintain twelve (12) credit hours per semester Eligibility for this program 
ends once the first undergraduate degree is completed 

University Grant. The University administers this need-based program to 
students. Applicants who have at least a 3 GPA and whose FAF is 
processed by February 15th are considered for this grant 

UMCP Grant. This need-based grant is administered by the University To 
be considered, students must have their FAF processed by February 15th. 
the priority deadline for OFSA 

Self-Help 

The University administers a number of student loan programs which 
provide low-interest, long-term loans to undergraduate students with finan- 
cial need Only students who complete a FAF are considered for these 
programs Loans are becoming a very important part of the financial aid 
package It is imperative to plan carefully for your college education, so 
that the amount of your indebtedness once you leave school does not 
exceed your ability to repay your loans 

Perkins Loans. The Perkins program was designed to make low-interest 
loans to students with demonstrated financial need The borrower must 
sign a promissory note Repayment, at an interest rate of 5 per cent. 



20 Financial Aid 



begins six or nine months after a student graduates, withdraws, or drops 
below half-time status 

Stafford Loans. The Federal Stafford Loan program allows students to 
borrow funds directly from banks, credit unions, savings and loans, or other 
participating lenders The commercial lending institution, not the Univer- 
sity, makes the loan to the student Undergraduates may borrow up to $2, 
625 per year for their first two years of study, or $4,CKX) per year after 
completing two years of study, depending on their need and lender poli- 
cies Need IS determined by completion of an FAF The interest rate is 8% 
during the first four years of repayment, and increases to 10% beginning 
with the fifth year of repayment 

Applications are available from the Office of Student Financial Aid. 
Forms should be completed at least three months before the funds are 
required The FAF is required 

Parent Loans (PLUS) or Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS). Some 
banks or lending institutions currently participate in the Parent Loan 
(PLUS) or Supplemental Loan (SLS) programs These loans are available 
to parents or dependent students and to independent students. The 
maximum that parents and independent students may borrow in a year is 
$4,000 The interest rate is variable, but will not exceed 12 per cent 
Repayment begins 60 days after disbursement of the loan In all cases, the 
key to obtaining one of these loans is finding a bank or lender willing to 
make the loan The recommended application filing deadline is July 31st 
NOTE: Effective August 17, 1988, students must complete an FAF before 
a Supplemental Loan can be processed. 

Part-time Employment 

Working dunng your college years may offer advantages in addition to 
the obvious one of financing a college education The employed student 
has a special opportunity to learn new skills, develop good work habits, 
and learn how to get along with people Sometimes part-time employment 
helps students choose a vocation or acquire necessary expertise 

College Work-Study Program. Under provisions of the Educational Amend- 
ments of 1976, employment may be awarded as a means of financial aid to 
students who (1) are in need of earnings from such employment to pursue 
a course of study at a college or university, and (2) are capable of maintain- 
ing good standing in the course of study while employed Under the Work- 
Study Program, students may work up to twenty hours per week during the 
school year and a maximum of forty hours per week during the summer 
The amount of money that may be earned is determined by the student's 
demonstrated need. 

Dining Hall Worfcship Program. Under the Dining Hall Workship Program, 
students may earn their board by working approximately twelve hours per 
week. After a successful semester, the workload may be increased at the 
student's request Students normally cannot make arrangement for 
employment until they are on campus at the beginning of the semester 
Application must be made in person and the applicants should have a 
schedule of classes and study hours so that they can seek employment 
best suited to their free time Contact Dining Services 

Library Workship Program. Students may be awarded jobs under the 
Library Workship program through the Office of Student Financial Aid 
Students must follow the usual financial aid application procedures and 
show financial need The amount of the award (generally about $1 ,200 per 
year) is credited to the student's account 

Additional Resources 

Job Referral Services. In addition to the need-based College Work Study 
(CWS) program, the Job Referral service, located in Room 3120 Hornbake 
Library, serves without charge as a clearinghouse for students seeking 
pan-lime work and for employers seeking help Call 454-2490 for further 
information Many jobs, including full-time summer employment opportuni- 
ties, are available both on and off campus. 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

As a recipient of Federal student aid, you have certain rights you should 
exercise, and certain responsibilities you must meet Knowing what they 
are will put you in a better position to make decisions about your educa- 
tional goals and how you can best achieve them 

Student Rights 

1 You have the nght to know what financial aid programs are available 

2 You have the right to know the deadlines lor submitting applications 
for each of the financial aid programs available 

3 You have the right to know how financial aid will be distributed, how 
decisions on that distnbution are made, and the t^asis for these 
decisions 



4 You have the right to know how your financial need was determined. 
This includes how costs tor tuition and fees, room and board, travel, 
books and supplies, personal and miscellaneous expanses, and the 
like are considered in your budget 

5 You have the right to know what resources (such as parental contribu- 
tion, other financial aid, your assets, etc ) were considered in the 
calculation of your need 

6 You have the right to know how much of your financial need as deter- 
mined by the institution has tseen met 

7 You have the right to request an explanation of the various programs in 
your student aid package 

8 You have the right to know the school's refund policy 

9 You have the ngnl to know what (jorlion of the financial aid you receive 
must be repaid, and what portion is grant aid If the aid is a k>an. you 
have the right to know what the interest rate is the total amount that 
must be repaid, the payback procedures, the length of time you have 
to repay the loan, and when repayment is to begin 



Student Responsibilities 



1 You must complete all application forms accurately and submit them 
by the deadline date to the appropriate office It is understood that in 
some instances estimated income must be used in order to meet 
deadlines, however, you are required to update estimated information 
after this information is completed or corrected by making corrections 
on your Student Aid Reports (SAR) and your Financial Aid Form (FAF) 
acknowledgement processed by the College Scholarship Service 

2, You must provide correct information If you purposefully give false or 
misleading information on your financial aid application forms, it is 
considered a criminal offense which could result in indictment under 
the US Criminal Code 

3 You must return all additional, verification, corrections, and/or new 
information requested by either the financial aid office or the agency to 
which you submitted your application 

You are responsible for reading and understanding all forms that you 
are asked to sign and for keeping copies of them 



You must accept responsibility for all agreements that you sign. 
You must perform the work that is agreed upon in accepting a College 



Work-Study award 

You must be aware of and comply with the deadlines for application or 
reapplication for aid 

You should be aware of the schools refund procedures 
You must complete an exit interview if you are a loan borrower ar>d are 
terminating student status or registering as less than a half-time 
student 

10, You must maintain current and correct addresses with the Office of 
the Bursar and the Records & Registrations Office 

11 You should be aware of any stipulations (eg , minimum amount of 
credits you must be registered for) in order to maintain your financial 
aid (i e . grants, scholarships, loans) 

12 You are responsible to contact your Financial Aid Counselor to report 
any changes, decisions, or in registration status (e g transferring to 
another institution, withdrawing from the University or from a class, 
graduation date, cooping) Failure to do so may result in the car>cet- 
lation of your aid or a portion of your aid 

For in-depth instructions, directions, and answers to your financial aid 
questions and concerns, please refer to the Financial Facts " txx>k (a 
guide to financial aid resources) published yearly by the Financial Aid 
Office This book is made available with the financial aid packet, or you 
may stop by the Financial Aid Office, 2130 Ivlitchell Building to obtain your 
FREE COPY. 

Remember The Facts book contains vital information you need to 
know-from applying for financial aid. to receiving financial aid and keeping 
the financial aid you are offered 



SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR 
FINANCIAL AID 

Federal legislation governing the administration of the Pell Grant, tf>e 
Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan), the Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), the College Work Study (CWS). 
the Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) and the PLUS Supplemental Loan 
requires that colleges and universities define and enforce standards of 
progress for students receiving or applying for federal financial aid To 
comply with that legislation, the following Standards of Satisfactory Pro- 
gress have been established, and all recipients of the atx)ve mentioned 
wms of financial aid are subject to these standards for renewal or receipt 
of their federal financial aid 

A review of the student s compliance with the Standards of Satisfactory 
Progress will normally occur at the end of the Spnng Semester Students 
who have not met the minimum credit hour requirement and'of minimum 
grade point average requirement will be informed m writing prior to the Fal 
Semester 



Financial Aid 21 



What You Must Do To Keep Your Aid 

1 All undetgraduale and qraduale students must earn a basic annual 
credit minimum The (ollowing chart will be used to determine eligibil- 
ity (or renewalreceipi of federal student financial aid funds 

Undergraduate Students 

Full-time Undergraduate Students 

1st Year students must earn 15 cryr 
2nd Year students must earn 18 cr/yr 
3rd Year & up students must earn 24 cr/yr 

Part-time Undergraduate Students 

1st Year students must earn 8 cr/yr 
2nd Year students must earn 9 cr/yr 
3rd Year & up students must earn 12 cr/yr 

Graduate Students 

Full-time Graduate Students 

1st Year students must earn 12 cr/yr 

2nd Year & up students must earn 18 cr/yr 

Part-time Graduate Students 

1st Year students must earn 6 cr/yr 

2nd Year & up students must earn 9 cr/yr 

2. Federal aid recipients must maintain the required grade point average 
necessary to continue as degree students at the University of Mary- 
land. Therefore, you must maintain academic standing consistent with 
the institutions graduation standards as defined by the Registrar and 
the Graduate School as outlined in the Undergraduate and Graduate 
Catalogs 

3 Students are eligible to receive federal student financial assistance for 
the following maximum time periods: 

The maximum time frame allowed for a baccalaureate degree is as 

follows 

Pell Recipients: 

Full-time 5 yrs (10 sem ) 

Part-time 10 yrs (20 sem ) 

All Other Federal Aid Programs 

Full-time: 4 yr program 6 yrs (12 sem.) 

5 yr program, 7 yrs (14 sem.) 
Part-time: 4 yr program 12 yrs (24 sem.) 

5 yr program .13 yrs (26 sem ) 

The maximum time frame allowed for a IVIaster's degree / AGS certifi- 
cate is as follows 



All Federal Aid Programs 

Full-time or part-time 5 yrs (10 sem ) 

'exceptions made on an individual basis for programs requiring additional 

coursework 

The maximum time frame allowed for Doctoral degree candidates is 
as follows 

All Federal Aid Programs 

Full lime or part lime 9 yrs (18 sem ) 

How to Regain Eligibility 

II a student is denied aid because of lack of progress, courses must be 
taken at the students own expense until he/she has earned the minimum 
credit hours required or earned the required grade point average At the 
time the student fulfills the Standards of Satisfactory Progress, the student 
must notify the Office of Student Financial Aid by submitting an appeal 
form to us indicating that the requirements have been met 

Appeals 

students who do not comply with the Standards of Satisfactory Pro- 
gress may submit a written appeal to the Office of Student Financial Aid if 
extenuating circumstances have affected their academic progress The 
written appeal should include appropriate third-party documentation If the 
appeal is denied, the student must complete the needed hours or grades 
before he/she will become eligible for federal financial assistance 

Complications . . . Consequences 

If you do not meet these standards, your aid will be cancelled Should 
you submit a written appeal and if we approve it based on your academic 
record and the unusual circumstances you describe, your eligibility may be 
reinstated If you are not eligible for aid because you did not pass the 
minimum number of required credits, your eligibility may be reinstated after 
you successfully complete the deficient credits at your own expense Aid 
will be reinstated on a funds available basis 

Not all credits count toward the minimum credit requirement, only 
grades of A, B, C, D, Pass, or Satisfactory will count The following credits 
are not counted "F" (Fail), "I" (Incomplete), "W" (Withdrawal), Unsatis- 
factory, Audit, repeats, and ivIEl 

The annual credit requirement and grade point average applies to you 
whether or not you receive financial aid. 

For more information on specific Standards of Satisfactory Academic 
Progress issues, please contact the Office of Student Financial Aid If you 
choose to withdraw from a class or are in danger of not passing a class, you 
should contact this office to see how your financial aid will be affected. 



22 



4 Campus Administration, 
Resources, and 
Services 



Campus Administration 

Office of the President 

1101 Mam Administration. 454-4796 

The President is the chief executive officer of the University of Maryland 
at College Park Four Vice Presidents, v^ho report to the President, man- 
age different divisions of the campus administration The Office of Human 
Relations Programs, the Campus Senate, and the Department of Intercolle- 
giate Athletics report to the Office of the President. 

Academic Affairs 

1119 Mam Administration, 454-4508 

The Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs coordinates the 
academic life of all students at College Park -both graduates and under- 
graduates -from admission and the granting of financial aid through the 
development of programs of study and academic policies, to the awarding 
of degrees The Vice President is responsible for the formulation, peiiodic 
revision, and implementation of academic policies and procedures, and for 
ensuring the integrity and continuity of all curricula offered at College Park. 
The Office also functions as the coordinator for participants in the Aca- 
demic Common Market, an interstate agreement for sharing academic 
programs through an exchange of students across state lines. Under this 
program, students have access to selected programs not offered at public 
post-secondary institutions in Maryland without having to pay out-of-state 
tuition charges 

Adcniriistrative Affairs 

1 132 Mam Administration, 454-4795 

Administrative Affairs is responsible for the effective management of 
the physical, fiscal, and staff support resources of the institution It also 
provides campus safety and security, materials management, administra- 
tive computing, and other necessary support services Of particular inter- 
est to students are the community awareness and security programs 
offered by the University Police and the information and assistance ser- 
vices provided by the Bursar for concerns of students regarding University 
billings 

Institutional Advancement 

1114 Mam Administration, 454-1414 

The Office of Institutional Advancement conducts a variety of programs 
to develop greater understanding and support for UMCP among its many 
publics Units of this Office include Development, Public Information, 
Creative Services/Publications, and Alumni Programs The Office of Insti- 
tutional Advancement is responsible for all official campus-wide advance- 
ment programs such as fundraising, alumni affairs, production of official 
campus publications, films and video presentations, media relations, and 
management of major campus events 

Student Affairs 

2108 Mitchell Building. 454-2925 

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs provides administra- 
tive leadership for the development of programs and services that help 
students clarify and fulfill their needs and objectives, and that conlnbule to 
a constructive campus learning environment The Office serves as a gen- 
eral point of contact for students and their families regarding student life it 
coordinates Student Affairs efforts with the academic colleges, the Gradu 
ate School, and other administrative units in the areas of student conduct, 
due process and student-related legal matters The Office maintains liai- 
son with the University Chaplains, the Student Government Association 
(SGA), and the Graduate Student Association (GSA), and also advises 
Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society 



Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies 

1115 Hornbake Library, South Wing, 454-6231 

The Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies coordinates the 
interpretation and implementation of academic regulations and require- 
ments with the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and cooperates with 
academic Deans and Department Chairs to assure the overall organization 
and continuity of the undergraduate curriculum Specifically, the Office 
oversees the general education requirements as well as undergraduate 
advising at both the departmental and college levels Undergraduate 
Studies is also the advising home for pre-business students and for those 
students who have not yet decided upon a major The special advising 
necessary for students interested in health professions and law is also 
located here 

The Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies supervises the Gen- 
eral Honors Program and the Individual Studies Program, administers the 
Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Program, and serves as the campus coordi- 
nator for Merit Scholarships and Honor Societies (see tselow) It also 
administers the Credit by Examination Program and coordinates informa- 
tion about CLEP and Advanced Placement credits 

Academic service components reporting to this Office include the 
Career Development Center, the Office for Experiential Learning Programs, 
the Undergraduate Advising Center, the Health Professions Advising 
Office, Intensive Educational Development, Upward Bound, Talent Search, 
the Retention Office, and related tulonal services 

Honor Societies. Students who excel in scholarship and leadership may 
be invited to join the appropnate honor society For information, contact 
the Coordinator, Undergraduate Advising Center, 454 2733 Honor socie- 
ties at College Park include the following: 

'Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engineenng) 

'Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 

'Alpha Lambda Delta (Scholarship-Freshmen) 

Alpha Zeta (Agriculture) 

Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting major in Business and Management) 

Beta Gamma Sigma (Business and Management) 

Delta Phi Alpha (National German Honors Society) 

Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

'Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

Financial Management Association 

'Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 

Golden Key National Honor Society (Scholarship and Leaderstiip: 

juniors and seniors) 

lota Lambda Sigma (Industrial Ecucalion) 

'Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

"Kappa Tau Alpha (Journalism) 

'Mortar Board (Scholarship and Leadership) 

'Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineenng) 

'Omega Rho (Business and Management) 

'Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

'Omicron Delta Kappa (Scholarship and Leadership) 

'Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 

Phi Alpha Epsilon (Physical Education, Recreation, and Health) 

'Phi Alpha fhela (History) 

Phi Beta Kappa (Lit)eral Arts and Sciences) 

•Phi Eta Sigma (Scholarship-Freshmen) 

'Phi Kappa Phi (Senior and Graduate Scholarship) 

'Phi Sigma (Biology) 

'Phi Sigma lota (French and Italian) 

Phi Sigma Pi (Scholarship and Leadership) 

Pi Alpha Xi (Floriculture) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 

Pi Pi (Slavic Languages) 

•Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 

'Psi Cfhi (Psychology) 

Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering) 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Services 23 



Sigma Alpha Omicron (Microbiology) 

Sigma Delta Chi (Society o( Professional Journalists) 

"Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 

'Sigma Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering) 

"Sigma Tau Delta (English) 

"Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) 

"Members ol Association of College Honor Societies 

Administrative Dean (or Summer Programs 

2103 Reckord Armory. 454 3347 

The University o( Maryland at College Park offers two summer sessions 
of SIX weeks each year in addition to its regular fall and spring semesters 
See the Academic Calendar printed in this catalog or the Schedule of 
Classes for exact dates New freshman applicants who have met the 
regular University admission requirements for fall enrollment may begin 
their studies dunng the summer rather than waiting tor the next fall term 
By taking advantage ol this opportunity and continuing to attend summer 
sessions, the lime required for completion of a baccalaureate degree can 
be shortened by a year or more, depending upon the requirements of the 
chosen curriculum and the rale of progress 

Many new students have found that attendance during the summer 
sessions eases the transition from high school to college Courses offered 
during the summer are the same in content and instruction as those 
offered during the fall and spring semesters 

The Summer Cultural and Recreational Program is an important part of 
"Summer at Maryland " The Maryland Summer Institute for the Creative 
and Performing Arts offers a series of programs in art, dance, drama, film 
and music, and outstanding performers in these media appear on the 
campus Facilities for most sports and an intramural program in several 
team and individual sports are available to the students For additional 
information, write for a Summer Programs catalog to the Administrative 
Dean for Summer Programs, The University of Maryland, College Park, Md 
20742 

Campus Resources and Services 

Academic Advising 

Undergraduate Advising Center: 1117 Hornbake Library, 454-2733 
Health Professions Advising: 454-2540 
Credit-By-Exam,Advanced Placement/CLEP: 454-2733 

General Information 

Academic advising is available to all students at College Park Advising 
is an essential part of an undergraduate's educational experiences. From 
orientation to graduation, advising can provide students with the assis- 
tance they need to plan their programs constructively Effective academic 
advising functions like the hub of a wheel, providing connections between 
coursework and career, between learning and doing, between seeking 
advice and accepting responsibility. 

Advantages for Students: As active and regular participants in existing 
advising programs, students can reasonably expect to: 

(1) better understand their purposes for attending the University; 

(2) develop insights about personal behaviors that promote improved 
adjustment to the campus setting. 

(3) increase their awareness of academic programs and course offerings 
at College Park, 

(4) more frequently explore opportunities both inside and outside the 
classroom for intellectual and cultural development: 

(5) acquire decision-making skills that can accelerate academic and 
career planning, 

(6) more realistically evaluate their academic progress and its relation- 
ships to successful planning: and 

(7) understand the relationship between academic success and planning 
skills 

Required Advising: Students enrolled in certain majors are required to 
see advisors before each registration For most students, routine advising 
IS not mandatory However, the University does require all students to see 
an advisor under certain circumstances: 

Students in their First Semester of Registration at College Park. Stu- 
dents who are in their first semester of registration at College Park are 
urged to meet with an advisor prior to scheduling their classes 

Students Receiving an Academic Warning. Students who receive an 
Academic Warning" at the end of any semester will be urged in writing to 
meet with an advisor prior to the beginning of the next semester. Students 
who do not meet with an advisor will not be allowed to drop or add courses 
or to register for the following semester 

Students Dismissed from the University. Each student dismissed from 
the University for academic reasons must, as a condition of reinstatement, 
meet with an academic advisor According to the student's individual 
needs, this meeting may occur before or after reinstatement is granted: in 



no case, however, may a reinstated student complete registration until the 
fact of this meeting has been acknowledged/recorded by the advisor 

Students Who Withdraw. Given circumstances deemed appropriate by 
the Office of ReenrollmenI certain students applying for reinstatement 
following withdrawal may be required to meet with an advisor as a condi- 
tion ol their reinstatement When this occurs the tact of the meeting must 
t>e acknowledged/recorded by an advisor before registration can be com- 
pleted The intent is to require advising of those students who have a 
record of consecutive withdrawals, withdrawal during a semester following 
probation, and various other reasons for similar concern 

Senior Audit: After a student has earned tietween 70 and 80 credits 
toward a baccalaureate degree, that student shall be urged in writing to 
meet with an advisor This meeting is for the express purpose of reviewing 
the student's progress toward the degree and. at a minimum, requires the 
advisor to detail, in writing, all coursework yet to be completed in fulfillment 
of the degree requirements Each college and department will have availa- 
ble one or more advisors to meet with these students at appropriate times. 

Finding An Advisor: Undergraduate students at College Park are 
encouraged to use the many advisement opportunities that are available to 
them At both academic levels college and department -at least one 
person has been designated to coordinate advising A list of these per- 
sons, providing name, room number, and telephone extension is published 
each semester in the Schedule of Classes. Students who are unable to 
locate an advisor or who have questions about campus advising programs 
should visit or call the Undergraduate Advising Center, 1117 Hornbake 
Library, 454-2733 

Undergraduate Advising Center 

Many University students have decided to be "undecided about their 
majors and want help in defining their goals Other students, such as pre- 
business students, have plans to enter a particular program but are not 
certain they will meet the requirements Still other students discover they 
have chosen the wrong majors and need help redefining their goals 

Whatever their reasons for being "undecided," these students have a 
temporary advising home in the Undergraduate Advising Center Working 
with the Center's staff of trained academic advisors, they are able to 
explore ma|ors, choose and schedule courses, plan their academic pro- 
gram, and learn about campus-wide resources available for solving 
problems they encounter 

The Undergraduate Advising Center staff works closely with the Career 
Development Center, the Counseling Center, various tutoring services, 
and advisors from academic departments and programs across campus to 
provide a coordinated advising network which helps students design their 
personal academic plans, as follows: 

Choosing a Major: providing information and referral to the wide range of 
academic programs available to students and coordinating with services 
offered by the Career Development Center, the Counseling Center, and 
the academic colleges and departments. The Undergraduate Advising 
Center helps students select majors which best meet their interests and 
further their career goals. 

Pre-professional Advising: offering pre-professional advising for pre-law 
students (phone 454-2733), and referral for students with interest in the 
health professions For further information on pre-professional advising for 
pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-allied health students, consult the Cam- 
pus-wide Programs section of this catalog or phone (301) 454-2540 

Information and Referral: maintaining a central file of information atx)ut 
academic programs and requirements and academic support services at 
College Park Workshops designed to help students select majors and 
courses are offered regularly during the pre-registration period 

Troubleshooting: helping individual students identify and solve specific 
advising problems and difficulties with administrative procedures, such as 
transfer credit evaluation, schedule revisions, changing majors, errors in 
academic records, etc 

Policy Interpretation: keeping students and advisors informed about new 
academic policies and helping to interpret existing policies and practices 
and determine under what conditions exceptions might be granted 

Credit-by-Exam. CLEP, Advanced Placement: administering the cam- 
pus-wide program of credit-by-examination and coordinating information 
about CLEP and advanced placement credits Phone (301) 454-2733 

General Assistance: giving general assistance to students who have not 
been assigned to a permanent advising home such as students visiting 
this campus from other institutions 

Admissions 

Ground Level, Mitchell Building, 454-5550/6759 

The services offered by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions are 
designed to meet the individual needs of both prospective and enrolled 



24 Campus Administration, Resources, and Services 



students For prospective students, ttie Office provides general informa 
tion about College Park through brochures, letters, personal interviews, 
and campus tours II also evaluates the applications of both freshman and 
Iransler students in order to select qualified students The Office of 
ReenrollmenI reviews all applications for readmission and reinstatement 
Services for enrolled students include acting as a liaison with the academic 
departments for the evaluation of transfer credits, advanced placement, 
and CLEP scores, and providing any additional general information 
requested by enrolled students Please refer to Chapter 2 of this catalog 
for more information concerning undergraduate admissions. 

Campus Activities 

1191 Stamp Student Union, 454-5605. 

The Office of Campus Activities is a major resource for students wish- 
ing to become involved in extracurricular activities on the campus This 
Onice provides advisement, consultation, and programming assistance to 
campus student organizations for the primary purpose of enhancing the 
educational growth of groups' leaders, members, and associates Efforts 
focus on encouraging involvement of all students in campus life activities, 
establishing various programs for the benefit of the University community, 
and providing numerous leadership development opportunities Specific 
efforts include 

Student Organizations. Campus Activities registers all student organiza- 
tions at College Park, and provides to any student a directory of the over 
350 groups The Office also arranges reservations for these organizations 
when they wish to use campus facilities for their programs and events 
Additionally, a full-service accounting ottice serves those groups which 
have received funding from Student Activity Fees. 

Organization Advisement Major student groups such as the Student 
Government Association, the Homecoming Committee, and the University 
Talent Show Committee receive direct advisement from the staff of Cam- 
pus Activities Other student groups can also obtain help from the trained 
staff merely by requesting it. 

Leadership Development. Campus Activities offers a wide range of train 
ing experiences in interpersonal and organizational development skills 
ranging in format from half-day seminars to weekend workshops to full 
semester courses earning academic credit 

Gree/fS. Social fraternities and sororities are advised and supported by 
Campus Activities, individually and through the three "umbrella " organiza- 
tions; the Intrafraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council, and the Panhel- 
lenic Association 

Campus Senate 

0104A, Reckord Armory, 454-4549 

The Campus Senate, an integral part of the institution's system of 
governance, is unique in that it has representation from all segments of the 
campus community administrators, staff, faculty, and undergraduate and 
graduate students Participation in the Senate or any of its thirteen stand- 
ing committees is an honor and a responsibility 

The full Senate meets eight times a year to consider matters of concern 
to the institution including academic issues. University policies, plans, 
facilities, and the welfare of faculty, staff, and students The Senate 
advises the President, the Chancellor, or the Board of Regents as it deems 
appropnate 

To Isecome a student senator, students must be elected through their 
College or School, or the Office of Undergraduate Studies Elections are 
held every year during the Spring semester Additional student input is 
made possible through a series of Senate standing committees that draw 
memtiership from the campus community at large and cover every aspect 
of campus life and function 

Career Development Center 

3121 Hornbake Library, South Wing, 454-2813/4 

The Career Development Center (CDC) supports and assists students 
from all departments in early and systematic consideration of career ques- 
tions and concerns, such as How are my interests, skills and values 
related to career fields and UMCP majors? What are effective strate- 
gies in securing a job or selecting a graduate school? How do I prepare 
now for a rewarding career in the future? Career Development Center 
programs and services are designed to be used most effectively by stu- 
dents beginning in the freshman year and continuing through the college 
years Students who begin to plan their education and career early in their 
college expenence will t>e in the best position to direct themselves toward 
meaningful and rewarding careers upon leaving the University of Maryland 

Career Development Center Programs and Services 

Career Resource Center. The Career Resource Center provides excellent 
information and guidance for career exploration, decision-making, gradu- 
ate school planning and job seeking The Center's holdings include com- 
prehensive reference material on all as|3ects of work, education, and career 



exploration, as well as listings of job vacancies, employer and graduate 
school information, job seeking guides, videotapes of career workshops 
and employer information, and the DISCOVER computerized career infor- 
mation system 

Career Counselors. Career counselors will assist students in identifying 
careers and majors suited to their interests and skills, and in devek>p<ng 
the skills needed lor their job search, graduate training, or career change. 
Counselors are available with or without an appointment Check the 

Center for walk-in times and further information 

Course: EDCP 108D--Career Planning and Decision Making (1 cr). This 
course emphasizes the learning of the lifelong process of career planning. 
Assignments are chosen to facilitate self and career exploration, to teach 
effective decision-making skills for choosing a major, selecting career 
objectives, and planning (or future job'career changes 

Credentials Service. Credentials are a student's permanent professional 
record including letters of recommendation, evaluations, and course and 
resume information Any undergraduate or graduate student may develop 
a file prior to graduation to assist job or graduate school application 
processes All senior Education majors are required to establish a creden- 
tials file for employment purposes 

Group Programs and Campus-wide Events. Group programs on a wide 
variety of career development topics run continuously throughout each 
semester, including How to Choose a Major, Beginning ana Advanced 
Interviewing, Resume Writing, Orientation to the On-Campus Recruit- 
ing Program. Your Job Search, and Applying to Graduate School. Cam- 
pus-wide programs including career panels, Graduate'Professional School 
Fair, and career/job fairs bring students and employer representatives 
together for information exchange and employment contact Check for 
current dates and times of these special events 

On-Campus Recruiting Program (OCRP). Each year 600-700 employers 
come to campus to interview interested students who are within two 
semesters of graduation Job opportunities are concentrated in the areas 
of management training, engineering, computer science, accounting and 
financial operations, and scientific research and applications The Balti- 
more-Washington corridor offers additional opportunities in a variety of 
government and specialized careers Employers also have the opportunity 
to list vacancies in the Career Resource Center, and to receive information 
from those graduating seniors who register for and participate in the Mini- 
Resume Referral database service Job searches should be initialed at 
least one year in advance of graduation. 

Placement Manual and Handouts The Placement Manual provides 
detailed, comprehensive information regarding the services offered by the 
Career Development Center Career planning and job search strategies 
including resume wnting and interviewing techniques are discussed, and a 
preliminary listing of employers participating in the On-Campus Recruiting 
Program is provided There are also numerous handouts available to afl 
students, covering a wide variety of career planning topics 

Commuter Affairs 

1195 Stamp Student Union; 454-5274 

The Office of Commuter Affairs has established services to work on 
behalf of, with and for the commuter students at College Park In addition 
to the services descnbed below, the Office is actively involved in several 
research projects and houses the National Cleannghouse for Commuter 
Programs 

Carpooling. Students interested in forming a carpool can join the individ- 
ual match-up program by filling out an application at the Office of Com- 
muter Affairs or calling 1-800-492-3757 Student run regional carpools are 
given assistance from OCA Students who carpool with three or more 
people may apply at OCA for preferred parking 

Off-Campus Housing Service maintains up-to-date computerized lislir>gs 
of rooms, apartments, and houses (tKDth vacant and to share) Area maps, 
apartment directories, and brochures concerning topics of interest to com- 
muter students are available in the office Telephone 454-3645 

Settling In. UMaps serve as a unique guide to the institution, helpir>g 
students match their own interests with courses, careers, and opportuni- 
ties (or involvement on campus Personal copies of UMaps are available in 
the Office o( Commuter Atfairs 

Shuttle Bus System is operated by the Odice of Commuter Affairs (or the 
security and convenience of all students The bus system offers five 
distinct programs daytime commuter routes evening secunty routes, 
evening security call-aride. transit service (or the disabled, and charter 
services Schedules are available at the Stamp Student Union Information 
Desk, the Otfice o( Commuter Atfairs and the Shuttle-UM Office Tele- 
phone 454-2255 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Services 25 



Counseling Center 

Shoemaker Building, 454 2931 

The Counseling Center provides personal, vocational, and educational 
counseling both individually and in groups for UMCP students Programs 
(Of returning students, workshops on multiple roles (or women, increasing 
self esteem, eating disorders, adult children of alcoholics, study skills, sign 
language and exam skills are also available The Center also provides 
consultation to a variety of groups and individuals about educational or 
psychological issues of concern to them Available in the reception lobby 
are occupational and educational information brochures, as well as tape- 
recorded conversations with academic department chairpersons about 
majoring in their departments Records kept as part of providing counsel- 
ing services are confidential and not part of the University's educational 
records Counseling Center offices are located in the Shoemaker Building 
The Counseling Center includes five divisions described below 

Counseling Service. Psychologists provide professional, individual and 
group counseling services for students with educational-vocational and 
emotional-social adjustment concerns The Service also offers a large 
variety of special counseling workshop programs on such topics as asser- 
tiveness training, vocational planning, and stress management Telephone 
454-2931 

Disabled Student Service. Professionals in this Office provide services for 
disabled students including general campus information, assistance in 
locating interpreters for hearing impaired, readers for the blind, and access 
guides to various buildings and facilities on campus Telephone 454-5028 
(TTY 454-5029) 

Learning Assistance Service. Educational specialists provide individual 
and group work for improving academic skills such as reading comprehen- 
sion, speed reading, listening, notetaking, English as a second language, 
and how to learn mathematics and science material Workshops offered 
by this unit cover such topics as study skills, time management, learning 
math skills, and overcoming exam anxiety. Telephone 454-2935 

Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service. Professionals provide 
consultation, testing, and counseling for youngsters ages 5-14, and fami- 
lies Telephone 454-7203 

Testing, Research, and Data Processing Unit. National testing programs 
such as the CLEP, GRE and fvliller Analogies, as well as testing for counsel- 
ing purposes, are administered through this Office Staff members also 
produce a wide variety of research reports on characteristics of students 
and the campus environment Telephone 454-3126 

Dining Services 

1144 South Dining Hall, 454-2901 
Meal Plan Information: 454-2906 

Dining Services offers several meal plan alternatives at 28 different 
dining locations across campus It is the intent of Dining Services to 
provide flexibility, convenience, a diverse selection of foods, and conve- 
nient hours to all students, faculty, and staff 

Meal plans that are available to both on-campus and off-campus stu- 
dents include 1 ) a la carte selections: 2) dining room meal plans: and 3) DS 
Cash Card, offering an automatic discount of 10% at selected locations. 

Dining locations include traditional dining halls, a custom deli, ethnic 
eatenes, a table service restaurant, an upscale '50's-style eatery, a bakery, 
a dairy ice cream shop traditional fast foods, and a convenience store 

Students may obtain more information and apply for a meal plan in the 
Dining Services Contract Office 

Experiential Learning Programs 

0119 Hornbake Library. 454-4767 

The Office of Experiential Learning Programs (ELP) provides a number 
of learning opportunities that involve students in the work of the commu- 
nity and the campus These programs encourage students to test class- 
room learning m work situations, explore career possibilities by direct 
participation, learn about the culture and people of an organization, geo- 
graphic area, or academic environment, and enhance their personal devel- 
opment through work, academic travel, and volunteer experiences The 
programs include the following 

Internships and Field Experience. There are several ways for students to 
earn academic credit through a work expenence. Two internship courses, 
386 (Field Experience) and 387 (Analysis of Field Experience), are available 
in many departments across the campus These courses allow students to 
develop individualized work and learning plans with a sponsoring faculty 
member After departmental approval, students must register concur- 
rently for these courses Students may take the 386/387 sequence only 
once in any department for a maximum of six credits No more than one 
386/387 sequence may be taken in each semester In addition, the student 
must prepare and submit a learning proposal to the Experiential Learning 
Program Office by the end of late registration for the semester of the 
internship The maximum number of 386/387 credits applicable toward a 



baccalaureate degree is 24 Many departments also offer their own intern- 
ship programs ELP will help students match their interests with internship 
options and the nearly 2,000 local placement sites Students should plan 
for their internship 

Volunteer Service. The ELP Otlice maintains a listing of over 300 agencies 
and organizations that have expressed an interest in having volunteers 
from the University of Maryland Volunteer service opportunities can range 
from research and advocacy to direct service to agencies and individuals 
Students who wish to volunteer in a group setting may get involved with 
People Active in Community Effort (PACE), a student organization that 
provides valuable volunteer service/learning opportunities 

Cooperative Education for Liberal Arts, Business, and the Sciences. 
Cooperative Education (Coop) allows students to gain paid professional 
level work experience that is related to their ma|or Students learn more 
about their field of study and earn a competitive salary While most 
opportunities are in computer science and business, there are some pxDSi 
lions available for students in most majors To be eligible, a student musi 
have completed thirty-six semester hours, twelve of which must have been 
earned at UMCP the semester before cooping, and have a minimum 2.0 
cumulative GPA in the major, and each semester before co-oping While 
most CO op students alternate semesters of on-campus study with semes- 
ters of full time paid work, some choose a part-time co-op schedule The 
minimum is the equivalent of six months of full-time work 

Interested students must complete a co-op application and attend 
three required information and preparation sessions Students interested 
in co-oping beginning with the Spring semester should apply in the Fall 
Those interested in cooping beginning Summer or Fall should apply in the 
Spring See the College of Engineering entry in this catalog for details 
about the Engineering Co-op Program. 

National Student Exchange. National Student Exchange (NSE) provides 
students with the opportunity to experience educational travel, curricular 
development, cultural enrichment, and personal growth Students may 
attend one of about 80 state-supported colleges and universities in the 
NSE consortium for a semester or academic year The campuses vary and 
are located throughout the continental US and in Hawaii, the Virgin 
Islands and Puerto Rico Students often participate in NSE for a variety of 
reasons, selecting schools that provide a particular academic focus, 
unique cultural environment, or different geographic location NSE pro- 
vides the opportunity for students to experience a new living and learning 
environment and assists with a simplified admissions process and assur- 
ance of transferability of credit Exchanges should be completed prior to 
the student's final thirty hours of coursework at College Park 

Maryland students pay tuition and mandatory fees to UMCP and room 
and board and miscellaneous fees to the host institution Exchanges for 
the next academic year are negotiated in March by the NSE Coordinator. 
Whenever possible, students are placed at the school of their first choice. 

Students must have a 2 5 cumulative GPA at the time of application 
and exchange Students may not exchange during their final thirty credits. 

Financial Aid 

2130 Mitchell Building. 454-3046 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OFSA) administers a variety of 
financial assistance and student employment opportunities, primarily 
based on the need of the applicant The staff of the Office is available for 
individual counseling on matters pertaining to financial planning for college 
expenses For additional information, see Chapter 3 of this catalog. 

Health Center 

Campus Drive, opposite the Stamp Student Union, 454-3444 

Check out the Health Center, located directly across from the Stamp 
Union on Campus Dnve for pnmary care of illness and injury, health promo- 
tion and maintenance, consultation or education Health Center services 
include the dental clinic; men's clinic: women's clinic: skin care; sports 
medicine, physical therapy: nutrition counseling: mental health; social ser- 
vices: laboratory and pharmacy 

Individual group health education programs are also available on topics 
such as sexual health; stress management: substance use and abuse: and 
date rape prevention 

The Health Center is open 24 hours, seven days a week Hours vary 
dunng semester breaks and holidays. Currently registered students who 
have paid the health fee are eligible for care Appointments are recom- 
mended Students, however, are also seen on a walk-in basis Some 
problems may require referral outside the Health Center at the student's 
expense There are additional charges for special services such as x-ray: 
laboratory tests: dental treatment; allergy injections, pharmacy supplies; 
and physical therapy 

All information in student medical records is confidential Medical infor- 
mation IS released only with the student's written permission or court- 
ordered subpoena The Health Center does not issue routine absence 
excuses for illness or injury In case of prolonged absence or a missed 
exam, with the student's signed permission, the Health Center will verify 
dates of treatment 



26 Campus Administration, Resources, and Services 



Health Center telephone numbers to remember 

Information x3444 

Appointments x4923 

Mental Health Services: x4925 

Pharmacy x6439 

Health Insurance x6750 

Health Education x4922 

Honors Programs 

General Honors Program, 0110 Hornbake Library, 454-2532/2535 

Honors programs on campus are currently under review. Changes 
may be forthcoming. 

A number of special opportunities are available to energetic, academi- 
cally talented students through the establishment of honors programs 
The General Honors Program is available to qualified students across 
campus In addition, there are departmental honors programs in approxi- 
mately thirty academic departments and colleges 

All honors programs offer challenging academic experiences character- 
ized by small classes, active student participation, and an Honors faculty 
that encourages dialogue Individually guided research, field experience, 
and independent study are important aspects of Honors work 

General Honors allows students to pursue their general education at a 
challenging, demanding level They can engage, with others of similar 
ability and varied interests, in a program whose emphasis is on interdisci- 
plinary and educationally broadening activity These studies complement 
the students' specialized work in their chosen fields. Departmental honors 
programs offer students the opportunity to pursue more deeply their stud- 
ies in their chosen fields of concentration These programs usually begin in 
the junior year, although a few may start earlier Some students who enter 
the General Honors Program as freshmen transfer to their departmental 
programs in their sophomore or junior years 

Students who successfully complete the Honors curriculum graduate 
with a citation in General or Departmental Honors, or both For information 
about departmental programs, students should contact the department: 
for information about the General Honors Program, call 454-2532, or write 
Director, General Honors Program. The University of Ivlaryland, College 
Park, IvID 20742 

Human Relations Programs 

1107 Hornbake Library, 454-4707/4124 

The Human Relations Office (HRO) is responsible for initiating action in 
compliance with institution. State, and Federal directives designed to pro- 
vide equal education and employment opportunities for College Park stu- 
dents and employees It also monitors the outcomes of actions taken in 
this regard, reporting its findings to the President, the Campus Senate, and 
to the campus community at large The HRO will provide students and 
staff with general information on equity efforts and on the status of equity 
and compliance matters at College Park 

The HRO both sponsors programs that promote cross-cultural appreci- 
ation, and processes complaints of discrimination, following procedures 
set forth in the Campus Human Relations Code (see Appendix A of this 
catalog) Copies of the code are also available from the HRO and from the 
offices of the Vice Presidents and deans of the colleges and schools 
Equity Officers will provide them on request {see list below) 

Any student or employee having a concern about possible inequities in 
educational or employment matters, or who wishes to register a complaint, 
may contact an Equity Officer He or she may also contact the HRO Office 
directly 

N/inonty and/or women students and staff wanting specific information 
about programs and opportunities available to them within a particular 
academic or administrative unit may contact the Equity Officer within that 
unit 



Campus Equity Officers 

HRO Campus Compliance Officer 

fvis Gladys Brown, 1107 Hornbake Library 
Academic Affairs 

Dr Mane Davidson. 1119E Mam Administration 
Administrative Affairs 

Dr Sylvia Stewart. 1132 Mam Administration 
Agricultural and Life Sciences 

Mr Eugene Brilt. 1105 Symons Hall 
Architecture 

Mr Stephen F Sachs. 1205 Architecture BIdg. 
Arts and Humanities 

Dr Judy Hallet, 1102 Francis Scott Key Hall 
Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Dr Diana Jackson. 2141 Tydings Hall 
Business and Management 

Dr Pat Slocker. 3140 Tydings Hall 
Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences 

Dr Richard Ellis, 2300 Mathematics Building 
Education 



454-4704 
454-2052 
454-4795 
454-3743 
454-4174 
454-2510 
454-5272 
454-2406 
454-4596 



Dr Jeanette Kreiser, 3119 Benjamin Building 454-1524 

Engineering 

Ivlr James Newton. 1131L Engineering Classroom Building 454-4048 
Human Ecology 

Dr Effie Hacklander, 1100D Mane Mount Hall 454 5387 

Institutional Advancement 

Ms Maitland Dade. 2101 Turner Building 454-4198 

Journalism 

Dr Greig Stewart. 2115 Journalism Building 454-2228 

Library and Information Services 

Dr William Cunningham, 41 1 1C Hornbake Library 454-2376 

Physical Fducation, Recreation and Health 

Ms Colleen (Coke) Farmer, 2314 PERH BIdg 454 3550/2928 

President's Office 

Mr Ray Gillian. 1111 Mam Administration 454-4703 

Public Affairs 

Dr Bill Powers, 2106 Mornll Hall 454 7401 

Student Affairs 

Ms Sharon Fries. 2108 Mitchell Building 454-2925 

Intensive Educational Development Program 

01 1 1 Chemistry Building, 454-4646.4647 

The Intensive Educational Development Program (lED) is designed to 
provide comprehensive support services to both freshmen and sopho- 
mores currently enrolled at the University of Maryland at College Park, and 
also to high school seniors seeking admission to the University Specifi- 
cally, the program provide services in the areas of English, study skills. 
math, counseling, academic advising, and tutoring The program encour- 
ages students to utilize all lED and University services that would enable 
them to develop their mtellectual. personal, social, and economic potential 

All prospective students attempting to gam entrance to the tjniversity 
by participation in the program are required to attend the six-week Summer 
Transitional Program which is designed to develop, expand, and improve 
their English, math, and study skills: provide a learning experience that will 
assist them in the transition from high school to the University: and provide 
an opportunity to challenge and further evaluate each students potential 
for success at this institution 

Following the initial summer component and throughout the academic 
year, lED supports all students at College Park through sound academic 
advisement, continuing development of English, math, reading and study 
skills: personal counseling, and a free, comprehensive tutoring program 

The Tutorial Program offers tutoring in 117 courses in 30 major aca- 
demic areas Tutors are University students who are intensively screened 
and trained Sessions between students and tutors are arranged at mutu- 
ally convenient times Hourly math exam reviews are scheduled, as well as 
workshops on time management, note-taking, and theme writing. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Cole Student Activities Building. 454-2485 

The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is responsible for directmg 
intercollegiate athletic programs for both women and men. and lor manag- 
ing the College Park athletic complex 

Women's intercollegiate athletic teams include cross country, field 
hockey, and volleyball m the fall, basketball, swimming, indoor track and 
gymnastics during the winter, and lacrosse and track m the spring Tennis 
competition is scheduled in both the fall and spnng seasons 

There are men s teams in football, soccer and cross country m the fall. 
basketball, swimming, wrestling, and indoor track during the winter, and 
baseball, golf, tennis, lacrosse, and outdoor track m the sprmg Both 
men's and women's team compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) 
and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) 

National Collegiate Athletic Association Requirements for Student 
Athletes 

1 NCAA eligibility for regular season competition subsequent to the stu- 
dent's first year is based upon satisfactory completion prior to each fall 
term of twenty four (24) semester hours of acceptable degree credits or 
an average of twelve (12) semester hours per term of attendance 

2 The calculation ol credit hours shall be based upxjn hours accepted (or 
degree credit at the institution 

3 Student athletes must declare a major program ol study no later than 
the beginning ol their filth term of attendance 

4 Credit hours earned toward athletic eligibility for students in declared 
majors must be acceptable m their sf)ecilic majors 

5 The 24 credit hours ol acceptable credit required each year may mclude 
credits earned for a repeated course when the previous grade was an F. 
but may nof mclude the credits if the previous grade was D or toeUer 

University of Maryland Athletic Eligibility Requirements 

The University ol Maryland requires student athletes to mamlam a 
sf)eci(ied minimum grade point average to be eligible (or practice and 
competition The following standards are effective (or tail term, 1969 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Services 27 



Freshman (second term) 
2nd year enrollment 
3rd year enrollment 
4lh year enrollment 
5th year enrollment 



1 29 cumulative g pa 
1 78 cumulative g p a 

1 86 cumulative g p a 
2 00 cumulative g pa 

2 00 cumulative g p a 



Student athletes who meet the required grade point average and all other 
NCAA eligibility requirements will be eligible to compete and practice for 
the full academic year w\th the exceptions noted tselow 

1 Student athletes who (ail to meet necessary grade point average 
requirements (or the fall semester are ineligible (or the entire academic 
year However, ineligible student athletes may restore their eligibility at 
the end of any semester if they raise their grade point average to the 
minimum standard for the ensuing year 

2 Ineligible student athletes are not permitted to practice or compete 
3. First semester freshmen and transfer student athletes will be required 

to meet established grade point average requirements after their initial 
semester at the University Transfer students are required to attain the 
appropriate grade point averages based upon year o( enrollment 

4 Student athletes in their (inal year of eligibility must maintain a 2 
cumulative g pa in order to be eligible for practice and competition 
during spring term 

5 Eligible student athletes who go on academic warning after (all term are 
required to attend regularly supervised study sessions and receive 
academic support services as assigned by the Academic Support Unit 
StaH 

6 Dismissed and later reinstated student athletes are ineligible (or both 
practice and competition until they meet designated grade point 
averages 

For further information, please contact Dr Gerald Gurney, 454-2485 

International Education Services 

2113 Skinner (temporary address), 454-3043 

International students and faculty receive a wide variety of services 
designed to help them benetit (rom their expenence in the United States 
International Education Services works very closely with the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions by evaluating academic records from overseas 
and processing applications for English proficiency, visa, and financial 
requirements Other services provided to the prospective student include 
special advising and orientations, help with securing housing, information 
about programs of international interest, and assistance with the forms 
that are required for compliance with immigration and other governmental 
regulations 

Study Abroad Office. American students and (acuity receive advisement 
and information about study, travel, and work in other countries Students 
may obtain assistance with transfer credits, reenrollment, pre-registration. 
and housing for the semester they return to campus The University of 
fvlaryland offers study abroad programs in Israel and London Information 
and advisement are also available about programs through other universi- 
ties to most areas of the world For more information about Study Abroad, 
please see Chapter 8 of this catalog 

Englisti Language Instruction to Non-native Speakers. The University of 
K/laryland, through the Maryland English Institute, offers two programs of 
English language instruction for those who are not native speakers of 
English For those students who are admissable but require part-time 
English instruction, the Maryland English Institute offers semi-intensive 
(part-time) instruction Semi-intensive study would also require the student 
to enroll in a half-time academic program. Applicants who need more 
instruction take an /nfef7s/Ve (full-time) program before beginning an aca- 
demic program These programs are offered on a semester basis and are 
also available during the summer Dunng the summer only, semi-intensive 
instruction is also available to students not admitted to College Park For 
information regarding admission to the intensive Maryland English Insti- 
tute, contact the International Education Services office. For more informa- 
tion alxiut the Maryland English Institute, see the College of Arts and 
Humanities entry in Chapter 7 of this catalog. 

Judicial Programs 

2108 Mitchell Building. 454-2927. 

(To report instances o( academic dishonesty, 454-4746.) 

General Policy. The primary purpose for the imposition of discipline in the 
University setting is to protect the campus community and to create an 
atmosphere of personal freedom, in which the rights of all students and 
staff members are fully protected 

Students may be accountable to both civil authorities and to the Univer- 
sity for acts which constitute violations of law and of University regulations. 
Likewise, an act constituting a violation of the resident hall contract and 
University regulations may result in removal (rom University housing, the 
imposition of disciplinary sanctions, or both. 

General Statement of Student Responsibility. Students are expected to 
conduct themselves at all limes in a manner consistent with the University 



responsibility of ensuring to all members of the community the opportunity 
to pursue their educational objeclives, and of protecting the safety, wel- 
(are. rights, and property o( all memtiers of the community and of the 
University itseK Students should consult the Code o( Student Conduct. 
Appendix C. (or (urthor intormation 

Office of Judicial Programs. The Otfice o( Judicial Programs directs the 
etforts of students and staff memtjers in matters involving student disci- 
pline The responsibilities of the Office include ( 1 ) determining the discipli- 
nary charges to be filed against individual students or groups of students, 

(2) interviewing and advising parties involved in disciplinary proceedings. 

(3) sup)ervising. training, and advising the various judicial boards: (4) 
reviewing the decisions of the judicial boards, (5) maintaining all student 
disciplinary records, and (6) collecting and disseminating research and 
analysis concerning student conduct 

Student |udicia( board members are invited to assume positions o( 
responsibility in the University discipline system in order that they might 
contribute their insights to the resolutions o( disciplinary cases Final 
authority in disciplinary matters, however, is vested in the campus adminis- 
tration and in the Board of Regents 

Disciplinary Procedures. Students accused of violating University regula- 
tions are accorded fundamental due process in disciplinary proceedings. 
Formal rules of evidence, however, shall not be applicable, nor shall devia- 
tions (rom prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a decision or pro- 
ceeding unless significant prejudice to one of the parties may result Uni- 
versity hearing procedures are outlined in the document Preparing for a 
Judicial Hearing, available in the Office of Judicial Programs 

Minority Student Education 

1101 Hornbake Library. 454-4901 

Nyumburu Community Center: South Campus Dining Hall. 454-5774 

The Office of Minority Student Education (OMSE) was officially created 
on July 1, 1972. as a result of proposals and recommendations submitted 
to the Chancellor from the Campus Black Community and the Study Com- 
mission on Student Life The Office exists to enhance the personal and 
social development and the academic success of minority students Its 
mission IS to work together with other resources on campus to provide 
support services for minority students throughout their college career at 
the University of Maryland 

Throughout the year OMSE implements several key programs that have 
as their objective enhancing the recruitment, retention, and graduation of 
minority students at the University of Maryland Some of the programs, 
which constitute a supplemental support system, are the Tutorial Program, 
Job Fair, Minority Pre-Professional Academic Societies Workshop Senes, 
and Strategies for Personal, Academic and Career Excellence 

The OMSE Tutorial Program is designed to provide assistance to minor- 
ity students on a walk-in or appointment basis 

The Job Fair, an annual event sponsored by OMSE in conjunction with 
the Career Development Center, is designed to contnbute to the career 
development of minority undergraduates at all levels It brings representa- 
tives (rom local and national companies to interview students who are 
interested in either permanent positions, summer positions, internships, or 
general occupational information Workshops in resume writing and inter- 
viewing techniques are available for students prior to the Job Fair. 

Through its Pre Professional Society Workshop Series, OMSE staff 
attempt to develop a healthy socio-cultural minority community by encour- 
aging and assisting in the organizing of pre-professional societies in each 
academic department OMSE supports some and works cooperatively 
with a number of other minonty preprotessional societies, including law. 
business, media, engineering, and computer science OMSE also works 
closely with the campus Hispanic Society, the American Indian Student 
Union, the Black Student Union, and the Black Panhellenic Council 

OMSE contains a study-lounge which doubles as a tutorial center and a 
Computer Science Center workstation It provides minority students with 
an opportunity to study, get assistance from a tutor, or work at state-of-the- 
art computers in a relaxed, social atmosphere 

Orientation 

1195 Stamp Student Union. 454-5752 

The primary goal o( orientation is to ease the transition of new students 
into the University community Onentation begins at the time a student is 
admitted to the University, and ends at the culmination o( his or her (irst 
semester At the time o( admission to the University, new students will 
receive material announcing the Orientation program The purpose of the 
Program is to 

"Introduce new students to the academic community 

'Coordinate academic advisement for the first semester 

•Introduce campus services and resources 

'Administer the math placement lest 

The Freshman Program runs for two days and provides new students 
with the opportunity to interact formally and informally with faculty, admin- 
istrators, returning students, and other new students The Transfer Pro- 
gram lasts for one day and focuses on transfer evaluation, advisement, and 



28 Campus Administration, Resources, and Services 



registration The math placement test is administered during both orienta 
tlon programs 

Note: Students who arrive after 8 30 am on their program day will be 
reassigned to the next available day 

Parents of new students are invited to attend a one-day program spe- 
cifically designed to introduce parents to the academic, social, and cultural 
milieux of the University These programs are offered during the months of 
June and July. 

The Orientation Office also coordinates the ongoing one-credit orienta- 
tion course EDCP 108-O The goal of this course is to introduce students to 
the world of higher education generally, and the University of Maryland 
specifically The course is taught by faculty and administrators, and is 
limited to 25 students per section 

Parking 

Parking Garage 2 (off Regents Drive), 454-4242 

The Department of Campus Parking (DCP) is responsible for managing 
and maintaining over 17,000 parking spaces on the University of f\/1aryland 
at College Park campus All UfvlCP students who plan to park a motor 
vehicle in one of these spaces must register with the Department of Cam- 
pus Parking. Motorcycles are considered in the same category as any 
other vehicle for the purposes of registration. 

WHEN? You may register for parking at the DCP Office at any time during 
regular business hours Extended hours and additional locations are avail- 
able during the first few weeks of the semester 

WHERE'' The Department of Campus Parking Is now located in Parking 
Garage 2, off Regents Drive 

HOW? Bnng your student ID card 

Pick up and complete the UMCP-DCP parking application for 
student parking 

Pay the appropriate parking fees Student rates for parking on 
campus range from $9.00 to $67 00 for the academic year. 

Illegally parked vehicles, as well as those vehicles not displaying a UMCP 
hanging permit, will be ticketed, and students with outstanding parking 
fines may be barred from registration Complete parking regulations, fines, 
and other information can be obtained when you register for parking 

Bicycles and mopeds need not be registered, but must be parked in 
designated bicycle racks so that they do not hamper access to buildings 
Maryland State law prohibits securing or parking a bicycle or moped in any 
manner which would obstruct vehicles or pedestrians (or handicapped 
access to buildings). Bicycles or mopeds parked in violation of this law will 
be subject to impoundment, and should be reported to the Environmental 
Safely Office, 454-5744 

Records and Registrations 

First floor. Mitchell Building. 454-5559 

The Office of Records and Registrations provides services to students 
and academic departments related to the processes of registration, sched- 
uling, withdrawal, and graduation The Office also maintains the student's 
academic records, and issues transcripts Staff members are available to 
students for consultation Please see Chapter 5 of this catalog for detailed 
information about registration procedures and record-keeping. 

Recreation Services 

1104 Reckord Armory. 454-3124 

(24-hour recording listing facility hours 454-5454) 

Thousands of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff 
members recognize the value of spending their free time in some sort of 
healthful physical activity They find a lifestyle which balances academic 
pursuits with recreational and social involvement ideal for a fulfilling and 
enjoyable college experience The Campus Recreation Services (CRS) 
staff meets almost everyone s leisure-time needs through informal recrea- 
tional opportunities, intramural sports activities, fitness and wellness pro- 
grams, sport clubs, and special events 

Informal recreational opportunities include lifting weights, running, 
swimming laps, and joining a colleague for a friendly game of racquetbaH. 
squash, or tennis Intramural sports provide organized tournament and 
league play for individuals, pairs, and teams Students have the choice of 
over twenty-five competitive sports (from badminton and basketball to 
track and field and volleyball) in the Men s Open (for commuters). Mens 
Dormitory, Fraternity, and Women s Leagues There is a Graduate Slu- 
dents'FacultyStaff League, as well In most sports, entrants can select the 
Above Average or Average skill level of play 

Fitness and wellness programs exist in the form of aerobics and water 
aerobics sessions and the Lifeline Fitness Club, a sell directed fitness 
program, while more than twenty-five sport clubs (from bowling and martial 
arts to rugby and sailing) are organized and supported through CRS 
These groups comprise students, faculty, and staff interested in participat- 
ing (and sometimes competing against other colleges) in one particular 



sport Special events, such as the annual All-Conners Track & Field Meets 
(open to the public as well), the Sports Trivia Bowl, and the Terrapin Tip-Off 
basketball tournament round out the activities calendar at CRS 

Fees paid at the time of class registration cover virtually all the costs of 
participating in CRS activities All that is left is to GET INVOLVED 

Religious Programs 

University Memonal Chapel and 2108 Mitchell Building. 454-5143 

A broad range of religious traditions is represented by the chaplains 
and religious advisors at tne University Individually and cooperatively, they 
offer many services, including counseling, worship, student programs here 
and abroad, personal growth groups, and opportunities lor service and 

involvement 

The following chaplains and their services are available: 

Baptist 

Gerald Buckner, Chaplain 1 101 Memonal Chapel, 454-4604 

Black Ministries Program 

Louis Shockley, Jr , Chaplain 2120 Memorial Chapel, 454-5748 

Christian Science 

Jack B Pevenstein, Advisor 1112 Memorial Chapel, 587-3345 

Church of Christ 

Graydon Stephenson, Chaplain 2112 Memonal Chapel, 454-5135 

Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter Day Saints (Morman) 

Neil Petty, Director 



Episcopal 

Peter Peters, Chaplain 

Jewish 

Robert Saks, Chaplain 



Lutheran 

Elizabeth Platz, Chaplain 

Roman Catholic 

Thomas Kalita, Chaplain 
Rita Ricker, Associate 



7601 Mowatt Lane, 422-7570 

College Park, MD 20740 

2 1 1 6 Memorial Chapel , 454-2347 

Jewish Student Center, 422-6200 
7612 Mowatt Lane 
College Park, MD 20740 

2103 Memonal Chapel, 454-3317 



4141 Guilford Dnve 864-6223 

College Park, MD 20740 
(Opposite Lot 3) 

United Campus Ministry 

Rob Burdette, Chaplain 2102 Memorial Chapel. 454-2348 

Kathleen Kline-Chesson, Chaplain 
Ki Yul Chung, Associate Chaplain 

(Supported by the Church of the Brethren, Disciples of Christ. United 
Presbyterian Church, United Church of Christ, and United Methodist 

Church) 

Chaplain Emeritus 

Wofford K Smith 2128 Memorial Chapel, 454-1351 

Resident Life 

3118 Mitchell Building. 454-2711 

The Department of Resident Life is responsible for management of ttie 
residence halls as well as for cultural, educational, recreational, and social 
programming activities in the resident halls A staff of full-time, graduate 
and undergraduate employees in each of five residential communities 
helps to meet community programming, physical environment, and admin- 
istrative needs These staffs work with other campus and State agencies 
to provide services and programs in accordance with University and State 
exp>ectations 

On-campus housing is available in 35 undergraduate resident halls that 
are near academic, cultural, social, and recreational resources of tfie cam- 
pus All-male, all-female, and coeducational living arrangements are availa- 
ble in the halls, which accommodate from 35 to 550 residents Traditional 
■ dormitory style ' residence halls. ap»artment suites for four to six students, 
and kitchenless suites for four to eight students are availat)le 

No student may t>e required to live on campus An application is 
required Once accommodated, a student may remain in residence halls 
throughout his or her undergraduate career Preference is given to single, 
full-time undergraduates, although graduate and part time undergraduate 
students may apply Because most of the 7.800 available spaces each 
year are reserved by returning upperclass students, the number of enter- 
ing students from whom applications are received each year exceeds the 
approximately 3.000 spaces that remain Applicants who canrwt be 
accommodated at the start of classes each fall semester are placed m 
residence halls throughout the academic year as vacancies occur Soon 
after application is made for housing services, each student is informed of 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Services 29 



the likelihood ot secunng accommodalions (or the start of classes, and the 
advisability ot considering other housing alternatives 

Stamp Student Union 

Administrative Offices 2104 Stamp Student Union. 454-2801 

The Adele H Stamp Student Union is the "community center" of the 
University of Maryland at College Park Over 22.000 students, faculty, staff 
memt)ers, and campus guests visit the Union daily to take advantage of its 
services, programs, and facilities In serving as the campus community 
center, the Union offers lounge space, a variety of information services, 
recreation and leisure activities, student sponsored programs, visual 
arts, retail outlets, and over 40.000 square feet of reservable space 

Information Services 

*AIM (Access to Information atxjut fvlaryland). a computerized guide 
to activities and events at College Park, located in the Union 
and Library lobbies 
•Information Center located in the mam lobby (phone 454-2801) 
'Bulletin Boards located throughout the building 
"Copy machines in the mam lobby 
'Display showcases located on the mam level 

Recreation and Leisure 

Camping equipment rentals at the "Outhaus" in the Recreation 

Center 
Hoff movie theatre (for schedule, phone 454-2594) 
Piano practice rooms located on the second level 
Recreation Center, including full-service bowling lanes, billiard 
tables, and video games (for information, phone 454-2804) 

Student Sponsored Programs 

Stamp Union Program Council (SUPC). a student-directed program 
board whose committees plan games, tournaments, concerts, lectures, 
outdoor recreation trips, and bicycle and road 'aces (phone 454-4987) 

Student Tutorial Academic Referral Center (STAR Center), offering 
tutor listings and test files (phone 454-4948) 

Student Organization offices of over 40 student groups, including the 
Student Government Association 

Visual Arts 

Art Center, a visual arts work and teaching center, offenng mini-courses 
and studio space for a variety of arts including photography, woodworking, 
pottery, and sign and banner services (phone 454-4754) 

Parents' Association Art Gallery, located off the main lobby 

Retail Outlets (all retail sen/ices are located in the lower level mall area, 
except the Book Center), 

Bank Citizens Bank and Trust Co of f^aryland 
Bookstore University Book Center (lower level) 
Flower Cart: Union Shop 

Food Services: Eateries, Dory's Ice Cream, Food Co-op. Maryland Deli 
and Sandwich Factory. Pizza Shop. Roy Rogers Family 
Restaurant, What's Your Beef Restaurant 
Record Co-op, featunng records, tapes, and compact disks 
Ticket Office, offering campus performance tickets, and a full Ticket 

Center Outlet (for ticket information, phone 454-2803) 
Union Shop, featuring snacks, sodas, tobacco, and newspapers and 

magazines 
US- Postal Service Automated Facility 

Reservable Space 

The Union offers meeting rooms that accommodate groups from 8 to 
1000 people For reservation, or catenng information, contact the Union 
Reservation Office at 454-2809. 

Union Hours 

The Union is open Monday through Thursday from 7:00 a.m. until 12:00 
midnight, on Friday, until 1:00 am . on Saturday from 8 00 am. until 1:00 
a.m., and on Sunday from 12:00 noon until 1200 midnight 



Talent Search 

01 12 Chemistry Building. 454 1578 

The Talent Search Program is an educational outreach program which 
provides precollege orientation services and college placement assis- 
tance to middle and secondary school students and adults up to age 27 
years who display the academic ability and interest to pursue postsecon- 
dary study Program participants are provided with advisement on post 
secondary and career options, financial aid information, college orientation 
seminars and workshops, college campus visits, and assistance in prepar 
ing for college entrance exams and the application process 

Tutoring 

When students need tutoring, they should first contact their professor 
or the graduate Teaching Assistant assigned to the course They should 
inquire also at the department office to find out if the department sponsors 
any tutoring services Many campus clubs, organizations, and honors 
societies also offer tutoring Check out the Learning Assistance Center. 
General Honors Program. Intensive Educational Development Program 
Office of Minority Student Education, and the STAR Center in the Stamp 
Student Union 

University Book Center 

Lower level. Stamp Student Union, 454-3222 

The Book Center provides a convenient, on-campus selection of text- 
books, general interest books, literature, best sellers, magazines, and a 
large selection of school and office supplies to meet every educational 
need The Book Center also has a wide selection of imprinted clothes and 
related items, plus cards, gifts, posters, convenience foods, and health 
and beauty aids The Book Center is located on the lower level, east, of the 
Stamp Student Union, and is open Monday through Friday, 8:30 am. to 
7:30 p.m . Saturday from 9 00 am to 5:00 p m , and Sunday from 12:00 
noon to 5 00 p m 

Upward Bound Program 

1107 West Education Annex, 454-2116/2117 

The University of Maryland's Upward Bound Program is a highly suc- 
cessful college preparatory program designed to provide rigorous aca- 
demic instruction, individual tutoring and counseling to capable but under- 
achieving high school students Upward Bound serves as a supplement to 
Its participants' secondary school experiences through an academic year 
and six-week summer residential program 

On twenty-two Saturdays dunng the academic year. Upward Bound 
students receive individualized academic skills development in English, 
mathematics and science Tutoring, individual and group counseling are 
also provided Through counseling each student is given the opportunity 
to improve or develop skills necessary to acquiring a positive self image, 
broadening his/her educational perspective, and for identifying and actual- 
izing undiscovered potentials Counselor follow-up in the high schools 
along with after-school tutorial services, adds to the progress and motiva- 
tion of the students. 

During the summer. Upward Bound students live on the college cam- 
pus The students are involved m an intensive academic study program 
that includes English, mathematics, science, reading, writing, and study 
skills development Individual and group counseling is also an important 
element of the program 

Upward Bound students are selected from high schools in Prince 
George's and Montgomery counties Students are recommended to the 
program by high school principals, teachers, counselors, talent search, 
social service agencies, and individuals knowledgeable about the 
program 

Persons interested in further information regarding the Upward Bound 
Program should contact the Director of Upward Bound, Room 1 107, West 
Education Annex, The University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742; 
(301)454-2116/7 



30 



5 Registration, Records, 
and Academic 
Regulations 



REGISTRATION 

First Floor Mitchell Building, 454-5559 

To attend classes at the University of Maryland It Is necessary to 
process an official registration Specific registration dates and instructions 
can be found in the current SCHEDULE OF CLASSES. The SCHEDULE 
is Issued four times per year: prior to early registration for the fall and spring 
semesters, and again at the beginning of each semester. 

1 Newly admitted students are invited and encouraged to attend an 
Orientation session. Advising and course registration are part of the pro- 
gram All newly admitted students must meet with an advisor prior to 
registration. 

2. All incoming freshman, transfer, and new graduate students are 
required to provide proof of immunization for measles, rubella, mumps, and 
tetanus/diphtheria 

3 Currently enrolled students are invited to early registration. Registration 
appointments for the Fall semester begin in mid March; appointments for 
the Spring semester begin in late October 

4 Open registration follows Early Registration and continues up to the first 
day of classes During this time students may make schedule adjustments 
or process an original registration. 

5 The schedule adjustment period is the first ten day of classes for the fall 
and spring semesters, and a corresponding period for summer semesters. 
Dunng this period, a full-time undergraduate may drop or add courses, 
change sections, or change credit level with no charge. Part-time under- 
graduate students may also drop or add courses, change sections, or 
change credit level, but they should consult the deadline section in the 
SCHEDULE OF CLASSES to avoid incurnng additional charges The 
choice of grading method option (including the pass-fail option) may be 
changed only dunng the schedule adjustment period Registration Is final 
and official when all fees are paid 

Courses may be added, where space Is available, during the schedule 
adjustment period and will appear on the student's permanent record 
along with other courses previously listed Courses dropped during this 
period will not appear on the student's permanent record 

Departments may identify courses or sections of courses with the approval 
of the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, which after the first 
five days of the schedule adjustment period, shall require faculty or depart- 
mental approval for students to add 

6. After the schedule adjustment period: 

a) Courses may not be added without special permission of the depart- 
ment and the dean of the academic unit In which the student is 
enrolled 

b)AII courses for which the student is enrolled (or subsequently adds) 
shall remain as a part of the student's permanent record The stu- 
dent's status shall be considered as full-time if the numtjer of credit 
hours enrolled at this time Is nine or more 

c)A charge shall be made for each course dropped or added. 

d)An official class list for each course being offered is issued to the 
appropriate department by the Office of Records and Registrations 
No student is permitted to attend a class if his or her name does not 
appear on the class list Instructors must report discrepancies to the 
Office of Records and Registrations 

7. The drop period for undergraduate students will begin at the close of 
the schedule adjustment period and terminate at the end of tenth week 
of classes during the fall and spring semesters and at a corresponding 
time for summer sessions 

During the drop period a student may drop a maximum of four credits. 
However, it the course that the student wishes to drop carries more 



than four credits, the student may drop the entire course or. in the case 
of a variable credit course, reduce the credit level by up to four credits 
Such a drop will be recorded on the student s permanent record with 
the notation "W" and will be considered to represent a single enroll- 
ment (one of three possible) In the course This mark shall not be used 
in any compulation of cumulative grade point average 

8. An official class list for each course being offered is issued each semes- 
ter to the appropriate department by the Office of Records and Regis- 
trations No student is permitted to attend a class if his or her name 
does not appear on the class list Instructors must report discrepancies 
to Records and Registrations At the end of the semester official grade 
lists are issued to each department Instructors mark the final grades 
on the grade lists, sign the lists and return them to Records and 
Registrations 

9. Withdrawal from the University Students wishing to withdraw from all 
courses must do so on or before the last day of classes The policies 
governing withdrawals are as follows: 

a. Should a student desire or be compelled to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity at any time, he or she must secure a form for withdrawal from the 
Records Office, and submit the form along with the semester identifi- 
cation and registration cards 

b. The effective date of withdrawal as far as refunds are concerned is 
the date that the withdrawal form is received by the Records Office 
A notation of Withdrawn anti the effective date of the withdrawal will 
be posted to the permanent record The instructors and the college 
offices will be notified of all withdrawn students The deadline date 
lor submitting the withdrawal form for each semester is the last day 
of classes. Contact Undergraduate Admissions for readmission 
information. 

10 When Dean's Approval is required the Dean for Undergraduate Stud- 
ies shall assume the responsibilities normally delegated to the dean in 
the case of non-college students 

The University Studies Program 

The University Studies Program is the set of general education require- 
ments at the IJniversity of Maryland College Park These requirements are 
effective for students with eight or fewer credits from any institution of 
higher education, entering in May 1980 and thereafter Students who 
entered the University of Maryland at College Park prior to May. 1980 are 
referred to Chapter 6 for additional information about general education 
requirements 

These requirements are designed to be spread throughout the student's 
four years, and represent a third of the total academic work required for 
graduation The purpose of the program is to provide students with the 
intellectual skills and conceptual background basic to an understanding of 
the universe, society, and themselves 

The requirements include Fundamental Studies in written English and 
mathematics; Distributive Studies in the physical and biological sciences, 
the social and behavioral sciences, and the arts and hwrramtips and 
Advanced Studies in comparative intellectual approachr ■ le 

and to the analysis and solution of problems For a more n- f 

the program requirements, and a list of the approved col v 

be selected to meet them, see Chapter 6 of this catalog iic un'.efsity 
Studies Program 

Enrollment in Majors 

A student who is eligible to remain at College Park may transfer amor>g 
curricula, colleges, or other academic units except whetp l.mitations on 
enrollments have been approved A student must be onroHed m the major 
program from which he or she plans to graduate, when registenng (or the 
final fifteen hours of the baccalaureate program This requirement also 



Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 31 



applies to the third year of the combined, preprolessional degree 
programs 

A student who wishes to complete a second major in addition to his or her 
primary major of record must obtain written permission in advance from the 
appropriate deans As early as possible, but in no case later than the 
tjeginning of the second semester before the expected date of graduation, 
the student must file with the departments or programs involved and with 
the appropriate deans, formal programs showing the courses to be offered 
to meet requirements in each of the majors and supporting areas as well as 
the college and general education requirements Approval will not be 
granted ifthere is extensive overlap between the two programs. Students 
enrolled in two majors simultaneously must satisfactorily complete the 
regularly prescrit)ed requirements for each of the programs Courses 
talcen for one major may be counted as part of the degree requirements for 
the other and toward the requirements tor the University Studies Program 
If two colleges are involved In the double major program, the student must 
designate which college is responsible for the maintenance of records 

Concurrent Undergraduate-Graduate 
Registration 

A senior at the University of Maryland whose GPA is at least 3.0 and who is 
within seven hours of completing the requirements for the undergraduate 
degree may, with the approval of his or her dean, the chair of the depart- 
ment concerned, and tfie Graduate School, register for graduate courses, 
which may later be counted for graduate credit toward an advanced 
degree at this University The total of undergraduate and graduate credits 
in the senior year cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper pre- 
arrangement is made Seniors who wish to taKe advantage of this opportu- 
nity must formally apply for admission to the Graduate School. 

Credit Unit and Load Each Semester 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject 
pursued one period a week for one semester. Two or three hours of 
laboratory or field work are equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. 
The student is expected to devote three hours a week in classroom or 
lalDoratory or in outside preparation for each credit hour in any course. 

In order for undergraduate students to complete most curricula in four 
academic years, the semester credit load must range form twelve to 
nineteen hours so that they would complete from thirty to thirty-six hours 
each year toward the degree Students registering for more than nineteen 
hours per semester must have the approval of their dean. 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level 
Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the graduate faculty of the depart- 
ment or program offering the course, undergraduate students may register 
for graduate level courses, i e . those numbered from 600 to 898. with the 
exception of 799. for undergraduate credit, 

A student seeking to utilize the option will normally be in the senior year, 
have earned an accumulated grade point average of at least 3.0. have 
successfully completed, with a grade of B or better, the prerequisite and 
correlative courses, and be a major in the offering or a closely related 
department. The student will be required to obtain prior approval of the 
department offering the course Graduate School approval is not required 

Enrollment in a graduate level course does not in any way imply subse- 
quent departmental or Graduate School approval for admission into a 
graduate program, nor may the course be used as credit tor a graduate 
degree at the University of Maryland. 

Off-Campus Courses 

Courses taken at another campus of the University of Maryland, or at 
another institution concurrent with regular registration at College Park are 
treated as off-campus courses and may not be credited toward a degree 
without approval in advance by the dean of the college from which the 
student expects a degree The same rule applies to off-campus registra- 
tion in the summer program of another institution However, courses taken 
through The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan 
Area are treated as resident credit (See section on the Consortium. 
tjelow.) Permission to enroll in off-campus courses must be requested for 
any course which will eventually be added to the College Park transcript 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS 

There are two cards, used jointly, to identify currently enrolled students: 
the photo ID and the semester registration card The photo ID card is 



issued at the time the student first registers lor classes. This card is to be 
used for the entire duration of enrollment The semester registration card 
validates the photo identification card and is issued lor each semester in 
which the student is registered Both cards should be carried at all times 

Together the photo identification card and semester registration card can 
be used by students to withdraw books from the libraries, for admission to 
most athletic, social, and cultural events, and as a general form of identifi- 
cation on campus Students who have food service contracts use a 
separate identification card issued by Dining Services 

There is a replacement charge of $1 OO for lost or stolen registration cards 
and $7.00 for lost, stolen, or broken photo identification cards Questions 
concerning the identification card system should -be addressed to the 
Office of Records and Registrations. 

VETERANS BENEFITS 

Students attending the University under the Veterans Education Assis- 
tance Act (Title 38. US Code) may receive assistance and enrollment 
certification at the Veterans Certification Office in Records and Registra- 
tions, first floor, the Mitchell Building Consult the SCHEDULE OF CLAS- 
SES for further information. 

ATTENDANCE 

1 . The University expects each student to take full responsibility for his or 
her academic work and academic progress The student, to progress 
satisfactorily, must meet the quantitative requirements of each course 
for which he or she is registered Students are expected to attend 
classes regularly, for consistent attendance offers the most effective 
opportunity open to all students to gam a developing command of the 
concepts and materials of their course of study. However, attendance 
in class, in and of itself, in not a criterion for evaluation of the student's 
degree of success or failure Furthermore, absences (whether 
excused or unexcused) do not alter what is expected of the student 
qualitatively and quantitatively. Except as provided below, absences 
will not be used in the computation of grades, and the recording of 
student absences will not be required of the faculty 

2. In certain courses in-class participation is an integral part of the work of 
the course. A few examples would be courses in public speaking and 
group discussion, courses emphasizing conversation in foreign lan- 
guages, certain courses in physical education, and certain laboratory 
sessions. Each department shall determine which of its courses fall 
into this category. It shall be the responsibility of the instructor in such 
courses to inform each class at the beginning of the semester that in- 
class participation is an integral part of the work of the course and that 
absences will be taken into account in the evaluation of the student's 
work in the course, 

3. Laboratory meetings require special preparation of equipment and 
materials by the staff. A student who is not present for a laboratory 
exercise has missed that part of the course and cannot expect that he 
or she will be given an opportunity to make up this work later in the 
term. 

4. Special provision for freshmen; the freshman year is a transitional year. 
Absences of freshmen in the basic freshman courses will be reported 
to the student's dean or college officer when the student has accumu- 
lated more than three unexcused absences 

5. Excuses for absences (in basic freshman courses and in courses 
where in-class participation is a significant part of the work of the 
course) will be handled by the instructor in the course In accordance 
with the general policy of his or her department and college- 

THE CONSORTIUM OF UNIVERSITIES OF THE 
WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area con- 
sists of American University. The Catholic University of America, Gallaudet 
College. Georgetown University. George Washington University. Howard 
University. Marymount University. Mt. Vernon College. Trinity College. Uni- 
versity of the District of Columbia, and the University of Maryland at Col- 
lege Park, Students enrolled in these institutions are able to attend certain 
classes at the other campuses and have the credit considered as "resi- 
dence " credit at their own institutions. The intention is to allow students to 
take an occasional course to augment a program rather than to develop an 
individual program Payment of tuition for courses will be made at the 
student's home campus. 

Currently registered, degree-seeking UMCP undergraduates may partici- 
pate in the Consortium program according to the stipulations listed in the 
current edition of the Schedule of Classes. Students interested in addi- 
tional information about the Consortium program should contact the Con- 
sortium Coordinator In the Office of Records and Registrations, Mitchell 
Building. 



32 Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 



EXAMINATIONS 

1 All examinations and tests shall be given during class hiours in accor- 
dance with the regularly scheduled (or officially "arranged") time and 
place of each course listed in the Schedule or Classes. Unpublished 
changes in the scheduling or location of classes/tests must be 
approved by the department chair and reported to the dean It is the 
responsibility of the student to be informed concerning the dates of 
announced quizzes, tests, and examinations. 

2 It IS the policy of the University to excuse the absences of students 
that result from religious observances and to provide without penalty 
for the rescheduling of examinations and other written tests that fall on 
religious holidays Examinations and other written tests may not be 
scheduled on Rosh Hashanah. Yom Kippur. or Good Friday An 
instructor is not under obligation to give a student a makeup examine 
tlon unless the absence was caused by illness, religious observance, 
participation in University activities at the request of Liniversity authon- 
ties, or compelling circumstances beyond the student's control. In 
cases of dispute, the student may appeal to the chair of the depart 
ment offering the course within one week from the date of the refusal 
of the nght to take a make-up exam. 

A make-up examination, when permitted, must be given on campus, 
unless the published schedule and course description require other 
arrangements The makeup examination must be at a time and place 
mutually agreeable to the instructor and student, cover only the mate- 
rial for which the student was originally responsible, and be given 
within a time limit that retains currency of the matenal The make-up 
must not interfere with the student's regularly scheduled classes In 
the event that a group of students require the same make-up examina 
tion. one make-up time may be scheduled at the convenience of the 
instructor and the largest possible number of students involved 
Under the same guidelines students shall have equal access to all 
information and drills missed due to the reasons listed. 
3. A final examination shall be given in every undergraduate course. 
Exceptions may be made with the written approval of the chair of the 
department and the dean To avoid basing too much of the semester 
grade upon the final examination, additional tests, quizzes, term 
papers, reports and the like should be used to determine a student's 
comprehension of a course The order of procedure in these matters is 
left to the discretion of departments or professors and should be 
announced to the class at the beginning of a course All final examina- 
tions must be held on the examination days of the Official Final Exami- 
nation Schedule No final examination shall be given at a time other 
than that scheduled in the Official Examination Schedule without wnt- 
ten permission of the department chair 

4 As of fall semester. 1980, graduating seniors will be expected to take 
final exams during the regular examination period However, graduat- 
ing seniors are not required to take final examinations on the day of 
graduation or on any regularly scheduled examination day following 
graduation In courses with exams scheduled on those days, graduat- 
ing seniors are expected to see their instructors early in the semester 
to make alternate arrangements. 

5 A file of all final examination questions must be kept by the chair of 
each department 

6. The chair of each department is responsible for the adequate adminis- 
tration of examinations in courses under his or her jurisdiction The 
deans should present the matter of examinations for consideration in 
staff conferences from time to time and investigate examination proce- 
dures in their respective colleges 

7 Every examination shall be designed to require for its completion not 
more than the regularly scheduled period except for final 
examinations 

8 A typewritten, mimeographed or pnnted set of questions shall be 
placed in the hands of every examinee in every test or examination 
requiring at least one period, unless the dean has authorized some 
other procedure 

9 Each instructor must safeguard examination questions and all trial 
sheets, drafts, and stencils. 

10 Each instructor should avoid the use of examination questions which 
have been included in recently given examinations and should prepare 
examinations that will make dishonesty difficult 

1 1 Only clerical help approved by the department chair shall be employed 
in the preparation or reproduction of tests or examination questions 

12 Proctors must be in the examination room at least ten minutes before 
the hour of a final examination Provisions should be made for proper 
ventilation, lighting, and a seating plan At least one of the proctors 
present must be sufficiently cognizant of the subject matter of the 
examination to deal authontatively with inquiries ansing from the 
examination 

13 Books, papers, etc belonging to the student, must be left in a place 
designated by the instructor before the student takes his or her seat, 
except in such cases where books or work sheets are permitted 

14 Students should be seated at least every other seat apart, or its 
equivalent, i e . about three feet Where this arrangement is not possi- 
ble some means must be provided to protect the integrity of the 
examination. 



15 "Blue books' only must be used in periodic or final examinaltons 
unless special forms are furnished by the department concerned 

16 If mathematical tables are required in an examination, they shall be 
furnished by the instructor If textbooks are used this rule does not 
apply. 

17 Proctors must exercise all diligertce to prevent dishonesty and to 
enforce proper examination decorum, including abstention from 
smoking 

18. Where an instructor must proctor more than forty students, he or she 
should consult the chair of the department concerning proctorial assis- 
tance An instructor should consult the department cnair if in his or her 
opinion a smaller number of students for an examination requires the 
help of another instructor 

19 No student who leaves an examination room will be permitted to 
return, except in unusual circumstances, in which case permission to 
do so must be granted by the proctor prior to the student's departure 

20 All conversation will cease prior to the passing out of examination 
papers, and silence will be maintained in the room during tfie entire 
examination f>enod 

21 Examination papers will be placed face down on the writing surface 
until the examination is officially begun by the proctor 

22 Examination papers will be kept flat on the wnting surface at all times 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS - Students are expected to notify the Office of 
Records and Registrations of any change in their local or permanent 
address Change of Address forms are available at the Registration 
Counter, first floor. Mitchell Building and at the Office of the Bursar, first 
floor. Lee Building 

RECORDS 

MARKING SYSTEM AND RECORD NOTATIONS 

The Records Office, located on the first floor of the Mitchell Building, is 
responsible for maintaining student records and issuing official transcnpts 

The following symbols are used on the student's permanent record for all 
courses in which he or she is enrolled after the initial registration and 
schedule adjustment period A, B, C. D. F. I, P. S. and W These marks 
remain as part of the student's (jermanent records and may be changed 
only by the original instructor on certification, approved by the department 
chair and the dean, that an actual mistake was made in determining or 
recording the grade 

A • denotes excellent mastery of the subject and outstanding scholar- 
ship In computations of cumulative or semester averages, a mark of A 
will be assigned a value of 4 quality points per credit hour 

B - denotes good mastery of the subject and good scholarship A mark 
of B is assigned a value of 3 quality pwints per credit hour 

C ■ denotes acceptable mastery of the subject and the usual achieve- 
ment expected A mark of C is assigned a value of 2 quality points per 
credit hour 

D - denotes borderline understanding of the subject It denotes margi- 
nal performance, and it does not represent satisfactory progress 
toward a degree A mark of is assigned a value of 1 quality point per 
credit hour 

F - denotes failure to understand the subject and unsatisfactory per- 
formance A mark of F is assigned a value of quality points per credit 
hour 

S is a department option mark that may be used to denote satislactory 
performance by a student in progressing thesis projects orientation 
courses, practice teaching, and the like Tn comfxitation of cumulative 
averages a mark of S will not t>e included 

W is used to indicate withdrawal from a course in which the student 
was enrolled at the end of the schedule adjustment period For infof 
mation and completeness, the mark of W is placed on the student s 
permanent record by the Office of Records and Registrations Tf>e 
instructor will be notified that the student has withdrawn from the 
course This mark is not used in any computation of quality points or 
cumulative average totals at the end of the semester 

Audit A student may register to audit a course or courses which have 
been designated as available under the audit option and in which 
space IS available The notation AUD will be placed on the transcript lor 
each course audited A notation to the effect thai this symbol does not 
imply attendance or any other effort in the course will be included on 
the transcnpt in the explanation of the grading system 

Pata-Fail • The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to A. B. C 
or D The student must inform the Registrations Office of ttie selection 
of this option by the end of the schedule ad|ustmenl period 



Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 33 



The following policy was approved by the Board o( Regents for imple- 
mentation beginning with the Spnng 1989 semester 

1 To register for a course under the pass-fail option, an undergraduate 
must nave completed 30 or more -redil hours of college credit with a 
GPA of at least 2 At least 15 of these credit hours must have been 
completed at UMCP with a University of Maryland GPA o( at least 2 0, 

2 Courses for which this option applies must be electives in the stu- 
dents program The courses may not be college, major, field of 
concentration, or general education program requirements 

3. Only one course per semester may be registered for under the pass- 
fail option 

4. No more than 12 semester hours of credit may be taken under the 
pass-fail option dunng a student's college career 

5 Students may not choose this option when reregistering for a course 

6 When registering under the pass-fail option, a course that is passed 
will count as hours in the student's record but will not be computed in 
the grade point average A course that is failed will appear on the 
student s record and will be computed tx)th in the overall average and 
the semester average 

7 Students registering for a course under the pass-fail option are 
required to complete all regular course requirements Their work will 
be evaluated by the instructor by the normal procedure for letter 
grades The instructor will submit the normal grade The grades A, B, 
C, or D will automatically be converted by the Office of Records and 
Registrations to the grade P on the student's permanent record 
The grade F will remain as given. The choice of grading option may be 
changed only during the schedule adjustment period for courses in 
which the student is currently registered 

Incompletes - The mark of "I" is an exceptional mark that is an instruc- 
tor option It IS given only to a student whose work in a course has 
been qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness or other cir- 
cumstances beyond the student's control, he or she has been unable 
to complete some small portion of the work of the course. 
In no case will the mark "I" be recorded for a student who has not 
completed the major portion of the work of the course. 

1 The student will remove the "I" by completing work assigned by the 
instructor It Is the student's responsibility to request arrangements 
for completion of the work and to request that an Incomplete Contract 
be written These arrangements must be documented in the Incom- 
plete Contract, signed by both the student and the instructor 

2 The Incomplete Contract must be submitted to the dean of the col- 
lege offering the course, and a copy forwarded to the Records Office, 
within SIX weeks after the grade submittal deadline or the "I" will 
convert to a grade of "F". A copy of the signed agreement should also 
be filed in the department office. 

3. All course work required by an Incomplete Contract must be com- 
pleted by the time stipulated in the contract, usually the end of the 
next semester; but in any event, no later than one year. If the instructor 
IS unavailable, the department chair will, upon request of the student, 
make the arrangements for the student to complete the course 
requirements If the remaining work for the course as defined in the 
contract is not completed on schedule, the "I" will be converted to the 
grade indicated on the contract 

4. Exceptions to the time period cited above may be granted by the 
student's dean upon the written request of the student if circum- 
stances are deemed to warrant further delay. The new completion 
date must again be specified and agreed to in writing by the student 
and the dean. 

5. It is the responsibility of the Instructor or the department chair con- 
cerned to return the appropriate supplementary grade report, both to 
the appropriate dean and to the Office of Records and Registrations, 
upon completion of the conditions of the Incomplete Contract. 

6. The "I" cannot be removed through re-registration for the course or 
through the technique of "credit by examination." In any event this 
mark shall not be used in any computation of quality points or cumula- 
tive averages 

RECORD NOTATIONS 

In addition to the above marks, there are provisions for other record or 
transcript notations that may be used based on University policy and 
individual circumstances 

Repeat- Beginning Fall 1973 the highest grade received in the repeated 
course is used to calculate the GPA A student may repeat any course; 
however no student may be registered for a course more than three times. 

If a student repeats a course in which he or she has already earned a mark 
of A, B, C, D, P, or S, the subsequent attempt shall not increase the total 
hours earned toward the degree Only the highest mark will be used in 
computation of the student's cumulative average Under unusual circum- 
stances, the student's dean may grant an exception to this policy. 



Duplicate course used to indicate two courses with the same course 
content The second course is counted in cumulative totals unless an 
exception is made by the student's dean 

Non-applicable (Non-AppI) In all cases of transfer from one college to 
another at College Park, the dean of the receiving college, with the 
approval of the student, shall indicate which courses, if any, in the stu- 
dent's previous academic program are not applicable to his or her new 
program, and shall notify the Office of Records and Registration of the 
adjustments that are to be made in determining the student s progress 
toward a degree Deletions may occur both in credits attempted and 
correspondingly in credits earned This evaluation shall be made upon the 
student's initial entry into a new program, not thereafter If a student 
transfers from one program to another, nis or her record evaluation shall be 
made by the dean in the same way as if he or she were transferring 
colleges If the student subsequently transfers to a third college, the dean 
of the third college shall make a similar initial adjustment; courses marked 
"nonapplicable" by the second dean may become applicable in the third 
program 

Excluded Credit (Excl Crd) • Excluded credit Is noted when Academic 
Clemency has been granted 

Academic Clemency Policy 

Undergraduate students returning to College Park after a separation of a 
minimum of five calendar years may petition the appropriate dean to have a 
number of previously earned grades and credits removed from the calcula- 
tion of their cumulative grade point average Up to sixteen credits and 
corresponding grades from courses previously completed at any Univer- 
sity of f^aryland campus will be removed from calculation of tine grade 
point average and will not be counted toward graduation requirements. 
The petition for clemency must be filed in the first semester of return to the 
campus Approval is neither automatic or guaranteed. 

PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION PROGRAMS 

The University of IVIaryland at College Park offers several opportunities to 
earn college credit through satisfactory achievement in a variety of exami- 
nations for new, continuing and returning students 

Currently, undergraduate students may earn credit through the various 
proficiency examination programs up to a total of one-half of the credits 
required for their degree It is the student's responsibility to consult with 
the appropriate dean or advisor with regard to applicability of any credit 
earned by examination to a specific degree program and to determine 
courses that should not be elected in order to avoid duplication A student 
will not receive credit (or both passing an examination in a course and 
completing the same course. 

Students with specific questions about the University's policy may contact 
the Coordinator, Undergraduate Advising Center, f^oom 1117, Hornbake 
Library (454-2733). 

Three proficiency examination programs are recognized for credit by Col- 
lege Park: 

1. Advanced Placement Programs (A.P.) - For complete policy and infor- 
mation, see the chapter on Admissions in this catalog. 

2. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) - This program exists for 
the purpose of recognizing college level competence achieved 
outside the college classroom. Two types of CLEP tests are available: 
General Examinations, which cover the content of a broad field of 
study; and Subject Examinations, which cover the specific content of a 
college course Credit can be earned and will be recognized by 
College Park for some CLEP General or Subject Examinations, pro- 
vided satisfactory scores are attained Credits earned under CLEP are 
not considered "residence" credit. 

Policies and Administration of CLEP Examinations 

These tests are administered at CLEP testing centers throughout the 
country. Written applications must be completed and on file at the testing 
center selected, usually not later than four working weeks prior to the 
intended test date The University of Maryland is a CLEP Test Center (Test 
Center Code #5814), giving tests on the third Saturday of most months. 

The fees for these examinations are listed on the standard CLEP applica- 
tion To obtain an application or additional information, contact the CLEP 
Administrator in the Counseling Center, Room 0106A Shoemaker Hall, or 
write to CLEP, CN 6600, Princeton, New Jersey, 08541-6600 

Students who want to earn credit through CLEP must have their official 
score reports sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Mitchell 
Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 

A student must matriculate at College Park before requesting the posting 
of CLEP credits. Such posting will not be done until a student has estab- 
lished a transcript, i e., earned credit through regularly taken courses 



34 Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 

Each institution of the University establishes standards for acceptance of An undergraduate who passes a departmental proficiency examination is 

CLEP and AP exemptions and credits. Students must check with the given credit and quality points toward graduation in the amount regularly 

Institution to which they will transfer to learn If they will lose, maintain, or allowed in the course, provided such credits do not duplicate credit 

gain credit. obtained by some other means (e^g , earned in high school or another 

college) 
College Park will award credit for a CLEP examination provided the exami- 
nation was being accepted for credit on this campus on the date the Although the mathematics and foreign language departments receive the 
examination was taken by the student most applications for credit by examination, most departments will provide 

r> ,. 1. . L, < I. .u „ I . _ J examinations for a number of their courses Any student who wishes more 

Credit will not be given for both completing a course and passing an information or to apply for an examination should inquire at the Undergrad- 

examination covering substantially the same material. ^3,e Advising Center Room 1117. Hornbake Library ^ 

CLEP examinations posted on transcripts from other institutions will be ^"''^'^^ governing credit by examination are as follows: 

accepted If the examination has been approved by College Park and the , ,. , . .^ , „ ^ .. ^ . .,. , , . ,.. . ^ 

scores reported are equal to or greater than those required by this campus. ^ ■ The applicant must be formally admitted to the University of Maryland 

If the transcript from the prior institution does not carry the scores, it wiN be ^ College Park Posting of credit, however, will be delayed until the 

the responsibility of the student to request the Educational Testing Service „ studerit is reqistered . ^ , , , 

to foro/ard a copy of the official report to the Office of Admissions. 2. DepartmentarProficiency Examinations may not be taken for courses 

'^' in which the student has been registered beyond the schedule adjust- 

General Examinations ment period (first ten day of classes) , k. ^ . k 

3. Departmental Proficiency Examinations may not be used to change 

Min- Crs. grades. Including incompletes 

imum Awd. ** Application for creditby examination is equivalent to registration for a 
Examination Score course; however, the following conditions apply 
English Composition 489 3 ^ ^ student may cancel the application at any time prior to comple- 
Acceptable for ENGL 101 (if taken tlon of the examination with no entry on his/her permanent record 
prior to 7/1/77): ENGL 102 (if taken (Equivalent to the schedule adjustment period ) 
prior to 7/1/78). Not acceptable ^ The instructor makes the results of the examination available to the 
after 7/1/78. student prior to formal submission of the grade Before final sub- 
Natural Science 489 6 mission of the grade, a student may elect not to have this grade 
Acceptable for general science credit; recorded In this case, a mark of W is recorded (Equivalent to the 
no specific course drop procedure ) 
Mathematics 497 3 ^ ^° course may be attempted more than twice. 

Acceptable for general math credit (if cl The instructor must certify on the report of the examination submit- 

taken prior to 9/1/77) Not acceptable 'ed to the Office of Records and Registrations that copies of the 

after 9/1/79. examination questions or identifying information in the case of 

Humanities 489 6 standardized examinations, and the students answers have t)een 

Sub Score :' '''ed with the chair of the department offering the course 

Fine Arts (50) (3) ^ Letter grades earned on examinations to establish credit, if accepted 

Acceptable for ARTH 100 (if taken ^V the student, are entered on the student s transcnpt and used in 

pnor to 9/1/79) Not acceptable computing his/her cumulative grade point average A student may 

after 9/1/79 elect to take an examination for credit on a "Pass-Fail" basis under tfie 

Literature (50) (3) normal "Pass-Fail" regulations. 

Acceptable for general English credit; 

no specific course TRANQPFR PRFOIT 

Social Science/History 488 6 ' MMNarCM UHtlUI I 

<?nriai'<?r^nrec /cifn i-w The Records Office posts all transfer credit that would be acceptable to 

Acceotable for aeneral social science cred- ^"^ °* '^^ ^^9'^^ programs at UMCP It ,s up to an academic advisor in the 

Mcceptaoie lor general social science crea ^^.^.g ^j ,^g ^^^^ ^^ ,^g college in which the student Is enrolled to deter- 

Ljlgj .cQv ,3> niine which transfer credits are applicable to the students degree pro- 

Acceotable for General historv credit ^'^"^ '" general, credit from academic courses taken at institutions of 

r,f S<An nfinr in i9nir7Q\ w^ ^iQ^er education accredited by a regional accrediting association will 

arrantaSaaftiri9/'ii/fa transfer, provided that the course is completed with at least a grade of C 

acoepidoie aner r^/jr//». ^^^ ,^g course Is similar in content and level to work offered at College 

*Sub scores will be used in approving three credits when only one test is ^^'^ The title of courses accepted for transfer credit will be noted on the 

acceptable. students record; however, the grade will not Transfer credit grades are 

not included in the UMCP grade point average calculation See Chapter 2, 

Subject Examinations Admissions, for additional Information. 

Score H/tin. Off-Campus Courses and Transfer of Credit from Another Institution 

Crs. Courses taken at another campus of the University of Maryland or at 

Examination (and related course) Awd. another institution concurrent with regular registration at the University of 

American Government (none) 50 3 Maryland at College Park are treated as off-campus courses and may not 

Analysis and Interpretation of Literature be credited toward a degree without approval in advance by the dean ol 

(ENGL 102) 51 3 the college from which the student expects a degree The same rule 

Biology. General (ZOOL 101) 49 6 applies to off-campus registration in the summer program of another insti- 

Calculus and Elementary Functions tutlon Permission to enroll in off-campus courses must be requested for 

(MATH 140) 50 6 any course which will eventually be added to the College Park transcript 

Chemistry. General (CHEM 103) 48 6 However, courses taken through the Consortium of IJmversilies of the 

College Algebra (None) 49 3 Washington Metropolitan Area are considered to be resident credit 

College Algebra - Trigonometry 

College Composition, with essay questions REQUIREMENTS FOR RETENTION 

(ENGL 1(j1) and passing essay 51 3 

Introductory Macroeconomics (ECON 201 ) 50 3 Academic retention is based solely on grade point average (GPA) The 

Introductory Microeconomics (ECON 203) 50 3 significance of the cumulative grade point average (cumulative GPA) var- 

Introductory Sociology (SOCY 100) 51 3 les according to the numtDer of credits attempted A minimum of 120 

Psychology, General (PSYC 100) 50 3 credits of successfully completed (not I. F, or W) course credits is required 

for graduation in any degree curriculum 
3. Credit by Examination (Departmental Proficiency Examinations) (Col- 
lege Park Departmental Proficiency Examinations, customarily referred Semester Academic Honors (Dean s List) will be awarded to a student 
to as "credit by examination," are offered in a number ol courses, and who completes within any qiven semester twelve or more credits (exclud- 
are comparable to comprehensive final examinations in those courses ing courses with grades of 1^ and S) with a semester GPA of 3 500 or higher 
These examinations are given at a time mutually agreed upon by the This notation will be placed on the individual's permanent record 
student and the department Department offices will provide informa 

tlon regarding place and administration, type of examination, and mate- Satisfactory PerlormarKe applies to those students with a cumulative 

rial which might be helpful in preparing for examinations GPA between 4 000 and 2 000 



Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 35 



1 Students with cumulative GPA of less than 2 000 tall into three catego- 
ries Unsatisfactory Performance, Academic Warning and Aca- 
demic Dismissal. The notations Academic Warning and Academic 
Dismissal will be placed on the student's permanent record The 
cumulative GPA that defines each of the categories varies according 
to the credit level as noted below: 



Credit 
Level 

0-13 
14-28 
29-56 
57-74 
75-more 



Unsatisfactory 
Performance 

1.999-1.290 
1.999-1.780 
1.999-1.860 
1.999-1.940 



Academic 
Warning 

1.289-0.230 
1.779-1.280 
1.859-1.630 
1.939-1.830 
1.999-1.940 



Academic 
Dismissal 

0.229-0.000 
1.279-0.000 
1.629-0.000 
1.829-0.000 
1.939-0.000 



2. Credits completed with grades of A, B, C, D and F. but not P and S, will 
be used in computation of the semester and cumulative GPA with 
values of 4 000, 3 000, 2 000, t 000 and 000 respectively Marks of I, 
P, S. W, and NGR will not be used in the computation of semester and 
cumulative GPA. 

3 Students with an unsatisfactory performance for any semester will be 
urged in writing to consult their advisors. 

4. Students on academic warning will have this fact noted on their tran- 
scripts and will be urged in writing to consult with their advisors prior 
to the beginning of the next semester. Students who receive an 
academic warning In any semester will not be allowed either to add or 
drop courses or to register dunng the <;emester following the receipt of 
the academic warning without seeing an advisor 

5 Any student with sixty credits or more attempted and who thereafter 
received academic warning for two consecutive semesters will be 
academically dismissed Students who are academically dismissed 
will have this action entered on their transcript 

6. No student transferring to the University of Maryland at College Park 
from outside the University of Maryland will be subject to Academic 
Dismissal at the end of the first semester as long as the student 
obtains a cumulative GPA of 0.23 or more. (A student who would 
otherwise be subject to Academic Dismissal will receive an Academic 
Warning.) Thereafter, such a student will be subject to the normal 
standards of academic progress This provision does not apply to 
students reinstated or readmitted to College Park 

7. A student who has been academically dismissed and who is rein- 
stated will be academically dismissed again if minimum academic 
standard are not met by the end of the first semester after reinstate- 
ment (See Readmission and Reinstatement ) In the computation of 
the cumulative GPA, all credits attempted at the University of Mary- 
land will be used 

8. Credits transferred, or earned during prior admissions terminating in 
academic dismissal or withdrawal and followed by readmission, will be 
applicable toward meeting credit requirements for a degree 

9. Under unusual circumstances, the Faculty Petition Board may set 
more rigorous requirements for the semester in which a reinstated 
student returns, or may allow a lengthened period (not to exceed two 
semesters) to reach the minimum or set academic standards. 

10. Any appeal from the regulations governing academic warning or aca- 
demic dismissal shall be directed to the Faculty Petition Board which 
shall be empowered to grant relief in unusual cases if the circum- 
stances warrant such action 

11. A student may repeat any course; however no student may be regis- 
tered for a course more than three times. If a student repeats a course 
in which he or she has already earned a mark of A, B, C, D, P, or S, the 
subsequent attempt shall not increase the total hours earned toward 
the degree. Only the highest mark will be used in computation of the 
student's cumulative average Under unusual circumstances, the 
students dean may grant an exception to this policy 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students. The University reserves the right to 
request at any time the withdrawal of a student who cannot or does not 
maintain the required standard of scholarship, or whose continuance in the 
University would be detrimental to his or her health, or to the health of 
others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the auttiorities of the Univer- 
sity. Additional information about the dismissal of delinquent students may 
t3€ found in the Code of Student Conduct, Appendix C of this catalog 

GRADUATION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The University of Maryland at College Park awards the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of General Studies (no admission to program as 
of Fall 1988), Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science, Master of Applied 
Anthropology, Master of Architecture, Master of Arts, Master of Business 
Administration, Master of Education, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Library 
Science, Master of Music Master of Public Management, Master of Public 
Policy, Master of Science. Doctor of Education, Doctor of Musical Arts, and 
Doctor of Philosophy Students in specified two-year curricula may be 
awarded certificates 



Graduation Applications 

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must file a formal application 
with the Office of Records & Registrations The deadline lor application is 
the end of the schedule adjustment period for the semester in which the 
student plans to graduate, or at the end of the first week of the second 
summer session for August degrees In all cases, graduation applications 
must be filed at the beginning of the student's final semester before 
receiving a degree 

If all degree requirements are not completed during the semester in which 
the graduation application was submitted, it is the responsibility of the 
student to file a new graduation application with the Office of Records and 
Registrations at the beginning of a subsequent semester when all degree 
requirements may be completed The graduation application fee is a one- 
time, nonrefundable charge If a subsequent application is filed for the 
same degree, the fee will not be charged a second time 

Degree Requirements 

The requirements lor graduation vary according to the character of work in 
the different colleges, schools, departments and academic units It is the 
responsibility of the colleges, schools, departments and other academic 
units to establish and publish clearly defined degree requirements 
Responsibility for knowing and meeting all degree requirements for gradu- 
ation in any curriculum rests with the student. Specific degree require- 
ments are listed in this catalog under the college and/or department as 
appropriate 

Each student should check with the proper academic authonties no later 
than the close of the junior year to ascertain his or her standing with 
respect to advancement toward a degree. For this purpose, each student 
should be sure to retain a copy of the semester grade reports issued by the 
Office of Records and Registrations at the close of each semester 

1) Residency requirement - Final Thirty-Hour Rule 

a. All candidates for College Park degrees should plan to take their final 
thirty credits in residence since the advanced work of their major study 
normally occurs in the last year of the undergraduate program. 
Included in these thirty semester hours will be a minimum of fifteen 
semester hours in courses numbered 300 or above, including at least 
twelve semester hours required in the major field (in curncula requinng 
such concentrations) 

b. A student who at the time of graduation will have completed thirty 
hours in residence at College Park may, under unusual circumstances, 
be permitted to take a maximum of six of the final thirty credits of 
record at another institution. In such cases, written permission must 
be obtained in advance from the dean of the academic unit from which 
the student expects to receive the degree. Exceptions beyond six 
credits will be made only under highly unusual circumstances: 
requests for an exception must be made through the Dean's office to 
the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs 

c. For students in the combined three-year, preprofessional programs, 
the final thirty hours of the ninety-hour program at College Park must 
be taken in residence. 

2) Enrollment in Majors 

A student must be enrolled in the major program from which he or she 
plans to graduate, when registering for the final fifteen hours of the bacca- 
laureate program This requirement also applies to the third year of the 
combined, preprofessional degree programs 

3) Credit Requirements 

While several undergraduate curricula require more than 120 credits, no 
baccalaureate curriculum requires fewer than 120. No baccalaureate 
degree will be awarded in instances in which fewer than 120 credit hours 
have been earned It is the responsibility of each student to familiarize 
himself or herself with the requirements of specific curricula The student 
IS urged to seek advice on these matters from the departments, colleges, 
or the Office of Undergraduate Studies. 

To earn a baccalaureate degree from the University of Maryland at College 
Park, a minimum of thirty credits must be taken in residence. 

4) Grade Point Average 

An overall C (2 00) grade point average is required for graduation in all 
curncula. 

Second Degrees and Second Majors 

a Second Degree Taken Sequentially. A student who has completed 
requirements for and has received one baccalaureate degree and who 
wishes to earn a second baccalaureate degree from College Park 
must satisfactorily complete the requirements of the second degree 
and enough additional credits so that the total, including all applicable 
credits earned at College Park or elsewhere, is at least 150 credits In 
no case, however, will a second baccalaureate degree be awarded to 



36 Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 



a student who has not completed thirty credits In residence at College 
Park Approval of the second degree will not be granted when there is 
extensive overlap between the two programs 

b. Second Degree Taken Simultaneously. A student who wishes to 
receive simultaneously two baccalaureate degrees from College Park 
must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 150 credits (180 credits if 
one of the degrees is in Special Education) The regularly prescribed 
requirements of both degree programs must be completed As early 
as possible and. in any case, no later than one full semester (preferably 
one year) before the expected date of graduation, the student must 
file with the departments or programs involved, as well as with the 
appropriate deans, formal programs showing the courses to be 
offered to meet the major, supporting area, college, and general edu- 
cation program requirements If two colleges are involved in the 
double degree program, the student must designate which college is 
responsible for the maintenance of records Approval of the second 
degree will not be granted when there is extensive overlap between 
two programs 

c. Second Major. A student who wishes to complete a second major in 
addition to his or her primary major of record must obtain written 
permission in advance from the appropriate deans As early as possi- 
ble, but in no case later than one full semester before the expected 
date of graduation, the student must file with the departments or 
programs involved and with the appropriate deans, formal programs 
showing the courses to be offered to meet requirements in each of the 
majors and supporting areas as well as the college and general educa 
tion program requirements Approval will not be granted if there is 
extensive overlap between the two programs. Students enrolled in 
two majors simultaneously must satisfactorily complete the regularly 
prescribed requirements lor each of the programs Courses taken for 
one major may be counted as part of the degree requirements for the 
other and toward the requirements for the general education require- 
ments as appropnate However, no course used in either curnculum to 
satisfy a major, supporting area, or college requirement may be used 
to satisfy the general education requirements If two colleges are 
involved in the double major program, the student must designate 
which college is responsible for the maintenance of records 

COMMENCEMENT HONORS 

Honors for excellence in scholarship are determined by the highest two 
percent (Summa cum Laude), the next three percent (Ivlagna cum Laude), 
and the following five percent (cum Laude) of the students of the preced- 
ing three commencements of each degree-granting unit. To be eligible for 
this recognition, a total of at least sixty semester credits earned at the 
University of Maryland is required Of these sixty credits, at least thirty 
credits must have been earned at College Park The computation of the 
cumulative grade point average does not include grades for courses taken 
during the last semester of registration before graduation, although the 
hours earned for that semester will apply toward the sixty-hour require- 
ment No student with a grade point average less than 3CKX5 will be 
considered 

Election to Phi Beta Kappa 

Organized in 1776. Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely 
respected academic honorary society in the United States Invitation to 
membership is based on outstanding scholastic achievement in studies of 
the liberal arts and sciences Student members are chosen entirely on the 
tjasis of academic excellence: neither extra-curricular leadership nor ser- 
vice to the community is considered. Election is held only once a year, in 
the spring semester 

The process for election to Phi Beta Kappa involves the annual review 
in March by a select committee of faculty members representing the 
humanities, social sciences and natural sciences The committee reviews 
transcripts of all juniors and seniors with qualifying grade point averages 
(irrespective of the graduation month of such a student) Whether a 
student qualifies for membership in Phi Beta Kappa depends on the qual- 
ity, depth and breadth of the student s record m lilseral education courses 
The final decision for election rests with the resident faculty members of 
Phi Beta Kappa. There is no application procedure for election to Phi Beta 
Kappa 

Requirements for selection to membership in the campus chapter of 
Phi Beta Kappa include 

1 Residence. At least 60 hours taken at the College Park campus of the 
University of Maryland. 

2 Liberal Courses. At least 90 hours in liberal courses in the arts and 
sciences (where "liberal" means academic, rather than professional or 
technical) 

3 Required Courses. One semester of mathematics and two semesters 
at least at the elementary level of one foreign language The mathe- 
matics requirement must be fulfilled bv college credit hours, the for 
eign language requirement may tm tultilled by a proficiency 
examination. 



4 Grade Point Average. For seniors t grade point average of at least 3 5 

in all liberal courses taken, for juniOrs a grade point average of at least 
3 75 in such courses 

5 Distribution. Normally the credit hours presented for Phi Beta Kappa 
must contain at least nine liberal hours in each of the three areas of 
humanities, social sciences and natural sciences Students with more 
challenging courses and moderately high grade point averages are 
preferred by the committee to tfiose with higher grade point averages 
but a narrow range of courses Minimal qualifications in more than one 
area may preclude election to Phi Beta Kappa 

Recommended criteria include: 

1 One latxiratory course in the natural sciences 

2. Regular grades (rather than pass/fail) in (a) mathematics and foreign 

language courses, and (b) distribution areas in which the numtjer of 

courses taken is minimal 

3 Some traditional social sciences and humanities courses that require 
wntten essays and papers (Note that internships may be counted as 
professional courses and not as liberal courses ) 

4 Courses in at least two of the required areas to tie taken at the College 
Park campus, especially if courses are transferred from other institu- 
tions without chapters of Phi Beta Kappa 

Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee election to Phi 
Beta Kappa. The judgment of the resident faculty members of Phi Beta 
Kappa on the quality, depth, and breadth of the student's record is th» 
deciding factor in every case. 

If you have any questions about criteria for election to Phi Beta Kappa 
(including equivalency examinations in foreign languages), please visit the 
Phi Beta Kappa Office. Room 2103 Mathematics Building or telephone 
(301)454-3303 

AWARDS AND PRIZES. In addition to the campus honors descrit>ed 
above, many colleges, departments, programs, corporations, and individu- 
als sponsor awards and prizes to graduating seniors The following is a 
selected list of recently-awarded pnzes 

Mitton Abramowitz Memorial Prize in Mathematics. A prize is awarded 
annually to a junior or senior student majoring in mathematics who has 
demonstrated supenor competence and promise for future devetopment in 
the field of mathematics and its applications. 

Agricultural Alumni Award. Presented to a senior who during his or her 
college career contributed most toward the advancement of the College of 

Agriculture 

Agricultural Engineering Outstanding Senior Award is presented to a stu- 
dent in Agricultural Engineering on the basis of scholastic performance, 
participation in ASAE National Student Branch, and other extracurricular 
activities 

Alpha Rho Chi Medal. Awarded annually by the Alpha Rho Chi fraternity for 
architecture and the allied professions to a graduating student of architec- 
ture who has made a distinctive contribution to school life, emtxidying tf>e 
ideals of professional service and leadership 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Award. Free member- 
ships in the institute for one year and cash prizes for the tiest paper 
presented at a student branch meeting and for the graduating aeronautical 
senior with the highest academic standing 

James R. Anderson Award in Geography. Awarded at each spring com- 
mencement to an outstanding undergraduate student in geography for 
high academic achievement 

Appleman-Norton Award in Botany is presented to a senior major m Bot- 
any who is considered worthy on the basis of demonstrated at>ility and 
excellence in scholarship 

Citizenship Prize for Men. An award presented annually as a memorial to 

the late President Emeritus H C Byrd to that male memtjer of the senior 
class who during his collegiate career has most nearly typified tf>e model 
citizen and has contributed significantly to the general advancement of ffie 
interest of the University 

Citizenship Prize for Women. An award presented annually as a merrKxial 

to Sally Sterling Byrd to that female memlser of the senior class who dunng 
her collegiate career has most nearly typified the model citizen and tws 
contributed significantly to the general advancement of the interest of Itie 
University 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. Awarded to the senior with the higfwsl 
overall scholarship in the college of Business and Management 

Educatton Alumni Award. Presented to the outstanding senior man and 

senior woman in the College of Education. 



Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 37 



Englne«rin9 Alumni Chapter Award is presented to a senior in the College 
of Engineering lot outstanding scholarship and service to the College of 
Engineering 

Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Senior Award is presented to a senior in Eiectn- 
cal Engineering tor outstanding scholastic achievement and service to the 
society and department 

Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards. The University Theatre recognizes 
annually the male and female memtsers of the senior class who have done 
the most for the advancement of dramatics at the University. 

P. Ame Hansen Memorial Award. Presented to the Outstanding Depart- 
mental Honors Student in Microbiology 

William Randolph Hearst Foundation Awards. Categories general news, 
features, editorials, investigative reporting, spot news. 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Award. The Washing- 
ton Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers defrays 
the expenses of a year's membership as an associate In the institute for the 
senior doing the most to promote student branch activities 

Joe Elbert James Memorial Award. Gold watch annually awarded to a 
graduating senior in horticulture on basis of scholarship and promise of 
future achievement 

Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association Annual Citation.Presented to 

the outstanding senior in journalism 

Pf Tau Sigma Memorial Award. Presented to the senior in l^echanical 
Engineering who has made the most outstanding contnbution to the 
University 

Public Relations Society of America. The Maryland Professional Chapter 
of PRSA presents an annual citation to the outstanding senior majoring in 
public relations 

The Shipleys of Maryland Award. Cash award given to the graduating 
History major with the best academic record. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award. This award is presented a senior student 
majoring in microbiology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

Sigma Delta Chi Citation. For Achievement at the University of Maryland. 

Sigma Delta Pi Award. Presented by the Department of Spanish and 
Portuguese Languages to the graduating member of Sigma Delta Pi 
(National Spanish Honor Society) who has rendered the greatest service to 
the Delta (University of Maryland) Chapter. 

Awards for Excellence in the Study of Spanish. Presented by the Depart- 
ment of Spanish and Portuguese Languages to the three members of the 
graduating class who have most distinguished themselves as students of 
Spanish language and literature 

James P. Wharton Art Award Fund. This fund was endowed by the former 
head of the Art Department, Colonel James P. Wharton. An annual award 
of $20000 is given to a senior for special achievement in Studio Art. 



Athletic Awards 

Atlantic Coast Conference Award. A plaque is awarded each year to a 
senior in each conference school for excellence in scholarship and 
athletics 

The Alvin L. Aubinoe Basl(etball Trophy. This trophy is given in memory of 
Alvin L Aubinoe for the senior who has contributed most to the squad 
during the time the student was on the squad. 

The Alvin L Aubinoe Tracl« Trophy. This trophy is given in memory of Alvin 
L. Aubinoe for the senior who has contributed most to the squad dunng the 
time the student was on the squad. 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. Presented to the outstanding senior baseball 
player 

Geary F. Eppley Award. Offered by Benny and Hotsy Alperstein to the 
graduating male senior who during his three years of varsity competition, 
lettered at least once and attained the highest overall scholastic average. 

Hallwrt K. Evans Memorial Tracts Award. This award, given in memory of 
"Hermie " Evans of the Class of 1940, by his fnends, is presented to a 
graduating member of the track team 

Chartes P. McCormick Trophy. This trophy is given in memory of Charles P. 
McCormick to the senior member of the swimming teach who has contrib- 
uted most to swimming during the swimmers collegiate career. 



TEKE Trophy. This trophy is offered by the Maryland Chapter of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon Fraternity to the student who during four years at the University 
has rendered the greatest service to football 



Air Force ROTC Awards 

Air Force Association Award to the outstanding senior cadet who has 
excelled in field training, possesses individual leadership charactenstics, 
ranks in the upper ten percent of his or her class in the University and the 
upper five percent of his or her ROTC class, and has outstanding promo- 
tion potential 

Air Force Historical Foundation Award to an AFRQTC cadet/commis- 
sionee in recognition of leadership, citizenship, academic achievement, 
and military performance Award is a $1,000 scholarship tor graduate 
study in a field beneficial to Air Force and American Aviation Technology. 

American Defense Preparedness Association Award. Presented to the 
outstanding senior cadet who has an academic average which places him 
or her in the upper half of his or her entire class at the University, has 
received no grade in the advanced ROTC courses less than B. is in upper 
twenty percent of total senior enrollment at the University of Maryland, has 
participated actively in athletics and/or campus activities, and has demon- 
strated outstanding leadership qualities. 

American Fighter Aces Award recognizes the outstanding graduating 
cadet pilot in each geographical area based on his or her performance and 
achievements as an AFROTC cadet and his or her performance in the flight 
instruction program 

American Legion Outstanding Senior Cadet This award is sponsored by 
the Amencan Legion, Department of Maryland, and is presented to the 
cadet described as the "Outstanding ROTC Senior " 

American Legion ROTC Military Excellence Awards to a senior (Gold 
award) and junior (Silver award) in the upper twenty-five percent of his or 
her AFROTC class and demonstrating outstanding qualities in military 
leadership, discipline, and character. 

American Legion ROTC Scholastic Award to an outstanding senior (Gold 
award) and junior (Silver award) in the upper ten percent of his or her class 
in the University and have demonstrated high qualities In military 
leadership. 

Commandant of Cadets Award to a junior or senior cadet for outstanding 
performance as a staff officer. This cadet most successfully exemplifies 
the "complete staff officer " 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award to the senior cadet who has 
demonstrated high qualities of dependability, good character, adherence 
to military discipline, and leadership ability 

Disabled American Veterans Cup to the senior cadet who has displayed 

outstanding leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. 

Professor of Aerospace Studies Award to the senior cadet who has distin- 
guished himself or herself through excellence of leadership m the Corps of 
Cadets 

Reserve Officer Association Awards to the senior cadet (Gold award) 
junior cadet (Silver award), and sophomore cadet (Bronze award) demon- 
strating outstanding academic achievement in AFROTC subject matter 
and highest officer potential Ribbons of merit are presented to the top ten 
percent of the freshman and the sophomore cadets. 

Society of American Military Engineers Award to recognize twenty junior 
or senior cadets nationally displaying outstanding scholastic achievement 
and leadership and majoring in the field of engineenng. 



ACADEMIC DISHONESTY 

The Academic Dishonesty Policy Statement is currently being revised by 
the Campus Senate to reflect the recent reorganization of the academic 
units at College Park. The following interim procedure is to t>e in effect until 
such time as this policy statement is revised by the Senate For the 
nondepartmentalized colleges, the Dean for Undergraduate Studies shall 
assume the responsibilities formerly held by the division provost For the 
departmentalized colleges, the dean of the college shall assume the 
responsibilities formerly held by the division provost 

Academic dishonesty is prohibited by the Code of Student Conduct (see 
Appendix C of this catalog for the complete text), and may result in a 
serious penalty, including expulsion from the University The Code defines 
academic distionesty as follows: 

a. Cheating. Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized mate- 
rial, information or study aids in academic exercises. 



38 Registration, Records, and Academic Regulations 



b Fabrication. Intentional and unauthonzed falsification or invention of 

any information or citation In an academic exercise 
c Facilitating Academic Dishonesty. Intentionally or knowingly lielping 

or attempting to hielp anothier to commit an act of academic 

dishonesty 
d Plagiarism. Intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas 

of another as ones own in any academic exercise 

In cases involving charges of academic dishonesty, the instructor in the 
course or person in charge of the activity shall report to the instructional 
department chairperson or dean (if there is no chairperson) any information 
received and the facts within his or her knowledge If the chairperson of 
the instructional department determines that there is any sound reason for 
tDelieving that academic dishonesty may be involved, he or she shall refer 
the matter to the dean The dean will check the Office of Judicial Programs 
records to determine if the student has any record of prior offenses involv- 
ing academic dishonesty The dean will then consult with the student 
involved, and if the alleged academic dishonesty is admitted by the stu- 
dent and is his or her first offence, the dean may resolve the charges, 
provided the penalty is accepted by the student in writing 
In such cases the dean will make a wntten report of the matter, including 
the action taken, to the students dean and to the Office of Judicial Pro- 
grams Disciplinary penalties not involving a course grade are subject to 
review and approval by the Office of Judicial Programs 

If the case is not resolved in the above manner, the dean of the instructional 
department will appoint an ad hoc Committee of Academic Dishonesty 
The committee will consist of a chairperson from the faculty of the college 
administered by the dean, one undergraduate student, and one member 
from the faculty of the student's college If the student's dean and the 
dean administenng the instructional department are the same, a second 
member of the faculty of the college concerned is appointed If within 
jurisdiction of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies that dean will appoint 



the ad hoc Committee on Academic Dishonesty consisting of two faculty, 
one serving as chairperson, and one student 

The dean of the instructional department will refer the sp)ecific report of 
alleged academic dishonesty to this ad hoc committee, which will hear the 
case. The hearing procedures before the committee are set forth in the 
document Preparing for an Academic Dishonesty Heanng ' issued by the 
Office of Judicial Programs The Code of Student Conduct ptovides that 
any act of academic dishonesty including a first offence, will place the 
student is jeopardy of "suspension from the University, unless specific ar>d 
significant mitigating factors are present " (part 11) A repealed violation, 
or the more serious first offense, may result in expulsion Also, disciplinary 
records for any act of academic dishonesty are retained in the Omce of 
Judicial Programs for at least three years from the date of final 
adjudication 

The chair of the committee will repjort its findings of facts and recom 
mended penalties, if any, to the dean of the instructional department The 
sanctions specified by the panel are regarded as recommendations to the 
dean, who will inform the student and the Office of Judicial Programs of the 
outcome in writing Also, if it has been determined that the student should 
be suspended or expelled, the dean should advise the student of the right 
to file an appeal in accordance with Parts 38 and 40 through 45 of the 
Code of Student Conduct. Disciplinary penalties not involving a course 
grade are subject to review and approval by the Office of Judicial 
Programs 

Students accused of academic dishonesty should request a copy of Ihe 
University document "Preparing for an Academic Dishonesty Heanng " 
Contact the Office of Judicial Programs at 454 2927 

TO REPORT ACADEMIC DISHONESTY, DIAL 454-4746 AND ASK FOR THE 
"CAMPUS ADVOCATE." 



39 



6 The University Studies 
Program 



Dean for Undergraduate Studies: Dr Kathryn Mohrman 
1115 Hornbake Library, 454-6231 



Th» Campus Senate and the Board of Regents have 
approved a new General Education Program. Implementa- 
tion of this program Is currently under way. It will not be in 
place until — at the earliest — Fall, 1990. 

The University Studies Program is the general education requirement at 
the University of Maryland College Park This program must be completed 
by all students entering in May 1980 and thereafter, w^ith eight or fewer 
credits from this or any other college The requirements of the University 
Studies Program represent a third of the total academic work required for 
graduation and are designed to be spread throughout the student's four 
years of baccalaureate study It is the purpose of the program that stu- 
dents be prepared to become productive, aware, and sensitive members 
of society, capable not only of understanding their world and the many 
kinds of people in It, but also of taking responsibility for their own decisions 
and their own lives 

The program has three major parts: Fundamental Studies, Distributive 
Studies, and Advanced Studies These areas of study will provide students 
with the intellectual skills and conceptual background basic to an under- 
standing of any subject matter and to an awareness of general modes of 
understanding the world 

The Fundamental Studies section of the program is intended to estab- 
lish the student's ability to participate in the discourse of the University 
through demonstrated mastery of written English and mathematics These 
requirements are to be completed early in the student's program in order 
to serve as a foundation for subsequent work 

The Distributive Studies requirements are intended, through study in 
particular disciplines, to acquaint students with the different ways of ana- 
lyzing and talking about the world that characterize each discipline Stu- 
dents must select two courses from each of four broad categories: culture 
and history, natural sciences and mathematics; literature and the arts; and 
social and behavioral sciences 

In Advanced Studies courses, students have the opportunity to 
examine how the different intellectual approaches observed in the Distribu- 
tive Studies courses compare to each other or may be used in complemen- 
tary ways to analyze and solve problems Thus, courses In Advanced 
Studies require students to exercise critical thinking skills in the analysis of 
complex problems To meet the Advanced Studies requirements, students 
must choose one course from the Development of Knowledge senes and 
one course from the Analysis of Human Problems series- 

Requirements in the Distributive Studies and the Advanced Studies are 
to be met by choosing courses from the list of courses approved for the 
University Studies Program. The outline of the program and the list of 
approved courses are given below 



Statement on Statute of Limitations for GEP and 
GUR 



Undergraduate students returning or transferring to College Park after 
August 1987 will no longer have the option of completing general educa- 
tion requirements under either the General Education Program or the Gen- 
eral University Requirements- 

Thereafter. following any substantive change in general education 
requirements, undergraduate students returning or transferring to College 
Park after a separation of five continuous calendar years must follow the 
requirements in effect at the time of re-entry Exception will be granted to 
those students who at the time of separation had completed sixty per cent 
(60%) of general education requirements then in effect 

Students from Maryland pulDlic community colleges shall be treated as 
if registration dates were concurrent with enrollment at College Park 

Other exceptions to this policy may be appealed to the Dean of Under- 
graduate Studies 



Outline of ttie University Studies Program 

A course taken to satisfy college, major, and/or supporting area require- 
ments may also be used to satisfy University Studies Program require- 
ments if it appears on the list of approved courses for this program 

Courses chosen on meet University Studies Program requirements 
may not be taken on a Pass-Fail basis 
I Fundamental Studies — nine credits (Except for ENGL 391 or 393, the 
Fundamental Studies requirement must be attempted by the time the 
student has completed thirty credit hours and passed successfully by 
the time the student has completed sixty credit hours ) 
A English Composition — 6 credits 
1 ENGL 101 — 3 credits 

a Students with TSWE (SAT verbal subtest) below 330 take 

ENGL 101A, 
b Students with SAT verbal 600 or above are exempt, 
c Students with AP score of 4 or 5 are exempt, 
d, ENGL 101X — 3 credits. Students for whom English is a 
second language may register for ENGL 101X instead of 
ENGL 101. To register for ENGL 101X, a student must pre- 
sent one of the following: (1 ) a score of 550 on the TOEFL, or 
(2) a score of 220 on the Comprehensive English Language 
Test (CELT) administered at the College Park Campus by 
the Maryland English Institute, or (3) successful completion 
of the Institute's semi-intensive course in English Based on 
scores from either the TOEFL or CELT a student might be 
required to complete a program of English language instruc- 
tion for non-native speakers through the Maryland English 
Institute before being allowed to register for ENGL 101 X. 
2. JUNIOR WRITING (3 credits) 

ENGL 391 — Advanced Composition 
ENGL 391 X — Advanced Composition (ESL) 
ENGL 392 — Advanced Composition (pre-law) 
ENGL 393 — Technical Writing 
ENGL 393X — Technical Writing (ESL) 
ENGL 394 — Business Writing 

ENGL 395 — Technical Writing (pre-med and health careers) 
(Any of these courses will fulfill the junior level writing requirement.) 

a. Must be taken AFTER student has completed 56 credit 
hours (i e., has reached junior standing) 

b. Students with an A in ENGL 101 (but NOT lOIAor 101X)are 
exempt 

c. Students who score 700 or better on the SAT Verbal will 
NOT be exempt from the Junior Writing requirement. 

B. Mathematics — 3 credits MATH 110 (or the modular equivalent 
MATH 102 - 3 - 4) or MATH 115 

1. Students with the following minimum examination scores or 
higher are exempt: 

a. SAT: 600 

b. College Board Achievement Test in Mathematics, Level I or 
II 600 

c Advanced Placement Examinations, Calculus AB or BC 3 
d Any CLEP Subject Examination in Mathematics: 60. 

2. Successful completion of any of the following entry courses of a 
higher level than MATH 110: MATH 111, 140,141, 150, 151,220, 
221, 240. 241, 246, 250, 251, STAT 100, 250 

II. Distnbutive Studies-minimum: 24 credits Courses to meet these 
requirements must be chosen from a list approved by the University 
Studies Committee. (See the Scliedule of Classes for this list.) 

A. Culture and History (minimum: 6 credits, 2 courses). 

B. Natural Sciences and Mathematics (minimum 6 credits, 2 
courses) One course must be a laboratory science. 

C. Literature and the Arts (minimum: 6 credits, 2 courses) Courses 
must be taken in two different departments. 

D Social and Behavioral Sciences (minimum 6 credits, 2 courses). 

Ill Advanced Studtes-six credits This requirement may be fulfilled only 

after student has completed fifty-six credit hours 

It is intended that, in fulfilling this requirement, students choose 

courses that offer a contrast to the major rather than supplementing it. 



40 The University Studies Program 



Courses to fulfill these requirements must be from two different depart- 
ments outside tlie department of the student's major 

Courses to meet these requirements must be chosen from a list desig- 
nated by the University Studies Committee as suitable for satisfying each 
of the requirements (See the Schedule of Classes for this list ) 

A The Development of Knowledge (three credits, one course). 
Courses which focus on the creation, discovery, exploration, test- 
ing, and evaluation of knowledge in one or more disciplines. 
B. The Analysis of Human Problems (three credits, one course) 
Courses which focus on the application of knowledge from one or 
more disciplines to the study of important human problems. 

Special Note for International Students 

Special requirements in English for international students are dis- 
cussed above 

Approved Courses 

Listed below are the courses approved by the University Studies Pro- 
gram Committee as of December 1988 Students must choose courses 
from this list in order to met the requirements of the Program 

Distributive Studies (A) Culture and History 

AASP 100 — Introduction to Afro-American Studies 

AASP 200 — African Civilizations 

AASP 202 — Black Culture in the United States 

AMST 201 — Introduction to Amencan Studies I 

AMST 205 — tvlatenal Aspects of American Life 

AMST 207 — Contemporary American Cultures 

ANTH 298A — Chesapeake An Archaeology of tvlaryland 

ANTH 298B — The First Americans 

CHIN 101 — Intensive Elementary Chinese I 

CHIN 102 — Elementary Spoken Chinese 

CHIN 103 — Elementary Written Chinese 

CHIN 201 — Intermediate Spoken Chinese I 

CHIN 202 — Intermediate Wntten Chinese I 

CHIN 203 — Intermediate Spoken Chinese II 

CHIN 204 — Intermediate Written Chinese II 

CLAS 170 — Greek and Roman Mythology 

EDPA 210 — Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education 

ENGL 260 — Introduction to Folklore 

FMCD 330 — Family Patterns 

FREN 101 — Elementary French I 

FREN 102 — Elementary French II 

FREN 103 — Review of Elementary French 

FREN 121 — Accelerated French I 

FREN 122 — Accelerated French II 

FREN 203 — Intermediate French 

FREN 31 1 — French Conversation: Contemporary Issues 

FREN 312 — French Conversation: Current Cultural Events 

FREN 370 — Aspects of French Civilization 

GEOG 150 — World Cities 

GEOG 202 — The World in Cultural Perspective 

GEOG 321 — Maryland and Adjacent Areas 

GEOG 324 — Europe — Contemporary Landscapes 

GEOG 325 — The Soviet Union 

GEOG 326 — Africa 

GEOG 327 — South Asia 

GEOG 331 — Southwest Asia 

GERM 101 — Elementary German I 

GERM 102 — Elementary German II 

GERM 103 — Review of Elementary German 

GERM 104 — Intermediate German 

GERM 141 — Elementary Yiddish I 

GERM 142 — Elementary Yiddish II 

GERM 144 — Intermediate Yiddish I 

GERM 145 — Intermediate Yiddish II 

GERM 280 — German-American Cultural Contrast 

GERM 281 — Women in German Society and Literature (in English) 

GERM 282 — Germanic Mythology 

GERM 381 — German Civilization I 

GERM 382 — German Civilization II 

GERM 383 — The Viking Era 

GERM 384 — The Age of Chivalry 

GERM 389C — Selected Topics in Germanic Area Studies (The 

Ancient Cells) 

GERM 3891 — Selected Topics in Germanic Area Studies (Ancient 

India) 

GREK 101 — Elementary Greek I 

GREK 102 — Elementary Greek II 

GREK 203 — Intermediate Greek 

GVPT 240 — Political Ideologies 

HEBR 1 1 1 — Elementary Hebrew I 

HEBR 112 — Elementary Hebrew II 

HEBR 21 1 — Intermediate Hebrew I 

HEBR 212 — Intermediate Hebrew II 

HEBR 333 — Hebrew Civilization 



HEBR 334 — Hebrew Civilization 

HIST 101 — Great Ideas. Events and Personalities in History 

HIST 115 — Modern Business History 

HIST 130 — The Ancient World 

HIST 131 — The Medieval World 

HIST 132 — The Rise of the West 1500-1789 

HIST 133 — Modern Europe 1789-Present 

HIST 144 — The Humanities I 

HIST 145 — The Humanities II 

HIST 156 — History of the United States to 1865 

HIST 200 — Introduction to the History of Science 

HIST 201 — Science and Technology in World History 

HIST 210 — Women in America to 1880 

HIST 211 — Women in America Since 1880 

HIST 234 — History of Bntain to 1485 

HIST 235 — History of Bnlain, 1461-1714 

HIST 236 — History of Britain. 1688 to Present 

HIST 237 — Russian Civilization 

HIST 250 — Latin American History I (to 1810) 

HIST 251 — Latin American History II (1810 to present) 

HIST 280 — Islamic Civilization 

HIST 282 — History of the Jewish People I (to late Middle Ages) 

HIST 283 — History of the Jewish People II 

HIST 284 — East Asian Civilization I (to 1700) 

HIST 285 — East Asian Civilization II (since 1700) 

HIST 290 — Afncan Civilization 

HONR 118 — Freshman Honors Colloquium. Cultural and Historical 

HONR 318 — Honors Seminar, Cultural and Historical 

ITAL 101 — Elementary Italian I 

ITAL 102 — Elementary Italian II 

ITAL 121 — Accelerated Italian I 

ITAL 122 — Accelerated Italian II 

ITAL 203 — Intermediate Italian 

ITAL 204 — Review Grammar and Composition 

ITAL 21 1 — Intermediate Conversalioln 

ITAL 370 — Italian Civilization 

JAPN 101 — Elementary Japanese I 

JAPN 102 — Elementary Japanese II 

JAPN 201 — Intermediate Spoken Japanese I 

JAPN 202 — Intermediate Written Japanese I 

JAPN 203 — Intermediate Spoken Japanese II 

JAPN 204 — Intermediate Written Japanese II 

JAPN 217 — Buddhism and Japanese Literature in Translation 

LATN 101 — Elementary Latin I 

LATN 102 — Elementary Latin II 

LATN 120 — Intensive Latin 

LATN 203 — Intermediate Latin I 

LATN 204 — Intermediate Latin II 

LATN 220 — Intermediate Intensive Latin 

PHED 293 — History of Sport in America 

PHIL too — Introduction to Philosophy 

PHIL 110 — Plato's Republic 

PHIL 243 — Philosophy of Rural Life 

PHIL 250 — Philosophy of Science I 

PORT 101 — Elementary Portuguese I 

PORT 102 — Elementary Portuguese II 

PORT 203 — Intermediate Portuguese 

RUSS 101 — Elementary Russian I 

RUSS 102 — Elementary Russian II 

RUSS 281 — Russian Culture 

RUSS 282 — Russian Language and Soviet Culture 

SPAN 101 — Elementary Spanish I 

SPAN 102 — Elementary Spanish II 

SPAN 103 — Review of Elementary Spanish 

SPAN 203 — Intermediate Spanish 

SPAN 204 — Review of Oral and Written Spanish 

SPAN 205 — Intermediate Conversation 

SPAN 31 1 — Advanced Conversation I 

SPAN 312 — Advanced Conversation II 

SPAN 325 — Spanish Civilization I 

SPAN 326 — Spanish Civilization II 

SPAN 346 — Latin Amencan Civilization I 

SPAN 347 — Latin American Civilization II 

TEXT 345 — History of Costume I 

TEXT 347 — History of Costume II 

TEXT 363 — History of Textiles 

THET 310 — The American Theatre 



Distributive Studies (B) Natural Sciences and Mattiematics Lab 
Sciences 

AGRO 100 & 102 — Crops Laboratory and Crop Production 
AGRO 302 — General Soils 

ASTR 100 & 1 10 or 111 — Introduction to Astronomy and Astron- 
omy Laboratory 

BIOL 101 and 102 — Organization and Interrelationships in ttw Bto- 
k>gical World. & LatMratory m Biology 



The University Studies Program 41 



BIOL 105 — Principles ol Biology I 
BIOL 106 — Principles o( Biology II 
BOTN 100 — General Botany for Nonscience Students 
CHEM 102 — Chemistry o( Man s Environment 
CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 
CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 
CHEM 105 — Principles of General Chemistry I 
CHEM 111 — Chemistry in Modern Life 
CHEM 113 — General Chemistry II 
CHEM 115 — Principles of General Chemistry II 
ENTM 205 — Principles of Entomology 

GEOG 170 & 171 — Maps and Map Use. and Maps and Map Use 
Laboratory 

GEOG 201 & 211 — The Geography of Environmental Systems and 
The Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory 
GEOL KX) & 110 — Physical Geology and Physical Geology 
Laboratory 

MICB 100 — Basic Microbiology 
MICB 200 — General Microbiology 
PHED 360 — Physiology of Exercise 
PHYS 102 and 103 — Physics of Music and Laboratory 
PHYS 106 and 107 — Light Perception, Photography and Visual 
Phenomena and Light Perception. Photography and Visual Phenom- 
ena Laboratory 

PHYS 114 — Energy and the Environment 
PHYS 117 — Introduction to Physics 
PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I 
PHYS 122 — Fundamentals of Physics II 
PHYS 141 — Principles of Physics I 
PHYS 142 — Principles of Physics II 
PHYS 221 — General Physics for Science Teachers I 
PHYS 222 — General Physics for Science Teachers II 
PHYS 262 & 262A (lab) — General Physics: Heat, Electricity and 
Magnetism 

PHYS 263 & 263A (lab) — General Physics: Waves, Relativity and 
Quantum Physics 

PHYS 272 & 275 — Introductory Physics: Thermodynamics, Electric- 
ity & Magnetism, Lab: Mechanics and Thermodynamics 
PHYS 273 & 276 — Introductory Physics: Electricity & Magnetism, 
Waves Optics Lab, Electricity & Magnetism 
ZOOL 210 — Animal Diversity 
ZOOL 212 — Ecology, Evolution and Behavior 

Non-lab Sciences and Mathematics 

AGRO 105 — Soil and the Environment 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 

ANTH 101 — Introduction to Anthropology 

ASTR 100 — Introduction to Astronomy 

ASTR 181 — Introductory Astronomy and Astrophysics I 

ASTR 182 — Introductory Astronomy and Astrophysics II 

ASTR 350 — Astronomy and Astrophysics 

BIOL 101 — Organization and Interrelationships in the Biological World 

BOTN 103 — Human Aspects of Plant Biology 

BOTN 211 — Ecology and Mankind 

CHEM 107 — Chemistry and Man 

ENAG 232 — Water, A Renev^iable Resource 

ENES 120 — Noise Pollution 

ENES 121 — The Man-Made World 

ENTM 100 — Insects 

GEOG 140 — Coastal Environments 

GEOG 170 — Maps and Map Use 

GEOG 201 — The Geography of Environmental Systems 

GEOL 100 — Physical Geology 

GEOL 101 — Physical Geology for Science Students 

GEOL 102 — Historical Geology 

GEOL 120 — Environmental Geology 

HESP 305 — Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism 

HONR 128 — Freshman Honors and Colloquium, Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics 

HONR 328 — Honors Seminar, Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

HORT 100 — Introduction to Horticulture 

MATH 105 — Mathematical Ideas 

MATH 1 1 1 — Introduction to Math II 

MATH 140 — Calculus I 

MATH 141 — Calculus II 

MATH 150 — Calculus I (Honors) 

MATH 151 — Calculus II (Honors) 

MATH 210 — Elements Mathematics 

MATH 21 1 — Elements Geometry 

MATH 220 — Elementary of Calculus I 

MATH 221 — Elementary of Calculus II 

MATH 240 — Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MATH 241 — Calculus III 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers 

MATH 250 — Calculus III (Honors) 

MATH 251 — Calculus IV (Honors) 



ME TO 100 — Weather and Life 

MICB 322 — Microbiology and the Public 

NUTR too — Elements of Nutrition 

PHIL 271 — Symbolic Logic I 

PHYS 101 — Contemporary Physics 

PHYS 102 — Physics of Music 

PHYS 106 — Light, Perception, Photography and Visual Phenomena 

PHYS 1 1 1 — Physics in the Modern World I 

PHYS 112 — Physics in the Modern World II 

PHYS 161 — General Physics Mechanics and Particle Dynamics 

PHYS 171 — Introductory Physics Mechanics 

PSYC 206 — Developmental Biopsychology 

PSYC 301 — Biological Basis of Behavior 

SOCY 201 — Introductory Statistics for Sociology . 

STAT 100 — Elementary Statistics and Probability 

STAT 250 — Introduction to Statistical Models 

ZOOL 181 — Life in the Oceans 

Distributive Studies (C) Literature and the Arts 

Note: Courses must be taken in different departments. 



Survey of Design History 
- An Introduction to the Built Environment 



APDS 104 - 

ARCH 170 

ARCH 222 — History of Western Architecture 

ARTH 100 — Introduction to Art 

ARTH 260 — History of Art I 

ARTH 261 — History of Art II 

ARTH 262 — Arts of Asia 

ARTH 284 — Introduction to African Art 

CHIN 213 — Chinese Poetry in English 

CHIN 314 — Chinese Fiction and Drama in Translation 

CHIN 315 — Modern Chinese Literature in Translation 

CHIN 441 — Traditional Chinese Fiction 

CHIN 442 — Modern Chinese Fiction 

CLAS 270 — Greek Literature in Translation 

CLAS 271 — Roman Literature in Translation 

DANC 200 — Introduction to Dance 

ENGL 201 — World Literature Homer to the Renaissance 

ENGL 202 — World Literature: The Renaissance to the Present 

ENGL 205 — Introduction to Shakespeare 

ENGL 211 — English Literature from Beginnings to 1800 

ENGL 212 — English Literature from 1800 to Present 

ENGL 221 — American Literature The beginning to 1865 

ENGL 222 — American Literature: 1865 to Present 

ENGL 234 — Introduction to Afro-American Literature 

ENGL 240 — Introduction to Literary Forms Fiction, Poetry. Drama 

ENGL 241 — Introduction to the Novel 

ENGL 242 — Fact and Fiction: Forms of Non-Fiction Prose 

ENGL 243 — Introduction to Poetry and Poetics 

ENGL 244 — Introduction to Drama 

ENGL 245 — Introduction to Film as Literature 

ENGL 246 — The Short Story 

ENGL 247 — Literature of Fantasy 

ENGL 250 — Women in Literature 

ENGL 271 — Honors World Literature: Homer to the Renaissance 

ENGL 272 — Honors World Literature: Renaissance to the 20th 

Century 

ENGL 301 — Cntical Methods in the Study of Literature 

ENGL 302 — English Medieval Literature in Translation 

ENGL 304 — Major Works of Shakespeare 

ENGL 305 — Shakespeare and His Contemporaries An Introduction 

ENGL 345 — Twentieth Century Poetry of Britain and America 

ENGL 462 — Folksong and Ballad 

FREN 250 — Readings in French Literature 

FREN 340 — Modern French Literature in Translation 

FREN 350/350H — Advanced Reading in French 

FREN 351/351H — French Literature from the Revolution to the 

Present 

FREN 352/352H — French Literature from the Middle Ages to the 

Revolution 

GERM 220 — Introduction to German Literature 

GERM 285 — German Film and Literature 

GREK 204 — Intermediate Greek (Homer) 

HEBR 223 — The Hebrew Bible Narrative 

HEBR 224 — The Hebrew Bible Poetry and Rhetoric 

HEBR 231 — Introduction to Jewish Literature in Translation 

HEBR 322 — Israeli Literature in Translation 

HONR 138 — Freshman Honors Colloquium: Literature and the Arts 

HONR 338 — Honors Seminar: Literature and the Arts 

HORT 160 — Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 

ITAL 251 — Introduction to Italian Literature 

ITAL 351 — Italian Literature from Dante to the Renaissance 

ITAL 352 — Italian Literature from the Renaissance to the Present 

ITAL 376 — The Italian Opera Libretto 

MUSC 130 — Survey of Music Literature 

MUSC 140 — Music Fundamentals I 



42 The University Studies Program 



MUSC 141 - 

MUSC 215 - 

RTVF 314 - 

RUSS 328A 

I 

RUSS 328B 

II 

SPAN 221 - 

SPAN 321 - 

SPAN 322 - 

SPAN 323 - 

SPAN 324 - 

THET 110 - 

WMST 250 - 



- Music Fundamentals II 

- The Art of the Performer 

- Introduction to the Film 

- Nineteenth Century Russian Literature in Translation 

- Nineteenth Century Russian Literature in Translation 

Readings in Spanish 

Survey of Spanish Literature I 

Survey of Spanish Literature II 

Survey of Spanish American Literature I 

Survey of Spanish American Literature II 

Introduction to the Theatre 

- Women, Art and Culture 



Distributive Studies (D) Social and Behavioral Studies 

AMST 203 — Popular Culture in America 

AMST 204 — Film and American Culture Studies 

AMST 206 — Business and American Culture Studies 

ANTH 102 — Introduction to Anthropology 

ANTH 221 — f^an and Environment 

ANTH 241 — Introduction to Archaeology 

ANTH 271 — Language and Culture 

AREC 240 — Environmental and Human Ecology 

ARSC 310 — Management and Leadership I 

ARSC 320 — National Security Forces in Contemporary American 

Society I 

BSOS 200 — Introduction to Applied Behavioral and Social Science 

CJUS 100 — Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CNEC 100 — Introduction to Consumer Economics 

CRIM 220 — Cnminology 

ECON 105 — Economics of Social Problems 

ECON 201 — Principles of Economics I 

ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

ECON 307 — Development of Economic Ideas 

ECON 310 — Evolution of Modern Capitalism in Western Europe 

and the United States 

ECON 311 — American Economic Development 

EDHD 306 — A Study of Human Behavior 

EDHD 330 — Human Development and Societal Institutions 

EDPA 201 — Education in Contemporary American Society 

FMCD 201 — Concepts in Community Development 

FMCD 250 — Decision Making in Families and Communities 

FOOD 110 — Food for People 

FOOD 300 — Economics of Food Consumption 

GEOG 100 — Introduction to Geography 

GEOG 110 — The World Today A Regional Geography 

GEOG 130 — Developing Countnes 

GEOG 203 — Economic Geography 

GVPT 100 — Principles of Government and Politics 

GVPT 170 — American Government 

GVPT 220 — Introduction to Political Behavior 

GVPT 273 — Introduction to Environmental Policy 

GVPT 300 — International Political Relations 

GVPT 343 — Political Themes in Contemporary Literature 

HESP 120 — Introduction to Linguistics 

HIST 157 — History of the US Since 1865 

HIST 275 — Law and Constitutionalism in American History 

HLTH 230 — Introduction to Health Behavior 

HLTH 285 — Controlling Stress and Tension 

HONR 148 — Freshman Honors Colloquium Social and Behavioral 

Sciences 

HONR 348 — Honors Seminar Social and Behavioral Sciences 

JOUR 100 — Introduction to Mass Communication 

LING 200 — Introduction to Linguistics 

LING 240 — Language and Mind 

PHED 287 — Sport and American Society 

PHED 350 — Psychology of Sport 

PHED 385 — Motor Learning and Skilled Performance 

PHIL 140 — Contemporary Moral Issues 

PHIL 245 — Political and Social Philosophy I 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 

PSYC 221 — Social Psychology 

PSYC 310 — Perception 

PSYC 335 — Personality and Adjustment 

PSYC 353 — Adult Psychopathology 

PSYC 355 — Child Psychology 

RECR 130 — History and Introduction to Recreation 

RTVF 124 — Mass Communication in 20th Century Society 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 

SOCY 105 — Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems 

SOCY 230 — Sociological Social Psychology 

SOCY 300 — American Society 

SOCY 327 — Introduction to the Study of Deviance 

SOCY 331 — Work. Bureaucracy and Industry 



SOCY 341 — Inequality in American Society 

SPCH 350 — Foundation of Communication Theory 

URBS 100 — Introduction to Interdisciplinary Urban Studies 

URBS 210 — Behavioral and Social Dimensions of the Urban 

Community 

URBS 220 — Environmental and Technological Dimensions of the 

Urban Community 

URBS 320 — The City and the Developing National Culturp of the 

United States 

WMST 200 — Introduction to Women's Studies 

Advanced Studies (A) Development of Knowrledge 

AMST 418E — Cultural Themes in America the American Image of 
Africa 

AMST 418K — Cultural Themes in Amenca Race in America Theory 
and Policy 

AMST 428A — American Cultural Eras Social Dramas in American Cul- 
tural History 

AMST 429B — Perspectives on Popular Culture Science Fiction in 
American Culture 

AMST 432 — Literature and American Society 
ANTH 371 — Introduction to Linguistics 
ANTH 389C — Culture and Personality 
ANTH 401 — Cultural Anthropology Principles and Processes 
ANTH 451 — Archaeology of the New World 

ARHU 308B — An Interdisciplinary Analysis of Scandinavian Civilization 
ARHU 309A — Forms and Forces of Human Experience An Interdisci- 
plinary Exploration — Philosophies of Art 
ASTR 300 — Stars and Stellar Systems 
ASTR 330 — Solar System Astronomy 
ASTR 340 — Galaxies and the Universe 
ASTR 380 — Life in the Universe 
BCHM 361 — Ongins of Biochemistry 
CJUS 330 — Contemporary Legal Policy Issues 
CLAS 320 — Women in Classical Antiquity 
CLAS 470 — Advanced Greek and Roman Mythology 
ECON 402 — Business Cycles 

EDCI 488N — Learning Styles and Learning Environments 
EDMS 451 — Introduction to Educational Statistics 

(Students who have credit for PSYC 200, ECON 421, BMGT 230, 
GVPT 422, GEOG 305 or SOCY 201 cannot receive credit for EDMS 
451 Students who wish to use EDMS 451 in lieu of one of the above to 
satisfy departmental requirements must receive approval from their 
departmental academic advisor ) 
ENGL 320 — English Romantic Literature 

ENGL 3790 — Special Topics in Literature Language and Gender 
Male/Female Difference in Language Use 

ENGL 379E — Special Topics in Literature; Film Analysis — The Rheto- 
nc of Fictional Worlds 

ENGL 3791 — Special Topics in Literature Science and Literature 
ENGL 379J — Special Topics in Literature Interpreting the Bible 
ENGL 379K — Special Topics in Literature Private Lives 
ENGL 3791- — Special Topics m Literature The Great Divide The Mod- 
ern and Pre-Modern Worlds 

ENGL 379M — Special Topics in Literature Bntain in the Age of 
Revolution, 1760-1820 

ENGL 379V — Special Topics in Literature Modern Poetry and the 
Visual Arts 

ENGL 385 — English Semantics 
ENGL 412 — Literature of the 17th Century, 1600-1660 
ENGL 432 — American Literature. 1865-1914 Realism & Naturalism 
ENGL 453 — Literary Criticism 
ENGL 477 — Studies in Mythmaking 

ENGL 479R — Special Topics in English and American Literature after 
1800 Readers, Wnters. and Rhetoric 

ENGL 489A — Special Topics in English Language The Language of 
Advertising 

ENGL 489C — Special Topics in English Language The Language of 
the Law 

GEOL 301 — Evolution in Geology 
GERM 348 — Yiddish Culture 

GERM 349A — Yiddish Literature in Translation Yiddish Culture — The 
Holocaust in Film and Literature 

GERM 479B — Selected Topics in Germanic Phitology Language and 
Science 

GNED 301 — The Arts and the Sciences 
GVPT 441 — History of Political Theory Ancient and Medieval 
GVPT 442 — History of Political Theory — Medieval to Recent 
GVPT 443 — Contemporary Political Theory 

HEBR 498B — Special Topics in Hebrew Issues in Jewish Ethics ar>d 
Law 

HEBR 498R — Special Topics in Hebrew Reconstructing AnoenI Civili- 
zations the Case of Mesopotamia 

HIST 31 lA — Approaches to the Past Approaches to European Social 
History 
HIST 31 IB — Approaches to the Past Historiography 



The University Studies Program 43 



HIST 31 IS — Approaches to the Past: Science and History — 
Archaeoaslronomy & the History o( Science 

HIST 401 — Ttie Scientific Revolution: From Copernicus to Newton 
HIST 402 — The Development of Modern Physical Science From 
Newton to Einstein 

HIST 403 — Twentieth Century Revolutions in Physical Sciences 
HIST 407 — History of Technology 
HIST 412 — Readings in Psycho-History 

HLTH 498T — Ways of Knowino about Human Stress and Tension 
HONR 368 — Honors Seminar Development of Knowledge 
HSAD 451 — Gaming Simulation in Design I 
ITAL 410 — The Italian Renaissance 
LING 440 — Grammars and Cognition 
I^ATH 310 — Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning 
MATH 406 — Introduction to Number Theory 
MATH 430 — Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries 
MUSC 340 — Music Literature Survey I 
NUTR 335 — History of Nutntion 
PHED 362 — Philosophy of Sport 

PHIL 308A — Studies in Contemporary Philosophy: Philosophy of Liter- 
ature and Film 

PHIL 308C — Studies in Contemporary Philosophy Philosophy and 
Computers 

PHIL 308D — Studies in Contemporary Philosophy Discovery & Anal- 
ogy in Science 

PHIL 308E — Studies in Contemporary Philosophy Philosophy of 
History 

PHIL 310 — Ancient Philosophy 
PHIL 328B — Marxist Philosophy 
PHIL 331 — Philosophy of Art 
PHIL 332 — Philosophy of Beauty 
PHIL 334 — Philosophy of Music 

PHIL 408D — Topics in Contemporary Philosophy: Philosophical Issues 
in Art History 

PHIL 408E — Topics in Contemporary Philosophy: Aesthetic Theory & 
Philosoptiy of Criticism 

PHIL 408F — Topics In Contemporary Philosophy: Contemporary 
French and German Philosophy 

PHIL 408S — Topics In Contemporary Philosophy: The Nature of Scien- 
tific Understanding 

PHIL 428A — Origins of the Modern Scientific World-View 
PHIL 447 — Philosophy of Law 
PHIL 450 — Scientific Thought I 
PHIL 451 — Scientific Thought II 
PHIL 452 — Philosophy of Physics 
PHIL 453 — Philosophy of Science II 
PHIL 454 — Philosophy of Economics 
PHIL 455 — Philosophy of the Social Sciences 
PHIL 456 — Philosophy of Biology 

PHIL 458A — Topics in the Philosophy of Science: Philosophy of Agri- 
cultural Science 

PHIL 458X — Topics in the Philosophy of Science: Causation and 
Causal Thinking 

PHIL 465 — Philosophy of Psychology 
PHIL 472 — Philosophy of Mathematics 
PHYS 420 — Principles of Modern Physics 
PHYS 421 — Introduction to Modern Physics 
PHYS 490 — History of Modern Physics 

PHYS 499F — Special Topics in Physics — Physics for Managers & 
Analysts Twentieth Century Physics 
SOCY 403 — Intermediate Sociological Theory 
SOCY 498K — Sociology of Knowledge 
SPCH 450 — Classical and Medieval Rhetorical Theory 
THET 495 — History of Theatrical Theory and Criticism 
WMST 400 — Theories of Feminism 
ZOOL 301 — Biological Issues and Scientific Evidence 
ZOOL 328F — Selected Topics in Zoology: The Brain 

Advanced Studies (B) Analysis of Human Problems 

AEED 323 — Developing Youth Programs 
AGRO 303 — International Crop Production 
AMST 330 — Critics of American Culture 

AMST 418B — Cultural Themes in America: Culture and Mental Dis- 
orders in Modern America 

AMST 418C — Cultural Themes In America: The American Environ- 
ment Conservation and Energy 

AMST 418D — Cultural Themes in America: Growing Up American 
AMST 4288 — American Cultural Eras: Amencan Film Culture In the 
1960s 

ANTH 389B — Medicine, Health and Culture 
AREC 365 — World Hunger: Population and Food Supplies 
AREC 433 — Food and Agricultural Policy 
AREC 453 — Natural Resource Economics and Public Policy 
ARHU 308A — Post World War II Japan through Film and Fiction 
CHEM 374 — Technology, Energy and Risk 
CLAS 374 — Greek Literature in Translation 



CNEC 310 — Consumer Economics and Public Policy 
CNEC 410 — Consumer Finance 
CNEC 431 — The Consumer and the Law 
CNEC 435 — Economics of Consumption 
CNEC 437 — Consumer Behavior 

ECON 315 — Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas 
ECON 451 — Public Choice and Public Policy 
ECON 490 — Survey of Urban Economic Problems and Policies 
EDCI 381 — Schools and Children 
EDCP 420 — Education and Racism 
EDCP 462 — The Disabled Person in American Society 
EDHD 413 — Adolescent Development 
EDHD 445 — Guidance of Young Children 
EDIT 476 — Application of Technology to Societal Problems 
EDIT 488T — Issues Confronting Families Past and Future A Mul- 
tidisciplinary Approach 

EDPA 400 — The Future of the Human Community 
EDPA 488G — Technology, Social Change and Education 
ENAG 315 — Energy Its Effects on Agriculture and Food 
ENGL 379F — Special Topics in Literature Coping with Change 
ENGL 379N — Special Topics in Literature Literature of Sentiment 
and Sentimentality 

ENGL 379Q — Special Topics in Literature Mores Utopia and Uto- 
pian Vision 

ENGL 379R — Special Topics in Literature: Different Views of the 
Chesapeake Bay 

ENGL 379S — Special Topics in Literature: Changing Ideas of the 
City in Western Literature 

ENGL 379T — Special Topics in Literature On Argument 
ENGL 479A — Selected Topics in English and American Literature 
After 1800 Ideal and Real Communities in 19th Century American 
Literature 

ENTM 303 — International Pesticide Problems and Solutions 
FMCD 381 — Poverty and Affluence Among Low Income Families 
and the Community 

FMCD 431 — Family Crises and Intervention 
FMCD 487 — Legal Aspects of Family Problems 
FMCD 497 — The Child and the Law 

FREN 478B — Themes and Movements of French Literature in 
Translation: Autobiographical Fiction by Francophone Women 
Writers 

FREN 478C — Themes of Movements of French Literature In Trans- 
lation: Conflict Between Individual and Society In French Literature 
FREN 479A — Masterworks of French Literature in Translation The 
Age of Anxiety — The Literature of Existentialism and the Absurd 
FREN 479D — Masterworks of French Literature in Translation: Ide- 
ologies and Relations between the Sexes 
GEOG 434 — Agricultural and Rural Development 
GEOG 456 — Social Geography of Metropolitan Areas 
GEOG 462 — Water Resources and Water Resource Planning 
GEOG 463 — Geographic Aspects of Pollution 
GEOG 464 — Energy Resources and Planning 
GERM 389J — Topics In Germanic Culture: Honor as a Theme in 
Western Literature 

GERM 389R — Topics in Germanic Culture Reason and Faith 
GNED 300 — Perspectives on Nuclear War 
GVPT 403 — Law, Morality and War (cross-listed with PHIL 446) 
GVPT 405 — Defense Policy and Arms Control 
GVPT 432 — Civil Rights and the Constitution 
GVPT 457 — American Foreign Relations 
GVPT 462 — Urban Politics 
GVPT 471 — Women and Politics 

HIST 31 2A — Crisis and Change in the United States: The Chang- 
ing Urban Scene 

HIST 31 2B — Crisis and Change in the United States Dynamics of 
Federal Indian Policy 

HIST 313A — Crisis and Change In European Society: Freedom and 
Authority 

HIST 314A — Crisis and Change In the Middle East and Africa 
Nationalism and Nation Building In the Middle East 
HIST 31 6A — Crisis and Change in Latin America: Slavery and Race 
Relations 

HIST 458A — Selected Topics in Women's History: VIctonan 
Women 

HLTH 476 — Death Education 

HLTH 490 — Theories of Children's Love and Peace Behaviors 
HONR 378 — Honors Seminar: Analysis of Human Problems 
ITAL 411 — Dante 
NUTR 425 — International Nutrition 

NUTR 498F — Development and Modification of Food Habits 
PHIL 308B — Philosophy of Life 
PHIL 308F — Philosophical Aspects of Feminism 
PHIL 340 — Making Decisions 
PHIL 342 — Moral Problems in Medicine 

PHIL 408A — Topics in Contemporary Philosophy: Analysis and 
Design of Legal & Moral Institutions 



44 The University Studies Program 



PHIL 408L — Topics in Contemporary Philosophy Racial and Sexual 

Discrimination 

PHIL 441 — History of Ethics 

PHIL 446 — Law, Morality and War (cross-listed with GVPT 403) 

PHYS 318N — Topics in Contemporary Physics: the Risks o( 

Nuclear Power 

PSYC 354 — Cross-Cullural Psychology 

SOCY 305 — Scarcity and Modern Society 

SOCY 325 — Sex Roles 

SOCY 333 — Technology and Society 

SOCY 427 — Deviant Behavior 

SOCY 431 — Formal and Complex Organizations 

SOCY 441 — Social Stratification and Inequality 

SOCY 460 — Sociology of Work 



SOCY 464 — Military Sociology 

SOCY 498A — Medical Sociology 

SOCY 498N — Sociology of Nuclear War 

SOCY 498R — Work, family, Community and Friendship: Issues in 

Social Identity and Well Being 

SPCH 324 — Communication and Sex Roles 

ZOOL 346 — Human Genetics and Society 

ZOOL 381 — Natural History and the Chesapeake Bay 

•This list includes all courses approved by the University Studies Program 
Committee as suitable for satisfying requirements of the program Since all 
courses approved are not offered every semester, students should consult the 
Schedule of Classes each semester for the most current list 



45 



7 Colleges and Schools 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
(AGRI) 

1114 Symons Hall. 454-6332 
Dean: Raymond J. Miller 

Today's agriculture is a highly complex and extremely efficient industry 
that involves supplies and services used in agricultural production, and the 
marketing, processing and distribution of products to meet the consumers' 
needs and wants The mission of the College of Agriculture includes the 
application of knowledge to the solution of some of the world's most critical 
problems concerning adequate amounts and quality of food and the qual- 
ity of the environment in which we live. The College strives to provide an 
agricultural education that fits all the needs of today's advanced science of 
agriculture 

The College of Agriculture offers educational programs with a broad 
cultural and scientific base Instruction in the College includes the funda- 
mental sciences, and helps develop the foundation for its students' future 
roles by emphasizing the precise knowledge graduates must employ in the 
industrialized agriculture of today Students are prepared for careers in 
agriculturally related sciences, technology and business Course programs 
in specialized areas may be tailored to fit the particular needs of the 
individual student Previous training in agriculture is not a prerequisite for 
study in the College of Agriculture, students with rural, suburban and 
urban backgrounds comprise the student body. Graduates of the College 
of Agriculture have an appropriate educational background for careers and 
continued learning after college in business, industry, production, teach- 
ing, research, extension, and many other professional fields. 

The original College of the University of Maryland at College Park was 
chartered in 1856 The College of Agriculture has a continuous record of 
leadership in education since that date. It became the beneficiary of the 
Land-Grant in 1862 The College of Agriculture continues to grow and 
develop as part of the greater University, providing education and research 
activities enabling us to use our environment and natural resources to best 
advantage while conserving basic resources for future generations 

The College of Agriculture offers the following majors and programs of 
study: 

Agricultural Extension Education 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agriculture — General Curriculum 

Agronomy 

Animal Sciences 

Food Science Program 

Horticulture 

Institute of Applied Agriculture (two-year program) 

Natural Resources Ivlanagement Program 

Combined Degree — College of Agriculture and Veterinary 

Medicine 

Advantage of Location and Facilities. Educational opportunities in the 
College of Agriculture are enhanced by the nearby location of several 
research units of the Federal government Teaching and research activities 
in the College are conducted with the cooperation of scientists and profes- 
sional people in government positions Of particular interest are the Agri- 
cultural Research Center at Beltsville, and the important National Agricul- 
tural Library there, and the U S Department of Agriculture Headquarters in 
Washington, DC Related research laboratories of the National Institutes of 
Health, military hospitals. National Aeronautics and Space Agency, and the 
National Bureau of Standards are also located in the vicinity of College 
Park Interaction of faculty and students with personnel from these agen- 
cies IS encouraged 

Instruction in the basic biological and physical sciences, social sci- 
ences and engineering principles is conducted in well-designed class- 
rooms and laboratories The application of basic principles to practical 
Situations IS demonstrated for the student in numerous ways For example, 
modern greenhouses are available for teaching and research on a wide 
variety of plants, plant pests, and crop cultural systems Dairy and beef 



cattle and flocks of poultry are available for teaching and research 

purposes 

In addition to on-campus facilities, several operating research farms, 
located in Central, Western, and Southern Maryland and on the Eastern 
Shore, support the educational programs in agriculture by providing loca- 
tions where important crops, animals, and poultry can be grown and main- 
tained under practical and research conditions These farms add an impor- 
tant dimension to the courses offered in agnculture Data from these 
operations and from cooperating producers and processors of agricultural 
products are utilized by students interested in economics, leaching, engi- 
neering, and conservation, as they relate to agriculture, as well as by those 
concerned with biology or management of agricultural crops and animals. 

Requirements for Admission. Admission requirements to the College of 
Agriculture are the same as those of the University 

For students entering the College of Agriculture it is recommended that 
their high school preparatory course include English, 4 units, mathematics, 
3 units: biological and physical sciences, 3 units: and history or social 
sciences, 2 units. Four units of mathematics should be elected by students 
who plan to major in agricultural engineenng or agricultural chemistry. 

Degree Requirements. Students graduating from the college must com- 
plete at least 120 credits with an average of 2.0 in all courses applicable 
toward the degree. Included in the 120 credits must be the following; 

1 University Studies Program Requirements (40 credits) 
2. College Requirements 

a. Chemistry: Any one course of three or more credits in chemistry 

numbered 102 or higher (Agribusiness majors excepted); 
b Mathematics or any course that satisfies the University Studies 

Program; 
c Biological Sciences: Any one course carrying three or more credits 
selected from offerings of the Departments of Botany, Entomology, 
Microbiology, or Zoology. Courses marked for non-science 
majors ■ cannot be used to satisfy degree requirements 
3 Requirements of the major and supporting areas, which are listed 
under individual program headings in chapter 8 of this catalog. 

Required Courses. Courses required for students in the College of Agricul- 
ture are listed in each curriculum The program of the freshman year is 
similar for all curricula Variations in programs will be suggested based on 
students' interests and test scores 

Typical Freshman Program-College of Agriculture. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

ENGL 101 3 

BIOL 105 4 

MATH .- ; 3 

ANSC 101 3 

BIOL 106 4 

AGRO 100 2 

AGRO 102 2 

SPCH 107 3 

University Studies Program Requirement . . _3 

Total 15 16 

Advising. Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty 
advisor. Advisors normally work with a limited number of students and are 
able to give individual guidance. 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curricu- 
lum are assigned to departmental advisors for counsel and planning of all 
academic programs Students who have not selected a definite curriculum 
are assigned to a general advisor who assists with the choice of electives 
and acquaints students with opportunities in the curricula in the College of 
Agriculture and in other units of the University. 

Financial Assistance: Scholarships. A number of scholarships are availa- 
ble for students enrolled in the College of Agriculture These include 
awards by the Agricultural Development Fund, Arthur M Ahalt Memorial 
Scholarship, Capitol Milk Producers Cooperative, Inc., George Earle Cook, 
Jr Scholarship Fund, Dr Ernest N Cory Trust Fund, Ernest T Cullen 



46 College of Agriculture 



Memorial Scholarship, Dairymen. Inc Scholarship, Delmarva Corn and Soy- 
bean Scholarship, Delaware-Maryland Plant Food Association, Mylo S 
Downey Memorial Scholarship, James R Ferguson Memorial Scholarship, 
Forbes Chocolate Leadership Award. Goddard Memorial Scholarship 
Manasses J, and Susanna Grove Memonal Scholarship, Joe E James 
Memorial Award Fund, The Kinghorne Fund. Gary Lee Lake Memorial 
Scholarship, Maryland Hoistein-Freisian Association Scholarship, Maryland 
Turfgrass Association, Maryland State Golf Association, Maryland and Vir- 
ginia Milk-Producers, Inc , Dr Ray A Murray Scholarship Fund Paul R 
Poffenberger Scholarship Fund, R J Reynolds Tobacco Scholarship, Ral- 
ston Purina Company, J Homer Remsberg Memorial Scholarship, The 
Schluderberg Foundation, The Ross and Pauline Smith Fund for Agricul- 
ture, Southern States Cooperative, Inc , the David N Steger Scholarship 
Fund, T B Symons Memorial Scholarship, Veterinary Science Scholarship, 
Winslow Foundation, and the Nicholas Brice Worthinglon Scholarship 
Fund 

Honors Program. An Honors Program is approved for majors in agncultural 
and resource economics The objective of the Honors Program is to 
recognize superior scholarship and to provide opportunity for excellent 
students to broaden their perspective and to increase the depth of their 
studies The programs in honors are administered by Departmental Hon- 
ors committees Students in the College of Agriculture who are in the top 
20% of their class at the end of their first year may be considered for 
admission into the Honors Program Of this group up to 50% may be 
admitted 

Sophomores or first semester juniors will be considered upon applica- 
tion from those students in the upper 20% of their class While application 
may be made until the student enters the sixth semester, early entrance 
into the program is recommended Students admitted to the program 
enjoy certain academic privileges 

Student Organizations. Students find opportunity for varied expression 
and growth in the several voluntary organizations sponsored by the Col- 
lege of Agriculture These organizations are Agriculture and Resource 
Economics Club, Agronomy Club, American Society of Agricultural Engi- 
neers. Animal Husbandry Club, Collegiate 4-H Club, Collegiate Future 
Farmers of America, Forestry Club, Equestrian Association, Food Science 
Club, Horticultural Club, INAG Club, Poultry Science Club, Soil Conserva- 
tion Society of America - The University of Maryland Student Chapter, and 
Veterinary Science Club, 

Alpha Zeta is a national agricultural honor fraternity. Members are 
chosen from students in the College of Agriculture who have attained the 
scholastic requirements and displayed leadership in agriculture. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from 
the various student organizations in the College of Agriculture. Its purpose 
IS to coordinate activities of these organizations and to promote work that 
IS beneficial to the college 

Research and Service Units 

The Agricultural Experiment Station 

The Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, headquartered on the 
UMCP Campus, is a state-wide agency conducting research in laboratories 
at UMCP or UMES or at one of its nine field locations throughout Maryland 
It was established m 1 888 to comply with the Hatch Act of 1 887 authorizing 
the establishment of an agricultural experiment station at the Land Grant 
Colleges The station is supported by Federal funds. State appropriations, 
grants and contracts with State and Federal agencies, and by gifts or other 
support from individual and farm-related businesses and industry The 
research is performed by faculty with the assistance of research assist- 
ants, technicians, graduate and undergraduate students 

The objective of the Experiment Station is to enhance all aspects of 
Maryland agriculture for the benefit of farmers, farm-related businesses 
and consumers through optimal utilization, conservation, and protection of 
soil and water resources For example, improved techniques of waste 
utilization or disposal require an examination of soilmoistureplant relation- 
ships and plant, bird, or animal-environment relationships as well as stud- 
ies of the applications of engineenng for producing or maintaining the 
optimal environment for biological systems 

Genetic principles are studied and applied in the improvement of turf 
and ornamentals, vegetable crops, field crops, poultry, dairy cattle, and 
other animals Similarly, pathological principles are of concern in the 
improvement of methods of identification, prevention and or control of 
plant and animal diseases Studies of biological, chemical and mechanical 
methods and improved chemical pesi control m the field forests food 
processing chain and the home are continuous Biochemistry plays an 
important role in evaluating the nutritional quality of crops produced the 
efficiency of feed conversion by poultry and animals, and the quality of 
plant and animal products for human consumption Research in progress 
is also concerned with improvement of processing systems to enhance 
food quality 

The socioeconomics of changing agncultural systems m terms of farm 
policy and rural development are also a major research area 



Cooperative Extension Service 

As part of the Iota! University, the Cooperative Extension Service takes 
the University of Maryland to the people of Maryland, wherever they are In 
lis role as the "off-campus, non-credil, oul-of-classroom' arm of the Univer- 
sity, it extends the classroom to all parts of the Slate With its uniquely 
effective educational delivery system the Cooperative Extension Service 
helps people to help themselves, to define their problems, to evaluate 
reasonable alternatives, and to generate action to solve their problems To 
accomplish its mission, the Cooperative Extension Service works closely 
with teaching and research faculty of the University and with units of the 
University outside of agriculture, as well as state and federal agencies and 
private groups. 

General administrative offices of the Maryland Cooperative Extension 
Service are located at the University of Maryland at College Park (UMCP) 
and the administration of the 1890 Program (an integral part of the total 
MCES effort) is based in offices at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore 
(UMES) 

The Cooperative Extension Service was authorized by Congress in 
1914 under the Smith-Lever Act and is funded by a three-way partnership 
Support comes from the Federal government for both 1862 and 1890 Land 
Grant institutions, and from the State and all twenty-three counties and 
Baltimore City in Maryland 

Off-campus faculty, located in each county and in Baltimore City, a/e 
the "front lines ' that deliver University resources in ways people can use 
them effectively These field faculty rely on campus based (Jooperative 
Extension specialists at both UMCP and UMES to provide up-to-date, 
meaningful information and for aid in planning and conducting relevant 
educational programs Many of the Cooperative Extension Service faculty 
at the State level carry joint appointments with teaching and research. 
especially in the UMCP College of Agnculture and College of Life Sciences 
In each county and in Baltimore City competent extension agents conduct 
educational work in program areas consistent with the needs of the citi- 
zenry and as funds permit Through these efforts, local people are 
assisted in finding solutions to their problems 

The Maryland Cooperative Extension Service delivers programs in eight 
major initiative areas These include ( 1 ) agricultural profitability. (2) natural 
resources. (3) diet, nutrition, and health, (4) human capital development, 
(5) family economic stability. (6) agricultural technology for urt)an audi- 
ences; (7) profitability of marine industries. (8) enhancement of community 
vitality 

The Cooperative Extension Service works in close harmony and assoa- 
ation with many groups and organizations such as 4-H and homemakers' 
clubs, farmers' groups and cooperatives, agribusiness firms, watermen's 
organizations, civic and social organizations, governmental agency per- 
sonnel, and elected officials, to multiply its effects In addition to work on 
farms and with agribusinesses, extension programs are aimed at many 
small and part-time farmers, rural non-farm and urban family consumers as 
well as watermen and marine-related businessmen Both rural and urtoan 
families learn good food habits through the Expanded Food and Nutntion 
Education Program Thousands of young people gam leadership knowl- 
edge and experience and are provided practical education instruction in 4- 
H clubs and other youth groups The Service maintains a close working 
relationship with the Maryland Department of Agriculture and other Stale 
agencies and organizations More than 22.000 volunteers in Maryland give 
generously of their time and energy 

Time-tested, informal educational methods used are farm and home 
visits, phone and office conferences, and structured events such as meet- 
ing, teaching institutes, workshops, and training conferences Teaching 
events include tours, field days, and demonstrations Short courses, work- 
shops, and conferences in various fields of interest are conducted at 
UMCP and other locations throughout the State Indirect communications 
include circular letters, radio and television programs newspaper articte«i 
and columns, articles in specialized publications, and exhibits to reacti a 
statewide audience 

The Cooperative Extension Service is committed to making its pro- 
grams available to all people without regard to race, color creed, mantal 
status, personal appearance, age. national origin, political affiliation, handi- 
cap, or sex 

Combined Degree Curriculum — College of 
Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine 

Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture who have completed at 
least ninety hours, including all University and college requirements may 
qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Maryland, 
College of Agriculture, upon successful completion m an accredited Col- 
lege of Vetennary medicine of at least thirty semester hours It is strongly 
recommended that the ninety hours include credits m animal science 



Combined Degree Requirements 



University Studies Program Requirements' 
ANSC 221 — Fundamentals of Animal Production 



Semester 

Credit Hours 

40 

3 



College of Agriculture 47 



ANSC 211 - 
ANSC 212 - 
BIOL 105 — 
BIOL 106 — 


- Anatomy of Domestic Animals 

- Applied Animal Physiology 
Principles of Biology 1 


4 
4 
4 
4 


Mathematics 
CHEM 103 - 
CHEM 113 - 
CHEM 233 - 
CHEM 243 - 
PHYS 121 - 


i (must include at least 3 credits of Calculus) 

- General Chemistry 1 

- General Chemistry II 

- Organic Chemistry 1 

- Organic Chemistry II 

- Fundamentals of Physics 1 


6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


PHYS 122 - 
Electives 


- Fundamentals of Physics II . 


4 

10 



■Includes eleven required credits listed above 

For additional information, please contact the Associate Dean. 
VMRCVM. The University of Maryland. 1316 Animal Sciences Annex. Col- 
lege Park, MD 20742 Telephone (301) 454-4268 

Institute of Applied Agriculture — Two-Year 
Program 

The Institute of Applied Agriculture, a two-year college-level program 
ottered as an alternative to the four-year program, prepares students for 
specific occupations in technical agriculture. 

The Institute offers three major programs with eleven curriculum 
options 

I Business Farming 

A Farm Production and Management 
B Agricultural Business Management 

II Ornamental Horticulture 

A General Ornamental Horticulture 

B Nursery Management 

C Garden Center Management 

D, Greenhouse Management 

E, Florist Shop Management 

F, Landscape Management 
III. Turfgrass Management 

A. Golf Course Management 

B. Lawn Care Management 

C. Lawn Care Technician (a one-year option) 

The business farming program develops skills needed for farm oprera- 
tion or for employment in agricultural service and supply businesses such 
as feed. seed, fertilizer, and machinery companies, and farmers' 
cooperatives 

Options in ornamental horticulture prepare students for employment 
in or management of greenhouses, nurseries, garden centers, florist shops, 
landscape maintenance companies or interior plantscaping companies. 

The turfgrass management program concentrates on the technical 
and management skills needed to work as a golf course superintendent, to 
work in commericial or residential lawn care companies or in other turf- 
grass-related industries such as parks and cemeteries. 

To enhance a student's occupational knowledge, the Institute requires 
participation in a Supervised Work Experience program, usually completed 
before taking second-year classes 

A graduate of the Institute is awarded a Certificate in Agriculture speci- 
fying the student's area of specialization Graduation requires the suc- 
cessful completion of sixty credit hours of a recognized program option, 
completion of Supervised Work Experience, and a 2 00 cumulative grade 
point average 

Though designed as a two-year terminal program, the Institute does not 
restrict continuing education In general, all Institute courses are transfera- 
ble to the UMCP and UMES campuses The extent to which the courses 
can be applied to a baccalaureate degree will depend on the individual 
department in which a student is planning to major. 



Courses Common to All Programs 

COMM 1-1 — Oral Communication* . 
COMM 1-2 — Written Communication" 
COMM 1-3 — Employment Communication 

AGMA 1-1 — Agricultural Mathematics' 

BOTN 1-1 — Introduction to Plant Science* 
HORT 1-5 — Diseases of Ornamentals 

AGRO 1-1 — Soils and Fertilizers* 

AGRO 1-6 — Weed Control 

AGRO 1-11 — Pesticide Use and Safety 

AGEN I-IA. B — Agricultural Mechanics I. II 

AGEN 1-2 — Power and Machinery 

AGEN I-3A — Land Measurement and Surveying 



3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2-2 
3 



AGEN 1-3B — Drainage Practices 1 

AGEN 1 3C — Irrigation Practices 1 

AGEN 17 — Machine Operation Laboratory 1 

AGEC 1-2 — Business Law . 3 

AGFC 1-4 — Business Operations 3 

AGEC 1-8 — Using Computers in Agriculture 2 

AGEC 1-10 — Personnel Management 3 

AGEC 1-12 — Agricultural Retailing 3 

AGEC 113 — Agricultural Finance 3 

AGEC 1-14 — Supervised Work Experience* 1 

■Required for all management options 

Courses for Farm Production and Agribusiness Management Majors 

ANSC 1-1 — Introduction to Animal Science 3 

ANSC 1-2 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

ANSC 1-3 — Animal Health 3 

ANSC 242 — Dairy Production 3 

ANSC 1-8 — Livestock Management 3 

ANSC 1-10 — Seminar 1 

ANSC 422 — Meats 3 

ENTM 242 — Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

AGRO 1-7 — Grain Production 3 

AGRO 1-10 — Forage and Pasture Production 3 

AGEC 1-5 — Financial Records and Analysis 3 

AGEC 1-7 — Agricultural Marketing 3 

AGEC 1-1 1 — Farm Management 3 

Courses for Ornamental Horticulture and Turfgrass Majors 

HORT 1-2 — Woody Ornamentals 3 

HORT 1-3 — Plant Propagation 3 

HORT 1-6 — Nursery Management 3 

HORT 1-7 — Greenhouse Management 2 

HORT 1-8 — Arbonculture 2 

HORT 1-10 — Floral Design I 2 

HORT 1-12 — Floral Crop Production 2 

HORT 1-13 — Floral Design II . . 2 

HORT 1-15 — Intenor Plant Culture 2 

HORT 1-17 — Floral Design III 2 

HORT 1-18 — Woody Ornamentals II . . 2 

HORT 1-19 — Intenor Ornamentals 2 

HORT 1-22 — Seminar 1 

HORT 1-26 — Landscape Design and Implementation 4 

HORT 1-27 — Landscape Management 4 

ENTM 1-2 — Pests of Ornamental Plants 3 

AGRO 1-2 — Turf Management 4 

AGRO 1-3 — Lawn Care Management 2 

AGRO 1-4 — Golf Course Management I 3 

AGRO 1-5 — Gold Course Management II 3 

For additional information, write Director, Institute of Applied Agriculture. 
The University of Maryland, College Park. MD 20742. 



VIRGINIA-MARYLAND REGIONAL COLLEGE OF 
VETERINARY MEDICINE— MARYLAND CAMPUS 

College of Agriculture 

3222 Chemistry Building. 454-4631 '4651 

Professor and Associate Dean: Mohanty 

Professor: Marquardt 

Associate Professors: Dutta. Mallinson. Snyder. Stephenson 

Assistant Professors: Carmel. Gorham, Ingling. Samal. Vakharia 

Instructors: Bradley, Penny 

The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine is oper- 
ated by the University of Maryland and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University Each year, thirty Maryland and fifty Virginia residents 
comprise the entering class of a four-year program leading to a Doctor of 
Veterinary Medicine (DVM) 

The first three years are given at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 
University in Blacksburg, Virginia The final year of instruction is given at 
several locations, including the University of Maryland, College Park 

A student desiring admission to the College must complete the pre- 
veterinary requirements and apply for admission to the professional curric- 
ulum Admission to this program is competitive, and open to all Maryland 
residents All Maryland residents' applications are processed at the 
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maryland. College Park. 



