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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland, College Park"

GOALS 



An educalion ai ihc University of 
Maryland al College Park strives 
to cultivate intellect by teaching 
students to extend principles and 
ideas to new situations and to new 
groups ot people. It aims to 
provide students with a sense of 
identity and purpose, a concern 
for others, a sense of respt)nsibil- 
ily for the quality of life around 
them, a continuing eagerness for 
knowledge and understanding, 
and a foundation for a lifetime of 
personal enrichment. It enlivens 
students to enlarge the common 
understanding, to develop humane 
values, to celebrate tolerance and 
fairness, to contribute to the social 
conscience, to monitor and assess 
private and collective assump- 
tions, and to recognize the glory, 
tragedy, and humor of the human 
condition. Specifically, under- 
graduate education at College 
Park seeks to enable students to 
develop and expand their use of 
basic academic and intellectual 
tools. Students are educated to be 
able to read with perception and 
pleasure, write and speak with 
clarity and verve, handle numbers 
and computation proficiently, 
reason mathematically, generate 
clear questions and find probable 
arguments, reach substantiated 
conclusions, and accept ambigu- 
ity. Students also study in depth 
and acquire a substantial compe- 
tence in a coherent academic 
discipline. A College Park 
education helps students to 
become aware of the varict> of 
ways of knowing, the complexity 
of being human, and to understand 
their place in history and in the 
contemptirary world. Students 
Icam to analyze and appreciate 
artistic creations, to identify and 
evaluate moral questions, to 
synthesize and integrate knowl- 
edge, and to become iniclleciu- 
ally fiexiblc, inventive, and 
creative. 



From: Promises to Keep: The College Park Plan for I'nJergraduaie Educalion. 
Approved hy the Campus Senate March. l9Hli. 



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HISTORY 




In 1888, the campus 
consisted of an ad- 
ministration build- 
ing, a classroom 
building, and a labo- 
ratory. As the Mary- 
land Agricultural 
College, it became 
one of the nation's 
first land-grant insti- 
tutions in 1865. 



Just after the American Revolu- 
tion, the state of Maryland 
established its first two colleges 
at Chestcrtown and Annapolis. 
By the 185()s. at least thirty 
little colleges had sprung up 
over the state, many vk-iih state 
support, but many of them 
disappeanng within a few years. 
Then, in 1859 a different kind of 
institution appeared at College 
Park — the Maryland Agricul- 
tural College, the third such 
college in the world, created 
mainly for farmers' sons. The 
college was established by 
Charles Benedict Calvert, a 
wealthy planter from nearby 
Riversdale — now Riverdale — 
and later a congressman. 
Calvert built a handsome Gothic 
donnitory-classroom structure 
located in a grove of trees near 
the present Morrill Hall, and he 
divided the land down to the 
Baltimore-Washington Turnpike 
into small plots where each of 
the 50-or-so students experi- 
mented with a different 
agricultural crop. After the Civil 
War the institution became a 
land-grant college, with small 
appropriations from Washing- 
ton. The little college began to 
grow about 1900 when agricul- 
tural experiments began to bring 
prosperity to Maryland, and 
when the college expanded its 
offerings into engineering, 
busine.ss. and the liberal arts. In 




1912 the old Gothic building 
burned, and the state provided 
mixJem structures. Women were 
admitted to the campus, and 
graduate work began. In 1920 
the college combined with the 
long-established professional 
schools of Baltimore and 
changed its name to the 
University of Maryland. Growth 
accelerated after 19.^3 when the 
politically astute football coach, 
H.C. "Curley" Byrd became 
president, added scores of new 
programs, and won national 
football championships. In the 
1950s and 1960s, President 
Wilson H. Elkins maintained the 
rapid growth, and College Park 
became one of the largest 
campuses in the nation. 
President Elkins, a Rhodes • 
Scholar, transformed the 
institution's public image from 
that of a party school to one of 
academic integrity. In the 1970s 
and 1980s, the university's 
graduate and research programs 
have especially nourished. In 
1988, the General Assembly of 
Maryland combined six state 
colleges with the five campuses 
of the University of Maryland, 
and specifically charged College 
Park with the role of leadership. 
The University of Maryland at 
College Park recognizes its 
special responsibility as the 
flagship and the largest of the 
eleven institutions within the 




statewide university system to 
lead the University of 
Maryland's quest for excellence. 
To this end. College Park offers 
broad coverage in the traditional 
arts and sciences as well as in a 
wide range of professional and 
pre-professional programs. The 
institution is organized into 
fourteen colleges and schools 
encompassing over 100 
departments and campus-wide 
programs of study. A growing 
number of these departments 
and programs rank among the 
best in the nation. Today the 
University of Maryland at 
College Park stands, by any 
measure, as one of the leading 
institutions of higher education 
in the world. 




VDDKr 




The university's 
close iinks to Baiti- 
more, Annapolis, 
and Washington, 
D.C. provide exciting 
opportunities for in- 
ternships, research, 
cultural activities, 
and recreation. 



LLL LLL 




RESEARCH 




▲ Undergraduate stu- 
dents are encour- 
aged to begin their 
own explorations 
through access to 
state of the art facili- 
ties and resources. 



Opportunities for conducting 
research abound at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland College Park 
and in the surrounding area, both 
for faculty to advance their own 
expertise and bring their insights 
back into the classroom, and for 
students to begin the exploration 
of their special interests with 
hands-on experience. On 
campus, special facilities and a 
number of organized research 
bureaus, centers, and institutes 
promote the acquisition and 
analysis of new knowledge in 
the arts, sciences, and applied 
fields. A sampling of such 
facilities include a computer 
vision laboratory, a full-scale 
low velocity wind tunnel, 
computer-assisted cartographic 
laboratories, a psycholinguistics 
laboratory, a Superconductivity 
Research Center, the Laboratory 
for Plasma and Fusion Studies, 
the Developmental Psychology 
Laboratory, the Center on Aging, 
the Systems Research Center, 
the Engineering Research 
Center, the Center for Renais- 
sance and Baroque Studies, and 
the Agricultural Experiment 
Station. Off campus. University 
of Maryland at College Park 
scientists placed a Low Energy 
Charged Panicle experiment on 
board Voyager 2, which passed 
Neptune in August, 1989; others 
are involved in the development 
of the world's largest array of 
radio telescopes housed at the 
Hat Creek Observatory of the 
University of California at 
Berkeley. UMCP is leading a 



mulli-instilulional excavation of 
the ruined city of Cacsarea 
Maritima in Israel, where 
Pontius Pilate lived while 
serving as Roman governor of 
Judea. Aided by the Maryland 
Sea Grant, College Park 
zoologists and microbiologists 
study the fisheries of the 
Chesapeake Bay. The 
university's unique location — 
just 10 miles from downtown 
Washington, D.C., and approxi- 
mately 30 miles from both 
Annapolis and Baltimore — 
enhances the research of its 
faculty and students because of 
its access to some of the finest 
libraries and research centers in 
the country. These include the 
National Institutes of Health, 
the Smithsonian Institution, the 
USDA Beltsville National 
Agricultural Research Center 
and National Agricultural 
Library, the Library of Congress, 
the National Archives, the 
Folger Shakespeare Library, and 
many other academic and 
special libraries. In the Balti- 
more area, in addition to the 
university's own libraries at 
Baltimore County and on the 
professional campus in Balti- 
more City, are the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library and the Maryland 
Historical Association Library. 
The state capital at Annapolis is 
the site of the Maryland Hall of 
Records.^ --'~' 



A major research 
university attracts 
topfacultywhobring 
their research Inter- 
ests and Insights to 
the classroom. 







ACCRDIWION 

The University of Maryland at College Park is accredited by 
the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools and is a member of the Association of American 
Universities. In addition, individual colleges, schools, and 
departments are accredited by such groups as the American 
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American 
Chemical Society, the National Association of Schools of 
Music, the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism 
and Mass Communications, the Committee on Accreditation 
of the American Library Association, the American Psycho- 
logical Association, the Engineering Accreditation Commis- 
sion of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technol- 
ogy (see College of Engineering for a listing of accredited 
engineering programs), the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education, the National Architectural Accrediting 
Board, the American Dietetic Association, the Planning 
Accreditation Board of the American Planning Association, 
the Council on Rehabilitation Education, the Council for 
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Program, 
the Institute of Food Technologists, The Association of 
Marriage and Family Therapists, and the Educational Stan- 
dards Board of the American Speech-Language Hearing 
Association. 



LIBRARIES 



Seven libraries and 
numerous special col- 
lections provide rich 
material and technical 
support for teaching 
and research. 





The seven libraries which make 
up the University of Maryland 
at College Park library system 
offer outstanding resources and 
services. The holdings of the 
libraries include over 2.1 million 
volumes, approximately 4.5 
million microform units, almost 
20,000 current periodical and 
newspaper subscriptions as well 
as over 7.^ 1 .000 government 
documents. 1 9 1 .000 maps, and 
extensive holdings of phono- 
records, films and filmstnps, 
slides, prints, and music scores. 
The libraries also feature a 
Technical Reports Center 
collection of some 2 million 
items — one of the most 
outstanding collections of its 
kind in the nation. Hombakc 
Library is the undergraduate 
library, providing reference, 
circulation and reserve services 
in all subject areas to under- 
graduate students. A late-night 
study room is open 24 hours 
during the fall and spring tenns. 



Nonprint Media Services, located 
on the founh floor of Hombake, 
is the central audio-visual 
department for the UMCP 
libraries. The collection consists 
primarily of videocasscttes, 
films, audiocasseites, and the 
equipment and facilities to use 
them. The newly renovated and 
expanded Theodore R. McKeldin 
Library is the main research 
library of the UMCP library 
system. In addition. McKeldin's 
reference works, periodicals, 
circulating books, special 
collections and other materials 
provide support for research and 
teaching throughout the univer- 
sity, with special emphasis on the 
humanities, the social sciences, 
and the life .sciences. The five 
specialized branch libraries on 
campus offer extensive resources 
which provide essential support 
for study, research, and teaching. 
These include the Architecture 
Library, the Art Library, the 
Engineering and Physical 
Sciences Library .the Music 
Library, and the While Memorial 
(Chemistry) Library. Included 
among the most outstanding 
special holdings of the libraries 
are the International Piano 
Archives at Maryland, a world- 
renowned collection of piano 
performance materials; the 
National Trust for Historic 
Preservation Library, located in 
McKeldin Library; the Maryland 
Room-a major center for 
Maryland studies; the Gordon W. 
Prange Collection of Japanese- 
language publications. 1945-49; 
the U.S. Patent Depository 
Library; the Government 
Document and Maps Room, 
featuring U.S. government 
publications as well as publica- 
tions of the United Nations, the 
League of Nations and other 
international organizations, maps 
from the L'.S. Army Map Service 
and the U.S. Geological Survey; 
the East Asia Collection; and the 
National Public Broadcasting 
Archives located in Hombake 
Library. 




Desktop computers 
are part of a campus- 
wide network of work- 
station and micro- 
computer laborato- 
ries. 




COMPUTER 

SCIENCE 

CENTER 



Effective July 5, 1989, any student, faculty, or staff member witfi a 
currently validated identification card at one of the following 
Maryland colleges and universities is entitled to direct borrowing 
privileges at any of them: the eleven institutions of the University 
of Maryland System; Morgan State University; St. Mary's College of 
Maryland; and the UM Center for Environmental Estuarine Studies. 
For more information, please contract the library circulation desk at 
your home institution. 



The Computer Science Center 
supports on-campus computing 
through a full range of quality 
computing services. It offers 
many training courses in popular 
microcomputer and mainframe 
software packages, as well as 
consulting and computer user 
First-Aid. TTie Center supports 
advanced workstation and 
microcomputer laboratories 
across campus for day and 
evening self-study and class 
projects. To support teaching 
and research, the center offers 
networked computer resources, 
including IBM mainframe and 
UNIX-based computer systems. 
Qualified researchers at College 
Park may also access off -campus 
supercomputers. The Center 
houses the Program Library, 
maintains the campus network 
backbone (UMDNET), operates 
the Computer Emporium, which 
sells microcomputers and 
provides low cost service and 
computer maintenance to 
members of the campus 
community. 



VII 



UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Agriculiural Engineering 

Agricullure 

AgriculiurcA'eierinary (combined) 

Agriculiural and Resource Economics 

Agronomy 

Animal Sciences 

Dicietics 

Food Science 

Horticulture 

Human Nutrition and Foods 

Natural Resources Management Program 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 
HUMANITIES 

American Studies 

An 

An History and Archeology 

Classical Languages and Literatures 

Dance 

East Asian Languages and Literatures 

English Language and Literature 

French Language and Literature 

Germanic Languages and Literatures 

History 

Jewish Studies 

Linguistics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Romance Languages 

Russian Area Studies 

Russian Languages and Literature 

Spanish Languages and Literature 

Speech Communication 

Theatre 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Afro- American Studies 

Anthropology 

Criminal Justice and Criminology 

Economics 

Geography 

Govcmmcni and Politics 

Hearing and Speech Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND 
MANAGEMENT 

Accounting 

Business/Law 

Finance 

General Business Administration 

Management Science and Statistics 

Marketing 

PersoTinel and Labor Relations 

Production Management 

Transportation 




<0LLE(;E of HEALTH AND 
HUMAN PERFORMANCE 

Family Studies 
Health Education 
Kinesiology 
Physical Education 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM 



COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Entomology 

Microbiology 

5^1 ogy 



COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, 
MATHEMATICAL, AND PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES 

Astronomy 
Computer Science 
Geology 
Mathematics 
Physical Sciences 
Physics 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Secondary Education 
An 



English 
Language Ans 
Foreign Language 
Mathematics 
Music 
Science 
Social Studies 
Speech and English 
Theatre and English 
Special Education 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Aerospace Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering 

Fire Protection Engineering 

Materials and Nuclear Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 



undkr(;raduate studies 

Allied Health ProfevMon»/Pre- 
professional Options 

Prc-Denial Hygiene 

Pre-Dcmi!itry5 

Pre-LawS 

Pre- Medical Technology 

Pre-MedtcineS 

Pre-Nursing 

Prc-Opiometryfi 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicincf 

Prc-Phtrmacy 

PrePhysical Therapy 

Pre-Podiainc Medicine} 
Individual Studies Program 
University Honors Programs 

SAdvising Available 



CAMPUS- WIDE CERTinCATES 

Afro- American Studies 
East Asian Studies 
Women's Studies 




viil 



Cultural and ethnic 
diversity are part of 
the educational tradi- 
tion at Maryland. 



CONTENTS 

IU:ABOnCCALBHMR X 

EUIDE TO INRMMATION X 

NUCYXTATHefT Xi 

1. ADMinimS, REqOtRBMBVTS, AM APPUCAT10N PMCOIKS 1 

I. FHS, EXPOIJB, AND HNANCIAl AID M 

I CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION, RfSOURCB, AND STUDBVT SERVICES 1 8 

4. REfilSntATION, ACADMIC REQUIRMBIITS, AND REGULATIONS 21 

5. 6BIIBML BNICATION REQUIRMBm (CORE) 41 

B. TIE COLLOES AND SCHOOLS 44 

College ot Agriculture 44 

School of Architecture 46 

College of Arts and Humanities 47 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 49 

College of Business and Management* 51 

College of Computer. Mathematical, and Physical Sciences 55 

College of Education 56 

College of Engineering 58 

College of Health and Human Performance 62 

College of Journalism* , 62 

College of Library and Information Services** 65 

College of Life Sciences 65 

School of Public Affairs** 65 

*This college is not organized by departments. This chapter includes all 

information on the college's program requirements. 

** Graduate Programs only. See the current Graduate Catalog. 

7. BffARTMBVTS AND CAMPUS WOE PROGRAMS 88 

MIK Departments and programs are listed alphabetically, regardless of 
college or school. Undergraduate certificate programs and pre-profes- 
sional programs appear at the end of the list. The acronyms in parentheses 
represent course code prefixes. 

Aerospace Engineering (ENAE) 66 

Afro-American Studies Program (AASP) 67 

Agricultural Engineering (ENAG) 68 

•Agricultural Sciences, General (AGRI) 69 

Agricultural and Extension Education (AEED) 69 

Agricultural and Resource Economics (AREC) 70 

Agronomy (AGRO) 71 

American Studies (AMST) 71 

Animal Sciences (ANSC) 72 

Anthropology (ANTH) „; 72 

Applied Mathematics Program (MAPL) 73 

Architecture (ARCH). See college listing 46 

Art(ARIT) 73 

Art History and Archeology (ARTH) 74 

Astronomy Program (ASTR) 75 

Biological Sciences Program 75 

Botany (BOTN) 76 

Business (BMGT). See college listing 51 

Chemical Engineering (ENCH) 76 

Chemistry and Biochemistry (CHEM, BCHM) 78 

Civil Engineering (ENCE) 78 

Classics (CLAS, LATN, GREK) 79 

Comparative Literature Program (CMLT) 80 

Computer Science (CMSC) 80 

Counseling and Personnel Services (EDCP) 81 

Criminal Justice and Criminology (CRIM; CCJS) 81 

Curriculum and Instruction (EDCI) 82 



Dance (DANG) 87 

Economics (ECON) 87 

Education Planning. Policy and Admin. (EDPA) 88 

Elecincal Engineering (ENEE) 89 

Engineering, General B.S 90 

English Language and Literature (ENGL) 91 

Entomology (ENTO) 91 

Family Studies (FMST) 92 

Fire Protection Engineering (ENFP) 92 

Fcxx) Science Program (FDSC) 93 

French and Italian (FREN. ITAL) 94 

Geography (GEOG) 94 

Geology (GEOL) : 96 

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 

(GERM. SLAV) 96 

Government and Politics (GVPT) 97 

Health Education (HLTH) 98 

Hearing and Speech Sciences (HESP) 99 

Hebrew and East Asian Languages and Literatures 

(HEBR,CH1N,JAPN) 99 

History (HIST) 100 

Horticulture (HORT) 101 

Housing and Design (HSAD, APDS) 102 

Human Development (EDHD) 103 

Human Nutrition and Food Systems (HNFS) 103 

Industrial, Technical and Occupational Ed, (EDIT) 104 

Jewish Studies Program (ARHU) 107 

Journalism (JOUR), See college listing 62 

Kinesiology (KNES) 107 

Linguistics Program (LING) 109 

Materials and Nuclear Engineering (ENMA, ENNU) 109 

Mathematics (MATH) 1 1 1 

Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation (EDMS) 1 12 

Mechanical Engineering (ENME) 1 13 

Meteorology (METO) 1 14 

Microbiology (MICB) 1 14 

Music (MUSC) 1 14 

Natural Resources Management Program (NMRT) 1 15 

Philosophy (PHIL) 1 16 

Physical Sciences Program 116 

Physics Program (PHYS) 1 17 

Psychology (PSYC) 117 

Radio, Television and Film (RTVF) 1 19 

Recreation (RECR) 1 19 

Romance Languages Program (ARHU) 120 

Russian Area Studies Program (ARHU) 120 

Sociology (SOCY) 121 

Spanish and Portuguese (SPAN, PORT) 122 

Special Education (EDSP) 122 

Speech Communications (SPCH) 124 

Textiles and Consumer Economics (TEXT) 124 

Theatre (THET) 126 

Urban Studies (URBS) 127 

Women's Studies Program (WMST) 127 

Zoology (ZOOL) 128 

CAMPOS WIDE PRIOUUMS 19 

Air Force ROTC (Air Science) 129 

Study Abroad 129 

UNDBGRADOAn STUDIES IM 

Individual Studies Program (IVSP) 130 

Universitv Honors Program (HONR) 130 



PRE PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS. 



111 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 131 

Pre-Dentistry* 131 

Pre-Law* 132 

Pre-Medical and Research Technology 132 

ix 



Pre-Medicine* 132 

Pre-Nursing 133 

Pre-Optometry* 133 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine* 134 

Pre-Phannacy 134 

Pre-Physical Therapy* 134 

Pre-Pcxiiairic Medicine 135 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 135 

♦Adsisini; Available 

UNBBIGMnun CBHlFICAn PMOUUVIS 1S5 

A Iro- American Studies 135 

East Asian Studies 135 

Women's Studies 135 

I. APPROVB) COURSES 131 

9. UNIVHiSmfOFMARYUUIIDSYSTBAAND 
COLLOE PAW ADMINISTMTORS AND FACULH 215 

10.APPByDICES 241 

General Summar>' 249 

A. Human Relations Code 249 

B. Campus Policies and Procedures on Sexual Harassment 253 

C. Code of Student Conduct 254 

D. Policy on Disclosure of Student Records 261 

E. Smoking Policy and Guidelines 263 

F. Resolution on Academic Integrity 263 

G. Statute of Limitations for die Termination of Degree Programs 264 

H. Policy for Student Residency Classification for Admission, 

Tuition, and Charge-Differential Purposes 264 

I. Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure 265 

J. Procedures for Review of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading .. 269 
K. Policy on Panicipation by Students in Class Exercises That 

Involve Animals 270 

11.INDEX 271 

CAMPUS MAP Z7B 



1993-94 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

SUMMB) SESSION 1, 1983 

First Day of Classes June 7 

Last Day of Classes July 16 

SIMMBI SESSION U, 1993 

First Da> (if Classes July 19 

Last Day of Classes August 27 

FALiSBHESTHI.19n 

First Day of Classes September 7 

Thanksgiving Recess November 25-28 

Last Day of Classes December 13 

Final Examinations December 15-22 

Commencement December 23 

ffMRIBHESTB.1914 

First Day of Classes January 18 

Spring Recess March 14-20 

Last Day of Classes May 9 

Final Exams May 11-18 

Commencement May 19 



GDIDETOINFORMAnDN 

PUBLICATIONS 

Departmental BriK-hures: Small brochures describing many of the 
departments and programs at the University of Maryland at College 
Park are available free. Write to the Office of Undergraduate Admis- 
sions. Mitchell Building. University of Maryland. College Park. MD 
20742, or contact the department directly. 

Graduate Catalog/(iraduale Bulletin: For information about 
obtaining the Graduate Catalog or Graduate Bulletin, call 301/314- 
4198. or write to the Graduate Office. Lee Building. University of 
Maryland, College Park. MD 20742. 

Prelude: College Park publishes a free mini-catalog and application 
packet. Prelude, for prospective undergraduate students. For a copy of 
this booklet, call 301/314-8385. or write to the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions. Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD 20742. 

Schedule of Classes: The Schedule of Classes lists course offerings 
and class times and room assignments, registration dates and proce- 
dures, deadlines, fees, and general information. The schedule is 
published four times a year, twice each semester. TTie first edition is 
available prior to early registration for the spring and fall semesters. The 
second edition, published a few weeks before the beginning of each 
semester, updates course offerings and registration procedures. The 
schedule is available to all students free of charge and can be picked up 
at the Mitchell Building. Stamp Student Union, Hombake Library and 
McKeldin Library. 

Undergraduate Catalog: The Undergraduate Catalog is made 
available to all students admitted to College Park, and is available free 
to all undergraduates and faculty at College Park with a valid ID from 
the University Book Center. Copies are available for consultation in 
libraries and in high schools in Maryland, the District of Columbia, and 
Virginia. Copies are on sale to the general public for $2.50 to cover 
postage and handling. Send a check (payable to University Book 
Center) to the University Book Center. Stamp Student Union. Univer- 
sity of Maryland. College Park, MD 20742. Wnte 'Catalog" on the 
check. Please allow four weeks for delivery. 



FSEQl/ENTLY CALLED NUMBERS (Arsa code: 301) 

General Information 405-1000 

Admissions 314-8385 

Advising 314-8418 

Financial Aid 314-8313 

Housing, Ofl-Campus 314-3645 

Housing. On-Campus 314-2100 

Onentation 314^17 

Parking 314-PARK 

Student Accounts 405-9041 

Summer Programs 405*551 



POLICY SWBMBVT 



DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION: 
In accordance with "The Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act of 1974" (P.L. 93-380), 
popularly referred to as the 
"Buckley Amendment," 
disclosure of student informa- 
tion, including Tinancial and 
academic, is restricted. Release 
to anyone other than the student 
requires a written waiver from 
the student. (For complete 
University policy on access to 
and release of student data/ 
information, see Appendix D.) 



The University of Maryland is an 
equal opponunity institution with 
respect to both education and 
employment. The University does 
not discriminate on the basis of 
race, color, religion, national 
origin, sex, age, or handicap in 
admission or access to, or 
treatment or employment in, its 
programs and activities as required 
by federal (Title VI, Title IX, 
Section 504) and state laws and 
regulations. Inquiries regarding 
compliance with Title VI of the 
Civil Rights Act of 1964. as 
amended, Title IX of the 1972 
Educational Amendments, Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 
1973, or related legal requirements 
should be directed to: 
Director 

Office of Human Relations 
1 107 Hombake Library 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742. 
Telephone: 301 -W5-2838 
(Complete texts of the University 
Human Relations Code and the 
Campus Policies and Procedures 
on Sexual Harassment are printed 
in Appendix A and Appendix B.) 
Inquiries concerning the applica- 
tion of Section 504 and part 34 of 
the C.F.R. to the University of 
Maryland, College Park, Mary- 
land, may be directed to: 
Director 

Disabled Student Services 
0126 Shoemaker Hall 
University of Maryland 
College Park, MD 20742. 
Telephone: 301-314-7682 (voice) 
301-314-7683 (TTY) 

Disclaimer: The provisions of this 
publication are not to be regarded 
as a contract between the student 
and the University of Maryland. 
Changes are effected from time to 
time in the general regulations and 
in the academic requirements. 
There are established procedures 
for making changes, procedures 
which protect the institution's 
integrity and the individual 
student's interest and welfare. A 
curriculum or graduation require- 
ment, when altered, is not made 
retroactive unless the alteration is 
to the student's advantage and can 



be accommodated within the span 
of years normally required for 
graduation. The university cannot 
give assurance that all students 
will be able to take all courses 
required to complete the aca- 
demic program of their choice 
within eight semesters. Addition- 
ally, because of space limitations 
in limited enrollment programs. 
College Park may not be able to 
offer admission to all qualified 
students applying to these 
programs. 

When the actions of a student are 
judged by competent authority, 
using established procedure, to be 
detrimental to the interests of the 
university community, that person 
may be required to withdraw from 
the University. (For the complete 
University of Maryland Code of 
Student Conduct, see Appendix 
C.) 

Important Information on Fees 
and Expenses: All Students Who 
Pre-register Incur a Financial 
Obligation to the University. 
IThose students who pre-register 
and subsequently decide not to 
attend must notify the Registra- 
tions Office, 1 130A Mitchell 
Building (formerly North 
Administration Building), in 
writing, prior to the first day of 
classes. If this office has not 
received a request for cancellation 
by 4:30 p.m. of the last day before 
classes begin, the university will 
assume the student plans to attend 
and accepts his or her financial 
obligation. 

After classes begin, students who 
wish to terminate their registration 
must follow the withdrawal 
procedures and are liable for 
charges applicable at the time of 
withdrawal. 

State of Maryland legislation has 
established a State Central 
Collections Unit, and in accor- 
dance with state law, the univer- 
sity is required to tum over all 
delinquent accounts to it for 
collection and legal follow-up. 



This is done automatically on a 
month-to-month basis by 
computer read-out. 

Collection Costs: Collection costs 
incurred in collecting delinquent 
accounts will be charged to the 
student. The minimum collection 
fee is 17%, plus any attorney and/ 
or court costs. 

Gender Reference: The mascu- 
line gender whenever used in this 
document is intended to include 
the feminine gender as well. 

Smoking Policy: It is hereby 
established as the policy of the 
University of Maryland at College 
Park to achieve a public environ- 
ment as close to smoke-free as 
practicably possible. (See 
Appendix E of this catalog for the 
complete "Smoking Policy and 
Guidelines.") 



Xl 



CHArTFR 1 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND 
APPUCATION PROCEDURES 



FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

The University ot Maryland is a publicly-supporled, land grant institution 
dedicated primarily to the educational needs of Maryland residents. Within 
its respxDnsibilities as a state institution, the university attracts a cosmo- 
politan student body and each year otters admission to a number of 
promising students from other states and jurisdictions. Currently, fifty 
states, the District of Columbia, two territories, and 100 foreign countries 
are represented in the undergraduate population. Admission policies are 
determined by the Board of Regents. 

The University of Maryland at College Park maintains a competitive 
admission policy, with priority given to those students with the most 
outstanding academic credentials, and seeks to enroll students who 
demonstrate the potential for academic success. 

That potential is typically assessed by examination of high school course 
work and results from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Test Assessment (ACT) . In general, all entering students 
should have completed four years of high school English; three years of 
history or social science; two years of science, both of which will involve 
laboratory wori<; three years of mathematics courses equivalent at least 
to Algebra I, Algebra II. and Plane Geometry: and two years of a foreign 
language. In addition, students are strongly encouraged to take a fourth 
year of mathematics. 



High School Record 



In general, the University of Maryland at College Park requires freshman 
applicants to earn a high school diploma prior to their first registration at 
the university. Applicants should make sure that final high school transcripts 
are sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admission prior to enrolling. All 
offers of admission are contingent upon satisfactory completion of current 
work. 

The University of Maryland at College Park will consider mid-year grades 
for the senior year in high school if they are available when an application 
is initially considered. Eariy applicants may also be asked to submit a mid- 
year transcript to demonstrate senior year progress. 

Each applicant's previous academic achievement is reviewed according 
to the information available on the student's high school transcript. The 
Admission Committee considers the following academic criteria when 
evaluating candidates for admission; nature and rigor of course load, 
grades in academic courses, progress as reflected in grades over time 
and p)erformance compared with high school peers. High school grades 
will be reviewed in context of the level of course work taken. 

Standardized Admission Test Scores 

All freshman applicants must present results from either the ACT or the 
SAT. Test results may be submitted directly to the University of Maryland 
at College Park by the American College Testing Program for the ACT or 
the Educational Testing Service for the SAT or by the high school. The 
applicant is strongly urged to include his or her social-security number 
when registering for either test. The social security number will expedite 
processing of the application for admission. The reporting code for the 
University of Maryland at College Park is 1746 for applicants submitting 
the ACT, and is 581 4 for those submitting the SAT. The university strongly 
recommends that these tests be taken as early as possible, but no later 
than January of the year of application. Further information on both tests 



may be obtained from high school guidance counselors or directly from the 
American College Testing Program. Iowa City, Iowa 52243 and the 
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 

Additional Criteria 

While standardized test scores and grade-point averages play an impor- 
tant role in the admission process, they are not the sole factors in 
determining a candidate's admissibility. Students are asked to submit a 
recommendation from their school counselor on the form provided in the 
application. A list of cocurricular activities in high school is requested on 
the application. An optional essay and additional letters of recommenda- 
tion also will be considered. The Admission Committee may review a 
student in light of his or her unique talents and abilities. Students with 
accomplishments in art, music, leadership and other cocurricular endeav- 
ors should make this information available to the Office of Undergraduate 
Admission. 

Application Forms 

Application forms may be obtained by writing to the Office of Undergradu- 
ate Admission, Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park. 
MD 20742-5235. or by calling (301 ) 314-8385. Application forms may be 
obtained in many high school guidance offices, as well. 

Application Fee 

A non-refundable $30.00 application fee is required with each application. 

Fall Semester Freshman Admission 

The University of Maryland at College Park strongly urges that all 
applicants apply eariy to assure consideration for admission. Because of 
space limitations, the campus may not be able to offer admission to all 
qualified applicants. A completed application will include official high 
school transcript and SAT or ACT report, application and $30.00 fee. 

The University of Maryland at College Park operates according to a 
modified rolling admission plan. The admission committee begins review- 
ing applications in October. Decisions are mailed beginning in November, 
with most decisions released by the end of March. Some applicants may 
be asked to submit senior mid-year grades before a final decision maybe 
made. The priority application deadline is December 1 , and all qualified 
students wfio complete an application for admission by this date will be 
considered for merit-based scholarships. Most of the new first-year class 
is filled by the end of March, and subsequent applications are considered 
on a space-available basis. The following calendar describes the admis- 
sion process for Fall semester applicants. 

October Admission committee Isegins to review applica- 

tions. 

December 1 Priority deadline for admission. Qualified students 

who apply by this date will be considered for merit- 
based scholarships. Admission committee begins 
to mail decisions. 

February 1 5 Priority deadline for financial-aid applications. For 

more information about financial aid, consult chap- 
ter two of this catalog. Applicants wishing to submit 



2 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



March 31 



Mayl 



June 1 



senior mid-year grades should do so no later than 
this date. 

Final admission decisions are released for candi- 
dates whose applications are complete. A limited 
number of students may be offered the opportunity 
to be placed on an admission waiting list. 

Enrollment Confirmation Deadline. All admitted 
students must confirm their intention by returning 
the Enrollment Confirmation Form with a $100 
deposit. 

Students on the waiting list are notified of final 
admission decisions. 



Spring Semester Freshman Admission 

Applications for spring semester freshman admission are considered on 
a rolling, space-available basis. Applicants should submit a complete 
application as early as possible, but no later than December 15. 

Financial Aid Applications 

Students seeking financial assistance should apply for financial aid 
before receiving their letter of admission. The priority application deadline 
is February 15. More information is available in the section on Financial 
Aid in Chapter Two of this catalog. 

Special Admission Options 

To serve students who are not typical freshmen, the University of 
Maryland at College Park has developed special options for admission: 

Admission Options for High Achieving High School Students 

1 . Concurrent Enrollment: Talented high school seniors have the oppor- 
tunity to enroll at the University of Maryland at College Park for two 
courses, or seven credits, each semester. Successful applicants will 
have pursued a rigorous high school program and will have indicated 
exceptional performance and ability achieved over time. To apply, 
students must submit a) the completed application and fee, and b) high 
school transcript, c) an essay explaining why they are interested in the 
program, d) a letter of recommendation from the high school, and e) 
a letter of permission from the parents or guardian. Students must live 
within commuting distance. Tuition is assessed on a per-credit-hour 
basis. All mandatory fees apply in full. 

2. Summer Enrollment: High school students with a minimum 3.00 
grade-point average may enroll for courses during the summer pre- 
ceding their junior or senior year. They must file a regular application 
for undergraduate admission, including an official high school tran- 
script. Tuition IS assessed on a per-credit hour basis. All mandatory 
fees apply in full. 

3. Eariy Admission: Although the University of Maryland at College Park 
generally requires applicants to earn a high school diploma prior to 
their first full-time registration, the university will admit a limited number 
of well-qualified students without high school diplomas. Successful 
applicants will have pursued a rigorous high school program and will 
have indicated exceptional performance and ability achieved over 
time. Students must be within two credits of high school graduation and 
have the commitment of the high school to award a diploma after 
successful completion of the freshman year at College Park. To apply, 
students must submit a) the completed application and fee, b) high 
school transcript and SAT or ACT results, c) an essay explaining how 
they will benefit from the program, d) a letter of permission from the 
parents or guardian. 

Early admission students are eligible for on-campus housing, scholar- 
ships based on academic achievement, and the University Honors 
Program. Eariy application is advised. 

4. Gifted Student Admission: The university will consider for admission 
a limited number of gifted students who have completed at least the 
seventh grade. Competitive applicants must have a superior aca- 
demic record as measured by grades and standardized test scores. 
Students must have an initial conference with a member of the 
Undergraduate Admission staff. The Admission staff may, if it is 
deemed helpful to the admission decision, make referrals for further 
assessment to campus counseling services. Students admitted under 



this category are usually limited to six credits of enrollment per 
semester. 

5. Students With Learning Disabilities: The University of Maryland at 
College ParV exf>ects that all students admitted to its degree programs 
will fulfill all of the published requirements for graduation These 
requirements are widely published, and include fundamental studies 
in English and mathematics, as well as other general education 
requirements of the CORE programs, and all curriculum requirements 
of the major program and the degree-granted college or school. 
Students should not accept an offer of admission with the expectation 
that any requirement will be waived. For additional information atxjut 
the admission process for students with documented learning disalMli- 
ties, please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admission. 

High School Equivalence Examination (GED) 

Maryland residents who are at least 1 6 years of age and who have not 
received a high school diploma may be considered for admission, provided 
they have earned the high school General Education Equivalency (GED) 
certificate. In order to be admitted, the applicant must present an above 
average total score, as well as above average scores on each of the five 
parts of the test. 

Non-Accredited/Non-Approved High School 

Students from non-accredited/non-approved high schools who seek 
admission to the University of Maryland at College Park shouki contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admission for information. 

Advanced Placement (AP) Credit 

The University of Maryland at College Park encourages applicants to seek 
AP credit so that academically successful students may move fonward in 
their programs at an appropriate pace. However, credit is not granted for 
all exams offered by the College Board. Credits are accepted and courses 
are exempted, based on departmental approval, according to the chart on 
the following page. Students should arrange to have their scores sent 
directly to the University of Maryland at College Park from the Educational 
Testing Service; the code is 5814. Students should also inform their 
advisors at Orientation that they anticipate receiving AP credit, because 
this information may affect their placement in subject-matter courses. 

If a student has already received AP credit at another institution , this credit 
will be reevaluated. The score received must be equivalent to the 
minimum score the University of Maryland at College Park accepted at the 
time the test was taken; othemvise, the credit will not be eligible tor transfer. 
AP credits that are accepted are recorded as transfer credit on University 
of Maryland at College Park records, and figure in the total number of 
credits earned toward graduation. Students may not receive credit for AP 
and satisfactorily completing an equivalent course at the University of 
Maryland at College Park or elsewhere. If students earn credit in a course 
equivalent to an AP exam for which they also earned credit, the AP credit 
will be deleted from their records. Students shouki check with ttieir 
advisors for detailed information on the assignment of AP credit. 

Please note that the chart (pgs. 3-4) represents a general outline of AP 
credit. In all cases, credit is available for grades of 3 or higher only, subject 
to ongoing departmental reevaluation. All departments reserve the right 
to reevaluate the content of exams and to change the assignment of credit 
and course equivalences. Any new exams offered after Febaiary 1 5. 1 990 
may or may not be evaluated by the appropriate department. Students 
should check with their advisor at orientation. 

Certain departments, particulariy Math and Physics, have separate critena 
for placement in courses and the assignment of credit Students sf>ouk) 
check with those departments for additional information. All entering 
freshmen will be placed in math courses according to the University of 
Maryland at College Park math placement exam. 



Admission to Limited-Enrollment Programs (LEP) 

Certain colleges, schools, and departments wittiin tt>e university have 
taken steps to limit their enrollment in order to maintain quality programs. 
For the 1 993-94 academic year, these will include: Schooi of Architecture; 
College of Business and Management; College of Engineenng. Depart- 
ment of Government and Politics: College of Journalism; Department of 
Psychology; Department of Special Education; and all teacher education 
majors, (continued on page 5) 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 3 



AP EXAM 
TITLE 



SCORE 



EQUIVALENT 

CREDITS OR RELATED 

AWARDED COURSES 



APPUCABILITY 
MAJOR CORE USP 



NOTES 



ART HISTORY 














History of Art 


3 


3 Credits 


ARTH 100 


No 


Yes 


Yes 




4 or 5 


3 Credits 


ARTH 201 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 



Students may use AP ARTH credit to fulfill CORE- 
Arts or one of the two USP Area C requirements. 
Students with scores of 4 or 5 may not take ARTH 
201 tor credit Consult department with questions 
about placement, 405-1490. 



ART 

Art-Drawing 
Art-General 



4 or 5 3 Credits ARTT110 Yes No No Students interested in establishing credit tor 

4 or 5 3 Credits LL Elective No No No specific courses must submit portfolio to depart- 

ment for evaluation, 405-1442. 



BIOLOGY 3 4 Credits LL Elective No No Yes AP BIOL 105 fulfills requirement for all majors In 

4 or 5 8 Credits BIOL 105 & Yes Yes Yes the College of Life Science; also fulfills lab science 

LL Elective No No Yes requirement (CORE and USP). AP LL Elective 

fulfills USP Area B nonlab requirement. Consult 
department with questions about placement, 
405-2080. 



CHEMISTRY 


4 


4 Credits 


CHEM103 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 




5 


8 Credits 


CHEIVI 103& 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 








CHEM113 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 



Students with score of 4 may not take CHEM 1 03 
or 103H for credit; with score of 5. also may not 
take 1 13 for credit. AP CHEI^ fulfills requirements 
for all Life Science majors; also fulfills lab science 
requirement (CORE and USP). Consult depart- 
ment with questions about placement, 405-1 791 . 



COMPUTER 














SCIENCE 














Comp. Scl. A 


4 or 5 


4 Credits 


LL Elective 


No 


No 


No 


Comps Scl. AB 


4 


4 Credits 


LL Elective 


No 


No 


No 




5 


6 Credits 


LL Elective 


No 


No 


No 



Credit will be given for either the A or the AB 
exam, not both. Students are exempt from CMSC 
1 1 2 and may not take CMSC 1 1 2 or CMSC 1 05 
for credit. Consult department with questions 
about placement, 405-2672. 



ECONOMICS 

Macroeconomics 3 or 4 
5 

Microeconomics 3 or 4 
5 



3 Credits ECON 205 No Yes Yes Economics majors must score 5 In order to receive 

3 Credits ECON 201 Yes Yes Yes credit which counts toward the major. AP ECON 

3 Credits ECON 105 No Yes Yes fulfills USP Area D or CORE-BSS requirements. 

3 Credits ECON 203 Yes Yes Yes Consult Department with questions about place- 

ment, 405-3491 . 



ENGLISH 

Literature and 3 
Composition 4 or 5 



Language and 3 
Composition 4 or 5 



3 Credits 
6 Credits 



3 Credits 
6 Credits 



LL Elective No No No Students with score of 4 or 5 on either English 

ENGL 101 & No Yes Yes examination satisfy the Fundamental Studies 

LL Elective No No No freshman writing requirement (ENGL 101). Stu- 
dents with credit for the Language examination 

LL Elective No No No may not receive credit for ENGL 291 or its 

ENGL 101 & No Yes Yes equivalent. Consult department with questions 

LL Elective No No No about placement, 405-3825. 



FRENCH 

Language 3 

4 or 5 



Literature 



FREN 203 No No Yes Language : Students with score of 3 who wish to 

FREN 204 & Yes No No continue must enroll in FREN 204 or higher; with 

FREN 21 1 Yes No No score of 4 or 5 must enroll in 300 level courses. 

Literature; Students with score of 3, 4, or 5 must 
FREN 250 Yes Yes Yes enroll in 300 level courses. AP FREN 203 fulfills 

FREN 250 & Yes Yes Yes one of two Area A USP requirements; AP FREN 

FREN 204 Yes No No 250 fulfills one of two Area C USPs or the CORE- 

Llt. requirement. Students continuing French 

study should consult department for proper 

placement, 405-4034. 



3 
4 or 5 



3 Credits 
6 Credits 



3 Credits 
6 Credits 



GERMAN 














Language 


3 


4 Credits 


GERM 101 


No 


No 


Yes 




4 or 5 


8 Credits 


GERM 101 & 


No 


No 


Yes 








GERM 102 


No 


No 


Yes 


GOVERNMENT 














AND POLmCS 














United States 


3, 4 or 5 


3 Credits 


GVPT170 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Comparative 


3, 4 or 5 


3 Credits 


GVPT 280 


Yes 


No 


No 



Consult department for proper placement, 405-4091. 



GVPT 170 fulfills one of two CORE-BSS require- 
ments. Consult Department with questions about 
placement, 405-41 50. 



4 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



AP EXAM 
TITLE 



SCORE 



CREDITS 
AWARDED 



EQUIVALENT .„„..„,„■■ .-rw 

OR RELATED APPLICABILITY 

COURSES MAJOR CORE USP 



NOTES 



HISTORY 

United States 


3 
4 or 5 


3 Credits 
6 Credits 


HIST 156 or 
HIST 157 
HIST 156& 
HIST 157 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


European 


3 
4 or 5 


3 Credits 
6 Credits 


HIST 111 or 
HIST 113 
HIST 111 & 
HIST 113 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 



US History : A score of 3 will be awarded three 
credits as chosen by the student (HIST 1 56 or 
HIST 1 57, but not both). A score of 4 or 5 
will be awarded six credits (HIST 156 and 157). 
Either course fulfills the CORE History require- 
ment; HIST 156 fulfills USP Area A and HIST 157 
fulfills USP Area D. 

Eurooean History : A score of 3 will be awarded 
three credits as chosen by the student (HIST 1 1 1 
or 1 1 3. but not both). A score of 4 or 5 will be 
awarded six credits (HIST 111 and 1 1 3). Either 
course fulfills the CORE History requirement; HIST 
1 1 1 and 113 fulfill USP Area A requirements. 



LATIN 

Vergil 
Catullus & 
Horace 



4 or 5 4 Credits LATN 201 Yes No Yes Students with score of 4 or 5 may not lake LATN 

4 or 5 3 Credits LL Elective No No No 201 or lower for credit. LATN 201 counts for 

majors in "Classical Humanities" or "Greek and 
Latin." Consult department with questions about 
placement, 405-2013. 



MATHEMATICS 

Calculus AB 3 

4 or 5 



Calculus BC 



4 Credits 
8 Credits 



3, 4, or 5 8 Credits 



MATH 140 
MATH 140 & 
MATH 141 

MATH 140& 
MATH 141 



Yes Yes Yes Students who receive credit have fulfilled both 

Yes Yes Yes Fundamental Studies math and a non-laboratory 

Yes Yes Yes math/science requirement (CORE & USP). 

Students who receive credit for MATH 140 or 140 
Yes Yes Yes & 1 41 may not receive credit for MATH 220 or 220 

Yes Yes Yes & 221 . Consult department with questions about 

placement, 405-5053. 



MUSIC 

Listening & 3, 4, or 5 3 Credits 

Literature 



Theory 4 or 5 

(Non-Majors) 
Theory (Majors) 4 or 5 



3 Credits 
3 Credits 



MUSC130 



MUSC 140 



MUSC150/ 
MUSC 151 



Yes 

Yes 
Yes 



Yes Yes 

Yes Yes 
No No 



Music majors with score of 4 on Theory exam take 
MUSC 151 ; majors with score of 5 receive credit 
for MUSC 150/151. Consult department with ques- 
tions about placement, 405-5563. 



PHYSICS 

Physics B 4 or 5 6 Credits See Note See Note 

Ph ysics C 

Mechanics 3. 4 or 5 3 Credits See Note See Note 

Elec. & 

Magnetism 3, 4 or 5 3 Credits See Note See Note 



Students completing any of the Physics AP 
Examinations with scores of 3, 4, or 5 must see 
the Physics Department for proper evaluation and 
placement. Please bring documentation concern- 
ing scores on the Calculus BC AP Examination 
and/or the UMCP Math Department Placement 
scores. These scores will be considered in 
determining evaluation and placement Under 
certain circumstances credit may apply to CORE 
and USP science requirements. Contact Student 
Services in the Physics Department, 405-5980. 



PSYCHOLOGY 4 or 5 



3 Credits 



PSYC 100 



Yes Yes The AP exam counts towards the 35 credits 

required in the major; instead of needing a 2.5 
GPA in Psyc 100 and 200. the student must earn 
a 2.5 GPA in Psych 200 and either Psyc 221 or 
235. 



SPANISH 

Language 



Literature 



3 

4 or 5 



3 
4 or 5 



3 Credits 
6 Credits 



3 Credits 
6 Credits 



SPAN 201 No No Yes 

SPAN 202 & Yes No Yes 

SPAN 207 Yes No No 

SPAN 221 Yes Yes Yes 

SPAN 202 & Yes No Yes 

SPAN 221 Yes Yes Yes 



Language : Students with score of 3 who wish to 
continue must enroll in SPAN 202. 21 1 . or 221 ; 
with score of 4 or 5 must enroll in 300 level 
courses Literature : Students with score of 3, 4, or 
5 must enroll in 300 level courses AP SPAN 201. 
and 202 fulfill Area A USP requirements. AP 
SPAN 221 fulfills one of two Area C USP 
requirements Students continuing Spanish study 
should consult department for proper placement, 
405-6452 



Please Note: LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Students may not receive credit both for AP courses and for 
equivalent UMCP or transfer courses. AP credit will be deleted In such cases. Decisions about applicability of courses to CORE are 
updated on an ongoing basis. Consult Schedule of Classes for most recent Information. Native speakers may not earn AP credit for 
the French, German, or Spanish language exams. 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 5 



Freshmen: Admission tor newlreshmen to Limited-Enrollment Programs 
is determined on a space-available basis Most trestimen will gam 
entrance to ttie major ot ttieir choice. Because space may be limited for 
a particular major, early application is encouraged Freshmen who are 
directly admitted to an LEP will be subject to a performance review when 
they complete 45 college credits The review vanes from program to 
program, but always includes satistaclory performance in a set oT appro- 
priate courses Students not passing the review will be required to choose 
another major. See the academic program description for specific details. 

Freshmen not directly admitted to an LEP may enroll in the Division of 
Letters and Sciences. Students are not guaranteed admission to an LEP 
at a later date, although they may gain admission by meeting the 
requirements outlined in their particular program by the time they com- 
plete 56 credits at College Park. See the following section on LEP transfer 
admission and the LEP program descriptions for further details about this 
option. 

Transfers: Transfer students and on-campus students wishing to change 
their major to an LEP must meet a set of gateway courses with minimum 
grades in order to be admitted to the program. Space is limited in each 
program, and the most qualified applicants will be admitted each semes- 
ter. Students will have one opportunity only to apply to a particular LEP, 
and must complete the gateway requirements by the semester in which 
they complete 56 credits. Specific requirements for each of the limited- 
enrollment programs may be found in ttie descriptions of academic majors 
elsewhere in this catalog. 

Transfer students who are not directly admissible to an LEP upon 
application to the university will be assigned to an alternate program. 
Those with fewer than 56 credits will be assigned to the Division of Letters 
and Sciences, and will be allowed one opportunity to meet the gateway 
requirements by the time they complete 56 credits. Students with more 
than 56 credits will be admitted to an interim program for one semester in 
which they will be advised regarding their qualifications for the LEP and, 
in some cases, the need to choose another major. A limited number of 
students in extraordinary circumstances will be considered under appeal 
for each LEP. Contact the Counselor for Limited-Enrollment Programs at 
(301) 314-8378 for further information. 



Preprofesslonal Programs and Options 

The University of Maryland at College Park offers preprofesslonal advis- 
ing in Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Law, Medical and Research Technology, 
Medicine, Nursing, Optometry, Osteopathy, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, 
Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine. This advising will guide the student to 
the best preparation for advanced study and training in these fields. For 
additional information, see the description of "Campus-Wide Programs" in 
this catalog. 

Participation in a preprofesslonal program at the University of Maryland at 
College Park does not guarantee admission to another brancti of the 
university or to another institution. 

Students who have already earned more than thirty semester hours at 
another college-level institution, and who seek admission to preprofesslonal 
programs in Nursing, Pharmacy, Dental Hygiene, Physical Therapy, and 
Medical and Research Technology, should contact the academic advisor 
for the preprofesslonal programs at the University of Maryland at College 
Park before filing an application for the University of Maryland at College 
Park. Please address correspondence to the academic advisor of the 
specific preprofessional program to which you are applying; for example, 
Advisor for Pre-Nursing Program, 3103 Turner Lalioratory, University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 

Special Applicants 

Golden Identification Card Program 

The University of Maryland at College Park participates in the University 
of Maryland's Golden Identification Card Program. The institution will 
make available courses and various services to persons who are 60 years 
of age or older, who are legal residents of the State of Maryland, and who 
are retired (not engaged in gainful employment for more than 20 hours per 
week). When persons eligible for this program are admitted to the 
university, they register on a space-available basis for credit courses as 
regular or special students in any session, and receive a Golden Identifi- 
cation card. Golden ID students must meet all course pre-requisite and co- 



requisite requirements. Tuition is waived for these courses, although 
Golden ID students pay part-time student fees as other students do. 
Golden ID students may register for a maximum of three courses per term. 
Golden ID students are not eligible for Consortium courses. The Golden 
Identification Card will entitle eligible persons to certain academic ser- 
vices, including the use of the libraries and the shuttle bus service. Such 
services will be available dunng any session only to persons who have 
registered for one or more courses for that semester. Golden ID students 
also have the opportunity to become involved with the Golden ID Student 
Association which provides cultural and social events, course recommen- 
dations, and peer advising. Additional information may be obtained from 
the Office of Undergraduate Admission. Mitchell Building, (301) 314- 
8385, or the Career Center, 01 19 Hornbake Library. 405-3956. 

Multi-Ethnic Students 

In keeping with the University Affirmative Action Program, special con- 
sideration will be given to multi-ethnic students who demonstrate the 
potential for academic success. Multi-ethnic students are urged to contact 
both an admission counselor in the Office of Undergraduate Admission, 
as well as the Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Education, 1 101 Hornbake 
Library, (301)405-5616. 

Non-Degree (Special) Students 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do not desire to work toward a 
baccalaureate degree may be admitted as non-degree-seeking (special) 
students. 

Special students who have received a baccalaureate degree are advised 
that no credit earned while enrolled as special students may be applied at 
a later date to a graduate program. These post-baccalaureate students 
may enroll in undergraduate courses for wtiich they possess the neces- 
sary prerequisites, but may not enroll in courses restricted to graduate 
students only. Students wtio wish to take courses at the graduate level 
(600 and above) must contact the Graduate School for information 
concerning admission requirements for Advanced Special Student status. 

Non-degree seeking (special) students who do not have a baccalaureate 
degree must submit transcripts and meet regular admission standards. 
Transcripts are not required from students with baccalaureate degrees. 
Because of space limitation, several departments require permission be 
given in advance to enroll as a non-degree student. Please contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admission for further information. 

Returning Students and Veterans 

Applicants who have not attended school for more than five years, or who 
have had military experience, should contact both an admission counselor 
and the Returning Students Program, 314-7693. 

Students returning to the University of Maryland at College Park after a 
separation of five calendar years may petition their appropriate dean to 
have a number of grades and credits from courses previously taken at the 
University of Maryland at College Park removed from the calculation of 
their cumulative grade-point averages and from the credits applied toward 
graduation requirements. For more information, consult the section on 
Academic Regulations and Requirements. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION 

The University of Maryland values the contribution international students 
make to the College Park academic community. Therefore, applications 
from the international community are welcomed. However, due to the 
differences between foreign educational systems and education in the 
United States, international students will face a number of challenges in 
adapting to study at the university. Students who have received, through- 
out their secondary school and university level work, marks or examination 
results considered to be "very good" to "excellent " are those who are most 
likely to succeed at our institution. Admission for international students is 
competitive and offered only to those who are considered by the university 
to be better than average in their own educational setting. Students also 
have to demonstrate, in their secondary level studies, that they have 
successfully completed a diversity of subjects representing language, 
mathematics, physical or biological science and social sciences. Because 
of the keen competition at the University of Maryland, we suggest 
applicants apply early. 



6 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



Those who will hold the following visa types, A, E, F, G. H, I, J, and L, will 
be admitted on the basis of their academic backgrounds and must present 
records with marks of "very good" to "excellent". Non-immigrants, who 
have completed four years of U.S. secondary education (grades 9 through 
12), will be evaluated on the same basis as U.S. Citizens and Permanent 
Residents/Immigrants. International applicants who present one full year 
of acceptable university level credit will be considered for admission as 
transfer students. Those with less than one full year of acceptable credit 
must also meet the freshman admission requirements for international 
applicants. 

International students applying for admission to undergraduate programs 
at the University of Maryland at College Park must submit: 1 ) an application 
and fee for admission: 2) copies of official secondary school records, 
including any secondary external examinations, such as the G.C.E. 
"Ordinary" level examinations, or the Baccalaureate: 3) transcripts of any 
university level studies completed in the United States or elsewhere. 
Original documents written in a language other than English must be 
accompanied by certified English translations. 

International students who have completed grades 10, 11, and 12 in a 
United States high school must also take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(SAT) or American College Test Assessment (ACT) and submit the 
results. All freshman applicants to the College of Engineering, regardless 
of where they have studied, must present SAT scores. Admission to 
limited-enrollment majors (see "Admission to Limited-Enrollment Majors" 
tor identification of these majors) requires international students to have 
marks of no less than "excellent" in previous education. 

International students on F-1 Student visas accepted for admission to the 
university will receive the 1-20 form from the office of International 
Education Services (lES); this form is needed to secure, transfer, and 
extend the Student visa after applicants have certified their financial 
support and submitted evidence of satisfactory English proficiency to the 
lES office. 

International students accepted for admission will be expected to plan 
their arrival sufticiently in advance of the registration period to secure 
housing and attend the special orientation program for international 
students that is held the week prior to registration. 

English Proficiency 

All applicants must demonstrate a satisfactory level of English proficiency. 
Such proficiency is necessary to pursue a full course of study at the 
University of Maryland at College Park. All non-native speakers of English 
must submit a score report from the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) during the application process. Non-native speakers who have 
received a degree from a tertiary level institution in the U.S., English- 
speaking Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, or 
Commonwealth Caribbean are exempt from the TOEFL requirement. 
Native speakers of English are defined as those educated entirely in the 
U.S., English-speaking Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland. Australia, New 
Zealand, or Commonwealth Caribbean. Applicants who are unsure as to 
whether or not they need to take the TOEFL should contact the Office of 
International Education Services. Non-native speakers of English who 
have graduated from U.S. high schools must submit TOEFL examination 
results or a score of 350 or higher on the SAT verbal section. For 
information and a TOEFL application brochure, write to: TOEFL, Box 
2896, Princeton, NJ 08540. 



Return of Foreign Records 



Application Deadlines 



All applicants must submit all foreign educational credentials, including 
certified English translations if the original documents are in a language 
other than English. All admission decisions will be released on a rolling 
basis. 

1 . All non-immigrants holding visas A, E, F, G, H, I, J and L must meet 
the following application deadlines: 

Fall semester — March 1 
Spring semester — August 1 

2. Permanent residents with foreign documents and U.S. citizens 
with foreign documents should submit their completed applications 
by the following deadlines: 

Fall semester — April 30 
Spring semester — November 1 



Transcripts, records and mark sheets of applicants with foreign creden- 
tials are maintained by the office of Undergraduate Admissions tor two 
years. If these documents are original copies, the student must request 
their return within two years of application. At the end ol this penod, the 
records are destroyed. 



Immigrant Students 



Immigrant applicants for admission at the undergraduate level are ad- 
missible under the same guidelines as U.S. citizens EXCEPT that 
applicants, including transfer applicants, whose native language is other 
than English must ALSO demonstrate a satisfactory level of English 
proficiency to pursue an approved course of study. 



TRANSFER ADMISSION 

A student who has attended any regionally accredited institution of higher 
education following graduation from high school and attempted twelve or 
more credits will be considered for admission as a transfer student. 
Transfer applicants must be in good academic and disciplinary standing 
at their previous institutions to be eligible for transfer to the University of 
Maryland at College Park. 

Where the numtjer of students desiring admission exceeds the number 
that can be accommodated at this institution, or in a particular professional 
or specialized program, admission will be based on overall grade-point 
average and the strength of the academic program the student has 
pursued. 

Requirements 

Admission for transfer applicants is primarily based on the number of 
credits a student has earned and the cumulative grade-point average for 
all college-level work. In calculating eligibility, the university will use the 
average stated on the transcript by the sending institution. When an 
applicant has attended more than one institution, a cumulative average for 
all previous college work attempted will be computed. To be considered, 
course work must have been completed at a regionally accredited college 
or university. All students with grade-point averages below 3.0 will be 
considered on a space-available basis These requirements apply to all 
transfer candidates, including those seeking to transfer from another 
institution in the University of Maryland system. In accordance with 
Maryland Higher Education Commission transfer policies, applicants from 
Maryland community colleges are, in some instances, given special 
consideration, and, when qualified, may be admitted with a cumulative 
grade-point average of 2.0 or higher. Students who were not admissible 
as high school seniors must complete at least 28 semester hours with the 
grade-point average as stated above. 

Application Deadlines 

Semeatef Qalfi 

Spring Decemb»er 1 

Fall July 1 

Transfer from Maryland Community Colleges 

Currently, Maryland residents who attend Maryland public community 
colleges may t>e admitted in accordance with the critena outlined in ttie 
general statement atx)ve. The university subscnbes to the policies set 
forth in the Maryland Higher Education Commission transfer policies. 
Where the numt)er of students desinng admission exceeds the number 
that can tie accommodated in a particular professional or specialized 
program, admission will be based on cntena devetoped by ttie university 
to select the best qualified students 

Articulated transfer programs are availat>le at each Maryland community 
college. An articulated transfer program is a list of community college 
courses that best prepare the applicant for a particular course of study at 
the University of Maryland at College Park If the applicant takes appro- 
priate courses specified in the articulated program and earns an accept- 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 7 



able grade, he/she is guaranteed transfer with no loss of credit. Articulated 
transfer programs help students plan their new programs after changing 
career ob)ectives Computerized articulation information, called ARTSYS, 
is available at the Office of Undergraduate Admission at the University of 
Maryland at College Park and in the transfer advisors office at each of the 
community colleges Applicants can eliminate all doubt concerning trans- 
fer of courses by following articulated programs. 

Transfer of Credits 

Admitted students will receive a preliminary review of transfer credit within 
two weeks after the letter of admission. An official review of transfer credit 
occurs thereafter, with final determination of applicability made by an 
academic advisor/evaluator in the office of the appropriate dean for the 
major. Generally, college-level courses completed at regionally-accred- 
ited institutions will transfer, provided that grades of at least "C" are earned 
and the course content is similar in content and scope to work offered at 
College Park. The regional accrediting bodies are: Middle States Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Schools: New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges; North Central Association of Colleges and Schools: Northwest 
Association of Schools and Colleges; Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools; and Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Up to 60 
credits from a community or two-year college or up to 90 credits from a 
four-year institution may be considered for transfer. Students are required 
to complete at least their final 30 credits on the College Park campus to 
earn a degree. 

Transfer of course work completed at Maryland public colleges and 
universities is covered by the Maryland Higher Education Commission 
(MHEC) transfer policies (see complete text later in this section). College 
Park will accept grades of "D" or better from appropriate course work 
completed at a regionally-accredited Maryland public institution. Including 
other institutions in the University of Maryland System. 

Each college-level course will be evaluated individually, with applicability 
toward major or general education requirements determined by the 
appropriate academic unit. College Park does not transfer blocks of 
courses, such as those completed through the Associate's Degree. See 
the appropriate sections of the catalog for specific general education and 
major requirements. 

Credit will be posted to the College Park record only from official tran- 
scripts sent from the institution at which the credit was completed. 
Students who have earned credit through Advanced Placement (AP) or 
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject area exams must 
have scores sent directly from the testing board, even if they are already 
posted on a transcript from another institution. 

College courses taken at a high school and taught by high school faculty 
are not transferable to College Part<, even if they are given in cooperation 
with a regionally-accredited college or university. 



SOURCE 


ACCEPT 
CREDITS? 


EQUIVALENT GRADES/SCORES 
OR REQUIRED WHERE 
CREDITS APPROPRIATE 


ACE Non- 
Collegiate 
Courses 


No 






Advanced 
Placement 
Program (CEEB) 


Yes 


EorR' 


3 or higher (see list 
on page 3) 


CLEP 


Yes 


EorR' 


See list on page 34 



Community Yes 

College of the 
Air Force 



EorR' 



C- or higher 
equivalent grade as 
appropriate to 
department 



Correspondence No 
courses 



Oantes 



No 



Defense 

Language 

Institute 



Yes 



EorR' 



Scores as 
Recommended 
by ACE. 



Department 
exams from 
other colleges 



EorR' 



C- or higher 



High school 
articulation 
(courses at 
high school) 



No 



Life experience 



No, unless validated through CLEP or UMCP 
Departmental exam 



Military credit No 



Nursing school 
courses: by 
transfer/by 
challenge exam 



No* 



Other 
articulation 
agreements 
(proprietary 
schools, public 
agencies, etc.) 



No, unless a newly-formed Maryland school 
operating under auspices of MHEC 



PONSI non- 
collegiate wortt 



No 



Portfolio credits 
from other 
colleges 



No 



Courses must be similar in depth and scope to UMCP courses. 
Applicability is determined by the appropriate dean. 
Professional courses are generally not transferable. Courses taken 
at a regionally-accredited Institution may be reviewed by the appro- 
priate dean. 



MARYLAND HIGHER EDUCATION COMMISSION 
TRANSFER POLICIES 

Authorization 

These Student Transfer Policies, as adopted by the Maryland Higher 
Education Commission, will supersede the transfer policies in effect since 
1972, as modified and adopted in 1979. These policies shall be effective 
and applicable to students first enrolling in Maryland public post-second- 
ary educational institutions in Fall 1 990, and thereafter. 

Applicability of Policies 

These transfer policies and procedures apply to admission, credit trans- 
fer, program articulation, and related matters for undergraduate students 
who wish to transfer between Maryland public colleges and universities. 
The Maryland Higher Education Commission also recommends them to 
Maryland independent institutions. 

Rationale 

A major premise of the Maryland public higher education system is that a 
student should be able to progress from one segment of higher education 
to another without loss of time or unnecessary duplication of effort. The 
Maryland Higher Education Commission's objective is to ensure that a 
student who intends to complete a baccalaureate degree and who t>egins 
his or her wori< at a community college, is able to move towards the 
completion of that degree by transferring to a baccalaureate degree- 
granting institution without loss of credit or unnecessary duplication of 
course content. At the same time, the Commission recognizes that some 
students change their educational objectives as they progress in their 
studies, indeed, sometimes because their studies expose them to new 



8 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



ideas and possibilities. These students should also be able to complete 
their general education courses and have them transfer without loss of 
credit. 

One means of accomplishing this objective is through the development of 
recommended transfer programs between two- and four-year institutions 
A recommended transfer program, developed by careful planning and 
agreement between specific two- and four-year institutions, is that rec- 
ommended sequence of courses which a student takes at a community 
college which will constitute the first two years of a baccalaureate degree 
program at a Maryland public institution of higher education. 

The Maryland Higher Education Commission recognizes that students 
select institutions of higher education for a variety of reasons. These 
pwlicies also recognize that each Maryland public college or university has 
a separate and distinct mission, and that each has the responsibility to 
establish and maintain standards of expectations for courses, programs, 
certificates, and degrees consistent with that mission. Nevertheless, 
effective and efficient transfer of credits between and among these 
institutions must occur within the larger context of the statewide structure 
of baccalaureate and community college education. 

Successful and harmonious articulation depends upon 

• firm agreement that the needs of the student should be a primary 
concern in developing articulation procedures, while maintaining 
the integrity of educational programs; 

• the establishment of clear and equitable policies to assure opti- 
mum accessibility for transfer students with minimal loss of credits 
and minimal duplication of course content; 

• mechanisms for evaluating and resolving difficulties students may 
encounter in moving from one school to another; 

• free and continuous communications among institutions; 

• mutual respect for institutions and their missions; 

• adaptability, within a context of understanding that changes affect 
not only the institution making changes but also the students and 
institutions impacted by the changes; 

• free exchange of data among institutions; and 

• timely exchange of information relative to students' progress. 

The intended principal benefactor is the student, whose uninterrupted 
progress towards a degree — based on successful academic perfor- 
mance — is best served by the open exchange of current information about 
programs, and is best protected by a clear transfer policy pertaining to the 
public segments of higher education in Maryland. 

The State's interests are similarly served through such a policy, which 
results in the optimal use of its higher education resources by reducing the 
costly duplication that results in the needless waste of the valuable time 
and effort of Maryland students, faculty, and administration. 

Institutional interests and missions are also protected by this systematic 
approach, which permits them to incorporate into their academic planning 
more accurate projections about the programmatic backgrounds of trans- 
ferring students. 

In more specific ways this document's purpose is to: 

• Define broad areas of agreement among the public two-year and 
four-year institutions of higher education pertaining to facilitating 
the transfer of students within these segments; 

• Provide a mechanism for continuous evaluation of programs, 
policies, procedures, and relationships affecting transfer of 
students; 

• Provide such revisions as are needed to promote the academic 
success and general well-being of the transfer student; 

• Provide a system of appeals beginning on the campus level to 
resolve difficulties that students experience in transfer. 

While policies and procedures can be established which facilitate the 
transfer of students, it is the responsibility of the student, as the principal 
in the process, to know and follow the procedures defined. 



I. POUOES 

The fair and equal treatment of "native" and "transfer" students is the 
fundamental principle of these policies. 

A. Admission of Transfer Students 

1 . Associate of Arts Degree Holders (or those with 56 or more credit 

hours): 

a. Students who have completed the Associate of Arts degree or 
students who have completed 56 semester hours of credit with 
a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher on a 
scale of 4.0, in either case in college and university parallel 
courses, shall not be denied direct transfer to an institution. 
(Only the last grade received in a course repeated by the 
student shall be used in computing a cumulative grade point 
average.) 

If the number of students seeking admission exceeds the 
number that can be accommodated in a particular professional 
or specialized program, or certain circumstances exist which 
limit the size of an upper division program or the total enroll- 
ment, admission decisions will be based on critena developed 
and published by the receiving institution, providing fair and 
equal treatment for native and transfer students. 

b. Courses taken at a Maryland community college as part of a 
recommended transfer program oriented toward a baccalaureate 
degree shall be applicable to related programs at a Maryland 
public institution granting the baccalaureate degree. 

c. The Associate of Arts degree (or those with 56 or more credit 
hours) shall meet the lower level general education requirements 
at the receiving institution. In cases where the general educa- 
tion requirements at the receiving institution exceed those of 
the sending institution, the transfer student will be required to 
take no more than the same number of lower division general 
education credits than those required of the native student. 

d. The determination of the major program requirements for a 
baccalaureate degree, including courses in the ma)or taken in 
the lower division, shall be the responsibility of the faculty of the 
institution awarding the degree. The receiving institution may 
set major requirements which may fulfill general education 
requirements simultaneously. However, in developing its lower 
division course work, the degree-granting institution would be 
expected systematically to exchange infonnation with the com- 
munity college to assure the transferability of credits into that 
program. 

2. Transfer Without an Associate of Arts Degree (or fewer than 56 
credit hours): 

a. Students from Maryland community colleges who were admis- 
sible to the four-year institution as high school seniors, and who 
have attained a cumulative 2.00 average in college/university 
parallel courses shall t>e eligible for transfer to the institution 
regardless of the number of credits. 

b. Students who were not admissible as high school seniors, but 
who have earned sufficient credits to be classified by the 
receiving institution as sophomores, must meet the staled 
admission criteria of the receiving institution. Such requirements 
for admission may vary by program, according to criteria 
developed and published tsy the receiving institution. Such 
admission critena shall provide for equal access for native and 
transfer students. 

c. Transferable courses defined as meeting the general educa- 
tion requirements at the sending institution. 

B. Credit Transterabillty 

1 . Traditional Credit: 

a. Credit earned at any public institution in Maryland shall be 
transferable to any other public institutwn provkJed: 

the credit is from a college or university parallel course or 
program; 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 9 



the grades in the block of courses transferred average 2.0 or 

higher; and 

the acceptance of the credit Is consistent with the policies of the 
receiving institution governing students following the same 
progrann (For example, if a "native" students "D" grade in a 
SF>ecific course is acceptable in a program, then a grade of "D" 
earned by a transfer student in the same course is also 
acceptable in the same program.) 

b. Credit earned in or transferred from a community college 
normally shall be limited to half the baccalaureate degree pro- 
gram requirement, but in no case more than 70 credits, and to 
the first two years of the undergraduate educational experience. 

2. Non-Traditional Credit; 

a. The assignment of credit for AP, CLEP, or other nationally 
recognized, standardized examination scores presented by 
transfer students will be determined according to the same 
regulations that apply to native students in the receiving insti- 
tution, and such assignment must be consistent with the State 
minimum requirements. 

b. Transfer of credit from the following areas shall be consistent 
with the State minimum standards and shall be evaluated by the 
receiving institution on a course-by-course basis: 

technical courses from career programs 

course credit awarded through articulation agreements with 
other segments or agencies 

credit awarded for clinical practical or cooperative education 
experiences 

credit awarded for life and work experiences. 

The basis for the awarding of the credit shall be indicated on the 
student's transcript. 

c. The baccalaureate degree granting institution shall inform 
transfer students of the procedures through which coursework 
for which there is no clear equivalency can be validated, such 
as ACE recommendations, portfolio assessment, credit through 
challenge examipations and satisfactory completion of the next 
course in sequence in the academic area. 

d. The baccalaureate degree-granting institution shall use valida- 
tion procedures when a transferring student successfully com- 
pletes a course at the lower division level which the degree- 
granting institution offers at the upper division level and, once 
validated, the credits earned for the course shall be substituted 
for the upper division course. 

C. Program Articulation 

Recommended transfer programs will be developed through con- 
sultation between the two institutions that allow students aspiring 
to the baccalaureate degree to plan their programs. These pro- 
grams will constitute freshman/sophomore level coursewori< to be 
taken at the community college in fulfillment of the receiving 
institution's lower division coursework requirement. 

II. POLICIES TO PROMOTE THE ACADEMIC SUCCESS AND GEN- 
ERAL WELL-BEING OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A. By the Sending Institutions: 

1 . Students who enroll at Maryland community colleges shall be 
encouraged to complete the Associate of Arts degree or to 
complete 56 hours in a recommended transfer program which 
includes both general education courses and courses appli- 
cable toward the program at the receiving institution. 

2. Community college students are encouraged to choose as 
early as possible the institution and program into which they 
expect to transfer. 

3. Sending institutions shall provide to community college stu- 
dents information about the specific transferability of courses at 
four-year colleges. 



4. Information about transfer students who are capable of honors 
work or independent study shall be transmitted to the receiving 
institution. 

5. The sending institution should promptly supply the receiving 
institution with all the required documents provided the student 
has met all requirements of the sending institution for transfer. 

B. By the Receiving Institutions: 

1 . Admission requirements and curriculum prerequisites shall be 
stated explicitly in institutional publications. 

2. Transfer students from newly established public colleges which 
are functioning with the approval of the Maryland Higher 
Education Commission shall be admitted on the same basis as 
applicants from regionally accredited colleges. 

3. The receiving institution shall evaluate the transcripts of degree 
seeking transfer students as expeditiously as possible, and 
shall notify students of the results no later than at the completion 
of the students' first semester of enrollment at the receiving 
institution. Students shall be informed both of which courses 
are acceptable for transfer credit and which of those are 
applicable to the student's intended program of study. 

4. Transfer students shall be given the option of satisfying insti- 
tutional graduation requirements which were in effect at the 
receiving institution at the time they enrolled as freshmen at the 
sending institution. In the case of major requirements, the 
transfer student has the option of satisfying the major require- 
ments in effect at the time when the student was identifiable as 
pursuing the recommended transfer program at the sending 
institution. These conditions are applicable to the student who 
has been continuously enrolled at the community college by 
completing a minimum of 12 hours within the calendar year. 

III. MAINTAINING PROGRAMMATIC CURRENCY, STUDENT AP- 
PEALS, AND PERIODIC REVIEW 

A. Programmatic Currency: 

1. Receiving institutions shall provide to the community college 
current and accurate information on recommended transfer 
programs and the transferability status of courses. Community 
college students shall have access to this information. 

2. Recommended transfer programs will be developed with each 
community college whenever new baccalaureate programs are 
cipproved by the degree-granting institution. 

3. When considering curricular changes, institutions shall notify 
each other of the proposed changes that might affect transfer 
students. An appropriate mechanism shall be created to ensure 
that both two and four year public colleges provide input or 
comments to the institution proposing the change. Sufficient 
lead time shall be provided to effect the change with minimum 
disruption. Transfer students shall not be required to repeat 
equivalent coursework successfully completed at the community 
college. 

B. Appeal Process: 

1 . A campus-based system of appeals which will not exceed three 
levels shall be implemented at each institution. The procedures 
for appeal shall be published in the college's catalog and 
student handbook. 

2. If a student believes he or she has not been treated fairiy in the 
application of these policies, the student may contact the 
receiving institution's Transfer Coordinator (see Periodic Re- 
view section 2 below) who will provide information on academic 
appeals policies and procedures at that institution, as de- 
scribed in catalogs and other official publications. 

3. Initially, differences of interpretation regarding the award of 
transfer credit shall be resolved between the student and the 
institution to which he or she has transferred. If a difference 
remains unresolved after using the appropriate appeal proce- 
dures of the receiving institution, the student shall present his 



10 Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 



or her evaluation of the situation to the institution from which the 
student has transferred. Representatives from the two institu- 
tions shall then have the opportunity to resolve the differences. 

4. The sending Institution shall have the right to present any 
unresolved case to the Advisory Articulation and Transfer 
Committee (se Periodic Review section 3 t)elow) through a 
written appeal. A hearing may be requested by either party. The 
Committee shall receive relevant documentation, opinions, 
and interpretations in writing from the sending and receiving 
institutions and from the student. The Committee will hold 
hearings if required and make a recommendation as to the 
merits of the appeal. The Secretary will forward the recom- 
mendation to the appropriate segment head for disposition. 

5. A student must initiate his or her complaint atxiut the awarding 
of transfer credits within one calendar year of transferable credit 
notification from the receiving institution. 

6. It shall be the responsibility of both the sending and receiving 
institutions to make certain that any student who is considering 
any appeal, that he/she be provided a copy of the appeal 
procedure and Ije advised and counseled on the appeal process . 

C. Periodic Review: 

1 . The progress of students who transfer from two-and four-year 
institutions within the State shall be reported annually by the 
receiving institution to each community college and to the 
Secretary of the Maryland Commission of Higher Education. 
The Commission will share the results with the State Board for 
Community Colleges. Such information shall include longitudi- 
nal reports on the subsequent academic success of enrolled 
transfer students, including graduation rates, by major subject 
areas. Comparable information on the progress of native stu- 
dents shall be included. 

2. Each public institution of higher education shall designate a 
Transfer Coordinator, who serves as a resource person to 
transfer students at either the sending or receiving campus, and 
who is responsible for overseeing the application of the policies 
and procedures outlined in this plan. The Transfer Coordinator 
shall also assist in interpreting transfer policies to the individual 
student and to the institution. 

3. The Maryland Higher Education Commission shall establish a 
permanent Transfer Advisory Committee that meets regulariy 
to review transfer issues and recommend policy changes as 
needed. The Committee shall also arbitrate disagreements as 
necessary and receive written appeals as described in the 
"student appeals" section above. 

4. The Transfer Advisory Committee shall review these transfer 
policies at least every five years and recommend changes as 
necessary. 

IV. DERNITIONS 

A. Native Student — A student whose initial college enrollment was 
at a given institution of higher education and who has not trans- 
fen-ed to another institution of higher education since that initial 
enrollment. 

B. Parallel Programs — The program of study (or courses) at one 
institution of higher education which has comparable objectives as 
those at another higher education institution, e.g. a transfer pro- 
gram in psychology in a community college is definable as a 
parallel program to a baccalaureate psychology program at a four 
year institution of higher education. 

C. Receiving Institution — The institution of higher education at which 
a transfer student currently desires to enroll. 

D. Recommend Transfer Program — A planned program of courses, 
including tx)th general education and courses in the major, taken 
at the community college which is applicable to a baccalaureate 
program at a receiving institution ; ordinarily the first two years of the 
baccalaureate degree. 



E. Sending Institution — The institution of higher education of most 
recent previous enrollment by a transfer student at which transter- 
cible academic credit was earned 

F. Transfer Student — A student entenng an institution for the first 
time with academic credit earned at another institution which is 
applicable for credit at the institution the student is entenng. 



RESIDENCY INFORMATION 

DetetTnlnatlon of In-State Status for Adcniaslon, Tuition, ■r>d Charge 
Differential Purposes: See Apperxllx H for the complete text of tttia 
policy. 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition, and 
charge-differential purposes will be made by the university at the time a 
student's application for admission is under consideration. The determi- 
nation made at that time, and any determination made thereafter shall 
prevail in each semester until the determination is successfully challenged. 
Students may challenge their classification by submitting a petition. 
Petitions are available in the office of Undergraduate Admission The 
deadline for meeting all requirements for in-state status and for sutMnitting 
all documents for reclassification is the last day of late registration for tt>e 
semester if the student wishes to be classified as an in-state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in 
completing the review process. It is hoped that a decision in each case will 
be made within ninety days of receipt of a request for redetermination and 
all necessary documentation. During this period of time, or any further 
period of time required by the university, fees and charges based on the 
previous determination must be pakl. If the determination is char>ged. any 
excess fees and charges will tie refunded. 

Petitions, related documents and questions concerning the policy of the 
University of Maryland for the determination of in-state status shouW t>e 
directed to the Campus Classification Office, 1116 Francis Scott Key HaJl, 
University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, (301 ) 405-2030. 

Students Classified as In-State for Admission, Tuition, and Charge- 
Differential Purposes: Students classified as instate for admission, 
tuition, and charge-differential purposes are responsible for notifying the 
office of Undergraduate Admission in writing within fifteen days of any 
change in their circumstances that might in any way affect their classifica- 
tion at the University of Maryland at College ParV. 

The written notice of change in circumstances or questions concerning the 
policy of the University of Maryland for the determination of in-state status 
should be directed to the Office of Undergraduate Admission, Ground 
Floor, Mitchell Building. 

READMISSiON AND REINSTATEMENT 

Students who do not maintain continuous registration must apply for 
readmission or reinstatement to reenroll at the university A student wfw 
was previously admitted and did not register for that semester must apply 
again for admission. A student who was previously admitted, registered, 
and canceled this registration, must also apply for admission. 

Readmission 

Students must apply for readmission if they interrupt registration for one 
or more semesters and were neither academically dismissed nor withdrew 
at the conclusion of the last semester of attendance. 

Reinstatement 

Students who withdraw or who are academically dismissed from ttie 
university must apply for reinstatement All applications for reinstatement 
are reviewed by a Faculty Petition Board Students may apply tor 
reinstatement for the semester immediately folkjwing witlidrawat'dis- 
missal or for any subsequent semester The Board members are empow- 
ered to grant reinstatement if circumstances wan-ant such action. 

Students who are denied reinstatement may apply tor future reinstatement 
in accordance with published deadlines Students may be required to 



Admission Requirements and Application Procedures 1 1 



comply with specific recommendations made by the Faculty Petition 
Board in order to quality for reinstatement. 

Deadlines 

There are no deadlines for readmission However, students are encour- 
aged to apply early in order to take advantage of early registration 

For full consideration, students applying for reinstatement must observe 
the following deadlines: 

Fall Semester — July 15 
Spring Semester — Decemtser 1 
Summer Session I — May 1 
Summer Session II — June 1 

Summer School 

Fall dismissals who are denied reinstatement for the spring semester are 
not eligible to attend summer sessions unless or until they are approved 
for reinstatement. Students dismissed at the end of a spring semester may 
attend the first and\or second summer sessions prior to being reinstated. 
However, these students must be approved for reinstatement in order to 
attend during the subsequent fall semester. 

Clearances 



Applications 

Applications tor readmission and reinstatement are available at the 
Information Counter. Undergraduate Admission, Ground Floor, Mitchell 
Building. Applications may also be requested by phone. 

Additional Information 

For additional information contact the Reenrollment Office. 0117 Mitchell 
Building. University of Maryland. College Park. MD 20742, 314-8382. 

GRADUATE STUDENT ADMISSION 

Those who have earned or will earn a bachelor's degree at a regionally 
accredited college or university in the United States, or the equivalent of 
this degree as determined by the University of Maryland at College Park 
in another country, will be considered for admission to the graduate school 
at College Park. Criteria are listed in the Graduate Schools Application 
Brochure obtainable from the graduate school. Requests for information 
about graduate programs or correspondence concerning application for 
admission to the graduate school at the University of Maryland at College 
Park should be addressed to Admissions Office, University of Maryland 
Graduate School. Lee Building. College Park. MD 20742. To request an 
application by telephone, call (301) 314-9304. 



Clearances from Judicial Programs, the Bursar's office. Health Center, or 
International Education Services may be requested of the applicant. 



12 



CHAPTER 2 



FEES. EXPENSES AND RNANCIAL AID 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Student Accounts Office 

1 135 Lee Building, 405-9041 and 403-4641 

Tuition and tees for the University of Maryland at College Park are listed 
below. The university requires that all deposits and fees be paid by stated 
deadlines, or penalties must be imposed. Many potential administrative 
difficulties can be avoided if students carefully follow published procedures 
and notify the appropriate office(s) of any changes that might affect their 
financial obligation to the university. This includes notifying the Bursar's 
Office of changes of address, so that mail affecting the student's financial 
relationship with the university will not be delayed or returned. 

College Park sponsors a low cost commercial ten month budget plan, 
TUITION PLAN, for the combined fall and spring semesters. Also, a single 
semester three payment plan may be available, albeit somewhat more 
expensive. Information regarding these plans is available by calling 
1-800-343-0911. 

All charges incurredduring a semester are payable immediately. Returning 
students will not be permitted to complete registration until all financial 
obligations to the university, including library fines, parking violations, and 
other penalty fees and service charges are paid in full. 

Payment for past due balances and current semester fees is due on or 
before the first day of classes. Students who register in advance must pay 
their bills in full prior to the general registration period. Students who 
register after the initial registration period are required to make full 
payment by the close of business the following working day to avoid 
cancellation of their enrollment and loss of their classroom seats to other 
students. 

Although the university regularly mails bills to students, it cannot assume 
responsibility for their receipt. Students are reminded that it is their 
responsibility to notify the university of any change in address, or to correct 
an address. If a student bill is not received on or before the beginning of 
each semester, it is the student's responsibility to obtain a copy of the bill, 
1 1 35 Lee Building, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of 
Maryland for the exact amount due. Student name and student social 
socurlty number should be written on the front side of the check. 

University grants and scholarships will be posted to the student's account. 
However, the first bill mailed prior to the beginning of each semester may 
not include these deductions. 

Students are urged to check their residence hall and dining service 
agreements for procedures for cancellation of reservations, and for 
deadlines for receiving refunds of deposits. Refunds cannot be made after 
these deadlines, even if the student decides not to attend the University 
of Maryland at College Park. 

Students will incur a late payment fee in the event of failure to pay a 
balance on their student account by its due date. A late payment fee of 
$1 0.00 or 5%, whichever is higher, will be assessed in addition to payment 
for the total past due amount. An additional 1 '/2% late fee will be charged 
monthly if the account is not settled. 



Students who fail to pay the indebtedness dunng the semester in which 
delinquency occurs will be ineligible to preregister for subsequent semes- 
ters until the debt and the penalty fees are cleared. 

In the event of actual registration for a subsequent semester by a 
delinquent student who has not settled his or her student account prior to 
that semester, such registration will be canceled and no credit will be 
earned for the semester. 

The state has established, under legislative mandate, a Central Collec- 
tions Unit (CCU) within the Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning. 
The university is required by state law to refer all delinquent accounts to 
the State Collections Unit. Please note that Maryland law allows the 
Central Collections Unit to intercept state income tax refunds for individuals 
with delinquent accounts, and that failure to make timely payment in 
response to CCU collection efforts may impair a credit rating. 

All Accounts Due from Students, Faculty, Staff, Non-Students, etc., 
are included within these guidelines. 

State Central Collection Unit costs incurred in collecting delinquent 
accounts will be charged to the student. The minimum collection fee is 
1 7% plus attorney and/or court costs. 

No degrees, diplomas, certificates, or transcripts of records will be issued 
to students who have not made satisfactory settlement of their accounts. 

An Important Fee Notice: Although changes in lees and charges ordi- 
narily will t>e announced in advance, the university reserves the nght to 
make such changes without prior announcement. 

Note: Additional Information on Student Financial Obligations. Disclosure 
of Information, Delinquent Accounts, and Special Fees, can be found in 
the "Policy Statement" elsewhere in this catalog. 

Payment of Fees 

All checks, money orders, or postal notes should be made payable to the 
University of Maryland. The student's Social Security numt>er must be 
written on the front of the check. VISA and Master-Card credit cards are 
accepted. 

A. UNDERGRADUATE FEES 

'Increases In board and lodging for 1 993-94 are under consideration 
by the Board of Regents at the time of this printing. 

1. Full-time Undergraduate Students 1993-94 Academic Year 

(For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time il the 
number of credit hours enrolled is 9 or more ) 

a. Maryland Residents 

Total Academic Year Cost 
Tuition $2,564.00 

Mandatory Fees (see Explanation of Fees t>ek)w) 61 5.00 
Board Contract (FY 92-93)* 

1) Point Plan 2,184.00 

Lodging (FY 92-93)* 2.819 00 

Telecommunications Fee 140 00 



Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 13 



b. Residents of the District of Columbia, other states, ar>d other 
countries: 

Total Academic Year Cost 
Tuition 8,168.00 

Mandatory Fees (see Explanation of Fees below) 615.00 
Board Contract (FY92-93) 

1) Point Plan 2,184.00 

Lodging (FY92-93) 2,819.00 

Telecommunications Fee 140.00 

2. Fees tor Part-Time Undergraduate Students 

Tuition (per credit hour) $145.00 

Mandatory Fees (per semester) 154 00 

Note: The term 'part-time undergraduate student" is interpreted 
to mean an undergraduate student taking eight semester credit 
hours or less. Students carrying nine semester hours or more are 
considered to be full-time and must pay the regular full-time fees. 

B. GRADUATE FEES 

1 . Maryland Residents (fee per credit hour) 189.00 

2. Residents of the District of Columbia, other states 

other countries (fee per credit hour) 324.00 

3. Mandatory Fees (per semester) 

Full-time (9 or more credit hours per semester) 21 5.00 

Part-time (8 or less credit hours per semester) 144.00 

EXPLANATION OF FEES 

Mandatory Fees 

Academic Services Fee (Non-Refundable): The Academic Services 
Fee is charged to all students each semester. 

Student Activities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all undergraduate 
students at the request of the Student Government Association. It is used 
in sponsoring various student activities, student publications, and cultural 
programs. 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students. This fee 
is paid into a fund that is used for capital improvement, expansion, and 
construction of various campus facilities such as open recreation areas 
(tennis courts, basi^etball courts, etc.), transportation alternatives, and the 
Stamp Student Union. These projects are not funded or are funded only 
in part from other sources. 

Athletic Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students for the support of the 
Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. All students are encouraged to 
participate in all of the activities of this department, or to attend the 
contests if they do not participate. 

Student Health Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students for tne sup- 
port of the Health Service facility. 

Shuttle Bus Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students for the support 
of the Shuttle Bus transportation system. 

Stamp Studept Union and Recreational Fee (Refundable): Charged to 
all students and is used to expand recreational facilities and Stamp 
Student Union services. 

Building Recreation Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students specifi- 
cally to support the construction and operation of Ritchie Coliseum and the 
new Campus Recreation Building, a multi-use facility that will include 
basl^etball and racquetball courts, indoor and outdoor pools, an indoor 
jogging tracit and multipurpose activity spaces. 

Telecommunications Fee; Assessed to all students living in University 
Residence Halls. 



Other Fees 

Undergraduate Application Fee (Non-Refundable): $30.00. Charged 
to all new undergraduate students. 

Graduate Application Fee (Non-Refundable): $40.00. Charged to all 
new graduate students. 



Enrollment Confirmation Deposit (Non-Refundable): $100.00. All 
newly accepted undergraduate students who intend to matriculate in the 
fall or spnng semester must submit a $100 fee which is credited to their 
tuition charges when they enroll. Should the student decide not to enroll 
tor the specific semester of application, the $100 lee is forfeited, and 
cannot be used to offset any charges, including onentation charges, the 
student may incur 

Students admitted for the fall term by April 1 must submit this deposit by 
May 1 ; students admitted for the spnng term prior to December 1 must 
submit this deposit within 30 days. Students admitted afler December 1 
for the spring term must submit this deposit within 14 days 

Pre-College Orientation Program Registration Fee: $88.00 (two-day 
program); $61 00 (one-day program); $32.00 (one parent). $64.00 (two 
parents). 

Late Registration Fee: $20.00. All students are expected to complete 
their registration on the regular registration days. Those who do not 
complete their registration during the prescribed days must pay this fee. 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation in math- 
ematics (MATH 001 and MATH 002) per semester $1 55 00 (Required 
of students whose curriculum calls for MATH 11 or 115 and who do not 
pass the qualifying examination lor these courses.) This Special Math Fee 
Is in addition to course charge. Students enrolled in this course and 
concurrently enrolled for six or more credit hours will be considered as full- 
time students for purposes of assessing fees. Students talking only MATH 
001 pay for three credits plus $1 55.00. A three-credit course plus MATH 
001 results in a charge for 6 credits plus $1 55.00. A full-time student pays 
full-time fees plus $1 55.00. This course does not carry credit towards any 
degree at the university but registration in MATH 001 or MATH 002 is 
counted in the calculation of semester credits for financial aid 

Cooperative Education in Lit>eral Arts, Business and Science (CO- 
OP 098-099) Per Semester: $60 00 

Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 098-099) Per Semester: $60.00 

Fees for Auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as those 
charged for courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate and 
graduate levels. Audited credit hours will be added to hours taken for credit 
to determine full-time or part-time status for fee assessment purposes. 
Special Students are assessed fees in accordance with the schedule for 
the comparable undergraduate or graduate classification. 

Special Examination Fee (Credit-by-Exam): $30.00 per course for all 
undergraduates and full-time graduate students; credit-hour charge for 
part-time graduate students. 

Parldng Registration Fees: All students enrolled for classes on the 
College Park campus and who drive or park a vehicle anywhere or 
anytime on the campus must register to park on campus each academic 
year. For additional information, please refer to the entry for Department 
of Campus Parking elsewhere in this catalog. 

Textbooks and Supplies: Textbooks and classroom supplies vary with 
the course pursued, but will average $550.00 per year (two semesters). 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checks: Payable for each check 
which Is returned unpaid by the drawee bank on initial presentation 
because of insufficient funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn 
against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $1 00.00: $1 0.00 

For checks from $100.01 to $500.00: $25.00 

For checks over $500.00: $50.00 

When a check is returned unpaid, the student must redeem the check and 
pay any outstanding balance in the account within 1 days or late fees may 
be assessed and the account transferred to the State Central Collection 
Unit for legal follow-up. Additionally, a minimum 1 7% collection charge is 
added to the charges posted to the student's account at the time the 
transfer Is made. When a check Is returned unpaid due to an error made 
by the student's bank, the student must obtain a letter from the branch 
manager of the bank or a person of equivalent status admitting the error. 
This letter must be submitted to the Office of the Bursar to have the service 
charged waived. 

Overdue Library Charges: For items from the library's main circulating 
collections, charges are 35 cents per day per item, and recalled Item fines 



14 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



are $1 .50 per day. I( an item is lost or mutilated, the borrower is charged 
the estimated cost of the item plus a processing tee to cover acquisition 
and cataloging costs. Different fine rates may apply for other library 
collections, such as reserve collections. 

Maryland English Institute Fee: Semi-intensive, $1,566.00 Intensive, 
$3.131 .00. Students enrolled with the Maryland English Institute pay this 
lee in support of the institute Students enrolled in the semi-intensive 
program may also enroll lor regular academic courses and pay the tuition 
and lees associated with those offerings. The program also offers non- 
credit courses: English Pronunciation, $265.00, and Workshop for For- 
eign Teaching Assistants, $530.00. 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to 
property or equipment. Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, 
the individual student will be billed for it: where responsibility cannot be 
fixed, the cost of repaihng the damage or replacing equipment will be 
prorated among the individuals involved. 

Late Payment Fee: One time fee of 5% of overdue amount, or $10.00, 
whichever is greater, plus an additional 1 '/2% on subsequent billing. 

Withdrawal or Refund Fees: Students compelled to leave the university 
at any time during the academic year should secure a lorm for withdrawal 
Irom the Records and Registration Office. The completed form and the 
semester Identification/Registration Card are to be submitted to the 
Records and Registration Office. Students will forfeit their right to refund 
if the withdrawal action described above is not adhered to. The effective 
date used in computing refunds is the date the withdrawal form is filed in 
the Records and Registration Office. Stop Payment on a check, failure to 
pay the semester bill, failure to attend classes, does not constitute 
withdrawal. A request for a refund must be processed by students with the 
Office of the Bursar: otherwise any credit on student accounts will 
automatically be carried over to the next semester Cancellation of 
Registration - Submitted to the WIthdrawal/Reenrollment Office 
before the official first day of classes entitles students to full credit 
of semester tuition. 

Undergraduate students withdrawing from the university will be credited 
for tuition and fees (except the academic services fee) in accordance with 
the following schedule: 



Prior to 1 st day of classes 
1 St 1 days of classes 
3rd week 
4th week 
5th week 
After 5th week 



100% 
80% 
60% 
40% 
20% 
No Refund 



Note: First semester freshmen who receive Title IV aid and who withdraw 
will receive a refund in accordance with federal regulations. 

Prior to the first day of classes, if full-time undergraduate students drop 
a course or courses, thereby changing the total number of credits for which 
they are preregistered to eight or less, charges for the semester will be 
assessed on the basis of the per credit hour fee for part-time students. 
However, if students later add a course or courses thereby changing the 
total number of credits lor which they are registered to nine or more, they 
will be billed for the difference between per credit hour fees paid and the 
general fees for full-time undergraduates. 

If during the first five days of classes full-time undergraduates drop a 
course or courses thereby changing the total number of credits for which 
they are registered to eight or less, charges for the semester will be 
assessed on the basis of part-time charges plus 20% of the difference 
tsetween the full-time fees and appropriate part-time charges. Afler the 
first five days of classes, there is no refund for changing from full-time to 
part-time status. 

Students who register as part-time undergraduate students and apply for 
a refund for courses dropped during the first week of classes will tie given 
a refund. No refund will be made for courses dropped thereafter. 

No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
students officially withdraw from the university or when they are given 
permission by the appropriate officials of the university to move from the 
residence halls and/or to discontinue dining hall privileges. In these cases. 
the room refund will be computed by multiplying the number of periods 
remaining by the pro rata weekly rate after adjusting for a service charge. 
Refunds to students having full board contracts will be calculated in a 
similar manner. No room and/or board refunds will be made after the 
fourteenth week of the semester Students are reminded that reservations 



for room and board must be canceled by the date published in the 
residence hall and dining services agreements). 

In computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of 
scholarships and loans from university funds, the computation will be 
made to return the maximum amount to the scholarship and loan accounts 
without loss to the university. 



Military Cail-Up 

Students who must withdraw from the University as a result of being called 
for military duty should contact the Office of Records and Registration 
immediately, and should have available a copy of their orders. The 
University of Maryland at College Park has procedures to ensure an 
orderly process of separation for these students. 



FINANCIAL AID 

Office of Student Financial Aid 

0102 Lee Building. 314-8313 

Applying for financial aid. receiving financial aid, and keeping financial aid 
do not happen automatically. Students have to make it happen! 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers all types of 
federal, state, and institutional financial assistance programs, and, in 
cooperation with other university offices, participates in the awarding of 
scholarships to deserving students. The primary responsibility for financ- 
ing attendance at the University of Maryland at College Park lies with 
students and families. Scholarships, grants, loans, and work-study posi- 
tions are awarded on the basis of academic ability and/or financial need 
determined by a federal needs analysis system. It is OSFAs intent to 
provide assistance to students who might not othenwise be able to pursue 
college studies due to lack of finances. 

Financial aid funds are limited: therefore, all new, readmitted, and returning 
students must follow these steps to receive priority consideration lor 
financial aid: 

1. Submit admissions applications and all necessary supporting docu- 
ments to the Office of Admission by the appropriate deadlines. 

2. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) after 
January 1. FAFSAs are available from OSFA A new FAFSA Is 
required for each academic year of the student's enrollment. The 

FAFSA replaces the FAF (Financial Aid Form), which was the required 
application form in previous years. 

New students should not wait to be admitted before filing tfie 

FAFSA. A financial aid application has no beanng on a student's 
admission application. However, students will not receive final consid- 
eration for aid until they are admitted to a degree program 

3. Mail the form to the Federal Student Aid Programs application proces- 
sor no later than February 7, so that it is received by the processor by 
February 15. Income for the previous year may be estimated 
initially, and corrected later on the Student Aid Report 

Applications received after February 15 will be reviewed after on-time 
applications in order of receipt as long as funds are available. All transfer 
students and new graduate students must provide a financial aid tran- 
script from each post-secondary school attended, whether aid was 
received or not. 

General Reguiations Applicable to All Forms of Aid 

Full-Tlme Status. For most types of aid. students must attempt at least 
12 credit hours through schedule adjustment each semester in order to 
receive the full financial aid award Please refer to the standards of 
Satisfactory Academic Progress when considenng dropping below 12 
credit hours lor any given semester 

Citizenship Status. Students must be United States citizens or eligit>le 

non-citizens in order to be eligible for federal, state, or university financial 
assistance 

Default/Owe Refund: To receive federal financial aid. you cannot be in 
default on an educational loan, nor can you owe any refund on a Pell Grant 



Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 15 



or Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) previously 
awarded at any post-secondary institution. 

Degree Seeking: To receive federal financial aid, students must be 
working toward a degree or certificate. Students must be admitted to ttie 
university as "degree-seeking." 

Satisfactory Progress: To receive federal financial aid. students must be 
making salistactory progress toward a degree or certificate according to 
the Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress publistied In tfie 
Schedule ot Classes. 

Financial Aid Transcripts. Any student who has attended another post- 
secondary institution must submit a financial aid transcript regardless of 
whether he or she received financial assistance. 

Selective Service: To receive federal financial aid, students must be 
registered with Selective Service if they are male, at least 1 8 years old and 
t)om after December 31. 1959, unless they are not required to be 
registered. Compliance with the registration requirement will be verified by 
the federal government. The names of those students whose status 
cannot be verified will be referred to the U.S. Department of Justice for 
possible prosecution. 

Receiving a Non-University Award: If a student receives assistance 
(scholarship or loan) from a non-university source, the university may 
reduce the financial aid awarded by the university. It Is the student's 
responsibility to notify the Office of Student Financial Aid of all outside 
awards. 

Change In Financial Situation: It is the student's responsibility to notify 
the Office of Student Financial Aid of any changes to his or her financial 
situation during the year. 

Reapplication Requirement: No form of assistance is automatically 
renewed from year to year. All students requesting aid must reapply by 
submitting a new FAFSA annually. Such reapplication must indicate 
continued financial need as well as Satisfactory Academic Progress. 

Award Poiicy: Financial aid is normally a combination ot grants, loans, 
and employment. The financial aid "package" is determined by the 
availability of the various types of financial aid and the individual cir- 
cumstances of the students. It is not necessary to make any special 
application for university grants. The Office of Student Financial Aid will 
determine awards which best fit the needs and qualifications of the 
candidates. 

Estimating Educational Cost 

A budget of average educational costs is used In determining how much 
aid a student is awarded during the academic year. The typical budget for 
an undergraduate at the University of l^^aryland at College Park for the 
1993-94 academic year will be: 

Dependent Student Living on Campus 



Tuition and Fees in-state: $3, 1 79.00 

Room 2,819.00 

Board 2,184.00 

Incidentals 1 ,500.00 

Books 550.00 



TOTAL 



$10,232.00 



out-of-state: $8,783.00 



$15,838.00 



Notes: 1. The atxjve budget is subject to change for the 1993-94 
academic year. 
2. To determine the 1 993-94 costs for tuition and fees, room, and 
board, please contact the Office of the Bursar. 

Merit-Based Financial Assistance 
Scholarships 

Several scholarships are available to gifted students at UMCP. Two types 
of scholarships are available: those based solely on academic or creative 
talent (merit-based), and those based on financial need as well as 
academic or creative talent (need-based). The eligibility criteria for the 
different scholarships vary, and are listed below. For more information on 
these programs, students are encouraged to contact the office or depart- 
ment responsible for selecting the recipients. 



Francis Scott Key Scholarship: The University of Maryland at College 
Park seeks to identity and select some ot the brightest high school seniors 
in the nation to continue their education as Francis Scott Key Scholars. 
Students selected for this prestigious award will receive lull financial 
support for four years, which covers tuition, room, board, and mandatory 
fees. They will also be admitted to the Honors Program, and will be 
afforded many other opportunities tor participation in intellectual enrich- 
ment programs Students may nominate themselves tor this award, or 
high school guidance counselors may make Key Scholar nominations. 
Applicants must submit an admission application, official transcript, and 
SAT scores to the Undergraduate Admission Office by December 1 for the 
following academic year. Credentials of National Merit Finalists and 
Semifinalists are reviewed provided these students notify the Francis 
Scott Key Scholarship Committee of these academic honors. Contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admission. 

Benjamin Banneker Schoiarship: The Banneker Scholarship is a four- 
year award given to exceptional African-American freshmen. New 
awards are made each year in the amount of full tuition, room, board, and 
mandatory fees. Recipients are automatically admitted to the Honors 
Program and are given priority for campus housing. Students may 
nominate themselves for this award, or high school guidance counselors 
may make Banneker Scholar nominations. Applicants must submit an 
admission application, official transcript, and SAT scores to the Under- 
graduate Admission Office by December 1 for the following academic 
year. Credentials of National Achievement Finalists and Semifinalists are 
reviewed provided these students notify the Banneker Scholarship Com- 
mittee of these academic honors. Contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admission. 

Regents Scholars Program: The Regents Scholars Program recog- 
nizes the extraordinary achievement of outstanding freshmen students. 
New awards are made each year in the amount of full tuition, room, board, 
and mandatory fees. In addition, winners receive a $1000 stipend each 
academic year. Recipients are automatically admitted to the Honors 
Program. A select number of the top high school scholars in the nation will 
be interviewed for this most prestigious award. An admission application, 
official transcript, and SAT scores must be submitted to the Undergradu- 
ate Admission Office by December 1 to apply for the Regents Scholars 
Program for the following academic year. Students may nominate 
themselves, or high school guidance counselors may make Regents 
Scholar nominations. Contact the Office of Undergraduate Admission. 

Honors Scholarship: University, Departmental, and College Honors 
students already attending UMCP may have an opportunity to apply for 
one of these $800 awards. Financial need is not a criterion for selection. 
Regents, Key and Banneker recipients are not eligible for Honors Schol- 
arships. Scholarships are renewable, if the recipient submits a written 
application and continues to meet the criteria. To be eligible for consid- 
eration, students must have a minimum 3.2 grade point average and be 
achieving satisfactory progress toward the completion of requirements for 
an Honors citation or for a Departmental or College Honors Program. In 
addition, the applicants must submit an essay and a faculty recommenda- 
tion. Contact the Hdnors Program. 

Full University Schoiarship: The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) 
designed the Full University Scholarship Program to recruit financially 
needy, academically talented entering freshmen to UMCP. These four- 
year awards cover tuition, mandatory fees, room, and board. To be 
eligible for consideration, a student must be an incoming freshman with a 
grade point average of 3.5 or above, combined SAT scores of 1 100 or 
higher, and demonstrate need as determined by OSFA via the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Approximately fifteen full 
scholarships are awarded each year. Candidates will be selected from 
those admitted to UMCP by March 1. Contact the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. 

UMCP Departmental Scholarships: Some Colleges and departments 
at UMCP offer a variety of merit scholarships. Most departmental 
scholarships require a student to have a minimum grade point average of 
3.0 and be registered for a minimum of 12 credits per semester. For 
information regarding departmental scholarships, please contact the 
appropriate college or department of study. 

Maryland State Scholarships: The Maryland State Scholarship Admin- 
istration (MSSA), located in Annapolis, awards both need- and merit- 
based scholarships to Maryland residents. There are currently sixteen 
different scholarships available, including the General State Scholarship, 
the Senatorial Scholarship, the House of Delegates Scholarship, and tlie 
Distinguished Scholar Award. You may obtain more information about 
these and other awards by calling MSSA at (41 0)974-5370. All Maryland 



16 Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



residents are expected to apply for State Scholarship assistance. Initial 
application for many of the awards is made through the Free Application 
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and Maryland Financial Aid Form (FAF). 
Please note that filing just the FAFSA is not sufficient to apply for Maryland 
Slate Scholarships. The application deadline for most programs is March 
1 . Maryland FAF/FAFSAs are available from MSSA and from the UMCP 
Office of Student Financial Aid. 

Scholarships from Other States: Several states have reciprocal 
agreements with the State of Maryland. Students who are residents of 
these states may receive funds for study in eligible post-secondary 
institutions in Maryland. Interested students should contact their state 
scholarship agencies for information. 

