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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduatecat1969indi 



^rndlana bulletin 

INDIANA 
UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

UNDERGRADUATE ISSUE 




.0.30.J 
-1*170 



INDIANA, PENNSYLVANIA 

1969-1970 



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RHODES R. STABLEY LIBRAI 

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-I 1 




INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



BULLETIN 



VOLUME 75 



FEBRUARY 1969 



Number 1 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 
INDIANA, PENNSYLVANIA 

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 

1969 - 1970 




THIS UNIVERSITY IS ACCREDITED BY THE NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR 

ACCREDITATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION, THE MIDDLE STATES 

ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND THE 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN. 






INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



tl 



COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

DAVID H. KURTZMAN, Superintendent of Public Instruction 

COUNCIL ON HIGHER EDUCATION 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

WILLIAM H. REA Pittsburgh 

KATHARINE E. McBRIDE Bryn Mawr 

OTIS C. McCREERY Bridgeville 

GAIL L. ROSE .Renfrew 

JAMES H. ROWLAND Harrisburg 

LEONARD N. WOLF Scranton 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

JOHN E. DAVIS, President Indiana 

ARTHUR P. MILLER, Treasurer New Kensington 

SAM R. LIGHT Punxsutawney 

JOHN B. CUTLER Mercer 

A. R. PECHAN, Vice President Ford City 

MARY ALICE ST. CLAIR, Secretary Indiana 

JOSEPH W. SERENE Indiana 

EDWIN L SNYDER Punxsutawney 

JAMES M. WYANT Kittanning 



INDIANA UNIVKKS1TY OK PENNSYLVANIA 



THE INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 
CALENDAR 

1969 — 1970 

THE SUMMER SESSIONS 

Pre Session — 1969 

Registration and Beginning of Classes June 9 

Session Ends June 27 

Main Session — 1969 

Registration June 30 

Classes Begin ' July 1 

Session Ends August 8 

Post Session — 1969 

Registration and Beginning of Classes August 11 

Summer Commencement August 24 

Session Ends August 29 

FIRST SEMESTER— 1969 

Orientation of Freshmen Friday, Saturday, 

(Details will be mailed) Monday, Tuesday, September 5-9 

Faculty Workshop Saturday, September 6 

Classes Begin with First Period Wednesday, September 10 

Thanksgiving Recess Begins at the Close of Classes Tuesday, November 26 

Thanksgiving Recess Ends at 8 :00 A.M Tuesday, December 2 

Christmas Recess Begins at the Close of Classes Saturday, December 20 

Christmas Recess Ends at 8 :00 A.M Saturday, January 3 

Commencement Sunday, January 11 

First Semester Ends at the Close of Final Examinations Saturday, January 17 

Last Meeting of Saturday Campus Classes Saturday, January 17 

SECOND SEMESTER — 1970 

Classes Begin at 8 :00 A.M Monday, January 26 

Spring-Easter Recess Begins at the Close of Classes Wednesday, March 25 

Spring-Easter Recess Ends at 8 :00 A.M Thursday, April 2 

Second Semester Ends at the Close of Final Examinations Thursday, May 21 

Alumni Day Saturday, May 23 

Commencement Sunday, May 24 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION 
OF THE UNIVERSITY 

WILLIAM HASSLER President 

BERNARD GANLEY Administrative Assistant 

RALPH W. CORDIER Dean of Faculty and Academic Affairs 

GEORGE A. W. STOUFFER, JR Dean, School of Education 

A. DALE ALLEN Assistant Dean, School of Education 

FRANCIS G. McGOVERN Dean, School of Arts & Sciences 

ALBERT E. DRUMHELLER Dean, School of Business 

HAROLD S. ORENDORFF Dean, School of Fine Arts 

ELLA C. BENDIX Dean, School of Home Economics 

JOHN CHELLMAN Dean, School of Health Services 

I. LEONARD STRIGHT Dean, Graduate School 

WILLIAM W. BETTS Assistant Dean, Graduate School 

ISADORE LENGLET Director of University Development 

SAMUEL F. FURGIUELE Director of Public Relations 

ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON Dean, School of Continuing Education 

S. TREVOR HADLEY Dean of Students 

JAMES LAUGHLIN Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Admissions 

WILLIAM R. SHANE Assistant Director of Admissions 

CLEO McCRACKEN Dean of Women 

F. LEE PATTESON Assistant Dean of Women 

PATRICIA L. YOUNG Assistant Dean of Women 

ELWOOD B. SHEEDER Dean of Men 

JOHN E. FRANK Assistant Dean of Men, Veterans' Counselor 

OWEN DOUGHERTY Assistant Dean of Men 

WILLIAM E. LAFRANCHI Librarian 

HAROLD C. McCORMICK Business Manager 

ROBERT O. WARREN Registrar 

C. DONALD SEAGREN Associate Registrar 

GEORGE W. MURDOCK Director of Financial Aids 

ROBERT L. WOODARD Director of Institutional Research 

LAWRENCE D. BERGMAN Executive Director, University Foundation 

WAYNE C. HAYWARD Director of Cultural Affairs 

LOIS BLAIR Director of Laboratory Experiences 

SAMUEL HOENSTINE Director of Placement 

CHRISTOPHER KNOWLTON Manager, Student Co-op Association 

GEORGE T. WILEY Director of Graduate Research 

J. ROBERT MURRAY Director, Learning Resource Center 

ROBERT L. MORRIS Director, Center for International Studies 

ALVIN J. STUART Director of University School 

GEORGE R. DINSMORE Assistant Director of Admissions 

CHARLES L. KLAUSING Director of Athletics 



CHAIRMAN OF DEPARTMENTS 

LAWRENCE F. McVITTY Art 

JAMES STONER Business and Distributive Education 

GEORGE SPINELLI Counseling & Guidance 

CHARLES COOPER Business Management 

NORMAN SARGENT Learning Resources & Mass Media 

DONALD WALKER Chairman, Economics 

ANTHONY A. ANGELONI Educational Psychology 

CRAIG G. SWAUGER Psychology 

RICHARD D. MAGEE Psychology 

P. DAVID LOTT Elementary 

CHARLES W. FAUST Foreign Languages 

THOMAS G. GAULT Geography 

C. ELIZABETH McCAULIFF Physical Education for Women 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



JOHNNY J. MILLER Physical Education for Men 

ARTHUR G. SHIELDS Acting Chairman, Allied Health Professions 

CLYDE G. GELBACH History 

MARY W. ARMSTRONG Home Economics Education 

ELISABETH A. SCHMIDT Institutional Food Service 

HAROLD J. YOUCIS Foundations of Education 

HARRY MORE Criminology 

MELVIN R. WOODARD Mathematics 

WILLIAM S. WILEY, JR Military Science 

HUGH JOHNSON Music 

ROBERT M. HERMANN Philosophy 

MARIAN A. MURRAY Nursing 

RICHARD F. HEIGES Political Science 

MORTON MORRIS Special Education 

FRANCIS W. LIEGEY Biology 

PAUL R. WUNZ Chemistry 

RICHARD E. BERRY Physics 

RALPH R. IRELAND Sociology — Anthropology 

DIRECTORS OF SPECIAL CLINICS 

MARION M. GEISEL Psychological Clinic 

MAUDE BRUNGARD Speech and Hearing Clinic 

DOROTHY M. SNYDER Reading Clinic 

DIVISIONAL COORDINATORS 

JAMES R. GREEN Humanities 

RAYMOND LEE Social Sciences 

DWIGHT SOLLBERGER Natural Sciences 

OPERATIONAL COMMITTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The following committees are concerned primarily with the day to day operations of 
the University: 

Administrative Council William W. Hassler 

Council on Academic Affairs Ralph W. Cordier 

Alumni Association Arthur Nicholson 

Athletic Charles Klausing 

Policy Committee William W. Hassler 

Elementary Education P. D. Lott 

Faculty Council George K. Seacrist 

Library and Instructional Matters William Lafranchi 

Professional Standards George A. W. Stouffer 

ROTC Selection William S. Wiley 

Student Cooperative Association Christopher Knowlton 

Student Personnel S. Trevor Hadley 

UNIVERSITY SENATE 

In the fall of 19GG a University Senate was organized. This senate is comprised of all 
faculty members with the rank of Associate and Professor. The chairman of the senate is 
William W. Hassler, President of the University. Maurice L. Rider is Vice-Chairman and 
John A. Polesky, Secretary of the Senate. The committees of the senate are as follows: 

Steering Committee I. L. Stright 

Curriculum Committee Robert Morris 

Academic Standards Committee Ralph W. Cordier 

Committee on Faculty Tenure, Promotion and Academic Freedom Ralph W. Cordier 

Graduate Council I. L. Stright 

Committee on Research Charles D. Leach 

Committee on Student Affairs and Athletics S. Trevor Hadley 

Committee on University Development Charles D. Leach 

Committee on Faculty Affairs George K. Seacrist 

Committee on Continuing and Nonresident Education Arthur F, Nicholson 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



THE FACULTY 

WILLIAM W. HASSLER President 

B.S., Juniata College ; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

ROBERT K. ALICO Biology 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., St. Bonaventure University, New York 

A. DALE ALLEN Assistant Dean. School of Education 

A.B., DePauw University; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana University, Indiana 

EDWARD L. ANDERSON English 

B.A., M.A., University of Michigan: Ph.D., New York University 

LOIS V. ANDERSON Elementary Education 

B.S. in Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; A.B., Muskingham, M.Ed., Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh 

MAMIE L. ANDERZHON Geography 

Ph.B., M.S., University of Chicago 

JOSEPH S. ANGELO Mathematics 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

ANTHONY A. ANGELONI Chairman, Department of Educational Psychology 

B.Ed., Duquesne University; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; D.Ed., Pennsylvania 
State University 

IDA Z. ARMS Mathematics 

B.S. in Ed., Shippensburg State College; M.S., University of Illinois; M.Ed., Duke 
University 

DAWN AUL Home Economics 

B.S., Seton Hall College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

MARY W. ARMSTRONG Chairman, Home Economics 

B.S., Rutgers University, New Jersey; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York 

EDWIN W. BAILEY Mathematics 

B.S., Albright College; M.A., Columbia University 

FRANK T. BAKER Biology 

B.S., Allegheny College ; M.A., Trenton State College 

RONALD L. BAKER Elementary Education 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

DONALD J. BALLAS Geography 

B.S. in Ed., Clarion State College; M.A.. University of Pittsburgh 

BARBARA J. BALSIGER Art 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.A., State University of Iowa 

JOHN P. BARRADOS Economics 

B.Comm., M.A., McGill University, Montreal ; Ph.D., Columbia University, New York 

DENNIS BARTHA Elementary Education 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

FRANK J. BASILE Geography 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

LEE ROY H. BEAUMONT, JR. Business 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

MARGARET L. BECK English 

A.B., Goucher College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



WILLIAM R. BECKER Music 

B.A.. M.A., State College of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa 

PATRICIA ANN BELL Home Economics 

B.S.. Buffalo State University; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

ELLA C. BENDIX Dean, School of Home Economics 

B.S., University of Tennessee ; M.A.. Teachers College, Columbia University ; Ph.D. 
Cornell University 

HERBERT A. BENTON Sociology-Anthropology 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

LAWRENCE BERGMAN Learning Resources 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

ANTHONY S. BERNARDI Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Geneva College 

ROBERT BERNAT Music 

B.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.F.A., Brandeis University 

RICHARD E. BERRY Chairman, Department of Physics 

B.S., Lafayette; M.S., Ph.D., Princeton 

WILLIAM W. BETTS, JR. Assistant Dean of Graduate School 

A.B., Dickinson College; A.M., Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

EDWARD W. BIEGHLER Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., University of Oregon ; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

MARGARET BIEGHLER Foreign Language 

B.A., University of Oregon 

WILLIAM A. BLACKSMITH Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

LOIS C. BLAIR Professional Laboratory Experiences 

B.A., Grove City College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University ; LL.D., Grove City College 

LOIS A. BLEDSOE Assistant Dean of Women 

A.B., M.S., Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 

CARL W. BORDAS Chemistry 

B.S., M.Ed., D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

NELSON H. BORMANN Special Education 

B.S., Southwest Texas State College ; M.A., Western Michigan University 

DAVID T. BORST Music 

B.S., Fredonia State Teachers College; M.Ed., University of Buffalo 

ELEANOR J. BOYER English 

B.S., Clarion State College 

WALLIS D. BRAMAN Music 

B.S.M., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.M., Ph.D., University of Rochester 

JESSIE BRIGHT English 

B.A., M.A., University of Rochester 

LORRIE J. BRIGHT English 

A.B., Kenyon College; M.A., University of Rochester 

KENNETH W. BRODE Foreign Languages 

A.B., M.A., Kent State University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



EDWARD N. BROWN Chemistry 

B.S., Westminster College ; M.A., Oberlin College 

MORRISON BROWN English 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Pennsyl- 
vania 

MAUDE O. BRUNGARD Special Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.Ed., Ed.D.. Pennsylvania State University 

GARY L. BUCKWALTER Physics 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University ; M.S., Ph.D., Catholic University of America 

ROBERT W. BURGGRAF Music 

B.S., Columbia University; A.M., University of Kentucky 

MARGARET O. CALDWELL English 

A.B., Grove City College; M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

CATHERINE C. CARL Music 

Mus.B., Oberlin Conservatory ; A.M., Indiana University 

FRANCIS V. CAMPI Military 

B.S., LaSalle College 

THOMAS CAMPISANO Health and Physical Education 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

PATRICK A. CARONE Political Science 

B.S., M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., Duke University 

BRUCE D. CARTWRIGHT Education-Psychology 

A.B., Waynesburg College; A.M., West Virginia University 

JAMES F. CAWLEY Business 

B.S., St. Vincent College; MBA, Duquesne University; OP. A. 

VINCE CELTNIEKS Health and Physical Education 

B.A., American University ; M.S., University of Montana 

CHRISTINA A. CHA Music 

B.A., Ewha University, Seoul, Korea; B.M., Illinois Wesleyan University, Blooming- 
ton; M.S.M., Union Theological Seminary, New York 

RICHARD R. CHAMBERLIN Library 

B.A., Northeastern University ; M.A., Michigan State University ; M.A., University of 
Denver 

WILLIAM D. CHAPMAN Special Education 

B.S., M.S., West Virginia University 

MICHAEL R. CHARNEGO Biology 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

FRED W. CHASE Health and Physical Education 

B.A., Purdue University 

JOHN CHELLMAN Dean, School of Health Services 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh; Ed.D., George 
Peabody College for Teachers 

NICHOLAS CHRISTODOLEAUS Chemistry 

B.S., Athens University, Greece; Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

DON-CHEAN CHU Foundations of Education 

A.B., National Central University, China; Ed.M., University of Maryland; Ed.D., 
Columbia University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SHOW CHIH RAI CHU Foreign Languages 

B.A., National Central University, China ; M.A., Bob Jones University 

VAUGHN H. CLAY, JR. Art 

B.A., Westminster; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

ROBERT COATES Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

STANLEY COHEN Criminology 

B.A., University of Cincinnati ; J.D., Chase College of Law 

EDWARD G. COLEMAN Chemistry 

B.S., Wisconsin State College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Carnegie Institute 
of Technology 

CAROLYN J. COMPTON English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

GLORIA T. CONWAY Home Economics 

B.S., Syracuse University 

THOMAS E. CONWAY Biology 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.ScT., Union College 

DAVID M. COOK English 

B.A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

CHARLES L. COOPER Chairman, Department of Business 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ed.M.. Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

EDITH M. CORD Foreign Languages 

Baccalaureat, Toulouse, France ; Iicence-es-Lettres, University of Toulouse 

STEVEN CORD History 

B.B.A., City College of New York ; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity 

RALPH W. CORDIER Dean of Academic Affairs and Faculty 

A.B., Manchester College; A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

JOSEPH J. COSTA Chemistry 

B.A., St. Vincent College ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

HARRY CRAIG English 

B.A., Geneva College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

WILLA RUTH CRAMER Home Economics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

ROBERT J. CRONAUER Art 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Columbia University 

BLAINE C. CROOKS Mathematics 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.M., Harvard 

CHARLES L. CUNIS Military 

B.A., Boston College 

ROBERT J. CUREY English 

B.A., Hillsdale College ; M.A., University of Michigan 

WILLIAM E. CUTLER Education-Psychology 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

CHARLES A. DAVIS Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., New York University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



CLARABEL T. DAVIS University School 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.A., New York University 

JOHN A. DAVIS English 

B.A., Lehigh University ; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

RICHARD S. DAVIS Philosophy 

A.B., Yale University ; M.A., Washington University 

WAYNE J. DAVIS Economics 

A.B., Dickinson College 

LEONARD B. DEFABO Educational Psychology 

A.B., St. Mary Seminary and University; M.Ed., Duquesne University 

CAROLYN I. DEISHER Mathematics 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

GUS DiANTONIO Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

DANIEL DICICCO Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.M., University of Michigan 

ALICE D. DICKIE Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College 

GEORGE R. DINSMORE Admissions Counselor 

B.S., A.M., University of Illinois 

ROBERT H. DOERR Business 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

THOMAS J. DONGILLA Art 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

ALBERTA R. DORSEY Elementary Education 

B.S.. California State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

OWEN J. DOUGHERTY Housing Director 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

ROBERT D. DOUGLASS Business 

B.A., Lafayette College; L.L.B., Harvard Law School 

JOHN J. DROPCHO Art 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

ALBERT E. DRUMHELLER Dean, School of Business 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

DONALD D. DUNCAN Mathematics 

B.S., Slippery Rock College; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Pennsylvania 
State University 

GLADYS DUNKELBERGER Music 

B.M., Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas; Mus.M., Northwestern University 

JERRY K. EDDY Physics 

B.A., West Liberty State College; M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia University 

KENNETH F. EDGAR Education-Psychology 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

DONALD G. EISEN English 

A.B., Adelbert College, Western Reserve; M.A., Western Reserve University 

ANN T. ELLIOTT Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Russell Sage College; B.A., Berea College; M.A., New York University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 11 



MARY LOUISE ELTZ Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed.. East Stroudsburg State College 

ROBERT W. ENSLEY English 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A.M., Columbia University 

CHARLES W. FAUST Chairman. Department of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Indiana State Teachers College, Terre Haute; M.A., Middlebury College 

GENE A. FELIX Speech and Hearing 

B.A., St. Francis College ; M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

GARY M. FERRENCE Biology 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.A.T., Ed.D., Indiana University, Bloomington 

NANCY C. FINCKE Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

FERNAND FISEL Foreign Languages 

B.A., Atlantic Union College; M.A., Andrews University 

JOSEPH P. FLAMM English 

B.S., Rider College; M.S., M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

MARSHALL G. FLAMM Speech and Hearing Clinic-Special Education 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Temple University 

MARY ANN T. FLANGO Home Economics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

LIDA T. FLEMING University School 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ed.M., Pennsylvania State University 

PAUL P. FOLEY Military 

B.A., University of Massachusetts 

WILLIAM M. FORCE English 

A.B., M.A., Colgate University 

OLIVE M. FORNEAR Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.M., West Virginia University 

JOHN E. FRANK Assistant Dean of Men 

B.S.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.S.Ed., Westminster College 

ERNEST B. FRICKE History 

A.B., Muhlenburg College; M. A., Lehigh University 

WERNER J. FRIES Foreign Languages 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

DONALD P. FRITZ, JR. English 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

EDWIN J. FRY Music 

B.M., M.M., DePaul University, Chicago 

GEORGIE ANN FUNK English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

SAMUEL F. FURGIUELE Director, Public Relations 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 

WALTER W. GALLATI Biology 

A.B., Drew University; M.S., University of Miami (Fla.) ; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity 

BERNARD JAMES GANLEY Assistant to the President 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



THOMAS G. GAULT Chairman, Department of Geography 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State College; M.A., Ed.D., George Peabody College (Nash- 
ville) 

MARION M. GEISEL Director, Psychological Clinic 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

CLYDE C. GELBACH Chairman, Department of History 

A.B., M.Litt., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

TERENCE A. GERACE Psychology 

B.A., M.Ed., State University of New York; M.A., George Washington University 

VIRGINIA GOULD GERALD Sociology-Anthropology 

B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., University of Arizona 

MEARL F. GERHEIM Foundations of Education 

B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

FRANK GHESSIE, JR. Business 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

ALICE GHRIST University School 

B.A., Lake Erie College; M.A., Columbia University 

RAYMOND D. GIBSON Mathematics 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.S., Westminster College; M.A., University of 
Illinois 

ROBERT B. GINGRICH Military 

B.A., Gettysburg College 

RALPH M. GLOTT Elementary Education 

B.S., California State College ; M.Ed.. University of Pittsburgh 

STANLEY S. GOEHRING Criminology 

B.A., M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

LOUIS L. GOLD Biology 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh ; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

WALTER GOLZ Music 

B.S., Trenton State College ; A.M., Columbia University 

THOMAS D. GOODRICH History 

B.A., University of California, SBC, Santa Barbara ; M.A., Columbia Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University 

DOROTHY W. GOURLEY English 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

WALTER GRANATA Geoscience 

B.S., Hamilton College; M.A., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Wyoming 

BROOKE V. GRANT Sociology-Anthropology 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

JAMES L. GRAY English 

B.A., Abilene Christian College; M.A., University of Texas; A.B.D., Duquesne Uni- 
versity 

WILLIAM F. GRAYBURN English 

A.B., M.A., University of Pittsburgh ; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

JAMES R. GREEN Coordinator of the Humanities Division 

B.S., Lafayette College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., New York University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 



RONALD C. GREEN Political Science 

B.S., State University of N.Y. at Oswego; M.A., State University of N.Y. at Albany 

DANIEL S. GRUBB English 

B.A., Wheaton College, 111.; M.A.T.. Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

CAROLYN R. GRUNDY Library 

B.A., Grove City College; M.S.L.S., University of Illinois 

ANTONIO M. GUARDIOLA Foreign Languages 

Maestro, Escuela Normal de la Habana (Cuba) ; Doctor en Pedagogia, University of 
Habana (Cuba) 

AURORA P. GUARDIOLA Foreign Languages 

Maestro, Escuela Normal de la Habana (Cuba) ; Doctor en Pedagogia, University of 
Habana (Cuba) 

S. TREVOR HADLEY - Dean of Student Personnel 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., D.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

HARRY' WILLIAM HALDEMAN English 

B.S., West Chester State College; M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

ROBERT E. HAMILTON Military 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College 

ROBERT W. HAMILTON Art 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

ARVILLA T. HARROLD Music 

A.B., Colorado College of Education, Greeley, Colorado; M.A., Eastman School of 
Music 

LEO E. HARROLD, JR. Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

RICHARD A. HARTLINE Chemistry 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.S., University of Arizona; Ph.D., University of 
California 

MARLIN E. HARTMAN Mathematics 

B.S., Clarion State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

E. SAMUEL HATFIELD History 

A.B., A.M., West Virginia University 

EDWARD F. HAUCK Learning Resources 

B.S., M.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

JOHN J. HAYS Educational Psychology 

B.A., Geneva College; M.A., Stetson University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

WAYNE HAYWARD English 

B.A., University of Washington ; M.A., Cornell University ; Ph.D., University of 
Birmingham (England) 

RICHARD HAZLEY English 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh ; A.M., Columbia University 

WILLIAM I. HEARD Chemistry 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 

RICHARD F. HEIGES Chairman, Department of Political Science 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

JACKSON W. HEIMER English 

A.B., M.A., University of Kentucky ; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ISABEL T. HELMRICH Educational-Psychology 

B.A., Westminster College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

OLIVER W. HELMRICH Educational-Psychology 

A.B., Lycoming College ; M.A., Bucknell University 

WILLARD W. HENNEMANN. JR. Mathematics 

B.S., Towson State College of Maryland; M.A.T., Ph.D., Cornell University 

ISOLDE A. HENNINGER Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ohio State University 

WILLIAM L. HENRY Criminology 

B.A., Allegheny College, L.L.B., West Virginia College of Law 

WILLIAM J. HENZELMAN Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

ROBERT M. HERMANN Chairman, Department of Philosophy 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

PAUL R. HICKS Library 

A.B., University of South Carolina ; M.A.L.S., George Peabody College for Teachers 

ELSIE M. HILEMAN Business 

B.S., Grove City College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

H. FOSTER HILL Business 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

JOSEPH B. HILL Criminology 

B.A., Duquesne University 

RICHARD C. HITCHCOCK Chemistry 

B.S., M.A., Wesleyan University; Ed.D., New York University 

E. SAMUEL HOENSTINE Director of Placement 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; 
D.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

ROBERT M. HOFMANN Military 

B.S., Seton Hall University 

DONALD E. HOFFMASTER Biology 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., West Virginia 
University 

HARRY G. HOLT Economics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.S., Bucknell University 

JAMES R. HORNER Political Science 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

RICHARD HORNFECK Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., The George Washington University 

HELEN B. HOVIS Home Economics 

B.S., Muskingham College ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

JOHN P. HOYT Mathematics 

B.S., Middlebury College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., George Washington 
University 

JOSEPH J. HRADNANSKY Mathematics 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology ; M.Ed., M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

LEON J. HUE Biology 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 15 



VICTOR HUESEN Foreign Languages 

Licence es lettrcs, St. Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon 

H. EUGENE HULBERT Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ed.M., Pennsylvania State University 

RAYMONA E. HULL English 

A.B., Western Reserve University; A.M., Cornell University; Ed.D., Columbia Uni- 
versity 

LAWRENCE A. IANNI English 

B.S., Clarion State College; M.A., Ph.D., Western Reserve University 

MARY E. IANNI University School 

B.S., Clarion State College ; M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

JAMES M. INNES Art 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Kansas City Art Institute 

DOMINIC J. INTILI Music 

Mus.B., Mus.M., Oberlin Conservatory of Music 

RALPH R. IRELAND Chairman, Department of Sociology-Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

HERBERT EUGENE ISAR Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

DANIEL R. JACOBS Psychology 

A. A., Hagerstown Junior College; A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; M.S., Penn- 
sylvania State University 

GEORGE B. JOHNSON Art 

B.S., M.A., M.F.A., Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 

M. KATHLEEN JONES Home Economics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

JOHN F. KADLUBOWSKI History 

B.A., M.A., University of Maryland 

ARTHUR KANNWISHER Philosophy 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary ; B.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

DAVID KAUFMAN Library 

A.B., M.A., University of Pittsburgh ; M.L.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology 

WILLARD J. KAYLOR Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Wake Forest College; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers 

JOSEPH A. KAZAMEK Elementary Education 

A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

ALMA B. KAZMER Home Economics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

DAVID SHANKLAND KEENE Political Science 

A.B., Bowdoin College; A.M., Ph.D., Princeton University 

ROBERT J. KELLY Military 

B.S., St. Peters College 

VANCE C. KENNEDY Criminology 

B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

BERNICE W. KING Home Economics 

B.S., Central State Teachers College ; M.A., Michigan State College 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ROBERT L. KING Elementary Education 

B.S., Lycoming College; M.S., Bucknell University 

JOHN L. KIPP Philoeophy 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; B.D., Th.D., Princeton Seminary 

CHARLES L. KLAUSING Athletic Director 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

MERLE G. KLINGINSMITH Learning Resources 

B.S., Edinboro State College ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

MAY E. KOHLHEPP Elementary Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; A.M., University of Pittsburgh 

RICHARD W. KOLACZKOWSKI Chemistry 

B.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., Cornell University 

L. JUNE KORAB Health and Physical Education 

B.S., State University of Iowa; M.S., Indiana University, Bloomington 

RUDOLF R. KRAUS Sociology 

A.B.I.T.U.R., Commercial Academy (Austria) ; A.M., University of Chicago 

JACK KUHNS Elementary Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 

GOPAL S. KULKARNI Geography 

B.S., Karnatak College, Dharwar, India; M.S., Banaras Hindu University, India; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

WILLIAM E. LAFRANCHI Library 

B.S., Clarion State College; M.S.L.S., University of Illinois 

FRANK E. LANDIS Foreign Languages 

A.B., M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 

DALE E. LANDON History 

B.A., M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

JAMES W. LAUGHLIN Assistant Dean of Students 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., D.Ed., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity 

ELIZABETH LaVELLE Institutional Food Services 

B.S., University of Rhode Island; M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

CHARLES D. LEACH Educational-Psychology 

B.S., Lycoming College ; M.Ed., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

RAYMOND L. LEE Coordinator, Social Science Division 

A.B., Eastern Michigan University ; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

NEIL B. LEHMAN History 

B.S., Bluffton College; M.S.. Ohio State University 

1SODORE R. LENGLET Director, University Development 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University ; M. A., University of Pittsburgh 

SYLVIA LYNN LENTZ English 

B.A., Goodman Theatre Art Institute of Chicago 

MERLE M. LENTZ English 

B.A., University of Tulsa ; M.A., University of South Dakota 

ARTHUR A. LEONE Foreign Languages 

LL.B., LaSalle Ext. University; B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 17 



EUGENE E. LEPLEY Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

ROBERT M. LETSO Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

MYRON H. LEVENSON Sociology-Anthropology 

B.S., M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

CHARLOTTE A. LEVENTHAL Foreign Languages 

B.A., Miami University; M.A.T.. Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 

WILLIAM J. LEVENTRY Educational-Psychology 

A.B., Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 

FRANCIS W. LIEGEY Chairman, Department of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., St. Bonaventure University 

DOROTHY I. LINGENFELTER . University School 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

YU-CHEN LIU Home Economics 

B.A., Cheeloo University (China) ; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State University 

PATRICIA LOMMOCK Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

WILLIAM F. LONG, SR. Mathematics 

B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., Bucknell University 

STANLEY W. LORE Chairman, Department of Psychology 

B.S., Clarion State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

P. DAVID LOTT Chairman, Department of Elementary Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., D.Ed., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity 

JOANNE P. LOVETTE Art 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ed.M., Pennsylvania State University 

ONEIDA I. LOZADA Foreign Languages 

Bachelor in Letters and Sciences, Instituto Habana, Cuba ; Doctor en Pedagogia, Uni- 
versity of Havana 

MING TAW LU Physics 

B.Engr., Cheng Kung University ; M.S., Tsing Hua University, China 

BEVERLY J. LUCAS Health and Physical Education 

B.S., West Chester State College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

JOHN E. LUCAS Library 

B.S., M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 

VANNIS A. LUCAS Home Economics 

A.B., Bridgewater College; M.S., Virginia Polytechnical Institute 

MICHAEL R. LUCKAS Geography 

B.S., Ph.D., University of London 

DOROTHY F. LUCKER English 

A.B., Ph.D., University of Texas; A.M., Columbia University 

DONALD M. MacISAAC Learning Resources 

A.B., M.S., Syracuse University 

WILLIAM H. MACKANESS Special Education 

B.S., Eastern Oregon College ; M.A., Stanford University, California ; Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of Oregon 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



CHARLES R. MADERER Mathematics 

B.A., Yale University; M.A.T., Brown University 

RICHARD D. MAGEE Chairman, Department of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Temple University 

MARY ALICE MAGRUDER Health and Physical Education 

B.S., University of Colorado; M.S., D.Ed., University of Oregon 

CHARLES MAHAN English 

A.B., Marshall; M.A., University of Kentucky 

DONALD C. MAHAN Business 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

W. DELIGHT MALITSKY Music 

B.A., University of Hawaii ; M.A., Manhattan School of Music 

KATHERYNE MALLINO Library 

B.S., Clarion State College; M.S.L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 

JAMES H. MAPLE Mathematics 

B.S., California State College; M.A., Bowling Green State University 

IRWIN MURRY MARCUS History 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University ; M.A., Ph.D., Lehigh University 

RONALD L. MARKS Chemistry 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.Ed., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

GRACE MARLIN University School 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

LILLIAN G. MARTIN University School 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

JOHN K. MATOLYAK Physics 

B.S., St. Francis College, Loretta, Pennsylvania; M.S., University of Toledo 

DOYLE RICHARD McBRIDE Mathematics 

B.S., Defiance College; M.A.T., Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 

RONALD L. McBRIDE Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Bowling Green State University 

C. ELIZABETH McCAULIFF Chairman, Department of Health and Physical Education 
B.A., State University of Iowa ; M.Ed., D.P.E., Springfield College 

WILLIAM McCAVITT Learning Resources and Mass Media 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.S., Syracuse University 

A. RICHARD McCLURE Business 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

BLANCHE W. McCLUER Psychology 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, Terre Haute, Indiana; M.Ed., Ph.D., Pennsyl- 
vania State University 

DONALD S. McCLURE English 

A.B., Kalamazoo College; M.A., Western Michigan University 

SUSAN H. McCLURE English 

B.A., Michigan State University; M.A., Western Michigan University 

RONALD E. McCOY Mathematics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

CLEO McCRACKEN Dean of Women 

B.S., Utah State University; M.Ed., Syracuse University 



INDIANA UNIVEKSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 



JOHN E. McELHOES Foundations of Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

FRANCIS G. McGOVERN Dean. School of Arts & Sciences 

B.S., Providence College; M.B.A., Boston University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

REGIS A. McKNIGHT Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Columbia University 

PATRICK J. McNAMARA Physics 

B.S., M.S., University of Detroit 

C. DAVID McNAUGHTON Music 

A.B., Dickinson College ; M.A.. Fh.D., New York University 

LAWRENCE F. McVITTY Chairman, Department of Art 

B.S., Edinboro State College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh; D.Ed., Pennsylvania 
State University 

JOHN G. MELLEKY Criminology 

B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

CRUZ MENDIZABAL Foreign Languages 

Licenciado en Filosofia y Letraa, Doctor en Filosofla y Letras, Universidad Javeriana, 
Bogota (Colombia) 

ROBERT E. MERRITT Biology 

B.A., New York State College for Teachers; M.S., Cornell University 

JOHN E. MERRYMAN Foundations of Education 

B.A., M.A., Bob Jones University ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

JANE S. MERVINE History 

B.A., Hood College; M.A., University of Michigan 

JAMES H. MILLER Biology 

A.B., Kansas State College; M.A., Stanford University 

JOHNNY J. MILLER Chairman, Department of Health and Physical Education 

B.A., Elon College; M.Ed., Emory University; Ed.D., George Peabody College for 
Teachers 

LAURABEL H. MILLER English 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

RAYMOND E. MILLER Foundations of Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 

VINCENT P. MILLER, JR. Geography 

A.B., Muskingum College ; A.M., Pennsylvania State University 

WILLIAM V. MILLER, JR. Military 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

GEORGE R. MILTZ Foreign Languages 

A.B., Xavier University; M.A., University of Cincinnati 

EDGAR W. MOORE History 

B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee 

ROBERT N. MOORE Chemistry 

B.S., Clarion State College ; M.S., Bucknell University 

HARRY W. MORE, JR. Chairman, Department of Criminology 

B.A., University of California; M.A., American University, Washington, D.C. 

BERNARD A. MOREAU Business 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



WALLACE F. MORRELL Mathematics 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Clarkson College of Technology 

MORTON MORRIS Chairman, Department of Special Education 

A.B., City University of New York; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., Columbia 
University 

ROBERT L. MORRIS Chairman, International Education 

B.A., Lycoming College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., West Virginia University 

EDWARD R. MOTT Elementary Education 

B.S., Clarion State College ; Ed.M., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

JoANNE MUELLER Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Montana State University 

GEORGE W. MURDOCH Director of Financial Aid 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

J. ROBERT MURRAY Director of Instructional Resources Center 

B.S., Edinboro State College; M.Ed., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

MARIAN A. MURRAY Chairman, Department of Nursing 

B.S., M.Litt. in Nursing, University of Pittsburgh ; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

ANTHONY J. NANIA English 

B.A., Northland College (Wis.) ; M.A., Marquette University 

WILLIAM A. NEAL Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.A.. The George Washington University 

RUSSEL C. NELSON Music 

B.M.E., M.M., Northwestern University ; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

ESKO E. NEWHILL Sociology-Anthropology 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D.. Syracuse University 

ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON Dean, School of Continuing and Non-Resident Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University ; 
Ed.D,. New York University 

RALPH A. NITTINGER Business 

B.S., Syracuse University ; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

JAMES NIX English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

LEOLA HAYES NORBERG Institution Food Services 

B.S., M.S., Temple University 

CARL P. OAKES Mathematics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

JAMES M. OLIVER History 

B.S., University of Arkansas; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri 

GARY JAMES OLMSTEAD Music 

B.S., University of Michigan; M.F.A., Ohio University 

JANE V. OLMSTEAD Music 

B.M., Eastman School of Music ; M.M., University of Michigan 

MARGARET S. OMRCANIN English 

A.B., M.A., University of Kentucky ; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

MILDRED E. OMWAKE Home Economics 

B.S., George Washington University; M.S., Drexel Institute 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 21 



LUDO OP DE BEECK Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., Belgian Ministry of Education 

HAROLD S. ORENDORFF Dean, School of Fine Arts 

A.B., Central Washington State College; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 
University 

DOROTHY ANN PALMER Political Science 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.A., Miami University (Ohio) 

FREDERICK R. PARK Geoscience 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College; M.S., University of Pittsburgh 

ELIZABETH STEWART PARNELL Library 

A.B., Smith College; M.S., School of Library Services, Columbia University 

ROBERT A. PATSIGA - Chemistry 

B.S., Geneva College; Ph.D., State University College of Forestry, Syracuse University 

PATRICIA L. PATTERSON Business 

B.S., Grove City College ; Ed.M., Pennsylvania State University 

F. LEE PATTESON Assistant Dean of Women 

A.B., West Virginia University; M.A., Marshall University 

JAMES EDWARD PAYNE Geography 

A.B., A.M., University of North Carolina 

LAURENCE JOHN PERKINS Music 

B.S., Northern State College, Aberdeen, South Dakota ; M.M., Eastman School of 
Music 

DANIEL PERLONGO Music 

B.M., M.M., University of Michigan 

EVERETT J. PESCI Counseling and Guidance 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., West Virginia University 

JOSEPH ALEXANDER PETERS Mathematics 

B.S., St. Joseph's College; M.S., University of Illinois 

DENTON F. PILLION Business 

A.B., Stonehill College, Massachusetts; Ed.M., Worcester State College; Boston Col- 
lege ; Clark University 

EDWARD E. PLATT Political Science 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

OLGA S. PLATT Library 

B.A., University of Connecticut ; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 

MARK A. PLIVELIC Business 

B.S., Duquesne University; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh; C.P.A., State of Mary- 
land 

RUTH PODBIELSKI Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

JOHN A. POLESKY Business 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

PETER J. POPIEL Music 

B.S., State University of New York; M.M., Eastman School of Music 

JOHN W. POSTLEWAIT Criminology 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

ROMAYNE POUNDS Special Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PAUL ANTHONY PRINCE Geoscience 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State College; M.A., Clark University; Ed.M., Harvard Uni- 
versity 



CLARA ELDENA PURCELL 
B.S., M.S., Purdue University 

DOWNEY RAIBOURN 

A.B., M.A., Indiana University (Bloomington) 

DAVID L. RAMSEY 

B.A., Washington & Jefferson College 

RICHARD E. RAY 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Home Economics 

Sociology- Anthropology 

Physics 

English 



CHARLES E. RECESKI Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Lycoming College; M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

MARY B. RECUPERO Area Coordinator, Business 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 



DANIEL G. REIBER 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University 



Physics 



JOHN WALLING REID Psychology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ed.D, Columbia Uni- 
versity 

L. LEON REID Special Education 

B.A., Bridgewater College, Virginia; M.A., Marshall University, West Virginia; 
Ph.D., University of Texas 

MILDRED M. REIGH Mathematics 

B.A., Juniata College; M.S., University of Illinois; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity 



JAMES L. REILEY 

B.S.. Lehigh University; M.S., Northern Arizona University 



Political Science 



JAMES B. REILLY Elementary Education 

B.S., Waynesburg College ; M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia University 



WILLIAM L. RETTIG 

B.S., California State College; M.S., Ohio State University 

RALPH W. REYNOLDS 

B.A., Beloit College ; M.A., State University of Iowa 

ROBERT D. REYNOLDS, JR. 

B.M., Texas Christian University; M.M., University of Texas 

WILLIS J. RICHARD 

B.A., Berea College; M.A., Iowa State University 

MAURICE L. RIDER 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

J. MERLE RIFE 

A.B., Muskingum College; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 



Mathematics 

Art 

Music 

Economics 

English 

History 

Library 



WANDA P. RIFE 

B.S., Ohio State University ; M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University 

PAUL A. RISHEBERGER Foundations of Education 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

ARLENE RISHER Business 

A.B., Mount Union College ; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 23 



RICHARD D. ROBERTS Physics 

B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

VIOLET V. ROCCO Elementary Education 

B.S., M.Ed., California State College 

BERNARD ROFFMAN Foreign Languages 

B.S., New York University; M.A., Fordham University 

ROSALY ROFFMAN English 

B.A., City College of New York ; M.A., University of Hawaii 

FRANK ROSS Art 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology 

PHYLLIS ROUMM English 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

MICHELINE A. ROZIER Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Idaho; M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

PHILIP RUFFNER English 

B.S., Clarion State College; M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

JOHN R. SAHLI History 

A.B., Geneva College; M.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

NORMAN W. SARGENT Chairman, Department of Learning Resources and Mass Media 
A.B., Hiram College; M.A., Ohio State University; Ed.D., Indiana University 

ROBERT H. SAYLOR Counseling and Guidance 

A.B., Juniata College; M.Ed., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

EUGENE F. SCANLON Special Education 

B.Ed., Duquesne University; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; D.Ed., Pennsylvania 
State University 

MARTHA S. SCHEEREN Library 

B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.S.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 

ELISABETH SCHMIDT Chairman, Institutional Food Services 

B.S., Mount Mercy College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

DOROTHY N. SCHROCK Business 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

GOULD F. SCHROCK Biology 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

ALICE K. SCHUSTER History 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

JOHN H. SCROXTON Chemistry 

B.A., M.S.. Alfred University 

GEORGE K. SEACRIST English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 

DONALD C. SEAGREN Scheduling Officer 

B.A., Thiel College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

JOHN E. SECOR Military 

B.S., Cornell University 

ROBERT C. SEELHORST Art 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Ed., Ed.D., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



FREDERICK W. SEINFELT English 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

DALE M. SHAFER Mathematics 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Okla- 
homa 

CATHERINE P. SHAFFER English 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University: A.M., Gettysburg College 

EDWARD D. SHAFFER Counseling and Guidance 

B.S., Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 

LEWIS H. SHAFFER Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Ohio University ; Ed.M., Pennsylvania State University 

ESTHER M. SHANE Special Education 

B.A., Westminster College; M.S., West Virginia University 

WILLIAM R. SHANE Criminology and Assistant Director of Admissions 

A.B., Harvard University ; L.L.B., University of Pennsylvania 

MILDRED NOBLE SHANK University School 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.A., Columbia University 

SATYA SHARMA Home Economics 

B.A., Lahore College for Women, India; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

MAHER Y. SHAWER Mathematics 

B.S., Teacher College, Cairo; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma 

WALTER T SHEA Sociology-Anthropology 

B.A., Morris Harvey College; M.S., University of Wisconsin 

ELWOOD B. SHEEDER Dean of Men 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ed.M., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

ARTHUR G. SHIELDS Acting Chairman, Allied Health Professions 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College ; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh ; D.Ed., Pennsyl- 
vania State University 

DAVID L. SHIELDS Foreign Languages 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Middlebury College 

KENNETH LEE SHILDT Assistant Director, Computer Center 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

DANIEL C. SHIVELY Library 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S.L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 

HARVEY A. SIMMONS Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

JOHN B. SIMONS Criminology 

B.A., Michigan State University 

HERMAN L. SLEDZIK Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

JEAN J. SLENKER Art 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.A., Professional Diploma, Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University 

ROBERT EUGENE SLENKER Art 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Columbia University; Professional 
Diploma, Teachers College, Columbia University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



EDWARD L. SLONIGER Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

BERT A. SMITH Political Science 

B.A., University of Nebraska ; M.A., University of Missouri 

HELENA M. SMITH English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity 

JAY M. SMITH Educational Psychology 

B.A., M.Ed., Johns Hopkins University 

JOHN W. SMITH Political Science 

B.S., Northwestern University ; M.A., University of Michigan 

W. WAYNE SMITH History 

B.S., Salisbury State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland 

WILLIAM R. SMITH Mathematics 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.M., Harvard University 

MARIE E. SNEAD Library 

B.S., Geneva College ; B.S.L.S., Syracuse University ; A.M.L.S., University of Michigan 

DOROTHY M. SNYDER Special Education Director, Reading Clinic 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; A.M., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia 
University 

DWIGHT E. SOLLBERGER Coordinator, Natural Sciences 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; Pr.D., Cornell University 

MARTHA P. SOLLBERGER Library 

B.S.. Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.Ed., L.S., Duquesne University 

ANTHONY J. SORENTO Foreign Languages 

B.A.. Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Middlebury College, Vermont; Doctor of 
Romance Philology, University of Madrid 

ELWOOD R. SPEAKMAN Mathematics 

B.A., Eastern Nazarene College; M.A., Bowling Green State University; M.A.T., 
Brown University 

LESLIE S. SPENCER Business 

B.S., M.B.A., Syracuse University 

GEORGE L. SPINELLI Chairman, Department of Counseling and Guidance 

B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

RUTH E. SPINELLI Nursing Education 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

ANDREE-MARIE SRABIAN Foreign Languages 

Baccalaureat es Lettres, Sorbonne, Paris, France 

JAMES G. STAPLES Music 

B.M., M.M., Florida State University 

MARTIN L. STAPLETON Biology 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.A., Lehigh University; Ed.D., Pennsylvania State 
University 

WALTER J. STAPLETON Health and Physical Education 

B.S., St. Francis College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

JOANNE B. STEINER Institutional Food Services 

B.S., Miami University; M.S., University of Wisconsin 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



RONALD A. STEINER Library 

B.A., University of Dubuque ; M.S.L.S., Case Western Reserve University 

GERALD STERN English 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Columbia University 

CHARLES B. STEVENSON Business 

B.A., M.A., George Washington University 

ELIZABETH D. STEWART Music 

B.M., American Conservatory, Chicago, Illinois ; M.F.A., Ohio University 

MALCOLM H. STILSON Library 

B.A., University of Southern California ; M. Librarianship, University of Washington 

MERLE STILWELL Mathematics 

B.S., Mansfield State College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Cornell University 

LAWRENCE C. STITT Music 

B.S., M.A., New York University 

JAMES K. STONER Chairman, Department of Business and Distributive Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

GEORGE A. STOUFFER, JR. Dean, School of Education 

B.S., Shippensburg State College; Ed.M., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

RICHARD M. STRAWCUTTER Biology 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Columbia University 

I. LEONARD STRIGHT Dean, Graduate School 

B.A., M.A., Allegheny College; Ph.D., Western Reserve University 

CONNIE J. SUTTON Geoscience 

B.S., M.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

ALVIN J. STUART Director, University School 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Ohio University 

LOUIS R. SUTTON Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; Ed.D., West 
Virginia University 

PHILIP J. SWANSON Music 

B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music 

CRAIG G. SWAUGER Chairman, Department of English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.Litt, Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

FORD HARRIS SWIGART, JR. English 

B.A., Otterbein College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

AUGUSTA SYTY Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

STANFORD L. TACKETT Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

BEATRICE F. THOMAS Business 

B.S., Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 

HAROLD W. THOMAS Business 

B.S., Grove City College; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 

RAYMOND L. THOMAS English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., Penn- 
sylvania State University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ROBERT N. THOMAS Geography 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

JACKIE L. THOMPSON Director, Computer Center 

B.S., University of Texas; M.S.M.E., New Mexico State University 

LaVERNE THOMPSON Mathematics 

B.A., Texas Western College ; M.S., New Mexico State University 

PAUL A. THOMPSON Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.M., University of Michigan 

RICHARD E. THORELL Music 

B.M., M.A.. M.E., University of Rochester 

J. DAVID TRUBY English 

B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

LAWRENCE R. TUCKER Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Bridgewater College; M.S., Ohio State University 

MARGOT A. UEHLING English 

B.A., Hastings College; M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

HENRY H. VALLOWE Biology 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

MARILYN VALLOWE Mathematics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.A., University of Chicago 

KEITH F. VANSANT Military 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

ROBERT J. VISLOSKEY Art 

B.S., Edinboro ; Ed.M., Pennsylvania State University 

DOROTHY B. VOLM Library 

A.B., McPherson College, McPherson, Kansas 

EVA VOUKLIZAS Music 

B.M., Syracuse University; M.M., Indiana University 

ROBERT C. VOWELS Economics 

A.B., M.A., Howard University; Ph.D., The American University 

EUPHEMIA NESBITT WADDELL Library 

A.B., College of Wooster ; M.L.S., Library School, University of Illinois 

JAMES A. WADDELL English 

A.B., Berea College; M.A., University of North Carolina 

PAUL M. WADDELL Physics 

A.B., Bethany College; M.A., Cornell University 

RICHARD F. WAECHTER Biology 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bucknell University; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
University 

ALBERT J. WAHL History 

B.S., M.S., Lafayette College; Ed.D., Temple University 

JOANN E. WALTHOUR University School 

B.S., Chatham College; M.M.E., University of Pittsburgh 

HELEN LOUISE WARREN English 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

ROBERT O. WARREN Registrar 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



WILLIAM M. WASKOSKIE . . Biology 

B.A., St. Francis College, Loretto, Pennsylvania ; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 

ROBERT M. WATSON Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

JOHN G. WATT A English 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 

CHARLES E. WEBER Geography 

B.A., Montclair State College, New Jersey; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University 

KATHRYN WELDY English 

B.S., Kutztown State College; M.A., Middlebury College 

GEORGE WEST Director, Punxsutawney Center 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pa. ; M.Ed., Penn State 

JACK R. WESTWOOD Mathematics 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania ; M.S., Burkwell University 

GEORGE M. WHITSON, III Mathematics 

B.S., University of Mississippi; M.A., University of Massachusetts 

GEORGE T. WILEY Director, Graduate Research 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Ph.D., Western Reserve University 

JAMES HERBERT WILDEBOOR Music 

A.B., Ottawa University; M.M.E., University of Kansas 

WILLIAM S. WILEY. JR. Chairman. Department of Military Science 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

CLIFFORD J. WILLIAMS. JR. Criminology 

B.A., Michigan State University ; M.A., St. Francis College 

ROGER N. WILLIAMS, JR. Foreign Languages 

B.S., Grove City College ; M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

HALLEY O. WILLISON, JR. Mathematics 

B.S.Ed., Clarion State Teachers College; M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh 

JAMES C. WILSON Counseling and Guidance 

B.S., Clarion State College; M.Ed., Duquesne University; Ed.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh 

T. KENNETH WILSON English 

B.A., University of Buffalo 

DAVID CLINTON W1NSLOW Geography 

B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Clark University 

EDWARD G. WOLF Library 

B.Ed., Duquesne University ; M. Letters, University of Pittsburgh ; M.S.L.S., Drexel 
Institute of Technology 

RICHARD E. WOLFE Mathematics 

A.B., Gettysburg College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

ALLEN M. WOODS Institutional Food Services 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

SUSAN WOOD Geography 

B.S., M.A., Kent State University 

MELVIN R. WOODARD Chairman, Department of Mathematics 

B.S., Mansfield State College; M.A., University of Illinois; Ed.D., Oklahoma State 
University 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ROBERT L. WOODARD Acting Dir. Geoscience Dept. ; Dir. of Institutional Research 

B.S.. Syracuse University; M.S., State University of New York, Geneseo, New York; 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

DON W. WOODWORTH English 

B.A., Dartmouth; M.A., Indiana University 

DALE W. WOOMER Business 

B.S.. M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

PAUL R. WUNZ, JR. Chairman, Department of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S.. Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University of Delaware 

JOSEPH L. WYSOCKI Home Economics 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology; M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

JOHN A. YACKUBOSKEY History 

B.A., North Georgia College; M.A., Emory University 

TWYLA L. YECKLEY English 

B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

HAROLD J. YOUCIS Chairman, Department of Foundations of Education 

B.M.E., Drake University; M.S., Ithaca College; Ed.D., Indiana University 

DAVID L. YOUNG English 

B.A., M.A., Kent State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

MAURICE M. ZACUR Geography 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

GENO ZAMBOTTI Chemistry 

B.S.. M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

CYRIL J. ZENISEK Biology 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

GEORGE D. ZEPP Elementary Education 

B.S., Millersville State College ; M.Ed., D.Ed., University of Maryland 

PATSY A. ZITELLI Physics 

A.B., Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh ; Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

EMERITI 

JOHN E. DAVIS Director of Teaching, Placement, University School 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University; A.M., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

MARY L. ESCH Registrar 

JOY E. MAHACHEK Chairman, Mathematics 

Coordinator of Secondary Education Departments 
A.B., State College of Iowa; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh 

GEORGE P. MILLER Chairman, Health and Physical Education 

B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

FLORENCE WALLACE History 

A.B., Wellesley College ; A.M., Columbia University 

NORAH E. ZLNK Geography 

B.S., University of Utah; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

WILLIS E. PRATT Chancellor 

A.B., Allegheny College; A.M., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; LL.D., Westminster 
College ; LL.D., University of Pittsburgh 



30 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SUPERVISING TEACHERS IN 
COOPERATING SCHOOLS 



Acciai, Deno — Lower Burrell 
A'Hearn, Neloese — Butler 
Aiello, Ronald — Westmoreland County 
Aikens, Bonnie — Lower Burrell 
Aikey, Charles — Johnstown 
Aikey, Robert — Johnstown 
Amann, Alfred — Jeannette 
Anderson, Doris — Ligonier 
Anderson, Rosena — Ford City 
Angle, Florence — Johnstown 
Anthony, George — Westmont 
Apel, Dale — New Kensington 
Appel, George — Ingomar 
Applegate, Marion — New Kensington 
Arezina, Marko — Lower Burrell 
Armstrong, John — New Kensington 
Askey, William — Westmont 
Aston, Susan — Monroeville 
Atchison, Ralph — Freeport 
Austin, Edward — Hempfleld 
Bach, Martha — Johnstown 
Bailey, Robert — Ferndale 
Baird, Betty — New Kensington 
Baker, Irma — Johnstown 
Balest, Florence — Monroeville 
Bankosky, Patricia — Indiana 
Banks, Anna Margaret — Indiana 
Baptist, Gail — Clairon 
Barkley, Janet — Highlands 
Barkley, Ruth — Lower Burrell 
Bash, Bernadine — Hempfleld 
Bash, Jean — Monroeville 
Battaglini, Charles — Westmont 
Beck, Janet — Westmoreland County 
Beck, William — Fox Chapel 
Beitel, Bruce — Hempfleld 
Bell, Larry — Lower Burrell 
Bellavia, Rita — Johnstown 
Benkerdt, Fred — Murrysville 
Benner, Helen — Ford City 
Benton, Elda — Altoona 
Beresford, Eleanor — Monroeville 
Berg, Barbara — Penn Hills 
Bergman, Anna Betty — Monroeville 
Bergman, Ronald — North Allegheny 
Bernat, Edwinna — Indiana 
Bianca, Arlene — Homer City 
Binkey, Marjorie — Homer City 
Bishop, Leila — Indiana 
Bistline, Darwin — Altoona 
Blair, Eleanor — Indiana 
Bloom, Keith — Marion Center 
Blose, Carolyn — Northern Cambria 
Blough, Verna — Johnstown 
Bolger, Dolores — Altoona 
Bolha, Emil — Westmont 
Boothman, Isabelle — Hempfleld 
Borbulich, Bernice — Cambria County 



Bowers, Edith — Punxsutawney 
Bowers, Lawrence — Murrysville 
Bowers, Richard — Butler 
Bowes, Margaret — Johnstown 
Bowser, Dorothy — Westmont 
Boyd, Sara — Monroeville 
Breon, Paul — Greensburg 
Brewer, Marguerite — Murrysville 
Brobst, Roger — Penn Hills 
Brooks, Edgar — Altoona 
Brougher, Glenn — ■ Ferndale 
Brown, Gladys — Indiana 
Brunelli, Julia — Greensburg 
Brusco, Shirley — Fox Chapel 
Bryja, Walter — Elders Ridge 
Buchanan, Kathryn — Indiana 
Buchanan, William G. — Purchase Line 
Buchovecky, Catherine — - Johnstown 
Burchfield, Robert — Altoona 
Burke, Vincent — Butler 
Burkhart, Virginia — Fox Chapel 
Burt, Elizabeth — Fox Chapel 
Calabrese, Clyde — Derry 
Calderwood, Lelia — Johnstown 
Calhoun, Elsie — New Bethlehem 
Callahan, Antionette — Greensburg 
Calvo, Delfino — Derry 
Cammisa, Michael — Butler 
Camp, Richard — Wilkinsburg 
Campbell, Mary Jane — Monroeville 
Carlos, Catherine — Fox Chapel 
Carnahan, Harry — Indiana 
Carosella, S. Anthony — Johnstown 
Carroll, Marie — -Armstrong Schools 
Casas, Charlotte — Shanksville 
Casillo, Catherine — New Kensington 
Centorcelli, Eugene — Lower Burrell 
ChegwidcTen, Gwendolyn — Murrysville 
Cherepko, Betty Lou — Murrysville 
Chisnell, Elnora — Laurel Valley 
Christy, Beulah — Lower Burrell 
Cihon, Helen — Monroeville 
Coffman, Harold — Kiski Area 
Colonna, Jeannette — Butler 
Conn, Patricia — Kittanning 
Colantoni, Joseph — Monroeville 
Connell, Linda — Butler 
Conrad, Mary Kay — Johnstown 
Conrad, Regina — Altoona 
Console Joseph — North Hills 
Cornell, Harry — Norwin 
Corrigan, Patrick — Penns Manor 
Coup, Jack — Norwin 
Covode, Nora — Richland Twp. 
Craig, Ruth — Allegheny County 
Cramer, Virginia — Penn Hills 
Creps, Jeanne — Indiana 
Cribbs, Ralph — Marion Center 



INDIANA UNIVKKSITY OF l'KNNSYLVANIA 



Crisafulli, Margaret — Concmaugh Twp. 

Crissman, Joseph — Punxsutawney 

Crissman, William — Kittanning 

Crist, Zella — Altoona 

Critchfield, Mrs. Donald — Somerset 

Crnarich, Francis — Altoona 

Cross, William — Butler 

Crowell, William — Cambria Heights 

Cruikshank, Marjorie — Butler 

Cummings, Patrick — Hollidaysburg 

Cunningham, Alice — Ligonier 

D'Amato, Hugh — Jeannette 

Daniels. Virginia — Latrobe 

Dautlick, Jeanne — Monroeville 

Davis, James — Ford City 

Dean, John — Johnstown 

DeGaetano, Arveta — Indiana 

Dekker, Ronald — Altoona 

Delia, Jean — New Kensington 

DeLuca, Margaret — Lower Burrell 

DeLuca, Richard — Lower Burrell 

Depp, Lois — Altoona 

Detwiler, Alice — Altoona 

Detwiler. Ray — Altoona 

DiAndreth, Robert — Penn Hills 

Dice, John — Somerset 

Dick, Roger — Hollidaysburg 

DiTullio, Josephine — Monroeville 

Dixon, Bernice — United Joint 

Dodson, Leroy — Johnstown 

Dombart, Donald — Butler 

Donaldson, Ralph — Greensburg 

Doney, Clifford — Punxsutawney 

Donnellan, Walter — Monroeville 

Douglass, Leona — Altoona 

Dunlap, William — Hempfleld 

Eardley, Arthur — Hollidaysburg 

Ebbecka, Thomas — Butler 

Edder, Margaret — Indiana 

Edwards, Glyn — Johnstown 

Elkin, Kenneth — Greensburg 

Elliott, Ruby — Johnstown 

Esch, Georgianna — Altoona 

Esch, Glynn — Altoona 

Esper, Thomas — Monroeville 

Evans, Alice — Monroeville 

Everett, Richard — Penn Hills 

Fails, George — Hempfleld 

Falsetti, Mary Jo — Churchill 

Farabaugh, Leonard — Murrysville 

Feeley, Paul — Richland 

Ferko, William — Punxsutawney 

Ferrara, Camilla- — Armstrong County 

Festa, Louis — Derry 

Fetterman, Gerald — Punxsutawney 

Fetterman, William — Penns Manor 

Ficca, Robert — Butler 

Ficco, Ruth Ann — Ferndale 

Fichter, Judith — North Hills 

Fink, Ronald — Altoona 

Fiorina, John — Derry 

Fisk, Jean — Murrysville 



Fitzmaurice, Vincent — New Kensington 

Fox, Cecil — Hollidaysburg 

Franceschi, James — Butler 

Franks, William — Latrobe 

Freeh, Mary — Kittanning Twp. 

Fulcomer, Thomas — Westmoreland County 

Furrer, Ethelyn — Altoona 

Gaggini, Frederick — Lower Burrell 

Gahagan, Zula — Blairsville 

Galbraith, Thelma — Churchill 

Galbreath, Edith — Johnstown 

Gallagher, Patricia — Johnstown 

Gallo, Elizabeth — Ligonier 

Gallo, John — Marion Center 

Garrity, James — Greensburg 

Gates, Jean — Altoona 

George, John — Lower Burrell 

Gerhart, Wade — Greensburg 

German, Mary Jo — Westmoreland County 

Gibboney, Clara — Altoona 

Giovannitti, Alma — Monroeville 

Glass, Mary — Monroeville 

Good, William — Westmont 

Gorgon, Stella — Altoona 

Gosser, Margaret — Kiski Area 

Graham, Eleanor — Butler 

Green, Elizabeth — Indiana County 

Green, S. Elizabeth — Richland Twp. 

Griffith, Robert — Somerset 

Gritzer, Doris — Johnstown 

Gritzer, Patricia — Johnstown 

Grove, Harold — Indiana 

Gutt, Frieda — Norwin 

Haber, Felicia — Monroeville 

Hahn, William — North Allegheny 

Hamilton, William — Altoona 

Hanak, Andrew — Johnstown 

Hancuff, William — Hollidaysburg 

Hnnley, Barbara — Punxsutawney 

Harden, Marian — Penn Trafford 

Harding, Richard — Baldwin-Whitehall 

Hardoby, Michael — Butler 

Harmon, Daniel — Indiana 

Harris, John — Somerset 

Harriger, Charles — Lower Burrell 

Harrold, Carol — New Kensington 

Harris, John — Somerset 

Harvey, Helen — Kittanning 

Hassel, Thomas — Murrysville 

Hazlett. Lawrence — Highlands 

Heaton, Mary Ellen — Indiana 

Heckler, Vieva — Windber 

Heininger, Lois — Altoona 

Hempfleld, Alma — Butler 

Herr, Ellen — Fox Chapel 

Hicks, Loretta — East Brady 

Hill, John — Murrysville 

Hindman, Dorothy — Westmont 

Hoffman, Harriett — Murrysville 

Hoffman, Ruth — Altoona 

Hoffman, Wilbert — Altoona 

Hogemyer, Amy — Altoona 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Hogg, Alta — Ford City 

Holliday, Joseph — Highlands 

Holstein, William — Indiana 

Hoover, Jean — Penn Hills 

Horner, Carole — Butler 

Hornick, Emilie — Johnstown 

Houk, Sara — Indiana 

Hoyer, Helen — Penn Hills 

Huber, Joseph — Richland Twp. 

Hunt, Margaret — Johnstown 

Hunter, Betty — Indiana 

Hunter, Sheldon — Westmont 

Iagnemma, Eugene — Kiski Area 

Iflt, Edith — Butler 

Ifft, John — Butler 

Ingersoll, Ralph — Monroeville 

Irwin, Virginia — Wilkinsburg 

Jacobs, Hugh — Murrysville 

Jacoby, Morna — Indiana 

Jamison, Ardelle — Homer Center 

Jerko, Beatrice — Purchase Line 

Johns, Beverly — Richland Twp. 

Jones, Margaret — United Joint 

Jones, Susannah — Derry 

Jubara, Francis — Cambria County 

Kalchthaler, Suzanne — 
Westmoreland County 

Kamerer, Ann — Norwin 

Kane, Janet — Norwin 

Karalfa, Rose — Johnstown 

Katter, Mary — Johnstown 

Kaufman, Marjorie — Westmont 

Keefer, Neal — Indiana 

Keeton, Gary — North Allegheny 

Kelley, Ethel — Turtle Creek 

Kelley, John — Blairsville 

Kelley, Ralph — Greensburg 

Kelley, Kathleen — Latrobe 

Kemmler, June — Baldwin-Whitehall 

Kensek, Michael — Highlands 

Kepple, Richard — Murrysville 

Kerr, Jane — Butler 

Kerr, Mary Jane — Murrysville 

Keslar, Grace — Portage 

Kinch, Donna — Indiana 

King, Marie — Ligonier 

Kinkead, Ralph — Greensburg 

Kist, Nell Marie — Derry 

Klipa, Steve — Monroeville 

Kneckel, Martha — Johnstown 

Koch, Edward — Indiana 

Kohler, Dolores — Johnstown 

Korczynski, Ronald — Highlands 

Kosmack, Joan — New Kensington 

Krehlick, Margaret — Kiski Area 

Krivacek, Paul — Westmoreland County 

Krouse, Hazel — Altoona 

Kropinak, Stephen — Kittanning 

Kunkle, Jean — Indiana 

Kurtz, Katherine — Johnstown 

Kurtz, Ralph — Ligonier 

Lace, Patricia — Lower Burrell 



Lagoon, James — Lower Burrell 

Laird, David — Indiana 

Laird, Rachel — Ligonier 

Lang, Theo — Fox Chapel 

Latshaw, Ann — Indiana 

Laughlin, Regis — Monroeville 

Lawrence, Bernice — Johnstown 

Lawson, Samuel — Latrobe 

Lawther, Mary — Altoona 

Lehew, John — ■ Butler 

Lehman, Wayne — Richland Twp. 

Lenhart. Carolyn - — Monroeville 

Lewis, Betty — Indiana 

Lindemer, Carmen — Altoona 

Lloyd, Frank — North Allegheny 

Lockard, Raymond — Penns Manor 

Lockwood, Ronald — Butler 

Long, Alice — Blairsville 

Long, Eleanor — Altoona 

Long, Kathryn — Johnstown 

Long, Thalia — Indiana 

Longwell, Jean — Monroeville 

Lore. Betty — Blairsville 

Loughren, James — North Allegheny 

Love, John — Penn Hills 

Love, Robert — Indiana 

Loveday, Marian — Murrysville 

Luchsinger, Jane — Blairsville 

Luciano, Nicholas — Altoona 

Lukehart, James — Indiana 

Lynn, Joyce — Monroeville 

Mack, Frances — Norwin 

Malacarne, Richard — Indiana 

Malletz, Alex — Derry 

Mancuso, Judith — Homer Center 

Mandigo, Howard — Indiana 

Manners, Diann — Monroeville 

Mannion, Robert — Westmont 

Marcy, Carole — Westmoreland County 
Marinucci, Frank — New Kensington 

Markle, Ruby — Derry 

Marshall, Clark — North Hills 
Marshall, George — Butler 
Martin, Robert — Indiana 
Marts, Bertha — Saltsburg 
Massabni, George — Altoona 
Mastro, Joseph — Derry 
Matisko, Michael — Lower Burrell 
McCormick, David — Murrysville 
McCoy, Lydia — Indiana 
McCullough, LaRue — Indiana 
McDonald, Gertrude — Blair County 
McElhinney, Feme — Kittanning 
McGary, Janete — Indiana 
McGee, Edgar — Mars 
McGee, Richard — Indiana 
McGregor, Dorothy — Altoona 
McKinney, Ronald — Butler 
McLaughlin, Charles — Monroeville 
McManus, Zetta — Johnstown 
McMasters, Patricia — Monroeville 
McMillan, Ruth — Fox Chapel 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



88 



McVltty. Claire — Indian* 

Meek, Richard — Hollidaysburg 

Meigham, Edward — Kiski Area 

Meneely, Clyde — Punxsutawney 

Middlekauff, Ray — Monroeville 

Miller, Carl — Johnstown 

Miller, Dorothy — Johnstown 

Miller, Evelyn — ■ Blair County 

Miller, Perry — Murrysville 

Miller, Richard — ■ Marion Center 

Miller, Ruth — Blairsville 

Milliron, Thomas — Hempfield 

Mills, Judith — Monroeville 

Minahan, Mary Ann — Johnstown 

Minnick, Margaret — McKeesport 

Mitchell, Leslie — Monroeville 

Mitchell, Melvin — Punxsutawney 

Montgomery, Marion — Marion Center 

Monti, John — Altoona 

Morgan, Mary — Richland Twp. 