48 School of Architecture 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 
(ARCH) 

Architecture Building, 454-3427 

Professor and Acting Dean: John W. Hill 

Associate Dean: Sachs 

Assistant to the Dean: Lapanne 

Professors: Bennett, Lewis, Loss, Lu, Schlesinger. Steffian 

Associate Professors: Bechhoefer, DuPuy, Ellin, Fogle. Schumacher. 

Vann 

Assistant Professors: Kelly. Thiratrakoolchai, Weiss 

Lecturers: Drost. Dynerman. Mclnturff. Rixey, Wiedemann, Wilkes 

The School of Architecture offers a four-year undergraduate program 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in architecture and a graduate 
program leading to the degree. Master of Architecture The undergraduate 
major in architecture is designed to minimize the time required to complete 
the curriculum leading to the professional degree. Master of Architecture 

Students receive ngorous and comprehensive instruction from a faculty 
whose members are active in professional practice or research. Many 
faculty members have distinguished themselves across the professional 
spectrum and represent different approaches to architectural design 
Their individual areas of expertise include architectural design and theory, 
history, architectural archaeology, technology, urban design and planning, 
and historic preservation Visiting cntics, lecturers, and the Kea distin- 
guished professor augment the faculty: together they provide students 
with the requisite exposure to contemporary realities of architectural 
design 

The B S degree in architecture will qualify graduates to pursue a career 
in any of a number of fields, such as construction, real estate development. 
public administration, or historic preservation, or to continue in graduate 
work In professional fields such as architecture, urban planning, or law 

The graduate of the Master's degree program in architecture will be 
qualified to enter the profession of architecture in private practice, as an 
employee of a public agency at the local, state, or Federal level, or to enter 
any one of a number of other career paths 

The school's professional program is accredited by the National Archi- 
tectural Accreditation Board, Inc , enabling graduates to qualify for licen- 
sure in all 50 states, and by reciprocal agreement, m several foreign 
countnes 

Entrance Requirements. Admission to the School of Architecture is selec- 
tive Students are normally admitted to the undergraduate major in archi- 
tecture after completing 56 credits of general and prerequisite work Early 
admission is possible directly from high school for outstanding students 
who meet one of the following standards: (1) 3 5 GPA in high school and 
combined SAT score of 1200. (2) National Merit Scholarship finalist, or (3) 
recipient of Maryland Distinguished, Banneker, Francis Scott Key Scholar- 
ship or equivalent award Such students need not submit the portfolio 
described below 

Pnor to admission, students not admitted directly to the school may 
enroll in a two year pre-architecture program, but must also declare an 
alternate major Pre-architecture is open to any UMCP student and pro- 
vides a program for the first two years that includes the basic requirements 
of the University Studies Program plus other pre-architecture 
requirements 

The School of Architecture normally accepts transfer credits from 
regionally accredited four-year institutions Transfer credits for technical 
and professional courses, however, are normally accepted only from insti- 
tutions that are also accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting 
Board (NAAB). 

Admission. Fall application deadline for student admission is February 1 
A 3 GPA is normally recommended for admission to the School of 
Architecture 

In addition to the required high school and college transcnpts. letters of 
recommendation, and other information a portfolio of creative work must 
be submitted by all transfer and pre-architecture student applicants The 
required portfolio of student work may include copies of drawings photo- 
graphs, and other evidence of creative work, submitted in an 8 12 x 11 " 
format such as, for example, a standard three ring notebook The portfolio 
should be submitted to the Director of Admissions. School of Architecture 
(Please see the more detailed information available from the School of 
Architecture The portfolio will be returned only if requested, in which case 
a self-addressed, stamped mailing envelope should be included with the 
portfolio for this purpose ) 

Curriculum Requirements: Pre-Architecture. In the first two years of 
college pre-archilecture students should adhere to the following 
curriculum. 



USP -University Studies Program 

ENGL 101 - Introduction to Wnting 

MATH 220 - Elementary Calculus T 

ARCH 170 - Introduction to the Built Environment 

MATH 221 Elementary Calculus II (recommended) 

PHYS 121 - Fundamentals of Physics I 

ARCH 220 • History of Architecture I 

ARCH 242 - Drawing I 

PHYS 122 ■ Fundamentals of Physics II 
ARCH 221 - History of Architecture II 

Total Credits 



Credit Hours 
28 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
4 
J 

56 



Curriculum Requirements: Bachelor of Science. Major in 

Architecture. 

If admitted after completing 56 credits, students are expected to complete 

the following requirements for a total of 121 credits 



Third Year 

ARCH 400 • Architecture Studio I 

ARCH 375 - Architectural Construction and Materials 

ARCH 4xx - Arch History/Area A" 

ARCH 401 ■ Architecture Studio II 
ARCH 460 - Site Analysis and Design 
ARCH 343 ■ Drawing II Line Drawing 
ENGL 391 - Advanced Composition 
USP Requirements 

Total 



Credit Hours 

6 
3 
3 
6 
3 
2 
3 
J 

32 



Fourth Year 

ARCH 402 - Architecture Studio III 

ARCH 445 - Visual Analysis of Architecture 

ARCH 312 - Architectural Structures I 

ARCH 313 - Thermal and Acoustical Technology in Buildings . . 

ARCH 403 - Architecture Studio IV 

ARCH 454 • Theory of Urban Form 

ARCH 412 - Architectural Structures II 

ARCH 415 - Illumination, Electrical and Systems Technology in 

Building 

ARCH 4xx - Arch. History/ Area B" 

Total 



Total Credits 



6 
3 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 

3 

J 

33 
121 



"Courses are to be taken in sequence as indicated by Roman numerals in 
course titles 

•• Architecture history courses Area A ARCH 422. 423. 432. and 436 
Area B: ARCH 433, 434. and 420 

Special Resources and Opportunities. The school is housed m a modem. 
air-conditioned building providing work stations for each student a large 
auditorium, and seminar and classroom facilities A well-equipped wood 
working and model shop, darkroom facilities, a lab equipped with testing 
machines and various instruments used in studying the ambient environ- 
ment, and computer terminal facilities are also provided The Architecture 
Library, one of the finest in the nation, contains some 26,000 volumes and 
150 current periodicals A special collection room of 12.000 books includes 
5.000 volumes on world expositions The National Trust Library for Historic 
Preservation is also housed within the school and contains 1 1 .(XX) volumes 
and 450 periodical titles A visual resources facility includes a reserve slide 
collection of 220.000 slides on architecture, landscape architecture, urtjan 
planning, architectural science, and technology as well as audio-visual 
equipment lor classroom and studio use 

The school provides learning experiences through CADRE Corporatior. 
a nonprofit Center for Architectural Design and Research, which (xovides 
an organizational framework for faculty and students to undertake contract 
research and design projects appropriate to tfie school s fundamental 
education mission CADRE Corporation projects include tKjikJing and 
urban design, urban studies, building technology, historic preservation 
architectural archaeology, studies in energy conservation, or other work for 
which the school s resources and interests are uniquely suited 

Summer programs include the Caesarea Ancient Hartwr Excavalwn 
Project (CAHEP). an ongoing land and underwater excavation in Israel at 
the harbor of Herod the Great at Caesarea Maritima In addition, summer 
workshops for histonc preservation are sponsored by the school each year 
in Cape May. N J . a designated national historic landmark district, and 
Kiplin Hall in North Yorkshire England Students may earn direct credit 
doing hands-on restoration work and by attending lectures by visiting 
architects, preservationists, and scholars 

Course Code Prefix — ARCH 



College of Arts and Humanities 49 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

1101 Francis Scott Key Hall 

Dean: James Lesher (Acting) 454-6790 

Office of Student Affairs: 454-2737 

Academic Advisors: 454 2737 

Internstiip Coordinator: 454-2737/6797 

Computer Facility: 3)0\ Francis Scott Key Hall. 454-1814 

The College of Arts and Humanities embraces a heterogeneous group 
of disciplines, all of which value the development of cntical thinking, fluent 
expression in writing and speech, sensitivity to ethical and aesthetic stan- 
dards, and a complex understanding of history and culture Departments 
and programs in Arts and Humanities, while they have strong individual 
Identities, are also involved in interdisciplinary studies Thus students will 
find, for example, courses in the Department of English that approach 
literature from political perspectives, courses in the Department of History 
that rely on feminist perspectives, courses in the Department of Art History 
that study African cultures and so on 

Examples of the special opportunities available to students in this richly 
variegated College are the Language House (a residence hall open to 
students with a proficiency in foreign language), an exceptionally large 
slide library in the Art History Department, the Music Department's newly 
refurbished recital hall, the Pugliese Theatre for experimental drama. 
Improvisations Unlimited (a faculty-student dance group), the Computer 
Assisted Design and Development Laboratory in the Department of 
Design, the campus literary magazine Calvert Review, a biweekly foreign 
and art film series, a junior year abroad program in Nice, a year abroad 
program in Sheffield, and Honors programs in most departments There 
are also special programs in women's studies, comparative literature, and 
the history and philosophy of science 

Preparation in the Arts and Humanities provides valuable background 
for careers in a broad range of fields Students should be aware that there 
have been many eloquent testimonials from leaders of the nation's busi- 
nesses that the skills of oral presentation, written exposition, critical think- 
ing, and analytic problem-solving nurtured in humanities courses are in 
vital demand in business, industry, and government. These skills, critical 
to a successful career in any number of different fields, underlie a certifi- 
cate program, the Liberal Arts in Business, available to Arts and Humani- 
ties majors 

Entrance Requirements. Students wishing to major in one of the creative 
or performing arts are encouraged to seek training in the skills associated 
with such an area pnor to matriculation Students applying for entrance to 
these programs may be required to audition, present slides, or submit a 
portfolio as a part of the admission requirements Admission to programs 
in Design and in Radio, Television and Film is restricted. 

Graduation Requirements. The following college requirements apply only 
to students earning Bachelor of Arts degrees from the College of Arts and 
Humanities These requirements are in addition to or in fulfillment of 
campus and departmental requirements For information concerning the 
Bactielor of Music in the Department of Music and the Bachelor of Science 
in the Department of Design, the student should consult advisors in those 
units 

Distribution 

A minimum of 45 semester hours of the total of 120 must be upper-level 
work (i e , courses numbered 300-499). 

Foreign Language 

Language proficiency may be demonstrated in one of several ways: 

(a) Successful completion of level 4 in one language or level 2 in each of 2 
languages in high school, or 

(b) Successful completion of a 12-credit sequence or of the intermediate 
level in college language courses, or 

(c) Successful completion of a language placement examination in one of 
the campus language departments offering such examinations. 

Students whose native language is not English should see an advisor in 
the College Office of Student Affairs 

Speech 

Successful completion of one of the following courses in speech com- 
munication: SPCH 100. 107. 125. 220. or 230: or 
Successful completion of a full unit of speech in high school (usually a 
year-long course) 



Major Requirements 

All students must complete a program of study consisting of a major (a 
field of concentration) and supporting courses as specified by one of the 
academic units of the college No program of study shall require m excess 
of 60 semester hours Students should consult the unit in which they will 
ma|or for specific details 

Students may choose a ma|or as early as they wish: however, once they 
have earned 56 hours of acceptable credit, they must choose a major 
tiefore their next registration 

A ma|or shall consist, in addition to the lower division departmental 
prerequisites, of 24 to 40 hours, at least 12 of which must be in courses 
numbered 300 or 400 and at least 12 of which must be taken at College 
Park 

Each major program also requires a secondary field of concentration 
(supporting courses) The nature and number of these courses are under 
the controfof the ma)or department 

No grade lower than C may be used to fulfill major or supporting course 
requirements No course for the major or support module may be taken 
Pass-Fail 

Advisors. Freshmen have advisors in the Arts and Humanities College 
Office of Student Affairs (454-2737) who assist them in the selection of 
courses and the choice of a major After selecting a major, students are 
advised by faculty members in the major department and may also con- 
tinue to see advisors in the College Office of Student Affairs For further 
information about advising, students should see the section on advising in 
the Mini-Guide, available from the College Office of Student Affairs 

Degrees and Majors. The College of Arts and Humanities offers the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in the following fields of study 

American Studies 
Art Studio 
Art History 
Classics 

Classical Humanities 

Greek 

Latin 
Comparative Literature 
Dance 
East Asian Languages and Literatures 

Chinese 

Japanese 
English Language and Literature 
French Language and Literature 
German Language and Literature 
History 

Jewish Studies 
Linguistics 
Music 
Philosophy 

Radio. Television, and Film 
Romance Languages 
Russian Language and Literature 
Russian Area Studies 
Spanish Language and Literature 
Speech Communication 
Theatre 

The College of Arts and Humanities offers the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in the following fields of study: 

Advertising Design 
Intenor Design 
Housing 

The College also offers the degree of Bachelor of Music and certificate 
programs in Women's Studies. The Liberal Arts in Business, and East 
Asian Studies 

Internships. Most departments in Arts and Humanities have well-estat)- 
lished internship offerings. Typically, students must complete an applica- 
tion and attach a current academic transcript. Internships are generally for 
one semester of the junior or senior year for students with a good academic 
record. Along with the actual work experience, students do a written 
analysis of the experience. For more information, students should contact 
their major departmental advisor or the College Office of Student Affairs 
(454-2737). 

Certification of High School Teachers. A student who wishes certification 
as a high school teacher in a subject represented in this college must 
consult the College of Education in the second semester of the sophomore 
year. Application for admission to the Teacher Education program is made 
at the time that the first courses in Education are taken Admission to the 
College of Education is selective 



50 College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 



Honors. Departmental Honors Programs are offered in the Departments of 
English, French, German, History, Music, Philosophy, Spanish, and Com 
munication Arts and Theatre Departmental Honors Programs are adminis- 
tered by an Honors Committee within each department Programs and 
policies differ from department to department Admission to a Departmen- 
tal Honors Program ordinarily occurs at the beginning of the first or second 
semester of the student's junior year Students must have a cumulative 
grade point average of at least 3 to be admitted Ivlost departments 
require a comprehensive examination over the field of the major program or 
a thesis On the basis of the student's performance on the Honors Com- 
prehensive Examination and in meeting such other requirements as may 
be set by the Departmental Honors Committee, the faculty may vote to 
recommend the candidate for the appropnate degree with (departmental) 
honors or for the appropriate announcement in the commencement pro- 
gram and citation on the student's academic record and diploma 

In some departments, honors students enjoy certain academic privi- 
leges similar to those of graduate students 

Phi Beta Kappa. Consult the description of Phi Beta Kappa in Chapter 5 of 
this catalog, under "Graduation " 

Research and Service Units 

The Center for Studies in Nineteenth-Century 
Music 

Director: H Robert Cohen 
Associate Director: Luke Jensen 
Research Coordinator: Gaetan tvlartel 

The Center for Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music promotes research 
focusing on nineteenth-century music and musical life The Center's pro- 
grams are designed to facilitate the study, collection editing, indexing, 
and publication of documentary source materials considered invaluable for 
furthenng significant research in this area The Center also promotes 
research focusing on the development of computer programs and laser 
printing techniques which permit both the realization of internationally- 
coordinated scholarly undertakings dealing with immense amounts of doc- 
umentation, and the production of scholarly publications in a camera-ready 
format 

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque 
Studies 

Director: S Schoenbaum 
Executive Director: Adele Seefl 

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies promotes teaching 
and research in the Renaissance and Baroque periods in all disciplines of 
the arts and humanities, as well as in such allied fields as the history and 
philosophy of science. 

Research Center for Arts and l-lumanities 

Acting Director: Calhoun Winton 
Acting Deputy Director: Gregory Staley 
Program Officer: Thomas Moore 

The Research Center for Arts and Humanities promotes advanced 
research, creative activity, and extramural support for projects within the 
College of Arts and Humanities The Center's programs, most of which are 
interdisciplinary in nature, are designed primarily for faculty and graduate 
students These programs bring together faculty and students from vari- 
ous departments, they include "polyseminars, ' public lectures, confer- 
ences, and symposia In addition, the Center awards, on a competitive 
basis, a number of fellowships to both faculty and graduate students each 
year 

Maryland English Institute 

1104 Preinkert Fieldhouse, 454-6545/6 

Director: Palmer 

The Maryland English Institute (MEI) offers special instruction in English 
to University of Maryland students who need to improve their competence 
in the language before they are able to undertake a full program of aca 
demic work Two programs are oflered — a half-time semi-intensive 
course and a full-time intensive course 

Semi-intensive. This program is open only to University of Maryland stu- 
dents, both graduate and undergraduate, who fall within a TOEFL score 
range of 450-549 Candidates in this proficiency range may be admitted to 
the University of Maryland on a provisional basis, requinng them to satis- 
factorily complete the MEI Semi-intensive program in order to become full- 
time students Classes meet two hours per day, five days per week during 



regular terms and (our hours per day, five days per week during Summer 
Session II In addition, students have two hours per week of assigned work 
in the language laboratory The program is designed especially to perfect 
the language skills necessary for academic study at the University of 
Maryland Enrollment is by permission of the director, and no credit is given 
toward any degree at the University. 

Intensive. This full-time English as-a-Foreign Language program is open to 
non native speakers of English who need substantial improvement in their 
English competence before they can undertake any academic study at a 
college or university in the United States On the basis of an entrance 
examination, students will be assigned to classes at their particular profi- 
ciency levels They will have four hours of English language instruction per 
day plus one hour of work in the language laboratory, five days per week 
during the regularly scheduled semester and an eight week summer ses- 
sion The program is intended pnmanly for students who wish to enroll at 
the University of Maryland after completing their language instruction 
However, satisfactory completion of the language program does not guar- 
antee acceptance at the University Enrollment is by permission oT the 
director and no credit is given toward any degree at the University 

COURSE CODE PREFIX — ARHU 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES (BSOS) 

2141 Tydings Hall, 454-5272 

Dean: Murray E Polakoff 

Associate Dean: Stewart L Edelstein 

Assistant Dean for Student Affairs: Katherine Pedro Beardsley 

Assistant Dean for Equity and Recruitment: Diana Ryder Jackson 

Advising and Records Office: 454-2301 

Center for f^inorities in Betiavioral and Social Sciences: 454-4225 

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences is comprised of a 
diverse group of disciplines and fields of study all of which emphasize a 
broad liberal arts education as the foundation for understanding the envi- 
ronmental, social, and cultural forces that shape our world At the heart of 
the behavioral and social sciences is the attempt to understand human 
beings, both individually and in groups Disciplines in the behavioral and 
social sciences use approaches that range from the scientific to the philo- 
sophical, from the experimental to the theoretical Integral to all the disci- 
plines, however, is the development and application of problem solving 
skills, which in combination with other academic skills, enable students to 
think analytically and to communicate clearly and persuasively Students 
interested in human behavior and in solving human and social problems 
will find many exciting opportunities through the programs and courses 
offered by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

The College is composed of the following major programs that lead to 
the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree, as appropriate: 

Afro-American Studies Program' 

Department of Anthropology 

Department of Economics 

Department of Geography 

Department of Government and Politics 

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Department of Psychology 

Department of Sociology 

Institute for Urban Studies 

Institute of Criminal Justice and Cnminology 

•The Afro American Studies Program also offers an undergraduate certificate 
requiring 21 semester hours of coursework (see the chapter on departments 
and campus wide programs in this catalog) 

Entrance Requirements. Requirements for admission to the College are 
the same as the requirements for admission to the University 

Advising. 

Coordinators 

Location 
Phone 



Lola Hillman and Gen Scholl 
2115 Tydings Hall 
454 2301 



The BSOS Undergraduate Advising Office coordinates advismo ar>d 
maintains student records for BSOS students Advisors are availarae to 
provide information concerning University requirements and regulations, 
transfer credit evaluations, and other general information at>out the Univer- 
sity by making same day appointments given on a walk-in basis from 9am 
to 4 p m daily 

Undergraduate advisors for each undergraduate major are kx»ted in 
the department offices These advisors are available to assist students in 
selecting courses and educational experiences in their major area of study 
consistent with major requirements and students' educational goals 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 51 



Graduation Requirements. Each student must complete a minimum of 120 
hours of credit with at least a 20 cumulative average Courses must 
include the credits required in the University Studies Program, and the 
specific ma|or and supporting course and grade requirements of the pro- 
grams in the academic departments offering baccalaureate degrees 

All students are urged to sp)eak with an academic advisor in the College 
Advising Office at least two semesters before graduation lo review their 
academic progress and discuss final graduation requirements 

Honors. Undergraduate honors are offered to graduating students in the 
Departments of Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Government and 
Politics, Psychology, and Sociology, and in the Institutes of Criminology 
and Cnminal Justice and Urban Studies 

Dean's Scholars. This is the highest academic award that a BSOS stu- 
dent can earn in the College Dean Scholars are those graduating seniors 
who have completed 90 credits at UMCP and have maintained a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 3 800 

Special Resources and Opportunities. 

The Center for Minorities in the Behavioral and 
Social Sciences 

Director Miriam Langa (Acting) 
Location: 2201 LeFrak Hall 
Phone: 454-4225 

The Center for Minorities provides academic and other support ser- 
vices designed specifically to meet the needs of minority students in the 
College The Center provides advising on academic and other concerns 
related to students progress at the University; provides referrals, when 
appropriate, to other campus offices; and sponsors workshops and related 
activities on issues of particular relevance to minonty students Advisors 
are available on a walk-in basis and by appointment 

7776 Maryland Project for Women and Politics 

Director: Georgia Sorenson 
Location: 2169 LeFrak Hall 
Phone: 454-6682 

This project was initiated in 1987 to foster and expand the participation 
of women in the political process Closely affiliated with each of the 
academic departments in the College, the project has established intern- 
ships and fellowships with the Maryland women senators and delegates, 
the Women Legislators of Maryland and the Office of the Governor, Lt 
Governor and Cabinet members The Capitol Hill Program places two 
students with each member of the Maryland delegation, and a Fellow with 
the Congressional Caucus for Women's issues Other components of the 
project include seminars, training, technical assistance and prominent 
speakers related to women and leadership and the political process An 
interactive computer link with the project and the Women Legislators of 
Maryland has been initiated to strengthen the ties between policy makers 
and faculty and students conducting research on gender issues. 

The BSS Computer Laboratory 

Director: Robert Bennett 
Location: 0221 LeFrak Hall 
Phone: 454-3924 

The College believes strongly that the study of behavioral and social 
sciences should incorporate both quantitative analysis and computational 
skills Consequently, curricula in most departments require some cour- 
sework in statistics, quantitative research methods, and the use of com- 
puters The BSS Computer Laboratory provides undergraduate students 
in the College with the facilities and staff assistance to satisfy a wide range 
of computer-related needs The Laboratory's facilities include 150 fully 
networked computers, 40 fully networked terminals, a Prime 9650 mini- 
computer, 4 Micro-Vax computers, a substantial number of graphics termi- 
nals and peripheral equipment, and full access to campus UNISYS and IBM 
mainframe computers. The Laboratory operates eight computer class- 
room facilities and a special purpose graphics lab which are available for 
both in and out-of-class student use. 

Field Experiences/Pre-professional and Profes- 
sional Training 

Pre-professional training and professional opportunities in the behav- 
ioral and social sciences are available in many fields The Department of 
Hearing and Speech Sciences offers training for students interested in 
careers as speech pathologists Students interested in urban planning will 
find academic and professional training through courses offered by the 
Institute for Urban Studies, the Department of Geography, and the Afro- 



American Studies Program Students may choose government and polit- 
ics, criminal justice and criminology, or sociology for preparation for 
careers in the law and related fields The internship programs offered by 
many departments in the College provide students with practical experi 
ence working in governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, corpora 
tions, and the specialized research centers and laboratories of the College 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities 

Undergraduate research internships allow qualified undergraduate stu- 
dents to work with research laboratory directors and faculty in depart- 
ments and specialized research centers, thus giving the student a chance 
for a unique experience in the design and conduct of research and scholar- 
ship. Students are advised to consult with their department advisors on 
research opportunities available in the major 

Student Organizations and Honor Societies 

Students who excel in their academic discipline may be selected for 
membership in an honorary society Honorariesioi which students in BSS 
are chosen include; 



Alpha Kappa Delta 
Alpha Phi Sigma 
Lambda Epsilon Gamma 
Omega Delta Epsilon 
Pi Sigma Alpha 
Psi Chi 



Sociology 
Criminal Justice 
Law 

Economics 
Political Sciences 
Psychology 



Dean's List: Any student who has passed at least twelve hours of aca 
demic work in the preceding semester, without failure of any course and 
with an overall average grade of at least 3.5 will be placed on the Dean's 
List of Distinguished Students. 

Students who major in the Behavioral and Social Sciences have a wide 
range of interests The following is a list of student organizations in the 
disciplines and fields of the Behavioral and Social Sciences; 

student Organizations: Academic Interests 

Anthropology Student Organization 

o Conservation Club 

o Criminal Justice Student Association 

Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 

Minority Pre-Professional Psychology Society 

Pre-Medical Society (Pre Med'Psychology Majors) 

o Thurgood Marshall Pre-Law Society 

For more information about these student organizations or starting a 
new student group, please contact the Office of Campus Activities at 454- 
5605 or by visiting 1191 Adele H Stamp Student Union 

Research and Service Units 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research 

Director: John Cumberland 
Location: 4118 Tydings Hall 
Phone: 454-2303 

The functions of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research are 
research, education, and public service The research activities of the 
Bureau are primarily focused on basic research and applied research in the 
fields of regional, urban, public finance, and environmental studies. 
Although the Bureau's long-run research program is carried out largely by 
Its own staff, faculty members from other departments also participate. 
The Bureau also undertakes cooperative research programs with the spon- 
sorship of Federal and State governmental agencies, research founda- 
tions, and other groups 

The educational functions of the Bureau are achieved through active 
participation by advanced graduate and undergraduate students in the 
Bureau's research program. This direct involvement of students in the 
research process under faculty supervision assists students in their 
degree programs and provides research skills that equip students for 
responsible posts in business, government and higher education. 

The Bureau fulfills its service responsibilities to governments, business, 
and private groups primarily through the publication and distribution of its 
research findings In addition, the Bureau staff welcomes the opportunity 
to be of service to governmental and civic groups by consulting with them 
on problems, especially in the fields of regional and urban economic devel- 
opment and forecasting. State and local public finance, and environmental 
management. 

Center for International Development and Conflict 
Management 

Director: Edward Azar 



52 College of Business and Management 



Location: 2nd floor Mill Building 
Phone: 454-2506 

The Center for International Development and Conflict f^^anagement is 
a research center focusing on the management and resolution of pro- 
tracted conflict in the world today. Established in 1981, the Center has a 
staff composed of University faculty visiting fellows and associates 
involved in study of contemporary international and intercommunal con- 
flicts — their causes, dynamics, management strategies and peaceful 
resolution. 

Industrial Relations and Labor Studies Center 

Director: Paul Weinstein 
Location: 4106 Tydings Hall 
Phone: 454-5235 

The Industrial Relations and Labor Studies Center was organized in 
1978 at UMCP and is concerned with two kinds of activity The first is 
interdisciplinary research directed primarily toward the study of labor- 
management relations, employment, wages and related problems, the 
labor market, occupational safety and health, comparative studies and 
human resources problems The Center draws on the expertise and inter- 
ests of faculty from the College of Business and Management, the School 
of Law, and the Departments of Economics, History, Psychology, Sociol- 
ogy, and Health Education The second mam activity consists of educa- 
tional projects serving management, unions, the public, and other groups 
interested in industrial relations and labor-related activities These projects 
consist of public lectures, conferences, and symposia as well as non-credit 
courses 

Survey Research Center 

Director: Susan Dowden (Acting) 
Location: 1103 Art-Sociology Building 
Phone: 454-6800 

The Survey Research Center was created in 1980 as a college-wide 
research facility within the behavioral and social sciences The Center 
specializes in the design of questionnaires and the conduct of surveys for 
policy purposes, and has the capacity to conduct mmi-surveys. survey 
experiments, and in-depth clinical interviews. The Center annually con- 
ducts the Maryland Poll, a sampling of public opinion across the State on 
important issues to Maryland citizens; it also conducts periodic surveys of 
the Baltimore-Washington region and shares results of these surveys 
nationally through the Network of State Polls The Center provides assis- 
tance to researchers in sample design, has technical expertise on the 
storage, manipulation, and analysis of very large data sets, and provides 
support services to archive and maintain such data sets. 

The Center supports undergraduate and graduate education by provid- 
ing both technical training and practical experience to students Also, the 
Center has a strong community service mission through the provision of 
technical assistance on survey methods and survey design to units of state 
and local governments, and by conducting surveys on a contract or grant 
basis for these governmental units 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND 
MANAGEMENT (BMGT) 

Office of Undergraduate Studies: 2136 Tyd- 
ings Hall, 454-4314 

Professor and Dean: Rudolph P Lamone 
Professor and Associate Dean: Leete 
Assistant Dean and Director of EDP: Stocker 
Assistant Dean for External Relations: Kelly 
Professor and Director of Doctoral Program: Preston 
Director of the Masters ' Programs: Waikart 
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Mattingly 
Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies: Stuart 
Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies: Zager 

The College of Business and Management recognizes the importance 
of education in business and management to economic, social, and profes- 
sional development through profit and nonprofit organizations at the local 
regional, and national levels The faculty of the College have been selected 
from the leading doctoral programs in business They are scholars, teach 
ers. and professional leaders with a commitment to superior education in 
business and management The College of Business and Management is 
one of two business schools in Maryland accredited by the American 
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the official national accredit- 
ing organization for business schools 



The College has faculty specializing in accounting, finance, decision 
and information sciences, management science and statistics, manage 
ment and organization, marketing, and transportation, business and public 
policy 

Degrees. The University confers the following degrees on students sue 
cessfully completing programs of study in the College Bachelor of Science 
(B S ), Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of Science 
(MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph D ) Each candidate for a degree must 
file in the Office of Records and Registrations by the end of the Schedule 
Adjustment Period, a formal application for a degree Information concern 
ing admission to the MBA or M S program is available from the College's 
Director of the Masters' Programs 

Undergraduate Program. The undergraduate program recognizes the 
need for professional education in business and management based on a 
foundation in the liberal arts Modern society comprises intricate business. 
economic, social, and government institutions requinng a large number of 
men and women trained to be effective and responsible managers The 
College regards its program leading to the Bachelor of Science in busir>ess 
and management as one of the most important ways it serves this need 

A student in business and management selects a major in one of 
several curricula; (1) Accounting. (2) Decision and Information Sciences. 
(3) Finance, (4) General Business and Management; (5) Management Sci- 
ence; (6) Marketing, (7) Personnel and Labor Relations, (8) Production 
Management. (9) Statistics, and (10) Transportation For students inter- 
ested in law as a career there is a combined business and law program 
The Bachelor of Science degree in one of the at>ove curricula is awarded 
after ninety semester hours and one year at the University of Maryland 
School of Law (See specific requirements at the end of the curricula 
section to follow ) 

Students interested in insurance, real estate, or international business 
may plan with their advisors to select elective courses to meet their spe- 
cialized needs, however, this interest is in addition to completion of one of 
the above majors (See specific suggestions at the end of curricula section 
to follow.) 

Academic Advising. General advisement in the College of Business and 

Management is available Monday through Friday in the Office of Under- 
graduate Studies in Room 2136. Tydings Hall (454-4314) It is recom- 
mended that students visit this office each semester to ensure that they 
are informed about current requirements and procedures Student 
problems concerning advising should be directed to the Director of Under- 
graduate Studies 

Transfer students entenng the University can be advised during spring, 
summer, and fall transfer orientation programs Contact the Orientation 
Office for further information (454-5752) 

Entrance Requirements. Admission to the College of Business and Man 
agement is on a competitive basis for undergraduates at the junior level, 
except for a small number of academically talented freshmen In order to 
be admitted as a junior, an applicant must have earned at least fifty-six 
semester credits, completed the required pre-busmess courses (i e . fresh- 
man-sophomore core requirements), and meet the competitive cumulative 
grade point average (GPA) in effect for the academic year This GPA will 
always be greater than 2 3 (on 4 scale), however, for Fall 1988 Spring 
1 989 this competitive cumulative GPA was set at 2 9 Competitive GPA for 
academic year 1989-90 will be determined in March 1989 In addition to all 
UMCP coursework, all courses from other colleges count toward the com- 
putation of the cumulative GPA for Business College admission regardless 
of whether the courses have been accepted for transfer credit to UMCP 

Statement of Policy on Transfer of Credit from Community Colleget. 

The College of Business and Management subscrit)es to the policy that a 
student's undergraduate program below the junior year should include no 
advanced, professional level courses This policy is based on the convic- 
tion that the value derived from these advanced courses is nnatenally 
enhanced when based upon a sound foundation in the liberal arts 

In adhering to the atwve policy, it is the practice of the College of 
Business and Management to accept in transfer from a regionally accred- 
ited community college no more than twelve semester hours of tjusiness 
administration courses The twelve semester hours of business adminis- 
tration acceptable in transfer are sp>ecifically identified as three semester 
hours in an introductory business course, three semester hours m txjsir>ess 
statistics, and six semester hours of elementary accounting Thus, it is 
anticipated that students transferring from another regionally accredited 
institution will have devoted the major share of their academic effort t)elow 
the junior year to the completion of basic requirements in the liberal arts A 
total of sixty semester hours may be transferred from a community college 
and applied toward a degree from the College of Business and 
Management 

Statement of Policy on the Transfer of Credits from Other Inatttutions. 

The College of Business and Management normally accepts transfer cred- 
its from regionally accredited four year institutions Junior and senior level 
business courses are accepted from colleges accredited by the American 
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) Junior and senior 



College of Business and Management 53 



level business courses from other than AACSB accredited schools are 
evaluated on a courseby course basis to determine transferability 

Summary of Bachelor ol Science Degree Requirements (all curricula).At 

least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academic work required for 
graduation must be in business and management subjects A minimum ol 
fifty-seven hours of the required 120 hours must be in 300 or 400 level 
courses These fifty-seven hours of upper level credits may not be 
attempted without special permission until a student has earned a mini 
mum of fifty-six credits In addition to the requirement of an overall cumula 
tive grade point average of 2 (C average) in all College Park coursework. 
an average of C in business and management subjects is required for 
graduation in all majors except Accounting Accounting majors must earn a 
"C" or better in the nine required Accounting courses, effective with Fall 
1986 matriculation Eleclives outside the ten curricula of the College may 
be taken in any department of the University, if the student has the neces- 
saryprerequisites Business courses taken as electives may not be taken 
on a pass/fail basis by students of the College of Business and 
Management 

Freshman-Sophomore Core Requirements Credit Hours 

MATH 220 or 140" (AND 141*) 3 (8) 

BMGT 220 and 221 6 

BMGT 230 (23r) 3 

ECON 201 and 203 6 

SPCH 100 or 107 _3 

Total 21 (26) 

■Required lor Decision and Information Sciences. Management Science, and 
Statistics curricula 

Junior-Senior Core Requirements BMGT 301 • Intro, to 
Data Processing (junior standing recom- 
mended) 3 

BMGT 340 - Business Finance {Prerequisite BMGT 221 

and 230) 3 

BMGT 350, Marketing Pnnclples and Organization (Pre- 
requisite ECON 203) 3 

BMGT 364, Management and Organizational Theory (jun- 
ior standing recommended) 3 

BMGT 380, Business Law (junior standing recommended) 3 

BMGT 495 or 495A, Business Policies (open ONLY to 

seniors) 3 

Economics (see below) _6 

Total 24 



Economics Requirements 

Finance Curriculum ECON 430 or ECON 431, AND one course from 
ECON 305, 306, 402, 440 or 450 

General Business and Management Curriculum: One course from 
ECON 305, 306. 430, or 440, AND one course from an approved list of 
ECON, GEOG. PSYC, or SOCY courses. The approved list is available 
in the Undergraduate Studies Office. College of Business and 
Management 

All other curncula One course from ECON 305, 306. 430 or 440. AND 
one of the following courses; ECON 311. 315, 316. 317. 361. 370, 374, 
375, 380 or any 400 level ECON course except 422. 423. or 425 

Junior-Senior Major Curriculum Concentration 

Refer to specific Curriculum section which follows. Accountingand Deci- 
sion and Information Sciences majors take 21 semester 

hours) 15-18(21) 

Total 15-18(21) 

University Studies Program (USPs) 

Fundamental Studies 

Freshman Composition (ENGL 101*) 3 

Upper Level Composition (ENGL 391. 392. 393. 394. 

395**) 3 

Distributive Studies 

Area A (minimum 2 courses) 6 

Area B (Lab Science only) 4 

Area C (must be from 2 different departments) 6 

Advanced Studies (must be from two different departments outside 
your major or majors): 

Development of Knowledge (not EDMS 451) 3 

Analysis of Human Problems (not CNEC 437) _3 

Total'" 28 

' Students exempt from ENGL 101 may take a three-credit elective of any level 
in Its place 

** Students exempt from ENGL 391. 392. etc. must take a three credit 
upper level elective in its place 



*** Students with an approved three-credit lab science course or a four- 
credit Area A USP course may change the USP total (above) and the 
elective total (below) accordingly 

Electives 

All Finance majors are required to have one three-credit BMGT elective in 
order to fulfill 45 hours in business NOTE: All students, except Account- 
ing and Decision and Information Sciences majors, who matriculated prior 
to Fall 1986. must have one three-credit BMGT elective 

The remaining electives must bring the degree total to 120 semester hours 
The student must have sufficient upper level electives to bring the total 
upper level courses (300 and 400 level) to fifty-seven semester hours 

Grand Total 120 



A Typical Program for the Freshman and Sophomore Years. 

Freshman Year 

USPs and/or electives 

English 101 or equivalent 

MATH 002**. 1 15, or 220 (or 140*) 

First semester total 

USPs and/or electives 

SPCH 100 or 107 

MATH 115, (141*), 220 or elective 

Second semester total 



Credit Hours 
9 (8) 
3 
_3 (4) 

15 

9 (8) 

3 
J (4) 
15 



Sophomore Year 

USPs and/or electives 6 

BMGT 220 (Prereq. Sophomore Standing) 3 

ECON 201 (Prereq Sophomore Standing) 3 

MATH 220 or BMGT 230 (231*) or elective _3 

Third semester total 15 

USPs and/or electives 6 

ECON 203 (Prereq ECON 201) 3 

BMGT 221 (Prereq. BMGT 220) 3 

BMGT 230 (Prereq. MATH 220 ) or 231* (Prereq MATH 

141) or elective _3 

Fourth semester total 15 

* Required for Decision and Information Sciences. Management Science, and 
Statistics curricula 

** MATH 002 IS a non-credit course which prepares a student for either 1 15 or 
220 depending on the grade earned in 002. 

CURRICULA 
Accounting 

Chair: S Loeb 

Professors: Gordon. S Loeb 

Associate Professors: Bedmgfield. Edelson. M Loeb 

Assistant Professors: Huss, Jang, Schick 

Lecturers: Harris, Zieha 

Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, classification, and 
recording of financial events and the reporting of the results of such events 
for an organization In a broader sense. Accounting consists of all financial 
systems for planning, controlling and appraising performance of an organi- 
zation Accounting includes among its many facets: financial planning, 
budgeting, accounting systems, financial management controls, financial 
analysis of performance, financial reporting, internal and external auditing, 
and taxation 

The Accounting curriculum provides an educational foundation for 
careers in Accounting and other management areas whether in private 
business organizations, government and non-profit agencies, or public 
accounting firms 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Accounting are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 310. 31 1 - Intermediate Accounting I and II 6 

BMGT 321 ■ Cost Accounting 3 

BMGT 323 - Income Tax Accounting ... 3 

Three of the following courses: _9 

BMGT 326 - Accounting Systems 

BMGT 410 - Fund Accounting 

BMGT 417 - Advanced Tax Accounting 

BMGT 420. 421 - Undergraduate Accounting Seminar 

BMGT 422 - Auditing Theory and Practice 

BMGT 424 - Advanced Accounting 

BMGT 426 - Advanced Cost Accounting 

BMGT 427 - Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice 

Total 21 



54 College of Business and Management 



The educational requitemenis ot the Maryland State Board of Account- 
ancy for certification are a baccalaureate or liigher degree with a nnajor in 
Accounting or with a non-accounting degree supplemented by coursework 
the Board determines to be substantially the equivalent o( an Accounting 
major Students planning to take the CPA examination for certification and 
licensing should determine the educational requirements for that stale and 
arrange their program accordingly 

Decision and Information Sciences 

Chair: Hevner 

Professor. Yao 

Associate Professor Hevner 

Assistant Professors: Ahad. Basu, Raschid 

Computer-based information systems are an integral part of nearly all 
businesses, large and small Decision and Information Sciences provides 
the data processing skills, the managerial and organizational skills, and the 
analytical skills required to design and manage business Information 
processing systems This program gives the student a firm basis in the 
business functional areas fvlarkeling. Finance, Production, and Account- 
ing In addition it provides an in-depth knowledge of information process- 
ing technology, information processing implementation techniques, and 
Management Science and Statistics These skills furnish the student with 
the expertise to analyze business problems both qualitatively and quantita- 
tively, to propose computer based solutions, and to implement those solu- 
tions There are many diverse employment opportunities available to grad- 
uates of this program The typical |ob areas include application 
proqrammer/analyst, systems analyst, and computer system marketing 
analyst Such positions are available in both large and small corporations, 
management consulting firms, and government agencies 

Students planning a major in this field must complete MATH 140 and 
141 prior to junior standing Students considering graduate work in this 
field should complete MATH 240 or 400 as early as possible in their careers 
It IS recommended that for the upper level English composition require- 
ment students choose ENGL 393 - Technical Writing or ENGL 394 - Busi- 
ness Writing, 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
the Decision and Information Sciences are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 302 - Information Systems Implementation Techniques 3 

BMGT 402 - Database and Data Communication Systems 3 

BMGT 403 - Systems Analysis 3 

BMGT 404 - Seminar in Decision Support Systems 3 

BMGT 430 - Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 434 - Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 435 - Introduction to Applied Probability Models _3 

Total 21 

Finance 

Chair Bradford 

Professors: Bradford, Chen, Haslem, Kolodny 
Associate Professors: Edmister. Eun 
Assistant Professors: Chang, Soubra, Unal 

The Finance curriculum is designed to familianze the student with the 
institutions, theory, and practice involved in the allocation of financial 
resources within the pnvate sector, especially the firm It is also designed 
to incorporate foundation study in such related disciplines as economics 
and the quantitative areas 

The Finance curriculum provides an educational foundation for careers 
involving financial analysis and management, investment analysis and 
portfolio management, investment banking, insurance and nsk manage- 
ment, banking and international finance: it also provides a foundation for 
graduate study in business administration, quantitative areas, economics, 
and law 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Finance are as follows 

Credit Hours 



BMGT 343 • Investments 

One of the following courses 

BMGT 332 Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 434 - Introduction to Optimization Theory 

Two of the following courses 

BMGT 440 - Financial Management 

BMGT 445 - Commercial Bank Management 

BMGT 443 Security Analysis and Valuation 

BMGT 444 - Futures Contracts and Options (Any combination 

except 443 and 444) 
One of the following courses (check prerequisites): 
BMGT 302 - Information Systems Implementation Techniques 
BMGT 430 - Linear Statistical Models in Business 
BMGT 431 - Design of Statistical Expenmenis in Business 
BMGT 433 • Statistical Decision Theory in Business 



BMGT 435 • Introduction to Applied Probability Models 

MATH 221/141 or higher advanced MATH 

Total 



15 



Management and Organization 

Chair Locke" 

Professors: Bartol+. Carroll. Gannon, Levine. Locke. Sims 
Associate Professors: Gupta. Olian. Power, Taylor 
Assistant Professors: Premack. Smith 

■Joint with Psychology 
-^DlStlngulShed Scholar Teacher 

Personnel and Labor Relations. Personnel Administration has to do with 
the direction of human effort It is concerned with securing, maintaining 
and utilizing an effective work force People professionally trained in 
Personnel Administration find career opportunities in business, in govern- 
ment, in educational institutions, and in charitable and other organizations 
Course requirements for the junior-seniof curriculum in Personnel arxJ 
Labor Relations are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 360 Personnel Management 3 

BMGT 362 - Labor Relations 3 

BMGT 460 - Personnel Management-Analysis & Problems 3 

BMGT 462 - Labor Legislation 3 

BMGT 464 - Organizational Behavior 3 

One of the following courses (check prerequisites) _3 

BMGT 385 - Production Management 

BMGT 467 - Undergraduate Seminar in Personnel Management 

GVPT 41 1 - Public Personnel Administration 

JOUR 330 - Public Relations 

PSYC 361 • Survey of Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

PSYC 451 - Pnnciples of Psychological Testing 

PSYC 452 - Psychology of Individual Differences 

SOCY 447 ■ Small Group Analysis 

SOCY 462 - Industrial Sociology 

Total 18 

Management Science and Statistics 

Chair Golden 

Professors: Assad. Ball, Bodin, Gass, Golden, Kolz-f. Lamone 

Associate Professors: Alt, Fromovitz, Widhelm 

Assistant Professor Ahn 

■fOistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

In the Management Science and Statistics curriculum, the student fias 
the option of concentrating primarily in Management Science. Production 
Management, or Statistics 

Management Science. Management Science (operations research) is the 
application of scientific methods to decision problems, especially Xtose 
involving the control of organized man-machine systems, to provide solu- 
tions that best serve the goals and objectives of the organization as a 
whole Practitioners in this field are employed in industry business, and 
federal, state, and local governments Students planning to major in this 
field must complete MATH 140 and 141 prior to junior standinq Students 
considenng graduate work in this field should complete MATH 240 and 24 1 
as early as possible in their careers 

Course requirements for ttie junior-senior cumculum concentration in 
the Management Science are as follows 

Credit Hours 
3 



BMGT 430 
BMGT 434 
BMGT 435 
BMGT 436 

Two of the 
BMGT 385 
BMGT 432 
BMGT 433 
BMGT 438 

BMGT 485 
BMGT 402 
BMGT 403 
Total 



Linear Statistical Models m Business 
Introduction to Optimization Theory 
Introduction to Applied ProtMtJility Models 
Applications of Mathematical Programming in Man- 
agement Science 
following courses (check prerequisites) 
Production Management 

Sample Survey Design tor Business and Economics 
Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
Topics in Statistical Analysis for Business and Man- 
agement 

Advanced Production Management 
Database and Data Communication Systems 
Systems Analysis 



18 



Production Management This curriculum is designed to acquaint the 
student with the problems of organization and control in the field of Produc- 
tion Management Theory and practice with reference to organization, 
policies, methods, processes, and techniques are surveyed, analyzed, and 
evaluated 



College of Business and Management 55 



Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration In 
Production Management are as follows: 

Credit Hours 
BMGT 321 • Cost Accounting 3 

BMGT 360 Personnel (Management 3 

BMGT 385 ■ Production Management 3 

BMGT 485 Advanced Production Management 3 

Two of the following courses (check prerequisites) j6 

BMGT 433 Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

BMGT 453 - Industrial Marketing 

BMGT 362 Labor Relations 

BMGT 332 ■ Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 372 ■ Traffic and Physical Dislnbution Management 

Total 18 

Statistics. Statistics consists of a body of methods for utilizing probability 
theory in decisionmaking processes Important statistical activities ancil- 
lary to the decision-making process are the systematizatlon of quantitative 
data and the measurement of variability Some specialized areas within 
the field of statistics are: sample surveys, forecasting, quality control, 
design of experiment, Bayesian decision processes, actuarial statistics, 
and data processing Statistical methods, such as, sample survey tech- 
niques, are widely used in accounting, marketing, industrial management, 
and government applications An aptitude for applied mathematics and a 
desire to understand and apply scientific methods to significant problems 
are important prerequisites for the statistician Students planning to major 
in statistics must take MATH 140 and 141 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration In 
Statistics are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 430 - Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 432 • Sample Survey Design for Business and Economics 3 

BMGT 434 - Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 438 ■ Topics in Statistical Analysis for Business and Man- 
agement 3 

Two of the following courses (check prerequisites): _6 

BMGT 385 - Production Management 
BMGT 433 - Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
BMGT 435 - Introduction to Applied Probability Models 
BMGT 436 - Applications of Mathematical Programming in Man- 
agement Science 
BMGT 450 - Marketing Research Methods 
Total 18 

Marketing 

Chair: Durand 

Professors: Durand, Greer, Jolson 
Associate Professors: Biehal, Krapfel, Nickels 
Assistant Professors: Calfee, Stephens 
Lecturers: Ali, Seshadrl, Stocker 

Marketing, the study of exchange activities. Involves the functions 
performed in getting foods and services from producers to users Career 
opportunities exist In manufacturing, wholesaling, retailing, service organi- 
zations, government, and non-profit organizations and include sales 
administration, marketing research, advertising, merchandising, physical 
distribution, and product management Students preparing for work in 
marketing research are advised to elect additional courses in Management 
Science and Statistics 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Marketing are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 451 - Consumer Analysis 3 

BMGT 452 - Marketing Research Methods 3 

BMGT 457 - Marketing Policies and Strategies 3 

Three of the following courses (check prerequisites): _9 

BMGT 332 - Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 353 - Retail Management 

BMGT 354 - Promotion Management 

BMGT 372 • Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 

BMGT 431 - Design of Statistical Experiments in Business 

BMGT 453 - Industrial Marketing 

BMGT 454 - International Marketing 

BMGT 455 - Sales Management 

BMGT 456 - Advertising 

Total 18 

Transportation, Business, and Public Policy 

Chair: Corsi 

Professors: Leete, Preston, Roberts (emeritus) Simon, Taff (emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Corsi, Polst 



Assistant Professors: Gnmm, Maltingly (affiliate). Scheraga, Windle 
Lecturers: Beach, Dresner, Scoff 

Transportation. This curriculum involves the movement of persons and 
goods in the satisfaction of human needs The curriculum in Transporta- 
tion includes an analysis o1 the services and management problems, such 
as pricing, financing, and organization, of the five modes of transport — air, 
motor, pipelines, railroads and water — and covers the scope and regula- 
tion of transportation in our economy The effective management of trans- 
portation involves a study of the components of physical distribution and 
the interaction of procurement, the level and control of inventories, ware- 
housing, material handling, transportation, and data processing The cur- 
riculum in Transportation is designed to prepare students to assume 
responsible positions with carriers, governmental agencies, and in traffic 
and physical distribution management in industry 

Course requirements for the junior senior curriculum concentration in 
Transportation are as follows 

Credit Hours 
BMGT 370 - Principles of Transportation 3 

BMGT 372 - Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 3 

BMGT 470 - Carrier Management 3 

BMGT 476 - Applied Computer Models in Transportation and 

Logistics 3 

One of the following courses: _3 

BMGT 473 Advanced Transportation Problems 
BMGT 475 ■ Advanced Logistics Management 

One of the following courses 3 

BMGT 332 - Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 454 - International Marketing 

BMGT 473 or 475 (depending on choice above) 

BMGT 474 ■ Urban Transportation and Development 

BMGT 477 - International Transportation and Logistics 

BMGT 481 - Public Utilities 

BMGT 482 - Business and Government 

Total 18 

General Curriculum in Business and Management. The General Curricu- 
lum Is designed for those who desire a broader course of study in business 
and management than offered in the other College curricula. The General 
Curnculum is appropriate for example, for those who plan to enter small 
business management or entrepreneurship where general knowledge of 
the various fields of study may be preferred to a more specialized curncu- 
lum concentration 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
General Business and Management are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

Accounting/Finance 

One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 321 - Cost Accounting 
BMGT 440 ■ Financial Management 
Management Science/Statistics 

One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 332 - Operations Research for Management Decisions 
BMGT 385 - Production Management 
BMGT 431 ■ Design of Statistical Experiments in Business 
BMGT 433 - Statistical Decision Theory in Business Marketing 

One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 353 - Retail Management or a higher number marketing 

course (check prerequisites) 
Personnel/Labor Relations 

One of the following courses 3 

BMGT 360 ■ Personnel Management 
BMGT 362 - Labor Relations 
Public Policy 

One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 481 - Public Utilities 

BMGT 482 - Business and Government 

Transportation/Physical Distribution 

One of the following courses: _3 

BMGT 370 ■ Principles of Transportation 

BMGT 372 • Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 

Total 18 

Business and Law, Combined Program. The College of Business and 
Management offers a combined business-law curriculum in which the stu- 
dent completes three years in the chosen curriculum concentration in the 
College and a fourth year of work at the University of Maryland School of 
Law Admission to the law school is contingent on meeting the applicable 
standards of the school Individual students are responsible for securing 
from the law school its current admission requirements The student must 
complete all the courses required of students in the College, except BMGT 
380 and BMGT 495 This means the student must complete all the pre- 
business courses: both upper level ECON courses: BMGT 301. 340, 350, 
and 364, all lower level and upper level USP requirements, the 15 to 21 
hours in the students specific business major: and enough additional 
electlves to equal a minimum of ninety semester hours, thirty of which must 



56 College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 



be numbered 300 or above No business law course can be included in the 
ninety tiours The last thirty hours of college work before entering law 
school must be completed in residence at College Park 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred by the College upon 
students who complete the first year in the law school with an average 
grade of "C" or better. 

Insurance and Real Estate. Students interested in insurance or real estate 
may wish to concentrate in Finance or General Business and Management 
and plan with their advisors a group of electives to meet their specialized 
needs College courses that are occasionally offered in insurance; 

BMGT 34b • Property and Liability Insurance 

BMGT 346 • Risk lylanagement 

BMGT 347 ■ Life Insurance 

College courses that are occasionally offered in real estate: 
BI^GT 393 ■ Real Estate Principles 
BMGT 490 - Urban Land Management 

Institutional Management. Students interested in hotel-motel manage 
ment or hospital administration must fulfill one of the ten majors such as 
General Business and Management, Finance, or Personnel and Labor Rela- 
tions and then plan with their advisors a group of electives, such as the 
following: 

BMGT 440 - Financial Management 

BMGT 482 - Business and Government 

FSAD 300 - Food Service Organization and Management 

International Business. Students interested in international business must 
fulfill one of the ten majors, such as Marketing, Finance, Transportation, or 
General Business and Management, and then plan with their advisors 
courses such as these below while selecting their ECON, USP Advanced 
Studies, and elective courses: 

BMGT 392 - International Business 

ECON 440 ■ International Economics 

GVPT 300 ■ International Political Relations 

GVPT 402 - International Law 

GVPT 457 - Amencan Foreign Relations and courses related to spe- 
cific geographic areas. 

Honor Societies. 

Beta Alpha Psi. National scholastic and professional honorary fraternity in 
accounting Members are elected on the basis of excellence in scholarship 
and professional service from junior and senior students majoring in 
accounting in the College of Business and Management 
Beta Gamma Sigma. National scholastic honorary society in business 
administration To be eligible students must rank in the upper five percent 
of their junior class or the upper ten percent of their senior class in the 
College of Business and Management Students are eligible the semester 
after they have earned forty-five credits on the College Park Campus, and 
have earned a total of seventy-five credits. 

Financial Management Association Honorary Society. National scholastic 
honorary society sponsored by the Financial Management Association To 
be eligible students must be finance majors with a cumulative grade point 
average of 3.5 for a minimum of ninety credits 

Omega Rho. National scholastic honorary society in operations research, 
management and related areas Members are elected on the basis of 
excellence in scholarship from junior and senior students majoring in 
appropriate quantitative areas 

Pi Sigma Phi. National scholastic honorary society sponsored by the 
Propeller Club of the United States Membership is elected from outstand- 
ing senior members of the University of Maryland chapter of the Propeller 
Club majoring in transportation in the College of Business and 
Management 

Student Awards. For high academic achievement, students in the college 
may receive recogition by the Dean's List; Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key, 
Distinguished Accounting Student Awards: and Wall Street Journal Stu- 
dent Achievement Award 

Scholarships. The college offers several scholarships, including the AIAC 
C J "Bud' Ecalono Memorial Scholarship #16. Alcoa Foundation Traffic 
Scholarship; Delta Nu Alpha Chesapeake Chapter No 23 Scholarship; 
Delta Nu Alpha Washington. D C Chapter No 84 Scholarship. Geico 
Achievement Award; William F Holm Scholarship: National Defense Trans- 
portation Association Scholarship Washington, D C Chapter; Propeller 
Club Scholarship; Warren Reed Scholarship (Accounting). Jack B Sacks 
Foundation Scholarship (marketing); Charles A Taff Scholarship (transpor- 
tation); and William and Carolyn Witzel Scholarship 

Student Professional Organizations. Students may choose to associate 

themselves with one or more of the following professional organizations 
American Marketing Association. American Society for Personnel Adminis 
tration (personnel). Association of College Entrepreneurs (all business 
majors). Dean's Undergraduate Advisory Council. Delta Nu Alpha (trans 
portalion): Delta Sigma Pi (all busmessmajors). Finance. Banking and 
Investments Society (finance). National Association of Accountants. 



National Defense Transportation Association (transportation). Phi Chi 
Theta (all business majors): Society (or the Advancement of Management 
(all business majors), and Propeller Club of Amenca (transportation) 

Course Code Prefix BMGT 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, 
MATHEMATICAL AND 
PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

2300 Mathematics Building, 454-4596 

Dean: J R Dorfman 
Assistant Dean: T M Williams 
Advisor/consultant: B J Banks 

The search for new knowledge is one of the most challenging activities 
of humankind Universities are the key institutions in society where funda- 
mental research is emphasized The College of Computer. Mathematical 
and Physical Sciences at College Park contributes very substantially and 
effectively to the research activities of the University of Maryland The 
College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences is like a techni- 
cal institute within a large university Students majoring in any one of the 
disciplines encompassed by the college have the opportunity of obtaining 
an outstanding education in their field 

The college serves both students who continue as professionals in their 
area of specialization, either immediately upon graduation or after post- 
graduate studies, and those who use their college education as prepara 
tory to careers or studies in other areas The focused specialist as well as 
the broad Renaissance person " can be accommodated 

Many research programs include undergraduates either as paid stu- 
dent helpers or in forms of research participation Students in departmen- 
tal Honors Programs particularly are given the opportunity to become 
involved in research Other students too may undertake research under 
the guidance of a faculty member 

A major portion of the teaching program of the college is devoted to 
serving students majoring in disciplines outside of the college Some of this 
teaching effort is directed toward providing the skills needed in support of 
such majors or programs Other courses are designed as enrichment for 
non-science students, giving them the opportunity to explore the reality of 
science without the technicalities required of the major 

The college is strongly committed to making studies in the sciences 
available to all regardless of their background In particular, the college is 
actively pursuing an affirmative action program to rectify the present 
under-representation of women and minonties in these fields There are in 
fact many career opportunities for women and members of minonties in the 
fields represented t)y the college 

Structure of the College. The following dep>artments, programs and 

research units comprise the College of CMPS: 

Department of Computer Science 

Department of Geology 

Department of Mathematics 

Department of Meteorology 

Department of Physics 

Applied Mathematics Program 

Astronomy Program 

Chemical Physics Program 

Physical Sciences Program 

Center for Automation Research 

Institute for Advanced Computer Studies 

Institute for Physical Sciences and Technology 

Laboratory for Plasma Research (joint with College ol Engineenng) 

Degree Programs. The following Bachelor of Science degree programs are 
offered to undergraduates by the departments and programs of the col- 
lege Astronomy. Computer Science, Geology. Mathematics. Physics 
Physical Sciences 

Mathematics Education. A student completing an undergraduate ma)or in 
astronomy, physics, physical sciences, or math who wishes certification as 
high school teacher in a subject represented by this college, must consult 
the College of Education in the second semester of the sophomore year 
Early contact should be made with either Dr John Layman (astronomy. 
physics, physical sciences) or Dr James Fey (mathematics) Application 
for admission to the Teacher Education program is made at the time tfiat 
the first courses in education are taken Admission to the Teacher Prepara 
tion program is selective 

Advising: The CMPS Undergraduate Office. Mathematics Building Room 
2300 (454-4596) is the central office for coordinating the advising, process 
ing and updating of student records Inquines concerning University reou- 
lations. transfer credits, and other general information should be 



College of Education 57 



addressed to this office Specific departmental information is best 
obtained directly from ttie departments 

Entrance RaqulremenU. With the exception of Computer Science, criteria 
and procedures for admission to the College are the same as admission to 
the institution Admission to the Computer Science Department is on a 
competitive basis for both freshmen and transfer students Freshmen are 
admitted on the basis of their Scholastic Aptitude Tests and high school 
grade point average Transfer admission is based on a cumulative grade 
point average and completion of specific courses in mathematics and 
computer science 

QraduaUon Requirements. 

1 . A minimum of 1 20 semester hours with at least a C average is required 
of all Bachelor of Science degrees from the college 

2 Thirty-nine credit hours which satisfy the University Studies Program 
as presented under Academic Regulations and Requirements in this 
catalog Courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also be 
used to satisfy major requirements All students who matriculated in 
the summer 1978 session or later must complete six credits of English 
Composition 

3 Major and supporting coursework as specified under each department 
or program 

4 The final thirty semester hours must be completed at College Park 
Occasionally, this requirement may be waived by the dean for up to six 
of these thirty credits to be taken at another institution Such a waiver 
IS granted only if the student already has thirty credits in residence 

5. Students must be enrolled in the program in which they plan to gradu- 
ate by the time they register for the last fifteen hours 

Research and Service Units 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology 

4201 Computer and Space Sciences Building. 454-2639 
Professor and Director: James A Yorkel 
IJoint with Mathematics 

The faculty members of the Institute for Physical Science and Technol- 
ogy are engaged in the study of pure and applied science problems that 
are at the boundaries between those areas served by the academic 
departments. These interdisciplinary problems afford challenging oppor- 
tunities for thesis research and classroom instruction Courses and thesis 
research guidance by the faculty of the Institute are provided either 
through the graduate programs in chemical physics and in applied mathe- 
matics' or under the auspices of other departments Students interested 
in studying with Institute faculty members should direct inquiries to the 
Director, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, College Park, MD 
20742 

Current topics of research interest in the Institute include optical phys- 
ics, statistical mechanics, chemical physics, physics of upper atmosphere 
and magnetosphere. fluid dynamics, physical oceanography, various 
aspects of space and planetary science, theoretical and applied numerical 
analysis, chaotic dynamics, and the history of science The Institute 
administers the Graduate Program in Chemical Physics, which provides 
courses, seminars, and research direction for graduate students in the 
general area of chemical physics. Further information may be obtained 
from the Director of the Chemical Physics Program at (301) 454-3839 

The Institute sponsors a wide variety of seminars in the vanous fields of 
its interest Principal among these are the general seminars in optical 
physics, statistical physics, applied dynamics, space science, numerical 
analysis, fluid dynamics, chemical physics, and history of science. Informa- 
tion concerning the seminars may be obtained by wnting to the Director of 
the Institute, or by calling 454-2636. 

Financial support for qualified graduate students is available through 
research assislantships funded by grants and contracts, and through 
teaching assistantships in related academic departments. 

"See the separate listing for the Applied Mathematics Program in chapter 8 of 
this catalog 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) 

Benjamin Building 454-2011 

Dean: Dale Scannell 

Office of Student Services: Director of Student Services 454-2017 

The College of Education is a professional college committed to 
advancing the science and art of education including the practices and 
processes which occur from infancy through adulthood in both school and 
non-school settings The College mission is to provide preparation for 



current and future teachers, counselors. adminisir,3iors educational spe 
cialists. and other related educational personnel, and to create and dis- 
seminate the knowledge needed by professionals and policy makers in 
education and related fields 

The College is organized into seven departments three of which offer 
undergraduate majors in Teacher Education The Department of Curricu- 
lum and Instruction which offers early childhood, elementary, and secon- 
dary education programs The Department of Industrial. Technological, 
and Occupational Education, and the Department of Special Education 
Admission to the teacher education programs in the above-mentioned 
departments is selective See admission requirements below 

The professional sequences in the teacher education program are open 
only to students who have been admitted to a Teacher Education Major 
Students with other majors who have an interest in the area of education 
may wish to enroll in a variety of courses that deal with schooling, human 
development, learning styles and techniques, and interaction processes 
The Department of Industrial. Technological, and Occupational Education 
also offers an Industrial Technology major leading to a career in industry 

In carrying out its mission, the College is committed to a society which 
IS open to and supportive of the educational aspirations of the widest 
population of learners and to continuous research and evaluation in relation 
to teaching and learning in a multicultural, high technology society At 
times, students may be invited to actively participate with graduate stu- 
dents and faculty members in research undertakings and evaluation 
processes Students also make use of the micro-teaching laboratory, the 
education technology and computer laboratory, and the curriculum 
laboratory 

In addition to the University Studies program, education majors have 
the opportunity to complete 45 to 55 credit hours of work in the arts, 
sciences and/or humanities In the teacher education courses, students 
develop professional behaviors through active experiences in the college 
classroom and participate in explonng. learning and practicing with chil- 
dren and teachers in classrooms in the community The capstone experi- 
ence of student teaching brings classroom theory and practice together 
into a personal set of professionally appropriate skills and processes. 

Admisaion to Teacher Education. Applicants to the University of Maryland 
who have declared an interest in education are admitted to the University 
by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions as pre-education Majors. Uni- 
versity of Maryland uncfergraduales can declare themselves pre-education 
majors at any time although it is recommended that this choice be made 
prior to completion of 45 credit hours Pre-education majors receive advis- 
ing by staff of their particular department regarding admission to the 
Teacher Education Program in the College of Education AH teacher edu- 
cation pre-majors must apply for admission to, and be admitted as stu- 
dents by, the College of Education in order to pursue the professional 
teacher education degree program 

For admission into a teacher education program, a student must (1) 
complete the USP Fundamental Studies requirements (six credits): (2) earn 
forty-five semester hours with an overall cumulative grade point average of 
at least 2 5 on a 4 scale (granted by UMCP or some other institution) In all 
coursework pnor to enrollment in EDHD 300: and (3) have a satisfactory 
score on the language and mathematics segments of the California 
Achievement Test Level 20 Transfer students with more than 45 semester 
hours of previously earned credit and post-Bachelors degree students 
must apply for admission to the College as early as possible Admission 
application forms are available in Room 1210 of the Benjamin Building 
Only those who are admitted are able to enroll in the professional educa- 
tion sequence 

A student who initially fails to meet the admission criteria may apply to 
the College whenever the criteria for admission are met. with the stipula- 
tion, however, that a student may take the CAT test a maximum of three 
times. A plan for becoming eligible for admission will be developed by the 
student and the department advisor. A Teacher Education Appeals Board 
will review appeals from students who do not meet the admission, 
advancement or retention criteria 

Critena for admission to the Teacher Education program apply to any 
teacher preparation program offered by the University of Maryland. Thus, 
students desiring a major in agriculture and extension education or a major 
in health or physical education should apply to the College of Education for 
admission to the professional program in Teacher Education 

The professional education courses are restricted to degree-seeking 
majors Students who are not enrolled in the College of Education but who. 
through an established cooperative program with another college are pre- 
panng to teach, must meet all admission, scholastic and curncular require- 
ments of the College of Education 

Student Teaching. Once the student has been admitted into the profes- 
sional program, required courses must be completed in an appropnate 
sequence leading to the required student teaching experience Prior to 
assignment to student teaching all students in teacher preparation pro- 
grams must (1) have maintained an overall grade point average of at least 
2 5 with a minimum grade of C in every course required for the major: (2) 
have satisfactorily completed all other required course work in their pro- 
gram: (3) apply for student teaching to the Office of Latxiratory Exper- 
iences one semester in advance: (4) be recommended by their depart- 
ment: and (5) have on file favorable ratings from prior supervised 



58 College of Education 



experiences in school settings including evaluations on the EDHD 300 field 
experiences 

A certificate Indicating freedom from tuberculosis and proof of immuni 
zation for measles (rubella) is required This may be obtained from a 
private physician, a health department, or the campus Health Center 

The student teaching experience is for most students the final experi 
ence in a professional program preparing them for the beginning teaching 
years This culminating phase of tfie teacher education program provides 
the prospective teacher with the opportunity to integrate theory and prac- 
tice in a comprehensive, reality-based, experience Student teaching 
placements, as well as all other field experiences, are arranged by the 
Office of Laboratory Experiences Prior to receiving a student leaching 
placement, prospective student teachers must have been admitted to 
Teacher Education and have completed requirements as described in the 
previous section In programs requiring more than one student teaching 
placement, the first placement must be satisfactorily completed before the 
student begins the succeeding placement 

Most student teaching placements and accompanying seminars are 
arranged in the Teacher Education Centers and other collaborative field 
sites jointly administered by the College of Education and participating 
school systems The student teaching semester is a full-time commitment 
and interference with this commitment because of employment or cour- 
sework is not permitted Living arrangements, including transportation for 
the student teaching assignments, are considered the responsibility of the 
student Students should contact the Office of Laboratory Experiences if 
there are any questions regarding this policy 

Graduation Requirements. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science are conferred by the College of Education The determination of 
which degree is conferred is dependent upon the amount of liberal arts 
study included in a particular degree program f^inimum requirements for 
graduation are 120 semester hours Specific departmental program 
requirements for more than the minimum must be fulfilled 

In addition to the University Studies program requirements and the 
specific requirements for each curriculum, the College requires that all 
majors complete EDHD 300. EDPA 301 . and three semester hours of an 
approved speech course A grade of C or better is required in all pre- 
professional and professional coursework required for the major An overall 
grade point average of 2 5 must be maintained after admission to Teacher 
Education A grade of S is required in student teaching 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the College ofEduca- 
tion must be recommended by the student's advisor and department 
chairperson, and approved by the dean 

Accreditation and Certification. All bachelor-degree teacher preparation 
programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education and have been approved by the Division of Certification 
and Accreditation of the Ivlaryland State Department of Education using 
standards of the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Educa- 
tion and Certification Accreditation provides for reciprocal certification 
with other states that recognize national accreditation 

The (Maryland State Department of Education issues certificates to 
teach in the public schools of the State In addition to graduation from an 
approved program, the N/laryland State Department of Education requires 
satisfactory scores on the National Teacher Exam (NTE) for certification At 
the time of graduation, the College informs the Ivlaryland State Department 
of Education of the graduate's eligibility for certification 

Special Resources and Opportunities. The College of Education offers 
many special resources and facilities to students, faculty, and the commu- 
nity The Center for Educational Research and Development. Institute for 
the Study of Exceptional Children and Youth. The Music Educators 
National Conference Historical Center. The Reading Center and the Center 
of Rehabilitation and Manpower Services all are part of the College of 
Education In addition, undergraduate education and pre-education 
majors are likely to find the following resources particularly useful 

The Student Services Office 

1210 Benjamin Building, 454-2017 

The Student Services Office provides academic advising support for 
pre-education and education students during admission, orientation, regis- 
tration, graduation and certification Pre-education majors and students 
who have been admitted to the College of Education receive academic 
advising through their departments 

7776 Office of Laboratory Experiences 

1209 Benjamin Building. 454-2029 

The Office of Laboratory Experiences (OLE) is the liaison unit between 
the College and the public school systems that serve as laboratones for the 
preparation of teachers While the primary role of the OLE is to provide 
undergraduate students with sites for the student teaching and pre stu- 
dent teaching classroom experience, the Office also operates in-service 
programs for teachers with the schools and facilitates research and staff 



development activities in the schools Placement coordinators are availa- 
ble in the OLE to answer questions, provide orientation programs and 
arrange all field expenence placements 

University Credentials Service, Career Develop- 
ment Center 

3121 Hornbake Library, 454-2813/4 

All seniors graduating in the College of Education (except Industrial 
Technology majors) are required to file credentials with the Career Devel- 
opment Center Credentials consist of the permanent record of a student's 
academic preparation and recommendations from academic and profes- 
sional sources An initial registration fee enables the Career Development 
Center to send a students credentials to interested educational employ- 
ers, as indicated by the student 

Students who are completing teacher certification requirements, or 
advanced degrees and are interested in a teaching, administrative or 
research position in education may also file credentials (This service is 
also available to alumni) 

Other services include vacancy listing in secondary schools and institu- 
tions of higher learning, notifications of interest -related p>ositions. on-cam- 
pus interviews with state and out-of-state school systems, and descnptive 
information on school systems throughout the country 

Curriculum Laboratory 

2230 Benjamin Building, 454-5466 

The Curriculum Laboratory is a model learning resource center serving 
the information needs of preservice and inservice teacher education stu- 
dents Included in the collection are curriculum guides, referer^ce and 
professional books, elementary and secondary textbooks, exemplary 
instructional materials, research documents, standardized test specimens. 
and professional journals 

Educational Technology Center 

0307 Benjamin Building. 454-4017 

The Educational Technology Center is designed as a muiti media facil- 
ity for students and faculty of the college It distributes closed-circuit 
television throughout the building, provides audio-visual equipment and 
service, a computer terminal, a learning lab. and instruction in all asp>ec(s ot 
instructional materials, aids, and new media Production and distnbution 
rooms and a studio are available for closed-circuit television and a video 
tape system Laboratories are available for graphic and photographic pro- 
duction with facilities for faculty research and development in use of 
instructional media Supporting the professional faculty in the operation of 
the center are media specialists 

Mathematics Center 

2304 Benjamin Building, 454-7443 

The Mathematics Center provides a mathematics latxiratory for under 
graduate and graduate students, and a program of clinical diagnostic and 
corrective/ remedial services for children Clinic services are a pari of a 
program in elementary school mathematics at the graduate level 

Center for Young Children 

1229 Benjamin Building, 454-2341 

The Center for Young Children, a demonstration nursery-kindergarten 
program providing child care for the University community (1) serves as a 
center in which individual professors or students may conduct research. 
(2) serves as a unit for undergraduate students to have selected exper 
iences with young children, such as student teaching, child study, and 
observation of young children; (3) provides a setting in which educators 
from within and without the University can come Tor sources of ideas 
relative to the education of young children 

Science Teaching Center 

0227 Benjamin Building, 454 2024 

The Science Teaching Center has been designed to serve as a repre 
sentative facility of its type to fulfill its functions of undergraduate and 
graduate science teacher education, science supervisor training, basic 
research in science education, aid to inservice teachers and supervisors, 
and consultative services, on all levels, kindergarten through community 
college Its reference library features relevant p>eriodicals. science and 
mathematics textbooks, new curriculum materials and works on science 
subjects and their operational aspects Its fully equipped research latwra- 
tory. in addition to its teaching lat)oratories for science methods courses, 
provides project space for both faculty and students 

Since 1962 the Science Teaching Center has served as the headquar- 
ters for the activities of the Science Teaching Materials Review Committee 



College of Engineering 59 



of the National Science Teachers Association. The Inlormation Clearing- 
house on Science and Mathematics Currlcular Developrr^ents. the Interna 
tional Clearinghouse lor A A A S , N S F , and UNESCO, started here thai 
year also Within the center is gathered the "sodware" and "hardware ' of 
science education in what is considered to be one of the most comprehen- 
sive collections of such materials in the world 

Student and Professional Organizations 

The college sponsors a chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, a Student National 
Education Association, and a Chapier of Kappa Delta Pi. an Honorary 
Society in education A student cnapter of the Council for Exceptional 
Children is open to undergraduate and graduate students in Special Edu 
cation A student chapter of the l^usic Educators National Conference 
(MENC) IS sponsored by the Department of l^usic. and the Industrial Edu- 
cation Department has a chapier of the Amencan Society of Tool and 
Manufacturing Engineers and a chapter of the American Industrial Arts 
Association 

In several departments there are informal organizations of students 
Students should contact theh individual departments for additional 
information 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
(ENGR) 

1131 Engineering Classroom Building, 454- 
2421 

Dean: George E Dieter 

Undergraduate Student Affairs: 454-2421 

Cooperative Engineering Education: 454 5191 

Center for Minorities in Science and Engineering: 454-7219 

The mission of the College of Engineering is to provide quality engineer- 
ing education, with sufficient scope to include both fundamental and spe- 
cialized engineering training, so that its graduates are prepared to serve 
txith the current and emerging needs of society Just as the boundary 
tjetween the functions of engineers and applied scientists or mathemati- 
cians IS becoming less distinct, the various branches of engineering 
Increasingly interact as technical problems become more sophisticated 
and require interdisciplinary approaches to their solutions. In addition to its 
teaching role, the College feels a related responsibility to conduct strong 
research programs that contribute to the advancement of knowledge. 

Engineers also occupy an intermediary position between scientists and 
the public, because in addition to understanding scientific principles, they 
are concerned with the timing, economics, and values that define the use 
and application of those principles With this in mind the College fosters a 
close partnership with industry and government, and also reaches out to 
both the campus community and the community at large with its services. 

Entrance Requirements 

Preparation for pursuing an engineering degree curnculum begins in 
the freshman or sophomore year of high school The time required to 
complete the various degree programs may be extended beyond the four 
years cited in this catalog to the extent that incoming students may be 
deficient in their high school preparation Therefore, students interested in 
studying engineering should enroll in the appropriate academic program in 
high school This course of study should include 3-1/2 to 4 years of college 
preparatory mathematics (including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and 
pre-calculus mathematics) In addition, students should complete one 
year each of physics and chemistry 

Admission to the College of Engineering is competitive for both fresh- 
men and transfer students Applicants who have designated a major 
Within the College of Engineering will be selected for admission on the 
basis of academic promise and available space. Because of space limita- 
tions, the College of Engineering may not be able to offer admission to all 
qualified applicants The College Park campus urges early application 
Applicants admissible to the University but not to the College will be 
offered admission to pre-engineenng A pre-engineering major does not 
assure eventual admission to the College of Engineering For considera- 
tion of appeals for admission contact the Office of Undergraduate Admis- 
sions Minority and women students are encouraged to apply for 
admission 

Freshmen 

Freshmen applicants who have designated a major offered within the 
College of Engineering will be selected for admission directly to the Col- 
lege on the basis of SAT scores and GPA earned in academic subjects 
during the 9th, 10th, and 1 1th grades, A minimum combined SAT score of 
1 100' (with at least 580' on the mathematics portion) and a 3 0' cumulative 
GPA will be required for all majors except electrical engineering Direct 
admission to electrical engineering requires a combined SAT score of 



1250* (with at least 650* on the mathematics portion) and a 3 5* cumulative 
GPA 

Academically talented freshmen are admitted directly to the College. 
We define these as 1) National Merit and National Achievement Finalists 
and Semifinalists. 2) Maryland Distinguished Scholar Finalists. 3) Chancel- 
lor or Banneker Scholars, and 4) students having participated in the "Study 
in Engineering" and the "Minority Scholars in Computer Science and Engi- 
neering" summer programs 

Transfer 

All new transfer students, as well as students currently enrolled at the 
College Park campus asking to be admitted to the College of Engineering, 
must meet the competitive admission requirements in effect for the semes 
ter in which they plan to enroll The requirements for admission to aero- 
space, agricultural, chemical/nuclear, civil, fire protection, mechanical, pre- 
electrical, undecided, and undesignated engineenng are 

1, Minimum Cumulative GPA: 
3 0* Maryland Residents 

3 2* Out of-State 

3 5* International 
2 Completion of the following five prerequisite courses or their 

equivalents with a minimum grade of "C" in each MATH 140. MATH 

141. CHEM 103, CHEM 113. and PHYS 161 
3. Completion of 28 semester hours, including ENGL 101 Introduction to 

Writing 

The requirements for admission to electrical engineering are: 

1 Minimum Cumulative GPA: 3 

2. Completion of the following 49 credits (14 courses) with a minimum 
cumulative GPA tor these courses of 3 0* 

CHEM 103 ENES 101 MATH 140 

CHEM 113 ENES 110 MATH 141 

PHYS 161 ENES 221 MATH 241 

PHYS 262 ENEE 204 MATH 246 

PHYS 263 ENES 240 



Special Notes 

1 Students with a previous B.A, or B S degree will be admitted to the 
College of Engineering with a minimum GPA of 3.0* and completion of 
the five prerequisites (MATH 140, MATH 141, CHEM 103, CHEM 113. 
and PHYS 161) 

2 UMBO and UMES students will be admitted to the College of Engineer- 
ing with official verification of their enrollment in engineering programs 
at their respective universities 

3, Maryland community colleges and Northern Virginia Community Col- 
lege students who meet the freshmen admission requirements but 
choose to attend a community college have the following options: 
A Remain at the community college in an articulated engineering 
program and complete at least 56 credits, after which lime the 
student will be admitted to the College on application provided 
that he/she has at least a 2 0* GPA at the community college (This 
will apply to all majors within the College except electrical engi- 
neenng ) The student must supply the high school transcript and 
SAT scores In the event that the community college does not offer 
a 56-credit articulated engineering program, the student may 
transfer earlier 
B Transfer immediately to the College (except electrical engineenng) 
provided the student has completed the five required courses 
(MATH 140, MATH 141, CHEM 103, CHEM 113. and PHYS 161) and 
meets the competitive GPA for the semester of intended enroll- 
ment on the College Park campus. 

•Please Note That These Figures Are Subject To Change Each Semester. 

Graduation Requirements 

Structure of Engineering Curricula 

Courses in the normal curriculum or program and prescribed credit 
hours leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (with curriculum desig- 
nation) are outlined in the sections descnbing each department in the 
College of Engineering No student may modify the prescribed number of 
hours without special permission from the Dean of the College The 
courses in each curriculum may be classified in the following categories: 

1 Courses in the University Studies Program Requirements. 

2, Courses in the physical sciences — mathematics, chemistry, physics. 

3 Related technical courses — engineering sciences and other courses 
approved for one curriculum but offered by another department 

4 Courses in the major department A student should obtain written 
approval for any substitution of courses from the department chair and 
the Dean of the College The courses in each engineenng curriculum. 



60 College of Engineering 



as classified below, form a sequential and developmental pattern in 
subject matter In this respect, curricula in engineering may differ from 
curncula In other colleges Some regulations which are generally 
applicable to all students may need clanfication for purposes of orderly 
administration among engineering students (see ttie Academic Regu- 
lations section of this catalog) Moreover, the College of Engineering 
establishes policies which supplement the University regulations 

College Regulations 

1 The responsibility for proper registration and for satisfying stated pre 
requisites for any course must rest with the student — as does the 
responsibility for proper achievement in courses in which the student 
is enrolled Each student should be familiar with the provisions of this 
catalog, including the Academic Regulations 

2. Required courses in mathematics, physics, and chemistry have high- 
est pnority; and it is strongly recommended that every engineering 
student register for mathematics and chemistry — or mathematics 
and physics — each semester until the student has fully satisfied 
requirements of the College of Engineenng in these subjects 

3. To be eligible for a bachelor's degree in the College of Engineering, a 
student must have an overall average of at least a C — 2 and a grade 
of C or better in all engineering courses (courses with an EN prefix) 
Responsibility for knowing and meeting all graduation requirements in 
any curnculum rests with the student 

4. All students are required to complete a number of general education 
courses and must follow the University's requirements regarding com- 
pletion of the University Studies Program Consult the Academic 
Regulations section of this catalog for additional information Engi- 
neering students who begin college level work (either at The University 
of Maryland or at other institutions) during the Fall 1988 semester are 
required to complete a junior level English course (with the exception 
of Agricultural Engineering students) regardless of their performance 
in Freshmen English classes This represents a College policy, not a 
University-wide policy Students beginning college level work in the 
Fall 1988 semester must also plan their University Studies Program 
courses to reflect depth as well as breadth They should plan to take 
at least two courses (preferably a lower level and upper level course) 
which follow a theme area or provide more than simply introductory 
level study in one general studies department of their choice 

5. All degree programs in the College of Engineering require a minimum 
of 120 credits plus satisfaction of all department, college, and Univer- 
sity Studies Program requirements Students should be aware that for 
all currently existing engineering programs the total number of credits 
necessary for the degree will exceed 120 by some number that will 
depend on the specific major and the student's background 

Curricula for the various engineering departments are given in this 
catalog to illustrate how the programs can be completed in four years 
These curricula are rigorous and relatively difficult for the average student 
Surveys have shown that only about one-third to one-half of the students 
actually receive an engineering degree in four years The majonty of 
students (whether at Maryland or at other engineering schools nationwide) 
complete the engineering program in four and one-half to five years It is 
quite feasible for a student to stretch out any curriculum, this may be 
necessary or desirable for a variety of reasons. However, students should 
seek competent advising in order to ensure that courses are taken in the 
proper sequence 

All students are urged to speak to a counselor in the College of Engi- 
neenng Student Affairs Office at least two semesters before graduation to 
review their academic progress and discuss final graduation requirements 

Advising. Advising is available on a walk-in basis Monday -Friday, 8 30 
am - 12 00 noon and 1 00 p m ■ 430 p m in the College of Engineering 
Student Affairs Office, Room 1131, Engineering Classroom Buildng, 454- 
2421 The Freshmen Advising Center is also located in the Student Affairs 
Office In addition, advising is available in the departments — see advising 
section in your specific engineering department for times and location 

Department and Degrees. The College of Engineenng offers the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in the following fields of study: 

Aerospace Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering (see also College of Agriculture) 

Chemical/Nuclear Engineenng 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Fire Protection Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Undesignated Engineering (Engineering Option and Applied Science 

Option) 

All of the above programs are accredited by The Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
except the Applied Science Option of the Undesignated Engineenng 
degree 



The Freshman-Sophomore Years 

The freshman and sophomore years in engineering are designed to lay 
a strong foundation in mathematics, physical sciences and the engineer- 
ing sciences upon which the student will later develop a professional 
program during the upper division (junior and senior) years The College 
course requirements for the freshman year are the same for all students, 
regardless of their intended academic program, and atx>ut 75 percent of 
the sophomore year course requirements are common, thus affording tfie 
student maximum flexibility in choosing a specific engineenng 
specialization. 

Engineering Sciences 

Engineering Science courses represent a common core of basic nnale- 
nal offered to students of several different departments All freshman and 
sophomore students of engineering are required to take ENES 101 and 
ENES 110 Other ENES courses, 220. 221 , 230, and 240, are specified by 
the different departments or taken by the student as electives Ttie 
responsibility for teaching the engineenng science courses is divided 
among the aerospace, civil, mechnical, chemical, and electircal engineer 
ing departments In addition to the core courses noted above several 
courses of general interest to engineering or non engineenng students 
have been given ENES designations See the List of Approved Courses in 
this catalog for further descriptions of these courses 

Freshman Curriculum 

All freshmen in the College of Engineering are required to complete the 
following basic curriculum regardless of whether the student plans to 
proceed through one of the designated baccalaureate degree programs or 
follow any of the multidisciplinary nondesignated degree curricula that are 
sponsored by the College 

Semes fer 
Credit Hours 

I II 
CHEM 103, 113 — General Chemistry I, II . 4 4 

PHYS 161 — General Physics 3 

MATH 140, 141 — Calculus I, II 4 4 

ENES 101 — Introductory Engineenng Science 3 

ENES 110 — Statics 3 

University Studies Program Requirements _6 _3 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing* 

(Freshman English) 

Total Credits 17 17 

* ENGL 101 Freshman English must be attempted betoie completKxi of thirty 
(30) credit hours 

Entering freshmen's math placements are determined by performance on 
math placement exams. Placement in MATH 002 or MATH 1 15 will delay 
by a semester eligibility to take certain engineenng courses 

Sophomore Year 

During the sophomore year the student selects a sponsoring academtc 
department (Aerospace. Agncultural ChemicafNuclear Civil. Electrical. 
Fire Protection, or fiilechanical Engineering) and this department assumes 
the responsibility for the student s academic guidance, counseling, and 
program planninq from that point until the completion of the degree 
requirements of that department as well as the College For the specific 
requirements, see the curriculum listing in each engineering department 

Engineering science courses represent a common core of basic male- 
nal offered to students of several different departments All freshmen and 
sophomore students of engineennq are required to take ENES 101 arxJ 
ENES 1 10 Other ENES courses 220 221 . 230. and 240 are specified by 
the different departments The responsibility for teaching the enqinoefing 
science courses is divided among the Chemical/'Nuclear. Civil. ElectncaT 
and Mechanical Engineering Departments In addition to the core courses 
noted above, several courses of general interest to engineenng or non 
engineenng students have been given ENES designations 

Engineering Transfer Programs 

Most of the community colleges m Maryland provide one- or two-year 
programs which have been coordinated to prepare students to enter the 
sophomore or junior year in engineering at Ttie University of Maryland 
These curricula are identified as Engineering Transfer Programs m ttie 
catalogs of the sponsoring institutions The various associate degree 
programs in technology do not provide the preparation and transferability 
into the professional degree curricula as the designated transfer programs 

A maximum of one halt of the degree credits (sixty to sixty-five semes- 
ter hours) may tie transferred from a two-year community college program 

There may be six to eight semester hours of ma/or departmental 
courses at the sophomore level which are not offered by tlie schools 



College of Human Ecology 61 



parlicppmling in the engineering transfer program Students should invesli 
gate the feasibility ol completing these courses in summer school at the 
University ol Maryland before starting their junior coursework in the fall 
semester 

Dual Degree Program 

The Dual Degree Program is a coo|Derative arrangement between the 
College of Engineering and selected liberal arts colleges which allows 
students to earn undergraduate degrees from both institutions in a five- 
year program A student in the Dual Degree Program will attend the liberal 
arts college for approximately three academic years (minimum ninety 
semester hours) and the College of Engineering at The University of Mary- 
land for approximately two academic years (minimum hours required — 
determined individually — approximately sixty semester hours) 

Dual degree candidates may participate in any of the baccalaureate 
degree programs in the College of Engineenng 

At the present lime the participating institutions in Maryland and the 
District of Columbia are American University, Bowie State University, 
Columbia Union College, Coppin State College, Frostburg Slate University, 
Morgan State University, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, St Mary's 
College of Maryland, Salisbury State University, Towson State University, 
Western Maryland College, Trinity College, and Washington College. Also 
participating in the program are Kentucky Slate University, King College in 
Tennessee, Shippensburg Slate University in Pennsylvania, and Xavier 
University in Louisiana 

Financial Assistance: The College of Engineering awards some merit 
based scholarships These awards are designated primarily for juniors and 
seniors in the College Students must submit an application by February 
15. including all supporting documents, in order to be considered for 
scholarship assistance for the ensuing year For additional information, 
contact the Student Affairs Office, Room 1131, Engineering Classroom 
Building. 454-2421 

(Honors. The College of Engineering offers an Engineering Honors Program 
that provides eligible students the opportunity to pursue an enriched pro- 
gram of studies which will broaden his or her perspective and increase the 
depth of his or her knowledge This program is available to students who 
meet the following criteria 

1 3 5 overall GPA 

2. 3 5 engineering GPA 

3 Junior standing or 65 applicable credits 
In completing the program, all engineering Honors students must: 

1 Submit an Honors research project necessitating a paper and oral 
presentation worth three hours of credit 

2 Successfully complete two semesters of the Engineering Honors Sem- 
inar (ENES 388, 1 credit each) 

3 Maintain a 3.3 GPA 

For additional information, contact the Student Affairs Office. Room 1131. 
Engineenng Classroom Building. 454-2421 

Research and Service Units. 



The Center for Minorities in Science 
and Engineering 

1134 Engineering Classroom Building, Telephone; (301) 454-7219 
Director: Rosemary L Parker (Acting) 

The Center is dedicated to increasing the graduation rates for black 
hispanic, and native American students majonng in engineering and com 
puter science It provides minority students with academic advising and 
free tutorial assistance in mathematics, chemistry, physics, engineering 
and computer science 

Through its scholarship and mentor program, the Center builds partner 
ships with various public and private organizations. The mentor program is 
designed to help minority students learn about their disciplines from pro 
fessionals working in the field and organizations to identify engineenng 
students for employment upon graduation 

Cooperative Engineering Education 

1137 Engineering Classroom Building Telephone: (301) 454-5191 

Director: Heidi Winick Sauber 

Cooperative education (co-op) is an optional academic program that 
combines classroom theory with career-related work experience Through 
co-op, students alternate semesters of full-time study with semesters of 
full-time paid employment for a total of fifty work weeks Co-op is designed 
to enhance a student s academic training, professional growth, and per- 
sonal development Co-op students earn a Bachelor of Science degree 
with co-op distinction and complete the same academic requirements as 
all other students 



The benefits of coop include 1) Integration ol theory and application, 
bringing new meaning to classroom studies and work experiences. 2) 
Professional level experience to offer potential employers alter graduation. 
3) Confirmation of career decisions and invaluable professional contacts. 4) 
Development of leadership skills and self-confidence, and 5) Ability to 
finance educational expenses 

Students are eligible after completing their freshman and sophomore 
engineering requirements provided they maintain a minimum 2 grade 
point average All students are expected to work (or the same employer 
throughout their co-op assignments so that they can be given progres- 
sively increased levels of responsibility 

instructional Television System 

2104 Engineering Classroom Building, Telephone; (301) 454-5190 

Director: Arnold E. Seigel 

The University of Maryland's Instructional Television System (ITV) is 
headquartered in the College of Engineering Each semester, over fifty 
regularly scheduled graduate and undergraduate classes are held in ITV's 
studio classrooms and broadcast live' to government agencies and busi- 
nesses in the greater Washington and Baltimore area Students in the 
remote classrooms watch the broadcasts on large TV monitors They are 
able to talk to the instructors and other students using a phone-line 'talk 
back " system Through the ITV system, working adult students are able to 
progress toward graduate degrees, primarily in engineering and computer 
science, without leaving their places of work 

Student Organizations. 