Scholarship Searches: A broad range of scholarships is available from 
pnvate sources. Usually, these awards are not as well publicized as the 
slate and university programs. Therefore, students should conduct a 
scholarship search to locate such sources. UMCP offers two sen/ices to 
students to aid them in their searches. The Oftlce of Student Financial 
Aid Scholarship Match is a free service available to students with an 
overall grade point average of 3.0 or above. This personalized program 
matches donors with potential scholarship recipients. The applications 
are maintained in an active file for the entire academic year and must be 
renewed annually. Applications become available at the Office of Student 
Financial Aid in January for the upcoming academic year. CASHE 
(College Aid Sources for Higher Education) is a computerized financial aid 
and scholarship search through which students may learn about possible 
sources of financial support from thousands of resources listed. The 
program matches the student with resources that are keyed to particular 
characteristics (gender, ethnic background, major, geographic region, 
etc). When students receive their list, it is their responsibility to contact the 
sources provided lor additional information and/or applications. The 
service is available to UMCP students and affiliates for $5 and to all others 
for $1 5. For applications for these two search services, contact the Office 
of Student Financial Aid at (301)314-8313. 



Need-Based Financial Assistance 

Grants 

The Office of Student Financial Aid administers several grant programs for 
undergraduate students. Awards are made based on financial need as 
determined by the FAFSA. Grants do not have to be repaid. 

Federal Pell Grant: This grant provides a "foundation" of financial aid, to 
which aid from other sources may be added. Only first-time undergradu- 
ate students (those who have not already completed a bachelor's degree) 
may receive a Federal Pell Grant. All undergraduates will be considered 
for this grant regardless of when their applications were received. Stu- 
dents may receive the Federal Pell Grant for less than full-time atten- 
dance, although the award will be pro-rated based on the number of 
credits attempted. Awards range from $400 to $2,300. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): The 

FSEOG is awarded to full-time undergraduates with exceptional need. 
Priority is given to Federal Pell Grant recipients. To be considered for 
FSEOG, you must meet OSFAs priority application deadline of February 
15. Awards range from $200 to $600 per year. 

Institutional Grants: UMCP awards grant money to full-time students 
who demonstrate financial need and who meet OSFAs phohty application 
deadline of February 15. There are three funds from which money is 
awarded, and OSFA selects recipients for the awards based on which 
grant best fits their qualifications. The Frederick Douglass Grant is 
awarded to African-American undergraduates. The University Grant is 
awarded to undergraduates who have a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 
or higher. The UMCP Grant may be awarded to any undergraduate 
Award amounts from these three programs range from $100 to $2,000. 



Self-Help 

Financial aid may be awarded in the form of an opportunity to obtain 
assistance, rather than as an outright monetary gift. Such aid programs 
are called "self-help." and take the form of employment programs and 
student loans. Most of these programs are awarded based on need as 
determined by the FAFSA. 

Federal Worlt-Study: The Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program provides 
students the opportunity to earn money to meet their educational and 



personal expenses through the semester. Money earned from a FWS job 
does not have to be paid back. To be considered for FWS. students must 
meet OSFAs pnority application deadline of February 15 This award is 
need-based, and may range from $800 to $2,000 Pay rates depend on 
the level of complexity of the work, but will be at least the federal minimum 
wage. FWS employees receive a paycheck every other week lor the 
hours worked, like all university employees. Most FWS |Obs are on 
campus, though there are opportunities for FWS students to worV off 
campus at pnvate non-profit organizations, through the Community 
Service Learning program. The number of hours students may worK is 
limited to twenty per week while school is in session, or forty p)er week 
during vacations and summer. 

Workships: Dining Hall Workships may be awarded to on-campus 
students with financial need who meet OSFA s pnonty application dead- 
line of February 15. Through a wori^ship. funds are advanced to the 
student at the beginning of the semester when he or she completes a 
contract stating the number of hours to t>e worked dunng that semester 
This program differs from Federal Work-Study in that the student receives 
all the "wages" up front to help cover the university bill, and so does not 
receive bi-weekly paychecks. Dining Hall workships may be awarded 
directly by Dining Services, or through OSFA. Students should either 
contact Dining Services at 31 4-8052. or follow OSFAs standard applica- 
tion procedure. 

Federal Perkins Loan: This is a low interest rate (5 percent) loan for 
students with exceptional financial need who attend at least three-quarter 
time. This is a loan borrowed from the school, and it must be paid back. 
To be eligible, students must meet OSFAs pnority application deadline of 
February 15. The amount of the award will depend upon the student's 
need, and may rangefrom $1 00 to $1 ,200. New IX)rrowers (those who first 
receive a Federal Perkins Loan after July 1 , 1 988) have a grace penod of 
9 months after graduating or leaving school Ijielore they must begin 
repaying their Federal Perkins Loans. Interest will begin accnjing at the 
time of repayment. Students are not responsible for paying the interest on 
the loan while they are attending school. 

Federal Stafford Loan: This is a low interest rate loan for students wtio 

attend at least half-time. Application is made first through the school 
financial aid office via the FAFSA, then through the lending institution of 
the student's choice (bank or credit union). Eligibility lor this loan is based 
on need, not credit history. This loan is borrowed by the student, and must 
be paid back by the student. 

There are two types of Federal Stafford Loans, subsidized and 
unsubsidized. The student must demonstrate financial need to receive 
a subsidized loan, and he or she is not required to pay the interest on it 
while in school. Students who do not demonstrate financial need, or who 
do not demonstrate sufficient need to borrow a full subsidized loan, may 
borrow a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. If a student borrows an 
unsubsidized loan, he or she will be responsible for paying the interest 
which accrues during school attendance. The FAFSA must be completed 
by all students who wish to apply for either type of Federal Stafford Loan. 
The interest rate for new Ijorrowers who take out their first Federal Stafford 
Loan after October 1 , 1992 is vanable, capped at 9%, and will be 6 94% 
through June 20, 1 993. For Federal Stafford tX)rrowers who took out their 
first loan between July 1 , 1 988 and October 1 , 1 992. the interest rate is 8 
percent for the first four years of repayment, and 1 percent thereafter up 
to the maximum of ten years total. For most borrowers, repayment of the 
principal will begin at the end of the 6 month grace period after graduation 
or dropping below half-time status. 

Maximum loan amounts are as follows: $2,625 per year for first-year 
undergraduates, $3,500 per year tor second-year undergraduates, and 
$5,500 per year for third-, fourth-, or fifth-year undergraduates. II the 
student does not demonstrate need to txsrrow the maximum lor his or her 
year in school through the subsidized Federal Stafford Loan, he or she 
may txjrrow the difference in a Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan For 
instance, if you are a junior, and you demonstrate need for a $3,000 
Federal Stafford Loan, you may borrow up to $2,500 more in an 
unsubsidized loan il you wish. The maximum borrowing limit for under- 
graduates is $23,000. 

Federal SLS (Supplemental Loan For Students): This is a k)an lor 
independent undergraduate students who do not demonstrate financial 
need, or who have remaining need after borrowing their full Federal 
Stafford Loan eligibility. Since eligibility lor the Federal Stafford program 
must be determined first, students must complete the regular application 
process, including filing the FAFSA, to be considered lor the Federal SLS 
Like the Federal Stafford Loan, the Federal SLS is borrowed through the 
lender ol choice, though application must first be made through the school. 
Students must attend at least half-time to receive a Federal SLS 



Fees, Expenses, and Financial Aid 17 



The Federal SLS is not a subsidized loan; therefore, the student will be 
responsible for paying the interest which accrues on the loan while in 
school. The interest rale for the Federal SLS is vanable, capped at 1 1%, 
and will be 7.36% through June 30. 1993 Repayment of this loan begins 
immediately upon receipt of the last disbursement for the academic year, 
unless the student makes arrangements with the lender to deter payment 
of the principal and/or interest. The maximum loan amounts are as follows: 
$4,000 per year lor first and second-year undergraduates, and $5,000 
per year for third-, fourth-, and fifth-year undergraduates. Undergraduate 
students may borrow up to a maximum of $23,000 

Federal PLUS (Parent Loans For Undergraduate Students): This is a 
non-need-based loan which parents may borrow to help them pay for their 
dependent children's education. The Federal PLUS enables parents to 
borrow the full yearly cost of the student's education (as determined by the 
school) minus all other financial aid. There is no yearly or cumulative 
borrowing limit. Because this loan is not need-based, submission of the 
FAFSA IS not required to apply. However, the loan application must first 
be submitted to the school for calculation of the amount which the parent 
may borrow for the student in that year. Final approval of the loan by the 
parents' chosen lender will be based on credit history. The interest rate 
for the Federal PLUS is vanable. capped at 10%. and will be 7.36% 
through June 30. 1993. Repayment of the loan begins immediately. 



for employers seeking help Call 314-8324 for further information. Many 
jobs, including full-time summer employment opportunities, are available 
both on and off campus. All students, even those who do not receive 
Federal Work Study, may use the Job Referral Service 

For in-depth instructions, directions, and answers to financial aid ques- 
tions and concerns, please stop by the Office of Student Financial Aid 
Public Inquiry Counter to pick up Financial Aid Fact Sheets on a vahety of 
topics, ranging from application procedures to specific aid programs. 

Stop by the Office of Student Financial Aid Public Inquiry Counter to pick 
up Financial Aid Fact Sheets on a variety of topics, ranging from applica- 
tion procedures to specific aid programs 

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid 

All students who receive federal, state, and/or institutional financial eiid are 
required to comply with standards of satisfactory academic progress as 
defined by the Office of Student Financial Aid, The standards are pub- 
lished in the Schedule ot Classes, and a copy of the policy may be 
obtained from OSFA. 



Additional Resources 
Job Referral Service 



The Job Referral Service. 31 20 Hornbake Building, serves f«ee of charge 
as an information clearinghouse for students seeking part-time work and 



18 



Notes 



19 



CHAPTFR 3 



CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION, RESOURCES, 
AND STUDENT SERVICES 



CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION 
Office of the President 

1101 Mam Administration. 405-5803 

The President is the chief executive otticer of the University of Maryland 
at College Park. Four Vice Presidents, who report to the President, 
manage different divisions of the campus administration. The Office of 
Human Relations Programs, the Campus Senate, the Department of 
Intercollegiate Athletics, and the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute 
report to the Office of the President. 

Academic Affairs 

1119 Main Administration, 405-5252 

The Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost provides 
leadership to the academic community and coordinates the academic life 
of all students at College Park. The Vice President and Provost oversees 
the development of programs of study; the development, review, and 
implementation of academic policies and regulations: and is responsible 
for ensuring the integrity and continuity of all curricula in the context of the 
institutional mission and the additional goals of promoting diversity and 
quality. This Office also acts as a liaison within the academic community 
and between the academic and other communities and cooperates with 
other campus units in strategic and long-range planning. 

Administrative Affairs 

1 1 32 Main Administration, 405-1 1 08 

The Office of the Vice President for Administrative Affairs is responsible 
for the effective management of the physical, fiscal, and staff support 
resources of the institution. It also provides campus safety and security, 
materials management, administrative computing, and other necessary 
support services. Of particular interest to students are the community 
awareness and security programs offered by the University Police and the 
information and assistance services provided by the bursar for concerns 
of students regarding university billings. 

Institutional Advancement 

1114 Main Administration, 405-4680 

The Office of the Vice President for Institutional Advancement conducts 
a variety of programs to develop greater understanding and support for the 
University of Maryland at College Park among its many publics. Units of 
this office include Development, Public Information, University Publica- 
tions, Special Events, and Alumni Programs.. The Office of Institutional 
Advancement is responsible for all official campus-wide advancement 
programs such as fund raising, alumni affairs, production of official 
campus publications, films and video presentations, media relations, and 
management of major campus events. 

Student Affairs 

2108 Mitchell Building, 314-8428 

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs provides administrative 
leadership for the development of programs and services that help 
students clarify and fulfill their needs and objectives, and that contribute 
to a constructive campus learning environment. The office serves as a 
general point of contact for students and their families regarding student 



life. It coordinates student affairs efforts with the academic colleges, the 
graduate school, and other administrative units in the areas of student 
conduct, due process and student-related legal matters. The office 
maintains liaison with the university chaplains, the Student Government 
Association (SGA), and the Graduate Student Association (GSA), and 
also advises Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society. 

Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies 

2130 Mitchell Building, 405-9363 

The Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies: 

Serves as campus advocate for excellence in undergraduate 
education; 

Helps students take full advantage of the University's many learn- 
ing opportunities; 

Promotes an academic environment that welcomes and celebrates 
the cultural richness of our community; 
Supports and rewards faculty for excellence as teachers and 
mentors; and 

Strives with faculty and staff to achieve the College Park commit- 
ment to delivering the broad, challenging, and enriching education 
required of all citizens in a democracy. 

In fulfilling its mission, Undergraduate Studies provides a wide range of 
academic support services for all undergraduate students, faculty and 
staff. All of its units work toward enhancing the undergraduate exp)erience 
at College Park. The Office coordinates the interpretation and implemen- 
tation of academic regulations and requirements with the Vice President 
for Academic Affairs, and cooperates with academic deans and depart- 
ment chairs to assure the overall organization, continuity, and effective- 
ness of the undergraduate curriculum. 

Undergraduate Studies includes: 
Academic Achievement Programs 
Career Center 

Center for Teaching Excellence 
CLEP and Advanced Placement credit information 
Credit by examination 
Distinguished Scholar-Teacher Program 
Division of Letters and Sciences 
Educational Talent Search 
General Education requirements (CORE) 
Health professions advising 
Individual Studies 
Internships and cooperative education (Experimental Learning 

Programs) 
University Honors Program 
Upward Bound 

The Center for Teaching Excellence 

2li30 Mitchell Building 

The Center for Teaching Excellence supports campus-wide efforts to 
enhance undergraduate education. The Center offers tangible assistance 
to individual faculty and TA's, as well as to the departments and colleges 
in which they work. It provides: Workshops and Conversations related to 
teaching and learning issues; assistance in organizing and implementing 
faculty teaching workshops, TA training activities, and evaluation/support 
strategies related to improving teaching; consultation on particular areas 
of concern in teaching and learning, research into teaching practice, and 
implementation of innovative teaching-learning strategies. 



20 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



The Center also facilitates the undergraduate Teaching Assistants pro- 
gram, the annual Celebrating Teachers awards for outstanding teaching, 
and the Center for Teaching Excellence Fellows program. 

For more information please call Dr. Jim Greenberg, the Center Project 
Coordinator, at 405-3154 or 405-9363. 

Distlnguislied Schiolar-Teacher Program 

2130 Mitchell Building 

Distinguished Scholar-Teacher (DST) is the highest recognition this 
campus gives to faculty. Faculty are selected for this honor based on both 
their intellectual achievements and on their abilities to translate their 
scholarship into successful classroom teaching. The DST Program brings 
the insights of these faculty to a larger audience by allowing them to teach 
a special Honors course and to give a public lecture during their year as 
DSTs. 

For information, please contact Undergraduate Studies, (301 ) 405-9355, 
Bonnie Oh, Asst. Dean 

Administrative Dean for Summer and Special Programs 

2103 Reckord Armory, 405-6551 

The summer school consists of two six-week sessions and numerous 
additional courses of various length from three to eight weeks. Newly 
admitted students may begin their studies during the summer rather than 
the following fall term. By taking advantage of this opportunity and 
continuing to attend summer sessions, completion of a baccalaureate 
degree might be shortened by a year or more. 

Attendance during the summer sessions eases the transition from high 
school to college. Classes are generally smaller, meet every day, and 
faculty contact is more frequent. Courses offered during the summer are 
the same in content and instruction as those offered during the academic 
year. 

The summer cultural and recreational programs are an important part of 
"Summer at Maryland." The Maryland Summer Institute for the Creative 
and Performing Arts offers a series of programs in art, dance, drama, film 
and music, and presents world-class artists on the campus. 

Facilities for most sports and an intramural program in several team and 
individual sports are available. For additional information, write for a 
Summer Programs catalog: Administrative Dean for Summer Programs, 
The University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 



CAMPUS RESOURCES AND SERVICES 
Academic Achievement Programs 

01 1 1 Chemistry Building, 405-4736 

Intensive Educational Development: Provides comprehensive, struc- 
tured support services to first- and second-year students currently enrolled 
at the University of Maryland at College Park, whose academic profile 
would suggest that they might be at retention risk without this support. lED 
also provides as-needed academic support and counseling services to 
upper-level lED students. Support services include math and English 
review, tutoring, and study skills enhancement instnjction. 

Prospective students attempting to gain admission to the University by 
participating in this program are required to attend the six-week Summer 
Transitional Program, designed to develop, expand, and improve English, 
math, and study skills, assist in the transition from high school to the 
University, and both challenge and evaluate each students potential for 
success at this institution 

Student Support Services: A U.S. Department of Education grant- 
supported program, which provides academic advisement (first and 
second years), counseling, tutohng, and skill enhancement instruction to 
low-income and first-generation college students. SSS also assists par- 
ticipants in identifying and acquiring significant financial aid to meet a 
student's full unmet need. 

Ronald E. McNaIr Post-baccalaureate Achievement: A U.S. Depart- 
ment of Education grant-supported program, which provides low-income 
and first-generation college juniors and seniors with skill enhancement, 
counseling, tutoring, academic advisement, mentoring, and scholarly and 



research experience designed to prepare students for graduate educa- 
tion. The six-week summer component includes a stipend of approxi- 
mately $2,000. 

Academic Support (or Returning Athletes: Provides continuing edu- 
cational opportunities and support to former basketball and football 
athletes who were in good academic standing, had attained junior or 
senior level status: had exhausted athletic eligibility, and left the University 
without obtaining the undergraduate degree. The program enables stu- 
dents to return to the classroom and complete degree requirements. 

Academic Advising 

Academic advising is an essential part of an undergraduate's educational 
experiences. 

Advantages of Advising: Students can expect advising to help them: 

(1 ) better understand their purposes for attending the university; 

(2) develop insights about personal behaviors that promote improved 
adjustment to the campus setting; 

(3) increase their awareness of academic programs and course 
offerings at the University of Maryland at College Park; 

(4) more frequently explore opportunities both Inside and outside the 
classroom for intellectual and cultural development; 

(5) acquire decision-making skills that can accelerate academic and 
career planning; 

(6) more realistically evaluate their academic progress and its rela- 
tionships to successful planning; and 

(7) understand the relationship between academic success and 
planning skills. 

Required Advising 

Students enrolled in certain majors are required to see advisors before 
each registration. For many students, most. If not all, advising is not 
mandatory. However, the university expects students to see an advisor 
under certain circumstances: 

Students in Their First Year of Registration at the University of 
Maryland at College Park 

Students Receiving an Academic Warning (Mandatory) 

Students Dismissed From the University (Mandatory) 

Students Who Withdraw From the University (Mandatory) 

Students Nearing Graduation 

Students With 70-80 Credits: Senior Audit 

Finding An Advisor 

Undergraduate students are encouraged to use the many advising 
opportunities available to them. At both academic levels — college ar>d 
department — at least one person has been designated to coordinate 
advising. A list of these persons, providing name, room number, ar>d 
telephone extension is published each semester In the Schedule of 
Classes. Students who are unable to locate an advisor or who have 
questions about campus advising programs should visit or call tfie 
Division of Letters and Sciences. 1117 Hornbake Library. 314-8418 

Division of Letters and Sciences 

Division of Letters and Sciences: 1117 Hornbake Library. 314-8418 
Health Professions Advising: 405-2793 
Credit-By-Exam/Advanced PlacemenVCLEP: 314-8418 
Law Advising: 314-8418 

Many university students decide to explore their academic interests 
before selecting a major. 

Working with a staff of trained academic advisors in the Division of Letters 
and Sciences, these students are able to explore majors, ctioose and 
schedule courses, plan their academic programs, and learn atwut cam- 
pus-wide resources available for solving problems they encounter To 
assist students in explonng the CORE general education program, and in 
choosing courses and majors, the Division of Letters and Scierx:es 
sponsors the annual "Celebrate Learnir>g" senes. which introduces tal- 
ented faculty, teachers and researchers from all areas of the curriculum. 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 21 



the Division of Letters and Sciences staff works closely with the Career 
Center, the Counseling Center, various tutoring services, and advisors 
from academic departments and programs across campus to provide a 
coordinated advising network which helps students design their personal 
academic plans, as follows; 

Choosing a Major: Providing information and referral to the wide 
range of academic programs available to students and coordinating 
with services offered by the Career Development Center, the 
Counseling Center, and the academic colleges and departments. 
The Division of Letters and Sciences helps students select majors 
which best meet their interests and further their career goals. 

Pre-professlonal Advising: Offering preprofessional advising 
lor students interested in law and the health professions. For 
further information on preprofessional advising, consult the entry 
on Campus-wide Programs in this catalog , or call 3 1 4-84 1 8 or 405- 
2793. 

Information and Referral: Maintaining information about aca- 
demic programs and requirements and academic support services 
at the ijniversity of Maryland at College Park. Workshops designed 
to help students select majors and courses are offered regularly 
during the pre-registration period. 

Troubleshooting: Helping individual students identify and solve 
specific advising problems and difficulties^with administrative pro- 
cedures, such as transfer credit evaluation, schedule revisions, 
changing majors, errors in academic records, etc. 

Policy Interpretation: Keeping students and advisors informed 
about new academic policies and helping to interpret existing 
policies and practices and determine under what conditions ex- 
ceptions might be granted. 

Credlt-by-Exam, CLEP, Advanced Placement (314-8418): 

Administering the campus-wide program of credit-by-examination 
and coordinating information about CLEP and advanced placement 
credits. 

General Assistance: Giving general assistance to students who 
have not been assigned to a permanent advising home, such as 
students visiting this campus from other institutions. 

Admission 

Ground Level, Mitchell Building, 314-8385 

The services offered by the Office of Undergraduate Admission are 
designed to meet the individual needs of prospective applicants. The 
office provides general information about the University of Maryland at 
College Park through brochures, letters, group information sessions, and 
campus tours. It also evaluates the applications of both freshman and 
transfer students in order to select qualified students. The Office of 
Reenrollment reviews all applications for readmission and reinstatement. 
For more information, seethe chapter on Undergraduate Admission in this 
catalog. 

Campus Programs 

1135 Stamp Student Union, 314-7174 

The Office of Campus Programs is a major resource for students wishing 
to become involved in co-curricular activities at the University of Maryland 
at College Park. Campus Programs provides advisement, consultation, 
and programming assistance to student organizations for the primary 
purpose of enhancing the educational growth of groups' leaders, mem- 
bers, and associates. Efforts focus on encouraging involvement of all 
students in campus life activities, establishing various programs for the 
benefit of the university community, and providing numerous leadership 
development opportunities. Specific efforts include: 

Student Organizations. Campus Programs registers all student 
organizations at the University and makes available a directory of 
more than 300 groups. The office also arranges reservations for 
these organizations when they wish to use campus facilities for 
their programs and events. The office sponsors a number of 
programs to help individual students participate in these groups 
and their activities. 

Organization Advisement. Major student groups such as the 
Student Government Association, the Homecoming Committee, 



and SEE Productions receive direct advisement from the staff of 
Campus Programs. Other student groups can also obtain help from 
the trained staff merely by requesting it. 

Leadership Development. Campus Programs offers a wide range 
of training expenences in interpersonal and organizational devel- 
opment skills ranging in format from half-day seminars to weekend 
workshops to full semester courses earning academic credit. 

Fraternities and Sororities. Social fraternities and soronties are 
advised and supported by Campus Programs, individually and 
through the three "umbrella" organizations: the Intrafraternity 
Council, the Pan-Hellenic Council, and the Pan-hellenic 
Association. 

Campus Senate 

1 100 Mane Mount Hall, 405-5805 

The Campus Senate, an integral part of the institutions system of 
governance, is unique in that it has representation from all segments of the 
campus community: administrators, staff, faculty, and undergraduate and 
graduate students. Participation in the senate or any of its fourteen 
standing committees is an honor and a responsibility. 

The full senate meets eight times a year to consider matters of concern to 
the institution including academic issues, university policies, plans, facilities, 
and the welfare of faculty, staff, and students. The senate advises the 
president, the chancellor, or the Board of Regents as it deems appropriate. 
To become a student senator, students must be elected through their 
college or school, or the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Elections are 
held every year during the spring semester. Students are also encouraged 
to participate in a series of senate standing committees, such as Student 
Affairs and Human Relations. These committees draw membership from 
the campus community at large and cover every aspect of campus life and 
function. Details about the election and appointment processes are 
available from the Campus Senate office. 

Career Center 

3121 Hornbake Library, South Wing, 314-7225 

The Career Center supports and assists students from all departments in 
early and systematic consideration of career questions and concerns, 
such as: "How are my interests, skills and values related to career fields 
and University of Maryland at College Park majors?" "What are effective 
strategies in securing a job or selecting a graduate school?" "How do I 
prepare now for a rewarding career in the future?" Career Center pro- 
grams and services are designed to be used most effectively by students 
beginning in the freshman year and continuing through the college years. 
Students who begin to plan their education and career early in their college 
experience will be in the best position to direct themselves toward 
meaningful and rewarding careers upon graduation. 

Programs and Services 

Career Resource Center. The Career Resource Center provides 
information and guidance for career exploration, decision-making, 
graduate school planning and job seeking. The center's holdings 
include comprehensive reference material on all aspects of work, 
education, and career exploration, as well as listings of job vacancies, 
employer and graduate school information, job seeking guides, 
videotapes, employer information, and the DISCOVER computer- 
ized career information system. 

Career Counselors. Career counselors assist students in identi- 
fying careers and majors suited to their interests and skills, and in 
developing the skills needed for their job search, graduate training, 
or career change. Counselors are available by appointment or 
during walk-in hours (for brief consultations). 

Experiential Learning Programs 

0119 Hornbake Library, South Wing, 405-3956 

Experiential Learning Programs (ELP) provides a number of learn- 
ing opportunities that encourage students to test classroom learn- 
ing in work situations, explore career possibilities by direct partici- 
pation, learn about the culture and people of an organization, 
geographic area, or academic environment, and enhance their 
personal development through work and academic travel. The 
Programs include the following: 



22 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



National Student Exchange (NSE). NSE provides students with 
the opportunity to experience educational travel, curricular devel- 
opment, cultural enrichment, and personal growth. Students may 
attend, for one semester or an academic year, campuses located 
throughout the continental U.S. and in Hawaii, the Virgin Islands, 
Alaska, Guam and Puerto Rico Students select schools that 
provide a particular academic focus, unique cultural environment, 
or different geographic location While on exchange, Maryland 
students pay tuition and mandatory fees to UMCP, and room and 
board to the host institution. March 1st is the deadline lor applica- 
tion for the next academic year. Students must have a 2.5 cumu- 
lative GPA at the time of application and exchange. Students must 
earn their final thirty hours of credits at College Park. 

Internships. Internships are paid or unpaid work experiences with 
specific educational objectives for which students may be granted 
academic credit. Internships are available for most majors. ELP 
maintains current files on over 1000 private businesses and 
government agencies which are actively seeking interns. Work- 
shops are offered to assist students in the process of locating 
internships. Finding a rewarding internship takes time, so students 
should start looking early in the semester before they would like to 
begin work. 

Cooperative Education for Liberal Arts, Business, and the 
Sciences (Co-op). Co-op allows students to learn more about their 
field of study, gain paid, professional-level work experience that is 
related to their major, and earn a competitive salary. To be eligible, 
students must have completed thirty-six semester hours, twelve 
UMCP credits the semester before enrolling in the co-op program, 
and maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA. Students may work 
either full-time or part-time. The minimum work commitment is 
equal to six months of full-time work. Interested students must 
attend two required information and preparation sessions. Stu- 
dents should apply the semester before they wish to begin working. 
See the College of Engineering entry in this catalog for details 
about the Engineering Co-op Program. 

Experimental Learning Course — Courses Numbered 386. Some 
internships and cooperative education placements may be appro- 
priate for academic credit. The University uses the course number 
386 to denote experiential learning credit. The Campus Senate has 
established the following regulations governing credit for 386: 

• To be eligible a student must have earned 56 credits, including 
12 at UMCP and 3 in the department in which credit is to t>e 
awarded. 

• The course may be taken by permission of a faculty memlser, 
if it is a departmental option and in accordance with departmen- 
tal internship policies. 

• The course may be taken for a letter grade or pass/fail. 

• 386 is a variable credit course. Students may earn from 3 to 6 
credits unless othen^/ise stipulated by departmental policies. 

• The numtser of credits earned depends on the number of hours 
worthed at the internship site plus time spent on completing 
projects as stipulated in the Learning Proposal. 

• 386 may be taken only once in any given department. 

• 386 may be taken In only one department per semester. 

• 386 may be taken for a maximum of 12 credits as part of an 
undergraduate program. 

In order to earn credit, students must secure a faculty sponsor and 
complete a learning proposal. The sponsor must be a faculty 
member in the department in which the student wishes to earn 
credit. That department must be logically related to the internship 
experience. The Learning Proposal is a one-page contract that 
spells out the nature of the internship, specific responsibilities, 
supervision, method of evaluation, learning objectives and contact 
with faculty sponsor. The Learning Proposal must be signed by the 
student, the on-site supervisor and the faculty sponsor and be 
submitted to ELP for approval Students will not be permitted to 
register for 386 without this approval. 

Courses: 

EDCP 108D — College and Career Advancement. Career Plan- 
ning and Decision-Making. Feeling confused about choosing a 
major? This course will help you identify your career interests, 
skills, and values and how they relate to UMCP majors. Recom- 
mended for freshmen and sophomores. 1 cr 

EDCP 108J — College and Career Advancement. Job Search 
Strategies. This course will help you learn special skills needed to 
be successful in today's job martlet. Topics include: networking, 
interviewing, resume writing, and planning for your career future. 
Junior or Senior standing required. 1 cr. 



Credentials Service. Credentials are a student's permanent pro- 
fessional record including letters of recommendation, evaluations, 
and course and resume information. Any undergraduate or gradu- 
ate student may develop a file in preparation tor graduation. 
Credential files are most helpful to students applying to graduate 
and professional schools (law, medicine, dentistry, etc ), andtfiose 
seeking jobs in education, government, and not-for-profit organi- 
zations. All senior Education majors are required to establish a 
credential file for employment purposes. 

Workshops and Special Events. Group programs each semes- 
ter include: Choosing a Major, Interviewing, Resume Writing, 
Onentation to the On-Campus Recruiting Program, Job Search 
Strategies, and Applying to Graduate School Special events that 
bring students and employer representatives together tor informa- 
tion exchange and employment contact include: career panels, a 
Graduate/Professional School Fair, and career/job fairs. 

On-Campus Recruiting Program (OCRP). Each year over 500 
employers come to campus to interview interested students who 
are within two semesters of graduation. Job opportunities are 
concentrated in the areas of management training, engineering, 
computer science, accounting and financial operations, and scien- 
tific research and applications. The Baltimore-Washington corridor 
offers additional opportunities in a variety of government and 
specialized careers. Employers also have the opportunity to re- 
ceive information from those graduating seniors who register for 
and participate in the Candidate Referral database service Job 
searches should be initiated at least one year in advance of 
graduation 

Placement Manual and Career Guide. The Placement Manual is 
designed as a special resource guide for students dunng their job 
searches. Contents include resume wnting guides, successful 
interviewing techniques, and job search strategies that work. A 
preliminary list of employers participating in the On-Campus Re- 
cruiting Program is featured. The Career Guide is intended to 
assist students in clarifying career goals and choosing a major 
Contents included a stef)-by-step guide to explonng your career 
options and identifying career goals through vanous exercises 
involving how your interests and values relate to career options. 
Both the Placement Manual and the Career Guide are availat)le to 
students free of charge. 

Community Service Programs 

1195 Stamp Student Union, 314-CARE 

Community Service Programs (CSP) provides students, faculty, and staff 
with information and resources about community service and volunteer 
opportunities. A listing of over 200 opportunities for individual or group 
involvement in short-term, long-term and one-time-only activities is avail- 
able in the office. CSP can also help students identify student organiza- 
tions involved with community service. Handouts to assist students in 
selecting, pursuing and reflecting upon their service expenence and a 
monthly newsletter listing current opportunities are also available. 

Commuter Affairs 

1 195 Stamp Student Union, 314-5274 

The Office of Commuter Affairs has established services to work on behalf 
of, with, and for the commuter students at the University of Maryland at 
College Parit. 

Carpooilng. Students interested in forming a carpool can join ttie 
individual match-up program by filling out an application at tlw 
Office of Commuter Affairs or calling 1-800-492 3757 Students 
who carpool with three or more p>eople may apply at OCA for 
Prionty Parking and receive a parking permit for a faculty/staff k)t 

Off-Campus Housing Service (314-3645) maintains up-to-date 
computerized listings of rooms, apartments, and houses (txsth 
vacant and to share). Area maps, apartment directones. and 
brochures concerning topMCS of interest to commuter students are 
available in the office. 

Settling In. Commuter Connection, a newspeiper mailed to tf)e 
homes of commuters twice a semester, contains helpful informa- 
tion on campus life UMaps, a unique guide to the institution, 
helping students match their own interests with courses, careers, 
and opportunities for involvement on campus, are available in tt>e 
Office of Commuter Affairs. Through the SHOW. (Students 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 23 



Helping. Orienting and Welcoming) Program (314-7250), new 
students are matched upon request with upperclass students to 
learn atxjut campus life Meet other commuters at "Good Morning, 
Commuters!" (or coffee and campus intormation on Wednesday 
mornings at the Union. 

Shuttl»-UM (314-2255) provides bus sen/ice for students, faculty 
and staff. The bus system offers daytime commuter routes, evening 
security routes, evening security caila-ride. and transit service for 
disabled faculty, staff or students. Schedules are available at the 
Stamp Student Union information Desk, the Office of Commuter 
Affairs, and the ShuWe-UM Office. 

Counseling Center 

Shoemaker Building. 314-7651 

The Counseling Center provides comprehensive psychological and 
counseling services to meet the mental health and developmental needs 
of students. Records kept as part of providing counseling services are 
confidential, and are not part of the university's educational records. The 
Counseling Center is open Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 
p.m. and Friday. 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

In order to help students overcome barriers to their teaming and develop- 
ment, the Counseling Center provides the following special services and 
programs: 

Counseling Service (314-7651). Psychologists provide profes- 
sional, individual and group counseling services for students with 
social-emotional and educational-vocational concerns. Counsel- 
ing is available to overcome depression, career indecisiveness, 
anxiety, loneliness and other problems experienced by students. 
Workshops ranging from developing assertiveness and self-es- 
teem to managing stress are offered. A 3:00 p.m. Minority Student 
Walk-in Hour is held daily. The center also provides a series of 
tape-recorded interviews with College Part< academic department 
heads about courses and career options in those fields. 

Learning Assistance Service (314-7693). Educational special- 
ists offer individual and group sessions for improving academic 
skills such as reading, writing, listening, notetaking. and learning 
mathematics and science material. Workshops cover such topics 
as study skills, time management, math skills, exam anxiety, and 
English as a second language. 

Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service (314-7673). 

Professional help is available through consultation, testing, and 
counseling for youngsters ages 5 through 14, and families. 

Testing, Research, and Data Processing Unit (314-7688). Na- 
tional testing programs such as CLEP, GRE, LSAT. MCAT. GMAT 
and Miller Analogies, as well as testing for counseling purposes 
including vocational assessment are administered through this 
office. Staff members produce a wide variety of research reports on 
characteristics of students and the campus environment. 

Disability Support Service (314-7682, TDD 31 4-7683). Services 
for disabled students include assistance in locating interpreters for 
hearing impaired students, readers for visually impaired students, 
and access guides to various buildings and facilities on campus. 
Services must be arranged in advance. New students are urged to 
contact the office as soon as possible. 

The University of Maryland at College Pari< is committed to making 
reasonable accommodations that will permit students with specific 
learning disabilities the opportunity to develop and demonstrate 
proficiency in the required subject matter. As the guiding principle 
was stated by the Campus Senate in 1989, "consideration should 
always be to accommodate the student's learning differences, not 
to water down scholastic requirements." 

Responsibilities of Students with Learning Disabilities. Stu- 
dents bear the primary responsibility for identifying their disabilities 
and for making the necessary adjustments to the learning environ- 
ment. Students with learning disabilities are responsible tor promptly 
communicating their needs for appropriate accommodations to the 
Office of Disability Support Service (DSS). Students may be 
required to obtain official documentation, testing and evaluation 
because determination of appropriate accommodation is based on 
the specific nature of the disability in individual cases. Some 
accommodations are within the authority of DSS and/or the faculty 
member(s) involved. However, written requests for adjustments to 



a curnculum on the basis of learning disability must t>e made to the 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the case of general education 
requirements and to the Dean of the College or School in which the 
student IS enrolled in a major program in the case of college and 
departmental curriculum requirements. The request(s) must be 
submitted in accordance with the "Guidelines for Curriculum Ad- 
justment Requests on the Basis of Learning Disabilities," as 
published by the Undergraduate Advising Center. 

Responsibilities of the University of Maryland at College Park. 

DSS counsels students and faculty and makes recommendations 
to the appropnate offices regarding whether and what kind of 
special aids or adaptations may be required by students with 
disabilities. Instructional, testing, and evaluation adjustments may 
be made by the faculty member(s) involved after the specific 
learning disability has bteen identified, verified, and discussed with 
DSS. The Deans will make the final decisions regarding requests 
for adjustments to curriculum, in consultation with DSS and the 
faculty member(s) involved. 

DSS. 0126 Shoemaker, is open Monday through Friday. 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 

Dining Services 

1 144 South Dining Hall, 314-8054 
Meal Plan Information: 314-8068 

Dining Sen/ices offers several meal plan alternatives at 31 different dining 
locations across campus, providing flexibility, convenience, a diverse 
selection of foods, and convenient hours to all students, faculty, and staff. 

Meal plans available include both a resident meal plan with two options 
and the Terrapin Express Card for off-campus students or students living 
in apartments on campus. 

Dining locations include dining rooms, a custom deli, ethnic eateries, a 
table sen/ice restaurant, an upscale '50's-style eatery, a bakery, a dairy 
ice cream shop, traditional fast foods, and two convenience stores. 
Students may obtain more information and apply for a meal plan in the 
Dining Services Contract Office. 

Educational Talent Search 

01 1 2 Chemistry Building, 314-7763 

The federally-funded Educational Talent Search Program identifies and 
recruits low-income and potential first-generation college students be- 
tween the ages of 1 2 and 27, who display the talent and academic ability 
to succeed in college, or who would like to reenter secondary or post- 
secondary programs. Through outreach to schools and community agen- 
cies. Talent Search provides college orientation and placement assis- 
tance services, advisement on post-secondary career and financial aid 
resources, pre-college development programs and workshops, tutorial 
programs, college campus visits, and assistance in preparing for college 
entrance exams and the application process. The program sen/es 950 
participants annually. 

Financial Aid 

0102 Lee Building, 314-8313 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) administers a variety of 
financial assistance and student employment opportunities, primarily 
based on the need of the applicant. Members of the office staff are 
available for individual counseling on matters pertaining to financial 
planning for college expenses. For additional information, see the chapter 
on Fees and Financial Aid in this catalog. 

Health Center 

Campus Drive, opposite the Stamp Student Union, 314-8180 

The UM University Health Center is located across from the Stamp Union 
on Campus Drive. The services provided by the University Health Center 
include primary care for illness and injury, health education and consul- 
tation, dental clinic, men's clinic, women's clinic, allergy clinic, anonymous 
HIV testing, substance abuse treatment, travel clinic, skin care clinic, 
sports medicine, physical therapy (located in the HLHP building), nutrition, 
mental health, social services, lab services, x-ray and a pharmacy. 
Individual and group health education programs are available on topics 
such as sexual health and contraception, stress management, substance 
abuse, date rape, dental health, and eating disorders. The University 
Health Center is open Monday-Friday, 7 a.m.-l 1 p.m. and Saturday and 



24 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Sunday, 9 a.m. -5 p.m. with varied hours during semester breaks and 
holidays. Students are seen for routine care tietween 9:00 and 5:00 on 
weekdays. Medical services are limited after 5:00p.m. and on weekends. 

All currently registered students pay a mandatory health fee and are 
eligible for care. While the student health fee covers most routine costs at 
the University Health Center, there are additional charges for x-rays, lab 
tests, dental treatment, allergy injections, physical therapy and pharmacy 
supplies. All students are encouraged to carry hospitalization insurance 
A student health insurance plan is available through the University. All 
students' medical records are strictly confidential and may only be 
released with the student's consent or through court-ordered subpoena. 

The Health Center only gives class excuses for a prolonged illness or 
missed exams due to a serious illness. 



University Health Center Phone Numbers: 



Information 
•Appointments 
Dental Clinic 
Health Education 

Honor Societies 



314-8180 
314-8184 
314-8178 
314-8128 



Health Insurance 
Mental Health 
Pharmacy 
Substance Abuse Prog. 



314-8165 
314-8106 
314-8167 
314-8128 



Students who excel in scholarship and leadership may be invited to join 
the appropriate honor society. For information, contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Studies, 405-9363. Honor societies at College Park 
include: 

'Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engineering) 

"Alpha Epsilon Delta (Pre-medicine) 
"Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 
"Alpha Lambda Delta (Scholarship-Freshmen) 
Alpha Zeta (Agriculture) 

Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting major in Business and Management) 
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business and Management) 
Delta Phi Alpha (National German Honors Society) 
Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 
"Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 
Financial Management Association 
"Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 

Golden Key National Honor Society (Scholarship and Leadership; juniors 
and seniors) 

lota Lambda Sigma (Industrial Education) 
"Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 
"Kappa Tau Alpha (Journalism) 
"Lambda Pi Eta (Speech Communication) 
"Monar Board (Scholarship and Leadership) 
"Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineering) 
"Omega Rho (Business and Management) 
'Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 
"Omicron Delta Kappa (Scholarship and Leadership) 
"Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 
Phi Alpha Epsilon (Health and Human Performance) 
"Phi Alpha Theta (History) 
Phi Beta Kappa (Liberal Arts and Sciences) 
■ "Phi Eta Sigma (Scholarship-Freshmen) 
"Phi Kappa Phi (Senior and Graduate Scholarship) 
"Phi Sigma (Biology) 
"Phi Sigma lota (French and Italian) 
Phi Sigma Pi (Scholarship and Leadership) 
Pi Alpha Xi (Horticulture) 
Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 
Pi Pi (Slavic Languages) 
"Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 
"Psi Chi (Psychology) 
Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering) 
Sigma Alpha Omicron (Microbiology) 
Sigma Delta Chi (Society of Professional Journalists) 
"Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 
"Sigma Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering) 
"Sigma Tau Delta (English) 
"Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) 

("Members of Association of College Honor Societies) 



Human Relations Programs 

1 107 Hornbake Library. 405-2838 

The Human Relations Office (HRO) is responsible for initiating action in 
compliance with institution, state, and federal directives designed to 
provide equal education and employment opportunities for College Park 
campus students and employees. It also monitors the outcomes of actions 
taken in this regard, reporting its findings to the president, the Campus 
Senate, and to the campus community at large. The HRO will provide 
students and staff with general information on equity efforts and on the 
status of equity and compliance matters at the University of Maryland at 
College Park. 

The HRO sponsors programs that promote cross-cultural appreciation, 
sexual harassment prevention, and processes complaints of discnmina- 
tion, following procedures set forth in the Campus Human Relations Code. 

Students or employees having a concern about possible inequities in 
educational or employment matters, or who wish to register a complaint, 
may contact an equity administrator (see list t>elow). 

Campus Equity Council (Administrators) 

HRO Campus Compliance Officer 

Dr. Gladys Brown, 1 1 07 Hornbake Library 405-2838 

Academic Affairs 

Dr. Cordell Black, 1 127 Main Administration 405-7227 

Administrative Affairs 

Dr. Sylvia Stewart, 1 132 Main Administration 405-1 109 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Dr. Amel Anderson, 1224 Symons Hall 405-2085 

Architecture 

Mr. Stephen F. Sachs, 1205 Architecture BWg. 405-6314 

Arts and Humanities 

Dr. Stephanie Pogue 405-2105 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Dr. Diana Jackson, 2141 Tydings Hall 405-1679 

Business and Management 

Dr. William Bradford, 1 146 Tydings Hall 405-2306 

Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences 

Dr. George Goldenbaum, 3417 A. V. Williams Building 405-2313 
Education 

Dr. Jeanette Kreiser, 31 19 Benjamin Building 405-2339 

Engineering 

Dr. Marilyn Berman, 1137 Engineering Classroom BIdg 405-3871 
Health and Human Performance 

Ms. Colleen (Coke) Farmer, 2314 HLHP BIdg. 405-2475 

Human Ecology 

Dr. Noel Myricks, 1 204F Marie Mount Hall 405-4007 

Institutional Advancement 

Ms. Patty Wang. 31 1 2 Lee Building 405-7764 

Journalism 

Dr. Greig Stewart, 2115 Journalism Building 405-2390 

Library and Information Sen/ices 

Dr. William Cunningham, 41 1 1C Hornbake Library 405-2046 

President's Office 

Mr. Ray Gillian, 1111 Main Administration 405-5795 

Public Affairs 

Dr. Stephen M. Block, BMGT/SPA Building 405-6354 

Student Affairs 

Ms. Sharon Fries-Britt, 21 08 Mitchell BuikJing 31 4-8431 

Undergraduate Studies 

Ms. Jo-Ann Amadeo, 21 30 Mitchell Building 405-9362 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Cole Student Activities Building, 314-7075 

The Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is responsible for directing 
intercollegiate athletic programs for both women and men. and for 
managing the College Park athletic complex 

Women's intercollegiate athletic teams include cross country, field hockey, 
soccer, and volleyball in the fall; basketball, swimming, indoor track and 
gymnastics during the winter; and lacrosse and track in the spnng Tennis 
competition is scheduled in both the fall and spnng seasons 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 25 



There are men's teams in football, soccer and cross country in the tail, 
baskettiall, swimming, wrestling, and indoor track dunng the winter; and 
baseball, golf, tennis, lacrosse, and outdoor track in the spring. 

Most men's and women's teams compete in the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence (ACC) and all compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion (NCAA) 

National Collegiate Athletic Association Requirements for 
Student Athletes 

1. NCAA eligibility for regular season competition subsequent to the 
student's first year is based upon satisfactory completion pnor to each 
tall term of twenty four (24) semester hours of acceptable degree 
credits or an average of twelve (12) semester hours per term of 
attendance. 

2. The calculation of credit hours shall be based upon hours accepted for 
degree credit at the institution. 

3. Student athletes must declare a major program of study no later than 
the beginning of their fifth term of attendance. 

4. Credit hours earned toward athletic eligibility for students in declared 
majors must be acceptable in their specific majors. 

5. The 24 credit hours of acceptable credit required each year may 
include credits earned for a repeated course when the previous grade 
was an F, but may not include the credits if the previous grade was D 
or better 

University of Maryland Athletic Eligibility Requirements 

The University of K/laryland at College Park requires student athletes to 
maintain a specified minimum grade point average to be eligible for 
practice and competition. The following standards are effective for fall 
term, 1991: 



Freshman (second term) 
2nd year enrollment 
3rd year enrollment 
4th year enrollment 
5th year enrollment 

Mid-Year Enrollees 



1.29 cumulative GPA 
1.78 cumulative GPA 
1.86 cumulative GPA 
2.00 cumulative GPA 
2.00 cumulative GPA 



Student athletes who matriculate in the spring semester are required to 
meet the following grade point average standards: 



End of 1st semester 


1.29 cumulative GPA 


End of 2nd semester 


1.78 cumulative GPA 


End of 3rd semester 


1.86 cumulative GPA 


End of 4th semester 


1 .86 cumulative GPA 


End of 5th semester 


1.94 cumulative GPA 


End of 6th semegter 


2.00 cumulative GPA 


End of 7th semester 


2.00 cumulative GPA 


End of 8th semester 


2.00 cumulative GPA 



Student athletes who meet the required grade point average and all other 
NCAA eligibility requirements will be eligible to compete and practice for 
the full academic year with the exceptions noted below: 



Student athletes who fail to meet necessary grade point average 

requirements for the fall semester are ineligible for the entire academic 

year. However, ineligible student athletes may restore their eligibility 

at the end of any semester if they raise their grade point average to the 

minimum standard for the ensuing year. 

Ineligible student athletes are not permitted to practice or compete. 

First semester freshmen and transfer student athletes will be required 

to meet established grade point average requirements after their initial 

semester at the university. Transfer students are required to attain the 

appropriate grade point averages based upon year of enrollment. 

Mid-year matriculants are required to meet the established GPA 

standard for each of their first three semesters. Thereafter, they will be 

reviewed at the beginning of each fall term. 

Student athletes in their final year of eligibility must maintain a 2.0 

cumulative GPA in order to be eligible tor practice and competition 

during spring term. 

Eligible student athletes who go on academic warning after fall term 

are required to attend regularly supervised study sessions and receive 

academic support services as assigned by the Academic Support Unit 

Staff. 

Dismissed and later reinstated student athletes are ineligible for both 

practice and competition until they meet designated grade point 

averages. 



The Office of Intercollegiate Athletics also sponsors a number of awards 
for achievement in athletics and/or scholarship. Consult the Student 
Athlete Handbook for details. 

For further information, contact the Academic Support Unit, 314-7042 

International Education Services 

31 16A Mitchell Building, 314-7740 

International students and faculty receive a wide vanety of services 
designed to help them benefit from their experience in the United States. 
International Education Services works closely with the Office of Under- 
graduate Admission, evaluating academic records from overseas and 
processing applications for English proficiency, visa, and financial re- 
quirements Other services provided to the prospective student include 
special advising and orientations, help with securing housing, information 
about programs of international interest, and assistance with the forms 
that are required for compliance with immigration and other governmental 
regulations. 

Study Abroad Office. American students and faculty receive 
advisement and information about study, travel, and work in 
other countries. Students may obtain assistance with transfer 
credits, reenrollment. pre-registration, and housing for the 
semester they return to campus. The University of Maryland at 
College Park offers study abroad programs throughout the 
world. For more information about Study Abroad, see the 
Campus-wide Programs section of this catalog. 

English Language Instruction for Non-native Spealters. 

The University of Maryland, through the Maryland English 
Institute, offers two programs of English language instruction 
for those who are not native speakers of English. For those 
students who are admissible but require part-time English 
instruction, the Maryland English Institute offers semi-intensive 
(part-time) instruction. Semi-intensive study would also require 
the student to enroll in a halt-time academic program. 

Judicial Programs 

2117 Mitchell Building, 314-8204 

(To report instances of academic dishonesty, 314-8450) 

General Statement of Student Responsibility. Students are expected 

to conduct themselves at all times in a manner consistent with the 
university responsibility of ensuring to all members of the community the 
opportunity to pursue their educational objectives, and of protecting the 
safety, welfare, rights, and property of all members of the community and 
of the university itself. Students should consult the Code of Student 
Conduct, Appendix C, for further information. 

Student judicial board members are invited to assume positions of 
responsibility in the university discipline system in order that they might 
contribute their insights to the resolutions of disciplinary cases. Final 
authority in disciplinary matters, however, is vested in the campus 
administration and in the Board of Regents. 

Disciplinary Procedures. Students accused of violating university 
regulations are accorded fundamental due process in disciplinary pro- 
ceedings. Formal rules of evidence, however, shall not be applicable, nor 
shall deviations from prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a 
decision or proceeding unless significant prejudice to one of the parties 
may result. University hearing and conference procedures are outlined in 
the documents titled "Preparing for a Hearing" and "Preparing for a 
Conference. " available from the Office of Judicial Programs. 

Multi-Etiinic Student Education 

1101 Hornbake Library, 405-5616 

The Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Education (OMSE) was officially 
created on July 1 . 1972. as a result of proposals and recommendations 
submitted to the chancellor from the Campus Black Community and the 
Study Commission on Student Life. The office exists to enhance the 
personal and social development and the academic success of multi- 
ethnic students. Its mission is to work together with other resources on 
campus to provide support services for multi-ethnic students throughout 
their college career at the University of Maryland at College Park (UMCP). 



26 Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 



Throughout the year OMSE implements several key programs that have 
as their objective enhancing the recruitment, retention, and graduation of 
multi-ethnic students at UMCP. Included among the programs are the 
Tutorial Program, Job Fair, a mentoring program, a course, EDCP 108N: 
College and Career Advancement: Concepts and Skills for Multi-Ethnic 
Students, and Celebrating Academic and Leadership Excellence to 
recognize outstanding students of color at UMCP. 

The OMSE Tutorial Program is designed to provide assistance to multi- 
ethnic students on a walk-in or appointment basis. 

The Annual Career and Job Fair is designed to contribute to the career 
development of multi-ethnic undergraduates at all levels. II brings repre- 
sentatives from local and national companies to see students who are 
interested in either permanent positions, summer positions, internships, 
or general occupational information. Workshops in resume writing and 
interviewing techniques are available for students prior to the Job Fair. 

OMSE staff members attempt to develop a healthy socio-cultural multi- 
ethnic community by encouraging and assisting in the organizing of pre- 
professional societies in each academic department. OMSE supports 
some and works cooperatively with a number of multi-ethnic pre-profes- 
sional societies, including law. business, media, engineering, and com- 
puter science. OMSE also works closely with the campus Hispanic 
Student Union, the Native American Student Union, the Black Student 
Union, and the Panhellenic Council. 

The OMSE office contains a study-lounge that doubles as a tutorial center 
and an OMSE/CSC Open WAM lab. It provides multi-ethnic students with 
an opportunity to study, get assistance from a tutor, or work at state-of-the- 
art computers in a relaxed, atmosphere. 

Nyumburu Cultural Center 

J. Otis Williams, Director 

3125 South Campus Dining Hall, 314-7758 

The Nyumburu Cultural Center serves as a major resource of cultural, 
historical and social programming at UMCP. The center works closely with 
student, faculty and neighborhood organizations in the production of multi 
media, diverse programs and activities based on the African American 
experience. Nyumburu is home for the Maryland Gospel Choir, Shades of 
Harlem (performing Arts Ensemble) UMCP Chapter NAACP, Sophisti- 
cated Steppers Modeling Group, Black Drama workshop. Black Explosion 
Newspaper and the Miss Black Unity Pageant. 

Orientation 

1195 Stamp Student Union, 314-8217 

The primary goal of orientation is to ease the transition of new students into 
the university community. Orientation begins when students are admitted 
to the university, and ends at the culmination of the first semester. At the 
time of admission to the university, new students will receive material 
announcing the orientation and registration program. The purpose of the 
program is to 

• Introduce new students to the academic community 

• Coordinate academic advisement for the first semester 

• Introduce campus services and resources 

• Administer the math placement test. 

• Register students for their first semester courses 

The Freshman Program runs for two days and provides new students with 
the opportunity to interact formally and informally with faculty, administra- 
tors, returning students, and other new students. The Transfer Program 
lasts for one day and focuses on transfer evaluation, advisement, and 
registration. The math placement lest is administered during troth orien- 
tation programs. 

Note: Students who arrive after 8:30 a.m. on their program day will be 
reassigned to the next available day. 

Parents of new students are invited to attend a one-day program specifically 
designed to introduce parents to the academic, social, and cultural milieux 
of the university. These programs are offered during June and July. 

The Orientation Office also coordinates the ongoing one-credit orientation 
course EDCP 1 08-O. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the 
world of higher education generally, and the University of Maryland 
specifically. The course is taught by faculty and administrators, and is 
limited to 22 students per section. 



Parking 

Parking Garage 2 (on Regents Drive), 314-PARK 

The Department of Campus Parking (DCP) is responsible for managing 
and maintaining over 1 6,000 parking spaces on the University of Maryland 
at College Park (UMCP) campus. All students who plan to park a licensed 
motor vehicle in one of these spaces must register for a parking permit at 
the DCP office. Campus resident students who have earned 55 or fewer 
UMCP-accepted credits may not register for a parking permit. 

Because UMCP has limited parking spaces, parking regulations are 
strictly enforced. 

Illegally parked vehicles, as well as those vehicles not displaying a UMCP 
parking permit, will be ticketed, and students with outstariding parking 
fines may be barred from registration. 

Complete parking regulations, a disabled parking directory, schedule of 
fines, and other information may be obtained from DCP. 

Records and Registration 

First floor, Mitchell Building, 314-8240 

The Office of Records and Registration provides services to students and 
academic departments related to the processes of registration, schedul- 
ing, withdrawal, and graduation. The office also maintains the student's 
academic records, and issues transcripts. Staff memtwrs are available to 
students for consultation. For detailed information about registration 
procedures, student records, and academic regulations, please see the 
chapter on Records and Registration in this catalog. 

Recreation Services 

1 104 Reckord Armory, 314-7218 
24-hour recording: 314-5454 

Thousands of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and staff 
members recognize the value of spending their free time in some sort of 
healthful physical activity. They find a lifestyle which balances academic 
pursuits with recreational and social involvement ideal for a fulfilling and 
enjoyable college experience. The Campus Recreation Services (CRS) 
staff meets almost everyone's leisure-time needs through informal rec- 
reational opportunities, intramural sports activities, fitness and wellness 
programs, sport clubs, and special events. 

Informal recreational opportunities include lifting weights, working out at 
the Fitness Center, running, swimming laps, and joining a colleague for a 
friendly game of racquetball, squash, or tennis Intramural sports provide 
organized tournament and league play for individuals, pairs, and teams 

Fitness and wellness programs exist in the form of aerobics and water 
aerobics sessions and the Terrapin Fitness Challenge, a self-directed 
fitness program, while twenty-four sport clubs (from tx)wling and martial 
arts to rugby and sailing) are organized and supported through CRS 
Thesegroups comprise students, faculty, and staff interested in participat- 
ing (and sometimes competing against other colleges) in one particular 
sport. 

Fees paid at the time of class registration cover virtually all the costs of 
participating in CRS activities. 

Religious Programs 

University Memorial Chapel and 0101 Annapolis Hall. 314-7884 
The following chaplains and their services are available: 

1 101 Memorial Chapef. 405-8443 

2120 Memorial Chapel. 405-8445 



Baptist 

Gerald Buckner, Chaplain 

Black Ministries Program 

Weldon Thomas, Chaplain 



Christian Science 

Bob Snyder, Advisor 



1112 Memorial Chapel, 699-9152 



Church of Jesus Christ of 7601 Mowatt Lane 
Latter Day Saints (Mormon) College Park, MD 20740 
Jerry Houck, Director 422-7570 



Campus Administration, Resources, and Student Services 27 



Episcopal 

William Bolln, Chaplain 

Hindu 

Kiran Sankhia, Chaplain 

Jewish 

Seth Mandell, Chaplain 



Lutheran 

Elizabeth Platz, Chaplain 



21 16 Memorial Chapel, 405-8453 



21 12 Memorial Chapel, 314-8006 

Jewish Student Center 

7612 Mowati Lane 

College Park. MD 20740, 422-6200 



2103 Memonal Chapel. 405-8448 



Roman Catholic 4141 Guilford Drive 

Thomas Kallta. Chaplain College Park. MD 20740 

Rita Ricker. Associate 864-6223 

United Campus Ministry 2101 Memorial Chapel. 405-8450 

Rob Burdette. Chaplain 

Holly Ulmer. Chaplain 

Ki Yul Chung. Associate Chaplain 

Resident Life 

2100 Annapolis Hall, 314-2100 

The Department of Resident Life is responsible for management of the 
residence halls as well as for cultural, educational, recreational, and social 
programming activities in the residence halls. A staff of undergraduate 
and graduate employees helps to meet the needs of resident students. 

On-campus housing/dining is readily available for all undergraduate 
students in 35 undergraduate residence halls near academic, cultural, 
social, and recreational resources of the campus. All-male, all-female, 
and coeducational living arrangements are available in the halls, which 
accommodate from 34 to 575 residents. Most new students will be 
assigned to traditional residence halls. Apartments for four to six students, 
and kitchenless suites for four to eight students are available for upper 
class students. 

All students are encouraged to live on campus. Freshman and transfer 
students will find housing accommodations and student interaction a 
benefit to the college experience. To secure an offer of housing and dining 
services for the academic year, check the interest block on the under- 
graduate application for admission. Students may also apply for on- 
campus housing through Resident Life after they are admitted. Once 
accommodated, students may remain in residence halls throughout their 
undergraduate career. 

Stamp Student Union 

Administrative Offices. 2104 Stamp Student Union, 314-8502 

The Adele H. Stamp Student Union is the "community center" of the 
University of Maryland at College Park. More than 17,000 students, 
faculty, staff members, and campus guests visit the union daily to take 
advantage of its services, programs, and facilities. In serving as the 
campus community center, the union offers lounge space, a variety of 
information services, recreation and leisure activities, student sponsored 
programs, visual arts, retail outlets, and more than 40,000 square feet of 
reservable space. 

Information Services 

• Information Center located in the main lobby, 314-DESK 

• Bulletin Boards located throughout the building 

• Copy machines in the main lobby. 

• Display showcases located on the main level 

Recreation and Leisure 

• Hoff Movie Theatre, 314-HOFF 

• Piano practice rooms located on the second level 

• Recreation Center, including full-service bowling lanes, billiard 
tables, and video games, 314-BOWL. 

Student Sponsored Programs 

• Stamp Union Program Council (SUPC), a student-directed pro- 
gram board whose committees plan games, tournaments, con- 
certs, lectures, outdoor recreation trips, and bicycle and road 
races, 314-8495. 

• Student Tutorial Academic Referral Center (STAR Center), otter- 
ing tutor listings and test files. 314-8359. 

• Student Organization offices of over 40 student groups, including 
the Student Government Association. 



Visual Arts, 314-ARTS 

• Art Center, a visual arts wori< and teaching center, ottering mini- 
courses and arts services, including graphic design, sign, and 
banner services. 

• Parents' Association Art Gallery, located oft the main lobby. 

Retail Outlets (except tor the University Book Center, located in the lower 
level mall area) 

• Citizens Bank and Toist Co. of Maryland 314-8603 

• University Book Center (lower level) 314-BOOK 

• Food Services: Eateries. Dory's Ice Cream. Maryland Food 

Co-op, Deli and Sandwich Factory. Pizza Shop. Roy Roger's 
(779-3917). and Umberto's Restaurant (314-8022). 

• Mailboxes Etc. . a full service postal and packaging facility 3 1 4-9982 

• Ticket Office, offenng campus p)erformance tickets, and a full 
Ticket Master Outlet, 314-TKTS. 

• Union Shop, featuring snacks, sodas, tobacco, and newspapers 
and magazines 

Reservable Space 

The union offers meeting rooms that accommodate groups from 8 to 1 000 
people. For reservations, or catering information, contact the Union 
Reservation Office, 314-8488. 

Stamp Student Union Hours 

The union is open Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight; 
Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m., and Sunday, 12:00 noon to 12:00 
midnight. 

Tutoring 

Students needing tutoring should first contact their professors or the 
graduate teaching assistants assigned to courses. They should inquire 
also at the department office to find out if the department sponsors any 
tutoring services. Many campus clubs, organizations, and honors societies 
also offer tutoring. Check out the Learning Assistance Center. University 
Honors Program. Office of Multi-ethnic Student Education, and the STAR 
Center in the Stamp Student Union. 

Tutoring for some 100 and 200 level courses is available through the 
Intensive Education Development Office, 01 12 Chemistry Building. Stu- 
dents may also sign up as tutors at lED. Call 405-4736 for further 
information. 

University Book Center 

Lower level, Stamp Student Union, 314-BOOK 

The Book Center provides a convenient (on-campus) selection of text- 
books and general interest books, including literature, technical books, 
and best sellers. It also offers a large selection of school and office 
supplies and computer software and supplies to meet every educational 
need. The Book Center also carries a wioe selection of imprinted clothes 
and related items, plus cards, gifts, snacks, and other convenience items 
including health and beauty aids. 

The Book Center is open Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 
p.m.; Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, 12:00 
noon to 5:00 p.m. 

Upward Bound Program 

1 1 07 West Education Annex, 405-6776 

The University of Maryland Upward Bound Program (UBP) provides 
academic and counseling assistance to capable but underachieving high 
school students with the purpose of preparing them to pursue post- 
secondary education. The UBP supplements its participants' secondary 
school experiences by providing each student with opportunities to 
improve or develop the skills he or she needs in order to acquire a positive 
self-image, broaden educational and cultural perspectives, and realize 
undiscovered potentials. 

Throughout the school year and during the summer residential program, 
participants may take advantage of the UPB's academic instruction, 
tutoring, counseling, and innovative educational experiences designed to 
help them develop the basic academic skills and motivation they need to 
achieve success in secondary school. 

High school students in Prince George's and Montgomery counties 
receive recommendations to the UBP from their high school principals, 
teachers, and counselors or from the Educational Talent Search Program, 
social service agencies, or individuals familiar with the UPB. 



28 



CHAPTER 4 



REGISTRATION, ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS, 
AND REGULATIONS 



REGISTRATION 

First Floor Mitchell Building, 314-8240 

To attend classes at the University of Maryland at College Park it is 
necessary to process an official registration. Specific registration dates 
and instructions can be found in the current Schedule of Classes. The 
schedule is issued four times per year: prior to early registration for the fall 
and spring semesters, and again at the beginning of each semester. The 
Summer Programs catalog is distributed in late March. 

1 . Newly admitted students are invited and encouraged to attend an 
orientation session. Advising and course registration are part of 
the program. All newly admitted students must meet with an 
advisor prior to registration. 

2. All newly admitted freshman and transfer students are required 
to provide proof of immunization for measles, rubella, mumps, 
and tetanus/diphtheria 

3. Currently enrolled students are invited to early registration 
Registration appointments for the fall semfester begin in late 
March; appointments for the spring semester begin in late 
October. 

4. Open registration follows Early Registration and continues up to 
the first day of classes Dunng this time students may make 
schedule adjustments or process an original registration. 

5. The schedule adjustirient period is the first ten day of classes 
for the fall and spring semesters, and the first five days of classes 
for summer sessions. During this period, full-time undergradu- 
ates may drop or add courses, change sections, or change credit 
level with no charge Part-time undergraduates may also drop or 
add courses, change sections, or change credit level, but they 
should consult the deadline section in the Schedule of Classes to 
avoid incurnng additional charges. The choice of grading method 
option (including the pass-fail option) may be changed only 
during the schedule adjustment penod. Registration is final and 
official when all fees are paid. 

Departments may identity courses or sections of courses with the 
approval of the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, 
which after the first five days of the schedule adjustment period 
in spring and fall semesters, shall require faculty or departmental 
approval for students to add. 

Courses may be added, where space is available, during the 
schedule adjustment period and will appear on the student's 
permanent record along with other courses previously listed. 
Courses dropped during this period will not appear on the 
student's permanent record. 

6. After the schedule adjustment period: 

a) Courses may not be added without special permission of the 
department and the dean of the academic unit in which the 
student is enrolled. 

b) All courses for which the student is enrolled shall remain as a 
pan of the student's permanent record. The student's status 
shall be considered as full-time for certification purposes if the 
number of credit hours enrolled at this time is twelve or more. 
For billing purposes, a student is considered full-time if the 
numt)€r of credit hours enrolled is nine or more 

c) An official class list for each course being offered is issued to 
the appropriate department by the Office of Records and 
Registrations Students are not permitted to attend a class if 
their names do not appear on the class list. Instructors must 
report discrepancies tothe Office of Records and Registrations 



7 The drop period for undergraduate students will t}egin at (tie 
close of the schedule adjustment p)eriod and terminate at the efxJ 
of tenth week of classes during the fall and spring semesters and 
at a corresponding time for summer sessions. 

During the drop period a student may drop a maximum of four 
credits However, if the course that the student wishes to drop 
carries more than four credits, the student may drop the entire 
course or, in the case of a variable credit course, reduce the credit 
level by up to four credits. Such a drop will be recorded on ttie 
student's permanent record with the notation "W and will be 
considered to represent a single enrollment (one of two possible) 
in the course. This mark shall not be used in any computation of 
cumulative grade point average 

8. At the end of the semester official grade lists are Issued to each 
department Instructors mark the final grades on the grade lists. 
sign the lists and return them to Records and Registrations. 

9. Withdrawal from the University. Students wishing to withdraw 
from all courses must do so on or t>efore the last day of classes. 
The policies governing withdrawals are as follows: 

a. Should a student desire or be compelled to withdraw from the 
university at any time, he or she must secure a form lor 
withdrawal from the Records Office, and submit the form 
along with the semester registration card. 

b. The effective date of withdrawal as far as refunds are con- 
cerned is the date that the withdrawal form is received by the 
Records Office. Notation of withdrawal, and the effective date 
of the withdrawal, will be posted to the permanent record. 
Instructors and college offices will be notified of all withdrawn 
students. The deadline date for submitting the withdrawal 
form for each semester is the last day of classes. Contact 
Undergraduate Admissions for readmission information. 

c. It is the intent of the University of Maryland at College Park to 
facilitate the withdrawal or change in registration and the 
reenrollment of students who are called to active military duty 
during the semester. The student (or a representative) should 
bring a copy of the military orders to the Records Office and 
process '^withdrawal" papers or "change in registration" pa- 
pers. Complete procedures are available from the office of 
Records and Registration. 

10. When Dean's approval is required, the Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies shall assume the responsibilities normally delegated to 
the dean in the case of students who are advised in the Division 
of Letters and Science. 

General Education Requirements 

Please see Chapter 5. 

Enrollment in Majors 

A student who is eligible to remain at the University of Maryland at College 
Park may transfer among curricula, colleges, or ottier academic units 
except where limitations on enrollments have been approved Students 
must be enrolled in the ma)or program from which they plan to graduate, 
when registenng for the final fifteen hours of Itie baccalaureate program. 
This requirement also applies to the third year of the combined, 
preprofessional degree programs. 

Students who wish to complete a second major in addition to tt>eir primary 
major of record must obtain wntten permissk>n in advance from the 
appropnate dean(s). As early as possible, but in r>o case later than the 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 29 



beginning ot the second semester before the expected date of graduation, 
students must tile with ttie departments or programs involved and with the 
appropiiate dean(s). tormal programs showing the courses to be offered 
to meet requirements in each of the majors and supporting areas as well 
as the college and general education requirements. Approval will not be 
granted if there is extensive overlap between the two programs Students 
enrolled in two maprs simultaneously must satisfactonly complete the 
regularly p)rescribed requirements for each ot the programs. Courses 
taken for one major may be counted as part of the degree requirements 
(or the other and toward the University's general education requirements. 
If two colleges are involved in the double major program, the student must 
designate which college is responsible for the maintenance of records. 

Credit Unit and Load Each Semester 

No baccalaureate curriculum requires fewer than 120 semester hours. 
The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subject 
pursued one period a week for one semester Two or three hours of 
laboratory or field work are equivalent to one lecture or recitation period. 
The student is expected to devote three hours a week in classroom or 
laboratory or in outside preparation for each credit hour in any course. 

In order for undergraduate students to complete most curricula in four 
academic years, the semester credit load must range form twelve to 
nineteen hours so that they would complete from thirty to thirty-six hours 
each year toward the degree. Students registering for more than nineteen 
hours per semester must have the approval of their dean. 

Classification of Students 

Official classifications of undergraduate students are based on earned 
credits as follows; freshman, 1-27 semester hours: sophomore, 28-55; 
junior. 56-85; and senior, 86 to at least 120. 

Concurrent Undergraduate-Graduate Registration 

A senior at the University of Maryland whose GPA is at least 3.0 and who 
is within seven hours of completing the requirements for the undergradu- 
ate degree may, with the approval of his or her dean, the chair of the 
department concerned, and the Graduate School, register for graduate 
courses, which may later be counted for graduate credit toward an 
advanced degree at this university. The total of undergraduate and 
graduate credits in the senior year cannot be used for graduate credit 
unless proper pre-arrangement is made. Seniors who wish to take 
advantage of this opportunity must formally apply for admission to the 
graduate school. 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the graduate faculty of the 
department or program offering the course, undergraduate students may 
register for graduate level courses, i.e., those numbered from 600 to 898, 
with the exception of 799. for undergraduate credit. 

A student seeking to utilize the option will normally be in the senior year, 
have earned an accumulated grade point average of at least 3.0, have 
successfully completed, with a grade of "B " or better, the prerequisite and 
correlative courses, and be a major in the offering or closely related 
department. The student will be required to obtain prior approval of the 
department offering the course. Graduate School approval is not required. 

Enrollment in a graduate level course does not in any way imply subse- 
quent departmental or graduate school approval for admission into a 
graduate program, nor may the course be used as credit for a graduate 
degree at the University of tvlaryland. 

Individual Combined BA/MA Programs 

In 1 990, the Board of Regents of the University of N/laryland authorized the 
individual development of combined Bachelor's and Master's degree 
programs. For complete guidelines, requirements, and application proce- 
dures, students should consult with their major department no later than 
the beginning of the second semester of the sophomore year. 



Courses taken at Otiier Institutions 

Courses taken at another institution may not be credited toward a degree 
without approval in advance by the dean of the college from which the 
student expects a degree. The same rule applies to off campus registra- 
tion in the summer program of another institution. Courses taken through 



The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area are 
treated as resident credit. (See section on the Consortium, below.) 
Permission to enroll in off-campus courses must be requested for any 
course which will eventually be added to the University of Maryland at 
College Park transcript 

THE CONSORTIUM OF UNIVERSITIES OF THE 
WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 
consists of American University, The Catholic University of America, 
Gallaudel College, Georgetown University. George Washington Univer- 
sity, l-loward University. Marymount University, Mt. Vernon College, 
Trinity College. University of the District of Columbia, and the University 
of Maryland at College Park. Students enrolled in these institutions are 
able to attend certain classes at the other campuses and have the credit 
considered as resident credit at their own institutions. The intention is to 
allow students to take an occasional course to augment a program rather 
than to develop an individual program. Payment of tuition for courses will 
be made at the student's home campus. 

Currently registered, degree-seeking University of Maryland at College 
Park undergraduates may participate in the consortium program accord- 
ing to the stipulations listed in the current edition of the Schedule of 
Classes. Golden ID students are not eligible to enroll in courses through 
the consortium with waiver of fees. Students interested in additional 
information about the consortium program should contact the consortium 
coordinator in the Office of Records and Registrations, Mitchell Building. 

VETERANS BENEFITS 

Students attending the university under the Veterans Education Assis- 
tance Act (Title 38, U.S. Code) may receive assistance and enrollment 
certification at the Veterans Certification Office in Records and Registra- 
tions, first floor of the Mitchell Building. Consult the Schedule of Classes 
for further information. 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS 

There are two cards, used jointly, to identify currently enrolled students; 
the photo ID and the semester registration card. The photo ID card is 
issued at the time the student first registers for classes. This card is to be 
used for the entire duration of enrollment. Additionally, students who have 
food service contracts will use this photo identification card. Contact 
Dining Services directly for further information. The semester registration 
card validates the photo identification card and is issued for each semes- 
ter in which the student is registered. Both cards should be carried at all 
times. 

Together the photo identification card and semester registration card can 
be used by students to withdraw books from the libraries, for admission to 
most athletic, social, and cultural events, and as a general form of 
identification on campus. 

There is a replacement charge of $1 .00 for lost or stolen registration cards 
and $20.00 for lost, stolen, or broken photo identification cards. Questions 
concerning the identification card system should be addressed to the 
Office of Records and Registrations. 

Change of Address 

Students are expected to notify the Office of Records and Registrations 
of any change in their local or permanent address. Change of Address 
forms are available at the Registration Counter, first floor, Mitchell Building 
and at the Office of the Bursar, first floor, Lee Building. 

AHENDANCE AND ASSESSMENT/EXAMINATIONS 

Attendance 

1 . The university expects each student to take full responsibility for 
his or her academic work and academic progress. The student, 
to progress satisfactorily, must meet the quantitative require- 
ments of each course for which he or she is registered. Students 
are expected to attend classes regularly, for consistent atten- 
dance offers the most effective opportunity open to all students 
to gain developing command of ttie concepts and materials of 



30 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



their course of study. However, attendance in class, in and of 
itself. Is not a criterion for evaluation of the students degree of 
successor failure. Forttiermore, absences (whether excused or 
unexcused) do not alter what is expected of the student qualita- 
tively and quantitatively. Except as provided below, absences will 
not be used in the computation of grades, and the recording of 
student absences will not be required of the faculty. 

2. It is the policy of the university to excuse the absences of students 
that result from the following causes: illness (where the student 
is too ill to attend class), religious observance (where the nature 
of the observance prevents the student from being present during 
the class period), participation in university activities at the 
request of university authorities, and compelling circumstances 
beyond the student's control. Students claiming excused ab- 
sence must furnish documentary support for their assertion that 
absence resulted from one of these causes. 

3. In certain courses. In-class participation is an ongoing require- 
ment and an integral part of the wor(< of the course, for example, 
courses in public speaking, courses requiring group discussion, 
courses emphasizing physical activity and conversation In for- 
eign languages, and courses with laboratories. In other courses, 
occasional in-class assessments may occur, sometimes without 
advance notice. It Is the responsibility of the instructor to inform 
each class at the beginning of the semester of the nature of in- 
class participation expected and what effect absences will have 
on the evaluation of the student's work in the course 

4. Absences in courses where in-class participation is a significant 
part of the work of the course shall be handled by the Instructor 
in the course In accordance with the general policy of his or her 
department and college. 

Assessment 

1. The university provides for the rescheduling of significant as- 
sessments by students without penalty, when such assessments 
are missed by students with an excused absence, except in 
cases where the nature of the assessment precludes the possi- 
bility of rescheduling. In no case may an examination be sched- 
uled on Rosh Hoshanah. Yom Kippur. Good Friday or the first two 
days of Passover. (Students who have a concern with other 
religious observances should see their Instructor at the start of 
the semester.) An Instructor Is not under obligation to give a 
student a make-up assessment unless the failure to perform was 
due to an excused absence, that Is, due to illness (where the 
student is too III to attend class) . religious observance (where the 
nature of the observance prevents the student from being present 
duhng the class period), participation In university activities at the 
request of university authorities, or compelling circumstances 
beyond the student's control. In cases of dispute, the student may 
appeal to the chair of the department offering the course within 
one week from the date of the refusal of the right to a make-up 
assignment. In those instances where the instructor is the chair, 
the appeal may be made to the dean; the chairs or dean's 
decision is final. When (jermitted, a make-up assessment must 
be given on campus unless the published schedule or course 
description requires other arrangements. The make-up assess- 
ment must be at a time and place mutually agreeable to the 
instructor and student, cover only the material for which the 
student was originally responsible, be at a comparable level of 
difficulty with the original assessment, and be given within a time 
limit that retains the currency of the material. The make-up 
assessment (nust not interfere with the students regulariy sched- 
uled classes. In the event that a group of students requires the 
same make-up assessment, one make-up assessment time may 
be scheduled at the convenience of the instructor and the largest 
possible number of students Involved. 

2. The student must notify his or her instructor of the reason for 
absence as soon as possible. Where the reason for absence from 
a scheduled assessment is known well in advance (for example, 
in cases of religious observance or participation in university 
activities at the request of university authonties). the student 
must inform the instructor by the end of the schedule adjustment 
period. Prior notification is especially important in connection with 
final examinations, since failure to reschedule a final examination 
before conclusion of the final examination period may result in 
loss of credits dunng the semester. Where the reason is not 
known well In advance (for example, in cases of illness or 
compelling circumstances beyond the student's control), the 
student must inform the instructor as soon as the reason devel- 
ops, if that is feasible, or. othenwise, as soon as possible after its 
development. 



3. All examinations and tests shall be given during class hours in 
accordance with the regularly scheduled (or officially "arranged") 
lime and place of each course listed in the Schedule of Classes. 
Unpublished changes in the scheduling or location of classes/ 
tests must be approved by the department chair and reported to 
the dean It is the responsibility of the student to be informed 
concerning the dales of announced quizzes, tests, and 
examinations. 

4. A final examination shall be given in every undergraduate course. 
Exceptions may be made with the written approval of the chair of 
the department or the dean. All final examinations must be held 
on the examination days of the Official Final Examination Sched- 
ule. No final examination shall be given at a time other than that 
scheduled in the Official Final Examination Schedule wittiout 
written permission of the department chair. 

5. Graduating seniors will be expected to take final examinations 
during the regular final examination period. However, graduating 
seniors are not required to take final examinations on the day of 
graduation or on any regularly scheduled day following gradua- 
tion. In courses with examinations scheduled on those days, 
graduating seniors must notify their instructors by the end of the 
schedule adjustment period. 

6. The chair of each department is responsible for the adequate 
administration of examinations in courses under his or her 
jurisdiction. 

7. Every examination shall be designed to require for its completion 
not more than the regularly scheduled period. In the case of final 
examinations, the time allotted should not exceed the scheduled 
final examination period. 

8. A typewritten, mimeographed or printed set of questions shall be 
placed in the hands of every examinee m every test or examina- 
tion requiring at least one period, unless the dean has authorized 
some other procedure. 

9. The following rules shall govern all university examinations, 
unless the instructor for a specific course stipulates alternate 
rules for that course. A breach of any of the rules shall constitute 
"disruption of class.' a disciplinary offense (Code of Student 
Conduct, section 9[j]). and may serve as the basis of an allegation 
of academic dishonesty. 

a. Students arriving late for an examination may not unreason- 
ably disrupt the examination room. 

b. Students must leave all unauthonzed matenr.ls (eg. books, 
notes, calculators) with the proctor before Ijeing seated. 

c. Where seating arrangements are established by proctors. 

students must conform to these arrangements. 

d. Students may not return to an examination room after leaving, 
unless permission to do so has been granted by the proctor 
prior to the student's departure. 

e. Students must cease conversation prior to the passing out of 
examination papers and maintain silence during the entire 
examination period. 

f. Students must place examination papers face down on the 
writing desk until the examination is officially t>egun by the 
proctor. 

g. Students must keep examination papers flat on the writing 
desk at all times. 

h. Students at an examination must be prepared to show current 
university Identification. 

10. Each faculty member is to retain, for one full semester after a 
course is ended, the students' final examinations. If a faculty 
member goes on leave for a semester or longer, or leaves the 
university, the final examinations and grade records for the 
course must be left with the department chair 

STATEMENT ON CLASSROOM CLIMATE 

The University of Maryland at College Park values the diversity of its 
student body and is committed to providing a classroom atmosphere that 
encourages the equitable participation of all students Patterns of interac- 
tion In the classroom between the faculty memt)er and students and 
among the students themselves may inadvertently communicate precon- 
ceptions atKJut student abilities based on age. disability ethnicity . gender, 
national origin, race, religion or sexual onentalion. These patterns are due 
in part to the differences the students themselves bring to the classroom 
Classroom instructors should be particularly sensitive to being equitat>le 
in the opportunities they provide students to answer questions in class, to 
contribute their own ideas, and lo participate fully m projects in and outside 
of the classroom 

Of equal importance to equity in the classroom is ttie need to attend to 
potential devaluation of students that can occur by reference to demean- 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 31 



ing stereotypes of any group and/or overlooking the contributions o( a 
particular group to the topic under discussion. Joking at the expense ot 
any group creates an inhospitable environment and is inappropnate 
Moreover, in providing evaluations ol students, it is essential that instruc- 
tors avoid distorting these evaluations with preconceived expectations 
about the intellectual capacities ot any group. 

It is the responsibility of individual faculty members to review their 
classroom t>ehaviors. and those of any teaching assistants they super- 
vise, to ensure that students are treated equitably and not discouraged or 
devalued based on their differences. Resources for self-evaluation and 
training for faculty memt)ers on classroom climate and interaction patterns 
are available from the Office ot Human Relations. 



RECORDS 

Marking System and Record Notations 

The Records Office, located on the first floor of the Mitchell Building, is 
responsible for maintaining student records and issuing official 
transcripts. 

The following symtwls are used on the students permanent record for all 
courses in which he or she is enrolled after the initial registration and 
schedule adjustment period: A, B, C, D. F, I, P, S, and W. These marks 
remain as part of the student's permanent records and may be changed 
only by the original instructor on certification, approved by the department 
chair and the dean, that an actual mistake was made in determining or 
recording the grade. 

A — denotes excellent mastery of the subject and outstanding 
scholarship. In computations of cumulative or semester averages, 
a mark of A will be assigned a value of 4 quality points per credit 
hour. 

B — denotes good mastery of the subject and good scholarship. A 
mark of B is assigned a value of 3 quality points per credit hour. 

C — denotes acceptable mastery of the subject and the usual 
achievement expected. A mark of C is assigned a value of 2 quality 
points per credit hour. 

D — denotes borderline understanding of the subject. It denotes 
marginal performance, and it does not represent satisfactory 
progress toward a degree. A mark of D is assigned a value of 1 
qualify point per credit hour. 

F — denotes failure to understand the subject and unsatisfactory 
performance. A mark of F is assigned a value of quality points per 
credit hour. 

S — is a department option mark that may be used to denote 
satisfactory performance by a student in progressing thesis projects, 
orientation courses, practice teaching, and the like. In computation 
of cumulative averages a mark of S will not be included. 

W — is used to indicate withdrawal from a course in which the 
student was enrolled at the end of the schedule adjustment period. 
For information and completeness, the mark of W is placed on the 
students permanent record by the Office of Records and Registra- 
tions. The instructor will be notified that the student has withdrawn 
from the course. This mark is not used in any computation of quality 
points or cumulative average totals at the end of the semester. 

Audit — A student may register to audit a course or courses which 
have been designated as available under the audit option and in 
which space is available. The notation AUD will be placed on the 
transcript for each course audited. A notation to the effect that this 
symbol does not imply attendance or any other effort in the course 
will t>e included on the trcinscript in the explanation of the grading 
system. 

Pass-Fail — The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to 
A, B, Cor D. The student must inform the Registrations Office of the 
selection of this option by the end of the schedule adjustment 
period. 

The following Pass-Fail policy was approved by the Board of Regents for 
implementation beginning with the spring 1 989 semester: 



1 . To register lor a course unaer the pass-fail option, an under- 
graduate must have completed 30 or more credit hours of college 
credit with a GPA of at least 2 0. At least 1 5 ol these credit hours 
must have t)een completed at UMCP with a University of Mary- 
land GPA of at least 2.0. 

2. Courses for which this option applies must be electives in the 
student's program. The courses may not be college, major, field 
of concentration, or general education program requirements. 

3 Only one course per semester may be registered for under the 
pass-fail option. 

4. Nomorethan12 semester hours of credit may be taken under the 
pass-fail option during a student's college career. 

5. Students may not choose this option when re.-registering for a 
course. 

6. When registering under the pass-fail option, a course that is 
passed will count as hours in the student's record but will not be 
computed in the grade point average. A course that is failed will 
appear on the student's record and will be computed both in the 
overall average and the semester average. 

7. Students registering for a course under the pass-fail option are 
required to complete all regular course requirements. Their work 
will be evaluated by the instructor by the normal procedure for 
letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. The 
grades A, B, C, or D will automatically be converted by the Office 
of Records and Registrations to the grade P on the students 
permanent record. The grade F will remain as given. The choice 
of grading option may be changed only during the schedule 
adjustment period for courses in which the student is currently 
registered. 

Incompletes. The mark of "I" is an exceptional mark that is an instructor 
option. It is given only to a student whose worit in a course has been 
qualitatively satisfactory, when, t)ecause of illness or other circumstances 
beyond the student's control, he or she has been unable to complete some 
small portion of the work of the course. In no case will the mark "I" be 
recorded for a student who has not completed the major portion of the work 
of the course. 

1 . The student will remove the "I" by completing work assigned by 
the instructor. It is the student's responsibility to request arrange- 
ments for completion of the wori< and to request that an Incom- 

■ plete Contract be written. These arrangements must be docu- 
mented in the Incomplete Contract, and signed by both the 
student and the instructor. 

2. The Incomplete Contract must be submitted to the dean of the 
college offering the course, and a copy forwarded to the Records 
Office, within six weeks after the grade submittal deadline or the 
'T will convert to a grade of "F. " A copy of the signed agreement 
should also be filed in the department office. 

3. All course work required by an lncomp>lete Contract must be 
completed by the time stipulated in the contract, usually the end 
of the next semester; but in any event, no later than one year. If 
the instructor is unavailable, the department chair will, upon 
request of the student, make the arrangements for the student to 
complete the course requirements. If the remaining work for the 
course as defined in the contract is not completed on schedule, 
the "I" will be converted to the grade indicated on the contract. 

4. Exceptions to the time period cited above may be granted by the 
student's dean upon the written request of the student if circum- 
stances are deemed to warrant further delay. The new comple- 
tion date must again be specified and agreed to in writing by the 
student and the dean. 

5. It is the responsibility of the instructor or the department chair 
concerned to return the appropriate supplementary grade report, 
both to the appropriate dean and to the Office of Records and 
Registrations, upon completion of the conditions of the Incom- 
plete Contract. 

6. The "I" cannot be removed through re-registration for the course 
or through the technique of "credit by examination. " In any event 
this mark shall not be used in any computation of quality points 
or cumulative averages. 

Record Notations 

In addition to the above marks, there are provisions for other record or 
transcript notations that may be used based on university policy and 
individual circumstances. 



32 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



Campus Repeat Policy 

The following students are required to (oilow the new repeat policy: 

• All new freshmen who begin at UfVlCP Fall 1990 and after. 

• Transfer students from schools other than Maryland Community 
Colleges who begin at UMCP Fall 1990 and after. This includes 
transfer students from another University of Maryland institution. 
(NOTE: There is one exception to this for students attending 
UMBC College of Engineering). 

1. There is a limit to the number of times a student may repeat a 
course. Students may only once repeat a course in which they 
earned an A, B. C, D, F, P, S, W, I. NCR or Audit; they cannot be 
registered (after the schedule adjustment period) for any given 
course more than twice. However, a dean's office may grant an 
exception allowing an additional course repeat. In this case, 
students must present a plan for successfully completing the 
course. These exceptions aill be counted against the limit for 
repeatable credits. 

2. There is also a limit on the number of courses that a student may 
repeat. The number of repeatable credits depends on each 
student's class standing when admitted to UMCP. The total 
credits at entry will be based on acceptable transfer credit, 
advanced placement, CLEP credits, etc. The following table 
outlines the limits: 



Credits 
at Entry* 

0-27 
28-55 
56-85 
86 + 



Class 
Standing 

Freshman 
Sophomore 
Junior 
Senior 



Repeatable 
Credits 

18 
14 
10 
06 



"Credits on entry will be based on acceptable transfer credit. 

Under very unusual circumstances, a student may obtain an 
exception to these limitations by appealing to the Vice President, 
for Academic Affairs/Provost. 

3. The grade point average will include all course attempts that 
result in a grade of A, B, C. D, or F. However, to help freshmen 
and transfer students adjust to the UMCP campus, the following 
two exceptions allow for the cumulative GPA to be calculated so 
that only the higher grade is included: 

• When the original registration of the repeated course is taken 
within the student's first semester at UMCP, or 

• When the original registration of the repeated course is 
attempted within the student's first 24 credit hours attempted 
(including transfer credits) or within the semester during 
which the student reaches the 24th credit hour attempted. 

4. Any grade earned in prior attempts of a repeated course will 
appear on the student's transcript, regardless of whether the 
grade is dropped from, or averaged into, the cumulative grade 
point average. 

5. Repeat by transfer — If a student repeats by transfer a course that 
was taken before or during the semester in which the student 
reaches 24 credits attempted (including transfer credits) and the 
transfer grade is higher, then the original grade in the course will 
be excluded from the GPA calculation. 

• If the course was taken after the semester in which the student 
reached 24 credits attempted then the transfer course will not 
replace the original grade in the GPA calculation. Special 
exceptions can be requested by the dean in unusual 
circumstances. 

Repeat Policy Prior to Fall 1990: 

1 . The following students follow the cM repeat policy: 

• Students who began at UMCP before the Fall 1 990 semester 
(including students who enter UMCP for summer 1990). 

• Transfer students who began at a Maryland Community 
College before Fall 1990 

• UMBC College of Engineering students who began before 
1990. 

The highest grade received in the repeated course is used to calculate the 
GPA. A student may repeat any course: however no student may be 
registered for a course more than three times. 

If a student repeats a course In which he or she has already earned a mark 



of A, B. C, D, P, or S. the subsequent attempt shall not increase the total 
hours earned toward the degree. Only the highest mark will t>e used in 
computation of the student's cumulative average. Under unusual circum- 
stances, the student's dean may grant an exception to this policy. 

Duplicate course: Used to indicate two courses with the same course 
content. The second course is counted in the cumulative totals earned; 
both courses are counted in the cumulative attempted credit and in the 
calculation of grade point average unless an exception is made by the 
student's dean. 

Non-applicabie (Non-Appl): In all cases of transfer from one college to 
another at the University of Maryland at College Park, the dean of the 
receiving college, with the approval of the student, shall indicate which 
courses, if any, in the student's previous academic program are not 
applicable to his or her new program, and shall notify the Office of Records 
and Registration of the adjustments that are to be made in determining the 
student's progress toward a degree. Deletions may occur both in credits 
attempted and correspondingly in credits earned. This evaluation shall be 
made upon the student's initial entry into a new program, not thereafter. 
If a student transfers from one program to another, his or her record 
evaluation shall be made by the dean in the same way as if he or she were 
transferring colleges. If the student subsequently transfers to a third 
college, the dean of the third college shall make a similar initial adjustment; 
courses marked "nonapplicable " by the second dean may become appli- 
cable in the third program. 

Excluded Credit (Excl Crd) - Excluded credit is noted when Academic 
Clemency has been granted. 

Academic Clemency Policy 

Undergraduate students returning to the University of Maryland at College 
Park after a separation of a minimum of five calendar years may petition 
the appropriate dean to have a number of previously earned grades and 
credits removed from the calculation of their cumulative grade point 
average. Up to sixteen credits and corresponding grades from courses 
previously completed at the University of Maryland at College Park will be 
removed from calculation of the grade point average and will not be 
counted toward graduation requirements. The petition for clemency must 
be filed in the first semester of return to the institution Approval is neither 
automatic or guaranteed. 

PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION PROGRAMS 

The University of Maryland at College Park offers new. continuing, and 
returning students several opportunities to earn college credit by demon- 
strating achievement in a subject field through examination. College Park 
recognizes three proficiency examination programs for credit: Advanced 
Placement (AP), Departmental Proficiency Examination Program (Credit 
By Examination), and College Level Examination Program (CLEP). 
Undergraduate students may earn a total of up to one-half of the credits 
required for their degree through examination. Usually, this is no more 
than 60 credits. Students are responsible for consulting with the appropri- 
ate dean or advisor atwut the applicability of any credits earned by 
examination to a specific degree program. Students should also seek 
assistance in determining which UMCP courses duplicate credits earned 
for an examination Students will not receive credit for both passing 
an examination and completing an equivalent course. 

Advanced Placement (AP) Credit. For complete information about the 
applicability of AP exams and the assignment of credit, please see the 
Admissions chapter of this catalog. 

Departmental Proficiency Examination (Credit by Examination). 

College Park Departmental Proficiency Examinations, customarily re- 
ferred to as "credit by examination," are comparable to comprehensive 
final examinations in a course. Although the mathematics and foreign 
language departments receive the most applications for credit by exami- 
nation, many departments will provide examinations for certain of ttieir 
courses. Initial inquiry as to whether an examination in a specific course 
is available is best made at the academic department which offers the 
course in question. 

If an examination for a course is available, the dep)artment will provide 
information regarding time and place, type of examination, and matenal 
which might t>e helpful in prepanng for the examination An undergraduate 
who passes a departmental proficiency examination is given credit and 
quality points toward graduation in the amount regularly allowed in the 
course, provided such credits do not duplicate credit obtained by some 
other means 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 33 



After making arrangements with the department, apply through the 
Undergraduate Advising Otfice. 1117 Hornbake. 314-8418. 

Policies governing credit by examination: 

1 The applicant must be formally admitted to the University of 
Maryland at College Park. Posting of credit earned, however, will 
be delayed until the student is registered. 

2. Departmental Proficiency Examinations may not be taken for 
courses in which the student has remained registered at the 
University of Maryland at College Park beyond the Schedule 
Adjustment Period with a transcript notation of "W." 

3. Departmental Proficiency Examinations may not be used to 
change grades, including Incompletes and Withdrawals. 

4. Application for creditbyexamination is equivalent to registration 
for the course; however, the following conditions apply: 

a. A student may cancel the application at any time prior to 
completion of the examination with no entry on his/her perma- 
nent record. (Equivalent to the schedule adjustment period.) 

b. The instructor makes the results of the examination available 
to the student prior to formal submission of the grade. Before 
final submission of the grade, the student may elect not to 
have this grade recorded. In this case, a mark of W is 
recorded. (Equivalent to the drop period.) 

c. No examination may be attempted more than twice. 

d. The instructor must certify on the report of the examination 
submitted to the Otfice of Records and Registration that 
copies of the examination questions (or identifying informa- 
tion in the case of standardized examinations), and the 
students answers have been filed with the Chair of the 
department offering the course. 

5. If accepted by the student (see 4.b, above), letter grades earned 
through credit by examination are entered on the student's 
transcript, and are used in computing his/her cumulative grade 
point average. A student may elect to take a "credit by examina- 
tion" 'Pass-Fair only if the credit fulfills an elective in the students 
degree program. No College, major, field of concentration, or 
general education program requirement may be taken under 
the pass-fail option. Please refer to the Pass-Fail policy under 
the "Records" section in this chapter. 

Coiiege-Levei Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) recognizes college- 
level competence achieved outside the college classroom. Two types of 
CLEP tests are available: General Examinations, which cover the content 
of a broad field of study: and Subject Examinations, which cover the 
specific content of a college course. Credit can be earned and will be 
recognized by College Park for some CLEP General or Subject Examina- 
tions, provided satisfactory scores are attained. Credits earned under 
CLEP are not considered "residence" credit, but are treated as transfer 
credit. 

CLEP exams are administered at CLEP testing centers throughout the 
country. The University of Maryland at College Park is a CLEP Test Center 
(Test Center Code #581 4). To obtain an application or additional informa- 
tion, contact the CLEP Administrator in the Counseling Center, Room 
01 06A Shoemaker Hall, (31 4-7688), or write to CLEP, CN 6600, Princeton, 
New Jersey, 08541-6600. 

Students who want to earn credit through CLEP must request their official 
scxire reports to be sent to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 
Mitchell Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. (The 
UMCP Score Recipient Code is #5814.) 

Policies governing CLEP are as follows: 

1 . A student must matriculate at College Park before CLEP credits 
are officially posted. The posting will not be done until a student 
has established a record. 

2. Each institution of the University of Maryland System establishes 
standards for acceptance of CLEP exemptions and credits. 
Students must check with the institution to which they will transfer 
to learn if they will lose, maintain, or gain credit. 

3. College Pari< will award credit for a CLEP examination 

(a) provided the examination was being accepted for credit 
here on the date the student took the examination, and 

(b) provided that the examination was not taken during a 
students final thirty credits. The final thirty hours of credit 



are to be taken In residence, unless prior approval has been 
granted by the students dean. 

4 Credit will not be given tor both completing a course and 
passing an examination covering substantially the same 
material. 

5. Furthermore, credit will not be awarded for CLEP examinations 
if the student has previously completed more advanced courses 
in the same field 

6. CLEP examinations posted on transcripts from other institutions 
will be accepted it the examination has been approved by College 
Park and the scores reported are equal to or higher than those 
required by this institution. If the transcript from the pnor institu- 
tion does not carry the scores, it will be the responsibility of the 
student to request Educational Testing Sen/ice to fonward a copy 
of the official report to the Office of Admissions. 

College Park awards credits for CLEP Examinations only as indicated on 
the chart provided in this catalog (if an examination is not listed, it is not 
accepted for credit at this institution). 

If you have questions about the applicability of specific credit to your 
program, consult the list provided in this catalog or contact your Dean's 
Office. 



TRANSFER CREDIT 

(For Current UMCP Students) 

The Records Office posts all transfer credit that would be acceptable to 
any of the degree programs at the University of Maryland at College Park. 
The dean of the college in which the student is enrolled determines which 
transfer credits are applicable to the student's degree program. In general, 
credit from academic courses taken at institutions of higher education 
accredited by a regional accrediting association will transfer, provided that 
the course is completed with at least a grade of C and the course is similar 
in content and level to work offered at College Park. The title of courses 
accepted for transfer credit will be noted on the student's record: however, 
the grade will not. Grades from transferred courses are not included in the 
UMCP grade point average calculation. See the chapter on Admissions 
in this catalog for additional information. 

Courses Taken at Other Institutions While Attending the University of 
Maryland at College Park 

1. Courses taken at another Institution may not be credited 
toward a degree without approval in advance by the dean of the 
college from which the student expects a degree. The same rule 
applies to registration in the summer program of another institu- 
tion. "Permission to Enroll in Another Institution" forms are 
available in the otfice of the student's dean. This form must be 
submitted and approved by the college for any course which will 
eventually be added to the College Park transcript. 

2. Courses taken at other University of Maryland Institutions 

For students who began their attendance at the University of 
Maryland at College Park in fall 1989 or later, all coursework 
taken at any University of Maryland System (UMS) institution will 
be posted as transfer credit. For all students who attended 
College Park prior to fall 1989, courses taken at another Univer- 
sity of Maryland Board of Regents institution (UMBC, UMAB. 
UMES, UMUC) prior to fall 1 989 will be included in the cumulative 
GPA. Courses taken at any other institution may not be credited 
toward a degree without advance approval. See #1 above for 
information. 

3. UMS Concurrent Inter-Institutional Registration Program 

College Park undergraduate students participating in the UMS 
Concurrent Inter-Institutional Registration Program may receive 
permission from their dean to have coursework count as resident 
credit. Students participating in this program must be enrolled 
full-time in a degree program at College Pari< for the semester in 
which these courses are taken. 

4. Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan 
Area Courses taken through the Consortium are considered to 
be resident credit. See above under "Consortium" and see the 
Schedule of Classes for information. 



34 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



CLEP EXAM 
TITLE 



SCORE 



CREDITS 
AWARDED 



EQUIVALENT 
OR RELATED 
COURSES 



APPLICABILITY 
MAJOR CORE USP 



NOTES 



GENERAL EXAMS 


NATURAL SCIENCE 

489 


6 Credits 


LL Elective 


No No 


No 




HUMANITIES 

Subscore II 50 


3 Credits 


LL Elective 


No No 


No 


Subscore II is the Literature subscore. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 
and HISTORY 

Subscore I 50 



3 Credits LL Elective No No No Subscore I is the Social Science sut)score. 



SUBJECT EXAMS 



BIOLOGY 

Gen. Biology 49 



3 Credits LL Elective No No No Students who receive CLEP credit in Biology and 

vi/ish to take additional BIOL credit should enroll in 
BIOL 105. 



CHEMISTRY 

Gen. Chemistry 48 



3 Credits 



LL Elective 



Students who receive CLEP credit in Chemistry juxJ 
wish to take additional CHEM credit shoukj enroll in 
CHEM103orCHEM 103H. 



ECONOMICS 














Intro. Macro 


51-64 


3 Credits 


ECON 205 


No 


Yes 


Yes 




65 


3 Credits 


ECON 201 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Intro Micro 


51-64 


3 Credits 


ECON 105 


No 


Yes 


Yes 




65 


3 Credits 


ECON 203 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 



Credit will be given (or either ECON 201 or ECON 
205 as a result of the introductory macro-economic 
examination, not both. 

Credit will be given for either ECON 203 or ECON 
105 as a result of the introductory micro-economics 
examination, not both. 



ENGLISH 

Analysis & 

Interpretation 

of Literature 
College 

Composition 

Essay" 



GOVERNMENT 

American 
Government 



"To receive credit for CLEP. and lulfill fundamental 
studies ENGL 101, students with satisfactory CLEP 

None None No No No scores may submit portfolios of written work for 

evaluation to the Office o( the Director of Writing 
Programs (31 19 Campus Surge). Contact the 

3 Credits See Note" No See Note" Office for information about portfolio content 
(301-405-3771). 



58 



3 Credits 



LL Elective 



No 



No Lower level elective credit only. 



MATHEMATICS 














Calculus & Elem. 














Functions 


50 


6 Credits 


MATH 140 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


College Algebra 


— 


None 


None 


No 


No 


No 


College Algebra/ 














Trigonometry 


49 


3 Credits 


MATH 115 


No 


Yes 


Yes 



For CORE, MATH 140 fulfills the Math & Formal 
Reasoning non-lab requirement: for USP, it fulfills 
the Area B non-lab requirement. MATH 140 also 
fulfills CORE and USP Fundamental Studies Math 
requirements. MATH 1 15 fulfills CORE and USP 
Fundamental Studies Math requirement. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Gen. Psychology 



None 



None 



No 



No 



No 



The Psychology Department awards no credit for 
this examination. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Introd. Sociology 



3 Credits 



LL Elective 



No No Sociology majors who receive credit for this exam will 

be exempt from SOCY 100. Other students wtio 
wish to fulfill either a CORE or USP requirement are 
encouraged to enroll in SOCY 1 05. 



Please Note: LL refers to courses at the lower (100 and 200) level. Any test not listed will not be accepted for credit at UMCP. 
Students may not receive credit both for CLEP courses and for equivalent UMCP courses or transfer courses. CLEP credit will be deleted In 
such cases. Applicable scores for a particular examination are those in effect when a student takes the exam. Contact your College Dean If you 
have questions. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 35 



REQUIREMENTS FOR RETENTION 

Academic reteniion is based solely on grade point average (GPA). The 
significance of the cumulative grade point average (cumulative GPA) 
varies according to the number o( credits attempted. A minimum ot 120 
credits of successfully completed (not I, F, or W) course credits Is required 
for graduation in any degree curriculum 

Satisfactory Performance applies to those students with a cumulative 
GPA between 4 000 and 2 000 

Semester Academic Honors (Dean's List) will be awarded to a student 
who completes within any given semester twelve or more credits (exclud- 
ing courses with grades of P and S) with a semester GPA of 3.500 or 
higher This notation will be placed on the individual's permanent record. 

Unsatisfactory Performance: Students with a cumulative GPA of less 
than 2.000 fall into three categories: Unsatisfactory Performance. Aca- 
demic Warning and Academic Dismissal. The notations Academic Warn- 
ing and Academic Dismissal will be placed on the student's permanent 
record. The cumulative GPA that defines each of the categories varies 
according to the credit level as noted below: 

GPA Retention Levels 

Credit Unsatisfactory Academic Academic 



Level Performance 

0-13 1.290-1.999 

14-28 1.780-1.999 

29-56 1.860-1.999 

57-74 1.940-1.999 

75-more 



Warning Dismissal 

0.230-1.289 0.000-0.229 

1.280-1.779 0.000-1.279 

1.630-1.859 0.000-1.629 

1.830-1.939 0.000-1.829 

1.940-1.999 0.000-1.939 



1 . Credit level: Courses with grades of A, B, C, F, P, S and transfer 
credit from other institutions. Advanced Placement. CLEP and 
other similar tests in which credit is given. 

2. Compulation of GPA: GPA is computed by dividing the total 
number of quality points accumulated in courses for which a 
grade of A, B, C. D. or F has been assigned by the total number 
of credits attempted in those courses. Courses for which a mark 
of P, S. I or NGR has been assigned are not included in 
computing the GPA. Each letter grade has a numerical value: 
A = 4; B = 3: C = 2: D = 1 : F = 0. Multiplying this value by the 
number of credits for a particular course gives the number of 
quality points earned for that course. 

3. Students with an unsatisfactory performance for any semester 
will be urged in writing to consult their advisors. 

4. Students on academic warning will have this fact noted on their 
transcripts and will be urged in writing to consult with their 
advisors prior to the beginning of the next semester. Students 
who receive an academic warning in any semester will not be 
allowed either to add or drop courses or to register during the 
semester following the receipt of the academic warning without 
seeing an advisor. 

5. Any student with sixty credits or more attempted and who 
thereafter received academic warning for two consecutive se- 
mesters will be academically dismissed. Students who are 
academically dismissed will have this action entered on their 
transcript. 