Morosky, Patricia — Monroeville 

Mostoller, Earl — Westmont 

Munro, Mary Ann — Monroeville 

Myers, Mary Jane — Cambria County 

Myers, Nancy — Johnstown 

Nealen, William — Northern Cambria 

Neeler, Edward — Marion Center 

Neely, Donald — Hollidaysburg 

Neff, Gary — Latrobe 

Neff, Patricia — Monroeville 

Neidig, Eileen — Fox Chapel 

Nelson, Anna — Altoona 

Nelson, Wilbur — Southwest Butler County 

Nemec, Margaret — Monroeville 

Nemeth, Bonnie — • Westmoreland County 

Netzlof , Catherine — Latrobe 

Neutrelle, James — Butler 

Newquist, Ruth — Indiana 

Nicely, Robert — Monroeville 

Nichol, Evelyn — Indiana County 

Nicholas, Anthony — Kiski Area 

Nicholls, Sterling — Indiana 

Nicholson, Louise — Indiana 

Nieme, Betty — Monroeville 

Oakes, Robert — Penns Manor 

O'Bruba, William — Indiana 

O'Leary, Robert — Monroeville 

Oliver, Frank — New Kensington 

Olmer, Genevieve — New Kensington 

Owens, Lucille — Jeannette 

Page, Roberta — Monroeville 

Painter, Martha — Ford City 

Palmer, Bain — Marion Center 

Palmer, Donna — Homer Center 

Panebianco, Ellen — Murrysville 

Paone, Anthony — Westmont 

Papinchak, Ernest — Westmont 

Park, Jean — Greensburg 

Patrick, Muriel — Elderton 

Penzenstadler, Frank — Monroeville 

Pepe, Arthur — Somerset 

Pesarchick, John — Norwin 



Pesceyne, Dwight — Indiana 
Peters, Leila — Laurel Valley 
Philliber, Robert — Punxsutawney 
Pino, Bruno — Penns Manor 
Poliziani, Leonard — Saltsburg 
Polk, Helen — Murrysville 
Pollock, George — Indiana 
Popp, Frank — Blairsville 
Porter, Helen — Indiana 
Potter, Richard — Altoona 
Preisser, Dennis — New Kensington 
Preuss, Mary — North Hills 
Previte, Peter — Penns Manor 
Puckey, Marian — Altoona 
Puff, Margaret — Butler 
Puhala, Joan — Johnstown 
Quattrone, Sal — Freeport 
Querry, Dorothy — Altoona 
Quinn, Jean — Elderton 
Radomsky, Andrew — Marion Center 
Ramsey, Arthur — Altoona 
Randolph, Virginia — Indiana 
Rankin, James — Indiana 
Rankin, Rogers — Indiana 
Ravotta, Lorraine — Lower Burrell 
Ray, Margaret — Johnstown 
Redenberger, Charles — Altoona 
Reffner, John — Westmont 
Reid, John — Altoona 
Rend, Kathy — Indiana 
Renison, Mary — Mars 
Renkin, Sylvia — Wilkinsburg 
Rhodes, James — Hollidaysburg 
Richards, Thelma — Johnstown 
Riehl, Michael — Jeannette 
Rigby, Kenneth — Murrysville 
Ringer, Alice — Monroeville 
Risher, Elsie — Richland Twp. 
Roadarmel, Patricia — Altoona 
Robins, Theodore — Wilkinsburg 
Rohrbacher, Gail — Monroeville 
Rose, Martha — Penn Hills 
Rosenthal, Sheila — Monroeville 
Ross, Miriam — Marion Centex 
Ruck, Joan — Hollidaysburg 
Rugh, Sarah — Greensburg 
Ruland, Dorothy — Indiana 
Rupert, Herman — Elderton 
Russell, Helen — Indiana 
Rutkowski, Robert — Highlands 
Rutter, Gilbert — Hempfield 
Sabatos, John — Homer Center 
Salay, John — Conemaugh Twp. 
Salinger, Ann — Johnstown 
Sanfilippo, Alvin — Greensburg 
Sann, Lillian — Johnstown 
Santner, Ann — Norwin 
Schnorr, Anna — Fox Chapel 
School, Beverly — Allegheny County 
Schweiger, Thomas — Monroeville 
Schweinberg, Raymond — Butler 
Sebastian, Frank — Purchase Line 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Seelhonrt, Wayne — North Hill* 

Servinsky, Stanley — Indiana 

Shaffer, Blanche — Conemaugh Twp. 

Shaffer, Sally — Indiana 

Shannon, Betty — Forbes 

Shannon, Jerry — Wilkinsburg 

Sharrow, Frederick — Freeport 

Shaw, Francis — Punxsutawney 

Shearer, Walter — New Kensington 

Shearer, Yvonne — Westmoreland County 

Sherren, Colette — Somerset 

Shiring, Paul — Lower Burrell 

Shulick, Suzanne — Blairsville 

Shuster, Stephen — Greensburg 

Sibley, James — Greensburg 

Simmons, Robert — Hempfield 

Sinclair, Donna — Butler 

Singer, Chester — Somerset 

Skubis, Judith — Marion Center 

Slack, Robert — Monroeville 

Slezak, Elmer — Greensburg 

Slosky, Kenneth — New Kensington 

Smeltzer, Glenn — Derry 

Smith, Eileen — Lower Burrell 

Smith, Gladys — Elderton 

Smith, Helene — Monroeville 

Smith, Mona — Blairsville 

Smith, Pauline — New Bethlehem 

Smith, Virginia — Monroeville 

Snyder, Elvin — Punxsutawney 

Southern, Mildred — Somerset 

Sowers, Harold — Ford City 

Speacht, Eugene — Altoona 

Speicher, Sara — Shaler Twp. 

Spenger, Mary — Johnstown 

Sproull, Harry — New Kensington 

St. Clair. Frederick — United Joint 

Stachowski, Jan — Fox Chapel 

Stapleton, Walter — Indiana 

Staruch, Stephen — Butler 

Steele, Charles — Murrysville 

Stephenson, Vivian — Highlands 

Stevenson, Alan — Elderton 

Stevenson, Evelyn — Greensburg 
Stewart, Joyce — Monroeville 
Stewart, Nancy — Lower Burrell 
Stewart, Robert — Marion Center 
Stickley, David — New Kensington 
Stinebisor, Earl — Jeannette 
Stormer, William — Central Cambria 
Stokes, Minerva — Lower Burrell 
Stoltenberg, Loretta — Murrysville 
Stramanak, Judith — Johnstown 
Stringer, Catherine — Johnstown 
Strycula, Walter — North Allegheny 
Stuchell, William — Punxsutawney 
Sullinger, James — Indiana 
Sutton, Donnella — Blairsville 
Swacus, John — Murrysville 
Swartz, Marguerite — Murrysville 
Swartz, Richard — Altoona 
Swartzwelder, Phyllis — Johnstown 



S wauger , Evelyn — Indiana 

Szul, Joseph — Lower Burrell 

Thomas, Mary Bess — Greensburg 

Thompson, Elizabeth — New Kensington 

Tie, Dorothy — Johnstown 

Torzok, Yvonne — Homer Center 

Townsend, Barbara — Indiana 

Traugh, Robert — Indiana 

Trefts, Janet — Greensburg 

Truxal, Nellie — Blairsville 

Urch, John — Ligonier 

Van Dyke, Frederick — Indiana 

Van Horn, Louella — Elderton 

Varner, Marian — Johnstown 

Varrato, La Verne — Blairsville 

Vassilaros, Constantine — Monroeville 

Veselicky, Rudy — Lower Burrell 

Vesely, Donna — Westmoreland County 

Vinton, Beth — Indiana 

Vogel, Domenica — Lower Burrell 

Vorlage, Ethel — New Kensington 

Waddell, Mildred — Indiana 

Waldf ogle, Robert — North Hills 

Walter, Clair — New Kensington 

Wampler, Katherine — Churchill 

Wanderer, Marjorie — Lower Burrell 

Ward, Rosalyn — Westmoreland County 

Waryck, William — Hollidaysburg 

Warzel, Roland — United Joint 

Watkins, Jacques — Lower Burrell 

Watkins, Thomas — Derry 

Watson, Lee — Altoona 

Watts, Mary Lou — Monroeville 

Waugaman, Sara — Hempfield 

Weaver, Marion — Ford City 

Weber, William — Derry 

Wellen, Maxine — Marion Center 

West, Martha — Homer Center 

Wetzel, Helen — Elderton 

Wetzel, Jean — Elders Ridge 

Wiberg, James — Altoona 

Wilden, Helen — Indiana 

Wille, Gladys — Penns Manor 

Wilson, Arthur — Greensburg 

Wilson, Betty — Monroeville 

Wilson, Bonnie — Kiski Area 

Wilson, Thomas — Punxsutawney 

Wingard, Marlin — Windber 

Winslow, Mary — Indiana 

Wolfe, Donald — Kiski Area 

Wolfe, Norma — Jeannette 

Wood, Dorothy — Punxsutawney 

Wood, Glenna — Ford City 

Wood, Harry — Indiana 

Woodle, Walter — Dayton 

Woods, Janet — Monroeville 

Woomer, Ida — Altoona 

Wyncoop, Genevieve — Norwin 

Yount, William — DuBois 

Zedick, John — Indiana 

Zeolla, Carole — Lower Burrell 




The University 



fc ^ PURPOSES 

^X-JSv JrH S^ GENERAL INFORMATION 

^^T* ™* HISTOF 






HISTORY 

ADMISSION REGULATIONS 

FEES, DEPOSITS, 
REPAYMENTS 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

REGULATIONS OF 
THE COLLEGE 

SPECIAL SERVICES 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



86 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PURPOSES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

As a multi-purpose institution Indiana University encom- 
passes the Schools of Education, Arts and Sciences, Business, 
Continuing and Non-Resident Education, Health Services, 
Home Economics, Fine Arts and the Graduate School. Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania endeavors to fulfill the primary 
purpose of education as stated by Alfred North Whitehead, 
namely, "To stimulate and guide student self-development" so 
that the student learns both how to make a living and how to 
live. The University extends this educational opportunity to 
those students whose conscientious application and serious mo- 
tivation indicate promise of substantial achievement. 

As Emerson noted in his Journal over a hundred years 
ago, "The things taught in schools and colleges are not an edu- 
cation but the means of education." At Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania these "means of education" comprise a variety 
of factors. First there is a pervasive, intellectual climate de- 
signed to stimulate the student's imagination, stretch his mind, 
and extend his tolerance as he rubs minds with new ideas, 
teachers, and associates in the classroom, laboratory and the 
library. These intellectual contacts also tend to develop critical 
independent judgments, mental discipline and the ability to 
make mature decisions. 

The various curricula are carefully structured to provide 
the student with a broad perspective that will enable him to 
appreciate his cultural heritage and at the same time afford 
him the opportunity to pursue in considerable depth his par- 
ticular sphere of interest. Such a comprehensive program in- 
evitably includes some knowledge that is worth knowing not 
for any material gain but simply because it enriches one's ex- 
istence. Also, the wide spectrum of courses which a student 
takes frequently contains at least one or two in which a stu- 
dent will have little interest or skill, but these too have their 
values for as T. S. Eliot has observed: "No one can really be- 
come educated without having pursued some study in which 
he took no interest." The vast bulk of the program, of course, 
will both absorb and challenge the motivated student. 

Undergirding the entire academic program is the philoso- 
phy that in the final analysis there is no education except self- 
education. Consequently, the faculty strive to whet intellectual 
appetites and to inculcate the problem-solving approach so that 
the student will acquire both the desire and ability to teach 
himself. In this way Commencement truly will become the 
beginning of "life-long learning." 

In addition to enabling students to acquire professional 
skills and enrich their cultural existence, the University en- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 37 

deavors to instill in each student a social consciousness which 
will make him a contributive and substantive member of soci- 
ety, for as de Tocqueville emphasized we cannot have a strong 
democratic society without a good quality of citizenship. This 
attribute of good citizenship accrues partly from academic 
study and partly as a result of the social mores and associa- 
tions which one encounters and experiences in college. 

Intertwined with the goal of increasing the student's social 
awareness and consideration for his fellow men, is the devel- 
opment of moral fibre. General Omar N. Bradley is duly dis- 
turbed by the fact that "ours is a world of nuclear giants and 
ethical infants." Indiana University of Pennsylvania firmly be- 
lieves that no education, regardless of its academic excellence, 
can fulfill its true potential unless students are inspired and 
guided by spiritual values and moral considerations. 

Admittedly the University cannot succeed in realizing all 
of these goals; however, even this is part of the dynamic edu- 
cational process of becoming rather than attaining. 

This university welcomes qualified students, faculty, and 
staff from all racial, religious, ethnic, and socio-economic back- 
grounds. 

THE UNIVERSITY, PRESENT AND PAST 

The Indiana University of Pennsylvania is a state-owned 
and state-controlled institution for higher education. It is a 
multi-purpose institution composed of eight schools. 

The university is an approved and fully accredited mem- 
ber of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, the American Association of University Women, and 
the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Educa- 
tion, the three acknowledged accrediting agencies for institu- 
tions in this region. The fact that this university is a member 
of these three organizations is of immediate personal impor- 
tance to the individual student in two ways; first, the student 
may transfer college credits from one approved institution to 
another without loss in case he finds it necessary to change 
colleges; and second, the student who is a graduate of an ap- 
proved institution is eligible for a better position. 

Throughout the entire history of the University at Indiana, 
great emphasis has been placed on maintaining high academic 
standards and providing adequate facilities conducive to in- 
dividual and group growth. The present record and reputation 
enjoyed by the University have evolved during a ninety year 
history. Growing out of the need for a teacher training institu- 
tion in Western Pennsylvania, the General Assembly passed an 
act in the legislative session of 1871 granting aid for the estab- 
lishment of a normal school in the ninth district at Indiana. 



38 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

The first building was completed and opened for students 
on May 17, 1875. This building, named John Sutton Hall in 
honor of the first president of the Board of Trustees, is still in 
use and in very good condition. 

The steady growth of the institution has caused a continu- 
ous expansion in its building program and many new buildings 
have followed that edifice of tradition — John Sutton Hall. The 
size and natural beauty of the university campus offer ample 
opportunity for recreation in an environment conducive to per- 
sonal enjoyment. The main campus of the university originally 
23 acres with one building is now composed of 87 acres on 
which are located twenty-five principal halls, 20 other build- 
ings, and seven athletic fields. The University Lodge, located a 
few miles from Indiana, is surrounded by 100 acres of wooded 
hillside. This not only offers opportunity for nature study by 
science and conservation classes but also provides an ideal set- 
ting for numerous activities of the university. 

In April, 1920, control and ownership of the school passed 
to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In May, 1927, by au- 
thority of the General Assembly, the State Normal School be- 
came a college with the right to grant degrees. The name was 
then changed to the State Teachers College at Indiana, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1960, the name was changed to Indiana State Col- 
lege setting the stage for a liberal arts program which gradu- 
ated its first students in January 1964. 

In December, 1965 Indiana was redesignated the Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania and given the right to expand its 
curricula offerings and to grant degrees at the doctoral level, 
as well as in a number of additional areas at the master's level. 

Since the founding of the university in 1875, Indiana has 
graduated over 23,000 students, and since the university be- 
came a degree conferring institution in 1927, over 14,000 de- 
grees have been granted. Many of the graduates are organized 
into a strong Alumni Association with units active in many 
sections of Pennsylvania as well as in New York, Michigan, 
and the District of Columbia. The Alumni Association cooper- 
ates with the university in many projects designed to better 
the institution and for the welfare of the students. 

Located in Indiana Borough, Indiana County seat, in the 
foothills of the Alleghenies at an elevation of about 1,300 feet, 
the Indiana University of Pennsylvania is ideally situated for 
cleanliness and beauty. The University is easily accessible by 
automobile over excellent state highway routes coming from 
all sections of the state. These leading routes are route 422 east 
and west, route 286 northeast and southwest, and route 119 
north and south. Bus passenger services operate on frequent 
schedules to and from Indiana and all nearby cities and towns 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



including Pittsburgh, Altoona, Johnstown, Butler, Punxsu- 
tawney, Kittanning, DuBois, Ridgway, New Castle and others. 
Indiana is also served by bus connections with the main line 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad at Johnstown and Pittsburgh. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The campus at the university at Indiana is frequently de- 
scribed as one of the most beautiful university campuses in the 
country. The campus proper located in the central section of 
the Indiana community contains about 190 acres of land, 23 of 
which were in the original area. In the center of the campus 
is the historic oak grove about which are grouped many of the 
main buildings, forming three sides of a quadrangle. The rest 
of the campus is made beautiful by a careful distribution of 
shrubs, flowers and vines artistically arranged. 

John Sutton Hall, constructed in 1875, was the original 
building and is the largest on the university campus at the 
present time. In addition to housing more than 1500 women 
students, it contains parlors, recreation rooms, laundry and 
ironing room, a shampoo room, and several large storage 
rooms and offices on the ground floor. The computer center, 
programming center, and library work rooms are located in 
the basement. 

Thomas Sutton Hall, erected in 1903, an addition to John 
Sutton Hall, contains a kitchen and dining room on the first 
floor, and housing for women students on the second and third 
floors. On the ground floor is located the duplicating services 
for the University. 

Clark Hall, named in honor of Justice Silas M. Clark, a 
former member of the Board of Trustees, was erected in 1906 
on the site of a building burned that year. It was used as a 
men's dormitory until 1924; from 1924 to 1960 it served as a 
dormitory for women. It has now been reconverted into an 
administration building containing offices for the president, 
the deans, graduate studies, public relations, business, and 
other administrative offices. 

Memorial Field House, completed in 1966, includes two 
large gymnasium areas, swimming pool and diving well, hand- 
ball courts, wrestling room, generous locker room and shower 
facilities, physical therapy rooms, weight rooms, team rooms, 
and a lounge area. The School of Health Services maintains of- 
fices and classrooms in this building. 

Wilson Hall, was erected in 1893 as the model school and 
was named for A. W. Wilson, third president of the Board of 
Trustees. From 1941 to 1960 the building served as the library 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



for the college. From 1960 to 1969, Wilson Hall was occupied 
by the Departments of Economics, Political Science and Soci- 
ology-Anthropology. In addition, part of the special education 
services was located on the ground floor. The Departments of 
Psychology and Criminology were moved to this building in 
1969. 

The Rhodes R. Stabley Library named for the late Dr. 
Rhodes R. Stabley, chairman of the English-Speech Depart- 
ment from 1941 to 1958, was completed in the spring of 1961. 
The three story building houses 300,000 volumes and provides 
study room for about 550 students. 

An instructional program in the use of library tools and 
reference books is carried on by the staff to develop needed 
skills in library use. The well-organized general holdings of 
250,000 volumes are enhanced by the reference collection, 
2,000 current magazines, extensive files of bound and micro- 
filmed magazines and newspapers, state and federal docu- 
ments, pamphlets and curriculum materials. 

Most materials are available by the "open stack" system 
which encourages the habit of using books freely. Students 
having access to all library materials can broaden their educa- 
tion through browsing, as well as widen their interests through 
intellectual reading. 

Comfortable reading areas have been arranged in the li- 
brary. Exhibits and displays are frequently changed as a means 
of arousing interest and supplying information. The library is 
completely air-conditioned. 

Leonard Hall, named for Jane E. Leonard, for many years 
preceptress of Indiana Normal School, was erected in 1903 as 
a recitation building, and was destroyed by fire on April 14, 
1952. A new Leonard Hall was constructed by the General 
State Authority and opened in September, 1954. The new 
building contains classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices 
for the English Department and Geography Department. 

David J. Waller Gymnasium was completed in 1928 and is 
used for the women's health and physical education program. 
It includes two gymnasiums, a swimming pool, a physical ther- 
apy room, two classrooms, and numerous offices for the fac- 
ulty. 

Jean R. McElhaney Hall, completed in 1931 houses the art, 
business, and part of the foreign languages departments, one 
entire floor being given to each. This building at one time also 
housed the department of home economics. 

John S. Fisher Auditorium, completed in 1939, has a seat- 
ing capacity of 1600, and a stage large enough to accommodate 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 41 

a cast of 100 people. Its design facilitates the presentation of 
intimate drama to a small group or spectacles to capacity audi- 
ences. Light, air, and sound may all be mechanically controlled 
by the director of any presentation. 

John A. T. Keith Hall, completed in 1939, was extensively 
renovated in 1969. History, economics, sociology-anthropology, 
and the offices of the social sciences coordinator are all in- 
cluded in this facility. 

Keith Hall Annex. This building, completed in 1961, is a 
wing of John H. Keith Hall and houses the offices of the politi- 
cal science department. 

The Art Education Annex and six acres of land were 
bought in 1947. The building has been renovated and houses 
part of the art education department. 

Old Military Hall, a war-surplus structure erected in 1947, 
is located on Grant Street. It formerly contained offices, stor- 
age rooms and two classrooms for the Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps. Presently this facility is used by the Division of 
Business Affairs as a purchasing and receiving facility. 

The University Lodge is an important location in the in- 
structional and recreational life of the university. Owned by 
students and faculty, the 100 acres of wooded hillside with its 
rustic lodge and three shelter houses, not only offers oppor- 
tunity for nature study by science and conservation classes, 
but is in frequent demand for picnics, meetings, and winter 
sports. 

Whitmyre Hall, named for Walter M. Whitmyre, who re- 
tired as dean of men in 1954 after serving for thirty-seven 
years, was completed in 1952. The dormitory houses 210 men 
students, recreational rooms, music practice rooms, dean of 
men's office, the dean of men's apartment, and the Whitmyre 
Dining Hall. 

Langham Hall, named for Judge J. Nicholas Langham, In- 
diana County Judge for twenty years and a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the University for fourteen years, was 
completed in 1960. This dormitory houses 185 men students, a 
large recreation area, lounges, study rooms, and laundry room. 

The Student Union was completed in the fall of 1960, and 
doubled in size in 1963. Another addition was added in 1965. 
It houses co-educational recreation center, the cooperative of- 
fices, some student publication offices, and other recreational 
facilities for students. This building is owned and operated 
through the Student Union Association, Inc., and the Student 
Cooperative Association, Inc., as is the modern new bookstore 
just across Garman Avenue. 



42 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Cogswell Hall, named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Hamlin E. 
Cogswell, former music department chairman and his wife — a 
teacher who composed the Alma Mater, is located on South 
Eleventh Street. The building, housing music classrooms, prac- 
tice rooms and studios, and a recital hall, was completed in 
1960. 

Wahr Hall, named for Corrine Menk Wahr of the class of 
1916 who left a large sum of money to the university for schol- 
arship purposes, is located immediately adjacent to Langham 
Hall. This dormitory, housing 152 women students, recreation 
room and (more) lounges, and quarters for an assistant dean 
of women, was completed in 1960. 

Walsh Hall, named for Dr. Matthew J. Walsh, longtime 
professor and dean of instruction at Indiana, is located to the 
immediate east of Wilson Hall. This building, housing the 
Mathematics Department, provides classrooms for 200 students 
as well as faculty offices, lecture demonstration areas, and 
seminar rooms, was completed in 1960. 

The Greenhouse of the University is used as an experi- 
mental and demonstration laboratory by the Science Depart- 
ments in the conducting of biology courses. 

The new University Infirmary (Albert R. Pechan Hall) is 
located at the corner of Maple Street and Pratt Drive. This 
modern facility was completed in 1969. 

The Athletic Field consisting of about 20 acres includes a 
baseball diamond, six all weather tennis courts, and other facil- 
ities including a track. The George P. Miller Football Stadium 
was completed in October, 1962. 

Agnes Sligh Turnbull Hall, Mabel Waller Mack Hall and 
Hope Stewart Hall, three dormitories for women students have 
been constructed on the former Memorial Athletic Field. Turn- 
bull Hall was occupied in January, 1963; the other two halls 
were occupied in the fall of 1963. 

Jennie M. Ackerman Hall, located on East Campus near 
Pratt Drive, is the new Home Economics Building. Built at an 
approximate cost of $825,000, the new building contains class- 
rooms, lunch room, and nursery school facilities. 

McClellan Gordon Hall, a dormitory for men, was com- 
pleted in January, 1964. A new four-story structure which 
houses 230 men and the office of the assistant dean of men, is 
located just north of the John A. H. Keith Hall. 

Joseph Uhler Hall, formerly Thaddeus Stevens School, has 
been completely remodeled and converted into a university 
classroom building. Located on the corner of Oakland Avenue 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 43 

and Washington Street, the building contains twelve class- 
rooms and office space for members of the foundations of edu- 
cation, educational psychology, and counseling and guidance 
departments. Part of the foreign languages department, in- 
cluding an elaborate language laboratory installed in 1968, is 
also housed here. 

Elkin Hall, a five-story girls' dormitory is located on the 
southeast corner of School Street and Oakland Avenue. Costing 
over a million dollars, the building was completed in January, 
1965, and houses 314 students. 

Foster Hall, completed in October, 1965, contains dining 
facilities for 2,000 students. This new dining hall also contains 
a cafeteria and a snack bar and coffee shop. 

John E. Davis Hall is I.U.P.'s newest classroom building. 
This unique eight-sided facility houses many departments of 
the School of Education on its six floors. Administrative of- 
fices, the elementary education department, special education 
department, learning resources and mass media department, 
various clinics, and the University School, a laboratory school 
which enrolls 160 children, are all included in this ultra modern 
structure. 

David L. Lawrence Hall, William W. Scranton Hall, and 
Raymond P. Shafer Hall are three eight-story dormitories for 
men which were first placed in use in September, 1969. More 
than 1100 men reside in these attractive and conveniently 
located buildings. 

Hill House and McFarland House, both named for long- 
time university employees are former residences now being 
used by the School of Fine Arts for art and music studios and 
offices. 

The Maintenance Building was completed in early 1969 and 
houses the maintenance offices, several shops, garages, and part 
of the storage and supply rooms of the university. 

Colonel William E. Pierce Hall is I.U.P.'s only windowless 
classroom building. This modern, air-conditioned facility pro- 
vides classrooms, offices, storage rooms, and a rifle range for 
the Department of Military Science. 

PRIVATE DORMITORIES 

Private investors have completed several private dormi- 
tories adjacent to the university campus and these facilities 
provide housing for undergraduate students. 

Leininger Hall, located on Oakland Avenue and School 
Street, houses 100 women students on the second and third 



44 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

floors. On the ground floor is located the head resident's apart- 
ment and lounge area. Also on the ground floor is located a 
shopping complex, including a drug store, a beauty salon, a 
dairy store, record shop, and a local dry-cleaning pickup sta- 
tion. 

Grant House, located on Grant Street and Wayne Avenue, 
houses 60 women and provides the required facilities for 
housing undergraduate women. 

Algonquin Hall is located on Wayne Avenue and houses 

fifty women. 

Stone Manor is located on Wayne Avenue and houses forty 

women students. 

LeRoy Hall is located on Wayne Avenue and houses 222 
women. In addition, it provides the necessary lounges, laundry, 
study areas and the apartment for the head resident. 

Locust House, located on Locust Street, houses thirty un- 
dergraduate women students. 

Oakland Hall, located on Thirteenth Street and Oakland 
Avenue, provides housing for 260 men students. Included in 
this facility are lounge areas, television room, concessions area, 
laundry and head resident's apartment. 

Rooney Hall, located on Thirteenth Street and Oakland 
Avenue, provides housing for 250 men. Included in this facility 
are lounge areas, study rooms, laundry room, and a head resi- 
dent's apartment. 

Wyoming Hall, located on Oakland Avenue, houses 140 
women students on three floors, including lounges, recreation 
area, laundry room, study rooms and a head resident's apart- 
ment. 

Conestoga Hall, located on Grant Street, houses 180 women 
students. This building has three floors providing accommoda- 
tions for 180 women students, including lounge areas, study 
areas, a laundry area and a head resident's apartment. 

Carriage House is an apartment type facility for 400-600 
women students which was completed in 1968. The university 
leases eight apartment units for its Home Management pro- 
gram. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania offers programs of 
study leading to the degrees: Master of Arts, Master of Edu- 
cation, or Master of Science. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



A qualified graduate student may earn the Master of Arts 
Degree in English, History, Geography, and Counseling Serv- 
ices. The Master of Education Degree is offered in Art, Busi- 
ness, English, Elementary, Mathematics, Counselor Education, 
Social Science, Music, Geography, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, 
Elementary Science, Science, Special Education, Speech & 
Hearing, Spanish, and Home Economics. A program leading to 
the Master of Science Degree is available in Mathematics and 
Geography and Physics. A non-degree program leading to cer- 
tification as "Learning Resources Specialist" is available. 

The primary purposes of the graduate programs at Indiana 
are: To encourage excellence in scholarship, to provide for 
depth in the student's special field, and to stimulate enthusi- 
asm for continued cultural and professional growth. 

Graduate credit is issued to students who are admitted to 
the Graduate School and who are registered in the graduate 
courses. (Courses numbered 500 or above.) 

The graduate programs and courses are not listed in this 
bulletin but are shown in the "Graduate Bulletin." Interested 
persons should write to the Dean of the Graduate School for 
information regarding admission, course offerings, and degree 
requirements. 

Applicants must qualify for admission to the Graduate 
School. Applications for admission should be filed with the 
Dean of the Graduate School at least six weeks before the 
beginning of the session in which the student wishes to initiate 
study. Admission to the Graduate School is governed by the 
following policy which has been established by the Graduate 
Council: 

1. The applicant must present a Bachelor's degree from a 
college or university that has been accredited by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools or the appropriate regional accrediting agency. 

2. The applicant must present a transcript of his under- 
graduate work showing a 2.5 honor point value for all 
four years of his undergraduate work. The 2.5 assumes 
a grade of A to have 4 honor points per credit hour, a 
grade of B to have 3 honor points per credit hour, and a 
grade of C to have 2 honor points per credit hour. If the 
applicant's undergraduate record does not meet this 2.5 
honor point value, or if he is a graduate of an unac- 
credited college, he may be admitted by making a satis- 
factory score on an entrance qualification examination. 

3. If the applicant is in the field of Education and inter- 
ested in certification, he must possess a Provisional 
Pennsylvania Teacher's Certificate or its equivalent in 
the field in which he wishes to do graduate study. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



4. A satisfactory recommendation must be obtained from 
the applicant's undergraduate department or from 
qualified references. 

5. Students applying for the degree in Music Education 
must present evidence of musical maturity by means of 
a tape recording of their major area of music perform- 
ance. This should be mailed to the chairman of the 
Music Department with a covering letter at the time of 
application. 

THE SUMMER SESSIONS 

The Summer School is an integral part of the year's work. 
Students from other colleges, teachers in service and students 
in regular attendance can secure in the summer session three 
to twelve hours credit toward any certificate or toward grad- 
uation in any curriculum. The courses are planned primarily 
for those who have had previous work and for those who are 
accelerating their work. An effort is made to meet all reason- 
able requests of teachers who are working toward higher cer- 
tification or toward graduation. 

All courses given in the summer session require the same 
amount of time and are granted the same credit as if taken 
during a regular semester. The Summer School Bulletin will 
be mailed to anyone desiring more complete information re- 
garding the courses to be offered. 

Dates. Three sessions, two of three weeks and one of six 
weeks, are planned for the summer of 1969. The pre-session 
will open Monday, June 9 and close Friday, June 27. The main 
session starts Monday, June 30 and continues to Friday, August 
8. The post-session opens Monday, August 11 and closes, 
Friday, August 29. It is thus possible for a student to secure 
three to twelve credits by attending the summer school. 

Address Director of Summer Sessions for special bulletin 
indicating courses and activities of the Summer Session. 

THE RHODES R. STABLEY LIBRARY 

Named for the late Dr. Rhodes R. Stabley, chairman of the 
English-Speech Department from 1941 to 1958, was completed 
in the spring of 1961. The three story building will eventually 
house 380,000 books and provide study room for about 550 
students. 

An instructional program in the use of library tools and 
reference books is carried on by the staff to develop needed 
skills in library use. The well-organized general holdings of 
300,000 volumes are enhanced by the reference collection, 2,500 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 47 

current magazines, extensive files of bound and microfilmed 
magazines and newspapers, state and federal documents, pam- 
phlets, and curriculum materials. 

Most materials are available by the "open stack" system 
which encourages the habit of using books freely. Students 
having access to all library materials can broaden their edu- 
cation through browsing, as well as widen their interests 
through intellectual reading. 

Comfortable reading areas have been arranged in the 
library. Exhibits and displays are frequently changed as a 
means of arousing interest and supplying information. 

LIBRARY HOURS: Monday through Thursday: 7:45 A.M. 
to 10:30 P.M.; Friday: 7:45 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.; Saturday: 7:45 
A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Sunday: 2:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. 

HOW TO APPLY FOR ADMISSION 

1. Request an application form and catalog by writing to 
or visiting the Registrar's Office, Clark Hall, Indiana Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania 15701. 

THE SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST 

2. Plan to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test ("the College 
Boards") before January 1 of your senior year of high school. 
The Admissions Committee recommends that you first take the 
test in the spring of your junior year because your application, 
if complete, may receive early consideration in the fall of your 
senior year. If you have an excellent high school record and 
strong College Board scores, your application for admission 
may be approved by December 1 of your senior year. 

3. Whether you take the College Boards in your junior 
year or not you are REQUIRED to take the test no later than 
December of your senior year. This requirement includes 
those applicants who are admitted early. 

4. To arrange to take the College Boards, write to The 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, 
New Jersey 08540 for an information pamphlet and test ap- 
plication. You may also make arrangements through your 
principal or H. S. Guidance Counselor. 

5. When you receive the information and test application, 
fill out the test application and designate the Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania as one of the schools that you want 
to receive a copy of your test scores. Return the test applica- 
tion to the Princeton, N.J. address. 

6. Take the test on the scheduled date. 



48 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

THE ADMISSION APPLICATION FORM 

(Blue and White forms) 

7. Your admission application is in three forms — one blue 
and two white. If one of these papers is missing, please write 
for it. 

8. You may fill out and submit the blue form and the 
white mailing label sheet after JULY 15 of the summer fol- 
lowing completion of your junior year. Women MUST submit 
the blue form before NOVEMBER 1 of their senior year. Men 
MUST submit the blue form before JANUARY 1 of their 
senior year. Limited housing and classrooms make the above 
closure dates necessary. 

9. When you submit the blue form, enclose a check or 
money order for ten dollars payable to the Indiana University 
of Pennsylvania. This money will be used to meet the cost of 
filing and processing your application. 

10. Mail the blue form and the $10 application fee (pay- 
able the Indiana University of Pennsylvania) to the Admis- 
sions Office, Clark Hall, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 
Indiana, Pennsylvania 15701. 

11. After September 10 of your senior year give the white 
form to your high school principal or guidance counselor and 
ask that the form be filled out and mailed directly to the Ad- 
missions Office. Photocopies of your high school record may 
be attached to the white form. 

12. Your application is complete when the Admissions 
Committee receives your Senior College Board test results 
(usually by February 1), high school record (white form) the 
blue applicant information form and the application fee. In 
some cases the Committee may request additional information 
such as a list of senior year subjects or a senior grade report. 

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER MY APPLICATION 
IS COMPLETE? 

1. The Admissions Committee will try to read, with care 
and understanding, each of the several thousand applications 
that are submitted each year. 

2. Those persons who, in the Committee's judgment, meet 
its high standards for early admission receive by November 
20, letters of admission. Decisions on most applications are de- 
ferred until later in the year. Final action on a completed 
application takes from 8 to 16 weeks depending on the number 
of applications that must be read. This delay is necessary if 
each application is to be examined carefully. Applicants who 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 49 

are not given early admission can expect a decision by March 
15. 

3. If you are admitted to an entering class, you are re- 
quired to visit the campus on an appointed date to discuss 
your academic and career plans with deans and other inter- 
ested advisors. Choosing a major and possible career is an 
important problem for young men and women. We hope that 
early consultation with knowledgeable advisors will help you 
make these crucial decisions. 

4. The medical examination form will be mailed to every 
applicant at the time his admission is confirmed. 

5. Your campus interview and the payment of the $15 ad- 
vance registration fee completes the processing of your appli- 
cation and signifies your intention to attend the Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students at other colleges seeking to transfer to the Uni- 
versity should file an official transcript of all college work and 
ask the college dean to forward a statement certifying that the 
student is entitled to honorable dismissal from that institution. 
Your high school transcript and college board scores should 
also be submitted. All of these items should be mailed to the 
Assistant Director of Admissions, 315 Clark Hall. If you are 
not eligible to continue at your present college for academic 
or other reasons you should NOT attempt to transfer to Indi- 
ana. Students with average or below average academic records 
should NOT attempt to transfer to the University. Due to space 
limitations the Admissions Committee will not be able to con- 
sider transfer applications for January 1970. 

DEADLINES FOR TRANSFER APPLICATIONS FOR SEP- 
TEMBER 1970 

Female Transfer Applicants: November 1, 1969 
Male Transfer Applicants: January 1, 1970 

APPLICATIONS FOR PART TIME STUDY 

1. If you plan to take day classes Monday through Friday 
write to or visit Room 315, Clark Hall, Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania and ask for the application for part-time study. 

2. If you plan to take evening or Saturday classes con- 
tact the office of the Dean of the School of Continuing and 
Non-Resident Education, Room 217, Clark Hall. 

3. Fill out the application for part-time study and return 
it to Clark Hall before the appropriate deadline 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Deadline for Fall semester: August 25 
Deadline for Spring semester: January 15 

NOTE: A new application form must be completed prior 
to EACH SEMESTER of part-time study. One form does not 
cover all future part-time work. 

4. Please arrange for a copy of your transcripts from other 
colleges and universities that you have attended to be sub- 
mitted to the Admissions Office. 

5. At the end of 15 credit hours of course work a part-time 
student must have a 1.6 cumulative average to continue. At 
the end of 30 credit hours a part-time student must have a 
cumulative average of 2.0 to continue. Those persons who do 
not attain a 1.6 cumulative average at the end of 15 credit 
hours or a 2.0 average at the end of 30 credit hours cannot 
continue part-time study. 

DEGREE CANDIDACY 

If a part-time student completes 15 credit hours of "C" 
work in academic subjects and has a cumulative average of 
2.0 or better, he may inquire at the Admissions Office about 
the procedure for becoming a degree candidate. Part-time stu- 
dents who have successfully petitioned for degree candidacy 
may seek full-time status by writing to the Dean of their 
school at least three months in advance of the semester they 
want to begin as a full-time student. Students who want to be 
degree candidates must submit a high school transcript and 
College Board scores to the Assistant Director of Admissions, 
315 Clark Hall. 

READMISSION POLICY FOR STUDENTS WHO 
WITHDRAW FROM THE UNIVERSITY VOLUNTARILY 

Students who withdraw from the University on a volun- 
tary basis for reasons of health, financial difficulty, etc., and 
wish to re-enter, will need to notify in writing the Dean of the 
School in which they were enrolled as to their intent. This 
notification should be, at least, three months in advance of the 
beginning of the semester in which they wish to re-enter the 
University. The preceding guidelines apply also to part-time 
degree candidates desiring full-time status for any given 
semester. 

PRE-PROGRAMMING AND REGISTRATION 

Students who are in full-time enrollment status are given 
the opportunity to pre-program with departmental advisors 
for the next semester of attendance. Students will pre-program 
in March for the first semester and in May for the pre summer 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA II 

session. Pre-programming for the second semester occurs in 
October. Class cards for the courses selected are pulled in the 
Programming Center at designated dates shortly after such 
pre-programming. Prospective freshmen will prepare a pro- 
gram of studies with departmental advisors during interview 
dates preceding the semester of entrance. 

All students will accomplish registration and payment of 
fees by mail for the first and second semesters of each year. 
Registration materials are mailed to the student's home ad- 
dress and should be returned according to the schedule listed 
elsewhere in the catalog. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Absence and Tardiness. The university has no cut system 
of absenteeism. In case of absence or tardiness, the student 
will fill out a blank and present it to the teacher for admission 
to the class. 

The professor will pass judgment on the merits of the 
excuse and handle the matter accordingly. 

The blanks will be available at any department office. 

This plan puts the responsibility first upon the student, 
second upon the professor, and third upon the Deans of the 
Undergraduate Schools, who may in turn furnish the adviser 
and the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women with whatever 
information is necessary for a follow-up. 

Whenever a professor feels that any student has been ab- 
sent or tardy to an extent that might endanger scholastic 
standing, the professor will report the fact promptly to the 
office of the Dean of the appropriate undergraduate school. 

Grades. The following grades are used in reporting the 
standing of students at the end of each semester or summer 
term: A, excellent; B, good; C, average; D, passed; F, failed; 
I, incomplete. 

A grade of F can be cleared only by repeating the course 
in the regular way. The grade of I is used to record work 
which so far as covered, is of passing grade, but is incomplete 
because of personal illness or other unavoidable reason. It 
must be made up within two months after the student returns 
to the university. 

Quality Points. Quality points are assigned as follows: 
Grade A, 4 quality points per semester hour; B, 3 quality 
points per semester hour; C, 2 quality points per semester 
hour; D, 1 quality point per semester hour and F, no quality 
points. 



62 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

To qualify for graduation, a student must have secured 
twice as many quality points as the number of semester hours 
he has earned in this university toward his degree. Quality 
points are not counted on grades from other schools and a 
student transferring from another school is held responsible 
for quality points only on work taken in this University. 

Advisory System. Purpose of the advisory system is to 
assist the student in his orientation of university life. Each 
student is assigned to a faculty adviser who confers with him 
relative to his program, his activities, his academic work, the 
evaluation of his progress and his education in values. At mid- 
semester teachers make reports of unsatisfactory work to the 
student's adviser. The adviser consults with the student re- 
ported with the thought of assisting him to improve his status 
by the end of the semester. 

Grade Reports. About a week after each semester or sum- 
mer session a full report is given or mailed to every student. 
Parents do not receive reports as it is assumed that university 
students are sufficiently mature and trustworthy to report the 
facts to their parents. 

Criteria Governing Continuance in the University. The 

following policy will apply to students who begin their college 
studies in September 1968: Freshmen will be required to attain 
a quality point average of 1.6. Sophomores, a quality point 
average of 2.0. These students will be given until the close of 
the Main summer session following their academic year to 
attain these averages. Juniors and Seniors will likewise be 
given to the close of the Main summer session to maintain a 
quality point average of 2.0. 

Grade point averages will be computed by the total credits 
attempted including those for repeat courses. According to the 
new system the sum of all course credits including repeats will 
be divided into the total quality points to calculate the grade 
point ratio. However, this methods of computation will not 
apply retroactively to student averages compiled before Sep- 
tember 1, 1968, save for Summer School 1968 ABC students. 

Any student failing to meet the above criteria will be dis- 
missed from the university and will not be considered for re- 
admission until the lapse of one academic year. 

If the student chooses to avail himself of the procedure 
provided for him to seek readmission, it will be his responsi- 
bility to notify in writing the Office of the Dean of the School 
in which he was enrolled at the time of his dismissal and the 
Office of the Dean of Students before April 1, if requesting 
readmission for the following summer sessions or for the Fall 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 53 

semester starting in September. Written requests must be 
made to the above mentioned offices before November 1, if 
requesting readmission for the Spring semester starting in 
January. 

Acceptable Academic Standing. A freshman student must 
attain a cumulative average of 1.6 by the end of his first aca- 
demic year, or by the end of the Main summer session follow- 
ing his first academic year in college. All other students in the 
university must maintain a C or 2.0 average on all work com- 
pleted in the university. 

Full-Time Student is one who is carrying a minimum of 
12 semester hours during a regular semester or during the full 
12 weeks summer sessions. 

Classification of Students. Students are placed in one of 
four classes according to progress towards graduation. 

A freshman has less than 30 semester hours and 62 quality 
points. 

A sophomore has at least 30 semester hours and 62 quality 
points but has not attained junior standing. (Transfers having 
30 or more semester hours are so classified for one semester.) 

A junior has applied for junior standing and has been ap- 
proved. (See Junior Standing explanation, below.) 

A senior has been approved for junior standing and has 
earned 96 or more semester hours. (Persons holding degrees 
may be classified as seniors.) 

Junior Standing. The main purpose of junior standing is to 
screen the student at the close of his sophomore year to assure 
him that success in a university is evident; and that the uni- 
versity intends to recommend him for a position if he main- 
tains his progress at the same level. Formal admission to junior 
standing is a requisite for continuing the program in the uni- 
versity. 

A student who is enrolled in his fourth semester of uni- 
versity work or who will have at least 57 semester hours at 
the end of the current semester must apply for junior stand- 
ing during the current semester. 

This application should be filled out completely by the 
student and his advisor and turned in to the office of the Dean 
of his School on or before the deadline set for the current 
semester. Each application is taken under advisement for ap- 
proval or rejection by the Committee of Academic Standards 
within that School. 

Students must meet the following requirements to obtain 
approval for junior standing: 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



1. The scholastic record must be "C" average or better for 
the first two years of work taken by the student, with 
a minimum of 57 semester hours, and the student must 
continue in good standing. 

2. A passing grade must be attained in English I and Eng- 
lish II. Students who transfer English credits to Indiana 
and are given credit for English II must attain at least 
a "C" grade in English I. If less than a "C" is earned, it 
will be necessary for the student to take English II. 

3. An adequate level of achievement as measured by the 
sophomore examinations in Reading, Writing, Mathe- 
matics, Social Studies, and Science will be required. A 
student who fails any one of the examinations must re- 
peat the test or tests the next semester or summer ses- 
sion he is in college. Some students may be advised to 
take additional course (s) in the areas where test scores 
are lowest. 

4. For the School of Education the voice must be free 
from objectionable qualities. Students who have failed 
to pass a speech test are required to take corrective 
work in the Speech Clinic until their deficiencies, if 
remediable, have been overcome. Irremediable cases are 
given special consideration by the committee. 

5. The student should manifest academic and social ma- 
turity, professional zeal, and social consciousness. Ad- 
ditionally, he should have proved himself to be depend- 
able, co-operative and to possess high principles and 
good moral character. Preferably, he should participate 
in some extra-curricular activities. 

6. The student must have the endorsement of his depart- 
ment. A student who fails to receive the endorsement 
of his department should clarify his standing with the 
department or change his major field. 

Students who fail to meet the above requirements will be 
given one semester or summer session to make them up. Stu- 
dents who fail to clear their deficiencies at the time of the 
second application will be dismissed from the university. 

After the first application for Junior Standing only one 
department change will be permitted. If the student, after his 
first application, changes his department it is his responsibility 
to see that his new department has every opportunity to eval- 
uate him as a candidate for a degree in that particular area. 

Credentials will be examined by the Committees on Aca- 
demic Standards and decisions will be reached on the basis 
of all evidence available. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 66 

FEES, DEPOSITS, REPAYMENTS 

(Subject To Change) 
Basic Semester Fee 

The basic fee for all students is $175.00 

This fee covers registration and the keeping of records of 
students, library, student welfare, health services (other than 
extra nurse and quarantine) , and laboratory facilities. 

Students taking NINE or fewer semester hours shall pay 
at the rate of $17.50 per semester hour. Students taking more 
than NINE semester hours shall pay the regular basic fees. 

OTHER FEES 

Housing Fee. The housing fee for students is $306.00 per 
semester. This includes room, meals in one of the college din- 
ing rooms, and laundry of sheets and pillow cases. 

Out-of-State Fee. Out-of-state students pay a basic fee of 
$20.00 per semester hour of credit. 

Student Activity Fee. An activity fee is collected from all 
students and administered through the Student Cooperative 
Association under regulations approved by the Board of Trus- 
tees. This fee of $20.00 per semester covers the cost of student 
activities in athletics, lectures, entertainment, student publi- 
cations, etc., and is payable in one sum for the semester at the 
time of registration. A fee of $7.50 is charged for Saturday 
campus and part time students. 

Late Registration Fee. Each student registering after the 
date officially set for registration is required to pay an addi- 
tional fee of $1.00 per day until the student is in regular at- 
tendance (except when permission for late registration has 
been secured in advance from the President because of illness 
or other unavoidable causes), provided that the total amount 
of the late Registration Fee shall not exceed $5.00. The same 
regulation shall apply to approved inter-semester payments. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Private Instruction in Music: The vocal and instrumental 
fee per semester is $50.00. 

Damage Fee. Students are responsible for damages, break- 
age, loss, or delayed return of university property. 

Infirmary Fee. After three days in the university infirmary 
the University shall charge students who regularly eat in the 
university dining room an additional $1.00 for each day. Stu- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



dents who room at the university but do not eat in the uni- 
versity dining room shall pay $3.00 per day after the third day. 
Day students admitted to the infirmary pay board at the rate 
of $3.00 a day. This charge includes the regular nurse and reg- 
ular medical service but does not include special nurse or 
special medical service. 

Degree Fee. A fee of $5.00 to cover the cost of a diploma 
must be paid by each candidate for a degree. 

Transcript Fees. A fee of $1.00 is charged for the second 
and each subsequent transcript of records. 

Delinquent Accounts. No student shall be enrolled, grad- 
uated, or receive a transcript of his records until all previous 
charges have been paid. 

Other Charges. In addition to the above fees the average 
student will require approximately $75.00 per semester for 
books, gymnasium costume, student organization dues, etc. 

Military Fee. An Activity Fee of $3.00 is required of all 
ROTC Cadets. 

Advance Registration Deposit. A deposit of $15.00 must be 
made when students are accepted for enrollment. This $15.00 
may be deducted when the first semester fees are paid but is 
not refundable. 

Private Accounts. As a convenience to students, personal 
deposits may be made in the Student Co-operative Book Store 
and drawn against by countercheck from time to time. A small 
fee will be charged for this service. 

SUMMER SESSIONS FEES 

Basic Fee for Six-Weeks Summer Session. The fee for stu- 
dents enrolled for the regular Summer Session is $17.50 per 
semester hour. A minimum basic fee of $52.50 is charged. 

Activity Fee. For the regular summer session the fee is 
$7.00 and for the pre- and post-summer sessions, $3.50. 

Housing Fee. For the regular summer sessions the fee is 
$102.00 and for the pre- and post-sessions, $51.00. This fee in- 
cludes room, meals and the laundry of sheets and pillow cases. 

Out-of-State Fees. Students who are not residents of Penn- 
sylvania will pay a basic fee of $20.00 per semester hour with 
a minimum charge of $60.00 for each session. 

REPAYMENTS 

No refunds will be made to students who are temporarily 
suspended, indefinitely suspended, dismissed, or who volun- 
tarily withdraw from the university. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 57 

For personal illness, if certified to by an attending physi- 
cian, or for other reasons approved by the Board of Trustees, 
the housing and basic fees for that part of the semester which 
the student does not spend in the university will be refunded. 

TIME OF PAYMENTS 

Payment in full of all Pre-Session fees June 9, 1969 

Payment in full of all Main Summer Session fees June 30, 1969 
Payment in full of all Post-Session fees . . . August 11, 1969 
Payment for the first half of first semester . August 12, 1969 
Payment for the second half of first semester 

November 4-6, 1969 
Payment for the first half of second semester 

December 12, 1969 
Payment for the second half of second semester 

March 18-20, 1970 
Payment for the entire semester may be made in Septem- 
ber and January if desired. Above dates are for 1969-70. Dates 
for 1970-71 will be about the same. Exact dates for 1970-71 may 
be secured from the university's registrar or business office. 

HOW BILLS AND CHARGES ARE TO BE PAID 

All bills, including basic fee and housing fee, are payable 
on enrollment day for at least the first nine weeks. Paj^ment 
must be made by the student at registration. Checks or money 
orders, in the exact amount of the account, should be made 
payable to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Book Store 
purchases are on a cash basis. Checks for Activity Fee should 
be separate and made payable to the Student Cooperative 
Association. 

Students will not be permitted to enroll for any semester 
until all bills previously incurred have been paid; nor will 
credit be certified to other institutions or to the Department of 
Public Instruction until all overdue accounts have been paid. 

Students desiring to leave school before the close of a se- 
mester must report to the dean of students, registrar and to 
the business office to settle all unpaid accounts. 

Meal tickets for visitors can be obtained in the Slater 
Company office. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The financial aid program at Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania is administered through the office of the Director of 
Financial Aids. A single financial aid application form is used 
for both scholarships and loans. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



All students who are applying for financial aid at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania must also submit the Parent's Con- 
fidential Statement of the College Scholarship Service. This 
form may be obtained from your high school counselor, prin- 
cipal, or the College Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton, 
New Jersey. Applications for financial aid from entering fresh- 
men must be on file in the Financial Aids Office by March 1 
for those entering college in September, and by November 1 
for those entering college in the following January. 

Upperclassmen making a request must also have a Par- 
ents' Confidential Statement on file. This Statement can be 
secured at the Office of Financial Aids. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

M. Vashti Burr Memorial Award. The sum of $100 is 
awarded annually to that student of Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania who is deemed by the faculty to be most de- 
serving, having in mind his or her economic need and the ex- 
cellence of his or her industry and scholarship. This award is 
given through the generosity of Mr. William V. Whittington, 
Washington, D. C. 

Clark Scholarship. The Lieutenant Alpheus Bell Clark 
Memorial Scholarship was established by Mr. and Mrs. Steele 
Clark, Cherry Tree, Indiana County, in memory of their son. 
The sum of seventy-five dollars will be awarded each semester 
to that young man or woman, a senior in the University and a 
resident of Indiana County, who in the opinion of a committee 
chosen by the President, best qualifies for the honor in terms 
of academic ability, leadership, and service to the University 
with preference going to a veteran, or a son or a daughter of 
a veteran. 

Harriet Farr Davis Scholarship in the Fine Arts. This 
scholarship worth fifty dollars ($50) is awarded each year to a 
senior in the Art Department who best meets a number of 
criteria established for this award. This scholarship was estab- 
lished by Dr. Guy P. Davis, a retired member of the faculty, 
in honor of his wife, Harriet Farr Davis. 

Educational Opportunity Grants. The University receives 
under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 a sum of money 
to be given to students from "exceptionally low-income fami- 
lies" a grant from $200 to $800 a year. This grant must, how- 
ever, be matched with some other aid from either the institu- 
tion or an outside source. These grants are for four years. 

Elementary Scholarship Award. Through the generosity of 
Mrs. Julia Bitner, Class of 1951, of the Elementary Education 
Department, an annual scholarship award of $50 is made each 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 69 

year to a senior in the Elementary Education Department who 
has maintained a fine academic record and who has strong 
professional promise. 

Extension Homemaker Scholarships. Homemakers partici- 
pating in the Home Economics Extension program contribute 
funds annually for scholarships to be given to sophomores, 
juniors or seniors who are majoring in home economics in 
several colleges in the state. Indiana awards six on the basis 
of 4-H experience, need, scholarship and other outstanding 
characteristics. Each award is for $200 a year. 

Gorell Educational Fund Scholarships. Each year several 
scholarships are granted to entering freshmen at Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. These scholarships are granted on the 
basis of need and academic record and are granted to Western 
Pennsylvania students. Funds for these scholarships come from 
the Gorell Educational Fund administered through the Pitts- 
burgh Foundation. 

J & J Scholarship. This Scholarship of $100 is given to a 
worthy student from the Indiana County area. The student 
must have a high scholastic average and be in need of financial 
assistance. 

Junior Chamber of Commerce Awards. These awards are 
given annually to juniors selected by the officers of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce and the Business Education Depart- 
ment faculty for $35 each for one semester only. 

Kappa Delta Pi Scholarships. The Kappa Delta Pi Scholar- 
ship was established by the Beta Gamma Chapter of this uni- 
versity to honor that member of the sophomore class who is 
judged to be the ideal university student. This award of 
twenty-five dollars is made each year by a committee of the 
local chapter and is awarded on the basis of scholarship. The 
Beta Gamma Chapter beginning with the 1961-62 college year 
is also offering an award of $25.00 to the graduate student at 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania with the best academic 
record. 

Law Enforcement Scholarships. Five full-tuition scholar- 
ships at $280 each and five half-tuition scholarships at $140 
each will be awarded to students in the Criminology program. 
The scholarships are given by the U. S. Department of Justice, 
Office of Law Enforcement Assistance. Applications and infor- 
mation can be secured from the Director of Criminology, 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania. 

Ray Metzel Mellowmen Scholarship. One scholarship is 
given annually to that junior or senior who is a member of 
the Mellowmen. The scholarship is worth $200 for one year. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Monday Musical Club String Scholarship. The Monday 
Musical Club of Indiana, Pennsylvania, gives a scholarship in 
the amount of $100 good for one year only to a string major 
in the Music Department. 

The Club also gives $100 Scholarship to a Homer Center 
High School senior that is going into the music field. 

Morris Scholarships. The Helen Wood Morris Scholarships 
were established by Lieutenant-Colonel L. M. Morris, of Al- 
toona in memory of his wife, a graduate of the university. The 
sum of $125 will be awarded annually to students selected by 
a committee named by the institution, one award to a sopho- 
more, the other to a junior. Students chosen must be in the 
highest quarter of their class, must be in need of financial 
assistance, and must have demonstrated worthiness in terms 
of character, personality, leadership, and American citizenship. 

Operation Friendship Scholarship. The award is given to 
a foreign student who demonstrates good will, character and 
scholastic achievement at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. 
The Loan and Scholarship Committee will name the recipient. 

Ethyl V. Oxley Scholarships. Each year the Alumni of the 
Home Economics Department awards $75.00 scholarships to 
one, two or three outstanding students in the department. 
Awards are based on evidence of such characteristics as de- 
pendability, initiative in worthwhile professional experiences, 
accepting responsibility, social sensitivity and sincerity in deal- 
ing with people, sense of values, personality and scholarship. 

The Lenora Pechan Scholarship. The Lenora Pechan 
Scholarship is awarded by Dr. Albert R. Pechan, a member of 
the Senate of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and of the 
Board of Trustees of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
in the amount of $100 each year ($50 each semester) to a 
sophomore student, a member of the Reserve Officer Training 
Corps, who has been an outstanding student in the ROTC and 
whose other academic work is satisfactory. First priority will 
be given to a student from Armstrong County, selected by the 
officers of the Reserve Officers Training Corps and the Faculty 
Scholarship and Loan Committee. 

Pennsylvania Federation of Women's Clubs Scholarships. 

At least four scholarships of $100 each are offered annually to 
students in the art education department. These scholarships 
are provided by voluntary contributions from clubs to "Pen- 
nies For Art Fund," by the Pennsylvania Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 

Raymond P. Phillips Athletic Scholarship. The Raymond 
P. Phillips Scholarship was established in 1966. A committee 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYL VANIA 61 

was named by the donor to handle all applications. The Direc- 
tor of Financial Aids is Chairman. Two scholarships at $200 
each are given each year. The Scholarship holder must be par- 
ticipating in the sport to remain eligible. 

Presser Foundation Scholarship. The Presser Foundation 
of Philadelphia awards two scholarships each year to music 
students at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Interested 
music students should apply through the chairman of the 
music department. 

Quota Club Scholarship. The Quota Club of Indiana has 
established a scholarship of $100 per year. Senior girls in 
Speech and Hearing are eligible. Interested persons please 
contact the Director of Speech and Hearing for information. 

ROTC Scholarships. The United States Army offers sev- 
eral two and four year scholarships. The United States Army 
pays for tuition, laboratory fees, textbooks and other required 
expenses except room and board. In addition the student re- 
ceives $50 per month for the duration of the scholarship, ex- 
cept for a six-week Summer Camp Program where the pay is 
$151.95 per month. To qualify the student must complete the 
ROTC program and must display a strong desire for a career 
as a Regular Army Officer. Instructions on how to apply may 
be obtained from the Professor of Military Science. 

Hannah Kent Schoff Memorial Scholarship. Annually a 
scholarship worth six hundred dollars ($600) will be awarded 
to two entering freshmen at Indiana University of Pennsyl- 
vania. Applicants must be graduates of Pennsylvania High 
Schools who wish to prepare for teaching. Application forms 
may be obtained by writing the Financial Aid Office, Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania. Applica- 
tions must be filed prior to March 1st of each year. 

Secondary Education Club Scholarship. The Secondary 
Education Club grants a one-year scholarship for $50 to a 
secondary upperclassman. 

Service Club Scholarships. The Kiwanis, Lions, and Rotary 
Clubs of Indiana, Pennsylvania, have scholarship programs 
which provide financial aid for approximately 16 students per 
year at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. These scholarships 
are administered by the local service clubs with assistance 
from the Financial Aid Office at the University. 

Sgriccia Brothers Memorial Scholarships. Each year three 
scholarship awards of $100 each are granted to a senior in each 
of the following high schools: Marion Center, Penns Manor, 
and Purchase Line. These awards are made to a senior boy 
or girl planning to attend Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



62 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

who has attained the highest academic average during the 
tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade years. Funds for these 
scholarships have been provided by the Sgriccia Brothers of 
Clymer, Pennsylvania. 

State Scholarships. The Department of Public Instruction 
annually awards scholarships on the basis of competitive ex- 
aminations held in November of each year. These are awarded 
in each county and senatorial district in the state. Each schol- 
arship is worth $200 a year for four years and may be used 
at the State Colleges. Inquiries concerning State Scholarships 
should be sent to State Scholarship Program, Division of 
Guidance and Testing, Department of Public Instruction, P.O. 
Box 911, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

String Scholarship Fund. This Scholarship information can 
be secured from the Music Department. We want to thank the 
following for their contributions: Bruno's Restaurant; First 
National Bank in Indiana, Pennsylvania; Indiana Music House; 
and Pepsi Cola Bottling Corp. 

Student Council Foreign Student Scholarships. The Stu- 
dent Council grants four full scholarships annually to foreign 
students who have not previously been in the United States, 
and who can complete their proposed program in one academic 
year. Applications should be submitted to the Foreign Student 
Adviser no later than March. 

Syntron Foundation Scholarships. Through the Syntron 
Foundation of Homer City, four 4-year scholarships are award- 
ed annually to freshmen. These scholarships are worth $350 
per year. Eighteen scholarships are in effect each year. Prefer- 
ence is given to graduates of Blairsville, Homer City, and 
Indiana High Schools and other high schools in the county. 
Applications must be filed with the Director of Financial Aids 
by March 2. Nine of these scholarships are identified as C. S. 
Weyandt Memorial Scholarships and the other nine are identi- 
fied as J. A. Metz Memorial Scholarships. 

Theta Xi Scholarships. Each year through the generosity 
of the Theta Xi National Men's Fraternity four scholarships of 
full tuition are granted to students at Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. Two of these scholarships are granted to mem- 
bers of the Beta Lambda Chapter of the Theta Xi. Two are 
granted to members of the student body at large. 

J. M. Uhler Memorial Scholarships. In honor of a former 
President of the University, and a past President of the Indi- 
ana Kiwanis Club, this organization awards a $100 per semes- 
ter scholarship for the recipient's four years in school showing 
adequate scholastic progress. These scholarships are available 
to graduates of high schools within Indiana County. This fund 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 68 

is administered by the J. M. Uhler Scholastic Committee of 
the Indiana Kiwanis Club. 

Corinne Menk Wahr Scholarships. Through the generosity 
of Corinne Menk Wahr. Class of 1916, approximately fifteen 
scholarships are awarded each year to worthy students. The 
amounts range from fifty to one hundred and forty-four dol- 
lars, payable in the designated amount for each of four years. 
Applicants for Wahr Scholarships must be residents of Penn- 
sylvania and must be interested in the teaching profession. 
Applications may be secured from the Director, Financial Aid. 
In any one year as many as eighty students may be receiving 
a total of $9,000 of Wahr Scholarship money. Policy governing 
the scholarship fund is established by the Board of Trustees 
and administered by a committee appointed by the President 
of the University. 

Nine Wahr merit recognition scholarships of fifty dollars 
each are given each year to students at the university for ex- 
cellence in certain fields as follows: The student who excels in 
athletics; the student who contributes the most to campus wel- 
fare; the student who does the most to promote the fine arts; 
the student showing the most initiative in bringing new ideas 
or action to the Indiana campus; the student evidencing the 
most professional promise as a teacher; the student with the 
highest scholarship during the first three years of university; 
and the student who writes most effectively; and the graduate 
student with the most commendable record. 

The Norah E. Zink Football Award. Dr. Norah E. Zink, a 
retired professor of the Geography Department of Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania has established an annual award 
of $25 which she gives that member of the varsity football 
team whose academic average shows the greatest improve- 
ment over the fall semester. 

LOANS 

Jennie E. Ackerman Loan Fund. By action of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
Alumni Association, the Jennie E. Ackerman Loan Fund was 
established in 1962, by contributions from alumni and friends. 
This fund commemorates the memory of Jennie E. Ackerman 
who served as Supervisor of Student Teachers at Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania for many years and is available to 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are maintaining satisfac- 
tory academic records at the University. The maximum out- 
standing amount extended to any one student cannot exceed 
$200. Interest is at the rate of 2% payable at maturity of the 
loan. Notes extended beyond that time will carry a 6% in- 
terest charge. 



G4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Robert Bellis Scholarship Loan Fund. A loan fund has 
been established at Indiana University of Pennsylvania by 
friends and relatives in memory of Robert G. Bellis, a gradu- 
ate of Indiana State College. The Robert Bellis Scholarship 
Loan Fund, as the memorial will be known, will be used to 
grant loans to deserving students, preferably to juniors or 
seniors. Interest is at the rate of 2% payable at maturity of 
the loan. Notes extended beyond that time will carry a 6% 
interest charge. 

Jane E. Leonard Memorial Loan Fund. This loan fund was 
established several years ago and has been built up largely 
through the work of the faculty and alumni. The fund now 
totals about $30,000. The governing board in charge of grant- 
ing loans consists of a faculty committee appointed by the 
president of the University. The plan in operation provides 
for the granting of loans to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
with interest at two per cent, payable at maturity of the loan. 
In special cases of emergency a freshman may arrange for a 
short-term loan during his second semester in the university. 
The maximum outstanding loan to any student cannot exceed 
$400. Applications are available at the Director of Financial 
Aids Office. 

Thirty-day loans not to exceed $20 are available to all stu- 
dents in cases of emergency. No interest is charged. These 
loans are available upon application to the Dean of Students, 
Dean of Men, or Dean of Women. 

Mack Loan and Scholarship Fund. A loan and scholarship 
fund has been established by members of the Mack family to 
be used for making loan and scholarship grants to worthy stu- 
dents with financial need. Preference will be given to fresh- 
men and sophomores who can give evidence of academic ex- 
cellence, financial need, and promise as a future member of 
the teaching profession. At the present time the maximum loan 
available is $200 per year. Interest is at the rate of 2% payable 
at maturity of the loan. Notes extended beyond that time will 
carry a 6% interest charge. 

Dr. Joy E. Mahachek Loan Fund. A loan fund in the name 
of Dr. Joy E. Mahachek, former Chairman of the Mathematics 
Department at Indiana State College, has been established by 
the Alpha Sigma Alpha. Preference of this loan will be given 
to a sophomore with a minimum cumulative average of 2.0. 

Alan P. Mewha Geography Memorial Loan Fund. This 
fund was established in 1959 and is administered by the faculty 
of the Geography Department. Juniors and Seniors have prior- 
ity on loans from this fund. Interest rates are the same as 
those for the Jane Leonard Fund. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 65 

National Defense Student Loan Program. The National 
Defense Student Loan Program was authorized by the enact- 
ment of Public Law 85-864, the National Defense Education 
Act of 1958. The law requires that each borrower be a full- 
time undergraduate or graduate student, that he be in need 
of the amount of his loan to pursue his courses of study, and 
that he be, in the opinion of his institution, capable of main- 
taining good standing in his chosen courses of study. The law 
further provides that special consideration in the selection of 
loan recipients be given to (a) students with a superior aca- 
demic background who express a desire to teach in elementary 
or secondary schools, and (b) students whose academic back- 
ground indicates a superior capacity or preparation in science, 
mathematics, engineering, or a modern foreign language. A 
student may borrow for college expenses in one year a sum 
not exceeding one thousand dollars ($1,000), and during his 
entire course in higher education, a sum not exceeding five 
thousand dollars ($5,000). Applications are available upon re- 
quest at the office of the Director of Financial Aid. 