Professional Societies. Each of the engineering departments spon- 
sors a student chapter or student section of a national engineering society 
The student chapters sponsor a variety of activities including technical 
meetings, social gatherings, and College or University service projects 
Students who have selected a major are urged to affiliate with the chapter 
in their department 
These organizations are 

American Helicopter Society 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers 

Amencan Nuclear Society 

American Society ol Agricultural Engineers 

American Society ol Civil Engineers 

American Society ol Mechanical Engineers 

Black Engineers Society 

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 

Society of Asian Engineers 

Society of Automotive Engineers 

Society of Fire Protection Engineers 

Society of Hispanic Engineers 

Society of Women Engineers 

Engineering Honor Societies. The College of Engineering and each of 
the engineenng departments sponsors an honors society Nominations or 
invitations for membership are usually extended to junior and senior stu- 
dents based on scholarship, service and/or other selective criteria Some 
of the honors organizations are branches of national societies others are 
local groups 

Tau Beta Pi - College Honorary 

Alpha Epsilon - Agricultural Engineering 

Alpha Nu Sigma - Nuclear Engineering 

Chi Epsilon - Civil Engineering 

Eta Kappa Nu - Electrical Engineering 

Omega Chi Epsilon - Chemical Engineenng 

Pi Tau Sigma - Mechanical Engineering 

Salamander - Fire Protection Engineering 

Sigma Gamma Tau - Aerospace Engineering 

Undergraduate Research Programs. Undergraduate research pro- 
grams allow qualified undergraduate students to work with research labo- 
ratory directors in departments, thus giving the student a chance for a 
unique experience in research and engineering design Projects in engi- 
neering allow undergraduate students to do independent study under the 
guidance ol faculty members in an area of mutual interest For more 
information contact your designated engineering department 



COLLEGE OF HUMAN ECOLOGY 
(HUEC) 

1100 Marie Mount Hall, 454-2136 

Dean: Dr Laura S Sims 

Associate Dean: Dr Effie Hacklander 



62 College of Journalism 

The College of Human Ecology is an interdisciplinary professional 
school focused upon issues arising from the interrelationships and interac- 
tions between people and their environment Human ecology is involved in 
developing, integrating, and applying technical knowledge and methodolo- 
gies in the natural and behavioral sciences and in the arts and the humani- 
ties to the identification analysis, and solution of societal problems 

The College of Human Ecology shares in the obligation of all higher 
education to provide a broad-based education for undergraduates and 
graduate students The college provides a balance of professional educa- 
tion as well as expenences which tienefit the individual personally as a 
functioning and contributing member of society. 

Opportunities are provided through laboratory, practical and field 
experiences for making knowledge and innovative discovery more mean- 
ingful to the individual Students are encouraged to transfer to the society- 
at-large new ideas and methods for more effective interaction within the 
social and physical systems in which we function 

Fields of study leading to a major in the College of Human Ecology are 
organized into three departments: Family and Community Development 
(FMCD). Human Nutrition and Food Systems (HNFS). and Textiles and 
Consumer Economics (TXCE). 

Admissions. All students desiring to enroll in the College of Human Ecol- 
ogy must apply to the Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland- 
College Park Two of the majors, Textile Marketing/Fashion Merchandising 
and Consumer Economics are selective admissions programs Specific 
information concerning the selective admissionscan be obtained by con- 
tacting the Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics 

Degrees. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfac- 
tory completion, with an average of C or better, of a prescribed curriculum 
of 1 20 academic semester hour credits No grade below C is acceptable in 
the departmental courses which are required for a departmental major 

Curricula. A student may elect one of the following curncula, or a combina- 
tion of curricula: expenmental foods, dietetics, human nutrition and foods, 
foodservice administration, family studies, apparel design, textile market- 
ing/fashion merchandising, textile science, or consumer economics. 

All students in the College of Human Ecology, in addition to meeting the 
University Studies Requirements, are required to complete a series or 
sequence of courses to satisfy college and department requirements The 
remaining courses needed to complete a program of study are elected by 
the student with the approval of tiis or her advisor 

The final responsibility of meeting all the requirements for a specific 
major rests with each individual student 

COLLEGE OF HUMAN ECOLOGY REQUIREMENTS 

(for every student depending on the major) 

Credit Hours 

Human Ecology Electives" 6 

SOCY 100 3 

PSYC 100 3 

ECON 205 ■ Fundamentals of Economics or 

ECON 201 ■ Principles of Economics 3 

SPCH 100. 107. or 125 3 

"Human Ecology Electives to be taken in the college in the two departments 
other than the major department 

Advising. The College of Human Ecology maintains a Student Advising 
and Support Services Center in 1300 Mane Mount Hall The Advise Center 
IS open 8 30 - 4:30. Monday through Friday Advising is mandatory for all 
students majoring in programs in Human Ecology Students may walk in or 
make an appointment for advising by calling 454-0135 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM (JOUR) 

Journalism Building, 454-2228 

Dean and Professor Reese Cleghorn 

Associate Dean and Professor: Martin 

Assistant Dean: Stewart 

Professors: Beasley. Blumler. Crowell (Emeritus). Franklin. Gurevitch. J 

Grunig. Hiebert, Holman, Levy 

Associate Professors: Barkin. Zanot 

Assistant Professors: L Grunig. McAdams. Paterson. Roche. Smith. 

Stepp 

Lecturers: Greenfeld. Keenan 

Instructors: Kay. Rhodes 

Lois Kay, Director of Career Development, Internship Coordinator 

Frank Quine. Director of Development 

Carroll Volchko. Director of Business Administration 

Timothy McDonough. Associate Director of Development 

Located just 9 miles from the nations capital and 30 miles from the 
bustling commercial port of Baltimore, the College of Journalism at tfte 



University of Maryland is one of only six comprehensive journalism schools 
in the 10 states stretching from New York to Virginia — the nation's most 
populous region But the College has a lot more than geography going lor 
it In a study by the Gannett Center for Media Studies at Columkjia 
University, the College recently was designated one of "Eleven Exemplary 
Journalism Schools nationwide those that surpass others in criteria 
including teaching, research, facilities and job placement 

Founded in 1^47. the College has tieen accredited for close to three 
decades by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass 
Communication Since it is within easy reach of the offices of Washington 
and Baltimore newspapers and the Washington bureaus of news organiza- 
tions such as The New York Times, the Associated Press and the major 
networks, it is an ideal place lor the study of journalism and mass communi- 
cation Students have internship opportunities at a variety of media, non- 
profit, government and international agencies Talented adjunct faculty 
members are also tapped from these organizations to enhance curriculum 
offenngs 

After successful completion of a basic wnting and editing skills series 
majors are provided the following sequences in which to focus their 
remaining journalism curriculum News-Editonal. Public Relations. Broad- 
cast News. Advertising Within the News-Editonal Sequence ennphases 
are provided in the areas of News. Magazine. Photojournalism and Science 
Communication 

Entrance Requirements. 

Freshman Admission: A small number of academically talented freshmen 
are admitted directly to the College, but most students apply only after 
completing 28 credits For direct admission as freshmen students must 
be either recipients of University scholarships, or have earned both a 
minimum of 1200 on the SAT examination (with a minimum of 550 in the 
verbal section) and a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) academic grade point average in 
high school. 

Upperclass Admission: The majority of students are admitted after Slav- 
ing earned 28 credits with a minimum designated grade point average on 
all previous college level work Of those credits, a "C" or t>etter must have 
been earned in Freshman English Students also must demonstrate 
English grammar skills competency by either passing the Test of Lan- 
guage Skills ' or the "Test of Standard Written English" or have earned at 
least a score of 22 on the American College Testing Program (ACT) English 
usage subsection These cntena entitle theapplicant to "Provisional" jour- 
nalism major status. Students have two semesters to t)ecome full maiors 
by earning at least a ' C" in Writing for the Mass Media (JOUR 201) 
together with maintaining the GPA set for admission which vanes from time 
to time 

Pre-Journalism: Students not meeting the above cntena yet who are 
willing to work toward the admissions standards are permitted to register 
for "'Pre-Journalism' status "Pre-Journalism" is not a major but a pro- 
gram, and this status does not assure eventual admission to tt\e College 

Graduation Requirements: Students are required to earn a minimum of 
120 credits. Accrediting regulations require three-fourths of a student's 
coursework (a minimum of 90 credits) to be in areas other than mass 
communication (such as radio-television-film or speech) or journalism Tt>e 
required public speaking course is exempt from this regulation A grade of 
"C " or better must be earned in all journalism courses for which JCClR 201 
Writing for the Mass Media, serves as a prerequisite 

Students are also required to demonstrate atjstract thinking skills As a 
measure, majors are offered either a language or mathematics option 
Language skills must be demonstrated by taking coursework through tt>e 
intermediate level The Math option requires that students comptete the 
following courses statistics, calculus and computer science 

A minor consisting of four upper-level courses in a concentrated field is 
also required of Journalism majors Finally, in addition to University gradu- 
ation requirements. Journalism majors must complete additional Tiljefal 
arts coursework with one course each in government and politics, public 
speaking, psychology and economics and one course in sociology, anthro- 
pology or history 

Advising: The Office of Student Services provides academic advisirig to 
majors on an appointment basis To arrange for advising, call 454-2228 or 
stop by Room 1117 of the Journalism Building 

Pre-Journalism students are welcomed on a space-availatiie basis Oth- 
erwise, advising is provided in the College of Arts and Hurr^anities m 
Francis Scott Key. Room 1111 

Departments and Degrees: The College of Journalism offers the B S . MA 
and Ph D degrees At the undergraduate level, students are required to 
specialize in one of the four sequences offered All diplomas are m 
Journalism 

Field Work and Intemsliip Opportunitie*: Supervised internships are 

required lor the Public Relations (il academically qualified) and Advertisir>g 
sequences along with the Ptiolojournalism and Soence Commuriicalion 
sp>ecializations within the News-Edilonal sequence Other students may 



College of Library and Information Services 63 



take advantage of an internship as a journalism elective No more than four 
internship credits may be applied toward a student's degree Ms Lois Kay 
IS the Coordinator of the Journalism Internship Program The Internships 
Office IS in Room 1 1 18 of the College of Journalism and may be reached by 
calling 454 6939 

For Students in the Broadcast New/s Sequence, opportunity to gam 
experience with a cable news program entitled "Tuesday Weekly ' is 
presented within the curriculum 

Students may also earn internship or independent study credit through 
supervised experience gained at The Diamondback, the award-winning 
student daily newspaper for the College Park campus Other co-op and 
volunteer experiences are available to Journalism students through the 
University's Office of Experiential Learning in Hornbake 

Student Organizations. The College sponsors student chapters of the 
Society for Professional Journalists (Sigma Delta Chi), the Public Relations 
Student Society of America and the Advertising Club These organizations 
provide students with opportunities to practice skills, establish social rela- 
tionships with other students both on and off. campus and meet and work 
with professionals in the field 

Campus media opportunities abound The campus radio station is 
WMUC The student daily publication is The Diamondback. Student 
newspapers of interest to special populations include The Eclipse and 
Mitzpeh. 

Although no departmental honors program currently exists within the 
College, academically outstanding students are recognized through 
Kappa Tau Alpha, the Journalism academic honor society 

For information on the organizations listed, contact the Student Ser- 
vices Office in Room 1 1 17 of the Journalism Building or call 454-2228. 

Special Resources and Opportunities. The College owns the prestigious 
monthly Washington Journalism Review, with a national circulation of 
30,000 Extensive career programs for professional journalists, including 
the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism, enhance the school's 
national prestige 

Students are informed about the College and special opportunities 
through a newsletter. Deadline, published monthly and available in the 
Lobby of the Journalism building and the Office of Student Services. 
The Jobs Bulletin is published regularly to inform students about full-time 
and part-time positions. 

Accreditation. The College of Journalism became accredited in 1981 by 
the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communica- 
tions Standards set by the Council are generated from professional and 
academic ethics and principles This accrediting body underscores the 
liberal arts foundation of a journalism curriculum, limiting professional and 
skills courses to 1/4 of a student's academic program. 

Journalism Academic Programs. 

1. Required Core for all Journalism Majors: 

Course: Credit: 

JOUR 001 Professional Onentation 

JOUR 201 Writing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 202 Editing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 400 Law of Mass Communication 3 

Minor in one field (numbered 300 or higher), 12 

(may not be in Speech or Radio-TV-Film) 

A. Advertising 

JOUR 340 Advertising Communication 3 

JOUR 341 Advertising Techniques 3 

JOUR 342 Advertising Media Planning 3 

JOUR 396 Supervised Internship 3 

JOUR 477 Mass Communication Research 3 

At least one additional journalism course numbered 410-480 3 

Journalism Elective (330, 484. 350, 372 recommended) . . 3 

B Broadcast News Sequence Requirements 

JOUR 360 Broadcast News 1 3 

JOUR 361 Broadcast News 2 3 

JOUR 365 Theory of Broadcast Journalism 3 

At least one additional journalism course numbered 410-480 3 

Journalism and Radio-TV-Film electives 9 

(chosen with permission of advisor) 

C. Public Relations 

JOUR 330 Public Relations Theory 3 

JOUR 331 Public Relations Techniques 3 

JOUR 396 Supervised Internship 3 

JOUR 477 Mass Communication Research 3 



Advanced Writing Course (320. 360, 
371 or 380 recommended) 
Journalism Electives (333. 335. 483 
and 350 recommended) 

D News-Editorial Sequence 

i. News Specialization 

JOUR 320 News Reporting 
JOUR 350 Photojournalism 



JOUR 373 Graphics 

JOUR 321 Public Affairs Reporting 
or 

JOUR 322 Beats and Investigations 

Advanced Writing and Reporting Course 
(323, 326. 328. 371 and 380 recommended) 
Journalism Electives (396 recommended) 

ii Magazine Specialization 

JOUR 320 News Reporting . . 

JOUR 371 Feature Writing 

JOUR 487 Literary Journalism 

JOUR 396 Internship 

Journalism Electives 



ill Science Communication Specialization 

JOUR 320 News Reporting 

JOUR 371 Feature Writing 

JOUR 380 Journalism for Science and 

Technology 

JOUR 481 Advanced Science Writing 

JOUR 396 Internship 

Journalism Electives (JOUR 330 recommended) 

iv. Photo Journalism Specialization 

JOUR 320 News Reporting . . 
JOUR 350 Photojournalism . . 

JOUR 351 Advanced Photojournalism 

JOUR 373 Graphics 

JOUR 396 Internship 

Journalism Elective 

v. Literary Journalism Specialization 

JOUR 320 News Reporting 

One of the following: 

JOUR 326 News Commentary and Critical Writing 
JOUR 321 Advanced Reporting: Public Affairs 
JOUR 322 Advanced Reporting: Beats & Investiga- 
tions 
JOUR 398 Independent Study 

JOUR 371 Magazine Article and Feature Writing 

JOUR 440 Readings in Journalism Literature 

JOUR 481 Writing the Complex Story 

JOUR 487 Literary Journalism 



COLLEGE OF LIBRARY AND INFOR- 
MATION SERVICES (CLIS) 

Dean: Dr Claude E Walston 

The College of Library and Information Services is a graduate program 
accredited by the American Library Association The undergraduate por- 
tion of the program has been discontinued. 

COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES 
(LFSC) 

1114 Symons Hall. 454-6332 

Dean: Raymond J Miller 

The College of Life Sciences offers educational opportunities for stu- 
dents in subject matters relating to living organisms and their interaction 
with one another and with the environment Programs of study include 
those involving the most fundamental concepts of biological science and 
chemistry and the use of knowledge in daily life as well as the application of 
economic and engineenng principlesin planning the improvement of life. In 



64 College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 



addition to pursuing the baccalaureate degree, a number of students in 
this college engage in preprofessional education in such fields as pre 
medicine, predentistry. and prevetennary medicine 

The student may obtain a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in 
any of the departments and curricula listed below Students in preprofes 
sional programs may, under certain circumstances, obtain a B S degree 
following three years on campus and one successful year in a professional 
school For additional information on combined degree programs, see 
Chapter 8 of this catalog 

The College of Life Sciences includes the following departments and 
programs; 

a Departments Botany, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Entomology, 

Microbiology. Zoology 
b Program General Biological Sciences 

Admission. Requirements for admission to the college are the same as 
those for admission to the University Application must be made to the 
Director of Admissions, The University of fularyland. College Park, Maryland 
20742 

Students desiring a program of study in the College of Life Sciences 
should include the following subjects in their high school program: English, 
four units: college preparatory mathematics (algebra, plane geometry), 
four units: biological and physical sciences, two units: history and social 
sciences one unit They should also include chemistry and physics 

Advising. A faculty advisor will be designated to help select and design a 
program of courses to meet the needs and objectives of each entering 
student As soon as a student selects a major field of study, an advisor 
representing that department or program will be assigned All students 
must see their advisor at least once each semester 

Students following preprofessional programs will be advised by knowl- 
edgeable faculty For further information on the preprofessional programs 
offered at College Park, see Chapter 8 of this catalog 

Area Resources. In addition to the educational resources on the campus, 
students with specific interests have an opportunity to utilize libranes and 
other resources of the several government agencies located close to the 
campus Research laboratories related to agriculture or manne biology are 
available to students with special interests 

Degree Requirements. Students graduating from the college must com- 
plete at least 120 credits with an average or 2 in all courses applicable 
towards the degree Included in the 120 credits must be the following 

1 University Studies Program Requirements (40 credits) 

2 College Requirements 

As of Fall 1988, all students in the College of Life Sciences must 
complete the following core curriculum: 
CHEM 103,113, or 105. 115 
CHEM 233,243 or 235, 245 
MATH 220.221 or 140. 141 
PHYS 121.122 or 141. 142 
BIOL 105 and 106" 

•Chemistry and Biochemistry majors substitute CHEM 321 in place of BIOL 106 

Honors Programs. Students may apply for admission to the honors pro- 
grams of Botany. Chemistry. General Biological Sciences. Microbiology, 
and Zoology On the basis of the student's performance during participa- 
tion in the Honors Program, the department may recommend candidates 
for the appropriate degree with (departmental) honors, or for the appropri- 
ate degree with (departmental) high honors Successful completion of the 
Honors Programs will be recognized by a citation in the Commencement 
Program and by an appropriate entry on the student's record and diploma 



Education (school and community), and Recreation. The college also 
offers curricula in Kinesiological Sciences and Safely Education In addi- 
tion, each department offers a wide variety of courses for all University 
students These courses may be used to fulfill the general education 
requirements and as eleclives 

Programs combining research, service and instruction are provided by 
the Children s Health and Developmental Clinic, the Adults Health and 
Developmental Program and the Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 
Center More detailed information regarding these program offerings is 
available through the individual departments 

Advising: At the time of matriculation and first registration, each student is 
assigned to a member of the faculty of the college who acts as tfie stu- 
dent s academic advisor These assignments are made by the individual 
departments and depend upon the student s chosen major Students who 
are enrolled in the college but who are undecided regardino their major 
should contact the Associate Dean in Room 3310H of the PbRH Building 
the phone numtjer is 454-3192 

Departments and Degrees: The College of Physical Education. Recreation 
and Health offers the baccalaureate degree in the following fields of study 
Physical Education, Kinesiological Sciences, Health Education and Recre- 
ation The degree of Bachelor of Science isconferred upon students wtio 
have met the conditions of their curricula as herein prescribed by the 
College of Physical Education. Recreation and Health 

Each candidate for a degree must file a formal application with Ifie 
Registrations Office according to the scheduled deadlines for the antici- 
pated semester of graduation 

Honors: Phi Alpha Epsilon Honorary Society of the College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health 

The purpose of this organization is to recognize academic achievement 
and to promote professional growth by sponsoring activities in the fiekjs of 
physical education, recreation and health, and related areas 

Students shall qualify for membership at such times as they shall have 
attained junior standing in physical education, recreation, or health, and 
have a minimum overall average of 2 7 and a minimum professional aver 
age of 31 Graduate students are invited to join after ten hours of work 
with a 3 3 average For additional information, please contact Dr Donald 
Steel. 454-3382 

Special Resources and Opportunities: Gymkana Troupe. The Gymkana 
troupe IS a group of highly disciplined young men and women who place a 
high priority on education and who engage in gymnastics for purposes of 
recreation, health and personal development Each member has pledged 
himself or herself to a drug-free lifestyle in hopes of acting as a role model 
so others might be motivated to do the same Gymkana travels throughout 
the United States dunng February and March, performing once a week, 
and ending the season with its annual gymnastic performance at the 
University Membership is open lo all students regardless of their gymnas- 
tic ability Gymkana is co-sponsored by the College of Physical Education. 
Recreation and Health and the Student Government Association For 
additional information, please contact Dr Joe Murray. 454-3358 



RESEARCH AND SERVICE UNITS 

Center on Aging 

Room 2304. PERH Building. 454-5393 

Director and Professor: Dr Laura B Wilson 
Associate Director: Dr Edward F Ansello 
Associate Professor: Dr James M Hagberg 
Researcfi Associate: Dr Mark R Memers 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 
(PERH) 

3310 PERH Building, 454-5616 

Dean: Dr John J Burt 

Academic/Student Affairs, Associate Dean: Dr Jerry Wrenn. 454- 

5616 

Records: 454-3192 

The College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health provides 
preparation leading to the Bachek>r of Science degree in the following 
professional areas: Physical Education (three certification options). Health 



The Center on Aging stimulates and supports aging-ielaled activities 
within existing departments, colleges, and schools throughout all of the 
various campuses of the University of Maryland The center coordinates 
the Graduate Gerontology Certificate (Master s and Doctoral levels). tt>e 
University s first approved graduate certificate program The center 
assists undergraduate and graduate students interested in the field of 
gerontology and helps them to devise educational programs lo meet their 
goals It IS a research center working in physiology economics arvj policy 
It also sponsorsa colloquium series on aging, conducts community educa 
lion programs, assists faculty in pursuing research activities in the field of 
aging, publishes a newsletter, conducts conferences on adulthood and 
aging-related topics and provides on and off campus technical assis- 
tance to practitioners who serve older adults 

For further information on any of the center's activities call, write or visit 
the Center on Aging 

Course Code Prefix: PERH 



School of Public Affairs 65 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
(PUAF) 

2105 Morrill Hall; 454-6193 

Dean: Michael Nachi 

The School of Public Affairs provides graduate-level, professional edu- 
talion to men and women interested in careers In public service Five 
disciplines are emphasized accounting, statistics, economics, politics, 
and ethics Students specialize in issues of government/private sector 
interaction, national security and arms control, or public sector financial 
management 



The School offers separate degrees for pre career and mid career col- 
lege graduates Recent college graduates may enroll in the two year, fifty- 
one credit Master of Public Management (MPM) program This program 
combines a rigorous applied course of study with practical, hands-on 
experience The School also offers )Oint degree programs with the College 
of Business and Management (MPM/MBA) and the School of Law (MPM/ 
JD), and accepts a small number of Ph D candidates each year 

Public sector employees with a minimum of three years work experi- 
ence seek the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degree This is a part-time, 
three year, thirty six credit program Individuals who wish to improve their 
analytical and management skills without pursuing a degree may enroll in 
several certificate programs 

For further information, call or write the School of Public Affairs 



66 



8 Departments and 
Campus-Wide 
Programs 



Accounting 



For Information, consult College of Business and Management entry 



Aerospace Engineering (ENAE) 

College of Engineering 

0151 Engineering Classroom BIdg , 454-2426 

Acting Chair and Professor: Chopra 

Professors; Anderson, Donaldson, Gessow Melnik 

Associate Professors: Barlow, Jones. Lee. Winkelmann 

Assistant Professors: Cell, Leishman, Lewis, Vizzini 

Lecturers: Agravja\. Billig, Chander, Chlen. Korkegi, Lekoudis, Regan, 

Slabinski, Stanzione, Vamos. VanWie, Waltrup, Weissman. Winblade. 

Yanta 

The Aerospace Major 

Aerospace engineering is concerned witti the physical understanding, 
analysis, and design of aerospace vehicles operating within and above the 
atmosphere. Such vehicles range from helicopters and other vertical take- 
off aircraft at the low speed end of the flight spectrum to spacecraft 
operating at thousands of miles per hour during entry into the atmospheres 
of the earth and other planets In between are general aviation and com- 
mercial transports flying at speeds well below and close to the speed of 
sound, and supersonic transports, fighters, and missiles which cruise at 
many times the speed of sound Although each speed regime and each 
vehicle type poses its own special research, analysis and design problems, 
each can be addressed by a common set of technical specialties or 
disciplines 

These include aerodynamics, the study of how and why airflow pro- 
duces effects on temperature, forces, and moments, flight dynamics, the 
study of the motion and flight path of vehicles, flight structures, the study 
of the mechanical behavior of materials, stresses and strains, deflection, 
and vibration, flight propulsion, the study of the physical fundamentals of 
how engines work, and the synthesis of all these principles into one system 
with a specific application — such as a complete transport aircraft or a 
missile — through the discipline of aerospace vehicle design. 

The facilities of the department include three subsonic wind tunnels 
(with sections ranging from 2 by 2 ft to 7 75 by 1 1 ft), one supersonic 
tunnel, equipment for the static and dynamic testing of structural compo- 
nents, and a flight simulator The Center for Rotorcraft Education and 
Research (CRER) has established some unique experimental facilities to 
test helicopter models in simulated environments, including an automated 
model rig and computer-controlled vacuum chamtier The Composite 
Research Laboratory (CORE) has the facilities necessary to the manufac- 
tunng, testing and inspection of composite materials and structures, 
including an autoclave, an x-ray machine, and a 220 Kip Uniaxial test 
machine with hydraulic grips The department's computing facilities 
include four microcomputers, several Sun workstations and microcom- 
puters and terminals providing access to the campus mainframes and 
several supercomputing centers 

Department of Aerospace Engineering Requirements 

The Freshman curriculum is the same for all Engineering departments 
Please consult the College of Engineering entry 



PHYS 262, 263 — General Physics 

ENES 240 — Engineering Computation 

ENES 221 — Dynamics 

ENAE 201, 202 — Introduction to Aerospace Engineering 

I, II 

Total 

Junior Year 

Univ Studies Requirements 

MATH 240 — Introduction to Linear Algebra 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Matenals 

ENME 217 — Thermodynamics 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 

ENAE 305 — Aerospace Laboratory I 

ENAE 345 — Introduction to Dynamics of Aerospace 

Systems 

ENAE 451 , 452 — Flight Structures 1,11 

ENAE 371 — Aerodynamics I 

Total 

Senior Year 

ENAE 471 — Aerodynamics II 

ENAE 475 — Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic Heating 

ENAE 401 — Aerospace Laboratory II (Fall) 

ENAE 402 — Aerospace Lat)oratory III (Spring) 

ENAE 461 — Flight Propulsion I 

Univ Studies Requirements 

Elective ' 

Applied Dynamics Elective ' 

Aerospace Elective ^ 

Technical Elective * 

Total 



4 


4 


3 


— 


— 


3 


2 


2 


16 


15 


3 


3 


4 


— 


3 




— 


3 


3 




— 


3 





3 


4 


3 


— 


3 


17 


16 


3 




3 




2 




3 




9 




3 




3 




3 




3 




33 





Sophomore Year 

Univ Studies Requirements 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations . 

MATH 241 — Calculus III 



Minimum Degree Credits — 120 credits and the fulfillment of all 
Department, College, and University requirements 

' The students shall take one of the following design courses: 

ENAE 411 Aircraft Design (fall) 

ENAE 412 Design of Aerospace Vehicles (spnng) 

2 The student shall take one course which utilizes dynamics in a system 

analysis The following courses are offered 

ENAE 445 Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehicles 

(fall) 
ENAE 355 Aircraft Vibrations (spnng) 
ENAE 488E Aerospace Control Systems 

' Three credits must be taken from elective courses offered by Ifie Aero- 
space Enqineenng Department Currently offered courses are 
ENAE 4l5Computeraided Structural Design Analysis 

(Spring) 
ENAE 453 Matrix Methods in Computational Mecfianics 

(fall) 
ENAE 473 Aerodynamics of High-Speed Flight (not of- 
fered every year) 
ENAE 488 Topics in Aerospace Engineering 
ENAE 499 Elective Research 

Courses listed under 2 and 3 above and which are not used to rr>eet the 
requirements of 2 and 3 may be elected to fulfill requirement 4 

* Courses available as Aerospace electives may be used as tt>e tec^ncal 
elective The Department maintains a list of acceptable technical electives 
Generally they must be 400 level courses to be considered 

Admission: Admission requirements are idenlical to tfiose set by the Col- 
lege of Engineenng (see College of Engineering sectnn on Entrance 
Requirements) 



Afro-American Studies Program 67 



Advising: Advising is mandatory and is delernnined by departmental 
faculty listings in tne mam office at x2426 

Financial Assistance: Jhe department offers Glenn L Martin Schiolarshiips 
and a Zonta Sctiolarsfiip Students may obtain information/application 
forms in tfie main office at x2426 

Honors and Awards: The Department offers tfie following awards Aca 
demic Achievement Award lor highest overall academic average; R M 
Rivello Scholarship Award lor highest overall academic average; Sigma 
Gamma Tau Outstanding Achievement Award for scholarship and service 
to the Student Chapter; American Helicopter Society Outstanding 
Achievement Award for service to the student chapter, American Institute 
of Aeronautics and Astronautics Outstanding Achievement Award tor 
scholarship and service to the student chapter. (Norton Thiokol Award for 
completion of junior year with highest grade point average Eligibility crite- 
ria are available m department office 

Student Organizations: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronau 
tics, Sigma Gamma Tau and American Helicopter Society, students may 
obtain information on membership at the Lounge in the Engineering Labo- 
ratory Building 

COURSE CODE PREFIX; ENAE 



Afro-American Studies Program 
(AASP) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 Lefrak Hall Phone: 454-5665 

Professor and Director: flyers' (Economics) 
Associate Professor: Harley 

Assistant Professors: Lashley, R Williams* (Economics) 
Lecturers: E Carson, Chan, Cornelius, Felder, Hill, Rugumamu, Sabol, 
Smead 

Affiliate Faculty: Billingsley* (Family and Comm Dev ), Holman* (Jour- 
nalism), Perinbam" (History), O Williams* (Nyiumburu) 

*Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

The Afro-American Studies Program offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in 
the interdisciplinary study of the life and history of blacks in America Built 
on a curriculum that places special emphasis on the relevance of social, 
political and economic institutions to blacks and their communities, the 
program prepares students to apply analytic, social science skills to seek- 
ing solutions to the pressing socio-economic problems confronting the 
black community in the United States 

Two program options lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree Both require 
a twelve-credit core that concentrates on Afro-Amencan history and cul- 
ture or on public policy and the black community. 

The generai concentration requires 18 additional credit hours in one or 
more specialty area within Afro-American Studies such as history, litera- 
ture, government and politics, sociology or anthropology, as well as depart- 
mental seminars and a thesis. 

The public policy concentration, requiring competencies in analytic 
methods, such as economics and statistics, trains students to develop 
specialized knowledge and abilities in solving problems affecting minority 
communities Substantive areas of study include the family, criminal jus- 
tice, employment, health care, discrimination, urban development, as well 
as other related topics An internship and departmental seminars complete 
the requirements for this option. 

Major Requirements: 

Core 

AASP 100, 200, 202; and either 300 for the general concentration or 
428J for the policy concentration. 

General Concentration: 

In addition to the core requirements, 18 credits of AASP Upper Division 
Electives (300-400 numbers), AASP 401 and AASP 397 

Public Policy Concentration: 

In addition to the core, three credits of statistics (eg , STAT 100 or 
SOCY 201), three credits of elementary economics (ECON 201 or 205), 
nine credits of AASP electives in the policy area (AASP numbers 300-400), 
AASP 428K and 397 

Afro-American Studies Program 

PUBLIC POLICY CONCENTRATION 

Freshman Year (30 credits) 
Fall Cr. Spring Cr. 
AASP 100 3 AASP 298 3 



ENGL 101 
USP (Distnb ) 
Elective 



K/1ATH 110 
USP (Distrib ) 
Elective 



Fall 

AASP 202 
USP (Distrib ) 
ECON 201 (or 205) 
Elective 



Sophomore Year (30 credits) 

Cr. Spring Cr. 

3 AASP 300 3 

6 USP (Distrib ) 6 

3 STAT 100 (or SOCY 201) 3 

3 Elective 3 

Junior Year (30 credits) 

Fall Cr. Spring Cr. 

AASP 428J 3 AASP fvtajor Electives 6 

ENGL 391 (or 393) 3 Electives . . 6 

ADV USP 3 ADV USP 3 

Electives 6 

Senior Year (30 credits) 

Fall Cr. Spring Cr. 

AASP 401 3 AASP 397 ... 3 

AASP Major Elective 3 AASP 386 3 

Electives 9 Electives . 9 

NOTE: This suggested curnculum is as broad as possible in order to tailor 
USP requirements and electives to the individual students needs and 
course of study. 

Each course counted toward completion of the requirements must be 
passed with a grade of C or better Related and supporting courses in 
other departments must be approved by a faculty advisor 

The Afro-American Studies Program offers three options for students 
who major in another department First, students may obtain a certificate 
by completing twenty-one hours of course work with an emphasis on black 
life and experience Second, the AASP will offer assistance in finding 
students internships Third, the AASP is the supporting area for Computer 
Science majors, as well as other fields such as pre-Business or pre-Engi- 
neering Students may also designate Afro-Amencan Studies as the alter- 
nate major. 

Admission and Advising 

Undergraduates in good standing may enroll in the Afro-Amencan 
Studies Program or obtain more information about any of the options by 
contacting Mrs Gills, Assistant Advisor, Afro-Amencan Studies Program, 
2169 Lefrak Hall, phone: (301) 454-5665, 

Course Code Prefix — AASP 



Agricultural Chemistry (AGCH) 

College of Agriculture 

454-6332 

This curriculum combines the fundamentals of chemistry with flexibility 
through electives to prepare the student for graduate work in agricultural 
and life sciences programs, technical work in government and private 
research and quality control laboratories, and production and sales work in 
specialized chemical industries and food production and processing 
industries 

Program revisions are under consideration. Each student should see an 
advisor. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program requirements* 30 

t^/lajor Requirements: 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I or CHEM 105 4 

CHEM 113 — General Chemistry II or CHEM 115 4 

CHEM 233 — Organic Chemistry I or CHEM 235 4 

CHEM 243 — Organic Chemistry II or CHEM 245 4 

CHEM 321 — Quantitative Analysis 4 

Eight Credits from the Following Courses: 

AGRO 302 — General Soils 4 

BOTN 221 — Plant Pathology 4 

ENTM 204 — General Entomology 4 

GEOL 100 — Physical Geology 3 

GEOL 1 10 — Physical Geology Laboratory 1 

Additional Requirements: 

MATH 140 — Analysis I 4 

MATH 141 — Analysis II ,. 4 

PHYS 141 — Principles of Physics , 4 

PHYS 142 — Principles of Physics 4 

Electives in Biology 6 



68 Agricultural Engineering 



Approved Agricultural Eleclives. chosen trom the (oilow 
ing any 400 level courses in CHEM or 
BCHM. FDSC 421 or 423. or ENTM 452" 12 

Electives" 28 

"These courses should be selected after consultation with the Agricultural 
Chemistry Advisor The advisor may approve other courses, in speciarcases, to 
meet the career obieclives of the student 

"Six to ten of the elective credits must be for upper level courses to meet the 
curnculum requirement of thirty-five credits of total upper-level work 

Course Code Prefix — CHEM 



Agricultural Engineering (ENAG) 

College of Agriculture 

1130 Shriver Laboratory, 454-3901 

The major in Agricultural Engineering is offered through both the College of 
Agriculture and the College of Engineering Students enrolled in this pro- 
gram through the College of Agriculture are required to complete that 
Colleges core requirements in addition to the requirements defined in the 
program below Students should consult their advisors 

Chair: Stewart 

Professors: Harris, Johnson, Wheaton 

Associate Professors: Grant, Ross, Stewart 

Assistant Professors: Magette, Shirmohammadi 

Instructors: Carr, Gird, Hochheimer, Smith 

Senior Specialist: Brodie 

Emeriti: Felton, Green, Krewatch, Merrick 

The Agricultural Engineering Major: This program is for students who wish 
to become registered professional engineers but who are also seriously 
interested in biological systems and how the physical and biological sci- 
ences interrelate the biological and the engineering aspects of plant, 
animal, food processing and natural resource systems are studied Agricul- 
tural Engineering graduates are prepared to apply engineering, mathemati- 
cal and computer skills to design systems and facilities within the food 
production and processing system, in the protection of the natural 
resources associated with this system and in other bioengineering applica- 
tions Graduates ftnd employment in design, management, research, edu- 
cation, sales, consulting or international service. 

Re^juirements for Major The curriculum is composed of: (1) the required 
USP (general education) requirements of the institution; (2) a core of math- 
ematics, physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences required of all engi- 
neering students (3) sixteen credits of agricultural engineering design, 
and (4) twenty-two hours of electives to allow development of special 
student interests Emphasis areas include aquacultural engineering, bio- 
logical engineering, plant systems engineering, animal systems engineer- 
ing, food process engineering and natural resources engineenng 

Freshman Year 

The Freshman curriculum is the same for all Engineering departments 
Please consult the College of Engineering entry 

Semes fer 

Sophomore Year I II 

MATH 241 — Analysis III 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations for Scientists and 

Engineers 3 

PHYS 262, 263 — General Physics 4 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Malenals 3 

ENES 221 — Dynamics 3 

ENME 21 7 — Thermodynamics 3 

Free Elective 3 

University Studies Program Requirements" _3 _3 

Total 17 16 

Junior Year" 

ENCE 300 (or ENME 401"") Engineenng Materials 3 

ENME 342 (or ENCE 330) — Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

ENCE 350 — Structural Analysis 3 

ENAG 454 — Biological Process Engineenng 4 

Technical Electives 4 6 

University Studies Program Requirements" _3 _3 

Total 16 16 

Senior year 

ENAG 421 — Power Systems 3 

ENAG 4444 — Functional Design of Machinery and 

Equipment 3 

ENAG 422 — Soil and Water Engineenng 3 



ENAG 424 — Functional and Environmental Design of 

Agricultural Structures 3 

Technical Electives 3 3 

Free Electives 3 

University Studies Program Requirements'* _3 _6 

Total 15 15 

Minimum Degree Credits — 120 credits and (uKillment of all Department, 
College and University requirements. 

•Chem 105 may be substituted tor GHEM 103 and CHEM 104 or CHEM 115 may 

be substituted lor CHEM 1 13 Check with an advisor regarding the chemistry 

requirement lielore registering 

"Students must consult with an advisor on selection of appropriate courses lor 

their particular area of study 

"'No 300 level and at)ove courses may be attempted without special permis 

sion until fifty six credits have tieen earned 

""ENME 310 must be taken as a technical elective prerequisite or corequisile 

with ENME 401 

Technical electives. related to field of concentration, must be selected from 

a departmentally approved list Nine credits must be 300 level and atx>ve 
Agricultural Engineering students are exempt from ENGL 391 393 

Admission: Students in agricultural engineering may enroll through either 
the College of Agriculture or the College of Engineering However, all 
Agricultural Engineering Majors must meet admission, progress and reten- 
tion standards of the College of Engineenng 

Advising: Advising for Agncultural Engineering majors is marvjalory Call 
Ext 3901 and ask to talk to an advisor to schedule an appointment 

Fieldworfc/lntemships: Contact Departmental academic advisors to 

arrange teaching or research internships 

Financial Assistance: The Department offers three scholarships specifi- 
cally for Agricultural Engineenng majors Cooperative education (work 
study programs) are available through the College of Engineering Part- 
time employment is available in the Department and in USDA laboratories 
located near campus 

Honors and Awards: Outstanding junior and senior students are recog 
nized each year for scholastic achievement and for their contnbution to the 
Department, College and University Top students are selected for Alpha 
Epsilon. the Honor Society of Agricultural Engineering 

Student Organization: Students operate the professional club of the Ameri- 
can Society of Agricultural Engineers Academic advisors will tell you how 
to become a participant 

Course Code Prefix — ENAG 



Agricultural Sciences, General 
(AGRI) 

College of Agriculture 

0102 Shriver Laboratory, 454-3901 

Coordinator: LP Grant 

Agriculture is a complex scientific field, encompassing all other scien- 
tific and professional fields However, majoring in Agricultural Sciences 
does not require an agricultural background Students in this major have 
backgrounds as varied as is the field itself The Agricultural Sciences 
program is designed for students who are interested in a broad education 
in the field of agriculture It is ideal for students who would like to survey 
agriculture before specializing, and for those who prefer to design Ihetr 
own specialized programs, such as International Agriculture or Agncultural 
Journalism To supplement their classroom work, students in this major are 
encouraged to obtain summer positions that will provide technical lalxwa 
tory or field experience in their chosen area 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

30 



Requirements 



University Studies Program Requirements* 

BIOL 105 General Biology 1-4* 4 

BIOL 106 General Biology 11-4* 4 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 4 
CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry or 
(CHEM 1 13 — General Chemistry II and CHEM 233 — Organic 

CHEM I) 4-8 

MATH 115 or Higher* 3 

ENAG 1(X) — Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 3 

ENAG 200 — Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

AGRO too — Crop Production Laboratory 2 

AGRO 302 — General Soils 4 



Agricultural and Extension Education 69 

AEED 311 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 

AEED 313 — Student Teaching 5 

AEED 315 — Student Teaching 4 

AEED 398 — Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 

AEED 464 — Rural Life in Modern Society 3 

AEED 489C — Field Experience Teaching Agriculture 1 

SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 3 

Electives 6 

Course Code Prefix AEED 



Agricultural and Resource Econom- 
ics (AREC) 

College of Agriculture 

2211 Symons Hall, 454-4101 

Professor and Chair: Hueth 

Professors: Bockstael. Brown. Cam, Chambers, Curtis (Emeritus), Fos- 
ter, Gardner, Just, Lessleyt , McConnell, Poffenberger (Emeritus), Ste- 
vens (Emeritus), Strand, Tuthill, Wysong 
Associate Professors: Hardie, Lopez, Russell 
Assistant Professors: Favero, Horowitz, Leathers, Lichtenberg 

t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The curriculum combines training in business and economic aspects of 
agricultural production, marketing and natural resource use with the bio- 
logical and physical sciences In these programs, students are trained for 
employment in agricultural business firms, for positions in sales or manage- 
ment, for local, state, or federal agencies: for extension work, for foreign 
service in international agriculture, for research, work in government or 
private firms, for graduate school, and for farm operation or management. 

Courses for the freshman and sophomore years are essentially the 
same for all students. However, freshmen and sophomores are 
encouraged to fulfill the math and basic business requirements in their first 
two years In the junior year the student selects the option of his or her 
choice. Courses in this department are designed to provide training in the 
application of economic principles to the production, processing, distribu- 
tion, and merchandising of agricultural products and the effective manage- 
ment of our natural and human resources The curriculum includes courses 
in general agricultural economics, marketing, farm management, prices, 
resource economics, agricultural policy, and international agricultural 
economics 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program 40 

Biological Science with lab 4 

AREC 250 — Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

ECON 201 — Macroeconomic Principles 3 

ECONI 203 — Microeconomic Principles 3 

ECON 306/406 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

MATH 115 — Precalculus 3 

MATH 1 1 1 — Intro Probability 3 

MATH 220 — Elementary Calculus 

Computer Applications* 3 

Agribusiness Option 

AREC 306 — Farm Management 

AREC 407 — Agricultural Finance 

AREC 414 — Agribusiness Management 

AREC 427 — Agricultural Marketing 

BMGT 220 — Accounting I 

BMGT 221 — Accounting II 

BMGT 230 — Business Statistics 

BMGT 340 — Business Finance 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Pnnciples 

BMGT 364 — Management and Organization Theory 

BMGT 380 — Business Law 

Technical Agriculture* 

Free Electives 



ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

ANSC or AGRO — " 3 

AREC 250 — Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

AREC — *• 3 

BOTN 221 — Diseases of Plants or ANSC 412 — Introduction 

to Diseases of Animals 4 

ENTM 252 — Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

HORT — •* 3 

AEED 464 — Rural Life in Modern Society. 

AEED 466 — Rural Poverty in an Affluent Society, or SOCY 305 

— Scarcity and Modern Society 3 

Community Development Related. Non agricultural Life Science. 

Biometrics. Computer, or Accounting 6 
Electives (eighteen credit hours 300 or above) 22-29 

'includes eleven required credits listed below 

**Student may select any course(s) having required hours in the department 

indicated 



Agricultural and Extension Educa- 
tion (AEED) 

College of Agriculture 

0222 Symons Hall. 454-3738 

Professor and Ctiair: Miller (Acting) 

Professor: Longest 

Associate Professors: Cooper, Rivera. Seibel. Smith 

Affiliate Associate Professors: Booth. Cottindaffer 

Assistant Professors: Gibson. Glee 

A degree in agricultural and extension education may lead to career 
opportunities in educational and developmental programs, public service, 
business and industry, communications, research, or college teaching 

The program prepares individuals to teach agriculture at the secondary 
or postsecondary levels It also prepares individuals to enter community 
development and other agriculturally related careers which emphasize 
working with people 

Students preparing to become teachers of agriculture, including horti- 
culture, agribusiness and other agriculturally related subjects, should have 
had appropriate experience with the kind of agriculture they plan to teach 
or should arrange to secure that experience during summers while in 
college 

Students m the agricultural education curriculum are expected to par- 
ticipate in the Collegiate FFA chapter for developing skills necessary for 
advising FFA groups 

Students may major in preagricultural education and choose a second 
major until they complete a minimum of 56 credits Then they may apply for 
the admission to the teacher education program in agricultural education 
Contact the Teacher Education Coordinator in AEED for application forms 
and procedures 

Agricultural and Extension Education Program 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements 40 

AGRO 100 — Crops Laboratory 
AGRO 102 — Crop Production or 

AGRO 406 — Forage Crop Production (3) 2 

AGRO 302 — General Soils 4 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

AREC 306 — Farm Management or 

AREC 407 — Financial Analysis of Farm Business 3 

BIOL 105. 106 — Pnnciples of Biology I, II 4,4 

BOTN 221 — Diseases of Plants 4 

CHEM 103, 104 — General Chemistry I, Fundamentals of Or- 
ganic and Biochemistry 4,4 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 6 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education 3 

ENAG 100 — Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 3 

ENAG 200 — Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

ENAG 305 — Farm Mechanics 2 

ENTM 252 — Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

HORT 201 — Environmental Factors and Horticultural Crop Pro- 
duction 4 

HORT 202 — Management of Horticultural Crop Production 4 

MATH 1 10 — Introduction Mathematics I 3 

AEED 302 — Introduction to Agricultural Education 2 

EDIT 450 ^ Training Aids Development 3 

AEED 305 — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 



Agricultural Economics Option 

Chemistry 

AREC 306 — Farm Management 

AREC 404 — Agricultural Prices 

AREC 427 — Agncultural Marketing 

AREC 433 — Food and Agncultural Policy 

ECON 305 — Inter Macroeconomic Theory 

Statistics' 

Technical Electives* 

Free Electives 



70 Agronomy 

Resource Economics Option 

Chemistry 3 

AREC 240 — Environmental and Human Ecology 3 

AREC 404 — Agricultural Prices 3 

AREC 432 — Introduction to Natural Resources Policy 3 

AREC 453 — Natural Resources and Public Policy 3 

ECON 381 — Environmental Economics 3 

ECON 305 — Inter. Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Statistics* 3 

Technical Electives* 15 

Free Electives 28 

International Agriculture Option 

Chemistry 3 

AREC 306 — Farm Management 3 

AREC 365 — World Food Hunger 3 

AREC 404 — Agricultural Prices 3 

AREC 433 — Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

AREC 445 — Agricultural Development 3 

ECON 305 — Inter Macroeconomic Theory 3 

ECON 440 — International Economics 3 

Statistics* 3 

Technical Electives* 12 

Free Electives 28 

*Chosen with approval of advisor 
Course Code Pretix — AREC 



Agronomy (AGRO) 

College of Agriculture 

1109 HJ Patterson Hall, 454-3718 

Professor and Chairman: Aycock 

Professors: Axley (Emeritus). Bandel, Clark (Emeritus). Decker, Fan- 
ning, Hoyert (Emeritus), Kuhn (Emeritus), McKee, Miller (Emeritus), 
Street (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Angle, Dernoeden, Glenn, Kenworthy, Mcintosh, 
Mulchi. Ritter, Sammonsf, Turner, Vough, Well, Welsmiller 
Assistant Professors: Bruns, Hill, James, Rabenhorst, Slaughter, 
Thomison. Welterlen 
Adjunct Professor: Lee, Meislnger, Small 

t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Agronomy Major 

Agronomy instruction combines the principles of basic sciences with a 
thorough understanding of plants and soils This amalgamation of basic 
and applied sciences provides the opportunity for careers involved In 
conserving soil and water resources. Improving environmental quality, 
increasing crop production to meet the global need for food, and beautify- 
ing and conserving the urban landscape using turfgrass. 

The agronomy curricula are flexible and allow the student either to 
concentrate on basic science courses that are needed for graduate work 
or to select courses that prepare for employment at the bachelor's degree 
level Graduates with a bachelor's degree are employed by private corpo- 
rations as golf course managers, seed, fertilizer, chemical, and farm equip- 
ment company representatives, or by county, stale, or federal government 
as agronomists or extension agents Students completing graduate pro- 
grams are prepared for research, teaching, and management positions 
with industry, international agencies, or federal and state government. 

Additional information on opportunities in agronomy and available 
scholarships may be obtained by wnling to the Department of Agronomy 

Major Requirements 

Agronomy Curricula 

University Studies Program Requirements (39 semester hours): math and 
science requirements (9 hours) are satisfied by departmental 
requirements 



Department Requirements 
(31 semester hours) 



AGRO 100 — Crops Laboratory 

AGRO 102 — Crop Production 

AGRO 302 — General Soils 

AGRO 398 — Senior Seminar 

BIOL 105 — Pnnciples of Biology I 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry' 
MATH 1 10 — introduction to Mathematics 



Semester 

Credit Hours 

2 

2 

4 



MATH 115 — Pre-calculus (consult advisor) 3 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication 

or 

SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 3 

*Students intending to take additional chemistry should substitute 
CHEM 113, followed by CHEM 233 and CHEM 243 

Crop Science Curriculum 

University and Department requirements 61 

AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Advisor) 8 

AGRO — Advanced Soils Courses (Consult Advisor) 6 

BOTN 441 — Plant Physiology 4 

One of the following 3-4 

BOTN 212 — Plant Taxonomy (4) 

BOTN 414 — Plant Genetics (3) 

BOTN 416 — Pnnciples of Plant Anatomy (4) 

Electives 37-38 

Soil Science Curriculum 

University and Department requirements 61 

AGRO — Advanced Soils Courses (Consult Advisor) 3 

AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Advisor) 6 

AGRO 414 — Soil Classification and Geography 4 

AGRO 41 7 — Soil Physics 3 

AGRO 421 — Soil Chemistry 3 

GEOL 100 — Introduction to Physical Geology 3 

MICE 200 — General Microbiology 4 

Electives 33 

Turf and Urban Agronomy Curriculum 

University and Department Requirements 61 

AGRO 411 — Soil Fertility Pnnciples 3 

AGRO 405 — Turf Management 3 

AGRO 453 — Weed Control 3 

BOTN 441 — Plant Physiology 4 

BOTN 425 — Diseases of Ornamentals and Turf* 2 

ENTM 453 — Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Turf* 3 

HORT 160 — Introduction to the Art of Landscaping* 3 

AGRO 415 — Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

Electives (HORT 453, HORT 454, and RECR 495 suggested) . 35 
*BOTN 221, ENTM 204, and BOTN 212 serve as prerequisites 

Conservation of Soil, Water and Environment Curriculum 

University and Department Requirements 61 

AGRO 417 — Soil Physics or 

AGRO 421 — Soil Chemistry 3 

AGRO 413 — Soil and Water Conservation 3 

AGRO 41 1 — Soil Fertility Pnnciples 3 

AGRO 414 — Soil Classification and Geography 4 

AGRO 415 — Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

AGRO 423 — Soil-Water Pollution 3 

AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Advisor) 5-6 

Select one of the following courses: 3 

BOTN 21 1 — Principles of Conservation (3) 

GEOG 445 — Climatology (3) 

AREC 432 — Introduction to Natural Resources Policy (3) 

Electives 31-32 

Journalism-Science Communication Option 

A student following this option in the crop science or soil scterice 
curriculum must elect lournalism and basic science and math courses in 
addition to the required curriculum courses Many combinations will be 
acceptable The advisor can aid in helping the student plan an appropriate 

program 

Course Code Prefix — AGRO 



American Studies (AMST) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2140 Taliaferro, 454-4661 

Associate Professor and Ctiair: Kelly 
Associate Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator: Diner 
Associate Professors: Caughey, Lounsbury, Mintz 
Assistant Professor: Sies 

The department offers an interdisciplinary locus on American culture 
and society in both historical and contemporary sources Undergraduate 
majors, with the help of faculty advisors, design a program that includes 
courses offered by the American Studies faculty and sequences of 
courses in the disciplines usually associated with American studies (i e , 



Animal Sciences 71 



history, literature, sociology, anthropology, political science, and others), or 
pertinent courses grouped thematically (e g . Afro-American studies, 
women's studies, ethnic studies, comparative cultures, popular culture, 
urban and environmental studies, and so forth) 

Requirements for Major 

The ma|or requires forty-five hours, at least twenty-four of which must 
be at the 300-400 level Of those forty-five hours, twenty-one must be in 
AMST courses, with the remaining twenty-four in two twelve-hour core 
areas outside the regular AMST offerings 

No grade lower than a C may be applied toward the ma|or The depart- 
ment recommends that students fulfill the college s history requirement 
with an American history course, particularly if American history is not one 
of the core areas in the student s program Lists of courses applicable to 
the major for each of the core areas are available from the department 
office No courses other than those on the lists will be accepted for credit 
toward the major unless an advisor's permission has been granted in 
writing and placed in the student's file 

Distribution of the 45 Hours: 

AMST Courses (21 hours required) 

1 AMST 201 — Introduction to American Studies I (3) required of majors 

2 AMST 203 — Popular Culture in Amenca: AMST 205 — Matenal 
Aspects of American Life AMST 207 — Contemporary American Cul- 
tures three (3) hours minimum from this group, six (6) hours maximum 
may be applied toward the 21 -hour AMST requirement 

3 AMST 330 — Critics of American Culture (3) required of majors 

4 AMST 418 — Cultural Themes in America: AMST 426 — Culture and 
the Arts in America: AMST 428 — American Cultural Eras: AMST 429 
— Perspectives on Popular Culture: AMST 432 — Literature and 
American Society majors will take six to nine hours (depending 
upon number of hours taken at 200 level) of these courses. No 
more than six hours of a repeatable number may be applied to the 
major. AMST 298, 498 (special topics), AMST 398 (independent 
study), or AMST 386-387 (internship) may sometimes be substituted 
for major requirements with advisor approval. 

5 AMST 450 — Seminar in American Studies (3): required of majors. 

Core Areas Outside AMST (24 hours required): 
Student majors will choose two outside core areas of twelve hours each. 
One of the core areas may be interdisciplinary in nature (see interdiscipli- 
nary core suggestions) All interdisciplinary cores must be approved by an 
advisor in writing: they may not be organized merely by grouping courses 
from the approved-course list. 

Departmental Cores 

Courses chosen from the approved list or accepted by an advisor in 
American History, American Literature, Sociology, Anthropology. Govern- 
ment and Politics, Psychology, Art History, Architecture, Geography. 
Radio-TV-Film. Economics. Education, Journalism, Philosophy 

Interdisciplinary Cores 

Afro-American Studies, Women's Studies, Urban and Environmental Stud- 
ies, Popular Culture, Personality and Culture, Creative and Performing Arts, 
Comparative Cultures. Ethnic Studies, Business and Industry, Material 
Culture. Folklore, Pre-Law 

Individual cores may also be designed with advisor assistance and 
approval 

Course Code Prefix — AMST 



Animal Sciences (ANSC) 

College of Agriculture 

2115 Animal Sciences Building. 454-3926 

Department of Animal Sciences 

Professor and Chair: Westhotf 

Professors: Flyger, Foster (Emeritus), King (Emeritus). Leffel (Emeri- 
tus). Mather, Mattick (Emeritus), Vandersall. Vijay. Williams. Young 
Associate Professors: DeBarthe. Douglass. Erdman. Goodwin. Hart- 
sock, Majeskie, Peters, Russek-Cohen, Stricklin. Varner 
Assistant Professors: Alston-Mills. Barao. Cassel. Marshall 
Principal Specialist: Morris (Emeritus) 
Associate Specialist: Curry 

Department of Poultry Science 

Associate Professor and Acting Chairman: Doerr 

Professors: Health, Kuenzel, Shorb (Emerita), Scares. Thomas 

Associate Professors: Murphy. Ottmger. Wabeck 

Adjunct Professor: Kotula 

Assistant Professor: Mench 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Failla. Rattner 



The curriculum in animal sciences offers a broad background in general 
education, basic sciences, and aqricultural sciences, and the opportunity 
for students to emphasize that phase of animal agriculture in which they 
are specifically interested Each student will be assigned to an advisor 
according to the program he or she plans to pursue 

Curriculum requirements in animal sciences can be completed through 
the Departments of Animal Sciences or Poultry Science Programs of elec- 
tive courses can be developed that provide major emphasis on beef cattle, 
sheep, swine or horses, dairy or poultry Each student is expected to 
develop a program of electives in consultation with an advisor by the 
beginning of the junior year 

Objectives. The following specific objectives have been established for the 
program in animal sciences 

1 To acquaint students with the role of animal agriculture in our cultural 
heritage 

2 To prepare students for careers in the field of animal agriculture These 
include positions of management and technology associated with 
animal, dairy, or poultry production enterprises: positions with market- 
ing and processing organizations, and positions in other allied fields, 
such as feed, agricultural chemicals, and equipment firms 

3 To prepare students for entrance to veterinary schools 

4 To prepare students for graduate study and subsequent careers in 
teaching, research, and extension, both public and private 

5 To provide essential courses for the support of other academic pro- 
grams of the University 

Required of All Students 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements' 40 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

FDSC 1 1 1 — Contemporary Food Industry and Consumerism 3 

ANSC 201 — Basic Principles of Animal Genetics 3 

ANSC 221 — Anatomy of Domestic Animals 4 

ANSC 212 — Applied Animal Physiology 3 

ANSC 214 — Applied Animal Physiology Laboratory 1 

ANSC 401 — Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

ANSC 412 — Introduction to Diseases of Animals 3 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 4 

BIOL 105 — Principlesof Biology I 4 

SPCH 107 — Public Speaking 3 

Two of the Following: 

ANSC 221 — Fundamentals of Animal Production 3 

ANSC 242 — Dairy Production 3 

ANSC 262 — Commercial Poultry Management 3 

One of the Following: 

ENAG 100 — Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 3 

CHEM 233 — Organic Chemistry I"* 4 

CHEM 243 — Organic Chemistry II*" 4 

MATH 111 — Introduction to Mathematics II 3 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

"Electives 39-40 

"includes eleven required credits listed below- 

"electives must include at least twelve credits in upper-level courses in animal 

science 

"•CHEM 233 IS a prerequisite. 

Course Code Prefix — ANSC 



Anthropology (ANTH) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1107 Woods Hall. 454-4154 

Associate Professor and Chair: Whitehead 
Professors: Agar, Gonzalez, A Williams 
Associate Professors: Chambers, Leone 
Assistant Professors: Stuart, Wall 

Lecturers: Cassidy (p t). Chase (p.t), Eidson (p t), McDaniel* (Instruc- 
tional Computing). Shackel (p.t). Vreeland (p.t.) 

* Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

Anthropology has been defined as "the study of humanity" because it 
is the discipline that tries to understand humans as a whole — as an 
animal, as a social being, as a literate being — from the very beginning of 
time and all over the world. Anthropologists try to explain differences 
among humans — differences in their physical characteristics as well as 
their customs, behavior, and attitudes Since children learn their culture 
from the older generation, who in turn learned it from the proceeding 
generation, culture is a product of the past Anthropologists study the way 



72 Applied Mathematics Program 



human culture has grown and changed through time, and the way the 
species has spread over the earth This is not the history of kings and great 
women or men or of wars and treaties, it is the history, including the 
present, and science of human knowledge and behavior 

It IS becoming increasingly clear that anthropology has been a definite 
asset in finding jobs in a variety of fields ranging from business to the fine 
arts Whether one goes on to a Master's or a Ph D , striving to advance the 
frontiers of knowledge concerning our species and the cultural process, or 
combines the anthropology B A with other specific knowledge and goes 
out as a city planner, development consultant, or program evaluator, is up 
to the individual Anthropology at UMCP offers a solid and rigorous back- 
ground for a variety of career options 

The Anthropology Department offers beginning and advanced cour- 
sework in the four principal subdivisions of the discipline physical anthro- 
pology, linguistics, archaeology, and cultural anthropology Within each 
area, the department offers some degree of specialization and provides a 
variety of opportunities within the curriculum Laboratory courses are 
offered in physical anthropology and archaeology, field schools are offered 
In archaeology and ethnography Instruction is available in both Old World 
and New World archaeology and ethnology, and lab courses include 
human evolution, human population biology, forensic anthropology, osteol- 
ogy, and archaeological analysis The interrelationship of all branches of 
anthropology is emphasized Courses in these subdivisions may be used 
to fulfill the minor or supporting courses' requirement in some programs 
leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree 

The Anthropology Department has a total of four laboratories located in 
Woods Hall, which are divided into teaching labs and research labs At 
present, there are two physical anthropology labs one osteological 
research lab, and one "wet ' lab for teaching and research in serology, 
histology, and anatomy These laboratories contain radiographic, histolic, 
and electrophonetic equipment, and the osteological lab is centered 
around an extensive research collection The department's two archaeol- 
ogy labs, containing materials collected from field schools of the past 
several years, serve as both teaching and research labs 



Anthropology Major Requirements. A student who declares a major In 
anthropology will be awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree upon fulfillment of 
the requirements of the degree program. The student must complete at 
least ttiirty hours of courses labeled ANTH with a grade of C or better in 
each course The courses are distributed as follows: 
a. Eighteen hours of required courses that must Include ANTH 101, 102. 

397, 401, 441 or 451 and 371 or 461 or 361, 
b Twelve hours of elective courses In anthropology of which nine hours 

must be at the 300 level or above, 
c Eighteen hours of supporting courses (courses outside of anthropol- 
ogy offerings in fields that are complementary to the major's specific 
anthropological interest) Supporting courses are to be chosen by the 
student and approved by a faculty advisor 

In addition to the above requirements anthropology majors must meet 
those of the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences specifying general 
courses, grade point average, course load, and the forty credit hours of 
University Studies program approved courses required of every degree- 
seeking student of the University 



Advising. The Anthropology Department allows the student to select his or 
her faculty advisor to fit particular Interests and needs All anthropology 
faculty members are advisors (and should be contacted individually) who 
help plan each student's program All majors are expected to seek out a 
faculty advisor and consult with him/her on a regular basis For additional 
information, students should contact the Undergraduate Studies Coordi- 
nator, Dr Richard Dent. Room 1106. Woods Hall telephone 454-5354 



The Honors Program. The Anthropology Department also offers an Honors 
Program that provides the student an opportunity to pursue in-depth study 
of his or her interests Acceptance is contingent upon a 3 5 GPA in anthro- 
pology courses and a 3 overall average Members of this program are 
encouraged to take as many departmental honors courses as possible 
The citation is awarded upon completion and review of a thesis to be done 
within the field of anthropology Details and applications are available in the 
Anthropology Office, or contact your advisor for further information 

ANTH 101 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor is prerequisite for 
all upper division archaeology or physical anthropology courses ANTH 102 
(or equivalent), or permission of instructor is prerequisite for all upper 
division cultural anthropology and linguistics courses 



Anthropology Student Association. An anthropology student association 
meets regularly to plan student events and to help coordinate various 
student and faculty activities Meeting times are posted outside Room 
0133. Woods Hall 



Course Code Prefix — ANTH 



Applied Mathematics Program 
(MAPL) 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and 
Physical Sciences 

1104 Mathematics, 454-5331 

Director: Cooper 

Faculty: Over 1(X3 members from thirteen units of the campus 

The Applied Mathematics Program is a graduate program in which the 
students combine studies in mathematics and application areas The pro- 
gram IS administered by the Applied Mathematics Program and all MAPL 
courses carry credit in mathematics An undergraduate program stressing 
applied mathematics is available to majors in mathematics and sucn 
courses occur under the MATH and STAT label as well as the MAPL label 
See Mathematics listing for details 

Course Code Prefis — MAPL 



Architecture (ARCH) 

For Information consult School of Architecture entry 



Art (ARTT) 



College of Arts and Humanities 

1211 ArlSociology Building. 454-0344 

Chair: Morrison 

Professors: DeMonte. Dnskell, Lapinski, Truitt 

Associate Professors: Craig, Forbes, Gelman, Kehoe, Klank, 

Krushenick. Niese. Pogue, Richardson 

Assistar}t Professors: Blotner, Gossage. Ruppert, Sanborn 

The Art Major 

An Art Department Is a place where concepts become art objects To 
accomplish this transformation the artist must be capable of articulating 
and refining the concept, and then be able to apply acquired knowledge 
and skills to the materials that compnse the resulting object 

This inclination of human beings to make and emt)ellish objects that 
ultimately reflect something about intangible concepts is thousands of 
years old In the Twentieth Century, Art Department faculties and students 
embody this fundamental human inclination and attempt to understand. 
convey, and celebrate it 

Requirements for the Art Major 

The student may choose one of two Major Program Options; Program 

"A " or Program "B" 

Program "A' Requirements (39 Major credits 1 12 Supporting Area credits) 
ARTH 100 Introduction to Art (3) 
ARTT 100 Elements of Design (3) 
ARTT 1 10 Elements of Drawing (3) 

ARTT 208 Intermediate Design or alternative course chotce (3) 
ARTT 210 Intermediate Drawing (3) 
ARTT 200 (formerly 260) History of Art (Prehistoric to Renaissance) 

(3) 

ARTT 201 (formerly 261) History of Art (Renaissance to present) (3) 

ARTT 320 Elements of Painting (3) 

ARTT 33x Elements of Sculpture (330. 334. or 335) (3) 

ARTT 34x Elements of Printmakmg (340, 341, or 344) (3) 

ARTT 418 Advanced Drawing (3) 

ARTT XXX Choice, 3/400 level (3) 

ARTT XXX Choice, any level (3) 

Supporting Area 

Twelve coherently related non-art courses approved by an advisor S<x 
of these credits must be taken in one department ar>d must be at the 3. 
400level (12) 

Program "B' requirements (30 Major credits t 12 Supporting Area) 
ARTH 100 Introduction to Art (3) 
ARTT 100 Elements of Design (3) 
ARTT 1 10 Elements of Drawing (3) 

ARTT 208 Intermediate Design or alternative course chotce (3) 
ARTT 210 Intermediate Drawing (3) 
ARTT 320 Elements o( Painting (3) 



ARTT 33x Elements of Sculpture (330, 334, or 335) 
ARTT 34x Elements of Prinlmaking (340, 341, or 344) (3) 
ARTT 418 Advanced Drawing (3) 
ARTT XXX Choice. 3/400 leveT (3) 

Supporting Area 

ARTH 200 (formerly 260) History of Art (Pretiistoric to Renaissance) (3) 

ARTH 201 (formerly 261) History of Art (Renaissance to present) (3) 

ARTH XXX Cfioice, 3/400 level (3) 

ARTH XXX Ctioice, 3/400 level (3) 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy Major or 
Supporting Area requirements 

Advising: 

Advisor's signature Is not required, however we strongly recommend 
that the student see an advisor each semester Additionally, we recom- 
mend that the student see an Arts & Humanities advisor once each year 
Professor Jim Forbes is the Primary Advisor and can be reached at x0344 
The Advising Office is in room fvll 320 in the Art/Socy Building 

Fi«ldwor1( and Internship Opportunities: 

Students in past internships have worked in a variety of settings These 
have included assisting professionals complete public commissions, com- 
mercial or cooperative gallery and exhibition duties, and working in profes- 
sional artists' workshops in the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan 
area Professors Patrick Craig and Patrice Kehoe are coordinators of the 
Fleldwork and Internship program (ARTT 386 & 387) They may be con- 
tacted through the mam office of the Art Department 

Financial Assistance: 

The Art Department administers ten Creative and Performing Arts 
Scholarships that are available to entering freshmen and transfer students 
This award is awarded on a one-year basis but is potentially renewed for a 
maximum of four years to any one individual Annual Faculty reviews are 
required for students who wish to be considered for renewal Additional 
information is available in the main office of the Art Department 

Honors and Awards: 

Our Honors Program is currently being developed. Students interested 
in further information are encouraged to contact Professor Richard Klank 
through the mam office of the department 

Graduating Art Majors have an exhibition in December and in May of 
each academic year The James P Wharton Prize is awarded to the out- 
standing graduating student in these exhibitions. Professor Wharton is a 
former chairman of the department. 

The exhibition is presented in The West Gallery This exhibition space is 
devoted primarily to exhibitions of the student's art works and is adminis- 
tered by undergraduate art majors (Room 1309) 

Lecture Program: 

The Art Department has a lecture program in which artists and critics 
are brought to the campus to explore ideas in contemporary art. A strong 
component of this program is devoted to the art ideas of women and 
minonties 

Course Ck)de Prefix: ARTT 



Art History (ARTH) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1211 Art/Sociology Building, 454-3431 

Professor and Chair: Farquhar 

Professors Emeritus: deLeins, Levitme 

Professors: Burnham, Denny. Eyo, Miller, Rearick, Wheelock 

Associate Professors: Hargrove, Pressly, Spiro, Withers 

Assistant Professors: Caswell, Kim, Peters-Campbell, Sandler, Venit 

Slide Curator: Bonnell 

Gallery Director: Owens 

The Art History Major 

A major in the department of Art History leads to a Bachelor of Arts 
degree through the study and scholarly interpretation of existing works of 
art, from the prehistoric era to the present The goal of the Art History 
Department is to develop the student's aesthetic sensitivity and under- 
standing of art as well as to impart a knowledge of the works, the artists, 
and their place in history In addition to courses in European art history and 
archaeology, the curriculum includes courses in African, American. Black 
American. Chinese, Japanese, and Pre-Columbian art history and archaeol- 
ogy, all taught by specialists in the fields The department's 65,000 volume 
art library and the University s art gallery are located m the art building 

An Art History major is often combined for a double major with other 
academic disciplines, such as Anthropology, American studies. Classics, 



Art History 73 

Economics, History, languages and literature, or with professional disci- 
plines, such as Architecture. Design, and Journalism The Art History 
faculty encourages the development of language skills and writing The 
program provides a good foundation for graduate study, for work in muse- 
ums and galleries, or for law, writing and publishing, teaching, and any 
profession for which clear thinking and wnting are required 
The Department of Art History offers two majors 

Art History Major A with a non-art supporting area: 

Required courses: 

ARTH 100, Introduction to Art (3) 

ARTH 200 (formerly 260) Survey of Art History, part I (3) 

ARTH 201 (formerly 261) Survey of Art History, part II (3) 

Five 300-400 level ARTH courses, excluding the department's 

Masterpiece Courses (15) 

ARTT 100, Elements of Design (3) 

ARTT 110, Elements of Drawing (3) 

One more course in ARTT, any level (3) 

Supporting Area: 

Twelve coherently related non-art credits approved by an advisor. Six 
of these credits must be taken in one department and must be at junior- 
senior level (12) 

Art History Major B, with the supporting area in studio art: 

Required courses: 

ARTH 100. Introduction to Art (3) 

ARTH 260 (or 200) Survey of Art History, part I (3) 

ARTH 261 (or 201) Survey of Art History, part II (3) 

Five 300 400 level ARTH courses (15) 

Three more ARTH courses at any level (9) 

ARTT 100, Elements of Design (3) 

ARTT 110, Elements of Drawing (3) 

Two upper level ARTT courses (6) 

Total credit hours needed for Art History Major A or B, combined major 
and supporting area, are 45 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major or 
supporting area requirements 

Awards 

The Department of Art History offers two undergraduate awards each 
year: the J K Reed Fellowship Award to an upper-level major who will be 
studying at the university for at least one more semester and the Frank 
DiFederIco Book Award to a senior nearing graduation 

Course Code Prefix: ARTH 



Astronomy Program (ASTR) 

Collejge of Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences 

2105 Space Sciences BIdg , 454-3001 

Director: Bell 

Associate Director: Trasco 

Professors: A'Hearn, Harnngton, Kundu, Papdopoulos, Rose, Wentzel, 

Wilson 

Associate Professors: Blitz, Eichler, Heckman, Matthews, Zipoy 

Assistant Professor: Mundy 

Adjunct/Part-Time Professors: Hauser, Holt, Trimble, Westerhout 

Professors Emeritus: Erickson, Kerr 

The Astronomy Program offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Astronomy as well as a series of courses of general interest to non- 
majors Astronomy majors are given a strong undergraduate preparation in 
astronomy, mathematics and physics. The degree program is designed to 
prepare students for positions in government and industry laboratones or 
for graduate work in astronomy or related fields A degree in astronomy has 
also proven valuable as preparation for non-astronomical careers such as 
in law or business. 

Major Requirements 

Astronomy majors are required to take two basic courses in astronomy 
and astrophysics — ASTR 200 and ASTR 350 They are also required to 
take ASTR 210 (Practical Astronomy) plus three 400-level astronomy 
courses, one of which must be ASTR 410 

Students majoring in astronomy are also required to obtain a good 
background in physics and in mathematics The normal required sequence 
is PHYS 171, 272, 273 and the associate labs PHYS 275, 276 and 375 With 



74 Biological Sciences Program 



the permission of the advisor, PHYS 161. 262, 263 plus 375 can be substi- 
tuted for this sequence Astronomy majors are also required to lake a 
series of supporting courses in mathematics These are I^ATH 140, 141, 
240 and 241 In addition. I\^ATH 246 is strongly recommended 

The Program requires that a grade of C or better be obtained in all 
courses Any student who wishes to be recommended for graduate work in 
astronomy must maintain a B average He or she should also consider 
including several additional advanced courses beyond the minimum 
required, to be selected from astronomy, physics and mathematics 

Detailed information on typical programs an alternatives to the stan- 
dard program can be found in the pamphlet entitled "Department Require- 
ments for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Astronomy" which is available 
from the Astronomy Program office 

Courses (or Non-Science Majors. There are a variety of astronomy courses 
offered for those who are interested in learning about the subject but do 
not wish to major in it These courses do not require any background in 
mathematics or physics and are geared especially to the non-science 
major ASTR 100 is a general survey course that briefly covers all of the 
major topics in astronomy ASTR 1 10 is the lab that can be taken with or 
after ASTR 100 Several 300-level courses are offered primarily for non- 
science students who want to learn about a particular field in depth, such 
as the Solar System, Galaxies and the Universe, and Life in the Universe 
Non-science majors should not normally take ASTR 200 or ASTR 350 

Honors in Astronomy. The Honors Program offers students of exceptional 
ability and interest in astronomy an educational program with a number of 
special opportunities for learning. There are many opportunities for part- 
time research participation which may develop into full-time summer 
projects An honors seminar is offered for advanced students, credit may 
be given lor independent work or study, and certain graduate courses are 
open for credit toward the bachelor's degree 

Students for the Honors Program are accepted by the Department's 
Honors Committee on the basis of recommendations Irom their advisors 
and other faculty members Most honors candidates submit a written 
report on their research project, which together with an oral comprehen- 
sive examination in the senior year, concludes the program which may lead 
to graduation "with honors (or high honors) in astronomy " 

Further information about advising and the honors program can be 
obtained by calling the Astronomy Program office at (301) 454-3001 

Course Code Prefix — ASTR 



Biological Sciences Program 

College of Life Sciences 

H.J. Patterson Hall, 454-3812 

Coordinator: Berg 

The General Biological Sciences Major: This program is designed for the 
student who is interested in a broader education in the biological sciences 
than IS available in the programs for majors in the various departments in 
the College of Life Sciences It is appropriate for the entering student who 
wishes to explore the various areas of biology before specializing in the 
major offered by a single department, or for the student desiring to concen- 
trate on a broad area of biology 

By the beginning of the junior year students select one of several areas 
to emphasize, including marine biology, ecology, physiology, genetics, 
animal sciences, botany, chemistry, entomology, microbiology, or zoology 
Information pertaining to a specific emphasis or to the generalist program 
is available at the College Office Alternatively, the student may elect to 
remain a generalist throughout the program Individual programs to meet 
specific career goals may be developed between the student and the 
Coordinator In each case, advising will be carried out in the department in 
which most of the work is to be taken 

Preparation for graduate study in a specialized area of biology is readily 
accomplished under this program by the judicious selection of junior-senior 
level courses in the proposed area of graduate concentration Students in 
the program who are attempting to meet the requirements of a pre-profes- 
sional program should also seek advice from advisors of those respective 
programs Students in the program who wish to prepare for secondary 
school science teaching should contact the staff of the Science Teaching 
Center of the College of Education for information concerning the require 
menis for certification 

Requirements for Major All students must complete the core require 
ments for the College of Life Sciences In addition, the following courses 
are required 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements 30 

College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 38-40 



1 of the following three courses 

BOTN 202-Plant Kingdom 

ENTM 205 Principles of Entomology 

ZOOL 210Animal Diversity 

IvIICB 200-General Microbiology 

1 of the following 5 courses 

BOTN 414-Plant Genetics 

ZOOL 213-Genetics 

ANSC 201 -Basic Principles of Animal Genetics 

HORT 274-Genetics of Cultivated Plants 

MICB 380-Bacterial Genetics 

Advanced Program 

Electives 



22 
16-19 

^ra3 



A grade of "C or better IS required for BIOL 105, 106. the Diversity course, 
MICB 200 and genetics A "C" average is required for the other College ol 

Life Sciences core courses 

Advanced Program: Students must complete an approved curriculum that 
includes one course in statistics (BIOM 301. BIOM 401, STAT 250. STAT 
400, STAT 464, or PSYC 200) and 19 credits of biological sciences selected 
from the courses t)elow A minimum of ten credits must t>e taken in the area 
of emphasis At least two courses must involve latwratory or fieldwork at 
the 300-400 level At least 15 of the 19 credits of biological sciences must 
be completed in courses numbered 300 or above Two participating 
departments must be represented by at least one course in the 15 credits 
of 300-400 work No 386-387 credits (experiential learning) will be 
accepted A grade ol 'C" or better is required in all courses within the 
Advanced Program Courses currently approved for the advanced pro- 
gram include: 

AGRI411, 489 

AGRO 105, 403, 422, 423 

ANSC 101, 211, 212. 214, 252. 305, 327, 350, 370, 398. 399. 401. 406. 

412. 413, 415, 416, 427, 443, 446. 447. 452, 462, 463, 466. 480 
BIOL 398 399 

BOTN all courses except BOTN 100, 101. 103. 200. 202, 211 and 414. 
BCHM 261. 461, 462, 463, 464 
CHEM 287, 487 

ENTM all courses except ENTM 100, 111 205, 252, and 303 
GEOL 102, 331, 431. 432. 434. 452 
HORT 171 and 271 

MICB all courses except MICB 100, 200. 322 
NUSC 402, 403, 450 
NUTR 440, 450 Credit will be given for only one ol Ihese-NUSC 450 or 

NUTR 450 
PHED 300 

PSYC 400, 402, 403, 410, 412, and 479 
ZOOL all courses except ZOOL 101, 146. 181. 207. 210, 213. 301. 346. 

and 381 
ZOOL 328Z requires prior approval ol Coordinating Advisor 

Research experience in the various areas ol biology is piossible under 
this plan by special arrangement with faculty research advisors and prior 
approval of Coordinator Not more than 3 hours ol special prot)lems or 
research can be taken as part ol the advanced program requirement All 
advanced program curricula are subject to the approval of the General 
Biological Sciences Program Committee 

In compliance with the University Studies Program, the following 
courses cannot be used by G BS majors to fullill USP requirements 
EDMS451, ZOOL 346 

Advising: Academic advising is mandatory Contact one of the following 

advisors 

Berg, Coordinator (H J Patterson room 1225, 454-3812) 
Barnett (HJP room 3214 454-3812) 
Koines (HJP room 1227, 454-3812) 
Van Valkenburg (HJP room 3226. 454-3812) 
Armstrong-Entomology Emphasis (Symons room 2309. 454-7122) 
Botlino-Genetics Emphasis (HJP room 3223. 454 3821) 
Cook-Microbiology Emphasis (Microbiology room 3115, 454-5381) 
Klavon-Chemistry Emphasis (Symons room 1220 454 5257) 
Linder-Zoology Emphasis (Zoology-Psychology room 3202. 454-6249) 
Motta-Bolany Emphasis (HJP room 4108. 454-3994) 

Honors: The General Biological Sciences Honors Program is a special 
program for exceptionally lafenled and promising students It emphasizes 
the scholarly approach to independent study Information about this hon- 
ors program may be obtained from the Coordinating Advisor 

Student Honor Society: Phi Sigma Contact Linda Dale X5l3t, (or informa 
lion on membership and eligibility 

Course Code Prefix BIOL 



Botany (BOTN) 

College of Life Sciences 

HJ Patterson Hall. 454 3812 

Professor and Acting Chair: Teramura 

Distinguished Professor: Diener 

Professors: Bean, Corljett. Gant. Kantzes. Krusberg, Kung, Lockard. 

Patterson, Reveal, Sisier 

Associate Professors: Barnett, Bottino, Cooke, Forsetti, Grybauskas, 

Motta, Racusen, Steiner, Sze, Wolnjak 

Assistant Professors: Hutcheson, Van Valkenburg, Watson 

Lecturer: Berg 

Instructors: Hlggins, Koines 

Emeriti: Brown, Sorokin 

The Botany Major This major is designed with a diverse range of career 
possibilities for students in botany or plant biology, and gives students a 
broad backqround in supporting areas of biological sciences, chemistry. 
math, and physics In addition to the botany courses required of all majors, 
this major allows students to take a number of botany or related electives 
to develop the students area of interest within botany The department 
offers instruction in the fields of physiology, pathology, ecology, taxonomy, 
anatomy-morphology, genetics, mycology, nematology, virology, phycol- 
ogy, and general botany 

Requirements for Major Requirements of this major are under review 
and may be changed prior to the 1989-90 academic year. All students 
must complete the core requirements for the College of Life Sciences In 
addition, the following courses are required 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements 30 

College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 38-40 

Botany 202-Plant Kingdom 4 

Botany 21 2Plant Taxonomy 4 

Botany 221 Diseases of Plants 4 

Botany 398-Seminar 1 

Botany 414Plant Genetics 3 

Botany 416Plant Structure 4 

Botany 441 -Plant Physiology 4 

Botany 462-Plant Ecology 2 

Botany 464Plant Ecology Laboratory 2 

Botany Electives or Related Electives 8-10 

Microbiology 200-General Microbiology 4 

Electives 10 

All required courses, including botany-related electives, require a grade 
of C or better Botany-related electives may include no more than one 
lower-level course and must be approved by the advisor In some areas of 
botany, an introductory course in geology or soils is highly recommended 

Advising: Academic advising is mandatory Contact the Botany Coordinat- 
ing Advisor. Dr Neal Barnett (room 3214, HJP), or Dr Linda Berg (room 
1225, HJP) Phone 454-3812 to schedule appointments 

Honors: The Botany Department offers a special program for exceptionally 
talented and promising students through the Honors Program, which 
emphasizes the scholarly approach to the independent study Information 
concerning this program may be obtained from the academic advisors 

Course Code Prefix: BOTN 



Business and Management, 
General 

For information, consult College of Business and Management entry 

Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 
(ENCH, ENNU) 

College of Engineering 

2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineenng BIdg,, 454-2431 
Chair: Roush 



Botany 75 

The Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department offers programs in 
chemical, nuclear and materials engineenng In addition, study programs in 
the specialty areas of applied polymer science, biochemical engineenng. 
and process simulation and control are available The latter programs are 
interdisciplinary with other departments at the University The departmen- 
tal programs prepare an undergraduate for graduate study or immediate 
industrial employment following the baccalaureate degree 

Chemical Engineering Program (ENCH) 

Director: Smith 

Professors; Asbjorsen, Cadman, Gentry, Hsu. McAvoy. Regan. 

Sengers", Silverman, Smith, Weigand 

Associate Professors: Calabrese, Choi, Gasner 

Assistant Professors: Benlley, Coppella, Davison, Halemane, Lee. 

Mavrovouniotis, Payne, Rao, Wang, Zafinou 

Adjunct Professor: Ulbrecht 

Emeritus: Beckmann 

"member of Institute tor Physical Sciences and Technology 

The Chemical Engineering Major The Chemical Engineenng Program 
emphasizes the application of basic engineering and economic principles 
— and basic sciences of mathematics, physics and chemistry — to pro- 
cess industries concerned with the chemical transformation of matter The 
chemical engineer is primarily concerned with research and process devel- 
opment leading to new chemical process ventures or a better understand- 
ing of existing ones, with the efficient operation of the complete chemical 
plant or its component units, with the technical services engineering 
required for improving and understanding plant operation and the prod- 
ucts produced: with the sales and economic distribution of the plant prod- 
ucts: and with the general management and executive direction of process 
industry plants and industrial complexes The process may be a chemical, 
petrochemical, biochemical or petroleum operation 

Because of this wide range of ultimate applications, the chemical engi- 
neer finds interesting and diverse career opportunities in such vaned fields 
as chemical (inorganic and organic), food processing and manufacture, 
metallurgical, nuclear and energy conversion, petroleum (refining, produc- 
tion, or petrochemical), and pharmaceutical industries Additional opportu- 
nities are presented by the research and development activities of many 
public and private research institutes and allied agencies 

Requirements for Major The curriculum is composed of: (1) the required 
USP (general education) requirements of College Park: (2) a core of mathe- 
matics, physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences required of all engi- 
neering students: (3) the required core of 31 credits of ENCH courses 
which includes ENCH 215, 280, 300, 333, 425, 427, 437, 440, 444, and 446: 
(4) twelve credits of ENCH electives A sample program follows 

Freshman Year. The freshman year is the same for all Engineering depart- 
ments Please consult The College of Engineering entry 



Sophomore Year i II 

Math 241 — Calculus III 4 

Math 246 — Differential Equations for Scientists & Engi- 
neers 3 

PHYS 262, 263 — General Physics 4 4 

ENES 230 — Intro to Matenals and Their Applications . 3 

CHEM 233 — Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 243 — Organic Chemistry II 4 

ENCH 215 — Chem, Engr. Analysis 3 

ENCH 280 — Transport Processes I: Fluid Mechanics ... 2 

University Studies Program Requirements _3 

Total 18 16 

Junior Year 

ENCH 300 — Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

ENCH 440 — Chemical Engineering Kinetics 3 

ENCH 442 — Chemical Engr Systems Analysis 3 

CHEM 481, 482 — Physical Chemistry I, II 3 3 

CHEM 483 — Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 2 

ENCH 425, 427 — Transport Processes II: Heat Transfer: 

Transport Processes III: Mass Transfer 3 3 

ENEE Elective*** 3 

University Studies Program Requirements _3 _6 

Total 17 18 

Senior Year 

ENCH 437 — Chemical Engineenng Lab 3 

ENCH 444 — Process Engr Economics and Design I , . 3 

ENCH 446 — Process Engr Economics and Design II . . 3 

ENCH 333 — Seminar 1 

Technical Electives 6 6 

University Studies Program Requirements _3 _6 

Total 15 16 



76 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 



Minimum Degree Credits — 120 credits and fulfillment of all department, 
college, and University requirements 

•Qualified students may elect to take CHEI^ 105 and 115 ( 4 sem firs each) 

Instead of CHEIVI 103 and 113 

"Students must consult witfi an advisor on selection of appropriate courses for 

tfieir particular course of study 

■"ENEE 300 IS a recommended course 

Technical Electives Guidelines 

Chemical Engineering 

Twelve credits of technical electives are required It is recommended 
that they be taken during the senior year 
Additional guidelines are as follows 
1 Two courses must be taken in one of the areas of specialization given 
below 

2. The remaining technical electives will normally also be chosen from the 
list given Upon the approval of your advisor and written permission of 
the department chair or program director, a limited amount of substitu- 
tion may be permitted Substitutes, including ENCH 468 — Research 
(1 — 3 cr ) must fit into an overall plan of study emphasis 

3, As noted, several of the technical elective courses are sequenced 
Check recommended prerequisites when planning your technical 
electives 

Technical Electives — Chemical Engineering Program 

Biochemical Engineering 

ENCH 482 Biochemical Engineering (3) 

ENCH 485 Biochemical Engineering Laboratory (2), recommended 
only if ENCH 482 is taken Simultaneous enrollment in 
ENCH 468 (1 credit) is recommended 
Polymers 

ENCH 490 Introduction to Polymer Science (3) 
ENCH 492 Applied Physical Chemistry of Polymers (3) 
ENCH 494 Polymer Technology Laboratory (3) Recommended if ENCH 
490 or 492 is taken 

Chemical Processing 

ENCH 450 Chemical Process Development (3) 

Processing Analysis and Optimization 

ENCH 452 Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis (counts as 

Lab ) (3) 
ENCH 453 Applied fvlathematics in Chemical Engineenng (3) 
ENCH 454 Chemical Process Analysis and Optimization (3) 

Admission: All Chemical Engineenng majors must meet admission, pro- 
gress and retention standards of the College of Engineering 

Advising: All students choosing chemical engineering as their primary field 
must see an undergraduate advisor each semester Appointments for 
advising can be made by calling extension 7898 or by going to room 2143 
of the Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building 

Coop Program: The chemical engineering program works within the Col- 
lege of Engineering Cooperative Engineering Education Program For infor- 
mation on this program consult the College of Engineering entry in this 
catalog or call 454-5191 

Financial Assistance: Financial aid based upon need is available through 
the University Office of Student Financial Aid A number of scholarships are 
available through the College of Engineering Part-time employment is 
available in the Department 

Honors and Awards: Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship 
and outstanding service to the Department. College and University These 
awards include the David Arthur Berman Memorial Award, the Engineering 
Society of Baltimore Award, and the American Institute of Chemists Award 
for the outstanding senior in chemical engineering AlChE awards are 
given to the junior with the highest cumulative GPA as well as to the 
outstanding junior and outstanding senior in chemical engineenng 

Student Organization: Students operate a campus student chapter of the 
professional organization, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers 



Course Code Prefi) 



ENCH 



Nuclear Engineering Program (ENNU) 

2309 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, 454-2436 

Director: Uunno 

Professors: Hsu, Munno, Roush, Silverman 

Associate Professors: Almenas, Modarres. Pertmer 

Assistant Professor: Mosleh 

Lecturer: Lee (p t ) 



The Nuclear Engineering Major Nuclear Engineering deals with the practi- 
cal use of nuclear energy from nuclear fission, fusion and radioisotope 
sources The major use of nuclear energy is in electric power generation 
Other uses are in the areas of chemical processing, medicine, instrumenta- 
tion, and isotope trace analysis The nuclear engineer is primarily con- 
cerned with the design and operation of energy conversion devices rang- 
ing from very large reactors to miniature nuclear batteries, and with the use 
of nuclear reactions in many environmental, biological and chemical 
processes Because of the wide range of uses for nuclear systems the 
nuclear engineer finds interesting and diverse career opportunities in a 
variety of companies and laboratories 

Students may use nuclear engineering as a field of concentration in the 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program 

Requirements for Major The curriculum is composed of (1) the required 
USP (general education) requirements of the campus: (2) a core of mathe- 
matics, physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences required of all engi- 
neering students. (3) twelve credits of courses selected within a secondary 
field, (4) twenty-seven credits of nuclear engineering courses including 
ENNU 21 5, 440. 450. 455, 460, 465, 480, and 4§0 (5) the course on environ- 
mental effects on materials, ENMA 464 A maximum degree of flexibility 
has been retained so that the student and advisor can select an elective 
ENES course, an elective ENNU course, and two technical elective 
courses A sample program follows 

Freshman Year. The Freshman year is the same for all Engineering depart- 
ments Please consult The College of Engineering entry 

Semester 

Soptiomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MATH 241 — Calculus III , , 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations 

PHYS 262, 263 — Genera! Physics 

ENES 230 — Intro to Materials and Their Applications 
ENES 240 — Engineering Computation or ENME 205 — 
Engineering Analysis and Computer Prog 

Secondary Field Electives 

ENNU 215 — Intro to Nuclear Technology 

Total 

Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENNU 440 — Nuclear Technology Laboratory 

ENNU 450 — Nuclear Reactor Engineenng I 

Math-Physics Science Elective 

Secondary Field Courses 

ENNU 455 — Nuclear Reactor Engineering 11 

ENNU 460 — Nuclear Heat Transport 

ENMA 464 — Environmental Effects on Engineering 

Materials 

Total 



/ 


// 


3 


3 


4 






3 


4 


4 


3 




3 






3 




3 


17 


16 


3 


6 


3 




3 




3 




3 


3 




3 




3 




3 


15 


18 


3 


3 


3 






3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






3 


3 




18 


15 



Senior Year 

University Studies Programs Requirements 

ENNU Elective 

ENNU 465 — Nuclear Reactor Systems Analysis 

Secondary Field Courses 

Technical Electives 

ENNU 480 — Reactor Core Design 

ENNU 490 — Nuclear Fuel and Power Management 

ENES Elective 

Total 

Minimum Degree Credits — 120 credits and fulfillment of all department, 
college, and University requirements 

•Qualified students may elect to lake CHEM 105 and 115 (4 sem hrs each) 
instead of CHEM 103 and 1 13 

••Students must consult with an advisor on selection ol appropriate courses lof 
their particular course ol study 

Admission: All Nuclear Engineenng students must meet admission, pro 
gress and retention standards of the College of Engineering 

Coop Program: The nuclear engineering program works within the College 
of Engineenng Cooperative Engineering Education Program For informa- 
tion on this program, see the College of Engineenng entry in this catalog, or 
call ext 5191 

Advising: Students choosing nuclear engineenng as their pnmary fieW 
should follow the listed curriculum lor nuclear engineers They should 
submit a complete program ol courses for approval during ttieir junwr year 
Students electing nuclear engineering as their secondary field should seek 
advice from a member of the nuclear engineenng faculty prior to their 
sophomore year Call extension 2430 to talk to an advisor or to schedule an 
appointment 



Chemistry and Biochemistry 77 

Minor Courses 3 3 

Technical Eleclives _3 

Total 16 18 

Senior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 6 

ENMA 470 — Structure and Properties of Engineering 

Materials 3 

ENMA 471 — Phys Chem of Engineering Materials 3 

ENMA 472 — Technology of Engineering Matenals 3 

ENMA 473 — Processing of Engineering Materials 3 

Minor Courses 3 3 

Technical Electives _ Ji 

Total " 15 18 

Minimum Degree Credits — 120 credits and the fulfillment of all Depart- 
ment, College, and University requirements 

■Qualified students may elect to take CHEM 105 and 1 15{4sem hrs each) 
instead of CHEM 103 and 113, 

"Students must consult with an advisor on selection of appropriate 
courses for their particular course of study 

Admission: All Materials Engineenng students must meet admission, pro- 
gress and retention standards of the College of Engineering 

Advising: Students choosing materials engineering as their primary field 
should follovtf the listed curriculum for materials engineers They should 
submit a complete program of courses for approval during their )unior year 
Students electing materials engineering as their secondary field should 
seek advice from the director of the materials engineering faculty prior to 
their sophomore year. Call extension 2434 to talk to the director or to 
schedule an appointment 

Coop Program: The materials engineering program works within the Col- 
lege of Engineering Cooperative Engineenng Education Program For 
details, see The College of Engineering entry in this catalog 

Financial Assistance: Financial Aid based upon need is available through 
the University Office of Student Financial Aid A number of scholarships are 
available through the College of Engineering Part-time employment is 
available in the Department 

Honors and Awards: Each of the large number of professional materials 
onented societies such as the metallurgical and ceramic societies sponsor 
awards to recognize outstanding scholarship and undergraduate research. 
All students enrolled in the materials engineering program are encouraged 
to select a faculty advisor who in their junior and senior year will guide them 
towards the nomination for these awards. 