6. No student transferring to the University of Maryland at College 
Park from outside the University of Maryland will be subject to 
Academic Dismissal at the end of the first semester as long as the 
student obtains a cumulative GPA of 0.23 or more. (A student 
who would otherwise be subject to Academic Dismissal will 
receive an Academic Warning.) Thereafter, such a student will 
be subject to the normal standards of academic progress. This 
provision does not apply to students reinstated or readmitted to 
College Park. 

7. A student who has been academically dismissed and who is 
reinstated will be academically dismissed again if minimum 
academic standards are not met by the end of the first semester 
after reinstatement. (See Readmission and Reinstatement in the 
Admissions chapter of this catalog.) 

8. Credits transferred, or earned during prior admissions terminat- 
ing in academic dismissal or withdrawal and followed by 
readmission. will be applicable toward meeting credit require- 
ments for a degree. 

9. Under unusual circumstances, the Faculty Petition Board may 
set more rigorous requirements for the semester in which a 



reinstated student returns, or may allow a lengthened period (not 
to exceed two semesters) to reach the minimum or set academic 
standards. 

10. Any appeal from the regulations governing academic warning or 
academic dismissal shall be directed to the Faculty Petition 
Board which shall be empowered to grant relief in unusual cases 
If the circumstances warrant such action. 

1 1 . See Repeat Policy to determine the effect of repeated courses 
in calculation of GPA. 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students. The university reserves the right to 
request at any time the withdrawal of a student who cannot or does not 
maintain the required standard of scholarship, or whose continuance in 
the university would be detrimental to his or her health, or to the health of 
others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities of the 
university Additional information atwut the dismissal of delinquent stu- 
dents may be found in the Code of Student Conduct, Appendix C. 



GRADUATION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The University of Maryland at College Park awards the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of General Studies (no admission to program 
as of fall 1 988) , Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Science, Master of Applied 
Anthropology. Master of Architecture. Master of Arts, Master of Business 
Administration, Master of Education, Masterof Fine Arts, Master of Library 
Science, Master of Music, Master of Public Management. Master of Public 
Policy, Master of Science, Doctor of Education, Doctor of Musical Arts, 
and Doctor of Philosophy. Students in specified two-year curricula may be 
awarded certificates. 

Graduation Applications 

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must file a formal application 
with the Office of Records and Registrations. The deadline for application 
is the end of the schedule adjustment period for the semester in which the 
student plans to graduate, or at the end of the first week of the second 
summer session for August degrees. 

In all cases, graduation applications must be filed at the beginning of the 
students final semester before receiving a degree. If all degree require- 
ments are not completed during the semester in which the graduation 
application was submitted, it is the responsibility of the student to file a new 
graduation application with the Office of Records and Registrations at the 
beginning of a subsequent semester when all degree requirements may 
be completed. The graduation application fee is a one-time, non-refund- 
able charge. If a subsequent application is filed for the same degree, the 
fee will not be charged a second time. 

Degree Requirements 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of work 
in the differentcolleges, schools, departments and academic units. It is the 
responsibility of the colleges, schools, departments and other academic 
units to establish and publish cleariy defined degree requirements. 
Responsibility for knowing and meeting all degree requirements for 
graduation in any curriculum rests with the student. Specific degree 
requirements are listed in this catalog under the college and/or depart- 
ment as appropriate. 

Each student should check with the proper academic authorities no later 
than the close of the junior year to ascertain his or her standing with 
respect to advancement toward a degree. For this purpose, each student 
should be sure to retain a copy of the semester grade reports issued by 
the Office of Records and Registrations at the close of each semester. 

1 ) Residency requirement — Final Thirty-Hour Rule 

a. All candidates for College Park degrees should plan to take 
their final thirty credits in residence since the advanced work of 
their major study normally occurs in the last year of the 
undergraduate program. Included in these thirty semester 
hours will be a minimum of fifteen semester hours in courses 
numbered 300 or above, including at least twelve semester 
hours required in the major field (in curricula requiring such 
concentrations). 

b. A student who at the time of graduation will have completed 
thirty hours in residence at College Pari< may, under unusual 
circumstances, be permitted to take a maximum of six of the 
final thirty credits of record at another institution. In such cases, 
written permission must be obtained in advance from the dean 



36 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



of the academic unit from wfiicfi the student expects to receive 
the degree Exceptions beyond six credits will t>e made only 
under highly unusual circumstances: requests for an exception 
must be made through the Deans office to the Office of the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs, 
c. For students in the combined three-year, preprofessional pro- 
grams, the final thirty hours of the ninety-hour program at the 
University of Maryland at College Park must be taken in 
residence. 

2) Enrollment in f^/lajors. A student must be enrolled in the major 
program from which he or she plans to graduate, when registering 
for the final fifteen hours of the baccalaureate program. This 
requirement also applies to the third year of the combined, 
preprofessional degree programs. 

3) Credit Requirements. While several undergraduate curricula re- 
quire more than 1 20 credits, no baccalaureate curriculum requires 
fewer than 120. No baccalaureate degree will be awarded in 
instances in which fewer than 1 20 credit hours have been earned. 

It is the responsibility of each student to familiarize himself or 
herself with the requirements of specific curricula. The student is 
urged to seek advice on these matters from the departments, 
colleges, or the Office of Undergraduate Studies. 

To earn a baccalaureate degree from the University of Maryland at 
College Park, a minimum of thirty credits must be taken in residence. 

4) Grade Point Average. A minimum cumulative 2.00 grade point 
average is required for graduation in all curricula. 



Second Degrees and Second Majors 



a. Second Degree Taken Sequentially. A student who has com- 
pleted requirements for and has received one baccalaureate 
degree and who wishes to earn a second baccalaureate degree 
from College Park must satisfactorily complete the requirements of 
the second degree and enough additional credits so that the total, 
including all applicable credits earned at College Park or else- 
where, is at least 150 credits. In no case, however, will a second 
baccalaureate degree be awarded to a student who has not 
completed thirty credits in residence at College Park. Approval of 
the second degree will not be granted when there is extensive 
overlap between the two programs. 

b. Second Degree Taken Simultaneously. A student who wishes to 
receive simultaneously two baccalaureate degrees from College 
Park must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 150 credits (180 
credits if one of the degrees is in Special Education). The regularly 
prescribed requirements of both degree programs must be com- 
pleted. As early as possible and, in any case, no later than one full 
semester (preferably one year) before the expected date of gradu- 
ation, the student must file with the departments or programs 
involved, as well as with the appropriate deans, formal programs 
showing the courses to be offered to meet the major, supporting 
area, college, and general education program requirements. If two 
colleges are involved in the double degree program, the student 
must designate which college is responsible for the maintenance 
of records. Approval of the second degree will not be granted when 
there is extensive overlap between two programs. 

c. Second Major. A student who wishes to complete a second major 
concurrently with his or her primary major of record must obtain 
wntten permission in advance from the appropriate deans. As early 
as possible, but in no case later than one full semester before the 
expected date of graduation, the student must file with the depart- 
ments or programs involved and with the appropriate deans, formal 
programs showing the courses to be offered to meet requirements 
in each of the ma)ors and supporting areas as well as the college 
and general education program requirements. Approval will not t)e 
granted if there is extensive overlap between the two programs. 
Students enrolled in two majors simultaneously must satisfactorily 
complete the regularly prescribed requirements for each of the 
programs. Courses taken for one major may iDe counted as part of 
the degree requirements for the other and toward the requirements 
for the general education requirements as appropriate. If two 
colleges are involved in the double major program, the student 
must designate which college is responsible tor the maintenance 
of records. 



COMMENCEMENT HONORS 

Summa Cum l^ude. Magna Cum Laude. and Cum Laude are the 
commencement honors for excellence in scholarship Honors are awarded 



to students with a GPA equal to the highest two percent (Summa), the next 
highest three percent (Magna), and the following five percent (Cum laude) 
of the GPA distnbution used in calculations for that semester The GPA 
distribution shall be computed each semester Irom the GPAs of the three 
preceding classes of the student's degree-granting unit. To be eligible tor 
this recognition, at least 60 semester hours must be earned at or 
transferred with a grade to College Park No more than six credits taken 
pass/fail or satisfactory/fail shall count toward the 60-hour minimum. No 
student with an average less than 3 30 will be considered for a commence- 
ment honor. Because grades for a term generally are officially recorded 
after the term's graduation day. computation of the student s GPA will not 
include grades for courses taken during the student's final semester at 
College Park. However, the hours taken during that semester will apply 
toward the 60-hour requirement. 

Election to Phi Beta Kappa 

Organized in 1776. Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely 
respected academic honorary society in the United States Invitation to 
membership is based on outstanding scholastic achievement in studies of 
the liberal arts and sciences Student members are chosen entirely on the 
basis of academic excellence, neither extra-curricular leadership nor 
service to the community is considered Election is held only once a year, 
in the spring semester. 

The process for election to Phi Beta Kappa involves the annual review in 
March by a select committee of faculty members representing the humani- 
ties, social sciences and natural sciences The committee reviews tran- 
scripts of all juniors and seniors with qualifying grade point averages 
(irrespective of the graduation month of such a student). Whether a 
student qualifies for membership in Phi Beta Kappa depends on the 
quality, depth and breadth of the students record in literal education 
courses. The final decision for election rests with the resident faculty 
members of Phi Beta Kappa. There is no application procedure for 
election to Phi Beta Kappa. 

Requirements for selection to membership In the campus chapter of Phi 
Beta Kappa include: 

1 . Residence. At least 60 hours taken at the College Park campus of 
the University of Maryland. 

2. Liberal Courses. For seniors, at least 90 hours in liberal courses in 
the arts and sciences (where "liberal" means academic, rather than 
professional or technical) at least 45 of which are at the College 
Park campus. For juniors, at least 75 total hours must be com- 
pleted, at least 60 of which are liberal courses, of which at least 45 
are at the College Park campus. 

3. Required courses. One semester of mathematics, which must be 
fulfilled by college level credit hours. Two semesters of a foreign 
language, at the elementary level or above Students m the College 
of Arts and Humanities may use fulfillment of that College's foreign 
language requirement to satisfy the Phi Beta Kappa requirement. 
The language requirement may also be satisfied by a proficiency 
examination or department certification: foreign students wtiose 
native language is not English are exempted from the Phi Beta 
Kappa language requirement Students in the latter two categories 
who wish to be considered for admission to Phi Beta Kappa should 
notify the Phi Beta Kappa office in wnting prior to March of the year 
of admission. 

4. Grade Point Average. For seniors a grade point average of at least 
3.5 in all liljeral courses taken: for juniors a grade point average of 
at least 3.75 in such courses. 

5. Distritiutlon. Normally the credit hours presented for Phi Beta 
Kappa must contain at least nine liberal hours in each of the three 
areas of humanities, social sciences and natural sciences (includ- 
ing a laboratory science course). Students with more challenging 
courses and moderately high grade pwint averages are preferred 
by the committee to those with higher grade point averages but a 
narrow range of courses. Minimal qualifications m more than one 
area may preclude election to Phi Beta Kappa. 

Recommended criteria include: 

1. Regular grades (rather than pass/fail) in (a) mathematics and 
foreign language courses, and (b) distribution areas in which the 
number of courses taken is minimal, 

2. Some traditional social sciences and humanities courses that 
require wntten essays and papers (Note that internships may tje 
counted as professional courses and not as liberal courses.) 

3. Courses in at least two of the required areas to be taken at ttie 
College Park campus, especially if courses are transferred from 
other institutions without chapters of Phi Beta Kappa. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 37 



Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee election to Ptii Beta 
Kappa. The ludgment o( the resident faculty memljers of Phi Beta Kappa 
on the quality, depth, and breadth of the student's record is the deciding 
factor in every case. 

Any questions about cnteria for election to Phi Beta Kappa (including 
equivalency examinations in foreign languages) should be directed to the 
Phi Beta Kappa Office. Room 0201 Energy Research Building, 405-7369. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT COLLEGE PARK 
CODE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY (Approved by 
the Campus Senate February 13, 1989) 

Introduction 

The university is an academic community. Its fundamental purpose is the 
pursuit of knowledge. Like all other communities, the university can 
function properly only if its members adhere to clearly established goals 
and values. Essential to the fundamental purpose of the university is the 
commitment to the principles of truth and academic honesty. Accordingly, 
The Code of Academic Integrity is designed to ensure that the principle of 
academic honesty is upheld. While all members of the university share this 
responsibility. The Code of Academic Integrity is designed so that special 
responsibility for upholding the principle of academic honesty lies with the 
students. 

Definitions 

1 . ACADEMIC DISHONESTY Any of the following acts, when com- 
mitted by a student, shall constitute academic dishonesty: 

(a) CHEATING— intentionally using or attempting to use unautho- 
rized materials, information, or study aids in any academic 
exercise. 

(b) FABRICATION— intentional and unauthorized falsification or 
invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. 

(c) FACILITATING ACADEMIC DISHONESTY— intentionally or 
knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any 
provision of this code. 

(d) PLAGIARISM— intentionally or knowingly representing the 
words or ideas of another as one's own in any academic 
exercise. 

Responsibility to Report Academic Dishonesty 

2. Academic dishonesty is a corrosive force in the academic life of a 
university. It jeopardizes the quality of education and depreciates 
the genuine achievements of others. It is, without reservation, a 
responsibility of all members of the campus community to actively 
deter it. Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of academic 
dishonesty is not a neutral act. Histories of institutions demonstrate 
that a laissez-faire response will reinforce, perpetuate, and enlarge 
the scope of such misconduct. Institutional reputations for aca- 
demic dishonesty are regrettable aspects of modern education. 
These reputations become self-fulfilling and grow, unless vigor- 
ously challenged by students and faculty alike. 

All members of the university community students, faculty, and 
staff share the responsibility and authority to challenge and make 
known acts of apparent academic dishonesty. Faculty must under- 
take a threshold responsibility for such traditional safeguards as 
examination security and proctoring. 

Honor Pledge 

3. All applicants for admission to undergraduate or graduate pro- 
grams at the University of Maryland College Park, as well as all 
students registering for courses, will be expected to sign an Honor 
Pledge as a condition of admission and at each registration. The 
wording of the pledge will be recommended by the Student Honor 
Council, for approval by the Campus Senate. 

Procedures: Academic Dishonesty 

4. Any member of the university community who has witnessed an 
apparent act of academic dishonesty, or has information that 



reasonably leads to the conclusion that such an ad has occurred 
or has been attempted, has the responsibility to inform the Office 
of Judicial Programs promptly. The Office of Judicial Programs 
will then send a wntten report of the allegation to the Student 
Honor Council, the accused student, and the instructor teaching 
the course. 

5. Upon receipt of a report of academic dishonesty, the Student 
Honor Council will assign the matter to three of its members lor 
preliminary inquiry. Members of the Student Honor Council when 
acting in this capacity shall be designated Review Officers. In the 
event the report pertains to the conduct of a graduate student, 
then at least two Review Officers will be graduate students. 

6 The Review Officers shall conduct a preliminary inquiry into the 
facts of the case in order to determine if there Is reasonable cause 
to believe that an act of academic dishonesty-has occurred, or 
has been attempted 

7. University administrators and faculty members are expected to 
provide reasonable assistance to the Review Officers, and to 
permit access to pertinent student papers or examinations, as 
determined by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The 
Review Officers shall be advised by the Director of Judicial 
Programs. 

8. If. after consultation with the Director of Judicial Programs: 

(a) a majority of Review Officers determine that an act of 
academic dishonesty did not occur, or was not attempted, 
the council will inform the student and the course instructor 
of its finding; or 

(b) if a majority of Review Officers determine that there is 
reasonable cause to believe that an act of academic dishon- 
esty did occur, or was attempted, they will forward a written 
referral containing a statement of facts and their rationale to 
the Student Honor Council. 

9. Upon receipt of a written referral from the Review Officers, the 
Student Honor Council shall: 

(a) convene an Honor Board to resolve the matter through an 
Honor Review. The Board will be selected in the manner 
described in Paragraph 1 3. below. 

(b) Appoint one of the Review Officers or the Campus Advocate 
to serve as the Presenter of the case. The responsibilities of 
the Presenter are more full described in Paragraph 11, 
below. 

1 0. The meetings and deliberations of the Review Officers and of the 
Student Honor Council shall be privileged and confidential. 

1 1 . The principal responsibilities of the Presenter are: 

(a) to prepare a formal Charge of Academic Dishonesty, includ- 
ing the identity of the complaining party, and deliver it to the 
student and the Honor Board. The student will be deemed 
to have received such notice on the date of personal 
delivery, or if certified mail is used, on the date of delivery at 
the most recent address provided to the university by the 
student; 

(b) to inform the complaining party of the actions being taken; 

(c) to presentthe evidence and analysis upon which the Charge 
is based to the Honor Board during the Honor Review; 

(d) to perform such other duties as may be requested by the 
Student Honor Council or the Honor Board. 

12. The Charge of Academic Dishonesty serves to give a student a 
reasonable understanding of the act and circumstances to be 
considered by the Honor Board, thereby placing the student in a 
position to contribute in a meaningful way to the inquiry. It also 
serves to provide initial focus to that inquiry. It is not, however, a 
technical or legal document, and is not analogous to an indict- 
ment or other form of process. The charge may be modified as the 
discussion proceeds, as long as the accused student is accorded 
a reasonable opportunity to prepare a response. 

Procedures: Resolution by an Honor Review 

1 3. An Honor Review is conducted by an Honor Board. The Board is 
convened by the Student Honor Council acting for the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs. It must consist of six persons, five 
of whom will be voting members. Determinations of the Honor 
Board will be by a majority vote (three votes or more). Honor 
Boards are selected as follows: 

(a) three students selected by the Student Honor Council from 
among its members. In the event the student accused of 
academic dishonesty is a graduate student, then at least 
two of the student members shall be graduate students. No 
person who served as a Review Officer may serve on a 
factually related Honor Board. 



38 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



(b) Two faculty members selected in accordance with proce- 
dures established by the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs. In the event the student accused o( academic 
dishonesty is a graduate student, then at least one of the 
persons selected shall be a regular member of the Graduate 
Faculty. 

(c) The Honor Board shall have one non-voting member, who 
shall sen/e as the Presiding Officer. The Presiding Officer 
may be a student, faculty, or staff member of the university. 
The Presiding Officer will be selected by the Director of 
Judicial Programs. 

14. If the Vice President for Academic .Affairs determines that the 
Student Honor Council or a Student Honor Board cannot be 
convened within a reasonable pehod of time after an accusation 
is made, the Vice President or a designee may review the case. 
If there is reasonable cause to believe that an act of academic 
dishonesty has occurred or has been attempted, the Vice Presi- 
dent or designee will convene an ad hoc Honor Board by 
selecting and appointing two students and one faculty/staff 
member. Whenever possible, student members of ad hoc honor 
boards shall be members of the Student Honor Council. A non- 
voting presiding officer shall be appointed by the Director of 
Judicial Programs. If Review Officers cannot be appointed in 
accordance with Part Five of this Code, the Campus Advocate or 
another person designated by the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs will serve in that capacity. 

1 5. The purpose of an Honor Review is to explore and investigate the 
incident giving rise to the appearance of academic dishonesty, to 
reach an informed conclusion as to whether or not academic 
dishonesty occurred, and to make a recommendation to the 
Dean. In keeping with the ultimate premise and justification of 
academic life, the duty of all persons at an Honor Review is to 
assist in a thorough and honest exposition of all related facts. 

The basic tenets of scholarship — full and willing disclosure, 
accuracy of statement, and intellectual integrity in hypothesis, in 
argument and in conclusion — must always take precedence over 
the temptation to gain a particular resolution of the case. An 
Honor Review is not in the character of a criminal or civil legal 
proceeding. It is not modeled on these adversarial systems; nor 
does it serve the same social functions. It is not a court or tribunal. 
Rather, it is an academic process unique to the community of 
scholars that comprise a university. 

16. The role of the Presiding Officer is to exercise impartial control 
over the Honor Review in order to achieve an equitable, orderly, 
timely and efficient process. The Presiding Officer is authorized 
to make all decisions and rulings as are necessary and proper to 
achieve that end. including such decisions and rulings as pertain 
to scheduling and to the admissibility of evidence. II in the 
judgment of the Presiding Officer there is reasonable cause to 
question the impartiality of a board member, the Presiding Officer 
will so inform the Honor Council, which will reconstitute the board. 

17. The Presiding Officer will select the date, time and place for the 
Honor Review, and notify the student in writing a minimum of ten 
(10) days prior to the review. 

18. The sequence of an Honor Review is necessarily controlled by 
the nature of the incident to be investigated and the character of 
the information to be examined. It thus lies within the judgment of 
the Presiding Officer to fashion the most reasonable approach. 
The following steps, however, have been found to be efficient, 
and are generally recommended: 

(a) The Presenter, and then the student, summarize the matter 
before the Honor Board, including any relevant Information 
or arguments. 

(b) The Presenter, and then the student, present and question 
persons having knowledge of the incident, and offer docu- 
ments or other materials bearing on the case. The Pre- 
senter, the student, and all members of the Honor Board 
may question any person giving testimony. 

(c) The members of the Honor Board may ask the Presenter or 
the student any relevant questions. The members may also 
request any additional material or the appearance of other 
persons they deem appropriate. 

(d) The Presenter, and then the student, should make brief 
closing statements. 

(e) The Honor Board meets privately to discuss the case, and 
reaches a finding by a majority vote. 

(f) The Honor Board will not conclude that a student has 
attempted or engaged in an act of academic dishonesty 
unless, after considering all the information before it. a 
majority of members believe that such a conclusion is 
supported by clear and convincing evidence If this is not the 
case, the Honor Board will dismiss the charge of academic 



dishonesty in favor of the student with a finding that an 
attempt or act of academic dishonesty "did not occur", or 
that It was "not proven", whichever more accurately de- 
scnbes the result of its investigation. The student would then 
be notified in wnting of the decision to dismiss the charge. 

(g) If the Honor Board finds the student has engaged in an act 
of academic dishonesty, both the Presenter and the student 
may recommend an appropnate penalty Pertinent docu- 
ments and other material may be offered The Honor Board 
then meets privately to formulate a Recommendation. The 
recommendation of the Honor Board will be by a ma)ority 
vote of its members. 

(h) The Presiding Officer will provide the appropnate Dean with 
a written report of the Honor Board's findings and 
recommendations. 

19. The Presiding Officer will attempt to ensure the following njles 
and points of order are observed. 

(a) The student may be assisted by an adviser, who may be an 
attorney. The role of an adviser will be limited to: 

I. Making brief opening and closing statements, as well as 
comments on an appropriate sanction. 

II. Suggesting relevant questions which the Presiding 
Officer may direct to a witness; 

III. Providing confidential advice to the student. 

Even if accompanied by an adviser, the student must 
take an active and constructive role in the Honor Re- 
view. In particular, the student must fully cooperate with 
the Honor Board and respond to its Inquiries without 
undue intrusion or comment by an adviser. 

In consideration of the limited role of an adviser and of the 
compelling interest of the university to expeditiously conclude the 
matter, the work of an Honor Board will not. as a general practice, 
be delayed due to the unavailability of an adviser. 

(b) A tape recording of the Honor Review will be maintained. 

(c) Presence at an Honor Review lies within the judgment of the 
Presiding Officer. An Honor Review is a confidential inves- 
tigation. It requires a deliberative and candid atmosphere, 
free from distraction. Accordingly, it is not open to the public 
or other "interested" persons. However, at the student's 
request, the Presiding Officer will permit a student's parents 
or spouse to observe and may permit a limited number of 
additional observers. The Presiding Officer may cause to be 
removed from the Honor Review any person, including the 
student or an adviser, who disrupts or impedes the investi- 
gation, or who fails to adhere to the rulings of the Presiding 
Officer. The Presiding Officer may direct that persons, other 
than the student and the Presenter, who are to be Ccilled 
upon to provide information, be excluded from the Horror 
Review except for that purpose. The members of the Honor 
Board may conduct private deliberations at such times and 
places as they deem proper. 

(d) It is the responsibility of the person desiring the presence of 
a witness before an Honor Board to ensure that the witness 
appears. If necessary, a subpoena may be requested, in 
accordance with Part 32 (b) of the Code of Student Conduct. 
Because experience has demonstrated that the actual 
appearance of an individual is of greater value than a written 
statement, the latter is discouraged and should not be used 
unless the individual cannot or reasonably should not be 
expected to appear. Any written statement must be dated, 
signed by the person making it. and witnessed by a univer- 
sity employee The work of an Honor Board will not. as a 
general practice, be delayed due to the unavailability of a 
witness. 

(e) An Honor Review is not a trial. Formal rules of evlderK» 
commonly associated with a civil or cnminal tnal may be 
counterproductive in an academic investigatory proceed- 
ing, and shall not be applied. The Presiding Officer will 
accept for consideration all matters which reasonable per- 
sons would accept as having probative value in the conduct 
of their affairs Unduly repetitious, irrelevant, or personally 
abusive matenal should be excluded. 

20. If the Honor Board finds that an attempt or act of academic 
dishonesty did occur, it shall recommend an appropriate sanc- 
tion. The normal sanction shall be a grade of XF in the course, but 
the Honor Board may recommend a lesser or more severe 
sanction. Generally, acts involving advance plannir>g. falsifica- 
tion of papers. collat>oration with others, or some actual or 
potential harm to other students will ment a severe sanction. I.e. 



Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 39 



suspension or expulsion, even tor a first offense. An attempt to 
commit an act stiall be punistied to the same extent as the 
consummated act 

21 . Ttie finding ot the Honor Board will be final and not subject to 
review. The Board's sanction recommendation is advisory to the 
Dean. If the Dean modifies the Honor Boards recommendation, 
the Dean will provide written reasons to the Honor Board. 

Procedures: Action by the Dean, Instructor, 
Vice President, President 

22. If the Honor Board finds that an attempt or act of academic 
dishonesty did occur, then the Dean will provide the student a 
copy of the Boards findings and recommendations, by personal 
delivery or certified mail. The student may submit a written appeal 
to the Dean concerning the Honor Boards recommendation 
within ten (10) days after the student receives the Board's 
findings and recommendations. The student will be deemed to 
have received such findings and recommendations on the date 
of personal delivery, or if certified mail is used, on the date of 
delivery at the last address provided to the university by the 
student. 

23. If the Dean awards the student a grade, including the grade of 
"XF", or fashions an academic requirement, the decision consti- 
tutes the final and conclusive action of the university. If the Dean 
determines to suspend the student, then this will not be imple- 
mented until reviewed by the Vice President for Student Affairs 
(or designee). If the Dean determines to expel the student, then 
this will not be implemented until reviewed by the President (or 
designee). If the Dean determines to take an action not otherwise 
described above (e.g. a community service assignment), then 
this will not be implemented until reviewed by the Director of 
Judicial Programs. In each instance, the review shall be limited 
to ensuring the sanction is not grossly disproportionate to the 
findings of the Honor Board. 

The Grade of "XF" 

24. The grade of "XF" is intended to denote a failure to accept and 
exhibit the fundamental value of academic honesty. The grade 
"XF" shall be recorded on the student's transcript with the 
notation •■failure due to academic dishonesty." The grade "XF" 
shall be treated in the same way as an "F" for the purposes of 
Grade Point Average, course repeatability, and determination of 
academic standing. 

25. No student with an "XF" on the student's transcript shall be 
permitted to represent the university in any extracurricular activ- 
ity, or run for or hold office in any student organization which is 
allowed to use university facilities, or which receives university 
funds. 

26. A student may file a written petition to the Student Honor Council 
to have the grade of "XF" removed and permanently replaced 
with the grade of "F". The decision to remove the grade of "XF" 
and replace it with an "F" shall rest in the discretion and judgment 
of a majority of a quorum of the Council; provided that: 

(a) at the time the petition is received, at least twelve months 
shall have elapsed since the grade of "XF" was imposed; 
and, 

(b) at the time the petition is received, the student shall have 
successfully completed a non-credit seminar on academic 
integrity, as administered by the Office of Judicial Programs; 
or, for the person no longer enrolled at the university, an 
equivalent activity as determined by the Office of Judicial 
Programs, and, 

(c) the Office of Judicial Programs certifies that to the best of its 
knowledge the student has not been found responsible for 
any other act of academic dishonesty or similar disciplinary 
offense at the University of t^/1aryland or another institution. 

27. Prior to deciding a petition, the Honor Council will review the 
record of the case and consult with the Director of Judicial 
Programs. Generally, the grade of "XF" ought not to be removed 
if awarded for an act of academic dishonesty requiring significant 
premeditation. If the "XF" grade is removed, records of the 
incident may be voided in accordance with Parts 47 and 48 of the 
Code of Student Conduct. The decision of the Honor Council 
shall not be subject to subsequent Honor Council review tor four 
years, unless the Honor Council specifies an earlier date on 
which the petition may be reconsidered. Honor Council determi- 
nations pertaining to the removal of the "XF" grade penalty may 
be appealed to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If the Vice 



President removes the grade of "XF" from the student's tran- 
script, the Vice President shall provide written reasons to the 
Honor Council. 

The Student Honor Council 

28 There shall be a Student Honor Council. The Honor Council is 
composed of twenty-live (25) full-time students, normally ap- 
pointed in the spnng tor the following academic year, and wlio 
may each be reappointed for additional one.year terms. 

29. The memtiers of the Honor Council are appointed in the following 
manner: 

(a) The Deans of the Colleges of Agriculture; Arts and Humani- 
ties; Behavioral and Social Sciences; Business and Man- 
agement; Computer, Ivlathematical and Physical Sciences; 
Education; Engineering; Human Ecology; Journalism; Life 
Sciences; Health and Human Performance; the Dean of the 
School of Architecture; and the Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies will each appoint one undergraduate student. 

(b) The Dean of the Graduate School will appoint seven gradu- 
ate students. 

(c) A committee consisting of the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs, the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Chair of 
the Graduate Student Association, and the President of the 
Student Government Association will appoint the remaining 
members. 

(d) If a Dean or the Committee wishes to reappoint a member 
of the Council, the Dean or the Committee shall seek the 
recommendation of the Executive Committee of the Student 
Honor Council. The Council shall recommend reappoint- 
ment only if the member has demonstrated a level of service 
and commitment to the functions and ideals of the Council 
that is exemplary. 

30. A member must be in high academic standing (a cumulative 
G.P.A. of at least 3.0) at the university and have no history of 
disciplinary, academic, or criminal misconduct. 

31 . All council members are subject to the training and conduct 
requirements of Paris 25 and 26 of the Code of Student Conduct. 

32. The Student Honor Council has the following responsibilities and 
authority: 

(a) To develop bylaws subject to approval by the university for 
legal sufficiency and consistency with the requirements of 
this Code, and the Code of Student Conduct. 

(b) To designate from its members students to sen/e as Review 
Officers, Presenters, and members of Honor Boards as 
specified in this Code. Appointmentto these responsibilities 
will generally rotate in accordance with the bylaws of the 
Honor Council. 

(c) To consider petitions for the removal of the grade of "XF" 
from university records in accordance with Part 26 of this 
Code. 

(d) To receive complaints or reports of academic dishonesty 
from any source. 

(e) To assist in the design and teaching of the non-credit 
seminar on academic integrity and moral development, as 
determined by the Director of Judicial Programs. 

(f) To advise and consult with faculty and administrative offic- 
ers on matters pertaining to academic integrity at the 
university. 

(g) To issue an annual report to the Campus Senate on aca- 
demic integrity standards, policies, and procedures, includ- 
ing recommendations for appropriate changes. 

33. The campus administration shall provide an appropriate facility, 
reserved for the primary use of the Honor Council, and suitable 
for the conduct of hearings. Clerical and secretarial assistance 
will also be provided. 

Future Self Governance 

34. Insofar as academic dishonesty is most immediately injurious to 
the student body, and because the student body is in a unique 
position to challenge and defer it, it is the intent of the university 
that ultimately this Code will evolve into one the provisions of 
which are marked by complete student administration. The 
Campus Senate shall review the operation of this Code during the 
1 992-93 academic year based in part on the annual reports of the 
Student Honor Council for the first three years of its operation. 
Consideration at that time should be given to introducing addi- 
tional enforcement responsibilities and privileges characteristic 
of traditional honor systems at sister institutions, including the 
provision that only student members of Honor Boards may vote. 



40 Registration, Academic Requirements, and Regulations 



It is expected that faculty participation on the Honor Boards will 
continue, since the faculty has an important interest in academic 
integrity, and since faculty members will have insights that should 
be considered in the resolution of individual cases. 



TERMS 

AD HOC HONOR BOARD: board consisting of two students and one 
faculty member appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and 
a Presiding Officer appointed by the Director of Judicial Programs. 
[Part 14]. 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: see Part 1 of this Code. 

CHARGE OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: a formal description of the 
case being considered by the Honor Board. [Part 12]. 

HONOR BOARD: body appointed by the Student Honor Council to hear 
and resolve a case of academic dishonesty. The board consists of five 
voting members (three student members of the Honor Council and two 
faculty members). [Part 13]. 

HONOR REVIEW: the process leading to resolution of an academic 
dishonesty case. The process is conducted by an Honor Board. 
[Parts 18-21]. 

PRESENTER: officer responsible for preparing the charge of academic 
dishonesty and presenting the case tiefore the Honor Board. The pre- 
senter is appointed by the Honor Board from among the Review Officers. 



or is the Campus Advocate. (Pan 11]. 

PRESIDING OFFICER: individual on the Honor Board responsible for 
directing proceedings during the Honor Review. The presiding officer is a 
non-voting member of the Honor Board selected by the Director of Judicial 
Programs. [Pan 16]. 

QUORUM: two-thirds of the members of the Student Honor Council. 

REVIEW OFFICERS: three members of the Student Honor Council 
assigned to make a preliminary inquiry into an allegation of academic 
dishonesty. (Part 5]. 

STUDENT HONOR COUNCIL: body of 25 students appointed by the 
various Deans and Vice Presidents, as well as by the President of ttie 
Student Government Association and the Chair of the Graduate Student 
Association. 

Students accused of academic dishonesty should request a copy of the 
university document "Preparing for an Honor Review' Contact the Office 
of Judicial Programs at 314-8204. TO REPORT ACADEMIC DISHON- 
ESTY, DIAL 314-8206 AND ASK FOR THE "CAMPUS ADVOCATE." 



' As used throughout this document, the term "Dean" refers to the Dean 
of the College in which the alleged academic dishonesty occurred, or, if 
the accused student is a graduate student, the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 



41 



CHAPTER 5 



GENERAL EDUCATION 



CORE LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 
STUDIES PROGRAM (CORE) 

GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM AND REQUIREMENTS 

Dean for Undergraduate Studies: Ira Berlin (Acting) 
2130 Mitchell Building, 405-9354 

To earn a baccalaureate degree at the University of Maryland at College Park, all students complete both 
a major course of study and a campus-wide general education program. 



The CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies Program (CORE) 

has been the required general education program at UMCP since Fall, 1990. The CORE 
Program must be completed by all students entering UMCP in May 1 990 and thereafter who 
have earned eight or fewer credits from UMCP or any other college. Students who enter 
UMCP with nine or more credits earned before May 1 990 from UMCP or any other college 
may complete their general education requirements under the University Studies Program 
(USP). (See USP below.) Advanced Placement (AP) and other examination-based credits 
will QQl be considered in these determinations. 



A liberal education is at the heart of a civil society. 

-A. Bartlett Giamatti. former President of Yale University and Commissioner of Baseball 
A university is a unique organization in human centuries. Plan nov^ to take an active role in all 

society: we are the most prolific source of new your classes-get to know your professor, ask 

knowledge, and we are the repository of the best questions in class, be an involved participant in 

that has been thought and created over the learning. 

-From the Dean's letter to UMCP students 
--Kathryn Mohrman, President of Colorado College 
and former Dean for Undergraduate Studies, University of Maryland 

The Purpose of General Education 

Participation in a democratic society requires more than the central instruction provided by one major 
field of study. In our world of rapid economic, social, and technological change, a strong and broadly- 
based education is essential. 

General education helps students achieve the intellectual integration and awareness they need to 
meet challenges in their personal, social, political, and professional lives. General education courses 
introduce the great ideas and controversies in human thought and experience. These courses provide the 
breadth, perspective, and rigor that allow UMCP graduates to claim to be "educated people." 

Most Americans change their careers three times during their lifetime. A solid general education 
provides a strong foundation for the life-long learning that makes career-change goals attainable. 

General Education at UMCP =CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences Studies 

CORE makes up about one third of your undergraduate courses. 

CORE helps you choose or change your major and the shape of your whole life by introducing you to 

new ways of viewing yourself and the world around you. 

CORE offers one of the best opportunities you will ever have to explore different fields of study. 

GET THE MOST OUT OF CORE 

• PLAN ahead and see an academic advisor regularly. 

• INVEST in yourself; select CORE courses that will add to your understanding and appreciation of 
social, cultural, national, and international issues in the years ahead. 



42 General Education Programs 



CORE LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES STUDIES PROGRAM (CORE) 

The CORE Program strategically builds a sound skill and knowledge base over the student's four years of baccalaureate study and 
represents a third of the total academic work completed for graduation. 

At UMCP, the CORE Program has four major components: 

FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES build competence and confidence in basic writing and mathematics. IWIastery of these basics greatly 
enhances success both during and after college. Students begin fulfilling Fundamental Studies requirements in their first year at UMCP. 

DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES introduce broad areas of learning in many disciplines. Through these courses, students explore different kinds 
of knowledge and the very nature of scholarship in the humanities, arts, natural sciences, mathematics, social sciences, and history. 
Students generally pursue Distributive Studies in the first two years of their coursework. 

ADVANCED STUDIES intensify the exploration begun with Distributive Studies. Advanced Studies courses encourage students to reflect 
upon the ways in which people in disciplines outside their majors approach contemporary social and ethical problems. Student take 
Advanced Studies courses in their junior and senior years. 

HUMAN CULTURAL DIVERSITY encourages all members of our diverse undergraduate community to learn about attitudes and cultures 
different from their own. Students may complete the Cultural Diversity requirement at any lime before graduation. 



CORE Program Outline 



Courses used to fulfill CORE Requirements: 



IVIUST be selected from the approved CORE course list. 
fvlAY also be used to satisfy college, major, and/or support- 
ing area requirements if the courses also appear on CORE 
Fundamental or Distributive Studies lists. 
MAY NOT be taken on a Pass-Fail basis. 



I. CORE Fundamental Studies 
three courses required: 

1. One course in Introduction to Writing (Must be attempted 
within the first thirty credits; must be passed within the 
first 60 credits.) 

Approved CORE Introduction to Writing Courses: 

(Select the appropriate course based on requirements listed.) 

ENGL 101 Introduction to Writing 

ENGL 101 A Introduction to Writing (Mustbetaken if student 
has TSWE [SAT verbal subtest] score below 
330) 

ENGL 101H Introduction toA/Vriting (Honors Students) 

ENGL 1 01 X Introduction to Writing (Students for whom 
English is a second language may register for 
ENGL 1 01 X instead of ENGL 1 01 . To register 
for ENGL 1 01 X, a student must present one of 
the following: 

(1) 550 on the TOEFL, OR 

(2) 220 on the Comprehensive English Lan- 
guage Test (CELT) administered at the 
College Park campus by the Maryland 
English Institute (MEI), OR 

(3) successful completion of the MEI's semi- 
intensive course in English. 

Note: Based on scores from either the TOEFL or CELT, 
students may be required to complete a program of 
English language instruction for non-native speakers 
through the MEI before being allowed to register for 
ENGL 101X. 

Exemptions from Introduction to Writing Requirement: 

• SAT verbal score 600 or above; OR 

• AP English score of 4 or 5 



2. One course in Mathematics (Must be attempted within the 
first thirty credits; must be passed within the first 60 
credits.) 

Approved CORE Fundamental Studies Mathematics 
Courses: 

MATH 110 Elementary Mathematical Models, or 
MATH 115 Pre-calculus, or 

Any 100 or 200 level MATH or STAT course except MATH 
210, and MATH 211 

Exemptions from Mathematics Requirement: 

• SAT Math score 600 or above; OR 

• College Board Achievement Test in Mathematics, Level I 
or II, score of 600 or above; OR 

• AP score of 3 or above in Calculus AB or BC; OR 

• Any CLEP Subject Examination in Mathematics score 60 
or above. 

3. One course in Professional Writing (Taken after reaching 
junior standing (at least 56 credits).) 

Approved CORE Professional Writing Courses: 

(Select the appropriate course based on requirements listed. ) 

ENGL 391 Advanced Composition 

ENGL 391 H Advanced Composition (Honors Students) 

ENGL 391 X Advanced Composition (English as a Second 

Language [ESL]) 
ENGL 392 Advanced Composition (Pre-Law) 
ENGL 393 Technical Writing 
ENGL 393H Technical Writing (Honors Students) 
ENGL 393X Technical Writing (ESL) 
ENGL 393Z Technical Writing (Includes computer assisted 

instruction) 
ENGL 394 Business Writing 
ENGL 395 Technical Writing (Pre-Med and Health careers) 

Exemption from Professional Writing Requirement: 

• Grade of "A' in ENGL 101 (NOT ENGL 101 A or ENGL 
101X), except for students majoring in Engineenng. 

Note: No exemption from the Professional Writing require- 
ments will lye granted for achievement on SA T verbal exam. 



General Education Programs 43 



It Is not enough to offer a smorgasbord of 

courses. We must insure that students are not 

just eating at one end of the table. 

— A. Bahtlett Giamatti 



...All life Is Interrelated, 

whatever affects one of us, 

affects all. 

— Martin Luther King, Jr. 



II. CORE DISTRIBUTIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 
nine courses required: 

See list of approved CORE courses in Schedule of Classes . 

1. Humanities and the Arts — three courses required: 

• One course from Literature list, and 

• One course from History/Tfieory of the Arts list, and 

• One more course from Literature, OR History/Theory of 
Arts . OR Humanities lists 

2. Mathematics and the Sciences — three courses required: 

• Up to two courses from Physical Sciences list, and 

• Up to two courses from Life Sciences list, and 

• Up to one course from lylathematics/Formal Reasoning list 

Notes: One course MUST include or be accompanied by 
a lab taken in the same semester. More than one lab 
course may be taken. All three courses may be from the 
science lists. 

3. Social Sciences and History — three courses required: 

• One course from Social/Political Histon/ list, AND 

• Two course from Behavioral and Social Sciences list 



IV. 



CORE HUMAN CULTURAL DIVERSITY 
one course required: 



Human history becomes more and more a race 
between education and catastrophe. 

— H.G. Wells 



III. CORE ADVANCED STUDIES 
two courses required: 

See list of approved CORE courses in the Schedule of Classes . 

• One course from Analysis of Social and Ethical Problems 
list (outside the major; after 56 credits), AND 

• One more course chosen from: 

(1) Analysis of Social and Ethical Problems list (outside 
the major; after 56 credits), OR 

(2) Development of Knowledge list (outside the major; 
after 56 credits), OR 

(3) Approved CORE Capstone list (within major; after 86 
credits) 

Notes: For CORE credit, Analysis of Social and Ethical 
Problems and Development of Knowledge courses must 
be taken outside the major and after reaching junior 
standing (56 credits). CORE Capstone courses must be 
taken within the major and after reaching senior standing 
(86 credits). Successful completion and defense of an 
honors thesis in either the University Honors or a Depart- 
mental Honors Program counts as CORE Capstone credit. 



See list of approved CORE Diversity courses in Schedule of 
Classes . 

Cultural Diversity courses focus primarily on:'(a) the history, 
status, treatment, or accomplishment of women or minority 
groups and subcultures; (b) non-Western culture, or (c) 
diversity issues or studies themselves as they relate to (a) 
and/or (b). 

Note: A number of CORE Cultural Diversity courses also 
satisfy CORE Distributive Studies or CORE Advanced 
Studies requirements or a college, major, and or support- 
ing area requirement. 

FOR COMPLETE CORE COURSE LISTS AND MORE INFOR- 
MATION CONSULT: 

Schedule of Classes , revised each semester. 

CORE Guide for Undergraduate Advisors updated each semes- 
ter and revised annually (Copies are available at the Hornbake 
Library Reference Desk and in advising offices). 

INFO on-line information system updated regularly (access through 

student Workstations at Maryland [WAM] account). 

UNIVERSITY STUDIES PROGRAM (USP) 

USP requirements preceded CORE General Education Program 
requirements. All students who entered UMCP before May 1990 
with nine or more credits from UMCP or any other college entered 
under USP requirements. These students may choose to com- 
plete the CORE Program instead and should consult their aca- 
demic advisors about the possible benefits of doing so. For 
detailed information about USP requirements, see the current 
Schedule of Classes and undergraduate catalogs dated 1 992 and 
earlier. 

MARYLAND PUBLIC COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS 

For the purpose of determining which general education program 
is required (CORE or USP), students transferring to UMCP from 
Maryland Public Community Colleges shall be treated as if their 
registration dates were concurrent with enrollment at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland at College Park. 

STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS FOR PREVIOUS GENERAL EDU- 
CATION PROGRAMS AT UMCP (GEP, GUR, USP) 

Undergraduate students returning or transferring to the College 
Park campus after August 1987 will no longer have the option of 
completing general education requirements under the older Gen- 
eral Education Program (GEP) orthe General University Require- 
ments (GUR). 

Thereafter, following any substantive change in general education 
requirements (like the change in Fall 1990 from USP to CORE), 
undergraduate students returning or transferhng to College Park 
after a separation of five continuous years must follow the require- 
ments in effect at the time of re-entry. Exceptions may be granted 
to those students who at the time of separation had completed 60% 
of the general education requirements then in effect. 



44 



CHAPTF.R h 



THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE (AGRI) 

1224 Symons Hall, 405-2080 

Dean: Paul H. MazzocchI (Interim) 

Today's agriculture Is a highly complex and extremely efficient industry 
that involves supplies and sen/ices used in agricultural production, and 
the marketing, processing and distribution of products to meet consuTners' 
needs and wants. The mission of the College of Agriculture includes the 
application of knowledge to the solution of some of the world's most critical 
problems concerning adequate amounts and quality of food and the 
quality of the environment in which we live. The college stnves to provide 
an agricultural education that fits all the needs of today's advanced 
science of agriculture. 

The College of Agriculture offers educational programs with a broad 
cultural and scientific base, emphasizing the precise knowledge gradu- 
ates must employ in the industrialized agriculture of today. Students are 
prepared for careers in agriculturally related sciences, technology and 
business. Course programs in specialized areas may be tailored to fit the 
particular needs of the individual student. Previous training in agriculture 
is not a prerequisite for study in the College of Agriculture; students with 
rural, suburban and urban backgrounds comprise the student body. 
Graduates of the College of Agriculture have an appropriate educational 
background for careers and continued learning after college in business, 
industry, production, teaching, research, extension, and many other 
professional fields. 

The original college of the University of Maryland at College Park was 
chartered in 1856. The College of Agriculture has a continuous record of 
leadership in education since that date. It became the beneficiary of the 
Land Grant in 1862. The College of Agriculture continues to grow and 
develop as part of the university system, providing education and research 
activities enabling us to use our environment and natural resources to best 
advantage while conserving basic resources for future generations. 

The College of Agriculture offers the following majors and programs of 
study: 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural Sciences, General 

Agronomy 

Animal Sciences 

Food Science Program 

Horticulture 

Human Nutrition and Food Systems 

Institute of Applied Agnculture (two-year program) 

Natural Resources Management Program 

Combined Degree: College of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine 

Advantage of Location and Facilities 

Educational opportunities in the College of Agnculture are enhanced by 
the proximity of several research units of the federal government. Teaching 
and research activities in the college are conducted with the cooperation 



of scientists and professional people in government positions. Of particu- 
lar interest are the Agricultural Research Center at Beltsville. the National 
Agricultural Library, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters 
in Washington, D.C. 

Instruction in the basic biological and physical sciences, social sciences 
and engineering principles is conducted in well-designed classrooms and 
laboratories. The application of basic principles to practical situations is 
demonstrated for the student In numerous ways. For example, modem 
greenhouses are available for teaching and research on a wide variety of 
plants, plant pests, and crop cultural systems. Dairy and beef cattle and 
flocks of poultry are available for teaching and research purposes. 

In addition to on-campus facilities, several operating research farms, 
located in Central, Western, and Southern Maryland and on the Eastern 
Shore, support the educational programs in agnculture by providing 
locations where important crops, animals, and poultry can be grown and 
maintained under practical and research conditions. 

Requirements for Admission 

For students entering the College of Agriculture it is recommended that 
their high school preparatory course include: English, 4 units: mathemat- 
ics, 3 units: biological and physical sciences, 3 units: and history or social 
sciences, 2 units. Four units of mathematics should be elected by students 
who plan to major in agricultural engineering. 

Degree Requirements 

Students graduating from the college must complete at least 120 credits 
with an average of 2.0 in all courses applicable toward the degree. 
Included In the 120 credits must be the following: 

1 . CORE (40 credits) 

2. College Requirements 

a. Chemistry: Any one course of three or more credits in chemistry 
numbered 102 or higher. 

b. Mathematics or any course that satisfies the CORE Program 

c. Biological Sciences: Any one course carrying three or more credits 
selected from offerings of the Departments of Botany. Entomology. 
Microbiology, or Zoology. 

Courses marked 1or non-science majors" cannot be used to satisfy 
degree requirements for any major In tfie College of Agnculture. 

3. Requirements of the major and supporting areas, which are listed 
under individual program headings in Chapter 7. 

Required Courses 

Courses required for students in the College of Agnculture are listed in 
each curriculum. The program for the freshman year is similar for all 
curricula. Variations in programs will be suggested based on students' 
interests and test scores. 



College of Agriculture 45 



Typical Freshman Program — College of Agriculture 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

I II 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

BIOL 105— Principles ot Biology I 4 

MATH 3 

ANSC 101— Principles of Animal Science 3 

BIOL 106— Principles of Biology II 4 

AGRO 101 4 

ENAG 200 2 

SPCH 1 07— Technical Speech Communication 3 

CORE Program Requirement 3 

Elective _L 

Total 15 15 

Advising 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to a faculty advisor. 
Advisors normally work with a limited number of students and are able to 
give individual guidance Students entering the freshman year with a 
definite choice of curriculum are assigned to departmental advisors for 
counsel and planning of all academic programs. Students who have not 
selected a definite curriculum are assigned to a general advisor who 
assists with the choice of electives and acquaints students with opportunities 
in the curncula in the College of Agriculture and in other units of the 
university. 

Financial Assistance 

A number of scholarships are available for students enrolled In the College 
of Agriculture. These include awards by the Agricultural Development 
Fund, Arthur M. Ahalt Memonal Scholarship, Capitol Milk Producers 
Cooperative, Inc., George Earle Cook, Jr. Scholarship Fund, Dr. Ernest N. 
Cory Trust Fund, Ernest T. Cullen Memorial Scholarship, Dairymen, Inc. 
Scholarship. Delmarva Corn and Soybean Scholarship, Delaware- 
Maryland Plant Food Association, Mylo S. Downey Memonal Scholarship, 
James R. Ferguson Memorial Scholarship, Forbes Chocolate Leadership 
Award, Goddard Memorial Scholarship, Manassas J. and Susanna Grove 
Memorial Scholarship. Joe E. James Memorial Award Fund, The Kinghorne 
Fund, Gary Lee Lake Memorial Scholarship, Maryland Holsteln-Freislan 
Association Scholarship, Maryland Turfgrass Association, Maryland State 
Golf Association. Maryland and Virginia Milk Producers, Inc., Dr. Ray A. 
Murray Scholarship Fund, Paul R. Poffenberger Scholarship Fund, R. J. 
Reynolds Tobacco Scholarship, Ralston Purina Company, J. Homer 
Remsberg Memorial Scholarship, The Schluderberg f^oundation. The 
Ross and Pauline Smith Fund for Agriculture, Southern States Cooperative, 
Inc., The David N. Steger Scholarship Fund, T. B. Symons Memorial 
Scholarship. Veterinary Science Scholarship, WInslow Foundation, and 
The Nicholas Brice Worthington Scholarship Fund. 

Honors 

An Honors Program Is approved for majors In Agricultural and Resource 
Economics. The objective of the Honors Program Is to recognize superior 
scholarship and to provide opportunity for excellent students to broaden 
their perspective and to increase the depth of their studies. The programs 
in Honors are administered by departmental Honors committees. Students 
in the College of Agriculture who are in the top 20 percent of their class at 
the end of their first year may be considered for admission Into the Honors 
Program. Of this group up to 50 percent may be admitted. 

Sophomores or first semester juniors will be considered upon application 
from those students In the upper 20 percent of their class. While application 
may be made until the student enters the sixth semester, early entrance 
Into the program is recommended. Students admitted to the program 
enjoy certain academic phvileges. 

Student Organizations 

Students find opportunity for vahed expression and growth in the several 
voluntary organizations sponsored by the College of Agriculture. These 
organizations are Agriculture and Resource Economics Club. Agronomy 
Club. American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Animal Husbandry 
Club, Collegiate 4-H Club, Collegiate Future Farmers of America, Forestry 
Club, Equestrian Association, Food Science Club, Horticultural Club, 
INAG Club, Poultry Science Club. Soil Conservation Society of America, 



The University of Maryland Student Chapter, and Veterinary Science 
Club. 

Alpha Zela is a national agricultural honor fraternity Members are chosen 
from students in the College of Agriculture who have attained the scholas- 
tic requirements and displayed leadership In agriculture 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from the 
vanous student organizations In the College of Agriculture Its purpose is 
to coordinate activities of these organizations and to promote work that is 
beneficial to the college 

Combined Degree Curriculum— College of Agriculture 
and Veterinary Medicine 

Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture who have completed at 
least ninety hours. Including all university and college requirements, may 
qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Maryland, 
College of Agriculture, upon successful completion In an accredited 
College of Veterinary Medicine of at least thirty semester hours. It Is 
strongly recommended that the ninety hours include credits In animal 
science. 

Combined Degree Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements 40 

ANSC 221 — Fundamentals of Animal Production 3 

ANSC 201— Genetics 3 

ANSC 203— Feeds & Feeding 3 

BIOL 1 05— Principles of Biology 1 4 

BIOL 106— Phnclples of Biology II 4 

Mathematics (must include at least 3 credits of Calculus) 6 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 1 1 3— General Chemistry II 4 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II 4 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

Biochemistry 3 

Electives 10 

'Includes eleven required credits listed above. 

For additional Information, please contact the Associate Dean. VMRCVM, 
1 203 Gudelsky Veterinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD 20742, (301)935-6083. 



VIRGINIA-MARYLAND REGIONAL COLLEGE OF 
VETERINARY MEDICINE-MARYLAND CAMPUS 

College of Agriculture 

1203 Gudelsky Veterinary Center, 405-6083 

Professor and Associate Dean: Mohanty 

Professor; Marquardt 

Associate Professors: Dutta, Mallinson, Snyder, Stephenson 

Assistant Professors: Carmel, Ingling, Samal, Sarmlento. Vakharia 

Instructors: Bradley, Penny 

The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine is oper- 
ated by the University of Maryland and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University. Each year, thirty Maryland and fifty Virginia residents 
comprise the entering class of a four-year program leading to a Doctor of 
Veterinary Medicine (DVM). 

The first three years are given at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 
University in Blacksburg, Virginia. The final year of instruction Is given at 
several locations, including the University of Maryland at College Park. 

A student desiring admission to the college must complete the pre- 
veterlnary requirements and apply for admission to the professional 
curriculum. Admission to this program Is competitive, and open to all 
Maryland residents. All Maryland residents' applications are processed at 
the Department of Vetehnary Medicine, University of Maryland, College 
Park. 



46 School of Architecture 



Institute of Applied Agriculture— Two- Year Program 

The Institute ot Applied Agriculture, a two-year, college-level program 
offered as an alternative to tfie four-year program, prepares students for 
specific occupations in tectinical agriculture. 

Tfie Institute offers three major programs with the following specialty 
areas: 

I. Business Farming 

A. Farm Production and Management 

B. Agricultural Business Management 

II. Ornamental Horticulture 

A. General Ornamental Horticulture 

B. Landscape Management 

C. Urban Forest Management 

III. Turfgrass Management and Golf Course Management 

The Business Farming program develops skills needed for farm opera- 
tion or for employment in agncultural service and supply businesses such 
as feed. seed, fertilizer, machinery companies, and farmers' coopera- 
tives. 

Options in Ornamental Horticulture prepare students for employment 
in, or management of. greenhouses, nurseries, garden centers, landscape 
maintenance companies and tree care professions. 

The Turfgrass Management program concentrates on the technical and 
management skills needed to work as a golf course superintendent, in 
commercial or residential lawn care companies, or in other turfgrass- 
related industries such as parks and cemeteries. 

To enhance a students occupational knowledge, the Institute requires 
completion of a Supervised Work Experience program, usually done in the 
summer between the first and second years. 

A graduate of the Institute is awarded a Certificate in Agriculture specifying 
the student's major area of study. Graduation requires the successful 
completion of sixty credit hours of a recognized program option, completion 
of Supervised Work Experience, and a 2.00 cumulative grade point 
average. 

Though designed as a two-year terminal program, the Institute does not 
restrict continuing education. Ingeneral. all Institute courses are transferable 
to the University of Maryland at College Park and the University of 
Maryland Eastern Shore. The extent to which the courses can be applied 
to a baccalaureate degree will depend on the individual department in 
which a student is planning to major. 

Courses Common to All Programs 

COMM 1-1— Oral Communication 3 

COMM 1-2— Written Communication 3 

AGMA 1-1— Agricultural Mathematics 3 

BOTN 1-1— Introduction to Plant Science 3 

AGRO 1-1— Soils and Fertilizers* 3 

AGRO 1-1 1— Pesticide Use and Safety 2 

AGEN 1-1 — Agricultural Mechanics 3 

AGEC 1-2— Business Law 3 

AGEC 1-4 — Business Operations 3 

AGEC 1-8— Using Computers in Agriculture 2 

AGEC 1-10 — Personnel Management 3 

AGEC 1-14 — Supervised Work Experience 1 

AGEC 1-15 — Business Management 3 

Courses for Farm Production and Agribusiness Management Majors 

ANSC 1-1— Introduction to Animal Science 3 

ANSC 1-2— Feeds and Feeding 3 

ANSC 1-3— Animal Health 3 

ANSC 242— Dairy Production 3 

ANSC 1-8— Livestock Management 3 

ANSC 1-10— Seminar 1 

ANSC 422— Meats 3 

AGRO 1-7— Grain and Forage Crop Production 4 

AGRO 1-12— Crop Production Practices , 3 

AGEC 1-7— Agricultural Marketing ' 3 

AGEC 1-11— Farm Management 3 



Courses for Ornamental Horticulture and Turfgrass Majors 

HORT 1-2— Woody Ornamentals 3 

HORT 1-3— Plant Propagation 3 

HORT 1-7 — Greenhouse Management 2 

HORT 1-8— Arboriculture 2 

HORT 1-12— Floral Crop Production 2 

HORT 1-18— Woody Ornamentals II 2 

HORT 1-26 — Landscape Design and Implementation 4 

HORT 1-27— Landscape Management 4 

HORT 1 -30— Vegetable Production Practices 2 

ENTM 1-2— Pests ot Ornamental Plants 3 

AGRO 1-2— Turf Management 4 

AGRO 1-4 — Golf Course Management I 3 

AGRO 1-5 — Golf Course Management II 3 

URFS 1-1— Urban Forest Management 3 

URFS 1-2— I. P.M. Monitonng 2 

For additional information, write: Director, The Institute of Applied Agn- 
culture, 2123 Jull Hall, University of Maryland. College Park. MD 20742- 
2525, or call (301)405-4686. 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

Architecture Building. 405-6284 

Professor and Dean: Steven W. Hurtt 

Associate Dean: Stephen F. Sachs 

Assistant to the Dean: Nancy Lapanne 

Professors: Bennett, Etiinf, Fogle, Hill, Lewis, Loss, Schlesinger. 

Schumacher, Steffian 

Associate Professors: Bechhoefer, Bovill. DuPuy, Vann 

Assistant Professors: Bell, Drost, Gardner. Kelly. Gournay 

Lecturers: Mclnturff. Stup. Wiedemann 

tOistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The School of Architecture offers a four-year undergraduate program 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in architecture, and a graduate 
program leading to the degree. Master of Architecture. The undergradu- 
ate major in architecture is designed to minimize the time required to 
complete the curriculum leading to the professional degree. Master of 
Architecture. 

Students receive rigorous and comprehensive instruction from a faculty 
whose members are active in professional practice or research. Many 
faculty members have distinguished themselves across the professional 
spectrum and represent different approaches to architectural design. 
Their individual areas of expertise include architectural design and theory, 
history, architectural archaeology, technology, urban design and planning, 
and historic preservation. Visiting critics, lecturers, and the Kea Distin- 
guished Professor augment the faculty; together they provide students 
with the requisite exposure to contemporary realities of architectural 
design. 

The B.S. degree in architecture will qualify graduates to pursue a career 
in any of a number of fields, such as construction, real estate development, 
public administration, or historic preservation, or to continue in graduate 
work in professional fields such as architecture, urban planning, or law. 

Admission to Architecture 

See the Admissions section in this catalog for general LEP admission 

policies. 

Freshman Admission and the 45 Credit Review Most first-time enter- 
ing freshmen will gain admission to the School of Architecture directly from 
high school, as allowed by space considerations within the School 
Because space may be limited before all interested freshmen are admit- 
ted to the program, early application is encouraged Freshmen admitted 
to the program will have access to the necessary advising through their 
initial semesters to help them determine if Architecture is an appropnate 
major for their interests and abilities 

Freshmen who are admitted directly to Architecture will be subject to a 
performance review by the time they have completed 45 credits To meet 
the provisions of the review, these students must complete (1) FurxJa- 
mental Studies; (2) 60% of Distnbutive Studies; (3) ARCH 1 70, 220. and 



College of Arts and Humanities 

Fourth Year 

ARCH 402— Architecture Studio III 

ARCH 445 — Visual AnalysfS of Architecture 

ARCH 412— Architectural Technology III 

ARCH 403— Architecture Studio IV 

ARCH 413— Architectural Technology IV 

CORE Requirements 

One of the following 

ARCH 460 Site Analysis & Design 

ARCH 450 Introduction to Urban Planning 

ARCH 454 Theories of Urban Form 

ARCH 4xx— Arch. History/ Area B" 

Total 

Total Credits 



47 



242 with grades of B in each; (4) MATH 220, PHYS 121 . and PHYS 122 
with minimum grades of C In each and a combined GPA of 2.6 for the 3 
courses: (5) three letters of recommendation; and (6) a portfolio review as 
specified by the School Students who do not meet these requirements 
will not be allowed to continue In the LEP and will be required to select 
another major. 

Transfer Admission The following requirements affect new transfer 
Students to the university as well as on-campus students hoping to change 
majors to Architecture. Admission of transfer students may be severely 
limited, and capacity is determined each year in accordance with the 
success of incoming freshmen. 

In order to be admitted to Architecture, transfer students will be required 
to meet the following set of gateway requirements: (1) completion of 
Fundamental Studies: (2) completion of all Distributive Studies; (3) 
completion of ARCH 242 with a grade of B; (4) completion of IvIATH 220 
and PHYS 1 22 with minimum grades of C and a combined average of 2.4; 
(5) successful review of a portfolio to assess drawing skills; and (6) 
attainment of a minimum cumulative GPA for all college-level work 
attempted. The required GPA is set each year and may vary from year to 
year depending upon available space. Contact the School of Architecture 
or the Office of Undergraduate Admission for the current GPA standard. 

Appeals. Students who are unsuccessful In gaining admission to 
Architecture at the freshman or transfer level, and believe they have 
extenuating or special circumstances which should be considered, may 
appeal in writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admission. The student 
will be notified In writing of the appeal decision once it is made. 

Students admitted to Architecture as freshmen who do not pass the 45 
credit review but believe they have special circumstances which should be 
considered may appeal directly to the School. 

For further Information, contact the Counselor for Limited Enrollment 
Programs at 301-314-8378. 



Curriculum Requirements 



In the first two years of college, directly admitted students and those 
seeking to transfer Into the School of Architecture should adhere to the 
following curriculum; 

Credit Hours 

General Education (CORE) and Elective 28 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing (CORE) 3 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I (CORE) 3 

ARCH 1 70— Introduction to the Built Environment (CORE) ... 3 

MATH 221 — Elementary Calculus II (recommended) 3 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I (CORE) 4 

ARCH 220— History of Architecture I* 3 

ARCH 242— Drawing I 2 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II (CORE) 4 

ARCH 221— History of Architecture II _3 

Total Credits 56 



Curriculum Requirements 



Bachelor of Science, Major in Architecture. If admitted after completing 
56 credits, students are expected to complete the following requirements 
for a total of 1 20 credits: 

Credit Hours 
Third Year 

ARCH 400— Architecture Studio I* 6 

ARCH 410— Architectural Technology I 4 

ARCH 4xx— Arch. History/Area A" 3 

ARCH 401— Architecture Studio II 6 

ARCH 41 1— Architectural Technology II 4 

ARCH 343— Drawing II Line Drawing 3 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 3 

CORE Requirements 3 

Total 32 



_2 

32 

120 



"Courses are to be taken in sequence as Indicated by Roman numerals 
in course titles. 

•• Architecture history courses: Area A, ARCH 422. 423, 432, and 436 
Area B, ARCH 433, 434, and 420. 

Special Resources and Opportunities 

The school Is housed in a modern, air-conditioned building providing 
design workstations for each student, a large auditorium, and seminar and 
classroom facilities. A well-equipped woodworking and model shop, 
darkroom, a lab equipped with testing machines and vanous instruments 
used in studying the ambient environment, and computer terminal facili- 
ties are also provided. The Architecture Library, one of the finest in the 
nation, offers convenient access to a current circulating collection of over 
24,000 volumes, 6,000 periodicals, and an extensive selection of refer- 
ence materials. Rare books and special acquisitions Include a collection 
relating to international expositions and the 1 1 ,000-volume National Trust 
for Historic Preservation Library. A visual resources facility includes a 
reserve slide collection of 250,000 slides on architecture, landscape 
architecture, urban planning, architectural science, and technology as 
well as audio-visual equipment for classroom and studio use. 

The school provides learning expenences through CADRE Corporation, 
a nonprofit center for Architectural Design and Research, which provides 
an organizational framework for faculty and students to undertake con- 
tract research and design projects appropriate to the school's fundamen- 
tal education mission. CADRE Corporation projects include building and 
urban design, urban studies, building technology, historic preservation, 
architectural archaeology, studies in energy conservation, or other work 
for which the school's resources and Interests are uniquely suited. 

Summer programs include the Caesarea Ancient Harbor Excavation 
Project (CAHEP), an ongoing land and underwater excavation in Israel at 
the harbor of Herod the Great at Caesarea Maritima. In addition, summer 
workshops for historic preservation are sponsored by the school each 
year in Cape May, New Jersey, a designated national historic landmark 
distnct, and Kiplin Hall in North Yorkshire, England. Students may earn 
direct credit doing hands-on restoration work and by attending lectures by 
visiting architects, preservationists, and scholars. 

Course Code: ARCH 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES (ARHU) 

1101 Francis Scott Key Hall. 405-2088 

Dean: Robert Griffith 

Office of Student Affairs (405-21 10) 

Academic Advisors (405-21 1 0) 

The College of Arts and Humanities embraces a heterogeneous group of 
disciplines, all of which value the development of critical thinking, fluent 
expression In writing and speech, sensitivity to ethical and aesthetic 
standards, and a complex understanding of history and culture. Depart- 
ments and programs In Arts and Humanities, while they have strong 
individual identities, are also involved in interdisciplinary studies. Thus 
students will find, for example, courses in the Department of English that 



48 College of Arts and Humanities 



approach literature from political perspectives, courses in the Department 
of History that rely on feminist perspectives, courses in the Department of 
An History that study Afncan cultures and so on. 

Examples of the special opportunities available to students in this richly 
variegated college are an exceptionally large slide library in the Art History 
Department, the Ivlusic Department's refurbished recital hall, the Pugliese 
Theatre for experimental drama. Improvisations Unlimited (a faculty- 
student dance group), the Computer Assisted Design and Development 
Laboratory, a biweekly foreign and art film series, a junior year abroad 
program in Nice, a year abroad program in Sheffield, and Honors 
programs in most departments. There are also special programs in 
women's studies, comparative literature, and the history and philosophy 
of science. 

Preparation in the Arts and Humanities provides valuable background for 
careers in a broad range of fields. Students should be aware of the many 
eloquent testimonials from leaders of the nation's businesses, industry 
and government to the skills of oral presentation, written exposition, 
critical thinking, and analytic problem-solving nurtured in humanities 
courses. These skills are essential to a successful career in any number 
of different fields. 

Entrance Requirements 

Students wishing to major in one of the creative or performing arts are 
encouraged to seek training in the skills associated with such an area prior 
to matriculation. Students applying for entrance to these programs may be 
required to audition, present slides, or submit a portfolio as a part of the 
admission requirements. 

Graduation Requirements 

The following college requirements apply only to students earning Bachelor 
of Arts degrees from the College of Arts and Humanities. These require- 
ments are in addition to or in fulfillment of campus and departmental 
requirements. For information concerning the Bachelor of Music in the 
Department of Music the student should consult a department advisor. 

Distribution 

A minimum of 45 semester hours of the total of 120 must be upper-level 
work (i.e., courses numbered 300-499). 

Foreign Lafiguage 

Language proficiency may be demonstrated in one of several ways: 

(a) Successful completion of level 4 in one language or level 2 in 
each of 2 languages in high school, or 

(b) Successful completion of a 1 2-credit sequence or of the interme- 
diate level in college language courses, or 

(c) Successful completion of a language placement examination in 
one of the campus language departments offering such 
examinations. 

Students whose native language is not English should see an advisor in 
the College Office of Student Affairs. 

Major Requirements 

All students must complete a program of study consisting of a major (a field 
of concentration) and supporting courses as specified by one of the 
academic units of the college. No program of study shall require in excess 
of 60 semester hours. Students should consult the unit in which they will 
major for specific details; certain units have mandatory advising. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the lower division departmental 
prerequisites, of 24 to 40 hours, at least 12 of which must be in courses 
numbered 300 or 400 and at least 12 of which must be taken at the 
University of Maryland at College Park. 

A ma)or program usually requires a secondary field of concentration 
(supporting courses). The nature and numljer of these courses are 
determined by the major department. 

No grade lower than C may be used to fulfill major or supporting course 
requirements. No course for the major or support module may t>e taken 
Pass-Fail. 



Advising 



Freshmen and new transfer students have advisors in the Arts and 
Humanities College Office of Student Affairs (405-21 1 0) who assist them 
in the selection of courses and the choice of a major After selecting a 
major, students are advised in their major department and may also 
continue to see college advisors. For furtfier information about advising, 
students should see the section on advising in the Mmi-Guide. availcible 
from the College 

Degrees and Majors 

The College of Arts and Humanities offers the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in the following fields of study: 

American Studies 

Art 

Art History and Archeology 

Classics 

Classical Humanities 

Greek 

Latin 
Dance 
Design* 

Advertising Design 

Interior Design 
East Asian Languages and Literatures 

Chinese 

Japanese 
English Language and Literature 
French Language and Literature 
German Language and Literature 
History 

Italian Language and Literature 
Jewish Studies 
Linguistics 
Music 
Philosophy 

Radio, Television, and Film* 
Romance Languages 
Russian Language and Literature 
Russian Area Studies 
Spanish Language and Literature 
Speech Communication 
Theatre 
*Admission to these programs has been suspended. 

The college also offers the degree of Bachelor of Music, certificate 
programs in Women's Studies and East Asian Studies; and a program in 
Comparative Literature. 

Internships 

Some departments in Arts and Humanities have well-established intern- 
ship offerings. Typically, students must complete an application and 
attach a current academic transcript. Internships are generally for one 
semester of the junior or senior year for students with a good academic 
record. Along with the actual work experience, students do a wntten 
analysis of the experience. For more information, students should contaci 
their major departmental advisor A Literacy Internship Program is avail- 
able through the college office (405-21 1 5) 

Certification of High School Teachers 

A student who wishes certification as a high school teacher in a subject 
represented in this college must consult the College of Education in the 
second semester of the sophomore year. Application tor admission to fhe 
Teacher Education program is made at the time that the first courses in 
Education are taken. Enrollment in the College of Education is limited. 

Honors 

Departmental Honors Programs are offered in the Departments of Art 
History. English. French. German. History, Music. Philosophy. Spanish, 
Speech, and Theatre. Departmental Honors Programs are administered 
by an Honors Committee within each department Programs and pwliaes 
differ from department to department Admission to a Departmental 
Honors Program ordinanly occurs at the beginning of the first or second 



College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 49 



semester ol the student's junior year. Students must have a cumulative 
grade point average ot at least 3.0 to be admitted Most departments 
require a comprehensive examination over the (leld ot the major program, 
or a thesis. On the basis ot the students performance on the Honors 
Comprehensive Examination and in meeting such other requirements as 
may be set by the Departmental Honors Committee, the faculty may vote 
to recommend the candidate tor the appropriate degree with (departmen- 
tal) honors or tor the appropnate announcement in the commencement 
program and citation on the student's academic record and diploma. 

In some departments, honors students enjoy certain academic privileges 
similar to those of graduate students. 

Phi Beta Kappa. Consult the description of Phi Beta Kappa elsewhere in 
this catalog 

Research and Service Units 
Academic Computitig Sei\ices 

3101 Francis Scott Key Hall; 405-2104 
Director: John F. Smith 

Academic Computing Services provides facilities and support for a wide 
range ot computing needs for undergraduate students in the College of 
Arts and Humanities. There are currently 65 networked microcomputers 
located in four laboratories throughout the college which are available for 
student use. In addition, the college provides discipline specific classroom 
latwratories for the Professional Writing Program in English, foreign 
language instruction and computer-aided design. 

The All Gallery 

2202 Art-Scciology Building; 405-2763 
Director: Terry Gips 

The Art Gallery presents a series of exhibitions each year of historic and 
contemporary art in a variety of media and subject matter. Opportunities 
for museum training and experience are available to students through 
intern and work-study positions. 

The Center for Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music 

4321 Hartwick Rd. Suite L220: 403-4230 
Director: H. Robert Cohen 
Associate Director: Luke Jensen 

The Center for Studies in Nineteenth-Century tviusic promotes research 
focusing on nineteenth-century music and musical life. The center's 
programs are designed to facilitate the study, collection, editing, indexing, 
and publication of documentary source materials. 

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies 

1 1 20 Francis Scott Key Hall; 405-6830 
Director: S. Schoenbaum 
Executive Director: Adele Seeff 

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies promotes teaching and 
research in the Renaissance and Baroque periods in all disciplines of the 
arts and humanities, as well as in such allied fields as the history and 
philosophy of science. 

The Language Center 

1 1 06 Jimenez Hall; 405-4926 
Director: A Ronald Walton (Acting) 
Assistant Director: Charlotte Groft Aldridge 

The Language Center promotes cross-departmental projects in teaching 
and research relating to other languages and cultures. It provides for the 
common needs of language instruction for all the individual campus units 
involved in second-language acquisition. It encompasses three units: 

Language Mouse 

0107 St. f\^ary's Hall; 405-6995 
Coordinator: Dolores Bondurant 

The Language House is a campus residence for students wishing to 
immerse themselves in the study of a foreign language and culture. A total 
of 92 students of Chinese. French. German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, 
Russian, and Spanish share 19 apartments. A live-in graduate mentor 
leads each language cluster. The goal of language immersion is achieved 
through activities organized by the students and mentors, a computer- 
based Language Learning Center, an audio-visual room, an international 
cafe, and foreign television programs received via satellite. 



Language Media Center 

1 202 Jimenez Hall; 405-4924 
Coordinator: James E Royalty 

The Language Media Center serves the technological needs of foreign 
language instruction at College Park It houses a large collection ot video 
and audio programs in more than 25 languages, graphic and resource 
materials, language laboratones. and video viewing rooms. 

FOLA 

41 1 7 Jimenez Hall; 405-4046 
Director: William MacBain 

The FOLA (Foreign Language) Program enables qualified students with 
high motivation to acquire a speaking knowledge of a number of foreign 
languages not offered in regular campus programs While instruction is 
basically self-instructional, students meet regularly with a native-speaking 
monitor for practice sessions to reinforce what has already been covered 
through the Individual use of books and audio tapes. Final examinations 
are administered by outside examiners who are specialists in their field. 

Maryland English Institute 

1 102 Preinkert Fieldhouse; 405-8634 
Director: Leslie A. Palmer 

The Maryland English Institute (MEI) offers special instruction in English 
to students at the University of Maryland who need to improve their 
competence in the language before they are able to undertake a full 
program of academic work. Two programs are offered: a half-time semi- 
intensive course and a full-time intensive course. 

Semi-Intensive. This program is open only to University of Maryland 
students, both graduate and undergraduate, who fall within a TOEFL 
score range of 450-549. Candidates in this proficiency range may be 
admitted to the University of Maryland on a provisional basis, requiring 
them to satisfactorily complete the MEI Semi-intensive program in order 
to become full-time students. Classes meet two hours per day. five days 
per week. In addition, students have two hours per week of assigned work 
in the language laboratory. The program is designed especially to perfect 
the language skills necessary for academic study at the University of 
Maryland. Enrollment is by permission of the director, and no credit is 
given toward any degree at the university. 

Intensive. This full-time English-as-a-Foreign-Language program isopen 
to non-native speakers of English who need substantial improvement in 
their English competence before they can undertake any academic study 
at a college or university in the United States. On the basis of an entrance 
examination, students will be assigned to classes at their particular 
proficiency levels. They will have five hours of English language instruc- 
tion per day. five days per week during the regularly scheduled semester 
and an eight-week summer session. The program is intended primarily for 
students who wish to enroll at the University of Maryland after completing 
their language instruction. However, satisfactory completion of the lan- 
guage program does not guarantee acceptance at the university. Enroll- 
ment is by permission of the director and no credit is given toward any 
degree at the university. 

Course Code: ARHU 



COLLEGE OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL 
SCIENCES (BSOS) 

2141 Tydings Hall, 405-1679 

Dean; Irwin L. Goldstein 

Associate Dean: Stewart L. Edelstein 

Assistant Dean for Student Affairs; Katherine Pedro Beardsley 

Assistant Dean for Equity and Recruitment: Diana Ryder Jackson 

Advising and Records Office: 405-1697 

Center for Minorities in Behavioral and Social Sciences: 405-1708 

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences is comprised of a diverse 
group of disciplines and fields of study all of which emphasize a broad 
liberal arts education as the foundation for understanding the environmen- 
tal, social, and cultural forces that shape our world. At the heart of the 
behavioral and social sciences is the attempt to understand human 
beings, both individually and in groups. Disciplines in the behavioral and 
social sciences use approaches that range from the scientific to the 
philosophical, from the experimental to the theoretical Integral to all the 



50 College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 



disciplines, however, is the development and application of problem 
solving skills, which in combination with other academic skills, enable 
students to think analytically and to communicate clearly and persua- 
sively. Students interested in human behavior and in solving human and 
social problems will find many exciting opportunities through the programs 
and courses offered by the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

The college is composed of the following major programs that lead to the 
Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree, as appropnate: 

Afro-American Studies Program* 

Department of Anthropology 

Department of Economics 

Department of Geography 

Department of Government and Politics 

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Department of Psychology 

Department of Sociology 

Department of Urban Studies and Planning 

Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology 

'The Afro-American Studies Program also offers an undergraduate 
certificate requiring 21 semester hours of coursework (See "Campus- 
Wide Programs" in this catalog.) 

Advising 

The BSOS Undergraduate Advising Office and the Center for Minorities 
coordinate advising and maintain student records for BSOS students. 
Advisors are available to provide information concerning university re- 
quirements and regulations, transfer credit evaluations, and other general 
information about the university by appointments taken on a walk-in basis 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Undergraduate advisors for each undergradu- 
ate major are located in the department offices. These advisors are 
available to assist students in selecting courses and educational experi- 
ences in their major area of study consistent with major requirements and 
students' educational goals. 

Graduation Requirements 

Each student must complete a minimum of 1 20 hours of credit with at least 
a 2.0 cumulative average. Courses must include the credits required in the 
University's general education requirements (USP or CORE) and the 
specific major and supporting course and grade requirements of the 
programs in the academic departments offering baccalaureate degrees. 

All students are urged to speak with an academic advisor in the College 
Advising Office at least two semesters before graduation to review their 
academic progress and discuss final graduation requirements. 

Honors 

Undergraduate honors are offered to graduating students in the Afro- 
American Studies Program, the departments of Anthropology. Econom- 
ics. Geography, Government and Politics. Psychology, and Sociology, 
the Institute for Urban Studies and the Institute of Criminology and 
Criminal Justice. 

Dean's Scholars. The highest academic award that a BSOS student can 
earn in the college. Deans Scholars are those graduating seniors who 
have completed 90 credits at UMCP and have maintained a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 3.800. 

Dean's List. Any student who has passed at least twelve hours of 
academic work in the preceding semester, without failure of any course 
and with an overall average grade of at least 3.5 will be placed on the 
Dean's List of Distinguished Students. 

Field Experiences/Pre-professional and Professional 
Training 

Pre-professional training and professional opportunities in the behavioral 
and social sciences are available in many fields. The internship programs 
offered by many departments in the college provide students with practical 
experience working in governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, 
corporations, and the specialized research centers and laboratones of the 
College. 



Undergraduate Research Opportunities 

Undergraduate research internships allow qualified undergraduate stu- 
dents to work with research laboratory directors and faculty in departments 
andspecialized research centers, thus giving the student a chance tor a 
unique experience in the design and conduct of research and scholarship. 
Students are advised to consult with their department advisors on re- 
search opportunities available in the major. 

Student Organizations and Honor Societies 

Students who excel in their academic discipline may be selected for 
membership in an honorary society. Honoraries for which students in 
BSOS are chosen include: 

Alpha Kappa Delta— Sociology 
Alpha Phi Sigma— Criminal Justice 
Lambda Epsilon Gamma— Law 
Omega Delta Epsilon— Economics 
Pi Sigma Alpha — Political Sciences 
Psi Chi— Psychology 

Students who major in the Behavioral and Social Sciences have a wide 
range of interests. The following is a list of student organizations in the 
disciplines and fields of the Behavioral and Social Sciences: 

Anthropology Student Organization 

Conservation Club 

Criminal Justice Student Association 

Economics Club 

Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 

Government and Politics Club 

fVlinority Pre-Professional Psychology Society 

National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association 

(NSSLHA). Maryland Chapter 
Pre-Medical Society (Pre-Med/Psychology Majors) 
Thurgood Marshall Pre-Law Society 

For more information about these student organizations or starting a new 
student group, please contact the Office of Campus Activities, 1191 Adele 
H. Stamp Student Union, 314-7174. 

Special Resources and Opportunities 

The Center for Minorities in the Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2201 LeFrak Hall; 405-1708 

The Center for Minorities provides academic and other support services 
designed specifically to meet the needs of minority students in the college 
The center provides advising on academic and other concerns related to 
students' progress at the university; provides referrals, when appropnate. 
to other campus offices; and sponsors workshops and related activities on 
issues of particular relevance to minonty students Advisors are available 
on a walk-in basis and by appointment 

The Center for Political Participation and Leadership 

31 10 Art-Sociology Building; 405-6402 
Director: Georgia Sorenson 

The Center was established in Novemtjer of 1 989 to foster and encourage 
young people to prepare for elective office and community and public 
service. Special attention is paid to students from groups historically 
underrepresented in the political spectrum Closely affiliated with the 
academic departments in the college, the center has established intern- 
ships and Fellowships with Maryland senators and delegates, the Women 
Legislators of Maryland, the Offices of the Governor and Lt. Governor and 
Cabinet members. The center has placements on Capitol Hill and in 
county and local elected officials offices around the state Research 
Fellowships for the study of global politics have tjeen funded in the past. 

The BSOS Computer Laboratory 

0221 LeFrak Hall; 405-1670 
Acting Director: Charies Wellford 

The college believes strongly that the study of tiehavioral and social 
sciences should incorporate t)oth quantitative analysis and computational 
skills. Consequently, curricula in most departments require some 
coursework in statistics, quantitative research methods, and the use of 



College of Business and Management 51 



computers. The BSOS Computer Latjoratory provides undergraduate 
students in the college with the facilities and staH assistance to satisfy a 
wide range of computer-related needs The Laboratory operates eight 
computer classroom facilities and a special purpose graphics lab which 
are available tor both in and out olclass student use. 

Research and Service Units 

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences sponsors several special 
purpose college wide research centers These centers are The Center 
(or Global Change, The Center for International Development and 
Conflict Management, and the Center for Substance Abuse Re- 
search. These interdisciplinary centers often offer internships and a 
selected number of undergraduate research assistant opportunities for 
interested students. These research experiences offer excellent prepara- 
tion for future graduate study and/or job opportunities in the private and 
public sectors 

The Center for International Development and Conflict 
Management 

2nd Floor fvlill Building; 314-7703 
Director: Murray E. Polakoff 

The Center for International Development and Conflict Management is a 
research center focusing on the management and resolution of protracted 
conflict in the world today. Established in 1 981 , the center has a staff com- 
posed of university faculty, visiting fellows and associates involved in 
study of contemporary international and intercommunal conflicts, including 
their causes, dynamics, management strategies and peaceful resolution. 

Center for Substance Abuse Researcfi (CESAR) 

Acting Director: Enc D. Wish 

Established in 1990. CESAR is a research unit co-sponsored by the 
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the College of Health and 
Human Performance. CESAR staff gather, analyze, and disseminate 
timely information on issues of substance abuse, and monitor alcohol and 
drug use indicators throughout Maryland. CESAR aids state and local 
governments in responding to the problem of substance abuse by 
providing the above stated information, as well as technical assistance 
and research. Faculty members from across campus are involved with 
CESAR-based research, creating a center in which substance abuse 
issues are analyzed from multi-disciplinary perspectives. Students obtain 
advanced technical training and hands-on experience through their 
involvement in original surveys and research. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT 
(BMGT) 

Office of Undergraduate Studies: 1308 MPA Building, 405-2286 

Professor and Dean: William E. Mayer '^ 
Professor and Associate Dean: Bradford 
Associate Dean and Director of EDP: Stocker 
Professor and Director of Doctoral Program: Sims 
Director of the Masters' Programs: Wellman 
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies: Mattingly 
Director of Undergraduate Student Services: King 
Advisor/Consultant: Mirhadi 

The College of Business and Management recognizes the importance of 
education in business and management to economic, social, and profes- 
sional development through profit and non-profit organizations at the 
local, regional, and national levels. The faculty of the college have been 
selected from the leading doctoral programs in business. They are 
scholars, teachers, and professional leaders with a commitment to 
superior education in business and management, specializing in account- 
ing, finance, decision and information sciences, management science 
and statistics, management and organization, marketing, and transporta- 
tion, business and public policy. The College of Business and Manage- 
ment is accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of 
Business, the official national accrediting organization for business schools. 

Degrees 

The university confers the following degrees on students successfully 
completing programs of study in the college: Bachelor of Science (B.S.), 
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), 



and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Information concerning admission to 
the MBA. or M.S. program is available from the college's Director of the 
Masters' Programs. 

Undergraduate Program 

The undergraduate program recognizes the need for professional education 
in business and management based on a foundation in the liberal arts. 
Modern society comprises intricate business, economic, social, and 
government institutions requinng a large number of men and women 
trained to be effective and responsible managers. 

A student In business and management selects a major in one of several 
curricula: (1) Accounting: (2) Decision and Information Sciences; (3) 
Finance; (4) General Business and Management (including an Interna- 
tional Business option); (5) Management Science; (6) Marketing; (7) 
Personnel and Labor Relations; (8) Production Management; (9) Statis- 
tics; and (10) Transportation. 

Students interested in institutional management, insurance or real estate 
may plan with their advisors to select elective courses to meet their 
specialized needs; however, this interest is in addition to completion of 
one of the above majors. (See specific suggestions at the end of curricula 
section to follow.) 

Honors Program 

The College of Business and Management Honors Program has two 
components: class study and individual study. Together, these provide for 
in-depth inquiry and research into the field of business. Admission is 
administered through the College of Business and Management Honors 
Admission Committee. Interested students should contact an advisor in 
the Office of Undergraduate Studies. 

Advising 

General advising in the College of Business and Management is available 
Monday through Friday in the Office of Undergraduate Studies, 1 308 MPA 
Building, 405-2286. It is recommended that students visit this office each 
semester to ensure that they are informed about current requirements and 
procedures. 

Transfer students entering the university can be advised during spring, 
summer, and fall transfer orientation programs. Contact the Ohentation 
Office for further information. 314-8217. 

Admission to Business and Management 

See the Admissions section in this catalog for general LEP admissions 
policies. 

Freshman Admission and the 45 Credit Review. Most first-time enter- 
ing freshmen will gain admission to the College of Business and Manage- 
ment directly from high school, as allowed by space considerations within 
the College. Because space may be limited before all Interested freshmen 
are admitted to the program, early application is encouraged. Freshmen 
admitted to the program will have access to the necessary advising 
through their initial semesters to help them determine if Business is an 
appropriate area for their interests and abilities. 

Freshmen who are admitted directly to Business will be subject to a 
performance review by the time they have completed 45 credits. To meet 
the provisions of the review, these students must complete: (1) English 
Fundamental Studies: (2) 60% of lower level CORE requirements; (3) 
BMGT 220, BMGT 230 or 231, and ECON 201 or ECON 203 with a 
combined GPA of 2.5 in the 3 courses; and (4) a minimum cumulative GPA 
of 2.0. Students who do not meet these requirements will not be allowed 
to continue in the LEP and will be required to select another major. 

Transfer Admission. The following requirements affect new transfer 
students to the university. 

Transfer students, as well as on-campus students hoping to change 
majors into the College, will be required to meet the following set of 
gateway requirements: (1 ) completion of BMGT 220, BMGT 230 or 231 , 
and ECON 201 or 203 with a minimum grade of C in each and a combined 
average of 2.5 for the three courses; and (2) attainment of a minimum 
cumulative GPA for all college-level work attempted. The required GPA 
is set each year and may vary from year to year depending upon available 



52 College of Business and Management 



space. Contact the College of Business and Management or the Ottlce 
of Undergraduate Admission for the current GPA standard. 

Appeals. Students who are unsuccessful in gaining admission to Busi- 
ness at the freshman or transfer level, and believe they have extenuating 
or special circumstances which should be considered, may appeal in 
writing to the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the College of 
Business and IVIanagement. The student will be notified in writing of the 
appeal decision once it is made. 

Students admitted to Business as freshmen who do not pass the 45 credit 
review but believe they have special circumstances which should be 
considered may also appeal directly to the College 

For further information, contact the Office of Undergraduate Studies for 
the College of Business and Ivlanagement at 301 -405-2286. 

Statement of Policy on Transfer of Credit from 
Community Colleges 

It is the practice of the College of Business and Management to consider 
for transfer from a regionally accredited community college only the 
following courses in business administration: an introductory business 
course, business statistics, elementary accounting or business law. Thus, 
it is anticipated that students transferring from another regionally accred- 
ited institution will have devoted the major share of their academic effort 
below the junior year to the completion of basic requirements in the liberal 
arts. A total of sixty semester hours from a community college may be 
applied toward a degree from the College of Business and Management. 

Other Institutions 

The College of Business and Management normally accepts transfer 
credits from regionally accredited four-year institutions. Junior and senior 
level business courses are accepted from colleges accredited by the 
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Junior 
and senior level business courses from other than AACSB accredited 
schools are evaluated on a course-by-course basis to determine 
transferability. 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (all cur- 
ricula): At least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academic work 
required for graduation must be in business and management subjects 
A minimum of fifty-seven hours of the required 1 20 hours must be in 300 
or 400 level courses. In addition to the requirement of an overall 
cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C average) in all College Park 
coursework, effective Fall 1989, all business majors must earn a "C" or 
better in all required courses, including Economics, Mathematics, and 
Speech. Electives outside the curricula of the college may be taken in any 
department of the university, if the student has the necessary prerequi- 
sites. 

Junior-Senior College Requirements Credit Hours 

BMGT 301— Intro, to Data Processing 3 

BMGT 340 — Business Finance (Prerequisite 

BMGT 221 and 230) 3 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles and Organization 

(Prerequisite ECON 203) 3 

BMGT 364— Management and Organizational Theory 3 

BMGT 380— Business Law 3 

BMGT 495 or 495A, Business Policies (open ONLY to seniors) . 3 

Economics (see below) 6 

Total 24 

Economics Requirements 

Finance Curriculum: ECON 430 or ECON 431 , AND one course from 
ECON 305, 306, 402, 440 or 450. 

General Business and Management Curriculum: One course from 
ECON 305, 306. 430. or 440. AND one course from an approved list of 
ECON, GEOG. PSYC, or SOCY courses. The approved list is available 
in 2136 Tydings Hall. For the International Business option, ECON 440 
and one of the following: ECON 305. 306, 31 1 , 31 5. 316, 31 7, 361 , 370, 
374, 375, 380; or any 400 level ECON except 422, 423, or 425. 

All ottier curricula: One course from ECON 305, 306, 430 or 440, AND 
one ot the following courses: ECON 305, 306, 311,315,316, 317.361. 
370, 374, 375. 380 or any 400 level ECON course except 422. 423. or 425. 



A Typical Program for the Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Freshman Year Credit Hours 

CORE and/or electives 9 (8) 

English 101 or equivalent 3 

MATH 002*, 1 1 5, or 220 (or 140") 3 (4) 

First semester total 15 

CORE and/or electives 9 (8) 

SPCH 100 or 107 3 

MATH 115. (141"), 220 or elective 3 (4) 

Second semester total 1 5 

Sophomore Year 

CORE and/or electives 6 

BMGT 220 (Prereq. Sophomore Standing) 3 

ECON 201 (Prereq. Sophomore Standing) 3 

MATH 220 or BMGT 230 (23r') or elective 3 

Third semester total 15 

CORE and/or electives 6 

ECON 203 (Prereq. ECON 201 ) 3 

BMGT 221 (Prereq. BMGT 220) 3 

BMGT 230 (Prereq. MATH 220 ) or 231" 

(Prereq. MATH 141) or elective 3 

Fourth semester total 15 

■MATH 002 is a non-credit course which prepares a student for either 1 1 5 
or 220 depending on the grade earned in 002. 

"Required for Decision and Information Sciences, Management Science, 
and Statistics curricula. 

Curricula 
Accounting 

Chair: S. Loeb 

Professors: Gordon. S. Loeb 

Associate Professors: Bedingfield. M Loeb 

Assistant Professors: Jang. Kandelin, LeClere. Thompson, Wong 

Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, classification, and record- 
ing of financial events and the reporting of the results of such events for 
an organization. In a broader sense. Accounting consists of all financial 
systems for planning, controlling and appraising performance of an 
organization. Accounting includes among its many facets: financial plan- 
ning, budgeting, accounting systems, financial management controls, 
financial analysis ol performance, financial reporting, internal and exter- 
nal auditing, and taxation. 

The Accounting curhculum provides an educational foundation for ca- 
reers in Accounting and other management areas whether in phvate 
business organizations, government and non-profit agencies, or public 
accounting firms. 

Course requirements lor the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Accounting are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 310, 31 1— Intermediate Accounting I and II 6 

BMGT 321— Cost Accounting 3 

BMGT 323 — Income Tax Accounting 3 

Three of the following courses: 9 

BMGT 326— Accounting Systems 

BMGT 41 0— Fund Accounting 

BMGT 41 1— Ethics and Professionalism in Accounting 

BMGT 417— Advanced Tax Accounting 

BMGT 420, 421— Undergraduate Accounting Seminar 

BMGT 422— Auditing Theory and Practice 

BMGT 424 — Advanced Accounting 

BMGT 426 — Advanced Cost Accounting 

BMGT 427— Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice 
Total 21 

The educational requirements of the Maryland State Board of Accoun- 
tancy for certification are a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major 
in Accounting or with a non-accounting degree supplemented by 
coursework the Board determines to be substantially the equivalent ol an 
Accounting major. Students planning to take the CPA examination lor 
certification and licensing outside Maryland should determine the educa- 
tional requirements for that state and arrange their program accordingly. 



College of Business and Management 53 



Decision and Information Sciences 

Chair: Hevner 

Professor; Yao 

Associate Professors: Alavi. Hevner 

Assistant Professors: Rascfiid 

Computer-based information systems are an integral pari of nearly all 
businesses, large and small Decision and Information Sciences provides 
ttie data processing skills, ttie managenal and organizational skills, and 
thie analytical skills required to design and manage business information 
processing systems. Ttiis program gives thie student a firm basis in the 
business functional areas: Marketing, Finance, Production, and Account- 
ing. In addition, it provides an in-depth knowledge of information process- 
ing technology, information processing implementation techniques, and 
Management Science and Statistics. There are many diverse employ- 
ment opportunities available to graduates of this program. The typical job 
areas include application programmer/analyst, systems analyst, and 
computer system marketing analyst. Such positions are available in both 
large and small corporations, management consulting firms, and govern- 
ment agencies. 

Students planning a major in this field must complete MATH 140 and 
MATH 1 41 and BMGT 231 pnor to junior standing. Students considering 
graduate work in this field should complete MATH 240 or 400 as early as 
possible in their careers. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curnculum concentration in the 
Decision and Information Sciences are as follows: 

Credit Hours 
BMGT 302 — Information Systems Implementation 

Techniques 3 

Three of the following four courses: 

BMGT 402— Database and Data Communication 

Systems 3 

BMGT 403— Systems Analysis 3 

BMGT 404 — Seminar in Decision Support Systems 3 

BMGT 405 — Business Telecommunications 3 

BMGT 407 — Information Systems Projects 3 

BMGT 43ID — Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 434 — Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 435— Introduction to Applied Probability Models 3 

Total 24 

Finance 

Chair: Kolodny 

Professors: Bradford. Chen, Haslem. Kolodny. Senbet 
Associate Professors: Chang, Eun, Madan, Maksimovic 
Assistant Professors: Pichler, Unal 

The Finance curnculum is designed to familiarize the student with the 
institutions, theory, and practice involved in the allocation of financial 
resources within the private sector. It is also designed to incorporate 
foundation study in such related disciplines as economics and the 
quantitative areas. 

The Finance curriculum provides an educational foundation for careers 
involving financial analysis and management, investment analysis and 
portfolio management, investment banking, insurance and risk manage- 
ment, banking, and international finance; it also provides a foundation for 
graduate study in business administration, quantitative areas, economics, 
and law. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Finance are as follows; 

Credit Hours 
Both of the following courses; 6 

BMGT 343— Investments 

BMGT 44ID — Financial Management 
Three of the following courses; 9 

BMGT 443 — Security Analysis and Valuation 

BMGT 444 — Futures Contracts and Options 

BMGT 445 — Commercial Bank Management 

BMGT 446 — International Finance 

BMGT 498 — Special Topics in Business and Management (Finance) 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 310 — Intermediate Accounting 

BMGT 332 — Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 430 — Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT 434 — Introduction to Optimization Theory 
Total 18 



NOTE: Students may take alternative courses in Section 2 and 3 subject 
to availability and approval of the chairperson. 

Management and Organization 

Chair: Lockef 

Professors: Bartolt, Carrollf, Gannon, Gupta, Levine, Locke, Sims, Smith 

Associate Professors: Olian. Taylor 

Assistant Professors: Stevens, Wally 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Human Resource Management is the direction of human effort. It is 
concerned with secunng. maintaining and utilizing an effective work force. 
People professionally trained in Human Resource Management find 
career opportunities in business, government, educational institutions, 
and charitable and other organizations. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum in Human Resource 
Management are as follows; 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 360 — Human Resource Management 3 

BMGT 362— Labor Relations 3 

BMGT 46(D — Human Resource Management-Analysis 

and Problems 3 

BMGT 462— Labor Legislation 3 

BMGT 464 — Organizational Behavior 3 

One of the following courses (check prerequisites): _2 

BMGT 385 — Production Management 

BMGT 467 — Undergraduate Seminar in Human Resource 
Management 

GVPT 41 1 — Public Personnel Administration 

JOUR 330— Public Relations 

PSYC 361 — Survey of Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

PSYC 451 — Principles of Psychological Testing 

PSYC 452 — Psychology of Individual Differences 

SOCY 447— Small Group Analysis 

SOCY 462— Industrial Sociology 
Total 18 

Management Science and Statistics 

Chair; Golden 

Professors; Assad, Ball, Bodin, Gass, Golden, Kotz', Lamone 

Associate Professors; Alt. Fromovitz. Widhelm 

Assistant Professors; Fu, Grimshaw, Kaku 

•Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

In the Management Science and Statistics curriculum, the student has the 
option of concentrating primarily in Management Science. Production 
Management, or Statistics. All Management Science and Statistics stu- 
dents must take MATH 140 and MATH 141 and BMGT 231. 

Management Science 

Management Science (operations research) is the application of scientific 
methods to decision problems, especially those involving the control of 
organized human-machine systems, to provide solutions that best serve 
the goals and objectives of the organization as a whole. Practitioners in 
this field are employed in industry, business, and federal, state, and local 
governments. Students planning to major in this field must complete 
MATH 140 and 141 priorto junior standing. Students considering gradu- 
ate work in this field should complete MATH 240 and 241 as early as 
possible in their careers. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curnculum concentration in the 
Management Science are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 430 — Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 434 — Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 435— Introduction to Applied Probability Models 3 

BMGT 436 — Applications of Mathematical Programming in 

Management Science 3 

Two of the following courses (check prerequisites) _£ 

BMGT 385 — Production Management 

BMGT 432 — Sample Survey Design for Business and Economics 

BMGT 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

BMGT 438 — Topics in Statistical Analysis for Business 

and Management 
BMGT 485 — Advanced Production Management 
BMGT 402 — Database and Data Communication Systems 
BMGT 403— Systems Analysis 
Total 18 



54 College of Business and Management 

Production Management 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student with the problems of 
organization and control in the field of Production Management. Theory 
and practice with reference to organization, policies, methods, processes, 
and techniques are surveyed, analyzed, and evaluated. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Production l\/1anagement are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 321— Cost Accounting 3 

BIVIGT 360— Human Resource Management 3 

BMGT 385 — Production Management 3 

BMGT 485 — Advanced Production Management 3 

Two of the following courses (check prerequisites): _£ 

BMGT 362— Labor Relations 

BMGT 332 — Operations Research for Management Decisions 
BMGT 372— Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 
BMGT 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
BMGT 453— Industrial Marketing 
Total 18 

Statistics 

Statistics consists of a body of methods for utilizing probability theory in 
decision-making processes. Important statistical activities ancillary to the 
decision-making process are the systematization of quantitative data and 
the measurement of variability. Some specialized areas within the field of 
statistics are sample surveys, forecasting, quality control, design of 
experiment, Bayesian decision processes, actuarial statistics, and data 
processing. Statistical methods, such as sample survey techniques, are 
widely used in accounting, marketing, industrial management, and gov- 
ernment applications. An aptitude for applied mathematics and a desire 
to understand and apply scientific methods to significant problems are 
important prerequisites for the statistician. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Statistics are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 430 — Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 432 — Sample Survey Design for Business and 
Economics 3 

BMGT 434— Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 438— Topics in Statistical Analysis for Business 

and Management 3 

Two of the following courses (check prerequisites): _£ 

BMGT 385 — Production Management 
BMGT 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
BMGT 435 — Introduction to Applied Probability Models 
BMGT 436 — Applications of Mathematical Programming in 

Management Science 
BMGT 450— Marketing Research Methods 

Total 18 

Marketing 

Chair: Durand 

Professors: Durand. Greer. Jolson 

Associate Professors: Biehal. Krapfel. Nickels, Wagner 

Assistant Professors: All. Lefkoff-Hagius. Sengupta. Seshadri 

Marketing, the study of exchange activities, involves the functions per- 
formed in getting foods and services from producers to users. Career 
opportunities exist in manufacturing, wholesaling, retailing, service orga- 
nizations, government, and non-profit organizations, and include sales 
administration, marketing research, advertising, merchandising, physical 
distribution, and product management. Students prepanng for work in 
marketing research are advised to elect additional courses in Manage- 
ment Science and Statistics. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Marl^eting are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 451— Consumer Analysis 3 

BMGT 452— Marketing Research Methods 3 

BMGT 457— Marketing Policies and Strategies 3 

Three of the following courses (check prerequisites): _2 

BMGT 353— Retail Management 



BMGT 354 — Promotion Management 

BMGT 372— Traffic and Physical Distribution Management OR 
BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business OR 
BMGT 431 — Design of Statistical Expenments in Business 
(only one of BMGT 372. 430. and 431 may be taken) 
BMGT 453— Industrial Marketing 
BMGT 454 — International Marketing 
BMGT 455 — Sales Management 
BMGT 456— Advertising 
Total 18 

Transportation, Business, and Public Policy 

Chair: Corsi 

Professors: Corsi. Leete. Preston, Simon. Taff (emeritus) 

Associate Professor: Grimm 

Assistant Professors: Dresner, Mattingly. Ostas. Scott. Stockdale, Windle 

Transportation 

This curriculum involves the movement of persons and goods in the 
satisfaction of human needs. The curriculum in Transportation includes an 
analysis of the services and management problems, such as pricing, 
financing, and organization, of the five modes of transport — air. motor, 
pipelines, railroads and water — and covers the scope and regulation of 
transportation in our economy. The effective management of transporta- 
tion involves a study of the components of physical distnbution and the 
interaction of procurement, the level and control of inventones, warehous- 
ing, material handling, transportation, and data processing. The curricu- 
lum in Transportation is designed to prepare students to assume responsitHe 
positions with carriers, governmental agencies, and in traffic and physical 
distribution management in industry. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration In 
Transportation are as follows: 

Credit Hours 

BMGT 370 — Principles of Transportation 3 

BMGT 372— Traffic and Physical Distnbution Management 3 

BMGT 470 — Carrier Management 3 

BMGT 476 — Applied Computer Models in Transportation 

and Logistics 3 

One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 473— Advanced Transportation Problems 

BMGT 475 — Advanced Logistics Management 
One of the following courses: _2 

BMGT 332 — Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 454 — International Marketing 

BMGT 473 or 475 (depending on choice above) 

BMGT 474 — Urban Transportation and Development 

BMGT 477— International Transportation and Logistics 

BMGT 481— Public Utilities 

BMGT 482— Business and Government 
Total 18 

General Business and Management 

The General Curriculum is designed for those who desire a broader 
course of study in business and management than offered in the other 
college curricula. The General Curriculum is appropnate. for example, for 
those who plan to enter small business management or entrepreneurshlp 
where general knowledge of the various fields of study may be preferred 
to a more specialized curriculum concentration. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
General Business and Management are as follows: 

Credit Hours 
Accounting/Finance 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 321— Cost Accounting 

BMGT 440 — Financial Management 
Management Science/Statistics 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 385 — Production Management 

BMGT 431— Design of Statistical Experiments In Business 

BMGT 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
Marketing 
One of the following courses: 3 

BMGT 353— Retail Management 

OR a higher number marketing course (checit prerequisites) 



College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 55 

Personnel/Labor Relations BMGT 440 — Financial Management 

One ot the tollowing courses: 3 BMGT 482— Business and Government 

BMGT 360 — Human Resource Management FSAD 300 — Food Service Organization and Management 

BMGT 362— Labor Relations 

Public Policy Honors 

One ot the tollowing courses: 3 

BMGT 481— Public Utilities 

BMGT 482— Business and Government Honor Societies: 
Transportation/Physical Distribution 

Oneot the tollowing courses: 3 Beta Alpha Psi National scholastic and professional honorary fraternity in 

BMGT 370 — Principles of Transportation accounting Members are elected on the basis of excellence in scholar- 

BMGT 372 — Traffic and Physical Distribution Management ship and professional service from junior and senior students majoring in 

Total 18 accounting in the College of Business and Management. 