Rusty Preisendefer Memorial Loan Fund. This fund was 
established as a gift given by Mrs. Suzanne Preisendefer 
Brickner in memory of her husband who was killed in action 
in South Viet Nam. Preference in granting loans from this 
fund shall be given to members of the advanced R.O.T.C. and 
upperclassmen. Loans will be made up to a maximum of $400 
per individual with the first note carrying a 2% interest 
charge. Notes extended beyond that time will carry a 6% in- 
terest charge. 

Flossie Wagner Sanford Student Loan Fund. The Penn- 
sylvania Federation of Women's Clubs has established a stu- 
dent loan fund in honor of Flossie Wagner Sanford an alumna 
and former member of the faculty of Indiana State College. 
Loans from this fund are made to qualified students by the 
Faculty Loan and Scholarship Committee who need financial 
assistance. Interest is at the rate of 2% payable at the maturity 
of the loan. Notes extended beyond that time will carry a 6% 
interest charge. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon Loan Fund. Through the generosity of 
a former Tau Kappa Epsilon faculty adviser, a sum of money 
has been made available for loans to members in good stand- 
ing academically and with the fraternity. The maximum out- 
standing amount to any one student cannot exceed $400. 

Men's Varsity "I" Loan Fund. The Men's Varsity I Club 
has built up a loan fund for members of varsity athletic teams 
in good standing. Members may borrow not more than $150.00 
per year. Loans are made for a reasonable period of time and 
are interest free for the first year. Thereafter the interest rate 
is two per cent per annum. 



66 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



EMPLOYMENT 

Student Employment. Students are employed on a part- 
time basis in a number of departments on the campus. Posi- 
tions are filled on the basis of financial need and the special 
abilities required in certain jobs. Students are assigned to such 
jobs as waiters in the dining room, typists, office clerks, library 
assistants, relief switchboard and elevator operators, and jani- 
tors. Students in need of employment should file an applica- 
tion in the office of Financial Aid. All assignments to student 
employment are made by this office. Except in cases of ex- 
treme necessity, freshmen should not seek employment, but 
should plan to concentrate on their academic work. 

Applications for student employment are not accepted 
from students until they are actually on campus. To be kept 
on student employment rolls, the student must earn at least 
a "C" average in his total academic program. 

Student employment may be either under the Work-Study 
Program under the Higher Education Act or the regular uni- 
versity employment budget. 

Work-Study Program. This program was initiated by the 
enactment of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. It is in- 
tended to stimulate and promote the part-time employment of 
students who are from low-income families. When the needs 
of all interested students from these income levels have been 
met, then any remaining funds may be used to provide em- 
ployment for other students who have demonstrated financial 
need. The minimum hourly rate of pay is $1.25 per hour with 
fifteen hours per week. 

STUDENT SERVICES 

The student personnel staff of the university attempts to 
provide those services to students which should support the 
best learning climate possible. Recognizing that the academic 
program of the university is its reason for existence, the stu- 
dent personnel staff considers its program a most important 
supportive function of the university. Students are urged to 
become completely informed about these services and about 
the rules and regulations applying to them as citizens of a uni- 
versity community. 

SOCIAL REGULATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Enrollment in the University implies an agreement on the 
part of each student to comply with the customs of the Uni- 
versity and to obey the regulations. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 67 



The University reserves the right to dismiss any student 
who refuses to conform to University regulations. 

No firearms or ammunition may be stored in university- 
owned or university-supervised dormitories. Students living in 
private rooms or apartments in town may not possess or store 
firearms or ammunition without prior approval of the land- 
lord. 

There shall be no intoxicating beverages or gambling on 
university property, in fraternity houses, or in residences rent- 
ed in town. Students 21 years of age or over are not subject 
to the provisions of the ban on drinking providing they live 
in town and have prior permission from their landlords. Stu- 
dents living in town who are 21 years of age or over must 
assume full responsibility under the laws of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania concerning supplying intoxicating bev- 
erages to those under the legal drinking age. Violation of this 
rule may lead to immediate suspension from the University. 
Students appearing on campus in an intoxicated condition re- 
gardless of age may be suspended. 

Smoking will be permitted except in areas officially desig- 
nated by the University as non-smoking areas. These include 
classroom buildings, the library, and many dormitory build- 
ings which are considered unsafe for smoking. Smoking in 
these dormitories will be confined to prescribed smoking room 
areas. 

Students are not permitted to act as sales or advertising 
representatives on campus without permission of the Dean of 
Students. Students should require outside sales representa- 
tives to show their authorization before making any commit- 
ment of any kind. 

Students are not permitted to use or to have stoves, heat- 
ers or cookers, or other equipment for producing fire or heat 
in their rooms. Such equipment is prohibited by fire regula- 
tions and will be removed and confiscated by the fire inspector. 

Non-commuting freshmen are not permitted to have cars 
at the University. Upperciass students living in dormitory 
residences are also not permitted to have cars on the Univers- 
ity campus. Upperciass students living off campus will be per- 
mitted to have cars provided they are registered with the Dean 
of Student's Office. Students not commuting from home are not 
permitted to park on the campus between the hours of 8:00 
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. daily. Exceptions to the above rules may be 
made in unusual circumstances by the Dean of Men or the 
Dean of Women. 



68 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ADVISORY SYSTEM 

The objective of the advisory system is to provide an op- 
portunity for each student to discuss problems relative to his 
scholastic work with an instructor in his major field. Each stu- 
dent is assigned a faculty adviser by the chairman of his major 
department and the Dean of Students' office. A regular ad- 
visory hour is scheduled at 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday and Thurs- 
day of each week, although a student may consult his adviser 
at other times. An attempt is made to keep the student with 
the same adviser throughout his program at the University. 

CARS 

Every student and every faculty or staff member who reg- 
ularly drives a car on the University campus must register 
with the Dean of Students and have a sticker on the left side 
of the rear bumper. Parking violations are checked daily; driv- 
ers may be fined for illegal parking. These regulations also 
apply to motor bikes and scooters. 

Students living in university-owned or university-super- 
vised dormitories are not permitted to keep cars in Indiana 
unless special permission is given them by the Dean of Women 
or the Dean of Men. 

WOMEN'S DINING ROOM POLICY 

All freshmen, sophomore and junior women living in uni- 
versity owned or operated dormitories will take meals in the 
university dining halls unless excused by the Dean of Women 
for good cause. Senior women may take meals in the dining 
halls if they wish. All arrangements for off-campus meals must 
be made with the Dean of Women before June 1 or January 1. 
This policy is subject to change at the close of any semester. 
Any changes in dining room status during the semester must 
be approved by the Dean of Women. 

WOMEN'S HOUSING POLICY 

All single women except those living with immediate rela- 
tives, those working for room and board in approved private 
homes, graduates of other institutions, or veterans are required 
to live in university dormitories or university operated houses 
unless special permission is granted by the Dean of Women. 
Married women may arrange for accommodations off campus. 

Note: Working for room and board constitutes the giving 
of twenty hours of work in exchange for room and meals. 
There shall be no exchange of cash monies except where the 
employer feels that the employee has done more than her 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



share, or where extra work is done over and above the twenty 
hours. 

Up to March 15, those students who have indicated their 
intention of returning in the fall will have rooms assigned to 
them as follows: If they desire to keep the rooms they have, 
these rooms are reassigned to them, unless for some reason it 
is felt wise or necessary to withdraw students from said rooms. 
As soon after March 15 as possible, the remaining rooms are 
chosen by lot. Only students who have indicated their inten- 
tion of returning in the fall may reserve a room for the fol- 
lowing year. Otherwise, their assignment to a room is can- 
celled and they take a place on the list of entering students. 

General supervision of the personal and social welfare of 
women students is exercised by the Dean of Women, Assistant 
Dean of Women, and head residents. Student body, faculty, 
and administration cooperate to maintain high standards of 
social life and conduct. Privileges are granted according to of- 
ficial class ratings based on academic achievement. Restric- 
tions which are put upon the freedom of students are felt to 
be necessary for successful study and living conditions and 
for the well-being of the group. 

Participation in dormitory government is vested in the 
Women's Collegiate Association, of which all resident women 
are automatically members. Representatives from each living 
unit make up the Council, which serves as a clearing house 
for discussing difficulties and making recommendations con- 
cerning dormitory problems. A Judicial Board administers and 
enforces association regulations. 

MEN'S DINING ROOM POLICY 

All male students living in university buildings shall eat 
in a university dining room. Men living off campus who wish 
to eat in a university dining room may do so as long as space 
is available, but they shall make arrangements with the Dean 
of Men. Cooking in rooms in university buildings is absolute- 
ly forbidden. Assignments to a university dining room are on 
a semester basis except in cases of emergency and when ex- 
cused by the Dean of Men. 

The appropriate dress for men for the evening meal in 
university dining halls will be shirts with collars, slacks, socks, 
and hard-soled shoes. Blue jeans, shorts, and generally untidy 
appearance will not be tolerated. Shorts, sweat shirts, and 
tennis shoes are permissible dress for the breakfast and noon 
meals except on Sundays. Dress for the Sunday noon meal 
will be dress shirts with ties and coats. Socks are required at 
all meals. 



70 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



These regulations are subject to change at the close of any 
semester. 

Men's Housing Policy. Campus rooming facilities are under 
the supervision of head residents, student hall counselors or 
house heads, and these are responsible to the Dean of Men and 
Assistant Dean of Men. This group assists in effecting orderly 
procedures in resident living. All men, whether living on or 
off the campus, are expected to abide by the rules and regu- 
lations of the University. 

All freshmen, except those who commute from home daily, 
or who live with relatives, or who are married, shall live in 
one of the dormitories, or other college property when accom- 
modations are available. Other non-commuting students enter- 
ing Indiana for the first time shall live in university property 
when they can be accommodated. 

Likewise, upperclass non-commuting men under 21 years 
of age, shall live in one of the dormitories or other university 
property when space is available unless excused by the Dean 
of Men. Priority for assignments shall be to sophomores, jun- 
iors, and seniors, in that order. 

Non-commuting men who cannot be accommodated on the 
campus are expected to select rooms in town from an approved 
list compiled in the office of the Assistant Dean of Men. All 
financial arrangements are the responsibility of the student 
and the landlord. The Assistant Dean of Men is responsible for 
supervising rooming accommodations in town. 

The foregoing policy may be changed at the end of any 
semester. 

FOOD SERVICES 

There are three dining halls on campus, each providing 
twenty-one planned meals per week for resident students. 
Non-resident students may make arrangements to take meals 
in one of the dining halls through either the Dean of Women 
or the Dean of Men. All such arrangements are on a semester 
basis. Meals or snacks may be purchased in the Student Union 
Coffee Shop or in the cafeteria in Foster Hall. There are also 
restaurants and sandwich shops located around the edge of 
the campus. 

Baggage. All baggage is delivered to the basement of the 
dormitory to which the student is assigned. Luggage should 
be plainly marked with the student's name and, if the room 
assignment has been made, should also bear the room number. 
Students living in university owned or university controlled 
houses should mark their baggage with the street address. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 71 

Laundry. The university provides each student with a 
laundered sheet and pillow case each week plus a laundered 
bedspread twice a month. 

Laundry and ironing rooms are maintained on the ground 
floors of all women's dormitories and on the ground floors of 
the newer male dormitories. 

Student Supplies. Students who live in university dormi- 
tories are furnished bed linen and bedspreads. Each student 
must provide blankets, towels, soap, needed toilet articles, etc. 
Curtains and draperies are provided. 

Students must also furnish their own gymnasium attire 
and towels. The Physical Education Department requires reg- 
ulation gymnasium and pool equipment, which are purchased 
in the College Book Store. 

Each student is required to own a good college dictionary, 
approved by the English Department. Such a dictionary costs 
about $6.00 and can be purchased in the College Book Store. 
Core courses in English require the dictionary as a standard 
text; other college courses use it extensively. 

Vacation and Guest Charges. Students may not remain at 
the university during Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, or sum- 
mer vacation. Students and teachers are responsible for meals 
of their guests at current transient rates. The transient rate 
for meals is as follows: breakfast, 60 cents; lunch, 85 cents; 
dinner, $1.25. 

A charge of $1.58 is made for overnight guests on Friday 
and Saturday nights. Arrangements should be made with the 
House Director, or Dean of Women, or Dean of Men, depend- 
ing on the dormitory involved. 

UNIVERSITY INFIRMARY 

SPECIAL CLINICS 

Three clinics at the university offer diagnostic testing and 
remedial or improvement service or instruction in the follow- 
ing areas: 

Psychological Clinic-diagnosis of academic and behavior 
problems and personal, vocational, and educational counseling. 

Reading Clinic-diagnosis and remedial instruction for 
reading and spelling disabilities and instruction for the im- 
provement of present skills. 

Speech & Hearing Clinic-diagnosis of speech problems, 
hearing tests and evaluations, and a regular program of 
therapy. 



72 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

These services are made available without charge to the 
students regularly enrolled at the university in order that they 
may be given the assistance necessary to remove deficiencies 
which would interfere with their successful performance and 
progress in the university and in their future work. 

University students who need help in any of the areas 
suggested above are encouraged to use the facilities provided 
for them. 

University students may of their own initiative come to 
any clinic for help, or they may be referred by any faculty 
member or university official. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The services of the Placement Office are available to stu- 
dents who are graduating, students who are attending for 
certification, students who have been admitted to the gradu- 
ate school, and alumni. The directors of the various depart- 
ments take an active interest in the placement of their gradu- 
ates. The Office supplies credentials to employers who are 
seeking applicants for positions, arranges for interviews, 
serves as a center where graduates may keep their records 
up-to-date, supplies occupational counseling service, and main- 
tains a current file of job opportunities. A computerized in- 
formation retrieval system is available which permits college 
graduates to make their qualifications known to employers 
seeking to fill their company's open positions. Positions are 
not guaranteed by the university, but Indiana's record of 
placement is one of the very best in Pennsylvania. The Place- 
ment Office also receives and makes available to graduates and 
undergraduates lists of vacancies in summer camp counseling. 

MAIL 

The University Post Office is located in the west wing of 
Foster Dining Hall, at the corner of Eleventh and Grant 
Streets. The mail is delivered to offices and dormitories from 
this location. As it is a branch of the Indiana Post Office, the 
University Post Office provides most postal facilities, including 
boxes for commuting students. 

The hours are 8:00-4:00, Monday through Friday, and 8:00- 
11:30 a.m., Saturday. During summer school, the Post Office 
closes at 3:00 on weekdays. 

COMMUTERS 

Accommodations for women day students are provided in 
John Sutton Hall. There is a study room for men day students 
on the ground floor of Gordon Hall. Men may obtain lockers, 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 73 

in the basement of Whitmyre Hall, by applying at the office 
of the Dean of Men. 

Library facilities provide pleasant study conditions for 
non-resident students, and the Foster Dining Hall Lounge is 
open to all students. Commuter mail is held at the University 
Post Office window. Mail boxes are available. 

Day students may purchase lunches in the Thomas Sutton 
Dining Hall, the Charles Foster Dining Hall, the Student 
Union, or in the coffee shop of Foster Dining Hall. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS 

All students must register with their Local Draft Board 
when they reach 18 years of age. 

To secure a 2-S classification a student must complete the 
Selective Service Information card which is included in his 
registration packet. The students selective service number 
must be reported to the Assistant Dean of Men if it is re- 
ceived at a later date. 

A student must carry at least 15 credit hours per semes- 
ter, throughout the semester, to be eligible for a 2-S classifi- 
cation. Satisfactory progress at the University is necessary to 
retain a student deferment. 

Application forms for the Selective Service Qualification 
Test are available at the office of the Assistant Dean of Men 
at appropriate times throughout the year. 

Veterans. Children of a deceased veteran whose death was 
due to service-related causes may be eligible for educational 
assistance from the Federal Government under Public Law 
634 (War Orphans' Educational Assistance Act). Immediately 
upon acceptance to Indiana, men and women who may qualify 
for such assistance should contact Veterans Administration to 
determine their eligibility. They should report to the Assistant 
Dean of Men before registering at the University if the Vet- 
erans Administration approves their training under Public 
Law 634. The office of the Veterans' Counselor is in Gordon 
Hall. 

An individual serving with the Armed Forces for more 
than 180 days after January 31, 1955 is eligible for the Cold 
War G.I. Bill (PL 89-358) providing he meets certain other re- 
quirements. A prospective student should contact the Veterans 
Administration and submit to them the Veterans' Application 
for Program of Education. 

Individuals eligible for the Cold War G.I. Bill must report 
to the office of the Assistant Dean of Men in Gordon Hall fol- 



74 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

lowing registration and scheduling to prepare the necessary 
forms for education benefits. 

Reserve Officers Training Corps. The United States Army 
has a unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps at the uni- 
versity. All physically, morally qualified male freshmen are 
required to take and pass one year of the Basic Course of 
Military Science. A freshman male who is a conscientious ob- 
jector may apply to the Dean of Academic Affairs for a waiv- 
er of the Military Science requirement. Upon graduation from 
the regular university course and successful completion of the 
Reserve Officers Training Corps Program, the student will re- 
ceive a second lieutenant's commission in the United States 
Army Reserve. To make this program possible, deferments 
from the draft are issued to the students successfully meeting 
the University and ROTC requirements. Upon graduation, the 
former student serves on active duty for a period not to ex- 
ceed two years, if called by the Secretary of the Army. This 
enables the student to obtain his university degree and then 
fulfill his obligation to his country. 

Under special conditions, deferments to obtain advanced de- 
grees are granted by the Army to ROTC students who wish to 
do graduate work prior to going on active duty. Additional in- 
formation on this subject can be obtained at Military Hall. 

STUDENT COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 

The Student Cooperative Association plays an extremely 
broad role in the extracurricular life of the college. All stu- 
dents and faculty members belong to the Association. Gen- 
erally speaking, almost all campus-wide activities outside of 
the instructional program are sponsored wholly or in part by 
the Association. 

The ACTIVITY FEE is the chief source of income for the 
Association's activities. Upon payment of the fee each semes- 
ter, every student receives an "I" card which will admit him 
free of charge to all University social, cultural, and athletic 
activities. Full refund of the fee will be given to students 
withdrawing from the University within one month from the 
first day of classes. After the first month no refunds will be 
given. Other income for the Association comes from the Co-op 
Bookstore profits, athletics income, and income from all other 
events sponsored by the Association. 

FACILITIES OF THE ASSOCIATION 

STUDENT UNION— The Student Union, built by the stu- 
dents through their Activity Fee, offers many facilities for the 
University family. Students may relax or watch television in 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 76 

the lounge, buy a snack or a complete meal at the coffee shop, 
listen to their choice of records in the music center, or play 
cards, billiards, or table tennis. 

The Bookstore, the Student Bank, and the Cooperative 
Association offices are located in the Union, as well as the 
Penn, the Oak, the Student Government, the Student Union 
Board, and a general student organization office area. 

The Student Union Board and the Union Director and 
Program Director plan an active program of lectures, dances, 
movies, receptions, exhibits, and other events throughout the 
year. 

BOOKSTORE— The Co-op Bookstore is located in the Stu- 
dent Union Building. The store stocks a complete line of all 
needed textbooks, supplies, paper-back books and other re- 
quirements needed for class use. In addition, the shopper will 
find an extensive selection of records, college wear, stationery, 
jewelry, sundries and souvenir items. 

The store is operated on a competitive retail basis with 
all profits from operations reverting to the Student Coopera- 
tive Association for use in supporting student activities. 

BANKING SERVICES— The Student Bank is operated in 
the business office of the Student Union. Students receiving 
money from home and not wishing to take the risk of carrying 
it on their persons or leaving it in their rooms may deposit it 
in the bank and withdraw it as needed by the issuance of 
checks. University checks are good only on campus. To help 
defray the expense of operation, a nominal charge is made 
when an account is opened. Students are urged to use this 
service as a precaution against loss. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

INDIANA PENN 

The INDIANA PENN, the campus newspaper, is published 
twice a week — Tuesdays and Fridays — by students who wish 
to gain writing experience. Interested students are advised to 
attend the organizational meeting which is held early each 
semester. 

The positions of editors and news editors are filled by 
Student Government action upon recommendation of a stu- 
dent-faculty committee. The co-editors select their own staff. 
There are 10 paid staff positions. 

Applications for editor and news editor may be obtained 
from the PENN adviser. Only those students with at least one 
semester experience on the PENN staff are eligible to apply 
in* t,h e two top positions. Advisor: Dr. Swauger. 



76 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

OAK 

The OAK is the University yearbook, a pictorial and writ- 
ten review of the year's activities. Subscriptions may be pur- 
chased during the Fall Semester in Leonard Hall. The Daily 
Bulletin will carry notices of the subscription drive. 

Applications for staff positions may be obtained from the 
Director of Public Relations. From these applications, a com- 
mittee, composed of students and faculty, selects the staff 
members. The ten paid positions on the staff are subject to 
the approval of the Student Government. Advisors: Mr. Judge, 
Dr. Swigart, Mr. Slenker. 

PARCHMENT CONCH 

The PARCHMENT CONCH, a student-sponsored maga- 
zine, gives under-graduates the opportunity to see their best 
literary efforts in print. Any student may submit articles, 
short stories, short plays, poems, and essays for publication. 
Instructions for submitting manuscripts appear in the Daily 
Bulletin in November of each year. 

Application for the editorial positions on the PARCH- 
MENT CONCH should be made to the advisers, but the final 
selection is made by the Student Government acting on the 
recommendation of the Committee on Publications. Advisors: 
Rider and Ianni. 

UNIVERSITY DIRECTORY 

The University Directory is distributed early in the fall 
term to students and faculty. It contains a directory of all 
properly registered students, of staff, and of University offices. 
Advisor: Knowlton. 

INFORMATION BOOKLET 

This handbook is distributed annually to all students free 
of charge. It includes rules and regulations, the extra-curricu- 
lar program, and general information of interest to students. 

UNIVERSITY LODGE 

The University Lodge plays an important part in the rec- 
reational and instructional life of the University. Owned by 
students and faculty, this 100 acres of wooded hillside, with its 
rustic lodge, three picnic shelters, rope ski tow, toboggan run, 
and nature and hiking trails, not only offers opportunities for 
classes to study nature and conservation but also is in demand 
for picnics, meetings, and winter sports. 

Any student or faculty member is welcome to use the 
Lodge property, but must be ready to identify himself by pre- 
senting an "I" card at the request of the caretaker. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



77 



During the winter sports season, ski equipment, sleds, and 
toboggans may be checked out for use. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

A large number of extra-curricular organizations conduct 
active programs on the Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
campus. In order to be recognized as an official university or- 
ganization, it must be approved by the Student Government 
Association and the Administrative Council of the University. 
Below are listed those organizations which are presently rec- 
ognized as extra-curricular groups on the Indiana campus. 

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 



American Chemical Society 
American Guild of Organists 
Art Club 
Association for Childhood 

Education 
Basketball Club 
Campus 4H Club 
Chess Club 
Classics Club 

Defense Supply Association 
Democratic Club 
English and Speech Club 
Fencing Club — Women 
Foreign Language Club 
Foreign Students' Club 
Geographical Society 
Gymnastics Club 
Health and Physical Education 

Majors Club — Women 
Home Economics Club 
International Relations Club 

and WUS 
Junior Chamber of 

Commerce 
Kaydeens 
Mathematics Club 
McKeldin Philosophy Society 
Men's Student Leagues 



Men's Varsity "I" 

Music Educators Club 

Nurses Club 

Non-Resident Women's League 

Orchesis Club 

Pershing Rifles 

Physics Club 

Psychology Club 

Ranger Company 

Republican Club 

Rifle Team 

Safety Club 

Science Club 

Social Science Society 

Special Education Club 

Speech and Hearing Therapy 

Club 
Student PSEA-NEA 
Student Government 
Student Union Board 
The Masquers 

Unidentified Flying Objects 
University Slide Society 
University Drama Club 
Volleyball Club — Women 
Women's Athletic Association 
Women's Collegiate 

Association 
Women's Judicial Board 



CLASS ORGANIZATIONS 

Each of the four classes — Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, 
and Senior — has a class organization, holds social and profes- 
sional meetings, and sponsors a formal dance each year. 



78 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



FRATERNITIES 



Honorary — 

Alpha Psi Omega, honorary 

dramatic 
Chi Beta Phi, honorary science 
Delta Omicron, honorary music 

for women 
Delta Phi Delta, honorary art 
Gamma Rho Tail, honorary for 

business men 
Gamma Theta Upsilon, 

honorary geography 
Kappa Delta Pi, honorary 

educational 
Kappa Mu Epsilon, honorary 

mathematics 
Kappa Omicron Phi, honorary 

home economics 
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Music 

Fraternity of America, for 

male music students 
Pi Gamma Mu, honorary social 

science 
Pi Omega Pi, honorary business 
Sigma Alpha Eta, honorary for 

speech and hearing 
Service — 

Alpha Phi Omega, men's service 
Phi Alpha Theta 
National History, 

honorary society 



Social — 

Panhellenic Association 

Women 
Alpha Delta Pi 
Alpha Gamma Delta 
Alpha Omega Pi 
Alpha Phi 
Alpha Sigma Alpha 
Alpha Sigma Tau 
Alpha Xi Delta 
Delta Zeta 
Phi Lambda Chi 
Phi Mu 
Sigma Kappa 
Sigma Phi Sigma 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Zeta Tau Alpha 
Inter-Fraternity Council 

Men 
Delta Gamma Nu 
Delta Sigma Phi 
Kappa Delta Rho 
Phi Sigma Kappa 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Sigma Tau Gamma 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Theta Chi 
Theta Xi 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 

The religious life of students is cared for through the 
activities of some twelve independent organizations. Four of 
these, the Newman Club, Westminster Fellowship, Wesley 
Foundation, and Lutheran Center, maintain private meeting 
facilities near the campus. Others affiliate with and meet in 
local churches. For those groups too small to arrange their 
own needs, the university undertakes to provide limited facili- 
ties and faculty advisement. 

In addition to the denominational emphasis of these 
groups, selected programs in the University Cultural Affairs 
series are devoted to religious topics. The annual Christmas 
Pageant, a cultural event primarily musical in nature, has 
become a tradition and attracts much attention in December. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 79 

All students are urged to attend their choice of the many 
community places of worship and to participate in the area, 
district, and national conferences which provide opportunity 
for the study of religious problems. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student Government Association. Student Government 
Association is composed of representatives from all areas of 
the university. The President, the Vice-President, and the 
members of the Student Government Association are elected 
annually in a campus-wide election held in late fall. The Stu- 
dent Government Association is active in making recommenda- 
tions to the Administration for the improvement of student 
welfare and is also active in promoting the general welfare of 
the university and good community relationships. The Student 
Government Association provides an opportunity for discus- 
sion of student problems, brings the student body, faculty, and 
administration closer together through a frank understanding 
of mutual problems and promotes the observance of policies 
that will lead to improvement of university campus life. 

ATHLETICS 

Both in terms of a variety of sports sponsored and com- 
plete facilities in which to sponsor them, the Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania athletic program can compare favor- 
ably to that of any college or university of similar enrollment. 

In each season of the academic year the university spon- 
sors at least two varsity sports simultaneously under the gen- 
eral direction of athletic director Charles L. Klausing. There 
are a total of nine sports sponsored. 

Football and cross country are featured in the fall, while 
basketball, wrestling, swimming and rifle take the stage in 
the winter, and baseball, track and field, golf and tennis 
hold the spotlight in the spring. 

Along with varsity squads in the respective sports, there 
are also football, basketball, wrestling and baseball teams 
which compete on the freshman or junior varsity level. 

A well organized and varied program of intramural 
sports and athletic activities is conducted for both men and 
women. Organized league play is held in touch football, bas- 
ketball, volleyball, swimming, and wrestling for men. Women 
compete in basketball, volleyball, badminton, swimming, and 
tennis. Coed activities are held in volleyball and badminton. 
Women also participate in a number of play days with other 
colleges and universities. 



80 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Memorial Field House and Waller Gymnasium are also 
used extensively for informal recreational play by students 
and faculty. Memorial Field House is open seven days a week 
for student use. 

Crowned by the new two million dollar Memorial Field 
House dedicated in 1966 and also including the spacious six 
thousand seat George P. Miller Stadium completed in 1962, the 
physical plant for athletics at the south end of campus is com- 
plimented for intramurals by Waller Gymnasium and various 
other playing fields. 

Both in terms of a variety of sports sponsored and com- 
plete facilities in which to sponsor them, the Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania athletic program compares favorably 
with other universities of similar enrollment. 

In each season of the academic year, the University spon- 
sors at least three varsity sports under the general direction 
of Charles Klausing, Director of Athletics. There are a total 
of ten sports sponsored. 

Football, cross country, and rifle are featured in the fall. 
While basketball, swimming, and wrestling are offered in the 
winter, and baseball, track & field, golf, and tennis are fea- 
tured in the spring. Along with the varsity squads . . . level. 

Women participate in varsity volleyball and basketball 
during the fall and winter. 

INTRAMURALS 
WOMEN - MEN 

A well organized and varied program of intramural 
sports and athletic activities is conducted for both men and 
women. Women compete in basketball, volleyball, badminton, 
swimming, and tennis. Coed activities are held in volleyball 
and badminton. Men participate in the following activities. 

Fall Sports Type 

Golf M 

Touch Football RR 

Archery RR 

Horseshoes RR 

Cross Country M 

Foul Throw C 

Winter Sports Type 

Bowling RR 

Handball RR 

Basketball RR 

Badminton RR 

Paddleball RR 

Volleyball RR 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 81 

Spring Sports Type 

Table Tennis RR 

Swimming M 

Wrestling M 

Track M 

Softball RR 

Pocket Billiards RR 

Legend: RR— Round Robin M— Meet C— Contest 

An intramural handbook is available " for all male students. 
Contact Dr. Louis Sutton, Intramural Director. 

Memorial Field House and Waller Gymnasium are also 
used extensively for informal recreational play by students 
and faculty. Memorial Field House is open seven days a week 
for student use. 

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION 

The community of Indiana is serviced by Edwards Lakes- 
To-Sea System, Lanich Bus Lines, and Grove City Bus Lines. 
Connections can be made with other major bus lines. Taxicab 
service is provided by two taxi companies. Approximately ten 
modern motels offer overnight accommodations. 

INSURANCE 

The Indiana University of Pennsylvania Board of Trustees 
instituted mandatory student accident and health insurance at 
the University effective September, 1963. It is realized, how- 
ever, that some of the freshman class students are covered by 
hospitalization policies of their parents. Where this is the case 
and additional coverage under the Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania student insurance plan is not desired, a waiver card 
can be submitted at the time of registration. The plan has been 
designed to protect all full-time students at the university. 
Full information concerning this insurance coverage is mailed 
to prospective students with their registration material. 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT FIRST SEMESTER 1968-69 
Full-Time Undergraduate Students 

Men Women Total 

Indiana Campus 3,026 3,753 6,779 

Armstrong County Center 205 289 494 

Punxsutawney Center 124 165 289 

Total Full-Time Students 3,355 4,207 7,562 7,562 

Part-Time Undergraduate Students 

Indiana Campus 238 403 641 

Armstrong County Center 15 36 51 

Punxsutawney Center 8 12 20 

Total Part-Time Students 261 451 712 712 

Graduate Students 465 367 832 832 

GRAND TOTAL 4,081 5,025 9,106 9,106 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania may pur- 
sue programs of study in any one of the eight schools. A stu- 
dent may earn the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation. For each degree the student must earn 124 semester 
credits with an overall "C" average, in addition to meeting all 
other degree requirements for graduation. 

DEPARTMENTAL ABBREVIATIONS 

The following departmental abbreviations are used to 
identify courses referred to in this catalog. 



Anth— Anthropology 
Art— Art 
Bio — Biology 
BE — Business Education 
Bus — School of Business 
BM — Business Management 
Chem — Chemistry 
Crmn — Criminology 
DE — Distributive Education 
Econ — Economics 
Ed — Education 
EdPsy — Educational 
Psychology 
El — Elementary 
Eng — English 
FL— Foreign Languages 
Fr — French 
Geo — Geography 
Geos — Geoscience 
Ger — German 
HE — Home Economics 
Hist — History 
HPe— Health & Physical 
Education 



IE — International Education 

Lat — Latin 

LRes — Learning Resource 

Math— Mathematics 

MS— Military Science 

Mus — Music 

Phil — Philosophy 

Phys — Physics 

PolS — Political Science 

Psy — Psychology 

PSN— Public School Nursing 

Rus — Russian 

Sci — Science 

Soc — Sociology 

Sp — Spanish 

SpE — Education for 

Mentally Retarded 
SpH— Speech Pathology & 

Audiology 
SpR — Rehabilitation Education 
SS— Social Studies 
Zool — Zoology 



KEY FOR COURSE NUMBERS 

Courses for freshmen are numbered in the 100's, sopho- 
mores in the 200's, juniors in the 300's and seniors in the 400's. 

Required courses are numbered between 1 and 50 and elec- 
tive courses are numbered between 51 and 100, within each 100. 

Elective courses open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors 
are listed in the 200's. Elective courses open to juniors and 
seniors are listed in the 300's. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 83 

General Education 

The primary objective of general education is to develop 
those understandings, attitudes and values, and social skills 
that will enable the student to enjoy a life that is satisfying to 
himself as an individual and which will enable him to play a 
constructive role in his community and in society without re- 
spect to his professional or vocational interest or activity. 

The following program in general education will be taken 
by all students. The courses in this program will be distributed 
throughout the four years of university study. Only basic or 
introductory courses in the program will be concentrated in 
the first two years of the student's program. 

Numerous electives are offered in the General Education 
program to enable each student to explore subjects of par- 
ticular interest. The student is free to exercise his own choice 
among the listed electives, although the department in which 
he is majoring may recommend that a student select a specific 
course. 

GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

HUMANITIES 

19-22 credits 
Eng 101, Eng 102 English I and II 8 

English 201 Literature I 2 

(Tragic Themes in Literature) or 
English 301 Literature II 

(Literature of Social Criticism) 
Art 101 Introduction to Art or 3 

Music 101 Introduction to Music or 
English 103 Introduction to Theater 
Foreign Language *Foreign Language 6 

(Completion of intermediate sequence) 

General Electives — Students who do not take Foreign Lan- 
guage may elect 3 courses from the following list or 2 from 
this group and 1 from the General Electives in Natural 
Science. Students who take Foreign Language must elect 1 
from the General Electives list for either Humanities or 
Natural Science. 

Phil 328 Aesthetics Mus 301 Music History I 

Art 115 Art History I or Phil 120 Intro to Philosophy 

Art 116 Art History II Eng 261 The English Bible as Lit 

Hist 101 History of Civ. I Phil 110 World Religions 

Phil 221 Logic Phil 222 Ethics 
Eng 271 Modern American Fiction 

NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 

11-14 credits 
Mathematics 3 

Laboratory Science 8 

The eight-credit laboratory science requirement in General Edu- 
cation may be met by any of the following: 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Bio 103 Gen. Biology I Sci 105 Physical Science I 

Bio 104 Gen. Biology II Sci 106 Physical Science II 

Chem 111 Gen. Chemistry I Phys 111 Physics I 

Chem 112 Gen. Chemistry II Phys 112 Physics II 



General Electives: 

Geos 111 Solar System Math 362 Probability and Statistics 

Geos 112 Stellar Astronomy Geos 121 Physical Geology 

Math 366 Computer Math I Geos 122 Historical Geology 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Each student will elect 5 courses from the following: 15 credits 
Pol. Sci. Ill American Citizenship Hist 102 History of Civ II 
Anth 110 Intro to Anthropology Hist 104 Hist of US & Pa. II** 
Econ 101 Basic Economics Psy 201 General Psychology** 

Geo 101 World Geography Soc 151 Principles of Sociology 

Crmn 101 Adm. of Justice IE 101 World Politics 

* Required of all Liberal Arts students. Optional for other students. 
** Required of School of Education students. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION or R.O.T.C. 4 credits 

Physical Education (Men) 1 credit 

(Two semesters of Physical education are required 

for all male students. Credit =1 / 2 credit hour per 

semester) . 

Military Science 3 credits 

HPE 101 Physical Education I y 2 credit 

HPE 111 Physical Education II y 2 credit 

Physical Education (Women) 4 credits 

HPE 101 Personal and Community Health 2 credits 

HPE 102 Physical Education I 1 credit 

Swimming — Badminton or 

Swimming — Tennis 

Swimming — Basketball 
HPE 201 Physical Education II 1 credit 

or Fencing — Volleyball 
HPE 202 Physical Education H 1 credit 

or Archery — Dance 
HPE 203* Physical Education II 1 credit 

Bowling—Golf 

THE SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Ever since man began to systematize knowledge, a liberal 
education — which Mark Van Doren defines as "nothing less 
than a complete one" — has enjoyed wide acceptance and sup- 
port. With society's current emphasis on change, a broad liber- 
al education is now virtually a necessity. Thus, today's states- 
man must be skilled not only in political science and history; 
he also should be knowledgeable in economics, geography, sci- 
ence and sociology in order to cope effectively with the intri- 
cate problems of modern statecraft. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 85 

The philosophy which undergirds the Liberal Arts pro- 
gram is the emphasis upon a fundamental understanding and 
application of basic principles implemented by the delibera- 
tive method of teaching which stresses the quality rather than 
the rate of learning. Consequently, our staff consciously en- 
deavors not only to impart an appreciation of culture and the 
comprehension of our environment, but also to teach the stu- 
dent to analyze and to solve problems so that ultimately he 
may be able to teach himself. 

The program of studies in the School of Arts and Sciences 
is designed to enable the student to pursue a general program, 
a study in depth within a chosen subject, an interdisciplinary 
program or a pre-professional program of study. All students 
in this school are required to take the program of general ed- 
ucation of 52 semester hours as outlined on page . Each stu- 
dent also must elect a major in one of the subject fields in the 
Humanities, Natural Sciences or the Social Sciences. He may 
also elect a minor in a field approved by his adviser. 

Students in the Liberal Arts program may receive either 
the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree depending 
on their program of study. Students majoring in the Humani- 
ties and Social Sciences will be awarded the A.B. degree, 
whereas Natural Science majors who complete the prescribed 
requirements for a single area of concentration may receive 
the B.S. degree or the A.B. degree depending upon the pro- 
gram elected. 

Humanities Natural Sciences 

English, Speech-Theater Biology 

Foreign Languages Chemistry 

Philosophy Mathematics 

Medical Technology 

Physics 

Geoscience 

Social Sciences 

Economics Psychology 

History Geography 

Criminology Political Science 

Geography Sociology-Anthropology 

Inter-disciplinary Studies 

Students with dual or special objectives may, with the 
guidance and approval of his department and the Dean, under- 
take an inter-disciplinary program. One example of this type 
of program which has been established with well-defined re- 
quirements is that in Urban-Regional Planning and Adminis- 
tration as outlined on page . This is an integrated Social Sci- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ence program which equips the students for vocational oppor- 
tunities in a rapidly expanding field. Another type of inter- 
disciplinary program is illustrated by the study of a cultural 
area such as Latin America which would require the selection 
of courses in History, Language, Geography, Art, Literature 
and Political Science from both the Humanities and the Social 
Sciences. Other inter-disciplinary programs can be tailored for 
the various fields of student interests. 

Pre-Professional Studies 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania is accredited not only 
by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Educa- 
tion but by the Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools and The American Association of Univer- 
sity Women as well. It is on the basis of the latter accredita- 
tion that pre-professional programs of study are offered for 
admission to Medical, Dental, Theological and Law Colleges. 
These pre-professional programs of study are planned in con- 
sultation with advisers and the Dean. 

FOREIGN STUDY PROGRAMS 

The University supports several foreign study programs 
for which varying amounts of credit are given toward a bac- 
calaureate degree. Students should consider these programs as 
a possible means of combining foreign travel and study. Since 
each program carries different credit provisions, students are 
urged to plan their four-year program several years in ad- 
vance if they propose to participate in any foreign study ar- 
rangement. 

Junior Year Abroad. Indiana has combined with thirty- 
eight colleges and universities in Eastern Ohio, West Virginia 
and Western Penns3dvania to offer a Junior Year Abroad pro- 
gram for students in the Humanities and Social Sciences. For 
this purpose the Regional Council For International Education 
operates a college in Basel, Switzerland where courses in lan- 
guage, art, literature, and national-international issues are 
taught in English. Students are housed with Swiss families 
and are encouraged to do extensive traveling during seven 
weeks of scheduled vacations. A comprehensive fee covering 
trans-Atlantic travel, tuition, housing and food for the year 
has been fixed at $2490 for 1968-69. Students will earn 30 
semester hours of credit. Interested students should consult 
with the Coordinator, Social Science Division. 

Indiana At Valladolid. For the past seven years Indiana 
University has sponsored a semester of study at the University 
of Valladolid, Spain. For details see the description under the 
Department of Foreign Languages and request annual bro- 
chure from the department chairman. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 87 

Contemporary Europe. For the past several years Indiana 
University has sponsored a three or six-week study-travel tour 
during the summer months. Designed for students in every 
department of the University, this tour emphasizes the basic 
political, economic, social, and military organization of con- 
temporary Western Europe and the unresolved tensions of that 
part of the world. Background reading, lectures in major cap- 
itals, sight-seeing, and an extensive personal diary are re- 
quired. Three hours of graduate-undergraduate credit is 
granted. In 1969 the group will visit Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev, 
Helsinki, Stockholm, Oslo, Bergen, and Copenhagen. A com- 
prehensive fee covering trans-Atlantic transportation, housing 
and meals has been fixed at $869 in 1969. Interested students 
should consult with the Coordinator, Social Science Division. 

International Studies 

A Center for International Studies has been established 
by the University. The center offers a program leading to a 
Bachelor of Arts Degree for students interested in this field. 
A program of studies is fully described within this section of 
the catalog. 

HUMANITIES 

The Humanities comprise those branches of learning which 
are primarily cultural in character. In addition to developing 
communication skills, the Humanities program enhances one's 
capacities of logic, moral values and imagination. The Humani- 
ties also broaden and enrich a student's appreciation of litera- 
ture, art, music and philosophy. And as Matthew Arnold so 
aptly stated: "We shall find that this art, and poetry, and elo- 
quence, have in fact not only the power of refreshing and de- 
lighting us, they have also a fortifying, and elevating, and 
quickening, and suggesting power, capable of wonderfully 
helping us to relate the results of modern science to our need 
for conduct, our need for beauty." 

ENGLISH 

CRAIG G. SW AUGER, Chairman 

A candidate for the A.B. degree in English usually chooses 
this program because he wishes a broad undergraduate educa- 
tion in liberal studies. He may intend to prepare for graduate 
study in English for eventual college teaching or for other 
non-academic professions. The A.B. degree program does not 
lead to certification in secondary English. 

After satisfying the major requirement of thirty hours in 
required and elective English courses, (not including English 
101 and English 102) a student may select a minor of at least 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



fifteen hours in any one of several fields, such as history, 
philosophy, psychology, or foreign languages. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



Eng 101 
Biol 103 
Sci 103 



English I 4 

Biological Science I, or 

Physical Science I 4 

♦Foreign Language 3 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 



MS 101 



Military Science I 1% 

Social Science Elective .... 3 



15%-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Biol 104 Biological Science II, or 

Sci 104 Physical Science II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Education (women) 1 



MS 102 Military Science I 

♦Foreign Language 
Social Science Elective 



1% 



15-15% 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Eng 211 Classical Literature 3 

Art 101 Introduction to Art, or 
Mus 101 Introduction to Music, or 

Eng 103 Introduction to Theatre 3 

♦Foreign Language 3 

HPe 203 Physical Education II 

(women) 1 

Physical Activity (men) . . % 

Social Science Elective .... 3 

Humanities, or 

Natural Science Electives . . 3 

15%-16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Eng 212 American Literature to 

1865 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

Eng 214 Shakespeare 3 

Physical Activity (men) . % 

♦Foreign Language 3 

Social Science Elective ... 3 



15-15% 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Eng 213 Pre-Renaissance 

Major Electives 6 

Minor Electives 3- 6 

Free Electives 3- 6 

18 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

3 Eng 251 History of Eng. Language . 3 

Minor Electives 3- 6 

Major Electives 6 

Free Electives 0- 3 

15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Major Electives 3-6 

Minor Electives 3-6 

Free Electives 3-6 

15 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Major Electives 3-6 

Minor Electives 3-6 

Free Electives 3-6 

15 



♦ English majors may complete the intermediate sequence in a modern foreign lan- 
guage in one of three ways: by examination, by earning credit in 3rd and 4th semesters 
of a language begun in secondary school, or by completing 4 semesters of a new language. 

A candidate for the A.B. degree with a major in English will need 
at least 30 hours from the following list of courses. 

REQUIRED 

Eng 211 Classical Literature (instead of Eng 201 or Eng 301; one 

credit counted) 
Eng 212 American Literature to 1865 
Eng 213 Pre-Renaissance 
Eng 214 Shakespeare 
Eng 251 History of the English Language 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

Eng 215 The Augustans 

Eng 216 Romantic Movement 

Eng 217 Victorian Literature 

Eng 218 Age of Spenser 

Eng 219 Age of Milton 

Eng 224 The Metaphysical Poets 

Eng 238 Nature of Drama 

Eng 241 The Rise of the English Novel 

Eng 242 American Novel 

Eng 243 Contemporary Short Fiction 

Eng 244 Poetry and Its Forms 

Eng 245 Modern Drama 

Eng 246 Modern American Literature 

Eng 248 The Age of Johnson 

Eng 261 The English Bible as Literature 

Eng 271 Modern American Fiction 

Eng 351 English Drama to Restoration 

Eng 353 Restoration Literature 

Eng 355 Modern European Literature 

Eng 356 English Essayists 

Eng 357 The English Novel: Conrad to the Present 

Eng 358 Criticism of Contemporary Writing 

Eng 359 Seminar in English Studies 

Eng 360 The Nineteenth Century English Novel 

Eng 363 The Structure of English 

Eng 364 Trends in Linguistics 

SPEECH AND THEATER 

A candidate for the A.B. degree with a major in Speech and 
Theater must satisfy the intermediate sequence in a foreign language 
and have at least 30 credits from the following courses: 

REQUIRED 

Eng 214 Shakespeare 
Eng 231 Dramatic Arts 
Eng 232 Oral Reading 
Eng 238 The Nature of Drama 

ELECTTVES 

Eng 245 Modern Drama 

Eng 351 English Drama to the Restoration 

Eng 353 Restoration Literature 

Eng 371 Directing and Play Production 

Eng 377 Creative Dramatics and Story Telling 

Eng 378 Costume and Makeup 

Eng 379 Stagecraft and Scenic Design 

Eng 381 Fundamentals of Acting 

Eng 469 Oral Interpretation 

Eng 472 Public Speaking 

Note: The major in Speech and Theater is required to spend at 
least one summer in The Drama Workshop during the pre-session and 
main session of the summer school. 

The major in Speech and Theater will elect a minor of at least 
fifteen hours in another field. 



90 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

CHARLES W. FAUST, Acting Chairman 

The Department of Foreign Languages currently offers a 
complete undergraduate program in French, German, Latin, 
Russian, and Spanish, as well as an elementary and intermedi- 
ate sequence in Chinese and Classical Greek. 

In the course of his study of a foreign language as an ele- 
ment of general education, the non-major student will acquire: 

1. Some command of the language with primary stress on 
comprehension of the printed page, reasonable accuracy 
in pronunciation, some oral skill, and basic facts of 
structure. 

2. Some knowledge of the facts of political and cultural 
history of the area where the language is spoken. 

3. Some comprehension of current problems, trends, and 
directions of this area. 

4. A better understanding of language as a condition and 
tool of mankind, its nature, functions, and relationships. 

5. Development of greater understanding and tolerance of 
other cultures and their characteristic points of view. 

Those who major in a foreign language acquire active skill 
in all phases of the language, enter more deeply into the his- 
tory, culture, and literature of which it is the vehicle, and 
gain some comprehension of its historical development. 

Students who specialize in a modern foreign language are 
better prepared for careers in government work, librarianship, 
and journalism. Those students who elect to do further gradu- 
ate work in their languages may thereby prepare themselves 
for a career in college teaching. If they prefer teaching in the 
secondary area, they may gain excellent preparation and satis- 
fy formal requirements for certification by entering into the 
Master of Arts in Education program which is offered by sev- 
eral leading graduate institutions.* Finally, language com- 
petence is a distinct asset in the business and industrial world, 
especially to those involved in foreign trade and overseas op- 
erations. 

Freshmen can elect a foreign language major even though 
they may not have had previous instruction in the language of 
their choice or, indeed, in any foreign language. In most cases, 
to be sure, a student electing foreign languages as an area of 
concentration will have had at least two years of the language 
of his choice in high school. He will then begin with the se- 
quence of 251-252 and will take concurrently with those courses 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



91 



053-054, Oral Practice III and IV. If he has not had the lan- 
guage of specialization in high school, he will begin with 151- 
152 and 051-052, Oral Practice I and II. An area of concentra- 
tion requires a minimum of 36 semester hours excluding 151- 
152 or the equivalent courses in high school. It is recom- 
mended that a student concentrating in one foreign language 
also complete at least the intermediate sequence in a second 
language, particularly if he is looking forward to graduate 
work. The second language will normally be started in the 
sophomore year or the preceding summer session. 

*A graduate program leading to the Master of Education degree 
with major curriculum concentration in Spanish was initiated at the 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1967. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

School of Arts and Sciences* 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Eng 101 English I 4 

Biol 103 General Biology I or 

Chem 111 General Chemistry I or 

Sci 105 Physical Science I or 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 

101 Military Science I (men) 1% 

251 Language III 3 

053 Oral Practice III 2 

110 Phys. Ed. (men)** % 

15 



MS 
FL 
FL 
HPe 



Eng 


102 


Biol 


104 


Chem 112 


Sci 


106 


Phys 


112 


HPe 


102 


MS 


102 


Art 


101 


Mus 


101 


Eng 


103 


FL 


252 


FL 


054 



English II 4 

General Biology II or 
General Chemistry II or 
Physical Science II or 

Physics II 4 

Physical Ed. I (women) . 1 
Military Science II (men) 1% 
Intro, to Art or 
Intro, to Music or 

Intro, to Theater 3 

Language IV 3 

Oral Practice IV 2 

women 17 
men 17 % 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Eng 201 Lit. I (Tragic Themes in 

Literature) or 
Kng .101 Lit. II (Lit. of Social 

Criticism ) 2 

Hist 101 Hist. Civ. I 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) . . 1 

FL 351 Advanced Language I . . . . 3 

FL 055 Advanced Oral Pract. I . . . 1 

FL 361 Culture and Lit. I 3 

Free Elective (women) ... 3 

Free Electives (men) 6 

women 16 
men 18 

FIFTH SEMESTER 

Hum. or Nat. Sci. Elective 8 

Soc. Sci. Elective 8 

FL Elective 8 

Free Electives 6-9 

16-18 



Hist 


102 


Math 


i 101 


FL 


352 


FL 


056 


FL 


362 


HPe 


111 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Hist. Civ. II 3 

Found, of Math 3 

Advanced Lang. II 3 

Advanced Oral Pr. II ... . 1 

Culture and Lit. II 3 

Free Elective 3 

Phys. Ed. (men)** % 

women 16 
men 16% 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Hum. or Nat. Sci. Elective 3 

Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

FL Elective 3 

Free Electives 6- 9 

15-18 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

FL Elective 8 FL Elective 3 

Free Electives 9 Free Electives 9 

15 16 

* Applicable to entrants of Summer 1967 (including ABC students) and thereafter. 

Students entering with 2 or 3 high school credits should start with 251 and 053. Veterans 
with two years of active service will be exempted from the ROTC and Health and Phys. 
Ed. requirement. 

** HPe 110 and HPe 111 (% credit each) applies to male freshmen of September 1968 
and thereafter. 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Required Courses 

FL 251-252 Language III-IV 3 cr. each 

FL 053-054 Oral Practice III-IV 2 cr. each 

FL 351-352 Advanced Language I-II 3 cr. each 

FL 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice I-II _ 1 cr. each 

FL 361-362 Development of culture & Lit. Ml 3 cr. each 

Required FL Electives 12 credits 

"36~ 
MUSIC 

HUGH JOHNSON. Chairman 

The Liberal Arts student who desires to concentrate in 
Music has the choice of three options: Music Literature, Music 
Performance and Music Theory. The programs in these three 
phases of music for the Liberal Arts student are designed to 
give the student a considerable but not necessarily professional 
experience in depth in each phase. The student who chooses 
to concentrate in Theory will not become a composer, but he 
will acquire a fuller understanding of the art of music and its 
function in our culture. Similar statements could also be made 
in regard to the concentrations in Music Literature and in 
Musical Performance. 

The Liberal Arts student will not be preparing specifically 
for a vocation of further study, but rather for a deep and 
broad understanding of the culture in which he must live. 
However, by its very nature, it will be an excellent base for 
graduate study in the area of concentration and a fine back- 
ground for a rich cultured life. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



93 



Music Performance Concentration 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Eng 101 English I 4 

Eng 232 Oral Reading 3 

HPelOl Health I or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Muslll Sight Singing I 2 

Mus 115 Harmony I 3 

Mus 113 Ear Training I 1 

Private Instruction/Voice . . 2 



i6y a -i7 



Eng 201 English II 4 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 4 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

Mus 112 Sight Singing II 2 

Mus 116 Harmony II 3 

Mus 114 Ear Training II 1 

Private Instruction/Voice . 2 

17-18 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Eng 238 Nature of Drams 3 Psy 201 

FL Foreign Language* 3 FL 

Geog 101 World Geography 3 Art 116 

Art 115 Art History I 3 HPe 103 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) 1 Mus 216 

Mus 215 Harmony III 3 Mus 301 

Private Instrument or Voice 2 

17-18 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

General Psychology 3 

Foreign Language* 3 

Art History II 3 

Physical Ed. II (women) 1 

Harmony IV 3 

Music History I 3 

Private Instrument or Voice . 2 

17-18 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

FL Foreign Language* 8 

Biol 103 General Biology I 

Sci 105 Physical Science 4 

Eng 301 Introduction to Literature . 2 

Private Instrument or Voice 2 

Electives 4 

PHellO Phys. Ed. (men) % 

16-15y 2 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

FL Foreign Language* 3 

Biol 104 General Biology II 

Sci 106 Physical Science 4 

Eng 214 Shakespeare 3 

Private Instrument or Voice 2 

Electives 3 

PHe 111 Phys. Ed. (men) y 2 

15-15% 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Phil 120 Intro, to Philosophy or 

Anth 110 Intro, to Anthropology 3 

Hist 102 History of Civilization II . . . 3 

Phil 221 Logic 3 

Hist 104 History of U.S. and PA. II . 3 

Private Instrument or Voice 2 

Elective 2 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Phil 222 Ethics 3 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 3 

Eng 251 History of Eng. Language . . 3 

Private Instrument or Voice 2 

Electives 4 

15 



* A two semester sequence. 



94 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Music Theory Concentration 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 201 

Eng232 Oral Reading S Math 101 

HPe 101 Health I or 2 MS 102 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% Mus 112 

Mus 111 Sight Singing I 2 Mus 116 

Mus 115 Harmony I 3 Mus 114 

Mus 118 Ear Training I 1 



14%-15 



English II 4 

Foundations of Math 4 

Military Science I lYs 

Sight Singing II 2 

Harmony II 3 

Ear Training II 1 



14-16% 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Eng 238 Nature of Drama 3 

FL Foreign Language* 3 

Geog 101 World Geography 3 

Art 115 Art History I 8 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) .. 1 

Mus 215 Harmony III 8 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) .. 

16%-16 



% 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

FL Foreign Language* 3 

Art 116 Art History II 3 

HPe 103 Physical Ed. U (women) . . 1 

Mus 216 Harmony IV 3 

Mus 301 Music History I 3 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 

16%-16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

FL Foreign Language* 3 FL 

Biol 103 General Biology I or Biol 104 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 4 Sci 106 

Eng 301 Introduction to Literature ... 2 Eng 214 

Mus 306 Counterpoint I 2 Mus 307 

Mus 309 Orchestration I 2 Mus 310 

Mus 302 Music History II 3 Mus 303 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language* 3 

General Biology II or 

Physical Science II 4 

Shakespeare 3 

Counterpoint II 2 

Orchestration II 2 

Music History in 3 

17 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Phil 102 Intro, to Philosophy or 

Anth 110 Intro, to Anthropology 8 

SS 102 History of Civilization n ... 8 

Phil 221 Logic 8 

SS 104 History of U.S. and Pa. H . . 3 

Mus 441 Composition I 2 

Mus 308 Fugue and Canon 2 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Phil 222 Ethics 8 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 8 

Eng 251 History of English Language 3 

Mus 412 Composition H 2 

Electives 6 

16 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



96 



Music Literature Concentration 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 201 

Eng 232 Oral Reading 3 Math 101 

HPelOl Health I or 2 MS 102 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% Mus 112 

Mus 111 Sight Singing I 2 Mus 116 

Mus 115 Harmony I 3 Mus 114 

Mu8ll3 Ear Training I 1 



15Mt-16 



English II 4 

Foundations of Math .... 4 

Military Science I 1% 

Sight Singing II 2 

Harmony II 3 

Ear Training II 1 

14-15% 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Eng 238 Nature of Drama 3 

FL Foreign Language* 3 

Geog 101 World Geography 3 

Art 115 Art History I 8 

HPe 102 Physical Education I 1 

Mus 215 Harmony III 8 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 

15%-16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

FL Foreign Language* 3 

Art 116 Art History II 3 

HPe 103 Physical Education II 1 

Mus 216 Harmony IV 3 

Mus 301 Music History I 3 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 

16y 2 -16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

FL Foreign Language* 3 FL 

Biol 103 General Biology I or Biol 104 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 4 Sci 106 

Eng 301 Introduction to Literature ... 2 Eng 214 

Mus 302 Music History II 3 Mus 303 

Electives 5 

17 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language* 3 

General Biology II or 

Physical Science II 4 

Shakespeare 3 

Music History III 3 

Music Literature Elective ... 3 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Phil 120 Intro, to Philosophy or 

Anth 110 Intro, to Anthropology 3 

Hist 102 History of Civilization II . . . 3 

Phil 221 Logic 3 

Hist 104 History of U.S. and Pa. U . . 3 

Music Literature Elective . . 3 



15 



Phil 222 
PolS 111 
Eng 251 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Ethics 3 

American Citizenship 3 

History of English Language 3 

Music Literature Elective — 3 

Electives 6 



17 



* A two semester sequence. 

Students must pass a piano proficiency jury examination in all these areas of con- 
centration. 



96 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PHILOSOPHY 

ROBERT M. HERMANN, Chairman 

Studies in philosophy should better equip any student to 
handle the theoretical issues which confront him, though final 
answers to the special questions of ethics, aesthetics, meta- 
physics, epistemology, and logic are not easily agreed upon. 
Many of the proposed solutions have had great influence on 
human history and should be studied for this reason if for no 
other. But because no thinking person can long escape private 
confrontation with philosophic problems we would insist with 
William James that "To know the chief rival attitudes towards 
life, as the history of human thinking has developed them, and 
to have heard some of the reasons they can give for them- 
selves, ought to be considered an essential part of liberal edu- 
cation ... A man with no philosophy in him is the most in- 
auspicious and unprofitable of all possible social mates." 

Students may take either a major or minor in the Philoso- 
phy Department. Those concentrating in other areas are en- 
couraged to program electives in philosophy which relate to 
their primary fields. (See course description section.) 

Requirements for the Major Requirements for the Minor 

Phil. 120 Intro, to Philosophy 3 cr 8 cr. 

Phil. 221 General Logic 3 cr 3 cr. 

Phil. 222 Ethics 3 cr 3 cr. 

Phil. 324 History of Philosophy I . . 8 cr. 3 cr. 

Phil. 325 History of Philosophy H . 3 cr 3 cr. 

Phil. 328 Aesthetics 3 cr. 

Phil. 430 Readings Colloquim 3 cr. 

Departmental Electives . . 12 cr. 6 cr. 

88 cr. 21 cr. 



NATURAL SCIENCE 

DWIGHT SOLLBERGER, Natural Science Coordinator 

The objectives of the Science Departments as they relate 
to the Liberal Arts program are as follows: 

1. To provide all students with the opportunity to secure 
a sound understanding of the nature of the scientific 
enterprise and its relationship to society. 

2. To give science students a thorough background of 
knowledge in the specific field of their choice as far as 
the undergraduate years permit. 

3. To provide science students with those skills and atti- 
tudes which will enable them to go on successfully to 
more advanced programs. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA <J7 

The Science Departments believe that science has a very 
important contribution to make toward the realization of the 
objectives of the Liberal Arts program. Those qualities that 
promote science such as critical thinking, respect for truth, 
objectivity, reasonable skepticism, and a desire for a better 
knowledge of the natural world are all attributes of the liber- 
ally educated individual. 

The Science Departments believe that the objectives of 
the science program are reached through careful study in well- 
planned courses. The acquisition of knowledge gained by sci- 
entists is a first step in understanding the capabilities of sci- 
ence. Investigation in the classroom imparts to the student a 
knowledge of the methods scientists use to ferret out the 
secrets of their environment. Students are encouraged to un- 
dertake investigations to reach an understanding of the work 
of scientists. Students are expected to put forth their best ef- 
forts to achieve the objectives of the courses and of the sci- 
ence programs. 

The Science Departments offer a major in the general area 
of the Natural Sciences. This major consists of 36 semester 
hours. However, most students will wish to extend this major 
by concentrating in one of several areas of Science through 
selection of suitable electives. These areas are Biology, Chem- 
istry, Science, and Physics. By selecting a field of concentra- 
tion students will be eligible to enter graduate or professional 
schools in the area of their choice. Students who plan to con- 
tinue their studies beyond the undergraduate school should 
study carefully the requirements of advanced programs and 
select courses to meet such requirements. 

The vocational opportunities created by science have 
caused many young people to specialize in one of the many 
areas of Science with the expectancy of finding employment 
in work which is satisfying intellectually as well as financially. 
Today this hope is being realized as never before. University 
graduates who have had thorough preparation in the sciences 
have little difficulty in finding suitable employment. Some stu- 
dents use their preparation to continue work at the graduate 
level and qualify to do basic research which may or may not 
have ready application. Such students may join the staff of 
universities or research institutions. Others may join the staffs 
of industries where their knowledge and skills are used to im- 
prove the products of industry. Thus students are well-advised 
to look into the possibility of finding life-long work directly 
related to their preparation in science at the university level. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

FRANCIS W. LIEGEY. Chairman 

Requirements for the A.B. degree with a major in biology. 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



S.H. 

General Biology I 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

English I 4 

Intro, to Art, or 
Intro, to Music, or 

Intro, to Theater 3 

Health, or Military Science 2- 1% 

17-16% 



S.H. 

General Biology II 4 

General Chemistry II 4 

English II 4 

General Elective 3 

Health, or Military Science 2- 1% 



17-16% 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Foreign Language 3 

Algebra & Trigonometry 6 

Organic Chemistry I 4 

Biology Elective 3 

HPellO Physical Ed. (men) % 

^6% 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language 3 

Genetics 3 

Literature I or II 2 

Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 4 

HPelll Physical Ed. (men) % 

~1B% 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Ecology 8 

Biochemistry 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Biology Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Free Electives 9 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

General Physiology 3 

Biology Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Biology Elective 3 

Biology Seminar 1- 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Free Electives 6- 8 

15 



Requirements for a minor in Biology 



S.H. 

General Biology I 4 

General Biology II 4 

Genetics 3 



S.H. 

Ecology 3 

General Physiology 3 

Biology Elective 3 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



99 



BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

FRANCIS W. LIEGEY, Chairman 

Requirements for the B.S. degree with a major in biology. 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



S.H. 

General Biology I 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

English I 4 

Intro, to Art, or 
Intro, to Music, or 

Intro, to Theater 3 

Health, or Military Science 2- 1% 

17.16% 



S.H. 

General Biology II 4 

General Chemistry II 4 

English II 4 

General Elective 3 

Health, or Military Science 2- 1% 



17-16% 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Foreign Language 3 

Algebra & Trigonometry 6 

Organic Chemistry I 4 

Biology Elective 3 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 

Tb% 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language 3 

Anal. Geom. & Calculus 4 

Organic Chemistry II 4 

Literature I or II 2 

Biology Elective 3 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 

16% 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Physics I 4 

Biochemistry 8 

Ecology 8 

Biology Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 8 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Physics II 4 

Genetics 3 

Biology Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Elective 3 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

General Physiology 3 

Social Science Elective 6 

Electives 6 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Biology Seminar 1- 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Electives 6- 8 

12 



CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

PAUL R. WUNZ, JR., Chairman 

In the School of Arts and Sciences the chemistry depart- 
ment offers two majors. One of these majors is the B.S. degree 
and the other the B.A. degree. 

The B.S. degree in chemistry may be considered to be a 
professional degree. The student completing this major should 
be qualified to assume a position in industry as a chemist or to 
apply for admission to graduate school to work for advanced 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



degrees in chemistry. Anyone considering teaching at the col- 
lege or university level should plan on obtaining a B.S. degree 
and also a Ph.D. degree, since practically all universities re- 
quire their staff members to have a doctorate degree. 

The following B.S. curriculum should be at least equiva- 
lent to the minimum standards of the American Chemical 
Society. 

B.S. Curriculum for Chemistry (Liberal Arts) 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Cr. 

Chcm 111 Gen. Chem. I 4 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Math 162 Alg. & Trig 6 

MS 101 Mil. Sci. I, and 1% 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) or Ys 

HPe 101 Health 2 

16 



Cr. 

Chem 112 Gen. Chem. II 4 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Cal. I 4 

MS 102 Mil. Sci. I, and IY 2 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) or . . % 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) 2 

Art 101 Intro, to Art, or 

Mus 101 Intro, to Music, or 

Eng 103 Intro, to Theater 3 



17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Chem 231 Org. Chem. I 4 

Math 257 Calc. II 4 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

Eng 201 Lit. I, or 

Eng 301 Lit. II 2 

Foreign Language I* 3 

17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Chem 232 Org. Chem. II 4 

Math 357 Calc. Ill 4 

Phys 112 Physics II 4 

Social Science Elective 3 

Foreign Language II* 3 

18 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Chem 321 Quant. Anal 4 

Chem 341 Phys. Chem. I 4 

Math 361 Diff. Eq 3 

Foreign Language III* 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

17 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Chem 322 Inst. Anal 4 

Chem 342 Phys. Chem. II 4 

Chem 301 Seminar 1 

Foreign Language IV* 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Chem 411 Inorg. Chem 3 

Chem 498 Prob. in Chem 1 

Chem. Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Natural Science Electives 5 

15 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Chem 412 Inorg. Preps 3 

Chem 498 Prob. in Chem 1 

Chem. Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Natural Science Electives 6 

15 



* Foreign Language — German or Russian. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 101 

Social Science Elective! Natural Science Electives 

PolS 111 Amer. Citizenship Biology 

Anth 110 Intro, to Anthropology Physics 

Econ 121 Principles of Economics Math 

Hist 102 History of Civ. II Geology 

Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II Chem 303 Glassblowing Tech. 

Psy 201 General Psychology Chemistry Electives 

Geo 101 World Geography Chem 331 Org. Qual. Analysis 

Soc 151 Principles of Sociology Chem 351 Biochemistry 

Chem 333 Org. Mech. & Stereochemistry 
Chem 441 Advanced Phy. Chem. 
Chem 421 Advanced Inst. Anal. 

B.A. Curriculum in Chemistry 

The purpose of the B.A. curriculum is to give the student 
a basic training in chemistry, but with a flexibility to permit 
the student to obtain an adequate background in related areas. 
Students electing to take the B.A. curriculum would be those 
who are most interested in going into industry and perhaps in 
a fringe area of chemistry such as sales, technical service, 
patent law, or management. The training should be sufficient 
to permit the student to go to graduate school but at a slight 
disadvantage compared to a B.S. chemistry major. 

The requirements for a B.A. degree in chemistry would be 
the university graduation requirements, mathematics through 
the third semester of calculus, and a maximum of thirty-five 
(35) hours of chemistry which must include the following 
courses: Chem. Ill, 112, 231, 232, 321, 322, and 341. Based upon 
the interest of the student the remainder of the curriculum 
would be decided by the faculty advisor and the student in- 
volved. 