Student Organization: All major professional materials societies invite stu- 
dents to become active in their undergraduate divisions The materials 
faculty members specializing in certain areas of materials engineering will 
guide the students toward the society of their choice. 

Course Code Prefix: ENMA. 



Chemistry and Biochemistry (CHEM, 
BCHM) 

College of Life Sciences 

Chairman's Office Room 1309 Chemistry Building: 454-4114 
Student Information: Room 1320 Chemistry Building; 454-2605 

Chair: Dr Paul Mazzocchi 

Associate Chair: Dr Bruce Jarvis 

Professors: Alexander, Ammon. Bailey, Bellama, Castellan, Freeman, 

Gerit, Gordon, Greer. Hansen. Helz, Henery-Logan. Holmlund, Huheey, 

Jarvis, Khanna, Kozarich, Mariano, Mazzocchi, Miller, Moore, Munn, 

O'Haver, Ponnamperumat, Stewart, Tossell, Walters. Weiner 

Associate Professors: Armstrong, Boyd, DeShong, DeVoe, Dunaway- 

Mariano, Kasler, Mignereyt, Murphey, Ondov, Sampugna 

Assistant Professors: Brusilow, Herndon, Julin, Poll, Ruett-Robey, 

Thirumalai 

Emeriti: Adier, Jaquith, Keeney, McNesby, Pratt, Rollinson, Sturtz, 

Svirbely, Vandersllce, Veitch 

tDistinguished Scholar - Teacher 

The Major: The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers the B S 

degree in both Chemistry and Biochemistry Either curriculum is designed 
to prepare major students for entering graduate school, for career opportu- 
nities in chemical and pharmaceutical industries, for basic research posi- 
tions in government and academic laboratories or to attend professional 
schools 



Financial Assistance: Financial aid based upon need is available through 
the University Office of Student Financial Aid A number of scholarships are 
available through the College of Engineering Part time employment is 
available in the Department Of particular interest are scholarships availa 
ble to qualified students at all undergraduate levels from the Institute for 
Nuclear Power Operations 

Honors and Awards: Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship 
and outstanding service to the Department, College and University These 
awards include the American Nuclear Society Award for Leadership and 
Service and the Award for Outstanding Contribution to the ANS Student 
Chapter The American Nuclear Society also provides awards to recognize 
the highest GPA for a student at the senior, junior and sophomore levels 
and to a senior with greatest scholarship improvement The Baltimore Gas 
and Electric Company also grants, through the program, an award for the 
Outstanding Junior of the year and a scholarship which includes the oppor 
tunity for summer employment to an academically qualified student with 
demonstrated interest in utility employment. 

Student Organization: Students operate a campus student chapter of the 
professional organization, the American Nuclear Society 

Course Code Prefix ENNU. 

Materials Engineering Program (ENMA) 

1 HOC Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, 454-2434 

Director: Wuttig 

Professors: Arsenault, Dieter*, Wuttig 

Associate Faculty: Armstrong* 

Assistant Professors: Ankem, Salamanca-Young 

"memtier of mechanical engineering department 

The Materials Engineering Major: The development and production of 
novel materials has become a major issue in all fields of engineering. 
Materials which are strong and light at the same time are needed for space 
structures, faster electro-optical switching materials will result m improved 
mass communications: and high temperature plastics would improve the 
efficiency of transportation systems Many of today's materials require- 
ments can be met by composites The materials engineering program 
provides the student with an interdisciplinary science-based education to 
understanding the structure and resulting properties of metallic, ceramic 
and polymeric materials A wide variety of careers is open to graduates of 
this program ranging from production and quality control in the traditional 
materials industries to the molecular construction of electronic materials in 
ultra-clean environments 

Students may use Materials Engineering as a field of concentration in 
the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program 

Requirements for Major: The curriculum is composed of: (1) the required 
USP (general education) requirements of the campus: (2) a core of mathe- 
matics, physics, chemistry, and engineering courses required of all engi- 
neenng students, (3) twelve credits of courses selected within a secon- 
dary, minor field, (4) twenty-three credits of materials engineering courses: 
and (5) technical electives to be selected by the student and his or her 
advisor to enrich, specialize or expand certain areas of knowledge within 
the chosen field 

Freshman Year. The Freshman curriculum is the same for all Engineering 
departments Please consult The College of Engineering entry 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

MATH 241 — Calculus III 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations for Scientists and 

Engineers 3 

PHYS 262, 263 — General Physics 4 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 3 

CHEM 233. 243 — Organic Chemistry I, II 4 4 

ENES 230 — Introduction to Materials and Their Applica- 
tions 3 

ENME 205 — Engineering Analysis and Computer Prog. _3 

Total 17 16 

In general, students should not register for 300-400 level engineering sub- 
jects until and unless they have satisfactorily completed MATH 241 and 
246 

Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 3 

CHEM 481 , 482 — Physical Chemistry I, II 3 3 

ENMA 300 — Materials Science and Engineering 3 

ENMA 301 — Materials Engineering Laboratory 1 

ENMA 462 ^ Deformation of Engineering Materials 3 

ENMA 463 — Chemical, Liquid and Powder Process of 

Engineering Matenals 3 



78 Civil Engineering 



Requirements for the Chemistry Majon The major in chemistry requires 
thirty-nine credits in chemistry, of which sixteen are lower-level and twenty- 
three are upper-level Six credits of the twenty-three upper-level require- 
ments must be selected from approved chemistry courses The program is 
designed to provide the maximum amount of flexibility to students seeking 
preparation for either the traditional branches of chemistry or the interdisci- 
plinary fields In order to meet requirements for a degree to be certified by 
the American Chemical Society, students must complete two additional 
laboratory courses selected from CHEIVI 433, 443, 425, 487 and BCHM 463 

A sample program, listing only the required or recommended courses, 
IS given below It is expected that each semester's electives will include 
courses intended to satisfy the general requirements of the University or of 
the College of Life Sciences, plus others of the student's choice 

Each required chemistry course must be passed with a minimum grade 
of C Required supporting courses must be passed with a C average 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
30 



Course Code Prefix CHEM, BCHfvl 



University Studies Program Requirements 
College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 

Departmental Requirements 

CHEM 481 : Physical Chemistry I 

CHEIvl 483 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I . 

CHEIVI 482: Physical Chemistry II 

CHEIVl 484: Physical Chemistry Laboratory II 
CHEfvl 401: Inorganic Chemistry . . 

400Level Chemistry courses 

Electives 

Total 



31 
120 

Requirements for the Biochemistry Major The department also offers a 
major in biochemistry In addition to the sexteen credits of lower-level 
chemistry, the program requires CHEM 321 and BCHM 461, 462, and 464, 
CHEM 481, 482 and 483, MATH 140 and 141:PHYS 141 and 142; and nine 
credits of approved biological science that must include at least one 
upper-level course A sample program, listing only the required courses, is 
given below. It is expected that each semester's electives will include 
courses intended to satisfy the general requirements of the University or of 
the College of Life Sciences, plus others of the student's choice. 

Each required chemistry and biochemistry course must be passed with 
a minimum grade of C. Required supporting courses must be passed with 
a C average 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

30 

40 

23-24 



University Studies Program Requirements . . . 
College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 

Departmental Requirements 

Approved Biological Science Elective 

CHEM 481 : Physical Chemistry I 

CHEM 483 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I . 

CHEM 482: Physical Chemistry II 

CHEM 484: Physical Chemistry Laboratory II 

BCHM 461 Biochemistry I 

BCHM 462 Biochemistry II 

BCHM 464 Biochemistry Laboratory II 

Approved Upper-level Biological Science . . . 

Electives 

Total 



3-4 
3 

'2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
4 



120-121 



Advising: Prior to registration for each semester, advising is mandatory 
Appointments for advising can be made by contacting the secretary in the 
Oflice of Undergraduate Studies; phone 454-2605 Room 1320 in the 
Chemistry Building 

Financial Assistance: Two outstanding juniors who are Chemistry or Bio- 
chemistry majors are selected in the Spring of each year to receive $600 
tuition scholarships from the John J Leidy Foundation to be used during 
the senior year No application is necessary since all juniors are automati- 
cally reviewed by the members of the Awards Committee 

Honors and Awards: In the Junior or Senior year. CHEM 398, Special 
Problems for Horror Students, is an opportunity for students with a GPA of 
3 0or better to conduct honors research Dr Herndon (Room 2130 Chemis- 
try Building, 454-4133) is the Coordinator After successful completion of a 
senior thesis and seminar, graduation "with honors" or "with high honors " 
in Chemistry can be attained 

Student Organizations: Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Fraternity is a profes- 
sional coed fraternity which recruits members from Chemistry. Biochemis 
try, and related science majors during each Fall & Spring semester Mem 
bers must have completed 1 year of General Chemistry and are expected 
to complete a minimum of 4 semesters of Chemistry The fraternity, which 
averages 30 members, holds weekly meetings and provides tutoring once 
a week for students in lower division chemistry courses The office is Room 
321 1 in the Chemistry Building Dr. Adier (Room 2228, phone 454 2613) is 
the faculty moderator 



Civil Engineering (ENCE) 

1173D Engineering Classroom Building, 454- 
2438 

Chair: Professor James Colville 

Professors: Aggour, Albrecht. Birkner. Carter. McCuen. Pitcher. Pagan, 

Sternberg, Witczak, Wolde-Tinsae 

Associate Professors: Ayyub, Chang, Garber, Goodings. Hao. Schel- 

ling, Schonfeld, Schwartz. Vannoy 

Assistant Professors: Austin, Bernold, Chang. Perl, Walters 

Senior Research Associate: Rib 

The Civil Engineering Major 

Civil Engineering is a people-serving profession, concerned with the 
planning, design, construction and operation of large complex systems 
such as buildings and bridges, water purification and distribution systems, 
highways, rapid transit and rail systems, ports and hart)ors, airports, tun- 
nels and underground construction, dams, power generating systems, and 
structural components of aircraft and ships Civil engineering also includes 
urban and city planning, water and land pollution and treatment problems, 
and disposal of hazardous wastes and chemicals The design and con- 
struction of these systems are only part of the many challenges and 
opportunities faced by civil engineers The recent revolution in computers 
communications and data management has provided new resources that 
are widely used by the professional civil engineer in providing safe, eco- 
nomical and functional facilities to serve our society. 

Requirements for Major: 

At both the undergraduate and graduate levels, the department offers 
programs of study in all six major areas of concentration in civil engineer- 
ing: construction engineering and management, environmental engineer- 
ing, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, transportation engi- 
neering, and water resources and remote sensing A total of 132 credit 
hours is required for a Bachelor s degree with emphasis in basic science 
(mathematics, chemistry and physics), engineering science, (mechanics of 
materials, statics and dynamics), basic civil engineering core courses, and 
twenty-two credits of technical electives that may be selected from a 
combination of the six areas of civil enginering concentration The present 
undergraduate curriculum, therefore, provides a sensible blend of required 
courses and electives, which permits students to pursue their interests 
without the risk of overspecialization at the undergraduate level 
Mandatory student evaluations of teaching and a recent departmental peer 
evaluation of teaching indicates that the quality of teaching and instruction 
within the department is outstanding 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



Sophomore Year 

MATH 241 — Calculus III 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations for Scientists and 

Engineers 3 

PHYS 262, 263 — General Physics II. Ill 4 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENES 221 — Dynamics 3 

ENCE 280 — Engineering Survey Measurements 3 

ENCE 221 — Introduction to Environmental Engineering 3 

University Studies Program Requirements _3 _3 

Total 17 16 

Junior Year 

ENCE 300 — Fundamentals of Engmeenng Materials 3 

ENCE 330 — Basic Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENCE 340 — Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics 3 

ENCE 350. 351 — Structural Analysis and Design I. II 3 3 

ENCE 360 — Engmeenng Analysis and Computer 

Programming 4 

ENCE 370 — Fundamentals of Transportation 

Engineering 3 

ENME 320 — Thermodynamics or 

ENCH 300 — Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

ENCE — Technical Elective* 3 

University Studies Program Requirements _6 

Total 16 18 

Senior Year 

ENCE — Technical Elective (Group A, 8, C. D, E or F) 7 "'3 

ENCE — Technical Elective "3 "3 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

Technical Elective" 3 



Classics 79 



University Studies Program Requirements ^ _3 

Total 16 15 

Minimum Degree Credits — 132 credits and fulfillment of all department, 
college, and University requirements 

■ See notes concerning Tectinical Electives 

** One course from available Technical Electives in Civil Engineering or 

approved Tectinical Elective outside department 

*" These numbers represent threesemestercredit courses 

Additional semester credits will be involved to the extent that courses 

carrying more than three credits are selected 

Notes Concerning Technical Electives in Civil Engineering 

A minimum of twenty-two credit hours of technical electives are required as 

follows 

1 All three courses from one area of concentration A, B, C, D. E or F 
2. Any four courses from the entire technical list, such that the follow- 
ing IS met 

(a) One course must be from Area G 

(b) No more than two courses within any area of concentration A, 
B, C. D. E, F or G 

Areas of Concentration 
A Structures; ENCE 450 (3); 451 (4): 452 (3), 
B Water Resources: ENCE 430 (4). 431 (3); 432 (3). 
C Environmental ENCE 433 (3), 434 (3). 435 (4) 
D Transportation ENCE 470 (4), 473 (3), 474 (3) 
E. Geotechnical ENCE 440 (4), 441 (3); 442 (3) 
F Construction Engineering Ivlanagement ENCE 421 (3): 411 (4), 420 (3) 
G Support Courses; ENCE 410 (3); 461 (3), 489 (3) 

Admission: See College of Engineering entrance requirements 

Advising: All students are assigned a faculty advisor who assists in course 
selection and scheduling throughout the student's entire undergraduate 
program For advising contact Dr Garber at 454-2225 in Room 1 163 Engi- 
neering Classroom Building Call for an appointment 

Fieldwoiic and Internship Opportunities: Several excellent co-op opportu- 
nities are available for Civil Engineering students See the College of Engi- 
neering entry in this catalog for a full description of the Engineering co-op 
program, or contact Heidi Sauber at 454-5191. 

Financial Assistance: The Department of Civil Engineering awards a num- 
ber of academic scholarships. These awards are designated primarily for 
junior and senior students A department scholarship committee solicits 
and evaluates applications each year. 

Honors and Awards: See College of Engineering Honors Program The 
Department of Civil Engineering offers the following awards 1) The Civil 
Engineering Outstanding Senior Award, 2) The ASCE Outstanding Senior 
Award; 3) The Woodword-Clyde Consultants Award; 4) The Bechtel Award; 
5) The Chi Epsilon Outstanding Senior Award; 6) The Ben Dyer Award; and 
7) The ASCE Maryland Section Award 

Student Organizations: Student organizations include the American Soci- 
ety of Civil Engineers Student Chapter which is open to all civil engineering 
students The Civil Engineering Honor Society, Chi Epsilon, elects mem- 
bers semi-annually Information on membership and eligibility for these 
student organizations may be obtained from the President of each Society, 
Room 0401. Engineering Classroom Building. 

Course Code Prefix; ENCE 



Classics (CLAS) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

4220 Jimenez, 454-2510 

Professor and Ctiair: Rowland 

Associate Professors: Duffy, Hallett, Hubbe, Staley 

Assistant Professors: Doherty, Stehle 

Visiting Faculty (1988/89): Dexter, Meltzer 

Classics IS the study of the languages, literature, culture and thought of 
ancient Greece and Rome Students at the University of Maryland at Col- 
lege Park may major in Classics with four options and may enroll in a vanety 
of courses on the classical world These options include Latin, Greek, 
Greek and Latin, and Classics in Translation. 

Major Requirements 

Option A: Latin 



Thirty credits of Latin at the 200-level or higher, at least twelve of which 
must be at the 400-level or higher, plus nine credits of supporting courses 
(for example, CLAS 170, HlSl 130, and one 300- or 400-level course in 
Roman history) 

Option B: Greek 

Thirty credits of Greek at the 200-level or higher, at least twelve of which 
must be at the 400 level or higher, plus nine hours of supporting courses 
(for example. CLAS 170. HIST 130, and a 300- or 400-level course in Greek 
history) 

Option C: Greek and Latin 

Thirty credits of either Greek or Latin and twelve hours of the other classi- 
cal language, plus nine hours of supporting courses (for example, CLAS 
170, HIST 130, and a 300- or 400-level course in Greek or Roman history) 
Students with no previous training in the second language may count 
introductory level courses as part of the twelve hour requirement 

Option D: Classics in Translation (Classical Humanities) 

Eighteen credits in CLAS courses including CLAS 100 (Classical Founda- 
tions) and a senior seminar or thesis, twelve credits in Greek or Latin 
courses; twelve credits in supporting courses (normally in Art History, 
Archaeology, Architecture, Government, History, Linguistics or Philoso- 
phy) Note CLAS 280 and CLAS 290 do not count toward this degree, 300- 
and 400-level courses in LATN and GREK may, with permission, be 
included among the eighteen required hours in CLAS 

Course Code Prefixes; CLAS, GREK, LATN 



Communication Arts and Theatre 
(CMRT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1147B Tawes Fine Arts Building, 454-2541 

Professor and Ctiair: Gillespie 

Professors: Aylward, Bentley, Fink, Gomery, Kolker, Meersman, Pug- 

liese (Emeritus), Strausbaugh (Emeritus), Wolvin 

Associate Professors: Falcione, Ferguson, Freimuth, Gaines, Kirkley, 

Klumpp, McCaleb, O'Leary, Weiss 

Assistant Professors: Blum, Brown, Coleman, Edgar, Elam, Kriebs, 

Marchetti, Milton, Parks, Patrick, Patterson, Pecora, Robinson, Shyles, 

Stowe, Ufema 

Instructor: Donnelly 

Lecturers: Doyle. Lancaster, Niles (p t), Niven (p t), Novelli (p t), 

Tavares (p.t.) 

The department curncula lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree and 
permit the student to develop a program with emphasis in one of the three 
areas of the department; (1) speech communication (political communica- 
tion, organizational communication, health communication, educational 
communication, and interpersonal communication), (2) theatre (history, 
design, and performance; production in a liberal arts theatre program); (3) 
radio-television-film (broadcasting and film theory, production, history, criti- 
cism, and research in a comprehensive program). In cooperation with the 
Department of Curriculum and Instruction, the department provides an 
opportunity for teacher certification in speech and drama 

The curriculum is designed to provide (1) a liberal education through 
special study of the arts and sciences of human communication; (2) prepa- 
ration for numerous opportunities in business, government, media and 
related industries, education, and the performing arts 

Since communication and theatre are dynamic fields, the course offer- 
ings are under constant review and development, and the interested stu- 
dent should obtain specific information about a possible program from a 
department advisor 

Major requirements are thirty hours of coursework in speech communi- 
cation and radio-television-film, or forty-two hours of coursework in theatre, 
exclusive of those courses taken to satisfy college requirements. Of the 
thirty hours, at least fifteen (twenty-one in theatre) must be upper level (300 
or 400 series). No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy 
major or supporting area requirements. 

Each of the possible concentrations in the department requires certain 
courses to provide a firm foundation for the work in that area. 

Speech Communication 

Required Major Courses (total of thirty credits): SPCH 200, 230. 400, 401 , 
and 402. Three credits chosen from the following SPCH 450. 471. 475 
(Theories of Persuasion), 424 or 435 Twelve semester credit hours in 
SPCH courses, at least nine of which must be at the 300-400 level. 



80 Comparative Literature Program 



Supporting Courses: (total of eighteen credits) 1 Nine credits of cognate 
courses selected from anotfier discipline complementary to tfie ma|or 2 
Nine credits to develop essential intellectual skills, three credits in statisti- 
cal analysis, selected from STAT 100. PSYC 200. SOCY 201. BMGT 230. or 
EDIylS 451 Three credits in critical analysis, selected from ENGL 301, 
ENGL 453, or CIvILT 488, Three credits in structural analysis of language 
selected from LING 200, HESP 120, ANTH 371, ENGL 384, or ENGL 385 
Courses taken to fulfill the supporting area requirement can also be used to 
satisfy USP requirements No course with a grade of less than C may be 
used to satisfy major or supporting area requirements. 

Theatre 

Required Core Courses lor All Majors: THET 110. 111, 120, 170,330,479, 
480, 490, and 491 

The student may select one of two emphases 

Design Emphasis: THET 273, 375, 476, 481, plus additional courses in 
theatre to make the minimum 

Supporting courses for the Design Emphasis include one from each of the 

following: ENGL 403, 404, or 405: ENGL 434 or 454. DANC 100, or 210 or 
310: MUSC 100 or 130: any ARTH or ARTT course approved by Theatre 
Advisor 

Performing Emphasis: THET 221 , 320, 420 or 430, 474 or approved Techni- 
cal/Design course, plus additional courses in theatre to make up the 
minimum 

Supporting courses for the Performing Emphasis include one from each 
of the following: ENGL 403, 404, or 405, ENGL 434 or 454: DANC 100: 
MUSC 100 or 130: any ARTH or ARTT course approved by the Theatre 
Advisor, 

Radio- Tele vision-Film 

Admission to the program In Radio, Television, and Film is competitive 
A small number of academically talented freshman can be admitted 
directly into the program; National fvlerit Finalists and Semifinalists. 
National Achievement Finalists and Semifinalists. President's Scholars. 
Banneker Scholars. f\/laryland Distinguished Scholars, and students with a 
combined SAT score of 1200 coupled with a minimum of 3 00 high school 
GPA in academic subjects 

Admission for all others requires that the student has 

1 earned at least twenty-eight credits with a grade point average of 2 6 
(this average incudes transfer credit grades): 

2 completed, as a part of the twenty-eight required credits, English 101 
and fvlath 1 10 (or their equivalents) and RTVF 222, all with a grade of C 
or better 

The student must maintain the cumulative grade point average for at 
least one semester after admission to the RTVF major 

Students who have met the standards for admission should visit the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions (fvlitchell Building) to complete an 
application At this time students should present a copy of their transcript 
to demonstrate they have met the requirements 

Required Courses: RTVF 222 and either 223 or 314 

Supporting Courses: Fifteen graded credit hours of coherently related 
subjects, selected in consultation with an advisor and considenng the 
personal goals of the student 

The department otters numerous specialized opportunities for those 
interested through cocurricular activities in theatre, film, television and 
radio For the superior student an Honors Program is available Interested 
students should consult their advisor for further information no later than 
the beginning of their junior year 

Course Code Prefixes — SPCH, RTVF, THET 



Comparative Literature Program 
(CMLT) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

4223 Jimenez Hall. 454-2685 

Professor and Director Heyndels 

Professors: Beck, Beichen, Bentley, Berlin, Best, Bryer, Clignet, R 
Cohen Freedman, Fuegi, Gillespie, Gramberg, Haber. Herin. Hollon, 
Jones, Lifton. MacBain, Oster, Pacheco. Panichas, Pfisler. Price, Rimer, 
Rowland, J Russell, Schoenbaum, Sosnowski, Therrien. Trousdale 
Associate Professors: Aguilar-IVlora, Barry, Bennett, Bilik, R H Brown, 
Caramello, Coogan, David. Duffy. Fink. Flieger, Fredericksen. Glad, 
Gnmsted, Gullickson. Hage, Hallett. Handelman. J Harris, Herman, Igel, 



Joyce, Kelly. Kerkham, Klein, Leinwand, Levinson, Lolzeaux, Miniz, 

Peterson J Robinson, C Russell, Staley. Tanca 

Assistant Professors: Falvo. Kristal. Levine, Strauch, Zappala 

Instructor: Spector 

Faculty Research Assistant: Tailsch 

Undergraduates may emphasize Comparative Literature as they work 
toward a degree in one of the departments of literature or in another 
department associated with the Comparative Literature Program Each 
student will be formally advised by the faculty of his or her "home " depart- 
ment in consultation with the Director of the Comparative Literature Pro- 
gram In general, every student will be required to take CfuILT 401 and 
CI^^LT 402 The various departments concerned with have additional spe- 
cific requirements 

Students emphasizing comparative literature are expected to develop 
a high degree of competence in at least one foreign language 

Coursework may not be limited to the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries 

CLAS 170 is highly recommended for those contemplating graduate 
work in comparative literature 

Course Code Prefix — Cf^LT 



Computer Science (CMSC) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences 

2309 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 454-2002 

Professor and Acting Chair: Tripathi 
Assoc. Chairs: Austing Education: Agrawala Facilities 
Professor Emeritus: Atchison 

Professors; Agrawala, Chu. Davis, Edmundson', Gannon, Kanal. Mills, 
(linker, O'Leary, Rosenfeld. Samet. Stewart. Tripathi 
Associate Professors: Austing. Knott (Visiting). Kruskal. Nau. Perils, 
Reggia^, Rossopoulos, Shneiderman, Smith, Zelkowitz 
Assistant Professors: Aloimonos, Amir. Carson. Elman. Faloutsos, 
Fontecilla, Furuta, Gasarch, Hendler, Jalote, Johnson. Mark. Mount, Pla- 
teau, Pugh, Purtilo, Ricart^. Rombach. Salem, Sellis, Shankar, Stotts 

' Jointly with Mathematics 

2 Jointly with Corriputer Science Center 

^ Jointly with the School of Medicine. UMAB 

The Computer Science Major 

Computer science is the study of computers and computational sys- 
tems — their theory, design, development, and application Principal areas 
within computer science include artificial intelligence, computer systems, 
data-base systems, human factors, numerical analysis, programming lan- 
guages, software engineering, and theory of computing Computer sci- 
ence incorporates concepts from mathematics, engineenng, and 
psychology 

A computer scientist is concerned with problem solving Of interest are 
problems ranging from the abstract to the practical — from determining 
what kinds of problems can be solved with computers and the complexity 
of their algorittimic solutions, to computer systems suitable for human use 
Computer scientists design and analyze algorithms to solve problems, and 
implement the designs by writing correct, efficient programs They design. 
develop, and study the performance of different computer architectures, 
operating systems, databases, and programming languages Computer 
scientists are interested in problems pertaining to the modeling of human 
behavior (eg . expert systems, robotics) as well as those involving exten- 
sive numerical computations 

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Computer Science is 
designed to prepare students for employment and graduate work The 
program begins with mathematical foundations of programming methods 
It includes a wide range of courses which provide breadth an which enable 
a each student to select areas of individual interest 

Requirements for a Computer Science Major. The course of study for each 
computer science major must include all of the following requirements 
1 A minimum of thirty-five credit hours of CMSC courses which satisfy 
the following conditions 

(a) A grade of C or belter must be achieved in each course 

(b) CMSC 250 This requirement is effective for all UMCP students 
entenng the major in Spring 1 988 or later It also applies to students 
who matriculate at a Maryland public community college after 
Spring 1988 and to students in an articulated transfer program who 
transfer to UMCP after the beginning of Fall 1990 

(c) At least twenty-four credit hours must be at the 300-4(X) levels 
including CMSC 311, CMSC 330 and at least fifteen credit hours of 
the following courses 411:412. 420. 430. 435. 451 . 467, one of 421 . 
424 or 426. one of 450 or 452. one of 460 or 466 



Counseling and Personnel Services 81 



2 The mathematics calculus sequence MATH 140. 141 (or MATH 150, 
151) and at least two MATH, STAT, or MAPL courses which require 
MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course) as a prerequi 
site Of the two courses, at least one must be a statistics course A 
grade of C or better must be achieved in each course No course 
which IS crossiisted as CMSC may be counted in the requirement 

3 A minimum of twelve credit hours of 300-400 level courses (plus their 
prerequisites) in one discipline outside of computer science with an 
average of C or better No course crossiisted as CMSC may be 
counted in this requirement 

4. Thirty-nine credit hours which satisfy the University Studies Program 
(USP) Courses taken to satisfy these requirements may also be used 
to satisfy major requirements 

5. Electives to obtain at least the minimum 120 hours needed for gradua- 
tion (Students may wish to choose their electives to satisfy the 
requirements of another department's degree program, and, by so 
doing, qualify for a double major ) 

Selective Admissions Policies. 

Freshmen: Admission to the ma|or is competitive for incoming freshmen 
Applicants who have designated a computer science major will be 
selected for admission on the basis of academic promise and available 
space Applicants admissible to the University but not to the major will be 
offered admission to pre-computer science A pre-computer science major 
is not assured eventual admission to the major Because of space limita- 
tions the University may not be able to offer admission to all qualified 
applicants. College Park strongly urges early application 

Transfer: Admission to the major is competitive for transfer students 
Applicants who have designated a computer science major will be 
selected for admission on the basis of academic promise and available 
space Transfer applicants enrolled prior to May 1984 in a computer sci- 
ence program in a Maryland Community College, in a Northern Virginia 
Community College, or from the computer science program at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBO will be offered admission to the 
major under policies in effect at the time of their initial enrollment in the 
transfer program at the sending institution All other transfer applicants 
must compete for enrollment in the College based upon the criteria in 
effect for the semester during which the student wishes to enroll Because 
of space limitations the University may not be able to offer admission to all 
qualified applicants College Park strongly urges early application 

Courses: All pre-computer science majors must take CMSC 1 12 and 113 
and MATH 140 and 141 After completing at least twenty-eight credits, with 
at least a 2 3 GPA in the required courses, pre-majors may apply to be 
majors Space limitations mean that not all qualified applicants may be 
admitted to the major Computer science courses 300-level and above are 
restricted to majors only 

Introductory Computer Science Courses. The department offers a choice 
of courses, CMSC 103, 110, or 120, for students with little or no computer 
background 

CMSC 103 is considered a terminal course for liberal arts majors It 
provides an Introduction to the use of a computer and application of 
software 

Non-majors (particularly scientists and engineers) who may want to 
take additional CMSC courses should take CMSC 110 or CMSC 120 
instead of CMSC 103 Students who complete CMSC 110 or CMSC 120 
must still take CMSC 112-113 to become majors. Non-majors wishing to 
take upper-level courses must take CMSC 112-113. 

Majors should take the CMSC 112, 113 sequence in their first year. 
These courses emphasize the use of formal techniques in computer sci- 
ence grammars, discrete mathematics, functional semantics, and pro- 
gram correctness. 

Advising. Advisors are available during the normal business hours Monday 
through Friday. Detailed information about advising and the undergradu- 
ate program may be obtained in the Department's Education Office, Room 
1109, A V Williams Building. The telephone number is 454-2002. 

Honors Program. A departmental honors program provides an opportunity 
for selected undergraduate students in computer science to begin schol- 
arly research by conducting suitable independent study in a direction and 
at a pace not possible in the customary lecture courses Students are 
accepted into the program after their sophomore year based on their 
overall academic performance in computer science courses taken 

Course Code Prefix: CMSC 



Counseling and Personnel Services 
(EDCP) 



College of Education 

3218 Benjamin Building, 454-2026 



Professor and Chair: Hershenson 

Professors: Birk, Magoon. Marx, Power, Pumroy, Schlossberg 

Associate Professors: Allan, Greenberg, Hoflman, Lawrence, Leonard, 

Medvene, Rhoads, Scales, Sedlacek, Spokane, Strein, Tegiasi, 

Westbrook 

Assistant Professors: Boyd, Clement, Freeman, Komives, Lucas, 

McEwen, Mullison, Thomas 

Programs of preparation are offered by the Department of Counseling 
and Personnel Services at the masters degree, advanced graduate spe- 
cialist, and doctoral degree levels for counselors in elementary and secon- 
dary schools, rehabilitation agencies, community agencies, business and 
industry, and college and university counseling centers The department 
also offers graduate programs of preparation for other personnel services 
college student personnel administrators, pupil personnel workers, and 
school psychologists The department offers a program jointly with the 
Department of Psychology which leads to a l^h D in counseling 
psychology 

While the department does not offer an undergraduate major, it does 
offer a number of courses which are open to undergraduates and are 
suggested for students considering graduate work in counseling or other 
human service fields 

Course Code Prefix — EDCP 



Criminal Justice and Criminology 
(CRIM, CJUS) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2220 LeFrak Hall, 454-4538 

Director and Professor: Wellford 

Professor Emeritus: Lejins' (Sociology) 

Criminal Justice Curriculum 

Professor: Sherman 

Associate Professors: Ingraham, Paternoster 

Part-time Lecturers: Katznelson, Mauriello, Verchot 

Criminology Program 

Professor: Loftin 

Associate Professor: Maida, Smith 

Assistant Professors: Gottfredson 

Part-time Lecturer: Siman 

* Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

The purpose of the institute is to provide an organization and adminis- 
trative basis for the interests and activities of the University, its faculty and 
students in the areas usually designated as criminal justice, criminology, 
and corrections. The institute promotes study and teaching concerning the 
problems of crime and delinquency by offering and coordinating academic 
programs in the areas of criminal justice, criminology, and corrections; 
managing research in these areas; and conducting demonstration 
projects The Institute sponsors the annual Alden Miller Lecture, the Crimi- 
nal Justice Student Association, Alpha Phi Sigma, and an annual job fair. 

The institute comprises as its component parts: 

1. The Criminology Program, leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

2. The Criminal Justice Curriculum, leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

3. Graduate Program offering MA and Ph.D. degrees in Criminal Justice 
and Criminology. 

Criminology 

The major in criminology comprises thirty hours of coursework in Crimi- 
nology and Cnminal Justice Eighteen hours of social or behavioral science 
disciplines are required as a supporting sequence In these supporting 
courses a social or behavioral science statistics and a social or behavioral 
science methods course are required. In addition, two psychology elective 
courses and a general social psychology course are required. Regarding 
the specific courses to be taken, the student is required to consult with an 
advisor No grade lower than C may be used toward the major or the 
supporting courses 

Semester 
fviajor Credit Hours 

CRIM 220 3 

CRIM 450 3 

CRIM 451 3 

CRIM 452 3 

CRIM 453 3 

CRIM 454 3 

CRIM/CJUS Elective 6 

CJUS 100 3 

CJUS 230 _3 

Total 30 

Semester 



82 Curriculum and Instruction 

Supporting Credit Hours 

PSYC 353 3 
Social Psych — such as PSYC 221, SOCY 230. SOCY 430. or 

SOCY 447 3 

PSYC electives 6 

Soc Sci statistics 3 

CRIM/CJUS 300 3 

Total for Major and Supporting 48 

Criminal Justice 

The major in criminal justice comprises thirty hours of course work in 
criminal justice and criminology, the latter being offered as courses in the 
Criminology Program, divided as follows eighteen, but not more than 
twenty-four hours in criminal justice: six, but not more than twelve hours in 
criminology In addition to major requirements, a student must take six 
hours in methodology and statistics, and a support in sequence of courses 
totalling eighteen hours must be taken in government and politics, psychol- 
ogy, sociology, business management, counseling, or Afro-American Stud- 
ies No grade lower than C may t>e used toward the major, or to satisfy the 
statistics-methodology requirement An average of C is required in the 
supporting sequence courses. 

Major Requirements Semester 

(Core) Credit Hours 

CJUS 100 3 

CJUS 230 3 

CJUS 234 3 

CJUS 340 3 

CRIM 220 3 

CRIM 450 3 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
(Electives) 

CJUS 220 3 

CJUS 320 3 

CJUS 330 3 

CJUS 350 3 

CJUS 360 3 

CJUS 398 3 

CJUS 399 3 

CJUS 444 3 

CJUS 462 3 

CJUS 432 3 

CRIM 451 3 

CRIM 453 3 

CRIM 454 3 

CRIM 455 _3 

Total 30 

Semester 
Supporting Area Credit Hours 

Social Science Statistics 3 

CRIMCJUS 300 3 

Supporting sequence: Eighteen credit hours of specific recommended 
courses in GVPT, SOCY; BMGT, PSYC, AASP, and CAPS 

(see recommended list in Institute Office) 18 

24 
Total for Major and Supporting 54 

Advising for Criminology and Criminal Justice majors is available in the 
institute (454-4538) All majors are strongly encouraged to see an advisor 
at least once each semester 

Internships are available through CJUS 398 and CRIM 359 in a variety of 
federal, slate, local, and private agencies. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program provides supenor students the opportunity for 
advanced study in tjoth a seminar format and independent study under the 
direction of the faculty The Honors Program is a three-semester (nine- 
credit hour) sequence that a student begins in the spnng semester, three 
or four semesters prior to graduation CRIM/CJUS 388H, the first course in 
the sequence, is offered only dunng the spring semester The second and 
third courses in the sequence consist of a year-long research project (six 
credits, three each semester) or an honors thesis (one semester, three 
credits) followed by a graduate seminar in the Institute (one semester, 
three credits) Honors students may count their Honors courses toward 
satisfaction of their curriculum requirements if they are criminal justice 
majors, they may count their Honors courses toward satisfaction of the 
basic 30-hour requirement: if they are cnminology majors they may count 
their Honors courses in place of the psychology electives and social psy 
chology supporting course requirements Requirements for admission to 
the Honors Program include a cumulative grade-point average of at least 



3 25, no grade lower than B for any criminology or criminal justtce course, 
and evidence of satisfactory wnling ability 

Course Code Prefixes CRIM, CJUS 



Curriculum and Instruction (EDCI) 

College of Education 

Room 2311, Benjamin Building, 454-7346/7 

Professor and Chair (Acting): Fey' (Mathematics) 
Professors: E G Campbell. Fein Folstrom* (Music). Gambrell, Garner. 
Guthrie, Holliday, Jantz, Johnson, Layman* (Physics), Lockard' (Bot- 
any). Roderick, Weaver, Wilson 

Associate Professors: Amershek, Borko, Bngham. P Campkjell, Cirnn- 
cione' (Geography), Craig Davey. Davidson. DeLorenzo, Dreher, Eiey. 
Farreir (History), Heidelbach, Henkelman, Herman Klein, McCaieb' 
(Theatre), McWhmnie, Saracho, Slater 

Assistant Professors: Gillmgham, Graeber, Krajcik, Markham, 
O Flahaven, H Williams* (Library Science), Younq* (Physical Education) 
Emeriti: Blough, Carr, Duffey, Leeper, Risinger. Schindler StanI 

•Joint App>oin!menl with unit indicated 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction Major The Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction offers three undergraduate curricula leading to 
the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree 

1 Early Childhood Education — for the preparation of teachers in pre- 
school, kindergarten, and grades 1-3 

2 Elementary Education — for the preparation of teachers of grades 1-8 
and 

3 Secondary Education — for the preparation of teachers in various 
subject areas for leaching in middle schools and grades 7-12 The 
subject areas include, art, English, foreign language, mathematics, 
music, speech English, social studies and theatre English 

Requirements for Major Including Program Options: All Teacher Education 
Programs have designated pre-professional courses and a specified 
sequence of professional courses Before students can enroll in courses 
identified as part of the professional sequence they must first gain admis- 
sion to the College of Education s Teacher Education Program 

Admission: Application for admission to teacher education must be made 
early in the semester pnor to tjeginning professional courses The dead- 
lines for making application are October 1 and February 1 Admission 
procedures and critena are explained in "Entrance Requirements" in ttie 
section headed College of Education 

Advising: Advising is mandatory for all pre-education majors Students will 
receive advising through advising workshops which will be hekj dunng ttie 
pre-registration period Information regarding advising workshop sched- 
ules will be available with pre-registration materials 

Honors and Awards: Early Childhood Education majors are eligible for tfie 
Ordwein Scholarship Information is available in the Department office 

Student Organizations: The Department of Curriculum and Instruction 
sponsors a chapter of the Undergraduate Teacher Education Association 
(UTEA) Information concerning the organization is available through tfie 
Department s office in Benjamin Building Room 2311 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Graduates of the Early Childhood Education program recerve a Bache- 
lor of Science degree and meet the requirements for teaching preschool, 
kindergarten and pnmary grades in Maryland, the District of Columtjia and 
most other states 

Required courses 

Courses which are required in the program of studies for Earfy Ch«kJ- 
hood and which will also will satisfy University Studies program require- 
ments are the following 
PSYC 100 (3) USP Area D 

*Social Science or History Courses ANTH. GEOG, GVPT, ECX)N, 
SOCY 

HIST (6) USP Areas A and D 
HIST 156(3) USP Area A 

Biological Science with Lab BOTN, ZOOL, MICB ENTM (4) USP Area B 
Physical Science1.ab ASTR. GEOL PHYS (4) USP Area B 

Ottier Pre-Professional Requirements 

SPCH (100, no or 125 recommended) (3) 

MATH 210, 211 (4. 4) 

Creative Arts PHED 181, 183. 421 THET 120. 311 (3) 



Curriculum and instruction 83 



One of the following: FMCD 332. SOCY 343, NUTR 100, EDCI 416 (3) 
EDCI 280 — School Service Semester 

Professional Courses 

The Early Childhood Professional Block 1 starts only in Fall Semester 
and Is a prerequisite to Professional Block 2 All pre-professional require- 
ments must be completed before beginning the Early Childhood Profes- 
sional Blocks All pre-professional and professional courses must be com- 
pleted with a grade of C or better prior to student teaching 

Professional Block I: 

EDCI 313 — Creative Activities and Materials for the Young Child 
(3) 

EDCI 314 — Teaching Language, Reading, Drama & Literature (3) 
EDHD 419A — Human Development and Learning in School Set- 
lings (3) 

EDCI 318A — Professional Development Seminar (2) 
EDCI 318B — Professional Development Seminar (1) 
EDCI 385 — Computer Education lor Teachers (3) 

Professional Block II: 

EDCI 315 — The Young Child In the Social Environment (3) 
EDCI 316 — The Teaching of Reading: Early Childhood (3) 
EDCI 317 — The Young Child and the Physical Environment (3) 
EDCI 443A — Literature for Children and Youth (3) 
EDHD 419B — Human Development and Learning in School Set- 
lings (3) 

Professional Block III and/or IV: 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 
EDCI 411 — Student Teaching — Preschool 
EDCI 412 — Student Teaching — Kindergarten (8) 
EDCI 413 — Student Teaching — Primary Grades (8) 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Students who complete the elementary curriculum will receive the 
Bachelor of Science degree and will meet the Maryland State Department 
of Education requirements for the Standard Professional Certificate in 
Elementary Education. The curriculum also meets the certification require- 
ments in most other states and the District of Columbia 

Students admitted to Elementary Education must complete the follow- 
ing program which includes an area of concentration and a senior thesis. 

Required Courses 

Courses which will satisfy University Studies Program requirements and 

which are also required in the Elementary Education program of studies are 

as follows: 

HIST 156 (3) USP Area A 

Biological Science/Lab or Physical Science/Lab (4) USP Area 8 

Social Science: ANTH, ECON, GVPT, GEOG, HIST (3) Area A or D 

SOCY 230 (3) Area D 

Other Pre-Professional Requirements 

MATH 210, 211 (4) 

Speech Requirement 

Biological Science/Lab or Physical Science/Lab (4) Area B 

EDCI 301 

EDCI 443 

MUSC 155 

EDCI 280 

Coursework to complete the Area of Concentration (18 semester hours) 
can be chosen from the following areas: Communications, Foreign Lan- 
guage, Literature, Math, Science, Social Studies The EDCI Advising Office 
has detailed information regarding each area of concentration 

Professional Courses: 

Professional Semester 1 

EDCI 397 — Principles and Methods of Teaching (3) 
EDHD 300E — Human Development and Learning (6) 
EDCI 385 — Computer Education for Teachers (3) 
EDMS 410 — Principles of Testing and Evaluation (3) 

Professional Semester 2 

EDCI 322 — Curriculum and Instruction In Elementary Education — 

Social Studies (3) 

EDCI 342 — Curriculum and Instruction In Elementary Education — 

Language Arts (3) 

EDCI 352 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education — 

Mathematics (3) 

EDCI 362 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education — 

Reading (3) 



EDCI 372 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education — 
Science (3) 

Professional Semester 3 

EDCI 481 — Student Teaching Elementary (12) 

EDCI 464 — Clinical Practices In Reading Diagnosis and Instruction (3) 

Professional Semester 4 

EDCI 497 — The Study of Teaching (3) 

EDCI 489 — Field Expenences in Education (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in the teaching fields of art, 
English, foreign languages, mathematics, social studies, speech/English, 
and theatre/English. The Bachelor of Science degree is offered in art, 
mathematics, music, science, social studies and speech and drama 

In the areas of art and music, teachers are prepared to teach in both 
elementary and secondary schools All other programs prepare teachers 
for grades five through twelve 

Foreign Language Requirement — Bachelor of Arts Degree. 

All students who pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree in secondary 
education are required to complete two years (twelve semester hours) or 
the equivalent of a foreign language at the college level If a student has 
had three years of one foreign language or two years of each of two foreign 
languages as recorded on his or her high school transcripts, he or she Is 
not required to take any foreign languages in the college, although he or 
she may elect to do so 

If a student is not exempt from the foreign language requirements, he or 
she must complete courses through the 104 level of a modern language or 
204 level of a classical language 

In the modern languages — French, German, and Spanish — the 
student should take the placement test In the language in which he or she 
has had work if he or she wishes to continue the same language; his or her 
language instruction would start at the level indicated by the test With 
classical languages, the student would start at the level Indicated In this 
catalog. 

For students who come under the provisions above, the placement test 
may also serve as a proficiency test and may be taken by a student any 
time (once a semester) to try to fulfill the language requirement 

Students who have studied languages other than French, German, or 
Spanish, or who have lived for two or more years in a foreign country where 
a language other than English prevails, shall be placed by the chairperson 
of the respective language section, if feasible, or by the chairpersons of the 
foreign language departments Native speakers of a foreign language shall 
satisfy the foreign language requirements by taking twelve semester hours 
of English 

English Education 

A major in English Education requires forty-five semester hours in 
English and speech. All electlves In English must be approved by the 
student's advisor Intermediate mastery of a modern or classical language 
IS required. 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100. 125, or 220(3) 

Foreign Language (4, 4) 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing or ENGL 101H (3) 

ENGL 201 — World Literature or ENGL 202 (3) 

ENGL 281 — 'Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction (3) 

ENGL 310 — Medieval and Renaissance British Literature (3) 

ENGL 31 1 — Baroque and Augustan British Literature (3) 

ENGL 312 — Romantic to Modern British Literature (3) 

ENGL 301 — Critical Methods in the Study of Literature or ENGL 453 

(3) 

LING 200 — Introductory Linguistics (3) 

SPCH 230 — Argumentation and Debate or 

SPCH 330, 350 or 356 (3) 

ENGL 384 — Concepts of Grammar or ENGL 385, 482, or 484 (3) 

ENGL 304 — The Major Works of Shakespeare (3) 

ENGL 313 — American Literature or ENGL 430, 431, 432 or 433 (3) 

EDCI 466 — Literature for Adolescents (3) 

EDCI 467 — Teaching Writing (3) 

ENGL 391 — Advanced Composition or ENGL 393 or 493 (3) 

ENGL Electives (Upper level) (9) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 447 — Field Expenence In English, Speech, Drama Teaching (1) 



84 Curriculum and Instruction 



EDCI 340 — Curriculum Instruction in Secondary Education English/ 
Speech Drama (3) 

EDCI 463 — The Teaching of Reading in the Secondary School (3) 
EDCI 441 — Student Teaching — Secondary Schools English (12) 
EDCI 440 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education 
English, Speech, Drama (1) 

Art Education 

Students in art education are prepared to teach at any level, K-12. 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

ARTH 100 — Introduction to Art (3) 

ARTT 1 10 — Elements of Drawing (3) 

ARTT 100 — Elements of Design (3) 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 125 or 220 

(3) 

ARTH 260 — History of Art I (3) 

ARTH 261 — History of Art II (3) 

ARTT 320 — Elements of Painting 

EDIT 273 — Practicum in Ceramics (3) 

ARTT 330 — Elements of Sculpture (3) 

ARTT 428 — Painting II (3) 

EDCI 406 — Practicum in Art Education: Two Dimensional (3) 

EDCI 403 — Teaching of Art Criticism in Public Schools (3) 

EDCI 407 — Practicum in Art Education Three Dimensional (3) 

ARTT 340 — Elements of Printmaking: Intaglio 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 480 — The Child and the Curriculum — Elementary (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 300 — Curriculum and Instruction in Art Education (3) 

EDCI 401 — Student Teaching in Elementary Schools — Art (4-8) (6) 

EDCI 402 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Art (2-8) (6) 

EDCI 489 — Field Experiences in Education (3) 

Foreign Language Education 

The Foreign Language Education curriculum is designed for prospec- 
tive foreign language teachers in secondary schools The current focus is 
on Spanish. French, and German Students seeking certification in the 
areas of Hebrew, Italian, Latin. Portuguese, or Russian must apply for 
credit count certification through the Maryland State Department of Educa- 
tion, rather than a departmental "Approved Program" Further information 
can be obtained through a foreign language education advisor in the 
Curriculum and Instruction Office 

A minimum of thirty prescribed semester hours in a foreign language 
plus nine hours of electives in a related area for a total of thirty-nine hours is 
required. The student is strongly advised to begin or continue a second 
foreign language The foreign language education advisor must approve 
the nine hours of "related area" credit The following requirements must be 
met within the thirty required hours: one year of advanced conversation, 
one year of advanced grammar and composition, one year of survey of 
literature, one year of advanced literature (400 level), one semester of 
advanced civilization (300 or 400 level), and one semester of applied lin- 
guistics Equivalents to the above must be approved by the appropriate 
education advisor 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100, 125, or 220 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication 

(3) 

Foreign Language. (Intermediate or appropriate level as 

determined by placement exam) (3.3) 

Foreign Language — Grammar and Composition (3.3) 

Foreign Language — Survey of Literature (3.3) 

Foreign Language — Advanced Conversation (3.3) 

Foreign Language — Literature (400 level) (3.3) 

Foreign Language — Civilization (3) 

Foreign Language or Applied Linguistics (3) 

Electives in Foreign Language (6) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 
EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 430 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: For- 
eion Language (3) 

EDCI 330 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education For- 
eign Language (3) 

EDCI 431 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Foreign Lan- 
guages (12) 
Elective from 400-level courses in foreign language education (3) 



Mathematics Education 

A major in mathematics education requires the completion of MATH 
241 or its equivalent and a minimum of fifteen semester hours of mathe- 
matics at the 400 level (excluding MPJH 490): 400 level courses beyond 
those prescribed (402 or 403. 430) should be selected m consultation with 
the mathematics education advisor 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100, 125 or 220 (3) 

MATH 140, 141 — Calculus I. II (4.4) 

Science Requirement (7-10) 

MATH 240, 241 — Linear Algebra, Calculus III (4.4) 

CMSC 1 10 — Introduction to Fortran Programming or 

CMSC 120 — Introduction to Pascal Programming (4 4) 

MATH 430 — Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries (3) 

MATH 402 — Algebraic Structures or 

MATH 403 — Introduction to Abstract Algebra (3) 

MATH Electives (400-level) (9) 

Professional Courses 

EDHS 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 
EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
EDCI 350 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education: Mathe- 
matics (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 457 — Teaching Secondary Students with Difficulties in Learning 
Mathematics (3) 

EDCI 451 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Mathiemalics (12) 
EDCI 450 — Student Teaching Seminary in Secondary Education 
Mathematics Education (3) 

Music Education 

The curriculum in music leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
education with a major in music education It is planned to meet tfie 
demand for specialists, supervisors, and resource teachers in music in the 
schools The program provides training in the teaching of general music/ 
choral and instrumental music and leads to certification to leach music at 
both elementary and secondary school levels in Maryland and most other 
stales There are two options The general musicchoral option is tor stu- 
dents whose principal instrument is voice or piano, the instrumental option 
IS for students whose principal instrument is an orchestral or band instru- 
ment Students are able to develop proficiency in both certifications by 
taking additional courses 

Auditions are required for admission to the program All students teach 
and are carefully observed in clinical settings by members of the music 
education faculty This is intended to ensure the maximum development 
and growth of each students professional and personal compelerxyes 
Each student is assigned to an advisor who guides him or her through the 
various stages of advancement in the program of music and music 
education 



Instrumental 
Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 



MUSP 109. 
MUSC 150, 
MUSC 102. 
MUSC 116, 
SPCH 100. 
MUED 197 
MUSP 207, 
MUSC 250, 
MUSC 113, 
MUSC 230 
MUSP 305, 
MUSC 490. 
MUSC 120, 
MUED 470 
MUED 411 
MUED 420 
MUED 410 
MUSC 330. 
MUSP 409 
MUSC 229 



110 — Applied Music (Principal Instrument) {2.2) 

151 — Theory of Music I. II (3.3) 

103 — Beginning Class Piano I. II (2.2) 

1 1 7 — Study of Insrumenis (2.2) 

125. or 220 (3) 

— Pre-Professional Experiences (1) 

208 — Applied Music (Pnncipal InstnjmenI) (2,2) 
251 — Advanced Theory of Music I. II (4,4) 
121 — Class Study of Instruments (2.2) 

— History of Music I (3) 

306 — Applied Music (Pnncipal Instrument) [2.2) 

491 — Conducting (2) 

114 — Class Study of Instruments (2.2) 

— General Concepts for Teaching Music (1) 

— Instrumental Music Elementary (3) 

— Instrumental Music Secondary (2) 

— Instrumental Arranging (2) 
331 — History of Music (3.3) 

— Applied Music (Principal Instrunrienl) (2) 

— Ensemble (7) 



Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 484/494 — Student Teaching Music (12) 



Curriculum and Instruction 85 



Qensral Mutlc/Choral 

Pre-protessional/Subject Area Coursework 

Other Academic Support Courses 

MUSP 109. 110 — Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2,2) 

MUSC 150. 151 — Theory of Music I, II (3,3) 

MUSC 100 — Class Voice. MUSC 200 — Advanced Class Voice (2,2) 

or MUSC 102, 103 — Class Piano (2,2) 
MUED 197 — PreProfessional Experiences (1) 
SPCH 100, 125, or 220 (3) 

MUSP 207, 208 — Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2,2) 
MUSC 230 — Music History (3) 
MUSC 202. 203 — Advanced Class Piano (2,2) 
MUSC 250, 251 — Advanced Theory of Music (4,4) 
MUSP 405. 409 — Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2,2) 
MUSC 453 — Guitar-Recorder Methods (2) 
MUED 472 — Secondary Choral Methods (2) 
MUSC 490. 491 — Conducting (2.2) 
MUED 478 — Special Topics in Music Education (1) 
MUED 470 — General Concepts for Teaching Music (1) 
MUED 471 — Elementary General Music Methods (3) 
MUSC 330. 331 — History of Music (3,3) 
MUSP 410 — Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2) 
MUSC 329 — Major Ensemble (7) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 3(X)S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 484/494 — Student Teaching: Music (12) 

'Vanes according to incoming placement 
Physical Education and Health Education 

This curriculum is designed to prepare students for teaching physical 
education and health in elementary and secondary schools. To obtain full 
particulars on course requirements, the student should refer to the sec- 
tions on the Department of Physical Education and the Department of 
Health Education. 

Science Education 

A science major consists of a minimum of sixty semester hours' study in 
the academic sciences and mathematics. 

The following courses are required for all science education majors 
BOTN 101, CHEM 103; CHEM 104 (except chemistry, physics, and earth 
science education majors who take CHEM 1 1 3), GEOL 1 00- 1 1 0; PHYS 121- 
122 or 141-142: ZOOL 101; and six semester hours of mathematics Sci- 
ence education majors must achieve a minimum of grade C in all required 
mathematics, science, and education coursework. 

An area of specialization with a minimum of thirty-three semester hours, 
and the approval of the student's advisor, must be completed in biology, 
chemistry, physics, and geology, as noted below. 

Biology Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology I (4) 

BIOL 106 — Principles of Biology II (4) 

MATH 1 1 1 — Introduction to Probability (3) 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I (4) 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry (4) 

ZOOL 201 , 202 — Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II (4,4) 

BOTN 202 — The Plant Kingdom or ZOOL 201 — Animal Diversity (4) 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology (4) 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I (4) 

GEOL 100/110 — Physical Geology and Laboratory (4) 

SPCH 100, 125 or 220 (3) 

ZOOL 213 or BOTN 414 — Genetics (4) 

BOTN 441 — Plant Physiology (4) 

BOTN 212, BOTN 417, ZOOL 480 or ENTM 205 — Field Studies (4) 

PHYS 122 — Fundamentals of Physics II (4) 

BOTN 462-464 or ZOOL 212 — Plant Ecology (4) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 489B — Student Teaching Seminar in Science Ed (1) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education — 

Science (3) 

EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Science (12) 

EDCI 488F — Computers in Science Education (2) 



Chemistry Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology I (4) 

BIOL 106 — Principles of Biology II (4) 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I (4) 

CHEM 113 — General Chemistry II (4) 

MATH 140, 141 — Calculus I and II (4, 4) 

SPCH 100, 125 or 220 (3) 

CHEM 223, 243 — Organic Chemistry I and II (4, 4) 

PHYS 141, 142 — Principles in Physics (4. 4) 

GEOL 100, 110 — Physical Geology and Lab (4) 

CHEM 321 — Quantitative Analysis (4) 

CHEM 481. 482 — Physical Chemistry I and II (3.3) 

CHEM 483 — Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (2) 

CHEM Elective (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education — 

Science (3) 

EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Science (12) 

EDCI 488F — Computers in Science Education (1) 

EDCI 489B — Student Teaching Seminar in Science Education (2) 

Earth Science Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

GEOL 100. 110 — Physical Geology. Lab (4) 

GEOL 102. 112 — Historical Geology and Lab (4) 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology I (4) 

BIOL 106 — Principles of Biology II (4) 

MATH 110 or 140 — Elementary Mathematical Models (3) or Calculus I 

(3) 

MATH 111 or 141 — Introduction to Probability (3) or Calculus II (3) 

SPCH 100, 125 or 220 (3) 

GEOL 340 — Geomorphology (4) 

CHEM 103, 113 — General Chemistry I and II (4, 4) 

GEOL 322 — Mineralogy (4) 

ASTR 100, 122 — Introduction to Astronomy, Lab (4) 

Earth Science Elective (6) 

GEOL 341 — Structural Geology (4) 

PHYS 121, 122 — Fundamentals of Physics I and II (4. 4) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education — 

Science (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Science (12) 

EDCI 488F — Computers in Science Education (1) 

EDCI 4898 — Student Teaching Seminar in Science Education (2) 

Physics Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

CHEM 103, 113 — General Chemistry I and II (4. 4) 

MATH 140, 141 — Calculus I and II (4. 4) 

PHYS 141. 142 — Principles of General Physics I and II (4. 4) 

SPCH 100, 125 or 220 (3) 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology I (4) 

BIOL 106 — Principles of Biology II (4) 

PHYS 296 — Intro Lab in Electromagnetic Waves (2) 

PHYS 295 — Intro Lab in Electricity and Magneticism (2) 

ASTR 100 — Introduction to Astronomy (3) 

ASTR 111 — Observational Astronomy Laboratory (1) 

MATH 240 — Linear Algebra (4) 

PHYS 404 — Intermediate Theoretical Mechanics (3) 

PHYS 405 — Intermediate Theoretical Electricity and Magnetism (3) 

PHYS 420 — Principles of Modern Physics (3) 

PHYS 305 — Physics Shop Techniques (1) 

GEOL 100 — Physical Geology (3) 

GEOL 110 — Physical Geology Laboratory (1) 

PHYS 406 — Optics (3) 

PHYS 499 — Special Problems in Physics (2) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 



86 Curriculum and Instruction 



EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education — Science 

EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Science (12) 

EDCI 489B — Student Teaching Seminar in Science Education (1) 

EDCI 488F — Computers in Science Education (2) 

Social Studies Education 

Option I HISTORY. Requires fifty-four semester hours of which at least 
twenty-seven must be in history, usually at least six hours In American 
history: six hours of non-American history; three hours in Pro-Seminar in 
Historical Writing; and twelve hours of electives, nine of which must be 300 
400 level One course in Ethnic and Minority Studies must be included 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100, 125 or 110(3) 

HIST 156, 157 (US) (6) 

HIST (non US) (6) 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 101 (3) 

GEOG 100 — Introduction to Geography (3) 

GEOG 202 or 203 (3) 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

ECON 310 — Evolution of Modern Capitalism (3) 

GVPT 100, 240, 260, or 280 (3) 

GVPT 1 70 — American Government (3) 

Social Sciences Electives, upper level (6) 

History Electives (12) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 320 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education — Social Studies (3) 

EDCI 421 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Social Studies 

(12) 

EDCI 463 — Teaching of Reading in Secondary Schools (3) 

EDCI 420 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education — 

Social Studies (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

Option II GEOGRAPHY. Requires fifty-four semester hours of which 
twenty-seven hours must be in geograptiy GEOG 201. 202. 203. and 305 
and are required The remaining fifteen hours in geography must be upper 
level courses with one course in regional geography included One course 
in Ethnic and Minority Studies must be included 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100. 125 or 110(3) 

GEOG 201 — Geography of Environmental Systems (3) 

GEOG 202 — The World in Cultural Perspective (3) 

GEOG 203 — Economic Geography (3) 

GEOG 305 — Quantitative Methods In Geography (3) 

GEOG Electives (15) 

HIST (US) 156 or 157 (3) 

HIST (non-U S ) 101, 130-133, 144-145 (3) 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 101 (3) 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

ECON 310 — Evolution of Modern Capitalism (3) 

GVPT 100. 240 or 280 (3) 

GVPT 170 — American Government (3) 

History/Social Science Elective (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 3008 — Human Development and Learning (6) 
EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
EDCI 320 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education — 
Social Studies (3) 

EDCI 421 — Student Teaching in Secondary Education — Social Stud- 
ies (12) 

EDCI 420 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education — 
Social Studies (3) 

EDCI 463 — Teaching Reading in Secondary Schools (3) 
EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

Speech and Drama Education 

The ma|or Speech and Drama Education is no longer offered Majors in 
Speech/English and Theatre/English are described bielow 

Speech/English Education 

Students interested in teaching speech in secondary schools complete 
a minimum of 30 credits in speech and speech-related courses Because 
most speech teachers also teach English classes, the program includes 
another 30 credits in English and English education Upon selection of this 



major, students should meet with an advisor to carefully plan their 
programs 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

Speech Area (6) SPCH 100 — Basic Pnnciples or SPCH 107 — Tech 

meal Speech Communication. SPCH 110 — Voice & Diction. SPCH 125 

— Interpersonal Communication SPCH 220 — Group Discussion, 

SPCH 230 — Argumentation and Debate. SPCH 240 — Oral 

Interpretation 

SPCH 470 — Listening (3) 

SPCH 200 — Advanced Public Speaking (3) 

RTVF 124 — Mass Communication in 20th Century or RTVF 222 or 

RTVF 314 (3) 

HESP 202 — Introduction to Hearing and Speech Sciences or HESP 

305 or HESP 400 (3) 

THET 1 10 — Introduction to Theatre (3) 

SPCH 350 — Foundations of Communication Theory or SPCH 402 (3) 

SPCH 401 — Foundations of Rhetoric (3) 

SPCH Upper level electives (6) 

ENGL 1(J1 — Introduction to Writing (3) 

LING 200 — Introduction to Linguistics (3) 

ENGL 201 or 202 — World Literature (3) 

ENGL 281 — Standard English Grammar. Usage, and Diction or ENGL 

385 or ENGL 482 or ENGL 484 (3) 

ENGL 301 — Critical Methods in the Study of Literature or ENGL 453 

(3) 

ENGL 310, 311 or 312 — English Literature (3) 

ENGL 313 — American Literature (3) 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical Writing (3) 

EDCI 463 — Teaching of Reading (3) 

EDCI 466 — Literature for Adolescents (3) 

EDCI 467 — Teaching Writing (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Pnnciples & Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 340 — Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Education Eng/ 

Spch/Drama (3) 

EDCI 447 — Field Experiences (1) 

EDCI 442 — Student Teaching in Speech (6) 

EDCI 441 — Student Teaching in English (6) 

EDCI 440 — Student Teaching Seminar (1) 

Theatre/English Education 

Students interested in teaching theatre in secondary schools complete 
a minimum of 30 credits in theatre and theatre-related courses Because 
most theatre teachers also teach English classes, the program includes 
another 30 credits in English and English education Up)on selection of this 
major, students should meet with an advisor to carefully plan their 
programs 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

THET 120 — Acting Fundamentals (3) 

THET 170 — Stagecraft (3) 

THET 273 — Scenographic Techniques or THET 476 or THET 480 (3) 

THET 330 — Play Directing (3) 

THET 460 — Theatre Management (3) 

THET 479 — Theatre Workshop (3) 

THET 490 — History of Theatre I (3) 

THET 491 — History of Theatre II (3) 

THET electives (3) 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles or SPCH 107 or SPCH 200 or SPCH 230 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Wnting (3) 

LING 200 — Introduction to Linguistics (3) 

ENGL 201 or 202 — World Literature (3) 

ENGL 281 — Standard English Grammar. Usage, and Diction or ENGL 

385 or ENGL 482 or ENGL 484 (3) 

ENGL 310, 311. or 312 — English Literature (3) 

ENGL 313 — Amencan Literature (3) 

ENGL 301 — Cntical Methods in the Study of Literature of ENGL 453 

(3) 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition (3) 

EDCI 463 — Teaching of Reading (3) 

EDCI 467 — Teaching Writing (3) 

EDCI 468 — Literature for Adolescents (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 3003 — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles & Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 340 — Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Education Eng/ 

Spch/Drama (3) 



Dance 87 



EDCI 447 — Field Experience (1) 
EDCI 448 — Student Teaching in Theatre (6) 
EDCI 441 — Student Teaching in English (6) 
EDCI 440 — Student Teaching Seminar (1) 

Course Code Prefix — EDCI 



Dance (DANC) 



College of Arts and Humanities 

1116 Temporary Building EE, 454-4056 

Professor and Chair: Wiltz 

Professors: Madden (Emerita). M Rosen, L Warren 
Associate Professors: Dunn A Warren 
Assistartt Professor: J FroschSchroder 
lr)structors: Haigler. de Robles, Mayes, Rutter-HIII 
Lecturers: Butler (p t ), Druker, Jackson 

Recognizing that dance combines both athleticism and artistry, the 
dance program offers comprehensive technique and theory courses as a 
foundation for the dance professions By developing an increasing av^^are- 
ness of the physical, emotional and intellectual aspects of movement in 
general, the student eventually is able to integrate his or her own particular 
mind-body consciousness into a more meaningful whole To facilitate the 
acquisition of new movement skills, as well as creative and scholarly 
insights in dance, the curriculum provides a structured breadth experience 
at the lower department level At the upper level students may either 
involve themselves in various general university electives, or they may 
concentrate their energies in a particular area of emphasis in dance 
Although an area of emphasis is not mandatory, many third and fourth year 
students are interested in studying a singular aspect of dance in depth, 
such as performance, choreography, production/management, education, 
or general studies (encompassing dance history, literature and criticism) 

The dance faculty is composed of a number of distinguished teachers, 
choreographers, and performers, each one a specialist in his or her own 
field Visiting artists throughout the year make additional contributions to 
the program. There are several performance and choreographic opportuni- 
ties for all dance students, ranging from informal workshops to fully 
mounted concerts both on and off campus Students may have the oppor- 
tunity of working with Improvisations Unlimited, a company in residence in 
the department 

Students must complete fifty-nine semester hours of dance credits. Of 
these, eighteen hours of modern technique and four hours of ballet tech- 
nique are required. Majors may not use more than seventy-two DANC 
credits toward the total of 120 needed for graduation. In addition to the 
twenty-two technique credits required, students must distribute the 
remaining thirty-seven credits as follows: 

DANC 208, 308, 388 — Choreography I, II, III 9 

DANC 102 — Rhythmic Training 2 

DANC 109 — Improvisation 2 

DANC 266 — Dance Notation 3 

DANC 200 — Introduction to Dance 3 

DANC 171 — Movement Integration 2 

DANC 305 — Principles of Teaching 3 

DANC 482 — Dance History 3 

DANC 370 — Kinesiology for Dancers 4 

DANC 410 — Dance Production 3 

DANC 484 — Philosophy of Dance 3 

A grade of C or higher must be attained in all dance courses. 

New, re-entering and transfer students are expected to contact the 
department following admission to the University for instructions regarding 
advising and registration procedures. Although entrance auditions are not 
required, some previous dance experience is highly desirable Further 
information may be obtained from the Dance Department Student 
Handbook 

Course Code Prefix — DANC 



Decision and Information Sciences 

For information consult College of Business and Management entry 

Economics (ECON) 

College of Behavioral and Social Science 

Undergraduate Studies 3115H Tydings, 454-3447 



Undergraduate Advisor; 3115G Tydings. 454-5443 

Professor and Cliair: Straszheim 

Professors: Aaron, Almon, Bailey, Betancourt, Brechling, Clague, Cum- 
berland, Harris, Hullen, Kelejian, McGuire, Mueller, Murrell, Myers* (Afro- 
American Studies), Dates, Olsont, Wonnacott 
Associate Professors: Abraham, Bennett, Coughlin, Cropper, Hal- 
tiwanger. Knight, Meyer, Panagariya, Prucha, Schwab, Weinstein 
Assistant Professors: Anderson, Evans, Haliassos, Kessides, Lyon 
(BBER)*, Succar. Wallis 
Emeriti: Bergmann, Dillard, Gruchy, OConnell, Ulmer 

■Joint appointment with unit indicated 
tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Economics is the study of the production, pricing, and distribution of 
goods and services within societies Economist study such problems as 
inflation, unemployment, technical change, poverty, environmental quality 
and foreign trade Economists also apply economics to such diverse areas 
as crime, sexual roles, health care and the elderly, discrimination, urban 
development, and developing nation problems 

Two characteristics of modern economics receive special attention in 
the department's program Government policies have profound effects on 
how our economic system performs Government expenditures, regula- 
tions and taxation either directly or indirectly affect both households and 
firms Second, there is a growing interdependency among economies 
throughout the world Extensive world wide markets exist in which goods 
and services are traded, and capital and investments move across national 
boundaries Economic events in one nation are often quickly transmitted to 
other nations. 

Economists study these phenomena through the development of sys- 
tematic principles and analytic models which describe how economic 
agents behave and interact These models are the subject of empirical 
testing, often using computers and extensive data sets 

The interests of the faculty, as reflected in the course offerings, are 
both theoretical and applied As a large diverse department, the Econom- 
ics Department offers courses in all of the major fields of economic study. 
The Department's program stresses the application of economic theory 
and econometrics to current problems in a large number of fields Many 
courses in the department's program analyze the role of the government 
and public policies on the economy. 

The program is designed to serve both majors and non-majors The 
Department offers a wide variety of 300-level courses on particular eco- 
nomic issues which can be taken after one or two semesters of basic 
principles These courses can be especially useful for those planning 
careers in law, business, or the public sector The program for majors is 
designed to serve those who will seek employment immediately after 
college as well as those who will pursue graduate study 

Economics majors have a wide variety of career options in both the 
private and public sectors These include careers in state and local govern- 
ment, federal and international agencies, business, finance and banking, 
journalism, teaching, politics and law Many economics majors pursue 
graduate work in economics or another social science, law, business or 
public administration (public policy, health, urban and regional planning, 
education, and industrial relations). 

Entrance Requirements. Economics is a selective major Admission to 
the major occurs at the Junior level, except for a limited number of academ- 
ically talented freshmen In order to be admitted, an applicant must (1) 
have earned at least 56 credits, with a cumulative GPA equal to or above 
the minimum GPA in effect for the semester the student applies (eg, 2 8 
GPA for Fall 1988); and (b) have completed nine hours of "economics 
entry " courses at a satisfactory grade level The "economics entry " 
courses include MATH 220 (or MATH 140), ECON 201, and ECON 203, 
which must be completed with a grade of C or better in each course, and a 
minimum GPA of 2.5 in the nine hours. Students may apply for admission at 
the Office of Admission 

Economics Degree Requirements. In addition to University Studies 
requirements, the requirement for the Economics major is as follows; 

(1) Economics (and Mathematics) Courses (36 hours) 

Economics majors must earn 33 credit hours in Economics, and 3 credit 
hours in Mathematics (MATH 220 or 140), with a grade of C or better in 
each course. 

All majors must complete 12 hours of Core Requirements with a satis- 
factory grade point average (GPA) The Core Requirements include ECON 
201, ECON 203, ECON 305 (formerly ECON 401) or ECON 405, and ECON 
306 (formerly ECON 403) or ECON 406. A satisfactory GPA must satisfy 
each of the following: a grade of C or better in each course; a 2 5 GPA in the 
four courses comprising the Core Requirements; and a 2 5 GPA in ECON 
305 (or 405) and 306 (or 406). 

Students must also complete twenty-one hours in upper level Econom- 
ics courses 

a) three hours in statistics, ECON 321 (formerly ECON 421) or BMGT 
230 or BMGT 231 or STAT 400 

b) three hours in economic history or comparative systems; ECON 
310, ECON 311, ECON 315 (formerly ECON 415) or ECON 380; 



88 Education Policy, Planning, and Administration 



c) nine hours in courses with at least one semester of intermediate 
theory or economic statistics (ECON 321) as a prerequisite The 
following courses presently meet this prerequisite ECON 402. 
ECON 416. ECON 422. ECON 423. ECON 425, ECON 431. ECON 
441. ECON 454, ECON 460 and ECON 470 

d) SIX other hours in upper division Economics 

(2) Additional Supporting Courses (15 hours) 

Students must earn 15 hours of credit in upper division courses in 
addition to the 36 hours of Economics (and f\/lathematics) courses listed 
above Upper division courses include all courses with a 300 number and 
above Additional mathematics courses beyond the required mathematics 
course (IvIATH 220), and computer programming courses at the 200 level 
and above may be counted as fulfilling the Additional Support Course 
Requirement Additional economics courses may be included among the 
15 hours of supporting courses 

All courses meeting this Additional Support Course requirement must 
be completed with a grade of C or better, and supporting courses may not 
be taken pass-fail 

Study Sequences and Plans of Study. Economics is an analytic disci- 
pline, building on a core of a more advanced principles, analytic models, 
and statistical techniques Students must begin with a foundation in math- 
ematics and economic principles (ECON 201 and ECON 203) A more 
advanced indepth, analytic treatment of economics is presented in inter- 
mediate theory (ECON 305 and ECON 306), which is a necessary back- 
ground for study by economics majors. 

The department urges that the student take ECON 201 , 203 and I^ATH 
220 as soon as possible Honors versions of ECON 201 and ECON 203 are 
offered for students seeking a more rigorous analysis of principles, depart- 
mental honors candidates, and those intending to attending graduate 
school Admission is granted by the Office of Undergraduate Advising or 
the General Honors Program 

Courses in applied areas at the 3(X) level may be taken at any point 
after ECON 203 However, majors will benefit by completing courses in 
intermediate theory and statistics as soon as possible Majors should take 
ECON 305. ECON 306, and ECON 321 or its equivalent immediately upon 
completion of ECON 203 While most students take ECON 305 and 306 in 
sequence, they may be taken concurrently Courses at the 400 level are 
generally more demanding, particularly those courses with intermediate 
theory as a prerequisite 

Empirical research and the use of computers are becoming increas- 
ingly important in economics All students are well advised to include as 
many statistics, econometrics, and computer programming courses in 
their curriculum as possible 

Those students planning to pursue graduate study in economics must 
begin to prepare themselves analytically for graduate work by focusing on 
theory, statistics, and mathematics in their undergraduate curriculum 
These students should complete the advanced version of intermediate 
theory (ECON 405 and ECON 406) and the econometric sequence (ECON 
422 and ECON 423) Mastery of the calculus and linear algebra is essential 
for success in many of the top graduate schools Students should consider 
MATH 140, MATH 141, MATH 240 (or MATH 400). MATH 241 and MATH 
246 as very useful preparation 

ADVISING: 

The Department has a full-time academic advisor providing advising on 
a walk-in basis in the Office of Undergraduate Advising. Tydings 31 15G 
Economic Honors Program. The Honors Program provides economics 
majors with the opportunity for advanced study in a seminar format, with 
faculty supervision of seminar papers and an honors thesis The Honors 
Program is designed for students intending to attend graduate school or 
those seeking an in-depth study of economic theory and its application to 
economic problems 

The Honors Program is a twelve-hour sequence, culminating in the 
completion of a senior thesis Students must complete ECON 396 (Honors 
Workshop) and ECON 397 (Honors Thesis) in their senior year, as well as 
two of the following four courses; ECON 405, 406, 422 and 425 Students 
must complete these twelve hours with a GPA of 3 5 ECON 396 is only 
offered in the fall term 

To be eligible for admission, a student must have completed fifteen 
hours of economics with a GPA of 3.25 Interested students should meet 
with the Director of Undergraduate Studies at the earliest possible date to 
review their curnculum plans and to apply for admission to the program 

Course Code Prefix — ECON 



Education Policy, Planning, and 
Administration (EDPA) 

College of Education 

Room 3112, Benjamin Building 454-5766 
Professor and Chair: Warren 



Professors; Andrews. Berdahlt. Berman, Cart)one, Chait. Dudley. Fin- 
kelstein, McLoone, Male, Stephens. 

Associate Professors: Agre. Clague. Goldman. Hopkins, Huden, Lind- 
say, Noll, Schmidtlein, Selden. Splaine 
Assistant Professors: Heidi Leak, Slater 
Affiliate Associate Professor: Hershfield 
Affiliate Assistant Professors: Edelstem, Gilmour 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: McKay 
Emeriti: V E Anderson, Newell. McClur 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Although primarily a graduate program, the Department of Education 
Policy. Planning and Administration offers several courses at the under- 
graduate level These include Foundations of Education (EDPA 301) and 
Utilization of Educational Media (EDPA 440) In addition. University Studies 
Program (distributive studies) requirements may be met by taking Educa- 
tion in Contemporary American Society (EDPA 201) or Historical and Phiki- 
sophical Perspectives on Education (EDPA 210) University Studies Pro- 

§ram (advanced studies) requirements may be met by taking Technology, 
ocial Change, and Education (EDPA 401). or Future of the Human Com- 
munity (EDPA 400) 

Graduate degree programs are offered in five areas Administration and 
Supervision i^administrators in education-related agencies, school supenn- 
tendents. principals, supervisors). Foundations of Education (comparative 
education: history, philosophy, politics, and sociology of education and 
technology policy). Higher and Adult Education (adult and continuing edu- 
cation, governance, finance, and planning law and higher education f)ol- 
icy: curriculum and teaching, and institutional advancement) and Educa- 
tion Policy (policy analysis for elementary and secondary education. 
postsecondary education, government agencies, and not-for-profit organi- 
zations concerned with education 

Course Code Prefix — EDPA 



Electrical Engineering (ENEE) 

College of Engineering 

Engineering Building Room 3170, Phone 454-4171 

Ct)air: William Destler 

Associate C/ia/rs; Christopher Davis. Facilities and Services: Fawzi 
Emad. Graduate Program: James Pugsley, Undergraduate Program 
Professors: Baras. Barbe. Blakenship, Chu, Davis, Davisson, DeClaris. 
Des'ler, Emad, Ephremides, Frey, Granatstem, Harger. Hochuli, Ja'Ja'. 
Krisnaprasad, Lee, Levine, Ligomenides, Lin, Mayergoyz. Newcomb. 
Oft, Peckerar (part-time). Rabin. Reiser, Rhee, Striffler, Taylor, Zaki 
Associate Professors: ^bed. Antonsen, Dagenais, Farvardin, Gerani- 
otis, Gligor, Goldhar, Ho, Makowski, Nakajima, Narayan. Oruc, Pugsley. 
Shayman, Silio, Tits, Tretter 

Assistant Professors: Fuja, Goldsman, lliadis. loannou. Lawson. 
Menezes, Milchberg, Papamarcou. Shamma, Webb 

The Electrical Engineering major is intended to prepare students to 
function as effective citizens and engineers in an increasingly technokjgi- 
cal world as well as in science and engineenng subjects Depth as well as 
breadth is required in the humanities and social sciences to understand 
the economic, ecologic, and human factors involved in reaching the best 
solution to todays problems 

The basic foundation in mathematical, physical, and engineering sci- 
ences IS established in the first two years of the curriculum men a core of 
required Electrical Engineering courses is followed by a flexible structure of 
electives which allows either breadth or specialization Appropriate 
choices of electives can prepare an Electrical Engineering major for a 
career as a practicing engineer and'or for graduate study 

Areas stressed in the major include communication systems, computer 
systems, control systems, engineering electromagnetics, microelectron- 
ics, and power systems Within these areas are courses in such topics as 
solid slate electronics, integrated circuits, lasers, communications engi- 
neering, computer design, power engineering, digital signal processing, 
antenna design, and many others Project courses allow undergraduate 
students to undertake independent study under the guidance of a faculty 
member in an area of mutual interest 

Requirements for the Electrical Engineering major include thorough 
preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry and engineering science 
Elective courses must include both Electrical Engineering courses and 
technical courses outside the department A sample program for the por 
tion of the program following the common freshman year in Engineering is 
shown below 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
University Studies ' 
MATH 246 DiHerential Equations 
MATH 241 Analysis III 



Semester 



Engineering, Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering 89 



PHYS 262, 263 General Physics 
ENES 240 Engineering Computation 
ENES 221 Dynamics 
ENEE 204 Systems and Circuits I 
ENEE 250 Computer Structure 

Total Credits 

JUNIOR YEAR 

MATH xxx (Elect Advanced Math ' 
ENEE 322 Signal and System Theory 
ENEE 380 Electromagnetic Theory 
ENEE 381 Elect Wave Propagation 
ENEE 304 Systems and Circuits II 
ENEE 305 Fundamental Laboratory 
ENEE 324 Engineerina Probability 

ENEE 314 Electronic Circuits 

ENEE XXX Advanced Elective Lab ^ 

Electives ' 

University Studies ' 

Total Credits 

SENIOR YEAR 

Electives ^ 
University Studies ' 

Total Credits 



' See details of University Studies below 

^ The twenty-nine credits of electives must satisfy the following 
conditions 

(1) 3 credits must be a MATH course from the Electrical Engineering 
Department's approved list 

(2) 2 credits must be a 400-level ENEE laboratory course 

(3) 9 credits must be from the EE Department's approved list (this may 
include additional MATH ) 

(4) 12 credits must be 400-level ENEE courses 

(5) the remaining 3 credits may be either 400level ENEE or from the EE 
Department's approved list 

ENEE ADVANCED ELECTIVE LABORATORIES 

ENEE 407 Microwave-Circuits Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 413 Electronics Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 418L Power Laboratory 

ENEE 445 Computer Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 473 Transducers and Electrical Machinery Laboratory (1) 

ENEE 483 Electromagnetic Measurements Laboratory (2) 

ADMISSION: 

Admission requirements are different from those of the other engineer- 
ing departments (see College of Engineering section on Entrance 
Requirements) 

ADVISING: 

Nearly all of the faculty in Electrical Engineenng functions as under- 
graduate advisors Departmental approval is required for registration in all 
upper-division courses in the major The department's Undergraduate 
Office (Engineering Classroom Building (EGR) room 3188, 454-4172 is the 
contact point for undergraduate advising questions 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE: 

Several corporate scholarships are administered through the depart- 
ment. Information and scholarship applications are available from either the 
Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Office (EGR-3188, phone 4172) or 
the College of Engineering Student Affairs Office (EGR-1 131 , phone 2421) 

HONORS AND AWARDS: 

The Electrical Engineering department annually gives a variety of aca- 
demic performance and service awards Information on criteria and eligibil- 
ity IS available from the department s Undergraduate Office 

Majors in Electrical Engineering participate in the Engineering Honors 
Program See the College of Engineering entry in this catalog for further 
information 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS: 

There is an active Student Chapter of the Institute of Electrical and 
Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Information and membership applications are 
available in the Electrical Engineering undergraduate lounge (EGR-0107) 

Equally active, if not more so, is the chapter of Eta Kappa Nu, the 
nationwide Electrical Engineering honorary society. Information on eligibil- 
ity can be obtained from the EE Undergraduate lounge (ECR-0107), from 
the departmental Undergraduate Office (EGR-3188), or from the College 
Student Affairs Office (EGR-1 131), 

Course code prefix: ENEE 



Engineerina, Bachelor of Science 
Degree in Engineering 

College of Engineering 

1137 Engineering Classroom Building, 454-2421 

General Regulations for the B.S. — Engineering Degree. All undergradu- 
ate students in engineering will select their major field sponsoring depart- 
ment at the beginning of their second year regardless of whether they plan 
to proceed to a designated or an undesignated degree A student wishing 
to elect the undesignated degree program may do so at any time following 
the completion of the sophomore year, or a minimum of fifty earned credits 
towards any engineering degree, and at least one semester pnor to the 
time the student expects to receive the baccalaureate degree As soon as 
the student elects to seek an undesignated baccalaureate degree in engi- 
neering, the student's curriculum planning, guidance, and counseling will 
be the responsibility of the "Undesignated Degree Program Advisor " in the 
primary field department At least one semester before the expected 
degree is to be granted, the student must file an "Application for 
Admission to Candidacy for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering" w\\h the dean's office of the College of Engineering The 
candidacy form must be approved by the chair of the primary field depart- 
ment, the primary engineering, and the secondary field advisors and the 
college faculty committee on "Undesignated Degree Programs " This 
committee has the responsibility for implementing all approved policies 
pertaining to this program and reviewing and acting on the candidacy 
forms filed by the student. 

Specific University and college academic regulations apply to this 
undesignated degree program in the same manner as they apply to the 
conventional designated degree programs. For example, the academic 
regulations of the University apply as stated in Chapter 5 of this catalog, 
and the college requirement of 2 00 factor in the major field during the 
junior and senior years applies. For the purpose of implementation of such 
academic rules, the credits in the primary engineering field and the credits 
in the secondary field are considered to count as the "major " for such 
academic purposes 

Options of the 'B.S. — Engineering' Program. The 'B S — Engineering" 
program is designed to serve three primary functions. (1) to prepare those 
students who wish to use the breadth and depth of their engineering 
education as a preparatory vehicle for entry into post-baccalaureate study 
in such fields as medicine, law, or business administration, (2) to provide 
the basic professional training for those students who wish to continue 
their engineering studies on the graduate level in one of the new interdisci- 
plinary fields of engineering such as environmental engineering, bio-medi- 
cal engineering, systems engineering, and many others, and finally (3) to 
educate those students who do not plan a normal professional career in 
designated engineering field but wish to use a broad engineering educa- 
tion so as to be better able to serve in one or more of the many auxiliary or 
management positions of engineering related industries. The program is 
designed to give the maximum flexibility for tailoring a program to the 
specific future career plans of the student. To accomplish these objectives, 
the program has two optional paths: an engineering option and an applied 
science option 

The engineering option should be particularly attractive to those stu- 
dent contemplating graduate study or professional employment in the 
interdisciplinary engineering fields, such as environmental engineering, 
bio-engineering. biomedical, and systems and control engineering, or for 
preparatory entry into a variety of newer or interdisciplinary areas of gradu- 
ate study. For example, a student contemplating graduate work in environ- 
mental engineering might combine chemical and civil engineering for his or 
her program; a student interested in systems and control engineering 
graduate work might combine electncal engineering with aerospace, 
chemical, or mechanical engineering. 

The applied science option should be particularly attractive to those 
students who do not plan on professional engineering career but wish to 
use the rational and developmental abilities fostered by an engineering 
education as a means of furthering career objectives Graduates of the 
applied science option may aspire to graduate work and an ultimate career 
in a field of science, law, medicine, business, or a variety of other attractive 
opportunities which build on a combination of engineering and a field of 
science Entrance requirements for law and medical schools can be met 
readily under the format of this program In the applied science program, 
any field in the University in which the student may earn a B S degree is an 
acceptable secondary science field, thus affording the student a maximum 
flexibility of choice for personal career planning 

Environmental Engineering. Environmental engineering is the application 

of basic engineering and science to problems in the environment to ensure 
optimum environmental quality In recent years, humans have suffered a 
continually deteriorating environment A truly professional engineer 
involved in the study of environmental engineering must see the total 



90 English Language and Literature 



picture and relate it to a particular mission wtiettier this be air pollution, 
water quality control, environmental tiealth, or solid and liquid waste dispo- 
sal The total picture includes urban systems design, socio-economic (ac- 
tors, water resource development, and land and resource conservation 

A student who selects the B S — Engineering degree program can 
specialize in environmental engineenng by proper selection of primary and 
secondary fields from the wide selection of courses related to environmen- 
tal engineering given by the various departments in the college 

Engineering-Medicine. Advanced technology is finding increasingly 
sophisticated applications In medical care delivery and research Pace- 
makers, heart-assist pumps, kidney dialysis machines, and artificial limbs 
are only a few examples of the role of engineering and technology in 
medicine In addition, diagnostic procedures and record-keeping have 
been greatly enhanced by the use of computers and electronic testing 
equipment There is a growing need for physicians and researchers in life 
sciences, having strong backgrounds In engineering, who can effectively 
utilize these technologies and who can work with engineers in research 
and development 

The Bachelor of Science in Engineenng degree provides the student an 
excellent opportunity to develop a professional level of competence in an 
engineering discipline while at tfie same time meeting the entrance 
requirements for medical school Under the applied science opUon. the 
student could select any engineering field of most interest to him/her, and 
his or her secondary field would usually be chemistry or zoology In addition 
to the medical school entrance requirements, he or she would complete 
twelve credits of advanced work in his or her secondary field 

Under the engineering option, the student would generally combine 
chemical engineering (as either primary or secondary field) with another 
engineering discipline This option allows the student to complete more 
advanced work in his/her primary field of engineenng than does the aplied 
science option Either option can be completed in a four-year period with 
careful planning and scheduling 

Minimum Requirements. Listed below are the minimum requirements for 
the B S — Engineering degree with either an engineering option or an 
applied science option The sixty-six semester credit hours required for the 
completion of the junior and senior years are superimposed upon the 
frestiman and sophomore curriculum of the chosen primary field of engi- 
neering The student, thus, does not make a decision whether to take the 
designated or the undesignated degree in an engineering field until the 
beginning of the junior year In fact, the student can probably delay the 
decision until the spring term of the junior year with little or no sacrifice, 
thus affording the student ample time for decision Either program may be 
taken on the regular four-year format or under the Maryland Plan for Coop- 
erative Engineering Education 

Junior-Senior Requirements for the Degree of B.S. — Engineering 

Semester Semester 

Hours Hours 

(Engineering (Applied Science 

Option) Option) 
Requirements 
Univ Studies Prog 

Requirements 15 15 

Mathematics 
Physical Sci 

Requirements^ 3 3 

Engineenng Sciences '.^ 6^ 6 

Primary Field' 24 (Engr ) 18 (Engr.) 

Secondary Field 12 (Engr) 12 (Sci.) 