International Business Beta Gamma Sigma. National scholastic honorary society in business 

administration. To be eligible students must rank in the upper five percent 

International Business is a new option in the General Business major and of their junior class or the upper ten percent of their senior class in the 

responds to the global interest in international economic systems and their College of Business and Management. Students are eligible the semester 

multicultural characteristics. This degree option combines the college- after they have earned forty-five credits at the University of Maryland at 

required courses with five International Business courses and a selection College Park, and have earned a total of seventy-five credits, 
of language, culture and area studies courses from the College of Arts and 

Humanities and the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. Financial Management Association Honorary Society. National scholastic 

honorary society sponsored by the Financial Management Association. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in To be eligible students must be finance majors with a cumulative grade 

General Business and Management, International Business option, are point average of 3.5 for a minimum of ninety credits. 

Credit Hours Omega Rho. National scholastic honorary society in operations research. 

BMGT 372 — Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 3 management and related areas. Members are elected on the basis of 

BMGT 392 — Introduction to International Business 3 excellence in scholarship from junior and senior students majoring in 

BMGT 454— International Marketing 3 appropriate quantitative areas. 

BMGT 477 — International Transportation and Logistics 3 

BMGT 446 — International Finance 3 Pi Sigma Phi. National scholastic honorary society sponsored by the 

Any 400 level BMGT course or an agreed upon Foreign PropellerClubofthe United States. Membershipiselectedfrom outstanding 

Language course 3 senior members of the University of Maryland chapter of the Propeller 

Club majoring in transportation in the College of Business and Management. 

Students are strongly encouraged to complete the language option to 

increase the applicability of the International Business option. Student Awards: For high academic achievement, students in the col- 
lege may receive recognition by the Dean's List; Delta Sigma Pi Schol- 

Business and Law, Combined Program arship Key; Distinguished Accounting Student Awards; and Wall Street 

Journal Student Achievement Award. 

In this program, a student completes three years in a chosen major in the 

business school and, on gaining admission to the University of ivlaryland Scholarships: The college offers several scholarships, including the 

School of Law. may use the first year of law school to complete the B.S. AIACC. J. "Bud" Ecalono Memorial Scholarship #16; Alcoa Foundation 

requirements provided he/she earns an average grade of "C" or better. Traffic Scholarship; Delta Nu Alpha Chesapeake Chapter No. 23 Schol- 

Satisfactory completion of an additional 2 years in law school will earn the arship; Delta Nu Alpha Washington, D.C. Chapter No. 84 Scholarship; 

law degree. A student who fails to gain admission to law school, which is Geico Achievement Award; William F. Holin Scholarship; National Defense 

highly competitive and contingent on meeting the applicable standards of Transportation Association Scholarship, Washington, DC. Chapter; 

the school, will be permitted to complete the final year for the B.S. degree Propeller Club Scholarship; Warren Reed Scholarship (Accounting); Jack 

at College Park. Interested students are responsible for securing from the B. Sacks Foundation Scholarship (Marketing) ; and Charles A. Taff Schol- 

law school its current admission requirements. The student must com- arship (Transportation). 

plete all the courses required of students in the college, except BMGT 380 

and BMGT 495. This means the student must connplete all the pre- StUdent PrOfeSSlOnal Organizations 

business courses; both upper level ECON courses; BMGT 301 . 340, 350, " 

and 364; all lower level CORE requirements; the 15 to 21 hours in the 

students specific business major; and enough additional electives to Students may choose to associate themselves with one or more of the 

equal a minimum of ninety semester hours, thirty of which must be following professional organizations: Amencan Marketing Association; 

numbered 300 or above. No business law course can be included in the Society of Human Resource Management (Human Resource Manage- 

ninety hours. The last thirty hours of college work before entering law ment); Association of College Entrepreneurs (all business majors); Black 

school must be completed in residence at College Park. Business Society. Dean's Undergraduate Advisory Council; Delta Nu 

Alpha (Transportation); Delta Sigma Pi (all business majors); Finance, 

Insurance and Real Estate Banking and Investments Society (finance): National Association of 

Accountants; Phi Chi Theta (all business majors); Transportation and 

Students interested in insurance or real estate may wish to concentrate in Logistics Club (NDTA and Propeller Club). 

Finance or General Business and Management and plan with their r a ■ nMrx 

advisors a group of electives to meet their specialized needs. College Course Code: BMGT 

courses that are occasionally offered in insurance: 

BMGT 345-Property and Liability Insurance COLLEGE OF COMPUTER, MATHEMATICAL AND 

BMGT 346 — Risk Management .»■■,,<»■*».■ ^^,,.^,^^^ ,^,m,*f^\ 

BMGT 347-Life Insurance PHYSICAL SCIENCES (CMPS) 

College courses that are occasionally offered in real estate: 3400 A V Williams 405-2677 

BMGT 393— Real Estate Principles 

BMGT 490 — Urban Land Management Dean- R H Herman 

, . Assistant Dean: Williams 

Institutional Management Assistant to Dean: Bryant 

Students interested in hotel-motel management or hospital administration jhe search for new knowledge is one of the most challenging activities of 
must fulfill one of the ten majors such as General Business and Manage- humankind. Universities are the key institutions in society where funda- 
ment. Finance, or Personnel and Labor Relations and then plan with their ^g^ital research is emphasized. The College of Computer, Mathematical 
advisors a group of electives, such as the following: 



56 College of Education 



and Physical Sciences at College Park contributes very substantially and 
effectively to the research activities of the University of Maryland. The 
College ol Computer, Mathematical and Physical Sciences is like a 
technical institute within a large university. Students majoring in any one 
of the disciplines encompassed by the college have the opportunity of 
obtaining an outstanding education in their field. 

The college serves both students vi/ho continue as professionals in their 
area of specialization, either immediately upon graduation or after post- 
graduate studies, and those who use their college education as preparatory 
to careers or studies in other areas. The focused specialist as well as the 
broad "Renaissance person" can be accommodated. Many research 
programs include undergraduates either as paid student helpers or in 
forms of research participation. Students in departmental Honors Programs 
particularly are given the opportunity to become involved in research. 
Other students too may undertake research under the guidance of a 
faculty member. 

A major portion of the teaching program of the college is devoted to serving 
students majoring in disciplines outside of the college. Some of this 
teaching effort is directed toward providing the skills needed in support of 
such majors or programs. Other courses are designed as enrichment for 
non-science students, giving them the opportunity to explore the reality of 
science without the technicalities required of the major. 

The college is strongly committed to making studies in the sciences 
available to all regardless of their background. In particular, the college is 
actively pursuing an affirmative action program to rectify the present 
under-representation of women and minorities in these fields. There are 
in fact many career opportunities for women and members of minorities 
in the fields represented by the college. 

Structure of the College 

The following departments, programs and research units comprise the 

college: 

Department of Astronomy 

Department of Computer Science 

Department of Geology 

Department of Mathematics 

Department of Meteorology 

Department of Physics 

Applied Mathematics Program* 

Chemical Physics Program 

Physical Sciences Program 

Center for Automation Research 

Institute for Advanced Computer Studies 

Institute for Physical Sciences and Technology 

Laboratory for Plasma Research (Joint with College of Engineering) 

"See the separate listing for the Applied Mathematics Program in the 

chapter on departments in this catalog. 

Degree Programs 

The following Bachelor of Science degree programs are offered to 
undergraduates by the departments and programs of the college: As- 
tronomy, Computer Science, Geology. Mathematics, Physics, Physical 
Sciences. 

Advising 

The CMPS Undergraduate Office, 3400 A. V. Williams Building. 405-2677, 
is the central office for coordinating the advising, processing and updating 
of student records. Inquiries concerning university regulations, transfer 
credits, and other general information should be addressed to this office. 
Specific departmental information is best obtained directly from the 
departments 

Graduation Requirements 

1 . A minimum of 1 20 semester hours with at least a C average is required 
of all Bachelor of Science degrees from the college. 

2. Forty-three credit hours which satisfy the general education CORE 
program requirements of the University. In some instances, courses 
taken to satisfy these requirements may also be used to satisfy major 
requirements. All students who matriculated in the summer 1978 
session or later must complete six credits of English Composition. 

3. Major and supporting coursework as specified under each department 
or program. 



4. The final thirty semester hours must be completed at College Park. 
Occasionally, this requirement may be waived by the dean for up to six 
of these thirty credits to t>e taken at another institution Such a waiver 
is granted only if the student already has thirty credits in residence. 

5. Students must be enrolled in the program in which they plan to 
graduate by the time they register for the last fifteen hours. 

Research and Service Units 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology 

4203 Computer and Space Sciences Building. 405-4875 
Professor and Director: James A Yorke 

The faculty members of the Institute for Physical Science and Technology 
are engaged in the study of pure and applied science problems that are 
at the boundaries between those areas served by the academic depart- 
ments. These interdisciplinary problems afford challenging opfwrtunities 
for thesis research and classroom instruction. Courses and thesis research 
guidance by the faculty ol the institute are provided either through the 
graduate program in chemical physics, the applied mathematics program 
or under the auspices of other departments. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION (EDUC) 

Benjamin Building 

Office of Student Services: 405-2344 

Dean: Willias D Hawley 

The College of Education is a professional college committed to advancing 
the science and art of education including the practices and processes 
which occur from infancy through adulthood in both school and non- 
school settings. The college mission is to provide preparation for current 
and future teachers, counselors, administrators, educational specialists, 
and other related educational personnel, and to create and disseminate 
the knowledge needed by professionals and policy makers in education 
and related fields. 

The college is organized into six departments, two of wtiich offer under- 
graduate majors in Teacher Education: the Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction, which offers early childhood, elementary, and secondary 
education programs: and the Department ol Special Education. Enroll- 
ment in the professional teacher education programs in the above- 
mentioned departments is limited to those who meet the admission 
requirements specified below. 

Only students who have been admitted to the teacher education programs 
are permitted to enroll in the professional education course sequences. 
Students with other majors who have an interest in the area of education 
may wish to enroll in a variety of courses offered by the college that deal 
with schooling, human development, learning styles and techniques, and 
interaction processes. 

In carrying out its mission, the college Is committed to a society which is 
open to and supportive of the educational aspirations of the widest 
population of learners and to continuous research and evaluation in 
relation to teaching and learning in a multicultural, high technology 
society. At times, students may be invited to participate actively with 
graduate students and faculty members in research undertakings and 
evaluation processes. Students also make use of the micro-teachir>g 
laboratory, the education technology and computer laboratory, and the 
curriculum latwratory. 

In addition to the CORE or USP program requirements, education ma|0rs 
have the opportunity to complete 45 to 55 credit hours ol work in the arts, 
sciences and/or humanities. In the teacher education courses, students 
develop professional tjehaviors through active expenences in the college 
classroom and participate in explonng, learning and practicing with 
children and teachers in classrooms in the community. The capstone 
expenence of student teaching brings classroom theory and practice 
together into a personal set of professionally appropnate skills and 
processes 

Admission to Teacher Education Professional 
Coursework 

Applicants to the University of Maryland who have declared an interest in 
education are admitted to a department in the college as intended majors. 



College of Education 57 



All intended majors must apply for admission, and be admitted, in order 
to enroll in courseworK in the professional teacher education degree 
program 

For admission into a teacher education ma|or. a student must ( 1 ) complete 
English 101 and Math 110 or higher (six credits); (2) earn forly-tive 
semester hours with an overall cumulative grade point average ot at least 
2.5 on a 4 scale (granted by UMCP or some other institution) in all 
coursework prior to enrollment in EDHD 300 (or EDHD 41 9 A/D tor Early 
Childhood); (3) submit a personal goal statement that indicates an 
appropnate commitment to professional education; (4) have pnor experi- 
ences in the education field; (5) submit three letters of recommendation/ 
reference; and (6) have a satisfactory score on the spelling, language and 
mathematics segments ot the California Achievement Test Level 20. 
Admission application forms are available in Room 1 21 of the Benjamin 
Building. Students with documented disabilities may contact Disability 
Support Services (314-7682; TTY. 314-7683) to make special arrange- 
ments for taking the examination. Only those who are admitted are able 
to enroll in the professional education sequence. An overall grade point 
average of 2.5 must be maintained after admission to Teacher Education 
to continue in the professional education programs. 

A student who initially fails to meet the admission critena may apply to the 
college whenever the critena for admission are met, with the stipulation, 
however, that a student may take the CAT test a maximum of three times. 
A plan for becoming eligible for admission may be developed by the 
student and the department advisor. A Teacher Education Appeals Board 
reviews appeals from students who do not meet the admission, advance- 
ment or retention criteria. Consult the Student Services Office for policies 
and procedures regarding appeals. 

Criteria for admission to the Teacher Education program apply to any 
teacher preparation program offered by the University of Maryland. Thus, 
students desinng a major in health or physical education should apply to 
the College of Education tor admission to the professional program in 
Teacher Education. Students who are not enrolled in the College of 
Education but who. through an established cooperative program with 
another college are preparing to teach, must meet all admission, scholas- 
tic and curricular requirements of the College of Education. The profes- 
sional education courses are restricted to degree-seeking majors who 
have met College of Education requirements for admission. 



Student Teaching 



Prior to receiving a student teaching placement, prospective student 
teachers must have been admitted to Teacher Education and have 
completed requirements descnbed below. In programs requiring more 
than one student teaching placement, the first placement must be satis- 
factorily completed before the student begins the succeeding placement. 
Prior to assignment all students in teacher preparation programs must: (1 ) 
have maintained an overall grade point average of at least 2.5 with a 
minimum grade of C in every course required for the major; (2) have 
satisfactorily completed all other required course work in their program; (3) 
apply for student teaching to the Office of Laboratory Experiences one 
semester in advance; (4) be recommended by their department; (5) have 
on file favorable ratings from prior supervised experiences in school 
settings including evaluations of the EDHD 300 (or EDHD 419 A/B for 
Eariy Childhood) field expenences; and (6) have undergone a criminal 
background check. A certificate indicating freedom from tuberculosis and 
proof of immunization for measles (rubella) is also required. This may be 
obtained from a private physician, a health department, or the University 
Health Center. 

The student teaching experience is for most students the final experience 
in a professional program preparing them for the beginning teaching 
years. This culminating phase of the teacher education program provides 
the prospective teacher with the opportunity to integrate theory and 
practice in a comprehensive, reality-based, experience. Student teaching 
placements, as well as all other field experiences, are arranged by the 
Office of LatxDratory Experiences. 

Most student teaching placements and accompanying seminars are 
arranged in the Teacher Education Centers and other collaborative field 
sites jointly administered by the College of Education and participating 
school systems. The student teaching semester is a full-time commitment 
and interference with this commitment because of employment or 
coursework is not permitted. The Office of Laboratory Expenences makes 
student teaching assignments with consideration given to location, pro- 
grammatic priorities, diversity, and availability of sites. Students should be 



prepared to travel to whichever school has been assigned. Living arrange- 
ments, including transportation lor the student teaching assignments, are 
considered the responsibility of the student. Students should contact the 
Office of Laboratory Expenences if there are any questions regarding this 
policy 

Graduation Requirements 

The degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science are conferred by 
the College of Education The determination of which degree is conferred 
is dependent upon the amount of liberal arts study included in a particular 
degree program. Minimum requirements for graduation are 1 20 semester 
hours. Specific departmental program requirements for more than the 
minimum must be fulfilled. 

In addition to the university general education requirements (USP or 
CORE) and the specific requirements for each curriculum, the college 
requires that all majors complete EDHD 300 (or EDHD 419 A/B for Eariy 
Childhood). EDPA 301 . and three semester hours of an approved speech 
course. A grade of C or better is required in all pre-professional and 
professional coursework required for the major. An overall grade point 
average of 2.5 must be maintained after admission to Teacher Education. 
A grade of S is required in student teaching. 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the College of Educa- 
tion must be recommended by the student's advisor and department 
chairperson and approved by the dean. 

Accreditation and Certification 

All bachelor-degree teacher preparation programs are accredited by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and have been 
approved by the Office of Certification and Accreditation of the Maryland 
State Department of Education using standards of the National Association 
of State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification. Accreditation 
provides for reciprocal certification with other states that recognize 
national accreditation. 

The Maryland State Department of Education issues certificates to teach 
in the public schools of the state. In addition to graduation from an 
approved program, the Maryland State Department of Education requires 
satisfactory scores on the National Teacher Exam (NTE) for certification. 
At the time of graduation, the college informs the Maryland State Department 
of Education of the graduate's eligibility for certification. 

Special Resources and Opportunities 

The College of Education offers many special resources and facilities to 
students, faculty, and the community. The Center for Educational Re- 
search and Development, Institute for the Study of Exceptional Children 
and Youth, the Music Educators National Conference Historical Center, 
the Reading Center and the Center of Rehabilitation and Manpower 
Services all are part of the College of Education. In addition, intended and 
declared education majors are likely to find the following resources 
particularly useful: 

The Student SetA^ices Office 

1210 Benjamin Building, 405-2344 

The Student Services Office provides academic advising support for 
education students during admission, orientation, registration, graduation 
and certification. At other times, students who have been admitted to the 
College of Education receive academic advising through their 
departments. 

The Office of Laboratory Experiences 

1210 Benjamin Building, 405-5604 

The Office of Laboratory Experiences (OLE) is the liaison unit between the 
college and the public school systems that serve as laboratories for the 
preparation of teachers. While the primary role of the OLE is to provide 
teacher education students with sites for internships, student teaching 
and pre-student teaching classroom experience, the office also operates 
in-service programs for teachers and facilitates research and staff devel- 
opment activities in the schools. Placement coordinators are available in 
the OLE to answer questions, provide orientation programs and arrange 
all field experience placements. 



58 College of Engineering 



University Credentials Service, Career Center 

3121 Hornbake Library, 314-7226 

All seniors graduating in the College of Education (except Industrial 
Technology majors) are required to complete a credentials file with the 
Career Center. Credentials consist of a record of a student's academic 
preparation and recommendations from academic and professional 
sources. An initial registration fee is required and enables the Career 
Center to send a student's credentials to interested educational employ- 
ers, as indicated by the student. Students who are completing teacher 
certification requirements, or advanced degrees and are interested in a 
teaching, administrative or research position in education may also file 
credentials. (This service is also available to alumni.) 

Other services include job vacancy listings in public/private schools and 
institutions of higher learning, on-campus interviews with state and out-of- 
state school systems, and information about and applications for school 
systems throughout the country. 

Curriculum Laboratory 

0220 Benjamin Building. 405-3176 

The Curriculum Laboratory provides reference assistance and offers both 
general and subject-specific classroom orientations. Resources include 
curriculum guides, reference books, K-12 textbooks, exemplary instruc- 
tional materials, research documents, standardized test specimens, and 
material placed on faculty reserve. 

Educational Technology Center 

0307 Benjamin Building. 405-361 1 

The Educational Technology Center provides a broad range of media 
services including; 1) distribution and loan of all types of equipment and 
materials, including operation of a closed circuit video system throughout 
the Benjamin Building; 2) development and production of instructional 
materials; 3) specialized facilities (computer lab. video classroom, tv 
studio, self-service production area, video viewing stations) ; 4) instruction 
in media production and utilization techniques: and 5) consultation on 
ways to develop and use technology effectively. 

Center for Mathematics Education 

2226 Benjamin Building. 405-31 15 

The Center for fi/lathematics Education provides a mathematics labora- 
tory for undergraduate and graduate students, and a program of diagnos- 
tic and tutoring services for children and adolescents. These services are 
offered in conjunction with specific graduate and undergraduate courses 
in elementary and secondary school mathematics. Center faculty are 
engaged in research in mathematics education, serve as consultants to 
school systems and instructional publishers, and provide inservice teacher 
education in addition to graduate degree programs. 

Center for Young Children 

Cambridge Complex East, 405-3168 

The Center for Young Children is part of the Institute for Child Study in the 
College of Education. It offers a creative learning experience for children 
three, four, and five years old whose parents are affiliated with the 
University. The Center engages in child study, curriculum development, 
and teacher training. Its research and observation facilities are available 
to parents, faculty, and other persons concerned with the care and 
education of young children. 

Science Teaching Center 

2226 Benjamin Building. 405-3161 

The Science Teaching Center offers programs related to undergraduate 
and graduate science teacher education, science supervisor training, and 
basic research in science education, and provides aid to inservice 
teachers, to districts and science supervisors. 

Student and Professional Organizations 

The college sponsors chapters of Phi Delta Kappa: the Undergraduate 
Teachers Education Association (UTEA): a student national education 
association; and Kappa Delta Pi. an honor society in education The Mary 
McLeod Bethune Society is a pre-professional organization concerned 
with minority issues and education. A chapter of the Council for Excep- 
tional Children is open to undergraduate and graduate students in Special 
Education and the Department of Music sponsors a student chapter of the 
Music Educators National Conference (MENC). 



In several departments there are informal organizations of students. 
Students should contact the individual departments or. in the case of 
college-wide groups, the Dean's office, for additional information regard- 
ing these organizations. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING (ENGR) 

1 131 Engineering Classroom Building. 405-3855 

Dean: George E. Dieter 

Undergraduate Student Affairs: 405-3855 

Cooperative Engineenng Education: 405-3863 

Center for Minorities in Science and Engineering: 405-3878 

The mission of the College of Engineering is to provide quality engineering 
education, with sufficient scope to include both fundamental and special- 
ized engineering training, so that graduates are prepared to serve the 
current and emerging needs of society. Just as the boundary between the 
functions of engineers and applied scientists or mathematicians is becom- 
ing less distinct, the various branches of engineering increasingly interact 
as technical problems become more sophisticated and require interdisci- 
plinary approaches to their solutions. In addition to its teaching role, the 
college feels a related responsibility to conduct strong research programs 
that contribute to the advancement of knowledge. 

Engineers also occupy an intermediary position between scientists and 
the public because, in addition to understanding scientific principles, they 
are concerned with the timing, economics, and values that define the use 
and application of those principles. With this in mind the college fosters a 
close partnership with industry and government, and also reaches out to 
both the campus community and the community at large with its services. 

Entrance Requirements 

Preparation for pursuing an engineering degree begins in the freshman or 
sophomore year of high school. The time required to complete the various 
degree programs may be extended beyond the four years cited in this 
catalog to the extent that incoming students may be deficient in their high 
school preparation. Therefore, students interested in studying engineer- 
ing should enroll in the appropriate academic program in high school. This 
course of study should include 3-1 '2 to 4 years of college preparatory 
mathematics (including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and pre-calcu- 
lus mathematics). In addition, students should complete one year each of 
physics and chemistry. 

Admission to the College of Engineenng is competitive for both freshmen 
and transfer students. Applicants who have designated a major within the 
College of Engineenng will be selected for admission on the basis of 
academic promise and available space. Because of space limitations, the 
College of Engineering may not be able to offer admission to all qualified 
applicants. The University of Maryland at College Park urges earty 
application. Applicants admissible to the university but not to the college 
will be offered admission to the Division of Letters and Science. This does 
not assure eventual admission to the College of Engineenng For consid- 
eration of appeals for admission contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions. Minority and women students are encouraged to ap>ply for 
admission. 

Freshmen 

Limited Enrollment status for this college has been approved. Students 
should check with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, the college or 
the department for updated information. 

Admission to College of Engineering 

See the Admissions section in this catalog lor information on general LEP 
admissions policies. 

Freshman Admission and the 45 Credit Review. Most first-time enter- 
ing freshmen will gam admission to the College of Engineenng directty 
from high school, as allowed by space considerations within the College. 
Engineering has histoncally had more requests for its majors than can be 
accommodated, so freshmen generally need to present an above-aver- 
age high school record and a strong math SAT score to gam admission. 
Because space may be limited before all interested, eligible freshmen are 
admitted to the program, eariy application is encouraged Freshmen 
admitted to the program will have access to the necessary advising 



College of Engineering 59 



through their initial semesters to help them determine if Engineering is an 
appropnate area lor their interests and abilities 

Freshmen who are admitted directly to Engineering will be subject to a 
performance review by the time they have completed 45 credits. To meet 
the provisions ot the review, these students must meet the campus 
retention criteria. Students who do not meet this standard will not be 
allowed to continue in the LEP and will be required to select another major. 

Transfer Admission The tollowing requirements affect new transfer 
students to the university as well as on-campus students hoping to change 
majors into the College. Admission of transfer students may be severely 
limited, and capacity is determined each year in accordance with the 
success of incoming freshmen. 

In order to be admitted to Engineering, transfer students will be required 
to meet the following set of gateway requirements: (1) completion of 
CHEI^ 113. MATH 141. and PHYS 1 61 with a minimum grade of C in each; 
and (2) attainment of a minimum cumulative GPA for all college-level work 
attempted. The required GPA is set each year and may vary from year to 
year depending upon available space. Contact the College of Engineering 
or the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for the current GPA standard. 

Appeals. Students who are unsuccessful in gaining admission to Engi- 
neering at the freshman or transfer level, and believe they have extenu- 
ating or special circumstances which should be considered, may appeal 
in writing to the Office of Undergraduate Adniissions. The student will be 
notified in wnting of the appeal decision once it is made. 

Students admitted to Engineering as freshmen who do not pass the 45 
credit review but believe they have special circumstances which should be 
considered may appeal directly to the College. 

For further information, contact the Counselor for Limited Enrollment 
Programs at 301-314-8378. 

Transfer 

All new transfer students, as well as students currently enrolled at the 
University of Maryland at College Park asking to be admitted to the 
College of Engineering, must meet the competitive admission require- 
ments in effect for the semester in which they plan to enroll. The 
requirements for admission to all programs are 

1 . Attainment of a cumulative grade point average which equals or 
exceeds the minimum set to meet the competitive admission 
requirements. 

2. Completion of the following three gateway courses or their equiva- 
lents with a minimum grade of "C" in each: MATH 141 , CHEM 1 1 3. 
and PHYS 161. 

Special Notes 

1 . Students with a previous B.A. or B.S. degree will be admitted to the 
College of Engineering with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and completion 
of the five prerequisites (MATH 140. MATH 141, CHEM 103, 
CHEM 113. and PHYS 161). 

2. UMBC and UMES students will be admitted to the College of 
Engineering with official verification of their enrollment in engineer- 
ing programs at their respective universities. 

3. Maryland community colleges and Northern Virginia Community 
College students who meet the freshmen admission requirements 
but choose to attend a community college have the following 
options: 

a. Remain at the community college in an articulated engineering 
program and complete at least 56 credits, after which time the 
student will be admitted to the college on application provided 
that he/she has at least a 2.0 GPA at the community college. 
(This will apply to all majors within the college except aerospace 
and electrical engineenng.) The student must supply the high 
school transcript and SAT scores. In the event that the commu- 
nity college does not offer a 56-credit articulated engineering 
program, the student may transfer earlier. 

b. Transfer immediately to the college provided the student has 
completed the five required courses (MATH 140, MATH 141, 
CHEM 1 03. CHEM 1 1 3. and PHYS 1 61 ) and meets the com- 
petitive GPA for the semester of intended enrollment on the 
College Park campus. 

'Please Note That Minimum GPAs Are Subject To Change Each 
Semester. 



Graduation Requirements 

Structure of Engineering Curricula: Courses in the normal curriculum or 
program and prescribed credit hours leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science (with curriculum designation) are outlined in the sections describ- 
ing each department in the College of Engineenng No student may modify 
the prescribed number of hours without special permission from the Dean 
of the college The courses in each curriculum may be classified in the 
following categories: 

1 . Courses in the CORE Liberal Arts and Science Studies Program. 

2. Courses in the physical sciences, mathematics, chemistry, physics. 

3. Related technical courses, engineenngsciencesandothercourses 
approved for one curriculum but offered by another department. 

4. Courses in the major department. A student should obtain written 
approval for any substitution of courses from the department chair 
and the Dean of the college. The courses in each engineering 
curriculum, as classified below, form a sequential and develop- 
mental pattern in subject matter. In this respect, curncula in 
engineering may differ from curricula in other colleges. Some 
regulations which are generally applicable to all students may need 
clarification for purposes of orderly administration among engi- 
neering students (see the Academic Regulations section of this 
catalog). Moreover, the College of Engineering establishes poli- 
cies which supplement the university regulations. 

College Regulations 

1 . The responsibility for proper registration and for satisfying stated 
prerequisites for any course must rest with the student as does the 
responsibility for proper achievement in courses in which the 
student is enrolled. Each student should be familiar with the 
provisions of this catalog, including the Academic Regulations. 

2. Required courses in mathematics, physics, and chemistry have 
highest priority; and it is strongly recommended that every engi- 
neering student register for mathematics and chemistry or math- 
ematics and physics each semester until the student has fully 
satisfied requirements of the College of Engineering in these 
subjects. 

3. To be eligible for a bachelor's degree in the College of Engineering, 
a student must have an overall average of at least a C (2.0) and a 
grade of C or better in all engineering courses (courses with an EN 
prefix). Responsibility for knowing and meeting all graduation 
requirements in any curriculum rests with the student. 

4. All students are required to complete a number of general educa- 
tion courses and must follow the university's requirements regard- 
ing completion of the general education (CORE) Program. Consult 
the Academic Regulations section of this catalog for additional 
information. Engineering students who began college level work 
(either at the University of Maryland or at other institutions) during 
the Fall 1989 semester or later are required to complete a junior 
level English course (with the exception of Agricultural Engineering 
students) regardless of their performance in Freshmen English 
classes. This represents a college policy, not a university-wide 
policy. Students beginning college-level work in the Fall 1989 
semester must also plan their general education (CORE) courses 
to reflect depth as well as breadth. They should plan to take at least 
two courses (preferably a lower level and upper level course) which 
follow a theme area or provide more than simply introductory level 
study in one general studies department of their choice. 

5. All degree programs in the College of Engineering require a 
minimum of 1 20 credits plus satisfaction of all department, college, 
and University general education (CORE) Program requirements. 
Students should be aware that for all currently existing engineering 
programs the total number of credits necessary for the degree will 
exceed 1 20 by some number that will depend on the specific major 
and the students background. 

Curricula for the various engineering departments are given in this catalog 
to illustrate how the programs can be completed in four years. These 
curricula are rigorous and relatively difficult for the average student. 
Surveys have shown that only about one-third to one-half of the students 
actually receive an engineering degree in four years. The majority of 
students (whether at Maryland or at other engineering schools nation- 
wide) complete the engineering program in four and one-half to five years. 
It is quite feasible for a student to stretch out any curriculum; this may be 
necessary or desirable for a variety of reasons. However, students should 
seek competent advising in order to ensure that courses are taken in the 
proper sequence. 



60 College of Engineering 



All students are urged to speak to a counselor in the College of Engineer- 
ing Student Affairs Office at least two semesters before graduation to 
review tfieir academic progress and discuss final graduation requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is available by appointment Monday tfirougfi Friday, from 9;00 
a.m. to 1 1 :30 a.m and 1 ;00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the College of Engineering 
Student Affairs Office, 11 31 Engineering Classroom Building, 405-3855. 
In addition, advising is available in the departments. See advising section 
in the specific engineenng department entry for times and location. 

Departments and Degrees 

The College of Engineering offers the degree of Bachelor of Science in the 
following fields of study: Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering 
(see also College of Agriculture), Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineer- 
ing, Electrical Engineering, Fire Protection Engineering, t^^echanical 
Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Undesignated Engineering (Engi- 
neering Option and Applied Science Option). 

All of the above programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
except the Applied Science Option of the Undesignated Engineering 
degree. 

The Freshman-Sophomore Years 

The freshman and sophomore years in engineering are designed to lay a 
strong foundation in mathematics, physical sciences, and the engineering 
sciences upon which the student will later develop a professional program 
during the upper division (junior and senior) years. The college course 
requirements for the freshman year are the same for all students, 
regardless of their intended academic program, and about 75 percent of 
the sophomore year course requirements are common, thus affording the 
student maximum flexibility in choosing a specific engineering 
specialization. 

Engineering Sciences 

Engineering Science courses represent a common core of basic material 
offered to students of several different departments. All freshman and 
sophomore students of engineering are required to take ENES 100 and 
ENES 1 02. Other ENES courses, 220, 221 , 230, and 240, are specified 
by the different departments or taken by the student as electives. The 
responsibility for teaching the engineering science courses is divided 
among the Chemical, Civil, Electncal, and Mechanical Engineering de- 
partments. In addition to the core courses noted above, several courses 
of general interest to engineenng or non-engineering students have been 
given ENES designations. See the List of Approved Courses in this 
catalog for further descriptions of these courses. 

Freshman Curriculum 

All freshmen in the College of Engineering are required to complete the 
following basic curriculum regardless of whether the student plans to 
proceed through one of the designated baccalaureate degree programs 
or follow any of the multidisciplinary nondesignated degree curricula that 
are sponsored by the college. 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

I II 

CHEM 103. 113— GeneralChemistryl.il 4 4 

PHYS 161— General Physics 3 

MATH 140, 141— Calculus I, II 4 4 

ENES 100 — Introduction to Engineering Design 2 

ENES 102— Statics 2 

ENES 103— Fortran for Engineers 1 

CORE Program Requirements _fi _3 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Wnting (Freshman English)* 

Total 16 17 

'ENGL 101 : Freshman English must be attempted before completion of 
thirty (30) credit hours. 



Entering freshmeh math placements are determined by performance on 
math placement exams. Placement in MATH 002 or MATH 1 15 will delay 
by a semester eligibility to take certain engineenng courses. 

Sophomore Year 

During the sophomore year the student selects a sponsoring academic 
department (Aerospace, Agricultural, Chemical. Civil, Electncal, Fire 
Protection. Mechaflical. or Materials and Nuclear Engineenng) and this 
department assumes the responsibility for the student s academic guid- 
ance, counseling, and program planning from that point until the comple- 
tion of the degree requirements of that department as well as the college. 
For the specific requirements, see the curriculum listing in each engineer- 
ing department 

Dual Degree Program 

The Dual Degree Program is a cooperative arrangement between the 
College of Engineering and selected liberal arts colleges which allows 
students to earn undergraduate degrees from both institutions in a five- 
year program. A student in the Dual Degree Program will attend the literal 
arts college for approximately three academic years (minimum ninety 
semester hours) and the College of Engineenng at the University of 
Maryland for approximately two academic years (minimum hours required 
determined individually approximately sixty semester hours). 

Dual degree candidates may participate in any of the baccalaureate 
degree programs in the College of Engineering. 

At the present time the participating institutions in Maryland and the 
District of Columbia are American University. Bowie State University, 
Columbia Union College, Coppin State College, Frostburg State Univer- 
sity, Morgan State University. College of Notre Dame of Maryland, St. 
Marys College of Maryland. Salisbury State University, Towson State 
University, Western Maryland College, Tnnity College, and Washington 
College. Also participating in the program are Kentucky State University, 
King College in Tennessee, Shippensburg State University in Pennsylva- 
nia, and Xavier University in Louisiana, 

Dual Degree Program in Engineering and German 

The College of Engineering and the Department of German and Slavic 
Languages have established a dual degree program in Engineenng and 
German in which students can simultaneously earn two baccalaureate 
degrees in both disciplines. The program provides eight weeks in Ger- 
many studying intensive technical German at the Carl Duisberg 
Sprachcolleg and a four to six month paid internship in German industry. 

For further information about this program, students should contact the 
Engineering Student Affairs Office (405-3855) or the Department of 
German and Slavic Languages and Literature, 405-4091. 

The Japan Technological Affairs Program 

The Japan Technological Affairs Program offers students in the College 
of Engineering intensive Japanese language instruction, workshops, and 
activities related to Japanese culture and society to prepare students for 
year long internships in Japan in a Japanese laboratory or company. The 
program is coordinated between the College of Engineenng and the 
Department of East Asian Languages. Students complete their baccalau- 
reate studies in engineering and receive the intensive Japanese instruc- 
tion in summer classes in the University's Language House and classes 
during the academic year to prepare the future engineer to operate with 
ease in Japan's research community. 

For further information about this program, students stwuld contact the 
Engineenng Student Affairs Office (405-3855) 

Engineering Transfer Programs 

Most of the community colleges in Maryland provide one- or two-year 
programs which have been coordinated to prepare students to enter the 
sophomore or junior year in engineenng at the University of Maryland 
These curncula are identified as Engineenng Transfer Programs m the 
catalogs of the sponsonng institutions The vanous associate degree 
programs in technology do not provide the preparation and transferabtlrty 



College of Engineering 61 



into the professional degree curricula as the designated transfer pro- 
grams. A maximum of one-half of the degree credits (sixty to sixty-five 
semester hours) may be transferred from a two-year community college 
program. 

There may be six to eight semester hours of major departmental courses 
at the sophomore level which are not offered by the schools participating 
in the engineering transfer program. Students should investigate the 
feasibility of completing these courses in summer school at the University 
of Maryland before starting their junior coursework in the fall semester, 

Financial Assistance 

The College of Engineering awards some merit-based scholarships. 
These awards are designated primarily for juniors and seniors in the 
college. Students must submit an application and all supporting docu- 
ments by February 1 5 in order to be considered for scholarship assistance 
for the ensuing year. For additional information, contact the Student 
Affairs Office. 11 31 Engineering Classroom Building. 405-3855, 

Honors 

The College of Engineering offers an Engineering Honors Program that 
provides eligible students the opportunity to pursue an enriched program 
of studies which will broaden their perspectives and increase the depth of 
their knowledge This program is available to students who meet the 
following criteria: 

1. 3.5 overall GPA 

2. 3.5 engineering GPA 

3. Junior standing or 65 applicable credits. 

In completing the program, all engineering Honors students must: 

1 . Submit an Honors research project necessitating a paper and oral 
presentation worth three hours of credit, 

2. Successfully complete two semesters of the Engineering Honors 
Seminar (ENES 388. 1 credit each). 

3. fvlaintain a 3.3 GPA, 

For additional information, contact the Student Affairs Office, 1 131 Engi- 
neering Classroom Building, 405-3855. 

Research and Service Units 

The Center for Minorities in Science and Engineering 

1134 Engineering Classroom Building. 405-3878 
Director: Rosemary L. Parker 

The Center is dedicated to increasing the enrollment and graduation rates 
of African-American. Hispanic, and Native American students majoring in 
engineering. The Center provides a complete package of services 
designed to assist students from the time they are considering engineer- 
ing as a major to their successful graduation. Services include academic 
advising, tutorial assistance, scholarsliip information, tine BRIDGE Pro- 
gram, the Mentor Program, outreach programs, job information and 
support of student organizations. All services are free of charge and can 
be utilized on a walk-in or appointment basis. 

Cooperative Engineering Education 

1 137 Engineering Classroom Building. 405-3863 
Director: Heidi Winick Sauber 

Cooperative education (co-op) is an optional academic program that 
combines classroom theory with career-related work experience. Through 
co-op. students alternate semesters of full-time study with semesters of 
full-time paid employment for a total of fifty work weeks. Co-op is designed 
to enhance a student's academic training, professional growth, and 
personal development. Co-op students earn a Bachelor of Science 
degree with co-op distinction and complete the same academic require- 
ments as all other students. Students are eligible after completing their 
freshman and sophomore engineering requirements provided they main- 
tain a minimum 2.0 grade point average. 

The benefits of co-op include: 1 ) Integration of theory and application, 2) 
Professional level experience to offer future employers, 3) Confirmation 
of career decisions and invaluable professional contacts, 4) Development 
of leadership skills and self-confidence, and 5) Ability to finance educa- 
tional expenses. 



Summer Undergraduate Employment Program 

The Summer Undergraduate Employment Program (SUEP) is designed 
to assist academically talented engineering, computer science, and 
physics students in finding exciting summer work experiences with 
companies located throughout IVIaryland. SUEP enables students to build 
a solid foundation for future career plans, network with professionals in 
their field, and earn money while gaining invaluable hands-on expenence. 
To participate, a student must be a junior or non-graduating senior and 
have a minimum cumulative GPA. of 3.0, 

Instructional Television System 

2104 Engineering Classroom Building, 405-4910 
Director: Arnold E. Seigel 

The University of f^aryland's Instructional Television System (ITV) is 
headquartered in the College of Engineering. Each semester, over sixty 
regularly scheduled graduate and undergraduate classes are held in ITV's 
studio classrooms and broadcast "live" to government agencies and 
businesses in the greater Washington and Baltimore area. Students in the 
remote classrooms watch the broadcasts on large TV monitors. They are 
able to talk to the instructors and other students using a phone-line "talk 
back" system. In addition to academic courses, professional development 
courses on extremely current topics are offered via satellite to engineers 
and managers throughout the United States. Through the ITV system, 
working adult students are able to progress toward graduate degrees, 
primarily in engineering and computer science, without leaving their 
places of work. 

Undergraduate Research Programs 

Undergraduate research programs allow qualified undergraduate stu- 
dents to work with research laboratory directors in departments, thus 
giving students a chance for a unique experience in research and 
engineering design. Projects in engineering allow undergraduate stu- 
dents to do independent study under the guidance of faculty members in 
an area of mutual interest. For more information contact your designated 
engineering department. 

Undergraduate Research Participation Award 
Institute for Systems Research 

A. V. Williams Building, 405-6613 

The Institute for Systems Research (ISR) has available Undergraduate 
Research Participation Awards (URPA) for full-time engineering students 
who have a minimum grade point average of 3.0. The total URPA stipend 
is $4,000 for a one year period. Interdisciplinary research is conducted in 
Chemical Process Control. Systems Integration. Ivfanufacturing Systems, 
Communication Systems, Signal Processing, and Intelligent 
Servomechanisms. Applications and supporting documents must reach 
the ISR by April 1st for the summer/fall semesters and November 1st for 
the spring semester. 

Academic Computing 

1131 Engineering Classroom Building, 405-3872 
Director: Jayanta (Joy) K. Sircar 

Recognizing that state-of-the-art technological developments in com- 
puting provide a significant contribution to the advancement of engi- 
neering learning and research, the College of Engineering provides a 
computing and communications environment that will be the standard 
for engineers in the years ahead. Using a local area net. approximately 
2 miles long and spanning six buildings, in a distributed computing 
framework, the network supports nearly 500 workstations. These 
workstations include approximately 1 80 Sun lyiicrosystems. 90 Macin- 
tosh ll's, 90 IBM Pes and PS/2's and their clones, 50 VAXstations and 
DECstations, and 25 Hewlett-Packards. Additional systems include 
those from vendors such as IBM, Silicon-Graphics, NeXT, Solborne, 
Symbolics, Texas Instruments, and Tektronix. Further, the College of 
Engineering network can access not only other University of Maryland 
facilities but all computing facilities in the nation supported by Internet, 
as well as other countries in the world using Bitnet. 



62 College of Health and Human Performance 



Student Organizations 

Professional Societies 

Each of the engineering departments sponsors a student chapter or 
student section of a national engineering society. The student chapters 
sponsor a variety of activities including technical meetings, social gather- 
ings, and college or university service projects. Students who have 
selected a major are urged to affiliate with the chapter in their department. 
These organizations are American Helicopter Society, American Institute 
of Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers, American Nuclear Society, American Society of Agricultural En- 
gineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers, Black Engineers Society, Institute of Electrical and 
Electronics Engineers, Society of Asian Engineers, Society of Automotive 
Engineers, Society of Fire Protection Engineers, Society of Hispanic 
Engineers, and Society of Women Engineers. 

Honor Societies 

The College of Engineering and each of the engineering departments 
sponsor honors societies. Nominations or invitations for membership are 
usually extended to junior and senior students based on scholarship, 
service and/or other selective criteria. Some of the honors organizations 
are branches of national societies; others are local groups: Tau Beta Pi 
(College Honorary); Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engineering); Alpha Nu 
Sigma (Nuclear Engineering); Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering); Eta Kappa 
Nu (Electrical Engineering); Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineering); 
Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering); Salamander (Fire Protection 
Engineering); and Sigma Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering). 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN 
PERFORMANCE (HLHP) 

(Formerly College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health) 

3310 HLHP Building, 405-2438; Records, 405-2442 

Dean: Dr. John J. Burt 

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Jerry Wrenn 

The College of Health and Human Performance provides preparation 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the following professional 
areas; Physical Education (three certification options), Health Education 
(school and community), and Family Studies. The college also offers 
curricula in Kinesiological Sciences and Safety Education. In addition, 
each department offers a wide variety of courses for all university 
students. These courses may be used to fulfill the general education 
requirements and as electives. 

Programs combining research, service and instruction are provided by the 
Children's Health and Developmental Clinic, the Adults' Health and 
Developmental Program, and the Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 
Center. More detailed information regarding these program offerings is 
available through the individual departments. 

Advising 

At the time of matriculation and first registration, each student is assigned 
to a member of the faculty of the college who acts as the student's 
academic advisor. These assignments are made by the individual depart- 
ments and depend upon the student's chosen major. Students who are 
enrolled in the college, but who are undecided regarding their major, 
should contact the Associate Dean, 3310H HLHP Building, 405-2442, 

Departments and Degrees 

The College of Health and Human Performance offers the baccalaureate 
degree in the following fields of study; Physical Education, Kinesiological 
Sciences, Health Education and Family Studies. The degree of Bachelor 
of Science is conferred upon students who have met the conditions of their 
curricula as herein prescribed by the College of Health and Human 
Performance. 

Each candidate for a degree must file a formal application with the 
Records Office according to the scheduled deadlines for the anticipated 
semester of graduation. 



Honors 

Phi Alpha Epsilon. Honorary Society of the College of Health and Human 
Performance. The purpose of this organization is to recognize academic 
achievement and to promote professional growth by sponsonng activities 
in the fields of physical education, kinesiology, family studies and health, 
and related areas. 

Students shall qualify for membership at such times as they shall have 
attained junior standing in physical education, kinesiology, family studies, 
or health, and have a minimum overall average of 2.7 and a minimum 
professional average of 3. 1 . Graduate students are invited to join after ten 
hours of work with a 3.3 average. For additional information, please 
contact Dr. Donald Steel, 405-2490 

Special Resources and Opportunities 

Gymkana Troupe. The Gymkana troupe is a group of highly disciplined 

young men and women who place a high priority on education and who 
engage in gymnastics for purposes of recreation, health and personal 
development. Each member has pledged himself or herself to a drug-free 
lifestyle in hopes of acting as a role model so others might be motivated 
to do the same. Gymkana travels throughout the United Stales during 
February and March, performing once a week, and ending the season with 
its annual gymnastic performance at the university. Membership is open 
to all students regardless of their gymnastic ability. Gymkana is co- 
sponsored by the College of Health and Human Performance and the 
Student Government Association. For additional information, please 
contact Dr. Joe Murray, 405-2566. 

Research and Service Units 
Center on Aging 

2304 HLHP Building, 405-2469 

Director and Professor; Dr. Laura B. Wilson 

Associate Professor; Dr. James M. Hagberg and Dr Mark R. Meiners 

The Center on Aging stimulates and supports aging-related activities 
within existing departments, colleges, and schools throughout all of the 
various institutions of the University of Maryland. The center coordinates 
the Graduate Gerontology Certificate (Master's and Doctoral levels), the 
university's first approved graduate certificate program. The center as- 
sists undergraduate and graduate students interested in the field of 
gerontology and helps them to devise educational programs to meet their 
goals. It Is a research center working in physiology, economics and policy. 
It also conducts community education programs, assists faculty in pursu- 
ing research activities in the field of aging, conducts conferences on 
adulthood and aging- related topics, and provides on- and off-campus 
technical assistance to practitioners who serve older adults. 

For further information on any of the center's activities call, write or visit the 
Center on Aging. 

Course Code; HLHP 



COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM (JOUR) 

Journalism Building, 405-2399 

Dean and Professor; Cleghorn 

Associate Dean and Professor; Levy 

Assistant Dean; Stewart 

Professors; Beasley, Blumler, Gomery. Gurevitch. J. Grunig, Hiebert. 

Holman, Martin (Emeritus), Rot>erts 

Associate Professors; BarVin, Ferguson, L. Grunig, Paterson. Stepp. Zanot 

Assistant Professors; Keenan. McAdams, Roche, Smith. Zerbinos 

Instructors; Callahan, Harvey, Rhodes 

Howard Bray, Director of Knight Center for Specialized Journalism 

Frank Quine, Director of Advancement 

Carroll Volchko, Director of Business Administration 

Give Reid, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Located just nine miles from the nation's capital and 30 miles from \he 
bustling commercial port of Baltimore, the College of Journalism at the 
University of Maryland is one of only six comprehensive loumaltsm 



College of Journalism 63 



schools in the 1 states stretching from New York to Virginia — the nation's 
most populous region. But the college has a lot more than geography 
going for it. In a study by the Gannett Center lor Media Studies at Columbia 
University, the college recently was designated one ot "Eleven Exemplary 
Journalism schools" nationwide: those that surpass others in criteria 
including teaching, research, facilities and job placement. 

Founded in 1947. the college has been accredited lor close to three 
decades by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass 
Communication. Since it is within easy reach of the offices of Washington 
and Baltimore newspapers and the Washington bureaus of news organi- 
zations such as The New York Times, the Associated Press and the major 
networks, it is an ideal place lor the study of journalism and mass 
communication. Students have internship opportunities at a vahety of 
media, non-profit, government and international agencies. Talented ad- 
junct faculty members are also tapped from these organizations to 
enhance curnculum offenngs. 

After successful completion of a basic writing and editing skills series of 
courses, majors are provided the following sequences in which to locus 
their remaining journalism curnculum: news-editorial, public relations, 
broadcast news, advertising. Within the news-editorial sequence, empha- 
ses are provided in the areas of news and magazine. 

Admission to College of Journalism 

See the Admissions section in this catalog for general LEP admissions 
policies. 

Freshman Admission and the 45 Credit Review. Most first-time enter- 
ing freshmen will gain admission to the College of Journalism directly from 
high school, as allowed by space considerations within the College. 
Because space may be limited before all interested freshmen are admit- 
ted to the program, early application is encouraged. Freshmen admitted 
to the program will have access to the necessary advising through their 
initial semesters to help them determine if Journalism is an appropriate 
area for their interests and abilities. 

Freshmen who are admitted directly to Journalism will be subject to a 
performance review by the time they have completed 45 credits. To meet 
the provisions of the review, these students must complete: (1 ) Funda- 
mental Studies; (2) 60% of Distributive Studies; (3) ENGL 1 01 and JOUR 
201 with grades of C; and (4) a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. 
Enrollment in JOUR 201 requires proof of grammar skills competency 
through attainment of a minimum score of 52 on the Test ot Standard 
Written English (TSWE). 61 on the Test of Language Skills (TLS). or 22 
on the ACT English usage subsection. Students who do not meet these 
requirements will not be allowed to continue in the LEP and will be required 
to select another major. 

Transfer Admission. These requirements affect new transfer students to 
the university as well as on-campus students hoping to change majors to 
the College. Admission of transfer students may be severely limited, and 
capacity is determined each year in accordance with the success of 
incoming freshmen. 

In order to be admitted to Journalism, transfer students will be required to 
meet the following set of gateway requirements: (1 ) completion of Funda- 
mental Studies; (2) completion of 60% of Distributive Studies; (3) comple- 
tion of ENGL 101 and JOUR 201 with grades of C; and (4) attainment of 
a minimum cumulative GPA for all college-level work attempted. Enroll- 
ment in JOUR 201 requires proof of grammar skills competency through 
attainment of a minimum score of 52 on the Test of Standard Written 
English (TSWE), 61 on the Test of Language Skills (TSL), or 22 on the 
ACT English usage subsection. The required GPA is set each year and 
may vary from year to year depending upon available space. Contact the 
College of Journalism or the Office of Undergraduate Admission for the 
current GPA standard. 

Appeals. Students who are unsuccessful in gaining admission to Journal- 
ism at the freshman or transfer level, and believe they have extenuating 
or special circumstances which should be considered, may appeal in 
writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admission. The student will be 
notified in writing of the appeal decision once it is made. 

Students admitted to Journalism as freshmen who do not pass the 45 
credit review but believe they have special circumstances which should be 
considered may appeal directly to the College. 

For further information, contact the Counselor for Limited Enrollment 
Programs at 301-314-8378. 



Degrees, 

The College of Journalism offers the B. A., MA and Ph.D. degrees. At the 
undergraduate level, students are required to specialize in one of the tour 
sequences offered. All diplomas are in Journalism. 

Graduation Requirements 

Students are required to earn a minimum of 121 credits. Accrediting 
regulations require three-fourths of a student's coursework (a minimum of 
90 credits) be in areas other than mass communication (such as speech) 
or journalism A minimum of 65 of those 90 credits must be earned in 
liberal arts designated courses. A grade of "C" or better jnust be earned 
in JOUR 201 and JOUR 202 prior to taking courses for which they serve 
as prerequisites. Students must have a "C" average in their major. 

Students are also required to demonstrate abstract thinking skills. As a 
measure, majors are offered either a language option, a mathematics 
option, or a combination of the two. Language skills must be demonstrated 
by taking coursework through the intermediate level. The Math option 
requires that students complete the following courses: statistics, calculus 
and computer science. 

A support area consisting of four upper-level courses in a concentrated 
field is also required of Journalism majors. Students must also complete 
a minimum of 57 credits at the upper level. Finally, in addition to university 
graduation requirements. Journalism majors must complete additional 
liberal arts coursework with one course each in government and politics, 
public speaking, psychology and economics and one course in sociology, 
anthropology or history. 

Journalism Academic Programs 

I. Required courses for all Journalism majors: 

A. Non-journalism course requirements 

1 . Abstract thinking skills requirement: 

Completion of a minimum of nine credits through one or a 
combination of the following options. Should a student choose 
to combine the options, at least one language course must be at 
the intermediate level: 

a. Language — any skills language course(s). Up to three 
courses with at least one course at the intermediate level 
and no more than one course at the introductory level. (High 
school equivalency does not satisfy this requirements.) 

b. Math/Statistics/Computer Science — Up to three courses 
including no more than one course from each category. 

i. One of the following math courses: MATH 111.115, 140 
or 220 or any course for which any of these serves as a 
prerequisite. 

ii. One of the following statistics courses: AREC 484, 
BIOM 301. BMGT 230, CNEC 400, ECON 321, EDMS 
451, GVPT 422, PSYC 200, SOCY 201. GEOG 305, 
TEXT 400, URBS 350, or a more advanced statistics 
course. 

iii. One of the following computer science courses — CMSC 
103, 104 or any higher-level CMSC course. 

2. A course in public speaking chosen from SPCH 100, 107, 200 

or 230. 

3. One of the following: 

A. Sociology 100 or 105 

B. Anthropology 101 

C. HIST 156 or 157. 

4. PSYC100or221. 

5. ECON 201. 203 or 205. 

6. GVPT 100 or 170. (For news-editorial students. GVPT 260 or 
460 is also required.) 

7. Four upper level (numbered 300 or higher) courses for a 

minimum of 12 credits in a supporting field (may not be in 
Speech or Radio-TV-Film). 



64 College of Journalism 

B. Journalism course requirements: 

Credit 

JOUR 101— Professional Orientation 1 

JOUR 201— Writing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 202— Editing for tfie Mass Media 3 

JOUR 400 — Law of Mass Communication 3 

II. Required courses for Journalism sequences: 

A. Advertising 

JOUR 340 — Advertising Communication 3 

JOUR 341— Advertising Techniques 3 

JOUR 342— Advertising Media Planning 3 

JOUR 346— Supervised Internship 3 

JOUR 477— Mass Communication Research 3 

JOUR 484— Advertising Campaigns 3 

At least one additional upper-level journalism cx}urse 

numbered 410-480 3 

B. Broadcast News 

JOUR 360— Broadcast News 1 3 

JOUR 361— Broadcast News 2 3 

JOUR 365 — Theory of Broadcast Journalism 3 

At least one additional upper-level journalism 

course numbered 410-480 3 

Journalism and Radio-TV-Film electives 9 

(chosen with permission of advisor: 366 recommended) 

C. Public Relations 

JOUR 330— Public Relations Theory 3 

JOUR 331— Public Relations Techniques 3 

JOUR 336— Supervised Internship 3 

JOUR 477 — Mass Communication Research 3 

JOUR 483— Senior Seminar In Public Relations 3 

Additional Writing Course (320. 332" or 360) 3 

Upper-Level Journalism Electives (333, 334 recom- ... 3 

mended or an second additional writing course; 320. 321 . 

332. 360. 361. 371. 380', 481) 

'Recommended for students preparing for science writing 
positions In the public relations department of a scientific or 
technical organization. 

D. News-Editonal 

(GVPT 260 Is a News-Editorial Sequence requirement for all 

specializations.) 

I. News Specialization 

JOUR 320— News Reporting 3 

JOUR 350— Photojournalism or 3 

JOUR 373— Graphics 

JOUR 321— Public Affairs Reporting or 3 

JOUR 322— Beats and Investigations 

Advanced Writing and Reporting Course 3 

(323, 324. 328. 371 and 380 recommended) 

Elective Journalism course 3 

(tietween410and 480) 

Upper-Level Journalism Electives 

(326 recommended) 6 

ii. Magazine Specialization 

JOUR 320— News Reporting 3 

JOUR 371— Feature Writing 3 

JOUR 373— Graphics 3 

JOUR 326 — Supervised Internship 3 

One of the following: 3 

JOUR 380— Science Writing for Magazines and 
Newspapers 

JOUR 481— Writing the Complex Story 

JOUR 487 — Literary Journalism 

Upper-Level Elective Journalism course 3 

(between 410 and 480) 

Upper-Level Journalism Elective 3 

iii. Photojournalism Specialization 

JOUR 320— News Reporting 3 

JOUR 350— Photojournalism 3 

JOUR 351 — Advanced Photojournalism 3 

JOUR 373— Graphics 3 

JOUR 326— Internship 3 

Upper-Level Elective Journalism course 3 

(between 410 and 480) 

Upper-Level Journalism Elective 3 



Advising 

The Office of Student Services. 1119 Journalism Building. 405-2399. 
provides academic advising to majors on an appointment basis. 

Honors and Awards 

Although no honors program currently exists within the college, academi- 
cally outstanding students are recognized through Kappa Tau Alpha, the 
Journalism academic honor society 

Adams Sandler Award. Awarded annually to the outstanding graduate 
in the Advertising sequence. 

Broadcast News Sequence Award Awarded at each commencement 
to the outstanding graduate in the Broadcast News Sequence. 

Pubiic Reiations Award. Awarded at each commencement to the 

outstanding graduate in the Public Relations Sequence. 

News-Editorial Award. Awarded at each commencement to the out- 
standing graduate in the News-Editonal sequence and its speaalizations 

Sigma Delta Chi/Society of Professional Journalists Citation Awarded 
annually to an outstanding journalism student 

Kappa Tau Alpha Citation. Awarded at each commencement to the 
journalism student earning the highest academic achievement for all 
undergraduate study. 

Field Work and Internship Opportunities 

Supervised internships are required lor the Public Relations and Adver- 
tising sequences along with the Magazine specialization within the News- 
Editonal sequence. Other students may take advantage of an internship 
as a journalism elective. No more than four mass-communication intern- 
ship credits, regardless of the discipline in which they are earned, may t»e 
applied toward a student's degree. Dr. Greig Stewart is the Coordinator of 
the Journalism Internship Program. 1118 Journalism Building. 405-2380. 

The Annapolis and Washington bureaus of the Capital News Service are 
staffed by students. Through curncular programs, students cover state 
and legislative news for client papers around the region Students are 
required to report breaking news by afternoon deadlines, wnte profiles 
and cover state agencies. This is a full-time, semester-long program, on 
site at the two bureau locations. 

For students In the Broadcast News Sequence, opportunity to gain 
experience with a cable news program entitled 'Maryland Update' is 
presented within the curriculum. 

Students may also earn internship or independent study credit through 
supervised expenence gained at The Diamondtsack. the award-winning 
student daily newspaper for the University of Maryland at College ParV. 
Other co-op and volunteer expenences are available to Journalism 
students through the university's Office of Expenential Learning in 
Hornbake. 



Student Organizations 



The college sponsors student chapters of the Soaety lor Professional 
Journalists, the Public Relations Student Society of Amenca. the National 
Association of Black Journalists, the Radio and Television News Direc- 
tors' Association and the Advertising Club These organizations provide 
students with opportunities to practice skills, establish social relationships 
with other students both on and oft campus, and meet and worV with 
professionals in the field. 

Campus media opportunities abound The campus radio station is WMUC. 
The student daily publication is The Diamondtwck Student newspapers 
of interest to special populations include The Eclipse. Black Expk>sion and 
MItzpeh. 

For information on the organizations listed, contact ttie Student Services 
Office. 1117 Journalism Building. 405-2399 



College of Life Sciences 65 



Accreditation 



Area Resources 



The College of Journalism became accredited in 1 960 by the Accrediting 
Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications Stan- 
dards set by the council are generated from professional and academic 
ethics and principles. This accrediting body underscores the liberal arts 
foundation of a journalism curriculum, limiting professional and skills 
courses to one-fourth of a students academic program. 



COLLEGE OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION 
SERVICES (CLIS) 

Dean: Dr. Claude E. Walston 

The College of Library and Information Services is a graduate program 
accredited by the American Library Association. The undergraduate 
portion of the program has been discontinued. 

COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES (LFSC) 

1224 Symons Hall. 405-2080 

Dean: Dr. Paul H. Mazzocchi 

The College of Life Sciences offers educational opportunities for students 
in subject matters relating to living organisms and their interaction with one 
another and with the environment. Programs of study include those 
involving the most fundamental concepts of biological science and chem- 
istry and the use of knowledge in daily life as well as the application of 
economic and engineenng principles in planning the improvement of life. 
In addition to pursuing the baccalaureate degree, a number of students in 
this college engage in pre-professional education in such fields as pre- 
medicine. pre-dentistry. and pre-vetennary medicine. 

The student may obtain a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in any 
of the departments and curricula listed below. Students in pre-profes- 
sional programs may, under certain circumstances, obtain a B.S. degree 
following three years on campus and one successful year in a professional 
school. For additional information on combined degree programs, see the 
entry on pre-professional programs in this catalog. 

The College of Life Sciences includes the following departments and 
programs: 

a. Departments: Botany. Chemistry and Biochemistry, Entomology, 
(^Microbiology. Zoology. 

b. Program: General Biological Sciences 

Admission 

Students desiring a program of study in the College of Life Sciences 
should include the following subjects in their high school program: 
English, four units; college preparatory mathematics (algebra, plane 
geometry), four units; biological and physical sciences, two units; history 
and social sciences, one unit. They should also include chemistry and 
physics. 



Advising 



A faculty advisor will be designated to help select and design a program 
of courses to meet the needs and objectives of each entering student. As 
soon as a student selects a major field of study, an advisor representing 
that department or program will be assigned. All students must see their 
advisor at least once each semester. 

Students following pre-professional programs will be advised by knowl- 
edgeable faculty. For further information on the pre-professional pro- 
grams offered at College Park, see the entry in this catalog. 



In addition to the educational resources on campus, students with specific 
interests have an opportunity to utilize libranes and other resources of the 
several government agencies located close to the campus. Research 
laboratories related to agriculture or marine biology are available to 
students with special interests. 

Degree Requirements 

Students graduating from the college must complete at least 120 credits 
with an average of 2.0 in all courses applicable towards the degree. 
Included in the 120 credits must be the following: 

1. CORE (40 credits) 

2. College Requirements: 

As of Fall 1988. all students in the College of Life Sciences must 

complete the following: 

CHEM 103. 113, or 103H. 113H 

CHEI^ 233, 243 or 233H, 243H 

•MATH 220, 221 or 140, 141 

PHYS 121, 122 or 141. 142 

BIOL 105 and 106 

'Chemistry and Biochemistry majors must take MATH 140. 141. 

Honors 

Students may apply tor admission to the honors programs in Botany, 
Chemistry, General Biological Sciences, Microbiology, and Zoology. On 
the basis of the student's performance during participation in the Honors 
Program, the department may recommend candidates for the appropriate 
degree with (departmental) honors, or for the appropriate degree with 
(departmental) high honors. Successful completion of the Honors Pro- 
grams will be recognized by a citation in the Commencement Program and 
by an appropriate entry on the student's record and diploma. 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS (PUAF) 

2101 MPA Building. 405-6330 

Dean: Michael Nacht 

The School of Public Affairs provides graduate-level, professional educa- 
tion to men and women interested in careers in public service. Five 
disciplines are emphasized: accounting, statistics, economics, politics, 
and ethics. Students specialize in issues of government/private sector 
interaction and trade policy, national security and arms control, public 
sector financial management, environmental policy, or social policy. 

The school offers separate degrees for pre-career and mid-career college 
graduates. Recent college graduates may enroll in the fifty-one credit 
Master of Public Management (MPM) program which can be completed 
in two years by full-time students. This program combines a rigorous 
applied course of study with practical, hands-on experience. The school 
also offers joint degree programs with the College of Business and 
Management (MPM/MBA) and the School of Law (MPM/JD), and accepts 
a small number of Ph.D. candidates each year. 

Public sector employees with a minimum of three years' work experience 
seek the Master of Public Policy (MPP) degree. This is generally a part- 
time, three-year, thirty-six credit program, but individuals wishing to 
complete the program sooner may do so by attending full-time. 

Individuals who wish to improve their analytical and management skills 
without pursuing a degree may enroll in an 18-credit certificate program 
which mirrprs the areas of specialization found in the masters degree 
programs. 

For further information, call or write the School of Public Affairs. 



66 



CHAPTER? 



DEPARTMENTS AND CAMPUS-WIDE PROGRAMS 



ACCOUNTING 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (ENAE) 
College of Engineering 

3181 Engineering Classroom BIdg., 405-2376 

Professor and Acting Chair: Lee 

Professors: Anderson, Chopra, Donaldson, Gessow, Lee, Melnik 

Associate Professors: Akin, Barlow, Cell, Jones, Vizzini, Winkelmann 

Assistant Professors: Leishman, Lewis 

Lecturers: Chander, Haggar, Heimerdinger, Korkegi, Lekoudis, Obrimski, 

Regan, Russell, Vamos, Winblade, Yanta 

The Major 

Aerospace engineering is concerned with the physical understanding, 
related analyses, and creative processes required to design aerospace 
vehicles operating within and beyond planetary atmospheres. Such 
vehicles range from helicopters and other vertical takeoff aircraft at the low 
speed end of the flight spectrum to spacecraft operating at thousands of 
miles per hour during entry into the atmospheres of the earth and other 
planets. In between are general aviation and commercial transports flying 
at speeds well below and close to the speed of sound, and supersonic 
transports, fighters, and missiles which cruise at many times the speed of 
sound. Although each speed regime and each vehicle type poses its own 
special research, analysis and design problems, each can be addressed 
by a common set of technical specialties or disciplines. 

These include aerodynamics, the study of how airflow produces effects on 
temperature, forces, and moments; flight dynamics, the study of the 
motion and flight path of vehicles; flight structures, the study of the 
mechanical behavior of materials, stresses and strains, deflection, and 
vibration; flight propulsion, the study of the physical fundamentals of how 
engines work; and the synthesis of all these principles into one system 
with a specific application such as a complete transport aircraft, a missile. 
or a space vehicle through the discipline of aerospace vehicle design. 

The facilities of the department Include several subsonic wind tunnels with 
sections ranging from a few inches up to the Glenn L. Martin Wind Tunnel 
with a 7.75 by 1 1 foot cross section which is the best of Its class located 
at any university. There is a supersonic tunnel, equipment for the static 
and dynamic testing of structural components, and a flight simulator. The 
Center for Rotorcratt Education and Research (CRER) has established 
some unique experimental facilities to test helicopter models in simulated 
environments, including an automated model ng and computer-controlled 
vacuum chamber. The Composite Research Laboratory (CORE) has the 
facilities necessary to the manufactunng, testing and inspection of com- 
posite materials and structures, including an autoclave, an x-ray machine, 
and a 220 Kip Uniaxial test machine with hydraulic gnps. The Space 
Systems Laboratory op>erates the Neutral Buoyancy Research facility for 
investigating assembly of space structures in a simulated zero gravity 
environment together with robots and their associated controllers. The 
department's computing facilities include microcomputers. Sun worksta- 
tions, and terminals. There is network access to many minicomputers, the 
campus mainframes, and several supercomputing centers. 



Requirements for Major 

The Freshman curriculum is the same for all Engineering departments. 
Please consult the College of Engineering entry. 

Sophomore Year I II 

CORE Requirements 3 3 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 3 

MATH 241— Calculus III 4 

PHYS 262 and 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 240 — Engineering Computation 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENAE 201 , 202— Introduction to Aerospace 

Engineering I, II 2 2 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 4 

Total 16 19 

Junior Year 

CORE Requirements 3 3 

MATH 240— Introduction to Linear Algebra 4 

ENME 217— Thermodynamics 3 

ENEE 300— Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

ENAE 305 — Aerospace Laboratory I 3 

ENAE 345— Flight Dynamics 3 

ENAE 451— Flight Structures I 4 

ENAE 371— Aerodynamics 1 3 

ENAE 471— Aerodynamics II 3 

Total 16 16 

Senior Year 

ENAE 452— Flight Structures II 3 

ENAE 475 — Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic Heating 3 

ENAE 401— Aerospace Laboratory II (Fall) 2 

ENAE 402— Aerospace Laboratory III (Spring) 1 

ENAE 461— Flight Propulsion I 3 

CORE Requirements 9 

Design Elective (1) 3 

Applied Dynamics Elective [2] 3 

Aerospace Elective [3] 3 

Technical Elective [4] 3 

Total 33 

Minimum Degree Credits: 1 20 credits and the fulfillment of all department, 

college, and university requirements. 

' The students shall take one of the following design courses: 

ENAE 41 1— Aircraft Design 

ENAE 412 — Design of Aerospace Vehicles 

ENAE 488W— Design of Remotely Piloted Vehicles 

^ The student shall take one of the following: 

ENAE 445— Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehicles 

ENAE 355— Aircraft Vibrations 

ENAE 488 E— Aerospace Control Systems 

' These three credits must be upper level Aerospace courses which are 

not used to satisfy other requirements. Courses listed under [1 ) or [2] and 

not used to meet those requirements are acceptable. Other courses 

frequently offered include: 

ENAE 415— Computer-aided Structural Design Analysis 

ENAE 453 — Matnx Methods in Computational Mechanics 

ENAE 473— Aerodynamics of High-Speed Flight 

ENAE 488 — Topics in Aerospace Engineenng 

ENAE 499— Elective Research 



Afro-American Studies Program 67 



* These three credits must be a 400 level course In Engineering, Math- 
ematics, or Physical Science that has been approved tor this purpose by 
the department A list is maintained and is available trom the advisors. 
Courses listed under ( 1 ], [2), and |3] atiove and which are not used to meet 
one of those requirements may be elected to tuiflll requirement [4]. 

Admission 

See College of Engineering entrance requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Each student is assigned to one of the full lime 
faculty members who must be consulted and whose signature Is required 
on the request for course registration each semester. The list of advisor 
assignments is available in the main office, 405-2376. 

Cooperative Program 

Participation in the Coop program is encouraged. See College of Engi- 
neering entry tor details. 

Financial Assistance 

The department offers Glenn L. t^artin Scholarships and a Zonta Schol- 
arship. Students may obtain information/application forms in the main 
oftice. 

Honors and Awards 

The department makes the following awards: Academic Achievement 
Award for highest overall academic average at graduation; R.M. Rivello 
Scholarship Award for highest overall academic average through the 
junior year; Sigma Gamma Tau Outstanding Achievement Award for 
scholarship and service to the Student Chapter, American Helicopter 
Society Outstanding Achievement Award for service to the student 
chapter; American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Outstanding 
Achievement Award for scholarship and service to the student chapter. 
Eligibility criteria are available in the department office. 

Student Organizations 

The department is home to student chapters of the American Institute of 
Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Helicopter Society. 
Aerospace Engineenng students are also frequent participants in student 
activities of the Society of Automotive Engineers. 

Course Code: ENAE 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM (AASP) 
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169 Lefrak Hall, 405-1158 

Acting Director: S. Harley 

Associate Professors: S. Harley, E. Wilson* (GVPT.) 

Assistant Professors: M. Lashley, R. Williams* (Economics), F. Wilson 

* Joint Appointment with unit indicated. 

The Afro-American Studies Program offers an interdisciplinary Bachelor 
of Arts degree In the study of the lite and history of African Americans. The 
curriculum emphasizes the historical development of African American 
social, political and economic institutions, while preparing students to 
apply analytic, social science skills in the creation of solutions to the 
pressing socio-economic problems confronting African American 
communities. 

Two program options lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Both require a 
twelve-credit core of course work that concentrates on Afro-American 
history and culture. 

The general concentration provides a broad cultural and historical 
perspective. It requires 1 8 additional credit hours in one or more specialty 
areas within Afro-American Studies such as history, literature, govern- 



ment and politics, sociology or anthropology, as well as departmental 
seminars and a thesis. 

The public policy concentration provides in depth training for problem 
solving in minority communities. It requires 21 additional credit hours in 
analytic methods, such as economics and statistics, 9 credit hours of 
electives in a policy area (with departmental approval) and an internship 
or a thesis or a departmental seminar. Substantive areas of study include 
the family, cnminal justice, employment, health care, discrimination, and 
urban development 

Requirements for Major 

Core Courses: AASP 100, 101 (formerly 300), 200, 202. 

General Concentration: In addition to the core requirerrients, 1 8 credits 
of AASP Upper Division Electives (300-400 numbers). AASP 402 and 
AASP 397. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Liberal Arts and Sciences 43 

AASP Core (total 12): 

AASP 1 00— Introduction to Afro-American Studies 3 

AASP 101 (Formerly 300)— Public Policy and Black 

Community 3 

AASP 200— African Civilization 3 

AASP 202— Black Culture in the United States 3 

Upper Division Electives 

AASP 310— African Slave Trade 3 

AASP 312— Social and Cultural Effects of Colonization 

and Racism 3 

AASP 400 — Directed Readings in Afro-American Studies 3 

AASP 410 — Contemporary African Ideologies 3 

AASP 411 — Black Resistance fi^ovements 3 

AASP 498— Special Topics in Black Culture 3 

Students may select, with AASP approval, elective courses from other 
departments. 

Seminars 

AASP 402 — Classic Readings in Afro-American Studies 3 

AASP 397— Senior Thesis 3 

Public Policy Concentration: In addition to the core, three credits of 
statistics; six credits of elementary economics (ECON 201 and 203); 
AASP 301 , AASP 303, AASP 305 or approved courses in other depart- 
ments; nine credits of upper-division AASP electives in the policy area 
(AASP numbers 300-400) or, with approval, elective courses outside of 
AASP; and one of AASP 386/387 or AASP 397 or AASP 497. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Core Liberal Arts and Sciences 43 

AASP CORE (total 12): 

AASP 100 — Introduction to Afro-American Studies 3 

AASP 101 (Formeriy 300)— Public Policy and the 

Black Community 3 

AASP 200— African Civilization 3 

AASP 202— Black Culture in the United States 3 

ANALYTIC COMPONENT: 

AASP 301 (Formerly 428J) 3 

AASP 303 (Formerly 428P)— Computer Applications in 

Afro-American Studies 3 

AASP 305* (Formerly 401)— Theoretical, l^ethodological 

and Policy Research Issues in Afro American Studies 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics 1 3 

ECON 203 Principles of Economics II 3 

STAT 1 00 Elementary Statistics and Probability 

OR SOCY 201 Introductory Statistics for Sociology 

OR Equivalent Statistics Course 3 

One additional analytical course outside of AASP, with 

AASP approval 3 

POLICY ELECTIVES: 

AASP 441 — Science, Technology and the Black 

Community 3 

AASP 443— Blacks and the Law 3 

AASP 499 — Advanced Topics in Public Policy and the 

Black Community 3 



68 Agricultural Chemistry 

Students may select, with AASP approval, elective courses from other 

depaflments. 

FINAL OPTION: 

One of the following courses is required; 

AASP 386— Internship 6 

AASP 397— Senior Thesis 3 

AASP 497 — Policy Seminar in Afro-American Studies 3 

■Required if you select the Senior Thesis option or Policy Seminar in Afro- 
American Studies. 

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in each course that is to 
be counted toward completion of degree requirements. All related or 
supporting courses in other departments must be approved by an AASP 
faculty advisor. 

Honors Program 

Academically talented undergraduates may enroll in the University Honors 
Program with a specialization in Afro-American Studies. The honors 
program includes seminars and lectures presented by distinguished 
UI^CP faculty and guests. A reduced ratio of students to faculty insures 
a more individualized study focus. 

BA/MPM Program 

An innovative joint program whose candidates earn a Bachelor's degree 
in Afro-American Studies and a Master's degree in public management 
after approximately five years. Designed to integrate the study of the 
history, culture and life of African Americans with technical skills, training 
and techniques of contemporary policy analysis, the BA/MPM program 
also features a summer component that includes a lecture series, re- 
search opportunities, and special seminars. 

Admission into the BA/MPM program requires two steps: 

Undergraduate 

(1 ) Students must major in the public policy concentration within the 
Afro-American Studies program and maintain an overall GPA of 
3.00 or greater. 

Graduate 

(2) Students apply to the joint program after completing 81 credit 
hours of undergraduate work. Applicants must meet both UMCP 
graduate and School of Public Affairs graduate admission 
requirements. 

Eligibility 

Freshmen or UMCP students in good academic standing with fewer than 
60 credits are encouraged to apply 

Contact: The Afro-American Studies Program at 301 -405-1 1 58 for appli- 
cation and scholarship details. 

Options for Study with AASP 

For students who major in other departments, the Afro-American Studies 
Program offers three options for study: 

1 . The AASP Certificate in the general concentration or in the public 
policy concentration. Students may obtain a cerlificate by completing 
twenty-one credit hours of course work. To qualify for the certificate 
in AASP. students must take AASP 1 00. AASP 1 01 and AASP 200 
or AASP 202; nine credits of upper division AASP electives"; and 
AASP 402. 

"Three of these credits may be taken outside of the 
department but permission is required from the AASP 
Advisor. 

2. Students may designate Afro-American Studies as a double major 
study area, completing the major requirements for both AASP and 
another program. 

3. AASP is the supporting area of study for Computer Science and 
Urban Studies and Planning majors, as it can be for other fields of 
study such as Business andvor Engineering. 

Scholarships and Financial Aid: 

1 . John B. Slaughter Scholarships 

2. Ford Foundation Scholarships 



Advising 

Undergraduates in good academic standing may enroll in the Afro- 
Amencan Studies Program or obtain more information about available 
options and services by contacting Undergraduate Academic Advisor, 
Afro-American Studies Program, 21 69 Lefrak Hall. University of Marylarid, 
College Park, Maryland 20742, (301) 405-1 158. 

Course Code; AASP 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING (ENAG) 
College of Agriculture/Engineering 

1 1 30 Shriver Laboratory. 405- 1 1 98 

Chair; Stewart 

Professors; Brodie. Johnson, Wheaton 

Associate Professors; Grant, Kangas, Magette, Ross, Shirmohammadi, 

Stewart 

Instructor; Carr 

Emeriti; Felton, Green. Harris, Krewatch, Mernck 

The Major 

This program is for students who wish to become engineers but who also 
have senous interest in biological systems and how the physical and 
biological sciences interrelate. The biological and the engineenng as- 
pects of plant, animal, genetic, microbial, medical, food processing and 
environmental systems are studied. Graduates are prepared to apply 
engineering, mathematical and computer skills to the design of biological 
systems and facilities. Graduates find employment in design, manage- 
ment, research, education, sales, consulting or international service. 

Requirements for Major 

Emphasis areas include aquacultural engineering, biological engineer- 
ing, plant systems engineering, animal systems engineenng. food pro- 
cess engineering and natural resources engineering. 

Agricultural Engineering Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

ENES 100— Introduction to Engineering Design 2 

•MATH 140— Calculus I 4 

•CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 4 

•BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I 4 

or BIOL 106— Principles of Biology II 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

Total 17 

ENES 102— Statics 2 

•MATH 141— Calculus II 4 

•CHEM 1 04 — Fundamentals of Organic and Bio Chemistry 4 

•PHYS 141— Principles of Physics 4 

•CORE' 3 

Total 17 

Sophomore Year 

MATH 241— Calculus III 4 

•MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 4 

•PHYS 142— Pnnciples of Physics 4 

ENES 103 — Fortran for Engineers 1 

Total 17 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists 

and Engineers 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENME 217— Thermodynamics 3 

ENAG 241— Computer Use in Bioresource Engineering 3 

*ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics (or substitute 

approved course) 3 

•CORE' 3 

Total 18 

Junior Year' 

ENCE 300 — Fundamentals of Engineering Matenals 3 

or ENMA 300 — Matenals Science and Engineering 
or ENES 230 — Introduction to Matenals and Their 
Applications 



Agricultural Sciences, General 69 



or ENME 401'— The Structure and Properties of Engineering 
Materials 

ENME 342— Fluid Mechanics 3 

or ENCE 330— Basic Fluid Mechanics 

ZOOL 21 1— Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

[ENGR SCI: Technical Elective)' 3 

•CORE' 3 

Total J6 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

ENEE 301 — Electrical Engineering Lat)oratory 1 

ENAG 454— Biological Process Engineering 4 

[BIOL SCI: Technical Elective)' 3 

(ENGR SCI: Technical Elective]* 3 

•CORE' 3 

Total 17 

Senior Year 

ENAG 421— Power Systems 3 

ENAG 422— Soil and Water Engineering 3 

(BIOL SCI: Technical Elective)' 3 

ENGL 393— Technical Writing 3 

•CORE' 6 

Total 18 

ENAG 481— Creative Design with CAD/CAM 3 

ENAG 424 — Functional and Environmental Design of 

Agricultural Structures 3 

ENAG 485 Capstone Design 3 

[BIOL SCI or ENGR SCI: Technical Elective]' 3 

•CORE' 3 

Total 15 

Total 135 

•Satisfies General Education Requirements 

'Students must consult with an advisor on selection of appropriate 

courses for their particular area of study. 

^No 300 level and above courses may be attempted without special 

permission until fifty-six credits have been earned. 

'ENME 31 must be taken as a technical elective prerequisite or corequisite 

with ENME 401. 

'Technical electives, related to field of concentration, must be selected 

from a departmentally approved list. Nine credits must be 300 level and 

above. An elective such as computer-aided design (e.g., ENAG 489B) 

provides a strong base for the capstone design project. 

Admission/Advising 

All Agricultural Engineering majors must meet admission, progress and 
retention standards of the College of Engineering, but may enroll through 
either the College of Agriculture or Engineering. 

Advising is mandatory: call 405-1 198 to schedule an appointment. 

Contact Departmental academic advisors to arrange teaching or research 
internships. 



Financial Assistance 

The department offers three scholarships specifically for Agricultural 
Engineering majors. Cooperative education (work study) programs are 
available through the College of Engineering. Part-time employment is 
available in the department and in USDA laboratories located near 
campus. 

Honors and Awards 

Outstanding junior and senior students are recognized each year for 
scholastic achievement and for their contribution to the department, 
college and university. Top students are selected for Alpha Epsilon, the 
Honor Society of Agricultural Engineering. 

Student Organization 

Join the student branch of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers. 
Academic advisors will tell you how to become a participant. 

Course Code: ENAG 



AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, GENERAL (AGRI) 
College of Agriculture 

01 02 Shnver Laboratory, 405-1 1 79 

Coordinator: L.P, Grant 

Agriculture is a complex scientific field, encompassing all other scientific 
and professional fields. However, majoring in Agricultural Sciences does 
not require an agricultural background Students in this major have 
backgrounds as varied as is the field itself. The Agricultural Sciences 
program is designed for students who are interested in a broad education 
in the field of agriculture. It is ideal for students who would like to survey 
agriculture before specializing, and for those who prefer to design their 
own specialized programs, such as International Agriculture or Agricul- 
tural Journalism. To supplement their classroom work, students in this 
major are encouraged to obtain summer positions that will provide 
technical laboratory or field experience in their chosen area. Advising is 
mandatory. 

Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements' 40 

BIOL 105— General Biology I 4 

BIOL 106— General Biology II 4 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 

OR (CHEM 1 13 General Chemistry II and CHEM 233 

Organic CHEM I) 4-8 

MATH 110 or higher (115 recommended) 3 

ENAG 100 — Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 3 

ENAG 200 — Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

AGRO 101 — Introductory Crop Science 4 

AGRO 302— General Soils 4 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 315— Applied Animal Nutrition 3 

ANSC or AGRO" 3 

AREC 250 — Elements of Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 3 

AREC— •• 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants OR 

ANSC 41 2— Introduction to Diseases of Animals 4 

ENTM — "Insect Pest Type Course 3 

HORT— •• 3 

SOCY 305— Scarcity and Modern Society 3 

Community Development Related, Non-agricultural 

Life Science, Biometrics, Computer, or Accounting 6 

Electives (eighteen credit hours 300 or above) 20-29 

'Includes eleven required credits listed below. 

"Student may select any course(s) having required hours in the depart- 
ment indicated. 

Course Code; AGRI 



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 
(AEED) 

College of Agriculture 

0220 Symons Hall, 405-2333 

This program has been closed. New students are not being admitted to the 
program. Current students should contact the college for advising. 

A degree in agricultural and extension education may lead to career 
opportunities in educational and developmental programs, public service, 
business and industry, communications, research, or college teaching. 

The program prepares individuals to teach agriculture at the secondary or 
postsecondary levels. It also prepares individuals to enter community 
development and other agriculturally related careers which emphasize 
working with people. Students preparing to become teachers of agricul- 
ture, including horticulture, agribusiness and other agriculturally related 
subjects, should have had appropriate experience with the kind of 



70 Agricultural and Resource Economics 

agriculture they plan to teach or should arrange to secure that experience 
during summers while in college. Advising is mandatory. 

Students in the agricultural education curriculum are expected to partici- 
pate in the Collegiate FFA Chapter tor developing skills necessary tor 
advising FFA groups. Students must apply for admission to the teacher 
education program in agricultural education. Contact the Teacher Educa- 
tion Coordinator in AEED for application forms and procedures. 

Agricultural and Extension Education Program Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements 40 

AGRO 100 — Crops Laboratory 
AGRO 102— Crop Production or 

AGRO 406— Forage Crop Production (3) 2 

AGRO 302— General Soils 4 

ANSC 101— Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203— Feeds and Feeding 3 

AREC 306 — Farm Management OR 

AREC 407— Financial Analysis of Farm Business 3 

BIOL 105. 106— Principles of Biology I, II 4,4 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 4 

CHEM 103. 104— General Chemistry I, Fundamentals of 

Organic and Biochemistry 4,4 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 6 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

ENAG 100 — Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 3 

ENAG 200— Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

ENAG 305 — Farm Mechanics 2 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

HORT 201— Environmental Factors and Horticultural 

Crop Production 4 

HORT 202— Management of Horticultural Crop Production ... 4 

MATH 110 — Introduction Mathematics I 3 

AEED 302— Introduction to Agricultural Education 2 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development 3 

AEED 305 — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 

AEED 31 1 —Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 

AEED 313— Student Teaching 5 

AEED 31 5— Student Teaching : 4 

AEED 398— Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 

AEED 464— Rural Life in Modern Society 3 

AEED 489C— Field Experience; Teaching Agriculture 1 

SPCH 1 07— Technical Speech Communication 3 

Electives 6 

Course Code: AEED 



AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS 
(AREC) 

College of Agriculture 

2200 Symons Hall, 405-1293 

Professor and Chair: Just 

Professors: Bender (Emeritus), Bockstael, Brown, Cain, Chambers, Fos- 
ter, Gardner, Hueth, Lopez, McConnell, Moore, Poffenberger (Emeritus), 
Stevens (Emeritus), Strand, Tuthill (Emeritus), Wysong 
Associate Professors: Hardie, Leathers, Lichtenburg 
Assistant Professors: Horowitz, Whittington 

The curnculum combines education in business and economic aspects of 
agricultural production, marketing and natural resource use with the 
biological and physical sciences. Depending on the option selected, 
graduates of the curriculum have appropriate background for manage- 
ment positions in the private sector, for positions in local, state, or federal 
agencies; for service in foreign agricultural trade and development; for 
research; for graduate school; or for farm management. 



Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Appointments may be made in Room 2200 
Symons Hall, 405-1291. 

Awards 

Scholarships honoring Arthur and Pauline Seidenspinner and Ray Murray 
are availatjie Applicants must complete the Financial Aid Form of the 
College Scholarship Service, available at the University Office of Student 
Financial Aid, 2130 Mitchell Building. 

Requirements for Major 

Changes in major requirements are under review. Students should check 
with a departmental advisor for updated information. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Major Core Courses 

AREC 250 — Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

ECON 201— Macroeconomic Principles 3 

ECON 203 — Microeconomic Principles 3 

ECON 306/405— Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

MATH 115— Precalculus 3 

STAT 100 or MATH 111— Intro Probability 3 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus 3 

CMSC 1 03 — Computer Applications or higher CMSC 3 

Agribusiness Option 

AREC 306— Farm Management 3 

AREC 407 — Agricultural Finance 3 

AREC 414— Agribusiness Management 3 

AREC 427— Agricultural Marketing 3 

BMGT 220— Accounting I 3 

BMGT 221— Accounting II 3 

BMGT 230— Business Statistics or other statistics 3 

BMGT 340— Business Finance 3 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles 3 

BMGT 364— Management and Organization Theory 3 

BMGT 380— Business Law 3 

Technical Agriculture* 6 

Agricultural Economics Option 

AREC 306 — Farm Management 3 

AREC 404 — Agricultural Prices 3 

AREC 427— Agricultural Marketing 3 

AREC 433— Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

ECON 305 — Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Statistics 3 

Technical Electives* 18 

Resource Economics Option 

AREC 240 — Environmental and Human Ecology 3 

AREC 404— Agricultural Prices 3 

AREC 432— Introduction to Natural Resources Policy 3 

AREC 453— Natural Resources and Public Policy 3 

ECON 381— Environmental Economics 3 

ECON 305 or 405 — Macroeconomic Theory 3 

Statistics 3 

Technical Electives* 15 

internationai Agriculture Option 

AREC 306— Farm Management 3 

AREC 365— World Food Hunger 3 

AREC 404— Agricultural Prices 3 

AREC 433 — Food and Agricultural Policy 3 

AREC 445 — Agricultural Development 3 

ECON 305 or 405 — Macroeconomic Theory 3 

ECON 440— International Economics 3 

Statistics 3 

Technical Electives* 12 

*Chosen with approval of advisor. 

Course Code: AREC 



American Studies 71 

Soil Science Curriculum 

University and Department Requirements 61 

AGRO— Advanced Soils Courses (Consult Advisor) 3 

AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Advisor) 6 

AGRO 414 — Soil Morphology. Genesis and Classification .... 4 

AGRO 41 7— Soil Physics 3 

AGRO 421— Soil Chemistry 4 

GEOL 100— Physical Geology 3 

AGRO 422— Soil Microbiology 4 

Eleclives 33 

Turf and Urban Agronomy Curriculum 

University and Department Requirements 61 

AGRO 41 1— Soil Fertility Pnnciples , 3 

AGRO 310 — Introduction to Turt Management 3 

AGRO 453— Weed Science 3 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 4 

BOTN 425 — Diseases of Ornamentals and Turf* 2 

ENTM 453 — Insects of Ornamentals and Turf' 3 

HORT 453— Woody Plant Materials 3 

AGRO 41 5— Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

Electives (HORT 160 and RECR 495 suggested) 35 

'BOTN 221 , ENTM 204, and BOTN 212 serve as prerequisites 

Conservation of Soil, Water and Environment Curriculum 

University and Department Requirements 61 

AGRO 417— Soil Physics OR 

AGRO 421— Soil Chemistry 3-4 

AGRO 41 3— Soil and Water Conservation 3 

AGRO 41 1— Soil Fertility Principles 3 

AGRO 414 — Soil Morphology. Genesis and Classification .... 4 

AGRO 41 5— Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

AGRO 423— Soil-Water Pollution 3 

AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Advisor) 5-6 

Select one of the following courses: 3 

BOTN 21 1— Ecology and Mankind 

GEOG 345— Climatology 

AREC 432— Introduction to Natural Resources Policy 
Electives 31-32 

Course Code: AGRO 



AMERICAN STUDIES (AMST) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

2101 South Campus Surge Building, 405-1354 

Associate Professor and Chair: Kelly 

Professors: Caughey, Diner 

Associate Professors: Lounsbury, Mintz, Paoletti, Parks 

Assistant Professor: Sies 

The Major 

American Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of 
American culture and society, past and present, with special attention to 
the ways in which Americans, in different historical or social contexts, 
make sense of their experience. Emphasizing analysis and synthesis of 
diverse cultural products, the major provides valuable preparation for 
graduate training in the professions as well as business, government and 
museum work. Undergraduate majors, with the help of faculty advisors, 
design a program that includes courses offered by the American Studies 
faculty, and sequences of courses in the disciplines usually associated 
with American Studies (i.e., history, literature, sociology, anthropology, 
political science, and others), or pertinent courses grouped thematically 
(e.g., Afro-American studies, women's studies, ethnic studies). 

Requirements for Major 

The major requires forty-five hours, at least twenty-four of which must be 
at the 300-400 level. Of those forty-five hours, twenty-one must be in 
AMST courses, with the remaining twenty-four in two twelve-hour core 
areas outside the regular AMST departmental offerings. No grade lower 
than a C may be applied toward the major. 



AGRONOMY (AGRO) 
College of Agriculture 

1 109 H J Patterson Hall, 405-1306 

Professor and Acting Chair: Weismiller 

Professors: Angle, Aycock. Dernoeden, Fanning, Kenworthy, Mcintosh, 

McKee, Mulchi, Sammonsf. Weil, Weismiller 

Associate Professors: Glenn, Hill, James, Rabenhorst, Ritter, Turner, 

Vough 

Assistant Professors: Carroll, Slaughter 

Adjunct Professors: Lee, Thomas 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Daughtry, Meisinger, Van Berkum 

Ementi: Axley. Bandel, Clark, Decker, Hoyert, Kuhn, Miller 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Major 

Agronomy instruction combines the principles of basic sciences with a 
thorough understanding of plants and soils. This amalgamation of basic 
and applied sciences provides the opportunity for careers involved in 
conserving soil and water resources, improving environmental quality, 
increasing crop production to meet the global need for food, and beauti- 
fying and conserving the urban landscape using turtgrass. 

The agronomy curricula are flexible and allow the student either to 
concentrate on basic science courses that are needed for graduate work 
or to select courses that prepare for employment at the bachelor's degree 
level. Graduates with a bachelor's degree are employed by private 
corporations as environmental soil scientists, golf course managers, 
agribusiness company representatives, or by county, state, or federal 
government as agronomists or extension agents. Students completing 
graduate programs are prepared for research, teaching, and manage- 
ment positions with industry, international agencies, or federal and state 
government. Advising is mandatory. 

Requirements for Major 

Changes in major requirements are under review. Students should check 
with a departmental advisor for updated information. 

Agronomy Curricula. CORE Program Requirements (40 semester 
hours); Math and science requirements (9 hours) are satisfied by depart- 
mental requirements. 

Department Requirements 

(31 semester hours) 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

AGRO 101 — Introductory Crop Science 4 

AGRO 302— Fundamentals of Soil Science 4 

AGRO 398— Senior Seminar 1 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology 1 4 

CHEM 1 03— General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry* .... 4 
MATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics OR 

MATH 1 1 5 — Pre-calculus (consult advisor) 3 

PHYS 1 17— Introduction to Physics OR 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication 

OR SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 3 

'Students intending to take additional chemistry or attend graduate school 
should substitute CHEM 113, followed by CHEM 233 and CHEM 243. 

Crop Science Curriculum 

University and Department Requirements 61 

AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Advisor) 8 

AGRO — Advanced Soils Courses (Consult Advisor) 6 

BIOL 106— General Biology 4 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 4 

One of the following: 3-4 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy (4) 

BOTN 414— Plant Genetics (3) 

BOTN 416— Plant Structure (4) 
Electives 34-35 



72 Animal Sciences 



Distribution of the 45 hours: 

AMST Courses (21 hours required) 

1 . AMST 201 /Introduction to American Studies (3): required of majors. 

2. Three (3) or six (6) hours of additional lower level course work. 

3. AMST 330/Cntics of American Culture (3): required of majors. 

4. Six (6) or nine (9) hours of upper level course work. No more than 
6 hours of a repeatable number may be applied to the major. 
'"Students should take AMST 201 before taking any other AMST 
courses and will complete 330 before taking 400 level courses. 

5. AMST 450/Seminar in American Studies (3): required of majors. 

Core Areas Outside American Studies (24 hours required) 

Majors choose two outside core areas of twelve hours each At least one 
of the cores must be in a discipline traditionally associated with American 
Studies. The other core may be thematic. Upon entering the major, 
students develop a plan of study for the core areas in consultation with an 
advisor: this plan will be kept in the student's file. All cores must be 
approved by an advisor in writing. 

Traditional Discipiinary Cores 

History, Literature. Sociology/Anthropology, Art/Architectural History. 

interdiscipiinary or Thematic Cores 

Afro-American Studies, Women's Studies, Urban Studies, Popular Cul- 
ture, Personality and Culture, Comparative Culture, Material Culture, 
Ethnic Studies, Business and Economic History, Folklore, Government 
and Politics, Education, Philosophy, Journalism. 

Course Code: AMST 



ANIMAL SCIENCES (ANSC) 
College of Agriculture 

1415A Animal Sciences Center, 405-1373 

Department of Animal Sciences 

Chair: Westhoff 

Professors: Mather, Vljay, Westhoff, Erdman, Scares 

Associate Professors: Barao, DeBarthe, Douglass, Hartsock, Majeskie, 

Peters, Russek-Cohen, Stricklin, Varner 

Assistant Professors: Deuel 

Associate Specialist: Curry 

Emeriti: Flyger, Foster, King, Leffel, Mattick, Morris, Vandersall, Williams, 

Young 

Department of Poultry Science 

Rm. 31 13 Animal Science Center, 405-5775 

Chair: Heath (Acting) 

Professors: Heath, Kuenzel, Ottinger, Thomas, Wabeck 

Associate Professors: Doerr, Mench, Murphy 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Hill, Rattner, Sperling, Woods 

The Major 

The curriculum in Animal Sciences offers a broad background in general 
education, basic sciences, and modern agricultural sciences, and the 
opportunity for students to emphasize that phase of animal agriculture in 
which they are specifically interested. The curriculum is intended to 
prepare students for entrance to veterinary schools and graduate schools 
and to prepare students for careers in animal agnculture including 
positions in management and technology associated with animal, dairy, 
or poultry production enterprises: positions with marketing and process- 
ing organizations: and positions in other allied fields such as biotechnol- 
ogy research, pharmaceutical, feed, and equipment firms. 

Requirements for Major 

Curriculum requirements In animal sciences can be completed through 
the Departments of Animal Sciences or Poultry Science. 

Required of All Students 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements' 40 

ANSC 101— Principles ol Animal Science 3 

ANSC 21 1— Animal Anatomy 4 

ANSC 212— Animal Physiology 3 



ANSC 215 — Comparative Animal Nutrition 3 

ANSC 4"— Senior Capstone 3 

BIOL 1 05— Pnnciples ol Biology 1 4 

BIOL 1 06— Principles ol Biology II 4 

BIOL 222— Introductory Genetics 4 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

or 

CHEM 1 13 and CHEM 233 General Chemistry II and Organic 

Chemistry I 

Mathematics: MATH 1 15 or above 3 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics 4 

or 

ENAG 100 — Basic Agricultural Engineering Techniques 3 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics 3 

MICB 200— General Microbology 4 

"Includes sixteen required credits listed t>elow 

All students must complete 23 or 24 credits ol additional course work listed 
under one of the following areas of specialization: 

ANIMAL MANAGEMENT AND INDUSTRY 

AVIAN BUSINESS 

EQUINE STUDIES 

LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT 

SCIENCES 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Each student will be assigned to a faculty advisor 
to assist in planning his or her academic program. For information or 
appointment: 1415A Animal Sciences Center, 405-1373. 

Honors and Awards 

American Society of Animal Sciences Scholastic Recognition and Depart- 
ment of Animal Sciences Scholastic Achievement Awards are presented 
each year at the College of Agriculture Student Awards Convocation. For 
eligibility criteria see ANSC Undergraduate Studies Office, 1 41 5A Animal 
Sciences Center. 

Student Organizations 

ANSC majors are encouraged to participate In one or more of the following 
social/professional student organizations. The Block and Bndle Club. The 
University of Maryland Cavalry, and the Veterinary Science Club. For 
more information see ANSC Undergraduate Studies Office, 141 5A Ani- 
mal Sciences Center. 

Course Code: ANSC 



ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1111 Woods Hall. 405-1423 

Associate Professor and Chair: Whitehead 

Professors: Agar. Chambers, Williams 

Associate Professor: Jackson 

Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair: Stuart 

Assistant Professors: Seldel. Wall 

Lecturers: Kedar, Nagle 

Research Associates: Kaljee (CuSAG), Peterson (CuSAG) 

Affiliate Faculty: Bolles (WMST), Gonzalez (CIDCM)' 

Adjunct Faculty: Potter (National Park Service) 

Joint appointment with unit indicated 
'Distinguished Scholar Teacher 

The Major 

Anthropology, the holistic study ol humanity, seeks to understand humans 
as a whole — as social animals who are capable of symtxslic communica- 
lion through which they produce a nch cultural record — from the very 
beginning of time and all over the world. Anthropologists try to explain 
differences among humans — differences in their physical characlenstics 
as well as in their attitudes, customary behavior, and artifacts. Since 



Applied Mathematics Program 73 



children learn their culture from the preceding generation, who in turn 
learned it from the preceding generation, culture has grown and changed 
through time as the species has spread over the earth. Anthropology is not 
the history of kings and great women or men or of wars and treaties: it is 
the history and the science of the biological evolution of human species, 
and of the cultural evolution of human beings' knowledge and customary 
behavior. 

Anthropology at UMCP offers rigorous training for many career options. 
A strong background in anthropology is a definite asset in preparing for a 
variety of academic and profession fields, ranging from ttie law and 
business, to comparative literature, philosophy and the fine arts. Whether 
one goes on to a Master's or a Ph.D., the anthropology BA prepares one 
for a wide range of non-academic employment, such as city and public 
health planning, development consulting, program evaluation, and public 
archaeology 

Academic Programs and Departmental Facilities 

The Anthropology Department offers beginning and advanced coursework 
in the four pnncipal subdivisions of the discipline; ethnology (also known 
as cultural anthropology), archaeology, biological anthropology, and 
linguistics. Within each area, the department offers some degree of 
specialization and provides a variety of opportunities for research and 
independent study. Laboratory courses are offered in biological anthro- 
pology, archaeology, and ethnographic methods. Field schools are of- 
fered in archaeology and ethnography. The interrelationship of all branches 
of anthropology is emphasized. 

The undergraduate curriculum is closely tied to the department's Master 
in Applied Anthropology (MAA) program; accordingly, preparation for 
non-academic employment upon graduation is a primary educational goal 
of the Department's undergraduate coursework and internship and re- 
search components. 

The Anthropology Department has a total of four laboratories located in 
Woods Hall, which are divided into teaching labs and research labs. The 
department's two archaeology labs, containing materials collected from 
field schools of the past several years, serve both teaching and research 
purposes. The other two laboratories are a teaching laboratory in biologi- 
cal anthropology and the Laboratory for Applied Ethnography and Com- 
munity Action Research. 

All students have access to a twenty-workstation IBM computer laboratory 
located at 1 102 Woods Hall. 

Cultural Systems Analysis Group (CuSAG), a research and program 
development arm of the department, is located in Woods Hall. 

Requirements for Major 

Changes in major requirements are under review. Students should check 
with a departmental advisor for updated information. 

A student who declares a major in anthropology will be awarded a 
Bachelor of Arts degree upon fulfillment of the requirements of the degree 
program. The student must complete at least thirty hours of courses with 
the prefix ANTH with a grade of C or better in each course and eighteen 
hours of supportive courses. The courses are distributed as follows: 

a. Eighteen hours of required courses that must include ANTH 101 , 
102, 397, 401, 451 (or 441), and 371 or 361 (461); 

b. Twelve hours of elective courses in anthropology of which nine 
hours must be at the 300 level or above; 

c. Eighteen hours of supporting courses (courses outside of anthro- 
pology offerings in fields that are complementary to the student's 
specific anthropological interests). Supporting courses are to be 
chosen by the student and approved by a faculty advisor. Quanti- 
tative methods course(s) beyond MATH 1 10 are strongly encour- 
aged, as is foreign language course work. With the advisor's 
endorsement, up to six hours of anthropology courses may be 
counted as "supporting". 

In addition to the above requirements, anthropology majors must meet the 
requirements of the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, as well as 
the requirements of the University's general education program. 

Advising 

Undergraduate advising is coordinated by the Director for Undergraduate 
Studies, Dr. William Stuart, who serves as the Administrative Advisor for 



all undergraduate majors and minors. All maprs are required to meet with 
Dr Stuart at least once per term, at the time of pre-registration. In addition, 
the Anthropology Department encourages students to select an academic 
advisor who will work closely with the student to tailor the program to fit the 
student's particular interests and needs All Anthropology faculty mem- 
bers serve as academic advisors (and should be contacted individually). 
Each major is expected to select an academic advisor and to consult with 
him/her on a regular basis. For additional information, students should 
contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Dr. William Tafl Stuart, 
0100A Woods Hall, 405-1435. 

Honors 

The Anthropology Department also offers an Honors Program that pro- 
vides the student an opportunity to pursue in-depth study of his or her 
interests. Acceptance is contingent upon a 3 5 GPA in anthropology 
courses and a 3.0 overall average. Members of this program areencouraged 
to take as many departmental honors courses (either as HONR or as "H" 
sections of ANTH courses) as possible. The Honors Citation is awarded 
upon completion and review of a thesis (usually based upon at least one 
term of research under the direction of an Anthropology faculty member) 
to be done within the field of anthropology. Details and applications are 
available in the Anthropology Office, or contact your advisor for further 
information. 

Student Organizations 

Anthropology Student Association (ASA). An anthropology student as- 
sociation meets regularly to plan student events and to help coordinate 
various student and faculty activities. Meeting times are posted outside 
0133 Woods Hall. 

The department and the ASA jointly sponsor a public lecture series. 

Course Code: ANTH 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS PROGRAM 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical 
Sciences 

1 104 Mathematics, 405-5062 

Director: Cooper 

Faculty: Over 100 members from 13 units. 

The Applied Mathematics Program is a graduate program in which the 
students combine studies in mathematics and application areas. All MAPL 
courses carry credit in mathematics. An undergraduate program em- 
phasizing applied mathematics is available to majors in mathematics. 
Appropriate courses carry the MATH and STAT prefix, as well as the 
MAPL prefix. 

Course Code: MAPL 



ART (ARH) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

121 1-E Art/Sociology Building. 405-1442 

Associate Professor and Chair; Craig 

Assistant to the Chair: Jacobs 

Undergraduate Director; Ruppert 

Graduate Director; Humphrey 

Professors; DeMonte, Driskell, Lapinski, Pogue, Fabiano 

Associate Professors; Craig, Forbes, Gelman, Kehoe, Klank, Niese, 

Lozner, Richardson, Thorpe 

Assistant Professors: Humphrey, McCarty, Ruppert, Sham 

Emerita: Truittt 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher , 

Undergraduate Secretary: Germash Teferra 

The Major 

An Art Department is a place where ideas become art objects. To 
accomplish this transformation, the art student must articulate and refine 



74 Art History and Archeology 



the concept, and then apply acquired knowledge and skills to the materials 
that comprise the object. 

Human beings have made and embellished objects tor thousands of 
years. In the Twentieth Century, Art Department (acuities and students 
embody this fundamental human inclination and attempt to understand, 
convey, and celebrate it. 