PHYSICS 

RICHARD E. BERRY, Chairman 

The physics student has a choice of two curricula in the 
school of Arts and Sciences. Either of these curricula is suit- 
able preparation for graduate school. A very able student may 
prefer the B.A. program which contains a larger number of 
electives. A student wishing to cover the maximum physics to 
strengthen his speciality before entering Graduate School may 
prefer the B.S. program. Transfer into these programs from 
other curricula is possible prior to the junior year. These cur- 
ricula do not include the education courses required for certi- 
fication in public school teaching. The curriculum required for 
certification is described in the School of Education section of 
this catalog. 

B.A. in Physics 

This curriculum is designed to allow the maximum flexi- 
bility. The large number of elective courses may be used to 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



satisfy many special requirements. Interdisciplinary degree 
programs such as geo-physics, or bio-physics can be prepared 
in consultation with your adviser. Students planning graduate 
school should consider this curriculum because they will have 
ample opportunity to complete this training in physics in 
graduate school. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 

HPellO Physical Ed. (men) % 

MS 101 Military Sci. I (men) 1% 

Math 152 Algebra & Trig 5 

Math 155 Computer Programming ... 1 

Phys 111 Physics I (Lecture) 3 

Phys 121 Laboratory Physics I 1 

16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. (women) 1 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. (men)* % 

MS 102 Military Sci. I (men) 1% 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Cal. I 4 

Phys 112 Physics II (Lecture) 3 

Phys 122 Laboratory Physics II 1 

Intro, to Art, Music or Theatre 3 

10-17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calc. II 4 

Phys 231 Electronics 4 

Foreign Language III 3 

S. S. Elective 1 3 

S. S. Elective 2 3 

17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

English Literature I or II 2 

Math 357 Calculus III 4 

Phys 222 Mechanics I 3 

Phys 242 Optics 4 

Foreign Language IV 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. (women) 1 

16-17 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Math 361 Differential Equations 3 

Phys 331 Atomic & Nuclear Physics ... 4 

Natural Science Sequence 3 

S. S. Elective 3 3 

Elective 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Phys 322 Electricity & Magnetism I 
Natural Science Sequence 

Philosophy Elective 

S. S. Elective 4 

Elective 



16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Phys 421 Selected Experiments I 3 

Phys 483 Quantum I 3 

Advanced Social Science** or 

Natural Science Sequence 3 

Elective 8 

Elective 8 



15 



* May be taken second year. 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Advanced Social Science** or 

Natural Science Sequence 3 

S. S. Elective 5 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



** Building on one of the required Social Science courses or the Natural Science 
Sequence. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



103 



B.S. in Physics 

The Bachelor of Science curriculum is primarily a con- 
centrated program of specialization in physics and is recom- 
mended for those students who may not attend graduate 
school. The B.S. graduate will have adequate preparation in 
Physics and Mathematics to hold a position in industrial or 
private research without further education. In addition, the 
concentration in these areas will enable him to more readily 
absorb the advanced physics required in graduate school. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. (men) V. 

MS 101 Military Sci. I (men) IV 

Math 152 Algebra & Trig 5 

Math 156 Computer Programming ... 1 

Phys 111 Physics I (Lecture) 3 

Phys 121 Laboratory Physics I 1 

16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. (women) 1 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. (men)* % 

MS 102 Military Sci. I (men) 1% 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Cal. I 4 

Phys 112 Physics II (Lecture) 3 

Phys 122 Laboratory Physics II 1 

Intro, to Art, Music or Theatre 3 

lfi-17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calc. II 4 

Phys 231 Electronics 4 

Foreign Language III 3 

S. S. Elective 1 3 

R. S. Elective 2 3 

17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

English Literature I or II 2 

Math 357 Calculus III 4 

Phys 222 Mechanics I 3 

Phys 242 Optics 4 

Foreign Language IV 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. (women) 1 

16-17 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Math 361 Differential Eqs 3 

Phys 223 Mechanics II 3 

Phys 331 Atomic & Nuclear 4 

S. S. Elective 3 3 

Elective 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Phys 322 Electricity & Magnetism I . . . 3 

Phys 342 Heat & Thermo 4 

S. S. Elective 4 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Phys 323 Electricity & Mag. II 3 

Phys 421 Selected Exp. I 3 

Phys 483 Quantum I 3 

S. S. Elective 6 8 

Elective 3 

16 

• May be taken second year. 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Phys 422 Selected Exp. II 3 

Phys 472 Modern Physica 3 

Phys 484 Quantum II 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

16 



104 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



MATHEMATICS 



MELVIN R. WOODARD, Chairman 



The program for a Mathematics concentration as a part of 
the Natural Science major is two phased. A student may pur- 
sue a degree in Mathematics or a degree in Applied Mathe- 
matics. Those completing a degree in Mathematics will be pre- 
pared to continue their studies in graduate school in mathe- 
matics even though some may enter business, industry or 
government positions. Those students receiving the degree in 
Applied Mathematics will be prepared to enter computer sci- 
ence related fields or to continue graduate school in Computer 
Science. The student would not be expected to continue grad- 
uate studies in pure mathematics, however. 

A major in either field requires a minimum of 38 credits 
in mathematics. 

MATHEMATICS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calc. I* . . 4 

Math 155 Comp. Prog, or 1 

Intro, to Art, Music, or Theater ... 3 

HPe 101 Health or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I and 1% 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 

Foreign Languagef 3 

14-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) or 1 

MS 102 Military Science I and Wj 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calc. II . . 4 

Math 155 Comp. Prog, or 1 

Intro, to Art, Music, or Theater ... 3 

Math 375 Modern Math 3 

Foreign Languagef 3 



16-18 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 357 Anal. Geom. & Calc. Ill 4 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) 1 

Eng 201 Literature I or 2 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 

Humanities or Nat. Sciences 

Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

Math Elective 3 

17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Math 355 Found, of Geom 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elec 3 

Math Elective 3 

Phys 112 Physics II 4 

Elective 3 

16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Math "61 Differential Equations 3 

Math 371 Linear Algebra or 

Math 376 Abstract Algebra 3 

Science Elective 3- 4 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 3 

16-16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Math 381 Adv. Calc. I 3 

Math Elective 3 

Science Elective 3- 4 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 3 

16-16 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



106 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Math Elective 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 10 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Math Elective 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Math 452 Seminar 1-3 

Elective 9 

16-18 



Trig. 



Elertives may be chosfn from the following: 841, 356, 303, 304. 367. 371, 376, 382. 

* Those who do not qualify for Math 157 are required to take Math 152, Algebra and 

t The intermediate sequence. 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I and V/> 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I % 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calc. I* . . . 4 

Math 155 Computer Programming ... 1 

Intro, to Art or Music or Theater ... 3 



Foreign Language! 3 

17 

THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 357 Anal. Geom. & Calc. Ill 4 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

HPe 203 Physical Education II 1 

Humanities or Natural Science 

Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Eng 201 Literature I or 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 

Math 366 Computer Math I 3 

17 



Eng 201 English II 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I or 

MS 102 Military Science I and . . . 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calc. II 
Math 375 Modern Mathematics . . . 
Foreign Language! 



Cr. 
4 
1 

1% 
% 
4 
3 
3 



15-16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Math 371 Linear Algebra I 3 

Phys 1 12 Physics II 4 

Math 461 Computer M:ith II 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Math 361 Differential Equations 3 

Science Elective 3-4 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 6 

16-16 

SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Math 367 Numerical Analysis 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 10 



16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Math 3S1 Advanced Calculus I 3 

Science Elective 3- 4 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 6 

15-16 

EIGHTH SEMESTER 
Math 471 Seminar: Adv. Topics in 

Computer Science 3 

Math 452 Seminar 1- 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 9 



253. 



16-18 
Electives in Mathematics may be chosen from the following: Math 382, 376, 363, 364, 
* Those who do not qualify for Math 157 are required to take Math 152, Algebra and 



Trig. 



t The intermediate dequence. 



106 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

SOCIAL SCIENCE DIVISION 

RAYMOND J. LEE, Coordinator 

The Social Science Division spans nine areas of the Social 
Sciences — Anthropology, Criminology, Economics, Geography, 
History, International Studies, Political Science, Psychology, 
and Sociology. As a Division it is organized to perform two 
functions: 

1. To provide a General Education Program for all students. 

2. To offer major and minor fields of concentration within 
the various Social Science disciplines (27 semester hours are 
required for a major; 15 semester hours for a minor, including 
General Education courses in that area) . 

Vocational opportunities that emerge from the Social Sci- 
ences disciplines are not easily classified, although the range 
of opportunities is great. The Division has prepared a booklet 
on career opportunities that is available upon request to the 
Divisional office. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

DONALD A. WALKER. Chairman 

The Department of Economics sponsors offerings of three 
general types: a program directed to the needs of students de- 
siring to major or minor in economics; various specialized 
courses open to Social Science and other majors and minors; 
and a General Education elective. 

Econ 101, Basic Economics, is the department's General 
Education offering. It develops concepts studied in greater 
depth in the six hour Principles I and II combination, and is 
designed for the student whose course contact with economics 
presumably will be limited to three semester hours. The course 
should not be programmed by students majoring in any of the 
social sciences or in either business management or business 
education. 

Principles of Economics I taken alone, or Basic Economics 
if accepted by the department in substitution, serves as a 
foundation for certain additional economics courses for non- 
economics majors and minors. Principles I and II are prerequi- 
sites to later courses for those majoring or minoring in eco- 
nomics. The departmental majors program is designed for 
those planning careers as economists in education, government, 
industry, finance, or commerce. Today's professional economist 
occupies an increasingly active role in the American society, 
and great opportunity exists for qualified people. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 107 

The department's upper-division Electives are open to 
qualified non-economic majors and minors as well as to stu- 
dents specializing in the discipline, and are designed to aid 
the student in developing sophisticated insights into the work- 
ings of the American society from their respective standpoints. 
The course number and title of the earlier elective Econ 241, 
Contemporary Economic Problems, have been deleted; this 
course now appears under the listing Econ 122, Principles of 
Economics II, and Econ 122 must henceforth be programmed 
wherever Contemporary Economic Problems was required. 

To achieve concentration in economics, a total of twenty- 
seven semester hours must be programmed from the courses 
listed below. The core courses are requirements for economics 
majors. Achievement of a minor in economics requires fifteen 
semester hours. Economics may also be part of the twenty-one 
hour comprehensive Social Science minor described elsewhere 
in this bulletin. 

It is recommended that the economics major "minor" in 
a related discipline. Minors may be taken in any university- 
recognized discipline where sufficient credits can be obtained. 
Recommended as areas for a minor are the other social sci- 
ences: anthropology-sociology, criminology, geography includ- 
ing urban and regional planning, history, political science in- 
cluding international studies, and psychology. Recommended 
also are business (business management, general business, ac- 
counting) and mathematics (emphasis upon statistics, com- 
puter science, general mathematics). A minor in mathematics 
is particularly desirable for those whose future may include 
graduate work in economics. 

THE ECONOMICS CURRICULUM 

Core Courses, Economics Majors 

Econ 121 Principles of Economics I 3 Cr. 

Econ 122 Principles of Economics II 3 Cr. 

Econ 221 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 Cr. 

Econ 222 Microeconomic Analysis 3 Cr. 

Econ 321 History of Economic Thought 3 Cr. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Econ 101 Basic Economics 3 Cr. 

Econ 241 Contemporary Economic Problems: no longer 
offered; see text 

Econ 305 Quantitative Economic Methods I 3 Cr. 

Econ 306 Quantitative Economic Methods II 3 Cr. 

Econ 325 Money, Banking, and Monetary Policy „. 3 Cr. 

Econ 330 Labor and Industrial Relations 3 Cr. 

Econ 335 Public Finance 3 Cr. 

Econ 340 Economics of Underdeveloped Countries 3 Cr. 

Econ 341 Economic Development of the United States 3 Cr. 

Econ 342 Economic Development of Modern Europe 3 Cr. 



108 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Econ 343 Economics of Population and Manpower 3 Cr. 

Econ 345 International Economics 3 Cr. 

Econ 350 Comparative Economic Systems 3 Cr. 

Econ 355 Introduction to Econometrics 4 Cr. 

Econ 360 Seminar, Special Studies in Economics 3 Cr. 

Econ 390 Honors in Economics 3 Cr. 

Math 362 Probability and Statistics 3 Cr. 



RECOMMENDED PROGRAM SEQUENCE 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Eng 101 English I 

HPe 101 Health (women) or 

MS 101 Military Science I 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Science Elective 

Laboratory Natural Sci 

Foreign Language 



Cr. 
4 
2 

1% 
3 
4 
3 



Eng 102 English II 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) or 

MS 102 Military Science I 

Econ 121 Principles of Econ. I .... 

Laboratory Natural Sci 

Foreign Language 



Cr. 
4 
1 

1% 
3 
4 



15M..-16 



15-1 6 V.> 



THIRD SEMESTER 



Math 101 Foundations of Math . . . 

Art 101 Introduction to Art or 

Mus 101 Introduction to Music or 

Eng 103 Introduction to Theatre . 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) ... 

Econ 122 Principles of Econ. II . . 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective . 

Gen. Ed. Humanities Elec. < 

Gen. Ed. Natural Sci. Elec. 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Eng 201 Literature I or 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 

HPe lllPhysical Ed. II (men) % 

Econ 321 History of Econ. Thought 3 

Economics Elective 3 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elec 6 

Gen. Ed. Humanities Elec. . . 3- 6 



17-17% 



16M..-16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Econ 221 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

Economics Elective or 

Elec. in Minor Field 6 

Gen. Ed. Humanities Elec 3 

Free Electives 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Econ 222 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Economics Elective 3 

Electives in Minor Field 6 

Free Electives 3 



15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Economic Electives 6 

Elec. in Minor Field 3 

Free Electives 6 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 
Free Electives 



15 
15 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 101) 



GEOGRAPHY 

THOMAS G. GAULT. Chairman 

The function and purpose of geography is to prepare the 
future citizen to make rational judgements in his private and 
public life as it relates to the use of natural and cultural re- 
sources. Geography also acts as a meaningful integrator of the 
many subject matter areas taken by the student. 

Though geography is listed as social science in Arts and 
Science curricula, it is of broader scope. Geography includes 
physical geography (earth science), cultural geography, eco- 
nomic geography, urban and regional planning, or combines 
these for a broad understanding of man in his total environ- 
ment. 

Vocational opportunities in geography are expanding 
rapidly. Students will find a wide variety of well-paid posi- 
tions in government service, marketing, urban and regional 
planning, army and naval map services, editorial positions, 
and business. 

There are three options for a major in the Geography De- 
partment in the School of Arts and Sciences: (1) General 
Geography, (2) Physical Geography, and (3) Urban /Regional 
Planning. 

A major in geography consists of 36 semester hours in 
geography course work as listed in following pages. The op- 
tions are exercised through judicious use of the minor and 
electives. 

A minor in geography consists of 15 semester hours of 
geography course work including those taken as General Edu- 
cation as follows: 

1) World Geography or Physical Geography 

2) Cultural Geography or Economic Geography 

3) One physical geography elective: Climatology, Physiog- 
raphy, Cartography, Conservation: Resource Use. 

4) One human systematic elective: Political Geography, 
Geog. Infl. in History, Trade and Transportation, World 
Problems in Geography, Historical Geography of Cities 
and City Planning. 

5) One Regional Geography elective: Europe, Far East, 
Southeast Asia, Anglo-America, Africa, U.S.S.R., South 
America, Australia, U.S. and Pa., Pennsylvania. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Geography Major 



FIRST SEMESTER 



English I 

Biology I or Chemistry I or 

Physics I or Geology I 

Physical Geography 

General Ed. Soc. Science Elective 
Military Science or Health 



Cr. 
4 

4 

3 

3 

. 1%- 2 

15y 2 -16 



SECOND SEMESTER 



English II 

Nat. Science Continued 

Cultural Geography 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Science Elective 

Military Science or 

Physical Ed. I (women) 



Cr. 
4 

4 
3 
3 
1% 

1 



15i/o-16 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Foreign Language III 3 

Literature I or II 2 

Math 162 5 

Economic Geography 3 

Intro, to Art. or Music or Theater . 3 

Physical Ed. I (men) 



& 



I6-I6I/2 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language IV 3 

Gen. Ed. Nat. Sci. Elective 3 

Geology or Physiography 3- 4 

Geography Anglo-America 3 

Physical Ed. II (women) 1 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Physical Ed. (men) \ 

15%-17 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Geography Thought 3 

Geography Elective 3 

Minor Elective 3 

Meteorology or Climatology 3- 4 

15-16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Cartography 3 

Regional Elective 3 

Minor Elective 3 

Free Elective 6 

15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Geography Elective 3 

Minor Elective 3 

Free Elective 8 

14 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Geography Elective 3 

Minor Elective 6 

Free Elective 5 

14 



Option in Physical Geography 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 



English I 4 

Chemistry I 4 

Geology I 3 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Military Science or Health 2 

16 



English II 

Chemistry II 

Cultural Geography 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 

Military Science or Physical Ed. I 



Cr. 

4 
4 
3 



15-16 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Foreign Language III 3 

Literature I or II 2 

Math 152 6 

Economic Geography 3 

Intro, to Art or Music or Theater 3 

16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language IV 3 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Math 157 5 

Geology II 3 

Physical Ed. II (women) 1 

15 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

General Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Geography Thought 3 

Physics I 4 

Cartography 3 

Astronomy I 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Physics II 4 

Geography Anglo-Am 3 

Climatology 3 

Physiography 4 

Astronomy II 3 

17 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Meteorology 4 

Biology I 4 

Free Electives 8 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Oceanography 4 

Biology II 4 

Free Elective 6 

14 



Urban-Regional Planning and Administration 

Option in Geography 

There is at present a large and unfilled need for students 
with a background in the Social Sciences and with a concen- 
tration in one or more of these sciences to enter the fields of 
Urban-Regional Planning and Administration. Essentially two 
types of personnel are desired: (1) the trained planner and 
administrator to direct and evaluate, and (2) the technician 
who is capable of carrying out individual research in relation 
to the overall pattern established by planners and administra- 
tors. 

In response to these needs the Geography Department has 
established an inter-disciplinary option in Urban-Regional 
Planning and Administration so that students interested in 
this type of undergraduate program will be prepared to enter 
recognized graduate schools to prepare for positions as city 
managers, governmental administrators, and planners. Com- 
pletion of the undergraduate curricula will qualify students 
for employment in subordinate positions in these fields. 

The undergraduate inter-disciplinary program constitutes 
an introduction to the professional field of Urban-Regional 
Planning and Administration. It provides a basic understand- 
ing of planning and training desirable for entering the field of 
Urban-Regional Planning and Administration. 



112 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



The program consists of 53 semester hours of general edu- 
cation, a 36 semester hour major in a geography plus 36 semes- 
ter hours selected from five areas listed below. 

In addition, students who elect the Planning-Administra- 
tion option will be expected to devote two hours per week, for 
those semesters when they take the Urban /Regional Planning 
courses to practical problems in the county or borough offices. 
Students who complete two planning and administration 
courses are expected to take an apprenticeship. The appren- 
ticeship will be during the summer session in some planning 
or administrative office within the state and the student will 
be compensated. 

Urban /Regional Planning Option in Geography 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Cr. 

English I ■* 

Gen. Ed. Nat. Sci. Elective 4 

Physical Geography 3 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Military Science or Health 1%- 2 

15%-16 



Cr. 

English II 4 

Nat. Sci. continued 4 

Cultural Geography 3 

Gen. Ed. Sci. Elective 3 

Military Sci. or Phy. Ed. (women) 1%- 1 

15%-16 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Foreign Language III 3 

Literature I or II 2 

Math 101 or 152 3 - 5 

Economic Geography 3 

Intro, to Art or Music or Theater . . 3 

Physical Ed. II (women) 1 

Physical Ed. I (men) % 

16y 2 -17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language IV 3 

Gen. Ed. Nat. Sci. Elective 3 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Geology I 3 

Geography Anglo-America o 

Physical Ed. II (men) % 

1b% 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Geography Thought 3 

Hist. Geographic Cities 3 

Group I Elective* 3 

Climatology or Meteorology 3 

15 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Cartography 3 

Regional Geog. Elective 3 

Group II Elective* 3 

Group III Elective* 3 

Group IV Elective* 3 

15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

City and Regional Planning 3 

Group V Elective* 3 

Group I Elective* 3 

Group II Elective* 3 

Group III Elective* 3 

15 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Urban Design 3 

Group IV Elective* 3 

Group V Elective* 3 

Urban PI. Basic Studies 3 

Elective 6 

18 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



118 



♦Groups of Electives for Urban /Regional Planning Option 

in Geography 



GROUP I 

Econ 343 Economic Analysis 3 

Econ 344 Public Finance 8 

Econ 341 Industrial Relations 3 



GROUP IV 

Bus 221 Introduction to Accounting ... 3 

Bus 251 Intermediate Accounting 3 

Math 362 Probability and Statistics ... 3 

Math 366 Fortran 8 

Art 211 Mech. Drawing and Ind. Design 8 



GROUP II 

Geog 246 Physiography 4 

Geog 354 Trade and Transportation .... 8 

Geog 452 Conservation : Resource Use . . 3 

Geog 462 Field Course in Geography 3 



GROUP V 

PolS 354 Metropolitan Problems 3 

PolS 356 State and Local Government . . 3 

PolS 350 Public Administration 3 

PolS 358 Contemporary Pol. Problems . 3 



GROUP III 

Soc 334 Population Problems 8 

Soc 332 Racial-Cultural Minorities 8 

Soc 333 Juvenile Delinquency 3 

Soc 335 Social Stratification 3 



At least one course must be elected from 
each group. 



HISTORY DEPARTMENT 

CLYDE C. GELBACH, Chairman 

The program in history is designed to give both the major 
and minor student an opportunity to study in some depth the 
past story of man and his world. Not only the story of the 
United States, but also that of other peoples and other times 
is covered in the belief that such study, together with an 
understanding of the craft of the historian, is an essential for 
the future of mankind. 

The history student will find that his program is excellent 
preparation for government service, for pre-law training, for 
broad business opportunities, for work in varied fields of jour- 
nalism, for archival and manuscript positions, as well as train- 
ing for creative writing areas including the writing of history. 
In addition, an excellent undergraduate scholarship record in 
history can lead to opportunities for graduate study in this 
and other fields. 

Requirements for a major in history are twenty-seven 
hours including General Education courses. For a minor fifteen 
hours are required including General Education courses. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Laboratory Natural Science ... 4 

Foreign Language 8 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 8 

16%-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) 1 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

Laboratory Natural Science ... 4 

Foreign Language 3 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

15-15y 2 



114 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) ... 1 Art 101 Intro, to Art or 

Ens 201 Literature I or Mus 101 Intro, to Music or 

Ensr 301 Literature II 2 Eng 103 Intro, to Theater 3 

Gen. Ed. Natural Sci. or Course in Major-Minor Fields . 9 

Humanities Elective 3 HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 6 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 15-15% 

14%-16 

FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH SEMESTER 

Courses in Major-Minor Fields Courses in Major-Minor Fields 

or free electives 16-18 or free electives 15 

SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Courses in Major-Minor Fields Courses in Major-Minor Fields 

or free electives 15 or free electives 15 

CRIMINOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

HARRY W. MORE, Chairman 

The department offers men and women who seek a career 
in the Criminology field a professional education program sup- 
ported by a broad liberal arts education. 

The program in Criminology has a five-fold objective: 

1. The education of students for employment and leadership 
in the expanding field of criminal justice. 

2. The education of presently employed law enforcement and 
correctional officers who recognize the need for raising their 
educational level. 

3. The instruction of students who wish to acquire an under- 
standing of the processes of criminal justice as a cultural 
part of their higher education. 

4. The instruction of students who wish to prepare for gradu- 
ate study and research in the administration of justice. 

5. A curriculum which provides an excellent foundation for 
students preparing for a career in law. 

Nearly every level of government offers opportunities for 
professional careers in criminology. Students will find employ- 
ment opportunities in more than fifty federal agencies includ- 
ing the Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Secret Service, 
Bureau of Narcotics, Intelligence Division (I.R.S.), Inspection 
Service (I.R.S.), Alcohol Tobacco Tax Division (I.R.S.), State 
Department Security, Atomic Energy Commission, and mili- 
tary investigative branches. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 115 

Both men and women will find employment opportunities 
in parole and probation work for federal, state and local gov- 
ernments, institutional careers concerned with the custody 
and treatment of juveniles and adults at all levels of govern- 
ment. In addition, many police departments have specialized 
units dealing with juveniles, community relations, training 
and research. Criminalistic laboratories provide another career 
area and there are a wide variety of opportunities in traffic ad- 
ministration, investigative and security activities in the com- 
mercial and industrial fields. 

Career opportunities are also available in research and 
teaching at the college and university level and in research 
divisions of agencies in the field of administration of justice. 

Criminology majors are required to complete a minimum 
of thirty hours in the department. The student's career ob- 
jectives will determine the program which he will take, and 
course work will emphasize: law enforcement, criminalistics, 
corrections, or security administration. 

MINOR IN CRIMINOLOGY 

A minor in Criminology consists of 15-27 semester hours. 
Students taking courses beyond these listed below should con- 
sult with the Chairman of the Department of Criminology. 

Crmn 101 General Administration of Justice 

Crmn 102 Criminology 

Crmn 340 Crime Prevention 

Crmn 430 Comparative Study of Justice 

Crmn 490 Crime and Modern Society 

CERTIFICATE IN LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Officers taking this program in law enforcement will be 
required to complete 60 semester credits of course work. Thirty 
hours in law enforcement and thirty hours in general educa- 
tion courses. 

Suggested Curriculum 

Crmn 101 General Administration of Justice 3 

Crmn 102 Criminology 3 

Crmn 201 Police Administration I 3 

Crmn 202 Police Administration II 3 

Crmn 301 Criminal Law I 3 

Crmn 302 Criminal Law II 3 

Crmn 310 Criminal Investigation 3 

Crmn 340 Crime Prevention 3 

Crmn 350 Techniques of Interviewing 3 

Crmn 415 Supervision in the Administration of Justice .... 3 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Eng 102 English II : 4 

Soc 151 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Pol S III American Citizenship 3 

Social Science Electives 13 

Semester Hours 60 



116 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



General education courses can be taken at other colleges 
or universities and applied toward the certificate. The general 
education courses listed above must be taken by all students. 
The 13 hours of social science electives must be approved by 
the Department of Criminology. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Crmn 101 Gen. A dm. of Justice 3 

Science 4 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 

MS 101 Military Science I (men) 1% 

Social Science 3 

15%-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Science 4 

Crmn 102 Criminology 3 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) 1 

MS 102 Military Science I (men) 1% 

Soc 161 Principles of Sociology 3 



16-16% 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Crmn 201 Police Administration I 

(law enforcement emphasis) . . 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Foreign Language 

(Intermediate sequence) 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) ... 1 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 

Art 101 Introduction to Art or 
Mus 101 Introduction to Music or 

Eng 103 Introduction to Theater 3 

Eng 201 Literature I 2 

16-16% 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Crmn 202 Police Administration II 

(law enforcement emphasis) . . 3 

Foreign Language 

(Intermediate sequence) 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Electives ... 6 

1 6-16% 



FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH SEMESTER 

Social Science Courses 6 Criminology Courses 6 

Criminology Courses 6 Electives 9 

Humanities or Natural Sci. Elective 3 

16 
16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Criminology Course 3 

Electives 12 



15 



SUMMER 



Crmn 497 Internship 

(By Appointment Only) 6 



6 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Criminology Course 3 

Electives 12 



15 



All students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts program 
must complete 52 semester hours in General Education and a 
minimum of 30 semester hours in the major field. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 117 

In addition, majors in Criminology are required to pursue 
a minor field, 15-27 semester hours, in one of the social sci- 
ences or a special combined minor may be selected. 

After students meet the minimum requirements in their 
major-minor field, they may select Free Electives, 15-27 se- 
mester hours. The selection of free electives must be planned 
with the advice and consent of the student's advisor. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

RICHARD F. HEIGES. Chairman 

Political Science involves the study of political systems, 
power, public policy making, and related concepts. Although 
historically the discipline has centered on values and raises 
questions as to the nature of the ideal society, behaviorism in 
recent decades has emphasized the scientific method, empirical 
findings, and the development of a system of political theory. 
Political Science in modern society strives to assist public 
policy making and administration by integrating the older 
normative approach with the newer empirical methods. 

Students majoring in Political Science find employment 
opportunities, usually through civil service examinations, in 
federal, state, and local governments, and with private civic 
groups, interest groups, and political groups. Students who go 
on to graduate work find appointments at higher levels and in 
college teaching. Students majoring in Political Science, as in 
any of the Social Sciences, furthermore, are in demand by em- 
ployers in business and industry. 

The Political Science major is also especially suitable for 
the pre-law student. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

AND MINOR 

The Political Science Major consists of a minimum of 
twenty-seven semester hours in the discipline; the minor con- 
sists of fifteen hours. 

In both the major and the minor, two courses are required; 
Pol S 111, American Citizenship and Pol S 120, Introduction to 
Political Science. 



118 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Course Sequence — Political Science Major 

Effective for students entering after June, 1968 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Laboratory Natural Science ... 4 

Foreign Language 3 

PolS 120 Intro, to Political Science . . 3 



15y 2 -16 



Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I or 1 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

Laboratory Natural Science ... 4 

Foreign Language 3 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 3 



15-15V 2 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

HPe 103 Physical Ed. II or 1 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. for Men % 

Eng 101 Literature I or 

Eng 102 Literature II 2 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Electives ... 6 
General Ed. Natural Sci. or 

Human. Elective 3 

14%-15 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. for Men | 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Electives ... 6 

Art 101 Intro, to Art, or 

Mus 101 Intro, to Music, or 

Eng 103 Intro, to Theatre 3 

Courses in Major-Minor Field . 6 



15-15V. 



FIFTH SEMESTER (and after) 
Courses in Major-Minor Field or 
Free Electives per semester IB 

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

ROBERT MORRIS, Director 



The Center for International Studies was established at 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania to meet the demand for 
college graduates qualified for international service. The Cen- 
ter offers a flexible program leading to a B.A. degree. The cur- 
riculum in International Studies is broad enough to prepare 
the student for any one of a great variety of international 
career opportunities; however, the courses offered permit the 
student to specialize during his junior and senior years. Al- 
though the specialist is needed in international service, the 
successful specialist is one who has a very broad training at 
the undergraduate level. 

Beyond the general education courses required of all stu- 
dents in the School of Liberal Arts at the University (which 
includes a foreign language requirement), the International 
Studies major must fulfill three curriculum requirements es- 
tablished by the Center: 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 119 

I. He must complete two introductory courses in Inter- 
national Studies. (6 semester hours) PolS 357 Inter- 
national Relations and PolS 278 International Organi- 
zation. 

II. He must build an interdisciplinary elective sequence 
selected from at least three of the following groups. 
(9-18 semester hours) 



Bus 101 Business Organization & Management 
Crmn 430 Comparative Study of Justice 
Psy 452 Social Psychology 
Psy 114 Industrial Psychology 

B 

Econ 122 Principles of Economics II 
Econ 340 Economic Development 
Econ 345 International Economics 
Econ 350 Comparative Economic Systems 



Geog 149 Economic Geography 

Geog 453 Political Geography 

Geog 454 World Problems in Geography 

D 

Hist 363 Diplomatic History of U.S. 

Hist 374 History of the 20th Century World 

E 

PolS 350 Public Administration 
PolS 355 Comparative Government 
PolS 379 Developing Nations 
PolS 360 American Foreign Policy 



Soc 334 Population Problems 
Soc 357 World Cultures 
Anth 211 Cultural Anthropology 
Anth 312 World Ethnography 

III. He must complete a specialization in the economic and 
political systems of another culture that includes a 
study of the language, literature, history, and geogra- 
phy of a specific region of the world. (12-18 semester 
hours) Currently three specializations are offered: So- 
viet Studies, The Far East, and Latin America. How- 
ever, students interested in Africa, the Middle or Near 
East may elect interdisciplinary courses focusing on 
the developing nations. It is also possible to build a 
program centering on the Atlantic community of na- 
tions. 

Specialization must include work in at least three disci- 
plines. The student is expected to have completed the inter- 



120 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENN SYLVANIA 

mediate language sequence of the appropriate language in the 
general education requirements so that no credit towards 
specialization is counted for language courses numbered below 
the 300 level. 

A. Soviet Studies 

Rus 351-352 Advanced Russian Language 

Rus 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice 

Rus 361-362 Development of Russian Culture and Literature I and II 

Hist 354 History of Russia 

Geog 357 Geography of U.S.S.R. 

PolS 380 Soviet Politics & Government 

PolS 385 Political Systems: Central & Eastern Europe 

Hist 355 History of Soviet Russia 

B. The Far East 

Hist 375 History of the Far East 
PolS 379 Developing Nations 
PolS 383 Political Systems: Asia 
Geog 361 Geography of the Far East 
Geog 362 Geography of Asia 

C. Latin America 

Sp 351-352 Advanced Spanish Language 

Sp 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice 

Sp 361-362 Development of Spanish Culture and Literature I and II 

Hist 350 Latin America: Colonial Period 

Hist 352 Latin America: National Period 

Geog 371 Geography of South America 

Geog 372 Geography of Middle America 

PolS 379 Developing Nations 

PolS 381 Political Systems: Latin America 

A minor in International Studies consists of meeting the 
requirements listed under I and II above. The student's major 
is substituted for his specialization (III). The curriculum of 
the Center for International Studies is flexible enough so that 
the student can plan a program to match his interests. Stu- 
dents enrolled at the Center are preparing for careers in For- 
eign Service or for work with other branches of the govern- 
ment. Corporations and religious and philanthropic organiza- 
tions are also seeking college graduates qualified for interna- 
tional service. In addition, American colleges and universities 
need professors qualified to teach in international affairs pro- 
grams. The Center for International Studies at Indiana Uni- 
versity prepares students for these opportunities. 

It is possible for a social science education major to plan 
a concentration in the Center for International Studies. A con- 
centration in International Studies will supplement the stu- 
dents required courses and leads to certification in the social 
science fields for teaching positions in the state of Pennsyl- 
vania. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 121 



PSYCHOLOGY 

RICHARD D. MAGEE, Chairman 

The Psychology Major is designed to provide the neces- 
sary background for graduate work in psychology. It may also 
be a useful preparation for such related fields as personnel 
work, advertising, medicine, law, theology, social work, mar- 
ket research and rehabilitation counseling. The student who 
desires a general cultural background in the Liberal Arts with 
special emphasis on the understanding of human behavior will 
find this a desirable major. 

Psychology majors will be required to take General Psy- 
chology and Probability and Statistics as part of the General 
Education program. An additional 30 semester hours in Psy- 
chology will be required for graduation, of which 12 semester 
hours are prescribed. Any deviation from these requirements 
will require departmental approval. 

The student's objectives will determine his selection of 
electives in Psychology and he will be advised accordingly. 
Those who plan to pursue graduate work in Psychology should 
expect to earn an overall average of B or better in order to 
insure admittance to a graduate school. 

Students who desire a minor in Psychology will be re- 
quired to have a minimum of 18 semester hours, including 
General Psychology. In addition, minors will be required to 
have Developmental Psychology and Mental Hygiene. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Psy 201 General Psychology (General Education requirement for 

Majors; required for Minors) 
Psy 354 Developmental Psychology (Required for Majors and Minors) 
Psy 452 Social Psychology (Required for Majors) 
Psy 352 Mental Hygiene (Required for Minors) 

or 
Psy 461 Abnormal Psychology (Majors are required to have at least 

one of these) 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 201 English II 4 

Biol 103 General Biology I or Biol 104 General Biology I or 

Sci 105 Phys. Science I 4 Sci 106 Phys. Science II 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% Foreign Language 3 

Foreign Language 3 HPe 102 Physical Ed. I or 1 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

15%-16 . 15-16y 2 



122 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

Math 362 Probability and Statistics 3 Eng 201 Literature I or 

Intro, to Music, Art or Theater . . 3 Eng 301 Literature II 2 

Phil 120 Philosophy (or other Humani- Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. elective 6 

ties or Natural Sci. elect.) 3 Courses in Psy. and Minor 9 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. elect 3 

1 7 
Psychology 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) ... 1 

15-16 

FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH, SEVENTH AND 

EIGHTH SEMESTERS 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Courses in Major-Minor Fields or Courses in Major-Minor Fields or 

free electives 12 free electives 15 

(Total credits required for graduation — 124) 
15 



SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

RALPH R. IRELAND, Chairman 

The Sociology-Anthropology Department provides an op- 
portunity for studies in two closely related disciplines. Al- 
though a student may elect to concentrate his studies in one 
area more than another, studies in both disciplines are recom- 
mended. Sociology and Anthropology are both concerned with 
man's social and cultural setting and the nature of his rela- 
tionships with his fellow men. Sociology focuses primarily on 
studies of our own society whereas Anthropology is mainly 
concerned with non-Western cultures. 

Sociology-Anthropology training can be preparatory for a 
variety of vocations. Teaching in secondary schools or in col- 
leges and universities are vocations of interest to many stu- 
dents. Social work is an area of increasing opportunities. An- 
thropologists find employment opportunities primarily in high- 
er education, museum work, and in civil service positions. Stu- 
dents planning future studies in theology, law, personnel man- 
agement or other human relations occupations will find that 
undergraduate training in Sociology and Anthropology is emi- 
nently appropriate. 

Departmental Requirements 

A major in Sociology- Anthropology requires a total of 
twenty-seven hours of course work including General Educa- 
tion courses. 

Fifteen hours of course work are required for a minor in 
the department including General Education courses. 

Both majors and minors must elect their courses from 
those listed below. All students must include the required 
courses. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 123 

Sociology-Anthropology Department 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Soc 151 Principles of Sociology 3 

Soc 331 Contemporary Social Problems 3 

Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology 3 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Soc 332 Racial and Cultural Minorities . 3 

Soc 333 Juvenile Delinquency _ 3 

Soc 334 Population Problems _ _ 3 

Soc 335 Social Stratifications _ 3 

Soc 336 Sociology of the Family ..._ 3 

Soc 337 World Cultures „ „ „ 3 

Soc 338 Introduction to Social Work ..._ _ 3 

Soc 339 American Communities _ 3 

Soc 340 Industrial Sociology _ 3 

Soc 341 Sociology of Education 3 

Anth 211 Cultural Anthropology 3 

Anth 312 World Ethnography 3 

Anth 313 Old World Archaeology 3 

Anth 314 Ethnology of North American Indians 3 

Anth 315 North American Archaeology 3 

Anth 316 The Anthropology of Religion 3 

Anth 317 Archaeological Techniques 3 

Anth 318 Museum Methods 3 

Anth 319 Social Structure and Function 3 

Anth 320 Archaeological Field School 3 



GENERAL PROGRAM — LIBERAL ARTS 

Sociology -Anthropology Department 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 HPe 102 Physical Ed. I or 1 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% MS 102 Military Science II 1% 

Laboratory Natural Science ... 4 Laboratory Natural Science . . 4 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Soc 151 Prin. of Sociology or Soc 151 Prin. of Sociology or 

Anth 101 Intro, to Anthropology .... 3 Anth 101 Intro, to Anthropology .... 3 



16%-16 15-15% 



THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

HPe 103 Physical Ed. II (women) ... 1 Intro, to Art, Music, or Theater 3 

Eng 201 or 301 Literature I or II 2 Courses in Major-Minor Field . 9 

Soc 331 Contemp. Soc. Prob 3 HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 



Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective .... 3 

Gen. Ed. Natural Sci. or 15-15% 

Humanities Elective 3 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 

14%-15 



124 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH SEMESTER 

Courses in Major-Minor Field Courses in Major-Minor Field 

or free electives 15 or free electives 15 

SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Courses in Major-Minor Field Courses in Major-Minor Field 

or free electives 15 or free electives 15 

* Sociology-Anthropology majors must plan their major-minor program in consulta- 
tion with their adviser. 



THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

ALBERT E. DRUMHELLER, Dean 

The establishment of a School of Business was authorized 
by the Board of Trustees of the University in May, 1966. In 
doing so, it was indicated that the School should consist of 
several departments. 

The Department of Business Education, which has been 
one of Indiana's areas of specialization for some fifty years, 
represents one of the departments. This area of education is 
designed to prepare business teachers for the secondary 
schools. The Department of Distributive Education was re- 
cently created to prepare Teacher-Coordinators for those 
schools offering programs in marketing, distribution and co- 
operative work experience. Another newly instituted depart- 
ment was designated as the Department of Business Manage- 
ment. The primary purpose of this area of study is to prepare 
students for activity in the world of business and industry. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

The credit requirements in General Education are the 
same in the School of Business as they are in all other Schools 
of the University. Slight variations in specific courses needed 
to meet the General Education requirements exist in the sev- 
eral departments of the School. 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Business and Distributive Education. Those persons en- 
rolled in Business and Distributive Education have a choice of 
five areas of specialization. Accounting, Data Processing, Dis- 
tributive Education, Retailing and Stenography represent the 
possibilities. It is a requirement of the two departments that 
all persons enrolled choose two of the fields according to their 
interests and desires, in order to meet the departments' stan- 
dards for graduation. All State requirements for certification 
are more than adequately met in Indiana's curriculum. Addi- 
tional hours beyond the State's requirements enrich the stu- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 125 

dents' preparation for teaching in their chosen fields. Student 
Teaching under local supervision provided at the centers 
where this experience is gained, combined with supervision 
from the college during this stage of training provides a fine 
conclusion to the preparation for teaching. It is an experience 
which brings together in a useful form all of the trainee's aca- 
demic preparation. 

Business Management. This department offers men and 
women who seek a career in the world of business or industry 
an opportunity to pursue their interests in any of four areas of 
specialization; Accounting, Systems Analyst, Office Manage- 
ment, or General Business. The curriculum is generally similar 
for all during the first two years. The choice of an area of 
specialization is necessary prior to the start of the students 
junior year. The Accounting area provides the necessary 
training for a person to enter the field of public accounting, 
accounting in business or industry, or governmental ac- 
counting. The Systems Analyst area provides training in 
business computer technology and in the designing and imple- 
mentation of management information systems. The Office 
Management area provides training for executive secretarial 
positions and various other related office positions. The 
General Business area provides an opportunity for students to 
pursue training in two or more of the previous areas of special- 
ization but not to the extent permitted a student concentrating 
in only one of these areas. Each area provides for a generous 
election of a wide variety of business, economics, or business 
related courses designed to enrich the students understanding 
of the world of modern business. 



BUSINESS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

JAMES K. STONER, Chairman 

The curriculum in this department is designed to prepare 
students for a professional teaching career in business. 
Students may pursue the work of the entire curriculum or they 
may elect to pursue work according to their aptitudes as 
follows: 

1. The Complete Program leads to certification in all four 
fields, thus affording certification in all of the high school 
business subjects. Those who possess aptitudes that indicate 
success in stenographic, accounting, retailing, and data pro- 
cessing work may, if they wish, pursue this complete program. 

2. A Combination Program includes Data Processing, or 
combines either the Stenographic and Accounting, the Steno- 
graphic and Retailing, or the Accounting and Retailing Fields. 
All students planning to enter this Department should plan to 



126 INDIANA UNIVERSITY O F PENNSYLVANIA 

be graduated in Data Processing or one of the combined 
programs. School administrators who employ our graduates 
believe that a combination program is necessary for breadth of 
certification when teaching in the public schools of the 
Commonwealth. 

3. The Stenographic Field includes all the courses in the 
curriculum listed under that heading. Elective courses may be 
chosen from any other department of the University. 

4. The Accounting Field includes all of the courses in the 
curriculum listed under that heading. Elective courses may be 
chosen from any other department of the University. 

5. The Retailing Field includes all of the courses in the 
curriculum listed under that heading. Elective courses may be 
chosen from any other department of the University. 

6. The Data Processing Field includes all of the courses in 
the curriculum listed under that heading. Elective courses may 
be chosen from any other department of the University. 

Practical Business Experience Requirements. Before 
graduation, each student will be required to have completed 
the equivalent of six months of store practice, secretarial 
practice, accounting practice, clerical practice, or a combi- 
nation of these or other business contacts, acquired at places 
and under conditions approved by the chairman of this de- 
partment. This experience should be preferably in the field or 
fields in which the student is contemplating certification. 
Much of this experience can be acquired during the summer 
vacations and in offices on the campus during the regular 
school term. 



DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

JAMES K. STONER, Teacher-Educator 

The curriculum in this department is designed to prepare 
students for a professional teaching career in the distributive 
occupations. Students following this program will be gradu- 
ated as Teacher-Coordinators of Distributive Education and 
will be also certified to teach certain courses in Business 
Education. 

Teaching in the field of Distributive Education combines 
the personal satisfaction of teaching with the enjoyment of 
public relations work in the distributive area of business — re- 
tailing, wholesaling, and service enterprises. If you like the 
prestige of teaching, along with the plus values of working 
with business leaders and young people, you will find this a 
challenging and rewarding career. Distributive Education pre- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



127 



sents a promising future for persons in the teaching profession. 
With the recognition of the importance of distribution to our 
National economy, this vocational field of teaching is expand- 
ing rapidly. 

Students enrolled in this department are encouraged to 
combine this area of concentration with the Accounting cur- 
riculum in the Business Education Department. 

Curriculum in Business and Distributive Education - 
School of Business. 

School of Business 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS AND 
DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 



HPE 110 
MS 101 
HPE 101 
ENG 101 
SCI 103 
SCI 105 
ART 101 
MUS 101 
ENG 103 
BUS 101 
BUS 131 



FIRST SEMESTER 
Phys. Ed. I (men) and . 2— % 

Military Science I or .... 3 — 1% 

Health (women) 2—2 

English I 4 — 4 

General Biology I or .... 

Physical Science I 5 — 4 

Intro, to Art or 

Intro, to Music or 

Intro, to Theater 3 — 3 

Business Org. & Mgt. . . . 3 — 3 
Principles of Typing . . . 5 — 2 



SECOND SEMESTER 

HPE 111 Phys. Ed. II (men) and 2— % 

MS 102 Military Science I or 8—1% 

HPE 102 Phys. Ed. I (women) ... 2—1 

ENG 102 English II 4—4 

SCI 104 General Biology II or ... 

SCI 106 Physical Science II 5—4 

GEO 101 World Geography 3—3 

BE 111 Foundations of Math 

(Bus.) 3—3 

BUS 132 Intermediate Typing 5 — 2 

(exemption by examination) 



THIRD SEMESTER 



Data 
Process. 

HPE 203 Physical Ed. II (women) 2— 1 

BUS 221 Introduction to Accounting 5 — 3 

BE 212 Business Math II 3—3 

BUS 261 Shorthand Theory — 

PSY 201 General Psychology 3—3 

ENG 201 Literature I or 

ENG 301 Literature II 2—2 

BUS 271 Advanced Typewriting 5 — 2 

BUS 233 Marketing 3—3 

FOURTH SEMESTER 



Stenog. 

2— 1 
5— 3 

3— 3 
5— 3 
3— 3 

2— 2 
5— 2 



BUS 235 Business Law I 3—3 

BUS 251 Intermediate Accounting 5 — 3 

BUS 262 Shorthand Dictation — 

EdPSY 302 Educational Psychology 3 — 3 

HIST 102 History of Civilization II 3—3 

ECON 121 Principles of Economics I 3 — 3 

BUS 332 Retail Management — 

MATH 101 Foundations of Math (Computer) 3 — 3 

FIFTH SEMESTER 



3— 
5— 



3— 
3— 
3— 



BUS 321 Business Communication 

BE 311 Methods of Teaching Bus. Courses 

BUS 336 Business Law II 

BUS 331 Sales and Retailing 



3— 
3— 



3— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 



Acct'g. 

2— 1 
5— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 

2— 2 

5— 2 



3— 3 
5— 3 



3— 3 
3— 3 
3— 3 



Retail 

2— 1 
5— 3 

3— 3 



2— 2 
5— 2 



3— 3 

5— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 



3— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 



Distrib. 
Edu. 

2— 1 
5— 3 

3— 3 



2— 2 

3— 3 



3— 3 

5— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 

3— 3 



3— 3 
3— 3 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



BUS 352 Corporate Accounting 3 — 3 — 8 — 3 — — 

BUS 363 Transcription — 5—3 — — — 

BUS 335 Office Machines 5—2 — 5—2 5—2 — 

ECON 122 Principles of Economics II — 3—3 3—3 3—3 3—3 

BUS 333 Principles of Selling — — — — 3—3 

BUS 339 Business Data Processing 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 

SIXTH SEMESTER 

MATH 461 Computer Math II 3—3 — — — — 

DE 310 Principles of DE — — — — 3—3 

BE 312 Eval. Tech. in Bus. Courses 3—2 3—2 3—2 3—2 — 

BUS 321 Business Communications 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — — 

BUS 335 Office Machines — 5—2 — — 6 — 2 

BUS 353 Cost Accounting — — 3—3 — — 

BUS 339 Business Data Processing — 3 — 3 — 3 — 3 — 

BUS 332 Retail Management — — — 3—3 — 

BUS 364 Secretarial Office Practice — 5—3 — — — 

ED 301 Audio- Visual Education 3—2 3—2 3 — 2 3—2 3 — 2 

BUS 454 Federal Taxes 3—3 — 3—3 — — 

ED 302 History & Philosophy of Am. Ed. . . 3— 3 3—3 3—3 3—3 3—8 

*DE 434 Supvd. Work Exp. & Seminar in DE — — — — 16 — 6 

SEVENTH SEMESTER 

HIST 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II 3—3 3—3 3—3 3—3 3 — 3 

BUS 454 Federal Taxes — — 3—3 — — 

PHIL 120 Introduction to Philosophy or 
PHIL 221 Logic or 

PHIL 222 Ethics 3—3 3—3 3—3 3—3 3—3 

BE 433 Retail Practice — — — 15— 6 — 

POLS 111 American Citizenship 3 — 3 3 — 3 3 — 3 3 — 3 3 — 3 

BUS 455 Auditing (Elective)'* — — 3—3** — — 

BE342 Consumer Economics (Elective)**.. 3—3** 3—3** 3—3** 3— 3** 3— 3** 

DE 313 Methods of Teaching Courses in DE — — — — 3—3 

BUS 439 Business Information Systems 3 — 3 — — — — 

EIGHTH SEMESTER 

ED 421 Student Teaching 30—12 30—12 30—12 30—12 30—12 

ED 422 Professional Practicum 2—2 2—2 2—2 2—2 2 — 2 

* Supervised work experience during the summer Effective : BE 9/67 ; DE & Data Process- 
ing 9/68. 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 

CHARLES L. COOPER, Chairman 

The training offered by the Business Management Depart- 
ment is intended to provide a broad basic liberal background 
in the behavorial sciences; to give a keen perception to the 
social-economic world in which one is to live and work; to 
provide the foundation of general professional education for 
personally fruitful and socially useful careers in the varied 
fields of business and other types of institutions; and to furnish 
the opportunity to obtain the specialized knowledge and skills 
essential to future occupational growth and advancement for 
students preparing for responsible technical, supervisory, and 
executive positions. Students may pursue work according to 
their interests and aptitudes, as follows: 



INDIANA UNIVEKSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 129 

1. The ACCOUNTING PROGRAM includes all the courses 
of the curriculum listed under that heading. Six credits of 
elective courses must be in the area of Economics and the re- 
maining elective courses may be chosen in any area of busi- 
ness, areas related to business, or approved areas of the be- 
havorial sciences. To major in accounting, a student must 
maintain a "B" average in the first nine credit hours of ac- 
counting. 

2. The SYSTEMS ANALYST PROGRAM includes all the 
courses of the curriculum listed under that heading. Elective 
courses may be chosen in any area of business areas related to 
business, or approved areas of the behavorial sciences. 

3. The OFFICE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM includes all 
the courses of the curriculum listed under that heading. Elec- 
tive courses may be chosen in any area of business, areas re- 
lated to business, or approved areas of the behavorial sciences. 

4. The GENERAL BUSINESS PROGRAM includes all the 
courses of the curriculum listed under that heading plus nine 
credits of elective in other Business Management courses and 
six credits of electives in the area of Economics. The remain- 
ing elective courses may be chosen in any area of business, 
areas related to business, or approved areas of the behavorial 
sciences. 

Two-thirds of the allowed electives in each of the above 
areas of concentration must be in the business or business re- 
lated areas. 



BUSINESS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Eng 101 English I 4—4 Eng 102 English II 4—4 

Biol 103 General Biology I or Biol 104 General Biology II or 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 5—4 Sci 106 Physical Science II 5 — 4 

Art 101 Introduction to Art or BM 111 Foundations of Math 

Mus 101 Introduction to Music or (Mgt.) 3 — 3 

Eng 103 Introduction to Theater . . 3—3 *Bus 101 Bus. Org. & Mgt 3—3 

*Geog 101 World Geography 3 — 3 **Math 101 Foundations of Math 

**Busl01 Bus. Org. & Mgt 3—3 (Comp.) 3—3 

MS101 Military Science I or 3— V/ 2 MS 102 Military Science I or 3—1% 

HPe 101 Health 2—2 HPe 102 Physical Education I 2—1 

THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

Econ 121 Principles of Econ. I . . . 3 — 3 Econ 122 Principles of Econ. II . . 3 — 3 

BM 201 Personnel Management . . . 3—3 *Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II 3—3 

Math 362 Probability & Statistics . 3 — 3 Bus 251 Intermediate Accounting . 5 — 3 

Bus 221 Intro, to Accounting 5 — 3 Bus 235 Business Law I 3 — 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 — 3 BM 215 Business Statistics ... 3 — 3 

HPe 203 Physical Education II . . . 2—1 **Bus 339 Bus. Data Processing . . 3—3 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I [men) ... 2— % HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) .. 2— V 2 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



FIFTH SEMESTER 



Systems 

Systems 

Accounting Analyst 

Bus 233 Marketing 3 — 3 3 — 3 

Bus 352 Corporate Accounting 3 — 3 3 — 3 

Bus 336 Business Law II 3 — 3 3 — 3 

Econ 325 Money, Banking & Monetary Policy . . 3 — 3 — 

Bus 131 Principles of Typing or by exam — — 

Bus 261 Shorthand Theory — — 

Bus 439 Business Information Systems — 3 — 3 

Math 461 Computer Math II — 3 — 3 

Electives 3 — 3 — 



Office 




Manage- 




Manage- 


General 


ment 


Business 


3—3 


3—3 


— 


3—3 


3—3 


3—3 


3—3 


3—3 


5—0 


— 


5—3 


— 



3—3 



3—3 



SIXTH SEMESTER 



**Geog 101 World Geography — 

*»Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II — 

Eng 301 Literature II 2—2 

BM 241 Finance 3—3 

Bus 353 Cost Accounting 3 — 3 

Bus 339 Business Data Processing 3 — 3 

Bus 132 Intermediate Typewriting — 

Bus 262 Shorthand Dictation — 

Bus 335 Office Machines — 

BM 340 Business Systems Technology — 

BM 342 Business Problem Application I — 

Electives 6 — 6 



3—3 — — 

3—3 — — 

2—2 2—2 2—2 

3—3 — 3—3 

— 3—3 3—3 

— 5—2 — 

— 5—3 — 

— 5—2 — 
3—3 — — 
3—3 — — 



3—3 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 



Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology or 

Soc 151 Introduction to Sociology 3 — 3 

BM 451 Advanced Principles of Accounting .... 3 — 3 

Econ 330 Industrial and Labor Relations 3 — 3 

*Bus 321 Business Communications 3 — 3 

Bus 271 Advanced Typewriting — 

Bus 363 Transcription — 

BM 443 Business Systems Analysis I — 

BM 441 Business Problem Programming — 

BM 442 Business Problem Application II — 

Electives 3—3 



3—3 



3—3 



3—3 



— 3—3 3—3 

— 3—3 3—3 

— 5—2 — 

— 5—3 — 
3—3 — — 
3—3 — — 
3—3 — — 
3—3 3—3 6—6 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



**Bus321 Business Communications — 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 3 — 3 

Bus 454 Federal Taxes 3 — 3 

Bus 455 Auditing 3 — 3 

Bus 364 Secretarial Office Practice — 

BM 470 Office Management — 

BM 444 Business Systems Analysis II — 

BM 445 Quantitative Methods — Oper. Res — 

Electives 6 — 6 



3—3 


— 


— 


3—3 


3—3 

5—3 
8—3 


3—3 
3—3 


3—3 
3—3 


— 


3—3 


6—6 


9—9 



* Required in different semester for Systems Analyst majors. 
** Required in designated semester for Systems Analyst majors. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



THE SCHOOL OF CONTINUING AND 
NON-RESIDENT EDUCATION 

ARTHUR F. NICHOLSON, Dean 

The School of Continuing and Non-Resident Education 
operates the University's two Off-Campus Centers at Punxsu- 
tawney and Kittanning. In cooperation with the other Schools 
of the University, the School of Continuing and Non-Resident 
Education also holds Saturday Campus Classes and in con- 
junction with the School of Arts and Sciences schedules under- 
graduate Evening School Classes for credit. 

As an additional phase of Continuing Education, the 
School runs a fall and spring series in the adult education 
field entitled the Community-University Studies Series. These 
courses are for non-credit in various fields of adult education. 
The courses are established to fill demands and needs of adults 
in the area served by the University. 

The School of Continuing and Non-Resident Education 
also has some supervision over the cultural affairs of the Uni- 
versity and conferences held at the University. 

OFF-CAMPUS CENTERS 
OF INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania now has two off-cam- 
pus centers operating in the Punxsutawney and Kittanning 
communities, both about 28 miles from the main campus in 
Indiana, Pennsylvania. 

The first center was established in September, 1962, at 
Punxsutawney in an attractively renovated building, formerly 
used by the Punxsutawney School district in the west side of 
that community at the corner of Winslow and Center Streets. 
Enrollment at the Punxsutawney Center for 1969-70 will be 325 
full and part-time students. 

In September, 1963, Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
established a second center known as the Armstrong County 
Center located in the former offices of the West Penn Power 
Company at the corner of Rebecca and McKean Streets in 
Kittanning. The structure has been neatly renovated into a 
college instructional building which in 1969-70 will provide for 
525 full and part-time students. 

Both centers now have resident faculties who are regular 
university faculty members working full time at the centers. 
Other faculty from the main campus travel to the centers to 
provide adequate instructional staff to meet curriculum needs 
of students for their first year or two of college in general edu- 



132 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

cation subjects for areas of concentration in a liberal arts 
school or majors in fields in a school of education. 

In most cases, the centers provide one or two full years of 
college work transferable to the main campus of Indiana Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania or to other accredited colleges. The 
chairmen of Indiana University of Pennsylvania centers ad- 
vise with students as to their instructional programs and the 
best time for transfer to main campus for those in highly 
specialized areas. The centers and Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania maintain a close liaison through the Dean of the 
School of Continuing Education who regularly visits both 
centers and maintains an office in Indiana. 

For the most part students at the centers are persons 
living in the immediate county areas of the centers. Some stu- 
dents from distant points who cannot find accommodations on 
the main campus of Indiana University of Pennsylvania are 
also given the privilege of attending the centers and later 
transferring to the main campus. Regular procedures for 
transfer have been established. 

Fry Hall I and Fry Hall II at Punxsutawney, Boyer Hall 
and Trust Hall at Armstrong County Center in Kittanning 
have been established as dormitories for students needing 
residence at these respective centers. 

Each center has its own library facilities supervised by a 
professional librarian from the main campus. In addition the 
centers may draw upon University library facilities and the 
services of the University in many other areas. 

Control of the centers is directly vested with the Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania administration and Board of 
Trustees. Advisory Boards from both center areas serve to 
establish local needs and advise with main university au- 
thorities. 

Both centers have their own evolving programs of lec- 
ture series, social affairs, and other matters vital to a complete 
college in addition to having access to the resources of Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Prospective college students from the areas served by the 
centers and a limited number of others who can not be ac- 
commodated on the main campus may apply for admission by 
requesting application papers from the Registrar's Office, 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania, or from the director of 
either the Punxsutawney or Armstrong County Centers. 

The same standards and requirements for admission 
which apply to students at the main campus also apply to 
both university centers. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 133 

For more detailed information on the programs at Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania Centers, one should write to the 
Director, Punxsutawney Center, Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania, Punxsutawney, Pa., or the Director, Armstrong 
County Center, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Kittan- 
ning, Pa., and request an Off-Campus Centers bulletin. This 
publication explains the steps necessary for admissions, out- 
lines programs of study, and gives other general details of the 
two year University Centers. 

SATURDAY CAMPUS CLASSES 

Saturday Campus Classes are held on the campus on Sat- 
urdays (generally between 9:00 A. M. and 1:00 P. M.). Cour- 
ses are arranged according to the demand for them as indi- 
cated by teachers who are interested. This is not extension 
work. It is credited as "residence" work. Classes are scheduled 
to enable students to earn as much as six semester hours 
credit each semester. Persons interested should write for a 
schedule of courses to the Dean of the School of Continuing 
Education, Indiana University of Pennsvlvania, Indiana, Pa., 
15701. 

The basic fee for Saturday Campus Classes is $17.50 per 
semester hour of credit for students who are residents of Penn- 
sylvania with a minimum basic fee of $52.50, and $25.00 per 
semester hour of credit for students other than residents of 
Pennsylvania with a minimum basic fee of $75.00. Not more 
than six semester hours credit may be earned in one semester 
by one who is doing full time teaching or other employment. 

THE CULTURAL LIFE SERIES 

The Artists-Lecture Series, administered by the Director 
of Cultural Affairs in the School of Continuing Education, and 
financed by the Student Co-operative Association, brings to 
the Indiana campus speakers on contemporary affairs and 
artists in the fields of music, dance, musical comedy, lecturers, 
world travelers and explorers. 

During the past year the Artists-Lecture Series presented 
a series of three quartets in four programs partially sponsored 
by the National Foundation of the Arts. The Alard Quartet ap- 
peared twice with two open rehearsals, followed by the Ber- 
nede Quartet from Paris, and the Toledo Quartet from Ohio. 
John Jacob Niles, composer and arranger, presented a program 
of folk songs. Helga and Klaus Storck from Cologne, Germany, 
appeared in a program of cello and harp music, while Fred- 
erick Hand presented an evening of music played on the classi- 
cal guitar. Christiane Van Acker and Michel Podolski, from 
Belgium, presented a Monteverdi opera assisted by members of 
the Indiana Music Department and also a program for lute and 



134 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

soprano. Masuko Ushioda, a prize winner in the Tchaikowsky 
Competition appeared as violin soloist. The "Studio der Frue- 
hen Musik" played a concert utilizing early and little-known 
instruments. The Princeton Chamber Orchestra, under the 
direction of Nicholas Harsanyi, with Janice Harsanyi as so- 
prano soloist, appeared on the program, as did San Francisco 
opera tenor, James Schwabacher: and a duo piano team 

Yarbrough and Cowan. 
The Boris Goldovsky Company presented the opera Carmen. 
The American composer Ross Lee Finney spent several days 
on campus to lead the Fourth Contemporary Musical Festival. 

Walter Schenkman presented a program of piano music. 
Else Mayer-Lisman of London appeared in connection with the 
University Opera Theatre. 

The United States Army Field Band and Soldier's Chorus 
appeared under the sponsorship of the Artists-Lecture Series. 

The field of musical comedy was represented by a produc- 
tion of Man of la Mancha with a cast from the Broadway The- 
atre. 

In the field of drama the Theatre Royal, Windsor (Eng- 
land) presented The Beaux' Stratagem, Viveca Lindfors lead a 
company in the presentation of an evening of August Strind- 
berg's plays, The National Players offered The Orestia of 
Aeschylus and Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. 

Two travel films, one By Jeep Around the World and the 

other on Spain, were presented by Theodore Bumiller while 
Antarctic Challenge was narrated by Captain Finn Ronne. 

Paul Taylor and his company presented an evening of 
Modern Dance. 

Lecturers were John Ciardi, Gerald Torkelson, Kurt Wee- 
ge, Saul Maloff, and The Honorable Ferenc Nagy. 



THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

GEORGE A. W. STOUFFER, JR., Dean 

The School of Education is designed to enable the student 
to pursue a program of study in general education, a program 
of major study within an academic or special field, and a pro- 
gram of professional education that will qualify the student 
for certification to teach in the public schools of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania. Students who meet all of the require- 
ments for graduation from this school will be granted the 
Provisional College Certificate to teach the subjects within 
their respective fields of major study. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 135 



General Education 

All students in the School of Education are required to 
take the same program of 55 semester hours in general educa- 
tion as is required of all students in the School of Liberal Arts. 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND CERTIFICATION 

Certification standards, established by the Department of 
Public Instruction and the State Council on Education, require 
work in the field of professional education. In accordance with 
these standards all students in the School of Education are 
required to take the following courses in professional educa- 
tion — History and Philosophy of American Education, Educa- 
tional Psychology, Evaluation Methods (except in certain spe- 
cial departments), Audio- Visual Education and one or more 
methods courses, INVOLVING LABORATORY EXPERI- 
ENCES, within their major field of academic study or speciali- 
zation. In addition all students in this school are required to 
do a semester of student teaching under the supervision of a 
cooperating teacher and a university superviser. 

Laboratory experiences, designed to clarify theoretical 
concepts of learners and learning processes, are provided 
through direct experiences in classrooms or observation by 
television. 

Student teaching is a full-time, full semester experience 
in University School or in a public school known as a student 
teaching center. Student teachers under careful supervision 
perform the many role functions of teachers and develop atti- 
tudes, understandings, skills, and other competencies essential 
for success in the profession. Teachers wishing to extend their 
area of certification or replace the State Standard Limited 
Certificate may be permitted to take student teaching during 
the summer session. 

Professional Practicum including School Law is taken as 
a part of the student teaching experience. This course, organ- 
ized in two parts, is scheduled concurrently with student 
teaching. One part is designed to help students gain an over- 
view and understanding of the total school program and a 
knowledge of Pennsylvania school laws governing education. 
The second part is intended to help students gain breadth and 
depth in understanding the role of the classroom teacher in 
a particular area of specialization. 

The professional education requirement amounts to ap- 
proximately 27 semester hours within the 124 semester hours 
required for graduation. 



13G INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

The College Provisional Certificate is issued to the begin- 
ning teacher upon graduation from this school. The Provi- 
sional College Certificate can be made permanent upon the 
completion of from three to six years of successful teaching 
during which period the teacher must have taken twenty-four 
semester hours of additional college work. These credits may 
be earned at either the undergraduate or graduate level. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL. The University School provides 
for a program of instruction from kindergarten through sixth 
grade, thus affording opportunities for professional laboratory 
experiences and research activities. Professional laboratory 
experiences, such as observation, participation, and student 
teaching, may be planned and scheduled with the Director of 
Professional Laboratory Experiences. Research activities may 
be scheduled with the Director of the University School. 



Fields of Major Study 

The School of Education offers programs of major study 
leading to certification in the following academic fields — 

Biology German 

Chemistry History 

Earth Science Mathematics 

Geo-Science Physics 

English Russian 

French Social Science 

Geography Spanish 

The School of Education offers programs of major study 
leading to certification in the following special fields — 

Dental Hygiene Public School Nursing 

Education for Safe Living Rehabilitation Education 

Elementary Speech and Hearing Correction 

Education for the 
Mentally Retarded 

The required courses in the foregoing fields and the se- 
quence in which they are to be taken are indicated on the 
pages following. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



137 



BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

FRANCIS W. LIEGEY, Chairman 
Requirements for Biology Majors. 



The major in Biology consists of 25 semester hours credit. 
In addition supporting courses in Chemistry, Mathematics, and 
Physics are required. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Sem. 

Hrs. 

General Biology I 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

English I 4 

Intro to Art or 
Intro to Music or 

Intro to Theater 3 

Military Science or 1% 

Health 2 

16y 2 -17 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Sem. 

Hrs. 