Approved Electives'.^ 6 (Tech ) 9 or 10 

Sr Research/Project' 3 or 2 
Total 



66 



66 



Engineering fields of concentration available under the B 8 — Engineering 
program as primary field within either the engineering option or the applied 
science option are aerospace engineering engineering materials, agricultural 
engineenng, fire protection engineenng chemical engineering, mechanical 
engineering, civil engineering, nuclear engineering, and electircal engineering 
All engineenng fields of concentration may be used as a secondary field within 
the engineering option 

' Engineering sciences, for the purpose of this degree, are those courses 
in the College of Engineering prefixed by ENES. or, are in an engineering 
field not the primary or secondary field of engineering concentration 

' Students following the enqineering option may use up to six semester 
hours of coursework at the 100 or 200 course number level in the primary or 
the secondary field of engineering concentration as an engineering 
science 

^ A minimum of fifty percent of the coursework in the mathematics, 
physical sciences, engineering science and elective areas must be at the 
300 or 400 course number level 

• All of the courses used to fulfill the fields of concentration requirements 
(Ihirly-six semester hours in the engineering option and thirty in the applied 
science option) must be at the 3d0 course number level or above 

' For the applied science option each student is required — unless 
specifically excused, and if excused, fifteen semester hours of approved 



electives will be required — to satisfactonly complete a senior level project 
or research assignment relating the engineenng and science fields of 
concentration 

* In the engineering option, the six semester hours of electives must be 
technical (math, physical sciences or engineering sciences, but may not 
be in the primary or secondary fields of concentration) In the applied 
science option, the approved electives should be selected to strengthen 
the student's program consistent with career objectives Courses in the 
primary or secondary fields of concentration may be used to satisfy the 
approved electives requirement 



English Language and Literature 
(ENGL) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1123 Taliaferro Hall. 454-2511 

Undergraduate Advisors: 1122 Taliaferro. 454-2521 
Freshman English Office: 0139 Taliaferro, 454-4160 
Junior Writing Program: 21 17 Taliaferro, 454-4163 

Professor and Chair: David 

Professors: Bode (Emeritus). Bryer, Cross, Damrosch, David, Freed- 
man, Holton, Hovey (Emeritus). Howard. Isaacs. Jellema. Kornbtatt. 
Lawson. Lutwack (Ementus). M Miller. Mish (Emeritus). Murphy (Emen- 
tus). Myers (Ementus). Panichas. W Peterson. Plumly. Russell. Sala- 
manca, Schoenbaum-H. Trousdale. Vitzlhum. Whittemore (Ementus). 
Winton 

Associate Professors: Auchard. Barry. Beauchamp. Bennett Birdsall. 
Caramello, Carretta, Cate. Coletti. Coleman. Coogan, Cooper. 
Donawerth. Fahnestock. Flieger. Fraistat. Fry. D Hamilton. G Hamilton 
Hammond, Handelman, Herman, Joyce, Kautfman Kleine. Leinwand. 
Loizeaux. Mack, Marcuse. Norman. Pearson. C Peterson. Robinson. 
Weber (Emeritus). Wilson. Wyatt 

Assistant Professors: Auerbach, Cartwnght. Collier, Dobin. Dunn, 
Grant-Davie, James, Leonardi, Levine. Moser. Rutherford. Ryan (Visit- 
ing). Smith, Van Egmond. 

Instructors: Buhlig. Demaree. Logan. MacBain, J Miller, Scheltema, 
Shapiro. Terchek. Townsend 

•f Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The English major requires 39 credits in English beyond the two 
required University writing courses This relatively small number reflects 
the department's desire that students choose wisely a vanety of electives 
to acquire a broad and liberal education An English major is good profes- 
sional preparation for a career in the law. government, journalism, business 
communication, teaching, or any field that requires strong analytical, com- 
munication, and human skills Students may also want to consider a double 
major or the Litieral Arts and Business program (call ext 6794) to prepare 
themselves for a profession 

A student may pursue an English major with an emphasis in 1) English 
and American Literature, 2) Comparative Literature 3) English Language 
and Linguistics, or 4) English Education Basic requirements for tfie most 
commonly selected option, English and American Literature are 

1) The department's core courses (restricted to English and English 
Education majors) English 310 (Medieval and Renaissance British 
Literature), 311 (Baroque and Augustan Bntish Literature). 312 
(Romantic to Modern Bntish Literature) and 313{Amertcan Literature) 

2) Shakespeare English 205 or 304 or 403 or 404 

3) One 300-400 level course — other than Shakespeare — in English or 
American literature before 1800 

4) A senior seminar English 399 

5) 18 elective credits m English 

6) 12 supporting credits in the departments of modern languages. Classi 
cal Languages. Philosophy History, or Comparative Literature 

Only two 200 level courses may be counted toward the major f^ 
course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major or supfxyting 
area requirements Full details of this option, and of the other three options, 
should be obtained by consulting the English Departments advisors 
(Room A1 122 ext 2521) For information about English Education, see the 
entry for the Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

Honors: The English Department offers an extensive Honors Program. 
pnmanly for majors bul open to others with the approval of the Departmen- 
tal Honors Committee Interested students stK>uld ask for detailed informa- 
tion from an English Department advisor as early as possible m tf^r 
college careers 

The Writing Center m room 1 1 26 Taliaferro Hall provides free tutorial assis- 
tance daily to students enrolled in English courses English 101 students 
generally work with student tutors English 391 2 3 4 5 students work with 
tutors who are retired professionals In addition to fiel[>ng students with 



Entomology 91 



writing assignments, the Center prepares 101 students for the English 
Proficiency Exam Appointments are recommended, but walk-ins are wel- 
come t}ased on availability of tutors Call 454-4011 

Course Code Prefix — ENGL 



Entomology (ENTM) 

College of Life Sciences 

1302 Symons Hall. 454 3843 

Professor and Chair. Steinhauer 

Professors: Barbosa, Bickley (Emeritus), Bottrell, Davidson, Denno, 

Harrison (Emeritus). Jones (Emeritus), Menzer, Messersmith, Wood 

Associate Professors: Armstrong, Bissell (Emeritus), Dively, Hellman, 

Linduska, Wa, Milter. Nelson. Raupp, Regier, Reicheiderter, Scott 

Associate Research Scientists: Mickevich 

Assistant Professor: Lamp 

This curriculum prepares students for various types of entomological 
positions or for graduate work in any of the specialized areas of entomol- 
ogy Professional entomologists are engaged in fundamental and applied 
research m university, government, and private laboratories; regulatory 
and control activities with Federal and State agencies; commercial pest 
control and pest management services; sales and development programs 
with chemical companies, and other commercial organizations; consulting, 
extension work; and teaching 

Students should work closely with their advisors in choosing electives 
The curriculum is designed to allow majors intending to go to graduate 
school to broaden their preparation Those intending to begin a career after 
the baccalaureate would be advised to concentrate on a more defined 
curnculum 

College of Life Science Core Requirements 38-40 

University Studies Program Requirements 40 

Departmental Requirements 

ENTM 205 Principles of Entomology 4 

ENTM 398 General Colloquium in Entomology 1 

ENTM 399 Special Problems 1-2 

ENTM 423 Insect Comparative Morphology 4 

ENTM 424 Insect Diversity and Classification 4 

ENTM 432 Insect Physiology 4 

ENTM 451*' Insect Pests of Agn. Crops 4 

Total departmental requirements 22-23 

Supporting Courses 

MICB 200* General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL213 or 

BOTN 414 Plant Genetics 3 

ZOOL 212 Ecology, Evolution, & Behavior 4 

BIOM 401 Agricultural Biometrics 3 

or 

STAT 464 Introduction to Biostatistics 3 

Total supporting courses 14-15 

Two (2) of the following six (6) courses: 

BCHM 461 Biochemistry 1 3 

BOTN 212 Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 221 Diseases of Plants 4 

BOTN 441 Plant Physiology 4 

ZOOL 41 1 Cell Biology 4 

ZOOL 422 Vertebrate Physiology _4 

Total 6-8 

Electives 7-8 

127-134 

* May satisfy departmental requirements and/or a University Studies 
requirement 

" In addition to ENTM 451. students pursuing an applied program are 
encouraged to take ENTM 351 as an elective 

"* Students who intend to pursue a career in applied entomology should elect 
the following courses BOTN 212. BOTN 221. AGRI 401. ZOOL 422, BOTN 
441, AGRO 453 (Weed Control). AGRO 423 (Soil and Water Pollution) 
These seven courses are prerequisite to the M S program in pest 
management 

A "C" average is necessary for all ENTM and supporting courses 

Course Code Prefix — ENTM 



Family and Community Develop- 
ment (FMCD) 

College of Human Ecology 

I204A Mane Mount Hall. 454 6424 

Professor and Chair: Billingsley 

Professors: Gaylin. Hanna, Koblinsky 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Epstein, Myricks 

Assistant Professors: Churaman, Leslie, Randolph 

Lecturer: Werlimch 

Instructors: Millstein. Zeiger 

The Department of Family and Community Development is devoted to 
describing, explaining, and improving the quality of life by means of 
research, education, community outreach, and public service The 
approach is holistic, emphasizing human ecology The curnculum places 
special emphasis upon the family and the community as mediating struc- 
tures in determining life quality The jobs for which the curriculum is 
designed include counseling, program management, research, advocacy, 
and service delivery 

Graduates of the department obtain positions in human service agen- 
cies, consulting firms, voluntary organizations, and Federal. State, and 
local governments Their specific jobs may be in area agencies or organiza- 
tions such as the Federal Drug Administration. Planned Parenthood, youth 
services, family services, or senior citizens programs 

There are three interrelated majors offered by the department: 

I Family Studies. This course of study stresses a working knowl- 
edge of the growth of individuals throughout the life span with 
particular emphasis on intergenerational aspects of family living. It 
examines the pluralistic family forms and life styles within our post- 
technological complex society and the development of the individ- 
ual within the family within the community. 

II Management and Consumer Studies. Within this major are two 
specializations: (a) program management and (b) consumer 
affairs The focus is upon the efficient and effective utilization of 
organizational and other community resources. 

III Community Studies. This major stresses community develop- 
ment, community organization, and advocacy and their relevance 
to families In general there is an emphasis upon the processes and 
methods for social change, as well as the individuals, organizations 
or groups which act as agents of change. 

Each of these courses of study includes a set of major subject courses 
offered primarily within the department plus a sequence of supporting area 
courses which may be taken outside the department or in an interdepart- 
mental combination. Examples of supporting areas include the aging, the 
disabled, human service, children's issues, management, health, public 
administration, rehabilitation, and urban affairs Students are strongly 
encouraged to consult with an appropriate advisor in developing their 
course of study 

There are parallel requirements for each of the departments majors 
(family studies, management and consumer studies and community stud- 
ies). Each major requires a fifteen-credit thematic set of supportive area 
courses To graduate, students must also meet the requirements of the 
campus (eg, those specified in the University Studies Program) and of the 
College of Human Ecology. 

GRADES: All students are required to earn a grade of C or better in all 
courses applied toward satisfaction of the major This includes all required 
courses with the FMCD prefix as well as the courses used for the support- 
ing area 

COLLEGE CORE - required of all majors 

SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology (3) 

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology (3) 

ECON 201 Principles of Economics I (3) and 

ECON 203 Principles of Economics II (3) or 

ECON 205 Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

SPCH 100 Basic Principles of Speech Communications (3) 

or 107 Technical Speech Communication (3) 

or 125 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3) 

and two courses in Human Ecology, one each in the Departments of 
Human Nutrition and Food Systems and Textiles and Consumer Eco- 
nomics (6) 

Family Studies Major 
(a) Major subject area: A grade of C or better is required in these courses. 

FMCD 200 Pre-Professional Seminar (1) 

FMCD 202 Methods for Family, Community and Management Studies 

(3) 

FMCD 250 Decision Making in Families and Communities (3) 



92 Finance 



FMCD 330 Family Patterns (3) 

FMCD 348 Practicum in Family and Community Development (6 12) 

FMCD 349 Analysis of Practicum (1-2) 

(b) And a minimum of fifteen credits selected from the following coursai 
and completed with a grade of C or better. 

FMCD 105 The Individual in ttie Family (3) 

FMCD 260 Interpersonal Life Styles (3) 

FMCD 332 Ttie Ctiild in ttie Family (3) 

FMCD 370 Interpersonal Communication Processes (3) 

FMCD 381 Poverty and Affluence Among Families and Communities (3) 

FMCD 430 Gender Role Development in ttie Family (3) 

FMCD 431 Family Crisis and Intervention (3) 

FMCD 432 Intergenerational Aspects of Family Living (3) 

FMCD 441 Personal and Family Finance (3) 

FMCD 447 The Disabled Person in the Family and Community (3) 

FMCD 460 Violence in the Family (3) 

FMCD 485 Introduction to Family Counseling (3) 

FMCD 487 Legal Aspects of Family Problems (3) 

FMCD 497 The Child and the Law (3) 

AND SPECIAL TOPICS COURSES APPROVED FOR THIS MAJOR 

(c) Eighteen credits in supportive area consisting of a common focus or 
theme, e.g., aging and the aged, mental health, sociology, psychology. A 
grade of C or better is required for all courses used as the supportive 



(d) College Core Courses (see above). 

Management and Consumer Studies 

(a) Major subject courses: A grade of C or better is required in these 
courses. 

FMCD 200 Pre-Professional Seminar (1) 

FMCD 202 Methods for Family, Community and Management Studies 

(3) 

FMCD 250 Decision Making in Families and Communities (3) 

FMCD 348 Practicum in Family and Community Development (6-12) 

FMCD 349 Analysis of Practicum (1-2) 

FMCD 444 Human and Community Program Management (3) 

(b) And a minimum of fifteen credits selected from the following 
courses and completed with a grade of C or better. 

FMCD 280 Families and Communities in the Ecosystem (3) 

FMCD 381 Poverty and Affluence Among Families and Communities (3) 

FMCD 443 Consumer Problems (3) 

FMCD 445 Family and Household Management (3) 

FMCD 447 The Disabled Person in the Family and Community (3) 

FMCD 453 Family and Community Advocacy (3) 

(c) Eighteen credits in a supportive area constituting common focus or 
theme, e.g., personnel and labor relations, or public administration. A 
grade of C or better is required for all courses used as the supportive 
area. 

(d) College Core Courses (see above). 

Community Studies Major 

(a) Major subject courses: A grade of C or better is required in these 
courses 

FMCD 200 Pre-Professional Seminar (1) 

FMCD 201 Concepts in Community Development (3) 

FMCD 202 Methods for Family, Community and Management Studies 

(3) 

FMCD 250 Decision Making in Families and Communities (3) 

FMCD 348 Practicum in Family and Community Development (6-12) 

FMCD 349 Analysis of Practicum (1-2) 

(b) And a minimum of fifteen credits selected from the following courses 
and completed with a grade of C or better. 

FMCD 280 Families and Communities in the Ecosystem (3) 

FMCD 381 Poverty and Affluence Among Families and Communities (3) 

FMCD 444 Human and Community Program Management (3) 

FMCD 447 The Disabled Person in the Family and Community (3) 

FMCD 453 Family and Community Advocacy (3) 

FMCD 483 Family and Community Service Systems (3) 

(c) Eighteen credits in a supportive area constituting common focus or 
theme, e.g., community psychology, international development, or urban 
studies. A grade of C or better is required for all courses used as the 
supportive area. 

(d) College Core Courses (see above). 

Course Code Prefix - FMCD 



Finance 

For information, consult College of Business and Management entry 



Fire Protection Engineering (ENFP) 

College of Engineering 

0147 Engineering Classroom Building, 454-2424 

Professor and Chair: Bryan 

Assistant Professor: Mowrer 

Lecturer: Miike 

Lecturers (part-time) DiNenno, Quiliere, Walton 

MAJOR: Fire Protection Engineering 

The fire protection engineering major is concerned with the scientific 
and technical problems of preventing loss of life and property from fire, 
explosion, and related hazards, and of evaluating and eliminating hazard- 
ous conditions 

The fundamental principles of fire protection engineering are relatively 
well-defined and the application of these principles to a modern industrial- 
ized society has become a specialized activity Control of the hazards in 
manufacturing processes calls for an understanding not only o( measures 
for the protection but of the processes themselves Often the most effec- 
tive solution to the problem of safeguarding a hazardous operation lies in 
the modification of special extinguishing equipment The fire protection 
engineer must be prepared to decide in any given case what is the best 
and most economical solution of the fire prevention problem His or her 
recommendations are often based not only on sound principles of fire 
protection but on a thorough understanding of the special problems of the 
individual property 

Modern fire protection utilizes a wide variety of mechanical and electri- 
cal equipment which the student must understand in principle before he or 
she can apply them to special problems The fire protection curriculum 
emphasizes the scientific, technical, and humanitarian aspects of fire pro- 
tection engineenng and the development of the individual student 

The problems and challenges which confront the fire protection engi- 
neer include the reduction and control of fire hazards due to processes 
subject to fire or explosion in respect to design, installation and handling, 
involving both physical and human factors, the use of buildings and trans- 
portation facilities to restrict the spread of fire and to facilitate the escape 
of occupants in case of fire: the design, installation and maintenance of fire 
detection and extinguishing devices and systems, and the organization 
and education of persons for fire prevention and fire protection 

REQUIREt^ENTS FOR I^AJOR Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 3 
MATH 240 — Linear Algebra or 

MATH 241 — Calculus 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations for Scientists & Engi- 
neers 3 

PHYS 262, 263 — General Physics 4 4 

ENES 221 — Dynamics 3 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENFP 251 — Introduction to Fire Protection Engineenng 3 

ENFP 290 — Fire Protection Fluids _ _3 

Total 17 16 

Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 3 

CMSC 1 10 — Intro to Fortran Programming (4) or 

ENES 240 — Engineering Computation (3) 3-4 

ENME 320 — Thermodynamics or 

ENCH 300 — Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

ENCE 300 — Fundamentals of Engineering Materials or 

ENME 310 — Mechanics of Detormable Solids 3 

ENCE 330 — Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENFP 310 — Fire Protection Systems Design I 3 

ENFP 315 — Fire Protection Systems Design II 3 

ENFP 320 — Pyromelrics of Materials 3 

ENFP 312 — Heat Transfer in Fire Protection 3 

Approved Electives _2 _2 

Total 17-18 17 

Senior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 6 

ENNU 310 — Environmental Aspects of Nuclear Engi 

neering or 
ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

ENFP 421 — Functional and Life Safely Analysis 3 



Food Scic ice Program 93 



ENFP 415 — Fire Dynamics 

ENFP 411 — Fire Protection Hazard Analysis 
ENFP 416 — Problem Synthesis and Design 
Technical Electives' 
Total 



3 

3 

3 

_3 J 

15 15 



Minimum Degree Credits — 120 credits and fulfillment of all department, 
college, and University requirements 

■Three credits of technical electives must be in ENFP 

Admission: 

Admission requirements are identical to those set by the College of 
Engineering (see College of Engineering section on Entrance 
Requirements) 

Advising: 

Mandatory advising by Department Faculty is required of all students 
every semester Students schedule their advising appointments in the 
Departmental Office, room 0147 Engineenng Classroom Building or by 
phone 454-2424 

Fieldworfc and Internship Opportunities: 

Part-time and summer professional experience opportunities and paid 
internship information is available in the Departmental Office, room 0147 
Engineering Classroom Building Coordinator: J,L Bryan, Phone 454-2424 

Financial Assistance: 

Scholarships and grants are available to students in the Department 
from organizational and corporate sponsors Information is available on 
eligibility, financial terms and retention critena in the Departmental Office, 
room 0147 Engineenng Classroom Building 

Honors and Awards: 

Academic achievement awards are sponsored by the Department, and 
the student professional-honor societies These awards are presented at 
the annual College of Engineering Honors Convocation Eligibility criteria 
for these awards are available in the Departmental Office, room 0147 
Engineering Classroom Building Qualified students in the Department are 
eligible for participation in the College of Engineering honors program 

Student Organizations: 

The Departmental honor society Salamander is provided for academi- 
cally eligible junior and senior students. The University of Maryland student 
chapter of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers is the professional 
society for all interested students in the Department. Information on both 
organizations may be obtained from current members in the student 
lounge, room 1123 Engineenng Laboratory Building, phone 454-2686. 

Course Code Prefix: ENFP 



Food Science Program (FDSC) 

College of Agriculture 

1122A Holzapfel Hall, 454-2829 

Professor and Coordinator Wiley 

Professors: Bean, Cook. Johnson, Heath, Quebedeaux, Solomos, Vijay, 

Westhoff. Wheaton 

Professors Emeritus: Keeney, King, Maffick, Twigg 

Associate Professors: Chai, Doerr, Schlimme, Stewart 

Assistant Professors: CUoi. Kantor, Marshall 

Lecturers: Bednarczyk. Elehwany, Hsieh, Pohland, Solomon, Weeks 

The Food Science Major 

Food Science is concerned with the application of the fundamental 
pnnciples of the physical, biological and behavioral sciences and engineer- 
ing to better understand the complex and heterogeneous materials recog- 
nized as food The contemporary food industry is highly dependent on this 
accumulating multidisciplinary body of knowledge and especially on the 
people who are educated to apply it — the food scientists or the food 
technologists, terms that are used interchangeable 

Courses include the general areas of manufacture, distnbution, prepa- 
ration and utilization of foods to provide a better and more plentiful food 
supply for humankind 

Specialization is offered m the areas of flavor and food chemistry, food 
microbiology including fermentation, food processing technology including 
freezing, thermal and aseptic processing, quality assurance, and the food 
commodity areas of fruits and vegetables, milk and dairy products, poultry 
and poultry products, red meats and seafood products 

Opportunities for careers in food science are available in industry, trade 
associations, government and universities. Specific positions for food 
scientists include food product development, production management. 



quality assurance, technical sales and service, ingredient management, 
food processing, research and teaching 

Requirements for Major Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements* 41 

College Requirements 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

MATH 110 or 115 — 

Curriculum Requirements 

ENGL 393 — Technical Writing 

ENAG 414 — Mechanics of Food Processing 

CHEM 104 or CHEM 233 , 

CHEM 1 13 — General Chemistry II 

FDSC 1 1 1 — Contemporary Food Industry and Consumerism 

FDSC 398 — Seminar 

FDSC 412, 413 — Principles of Food Processing I, II 

FDSC 421 — Food Chemistry 

FDSC 422 — Food Product Research and Development . . 

FDSC 423 — Food Chemistry Laboratory 

FDSC 430 — Food Microbiology 

FDSC 431 — Food Quality Control 

FDSC 434 — Food Microbiology Laboratory 

FDSC 442, 452. 461. 471, 482 — Horticulture, Dairy, Poultry, 
Meat and Seafood Products Processing (2 re- 
quired) 

NUTR 100 — Elements of Nutrition 

BCHM 261 — Elements of Biochemistry 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics 

Electives 



3 
4 
4 
3 

3 
4 
4 
4 
3 
1 
3,3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
2 



3,3 
3 
3 
4 

25 



'includes 17 required credits listed below 

Advising: Advisement of undergraduate students is required The Food 
Science Undergraduate advisor is Dr DV Schlimme, Room 11228 
Holzapfel hall, 454-6526 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities are available with such organiza- 
tions as McCormick and Co , National Food Processors Association, Fair- 
field Farm Kitchens, the Food and Drug Administration, Highs Ice Cream 
Corp., and Strasburger and Siegel, Inc For information, contact Dr D,V. 
Schlimme, Room 1122B Holzapfel Hall, 454-6526 

Honors and Awards: The Food Science department offers opportunities for 
scholarships and achievement awards such as the Institute of Food Tech- 
nologists and Washington, D C Section IFT, Maryland and D C Dairy 
Technology, and C W England scholarships, and the Forbes Chocolate 
Leadership Award 

Student Organization: Dairy Products Judging Team. 

Course Code Prefix: FDSC 



French and Italian Languages and 
Literatures (FREN) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3106C Jiminez Hall, 454-4303/4 

Associate Professor and Cliair: Tanca 
Professors: MacBain, Therrien 

Associate Professors: Black, Demaitre, Fink, Mage, Joseph, C Rus- 
sell. Verdaguer 

Assistant Professors: Ancekewicz, Brami, Flavo, Mossman 
Lecturers: Barrabim, Bondurant, C.P. Russell 
Instructors: Amodeo 
Affiliate Lecturer: Jacoby 
Emeritus: Bingham 

French is one of the world's great languages of culture, providing 
access to an outstanding body of literature and criticism, studies in the 
arts, the humanities, the social and natural sciences, and career opportuni- 
ties in commerce, foreign affairs, and the academic world The department 
seeks to provide an atmosphere conducive to a cultural awareness and 
intellectual growth. It hosts an active student club and a chapter of a 
national honor society For further information telephone 454-4303 

The undergraduate major in French consists of thirty-six hours of 
French courses above FREN 203 Two options, both having the same core, 
lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree: (1 ) French language and literature and 
(2) French language and culture No grade lower than C may be used 
toward the major Students intending to apply for teacher certification 
should consult the Director of Undergraduate Advising as early as possible 
for proper planning 



94 Geography 

French Language and Literature Option. Required core courses FREN 

204, 250, 301 , 351 , 352, and one of 21 1 , 31 1 , 312, 404 Specialization either 
401 or 405, either 302 or 402, four additional 400-level courses (excluding 
404, 475, 478, 479), of which three must be in literature. Additional require- 
ments outside French twelve credits in supporting courses chosen from a 
list approved by the department, or at least twelve credits (six credits at 
200 level and six credits at 300-400 level) in one specific area, representing 
a coordinated plan of study 

French Language and Culture Option: Required core courses FREN 204, 
250, 301, 351, 352, and one of 21 1, 311, 312, 404 Specialization; one of 
302, 401, 402, either 471, or 472: 473: three additional 400level courses 
(excluding 404, 475, 478, 479) Additional requirements outside French 
twelve credits in supporting courses chosen from a list approved by the 
department: or at least twelve credits (six credits at 200level and six 
credits at 300-400 level) in one specific area, representing a coordinated 
plan of study. 

Honors. The department offers an honors program in French for students 
of superior ability Honors students must take a total of thirty-six credits in 
French, including 494H (preparation for the final comprehensive examina- 
tion) and 495H (Honors Thesis) For further information see the Director of 
the French Honors Program 

Italian Language, while the department does not yet offer a major in Italian, 
It does offer a large selection of language, literature and civilization courses 
at all levels. Students may follow a course of study which prepares them in 
Italian for all further academic or professional needs, Italian is also one of 
the three component languages in the Romance Languages major 
described below 

Course Code Prefix — FREN, ITAL. 



Geography (GEOG) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1113 Lefrak Hall, 454-2241 

Chair: Corey 

Professors: Corey, Fonaroff, Harper 

Associate Professors: Brodsky, Christian* (Urban Studies), Cirrincione* 

(Curriculum and Instruction), Groves, Kearney, Leatherman, l\^itchell, 

Thompson, Wiedel 

Assistant Professors: Goward, Lai, Marcus 

Part-time Lecturers: Broome, Chaves, Deshler, Eney, Frieswyk 

Affiliate Faculty: Corsi' (Business and Management) 

■Joint appointment with unit indicated 

The Geography Major. The Department of Geography offers programs of 
study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree Many students find that 
the multiple perspectives of geography form an excellent base for a liberal 
arts education The abilities to write clearly and to synthesize information 
and concepts are valued highly in geographical education and practice 
Students of geography must master substantive knowledge either in the 
physical/natural sciences or in the behavioral/social sciences in addition to 
methodological knowledge International interests are best pursued with 
complementary study in foreign languages and area studies 

The central question in geographical study is "where'" Geographers 
research locational questions of the natural environment, of social and 
economic systems, and of past human activity on the land Students of 
geography must master a vanety of techniques that are useful in locational 
analysis, including computer applications and mapping, map making or 
cartography, air-photo interpretation and remote sensing, field observa- 
tion, statistical analysis, and mathematical modelling 

Increasingly, geographers apply their combined methodological and 
substantive knowledge towards the solution of society's problems Some 
graduates find geography to be an excellent background for careers in 
defense and intelligence, journalism, law, travel and tourism, the nonprofit 
sector, and business and management Most professional career positions 
in geography require graduate training Many geographers take positions 
in scientific research, planning, management and policy analysis for tX5th 
government and private agencies 

Requirements (or Major Including Program Options: Within any of the 
specializations available in the geography major program it is possible for 
students to adjust their programs to fit their individual interests The geog- 
raphy major totals thirty-seven semester hours In addition to the thirty- 
seven semester hours, the geography major is required to take an addi- 
tional fifteen semester hours of supporting coursework outside of the 
department The hours can be either in one department of in an area of 
concentration An area of concentration requires that a written program of 
courses be reviewed and placed on file by the department advisor See 
Professor Cirnncione, 1125 LeFrak Hall, telephone 454-2244 Supporting 
courses generally are related to the area of specialty in geography The 



pass-fail option is not applicable to major or supporting courses A mini- 
mum grade of C in each course is required tor major and supporting 
courses 

The required courses for geography majors are as follows 

Semester Credit Hours 

Geography Core (GEOG 201 , 202, 203. 21 1 , 305. 310) 16 

An additional techniques course (selected from 370, 372. 373. 

380) 3 

A regional course 3 

Elective systematic courses 15 

Total 37 

The Geography Core - The following six courses form the mini- 
mum essential base on which advanced work in 
geography can be built 

GEOG 201 — Geography of Environmental Systems . . 3 

GEOG 202 — The World in Cultural Perspective 3 

GEOG 203 — Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 211 — Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory 1 

GEOG 305 — Quantitative Methods in Geography 3 

GEOG 310 — Research and Writing in Geography 3 

The four lower division courses are to be completed pnor to GEOG 310 and 
all other upper division courses GEOG 201 . 202, and 203 may be taken in 
any order and a student may register for more than one in any semester 
GEOG 211 may be taken concurrent with, or after taking GEOG 201 
GEOG 305 IS prerequisite to GEOG 310 GEOG 310 is designed specifi- 
cally as a preparation to upper level work and should be taken by the end 
of the junior year Upon consultation with a department advisor, a reasona- 
ble load of other upper level work in geography may be taken concurrently 
with GEOG 310 Completion of GEOG 310 satisfies for geography majors 
only the upper level English composition requirement 

The techniques requirement may be fulfilled by taking one of the follow- 
ing: GEOG 370 — Cartographic Principles, GEOG 372 — Remote Sensing, 
GEOG 373 — Computer Mapping, and GEOG 380 — Local Field Course 

Suggested Program of Study for Geography 

Semester Credit Hours 
Freshman and Sophomore Years 

GEOG 100. 110, 120, 130, 140. 150. 160, 170. 171 (1) — Intro- 
ductions to Geography (Does not count toward 

geography majors) 3+1 

GEOG 201 — Geography of Environmental Systems 3 

GEOG 202 — The World in Cultural Perspective 3 

GEOG 203 — Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 21 1 — Geography of Environmental Systems Latxjratory 1 

General University, or University Studies Program Requirements 

and/or electives 47 

60 

Junior Year 

GEOG 305 — Quantitative Methods in Geography 3 

GEOG 310 — Research and Writing in Geography 3 

GEOG — A regional geography course 3 

GEOG — Techniques (choice) 3 

GEOG — Elective 3 

General University, or University Studies Program Requirements 

and/or electives 15 

30 

Senior Year 

GEOG — Courses to complete major 12 

Electives 18 

30 
Total 120 

Introduction to Geography. The lOO-ievei geography courses are general- 
education courses for persons who have had no previous contact with the 
discipline in high school or for persons planning to take only one course in 
geography They provide general overviews of the field or in one of its 
major topics Credit for these courses is not applied to the major 

Areas of Specialization. Although the major program is flexible and can be 
designed to fit any individual student s own interest several specializa- 
tions attract numbers of students They are 

Urban Geography and Regional Development-Provides preparation tor 
careers in planning, development research and teaching Majors electing 
this specialty take departmental courses in urban geography, location 
theory and spatial analysis transportation and economic geography 
among others and supporting courses outside the department in urt>an 
sociology, urban economics urban transportation housing and design. 
family and community development architecture, and in urban studies and 
planning 

Environmental Analysis. Resources Management and Physical Geoqra 
phy-For students with special interests m the natural environnnent and its 
interaction with humans This specialization consists of departmental 



Geology 95 



courses in geomorphology, climatology, biogeography, and energy, pollu- 
tion, and water resources, and of supporting courses in geology, soils, 
meteorology, civil engineering, hydrology, and botany 

Computer Mapping, Cartography and Spatial Analysis Prepares stu- 
dents (or careers in map design, compilation, and reproduction The 
department offers various courses in thematic mapping, cartographic his 
tory and theory, map evaluation, map. photo, and image interpretation. 
computer-assisted cartography, spatial statistics, and geographic informa- 
tion systems Students concentrating in cartography are not required to 
take GEOG 305 and are limited to nine hours of upper level systematic 
geography courses Students must complete fifteen hours in cartography/ 
geographic techniques Supporting area courses must be taken from a list 
provided by the department All math programs should be approved by a 
departmental advisor 

The required courses of the Cartography concentration are as follows 

Semester Credit Hours 

Geography Core (GEOG 201, 202. 203, 211, 310) 13 

Elective systematic geography courses 9 

Cartography Geographic technique courses 15 

Total 37 

Human and Historical Cultural Geography Of interest to students particu- 
larly concerned with the geographic aspects of population, politics, and 
other social and cultural phenomena, and with historical and locational 
processes in cities and in colonial settlement In addition to departmental 
course offerings, this specialization necessitates study in sociology, 
anthropology, government and politics, history, and economics 

For further information on any of these areas of specialization, students 
should contact a departmental advisor 

Geography Minor and Secondary Education Geography Specialization. 

Secondary Education majors with a concentration in geography are 
required to take twenty-seven hours in the content field, GEOG 201 , 202, 
203. 311, 305, and 490, or another upper-level course reflecting this inter- 
est The remaining twelve hours of the program consist of three hours of 
regional geography and nine hours of upper -division systematic courses 
For majors in elementary education and others needing a geography 
course for teaching certification, GEOG 100 is the required course 

Geography minors should take at least GEOG 201 , 202, and 203 in the 
geography core and 310 is recommended As with the major, these 
courses should be taken before any other geography courses 

Internship Opportunities. The department offers a one-semester intern- 
ship program for undergraduates (GEOG 384 and 385) The goal of the 
program is to enhance the intellectual growth and the career opportunities 
of undergraduates The internship provides students an opportunity to 
expand their understanding of the field by linking the theoretical aspects of 
geography acquired in the classroom to the applied aspects operating in a 
practice situation The internship program is open only to geography 
juniors and seniors All interns must have completed the following prerequi- 
sites: GEOG 201 , 202, 203, 21 1 , 305, and 310. An application form from the 
undergraduate geography advisor must be submitted one semester 
before the internship is desired See Professor Cirrincione, 1125 LeFrak 
Hall, telephone 454-2244 

Honors. For information on the geography honors program, contact the 
undergraduate advisor 

Student Organizations: Gamma Theta Upsilon, the goegraphy undergrad- 
uate organization, operates a program of student-sponsored talks and field 
tnps Information may be obtained from Professor Marcus, 1171 Lefrak 
Hall, 454-4862 



Course Code Prefi) 



GEOG. 



Geology (GEOL) 

Collejge of Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences 

1115 Geology Building, 454-3548 

Professor and Chair: Chang 

Associate Professors: Candela, Ridky, Segovia, Siegrist, Stifel, Weid- 

ner, Wylie 

Assistant Professor: McLellan 

The Geology Major Geology is the basic science of the earth In its 
broadest sense, geology concerns itself with planetary formation and mod- 
ification with emphasis on the study of the planet earth Geology concerns 
itself with the application of geological principles and with application of 
physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics to the understanding of our 
planet This study directs its attention to the earth's internal and external 



structure, materials, chemical and physical processes and its physical and 
biological history 

Geology studies thus encompass understanding the development of 
life from the fossil record, the mechanics of crustal movement, and earth- 
quake production, the evolution of the oceans and their interaction with 
land the origin and emplacement of mineral and fuel resources and the 
determination of the human species' impact on the geological 
environment 

Geological scientists find employment in government, industrial, and 
academic establishments In general, graduate training is expected for 
advancement to the most rewarding positions Although some sectors of 
the geological industry, such as the petroleum industry, are subject to 
cyclical employment conditions, most sectors are enjoying a strong 
employment outlook Strong areas of employment include mineral 
resource consumption, land management, hydrology and ground water, 
remote sensing, geophysics and virtually all areas of environmental stud- 
ies At this time, students with the Bachelor of Science, particularly those 
with supportive training in statistics and computer science, can find satis- 
factory employment 

The Geology program includes a broad range of undergraduate 
courses to accommodate both geology majors and students interested in 
selected aspects of the science of the earth Opportunities exist for under- 
graduates to work on research projects, individually with faculty members. 

Requirements for Major Including Program Options: The geology curricu- 
lum is designed to meet the requirements of industry, graduate school and 
government However, students may select, at their option, geology elec- 
tives that are designed for a particular interest, rather than for the broad 
needs of a professional career Five areas of concentration are suggested: 
Advanced Study for Graduate School, Energy and Mineral Resources. 
Minerals and Materials. Environmental and Engineering Geology, and Earth 
Science Education These concentrations are used by the undergraduate 
advisors to help students plan career directions which tit their interests, 
abilities, and the present and predicted job market. 

All required geology courses must be completed with a grade of C or 
better An average of C is required in the supporting courses Courses 
required for the B S in geology are listed below 

Semester Credit Hour 

30 



University Studies Program Requirements* 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

GEOL 101 — Physical Geology (or GEOL 100 -»- GEOL 110) 4 

GEOL 102 — Historical Geology 4 

GEOL 322 — Mineralogy 4 

GEOL 331 — Invertebrate Paleontology 4 

GEOL 340 — Geomorphology 4 

GEOL 341 — Structural Geology 4 

GEOL 342 — Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 4 

GEOL 390 — Field Methods 3 
GEOL 393 — Research Problems in Geology 

First Senior Semester 3 
GEOL 394 — Research Problems in Geology 

Second Senior Semester 3 

GEOL 423 — Optical Mineralogy 3 

GEOL 443 — Petrology 3 

GEOL 490 — Field Camp 3 

Supporting Requirements 24 

CHEM 103. 113 4 4 

MATH 140, 141 4 4 

PHYS 141, 142 4 4 

Electives 16-20 

* Of the normal USP requirements (forty credit hours), at least ten credits are 
met by the major requirements in mathematics, chemistry, or geology (basic 
mathematical skill and Distributive Studies Area B) 

■• Until Fall 90 Students enrolling as Geology majors beginning with the Fall '90 
semester will be required to take GEOL l(jl (4) 

•• Students who failed GEOL 100 or GEOL 101 (old) but passed GEOL 1 10 may, 
on petition, be permitted to take 101 (new) without a lab 

Advising: The Director of the Undergraduate Program serves as the major 
advisor for geology majors The office is Rm 3115, Geology Building. Ext 
3548 All geology faculty members are involved in advising 

Honors and Awards: (1) Geology Alumni Award for graduating senior with 
the highest overall scholastic average; (2) Fernow Memorial Faculty Field 
Camp Awards for geology majors to attend geology summer camp, (3) 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon Award for a senior in geology for Outstanding 
Scholastic Achievement and service to the Society; and (4) Best Senior 
Research Award 

Student Organizations: (1) Sigma Gamma Epsilon, National Honor Society 
for Earth Sciences, and 2) Geology Club 

Course Code Prefix GEOL 



96 Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 



Germanic and Slavic Languages 
and Literatures (GERM) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3215 Jimenez Hall. 454-4301/1 

Professor and Chair; Davidson 

Professors: Beiken. Best. Brecht, Fuegi. Herln. Jones (Emeritus). Oster, 

Pfister 

Associate Professors: Berry, Bllik. Fleck, Frederlksenf. Glad, 

Hitchcock 

Assistant Professors: Fagan, Lekic, Merrill, Sctiallert. Strauch 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Garza 

■ Dislinguistied Scholar-Teacher 

Germanic Language and Literature 

The undergraduate major in Germanic Language and Literature con- 
sists of thirty-six hours beyond the basic language acquisition sequence 
(GERM 101/104) No course completed with a grade lower than C may be 
used to satisfy the major requirements Three program options lead to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree 1) German language. 2) German literature, and 3) 
Germanic area studies Secondary concentration and supportive electives 
are encouraged in the other foreign languages, comparative literature, 
English, history, and philosophy Majors intending to go on to graduate 
study in the discipline are urged to develop a strong secondary concentra- 
tion in a further area of Germanic studies: such "internal minors" are 
available in German language. German literature, Scandinavian studies, 
and Indo-European and Germanic philology 

Major Requirements 

German Language Option 

Core 220, 301, 302, and both 321 and 322 Specialization 401, 403, 405 

and four 300 level courses in Germanic languages and literatures. 

German Literature Option 

Core 220; two further German language courses (301, 302, 401, 403, or 

405): and 321, 322 Specialization seven 400-level courses in German 

literature 

Germanic Area Studies Option 

Core 220: two further German language courses (301, 302, 401. 403. or 
405): and 321. 322 Specialization two upper-level courses in Germanic 
area studies (348, 358, 368, 381 . 382, 383, 384, or 389) and five upper-level 
courses in a specialization, such as Scandinavian studies or Indo-European 
and Germanic philology 

Russian Language and Literature 

The undergraduate major in Russian Language and Literature consists 
of 39 hours beyond the basic language acquisition sequence (RUSS 101 , 
102, 201 , 202) No course grade lower than C may be used to satisfy the 
major requirements Two program options lead to the B A degree 1) 
Russian Language and Literature or 2) Russian Language and Linguistics 

A common set of core courses is required of all majors, and each option 
must be supported by 9 hours of related course work in such disciplines as 
comparative literature, English, history, linguistics or philosophy. Students 
must submit a written proposal demonstrating the expected relevance of 
their chosen support module to their area of specialization In the senior 
year, all language and linguistics majors must take a Selected Topics 
course in their area of specialization In the senior year, all majors must 
wnte a Senior Paper typically in conjunction with one of the following (to be 
determined in consultation with the Undergraduate Advisor and with the 
permission of the course instructor) a Special Topics course within the 
area of specialization (for students in either option) or a 400-level course in 
Russian literature (an option for students in the language and literature 
option) 

New courses whose content is identical or substantially overlaps with 
that of old courses may not be taken for additional credit by students who 
have already taken the corresponding old courses 

Major Requirements 

Core (18 hours) 210 or 211, 301, 302. 303, 321. 322 
Supporting Courses (9 hours) LING 200 or ENGL 301. 6 additional hours 
chosen from outside the Slavic section in consultation with the approved 
by a departmental advisor At least 6 of the 9 total hours must be at the 
300-400 level 
Specialization (12 hours) all requirements of at least one option must be 
fulfilled 



Major Requirements 

Four courses m advanced language (one from each set 201-202. 301-302. 
401-402, 403-404), the two-semester Survey of Russian Literature (321 and 
322). five additional courses on the 400-level. no more than two of which 
may be literature in translation 

Russian Language and Literature Option 

401, 403, 431 or 432. 433 or 434 409, 439. or 479 may be substituted for 

one of 431 434 upon consent of the Undergraduate advisor 

Russian Language and Linguistics Option 

479 and three additional courses chosen from among 410. 411. 412. 472, 

473. 475 

Course Code Prefix — GERM. SLAV 



Government and Politics (GVPT) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2181 LeFrak, 454-2248 

Professor and Chair: Quester 

Professors: Azar, Butterworth, Claudef, Conwayt, Davidson. Dawisha. 

Dillon (Emeritus) Elkin, Glass, Harrison (Emeritus), Hathorn (Emeritus). 

Hsueh, Marando, McNelly, Oppenheimert, Phillips, Piper, Pirages, 

Plischke (Emeritus), Reeves, Stone' (Urban Studies). Usianer, 

Wilkenfeld 

Associate Professors: Alford, Glendenmg, Heisler, Mcintosh. Ranald. 

Soltan, Terchek 

Assistant Professors: KaminskI, Lalman, Lanning. McCarricl<, Swistak 

Lecturer: Vietri 

• Joint appointment with unit Indicated 
t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Department of Government and Politics offers programs designed 
to prepare students for government service, politics, foreign assignments, 
teaching, and a variety of graduate programs, law schools, and Tor intelli- 
gent and purposeful citizenship Satisfactory completion of requirements 
leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree in government and politics 

The study of politics is both an ancient discipline and a modern social 
science The origin of the discipline can be traced back to the earliest times 
when philosophers, statesmen, and citizens studied the nature of govern- 
ment justice, responsibility, and the consequences of government's 
action More recently, the study of politics has also emphasized scientific 
observations about politics Today, the discipline reflects a broad effort to 
collect data about politics and governments utilizing relatively new tech- 
niques developed by all of the social sciences 

The Department of Government and Politics combines both philosophi- 
cal and scientific concerns in its overall program as well as in specific 
courses and emphasizes such broad areas as political development, policy 
analysis, social justice, political economy conflict, and human nghts 
These broad conceptual areas are integral components of the formal fields 
in the department The formal fields are (1) Amencan government and 
politics. (2) comparative government. (3) political theory. (4) international 
affairs, (5) public administration, (6) public law, and (7) public policy and 
political behavior 

Areas of Specialization: The program In government and politics is highly 
flexible, and a variety of advising programs have been developed that meet 
the academic and career interests of departmental majors The programs 
listed below are among the more popular ones in the department, and 
students can construct their own program with an advisor 

Pre-Law. Provides the student with a strong liberal arts background 
emphasized by law schools includes at least one course in law, additKxial 
courses in the political and social context of law, as well as appropriate 
courses outside of the department 

Public Sector Employment. Within this broad category are advising pro- 
grams in general public administration leading to careers at entry-level 
positions in federal, state, and local governments, public finance and 
budgeting, public policy analysis, and public personnel managennenl 
Quantitative skills are highly recommended in this area, and majors are 
advised to select a strong substantive minor to complement their work in 
public administration, American pjolitics. and public law 

International Relations. Combines courses in the department m interna- 
tional relations and comparative politics with a strong substantive minor, 
such as economics, business, or resource management In addition, a 
strong background in a foreign language is highly recommended 

Public Interest. A broadly defined area emphasizing the American political 
system, organizing, campaigning, lobbying, policy analysis, arxj public 
sector management 



Health Education 97 



In addition, the department also offers stronq programs in political 
theory, comparative human rights, environmental politics, women and 
politics, and urban politics 

Requirements tor the Government and Politics Major. Government and 
Politics ma|Ofs must take a minimum ot thirty six semester hours in govern 
menl courses and may not count more than lorly two hours in government 
toward graduation No government course in which the grade is less than 
C may be counted as part of the major No government courses in the 
major may be taken on a pass-tail basis 

All government maprs are required to take GVPT 100, 170, 441, or 442 
and such other supporting courses as specified by the department They 
must take one course from three separate government fields as desig- 
nated by the Department 

All departmental majors shall lake ECON 205 or ECON 201 In addition, 
the major will select courses from one of the approved skill options A list of 
courses that will satisfy each option is available in the departmental office 

All students majoring in government may apply for admission to the 
GVPT Honors Program Additional information concerning the Honors Pro- 
gram may be obtained at the departmental offices 

The department offers students the opportunity <o observe govern- 
ment agencies and political groups in action through a variety of internship 
experiences Only nine hours of GVPT internship credit will apply to the 
thirty-six hours needed in the major In no case may more than fifteen GVPT 
internship credits be counted toward the 120 credits needed to graduate 

Academic advising is available daily on a walk-in basis in the Under- 
graduate Advising office (2181J LeFrak Hall) 

Course Code Prefix — GVPT 



Health Education (HLTH) 

College of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Kealth 

Room 2387 PERH Building, 454-6077 

Chair Or Glen G Gilbert 

Associate Chair: Dr Harvey E Clearwater 

Professors: Burt. Gold, Greenberg, Leviton and Wilson 

Associate Professors: Allen, Beck. Clearwater, Feldman and IVIiller 

Assistant Professors: ivIcKay and Thomas 

Lecturers: Ivlann and Schiraldi 

Instructors: Hyde and Ramsey 

The Healtli Education Major Students majoring in health education have 
two tracks to choose from at the undergraduate level The first option is 
community health education which prepares students for entry level health 
education positions in community settings such as voluntary health 
associations, worksite health promotion programs, or other health agen- 
cies The second option is school health educaion which prepares stu- 
dents for teaching health educaion in schools Students are referred to the 
section on the College of Education for information on teacher education 
application procedures Two certificate options are also available in driver 
education 

Requirements for Major Including Program Options: 

The Freshman curriculum for both the School Health Option and the Com- 
munity Health Option is the same; 

Freshman Curriculum 

Semester Credit Hours 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing 3 

IVIATH 1 10 or 102-3-4 or 1 15 — Ivlathematics 3 

HLTH 140 — Personal and Community Health 3 

CHEM 1 1 1 — Chemistry in Modern Life 3 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology 1 4 

JOUR 100 — Introduction to Mass Communications 3 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

HLTH 150 — First Aid and Emergency Medical Services 2 

Health Education Curriculum - School Health Option 

Sophomore Year 

HLTH 230 — Introduction to Health Behavior 6 

PHIL 140 — Contemporary Moral Issues 3 

ZOOL 201, 202 — Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II . . 4 

University Studies Program Requirements 9 

Required Health Electives 6 



PSYC 221 
HLTH 105 



Social Psychology 

Science and Theory of Health 



Junior Year 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical Writ- 
ing 3 
HLTH 420 — Methods and Materials in Health Education 3 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning 6 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 3 
Required Health Elective 3 
EDHD 340 — Human Development Aspects ol the Helping Re- 
lationship 3 

HLTH 390 — Organization and Administration ol Health Pro- 
grams 3 

EDMS 410 — Principles of Testing and Evaluation .' 3 

EDCP 417 — Group Dynamics and Leadership 3 

Senior Year 

HLTH 340 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 3 

Required Health Electives 6 

University Studies Program Requirements — Advanced Studies 6 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education 3 

EDCI 491 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Health 12 

Community Health Option 



Sophomore Year 

HLTH 230 — Introduction to Health Behavior 

PHIL 140 — Contemporary Moral Issues 

ZOOL 201, 202 — Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II . 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Required Health Electives 

PSYC 221 — Social Psychology 

HLTH 105 — Science and Theory of Health 

Junior Year 

U.S. P. Junior English Requirement 

MICB 100 — Basic Microbiology 

EDHD 340 — Human Development Aspects of the Helping Re- 
lationships 

EDMS 451 — Introduction to Educational Statistics 

HLTH 390 — Organization and Administration of School Health 
Programs 

HLTH 420 — Methods and Materials in Health Education 

HLTH 498R — Introduction to Community Health 

SOCY 498A — Medical Sociology 

HLTH 430 — Health Education in the Workplace 

EDCP 417 — Group Dynamics and Leadership 

Senior Year 

Required Health Electives 

HLTH 498S — Pnnciples of Community Health 

FMCD 483 — Family and Community Sen/ice Systems 

HLTH 489 — Field Laboratory Projects and Workshops 

HLTH 386 — Field Work 

HLTH 387 — Field Work Analysis 



Minor in School Health Education: 27 hour minor Thirteen semester hours 
in health education (HLTH 140, 150, 310, 420, 450) Eight semester hours in 
human anatomy and physiology (ZOOL 201. 202) Six semester hours of 
human behavioral science At least one course should focus on children or 
youth 

Driver Education Instructors Certification Programs 

A Classroom Instructor — 18 semester hours Twelve semester hours as 
follows: HLTH 280. 305. 345 and 375. plus six semester hours selected 
from the following courses; HLTH 270, 498F, or ENES 473 

B Laboratory Instructor — 12 to 15 semester hours HLTH 280, 305, 345, 
plus an internship in driver education (usually six semester credits) 

Admission: Admission requirements to the Department of Health Educa- 
tion are the same as those of the College of Education 

Advising: Undergraduate Health Education Advisor; David H Hyde, PERH 
Building, Room 2374, 454-3369 or 454-2629 Advising is mandatory 

Student Honors Organization: Eta Sigma Gamma The Epsilon chapter 
was established at the University of Maryland in May of 1969 This profes- 
sional honorary organization for health educators was established to pro- 
mote scholarship and community service for health majors at both the 
graduate and undergraduate levels. Students may apply after two consec- 
utive semesters with a 2.75 cumulative average 

Course Code Prefix; HLTH 



98 Hearing and Speech Sciences 



Hearing and Speech Sciences 
(HESP) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

0100 LeFrak Hall, 454-5831 

Professor and Acting Chair: McCall 

Professors: Newby (Emeritus). Yeni-Komshian 

Associate Professors: Baker, Dingwall, GordonSalani, Roth 

Assistant Professor: Ratner 

Instructors: Cuyje\. McCabe, Patrick, Perlroth, Rosenberg, Smallets 

Hearing and speech sciences is an inherently interdisciplinary field, 
integrating knowledge from the physical and biological sciences, 
medicine, psychology, linguistics, and education In order to understand 
human communication and its disorders The department curriculum leads 
to the Bachelor of Arts degree An undergraduate major in this field is an 
appropriate background for graduate training in speech-language pathol- 
ogy or audiology, as well as for graduate work in other disciplines requinng 
a knowledge of normal or disordered speech, language, or hearing The 
student who wishes to work professionally as a speech-language patholo- 
gist or audiologist must complete additional graduate coursework in order 
to meet state licensure and national certification requirements 

The department operates a Hearing and Speech Clinic (telephone 454- 
2546), which serves the campus and surrounding area, and provides an in- 
house opportunity for the clinical training of students Department facilities 
also include an integrated audiovisual listening and viewing laboratory, 
and several well-equipped research laboratories Hearing and speech 
majors are invited to join the departmental branch of the National Student 
Speech-Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA) 

The hearing and speech sciences curriculum is designed in part to 
provide supporting coursework for majors in related fields, so most course 
offerings are available to both departmental majors and non-majors Per- 
mission of instructor may be obtained for waiver of course prerequisites for 
non-majors wishing to take hearing and speech courses of interest 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

A student majoring in hearing and speech sciences must complete 
thirty semester hours of specified courses and six semester hours of 
electives in the department to satisfy major course requirements No 
course with a grade less than C may count toward major course require- 
ments In addition to the thirty-six semester hours needed for a major, 
twelve semester hours of supporting courses in statistics, allied and other 
related fields are required For these twelve hours, a C average is required 

Major Courses. Specified courses for a major in heanng and speech sci- 
ences (thirty credits) are: 

Credit Hours 
HESP 202 — Introduction to Hearing and Speech Sciences (In- 
troduction to Communication and Its Disorders) . 3 

HESP 300 — Introduction to Psycholinguistics 3 

HESP 305 — Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mecha- 
nism 3 

HESP 31 1 — Anatomy, Pathology and Physiology of the Audito- 
ry System 3 

HESP 400 — Speech and Language Development in Children 3 

HESP 402 — Speech Pathology I (Childhood Language and Ar- 
ticulation Disorders) formerly HESP 302 3 

HESP 403 — Introduction to Phonetic Science 3 

HESP 404 — Speech Pathology II (Voice Disorders, Stuttering 

and Oro-facial Anomalies) 3 

OR 

HESP 406 — Sf)eech Pathology III (Aphasia and Neuromotor 

Disorders) 3 

HESP 407 — Bases of Heanng Science 3 

HESP 41 1 — Introduction to Audiology 3 

Electives in the department (6 credits) may be taken from 

among the following 
HESP 417 — Principles and Methods in Speech-Language Pa- 
thology and Audiology 3 

HESP 418 — Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology 

and Audiology 3 

HESP 498 — Seminar (various topics — check current listings) 3 

HESP 499 — Independent study 3 

The sequence of courses may vary, however, no upper level courses 
may be attempted without special permission until a student has earned a 
minimum of fiftysix credits The student is encouraged to consult with a 
faculty advisor in the preparation of an individualized program plan of 
study Information on advising for hearing and speech sciences may be 
obtained by calling the department office at 454-5801. 



Supporting Courses. The undergraduate student with a major in heanng 
and speech sciences will take twelve semester hours in supporting areas 
of study, including one of the following courses in statistics EDMS 451, 
PSYC 200, or SOCY 201 The remainder of supporting courses are from 
allied fields such as psychology, linguistics, sociology, education, health, 
family and community development, and anthropology (three to six cred- 
its), and other related fields such as physics, zoology, engineering, philoso- 
phy, computer science, and physical education (three to six cr^its) The 
student should see a faculty advisor in the Hearing and Speech ScierKes 
Department for advice and approval of a supporting course sequer^ce 

Course Code Prefix — HESP 



Hebrew and East Asian Languages 
and Literatures (HEBR, CHirJ, JAPN) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2106 Jimenez Hall, 454-4307'5152 

Professor and Ctiair Rimer 

Professors: Berlin, Mintz, Ramsey 

Associate Professors: Chin, Kerkham, Sargent, Walton 

Assistant Professor: Manekin 

Instructors: Levy, Liberman, Miura. Yaginuma 

East Asian Languages and Literatures 

Major. A student may major in East Asian languages and literatures with a 
concentration in Chinese or Japanese Either concentration provides tf>e 
training and cultural background needed for entenng East Asia-related 
careers in such fields as higher education, the arts, business, government, 
international relations, agriculture, or media Students may also want to 
consider a double major in East Asian languages and literatures and 
another discipline, such as business, international relations, economics Of 
journalism 

After completing the prerequisite of one year of language (twelve cred- 
its); CHIN 101 (Elementary Chinese: six hours per week. fall). CHIN 102 
(Elementary Spoken Chinese: three hours per week, spring), and CHIN 103 
(Elementary Written Chinese: three hours per week spnng) or JAPN 101 
(Elementary Japanese 1; six hours per week, fall) and JAPN 102 (Elemerv 
tary Japanese 11; six hours per week, spring), students must complete 
thirty-six credits for the major course requirements (eighteen language, six 
civilization/history, twelve elective) No grade lower than C (2 0) may be 
used toward the major 

Chinese Course Requirements. Language: CH\N 201, 202, 203. 204, 301, 
302 Civilization/History: Option 1 — HIST 284 and 481 (or 485), Option 2 
— HIST 285 and 480. four electives at the 300 level or above in Chinese 
language, literature, linguistics, or other East Asian subjects, subject to tfw 
approval of student's advisor Among the four, one must be in the area of 
Chinese linguistics, and one in the area of Chinese literature 

Japanese Course Requirements. Language: JAPN 201. 202. 203. 204. 
301 . 302. Civilization/History: Option 1 — HIST 284 and 483. Option 2 — 
HIST 285 and 482: four electives at the 300 level or atxive Among the four, 
one must be in the area of Japanese linguistics and one in Japanese 
literature, subject to the approval of student s advisor 

Supporting Courses lor Chinese or Japanese. Students are strongly 

urged to take additional courses in a discipline relating to their particular 
field of interest, such as linguistics, literary criticism, or comparative litera- 
ture The range of supporting courses can t>e decided upon in consultation 
with the student's advisor 

Special Language Courses. In addition to the more traditional courses in 
literature in translation linguistics, and advanced language acquisition, 
courses in both Chinese and Japanese business language at the third-year 
level are offered Students are also encouraged to spend at least one 
summer or semester in China (Taiwan or the People s Republic of China) or 
Japan in intensive language study under one or another of the University's 
exchange programs with foreign universities or at other approved centers 
of higher education 

Internship Program. This program allows students to gam practical experi- 
ence by working in WashingtonBaltimore area firms, corporations, arxl 
social service organizations that are East Asia related as well as in various 
branches of the Federal government 

Hebrew Language and Literature 

While the department does not yet offer a major in Hebrew language 
and literature, it does provide txith tieginners and those with previous 



History 99 



study of the Hebrew language an opportunity to become conversant with 
the 3,000 year development of Hebrew language, literature, and culture 

Elementary and intermediate courses develop the ability to communi- 
cate effectively in modern Hebrew Courses in composition and conversa 
tion emphasize vocabulary enrichment, grammar and syntax of the written 
and spoken language On the advanced level the student analyzes the 
ma)or texts ol classical and modern Hebrew literature 

Courses are also offered in English on topics such as the Bible, 
Rabbinic Thought. Jewish Mysticism. Jewish Law Ancient Near Eastern 
Civilization, Hebrew Literature in Translation, Women in Jewish Literature, 
and other special topics 

Hebrew may be used to fulfill the requirements of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Education curriculum of the Department of Secondary Education, 
Students wishing to emphasize Hebrew as a major subject may do so 
within the framework of the Jewish studies major See the entry on the 
Jewish Studies Program or consult the Hebrew Office for requirements 

Course Code Prefix — CHIN, HEBR. JAPN 



History (HIST) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2115 Fiancis Scott Key Hall, 454-2843 

Professor and Chair: Price 

Professors: Belz, Berlin. Brushf. Calcott. Cockburn, Cole, Duffy (Emeri- 
tus), Evans, Foust, Gilbertf, Goodblatt, Gordon (Emeritus), Haber, 
Harlant, Henretta, Jashemski (Emerita)t, Kent, Lampe, McCusker, Mer- 
rill (Ementus), A Olsonf, K. Olson, E B, Smith. Sparks. Sutherland, War- 
ren. Yaney 

Associate Professors: Brestow . Darden, Eckstein, Farrell, Flack, Folsom, 
Friedel. Giffin, Grimsted, Gullickson, Harris, Hoffman, Holum, Kaufman, 
Majeska, Matossian, Mayo, Moss, Perinbam, Reichard. Ridgway. Rozen- 
blit, Spiegel, Stowasser. Sumida, Weissman, Wright, Zilfl 
Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Nicklason, Thompson, Williams 
Adjunct: Carr. Papenfuse 

fDislinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Department of History seeks to broaden the student's cultural 
background through the study of history and to provide preparation for 
those interested in law, publishing, teaching, journalism, government ser- 
vice, and graduate study 

A faculty advisor will be assigned by the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies to assist each major In planning a curriculum to meet his or her 
personal interests A program plan," approved by the advisor, should be 
filed with the department as soon as possible. Students are required to 
meet with an assigned advisor once every semester or sign a waiver during 
prereglstration 

The Department sponsors a History Undergraduate Association which 
majors and other interested students are encouraged to join 

Major Requirements. Minimum requirements for undergraduate history 
majors consist of thirty-nine hours of coursework distributed as follows 
twelve hours in 100-200 level survey sources selected from at least two 
fields of history (United States, European, and Non-Western); fifteen hours, 
including HIST 309 in one major area (see below), twelve hours of history in 
at least two major areas other than the area of concentration. Without 
regard to area, fifteen hours of the thirty-nine total hours must be at the 
junior-senior (300-400) level. Note: M\ majors must take HIST 309. 

I Survey Courses 

1. The requirement is twelve hours at the 100-200 level taken In at 
least two fields 

2. Fields are defined as United States, European, and Non-Western 
history All survey courses have been assigned to one of these 
fields See department advisor 

3. In considering courses that will fulfill this requirement, students are 
encouraged to 

a select at least two courses in a sequence 

b select at least one course before AD. 1500 and one course 

after AD 1500 
c sample both regional and topical course offerings 
4 Students will normally take one or more survey courses within their 
major area of concentration 

II Major Area of Concentration 

1 The requirement is fifteen hours including HIST 309 In a major area 
of concentration 

2 An area is defined as a series of related topical, chronological, or 
regional courses, such as: 



United States 

Early Modern Europe 

Medieval 

Ancient 

East Asia 

African 



Topical Region 

History & Philosophy Latin American 

of Science Middle Eastern 

Social European 



Country 

Britain 

Continental Europe 
Russia 



Intellectual 

Economic 

Religious 

Diplomatic 

Women s History 

Afro-American 

Constitutional 

Jewish 

Military 

3 The major area may be chronological, regional, or topical 

4 Students may select both lower and upper level courses 

5 A combination of chronological-topical courses or regional-topical 
courses is desirable 

6 The proseminar, HIST 309, should normally be taken in the major 
area of concentration 

III. Twelve Hours of History in at least Two Other Areas than the Area of 
Concentration. 

1 Students may select either lower or upper level courses 
2. Students are encouraged to consider regional diversity 
3 Students are encouraged to take at least two elective courses in 

chronological periods other than that of their major area of 

concentration 

Supporting courses. Nine credits at the 300-400 level In appropriate sup- 
porting courses, the courses do not all have to be in the same department 
The choice of courses must be approved In wnting — before attempted, if 
possible — by the departmental advisor. 

Grade of C or tiiglter is required in all required history and supporting 
courses. 

For students matriculating after December, 1979, credit may not be earned 
from the CLEP general history exam; for students matriculating after Sep- 
tember 1, 1981, history credit may not be earned from any CLEP exam 
Advanced placement credit will be granted as elective, but will not apply 
toward major requirements 

General University Requirements in History. All History courses on the 
100, 200, 300, and 400 levels are open to students seeking to meet the 
University requirements in Area C (Division of Arts and Humanities) with 
the exception of HIST 214, 215, 309, 316, 317, 318 A few other courses are 
open only to students who satisfy specified prerequisites, but that does 
not limit them to history majors. It should be noted that special topics 
courses — HIST 219, 319 and 419 — are offered on several different 
subjects of general interest each semester Descriptions may be obtained 
from the History Department 

Honors in History. Students who major or minor in history may apply for 
admission to the History Honors Program during the second semester of 
their sophomore year Those who are admitted to the program substitute 
discussion courses and a thesis for some lecture courses and take an oral 
comprehensive examination prior to graduation Successful candidates 
are awarded either honors or high honors in history 

The History Department offers pre-honors work in American history and 
in European history and in European history courses Consult the Sched- 
ule of Classes for specific offerings each semester Students in these 
sections meet in a discussion group instead of attending lectures They 
read widely and do extensive written work on their own Pre-honors sec- 
tions are open to any student and are recommended for students in Gen- 
eral Honors, subject only to the instructor's approval 

Course Code Prefix — HIST 



Horticulture (HORT) 

College of Agriculture 

Undergraduate Program 2109B Holzapfel Hall, 454-3143 

Professor and Chair: Ouebedeaux 

Professors: Gouin, Kennedy, Oliver, Solomos, Wiley 

Professors Emeritus: Unk, Scott, Shanks, Stark, Thompson, Twigg 

Adjunct Professor: Galleta 

Visiting Professor: Faust 

Associate Professors: Beste, Bouwkamp, Deitzer. Gould. Kundt, 

McClurg. Ng. Schales, Schlimme, Swartz, Walsh 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Kretchmer. Krizek 

Assistant Professors: Graves, Hamed, Healy, Hershey, Scarfo, Stutte 

Lecturer: Mityga 

The horticulturist combines a knowledge of the basic sciences with a 
knowledge of factors affecting plant growth and development In an effort 
to help meet the food needs of the world population and help beautify our 
surroundings The horticulturist specifically is involved with fruit production 
(pomology), vegetable production (olericulture), greenhouse plant produc- 
tion (floriculture), the production of ornamental trees and shrubs, and the 



100 Horticulture 



storage and transportation of horticultural crops until they reach the con- 
sumer (post-harvest horticulture) The landscape designer combines a 
knowledge of plant growth and development with principles of functional 
and aesthetic planning and design to create landscapes that are useful, 
pleasing, and environmentally sound 

The Department of Horticulture offers undergraduate curriculum 
options in Horticultural Production, Horticultural Science, Horticultural Edu 
cation, and Landscape Design and Contracting The undergraduate curric 
ulum options prepare the student either for advanced graduate study a 
the masters or doctorate level or for entry into any of the various horticul 
tural industries. Advanced studies in the department, leading to the lyl.S 
and Ph D degrees, are available to outstanding students having a strong 
motivation for horticultural research, university teaching, and/or extension 
education 

Students interested in pursuing a continued education in forestry, con- 
servation-related subjects, or other disciplines related to the biological/ 
natural life sciences are advised in the Department of Horticulture Founda- 
tion courses, strongly oriented in the sciences, transfer readily into related 
curricula to any of the approximately fifty universities which offer accred- 
ited undergraduate degrees in forestry Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University (VPI/SU) and West Virginia University (WVU) offer lylary- 
land residents accepted into their forestry programs eligibility for instate 
tuition. 

Immediate employment opportunities for horticulture graduates 
include commercial production and wholesale and retail sale of horticul- 
tural crops through orchards and vegetable farms, nurseries, greenhouse 
operations, garden centers, and flonst shops; production management 
and sales in allied industries such as food processing, seed production, 
and agricultural chemicals; interior plantscaping; and management of land- 
scapes associated with public and private parks, botanical gardens, 
arboretums, highway systems, and large scale commercial, industrial, or 
residential developments Graduates of the landscape design and con- 
tracting option are employed by commercial landscape contracting, nurs- 
ery, and engineering firms engaged In the provision of planning design and 
installation services for landscape development Other landscape design 
and contracting students have pursued the Ivlaster of Landscape Architec- 
ture degree The department's horticulture education option certifies stu- 
dents to teach horticulture at the high school level 

All students should meet with the option advisor before enrolling in 
courses for the option All horticulture students, regardless of option, must 
complete all courses listed as Departmental Requirements Students must 
also complete all courses listed as Option Requirements in one of the 
department s four curriculum options. 

Curriculum In Horticulture 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Departmental Requirements — All Options 

AGRO 302 — General Soils 4 

AGRO 453 — Weed Control 3 

BIOL 105 — Pnnciples of Biology I 4 

BOTN 212 — Plant Taxonomy 4 

BOTN 221 — Diseases of Plants 4 

BOTN 441 — Plant Physiology 4 

CHEIvl 103 — General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry, 4 

or 

CHEM 233 — Organic Chemistry I" 4 

ENTIvl 252 — Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

or 

ENTM 453 — Insect Pests of Ornamental Plants'* 3 

HORT 398 — Seminar 1 

t\/1ATH 110 — INtroduction to Mathematics 3 

or 
MATH 115 — Pre-calculus* 

'Students interested in corripleting the Horticultural Science Option shall enroll 
in CHEM 233 rather than Chem 104 (r^te CHEM 113 is a prerequisite for 
CHEM 233 ) Horticultural Science Option students shall enroll m MATH 115 
rather than MATH 1 10 

"Students interested in completing the Landscape Design and Contracting 
Option shall enroll in ENTM 453 rather than ENTM 252 

Horticultural Production Option 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
AREC 250 — Elements of Agricultural and Resources Econom- 
ics 3 

or 
ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 3 

AREC 306 — Farm Management 3 

or 
AREC 414 — Agncultural Business Management 3 

HORT 201 — Environmental Factors and Horticultural Crop Pro- 
duction 4 
HORT 202 — Management of Horticultural Crop Production 4 



HORT 271 — Plant Propagation 3 

HORT 274 — Genetics of Cultivated Plants 3 

HORT 474 — Physiology of Maturation and Storage of Horticul- 
tural Crops 3 
Select two of the following 

AGRO 405 — Turf Management 3 

HORT 41 1 — Fruit Crop Production 3 

HORT 422 — Vegetable Crop Production 3 

HORT 432 — Greenhouse Crop Production 3" 

HORT 452 — Landscape Establishment and Maintenance 3 

HORT 456 — Nursery Crop Production 3 
HORT 472 — Advanced Plant Propagation 2 
University Studies Program requirements (over and above what 
IS included in Departmental and Option require- 
ments) 27-30 

Electives , 23-27 



Horticultural Science Option 

CHEM 113 — General Chemistry II 

HORT 201 — Environmental Factors and Horticultural Crop Pro- 
duction 

HORT 202 — Management of Horticultural Crop Production 

HORT 271 — Plant Propagation 

HORT 274 — Genetics of Cultivated Plants 

HORT 474 — Physiology of Maturation and Storage of Horticul- 
tural Crops 

MATH 220 — Elementary Calculus I 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I 

PHYS 122 — Fundamentals of Physics II 

Select one of the following: 

AGRO 403 — Crop Breeding 

AGRO 41 1 — Soil Fertility 

AGRO 417 — Soil Physics 

AGRO 421 — Soil Chemistry 

BCHM 261 — Elements of Biochemistry 

BOTN 416 — Plant Structure ■ 

BOTN 484 — Plant Biochemistry 

University Studies Program Requirements (over and above what 
is included in Departmental and Option require- 
ments) 

Electives 



Horticultural Education Option 

AEED 302 — Introduction to Agricultural Education 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development 

AEED 305 — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 

AEED 31 1 — Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 

AEED 313 — Student leaching 

AEED 315 — Student Teaching 

AGRO 405 — Turf Management 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education 

HORT 160 — Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 

HORT 201 — Environmental Factors and Horticultural Crop Pro- 
duction 

HORT 202 — Management of Horticultural Crop Production 

HORT 271 — Plant Propagation 

HORT 453 — Woody Plant Materials 
or 

HORT 454 — Woody Plant Matenals 

SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 

University Studies Program requirements (over and abiove what 
is included in Departmental and Option require- 
ments) 

Electives 

Landscape Design and Contracting Option 

AREC 250 — Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 

or 
ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 
AREC 306 — Farm Management 

or 
AREC 414 — Agricultural Business Management 
APDS 101 — Fundamentals of Design 
EDIT 160 — Design Illustrating I 
HORT 160 — Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 
HORT 260 — Principles of Graphic Communication in Land 

scape Design 
HORT 361 — Pnnciples of Landscape Design 
HORT 452 — Pnnciples of Landscape Establishment and Main- 
tenance 
HORT 453 — Woody Plant Materials 
HORT 454 — Woody Plant Materials 
HORT 462 — Planting Design 

HORT 464Z — Principles of Landscape Development 
HORT 465 — Design of Landscape Structures and materials 



30 
16-17 



2 
3 

1 
3 
5 
1-4 
3 
6 
3 
3 



27 
6-9 



Housing and Design 101 



HORT 466 — Advanced Landscape Design 3 

HORT 467 — Principles ol Landscape Contracting 3 

Electives 8 12 

Course Code Prefix — HORT 



Housing and Design (HSAD) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

Room 1401 Mane Mount Hall, 454-2135 

Professor and Chair: Francescato 

Professors: Bonla. Fabiano, Kjaer 

Associate Professor: Chen. McWhinme. Lozner 

Assistant Professors: Ansell. Eckersley, Gips, Hoover. Roper. Thorpe 

Lecturers: Davis (p t ), Dean. Elliott (p t ). Jacobs, Falleroni (p t ). Gracy- 

ainy (p t ). Sham, Tasi (p.t ) 

The Department of Housing and Design offers programs of concentra- 
tion in three areas housing, intenor design, and advertising design The 
department seeks to provide professionally focused instruction in the theo- 
retical foundation, methods and skills pertinent to each concentration area 
In addition, students are encouraged to acquire a broad base of general 
education by enrolling in elective, recommended, and required courses 
outside of the department 

Housing. The housing curriculum is designed to reflect the multidisiclpli- 
nary nature of the field as well as the varied interests of housing majors 
Consequently, students under the close supervision and advisement of the 
faculty are given the opportunity to develop a program suitable to their 
interests and career goals Aside from the required housing courses pro- 
vided by the department, students are recommended to take courses that 
will emphasize the development of methodological skills (eg , statistics, 
computer programming), as well as an understanding of the political, 
social, and economic environment in which housing is produced and con- 
sumed Graduates will be qualified for employment in the housing industry, 
governmental housing agencies, housing authorities, and consumer orga- 
nizations They will also be qualified to pursue a program of graduate 
studies in housing or urban affairs 

Interior Design. This program provides the student with fundamental con- 
cepts and basic professional skills required to plan and design interior 
environments These include not only aesthetic considerations, but also 
the integration of structural and mechanical building systems, the satisfac- 
tion of functional requirements, an understanding of the needs and motiva- 
tions of the users and sponsors, considerations of cost, and compliance 
with codes and regulations Functional and imaginative applications of 
design skills to space planning and furnishing of commercial, institutional, 
and residential interiors are stressed Special courses include gaming 
simulation in design and seminars in theoretical concerns A student chap- 
ter of the professional organization American Society of Interior Design 
(ASID) and internship opportunities provide contact with practicing profes- 
sionals Graduates will be qualified for entry level employment with interior 
design firms and architectural firms Students with above average perform- 
ance will be qualified to pursue graduate study After considerable experi- 
ence has been gained in professional practice, some graduates will open 
their own firm or partnerstiip The Interior Design Program is accredited by 
the Foundation for Interior Design Education and Research (FIDER). 

Advertising Design. This program provides a foundation in the fields of 
graphic and visual communication Although some of the media used in 
visual communication are the same as those of the painter and the sculp- 
tor, the purposes and methods of the designer differ from those of the 
artist in that utility is the focus of this endeavor. Visual elements such as 
lines, planes, volume, texture, and color are used to generate information 
and to communicate messages This process requires the acquisition of 
specific professional skills such as page composition, type selection, illus- 
tration, photography, design of orientation systems, and the use of com- 
plex technology in contemporary printing and electronic media Students 
graduating from this program will be qualified to begin a career as graphic 
designers and seek employment in publishing firms, advertising agencies, 
the film and television industry, the print media, the packaging industry, 
and in the graphic section of institutions and government agencies Stu- 
dents with above average performance will be qualified to pursue graduate 
study A student chapter of the professional organization I G I and intern- 
ship opportunities provide contacts with practicing professionals 

Admission to the Pre-Design Major. Any student who has been admitted 
to the University may declare a pre-design ma|or However, admission to 
the University or to the pre-design major does not guarantee admission to 
the interior design or advertising design major Admission to these two 
majors is governed by the "Selective Admission" procedure outlined 
below 

Admission to the Interior Design and Advertising Design Majors. 



A change in admissions criteria tor the Design major is currently 
under consideration. Students should check with the department 
for the latest information on the status of this proposed change. 

Admission to the majors ol interior design and advertising design is 
selective Ordinarily, students are admitted to these majors only after a 
Design Work Portfolio, produced according to minimum requirements set 
forth below, has been reviewed and found satisfactory by the Faculty 
Admission Committee composed of the three Area Coordinators and the 
Department Chair The portfolio must be submitted by the appropriate 
deadline Students will need a minimum of twenty-nine credit hours, includ- 
ing a grade of Cor higher in APDS 101.APDS 102, APDS 103 and EDIT 160. 
before their portfolios are reviewed The following categories of stu- 
dents are exempted from the portfolio review requirement 

(a) Freshmen having a 3 high school GPA and corribined SAT score of 
1200 or above, or who are National Merit and National Achievement 
Scholarship finalists or semifinalists: or recipients of the Francis Scott 
Key Scholarship, or ol Maryland Distinguished Scholar Award, or Ben- 
jamin Banneker Scholarship 

(b) Students with a minimum of twenty-nine credit hours and a grade of B 
or higher in the following courses APDS 101. APDS 102, APDS 103. 
and EDIT 160 

Transfer students must submit their Design Work Portfolio at the lime of 
their application for admission to the University ol Maryland or later, but in 
any case by the appropriate deadline These students will be admitted to 
the majors ol interior design or advertising design after the portfolio has 
been reviewed and found satisfactory Transfer students who have not 
completed twenty-nine credits, or who have not completed the four 
required courses, or whose Design Work Portfolios have been found unsat- 
isfactory may be admitted as "pre-design" students 

Potentially talented students who are unable to meet the above criteria 
may be admitted provided they have applied as a "case-by-case" student 
and have been accepted by the Faculty Admission Committee composed 
of the three Area Coordinators and the Department Chair Examples of 
non-academic cntena on the basis ol which the Committee may grant 
admission are samples of the applicant's design work done in high school 
or community college, participation in portfolio preparation summer 
courses, leadership in extracurricular or community activities, hobby skills 
related to interior design and/or advertising design, job related experience 
in the design field. Armed Forces experience in design areas, etc 

Students not yet admitted to the majors of interior design an advertis- 
ing design are classified as "pre-design" students Pre-design students 
will be granted preferential treatment when registering for departmental 
courses in which there is an enrollment limitation 

Admission to the interior design or advertising design majors is not 
automatic, even when all relevant requirements have been fulfilled It is the 
student's responsibility to file a "Change of Major" form with the depart- 
ment by the appropriate deadline prior to the beginning of the semester in 
which the student plans to take 200-level-and-above courses restncted to 
majors only No exceptions will be made to this procedure Students will be 
informed by mail of action taken 

Deadlines: Admission application (filing "Change of Major"" form) and 
portfolio submission must be received by 

(a) For fall semester — May 23 (August 1 5 for students enrolled in "Prepa- 
ration of Design Portfolio " or in Summer School) 

(b) For spring semester — January 6 

Degree Requirements. The degree of Bachelor Science is conferred for the 
satisfactory completion, with an average of C or better, of a prescribed 
curriculum of 120 academic semester hour credits Students must earn a 
grade of C or higher in all courses applied towards satisfaction of the 
requirements for the major in Interior or Advertising Design. Moreover, a 
course in which a grade lower than a C was earned cannot be used as a 
prerequisite for a course required for the major. 

Advertising Design Curriculum 

(Advertising design courses must be taken in sequence.) 

Semester 

Credit Hours' 

University Studies Program Requirements 39-40 

B S Requirements** 21 

ARTT 110 — Elements of Drawing 3 

EDIT 160 — Design Illustrating I 3 

APDS 101 — Fundamentals of Design 3 

APDS 102 — Design II 3 

APDS 103 — Design III Three-dimensional Design 3 

APDS 210 — Presentation Techniques 3 

APDS 21 1 — Action Drawing. Fashion Sketching 3 

EDIT 234 — Graphic Communications 3 

APDS 237 — Photography 3 

APDS 320 — Fashion Illustration 3 

APDS 330 — Typography and Lettering 3 

APDS 331 — Advertising Layout 3 

APDS 332 — Display Design 3 

APDS 337 — Advanced Photography 3 

APDS 380 — Professional Seminar ,• 3 



102 Human Development (Institute for Child Study) 



APDS 430 — Advanced Problems in Advertising Design 3 

APDS 431 — Advanced Problems in Advertising Design 3 

HSAD 340 or 341 or 362 — (courses dealing with Interiors) 3 
ARTH 450 — 20tti Century Art 

(or Other Upper Level ARTH) 3 

Electives — 10-14 

Total 120 

Interior Design Curriculum 
(Interior Design courses must be taken in sequence.) 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
University Studies Program Requirements 39-40 



B S Requirements 

EDIT 160 — Design Illustrating I 

APDS 101 — Fundamentals of Design 

APDS 102 — Design II 

APDS 103 — Design III Three Dimensional Design 

EDIT 241 — Architectural Drawing 

HSAD 210 — Presentation Techniques 

PHYS 106 — Light, Perception. Photography, and Visual Phe- 
nomena 

PHYS 107 — Laboratory 

HSAD 246 — Materials of Interior Design 

HSAD 340 — Period Homes and Their Furnishings 

HSAD 341 — Contemporary Developments in Architecture, In- 
teriors, Furnishings 

HSAD 342 — Space Development 

HSAD 343 — Interior Design I 

HSAD 344 — Interior Design II 

HSAD 345 — Professional Aspects of Interior Design 

HSAD 362 — Ideas in Design OR 

ARTH (300-400 Level) 

TEXT 363 — History of Textiles 

HSAD 440 — Interior Design III 

HSAD 441 — Interior Design IV 

Electives 

Total 



21 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 

3 
1 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
3 
4 
4 
10-24 
120 

■ No upper level credits may t>e attempted without special permission until a 

student has earned a minimum of 56 credits 

'■ These credits may simultaneously satisfy University Studies requirements 

Note:More detailed information about curriculum and semesfer-by-semes- 
ter sample programs is available from the department 

Course Code Prefixes — APDS HSAD 



Human Development (Institute for 
Child Study) (EDHD) 

College of Education 

3304 Benjamin Building, 454-2034 

Professor and Director: Hardy 

Professors: Eliot, Grambst, Hatfield, Porges, Seefeldf, Torney-Purta 

Associate Professors: Bennett. Flatter, Fox, Gardner, Huebner, Koop- 

man. Marcus, Matteson, RobertsonTchabo, Tyler 

Assistant Professors: Green, Holloway, Hunt. Taylor 

Emeriti: Boviie. Dittmanf, Goering, Hatfield, Kurtz. Margan 

t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Department of Human Development offers: (1) a variety of under- 
graduate courses in human development at the 300 and 400 levels, includ- 
ing the areas of development, learning and adjustment: (2) graduate pro- 
grams leading to the MA, M Ed and PhD degrees and the AGS 
certificate, and (3) field experiences and internships to develop compe- 
tence in applying theory to education practice in schools and other set- 
tings Areas of concentration in human development include infancy, early 
childhood, adolescence adulthood, and aging Research in educational 
psychology, social, physiological, personality and cognitive areas with 
emphasis on the social aspects of development enhance the instructional 
program 

Undergraduate courses and workshops are designed for pre-service 
and in-service teachers as well as for students preparing to enter human 
services vocations The department does not offer an undergraduate 
major However, undergraduate students may elect human development 
courses in areas of concentration such as (1) infancy and early childhood, 
(2) adolescence, (3) aging, and (4) human services (social service, recrea 
tion, corrections, etc ) Major purposes of undergraduate offenngs in 
human development are (1) providing expenences which facilitate the 
personal growth of the individual, and (2) preparing people for vocations 
and programs which seek to improve the quality of human life These 



offerings are designed to help professionals and paraprofessionals acquire 
a positive orientation toward people and basic knowledge and skills for 
helping others 

Through the Institute for Child Study the faculty provides consultant 
services and staff development programs for school systems, parent 
groups, court systems, mental health agencies, and other organizations 
involved with helping relationships 

Course Code Prefix — EDHD 



Human Nutrition and Food Systems 
(HNFS) 

College of Human Ecology 

3304 Mane Mount Hall, 454-21.39 

Professor and Chair: Read 

Professors: Ahrens. Beaton. Prather. Sims 

Associate Professors: Castonguay. Moser-Veillon, Williams 

Assistant Professors: Choi. Noble. Taylor 

Lecturers: Curtis. Norton 

Adjunct Professors: Hamosh. Reiser 

Adjunct Associate Professors: CaWaway. Goldberg, Pao, Reynolds, 

Szepesi 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: Behall, Conway, Deuster. Hallfrisch, 

Michaelis, Miles, Monagan, Patterson, Raiten. Rinke 

Affiliate Professors: Hansen, Heald 

Affiliate Assistant Professor: McKenna 

Visiting Professor: Winick 

The area of human nutrition and food systems offers many diverse 
professional opportunities Courses introduce the student to the pnnciples 
of selection, preparation, and utilization of food for human health and the 
welfare of society Emphasis is placed on the scientific, cultural, and pro- 
fessional aspects of this broad area of food and nutrition The department 
offers four areas of emphasis dietetics, experimental foods, foodservice 
administration, and human nutntion and foods Each program provides for 
competencies in several areas of work; however, each option is designed 
specifically for certain professional careers 

DEPARTMENT MAJORS: The Dietetics major develops an understanding 
and competency in food, nutrition, and management as related to 
problems of dietary departments and delivery of nulntional care Nutntion 
education and community nutntion are included in this program The Die- 
tetics program is approved by the American Dietetic Association The 
Experimental Foods major develops competency in food science and 
food-related behavior Physical, chemical and biological sciences m rela- 
tion to food are emphasized The program is designed lor students inter- 
ested in product development, quality control, consumer concerns and 
technical research in foods Foodservice Administration emphasizes the 
administration of quantity food services in elementary and secondary 
schools, colleges, restaurants, health care facilities and corporate cafete- 
rias The Human Nutrition and Foods major emphasizes the physical and 
biological sciences in relation to nutrition and the development of labora- 
tory skills in these areas Students in this major frequently elect to go on to 
graduate or medical school 

Each of these courses of study includes a set of major subject courses 
offered primarily within the department, plus supporting courses taken 
outside the department To graduate, students must also meet the require- 
ments of the campus (e g , those specified in the University Studies Pro- 
gram) and the College of Human Ecology 

Grades: All students are required to earn a C grade or better in all courses 
applied toward satisfaction of the major This includes all required courses 
with a prefix of FOOD, NUTR, and FSAD as well as certain required courses 
in supporting fields A list of these courses for each program may be 
obtained from the department office 

Program Requirements 

I. Dietetics 

a Major Subject Courses 
NUTR 100 — Elements of Nutrition 3 



or 

NUTR 200 — Nutrition for Health Services 

NUTR 330 — Nutritional Biochemistry 

NUTR 440 — Advanced Human Nutrition I 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Human Nutntion II 

NUTR 460 — Therapeutic Human Nutrition 

NUTR 470 — Community Nutntion 

NUTR 475 — Dynamics of Community Nutntion 

FOOD 240 — Science of Food I 

FOOD 250 — Science of Food II 

FSAD 300 — Foodservice Organization and Management 



Human Nutrition and Food Systems 103 



FSAD 350 — Foodservice Operations I 

FSAD 390 — Introduction to Foodservice Budgeting 

FSAD 440 — Foodservice Personnel Administration 

Subtotal 



b Supporlina Courses 
MATH 110 — Elementary Mathematical Models 

or 
MATH 115 — PreCalculus 
CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 

CHEM 1 13 — General Chemistry II 

CHEM 233 — Organic Chemistry I 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology I 

ZOOL 202 — Human Anatomy & Physiology II 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication 

or 
SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

EDMS 451 — Introduction to Educational Statistics 

or 
BIOM 301 — Introduction to Biometrics 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing 

ENGL 391 — Advanced Composition 

or 
ENGL 393 — Technical Writing 

University Studies Program Courses 

Human Ecology Courses 

Electives 

Subtotal 

Total Credits 



II. Experimental Foods 

a Major Subject Courses 

FOOD 240 — Science of Food I 

FOOD 250 — Science of Food II 

FOOD 440 — Advanced Food Science I 

FOOD 445 — Advanced Food Science Laboratory 

FOOD 450 — Advanced Food Science II 

NUTR 100 — Elements of Nutntion 

FDSC 412 — Principles of Food Processing I 



or 

FDSC 413 — Principles of Food Processing II 

FDSC 422 — Food Product Research & Development 

FDSC 430 — Food Microbiology 

FDSC 434 — Food Microbiology Laboratory 

ENAG 414 — Mechanics of Food Processing 

Subtotal 

b Supporting Courses 

MATH 1 15 — Pre-Calculus 

MATH 220 — Elementary Calculus I 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 

CHEM 1 13 — General Chemistry II 

CHEM 233 — Organic Chemistry I 

CHEM 243 — Organic Chemistry II 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology I 

BCHM 261 — Elements of Biochemistry 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Wnting 

ENGL 393 — Technical Writing 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

BIOM 301 — Introduction Biometrics 



or 



18 
6 
7 

_7? 

120 



BIOM 401 — Biostatistics I (4) 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication . 3 

or 
SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 

University Studies Program Courses 18 

Human Ecology Courses 6 

Electives 8 

Subtotal _90 

Total Credits 120 

III. Foodservice Administration 

a Major Subject Courses 

FSAD 300 — Foodservice Organization and Management ... 3 

FSAD 350 — Foodservice Operations I 5 

FSAD 355 — Foodservice Operations II 4 

FSAD 415 — Foodservice Cost Accounting 3 



FSAD 440 — Foodservice Personnel Administration 2 

FSAD 450 — Foodservice Equipment Planning 3 

FSAD 455 — Manpower Planning (or Foodservice 3 

FSAD 480 — Practicum in Foodservice Administration 3 

or 
FSAD 490 — Special Problems in Foodservice 

FOOD 240 — Science of Food I 3 

FOOD 250 — Science of Food II 3 

FOOD 300 — Economics of Food Consumption 3 

NUTR 200 — Nutntion for Health Services 3 

NUTR 470 — Community Nutrition _3 

Subtotal 41 

b Supporting Courses 
MATH 110 — Elementary Mathematical Models 3 

or 
MATH 115 — Pre-Calculus 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic & Biochemistry. . . 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology I 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

ZOOL 202 — Human Anatomy & Physiology II 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

BMGT 220 — Principles of Accounting I 

BMGT 362 — Labor Relations 



or 
ECON 370 — Labor Markets. Human Resources, and Trade 

Unions 

Data Processing or Statistics 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication 

or 

SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing 
ENGL 391 — Advanced Composition 

or 
ENGL 393 — Technical Writing 

University Studies Program Courses 

Human Ecology Courses 

Electives 

Subtotal 

Total Credits 

IV. Human Nutrition and Food 

a Major Subject Courses 

NUTR 100 — Elements of Nutrition 

or 
NUTR 200 — Nutrition for Health Services 

NUTR 440 — Advanced Human Nutrition I 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Human Nutrition II 

FOOD 240 — Science of Food I 

FOOD 250 — Science of Food II 

FOOD 440 — Advanced Food Science I 

FOOD 445 — Advanced Food Science Laboratory 

Subtotal 



6 

5 

_Z9 

120 



b Supporting Courses 

MATH 115 — Pre-Calculus 3 

MATH 220 — Elementary Calculus I 3 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 113 — General Chemistry II 4 

CHEM 233 — Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 243 — Organic Chemistry II 4 

ZOOL 21 1 — Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

ZOOL 422 — Vertebrate Physiology 4 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

BCHM 461 — Biochemistry I 3 

BCHM 463 — Biochemistry Laboratory I 2 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 4 

BIOM 301 — Introduction to Biometrics 3 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Wnting 3 

ENGL 393 — Technical Writing 3 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication 3 
or 

SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 3 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 

University Studies Program Courses 18 

Human Ecology Courses 6 

Electives 9 

Subtotal 100 

Total 121 



104 Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 



Advising. Departmental advising is mandatory Students should consult 
the current Undergraduate Catalog and also see an appropriate depart- 
mental advisor when planning their course of study Information on advis- 
ing may be obtained by calling the department office at 454-2139 

Financial Assistance. The Department has collaborative arrangements for 
hourly employment with nearby government agencies and can provide 
suggestions for a wide variety of opportunities in hospitals, industry, and 
other locations Call 454-2139 for more information 

Honors and Awards. The HNFS Department offers yearly awards for Out- 
standing Sophomore, Outstanding Junior, Outstanding Senior, Outstand- 
ing Graduate Student, Outstanding Returning Student, Outstanding Self- 
Supporting Student and a Special Departmental Award Call 454-2139 for 
more information 

Student Organizations. The HNFS Department has an active undergradu- 
ate club which does a number of outreach activities, sponsors speakers on 
career-related topics, and participates in a variety of social activities Call 
454-2139 for more information 

Course Code Prefixes: FOOD, FSAD, NUTR. 