Requirenients for Major 

Along with college and campus-wide general education requirements, the 
student may choose one of two Major Program Options; Program "A" or 
Program "B " 

Program "A" Requirements: (42 Major credits, 12 Supporting Area 
credits) 

ARTT 150 Introduction to Art Theory (3) 

ARTT 100 Elements of Two Dimensional Space and Form (3) 

ARTT 1 1 Elements of Drawing (3) 

ARTT 200 Elements of Three Dimensional Space and Form (3) 

ARTT 210 Elements of Drawing II (3) 

ARTT 320 Elements of Painting (3) 

ARTT 33x Elements of Sculpture (One course from the 330 series) (3) 

ARTT 34x Elements of Printmaking (One course from the 340 series) (3) 

ARTT 418 Advanced Drawing (3) 

ARTT 460 Seminar in An Theory (ARTT 461 may be taken as an 

alternate) (3) 
ARTT XXX 300/400 elective (3) 

ARTH 200 History of Art (Survey I) (3) 
ARTH 201 History of An (Survey II) (3) 
ARTH XXX 300/400 elective (3) 

Supporting Area: Four reiated (not ARTT) courses approved by the 
advisor. Six credits must be taken in one department and must be at 
the 300/400 level. (12) 

Program "B" requirements: (36 Major credits, 12 Supporting Area) 

ARTT 150 Introduction to Art Theory (3) 

ARTT 100 Elements of Two Dimensional Space and Form (3) 

ARTT 1 1 Elements of Drawing I (3) 

ARTT 200 Elements of Three Dimensional Space and Form (3) 

ARTT 210 Elements of Drawing II (3) 

ARTT 320 Elements of Painting (3) 

ARTT 33x Elements of Sculpture (One course from the 330 series) (3) 

ARTT 34x Elements of Pnntmaking (One course from the 340 series) (3) 

ARTT 418 Advanced Drawing (3) 

ARTT 460 Seminar In An Theory (ARTT 461 may be taken as an 

alternate) (3) 
ARTT XXX 300/400 level elective (3) 
ARTT XXX 300/400 level elective (3) 

Supporting Area: 

ARTH 200 History of An (Survey I) (3) 

ARTH 201 History of Art (Survey II) (3) 

ART XXX 300/400 level ARTH or Art Theory elective (3) 

ART XXX 300/400 level ARTH or Art Theory elective (3) 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy Major or 
Supporting Area requirements. 

Advising 

We strongly recommend that the student see his or her advisor each 
semester. The department has four advisors. Students should contact 
the Undergraduate Secretary. Germash Teferra, in the main office for 
specifics. 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Students in the past have worked in a variety of intemship settings. These 
have included assisting professionals complete public commissions, 
commercial or cooperative gallery and exhibition duties, and working in 
professional artists' workshops in the Baltimore and Washington metro- 
politan areas. Additional information is available from the undergraduate 
secretary in the Art Department office. 



Financial Assistance 

The Art Department administers eight Creative and Pertorming Arts 
Scholarships (CAPA's) that are available to freshman and entenng 
transfer students for the Fall semesters. This is a ment based scholarship 
that is awarded on a one-year basis. Additional information is available in 
the main office of the department. 

Honors and Awards 

Our Honors Program is currently being developed. Students interested in 
further information are encouraged to contact Professor Richard Klank at 
405-1463. 

Student Art Exhibit 

Graduating Art Majors have an exhibition in the West Gallery in December 
and in May of each academic year. The James P Wharton Pnze is 
awarded to the outstanding student in these exhibitions The West Gallery 
(1309 Art Sociology Building) is an exhibition space devoted pnmarily to 
showing students' art work, and is administered by undergraduate art 
majors. 

Lecture Program 

The An Department has a lecture program in which artists and critics are 
brought to the campus to explore ideas in contemporary art. A strong 
component of this program is devoted to the art ideas of women and 

minorities. 

Course Code: ARTT 



ART HISTORY AND ARCHEOLOGY (ARTH) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

1 21 1 B Art/Sociology Building, 405-1479 

Professor and Chair: Farquhar 

Professors: Denny, Eyo, Hargrove. Miller. Rearick, Wheelock 
Associate Professors: Kelly, Kuo, Pressly, Spiro, Venit. Withers 
Assistant Professors: Colantuono, Promey, Sandler 

The Major 

A major in the department of Art History and Archeology leads to a 
Bachelor of Arts degree through the study and scholarly interpretation of 
existing works of art, from the prehistonc era to the present. 

The goal of the Art History and Archeology Department is to develop the 
student's aesthetic sensitivity and understanding of art as well as to impart 
a knowledge of the works, the artists, and their place in history In addition 
to courses in European art history and archaeology, the curnculum 
includes courses in African, American, Black Amencan. Chinese. Japa- 
nese, and Pre-Columbian art history and archaeology, all taught by 
specialists in the fields. A 65,000 volume art library and the University's art 
gallery are located in the art building. 

The Art History faculty encourages the development of language skills 
and writing. The program provides a good foundation for graduate study, 
for work in museums and galleries, or for teaching, or for any profession 
in which clear thinking and wnting are required. 

The requirements for a major in Art History and Archaeology are as 
follows: three ARTH courses (9 credits) at the 200 level: seven ARTH 
courses (21 credits) at the 300-400 level: either ARTT 100 or ARTT 110; 
a supporting area compnsed of four courses ( 1 2 credits) m coherently 
related subject matter outside the Art History Department, of which two 
courses must be at the 300-400 level and in a single department Thus, 
there is required a total of 45 credits (30 in ARTH courses, 3 in an ARTT 
course, and 12 in the supporting area) 



Biological Sciences Program 75 



No major credit can be received for ARTH 1 00. 355, 380, 381 or 382. No 
course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major or supporting 
area requirements. Students are encouraged lo explore the diversity of 
geographical and chronological areas offered in the Art History program 

Honors Program: Qualified majors may participate in the departments 
honors program, which requires the completion of 6 credits of ARTH 378 
and 6 credits of ARTH 379. Consult a departmental advisor for details. 

Awards: The Department of Art History and Archeology offers three 
undergraduate awards each year: the J.K Reed Fellowship Award to an 
upper-level major and the George Levitine and Frank OiFederico Book 
Awards lo seniors nearing graduation. 

Course Code: ARTH 



ASTRONOMY (ASTR) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences 

2105 Space Sciences BIdg., 405-3001 

Acting Chair: A'Hearn 

Associate Chair: Trasco 

Professors: A'Hearn. Bell, Blitz. Earl. Harrington. Kundu, Rose. Wentzel, 

Wilson 

Associate Professors: l\/1atthews. Vogel 

Assistant Professors: l^lundy. Stone 

Adjunct' Part-Time Professors: Hauser. Holt. Trimble 

Professors Emeriti: Erickson. Kerr 

Instructors: Deming. Theison 

Associate Research Scientists: Goodrich, Gopalswamy, White 

Assistant Research Scientists: Arnaud, deGeus, Kim, Schaefer 

The Major 

The Astronomy Program offers courses leading to a Bachelor of Science 
in Astronomy as well as a sehes of courses of general interest to non- 
majors. Astronomy majors are given a strong undergraduate preparation 
in astronomy, mathematics and physics. The degree program is designed 
to prepare students for positions in government and industry laboratories 
or for graduate work in astronomy or related fields. A degree in astronomy 
has also proven valuable as preparation for non-astronomical careers. 

Requirements for Major 

Astronomy majors are required to take a two semester introductory 
astrophysics course sequence: ASTR 200. 350 as well as a two semester 
sequence on observational astronomy ASTR 310 (Optical Astronomy) 
and ASTR 41 (Radio Astronomy). Two additional upper level astronomy 
courses are also required. 

Students majoring in astronomy are also required to obtain a good 
background in physics and in mathematics. The normal required sequence 
Is PHYS 1 71 . 272. 273 and the associated labs PHYS 275. 276 and 375. 
With the permission of the advisor. PHYS 161. 262, 263 plus 375 can be 
substituted for this sequence. Astronomy majors are also required to take 
a series of supporting courses in mathematics. These are IVIATH 1 40, 1 41 , 
240 and 241. In addition. fi/IATH 246 is strongly recommended. 

The program requires that a grade of C or better be obtained in all courses. 
Any student who wishes to be recommended for graduate work in 
astronomy must maintain a B average. He or she should also consider 
including several additional advanced courses beyond the minimum 
required, to be selected from astronomy, physics and mathematics. 

Detailed information on typical programs and alternatives to the standard 
program can be found in the pamphlet entitled "Department Requirements 
for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Astronomy" which is available from 
the Astronomy department office. 

Facilities 

The Department of Astronomy has joined with two other universities in 
upgrading and operating an mm wavelength array located at Hat Creek in 
California. Observations can be made remotely from the College Park 
campus. Several undergraduate students have been involved in projects 
associated with this array. The Department also operates a small obser- 



vatory on campus. This is equipped with a CCD camera which is used in 
the observing class. Results obtained at the observatory can be analyzed 
using the department's computer network 

Courses for Non-Science Majors 

There are a vanety of astronomy courses offered for those who are 
interested in learning about the subject but do not wish to major in it These 
courses do not require any background in mathematics or physics and are 
geared especially to the non science major. ASTR 1 1 is a general survey 
course including laboratory work. It briefly covers most of the major topics 
in astronomy. Several 300-level courses are offered primanly lor non- 
science students who want lo learn about a particular field in depth, such 
as the Solar System, Galaxies and the Universe, and Life in the Universe. 
Non-science majors should not normally lake ASTR 200 or ASTR 350. 

Honors 

The Honors Program offers students of exceptional ability and interest in 
astronomy opportunities for part-time research participation which may 
develop into full-time summer projects. An honors seminar is offered for 
advanced students; credit may be given for independent work or study; 
and certain graduate courses are open for credit toward the bachelor's 
degree. Students are accepted into the Honors Program by the 
Department's Honors Committee on the basis of recommendations from 
their advisors and other faculty members. Most honors candidates submit 
a written report on their research project, which together with an oral 
comprehensive examination in the senior year, concludes the program 
which may lead to graduation "with honors (or high honors) in astronomy." 

Further information about advising and the honors program can be 
obtained by calling the Department of Astronomy office at (301 ) 405-3001 . 

Course Code: ASTR 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES PROGRAM 



College of Life Sciences 

1213 Symons. 405-6892 
Director: OIek 

The Major 

The Biological Sciences curriculum is an interdepartmental program 
sponsored by the Departments of Botany. Entomology, Ivficrobiology. and 
Zoology. The program is designed to challenge talented students as they 
explore and develop their interests by completing a common two year 
sequence of courses. Students may then elect to specialize in one of eight 
subjects areas (called "Specialization Areas") or to construct their own 
program under the Biological Sciences Individualized Studies (BIVS) or 
general studies (BGEN) options. The defined Specialization Areas in- 
clude Plant Sciences (PLNT). Entomology (ENTM). Microbiology (MICB), 
Zoology (ZOOL), Cell and Molecular Biology and Genetics (CMBG), 
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior (EEBB). Physiology and 
Neurobiology (PHNB). and Marine Biology (MARB). Students selecting 
one of these areas complete 21 - 24 credits of advanced course wortc in 
the junior and senior years. A complete list of Specialization Area 
requirements is available from the Biological Sciences Program Office 
(301-405-6892). 

The undergraduate curriculum in Biological Sciences at College Park 
emphasizes active learning through student participation in a variety of 
quality classroom and laboratory experiences. The well-equipped teach- 
ing laboratories incorporate modern research technologies to provide 
students with the very best learning environment. The program requires 
supporting course work in chemistry, mathematics and physics, but still 
allows time for exploring other academic disciplines and securing a quality 
general education. 

Each of the participating departments offers research opportunities that 
may be completed either in a faculty member's research laboratory or field 
site or at one of the many nearby research facilities. The National Institutes 
of Health. Patuxent Wildlife Refuge, the National Zoo. and the Chesa- 
peake Bay Laboratory are just a few of the many sites utilized by UMCP 
students. 



76 Botany 

Many of our graduates pursue advanced degrees in masters or doctoral 
programs or by entering medical, denial, or other professional scfiools. 
Some elect to seek employment as skilled technical personnel in govern- 
ment or industry research laboratories. Students emphasizing environ- 
mental biology find careers in fish and w/ildlite programs, zoos and 
museums. Other recent graduates are now science writers, sales repre- 
sentatives for the biotechnology industry, and lawyers specializing In 
environmental and biotechnology related issues. 

Requirements for Major 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements 30 

College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 38-40 

One of the following four courses in organismal diversity: 4 

BOTN 207— Plant Diversity 

ENTM 205 — Principles of Entomology 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

ZOOL 210— Animal Diversity 

BIOL 222— Principles of Genetics 4 

or MICB 380 — Bacterial Genetics for student selecting 
Microbiology as their specialization area. 

Advanced Program 21-24 

Electives 16-19 

A grade of C or better is required for BIOL 1 05, 1 06. the diversity course. 
and BIOL 222 or MICB 380. 

A C average is required for the Biological Sciences supporting courses 
(math, chemistry, and physics). 

Advanced Program 

Students must complete an approved curriculum that includes one course 
in statistics or biochemistry (BCHM 461 . BIOM 301 . BIOM 401 . STAT 400. 
STAT 464. or PSYC 200) and 1 8-21 credits of biological sciences selected 
from the specialization area approved list with at least 14 credits in 
biological sciences courses numbered 300 or above including two labo- 
ratory courses. No 386 credits (experiential learning) will be accepted. A 
grade of C or better is required in all courses within the Advanced 
Program. Courses currently approved for the advanced program include: 
BOTN all courses except BOTN 100. 101. 103, 200, 202, 207, 211 and 
414. 

BCHM461,462. 464. 465. 
CHEM 287. 487. 

ENTM all courses except ENTM 1 00. 1 1 1 . 205. 252. and 303. 
MICB all courses except MICB 100. 200. 322 

ZOOL all courses except ZOOL 181 . 201 . 202. 207. 210. 301 , 323. 346. 
and 381 . See advisor for applicability of ZOOL 328 courses. 

Research experience in the various areas of biology is possible under this 
plan by special arrangement with faculty research advisors and prior 
approval of the Director. Not more than 3 hours of special problems or 
research can be taken as part of the advanced program requirement. All 
advanced program curricula are subject to the approval of the General 
Biological Sciences Program Committee. 

In compliance with the University Studies Program, the following courses 
cannot be used by G.B.S. majors to fulfill USP requirements: EDMS 451 . 
ZOOL 346, 381 , 301 , 323, BCHM 361 , CHEM 374. 

Advising 

Director: OIek (1213 Symons, 405-6892) : Coordinating Advisors: Armstrong 
(2309 Symons, 405-3925). Barnett (3214 H.J. Patterson. 405-1597). 
Presson (2227 Zoology-Psychology, 405-6904). Smith (2107 Microbiol- 
ogy. 405-2107). 

Honors 

The Honors Programs within participating departments offer exceptional 
opportunities for talented and promising students, emphasizing the schol- 
arly approach to independent study. Information about these honors 
programs may be obtained from the Director. 



Student Honor Societies 

Phi Sigma Biological Honor Society. Contact the Biology Program Office 
(301-405-6892). Sigma Alpha Omicron Microbiological Honor Society. 
Contact the Department of Microbiology (301-405-5435). 

Course Code: BIOL 



BOTANY (BOTN) 
College of Life Sciences 

H.J. Patterson Hall. 405-1597 

Professor and Chair: Teramura 

Distinguished Professor: Diener 

Professors: Bean, Gantt, Kantzes, Krusberg, Kung, Lockard, Patterson, 

Reveal, Sisler, Steiner, Sze 

Associate Professors: Barnett, Bottino, Cooke, Forseth, Grybauskas, 

Hutcheson, Motta, Racusen, Wolniak 

Assistant Professors: Dudash, Fenster, Straney, Watson 

Lecturer: Berg 

Instructors: Browning, Koines 

Emeriti: Brown. Sisler. Sorokin 

This specialization area is designed with a diverse range of career 
possibilities for students in botany or plant biology. The department offers 
instruction in the fields of physiology, pathology, ecology, taxonomy, 
anatomy-morphology, genetics, mycology, nematology, virology, and 
general botany. 

Requirements for Specialization 

See Biological Sciences in this catalog and Botany advisor for specific 
program requirements. 

Advising 

Academic advising is mandatory. Contact the Botany Coordinating Advi- 
sor, Dr. Neal Barnett. 3214 H.J. Patterson. 405-1597. 

Honors 

The Botany Department offers a special program for exceptionally tal- 
ented and promising students through the Honors Program, which em- 
phasizes the scholarly approach to independent study. Information con- 
cerning this program may be obtained from the academic advisors. 

Course Code: BOTN 



BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT, GENERAL 

For information, consult the College ot Business and Management entry. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (ENCH) 
College of Engineering 

2113 Chemical and Nuclear Engineenng BIdg . 405-1938 

Acting Chair: Calabrese 

Undergraduate Director: Weigand 

Professors: Gentry. McAvoy. Regan. Sengers*. Smith, Weigand 

Associate Professors: Calabrese, Choi, Gasner. Ranade", 2Iafihou 

Assistant Professors: Benlley. Mavrovouniotis. Wang 

Emeritus: Beckmann 

"Member of Institute for Physical Sciences and Technotogy 

"Adjunct 



Chemistry and Biochemistry 77 



The Major 

The Chemical Engineering Department offers a general program in 
chemical engineering In addition, study programs in the specialty areas 
of applied polymer science, biochemical engineering, and process engi- 
neering are available. The latter programs are Interdisciplinary with other 
departments at the university. The departmental programs prepare an 
undergraduate tor graduate study or immediate industrial employment 
following the baccalaureate degree 

Because of this wide range o( ultimate applications, the chemical engineer 
finds interesting and diverse career opportunities in such varied fields as 
chemical (inorganic and organic), food processing and manutactunng, 
metallurgical, polymer, energy conversion, petroleum (redning, produc- 
tion, or petrochemical), and pharmaceutical industries. Additional oppor- 
tunities are presented by the research and development activities of many 
public and private research institutes and allied agencies. 

Requirements for Major 

The curriculum is composed ot: (1) the required CORE (general educa- 
tion) requirements ol College Park: (2) a core of mathematics, physics, 
chemistry, and engineering sciences required of all engineering students; 
(3) the required core of 34 credits ol ENCH courses which includes ENCH 
215, 250, 300. 333, 422, 424, 426, 437, 440, 442, 444, and 446; (4) nine 
credits ot ENCH electives. A sample program follows: 

Freshman Year: The freshman year is the same for all Engineering 
departments. Please consult the College of Engineering entry. 

Semester 

I II 

Sophomore Year 

MATH 241— Calculus III 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations for Scientists 

and Engineers 3 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 230 — Intro, to Materials and Their Applications 3 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II 4 

ENCH 215— Chem. Engr. Analysis 3 

ENCH 250— Computer Methods in Chem. Engr 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 

Total 18 17 

Junior Year 

ENCH 300 — Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

ENCH 440 — Chemical Engineering Kinetics 3 

ENCH 442 — Chemical Engr. Systems Analysis 3 

CHEM481,482— Physical Chemistry I, II 3 3 

CHEM 483— Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 2 

ENCH 422— Transport Processes I 3 

ENCH 424 — Transport Processes II 3 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 

(Recommended) 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 6 

Total 17 18 

Senior Year 

ENCH 437— Chemical Engineering Lab 3 

ENCH 444 — Process Engr. Economics and Design I 3 

ENCH 446 — Process Engr. Economics and Design II 3 

ENCH 333— Seminar 1 

ENCH 426— Transport Processes III 

Technical Electives" 3 6 

CORE Program Requirements 3 6 

Total 15 16 

Minimum Degree Credits: 120 credits and fulfillment of all department, 

college, and university requirements. 

'Qualified students may elect to take CHEM 105 and 1 15 (4 sem. hrs. 

each) instead of CHEM 103 and 113. 

"Students must consult with an advisor on selection of appropriate 

courses for their particular course of study. 

Technical Electives Guidelines 



Additional guidelines are as follows: 

Technical electives will normally be chosen from the list given Up)on the 
approval of your advisor and wntten permission of the department, a 
limited amount ol substitution may be permitted. Substitutes, including 
ENCH 468 Research (1-3 cr), must fit into an overall plan of study 
emphasis and ensure that the plan fulfills accreditation design requirements. 

Technical Electives: 

Biochemical Engineering 

ENCH 482— Biochemical Engineering (3) 

ENCH 485 — Biochemical Engineenng Laboratory (3), recommended 

only if ENCH 482 is taken. 

Polymers 

ENCH 490— Introduction to Polymer Science (3) 

ENCH 492— Applied Physical Chemistry of Polymers (3) 

ENCH 494 — Polymer Technology Laboratory (3) . Recommended if ENCH 

490 or 492 is taken. 

Chemical Processing 

ENCH 450— Chemical Process Development (3) 

Process Analysis and Optimization 

ENCH 452 —Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis (3) 
ENCH 453 — Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering (3) 
ENCH 454 — Chemical Process Analysis and Optimization (3) 

Admission 

All Chemical Engineering majors must meet admission, progress and 
retention standards of the College of Engineering. 



Advising 

All students choosing Chemical Engineering as their primary field must 
see an undergraduate advisor each semester. Appointments for advising 
can be made at 21 13 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building, 405- 
1914. 

Co-op Program 

The Chemical Engineering program works within the College of Engineer- 
ing Cooperative Engineering Education Program. For information on this 
program consult the College ol Engineering entry in this catalog or call 
405-3863. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid based upon need is available through the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. A number of scholarships are available through the College 
of Engineering. Part-time employment is available in the department. 

Honors and Awards 

Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship and outstanding 
service to the department, college and university. These awards include 
the David Arthur Berman Memorial Award, the Engineering Society of 
Baltimore Award, and the American Institute of Chemists Award for the 
outstanding senior in chemical engineering. AlChE awards are given to 
the junior with the highest cumulative GPA as well as to the outstanding 
junior and outstanding senior in chemical engineering. 

Student Organization 

Students operate a campus student chapter of the professional organi- 
zation, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. 

Course Code: ENCH 



Nine credits of technical electives are required. It is recommended that 
they be taken during the senior year. 



78 Civil Engineering 



CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (CHEM, BCHM) 
College of Life Sciences 

1320 Chemistry Building. 405-1788 

Student Information: 1309 Chemistry Building, 405-1791 

Professor and Chair: Greer 

Associate Chair: DeShong 

Director. Undergraduate Programs: Harwood 

Professors: Alexander. Ammon. Armstrong. Bellama. DeShong, Dunaway- 

Mariano, Freeman. Gerll. Greer, Grim, Hansen. Helz. Huheey. Jarvist. 

Khanna. Kozarich. Mariano, Mazzocchi. Mignereyt. G. Miller. Moore. 

Munn. O'Haver, Ponnamperuma. Stewart. Tossell. Walters. Weiner 

Associate Professors: Boyd. DeVoe. Herndon. Kasler. Murphy, Ondov, 

Poll. Sampugna. Thirumalai 

Assistant Professors: Eichhorn, Falvey, Julin, C. Miller. Pilato. Ruett- 

Robey. Woodson 

Emeriti: Castellan. Henery-Logan, Holmlund, Jaquith. Keeney. McNesby. 

Pratt. Rollinson. Sturtz. Svirbely. Vanderslice, Veitch 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Majors 

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers the B.S. degree in 
both Chemistry and Biochemistry. Either curriculum is designed to pre- 
pare major students for entering graduate school, for career opportunities 
in chemical and pharmaceutical industries, for basic research positions in 
government and academic laboratories, or to attend professional schools. 

Requirements for Chemistry Major 

Beginning Fall 1 991 , majors in Chemistry or Biochemistry should take the 
new sequence CHEM 143-153, General Chemistry for Majors. Transfer 
students or students changing to the major after the freshman year will 
take a three-course sequence: CHEM 103.1 13.227. 

The major in chemistry requires forty-one credits in chemistry, of which 
eighteen are lower-level and twenty-three are upper-level. Six credits of 
the twenty-three upper-level requirements must be selected from approved 
chemistry courses. The program is designed to provide the maximum 
amount of flexibility to students seeking preparation for either the tradi- 
tional branches of chemistry or the interdisciplinary fields. In order to meet 
requirements for a degree to be certified by the American Chemical 
Society, students must select one laboratory course from their upper level 
chemistry electives. 

A sample program, listing only the required or recommended courses, is 
given below. It is expected that each semester's electives will include 
courses intended to satisfy the general requirements of the University or 
of the College of Life Sciences, plus others of the student's choice. 

Each required chemistry course must be passed with a minimum grade of 
C. Required supporting courses must be passed with a C average 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

CORE Requirements 29 

College of Life Sciences Core Requirements 20 

Departmental Requirements 41 

CHEM 481— Physical Chemistry I 3 

CHEM 483— Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1 2 

CHEM 482— Physical Chemistry II 3 

CHEM 484— Physical Chemistry Laboratory II 2 

CHEM 401— Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHEM 425— Instrumental Analysis 3 

400 — Level Chemistry courses 6 

Electives 30 

Total 120 

Requirements for Biochemistry Major 

The department also offers a major in biochemistry. In addition to the 
eighteen credits of lower-level chemistry, the program requires BCHM 
46 1 . 462. and 464 : CHEM 48 1 . 482 and 483 ; MATH 1 40 and 1 4 1 ; PH YS 
141 and 142. and six credits of approved biological science that must 
include at least one upper-level course. 

A sample program, listing only the required courses, is given t>elow. It is 
expected that each semester's electives will Include courses Intended to 



satisfy the general requirements of the university or of the College of Life 
Sciences, plus others of the student's choice. 

Each required chemistry and biochemistry course must be passed with a 
minimum grade of C. Required supporting courses must be passed with 
a C average 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Requirements 29 

College of Lite Sciences Core Requirements 20 

Departmental Requirements 45-46 

Approved Biological Science Elective 4 

CHEM 481— Physical Chemistry I 3 

CHEM 483— Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 2 

CHEM 482— Physical Chemistry II 3 

CHEM 425— Instrumental Analysis 3 

BCHM 461— Biochemistry I 3 

BCHM 462— Biochemistry II 3 

BCHM 464— Biochemistry Laboratory II 2 

Approved Upper-level Biological Science 3-4 

Electives 26 

Total 120-121 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Appointments for advising can be made by 
contacting the secretary in the Office of Undergraduate Studies, 1309 
Chemistry Building. 405-1791. 

Financial Assistance 

Two scholarships are available for maprs: The Isidore and Annie AdIer 
Scholarship of $500 to an outstanding major with financial need and tfie 
Leidy Foundation Scholarship of $600 to two outstanding junior majors 
No application is necessary as all majors are automatically reviewed by 
the Awards Committee. 

Honors and Awards 

In the senior year, CHEM 398, Special Problems for Honor Students, is an 
opportunity for students with a GPA of 3.0 or better to conduct honors 
research. Students must have completed one year of CHEM or BCHM 
399, Undergraduate Research, to be considered for Departmental Hon- 
ors as Seniors. Dr. Harwood (1309 Chemistry Building. 405-1791) is the 
coordinator. After successful completion of a senior thesis and seminar, 
graduation "with honors" or "with high honors" in Chemistry can be 
attained. 

Student Organizations 

Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Fraternity is a professional co-ed fraternity 
which recruits members from Chemistry. Biochemistry, and related sci- 
ence majors during each fall and spnng semester Memt)ers must have 
completed 1 year of General Chemistry and are expected to complete a 
minimum of 4 semesters of Chemistry. The fraternity, which averages 50 
members, holds weekly meetings and provides tutonng once a week for 
students in lower division chemistry courses The office is 1 403 Chemistry 
Building. Dr. Boyd (1206 Chemistry Building. 405-1805) is the faculty 
moderator 

Course Codes: CHEM. BCHM 



CIVIL ENGINEERING (ENCE) 
College of Engineering 

1173D Engineenng Classroom Building, 405-1974 

Chair: Colville 

Professors: Aggour, Albrecht, BirVner, Carter. Donaldson. Maloney, 

McCuen. Ragan. Schellmg. Sterntjerg. Vannoy. Witczak. Wolde-Tinsae 

Associate Professors: Ayyub, L. Chang. P. Chang. Goodings. Hao. 

Scf>onfeld. Schwartz 

Assistant Professors: Austin, Davis. Flood. Haghani. Johnson. Kartam. 

Sircar (Affiliate) 

Senior Research Associate: Rib 



Classics 79 



The Major 

Civil Engineering is a people-serving profession, concerned with the 
planning, design, construction and operation ot large, complex systems 
such as buildings and bridges, water punfication and distnbution systems, 
highways, rapid transit and rail systems, ports and harbors, airports, 
tunnels and underground construction, dams, power generating systems 
and structural components ot aircraft and ships Civil engineenng also 
includes urban and city planning, water and land pollution and treatment 
problems, and disposal of hazardous wastes and chemicals The design 
and construction of these systems are only pari of the many challenges 
and opportunities faced by civil engineers. The recent revolution in 
computers, communications and data management has provided new 
resources that are widely used by the professional civil engineer in 
providing safe, economical and functional facilities to serve our society. 

Requirements for Major 

At both the undergraduate and graduate levels, the department offers 
programs of study in all six major areas of specialization in civil engineer- 
ing: construction engineenng and management, environmental engineer- 
ing, geotechnical engineenng, structural engineenng, transportation en- 
gineenng, and water resources and remote sensing. A total of 132 credit 
hours is required for a Bachelor's degree with emphasis in basic science 
(mathematics, chemistry and physics), engineenng science (mechanics 
of matenals. statics and dynamics), basic civil engineering core courses, 
and sixteen credits of technical electives that may be selected from a 
combination of the six areas of civil engineering specialization. The 
curriculum provides a sensible blend of required courses and electives. 
which permits students to pursue their interests without the risk of 
overspecialization. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

Sophomore Year 

Math 241— Calculus III 4 

Math 246— Differential Equations for Scientists 

and Engineers 3 

PHYS 262. 263— General Physics II. Ill 4 4 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 4 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENCE 201 — Computational Methods in Civil Engineering 1 . 3 

ENCE 255 — Elementary Structural Analysis 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Total 18 16 

Junior Year 

ENCE 300 — Fundamentals of Engineering Materials 3 

ENCE 301— Computational Methods in Civil 

Engineering II 3 

ENCE 315 — Introduction to Environmental Engineering 3 

ENCE 320 — Construction Engineering and Management ... 3 

ENCE 321 — Engineenng Survey Measurements 1 

ENCE 330— Basic Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENCE 340 — Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics 3 

ENCE 355 — Elementary Structural Design 3 

ENCE 370 — Fundamentals of Transportation Engineering . 3 

ENME 320 — Thermodynamics 3 

ENGL 393— Technical Writing 3 

CORE Program Requirements 3 

Total 18 16 

Senior Year 

ENCE Technical Electives (Group A. B, C, D, E, or F)* 7 3 

ENCE Technical Electives' 3 3 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

ENCE 466 — Design of Civil Engineering Systems 3 

CORE Program Requirements 6 3 

Total 16 15 

Minimum Degree Requirements: 120 credits and the fulfillment of all 
department, college and university requirements. 
* See notes concerning Technical Electives. 

Additional semester credits will be involved to the extent that courses 
carrying more than three credits are selected. 



Notes Concerning Technical Electives in Civil Engineering 

A minimum of 1 6 credit hours of technical electives are required as follows: 

(1) All 3 courses from one area of specialization A, 8, C, D. E or F. 

(2) Two other courses from the entire technical elective list. 

Technical Elective Groups: 

A. Structures: ENCE 453 (4); 454 (3): 455 (3). 

B. Water Resources: ENCE 430 (4); 431 (3): 432 (3). 
C Environmental: ENCE 433 (3); 435 (4); 436 (3) 

D. Transportation: ENCE 470 (4); 473 (3): 474 (3). 

E. Geotechnical: ENCE 440 (4); 441 (3); 442 (3). 

F Construction Engineering Management: ENCE 420 (3); 423 (4); 

425 (3). 
G. Support Courses: ENCE 410 (3); 462 (3): 463 (3): 464 (3): 465 (3); 

489(1-3). 

Admission/Advising 

See College of Engineering entrance requirements. 

All students are assigned a faculty advisor who assists in course selection 
and scheduling throughout the student's entire undergraduate program. 
For advising contact Dr. Birkner. 405-1 948, 1 1 72 Engineering Classroom 
Building. 

Fleldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Several excellent co-op opportunities are available for Civil Engineering 
students. See the College of Engineering entry in this catalog for a full 
description of the Engineering co-op program, or contact Heidi Sauber. 
405-3863. 

Financial Assistance 

The Department of Civil Engineering awards a number of academic 
scholarships. These awards are designated primarily for junior and senior 
students. A department scholarship committee solicits and evaluates 
applications each year. 

Honors and Awards 

See College of Engineering Honors Program. The Department of Civil 
Engineering offers the following awards: 1) The Civil Engineering Out- 
standing Senior Award: 2) The ASCE Outstanding Senior Award: 3) The 
Woodward-Clyde Consultants Award: 4) The Bechtel Award: 5) The Chi 
Epsilon Outstanding Senior Award: 6) The Ben Dyer Award: 7) The ASCE 
Maryland Section Award: and 8) The Department Chairman's Award. 

Student Organizations 

Student organizations include the American Society of Civil Engineers 
Student Chapter which is open to all civil engineenng students. The Civil 
Engineering Honor Society, Chi Epsilon, elects members semi-annually. 
Information on membership and eligibility for these student organizations 
may be obtained from the president of each society, 0401 Engineenng 
Classroom Building, 

Course Code: ENCE 



CLASSICS (CLAS) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

4220 Jimenez, 405-2014 

Professor and Chair: Duffy 

Associate Professors: Hallett, Lee, Staley 

Assistant Professors: Doherty, Stehle 



80 Computer Science 



The Major 

Classics is the study of the languages, literature, culture and thought of 
ancient Greece and Rome. Students at the University of Maryland at 
College Park may major in Classical Languages and Literatures with four 
options and may enroll in a variety of courses on the classical w^orld. These 
options include Latin. Greek. Greek and Latin, and Classics in Translation. 

Requirements for Major 

Option A: Latin 

Thirty credits of Latin at the 200-level or higher, at least twelve of which 
must be at the 400-level or higher, plus nine credits of supporting courses 
(for example. CLAS 1 70. HIST 1 30. and one 300- or 400-levels course in 
Roman history). 

Option B: Greek 

Thirty credits of Greek at the 200-level or higher, at least twelve of which 
must be at the 400-level or higher, plus nine hours of supporting courses 
(for example. CLAS 170. HIST 130, and a 300- or 400-level course in 
Greek history). 

Option C: Greek and Latin 

Thirty credits of either Greek or Latin and twelve hours of the other 
classical language, plus nine hours of supporting courses(for example, 
CLAS 1 70, HIST 1 30, and a 300- or 400-level course in Greek or Roman 
history). Students with no previous training in the second language may 
count introductory level courses as part of the twelve hour requirement. 

Option D: Classics in Translation (Classical Humanities) 

Eighteen credits in CLAS courses including CLAS 100 (Classical Foun- 
dations) and a senior seminar or thesis; twelve credits in Greek or Latin 
courses; twelve credits in supporting courses (normally in Art History. 
Archaeology. Architecture. Government. History. Linguistics or Philoso- 
phy). Note: CLAS 280 and CLAS 290 do not count toward this degree; 
300- and 400-level courses in LATN and GREK may. with permission, be 
included among the eighteen required hours in CLAS. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e.. 101. 102. 
201. 202. etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level language 
acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be taken for credit. 

Course Codes: CLAS, GREK, LATN 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE PROGRAM (CMLT) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

2107 South Campus Surge BIdg.. 405-2853 

Core Faculty 

Professor and Director: Lanser 
Professors: Fuegi. Kolker. Lifton 
Associate Professors: Marchetti. C. Peterson 
Instructors: Gilcher. E. Robinson 

Affiliate Faculty 

Professors: Agar. Alford. E. Beck. Berlin. R. Brown, Chambers. Cond6. 

Coogan. Cross. Diner. Fink. Frederiksen. Gillespie. Handelman. Herndon, 

Holton. Kautfman. Pearson. Therrien. Trousdale 

Associate Professors: Auchard. Barry. Bedos-Rezak, Bilik. Bolles. Brami. 

J. Brown. P. Butler. Caramello. Cottenet-Hage. Donawerth. Fahnestock. 

Falvo. Flieger. Grossman. Hallett, Igel. Kelly. Leinwand. Mintz. Mossman. 

Norman. Phaf. C. Robertson. Strauch 

Assistant Professors: Coustaut. Doherty. Greene-Gantzberg. King, 

Rabasa. Ray, Richter, Upton. Wang, Yee 

The Major 

Undergraduates may emphasize comparative studies in literature, cul- 
ture, film and media studies as they work toward a degree in a department 
associated with the Comparative Literature Program Each student will be 
formally advised by the faculty of the "home" department in consultation 
with the Director of the Comparative Literature Program. 

Students emphasizing comparative literature are expected to develop a 
high degree of competence in at least one foreign language. 

Course Code: CMLT 



COMPUTER SCIENCE (CMSC) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences 

1103 A. V. Williams Building, 405-2672 

Professor and Chair: Tripathi 

Professors: Agrawala, Basili, Davis. Gannon. Kanal. Miller. Minker. O'Leary. 

Rosenfeld. Roussopoulos. Samet. Shneiderman, Stewart, Zelkowitz 

Associate Professors: Aloimonos, Austing. Elman, Faloutsos. Gasarch, 

Hendler. Kruskal. Mount, Nau. Perils. Purtilo. Ricart* (Computer Science 

Center). Reggia. Sellis. Shankar. Smith 

Assistant Professors: Anderson. Dorr. Gerber. Khuller, Porter, Pugh. 

Salem. Subrahmanian 

Instructor: Kaye 

Professors Emeriti: Atchison. Chu, Edmundson 

■Jointly with unit indicated. 

The Major 

Computer science is the study of computers and computational systems: tfietr 
theory, design, development, and application. Pnncipal areas within computer 
science include artificial intelligence, computer systems, datatase systems, 
human factors, numencal analysis, programming languages, software engi- 
neering, and theory of computing Computer science incorporates corx:8pts 
from mathematics, engineering, and psychotogy. 

A computer scientist is concerned with problem solving. Problems range 
from abstract (determining what problems can be solved with computers 
and the complexity of the algorithms that solve them) to practical (design 
of computer systems easy for people to use). Computer scientists build 
computational models of systems including physical phenomena (weather 
forecasting), human behavior (expert systems, robiotics). and computer 
systems themselves (performance evaluation). Such models often re- 
quire extensive numenc or symbolic computation. 

Requirements for Major 

Changes in major requirements are under review. Students should check 
with a departmental advisor for updated information. 

The course of study for a Computer Science major must satisfy all of the 

following requirements: 

1 . A grade of C or tjetter in the following courses: 

a. CMSC 1 1 2 or an acceptable score on the Advanced Placement 
exam or the Department's CMSC 112 exemption exam. 

b. CMSC 1 50 or an acceptable score on the Department's CMSC 
150 exemption exam. 

c. CMSC 113 

d. At least 24 credit hours at the 300-400 levels, including CMSC 
31 1, CMSC 330 and at least 15 credit hours of the following 
CMSC courses: 

Computer Systems: 411; 412: 

Information Processing: 420: one of 421, 424, or 426; 

Software Engineenng/Programming Languages: 430; 435: 

Theory of Computation: 451 ; 452; 

Numerical Analysis: one of 460 or 466; 467. 

Note : CMSC 421. 451. and 452 require CMSC 251 as an 

additional prerequisite. Courses in Numencal Analysis require 

MATH 240 or 241 as additional prerequisites Students without 

either of these prerequisites must choose their 1 5 credits hours 

from the remaining courses in the other three areas. 



MATH 1 40 and 1 41 (or Math 250. Math 251 ). A STAT course which 
has MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course) as a 
prerequisite, and one other MATH. STAT, or MAPL course which 
as MATH 141 (or a more advanced mathematics course) as a 
prerequisite. A grade of C or better must be earned in each of the 
courses. No course that is cross-listed as CMSC may be counted 
in this requirement. 

A minimum of 1 2 additional credit hours of 300-400 level courses 
in one discipline outside of comfjuter saence with an average 
grade of C or t>etter. No course that is cross-listed as CMSC may 
be counted in this requirement 



Criminology and Criminal Justice 81 



Computer Science majors should take CMSC 1 50 and CMSC 11 3 in their 
first year. These courses emphasize the use of formal techniques in 
computer science: grammars, discrete mathematics, functional seman- 
tics, and program correctness. 

Advising 

Computer science majors may obtain advising at room 1103 A.V. Wil- 
liams. Interested students should call (301) 405-2672 to receive further 
information atxjut the program. 

Financial Assistance 

There are opportunities tor student employment as a tutor or as a member 
of the department's laboratory staff Professors may also have funds to 
hire undergraduates to assist in research, tvlany students also participate 
in internship or cooperative education programs, working in the computer 
industry for a semester during their junior or senior years. 

Honors 

A departmental honors program provides an opportunity for outstanding 
undergraduates to take graduate level courses or to begin scholarly 
research in Independent study with a faculty member. Students are 
accepted Into the program after their sophomore year based on their 
academic performance. 

Student Organizations 

Computer-related extracurricular activities are arranged by our student 
chapter of the ACM, the professional group for computer scientists and by 
the Mlnonty Computer Science Society. Ivleetings Include technical lec- 
tures and career information. The department also participates In the 
programming contest run by the national ACI^, and our teams have been 
very successful in this competition. 

Course Code: CIvISC 



COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICES 
(EDCP) 

College of Education 

3214 Benjamin Building, 405-2858 

Professor and Chair: Rosenfield 

Professors: Birk, Byrne (Emeritus). Hershenson, Magoon (Emeritus), 
Marx, Power, Pumroy (Emeritus), Schlossberg, Sedlacek 
Associate Professors: Boyd. Greenberg, Hoffman, Krelser (Affiliate), 
Lawrence, McEwen, Medvene (Affiliate). Scales (Affiliate). Strein, Teglasi, 
Westbrook (Affiliate) 

Assistant Professors: Bagwell (Affiliate), Clement (Affiliate), Cook, Cuyjet 
(Affiliate). Fasslnger. Freeman (Affiliate), Gast (Affiliate), Hrutka (Affili- 
ate). Jacoby (Affiliate), Kandell. Komlves. Lucas. MIeIke (Affiliate). Osteen 
(Affiliate). Otani (Affiliate). Phillips, Schmidt (Affiliate), Stewart (Affiliate), 
Stimpson (Affiliate), Thomas (Affiliate) 

The Department of Counseling and Personnel Services offers programs 
of preparation at the Master's degree, advanced graduate specialist, and 
doctoral degree levels for counselors In elementary and secondary 
schools, rehabilitation agencies, community agencies, business and 
Industry, and college and university counseling centers. Additional gradu- 
ate programs of preparation are provided for college student personnel 
administrators and school psychologists. The department also offers a 
joint doctoral program with the Department of Psychology in counseling 
psychology. 

While the department does not have an undergraduate major, it does offer 
a number of courses which are open to undergraduates and are sug- 
gested for students considering graduate work In counseling or other 
human service fields. 



CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CCJS) 
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

LeFrak Hall, 405-4699 

Director and Professor: Wellford 

Professors: Loftln. McDowall. Paternoster'. Sherman, Smith 

Associate Professors: Gottfredson, Ingraham. Maida 

Assistant Professor: Simpson 

Lecturers: Brooks, Mauriello 

Professor Emeritus: Lejins' (Sociology) 

'Distinguished Scholar-Teacher. 
'Joint Appointment with unit indicated. 

The purpose of the Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology is to 
provide an organization and administrative basis for the interests and 
activities of the university. Its faculty and students In the areas usually 
designated as criminal justice, criminology, and corrections. The institute 
promotes study and teaching concerning the problems of crime and 
delinquency by offering and coordinating academic programs in the areas 
of criminal justice, criminology, and corrections; managing research In 
these areas; and conducting demonstration projects. The Institute spon- 
sors the annual Alden Miller Lecture, the Criminal Justice Student Asso- 
ciation, Alpha Phi Sigma, and an annual job fair. The Institute comprises 
as Its component parts: 

1 . The Criminology and Criminal Justice Program leading to a Bach- 
elor of Arts degree. 

2. Graduate Program offering M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Criminology 
and Criminal Justice. 

The Criminology and Criminal Justice Major 

The major In criminology and criminal justice comprises thirty hours of 
coursework In Criminology and Criminal Justice. Eighteen (18) hours of 
supporting sequence selected from a list of social and behavioral science 
courses (list is available In the Institute) are required. No grade lower than 
a C may be used toward the major. An average of C Is required In the 
supporting sequence. Nine hours of the supporting sequence must be at 
the 300/400 level. In addition an approved course In social statistics must 
be completed with a grade of C or better. 

Semester 
Major Requirements Credit Hours 

CCJS100: Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

CCJS105: Cnmlnology 3 

CCJS230: Criminal Law In Action 3 

CCJS300: Criminological and Criminal Justice Research 

Methods 3 

CCJS340: Concepts of Law Enforcement Administration 3 

CCJS350: Juvenile Delinquency 3 

CCJS 451 , 452. or 454 3 

CCJS Electlves (3) 9 

Total 30 

Supporting Sequence Credit Houcs 

18 hours (9 hours at 300/400) 18 

Social Science Statistics 3 

Total for Major and Supporting 51 

Electlves for CCJS Majors (all courses are 3 credits): 
CCJS234, CCJS320, CCJS330, CCJS331. CCJS352, CCJS357, 
CCJS359, CCJS360, CCJS398, CCJS399. CCJS400, CCJS432, 
CCJS444, CCJS450, CCJS451, CCJS452. CCJS453, CCJS454, 
CCJS455, CCJS456, CCJS457, CCJS461 . CCJS462. and CCJS498. 

Internships 

Internships are available through CCJS398 and CCJS359 in a variety of 
federal, state, local, and private agencies. 



Course Code: EDCP 



82 Curriculum and Instruction 



Honors 

Each semester the Institute selects the outstanding graduating senior for 
the Peter P. Lejins award. 

The Honors Program provides superior students the opportunity for 
advanced study in both a seminarformat and independent study under the 
direction of the faculty. The Honors Program is a three-semester (nine- 
credit hour) sequence that a student begins in the spring semester, three 
or four semesters prior to graduation. CCJS388H. the first course in the 
sequence, is offered only during the spring semester. The second and 
third courses in the sequence consist of a year-long research project (six 
credits, three each semester) or an honors thesis (one semester, three 
credits) followed by a graduate seminar in the institute (one semester, 
three credits). Honors students may count their Honors courses toward 
satisfaction on the basic 30-hour requirement. Requirements for admis- 
sion to the Honors Program include a cumulative grade-point average of 
at least 3.25. no grade lower than B for any criminology and criminal justice 
course, and evidence of satisfactory writing ability. 

Advising 

All majors are strongly encouraged to see an advisor at least once each 
semester. Call 405-4699. 

Course Code: CCJS 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (EDCI) 
College of Education 

2311 Benjamin Building. 405-3324 

Professor and Chair: Howe 

Professors: Davey. Fein. Fey* (l^athematics). Folstrom' (Music). Gambrell. 
Holliday. Jantz. Johnson. Layman* (Physics). Rodenck, Saracho 
Associate Professors: Afflerbach. Amershek, Beatty. P. Campbell, 
Cirrincione* (History/Geography), Craig. Davidson, DeLorenzo, Dreher, 
Graeber, Gentzler. Heidelbach. Klein. IvlcCaleb' (Theatre). t^cWhinnie. 
Slater. Stough. Sullivan 

Assistant Professors: Carey. Grant. f^cAlister. O'Flahaven, Owens* (Physi- 
cal Education), Van Sledright. Wong 

Emeriti: Blough. Carr. Dutfey. Leeper. Risinger, Schindler, Stant. Weaver, 
Wilson 

'Joint Appointment with unit indicated 

The Major 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers three undergraduate 
curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree: 

1 . Early Childhood Education: for the preparation of teachers in pre- 
school, kindergarten, and grades 1-3 

2. Elementary Education : for the preparation of teachers of grades 1 • 
Sand 

3. Secondary Education: for the preparation of teachers in various 
subject areas for teaching in middle schools and secondary schools, 
grades 7-12. The subject areas include art, English, foreign lan- 
guage, mathematics, music, science. speech/English, social 
studies, and theatre/English. 

Graduates of the Early Childhood. Elementary or Secondary Education 
programs meet the requirements for certification in the District of Colum- 
bia, f^aryland and most other states. 

Requirements for Major Including Program Options 

All Teacher Education Programs have designated pre-professional courses 
and a specified sequence of professional courses. Before students may 
enroll in courses identified as part of the professional sequence, they must 
first gain admission to the College of Education's Teacher Education 
Program. 

Admission 

Application for admission to the Teacher Education Professional Program 
must be made early in the semester prior to beginning professional 



courses. Admission procedures and criteria are explained in "Entrance 
Requirements" in the College of Education entry in this catalog. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory for all students desiring acceptance into the 
Teacher Education Program. Students will receive advising through 
advising workshops which will be held during the pre-registration period. 
Information regarding advising workshop schedules will be available each 
semester with pre-registration materials. Walk-in advising hours are also 
posted each semester. Check in the department office. Room 2311 
Benjamin. 

Honors and Awards 

Early Childhood Education majors are eligible for the Ordwein Scholar- 
ship. Information is available in the Dean's office (Room 3119). 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Graduates of the Early Childhood Education program receive a Bachelor 
of Science degree and meet the requirements for teaching preschool, 
kindergarten and primary grades. 

Required courses 

The following courses are required in the program of studies for Early 
Childhood and may also satisfy the University's general education re- 
quirements (USP and CORE). See departmental worksheets and advi- 
sors and the Schedule of Classes. 

PSYC100(3) 

•Social Science or History Courses: ANTH. GEOG. GVPT. ECON, SOCY 

(6) 

HIST 156 (3) 

Biological Science with Lab: BIOL. BOTN. MICRO (4) 

Physical Science/Lab: ASTR, CHEM. GEOL. PHYS (4) 

Other Pre-Professional Requirements 

SPCH (100. 125. or HESP 202 recommended) (3) 

MATH 210, 211 (4,4) 

MUSC155(3) 

Creative Arts: One of the following: KNES 1 81 , 1 83. 421 : THET 1 20, 31 1 . 

ARTT100(3) 

Education Electives: One of the following: FMCD 332, SOCY 343. NUTR 

100. EDCI 416 (3) 

EDCI 280 School Service Semester (3) 

EDPA 301 Foundations of Education (3) 

Professional Courses 

The Early Childhood Professional Block 1 starts only in Fall Semester and 
is a prerequisite to Professional Block 2. All pre-professional requirements 
must be completed with a minimum grade of "C before beginning the 
Eariy Childhood Professional Blocks. All pre-professional and profes- 
sional courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C prior to 
student teaching. 

Professional Block I: 

EDCI 313 Creative Activities and Matenals for the Young Child (3) 

EDCI 443A Literature for Children and Youth (3) 

EDHD 41 9A Human Development and Learning in School Settings (3) 

EDCI 312 Professional Development Seminar (3) 

EDCI 488E Field Problem Analysis (3) 

Professional Block II: 

EDCI 315 The Young Child in the Social Environment (3) 
EDCI 316 The Teaching of Reading: Early Childhood (3) 
EDCI 317 The Young Child and the Physical Environment (3) 
EDCI 314 Teaching Language. Reading. Drama and Literature (3) 
EDHD 41 9B Human Development and Learning m School Settings (3) 

Professional Block III. 

EDCI 41 1 Student Teaching: Preschool (4) 
EDCI 412 Student Teaching: Kindergarten (4) 
EDCI 413 Student Teaching: Primary Grades (8) 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Students who complete the elementary curnculum will recetve the Bach- 
elor of Science degree and will meet the Maryland Stale Department ol 
Education requirements for the Standard Professional Certificate in 



Curriculum and Instruction 83 



Elementary Education. Students admitted to Elementary Education must 
complete the following program which includes an area of concentration 
and a senior thesis. 

Required Courses: Courses which may satisfy the University's general 

education requirements (USP OR CORE) and which are required in the 

Elementary Education program of studies are as follows: 

HIST 156(3). 

Biological Science/Lab or Physical Science/Lab (4) USP Area B 

Social Science: ANTH, ECON, GVPT. GEOG, HIST (3) Area A or D 

SOCY 230 (3) Area D 

Other Pre-Professlonal Requirements 

MATH 210 (4). 211 (4) 

Sp)eech Requirement (3) Any speech course or HESP 202 

Biological Science/Lab or Physical Science/Lab (4) Area B 

EDCI 301 or ARTT 1 00 or ARTT 110(3) 

EDCI 443 (3) 

IVIUSC155(3) 

EDCI 280 (3) 

Coursework to complete the Area of Concentration (18 semester hours) 
can be chosen from the following areas: Communications. Foreign 
Language. Literature, f^^ath, Science, Social Studies. The EDCI Advising 
Office has detailed information regarding each area of concentration. All 
preprofessional coursework must be completed with a "C" or better prior 
to entenng professional courses. 

Professional Courses: 

All professional courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better. 
All preprofessional and professional coursework must be completed with 
a "C" or better prior to student teaching. 

Professional Coursework to be taken prior to Professional Semester 2 

EDCI 397— Principles and Methods of Teaching (3) 

EDHD 300E — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 385 — Computer Education for Teachers (3) 

EDMS 410 — Principles of Testing and Evaluation (3) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

Professional Semester 2 

EDCI 322 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education: Social 

Studies (3) 
EDCI 342— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education: 

Language Arts (3) 
EDCI 352 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education: 

Mathematics (3) 
EDCI 362 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education: 

Reading (3) 
EDCI 372 Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education: 

Science (3) 

Professional Semester 3 

EDCI 481— Student Teaching: Elementary (12) 

EDCI 464 — Clinical Practices in Reading Diagnosis and Instruction (3) 

Professional Semester 4 

EDCI 497— The Study of Teaching (3) 

EDCI 489 — Field Experiences in Education (3) 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in the teaching fields of art, English, 
foreign languages, mathematics, social studies, speech/English, and 
theatre/English. The Bachelor of Science degree is offered in art, math- 
ematics, music, science, social studies and speech/English, and theatre/ 
English. In the areas of art and music, teachers are prepared to teach in 
both elementary and secondary schools. All other programs prepare 
teachers tor grades five through twelve. 

All preprofessional and professional courses must be completed with a 
grade of "C" or better prior to student teaching. 

Foreign Language Requirement Bachelor of Arts Degree. 

All students who pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree in secondary 
education are required to complete two years (twelve semester hours) or 
the equivalent of a foreign language at the college level. If students have 
had three years of one foreign language or two years of each of two foreign 
languages as recorded on their high school transcripts, they are not 
required to take any foreign languages in the college, although they may 
elect to do so. 



If students are not exempt from the foreign language requirements, they 
must complete courses through the 1 04 level of a modern language or 204 
level of a classical language. 

In the modern languages: French, German, and Spanish students should 
take the placement test in the language in which they have had work if they 
wish to continue the same language; their language Instruction would start 
at the level Indicated by the test. With classical languages, students would 
start at the level indicated in this catalog 

For students who come under the provisions above, the placement test 
may also serve as a proficiency test and may be taken by a student any 
time (once a semester) to try to fulfill the language requirement. 

Students who have studied languages other than French, German, or 
Spanish, or who have lived for two or more years In a foreign country 
where a language other than English prevails, shall be placed by the chair 
of the respective language section, if feasible, or by the chairs of the 
foreign language departments. Native speakers of a foreign language 
shall satisfy the foreign language requirements by taking twelve semester 
hours of English. 

English Education 

A major In English Education requires forty-five semester hours in English 
and speech. All electlves In English must be approved by the student's 
advisor. Intermediate mastery of a modern or classical language Is 
required. Changes In major requirements are under review. Students 
should check with a departmental advisor for updated information. 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100, 125, or 220 (3) 

Foreign Language (4, 4) 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing or ENGL 101H (3) 

ENGL 201— World Literature or ENGL 202 (3) 

ENGL 281 — Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction (3) 

ENGL 310 — Medieval and Renaissance British Literature (3) 

ENGL 311 — Baroque and Augustan British Literature (3) 

ENGL 312— Romantic to Modern British Literature (3) 

ENGL 301— Critical Methods In the Study of Literature or ENGL 453 (3) 

LING 200— Introductory Linguistics (3) 

SPCH 230— Argumentation and Debate or SPCH 330, 350 or 401 (3) 

ENGL 384— Concepts of Grammar or ENGL 385, 482, or 484 (3) 

ENGL 304— The Major Works of Shakespeare (3) or ENGL 403 or 404 (3) 

ENGL 313— American Literature or ENGL 430, 431, 432 or 433 (3) 

EDCI 466— Literature for Adolescents (3) 

EDCI 467— Teaching Writing (3) 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition or ENGL 393 or 493 (3) 

ENGL Electlves (Upper level) (9) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 447 — Field Experience in English, Speech, Drama Teaching (1) 

EDCI 340 — Curriculum and Instruction In Secondary Education: English/ 

Speech/Drama (3) 
EDCI 463 — The Teaching of Reading In the Secondary School (3) 
EDCI 441 — Student Teaching Secondary Schools: English (12) 
EDCI 440 — Student Teaching Seminar In Secondary Education: English, 

Speech, Drama (1) 

Art Education, K-12 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

ARTH 100— Introduction to Art (3) 

ARTT 110 — Elements of Drawing (3) 

ARTT 100— Elements of Design (3) 

SPCH 1 00 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 1 25 or 220 (3) 

ARTH 200— Art of the Western World I (3) 

ARTH 201— Art of the Western World II (3) 

ARTT 320— Elements of Painting 

EDIT 273— Practlcum in Ceramics (3) 

ARTT 330— Elements of Sculpture (3) 

ARTT 428— Painting II (3) 

EDCI 406 — Practlcum In Art Education: Two Dimensional (3) [Fall Only] 

EDCI 403— Teaching of Art Criticism In Public Schools (3) [Spring Only] 

EDCI 407 — Practlcum in Art Education: Three Dimensional (3) 

ARTT 340 — Elements of Printmaking: Intaglio 



84 Curriculum and Instruction 



Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390— Pnnciples and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 480 — The Child and the Curriculum Elementary (3) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 300 — Curriculum and Instruction in Art Education (3) [Fall Only] 

EDCI 401— Student Teaching in Elementary Schools Art (4-8) 

EDCI 402— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools An (2-8) 

EDCI 489— Field Experiences in Education (3) [With Student Teaching] 

Foreign Language Education 

The Foreign Language (FL) Education curriculum is designed for prospec- 
tive foreign language teacfiers in middle through senior high schools who 
have been admitted to the EDCI Teacher Education Program. Currently, 
admission is open to qualified students seeking teacher certification in 
Spanish, French, Russian, and German only. 

A minimum of six hours of intermediate level language course work in the 
student's major language must precede the required 300-400 level courses. 
The latter are comprised of a minimum of thirty hours of prescribed course 
work which Includes the areas of grammar and composition, conversation, 
literature, civilization and culture, and linguistics. Students must also take 
a minimum of nine hours (three courses) of electives in a related area. 
Students are strongly advised to utilize these nine hours to begin or 
continue the study of another language as soon as possible after entering 
the university. The second area of concentration must be approved by a 
FLED advisor and may be in any foreign language regardless of whether 
or not it is a Maryland State Department of Education approved FL 
certification program. 

The following requirements must be met with the FL Education program: 

Pre- Professional/Subject Area Course Work 

SPCH 1 00. 1 25. or 220— Basic Principles of Speech Communication (3) 
Pnmary FL Area- Intermediate (200 level) (3.3) 
Primary FL Area— Grammar and Composition (300-400 levels) (3,3) 
Primary FL Area— Survey of Literature (300-400 levels) (3,3) 
Primary FL Area— Conversation (300-400 levels) (3.3) 
Primary FL Area — Literature (400-above levels) (3.3) 
Primary FL Area — Culture and Civilization (3) 
Applied Linguistics (In the Primary FL Area if available; othera/ise. 
LING 200 or ANTH 371 )— FL Phonetics does not satisfy this re- 
quirement). (3) 

Electives in FL-Related Courses (9 hours — Minimum of three courses). It 
is strongly recommended that these hours be utilized to begin or 
continue the study of another foreign langauge as soon as possible. 

All Primary FL Area courses must have been completed prior to the 
Student Teaching semester. Any substitutions for the above must be 
pre-approved by a FL Education advisor. 

Proiessior)al Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (3) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 400 — Level FL Education Elective only in consultation with FL 

Education. Advisor (3) 
EDCI 330 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education: Foreign 

Language (3) Pre-requisites EDCI 3003, All Primary FL Area course 

work 
EDCI 430 — Seminar in Student Teaching (3) (Taken concurrently with 

EDCI 431. only) Pre-requisite EDCI 330. 
EDCI 431— Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools (12) (Taken 

concurrently with EDCI 430 only) Pre-requisites EDCI 330 and 301 . 

Mathematics Education 

Students completing an undergraduate major in astronomy, physics, 
physical sciences, or in mathematics, or who may be enrolled in the 
College of Education, may prepare to teach astronomy, physics, physical 
science, or mathematics. Early contact should be made with either Dr. 
John Layman (astronomy, physics, physical sciences) or Dr. James Fey 
(mathematics). See also the entry on the College of Education in this 
catalog. 

A major in mathematics education requires the completion of MATH 241 
or its equivalent, and a minimum of 15 semester hours of mathematics at 



the 400 level (excluding MATH 490): 400 level courses beyond those 
prescribed (402 or 403: 430) should be selected in consultation with a 
mathematics education advisor. The mathematics education ma)or must 
be supported by one of the following science sequences: CHEM 1 03 and 
113, orCHEM 103 and 104:PHYS221 and 222 or PHYS 161 and 262. 
or PHYS 1 4 1 and 1 42 : BIOL 1 05 and 1 06: ASTR 200 and three additional 
hours in ASTR (none of which include ASTR 1 00. 1 01 . 1 1 or 1 1 1 ). Also 
CMSC 110 or 120 is required. 

Pre-protessional/Subjecl Area Course Work 

SPCH 100. 125 or 220 (3) 

MATH 140. 141— Calculus I. II (4,4) 

Science Requirement (7-10) (See above) 

MATH 240. 241— Linear Algebra. Calculus III (4.4) 

CMSC 110 — Introduction to Fortran Programming or 

CMSC 120 — Introduction to Pascal Programming (4,4) 
MATH 430 — Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries (3) 
MATH 402— Algebraic Structures or 
MATH 403— Introduction to Abstract Algebra (3) 
MATH Electives (400-level) (9) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 350 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education: 

Mathematics (3) 
EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 
EDCI 457— Teaching Secondary Students with Difficulties in Learning 

Mathematics (3) 
EDCI 451— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools: Mathematics (12) 
EDCI 450 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

Mathematics Education (3) 

Music Education, K-1 2 

Changes in major requirements are under review. Students should check 
with a departmental advisor for updated information. 

The curriculum in music leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
education with a major in music education. It is planned to meet the 
demand for specialists, supervisors, and resource teachers in music in the 
schools. The program provides training in the teaching of general music 
choral and instrumental music and leads to certification to teach music at 
both elementary and secondary school levels in Maryland and most other 
states. There are two options The general music/choral option is for 
students whose principal instrument is voice or piano; the instrumental 
option is for students whose principal instrument is an orchestral or band 
instrument. Students are able to develop proficiency in both certifications 
by taking additional courses. 

Auditions are required for admission to the program. All students teach 
and are carefully observed in clinical settings by memtsers of the music 
education faculty. This is intended to ensure the maximum development 
and growth of each student's professional and personal competencies 
Each student is assigned to an advisor who guides him or her through the 
various stages of advancement in the program of music and music 
education. 

Instrumental 

Pre-professionai Subject Area Coursework 

MUSP 109. 1 10— Applied Music (Pnncipal Instrument) (2,2) 

MUSC 150. 151— Theory of Music I. II (3.3) 

MUSC 102. 103 — Beginning Class Piano I. II (2.2) 

MUSC 116. 1 17— Study of Instruments (2.2) 

SPCH 100. 125. or 220 (3) 

MUED 197— Pre- Professional Expenences (1) 

MUSP 207. 208— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2,2) 

MUSC 250. 251— Advanced Theory of Music I, II (4.4) 

MUSC 113.121 —Class Study of Instruments (2.2) 

MUSC 230— History of Music I (3) 

MUSP 305. 306— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2.2) 

MUSC 490, 491— Conducting (2) 

MUSC 120. 1 14— Class Study of Instruments (2.2) 

MUED 470 — General Concepts for Teaching Music (1 ) 

MUED 41 1— Instrumental Music: Elementary (3) 

MUED 420— Instrumental Music: Secondary (2) 

MUED 410— Instrumental Arranging (2) 

MUSC 330. 331— History of Music (3.3) 

MUSP 409— Applied Music (Pnncipal Instrument) (2) 

MUSC 229— Ensemble (7) 



Curriculum and Instruction 85 



Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301— Foundations ot Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 484/494— Student Teaching: Music (4) (4) 

General Music/Choral 

Preprotessional Subject Area Coursework 

Other Academic Support Courses 

MUSP 109, 110— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2,2) 

MUSC 150. 151— Theory ot Music I, II (3,3) 

MUSC 100— Class Voice, MUSC 200 Advanced Class Voice (2,2) or 

MUSC 102, 103— Class Piano (2,2) 
MUED 197 — Pre-Professional Expenences (1) 
SPCH 100, 125. or 220 (3) 

MUSP 207. 208— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2,2) 
MUSC 230— Music History (3) 
MUSC 202, 203— Advanced Class Piano (2,2) 
MUSC 250, 251— Advanced Theory of Music (4,4) 
MUSP 405, 409— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2,2) 
MUSC 453— Guitar-Recorder Methods (2) 
MUED 472— Secondary Choral Methods (2) 
MUSC 490, 491— Conducting (2,2) 
MUED 478 — Special Topics in Music Education (1) 
MUED 470 — General Concepts for Teaching Music (1 ) 
MUED 471— Elementary General Music Methods (3) 
MUSC 330. 331— History of Music (3.3) 
MUSC 410 — Applied Music (Principal Instrument) (2) 
MUSC 329— Major Ensemble (7) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 484/494— Student Teaching: Music (4) (4) 

"Varies according to incoming placement 

Physical Education and Health Education 

This curriculum is designed to prepare students for teaching physical 
education and health in elementary and secondary schools. To obtain full 
particulars on course requirements, the student should refer to the 
sections on the Department of Kinesiology and the Department of Health 
Education. 

Science Education 

A science major consists of a minimum of sixty semester hours' study in 
the academic sciences and mathematics. 

The following courses are required for all science education majors; BIOL 
1 05: 1 06; CHEM 1 03; CHEM 1 04 (except chemistry, physics, and earth 
science education majors who take CHEM 113);GE0L 100-110; FHYS 
121-122 or 141-142; and six semester hours of mathematics. Science 
education majors must achieve a minimum of grade C in all required 
mathematics, science, and education coursework. 

An area of specialization planned with the approval of the student's 
advisor, must be completed in biology, chemistry, earth science and 
physics as noted below. 

Biology Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Courseworl< 

MATH 110 — Elementary Mathematical Models (3) 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I (4) 

BIOL 106— Principles of Biology II (4) 

MATH 1 1 1— Introduction to Probability (3) 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I (4) 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry (4) 

ZOOL 201 or 202— Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II (4) 

BOTN 207— Plant Diversity or ZOOL 210 Animal Diversity (4) 

MICB 200— General Microbiology (4) 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I (4) 

GEOL 100/110— Physical Geology and Laboratory (4) 

SPCH 107, 125 or HESP 202 (3) 

BIOL 222— Principles of Genetics (4) 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology (4) 

ZOOL 480 (4), BOTN 212 (4), and ENTM 205 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II (4) 

BOTN 462-464 or ZOOL 212 Plant Ecology (4) 



Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Pnnclples and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education 

Science (3) 
EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Science (12) 
EDCI 371 — Computers in the Science Classroom and Laboratory (2) 
EDCI 470 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

Science (1) 

Chemistry Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I (4) 

BIOL 106— Pnnciples of Biology II (4) 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I or 105 (4) 

CHEM 113— General Chemistry II or 104 (4) 

MATH 140, 141— Calculus I and II (4, 4) 

SPCH 107, 125 or HESP 202 (3) 

CHEM 233, 243— Organic Chemistry I and II (4, 4) 

PHYS 141, 142— Principles in Physics (4, 4) 

GEOL 100. 1 10— Physical Geology and Lab (4) 

CHEM 321— Quantitative Analysis (4) 

CHEM 481 . 482— Physical Chemistry I and II (3,3) 

CHEM 483— Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (2) 

CHEM Elective (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education 

Science (3) 
EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Science (12) 
EDCI 371 — Computers in the Science Classroom and Laboratory (2) 
EDCI 470 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

Science (1) 

Earth Science Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

GEOL 100. 1 10— Physical Geology. Lab (4) 

GEOL 102— Historical Geology and Lab (4) 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I (4) 

BIOL 106— Principles of Biology II (4) 

MATH 1 10 or 140— Elementary Mathematical Models (3) 

or 

Calculus I (3) 

MATH 1 1 1 or 141— Introduction to Probability (3) 

or 

Calculus II (3) 

SPCH 107 or 125 or HESP 202 (3) 

GEOL 322— Mineralogy (4) 

GEOL 340— Geomorphology (4) 

GEOL 341— Structural Geology (4) 

CHEM 103. 1 13— General Chemistry I and II (4,4) 

ASTR 101— General Astronomy (4) 

PHYS 121, 122— Fundamentals of Physics I and II (4, 4) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education 

Science (3) 
EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 
EDCI 471— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Science (12) 
EDCI 371 — Computers in the Science Classroom and Laboratory (2) 
EDCI 470 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

Science (1) 

Physics Education 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

CHEM 103, 113— General Chemistry I and II (4,4) 

MATH 140, 141— Calculus I and II (4,4) 

PHYS 141, 142— Principles of General Physics I and II (4,4) or 

Engineering or Physics Majors Sequence 
SPCH 107, 1 10, or HESP 202 (3) 
BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I (4) 
BIOL 106— Principles of Biology II (4) 
PHYS 275— Experimental Physics I (1) 
PHYS 276— Experimental Physics II (2) 



86 Dance 



PHYS 375— Experimental Physics III (2) 

ASTR 101— General Astronomy (4) 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra (4) 

PHYS 410— Intermediate Theoretical Physics (3) 

PHYS 420— Principles of Modern Physics (3) 

PHYS 305— Physics Shop Techniques (1) 

GEOL 100— Physical Geology (3) 

GEOL 110— Physical Geology Laboratory (1) 

PHYS 406— Optics (3) 

PHYS 499— Special Problems in Physics (2) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301— Foundations o( Education (3) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 370 — Curnculum and Instruction in Secondary Education Science 

EDCI 471— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Science (12) 

EDCI 470 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education: 

Science (1) 
EDCI 371 — Computers in the Science Classroom and Laboratory (2) 

Social Studies Education 

Option I HISTORY. Requires fifly-tour semester hours of which at least 
twenty-seven must be in history, usually at least six hours in American 
history: six hours of non-American history: three hours in Pro-Seminar in 
Historical Writing: and twelve hours of electives, nine of which must be 
300-400 level. One course in Ethnic and Minority Studies must be 
included. 

Pre-prolessional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100, 125 or 110 (3) 

HIST 156, 157 (US.) (6) 

HIST(nonU.S.)(6) 

SOCY lOOorANTH 101 (3) 

GEOG 100— Introduction to Geography (3) 

GEOG 201, 202 or 203 (3) 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

ECON 310 — Evolution of Modern Capitalism (3) 

GVPT 100, 240, 260, or 280 (3) 

GVPT 1 70 — American Government (3) 

Social Sciences Electives, upper level (6) 

History Electives (12) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 320 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education — Social 

Studies. (3) 
EDCI 421— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Social Studies 

(12) 
EDCI 463 — Teaching of Reading in Secondary Schools (3) 
EDCI 420 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education — Social 

Studies (3) 
EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

Option II GEOGRAPHY: Requires fifty-four semester hours of which 
twenty-seven hours must be in geography. GEOG 201 ,211, 202, 203 are 
required. The remaining eighteen hours in geography must be upper level 
courses with one course in regional geography included. One course in 
Ethnic and Minority Studies must be included. 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

SPCH 100, 125 or 110(3) 

GEOG 201— Geography of Environmental Systems (3) 

GEOG 21 1— Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory (1) 

GEOG 202— The World in Cultural Perspective (3) 

GEOG 203— Economic Geography (3) 

GEOG Electives (18) HIST (U.S.) 156 or 157(3) 

HIST (non-U.S.) 101, 130-133, 144-145 (3) 

SOCY lOOorANTH 101 (3) 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

ECON 310— Evolution of Modern Capitalism (3) 

GVPT 100, 240 or 280 (3) 

GVPT 1 70 — American Government (3) 

History/Social Science Elective (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390— Pnnciples and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDCI 320 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary Education — Social 

Studies (3) 
EDCI 421— Student Teaching in Secondary Education — Social 



Studies (12) 
EDCI 420 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary Education — Social 

Studies (3) 
EDCI 463 — Teaching Reading in Secondary Schools (3) 
EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

Speech/English Education 

Students interested in teaching speech in secondary schools complete a 
minimum of 30 credits in speech and speech-related courses Because 
most speech teachers also teach English classes, the program includes 
another 30 credits in English and English education Up>on selection of this 
major, students should meet with an advisor to carefully plan their 
programs. 



luage is 



In addition, intermediate mastery of a modern or classical lang 
required for a B.A. 

Pre-professtonal/Subject Area Coursework 

Speech Area (6) : SPCH 1 00 — Foundations of Speech Communication or 
SPCH 107— Speech Communication, SPCH 1 10— Voice and Diction, 
SPCH 125— Interpersonal Communication. SPCH 220— Group Dis- 
cussion, SPCH 230— Argumentation and Debate, SPCH 340— Oral 
Interpretation SPCH 470— Listening (3) 

SPCH 200— Advanced Public Speaking (3) 

RTVF 1 24— Mass Communication in 20th Century or RTVF 222 or RTVF 
314(3) 

HESP 202— Introduction to Hearing and Speech Sciences or HESP 305 
or HESP 400 (3) 

THET 1 10— Introduction to Theatre (3) 

SPCH 350— Foundations of Communication Theory or SPCH 402 (3) 

SPCH 401— Foundations of Rhetoric (3) 

SPCH Upper level electives (6) 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing (3) 

LING 200— Introduction to Linguistics (3) 

ENGL 201— or 202 World Literature (3) 

ENGL 281 — Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction or ENGL 
385 or ENGL 482 or ENGL 484 (3) 

ENGL 301— Critical Methods in the Study of Literature or ENGL 453 (3) 

ENGL 310, 31 1 or 312— English Literature (3) 

ENGL 313— Amencan Literature (3) 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical Writing (3) 

EDCI 463— Teaching of Reading (3) 

EDCI 466— Literature for Adolescents (3) 

EDCI 467— Teaching Wnting (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390 — Principles & Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 340 — Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Education: Eng/SpctV 

Drama (3) 
EDCI 447— Field Experiences (1) 
EDCI 442— Student Teaching in Speech (6) 
EDCI 441— Student Teaching in English (6) 
EDCI 440— Student Teaching Seminar (1) 

Theatre/English Education 

Students interested in teaching theatre in secondary schools complete a 
minimum of 30 credits in theatre and theatre-related courses. Because 
most theatre teachers also teach English classes, the program includes 
another 30 credits in English and English education Upon selection of this 
major, students should meet with an advisor to carefully plan tfieir 
programs. 

In addition, intermediate mastery of a modern or classical language is 
required for a B.A. 

Pre-professional/Subject Area Coursework 

THET 120— Acting I Fundamentals (3) 

THET 1 70— Stagecraft (3) 

THET 273— Scenographic Techniques or THET 476 or THET 480 (3) 

THET 330— Play Directing (3) 

THET 460— Theatre Management (3) 

THET 479— Theatre Workshop (3) 

THET 490— History of Theatre I (3) 

THET 491— History of Theatre II (3) 

THET electives (3) 

SPCH 1 00— Foundations of Speech Communiction or SPCH 107 or 

SPCH 200 or SPCH 230 (3) 
ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing (3) 
LING 200— Introduction to Linguistics (3) 



Economics 87 

DANC 370— Kinesiology for Dancers 4 

DANC 210— Dance Production 3 

DANC 485 — Seminar in Dance 3 

A grade o( C or higher must be attained in all dance courses. 

New, re-entering and transfer students are expected to contact the 
department following admission to the university for instructions regarding 
advising and registration procedures. Although entrance auditions are not 
required, some previous dance experience is highly desirable. 

Dance Concentration 

The Department of Dance offers a Concentration in Dance of 22-24 
credits. Students take '14-15 hours of specified core courses and 8-9 
hours of courses in an emphasis of the student's choice. 

Course Code: DANC 



DECISION AND INFORMATION SCIENCES 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 



ECONOMICS (ECON) 

College of Behavioral and Social Science 

Undergraduate Studies: 3105 Tydings, 405-3505 
Undergraduate Advisor: 3127A Tydings, 405-3503 

Professor and Chair: Straszheim 

Professors: Aaron, Abraham, Almon, Ausubel, Baily, Betancourt, Brechling, 

Clague, Cropper, Dardis, Dorsey, Drazen, Haltiwanger, Hulten, Kelejian, 

Montgomery, Mueller, Murrell, Oates, Olson, Panagariya, Prucha, 

Schelling* (Public Affairs) 

Associate Professors; Bennett, Coughlin, Knight, Meyer, Wallis, Weinstein 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Delias, Evans, Haliassos, Hoff, Lyon, 

Sakellaris, Sen, Swamy, Williams* (Afro-American Studies) 

Emeriti: Bergmann, Cumberland, O'Connell, Ulmer 

'Joint appointment with unit indicated 

The Major 

Economics is the study of the production, pricing, and distribution of goods 
and services within societies. Economists study such problems as infla- 
tion, unemployment, technical change, poverty, environmental quality, 
and foreign trade. Economists also apply economics to such diverse 
areas as crime, sexual roles, health care and the elderly, discrimination, 
urban development, and developing nation problems. 

Two characteristics of modern economics receive special attention in the 
Department's program. Government policies have profound effects on 
how our economic system performs. Government expenditures, regula- 
tions, and taxation either directly or indirectly affect both households and 
firms. Second, there is a growing interdependency among economies 
throughout the world. Extensive worldwide markets exist in which goods 
and services are traded, and capital and investments move across 
national boundaries. Economic events in one nation are often quickly 
transmitted to other nations. 

Economists study these phenomena through the development of system- 
atic principles and analytic models which describe how economic agents 
behave and interact. These models are the subject of empincal testing, 
often using computers and extensive data sets. 

The interests of the faculty, as reflected in the course offerings, are both 
theoretical and applied. As a large diverse department, the Economics 
Department offers courses in all of the major fields of economic study. The 
Department's program stresses the application of economic theory and 
econometrics to current problems in a large number of fields. Many 
courses in the Department's program analyze the role of the government 
and public policies on the economy. 

The program is designed to serve both majors and non-majors. The 
Department offers a wide variety of upper-level courses on particular 
economic issues which can be taken after one or two semesters of basic 
principles. These courses can be especially useful for those planning 



ENGL 201 or 202— World Literature (3) 

ENGL 281— Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction or ENGL 

385 or ENGL 482 or ENGL 484 (3) 
ENGL 310, 31 1 , or 312— English Literature (3) 
ENGL 313— American Literature (3) 

ENGL 301— Critical Methods in the Study of Literature or ENGL 453 (3) 
ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical Writing (3) 
EDCI 463— Teaching of Reading (3) 
EDCI 467— Teaching Writing (3) 
EDCI 466— Literature for Adolescents (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDCI 390— Principles & Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDCI 340 — Curriculum & Instruction in Secondary Education: Eng/Spch/ 

Drama (3) 
EDCI 447— Field Experience (1) 
EDCI 448— Student Teaching in Theatre (6) 
EDCI 441— Student Teaching in English (6) 
EDCI 440— Student Teaching Seminar (1) 

Course Code: EDCI 



DANCE (DANC) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

Dance Building, 405-3180 

Professor and Chair: Wiltz 

Professors: Madden (Emerita). Rosen, A. Warren, L. Warren 

Associate Professor: Dunn 

Assistant Professor: J. Frosch-Schroder 

Instructor: Mayes 

Lecturers: Druker. Fleitell, Jackson, Rolland, Slater 

Accompanists: Freivogel, Johnson 



The Major 



Recognizing that dance combines both athleticism and artistry, the dance 
program offers comprehensive technique and theory courses as a foun- 
dation for the dance professions. By developing an increasing awareness 
of the physical, emotional and intellectual aspects of movement in 
general, the student eventually is able to integrate his or her own particular 
mind-body consciousness into a more meaningful whole. To facilitate the 
acquisition of new movement skills, as well as creative and scholarly 
insights in dance, the curriculum provides a structured breadth of experi- 
ence at the lower level. At the upper level students may either involve 
themselves in various general university electives, or they may concen- 
trate their energies in a particular area of emphasis in dance. Although an 
area of emphasis is not mandatory, many third and fourth year students 
are interested in studying a singular aspect of dance in depth, such as 
performance, choreography, production/management, or general studies 
(encompassing dance history, literature and criticism). 

The dance faculty is composed of a number of distinguished teachers, 
choreographers, and performers, each one a specialist in his or her own 
field Visiting artists throughout the year make additional contributions to 
the program. There are several performance and choreographic opportu- 
nities for all dance students, ranging from informal workshops to fully 
mounted concerts both on and off campus. 

Requirements for Major 

Students must complete fifty-nine semester hours of dance credits. Of 
these, eighteen hours of modern technique and four hours of ballet 
technique are required. Majors may not use more than seventy-two DANC 
credits toward the total of 120 needed for graduation. In addition to the 
twenty-two technique credits required, students must distribute the re- 
maining thirty-five credits as follows: 

DANC 208, 308, 388— Choreography I, II, III 9 

DANC 102— Rhythmic Training 2 

DANC 109— Improvisation 2 

DANC 365— Dance Notation 3 

DANC 200— Introduction to Dance 3 

DANC 171 — Movement Integration 2 

DANC 305— Phnciples of Teaching 3 

DANC 483— Dance History II 3 



88 Education Policy, Planning and Administration 



careers in law. business, or the public sector. The program for majors is 
designed to serve those who will seek employment immediately after 
college as well as those who will pursue graduate study. 

Economics majors have a wide variety of career options in both the private 
and public sectors. These include careers in state and local government, 
federal and international agencies, business, finance and banking, jour- 
nalism, teaching, politics and law. Many economics majors pursue gradu- 
ate work in economics or another social science, law, business or public 
administration (public policy, health, urban and regional planning, education, 
and industrial relations). 

Requirements for Major 

In addition to the University's general education (CORE) requirements, 
the requirements for the Economics major are as follows: 

(1) Economics (and Mathematics) Courses (36 hours) 

Economics majors must earn 33 credit hours in Economics, and 
3 credit hours in Mathematics (MATH 220 or 1 40), with a grade of 
C or better in each course. 

All majors must complete 12 hours of core requirements with a 
satisfactory GPA. The core requirements include ECON 201, 
ECON 203. ECON 305 (formerly ECON 401) and ECON 306 
(formerly ECON 403). A satisfactory GPA must satisfy each of the 
following: a grade of C or better in each course: a 2.5 GPA in the 
four courses comprising the core requirements: and a 2.5 GPA in 
ECON 305 and 306. 

Students must also complete twenty-one hours in upper level 
Economics courses: 

a) three hours in statistics; ECON 321 (formerly ECON 421) or 
BMGT 230 or BMGT 231 or STAT 400: 

b) three hours in economic history or comparative systems; 
ECON 310, ECON 311, ECON 315 (formerly ECON 415), 
ECON 380. or ECON 410; 

c) nine hours in courses with at least one semester of intermedi- 
ate theory or economic statistics (ECON 321) as a prerequi- 
site. The following courses presently have this prerequisite: 
ECON 402, ECON 407, ECON 416, ECON 417, ECON 422, 
ECON 423, ECON 425, ECON 431 , ECON 441 , ECON 454, 
ECON 456, ECON 460, ECON 470, and ECON 476; 

d) six other hours in upper division Economics. 

(2) Additional Supporting Courses (15 hours) 

Students must earn 1 5 hours of credit in upper division courses in 
addition to the 36 hours of Economics (and Mathematics) courses 
listed above and the University's CORE requirements. Upper 
division courses include all courses with a 300 number and above. 
Additional mathematics courses beyond the required mathemat- 
ics course (MATH 220 or 140). and computer programming 
courses at the 200 level and above may be counted as fulfilling the 
Additional Support Course Requirement. Additional economics 
courses may be included among the 15 hours of supporting 
courses. 

All courses meeting this Additional Support Course requirement 
must be completed with a grade of C or better and may not be taken 
pass-fail. 

Study Sequences and Plans of Study 

Economics is an analytic discipline, building on a core of principles, 
analytic models, and statistical techniques. Students must begin with a 
foundation in mathematics and economic principles (ECON 201 and 
ECON 203). A more advanced, analytic treatment of economics is 
presented in intermediate theory (ECON 305 and ECON 306), which is a 
necessary background for in-depth study by economics majors. 

The department urges that the student take ECON 201 and 203 and 
MATH 220 as soon as possible. Honors versions of ECON 201 and 203 
are offered for students seeking a more rigorous analysis of principles, 
departmental honors candidates, and those intending to attend graduate 
school. Admission is granted by the Office of Undergraduate Advising or 
the University Honors Program. 

Courses in applied areas at the 300 level may be taken at any point after 
principles. However, rrtajors will benefit by completing ECON 305, ECON 
306, and ECON 321 or its equivalent immediately upon completion of 



principles. While most students take ECON 305 and 306 in sequence, 
they may be taken concurrently. Courses at the 400 level are generally 
more demanding, particularly those courses with intermediate theory as 
a prerequisite. 

Empirical research and the use of computers are becoming increasingly 
important in economics. All students are well advised to include as many 
statistics, econometrics, and computer programming courses in their 
curriculum as possible. 

Those students planning to pursue graduate study in economics must 
begin to prepare themselves analytically for graduate work by focusing on 
theory, statistics, and mathematics in their undergraduate curriculum. 
These students should consider the advanced theory courses (ECON 407 
and ECON 417) and the econometrics sequence (ECON 422 and ECON 
423). Mastery of the calculus and linear algebra is essential lor success 
in many of the top graduate schools. Students should consider MATH 1 40, 
MATH 141, MATH 240 (or MATH 400), MATH 241 and MATH 246 as very 
useful preparation. 

Advising 

The department has academic advisors providing advising on a walk-in 
basis in the Office of Undergraduate Advising, 3127A Tydings. 

Honors 

The Economics Honors Program provides economics majors with the 
opportunity for advanced study in a seminar format, with faculty supervi- 
sion of seminar papers and an honors thesis. The Honors Program is 
designed for students intending to attend graduate school or those 
seeking an in-depth study of economic theory and its application to 
economic problems. 

The Honors Program is a twelve-hour sequence, culminating in the 
completion of a senior thesis. Students must complete ECON 396 
(Honors Workshop) and ECON 397 (Honors Thesis) in their senior year, 
as well as two of the following five courses: ECON 407, 417, 422, 423. 425. 
Students must complete these twelve hours with a GPA of 3.5. ECON 396 
is offered only in the fall term. 

To be eligible for admission, a student must have completed fifteen hours 
of economics with a GPA of 3.25. Interested students should meet with the 
Director of Undergraduate Studies at the earliest possible date to review 
their curriculum plans and to apply for admission to the program. 

Awards 

The Dudley and Louisa Dillard Prize, currently $500, is awarded to the 
outstanding Economics junior and senior with a broad liberal arts 
program. 

Student Organizations 

Omicron Delta Epsilon, the economics honorary society, meets regularly 
to discuss economics and other graduate schools, employment opportu- 
nities, and recent economic trends. Please see the Undergraduate 
Economics Secretary, 41 1 5A Tydings, for memt>ership information. 

Course Code: ECON 



EDUCATION POLICY, PLANNING, AND 
ADMINISTRATION (EDPA) 

College of Education 

3112 Benjamin Building, 405-3574 

Acting Chair: Schmidtlein 

Professors: Andrews, Berdahl, Berman, Birnbaum. Chait. Clague. Dudley, 

Finkelstein. McLoone. Male. Selden. Stephens 

Associate Professors: Agre. Goldman. Herschbach. Hopkins, Huden, 

Hultgren. Lindsay. Noll. Schmidtlein, Splame 

Assistant Professor: Heid 

Affiliate Assistant Professors: Edelstein. Lawrence 

Adjunct Professors: Farmer, Heynemann, Hickey, Hogan 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Hrabowski 



Engineering, Bachelor of Science Degree 89 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 240— Engineering Computation 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENEE 204— Basic Circuit Theory 3 

ENEE 244— Digital Logic Design 3 

Total 16 17 

Junior Year 

Math XXX (Elect. Advanced Math=') 3 

ENEE 302— Analog Electronics 3 

ENEE 305— Fundamental Laboratory 2 

ENEE 312— Digital Electronics 3 

ENEE 322— Signal & System Theory 3 

ENEE 324— Engineenng Probability 3 

ENEE 350 — Computer Organization "... 3 

ENEE 380— Electromagnetic Theory 3 

ENEE 381— Elect. Wave Propagation 3 

ENEE XXX — Advanced Elective Lab.' 2 

CORE 3 3 

Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

Electives^ 6 12 

Advanced Elective Lab^ 2 

CORE 6 3 

Total 14 15 

'See details of CORE in Chapter 5. 

^The twenty-five credits of electives must satisfy the following conditions: 

(1)13 credits must be 400-level ENEE courses, including at least four 

credits of advanced laboratory courses. 

(2) 1 2 credits must be non-electrical engineering (mathematics, physics, 

other fields of engineering, etc.) and must be selected from the Electrical 

Engineering Department's approved list; at least three credits of these 

nine must be a 400-level MATH course from the departmental list. 

Admission 

Admission requirements are the same as those of other departments (see 
College of Engineering section on Entrance Requirements). 

Advising 

Nearly all of the faculty in Electrical Engineering function as undergradu- 
ate advisors. Departmental approval is required for registration in all 
upper-division courses in the major. The department's Undergraduate 
Office (2429 A.V. Williams Building, 405-3685 is the contact point for 
undergraduate advising questions. 

Financial Assistance 

Several corporate scholarships are administered through the department. 
Information and scholarship applications are available from either the 
Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Office, 2429 A.V. Williams Build- 
ing, 405-3685, or the College of Engineering Student Affairs Office, 1131 
Engineering Classroom Building, 405-3860 

Honors and Awards 

The Electrical Engineering department annually gives a variety of aca- 
demic performance and service awards. Information on criteria and 
eligibility is available from the department's Undergraduate Office. Majors 
in Electrical Engineering participate in the Engineering Honors Program. 
Seethe College of Engineering entry in this catalog for further information. 



Adjunct Assistant Professor: McKay 
Emeriti: Anderson, Newell, McClure 

The Department of Education Policy, Planning and Administration offers 
several courses at the undergraduate level These include Foundations of 
Education (EDPA 301 ), In addition, University Studies Program (distribu- 
tive studies) requirements may be met by taking Education in Contempo- 
rary Amencan Society (EDPA 201) or Historical and Philosophical Per- 
spectives on Education (EDPA 210). University Studies Program (ad- 
vanced studies) requirements may be met by taking Technology, Social 
Change, and Education (EDPA 401 ), or Future of the Human Community 
(EDPA 400). EDPA 210 is one of the CORE Humanities requirements. 

Master's and doctoral programs are offered in school administration and 
supervision, curriculum theory and development, foundations of educa- 
tion and education policy, and higher education administration. 

Course Code: EDPA 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (ENEE) 
College of Engineering 

2429 A.V. Williams Building. 405-3683 

Chair: Destlerf 

Associate Chairs: Davis (Facilities and Services); Emad (Graduate Pro- 
gram); Pugsley (Undergraduate Program) 

Professors: Antonsen, Baras, Barbe, Blankenship, Chellappa, Dagenais, 
Davis, Davisson, DeClaris. Destler, Emad, Ephremides, Frey, Gligor, 
Goldhar, Granatstein, Harger, Hochuli, Ja'Ja', Krisnaprasad, Lee, Levine, 
Ligomenides, Makowski, Mayergoyz. Newcomb, Ott, Peckerar (part- 
time), Rabin, Reiser, Rhee, Striffler, Taylor, Tits, Venkatesan. Vishkin, 
Zaki 

Associate Professors: Abed, Farvardin, Geraniotis, Ho, lliadis, Nakajima, 
Narayan, Oruc. Pugsley, Shamma, Shayman, Silio, Tretter 
Assistant Professors: Dayawansa, Fuja, Goldsman, Greenberg, loannou, 
Lawson, Liu, Milor, Menezes, Milchberg, Papamarcou, Yang 
Emeritus: Lin 
tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Major 

The Electrical Engineering major is intended to prepare students to 
function as effective citizens and engineers in an increasingly technological 
world as well as in science and engineering subjects. Depth as well as 
breadth is required in the humanities and social sciences to understand 
the economic, ecologic, and human factors involved in reaching the best 
solutions to today's problems. 

The basic foundation in mathematical, physical, and engineering sci- 
ences is established in the first two years of the curriculum. A core of 
required Electrical Engineering courses is followed by a flexible structure 
of electives that allows either breadth or specialization. Appropriate 
choices of electives can prepare an Electrical Engineering major for a 
career as a practicing engineer and/or for graduate study. 

Areas stressed in the major include communication systems, computer 
systems, control systems, engineering electromagnetics, microelectron- 
ics, and power systems. Within these areas are courses in such topics as 
solid state electronics, integrated circuits, lasers, communications engi- 
neering, computer design, power engineering, digital signal processing, 
antenna design, and many others. Project courses allow undergraduate 
students to undertake independent study under the guidance of a faculty 
member in an area of mutual interest. 

Requirements for Major 

Requirements for the Electrical Engineering major include thorough 
preparation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and engineering science. 
Elective courses must include both Electrical Engineering courses and 
technical courses outside the department. A sample program for the 
portion of the program following the common freshman year in Engineer- 
ing is shown below. (See College of Engineering section for suggested 
Freshman Year program.) 

Semester 
I II 

Sophomore Year 

CORE 3 3 

Math 246— Differential Equations 3 

Math 241— Analysis III 4 



Department Honors Program 



The Electrical Engineering Honors Program is intended to provide a more 
challenging and rewarding undergraduate experience for the best stu- 
dents pursuing baccalaureate degrees in Electrical Engineering. Honors 
sections are offered in almost all technical courses in the freshmen, 
sophomore, and junior years, and a capstone honors design project is 
taken during the senior year. Students completing the program with at 
least a 3.0 average on a 4.0 scale will have their participation in the 
program indicated on their B.S. diploma. For further information contact 
Dr. James Pugsley in the Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Office 
(AVW 2429). 



90 English Language and Literature 



Student Organizations 

There is an active Student Chapter of the Institute of Electrical and 
Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Information and membership applications 
are available in the Electrical Engineering undergraduate lounge, 0107 
Engineering Classroom Building. Equally active is the chapter of Eta 
Kappa Nu, the nationwide Electrical Engineering honorary society. Infor- 
mation on eligibility can be obtained from the EE Undergraduate lounge, 
from the departmental Undergraduate Office, or from the College Student 
Affairs Office. 

Course Code: ENEE 



ENGINEERING, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
DEGREE IN 

College of Engineering 

1 131 Engineering Classroom Building, 405-3855 

General Regulations for the B,S. Engineering Degree: All undergradu- 
ate students in engineering will select their major field sponsoring depart- 
ment at the beginning of their second year regardless of whether they plan 
to proceed to a designated or an undesignated degree. A student wishing 
to elect the undesignated degree program may do so at any time following 
the completion of the sophomore year, or a minimum of fifty earned credits 
towards any engineering degree, and at least one semester prior to the 
time the student expects to receive the baccalaureate degree. As soon as 
the student elects to seek an undesignated baccalaureate degree in 
engineering, the student's curnculum planning, guidance, and counseling 
will be the responsibility of the "Undesignated Degree Program Advisor" 
in the primary field department. At least one semester before the expected 
degree is to be granted, the student must file an "Application for Admission 
to Candidacy tor the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering" with 
the dean's office of the College of Engineering. The candidacy form must 
be approved by the chair of the primary field department, the primary 
engineering, and the secondary field advisors and the college faculty 
committee on "Undesignated Degree Programs." This committee has the 
responsibility for implementing all approved policies pertaining to this 
program and reviewing and acting on the candidacy forms filed by the 
student. 

Specific university and college academic regulations apply to this 
undesignated degree program in the same manner as they apply to the 
conventional designated degree programs. For example, the academic 
regulations of the university apply and the college requirement of 2.0 
G.P.A. in the major field during the junior and senior years applies. For the 
purpose of implementation of such academic rules, the credits in the 
primary engineering field and the credits in the secondary field are 
considered to count as the "major" for such academic purposes. 

Options of the "B.S. Engineering" Program 

The "B.S. Engineering" program is designed to serve three phmary 
functions: (1 ) to prepare those students who wish to use the breadth and 
depth of their engineenng education as preparation for entry into post- 
baccalaureate study in such fields as medicine, law, or business admin- 
istration; (2) to provide the basic professional training for those students 
who wish to continue their engineering studies on the graduate level in one 
of the new interdisciplinary fields of engineering such as environmental 
engineering, bio-medical engineenng, systems engineering, and many 
others; and finally (3) to educate those students who do not plan a normal 
professional career in a designated engineering field but wish to use a 
broad engineering education so as to be better able to serve in one or more 
of the many auxiliary or management positions of engineering related 
industries. The program is designed to give the maximum flexibility for 
tailoring a program to the specific future career plans of the student. To 
accomplish these objectives, the program has two optional paths: an 
engineering option and an applied science option. 

The engineering option, which is ABET accredited, should be particu- 
larly attractive to those students contemplating graduate study or profes- 
sional employment in the interdisciplinary engineering fields, such as 
environmental engineenng. bio-engineering, bio-medical, systems and 
control engineering, and manufacturing engineering, or for preparatory 
entry into a variety of newer or interdisciplinary areas of graduate study. 
For example, a student contemplating graduate worl< in environmental 
engineenng might combine chemical and civil engineering for his or her 



program; a student interested in systems and control engineering gradu- 
ate work might combine electrical engineering with aerospace, chemical, 
or mechanical engineering. 

The applied science option, which is not ABET accredited, should be 
particularly attractive to those students who do not plan to pursue a 
professional engineenng career but wish to use the rational and develop- 
mental abilities fostered by an engineenng education as a means of 
furthenng career objectives. Graduates of the applied science option may 
aspire to graduate work and an ultimate career in a field of science, law, 
medicine, business, or a variety of other attractive opportunities which 
build on a combination of engineering and a field of science. Entrance 
requirements for law and medical schools can be met readily under the 
format of this program. In the applied science program, any field in the 
university in which the student may earn a B.S. degree is an acceptable 
secondary science field, thus affording the student a maximum flexibility 
of choice for personal career planning. 

Minimum Requirements 

Listed below are the minimum requirements for the B.S. Engineering 
degree with either an engineering option or an applied science option. The 
sixty-six semester credit hours required for the completion of the junior 
and senior years are superimposed upon the freshman and sophomore 
curriculum of the chosen primary field of engineering. The student, thus, 
does not make a decision whether to take the designated or the 
undesignated degree in an engineering field until the beginning of the 
junior year. In fact, the student can probably delay the decision until the 
spring term of the junior year with little or no sacrifice, thus affording ample 
time for decision-making. Either program may be taken on the regular 
four-year format or under the l^aryland Plan for Cooperative Engineering 
Education. 

Junior-Senior Requirements for the Degree of B.S. — Engineering 



Option: 



CORE 

Mathematics Physical Sci.'' 

Engineering Sciences''^ 

Primary Field"^ 

Secondary Field^ ' _ 

Approved Electives^ 

Sr. Research/Project* 

Total 



Semester 
Hours 


Engineering 


Applied 
Science 


15 
3 

6 
24(Engr.) 
12(Engr.) 
6 (Tech.) 

66 


15 
3 

6 

18(Engr.) 

12 (Sa.) 

9 or 10 

3 or 2 

66 



Engineering fields of concentration available under the B.S. Engineering 
program as pnmary field within either the engineering option or the applied 
science option are aerospace engineering, engineenng materials, agri- 
cultural engineering, fire protection engineenng, chemical engineering, 
mechanical engineering, civil engineenng. nuclear engineering, and 
electrical engineering. All engineering fields of concentration may be used 
as a secondary field within the engineenng option. 

' Engineering sciences, for the purpose of this degree, are those courses 
in the College of Engineering prefixed by ENES or in any engineenng field 
including the primary or secondary field of engineering concentration. 
^A minimum of fifty percent of the coursework in the mathematics, physical 
sciences, engineering science and elective areas must be at the 300 or 
400 course number level. 

'All of the courses used to fulfill the fields of concentration requirements 
(thirty-six semester hours in the engineenng option and thirty in the 
applied science option) must be at the 300 course number level or atX3ve. 
In addition, three courses with laboratory expenence should be incorpo- 
rated into the program. 

'For the applied science option each student is required, unless specifi- 
cally excused; and if excused, fifteen semester hours of approved 
electives will be required to complete satisfactorily a senior level project 
or research assignment relating the engineering and science fields of 
concentration. 

*tn the engineering option, the six semester hours of electives must be 
technical (math, physical sciences, or engineering sciences), but may not 
be in the primary or secondary fields of concentration In the applied 
science option, the approved electives should be selected to strengthen 
the student's program consistent with career objectives Courses m the 
primary or secondary fields of concentration may t>e used to satisfy the 
approved electives requirement. 



Entomology 91 



'For the engineering option, the program must contain the proper design 
component, as specified by the ABET requirements. It is the responsibility 
ot students and their advisors to ensure that the requirements are satisfied 
by the appropriate selection of courses in the pnmary and secondary 
fields of concentration As part of the required design component, all 
students, except those choosing Nuclear Engineering as a primary field, 
must complete ENME 404. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (ENGL) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

3101 S Campus Surge BIdg.. 405-3809 

Undergraduate Advisors: 21 15 SCP. 405-3825 
Freshman English Office: 3119 SCP. 405-3771 
Professional Wnting Program: 31 19 SCP. 405-3762 

Chair (Acting): Hammond 

Professors: Bryer. Carretta. Coletti. Coogan. Cross. Fraistat. Freedman 

(Emeritus). Fry. D. Hamilton. Handelman'. Holton. Hovey (Emeritus), 

Howard. Isaacs. Jellema (Emeritus). Kauffman. Kolker. Kornblatt. Lanser. 

Lawson. Lutw/ack (Emeritus), Miller (Ementa). I^^urphy (Emeritus). Myers 

(Emeritus). Panichas (Emeritus). Pearson. W. Peterson, Plumly. Russell. 

Salamanca (Emeritus). Trousdale. Turner. Vitzthum. Washington. 

Whittemore (Emeritus). Winton. Wyatt 

Associate Professors: Auchard. Auerbach. Barry. Caramello. Cartwright. 

Cate, Coleman. Collier. Dobin. Donaw/erth. Fahnestock. Flieger. Grossman. 

G. Hamilton. Hammond. Herman. Kleine. Leinwand. Leonardi. Levine, 

Loizeaux. Mack. Marcuse. Norman. C. Peterson. Robinson. Smith. Weber 

(Emeritus) 

Assistant Professors: Levin. Lindemann. Logan. McDowell, Moser, Ray. 

Rutherford. Schilb. Upton. Van Egmond. Wang 

Instructors: Miller. Ryan, Scheltema. Shapiro, Terchek 

'Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Major 

The English major was designed with three purposes in mind: 1) to give 
students a sense of the variety of literature written in English over the 
centunes; 2) to help English majors develop their abilities to think carefully 
and to express themselves well: and 3) to introduce students to the 
debates about literature that shape our intellectual lives. An English major 
is good professional preparation for a career in the law, government, 
journalism, business, communication, teaching, or any field that requires 
strong analytical and communication skills. 

Requirements for Major 

The English major requires 39 credits in English beyond the two required 
University writing courses. It also requires an additional 12 supporting 
credits taken in another department such as History, Philosophy or one of 
the foreign languages, chosen in consultation with the student's English 
Department advisor. 

The English major has three parts. The Core Requirements assure that 
students read widely and become aware of the questions an inquiring 
reader might ask of a text. The Concentration offers students the opportunity 
to read more deeply in an area of special interest. The Electives allow 
students to explore other areas of interest. 

Core Requirements (18 credits) 
All to be taken at the 300- or 400-level 

1. English 301 Critical Methods in the Study of Literature. 

Majors must take 301 before they take other 300- or 400- level 
English courses. We recommend it be taken during the sophomore 
year. 

2. A course in British Literature emphasizing literature written before 
1670. 

3. A second course in British Literature emphasizing literature before 
1900. 

4. A course in American Literature. 

5. A course in the literature of a) African-Americans, b) peoples of 
color, or c) women. 

6. A senior seminar, to be taken in the senior year. 



Concentrations (12 credits) 
(Four courses beyond the Core Requirements) 

Students choose one of the following: 

1 . British and American Literature 

2. American Literature 

3. Language. Whting, and Rhetoric 

4. Creative Writing 

5. Literature of the African Diaspora 
6 Mythology and Folklore 

7. Literature by Women 

8 International Literature (special permission required) 
9. Cultural Studies (special permission required) 
10. Student Specified Concentration (special permission required) 

Electives (9 credits) 

Chosen in consultation with an advisor. 

Only two 200-level courses may be counted toward the major. No course 
with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy the major or supporting 
area requirements. For further details on requirements, contact the 
English Department's Office of Undergraduate Studies (21 15 SCP, 405- 
3825). 

English Education 

In conjunction with the College of Education, the English Department 
otters a special 83-credit program for students wishing to major in English 
and earn a certificate to teach English on the secondary level. For a list of 
requirements, contact the Office of Undergraduate Studies (21 15 SCP, 
405-3825). 

Honors 

The English Department otters an extensive Honors Program, primarily 
for majors but open to others with the approval of the departmental Honors 
Committee. Interested students should ask for detailed information from 
an English Department advisor as early as possible in their college 
careers. 



The Writing Center 



The Wnting Center. 2105 SCP, 405-3785, provides free tutorial assis- 
tance daily to students enrolled in English courses. English 101 students 
generally work with student tutors. English 391/2/3/4/5 students work with 
tutors who are retired professionals. In addition to helping students with 
writing assignments, the center prepares ENGL 101 students for the 
English Proficiency Examination. Appointments are recommended, but 
walk-ins are welcome based on availability of tutors. 

Course Code: ENGL 



ENTOMOLOGY (ENTM) 
College of Life Sciences 

1302 Symons Hall, 405-3911 

Professor and Chair: Steinhauer 

Professors: Barbosa, Bickley (Emeritus), Bottrell, Davidson, Denno, 

Harrison (Emeritus), Jones (Emeritus), Menzer (Emeritus), Messersmith 

(Emeritus), Raupp, Wood (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Armstrong, Dively, Hellman, Lamp, Linduska, Ma, 

Mitter, Nelson, Regier, Scott 

Assistant Professor: O'Brochta, Roderick, Thorne 



The Major 



This specialization area prepares students for careers or graduate work 
in any of the specialized areas of entomology. Professional entomologists 
are engaged in fundamental and applied research in university, govern- 
ment, and private laboratories; regulatory and control activities with 
Federal and State agencies: commercial pest control and pest manage- 



92 Fire Protection Engineering 



ment services; sales and development programs with chemical compa- 
nies, and other commercial organizations; consulting, extension work; 
and teaching. 

Advising is mandatory. Students should work closely with their advisors 
in choosing electives. 

Requirements for Specialization 

See Biological Sciences in this catalog and Entomology advisor for 
specific program requirements. 

Course Code: ENTM 



FAMILY STUDIES (FMST) 

College of Health and Human Performance 

1204 Mane tvlount Hall, 405-3672 

Professor and Chair: Billingsley 

Professors: Epstein, Gaylin. Koblinsky 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Leslie, Myricks, Rubin, Wallen 

Assistant Professors: Mokhtah, Randolph 

Lecturer: Werlinich 

Instructors: Millstein. Zeiger 

The Major 

The major in Family Studies emphasizes an understanding of the family 
as the primary social institution linking individuals to their world. The 
program has three interrelated foci 1 ) the family as a unique and dynamic 
social unit. 2) the development and functioning of the individuals within the 
family, and 3) the relationship of the family to its larger socio-cultural, 
historical and economic context. The course of study stresses a working 
knowledge of the development of individuals through- out the family life 
span, interpersonal relations, and resource use Education about family 
life issues such as family life enrichment, intergenerational relations, 
family crises, legal problems, and changing family forms and lifestyles, will 
be studied. Intervention strategies alleviating and preventing family prob- 
lems and an understanding of the reciprocal relationships between 
families and the policies, practices, and management of institutions and 
organizations will be offered. The curriculum prepares students to be 
educators and have careers in direct service roles and mid-level manage- 
ment and policy positions emphasizing family. Opportunities exist in 
public, private and non-profit agencies and institutions working with family 
members, entire family units or family issues. Graduates also will be 
prepared for graduate study in the family sciences, human services 
administration, and other social and behavioral science disciplines and 
professions. 