General Biology II 4 

General Chemistry II 4 

English II 4 

General Elective 3 

Military Science or 1% 

Phys. Ed I (Women) 1 

16-16'/ 2 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Foreign Language or 

General Elective 3 

Organic Chemistry I 4 

General Psychology 3 

Biology Elective 3 

Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Phys Ed I (Men) % 

16-16i/o 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language or 

General Elective 3 

Algebra & Trigonometry 5 

Genetics 3 

Lit I or II 2 

Biology Elective 3 

Phys Ed II (Men) % 

16-1 6 1/0 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Physics I 4 

History of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Biochemistry 3 

Ecology 3 

Audio Visual Education 2 

15 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Physics II 4 

Educational Psychology 3 

Teh. Sci. in Sec. Schools 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Evaluation Methods 2 

15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

General Physiology 3 

Biology Electives 4 

Soc. Sci. Electives 3 

History & Philosophy of Ed 3 

Biology Seminar 1-3 

14-16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Student Teaching 
Prof. Practicum . 



138 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

PAUL R. WUNZ, Chairman 
Requirements for B.S. in Education 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Chem 111 Gen. Chem I 4 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Math 152 Alg. & Trig 5 

MS 101 Military Science I or 1% 

HPe 101 Health 2 

i4y 2 -i5 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Chem 231 Org. Chem. I 4 

Math 257 Calc. II 4 

Phy 111 Physics I 4 

Psy 201 Gen. Psy 3 

Eng 201 Lit. I or 

Eng 301 Lit. II 2 



1? 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Chem 321 Quant. Anal 4 

Chem. 341 Phy. Chem. I 4 

Ed Psy 302 Ed. Psy 3 

Ed 302 Hist. & Phil. Amer. Ed 3 

Humanities Elective 3 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Chem 112 Gen. Chem. II 4 

Eng 101 English II 4 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calc. I 4 

MS 102 Military Science I or 1% 

HPe 102 Phys. Ed. I (Women) 1 

Art 101 Intro to Art or 
Mus 101 Intro to Music or 

Intro to Theater 3 



IT 



16-16V 2 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Chem 232 Org. Chem. II 4 

Math 357 Calc. Ill 4 

Phy 112 Physics II 4 

LRes 301 Audio Vis. Ed 2 

Humanities Elective 3 



17 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Chem 322 Inst. Anal 4 

Chem 342 Phy. Chem. II 4 

Ed 451 Teaching Sci. in 

Secondary School 3 

Ed Psy 305 Evaluation Methods 2 

Humanities Elective 3 



16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Hist 103 Hist. U.S. & Pa 3 

Soc. Sci. Electives 9 

Science Elective 3-4 

15-16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Ed 421 Student Teaching 

Ed 422 Prof. Pract. & School Law 



14 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



139 



EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE 

(Geoscience Department) 

ROBERT L. WOODARD, Acting Chairman 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Math 152 Alg. & Trig 5 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

MS 101 Military Science and/or 

Physical Education 2 



\o 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calculus I ... 4 

Phys 112 Physics II 4 

MS 102 Military Science and/or 

Physical Education 2 

Art, Music or Drama 3 



17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Chem 111 General Chemistry I 4 

Geos 111 Solar System 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Foreign Language or 

Humanities Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 



u; 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Chem 112 General Chemistry II 4 

Geos 112 Stellar Astronomy 3 

English Literature 2 

Foreign Language or 

Humanities Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 



1G 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Bio 103 General Biology I 4 

Geoa 121 Physical Geology 3 

Geos 241 Meteorology I 3 

Ed 305 Evaluative Methods 2 

Psy 302 Educational Psychology 3 

15 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Bio 104 General Biology II 4 

Geos 122 Historical Geology 3 

Geos 247 Oceanography 3 

Ed 302 History & Phil, of Am. Ed 3 

Ed 301 Audio-Visual Education 2 



15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Ed 451 Teach. Sci. Sec. School 3 

Electives, including 

geoscience & general 8 

17 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Ed 421 Student Teaching 

Ed 422 Practicum 



14 



140 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



DENTAL HYGIENIST 

GEORGE A. W. STOUFFER, JR., Director 

The Board of Presidents of the State Colleges approved 
on November 17, 1950, a curriculum for dental hygienists lead- 
ing to the degree of bachelor of science in education. The re- 
quirements shown below must be met. 

1. The satisfactory completion of an accredited two-year 
curriculum for the preparation of dental hygienists ap- 
proved by the State Dental Council and Examining 
Board. 

2. The licensing of the student by the proper state author- 
ities. 

3. The satisfactory completion in addition thereto of 64 
semester hours of professional and general education 
courses distributed as follows: 

General Education 36 

Eng 101 and 102 English I and II 8 

Eng 201 and 301 Literature I and II 4 

Fine Arts 3 

Art 101 Introduction to Art or 

Mus 101 Introduction to Music 
Geography 3 

Geog 112 Geography of the United States 
and Pa. 
Social Studies 6 

Hist 101 and 102 

History of Civilization I and II 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 

Econ 121 Principles of Economics 

Hist 104 History of U.S. and Pa. II 

Soc 151 Principles of Sociology 

Education 14 

Ed 302 Hist. & Phil, of Am. Ed 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

EdPsy 302 Educational Psychology 3 

Psy 352 Mental Hygiene 3 

LRes 301 Audio-Visual Education 2 

Electives 14 

Total &T 

In each category above, credit will be given for equivalent courses in the two-year 
dental hygiene curriculum. In such cases students will be permitted to increase their elec- 
tives by the number of semester hours so credited. 

Electives may be chosen with the approval of the dean of instruction from any field 
or curriculum offered at the college in which the student is enrolled. 

In the case of dental hygienists who have had less than two years of special training 
on the basis of which they have been licensed by the State Dental Council and Examining 
Board such persons will pursue additional courses in college to fulfill the requirements for 
the degree. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 141 



GEOSCIENCE 

ROBERT L. WOODARD, Acting Chairman 

The geoscience department provides for the needs of the 
students and curricula in areas of natural science dealing with 
and related to the earth and its environment. This department 
offers courses in astronomy, geology, meteorology, and ocean- 
ography. The opportunity is provided for taking an under- 
graduate major in geology leading to either a Bachelor of Arts 
or a Bachelor of Science degree. Students with professional 
aspirations in astronomy, meteorology, or oceanography will 
have opportunities to take an introductory level course in the 
fields of their choice and will be counseled in the selection of 
mathematics and science courses which will prepare them for 
graduate study in those areas. 

It is the philosophy and desire of the department to teach 
certain astronomy and geology courses which may be taken 
by students from any department on campus. These courses 
are meant to stimulate an intellectual curiosity about ones 
environment which any scholar may have. 

The department also recognizes as one of its primary 
functions the role of serving the field of public education by 
the preparation of qualified and certificated teachers of earth 
and space science. The curriculum for this education major 
will be found on page 

Geology Majors 

Two degrees are offered in geology. One, the Bachelor of 
Arts degree is a terminal degree designed to equip geology 
majors with the necessary background for obtaining certain 
positions as professional geologists, upon graduation. Qualified 
holders of the B.A. degree in geology may anticipate careers 
in urban geology, engineering geology, and certain phases of 
economic geology, dealing with both the exploration for and 
the exploitation of natural resources. 

The Bachelor of Science degrees in geology is designed for 
those students who are interested in pursuing their education 
beyond the level of the baccalaureate degree. Many profes- 
sional careers in geology and associated geosciences require 
graduate school training. The B.S. program in geology is de- 
signed to provide the necessary background for admission to 
graduate school. 

The requirements for fulfillment of the two degrees in 
geology will be found below in the form of a summary of re- 
quirements for each degree and a suggested program (subject 
to modification) for fulfilling these requirements. 



142 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



B.S. in Geology 
Summary Statement 

Requirements for graduation — 124 Semester hours required 

General Education Requirements 

credit hours 

Humanities 19 

Social Science 15 

Military Science and 
Physical Education 4 

Geology Requirements 24 

Geoscience Requirements 9 

Allied Science 

Math 12 

Biology 8 

Chemistry 8 

Physics 8 

Electives 17 

Total 



38 

24 

9 



36 

17 



124 hours 



B.S. Program in Geology (Pre-Professional) 
Suggested Programming 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Cr. 

Bio 103 Biology I 4 

Math 152 Alg. & Trig 5 

Geos 121 Physical Geology 3 

Foreign Language 

(suggested) 3t 

MS 101 Military Science and 1% 

HPe 110 Physical Education It 



(Men) 



%t 



17 



Cr. 

Bio 102 English II 4 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calculus I 4 

Geos 122 Hist. Geology 3 

Foreign Language 

(suggested) 3t 

MS 102 Military Science and 1% 

HPe 111 Physical Education lit 



(Men) 



%t 



17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Eng 101 English I 4t 

Chem 111 General Chemistry I 4 

Geos 231 Mineralogy 3 

Social Science 3t 

Math 3 

17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Eng 102 English II 4t 

Chem 112 General Chemistry II 4 

Geos 223 Paleontology 3 

Social Science 3t 

Elective 3 

17 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

Geos 235 Structural Geology 3 

English Literature 2t 

Social Science 3t 

Elective 3 

15 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Phys 112 Physics II 4 

Petrology or 

Sedimentology 3 

Geoscience option 3 

Social Science 3f 

Elective 3 

16 



INDIANA UN1VEKSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



143 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Geoscience option* 3 

Geol. Sem 1 

Elective 2-3 

Elective 2-3 

Elective 2-3 

10-13 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Geoscience option* 3 

Social Science 3t 

Elective 2-3 

Elective 2-3 

Elective 2-3 

12-15 

+ May be taken in Third & Fourth Semesters. 

t General Education Requirements 

* Geoscience option: Astronomy, Meteorology, Oceanography (1 year sequence of one and 
1 semester minimum of another) 

B.A. Program in Geology 

Summary Statement 

Requirements for graduation — 124 Semester hours required 
General Education Requirements 

credit hours 

Humanities 19 

Social Science 15 

Military Science and /or 

Physical Education 4 38 

Geology Requirements 30 30 

Geoscience Requirements 6 6 

Allied Sciences 16 16 

(Math, Physics, Chemistry) 
Electives 34 34 

Total 124 hours 



B.A. Program in Geology (Vocational) 
Suggested Programming 



FIRST SEMESTER 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4t 

Math 152 Alg. & Trig 5 

Geos 121 Physical Geology 3 

Foreign Language 

(suggested) 3t 

MS 101 Military Science and V/j 

HPe 110 Physical Education I 



(Men)t 



%t 



Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4t 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calculus I 4 

Geos 122 Hist. Geology 3 

Foreign Language 

(suggested) 3t 

MS 102 Military Science and 1% 

HPe 111 Physical Education II 

(Men) J %t 



17 



16 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Chem 111 General Chemistry I 4 

Geos 231 Mineralogy 3 

English Literature 2t 

Social Science 3t 

Elective 3 

15 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Chem 112 General Chemistry II 4 

Geos 223 Paleontology 3 

Art, Music or Drama 3t 

Social Science 3t 

Elective '. 3 

16 



144 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH SEMESTER 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 Phys 112 Physics II 4 

Geos 235 Structural Geology 3 Geology Elective 3 

Geoscience Elective* 3 Geoscience Elective* 3 

Social Science 3t Social Science 3t 

Elective 2-3 Elective 2-3 

15-16 15-16 

Summer of Junior Year Geology Field Camp — 5 credits 

SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Geology Elective 3 Geology Elective 3 

Geology Seminar 1 Geology Seminar 1 

Social Science 3t Elective 2-3 

Elective 2-3 Elective 2-3 

Elective 2-3 Elective 2-3 

Elective 2-3 Elective 2-3 

13-16 12-16 

t May be taken in Third and Fourth Semesters. 

t General Education Requirements 

* Geoscience Electivcs — Meaning here ; Astronomy, Meteorology, Oceanography. 

GEOSCIENCE MAJOR 

One general degree, Bachelor of Science, is offered for the 
student desiring to pursue graduate work in astronomy, mete- 
orology, or oceanography. The objective of this department is 
to provide a suitable background of mathematics and science 
courses with which one may confidently approach graduate 
studies in the area of his choice. Only introductory courses are 
offered for orientation toward the ultimate goal; the profes- 
sional training being the role of graduate study. Each individ- 
ual program will be closely supervised by a faculty member 
aware of graduate school demands and the student's goal. 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania is a participant in a 
Consortium on Oceanography operating at the Delaware Bay 
Marine Science Center at Lewes, Delaware. This facility pro- 
vides an opportunity for field experience in oceanography, 
marine geology and marine biology both during the regular 
academic year and through an extensive summer program. 

B.S. in Geoscience 

Summary Statement 

Requirements for Graduation — 124 Semester hours required 
General Education Requirements 

credit hours 

Humanities 19 

Social Science 15 

Military Science and /or 
Physical Education 4 38 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Mathematics and Science 
Mathematics - Through 

Calculus 12-17 

First year Biology, 

Chemistry, Physics 24 

Second year Chemistry 

or Physics 6 

Orientation in objective field 6 

Geoscience electives 12 

General Electives 

Including, but not restricted to, 

more science and mathematics 21-26 



Total 



60-65 

21-26 
124 hours 



B.S. in Geoscience 
Suggested Programming 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Math 152 Algebra and Trig 5 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

MS 101 Military Science and 1% 

HPe 110 Physical Education I 

(Men)? % 

15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calculus I . . 4 

Phys 112 Physics II 4 

MS 102 Military Science and 1% 

HPe 111 Physical Education II 

(Men)* % 

Art, Music or Drama 3 

17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Chem 111 Chemistry I 4 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calculus II . . 4 

Foreign Language 3 

Social Science 3 

Literature 2 

16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Chem 112 Chemistry II 4 

Math 357 Anal. Geom. & Calculus III . 4 

Foreign Language 3 

Social Science 3 

14 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Bio 103 Biology I 4 

Objective Orientation 3 

Physics or Chemistry 3 

Social Science 3 

Geoscience Elective 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Bio 104 Biology II 4 

Objective Orientation 3 

Physics or Chemistry 3 

Social Science 3 

Geoscience Elective 3 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Geoscience Elective 3 

Social Science 3 

Electives 9 

15 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Geoscience Elective 3 

Electives 12 



15 



146 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SPECIAL EDUCATION AND CLINICAL SERVICES 

MORTON MORRIS, Chairman 

This Department offers three options for students whose 
major interest is working with exceptional children and adults. 
Each of the three options follows a prescribed sequence of 
courses. Students may elect to major in any one of the follow- 
ing fields of exceptionality, namely, 

(A) Education for the Mentally Retarded 

(B) Speech Pathology and Audiology 

(C) Rehabilitation Education 

The first two major areas lead to certification in the Penn- 
sylvania Public Schools. The third area — Rehabilitation Educa- 
tion — prepares student majors seeking career opportunities 
with state and federal rehabilitation agencies and with private 
health and welfare agencies and institutions. 

Education for the Mentally Retarded 

A coordinated program of not less than 48 semester hours 
is required, leading to comprehensive certification to teach 
the mentally retarded. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Biol 103 General Biology I or 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 4 

SpE 220 Intro to Excepfl. Child 3 

HPe 101 Health (or) 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Art 101 Intro to Art or 

Mus 101 Intro to Music or 

Eng 101 Intro to Theater 3 

16%-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Biol 104 General Biology II or 

Sci 105 Physical Science II 4 

Math 160 Numeration Theory I . . . 3 

SpH 254 Speech Dev. & Improv. or 
SpE 255 Development of Lang. 

in Chldrn 3 

MS 102 Military Science I (or) ... 1Y 2 

Electives ., 2-3 

15Ms-I7 



THIRD SEMESTER 

HPe 102 Physical Educ. I %-l 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Ed 362 Developmental Reading or 

El 222 Teaching of Reading 3 

Soc 151 Princ. of Sociology 3 

Humanities Electives* 6 

15%-16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

HPe 203 Physical Educ II %-l 

Hist 102 History of Civ. II 3 

SpE 215 Child Development 3 

Ed 301 Audio- Visual Educ 2 

EdPsy 302 Educ. Psychology 3 

Eng 201/ 

301 Literature I or II 2 

Humanities (or) 

Nat. Sci. Elective 3 

i6y 2 -i7 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



147 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Hist 104 Hist, of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

EdPsy 305 Evaluation Methods 2 

Art 330 Arts & Crafts for MR 3 

Geog 251 Anglo-American Geography . . 3 

SpE 320 Psychology of the MR 3 

Electives 2 



1(5 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Ed 302 Hist. & Phil, of Am. Educ 3 

E! 313 Tchg. of Math for El. Schl 3 

Psy 352 Mental Hygiene or 

SpE 216 Mental Health In Schls 3 

SpE 301 Rdg. & LA for MR 3 

Electives 3 

15 



SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

PoIS 111 American Citizenship 3 Ed 421 Student Teaching of the 

Anth 110 Intro, to Anthro. (or) Mentally Retarded 12 

Econ 101 Basic Economics 3 Ed 422 Professional Practicum & 

SpE 431 Curriculum & Methods for School Law 2 

the MR 3 

SpE 411 Health & Phya. Ed. for the 14 

Exceptional Child 2 

Electives 5 

16 

* Student majors in this curriculum may substitute Foreign Language (completion of in- 
termediate sequence) instead of 6 semester hours of Humanities/Natural Science electives. 

SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 

The major in Speech Pathology and Audiology consists 
of 40 semester hours. Thirty-one are required in Speech 
Pathology and Audiology, 6 in related areas, and one elective 
may be chosen in the department or in a supporting field. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Bio 103 Gen. Biology I or 

Sci 105 Phys. Science I 4 

Art 101 Intro, to Art or 
Mus 101 Intro, to Music or 

Eng 103 Intro, to Theater 3 

SpH 111 Fundamentals of Speech 

and Hearing 3 

HPe 101 Health Education or 

MS 101 Military Science I 2 

16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Sem. 

Hrs. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Bio 104 Gen. Biology II or 

Sci 106 Physical Science II 4 

SpH 122 Phonetics 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

Hpe 102 Physical Ed. I or (1) 

MS 102 Military Science I 2 

15-16 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

SpE 220 Intro, to Except. Child 3 

SpH 251 Anat. and Physiology of 

Sph. & Hear. Mech 3 

Hist 102 Hist, of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

HPe 201 Physical Ed. II 1 

16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

EdPsy 302 Educational Psychology 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

SpH 222 Intro, to Audiology 3 

SpH 232 Sp. Pathology I (Non-Organic) 3 

General Electivea 3 

15 



148 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



FIFTH SEMESTER 



SIXTH SEMESTER 



Eng 201 Lit. I or Lit. II 2 Ed 301 Audio- Visual Ed 2 



SpE 215 Child Development 3 

SpH 321 Psy. of Sp. & Language 3 

SpH 311 Sp. Rd. & Aud. Training 3 

SpH 331 Sp. Pathology II (Organic) ... 3 

SpH 310 Speech Clinic I 2 



16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Ed 302 Statistics 3 

Ed 263 Developmental Reading or 

El 222 Teaching of Reading 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Humanities Electives 3 

General Electives 4 



16 



SpH 312 Org. and Admin, of Speech 

and Hearing Programs 3 

SpH 320 Speech Clinic II 2 

Psy 352 Mental Hygiene 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Ed 302 Hist. & Phil, of American Ed. . . 3 



16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Ed 401 Stud. Teach.— Speech Pathology 

and Audiology 12 

ED 402 Fundamental Law 2 



14 



REHABILITATION EDUCATION 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 



Sem. Hrs. 



Eng 101 English I 

Biol 103 General Biology I (or) 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 

SpE 220 Intro, to Except. Child 

HpE 101 Health (or) 

MS 101 Military Science I 

Art 101 Intro, to Art or 

Mus 101 Intro, to Music or 

Eng 103 Intro, to Theatre 



4 

3 

(2) 

(1%) 



Sem. Hrs. 



Eng 102 English II 

Bio 104 General Bio. II (or) 

Sci 106 Physical Science II 

Math 101 Foundations of Math I .. 
MS 102 Military Science I (or) . . . 

Electives 

SpE 255 Language Development in 
Children 



4 

3 

(1%) 

2- 3 



15V.-16 



15*4-17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

HPel02 Physical Educ. I (%) or 1 

Phil 330 Philosophy of Science 3 

Psy 201 General Psych 3 

Soc 151 Principles of Sociology .... 3 

Econ 101 Basic Economics 3 

Humanities Elective 3 



1614-16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

HPe 203 Physical Educ. II (%) or 1 

SpE 215 Child Development 3 

Psych 371 Personality 3 

Eng 201/301 Literature I or II 2 

Hist 102 Hist, of Civilization II 3 

Free Electives 4 

15Vo-16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

SpE 320 Psychology of the MR 3 

Psych 461 Abnormal Psych 3 

Ed 302 Hist. & Phil, of American Educ. 3 

SpR 310 Physical Basis of Disability ... 3 

Soc 336 Sociology of the Family 3 

Free Elective 2 



17 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

CnEd 251 Fundamentals of Guidance . . 3 
SpR 320 Principles & Methods of 

Rehabilitation 3 

SpR 321 Psychological Basis of Disability 3 
Psych 352 Mental Hygiene (or) 

SpE 216 Mental Health in Schools 3 

Natural Science Elective 3 

15 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



149 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

SpR 410 Field Training in 

Rehabilitation 6 

SpR 411 Occupational Information 3 

Soc 333 Juvenile Delinquency 3 

Soc 338 Intro, to Social Work 3 

15 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

SpR 420 Field Training in 

Rehabilitation II <i 

SpR 421 Clinical Info, in Rehabilitation :; 

Phil 222 Ethics 3 

Hist 104 Hist, of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

15 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

P. DAVID LOTT, Chairman 

The required courses for a degree in Elementary Educa- 
tion are listed below. It is expected that most of the electives 
will be used in one academic field, so that when they are com- 
bined with the general education requirements in that field, a 
concentration of at least 18 credits will be attained. The areas 
of concentration are English, French, Geography, German, 
History, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Spanish. 

It is recommended that students who plan to major in ele- 
mentary education should have high school biology, chemistry, 
physics, and at least two years of academic mathematics. Stu- 
dents will find this background helpful in taking college level 
courses in science and mathematics. 

(Course sequence subject to change depending upon aca- 
demic concentration or for administrative purposes.) 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Seni. Hrs. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 4 

Geog 101 World Geography 3 

HPe 101 Health or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Math 160 Numeration Theory I . . . . 3 

15%-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Sum. Hrs. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Sci 106 Physical Science II 4 

Geog 112 Geography of U.S. and Pa. 3 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) . . 1 

MS 102 Military Science I \\U 

Math 250 Numeration Theory II . . . 3 

15y 2 -16 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Art 101 Introduction to Art or 
Mus 101 Introduction to Music or 

Introduction to Theater ... 3 

Foreign Language or 

Humanities Elective* 3 

Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II . . 3 

El 221 Children's Literature 3 

El 213 Art for the Elem. Grades ... 2 

Elective 2 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 



16-16% 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language or 

Humanities Elective* 3 

Psy 101 General Psychology 3 

El 222 Teaching of Reading 3 

El 313 Teaching Mathematics in the 

Elementary School 3 

El 211 Music for the Elem. Grades 2 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) . 1 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) 1 

14%-15 



150 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



FIFTH or SIXTH SEMESTER 
Ed 302 History and Philosophy of 

American Education 3 

EdPsy 302 Educational Psychology 3 

El 314 Teaching of Health and 

Physical Education 2 

Social Science Elective** 3 

Electives 6 



17 



SEVENTH or EIGHTH SEMESTER 

El 312 Teaching of Elementary Science 3 

Social Science Electives** 3 

Ed 301 Audio- Visual Education 2 

EdPsy 305 Evaluation Methods 2 



FIFTH or SIXTH SEMESTER 

Eng 302 Literature II 2 

Psy 215 Child Development 3 

Bio 311 Environmental Biology 4 

Ed 321 Student Teaching 6 

15 



SEVENTH or EIGHTH SEMESTER 

El 411 Teaching of Social Studies 3 

El 413 Teaching of Language Arts .... 3 
Ed 422 Professional Practicum and 

School Law 2 



Electives 6 Ed 421 Student Teaching 6 



ie 



14 



• Humanities Electives: Phil 328 Aesthetics, Art 115 Art History I or Art 116 Art History 
II, Phil 222 Ethics, Hist 101 History of Civilization I, Phil 221 Logic, Eng 271 Modern 
American Fiction, Mus 301 Music History I, Phil 120 Philosophy, Eng 261 The English 
Bible as Literature, Phil 110 Basics of Religious Thought and Practice. 

'* Social Science Electives: Hist 102 History of Civilization II, PolS 111 American Citizen- 
ship, Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology, Soc 251 Introduction to Sociology, Econ 
121 Principles of Economics. 



ENGLISH EDUCATION 

CRAIG G. SWAUGER, Chairman 

The student who is a candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Education with an English major must take a 
minimum of 36 hours in English (not counting Eng 101 and 
102) in order to satisfy the requirements for certification. 
Since English majors do not take a minor, many of them aug- 
ment the basic required program with courses that will prepare 
them for graduate study in their profession of secondary Eng- 
lish teaching. Their advisors work closely with them through- 
out the four years to assist in the scheduling of general educa- 
tion, professional education, required and elective English 
courses, and free electives. 

It should be noted that a major in English Education must 
complete the intermediate sequence of a modern foreign lan- 
guage. 



FIRST SEMESTER 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Biol 103 Biological Science I, or 


4 


Eng 102 English II 4 




Biol 104 Biological Science II, or 




4 






3 




Art 101 Introduction to Art, or 




HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) or 1 


Mus 101 Introduction to Music, or 






Eng 103 Introduction to Theatre . . . 


3 
2 








1% 


lB-15 1 /^ 



15%-16 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



THIRD SEMESTER 



Eng211 Classical Literature , 

Eng 212 American Lit. to 1865 . . 

Math 101 Foundations of Math .. 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) 
Physical Activity (men) . . , 

Social Science Elective 

Humanities Elective 



16y 2 -16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Hist 104 History of U.S. and Pa. II 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Eng 261 History of Eng. Language . 3 

Physical Activity (men) * 

Social Science Elective 3 

English Elective 3 



15-15*4 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Eng 363 Structure of English 8 

EdPsy 302 Ed. Psychology 8 

English Electives 6 

Free Elective 8 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Eng 221 Journalistic Writing, or 
Eng 222 Advanced Composition, or 

Eng 223 Creative Writing 3 

English Electives 9 

Free Electives 6 

18 



SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Ed 451 Teh. of English, Speech Ed 421 Student Teaching 12 

and Reading 3 Ed 422 Professional Practicum and 

EdPsy 305 Evaluation Methods 3 School Law 2 

English Electives 6 

Free Elective 3 

15 

• English Education majors may complete the intermediate sequence in a modern foreign 
language in one of three ways: by examination, by earning credit in the 3rd and 4th 
semesters of a language begun in secondary school, or by completing 4 semesters of a 
new language. 



Required courses for a major in English Education: 

Eng 211 Classical Literature (Instead of Eng 201 or Eng 301, one 
credit counted toward the major) 

Eng 212 American Literature to 1865 

Eng 222 Advanced Composition (Eng 221 or Eng 223 may be sub- 
stituted) 

Eng 363 The Structure of English 

Ed 451 The Teaching of English, Speech, and Reading 

ELECTIVE COURSES: 

With the help of his advisor the English Education major will 
select at least two period courses and one form course from the fol- 
lowing list and additional courses to satisfy the 36 credit-hour mini- 
mum requirement. 

Eng 213 Pre-Renaissance 

Eng 214 Shakespeare 

Eng 215 The Augustans 

Eng 216 The Romantic Movement 

Eng 217 Victorian Literature 

Eng 218 The Age of Spenser 

Eng 219 The Age of Milton 

Eng 224 The Metaphysical Poets 

Eng 241 The Rise of the English Novel 

Eng 242 The American Novel 



152 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Eng 243 Contemporary Short Fiction 

Eng 244 Poetry and Its Forms 

Eng 245 Modern Drama 

Eng 246 Modern American Literature 

Eng 248 The Age of Johnson 

Eng 261 The English Bible as Literature 

Eng 271 Modern American Fiction 

Eng 351 English Drama to the Restoration 

Eng 353 Restoration Literature 

Eng 355 Modern European Literature 

Eng 356 The English Essayists 

Eng 357 The English Novel: Conrad to the Present 

Eng 358 Criticism of Contemporary Writing 

Eng 359 Seminar in English Studies 

Eng 360 The Nineteenth Century English Novel 

Eng 364 Trends in Linguistics 

One of the following courses may be counted toward the 36-hour 
major in English Education. 

Eng 133 Newspaper Reporting 

Eng 231 Dramatic Arts 

Eng 232 Oral Reading 

Eng 469 Oral Interpretation 

Eng 472 Public Speaking 

The following two courses added to the English major will quali- 
fy a student for additional certification in reading. 

Ed 362 Developmental Reading 

El 352 Diagnostic & Remedial Reading 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

CHARLES W. FAUST, Acting Chairman 

The major in a foreign language consists of 33 semester 
hours credit beyond the college elementary sequence 151-152 
or equivalent high school preparation, plus the departmental 
methods course Ed 451, The Teaching of Foreign Languages in 
the Secondary School. 

Specialization in a Foreign Language 

A student may work for certification in French, German, 
Latin, Russian, or Spanish. It is assumed that he will have had 
at least two years in high school in the language of his choice. 
He will then begin with the sequence 251-252 and will take 
concurrently with those courses 053-054, Oral Practice III and 
IV. If he has not had the language of specialization in high 
school, he will begin with 151-152 and 051-052, Oral Practice I 
and II. 151-152 are not counted toward the major. 

Language Laboratory 

Course titles which bear a number beginning with "0" are 
oral practice courses conducted in the language laboratory, 
and demand independent laboratory work as a major part of 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 153 

preparation. 055 and 056 are advanced conversation courses 
which may be conducted in the classroom and /or the labora- 
tory. 

The Pennsylvania- Valladolid Study in Spain Program 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania is charged by the 
Department of Public Instruction with the organization and 
administration of this Program for the benefit not only of 
Indiana students but also students in the Pennsylvania State 
Colleges. The Program is designed primarily to improve the 
preparation of future teachers of Spanish but participation 
is not a requirement for graduation. Students who participate 
in the Program will normally have completed the first semes- 
ter of the junior year. The Program runs annually during 
the spring semester at the University of Valladolid, Spain, 
under the supervision of a staff member of the Department 
of Foreign Languages and a Spanish resident director. A total 
of 18 hours may be earned in the areas of Spanish language, 
Literature and Culture. For further details consult the cur- 
rent brochure printed annually. Students enrolled in the 
School of Education and the School of Arts and Sciences are 
eligible to participate. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

School of Education* 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 102 English II 4 

Biol 103 General Biology I or Biol 104 General Biology II or 

Chem 111 General Chemistry I or Chem 112 General Chemistry II or 

Sci 105 Physical Science I or Sci 106 Physical Science II or 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 Phys 112 Physics II 4 

HPelOl Health (women) 2 HPe 102 Physical Ed. I (women) 1 

MS 101 Military Science I (men) 1% MS 102 Military Science I (men) 1% 

FL 251 Language III 3 Art 101 Intro, to Art or 

FL 053 Oral Practice III 2 Mus 101 Intro, to Music or 

HPe 110 Physical Education (men)** V> Eng 103 Intro, to Theater 3 



15 



FL 252 Language IV 3 

FL 054 Oral Practice IV 2 



women 17 
men 17% 



THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

Eng 201 Lit. I (Tragic Themes in Lit.) Hist 102 Hist. Civ. II 



Psy 201 Gen. Psych 3 

Eng 301 Lit. II (Lit. of Social Criticism) 2 FL 352 Advanced Language II 3 

Hist 101 Hist. Civ. I 3 FL 056 Adv. Oral Practice II 1 

HPe 203 Phys. Ed. (women) 1 FL 362 Culture and Literature II 3 

FL 351 Advanced Language I 3 Free Elective 3 

FL055 Advanced Oral Practice I 1 HPe 111 Physical Ed. (men)** . % 

FL 361 Culture and Literature I 3 

Free Elective (women) 3 

Free Electives (men) 6 

women 16 
men 18 



women 16 
men 16% 



154 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH SEMESTER 

Math 101 Found, of Math 3 Hum. or Nat. Sci. Elective 3 

EdPsy 302 Educ. Psych 3 Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Ed 302 Hist. Philos. Am. Ed 3 L Res 301 A-V Education 2 

FL Elective 3 FL Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective(s) 3- 6 

15 14-17 

SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Ed 421 St. Teaching 12 

Ed 451 Teh. FL Sec. Sch.t 3 Ed 422 Prof. Praet 2 

EdPsy 305 Eval. Methods 2 

FL Elective 3 14 

Hist 104 Hist. U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Free Elective 3 

17 

• Applicable to entrants of Summer 1967 (including ABC students) and thereafter. Stu- 
dents entering with 2 or 3 high school credits should start with 251 and 053. Veterans 
with two years of active service will be exempted from the ROTC and Health and 
Phys. Ed. requirement. 
** HPe 110 and HPe 111 (Va credit each) applies to male freshmen of September, 1968 
and thereafter. 

t Prerequisite: Successful completion of 351-352 and 055-056 in the student's major 
language. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

School of Education 

Required Courses 

FL 251-252 Language III-IV 3 cr. each 

FL 053-054 Oral Practice III-IV 2 cr. each 

FL 351-352 Advanced Language I-II 3 cr. each 

FL 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice I-II 1 cr. each 

FL 361-362 Development of Culture and Literature I-II 3 cr. each 

Required FL Electives 9 credits 

Ed 451 The Teaching of FL in the Sec. Sch 3 credits 

3fT 
GEOGRAPHY EDUCATION 

THOMAS G. GAULT, Chairman 

The function and purpose of geography is to prepare the 
future citizen to make rational judgements in his private and 
public life as it relates to the use of natural and cultural re- 
sources. Geography also acts as a meaningful integrator of the 
many subject matter areas taken by the student. 

Though geography is listed as social science in the cur- 
ricula, it is of broader scope. Geography includes physical 
geography (earth science) , cultural geography, economic geog- 
raphy, urban and regional planning, or combines these for a 
broad understanding of man in his total environment. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



165 



Vocational opportunities in geography are expanding rap- 
idly. Students will find a wide variety of well-paid positions 
in government service, marketing, urban and regional plan- 
ning, army and naval map services, editorial positions, and 
business. 

There are several options for dual certification with a ma- 
jor in the geography department in School of Education. Geog- 
raphy majors are more likely to certify in earth science or 
social science in addition to their major. 

A major in geography consists of 36 semester hours in 
geography course work as listed in following pages. The op- 
tions are exercised through judicious use of electives.* 



FIRST SEMESTER 

English I 4 

Gen. Ed. Nat. Science Elective .... 4 

Physical Geography 3 

Military Sci. or Health 1%- 2 

Social Science Elective 3 

15%-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

English II 

Gen. Ed. Nat. Sci. Elective 

Cultural Geography 

Military Sci. or Physical Ed. I . . . . 1%- 
General Psychology 



15%-16 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Literature I or II 2 

Gen. Ed. Humanity Elective 3 

Math 162 or 101 5 or 3 

History of U.S. and Pa. II 3 

Meteorology or Climatology 4 or 3 

17 or 15 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Intro, to Art, or Music, or Theater 3 

Gen. Ed. Humanity Elective 3 

Gen. Ed. Nat. Sci. Elective 3 

Gen. Ed. Social Sci. Elective 3 

Geology or Physiography 3 or 4 

Physical Ed. II (women) 1 



16 or 17 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Educational Psy 3 

Evaluation Methods 2 

Geography Anglo-America 3 

Regional Geog. Elective 3 

Economic Geography 3 

14 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Hist. & Phil, of Am. Ed 8 

Audio- Visual Ed 2 

Geography Thought 3 

Regional Geography Elective 3 

Geography Elective 3 

14 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Teaching of Geography 3 

Elective 6 

Free Electives 7 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Student Teaching 12 

Prof. Practicum & Law 2 

14 

Graduation Total 124 



* The Geography major may obtain a combination Social Science certificate by careful 
selection of general education electives and free electives ; or he may be certified in Geo- 
Science by proper election of courses in general education and within geography and 
free electives. 



156 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



MATHEMATICS 

MELVIN R. WOODARD, Chairman 



The program in mathematics prepares the student for 
teaching mathematics in the junior or senior high school. Many 
of our graduates, however, continue their formal education in 
mathematics at the graduate level. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Sem. Hrs. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Math 152 Algebra and Trig 6 

Phys 111 Physics I 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Math 155 Computer Programming . . 1 

15y 2 -16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Sem. Hrs. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Calc. I . . . 4 

Phys 112 Physics II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I or 1 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

Intro, to Art or Music or Theater . . 3 

16-16% 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calc. II . . 4 
For. Lang, or Humanities 

Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II (women) or 1 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) ' 

Math 375 Intro, to Modern Math ... 3 

Eng 201 Literature I 2 

15%-16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Math 357 Anal. Geom. & Calc. Ill . 4 
For. Lang, or Humanities 

Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Math 355 Foundations of Geom 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Humanities or Nat. Sci. Elec 3 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 



16-16y a 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Hist 104 History of U.S. and Pa. II . . . 3 

Psy 201 Gen. Psych 3 

Math Elcctives 3 

SS Gen. Ed. Elective 3 

Elective 3 

15 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

LRes 301 Audio- Visual Ed 2 

EdPsy 302 Ed. Psych 3 

Ed 203 Hist, and Phil, of Ed 3 

Math 371 Linear Algebra I or 3 

Math 376 Abstract Algebra 3 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 

Elective .' 3 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Ed 305 Evaluation Methods 2 

Ed 451 Tchg. of Math in Sec. School . 3 

Math 452 Seminar 1-4 

Math Elective 3 

Elective 6 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Ed 421 Student Teaching 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum & 
School Law 



12 



15-18 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 157 



PUBLIC SCHOOL NURSING 

GEORGE A. W. STOUFFER, Director 

The Board of Presidents of the State Colleges approved on 
January 19, 1951, a curriculum for public school nurses leading 
to the degree of bachelor of science in education. The require- 
ments shown below must be met. 

1. The satisfactory completion of a three-year curriculum 
in an approved school of nursing and registration by 
the State Board of Examiners for the Registration of 
Nurses of Pennsylvania. 

2. The satisfactory completion of sixty (60) semester hours 
of additional preparation distributed as follows: 

A. Courses Related to Public School Nursing 

Semester Hours 

PSN 301 Public School Nursing 2 

PSN 302 Public School Organization 2 

PSN 401 Public Health Nursing 6 

PSN 402 Nutrition and Community Health ... 2 

PSN 403 Family Case Work 3 

TOTAL 15 

B. General and Professional Education 

Hist 104 History of the United States and Pa. II 3 

Eng 102 English II ... . 4 

Hist 101 or 102 History of Civilization I or II .. 3 

Eng 201 Literature I 2 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 3 

Soc 151 Principles of Sociology 3 

Ed 302 Hist, and Phil, of Am. Ed 3 

EdPsy 302 Educational Psychology 3 

Psy 352 Mental Hygiene 3 

SpH 354 Audiometry for PSN 3 

LRes 301 Audio-Visual Education 2 

Electives 11 

TOTAL 45 

GRAND TOTAL 60 

In the case of nurses with less than three years prepara- 
tion for registration, such persons will pursue additional 
courses to meet the requirements for the degree. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



169 



PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 

RICHARD E. BERRY, Chairman 

The curriculum described here will prepare the graduate 
for physics certification in public school teaching. Transfers 
into this program from other physics programs can be accept- 
ed prior to the junior year. Students planning to go into col- 
lege or university teaching should consider obtaining a B.A. 
or B.S. degree. These curricula are described in the Arts and 
Sciences section of this catalog. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICS MAJORS 

The major in Physics consists of 30 semester hours credit. 
In addition supporting courses in Chemistry and Mathematics 
are required. 

Major in Physics 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 

HPellO Physical Ed. (men) % 

MS 101 Military Sci. I (men) 1% 

Math 152 Algebra & Trig 5 

Math 155 Computer Programming ... 1 

Physlll Physics I (Lecture)t 3 

Phys 121 Laboratory Physics It 1 

16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. (women) 1 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. (men) % 

MS 102 Military Sci. I (men) 1% 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Cal. I 4 

Phys 112 Physics II ( Lecture) t 3 

Phys 122 Laboratory Physics lit .... 1 

Intro, to Art, Music or Theatre 3 

16-17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calc. II 4 

Phys 231 Electronics 4 

Foreign Language or 

Humanities Gen. Ed. Elective ... 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Social Science Elective I 3 

17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Eng 201 Literature I 2 

Math 357 Calculus III 4 

Phys 222 Mechanics I 3 

Phys 242 Optics 4 

Foreign Language or 

Humanities Gen. Ed. Elective ... 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. (women) 1 

16-17 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Phys 331 Atomic & Nuclear 4 

EdPsy 305 Evaluation Methods 2 

EdPsy 302 Ed. Psychology 3 

Chem 111 General Chem. I 4 

Elective 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Ed 451 Teaching of Science 3 

Ed 302 Hist. & Phil, of Am. Ed 3 

LRes 301 Audio Visual Ed 2 

Chem 112 General Chem. II 4 

Hist 104 Hist, of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Phys 342 Heat & Thermo. . . . : 4 

16 



160 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Hist 104 Hist, of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Phys 421 Selected Experiments 3 

Social Science Elective 2 3 

Social Science Elective 3 3 



15 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Ed 421 Student Teaching 12 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum 

and School Law 2 



14 



t The completion of the Physics 111-112 and the Physics 121-122 sequences will satisfy 
the requirements of eight hours of a laboratory science in the General Education Program. 



The Physics-Mathematics major consists of a minimum of 
21 credits of Physics and 25 credits of Mathematics. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 

HPellO Physical Ed. (men) % 

MS 101 Military Sci. I (men) 1% 

Math 152 Algebra & Trig.* 5 

Math 155 Computer Programming ... 1 

Phys 111 Physics I (Lecture)t 3 

Phys 121 Laboratory Physics It 1 



16 



THIRD SEMESTER 



English Literature I or II 2 

Math 257 Anal. Geom. & Calc. II 4 

Math 375 Modern Mathematics 3 

Foreign Language III or 

Gen. Ed. Hum. Elective 3 

S. S. Elective 1 1 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. (women) 1 



15-16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 



His 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Math 361 Differential Equations 3 

Phys 331 Atomic and Nuclear Physics . 4 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Elective 3 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 



16 



Math 371 Linear Algebra 3 

Ed 302 History and Philosophy of Ed. . . 3 

Phys 421 Selected Experiments I 3 

Electives 6 



16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. (women) 1 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. (men) % 

MS 102 Military Sci. I (men) 1V 2 

Math 157 Anal. Geom. & Cal. I 4 

Phys 112 Physics II (Lecture)t 3 

Phys 122 Laboratory Physics lit ... . 1 

Intro, to Art, Music or Theatre 3 



16-17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 



Math 357 Anal. Geom. & Calc. Ill 4 

Phys 222 Mechanics I 3 

Foreign Language IV or 

Gen. Ed. Hum. Elective 3 

S. S. Elective 2 3 

S. S. Elective 3 3 



16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 



Ed 451 Teaching of Science 

LRes 301 Audio- Visual Education 

Math 355 Geometry I 

Phys Physics Elective 

Psy 302 Educational Psychology , 
Ed 305 Evaluative Methods 



16-17 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Ed 421 Student Teaching 12 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum and 

School Law 2 



14 



* Algebra and Trigonometry will be taken by those students who have not shown the 
necessary pre-caleulus proficiency. These credits are not considered as part of the major. 

t The completion of the Physics 111-112 and the Physics 121-122 sequences will satisfy 
the requirement of eight hours of a laboratory science in the General Education Program. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



161 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

RAYMOND L. LEE, Coordinator 

Forty-two semester hours are required for a major in The 
Social Sciences, including general education courses in The 
Division. A minimum of six semester hours must be pro- 
grammed in each of five areas: Economics, Geography, History, 
Political Science, and Sociology-Anthropology. A concentra- 
tion of 15 semester hours must be programmed in one area. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Laboratory Natural Science . 4 

General Ed. Hum. Elective . . 3 

General Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

15%-16 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Cr. 



Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 102 Physical Ed. I or 1 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

Laboratory Natural Science . 4 

General Ed. Hum. Elective . . 3 

General Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective 3 



15-15y 2 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 

(or alternative) 3 

HPe 103 Physical Ed. II (women) . 1 

Literature I or II 2 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective . . 6 

Gen. Ed. Natural Sci. or 

Hum. Elective 3 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) \ 

i4y 2 -i5 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

EdPsy 302 Education Psychology ... 3 

Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Elective . . 3 

Intro, to Art, Music, Theater 3 

Courses in Major Field 6 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 



15-16% 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Ed 302 Hist.-Phil. Education 3 

Courses in Major Field 15 

18 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

LRes 301 Audio-Visual Education 2 

Ed 354 Teaching Social Studies 3 

Courses in Major Field or 

free electives 11 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

EdPsy 305 Evaluation Methods 2 

Courses in Major Field or 

free electives 13 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 
Student Teaching and Practicum 14 

14 



15 



TOTAL 124 



162 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

HISTORY DEPARTMENT 

CLYDE C. GELBACH, Chairman 

Thirty semester hours are required for a major in history. 
Beyond the General Education requirements at least one 
course must be programmed in each of the following sub- 
divisions: European History, United States History, Regional 
History. (For course descriptions see page .) 

European History 

Hist 101 History of Civilization I 

Hist 102 History of Civilization II 

Hist 360 Special Studies in History 

Hist 371 Renaissance and Reformation 

Hist 372 History of Europe: 1600-1815 

Hist 373 History of Europe: 1815-1914 

Hist 374 History of the Twentieth Century World 

Hist 380 Medieval Europe I, 400-900 

Hist 381 Medieval Europe II, 900-1350 

United States History: 

Hist 103 History of the United States and Pennsylvania I 

Hist 104 History of the United States and Pennsylvania II 

Hist 345 Colonial America 

Hist 360 Special Studies in America 

Hist 361 Contemporary United States History 

Hist 363 Diplomatic History of the United States 

Hist 364 Great Personalities in History 

Hist 365 History of Pennsylvania 

Hist 390 Social and Intellectual History of the United States to 

1875 
Hist 391 Social and Intellectual History of the United States 

Since 1875 

Regional History: 

Hist 350 History of Latin America: Colonial Period, 1450-1820 

Hist 351 History of Latin America: National Period, 1820 to 

Present 

Hist 352 History of England to 1688 

Hist 353 History of England, 1688 to Present 

Hist 354 History of Russia to 1917 

Hist 355 History of Soviet Russia 

Hist 356 The Old Regime through the Empire: France 1589-1815 

Hist 357 Modern France 

Hist 358 History of Germany to 1848 

Hist 359 History of Germany: 1849-1949 

Hist 375 History of the Far East 

Hist 376 History of the Middle East 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 102 English II 4 

HPe 101 Health or 2 HPe 102 Physical Ed. I or 1 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

Humanities General Education Laboratory Natural Science . 4 

Elective (Hist. Civ. I) 3 Gen. Ed. Soc. Sci. Electives . . 6 



Laboratory Natural Science . 4 — 

Gen. Ed, Soc. Sci. Elective .. 3 16-16% 

15y 2 -16 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA 168 

THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

En^ 201 Literature I or Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Engr 301 Literature II 2 General Education Humanities 

Art 101 Introduction to Art or Elective or 

Mub 101 Introduction to Music or Natural Science Elective .... 3 

Introduction to Theater 3 General Education Humanities 

Hist 104 Hist. U.S. and Pa. II 3 Elective 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math .... 3 Courses in major-minor field . 6 

HPel03 Physical Ed. II (women) . 1 HPe 111 Physical Ed. (men; y 2 

Humanities General Education 



Elective 3 15-15% 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 



15-15Vj 



FIFTH, SIXTH, SEVENTH SEMESTERS EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Courses in major-minor fields or Ed 421 Student Teaching 12 

free electives .... 15-18 per semester Ed 422 Professional Practicum and 

School Law 2 

14 



THE SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 

HAROLD S. ORENDORFF, Dean 

For countless centuries, man has endeavored to express 
himself in the creation of the various fine art forms. The de- 
partments in the School of Fine Arts are dedicated to the 
principle of developing the student's creativity in these forms 
of expression to the highest possible level. 

The School of Fine Arts also has a responsibility to the 
community in the larger sense, that of providing the leader- 
ship and stimuli to encourage the growth, development and 
constant improvement of all the arts in the area. 

At the present time, the School of Fine Arts consists of 
four departments in two administrative units; Art and Art 
Education, Music and Music Education. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART AND ART EDUCATION 

LAWRENCE F. McVITTY, Chairman of Department 

The general requirements for admission to the University- 
are explained under that heading in this catalog. The appli- 
cant for Art or Art Education should submit a portfolio con- 
taining work done on his own initiative as well as work com- 
pleted in school to the Art Department. If, for some reason, a 
portfolio cannot be submitted the student should arrange an 
interview with the Art Department. 



164 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



The art program at the University includes general and 
professional studies as well as development of the student's 
creative and expressive abilities. Some students will elect to 
develop their skills for art teaching. Some will choose to gain 
a knowledge of art for use in art related fields. Many students 
will use the knowledge of art gained here as a background to 
further study. To meet these various needs, the program re- 
quires the student to complete a core sequence of two aca- 
demic years. Basic experiences are given in the core, equipping 
the student for a more demanding experience in upper level 
courses. 

Upon entering his Junior year, the student elects to fol- 
low a specific concentration. The degrees offered are Bachelor 
of Science in Art Education, and Bachelor of Arts in: Art His- 
tory, Painting-Drawing, or Design. Each area follows a planned 
sequence. The student along with his advisor selects the 
courses for the student's area of concentration. 

The faculty is composed of people who are interested in 
student welfare. They are dedicated teachers, active profes- 
sionally in the fields they teach. 

Students graduating in Art Education will be qualified to 
enter the profession of art teaching in the elementary and the 
secondary schools. This program is a prerequisite to advanced 
study, which is necessary before the art teacher's certification 
can be made permanent. 

Those students completing the degree Bachelor of Arts in 
an area of art concentration will be eligible to attend schools 
for advanced study. The student may find a career in areas 
where art knowledge or performance are required. 

The student is required to maintain a 2.0 average (C) or 
higher in his major field. Students intending to continue into 
graduate school are reminded that a 2.5 average is preferred. 

The art student must also demonstrate an interest in the 
welfare of the department by constructive participation in its 
professional and social affairs. 

Credit hours within various divisions: 





Art 
Education 


Art 
History 


Painting- 
Dra wing- 
Sculpture 


Design 


General Education 


52 


52 


52 


52 


Professional Education 

Core 

Major 

Academic Electives 


28 
26 
20 


26 

33 

6 


26 

30 

6 


26 

30 

6 


Art Electives 


6 
132 


6 
l23" 


9 
T23~ 


9 
"l23 



INDIANA UNIVER SITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 165 

Semester hour credit is counted on the basis of two clock 
hours of studio for one semester hour of credit. 

Art Education Majors are prepared for certification for 
teaching in both elementary and secondary art. 

Any student in the university may elect to take any course 
in art providing he has received written permission from the 
particular instructor concerned. 

ART MINOR 

A student electing to take an Art Minor (15 to 21 semester 
hours) must complete certain prerequisite courses. 

Art History: Art 115, Art 116, Art 411, Art 413. 16 to 18 
semester hours of undergraduate work in Art History is re- 
quired for Master's work in Art History. 

Art: Art 111; 112; 113 or 114; 115 or 116 or 411; 211; 213; 
215 plus art electives in lower or upper division. 

ART AND ART EDUCATION CURRICULUM SEQUENCE 

Course sequences are listed herewith. Any variations 
should be cleared with the student's advisor. A more complete 
analysis of this is found in the check sheet available in the 
department office. 

CORE SEQUENCE 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Sem. Sem. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Art 111 Drawing I 2 Art 112 Drawing n 2 

Art 113 Design I 2 Art 114 Design II 2 

Art 115 Art History I 3 Art 116 Art History II 3 

Biol 103 General Biology I or Biol 104 General Biology II or 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 4 Sci 106 Physical Science II 4 

Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 102 English H 4 

HPe 101 Health 2 HPe 102 Physical Ed. I 1 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% MS 102 Military Science I 1% 



16%-17 16-16% 



THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

Art 211 Painting I 2 Art 212 Painting II 2 

Art 213 Crafts I 2 Art 214 Ceramics I 2 

Art 215 Sculpture I 2 Art 216 Metalry I 2 

Art 217 Printmaking I 2 Art 218 Graphic Design I 2 

Mus 101 Introduction to Music 3 Social Science — elective 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 General Studies — elective 3 

HPe 103 Physical Ed. II (women) .. 1 HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) % 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 



14%-15 



16-16% 



166 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ART EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Sem. 

Hrs. 

Art 311 Painting III 2 

Art 313 Sculpture II 2 

Art 316 Printmaking II 2 

Art 317 Arts & Crafts El. Ed 2 

Art 319 Teach Sem. in El. Art Ed 1 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

EdPsy 302 Educational Psychology 3 

Hist 104 History U.S. & Pa. II 3 

18 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

Art 312 Ceramics II 2 

Art 314 Costume and Theatre Arts 2 

Art 316 Metalry II — enamel-raising .... 2 

Art 318 Arts & Crafts Sec. Ed 2 

Art 320 Teach Sem. in Sec. Art Ed. . . . 1 

Social Science — elective 3 

LRes 301 Audio- Visual Education 2 

Ed 302 History & Phil, of Am. Ed 3 

17 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Art 411 Art History III 2 

Art 413 Seminar in Art 2 

Art 415 Crafts II 2 

Art Art electives 6 

Eng Literature I or II 3 

Social Science — elective 3 

17 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Ed 421 Student Teaching 

Ed 422 Prof. Practicum, including 
School Law 



12 

2 

14 



ART HISTORY CONCENTRATION 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Sem. 

Hrs. 

Art 321 Drawing III 2 

Art 411 Art History III 2 

Art Art History 3 

Art Art Studio 2 

Fl Foreign Language 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

Art Art Studio 2 

Art Art History 3 

Art 410 Primitive and Pre-Greek Art . . 3 

Fl Foreign Language 3 

Social Science — elective 3 

14 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Art Art Studio 2 

Art Art History 6 

Academic — elective 3 

Social Science — elective 3 

14 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Art 413 Seminar in Art 2 

Art Art Studio 6 

Art Art History 6 

Social Science — elective 3 

Academic — elective 3 

16 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



167 



DRAWING-PAINTING-SCULPTURE CONCENTRATION 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Sem. 

Hrs. 

Art 321 Drawing III 2 

Art 411 Art History III 2 

Art Art Studio 6 

Fl Foreign Language 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

Art Art Studio 2 

Art Art History 3 

Fl Foreign Laneuage 3 

Academic elective 3 

Social Science elective 3 

14 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Art Art Studio 10 

Academic elective 3 

Social Science elective 3 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Art 413 Seminar in Art 2 

Art Art Studio 6 

Academic elective 3 

Social Science elective 3 

14 



DESIGN CONCENTRATION 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Art 321 Drawing III 2 

Art 411 Art History III 2 

Art Art Studio 4 

Fl Foreign Language 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

14 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Art Art History 3 

Art Art History 4 

Fl Foreign Language 3 

Social Science elective 3 

Academic elective 3 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Art Art Studio 10 

Social Science elective 3 

Academic elective 3 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Art 413 Art Seminar 2 

Art Art Studio 6 

Social Science elective 3 

Academic elective 3 

14 



Electives 

Art 451 Crafts III 2 

Art 452 Ceramics III 2 

Art 453 Sculpture III 2 

Art 454 Painting IV 2 

Art 455 Graphic Design II 2 

Art 457 Printmaking III 2 

Art 458 Architecture and Home Plan. . 2 

Art 459 Advanced Fabrics 2 

Art 460 Advanced Metalry 2 

Art 330 Arts and Crafts for 

Mentally Retarded 3 



Electives 

MS 101 Military Science I \Vz 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

MS 203 Military Science II 2 

MS 204 Military Science II 2 

MS 305 Military Science III 2 

MS 306 Military Science III 2 

MS 407 Military Science IV 3 

MS 408 Military Science IV 3 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Students in the Department of Art and Art Education who 
find it necessary to complete courses under the old curriculum, 
should program for new curriculum courses under the new 
curriculum numbers and consult with the department chair- 
man or the instructor about change in credit. In this transi- 
tional period students should adhere to the curriculum as 
nearly as possible as it was designated in the catalog for the 
year in which they entered the university. 

In arranging programs students and advisors in the De- 
partment of Art and Art Education should consult that 
portion of the catalog designated as General Education 
Program. (Humanities 22 cr. - Natural Science 11 cr. - Social 
Science 15 cr. - ROTC and Phys. Ed. 4 cr.) 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS 
IN ART EDUCATION 

credits 

Psych 202 Educational Psychology 3 

Art 317 Arts and Crafts Elementary Education 2 

Art 319 Teaching Seminar Elementary Art 1 

Art 318 Arts and Crafts Secondary Education 2 

Art 320 Teaching Seminar Secondary Art _ — 1 

Ed 301 Audio Visual Education 2 

Ed 302 History and Philosophy of American Education 3 

Ed 421 Student Teaching _ _ 12 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum in School Law 2 

~2Ts.h. 

Students desiring to teach Art in the State of Pennsyl- 
vania must complete the above professional requirements for 
graduation and certification as well as the sequences in Gener- 
al Education in Humanities and those courses as listed by the 
Department of Art and Art Education. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC AND MUSIC EDUCATION 

HUGH JOHNSON, Chairman 

Admission to either department requires a satisfactory 
tape recorded audition to be mailed to the chairman. Detailed 
instructions will be sent to the applicant on request. 

The Music Division offers a flexible program leading to 
the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music (usually Bachelor of 
Music) with a major in one of the eighteen areas of per- 
formance. The graduate of this program will be prepared for 
graduate study in performance or for an audition for member- 
ship in one of the minor professional organizations. 

The Music Education Division program leads to the Bache- 
lor of Science in Music Education along with certification to 
teach in the Public Schools of Pennsylvania. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSY LVANIA 169 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers a program leading 
to a degree of Bachelor of Arts in Music with a major in 
Performance, Theory and Composition and, Music History and 
Literature. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS* 
IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE DEGREE 

(BACHELOR OF MUSIC) 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

Humanities 16 

English I and II 8 

Literature I or II - 2 

Foreign Language 

(Completion of Intermediate Sequence) 6 

Natural Sciences 11 

Laboratory Science ~ - 8 

Foundations of Math I 3 

Social Sciences _ 15 

Each student will elect five courses from the following: 

American Citizenship Hist, of Civ. II 

Intro, to Anthropology Hist, of U.S. & Pa. II 

Principles of Economics General Psychology 

World Geography Prin. of Sociology 



MUSIC 

Lower Division 24 

Theory I, II, III, & IV ~ 12 

Sight Singing I & II 4 

Ear Training I & II 2 

Keyboard Harmony I & H 2 

Music Literature I & II 4 

Upper Division 14 

Fourteen hours to be selected from the following, 

Form and Analysis I.... 2 Hist, of Music I 3 

Form and Analysis II.... 2 Hist, of Music II 3 

Counterpoint I 2 Mus. of the An. World 3 

Counterpoint II 2 Mus. of the Middle Ages.. 3 

Orchestration I 2 Renaissance Music 3 

Orchestration n 2 The Baroque Era 3 

Fund, of Conducting .... 2 18th Century Music 3 

Choral Conducting 2 The Early Romantic Per... 3 

Inst. Conducting 2 The Late Romantic Per 3 

Lit. of the Major I 2 Contemporary Music 3 

Lit. of the Major II 2 American Music 3 

Applied Music . 40 

Major Instrument or Voice 32 

Minor Instrument or Voice 8 

Piano proficiency required. 

Junior and Senior Recitals required in the major. 



170 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SEQUENCE IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Hours 
Sem. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

HPe 102 Physical Education I 1 

Mus 111 Sight Singing I 2 

Mus 113 Ear Training I 1 

Mus 115 Theory I 3 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Hours 
Sem. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

HPe 103 Physical Education II 1 

Mus 112 Sight Singing II 2 

Mus 114 Ear Training II 1 

Mus 116 Theory II 3 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 



i6-i6y 2 



16-161/2 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Foreign Language 3 

Eng 201 or 301 Literature I or II . . 2 

Mus 215 Theory III 3 

Mus 217 Keyboard Harmony I 1 

Mus 220 Music Literature I 2 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 

HPe 110 Physical Ed. I (men) % 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Foreign Language 3 

Math 101 Foundation of Mathematics 3 

Mus 216 Theory IV 3 

Mus 218 Keyboard Harmony II ... . 1 

Mus 221 Music Literature II 2 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 

HPe 111 Physical Ed. II (men) ... y 2 



16-16% 



17-17% 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Laboratory Science I 4 

Social Science Elective 3 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 

Upper Division Selection 4 

16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Laboratory Science II 4 

Social Science Elective 3 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 

Upper Division Selection 4 

16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Social Science Elective 3 

HPe 101 Health (women) 2 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 

Upper Division Selection 4 

12-14 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Social Science Elective 6 

Applied Major 4 

Applied Minor 1 

Upper Division Selection 2 



13 



* Requirements for B.A. in Music found under the School of Arts and 
Sciences. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



171 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
MUSIC EDUCATION DEGREE 



GENERAL EDUCATION 



Humanities 










English I and II 








8 


Literature I or II 








2 


Intro, to Art, Music, or Theater 






3 


Basic Music 








14 


Theory I 




3 






Ear Training I 




1 






Sight Singing I 




2 






Music Literature I 




2 






Music History I & II 




6 






General elective 








(3) 


Aesthetics 


Mod. 


Am. 


Fiction 




Art Hist. I or II 


Philosophy 




Ethics 


Relig: 


LOUS 


Lit. 




Hist. Civ. I 


Relig: 


ious 


Thought 




Logic 










Natural Science 










Laboratory Science 








8 


Foundations of Math I 








3 


General elective 








(3) 


Astronomy 










Computer Math. 










Found, of Math. II 










Geology 










Statistics 










Social Science 










Hist, of U.S. & Pa. II 








3 


General Psychology 








3 


Electives 








9 


American Citizenship 










Intro, to Anthropology 










Principles of Economics 










World Geography 










History of Civilization II 










Principles of Sociology 










R.O.T.C. and Physical Education 










Rhythmic Activities 








2 


Health 








2 



27-30 



11-14 



15 



60 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

Required of all Music Education students: 

Theory II, III, and IV 9 

Ear Training II 1 

Sight Singing II 2 

Music Literature n 2 

Fundamentals of Conducting 2 

Woodwinds Seminar 1 

Brass Seminar 1 

Strings Seminar 1 

Class Percussion I 1 

Voice Seminar I and II 2 

Class or Private Piano 1 or 2 



23 or 24 



172 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Twenty-five semester hours to be 
with the approval of the advisor: 

Choral Conducting 2 Private 

Instrumental Conducting 2 Private 

French Diction 2 Private 

German Diction 2 Private 

Counterpoint I 2 Private 

Orchestration I 2 Private 

Class Brass 1 Private 

Class Woodwinds 1 Private 

Class Strings 1 Private 

Class Percussion II 1 Private 

Private Piano 2 Private 

Private Voice 2 Private 

Private Organ 2 Private 

Private Harpsichord 2 Private 

Private Violin 2 



selected from the following 

25 



Viola 

Cello 

Bass Viol 

Flute 

Oboe 

Clarinet 

Bassoon 

Saxophone 

Trumpet 

French Horn 

Trombone 

Baritone Horn 

Tuba 

Percussion 



48 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 



Educational Psychology 
Audio-Visual Education 
History & Philosophy of Am. Ed. 
Elementary Methods 
Secondary Methods 
Instrumental Methods 
Professional Practicum 
Student Teaching 



3 

2 
3 
2 
2 

2 
2 

12 

~28~ 



Each student must declare a major performing medium 
and one or more minor performing media. One of the minors 
for a voice major must be piano and one of the minors for a 
piano major must be voice. 

Jury clearance on all majors and minors is required. 

All students must have piano jury clearance at their level 
of declaration. 

All students must participate in one or more performing 
organizations. It is recommended that participation be in both 
vocal and instrumental organizations. 

Student teaching will include all areas of Music Education 
at all levels of the public schools. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



178 



SEQUENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Hours Sem. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

HPe Health 2 

MS 101 Military Science I 1% 

Mus 111 Sight Singing I 2 

Mus 113 Ear Training I 1 

Mus 115 Theory I 

Mus 155 Class Strings I (1st or 2nd) 1 

Mus 151 Class Voice I 1 

Private or Class Piano 1 

14%-15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Hours Sem. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

101 Intro, to Art, Music or 

Theater 3 

MS 102 Military Science I 1% 

Mus 112 Sight Singing II 2 

Mus 114 Ear Training II 1 

Mus 116 Theory II 3 

Mus 152 Class Voice II 1 

Private or Class Piano 1 

To be selected 1 or 2 

15%-16 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Laboratory Science 4 

Mus 215 Theory III 3 

Mus 220 Music Literature I 2 

Mus 311 Fundamentals of Conducting . . 2 

Mus 204 Rhythmic Activities I 1 

Mus 161 Class Woodwinds I or 

Mus 157 Class Percussion I 1 

To be selected 4 

17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Laboratory Science 4 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Mus 216 Theory TV 

Mus 221 Music Literature II 2 

Mus 205 Rhythmic Activities II 1 

Mus 157 Class Percussion I or 

Mus 161 Class Woodwinds I 1 

To be selected 3 

17 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Math 101 Foundations of Mathematics 3 

Eng 201 or 301 Literature I or II . . 2 

Social Science Elective 8 

Mus 301 Music History I 3 

Mus 331 Elementary Methods 2 

Mus 159 Class Brass I 1 

To be selected 3 

17 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Humanities or Science Elective . . 3 

Psy 302 Educational Psychology 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Mus 302 Music History II 3 

Mus 333 Secondary Methods 2 

To be selected 3 

17 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

Ed 302 History and Phil, of Am. Ed. . . 3 
101 Intro, to Art or Theater (men) (3i 

Social Science Elective 3 

Hist 104 History of U.S. and Ua. II . . 3 
LRes 301 Audio-Visual Education .... 2 

Mus 334 Instrumental Methods 2 

To be selected 1-3 

16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Ed 421 Student Teaching 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum 



11 



174 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

ELLA C. BENDIX, Dean 

The School of Home Economics offers two major curricula 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics. 
The Home Economics Teacher Education Curriculum meets 
certification required for teaching home economics in Penn- 
sylvania. The Institutional Food Service Curriculum offers 
two programs; one leading to certification for Pennsylvania 
School Food Service and the other preparing for the Ameri- 
can Dietetic Association internship requirements and/or man- 
agement positions in public and private institutional food 
services. 

General Education: All students in the School of Home 
Economics are required to complete the general education 
program and meet teacher certification requirements. Ap- 
proximately two thirds of this work is taken during the first 
two years. 

Home Economics Professional Requirements: A series of 
home economics courses are required of all students enrolled 
in the School of Home Economics. The required courses are: 

HE 111 Meal Management HE 218 Child Development 
HE 113 Management and HE 315 Family Finance and 
Equipment Consumer Education 

HE 211 Advanced Foods HE 411 Family Relations 
HE 212 Nutrition 

See pages 275-276-280 for course descriptions. 

Home Economics Electives: Students enrolled in the 
School of Home Economics may choose home economics elec- 
tives from either department. Some home economics courses 
may be elected by students not enrolled in the School of Home 
Economics. 

Students are required to maintain a 2.0 (C) average or 
higher. For those intending to continue into graduate school 
a 2.5 average or higher is preferred. 

It may be necessary for some students to attend one or 
more summer school sessions during their undergraduate 
study in order to meet requirements for certification. 

The Curricula in the School of Home Economics con- 
tributes to the development of professional competencies 
which enable the students to enter a diversity of careers such 
as: equipment and utility home service representatives, ex- 
tension services, homemaking, radio and television and family 
and community welfare work. These are in addition to the 
teaching and institutional food service careers. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 176 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

MARY W. ARMSTRONG, Chairman 

The Home Economics Education Department offers a 
home economics teacher education program leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The program designed to meet 
university and teacher certification requirements includes 
courses in general liberal education, home economics, general 
professional education and professional home economics edu- 
cation. The graduate of this program will be prepared for 
graduate study in home economics education. 