Industrial, Technological and 
Occupational Education (EDIT) 

College of Education 

Room 3216 J M Patterson Building, 454-4264 

Associate Professor and Acting Chair: Beatty 

Professors: Hornbake (Emeritus), Luetkemeyer, Maley (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Beatty, Herschbach, Hultgren, 

f^ietus, Peters. Stough, Sullivan 

Assistant Professors: Boyce, Elkins, Hunter, Usiak 

Instructors: Ashley, Jones, lylason, McLaughlin, Milligan, Mosser, Smith, 

Spear, Strenge 

The Department of Industrial, Technological and Occupational Educa- 
tion offers programs leading to teacher certification and degrees in five 
different fields of teacher preparation A sixth field of study, industrial 
technology, is designed to prepare individuals for supervisory and man- 
agement positions in industry, business, and government In addition, a 
technical education program is available for persons with advanced techni- 
cal preparation who wish to teach in technical institutes or community 
colleges 

The five curricula administered by the department include (1 ) business 
education; (2) home economics education; (3) industrial arts/technology 
education; (4) industrial technology; (5) vocational-technical education 
Undergraduate and graduate programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science, Master of Education, Advanced Graduate Specialist, Master of 
Arts, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy are available 

Advising. Advising is mandatory Advisors are located in the J M Patterson 
Building Call the department for additional information 

Business Education 

Two curncula are offered for preparation of teachers of business sub- 
jects General Business and Secretarial Education The general business 
education curriculum qualifies students for teaching all business subjects 
except shorthand Providing thorough training in general business, includ- 
ing economics this curriculum leads to teaching positions at both junior 
and senior high school levels 

General Business Education 

A program of 124 hours of University credit hours is required for a 
general business education major. Six hours of eleclives must be selected 
from the business field 

University Studies Requirements 
Other Academic Support Courses 

MATH 111 (3) 

SPCH 100, 125 or 220 (3) 

Content Courses 

BMGT 110 — Introduction to Business and Management (3) 

EDIT 114 — Principles of Typewriting (2) 

EDIT 115 — Intermediate Typewriting (2) 

BMGT 220, 221 — Principles of Accounting I & II (3) 

ECON 201 . 203 — Pnnciples of Economics I & II (USP Distributive) (3) 

EDIT 214 — Office Typewriting Problems (2) 

EDIT 215 — Survey of Office Machines (3) 

BMGT 380 — Business Law (3) 

BMGT 301 — Introduction to Data Processing (3) 

BMGT 302 — Information Systems Implementation Techniques (3) 



BMGT 350 — Marketing Pnnciples and Organization (3) 
EDIT 406 — Word Processing (3) 
EDIT 415 — Financial and Economic Education I (3) 
EDIT 416 — Financial and Economic Education II (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270 — Field Experiences (3) 
'EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 
EDIT 485 — Field Experiences in Business Education (3) 
•EDPA 301 — Foundations in Education (3) 
•EDIT 340 — Methods of Teaching Office Skills (3) 
"EDIT 341 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation — Business Edu- 
cation (3) 

'EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
•EDIT 432 — Student Teaching (12) 
• Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Secretarial Education 

The secretarial education curriculum is adapted to the needs of those 
who wish to become teachers of shorthand as well as other tx/siness 
subjects A program of 127 hours of University credit is required for a 
secretarial education major Nine hours of electives must be selected from 
field of business 

University Studies Requirements 
Other Academic Support Courses 

SPCH 220 — Group Discussion (3) 

Content Courses 

EDIT 114 — Principles of Typewnting (if exempt, BMGT 110) (2) 

EDIT 115 — Intermediate Typewnting (2) 

EDIT 116, 117 — Principles of Shorthand I, II (3) 

BMGT 220, 221 — Principles of Accounting I & II (3) 

ECON 201. 203 — Pnnciples of Economics I & II (USP Distributive) (3) 

EDIT 214 — Office Typewriting Problems (2) 

EDIT 215 — Survey of Office Machines (3) 

EDIT 216 — Advanced Shorthand and Transcnption (3) 

EDIT 304 — Administrative Secretarial Procedures (3) 

BMGT 380 — Business Law (3) 

EDIT 406 — Word Processing (3) 

EDIT 405 — Business Communications (3) 

BMGT 301 — Introduction to Data Processing (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270 — Field Experiences in Education for Business and Industry 
(3) 

•EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 
•EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 
EDIT 485 — Field Experiences in Business Education (3) 
•EDIT 340 — Methods of Teaching Office Skills (3) 
•EDIT 341 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation — Business Edu- 
cation (3) 

•EDCI 390 — Pnnciples and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
•EDIT 432 — Student Teaching (12) 

•Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Home Economics Education 

The home economics curriculum is designed for students wtv) are 
preparing to teach home economics and includes study in each area of 
home economics and of the supporting disciplines 

A major in Home Economics Education requires 128 University credit 
hours The major is an intensive program which includes required courses 
in academic support, content and professional areas A nine-hour area of 
concentration designed to give the student expertise in some special facet 
of home economics must be completed with the approval of an advisor No 
upf>er level credits can be attempted until a student has earned a minimum 
of fifty-six credits 

University Studies Program Requirements 
Other Academic Support Courses 

CHEM 103 (4) 

SPCH 100. 107 or 125 (3) 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology (3) 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology (3) 

BIOL 101 — Concepts of Biology (3) 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

Content Courses 

TEXT 205 — Intro to Textile Matenals or 
TEXT 105 — Textiles in Contemporary Living (3) 
NUTR 100 — Elements of Nutntion (3) 
APDS 101 — Fundamentals of Design or 
ARTE 101 — INtroduction to Art Education (3) 
FMCD 250 — Decision-Making m Family Living (3) 
HSAO 240 — Design and Furnishings in the Horrw (3) or 
HSAD 251 — Family Housing (3) 



Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 105 



EDHD 411 — Child Growth and Development (3) 

FOOD 210 — Scientific Principles of Food Preparation and Manage 

ment (4) 

TEXT 21 1 — Apparel or TEXT 222 — Apparel II (3) 

FIvlCD 330 — Family Patterns or Ff^CD 105 (3) 

SOCY 443 — The Family and Society or Ff^CD 441 (3) 

FMCD 445 — Family and Household fvlanagement (3) 



Courses 

Bases for Curriculum Decisions in Home Economics (3) 

- Human Development and Learning (6) 
Curriculum Development in Home Economics (3) 
Field Exfjerience in Analysis of Child Development Lab (3) 

- Foundations of Education (3) 
Home Economics for Special Need Learners or 

Introduction to Special Education (3) 
■ Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
Curriculum. Instruction, and Observation — Home Eco- 

Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Home Econom- 



Prolesslonal 

EDIT 207 - 
•EDHD 300 - 
EDIT 435 - 
EDIT 436 — 
•EDPA 301 - 
EDIT 493 — 
EDSP 470 - 
•EDCI 390 - 
EDIT 342 - 
nomics (3) 
EDIT 442 — 
ics (12) 

• Requires Admission to Teacher Education 



Industrial Arts/Technology Education 

This industrial arts/technology education curriculum prepares persons 
to teach industrial arts/technology education at the middle and secondary 
school level It is a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree While trade or industrial experience contributes significantly to the 
background of the industrial arts/technology education teacher, previous 
work experience is not a condition of entrance into this curriculum Stu- 
dents who are enrolled in the curriculum are encouraged to obtain work in 
industry dunng the summer months Industrial arts/technology education 
as a middle and secondary school subject area is a part of the general 
education program characterized by extensive laboratory experiences 

To obtain a bachelors degree in Industrial Arts Education, a student 
must complete 128 hours of University credit The major is intensive and 
involves required courses in academic support, content, and professional 
areas Eight hours of elective credit should be taken with the advice of the 
advisor No upper level credits can be attempted until a student has 
earned a minimum of fifty-six credits 

University Studies Program Requirements 
Other Academic Support Courses 

CHEM 102 or 103 (4) 
SPCH 100 (3) 
RHYS 111 or 112 (3) 
ECON 205 

Content Courses 

EDIT 101 — Mechanical Drawing I (2) 

EDIT 102 — Fundamentals of Woodworking (3) 

EDIT 112 — Technical Calculations (3) 

EDIT 262 — Basic Metal Machining (3) 

EDIT 121 — Mechanical Drawing II (2) 

EDIT 202 — Machine Woodworking (3) 

EDIT 127 — Fundamentals of Electricity — Electronics (3) 

EDIT 233 — Fundamentals of Power Technology (3) 

EDIT 241 — Architectural Drawing (2) 

EDIT 227 — Applications of Electronics (3) 

EDIT 223 — Arc and Gas Welding (1) 

EDIt 210 — Foundry (1) 

EDIT 226 — Fundamental Metal-Working Processes (3) 

EDIT 234 — Graphic Communications (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270 — Field Experience (3) 

"EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning (6) 

•EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDIT 31 1 — Lab Practicum in Industrial Arts (3) 

"EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDIT 344 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation (3) 

•EDIT 422 — Student Teaching (12) 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development (3) 

EDIT 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 

EDIT 466 — Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts (3) 

* Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Industrial Technology 

The industrial technology curriculum is a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree The purpose of the program is to prepare 
persons for jobs within industry It embraces four major areas of compe- 
tence (a) technical competence; (b) human relations and leadership com- 
petence: (c) communications competence, and (d) social and civic 
competence 



To obtain a bachelor s degree in Industrial Technology, a student must 
complete 128 hours of University credit The program involves required 
courses in academic support and content areas Twenty-four hours of 
electives should t>e selected to create a concentration in one of the follow- 
ing areas: 

Production and Manufacturing 

Industrial Safety 

Industrial Training and Human Resource Development 

Fire Science and Industrial Safety 

Specific Technical Specialty 

No upper level credits can be attempted until a student has earned a 
minimum of fifty-six credits 

University Studies Program Requirements 
Other Academic Support Courses 

PSYC 100 (3) 

SPCH 107 (3) 

MATH 1 1 1 or MATH 220 (3) 

PHYS 111 (3) 

CHEM 102 or CHEM 103 (4) 

ECON 205 (3) 

PHYS 112 (3) 

Content Courses 

EDIT 262 — Basic Metal Machining (3) 
EDIT 101 — Mechanical Drawing I (2) 
EDIT 112 — Technical Calculations or EDIT Elective (3) 
EDIT 121 — Mechanical Drawing II (2) 
EDIT 210 — Foundry (1) 
EDIT 223 — Arc and Gas Welding (1) 
CMSC 103 — Intro to Computing for Non-Majors or 
CMSC 110 — Introductory Computer Programming (3/4) 
EDIT 127 — Fundamentals of Electricity Electronics (3) 
EDIT 291 — Introduction to Plastics Technology (3) 
EDIT 224 — Organized and Supervised Work Experience (3) 
PSYC 361 — Industrial Psychology (3) 
EDIT 443 — Industrial Safety Education I (3) 
EDIT 465 — Modern Industry (3) 
EDIT 226 — Fundamental Metalworking Processes or 
EDIT 233 — Fundamentals of Power Technology or 
EDIT 234 — Graphic Communications (3) 
BMGT 360 — Personnel Management (3) 
EDIT 444 — Industrial Safety Education II (3) 
EDIT 425 — Analysis of Industrial Training Programs I (3) 
EDIT 324 — Organized & Supervised Work Experience (3) 
BMGT 362 — Labor Relations (3) 

BMGT 385 — Production Management or approved BMGT Elect, (3) 
EDIT 360 — Industrial Production Technology or approved BMGT Elec- 
tive (3) 

Marketing and Distributive Education 

A major In Marketing and Distributive Education requires 126 hours of 
University credit The major is an Intensive program involving required 
courses in academic support, content, and professional areas. Twenty-one 
hours of electives must be chosen from the business field No upper level 
credits can be attempted until a student has earned a minimum of fifty-sIx 
credits 

University Studies Program Requirements 
Other Academic Support Courses 

SPCH 100, 125 or 220 (3) 

Content Courses 

BMGT 1 10 — Business Enterprise (3) 
ECON 201 — Pnnciples of Economics I (3) 
ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II (3) 
BMGT 220 — Principles of Accounting I (3) 
BMGT 221 — Principles of Accounting II (3) 
BMGT 354 — Promotion Management (3) 
BMGT 350 — Marketing Management (3) 
BMGT 360 — Personnel Management I (3) 
BMGT 353 — Retailing (3) 
BMGT 380 — Business Law (3) 
EDIT 486 — Field Experience (3) 
BMGT 455 — Sales Management (3) 

Professional Courses 

"EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 

EDIT 414 — Organization and Coordination of Distributive Education 

Programs (3) 

EDIT 343 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation (3) 

"EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

•EDIT 452 — Student Teaching (12) 

■ Requires Admission to Teacher Education 



106 Jewish Studies Program 



Vocational-Technical Education 

The vocational-technical programs may lead either to certification as a 
vocational-industnal teacher witn no degree Involved or to a Bachelor of 
Science degree, including certification The University of Maryland is des- 
ignated as the institution which shall offer the "Trades and Industries" 
certification courses The courses offered are those required for certifica- 
tion in Maryland The vocational-technical curriculum requires trade com 
petence as specified by the Maryland State Plan for Vocational-Industrial 
Education A person who aspires to be certified should review the state 
plan and contact the Maryland State Department of Education If the 
person has in mind teaching in a designated school system, he or she may 
discuss his or her plans with the vocational-industrial education represen- 
tative of that school system inasmuch as there are variations in employ- 
ment and certification requirements. 

Vocational-Technical Degree Program 

The vocational-technical curriculum is a four-year program of studies 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in education It is intended to 
develop the necessary competencies for the effective performance of the 
tasl<s of a vocational or occupational teacher 

To obtain a bachelor s degree In Vocational-Technical Education, a 
student must complete 128 hours of University credit The major is inten- 
sive and involves required courses in academic support, content, and 
professional areas. Five hours of elective credit should be taken with the 
advice of an advisor An additional twelve credits of electlves are included 
if student has been exempted from study teaching on the basis of pnor 
experiences. 

Persons pursuing this curriculum must present documentary evidence 
of having an apprenticeship or comparable learning period and journey- 
man experience This evidence of background and training is necessary in 
order that the trade examination phase of the curriculum may be accccn- 
plished If sufficient trade experience is unavailable, such experience must 
be completed while pursuing the degree Twenty semester hours of credit 
toward the degree are granted upon satisfactory completion of the trade 
competency examination 

Persons having completed the necessary certification courses prior to 
working on the degree program may use such courses toward meeting 
graduation requirements However, after certification course requirements 
have been met, persons continuing studies toward a degree must take 
courses in line with the curriculum plan and University regulations For 
example, junior level courses may not be taken until the student has 
reached full junior standing 

University Studies Program Requirements 
Other Academic Support Courses 

SPCH 100 (3) 
ECON 205 (3) 
MATH 115 (3) 
PSYC 100(3) 
CHEM 103 (4) 

Content Courses 

EDIT 112 — Technical Calculations (3) 
EDIT 465 — Modern Industry (3) 

Professional 

EDIT 270 — 
•EDHO 300 - 
EDIT 462 - 
EDIT 450 — 
EDIT 471 — 
EDIT 457 — 
EDIT 350 — 
•EDCI 390 - 
EDIT 482 — 
EDIT 461 — 
EDIT 499 — 
•EDPA 301 - 
EDIT 464 — 



Courses 

Field Experience (3) 

- Human Development and Learning (6) 
Occupational Analysis and Course Construction (3) 
Training Aids Development (3) 
Principles and History of Vocational Education (3) 
Tests and Measurements (3) 
Methods of Teaching (3) 

- Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
Student Teaching' (12) 
Principles of Vocational Guidance (3) 
Coordination of Co-op Work Experience (3) 
■ Social Foundations olEducation (3) 
Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 



* Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Elective courses in the technical area (shop and drawing) will be limited 
to courses and subjects not covered in the trade training experience 
Courses dealing with advanced technology and recent improvements in 
field practices will be acceptable 



Option 1 

EDIT 350 — Methods of Teaching (3) 

EDIT 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 

EDIT 457 — Tests and Measurements (3) 

EDIT 462 — Occupational Analysis and Course Construction (3) 

The remainder of the credit hours shall be met through the election of 

any two of the seven courses or completing one of the options 

EDCP 41 1 — Mental Hygiene (3) 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development (3) 

EDIT 461 — Principles of Vocational Guidance (3) 

EDIT 465 — Modern Industry (3) 

EDIT 467 — Problems in Occupational Education (3) 

EDIT 471 — History and Principles of Vocational Education (3) 

EDIT 499D — Workshop in Vocational Education (3) 

Option 2. 

EDHD 300 — Human Growth and Development (6) 

Option 3 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology (3) 

EDHD 360 — Educational Psychology (3) 

A person in vocational-technical education may use his or her certifica- 
tion courses toward a Bachelor of Science degree A maximum of twenty 
semester hours of credit may be earned through examination in the trade in 
which the student has competence Prior to taking the examination, the 
student shall provide documentary evidence of his or her apprenticeship or 
learning period and journeyman experience For further information at>oul 
credit examination refer to the academic regulations or consult with the 
department staff 

Course Code Prefix: EDIT 



Jewish Studies Program 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2106 Jimenez Hall, 454-7251/4307 

Associate Professor and Director: Adele Berlin 
Professors: Beck Berlin, Goodblatt 
Associate Professors: Bilik, Handelman, Rozenblil 
Assistant Professors: Diner, Manekin 
Instructors: Levy. Litserman 

The Jewish Studies major provides undergraduate students with a 
framework for organized and interdisciplinary study of the history, philoso- 
phy, and literature of the Jews from antiquity to the present Jewish Stud- 
ies draws on a vast literature in a number of languages, especially Hebrew 
and Aram^lc and includes the Bible, the Talmud, medieval and modern 
Hebrew literature Yiddish language and literature compnse an important 
sub-field 

The undergraduate major requires forfy-eighl semester hours (twenty- 
seven hours minimum at 3(30-400 level) consisting of courses in the Hebrew 
Program and the History Department as well as other courses in the 
Departments of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. English. 
Geography, Philosophy, and Sociology 

A minimum grade of C is required in all courses offered toward ma)or 
requirements A major in Jewish Studies will normally conform to the follow- 
ing curriculum 

1 Prerequisite HEBR 1 11. 112, 211. 212 (or placement exam) 

2 Required coures HEBR 313, 314. HIST 282, 283. and either HIST 309 
or research-onented course in Hebrew approved by advisor (at 300 
level or above): two upper-level courses in Hebrew literature and one 
upper-level course in Jewish history (twenty-four credit hours) 

3 Electlves twelve credits in Jewish Studies courses in Hebrew lan- 
guage and literature, Jewish history and Yiddish language and litera- 
ture At least nine credits must t>e at the 300-400 level 

4 Nine credits of supporting courses in areas outside Jewish Studies 
such as history sociology, philosophy, psychology, or literature. 
including at least six credits at the 300-4(X) level, to be selected with 
the approval of a facully advisor 



Vocational-Industrial Certification 

To tiecome certified as a trade industrial and service occupations 
teacher in the State of Maryland a person must successfully complete 
eighteen credit hours of instruction plus a three credit course in special 
education or mainstreaming 

The following courses must be included in the eighteen credit hours ol 
instruction 



Journalism (JOUR) 

College of Journalism 

For inlormation. see College of Journalism entry 



Linguistics Program 107 



Linguistics Program (LING) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1109 Mill Building, 454-7002 

Professor and Director: Lightfoot 

Associate Professor. Homslein 

Assistant Professor: Gorrell. Lebeaux, Weinberg, Uriagereka 

Affiliate: Gasarch 

The Linguistics Program offers courses on many aspects of language 
study and an interdisciplinary major leading to a Bachelor of Arts Lan- 
guage IS basic to many human activities and linguistics relates to many 
other disciplines which include work on language 

Work on language has provided one of the main research probes In 
philosophy and psychology for most of the 20lh century It has taken on a 
new momentum in the last twenty-five to thirty years and language 
research has proven to be a fruitful means to cast light on the nature of the 
human mind and on general cognitive capacity Several courses focus on a 
research program which takes as a central question How do children 
master their native language? Children hear many styles of speech, varia- 
ble pronunciations and incomplete expressions, but, despite this flux of 
expserience, they come to speak and understand speech effortlessly, 
instantaneously and subconsciously Research aims to discover how this 
happens, how a person's linguistic capacity is represented in the mind, 
and what the genetic basis for it is Students learn how various kinds of 
data can be brought to bear on their central question, how that question 
influences the shape of technical analyses 

The major program in Linguistics is designed for students who are 
pnmarily interested in human language per se, or in describing particular 
languages in a systematic and psychologically plausible way, or in using 
language as a tool to reveal some aspect of fiuman mental capacities 
Such a major provides useful preparation for professional programs in 
foreign languages, language teaching, communication, psychology, 
speech pathology, artificial intelligence (and thus computer work) 

Major Requirements. Students obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics 
by following one of two tracks: "Grammars and Cognition" or "Grammati- 
cal Theory and Language" In each case, students take a common core of 
LING courses LING 200, 240, 311 -31 2, 321-322 Beyond this core, students 
must specialize by completing an additional nine hours in LING plus one of 
the following either eighteen hours from selected courses in HESP, PHIL 
and PSYC, or eighteen hours in a particular language. The specializations 
in detail are 

Grammars and Cognition 

LING 440 — Grammars and Cognition 

Two 300/400 LING electives 

PHIL 466 — Philosophy of f^ind 

HESP 400 — Speech and Language Development in Children 

OR 

HESP 498 — Seminar in Psycholinguistics 

PSYC 440 — Introduction to Cognitive Psychology 

OR 

PSYC 422 — Psychology of Language 

Three 300/400 electives in HESP. PHIL, PSYC or CMSC 

Grammatical Ttieory and a Language 

LING 410 — Grammars and Meaning and LING 411 — Comparative 

Syntax 

OR 

LING 420 — Word Formation and LING 412 — Advanced Phonology 

LING 300,400 elective 

Five required courses in the language of specialization 

A course in the history or structure of the language of specialization 

When possible, the language of specialization should be the same as 
the one used to satisfy the college Foreign Language Requirement The 
specialization normally includes those courses that make up the desig- 
nated requirement for a major in the chosen language Special provision 
may be made for students who are native speakers of a language other 
than English and wish to conduct analytical work on the grammar of that 
language A student may also study grammatical theory and English; the 
eighteen hour concentration in English consists of courses in the history 
and structure of English to be selected in consultation with the student's 
Linguistics advisor 

For a double major, students need twenty-seven credits in Linguistics, 
which normally include the LING courses for one of the two specializations 

Course Code Prefix — LING 



Management and Organization 

For information, see College of Business and Management entry 

Management Science and Statistics 

For information, see College of Business and Management entry 

Marketing 

For information, see College of Business and Management entry 



Mathematics (MATH) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences 

3207 Mathematics Building, 454-2834 
Undergraduate Office 454-2746 

Professor and Ct\air: Markley 

Professors:^ Adams, Alexander, Antman, Auslander, Babuska'", Bene- 
detto, Berenstein, Brin, Chu, J Cohen, Cook, Copper, Correl, Doughs, 
Edmundson*, Ehrlich, Evans, Fey", Fitzpatnck. Freidlin. Goldlierg, 
Goldhaber. Good. Gray, Greenberg, Grove, Gulick, Herb, Horvath, Hub- 
bard"*, Hummel, Johnson, Kellogg'", King, Kirwan, Kleppner, Kuda, 
Kueker. Lay, Lehner, Lipsman, Liu, Lopez-Escobar. Mikulski, Neri, Olver"*. 
Osborn, Owings, Pearl, Rosenberg, Rudolphf, Schafer, Sweet, Syski, 
Washington, Wei, Wolfe, Wolpert, G Yang, Yorke"*, Zagier, Zedek 
Associate Professors: l\mo\6. Berg, Dancis. Ellis, Glaz. Goldman, 
Green, Hamilton, Helzer, Jones, Kedem, Sather, Schneider, Slud. Smith, 
Vogelius, Warner, Winkelnkemper 

Assistant Professors: J Adams, Boyle. Chang. Currier, Fakhre-Zakeri, 
Grillakis, Maddocks, Nochetto"*, Stuck, Wang 
Professors Emeriti: Brace, L Cohen, Hems. Jackson. Stellmacher 
Affiliate Professors: Stewart, Young 
Affiliate Associate Professor: OLeary 
Instructors: Alter, Cleary 

' Joint Appointment Department of Computer Science 

" Joint Appointment Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

•" Joint Appointment: IPST 

t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The program in mathematics leads to a degree of Bachelor Science in 
mathematics and offers students training in mathematics and statistics in 
preparation for graduate work, teaching, and positions in government or 
industry A student intending to major in mathematics should complete the 
introductory sequence MATH 140, 141, 240, 241 or the corresponding 
honors sequence MATH 250, 251 , and should have an average grade of at 
least B and no grade less than C in these courses 

Each mathematics major will complete with a grade of C or better the 
following: 

1 CMSC 112-1 13 or CMSC 1 10 or ENES 240 or a CMSC course having 
CMSC 110 or 113 as a prerequisite 

2 MATH 256, or an upper level MATH/MAPL course having CMSC 110 as 
a prerequisite 

3 Eight MATH/MAPL/STAT courses at the 400 level or above, at least 
four of which are taken at College Park The eight courses will include: 

(a) MATH 410-411 (Students successfully completing MATH 250-251 
are exempted from MATH 410-41 1 and receive credit for two upper 
level courses ) 

(b) One course from among MATH 401, MATH 405, or MAPL 471. or 
the sequence MAPL 466-467. 

(c) One course from among MATH 414, MATH 415, MATH 462, MATH 
436. or MATH 246 If MATH 246 is chosen, it will not count as one of 
the eight upper-level courses 

(d) The remaining 400 level MATH/MAPUSTAT courses are electives. 
but cannot include any of the following MATH 400. 461. 478 
through 488, or STAT 4W EDCI 451 may be used to replace one of 
the elective upper level mathematics courses 

Undergraduate Math/Stat Majors with interest in applied mathematics 
are permitted with the approval of the Undergraduate Office to substitute 
two courses (with strong mathematics content) from outside the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics for one of the elective upper-level mathematics 
courses With the approval of an advisor, the qualified student may substi- 
tute appropriate 600 or 700 level courses for 400 level mathematics 
courses 



108 Mathematics 



4 In order to broaden the student's mathematical experience, each 
Math/Stat major must complete, with a grade of C or better, a course 
sequence in a supporting area Other sequences may be considered, 
on a case-by-case basis, by the Undergraduate Chair However, any 
sequence to be approved, which does not appear in this list must 
make substantial use of mathematics, comparable to the sequences 
on this list 

(a) Physics. One of the following sequences 

PHYS 161. 262, 263 (or ASTR 200) — engineering sequence 
PHYS 171. 272, 273 (or ASTR 200) — physics major sequence 
PHYS 141. 1 42. and an upper level course approved by the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics 

(b) ENES 110, PHYS 161. ENES 220 

(c) Computer Science. CMSC 112. 113, and any group of three 
courses (3-credit) from CMSC 21 1 -477 that does not include CMSC 
250, CMSC 400 or any CMSC courses cross-listed with mathemat- 
ics The three courses might include 

CMSC 211 or 220. 311, 411 or 412 (aimed toward computer 
systems) 

CMSC 220, 420, 424 or 426 (aimed toward information 
processing) 

CMSC 330, 430, 432 or 435 (aimed toward program languages) 
CMSC 21 1 or 220. 31 1 and 330 (most general CMSC courses) 
(d)CHEM 103, 113. 233 

(e) Economics. ECON 201 , 203, and two of the following (including 
one of ECON 405. 406): ECON 402. 405. 406, 431. 440, 441 

(f) Business. ECON 201 or 205 and any three of the following; 
BMGT 220, 221. 340. 431, 434, 435 

(For business supporting area, MATH 411 can be replaced by 
STAT 410, provided one of the following courses is included among 
the eight 400-level math courses STAT 41 1 , 420, 450, MAPL 477 ) 

Within the Department of Mathematics there are a number of identifi- 
able areas which students can pursue to suit their own goals and interests 
They are briefly described below Note that they do overlap and that 
students need not confine themselves to one of them 

1, Pure mathematics the courses which clearly belong in this area are: 
MATH 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 410, 41 1,414, 415, 417, 430, 432, 433, 
436. 444, 446, 447. 450: STAT 410, 411, 420 Students preparing for 
graduate school in mathematics should include MATH 403, 405, 410 
and 41 1 in their programs MATH 463 (or 660) and MATH 432 (or 730) 
are also desirable Other courses from the above list and graduate 
courses are also appropriate 

2 Secondary teaching the following courses are required to teach math- 
ematics at the secondary level MATH 402 or 403, 430 and EDCI 451 
(EDCI 451 IS acceptable as one of the eight upper level math courses 
required for a mathematics major ) These additional courses are par- 
ticularly suited for students preparing to teach MATH 406. 444. 463. 
STAT 400 and 401 EDHD 300, EDPA 301 , EDCI 350 or 455, and EDCI 
390 are necessary to teach, before registering for these courses, the 
student must apply for and be admitted to teacher education 

3. Statistics For a student with a Bachelor of Arts seeking work requiring 
some statistical background, the minimal program is STAT 400-401 To 
work primarily as a statistician, one should combine STAT 400-401 with 
at least two more statistics courses, most suitably, STAT 450 and 
STAT 440 A stronger sequence is STAT 410. 420, 450 This offers a 
better understanding and wider knowledge of statistics and is a gen- 
eral purpose program (i e , does not specify one area of application) 
For economics applications STAT 400, 401. 440, 450, and MAPL 477 
should be considered For operations research MAPL 477 and/or STAT 
41 1 should be added or perhaps substituted for STAT 450 To prepare 
for graduate work, STAT 410 and 420 give the best background, with 
STAT 411, 421. 440. 450, and 460 added at some later stage 

4 Computational mathematics there are a number of math courses 
which emphasize the computational aspects of mathematics including 
the use of the computer They are MAPL 460, 466, 467, 477, and MATH 
475 Students interested in this area should take CMSC 112, 113 as 
early as possible, and CMSC 420. 21 1 are also suggested 

5 Applied mathematics the courses which lead most rapidly to applica- 
tions are the courses listed above in 3 and 4 and MATH 401. 414. 415, 
436. 462, 463, 464 A student interested in applied mathematics 
should obtain, in addition to a solid training in mathematics, a good 
knowledge of at least one area in which mathematics is currently being 
applied Concentration in this area is good preparation for employment 
in government and industry or for graduate study in applied 
mathematics 

Advising. Advising for math majors is mandatory Students are 
required to sign up for an advising appointment at the math under 
graduate office window (room 1117). beginning the week before pre 
registration 

Language. Since most of the non English mathematical literature is written 
in French. German or Russian, students intending to continue studying 
mathematics in graduate school should obtain a reading knowledge of at 
least one of these languages 



Honors In Mathematics. The Mathematics Honors Program is designed for 

students showing exceptional ability and interest in mathematics Its aim is 
to give a student the best possible mathematical eduction Participants are 
selected by the Departmental Honors Committee during the first semester 
of their junior year To graduate with honors in mathematics they must pass 
a final written and oral comprehensive examination Six credits of graduate 
work or three credits in a graduate course and three credits of independent 
study in mathematics approved by the Honors Committee are also 
required The rest of the program is flexible Independent work is 
encouraged and can be done in place of formal coursework 

The department also offers a special mathematics department honors 
calculus sequence (MATH 250, 251) for promising freshmen with a strong 
mathematical background (including calculus) Enrollment in the sequence 
IS normally by invitation but any interested student may apply to the 
Mathematics Departmental Honors Committee for admission 

Participants in the General Honors Program may also enroll in special 
honors sections of the regular calculus sequence (MATH 140H, 141H, 
240H, 241H) They may also enroll in the honors calculus sequence if 
invited by the Mathematics Departmental Honors Committee However. 
the mathematics departmental honors calculus sequence and the General 
Honors Program are distinct, and enrollment in one does not imply accept- 
ance in the other 

Neither honors calculus sequence is prerequisite for participating in the 
Mathematics Honors Program, and students in these sequences need not 
be mathematics majors 

Awards. Aaron Strauss Scholarships Up to 2 are awarded each year to 
outstanding junior Math Majors The recipient receives full remission of (in- 
state) tuition and fees Applications may be obtained early in the spnng 
semester from the math undergraduate office (room 1117) 

Higgibbotham Prize An award (up to $500) is made to an outstanding 
senior math major in the spring 

Student Organization. Pi Mu Epsilon. The local chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon, 
the nationafhonorary mathematics fraternity, meets frequently to discuss 
mathematical or educational topics of interest to undergraduates. The 
programs are open to the public 

Ptacement in Mathematics Courses. The Department of Mathematics has 
a large offering to accommodate a great variety of backgrounds, interests, 
and abilities The department permits students to take any course for 
which the appropriate background regardless of formal coursework For 
example, students with a high school calculus course may be permitted to 
begin in the middle of the calculus sequence even if they do not have 
advanced standing Students may obtain undergraduate credit for mathe- 
matics courses in any of the following ways passing the appropriate CEEB 
Advanced Placement Examination, passing standardized CLEP examina- 
tions, and through the departments Credit-by-Examination Students are 
urged to consult with advisors from the Department of Mathematics to 
assist with proper placements 

Statistics and Probability, and Applied Mathematics. Courses m statistics 
and probability and applied mathematics are offered by the Department of 
Matfiematics These courses are open to non-majors as well as majors, and 
carry credit in mathematics Students wishing to concentrate in the above 
may do so by choosing an appropriate program under the Department of 
Mathematics 

Couse Code Prefixes — MATH. STAT. MAPL 

Mathematics Education 

Students completing an undergraduate major in astronomy, physics, 
physical sciences or in math, or who may be enrolled in the College of 
Education, may prepare to teach astronomy, physics, physical science, or 
math Early contact should be made with either Dr John Layman (astron- 
omy, physics, physical sciences) or Dr James Fey (mathematics) See also 
the entry on the College of Education in this catalog 



Measurement, Statistics and 
Evaluation (EDMS) 

College of Education 

Room 4107, Benjamin Building 454-3747 

Professor and Chair: Lissitz 
Professors: Dayton. Macready. Stunkard 
Associate Professors: Benson. Johnson. Schafer 
Assistant Professor: DeAyaia 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates. The Department of Mea 

suremeni Statistics and Evaluation offers courses in measurement 
applied statistics, and algorithmic methods for undergraduates The 
department is primarily graduate oriented and offers programs at the 



Mechanical Engineering 109 

Requirements For Major The Freshman curriculum is the same for all 
Engineering departments and programs Please consult The College of 
Engineering entry 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

Sophomore Year I ll 

Univ Studies Req 3 3 

MATH 241 — Calculus III ; 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262 — Physics ,. 4 

PHYS 263 — Physics '. 4 

ENES 220 — l^echanics of Materials 3 

ENES 221 — Dynamics -. . . 3 

ENME 201 — M E Project 1 

ENME 205 — Engineering Analysis and Conriputer Pro- 
gramming 3 

ENME 21 7 — Thermodynamics '. _3 

Total 17 17 

Junior Year 

Univ. Studies Req 3 6 

ENEE 300 — Elect Engr 3 

ENEE 301 — E E- Lab 1 

ENME 310 — Mech, Def Solids 3 

ENME 31 1 — Def Solids Lab 1 

ENME 315 — Inter Thermo 3 

ENME 321 — Trans. Proc 3 

ENME 342 — Fluid Mech 3 

ENME 343 — Fluids Lab 1 

ENME 360 — Dyn. of Mach 3 

ENME 381 — Meas. Lab _ _3 

Total 17 16 

Senior Year 

Univ. Studies Req 3 3 

ENME 401 — MatI Sci 3 

ENME 403 — Auto Controls 3 

ENME 404 — M E. Sys. Des 4 

ENME 480 — Engr Exp 3 

Tech Elect 3 

Design Tech Elect 3 

Core Option 

ENME 400 3 

ENME 405 3 

or 

Thermal Fluids 

ENME 405 3 

Design Tech Elect 3 

or 
Solids-systems 

ENME 400 3 

Design Tech. Elect _3 

Total 15 16 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE RESTRICTIONS: 

Core Option Two electives; at least one design 

Solids Systems Three electives: at least two design, and at least two from 

402. 410, 411. 412, 461, 462, 464, 465, 489F, 489K, 489R. 

others as approved 
Thermal Fluids: Three electives: at least two design, and at least two from 

415, 422, 423. 424, 442, 450, 451, 452, 453, 4891, others as 

approved 



master's and doctoral level for person and quantitative interests from a 
variety of social science and professional backgrounds In addition, a 
doctoral minor is offered for students majoring in other areas The doctoral 
major IS intended primarily to produce individuals qualified to teach 
courses at the college level in applied measurement, statistics and evalua- 
tion, generate original research and serve as specialists in measurement, 
applied statistics or evaluation in school systems, industry or government 
Tne masters level program is designed to provide individuals with a broad 
range of data management, analysis and computer skills necessary to 
serve as research associates in academia, government, and business At 
the doctoral level, a student may choose a specialty within one of three 
areas applied or theoretical measurement, applied statistics, and program 
evaluation 

Course Code Prefix — EDMS 



Mechanical Engineering (ENME) 

College of Engineering 

2181 Engineering Classroom Building, 454-2410 

Chair: Fourney 

Associate Ctiair: Walston 

Professors: Allen (PT). Anand. Armstrong. Berger. Buckley. Cunniff, 

Dally, Dieter. Durelli (PT), Fourney, Gupta, Holloway, Irwin (PT), Kirk, 

Koh, Magrab. Marcinkowski, Marks, Sallet, Sanford, Sayre (PT), Shreeve 

(PT), Talaat. Wallace. Wockenfuss (PT), Yang 

Associate Professors: Barker, Bernard, Dick (PT), dlMarzo, Krayterman 

(PT), McCaffrey, Pecht, Shih, Tsai, von Kerczek, Walston 

^ss/sfar7f Professors.- Abdelhamid, Anjanappa. Azarm. Bigio, Chen, 

Choudhury (PT), Dasgupta, Gore, Hammar, Harhalakis, Haslach, Herold, 

Khan, Minis, Pandelidis, Piomelli, Radermacher, Sirkis, Ssemakula, Tsui, 

Wilner 

Emeriti: Jackson, Shreeve, Weske 

Lecturers: Bedewi, Case, Cook, Etheridge, Peltzman, Richter, Wang, 

Werneth 

Researcti Associates: G'Hara, Pavlin, Zhang 

The Mechanical Engineering Major: The primary function of the mechani- 
cal engineer is to create devices, machines, structures, or processes which 
are used to advance the welfare of people Design, analysis, synthesis, 
testing, and control are the essential steps in performing this function 
Certain aspects of the science and art of engineenng are of particular 
importance to achieve a successful product or service Some of these 
aspects are those relating to the generation and transmission of mechani- 
cal power, the establishment of both experimental and theoretical models 
of mechanical systems, computer interfacing, the static and dynamic 
behavior of fluids, system optimization, and engineering and production 
management 

There are many career opportunities in all of these areas In particular, 
the areas of design, systems analysis, management, consulting, research, 
maintenance, manufacturing, teaching, and sales offer challenging and 
rewarding futures Graduates from the University of Maryland are sought 
by national and local industries as well as Federal and State agencies and 
laboratories 

Because of the wide variety of professional opportunities available to 
the mechanical engineer, the curriculum is designed to provide students 
with a thorough training in basic fundamentals These include physics, 
chemistry, mathematics, computers, mechanics of solids and fluids, ther- 
modynamics, materials, heat transfer, controls, and design The curriculum 
includes basic laboratory courses in fluid mechanics, materials engineer- 
ing, electronic instrumentation and measurements, and a senior laboratory 
which provides an introduction to professional research and evaluation 
procedures Students are introduced to the concept of design via machine 
design and energy conversion design courses, and seniors participate in a 
comprehensive design course during their final semester which is fre- 
quently linked with an advisor and a problem from industry This expen- 
ence helps students anticipate the type of activities likely to be encoun- 
tered after graduation and also helps to establish valuable contacts with 
professional engineers 

In order to provide flexiDility for students to follow their own interests in 
Mechanical Engineering students may choose to concentrate in either 
mechanical design or energy design in their senior year. In addition, seniors 
may choose from a wide variety of elective courses such as courses in 
robotics, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, elec- 
tronic packaging, microprocessor theory, ocean engineering, finite ele- 
ment analysis, heating ventilation and air conditioning, solar energy, com- 
bustion, advanced fluid flow, and advanced mechanics, to list only a few A 
small number of academically superior undergraduate students are able to 
participate in Special Topic Problems courses in which a student and 
faculty member can interact on a one-to-one basis. 



Sample Topics: 

Biomedical Engineering 
Engineering Communications 
Ethics and Professionalism 
Finite Element Analysis 
Internal Combustion Engines 



Kinematic Systems of Mechanisms 

Packaging of Electronic Systems 

Patent Law 

Reliability and Maintainability 

Robotics 



Admission: Admission requirements are identical to those set by the Col- 
lege of Engineering (see College of Engineering section on Entrance 
Requirements) 

Advising: All mechanical engineering students are required to meet with an 
advisor during registration The Undergraduate Advising Office is located 
in Room 2188 of the Engineering Classroom Building Telephone 454- 
2409 

Financial Assistance: A very limited amount of financial aid is available 
Information may be obtained in the Undergraduate Advising Office 

Honors and Awards: The honors program is administered through the 
College of Engineenng Individual honors and awards are presented based 
on academic excellence and extracurncular activities. 



110 Meteorology 



student Organizations: Student chapters of professional societies Include 
the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Autonnotive 
Engineers and the American Production Inventory and Control Society The 
mechanical engineering honor society is Pi Tau Sigma Information regard- 
ing these societies may be obtained in Room 2188 of the Engineenng 
Classroom Building 

Course Code Prefix: ENME 



Meteorology (METO) 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and 
Physical Sciences 

2207 Computer and Space Sciences Building. 454-2708 

Professor and Acting Chair: Goldenbaum 
Professors; Baer, Fallerl, Shukia, Thompson. Vernekar 
Associate Professors: Dickerson, Elingson, Pinker. Robock 
Assistant Professor: Carton 

'Institute for Physical Science and Technology 

The Department of fvleteoroiogy offers a number of courses of interest 
to undergraduate students These courses provide an excellent under- 
graduate background for those students who wish to do graduate work in 
the fields of atmospheric and oceanic science, meteorology, air pollution, 
and other environmental sciences The interdisciplinary nature of studies in 
meteorology and physical oceanography assures that all science-oriented 
students will gam a broadened view of physical science as a whole, as well 
as the manner in which the sciences may be applied to understand the 
behavior of our environment 

Undergraduate students interested in pursuing a bachelor's degree 
program preparatory to further study or work in meteorology are urged to 
consider the Physical Sciences Program, in which they can specialize in 
meteorology It is important that students who anticipate this specialization 
consult the Physical Sciences Program advisor representing the Depart- 
ment of Meteorology as early as possible in their studies 

Because of its interdisciplinary nature, the study of the atmosphere 
requires a firm background in the basic sciences and mathematics To be 
suitably prepared for 400-level courses in meteorology, the student should 
have the following background either the physics major series PHYS 171 
— 375 or the series PHYS 161. 262. 263. the mathematics senes MATH 
140. 141.240.241 and either the series CHEM 103. 113orCHEM 105. 115 
See the section on course descriptions for electives in meteorology 

Students who may be preparing for graduate education in meteorology 
are strongly advised to pursue further coursework from among the areas of 
physics, applied mathematics, chemistry, computer science, and statistics 
to supplement coursework in meteorology With proper counseling from 
the Department of Meteorology advisor, the student wishing to graduate 
with an MS degree in meteorology may achieve that goal in five years from 
the inception of university studies 

Course Code Prefix — -METO 



Microbiology (MICB) 

College of Life Sciences 

Microbiology Building. 454-2848 

Professor and Ctiair: S W Joseph 

Professors.- Colwell. Cook. Hetnckt. Roberson. Weiner*. Yuan 

Associate Professors: MacQuillan. Robb*. Vol! 

Assistant Professors: Benson. Capage. Stein 

Instructor: Smith 

Adjunct Professors: Mora. Pearson 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Dougherty. White 

Emeritus Professors: Doetsch. Faber, Pelczar 

t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

'Joint appointment with Center ol Marine Biotechnology 

The Microbiology Major 

Microbiology is the branch of biology dealing with microscopic life- 
forms such as bacteria, yeast, molds, and viruses As one of the important 
basic sciences, microbiology is particularly concerned with the principles 
of host-parasite interactions From this perspective, microbiologists are 
helping to solve current world-wide problems in disease control and pre- 
vention, food production, and the environment 

The aim of the B S program in Microbiology is to provide students with 
a thorough and rigorous education in molecular genetics, immunology, 
virology, ecology, pathogenic microbiology and microbial physiology in 



addition to the basic principles of Microbiology This background will pre- 
pare students for careers in scientific research, business and industry, or m 
the health-related professions such as medicine and dentistry 

There are many employment opportunities for microbiologists at all 
levels of education and professional development m government private 
industry, and academics Microbiology is an appropriate undergraduate 
major for students wishing to pursue a scientific career in such fields as 
genetic engineering, cancer research, vaccine development pollution con- 
trol, production ol monoclonal antibodies, discovering new antibiotics and 
chemotherapeutic agents, developing new fermentation techniques and 
controlling AIDS and other viral diseases In addition, the training received 
provides the student with all of the core course requirements needed lor 
admission into advanced degree programs and professional programs in 
dentistry, optometry, podiatry, law. and medicine 

Semester 
Requirements for ttie Microbiology Major Credit Hours 

Semester 
University Studies Program Requirements 30 

College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 38—40 

MICB 200* General Microbiology 4 

MICB 440 Pathogenic Microbiology 4 

Additional MICB courses" 16 

BCHM 461 . 462 Biochemistry I. II 6 

Electives 20—22 

'A major course that may also be taken to satisfy the University Studies 

requirement 

"Either of the research problems courses MICB 399 (3 credits) or MICB 388R (1 
— 4 credits), but not both, may be included in these sixteen credits, with a 
maximum of four credits permitted 

Suggested emphasis areas: 

Students wishing to pursue a Basic Microbiology major that meets 
American Society for Microbiology guidelines should complete the follow- 
ing courses MICB 380, MICB 450, MICB 460. and MICB 470 Electives 
should be chosen from the following courses: CMSC 103. BIOM 301 . ZOOL 
211; ZOOL 213 

Students wishing to emphasize Molecular Microbiology should com- 
plete the followinq courses MICB 380: MICB 388Z: MICB 450. MICB 453. 
and MICB 470 Electives should be chosen from the following courses 
ZOOL 211: ZOOL 213: ZOOL 446: CMSC 103. BIOM 301 

No microbiology course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy 
the major requirements In addition, for graduation the student must 
achieve an overall C average in the College of Life Sciences core curricu- 
lum plus BCHM 461 and 462 

Advising: Students are assigned to a faculty memtDer for advising and 
career counselling Information about advising can be obtained from the 
departmental office (room 1117. telephone 454-2848) or from the advising 
coordinator (room 3115, telephone 454-5381) 

Research Experience and Internships: Students may gain research expe- 
rience off campus by registering for MICB 388R Permission is required for 
registration contact Dr S Joseph for information and permission call 454 
2848 for an appointment In addition, students may gam research expen- 
ence on campus working in various faculty laboratories Students should 
contact faculty directly to arrange for independent research projects 

Honors and Awards: The Departmental Honors program in Microbiology 
involves an independent research project undertaken with a faculty advi- 
sor To apply or for information, contact the Honors Chairman. Dr M Voll. 
room 2114. telephone 454 5196 The P Arne Hansen Award may be 
awarded to an outstanding departmental honors student The Sigma Alpha 
Omicron Award is given annually to the graduating senior selected by the 
faculty as the outstanding student m Microbiology 

Student Organizations: All students interested in microbiology may join the 
University of Maryland student chapter ol the American Society lor Microtn- 
ology. the professional scientific society lor microbiologists Students with 
superior scholastic achievements are invited to join the Sigma Alpha Omi 
cron microbiology honor society Information on these organizations may 
be obtained in the departmental office 

Course Code Prefix — MICB 



Music (MUSC) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

Tawes Fine Arts Building. 454-2501 

Professor and Ctiair: Cohen 
Associate Ctiairman: Cooper 



Natural Resources Management Program 111 



Professors: Bernstein. Cossa. Folslrom. Garvey. Guarneri String Quar- 
tet (Dalley. Soyer, Steinhardt, Tree), Head, Heifelz. Heim, Helmt, Hud- 
son, Johnson, Koscielny, Mapr, McDonald, Montgomery, Mossf. Schu- 
macher, Serwer, Traverf, Troth 

Associate Professors: Barnetl, Davis, Delio, Ellislon, Elsing, Fanos, 
Fleming, Gibson, Gowen, Mabbs, McClelland, Olson, Pennington, Rob- 
ertson, Rodriguez, Ross. Wakefield. Wexler, Wilson 
Assistant Professors: Balthorp. McCoy, Payerle. Saunders, Sparks 
Lecturer: Beicken 
Instructor: Walters 

t Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The objectives of the department are (1) to provide professional musi- 
cal training based on a foundation in the liberal arts: (2) to help the general 
student develop sound critical judgment and discriminating taste in the 
performance and literature of music, (3) to prepare the student for gradu- 
ate work in the field, and (4) to prepare the student to leach music in the 
public schools To these ends, three degrees are offered the Bachelor of 
Music, with majors in theory, composition, and music performance: the 
Bachelor of Arts, with a major in music, the Bachelor of Science, with a 
major in music education, offered in conjunction with the College of 
Education 

Music courses and private lessons are open to all majors who have 
completed the specified prerequisites, or their equivalents Lessons are 
also available for non-majors, if teacher time and facilities permit The 
University Bands, University Orchestra. University Chorale, University Cho- 
rus. Jazz Ensemble, and other ensembles are likewise open to qualified 
students by audition 

Th« Bachelor of Music Degree. Designed for qualified students with exten- 
sive pre-college training and potential for successful careers in profes- 
sional music Recommendation for admission is based on an audition 
before a faculty committee A description of the audition requirements and 
prerequisites is available in the departmental office A grade of C or above 
IS required in all major courses 

Bachelor of Music (Perf.: Piano) 
Sample Program 



Freshman Year 

MUSP 119 

MUSC 128 Sight Reading for Pianists 
MUSC 150 Theory of Music I 
University Studies Program 



Soptiomore Year 

MUSP 217 

MUSC 228 Accompanying for Pianists , , 

MUSC 230 History of Music I 

MUSC 250 Advanced Theory of Music I 
University Studies Program 



History of Music II 

Chamber Music Performance for Pianists . 
Musical Form 



Junior Year 
MUSP 315 
MUSC 330 
MUSC 328 
MUSC 450 

Elective 

University Studies Program 



Senior Year 

MUSP 419 

MUSC 492 Keyboard Music I 
Muse 467: Piano Pedagogy I . 

Elective 

University Studies Program . 



Semester 


Credit Hours 


4 


4 


2 


? 


3 


3 


6 


6 


15 


15 


4 


4 


2 


2 




3 


4 


4 


6 


3 


16 


16 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 






2 


4 


6 


16 


17 


4 


4 




3 


3 




2 




6 


3 


15 


10 



The Bachelor of Arts Degree. Designed for qualified students whose inter- 
ests include broader career alternatives Recommendation for admission is 
based on an audition before a faculty committee. A description of the 
audition requirements, prerequisites, and program options is available in 
the departmental office A grade of C or above is required in all major 
courses 



Bachelor of Arts (Music) 
Sample Program 



MUSC 129 Ensemble 

Electives. College and USP Requirements 



Soptiomore Year 

MUSP 207 

MUSC 250 Advanced Theory of Music I . 

MUSC 229 Ensemble 

Electives, College and USP Requirements 



Junior Year 

MUSP 305 

MUSC 330 History of Music II 

MUSC 450: Musical Form 

MUSC 329: Ensemble 

Electives. College and USP Requirements 



Senior Year 

Music Electives 

Electives, College and USP Requirements 



10 
_20 
120 



Frestiman Year 

MUSP 109 



MUSC 150: Theory of Music I 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
4 



The Bachelor of Science Degree. 
(Music Education) 

The Department of Music in conjunction with the College of Education 
offers the Bachelor of Science degree with concentrations available in 
Instrumental Music Education and Choral-General Music Education for 
qualified students preparing for careers in teaching K through 12 Recom- 
mendation for admission is based on a performance audition before a 
faculty committee Descriptions of audition requirements and program 
requirements are available in the Music Department Office on request. For 
sample program requirements, see Dept of Curriculum and Instruction, 
Music Education 

Special Programs. The Department of Music actively cooperates with 
other departments in double majors, double degrees, and Individual Stud- 
ies programs Details are available on request 

Course Code Prefixes — -MUSC. MUED, MUSP 



Natural Resources Management 
Program (NMRT) 

College of Agriculture 

Room 0218, Symons Hall, 454-3738 

Assistant Professor and Coordinator: Gibson 
Adjunct Professor: Flyger 
Instructors: Sieling, Adams 

The responsible development and use of natural resources are essen- 
tial to the full growth and stability of an economy 

The goal of the Natural Resources Management Program is to teach 
students balanced concepts of the efficient use and judicious manage- 
ment of natural resources This preprofessional program identifies their role 
in economic development while maintaining concern for society and the 
environment, through a comprehensive approach involving natural sci- 
ences, economics, and social sciences It prepares students for careers in 
technical, administrative, educational, and research work in such areas as 
water and land use, fish and wildlife management, and other areas of 
natural resources management Course options also include preparation 
tor graduate study in any of several areas within the biological and social 
sciences 

Students will pursue a broad education program and then elect sub- 
jects concentrated in one of three management areas of interest Plant and 
Wildlife Resources Management, Land and Water Resources Manage- 
ment, or Environmental Education and Park Management. 

Basic Curriculum Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements' 40 

BIOL 105 — Principles of Biology 1 4 

BIOL 106 — Principles of Biology II 4 

CHEM 103, 113 — General Chemistry I, General Chemistry 11* . . 8 

GEOL too, 110 — Introductory Physical Geology, Physical Geol- 
ogy Laboratory* 
OR 

GEOG 201, 211 — Geography of Environmental Systems, Ge- 
ography of Environmental Systems Laboratory* 4 



112 Personnel and Labor Relations 

AGRO 302 — General Soils' 4 

AREC 240 — Environment and Human Ecology* 3 

MATH 140 or 220 — Calculus I or Elementary Calculus I* 4—3 

BIOM 301 — Introduction to Biometrics 3 

ECON 201 or 205 — Economies' 3 

AREC 453 — Economic Analysis of Natural Resources 3 

BOTN 462 — Plant Ecology and Plant Ecology Laboratory 4 

GEOG 340 3 

OR 

GEOL 340 — Geomorphology 4 

Mice 200 — General Microbiology' 3 

PHYS 1 1 7 — Introduction to Physics" 4 

ZOOL 212 — Ecology. Evolution and Behavior* 4 

NRMT 470 — Principles of Natural Resource Management 3 

GVPT 273 — Introduction to Environmental Politics 3 

AREC 432 — Introduction to Natural Resource Policy 3 

BMGT 360 — Personnel Management 3 

CMSC 103 — Introduction to Computing for Non-majors 

OR 

EDCI 487 — Introduction to Computers in Instructional Settings 3 

■ May satisfy college requirements and/or a University Studies requirement 

Management Areas (23 hours) 

Plant and Wildlife Resource Management 
Science Area 10 

Management Area 10 

Related Coursework or Internship 3 

Land and Water Resource Management 

Science Area 10 

Management Area 10 

Relat«j Coursework or Internship 3 

Environmental Education and Park Management 

Science Area 10 

Management and Education Area 10 

Related Coursework or Internship 3 

Advising: Advising is mandatory. See Dr Gibson in room 0218 Symons 
Hall: phone 454-3738 

Internships: Natural Resources Management Internships are available by 
signing up for NMRT 389 For further information, see Dr Gibson in Room 
0218 Symons Hall; phone 454-3738 

Student Organization: Students may )oin the campus branch of the Natural 
Resources Management Society Further information is available from Dr 
Gibson in Room 0218 Symons Hall. 

Course Code Prefix — -NRMT 



Personnel and Labor Relations 

For information, see College of Business and Management entry. 



Philosophy (PHIL) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1131C Skinner Building, 454-2851/2 

Professor and Chair: Slote 

Professors: Bub, Devitt, Lesher, Pasch, Schlaretzki (Ementus). Suppe. 
Svenonius, Wallace (part-time) 

Associate Professors: J Brown. Celaner, Cherniak, Darden, Green- 
span, Johnson, Levmson, Martin. Odell, Rey. Stairs 
Assistant Professors: Horty. Thomas 

Research Associates: Fullinwider. LichtenlDerg, Luban, MacLean, 
Sagoff, Shue, Wachbroit 

The Department of Philosophy seeks to develop students' logical and 
expository skills and their understanding of the foundations of human 
knowledge and of value, in accordance with its conception of philosophy 
as essentially an activity rather than a body of doctrine Thus in all courses 
students can expect to receive concentrated training in thinking clearly 
and inventively and in expressing themselves exactly about philosophical 
issues This training has general applicability to all professions in which 
intellectual qualities are highly valued such as law, medicine, government 
and business management With this in view the major in philosophy is 
designed to serve the interests of those m the majority who are preparing 
for careers outside of philosophy as well as those in the minority who are 
preparing for graduate study in philosophy 

The following are among the courses giving the general student train- 
ing In rigorous thinking, experience in critical and imaginative reflection on 



philosophical problems or familiarity with the philosophical foundations of 
Western and other culture PHIL 100 (Introduction to Philosophy), PHIL 1 10 
(Plato s Republic), PHIL 140 (Contemporary Moral Issues), PHIL 170 (Intro- 
duction to Logic). PHIL 1 73 and 1 74 (Logic and the English Language I and 
II). PHIL 236 (Philosophy of Religion). PHIL 243 (Philosophy of Rural Ufe). 
PHIL 341 (Ethical Theory), and the historical courses 310. 316. 320. 325. 
326, 327, 328 

For students interested particularly in philosophical problems arising 
within their own special disciplines, a numtDer of courses are appropriate: 
PHIL 233 (Philosophy in Literature). PHIL 250 and 453 (Philosophy of Sci- 
ence I and II), PHIL 245 and 445 (Political and Social Philosophy I and II). 
PHIL 360 (Philosophy of Language), PHIL 331 (Philosophy of Art), PHIL 332 
(Philosophy of Beauty), PHIL 334 (Philosophy of Music), PHIL 438 (Topics in 
Philosophical Theology), PHIL 308C (Philosophy and Computers). PHIL 450 
and 451 (Scientific Thought I and II). PHIL 452 (Philosophy of Physics). PHIL 
454 (Philosophy of Economics), PHIL 455 (Philosophy of the Social Sci- 
ences), PHIL 456 (Philosophy of Biology). PHIL 457 (Philosophy of History), 
PHIL 458 (Topics in the Philosophy of Science). PHIL 465 (Philosophy of 
Psychology). PHIL 472 (Philosophy of Mathematics), and PHIL 474 (Induc- 
tion and Probability) 

Pre-law students may be particularly interested in PHIL 140 (Contempo- 
rary Moral Problems). PHIL 245 and 445 (Political and Social Philosophy I 
and II), and PHIL 447 (Philosophy of Law) Pre-medical students may be 
particularly interested in PHIL 342 (Moral f^roblems in Medicine) and PHIL 
456 (Philosophy of Biology) 

The Departments curriculum is enriched by courses in philosophy and 
public policy issues taught by research associates in the Institute for 
Philosophy and Public Policy under the repeatable designations PHIL 308 
(Studies in Contemporary Philosophy) and PHIL 408 (Topics in Contempo- 
rary Philosophy), cross-listed under similar headings in Government and 
Politics Topics include such subjects as Business Ethics. Welfare and 
Distnbutive Justice. Responsibility of Professionals. Environmental Ethics, 
and the Morality of Forced Military Draft 

The department requirements for a ma|or in philosophy are as follows 
(1) a total of at least thirty hours in philosophy, not including PHIL 100. (2) 
PHIL 271, 310 320, 326, 341, and at least two courses numbered 399 or 
above. (3) a grade of C or higher in each course counted toward the 
fulfillment of the major requirement 

Fifteen hours of supporting courses are required to be selected in 
accordance with guidelines available in the Philosophy Department Office 

Course Code Prefix — -PHIL 



Physical Education (PHED) 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health 

Room 2351 PERH Building, 454-2928 

Chair: Dr David H Clarke 

Associate Chair: Dr Jerry P Wrenn 

Professors: Clarke, Dotson, Kelley. Sloan, Steel. Vaccaro 

Associate Professors: Clark, HaglDerg. Hatfield. Hult. Hurley. Ptiillips, 

Santa Maria, Struna, Wrenn 

Assistant Professors: Arnghi. Caldwell. Chalip, Ryder, Scott, Tyler, 

Vander Velden 

Instructors: Coates, Drum, McHugh, Owens. Roper. WenhoW 

Lecturer: Brown 

Emeriti: Eyier. Humphrey. Husman 

The Department of Physical Education offers two undergraduate 
degree programs to satisfy different needs of students Students may 
choose to ma)or in Physical Education or in Kinesiological Sciences 
Descriptions of each program follow 

The Physical Education Major This curriculum, including three certifica 
lion options, prepares students (1) for teaching physical educatKXi m the 
secondary schools, (2) for coaching, and (3) for leadership in youth and 
adult groups which offer a program of physical activity Students are 
referred to the section on the College of Education tor information on 
teacher education application procedures The first two years of this curric- 
ulum are considered to be an orientation penod in which the student has an 
opportunity to gam an adequate background in general education as well 
as in those scientific areas closely related to this field of specialization In 
addition, emphasis is placed upon the development of skills in a wide 
range of motor activities Further students are encouraged to select 
related areas especially m the field of biology, social sciences psycfiol- 
ogy, health education, and recreation as fields of secondary interest 
These materially increase the vocational opportunities which are available 
to graduates in physical education 



Physical Education 113 



Requirements for Major Includmg Program Options: Physical Education 
majors have a choice o( three separate options lor teacher certification (1) 
kindergarten through sixth grade, (2) seventh through Iweltth grade or (3) 
kindergarten through twelfth grade Due to increased marketability it is 
recommended that students pursue the K 12 option The specific course 
requirements tor each option are as follows 



Departmental Requirements/All Certification Options 



Credit 
Hours 
40 
2 
3-4 
3 



University Studies Program Requirements 

HLTH 150 — First Aid and Safety 

PHYS 101 or 11 or CHEM 102 or 103 or 105 

PHED 180 — Foundations of Physical Education 

BIOL 105 — Pnnciples ol Biology I 

ZOOL 201, 202 — Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 

PHED 300 — Kinesiology 

EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education 

PHED 314 — Methods in Physical Education 

PHED 333 — Physical Activity for the Handicapped 

PHED 385 — Motor Learning and Skilled Performance 

PHED 390 — Practicum in Teaching Physical Education 

PHED 480 — Measurement in Physical Education 

PHED 491 — Curriculum in Physical Education 

PHED Skills Laboratories' 

'Students should discuss this requirement with department advisors. 

K - 6 Certification Option 

PHED 370 — Motor Development 

EDHD 320 — Human Development through the Lifespan 

EDO 485 — Student Teaching in Elementary School-Physical 

Education 
PHED 421 — Physical Education for Elementary School: A 

Movement Approach 
PHED Electives (6 hours total), PHED 350. PHED 360, or PHED 

493 
Electives 6— 



7-12 Certification Option 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 
PHED 381 — Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 
EDCI 495 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 
PHED 360 — Physiology of Exercise 

PHED 490 — Administration of Physical Education and Sport 
PHED 493 — History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Edu- 
cation 
Electives 

K - 12 Certification Option 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 
EDCI 485 — Student Teaching in Elementary Schools 
EDCI 495 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 
PHED 381 — Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 
PHED 421 — Physical Education for Elementary School: A 

Movement Approach 
PHED 360 — Physiology of Exercise 
PHED 370 — Motor Development 

PHED 490 — Administration of Physical Education and Sport 
PHED 493 — History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Edu- 
cation 



Admission: Admission to the Physical Education major occurs upon com- 
pletion of 45 applicable credits At that time, students apply through the 
College of Education by taking the California Achievement Test. Addition- 
ally, all physical education majors must have and maintain a 2,5 average to 
gam admittance and continue in the program 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities: Student Teacfiing. Opportunity is 
provided for student teaching expenence in physical education and school 
health education. The student devotes one semester in the senior year to 
observation, participation, and teaching under a qualified supervising 
leaching in an approved Teaching Education Center A University supervi- 
sor from the College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health visits 
the student periodically and confers with the student teacher, the cooper- 
ating teacher, and the center coordinator, giving assistance when needed 
To be eligible for student teaching, students must: (1) have the recom- 
mendation of the University supervising teacher, and (2) have fulfilled all 
required courses for the B S degree except those in the Block Student 
Teaching Semester, excluding those exceptions approved by each depart- 
ment. The student must obtain a grade of "C " or better in all professional 
courses in his or her curriculum and must register for all courses in the 
"Block' concurrently 

Uniforms: Suitable uniforms, as prescnbed by the department, are 
required for the activity classes, teaching practicum(s) and for student 



teaching. These uniforms should be worn only during professional 

activities 

Kinesiological Sciences Major: This curriculum offers students the oppor- 
tunity to study the body of knowledge of human movement and sport, and 
to choose specific programs of study which allow them to pursue a particu- 
lar goal related to the discipline There is no intent to orient all students 
toward a particular specialized interest or occupation 

This program provides a hierarchical approach to the study of human 
movement First, a core of knowledge is recognized as being necessary for 
all students m the curriculum. These core courses are considered founda- 
tional to advanced and more specific courses Secondly, at the "options" 
level, students may select from two sets of courses which they believe will 
provide the knowledge to pursue whatever goal they set for themselves in 
the future To further strengthen specific areas of interest, students should 
carefully select related studies courses and electives. 

Kinesiological Sciences Option 
Freshman Year 

PHED 287 — -Sport and American society 3 

PHED 293 — -History of Sport in America 3 

Activity Courses' 6 

Electives 3 

Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201 , 202 Human Anatomy and Physiology 8 

PHED 370 — -Motor Development 3 

Activity Courses' 2 

Electives 9 

Related Studies' 6 

Junior Year 

PHED 300 Kinesiology 4 

PHED 350 — -Psychology of Sports 3 

PHED 360 — -Physiology of Exercise 3 

PHED 263 — -Philosophy of Sport 3 

PHED 385 Motor Learning and Skilled Performance 3 

Option' 3 

Related Studies' 6 

Senior Year 

PHED 496 — -Quantitative Methods 3 

PHED 497 — -Independent Studies Seminar 3 

Electives 7 

Option' 9 

Related Studies* 3 

'Students should discuss these requirements with departmental advisor. 

In addition to the above required courses, students must fulfill the Univer- 
sity Studies Program and College of Physical Education, Health, and Rec- 
reation Requirements Minimum number of semester hours for degree is 
120 

Advising: Advising is strongly recommended for all students majonng in 
Physical Education and Kinesiological Sciences although it is not 
mandatory Students are assigned a permanent faculty member to assist 
them with registration procedures, program updates and other information 
Students are advised to follow closely the program sheets which outline 
the order in which courses should be taken to allow proper progression 
through the degree programs Departmental contacts are Physical Educa- 
tion-Lynn Owens, 454-3072; Kinesiological Sciences-Dr. Robert Tyler, 454- 
6252 

Honors and Awards: The aim of the Honors Program is to encourage 
superior students by providing an enriched program of studies which will 
fulfill their advanced interests and needs Qualified students are given the 
opportunity to undertake intensive and often independent studies wherein 
initiative, responsibility, and intellectual discipline are fostered To qualify 
for admission to the program. 

1 A freshman must have a "B" average in academic (college prep) 
curriculum of an accredited high school 

2 A sophomore must have a cumulative GPA of 300 in all college 
courses of official registration 

3 All applicants must have three formal recommendations concerning 
their potential, character, and other related matters 

4 All applicants must be accepted by the Faculty Honors Committee In 
completing the program, all honor students must: 

a Participate in an honors seminar where thesis and other relevant 

research topics are studied 

b. Pass a comprehensive oral examination covenng subject matter 

background 

c Successfully prepare and defend the honors thesis 

On the basis of the student's performance in the above program, the 
college may vote to recommend graduation without honors, with honors, or 
with high honors. 



114 Physical Sciences Program 



student Organizations: All students enrolled in physical education as 
either teacher preparation or kinesiological sciences majors are eligible for 
mennbership in the Physical Education Student Association (PESA) The 
goals of PESA are: (1 ) to encourage participation in local, state, or regional, 
and national professional organization, (2) to provide opportunities for 
leadership through involvement in campus, community, and professional 
activities, (3) to promote the student and discussion of current issues, 
problems, and trends, (4) to assist in the acquisition of career skill compe- 
tencies by application in relevant field experiences, (5) to foster a spirit of 
service to others through volunteer projects, and (6) to sponsor social 
activities and to develop effective professional relationships 

Course Code Prefix PHED 



Physical Sciences Program 

Colleige of Computer, Mathematical, and 
Physical Sciences 

Dean s Office: Rm 2300 Mathematics Building, 454-4596 

Co-Chairs: Williams/Ellis 
Astronomy: Ivtatthews 
Chemistry: Durso 
Computer Science: Atchison 
Geology: Stifel 
Engineering: Walston 
^Mathematics: Lipsman 
Meteorology: Carton 
Physics: Hornyak 

Purpose. This program is suggested for many types of students those 
whose interests cover a wide range of the physical sciences, those whose 
interests have not yet centered on any one science; students interested in 
a career in an interdisciplinary area within the physical sciences; students 
who seek a broader undergraduate program than is possible in one of the 
traditional physical sciences, students interested in meteorology, 
preprofessional students (pre-law, pre-medical); or students whose inter- 
ests in business, technical writing, advertising or sales require a broad 
technical background This program can also be useful for those planning 
science-oriented or technical work in the urban field; the urban studies 
courses must be taken as electives Students contemplating this program 
as a basis for preparation for secondary school science teaching are 
advised to consult the Science Teaching Center staff of the College of 
Education for additional requirements for teacher certification 

The Physical Sciences f^rogram consists of a basic set of courses in 
physics, chemistry, and mathematics, followed by a variety of courses 
chosen from these and related disciplines astronomy, geology, meteorol- 
ogy, computer science, and engineering Emphasis is placed on a broad 
program as contrasted with a specialized one 

Students are advised by members of the Physical Sciences committee 
This committee is composed of faculty members from each of the repre- 
sented disciplines Assignment of an advisor depends on the interest of 
the student, e g . one interested principally in chemistry will be advised by 
the chemistry member of the committee Students whose interests are too 
general to classify in this manner will normally be advised by the chair of 
the committee 

The Curriculum. The basic courses include t^ATH 140, 141 and one other 
math course for which IvIATH 141 is a prerequisite (1 1 or 12 credits), CHEM 
103 and 113, or 105 and 1 15 (8 credits). PHYS 162,262,263(11 credits), or 
PHYS 171, 272. 273. 275. 276. 375 (14 credits); CfVlSC 110 (4 credits); or 
112/113 (8 credits). 

The choice of the physics sequence depends on the student's future 
aims and his/her background PHYS 161, 262. 263 is the standard 
sequence recommended for most physical science majors This sequence 
will enable the student to continue with intermediate level and advanced 
courses Students desiring a strong background in physics are urged to 
enroll in PHYS 171 — 375 This is the sequence also used by physics 
majors and leads directly into the advanced physics courses 

Beyond these basic courses the student must complete twenty four 
credits at the 300 or 400 level, chosen from any three of the following 
disciplines chemistry, physics, mathematics (including statistics), astron 
omy. geology, meteorology, computer science, and one of the engineering 
disciplines, subject to certain limitations The twenty-four distributive cred- 
its must be at the upper level (300 — 400) and shall be distributed so that 
at least six credits are earned in each of the three selected areas of 
concentration A grade of C or bietter must be earned in both basic and 
distributive requirement courses 

All Physical Science students must have a planned program of study 
approved by the Physical Sciences Committee In no case shall the Com 
mittee approve a program which has less than 18 credits in the three 
distributive areas of the Physical Sciences program to be completed, at the 
time the program is submitted 



Englneenng courses used for one of the options must all tw from the 
same department, eg , all must be ENAE courses, or a student may use a 
combination of courses in ENCH. ENNU, and ENfvIA, which are all offered 
by the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, courses ottered 
as engineering sciences. ENES. will be considered as a department for 
these purposes 

Because of the wide choice and flexibility within the program, students 
are required to submit for approval a study plan during their sophomore 
year, specifying the courses they wish to use in satisfying the requirements 
of the major 

Students who wish to depart from the stipulated curnculum may pre- 
sent their proposed program for approval by the Physical Science Commit- 
tee An honors program is available to qualified students in their senior 
year 

Certain courses offered in the fields included in the program are not 
suitable for physical science majors and cannot count as part of the 
requirements of the program These include any courses corresponding to 
a lower level than the basic courses specified above (e g , MATH 115). 
some of the special topics courses designed for non-science students, as 
well as other courses A complete listing of "excluded ' courses is available 
from the CfvlPS Undergraduate Office 

Honors Program. The Physical Sciences Honors Program offers students 
the opportunity for research and independent study Interested students 
should request details from their advisor 



Physics (PHYS) 

Collejge of Computer, Mathematical, and 
Physical Science 

1117 Physics Building. 454-3401/2 

Professor and Chair: Liu 
Professor & Associate Chair: Bardasis 
Associate Professor and Associate Chair: Skuja 
Professors Emeriti: G\ovei III, Myers 

Professors: Alley, Anderson. Banerjee. Bhagat. Boyd. Bnll. C C 
Chang, C Y Chang, Chant, Chen, Currie, Das Sarma. DeSilva. Dorf- 
man, Dragtf, Drew. Earl, Einstein, Falk. Ferrell. Glasser, Click. 
Gloeckler, Gluckstern, Goldenbaum. Greenberg, Griem. Griffin. Holm- 
gren, Hornyak, Howarth, Hu, Korenman. Layman. Lee. Lynn. MacDon- 
ald, Misner, Mohapatra. Oneda, Ott, Papadopxiulos, Park. Patif. Prange. 
Redish. Richard. Roos. Siegel, Snowf. Sucher. Toll. Wallace. Weber. 
Woo, Zorn 

Affiliate Professor: Fisher 
Professors (part-time): Z Slawsky. J Wilson 
Visiting Professors: Franklin, Trimble 
Adjunct Professors: Boldt, Ramaty. Trivelpiece 
Associate Professors: Antonsen. Drake. Ellis. Fivel, Gates, Goodman, 
Hadley. Hassam, Kacser, Kim, Kirkpatrick. Mason. Paik, Wang. Williams 
Adjunct Associate Professor: Dixon 

Assistant Professors: Hamilton, Jacobson. Jawahery. Kelly, Talaga 
Lecturers: Beach, Carlson, Frey. Holt. Kirshner. Rapport. M Slawsky, 
Solow, Stern, Swank 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Physics Program includes a broad range of undergraduate courses 
designed to satisfy the needs of almost every student, from the advanced 
physics major to the person taking a single introductory physics course In 
addition, there are various opportunities for personally directed studies 
between student and professor, and many undergraduate research oppor- 
tunities also are available For further information consult Undergraduate 
Study in Physics" available from the department 

Courses for Non-Majors. The department offers several courses which are 
intended for students other than physics majors PHYS 101 , 102. 106. 1 1 1 
and 1 12 without a laboratory and PHYS 1 14 and 1 17 with latmratory are 
designed to satisfy the University Studies distnbulion requirements (FHhyS 
106 may be taken with the lab PHYS 107 to satisfy the lab requirement, 
PHYS 102 taken with the lab PHYS 103 similarly satisfies the lab require- 
ment) PHYS 121. 122. or 141. 142 satisfy the requirements for prolesstonal 
schools such as medical and dental and PHYS 161. 262, 263 satisfy ttie 
introductory physics requirement for most engineering programs PHYS 
318 and 499F are one semester courses stressing contemporary topics lor 
those who have completed a year of one of the above sequences In 
addition, PHYS 420 is a one-semester modern physics course for 
advanced students in science or engineering Either tt>e course sequence 
161, 262, 263 or the Physics major sequence 171. 272. and 273 is suitable 
for mathematics students and those who major in other physical sciences 

The Physics Major. Courses required for Physics Major 

Credit 
Lower Level Courses Moors 



Production Management 115 



PHYS 171 • 


— Introductory Physics: Mechanics 


3 


PHYS 272 • 


— Introductory Physics: Thermodynamics. Electricity 






and Magnetism 


3 


PHYS 273 ■ 


— Introductory Physics Electricity and Magnetism. 






Waves. Optics 


3 


PHYS 275 ■ 


— Introductory Physics Lab Mechanics and Ther- 
modynamics 


1 


PHYS 276 ■ 


— Introductory Physics Lab Electricity and Magnet- 


2 
2 


PHYS 375 ■ 


— -Introductory Physics Lab: Optics 


MATH 140 


— -Calculus 1 


4 


MATH 141 


— -Calculus II 


4 


MATH 241 


— -Calculus III 


4 


MATH 240 


— Linear Algebra 


4 



Upper Level Courses 

PHYS 410 — Elements of Theoretical Physics Mechanics 4 

PHYS 411 — Elements of Theoretical Physics Electricity and 

Magnetism 4 
PHYS 414 — -Introduction to Thermodynamics and Statistical 

Mechanics 3 

PHYS 421 — -Introduction to Modern Physics 3 

PHYS 422 — -Modern Physics 4 

PHYS 395 — -Advanced Experiments 3 
One upf)er level mathematics course (preferably differential equations) 

PHYS 429 — -Atomic and Nuclear Physics: Laboratory 3 
OR 

PHYS 485 — -Electronic Circuits 4 

After taking the basic sequence, the student will be able to take spe- 
cialty courses, such as those in nuclear physics or condensed matter 
physics, or courses in related fields which are of particular interest to him or 
her In addition, a student interested in doing research may choose to do a 
bachelors thesis under the direction of a faculty member 

Honors in Physics. The Physics Honors Program offers to students of good 
ability and strong interest in physics a greater flexibility in their academic 
programs, and provides a more stimulating atmosphere through contacts 
with other good students and faculty members There are opportunities for 
part-time research participation which may develop into full-time summer 
projects An honors seminar is offered for advanced students and credit 
may be given for independent work or study. 

Students are accepted by the departments Honors Committee on the 
basis of recommendations from their advisors and other faculty members 
To receive a citation of "with honors in physics" or "with high honors in 
physics the student must complete a senior thesis and pass a compre- 
hensive examination in his or her senior year. 

Course Code Prefix — -PHYS 



Production Management 

For information, see College of Business and Management entry. 



Psychology (PSYC) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1147 Zoology-Psychology Building, 454-6691 

Professor and Chair: Goldstein 
Professor and Assistant Ctiair B Smith 

Professors: Anderson, Carter-Porges (affiliate). Dies, Pooling, Fein (affil- 
iate), Fretz, Gelso, Gollub, Hall, Hill, Hodost, Morton, Isen (affiliate), 
Kruglanski, Levinson (Emeritus), Lightfoot (affiliate), Lissitz (affiliate), 
Locke' (Business and Management), Lonon, Magoon, Martin, Mclntire, 
J. Mills, Penner, Porges (affiliate), Pumroy, Schneider, Scholnick, Sigall, 
Steinman, Sternheim, Torney-Purta (affiliate), Tnckett, Tyler, Waldrop 
(Emeritus), Yeni-Komshian (affiliate) 

Associate Professors: Allen, Brauth, R Brown, Coursey, Egel (affiliate), 
Freeman, (affiliate. Counseling Center), Helms, Larkin, Norman, 
Schneiderman (affiliate), Steele 

Assistant Professors: Hanges, Johnson, Klein, Kivlighan (affiliate. 
Counseling Center), O'Grady, Plude. Stangor, Zamostny (affiliate. Coun- 
seling Center) 

' Joint appointment with unit indicated. 
tDislinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Psychology can be classified as a biological science (Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree) and a social science (Bachelor of Arts degree) and offers 
academic programs related to both of these fields The undergraduate 
curnculum in psychology provides an organized study of the behavior of 



humans and other organisms in terms of the biological conditions and 
social factors that influence such behavior In addition, the undergraduate 
program is arranged to provide opportunities for learning that will equip 
qualified students to pursue further study of psychology and related fields 
in graduate and professional schools 

Students who are interested in the biological aspects of behavior tend 
to choose a program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree, while 
those interested primarily in the social factors of t3ehavior tend to choose 
the Bachelor of Arts degree The choice of program is made in consultation 
with an academic advisor 

Graduation Requirements 

Graduation requirements are the same for the Bac/ielor of Science and 
Bachelor of Arts degrees Students must take at least 35 credits in Psy- 
chology including 14 credits at the 400 level PSYC 386, 387. 478 and 479 
may not be included in those 35 required credits The required courses 
include PSYC 100, 200 and two laboratory courses chosen from PSYC 400. 
410. 420 and 440 In order to assure breadth of coverage Psychology 
courses must have been divided into four areas The 35 credit total must 
include at least two courses from two of the four areas and at least one 
course from each of the remaining areas The areas and courses are: 

Area I: 206, 301, 310, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 410, 453: 

Area II: 221, 341, 420, 421, 423, 424, 440, 442, 443, 444 

Area III: 235, 330. 332, 334, 337, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 432, 435, 436, 

456, 457, 458 
Area IV: 336, 354, 361, 451, 452, 460, 462, 463, 464, 465, 466 

In addition, all students must complete (a) either Math 111, 140 or 220, 
(b) one of the following laboratory courses BIOL 105, CHEM 103, 104, 105, 
113, 115. PHED 360, PHYS 121. 141, 142, 191 '5, 192'6, 293/5, 
294/6, 262, 263, ZOOL 101, 201, 202, 210, 212 and (c) ENGL 101 or an 
English literature course from a prescribed department list 

Students wishing to receive a Bachelor of Science degree must com- 
plete a 15 credit supporting course sequence in relevant math and'or 
science courses including two laboratory courses and a total of 9 credits at 
the advanced level The 15 credits must be completed with at least a 2 
average The students should consult the current Psychology Undergradu- 
ate Program Guide for a list of approved advanced N/lath-Science Courses. 

A grade of C or better must be earned in all 35 credits of psychology 
courses used for the major and all credits used to meet the Math-English- 
Science supporting course sequence No course may be used as a prereq- 
uisite unless a grade of C is earned in that course prior to its use as a 
prerequisite The prerequisite for any required laboratory course is a 2 5 
grade point average in F'SYC 100 and 200 The departmental grade point 
average will be a computation of grades earned in all psychology courses 
taken (except 386, 387, 478, and 479) and the courses selected to meet the 
Math-English-Science sequence. The GPA in the major must be at least 
2.0 

Advising 

Advising and information about the Psychology program are available 
weekdays from 9 am -12 noon and 1 p m -4 30 p m in the Psychology 
Undergraduate Office (Room ZP1107) Advising appointments may be 
made by calling 454-6691 Ms June Slack coordinates the Undergraduate 
Advising system The director of the Undergraduate Program is Dr Ellin K 
Scholnick whose office is ZP 2147A (454-6394) 

Student Organizations 

The Psychology Honorary Society is Psi Chi which has an office in the 
Undergraduate Suite (ZP 1 107) where information about applications, eligi- 
bility and membership can be obtained Psi Chi offers a series of work- 
shops on topics of interest to undergraduates. 

Fieldwork 

The department offers a program of fieldwork coordinated with a semi- 
nar through the course offering PSYC 386, 387 Dr Robert Coursey (301- 
454-6895) usually administers the course 

Honors 

The Departmental Honors Program offers the exceptional student a 
series of seminars and the opportunity to do independent research under a 
faculty mentor To be admitted to the program students must file a formal 
application and be interviewed by the Director of the Program, Dr William 
S Hall (ZP 2147B, 301-454-6393). Students are eligible to enter the pro- 
gram if they are in their fourth to sixth semester of undergraduate work and 
have completed three courses in Psychology including Psyc 200 and have 
a 33 GPA overall and in Psychology Students in the General Honors 
program may be admitted in their third semester providing that they have 
(a) earned an A in PSYC 100 or 100H, (b) finished the mathematics prereq- 
uisite for PSYC 200 and (c) have an overall GPA and Psychology GPA of at 
least 3,3 Since there are different graduation requirements including an 
undergraduate thesis and supporting math and science courses, the stu- 
dent IS urged to consult the Guide to the Honors Program in Psychology 
available In the Undergraduate Office 



116 Recreation 



Special Facilities 

Computer terminals, connected to the University computer system, are 
available in Room ZP 1 140 for student use 



Course Code Prefix 



-PSYC 



Recreation (RECR) 



College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health 

Room 2367. PERH Building, 454-2930 

Chair Dr Fred N Humptirey 

Associate Chair: Dr Veda E Ward 

Professors: Humphrey. IsoAhola 

Associate Professors: Churchill, Kuss, Strobe!!, Verhoven 

Lecturers: Annand, Kauffman, Ward 

The Recreation Major This curriculum is designed to meet the needs of 
students who wish to qualify for positions in the leisure services fields, to 
enhance their understanding of leisure behavior and related opportunities, 
and to enable them to render distinct contributions to community life The 
department draws upon various other departments and colleges within the 
University, and upon notable practitioners in the metropolitan area, to 
enrich course offerings in the leisure studies curriculum A total of 120 
credits is required for the Bachelor of Science degree 

Those majonng in recreation and leisure studies have opportunity for 
observation and practical experience in local, county, state and federal 
recreation programs, in social and group work agency programs, and in 
various programs of the Armed Forces, American Red Cross, hospitals, 
voluntary organizations, business and industry, and commercial recreation 
establishments. Majors are required to select an area of interest around 
which to center their elective coursework. The "options," accredited by 
the National Recreation and Parks Association, are Program Services. 
Recreation Resources Management. Therapeutic Recreation, and General- 
ist Development of an area of professional emphasis within an option 
which IS consistent with the student's career goals is encouraged. This 
area should focus on a specific population, setting or function within the 
more general option 

Requirements for Major Including Program Options: The Recreation 
degree consists of 120 credits with course work falling into the following 
categories: general education (40). major (40), option (30) and pure elec- 
lives (10). There is ample opportunity for double-counting coursework to 
provide space for additional elective coursework, if desired 

Recreation Curriculum 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

"University Studies Program 40 

RECR 130 Recreation and Leisure 3 

SPCH 100 (or alternate approved by Department) 3 

GVPT 170/100/273 3 

RECR 270 Leisure Services and Special Populations 3 

RECR 350 Recreational Use of Natural Areas 3 

EDHD 320 Human Development Through the Life Span 3 

RECR 420 Program Planning and Analysis 3 

RECR 200 Sophomore Seminar 1 

RECR 340 Field Work I 6 

RECR 460 Leadership Techniques and Practices 3 

RECR 490 Organization and Administration of Recreation 3 

RECR 410 Measurement and Evaluation in Recreation 3 

RECR 432 Philosophy of Recreation 3 

RECR 300 Senior Seminar 1 

RECR 341 Field Work I! , 8 

Focus Area coursework 30 

"Option Requirements 6, Therapeutic Recreation 10 
"Option Competencies 6 

Option Electives 18 

Pure Elective 1 

■Please check advisor for recommended coursework 
"RECR prefix courses may be mandated by option 

Admission: Department admission requirements are consistent with those 
of the University 

Advising: Although students are ultimately responsible for progress 
toward the Bachelor of Science degree, advising in the department is 
mandatory For this purpose a faculty advisor is assigned to assist in 
identifying coursework which maximizes integration of general education 
and major requirements Record evaluations and initial advisement is avail 
able through Dr Veda Ward at 454-3069 



Fieldwork: A unique aspect of the Recreation major is the requirement of 
two practical field-based experiences totalling 560 hours, one is taken at 
the sophomore level and the other at the senior level 

Honors and Awards: Phi Alpha Epsilon 

Student Organizations: University of Maryland Recreation and Parks Soci- 
ety In the fall of 1959 the University of Maryland Recreation and Parks 
Society was formed by the undergraduate and graduate majors The soci- 
ety, an affiliate of the State and national recreation organizations provides 
opportunities lor University and community service, for rich practical expe- 
rience and lor social interaction with those students and practitioners 
having mutual professional interest in parks, recreation and leisure 
services 

Course Code Prefix: RECR 



Romance Languages Program 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3106 Jimenez Hall. 454-4303 

Advisory Committee: Dr Charles Russell (Italian), Little (Spanish). 

Black (French) 

The Romance Languages Program is intended for students who wish to 
major in more than one romance language Students selecting this major 
must take a total of forty-five credits selected from courses in two of the 
three components listed below French. Italian and Spanish The first tour 
courses listed under each group are required for that particular language 
component: exceptions or substitutions may be made only with the 
approval of the student's advisor in consultation wtth the Romance Lan- 
guages Advisory Committee To achieve the total of forty-five credits, 
twenty-one credits are taken in each of the two languages, as specified, 
and three additional credits are taken at the 400 level in either of the 
languages chosen Literature or civilization courses may not be taken in 
translation There are no requirements for support courses for ttie 
Romance Languages major No grade lower than C may be used toward 
the major Students who wish to apply for Teacher's Certification should 
consult the College of Education 

Requirements for each language are as follows French — 204. 301. 
351. 352: one additional language course at the 300 or 400 level; two 
additional literature or civilization courses at the 400 level. Italian — 204. 
301. 351. 352: three additional literature or civilization courses at the 400 
level Spanish — 204. 301. 321-322 or 323-324. one additional language 
course at the 300 or 400 level; two additional literature or civilization 
courses at the 400 level 



Russian Area Studies Program 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2102E Francis Scott Key Hall. 454-4204 

Professors: Harper (Geography). Brecht and Davidson (Germanic and 

Slavic). Dawisha (Government and Politics). Foust. Lampe (History), 

Yaney (History) 

Associate Professors: Murrell (Economics), Berry, Glad arnJ Hilcticock 

(Germanic and Slavic), Majeska (History) 

Assistant Professors: Lekic. Merrill and Schallert (Germanic and 

Slavic) Kaminski (Government and Politics) 

Instructor: Brin (Germanic and Slavic) 

Lecturer: Manukian (Government and Politics) 

The Russian Area Studies Program offers courses leading to a Bachelor 
of Arts in Russian studies Students in the program study Russian ar>d 
Soviet culture as broadly as possible, striving to comprehend it in ail its 
aspects rather than focusing their attention on a single segment ol human 
behavior It is hoped that insights into the Russian way of life will be 
valuable not only as such but as a means to deepen the students aware- 
ness of their own society and of themselves 

Course offerings are in several departments language and literature, 
government and politics, history, economics, geography philosophy, and 
sociology A student may plan his or her curriculum so as to emphasize any 
one of these disciplines, thus prepanng for graduate work either in the 
Russian area or in the discipline 

Students in the program must meet the general degree requirements of 
the University and college from which they graduate They must comp)tete 
twenty-four hours in Russian language and literature courses selected from 
among the following equivalent courses RUSS 101 102. 201. 202. 301 
302, 3D3, 321, 322, 401, 402, 403. and 404 In addition, students must 
complete twenty-tour hours in Russian area courses on the 300 level or 



Science Communications 117 



above These Iwenty (our hours must be laken in at least live different 
departments, if appropriate courses are available, and may include Ian 
guagelilerature courses beyond those required above 

It IS recommended but not required that the student who plans on 
doing graduate work complete at least eighteen hours at the 300 level or 
above (which may include courses applicable to the Russian Area pro- 
gram) in one of the above-mentioned departments It is also recommended 
that students who plan on doing graduate work m the social sciences — 
government and politics, economics, geography, and sociology — take at 
least two courses in statistical methods 

The students advisor will be the program director or the designate The 
student must receive a grade of C or better in all the above mentioned 
required courses 

In addition to the courses in Russian language, literature, and culture 
taught in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Litera- 
tures, the following Russian Area courses are regularly offered 

ECON 380 — Comparative Economic Systems 

ECON 482 — -Economics of the Soviet Union 

GEOG 325 — Soviet Union 

GVPT 445 — Russian Political Thought 

GVPT 451 — -Foreign Policy of the USSR 

GVPT 481 — -Government and Administration of the Soviet Union 

HIST 305 — The Eastern Orthodox Church Its Cultural History 

HIST 340 — -Eastern Europe Under Communism 

HIST 344 — -The Russian Revolutions of 1917 

HIST 424 — -History of Russia to 1801 

HIST 425 — -History of Russia from 1801 — -1917 

HIST 442 — -The Soviet Union 

HIST 443 — -Modern Balkan History 

PHIL 328B — -Studies in the History of Philosophy: Marxist 

Philosophy 

SOCY 474 — Soviet Ethnic Issues 

The vanous cooperating departments also offer occasional special 
courses in the Russian and Soviet field HIST 237, Russian Civilization, is 
recommended as a general introduction to the program but does not count 
toward the fulfillment of the program's requirements 

Course Code Prefix — RUSS, SLAV 



Science Communications 

Colleige of Computer, Mathematical, and 
Physical Sciences 

The University of Maryland offers several interdisciplinary approaches 
to the training of science communicators, ranging from specialization in 
one science or engineering discipline with background in communication 
to specializing in journalistic communication with background coursework 
in the sciences Each of the several program options can be tailored to the 
needs of individual students 

Undergraduate students interested in science communications can 
choose from a wide range of possibilities For example, some may want a 
career writing about the general happenings of the day in the physical and 
life sciences, or some students may prefer writing about the span from a 
pure science to its applied technology Others may prefer writing about 
one field — such as agronomy, astronomy, geology — -and its impact on 
society — -in ecological problems, space exploration, and plate tectonics. 

The following are several approaches Writing about the physical sci- 
ences: A recommended approach would be to take the Physical Sciences 
program with a minor in journalism The Physical Sciences Program con- 
sists of a basic set of courses in physics, chemistry, and mathematics, 
followed by a vanety of courses chosen from these and related disciplines: 
astronomy, geology, meteorology, and computer science. 

Writing about the life sciences: A recommended approach would be to 
take the Biological Sciences Program with a minor in journalism. The Bio- 
logical Sciences Program includes work in botany, entomology, microbi- 
ology, and zoology, and introduces the student to the general principles 
and methods of each of these biological sciences. 