Curriculum 

(a) Ma|or subject area: A grade of C or better Is required In these 
courses. 

FMST 302— Research Methods (3) 

FMST 330— Family Theories and Patterns (3) 

FMST 332— Children in Families (3) 

FMST 347 — Internship and Analysis (3) 

FMST 381— Poverty. Affluence, and Families (3) 

FMST 383 — Delivery of Human Services to Families (3) 

FMST 432— Intergenerational Aspects of Family Living (3) 

FMST 487— Legal Aspects of Family Problems (3) 

(b) Six additional departmental credits must be selected from any 
other FMST courses, with the exception of independent study 
(FMST 399) and tield work (FMST 386, FMST 387). Must receive 
a grade of C or better. 

(c) Additional Core Courses. Required of all majors. All students 
must earn a grade of C or better in all courses applied toward 
satisfaction of the major. 

EDMS 451— Introduction to Educational Statistics (3) OR 
STAT 100— Elementary Statistics and Probability (3) 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology (3) OR 
SOCY 105— Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology (3) 



ECON 201— Principles of Economics I (3) AND ECON 203— Principles of 
Economics II (3) OR ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

SPCH 100— Foundations of Speech Communication (3) OR SPCH 
107 — Speech Communication: Principles and Practices (3) 
OR SPCH 125— Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3) 

Course Code: FMST 



FINANCE 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING (ENFP) 
College of Engineering 

0151 Engineering Classroom Building. 405-3992 

Professor and Chair: Bryan 
Professors: Brannigan, Quintiere, Spivak 
Assistant Professors: Milke. Mowrer 
Lecturer (part-time): Levin 



The Major 



The fire protection engineering major is concerned with the scientific and 
technical problems of preventing loss of life and property from fire, 
explosion, and related hazards, and of evaluating and eliminating hazardous 
conditions. 

The fundamental principles of fire protection engineenng are relatively 
well-defined and the application of these principles to a modern industri- 
alized society has become a specialized activity. Control of the hazards 
in manufacturing processes calls for an understanding not only of mea- 
sures for protection, but of the processes themselves. Often the most 
effective solution to the problem of safeguarding a hazardous operation 
lies in the modification of special extinguishing equipment. The fire 
protection engineer must be prepared to decide in any given case what is 
the best and most economical solution of the fire prevention problem. His 
or her recommendations are often based not only on sound principles of 
fire protection but on a thorough understanding of the special problems of 
the individual property. 

Modern fire protection utilizes a wide variety of mechanical and electrical 
equipment which the student must understand in pnnciple tsefore he or 
she can apply them to special problems The fire protection curriculum 
emphasizes the scientific, technical, and humanitanan aspects of fire 
protection engineenng and the development of the individual student. 

The problems and challenges which confront the fire protection engineer 
include the reduction and control of fire hazards due to processes subject 
to fire or explosion in respect to design, installation and handling, involving 
both physical and human factors; the use of buildings and transportation 
facilities to restrict the spread of fire and to facilitate the escape of 
occupants in case of fire; the design, installation and maintenance of fire 
detection and extinguishing devices and systems; and the organization 
and education of persons for fire prevention and fire protection. 

Requirements for Major 

Semester 
I II 
Sophomore Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

Math 240— Linear Algebra OR Math 241— Calculus 4 

Math 246— Differential Equations for Scientists 

and Engineers 3 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 4 

ENFP 251 — Introduction to Fire Protection Engineering 3 

ENFP 290— Fire Protection Fluids 3 

Total 18 16 

Junior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

CMSC 104— Fortran Programming (4) OR 

ENES 240— Engineenng Computation (3) 3-4 



Food Science Program 93 



ENME 320— Thermcxlynamics OR 

ENCH 300 — Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

ENCE 300— Fundamentals of Engineenng Materials OR 

ENME 310— Mechanics of Deformable Solids 3 

ENCE 330— Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENFP 310— Fire Protection Systems Design I 3 

ENFP 315— Fire Protection Systems Design II 3 

ENFP 320— Pyrometrics of Materials 3 

ENFP 312 Heat Transfer Applications in Fire Protection 3 

Approved Electives 2 2 

Total 17-18 17 

Senior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 6 

ENNU 310— Environmental Aspects of Nuclear 
Engineering OR 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

ENFP 421— Functional and Life Safety Analysis 3 

ENFP 415— Fire Dynamics 3 

ENFP 41 1— Fire Protection Hazard Analysis 3 

ENFP 41 6— Problem Synthesis and Design 3 

Technical Electives* 3 3 

Total 15 15 

Minimum Degree Credits: 120 credits and fulfillment of all department, 

college, and University requirements. 

'Three credits of technical electives must be in ENFP. 

Admission 

Admission requirements are identical to those set by the College 
of Engineering (see College of Engineering section on Entrance 
Requirements). 

Advising 

Mandatory advising by Department faculty is required of all students every 
semester. Students schedule their advising appointments in the Depart- 
ment Office, 0151 Engineering Classroom Building, 405-3992. 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Part-time and summer professional experience opportunities and paid 
internship information is available in the Department Office, 0151 Engi- 
neering Classroom Building. Coordinator: J.L. Bryan, 405-3992. 

Financial Assistance 

Scholarships and grants are available to students in the Department from 
organizational and corporate sponsors. Information is available on eligi- 
bility, financial terms and retention criteria in the Department Office, 0151 
Engineering Classroom Building. 

Honors and Awards 

Academic achievement aviords are sponsored by the Department, and 
the student professional-honor societies. These awards are presented at 
the annual College of Engineering Honors Convocation. Eligibility criteria 
forthese awards are available in the Department Office, 01 51 Engineering 
Classroom Building. Qualified students in the department are eligible for 
participation in the College of Engineering honors program. 

Student Organizations 

The department honor society. Salamander, is open to academically 
eligible junior and senior students. The University of Maryland student 
chapter of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers is the professional 
society for all interested students in the department. Information on both 
organizations may be obtained from current members in the student 
lounge, 1123 Engineering Laboratory Building, 405-3999. 

Course code: ENFP 



FOOD SCIENCE PROGRAM (FDSC) 
College of Agriculture 

21 13 Animal Science Center, 405-1377 

Professor and Coordinator: Westhoft' (Animal Sciences) 

Professors: Bean, Heath. Johnson, Scares, Solomos, Vijay, Wheaton, 

Wiley 

Professors Emeritus: Cook, Keeney, King, Mattick, Twigg 

Associate Professors: Chai, Doerr, Schlimme, Shehata, Stewart, Wabeck 

The Major 

Food Science is concerned with the application of the fundamental 
principles of the physical, biological and behavioral sciences and engi- 
neering to better understand the complex and heterogeneous materials 
recognized as food. The contemporary food industry is highly dependent 
on this accumulating multidisciplinary body of knowledge and especially 
on the people who are educated to apply it. e.g., the food scientists or food 
technologists, terms that are used interchangeably. 

Specialization is offered in the areas of flavor and food chemistry, food 
microbiology, food processing technology including freezing, thermal and 
aseptic processing, quality assurance, and the food commodity areas of 
fruits and vegetables, milk and dairy products, poultry and poultry prod- 
ucts, red meats and seafood products. 

Requirements for Major 

Credit IHours 

CORE Program Requirements* 40 

College Requirements: 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

MATH 115— Precalculus 3 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology 1 3 

Curriculum Requirements: 

ENGL 393— Technical Writing 3 

ENAG 414 — Mechanics of Food Processing 4 

CHEM 104 or CHEM 233 4 

CHEM 113— General Chemistry II 4 

FDSC 1 11 — Contemporary Food Industry and 

Consumerism 3 

FDSC 398— Seminar 1 

FDSC 412, 413— Principles of Food Processing I, II 3,3 

FDSC 421— Food Chemistry 3 

FDSC 422 — Food Product Research and Development 3 

FDSC 423— Food Chemistry Laboratory 2 

FDSC 430— Food Microbiology 2 

FDSC 431— Food Duality Control 4 

FDSC 434 — Food Microbiology Laboratory 2 

Two of the following: FDSC 442, 451 , 461 , 471 , 482— 
Horticulture, Dairy, Poultry, Meat and Seafood Products 

Processing 3,3 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 3 

BCHM 261— Elements of Biochemistry 3 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics 4 

Electives 19 

'Includes 13 required credits listed. 

Advising 

Advisement is mandatory. The Food Science Undergraduate advisor is 
Dr. D.V. Schlimme, 1122B Holzapfel Hall, 405-4347. 



Fieldwork and Internship 



Fieldwork and internship opportunities are available with such organizations 
as McCormick and Co., Islational Food Processors Association, Fairfield 



94 Geography 



Farm Kitchens, the Food and Drug Administration. Highs Ice Cream 
Corp., and Strasburger and Siegel, Inc. For information, contact Dr. D.V. 
Schlimme, 1122B Holzapfel Hall, 405-4347. 

Honors and Awards 

The Food Science Department offers opportunities for scholarships and 
achievement awards such as the Institute of Food Technologists and 
Washington. DC. Section IFT, Maryland and DC. Dairy Technology, and 
C.W. England scholarships, and the Forbes Chocolate Leadership Award. 

Student Organizations 

Student Association of Food Engineering, Science and Technology; Dairy 
Products Judging Team. 

Course Code: FDSC 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN LANGUAGES AND 

LITERATURES (FREN) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3106C Jimenez Hall, 405-4024 

Professor and Chair: Tarica 

Professors: Cond6, Fink, MacBain, Therrien 

Associate Professors: Black, Brami, Falvo. Hage, Joseph, Mossman, 

C. Russell. Verdaguer 

Assistant Professor: Kinginger 

Lecturers: Amodeo, Barrabini, Bondurant, C.P. Russell 

Affiliate Lecturer: Jacoby 

Emeritus: Bingham 

French is one of the world's great languages of culture, providing access 
to an outstanding body of literature and criticism, studies in the arts, the 
humanities, the social and natural sciences, and career opportunities in 
commerce, foreign affairs, and the academic world. The department 
seeks to provide an atmosphere conducive to cultural awareness and 
intellectual growth. It hosts active student clubs and a chapter of a national 
honor society. It sponsors a study-abroad program (l^aryland-in-Nice) 
and works actively with the language clusters of the Language House. 

The French Major 

The undergraduate major in French consists of thirty-six hours of French 
courses above FREN 203. Three options, all having the same core, lead 
to the Bachelor of Arts degree: (1) French language and literature, (2) 
French language and culture, and (3) French/International Business. No 
grade lower than C may be used toward the major. Students intending to 
apply for teacher certification should consult the Director of Undergradu- 
ate Advising as early as possible for proper planning. 

Core required of all majors (9 credits): FREN 204, 250, 301. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e., 101, 
102, 201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

French Language and Literature Option (27 credits) 

In addition to core: FREN 351 , 352: 31 1 or 31 2 or 404; 401 or 405; 302 or 
402; four additional 400-level courses of which three must be in literature 
(only one of FREN 475, 478, 479 may count towards the major). 'See note 
below. 

French Language and Culture Option (27 credits) 

In addition to core: FREN 351 , 352; 31 1 or 31 2 or 404; 302 or 401 or 402; 
471 or 472; 473; three additional 400-level courses (only one of FREN 
475, 478, 479 may count towards the major). "See note below. 

French and International Business Option (27 credits) 

In addition to core: FREN 302, 303, 306, 31 1 . 31 2; 401 or 402; 406, 473, 
474. *See note below. 



'Note: Additional requirements outside French for all three options: twelve 
credits in supporting courses as approved by department, or at least 
twelve credits (six credits at 200 level and six credits at 300-400 level) in 
one specific area, representing a coordinated plan of study. 

Honors 

A student may choose to do a departmental Honors version of either the 
French Language and Literature Option or the French Language and 
Culture Option. The requirements are the same except that at least three 
of the upper-level courses, beginning with FREN 351 . must be taken in the 
"H " version, and that two Honors courses be substituted at the upper-level: 
FREN 494H (preparation for the final comprehensive examination) and 
FREN 495H (Honors Thesis). For further information see the Director of 
the French Honors Program. 

The Italian Language and Literature Major 

The undergraduate major in Italian consists of 36 hours of Italian courses 
above ITAL 203. To satisfy the major requirements, students must take 
the following courses: the language sequence: ITAL 204. 21 1, 301, and 
either 302 or 31 1 ; the literature sequence: 251 , 351 , 352; five courses at 
the 400 level. No grade lower than C may be used to satisfy the major 
requirements. Additional requirements outside Italian: 12 credits in sup- 
porting courses as approved by the Department; or at least 1 2 credits (six 
credits at the 200 level and six credits at the 300-400 level) in one specific 
area, representing a coordinated plan of study. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e.. 101 , 
102, 201, 202. etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Romance Languages 

Either French or Italian, or both, may serve as components of this major 
(see the entry on the Romance Language Program below). 

Course Code: FREN. ITAL 



GEOGRAPHY (GEOG) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1 1 13 Letrak Hall, 405-4050 

Chair: Townshend 

Professors: Goward, Leatherman, Townshend, Wiedel 

Associate Professors: Brodsky, Christian. Cirrincione' (Curriculum and 

Instruction), Groves, Kearney, Mitchell, Prince, Thompson 

Assistant Professor: Dubayah 

Lecturers (part-time): Broome, Eney, Ernst, Frieswyk. Olsen 

Professor Emeritus: Harper 

•Joint Appointment with unit indicated. 

Adjunct Faculty: Cebrian, Williams 

The Major 

The Department of Geography offers programs of study leading to tfie 
Bachelor of Science degree. Many students find that the multiple per- 
spectives of geography form an excellent base for a liberal arts education. 
The abilities to wnte clearly and to synthesize information and concepts 
are valued highly in geographical education and practice. Students of 
geography must master substantive knowledge either in the physical/ 
natural sciences or in the behavioral social sciences In addition to 
methodological knowledge. International interests are best pursued with 
complementary study in foreign languages and area studies 

The central question in geographical study is "where'" Geographers 
research locational questions of the natural environment, of social and 
economic systems, and of past human activity on the land. Students of 
geography must master a variety of techniques that are useful in locational 
analysis, including computer applications and mapping, map making or 
cartography, air-photo interpretation and remote sensing. fiekJ observa- 
tion, statistical analysis, and mathematical modelling. 

Increasingly, geographers apply their combined methodological and 
substantive knowledge towards the solution of society's problems. Some 



Geology 95 

Senior Year 

GEOG Courses to complete major 12 

Electives 18 

Total 120 

Introduction to Geography 

The 100-level geography courses are general education courses for 
persons who have had no previous contact with the discipline in high 
school or for persons planning to take only one course in geography. They 
provide general overviews of the field or in one of its major topics. Credit 
for these courses is not applied to the major. 

Related Programs 

Computer Mapping, Cartography and Spatial Analysis. Prepares 
students for careers in map design, compilation, and reproduction. The 
department offers various courses in thematic mapping, cartographic 
history and theory, map evaluation, map, photo, and image interpretation, 
computer-assisted cartography, spatial statistics, and geographic infor- 
mation systems. Students concentrating in cartography are not required 
to take GEOG 305 and are limited to nine hours of upper level systematic 
geography courses. Students must complete fifteen hours in cartography/ 
geographic techniques. Supporting area courses must be taken from a list 
provided by the department. All math programs should be approved by a 
departmental advisor. 

The required courses of the Cartography concentration are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Geography Core (GEOG 201, 202, 203, 211, 310) 13 

Elective systematic geography courses 9 

Cartography/Geographic technique courses 15 

Total 37 

For further information students should contact a departmental advisor. 

Geography Minor and Secondary Education Geography 
Specialization 

Secondary Education majors with a concentration in geography are 
required to take twenty-seven hours in the content field, GEOG 201 , 202, 
203, 211, or another upper-level course reflecting this interest. The 
remaining eighteen hours of the program consist of three hours of regional 
geography and fifteen hours of upper-division systematic courses. For 
majors in elementary education and others needing a geography course 
for teaching certification, GEOG 100 is the required course. 

Geography minors should take at least GEOG 201 . 202, 203, and 21 1 In 
the geography core and 310 is recommended. As with the major, these 
courses should be taken before any other geography courses. 

Internship Opportunities 

The department offers a one-semester internship program for under- 
graduates (GEOG 384 and 385). The goal of the program is to enhance 
the intellectual growth and the career opportunities of undergraduates. 
The internship provides students an opportunity to expand their under- 
standing of the field by linking the theoretical aspects of geography 
acquired in the classroom to the applied aspects operating in a practice 
situation. The internship program is open only to geography juniors and 
seniors. All interns must have completed the following prerequisites: 
GEOG 201, 202, 203, 211, 305, and 310. An application form from the 
undergraduate geography advisor must be submitted one semester 
before the internship is desired. See Professor Cirrincione, 1 125 LeFrak 
Hall (405-4053). 

Honors 

For information on the geography honors program, contact the under- 
graduate advisor. 

Student Organizations 

Gamma Theta Upsilon, the geography undergraduate organization, oper- 
ates a program of student-sponsored talks and field trips. Information may 
be obtained from Professor Dubayah. 1 161 Lefrak Hall, 405-4069. 

Course Code: GEOG 



graduates find geography to be an excellent background for careers in 
defense and intelligence, journalism, law, travel and tourism, the nonprofit 
sector, and business and management. Most professional career posi- 
tions in geography require graduate training. Many geographers take 
positions in scientific research, planning, management and policy analy- 
sis for both government and pnvate agencies 

Major Requirements Including Program Options 

Within any of the specializations available in the geography major pro- 
gram it IS possible for students to adjust their programs to fit their individual 
interests. The geography major totals thirty-seven semester hours. In 
addition to the thirty-seven semester hours, the geography major is 
required to take an additional fifteen semester hours of supporting 
coursework outside of the department. The hours can be either in one 
department or in an area of concentration. An area of concentration 
requires that a written program of courses be reviewed and placed on file 
by the department advisor. See Professor Cirrincione. 1 125 LeFrak Hall, 
405-3140. Supporting courses generally are related to the area of spe- 
cialty in geography. The pass-fail option is not applicable to major or 
supporting courses. A minimum grade of C in each course is required for 
major and supporting courses. 

The required courses for geography majors are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Geography Core (GEOG 201 , 202, 203, 21 1 , 305, 310) 1 6 

An additional techniques course (selected from 370, 

372, 373, 380) 3 

A regional course 3 

Elective systematic courses 15 

Total 37 

The Geography Core 

The following six courses form the minimum essential base on which 
advanced work in geography can be built: 

GEOG 201 — Geography of Environmental Systems 3 

GEOG 202— The World in Cultural Perspective 3 

GEOG 203 — Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 211 — Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory 1 

GEOG 305 — Quantitative Methods in Geography 3 

GEOG 310 — Research and Writing in Geography 3 

The four lower division courses are to be completed prior to GEOG 31 
and all other upper division courses. GEOG 201 , 202, and 203 may be 
taken in any order and a student may register for more than one in any 
semester. GEOG 21 1 may be taken concurrent with, or after taking GEOG 
201. GEOG 305 is prerequisite to GEOG 310. GEOG 310 is designed 
specifically as a preparation to upper level work and should be taken by 
the end of the junior year. Upon consultation with a department advisor, 
a reasonable load of other upper level work in geography may be taken 
concurrently with GEOG 310. Completion of GEOG 310 satisfies for 
geography majors only the upper level English composition requirement. 

The techniques requirement may be fulfilled by taking one of the following: 
GEOG 370: Cartographic Principles, GEOG 372: Remote Sensing, 
GEOG 373: Computer Mapping, and GEOG 380: Local Field Course. 

Suggested Program of Study for Geography 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Freshman and Sophomore Years 

GEOG 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 171 (1)— 
Introductions to Geography (Does not count toward 

geography majors) 3■^1 

GEOG 201 — Geography of Environmental Systems 3 

GEOG 202— The World in Cultural Perspective 3 

GEOG 203 — Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 21 1 — Geography of Environmental Systems 

Laboratory 1 

CORE Program Requirements and/or electives 60 

Junior Year 

GEOG 305— Quantitative Methods in Geography 3 

GEOG 310 — Research and Writing in Geography 3 

GEOG — A regional geography course 3 

GEOG — Techniques (choice) 3 

GEOG— Elective 3 

CORE Program Requirements and/or electives 30 



96 Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 



GEOLOGY (GEOL) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences 

1115 Geology Building, 405-4365 

Professor and Chair; Brown 

Professors: Chang. Wylie 

Associate Professors: Candela, McLeilan, Prestegaard, RIdky, Segovia, 

Stifel 

Assistant Professors: Krogstad, Walker 

The Major 

Geology is the basic science of the earth. In its broadest sense, geology 
concerns itself with planetary formation and modification with emphasis 
on the study of the planet earth through the application of the principles of 
physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics to the understanding of the 
composition, behavior and history of our planet. Geologic studies involve 
the earth's internal and external structure and materials, chemical and 
physical processes and its physical and biological history. 

Geology encompasses such subjects as the development of life as 
evidenced by the fossil record, the mechanics of crystal movement and 
the associated production of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, the 
evolution of the oceans and their interaction with the continents, the origin 
and occurrence of mineral and fuel resources and the evaluation of the 
human impact on the natural environment. 

Geological scientists find employment in governmental, industrial, and 
academic establishments. In general, graduate training is expected for 
advancement to the most rewarding positions. Although some sectors of 
the geological science, such as the petroleum industry, are subject to 
cyclical employment conditions, most areas are enjoying a strong em- 
ployment outlook. Employment potential is strong in such specialties as 
hydrology and groundwater, mineral resource consumption, land use 
planning, and virtually all areas of environmental studies. At this time, 
students with the Bachelor of Science, particularly those with supportive 
training in statistics and computer science, can find challenging employ- 
ment. 

The Geology program includes a broad range of undergraduate courses 
to accommodate both geology majors and students interested in selected 
aspects of the science of the earth. Each undergraduate completes an 
individual research project under the direction of a faculty member. 

Requirements for Major 

The geology curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of graduate 
school or government or industhal employment. However, students may 
select elective courses that are designed for their particular interest, rather 
than for the broad needs of the professional career. Five areas of 
emphasis include: Advanced Study for Graduate School, Energy and 
Mineral Resources, Mineral and Materials, Environment and Engineering 
Geology, and Earth Science Education. These areas are used by the 
undergraduate advisor to help students plan career directions which fit 
their interests, abilities, and the present and predicted job market. 

All required geology courses must be completed with a grade of C or 
better. An average of C is required in the supporting courses. Courses 
required for the B.S. in geology are listed below. Some courses require 
field trips for which students are expected to pay for room (if required), 
board, and part of the transportation costs. Field camp is taken during the 
summer at Institutions other than UMCP offering camps approved by the 
Department. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements* 33 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

GEOL 100— Physical Geology 3 

GEOL 1 10— Physical Geology Laboratory 1 

GEOL 102— Historical Geology 4 

GEOL 322— Mineralogy 4 

GEOL 331— Invertebrate Paleontology 4 

GEOL 340 — Geomorphology 4 

GEOL 341— Structural Geology 4 

GEOL 342— Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 4 



GEOL 393 — Research Problems in Geology 

(First Senior Semester) 3 

GEOL 394— Research Problems in Geology 

(Second Senior Semester) 3 

GEOL 423— Optical Mineralogy 3 

GEOL 443— Petrology 4 

GEOL 490— Field Camp 6 

SUPPORTING REQUIREMENTS 24 

CHEM 103, 1 13 4, 4 

MATH 140, 141 4, 4 

PHYS 141 . 142 4, 4 

Electives 16-20 

"Of the normal CORE requirements (forty-three credit hours), at least ten 
credits are met by the major requirements in mathematics, chemistry, 
geology or physics (mathematics and the sciences area). 

Advising 

The director of the Undergraduate Program serves as the advisor for 
geology majors, 31 15 Geology Building, 405-4078. 

Honors 

A Geology Honors Program is offered for students of exceptional ability 
and interest in Geology. Qualified majors are invited to participate by the 
departmental Honors Committee. The program follows the University 
Honors Program Track I which is the thesis option and 1 5 credit minimum. 
Students take an honors seminar course, graduate level courses and 
complete a six-credit senior thesis under the supervision of a faculty 
member. 

Details are available from the Director of the Honors Program or the 
Departmental Office 

Honors and Awards 

Bengt Svenonius Memorial Scholarship for graduating senior with the 
highest overall scholastic average: Fernow Memorial Faculty Field Camp 
Awards for geology majors to attend geology summer camp: Sigma 
Gamma Epsilon Award for a senior in geology for Outstanding Scholastic 
Achievement and service to the society: and Best Senior Research 
Award. 

Student Organizations 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon, National Honor Society for Earth Sciences and 
the Geology Club. 

Course Code: GEOL 



GERMANIC AND SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURES (GERM) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

3215 Jimenez Hall, 405-4091 

Professor and Chair: Pfister (Acting) 

Professors: Beicken, Best, Brecht, Oster 

Associate Professors: Berry, Bilik, Fagan, Fleck, Frederiksenf, Glad, 

Hitchcock, Strauch 

Assistant Professors: Greene-Gantzberg, Lekic, Martin. Richter 

Emeriti: Herin, Jones 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

Germanic Language and Literature 
The Major 

Changes in major requirements are under review. Students shoukj check 
with a departmental advisor for updated information 

The undergraduate ma)0r in Germanic Language and Literature consists 
of thirty-six hours beyond the basic language acquisition sequer>ce 



Health Education 97 



(GERM 1 01 -201 ). No course completed with a grade lower than C may be 
used to satisfy the major requirements. Three program options lead to the 
Bachelor ot Arts degree: 1 ) German language. 2) German literature, and 
3) Germanic area studies. Secondary concentration and supportive 
eleclives are encouraged in the other foreign languages, comparative 
literature. English, history, and philosophy. Ma)ors intending to go on to 
graduate study in the discipline are urged to develop a strong secondary 
concentration in a further area of Germanic studies; such "internal minors" 
are available in German language. German literature. Scandinavian 
studies, and Indo-European and Germanic philology. All majors must 
meet with a departmental advisor at least once each semester to update 
their departmental tiles and obtain wntten approval of their program of 
study 

Requirements for Major 

German Language Option 

Core: 220. 301. 302. 321, and 322. Specialization: three of four 
German language courses (401. 403. 405. 41 9P); two 400-level 
German literature courses: two upper-level courses in any of the three 
areas o( specialization. 

German Literature Option 

Core: 220. 301. 302, 321, and 322. Specialization: five 400-level 
German literature courses: two upper-level courses in any of the three 
areas of specialization. 

Germanic Area Studies Option 

Core: 220, 301 , 302, 321 , and 322. (Modern Scandinavian Specializa- 
tion: 369. 461 : live upper-level courses in the Germanic area studies 
group. Medieval Scandinavian Specialization: 383, 475; five upper- 
level courses in the Germanic area studies group. 

Also available is a German Business Option, an International Business- 
German Business Option, and an Engineering-German dual degree. 
Students should contact a departmental advisor for more information. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e., 101, 
102, 201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Russian Language and Literature (RUSS, SLAV) 
The Major 

The undergraduate major in Russian Language and Literature consists of 
39 hours beyond the basic language acquisition sequence (RUSS 101 , 
102,201, 202). No course grade lower than C may be used to satisfy the 
major requirements. Two program options lead to the B.A. degree: 1) 
Russian Language and Literature or2) Russian Language and Linguistics. 

A common set of core courses is required of all majors, and each option 
must be supported by 9 hours of related course work. 

Requirements for Major 

1 ) Core (1 8 hours): 21 or 21 1 . 301 , 302. 303, 321 . 322; 2) Supporting 
Courses (9 hours) - LING 200 or ENGL 301 are required, depending 
on specialization (LING 200 for the Russian language and linguistics 
option, ENGL 301 for the Russian language and literature option); 
6 additional hours chosen in consultation with a departmental 
advisor. At least 6 of the 9 total hours must be at the 300-400 level. 
Specialization (12 hours): all requirements of at least one option 
must be fulfilled. 

a) Russian Language and Literature Option 

401, 403. 431 or 432, 433 or 434. 409, 439, or 479 may be 
substituted for one of 431-434 upon consent of the Under- 
graduate advisor. 

b) Russian Language and Linguistics Option 

479 and three additional courses chosen from among 410,411, 
412,473,475. 

Also available is a Russian Business Option. Students should contact a 
departmental advisor for more information. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e., 101, 
102, 201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be 
taken for credit. 



Honors in German 

The Department of Germanic and Slavic offers an extensive Honors 
Program tor majors The Honors Program affords Honor students sus- 
tained individual contact with faculty members. Honors Students are 
called on to work independently, to pursue a project that carries them 
beyond the regular undergraduate curriculum. Interested students should 
ask for detailed information from the Department Honors Studies Director. 

Course Codes: GERM, RUSS, SLAV 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (GVPT) 
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2181 LeFrak, 405-4154 

Professor and Chair: Wilkenfeld 

Professors: Alford', Butterworth', Claude', Davidson. Dawisha, Elkin, 
Glass, Gurr, Harrison (Emeritus). Hathorn (Emeritus). Hsueh, Marando, 
McNelly (Emeritus), Oppenheimer', Phillips, Piper, Pirages, Plischke 
(Emeritus), Ouester, Reeves, Stone, Usianer, Wilkenfeld 
Associate Professors: Glendening, Heisler, Kaminski, McCarrick, Mcin- 
tosh, Ranald, Soltan, Terchek, Williams, Wilson 
Assistant Professors: Haufler, Herrnson, Lalman, Lanning, Swistak, 
Tismaneanu 
Lecturer: Vietri 

'Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Department of Government and Politics offers programs designed to 
prepare students for government service, politics, foreign assignments, 
teaching, and a variety of graduate programs, law schools, and for 
intelligent and purposeful citizenship. Satisfactory completion of require- 
ments leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree in government and politics. 

The study of politics is both an ancient discipline and a modern social 
science. The origin of the discipline can be traced back to the earliest times 
when philosophers, statesmen, and citizens studied the nature of govern- 
ment justice, responsibility, and the consequences of government's 
action. More recently, the study of politics has also emphasized scientific 
observations about politics. Today, the discipline reflects a broad effort to 
collect data about politics and governments utilizing relatively new tech- 
niques developed by all of the social sciences. 

The Department of Government and Politics combines both philosophical 
and scientific concerns in its overall program as well as in specific courses 
and emphasizes such broad areas as political development, policy 
analysis, social justice, political economy, conflict, and human rights. 
These broad conceptual areas are integral components of the formal 
fields in the department. The formal fields are (1 ) American government 
and politics; (2) comparative government; (3) political theory; (4) interna- 
tional affairs; (5) public administration; (6) public law; and (7) public policy 
and political behavior. 

Admission to the Department of Government and 
Politics 

See the Admissions section in this catalog for general LEP admissions 
policies. 

Freshman Admission and the 45 Credit Review. Most first-time enter- 
ing freshmen will gain admission to the Department of Government and 
Politics directly from high school. Those freshmen who are admitted 
directly to Government and Politics will be subject to a performance review 
by the time they have completed 45 credits. To meet the provisions of the 
review, these students must complete: (1 ) a minimum cumulative GPA of 
2.0; and (2) GVPT 1 00, GVPT 1 70, and ECON 201 or 205 with a minimum 
average of 2.6 for the three courses. Students may attempt ECON 201 or 
205, but not both. Students who do not meet this standard will not be 
allowed to continue in the LEP and will be required to select another major. 

Transfer Admission. The following requirements affect new transfer 
students to the university as well as on-campus students hoping to change 
majors to the Department. Admission of transfer students may be severely 
limited, and capacity is determined each year in accordance with the 
success of incoming freshmen. 



98 Hearing and Speech Sciences 



In order to be admitted to Government and Politics, transfer students will 
be required to meet the following set of gateway requirements: (1) 
completion of GVPT 100, GVPT 170. and ECON 201 or 205 (only one, 
ECON 201 or 205, may be attempted) with a minimum average of 2.6; and 
(2) attainment of a minimum cumulative GPA for all college-level work 
attempted. The required GPA is set each year and may vary from year to 
year depending upon available space. 

Appeals. Students who are unsuccessful in gaining admission to Govern- 
ment and Politics at the freshman or transfer level, and believe they have 
extenuating or special circumstances which should be considered, may 
appeal in writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. The student 
may be notified in writing of the appeal decision once it is made. Contact 
the Counselor for Limited Enrollment programs at 301-314-8378 for 
further information. 

Students admitted to Government and Politics as freshmen who do not 
pass the 45 credit review but believe they have special circumstances 
which should be considered may appeal directly to the Department. 

Requirements for Major 

Government and Politics majors must complete thirty-six semester hours 
of GVPT courses with a minimum grade of C in each course and may not 
count more than forty-two semester hours of GVPT courses in the total 
credits required for graduation. At least eighteen of the thirty-six credits 
must be in upper-level courses and all majors are required to complete 
GVPT 1 00, GVPT 1 70, and either GVPT 441 or GVPT 442. 

In addition, all majors must complete ECON 201 or ECON 205, an 
approved skill option, and a secondary area of concentration in another 
department or approved interdisciplinary area. All courses used to satisfy 
these requirements must be completed with a minimum grade of C. 

Honors Program 

All students majoring in government may apply for admission to the GVPT 
Honors Program. Additional information concerning the Honors Program 
may be obtained at the department offices. 

Internships 

The department offers students a variety of internship experiences. Only 
nine hours of GVPT internship credit will apply to the thirty-six hours 
needed in the major. In no case may more than fifteen GVPT internship 
credits be counted toward the 1 20 credits needed to graduate. Internships 
are open only to GVPT majors with junior standing and a 3.0 GPA. 

Advising 

Academic advising is available daily on a walk-in basis in the Undergraduate 
Advising Office. 2173 LeFrak Hall. 

Course Code: GVPT 



HEALTH EDUCATION (HLTH) 

College of Health and Human Performance 

2387 HLHP Building, 405-2438 

Professor and Chair: Gilbert 

Associate Chair: Clearwater 

Professors: Burt, Feldman, Gold, Greenberg, Leviton, Wilson 

Associate Professors: Beck. Clearwater, Ettenson, Meiners, Thomas 

Assistant Professors: Alexander, Desmond, Hacklander 

Lecturers: Hyde. Sawyer, Scaffa, Schiraldi 

Faculty Research Assistants: Baker. Chu, Scofield. Spalding, Swartzlander 

The Major 

Students majoring in health education have two tracks to choose from at 
the undergraduate level. One option is community health education, 
which prepares students for entry level health education positions in 
community settings such as voluntary health associations, worksite 
health promotion programs, or other health agencies. The second option 
is school health education which prepares students for teaching health 



education in schools. Students are referred to the section on the College 
of Education for information on teacher education application procedures. 
Two certificate options are also available in driver education. 

Requirements for Major 

Students must earn a grade of "C" or tjetter in courses applied toward the 
major. 

Health Education Major 

The Freshman and Sophomore curricula for both the School Health 
Option and the Community Health Option are the same: 

Semester 
Freshman Year Credit Hours 

CORE Requirement 6 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

MATH 1 1 OR tVIATH 1 02 AND 1 03 AND 1 05 

OR 115: Mathematics 3 

HLTH 140 — Personal and Community Health 3 

CHEM 111— Chemistry in Modern Life 3 

BIOL 105— Pnnciples of Biology I 4 

HLTH 371— Communicating Health and Safety 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 3 

HLTH 150 — First Aid and Emergency Medical Services 2 

Sophomore Year 

HLTH 230— Introduction to Health Behavior 6 

PHIL 140 — Contemporary Moral Issues 3 

ZOOL 201 , 202— Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II ... 4,4 

Required Health Electives 6 

PSYC 221— Social Psychology 3 

HLTH 105— Science and Theory of Health 2 

CORE Requirement 9 

School Health 



Junior Year 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing 

HLTH 420 — Methods and Materials in Health Education .... 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 

Required Health Elective 

EDHD 340 — Human Development Aspects of the Helping 

Relationship 

HLTH 390 — Organization and Administration of Health 

Programs 

EDMS 410 — Principles of Testing and Evaluation 

EDCP 417 — Group Dynamics and Leadership 

CORE Requirement 

Senior Year 

HLTH 340 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 

Required Health Electives 

EDPA 301 —Foundations of Education 

EDCI 491 — Student Teaching in Secondary 

Schools Health 

CORE Requirement 

Community Health 

Junior Year 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing 

MICB 100— Basic Microbiology 

EDHD 340— Human Development Aspects of the Helping 

Relationships 

EDMS 451— Introduction to Educational Statistics 

HLTH 390 — Organization and Administration of School 

Health Programs 

HLTH 420 — Methods and Matenals in Health Education .... 

HLTH 498R— Introduction to Community Health 

HLTH 437 — Consumer Behavior 

HLTH 430— Health Education in the Workplace 

EDCP 417 — Group Dynamics and Leadership 

CORE Requirement 



Hebrew and East Asian Languages and Literatures 99 



Senior Year 

Required Health Electlves 9 

HLTH 498C— Principles of Community Health 3 

FMCD 483— Family and Community Service Systems 3 

HLTH 489— Field Latwratory Projects and Workshops 6 

HLTH 4981— Internship 3 

HLTH 498J— Internship 3 

Driver Education Instructors Certification Programs: Contact Dr. Harvey 
Cleanwaler, Room 0105 Cole Field House. 405-2579; or Room 2387 
HLHP Building, 405-2464 

Admission 

Admission requirements to the Department of Health Education are the 
same as those of the College of Education. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Undergraduate Health Education Advisor: David 
H. Hyde, 2374 HLHP Building, 405-2523 or 405-2463. 

Student Honors Organization 

Eta Sigma Gamma. The Epsiion chapter was established at the University 
of Maryland in May 1969. This professional honorary organization for 
health educators was established to promote scholarship and community 
service for health majors at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. 
Students may apply after two consecutive semesters with a 2.75 cumu- 
lative average. 

Course Code: HLTH 



HEARING AND SPEECH SCIENCES (HESP) 
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

0100 LeFrak Hall. 405-4214 

Associate Professor and Chair: Bernstein- Ratner 

Professors: Yeni-Komshian, McCall 

Associate Professors: Dingwall. Gordon-Salant. Ratner. Roth 

Instructors: Bngham. Daniel, Hart-Lits. McCabe, Perlroth, Worthington 

Lecturer: Balfour 

The Major 

Hearing and speech sciences is an inherently interdisciplinary field, 
integrating knowledge from the physical and biological sciences, medi- 
cine, psychology, linguistics, and education in order to understand human 
communication and its disorders. The department curriculum leads to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. An undergraduate major in this field is an 
appropriate background torgraduate training in speech-language pathology 
or audiology. as well as for graduate work in other disciplines requiring a 
knowledge of normal or disordered speech, language, or hearing. The 
student who wishes to work professionally as a speech-language pa- 
thologist or audiologist must complete additional graduate coursework in 
order to meet state licensure and national certification requirements. 

The heanng and speech sciences curriculum is designed in pan to provide 
supporting coursework for majors in related fields, so most course 
offerings are available to both departmental majors and non-majors. 
Permission of instructor may be obtained for waiver of course prerequi- 
sites for non-majors wishing to take hearing and speech courses of 
interest. 

Requirements for Major 

A student majoring in hearing and speech sciences must complete thirty 
semester hours of specified courses and six semester hours of electives 
in the department to satisfy major course requirements. No course with a 
grade less than C may count toward major course requirements. In 
addition to the thirty-six semester hours needed for a major, twelve 
semester hours of supporting courses in statistics and other related fields 
are required. For these twelve hours, a C average is required. 



A guide to the major is available through the department office in room 
0100. LeFrak 

Advising 

Information on advising for hearing and speech sciences may t>e obtained 
by calling the department office. 405-4214, 

Special Opportunities: The department operates a Hearing and Speech 
Clinic, 405-4218, that serves the campus and surrounding area, and 
provides an in-house opportunity for the clinical training of students. 
Department facilities also include an integrated audio-visual listening and 
viewing laboratory, and several well-equipped research laboratories. 

Student Organizations 

Heanng and speech majors are invited to ]oin the departmental branch of 
the National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association 
(NSSLHA), 

Course Code: HESP 



HEBREW AND EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURES (HEBR, CHIN, JAPN) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2106 Jimenez Hall, 405-4239 

Professor and Chair: Unger 

Professors: Berlin, Ramsey 

Associate Professors: Chin, Kerkham, Manekin, Sargent, Walton 

Affiliate Associate Professor: Oh 

Assistant Professor: Yee 

Instructors: Levy, Liberman, Miura, Yaginuma 

Hebrew Language and Literature 

The Hebrew Program provides, both to beginners and to those with 
previous background, an opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills 
in Hebrew language, literature, culture, and thought. Elementary and 
Intermediate level language courses develop effective communica- 
tions skills in modern Hebrew. Upper level language courses empha- 
size reading comprehension, vocabulary enrichment, and writing skills. 
More advanced students focus on the analytical study of major classi- 
cal and modern Hebrew texts. In addition, courses are offered in 
English (no knowledge of Hebrew required) in the areas of Bible. 
Ancient Near East. Rabbinic thought. Jewish Philosophy, and Hebrew 
literature in translation. 

While there is no Hebrew major, students wishing to focus on Hebrew 
language as a primary subject may do so through a concentration on 
Hebrew within tfie Jewish Studies major (see Jewish Studies program). A 
certificate is also available to students qualifying for a minor. Consult the 
Hebrew office for requirements. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e., 1 01 , 
102, 201. 202. etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Hebrew may be used to meet University and College language 
requirements. 

Honors and Awards 

Several forms of recognition for those excelling in Hebrew are available: 
Membership in Eta Beta Rho. the Hebrew Honor Society, the Bnai Zion 
Award. 

Students are encouraged to apply for residence in the Hebrew suite of the 
Language House, and are encouraged to spend some time studying at an 
Israeli University. The University of Maryland sponsors a semester 
program at Tel Aviv University. Scholarships for study in Israel are 
available through the Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies. 



100 Horticulture 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 
The Major 

A proposal to make the concentrations in Cfiinese and Japanese into 
separate degrees is currently under review. Interested students should 
contact the department for more information. 

A student may major in East Asian languages and literatures with a 
concentration in Chinese or Japanese. Either concentration provides the 
training and cultural background needed for entering East Asia-related 
careers in such fields as higher education, the arts, business, govern- 
ment, international relations, agriculture, or media. Students may also 
want to consider a double major in East Asian languages and literatures 
and another discipline, such as business, international relations, econom- 
ics or journalism. 

After completing the prerequisite of one year of language (twelve credits): 
CHIN 101 (Elementary Chinese; six hours per week, fall). CHIN 102 
(Elementary Spoken Chinese; three hours per week, spring), and CHIN 
1 03 (Elementary Written Chinese; three hours per week, spring) or JAPN 
101 (Elementary Japanese I; six hours per week, fall) and JAPN 102 
(Elementary Japanese II; six hours per week, spring), students must 
complete thirty-six credits for the major course requirements (eighteen 
language, six civilization/history, twelve elective). No grade lower than C 
(2.0) may be used toward the major. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e., 1 01 , 
102, 201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Chinese Course Requirements 

Language: CHIN 201 , 202, 203, 204, 301 , 302; Civilization/History: Option 
1 : HIST 284 and 481 (or 485); Option 2 : HIST 285 and 480; four electives 
at the 300 level or above in Chinese language, literature, linguistics, or 
other East Asian subjects, subject to the approval of student's advisor. 
Among the four, one must be in the area of Chinese linguistics, and one 
in the area of Chinese literature, subject to the approval of the student's 
advisor. 

Japanese Course Requirements 

Language: JAPN 205, 206. 301 , 302; Civilization/History: Option 1 : HIST 
284 and 483; Option 2 : HIST 285 and 482; four electives at the 300 level 
or above. Among the four, one must be in the area of Japanese linguistics 
and one in Japanese literature, subject to the approval of the student's 
advisor. 

Supporting Courses for Chinese or Japanese 

Students are strongly urged to take additional courses in a discipline 
relating to their particular field of interest, such as art, history, linguistics, 
literary criticism, or comparative literature. The range of supporting 
courses can be decided upon in consultation with the student's advisor. 

Special Language Courses 

In addition to the more traditional courses in literature in translation, 
linguistics, and advanced language acquisition, courses in both Chinese 
and Japanese business language at the third-year level are offered. 
Students are also encouraged to spend at least one summer or semester 
in China (Taiwan or the People's Republic of China) or Japan in intensive 
language study under one or another of the university's exchange pro- 
grams with foreign universities or at other approved centers of higher 
education. 



Internship Program 



This program allows students to gain practical experience by worthing in 
Washington/Baltimore area firms, corpwrations, and social service orga- 
nizations that are East Asia-related, as well as in various branches of the 
Federal government. Students are also invited to apply for the East Asian 
Studies Certificate. Please check the appropriate entry for details. 

Course Codes; CHIN, HEBR, JAPN 



HISTORY (HIST) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

21 15 Francis Scott Key Hall, 405-4265 

Professor and Acting Chair: Fousi 

Professors: Belz, Berlin', Brush', Callcott', Cockburn, Cole' (Emeritus), 

Duffy (Emeritus), Evans, Gilbert', Gordon (Emeritus). Griffith, Harian' 

(Emeritus), Henretta, Hoffman, Kaufman, Jashemski' (Emerita), Kent 

(Emeritus), Lampe, Merrill (Ementus), A. Olson', K. Olson, Price, E.B. 

Smith (Emeritus). Sparks (Emeritus). Spiegel, Sutherland. Warren, Wnght, 

Yaney (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Bedos-Rezak, Breslow. Cooperman, Darden, 

Eckstein, Flack, Friedel, Giffin, Grimsted, Gullickson, Harris. Holum, 

Majeska, IVIatossian, (^ayo. Moss, Perinbam, Ridgway, Rozenblit, 

Stowasser, Sumida, Zilfi 

Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Bravman, Muncy, Nicklason, RowlarxJ, 

Thompson, Wetzell, Williams 

Adjunct: Carr, Papenfuse 

'Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Department of History seeks to broaden the student's cultural 
background through the study of history and to provide preparation for 
those interested in law, publishing, teaching, journalism, government 
service, and graduate study. 

A faculty advisor assists each major in planning a curriculum to meet his 
or her personal interests A "program plan," approved by the advisor, 
should be filed with the department as soon as possible Students are 
required to meet with an assigned advisor once every semester or sign a 
waiver during registration. 

The department sponsors a History Undergraduate Association which 
majors and other interested students are encouraged to join. 

Requirements for Major 

Minimum requirements for undergraduate history majors consist of thirty- 
nine hours of coursework distributed as follows: twelve hours in 100-200 
level survey sources selected from at least two general geographical 
fields of history (United States, European, and Non-Western); fifteen 
hours, including HIST 309 in one major area of concentration (see below); 
twelve hours of history in at least two major areas other than the area of 
concentration. Without regard to area, fifteen hours of the thirty-nine total 
hours must be at the junior-senior (300-400) level. NOTE: All majors must 
take HIST 309. 

I. Survey Courses 

1 . The requirement is twelve hours at the 100-200 level taken in at 
least two geographical fields. 

2. Fields are defined as United States, European, and Non-Western 
history. All survey courses have t)een assigned to one of these 
fields. See department advisor. 

3. In considering courses that will fulfill this requirement, students are 
encouraged to: 

a. select at least two courses in a sequence 

b. select at least one course before 1 500 and one course 
after 1500. 

c. sample both regional and topical course offenngs. Students will 
normally take one or more survey courses within their major 
area of concentration. 

H. Major Area of Concentration 

1 . The requirement is fifteen hours, including HIST 309, in a major 
area of concentration 

2. An area consists of a selection of related topical, chronoksgical, or 
regional courses The areas are 

Topical: History & Philosophy of Science. Intellectual. Economic. 
Religious. Diplomatic. Women's History, Afncan-Amencan, Jew- 
ish, Legal, Military 

Chronological: Early Modern Europe. Medieval Europe. Ancient 
World 

Regional: Latin Amenca. Middle East. Europe. United Stales. 
East Asia. Africa, East Europe, Russia, Bntain 

3. The major area may be chronological, regional, or topical. 

4. Students may select both lower and upper level courses 



Housing and Design 101 



5. A combination of chronological-topical courses or regional-topical 
courses is desirable. 

6. The proseminar, HIST 309. should normally be taken in the major 
area of concentration In the senior year. 

III. Twelve Hours of History In at Least Two Areas Outside the Area 
of Concentration 

1 . Students may select either lower or upper level courses. 

2. Students are encouraged to consider regional diversity. 

3. Students are encouraged to take at least two courses In chrono- 
logical periods other than that of their major area of concentration. 

IV. Supporting Courses Outside History Nine credits at the 300-400 
level in appropriate supporting courses: the courses do not all have to 
be in the same department The choice of courses must be approved 
in wnling [before attempted, if possible] by the Director of Undergradu- 
ate Studies. Supporting courses should study some aspect of culture 
and society as taught by other disciplines In the student's area of 
concentration. 

Grade of C or higher is required In all required history and supporting 
courses. 

For students matriculating after December 1 979. credit may not be earned 
from the CLEP general history exam; for students matriculating after 
September 1. 1981. history credit may not be earned from any CLEP 
exam. 

History courses that meet University general education requirements 
(CORE) are listed In the Schedule of Classes each semester. 

Honors 

Students who major or minor In history may apply for admission to the 
History Honors Program during the second semester of their sophomore 
year. Those who are admitted to the program substitute discussion 
courses and a thesis for some lecture courses; they must defend their 
theses to a departmental committee. Successful candidates are awarded 
either honors or high honors in history. 

The History Department offers pre-honors work in American history and 
In European history courses. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific 
offerings each semester. Students In these sections meet In a discussion 
group instead of attending lectures. They read widely and do extensive 
written work on their own. Pre-honors sections are open to any student 
and are recommended for students In University Honors Program, subject 
only to the instructor's approval. 

Course Code: HIST 



HORTICULTURE (HORT) 
College of Agriculture 

Undergraduate Program: 2109B Holzapfel Hall, 405-4374 

Professor and Chair: Gouin (Acting) 

Professors: Ng. Oliver, Quebedeaux, Solomos, Walsh, Wiley 

Professors Emeritus: Link, Scott. Shanks, Stark. Thompson, Twigg 

Associate Professors: Beste, Bouwkamp, Deitzer, McClurg. Plhlak, Scarfo. 

Schales. Schlimme, Swartz 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Courtenay, Hllsenrath, Rab. Wallace 

Assistant Professors: Hamed. Hershey 

Lecturers: MItyga, Nola 

Horticulture students select from a broad spectrum of courses Including 
science, humanities and art. Knowledge of basic sciences and factors 
affecting plant growth are applied to resolve world food and environmental 
needs. Humanities, environmental plants and management courses are 
pursued by students wishing to design functional, aesthetically pleasing 
living spaces. 

The Department of Horticulture offers undergraduate curricula In Horticul- 
tural Production, Horticultural Science, Horticultural Education, and Land- 
scape Design and Contracting. Each prepares students for graduate 
study or entry into horticultural Industries. Advanced studies In the 
department, leading to the IVI.S. and Ph.D. degrees, are available to 
qualified students Interested In research, university teaching, and/or 
extension education. 



Forestry programs are available to University of Maryland students 
through the Academic Common Market at Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University (VPI/SU). West Virginia University, and possibly 
other locations. 

Horticulture programs are under review. Please contact the department 
office for the most current information. 

Curriculum in Horticulture 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Departmental Requirements — All Options: 

AGRO 302— General Soils _ 4 

AGRO 453— Weed Control 3 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology 1 4 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 4 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 4 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 4 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 

or CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry r 4 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 

or ENTM 453 — Insect Pests of Ornamental Plants'* 3 

HORT 398— Seminar 1 

MATH 1 1 5— Precalculus 3 

'Students Interested In completing the Horticultural Science Option shall 

enroll In CHEM 233 rather than Chem 104. (Note: CHEM 113 is a 
prerequisite for CHEM 233.) 

"Students interested In completing the Landscape Design and Contract- 
ing Option shall enroll In ENTM 453 rather than ENTM 252. 

Horticultural Production Option 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

AREC 250 — Elements of Agricultural and Resources 

Economics or ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 3 

AREC 306 — Farm Management 

or AREC 414 — Agricultural Business Management 3 

HORT 201 — Environmental Factors & Horticultural Crop 

Production 4 

HORT 202 — Management of Horticultural Crop Production ... 4 

HORT 271— Plant Propagation 3 

BIOL 222— Principles of Genetics 4 

HORT 474 — Physiology of Maturation and Storage of 

Horticultural Crops 3 

Select two of the following: 

AGRO 310— Introduction to Turf 3 

HORT 432— Greenhouse Crop Production 3 

HORT 433 — Technology of Fruit and Vegetable Production .. 4 

HORT 452 — Landscape Establishment and Maintenance 3 

HORT 456— Nursery Crop Production 3 

HORT 472— Advanced Plant Propagation 2 

CORE Program requirements (over and above what 

Is Included In Departmental and Option requirements) 25-28 

Electlves 25-29 

Horticultural Science Option 

CHEM 113— General Chemistry II .- 4 

HORT 201— Environmental Factors & Horticultural Crop 

Production 4 

HORT 202 — Management of Horticultural Crop Production ... 4 

HORT 271— Plant Propagation 3 

BIOL 222— Principles of Genetics 4 

HORT 474 — Physiology of Maturation and Storage of 

Horticultural Crops 3 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I 3 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

Select two of the following: 

AGRO 403— Crop Breeding 3 

AGRO 41 1— Soil Fertility 3 

AGRO 41 7— Soil Physics 3 

AGRO 421— Soil Chemistry 3 

BCHM 281— Elements of Biochemistry 3 

BOTN 416— Plant Structure 4 

BOTN 484 — Plant Biochemistry 3 

CORE Program Requirements (over and above what 

Is Included In Departmental and Option requirements) 31 

Electlves 15-16 



102 Housing and Design 

Horticultural Education Option 

AEED 302— Introduction to Agricultural Education 2 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development 3 

AEED 305— Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 

AEED 31 1— Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 

AEED 313— Student Teaching 5 

AEED 315— Student Teaching 1-4 

AGRO 310— Introduction to Turl 3 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 6 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

HORT 160— Introduction to the An of Landscaping 3 

HORT 201— Environmental Factors & Horticultural Crop 

Production 4 

HORT 202— Management of Horticultural Crop Production ... 4 

HORT 271— Plant Propagation 3 

HORT 453— Woody Plant Matenals 

or HORT 454— Woody Plant Materials 3 

SPCH 107— Technical Speech Communication 3 

CORE Program requirements (over and above what is 

included in Departmental and Option requirements) 27 

Electives 6-9 

Landscape Design and Contracting Option 

AREC 250 — Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 

or ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 3 

AREC 306— Farm Management 

or AREC 414 — Agricultural Business Management 

HORT 161— Design Fundamentals 

EDIT 160— Design Illustrating I 

HORT 160— Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 

HORT 260 — Principles of Graphic Communication in 

Landscape Design 

HORT 361— Principles of Landscape Design 

HORT 452— Principles of Landscape Establishment and 

Maintenance 

HORT 453— Woody Plant Materials 

HORT 454— Woody Plant Materials 

HORT 462— Planting Design 

HORT 464 — Phnciples of Landscape Development 

HORT 465 — Design of Landscape Structures and 

Materials 3 

HORT 466 — Advanced Landscape Design 3 

HORT 467— Principles of Landscape Contracting 3 

Electives 8-12 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Internship expenences (HORT 386) are available to interested students. 
Contact Dr. F. Gouin, 405-4374. 

Honors and Awards 

The department sponsors several scholarship and award programs. 
Contact Dr. F. Gouin, 405-4374, for details. 

Student Organizations 

The Horticulture Club provides students the opportunity to gain horticul- 
tural experience, meet new colleagues, and participate in departmental 
activities. Contact club advisor, Prof. Madis Pihiak, 405-4350. Pi Alpha Xi 
is an honorary organization for qualified Horticulture Majors. Dr. D. 
Hershey, 405-4341 , can provide additional information. 

Course Code: HORT 



HOUSING AND DESIGN (HSAD) 

This program has been closed. New students are not being admitted. 
Current students should contact the college for advising. 

College of Arts and Humanities 
Requirements for Major 

The degree Bachelor of Arts is conferred for the satisfactory completion, 
with an average of C or better, of a prescribed curnculum of 1 20 academic 



semester hour credits. Students must earn a grade of C or higher In all 
courses applied towards satisfaction of the requirements for the major in 
Interior or Advertising Design Moreover, a course in which a grade lower 
than a C was earned cannot be used as a prerequisite for a course 
required lor the major. 

Please Note: The Interior and Advertising Design curricula are 
currently under review; students matriculating after June 1, 1990 
should consult a department advisor for major requirements. 

Advertising Design Curriculum 

(Advertising design courses must be taken in sequence.) 

Semester 
Credit Hours* 

CORE Program Requirements 39-40 

B.A. Requirements" 15 

EDIT 160— Design Illustrating I 3 

DESN 101— Design Studio I 3 

DESN 102— Design Studio II 3 

DESN 103— Design Studio III 3 

ARTH 200— Art of the Western World I" 3 

DESN 204— History of Design 3 

DESN 205— Drawing for Designers 3 

DESN 210— Presentation Tech. Visual Communication 

Design 3 

DESN 230— Typography I 3 

DESN 237— Photography I 3 

DESN 300 — Computers, Design & Graphics" 

(or approv. sub.) 3 

DESN 320— Illustration I 3 

DESN 331— Advertising Design Studio I 3 

DESN 360— History, Culture and Design OR 

DESN 362— Ideas in Design" 3 

DESN 380 — Prof. Practices in Visual Communication 

Design 3 

DESN 430— Advertising Design Studio II 3 

DESN 450 BA— Thesis in Advertising Design" 3 

DESN Elective (DESN 386/387) 3 

DESN Elective 3 

Interior Design Curriculum 

(Interior Design courses must be taken in sequence.) 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements 39-40 

B.A. Requirements 15 

EDIT 160— Design Illustrating I 3 

DESN 101— Design Studio I 3 

DESN 102— Design Studio II 3 

DESN 103— Design Studio III 3 

PHYS 106— Light. Perception, Photography, & Vis. 

Phen." 3 

PHYS 107— lab for PHYS 106" 1 

ARTH 200— Art of the Western World I" 3 

DESN 204— History of Design 3 

DESN 212— Graphic Techniques for Interior Design 3 

EDIT 241— Architectural Drawing 3 

DESN 246— Matenals in Interior Design 3 

DESN 247— Building Technology 3 

HSAD 300— Computers, Design & Graphics" (or approv. sub.) 3 

DESN 342— Space Development 3 

DESN 343— Interior Design Studio I 5 

DESN 360— History Culture and Design 3 

DESN 362— Ideas in Design" 3 

DESN 444— Professional Practices in Interior Design 3 

DESN 445— Interior Design II 5 

DESN 446BA— Thesis in Intenor Design" 6 

DESN Elective (DESN 386/387) 3 

'No upper level credits may be attempted without special permission until 

a student has earned a minimum of 56 credits 

"These credits may simultaneously satisfy University general education 

(CORE) requirements. 

Note: More detailed information about curriculum as well as semeslerby- 

semesler sample programs are available from the department. 

Course Code; DESN 



Human Development 103 



HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (Institute for Child 
Study) (EDHD) 

College of Education 

3304 Benjamin Building. 405-2827 

Professor and Director: Hardy 

Professors: Eliot. Fox, Porges, Pressley. Seefeld', TorneyPurta 

Associate Professors: Bennett, Flatter. Gardner. Holloway. Huebner, 

Marcus. RobertsonTchabo 

Assistant Professors: Byrnes. Green, Smith, Wentzel, Wigfield 

Ementi: Bowie. Dittman, Goering. Hatfield, Morgan 

'Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Department of Human Development offers: { 1 ) undergraduate courses 
in human development at the 200, 300 and 400 levels: (2) graduate 
programs leading to the M.A.. M.Ed. Ed.D and Ph.D. degrees and the 
A.G.S, certificate; and (3) field experiences and internships to develop 
competence in applying theory to practice in schools and other settings. 
Areas of specialization in human development include educational psy- 
chology, infancy, early childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging. 
Research in educational psychology, social, physiological, personality 
and cognitive areas with emphasis on the social aspects of development 
enhance the instructional program. 

Undergraduate courses and workshops are designed for pre-service 
and in-service teachers as well as for students preparing to enter 
human services vocations. The department does not offer an under- 
graduate major. However, undergraduate students may elect human 
development courses in such areas as (1 ) infancy. (2) early childhood. 
(3) adolescence. (4) aging, and (5) educational psychology. Major 
purposes of undergraduate offerings in human development are (1) 
preparing people for vocations and programs which seek to improve 
the quality of human life, and (2) providing experiences which facilitate 
the personal growth of the individual. 

Through the Institute for Child Study, the faculty provides consultant 
services and staff development programs for school systems, parent 
groups, court systems, mental health agencies, and other organizations 
involved with helping relationships. Undergraduate students may partici- 
pate In these programs through coursework and internships. If interested, 
contact the Department/Institute. 

Course Code: EDHD 



HUMAN NUTRITION AND FOOD SYSTEMS 
(HNFS) 

Departmental programs are under review. Please contact the department 
office for the most current information. 

College of Agriculture 

3304 Mane Mount Hall. 405-2139 

Professor and Acting Chair: Moser-Veillon 
Professors: Ahrens. Prather. Sims 
Associate Professors: Castonguay, Jackson 
Lecturers: Curtis, Norton 

The department offers two areas of emphasis: dietetics and human 
nutrition and foods. Each program provides for competencies in several 
areas of work; however, each option is designed specifically for certain 
professional careers. 

Requirements for Major 

The Dietetics major develops an understanding and competency in food, 
nutrition, and management as related to problems of dietary departments 
and delivery of nutritional care. Nutrition education and community 
nutrition are included in this program. The Dietetics program is approved 
by the American Dietetic Association. 

The Human Nutrition and Foods major emphasizes the physical and 
biological sciences in relation to nutrition and the development of labora- 



tory skills in these areas. Students in this major frequently elect to go on 
to graduate or medical school. 

Each of these courses of study includes a set of major subject courses 
offered pnmarily within the department, plus supporting courses taken 
outside the department. To graduate, students must also meet the 
requirements of the University (e.g., those specified in the CORE Pro- 
gram) and the requirements of the College of Agriculture. 

Many courses in these majors are sequential, and some are offered only 
once per year. Contact a departmental advisor for help with scheduling. 

Grades. All students are required to earn a C grade or better in courses 
applied toward satisfaction of the major. This includes all required courses 
with a prefix of FOOD. NUTR. and FSAD as well as certain required 
courses in supporting fields. A list of these courses for each program may 
be obtained from the department office. 

Program Requirements 

I. Dietetics 

a. Major Subject Courses 

NUTR 200— Nutrition for Health Services 3 

NUTR 330— Nutritional Biochemistry 3 

NUTR 440 — Advanced Human Nutrition I 4 

NUTR 450— Advanced Human Nutrition II 4 

NUTR 460 — Therapeutic Human Nutrition 4 

NUTR 470— Community Nutrition 3 

NUTR 475 — Dynamics of Community Nutrition 3 

FOOD 240— Science of Food I 3 

FOOD 250— Science of Food II 3 

FSAD 300 — Foodservice Organization and 

Management 3 

FSAD 350 — Foodservice Operations I 5 

FSAD 440 — Foodservice Personnel Administration 2 

Subtotal 40 

b. Supporting Courses 

MATH 1 1 — Elementary Mathematical Models or 

MATH 115: Pre-Calculus 3 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 1 13— General Chemistry II 4 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 4 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology I 4 

ZOOL 202— Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

SPCH 107 — Speech Communication: 

Principles and Practices 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 

EDMS 451— Introduction to Educational Statistics or 

BIOM 301— Introduction to Biometrics 3 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

ENGL 391 — Advanced Composition or 

ENGL 393— Technical Writing 3 

Additional CORE Program Courses 21 

Electives 1 1 

Subtotal 80 

Total Credits 120 

II. Human Nutrition and Foods 

a. Major Subject Courses 

NUTR 200— Nutrition for Health Sen/ices 3 

NUTR 440 — Advanced Human Nutrition I 4 

NUTR 450— Advanced Human Nutrition II 4 

FOOD 240— Science of Food I 3 

FOOD 250— Science of Food II 3 

FOOD 440 — Advanced Food Science I 3 

FOOD 445 — Advanced Food Science Laboratory 1 

Subtotal 21 

b. Supporting Courses 

MATH 115— Precalculus 3 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I 3 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 113— General Chemistry II 4 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II 4 

ZOOL 21 1— Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology 4 



104 



Human Nutrition and Food Systems 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

BCHM 461— Biochemistry I 3 

BCHM 463— Biochemistry Laboratory 1 2 

BCHM 462— Biochemistry II 3 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 4 

BIOM 301— Introduction to Biometrics 3 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Wnting 3 

ENGL 393— Technical Writing 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 107— Speech Communication: 

Principles and Practices 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

Additional CORE Program Courses 21 

Electives 1 1 

Subtotal 99 

Total 120 



Advising 

Department advising is mandatory. Students should consult the current 
Undergraduate Catalog and also see an appropriate departmental advi- 
sor when planning their course of study. Information on advising may be 
obtained by calling the department office, 405-2139. 



Student Organizations 



The HNFS Department has an active undergraduate club vi^hich does a 
number of outreach activities, sponsors speakers on career-related 
topics, and participates in a variety of social activities. Call 405-2139 for 
more Information. 

Course Codes; FOOD, FSAD, NUTR 



HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 

INDUSTRIAL, TECHNOLOGICAL AND 
OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION (EDIT) 

This program has been closed. New applicants are not being accepted. 
Current students should contact the College of Education for advising. 

The Major 

The Department of Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 
offers programs leading to teacher certification and degrees in five 
different fields of teacher preparation. A sixth field of study, industrial 
technology, is designed to prepare individuals for supervisory, manage- 
ment, and training positions in industry, business, and government. In 
addition, a technical education program is available for persons with 
advanced technical preparation who wish to teach in technical institutes 
or community colleges. 

The five curricula administered by the department include: (1) business 
education: (2) home economics education; (3) industrial arts/technology 
education; (4) industrial technology; (5) vocational-technical education. 
Undergraduate and graduate programs leading to the degrees of Bach- 
elor of Science, Master of Education, Advanced Graduate Specialist. 
Master of Arts, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy are 
available. 

Business Education 

Two curricula are offered for preparation of teachers of business subjects: 
General Business and Secretarial Education. The general business 
education curriculum qualifies students for teaching all business subjects 
except shorthand. Providing thorough training in general business, includ- 
ing economics, this curriculum leads to teaching positions at both junior 
and senior high school levels. 



General Business Education 

A program of 1 24 hours of university credit hours is required for a general 
business education major. Six hours of electives must be selected from 
the business field. 

CORE/USP Requirements 

Academic Support Courses (may also count for CORE/USP Require- 
ments. Consult departmental advisor or worksheet and Schedule of 
Classes) 
MATH 1 1 1 (3) 
SPCH 100. 125 or 220 (3) 

Content Courses 

BMGT 1 1 — Introduction to Business and Management (3) 

EDIT 114 — Principles of Typewriting (2) 

EDIT 1 1 5 — Intermediate Typewriting (2) 

BMGT 220, 221— Principles of Accounting I & II (3) 

ECON 201 , 203— Principles of Economics I & II (USP Distnbutive) (3) 

EDIT 214 — Office Typewriting Problems (2) 

EDIT 215— Survey of Office Machines (3) 

BMGT 380— Business Law (3) 

BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing (3) 

BMGT 302 — Information Systems Implementation Techniques (3) 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization (3) 

EDIT 406— Word Processing (3) 

EDIT 415 — Financial and Economic Education I (3) 

EDIT 416 — Financial and Economic Education II (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270— Field Experiences (3) 

*EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDIT 485 — Field Experiences in Business Education (3) 

*EDPA 301— Foundations in Education (3) 

•EDIT 340— Methods of Teaching Office Skills (3) 

'EDIT 341 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation Business 

Education(3) 
'EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
•EDIT 432— Student Teaching (12) 
•Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Secretarial Education 

The secretarial education curriculum is adapted to the needs of those who 
wish to become teachers of shorthand as well as other business subjects. 
A program of 127 hours of university credit Is required for a secretarial 
education major. Nine hours of electives must be selected from the field 
of business. 

CORE/USP Requirements 

Academic Support Courses (may also count for CORE USP Require- 
ments. Consult departmental advisor or woricsheet and Schedule of 
Classes) 

SPCH 220 Group Discussion (3) 

Content Courses 

EDIT 114 — Principles of Typewriting (if exempt. BMGT 110) (2) 

EDIT 115 — Intermediate Typewriting (2) 

EDIT 116, 1 1 7— Pnnciples of Shorthand I. II (3) 

BMGT 220, 221— Pnnciples of Accounting I & II (3) 

ECON 201 , 203— Pnnciples of Economics I & II (USP Distributive) (3) 

EDIT 214 — Office Typewriting Problems (2) 

EDIT 215— Survey of Office Machines (3) 

EDIT 216 — Advanced Shorthand and Transcription (3) 

EDIT 304— Administrative Secretarial Procedures (3) 

BMGT 380— Business Law (3) 

EDIT 406— Word Processing (3) 

EDIT 405 — Business Communications (3) 

BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270 — Field Expenences in Education for Business and Industry (3) 
"EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 
•EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 
EDIT 485— Field Experiences in Business Education (3) 
•EDIT 340— Methods of Teaching Office Skills (3) 
•EDIT 341 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation Business 
Education (3) 



Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 105 



*EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 
•EDIT 432— Student Teactiing (12) 
■Requires Admission to Teacher Education. 

Home Economics Education 

The home economics curriculum is designed tor students who are 
preparing to teach home economics and includes study in each area of 
home economics and of the supporting disciplines. 

A ma)or in Home Economics Education requires 128 university credit 
hours. The major is an intensive program which includes required courses 
in academic support, content, and professional areas. A nine-hour area of 
concentration designed to give the student expertise in some special facet 
of home economics must be completed with the approval of an advisor. 
No upper level credits can be attempted until a student has earned a 
minimum of fifty-six credits. 

CORE USP Requirements 

Academic Support Courses (may also count for CORE/USP Require- 
ments. Consult departmental advisor or worksheet and Schedule of 
Classes) 

CHEM103(4) 

SPCH100. 107 or 125 (3) 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology (3) 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology (3) 

BIOL 101— Concepts of Biology (3) 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics (3) 

Content Courses 

TEXT 205— Intro, to Textile (Materials or TEXT 105— Textiles in 

Contemporary Living (3) 
NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition (3) 
DESN 101— Fundamentals of Design or 
ARTE 101— Introduction to Art Education (3) 
FMCD 250 — Decision-Making in Family Living (3) 
HSAD 240 — Design and Furnishings in the Home (3) 
or HSAD 251— Family Housing (3) 
EDHD 41 1— Child Growth and Development (3) 
FOOD 210 — Scientific Principles of Food Preparation and 

Ivlanagement (4) 
TEXT 211— Apparel or TEXT 222— Apparel II (3) 
FMCD 330— Family Patterns or FMCD 105 (3) 
SOCY 443— The Family and Society or FMCD 441 (3) 
FMCD 445 — Family and Household Management (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 207 — Bases for Curriculum Decisions in Home Economics (3) 

*EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDIT 435 — Curriculum Development in Home Economics (3) 

EDIT 436 — Field Experience in Analysis of Child Development Lab (3) 

*EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDIT 493 — Home Economics lor Special l^eed Learners or 

EDSP 470— Introduction to Special Education (3) 

*EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDIT 342 — Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation Home 

Economics (3) 
EDIT 442 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools Home 

Economics (12) 
•Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Industrial Arts/Technology Education 

This industrial arts/technology education curriculum prepares persons to 
teach industrial arts/technology education at the middle and secondary 
school level. It is a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree. While trade or industrial experience contributes significantly to the 
background of the industrial arts/technology education teacher, previous 
work experience is not a condition of entrance into this curriculum. 
Students who are enrolled in the curriculum are encouraged to obtain work 
in industry during the summer months. Industrial arts/technology educa- 
tion as a middle and secondary school subject area is a part of the general 
education program characterized by extensive laboratory experiences. 

To obtain a bachelor's degree in Industrial Arts Education, a student must 
complete 128 hours of University credit. The major is intensive and 
involves required courses in academic support, content, and professional 
areas. Eight hours of elective credit should be taken with the advice of the 
advisor. No upper level credits can be attempted until a student has 
earned a minimum of fifty-six credits. 



CORE/USP Requirements 

Academic Support Courses (may also count lor CORE/USP Require- 
ments. Consult departmental advisor or worksheet and Schedule of 
Classes) 

CHEM 102 or 103(4) 
SPCH 100(3) 
PHYS 111 or 112(3) 
ECON 205 

Content Courses 

EDIT 101— Mechanical Drawing I (2) 

EDIT 102— Fundamentals of Woodworking (3) 

EDIT 112— Technical Calculations (3) 

EDIT 262— Basic Metal Machining (3) 

EDIT 121— Mechanical Drawing II (2) 

EDIT 202— Machine Woodworking (3) 

EDIT 127— Fundamentals of Electricity Electronics (3) 

EDIT 233— Fundamentals of Power Technology (3) 

EDIT 241— Architectural Drawing (2) 

EDIT 227— Applications of Electronics (3) 

EDIT 223— Arc and Gas Welding (1) 

EDIT 210— Foundry (1) 

EDIT 226— Fundamental Metal-Working Processes (3) 

EDIT 234 — Graphic Communications (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270— Field Expenence (3) 

"EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning (6) 

•EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDIT 31 1— Lab Practicum in Industrial Arts (3) 

"EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDIT 344 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation (3) 

•EDIT 422— Student Teaching (12) 

EDHD 451 — Research and Experimentation in Ind. Arts (3) 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development (3) 

EDIT 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 

EDIT 466 — Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts (3) 

•Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Industrial Technology 

The industrial technology curriculum is a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree. The purpose of the program is to prepare 
persons for jobs within industry. It embraces four major areas of com- 
petence: (a) technical competence; (b) human relations and leadership 
competence; (c) communications competence; and (d) social and civic 
competence. 

To obtain a bachelor's degree in Industrial Technology, a student must 
complete 128 hours of university credit. The program involves required 
courses in academic support and content areas. Twenty-four hours of 
electives should be selected to create a concentration in one of the 
following areas; 

Production and Manufacturing 

Industrial Safety 

Industrial Training and Human Resource Development 

Fire Science and Industrial Safety 

Specific Technical Specialty 

No upper level credits can be attempted until a student has earned a 
minimum of fifty-six credits. 

CORE/USP Requirements 

Academic Support Courses (may also count for CORE/USP Require- 
ments. Consult departmental advisor or worksheet and Schedule of 
Classes) 

PSYC 100(3) 

SPCH 107 (3) 

MATH 1 1 1 or MATH 220 (3) 

PHYS 111 (3) 

CHEM 102 or CHEM 103 (4) 

ECON 205 (3) 

PHYS 112(3) 

Content Courses 

EDIT 262— Basic Metal Machining (3) 

EDIT 101— Mechanical Drawing I (2) 

EDIT 1 1 2— Technical Calculations or EDIT Elective (3) 

EDIT 121— Mechanical Drawing II (2) 



106 Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 



EDIT 21 0— Foundry (1) 

EDIT 223— Arc and Gas Welding (1 ) 

CMSC 103— Intro, to Computing for Non-Majors or 

CMSC 110— Introductory Computer Programming (3/4) 

EDIT 127— Fundamentals of Electricity Electronics (3) 

EDIT 291— Introduction to Plastics Technology (3) 

EDIT 224 — Organized and Supervised Work Experience (3) 

PSYC 361— Industnal Psychology (3) 

EDIT 443— Industnal Safety Education I (3) 

EDIT 465— Ivlodern Industry (3) 

EDIT 226 — Fundamental l^etalworking Processes or 

EDIT 233— Fundamentals of Power Technology OR EDIT 234 — Graphic 

Communications (3) 
BI^GT 360 — Personnel Management (3) 
EDIT 444— Industrial Safety Education II (3) 
EDIT 425— Analysis of Industrial Training Programs I (3) 
EDIT 324— Organized & Supervised Work Experience (3) 
BMGT 362— Labor Relations (3) 

BMGT 385— Production Management or approved BMGT Elect. (3) 
EDIT 360 — Industrial Production Technology or approved BMGT 

Elective (3) 

Distributive Education" 

A major in Distributive Education prepares the student for a career in 
teaching at the high school level in a cooperative vocational education 
program. The degree requires completion of courses in three components 
beyond the USP program academ.ic support, content and professional 
courses. The nine credit hours of electives must be selected from BMGT 
or EDIT offerings. Students must apply for admission to the Teacher 
Education Program during the semester in \Nh\cU they are completing 45 
credit hours. 

CORE USP Requirements 

Academic Support Courses (may also count for CORE/USP Require- 
ments. Consult departmental advisor or worltsheet and Schedule of 
Classes) 
SPCH100(3) 

Content Courses 

BMGT 110— Business Enterprise (3) 

ECON 201 — Principles of Economics I (3) 

ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II (3) 

BMGT 220 — Principles of Accounting I (3) 

BMGT 221— Principles of Accounting II (3) 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization (3) 

BMGT 353— Retail Management (3) 

BMGT 354 — Promotion Management (3) 

BMGT 360 — Personnel Management (3) 

BMGT 380— Business Law I (3) 

BMGT 455— Sales Management (3) 

EDIT 486— Field Experience (3) 

EDIT or BMGT Electives (9) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270— Field Experiences (in Education) (3) 

"EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDIT 350 — Methods of Teaching: Trades and Industry (3) 

'EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDIT 414 — Organization and Coordination of Cooperative 

Education Programs (3) 
EDSP 21 0— Introduction to Special Education OR EDSP 475— Education 

of the Slow Learner (3) 
'EDIT 482— Student Teaching: Trade and Industry (12) 
EDIT 457— Tests and Measurements (3) 
'Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

"A name change to Marketing Education has been proposed but has not 
yet been finally approved 

Vocational-Technical Education 

The vocational-technical programs may lead either to certification as a 
vocational-industrial teacher with no degree involved or to a Bachelor of 
Science degree, including certification. The University of Maryland is 
designated as the institution which shall offer the "Trades and Industries" 
certification courses. The courses offered are those required for certifica- 
tion in Maryland. The vocational-technical curriculum requires trade 
competence as specified by the Maryland Slate Plan for Vocational- 
Industrial Education. A person who aspires to be certified should review 
the stale plan and contact the Maryland State Department of Education. 



If the person has in mind teaching in a designated school system, he or 
she may discuss his or her plans with the vocational-industrial education 
representative of that school system inasmuch as there are vanations in 
employment and certification requirements. 

Vocational-Technical Degree Program 

The vocational-technical curriculum is a four-year program of studies 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in education It is intended to 
develop the necessary competencies for the effective performance of the 
tasks of a vocational or occupational teacher. 

To obtain a bachelor's degree in Vocational-Technical Education, a 
student must complete 128 hours of university credit The major Is 
intensive and involves required courses in academic support, content, 
and professional areas. Five hours of elective credit should be taken with 
the advice of an advisor. An additional twelve credits of electives are 
included if student has been exempted from study teaching on the t)asis 
of prior experiences. 

Persons pursuing this curriculum must present documentary evidence of 
having an apprenticeship or comparable learning period and journeyman 
experience. This evidence of background and training is necessary in 
order that the trade examination phase of the curriculum may be accom- 
plished. If sufficient trade expenence is unavailable, such experience 
must be completed while pursuing the degree. Twenty semester hours of 
credit toward the degree are granted upon satisfactory completion of the 
trade competency examination. 

Persons having completed the necessary certification courses pnor to 
working on the degree program may use such courses toward meeting 
graduation requirements. However, after certification course require- 
ments have been met, persons continuing studies toward a degree must 
take courses in line with the curriculum plan and University regulations. 
For example, junior level courses may not be taken until the student has 
reached full junior standing. 

CORE/USP Requirements 

Academic Support Courses (may also count tor CORE'USP Require- 
ments. Consult departmental advisor or worksheet and Schedule of 
Classes) 

SPCH100(3) 
ECON 205 (3) 
MATH 115 (3) 
PSYC 100 (3) 
CHEM103(4) 

Content Courses 

EDIT 1 12 Technical Calculations (3) 
EDIT 465 Modern Industry (3) 

Professional Courses 

EDIT 270— Field Expenence (3) 

'EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDIT 462 — Occupational Analysis and Course Construction (3) 

EDIT 450— Training Aids Development (3) 

EDIT 471— Principles and History of Vocational Education (3) 

EDIT 457— Tests and Measurements (3) 

EDIT 350— Methods of Teaching (3) 

'EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education (3) 

EDIT 482— Student Teaching' (12) 

EDIT 461— Pnnciples of Vocational Guidance (3) 

EDIT 499 — Coordination of Co-op Work Experience (3) 

'EDPA 301— Social Foundations of Education (3) 

EDIT 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 

'Requires Admission to Teacher Education 

Elective courses in the technical area (shop and drawing) will be limited 
to courses and subjects not covered in the trade training expenence. 
Courses dealing with advanced technology and recent improvements in 
field practices will be acceptable. 

Vocational-Industrial Certification 

To become certified as a trade industnal and service occupations teacher 
in the State of Maryland a f>erson must successfully complete eighteen 
credit hours of instnjction plus a three credit course m sp>ecial education 
or mainstreaming. 

The following courses must be included in the eighteen credit hours of 

instruction: 



Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 107 



EDIT 350— Methods ot Teaching (3) 

EDIT 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 

EDIT 457— Tests and Measurements (3) 

EDIT 462— Occupational Analysis and Course Construction (3) 

The remainder ot the credit hours shall be met through the election ol any 

two ot the following seven courses or completing one ot the options: 

EDCP 41 1 —Mental Hygiene (3) 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development (3) 

EDIT 461— Pnnciples of Vocational Guidance (3) 

EDIT 465— Modern Industry (3) 

EDIT 467— Problems in Occupational Education (3) 

EDIT 471— History and Principles of Vocational Education (3) 

EDIT 499D— Workshop in Vocational Education (3) 

Option 1 

EDHD 300— Human Growth and Development (6) 

Option 2 

General Psychology (3) 

Educational Psychology (3) 

A person in vocational-technical education may use his or her cenification 
courses toward a Bachelor of Science degree. A maximum of twenty 
semester hours ol credit may be earned through examination in the trade 
in which the student has competence. Prior to taking the examination, the 
student shall provide documentary evidence of his or her apprenticeship 
or learning period and journeyman experience. For further information 
about credit examination refer to the academic regulations or consult with 
the department staff. 

Course Code: EDIT 



JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM 
College of Arts and Humanities 

2106 Jimenez Hall. 405-4241 

Director: Cooperman 

Professors: Beck, Berlin, Diner, Handelman 

Associate Professors: Bilik, Cooperman. Manekin, Rozenblit 

Instructors: Levy, Liberman 

The Major 

The Jewish Studies major provides undergraduate students with a 
framework for organized and interdisciplinary study of the history, phi- 
losophy, and literature of the Jews from antiquity to the present. Jewish 
Studies draws on a vast literature in a number of languages, especially 
Hebrew and Aramaic, and includes the Bible, the Talmud, medieval and 
modern Hebrew literature. Yiddish language and literature comprise an 
important sub-field. 

Requirements for Major 

The undergraduate major requires forty-eight semester hours (twenty- 
seven hours minimum at 300-400 level) consisting of courses in the 
Department of Hebrew and East Asian Languages and Literatures, the 
History Department, and in other departments as appropriate. 

A minimum grade of C is required in all courses offered toward major 
requirements. A major in Jewish Studies will normally conform to the 
following curriculum: 

1 . Prerequisite: HEBR 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 21 1 , 21 2 (or placement exam) 

2. Required courses: HEBR 313, 314; HIST 282, 283, and either 
HIST 309 or a research-oriented course in Hebrew approved by 
advisor (at 300 level or above); one course in classical Jewish 
literature (200-level); one upper-level course in Hebrew literature 
in which the text and/or language of instruction are in Hebrew, 
(twenty-one credit hours). 

3. Electives: fifteen credits in Jewish Studies courses. At least nine 
credits must be at the 300-400 level. 

4. Twelve credits of supporting courses in areas outside Jewish 
Studies such as history, sociology, philosophy, psychology, or 
literature, including at least six credits at the 300-400 level, to be 
selected with the approval of a faculty advisor. 



Financial Assistance 

The MeyerhoH Center lor Jewish Studies (405-4241 ) otters scholarships 
lor study in Israel. Applications for scholarships are accepted in early 
March. 

See Hebrew departmental entry and East Asian Studies certificate. 
Students may also pursue a Jewish History concentration through the 
Department of History. 



JOURNALISM (JOUR) 

For information, consult the College of Journalism entry. 



KINESIOLOGY (KNES) 

(Formerly Physical Education) 



College of Health and Human Performance 

2351 HLHP Building, 405-2450 

Chair: Clarke 

Associate Chair: Wrenn 

Professors: Clarke, Dotson, Kelley, Sloan, Steel, Vaccaro 

Associate Professors: Clark, Ennis, Hagberg, Hatfield, Hult, Hurley, 

Phillips, Santa Maria, Struna, Wrenn 

Assistant Professors: Arnghi, Caldwell, Chalip, Rogers, Ryder. Scott. 

Tyler. Vander Velden 

Instructors: Drum. Owens, Wenhold 

Lecturer; Brown 

Emeriti: Eyier, Humphrey, Husman 

The Major 

The Department of Kinesiology otters two undergraduate degree pro- 
grams to satisfy different needs of students. Students may choose to 
major in Physical Education or in Kinesiological Sciences. Descriptions of 
each program follow. 

Physical Education Major 

This curriculum, including three certification options, prepares students 

(1 ) for teaching physical education in elementary and secondary schools, 

(2) for coaching, and (3) for leadership in youth and adult groups which 
offer a program of physical activity. Students are referred to the section on 
the College of Education for information on teacher education application 
procedures. The first two years of this curriculum are considered to be an 
orientation period in which the student has an opportunity to gain an 
adequate background in general education as well as in those scientific 
areas closely related to this field of specialization. In addition, emphasis 
is placed upon the development of skills in a wide range of motor activities. 

Physical Education majors have a choice of three separate options for 
teacher certification: (1) kindergarten through sixth grade. (2) seventh 
through twelfth grade or (3) kindergarten through twelfth grade. Due to 
increased marketability it is recommended that students pursue the K-1 2 
option. The specific course requirements for each option are as follows; 

Departmental Requirements/All Certification Options 

Credit Hours 

CORE Requirements (see the Schedule of Classes for 

more specific information) 46 

HLTH 150— First Aid and Safety 2 

PHYS 101 or 111 orCHEM 102 or 103 or 105 3-4 

KNES 180 — Foundations of Physical Education 3 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology 1 4 

ZOOL 201 , 202— Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II 8 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 6 

KNES 300 — Biomechanics of Human Motion 4 



108 Jewish Studies Program 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

KNES 314— Methods in Physical Education 3 

KNES 333— Physical Activity for the Handicapped 3 

KNES 385 — Motor Learning and Skilled Performance 3 

KNES 390 — Practicum in Teaching Physical Education 3 

KNES 480 — Measurement in Physical Education 3 

KNES 491— Curriculum in Physical Education 3 

KNES Skills Laboratories* 17 

'Students should discuss this requirement with department advisors. 

K-6 Certification Option 

KNES 370— Motor Development 3 

EDHD 320— Human Development through the Lifespan 3 

EDCI 485 — Student Teaching in Elementary School-- 

Physical Education 8 

KNES 421— Physical Education for Elementary School: 

A Movement Approach 3 

KNES Electives (6 hours total), KNES 350, KNES 360, or 

KNES 493 6 

Electives 6-7 

7-1 2 Certification Option 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 3 

KNES 381 — Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 3 

EDCl 495 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 8 

KNES 360— Physiology of Exercise 3 

KNES 490— Administration of Physical Education and 

Spon 3 

KNES 493— History and Philosophy of Sport and 

Physical Education 3 

Electives 4-5 

K - 12 Certification Option 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 3 

EDCI 485 — Student Teaching in Elementary Schools 6 

EDCI 495 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 6 

KNES 381— Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries 3 

KNES 421— Physical Education for Elementary School: 

A Movement Approach 3 

KNES 360— Physiology of Exercise 3 

KNES 370— Motor Development 3 

KNES 490 — Administration of Physical Education and 

Sport 3 

KNES 493— History and Philosophy of Sporl and 

Physical Education 3 

The Physical Education program requires a grade of "0" or better in all but 
general education and free elective courses. 

Admission 

Admission to the Physical Education major occurs upon completion of 45 
applicable credits. At that time, students apply through the College of 
Education by taking the California Achievement Test. Additionally, all 
physical education majors must have and maintain a 2.5 average to gain 
admittance and continue in the program. 

Kinesiological Sciences Major 

This curnculum offers students the opportunity to study the body of 
know/ledge of human movement and sport, and to choose specific 
programs of study which allow them to pursue a particular goal related to 
the discipline. There is no intent to orient all students toward a particular 
specialized interest or occupation. This program provides a hierarchical 
approach to the study of human movement. First, a core of knowledge is 
recognized as being necessary for all students in the curriculum. These 
core courses are considered foundational to advanced and more specific 
courses. Secondly, at the "options" level, students may select from two 
sets of courses which they believe will provide the knowledge to pursue 
whatever goal they set for themselves in the future. To further strengthen 
specific areas of Interest, students should carefully select related studies 
courses and electives. 



Kinesiological Sciences Degree Requirements 



Freshman Year 

KNES 287— Sport and American Society . 
KNES 293— History of Sport in America... 



Credits 



Activity Courses* 4 

Electives 3 

Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201 , 202— Human Anatomy and Physioiogy 8 

KNES 370— Motor Development 3 

Activity Courses* 4 

Related Studies* 6 

Junior Year 

KNES 300 — Biomechanics of Human Motion 4 

KNES 350— Psychology of Sports 3 

KNES 360— Physiology of Exercise 3 

KNES 362— Philosophy of Sport 3 

KNES 385— Motor Learning and Skilled Performance 3 

Option* 3 

Related Studies* 6 

Senior Year 

KNES 496— Quantitative Methods 3 

KNES 497— independent Studies Seminar 3 

Electives 7 

Option* 9 

Related Studies* 3 

*Students should discuss these requirements with a department advisor. 

In addition to the above required courses, students must fulfill the CORE 
Program. Minimum number of semester hours for degree is 120. 

The Kinesiological Sciences program requires a grade of "C" or better in 
all but general education and free elective courses. 

Advising 

Advising is strongly recommended for ail students majoring in Physical 
Education and Kinesiological Sciences although it is not mandatory. 
Students are assigned a permanent faculty member to assist them with 
registration procedures, program updates and other information. Stu- 
dents are advised to follow closely the program sheets which outline the 
order in which courses should be taken to allow proper progression 
through the degree programs. Departmental contacts are: Pliysical Edu- 
cation-Lynn Owens, 405-2495; Kinesiological Sciences-Dr. Rot)ert Tyler, 
405-2473. 

Honors and Awards 

The aim of the Honors Program is to encourage superior students by 
providing an enriched program of studies which will fulfill their advanced 
interests and needs. Qualified students are given the opportunity to 
undertake intensive and often independent studies wherein initiative, 
responsibility, and intellectual discipline are fostered. To qualify for 
admission to the program: 

1 . A freshman must have a "B" average in academic (college prep) 
curriculum of an accredited high school. 

2. A sophomore must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 in all college 
courses of official registration. 

3. All applicants must have three formal recommendations concern- 
ing their potential, character, and other related matters. 

4. All applicants must be accepted by the Faculty Honors Committee. 
In completing the program, all honor students must: 

a. Participate in an honors seminar where thesis and other rel- 
evant research topics are studied. 

b. Pass a comprehensive oral examination covering subject mat- 
ter background. 

c. Successfully prepare and defend the honors thesis. 

On the basis of the student's performance in the atwve program, the 
college may vote to recommend graduation without honors, with honors. 
or with high honors. 

Student Organizations 

All students enrolled in physical education as either teacher preparation 
or kinesiological sciences majors are eligible for memljership in the 
Physical Education Student Association (PESA) The goals of PESA are 
(1) to encourage participation in local, state, or regional, and national 
professional organizations, (2) to provide opportunities for leadership 
through involvement in campus, community, and professional activities, 
(3) to promote the study and discussion of current issues, problems, and 



Kinesiology 109 



trends, (4) to assist In the acquisition of career skill competencies by 
application in relevant field experiences. (5) to foster a spirit of service to 
others through volunteer pro|ects. and (6) to sponsor social activities and 
to develop effective professional relationships. 

Course Code: KNES 



LINGUISTICS (LING) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

1109 Mill Building. 405-7002 

Professor and Chair: Lightfoot 

Professor: Hornstein 

Assistant Professors: Gorrell. Lebeaux, Lombardi, Uriagereka, Weinberg 

Affiliate: Anderson. Berndt. Burzio, Caramazza. Gasarch. Zanuttini 

The Major 

The Linguistics Department offers courses on many aspects of language 
study and an interdisciplinary major leading to a Bachelor of Arts. 
Language is basic to many human activities and linguistics relates to many 
other disciplines which include work on language. 

Work on language has provided one of the main research probes in 
philosophy and psychology for most of the 20th century. It has taken on 
a new momentum in the last thirty years and language research has 
proven to be a fruitful means to cast light on the nature of the human mind 
and on general cognitive capacity. Several courses focus on a research 
program which takes as a central question: How do children master their 
native language? Children hear many styles of speech, variable pronun- 
ciations and incomplete expressions, but. despite this flux of expehence. 
they come to speak and understand speech effortlessly, instantaneously 
and subconsciously. Research aims to discover how this happens, how 
a person's linguistic capacity is represented in the mind, and what the 
genetic basis for it is. Students learn how various kinds of data can be 
brought to bear on their central question, how that question influences the 
shape of technical analyses. 

The Major 

The major program in Linguistics is designed for students who are 
primarily interested in human language per se. or in describing particular 
languages in a systematic and psychologically plausible way. or in using 
language as a tool to reveal some aspect of human mental capacities. 
Such a major provides useful preparation for professional programs in 
foreign languages, language teaching, communication, psychology, speech 
pathology, artificial intelligence (and thus computer work). 

Requirements for Major 

Students obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics by following one of two 
tracks: "Grammars and Cognition" or "Grammatical Theory and a Lan- 
guage". In each case, students take a common core of LING courses: 
LING 200. 240. 311-312. 321-322. Beyond this core, students must 
specialize by completing an additional nine hours in LING plus one of the 
following: either eighteen hours from selected courses in HESP, PHIL and 
PSYC. or eighteen hours in a particular language. The specializations in 
detail are: 

Grammars and Cognition 

LING 440 — Grammars and Cognition 

Two 300/400 LING electives 

PHIL 466— Philosophy of Ivlind 

HESP 400 — Speech and Language Development in Children 

OR HESP 498 — Seminar in Psycholinguistics 
PSYC 442— Psychology of Language 
Three 300/400 electives in HESP. PHIL. PSYC or CMSC 

Grammatical Theory and a Language 

LING 410 — Grammars and Meaning and LING 411 — Comparative 

Syntax OR 
LING 420— Word Formation and LING 412— Advanced Phonology 

LING 300/400 elective 
Five required courses in the language of specialization. 
A course in the history or structure of the language of specialization. 



When possible, the language of specialization should be the same as the 
one used to satisfy the college Foreign Language Requirement. The 
specialization normally includes those courses that make up the desig- 
nated requirement for a major in the chosen language. Special provision 
may be made for students who are native speakers of a language other 
than English and wish to conduct analytical work on the grammar of that 
language A student may also study grammatical theory and English; the 
eighteen hour concentration in English consists of courses in the history 
and structure of English to be selected in consultation with the student's 
Linguistics advisor. 

For a double major, students need twenty-seven credits in Linguistics, 
which normally include the LING courses for one of the two specializations. 

Course Code: LING 



MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE AND STATISTICS 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 

MARKETING 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 

MATERIALS AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 
(ENMA, ENNU) 

College of Engineering 

Acting Chair: Wuttig 

Materials Engineering Program (ENMA) 

1 1 1 0C Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Bldg., 405-521 1 

Professor and Director: Wuttig 

Professors: Arsenault. Dieter*. Roytburd 

Associate Professors: Ankem, Armstrong*, Salamanca-Riba 

Assistant Professors: Briber, Lloyd 

*Member of Mechanical Engineehng department 

The Major 

The development and production of novel materials has become a major 
issue in all fields of engineering. Materials which are strong and light at the 
same time are needed for space structures; faster electro-optical switching 
materials will result in improved mass communications; and high tem- 
perature plastics would improve the efficiency of transportation systems. 
Many of today's materials requirements can be met by composites. The 
materials engineehng program provides the student with an interdiscipli- 
nary science-based education to understand the structure and resulting 
properties of metallic, ceramic and polymeric materials. A wide variety of 
careers is open to graduates of this program ranging from production and 
quality control in the traditional matehals industries to the molecular 
construction of electronic materials in ultra-clean environments. 

Students may use Materials Engineehng as a field of concentration in the 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program. 

Requirements for Major 

The curriculum is composed of : (1 ) the required University CORE (general 
education) requirements; (2) a core of mathematics, physics, chemistry, 
and engineering courses required of all engineering students; (3) twelve 
credits of courses selected within a secondary, minor field; (4) twenty- 
three credits of materials engineering courses; and (5) technical electives 



110 Linguistics 



to be selected by the student and his or her advisor to enrich, specialize 
or expand certain areas of knowledge within the chosen field. 

Freshman Year 

The Freshman curriculum is the same for all Engineering departments. 
Please consult The College of Engineering entry. 

Semester 
I II 

Sophomore Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 

K/1ATH 241— Calculus III 4 

I^ATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists 

and Engineers 3 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 4 

CHEM233, 243— Organic Chemistry I, II 4 4 

ENES 230— Introduction to Materials & Their 

Applications 3 

ENME 205— Engineering Analysis and Computer Prog 3 

Total 19 17 

In general, students should not register for 300-400 level engineering 
subjects until and unless they have satisfactorily completed MATH 241 
and 246. 

Junior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

CHEM 481 . 482— Physical Chemistry I, II 3 3 

ENMA 300 — Materials Science and Engineering 3 

ENMA 301— Materials Engineering Laboratory 1 

ENMA 462— Deformation of Engineenng Materials 3 

ENMA 463 — Chemical, Liquid and Powder Process of 

Engineering Materials 3 

Minor Courses 3 3 

Technical Electives 3 

Total 16 15 

Senior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 6 6 

ENMA 470 — Structure and Properties of Engr 3 

ENMA 471— Phys. Chem. of Engineering Materials 3 

ENMA 472— Technology of Engineering Materials 3 

ENMA 473 — Processing of Engineering Materials 3 

Minor Courses 3 3 

Technical Electives 3 

Total 15 18 

Minimum Degree Credits: 1 20 credits and the fulfillment of all department, 

college, and university requirements. 

•Qualified students may elect to take CHEM 105 and 115 (4 sem. hrs. 

each) instead of CHEM 103 and 113. 

"Students must consult with an advisor on selection of appropriate 

courses for their particular course of study. 

Admission 

All Materials Engineering students must meet admission, progress and 
retention standards of the College of Engineering. 

Advising 

Students choosing materials engineering as their primary field should 
follow the listed curriculum for materials engineers. They should submit a 
complete program of courses for approval during their junior year. 
Students electing materials engineering as their secondary field sfiould 
seek advice from the director of the materials engineering faculty prior to 
their sophomore year. Call 405-521 1 to talk to the director or to schedule 
an appointment. 

Co-op Program 

The matenals engineenng program works within the College of Engineer- 
ing Cooperative Engineering Education Program. For details, see the 
College of Engineering entry in this catalog. 



Financial Assistance 

Financial Aid based upon need is available through the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. A number of scholarships are available through the College 
of Engineering. Part-time employment is available in the department. 

Honors and Awards 

Each of the large number of professional materials oriented societies such 
as the metallurgical and ceramic societies sponsor awards to recognize 
outstanding scholarship and undergraduate research All students en- 
rolled in the materials engineenng program are encouraged to select a 
faculty advisor who in their junior and senior year will guide them towards 
nomination for these awards. 

Student Organization: All ma|or professional matenals societies invite 
students to become active in their undergraduate divisions. The materials 
faculty members specializing in certain areas of materials engineering will 
guide the students toward the society of their choice. 

Course Code: ENMA 

Nuclear Engineering Program (ENNU) 

2309 Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Building. 405-5227 

Acting Director: Pertmer 

Professors: Almenas, Hsu, Modarres, Munno, Roush, Silverman 

Associate Professors: Mosleh, Pertmer 

Lecturers: Graves, Lee, Speis 

The Major 

Nuclear Engineering deals with the practical use of nuclear energy from 
nuclearfission, fusion and radioisotope sources. The major use of nuclear 
energy is in electnc power generation. Other uses are in the areas of 
chemical processing, medicine, instrumentation, and isotope trace analy- 
sis. The nuclear engineer is pnmarily concerned with the design and 
operation of energy conversion devices ranging from very large reactors 
to miniature nuclear batteries, and with the use of nuclear reactions in 
many environmental, biological and chemical processes. Because of the 
wide range of uses for nuclear systems, the nuclear engineer finds 
interesting and diverse career opportunities in a variety of companies and 
laboratories. Students may use nuclear engineering as a field of concen- 
tration in the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program. 

Requirements for Major 

The curriculum is composed of: (1) the required University general 
education (CORE) requirements; (2) a core of mathematics, physics, 
chemistry, and engineering sciences required of all engineenng students; 
(3) fifteen credits of courses selected within a secondary field: (4) twenty- 
seven credits of nuclear engineering courses including ENNU 215. 440, 
450, 455, 460, 465, 480, and 490; (5) the course on environmental effects 
on materials, ENMA 464. A maximum degree of flexibility has been 
retained so that the student and advisor can select an elective engineenng 
course, an elective ENNU course, and two technical elective courses. A 
sample program follows: 

Freshman Year. The Freshman year is the same for all Engineering 
departments. Please consult The College of Engineering entry. 

Semester 

I II 
Sophomore Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

MATH 241— Calculus III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 230— Intro, to Matenals and Their Applications 3 

ENES 240— Engineenng Computation or ENME 205 3 

Secondary Field Elective 3 

ENNU 215— Intro, to Nuclear Technology 3 

Total 17 16 



Materials and Nuclear Engineering 1 1 1 



Junior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 6 

ENNU 440 — Nuclear Technology Laboratory 3 

ENNU 450 — Nuclear Reactor Engineering I 3 

Math-Physical Science Elective 3 

Secondary Field Courses 3 3 

ENNU 455— Nuclear Reactor Engineering II 3 

ENNU 460— Nuclear Heal Transport 3 

ENMA 464 — Environmental Eftects on Engineering 

Materials 3 

Total 15 18 

Senior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

ENNU Elective 3 

ENNU 465 — Nuclear Reactor Systems Analysis 3 

Secondary Field Courses 3 3 

Technical Electives 3 3 

ENNU 480— Reactor Core Design 3 

ENNU 490 — Nuclear Fuel and Power Management 3 

Engineering Elective 3 

Total 15 18 

Minimum Degree Credits: 120 credits and fulfillment of all department, 

college, and University requirements. 

•Qualified students may elect to take CHEM 105 and 1 15 (4 sem. hrs. 

each) instead of CHEM 1 03 and 1 1 3. 

"Students must consult v*(ith an advisor on selection of appropriate 

courses tor their particular course of study. 

Admission 

All Nuclear Engineering students must meet admission, progress and 
retention standards of the College of Engineering. 



Co-op Program 

The nuclear engineering program works within the College of Engineering 
Cooperative Engineering Education Program. For information on this 
program, see the College of Engineering entry in this catalog, or call 405- 
3863. 

Advising 

Students choosing nuclear engineering as their primary field should follow 
the listed curriculum for nuclear engineers. They should submit a complete 
program of courses for approval during their junior year. Students electing 
nuclear engineering as their secondary field should seek advice from a 
member of the nuclear engineering faculty prior to their sophomore year. 
Call 405-5227 to talk to an advisor or to schedule an appointment. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial aid based upon need is available through the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. A number of scholarships are available through the College 
of Engineering. Part-time employment is available in the department. Of 
particular interest are scholarships available to qualified students at all 
undergraduate levels from the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations. 

Honors and Awards 

Annual awards are given to recognize scholarship and outstanding 
service to the department, college and university. These awards include 
the American Nuclear Society Award for Leadership and Service and the 
Award for Outstanding Contribution to the ANS Student Chapter. The 
American Nuclear Society also provides awards to recognize the highest 
GPA for a student at the senior, junior and sophomore levels and to a 
senior with greatest scholarship improvement. The Baltimore Gas and 
Electric Company also grants, through the program, an award for the 
Outstanding Junior of the year and a scholarship which includes the 
opportunity for summer employment to an academically qualified student 
with demonstrated interest in utility employment. 

Student Organization 

Students operate a campus student chapter of the professional organi- 
zation, the American Nuclear Society. 

Course Code: ENNU 



MATHEMATICS (MATH) 

College of Computer, Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences 

1117 Mathematics Building 
Undergraduate Office, 405-5053 

Professor and Chair: Johnson 

Professors: W. Adams, Alexander. Antman. Auslander, Babuska***, 

Benedetto, Berenstein, Brin, Chu, J.Cohen, Cook, Cooper, Correl, Ellis, 

Fey", Filzpatrick, Freidlin, Goldberg, Goldhaber, Goldman, Gray, Green, 

Greenberg, Gromov, Grove, Gulick, Hamilton, Herb, Herman, Horvath, 

Hummel, Jones, Kagan, Kedem, Kellogg*", King, Kirwan, Kleppner, 

Kudia, Kueker, Lay, Lipsman, Lopez-Escobar, Markley, Mikulski, Millson, 

Neri, Olver, Osborn, Owings, Rohrlich, Rosenberg, Rudolpht, Schafer, 

Slud, Sweet, Syski, Washington. Wei, Wolfe, Wolpertt, Yacobson, Yang, 

Yorke"*, Zedek 

Associate Professors: J. Adams, Berg, Boyle, Chang, Coombes, Dancis, 

Efrat, GIaz, Grebogi"*, Grillakis, Helzer, Li, Maddocks, Nochetto, Pego, 

Sather, Schneider, Smith, Warner, Winkelnkemper 

Assistant Professors: Currier, Fakhre-Zakeri, Laskowski, Lee, Stuck, von 

Petersdorff, Wang, Wu 

Professors Emeriti: Brace, L. Cohen, Douglis, Ehrlich, Good, Heins, 

Jackson, Lehner, Pearl, Stellmacher 

Affiliate Professors: Stewart, Young, O'Leary 

Instructors: Alter, Cleary 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

"Joint Appointment: Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

""Joint Appointment: IPST 

The program in mathematics leads to a degree of Bachelor of Science in 
mathematics and offers students training in the mathematical sciences in 
preparation for graduate work, teaching and positions in government or 
industry. 

Requirements for Major 

Each mathematics major must complete, with a grade of C or better in 
each course, the following: 

1. The introductory sequence MATH 140, 141, 240, 241 or the 
corresponding honors sequence MATH 250, 251. 

2. Eight MATH/MAPL7STAT courses at the 400 level or higher, at 
least four of which are taken at College Park. The eight courses 
must include: 

(a) At least one course from MATH 401 , 403, 405. 

(b) At least one course from MATH 246, 414, 415, 436, 462. If 
MATH 246 is chosen, it will not count as one of the eight upper 
level courses. 