Certification for Teaching Home Economics. Students who 
expect to qualify for a College Certificate for Teachers of 
Home Economics in Pennsylvania must complete the require- 
ments for the home economics teaching major. 

Certification for Teachers of Nursery Schools or Child 
Care and Development Laboratories in Secondary Schools In- 
cluding Vocational Schools. The certificate for teaching home 
economics in the secondary field will be extended to teaching 
child care and development in child development laboratories 
in secondary schools including vocational schools upon com- 
pletion of an additional twelve semester hours. Course offer- 
ings will be in areas of adolescent psychology, child develop- 
ment, nursery school child nutrition, nursery school education 
and student teaching with children between the ages of two 
and four years. 

Home Economics Teacher Education Curriculum 

for 
Pennsylvania State Certification for Teaching 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Cr. Cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 Eng 102 English II 4 

Chem 101 Chemistry 3 Chem 102 Chemistry 3 

Art 101 Introduction to Art or Social Science Elective* 3 

Mus 101 Introduction to Music or Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

Eng 103 Introduction to Theatre 3 HE 112 Clothing Construction 3 

HPe 102 Physical Education I 1 

HE 111 Meal Management 3 

HE 213 Principles of Design 2 



16 

THIRD SEMESTER FOURTH SEMESTER 

Biol 151 Physiology 3 Humanities Elective 3 

Humanities Elective* 3 Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Eng 201 Literature I or Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II 3 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 HPe 103 Physical Education U 1 

HPe 101 Health 2 HE 212 Nutrition 3 

HE 113 Management and Equipment . . 3 HE 214 Clothing II 3 



HE 211 Advanced Foods 3 

16 



16 



176 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

FIFTH SEMESTER SIXTH SEMESTER 

Biol 361 Microbiology 3 Social Science Elective* 8 

Social Science Elective* 3 Ed 302 History & Philosophy of 

EdPsy 302 Educational Psychology 3 American Education 3 

HE 216 Clothing Selection 3 HE 218 Child Development 3 

HE 315 Family Finance and Consumer HE 314 Textiles 3 

Education 8 HE 217 Home Planning & Furnishing 3 

15 15 

SEVENTH SEMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

HE Elective 8 Ed 421 Student Teaching 6 

LRes 301 Audio Visual Education 2 Ed 422 School Law 1 

Elective in any Area 3 HE 412 Nursery School 3 

HE 315 Methods of Teaching HE 414 Home Management Residence 3 

Vocational Home Economics .... 4 HE 452 Vocational Home Economics 

HE 411 Family Relations 3 Curriculum Construction 2 

15 15 

*See Catalogue Page 256 for listing of elective courses in Humanities, Natural Science 

and Social Sciences. 

Sequence of courses subject to change for administrative purposes. 

INSTITUTIONAL FOOD SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

ELISABETH A. SCHMIDT, Chairman 

Majors in this department pursue the general education 
program required of all students. A concentration may be 
selected either for Pennsylvania School Food Service Certifi- 
cation; or to meet dietetic internship requirements for Ameri- 
can Dietetic Association professional membership and/or prep- 
aration to enter commercial and industrial food management 
opportunities in public and private food service operations. 

To meet professional requirements the program includes 
Administration, Equipment and Layout, Food Purchasing, 
Microbiology and Sanitation, Field Food Service Experience, 
Quantity Food Management, Food Service Accounting, Per- 
sonnel Management, and an approved summer experience of 
at least six weeks full-time employment in a food service 
operation. 

Home Economics Education majors may elect food service 
courses to prepare for teaching in vocational food science pro- 
grams in the public schools. 



EWS and SCENES 

at 

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Indiana, Pennsylvania 



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INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



177 



CURRICULUM FOR PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL 
FOOD SERVICE CERTIFICATION 

ELISABETH A. SCHMIDT, Chairman 
BERNICE W. KING, ELIZABETH LAVELLE, LEOLA NORBERG, ALLEN M. WOODS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

HOURS 

clock sem. 

Eng 101 English I 4 4 

Chem 101 Inorganic Chemistry . 4 3 

HE 113 Management & Equip. ... 5 3 

HE 111 Meal Management 6 3 

HPe 101 Health 2 2 

HPe 102 Physical Education 

21 15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

HOURS 

clock sem. 

Eng 102 English II 4 4 

Chem 102 Organic Chemistry . . 4 3 
BM 111 Foundations of Math . . 3 3 
Gen Ed Introduction to Art 

or Theatre or Music 3 3 

HE 211 Advanced Foods 6 3 

HPe 101 Physical Education 2 1 

22 17 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 3 

Bio 151 Physiology for Home EC 4 3 

HE 212 Nutrition 4 3 

HPe 203 Physical Education 2 1 

Gen Ed Humanities Elective 3 3 

Gen Ed Social Science Elec 3 3 

19 16 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

Psy 302 Educational Psychology 3 3 
Chem 351 Biochemistry or 

Elective 4 3 

HE 218 Child Development 3 3 

HE 315 Fam. Finance & 

Cons. Econ 3 3 

HPe 204 First Aid 2 1 

Gen Ed Social Science Elec. ... 3 3 

18 16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

HE 303 Quantity Food Service ... 9 3 

Eng 201 Literature I 2 2 

Bio 361 Microbiology & Sanitation 5 3 

BM 201 Personnel Management . . 3 3 

HE 359 Quantity Food Purchasing 3 3 
HE 355 Diet Therapy or Elective 

in any area 3 3 



25 17 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

HE 3C2 Experimental Foods 6 3 

HE 411 Family Relations 3 3 

Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. . 3 3 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 2 

LRes 301 Audio Visual Ed 3 2 

♦HE 321 In-Service Training 2 1 

Gen Ed Social Science Elective 3 3 

22 17 



SEVENTHS EMESTER EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Ed 362 Hist & Phil of Education 3 3 HE 356 Food Service 

HE 360 Account, for Food Service 3 3 Administration 3 3 

HE 364 Methods of Teaching 3 3 HE 361 Food Service Experience 20 6 

HE 358 Food Service Equipment .33 HE 402 Nutrition and 

Elective in any area 3 3 Coram. Health 2 2 

Ed 422 School Law 2 1 

15 15 

27 12 

Additional Requirements: A summer practicum is required 
of all students. This is met by the completion of approved full- 
time employment of at least six weeks in a food service opera- 
tion, during one summer period. Courses in Military Science 
are also required of male students. 

♦Subject to curriculum committee approval 1968-1969. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



INSTITUTIONAL FOOD SERVICE CURRICULUM 

FOR INSTITUTION FOOD SERVICE 

MANAGEMENT AND DIETETICS 

This program meets the internship requirements of The 
American Dietetics Association. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

HOURS 
clock sem. 

Eng 101 English I 4 4 

HE 113 Management and 

Equipment 5 3 

HE 111 Meal Management 6 3 

Chem 101 Chemistry (Inorganic) 4 3 
HPe 101 Health 2 2 



21 IB 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 3 

Bio 101 Physiology 4 3 

HE 212 Nutrition 4 3 

HPe 203 Physical Ed. II 2 1 

Humanities Elective 3 3 

Social Science Elective 3 3 



19 16 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Eng 201 Literature 2 

Bio 360 Microbiology and 

Sanitation 5 

BM 201 Personnel Mgmt 3 

HE 313 Quantity Food Service 

and Mgmt 9 

HE 359 Quantity Food 

Purchasing 3 

HE 355 Diet Therapy 3 



SECOND SEMESTER 



HOURS 
clock sem. 

Eng 102 English II 4 4 

Chem 102 Chemistry (Organic) 4 3 
Gen Ed Intro to Art, or 

Theatre or Music 3 3 

HE 211 Advanced Foods 6 3 

BM 111 Foundations of Math ... 3 3 
HPe 102 Physical Ed. I 2 1 



22 17 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

HPe 204 First Aid 2 1 

Chem 351 Biochemistry 4 3 

EdPsy 302 Educational Psychology 3 3 

HE 215 Child Development 3 3 

HE 315 Consumer Economics 

and Family Finance 3 3 

Social Science Elective 3 3 



18 16 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

Eng 301 Literature II 2 2 

Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. 3 3 

LRes 301 Audio Visual Ed 3 2 

HE 362 Experimental Foods ... 6 3 

HE 411 Family Relations 3 3 

♦HE 321 Professional Employ- 
ment Practicum 1 1 

Social Science Elective 3 3 



25 17 



21 17 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 
HE 358 Food Service Equipment , 
Ed 302 His. and Phil, of 

American Ed 

HE 360 Accounting for Food 

Service 

HE 364 Methods of Teaching . , 



Elective in any area 3 



15 15 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

HE 401 Nutrition and Commu- 
nity Health 2 

Ed 422 School Law 2 

HE 356 Food Service 

Administration 3 

HE 361 Food Service Experience 20 



27 12 



Additional Requirements: Summer practicum is required 
of all students. This requirement is met by the completion of 
approved full-time employment in a food service operation of 
not less than six weeks during one summer period. Courses in 
Military Science are also required of male students. 



♦Subject to Approval of Curriculum Com. 1968-69. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 179 

THE SCHOOL OF HEALTH SERVICES 

JOHN CHELLMAN, Dean 

The establishment of a School of Health Services provides 
an opportunity to educate needed personnel representing vari- 
ous health disciplines. The School offers professional curricula 
leading to appropriate baccalaureate degrees for men and 
women in health and physical education; medical technology; 
corrective, physical, and occupational therapy; and nursing. 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania is affiliated with approved 
schools and hospitals for specialized training in all programs 
of the allied health professions and nursing. 

At the present time the School of Health Services includes 
five departments: 

1. Allied Health Professions 

2. Health and Physical Education for Women 

3. Health and Physical Education for Men 

4. Nursing 

5. Athletics 

ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS DEPARTMENT 

ARTHUR G. SHIELDS, Acting Chairman 

Corrective Therapy 

Corrective therapy is the application of the principles, 
techniques, and psychology of medically oriented physical edu- 
cation as prescribed by the medical doctor to aid in the com- 
plete rehabilitation of the patient. 

Men and women graduates with a major in physical edu- 
cation may qualify as corrective therapists with the Veterans 
Administration by completing a comprehensive six-weeks resi- 
dency course at a Veterans Administration hospital. This 
course, conducted during the summer months by a well-quali- 
fied hospital staff, requires 240 clock hours of lectures, demon- 
strations, and clinical experiences in corrective therapy as it 
applies to the physical medicine and rehabilitation of a Vet- 
erans Hospital. Room and board are provided by the super- 
vising hospital. 

Students interested in corrective therapy should so indi- 
cate prior to the completion of their junior year. Before com- 
pleting the course, applications may be filed with the Board 
of Civil Service Examiners, Veterans Administration Central 
Office, Washington, D.C. A list of Veterans Hospitals offer- 
ing such training is available in the Dean's office. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Physical Therapy 

The suggested major curriculum for Physical Education 
also satisfies entrance requirements to physicay therapy 
schools approved by the Council on Medical Education of the 
American Medical Association in collaboration with the Amer- 
ican Physical Therapy Association. Since entrance require- 
ments vary to some degree in the approved physical therapy 
schools, the student should devote his elective hours to addi- 
tional courses in physics, chemistry, biology, and psychology. 
After receiving the B. S. degree, the student enrolls in an 
approved physical therapy school of his choice for a twelve 
to sixteen month training period. At the completion of this 
specialized training, the student will be awarded a Certificate 
in Physical Therapy. 

The following approved schools of physical therapy are 
located within a reasonable distance of Indiana: 

Columbia University, New York 

New York University, New York 

State University of New York at Buffalo 

Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 

D. T. Watson Home of Physiatrics, Leetsdale, Penn- 
sylvania 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania 
A complete list of the twenty-one (21) schools which accept 
students with the B. S. degree in physical education is avail- 
able in the Dean's office. 

Occupational Therapy 

The suggested major curriculum for Physical Education 
also satisfies entrance requirements to occupational therapy 
schools approved by the Council on Medical Education of the 
American Medical Association in collaboration with the Amer- 
ican Occupational Therapy Association. Since entrance re- 
quirements vary to some degree in the approved occupational 
therapy schools, the student should devote his elective hours 
to additional courses in physics, chemistry, biology, and psy- 
chology. 

After receiving the B. S. degree, the student enrolls in an 
approved occupational therapy school of his choice for an 
eighteen (18) month experience in the theory and practice of 
therapy. This is a carefully supervised experience under the 
direction of registered occupational therapists qualified to di- 
rect such student activity. Included here are program plan- 
ning, hospital procedure, applying activity as treatment, rec- 
ord keeping, care of equipment, and academic work. 

A list of the schools approved by the Council on Medical 
Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Association 
is available in the Dean's office. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 181 

FIRST YEAR 

English I 4 English II 4 

General Biology I 4 General Biology II 4 

General Chemistry I 4 General Chemistry II 4 

Health or Military Science 2 Physical Education 1 

Art or Music or Theater 3 Humanities Electives 3 

17 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Literature I or II 2 Organic Chemistry 4 

Organic Chemistry 4 Microbiology 3 

Zoology 3 Algebra & Trig 5 

Quant. Anal. I 4 Psychology 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Health and Physical Ed 1 1B 

17 

THIRD YEAR 

Biochemistry 3 Physics II 4 

Physics I 4 Social Science Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Electives 7-9 

♦Electives 6 

14-16 

16 

* Suggested electives include genetics, parasitology, anatomy, biotechnique physiology, 
mycology and radiation biology. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Medical Technology, which has become a full-fledged 
profession since World War II, is indispensible to the practice 
of modern medicine. As an integral part of medicine, it entails 
a wide range of clinical laboratory tests and studies which are 
invaluable to physicians and surgeons in clinical diagnosis and 
therapy. Consequently, the Medical Technologist must be a 
skilled and intelligent member of the medical team capable of 
actively engaging in furthering the laboratory knowledge of 
diseases and their treatment and in developing new and im- 
proved laboratory methods. 

Modern clinical laboratory work requires personnel who 
possess extensive knowledge of Biology, Chemistry, Microbi- 
ology, Hematology, and Histology in addition to judgement, 
skill, and dexterity. 

With the tremendous increase in the number of clinical 
laboratories during recent years, there is a dearth of Medical 
Technologists to staff them. At the present time there are ap- 
proximately 35,000 registered Medical Technologists, and it is 
estimated that more than twice this number could be em- 
ployed if available. Hence there are unlimited employment op- 
portunities in this vital field of public service for those who 
possess the requisite qualifications and training. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



The standard program in Medical Technology consists of 
three years of college study (including specific area require- 
ments) plus a 12-month training period in an AMA approved 
hospital School of Medical Technology of which there are now 
about 800 in this country. There are forty-three (43) approved 
schools in Pennsylvania, ten of which are located within a 
fifty mile radius of Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Upon 
completion of the collegiate and clinical training, the student 
receives his baccalaureate degree from Indiana. Completion 
of the college and clinical training is followed by a board of 
examination conducted twice a year by the Registry of Med- 
ical Technology of the American Society of Clinical Patholo- 
gists. Successful passage of this examination certifies a stu- 
dent as a M.T. (Medical Technologist) signifying that he is a 
professionally qualified laboratory technologist. 

The college phase of the Medical Technology program re- 
quires a minimum of 16 semester hours of Biology and Chem- 
istry plus one semester of college mathematics. These require- 
ments together with those in the University's general educa- 
tion program are included in the following three year curric- 
ulum: 

SECOND YEAR 

Literature I or II 2 Foreign Language 3 

Foreign Language 3 Microbiology 3 

Zoology 3 Algebra & Trig 5 

Quant. Anal. I 3 Psychology 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Health & Physical Ed 1 

16 14 



THIRD YEAR 

Organic Chemistry 4 Organic Chemistry 4 

Physics I 4 Physics II 4 

Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

Elective 5-6 Elective 3-5 

16-17 14-16 



FOURTH YEAR 

This year of work is completed at a School of Medical Technology approved by the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists and the American Medical Association. It in- 
cludes both practical and theoretical work in all aspects of medical technology. 

Urinalysis 4 weeks Cytology 1 week 

Hematology and Coagulation ... 8 weeks Bacteriology, Parasitology 

Radio- Isotopes 1 week and Mycology 12 weeks 

Donor Center 1 week Serology 3 weeks 

Clinical Chemistry and Toxicology 12 weeks Virology 1 week 

Blood Bank 4 weeks Plasmapheresis 

Histology 3 weeks Orientation 3 weeks 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 183 

EDUCATION FOR SAFE LIVING 

JOHNNY J. MILLER, Chairman 

The State Council of Education approved this new certifi- 
cation in January 1948. The program is administered by the 
Department of Health and Physical Education for Men. The 
four courses below, Introduction to Safety Education, Driver 
Education, the Organization and Administration of Safety 
Education, and Methods and Materials in Safety Education in 
the Secondary Schools meet the requirements for certification 
with 12 semester hours. A temporary standard certificate is 
issued upon the completion of these courses and it becomes 
permanent after two years of successful experience in the field. 

HPe 251 Introduction to Safety Education 3 cr. 

HPe 252 Driver Education 3 cr. 

HPe 253 Methods and Materials in Safety Education in 

the Secondary Schools 3 cr. 

HPe 254 Organization and Administration of 

Safety Education 3 cr. 

See course descriptions listed under Health and Physical 
Education Department, on page 260. 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

FOR MEN 

JOHNNY J. MILLER, Chairman 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

FOR WOMEN 

C. ELIZABETH McCAULIFF, Chairman 

Students who elect the coeducationally oriented Health 
and Physical Education Curriculum pursue the general edu- 
cation program required of all students (52 semester hours). 
Upon the satisfactory completion of the preceding general 
education program, Professional Education requirements (23-24 
semester hours), Health and Physical Education Specialization 
requirements (45 semester hours) and free electives (7-8 
semester hours), the student will be granted the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Health Education by the University and 
will qualify for a Pennsylvania Provisional College Certificate 
in Health and Physical Education to be issued by the De- 
partment of Public Instruction in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 
This certificate will be valid for teaching health and physical 
education in any of the grades of the public schools of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

* Fee required approximately $7.00. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Candidates for the Health and Physical Education program 
at Indiana University of Pennsylvania must demonstrate 
acceptable intellectual competence and physical qualifications 
as well as desirable character and personality traits. The 
professional program seeks to foster those qualities of indi- 
vidual character and competence which are inherent in person- 
al and professional maturity. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 
MAJOR CURRICULUM SEQUENCE 

FIRST SEMESTER S.H. C.H. 

Eng 101 English I 

Biol 103 Biology I 

HPE 142 Intro, to H. P. E. R. 

MS 101 Military Science 

HPE 301 Tennis-Badminton 

HPE 261 Senior Life Saving 

or 
HPE 262 Water Safety Instructor's 
General Education Elective 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Eng 102 English II 

Biol 104 Biology II 

HPE 101 Personal-Community Health 

HPE 307 Rhythms, Movement 

MS 102 Military Science 

HPE 303 Bowling-Golf 

General Education Elective 

THIRD SEMESTER 

Sci 111 Science in Mod. Civilization 
Psy 201 General Psychology 
HPE 221 Human Anatomy 
HPE 231 Football- Volleyball 
HPE 212 Gymnastics-Tumbling 
General Education Elective 

17 23 

FOURTH SEMESTER S.H. C.H. 

Eng 201 Literature I 2 (2) 

or 
Eng 301 Literature II 
Ed Psy 302 Education Psychology 
Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II 
HPE 310 Archery-Fencing 
HPE 233 Basketball-Soccer 
HPE 332 Baseball-Resistive Exercise 
HPE 342 Analysis of Movement 
General Education 

17 23 



4 


(4) 


4 


(5) 


2 


(2) 


iy 2 


(3) 


i 


(3) 


i 


(2) 


i 


(2) 


3 


(3) 


16% 


23 


4 


(4) 


4 


(5) 


2 


(2) 


1 


(3) 


iy 2 


(3) 


i 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


16i/ 2 


23 


3 


(5) 


3 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


6 


(6) 



3 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


3 


(3) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 1S5 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Math 362 Prob. and Statistics 

Biol 151 Human Physiology 

HPE 441 Organization of Adm. P.E. 

HPE 321 Meth. Elem. H.P.E. 

HPE 333 Coaching: Football, Swimming 

Basketball 
Ed 302 History & Philosophy of Am. Ed. 
HPE 262 Water Safety Instructor 

or 
HPE 334 Sports Officiating 
HPE 305 Square-Folk Dance 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

HPE 341 Tests & Measurements H.P.E. 

HPE 343 Physiol, of Exercise 

HPE 344 Adapted Physical Education 

HPE 404 Org. & Adm. School Health Prog. 

HPE 318 Activity Intern. I 

HPE 432 Conducting Intramural & 

Interscholastic Programs 
HPE 345 Sports Injuries and First Aid 
HPE 335 Wrestling, Track & Field 

Free Elective 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 

HPE 346 First Aid Instructors 
HPE 442 Hist. & Phil of P.E. 
Ed 301 Audio-Visual Education 
HPE 408 Guided Research Prob. 

General Education Elective 

Free Elective 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 

Ed 421 Student Teaching 

Ed 422 Prof. Practicum & School Law 

14 
TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS 128 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 
MAJOR CURRICULUM SEQUENCE 

FIRST SEMESTER S.H. C.H. 

Eng 101 English I 

Biol 103 Biology I 

HPE 142 Intro, to H.P.E.R. 

HPE 102 Swimming-Tennis or 

Swimming-Badminton 
HPE 301 Tennis-Badminton 
HPE 302 Soccer-Basketball 

General Education Elective 

16 22 



3 
3 

2 
2 

1 


(3) 
(4) 
(2) 
(3) 
(3) 


3 

1 


(3) 
(3) 


1 
1 


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(2) 


16 


23 


3 

2 
2 
3 

1 
1 


(3) 
(2) 
(2) 
(3) 
(3) 
(2) 


1 
1 
1 


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(3) 
(2) 


15 


24 


3.H. 


C.H. 


1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
6 


(3) 
(2) 
(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
(6) 


16 


19 


12 
2 





4 


(4) 


4 


(5) 


2 


(2) 


1 


(2) 


I 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


3 


(3) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Eng 102 English II 

Biol 104 Biology II 

HPE 101 Personal-Community Health 

HPE 261 Senior Life Saving 

HPE 303 Bowling-Golf 

HPE 304 Volleyball-Softball 

HPE 307 Rhythms-Movement 

General Education Elective 



FIFTH SEMESTER 

Math 362 Prob. and Statistics 
Biol 151 Human Physiology 
HPE 441 Organization of Adm. P.E. 
Ed 302 Hist. & Phil, of Am. Ed. 
HPE 321 Meth. Elem. H.P.E. 
HPE 262 Water Safety Inst. 
HPE 311 Adv. Hockey-Volleyball 
HPE 316 Officiating I 



SIXTH SEMESTER 

HPE 341 Tests & Meas. H.P.E. 
HPE 343 Physiol, of Exercise 
HPE 344 Adapted P.E. 
HPE 404 Org. & Adm. Sch. Health Prog. 
HPE 312 Adv. Basketball-Gymnastics 
HPE 317 Officiating n 
HPE 318 Activity Intern. I 
Free Elective 



4 


(4) 


4 


(5) 


2 


(2) 


1 


(2) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


3 


(3) 



17 26 



3 


(5) 


3 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


6 


(6) 



THIRD SEMESTER S.H. C.H. 

Sci 111 Science of Mod. Civil. 
Psy 201 General Psychology 
HPE 221 Human Anatomy 
HPE 305 Square-Folk Dance 
HPE 306 Hockey-Tumbling 

General Education Elective 

17 23 

FOURTH SEMESTER 

Eng 201 Literature I 2 (2) 

or 
Eng 301 Literature II 
Psy 302 Educational Psychology 
Hist 104 Hist, of U.S. & Pa. 
HPE 308 Modern Dance 
HPE 309 Apparatus-Track & Field 
HPE 310 Archery-Fencing 
HPE 342 Analysis of Movement 

General Education Elective 



3 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


3 


(3) 


3 


(3) 



17 23 



3 


(3) 


3 


(4) 


2 


(2) 


3 


(3) 


2 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 



16 24 



3 


(3) 


2 


(2) 


2 


(2) 


3 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


1 


(3) 


2 


(2) 



15 21 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 187 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 


S.H. 


C.H. 


HPE 346 First Aid Instructor 
HPE 442 Hist. & Phil, of P.E. 
Ed 301 Audio-Visual Education 
HPE 406 Synchronized Swimming 


1 
2 
2 
2 


(3) 
(2) 
(3) 
(3) 


HPE 407 Advanced Modern Dance 






HPE 408 Guided Research Prob. 

General Education Elective 
Free Elective 


3 
6 


(3) 
(6) 



16 20 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 



Ed 421 Student Teaching 12 

Ed 422 Prof. Practicum & School Law 2 



14 



NURSING DEPARTMENT 

MARIAN A. MURRAY, Chairman 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with 
the Latrobe Area Hospital, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, has devel- 
oped a baccalaureate degree program in nursing initiated in 
September of 1968. This program meets all the requirements 
of the State Board of Nursing Examiners and the Department 
of Public Instruction. Graduates of the curriculum will be 
granted the degree, bachelor of science in nursing. 

The freshman and sophomore years will be devoted pri- 
marily to a general education curriculum on the Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania campus. A summer session plus 
the junior and senior years will be spent at the Latrobe Area 
Hospital. 

The dichotomous nature of a liberal-technical education 
is truly exemplified by the baccalaureate nursing program of- 
fered by the University. The curriculum has been designed to 
acquaint the prospective nurse with a broad background in 
general education coupled with the specialized knowledge and 
skills required for professional competency. The philosophy of 
this inter-relationship conceives of the professional nurse as a 
well-informed, well-adjusted, and socially conscious individ- 
ual desirous of ministering to human suffering. She possesses 
a keen sensitivity to the worth and dignity of human patients 
and views them as people instead of as problems to be solved. 
Additionally, she strives to practice within the professional 
code of nursing ethics, to interpret her profession to others, 
and to grow professionally by keeping abreast of current de- 
velopments. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



The educative functions through which the University- 
aims to achieve these objectives are the imparting and inte- 
grating of knowledge together with the mastery of problem 
solving techniques. The Department of Nursing endeavors to 
serve nursing students in residence, nursing alumni, nurses 
employed in hospitals and health agencies, schools of nursing, 
and the nursing profession, and to contribute to the improve- 
ment of nursing services at all levels. 

Both men and women are eligible to enroll in the nursing 
program. 



Nursing Curriculum" 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Sem. Hrs. 

Eng 101 English I 4 

Chem 101 Chemistry 3 

Psy 201 General Psychology 3 

Biol 103 Gen. Biology I 4 

HPe 102 Physical Education I 1 

15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Sem. Hrs. 

Eng 102 English II 4 

Chem 102 Chemistry 3 

Soc 151 Intro, to Sociology 3 

Biol 151 Physiology 3 

HPe 101 Health 2 



15 



* Curriculum subject to change on the recommendations of the University or Latrobe 
Area Hospital. 



THIRD SEMESTER 

Biol 361 Microbiology 3 

Intro, to Art, Music, Theater ... 3 
Hist 101 History of Civilization I . . . . 3 

Math 101 Foundations of Math 3 

HPe 203 Physical Education II 1 

Foreign Language or 
Psy 353 Child Psychology or 
SpE 215 Child Development or 
HE 218 Child Development 3 



in 



FOURTH SEMESTER 

HE 212 Nutrition 3 

Eng Literature I or II 2 

Hist 104 History of U.S. & Pa. II . . 3 

Phil 330 Philosophy of Science 3 

Foreign Language or 

Psy 452 Social Psychology 3 

Anth 110 Intro, to Anthropology .... 3 

17 



PRE-FIFTH SEMESTER 
(Summer Session — 10 wks.) 

S.H. 

Fundamentals of Nursing 6 

Foundations of Nursing 2 



FIFTH SEMESTER 
Nursing I — (Applied Sciences) 
Clinical Practicum — (Medical-Surgical) 
Introduction to Community Health 



SIXTH SEMESTER 
Nursing II — (Applied Sciences) 
Clinical Practicum — 

(Maternal & Child Health) 
Contemporary Trends in Nursing 



16 



SEVENTH SEMESTER 
Nursing III 
Clinical Practicum — 

(Psychiatric Nursing) 
Seminar in Nursing 



16 



EIGHTH SEMESTER 
Nursing IV 

Clinical Practicum — (Medical-Surgical) 
Seminar in Nursing 



16 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



THE DEPARTMENTS AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Department of Art and Art Education 

LAWRENCE F. McVITTY, Chairman of Department 



BARBARA J. BALSIGER 
VAUGHN H. CLAY, JR. 
ROBERT J. CRONAUER 
ANTHONY G. DeFURIO 
THOMAS J. DONGILLA 
JOHN J. DROPCHO 
ROBERT W. HAMILTON 
JAMES M. INNES 



GEORGE B. JOHNSON 
JOANNE P. LOVETTE 
BENJAMIN- T. MILLER 
RALPH W. REYNOLDS 
FRANK ROSS 
ROBERT C. SEELHORST 
JEAN J. SLENKER 
ROBERT E. SLENKER 
ROBERT J. VISLOSKY 



<S 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

ART IN GENERAL EDUCATION 

Art 101 Introduction to Art (elective for all students) 3 cr. 
Studies in the understanding and enjoyment of the visual 
arts as modes of expression, feeling, and communication make 
up the content of this course. Reproductions, demonstrations, 
slides, moving pictures as well as field trips to see original 
works of art, are used in sampling our cultural heritage. 

Art 115 Art History I 3 cr. 

The visual arts are examined as modes of expression in 
relation to the life of the individual in the home and in the 
community. The period covered is from Prehistoric times to 
the Renaissance. 

Art 116 Art History II 3 cr. 

This is a combination of Art History in which appreciation 
and critical judgment of old and modern masterpieces are 
goals. The relation of art to the world from the Renaissance 
to the 20th Century is presented. A brief survey of modern art 
is presented in the latter part of the course. 



CORE SEQUENCE COURSES 

These courses are lower level courses which are prerequi- 
site to upper level courses. 

Art 111 Drawing I (Drawing in All Media) 2 cr. 

A foundation course in drawing which includes a study 
of perspective light and shadow and composition with a variety 
of media and subject matter. 

Art 112 Drawing II (Composition and Figure Drawing) 2 cr. 

Figure construction, anatomy, and life drawing are stu- 
died. Included are pictorial design and composition. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Art 113 Design I (Color and Design) 2 cr. 

Basic elements and principles of design and color are stu- 
died. Problems in two and three dimensional design are com- 
pleted. 

Art 114 Design II (Design in Volume and Space) 2 cr. 

This course provides the student with a wide variety of 
experiences in three dimensional design using various mate- 
rials. Form, volume, and space are considered in different ma- 
terials and in their relationship to sculpture, architecture, and 
the crafts. The emphasis is on experimentation with materials 
and ideas. 

Art 211 Painting I (Water Color and Mixed Media) 2 cr. 

The course is primarily concerned with transparent water 
color painting but includes gouache and mixed media. Work 
begins with a study of brush strokes and realistic on-the-spot 
painting and progresses through creative realism, semi-abstract 
and non-figurative approaches. 

Art 212 Painting II (Oil Color and Mixed Media) 2 cr. 

This is a beginning course in painting with opaque plastic 
media. The student is introduced to the technical as well as 
the aesthetic and philosophical basis of painting through a 
creative approach to the design possibilities inherent in these 
plastic materials and their associated uses in processes. 

Art 213 Crafts I (Crafts in Metal and Wood) 2 cr. 

In this course the student is given an opportunity to de- 
velop his design awareness through experiencing those craft 
processes associated with wood and metal. Hand and power 
tools are used to experiment with these materials in discover- 
ing inherent design and construction possibilities. 

Art 214 Ceramics I (Pottery and Ceramics) 2 cr. 

The basic processes of wheel throwing, hand building, 
decoration, and ceramic sculpture will be introduced. Earthen- 
ware glazes will be dealt with and color tested in relation to 
their use in classroom situations. 

Art 215 Sculpture I (Modeling and Sculpture) 2 cr. 

The student develops personal expression while acquiring 
a knowledge of form as related to the figure. The emphasis 
will be placed on clay modeling of the human figure. In ad- 
dition basic carving processes in both stone and wood will be 
explored. 

Art 216 Metalry (Jewelry) 2 cr. 

The designing and creating of handwrought, decorative 
objects using gemstone, ivory, enamels, wood and nonferrous 
metals is approached from the viewpoint of the beginning 
craftsman learning the basic processes of metal fabrication. 
Jewelry making, the lapidary arts and beginning metal-smith- 
ing are experienced. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 191 

Art 217 Printmaking I (Graphic Arts) 2 cr. 

The basic techniques of graphic expression will be studied. 
They will include: relief, intaglio, lithograph, and serigraph 
prints. 

Art 218 Graphic Design I 

(Lettering, Commercial Art and Illustration) 2 cr. 

Layouts are analyzed as to their quality. The students 
explore various techniques and how they can be translated 
into commercial art work, package design, trademark and 
other design problems are confronted. Lettering is stressed, 
both instant type and hand lettering. 

Art 220 Mechanical Drawing and Industrial Design 2 cr. 

The principles and methods of instrumental drawing and 
shape description are studied in theory and in practice. Mod- 
ern industrial design practices are studied through the plan- 
ning and building of three dimensional products. 

Art 311 Painting III 2 cr. 

Students are given the opportunity for more individual 
growth in their creative and expressive ability through paint- 
ing. Experiences are offered in the transparent and opaque 
qualities of oil, synthetic and water base media. 

Art 312 Ceramics II 2 cr. 

The basic processes will be explored in greater depth and 
with more individual latitude. Firing techniques and the for- 
mulation and testing of stoneware glazes will take place. 

Art 313 Sculpture II 2 cr. 

An extension of sculpture I. The student explores carving 
processes in greater depth. A construction approach to sculp- 
ture will begin so that all students will experience both the 
additive and subtractive approaches to sculpture. 

Art 314 Costume and Theatre Arts 2 cr. 

Color and design are used to solve problems in school and 
college dramatics and pageantry. Theory and practice in the 
design, construction, painting of scenery, lighting, costume, 
and properties are basic experiences. 

Art 315 Printmaking II 2 cr. 

The basic techniques of graphic expression will be ex- 
panded to provide the student with a wider range of possibili- 
ties within the techniques of printmaking. 

Art 316 Metalry II — Enameling and Raising (Jewelry) 2 cr. 

Further exploration of the metal arts processes are ex- 
perienced in this course. Advanced silver-smithing, casting in 
metal and enameling on metal are basic processes attempted 
by the student craftsman. 



192 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Art 321 Drawing III 2 cr. 

This is an advanced course in drawing designed to meet 
the problems of the student who has some background in the 
field. Problems of composition, two and three dimensional re- 
lationships, and surface will be discussed on an individual 
basis in conjunction with the use of traditional subjects such 
as landscape and the figure. 

Art 410 Primitive and Pre-Greek 3 cr. 

A survey of the painting, architecture and sculpture of 
Prehistoric Man, Egypt and the Near East as well as the Art of 
Primitive Man of later times — The American Indian, African 
Art and the Art of Oceania. The course will also include ma- 
terial on ceramics, and the decorative arts of these people as 
a part of their cultural expression. 

Art 411 Art History III 2 cr. 

The great revolutionary movements which began about 
1850 and the trends of contemporary arts are vital to the art 
students of today. This course completes the sequence in the 
History of Art through the ages. 

Art 413 Seminar in Art 2 cr. 

In the course the theoretical background of the arts are 
studied. The historical, sociological, and formal approaches to 
the arts are examined with a particular emphasis on the visual 
arts. This course is a survey of speculative aspect of the arts, 
and the relation of the arts to life. 

Art 415 Crafts II (Fabrics) 2 cr. 

An experience in traditional and experimental techniques 
of handling the loom. A study of weaving and related pro- 
cesses in fabrics with emphasis on the artistic and design as- 
pects. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COURSES 

Art 317 Arts and Crafts in Elementary Education 2 cr. 

This course is designed to help the future art teacher 
understand the aesthetic and creative development of elemen- 
tary school children. Art education is studied as a process 
which helps develop the total growth of the child, and his art 
products are evaluated by this criterion. Art programs, plan- 
ning, and motivation are studied critically. Experience is giv- 
en with two dimensional materials as they apply to the ele- 
mentary level. 

Art 318 Arts and Crafts in Secondary Education 2 cr. 

(This course is a prerequisite to student teaching) 
The relationship of art education to the total secondary 
curriculum is studied to determine the goals of junior-senior 
high school art. The adolescent and his creative products are 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 193 

analyzed to help the prospective art teacher to identify him- 
self with the problems of his students. Emphasis is placed upon 
the concept of the adolescent's waning self-confidence in his 
creative expression and his dire need of aesthetic experiences 
help reorient himself. 

Art 319 Teaching Seminar in Elementary Art Education 1 cr. 

Art 320 Teaching Seminar in Secondary Art Education 1 cr. 

These courses are for the practical application of class- 
room theory involving children and youth. The concern is with 
development, use and evaluation of contemporary teaching 
methods. Art 317 and 319, and Art 318 and 320 are related 
courses and should be scheduled concurrently. All four courses 
are prerequisites for student teaching. 

Ed 421 Art Student Teaching and 
Directed Student Activities 12 cr. 

Here the prospective art teacher is given many opportuni- 
ties, under capable supervision, to guide the creative efforts 
of students at all age levels in the primary, elementary, junior, 
and senior high schools. Current philosophies of general and 
art education are applied in a practical teaching situation. Em- 
phasis is placed on the creative growth of teacher and pupil. 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum (including School Law) 2 cr. 

Consideration is given to recent education trends and 
methods, art curricula, and to planning of art courses for all 
grade levels. Practicum also includes professional readings, 
discussions, observations, and the accumulation and organiza- 
tion of pertinent teaching materials. 

ELECTIVES IN THE ART CURRICULUM 

With the foundations already established in three years 
of college art work the student may elect advanced courses. 
The work will be mainly individual, experimental, and in 
depth, with the aim of helping the student to make the tran- 
sition from the position of student in the college classroom 
with directed studies to the position of artist. These studio 
workshop courses will stress advanced techniques in the par- 
ticular field of study. 

Art 451 Crafts III (Advanced Crafts) 2 cr. 

This course is designed to have the student explore the 
crafts area in depth. The design and construction of functional 
objects will be undertaken with emphasis on innovation. 

Art 452 Ceramics III (Advanced Ceramics) 2 cr. 

In this course individual long range problems in ceramic 
art and decoration will be undertaken to foster student com- 
petence in the field. 



194 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Art 453 Sculpture III (Advanced Sculpture) 2 cr. 

This course is designed to give the student the opportunity 
to pursue independent study in sculpture. The materials and 
processes will be of his choosing and the work related to his 
own concepts with the hope that these concepts will be broad- 
ened. 

Art 454 Painting IV (Advanced Painting) 2 cr. 

Individual experimentation and exploration by the student 
painter are encouraged in this course. Investigation of the 
various technical approaches from the era of the masters to 
those used by contemporary artists is encouraged. Students 
are helped to discover their individually unique method of 
self expression. 

Art 455 Graphic Design II (Advanced Commercial Art) 2 cr. 

This course stresses advanced techniques in layout and 
illustration. The student explores ideas, such as invention of 
trademarks and how products are brought about. Layouts are 
analyzed as to their quality. Package design is studied. 

Art 457 Printmaking III (Advanced Graphic Art) 2 cr. 

The student will elect to study the print in greater depth. 
He will concentrate his interest in two of four basic print- 
making processes. He will work toward development of his 
own techniques and working processes. 

Art 458 Architecture and Home Planning 2 cr. 

This course is designed for the student who wishes to ex- 
plore basic ideas in home planning and architecture through 
studio experience, and a study of architectural history. The 
emphasis is upon building in the United States and contem- 
porary houses. 

Art 459 Advanced Fabrics 2 cr. 

Advanced study in areas of construction, decoration, and 
use of textiles constitutes this course. Weaving, hooking, batik, 
silk screen, block printing, applique and stitchery will be 
techniques available to students. 

Art 460 Advanced Metalry (Advanced Jewelry) 2 cr. 

Design and the processes associated with the art of metal- 
ry are given greater concentration. The developing craftsman 
is encouraged to investigate, in depth, one or more of the 
metal arts as an extension of the basic courses. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

Art 330 Arts and Crafts for the Mentally Retarded 3 cr. 

The materials and processes of arts and crafts are studied 
for opportunities they offer in the training, therapy and edu- 
cation of students who are mentally retarded, crippled, or 
need special help for any reason. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 196 

HE 213 Principles of Design 2 cr. 

Principles of design and color are studied and applied to 
a crafted object. The major emphasis is on the aesthetic qual- 
ity inherent in designing with materials. 

El 213 Art for Elementary Grades 2 cr. 

The creative growth and development of children is stu- 
died. Students are given experiences in the basic art materials 
and media, as well as opportunity to plan art motivation for 
children. The course requires that the student attend one lec- 
ture session and two studio sessions per week. 

El 214 Teaching Art in Elementary Grades 3 cr. 

This course provides the student with a wide variety of 
two and three dimensional art experiences with the emphasis 
on a developmental sequence from simple to more complex 
variations of a craft. Emphasis is placed on the creative chal- 
lenges of the art experience. 



196 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

FRANCIS W. LIEGEY, Chairman 



ROBERT K. ALICO 
♦FRANK T. BAKER 
THOMAS E. CONWAY 
MICHAEL R. CHARNEGO 
GARY M. FERRENCE 
WALTER W. GALLATI 
LOUIS L. GOLD 
DONALD E. HOFFMASTER 
LEON J. HUE 
JAN HUMPHREYS 
ROBERT E. MERRITT 
* On leave of absence. 



JAMES H. MILLER 
JERRY LEE PICKERING 
GOULD F. SCHROCK 
ARTHUR G. SHIELDS 
DWIGHT E. SOLLBERGER 
MARTIN L. STAPLETON 
RICHARD M. STRAWCUTTER 
HENRY H. VALLOWE 
RICHARD F. WAECHTER 
WILLIAM M. WASKOSKIE 
CYRIL J. ZENISEK 



GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

Biol 103 General Biology I 4 cr. 

This course deals with the principles of biology. Topics 
include cellular structure and physiology, growth and repair, 
reproduction and development, control, sources of food energy, 
inheritance, and man's interrelationship with his biological 
environment. The classification of plants and animals is re- 
viewed briefly. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory. 

Biol 104 General Biology II 4 cr. 

Prerequisite: General Biology I. 

A continuation of General Biology I. Three hours lecture 
and two hours laboratory. 

Sci 111 Science in Modern Civilization 3 cr. 

This course is designed to acquaint the secondary student 
with some of the major discoveries of science in all fields and 
the effects of discoveries upon man's way of life. Emphasis is 
placed upon developing an understanding of science and its 
implications. Discoveries leading to more abundant supplies 
of energy, discoveries contributing to better health and longer 
life ,more rapid transportation, to a more abundant and better 
food supply, better housing, better clothing and to greater de- 
structive potential are some of the topics developed. 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE COURSES 



3 cr. 



Biol 111 Botany I 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

Botany I is primarily a study of the flowering plants. 
Topics include the anatomy and life processes of plant cells, 
leaves, stem, roots, flowers, seeds, and fruits. The economic 
importance of plants used by man and the recognition and 
classification of the seed plants in the immediate environment 
of the university are included. Two hours lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 197 

Biol 112 Botany II 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. Two hours lecture 
and three hours laboratory per week. 

Botany II is concerned primarily with the non-flowering 
plants. It considers both the anatomy and life processes of 
selected algae, bacteria, fungi, mosses, ferns, and their allies. 
The economic importance and health implications of certain of 
these groups are emphasized. The recognition and classifica- 
tion of the non-flowering plants of the immediate surround- 
ings are stressed. 

Biol 121 Zoology I 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

This is a study of the life history, habits, origin, develop- 
ment, physiology and anatomy of the main phyla of inverte- 
brates. A phylogenetic sequence is followed to show interre- 
lationships among the phyla. The student becomes acquainted 
with the many invertebrate species found locally. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 122 Zoology II 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. Two hours lecture 
and three hours laboratory per week. 

This course is a study of the chordata in general, and more 
particularly the classes of vertebrates. Topics studied include 
the anatomy, physiology, origin, development, and life history 
of representative members of each class. Special attention is 
given to the vertebrates found in the vicinity of the university. 

Biol 251 Field Botany 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

This is a course in the taxonomy of the vascular plants of 
the region. It includes the ferns, fern allies, shrubs, trees and 
herbaceous plants. The use of the standard manuals for the 
identification of plant materials is stressed. Students are re- 
quired to make collections for their future use. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 252 Field Zoology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

Field Zoology is a course in the study of animals in the 
field; the collection of such forms, and the preparation and 
utilization of them for museum and instructional purposes. 
Students are required to make collections for their future use. 
Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. Field 
trips are required. 

Biol 261 Ornithology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 
Ornithology is a study of the birds of the region supple- 
mented by a review of the major orders of birds of the west- 



198 INDIA NA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

ern hemisphere. Indoor studies of skins are made during the 
early part of the course, while the latter part of the course is 
largely field work. Early morning field trips are required. Two 
hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 262 Entomology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

This is an introduction to the orders of insects, considering 
their characteristics, habits, and economic relations, together 
with the collecting and identifying of representative forms 
from Western Pennsylvania. Two hours lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 263 Genetics 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student an under- 
standing of the laws of inheritance as they operate in plants, 
animals, and humans. Cell structure, mendelian inheritance, 
eugenics, linkage, probability, crossing over, and random as- 
sortment are considered. Two hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory per week. 

Biol 271 Evolution 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

This course deals with the principles of organic evolution. 
Various lines of evidence for evolution are studied as well as 
the operational mechanisms involved which have resulted in 
present-day organisms. Consideration is given to the origin 
and phylogenetic relationships of biologic groups. The histori- 
cal development of evolutionary thought is also considered. 
Three hours lecture per week. 

Biol 272 Conservation of Plant and Animal Resources 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

In this course special attention is devoted to a study of 
accepted practices in soil, water, forest, and game conserva- 
tion. Numerous local and state conservation specialists are 
called in to assist in the discussion of the specialized fields of 
conservation. Field work is an essential part of the course. 
Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 281 Parasitology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Zoology I. 

An introductory course which covers the parasitic proto- 
zoa, flatworms, and roundworms. Major emphasis is placed 
upon species infesting man and includes their structure, physi- 
ology, ecology, life cycles, pathogenicity and treatment. Labor- 
atory work includes some dissection of vertebrate hosts and 
fixing, staining and mounting of any parasites recovered. Ar- 
thropods involved in parasite transmission are also included. 
Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 199 

Biol 285 Biotechniques 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II; General Chemis- 
try I and II. 

Through laboratory work, student will gain manipulative 
skills and allied information pertaining to techniques frequent- 
ly used by biologists. Major consideration will be given to 
microscope slide preparation with lesser emphasis on special- 
ized microscopy and the use of various instruments. Two com- 
bined lecture /laboratory sessions of three hours each. 

Biol 331 Embryology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Zoology II. Two hours lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. 

A course in the development of vertebrates as exemplified 
in the frog, chick, and pig. Major emphasis is placed on the 
chick. The sequence of maturation, fertilization, cleavage, gas- 
trulation and origin of organs is traced. 

Biol 332 Comparative Anatomy 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Zoology II. Embryology is desirable. Three 
combined lecture /laboratory sessions of two hours each. 

This course provides the student with a comparative study 
of the shark, Necturus and cat. Each system is studied in all 
three forms concurrently providing a true comparison. Addi- 
tional vertebrate forms are included in the lecture material. 

Biol 341 General Physiology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II and General 
Chemistry I and II. 

This course deals first with an exposition of the basic con- 
cepts as they apply to the structure of cells and their activi- 
ties. This is followed by a consideration of the manipulation of 
energy — of chemical concentration, of electrical potential, of 
mechanical energy, and of radiant energy — in the cell and or- 
ganism. Finally, the problems associated with growth and re- 
production and the factors involved in the integration of the 
organisms are considered. Two hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory. 

Biol 351 Plant Physiology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Botany I. Two hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory per week. 

This course studies the physiological processes occurring 
in plants. The phenomena of imbibition, osmosis, digestion, 
photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration and mineral nutrition 
are considered in relation to the growth and development of 
the plant. 

Biol 352 Animal Physiology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Zoology I and II. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory per week. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student a general 
background of how animals carry on their bodily processes 



200 INDIAN A UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

and a more detailed knowledge of human physiology. Related 
anatomy is taught as needed. 

Biol 361 Microbiology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II, General Chemis- 
try I and II, Organic Chemistry I. Two hours lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. 

This course is a study of microscopic forms of life, both 
plant and animal, which are commonly encountered in biologi- 
cal work. Some emphasis is placed on the study of disease- 
producing species of man and his domesticated animals. Meth- 
ods of culturing forms used in high school teaching are studied. 

Biol 362 Ecology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Biology I and II. 

This is a study of the interrelations and adaptations of 
plants, and animals and includes consideration of physical as 
well as biotic environmental factors. Field trips are taken to 
study various types of ecologic situations. Two hours lecture 
and three hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 371 Vertebrate Anatomy 3 cr. 

A study of the anatomical organization of the vertebrate 
animal. The cat is used as the subject for a detailed laboratory 
dissection. Prerequisite: Zoology II. Two hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 372 Plant Anatomy 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Botany I. Two hours lecture and three hours 
laboratory work per week. 

The embryological development and the growth and mat- 
uration of typical vascular plants will be studied. Emphasis is 
placed on the differentiation and maturation of the root, stem, 
leaf and flower among representatives of various plant fam- 
ilies. 

Biol 381 Mycology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Botany II, Microbiology or consent of in- 
structor. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the 
study of the fungi. Myxomycetes and Eumycophyta including 
the classes Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, and 
Fungi Imperfecti will be studied. Emphasis will be given to 
those organisms which are of economic importance as casual 
organisms of disease in plants and animals. The investigation 
will introduce taxonomy, morphology, physiology and ecology 
of the fungi. Techniques of isolation, growth in pure culture, 
and identification will be stressed. 

Biol 472 Radiation Biology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Two years of biology, Physics I-II, Chemis- 
try I-II. Additional chemistry through organic and biological 
chemistry strongly recommended. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 201 

Basic aspects of nuclear physics, the phenomena of radio- 
active isotopes and the biological effects of such isotopes. Con- 
current laboratory work utilizing instruments for detection 
and measurement of radioactive nuclids used in biological ex- 
perimentation. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per 
week. 

Biol 490 Biology Seminar 1-3 cr. 

The seminar is a discussion of recent trends in biological 
thought and research. Students report on assigned readings 
and /or personal research. An occasional outside speaker may 
summarize his research findings or lecture in his area of 
specialization. 

Biol 498 Problems in Biology 1-3 cr. 

A course in which the student may independently investi- 
gate any field of biology in which he is interested. This work 
is supervised by a faculty member but does not involve regu- 
lar class or laboratory hours. The student should expect to 
spend three hours per week for each credit earned. 

Biol 499 Research Biology 3 cr. 

A course designed to acquaint the undergraduate student 
with the techniques of modern research by actively engaging 
in a program of biological experimentation and /or research. 
Students will work in close harmony with the faculty member 
(or members) engaged in an active research project. There are 
no formal lectures or laboratories and a broad biological back- 
ground is required. Enrollment is by permission only. 

COURSE REQUIRED OF EDUCATION MAJORS 
IN THE VARIOUS FIELDS OF SCIENCE 

Ed 451 Teaching Science in the Secondary School 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: 12 hours of work in major field. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory work per week. 

This course is planned to give the science major a thorough 
background in the problems of teaching science. The objectives 
of science programs in secondary schools, selection of text- 
books, sources of suitable literature, how to secure materials 
for instruction, the preparation of units, and special techniques 
are studied. 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR STUDENTS IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Biol 311 Environmental Biology 4 cr. 

This is a laboratory and field course that provides the stu- 
dent with basic knowledge in biology as well as some practical 
aspects that can be used and applied in the elementary school. 
The physical and biological aspects of the environment con- 
stitute the main theme of the course. Offered on the block 
only. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



El 312 Teaching of Elementary Science 3 cr. 

The fundamental areas of physics and chemistry are cov- 
ered in this course. Student participation is fundamental to 
their understanding of the basic principles that can be trans- 
ferred to the elementary classroom, and to their familiariza- 
tion with scientific equipment. The latter part of the course is 
devoted to a survey of the biological environment and con- 
tinues the work begun in Elementary Science. 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR STUDENTS IN 
HOME ECONOMICS 

Biol 151 Human Physiology 3 cr. 

Functions of various tissues, organs and systems of mam- 
mals as applied to the human organism. Recommended for 
home economics, physical therapy and medical technology stu- 
dents. Not open to biology majors. Two hours lecture, two 
hours laboratory per week. 

Biol 361 Microbiology (Sanitation) 3 cr. 

This course is a study of microscopic forms of life, both 
plant and animal, which are commonly encountered in biologi- 
cal work. Some emphasis is placed on the study of disease- 
producing species of man and his domesticated animals. Meth- 
ods of culturing forms used in high school teaching are stud- 
ied. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



203 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

ALBERT E. DRUMHELLER, Dean 



LEE ROY H. BEAUMONT, JR. 
JAMES F. CAWLEY 
CHARLES L. COOPER 
ROBERT H. DOERR 
ROBERT D. DOUGLASS 
FRANK GHESSIE 
ELSIE M. HILEMAN 
H. FOSTER HILL 
DONALD C. MAHAN 
A. RICHARD McCLURE 
BERNARD A. MOREAU 
RALPH A. NITTINGER 



PATRICIA PATTERSON 
DENTON F. PILLION 
MARK A. PLIVELIC 
JOHN POLESKY 
MARY REOUPERO 
ARLENE RISHER 
LESLIE S. SPENCER 
CHARLES B. STEVENSON 
JAMES K. STONER 
BEATRICE F. THOMAS 
HAROLD W. THOMAS 
DALE WOOMER 



The courses listed below (prefix Bus) are available to 
students in the Business Education Department, the Distribu- 
tive Education Department, and the Business Management De- 
partment. Students in the School of Business should refer to 
the specific course requirements of their respective depart- 
ment (BE — Business Education, DE — Distributive Education, 
and BM — Business Management) shown on the following 
pages. 

Bus 101 Business Organization and Management 3 cr. 

This introductory course is an overview of the major as- 
pects of business and business management. The interrelated 
activities of a business firm are integrated through the major 
functions of management: planning, organizing, directing, and 
controlling. Emphasis is placed upon principles, practices, and 
methods common to most business firms in a private enter- 
prise system. 

Bus 131 Principles of Typewriting 2 cr. 

For those persons who have had instruction in this area, 
a test is given and exemption from taking the course granted 
if course standards are met. 

This introductory course places emphasis on the develop- 
ment of correct techniques in typewriting. The student is in- 
troduced to the basic styles of business letters, simple tabula- 
tions, and simple manuscripts. Individual remedial work is 
given. Specific standards of speed and accuracy are required. 

Bus 132 Intermediate Typewriting 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 131 with a grade of "C" or better or 
credit by examination. 

This course emphasizes the further development of speed, 
accuracy and production ability. Work includes business letters 
with special features, technical papers, business reports, busi- 
ness forms, rough drafts, manuscripts, liquid and stencil dupli- 
cation. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Bus 221 Introduction to Accounting 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: BM 111 or BE 111. 

This is the first course in this area and a prerequisite. Its 
purpose is to introduce the students to the keeping of records 
for service and professional establishments as well as mercan- 
tile enterprises involving the single proprietor. Emphasis is 
placed upon the distinction between keeping records on the 
cash basis as compared to the accrual basis. Consideration is 
given to special journals, the combined-cash journal, auxiliary 
records, and business papers. 

Bus 233 Marketing 3 cr. 

A study of the system of interacting business activities 
necessary to the planning, pricing, promoting, and placing of 
want-satisfying goods and services for use by household con- 
sumers and industrial users. Concepts and principles will be 
analyzed in order to give a basic understanding of the market- 
ing system and its significance today. 

Bus 235 Business Law I 3 cr. 

This course deals with the nature of law and the agencies 
and procedures for its enforcement, contracts, agency employ- 
ment, negotiable instruments, property, bailments and trans- 
portation. The aim is to apply principles of law to everyday 
life and to establish proper interests, ideals and attitude to- 
ward law as a means of economic and social control. 

Bus 251 Intermediate Accounting 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 221. 

Special consideration is given in connection with accruals 
and deferred items; the significance and handling of valuation 
accounts and the interpretation of the effect of all types of 
transactions on the operation of the business are stressed 
throughout the course. Special attention is given to the vouch- 
er system and to the preparation of columnar records for dif- 
ferent types of business along with the preparation and inter- 
pretation of comparative financial reports. Emphasis is placed 
on payroll accounting, the organization, operation, and dissolu- 
tion of partnerships. 

Bus 261 Shorthand Theory 3 cr. 

This is an introductory course in the basic principles of 
Gregg Shorthand, Diamond Jubilee. 

Bus 262 Shorthand Dictation 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 261. 

There are three major objectives for this course: to review 
and strengthen the student's knowledge of the principles of 
Gregg Shorthand, Diamond Jubilee, to build shorthand-writing 
speed, and to build transcription skill. 



INDIANA UNI VERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 206 

Bus 271 Advanced Typewriting 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: An average of "C" or better in Bus 131 and 
Bus 132. 

Emphasis is placed upon the further development of speed, 
accuracy and production ability. Practical office typing is 
stressed. Work assignments include advanced letter forms, 
legal documents, statistical reports and tables and manu- 
scripts. Students will become acquainted with auxiliary office 
machines that require typing ability. Machines such as the 
Vari-typer and offset duplicator may be included. 

Bus 321 Business Communications 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: "C" average in English 101 and 102. 

This course stresses the improvement of grammar and 
punctuation and helps students build their vocabularies. It is 
designed to develop skill in the writing of several kinds of 
business letters and reports, as well as application letters and 
data sheets. 

Bus 331 Sales and Retailing 3 cr. 

This course comprises a survey and analysis of the fields 
of retailing. A study is made of textile and non-textile mer- 
chandise, requirements for sales personnel, types of customers, 
merchandising plans and procedures, merchandise pricing and 
selling techniques. 

Bus 332 Retail Management 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Bus 331, or Bus 333, or Bus 233. 

This course is an advanced study of the units of Sales and 
Retailing, and includes a study of merchandising control, stock 
planning, buying, pricing, personnel training, store layout and 
equipment, retail advertising and display. Suggested public 
relations activities are practiced in this course. 

Bus 333 Principles of Selling 3 cr. 

Techniques of successful selling are studied and practices. 
Topics covered include the selection of prospects, the sales 
approach, determining customer needs, the sales presentation, 
overcoming objections of the customers, closing the sale and 
suggestion selling. Sales demonstrations incorporating audio- 
visual aids will be a part of the course. 

Bus 335 Office Machines 2 cr. 

This course covers the various fundamentals of operating 
office machines — rotary, key driven, and printing calculators; 
key punch; dictating and transcribing machines; bookkeeping 
machines. It includes instruction in records management. 

Bus 336 Business Law II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 235. 

The basic aim of this course is the same as that stated for 
Business Law I. Attention is given to kinds of business organ- 
izations, sales, insurance, surety and guaranty, leases and mort- 
gages, trust and estates, bankruptcy, business torts and crimes. 



206 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA 

Bus 339 Business Data Processing 3 cr. 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the de- 
velopment of Business Data Processing Systems, numbering 
systems, and data representation. A study will be made of all 
types of input, processing, and output equipment for off line as 
well as on line computing equipment. The student will com- 
plete exercises in flow charting and computer programming. 

Bus 352 Corporate Accounting 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 251. 

This course is a continued study of the financial principles 
and practices of accounting with emphasis on the character- 
istics, records, and financial reports of corporations. 

The following topics are included: corporate capital, de- 
preciation, revaluation of plant and equipment, intangibles, 
inventory valuation, cash and temporary investments, and 
receivables. 

Bus 353 Cost Accounting 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 352. 

Basic theory and procedures for determining unit cost of 
production and cost control involving material, labor, and 
manufacturing expenses in job-order and process cost sys- 
tems. The costing of joint and by-products and estimated cost 
systems is also considered. 

Bus 363 Transcription 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 262. 

This course develops additional speed in taking dictation 
with much emphasis placed on the development of transcrip- 
tion skill. 

Bus 364 Secretarial Office Practice 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 363. 

This course is an advanced study of the theory and the 
practice in activities common to the office — handling the mail, 
telegraphic services, shipping services, meeting callers, various 
business reports, financial and legal duties, transcription, secre- 
tarial standards; personality, reference books, itineraries, prep- 
aration of documents, editing, etc. 

Bus 454 Federal Taxes 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 352. 

This course is designed to enable the students to gain a 
familiarity with the Federal Income Tax Laws as they pertain 
to individuals, single proprietorships and partnerships. The 
Social Security Tax Law will also be considered as a phase of 
this course. In addition to studying the Internal Revenue Code 
in connection with the above topics, problems will be con- 
sidered which involve the use of the different forms that are 
necessary in tax accounting. The case method is utilized in 
the study of this subject. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA 207 

Bus 455 Auditing 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 353. 

A general review of the qualifications, duties, responsi- 
bilities, and professional ethics of auditors. A study of auditing 
theory and the practical application of auditing standards and 
procedures to the verification of accounts and financial state- 
ments; working papers; and audit reports. 



BUSINESS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

JAMES K. STONER, Chairman 

Required Courses For All Business Education Students 

Bus 101 Business Organization and Management 

(see description on page 202) 3 cr. 

BE 111 Foundations of Mathematics (Business) 3 cr. 

This is a review of the fundamental processes with em- 
phasis on speed and accuracy through adequate drill and prac- 
tical application in the handling of the fundamental business 
operations. Topics considered which especially concern busi- 
ness are the 60-day 6 per cent method of computing interest; 
compound interest; bank, cash, and trade discounts; and par- 
tial payments. 

Bus 131 Principles of Typewriting 

(see description on page 202) 2 cr. 

Bus 132 Intermediate Typewriting 

(see description on page 202) 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 131. 

BE 212 Business Mathematics II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: BE 111. 

The purpose of this course is to teach students to apply 
principles of business mathematics with speed and accuracy 
in solving advanced problems encountered by the businessman 
and the consumer. The mathematics of production, marketing, 
accounting, finance, and management correlate with the ac- 
counting courses. 

Bus 221 Introduction to Accounting 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 235 Business Law I (see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 251 Intermediate Accounting 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 221 and a "C" average in BE 111, BE 212, 
and English. 



208 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Bus 271 Advanced Typewriting 

(see description on page 204) 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 132. 

BE 311 Methods of Teaching Business Courses 3 cr. 

This course includes methods of teaching general business 
courses, as well as shorthand, typewriting, and bookkeeping. 
Unit plans, demonstrations, and lesson planning are empha- 
sized. Aims, techniques, and procedures of teaching, grade 
placement of subjects and classroom management are con- 
sidered items of the course. All courses in the student's major 
area along with the two psychology courses must have been 
cleared before this course is taken. 

BE 312 Evaluative Techniques in Business Courses 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: BE 311. 

This course includes the construction, administration, scor- 
ing, treatment, and grading of various type tests. The analysis 
of test results, remedial teaching and retesting, the evaluation 
of tests, all tied together in the psychological foundation of 
good methods as they function in the field of Business Educa- 
tion. 

Bus 321 Business Communications 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: "C" average in Eng 101 and 102. 

Bus 331 Sales and Retailing (see description on page 204) 3 cr. 
Bus 335 Office Machines (see description on page 204) 2 cr. 

Bus 336 Business Law II (see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 235. 

Bus 339 Business Data Processing 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Courses Required in the Stenographic Sequence 

Bus 261 Shorthand Principles 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 262 Shorthand Dictation 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

(see description on page ) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 261. 

Bus 363 Transcription (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 262. 

Bus 364 Secretarial Office Practice 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 363. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 209 



Courses Required in the Accounting Sequence 

Bus 352 Corporate Accounting 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 251. 

Bus 353 Cost Accounting (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 352. 

Bus 454 Federal Taxes (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 352. 

Courses Required in the Retailing Sequence 

Bus 251 Intermediate Accounting 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 332 Retail Management 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Bus 331, or Bus 333, Bus 233. 

BE 433 Retail Practice 6 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 332. 

This is a practical course of cooperative part-time training 
in the retail establishments of Indiana. The student spends 
a minimum of 15 clock hours per week for a semester in 
actual retail work at which time he puts into practice the 
theories of retailing studied in previous courses. This course 
may be taken by the student in or near his home town during 
the summer term by special arrangement and provided the 
distance is no greater than sixty miles from Indiana. Each of 
these plans is under the close supervision of store officials and 
the university. 

Courses Required in the Data Processing Sequence 

Math 101 Foundation of Mathematics (Computer) 

(see description on page 284) 3 cr. 

Bus 339 Business Data Processing 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Math 461 Computer Math II 

(see description on page 289) 3 cr. 

Bus 439 Business Information Systems 3 cr. 

This course orientates the student in the philosophy and 
concepts of business information systems. Management plan- 
ning, and organization objectives develop the management 
information system and its sub-systems. Information theory, 
data collection and editing redundancy, source document de- 
sign, report form designing, file organization and maintenance, 
and data reduction techniques will be developed. The areas of 
problem definition, information economics, information man- 
agement, flow charting, truth table testing, and documentation 
will be included. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Bus 352 Corporate Accounting 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Bus 454 Federal Taxes (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 352. 

SPECIAL ELECTIVES 

Bus 455 Auditing (see description on page 206) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 353. 

BE 342 Consumer Economics 3 cr. 

Problems of production, distribution, merchandising, and 
buying are studied. Intelligent consumership is stressed 
throuhgout all aspects of the course. Importance is placed 
upon maximum satisfaction from goods and services consumed 
by the individual. 

Some Business Management courses may be selected as 
electives. 

GENERAL ELECTIVE 

BE 371 Personal Typewriting and Duplicating 1 cr. 

This course may be taken as an elective by upper class- 
men other than Business Education Department students and 
Office Management students in the Business Management De- 
partment. Emphasis is placed on the development of correct 
techniques in typewriting. The student is introduced to simple 
tabulations and the typing of term papers, themes, and manu- 
scripts. He learns how to prepare masters and stencils for use 
on the various duplicating machines. 



DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

JAMES K. STONER, Teacher-Educator 

Required Courses For All Distributive Education Students 

Bus 101 Business Organization and Management 

(see description on page 202) 3 cr. 

Bus 131 Principles of Typewriting 

(see description on page 202) 2 cr. 

BE 111 Foundations of Mathematics (Business) 

(see description on page 206) 3 cr. 

Bus 132 Intermediate Typewriting 

(see description on page 206) 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 131. 

BE 212 Business Mathematics II 

(see description on page 206) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: BE 111. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Bus 233 Marketing (see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 221 Introduction to Accounting 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 235 Business Law I (see description on page ) 3 cr. 

Bus 251 Intermediate Accounting 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 221 and a "C" average in BE 111, BE 212, 
and English. 

Bus 271 Advanced Typewriting 

(see description on page 204) 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 132. 

Bus 332 Retail Management 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 233, or Bus 331, or Bus 333. 

Bus 321 Business Communications 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: "C" average in Eng 101 and 102. 

Bus 335 Business Machines (see description on page 204) 2 cr. 

Bus 336 Business Law II (see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Bus 339 Business Data Processing 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Bus 333 Principles of Selling 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 332. 

*DE 310 Principles of Distributive Education 3 cr. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint prospective 
teacher-coordinators with the objectives of distributive educa- 
tion and with the details and problems of organizing, adminis- 
tering, and supervising a complete cooperative program. The 
course will be concerned with the organization and coordina- 
tion of vocational education programs and the operation of an 
Advisory Committee. 

*DE 313 Methods of Teaching Courses in 

Distributive Education 3 cr. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with 
the basic principles of teaching the subjects in this area as 
well as the specific methods of presentation. Students will pre- 
pare unit plans, lesson plans, demonstration aids, and evalu- 
ative techniques. 