Writing about engineering: A recommended approach would be to 
take the B S -Engineering Program with a minor in journalism. The B.S.- 
Engineering Program blends two or three fields of engineering or applied 
science 

Writing about a specific field: A recommended approach would be to 
take a department major in any of the sciences, agriculture, or engineering 
and a minor in journalism 

Journalism combined with an overview of the sciences A journalism 
major could take selected science courses that provide a famillanty with 
scientific thought and application 



Sociology (SOCY) 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2112 Art Sociology Building, 454-5036 

Professor and Chair: Falk 

Professors: Billmgsley* (Family and Community Development). Clignet, 

Dager, Janes (Emeritus), Hage, Kammeyer, Lejins (Emeritus), Presser. 

Ritzer, Robinson, Rosenberg, D Segal, J Teachman 

Associate Professors: Brown, Finsterbusch. Henkel; Hirzel, J Hunt, L 

Hunt, Landry, Lengermann, Mclntyre. Meeker, Pease. M Segal. 

Vanneman 

Assistant Professors: Canjar. Harper, Kahn, NeustadI 

Lecturer: Altman* (BSOS) 

■Joint appointment with unit indicated 

Sociology is the scientific study of society, its institutions, organiza- 
tions, and groups Beginning with the simple interaction between two or 
more people, sociology examines the social organization of society from 
the development of social order to the causes and impact of social change 
Sociology's subject matter ranges from the study of the social factors that 
affect the self-concept or the nature of sex roles at the individual level, to 
group processes, such as organizations designed to produce products or 
provide services, or the major institutions of society In the latter category 
the department has strengths in the study of the military, family, education, 
health, welfare, and political and economic organizations At the societal 
and world system level, the department looks at social movements, the 
basis of stratification or inequality, sources of instability, war, technology, 
and a number of other issues 

A major in sociology offers (1) a general education especially directed 
toward understanding the complexities of modern society and its social 
problems by using basic concepts, research and statistical skills, (2) a 
broad preparation for various types of professions, occupations, and ser- 
vices dealing with people; and (3) preparation of qualified students for 
graduate training in sociology, social work, law, and business Sociology 
also forms a valuable background for those interested in other fields or 
majors. Courses in sociology can be used as preparation for careers in 
government and private research, urban planning, personnel work, human 
resources management, and many other policy-making and administrative 
careers 

Areas of Specialization. The program of instruction in Sociology offers 
courses in five major areas. The strong emphasis on advising in the depart- 
ment allows the student to combine these areas into individualized pro- 
grams directed toward the student's specific goals. Specializations are 
available in social science research methodology, social psychology, social 
demography, social institutions, and inequality. 

These areas of specialization can be combined to advantage or can be 
taken as part of a double major in conjunction with programs in other 
compatible areas such as economics, government and politics, psychol- 
ogy, business, etc. This program versatility and the rich experiential learn- 
ing possibilities of the Washington metropolitan area combine to make the 
sociology curriculum a valuable career choice. 

Requirements of the Sociology Major. Students in sociology must com- 
plete forty-four' hours of departmental requirements, none of which may 
be taken pass/fail Thirty-two* of these hours are in sociology coursework 
which must be completed with a minimum average of C, fourteen* hours 
are in required core courses and eighteen hours are sociology electives, of 
which nine are required at the 400 level and an additional three are required 
at either the 300 or 400 level. Required core courses for all majors are 
SOCY 100 (Introduction), SOCY 201 (Statistics), SOCY 203 (Theory), and 
SOCY 202 (Methods). 

•Forty-four hours are required because SOCY 201 and 202 are four-hour 
courses For transfer students or those witti equivalent courses which are only 
three-hour courses, exceptions to this forty-four hour requirement may be made 
by the Coordinator of the Sociology Undergraduate Program 

SOCY 100 should be taken in the freshman or sophomore year followed 
by SOCY 203. Three hours of mathematics (STAT 100: MATH 110. 111. 
115. 1 40. 220. or their equivalents) are required of majors as a prerequisite 
of SOCY 201 , SOCY 202 follows SOCY 201 

The supporting course requirement for majors is twelve hours of a 
coherent series of courses from outside of the department that relate to the 
student's major substantive or research interests. These courses need not 
come from the same department, but at least six hous must be from the 
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences It is strongly recommended that 
the student work out an appropriate supporting sequence for the particular 
specialization with the departmental advisor 

Internship. Although internships are not a requirement for a major, stu- 
dents are strongly urged to consider the internship program offered by the 



118 Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 



department or througti the Experiential Learning Office located in 
Hornbake Library Majors may receive up to six credits in SOCY 386/387 by 
the combination of working in an internship/volunteer position plus doing 
some academic project in conjunction with the work experience 

Advising. Further information on coursework, internships, honors program 
careers, and other topics may be obtained from the Sociology Undergradu 
ate Advisor, Room 2108 Art/Sociology Building, telephone number 454- 
5036 

Department of Sociology Requirements 

Semes fer 
Credit Hours 
University Studies Program Requirements 40 

SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology 3 

SOCY 201" Introductory Statistics for Sociology 4 

SOCY 202 Introduction to Research Methods in Sociology 4 

SOCY 203 Sociological Theory 3 

2 Sociology courses at any level 6 

1 Sociology course at 300 or 400 level 3 

3 Sociology courses at 400 level 9 

4 supporting" courses 12 

Internship (recommended, not required) 6 

Electives"* 30—36 

120 

• Three hours of mathematics (MATH 110, 111, 115, 140. 220 or their 

equivalents) are required as prerequisite 

■■ Courses complementing Sociology specialization must include at least two 

courses in behavioral and social sciences 

"■ Students choosing to take internships will reduce their elective credit total by 

SIX credits 

Honors Program: 

The objective of the Honors Program in the Department of Sociology is 
to encourage and recognize superior scholarship by providing an opportu- 
nity for interested, capable and energetic undergraduate students to 
engage in study in an area of the student's interest and under the close 
supervision of a faculty mentor The honors program is based upon tutorial 
study and independent research 

Students who have an overall cumulative grade point average of at 
least 3 3, a cumulative average of 3 5 in sociology courses, and who have 
taken at least 9 credits in sociology may apply. Transfer students with 
equivalent academic records at other accredited institutions are also eligi- 
ble Admission to the program will be based upon academic performance, 
and the judgment of tfie Undergraduate Committee on the degree to which 
the applicant has sufficient maturity and interest to successfully complete 
the requirements for graduation with Honors Further information on the 
honors program is available from the Sociology Undergraduate Office 

Student Organizations: 

There are two organizations for undergraduate sociology majors in the 
department The Sociology Collective is a group open to all Sociology 
majors The Collective was organized by a group of interested undergradu- 
ates to fill the needs of the student within the Sociology community The 
Collective seeks to keep students informed about topics of interest includ- 
ing Department activities, career planning, changes within the University 
that may affect them, etc , and strives to enhance the feelings of commu- 
nity within the Department Also, members of the Collective are invited to 
participate on faculty committees within the department and thereby 
represent the undergraduate perspective in policy decisions 

Alpha Kappa Delta is the National Honor Society for Sociology majors 
Membership is based on Sociology G PA (3.0) and overall G PA (3.0) 
Students can apply after they have completed 18 credits in Sociology 
coursework This organizations activities focus on providing tutoring ser 
vices for undergraduates in the core courses 

Course Code Prefix: SOCY 



Spanish and Portuguese 
Languages and Literatures 
(SPAN) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2215 Jimenez Hall, 454-4305/6 

Professor and Chair: Sosnowski 

Professors: Nemes. Pacheco 

Visiting Professor: Martinez 

Associate Professors: Aguilar-Mora, Igel 

Assistant Professors: Bemto-Vesseis, Lavine, Naharro-Calderon, 

Rabasa, Sanjines. Zappala 



Instructors: Downey-Vanover. Gordo, Little 

Majors. Undergraduate majors can benefit from a wide range of courses in 
Spanish and Latin American literature and civilization technical courses in 
translation, linguistics and commercial uses of Spanish Area studies pro- 
grams are also available in conjunction with other disciplines to provide the 
student with a solid knowledge of the Spanish and Latin American worlds 
The major literature prepares the student for graduate studies in Spanish 
and opportunities in various fields of study and work 

A grade of at least C is required in all major and supporting area 
courses. 

Language and Literature Major. Courses SPAN 204, 221 , 301 302, 31 1 or 
312, 321 322 or 323 324, 325 326 or 346 347, plus four courses in literature 
at the 400-level, Spanish American, or LusoBrazilian, for a total of Ihirly- 
nine credits Nine credits of supporting courses, six of which must be on 
the 300 or 400 level in a single area other than Spanish, for a combined total 
of forty-eight credits Suggested areas are art. comparative literature, 
government and pxjiilics, history, philosophy, and Portuguese All support 
ing courses should be germane to the field of specialization 

Foreign Area Major. Courses SPAN 204; 301-302, 31 1 or 312, 315 or 316 or 
31 7, 321 -322 or 323-324, 325-326 or 346-347, plus three courses in literature 
at the 4CI0 level, Spanish, Spanish American, or Luso-Brazilian, for a total of 
thirty six-credits Twelve credits of supporting courses, six of which must 
be on the 300 or 400 level in a single area other than Spanish, (or a 
combined total of forty-eight credits Suggested areas anthropology, eco 
nomics. geography, government and politics, history, Portuguese, and 
sociology All supporting courses should be germane to the field of 
specialization 

Translation Option. Courses SPAN 301 -302. 31 1 or 312; five courses from 
316, 317, 318 356. 357, 416, 417; 321 -322 or 323-324; one course from 325 
326 or 346-347, plus two courses in literature at the 400level. Spanish. 
Spanish American, or Luso-Brazilian, for a total of thirty-nine credits Nine 
credits of supporting courses, six of which must be on the 300 or 400 level 
in a single are other than Spanish, for a combined total of forty-eight 
credits Suggested areas art, comparative literature, government and 
politics, history, philosophy, and Portuguese 

Students interested in majoring in a combination of two Romance lan- 
guages should see the description of the Romance Languages Program, 
above 

Honors in Spanish. A student whose major is Spanish and who. at the lime 
of application, has a general academic average of 3 and 3 5 in his or her 
major field may apply to the Chair of the Honors Committee for admission 
to the Honors Program of the department Honors work normally begins the 
first semester of the junior year, but a qualified student may enter as early 
as the sophomore year or as late as the second semester of the junior year 
Honors students are required to take two courses from those numbered 
491, 492, 493, and the seminar numbered 496 or equivalent, as well as to 
meet other requirements for a major in Spanish There will be a final 
comprehensive examination covering the honors reading list which must 
be taken by all graduating seniors who are candidates for honors Admis- 
sion of students to the Honors Program, their continuance in the program, 
and the final award of honors are the prerogatives of the Departmental 
Honors Committee 

Elementary Honors. SPAN 102H is limited to specially approved candi 
dates who have passed SPAN 101 with high grades, and will allow them to 
enter 203H SPAN 203H is limited to students who have received high 
grades in 102, 102H, or 103 or the equivalent Upon completion of 203H. 
with the recommendation of the instructor, a student may skip 204 

Lower Division Courses. The elementary and intermediate courses in 
Spanish and Portuguese consist of three semesters of four credits each 
(101, 102, 203) The language requirement for the BA degree in the 
College of Arts and Humanities is satisfied by passing 203 or equivalent 

Students who wish to enroll in Spanish 101 , 102, and 203 must present 
their high school transcript for proper placement See the Schedule ol 
Classes for further information 

Transfer students with college credit have the option of continuing at 
the next level of study, taking a placement examination, or electing 
courses 103 or 203 If a transfer student takes course 103 for credit, he/she 
retains transfer credit only for the equivalent of course 101 A transfer 
student placing lower than his/her training warrants may ignore the 
placement but does so at his/her own risk If he/she lakes 203 for credit, he/ 
she retains transfer credit (or the equivalent of courses 101 and 102 

l( a student has received a D in a course, advanced and completed the 
next higher course, he/she cannot go back and repeat the original course 
in which heshe received a D A student who has earned credits (or Span- 
ish 204 may not subsequently earn credit (or any lower level course 

Course Code Predx — SPAN. PORT 



Special Education 119 



Special Education (EDSP) 

College of Education 

1308 Beniamin Building, 454 2118/9 

Professor and Chair: Burke 

Professors: Hette\ej . Simms 

Associate Professors: Beckman, Egel, Graham. Kohl, Leone 

Assistant Professors: Cooper, Harris, Lieber, Maag. Neubert, Speece 

Research Associates: Flonan, Kienas, MacArthur, Malouf, McLaughlin, 

Pilato, Powers 

Instructors: Aiello. Crowley. Hudak. Long. Simon 

Faculty Research Assistants: Krishnaswami. Newcomb. Rembacki, 

Schwartz. Strong, StettnerEaton, Teelucksingh 

The Special Education Department offers an innovative and rigorous 
undergraduate program which prepares teachers of handicapped infants, 
children, or young adults This program has been nationally recognized for 
many of its exemplary features It is a five-year (10 semester, 150 credit 
hour) professional certification program which graduates students with a 
Bachelor of Science degree in special education with full special education 
teacher certification in tne State of IVIaryland and certification reciprocity in 
over forty other states Students enter the program as pre-special educa- 
tion majors and enroll in courses which meet University and college 
requirements At the same time, students take supporting coursework 
designed to provide an understanding of normal human development and 
basic psychological and sociological principles of human behavior 

Special Education students receive specialized training in the following 
areas language development; motor development, social-emotional devel- 
opment: normal human behavior: social and educational needs of the 
handicapped, diagnostic and educational assessment procedures: 
instructional procedures and materials, curriculum development, class- 
room and behavior management: effective communication with the par- 
ents and families of handicapped children, community resource planning: 
and local. State, and Federal laws concerning handicapped children and 
youth Graduates of the program are expected to master specific skills in 
each of these areas 

Requirements. In Semester V and VI students accepted as Special Educa- 
tion majors take a two-semester sequence of generic special education 
courses and practicum experiences These courses provide the student 
with a solid foundation in theory and practice related to the education of all 
handicapped children across a wide range of ages and disabilities. 

At the completion of Semester V. students select one of the following 
four areas of specialization: 

1 Education of the Severely Handicapped (SH) 
2, Early Childhood Special Education (EC) 

3 Education of the Educationally Handicapped (EH) 

4 Secondary and Transition Special Education (SI) 

Coursework in each of these four areas is designed to develop exper- 
tise with a specific handicapped population Students work directly with 
handicapped children or youth during each semester, leading up to stu- 
dent teaching during the last semester 

Combined Bachelor's/Master/s Program. Selected undergraduate stu- 
dents majoring in special education will be eligible for dual application of 
credit to both the bachelor's and master's degrees, A student desiring 
graduate credit should apply for admission to the Graduate School during 
the last semester of the fourth year. If admitted to the Graduate School, the 
student may select up to twelve credits (four courses) of specified cour- 
sework from the fifth year of the undergraduate program to be applied 
simultaneously toward the credits required for the master's degree in 
special education at the University of Maryland The selected courses may 
not include field practica or student teaching experiences. Students will be 
expected to fulfill supplemental requirements in the selected courses. To 
complete the master's degree, students must fulfill all Graduate School 
requirements for the degree, with the exception of the selected 400-level 
courses 

Admission. Prior to formal acceptance as a special education major, all 
students are required to enroll in a special education introductory course 
(EDSP 210) which provides a survey of the history and current issues in 
special education. Upon successful completion of the introductory course 
and forty-five semester hours of requirements, prespecial education 
majors apply for formal admission to the Department of Special Education 
by submitting an application with a statement of intent specifying their 
professional goals. With the exception of academically talented students, 
all students declanng special education as a major will be accepted as pre- 
special education majors To be accepted as a full special education major, 
students must fulfill the College of Education requirements for admission 
to Teacher Education, as well as the following departmental conditions 
1 , Completion of coursework indicated below with an asterisk. 



2 Admission is competitive beyond the minimum 2 5 grade point aver- 
age required for consideration 

3 Submission of an application together with a statement of intent sfjeci- 
fying the applicant s professional goals 

Admittance will be based on the completion of the required courses, 
the grade point average, the applicant's experience with handicapped 
persons, and the appropriateness and clarity of the professional goal 
statement 

An appeals process has been established for students who do not 
meet the competitive GPA for admission, but who are applying in connec- 
tion with special University programs including affirmative action and aca- 
demic promise 

Advising. The Department of Special Education provides academic advise- 
ment through a faculty and a peer advisement program' Special education 
majors are assigned a faculty advisor, who is carefully matched to the 
student's area of interest It is required that all students receive advise- 
ment on a semester basis Students are urged to use the Special Educa- 
tion Advisory Center, room 1235 in the Benjamin Building 

Student Organizations. The Department of Special Education encourages 
student participation in extra-curricular activities within and outside of the 
University. 

Council for Exceptional Children. The Department of Special Education 
sponsors Chapter 504 of the council for Exceptional Children (CEC), The 
goals of the chapter include both professional development of the mem- 
bers and service to the University and community Activities include meet- 
ings on topics relevant to special education, trips to state and national 
conventions, and student/faculty social events 

Student Advisory Board. The department Student Advisory Board is 
made up of two undergraduate special education students, two graduate 
special education students, and one representative from CEC These 
members are elected by the student body The purpose of the board is to 
represent the student body at department faculty meetings and to offer 
student options on matters of concern. 

Volunteer and Career Services. This service, coordinated by students, 
compiles and disseminates information regarding volunteer and part-time 
job opportunities for working with handicapped students 

Required Courses: 

University Study Program Requirements to include the following courses 

which are departmental requirements: 

•HIST 156 (3) 

MATH 210 (4) 

"Lab Science (4) 

*ENGL Literature (3) 

•PSYC 100 (3) 

•SOCY 100 or 105 () 

Other Academic Support Courses 

•HESP 202 (3) 

HESP 400 (3) 

•STAT 100 or SOCY 201 (3/4) 

•EDHD 41 1 or PSYC 355 (3) 

EDHD 460 (3) 

Professional Courses: 

*EDSP 210 — Introduction to Special Education (3) 
EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning (6) 
EDPA 301 — Foundations of Education (3) 
EDSP 320 — Introduction to Assessment in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 321 — Comparative Approaches to Behavior and Classroom 
Management in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 322 — Field Placement in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 443 — Assessment and Instructional Design for the Handi- 
capped: Reading and Written Communication Disorders (3) 
EDSP 331 — Introduction to Curnculum and Instructional Methods in 
Special Education (3) 

EDSP 332 — Interdisciplinary Communication in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 333 — Field Placement in Special Education II (3) 

Admission to the department usually occurs during the sophomore 
year Students then take general special education coursework during the 
third year and choose a specialty area sequence at that time Students are 
accepted into one of their two specialty area choices Specialty area pro- 
grams include eleven to fourteen hours of electives. 

Specialty Area Requirements: 

The Severely Handicapped Option 

EDSP 400 — Curriculum and Instructional Methods for Severely Handi- 
capped Students (3) 

EDSP 402 — Field Placement: Severely Handicapped (4) 
EDSP 403 — Physical and Communication Development for Severely 
Handicapped Students (3) 
EDSP 404 — Education of Autistic Children (3) 



120 Statistics and Probability 



EDSP 405 — Field Placement Severely Handicapped II (4) 
EDSP 410 — Community Functioning Skills for Severely Handicapped 
Students (3) 

EDSP 330 — Families and ttie Education o( Handicapped Children (3) 
EDSP 420 — E5evelopmental and Behavioral Characteristics of Non- 
handicapped and Handicapped Infants and Young Children or 
EDSP 460 — Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped (3) 
EDSP 41 1 — Field Placement Severely Handicapped III (5) 
EDSP 412 — Vocational Instruction for Severely Handicapped Students 
(3) 

EDSP 417 — Student Teaching Severely Handicapped (11) 
EDSP 418 — Seminar Issues and Research Related to the Instruction 
of the Severely Handicapped (3) 



The Educationally Handicapped Option 

EDSP 440 — Assessment and Instructional Design for the Educationally 

Handicapped Cognitive and Psychosocial Development (3) 

EDSP 441 — Assessment and Instructional Design for the Educationally 

Handicapped Oral Language and Communication Disorders (3) 

EDSP 442 — Field Placement Educationally Handicapped (3) 

EDSP 330 — Families and Education of Handicapped Children (3) 

EDSP 445 — Field Placement Educationally Handicapped II (4) 

EDHD 413 — Adolescent Development (3) 

EDCI 456 — Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disabilities in fyialhe- 

matics (3) 

EDSP 446 — Instructional Design for the Educationally Handicapped 

Functional Living Skills (3) 

EDSP 447 — Field Placement Educationally Handicapped III (4) 

EDSP 450 — Program Management for the Educationally Handicapped 

(3) 

EDSP 457 — Student Teaching: Educationally Handicapped (11) 

EDSP 458 — Seminar Special Issues and Research Related to the 

Educationally Handicapped (3) 

EDSP 460 — Career Vocational Education for the Handicapped (3) 



The Secondary and Transition Special Education Option 

EDSP 330 — Families and the Education of Handicapped Children (3) 
EDSP 460 — Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped (3) 
EDSP 461 — Field Placement Career/Vocational (3) 
EDSP 462 — Career/Vocational Assessment and Instruction for the Mild 
to Moderately Handicapped (3) 
EDSP 463 — Field Placement: CareerA/ocational II (3) 
EDIT 421 — Industrial Arts in Special Education (3) 
EDCI 456 — Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disabilities in Mathe- 
matics (3) 

EDSP 450 — Program Management for the Educationally Handicapped 
(3) 

EDSP 465 — Field Placement CareerA/ocational III (3) 
EDSP 467 — Student Teaching: Career/Vocational (11) 
EDSP 468 — Special Topics Seminar in CareerA/ocational Education for 
the Handicapped (3) 

EDSP 464 — Career/Vocational Assessment and Instruction for the 
Mildly to Moderately Handicapped (Introduction to Secondary and Tran- 
sition Issues in Special Education (3) 

EDSP 446 — Instructional Design for the Educationally Handicapped 
Functional Living Skills (3) 



The Early Childhood Special Education Option 

EDSP 420 — Developmental and Behavioral Characteristics of Non- 
Handicapped and Handicapped Infants and Young Children (3) 
EDSP 421 — Field Placement Early Childhood Special Education I (3) 
EDSP 422 — Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Special 
Education (Moderate to Mild 3-8 yrs) (3) 

EDSP 424 — Field Placement Early Childhood Special Education II (4) 
EDCI 410 — The Child and Curriculum — Early Childhood (3) 
EDSP 330 — Families and the Education of Handicapped Children (3) 
EDSP 423 — Psychoeducalional Assessment of Preschool Handi- 
capped Children (3) 

EDSP 430 — Intervention Techniques and Strategies for Preschool 
Handicapped Children (Severe to Moderate Birth to Six Years) (3) 
EDSP 431 — Field Placement Early Childhood Special Education III 
(Severe to Moderate) (4) 

EDSP 437 — Student Teaching Early Childhood Special Education (11) 
EDSP 438 — Seminar Special Issues in Early Childhood Education (3) 
EDSP 400 — Curriculum and Instructional Methods for Severely Handi- 
capped Students or 

EDSP 441 — Assessment and Instructional Design lor the Handi- 
capped — Oral Language and Communication Disorders (3) 



Course Code Prefix — EDSP 



Statistics and Probability 

Department of Mathematics 

1105 Mathematics BIdg . 454 4883/4944 
Director: P Smith 

The Mathematical Statistics Program offers a wide range o( undergrad- 
uate courses in applied statistics, mathematical statistics, and probability 
The program is administered by the Statistics Branch of the Department of 
Mathematics, and all STAT courses carry credit in mathematics 

An undergraduate program stressing statistics is available to majors in 
mathematics See the Department of Mathematics listing for details 
Master s and doctoral degrees in statistics are offered by the Mathematical 
Statistics Program 

Course Code Prefix — STAT 



Textiles and Consumer Economics 
(TEXT) 

College of Human Ecology 

Room 2100 Mane Mount Hall, 454-2141 

Professor and Chair: Smith 

Professors: Dardis, Hollies, Spivak, Yeh 

Associate Professors: Block. Brannigan. Paoletti 

Assistant Professors: Anderson. Ettenson, Hacklander. Pourdeyhimj, 

Soberon-Ferrer, Verma, Wagner 

Adjunct Assistant Professors: Basiotis. Morris 

Lecturers: Ensor (pt ), Friedman (pt ), Goldberg (pt ). Jaklitsch (pt ), 

Stone (pt ) 

Assistant Instructor: Turner (pt ) 

Emeriti: Wilbur 

The Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics is devoted to the 
development and dissemination of knowledge concerning consumers and 
their near environment It draws upon and applies the knowledge of and 
methods of the physical and social sciences, the arts, humanities, and law 
to improve the welfare of consumers The department otiers the Bachelor 
of Science. Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees The 
faculty IS multidisciplinary and has degrees in a variety of fields including 
textiles, human ecology, economics, engineering, chemistry, psychology, 
and law In addition to their teaching responsibilities, the faculty conduct 
research and serve the University community through participation in Uni- 
versity committees The faculty members, together with the graduate stu- 
dents and adjunct faculty (many of whom work in government or industry), 
form a lively and stimulating community in which students are exposed to 
many different viewpoints 

The department has modern, well-equipped teaching and research 
laboratories including a comfort research laboratory, a computer-aided 
design laboratory, a computer-aided merchandising laboratory, and an 
historic textiles/coslume collection 

Students in Textiles and Consumer Economics may select one of four 
majors which offer diverse professional opportunities Specific careers 
depend on the major area of emphasis although there is over1app<ng of 
career opportunities in some instances reflecting similar course require- 
ments The majors offered by the department are as follows 

I Apparel Design. In this ma|or students develop an understanding of 
the interrelationships Isetween apparel design and apparel perlorm- 
ance Emphasis is placed on artistic expression and creativity, textile 
materials, and the design of apparel to meet different needs arxj 
different socio economic conditions Graduates are prepared lor posi 
tions as designers, assistant designers, stylists fashion executives, 
fashion coordinators, consultants to the home sewing industry, or 
extension and consumer educators 

II Textile Marketing/Fashion Merchandising These two programs 
emphasize the marketing and retailing of textile products and comb»r>e 
a background m textile materials with courses m marketing, retailing 
and consumer behavior Students may select an option in (a) textile 
marketing or (b) fashion merchandising An internship expener>c6 
gives students the opportunity to apply what they have teamed in 
class and prepares Itiem tor careers in marketing and retailing once 
they graduate Graduates completing the textile marketing option will 
be prepared for marketing positions with fiber, textile, or apparel com 
panies They may work in product development, sales merchandising 
promotion, market research, and management Graduates completing 



Textiles and Consumer Economics 121 



the fashion merchandising option will be prepared lor careers in retailing 
with department, specialty, or mass merchandising stores They may work 
in buying, merchandising, (ashion coordination, publicity, personnel, and 
management 

III Textile Science. This maior emphasizes the scientific and technologi- 
cal aspects of textiles It is designed to provide students with a back- 
ground in textile materials and textile science including the engineer- 
ing and finishing of fabrics for specific end uses Many students in the 
major go on to graduate study Graduates are prepared for careers in 
industry and government They may work in research and testing 
latKJratories in consumer technical service and marketings programs, 
in quality control, in buying and product evaluation, and in consumer 
education and information programs 

IV Consumer Economics. This major combines economics and market- 
ing with the knowledge of basic consumer goods and services The 
program focuses on consumer decision-making and the degree to 
which the marketplace reflects consumer needs and preferences The 
subiect matter includes consumption economics, marketing, con- 
sumer behavior, consumer law, and consumer product marketing 
Graduates may work in the planning, marketing, and consumer rela- 
tions divisions of business and industry, in program development and 
analysis for government agencies or in consumer education programs 
in industry and government 

An internship program is available to all students maionng in the 
Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics during their senior year 
Students must apply for admission to the internship program, including the 
retailing internship, in the second semester of their |unior year 

A department Honors Program permits outstanding undergraduates to 
explore on an individual basis a program of work which will strengthen their 
undergraduate program and their professional interests Students 
selected for the program must have at least a "B" average to be consid- 
ered Students in the honors program participate in a junior honors seminar 
and present a senior thesis Students completing this program graduate 
with department honors 

Advising. The Department has mandatory advising for ALL majors f^ajors 
are assigned faculty advisors and IvIUST discuss their program of study 
with their advisor each semester Majors should check with the Depart- 
ment office (Room 2100 Mane Mount Hall, Telephone 454-2141) if they do 
not know the name of their faculty advisor 

Selective Admission. Any student admitted to the University of Maryland 
at College Park is eligible for admission to Apparel Design, Textile Market- 
ing/Fashion Merchandising or Textile Science Admission to Consumer 
Economics is competitive 

Students applying for admission to Consumer Economics must com- 
plete MATH 220, ECON 201 and ECON 203 with a grade of C or better In 
each course. 

Students seeking admission to Consumer Economics must meet the 
grade point average (GPA) set by the Department for admission ALL 
students seeking admission to this competitive major should contact the 
Department for details of the selective admission process 

Requirements for Each Major 

To graduate, students must complete the required department and 
supfjorting courses with the required grades. Human Ecology require- 
ments and University Studies Program requirements Students should 
consult the current Undergraduate Catalog and Department Major Guides 
and also consult with their faculty advisor All students must complete a 
minimum of 120 credit hours to earn a Bachelor of Science degree Specific 
requirements for each major (or option) are as follows 

Apparel Design 

Majors must complete all required TEXT/CNEC courses with a grade of 
C or better 

Semester- 
Credit Hours 

Freshman Year I li 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 3 

TEXT 105 — Introduction to Textiles 3 

MATH 110 or 115 — Introduction to Mathematics I or 

Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 100, 107 or 125 Basic Principles of Speech Com- 
munication, Technical Speech Communica- 
tion or Introduction to Interpersonal Speech 

Communication 3 

Human Ecology Elective (APDS 101 — Fundamentals of 

Design) 3 

TEXT 205 — Textile Materials and Performance 3 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

University Studies Program Requirements _3 _3 

Total 15 15 



Sophomore Year 

CHEM 103 or 1 1 1 — General Chemistry I or Chemistry in 

Modern Life 3-4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and 

Bio-Chemislry or 

Department Requirement* 3-4 

ECON 201 — Principles ol Economics I . 3 

ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 3 

TEXT 221 — Apparel I 3 

TEXT 222 — Apparel II 3 

TEXT 305 — Textile Materials Evaluation and Characten 

zation 3 

Human Ecology Elective (APDS 102 — Design II) 3 

University Studies Program Requirements - 3 3 

Total 15-16 15-16 

Junior Year 

TEXT 347 — History of Costume II 3 

TEXT 355 — Textile Furnishings 3 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization . . , 3 

TEXT 365 — Fashion Merchandising 3 

TEXT 420 — Apparel Design, Draping 3 

Department Requirement* 3 

Human Ecology Elective (ARTT 110) 3 

Electives 6 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing _3 

Total 30 

Senior Year 

TEXT 441 — Clothing and Human Behavior 3 

TEXT 375 — Economics of Textile and Apparel Industries 3 

TEXT 425 — Apparel Design; Advanced Problems , 3 

Department Requirement* 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 

Electives 10 12 

Total 28-30 

*Department Requirement Select from TEXT 345. 363. 365, 388, 470. or 498. 
Textile Marketing/Fashion Merchandising 

Students in the Textile Marketing/Fashion Merchandising program 
must complete the common requirements of the program. In addition, they 
must select either the textile marketing or the fashion merchandising 
option and complete the courses specified for the option selected Textile 
marketing option: CHEM 103, CHEM 104, TEXT 400. TEXT 452 and TEXT 
470 Fashion merchandising option; CHEM 1 03. CHEM 1 04. TEXT 221 . and 
TEXT 365. 

Majors must complete MATH 110 (or MATH 115). ECON 201. ECON 
203, all required TEXT/CNEC courses and the BMGT Support Area courses 
with a grade of C or better 

Semester- 
Credit Hours 
Freshman Year I II 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing, if not exempt . 3 

TEXT 105 — Introduction to Textiles 3 

MATH 110 or 115 — Introduction to Mathematics 1 or 

Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 100, 107 or 125 — Basic Pnnciples of Speech 

Communication Technical Speech Commu- 
nication or Introduction to Interpersonal 

Speech Communication 3 

Human Ecology Elective (APDS 101 Fundamentals of 

Design) 3 

Elective 3 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

University Studies Program Requirements _3 _3 

Total 15 15 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 3 

ECON 201 — Principles of Economics I 3 

ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 3 

TEXT 205 — Textiles Materials and Performance 3 

Human Ecology Elective 3 

TEXT 221 — Apparel I or Elective* (See option selected) 3 

Elective _3 

Total 16 16 

Junior Year 

Electives 6 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization . . 3 

TEXT 355 — Textile Furnishings 3 



122 Transportation, Business, and Public Policy 

TEXT 400 — Research Methods or Department Require- Electlves 

ment* (See option selected) 3 Total 

Human Ecology Elective . , 3 

TEXT 365 — Fashion Merchandising or Department Re- 
quirement* (See option selected) 3 

BMGT Support Area" 3 

TEXT 305 — Textile Materials: Evaluation and Characteri- 
zation 3 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing _3 

Total 30 

Senior Year 

TEXT 441 — Clothing and Human Behavior or CNEC 437 

— Consumer Behavior 3 

TEXT 375 — Economics of the Textile and Apparel In- 
dustries 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 

TEXT 452 — Textile Science Chemical Structure and 

Properties of Fibers or Department Require- 
ment* (See option selected) 3 

BMGT Support Area** 6 

TEXT 470 — Textile and Apparel Marketing or Depart- 
ment Requirement* (See option selected) 3 

Electlves _4 

Total 28 

'Department Requirement Select from ALL CNEC and TEXT courses num- 
bered 300 or above 

•*BMGT Support Area: Select from BMGT 353, 354, 360, 364, 372, 380, 392, 
453, 454, 456 

Textiles 

Majors must complete ALL required TEXT/CNEC courses with a grade 
of C or better 

Semes fer- 

Credit Hours 

Freshman Year I II 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 3 

TEXT 105 — Introduction to Textiles 3 

MATH 1 15 — Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 110, 107, or 125 — Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication, Technical Speech Commu- 
nication or Introduction to Interpersonal 

Speech Communication 3 

Human Ecology Elective 3 

TEXT 205 — Textile Materials and Performance 3 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 1 13 — General Chemistry II 4 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology _3 _ 

Total 16 16 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 6 
TEXT 305 — Textile Materials Evaluation and Characteri- 
zation 3 

CHEM 233, 243, Organic Chemistry I, II 4 4 

MATH 140 — Calculus I . 4 

MATH 141 — Calculus II _ _4 

Total 14 14 

Junior Year 

ECON 201 and 203 — Principles of Economics I and II 6 

PHYS 141 or 121 — Principles of Physics or Fundamen- 
tals of Physics I 4 

PHYS 142 or 122 — Principles of Physics or Fundamen- 
tals of Physics II 4 

TEXT 452 — Textile Science Chemical Structure and 

Properties of Fibers 3 

Human Ecology Elective 6 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

Elective _3 

Total 29 

Senior Year 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing* 3 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization . . 3 

TEXT 454 — Textile Science Finishes or 

TEXT 456 — Textile Science Dyes and Dye Application 3 

TEXT 375 — Economics of the Textile and Apparel In- 
dustries , , , 3 

TEXT 400 — Research Methods 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 



*ENGL 393 preferred 



Consumer Economics 



Majors must complete MATH 1 15, MATH 220, ECON 201, ECON 203, 
ALL required CNEC/TEXT courses and Support Area courses with a grade 
of C or better ECON 305 and ECON 306 MUST be completed with an 
average grade of C. 

Stmester 
Credit Hours 
Freshman Year i li 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 3 

MATH 1 15 — Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 100, 107 or 125 — Basic Pnnciples of Speech 

Communication, Technical Speech Commu- 
nication or Introduction to Interpersonal 

Speech Communication 3 

Human Ecology Elective 3 

CNEC 100 — Introduction to Consumer Economics 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 3 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

Elective _3 

Total 15 15 



Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 
ECON 201 and 203 — Principles of Economics I and II 
MATH 220 or 140 — Elementary Calculus I or Calculus I 
MATH 221 or 141 — Elementary Calculus II or Calculus II 
or 

Elective 

Elective . , 

Human Ecology Elective 



6 

3 

3-4 



3-4 

3 

3 3 

Total 15-16 15-16 

Junior Year 

CNEC 435 — Economics of Consumption 3 

CNEC 310 — Consumer Economics and Public Policy 3 
ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical 

Wnting , , 3 

CNEC 431 — The Consumer and the Law 3 

Support Area Requirement* 3 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 
ECON 305 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and 

Policy 3 

ECON 306 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

Elective _6 

Total 30 

Senior Year 

CNEC 400 — Research Methods 3 

CNEC 437 — Consumer Behavior 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 

CNEC 410 — Consumer Finance 3 

Support Area Requirement* 6 

Electlves 7-9 

Total 28-30 

'Majors must select one of four identified Support Areas These areas are as 
follows Product Information, Marketing Finance or Economics Majors 

should check with the Department to obtain specific course requirements 
for each identified support area 

Course Code Prefix TEXT, CNEC 



Transportation, Business, and 
Public Policy 

For information consult College of Business and Management Entry 

Urban Studies, Institute for 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1113 Lefrak Hall 454 5718 
Director Corey 



Women's Studies Program 123 



Professors: Corey. Levin. Stone" (Government and Politics) 

Associate Professors: Baum. Brower, Christian* (Geography). Howl- 

and. Hula+ 

Assistant Professor: Chang 

Lecturers: Laidlaw (Part-time), Williams 

Affiliate Faculty: Chen. DuPuy. Fogle. Francescato 

■Joint dppoinlmeni with unil indicated 

•tDislinquished Scholar Teacher 

The Urban Studies Major The Institute for Urban Studies offers a program 
of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in urban studies The 
program is designed to encourage students either (1) to direct their learn- 
ing toward planning and management careers in metropolitan-area organi- 
zations, or (2) to study urbanization processes and methods as a means 
toward earning a general education The undergraduate urban studies 
program is built on several introductory and methods courses that examine 
the city in its metropolitan, interregional, national, and international policy 
contexts The problems of planning and management of the metropolis are 
stressed Students are encouraged by the multidisciplinary urban studies 
faculty to take advantage of the rich and extensive cross-departmental 
resources at College Park and are expected to select an urban-related 
specialization from another discipline In addition to coursework in the 
behavioral and social sciences, urban studies students should consider 
appropriate supporting coursework in: Afro-American Studies, Architec- 
ture. Civil Engineenng, Family and Community Development. Geography, 
History, Housing and Design. Recreation, Computer Science, Government 
and Politics. Economics, Business and Management, and other related 
fields Integrative metropolitan problem-solving, planning, and manage- 
ment experiences, such as an internship and a planning workshop, are 
provided Each student, working with an urban studies undergraduate 
advisor, designs a program of study based on interest and future career 
plans Inasmuch as the Institute exists to serve the planning and manage- 
ment personnel and research needs of metropolitan organizations in the 
non-profit, for-profit, and government sectors, career guidance and advice 
on job placement have a high prionty To that end, internships are 
encouraged Students are provided with advice in finding available vacan- 
cies, with resume writing and interview preparation Urban studies majors 
are prepared to enter the professional arena or to continue with advanced 
study 

Each year the Institute sponsors the Lefrak lectures This lecture series 
features highly-reputed scholars and practitioners in urban planning or 
urban policy formulation issues of the information age A feature of the 
series is to expand our understanding of urbanization driven by job crea- 
tion in high-technology manufacturing and higher-level services 

During the 1988-89 academic year the Urban Studies and Planning 
faculty IS revising the curriculum and major requirements Some courses 
may be offered in a manner that reflects the curriculum changes that are 
underway 

Requirements lor Major Including Program Options: The Urban Studies 
major consists of a total of forty-two semester credit hours in which the 
student must earn a C or better in each course. The division of require- 
ments IS as follows: 

Institute for Urban Studies Major Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Required URBS Core Courses, 5 of the following 6 courses 15 

URBS 1(X) — Introduction to Urban Studies (or GEOG 150) 

Behavioral and Social Dimensions of the Urban 
URBS 210 — Community 

Environmental and Technological Dimensions of 
URBS 220 — the Urban Community 
URBS 350 — Quantitative Methods in Urban Studies 

The Development of the American City (or URBS 
URBS 410 — 320, or GEOG 350) 
OR 
URBS 450 — Problems in Urban Law 

Required URBS Advanced Specialization Courses: 6 

City and Regional Economic Development Plan- 

URBS 440 — ning 

Management and Administration of Metropolitan 

URBS 470 — Areas 

Supporting Specialization Courses, 7 courses 21^ 

Total 42 

Students are expected to choose from URBS 438. URBS 460. URBS 
480. URBS 488 (Selected Topics), and additional related upp>er-dlvision 
courses from other departments throughout the campus that contribute to 
their supporting specialization Supporting courses may be selected from 
Geography. Architecture. Family and Community Development. Housing 
and Design, Economics, Sociology, Criminology. Afro-American Studies, or 
other urban-related fields 

The Institute encourages innovative supporting-course designs that are 
tailored individually to the particular needs of the student. These designs 
are developed with an advisor in the Institute for Urban Studies. 



Advising: Prior lo each pre registration and registration, each Urban Stud 
les major is expected to obtain advice from an Institute advisor The Urban 
Studies undergraduate advisor is located in room 1123, Lefrak Hall, the 
advisors telephone is 454 2488 

Internship Opportunities: Given the career focus of the Institute, intern- 
ships are encouraged Although the six credits for the internships do not 
count towards the Urban Studies major requirements, they are counted as 
elective credit However, concurrent registration for URBS 399A is possible 
and the three credits for this independent study may be used towards 
fulfilling the supporting course requirement The course is op)en principally 
to majors: however, at least second-semester sophomore status is 
required The Institute has an extensive list of possible placements contin- 
gent upon the approval of the Internship Coordinator Some of these orga 
nizations have included the City of Rockville, The United Way, Montgomery 
County, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the 
Maryland National Park and Planning Commission, and the Maryland Gen- 
eral Assembly More information and an internship application form may be 
obtained from Mrs Barbara Williams, Intern Coordinator, Room 1117, 
Lefrak Hall, telephone 454-2262 

Honors: For information on the Urban Studies Honors Program, contact 
Professor Hula, 1 127 Lefrak hall, 454-2244 or the Undergraduate Advisor. 
1123 LeFrak Hall. 454-2488 

Course Code Prefix — URBS 



Women's Studies Program (WMST) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1115 Mill Building. 454-3841 

Professor and Director: Beck 
Associate Professor: Moses 
Assistant Professor: King 
Lecturers: Meyer. Pratt, Stark, Zeiger, Zingo 

Affiliate Faculty: Harley (Afro-American Studies): Diner (American Stud- 
ies). Withers (Art): Doherty, Hallett (Classics): Gillespie (Communication 
Arts and Theater): Peterson (Comparative Literature): Leonard (Counsel- 
ing and Personnel Services). Heidelbach (Curriculum and Instruction): 
Beauchamp. Kauffman, Joyce, Smith, Townsend (English), Hage 
(French and Italian), Frederiksen, Oster, Strauch (Germanic and Slavic 
Languages). Conway, McCarnck (Government and Politics): Hollander 
(Health Education). Kerkham (Hebrew and East Asian Languages): Gul- 
lickson (History), Gips (Housing and Design): Grambs, Tyler (Human 
Development), Beasley, Grunig (Journalism): Robertson (Music), Fullin- 
wider (Philosophy and Public Policy). Hult (Physical Education): Hunt. 
Mclntyre. Segal (Sociology) 

The Women's Studies Program: The Women's Studies Program is an 
interdisciplinary academic program designed to examine the historical 
contributions made by women, reexamine and reinterpret existing data 
about women, and introduce students to the methodology of feminist 
scholarship The program offers interdisciplinary core courses on women, 
encourages the offering of courses on women in other disciplines, and 
promotes the discovery of new knowledge about women Women's Stud- 
ies courses challenge students to question traditional knowledge atxiut 
women and men and to examine differences among women Students gain 
an understanding of and respect for differences in human lives as they 
encounter issues of diversity in the classroom — age, ability, class, ethnic- 
ity, race, religion, and sexual preference. 

The Certificate Program. The Women's Studies Certificate Program con- 
sists of an integrated, interdisciplinary curriculum on women that is 
designed to supplement a student's major 

Requirements for the Certificate: The qualify for a Certificate in Women's 
Studies, a student will be required to earn twenty-one (21) credits in 
Women's Studies courses, nine of which must be at the 300 — 400 level 
No more than 3 credit hours of special topics courses may be counted 
toward the Certificate No more than 9 credit hours which are applied 
toward a major may be included in the Certificate Program No more than 9 
credit hours may be taken at institutions other than UMCP Each student 
must obtain a grade of C or better in each course that is to be counted 
toward the Certificate Of the twenty-one credits, courses must be distrib- 
uted as follows 

1 A core of nine (9) credit hours from the following WMST courses 
WMST 200: Introduction to Women's Studies: Women and Society 
(3) or 

WMST 250: Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art, and Cul- 
ture (3): 

WMST 400 Theories of Feminism (3): and WMST 490: Senior Seminar 
Feminist Reconceptualizations (3). 

2 At least one course from three of the four distributive areas listed 
below Two of these courses must be from departments other than 



124 Zoology 



Women s Studies At least one course must be identtfied as adding a 

multi-cultural dimension 

Area I. 

ARTH 489 Feminist Perspectives on Women in Art 

CMLT 498 Feminist Literary Criticism 

CMLT 498 Special Topics in Women in Literature 

ENGL 250 Women in Literature 

ENGL 348 Literary Works by Women 

FREN 478 French Women Wnters in Translation 

GERM 439 Women in German Literature 

JAPN 418 Japanese Women Writers in Translation 

MUSC 448 Women and Music in Cross-Cultural Perspective 

WMST 250 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art. and Culture 

Area II. 

EDCP 498 Issues Related to Counseling Women 

FMCD 430 Gender Role Development in the Family 

HLTH 471 Women's Health 

PSYC 336 Psychology of Women 

SOCY 325 Sex Roles 

SOCY 425 Sex Roles and Social Institutions 

SPCH 324 Communication and Sex Roles 

WMST 200 Introduction to Women's Studies: Women and Society 

Area III. 

AMST 418 Women and Family in Amencan Life 

AASP 428 Black Women in Amenca 

CLAS 309 Women in Ancient Greece and Rome 

CLAS 320 Women in Classical Antiquity 

GERM 281 Women in German Literature and Society 

HIST 210 American Women to 1880 

HIST 211 American Women 1880 to the Present 

HIST 301 Women and Industrial Development 

HIST 309 Proseminar in the History of Women 

HIST 318 Women in the Middle East 

HIST 458 Selected Topics in Women's History 

Hist 618: Readings In the History of Women 

PHED 492: History of the American Sportswoman 

Area IV. 

AASP 428 EEC Laws Implications for Women and Minorities 

AASP 428 Women and Work 

ECON 374 Sex Roles in Economic Life 

GVPT 436 Legal Status of Women 

GVPT 471 Women and Politics 

JOUR 460 Women in the Mass Media 

PHED 451 Sport and the American Woman 

3 The remaining courses may be chosen from any of the four distributive 
areas, or from among any of the WMST courses including WMST 498 
Special Topics in Women's Studies and WMST 499 Independent 
Study The Women's Studies Program also provides students with 
opportunities for co-curricular activities In the past, students have 
supported their coursework with practical experience working with 
legal defense funds, rape crisis centers, battered women's shelters, 
feminist journals, and on Capitol Hill, as well as in the classroom 
applying feminist methodology to teaching strategies 

Admission: Any student in good academic standing at College Park may 
enroll in the Certificate Program by declanng his'her intentions to the 
Women's Studies undergraduate advisor 

Advising: It is suggested that students meet with the advisor in order to 
plan individual programs Advising is available during regular office hours 
both with appointments and on a walk-in basis The advisor is located in 
1117 Mill Building 

Students may also earn an undergraduate major in Women's Studies by 
designing a major in consultation with the Assistant Dean for Undergradu- 
ate Studies and a member of the Women's Studies faculty 

Course Code Prefix WMST 



ZOOLOGY (ZOOL) 

College of Life Sciences 

Undergraduate Office 2227 Zoology-Psychology Building. 454-5131 

Professor and Chair: Popper 

Professors: Allan, Carter Porges, Chen Clark Gill, Highton, Levitanf, 

Pierce 

Associate Professors: Mes. Barnetl, Bonar, Borgia, Colombmi, 

Goode. Higgins Imberski. Inouye. Linder. Reaka. Small 

Assistant Professors: Chao, OIek, Payne, Shapiro, Wilkinson 



Instructors: Kent, Piper, Spalding 

Adjunct Professors: Kleiman, Manning, Morton, O'Brien Potter Smitti- 

Gill 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Kelly, Piatt, Wemmer 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Braun 

fDistinguished Scholar Teacher 

The Zoology Program is designed to give each student an appreciation 
of the diversity of programs studied by zoologists, an opportunity to 
explore more specialized biological subject areas, and an appreciation of 
the nature of observation and experimentation appropriate to investiga 
tions within these fields 

Major Requirements. The required Zoology core courses are listed tjelow 
All majors are required to complete the College of Life Sciences core 
curriculum (see College of Life Sciences entry in Chapter 7 of this catalog) 
which includes BIOL f05 and 106 In addition, students must also complete 
a minimum of 24 credit hours of Zoology including 

ZOOL 213 — Genetics (4). prerequisite one semester of organic ctiem- 

istry AND either. 
ZOOL 210 — -Animal Diversity (4) 

OR 
ZOOL 21 1 — -Cell Biology & Physiology (4). prerequisite one semester 

of general chemistry (CHEM 103) 

AND 
Fourteen hours of junior-senior level Zoology courses, including two 
courses with laboratory, 

AND one of the following 
BIOM 301 or 401 , BCHM 461 , MATH 240 or 400 PSYC 200, STAT 250 or 
400 or 464 

ZOOL 181. 201. 202. 301. 328Z. 330, 346, 361 and 381 do not satisfy 
major requirements ZOOL 308H, 309H, 318H and up to three credits of 
319, Special Problems in Zoology, may be used to fulfill six of the 
required 14 hours at the junior-senior level but not the laboratory 
requirements MICR 453 is accepted as a lat>oratory course towards tf>e 
major College credit for research experience obtained oft campus may 
be earned under ZOOL 328Z, but cannot t>e used to fulfill major 
requirements 

All majors must have a grade of C ' or better in BIOL 105, 106 and all 
Zoology courses and an average grade of C in the other College of Life 
Sciences core curriculum courses 

Students may specialize by registering for those courses particularly 
appropriate to their academic objectives Areas of specialization include 
molecular and cellular biology physiology and neurobiology, ecology. 
evolution and behavior marine science and genetics The Zoology major 
IS suitable for students seeking preparation for post-graduate work in 
medicine, dentistry and graduate programs in the biological sciences and 
for employment in science related fields 

Advising. Advising for zoology majors is mandatory Appointments can be 
scheduled through the Undergraduate Office (454-5131) 

Honors. The Department of Zoology Honor s Program, directed by Dr 
Herbert Levitan. offers highly motivated and academically qualified stu- 
dents the opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor on an original 
research project Information on this program and additional information on 
the Zoology program may be obtained from the Undergraduate Office 
(ZOP 2227). 454-5131 

Student Organization. Zoology Undergraduate Student Committee 
(ZUSC) promotes interactions with the faculty, provides information alxxjt 
departmental services, opportunities and events and sponsors a variety of 
educational and social activities Interested students may contact ZUSC 
by stopping by the ZUSC office (ZOP 2230) or by calling 454-5131 

Course Code Prefix — ZOOL 



Undergraduate Studies 



General Honors Program 



Room 0110 Hornbake Library 454-2532 2533 
Director: (Open) 

Honors programs on campus are currently under review Changes may 
be forthcoming Students are encouraged to call the General Honors Pro- 
gram Office at 454-2532 for the latest information 

The General Honors Program is designed to allow energetic, academi- 
cally talented students to pursue their general education at a ctialler>ging. 
stimulating level Students can engage with others of similar ability and 
varied interests in a program whose emphasis is on interdiscipdnary and 
educationally broadening activity 

Students may apply for admission as freshmen High scfKXJ) students 
ordinarily apply at the same time they apply for admission to the university. 



Pre-Professional Programs 125 



although a separate application form is required for General Honors 
Undergraduates already on campus majoring in any department or col 
lege, and transfer students with distinguished records from other institu- 
tions (especially if they come from other honors programs) are also 
encouraged to apply Selection is made on the basis o( academic records, 
recommendations, standardized test scores, personal achievement, and 
other evidences of motivation and ability 

f^embers of the program may enroll in a variety of kinds of courses, 
including special introductory colloquia. special honors sections of basics 
courses in many departments, upper level interdisciplinary general Honors 
seminars, independent study, and field experience Honors students take 
honors courses instead of, not in addition to. their other course work 
Honors Learning Communities allow students to integrate the content of a 
number of departmental courses around an important theme Successful 
General Honors students graduate with a citation in General Honors which 
is recorded on their transcripts and diplomas 

There is an extensive extracurncular program of activities, and student 
participation in decisionmaking and administration is an important aspect 
of the program The General Honors Program is a member of the National 
Collegiate Honors Council, the Northeast Region of the National collegiate 
Honors Council, and the fi^aryland Collegiate Honors Council Students 
and faculty participate regularly in the activities of these organizations The 
program participates in a program of student exchanges with honors pro- 
grams in other institutions 

For application forms and information about the General Honors Pro- 
gram, write to Director, General Honors Program. University of Maryland. 
College Park, MD 20742, or phone (301) 454-2532 

Individual Studies Program (IVSP) 

1115 Hornbake Librarv, 454-2530 

Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies: Mohrman 

The Individual Studies Program provides an opportunity for students to 
create and complete individualized majors To liie accepted into the pro- 
gram, a student must 

1) have a clearly-defined academic goal which cannot reasonably be 
satisfied in an existing curriculum at College Park, and 

2) be able to design, with faculty assistance, a sequence of courses and 
other learning experiences which is judged to have adequate sub- 
stance for the awarding of a degrees in the special field of study 

fvlost IVSP majors are either a form of "area study" utilizing offerings 
from many departments or a clear combination of two disciplines Ivlany 
include internships or independent study projects in the program All work 
IS done under the supervision of a faculty advisor 

Applicants are required to wnte a detailed prospectus outlining their 
proposed program of study They must meet the General University 
Requirements or University Studies Requirements according to year of 
entry The process of applying often involves considerable consultation 
and several drafts of a prospectus, so it should be begun as early as 
possible Students may be admitted to the Individuals Studies Program 
after completion of 30 college credits and must be officially approved by 
the Individual Studies Faculty Review Committee prior to the final 30 Indi- 
vidual Studies programs approved before they can declare Individual Stud- 
ies as a major 

Individual Studies provides three courses specifically for its majors 
IVSP 319. a one-credit course graded Satisfactory/Fail, is a program report 
which each IVSP student must complete each semester IVSP 318 is an 
indepiendent study course which students can use for a variety of out-of- 
class internship and research opportunities A vanable-credit course, it 
may be taken for one to fifteen credits per semester IVSP 320, the Bache- 
lor's Report. IS required for all students who complete more than 40% of 
their coursework through independent study, but many IVSP student enjoy 
the opportunity to complete a major work of synthesis that is evaluated by 
three faculty members 

More information on requirements and procedures is available from the 
Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies, 1 1 15 Hornbake Library. 454- 
2530 After reading that material, arrange a meeting with the Assistant 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies to discuss ideas informally and to plan the 
next steps 



Pre-Professional Programs 

Health Professions Advising Office 
3103 Turner BIdg., 454-2540 

Pre-professional programs are designed to provide the necessary aca- 
demic foundation required for entrance into professional schools Some 
require two or three years of pre-professional study before admission to 
professional school Others normally require completion of a bachelor s 
degree Five programs, for which completion of a bachelors degree is NOT 
a normal prerequisite, may be declared as the official undergraduate aca 
demic major pre-dental hygiene, pre-medical technology, pre-nursing, 
pre-pharmacy, and pre-physical therapy 



In contrast, seven programs lor which a bachelor s degree IS a normal 
prerequisite, are advisory ONLY and these cannot be declared as the 
official undergraduate academic major These include pre-dentistry. pre- 
law, pre-medicine pre optometry, pre-osteopathy. pre-podiatry and pre- 
veterinary medicine Students interested in such programs may choose 
from a wide variety ol academic majors across campus The preprofes- 
sional advisor can provide guidance concerning the choice of major 

Successful completion of a pre professional program at College Park 
does not guarantee admission to any professional school Each profes- 
sional school has its own admissions requirements and cnteria, which may 
include grade point average in undergraduate courses, scores in aptitude 
tests (Medical College Admission Test, Law School Admission Test, Dental 
Aptitude Test. Allied Health Professions Admission Test, etc ) a personal 
interview, faculty recommendations, and an evaluation from the pre-profes- 
sional advisor For admissions requirements, the student is urged to study 
the catalog of each professional school 

Although completion of the bachelors degree is a normal prerequisite 
for admission for dental, law, and medical schools, three professional 
school of the University of Maryland at Baltimore — Dentistry, Law and 
Medicine — have arrangements whereby a student who meets certain strin- 
gent requirements may be accepted for professional school after three 
years of undergraduate study (90 credit hours) After the successful com- 
pletion of the first year in professional school at Baltimore, the student may 
apply for the bachelor's degree to be awarded by College Park 

Because of the competitive nature of professional school admissions, 
pre-professional students should consider applying to more than one 
school and should also give some thought to alternative careers The 
degree to which this is necessary varies with the program in which one is 
enrolled It is helpful to discuss this with the pre-professional advisor 

The Health Professions Advising Office offers advising and information 
on health professions Reading material on health careers, options, and 
alternatives as well as catalogs from many professional schools across the 
country are available The reading room is open to anyone seeking informa- 
tion about health careers 



Pre-Dental Hygiene 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance 
into the UMAB Dental Hygiene Program but also for entrance into dental 
hygiene programs at other colleges and universities To do this efficiently, 
students should obtain program information when first entering college so 
that requirements can be taken in normal sequence Information for the 
University of Maryland Dental Hygiene Program is available at the Health 
Professions Advising Office, Room 3103, Turner Building 

The Dental School of the University of Maryland, located in Baltimore 
(UMAB). offers a baccalaureate degree program in dental hygiene, as well 
as a post-certificate program for registered dental hygienists who have 
completed a two-year accredited dental hygiene program and are inter- 
ested in completing the requirements for a baccalaureate degree. Com- 
pletion of a two-year pre-professional curnculum at any University of Mary- 
land campus except UMAB or at another accredited institution is required 
for eligibility to apply for admission as a junior in the Dental School at 
UMAB 

For registered dental hygienists. completion of a two-year accredited 
dental hygiene program, completion of all required preprofessional 
courses, and a minimum of one year of clinical expenence as a dental 
hygienist are required for eligibility to apply for admission to the Dental 
School at UMAB 

The following courses are required for admission to the UMAB Dental 
Hygiene Program; 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Freshman Year 

ENGL 101 Introduction to Writing 3 

BIOL 105: Pnnciple of Biology I 4 

CHEM 103: General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 104 Fundamental of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOCY 100 or SOCY 105 Introduction to Sociology or 
Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems 3 

MATH 110 or 115: Elementary Mathematical Models or 

Precalculus 3 

Humanities 3 

Elective 3 

Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201 and 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology I, II . . 4. 4 

MICB 200: General Microbiology 4 

NUTR 200 Nutrition for Health Service 3 

ENGL 291 (or 391 for juniors) 3 

Social Sciences 6 

SPCH 100 or 107: Basic Pnnciples of Speech Communi- 
cation or Technical Speech Communication 3 
STATE 100 Elementary Statistics & Probability 3 



126 Pre-Professional Programs 



Application and Admission 

High school students who wish to enroll in the predenlal hygiene currlcu 
lum at College Park should request applications directly from the Admis- 
sions Office, The University of Maryland, College Park. IvID 20742 II is 
recommended thai those preparing for a baccalaureate degree program in 
dental hygiene pursue an academic program in high school which includes 
biology, chemistry, math, and physics 

Pre-dental hygiene students should begin the application process for 
professional school in (all of Ihe sophomore year UMAB applications and 
instructions are available in the Health Professions Advising Office Enroll- 
ment as a predenlal hygiene student or as a registered denial hygienist at 
any institution does not guarantee admission to Ihe Dental Hygiene Pro- 
gram on the Baltimore City Campus (UMAB) 

Further Information. At College Park contact Ihe Dental Hygiene Advi- 
sor, Room 3103. Turner Building The University of Maryland. College Park, 
MA 20742 Telephone: (301) 454-2540, In Baltimore contact the Dental 
Hygiene Department, The University of Maryland at Baltimore, 666 W 
Baltimore Street, Baltimore. MD 21201. Telephone. (301) 328-7773 



Pre-Dentistry 

Advisor: Love 

The preprofessional program for pre-dental students is a program of 
advising for students prepanng to apply to dental school The advice is 
based on requirements and recommendations of Amencan dental schools 
and the requirements for a baccalaureate degree at College Par 

The recommendations made during advising are meant to prepare the 
student to take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) in the spring of the junior 
year. Application to dental school is made during the summer-fall of the 
senior year In addition to faculty letters of recommendation, most admis- 
sions committees request or require an evaluation from the student's pre- 
dental advisor It is important, therefore, for the student to contact the pre- 
dental advisor early in the academic career and to become familiar with the 
proper procedures necessary in the evaluation and application process. 

For more information on the pre-dental advising program, contact the 
Pre-dental Advisor. Room 3103, Turner Building, University of Maryland. 
College Park. MD 20742 Telephone; (301) 454-2540 

There are two ways to prepare for admission to dental school: a four- 
year program is preferable, but a three-year program is possible 

Four-Year Baccalaureate Program. Most pre-dental students at College 
Park complete a four-year undergraduate degree prior to entrance into 
dental school Students are encouraged to pursue a diversified curriculum, 
balancing humanities courses with science and mathematics courses 
Since there is no required, fixed "pre-dent" curriculum, the pre-dental 
student may choose an academic major from the variety of approved 
campus programs in the arts, humanities, behavioral and social sciences, 
mathematics, or physical and life sciences No specific major is required, 
favored, or preferred by dental school admissions committees 

The four-year student will plan an undergraduate experience which 
includes courses to satisfy major and supporting area requirements. Uni- 
versity Studies Program requirements, and the dental school admission 
requirements The student s academic advisor will advise about the first 
two topics, while the Pre-dental Advisor will advise about dental school 
admission requirements. 

Although specific admission requirements vary somewhat from dental 
school to dental school, the undergraduate courses which constitute the 
basic admission requirements and which prepare the student for the DAT 
are the following 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
ENGL 101.391 English Composition 3.3 

CHEM 103.113: General Chemistry I, II 4. 4 

CHEM 233. 243 Organic Chemistry I II 4. 4 

PHYS 121. 122 or PHYS 141. 142 Physics 4.4 

MATH 220. 221 or MATH 140. 141 Calculus 3. 3 or 4. 4 

Biology, minimum"(Recommended courses include MICB 
200. MICB 380. ZOOL 211. ZOOL 213 or 
ZOOL 422) 8 

•Although calculus is not an entrance requirement of many dental schools and is 
not included in the DAT. one year of calculus is strongly recommended lor Ihe 
preprofessional student 

Although the minimum biology requirement is eight credits, the successlul 
applicant will have more, including advanced training in biological sciences at 
Ihe 300 to 400 level BOTl^ 100, BIOL 101 and 124, and MICB 100 should not be 
taken to meet this requirement 

Three Year Arts-Dentistry Degree Program. Students whose performance 
during the first two years is exceptional may apply to the University of 
Maryland School of Dentistry at the beginning of their third year, for entry 
after three years of college work By Ihe end of the third year the student 
must have earned 90 academic credits, exclusive of physical education, 
the last 30 of which must have t)een earned at the University of Maryland at 
College Park Within the 90 credits Ihe student must have completed all 
the requirements listed below 



Semester- 
Credit Hours 

A University Studies Program Requirements 30 

B Chemistry (inorganic and organic) 16 

CHEM 103, 113. 233. 243, or CHEM 105, 115. 235. 245 
C Biological Sciences 19-20 

ZOOL 210— Animal Diversity 

ZOOL 21 1— Cell Biology and Physiology 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 

Either ZOOL 213 or MICB 380 

One of the following 

ZOOL 411— Cell Biology 

ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology 

ZOOL 430— Vertebrate Embryology 

ZOOL 495 — Mammalian Histology 

MICB 360— Medical Virology 

MICB 440— Pathogenic Microbiology 

MICB 450 — Immunology 
D Mathematics 68 

MATH 220. 221. or MATH 140, 141 
E Physics 121, 221. or 141. 142 
F Additional upper level courses from any one of Ihe following 

combinations 7-10 

1 Zoology— seven hours on Ihe 3(X)-400 level including one labora- 
tory course 

2. Microbiology — seven hours on the 300-400 level including one lab- 
oratory course 

3. CHEM 321 — Quantitative Analysis plus any three credit course as 
the 300-400 level in the physical or biological sciences which is 
approved by the Pre-Dental Advisor 

4 BCHM 461, 462, 463, and 464 

5 Nine hours on the 300-400 level in any one department of tf>e 
College of Arts and Humanities or the College of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences 

G Electives as needed to total at least 90 credits 0-4 

Total 90-92 

Incoming freshmen interested in this three year program are strongly 
urged to consult Ihe pre-dental advisor before registration for the first 
semester at College Park 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Dentistry program, may 
received the B S degree (Arts-Dentistry) after satisfactory completion of 
the first year at the University of Maryland Dental School on recomnf>enda- 
tion by the dean of the dental school and approval by the College Park 
Campus, the degree to be awarded in August following the first year of 
dental school The courses of the first year of dental school constitute the 
major, the College Park courses listing atxive constitute the supporting 
area 

Participation in the three year program in no way guarantees admis- 
sion the University of Maryland Dental School, three year students 
compete with the four year students for admission. 

Pre-Law 

117 Hornbake Library. 454-2733 

Advisor: Buhlig 

Although some law schools will consider only applicants with a B A or 
B S degree, others will accept applicants who have successfully com- 
pleted a three-year program of academic work Most law schools do rwl 
prescribe specific courses which a student must present for admission, 
but do require that the student follow one of the standard programs offered 
by the undergraduate college Many law schools require that the applicant 
take the Law School Admission Test, preferably in July or October of the 
academic year preceding entry into professional school 

Four-Year Program. The student who plans to complete Ihe requirements 
for the B A or B S degree before entering law school should select a major 
field of concentration Most law schools do not prescnbe specific majors or 
courses which must be presented for admission, but do require that one of 
Ihe standard programs offered by the undergraduate college be followed 
A students cnoices can be guided by the need to develop some of the 
essential skills needed for Ihe law prolession. namely, clear and imagina- 
tive thinking, accurate and perceptive reading, and literate expression 

Three- Year Arts-Law Program. Although some law schools will consider 
only applicants with a B A or B S degree, others will accept applicants 
who have successfully completed a three year program of academic work 
Students planning to enter law school at the end of the third year sfKXjkl 
complete the University Studies Program Requirements By the end of Ihe 
junior year, the student will complete the requirements for a minor (eigh 
teen semester hours in one department, six hours tieing at Ihe 300-400 
level) The program during Ihe first three years should include all of the 
basic courses required for a degree (including the eighteen hour mirxx 
course program) and all University requirements The academic courses 
must total ninety fiours. and must be passed with a minimum average of 



Pre-Professional Programs 127 

The pre-professional program for pre medical students is a program of 
advising for students preparing to apply to medical school The advice is 
based on requirements and recommendations of American medical 
schools and the requirements for a baccalaureate degree at College Park 
The premedical advisor in the Health Professions Advising Oflice is pre- 
pared to assist students in setting career objectives, selecting undergrad- 
uate coursework to meet the admissions criteria of the professional 
schools, and in all phases of the application process itself 

The recommendations made during advising are meant to prepare the 
student to take the Ivledical College Admission Test (fv^CAT) in the spring of 
the junior year Application to medical school is made during the summer- 
fall of the senior year Medical admissions committees generally request or 
require an evaluation from the student s pre-medical advisor It is impor- 
tant, therefore, for the student to contact the premedical advisor early In 
the academic career and to become familiar with the proper procedures 
necessary in the evaluation and application process 

For more information on the pre medical advising program, contact the 
Premedical Advisor, Room 3103, Turner Laboratory, The University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 Telephone (301) 454-2540 

There are tvi/o ways to prepare for admission to medical school: a four- 
year program is preferable, but a three-year program is possible 

Four- Year Baccalaureate Program. Most premedical students at College 
Park complete a four-year undergraduate degree prior to entrance into 
medical school Students are encouraged to pursue a diversified curricu- 
lum, balancing humanities courses with science and mathematics courses. 
Since there is no required, fixed "pre-med" curriculum, the premedical 
student may choose an academic major from the variety of approved 
campus programs in the arts, humanities behavioral and social sciences, 
mathematics, or physical and life sciences No specific major is required, 
favored, or preferred by medical school admissions committees 

The four-year student will plan an undergraduate experience which 
includes courses to satisfy major and supporting area requirements. Uni- 
versity Studies Program requirements, and the medical school admission 
requirements The student's academic advisor will advise about the first 
two topics, while the pre-medical advisor will advise about medical school 
admission requirements 

Although specific admission requirements vary somewhat from medi- 
cal school to medical school, the undergraduate courses which constitute 
the basic admission requirements and which prepare the student for the 
MCAT are the following: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

ENGL 101. 391 —English Composition 3.3 

CHEM 103. 1 13— General Chemistry I. II 4. 4 

CHEM 233, 243— Organic Chemistry I. II 4, 4 

PHYS 121, 122. or PHYS 141. 142— Physics 4, 4 

MATH 220. 221. or MATH 140, 141— Calculus* 3, 3 or 4, 4 

Biology, minimum" (Recommended courses include MICB 200, 

Mice 380, ZOOL 211, ZOOL 213 or ZOOL 422) 8 

" Although calculus is not an entrance requirement of many medical schools 
and IS not included in the MCAT, one year of calculus is strongly recommended 
for the pre-professional student 

*' Although the minimum biology requirement is eight credits, the successful 
applicant will have more, including advanced training in biological sciences at 
the 300-400 level BOTN 100. BIOL 101 and 124, and MICB 100 should be taken 
to meet this requirement 

Three-Year Arts-Medicine Degree Program. Students whose performance 
during the first two years is exceptional may apply to the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine at the beginning of their third year, for entry 
after three years of college work. By the end of the third year the student 
must have earned 90 academic credits, exclusive of physical education, 
the last 30 of which must have been earned at the University of Maryland 
College Park. 

Within the 90 credits the student must have completed all the require- 
ments listed below 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

A University Studies Program Requirements 30 

B Chemistry (inorganic and organic) 16 

CHEM 103, 113, 233, 243or 

CHEM 105, 115, 235, 245 
C Biological Sciences 19-20 

ZOOL 210— Animal Diversity 

ZOOL 211— Cell Biology and Physiology 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 

Either ZOOL 213 or MICB 380 

One of the following 

ZOOL 411— Cell Biology 

ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology 

ZOOL 430— Vertebrate Embryology 

ZOOL 495— Mammalian Histology 

MICB 360— Medical Virology 

MICB 440 — Pathogenic Microbiology 



2 To be acceptable to law schools, however, students in virtually all 
cases must have a considerably higher average 

Students with exceptional records who are accepted to the School of 
Law of the University of Maryland under the arts-law program may receive 
a B A degree (arts-law) after satisfactory completion of the first year of law 
school, upon recommendation by the dean of the University of Maryland 
Law School and approval by College Park The degree is awarded in 
August following the first year of law school (or after thirty credit hours are 
completed) 

For additional information, contact the Prelaw Advisor, Room 1117, 
Hornbake Library Telephone (301) 454-2733 

Pre-Medical Technology 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance 
into the UMAB Medical Technology Program but also for entrance Into 
medical technology programs at other colleges and universities To do this 
efficiently, students should obtain program information when first entenng 
college so that requirements can be taken in normal sequence Information 
for the University of Maryland Medical Technology Program is available at 
the Health Professions Advising Office, Room 3103, Turner Laboratory 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology is offered through 
the Medical Technology Program of the University of Maryland Medical 
School, located in Baltimore (UMAB) The first two years, consisting of pre- 
professional studies, may be completed at any University of Maryland 
institution, except UMAB, or at any regionally accredited university or 
college 

The medical technologist plays a major role In the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of disease by applying scientific knowledge and skill to the supervi- 
sion and accurate performance of complex laboratory and therapeutic 
procedures Career opportunities exist for the medical technologist in hos- 
pitals, private clinics, pharmaceutical research, government, academics, 
and sales The professional curriculum at UMAB includes courses in hema- 
tology, clinical chemistry, microbiology, immunology, immunohematology, 
microscopy, anatomy and physiology, and management The curriculum at 
UMAB IS designed to train students in the complex technical skills essen- 
tial for the modern medical technologist, as well as to challenge students to 
understand the more complex principles underlying their technology It is 
essential that students develop skills in the area of oral and written commu- 
nication and the critical assessment of information 

Application and Admission. Higti school students who wish to enroll in 
the pre-medical technology curriculum at College Park must meet admis- 
sion requirements of that institution While in high school students are 
encouraged to enroll in a college preparatory curriculum emphasizing biol- 
ogy, chemistry, and college preparatory mathematics 

Pre-medical technology students should begin the application pro- 
cess for professional school in fall of the sophomore year IJMAB applica- 
tions and instructions are available in the Health Professions Advising 
Office Enrollment as a pre-medical technology student at any campus 
does not guarantee admission to the Medical Technology Program at 
Baltimore City (UMAB). 

The following courses are required for admission to the UMAB Medical 
Technology Program 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Chemistry 103. 113: Gen Chem I. II 4, 4 

Chemistry 233. 243 Organic Chem I, II 4,4 

Biology 105: Prin of Biology I 4 

Microbiology 200 Gen Microbiology 4 

Mathematics 110, 111 or above 3, 3 

English 101. Intro to Writing and Literature 3. 3 

Speech 107 Tech Speech Communication or 100 3 

Humanities (History, literature, philosophy, appreciation of Art. 

Music, Drama, Dance) 3 

Behavioral and Social Sciences (Anthropology, Economics, Gov- 
ernment & Politics, Geography, Psychology, Soci- 
ology) 6 

Electives * _12 

Total Semester Hours 60 

• Recommended electives include statistics, computer science, and 
biochemistry 

Further Information. At College Park, contact the Medical Technology 
Advisor. The University of Maryland. Room 3103, Turner Laboratory, Col- 
lege Park. MD 20742 Telephone (301)454-2540 In Baltimore, contact the 
Medical Technology Program. The University of Maryland, Allied Health 
Professions Building. 32 S Greene Street. Baltimore. Maryland 21201 
Telephone (301) 328-7664. 

Pre-Medicine 

Advisor: Love 



128 Pre-Professional Programs 



MICB 450— Immunology 
D Mathematics 6-8 

MATH 220, 221 or MATH 140, 141 

E Physics 121. 122, or 141, 142 8 

F Additional upper-level courses from any one of the following 

combinations 7-10 

1 Zoology— seven hours on the 300-400 level, including 
one 

laboratory course 

2 Microbiology — seven hours on the 300-400 level, in- 
cluding one 

laboratory course 

3 CHEM 321— Quantitative Analysis, plus any three-credit 
course 

at the 300-400 level in the physical or biological 
sciences which is approved by the Pre-medical 
Advisor 

4 BCHM 461, 462, 463, and 464 

5 Nine hours on the 300-400 level in any one department 
of the 

College of Arts and Humanities or the College of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences 
G Electives as needed to total at least ninety credits . 0-4 

Total 90-92 

Incoming freshmen interested in this three-year program are strongly 
urged to consult the Pre-medical Advisor before registration for the first 
semester at College Park 

Students accepted in the combined arts-medicine program may 
receive the B S degree (arts-medicine) after satisfactory completion of the 
first year at the University of Maryland Medical School upon recommenda- 
tion by the dean of the School of Medicine and approval by College Park, 
the degree to be awarded in August following the first year of medical 
school The courses of the first year of medical school constitute the ma|or, 
the College Park courses listed above constitute the supporting area 

Participation in ttie three-year program in no way guarantees 
admission to The University of Maryland School of Medicine. Three- 
year students compete with the four-year students for admission. 

Pre-Nursing 

Advisor Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance 
into the University of Maryland nursing program but also for entrance into 
nursing programs at other colleges and universities To do this efficiently, 
students should obtain program information when first entenng college so 
that requirements can be taken in normal sequence Information for The 
University of Maryland School of Nursing is available at the Health Profes- 
sions Advising Office, Room 3103, Turner Laboratory 

The School of Nursing, located in Baltimore (UMAB), offers a four-year 
program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in nursing The first two 
years of pre-professional courses may be taken at any University of Mary- 
land institution except UMAB, or any other accredited college or university, 
while the final two years of upper level work are offered only at the School 
of Nursing 

In addition to the aforementioned generic program, an "RN to BSN" 
program is offered for registered nurses wishing to earn a BSN There are 
several options for completing pre-professional requirements for this pro- 
gram Interested nurses should contact the "RN to BSN" advisor listed 
below 

Application and Admission. High school students who wish to enroll in the 
pre-nursing curriculum at College Park must meet admission requirements 
of that institution While in high school students should enroll in a college 
preparatory curriculum including biology, chemistry, and three units of 
college preparatory mathematics 

Pre-nursing students should begin the application process for profes- 
sional school in the fall of the sophomore year UMAB applications and 
instructions are available in the Health Professions Advising Office Enroll- 
ment as a pre-nursing student at any campus does not guarantee 
admission to the nursing program at UMAB or UMBC. 

The following courses are required for admission to the University of 
Maryland School of Nursing In addition, there is an optional 1 -credit intern- 
ship available 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Chemistry 103, 104 General Chemistry I, Fundamentals of 

Organic and Biochemistry 4, 4 

English 101 lntr(K)uction to Writing 3 

(and 291 or 391) Intermediate Writing or Advanced Composition 3, 3 
Biology 105 4 
MATH 1 10 Elementary Mathematical Models or higher 3 
Humanities (literature, history, philosophy, math, fine arts, lan- 
guage, speech)* 9 

Psychology 1(X) Introduction to Psychology 3 



Sociology 100 Introduction to Sociology or 105 Introduction to 

Contemporary Social Problems 3 

EDHD 320 Human Development Through The Lifespan 3 
Other social sciences (sociology, psychology, anthropology, 

government & politics, economics, geograpny) 3 

Zoology 201. 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology I. II 4 4 

Microbiology 200 General Microbiology 4 

Nutrition 200 Nutrition for Health Services 3 

Elective 2-3 

59-60 

■ Courses must include at least one course which is not mathematics or 
.English 

Further Infomiation. At College Park contact the Nursing Advisor. Room 
3103. Turner Laboratory. College Park. MD 20742 Telephone (301) 
454-2540 In Baltimore contact the Director for Admissions. The University 
of Maryland, School of Nursing, 655 W Lombard Street, Baltimore, Mary 
land 21201 Telephone (301) 328-6282 "RN to BSN" advisor UMBC, 5401 
Wilkens Ave , Catonsville. MD 21228 (301) 455-3450 

Pre-Optometry 

Advisor: Love 

Requirements for admission to schools and colleges of optometry vary 
somewhat, and the pre-optometry student should consult the catalogs of 
the optometry schools and colleges for specific admission requirements A 
minimum of two years of pre-optometry studies is required for admission to 
all accredited schools, and about half of the schools require a minimum of 
three years At present, more than two-thirds of successful applicants f)old 
a bachelor's or higher degree Students who contemplate admission to 
optometry schools may major in any program that the University offers, but 
would be well-advised to write to ttie optometry schools of their choice for 
specific course requirements for admission In general, pre-optometry stu- 
dents should follow a four-year baccalaureate program which includes the 
following: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Biology and Microbiology and Zoology 4-12 

Inorganic Chemistry 8 

Organic Chemistry 4-8 

Physics 8 

Math through differential calculus 6 

English 6 

Psychology 3-6 

Statistics 3 

Social Sciences 6 

The State of Maryland participates in interstate contracts with five 
schools and colleges of optometry, located in Alabama, Illinois. Penn- 
sylvania. Tennessee, and Texas The contracts ensure available places in 
entering classes and provide for partial tuition remission for qualified appli- 
cants who are residents of Maryland 

For additional information on pre-optometry studies, contact Ifie Pre- 
medical Advisor. Room 3103, Turner Laboratory, The University of Mary- 
land, College Park, MD 20742 Telephone (301) 454-2540 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine 

Advisor: Love 

The pre-professional requirements for osteopathic medical school are 
essentially identical to those for allopathic medical school and the student 
IS referred to the pre-medicine discussion above 

The State of Maryland participates in an interstate contract with tf>e 
West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine This contract will ensure 
available places m entering classes, and will provide for partial tuition 
remission, for qualified applicants who are residents of Maryland 

For additional information on pre-osteopathy studies, contact tfie Pre 
medical Advisor. Room 3103. Turner Latxjratory. The University of Mary 
land. College Park. MD 20742 Telephone (301) 454-2540 

Pre-Pharmacy 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance 
into the UMAB School of Pharmacy but also for entrance into pharmacy 
programs at other colleges and universities To do this efficiently students 
should obtain program information when first entenng college so ftial 
requirements can be taken in normal sequence Information for tfie Univer 
sity of Maryland School of Pharmacy is availat>le at tfie Health ProtessKDns 
Advising Office, Room 3103. Turner Latxxatory Also at this locatwo stu- 
dents may read about other sctK)ols of pharmacy 



Pre-Professional Programs 129 



The School of Pharmacy, which is located in Baltimore (UMAB), otters 
both a 3 year professional program leading to a Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy and a 4-year program leading to a Doctor of Pharmacy degree 
Both programs are the same until the third year, when some students are 
accepted into the Doctor of Pharmacy program Preprofessional studies 
may be completed at any University of Maryland institution except UMAB 
or at another accredited institution The linal three or four years of profes- 
sional study must be completed in the School of Pharmacy at UMAB 

The purposes of the School of Pharmacy are to train students for the 
efficient, ethical practice of all branches of pharmacy: to instruct students 
in general scientific and cultural subjects so they can read critically, 
express themselves clearly and think logically as members of a profession 
and citizens of a democracy, and to guide students into productive schol 
arship and research for the increase of knowledge and techniques in the 
healing arts of pharmacy 

Application and Admission. Applicants for pre-pharmacy at College Park 
must meet all admission requirements of that Institution While in high 
school students are encouraged to enroll in a college preparatory curricu- 
lum emphasizing biology, chemistry, and college preparatory 
mathematics 

Pre-pharmacy students should begin the application process for pro- 
fessional school in fall of the sophomore year UMAB applications and 
instructions are available in the Health Professions Advising Office Appli- 
cations for other programs must be obtained individually from the respec- 
tive colleges 

Enroiiment as a pre-pharmacy student at any campus does not 
guarantee admission to the School of Pharmacy on the Baltimore City 
Campus (UMAB). Students who are uncertain about their chances of 
admission to professional school are encouraged to consult the 
advisor 

The following courses are required for admission to the UMAB School of 
Pharmacy 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CHEM 103, 1 13— General Chemistry I, II 4,4 

CHEM 233, 243— Organic Chemistry I, II 4, 4 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I 3 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I 4 

PHYS 121 , 122— Fundamentals of Physics I, II 4, 4 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Wnting 3 

Other English 3 

Humanities (English, Journalism, Fine Arts, Classics, Modern 

Language, Philosophy, or Speech) 6 

Social science (Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, 
Government and Politics, Psychology, or Sociolo- 
gy) 6 

Additional humanities or social science 6 

Electives 5-6 

60-61 

Further Information. At College Park contact the Pharmacy Advisor, The 
University of Maryland, Room 3103, Turner Laboratory, College Park, MD 
20742 Telephone (301 ) 454-2540 In Baltimore, contact Admissions Com- 
mittee Chairman, The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 North 
Pine Street, Baltimore. Maryland 21201. Telephone (301) 328-7650, 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance 
into University of Maryland physical therapy programs but also for entrance 
Into physical therapy programs at other colleges and universities. To do 
this efficiently, students should obtain program information when first 
entering college so that requirements can be taken in normal sequence 
Information for the University of Maryland programs is available at the 
Health Professions Advising Office, Room 3103. Turner Laboratory. Bulle- 
tins from other colleges may be seen at the same location 

The University of Maryland offers two B S programs in physical ther- 
apy One IS given by the Department of Physical Therapy at Baltimore City 
(UMAB) and the other is given at Eastern Shore (UMES), in Princess Anne 

For either of these programs, the first two years, consisting of pre- 
professional studies, may be completed on any University of Maryland 
institution (except UMAB) or any regionally accredited university or col- 
lege. It should be noted that the junior year course sequence for the UMAB 
program begins in summer, while the junior year course sequence for the 
UMES program begins in the fall 

The professional services of the physical therapist are offered to people 
who are disabled by illness or accident or were born with a handicap 
Clinical practitioners are responsible for the evaluation of each patient's 
ability, disability, and potential for recovery The most common areas of 
disorder include neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, sensory motor, and 
related cardio-vascular, and respiratory functions 



On the basis of test findings a treatment program is planned and 
implemented usually within the referral o( a licensed physician or dentist 
with whom the contact is maintained regarding patient care and progress. 
Treatment techniques include the therapeutic use of heat, cold, water, 
electricity, light, ultrasound, massage exercise, and functional training. 
Instruction is given to the patient, the family, and others who might help 
during the treatment and convalescent period 

Most physical therapists are employed in hospital clinics, rehabilitation 
centers, pnvate practice, schools for handicapped children, and nursing 
homes 

Application and Admission. Applicants for the pre physical therapy pro- 
gram at College Park must meet all admission requirements for that cam- 
pus While in high school students should pursue a college preparatory 
program Subjects specifically recommended are biology, chemistry, phys- 
ics, and three units of college preparatory mathematics 

Pre-physical therapy students should begin the application process 
for professional school In fall of the sophomore year UMAB or UMES 
applications and instructions are available in the Health Professions Advis- 
ing Office Applications for other programs must be obtained individually 
from the respective colleges 

Enrollment as a pre-physical therapy student at any campus does 
not guarantee admission to the physical therapy programs at either 
Uf^AB or UMES. In wew of the heavy competition for admission, all 
applicants are encouraged to apply to several programs. This entails 
looking at schools in other states and even other geographic regions. 

The following courses are required for admission to the UMAB and 
UMES Physical Therapy Programs: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
UMAB UMES 
CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1,104*— Fundamentals of 

Organic and Biochemistry 8 8 

PHYS 121, 122— Fundamentals of Physics I, II 8 8 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I 4 4 

ZOOL 201 and/or 202— Human Anatomy & Physiology 

I, II 4 8 

MATH 115: 3 

MATH 115,220" 6 

Statistics 3 3 

Social Science (Afro-American studies, anthropology ,eco- 
nomics, government and politics, urban- 
studies, sociology, geography, 

women's studies 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 3 

Psychology (developmental, abnormal, educational, or 

personality study recommended) 3 3 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Wnting 3 3 

ENGL 240— Introduction to Literary Forms 

and 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or 

Technical Writing 6 

SPCH 107— Technical Speech Communication 

or 100— Basic Principles of Speech Com- 
munication 3 3 

Arts and humanities (history [not for UMES], literature, 

foreign language, philosophy, or fine arts) . 6 6 

Health education 2-3 

Physical education 2 

Electives*** 6 1-2 

Total 60 64 

• CHEM 113 may be substituted for CHEM 104. 

" Preferred course, but other selections are possible See advisor. 

**• For the UMAB program no more than two credits of non-theory or skills may 
be used Review of introductory courses may not be used if below the required 
level in biology, chemistry, physics, math, or English. 

Further information. At College Park contact the Physical Therapy Advisor, 
Room 3103. Turner Latxiratory, College Park, MD 20742 Telephone: (301) 
454-2540 AT UMES, contact Dr Raymond Blakely, Department of Physi- 
cal Therapy, UMES. Princess Anne. MD 21 853. Telephone: (301)651-2200, 
extension 577 In Baltimore contact the Department of Physical Therapy, 
32 S Greene Street. Baltimore. MD 21201. Telephone (301) 328-7720. 



Pre-Podiatric Medicine 

The pre-professional requirements for pediatric medical school are 
essentially identical to those for allopathic medical school, and the student 
is referred to the pre-medicine discussion above 

For additional information on pre-podiatry studies, contact the Pre- 
medical Advisor, The University of Maryland, Room 3103, Turner Labora- 
tory, College Park, MD 20742. Telephone: (301) 454-2540. 



130 Campus-wide Programs 



Campus-wide Programs 

Air Force Aerospace Studies Pro- 
gram (ROTC) 

2132 Cole Student Activities BIdg . 454-3242 

Director: Gillespie 

Assistant Professors: Miller, Hughes, Fields. Meyer 

The Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) provides a pro- 
gram for college men and women to earn a commission as a Second 
Lieutenant in the United States Air Force while completing their University 
degree requirements 

Two Programs Offered 

Four-Year Program. This program is composed of a General Military 
Course (GMC) and a Professional Officer Course (POC) The first two years 
(GMC) normally for freshmen and sophomores, give a general introduction 
to the Air Force and the various career fields Students enrolled in the GMC 
program incur no obligation and may elect to discontinue the program at 
any time The final two years (POC) are concentrated on the development 
of management skills and study of American defense policy Students 
must compete for acceptance into the POC and are guaranteed a commis- 
sion upon successful completion of the program aU students enrolled in 
the last two years of the program receive approximately $1,000 annu- 
ally tax free. 

Students in the four-year program who successfully complete the first 
two years of the program and are accepted into the POC program must 
attend four weeks of field training at a designated Air Force base during 
the summer after completing the sophomore year of college To enter the 
AFROTC program, one should inform his or her advisor and register for 
classes in the same manner as for other courses 

Two-Year Program. This program is normally offered to prospective juniors 
but may be taken by seniors and graduate students The academic 
requirements for this program are identical to the final two years of the four- 
year program During the summer preceding entry into the program all 
candidates must complete a six-week field training at a designated Air 
Force base 

The Curriculum 

General Military Course (GMC) 

Freshman year— AHSC 100 (Fall) and ARSC 101 (Spring) In combination 
these two courses are designed to introduce the student to the roles of the 
Department of Defense and the U S Air Force in the contemporary world 
through a study of the total force structure, strategic offensive and defen- 
sive forces, general purpose forces, and aerospace support forces Each 
one-credit course consists of one hour of academic class and one hour of 
leadership laboratory each week 

Sophomore year— ARSC 200 (Fall) and ARSC 201 (Spring) These two 
courses provide a study of air power from balloons and dirigibles through 
the |et age an historical review of air power employment in military and 
nonmilitary operations in support of national objectives: and a look at the 
evolution of air power concepts and doctrine Each one-credit course 
consists of one hour of academic class and one hour of leadership labora- 
tory each week 

Professional Officer Course (POC) 

Junior year— ARSC 310 (Fall) and ARSC 311 (Spring) Each of these 
courses consists of three hours of academic classes and one hour of 
leadership laboratory each week Here the student is introduced to con- 
cepts and skills required by the successful manager and leader The 
curriculum includes individual motivational and behavioral processes, lead- 
ership, communication, and group dynamics, providing the foundation for 
the development of the junior officer's professional skills (officership) 
Course material on the fundamentals of management emphasizes decision 
making, the use of analytic aids in planning, organizing, and controlling 
in a changing environment as necessary professional concepts Organiza- 
tional and personal values (ethics), management of change, organizational 
power, politics, and managerial strategy and tactics are discussed within 
the context of the military organization Actual Air Force case studies are 
used throughout the course to enhance the learning and communication 
process ARSC 310 is an approved course for the University Studies Pro 
gram in the Social and Behavioral Studies area 

Senior year— ARSC 320 (Fall) and ARSC 321 (Spnng) Each of these 
courses consists of three hours of academic classes and one hour of 
leadership laboratory each week This course is a study of United States 



National Security Policy which examines the formulation, organization, and 
implementation of national secunty: context of national secunly, evolution 
of strategy, management of conflict, and civil-military interaction II also 
includes blocks ol instruction on the military profession, officership, and 
the military justice system The course is designed to provide future Air 
Force officers with a background ol United States National Security Policy 
so they can effectively function in today's Air Force 

All Aerospace Studies courses are open to any university student for 
credit whether or not he or she is in the AFROTC Program Only the 
AFROTC cadets attend the leadership laboratories ARSC 320 is an 
approved course for the University Studies Program in the Social and 
Behavioral Studies area 

Scholarships Available. The AFROTC College Scholarship Program pro- 
vides eight, seven, six, five, and/or four semester scholarships to students 
on a competitive basis Scholarships are currently available in numerous 
technical fields and are based on merit and not need Those selected 
receive full tuition, lab expenses, incidental fees, and book allowance p)lus 
a non-taxable allowance of $100 monthly (See AFROTC College Scholar- 
ship Program below ) 

Air Force ROTC Nurse Program. Air Force ROTC makes it possible for 

qualified applicants of nursing schools to enroll in its programs and, upon 
completion of all academic and licensing requirements, receive a commis- 
sion as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force Medical Corps 

General Requirements for Acceptance into the POC. The student must 
complete the General Military Course and a four-week field training ses- 
sion, or the six-week field training session, pass the Air Force (jfficer 
Ouaiification Test, be physically qualified, be m good academic standing. 
and meet age requirements Successful completion of the Professional 
Officer Course and a bachelor's degree (or highe