(c) One course from MAPL 460, 466. (This assumes knowledge 
of CMSC 104 or equivalent.) 

(d) MATH 41 (completion of MATH 250-251 exempts the student 
from this requirement and (e) below; students receive credit for 
two 400 level courses). 

(e) A one-year sequence which develops a particular area of 
mathematics in depth, chosen from the following list: 

(i) MATH 410-411 
(ii) MATH 403-404 
(iii) MATH 446-447 
(iv) STAT 41 0-420. 
(v) MATH/MAPL 472-473 

(f) The remaining 400 level MATH/MAPL7STAT courses are 
electives, but cannot include any of: MATH 400, 461 , 478-488, 
or STAT 464. EDCI 451 may be used to replace one of the 
upper level elective courses. Also, students with a strong 
interest in applied mathematics may, with the approval of the 
Undergraduate Office, substitute two courses (with strong 
mathematics content) from outside the Mathematics Depart- 
ment for one upper level elective course. 

3. One of the following supporting three course sequences. These 
are intended to broaden the student's mathematical experience. 
Other sequences might be approved by the Undergraduate Officebut 
they would have to make use of mathematical ideas, comparable 
to the sequences on this list. 

(a) i) PHYS161,262, 263 
ii) PHYS 171,272,273 

iii) PHYS 1 41 , 1 42, and an upper level physics course approved 
by the Mathematics Department 



112 Mathematics 



(b) ENES102, PHYS161,ENES220 

(c) i) CMSC 112, 113. andoneof CMSC311. 330 
ii) CMSC 112, 150,251 

(d) CHEM 103, 113, and one of CHEM 227, 233 

(e) ECON 201 , 203, and one of ECON 305 or 306 

(f) BI^GT 220, 221 , 340 

Within the Department of Mathematics there are a number of identifiable 
areas which students can pursue to suit their own goals and interests. 
They are briefly described below. Note that they do overlap and that 
students need not confine themselves to one of them. 

1. Pure mathematics: the courses which clearly belong in this area 
are: MATH 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 41 0, 41 1 , 41 4, 41 5, 41 7, 430, 
432, 436. 437, 445, 446, 447, 452, STAT 410,411, 420. Students 
preparing for graduate school in mathematics should include 
MATH 403, 405, 41 and 41 1 in their programs. MATH 463 (or 660) 
and MATH 432 (or 730) are also desirable. Other courses from the 
above list and graduate courses are also appropriate. 

2. Secondary teaching: the following courses are required to teach 
mathematics at the secondary level: MATH 402 or 403, 430 and 
EDCI 451 . (EDCI 451 is acceptable as one of the eight upper level 
math courses required for a mathematics major.) These additional 
courses are particularly suited for students preparing to teach: 
MATH 406, 445, 463, STAT 400 and 401 . EDHD 300, EDPA 301 , 
EDCI 350 or 455, and EDCI 390 are necessary to teach: before 
registering for these courses, the student must apply for and be 
admitted to teacher education. 

3. Statistics: For a student with a Bachelor of Arts seeking work 
requiring some statistical background, the minimal program is 
STAT 400-401. To work primarily as a statistician, one should 
combine STAT 400-401 with at least two more statistics courses, 
most suitably, STAT 440 and STAT 450. A stronger sequence is 
STAT 410. 420, 450. This offers a better understanding and wider 
knowledge of statistics and is a general purpose program (i.e., 
does not specify one area of application). For economics applica- 
tions STAT 400, 401 , 440, 450, and MAPL 477 should be consid- 
ered. For operations research MAPL 477 and/or STAT 41 1 should 
be added or perhaps substituted for STAT 450. To prepare for 
graduate work. STAT 41 and 420 give the best background, with 
STAT 41 1 , 440, 450 added at some later stage. 

4. Computational mathematics: there are a number of math courses 
which emphasize the computational aspects of mathematics in- 
cluding the use of the computer. They are MAPL 460, 466, 467, 
477, and MATH 450, 475. Students interested in this area should 
take CMSC 1 1 2, 1 1 3 as early as possible, and CMSC 420, 21 1 are 
also suggested. 

5. Applied mathematics: the courses which lead most rapidly to 
applications are the courses listed above in 3 and 4 and MATH 401 , 
414, 415, 436, 462, 463, 464, and MATH/MAPL 472 and 473. A 
student interested in applied mathematics should obtain, in addi- 
tion to a solid training in mathematics, a good knowledge of at least 
one area in which mathematics is currently being applied. Concen- 
tration in this area is good preparation for employment in govern- 
ment and industry or for graduate study in applied mathematics. 

Advising 

Advising for math majors is mandatory. Students are required to sign up 
for an advising appointment at the math undergraduate office window 
(1 11 7 Mathematics Building), beginning the week before preregistration. 

Honors 

The Mathematics Honors Program is designed for students showing 
exceptional ability and interest in mathematics. Its aim is to give a student 
the best possible mathematics education. Participants are selected by the 
Departmental Honors Committee during the first semester of their junior 
year. To graduate with honors in mathematics they must pass a three-hour 
written comprehensive examination. Six credits of graduate work are also 
required. A precise statement of the requirements may be found in the 
Math Undergraduate Office. 

The department also offers a special mathematics department honors 
analysis sequence (MATH 250.251 ) for promising freshmen with a strong 
mathematical background (including calculus). Enrollment in the se- 
quence is normally by invitation but any Interested student may apply to 
the Mathematics Departmental Honors Committee for admission. 

Participants in the University Honors Program may also enroll in special 
honors sections of the lower level mathematics courses (MATH 140H, 



1 41 H, 240H, 241 H, 246H). Students may also enroll in the honors calculus 
sequence if invited by the Mathematics Departmental Honors Committee. 
However, the mathematics departmental honors calculus sequence and 
the University Honors Program are distinct, and enrollment in one does 
not imply acceptance in the other. Neither honors calculus sequence is a 
prerequisite for participating in the Mathematics Honors Program, and 
students in these sequences need not be mathematics majors. 

Awards 

Aaron Strauss Scholarships. Up to two are awarded each year to 
outstanding junior Math Majors. The recipient receives full remission of 
(in-state) tuition and fees. Applications may be obtained early in the spring 
semester from the Mathematics Undergraduate Office. 1117 Mathemat- 
ics Building. 

Higginbotham Prize. An award (up to $500) is made to an outstanding 
senior math major in the spring. 

Placement in Mathematics Courses 

The Department of Mathematics has a large offering to accommodate a 
great variety of backgrounds, interests, and abilities. The department 
permits students to take any course for which they have the appropriate 
background, regardless of formal coursework. For example, students with 
a high school calculus course may be permitted to begin in the middle of 
the calculus sequence even if they do not have advanced standing. 
Students may obtain undergraduate credit for mathematics courses in any 
of the following ways: passing the appropriate CEEB Advanced Place- 
ment Examination, passing standardized CLEP examinations, and through 
the department's Credit-by-Examination Students are urged to consult 
with advisors from the Department of Mathematics to assist with proF>er 
placements. 

Statistics and Probability, and Applied Mathematics 

Courses in statistics and probability and applied mathematics are offered 
by the Department of Mathematics. These courses are open to non- 
majors as well as majors, and carry credit in mathematics. Students 
wishing to concentrate in the above may do so by choosing an appropriate 
program under the Department of Mathematics. 

Mathematics Education 

Students completing an undergraduate major in mathematics and plan- 
ning to be certified to teach should contact the College of Education. 

Course Codes: MATH.STAT.MAPL 



MEASUREMENT, STATISTICS, AND EVALUATION 
(EDMS) 

College of Education 

1230 Benjamin Building, 405-3624 

Professor and Chair: Lissitz 
Professors: Dayton, Macready 
Associate Professors: Johnson, Schafer 
Assistant Professors: DeAyala, Gold, Tarn 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

The Department of Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation offers courses 
in measurement, applied statistics, and algonthmic methods for under- 
graduates. The department is pnmanly graduate onented and offers 
programs at the master's and doctoral levels for persons with quantitative 
interests from a vanety of social science and professional backgrounds. 
In addition, a doctoral minor is offered for students majonng in other areas. 
The doctoral major is intended pnmanly to produce individuals qualified to 
teach courses at the college level in applied measurement, statistics and 
evaluation, generate original research and serve as specialists in mea- 
surement, applied statistics or evaluation in school systems, industry or 
government. The master's level program is designed to provide individu- 
als with a broad range of data management, analysis and computer skills 
necessary to serve as research associates in academia. government, and 
business. At the doctoral level, a student may choose a specialty within 



Mechanical Engineering 113 

MATH 241— Calculus III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262, PHYS 263— Physics 4 4 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 4 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENME 201— M E Project 1 

ENME 205 — Numerical Methods in Mechanical 

Engineering 3 

ENME 217— Thermodynamics 3 

Total 18 17 

Junior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 6 

ENEE 300— Elect. Engr 3 

ENEE 301— E. E. Lab :.... 1 

ENME 310— Mech. Def. Solids 3 

ENME311— Del. Solids Lab 1 

ENME 315— Inter. Thermo 3 

ENME 321— Trans. Proc 3 

ENME 342— Fluid Mech 3 

ENME 343— Fluids Lab 1 

ENME 360— Mechanical Vibration 3 

ENME 381— Meas. Lab 3 

Total 17 16 

Senior Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 

ENME 401— Matl. Sci 3 

ENME 403— Auto. Controls 3 

ENME 404— ME. Sys. Des 3 

ENME 480— Engr. Exp 3 

Technical Electives " 6 6 

Total 15 15 

"At least 3 of the 4 technical electives must be design. 

Sample Topics: Kinematic Systems of Mechanisms, Computer Aided 
Design, Packaging of Electronic Systems, Environmental Engineering, 
Finite Element Analysis, Reliability and Maintainability, Internal Combus- 
tion Engines, Robotics, Solar Energy, Fluid Machinery. 

Admission 

Admission requirements are identical to those set by the College 
of Engineering (see College of Engineering section on Entrance 
Requirements). 

Advising 

All mechanical engineering students are required to meet with an advisor 
during registration. Contact the Undergraduate Advising Office, 2188 
Engineering Classroom Building, 405-2409. 

Financial Assistance 

A very limited amount of financial aid is available. Information may be 
obtained in the Undergraduate Advising Office. 

Honors and Awards 

The Honors Program is administered through the College of Engineering. 
Individual honors and awards are presented based on academic excel- 
lence and extracurricular activities. 

Student Organizations 

Student chapters of professional societies include the American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers and the 
American Production Inventory and Control Society. The mechanical 
engineering honor society is Pi Tau Sigma. Information regarding these 
societies may be obtained at 2188 Engineering Classroom Building. 

Course Code: ENME 



one of three areas: applied or theoretical measurement, applied statistics, 
and program evaluation. 

Course Code: EDMS 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (ENME) 
College of Engineering 

2181 Engineenng Classroom Building, 405-2410 

Chair: Anand 

Associate Chair: Walston 

Professors: Allen (PT), Anand. Armstrong, Berger, Buckley (PT), Chrislou, 

Cunniff, Dally, Dieter. Fourney, Gupta, Holloway, Irwin (PT), A. Khan, Kirk, 

Koh, Magrab, Marcinkowski, Marks (PT), Sanford, Sayre (PT), Talaat, 

Tsai, Wallace. Yang 

Associate Professors: Azarm, Barker, Bernard, Bigio, Dick (PT), diMarzo, 

Duncan, Harhalakis, Humphrey, Ohadi, Pecht, Radermacher, Shih, von 

Kerczek, Walston 

Assistant Professors: Atxfelhamid, Anjanappa, Dasgupta, Haslach, Herold, 

H. Khan, Krishnan. Marasli, Minis, Piomelli, Rao, Sirkis, Tasch, Tasker, 

Topeleski, Tsui, Wang, Wilner, Wright, G. Zhang, Zhu 

Senior Lecturer: Russell 

Research Associates: Pavlin, Williams, X. Zhang 

Assistant Research Scientists: Jung, Sivathanu 

Instructor: Manion 

Emeriti: Jackson, Shreeve, Weske 



The Major 



The primary function of the mechanical engineer is to create devices, 
machines, structures, or processes which are used to advance the welfare 
of people. Design, analysis, synthesis, testing, and control are the 
essential steps in performing this function. Certain aspects of the science 
and an of engineering are of particular importance to achieve a successful 
product or service. Some of these aspects are those relating to the 
generation and transmission of mechanical power, the establishment of 
both experimental and theoretical models of mechanical systems, com- 
puter interfacing, the static and dynamic behavior of fluids, system 
optimization, and engineering and production management. 

Because of the wide variety of professional opportunities available to the 
mechanical engineer, the curriculum is designed to provide students with 
a thorough training in basic fundamentals. These include: physics, chem- 
istry, mathematics, computers, mechanics of solids and fluids, thermody- 
namics, materials, heat transfer, controls, and design. The curriculum 
includes basic laboratory courses in fluid mechanics, materials engineer- 
ing, electronic instrumentation and measurements, and a senior labora- 
tory which provides an introduction to professional research and evalua- 
tion procedures. Students are introduced to the concept of design via 
machine design and energy conversion design courses, and seniors 
participate in a comprehensive design course during their final semester 
which is frequently linked with an advisor and a problem from industry. 
This experience helps students anticipate the type of activities likely to be 
encountered after graduation and also helps to establish valuable con- 
tacts with professional engineers. 

In order to provide flexibility for students to follow their own interests in 
Mechanical Engineering, students may choose to concentrate in either 
mechanical design or energy design in their senior year. In addition, 
seniors may choose from a wide variety of elective courses such as 
courses in robotics, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufactur- 
ing, electronic packaging, microprocessor theory, ocean engineering, 
finite element analysis, heating ventilation and air conditioning, solar 
energy, combustion, advanced fluid flow, and advanced mechanics, to list 
only a few. A small number of academically superior undergraduate 
students are able to participate in Special Topic Problems courses in 
which a student and faculty member can interact on a one-to-one basis. 

Requirements for Major 

The Freshman curriculum is the same for all Engineering departments 
and programs. Please consult The College of Engineering entry. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

Sophomore Year 

CORE Program Requirements 3 3 



114 Mechanical Engineering 



METEOROLOGY (METO) 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical 
Sciences 

2207 Computer and Space Sciences Building, 405-5392 

Professor and Chair: Hudson 

Professors: Baer, Ellingson, Shukia, Thompson, Vernekar 
Associate Professors: Carton, DIckerson, Pinker, Robock 
Adjunct Professor: Sellers 

The Department of Meteorology offers a limited number of courses of 
interest to undergraduate students. Undergraduate students interested in 
pursuing a bachelor's degree program preparatory to further study or work 
in meteorology are urged to consider the Physical Sciences Program. It 
is important that students who anticipate careers in (Meteorology consult 
the Physical Sciences Program advisor representing the Department of 
Meteorology as early as possible in their studies. 

Because of its interdisciplinary nature, the study of the atmosphere 
requires a firm background in the basic sciences and mathematics. To be 
suitably prepared for 400-level courses in meteorology, the student 
should have the following background: either the physics major series 
PHYS 171, 272, 273 or the series PHYS 161, 262, 263: the mathematics 
series MATH 1 40, 1 41 , 240, 241 , 246 and either the series CHEM 1 03, 
1 1 3 or CHEM 1 05, 1 1 5. Consult the Approved Course Listing for electives 
in meteorology. 

Students who may be preparing for graduate education in meteorology 
are strongly advised to pursue further coursework from among the areas 
of physics, applied mathematics, chemistry, computer science, and 
statistics to supplement coursework in meteorology. With proper counsel- 
ing from the Department of Meteorology advisor, the student wishing to 
graduate with an M.S. degree in meteorology may achieve that goal in five 
and a half years from the inception of university studies. 

Course Code: METO 



MICROBIOLOGY (MICB) 
College of Life Sciences 

Microbiology Building, 405-5430 

Acting Chair: I.Z. Ades 

Professors: Colwell, Joseph, Roberson, Weiner", Yuan 

Associate Professors: Robb*, Stein 

Assistant Professors; Benson 

Instructors: Gdovin, Smith 

Emeritus Professors: Cook, Doetsch, Faber. Hetrickt, Pelczar 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

'Joint appointment with Center of Marine Biotechnology 

Specialization 

Microbiology is the branch of biology dealing with microscopic life-forms 
such as bacteria, yeast, molds, and viruses. Microbiologists are con- 
cerned with the genetics, physiology, ecology, and pathogenicity of these 
organisms. Studies in microbiology provide the cornerstone to modern 
molecular biology Basic pnnciples of microbiology are applied to solve 
current world-wide problems in disease control and prevention, in food 
production, and in the development of new techniques of biotechnology. 

Requiretnents for Specialization 

See Biological Sciences in this catalog and Microbiology advisor tor 
specific program requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Students are assigned to a faculty member for 
mandatory advising and career counselling. Information can be obtained 
from the departmental office (1117 Microbiology Building, 405-5435) or 
from the advising coordinator (2107 Microbiology Building, 405-5435). 



Research Experience and Internships 

Students may gam research experience in laboratories off campus by 
registering for MICB 388R or on campus in faculty laboratories by 
registering tor MICB 399. Contact the department office. 405-5435, tor 

more information. 

Honors and Awards 

The Honors Program in Microbiology involves an independent research 
project undertaken with a faculty advisor For information, contact the 
Honors Chair. Dr. S. Benson, 3136 Microbiology Building The P Arne 
Hansen Award may be awarded to an outstanding departmental honors 
student. The Norman C. Laffer Award is given annually to the graduating 
senior selected by the faculty as the outstanding student in Microbiology. 

Student Organizations 

All students interested in microbiology are encouraged to join the Univer- 
sity of Maryland student chapter of the American Society for Microbiology, 
the professional scientific society for microbiologists. Information on this 
organization may be obtained in the department office. 

Course Code: MICB 



MUSIC (MUSC) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

Tawes Fine Arts Building, 405-5549 

Professor and Chair: Major (Acting) 

Associate Chair: Cooper 

Professors: Bernstein, Cohen, Cossa, Fischbach. Folstrom. Guameri 

String Quartet (Dalley, Soyer. Steinhardt, Tree), Head. Heifetz. Helm. 

Hudson, Koscielny, Mabbs, McDonald, Montgomery, Moss. Page. 

Schumacher, Sender, Travert 

Associate Professors: Balthrop, Barnetl, Davis, Delio, Elliston, Elsing, 

Fanos, Gibson, Gowen, McClelland, McCoy, Olson. Robertson. Rodriguez. 

Sparks, Wakefield, Wexler, Wilson 

Assistant Professor: Payerle 

Lecturer: Beicken 

Instructor: Walters 

tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Major 

The objectives of the department are (1 ) to provide professional musical 
training based on a foundation in the liberal arts; (2) to help the general 
student develop sound critical judgment and discriminating taste in the 
perlormance and literature of music; (3) to prepare the student for 
graduate work in the field; and (4) to prepare the student to teach music 
in the public schools. To these ends, three degrees are offered: the 
Bachelor of Music, with majors in theory, composition, and music perfor- 
mance; the Bachelor of Arts, with a major in music; the Bachelor of 
Science, with a major in music education, ottered in conjunction with the 
College of Education. 

Music courses and private lessons are ofjen to all majors who have 
completed the specified prerequisites, or their equivalents. Lessons are 
also available for qualified non-majors, if teacher time and facilities permit. 
The University Bands. University Orchestra. University Chorale. Univer- 
sity Chorus. Jazz Ensemble, and other ensembles are likewise open to 
qualified students by audition. 



The Bachelor of Music Degree 



Designed for qualified students with extensive pre-college training and 
potential for successful careers in professional music Recommendation 
for admission is based on an audition t)efore a faculty committee A 
descnption of the audition requirements and prerequisites is available in 
the departmental office A grade of C or alx>ve is required in all major 
courses. 



Meteorology 115 



Sample Program 
Bachelor of Music (Perl. Piano) 

Credits 
Freshman Year 

MUSP 119/120— Applied Music 8 

MUSC 128— Sight Reading lor Pianists 4 

MUSC 150,151— Theory of Music l/ll 6 

CORE Program 12 

Total 30 

Sophomore Year 

MUSP 21 7 21 8— Applied Music 8 

MUSC 228— Accompanying for Pianists 4 

MUSC 230— History of Music I 3 

MUSC 250/251— Advanced Theory of Music l/ll 8 

CORE Program 9 

Total 32 

Junior Year 

MUSP 315 316— Applied Music 8 

MUSC 330-331— History of Music ll/lll 6 

MUSC 328 — Chamber Music Performance for Pianists 4 

MUSC 450— Musical Form 3 

CORE Program 10 

Total 31 

Senior Year 

MUSP 419/420— Applied Music 8 

MUSC 492— Keyboard Music I 3 

Muse 467 — Piano Pedagogy I 3 

Elective 4 

CORE Program 9 

Total 27 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Designed for qualified students whose interests include a broader liberal 
arts experience. Recommendation for admission is based on an audition 
before a faculty committee. A description of the audition requirements, 
prerequisites, and program options is available in the departmental office. 
A grade of C or above is required in ail major courses. 

Sample Program 
Bachelor of Arts (Music) 

Credit Hours 
Freshman Year 

MUSP 109/110— Applied Music 4 

MUSC 150/151— Theory of Music l/ll 6 

MUSC 129— Ensemble 2 

Electives, College and CORE Requirements 18 

Total 30 

Sophomore Year 

MUSP 207/208— Applied Music 4 

MUSC 250/251— Advanced Theory of Music l/ll 8 

MUSC 229— Ensemble 2 

Electives, College and CORE Requirements 16 

Total 30 

Junior Year 

MUSP 305 2 

MUSC 330/331— History of Music ll/lll 6 

MUSC 450— Musical Form 3 

MUSC 329— Ensemble 1 

Electives, College and CORE Requirements 18 

Total 30 

Senior Year 

Music Electives 10 

Electives, College and CORE Requirements 20 

Total 120 

The Bachelor of Science Degree (Music Education) 

The Department of Music in conjunction with the College of Education 
offers the Bachelor of Science degree with concentrations available in 



Instrumental Music Education and Choral-General Music Education for 
qualified students preparing for careers in teaching K through 1 2 Recom- 
mendation for admission is based on a performance audition before a 
faculty committee. Descriptions of audition requirements and interview 
requirements are available in the Music Department Office on request. For 
sample program requirements, see Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, 
Music Education 

Special Programs 

The Department of Music cooperates with other departments in double 
majors, double degrees, and Individual Studies programs. Details are 
available on request. 

Course Codes: MUSC, MUED. MUSP 



NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 
PROGRAM (NRMT) 

College of Agriculture 

0218 Symons Hall, 405-1258 

Coordinator; Kangas 
Instructor: Adams 

The goal of the Natural Resources Management Program is to teach 
students concepts of the efficient use and management of natural re- 
sources. This program identifies their role in economic development while 
maintaining concern for society and the environment. It prepares students 
for careers in technical, administrative, and educational work in water and 
land use, environmental management, and other areas. Course options 
also include preparation for graduate study in any of several areas within 
the biological and social sciences. 

Students will pursue a broad education program and then elect subjects 
concentrated in one of three areas of interest: Plant and Wildlife Re- 
sources Management, Land and Water Resources Management, or 
Environmental Education and Park Management. 

Curriculum Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program Requirements* 40 

BIOL 105— Pnnciples of Biology 1 4 

BIOL 1 06— Principles of Biology II 4 

CHEM 103, 1 13— General Chemistry I, General 

Chemistry 11* 8 

One of the following: 4 

GEOL 100, 1 1 0— Introductory Physical Geology AND 

Physical Geology Laboratory* OR 

GEOG 201, 21 1 — Geography of Environmental Systems And 

Geography of Environmental Systems Laboratory* 

AGRO 302— General Soils* 4 

AREC 240 — Environment and Human Ecology' 3 

MATH 140 or 220— Calculus I or Elementary Calculus I* 4-3 

BIOM 301— Introduction to Biometrics 3 

ECON 201 or 205— Economics* 3 

AREC 453 — Economic Analysis of Natural Resources 3 

BOTN 462, 464— Plant Ecology and Plant Ecology 

Laboratory 4 

GEOG 340 3 

OR GEOL 340— Geomorphology (4) 

MICB 200— General Microbiology* 4 

PHYS 117— Introduction to Physics* 4 

NRMT 470 — Principles of Natural Resource Management .... 4 

GVPT 273 — Introduction to Environmental Politics 3 

AREC 432 — Introduction to Natural Resource Policy 3 

BMGT360 — Personnel Management 3 

CMSC 103 — Introduction to Computing for Non-majors 

OR EDCI 487 — Introduction to Computers in 

Instructional Settings 3 

'May satisfy college requirements and/or a CORE requirement. 



1 1 6 Natural Resources Management Program 



Option Areas (23 hours) 

Plant and Wildlife Resource Management 

Science Area 10 

Management Area 10 

Related Coursework or Internship 3 

Land and Water Resource Management 

Science Area 10 

Management Area 10 

Related Coursework or Internship 3 

Environmental Education and Park Management 

Science Area 10 

Management and Education Area 10 

Related Coursework or Internship 3 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. See the Coordinator, 0218 Symons Hall, 405- 
1258. 

Student Organization 

Students may join the campus branch of the Natural Resources Man- 
agement Society. Further information is available from the Natural Re- 
sources Management Society in 0218 Symons Hall. 

Course Code: NRMT 



PHILOSOPHY (PHIL) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

1124 Skinner Building, 405-5689/90 

Professor and Acting Chair: Slote 

Professors: Bub, Darden, Devitt, Greenspan, Lesher, Levinson, Martin, 

Pasch. Perkins (Emeritus), Schlaretzki (Emeritus), Suppe, Svenonius, 

Wallace (part-time) 

Associate Professors: J. Brown, Celarier, Cherniak, Lichtenberg, Odell, 

Rey. Stairs 

Assistant Professor: Horty 

Affiliate Professors: Brush, Hornstein 

Adjunct Professor: Luban 

Research Associates: Fullinwider, Gottlieb, Sagoff, Wachbroit 

The Major 

The Department of Philosophy seeks to develop students' logical and 
expository skills and their understanding of the foundations of human 
knowledge and of value, in accordance with its conception of philosophy 
as essentially an activity rather than a body of doctrine. Thus, in all courses 
students can expect to receive concentrated training in thinking clearly 
and inventively and in expressing themselves exactly about philosophical 
Issues. This training has general applicability to all professions in which 
intellectual qualities are highly valued, such as law, medicine, govern- 
ment, publishing and business management. With this in view the major 
in philosophy is designed to serve the interests of students who are 
prepahng for careers outside of philosophy, as well as the interests of 
those who are preparing for graduate study in philosophy. The department 
also offers a wide range of courses in the philosophy of various disciplines 
for non-majors. 

Requirements for Major 

For students matriculating before June 1, 1991: 

(1 ) a total of at least thirty hours in philosophy, not including PHIL 1 00 
or PHIL 386 

(2) PHIL 271 , 31 0, 320. 326. 341 . and at least two courses numbered 
399 or above; 

(3) a grade of C or higher in each course counted toward the 
fulfillment of the major requirement. 



Fifteen hours of supporting courses are required to be selected in 
accordance with guidelines available in the Philosophy Department 
Lounge, Skinner Building, room 1119. 

For students matriculating after June 1, 1991 : 

(1 ) a total of at least thirty-six hours in philosophy; not including PHIL 
386 

(2) PHIL 31 0, 320, 326, either 271 or 273, either 250 or 360 or 380 
or 462 or 464, either 341 or 346. and at least two courses 
numbered 400 or above: 

(3) a grade of C or higher in each course counted toward the 
fulfillment of the major requirement. 

Fifteen hours of supporting courses are required to be selected in 
accordance with guidelines available in the Philosophy Department 
Lounge, Skinner Building, room 1119. 

Course Code: PHIL 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

See Kinesiology. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES PROGRAM 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical 
Sciences 

3400 A.V. Williams Building, 405-2677 

Chair: Williams 
Astronomy: Matthews 
Chemistry: Harwood 
Computer Science: Kaye 
Geology: Stifel 
Engineenng: Walston 
Mathematics: Alter 
Meteorology: Robock 
Physics: Kacser 

Purpose 

This program is suggested for many types of students: those wfrose 
interests cover a wide range of the physical sciences: those whose 
Interests have not yet centered on any one science: students interested 
in a career in an interdisciplinary area within the physical sciences; 
students who seek a broader undergraduate program than is possible in 
one of the traditional physical sciences; students interested in meteorol- 
ogy; preprofessional students (pre-law, pre-medical); or students whose 
interests in business, technical writing, advertising or sales require a 
broad technical background. This program can also be useful for those 
planning science-oriented or technical work in the urban fiekl; the urt)an 
studies courses must be taken as electives. Students contemplating this 
program as a basis for preparation for secondary school science teaching 
are advised to consult the Science Teaching Center staff of the College 
of Education for additional requirements for teacher certification. 

The Physical Sciences Program consists of a basic set ol courses in 
physics, chemistry, and mathematics, followed by a vanety of courses 
chosen from these and related disciplines; astronomy, geology, meteorol- 
ogy, computer science, and engineering Emphasis is placed on a broad 
program as contrasted with a specialized one. 

Students are advised by members of the Physical Sciences committee. 
This committee is composed of faculty members from each of the 
represented disciplines. Assignment of an advisor depends on the interest 
of the student, e.g.. one interested pnncipally in chemistry will be advised 
by the chemistry member of the committee Students whose interests are 
too general to classify in this manner will normally be advised by the cfiair 
of the Committee. 



Philosophy 117 

Jawahery, Kacser, Kelly, Kim, Obb, Wang 

Assistant Professors: Aniage, Baden, Cohen, Jacobson, Jawahery, Skiff, 

Wellstood 

Lecturers: Nossal, Rapport, Restorti, M. Slawsky, Solow, Stern, Swank 

'Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Physics Program includes a broad range of undergraduate courses 
designed to satisfy the needs of almost every student, from the advanced 
physics major to the person taking a single introductory physics course. 
In addition, there are various opportunities tor personally-directed studies 
between student and professor, and for undergraduate research For 
further information consult "Undergraduate Study in Physics" available 
from the department. 

The Major 

Courses required for Physics Major: 

Lower Level Courses Credit Hours 

PHYS 171 — Introductory Physics: Mechanics 3 

PHYS 272— Introductory Physics: Thermodynamics, 

Electricity and Magnetism 3 

PHYS 273— Introductory Physics: Electricity and 

Magnetism, Waves. Optics 3 

PHYS 275 — Introductory Physics Lab: Mechanics and 

Thermodynamics 1 

PHYS 276— Introductory Physics Lab: Electricity and 

Magnetism 2 

PHYS 375— Introductory Physics Lab: Optics 2 

MATH 140— Calculus I 4 

MATH 141— Calculus II 4 

MATH 241— Calculus III 4 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

Upper Level Courses 

PHYS 410 — Elements of Theoretical Physics: Mechanics 4 

PHYS 411 — Elements of Theoretical Physics: Electricity 

and Magnetism 4 

PHYS 414 — Introduction to Thermodynamics and 

Statistical Mechanics 3 

PHYS 421— Introduction to Modern Physics 3 

PHYS 422— Modern Physics 4 

PHYS 395 — Advanced Experiments 3 

One upper level mathematics course (preferably differential equation) 

PHYS 429 — Atomic and Nuclear Physics: Laboratory 3 

or PHYS 485— Electronic Circuits 4 

A grade of "C" or better is required in all Mathematics and Physics courses 
required for the major. 

Honors 



Curriculum 

The basic courses include MATH 1 40. 1 41 and one other math course for 
which MATH 141 is a prerequisite (1 1 or 12 credits); CHEM 103 and 113, 
or 1 05 and 1 1 5 (8 credits) ; PHYS 1 62, 262. 263 ( 1 1 credits): or PHYS 171. 
272, 273, 275, 276, 375 (14 credits); CMSC 104 (4 credits); or 112/113 
(8 credits). 

The choice of the physics sequence depends on the students future aims 
and his/her background, PHYS 161, 262, 263 Is the standard sequence 
recommended for most physical science majors. This sequence will 
enable the student to continue with intermediate level and advanced 
courses. Students desiring a strong background in physics are urged to 
enroll in PHYS 1 71 /375. This is the sequence also used by physics majors 
and leads directly into the advanced physics courses. 

Beyond these basic courses the student must complete twenty-four 
credits at the 300 or 400 level, chosen from any three of the following 
disciplines: chemistry, physics, mathematics (including statistics), as- 
tronomy, geology, meteorology, computer science, and one of the engi- 
neering disciplines, subject to certain limitations. The twenty-four distribu- 
tive credits must be at the upper level (300/400) and shall be distributed 
so that at least six credits are earned in each of the three selected areas 
of concentration. A grade of C or better must be earned In both basic and 
distributive requirement courses. 

All Physical Science students must have a planned program of study 
approved by the Physical Sciences Committee. In no case shall the 
Committee approve a program which has less than 1 8 credits in the three 
distributive areas of the Physical Sciences program to be completed, at 
the time the program is submitted. Engineering courses used for one of the 
options must all be from the same department, eg., all must be ENAE 
courses, or a student may use a combination of courses in ENCH, ENNU, 
and ENMA, which are offered by the Department of Chemical Engineering 
and the Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering: courses 
offered as engineering sciences, ENES, will be considered as a depart- 
ment for these purposes. 

Because of the wide choice and flexibility within the program, students are 
required to submit for approval a study plan during their sophomore year, 
specifying the courses they wish to use in satisfying the requirements of 
the major. Students who wish to depart from the stipulated curriculum may 
present their proposed program for approval by the Physical Sciences 
Committee. An honors program Is available to qualified students In their 
senior year. 

Honors 

The Physical Sciences Honors Program offers students the opportunity 
for research and Independent study. Interested students should request 
details from their advisor. 



PHYSICS (PHYS) 

College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical 
Science 

1 120 Physics Building, 405-5979 

Professor and Chair: Boyd 

Professor and Associate Chair: Bardasis 

Professors Emeriti: Glover, Hornyak, Snowt, Weber 

Chancellor Emeritus: Toll 

Professors: Alley, Anderson, Antonsen, Banerjee, Bhagat, Boyd, Brill, 

C.C. Chang, C.Y. Chang, Chant, Chen, Currie, Das Sarma, DeSilva, 

Dorfmant. Dragtt, Drake, Drew, Eari, Einstein, Falk. Ferrell. Fisher, 

Gates, Gllck, Gloeckler, Gluckstern, Goldenbaum, Goodman, Greenberg, 

Greene, Griem, Griftin, Holmgren, Hu, Kirkpatrick, Korenman, Layman, 

Lee, Lynn, MacDonald, Mason, MIsner, Mohapatra. Ott, Palk, 

Papadopoulos, Park, PatIT, Prange, Redish, Richard, Roos, Skuja, 

Suchert, Venkatesan, Wallace, Williams, Woo, Zorn 

Professor (part-time): Z. Slawsky 

Visiting Professor: Franklin 

Adjunct Professors: Boldt, Mather, Phillips, Ramaty, RIpIn 

Associate Professors: Cohen, Ellis, FIvel, Hadley, Hamilton, Hassam, 



The Physics Honors Program offers to students of good ability and strong 
interest in physics a greater flexibility In their academic programs. To 
receive a citation of "with honors In physics" the student must pass a 
comprehensive examination in his or her senior year. To receive a citation 
of "with high honors in physics" he or she must also complete a senior 
thesis. 

Course Code: PHYS 



PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

For Information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 



PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

1 107 Zoology-Psychology Building, 405-5867 

Professor and Acting Chair: B. Smith 

Professor and Assistant Chair: R. Dooling 

Professors: Anderson, Brauth, Campbell*, Carter-Porges, Dies, Fein* 



118 Physics 



Fox*, Gelso, Goldstein. Gollub. Hall. Helms. Hill, Hodosf, Horlon, 
Kruglanski, Lightfoot", Lissitz*. Locke", Lorion, Magoon (Emeritus), Mar- 
tin, Mclntire, J. Mills, Penner, Porges*, Rosenfeld", Schneider, Scholnick, 
Sigall, Steinman, Sternheim, Suomi", Torney-Purta', Trickett, Tyler, 
Waldrop (Emeritus). Yeni-Komshian* 

Associate Professors: R. Brown, Coursey. Freeman*. Guzzo, Hanges, K. 
Klein, Larkin, Leone*, Norman, O'Grady, Plude, Schneiderman*, Steele 
Assistant Professors: Alexander. Aspinwall, J. Carter**, Castles**, K. 
Dies**, Jofinson. Marx**. Miller**. Pompilo**. Stangor. Wine**, Zamostny' 

*aftiliate 
**adjunct 
tDistinguished Schiolar-Teacfier 

The Major 

Psychology can be classified as a biological science (Bachelor of Science 
degree) and a social science (Bachelor of Arts degree) and the depart- 
ment offers academic programs related to both of these fields. The 
undergraduate curriculum in psychology is an introduction to the methods 
by which the behavior of humans and other organisms is studied, and to 
the biological conditions and social factors that influence such behavior. 
In addition, the undergraduate program is arranged to provide opportuni- 
ties for learning that will equip qualified students to pursue further study 
of psychology and related fields in graduate and professional schools. 
Students who are interested in the biological aspects of behavior tend to 
choose a program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree, while those 
interested primarily in the impact of social factors on behavior tend to 
choose the Bachelor of Arts degree. The choice of program is made in 
consultation with an academic advisor. 

Requirements for Major 

Graduation requirements are the same tor the Bachelor of Science and 
Bachelor of Arts degrees. Students must take at least 35 credits in 
Psychology including 1 4 credits at the 400 level. PSYC 386. 387. 478 and 
479 may not be included in those 35 required credits. The required 
courses include PSYC 1 00. 200 and two laboratory courses chosen from 
PSYC 400, 410, 420. 440. and 450. In order to assure breadth of 
coverage. Psychology courses have been divided into four areas. The 35 
credit total must include at least tw^o courses from two of the four areas and 
at least one course from each of the remaining areas. The areas and 
courses are: 

Area I: 206, 301, 310, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 410, 453; 

Area II: 221 , 341 , 420, 421 , 423, 424, 440, 442, 443. 444; 

Area ill: 235. 330. 332. 334, 337, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357. 432, 433, 435, 

436,455. 456, 457, 458; 
Area IV: 336! 361, 450, 451, 452, 460, 462, 463, 464, 465, 466 

In addition, all students must complete (a) either MATH 1 1 1 . or MATH 1 40 
or MATH 220; (b) one of the following laboratory courses: BIOL 105. 
CHEM 103. 104. 105, 113. 115. KNES360. PHYS 121, 141, 142, 191/5. 
192/6. 293/5.294/6. 262. 263, ZOOL 201. 202. 210, 212; and (c) ENGL 
101 or an English literature course from a prescribed department list. 

Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must complete a 15 
credit supporting course sequence in relevant math and/or science 
courses including two laboratory courses and 9 credits at the advanced 
level. The 15 credits must be completed with at least a 2.0 average. 
Students should consult the current Psychology Undergraduate Program 
Guide for a list of approved advanced Math-Science Courses. 

A grade of C or better must be earned in all 35 credits of psychology 
courses used for the major and all credits used to meet the Math-English- 
Science supporting course sequence. No course may be used as a 
prerequisite unless a grade of C is earned in that course prior to its use as 
a prerequisite. The prerequisite lor any required laboratory course is a 2.5 
grade point average in PSYC 100 and 200 and completion of the Math- 
English-Science supporting course sequence. The departmental grade 
point average will be a computation of grades earned in all psychology 
courses taken (except 386, 387, 478. and 479) and the courses selected 
to meet the Math-English-Science sequence. The GPA in the major must 
be at least 2 0. 

Admission to the Department of Psychology 

See the Admissions section in this catalog for general LEP admissions 
policies. 



Freshman Admission and the 45 Credit Review. Most first-time enter- 
ing freshmen will gain admission to the Department of Psychology directly 
from high school, as allowed by space considerations within the Depart- 
ment. Because space may be limited before all interested freshmen are 
admitted to the program, early application is encouraged. Freshmen 
admitted to the program will have access to the necessary advising 
through their initial semesters to help them determine if Psychology is an 
appropriate area for their interests and abilities. 

Freshmen who are admitted directly to Psychology will be subject to a 
performance review by the time they have completed 45 credits. To meet 
the provisions of the review, these students must complete: ( 1 ) the Math/ 
English/Science supporting course sequence with a C or better in each 
course; and (2) PSYC 1 00 and 200 with a minimum average of 2.5 for the 
two courses. Students who do not meet this standard will be required to 
select another major. 

Transfer Admission. The following requirements affect new transfer 
students to the university as well as on-campus students hoping to change 
majors to the Department. Admission of transfer students may be severely 
limited, and capacity is determined each year in accordance with the 
success of incoming freshmen. 

In order to be admitted to Psychology, transfer students will be required 
to meet the following set of gateway requirements: 

Internal (on-campus) Transfers: (1 ) Completion of PSYC 200 and one 
other 200-level PSYC course. (2) Completion of the supporting course lab 
science requirement. (3) Attainment of a C in each course listed in ( 1 ) and 
(2), with a combined GPA of 2.5 for all three. (4) Attainment of a minimum 
cumulative GPA for all college-level work attempted. 

External Transfers: (1) Completion of PSYC 200 and one other PSYC 
course beyond the introductory level, equivalent to a College Park 
psychology course. The PSYC 200 equivalent course must include 
analysis of variance and regression. (2) Completion of the supporting 
course lab science requirement, (3) Attainment of a C in each course listed 
in (1 ) and (2), with a combined GPA of 2.5 lor all three. (4) Completion of 
a course in probability or calculus equivalent to MATH 1 1 1 , 1 20, or 1 40 
with a grade of C or better. (5) Attainment of a minimum cumulative GPA 
for all college-level work attempted. 

The required GPA is set each year and may vary from year to year 
depending upon available space. Contact the Department of Psychology 
or the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for the current GPA standard. 

Appeals. Students who are unsuccessful in gaining admission to Psy- 
cfiology at the freshman or transfer level, and t)elieve they have extenu- 
ating or special circumstances which should be considered, may appeal 
in writing to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. The students will be 
notifed in writing of the appeal decision once it is made. Contact the 
Counselor for Limited Enrollment Programs at 301/314-8378 lor further 
information. 

Students admitted to Psychology as freshmen who do not pass the 45 
credit review but believe they have special circumstances which should be 
considered may appeal directly to the Department. 

Advising 

Advising and information about the Psychology program are available 
weekdays from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 pm to 4:30 p.m. in the Psychology 
Undergraduate Office, 1107 Zoology-Psychology Building. A Program 
Guide is available. Advising appointments may be made by calling 405- 
5866. Contact Dr. Ellin K. Scholnick, Director of the Undergraduate 
Program, 21 47A Zoology-Psychology Building, 405-5914. for more infor- 
mation. 

Student Organizations 

The Psychology Honorary Society. Psi Chi. has an office in the Under- 
graduate Suite, 1107 Zoology- Psychology Building, where informatkjn 
about applications, eligibility, and membership can be obtained Psi Chi 
offers a series of workshops on topics of interest to undergraduates. 



Psychology 119 



Fieldwork 

The department offers a program of fieldwork coordinated witfi a seminar 
tfirougfi PSYC 386. Dr. Robert Coursey, 405-5904, usually administers 
tfie course. 

Honors 

The Psychology Honors Program offers the exceptional student a series 
of seminars and the opportunity to do independent research under a 
faculty mentor To be admitted to the program students must file a formal 
application and be interviewed by the Director of the Program, Dr. William 
S. Hall (2147B Zoology-Psychology Building. 405-5912). Students are 
eligible to enter the program if they are in their fourth to sixth semester of 
undergraduate work and have completed three courses in Psychology 
including PSYC 200. and have a 3.3 GPA overall and in Psychology. 
Students in the University Honors Program may be admitted in their third 
semester providing that they have (a) earned an A in PSYC 1 00 or 1 0OH, 
(b) finished the mathematics prerequisite for PSYC 200 and (c) have an 
overall GPA and Psychology GPA of at least 3.3. Since there are different 
graduation requirements including an undergraduate thesis and support- 
ing math and science courses, the student is urged to consult the Guide 
to the Honors Program in Psychology available in the Undergraduate 
Office. 

Course Code: PSYC 



RADIO-TELEVISION-FILM (RTVF) 

This program has been closed. No new applicants are being accepted. 
Current students should contact the college for advising. 



College of Arts & Humanities 



The RTVF Major 

The purpose of the Radio-Television-Film major is to provide a liberal 
education, leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, in all facets of broadcast 
communications and the cinematic arts. Our curriculum offers courses in 
historical and critical approaches to film and broadcasting, courses in the 
cultural effects of communications, broadcasting management studies, 
and production courses in sound, film, and television. Radio-Television- 
Film graduates go on to do post-graduate work in communications or 
cinema studies, or enter the fields of filmmaking, script writing, television 
production, broadcast management, corporate television, film archival 
work, film distribution, and other areas of the communications industry. 

Major Requirements 

Thirty hours of course work in Radio-Television-Film, exclusive of courses 
taken to satisfy college requirements. Only fifteen of these credits may be 
in production oriented courses. All courses require the grade of C or better. 
Three foundation courses, RTVF 212, 213, and 214, are required of all 
prospective majors who have satisfied the requirements of the limited 
enrollment admissions process. At least four courses from the 300 level 
core program must be taken before 400 level electives. Students are 
urged to examine the catalogue and check with their advisors to determine 
the appropriate prerequisites to the courses they may wish to take. 

RTVF 124 and 314 do not count toward the major. 

Supporting Courses 

Fifteen credits in a coherent body of supporting courses, usually in one 
department, relevant to an Arts & Humanities major. Nine of these credits 
must be at the 300 or 400 level. 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Supervised internships in a variety of private, educational, and govern- 
ment broadcasting and film organizations are available to RTVF majors 
who have completed at least 1 8 major credits with an overall average of 
at least 2.8. 



Students must register for the same number of credits in RTVF 384 (Field 
Work experience) and RTVF 385 (Field Work Analysis) up to a maximum 
of three credits each. These courses are not repeatable. RTVF 384 may 
only be taken Satisfactory-Fail with the grade based upon a written 
evaluation by the intern's supervisor at the particular organization. Only 
the credits earned in RTVF 385, in which a letter grade is given, may be 
counted toward the major requirement. The grade for RTVF 385 will be 
assigned by the student's faculty supen/isor. based on the quality of a 
project completed in conjunction with the field work experience, the scope 
of which must be consistent with the number of credits for which the 
student is enrolled. 

Financial Assistance 

The Eaton Fellowship is offered to high-ranking undergraduate seniors 
with a broadcasting emphasis. 

Student Organization 

Alpha Epsilon Rho — the student honorary organization. 
Course Code: RTVF 



RECREATION (RECR) 

This program has been closed. No new applicants are being accepted. 
Current students should contact the college for advising. 

College of Health and Human Performance 



The Major 

The Recreation curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students who 
wish to qualify for positions in the leisure services fields, to enhance their 
understanding of leisure behaviorand related opportunities, and to enable 
them to render distinct contributions to community life. The department 
draws upon various other departments and colleges within the University, 
and upon notable practitioners in the metropolitan area, to enrich course 
offerings in the leisure studies curriculum. A minimum of 120 credits is 
required for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Those majoring in recreation and leisure studies have opportunity for 
observation and practical experience in local, county, state and federal 
recreation programs, in social and group work agency programs, and in 
various programs of the Armed Forces, American Red Cross, hospitals, 
voluntary organizations, business and industry, and commercial recre- 
ation establishments. l\/lajors are required to select an area of interest 
around which to center their elective coursework. The "options." are 
Program Services, Recreation Resources fVlanagement, and Therapeutic 
Recreation. Development of an area of professional emphasis within an 
option consistent with the student's career goals is encouraged. This area 
should focus on a specific population, setting or function within the more 
general option. 

Requirements for Major 

The Recreation degree consists of a minimum of 1 20 credits with course 
work falling into the following categories: general education, major, option, 
related requirements and pure electives. There is ample opportunity for 
double-counting coursework to provide space for additional elective 
coursework. if desired. 

The Recreation program requires a grade of "C" or better in all but general 
education and free elective courses. 

Recreation Curriculum 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CORE Program (see Schedule of Classes for more 

specific information) 46 

RECR 130 — Recreation and Leisure 3 

SPCH 100 — (or alternate approved by Department) 3 

GVPT 170or 100or273 3 



120 Radio-Television-Film 



RECR 270— Leisure Services and Special Populations 3 

RECR 350 — Recreational Use ot Natural Areas 3 

EDHD 320— Human Development Througti the Life Span 3 

RECR 420— Program Planning and Analysis 3 

RECR 200— Sophomore Seminar 1 

RECR 340— Field Work I 6 

RECR 460— Leadership Techniques and Practices 3 

RECR 490 — Organization and Administration of Recreation . 3 

RECR 410 — t^easurement and Evaluation in Recreation 3 

RECR 432— Philosophy of Recreation 3 

RECR 300 — Senior Seminar 

RECR 341— Field Work II 8 

Focus Area coursework 30 

"Option Requirements (Resource Management and 

Program Services), (Therapeutic Recreation 10) 6 

"Option Competencies 6 

Option Electives 18 

Pure Elective 1 

■Piease check advisor for recommended coursework. 
"RECR prefix courses may be mandated by option. 

Fieldwork 

A unique aspect of the Recreation major is the requirement of two practical 
field-based experiences totalling 560 hours: one is taken at the sopho- 
more level and the other at the senior level. 

Course Code: RECR 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES PROGRAM 
College of Arts and Humanities 

31 06 Jimenez Hall, 405-4024 

Advisory Committee: Falvo (Italian), Little, (Spanish), Mossman (French) 

The Romance Languages Program is intended for students who wish to 
major in more than one Romance language. 

The Major 

Students selecting this major must take a total of forty-five credits selected 
from courses in two of the three components listed below: French, Italian 
and Spanish. The first four courses listed under each group are required 
for that particular language component: exceptions or substitutions may 
be made only with the approval of the student's advisor in consultation with 
the Romance Languages Advisory Committee. To achieve the total of 
forty-five credits, twenty-one credits are taken in each of the two languages, 
as specified, and three additional credits are taken at the 400 level in either 
of the languages chosen. Literature or civilization courses may not be 
taken in translation. 

There are no requirements for support courses for the Romance Lan- 
guages major. 

No grade lower than C may be used toward the major. Students who wish 
to apply for Teacher's Certification should consult the College of Education. 

Requirements for Each Language 

French — 204, 301 , 351 , 352: one additional language course at the 300 
or 400 level : two additional literature or civilization courses at the 400 level. 
Italian — 204, 301. 351, 352: three additional literature or civilization 
courses at the 400 level. Spanish — 204, 301 , 321-322 or 323-324: one 
additional language course at the 300 or 400 level : two additional literature 
or civilization courses at the 400 level. 



RUSSIAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM 
College of Arts and Humanities 

21 15 Francis Scott Key Hall. 405-4307 

Professors: Brecht and Davidson (Germanic and Slavic). Dawlsha (Gov- 



ernment and Politics), Foust, Lampe, Yaney (History), Robinson (Sociology) 

Associate Professors: Murrell (Economics), Berry, Glad, Hitchcock and 

Lekic (Germanic and Slavic), Kaminski and Tismaneanu (Government 

and Politics). Majeska (History) 

Assistant Professor: Martin (Germanic and Slavic) 

Instructor: Brin (Germanic and Slavic) 

Lecturer: Manukian (Government and Politics) 

The Major 

The Russian Area Studies Program offers courses leading to a Bachelor 
of Arts in Russian studies. Students in the program study Russian and 
Soviet culture as broadly as possible, striving to comprehend it in all its 
aspects rather than focusing their attention on a single element of human 
behavior. It is hoped that insights into the Russian way of life will be 
valuable not only as such but as a means to deepen the students' 
awareness of their own society and of themselves. 

Course offerings are in several departments: Germanic and Slavic Lan- 
guages and Literatures, Government and Politics, History, Economics. 
Geography. Philosophy, and Sociology. Student may plan their cumcu- 
lum so as to emphasize any one of these disciplines, thus preparing for 
graduate work either in the Russian area or in the discipline. 

The Major 

Students in the program must meet the general degree requirements of 
the University and college from which they graduate. They must complete 
twenty-four hours in Russian language and literature courses selected 
from among the following equivalent courses: RUSS 101, 102,201.202, 
301, 302, 303, 321, 322, 401, 402. 403. and 404. In addition, students 
must complete twenty-lour hours in Russian area courses at the 300 level 
or above. These twenty-lour hours must be taken in at least five different 
departments, if appropriate courses are available, and may include 
language-literature courses beyond those required above. 

It is recommended but not required that the student who plans on doing 
graduate work complete at least eighteen hours at the 300 level or above 
(which may include courses applicable to the Russian Area program) in 
one of the atwve-mentioned departments. It is also recommended that 
students who plan on doing graduate work in the social sciences, 
government and politics, economics, geography, and sociology take at 
least two courses in statistical methods. 

The student's advisor will be the program director or the designate. The 
student must receive a grade of C or better in all the above-mentioned 
required courses. 

In addition to the courses in Russian language, literature, and culture 
taught in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Lit- 
eratures, the following Russian Area courses are offered. Students should 
check the Schedule of Classes each semester. 

ECON 380 — Comparative Economic Systems 

ECON 482— Economics of the Soviet Union 

GEOG 325— Soviet Union 

GVPT 445— Russian Political Thought 

GVPT 451— Foreign Policy of the U.S.S.R, 

GVPT 481 — Government and Administration of the Soviet Union 

HIST 305— The Eastern Orthodox Church: Its Cultural History 

HIST 340— Eastern Europe Under Communism 

HIST 344— The Russian Revolutions of 1917 

HIST 424— History of Russia to 1801 

HIST 425— History of Russia from 1801-1917 

HIST 442— The Soviet Union 

HIST 443— Modern Balkan History 

HIST 487— Soviet Foreign Relations 

PHIL 328B— Studies in the History of Philosophy: Marxist Philosophy 

SOCY 474— Soviet Ethnic Issues 

The various cooperating departments also offer occasional special courses 
in the Russian and Soviet field HIST 237, Russian Civilization, is 
recommended as a general introduction to the program but does not count 
toward the fulfillment of the program's requirements. 

Course Codes: RUSS 



Romance Languages Program 121 

SOCY 201 ■— Introduclory Statistics for Sociology 4 

SOCY 202— Introduction to Researcti Methods in 

Sociology 4 

SOCY 203— Sociological Theory 3 

SOCY 441— Stratification and Inequality 3 

1 additional methodology course" 3 

2 Sociology courses at any level 6 

4 Sociology courses at 400 level 12 

4 supporting courses'" 12 

Internship (recommended, not required)"" 6 

USP/CORE Electives"" 24-30/21-27 

Total 120 

'Three hours of mathematics (MATH 1 1 1 or its equivalent, or higher) are 
required as prerequisite. 

"The second required methods course and all supporting courses must 

be selected from approved lists. 

'"Courses complementing Sociology specialization must be selected 

from an approved list and must include at least two courses at the 400 

level. 

""Students choosing to ta(<e internships will reduce their elective credit 

total by six credits. 

Advising 

Further information on coursework, internships, the departmental honors 
program, careers, and other topics may be obtained from the Sociology 
Undergraduate Advisor, 2108 Art/Sociology Building, 405-6389. 

Fieldwork and Internship Opportunities 

Although internships are not a requirement for a major, students may wish 
to consider the internship program offered by the department or through 
the Experiential Learning Office located in Hornbake Library. Majors may 
receive up to six credits in SOCY 386 by the combination of working in an 
internship/volunteer position plus doing some academic project in con- 
junction with the work experience. A prerequisite of 1 2 credits in Sociology 
coursework is also required. 

Honors 

The objective of the Honors Program in the Department of Sociology is to 
encourage and recognize superior scholarship by providing an opportu- 
nity for interested, capable, and energetic undergraduate students to 
engage in study in an area of the student's interest under the close 
supervision of a faculty mentor. The honors program is based upon tutohal 
study and independent research. 

Students who have an overall cumulative grade point average of at least 
3.3, a cumulative average of 3.5 in Sociology courses, and who have 
taken at least 9 credits in Sociology may apply. Transfer students with 
equivalent academic records at other accredited institutions are also 
eligible. Admission to the program will be based upon academic perfor- 
mance, and the judgment of the Undergraduate Committee on the degree 
to which the applicant has sufficient matuhty and interest to successfully 
complete the requirements for graduation with Honors. Further informa- 
tion on the honors program is available from the Sociology Undergraduate 
Office. 

Student Organizations 

The Sociology Collective, a group open to all Sociology majors, was 
organized by a group of interested undergraduates to fill student needs 
within the Sociology community. The Collective provides information 
about topics of interest, including department activities, career planning, 
and relevant changes with the university, and strives to enhance the sense 
of community within the department. Representatives of the Collective 
participate on faculty committees within the department and thereby 
provide the undergraduate perspective on policy issues. 

Alpha Kappa Delta is the National Honor Society for Sociology majors. 
Membership is based on Sociology G.P.A. (3.0) and overall G.P.A. (3.0). 
Students may apply after they have completed 1 8 credits in Sociology 
coursework. This organization's activities focus on providing tutoring 
sen/ices for undergraduates in the core courses. 



SOCIOLOGY (SOCY) 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2108 Art-Sociology Building. 405 6389 

Professor and Chair: Falk 

Professors: Billingsley' (Family and Community Development), Brown, 

Clignet, Dager (Ementus). Finsterbusch, Hage', Hamilton, Kammeyer, 

Lejins (Emeritus). Meeker, H. Presser, S. Presser, Ritzer, Robinson, D. 

Segal'. M. Segal'. J. Teachman 

Associate Professors: Favero' (AES), Henkel. Hirzel, J. Hunt, L. Hunt, 

Landry, Lengermann, Mclntyre. Pease, Vanneman 

Assistant Professors: Harper, Kahn, Malhotra, Neustadtl 

Lecturer: Moghadam 

'Distinguished Scholar-Teacher 
■Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

The Major 

Sociology is the scientific study of societies, institutions, organizations, 
groups, and individuals. Sociological studies range from the social factors 
that affect individuals, to group processes, and societal change. The 
strengths of the department are the study of population (demography), 
military sociology, political economy, social psychology, and the connec- 
tions among gender, work, and family. 

A major in sociology offers (1) a general education especially directed 
toward understanding the complexities of modern society and its social 
problems by using basic concepts, research and statistical skills; (2) a 
broad preparation for various types of professions, occupations, and 
services dealing with people; and (3) preparation of qualified students for 
graduate training in sociology, social work, law, and business. Sociology 
also forms a valuable background for those interested in other fields or 
majors. Courses in sociology can be used as preparation for careers in 
government and private research, urban planning, personnel work, hu- 
man resources management, and many other policy-making and admin- 
istrative careers. 

Areas of Specialization 

Undergraduate specializations are available in research methods, social 
psychology, social demography, social institutions, and inequality. These 
specializations can often be integrated with a second major. This program 
versatility and the rich experiential learning possibilities of the Washington 
metropolitan area combine to make the sociology curriculum a valuable 
career choice. 

Requirements for Major 

The following represent new requirements effective Spring, 1991. All 
students declaring Sociology as their major prior to Spring, 1991 will 
continue to operate under the old requirements. 

Students in sociology must complete 50 hours of departmental require- 
ments, none of which may be taken pass/fail. Thirty-eight of these fiours 
are in sociology coursework, which must be completed with a minimum 
grade of C in each course; SOCY 1 00 should be taken in the freshman or 
sophomore year followed by SOCY 203. Three hours of mathematics 
(MATH 1 1 1 or its equivalent or higher) are required of majors as a 
prerequisite of SOCY 201. SOCY 202 follow/s SOCY 201. SOCY 441 
(stratification) and one additional upper level methods course should be 
taken by the second semester of the junior year. 

The supporting course requirement for majors is tw^elve hours of a 
coherent series of courses from outside of the department that relate to the 
student's major substantive'" or research interests. These courses need 
not come from the same department, but at least six hours must be taken 
at the 400 level. It is strongly recommended that the student wori< out an 
appropriate supporting sequence for the particular specialization with the 
department advisor. 



Department of Sociology Requirements 



CORE/USP Program Requirements 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

40/43 
3 



122 Sociology 



Survey Research Center 

1103 Art-Sociology Building. 314-7831 

Director: Stanley Presser 

The Survey Research Center was created in 1980 as a special purpose 
research facility within the behavioral and social sciences. The center 
specializes in the design of questionnaires and the conduct of surveys for 
policy purposes, and has the capacity to conduct mini-surveys, survey 
experiments, and in-depth clinical interviews. The center supports under- 
graduate and graduate education by providing both technical training and 
practical experience to students. Also, the center has a strong community 
service mission through the provision of technical assistance on survey 
methods and survey design to units of state and local governments, and 
by conducting surveys on a contract or grant basis for these governmental 
units. 

Course Code: SOCY 



SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURES (SPAN) 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2215 Jimenez Hall, 405-6441 

Professor and Chair: SosnowskI 

Professor Emerita: Nemes 

Professors: Aguilar-Mora, Pacheco 

Associate Professors: Igel, Lavine, Phaf 

Assistant Professors: Benito- Vessels, Butler, Naharro-Calderon, Rabasa, 

Sanjines 

Instructors: Downey-Vanover, Little 

The Majors 

Undergraduate majors can benefit from a wide range of courses in 
Spanish and Latin Amehcan literature and civilization; technical courses 
in translation, linguistics, and commercial uses of Spanish. Area studies 
programs are also available in conjunction with other disciplines to provide 
the student with a solid knowledge of the Spanish and Latin American 
worlds. 

A grade of at least C is required in all major and supporting area courses. 

Language and Literature Major 

Courses: SPAN 207, 221 , 301 -302, 31 1 or 31 2, 321 -322 or 323-324, 325- 
326 or 346-347; plus four courses in literature at the 400-level; one course 
may be taken in Luzo-Brazilian literature, for a total of thirty-nine credits. 
Nine credits of supporting courses, six of which must be on the 300 or 400 
level in a single area other than Spanish, for a combined total of forty-eight 
credits. Suggested areas are: art, comparative literature, government and 
politics, history, philosophy, and Portuguese. 

Foreign Area Major 

Courses: SPAN 207; 301-302; 31 1 or 31 2; 31 5 and 41 5 or 31 6 and 31 7; 
321 -322 or 323-324; 325-326 or 346-347, plus three courses in literature 
at the 400-level; one course may be taken in Luzo-Brazilian literature, for 
a total of thirty nine-credits. Nine credits of supporting courses, six of which 
must be on the 300 or 400 level in a single area other than Spanish, for a 
combined total of forty-eight credits. Suggested areas: anthropology, 
economics, geography, government and politics, history, Portuguese, 
and sociology. 

Translation Option 

Courses: SPAN 207; 301 -302, 311 or 31 2; 31 6 and 31 7; two courses from 
31 8, 356, 357. 416. 417; 321-322 or 323-324; one course from 325. 326. 
346. 347; plus two courses In literature at the 400-level; one course may 
be taken in Luzo-Brazilian literature, for a total of thirty-nine credits. Nine 
credits of supporting courses, six of which must be on the 300 or 400 level 
in a single area other than Spanish, for a combined total of forty-eight 
credits. Suggested areas: art. comparative literature, government and 
politics, history, philosophy, and Portuguese. 



Business Option* 

Courses; SPAN 207:21 1:301 -302; 31 lor 312; 31 5and415;316and317; 
325-326 or 346-347; 422. for a total of thirty-six credits. Twelve credits of 
supporting courses, six of which must be on the 300 or 400 level In a single 
area other than Spanish. Suggested areas: business and management, 
economics, government and politics, history and geography 

Students interested in majoring in a combination of two Romance lan- 
guages should see the description of the Romance Languages Program, 
above. 

'A double major program (IBFL) exists combining International Business 
and Spanish. 

Honors 

The department Honors Program offers qualified students the possibility 
of working in close contact with a mentor on an original thesis. Honors 
seminars are primarily for students who have l>een accepted to the 
Program, but are open to others with the approval of the Honors Director. 
Honors students must take 6 credits of Honor Thesis (SPAN 479). 
Interested students should see the Director of the Spanish Honors 
Program. 

Elementary Honors. SPAN 102H is limited to specially approved candi- 
dates who have passed SPAN 101 with high grades, and will allow them 
to enter 201. SPAN 201 is limited to students who have received high 
grades in 1 02, 1 02H, or 1 03 or the equivalent. Upon completion of 203H, 
with the recommendation of the instructor, a student may skip 204. 

Lower Division Courses 

The elementary and Intermediate courses in Spanish and Portuguese 
consist of three semesters of four credits each (101, 102, 201). The 
language requirement for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and 
Humanities is satisfied by passing 201 or equivalent. Students who wish 
to enroll in Spanish 101, 102. and 201 must present their high school 
transcript for proper placement. See the Schedule of Classes for further 
information. Students may not receive credits for both Spanish 102 and 
Spanish 103. 

Transfer students with college credit have the option of continuing at the 
next level of study. 

Students must take language acquisition courses sequentially, i.e., 101, 
102, 201, 202, etc. Once credit has been received in a higher level 
language acquisition or grammar course, a lower level course may not be 
taken for credit. 

Course Codes: SPAN, PORT 



SPECIAL EDUCATION (EDSP) 
College of Education 

1308 Benjamin Building, 405-6515/4 

Professor and Chair: Burke 

Professors: Egel, Graham, Hebeler 

Associate Professors: Beckman, Cooper, Harris. Kohl, Leone. Lleber, 

Moon, Neubert, Speece 

Assistant Professors; Anderson. Harry 

Associate Research Scholar: McLaughlin 

Research Associates: Adger. Flonan, MacArthur 

Instructors: Aiello, Hudak, Long. Simon 

Faculty Research Assistants: Krishnaswami. Warren 

The Special Education Department offers an Innovative and ngorous 
undergraduate program which prepares teachers o( infants, children, or 
young adults with disabilities. This program has been nationally recog- 
nized for many of its exemplary features. II is a five-year ( 1 semester. 1 50 
credit hour) professional certification program which graduates students 
with a Bachelor of Science degree in special education with full special 
education teacher certification in the State of Maryland and certification 
reciprocity in twenty-eight other states. Students considenng a special 
education major enroll in courses which meet university and college 



Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 123 



requirements while they take supporting coursework designed to provide 
an understanding of normal human development and basic psychologica 
and sociological principles of human behavior. Special Education stu 
dents receive specialized training in the following areas: language devel 
opment; motor development; social-emotional development; normal hu 
man behavior; social and educational needs of individuals with disabili 
ties; diagnostic and educational assessment procedures; instructional 
procedures and materials; curnculum development, classroom and be 
havior management; effective communication with the parents and fami 
lies of children with disabilities; community resource planning; and local, 
state, and federal laws concerning children and youth with disabilities 
Graduates of the program are expected to master specific skills in each 
of these areas 

Requirements for Major 

students Interested In majoring in special education must consult a 
departmental advisor as early as possible after matriculation at tlie 
university since the curriculum requires an extensive and sequenced 
program of studies. Students accepted as Special Education majors take 
a two-semester sequence of generic special education courses and 
practicum experiences during the third year (Semesters V and VI) These 
courses provide the student with a solid foundation in theory and practice 
related to the education of all children with disabilities across a wide range 
of ages. During Semester VI, students select one of the following four 
areas of specialization: 

1. Education of the Severely Handicapped (SH) 

2. Early Childhood Special Education (EC) 

3. Education of the Educationally Handicapped (EH) 

4. Secondary and Transition Special Education (ST) 

Students select two specialty areas and are accepted into one of their two 
specialty area choices. Coursework in each of these four areas is 
designed to develop expertise with a specific special education popula- 
tion. Students work directly with children or youth with disabilities during 
each semester, leading up to student teaching during the last semester. 
Specialty area programs include twelve to fifteen hours of electives. 

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Program 

Selected undergraduate students majoring in special education will be 
eligible for dual application of credit to both the bachelor's and master's 
degrees. A student desiring graduate credit should apply for admission to 
the Graduate School during the last semester of the fourth year. If 
admitted to the Graduate School, the student may select up to twelve 
credits (four courses) of specified coursework from the fifth year of the 
undergraduate program to be applied simultaneously toward the credits 
required for the master's degree in special education at the University of 
(Maryland. The selected courses may not include field practica or student 
teaching experiences. Students will be expected to fulfill supplemental 
requirements in the selected courses. To complete the master's degree, 
students must fulfill all Graduate School requirements for the degree, with 
the exception of the selected 400-level courses. 

Admission 

Prior to formal acceptance as a special education major, all students are 
required to enroll in a special education introductory course (EDSP 210) 
which provides a survey of the history and current issues in special 
education. Upon successful completion of the introductory course and 
forty-five semester hours of requirements, students apply for formal 
admission to the professional program of the Department of Special 
Education by submitting an application with a statement of intent specify- 
ing their professional goals. To be accepted as a full special education 
major, students must fulfill the College of Education requirements for 
admission to Teacher Education, as well as the following departmental 
conditions: 

1 . Completion of coursework indicated below with an asterisk. 

2. Admission is competitive beyond the minimum 2.5 grade point 
average required for consideration. 

3. Submission of an application together with a statement of intent 
specifying the applicant's professional goals. 

Admittance will be based on the completion of the required courses, the 
grade point average, the applicant's experience with persons with disabili- 
ties, and the appropriateness and clarity of the professional goal state- 
ment. An appeals process has been established for students who do not 



meet the competitive GPA for admission, but who are af)plying in connec- 
tion with special university programs including affirmative action and 
academic promise. 

Advising 

The Department of Special Education provides academic advisement 
through a faculty and a peer advisement program. Special education 
majors are assigned a faculty advisor, who is carefully matched to the 
student's area of interest. It is required that all students receive advise- 
ment each semester. Students are urged to use the Special Education 
Advising Center, 1235 Benjamin Building. 

Awards 

The Department of Special Education Student Service Award is pre- 
sented annually to the graduating senior who has demonstrated outstand- 
ing leadership and service to the Special Education Department. 

Student Organizations: The Department of special Education 
encourages student participation in extracurricular activities within and 
outside of the University. Opportunities within the department include the 
Council tor Exceptional Children, and the Student Advisory Board. For 
more information, stop by the Special Education Advising Center, 1235 
Benjamin Building. 

Required Courses 

CORE Liberal Arts and Science Studies Program Requirements to 
include the following courses which are departmental requirements: 
(Consult with a departmental advisor with regard to USP requirements.) 

•HIST 156 or HIST 157 (3) 

•STAT 100 (3) 

*Lab Science (4) 

•ENGL Literature (3) 

*PSYC100(3) 

*SOCY 100 or 105(3) 

Other Academic Support Courses 

•HESP 202 (3) 

HESP 400 (3) 

l^/1ATH210(4) 

•EDHD411 orPSYC355(3) 

EDHD 460 (3) 

Professional Courses 

*EDSP 210— Introduction to Special Education (3) 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning (6) 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education (3) 

EDSP 320— Introduction to Assessment in Special Education (3) 

EDSP 321 — Comparative Approaches to Behavior and Classroom 

Management in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 322— Field Placement in Special Education I (3) 
EDSP 443 — Assessment and Instructional Design for the 

Handicapped: Reading and Written Communication Disorders (3) 
EDSP 331 — Introduction to Curriculum and Instructional Methods in 

Special Education (3) 
EDSP 332 — Interdisciplinary Communication in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 333— Field Placement in Special Education II (3) 

Specialty Area Requirements 

The Severely Handicapped Option 

EDSP 400 — Assessment, Curriculum and Instructional Methods for Stu- 
dents with Severe Handicaps (3) 
EDSP 402— Field Placement: Severely Handicapped I (4) 
EDSP 403 — Physical and Communication Adaptations for Students with 

Severe Handicaps (3) 
EDSP 404 — Education of Students with Autism (3) 
EDSP 405— Field Placement: Severely Handicapped II (4) 
EDSP 410 — Community Functioning Skills for Students with Severe 

Handicaps (3) 
EDSP 330 — Families and the Education of Handicapped Children (3) 
EDSP 420 — Developmental and Behavioral Characteristics of 
Nonhandicapped and Handicapped Infants and Young Children OR 



124 Special Education 



EDSP 460 — CareerA/ocational Education for the Handicapped (3) 

EDSP 411— Field Placement: Severely Handicapped III (4) 

EDSP 412— Vocational and Transitional Instruction for Students with 

Severe Handicaps (3) 
EDSP 417— Student Teaching: Severely Handicapped (11) 
EDSP 418— Seminar: Issues and Research Related to the Instruction of 

the Severely Handicapped (3) 

The Educationally Handicapped Option 

EDSP 440 — Assessment and Instructional Design for the Educationally 

Handicapped: Cognitive and Psychosocial Development (3) 
EDSP 441— Assessment and Instructional Design for the Educationally 

Handicapped: Oral Language and Communication Disorders (3) 
EDSP 442— Field Placement: Educationally Handicapped I (3) 
EDSP 330 — Families and the Education of Handicapped Children (3) 
EDSP 445 — Field Placement: Educationally Handicapped II (4) 
EDHD 413— Adolescent Development (3) 
EDCI 456 — Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disabilities in 

Mathematics (3) 
EDSP 446 — Instructional Design for the Educationally Handicapped: 

Functional Living Skills (3) 
EDSP 447— Field Placement: Educationally Handicapped III (4) 
EDSP 450— Program Management for the Educationally Handicapped 

(3) 
EDSP 457— Student Teaching: Educationally Handicapped (11) 
EDSP 458 — Seminar: Special Issues and Research Related to the 

Educationally Handicapped (3) 
EDSP 460— Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped (3) 

The Secondary and Transition Special Education Option 

EDSP 330 — Families and the Education of Handicapped Children (3) 
EDSP 460 — Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped (3) 
EDSP 461— Field Placement: Career/Vocational I (3) 
EDSP 462 — Vocational Assessment and Instruction in Special Education 

(3) 
EDSP 463— Field Placement: CareerA/ocational II (3) 
EDIT 421— Industrial Arts in Special Education (3) 
EDCI 456 — Diagnosis and Treatment of Learning Disabilities in 

Mathematics (3) 
EDSP 450— Program Management for the Educationally Handicapped 

(3) 
EDSP 465— Field Placement: Career/Vocational III (3) 
EDSP 467— Student Teaching: CareerA/ocational (11) 
EDSP 468 — Special Topics Seminar in CareerA/ocational Education for 

the Handicapped (3) 
EDSP 464 — Secondary and Transition Methods in Special Education (3) 
EDSP 446 — Instructional Design for the Educationally Handicapped: 

Functional Living Skills (3) 

The Early Childhood Special Education Option 

EDSP 420 — Developmental and Behavioral Characteristics of Non- 
Handicapped and Handicapped Infants and Young Children (3) 
EDSP 421— Field Placement: Early Childhood Special Education I (3) 
EDSP 422 — Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Special Edu- 
cation (Moderate to Mild:3-8 yrs) (3) 
EDSP 424— Field Placement: Early Childhood Special Education II (4) 
EDCI 410— The Child and the Curriculum: Early Childhood (3) 
EDSP 330 — Families and the Education of Handicapped Children (3) 
EDSP 423 — Assessment of Preschool Handicapped Children and Infants 

(3) 
EDSP 430 — Intervention Techniques and Strategies for Preschool Handi- 
capped Children and Infants (3) 
EDSP 431— Field Placement: Early Childhood Special Education III 

(Severe to Moderate) (4) 
EDSP 437— Student Teaching: Early Childhood Special Education (11) 
EDSP 438 — Seminar: Special Issues in Early Childhood Special Educa- 
tion (3) 
EDSP 400 — Assessment, Curriculum and Instructional Methods for Stu- 
dents with Severe Handicaps OR 
EDSP 441 — Assessment and Instructional Design for the Handicapped: 
Oral Language and Communication Disorders (3) 

Course Code: EDSP 



SPEECH COMMUNICATION (SPCH) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

2130 Skinner Building, 405-6519 

Professor and Chair: Wolvin 

Professors: Fink', Freimuth, Solomon 

Associate Professors: Falcione, Gaines, Klumpp, McCaleb 

Assistant Professors: Edgar, Goldsmith, Shaw 

Lecturer: Niles (p.t.) 

'Distinguished Scholar Teacher 

Speech Communication takes as its subject matter the history, processes, 
and effects of human communication through speech and its extensions. 
The departmental curhculum is designed to provide a liberal education in 
the arts and sciences of human communication as well as preparation tor 
career opportunities in business, government, education, and related 
fields of endeavor. Within the curriculum, students may pursue academic 
programs which emphasize a broad range of disciplinary areas, including 
interpersonal communication, organizational communication, political 
communication, health communication, educational communication, cog- 
nition and persuasion, rhetorical theory, history of rhetoric, and criticism 
of public discourse. 

The Major 

Major requirements include completion of thirty semester hours in Speech 
Communication and eighteen semester hours in supporting courses. No 
course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy mapr or supporting 
course requirements. 

Requirements for Major 

(Thirty semester hours): SPCH 200 or 230, 250, 400. 401. and 402. 
Fifteen semester hours in SPCH courses, at least twelve of which must at 
the 300-400 level. 

Required Supporting Courses 

(Eighteen semester hours): 1 . Nine semester hours of cognate courses 
selected from another discipline complementary to the major. (Selection 
of cognate courses must be in accordance with guidelines available in the 
departmental office.) 2. Nine semester hours to develop essential intel- 
lectual skills: Three credits in statistical analysis, selected from STAT 1 00, 
PSYC 200, SOCY 201 , BMGT 230. or EDMS 451 . Three credits in critical 
analysis, selected from ENGL 453, or CMLT 488. Three credits in 
structural analysis of language, selected from LING 200. HESP 120. 
ANTH 371 , ENGL 384, or ENGL 385. Courses taken to fulfill the support- 
ing course requirement may also be used to satisfy CORE requirements. 

Speech Communication offers special opportunities for students inter- 
ested in co-curricular activities, particularly debate and forensics. Supe- 
rior students may participate in an Honors Program. Interested students 
should consult with the Honors Director. 

Course Code: SPCH 

TEXTILES AND CONSUMER ECONOMICS (TXCE) 

This program has been closed. No new applicants are being admitted. 

The Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics is devoted to the 
development and dissemination of knowledge concerning consumers 
and their near environment The department offers the Bachelor of 
Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Students in Textiles and Consumer Economics may select one of lour 
majors which offer diverse professional opportunities Specific careers 
depend on the major area of emphasis although there is overlapping of 
career opportunities in some instances reflecting similar course require- 
ments. 



Speech Communication 125 



Requirements for the Major 

To graduate, students must complete the required department and 
supporting courses with the required grades, Human Ecology require- 
ments and University Studies Program requirements. Students should 
consult the current Undergraduate Catalog and Department Major Guides 
and also consult with their (acuity advisor All students must complete a 
minimum o( 120 credit hours to earn a Bachelor ot Science degree 
Specific requirements (or each ma)or (or option) are as (ollows: 

Apparel Design 

Ma)ors must complete all required TEXT/CNEC courses with a grade of 
C or better. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing, i( not exempt 3 

TEXT 105— Introduction to Textiles 3 

MATH 110 or 115 — Elementary Mathematical Models 

or Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 3 

SRCH 100. 107 or 125— Basic Pnnciples of Speech 
Communication. Technical Speech Communication or 

Introduction to Interpersonal Speech Communication .. 3 

DESN 101— Fundamentals of Design 3 

TEXT 221— Apparel I 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

ARTH 200— Art of the Western World I 3 

CORE Requirements 3 

Total 15 15 

Sophomore Year 

Elective 3 

ARTT 1 1 — Elements of Drawing 3 

ARTH 201— Art of the Western World II 3 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics I 3 

ECON 203— Principles of Economics II 3 

TEXT 205 — Textile Materials and Performance 3 

TEXT 222— Apparel II 3 

CMSC 103 or TEXT 235— Introduction to Computing 

or Computer Applications in Textiles 3 

DESN 102— Design II 3 

CORE Requirements 4 

Total 15 16 

Junior Year 

TEXT 347— History of Costume II 3 

TEXT 305 — Textile Materials: Evaluation and 

Characterization 3 

BGMT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

TEXT 365 — Fashion Merchandising 3 

CORE Requirements 9-10 

Human Ecology Core 6 

ENGL 391 or 393 or 394— Advanced Composition or 

Technical Writing or Business Writing 3 

Total 30-31 

Senior Year 

TEXT 420 — Apparel Design: Draping 3 

TEXT 441 — Clothing and Human Behavior 3 

TEXT 375 — Economics of Textile and Apparel Industry ... 3 

TEXT 425 — Apparel Design: Advanced Problems 3 

TEXT 430— Portfolio Presentation 3 

TEXT 435 — Woven Fabric Structure and Design 3 

CORE Requirements 9 

Elective 1-2 

Total 28-29 

Textile Marketing\Fashion Merchandising 

Students in the Textile Marketing\Fashion Merchandising program must 
complete the common requirements of the program. In addition, they must 
select either the textile marketing or the fashion merchandising option and 
complete the courses specified for the option selected. Textile marketing 
option: CHEM 103, CHEM 104. TEXT 400, TEXT 452 and TEXT 470, 
Fashion merchandising option: CHEM 103. CHEM 104. TEXT 221, and 
TEXT 365. 

Majors must complete MATH 1 1 (or MATH 115), ECON 201 , ECON 203, 
and all required TEXP^CNEC courses and BMGT 350 with a grade of C 



or better. Majors must complete 9 additional credits in upper-level BMGT 
courses and earn an average grade of "C" or better.. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

I II 

Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing, i( not exempt 3 

TEXT 105— Introduction to Textiles 3 

MATH 1 10 or 115 — Elementary Mathematical Models or 

Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 100, 107 or 125— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication, Technical Speech Communication 

or Introduction to Interpersonal Speech 

Communication 3 

DESN 101 — Fundamentals of Design or 

ARTT 100— Elements of Design 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

CORE Requirements 3 6 

Total 15 15 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry ... 4 

CORE Requirements 3 3 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics I 3 

ECON 203— Principles of Economics II 3 

TEXT 205 — Textiles Materials and Performance 3 

Human Ecology Core 3 

TEXT 221— Apparel I or Elective' (See option selected) 3 

Elective 3 

Total 16 16 

Junior Year 

Electives 3 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

TEXT 355 — Textile Furnishings 3 

TEXT 400 — Research Methods or Department 

Requirement* (See option selected) 3 

Human Ecology Core 3 

TEXT 365 — Fashion Merchandising or Department 

Requirement* (See option selected) 3 

BMGT Support Area** 3 

TEXT 305 — Textile Materials: Evaluation and 

Characterization 3 

ENGL 391 , 393 OR 394— Advanced Composition, 

Technical Writing or Business Writing 3 

CORE Requirements 3 

Total 30 

Senior Year 

TEXT 441 — Clothing and Human Behavior or 

CNEC 437— Consumer Behavior 3 

TEXT 375 — Economics of the Textile and Apparel 

Industry 3 

CORE Requirements 6 

TEXT 452 — Textile Science: Chemical Structure and 

Properties of Fibers or Department Requirement* 

(See option selected) 3 

BMGT Support Area" 6 

TEXT 470 — Textile and Apparel Marketing or Department 

Requirement* (See option selected) 3 

Electives 4 

Total 28 

*Department Requirement: Select from ALL CNEC and TEXT courses 
numbered 300 or above. 

**BMGT Support Area: Select from BMGT 353, 354, 360, 364, 372, 380, 
392, 453, 454, 456. 

Textiles 

Majors must complete ALL required TEXT/CNEC courses with a grade of 
C or better. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

Freshman Year 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 3 

TEXT 1 05— Introduction to Textiles 3 

MATH 115— Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 1 00— Introduction to Sociology 3 



1 26 Textiles and Consumer Econonfiics 



SPCH 1 10, 107. or 125 — Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication, Technical Speech Communication 

or Introduction to Interpersonal Speech 

Communication 3 

Human Ecology Core 3 

TEXT 205— Textile Materials and Performance 3 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 1 1 3— General Chemistry II 4 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

Total 16 16 

Sophomore Year 

CORE Requirements 3 6 

TEXT 305— Textile Materials: Evaluation and 

Characterization 3 

CHEM 233, 243, Organic Chemistry I, II 4 4 

MATH 140— Calculus I 4 

MATH 141— Calculus II 4 

Total 14 14 

Junior Year 

ECON 201 and 203— Principles of Economics I and II 6 

PHYS 141 or 121— Principles of Physics or 

Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PHYS 142 or 122— Principles of Physics or 

Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

TEXT 452— Textile Science: Chemical Structure and 

Properties of Fibers 3 

Human Ecology Core 6 

CORE Requirements 6 

Elective 3 

Total 32 

Senior Year 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical 
Writing* 3 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

TEXT 454 — Textile Science: Finishes or 

TEXT 456 — Textile Science: Dyes and 
Dye Applications 3 

TEXT 375— Economics of the Textile and Apparel I 
Industry 3 

TEXT 400— Research Methods 3 

CORE Requirements 6 

Electives 7 

Total 28 

"ENGL 393 preferred. 

Consumer Economics 

Majors must complete MATH 115, MATH 220, ECON 201, ECON 203, 
ALL required CNEC/TEXT courses and Support Area courses with a 
grade of C or better. ECON 305 and ECON 306 MUST be completed with 
an average grade of C. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 3 

MATH 115— Pre-Calculus 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 100, 107 or 125— Basic Pnnciples of Speech 

Communication. Technical Speech Communication 

or Introduction to Interpersonal Speech 

Communication 3 

Human Ecology Core 3 

CNEC 1 00— Introduction to Consumer Economics 3 

CORE Requirements 3 3 

PSYC 1 00— Introduction to Psychology 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 15 

Sophomore Year 

CORE Requirements 7 6-7 

ECON 201 and 203— Principles of Economics I and II 3 3 

MATH 220 or 1 40— Elementary Calculus I or Calculus 3-4 

MATH 221 or 141— Elementary Calculus II or 

Calculus II or Elective 3-4 

Elective 3 

Human Ecology Core 3 

Total 16-1715-17 



Junior Year 

CNEC 310 — Consumer Economics and Public Policy 3 

ENGL 391 . 393 or 394— Advanced Composition, 

Technical Writing or Business Wnling 3 

CNEC 431— The Consumer and the Law 3 

Support Area Requirement' 6 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

ECON 305 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and 3 

ECON 306 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

Elective 3 

CORE Requirements 3 

Total 30 

Senior Year 

CNEC 400— Research Methods 3 

CNEC 437— Consumer Behavior 3 

CNEC 435— Economics of Consumption 3 

CORE Requirements 6 

CNEC 410— Consumer Finance 3 

Support Area Requirement* 3 

Electives 5-8 

Total 26-29 

"Majors must select one of four identified Support Areas. These areas are 
as follows: Product Information, Marketing, Finance or Economics. Majors 
should check with the Department to obtain specific course requirements 
for each identified support area. 

Advising 

The department has mandatory advising for ALL majors. Majors are 
assigned faculty advisors and MUST discuss their program of study with 
their advisor each semester. Majors should check with the Office of 
Academic Affairs if they do not know the name of their faculty advisor. 

Honors 

A department Honors Program permits outstanding undergraduates to 
explore individually a program of work which will strengthen their under- 
graduate program and their professional interests. Students must have at 
least a "B" average to be considered. Students in the honors program 
participate in a junior honors seminar and present a senior thesis. 
Students completing this program graduate with department honors. 

internship Opportunities 

An internship program is available to all students majoring in the Depart- 
ment of Textiles and Consumer Economics during their senior year. 
Students must apply for admission to the internship program, including the 
retailing internship, in the second semester of their junior year. 

Course Codes: TEXT, CNEC 



THEATRE (THET) 

Coliege of Arts and Humanities 

1 146 Tawes Fine Arts Building. 405-6676 

Chair: Meersman 

Professors: Gillespie, Meersman 

Associate Professor: Blum, Elam, H6bert, O'Leary 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Couslant, Huang. Patterson, Schuler, 

Ufema 

Lecturers: Donnelly, Kriebs, Wagner 

Emeritus: Pugliese 

The department curricula lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree, and pwrmit 
the student to develop an emphasis in theatre design or performance. In 
cooperation with the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and the 
Department of Speech, an opportunity for teacher certification in speech 
and drama is provided. 

The curricula are designed to provide through the study of theatre history, 
design, performance, and production: 1) a liberal education through the 
study of theatre: 2) preparation for various opportunities in the performing 
arts. 



Textiles and Consumer Economics 127 



The Major 

Major Requirements are torly-two hours of coursework in theatre, exclu- 
sive of those courses taken to satisfy college and university requirements. 
Of the forty-two hours, at least twenty-one must be upper level (300-400 
senes) No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major 
or supporting area requirements. 

Requirements for Major 

Required core courses for all majors are: THET 110, 111, 120, 170.330, 
479,480,490,491 

Design Emphasis: THET 273, 375, 476, 418, plus additional courses in 
theatre to make the minimum. 

Performing Emphasis: THET 221, 320, 420 or 430, 474 or approved 
Technical/Design course, plus additional courses in theatre to make the 
minimum. 

Supporting courses for the Design and Performing Emphases include one 
from each of the following: ENGL 403, 404, or 405; ENGL 434 or 454; 
DANC 100 (or 210 or 310 tor design emphasis); IVIUSC 100 or 130; any 
ARTH or ARTT course approved by the departmental advisor. 

Advising 

Advising is required. Students are responsible for checking advisee 
assignments posted on faculty office doors and bulletin boards. 

Honors 

The Theatre department offers an honors program. Contact the Honors 
Program Advisor for information. 

Financial Aid 

Scholarships and financial assistance may be awarded to incoming 
students through a number of Creative and Performing Arts Scholarships 
and the Theatre Patrons Scholarships. Other scholarships and assistant- 
ships are awarded yearly to continuing students. For further information, 
contact the Theatre Awards Program Advisor. 

The department presents a number of University Theatre (UT) produc- 
tions each year. Students also comprise the Administrative Council for 
Theater (ACT). 

Course Code: THET 



TRANSPORTATION, BUSINESS, AND PUBLIC 
POLICY 

For information, consult the College of Business and Management entry. 

URBAN STUDIES AND PLANNING PROGRAM* 
School of Architecture 

1117 Lefrak Hall, 405-6790 

Chair: Howland 

Professors: Baum, Hanna, Levin 

Associate Professors: Brower, Chen 

Lecturer: Cohen 

Affiliate Faculty: Dupuy, Fogle, Francescato 



The Major 

The Urban Studies and Planning Program offers a program of study 
leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Urban Studies. The program is 
designed to encourage students either (1 ) to direct their learning toward 
planning and management careers in metropolitan-area organizations, or 
(2) to study urbanization processes and methods as a means toward 
earning a general education. The undergraduate urban studies and 



planning program is built on several introductory and methods courses 
that examine the city in its metropolitan, interregional, national, and 
international policy contexts. The problems of planning and management 
of the metropolis are stressed. Students are encouraged by the 
multidisciplinary urban studies and planning faculty to take advantage of 
the rich and extensive cross-departmental resources at College Park and 
are expected to select an urban-related specialization from another 
discipline. Inasmuch as the department exists to serve the planning and 
management personnel and research needs of metropolitan organiza- 
tions in the non-profit, for-profit, and government sectors, career guidance 
and advice on job placement have a high priority. Students are provided 
with advice in finding available vacancies, with resume writing and 
interview preparation. Urban Studies majors are prepared to enter the 
professional arena or to continue with advanced study. ■ 

Each year the department sponsors the Lefrak lectures. This lecture 
series features highly-reputed scholars and practitioners in urban plan- 
ning or urban policy formulation issues of the information age. A feature 
of the series is to expand our understanding of urbanization driven by job 
creation in high-technology manufacturing and higher-level services. 

Requirements for Major 

Urban Studies majors must complete thirty-nine semester hours of 
Departmental requirements with a minimum grade of C in each course. 
Fifteen of these hours must be core Urban Studies courses, including a 
Senior Capstone course in which students will write a major paper on an 
urban topic. Fifteen more must be in an urban-related focus in another 
department, such as Afro-Amencan Studies, Architecture, Economics, 
Geography, Government and Politics, or Sociology. Six credits must be in 
an urban specialization, including one upper division course, in the 
department or elsewhere. Three credits are a statistics and methods 
course, preferably in the department of disciplinary focus. 

Urban Studies Requirements 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Required URSP Core Courses ... 

URSP100 

URSP 240 

URSP 320 

URSP 401 

URSP 402 
Disciplinary Focus (5 classes) .... 
Urban Specialization (2 classes) 

Statistics and Methods 

Total 



15 
6 
3 

39 



Advising 



Prior to each pre-registration and registration, each Urban Studies major 
is expected to obtain advice from an Institute advisor. The undergraduate 
advisor is located in 1213 Lefrak Hall, 405-6799. 

Honors 

For information on the Urban Studies Honors Program, contact the 
Undergraduate Advisor. 1213 LeFrak Hall, 405-6799. 

Course Code: URSP 

*The undergraduate program is being eliminated and is accepting no new 
majors. 

WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM (WMST) 
College of Arts and Humanities 

1115 Mill Building, 405-6878 

Professor and Director: Beck 
Professors: Dill, Rosenfelt 
Associate Professors: Bolles, Moses 
Assistant Professors: Kim, King 
Lecturer: Pratt 

Affiliate Faculty: Harley, Williams (Afro-American Studies); Diner (Ameri- 
can Studies); Withers (Art); Doherty, Hallett, Stehle (Classics); Gillespie 
(Communication Arts and Theater); Lanser, Peterson (Comparative 



128 Theatre 



Literature); Fassinger (Counseling and Personnel Services); Heidelbach 
(Curriculum and Instruction); Beauchamp.Donawerth.Kauftman.Leonardi. 
Smith. Upton. Washington (English); Leslie (Family and Community 
Development); Hage. Mossman (French and Italian); Frederiksen. Strauch 
(Germanic and Slavic Languages); McCarnck (Government and Politics); 
Gullickson (History); Gips (Housing and Design); Tyler (Human Develop- 
ment); Beasley. Grunig (Journalism); Robertson (Music);Fullinwider (Phi- 
losophy and Public Policy); Hult (Physical Education); Coustou, (RTVF); 
Hunt. Mclntyre. Presser. Segal (Sociology); Solomon (Speech and Com- 
munication); Schuler (Theater). 

The Women's Studies Program is an interdisciplinary academic program 
designed to examine the historical contributions made by women, reex- 
amine and reinterpret existing data about women, and introduce students 
to the methodology of feminist scholarship. The program offers interdis- 
ciplinary core courses on women, encourages the offenng of courses on 
women in other disciplines, and promotes the discovery of new knowledge 
about women. Women's Studies courses challenge students to question 
traditional knowledge about women and men and to examine differences 
among women. Students gain an understanding of and respect for 
differences in human lives as they encounter issues of diversity in the 
classroom; age, ability, class, ethnicity, race, religion, and sexual 
preference. 

The Certificate Program 

The Women's Studies Certificate Program consists of an integrated, 
interdisciplinary curriculum on women that is designed to supplement a 
student's major. 

Requirements for Certificate 

Certificate requirements are under review — consult the Program Office for 
updated information. 

The qualify for a Certificate in Women's Studies, a student will be required 
to earn twenty-one(21 ) credits in Women's Studies courses, nine of which 
must be at the 300/400 level. No more than 3 credit hours of special topics 
courses may be counted toward the Certificate. No more than 9 credit 
hours which are applied toward a major may be included in the Certificate 
Program. No more than 9 credit hours may be taken at institutions other 
than UMCP. Each student must obtain a grade of C or better in each 
course that is to be counted toward the Certificate. Of the twenty-one 
credits, courses must be distributed as follows; 

1 . A core of nine (9) credit hours from the following WI^ST courses: 
WMST 200 — Introduction to Women's Studies: Women and Soci- 
ety (3) OR 

WMST 250 — Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art, and 

Culture (3) 

WlwlST 400— Theories of Feminism (3) 

WMST 490 — Senior Seminar: Feminist Reconceptualizations (3) 

2. At least one course from each of the three distributive areas listed 
below. Two of these courses must be from departments other than 
Women's Studies. At least one course must be identified as adding 
a multi-cultural dimension. 

Area I: Arts and Literature 

ARTH 466— Feminist Perspectives on Women in Art 

ENGL 250— Women in Literature 

ENGL 348 — Special Topics in Literature by Women 

ENGL 408— Special Topics in Literature by Women before 1800 

ENGL 444 — Feminist Theory and Literature 

ENGL 448 — Special Topics in Literature by Women of Color" 

ENGL 458— Special Topics in Literature by Women After 1800 

FREN 241 — Women of French Expression in Translation 

FREN 478 — French Women Writers in Translation 

GERM 281 — Women in German Literature and Society 

GERM 489 — Women in German Literature 

MUSC 448 — Special Topics: Women and Music* 

PORT 478C — Women as Authors and Characters in Brazilian 

Literature' 
RTVF 462— African-American Women Filmmakers' 
WMST 250 — Introduction to Women's Studies: Women, Art. and 

Culture 

Area II: Historical Perspectives 

AASP 498W— Black Women in America' 
AMST 418J — Women and Family in American Life 
CLAS 320— Women in Classical Antiquity 
HIST 210 — Amencan Women to 1880 



HIST 21 1— American Women 1880 to Present 
HIST 301 — Women and Industnal Development 
HIST 309 — Proseminar in the History of Women 
HIST 318— Women in the Middle East' 
HIST419C— Redefining Gender in the US: 1880-1935 
HIST 458 — Selected Topics in Women's History 
HIST 618 — Readings in the History of Women 
KNES 492— History of the American Sportswoman: Institutions 
and Issues 

Area III: Social and Natural Sciences 

AASP 498F— Women and Work' 

CNEC 312— Economics of the Family 

CRIM 498— Women and Crime 

FMCD 430 — Gender Role Development in the Family 

GVPT 436— Legal Status of Women 

HLTH 471— Women's Health 

JOUR 452— Women and the Media 

PHED 451 — Sport and the American Woman 

PSYC 336— Psychology of Women 

SOCY 325— Sociology of Sex Roles 

SOCY 425— Sex Roles and Social Institutions 

SOCY 498W— Women in the Military 

SPCH 324 — Communication and Sex Roles 

WMST 200 — Introduction to Women's Studies: Women and 

Society 
WMST 498 — Asian and Asian-Amencan Women' 
WMST 498— Women in the African Diaspora' 
ZOOL 313— Women and Science 
ZOOL 326— Biology of Reproduction 

'Fulfills Women's Studies Multi-Cultural Requirement 

3. The remaining courses may be chosen from any of the three 
distributive areas, or from among any of the WMST courses 
including WMST 498— Special Topics in Women's Studies and 
WMST 499— Independent Study. The Women's Studies Program 
also provides students with opportunities for co-curncular activi- 
ties. In the past, students have supported their coursework with 
practical experience working with legal defense funds, rape crisis 
centers, battered women's shelters, feminist journals, and on 
Capitol Hill, as well as in the classroom applying feminist method- 
ology to teaching strategies. 

Admission 

Any student in good academic standing at the University of Maryland at 
College Park may enroll in the Certificate Program by declanng his or her 
intentions to the Women's Studies undergraduate advisor. 

Advising 

Students should meet with an advisor in order to plan individual programs. 
Advising is available during regular office hours with appointments and on 
a walk-in basis in 1 1 25 Mill Building. 

Students may also earn an undergraduate major in Women's Studies by 
designing a major in consultation with the Assistant Dean tor Undergradu- 
ate Studies and a member of the Women's Studies faculty. 

Course Code: WMST 



ZOOLOGY (ZOOL) 
College of Life Sciences 

2227 Zoology-Psychology Building, 405-6904 

Professor and Chair: Popper 

Professors: Carter-Porges. Clark, ColomtJini, Gill, Highton. Levitanf, 

Pierce, Reaka-Kudla. Sebens 

Associate Professors: Ades. Barnett. Borgia. Cohen. Goode. Htggins. 

Imberski, Inouye, Linder. Palmer. Small. Wilkinson 

Assistant Professors: Carr. Chao. Dietz. Olek. Payne. Stephan, Tanda 

Instructors: Kent, Piper. Spalding 

Adjunct Professors: Allan. Kleiman, Manning, Morion. O'Bnen. Potter, 

Smith-Gill, Vermel) 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Brietburg. Hines, Piatt, Wemmer 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Braun 

Director Undergraduate Office: Presson 



Urban Studies and Planning 129 



tDistinguished Scholar-Teacher 

The Zoology specialization is designed to give each student an apprecia- 
tion of the diversity of programs studied by zoologists and an appreciation 
of the nature of observation and experimentation appropriate to Investiga 
tions within these fields 

Requirements for Specialization 

See Biological Sciences in this catalog and Zoology advisor for specific 
program requirements. 

Advising 

Advising is mandatory. Appointments can be scheduled through the 
Undergraduate Office, 405-6904. 

Honors 

The Department of Zoology Honors Program, directed by Dr. Margaret 
Palmer, offers highly motivated and academically qualified students the 
opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor on an original research 
project. Information on this program and additional information on the 
Zoology program may be obtained from the Undergraduate Office, 2227 
Zoology-Psychology Building, 405-6904. 

Student Organization 

Zoology Undergraduate Student Committee (ZUSC) promotes interac- 
tions with the faculty, provides information about departmental services, 
opportunities and events and sponsors a variety of educational and social 
activities. Interested students may contact ZUSC by stopping by the 
ZUSC office, 2230 Zoology-Psychology Building, 405-6904. 

Course Code: ZOOL 



CAMPUS-WIDE PROGRAMS 

Air Force Aerospace Studies Program (ROTO) 

2132 Cole Student Activities BIdg.. 314-3242 

Director: Rensler 

Assistant Professors: Lausman. Miller. Williams 

The Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) provides two 
programs for college men and women to earn a commission as a Second 
Lieutenant in the United States Air Force while completing their University 
degree requirements. To enter the AFROTC program, students should 
inform their advisor, and register for classes in the same manner as for 
other courses. 

Four- Year Program 

This program is composed of a General Military Course (CMC) and a 
Professional Officer Course (POC). The first two years (GMC). normally 
for freshmen and sophomores, give a general introduction to the Air Force 
and the various career fields. Students enrolled in the GMC program incur 
no obligation and may elect to discontinue the program at any time. The 
final two years (POC) concentrate on the development of leadership skills 
and the study of United States defense policy. Students must compete for 
acceptance into the POC. All students enrolled in the last two years of the 
program receive approximately $1 ,000 annually, tax free. 

Students in the four-year program who successfully complete the first two 
years of the program and are accepted into the POC program must attend 
four weeks of field training at a designated Air Force base during the 
summer after completing their sophomore year of college. 

Two-Year Program 

This program is normally offered to prospective juniors but may be taken 
by seniors and graduate students. The academic requirements for this 
program are identical to the final two years of the four-year program. 
During the summer preceding entry into the program, all candidates must 



attend 6 weeks of field training at a designated Air Force base. Students 
should start the application process in October for entry 1 1 months later. 

The Curriculum 

General Military Course (GMC) 

Freshman year— ARSC 100 (Fall) and ARSC 101 (Spnng). These 
courses introduce the student to the roles of the Department of Defense 
and the U.S. Air Force in the contemporary world. Each one-credit course 
consists of one hour of academic class and two hours of Leadership 
Laboratory each week. 

Sophomore year— ARSC 200 (Fall) and ARSC 201 (Spring). These 
courses provide an historical review of air power employment in military 
and nonmilitary operations in support of national objectives and a look at 
the evolution of air power concepts and doctrine. Each one-credit course 
consists of one hour of academic class and two hours of Leadership 
Laboratory each week. 

Professional Officers Course (POC) 

Junior year— ARSC 310 (Fall) and ARSC 31 1 (Spring). 

Senior year— ARSC 320 (Fall) and ARSC 321 (Spring). 

All Aerospace courses are open to any university student for credit 
whether or not he or she in the AFROTC Program. Students who are not 
in the AFROTC Program do not attend the Leadership Laboratory. 

General Requirements for Acceptance into the POC 

The student must complete the General Military Course and the field 
training session, pass tfie Air Force Officer Oualifying Test, be physically 
qualified, be in good academic standing, meet age requirements and be 
a U.S. citizen. Successful completion of the Professional Officer Course 
and a bachelor's degree or higher are prerequisites for a commission as 
a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force. Additional information 
may be obtained by telephoning the Office of Aerospace Studies, (301) 
314-3242. 

Scholarships 

The AFROTC College Scholarship Program provides eight, six, and four 
semester scholarships to students on a competitive basis. Scholarships 
are currently available in virtually any field and are based on merit. Those 
selected receive tuition, lab expenses, incidental fees, and book allow- 
ance plus a non-taxable allowance of $100 monthly. 

Any student accepted by the University of Maryland may apply for these 
scholarships. AFROTC membership is required to receive an AFROTC 
scholarship. 

AFROTC Awards 

AFROTC cadets are eligible for numerous local, regional, and national 
awards. Many of these awards include monetary assistance for school. 

Course Code: ARSC 



STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS 

3125 Mitchell BIdg. 314-7746 

Coordinator: Rick Weaver 

The goal of the Study Abroad Office is to enable students to incorporate 
a summer, semester, or year abroad into their degree program at 
Maryland. Study abroad increases awareness of other cultures and 
languages while providing a comparative international perspective. Many 
students find study abroad essential for their major or carefer plans. Others 
view it as part of their liberal arts education. 

Advising and Information 

The Study Abroad Office provides handouts and advising on the wide 
variety of programs available. A small library provides information on 



1 30 Women's Studies Program 



programs ottered by other universities. The ottice assists students in 
obtaining credit for their experience abroad. 

Maryland Study Abroad Semester/Year Programs 

Denmark's International Study Program : Maryland acts as a coordina- 
tor for DIS in Copenhagen, which offers liberal arts and business subjects 
taught in English. 

Semester In Israel : From January to May students learn Hebrew and take 
courses in Jewish and Israeli studies taught in English by faculty members 
at Tel Aviv University. 

Study in London: The curriculum consists of courses in the humanities, 
business, and the social sciences, which focus on Britain. Students are 
housed with families or in flats to increase their immersion in British life. 

German-Engineering: 2 month intensive technical German followed by 
4 months paid internship in Germany. 

Study in Brazil: Offers a summer and fall semester at the Catholic 
University of Rio to take regular university courses offered in Portuguese. 

Maryland in Mexico City: Offers Spanish language and Latin American 
studies courses. 

Maryland-in-Nice: Offers French language courses for foreigners and 
regular courses at the University of Nice for students with sufficient French 
language background. 

Summer Programs 

Architecture Abroad: The School of Architecture sponsors various 
summer study programs which allow students at an advanced under- 
graduate and graduate level to deal creatively with architectural issues in 
a foreign environment. Program locations vary, but include Tunisia, 
Turkey, and Western Europe. 

Summer in Kassel: The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages 
and Literature sponsors a five-week intensive language and culture 
program in Kassel, Germany. 

Summer in Madrid: The Department of Spanish and Portuguese spon- 
sors a five-week intensive language and culture program in Madrid, Spain . 

Exchanges 

The Study Abroad Office administers reciprocal exchanges with specific 
universities overseas. These exchanges are often related to academic 
departments and require extensive language or academic background. 
All the exchanges require at least a 3.0 grade point average. Exchanges 
are available with the following British Universities: University of Kent for 
Government and Politics majors; University of Sheffield for English majors 
and American Studies majors: University of Lancaster for Math majors; 
University of Bristol for Philosophy majors: University of Surrey for 
Sociology majors; and University of Liverpool for History majors. In Japan, 
Keio University in intensive Japanese. In West Germany, the University 
of Bremen, the Free University of Berlin, and the Gesamthochschule 
Kassel. In Austria, the University of Vienna. 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 
University Honors Program 

Anne Arundel Hall, 405-6771/3 

Director; Lawrence 

The University Honors Program offers academically-talented students 
special educational and cultural resources within a great metropolitan 
research university. Students combine Honors course worl< with studies 
in their major to enhance their total educational expenence. First- and 
second-year undergraduates broaden their intellectual horizons in spe- 
cial, some interdisciplinary. Honors seminars and Honors versions of 
regular courses in the arts and sciences. Juniors and seniors may apply 
to departmental or college Honors programs that give them the opporlu- 
nity to work with faculty mentors on independent research projects. 