DE 434 Supervised Work Experience and Seminar 

in Distributive Education 6 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 333. 



212 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Students will gain supervised work experience in selected 
business establishments operating in the field of distribution. 
This work experience will be conducted under the guidance of 
competent store personnel and the college supervisor. As 
part of this program, the students will attend weekly evening 
seminars in which discussions will center on daily problems. 
The trainees will be required to submit regular progress re- 
ports. 

*Note: Admission to professional courses in DE is subject to 
approval by a faculty committee. 



BUSINESS MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 

CHARLES L. COOPER, Chairman 

Required Courses For All Business Management Students 

Bus 101 Business Organization and Management 

(see description on page 202) 3 cr. 

BM 111 Foundations of Math (Management) 3 cr. 

This course is designed to provide a broad survey of the 
fundamental processes of mathematics as applied to business. 
Emphasis will be placed on the principles of solving business 
problems by the use of mathematics. Specific areas of concen- 
tration include: percentage, interest, discount, annuities, valu- 
ation of stocks and bonds, sinking funds, amortization plans, 
factoring, depreciation, pricing, taxes, insurance, and valuation. 

BM 201 Personnel Management 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 101. 

The fundamental principles involved in maintaining har- 
monious human relations at all levels of a business enterprise 
form the nucleus of this course. The basic elements involved 
in planning, organization, directing, and controlling personnel 
will be developed. Major topics included are the selection, 
training, evaluation, motivation, and remuneration of em- 
ployees. 

BM 215 Business Statistics 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: BM 111, Math 362. 

The major objective of this course is the application of 
statistical methods which are useful in guiding business deci- 
sions. Emphasis will be placed upon such statistical techniques 
as measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, meas- 
ure of relationship, sampling, and index numbers. 

Bus 221 Introduction to Accounting 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: "C" average in BM 111 and English 101 and 
102. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 213 

Bus 233 Marketing (see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 235 Business Law I (see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 251 Intermediate Accounting 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 221 with not less than "C" grade. 

Bus 321 Business Communications 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: "C" average in Eng 101 and 102. 

Bus 336 Business Law II (see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 235. 

Bus 339 Business Data Processing 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Courses Required in the Accounting Sequence 

BM 241 Finance 3 cr. 

A study of the financial structures of the various types 
of business organizations. The methods of securing and man- 
aging funds on a short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term 
basis when financing their inception and their operations. An 
analysis of fixed and working capital requirements. 

Bus 352 Corporate Accounting 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 251 with acceptable grade. 

Bus 353 Cost Accounting (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 352 and "B" average in accounting 
courses. 

BM 451 Advanced Principles of Accounting 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 353. 

A study of accounting problems of a specialized nature 
including the application of funds statement, consignments, 
installment sales, statement of affairs, receivership accounts, 
agency and branch accounting, corporate combinations, and 
consolidated statements. 

Bus 454 Federal Taxes (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: BM 451. 

Bus 455 Auditing (see description on page 206) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: BM 451. 

Electives (see recommended electives for Business 

Management students on page 215) 18 cr. 

Courses Required in the Systems Analyst Sequence 

Math 101 Foundations of Math (Comp) 

(see description on page 284) 3 cr. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Bus 352 Corporate Accounting 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 251 with acceptable grade. 

BM 241 Finance (see description above) 3 cr. 

Math 461 Computer Math II 

(see description on page 289) 3 cr. 

BM 340 Business Systems Technology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Math 101 (Comp), Bus 339 and Bus 439. 

An extensive study of computer technology. The data 
storage capabilities of the data cell, drum, thin film, paper 
tape, core storage and magnetic tape are covered. The file 
organization techniques of sequential, indexed sequential and 
direct access as they affect business systems design are dis- 
cussed. This course analyzes characteristics of full operating 
magnetic tape and disk operating systems. It reviews the func- 
tions of the background and foreground programs, job cards, 
and linkage editor. Library programs, utility programs, multi- 
programming, multi-processing and time sharing systems are 
reviewed. 

BM 342 Business Problem Application I 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Math 101 (Comp), Bus 339, Math 461, Bus 
439. 

Business problems will be solved using remote terminals 
as well as batch processing with the Computer Center's I.B.M. 
360. The assembler language will be utilized following prob- 
lems in general accounting, marketing, etc. Projects will be de- 
veloped in probablistic forecasting of income statements, bal- 
ance sheets and cash flow statements, manipulation of differ- 
ent depreciation methods to establish which is "best" under 
a given set of assumptions; devising and testing mathematical 
models, production planning simulation, and capital budgeting. 

Bus 439 Business Information Systems 

(see description on page 208) 3 cr. 

BM 441 Business Problem Programming 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Math 101 (Comp), Bus 339, Math 461, Bus 
439, BM 340, and BM 342. 

This course is a combination of computer programming 
and systems analysis techniques in business problem definition 
and solution. Problems will be analyzed, programmed, and 
made operational in the following functional areas: payroll, 
material and labor distribution, accounts receivable and paya- 
ble, general accounting, finance, marketing, sales, production, 
purchasing, and personnel. 

BM 442 Business Problem Application II 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Math 101 (Comp), Bus 339, Math 461, Bus 
439, BM 340, and BM 342. 

This course discusses the more recent developments in 
computer technology and its effect on business systems. The 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 215 

determination of data bases with their specific file organiza- 
tion needs as related to the hardware capabilities are studied. 
The capabilities of remote stations and time sharing comput- 
ing needs are related. Multi-programming, multi-processing, 
real time, and time slicing techniques will be covered as they 
effect the integrated and coordinated total system, accounting 
system, and business control system. 

BM 443 Business Systems Analysis I 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Math 101 (Comp), Bus 339, Math 461, Bus 
439, BM 340, and BM 342. 

A thorough study will be made of the techniques used in 
Systems Analysis. Systems definition of problem orientated 
business systems, PERT and flow charting of the problem, 
feasability, quantitative, and evaluative techniques as related 
to the sub-system, systems synthesis, systems simulation, and 
implementation are fully covered. The dynamics of an open- 
ended business system as related to short and long term ob- 
jectives are determined. 

BM 444 Business Systems Analysis II 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: BM 441, BM 442, and BM 443. 

This course will require that the student complete assign- 
ments in the analysis of business problems, preparation of flow 
charts, and writing of computer programs. The programs must 
be tested and made operational with raw detail and problem 
information. Case studies will cover payroll, inventory, pro- 
duction, and sales analysis. 

BM 445 Quantitative Methods — Operations Research 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: BM 441, BM 442, and BM 443. 

This course develops the computer programs necessary for 
business decision making techniques as decision tables, truth 
tables, decision matrix, decision making under certainty and 
uncertainty, sampling techniques, operations research, in- 
ventory models, systems models, simulation, queuing models, 
linear programming, matrix algebra, and game theory. In- 
tensive analysis of the decision making process: diagnosing 
problems; evaluation of alternative solutions, projection of 
results and the choice of alternatives. 

Courses Required in the Office Management Sequence 

Bus 131 Principles of Typewriting 

(see description on page 202) cr. 

Bus 132 Intermediate Typewriting 

(see description on page 202) 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 131. 

Bus 271 Advanced Typewriting 

(see description on page 204) 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 132. 



216 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Bus 261 Shorthand Theory (see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Bus 262 Shorthand Dictation 

(see description on page 203) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 261. 

Bus 335 Office Machines (see description on page 204) 2 cr. 

Bus 363 Transcription (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 262. 

Bus 364 Secretarial Office Practice 

(see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 363. 

BM 470 Office Management 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

A study of the duties and responsibilities of the office 
manager; the principles of practical office management and 
their application in controlling office costs; flow of work; pur- 
chase and use of office equipment; selection, training, and 
supervision of office employees; and report writing. 

Electives (see recommended electives for Business 

Management students below) 15 cr. 

Required Courses in the General Business Sequence 

BM 241 Finance (see description on page 212) 3 cr. 

Bus 352 Corporate Accounting 

(see description on page 212) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 251. 

Bus 454 Federal Taxes (see description on page 205) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 352. 

Electives (see recommended electives for Business 

Management students below) 27 cr. 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES FOR BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT STUDENTS 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS COURSES: 

Bus 331 Sales and Retailing 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Bus 332 Retail Management (see description on page 204) 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Bus 251 and 331. 

Bus 335 Office Machines (see description on page 204) 2 cr. 

Bus 333 Principles of Selling 

(see description on page 204) 3 cr. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 217 

BM 380 Principles of Investments 3 cr. 

The analysis and evaluation of various types of securities 
and other forms of investment possibilities and a study of the 
principles of sound investment policies. Factors influencing the 
general movement of security prices and the return from in- 
vestments are considered. 



BM 381 Principles of Insurance 3 cr. 

The historical development, the fundamental principles, 
and the social and regulatory environment underlying all 
forms of insurance — life, property, casualty, fire, and surety 
is considered. A comprehensive study of the theory of risk 
and its application to insurance. 

BM 382 Principles of Real Estate 3 cr. 

A study of the regulations, practices, legal aspects and 
professional ethics of the real estate business, including the 
areas of financing, advertising, property valuation and ap- 
praisal, and selling. 

BM 434 Advertising 3 cr. 

An introduction to the principles, practices, advantages, 
and limitations of advertising, including the purposes, tech- 
niques, media, and organization of advertising campaigns. The 
legal, economic, and social aspects of advertising are also con- 
sidered. 



BM 438 Marketing Research 3 cr. 

The nature, methods, analysis, and application of present 
day marketing research techniques utilized in the solution of 
practical marketing problems studied through the use of case 
material and outside research. 



BM 456 Advanced Cost Accounting 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Bus 353. 

The study of the theory, preparation, and use of budgets, 
production cost standards, and the analysis of cost variances 
as means of cost controls is emphasized. Direct costing and 
extensive analysis of various cost control and profit planning 
programs are also considered. 

BM 490 Decision Making In Business 3 cr. 

A case approach to the analytical techniques and concepts 
necessary in making business decisions concerning marketing, 
costs, pricing, profits, competition, production, and capital 
management. 



218 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

COURSES BY OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

(see description in the listing of department offering the 
course) 

ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT: 

Econ 321 History of Economic Thought 3 cr. 

Econ 340 Economic Development 3 cr. 

Econ 345 International Economics 3 cr. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT: 

151-152 Any Foreign Language 6 cr. 

Other electives are available with the approval of depart- 
mental chairman. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 219 



CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

PAUL R. WUNZ, JR., Chairman 

CARL W. BORDAS RONALD L. MARKS 

EDWARD N. BROWN DONALD R. McKELVY 

NICHOLAS D. CHRISTODOULEAS ROBERT N. MOORE 

EDWARD G. COLEMAN ROBERT PATSIGA 

JOSEPH J. COSTA JOHN H. SCROXTON 

RICHARD HARTLINE AUGUSTA SYTY 

WILLIAM I. HEARD STANFORD L. TACKETT 

RICHARD KOLACZKOWSKI GENO ZAMBOTTI 

DONALD N. ZIMMERMAN 



Chemistry Courses 

Chem 101-102 Home Economics Chemistry I and II 6 cr. 

This course is open only to those students who are major- 
ing in home economics and school food service management. 
The first semester covers the principles of general inorganic 
chemistry. The second semester covers those topics of organic 
chemistry and biochemistry which would be most important 
for the student of home economics. Three hours lecture and 
two hours laboratory per week. 

Chem 103 Chemistry for Nurses 3 cr. 

This course is open only to students in the nurses' train- 
ing program connected with the hospital. It is a one semester 
course, designed to survey the areas of inorganic, organic and 
biochemistry, particularly those topics which are related to 
the fields of medicine, nursing, and health. Three hours lecture 
and two hours laboratory per week. 

Chem 111-112 General Chemistry I and II 8 cr. 

General Chemistry I includes the study of the nature of 
matter, atomic structure, periodic law, chemical bond, stoi- 
chiometry, gases, liquids, solids and solutions. General Chem- 
istry II includes chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, elec- 
trical energy and chemical change, oxidation and reduction, 
descriptive chemistry and organic chemistry. The laboratory 
work illustrates fundamental principles; during the first se- 
mester it is semiquantitative in nature, and the second semes- 
ter is devoted to qualitative analysis. Three hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory per week. 

Chem 201 Industrial Chemistry 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Chemistry I and II. 

This course is a study of the applications of chemistry and 
science to the industries of Western Pennsylvania for the 
science teacher. The course consists of lectures, laboratory 
work, and field trips to representative industries. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Chem 231-232 Organic Chemistry I and II 8 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Chemistry I and II. 

A study of the compounds of carbon with special emphasis 
being placed on the structure and reactions of the more im- 
portant classes of carbon compounds. The laboratory work 
involves the preparation and purification of representative 
compounds. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory 
per week. 

Chem 301 Chemistry Seminar 1 cr. 

The seminar is a discussion of current technical literature, 
reports of students' research projects, and occasional lectures 
by noted chemists. The course is open to junior and senior 
chemistry majors or by permission of the instructor. One hour 
per week. 

Chem 303 Glassblowing Techniques 1 cr. 

The course is designed to introduce the science student to 
the techniques necessary for the construction and modifica- 
tion of scientific glass apparatus. Enrollment limited to junior 
and senior science majors and others by permission of instruc- 
tor. One hour instruction with two hours practice at students' 
convenience per week. 

Chem 305-306 New Approaches to Teaching 

High School Chemistry 4 cr. 

A course designed to acquaint the teacher and prospective 
teacher with the newer approaches to high school chemistry. 
One semester would consider the Chemical Bond Approach 
curriculum and the other semester the Chem Study curricu- 
lum. The student must be at least a junior chemistry educa- 
tion major. Arts and Science majors may take the course but 
will not be given credit towards graduation. The course will 
also include revisions of these newer approaches to high school 
chemistry, as well as any course being currently developed in 
the Secondary Chemistry Curriculum. Every prospective stu- 
dent teacher should plan to take these courses prior to his/her 
practice teaching experience. 

Chem 321 Quantitative Analysis 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Chem 111 and 112. Lectures, three hours 
per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

The theory and practice of quantitative analysis includes 
gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Special emphasis is 
placed on perfecting the student's laboratory technique and 
application of general chemical knowledge through problem 
solving. 

Chem 322 Instrumental Analysis 4 cr. 

Prerequisite: Chem 321. 

This course is designed to instruct the student in Modern 
Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis. The student will 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 2221 

learn the theory behind the instrument, the principles of oper- 
ation, the interpretation of the data obtained, and the limita- 
tions of the methods. Three hours of lecture and four hours of 
laboratory. 

Chem 331 Organic Qualitative Analysis 2 cr. 

Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I and II (Organic Chem- 
istry II may be taken concurrently). 

A course designed to give the student experience in the 
systematic identification of various classes of organic com- 
pounds by both chemical and physical methods. Six hours of 
laboratory per week. 

Chem 333 Organic Mechanisms and Stereochemistry 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I and II. 

An advanced undergraduate course in which the study of 
organic chemistry is approached on the basis of the mechan- 
ism by which the reactions occur. Such areas as nucleophilic 
and electrophilic substitution, addition and elimination reac- 
tions, carbanions and carbonium ions and rearrangements will 
be considered. The stereochemistry of organic compounds will 
be studied. Three hours lecture per week. 

Chem 341 Physical Chemistry I 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Calculus II and Organic Chemistry I and II. 

Classical thermodynamics, thermochemistry, gases, solu- 
tions and other topics as time permits. Three hours lecture 
and four hours laboratory per week. 

Chem 342 Physical Chemistry II 4 cr. 

Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry I. 

Application of classical thermodynamics to the study of 
phase equilibria, kinetics, diffusion, and other topics as time 
permits. Introduction to statistical thermodynamics and quan- 
tum physics. Three hours lecture and four hours laboratory 
per week. 

Chem 351 Biochemistry 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I. 

A study of the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, 
minerals, vitamins, and hormones and the biological functions 
of each. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per 
week. 

Chem 355 Biochemistry and Nutrition 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Chem 101-102. 

This course is designed for the Home Economics major 
and is a study of the chemistry and biological function of bio- 
logically active compounds with respect to nutritional require- 
ments. Three hours lecture per week. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Chem 411 Inorganic Chemistry 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I. 

This course is designed to give the student an understand- 
ing of the advanced theory of atomic structure, chemical bond- 
ing, acids and bases, coordination compounds, and selected 
topics. Three hours lecture per week. 

Chem 412 Inorganic Preparations 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I. 

Lectures will include a discussion of the descriptive chem- 
istry of the elements according to their periodicity. The labor- 
atory will be an investigation of the synthesis, purification, 
identification, and characterization of inorganic substances. 
One hour lecture and six hours laboratory per week. 

Chem 421 Advanced Instrumental Analysis 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Instrumental Analysis. 

A study of modern chemical analysis using advanced in- 
strumental techniques. The ireas of X-ray analysis, spectro- 
scopy, gas chromatography and electroanalysis will be fea- 
tured. Emphasis will be placed on theory, principles of oper- 
ation, capabilities, and limitations of the advanced analytical 
instruments used. One hour lecture and six hours laboratory. 

Chem 441 Advanced Physical Chemistry 3 cr. 

The course will include statistical thermodynamics, theo- 
retical kinetics, and other topics of current interest. Three 
hours lecture. 

Chem 498 Problems in Chemistry 1 to 2 cr. 

This course includes laboratory work, library reading, and 
conferences with a staff member. The purpose of the course 
is to give the student experience in the investigation of select- 
ed problems in chemistry. The credit is to be arranged. 

Sci 105 Physical Science I — See course description 

in Physics Dept. 4 cr. 

Sci 106 Physical Science II 4 cr. 

A course designed to fulfill the University science require- 
ment for non-science majors. This semester will survey the 
fields of chemistry and geology. Physical Science I (see Phys- 
ics Department) is not a prerequisite for Physical Science II 
and therefore either course may be taken first. Three hours 
lecture and two hours laboratory. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 



223 



CRIMINOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

HARRY W. MORE, Chairman 



STANLEY COHEN 
WALLACE R. CROUP 
STANLEY S. GOEHRING 
WILLIAM HENRY 
JOSEPH B. HILL 
VANCE C. KENNEDY 



JOHN G. MELLEKY 
JOHN W. POSTLEWAIT 
THEODORE J. RAYNOR 
WILLIAM SHANE 
JOHN B. SIMONS 
CLIFFORD J. WILLIAMS, JR. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Crmn 101 General Administration of Justice 3 cr. 

Administration of criminal justice in the United States. 
Deals with the role of the police, courts, and the correctional 
process. 

Crmn 102 Criminology 3 cr. 

General survey of the nature* and causes of crime and its 
prevention and treatment. 

Crmn 201 Police Administration I 3 cr. 

An analysis of organizational structure, administrative 
practices and operating procedures of law enforcement agen- 
cies. 

Crmn 202 Police Administration II 3 cr. 

Continuation of Police Administration I with special em- 
phasis on the staff functions such as records, communications, 
training, personnel administration and finance. 

Crmn 301 Criminal Law I 3 cr. 

A formal study of specific crimes as found in common law 
and in state and local codes. 

Crmn 302 Criminal Law II 3 cr. 

A detailed study of the legal procedures through which the 
accused passes. Laws of arrest, search and seizure with a dis- 
cussion of important case law. An analysis of the safeguards 
established for the protection of individual liberties, especially 
as found in the application of rules governing the introduction 
and use of information in formalized legal proceedings. 

Crmn 310 Criminal Investigation 3 cr. 

The theory and practice of investigation. A discussion of 
the various types of information obtainable from persons and 
things. The application of investigative theory to crime and 
accidents. 

Crmn 311 Criminalistics 3 cr. 

The application of scientific crime detection methods. Em- 
phasis on the collection, preservation, interpretation of physi- 
cal evidence found in connection with a crime. Two hours lec- 
ture and three hours laboratory per week. 



224 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Crran 330 Planning and Research 3 cr. 

The role of planning and research in contemporary law en- 
forcement establishment. Analysis of the planning process and 
the nature of planning with an emphasis in planning for spe- 
cial events and situations. 

Crmn 340 Crime Prevention 3 cr. 

Organization and function of crime prevention agencies; 
police techniques in the prevention of crime; case work; role 
of the policewoman; community resources in preventing crime. 

Crmn 350 Techniques of Interviewing 3 cr. 

Consideration of the nature, methods, and principles of in- 
terviewing. Emphasis on role playing in interviewing situa- 
tions. 

Crmn 360 Commercial and Industrial Security 3 cr. 

Plant protection and industrial security; merchandising 
safety and security; credit and insurance investigative proce- 
dures. 

Crmn 370 Community Relations 3 cr. 

The role of law enforcement agencies in modern day soci- 
ety. Community relations units; human relations resources; 
civil rights and professionalism in law enforcement. 

Crmn 410 Questioned Document Analysis 3 cr. 

Evaluation and identification of questioned documents; 
admissibility as evidence, preparation and presentation in 
court. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

Crmn 411 Advanced Criminalistics 3 cr. 

Ballistics, serology, narcotics, poisons, firearms identifica- 
tion, chromatography, alcohol tests, and hair identification. 
Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. 

Crmn 415 Supervision in the Administration of Justice 3 cr. 

A consideration of the supervisory problems in the field of 
administration of justice. Emphasis on such topics as leader- 
ship motivation, morale, discipline, public relations, communi- 
cations, decision-making, and the training functions. 

Crmn 430 Comparative Study of Justice 3 cr. 

Comparison of the American system of administration of 
justice with those of other nations to include developed and 
underdeveloped countries. 

Crmn 431 Etiology of Delinquent Behavior 3 cr. 

An analysis of the aberrant behavior of children and youth 
in terms of modern behavioral sciences. Personality and social 
factors are examined with the view toward developing pre- 
vention and control procedures. Offered during the summer. 
(By appointment only.) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 226 

Crmn 432 Treatment and Control of Delinquency 3 cr. 

An analysis of juvenile court procedures, juvenile proba- 
tion, juvenile institutions and juvenile parole in the treatment 
and control of delinquency. Offered during the summer. (By 
appointment only.) 

Crmn 440 Institutional Treatment of the Offender 3 cr. 

Modern philosophy and methods in the. treatment of adult 
criminals and juvenile delinquents in correctional institutions. 

Crmn 445 Non-institutional Treatment of the Offender 3 cr. 

Analysis of the principles and practices in probation and 
parole. Case method. Techniques of supervision. 

Crmn 490 Crime and Modern Society 3 cr. 

An analysis of the nature and extent of crime at the state, 
national, and international levels of government. Consideration 
of special problems in metropolitan areas, organized crime, the 
professional criminal and white collar crime. Crime control in 
a democratic society. 

Crmn 495 Seminar in Administration of Justice 3 cr. 

A study of problems in the administration of justice. Re- 
ports based upon original investigation; reviews of recent 
books and periodical literature; topics of current interest. 

Crmn 497 Internship 6 cr. 

A practicum designed to broaden the educational experi- 
ence of students through appropriate observational work as- 
signments with governmental agencies and private firms. Of- 
fered during the summer. (By appointment only.) 

Crmn 499 Special Problems 1-4 cr. 

Individual research under the direction of the staff. This 
course may be taken more than once for credit. (By appoint- 
ment only.) 



226 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

GEORGE L. SPINELLI, Chairman 

ROBERT H. SAYLOR EDWARD D. SHAFFER 

JAMES C. WILSON EVERETT J. PESCI 

The courses listed below are available, as electives and as 
offered, to undergraduate students in Education, in-service 
teachers, and other school personnel seeking a broad under- 
standing of helping roles in a school program of guidance 
services. These courses are not designed for those who would 
aspire to become school counselors. For information on coun- 
selor education programs see the current Graduate School 
Bulletin. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

CnGd 251 Fundamentals of Guidance 3 cr. 

This course is an elective for undergraduate students in 
Education and aims to provide a broad understanding of the 
role of the classroom teacher in a school guidance program. 

CnGd 252 Guidance in School Settings 3 cr. 

This is a survey course in guidance designed as an elec- 
tive for in-service teachers and school personnel other than 
counselors. 

CnGd 253 Counseling in School Settings 3 cr. 

This is an elective course designed to provide in-service 
teachers and school personnel, other than counselors, a basic 
understanding of the knowledge, information, and skills ap- 
propriate to counseling with individuals and groups. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA 227 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

DONALD WALKER, Chairman 

JOHN P. BARRADOS WILLIS J. RICHARD 

JOHN W. CROSS SARJIT SINGH 

WAYNE J. DAVIS *ROBERT C. VOWELS 

ALEXANDER C. GARVIN STEPHEN WARE 
HARRY G. HOLT 
* On leave of absence. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE 

Econ 101 Basic Economics 3 cr. 

(Should not be programmed by students majoring in 
any of the Social Sciences or in either Business Man- 
agement or Business Education. Acceptable for others 
in lieu of Econ 121 only upon achievement of 3.0 
grade or better.) 

Major characteristics of the American economy: nature of 
capitalism; contrasts with other economic systems; role of the 
price system; national income; modern employment theory; 
money and banking; basic market structures; economics of 
resource use; current domestic and international problem 
areas. 

OTHER DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

Econ 121 Principles of Economics I 3 cr. 

(Foundation course for those planning further course 
work in economics and required of all economics ma- 
jors and minors.) 

Nature and methodology of economics; mixed capitalism 
and the market economy; national income; full employment 
theory, including the economics of fiscal policy; money, bank- 
ing, and the Federal Reserve System; economic growth. 

Econ 122 Principles of Economics II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Econ 121; sequel to Econ 121; required of all 
economic majors and minors; substitute for earlier Econ 241. 
This course is recommended (but not required) for many eco- 
nomics electives; for prerequisites to specific electives, see in- 
dividual course descriptions below. 

Economics of the firm; theory of consumer demand; supply, 
costs, and resource allocation; the basic market models; price 
and output determination. Current social imbalances, the labor 
sector, foreign trade and the balance of payments, foreign eco- 
nomics. 



228 IND IANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Econ 221 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121 or Econ 101 if accepted in substitu- 
tion, and Econ 122. 

Income and employment analysis; national income ac- 
counts and theory; classical, Keynesian, and post-Keynesian 
models; investment, growth, and inflation theory; the role of 
government in our economy. 

Econ 222 Microeconomic Analysis 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121 or Econ 101 if accepted in substitu- 
tion, and Econ 122. 

Price, output, and distribution theory analyzed by market 
structure, with particular emphasis upon monopolistic compe- 
tition and oligopoly; resource allocation; general equilibrium 
analysis; consumer behavior; applications to current problems 
of economic policy. 

Econ 305 Quantitative Economic Methods I 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121 and 122; Math 101 or 152, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

The application of quantitative methods to economic 
theory. The first semester will include the following: func- 
tions, limits, derivatives, integration, maxima & minima, mean 
values, and partial derivatives. 

Econ 306 Quantitative Economic Methods II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Econ 205. 

Derivation and application of linear algebra to quantitative 
economics. The topics covered will include sets, functions, vec- 
tor analysis, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, 
linear difference and differential equations. 

Econ 321 History of Economic Thought 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substitu- 
tion. 

Contributions of the more prominent early philosophers 
through to the modern economists, and of the major schools of 
economic thought: Mercantilists, Physiocrats, Classicists, So- 
cialists, Marginalists, Institutionalists, Neo-Classicists, Keynesi- 
ans, Post-Keynesians. 

Econ 325 Money, Banking, and Monetary Policy 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substitu- 
tion. 

Organization, operation, and economic significance of 
American monetary institutions; commercial banks and the 
Federal System; monetary theory and policy; the mechanism 
of international payments. 

Econ 330 Industrial and Labor Relations 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substitu- 
tion, and Econ 122. 

Worker-management-government relationships in the in- 
dustrialized segment of the American economy: history, struc- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 229 

ture, and operations of trade unions and employer organiza- 
tions; major federal labor sector legislation; collective bar- 
gaining theory; wage determination; current labor problems. 

Econ 335 Public Finance 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substitu- 
tion, and Econ 122. 

Taxation and expenditure theory at . federal, state, and 
local government levels; federal budget and debt considera- 
tions; public sector impact upon the economy; intergovern- 
mental fiscal relations. 

Econ 340 Economics of Underdeveloped Countries 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substi- 
tution. 

The principles of economic development and their appli- 
cation to the performance and growth of economically poor 
countries. 

Econ 341 Economic Development of the United States 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substi- 
tution, and Hist 104. 

Examination of the main patterns of America's economic 
growth since the end of the eighteenth century; emphasizes 
economic development as a laboratory for economic analysis. 

Econ 342 Economic Development of Modern Europe 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substi- 
tution, and Hist 102. 

Study of the dynamic forces which have contributed to 
the development of modern Europe; industrial revolution in 
England, industrialization on the continent; impact of Europe 
on the world economy. 

Econ 343 Economics of Population and Manpower 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substi- 
tution, and Math 362 or permission of the instructor. 

Inquiry into the economic, demographic, and related fac- 
tors affecting the growth, structure, and distribution of an 
economy's population; historical and locational variations in 
manpower utilization rates; examination of the interrelation- 
ships among population, manpower utilization, and economic 
progress. 

Econ 345 International Economics 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substi- 
tution. 

Theory and practice in international trade relationships of 
the United States and other major industrialized countries to 
the world economy as reflected in their balance of payments; 
trade barriers; international economic organizations; stabiliza- 
tions and growth in world finance. 



230 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Econ 350 Comparative Economic Systems 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Econ 121, or Econ 101 if accepted in substi- 
tution. 

Capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism subjected 
to economic analysis: their principles, practices, institutions 
and philosophies. 

Econ 355 Introduction to Econometrics 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Econ 121 and 122, Math 362. 

The application of modern statistical methods to economic 
theory formulated in mathematical terms: elementary formu- 
lation; the nature of econometric models; demand, production, 
and cost analysis; income distribution, growth, and trade cycle 
models; macroeconomic applications. 

Econ 360 Seminar, Special Studies in Economics 

(Restricted to economics majors of senior standing.) 3 cr. 

An intensive analysis of selected contemporary economic 
issues or problems. 

Econ 390 Honors in Economics 3 cr. 

(An honors course open only to students who have 
successfully completed a minimum of twelve (12) 
hours in economics and who hold a 3.0 (B) grade 
average or better in the Social Sciences.) 

Readings, conferences, and reports arranged for students 
who have demonstrated proficiency in the science of econom- 
ics. Research work may be directed toward, but is not limited 
to, advanced study in any of the economics electives areas 
plus agricultural economics, business fluctuations, economics 
education, economic forecasting, economic planning, national 
security economics, social insurance, and current economics 
literature. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



231 



EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

ANTHONY A. ANGELONI. Chairman 



WILLIAM M. BAHN 
WILLIAM E. CUTLER 
LEONARD B. DEFABO 
JOHN J. HAYS 
ISABEL T. HELMRICH 



OLIVER W. HELMRICH 
CHARLES LEACH 
WILLIAM J. LEVENTRY 
BRUCE A. MEADOWCROFT 
MILDRED SHANK 
JAY M. SMITH 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COURSES 

Ed Psy 302 Educational Psychology 

(Required of all Education Majors) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

A course designed to promote a better understanding of 
the principles of psychology that govern human behavior, with 
particular emphasis on their relation to the learning process, 
the learning situation, and the learner himself. The signifi- 
cance of evaluation, individual variation, group dynamics, and 
child growth and development will be stressed throughout the 
course. 

Ed Psy 305 Evaluation Methods Fall-Spring 2 cr. 

Summer 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

This course includes elementary statistics concerning 
.graphs, sampling, frequency distribution, measures of central 
tendency and dispersion, and the normal curve. The course 
emphasizes the use and construction of tests made by the 
teacher and the systems of reporting pupil growth and devel- 
opment. 

Ed Psy 362 Developmental Reading 3 cr. 

This course, planned especially for the teacher of second- 
ary students, will assist the participating student to under- 
stand the developmental reading process. The study will in- 
clude such areas as objectives, background knowledge and un- 
derstandings of the reading process, an overview of the ele- 
mentary program, the pre-adolescent and the adolescent and 
their needs in reading, finding and providing for instructional 
needs, and special problems. Specific helps, experiences, tech- 
niques, and materials will be considered. It is suggested that 
the course be taken by secondary students just before the stu- 
dent teaching experience. 

GENERAL ELECTIVES OR FOR 
PERMANENT CERTIFICATION 

These courses satisfy post-graduate certification require- 
ments and serve as electives for undergraduate students of 
teacher education. 



232 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Ed Psy 372 The Psychology of Childhood Education 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Psychology or Educational Psy- 
chology. 

This course is designed to emphasize the relationship 
which physical, social, emotional and intellectual development 
have on the theory and practice of childhood and pre-adoles- 
cent education. 

Ed Psy 373 Adolescent Psychology for Teachers 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Psychology or Educational Psy- 
chology. 

This course is concerned with the study of the significant 
characteristics and behavior of adolescents with emphasis on 
developing an understanding of the relationship these factors 
have for educational and social problems which occur during 
this period of development. 

Ed Psy 376 Study of Problem Behavior 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Psychology or Educational Psychol- 
ogy- 

This course explores the emotional and social aspects of 

behavior problems encountered in classroom situations. The 
assumption that behavior is learned and purposeful forms a 
basis for study in the course. 

Ed Psy 377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Psychology or Educational Psychol- 
ogy- 

A course which emphasizes an understanding of the vari- 
ous evaluation instruments with attention being focused on 
standardized tests. The use and interpretation of information 
and test results are studied in relation to educational problems 
which occur in the classroom. The teacher's role in the selec- 
tion, administration, and interpretation of group tests is em- 
phasized. 

Ed Psy 378 Seminar in Problems of Learning 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: General Psychology or Educational Psychol- 
ogy- 

This course is intended to help teachers who deal with 

learning problems in the several basic skill and subject areas 
in a typical school setting. The course will attempt to develop 
a rationale for working with children who have learning prob- 
lems. Emphasis will be placed on actual application of tech- 
niques discussed and developed in class. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

P. D. LOTT, Chairman of Department 



LOIS A. ANDERSON 
RONALD L. BAKER 
DENNIS A. BARTHA 
LILLIAN BROOME 
ALBERTA R. DORSEY 
RALPH M. GLOTT 
JOSEPH A. KAZAMEK 
ROBERT L. KING 



MAY E. KOHLHEPP 
JACK KUHNS 
LINDA S. LINN 
EDWARD R. MOTT 
JAMES B..REILLY 
VIOLET V. ROCCO 
JOANN E. WALTHOUR 
GEORGE D. ZEPP 



REQUIRED COURSES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

El 211 Music for the Elementary Grades 2 cr. 

The content of this required course for all Elementary 
Students includes the following: review of music fundamentals, 
keyboard knowledge, the teacher's voice, care and develop- 
ment of the child voice, problems of the non-singer, rhythmic 
activities, listening activities, creative activities, rote to note 
process, special days, and lesson planning. To get practical 
application of class activities, students will be assigned obser- 
vations in the Laboratory School. Emphasis is placed on the 
primary grades. 

El 213 Art for Elementary Grades 2 cr. 

The creative growth and development of children are 
studied. Students are given experiences in the basic art ma- 
terials and media, as well as opportunity to plan art motiva- 
tions for children. 

Psy 215 Child Development 3 cr. 

This course is designed to enable the teacher to under- 
stand and help children. A survey of human development from 
conception through early adolescence is made in terms of 
basic scientific data. Developmental growth and behavior are 
studied and their implications for home, school, and commu- 
nity are considered. 

El 221 Children's Literature 3 cr. 

In this course the students acquire a wide acquaintance 
with children's literature, old and new. Poetry selections, an- 
notated stories, and bibliographies will be assembled. Ways 
and means to develop, stimulate, and guide children's reading 
of literature are presented. Principles and techniques of suc- 
cessful story-telling are studied and practiced. 

El 222 Teaching of Reading 3 cr. 

This course is given before the first student teaching ex- 
perience. Emphasis is placed upon methods and materials used 
in the developmental reading program. Its objective is to pro- 
vide the student with a general background of knowledge and 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



techniques for teaching children in the elementary school to 
read. Students are introduced to the experience, textbook, and 
individualized approaches to the teaching of reading. 

El 312 Teaching of Elementary Science 3 cr. 

Based on the previous work in science, this course takes 
up the planning and presentation of material suitable to the 
elementary field. Students are required to perform demonstra- 
tions and take part in science activities which illustrate facts 
or principles taught in the elementary science program. Con- 
siderable attention is given to the literature of the elementary 
science program as well as other aids such as community re- 
sources and simple equipment that can be secured for ex- 
perimentation and other activities. 

El 313 Teaching of Math in the Elementary School 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 160 and Math 250. 

In this course emphasis will be given to the place of arith- 
metic in the elementary school and to the recent changes in 
curriculum and method; to techniques for developing concepts 
and processes; to recent research in the field of arithmetic; 
and to books and material helpful to prospective teachers. Ob- 
servation of master teachers at work will be planned. 

El 314 Teaching of Health and Physical Education 2 cr. 

This course includes games, stunts, rhythms, relays, tum- 
bling, dances, and skills suitable for the elementary school 
child. The teaching of health in the elementary school is em- 
phasized. Methods, materials and lesson planning are a part of 
the course. 

El 411 Teaching of Social Studies 3 cr. 

This course gives an overview of social studies in the ele- 
mentary school. It includes study of objectives, trends, areas 
of content, patterns and principles of organization. Emphasis 
is placed on unification of subject matter and on implication 
of research in child development for content and methods. Stu- 
dents will have experience in preparing an individual resource 
unit and in planning, participating in, and evaluating social 
studies in class. A variety of learning experiences and mate- 
rials will be used and evaluated. 

El 413 Teaching Language Arts 3 cr. 

This course is designed to give the elementary student a 
knowledge of the latest techniques, methods, and materials in 
the language arts area. Research and trends are studied. The 
fields of handwriting, spelling, oral and written communica- 
tion, and vocabulary development are included. 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum Including School Law 2 cr. 

This course includes a series of conferences and related 
activities planned to prepare students for experiences which 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 235 

they will meet in teaching. It parallels the student teaching 
experience in the junior and senior years. Through these plan- 
ned experiences, students are expected to be able: to know 
and understand Pennsylvania laws governing education; to 
discuss adequately problems related to teaching; and to know 
and use materials of instruction and professional reference 
reading. A file of materials, required of each elementary stu- 
dent, is used during each student teaching experience and is 
checked during the senior year. 

ELECTIVE COURSES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

El 212 Teaching of Music in the Elementary Grades 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: El 211. 

A continuation of skills and understandings as developed 
in El 211 is treated with emphasis on methods and materials 
for the upper grades. Additional opportunities for growth in 
music reading and part singing are provided. Lessons are de- 
veloped in correlation of music with other areas. Type lessons 
are taught by students and constructively evaluated by the 
instructor and the class. 

El 214 Teaching Art in Elementary Grades 3 cr. 

This course provides the student with a wide variety of 
two and three dimensional art experiences with the emphasis 
on a developmental sequence from simple to more complex 
variations of a craft. Emphasis is placed on the creative chal- 
lenges of the art experience. 

El 351 Creative Activities in the Elementary School 3 cr. 

This course is planned to provide the student with a wide 
range of creative experiences in the fields of art, crafts, music, 
rhythmics, dramatics and games in the elementary school. 
Stress is placed upon the need to help children in developing 
their capacities for creative expression in these areas. 

El 352 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 3 cr. 

This course is planned for in-service teachers and students 
who have done their student teaching. It deals with methods 
and materials which help children who are retarded in reading 
ability. Attention is given to recent findings in the areas of 
reading readiness, word recognition including phonics, com- 
prehension, evaluation, and textbook selection. 

El 353 Pre School Education 3 cr. 

Students in this course will be mainly concerned with the 
five-year-old in kindergarten. Principles and practices of this 
age group will be studied. Special attention will be given to 
observations, the kindergarten program and its curriculum, 
materials, and methods of instruction. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Ed 356 Guidance in Elementary Schools 3 cr. 

This course is designed to give the student an initial un- 
derstanding of the guidance of young children. Study and dis- 
cussion center around the child himself — his characteristics, 
needs, problems, motives, and relations with others — and 
around the techniques and procedures for identifying, study- 
ing, and giving help to children in respect to these facets of 
personality. 

El 451 Teaching of Reading in the Primary Grades 

This course is concerned with the teaching of develop- 
mental reading, consistent with child growth, in the primary 
grades. 

Methods and techniques for readiness, word perception, 
comprehension, work-study skills, independent reading in both 
group and individualized approaches will be studied. 

Consideration will be given to the nature of reading, sig- 
nificant research in the field, the curriculum, selection of ma- 
terials and the use of formal and informal tests. 

El 452 Social Studies in the Primary Grades 

With El 411, Teaching of Social Studies, as a prerequisite, 
this course will include a more detailed examination of con- 
tent, objectives, and resource materials for social studies in 
kindergarten through third grade. Research problems will be 
examined and representative units developed. 

El 461 Organization of the Elementary School and 

Its Curriculum 3 cr. 

A study of the organization of the elementary school from 
the standpoint of curriculum design and development. The role 
of the teacher will also be examined as it relates to the evalu- 
ation, improvement, and development of the elementary school 
curriculum. Course is especially designed for those who have 
completed student teaching or are postgraduates. 

El 462 Innovations in Elementary Education 3 cr. 

A study of innovations which influence and direct the ed- 
ucational objectives of the modern elementary school and its 
organization. Particular attention will be given to those educa- 
tional innovations dealing with curriculum, school organiza- 
tion, and materials of instruction. Course is especially designed 
for those who have completed student teaching or are post- 
graduates. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



287 



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 

CRAIG SW AUGER, Chairman of Department 



BETTY S. ADAMS 
EDWARD ANDERSON 
MARGARET BECK 
WILLIAM BETTS 
JEAN BOYER 
JESSIE BRIGHT 
L. J. BRIGHT 
MORRISON BROWN 
MARGARET CALDWELL 
CAROLINE COMPTON 
DAVID COOK 
HARRY CRAIG 
WILLIAM CRAYCRAFT 
►BOB J. CUREY 
JOHN DAVIS 
DONALD EISEN 
ROBERT ENSLEY 
WILLIAM FORCE 
DONALD FRITZ 
GEORGIE ANN FUNK 
• Leave of absence. 



JAMES GRAY 
DOROTHY GOURLEY 
WILLIAM GRAYBURN 
DANIEL GRUBB 
HARRY HALDEMAN 
WAYNE HAYWARD 
RICHARD HAZLEY 
JACKSON HEIMER 
RAYMONA HULL 
LAWRENCE IANNI 
JOSEPH S. KRUPNIK 
MERLE LENTZ 
DOROTHY LUCKER 
CHARLES MAHAN 
DONALD McCLURE 
LAURABEL MILLER 
ANTHONY NANIA 
JAMES NIX 

MARGARET OMRCANIN 
•RICHARD RAY 



MAURICE RIDER 
ROSALY ROFFMAN 
PHYLLIS ROUMM 
PHILLIP RUFFNER 
GEORGE SEACRIST 
FREDERICK SEINFELT 
CATHERINE SHAFFER 
HELENA SMITH 

♦GERALD STERN 
FORD SWIGART 
RAYMOND THOMAS 
J. DAVID TRUBY 
MARGOT UEHLING 
JAMES WADDELL 
HELEN WARREN 
JOHN WATTA 

♦KATHRYN WELDY 
KENNETH WILSON 
DON WOODWORTH 
DAVID YOUNG 



4 cr. 
4 cr. 



2 cr. 



2 cr. 



GENERAL EDUCATION 

Both courses required of all students 

Eng 101 English I 
Eng 102 English II 

(Prerequisite: Eng 101) 

One course required of all students 

Eng 201 Literature I: Tragic Themes in Literature 

(Prerequisite: Eng 102) 
Eng 301 Literature II: The Literature of 
Social Criticism 

(Prerequisite: Eng 102) 

Humanities option (May be substituted for Introduction to Art 
or Introduction to Music) 
Eng 103 Introduction to Theater 3 cr. 

The following two courses may be elected as humanities elec- 
tives in general education 

Eng 261 The English Bible As Literature 3 cr. 

Eng 271 Modern American Fiction 3 cr. 

Eng 101 English I 4 cr. 

English I, a basic required course for all students, should 
be taken in the first semester of study at Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. Seven theme-length expository papers are writ- 
ten during the semester in addition to shorter exercises and 
a written final examination. The program for the course is 
based on readings in the nature and history of language, Ian- 



238 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

guage analysis, and problems in rhetoric, in order to develop 
competence in those language skills necessary for successful 
college study. Students are encouraged to confer with their in- 
structors throughout the semester about their writing prob- 
lems. Exemption is not granted from English I for a student 
who has completed a high school Advanced Placement English 
course. 

Eng 102 English II 4 cr. 

English II, the second required general education English 
course, may be taken after a student has received a passing 
grade in English I. Readings in imaginative literature continue 
the development of language skills begun in English I, with 
the writing of at least four long papers, including a research 
exercise based on a literary or other source book. Exemption 
from English II may be granted on the recommendation of the 
English I instructor, who will supervise the completion of a 
research paper by independent study of the exemptee. 

Eng 103 Introduction to Theater 3 cr. 

This course explores the place of the theatre in the life 
of man, with a critical appreciation of the various arts and 
skills involved. Emphasis is on the creative function of the 
audience. 

Eng 133 Newspaper Reporting 3 cr. 

This course is open to first-year and second-year students 
in any department who either work or aspire to work on the 
university newspaper staff. The course includes instruction in 
writing the news story, preparing copy, interviewing, covering 
special events and similar reporting activities. 

Eng 201 Tragic Themes in Literature 2 cr. 

The aims of this course are twofold: to introduce the stu- 
dent to one of the main thematic preoccupations of western 
literature, and to stimulate the student's desire to read on his 
own initiative. The literary works are drawn from the three 
major genres: poetry, drama, and prose fiction. Not open to 
English majors. 

Eng 211 Classical Literature 3 cr. 

A course for English majors that replaces Eng 201 and 
301. The masterpieces studied range from those of ancient 
Greece to the Middle Ages. English literature and American 
literature are excluded. 

Eng 212 American Literature to 1865 3 cr. 

This course provides a study of major American writers 
from colonial times to the Civil War. 

Eng 213 Pre-Renaissance 3 cr. 

Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, the Middle English 
lyric, the popular ballad, and the Arthurian romance are stu- 
died in this course. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Eng 214 Shakespeare 3 cr. 

Shakespeare's development as a poetic dramatist is studied 
against the background of the Elizabethan stage; the audience, 
textual problems, language, imagery, and philosophy are ex- 
amined. A few plays are read in detail and others are assigned 
for rapid reading. Phonograph recordings of complete plays, 
and of scenes and speeches by professional actors are used. 

Eng 215 The Augustans 3 cr. 

By an examination in some detail of the major poems of 
Dry den and Pope, of the major prose of Swift, Addison and 
Steele, and of selected works of a few minor writers, this 
course concerns itself with Augustan concepts of literature 
and morality. 

Eng 216 The Romantic Movement 3 cr. 

Basic tenets of Romantic philosophy are examined as they 
are expressed in the major writings of the period from 1780- 
1832 — poetry, the essay, and fiction. Special attention is given 
to the aesthetic creed of the Romantic poets and to the means 
of interpreting and evaluating their poems. 

Eng 217 Victorian Literature 3 cr. 

Essays, novels, and poetry of the second half of the nine- 
teenth century are read with special consideration of the criti- 
cism they offer of political, economics, social, and religious 
practices and creeds of Victorian England. 

Eng 218 The Age of Spenser 3 cr. 

This course surveys the non-dramatic literature of the 
English Renaissance, with particular emphasis on the poetry of 
Spenser. Some attention will be paid to both Elizabethan criti- 
cal theory and classical and continental backgrounds. 

Eng 219 The Age of Milton 3 cr. 

This course includes a brief reading of the later meta- 
physical poets and cavalier poets with concentration on the 
major poems of John Milton. Some attention is given to the 
religious and political conflicts of the time as they are reflect- 
ed in both prose and poetry. 

Eng 221 Journalistic Writing 3 cr. 

This course places special emphasis upon the writing of the 
news story, the column, the feature, and the editorial. Some 
attention is given to college and school publications and to the 
make-up and editorial policy. May be substituted for Eng 222 
to satisfy the advanced writing requirement for English Edu- 
cation majors. 

Eng 222 Advanced Composition 3 cr. 

This course primarily seeks to improve writing style, 
particularly in the more utilitarian forms such as the magazine 
article and the personal essay. The student is expected to 



240 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



develop artistic sensitivity in handling and judging language 
and literary forms. Required of English Education majors. 

Eng 241 Rise of the English Novel 3 cr. 

This course will survey the development of the English 
novel from its forerunners through the fiction of the Gothic 
romanticists and Jane Austen. Works such as the following will 
be read and discussed: Moll Flanders, Joseph Andrews, Tom 
Jones, Humphry Clinker, Tristram Shandy, and Mansfield 
Park. 

Eng 245 Modern Drama 3 cr. 

The reading of plays will start with Ibsen and other Scan- 
dinavian dramatists, followed by plays by outstanding Con- 
tinental, British, and American playwrights such as Becque, 
Chekhov, Pirandello, Wilde, Shaw, O'Casey, O'Neill, Williams, 
and Miller. 

Eng 246 American Literature Since 1865 3 cr. 

This course provides a study of major American writers 
from the Civil War to the present. 

Eng 248 The Age of Johnson 3 cr. 

This course, while it emphasizes the art and criticism of 
Samuel Johnson as revealed in his writings and Boswell's 
Life, also examines a number of minor writers as philosophi- 
cal and artistic innovators. 

Eng 251 The History of the English Language 3 cr. 

The historical development of the English language is 
studied as a basis for a better understanding of modern Amer- 
ican English. An examination is made of changes in sound, 
vocabulary enrichment from various sources, and changes in 
syntax and usage. The course is open to students from all de- 
partments and curricula, but is especially recommended to 
elementary majors and English majors. 

Eng 261 The English Bible as Literature 3 cr. 

This course will consider the literary aspects of the Eng- 
lish Bible by relating earlier translations to the Authorized 
Version of 1611 and by tracing some of the major influences 
of the King James Bible upon the writers and speakers of 
modern English. This course may be used as an elective in the 
humanities area of the general education program. 

Eng 271 Modern American Fiction 3 cr. 

Major American writers of fiction since 1900 will be con- 
sidered in this course. This course may be used as an elective 
in the humanities area of the general education program. 

Eng 301 The Literature of Social Criticism 2 cr. 

This course focuses primarily on the satiric and comic 
modes, although reflective essays may also be included if their 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 241 

major concern is social criticism. An attempt has been made 
to select works which reflect the social attitudes of most of 
the major periods of Western thought from Plato to Bertrand 
Russell. Selection has been made from all major literary 
genres. Not open to English majors. 

Eng 351 English Drama to the Restoration 3 cr. 

This course traces the development of English drama from 
900 to the closing of the theatres in 1642, but does not include 
the plays of Shakespeare. 

Eng 360 Nineteenth Century English Novel 3 cr. 

This course traces the historical and technical develop- 
ment of the novel from Scott to Hardy. Included will be such 
authors as Dickens, Thackeray. Trollope, the Brontes, and 
Eliot. 

Eng 364 Trends in Linguistics 3 cr. 

This course explores recent developments in linguistic 
theory and research. The subject matter will be selected in an 
effort to expose the student to the work of major contemporary 
linguists and allied scholars who are concerned with enlarging 
man's knowledge about language. No pre-requisite required. 

Eng 371 Directing and Play Production 3 cr. 

This course affords each student the opportunity to select, 
cast, rehearse, and produce a one-act play. Included are sug- 
gestions on how to improvise for meeting the demands of 
small stages. 

Eng 377 Creative Dramatics and Story Telling 3 cr. 

This course, through workshop experience, stresses crea- 
tive dramatics as a way of teaching for adults, a way of learn- 
ing for children in both the elementary and secondary schools. 
It emphasizes the student planning, acting, and evaluating 
techniques as they apply to unscripted, spontaneous dramatic 
expression. As a preliminary to creative dramatics, students 
learn various techniques in story telling. 

Eng 378 Costume and Make-up 3 cr. 

This course deals with the practical application of straight 
and character make-up. Emphasis on costuming to show how 
mood and illusion can be created through proper selection of 
style, color, and texture of materials. 

Eng 379 Stagecraft and Scenic Design 3 cr. 

Theories and techniques of designing, building, and paint- 
ing, of stage settings; organization and operation of production 
crews. 

Eng 381 Fundamentals of Acting 3 cr. 

This course gives attention to theory and practice in the 
techniques of acting. It introduces styles of acting as related 



242 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

to dramatic forms, with emphasis on stage movement and 
voice projection. 

Eng 469 Oral Interpretation 3 cr. 

This course emphasizes the understanding and apprecia- 
tion of literature through developing skill in reading aloud. 
Special attention is given to selecting, adapting, and preparing 
material for presentation in high school classes. 

Eng 472 Public Speaking 3 cr. 

Fundamental principles of public speaking, audience anal- 
ysis, interest and attention, selection and organization of 
speech material, and delivery are taught in this course. Prac- 
tice in preparation and delivery of extemporaneous speeches 
will be provided for. 

Ed 451 Teaching of English, Speech and Reading 

in the Secondary Schools 3 cr. 

Eng 363 is a prerequisite to this course, and this course 
is in turn a prerequisite to student teaching in English. 

This course introduces the student to the current profes- 
sional practices in the teaching of English in high school. Back- 
ground for competence in teaching is provided through (1) 
study of professional literature, (2) individual reports, (3) 
writing of unit plans and lesson plans, (4) observing teaching 
in high school classes, (5) participating in class demonstrations, 
and (6) building a professional file of instructional materials. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



248 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT 

CHARLES W. FAUST, Acting Chairman of Department 



EDWARD W. BIEGHLER 
MARGARET BIEGHLER 
KENNETH W. BRODE 
JOSE CARRANZA 
SHOW-CHIH RAI CHU 
EDITH M. CORD 
LEONARD B. DeFABO 
FERNAND FISEL 
WERNER J. FRIES 
ANTONIO M. GUARDIOLA 
AURORA P. GUARDIOLA 
ISOLDE A. HENNINGER 
WILLIAM J. HENZELMAN 
VICTOR HUESEN 



HERBERT E. ISAR 
FRANK E. LANDIS 
ARTHUR A. LEONE 
CHARLOTTE LEVENTHAL 
ONEIDA I. LOZADA 
CRUZ MENDIZABAL 
GEORGE R. MILTZ 
LUDO OP DE BEECK 
BERNARD ROFFMAN 
ELEANOR ROSEMAN 
MICHELINE A. ROZIER 
DAVID L. SHIELDS 
ANTHONY J. SORENTO 
ANDREE-MARIE SRABIAN 
ROGER N. WILLIAMS 



COURSES IN THE GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Chi 151-152 Chinese I and II 3 cr. each 

Fr 151-152 French I and II 3 cr. each 

Ger 151-152 German I and II 3 cr. each 

Grk 151-152 Greek I and II 3 cr. each 

Lat 151-152 Latin I and II 3 cr. each 

Port 151-152 Portuguese I and II 3 cr. each 

Rus 151-152 Russian I and II 3 cr. each 

^Sp 151152 Spanish I and II 3 cr. each 

This elementary sequence is designed primarily for the 
student who will complete a two semester course only or has 
not had the language in question in high school. Its basic ob- 
jectives are accuracy of pronunciation and to develop the abil- 
ity to read, write, speak, and understand the basic elements of 
the language under study, with emphasis on the people and 
customs of the country or countries concerned. These courses 
may not be taken for credit by students who have completed 
a two-year sequence in high school. 

3 cr. each 



Chi 251-252 Chinese III and IV 
Fr 251-252 French III and IV 
Ger 251-252 German III and IV 
Grk 251-252 Greek III and IV 
Lat 251-252 Latin III and IV 
Rus 251-252 Russian III and IV 



3 cr. each 
3 cr. each 
3 cr. each 
3 cr. each 
3 cr. each 



241 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Sp 251-252 Spanish III and IV 3 cr. each 

This sequence is designed for students who have had two 
years of the language in high school or one year in college, 
and continue in the same language, either to fulfill a language 
requirement or for specialization. The course is a systematic 
review of grammar and an intensive study of cultural texts, 
incorporating discussions and written exercises. Material of 
literary and cultural interest will be studied, and strong em- 
phasis is given to the development of oral skills. Majors in 
French, German, Russian, and Spanish must take 053 and 054 
concurrently; non-majors are invited to do so if they desire 
and their schedules permit additional work in oral practice. 

Courses Required in French, German, Latin, Russian, and 

Spanish 

Fr 051-052 Oral Practice I and II 2 cr. each 

Ger 051052 Oral Practice I and II 2 cr. each 

Rus 051-052 Oral Practice I and II 2 cr. each 

Sp 051-052 Oral Practice I and II 2 cr. each 

This laboratory sequence introduces the phonetic structure 
of the language, and encourages automatic response to recur- 
ring basic phrase units through constant oral drill. Majors 
must take this sequence concurrently with 151-152. 

Fr 053-054 Oral Practice III and IV 2 cr. each 

Ger 053-054 Oral Practice III and IV 2 cr. each 

Rus 053-054 Oral Practice III and IV 2 cr. each 

Sp 053-054 Oral Practice III and IV 2 cr. each 

This advanced laboratory sequence is a continuation of 
051-052, and carries oral skills to a higher level. It must be 
taken concurrently with sequence 251-252. 

Fr 351-352 Advanced French Language I and II 3 cr. each 

Ger 351-352 Advanced German Language I and II 3 cr. each 

Lat 351-352 Advanced Latin I and II 3 cr. each 

Rus 351-352 Advanced Russian Language I and II 3 cr. each 

Sp 351-352 Advanced Spanish Language I and II 3 cr. each 

This sequence reviews and supplements the grammar of 
earlier courses, and aims toward a systematic analysis of the 
structure of the language. Some attention is given to the his- 
torical background of the language, particularly those phases 
which lie beyond apparent irregularities and anomalies. Fre- 
quent original themes are required in the second semester. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Fr 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice I-II 1 cr. each 

Ger 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice I-II 1 cr. each 

Rus 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice I-II 1 cr. each 

Sp 055-056 Advanced Oral Practice I-II 1 cr. each 

These are relatively informal conversation courses which 
the student majoring in the language must take concurrently 
with the courses numbered 351-352, meeting two periods per 
week but not in the language laboratory. 

Fr 361-362 Development of French Culture and 

Literature I and II 3 cr. each 

Ger 361-362 Development of German Culture and 

Literature I and II 3 cr. each 

Lat 361 Development of Roman Culture and Literature 3 cr. 

Rus 361-362 Development of Russian Culture and 

Literature I and II 3 cr. each 

Sp 361-362 Development of Hispanic Culture and 

Literature I and II 3 cr. each 

This course sequence examines the historical and cultural 
aspects of the countries involved, reviews their characteristic 
contributions over the centuries, and analyzes the relationship 
of each literary school to the moment which produced it. 

Lat 362 Latin Conversation and Composition 3 cr. 

This course aims at the ability to speak latin on a conver- 
sational level and to write grammatically correct Latin prose. 

Ed 451 Teaching of Foreign Languages in the 

Secondary School 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the sequence 351- 
352 and 055-056 in the student's major language. 

The objective of this course is to prepare teachers of for- 
eign languages for the modern high school. It considers meth- 
ods and materials of instruction, current theories and tech- 
niques, and requires preparation and presentation of illustra- 
tive units. Training in the administration, operation, and main- 
tenance of the language laboratory constitutes a significant 
part of the course. 

Elective Courses in French 

Fr 253 Intermediate Composition and Conversation 3 cr. 

This course, usually reserved for the main summer ses- 
sion, has as its prerequisite a minimum of one year of college 
French. 

Fr 291 Special Projects I 1-3 cr. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Fr 391 Special Projects in French Literature 1-3 cr. 

These courses are planned to satisfy the special needs of 
an individual or a group as they may arise. Fr 391 is devoted 
to a special aspect or figure of French literature. 

Fr 365 Seventeenth Century French Literature 3 cr. 

Fr 366 Eighteenth Century French Literature 3 cr. 

Fr 367 Nineteenth Century French Literature 3 cr. 

Fr 368 Twentieth Century French Literature 3 cr. 

These courses are designed to present general surveys of 
the literature of their respective periods, with due considera- 
tion to the social factors and events behind them. 

Fr 371 The French Novel 3 cr. 

This course constitutes a coherent survey of the origin and 
development of the French novel. A selected list of works rep- 
resentative of the major modes are read in their entirety. 

Fr 372 Studies in Contemporary French Literature 3 cr. 

The content of this course will vary in accordance with 
the needs and interests of those who will elect it. 

Elective Courses in German 

Ger 253 Intermediate Composition and Conversation 3 cr. 

This course, usually reserved for the main summer ses- 
sion, has as its prerequisite a minimum of one year of college 
German. 

Ger 256 Scientific German 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: completion of German 251-252 or equivalent. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students spe- 
cializing in the Natural Sciences, and will normally be offered 
during the main summer session if the demand justifies the 
offering of such a course. 

Ger 291 Special Projects I 1-3 cr. 

Ger 391 Special Projects in German Literature 1-3 cr. 

These courses are planned to satisfy the special needs of 
an individual or a group as they may arise. Ger 391 is devoted 
to a special aspect or figure of German literature. 

Ger 363-364 Introduction to German Literature I and II 3-6 cr. 

Selected readings in German poetry, drama, and fiction. 
The aim of the course is to acquaint the student with some 
techniques for intelligent understanding and formal criticism 
of works of literature. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PE NNSYLVANIA 247 

Ger 367 Nineteenth Century German Literature 3 cr. 

Ger 368-369 Twentieth Century German Literature 3-6 cr. 

These courses are designed to present general surveys of 
the literature of their respective periods, with due considera- 
tion to the social factors and events behind them. 

Ger 370-371 The Age of Goethe I and II 3-6 cr. 

Selected readings to demonstrate the antecedents and ac- 
complishments of the Golden Age of German letters, 1750-1832. 

Elective Courses in Latin 

Lat 371-372 Survey of Latin Literature I and II 3 cr. 

This course sequence will give a comprehensive view of 
Latin literature from Ennius to the Middle Ages. 

Elective Courses in Russian 

Rus 291 Special Projects I 1-3 cr. 

Rus 391 Special Projects II 1-3 cr. 

These courses are planned to satisfy the special needs of 
an individual or a group as they may arise. 

Rus 367-368 Nineteenth Century Russian 

Literature I and II 3-6 cr. 

Rus 369-370 Twentieth Century Russian Literature 3-6 cr. 

These courses are designed to present general surveys of 
the literature of their respective periods, with due considera- 
tion to the social factors and events behind them. 

Rus 371 Russian Poetry 3 cr. 

A survey of Russian poetry from the eighteenth century 
to the present with particular emphasis on Pushkin and Ler- 
montov. 

Rus 372 Russian Drama 3 cr. 

The theater in Russia from Fonvizin to Chekhov and 
Stanislavsky. 

Elective Courses in Spanish 

Sp 253 Intermediate Composition and Conversation 3 cr. 

This course, usually reserved for the main summer ses- 
sion, has as its prerequisite a minimum of one year of college 
Spanish. 

Sp 291 Special Projects I 1-3 cr. 

Sp 391 Special Projects in Spanish Literature 1-3 cr. 

These courses parallel Fr 291 and 391, q.v. Sp 391 is de- 
voted to a special aspect or figure of Spanish literature. 

Sp 365 Spanish Literature Before 1650 3 cr. 

Sp 367 Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature 3 cr. 



248 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Sp 368 Twentieth Century Spanish Literature 3 cr. 

These courses are designed to present general surveys of 
the literature of their respective periods, with due considera- 
tion to the social factors and events behind them. 

Sp 370 Golden Age Drama 3 cr. 

This course traces the development of the Spanish theater 
and examines its artistic and spiritual flowering in the Baro- 
que period. 

Sp 371 The Spanish Novel 3 cr. 

After a brief survey of the origins and course of the 
Spanish novel major stress is given to the novel of the nine- 
teenth century and the Generation of 98. 

Sp 376 Spanish-American Literature 3 cr. 

Following a consideration of the salient tendencies of 
Spanish-American literature, this course may take the form 
of a comprehensive survey, or it may concentrate its attention 
upon the recent novel of social thesis. 

Sp 390 Spanish in the Elementary School 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 251-252 or equivalent. 

In this course the prospective teacher of Spanish on the 
elementary level is introduced to materials suitable for grades 
1-6. Much time is devoted in the language laboratory to the 
preparation of games, songs, poems, and story telling. 

LINGUISTICS 

Ling 421 Language and Society 3 s.h. 

The work of this course is designed to inform the student 
about the salient facts of language and its fundamental role in 
the development and continuity of society and culture. Some 
points considered are: language families and their character- 
istics, factors of linguistic change and development, reciprocal 
influences of culture and language, linguistic borrowing, sys- 
tems of writing, and psycholinguistics. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 249 



FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

DON-CHEAN CHU, Chairman of Department 

DON-CHEAN CHU JOHN E. MERRYMAN 

MEARL F. GERHEIM RAYMOND E. MILLER 

JOHN E. McELHOES PAUL A. RISHEBERGER 

HAROLD J. YOUCIS WILLIAM E. SALESSES 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COURSES 

(Required of all Students in Education) 

Ed 302 History and Philosophy of Education 3 cr. 

This course is designed to promote a clearer understand- 
ing of the modern educational system through a study of his- 
torical changes in instructional processes and ideas underlying 
it. Through the emphasis placed upon the study of educational 
beliefs and points of view, the course seeks to foster critical 
thinking which will lead to better judgement about the role 
of the school in our social structure, the meaning of democ- 
racy, the teacher and his profession, and the methods and ob- 
jectives of the school. 

Ed 422 School Law 2 cr. 

This course aims to provide an interpretation of school 
law as it directly pertains to the needs of the teacher. 

GENERAL ELECTIVES 

(These courses are open to juniors and seniors) 

Ed 454 Public School Administration 3 cr. 

The course is designed to acquaint the teacher with the 
administration and organization of the American public school. 
Attention is given to the cultural role of the schools. Treat- 
ment is given to decision-making in the operation of the 
schools and the total task of school operation with the empha- 
sis on what should be done. The functions and methods of all 
professional personnel in the operation and improvement of 
the schools will be considered. 

Ed 455 Comparative Education 3 cr. 

A brief study of historical backgrounds in education fol- 
lowed by an examination of contemporary educational systems 
in Eastern and Western civilizations. 

Ed 456 Issues and Trends in Education 3 cr. 

The purpose of this course is to survey the basic issues 
and problems confronting public schools, followed by an ex- 
amination of innovations, trends, and the new approach in the 
American schools. 

Ed 457 Secondary School Curriculum 3 cr. 

This course will study the social diagnosis for curriculum 
development, curriculum principles and procedures, patterns 
of organization, and curriculum issues. 



260 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT 

THOMAS G. GAULT, Department Chairman 

MAMIE L. ANDERZHON LEONARD TEPPER 

DONALD J. BALLAS ROBERT N. THOMAS 

FRANK J. BASILE WILLIAM WARREN 

GOPAL S. KULKARNI CHARLES E. WEBER 

ISADORE R. LENGLET DAVID C. WINSLOW 

VINCENT P. MILLER SUSAN WOOD 

JAMES E. PAYNE MAURICE M. ZACUR 

Foundation Geography Courses 

Geog 101 World Geography 3 cr. 

The purpose of this course is to develop a knowledge and 
appreciation of patterns of natural environment throughout 
the world, with special emphasis on man's adjustment to these 
environments. Understanding and appreciation of man's inter- 
relationship with the earth are accomplished through the study 
of the physical, cultural, economic, and demographic factors. 

Geog 149 Economic Geography 3 cr. 

Economic Geography is designed to promote geographic 
and economic concepts, methods, and skills pertinent to the 
understanding of the spatial variation of production, consump- 
tion, and exchange over the earth's surface. 

Geog 154 Cultural Geography 3 cr. 

May be taken in lieu of Geo 101. 

The geographical aspects of population, settlement, ethno- 
geography, and the cultural landscape are studied. The course 
considers the relationships of various ethnic and cultural 
groups to the natural environment. The student is acquainted 
with the tools, philosophy, and literature of cultural geography 
and related disciplines. 

Physical Geography Courses 

Geog 153 Physical Geography 3 cr. 

May be taken in lieu of Geog 101. 