Students who prefer to propose their own individually-designed research 
programs may do so. 

Honors programs offer challenging academic experiences charactenzed 
by small classes, active student participation, and an Honors faculty who 
encourage critical thinking and discussion. Individually guided research, 
field experience, and independent study are also important aspects of 
Honors work. 

The Honors community extends beyond the classroom with an exciting 
range of extracurhcular social and educational activities. An Honors 
student association oversees UHP's student-run committees, lecture 
series, social and cultural events, newsletter, and literary magazine. Anne 
Arundel Hall, the Honors Living/Learning Center, houses the UHP admin- 
istrative offices, seminar rooms, 2 computer labs, and the Honors Lounge, 
as well as providing housing for some Honors students. 

The UHP seeks bright, intellectually curious students, who will thrive in a 
challenging academic environment. Students may apply tor admission to 
the UHP either as entenng first-year students or as transfer students with 
fewer than 45 credits. Admission to the University Honors Program is by 
invitation. 

For more information, please write to Director, University Honors Pro- 
gram, University of Maryland. College Park, MD 20742, or call (301 ) 405- 
6771. 

Individual Studies Program (IVSP) 

2130 Mitchell Bluilding, 405-9355 

Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies: Oh 

The Individual Studies Program provides an opportunity for students to 
create and complete individualized majors. To be accepted into the 
program, a student must: 

1 ) have a clearly-defined academic goal which cannot reasonably be 
satisfied in an existing curriculum at College Park; 

2) be able to design, with faculty assistance, a sequence of courses 
and other learning experiences which is judged to have adequate 
substance for the awarding of a degree in the special field of study; 
and 

3) have at least a 2.0 GPA and earn a minimum grade of "C" in 
designated major courses. 

Most IVSP majors are either a form of "area study" utilizing offerings from 
many departments, or a clear combination of two disciplines. Many 
include internships or independent study projects in the program. All work 
is done under the supervision of a faculty advisor 

Applicants are required to write a detailed prospectus outlining their 
proposed program of study. They must meet ttie general education 
requirements according to year of entry. The process of applying often 
involves considerable consultation and several drafts of a prospectus, so 
it should be begun as eariy as possible. Students may t>e admitted to the 
Individual Studies Program after completion of 30 college credits and 
must be officially approved by the Individual Studies Faculty Review 
Committee pnor to the final 30 credits. Individual Studies programs must 
be approved before students can declare Individual Studies as a major. 

Individual Studies provides three courses specifically for its majors: IVSP 
317, a one-credit course graded Satisfactory Fail and taken as recom- 
mended by the student's advisor; IVSP 318. an independent study course 
which students can use for a variety of out-of-class internship and 
research opportunities (a vanable-credit course, it may be taken lor a total 
of nine credits towards the degree); and IVSP 420, Senior Paper Project, 
required for all students during the final semester. The project is evaluated 
by three faculty members. 

More information on requirements and procedures is available from the 
Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies, Mitchell Building, 405- 
9355. After reading that matenal, arrange a meeting with the Assistant 
Dean tor Undergraduate Studies to discuss ideas informally and to plan 
the next steps. 

Course Code Prefix: IVSP 



Campus-Wide Programs 131 



Pre-Professional Programs 

Health Professions Advising 
3103 Turner Laboratory. 405-2793 
Advisors: Bradley. Stewart 

General Information 



Pre-Law Advising 

3 1 03 Turner Laboratory. 3 1 4-84 1 f 

Advisor: Hotten 



Pre-professional programs are designed to provide the necessary aca- 
demic foundation required for entrance into professional schools. Some 
require two or three years of pre-professional study before admission to 
professional school. Others normally require completion of a bachelor's 
degree. Five programs, for which completion of a bachelor's degree is 
NOT a normal prerequisite, may be declared as the official undergraduate 
academic major: pre-dental hygiene, pre-medical and research technol- 
ogy, pre-nursing. pre-pharmacy. and pre-physical therapy. 

In contrast, seven programs, for which a bachelor's degree IS a normal 
prerequisite, are advisory ONLY and these cannot be declared as the 
official undergraduate academic major. These include: pre-dentistry, pre- 
law, pre-medicine, pre-optometry, pre-osteopathy. and pre-podiatry. Stu- 
dents interested in such programs may choose from a wide vanety of 
academic majors across campus. The pre-professional advisor can 
provide guidance concerning the choice of major. 

Successful completion of a pre-professional program at College Park 
does not guarantee admission to any professional school. Each profes- 
sional school has its own admissions requirements and criteria, which 
may include grade point average in undergraduate courses, scores on 
admissions tests, a personal interview, faculty recommendations, and an 
evaluation from the pre-professional advisor. For admissions require- 
ments, the student is urged to study the catalog of each professional 
school. 

All students are welcome to use the Reading Room for information on 
careers and on professional schools across the country. 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance into 
the UMAB Dental Hygiene Program but also for entrance into dental 
hygiene programs at other colleges and universities. To do this efficiently. 
students should obtain program information when first entering college so 
that requirements can be taken in normal sequence. Information for the 
University of f\/laryland Dental Hygiene Program is available at the 
advising office, 3103 Turner Lab, 

The Dental School of the University of fvlaryland, located in Baltimore 
(UMAB). offers a baccalaureate degree program in dental hygiene, as well 
as a post-certificate program for registered dental hygienists who have 
completed a two-year accredited dental hygiene program and are inter- 
ested in completing the requirements for a baccalaureate degree. Comple- 
tion of a two-year pre-professional curriculum is required before admis- 
sion to UIVIAB for the two professional years. 

Preprofessional curriculum for UMCP students: 

Semester 
Credit htours 
Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology 1 4 

CHEI\/1 103— General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEtV1 1 04 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOCY 100 or SOCY 105— Introduction to Sociology or 

Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems 3 

(VlATH 1 10 or 115 — Elementary Ivlathematical Models or 

Precalculus 3 

SPCH 100 or 107— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or Technical Speech Communication 3 

Elective : 3 

Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201 and 202— Human Anatomy & Physiology 1, II 4.4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

NUTR 200— Nutrition for Health Services 3 

ENGL 291 (or 391 for juniors) 3 

Social Sciences 6 

Humanities 3 

Statistics 3 



Application and Admission 

High school students who wish to enroll in the pre-dental hygiene 
curriculum at College Park should request applications directly from the 
Admissions Office, The University of Maryland. College Park, MD 20742, 
It IS recommended that those preparing for a baccalaureate degree 
program in dental hygiene pursue an academic program in high school 
which includes biology, chemistry, math, and physics. 

Pre-dental hygiene students should begin the application process for 
professional school in fall of the sophomore year. UN^AB applications and 
instructions are available in the advising office. Enrollment as a pre-dental 
hygiene student or as a registered dental hygienist does not guarantee 
admission to the Dental Hygiene Program on the Baltimore City campus 
(UMAB). 

Further Information 

At College Park contact the Dental Hygiene Advisor, 3103 Turner Labo- 
ratory, The University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, (301) 405- 
2793, In Baltimore, contact the Office of Recruitment and Admissions, 
University of Maryland School of Dentistry, 666 W. Baltimore Street, 
Baltimore, MD 21201, (410) 706-7472. 

Pre-Dentistry 

Advisor: Bradley 

The pre-professional program for pre-dental students is a program of 
advising for students preparing to apply to dental school. The advice is 
based on requirements and recommendations of American dental schools 
and the requirements for a baccalaureate degree at College Park. 

The recommendations made during advising are meant to prepare the 
student to take the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) in the spring of the junior 
year. Application to dental school is made during the summer-fall of the 
senior year. In addition to faculty letters of recommendation, most admis- 
sions committees request or require an evaluation from the student's pre- 
dental advisor. It is important, therefore, for the student to contact the pre- 
dental advisor early in the academic career and to become familiar with 
the proper procedures necessary in the evaluation and application pro- 
cess. 

For more information on the pre-dental advising program, contact the Pre- 
dental Advisor, 3103 Turner Laboratory, University of Maryland, College 
Park. MD 20742, (301) 405-2793. 

There are two ways to prepare for admission to dental school: a four-year 
program is preferable, but a three-year program is possible. 

Four-Year Baccalaureate Program 

Most pre-dental students at College Park complete a four-year under- 
graduate degree prior to entrance into dental school. Students are 
encouraged to pursue a diversified curriculum, balancing humanities 
courses with science and mathematics courses. No specific major is 
required, favored, or preferred by dental school admissions committees. 

The four-year student will plan an undergraduate experience which 
includes courses to satisfy major and supporting area requirements, 
general education requirements, and the dental school admission re- 
quirements. The student's academic advisor will advise about the first two 
topics, while the Pre-dental Advisor will advise about dental school 
admission requirements. 

Although specific admission requirements vary somewhat from dental 
school to dental school, the undergraduate courses which constitute the 
basic admission requirements and which prepare the student for the DAT 
are the following; 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

ENGL 101 and 391— English Composition 3, 3 

CHEM 103.113— General Chemistry I, II 4,4 

CHEM 233. 243— Organic Chemistry I, II 4, 4 

PHYS 121, 122orPHYS 141, 142— Physics 4,4 

Biology, minimum* 8 

'Although the minimum biology requirement is eight credits, the success- 
ful applicant will have more, including advanced training in biological 
sciences at the 300 to 400 level, BOTN 1 00, BIOL 1 01 and 1 24, and MICB 
100 should not be taken to meet this requirement. 



132 Undergraduate Studies 

Three Year Arts-Dentistry Degree Program 

Students whose performance during the first two years is exceptional may 
apply to the University of Maryland School of Dentistry at the beginning of 
their third year, for entry after three years of college work. By the end of 
the third year the student must have earned 90 academic credits, 
exclusive of physical education, the last 30 of which must have been 
earned at the University of Maryland at College Park. Within the 90 credits 
the student must have completed all the requirements listed below. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

General education requirements 30 

Chemistry (inorganic and organic) CHEM 103, 113, 233, 243, 

or CHEM 105, 115, 235, 245 16 

Biological Sciences 19-20 

Pre-Law 

1117 Hornbake Library and 3103 Turner Laboratory, 314-8418 
Advisor: Michele Hotten, J.D. 

Most law schools prefer applicants with a B.A. or B.S. degree; however, 
in some cases law schools will consider truely outstanding applicants with 
only three years of academic work. Most law schools do not prescribe 
specific courses which a student must present for admission, but do 
require that the student follow one of the standard programs offered by the 
undergraduate college. Many law schools require that the applicant take 
the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), preferably in July, October, or 
December of the academic year preceding entry into professional school. 

Four-Year Program 

No particular undergraduate major or special undergraduate courses are 
prerequisites for admission into law school. Students are encouraged to 
select a major in which they have a strong interest and expect to perform 
well. Course selections sfiould be guided by the need to develop skill 
which are essential in preparing to perform well in law school, on the Law 
School Admissions Test (LSAT), and ultimately as a lawyer. These skill 
include imaginative and coherent thinking, critical reasoning, accurate 
and perceptive reading, and a strong command of the spoken and written 
language, including grammar. A broad liberal arts background, with 
evidence of high quality of work, will provide a strong foundation for law 
school. 

Tfiree-Year Program 

Students with exceptional records may apply to the School of Law of the 
University of Maryland under the Arts-Law program. Upon recommenda- 
tion by the Dean of the University of Maryland Law School and approval 
by College Park, students admitted to the program may be awarded a B.A. 
degree (Arts-Law) in August following the first year of law school or (after 
thirty credits of the law program). Minimum requirements for approval from 
College Park are completion of at least ninety credits (at least 30 from 
College Park) including the following: all university and general education 
requirements; at least 18 hours in one department with six hours at the 
300-400 level. 

For additional information, contact the Pre-law Advisor, 1117 Hornbake 
Library, (301)314-8418. 

Pre-Medical and Research Technology 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance into 
the UMAB Medical and Research Technology Program, but also for 
entrance into clinical laboratory science programs at other colleges and 
universities. To do this efficiently, students should obtain program infor- 
mation when first entering college so that requirements can be taken in 
normal sequence. Information for the University of Maryland Program is 
available at the advising office, 3103 Turner Laboratory. 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Medical and Research Technology is 
offered through the Medical and Research Technology Department of the 
University of Maryland Medical School, located in Baltimore (UMAB). 
Completion of a two-year pre-professionai curriculum is required before 
admission to UMAB for the two professional years. Part-time study is 
possible. 

Application and Admission 

High school students who wish to enroll in this curnculum at College Park 
must meet this institutions admission requirements. While in high school 



students are encouraged to enroll in a college preparatory curriculum 
emphasizing biology, chemistry, and college preparatory mathematics. 

Pre-Medical and Research Technology students should begin the appli- 
cation process for professional school in fall of the sophomore year. 
UMAB applications and instructions are available in the advising office. 
Enrollment as a pre-professional student does not guarantee admission 
to UMAB. 



Pre-professional curriculum lor UMCP students: 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



CHEM 103, 113— Gen. Chem I, II 

CHEM 104 or CHEM 233 (organic chemistry) 

BIOL 105— Prin. of Biology I 

ZOOL 201 or 202, Anatomy and Physiology I or II 

MICB 200— Gen. Microbiology 

MATH 110, or 115 

Statistics 

ENGL 101— Intro, to Writing 

Literature 

SPCH 107 or SPCH 100 (speech) 

Humanities (History, literature, philosophy, appreciation 

of Art, Music, Drama, Dance) 

Behavioral and Social Sciences (Anthropology, Economics, 
Government & Politics, Geography, Psychology, Sociology) 

Electives" 

Total Semester Hours 

'May not include health or physical education. 

Further Information 



4.4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



9 

6 

60 



At College Park, contact the Medical and Research Technology Advisor, 
University of Maryland, 31 03 Turner Laboratory, College Park, MD 20742, 
(301 ) 405-2793. In Baltimore, contact the Medical and Research Technol- 
ogy Program, University of Maryland. Allied Health Professions Building, 
100 S. Penn Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. (410) 706-7664. 

Pre-Medicine 

Advisor: Bradley 

The pre-professional program for pre-medical students is a program of 
advising for students preparing to apply to medical school. The advice is 
based on requirements and recommendations of American medical 
schools and the requirements for a baccalaureate degree at College Park. 
The pre-medical advisor is prepared to assist students in setting career 
objectives, selecting undergraduate coursework to meet the admissions 
criteria of the professional schools, and in all phases of the application 
process itself. 

The recommendations made during advising are meant to prepare the 
student to take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) in the spring 
of the junior year. Application to medical school is made during the 
summer-fall of the senior year Medical admissions committees generally 
request or require an evaluation from the student's pre-medical advisor. 
It is important, therefore, for the student to contact the pre-medical advisor 
early in the academic career and to become familiar with the proper 
procedures necessary in the evaluation and application process. 

For more information on the pre-medical advising program, contact the 
Pre-medical Advisor, 3103 Turner Laboratory, The University of Mary- 
land, College Park, MD 20742, (301) 405-2793. 

There are two ways to prepare for admission to medical school; a four- 
year program is preferable, but a three-year program is possible. 

Four-Year Baccalaureate Program 

Most pre-medical students at College Park complete a four-year under- 
graduate degree prior to entrance into medical school Students are 
encouraged to pursue a diversified curriculum, balancing humanities 
courses with science and mathematics courses No specific major is 
required, favored, or preferred by medical school admissions committees. 

The four-year student will plan an undergraduate experience which 
includes courses to satisfy major and supporting area requirements, 
general education requirements, and the medical school admission 
requirements. The student's academic advisor will advise about the first 
two topics, while the pre-medical advisor will advise atx)ul medical school 
admission requirements. 



Undergraduate Studies 133 



Although specific admission requirements vary somewhat from medical 
school to medical school, the undergraduate courses which constitute the 
basic admission requirements and which prepare the student for the 
MCAT are the following: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

ENGL 101, 391— English Composition 3, 3 

CHEf^ 103, 113— General Chemistry I, II 4,4 

CHEI\/1 233. 243— Organic Chemistry I, II 4, 4 

PHYS 121. 122, or PHYS 141. 142— Physics 4,4 

tVIATH 220, 221 , or MATH 140. 141— Calculus 3, 3 

or 4, 4 

Biology, minimum*' 8 

'Although calculus is not an entrance requirement of many medical 
schools and is not included in the IVICAT. one year of calculus is strongly 
recommended for the pre-professional student. 
"Although the minimum biology requirement is eight credits. the success- 
ful applicant will have more, including advanced training in biological 
sciences at the 300-400 level. BOTN 100. BIOL 101 and 124. and I\/1ICB 
100 should not be taken to meet this requirement. 

Three- Year Arts-Medicine Degree Program 

Students whose performance during the first two years is exceptional may 
apply to the University of f>/laryland School of (Medicine at the beginning of 
their third year, for entry after three years of college work. By the end of 
the third year the student must have earned 90 academic credits, 
exclusive of physical education, the last 30 of which must have been 
earned at the University of IVIaryland College Park. Within the 90 credits 
the student must have completed all the requirements listed below. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

General education requirements 30 

Chemistry (inorganic and organic) 16 

CHEIVl 103, 113. 233. 243 or CHEIVI 105, 115, 235, 245 

Biological Sciences 19-20 

200L 210 — Animal Diversity 

ZOOL 21 1— Cell Biology and Physiology 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

Either ZOOL 213 or MICB 380 

One of the following: 

ZOOL 411— Cell Biology 

ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology 

ZOOL 430— Vertebrate Embryology 

ZOOL 495 — Mammalian Histology 

MICB 360— Medical Virology 

MICB 440 — Pathogenic Microbiology 

MICB 450 — Immunology 

Mathematics 6-8 

MATH 220, 221 or MATH 140, 141 

Physics 121. 122, or 141, 142 8 

Additional upper-level courses from any one of the following 
combinations: 7-10 

1 . Zoology: seven hours on the 300-400 level, including one labora- 
tory course 

2. Microbiology: seven hours on the 300-400 level, including one 
laboratory course 

3. CHEM 321 : Quantitative Analysis, plus any three-credit course at 
the 300-400 level in the physical or biological sciences which is 
approved by the Pre-medical Advisor. 

4. BCHM 461 . 462. 463. and 464 

5. Nine hours on the 300-400 level in any one department of the 
College of Arts and Humanities or the College of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences. 

Electives as needed to total at least ninety credits 0-4 

Total 90-92 

Incoming freshmen interested in this three-year program are strongly 
urged to consult the Pre-medical Advisor before registration for the first 
semester at College Park. 

Students accepted in the combined arts-medicine program may receive 
the B.S. degree (Arts-Medicine) after satisfactory completion of the first 
year at the University of Maryland Medical School upon recommendation 
by the dean of the School of Medicine and approval by College Park, the 
degree to be awarded in August following the first year of medical school. 
The courses of the first year of medical school constitute the major: the 
College Park courses listed above constitute the supporting area. 



Participation in the three-year program in no way guarantees admission 
to the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Three-year students 
compete with the four-year students for admission. 

Pre-Nursing 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance into 
the University of Maryland nursing program, but also for entrance into 
nursing programs at other colleges and universities To do this efficiently, 
students should obtain program information when first entering college so 
that requirements can be taken in normal sequence. Information for the 
University of Maryland School of Nursing is available at the advising office, 
room 3103, Turner Laboratory. 

The School of Nursing, located in Baltimore (UMAB), offers a four-year 
program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. Completion 
of a two-year pre-professional curriculum is required before admission to 
UMAB for the two professional years. An optional 1 -credit internship is 
offered. 

Application and Admission 

High school students who wish to enroll in the pre-nursing curriculum at 
College Park must meet admission requirements of that institution. While 
in high school, students should enroll in a college preparatory curriculum 
including biology, chemistry, and at least three units of college preparatory 
mathematics. 

Pre-nursing students should begin the application process for profes- 
sional school in fall of the sophomore year. UMAB applications and 
instructions are available in the advising office. Enrollment as a pre- 
nursing student does not guarantee admission to the nursing program at 
UMAB. 

Pre-professional curriculum for UMCP students: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CHEM 103, 104 — General Chemistry I, Fundamentals of 

Organic and Biochemistry 4, 4 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

ENGL 291 or ENGL 391 —Intermediate Writing or 

Advanced Composition 3, 3 

BIOL 105 4 

MATH 110 — Elementary Mathematical Models (or higher) .... 3 

Humanities* (literature, history, philosophy, 

math, fine arts, language, speech) 9 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology or 105 Introduction to 

Contemporary Social Problems 3 

EDHD 320 — Human Development Through The Lifespan 3 

Other social sciences (sociology, psychology, anthropology, 

government and politics, economics, geography) 3 

ZOOL 201 , 202— Human Anatomy & Physiology 1,11 4, 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

NUTR 200— Nutrition for Health Services 3 

Elective 2-3 

59-60 
"Must include at least one course which is not mathematics or English. 

Further Information 

At College Park contact the Nursing Advisor, 3103 Turner Laboratory, 
College Park, MD 20742, (301) 405-2793. In Baltimore contact the 
Director for Admissions, The University of Maryland, School of Nursing, 
655 W. Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21 201 , (41 0) 706-6282. "RN 
to BSN" advisor: UMBC. 5401 Wilkens Ave., Catonsville, MD 21 228 (41 0) 
455-3450. 

Pre-Optometry 

Advisor: Bradley 

Requirements for admission to schools and colleges of optometry vary 
somewhat, and the pre-optometry student should consult the catalogs of 
the optometry schools and colleges for specific admission requirements. 
A minimum of two years of pre-optometry studies is required for admission 
to all accredited schools, and about half of the schools require a minimum 
of three years. At present, more than two-thirds of successful applicants 
hold a bachelor's or higher degree. Students who contemplate admission 
to optometry schools may major in any program that the University offers, 



134 Undergraduate Studies 

but would be well-advised to write to the optometry schools of their choice 
for specific course requirements for admission. In general, pre-optometry 
students should follow a four-year baccalaureate program which includes 
the following: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Biology and Microbiology and Physiology 4 12 

Inorganic Chemistry 8 

Organic Chemistry 4-8 

Physics 8 

Math through differential calculus 6 

English 6 

Psychology 3-6 

Statistics 3 

Social Sciences 6 

For additional information on pre-optometry studies, contact the Pre- 
medical Advisor, 3103 Turner Latwratory, The University of Maryland. 
College Park. MD 20742. (301) 405-2793. 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine 

Advisor: Bradley 

The pre-professional requirements for osteopathic medical school are 
essentially identical to those for allopathic medical school, and the student 
is referred to the pre-medicine discussion above. 

For additional information on pre-osteopathy studies, contact the Pre- 
medical Advisor, 3103 Turner Laboratory. The University of Maryland. 
College Park. MD 20742. (301) 405-2793. 

Pre-Pharmacy 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance into 
the UMAB School of Pharmacy, but also for entrance into pharmacy 
programs at other colleges and universities. To do this efficiently, students 
should obtain program information when first entering college so that 
requirements can be taken in normal sequence. Information for the 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is available at the Health 
Professions Advising Office. 31 03 Turner Laboratory. Also at this location 
students may read about other schools of pharmacy. 

The School of Pharmacy, located in Baltimore (UMAB), is consolidating 
its two professional programs into a single, six-year, entry-level Doctor of 
Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program, effective with the junior class entenng in 
Fall 1 993. The professional phase will be four years in length and will offer 
different paths of concentration, including community practice and clinical 
pharmacy/pharmacotherapy. Completion of a two-year pre-professional 
curriculum is required before admission to the School of Pharmacy. 

Application and Admission 

Applicants lor pre-pharmacy at College Park must meet all admission 
requirements of that institution. While in high school students are encour- 
aged to enroll in a college preparatory curriculum emphasizing biology, 
chemistry, and college preparatory mathematics. 

Pre-pharmacy students should begin the application process for profes- 
sional school in fall of the sophomore year. UMAB applications and 
instructions are available in the advising office Applications for other 
programs must be obtained individually from the respective colleges. 

Enrollment as a pre-pharmacy student does not guarantee admission to 
the School of Pharmacy at the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
(UMAB). Students who are uncertain about their chances of admission to 
professional school are encouraged to consult the advisor. 

Pre-professional curriculum for UMCP students: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CHEM 103, 113— General Chemistry I. II 4, 4 

CHEM 233, 243— Organic Chemistry I, II 4. 4 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I 3 

BIOL 105— Principles of Biology 1 4 

PHYS 121, 122— Fundamentals of Physics I, II 4,4 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

Other English 3 

Humanities (English, Journalism, Fine Arts. Classics, Modern 

Language, Philosophy, or Speech) 6 

Social science (Anthropology, Economics. Geography, History. 



Government and Politics. Psychology, or Sociology) 6 

Additional humanities or social sciences 6 

Electives 5-6 

60-61 
Further Information 

At College Park contact the Pharmacy Advisor, University of Maryland, 
3103 Turner Laboratory, College Park. MD 20742. (301) 405-2793. In 
Baltimore, contact Admissions Committee Chairman. University of Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy, 20 North Pine Street, Baltimore. Marylar>d 
21201.(410) 706-7650. 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

Advisor: Stewart 

College Park students may prepare themselves not only for entrance Into 
University of Maryland physical therapy programs but also for entrance 
into physical therapy programs at other colleges and universities To do 
this efficiently, students should obtain program information when first 
entenng college so that requirements can be taken in normal sequence. 
Information for the University of Maryland programs is available at the 
Health Professions Advising Office. 31 03 Turner Laboratory. Information 
about other schools is also available 

The University of Maryland offers two entry-level masters (MPT) pro- 
grams in physical therapy, each six years in length. One is offered at the 
Baltimore City Campus (UMAB) and the other at the Eastern Shore 
Campus (UMES) in Princess Anne Completion of a three-year pre- 
professional curnculum is required before admission to the three-year 
professional phase of either program. The first professional year starts in 
summer at UMAB and in fall at UMES. 

Application and Admission 

Applicants for the pre-physical therapy program at College Par»< must 
meet all of that institution's admission requirements. While in high school 
students should pursue a college preparatory program Subjects Sf)ecifi- 
cally recommended are biology, chemistry, physics, and at least three 
units of college preparatory mathematics. 

Pre-physical therapy students should begin the application process for 
professional school about eight months pnor to the expected date of 
enrollment in professional school. UMAB or UMES applications and 
instructions are available in the advising office. Applications lor other 
programs must be obtained individually from the respective colleges. 

Enrollment as a pre-physical therapy student does not guarantee admis- 
sion to the physical therapy programs at either UMAB or UMES. In view 
of the heavy competition for admission, all applicants are encouraged to 
apply to several programs. This entails investigating schools in other 
states and other geographic regions. 

Preprofessional curriculum for UMCP students applying to UMAB 

Semester Hours 

CHEM 103, 104*: General Chemistry I, Fundamentals of 4, 4 

Organic & Biochemistry 

PHYS 121, 122: Fundamentals of Physics I & II 4. 4 

BIOL 105: Principles of Biology 4 

Biological science elective 4 

ZOOL 211: Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

MATH 220: Elementary Calculus 1 3 

Statistics (see advisor) 6 

CMSC 103: Introduction to Computing 3 

PSYC 100: Introduction to Psychology 3 

Personality or development psychology 3 

EDHD 320: Human Growth & Devel. through Life Span 3 

ENGL 101 : Introduction to Writing 3 

ENGL 291 or 391 : Intermediate or Advanced wnting 3 

General Education (See Advisor) 21 

Electives 14 

TOTAL 90 

Preprofessional curriculum tor UMCP students applying to UMES: 

Semester Hours 

CHEM 103. 104": General Chemistry I. Fundamentals of 4,4 
Organic & Biochemistry 

PHYS 121.1 22: Fundamentals of Physics I. II 4 

BIOL 105: Pnnciples of Biology 4 

ZOOL 201 . 202: Human Anatomy & Physiology I, II 4. 4 

ZOOL 21 1 :Cell Biology and Physiology 4 

MATH 115: Precalculus 3 



Undergraduate Studies 135 



Statistics 3 

PSYC 100: Introduction to Psychology 3 

Additional Psyctiology (abnormal or child) 3 

ENGL 101 : Introduction to Writing 3 

English (including at least one additional writing course) 6 

SPCH 107 OR SPCH 100: Technical Speech Communication 

OR Basic Pnnciples of Speech Communication 3 

Arts & Humanities (Literature, Foreign Language. Philosophy, 

or Fine Arts (nonsludio)) 6 

Health Education 2 

Physical Activities 2 

Electives 24 

TOTAL 90 

•CHEM 1 13 may be substituted lor CHEM 104. 

Further Information 

At College Park contact the Physical Therapy Advisor. 3103 Turner 
Laboratory, College Park. MD 20742. (301 ) 405-2793. At UMES. contact 
Dr. Raymond Blakely, Department of Physical Therapy, UI^ES, Princess 
Anne. MD 21 853, (410) 651 -6301 . In Baltimore contact the Department of 
Physical Therapy. 100 S. Penn Street, Baltimore, IViD 21201. (410) 706- 
7720. 

Pre-Podiatric Medicine 

Advisor: Bradley 

The pre-professional requirements for pediatric medical school 
areessentially identical to those for allopathic medical school, and the 
student is referred to the pre-medicine discussion above. 

For additional information on pre-podiatry studies, contact the Pre- 
medical Advisor. The University of Maryland, 3103 Turner Laboratory, 
College Park, MD 20742. (301) 405-2793. 

Pre-Veterinat7 Medicine 

Advisors: Hohenhaus. Ingling. Stephenson 

UMCP students interested in veterinary medicine are eligible for a special 
degree program offered through the College of Agriculture. Through this 
program (see programs in the College of Agriculture), students may earn 
a combined Bachelor of Sciences degree in Agriculture and Veterinary 
Medicine. 

Students within any major may also prepare for admission to veterinary 
school by completing required courses. Students should consult catalogs 
from the veterinary schools in which they are interested. Minimum 
requirements for most programs include the following: 

UMCP CORE Requirements 

BIOL 105, 106.222 

CHEM 103. 113.233,243 

Biochemistry; MICB 200 

PHYS121 (or 141), 122 (or 142) 

MATH 220 (or 140) and 3 credits of other mathematics 

Students should seek pre-veterinary advising through the Director of 
Resident Instruction, 1203 Gudelsky Veterinary Center, University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, (301) 935-6083. 



CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Afro-American Studies Certificate 

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

2169LeFrak, 405-1158 

The Afro-American Studies Certificate program offers the opportunity to 
gain a concentration in an interdisciplinary package of courses on the 
black experience. Courses include such disciplines as Anthropology. Art, 
Literature. History. Public Policy, and Sociology. 

Undergraduates in good standing may apply for the program by contact- 
ing Charlotte Gills of the Afro-American Studies Program in 21 69 LeFrak 



Hall. Students pursuing the certificate must meet the University's general 
education (CORE) and department requirements. 

See the complete description in the alphabetical list of programs. 

East Asian Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

2101B Francis Scott Key Hall, 405-4309 

The Undergraduate Certificate in East Asian Studies is a twenty-four- 
credit course of instruction designed to provide specialized knowledge of 
the cultures, histones, and contemporary concerns of the peoples of 
China, Japan, and Korea. It will complement and ennch a.studenfs major. 
The curriculum focuses on language instruction, civilization courses, and 
electives in several departments and programs of the university. It is 
designed specifically lor students who wish to expand their knowledge of 
East Asia and demonstrate to prospective employers, the public, and 
graduate and professional schools a special competence and set of skills 
in East Asian affairs. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the courses, with a grade of C or better 
in each course, and recommendation by the chairperson of the Committee 
on East Asian Studies, a certificate will be awarded. A notation of the 
award of the certificate will be included on the student's transcript. The 
student must have a baccalaureate degree awarded previous to or 
simultaneously with an award of the certificate. 

Certificate Requirements 

Core Courses: The student is required to take: 

1. HIST284— East Asian Civilization I 

2. HIST 285— East Asian Civilization II 

3. Six semester hours of introduction to one of the following East 
Asian languages (Chinese. Japanese, or Korean): 

CHIN 101— Elementary Chinese I 
JAPN 101 — Elementary Japanese I 
FOLA 1 09— Elementary Korean II AND 
FOLA 118K— Intermediate Korean I 

Students with language competence equivalent to these language courses 
are exempted from the language requirement; such students are required 
to complete an additional six hours of electives in East Asian courses to 
fulfill the twenty-four-credit requirement for the certificate. 

Electives: Students must complete at least twelve hours of electives 
selected from four regular formally approved courses on East Asia in at 
least two of the following categories: (1) art history, (2) geography, (3) 
government and politics. (4) history, (5) language, linguistics, and litera- 
ture, (6) music, (7) sociology, and (8) urban studies. Nine of the twelve 
hours of electives must be upper division (300-400 level) courses. A 
maximum of three credit hours of special topics courses on East Asian will 
be allowed with the approval of the student's certificate adviser. No more 
than nine credits from any one department may be applied toward the 
certificate. No more than nine credits applied to the student's major may 
also apply to the certificate. In addition, no more than nine credits of the 
courses applied toward the certificate may be transferred from other 
institutions. Students are asked to work with their advisor in ensuring that 
the electives maintain an intercollegiate and interdisciplinary focus (at 
least three disciplines are recommended). 

Interested students should contact Dr. Marlene Mayo, Department of 
History, Francis Scott Key Hall, (301) 405-4309. 

Women's Studies Certificate 

College of Arts and Humanities 

1115 Mill Building, 405-6878 

The Women's Studies Certificate Program consists of an integrated, 
interdisciplinary curriculum on women which is designed to supplement a 
student's major. Any student in good standing may enroll in the certificate 
program by declaring her/his intention to the Women's Studies under- 
graduate advisor. For additional information, contact the Women's Stud- 
ies Office. 405-7710. See the alphabetical list of programs, above, for 
curriculum details. 



136 



CHAPTFRH 



APPROVED COURSES 



The following list includes undergraduate courses that 
have been approved as of February 1, 1993 Courses 
added after that dale do not appear in this list. Courses 
eliminated after that date may still appear. Not every 
course is offered regularly. Students should consult the 
Schedule of Classes to ascertain which courses are 
actually offered during a given semester. 

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 



Number 

000-099 
100-199 
200-299 
300-399 

386-387 



400-499 
500-599 



600-899 

799 

899 



Eligibility 

Non-credit course. 
Pnmarily freshman course. 
Primanly sophomore course. 
Junior, senior course not acceptable for 
credit toward graduate degrees. 
Campus-wide internship courses; refer to 
information descnbing the Office Experien- 
tial Learning in Part 1. 
Junior, senior course acceptable for credit 
toward some graduate degrees. 
Professional School course (Dentistry, Ar- 
chitecture. Law, l^edicine) or post-bacca- 
laureate course. 

Course restricted to graduate students. 
Master Thesis credit. 
Doctoral Dissertation credit. 



AASP — Afro-American Studies 

AASP 100 Introduction to Afro-American Studies (3) 

Significant aspects of the history of Afro-Americans with 
particular emphasis on the evolution and development of 
blact^ communities from slavery to the present. Interdiscipli- 
nary introduction to social, political, legal and economic 
roots of contemporary problems laced by blacks in the 
United States with applications to the lives of other racial 
and ethnic minonties in the Americas and in other societies. 

AASP 101 Public Policy and the Black Community 

(3) Formerly AASP 300. The impact of public policies 
on the black community and the role of the policy 
process in affecting the social, economic and political 
well-being of minorities. Particular attention given to 
the post-1960 to present era. 

AASP 200 African Civilization (3) A survey of African 
civilizations from 4500 B.C. to present. Analysis of 
traditional social systems. Discussion of the impact of 
European colonization on these civilizations. Analysis of 
the influence of traditional Afncan social systems on 
modern African institutions as well as discussion of 
contemporary processes of Africanization 

AASP 202 Blacit Culture in the United States (3) The 

course examines important aspects of Amencan Negro 
life and thought which are reflected in Afro-American 
literature, drama, music and art. Beginning with the 
cultural hentage of slavery, the course surveys the 
changing modes of black creative expression from the 
nineteenth-century to the present. 

AASP 298 Special Topics In Afro-American Studies (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. An introductory 
multi-disaplinary and inler-disciplinary educational expen- 
ence to explore issues relevant to black life, cultural expe- 
nences, arxl fxjiitical. economic and artistic development. 

AASP 301 Applied Policy Analysis and the Black 
Community (3) Prerequisite: AASP 1 01 Recommended: 
one semester of statistics. Devetopment and application of 
the tools needed for examining the effectiveness of alterna- 
tive policy options confronting minonty communities Re- 
view policy research methods used in forming and evaluat- 
ing policies Examination of the policy process 

AASP 303 Computer Applications in Afro-American 
Studies (3) Prerequisite. STAT 100 or SOCY 201 or 



MATH 1 1 1 or equivalent. Introduction to statistics and 
database processing software used in model estimation 
and simulation in policy analysis. Special emphasis on 
applications for applied research on policy problems 
confronting minority communities 

AASP 305 Theoretical, Methodological and Policy 
Research Issues In Afro-American Studies (3) Pre- 
requisite: AASP 101 or permission of department. For- 
merly AASP 401. Theories and concepts in the social 
and behavioral sciences relating to problems in minority 
communities. Issues include validity and soundness of 
theoretical arguments, epislemological questions of 
various methodologies and the relationship between 
policy making and policy research. 

AASP 310 African Slave Trade (3) Formerly AASP 
311. The relationship of the slave trade of Africans to 
the development of British capitalism and its indus- 
trial revolution; and to the economic and social devel- 
opment of the Americas. 

AASP 312 Social and Cultural Effects of Coloniza- 
tion and Racism (3) A comparative approach to the 
study of the social and cultural effects of colonization 
and racism on black people in Africa, Latin Amenca and 
in the United States-community and family life, religion, 
economic institutions, education and artistic expression. 

AASP 397 Senior Thesis (3) Prerequisites: AASP 305; 
and permission of department. Directed research in 
Afro-American Studies resulting in the completion and 
defense of a senior thesis. 

AASP 398 Selected Topics In the African Diaspora 

(3) Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. Analysis 
of the historical experiences and cultures of Afncans 
in the diaspora. 

AASP 400 Directed Readings in Afro-American 
Studies (3) The readings will be directed by the 
faculty of Afro-American Studies. Topics to be cov- 
ered will be chosen to meet the needs and interests 
of individual students. 

AASP 402 Classic Readings in Afro-American Stud- 
ies (3) Classic readings of the social, economic and 
political status of blacks and other minorities in the 
United Slates and the Americas. 

AASP410Contemporary African Ideologies (3) Analy- 
sis of contemporary African ideologies. Emphasis on 
philosophies of Nyerere, Nkrumah, Senghor, Sekou 
Toure, Kaunda, Cabral, et al Discussion of the role of 
Afncan ideologies on modernization and social change 

AASP 41 1 Black Resistance Movements (3) A com- 
parative study of the black resistance movements in 
AInca and Amenca; analysis of their interrelationships 
as well as their impact on contemporary pan-Afncanism. 

AASP 441 Science, Technology, and tfie Black Com- 
munity (3) Prerequisite: AASP 100 or AASP 202 or HIST 
255 or permission of department Scientific knowledge and 
skills in solving technological and social problems, particu- 
larly those faced by the black community Examines the 
evolution and development of Afncan and Afro-Amencan 
coninbutions to science Surveys the impact of technologi- 
cal changes on minonty communities. 

AASP 443 Blacks and the Law (3) Prerequisite: AASP 
100orAASP202orHIST255orpermissionof department 
The relationship between black Amencans and tlie law, 
particularly cnmmal law. criminal institutions and tfie crimi- 
nal justice system Examines histoncal changes in the legal 
status of CHacks and char>ges in the causes of raaal 
dispanties in cnmmal involvement and punishments. 



AASP 468 Special Topics in Africa and the Amerfcat 

(3) Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs Cultural, 
histoncal and artistic dimensions of the Afncan expen- 
ence in Afnca and the Americas 

AASP 478 Humanities Topics in Afro- American Stud- 
ies (3) Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs Ad 
vanced studies in the humanities, often requinng prereq- 
uisites, focusing on the literary, artistic and philosophical 
contnbutions of Africans and African-Americans 

AASP 497 Policy Seminar In Afro-American Studies 

(3) Prerequisite: AASP 301 or permission of depart 
ment. Application of public policy analysis to important 
social problems and policy issues affecting black Amen- 
cans Policy research and analysis procedures through 
an in-depth study of a cntical. national black policy issue. 

AASP 498 Special Topics in Black Culture (3) Prereq- 
uisite: AASP 100 or AASP 202 Repeatable to 6 credits 
it content differs. Advanced study of the cultural and 
historical antecedents of contemporary Afncan and 
Afro-American society Emphasis on the social, politi- 
cal, economic and behavioral factors affecting blacks 
and their communities Topics vary 

AASP 499 Advanced Topics In Public Policy and tfie 
Black Community (3) Prerequisite AASP 301 or permis- 
sion of department Repeataljle to 6 credits if content 
differs. Examination of speafic areas of policy devetopment 
and evaluation in black and other communities. Application 
of advanced tools of policy analysis, espeaally quantitative, 
statistical and micro-economic analysis, 

AGRI — Agriculture 

AGR1 105 Risk and Responsibility - An Introduction to 
Agriculture (3) Formerly AGRI 101 Technical and human 
components of agnculture in a cross-disaptinary context. 
Agncultural ongins, crop and animal domestication, agri- 
cultural geography, food and nutntion. the natural resource 
base and environmental concerns, agncultural policy for- 
mation, agricultural mariteting and trade. sustainatJto agn 
culture, international agnculture. and the future of farming 

AGRI 302 introduction to Agricultural Education (2) 

Formerly AEED 302 An overview of the job of the 
teacher of agnculture. examination of agncultural edu- 
cation programs for youth and adults 

AGRI 305 Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 

(1) Formerly AEED 305 Charactenslics of young and 
adult farmer instruction m agriculture Determining needs 
for and organizing a course: selecting matenals for 
instruction; and class management Emphasis is on the 
conference method of teaching 

AGRI 31 1 Teaching Secondary VocatkMial Agriculture 

(3) A comprehensive course in the worts of high school 
departnnents of vocational agnculture It emphasizes par- 
ticulariy placement, supervised farming programs, tfie or- 
ganization and administration of future farmer actviDes. 
and objectrves and metfrads in all-day instruction 

AGRI 313 Student Teaching (5) Prerequisite satisfac- 
tory academic average and permission of department 
Formerly AEED 313 Full time student teaching in an 
oft -campus student teaching center under an approved 
supervising teacher of agnculture. participating expen- 
ence in all aspects of the work of a teacher of agnculture 

AGRI 315 Student Teaching (1-4) Prerequisite satis- 
factory academic average and pemnssion of deparl- 
meni Formerly AEED 315 Full lime observation and 
participation in worti of teacher of agnculture m off -campus 
student leaching center Provides students opportunity 
to gam expenence in the summer program of work, to 



AGRO — Agronomy 137 



panicipate in opening ol school activities, and to gain 
other experience needed by teachers. 

AGRI 322 An Introduction to Adult and Continuing 
Education (3) Formerly AEE D 322 This course introduces 
students to the tieW ot nonlormal adult and continuing 
education It examines the social functions, studies the 
cntical issues, explores career opportunities and surveys 
some o( the nontormal adult education delivery systems 

AGRI 323 Developing Youth Programs (3) Formerly 
AEED 323 Concepts involved in planning and execut- 
ing nontormal educational programs developed to meet 
the needs ol youth. Emphasize the idenliticalion of 
opportunities: needs, and problems of youth in all 
socio-economic levels; analysis of methods o( working 
with youth groups and developing volunteer staff. 

AGRI 325 Directed Experience In Extension Education 
(1-5) Prerequisite satistaclory academic average and per- 
mission of depanmeni. Formerly AEED 325, Full-time 
observation and participation in selected aspects of exten- 
sion education in an approved training county. 

AGRI 389 Selected Topics (1-3) Prerequisite: permis- 
sion of department, Repeatable to 6 credits. Students 
are placed in work experiences related to their stated 
career goals for a minimum of eight hours a week for a 
semester. Each student must do an in-deplh study m 
some portion of the work experience and produce a 
special project and report related to this study. A student 
work log is also required. An evaluation from the external 
supervisor of the project will be required 

AGRI 4IX) International Agricultural Extension and 
Development (3) Formerly AEED 400. Examination ot 
the social and ethical issues that shape extension's role 
in the agnculture sector ot countnes worldwide and that 
determine its contnbution to international development. 
Review of a wide range of literature from scholars, 
governments, and international organizations. 

AGRI 450 Human Resources Development in Agri- 
culture (3) Three hours of lecture and one hour of 
discussion/recitation per week. Junior standing. Human 
resources development in the agriculture sector high- 
lights policy, institutional, and programmatic determina- 
tions to advance work force capability in countries world- 
wide. Focus on developing countnes. their problems, 
needs, and the challenge ahead. 

AGRI 464 Rural Life In Modern Society (3) For- 
merly AEED 464. The historical and current nature of 
rural and agricultural areas and communities in the 
complex structure and culture ot U.S. society. Basic 
structural, cultural, and functional concepts for analy- 
ses and contrasts of societies and the organizations 
and social systems within them. 

AGRI 466 Rural Poverty In an Affluent Society (3) 

Formerly AEED 466. Factors giving rise to conditions of 
rural poverty Problems faced by the rural poor. Pro- 
grams designed to alleviate rural poverty. 

AGRI 488 Critique in Rural Education (1) Formerly 
AEED488. Current problems and trends in rural education. 

AGRI 489 Field Experience (1-4) Prerequisite: permis- 
sion of department. Repeatable to 4 credits. Formerly 
AEED 489. Credit according to time scheduled and 
organization of the course. A lecture senes organized to 
study in depth a selected phase of agnculture not 
nonnally associated with one of the existing programs. 

AGRI 499 Special Problems (1-3) 

AGRO — Agronomy 

AGRO 101 Introductory Crop Science (4) Credit will 
be granted for only one of the following: AGRO 101 or 
AGRO 100 and AGRO 1 02, f>/1ajor crop plants including: 
anatomy, physiology, morphology, history, use, adapta- 
tion, culture, improvement and economic importance. 

AGR0 105 Soil and Environmental Quality (3) Soils as 
an irreplaceable natural resource, the importance of soils in 
the ecosystem, soils as sources of pollution, and soils as a 
medium of the storage, assimilation or inactivation of 
pollutants. Acid rain, indoor radon, soil erosion and sedi- 
mentation, nutrient pollution of waters, homeowners prob- 
lems with soils, and the effect of soils on the food chain. 

AGRO 302 Fundamentals of Soil Science (4) Three 
hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. 



Prerequisite: one semester ot chemistry, or permission 
of department Study and management of soils as 
natural bodies, media for plant growth, and ecosystem 
components Morphology, composition, formation, and 
conservation of soils Chemical, biological, and physical 
properties of soils are discussed in relation to the pro- 
duction of plants, the functioning of hydrologic and 
nutrient cycles, the protection of environmental quality, 
and engineering uses of soils 

AGRO 303 International Crop Production (3) Prereq- 
uisite: BIOL 105 or equivalent An introduction to the 
biological dimension ot world hunger The problems and 
potentials for increasing world food supply based on 
current agronomic knowledge Emphasis on interna- 
tional aspects of food crop production and the interrela- 
tionships between agriculture and human populations in 
the developing world. 

AGRO 305 Introduction to Turf Management (3) 

Formerly AGRO 405. Principles of turf culture Identifi- 
cation and uses of turfgrass species; turfgrass fertiliza- 
tion, cultivation, mowing and establishment; and identi- 
fication ot turf pests. 

AGRO 308 Field Soil Morphology (1-2) One hour of 
lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
permission of department. Repeatable to 4 credits. Inten- 
sive field study of soils with particular emphasis on soil 
morphology, soil classification, and agrcullural and urban 
soil interpretations. Focus in fall semesters is on soils of the 
Northeast U.S.; focus in spring semesters is on soils 
outside the Northeast region. The lab period is devoted to 
fields trips and student efforts culminate in a mandatory 
extended field tnp. 

AGRO 398 Senior Seminar (1) Reports by seniors 
on current scientific and practical publications per- 
taining to agronomy. 

AGRO 401 Pest Management Strategies for Turfgrass 

(3) Prerequisite: AGRO 305. Interdisciplinary view of 
weed, disease, and insect management from an 
agronomy perspective. Plant responses to pest inva- 
sion, diagnosis of pest-related disorders, and pnnciples 
of weed, disease and insect suppression through cul- 
tural, biological and chemical means are discussed. 

AGRO 402 Sports Turf Management (3) Two hours 
of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: AGRO 305 and AGRO 401 . Sports turf 
management, including design, construction, soil 
modification, soil cultural techniques, pesticide use. 
fertilization, and specialized equipment. 

AGRO 403 Crop Breeding (3) Prerequisite: BOTN 
414 or ZOOL 213. Principles and methods of breed- 
ing annual self and cross-pollinated plant and peren- 
nial forage species. 

AGRO 406 Forage Crops (3) Prerequisite: BIOL 105. 
Recommended: BIOL 106. World grasslands and their 
influence on early civilizations; current impact on human 
food supply; role of forages in soil conservation and a 
sustainable agriculture. Production and management 
requirements of major grass and legume species for 
silage and pasture for livestock feed. Cultivar develop- 
ment; certified seed production and distribution. 

AGRO 407 Cereal and Oil Crops (3) Pre- or 
corequisites: BIOL 105 and AGRO 101. A study of 
principles of production for corn, small grains, rice, 
millets, sorghums, and soybeans and other oil seed 
crops. A study of seed production, processing, distri- 
bution and federal and state seed control programs of 
corn, small grains and soybeans. 

AGRO 41 Commercial Turf Maintenance and Pro- 
duction (3) Prerequisite: AGRO 305 and AGRO 401 . 
Commercial lawn care industry, sod production and 
turfgrass seed production. Fertilizer, renovation pro- 
grams, and weed and insect control programs used in 
professional lawn care. Environmental effects of lawn 
care programs. 

AGRO 411 Principles of Soil Fertility (3) Soil fac- 
tors affecting plant growth and quality with emphasis 
on the bio-availability of mineral nutrients. The man- 
agement of soil systems to enhance plant growth by 
means of crop rotations, microbial activities, and use 
of organic and inorganic amendments 

AGRO 413 Soil and Water Conservation and Man- 
agement (3) Prerequisite; AGRO 302. Importance and 



causes of soil erosion, methods ot soil erosion control. 
Effects of conservation practices on soil physical prop- 
erties and the plant root environment Irngation arid 
drainage as related to water use and conservation 

AGRO 41 4 Soil Morpfiology, Genesis and Classifica- 
tion (4) Three hours of lecture and three hours of 
laboratory per week Prerequisite: AGRO 302. Pro- 
cesses and factors of soil genesis Taxonomy of soils of 
the world by U S. System Soil morphological character- 
istics, composition, classification, sun/ey and field trips 
to examine and describe soils 

AGRO 415 Soil Survey and Land Use (3) Two hours of 
lecture and three hours ol laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisite: AGRO 302. Evaluation ol soils in the uses of land 
and the environmental implications of soil utilization. 
Interpretation of soil information and soil surveys as 
applied to both agricultural and non-agncultural prob- 
lems. Incorporation of soil data into legislation, environ- 
mental standards and land use plans, 

AGRO 417 Soil Physics (3) Two hours of lecture and 
three hours of laboratory per week Prerequisites. AGRO 
302 and a course in physics; or permission ot depart- 
ment. A study of physical properties ot soils with special 
emphasis on relationship to soil productivity. 

AGRO 421 Soil Chemistry (4) Three hours of lecture 
and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
AGRO 302. The chemistry and composition of mineral 
and organic colloids in soils, including ion exchange, 
oxidation-reduction, acidity, surface charge, and solu- 
tion chemistry. Lectures and readings penain to plant 
nutntion, waste disposal, and groundwater quality. 

AGRO 422 Soil Microbiology (3) Prerequisite: AGRO 
302. CHEM 1 04 or permission of department. Relation- 
ship of soil microorganisms to the soils' physical and 
chemical properties. Nitrogen fixation, mycorrhizae-plant 
interactions and microbially mediated cycling. 

AGRO 423 Soil-Water Pollution (3) Prerequisites: 
AGRO 302 and CHEI^1 1 04 or permission of department. 
Reaction and fate of pesticides, agricultural fertilizers. 
industrial and animal wastes in soil and water with 
emphasis on their relation to the environment. 

AGRO 440 Crop, Soils, and Civilization (3) Role and 
importance of crop and soil resources in the develop- 
ment of human civilization. History of crop and soil use 
and management as they relate to the persistence of 
ancient and modern cultures. 

AGRO 441 Sustainable Agriculture (3) Environmental, 
social and economic needs for alternatives to the conven- 
tional, high-inputfarming systemswhich currently predomi- 
nate in industrial countries. Strategies and practices that 
minimize the use of non-renewable resources. 

AGRO 444 Remote Sensing of Agriculture and Natu- 
ral Resources (3) Interaction of electromagnetic radia- 
tion. Remote sensing technology to agriculture and 
natural resource inventory, monitonng and manage- 
ment and related environmental concerns. 

AGRO 451 Crop Culture and Development (3) Pre- or 
corequisite: BOTN 441 . Application of basic plant physi- 
ology to crop production. Photosynthesis, respiration, 
mineral nutntion, water and temperature stress, and 
post-harvest physiology. 

AGRO 453 Weed Science (3) Two hours of lecture and 
three hours of laboratory per week. Weed identification, 
ecology, and control (cultural, mechanical, biological, 
and chemical methods). 

AGRO 454 Air and Soil Pollution Effects on Crops (3) 

Effects of air pollutants such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, acid 
rain, etc., and soil pollutants such as toxic metals, pesti- 
cides, on the growth, productivity and quality of crops. 

AGRO 483 Plant Breeding Laboratory (2) Prerequi- 
sites: AGRO 403 and permission of department. Current 
plant breeding research being conducted at The Univer- 
sity of Ivlaryland and USDA at Beltsville. Discussion with 
plant breeders about pollination techniques, breeding 
methods, and program achievements and goals. Field 
tnps to selected USDA laboratories. 

AGRO 499 Special Problems in Agronomy (1-3) 

Prerequisites: AGRO 302. AGRO 406, AGRO 407 or 
permission of department. A detailed study, including a 
written report of an important problem in agronomy. 



1 38 AMST — American Studies 



AMST —American Studies 

AMST 201 Introduction to American Studies (3) 

introduction to American cultural studies — past and 
present — by examining the concept ot 'sell" in American 
autobiographical wnling and the concept ol "society" in 
accounts of vanous communilies- 

AMST 203 Popular Culture in America (3) An intro- 
duction to American popular culture, its historical 
development, and its role as a retleclion ot and 
influence on our culture and society- 

AMST 204 Film and American Culture Studies (3) 

Exploration of the American film from an historical per- 
spective, illustrating the motion picture's role as an 
institutional phenomenon, as a form ol communication, 
and as a source ol cross-cultural study. 

AMST 205 Material Aspects of American Life (3) 

Histoncal survey ol American material culture. Ways ol 
describing and inteipreting accumulated malenal evi- 
dence, e.g. buildings, town plans, introduced by stress- 
ing relationship between artifact and culture, 

AMST 206 Business and American Culture Studies (3) 

Investigates the traditional definitions of personal success, 
the process of corporate ntuals and the role of innovation in 
Amencan business since 1945 Contemporary business 
discussed within the context of national and global socio- 
cultural changes applying organizational theory, historical 
studies and anthropological field work to an analysis of 
audiotapes, videotapes, films and popular literature. 

AMST207 Contemporary American Cultures(3) World 

views, values, and social systems of contemporary 
Amencan cultures explored through readings on se- 
lected groups such as middle-class suburbanites, old 
order Amish. and urban tramps. 

AMST 211 Technology and American Culture (3) 

Histoncal and contemporary technological innovations 
in Amencan society, with special emphasis on the hu- 
manities. Vaned social and cultural responses to one 
contemporary technological issue, e.g. environmental 
pollution, genetic engineering, communications tech- 
nology, and psychopharmacology. 

AMST 298 Selected Topics in American Studies (3) 

Repealable to 6 credits if content differs. Cultural study of 
a specific theme or issue involving artifacts and documents 
from both past and contemporary American experience, 

AMST 330 Critics of American Culture (3) Prerequi- 
site: pnorcourse in AlvlST. HIST, or SOCY, Philosophies 
of Amencan social purpose and promise. Readings from 
"classical' American thinkers, contemporary social com- 
mentators, and American studies scholars, 

AMST 398 Independent Studies (1-3) Prerequisite: 
permission of department, Repeatable to 6 credits. 
Provides the student with the opportunity to pursue 
independent, interdisciplinary research and reading in 
specific areas of American culture studies, 

AMST 418 Cultural Ttiemes in America (3) Repeat- 
able to 6 credits if content differs. Examination of struc- 
ture and development of American culture through 
themes such as "growing up American", "culture and 
mental disorders', "race", "ethnicity", "regionalism', "land- 
scape", "humor". 

AMST 428 American Cultural Eras (3) Repeatable to 
6 credits if content differs. Investigation of a decade, 
penod. or generation as a case study in significant social 
change within an American context. Case studies in- 
clude "Antebellum Amenca. 1840-1860". "American 
culture in the Great Depression' 

AMST 429 Perspectives on Popular Culture (3) Re- 
peatable to 6 credits if content differs Topics in popular 
culture studies, including the examination of particular 
genres, themes, and issues 

AMST 432 Literature and American Society (3) Pre 

requisite: pnor course in AMST. SOCY. American litera- 
ture, or Amencan history Examination of the relation- 
ship between literature and society: including literature 
as cultural communication and the institutional Irame- 
work governing its production, distribution, conserva- 
tion and evaluation, 

AMST 450 Seminar in American Studies (3) Prereq- 
uisite: nine hours pnor coursework in Amencan Studies. 



including AMST 201 . Senior standing. For AMST ma|ors 
only Developments in theories and methods ol Ameri- 
can Studies scholarship, with emphasis upon interac- 
tion between the humanities and the social sciences in 
the process of cultural analysis and evaluation. 

ANSC — Animal Science 

The following courses may involve the use of animals. 
Students who are concerned about the use ol animals in 
teaching have the responsibility to contact the instructor, 
prior to course enrollment, to determine whether ani- 
mals are to be used in the course, whether class exer- 
cises involving animals are optional or required and 
what alternatives, if any. are available, 

ANSC 101 Principles of Animal Science (3) Two 

hours of lecture and two hours ol laboratory per week, A 
comprehensive course, including the development of 
animal science, its contributions to the economy, char- 
acteristics of animal products, factors of efficient and 
economical production and distribution 

ANSC 211 Anatomy of Domestic Animals (4) Three 
hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 105, A systematic gross and micro- 
scopic comparative study of the anatomy of the major 
domestic animals. Special emphasis is placed on those 
systems important in animal production. 

ANSC 212 Applied Animal Physiology (3) Prereq 
uisite: ANSC 211 or equivalent. The physiology of 
domesticated animals with emphasis on functions 
related to production, and the physiological adapta- 
tion to environmental influences, 

ANSC 214 Applied Animal Physiology Laboratory (1) 

Three hours of latX)ratory per week. Pre- or corequisite: 
ANSC 212, Application of physiological laboratory tech- 
niques to latxjralory and domestic animals, 

ANSC 215 Comparative Animal Nutrition (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ANSC1 01 and (CHEM 104 or CHEM 233), Formeriy 
ANSC 402, Nutrients and their fundamental role in animal 
metatralism. in relation to their biochemical role in metatx)- 
lism. digestion, absorption, and their deficiency symptoms, 

ANSC 220 Livestock Management (4) Prerequisite: ANSC 
101, Formerly ANSC 221, Management of meat animals 
including beef, sheep, and swine Breeding, feeding man- 
agement and marketing practices at the leading edge of 
technology lor maximum economic efficiency. 

ANSC 222 Meats (3) Two hours of lecture and three hours 
of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 220, Fomierly 
ANSC 422, Meal and the factors influencing acceptability, 
marketing, and quality of fresh meats. Laboratory penods 
are conducted in packing houses, meatdistnbution centers, 
retail outlets and University Meats Laboratory, 

ANSC 230 Light Horse Management (4) Three hours of 
lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
ANSC 101, A general course in horse management for 
students who intend to tie involved in the care and manage- 
ment of light horses. The pnnciples of nutntion. anatomy, 
physiology, health and disease, growth, reproduction, loco- 
motion and tasic management techniques, 

ANSC 240 Dairy Cattle Management (2) Prerequisite: 
ANSC 220- Credit will tie granted for only one of the 
following: ANSC 240 or ANSC 444, Formeriy ANSC 444, 
All aspects of dairy production, including nutntion. repro- 
duction, mastitis control, milking management, farmstead 
facilities, financial management and forage production 

ANSC 241 Dairy Cattle Management Practlcum (1) 

Three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 
240. Formeriy ANSC 242. Practicum to parallel ANSC 
240. Field tnps required, 

ANSC 244 Dairy Cattle Type Appraisal (1) Two labo- 
ratory periods. Prerequisite permission of depanmeni 
Laboratory Analysis ol dairy cattle type with emphasis 
on the comparative judging ol dairy cattle 

ANSC 251 Beef and Sheep Management Practicum (1) 

Three hours of laboratory per week Prerequisite: ANSC 
220, Credit will be granted for only one of the following: 
ANSC 220 or ANSC 424 Formeriy ANSC 424 Practicum 
to parallel ANSC 220 Field tnps required 

ANSC 252 Introduction to the Diseases of Wildlife (2) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1 05, The principal diseases of North 
American wildlife will be bnefly considered For each 



disease, specilic attention will t>e given to the lollowing 
signs evidenced by the affected animal or bird, caus- 
ative agent, means of transmission and effects ol the 
disease on the population of the species involved. 

ANSC 262 Commercial Poultry Management (3) Pre- 
requisite ANSC 101 A symposium ol finance, invest- 
ment. Plant layout. Specialization, purchase of supplies 
and management problems in baby chick, egg. broiler 
and turkey production: foremanship. advertising, sell- 
ing By-products, production and financial records. Field 
trips required- 

ANSC 271 Swine Management Practicum (1) Three 
hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 220 
Formerly ANSC 421 . Practicum to parallel ANSC 220. FieW 
inps required 

ANSC 305 Companion Animal Care (3) Prerequisite: 

BIOL 105, Care, and management ot the companion 
small animals Species covered include the cat. dog. 
rodents, lagomorphs. reptiles, amphibians, birds and 
others as class interest and schedule dictate Basic 
description, evolutionary development, breeding, nutn- 
tional and environmental requirements, and public health 
aspects will t>e presented for each species 

ANSC 315 Applied Animal Nutrition (3) Two hours ol 

lecture and two hours ol latxjratory per week. Prerequisite: 
ANSC 215 Formeriy ANSC 203, Elements of nutrition, 
source charactenstics and adaptability of vanousleedstutfs 
to several classes ot livestock, A study ol ttie composition 
of feeds, nutnent requirements and computenzed lormula- 
tion of economic diets and rations for livestock, 

ANSC 327 Quantitative Domestic Animal Genetics (3) 

Two hours of lecture and two hours of latx)ratory per week. 
Prerequisite: BIOL 222 Population and quantitative genet- 
ics as applied to domestic livestock: concepts of vanation. 
heredity and relationship, breeding systems. Genetic evalu- 
ation, selection for improvement, and measuring genetic 
progress will be emphasized, 

ANSC 332 Horse Management (3) Prerequisite : ANSC 
230 Major topics include nutntion, reproduction, breed- 
ing, performance evaluation, basic training and man- 
agement techniques 

ANSC 350 Ornithology (4) Three hours ol lecture and 

three hours of laboralory per week. Three mandatory field 
trips Prerequisite: BIOL 105 Includes syslematics, 
anatomy, physiology, tjehavior , life histones, ecology, popu- 
lation dynamics, evolution and conservation of birds, 

ANSC 370 Animal Agriculture: Scientific and Cul- 
tural Perspectives (3) Prerequisite BIOL 105 Study 
will locus on the enhancement of biological efficiency 
that permits more extensive options for choice ot human 
activities, within the limitations of ecological constraints. 
The course examines the growth of knowledge, ol both 
cultural and scientific ongin, as applied in the devekip- 
ment of successful human-animal systems. 

ANSC 397 Senior Seminar (1 ) Prerequisite pd Career 
and professional opportunities Overview ol professional 
organizations and appropnate pnvale and govemmen 
tal agencies. Preparation and presentation of animal 
science topics. 

ANSC 398 Seminar (1) Repeatable to 2 credits rt 

content differs Presentation and discussion ol current 
literature and research work in animal saence 

ANSC 399 Special Problems in Animal Science (1-2) 

Work assigned m proportion to amount of credit A course 
designed for advanced undergraduates m which specific 
problems relating to animal saence will be assigned 

ANSC 401 Fundamentals of Nutrition (3) Prerequi- 
site CHEM 1 04 and ANSC 2 1 2 Recommended: BCHM 
261 Also ottered as NUSC 402 A study ol the funda- 
mental role of all nutnents in the body including their 
digestion, absorption and metatxjlism Dietary require- 
ments and nutritional deliciency syndromes of laix>ra- 
tory and farm animals and humans 

ANSC 406 Environmental Physiology (3) Prerequi 
site anatomy and physiology The specific analomtcal 
and physiological modifications employed by animals 
adapted to certain stressful environments will be consid- 
ered Particular emphasis vnll be placed on the problems 
ot temperature regulation and water balance. Specific 
areas for consideration will include animals in cold 



ARCH — Architecture 139 



(including hibernation), animals in dry heat, diving ani- 
mals and animals in high altitudes. 

ANSC 412 Introduction to Diseases ol Animals (3) 

Two lectures and one latjoralory period per week Pre 
requisite MICB 200 and BIOL 105 This course gives 
basic instruction in the nature ol disease including 
causation, immunity, methods ol diagnosis, economic 
importance, public health aspects and prevention and 
control ol the common diseases ol sheep, cattle, swine, 
horses and poultry 

ANSC 413 Laboratory Animal Management (3) A 

comprehensive course in care and management ol 
laboratory animals Emphasis will be placed on physiol- 
ogy, anatomy and special uses lor the dilterent species. 
Disease prevention and regulations (or maintaining ani- 
mal colonies will be covered Field trips will be required. 

ANSC 41 5 Parasitic Diseases of Domestic Animals (3) 

Two hours ol lecture and two hours ot laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: ANSC 41 2 or equivalent A study ot parasitic 
diseases resulting from protozoan and helminth infection 
and arthropod infestation. Emphasis on parasites ol veten- 
nary importance: their identification: life cycles, pathologi- 
cal effects and control by management 

ANSC 420 Animal Production Systems (4) Two 

hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites: ANSC 101, ANSC 220, and 
(ANSC 240 or ANSC 262) Formerly ANSC 423. 
Effects of management and economic decisions on 
animal production enterprises. Computer simulations 
ot intensive and extensive production units. 

ANSC 430 Topics in Equine Science (4) Three hours of 
lecture and two hours ol discussion/recitation per week. 
Prerequisites: ANSC 21 1 : ANSC 21 2 and ANSC 230. Pre- 
orcorequisite: ANSC 401 Specific problems of importance 
to the equine industry, including such areas as nutntion, 
physiology, anatomy, genetics and pathology. 

ANSC 431 Horse Production (2) One hour of lecture and 
two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ANSC 101: 
ANSC 211: ANSC 212: ANSC 230 and permission ol 
department. Laboratory and assigned project to t>e per- 
formed at University of Maryland Horse Farm, Ellicott City, 
Md. FieW tnps. Application ol equine science pnnciples to 
the management and production of horses. 

ANSC 443 Physiology and Biochemistry of Lacta- 
tion (3) Prerequisite: ANSC 212 or equivalent: and 
BCHM 261 or BCHIVI 461 . The physiology and biochem- 
istry ol milk production in domestic animals, particularly 
cattle. Mammary gland development and maintenance 
from the embryo to the fully developed lactating gland. 
Abnormalities of the mammary gland. 

ANSC 446 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduc- 
tion (3) Prerequisite ZOOL 422 or ANSC 212. 
Anatomy and physiology ol reproductive processes 
in domesticated and wild mammals. 

ANSC 447 Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 
Laboratory (1 ) Three hours of laboratory per week. Fre- 
er corequisite: ANSC 446. Animal handling, artificial 
insemination procedures and analytical techniques use- 
ful in animal management and reproductive research. 

ANSC 452 Avian Physiology (2) Two two-hour lecture/ 
laboratory/demonstration pehodsperweek.Prerequisite:a 
basic course in animal anatomy or physiology. The diges- 
tive, immune, excretory, respiratory, muscle, circulatory, 
endocrine and nervous systems ol avian species. Labora- 
tory exercises include use of anesthetics, suturing tech- 
niques, use of a polygraph and instmmentation lor analyz- 
ing blood, unne, liver, kidney and brain tissue. 

ANSC 453 Animal Welfare (3) Prerequisite: ANSC 1 01 
or ZOOL 210 or permission of department. Ethical 
concerns pertinent to the use of animals in modern 
society. Histoncal and philosophical aspects of human/ 
animal interrelationships, animal intelligence and aware- 
ness, and the treatment of animals in agriculture and 
scientific research will be considered. 

ANSC 455 Applied Animal Behavior (3) Two hours 
of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: (ANSC 101 or BIOL 106) and BIOL 
222. Principles of animal behavior applied to produc- 
tion systems in animal agriculture. 

ANSC 462 Physiology of Hatchability (1) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 



1 05. The physiology of embryonic development as related 
to pnnciples of hatchability and problems of incubation 
encountered m the hatchery industry are discussed 

ANSC 489 Current Topics in Animal Science (1-3) 
Prerequisite pd Repeatable to 6 credits i( content 
dillers Examination of current developments in the 
animal sciences 

ANTH — Anthropology 

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Archaeology 
and Physical Anthropology (3) May be taken lor credit in 
the general education program General patterns of the 
development of human culture, the biological and morpho- 
logical aspects ol man viewed in his cultural setting. 

AtMTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural An- 
thropology and Linguistics (3) Social and cultural pnn 
ciples as exemplified in ethnographic descriptions. The 
study of language within the context of anthropology. 

ANTH 221 Man and Environment (3) A geographical 
introduction to ethnology, emphasizing the relations 
between cultural terms and natural environment. 

ANTH 241 Introduction to Archaeology (3) A survey 
of the basic aims and methods of archeological Held 
work and interpretation, with emphasis on the recon- 
struction of prehistonc ways of life. 

ANTH 298 Special Topics in Anthropology (3) Repeat- 
able to 6 credits if content differs. Anthropological perspec- 
tives on selected topics of broad general interest. 

ANTH 361 Human Evolution and Fossil Man (3) A 

survey of the basic principles of human evolution as seen 
by comparative anatomic study of fossil specimens. 

ANTH 371 Introduction to Linguistics (3) Introduction 
to the basic concepts of modern descnptive linguistics. 
Phonology, morphology, syntax. Examinations of the 
methods of comparative linguistics, internal reconstruc- 
tion, dialect geography. 

ANTH 389 Research Problems (1-6) Prerequisite: 
permission of department. Introductory training in an- 
thropological research methods. The student will pre- 
pare a paper embodying the results of an appropriate 
combination of research techniques applied to a se- 
lected problem in any field of anthropology. 

ANTH 397 Anthropological Theory (3) Prerequisite: per- 
mission of department. A survey ol the histoncal develop- 
ment and current emphasis in the theoretical approaches 
of all fields ot anthropology, providing an integrated frame 
of reference for the discipline as a whole. 

ANTH 401 Cultural Anthropology: Principles and Pro- 
cesses (3) Prerequisites: ANTH 101. ANTH 1 02. or ANTH 
221 . An examination of the nature of human culture and its 
processes, txjth histoncal and functional. Theapproachwill 
be topical and theoretical rather than descriptive. 

ANTH 402 Cultural Anthropology: World Ethnogra- 
phy (3) Prerequisites: ANTH 101. ANTH 1 02. or ANTH 
221. A descriptive survey of the culture areas of the 
world through an examination of the ways of selected 
representative societies. 

ANTH 424 Ethnology of North America (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 1 02. The native people and 
cultures of North America north of Mexico and their 
historical relationships, including the effects of contact 
with European-derived populations. 

ANTH 426 Ethnology of Middle America (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ANTH 1 01 and ANTH 1 02. Cultural background and 
modern social, economic and religious lile of Indian and 
Mesltzo groups in Mexico and central Amenca; processes 
of acculturation and cunents in cultural development. 

ANTH 431 Social Organization of Primitive Peoples 

(3) Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. A com- 
parative survey of the structures of non-literate and folk 
societies, covenng both general pnnciples and special 
regional developments. 

ANTH 434 Religion of Primitive Peoples (3) Prerequi- 
sites: ANTH 101 and ANTH 102. A sunrey of the religious 
systems of primitive and folk societies, with emphasis on 
the relation ol religion to other aspects of culture. 



ANTH 437 Politics and Government in Primitive 
Society (3) A combined survey of politics in human 
societies and ol important anthropological theones con- 
cerning this aspect of society. 

ANTH 441 Archaeology of the Did World (3) Prereq 
uisite:ANTH 101 or ANTH 241 A survey of the archaeo- 
logical matenals of Europe, Asia and Afnca, with empha- 
sis on chronological and regional interrelationships, 

ANTH 451 Archaeology of the New World (3) Prereq 

uisite: ANTH 101 or ANTH 241 . A survey ol the archaeo 
logical materials ol North and South America with em 
phasis on chronological and regional interrelationships 

ANTH 461 Human Osteology Laboratory (3) Prerequi 
site ANTH 101 A laboratory study of the human skeleton 
Its morphology, measurement, andanatomic relationships 

ANTH 466 Forensic Anthropology Laboratory (3) Pre 

requisite: ANTH 461 or permission ol department. A latx)- 
ratory study ol the methods used to identify human remains 
by anthropological techniques and discussion of the role of 
the anthropologist in medico-legal investigation. 

ANTH 496 Field Methods in Archaeology (8) Fonnerly 
ANTH 499 Field training in the techniques of archaeologi- 
cal survey and excavation 

ANTH 498 Reld Methods in Ethnology (1-6) FieW train- 
ing in the collection and recording ot ethnological data. 

APDS — Design 

APDS 431 Advanced Problems in Advertising Design 

(3) Two studio penods per week. Prerequisite: APDS 430 
or DESN 430. For advertising design majors only. Ad- 
vanced problems in design and layout planned lor develop- 
ing competency in one or more areas of advertising design. 

ARCH — Architecture 

ARCH 170 Introduction to the Built Environment (3) 

Introduction to conceptual, perceptual, behavioral and 
technical aspects ol environmental design; methods of 
analysis, problem solving and project implementation, 

ARCH 217 Technology, Human Settlements, and 
Shelter (3) A survey ol developments in technology 
through history and their impacts and inlluences on the 
form and fabric of human settlements and shelter. Em- 
phasis on the technologies most relative to examples of 
buildings in cities in North America and Europe. 

ARCH 220 History of Architecture I (3) Sun/ey of West- 
ern architectural history to the Renaissance. With consid- 
eration of parallel developments in the Eastern World. 

ARCH 221 History of Architecture il (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 220 or permission of department. Survey of 
Western architectural history Irom the Renaissance to 
the Twentieth Century. With consideration of parallel 
developments in the Eastern Worid. 

ARCH 222 History of Western Architecture (3) Pre- 
requisite: ARCH 170 or permission of department. Not 
open to students who have completed ARCH 220, 
ARCH 221 , ARTH 340 or ARTH 34 1 . Survey of the major 
monuments and styles of western architectural history 
from the ancient world to the twentieth century. 

ARCH 223 History of Non-Western Architecture (3) 

Survey of architectural history including prehistoric and 
vernacular: ancient civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia 
and the Indus valley: the Islamic world: Hindu and 
Buddhist traditions of Asia; and pre- European Africa 
and the Americas. 

ARCH 242 Drawing I (2) introduces the student to basic 
techniques ol sketching and use of various media. 

ARCH 250 Survey of Urban Planning (3) A sun/ey of 
urtjan development and planning ; ancient through modem 
cities: focus on the roots of modern planning in I9th and 
20th century England and America: study ot a planning 
issue in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan area. 

ARCH 312 Architectural Structures I (3) Prerequi- 
sites: MATH 220; and PHYS 1 22. Recommended: ARCH 
401. For ARCH majors only Pnnciples of behavior 
displayed in architectural structural systems, elements 
and matenals; equilibrium and stability, distnbution of 
forces and stresses, strength and stiffness. Resolutions 
of lorces, reactions, movements, shears, deflection, and 
buckling of systems and elements. 



140 AREC — Agriculture and Resource Economics 



ARCH 313 Environmental Control and Systems I (3) 

Prerequisite: MATH 220. PHYS 122, ARCH 401 For 
majors only. Theory, quantification, and architectural de- 
sign applications for mechanical systems and acoustics, 

ARCH 343 Drawing II: Line Drawing (3) Studio, four 
hours per week. Six hours of laboratory per week 
Prerequisite: ARCH 400 or permission of depanmeni. 
For ARCH majors only. Basic tree hand line drawing lor 
architectural perception and design, 

ARCH 375 Architectural Construction and Materials 

(3) Prerequisite: MATH 220. PHYS 1 22, For majors only. 
Construction processes of building : related terminology: 
review of primary building materials: physical character- 
istics: use and performance of materials as related to 
environmental forces, 

ARCH 400 Architecture Studio I (6) Three hours of 
lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: 
ARCH majors only. Introduction to the processes of 
visual and architectural design including field problems, 

ARCH 401 Architecture Studio II (6) Three hours of 
lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prerequisite: 
ARCH 400 with a grade of C or better For ARCH majors 
only. Continuation of ARCH 400, 

ARCH 402 Architecture Studio III (6) Three hours of 
lecture and nine hours of studio per week. Prerequi- 
site: ARCH 401 with a grade of C or better. For ARCH 
majors only. Design projects involving the elements 
of environmental control, basic structural systems, 
building processes and materials, 

ARCH 403 Architecture Studio IV (6) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 402 with a grade of C or better. For ARCH majors 
only. Three hours of lecture and nine hours of studio per 
week. Design projects involving forms generated by 
different structural systems, environmental controls and 
methods of construction. 

ARCH 408 Selected Topics in Architecture Studio (1 -6) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 403 or equivalent and permission of 
department Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
To'pical problems in architecture and urban design, 

ARCH 410 Technology I (4) Prerequisites MATH 
220: and {(PHYS 121 and PHYS 122) or PHYS 117), 
Corequisite: ARCH 400, For ARCH majors only. First 
course in a four course sequence which develops the 
knowledge and skills of architectural technology. 
Addresses climate, human responses to climate, 
available materials, topography and impact on cul- 
ture. Principles of assembly, basic structural prin- 
ciples and philosophies of construction, 

ARCH 411 Technology II (4) Prerequisite: ARCH 410 
Corequisite: ARCH 401 , For ARCH majors only. Second 
course in a four course sequence. Building construction 
processes and terminology: use and performance charac- 
teristics of pnmary building materials: pnnciples of struc- 
tural behavior related to the building systems: equilibrium 
and stability, stiffness and strength, types of stress, distribu- 
tion of force and stress, resolution of forces, reactions, 
bending moments, shear, deflection, buckling, 

ARCH 412 Architectural Structures II (3) Prerequi- 
site: ARCH 312. ARCH 400 For ARCH majors only. 
Design of steel, timber, and reinforced concrete elements. 
and subsystems; analysis of architectural building sys- 
tems. Introduction to design for both natural and 
man-made hazards 

ARCH 415 Environmental Control and Systems II 

(3) Prerequisite: ARCH 313. ARCH 402, For ARCH 
majors only. Theory, quantification, and architectural 
design applications for water systems, fire protec- 
tion, electrical systems, illumination, signal equip- 
ment, and transportation systems 

ARCH 418 Selected Topics in Architectural Science 
(1-4) Prerequisite: permission of depanmeni. Repeat 
able to 7 credits it content differs. 

ARCH 419 Independent Studies in Architectural 
Science (1-4) Repeatable to 7 credits Proposed work 
must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee, 

ARCH 420 History of American Architecture (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ARCH 221 or permission of department Amencan 
architecture from lt>e late 1 7th to the 20th century 



ARCH 422 History of Greek Architecture (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ARCH 220 or permission of depanmeni. Survey 
of Greek architecture from 750-100 B C 

ARCH 423 History of Roman Architecture (3) Prereq- ^ 

uisite: ARCH 220 or permission of depanmeni Survey' 
of Roman architecture from 500 B C To AD, 325 

ARCH 426 Fundamentals of Architecture (3) Prereq- 
uisite: admission to 3 1/2 year M, ARCH program. 
Thematic introduction of a vanety of skills, issues, and 
ways of thinking that bear directly on the design and 
understanding of the built worid 

ARCH 427 Theories of Architecture (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 221 or permission of department. For ARCH 
majors only. Selected historical and modern theories of 
architectural design, 

ARCH 428 Selected Topics in Architectural History 
(1-3) Prerequisite permission of department Repeat- 
able to 7 credits if content differs 

ARCH 429 Independent Studies in Architectural 
History (1-4) Repeatable to 6 credits. Proposed work 
must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of 
the curriculum committee, 

ARCH 432 History of Medieval Architecture (3) Prereq 

uisite: ARCH 220 or permission of department Architec- 
ture of western Europe from the early Chnstian and Byzan- 
tine penods through the late Gothic, with consideration of 
parallel developments in the eastern work), 

ARCH 433 History of Renaissance Architecture (3) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 221 or permission of department. 
Renaissance architectural pnnciples and trends in the 
15th and 16th centuries and their modifications in the 
Baroque period. 

ARCH 434 History of Modem Architecture (3) Prerequi- 
site: ARCH 221 or permission of department. Architectural 
trends and principles from 1 750 to the present, with empha- 
sis on developments since the mid- 19th century, 

ARCH 435 History of Contemporary Architecture (3) 

For ARCH majors only Concentration on the develop- 
ments in architecture in Europe and the US, since World 
War II. their antecedents m the 1920s and 1930s, and 
the various reactions to modernism in the post-war era. 

ARCH 436 History of Islamic Architecture (3) Prereq- 
uisite: ARCH 220 or permission of department. Survey 
of Islamic architecture from the seventh through the 
eighteenth century. 

ARCH 437 History of Pre-Columbian Architecture (3) 

Architecture of Pre-Columbian Mexico and Central Amenca 
from the Pre-Classic Penod through the Spanish conquest 

ARCH 442 Studies in Visual Design (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 401 , Studio work in visual design independent of 
architectural problem solving, 

ARCH 443 Visual Communication (2) Two hours of 
lecture and rwo hours of lalxiratory per week. Prerequi- 
site: admission to the 3 1 '2 year M, ARCH program For 
ARCH majors only. Investigation of the relationship 
between drawing from life and architectural drawing, the 
conventions of architectural drawing and the role of 
architectural drawing as a means to develop, communi- 
cate, and generate architectural ideas, 

ARCH 445 Visual Analysis of Architecture (3) Two 

hours of lecture and two hours of studio per week. 
Prerequisite: ARCH 401 and ARCH 343. or permission 
of department. Visual principles of architectural design 
through graphic analysis, 

ARCH 448 Selected Topics In Visual Studies (1-4) 

Prerequisite: permission of department Repeatable to 
7 credits if content differs, 

ARCH 449 Independent Studies In Visual Studies 
(1-4) Repeatable to 6 credits Proposed work must 
have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee, 

ARCH 450 Introduction to Urban Planning (3) Intro- 
duction to city planning theory, methodology and tech- 
niques. dealing with normative, urban, structural, eco 
nomic. social aspects ot the city: urtian planning as a 
process Architectural majors or by permission of the 
instructor. Lecture, seminar. 3 hours per week 



ARCH451 Urban D«9lgnSeminar(3)Prerequtsi1e: ARCH 

350 or permission of department Advanced investigatjon 
into problems of analysis and evaluation of the design of 
urt)an areas, spaces arKJ complexes wtlh emphass on 
physical and soaal considerations, effects of putilic poli- 
cies, through case studies FiekJ observations 

ARCH 453 Urban Problems Seminar (3) Prerequisite: 
permission of department. A case study of urt>an develop- 
ment issues, dealing pnmanly with soao-ecorK>mic as- 
pects of changes in the buill environment 

ARCH 454 Theories of Urban Form (3) Theories of 
planning and design of urban spaces. buikJmg com- 
plexes, and new communities 

ARCH 459 Independent Studies in Urban Plan- 
ning (1-4) Repeatable to 6 credits Proposed work 
must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of 
the curriculum committee, 

ARCH 460 Site Analysis and Design (3) Prerequisite: 

ARCH majors only or permission of department, Pnn- 
ciples and methods ol site analysis, the influence of 
natural and man-made site factors on site design and 
architectural form, 

ARCH 461 Design and Energy (3) Two hours of lecture 
and two hours of laboratory per week Prerequisite ARCH 
402 and ARCH 4 1 5 Energy strategies m buiWing related to 
the broader context of architectural protjiem solving, 

ARCH 470 Computer Applications in Architecture 

(3) Prerequisite: ARCH 400 or permission ol depart- 
ment. Introduction to computer programming and utiliza- 
tion, with emphasis on architectural applications. 

ARCH 472 Economic Determinants in Architecture 

(3) Introduction to economic factors influencing architec- 
tural form and design, including land economics, real 
estate, financing, project development, finanaal plan- 
ning, construction and cost control 

ARCH 478 Selected Topics in Architecture (1-4) 

Prerequisite : permission of department. Repeatable to 7 
credits if content differs, 

ARCH 479 Independent Studies in Architecture 

(1-4) Repeatable to 6 credits Proposed wort< must 
have a faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee 

ARCH 480 Problems and Methods of Architectural 
Preservation (3) Prerequisite ARCH 420 or permission 
of department Theory and practice ol (xeservalion in 
Amenca, with emphasis on the protjiems and tech- 
niques of community preservation, 

ARCH 481 The Architect in Archaeology ( Prerequisite 
permission of department. The role of ttie architect in fieU 
archaeology and the analysis of excavatir>g. reconing. and 
publishing selected arcfiaeotogical expeditions, 

ARCH 482 The Archaeology of Roman and Byzan- 
tine Palestine (3) Archaeological sites in Palestine 

(Israel and Jordani from the reign of Herod the Great to 
the Moslem conquest 

ARCH 483 Field Archaeology (3) Prerequisite: permis- 
sion of department Participation in fieW archaeology 
with an excavation officially recognized by proper au- 
thonties of local government 

ARCH 488 Selected Topics In ArchHectural Preser- 
vation (1-4) Prerequisite permission of department 
Repeatable to 7 credits it content differs 

ARCH 489 Independent Studies In Architectural 
Preservation (1-4) Repeatable to 6 credits. Proposed 
work must have a faculty sponsor and receive approval 
ol the curnculum committee 

AREC — Agriculture and Resource 

Economics 

AREC 227 Marlieting Agricultural Products (3) The 

development ol marketing, its scope, channels, arx) 
agencies of distntxjtion lunclions costs, rT>etr>ods used 
and services rendered 

AREC 240 Introduction to Ecortomlcs and the Envi- 
ronment (3) Costs and social impacts of pollution and 
human crowding m the modern environment The eco- 
nomic, legal and institutional causes of tfiese problems 



ARTH — Art History and Archaeology 1 41 



Public policy approaches to solutions and the costs and 
benefits of alternative solutions 

AREC 250 Elements ol Agricultural and Resource 
Economics (3) An miroduclion to economic principles 
ot production, marketing, agricultural prices and in- 
comes, farm labor, credit, agricultural policies, and 
government programs 

AREC 306 Farm Management (3) The organization 
and operation o( the (arm business lo obtain an income 
consistent with family resources and objectives Pnn 
ciples of production economics and other related fields 
as applied lo the individual farm business. 

AREC 310 Horse Industry Economics (3) Prerequi- 
sites (AREC 250 and ECON 203) and (ANSC 101 or 
pd). Economic lorces affecting the horse industry and 
the economic tools required by horse farm managers, 
trainers and others in the industry The business aspects 
ol the horse industry, emphasizing the applied analysis 
of economic factors 

AREC 365 World Hunger, Population, and Food 
Supplies (3) An introduction to the problem of world 
hunger and possible solutions to it. World demand, 
supply, and distnbution of food- Alternatives tor leveling 
off world food demand, increasing the supply of food, 
and improving its distnbution. Environmental limitations 
to increasing world food production. 

AREC 399 Special Problems (1-2) Concentrated 
reading and study in some phase of problem in 
agricultural economics. 

AREC 404 Prices of Agricultural Products (3) Prereq 
uisite; ECON 306 An introduction to agricultural pnce 
behavior The use of price information in the 
decision-making process, the relation of supply and 
demand in determining agncultural pnces. and the rela- 
tion of pnces to grade, time, location, and stages of 
processing in the marketing system. Elementary meth- 
ods of price analysis, the concept of parity and the role 
ol pnce support programs in agncultural decisions. 

AREC 405 Economics of Agricultural Production (3) 

Prerequisite: ECON 306 and MATH 220 The use and 
application ol production economics in agnculture and 
resource industnes through graphical and mathematical 
approaches. Production functions, cost functions, mul- 
tiple product and joint production, and production pro- 
cesses through time 

AREC407 Agricultural Finance (3) Prerequisite; AREC 

250. Application of economic principles to develop cnte- 
na for a sound farm business, including credit source 
and use. prepanng and filing income tax returns, meth- 
ods of appraising farm properties, the summary and 
analysis ol farm records, leading to effective control and 
profitable operation of the farm business. 

AREC 414 Agricultural Business Management (3) Pre- 
requisite: AREC 250. The different forms of businesses. 
Management functions, business indicators, measures of 
performance, and operational analysis. Case studies are 
used to show applications of management techniques. 

AREC 427 Economics of Agricultural Marketing 
Systems (3) Prerequisite; AREC 250. Basic economic 
theory as applied to the marketing of agncultural prod- 
ucts, including price, cost, and financial analysis. Cur- 
rent developments affecting market structure including 
effects of contractual arrangement, vertical integration, 
governmental policies and regulation. 

AREC 432 Introduction to Natural Resources Policy 

(3) Development of natural resource policy and analysis 
of the evolution of public intervention in the use ol natural 
resources. Examination of present policies and of con- 
flicts tietween pnvate individuals, public interest groups, 
and government agencies. 

AREC 433 Food and Agricultural Policy (3) Prerequi- 
site; AREC 250. Economic and political context ol gov- 
ernmental involvement in the farm and food sector. 
Histoncal programs and current policy issues. Analysis 
of economic effects of agricultural programs, their ben- 
efits and costs, and companson of policy alternatives. 
Analyzes the interrelationship among international de- 
velopment, agncultural trade and general economic and 
domestic agricultural policies. 

AREC 445 Agricultural Development In the Third Worid 

(3) Prerequisite: ECON 203 or ECON 205 or AREC 250. 



Development ttieones. the role of agnculture in economic 
development, the agncultural policy emnronment, poliaes 
impacting on rural income and equity, environmental im- 
pacts ol agncultural development 

AREC 453 Natural Resources and Public Policy (3) 

Prerequisite AREC 250 and ECON 203 Rational use 
and reuse ol natural resources Theory, methodology. 
and policies concerned with the allocation ol natural 
resources among alternative uses Optimum slate of 
conservation, market lailure, sale minimum standard, 
and coslbenelit analysis 

AREC 484 Introduction to Econometrics In Agriculture 

(3) An introduction to the application ol econometric tech- 
niques to agncultural problems with emphasis on the 
assumptions and computational techniques necessary to 
denve statistical estimates, lest hypotheses, and make 
predictions with the use ol single equation models. Includes 
linear and nonlinear regression models, intemal least 
squares, discnminant analysis and laclor analysis. 

AREC 489 Special Topics in Agricultural and Re- 
sources Economics (3) Repeatable lo 9 credits 

ARHU— Arts and Humanities 

ARHU 308 Critical Eras: An Interdisciplinary View (3) 

Repeatable to 6 credits il content differs. An interdiscipli- 
nary exploration of a critical penod. ranging Irom a year 
to an era. stressing the relationship between different 
forms ot human expression and the social milieu. 

ARHU 309 Forms and Forces of Human Experience: 
An Interdisciplinary Exploration (3) Prerequisite one 
course in at least one ol the departments participating in 
the particular section. Repeatable to 6 credits if content 
dilfers. An interdisciplinary analysis ol a particular social 
or cultural topic, attitude, or concern. 

ARSC — Air Science 

ARSC 100 Ttie Air Force Today I (1) One hour of lecture 
and one hour ol laboratory per week. Study of U.S. Air 
Force in contemporary society. Survey of Air Force doc- 
tnne, mission, organization and systems. Freshman course 
for AFROTC Cadets. Open to all university students. 

ARSC 101 The Air Force Today II (1) Continuation of 
ARSC 100 The mission, organization and systems of 
U.S. Air Force offensive, defensive, and aerospace 
support forces and the use of these forces to support 
contemporary societal demands. Freshman year course 
for AFROTC cadets. Open to all university students. 

ARSC 1 10 Fundamentals of Flying (1 ) A study of basic 
aviation knowledge for the beginning student pilot. The 
basic pnnciples of flight; simple aerodynamics, a de- 
scnption of aircraft systems and flight instruments, basic 
meteorology, the use of the flight computer for simple 
flight computations and visual flight operations (VFR). 

ARSC 200 The Development of Air Power I (1 ) Devel- 
opment of air power from balloons and dirigibles through 
employment in World War I and II. Chronological ap- 
proach to growth of air power in response to civil and 
military requirements. Sophomore year course for 
AFROTC cadets. Open to all university students. 

ARSC 201 The Development of Air Power II (1) One 

hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. 
Growth and development of air power and aerospace 
support forces from 1 945 in response to Korea, the Cold 
War. Southeast Asia, and the Space Age. The peaceful 
employment of aerospace forces for relief and civic 
action program. Sophomore year course tor AFROTC 
cadets. Open to all university students. 

ARSC 205 The U.S. Air Force and Air Power (4) Open 
only to applicants selected by AFROTC to compete for 
entrance into the two-year AFROTC program as a contract 
cadet. Six week field training session held dunng summer 
months at designated Air Force bases. Successful comple- 
tion IS a pre-requisite for acceptance into the two year 
AFROTC program. Course content consists of a combina- 
tion of academics, physical training and leadership labora- 
tory experiences approximating those fouryear cadets gain 
in ARSC 100/101 and ARSC 200/201. 

ARSC 31 Management and Leadership I (3) Study of 
management functions, techniques and skills. Empha- 
sis on application of same in laboratory environment 
structured to approximate a contemporary military or 
bureaucratic organization. Junior year course for 
AFROTC cadets. Open to all university students. 



ARSC 311 Msnagemant and Leadarship II (3) Con- 
tinuation in study and application of management and 
leadership skills to a contemporary military environ- 
ment Emphasis on leadership, the uhilorm code ol 
military justice and current issues for the military man- 
ager and leaders Junior year course for AFROTC 
cadets Open to all university students 

ARSC 320 National Security Forces In Contennpo- 
rary American Society I (3) The role of the military 
profession in contemporary American society; its re- 
sponsibilities to society and its impact on society. The 
delinilion. development and alteration of defense policy 
m supporiing national objeaives Senior year course lor 
AFROTC cadets. Open to all university students. 

ARSC 321 National Security Forces in Contemporary 
American Society II (3) A continuation ol the study on the 
formulation, development and alteration ot strategy and ot 
the laclors in the modern world which necessitate tfie 
continuous reassessment ol Amencan delense policy 
Investigation ol the interplay of vanous governmental agen- 
cies in the formulation ol Amencan defense policy. Senior 
year AFROTC course. Open to all university students. 

ARTH — All History and Archaeology 

ARTH 100 Introduction to Art (3) No credit toward the 
ma|or can be received lor this course. Ma|or approaches 
to understanding the visual arts, and includes analysis 
of techniques, subject matter, and form. Painting, sculp- 
ture, architecture, and the graphic arts 

ARTH 200 Art of the Western Worid I (3) Formerly 

ARTH 260. Painting, sculpture, and architecture from 
prehistoric times to the Renaissance, 

ARTH 201 Art ot the Western Worid II (3) Formeriy 
ARTH 261 Painting, sculpture, and architecture from 
the Renaissance to the present. 

ARTH 275 Art of Africa (3) Formerly ARTH 284. Appre- 
ciation of the art of African cultures. A survey of Afncan 
culture through painting, sculpture, and architecture 
from prehistoric times lo the preserit. 

ARTH 290 Art of Asia (3) Formerly ARTH 262 South 
and East Asian art from prehistory through the 
mid-nineteenth century. 

ARTH 355 Twentieth-Century Art (3) No credit toward 
the major can be received for this course. Survey of 
major trends in painting and sculpture, in Europe and 
Amenca. from approximately 1900 to the present. 

ARTH 378 Special Topics for Honors Students (3) 

Prerequisites; admission to art history honors and per- 
mission ot department. For ARTH majors only. Repeat- 
able to 6 credits. Writing of a research paper. With an 
instructor's permission work may be done in conjunction 
with a graduate colloquium or seminar. 

ARTH 379 Honors Thesis (3-6) Prerequisites: admis- 
sion to art history honors and permission of department. 
For ARTH majors only. Repeatable to 6 credits. Re- 
search and writing of an honors thesis under the super- 
vision of a faculty advisor. 

ARTH 380 Masterpieces of Painting (3) No credit 
toward the major can be received for this course. For- 
merly ARTH 320. Selected masterwort<s of painting, 
revealing the creative process, artistic personality, and 
cultural context of these works. 

ARTH 381 Masterpieces of Sculpture (3) No credit 

toward the major can be received for this course. For- 
merly ARTH 330. Selected mastenA/orks of sculpture, 
revealing the creative process, artistic personality, and 
cultural context ol these worths. 

ARTH 382 Masterpieces of ArchKecture (3) No credit 
toward the major can be received for this course. For- 
merly ARTH 340. Selected masterworks of architecture, 
revealing the creative process, artistic personality, and 
cultural context of these works. 

ARTH 390 Art of China (3) Formerly ARTH 406. A 
chronological survey of Chinese painting, sculpture. 
and the applied arts. 

ARTH 395 Art of Japan (3) Formerly ARTH 407. A 
chronotogical survey of Japanese painting, sculpture, 
architecture, and the applied arts. 



142 ARH — Art Studio 



ARTH 400 Egyptian Art and Archaeology (3) For- 
merly ARTH 404. Sites and monuments o( painting, 
sculpture, arctiitecture, and the minor arts of ancient 
Egypt from earliest times ttirough ttie Roman conquest 
Emphasis on the pharaonic period 

ARTH 401 Aegean Art and Archaeology (3) Formerly 
ARTH 404 Sites and monuments of painting, sculpture, 
architecture, and the minor arts of Crete, the Cycladic 
islands, and the Greek mainland from the earliest times 
to the downfall of the tulycenaean empire. 

ARTH 402 Greek Art and Archaeology (3) Sites 

and monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, 
and the minor arts from the Geometric through the 
Hellenistic period with emphasis on mainland Greece 
in the Archaic and Classical periods. 

ARTH 403 Roman Art and Archaeology (3) Sites and 
monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the 
minor arts from the earliest times through the third 
century A.D with emphasis on the Italian peninsula from 
the Etruscan penod through that of Impenal Rome. 

ARTH 405 Late Roman and Early Christian Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 410. Painting, sculpture, architecture, 
and the minor arts from the early third century through 
the sixth century A.D 

ARTH 406 Byzantine Art (3) Formerly ARTH 411 
Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the minor arts from 
the seventh century to 1453 AD. 

ARTH 410 Early Medieval Art (3) Formerly ARTH 412 
Painting, sculpture and architecture in Western Europe. 
ca. 500-1150. 

ARTH411 Gothic Art (3)FormerlyARTH413. Painting. 
sculpture and architecture in Western Europe, ca. 
1150-1400 

ARTH 415 Italian Renaissance Art (3) Formerly ARTH 
424. Painting, sculpture and architecture of the fifteenth 
and sixteenth centuries. 

ARTH 418 Special Problems in Italian Renais- 
sance Art (3) Repeatable to 6 credits if content 
differs. Focus upon Aspects of painting, sculpture, 
and architecture of Renaissance. 

ARTH 420 Fourteenth and Fifteenth-Century North- 
ern European Art (3) Formerly ARTH 416. The art of 
northern Europe with an emphasis on painting in the 
Netherlands and France 

ARTH 425 Sixteenth-Century Northern European 
Painting (3) Formerly ARTH 417. Painting in France. 
Germany. England, and the Low Countries during the 
Renaissance and Reformation. 

ARTH 426 Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture in 
Northern Europe (3) Sculpture in France, Germany. 
England, and the Low Countnes from the fourteenth to 
the seventeenth century 

ARTH 430 Seventeenth-Century European Art (3) 

Painting, sculpture and architecture concentrating on 
Italy. Spam. France, and England. 

ARTH 435 Seventeenth-Century Art in the Nether- 
lands (3) Formerly ARTH 431 . Painting, sculpture and 
architecture in seventeenth-century Netherlands. 

ARTH 443 Eighteenth-Century European Art (3) From 

the Rococo to Neo-classicism. ma|or developments in 
painting, architecture, sculpture, and the landscape 
garden in eighteenth-century France, England. Italy, 
Spain, and Germany. 

ARTH 444 British Painting, Hogarth to the 
Pre-Raphaelites (3) A survey of Bntish painting focus- 
ing on the establishment of a strong native school m the 
genres of history painting, narrative subjects, portrai 
ture. sporting art. and landscape 

ARTH 445 Nineteenth-Century European Art to 1850 

(3) Formerly ARTH 440 The major trends from 
Neo-Classicism to Romanticism in painting, sculpture 
and architecture in Europe 

ARTH 446 Nineteenth-Century European Art (rom 
1850 (3) Formerly ARTH 441 The major trends from 
Realism through Impressionism to Symbolism and Art 
Nouveau. in painting, sculpture, and architecture. 



ARTH 453 History ol American Art to 1876 (3) Paint 
ing, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts in North 
America from the colonial period to 1876 

ARTH 454 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Sculp- 
ture (3) Trends in sculpture from Neo-Classicism to the 
present. 

ARTH 455 Twrentleth-Century Art to 1 945 (3) Formerly 
ARTH 450. Painting, sculpture and architecture in Eu- 
rope and America from the late nineteenth century to the 
end of World War II 

ARTH 456 Twentieth-Century Art from 1945 (3) For 

merly ARTH 451 . Painting, sculpture and architecture in 
Europe and America from 1945 to the present. 

ARTH 457 History of Photography (3) Formerly ARTH 
452 History of photography as ad from its inception in 
1839 to the present 

ARTH 460 American Art Since 1876 (3) Formerly 
ARTH 477. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the 
decorative arts in North America after 1876. 

ARTH 462 Twentieth-Century Black American Art (3) 

Formerly ARTH 474 The visual arts of Black Amencans in 
the twentieth century, including crafis and decoraDve arts. 

ARTH 466 Feminist Perspectives on Women in Art 

(3) Principal locus on European and American women 
artists of the 1 9th and 20th centunes. in the context of the 
new scholarship on women. 

ARTH 470 Latin American Art and Archaeology 
before 1500 (3) Pre-Hispanic painting, sculpture, and 
architecture, with a focus on the major archaeological 
monuments of f^exico. 

ARTH 471 Latin American Art and Archaeology after 
1500 (3) The effect of mingling European visual ideas 
with pre-Hispanic traditions. The formation of Latin 
Amencan colonial art. How native American people 
transformed European ideas and forms. 

ARTH 475 Ancient Art of Africa (3) Formerly ARTH 
462. An of the Afncan continent from rock an through the 
nineteenth century. The cultural meaning ol painting, 
sculpture, architecture, and artifacts from major archeo- 
logical sites. 

ARTH 476 Living An of Africa (3) Formerly ARTH 463 
Art styles among the segmentary, centralized and no- 
madic people of Africa. The iconography and function of 
their art and its relationship to their vanous societies, 
cults and ceremonies. 

ARTH 483 Structure and Analysis of Art (3) Basic 
concepts of structuralism applied to the analysis of art. 
Visual examples, including photography . cartoons, paint- 
ing, and sculpture, emphasize the underlying logic of 
narrative themes in Western art ranging from the time of 
Giotto to the present. 

ARTH 489 Special Topics In Art History (3) Prerequi- 
site: permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits. 

ARTH 490 Chinese Painting (3) Chinese painting history 
from the second century B.C. through the twentieth cen- 
tury, covenng cultural, stylistic and theoretical aspects 

ARTH 495 Japanese Painting (3) Formerly ARTH 405 
Japanese painting from the sixth through the nineteenth 
century, including Buddhist icon painting, narrative scrolls, 
and Zen-related ink painting 

ARTH 498 Directed Studies in Art History I (2-3) 
Prerequisite; permission of department Repeatable if 
content differs. Junior standing 

ARTH 499 Directed Studies In Art History II (2-3) 

ARTT— Art Studio 

ARTT 100 Elements of Two-Olmenslonal Form and 
Space (3) Two hours of lecture and two hours ol labora- 
tory per week Formerly ARTS 100 Pnnciples and 
elements of pictonal space examined through the ma- 
nipulation and organization of vanous matenals 

ARTT 110 Elements of Drawing I (3) Six hours of 
latxjratory per week Formerly ARTS 1 10 Media and 
related techniques to depict slill-lite. figure and nature 



ARTT 1 50 Introduction to Art Theory (3) Examination 
of contemporary an. review of global, philosophic and 
critical positions by the examination of worVs of art 

ARTT 200 Elements of Three-Dlmenslonal Form and 

Space (3) Two hours of lecture and two hours of latxxatory 
per week Prerequisite ARTT 100 Formerly ARTS 200 
Three-dimensional form and space examined through the 
manipulation and organization of vanous materials 

ARTT 208 Intermediate Special Topics In Art (3) Six 

hours of laljoratory per week Prerequisites: ARTT 110; 
and ARTT 200 Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs 
Formerly ARTS 208 Development of student s wor1< on 
an intermediate studio level within the context of a 
special topic 

ARTT 210 Elements ol Drawing II (3) Six hours ol 
laboratory per week Prerequisite ARTT 110 Formerly 
ARTS 210 Continuation of ARTT 110 with addUional 
emphasis on pictonal space 

ARTT 215 Anatomical Drawing (3) Six hours of latM- 
ratory per week Prerequisite: ARTT 210 or permission 
of department Formerly ARTS 215 A drawing course 
based on the study of anatomical structure emphasizing 
the human body. 

ARTT 277 Architectural Presentation (3) Six hours ol 
laboratory per week Prerequisites: ARTT 100; and 
ARTT 1 10 Formerly ARTS 277 Techniques of wash 
and watercolor in architectural, intenor and landscape 
architectural rendenng. 

ARTT 320 Elements ol Painting (3) Six hours ol 
laboratory per week Prerequisite ARTT 210 Formerly 
ARTS 320. Basic tools and language of painting. Oil and/ 
or water-based paints 

ARTT 330 Elements ol Sculpture: Metal Casting (3) Six 

hours of laboratory per week Prerequisites ARTT 200; 
and ARTT 210 Formerly ARTS 330 Basic sculptural 
techniques and processes related to metal casting. 

ARTT 331 Elements ol Sculpture: Steel (3) Six hours o) 
laboratory per week Prerequisites: ARTT 200. and ARTT 
210 Basic techniques relateo to steel fatxicated sculpture; 
torch cutting and weWing. arc welding, hot forging. 

ARTT 332 Elements of Sculpture: Stone (3) Sx hours of 
laboratory per week Prerequisites ARTT 200; and ARTT 
210 Formerly ARTT 335 Basic sculptural techniques and 
processes using stone and related matenals 

ARTT 333 Elements ol Sculpture: Wood and Mxed 
Media (3) Six hours of latxiratory per week Prerequisites: 
ARTT200;andARTT2lO Basicsculpturaltechniquesand 
processes using wood and mixed media 

ARTT 334 Elements ol Sculpture: Construction 

(3) Six hours of laboratory per week Prerequisite 
ARTT 210 Formerly ARTS 334 Basic techniques 
and processes related to metals, plas