Physical Geography introduces (1) the natural factors of 
the landscape as studied by the geographer; weather, climate, 
soils, rocks, minerals, structure of the earth's crust, the oceans; 
and (2) the tools of geography: globes, maps, aerial photo- 
graphs. 

Geog 240 Elements of Weather and Climate 3 cr. 

The elements of weather and climate, and the climatic 
regions of the earth are studied. Understanding and applica- 
tion are underscored in the laboratory. 

Geog 241 Climatology 

Physical aspects of climatology. Topics covered: heat and 
water budget; climatic classification systems; paleoclimates; 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



regional climates of the continents; selected microclimates; 
climate change in space and time; statistical and mathematical 
models. 

Geog 246 Physiography I 4 cr. 

This course studies the form of the earth's crust and its 
associated water bodies; classification, distribution, processes 
involved in their geomorphological development, and effect 
upon the human landscape. 

Geog 255 Cartography 3 cr. 

Cartography gives an understanding in the compilation 
and use of maps and develops an ability to construct economic 
and geographic maps. The use of aerial photographs is treated 
briefly. 

Geog 452 Conservation-Resource Use 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 9 hours of geography. 

A comprehensive survey of conservation in natural and 
human resources. It stresses regional understanding; accom- 
plished through inventory, planning and utilization evaluation. 
Field work, workshop activities, projects, and use of resource 
specialists are an integral part of the course. 

Geog 422 Aerospace Science 3 cr. 

A seminar conducted by a number of visiting aerospace 
authorities. It treats of the atmosphere and space environment; 
history of light and flight problems; satellites and space 
probes; manned orbital and space exploration projects; pro- 
pulsion, communication, and other systems. Problems of teach- 
ing and bibliography at the various elementary and secondary 
levels will be considered. An indoctrination flight in a small 
craft and field trips to air age installations and projects fortify 
learning. 

Regional Geography Courses 

Geog 251 Geography of Anglo-America 3 cr. 

A regional study of the United States and Canada con- 
cerned with the investigation of man's adjustment to his en- 
vironment as influenced by the physical factors of climate, 
vegetation, relief soils, and natural resources as well as recog- 
nition of cultural adjustments to the geographic environment, 
and the interrelations between the two countries and the rest 
of the world. (This course may not be taken if the student has 
completed Geog 112.) 

Geog 252 Geography of Pennsylvania 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: Geog 101. 

The topography, climate, natural vegetation, natural re- 
sources, population, agriculture, manufacturing, mining, etc., 
are treated. Internal and external relationships are studied to 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



gain an insight into the various regions of the state and Penn- 
sylvania's world relationships. 

Geog 256 Geography of Europe 3 cr. 

This regional course aims to help students acquire the 
ability to find and apply geographic relationships underlying 
land use, dominant international problems, boundary disputes 
and the regional complexes of the European continent. Special 
attention is paid to the natural and cultural patterns as de- 
veloped in modern times. 

Geog 257 Geography of U.S.S.R. 3 cr. 

Special emphasis is placed upon the major geographic re- 
gions of the Soviet Union. Human adjustment to the physical 
environment of the various regions is given major considera- 
tion. Natural resources, cultural patterns, population — both 
numbers and distribution, strategic areas and related geo- 
political problems are studied. 

Geog 261 Geography of Far East 3 cr. 

This study of Korea, Manchuria, Outer Mongolia, Japan, 
and China involves an intensive investigation of the natural 
factors and man's adjustment to them. This is accomplished 
through the study of the geographic, economic and political re- 
gions of eastern Asia. The geographic background needed in 
planning solution for raising the standards of living, for the 
wise use and restoration of natural resources, and the indus- 
trialization of countries as presented. 

Geog 262 Geography of South & Southeast Asia 3 cr. 

India, Pakistan, Indochina, Ceylon, Burma, Thailand, and 
Indonesia are the major areas studied. Students are given an 
understanding of the geographic relationships that effect land 
use, land reform, population, industrialization, nationalism, 
and boundary disputes. Special attention is given to regional 
similarities and differences, particularly as they pertain to hu- 
man adjustment. 

Geog 263 Geography of North Africa and Southwest Asia 3 cr. 

This study of the countries north of and including the 
Sahara Desert in Africa, Turko-Arabian peninsulas and Af- 
ghanistan in southwest Asia emphasizes the critical problems 
of water supply, land use, over-population, industrialization, 
resources and the relationships of these countries to other 
parts of the world. 

Geog 271 Geography of South America 3 cr. 

A regional study is made of South America with special 
emphasis placed on regional differences and similarities. South 
America relations with other areas, especially the United 
States, are stressed. The unique problems of South America, 
with special attention to tropical land use are considered. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 253 



Geog 272 Geography of Middle America 3 cr. 

The regional method is applied to Mexico, Central Amer- 
ica and the West Indies. Similarities and differences are noted 
both in the cultural and natural landscapes. Special emphasis 
is placed upon cultural relationships and problems evolved 
from international commerce and trade. The effects of the 
United States economy upon these areas, are given serious 
attention. 

Geog 281 Geography of Africa, South of Sahara 3 cr. 

This course begins with a systematic study of the physical, 
cultural, and historical geography of the continent. The sys- 
tematic background is followed by studies of the major regions 
and nations of Africa, emphasizing political, cultural, and eco- 
nomic factors in the development of that continent. 

Geog 291 Geography of Australia and Pacific Islands 2 cr. 

Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands are stud- 
ied. Cultural patterns in relation to natural environments are 
considered to discover interrelationships. Geographic aspects 
of land tenure, race, population, location, geopolitics and the 
strategic importance of the various areas are considered. 

Geog 292 Geography of Polar Regions 2 cr. 

Both Antarctica and the North Polar area are studied set- 
ting forth (1) the history of their exploration, (2) the physical 
environment, (3) the importance of the regions and of knowl- 
edge concerning the areas, and (4) future use and control of 
the areas. 

SYSTEMATIC HUMAN GEOGRAPHY COURSES 

Geog 253 Geography and Society 3 cr. 

A course especially designed for elementary and secondary 
social science teachers. Concepts of special importance will be 
emphasized, such as: spatial arrangement, areal change, earth 
for support of man. urbanization, significance of scale, bio- 
physical relationships with society, interdependency. value of 
location, the chronological organization of knowledge, among 
others. 

Geog 353 Geographic Influences in History 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Geog 101, 151, or 153 and Geog 251, or 112. 

A study is made of the relationship of the natural environ- 
mental factors to the settlement, development, and progress of 
selected countries — with major emphasis on the United States. 

Geog 354 Trade and Transportation 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Geog 101, 151, 153 and Econ 121. 

An introduction to trade and transportation, it embraces 
analysis, theory and application techniques. Treatment in- 
cludes trade patterns, place theory, statistics and models. Cir- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



culation, accessibility, time and distance concepts are consid- 
ered. Routes, terminals, vehicles, commodities, and passengers 
are defined. 

Geog 453 Political Geography 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Six credits in Geography and six credits in 
other Social Sciences. 

Consideration is given to the geographic elements as re- 
lated to geopolitical concepts, types and distribution of politi- 
cal systems, major political units and association, factors which 
influence political power, areas of friction, conflict, and arbi- 
tration. 

Geog 454 World Problems in Geography 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Six Geography credits and six credits in 
other Social Sciences. 

A study is made of world problems and the geographic 
backgrounds necessary to understanding them. Attention is 
given to boundary questions, world trade, world food resourc- 
es, control and development of natural resources, settlement 
population problems. 

Geog 455 Historical Geography of Cities and 

City Planning 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 12 s.h. of Geography. 

This course is intended to give the student a basic under- 
standing of the beginning of city planning and how it has de- 
veloped under the influence of the fundamental physical re- 
lationships of social, economic, and geographic conditions to 
reflect the art and science of present city planning. This course 
will examine the process of city planning as practiced during 
the ancient, medieval, and renaissance periods, and will give a 
review of early planning efforts in America, as well as the 
present influences in city planning. 

Geog 456 General City and Regional Planning 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Geog 455. 

The place of planning in the structure of government and 
the duties and responsibilities of planning commissions will be 
reviewed as well as planning enabling legislation of counties, 
cities, boroughs and townships. The process of preparing the 
City and Regional Comprehensive Plan will be studied. This 
course will examine the four phases involved in the prepara- 
tion of a community plan. Study items such as land use, nat- 
ural resources, topography, soils, geology, climate, and drain- 
age will be utilized to prepare a general comprehensive plan. 

Geog 457 Urban Design I 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Geog 456. 

This course will offer the student an opportunity to work 
on the various concepts of city and subdivision design which 
will utilize and describe the affects of topography, natural re- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



sources and other physical elements as they affect urban de- 
sign. Also included in this course will be a study of the neigh- 
borhood concept, planned unit development, and planning of 
new towns. 

Geog 458 Urban Planning Basic Studies and Analysis 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Geog 456. 

Research, analythical design and plan making techniques 
in urban and regional planning including studies of natural 
resources, land use, circulation, community facilities, public 
utilities, economic base, employment, population, market anal- 
yses, source and use of statistical data. This course will exam- 
ine the basic study items necessary upon which to prepare ur- 
ban and regional comprehensive plans. 

Geog 461 Regional Field Studies 1-3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in Geography. 

These trips, which involve the study of a selected area 
through the agencies of travel and actual investigation, are 
arranged from time to time to suit the needs of the student 
group. 

Geog 462 Field Techniques in Geography 1-3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in Geography or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

This course proposes to give experience in the study of 
land utilization and use of geographic tools and techniques of 
the field. 

Geog 491 Geographic Thought and Philosophy 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 18 semester hours in Geography. 

The seminar is limited to senior and graduate geography 
majors or minors. The emphasis will be upon individual study, 
research, and presentation of geographic data — both written 
and oral. This course will be offered every semester and all 
geography majors (graduate and undergraduate) are required 
to complete this for major in education or in an area of con- 
centration within the Liberal Arts. 

Geog 492 Geography Honors 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 18 semester hours in Geography. 

Admission to the Geography Honors course is by invita- 
tion only to students who have attained junior standing. Stu- 
dents will do independent research over two semesters under 
the direction of a department member. Prerequisite is a B 
average in Geography courses, and a B average in Geography 
must be maintained during the honors program. 

Geog 493 Geography High Honors 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Geog 492. 

This course is a third semester extension of Geog 492. Ad- 
mission is by invitation only to those who have completed 
Geog 495. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION COURSES 

Ed 421 Teaching of Geography in Secondary Schools 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 18 semester hours of Geography including 
two regionals. 

The major objectives of this course is the study of modern 
methods and techniques for teaching geography or geographic 
materials, and of current curricula in geography. Emphasis is 
placed on the contribution of the discipline to the understand- 
ing of national and world problems. 

Ed 422 Teaching of World Cultures 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 18 semester hours of Geography and /or So- 
cial Studies. 

The course will emphasize modern techniques of teaching 
"World Cultures." Major study will be directed to the place of 
"World Cultures" in the curriculum, selection of texts, source 
materials for classroom use, and the preparation of resource 
and teaching units. Additional study will better enable the 
classroom teacher to maintain the proper balance between 
Geography and Social Studies in the preparation of the "World 
Cultures" course. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 267 



GEOSCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

ROBERT L. WOODARD. Acting Chairman 

WALTER H. GRANATA PAUL A. PRINCE 

FREDERICK R. PARK CONNIE J. SUTTON 

FRANK W. HALL, II 

Geos 111 Solar System 3 cr. 

Fundamentals of astronomy with emphasis on the tele- 
scope, observational methods, an examination of the sun, 
moon, planets, asteroids, comets, and meteors, the mechanics 
and origin of the solar system, and the spatial relationship of 
the solar system to the other members of the universe. Sched- 
uled laboratory periods and night observations are part of the 
course. Two hours lecture and one laboratory period or night 
observation per week. 

Geos 112 Stellar Astronomy 3 cr. 

Fundamentals of astronomy with emphasis on the sun, 
stars, galaxies, the sidereal universe, and the use of spectro- 
scopy for gathering astronomical data. Scheduled laboratory 
periods and night observations are part of the course. Two 
hours lecture and one laboratory period or night observation 
per week. 

Geos 121 Physical Geology 3 cr. 

A basic course, with no college prerequisites, designed to 
meet the need of science and non-science majors. It provides 
a survey of the physical forces molding, modifying and de- 
stroying earth structures. Laboratory work includes map 
study, the identification of rocks and minerals, and field trips. 
Two hours of lecture and one three hour laboratory per week. 

Geos 122 Historical Geology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Physical Geology or permission of instructor. 

A basic course providing a history of our planet from the 
fiery beginnings to the present. Special consideration is given 
to rock stratigraphic sequences, invertebrate fossil distribution 
and geologic map interpretation. Laboratory work includes 
field studies. Two hours of lecture and one three hour labora- 
tory per week. 

Geos 213 Navigation 3 cr. 

A thorough grounding in the meanings of terms used in 
navigation, in the purposes and use of navigational instru- 
ments and publications and in the theory and general methods 
of piloting, dead reckoning and electronic and celestial navi- 
gation. Emphasis is placed upon chart work and the solution of 
practical navigational problems. Two hours lecture and two 
hours laboratory. 



268 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Geos 223 Paleontology 3 cr. 

This course covers the morphology, classification and evo- 
lution of the common fossils. Indiana University is fortunate 
in being located in an area in which a wide spectrum of repre- 
sentative fossils ranging from Cabrian to Permian time may 
be found within easy-driving distance of the campus. Major 
emphasis is placed on the invertebrate fossils. Field work is 
an essential part of the course. Two hours lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. 

Geos 225 Geology of Pennsylvania 3 cr. 

Pennsylvania is fortunate to possess a wide variety of fas- 
cinating geologic phenomena. An appreciation of Pennsylvania 
geology is not merely an end in itself, but can provide the 
geologic insight for understanding other areas with similar 
geologic features. The Appalachian Mountains in Pennsylvania 
are a classic area in which to study geosyniclinal development, 
processes of folding, faulting and mountain building. The gla- 
ciated areas of North Pennsylvania, the highly complicated 
igeneous and metamorphic terrain of south east Pennsylvania, 
along with the Triassic basin and the coastal plain all may 
serve as fine examples of different types of geologic develop- 
ment. 

Geos 231 Mineralogy 3 cr. 

A lecture and laboratory concerned with the properties 
of minerals. An introduction to crystallography and the chem- 
istry of crystals is followed by a determination of minerals and 
their probable genesis. 

Geos 232 Petrology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Mineralogy. 

The course is concerned with a description of rock charac- 
ter based upon the mineral components and the physical re- 
lationship between mineral components of a rock. 

Geos 235 Structural Geology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Physical and Historical Geology or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

The course will provide an analysis of deformation and 
deformational processes as they apply to rock units. Specific 
structures will be related to the geomorphology and economics 
of the region. One hour lecture and four hours laboratory. 

Geos 241 Meteorology I 3 cr. 

Introduction to meteorological sciences. Composition and 
structure of the atmosphere. Radiation principles. Elementary 
thermodynamics and heat balance. Cloud Physics. The meri- 
dional, zonal, and teritary circulations. Air masses, fronts and 
storm structure. Common instruments in use. Elementary 
weather map reading and forecasting techniques. Lectures, 
readings, and laboratory. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Geos 242 Meteorology II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Meteorology I. 

An introduction to physical, dynamical and theoretical 
meteorology. Hydrodynamic equations of motion. Circulation 
and vorticity. Atmospheric turbulence. Energy transformations 
in the atmosphere. Examination of circulation theories. Fluid 
dynamics. Lectures, readings and a term paper. 

Geos 247 Intro to Oceanography 3 cr. 

An introduction to the physical, chemical, geological and 
biological nature of the ocean. Topography, submarine geology 
and bottom deposits. Water masses and their circulation. Com- 
mon instruments in use. Dynamical aspects of waves, tides, 
and currents. Elementary discussion of the principles of ocean- 
ic mechanics, dynamics and thermodynamics. Economic prob- 
lems of the sea. Lectures, reading, term paper and laboratory. 

Geos 321 Sedimentology 3 cr. 

The course in sedimentology is designed to help students 
investigate the nature of sediments, the classification of sedi- 
mentary rocks, the processes of sedimentation and to examine 
techniques used in the geologic investigation of sediments and 
sedimentary rocks. Sediments and sedimentary rocks are end 
products which reflect the environment at or near the site 
both during and after the time of deposition. The effect of 
varying physical, chemical and biochemical factors on sedi- 
ments and sedimentary rocks will be stressed. The more im- 
portant technique used in deciphering the geologic history of 
sedimentary rocks will be examined and students will have the 
opportunity to investigate and interpret various problems in 
the field of sedimentology. 

Geos 324 Stratigraphy 3 cr. 

A course designed to present the principles and methods 
of stratigraphy as well as a consideration of selected strati- 
graphic problems. 

The relationship between the physical and chemical en- 
vironment in and around areas of current sedimentation will 
be examined. The observed relationships will then be applied 
to the interpretation of certain stratigraphic sequences of the 
geologic past. 

Geos 335 Economic Geology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Mineralogy. 

The course will deal with the location and probable origin 
on fossil fuels, ores of the non-metals and metallic ores both 
ferrous and non-ferrous. 

Geos 461 Field Technique in Geoscience 3 cr. 

Instruction on the methods employed in the field to ob- 
tain and interpret geologic information. 



260 IN DIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Geos 498 Problems in Geoscience 1-3 cr. 

Selected problems in geoscience are investigated by upper 
level students. Credit may be determined by nature and scope 
of the work undertaken. 

Geos 499 Research in Geoscience 1-4 cr. 

A method of instituting and giving credit for supervised 
research on the part of upper level students. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 

JOHNNY J. MILLER, Chairman 



owen j. dougherty 
charles a. godlasky 
richard hornfeck 
willard j. kaylor 
charles l. klausing 
eugene e. lepley 
regis a. Mcknight 



WILLIAM A. NEAL 
LEWIS H. SHAFFER 
HERMAN L. SLEDZIK 
EDWARD L. SLONIGER 
SAMUEL G. SMITH 
LOUIS R. SUTTON 
LAWRENCE R. TUCKER 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

C. ELIZABETH McCAULIFF, Chairman 



ALICE D. DICKIE 
ANN T. ELLIOTT 
MARY L. ELTZ 
L. JUNE KORAB 



PATRICIA L. LOMMOCK 
BEVERLY J. LUCAS 
MARY A. MAGRUDER 
RUTH PODBIELSKI 



The objectives of the Departments of Health and Physical 
Education for Men and Women are as follows: 

1. To provide opportunities for individual exploration, un- 
derstanding and evaluation of sound personal and community- 
health practices and alternatives. 

2. To provide opportunities for recreational participation 
and advancement of skill competencies in those physical ac- 
tivities which satisfy individual interests and needs. 

3. To provide opportunities for individuals to explore their 
capacities for physical activities so that educated decisions 
can be made concerning the nature and extent of their partici- 
pation in such activities throughout life. 

These objectives will be implemented through the conduct 
of the following services of the Departments of Health and 
Physical Education for Men and Women: 

1. Required programs of Health and Physical Education 
for all University students. 

2. Elective professional programs of Health and Physical 
Education for men and women who plan careers in this spe- 
cialized area or in the related health professions. 

3. Intramural programs consisting of a wide range of ac- 
tivities to meet the interests of University students. 

4. Sports clubs, clinics and informal recreational oppor- 
tunities for students, faculty and other University personnel. 



262 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

5. Recreational and instructional programs meeting the 
interests and needs of the community of Indiana, Pennsylvan- 
ia, insofar as is possible within the limitations of faculty and 
facilities necessary for the fulfillment of all obligations to the 
University community. 

Required Program for Men 

All men are required to schedule two semesters of physi- 
cal education for a total of one semester hour of credit. This 
represents one-half (%) credit per semester. This requirement 
may be waived in part or whole upon the recommendation of 
the University physician, the Dean, School of Health Services, 
and with the approval of the Dean of the School in which the 
student is enrolled. See page for electives. 

Regulation uniforms are required for all curricular activ- 
ity and are available at the University Book Store for approx- 
imately $10.00. 

Required Program for Women 

Four semester hours of health and physical education are 
required of all University women. This requirement may be 
waived in part or whole upon the recommendation of the Uni- 
versity physician, the Dean, School of Health Services, and 
with the approval of the Dean of the School in which the stu- 
dent is enrolled. See page for electives. 

Regulation uniforms are required for all curricular activ- 
ity and are made available for purchase at Waller Gymnasium 
at the beginning of each semester. Approximate cost, $16.00. 

Required in Elementary Education 

El 314 Methods in Elementary School Health and 

Physical Education 2 cr. 

This course includes games, rhythms, movement educa- 
tion, tumbling, folk and square dancing and other skills suita- 
ble for the elementary school child. The teaching of health in 
the elementary school is emphasized. Methods, materials and 
lesson planning are a part of the course. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

HPE 204 First Aid (M & W) 1 cr. 

This course provides the student with an understanding 
of the practices and skills used for the proper care of all types 
of injuries. The American Red Cross Standard and Advanced 
Certification cards are issued upon successful completion of 
the course. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 263 

HPE 261 Senior Life Saving (M & W) 1 cr. 

This course emphasized the swimming and rescue skills 
necessary to complete the American Red Cross Senior Life 
Saving Course. Certificates are awarded upon successful com- 
pletion of the course. 

HPE 262 Water Safety Instructor's (M & W) 1 cr. 

This course emphasizes the teaching aspect of the skills, 
techniques and attitudes that are necessary in all areas of 
swimming. Those students successfully completing the course 
are qualified to hold such positions as water front directors, 
aquatics directors and other similar positions. 

Prerequisite: HPE 261 or other proof of validated Senior 
Life Saving Certificate. 

HPE 264 Skin and Scuba Diving (M & W) 1 cr. 

This course is designed to teach the necessary skills and 
proper use of equipment for underwater swimming. Tanks, 
regulators, weights and special equipment will be furnished 
The student must purchase a mask, fins and snorkle ($15.00). 
The course will include theory as well as practical work. 

Prerequisite: American Red Cross Senior Life Saving Cer- 
tificate. 

HPE 334 Sports Officiating (M) 1 cr. 

Techniques of officiating and rules interpretation will be 
stressed. Practice in actual officiating will be required in sev- 
eral varsity sports. 

HPE 336 Organization and Administration of Recreation 3 cr. 

The history, theory and philosophy of recreation are dis- 
cussed. The importance of play in the modern world, trends in 
recreation, problems encountered in organizing community- 
school programs and the principles of leadership are studied. 

HPE 345 Care and Analysis of Sports Injuries (M & W) 2 cr. 

This course is required for all men majoring in the De- 
partment of Health and Physical Education but may be elected 
by other students at the University. The prevention and care 
of accidents in sports activities are studied. The significance 
of the medical examination, conditioning exercises and sound 
health practices are discussed. Laboratory work includes tap- 
ing, bandaging, use of physiotherapy equipment, massage and 
supervised training room experience. 

HPE 346 First Aid Instructor's 1 cr. 

American Red Cross Standard, Advanced and Instructors 
certification will be awarded upon completion of this course. 

HPE 405 Administration and Techniques 

of Camping (M & W) 2 cr. 

The growth and significance of the camp movement, and 
understanding of camping techniques and various types of 



2G4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

camp programs are considered. Attention is given to camp- 
craft, nature study, woods lore and special occasion activities. 
School outdoor recreation programs are also studied. 

HPE 406 Advanced Modern Dance (M & W) 2 cr. 

Advanced techniques of performance and choreography 
are studied. Theory and composition form an integral part of 
course content. 

HPE 407 Synchronized Swimming (M & W) 2 cr. 

Attention is given to types of synchronized swimming and 
accompaniment, composition of performance routines and 
methods of training swimmers for synchronized swimming. 

HPE 432 Organization and Administration of Intramural 

and Interscholastic Programs (M & W) 1 cr. 

Organization and administration of intramural activities 
and interscholastic programs for both men and women are 
studied. Attention is given to philosophical implications for 
school communities at all levels. 



CERTIFICATION IN THE FIELD OF EDUCATION 
FOR SAFE LIVING 

HPE 251 Introduction to Safety Education 3 cr. 

This course is concerned with the recognition of unsafe 
conditions and practices and the methods by which they may 
be eliminated or curtailed. It gives an overall view of the 
safety problems in the home, school, highway, public places, 
and the work environment. 

HPE 252 Driver Education 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: HPE 251. The student should have driving 
ability above the average and evidence of holding a driver's 
license, plus at least two years of driving experience without 
having a major accident for which the driver is responsible. 

Driver Education is a combination of class instruction in 
traffic safety and driver training in actual behind-the-wheel 
practice in a dual control car. It prepares the student to teach 
driver education in a high school. Three hours lecture, two 
hours laboratory. 

HPE 253 Methods and Materials in Safety Education in 

the Secondary Schools 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HPE 251 and HPE 252. Methods and Mater- 
ials in Secondary Schools is a course that emphasizes the use 
of correlation and integrating safety with many different sub- 
jects and school activities, teaching as a separate subject and 
centering safety education around pupil organization and spe- 
cial projects. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 265 

HPE 254 Organization and Administration of 

Safety Education 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: HPE 251 and HPE 252. The course empha- 
sizes the basic principles of organizing, administering and 
supervising safety education procedure in the public schools at 
all grade levels. Encouraging student activities in the school 
and community is a part of the course. 

HPE 255 Psychology of Accident Prevention 3 cr. 

The application of the principles of psychology to the de- 
velopment of safe behavior in the school, home, community, 
highway, and industry. The cause of accidents in relation to 
attitudes, habits, and behavior. 

* In order that the certification be properly recorded, stu- 
dents must include Education for Safe Living on the appli- 
cation for teaching certification prior to graduation. For 
those students who have already graduated, contact the of- 
fice of the Dean, School of Health Services, for the correct 
procedure. 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS 

(All courses are conducted on a coeducational basis except 
when otherwise indicated by "M", for men only or by "W", for 
women only). 

HPE 101 Personal and Community Health 2 cr. 

The understanding of the scientific approach to personal 
health problems and the development of desirable attitudes 
and practices in all areas of personal health constitute the 
major part of the course. The cause, prevention, and control of 
various diseases are also considered. 

HPE 102 Physical Education I (W) 1 cr. 

This course provides a program of carry-over sports and 
activities which improve general physical fitness and develop 
usable physical skills. Swimming is a required part of the 
course taken in conjunction with one other elected activity. 

HPE 142 Introduction to Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation 2 cr. 

The significant historical events in health, physical educa- 
tion and recreation are considered. Scientific principles which 
form the bases for the profession, and the present day influ- 
ences are studied. The basic concepts in teaching these areas 
are presented so the student will grasp the true meaning of the 
profession he has selected. The opportunity to develop a phil- 
osophy of physical education, health and recreation, and to de- 
fine their relationship to educational goals and modern society 
are afforded. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



HPE 212 Gymnastics-Tumbling (M) 1 cr. 

Instruction and skill development in elementary gymnas- 
tics apparatus, tumbling and stunts. Conditioning and the 
theory of gymnastics are also taught. 

HPE 221 Human Anatomy 3 cr. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the 
terminology of the structures which comprise the various body 
systems. 

HPE 231 Football-Volleyball (M) 1 cr. 

Fundamentals of position play, patterns of offense and de- 
fense, individual skills, and team organization in football are 
studied. In volleyball, individual skills, position play, and team 
patterns are considered. Conditioning and rule interpretations 
are covered for both sports. 

HPE 233 Basketball-Soccer (M) 1 cr. 

Development in the basic skills of each sport are taught. 
Team tactics, drill patterns, conditioning, rules interpreta- 
tions, and teaching methods are a part of the course. 

HPE 262 Water Safety Instructor's Course 1 cr. 

This course emphasizes the swimming and rescue skills 
necessary to complete the American Red Cross Senior Life 
Saving Course. Certificates are awarded upon successful com- 
pletion of the course. 

HPE 301 Tennis-Badminton 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. 

HPE 302 Soccer-Basketball (W) 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. 

HPE 303 Bowling-Golf (W) 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. 

HPE 304 Volleyball-Softball (W) 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 267 

HPE 305 Folk Dance-Square Dance 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. The role of folk and square dance in the phys- 
ical education programs of all levels is considered. 

HPE 306 Field Hockey -Tumbling (W) 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. 

HPE 307 Basic Rhythms and Fundamentals of 

Movement 1 cr. 

This course is designed to develop an awareness of basic 
movement techniques through rhythmic experiences knowl- 
edge of music notation and terminology, and methods in cre- 
ative presentation. 

HPE 308 Modern Dance (W) 1 cr. 

A basic course in the Dance which introduces the student 
to technique and creative experiences in the development of 
dance as a creative art and an educational medium. 

Prerequisite: HPE 307. 

HPE 309 Apparatus-Track and Field (W) 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. 

HPE 310 Archery-Fencing 1 cr. 

Presentation of skill progressions and analyses are made 
in combination with the opportunity to individually progress 
in skill competency in each activity. Methods and materials 
are emphasized. 

HPE 311 Advanced Field Hockey-Volleyball (W) 1 cr. 

Advanced techniques and game strategy are emphasized. 
Methods and materials are presented from the aspect of coach- 
ing responsibilities in these activities. 

Opportunities are provided for individual skill progression. 

Prerequisites: HPE 304, HPE 306. 

HPE 312 Advanced Basketball-Gymnastics (W) 1 cr. 

Advanced techniques, game strategy and /or coaching re- 
sponsibilities, methods and materials are emphasized. In gym- 
nastics, consideration is given to instructional and perform- 
ance methods for all school levels. 

Prerequisites: HPE 302, HPE 306, HPE 309. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



HPE 316 Officiating I (W) 1 cr. 

Officiating techniques and responsibilities in fall and early- 
winter sports are emphasized. Opportunities for officiating 
experience and qualification for professional ratings are pro- 
vided. 

Prerequisites: HPE 301, HPE 312 methods series. 

HPE 317 Officiating II (W) 1 cr. 

Officiating techniques and responsibilities in late winter 
and spring sports are emphasized. Opportunities for officiating 
experience and qualification for professional ratings are pro- 
vided. 

Prerequisites: HPE 301 - HPE 312 methods series. 

HPE 321 Methods in Elementary Health and 

Physical Education 2 cr. 

A thorough study and application of theories of movement, 
self testing activities, rhythms, relays, games, gymnastics suit- 
able for the elementary school child are a major portion of the 
course. Observation, materials and methods of teaching health 
and opportunities for student teaching within the class are pro- 
vided. 

HPE 337 Baseball-Football (M) 1 cr. 

Individual skills in fielding and batting, team strategy, 
position play and rules interpretation are stressed in the base- 
ball course. Detailed analysis of team development, practice 
routines and theories of play are considered in the football 
course. 

HPE 338 Gymnastics-Soccer (M) 1 cr. 

The rules, conditioning, theories of play, conduct of com- 
petitive teams and officiating are considered in the develop- 
ment soccer and gymnastics teams. 

HPE 339 Basketball-Track and Field (M) 1 cr. 

The training, theories of play and officiating of team and 
individual events are given attention for these sports. Labora- 
tory experiences with the intercollegiate teams will be re- 
quired. 

HPE 340 Wrestling-Swimming-Resistive Exercises (M) 1 cr. 

The basic skills of takedowns, escapes, reversals, pinning 
and counters are considered in wrestling. The training of var- 
sity swimmers in the various events and diving are studied in 
the swimming course. The physiological bases and principles 
of exercise with weights and weight machines are taught in 
the resistive exercise course. 

HPE 341 Tests and Measurements 3 cr. 

The study and application of tests in physical fitness, mo- 
tor ability, motor educability, sports skills, and health educa- 
tion, are taught. The evaluation of tests results and the appli- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



cation of elementary statistical methods to the health and 
physical program are also considered. 

Prerequisite: Math 362. 
HPE 342 Analysis of Movement 2 cr. 

A basic course in the study of muscular movement in 
physical activity; the application of the principles of kinesiol- 
ogy to body movement. 

Prerequisite: HPE 221. 
HPE 343 Physiology of Exercise 2 cr. 

The physiological aspects of various types of exercise on 
the human body are studied. The major factors of diet, con- 
ditioning, physical fitness, maximum performance level, and 
fatigue are considered. The latest research in sports physiology 
are also a part of the course. 

Prerequisites: HPE 221 and Biol 151. 
HPE 344 Adapted Physical Education Program 2 cr. 

The physiological principles of exercise and movement as 
they relate to the student with limited physical capacities are 
stressed. Modified and remedial activities for the disabled or 
handicapped student are taught. Administrative considerations 
for the adapted program are discussed. Screening tests and 
the appraisal of postural deviations are considered. 

Prerequisite: HPE 342. 
HPE 345 Care and Analysis of Sports Injuries (M) 2 cr. 

The prevention and care of accidents in sports activities 
are studied. The significance of the medical examination con- 
ditioning exercises, and sound health practices are discussed. 
Laboratory work includes taping, bandaging, use of physio- 
therapy equipment, massage, and supervised training room ex- 
perience. The American Red Cross Instructors Rating may 
also be an outcome of this course. 
HPE 404 Organization and Administration of the 

School Health Program 3 cr. 

A comprehensive study of the principles, methods, course 
content, and role of a complete school health program are con- 
sidered. Primary emphasis is given to curriculum planning at 
all school levels, pupil needs, community resources, the school 
environment, and the school health services. Administrative 
relationships and procedures conclude the course. 

Prerequisite: HPE 101. 
HPE 408 Guided Research Problem (HPE majors only) 2 cr. 

In an environment of seminar meetings and individual 
study, the major student is guided in the selection and re- 
search of a problem pertinent to his interests and those of the 
profession of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Stu- 
dent and faculty interaction within the structure of seminar 
meetings and conferences are a vital part of this course. 

Prerequisite: Senior status in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. 



270 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

HPE 433 Coaching: Wrestling-Basketball-Track and 

Field-Soccer 1 cr. 

Students select two sports for a nine week concentration 
in each sport. The course includes the improvement of skills, 
drills, practice routines, analysis of the physiological and psy- 
chological development of the teams, and the place of each ac- 
tivity in the school program. Rules study, conditioning, diet, 
and pre-game procedures are a part of the course. Extensive 
laboratory experiences with the respective intercollegiate 
teams are required. 

HPE 441 Organization and Administration of 

Physical Education 2 cr. 

The course includes the organization of the program in the 
elementary, junior, and senior high grades. It includes the in- 
structional program, intramurals, and interscholastic sports. 
The relationship of the physical education curriculum to the 
overall school program is studied. Scheduling, medical excuses, 
sound health practices, equipment, and various administrative 
problems are discussed. 

HPE 442 History and Philosophy of Physical Education 2 cr. 

A study of the historical and philosophical concepts of 
physical education is made in a seminar environment. Empha- 
sis is placed upon the practical and aesthetic implications 
which the evolvement of the physical education profession 
holds for the physical educator. 

Prerequisite: Senior status in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. 



ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

CHARLES L. KLAUSING. Director 

ANTHONY S. BERNARDI, assistant basketball coach 
WILLIAM A. BLACKSMITH. Ill, wrestling coach 
THOMAS E. CAMPISANO, rifle coach 
VINCE CELTNIEKS, soccer coach 
FRED W. CHASE, assistant football coach 
BERNARD J. GANLEY, golf coach 
CHARLES A. GODLASKY, tennis coach 
RICHARD HORNFECK, assistant football coach 
CHARLES L. KLAUSING, head football coach 
EUGENE E. LEPLEY, swimming coach 
ROBERT M. LETSO. assistant baseball coach 
DAVID L. LUEKING. trainer 
WILLIAM A. NEAL, assistant football coach 
CHARLES E. RECESKI, assistant football coach 
HERMAN L. SLEDZIK, head basketball coach 
WALTER J. STAPLETON, assistant basketball coach 
LOUIS R. SUTTON, cross country and track coach 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



271 



HISTORY DEPARTMENT 

CLYDE C. GELBACH, Department Chairman 



CHARLES D. CASHDOLLAR 
STEVEN CORD 
RONALD T. FERGUSON 
ERNEST FRICKE 
THOMAS GOODRICH 
E. SAMUEL HATFIELD 
JOHN KADLUBOWSKI 
DALE E. LANDON 
NEIL LEHMAN 
IRWIN MARCUS 



JOHN M. MASTRO 
JANE S. MERVINE 
ROBERT L. MORRIS 
JAMES M. OLIVER 
JOHN MERLE RIFE 
JOHN R. SAHLI 
ALICE K. SCHUSTER 
W. WAYNE SMITH 
ALBERT J. WAHL 
JOHN YACKUBOSKEY 



HISTORY COURSES 

Hist 101 History of Civilization I 3 cr. 

A survey course presenting in integrated form the origin 
and development of man's major political, social, economic, 
religious, and intellectual institutions from historical times to 
1600 A.D. Although part of the course is devoted to Oriental 
and Near Eastern civilizations, the major emphasis remains 
on Greek, Roman, Medieval, and early Modern European civ- 
ilizations. Through comparison, an effort is made to point up 
both the similarity and the uniqueness of these civilizations. 
Through the presentation of detail and conflicting historical 
interpretations an effort is made to create an appreciation of 
the depth and complexity of man's past. 

Hist 102 History of Civilization II 3 cr. 

This course deals with man's development from 1600 to the 
present. Among the topics discussed are: The Commercial 
Revolution; the Age of Reason; the Age of Revolution — politi- 
cal, economic, and social; the rise of constitutional govern- 
ments; nationalism and the clash of cultures incident to the 
growth of empire. Considerable attention is given to ideologies 
of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course con- 
cludes with an examination of the various formulas for world 
order proposed or attempted since 1900. 

Hist 103 History of the United States and 

Pennsylvania I 3 cr. 

A course covering the period in American history from the 
discovery of America to 1865 with emphasis on the history of 
Pennsylvania. Special attention is given to the colonial founda- 
tions of our nation, the emergence of our Federal Union, the 
rise of political democracy, social reform, and the controversy 
over sectionalism and slavery. 

Hist 104 History of the United States and 

Pennsylvania II 3 cr. 

A course in the history of the United States and Pennsyl- 
vania from 1865 to the present in which the industrialization 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



of America, urbanization, the rise of organized labor, and the 
development of a distinctly American culture are stressed. At- 
tention is also given to the political, economic, and social re- 
form movements of this period in our history as well as to the 
increasing role of the United States in world affairs. 

Hist 345 Colonial America 3 cr. 

A survey of United States' history to 1783 with special at- 
tention to economic, political, and social trends. 

Hist 346 Middle Period of the United States, 1783-1850 3 cr. 

A survey of United States' history from 1783 to 1850 with 
special attention to constitutional, political, economic, and 
social trends. 

Hist 347 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 cr. 

A study of the failure of American democracy to cope with 
the issues of the mid-nineteenth century followed by the politi- 
cal, economic, military, and social developments during the 
war and the reconciliation of the North and South. 

Hist 350 History of Latin America: 

Colonial Period, 1450-1820 3 cr. 

A study of the life of the people, the Indian cultures, the 
conquest by the Spaniards and Portuguese, the government 
during the Colonial Period, and the Wars of Independence. 

Hist 351 History of Latin America: 

National Period, 1820-Present 3 cr. 

A study of the history of the nations which have emerged 
since independence. Emphasis will be placed on the economic, 
political, cultural, and social developments of these nations as 
well as the relationships of these nations to others in the Hem- 
isphere. 

Hist 352 History of England to 1688 3 cr. 

A survey of the growth of the English nation with em- 
phasis on the political, social, and economic developments 
leading to the 17th century conflict between Crown and Parli- 
ament. 

Hist 353 History of England, 1638 to Present 3 cr. 

A survey of the growth of England as a democratic con- 
stitutional monarchy. Attention is directed to the industrial 
revolution, and to imperial expansion and England's role in 
the 20th century world. 

Hist 354 History of Russia 3 cr. 

A general survey of Russian history, culture, and institu- 
tions. Special consideration is given to the study of these his- 
torical forces which were formative of the Revolution of 1917. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Hist 355 History of Soviet Russia 3 cr. 

A general survey of contemporary Soviet history, culture, 
and institutions. Special consideration is given to the study of 
communist theory and its place in current Russian historiog- 
raphy. 

Hist 356 The Old Regime through the Empire: 

France 1589-1815 3 cr. 

Brief sketch of medieval France and the development of 
the monarchy. Concentration on the Old Regime, Revolution, 
and Empire with emphasis on politics, diplomacy, and econom- 
ics. Readings and brief papers. 

Hist 357 Modern France 3 cr. 

An investigation of the political, cultural, economic, and 
social developments since 1815. Lectures, discussions, and pap- 
ers. 

Hist 358 History of Germany to 1848 3 cr. 

A study of the evolution of the German nation from its 
prehistoric origins, through its ancient, medieval and early 
modern phases, to 1848. Topics treated will be: the Volkerwan- 
derung, Holy Roman Empire (First Reich) , Drang nach Osten, 
Reformation, rise of Austria and Prussia, Aufklarung and clas- 
sical Weimar, German idealism and romanticism, the impact 
of the French Revolution, Metternichian system, Zollverein, 
and the Revolution of 1848. 

Hist 359 History of Germany: 1849-1949 3 cr. 

A study of modern Germany from the Revolution of 1848, 
in its imperial, republican and totalitarian manifestations, to 
the post-war formation of the partitioned Germany of the 
present day. Topics treated will be: creation of the Second 
Reich by "Blood and Iron," Bismarckian Germany and Real- 
politik. Wilhelmian Germany and Weltpolitik, multi-national 
Austria, First World War, Weimar Republic, rise of National 
Socialism and the Third Reich, Second World War, Nurnberg 
Trials, the Allied occupation, and the beginnings of East and 
West Germany. 

Hist 360 Special Studies in History 3 cr. 

Selected periods or problems for intensive study. 

Hist 361 Contemporary United States History 3 cr. 

A study of the political, economic, and cultural changes in 
American life since 1917. This course will examine the roots of 
contemporary social problems facing us today. Recent foreign 
policy trends will also be studied. 

Hist 362 American Labor Movement 3 cr. 

An investigation of the growth of the American labor 
movement from the eighteenth century to the present. Em- 
phasis is placed on the role of the Knights of Labor, American 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Federation of Labor, Industrial Workers of the World and 

Congress of Industrial Organizations. 

Hist 363 Diplomatic History of the United States 3 cr. 

This course traces the history of our foreign relations from 
the American Revolution to the present. Emphasis is placed on 
those principles and major policies upon which our foreign 
policies are based. 

Hist 365 History of Pennsylvania 3 cr. 

A study of the foundings and development of Pennsyl- 
vania from its colonial beginnings to the present time. Em- 
phasis is placed on the social, economic, and political de- 
velopments in the different periods of its history. Special at- 
tention is given to the diversity of the people, their institutions 
and problems, and the growth of Pennsylvania to a leading 
position in our modern industrial world. 
Hist 366 History of the Islamic Civilization 3 cr. 

The course is to be a study of the rise of the Islamic civ- 
ilization and of its growth up to the nineteenth century, within 
the Middle East. Emphasis is on the cultural institutions that 
developed and on internal rather than external interactions. 

Hist 371 Renaissance and Reformation 3 cr. 

This is a course dealing with the study of the Renaissance, 
with reference to the artistic, literary, scientific and political 
aspects, and the vital personalities motivating them; the Re- 
formation as it affected the religious, economic, and political 
development in Europe. Particular attention will be given to 
the educational ideas of Erasmus and other reformers in this 
period. 
Hist 372 History of Europe: 1600-1815 3 cr. 

This course puts emphasis upon political, diplomatic, eco- 
nomic, and intellectual developments from 1600 to 1815. Com- 
ing in for special consideration are the development and oper- 
ation of the European state system, the Enlightenment, the 
extension of the parliamentary institutions in England, and 
the French Revolution and Napoleon. 
Hist 373 History of Europe: 1815-1914 3 cr. 

A study of Europe in the nineteenth century with empha- 
sis on political, diplomatic, military, and economic affairs. Ap- 
proximately two-thirds of the course is devoted to a descrip- 
tion of the major European states in this century. An effort is 
made to integrate this account through diplomatic history and 
by devoting approximately one-third of the course to topical 
consideration of such items as Imperialism, Nationalism, So- 
cialism, and the Industrial Revolution. 
Hist 374 Twentieth Century Europe 3 cr. 

The political, economic, and diplomatic trends in Europe 
since 1900, with a major emphasis on the causes and results of 
war, and the reach for recruiting. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 275 



Hist 375 History of the Far East 3 cr. 

A survey of the development of the Peoples of China, 
Japan, India, and adjacent territories for the purpose of gain- 
ing an understanding of their contemporary problems and 
ways of thinking as they relate to current world affairs. Spe- 
cial emphasis is placed on the impact of the West as a condi- 
tioning factor in the development of the Far East in Modern 
times. 

Hist 376 History of the Middle East 3 cr. 

This course is a study of the Ottoman Middle East and its 
lack of political unity resulting from the rise and development 
of Arab, Turkish, Zionist, and other nationalist movements. 
Special attention is given to the effect of these movements 
upon the contemporary history of the Middle East and to the 
significance of that area in current world affairs. 
Hist 380 Medieval Europe I, 400-900 3 cr. 

A history of early Medieval Europe from the decline of 
the Roman Empire to the beginning of the growth of the 
feudal monarchies. Emphasis placed on political, constitutional, 
economical, and social developments in Medieval Europe from 
400 A.D. to 900 A.D. 

Hist 381 Medieval Europe II, 900-1350 3 cr. 

A history of late Medieval Europe from the rise of the 
feudal monarchies to the beginnings of the Renaissance per- 
iod. Emphasis is placed on political, constitutional, economic, 
and social developments in Medieval Europe from 900 A.D. to 
1350 A.D. 
Hist 390 Social and Intellectual History of the 

United States to 1875 3 cr. 

A study of the social and intellectual factors which helped 
to shape the nation up to the time of Henry George. 
Hist 391 Social and Intellectual History of the 

United States Since 1875 3 cr. 

An analysis of the cultural forces which have helped to 
shape modern America. Ways of living characteristic of certain 
periods will be studied, together with the more significant so- 
cial-reform movements and their attendant systems of thought. 
Hist 392 Economic History of the United States 3 cr. 

A survey emphasizing features of the American economic 
system, especially the historical development of economic in- 
stitutions and the role of economic groups in relation to other 
aspects of American society. From Independence to the Presi- 
dent. 

Hist 393 3 cr. 

A description and analysis of the role of blacks in the his- 
tory of the United States since the Civil War. Emphasis will be 
placed on the key leaders, major organizations, leading move- 
ments and the crucial ideologies of blacks in modern America. 



276 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

ELLA C. BENDIX, Dean 



PATRICIA ANN BELL 
WILLA RUTH CRAMER 
GLORIA CONWAY 
MARY ANN FLANGO 
HELEN B. HOVIS 
M. KATHLEEN JONES 
ALMA B. KAZMER 
BERNICE W. KING 
ELEANOR GALLATI 
ELIZABETH HEARN LaVELLE 
YU-CHEN LIU 



VANNIS A. LUCAS 
DAWN McCLOWRY AUL 
LEO LA H. NORBERG 
MILDRED E. OMWAKE 
C. ELDENA PURCELL 
ELISABETH A. SCHMIDT 
SHATYA SHARMA 
JOANNE STEINER 
ALLEN M. WOODS 
JOSEPH WYSOCKI 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

(Listed Numerically) 

HE 111 Meal Management 3 cr. 

Basic principles of menu planning, marketing, food prepa- 
ration and table service for family meals are investigated and 
studied. Demonstration and laboratory methods of teaching 
are used. 

HE 112 Clothing I— Clothing Construction and Fitting 3 cr. 

Principles and techniques of fitting and construction of 
clothing are analyzed and studied. Directed laboratory experi- 
ences provide opportunity to solve individual clothing prob- 
lems through the application of principles. 

HE 113 Management and Equipment 3 cr. 

Management, decision making processes and organization 
relative to the administration of a home, is emphasized. Prin- 
ciples needed for the wise selection, efficient operation and 
care of kitchen, laundry and other household equipment are 
studied and applied. Comparative studies of operation and 
efficiency of various kinds of equipment, procedures and clean- 
ing materials, and work processes are emphasized. Good man- 
agement in arrangement, storage and working heights and 
procedures that will save time, energy, and money and secure 
good results in family living form the basis of the course. 

HE 211 Advanced Foods 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 111; Chem 101 & 102 or concurrently. 

A study is made of advanced and in-depth problems in 
food preparation and meal service. In such areas food preser- 
vation, protein, carbohydrate and fat cookery are emphasized. 

HE 212 Nutrition 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Chem 101 and 102; Biol 151 or concurrently. 

Sources and functions of nutrients, inter-dependence of 
dietary essentials and nutritive value of an optimum diet are 
investigated and studied. Nutritional requirements of each 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYL VANIA 277 

stage of human growth and development of life, nutritional 
deficiencies and diseases are emphasized. Attention is given to 
the different economics levels, racial and ethnic backgrounds, 
food additives, food fads and fallacies. 

HE 213 Principles of Design 2 cr. 

Principles of art and design are studied and applied. 

HE 214 Clothing II — Fitting and Pattern Study 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 112. 

Principles and techniques of pattern design and alteration 
are analyzed and used in the creation of an original design 
from a basic pattern. A garment is made utilizing construction 
processes best adapted to the design, the fabric and to the 
individual. 

HE 215 Home Furnishing 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 213. 

Problems of creating attractive homes are investigated and 
studied. Emphasis is given to the selection, purchasing, and 
arrangement of furniture and home furnishings; the selection 
and planning of floors, walls and windows; and the improve- 
ment of furniture. Directed laboratory experiences focus upon 
the application of principles and knowledge learned. 

HE 216 Clothing Selection 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 213, Psy 201. 

Aesthetic, economic and social-psychological factors affect- 
ing the selection of clothing for the individual are studied. 

HE 217 Home Planning and Furnishing 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 213. 

Problems confronting families in finding and selecting 
suitable housing and in creating attractive homes are identified 
and studied. Community planning; the selection, planning and 
construction of homes, are problem areas investigated. Focus 
is placed upon factors affecting cost and quality; plans for con^ 
venience, comfort, aesthetic values, and various legal factors. 
Directed laboratory experiences are required. 

HE 218 Child Development 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

The physical, emotional, social and intellectual develop- 
ment of the child from conception through the early adolescent 
period is studied and analyzed. Research from psychology, an- 
thropology, sociology, and human development is analyzed in 
terms of contributing toward better understanding of normal 
development and behavior of the child. 

HE 311 Family Health 1 cr. 

Family health problems are recognized and solutions in- 
vestigated. An understanding of the part the home plays in 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



positive health is developed. Principles of the care of the sick 
in the home and needs in time of disaster and emergencies are 
studied. Practical laboratory experience is provided. American 
Red Cross requirements are met. 

HE 312 Housing 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 213. 

Family and community housing problems are investigated. 
Convenience, cost, comfort, aesthetic values are emphasized in 
the study of such topics as: architectural designs, floor plans, 
processes in construction, ventilation, lighting, plumbing, heat- 
ing, financing and legal factors. Individual projects and field 
trips are required. 

HE 313 Quantity Food Service Management 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 111, HE 211, HE 212. 

This course is designed to give instruction and funda- 
mental experiences essential to quality food production on a 
quantity basis. Experiences include planning, purchasing, pre- 
paring and serving nutritionally adequate lunches to the cam- 
pus elementary school children. The requirements of the Na- 
tional School Lunch Program are emphasized. 

HE 314 Textiles 3 cr. 

Properties, identification, selection, use and care of textile 
fibers and fabrics are studied and analyzed. Focus is placed 
upon laws governing labeling and other factors related to con- 
sumer aid, protection and satisfaction. 

HE 315 Family Finance and Consumer Education 3 cr. 

Economic, sociological and psychological principles are 
applied to family money management problems. Production, 
distribution, retailing, and consumer aid and protection are 
investigated. Income (real and psychic) budgeting, installment 
buying, savings and investment, banking and wise use of time, 
materials and human resources are related to consumer satis- 
factions. Ways of living better on a given income are empha- 
sized. 

HE 351 Nutrition Education (School Education) 2 cr. 

A study is made of functional knowledge of nutritional 
concepts as backgrounds for helping teachers guide students 
through varied experiences directed toward improved food 
habits and nutritional health. The contribution made by the 
school lunch program is emphasized. Majors and non-majors. 

HE 352 Nutrition for the Pre-School Child 2 cr. 

Nutritional needs of pre-school children are studied from 
the biological and physiological standpoint. The influences of 
social, economic and ethnic background in establishing dietary 
habit- are analyzed. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 279 

HE 353 Clothing IV — Millinery and Other Accessories 2 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 213 and 216. 

Selection, construction and remodeling of hats is included 
in this course. Appropriate costume accessories are created, 
analyzed and evaluated. 

HE 354 Clothing V — Special Problems in Clothing 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. 

Clothing problems met by individuals, families and teach- 
ers are solved. This course provides excellent opportunities for 
students who have had too little experience in construction 
and other clothing problems. 

HE 355 Diet Therapy 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 111 and 212; Chem 101 and 102; Biol 151. 

A study is made of the modification of the normal ade- 
quate diet to meet the nutritional meals of the dietary prob- 
lems of the infant, growing child, the aged, the pregnant and 
lactating woman, and pathological conditions requiring special 
dietary treatment. Special diets are planned and calculated. 
The course is planned for students desiring advanced study in 
nutrition. 

HE 356 Food Service Administration 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Psy 201, HE 313, BM 201, HE 360. 

This course studies the integration of the organization and 
administration of the food service functions correlating the 
management of personnel policies and training, work simplifi- 
cation, cost controls, supervision, and sanitation. Field trips to 
various types of food service institutions are included. 

HE 357 Special Problems in Foods 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 111 and 211. 

Emphasis is placed on demonstration of food preparation 
and problems of catering banquets, receptions and other social 
functions. Opportunity is provided for solving individual and/ 
or group problems. 

HE 358 Institution Food Service Equipment and Layout 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 313. 

The emphasis in this course is placed on the selection and 
layout of food service equipment in relation to production re- 
quirements, materials and utility. Field trips permit the in- 
vestigating of a variety of layouts. 

HE 359 Quantity Food Purchasing 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 313 or concurrently. 

This course discusses sources, standards of quality, grades, 
methods of purchase, care and storage of various classes of 
food. Emphasis is given to the development of purchasing 
policies and the organization of purchasing procedures. Trips 
to markets are included. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



HE 360 Accounting for Food Service 3 cr. 

This course includes business procedures and practices; 
the use of accounting as a managerial tool; introduction of the 
basic theory of accounts; knowledge and skill adequate to 
keep books for a food service operation; journalizing, posting 
use of ledger accounts, closing of books of original entry and 
statement preparation aimed at the control of costs in food 
service operation. 

HE 361 Institution Food Service Experience 6 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 313, HE 356; HE 358; HE 359; HE 360, 
HE 364. 

This is a guided experience under the supervision of a 
certified school food service director in schools enrolled in the 
National School Lunch Program. Students gain practical ex- 
perience in management and other aspects of a school food 
service operation. 

HE 362 Experimental Foods 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 111, 211 and 212; Chem 101 and 102. 

A study of food preparation based upon the scientific 
method is carried out wherein effects of chemical and physical 
principles are observed. This is accomplished by investigating 
group and individual problems. 

HE 363 The Family and the Community 3 cr. 

An intensive study is made of community contributions 
and problems that affect the family as well as the contribu- 
tions of families to the community. Group dynamics, and 
media of communication and other experiences that aid under- 
standing of human behaviors is investigated. Field work is an 
integral part of the course. 

HE 364 Methods in Teaching 3 cr. 

An intensive study is made of Home Economics as it is 
related to and interrelates with the entire school and educa- 
tional program. Curriculum, teacher responsibilities, pupil- 
teacher planning, home-school relations, teaching techniques 
and aids, learning, evaluation and special school functions are 
studied. Reference is made to the application of training meth- 
ods for food service employees. Observations are included. 

HE 402 Nutrition and Community Health 2 cr. 

A study is made of nutritional problems of family mem- 
bers from infant to aged people of the community. Emphasis 
is placed on reorganizing good nutritional status and ways of 
guiding families toward better nutrition. School lunch is also 
emphasized. The course is also required of Public School Nurs- 
ing majors as PSN 402. 

HE 403 Home and Family Living 3 cr. 

Housing, home furnishing, household equipment, clothing, 
operational and nutritional needs of families are investigated. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Home management and money management operations are in- 
vestigated. Emphasis is placed on ways to help families derive 
the greatest benefits and satisfactions within the family in- 
come. Non-majors. 

HE 411 Family Relations 3 cr. 

Students have opportunity to gain knowledge and under- 
standing of personality development and the importance of 
early family and community influence in well adjusted lives 
and family stability. Emphasis is on preparation for marriage 
and problems of human relations within homes. Reading, dis- 
cussion, and conferences are used in facing and solving prob- 
lems. 

HE 412 Nursery School 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Psy 201, 302 and HE 218. 

Participation in the nursery school as a teacher assistant 
applying principles and concepts of child development is the 
major focus of this course. Techniques of planning for and 
managing a group of pre-school children are emphasized. 

HE 413 Consumer Economics 3 cr. 

Sociological and psychological reactions of persons are 
discussed in relation to customs, advertising and income. 
Knowledge of production, distribution and retail is used to 
analyze and interpret governmental and other aids to the con- 
sumers. Research studies are required of each student. 

HE 414 Home Management (Residence House) 3 cr. 

Decision making in group living is emphasized. Satisfying 
human relations are developed as family members care for a 
baby; plan, prepare and serve nutritious meals; use and care 
for equipment and furnishings; and provide for individual and 
group needs in various other ways. 

HE 415 Teaching Methods and Professional Practicum 

in Vocational Home Economics 4 cr. 

This course, taken the semester prior to the Student 
Teaching Experience, provides students with the opportunity 
to plan home economics curricula in relation to the needs and 
interests of pupils and their families within the school com- 
munity. Students become orientated to classroom experiences, 
activities and responsibilities which they will encounter in 
teaching, through planned observations in Secondary Schools, 
Adult Classes and their assigned Student Teaching Centers. 

HE 416 Family Finance 2 cr. 

Economic principles underlying personal and family finan- 
cial problems are studied. Sources of income, use of time, ma- 
terial and human resources, and planning for wise use of 
family income are investigated. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



HE 417 Clothing III — Tailoring 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 112, 214 or equivalent. 

Various tailoring methods are studied and applied in the 
selection, fitting and construction of a tailored garment. Com- 
parative study is made of commercial-tailored garments. 

Ed 421 Student Teaching (For Home Economics) 6 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 415. 

The student teacher participates in the experiences and 
responsibilities of the home economics teacher in the high 
school classroom as well as the community. The university 
supervisor guides and coordinates the kinds of learnings and 
aids the students in analysis and evaluation of personal and 
professional growth during visitations and Saturday Confer- 
ences. 

HE 421 Pre-School Education, Ages 2-5 Years 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Psy 201, 303; HE 218 and 412. 

Directed experiences in assisting a master teacher in a 
nursery school is required. Experiences include observation of 
work with children in a variety of situations. Selected chil- 
dren are studied intensively. Research is investigated as a 
basis for understanding child behavior, principles and pro- 
cedures of guidance. 

HE 422 Early Childhood Education — 

Equipment and Materials 2 cr. 

Prerequisites: Psy 201, 302; HE 218 and 412. 

Materials, equipment, activities and situations that will 
aid the physical, social, emotional and intellectual development 
of pre-school children are investigated. Children and the vari- 
ations of behavior are observed and analyzed as the 2-, 3-, 
and 4-year old reacts and interacts to their environment. 

HE 423 Marriage and Family Relations 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: HE 411. 

Emphasis is placed on the development of an understand- 
ing of inter-personal relations within family living. Potential 
problems of marriage are identified and investigated in terms 
of the development of an understanding of what constitutes 
good adjustment. Interviews, projects, observations, and case- 
studies are planned and carried out by individuals and /or 
groups. 

HE 424 The Family 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 411. 

A concentrated study is made of selected areas of family 
life with emphasis on the dynamics of family interaction and 
interpersonal relationships. Group projects and individual 
studies are required. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 288 

HE 451 Workshop in Home Economics 3 cr. 

This course is planned to meet the needs of experienced 
teachers and college graduates in home economics who are 
expecting to return to the teaching profession. Current edu- 
cational trends, issues and problems in home economics edu- 
cation are identified and evaluated. This advanced course is 
required of those who are returning to the home economics 
teaching profession after an absence of five or more years. 
It may be elected by advanced undergraduate students who 
have completed HE 415 and Education 421. 
HE 452 Vocational Home Economics — 

Curriculum Construction 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: HE 415. 

Home Economics curriculum planning and construction 
are studied in relation to the changing home economics cur- 
riculum in terms of the Vocational Education Act of 1963-P.L. 
88-210. An investigation and evaluation is made of current 
home economics related wage earning programs in secondary 
schools. Emphasis is placed on planning and evaluating home 
economics wage earning programs as an integral part of the 
home economics curriculum and the total educational program 
of the vocational and secondary schools. Field trips to schools, 
and to business and industrial establishments are required. 
HE 453 Materials and Methods of Teaching 

in Home Economics 2 cr. 

Current instructional and curriculum materials, learning 
resources, methods and techniques of teaching will be inves- 
tigated and studied in relation to the philosophy of home 
economics education, learning processes and the conceptual 
framework of home economics. This course is for advanced 
undergraduate students and college graduate in home eco- 
nomics. 
HE 454 Adult Home Economics Education 2 cr. 

Principles and theories of adult education are investigated 
and studied. Emphasis is placed on the needs and interests of 
adults and how home economics can meet these. Plans for 
implementing a vocational home economics program are for- 
mulated, analyzed and evaluated. 
HE 455 Education and Vocational Guidance 3 cr. 

Implications of the Manpower Act of 1962 and the Perkins 
Bill for home related employment are studied. Needs in Penn- 
sylvania communities are investigated. Possible programs are 
formulated and experiences needed for their implementation 
sought. 
HE 456 Evaluation in Home Economics 2 cr. 

Principles, techniques and procedures of evaluation are 
investigated in terms of learning processes. Evaluative instru- 
ments are studied and evaluated. Instruments for appraising 
major types of objectives are planned and constructed. This 
course is for advanced undergraduate students and college 
graduates in home economics. 



284 INDIANA U NIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

DEPARTMENT OF LEARNING RESOURCES 
AND MASS MEDIA 

NORMAN W. SARGENT, Department Chairman 

LAWRENCE D. BERGMAN WILLIAM McCAVITT 

MERLE G. KLINGINSMITH J. ROBERT MURRAY 

DONALD M. MacISAAC EDWARD F. HAUCK 

LRes 301 Audio-Visual Education 2 cr. 

(Professional course required of all students in Education) 

Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

A consideration of the needs for sensory techniques and 
the integration of all learning resources is given, with atten- 
tion to the psychological processes involved. Through class and 
laboratory work the student will have an opportunity to be- 
come acquainted with materials and equipment and skilled in 
audio-visual techniques within the teaching field. Activities 
will include actual production of materials for class use and 
participation in their use. 

LRes 371 Photography in Education 3 cr. 

This course is designed to provide a good introduction to 
photography and to emphasize the potential value of teacher- 
made photographic materials in teaching. The student will 
learn to use his own camera effectively; to determine expos- 
ures; to develop, contact print, and enlarge his own black and 
white negatives; to experiment with natural and artificial 
lighting; and to shoot, develop, and mount his own color slides. 
Both the technical and the artistic aspects of photography will 
be considered. No prerequisite required. Student must provide 
his own 35mm camera and an exposure meter. See instructor. 

LRes 372 Motion Picture Production in Education 3 cr. 

This course will emphasize the possibilities for effective 
use of teacher-made films in the classroom. The student will 
learn to use his own 8mm or 16mm motion picture camera ef- 
fectively, to choose the right film stock, to determine the cor- 
rect exposure, to plan and direct the action, to break the ma- 
terial up into scenes for effective presentation, to edit the 
material shot, and to use natural and artificial lighting. No 
prerequisite required. Student must provide his own camera 
and an exposure meter. See instructor. 

LRes 373 Introduction to Radio Broadcasting 3 cr. 

This course is an introduction to the organization and op- 
eration of a radio station. Technical aspects of radio and pro- 
gramming techniques will also be studied. The station's rela- 
tions with educational, industrial, and other social institutions 
will be examined. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 

MELVIN R. WOODARD, Chairman 



JOSEPH S. ANGELO 
IDA Z. ARMS 
EDWIN W. BAILEY 
ROBERT J. COATES 
BLAINE C. CROOKS 
CAROLYN DEISHER 
GUS DiANTONIO 
DONALD D. DUNCAN 
NANCY FINCKE 
RAYMOND D. GIBSON 
MARLIN E. HARTMAN 
WILLARD W. HENNEMANN 
JOHN P. HOYT 
JOSEPH J. HRADNANSKY 
WILLIAM F. LONG 
•CHARLES R. MADERER 
JAMES H. MAPLE 
DOYLE R. McBRDDE 
RONALD L. McBRIDE 

* On leave of absence. 



RONALD E. McCOY 
KATHERINE McKELVY 
WALLACE F. MORRELL 
JoANNE MUELLER 
CARL P. OAKES 
JOSEPH A. PETERS 
MILDRED M. REIGH 
WILLIAM RETTIG 
DALE M. SHAFER 
MAHER Y. SHAWER 
HARVEY A. SIMMONS 
WILLIAM R. SMITH 
ELWOOD R. SPEAKMAN 
MERLE E. STILWELL 
LaVERNE THOMPSON 
MARILYN E. VALLOWE 
JACK R. WESTWOOD 
GEORGE M. WHITSON 
HALLEY O. WILLISON 
RICHARD E. WOLFE 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Math 101 Foundations of Mathematics 3 cr. 

This course is designed to familiarize students with some 
of the ideas underlying the development of mathematics and 
an elementary treatment of problem solving and decision 
making. The primary objective is not to develop "computa- 
tional" skills but to study mathematics in its role as both an 
art and a science. 

Topics to be studied include: numeration and number 
systems with special emphasis on recognizing patterns and 
structure; intuitive set theory and applications, including 
probability and statistics; and informal logic in its relation to 
mathematics, both in algebra and geometry. 

Math 152 Algebra and Trigonometry 5 cr. 

Logic, number systems and equations; plane trigonometry; 
inequalities, functions and relations; complex numbers; theory 
of equations, mathematical induction; the binomial theory are 
the topics considered in this course. 

Math 155 Computer Programming 1 cr. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the 
facilities in the area of the computer programming available to 
him. The basic language rules of the Fortran compiler system 
and library programs and their use are studied. It is hoped that 
the student will then apply his knowledge in other courses 
throughout his college career. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Math 157 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 cr. 

Analytic Geometry of the straight line; circle; and the 
conies; polynomials and their graphs; elements of differential 
and integral calculus with applications involving polynomials. 

Math 160 Elementary Numeration Theory I 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: 3 years high school academic mathematics. 

This course is designed for those students whose major is 
elementary education and is one of the first two courses in the 
concentration of mathematics. 

Among the topics included in this course are: Develop- 
ment and the structure of numeration systems; properties of 
the rational reals, their subsets and the operations defined on 
them; tests for divisibility; modular arithmetic; primes; fac- 
torization; fundamental theorem of arithmetic; introduction to 
mathematical systems. 

Math 250 Elementary Numeration Theory II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 160 

This course is a continuation of Math 160 and will include 
such topics as: Rules for divisibility; properties of and opera- 
tions with real numbers; finite and infinite sets; Venn dia- 
grams; order relations; modular and clock arithmetic; intro- 
duction to algebra and geometry; informal look at probability; 
truth tables; linear functions. 

Math 251 Basic Concepts of Algebra (Elementary) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 160 and 250 

This course will include such topics as those touched upon 
in earlier courses but from a more general point of view. Gen- 
eralization and abstraction in linear equations, systems of 
equations, sets, groups and fields, inequalities, absolute values, 
complex numbers, polynomials, algebraic structures and func- 
tions will be stressed. 

Math 253 Theory of Equations 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. 

Among the topics considered are algebraic equations; de- 
termination of roots; algebraic solutions of cubic and quartic 
equations; systems of equations; determinants; matrices, and 
symmetric functions. 

Math 257 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. 
Differential and integral calculus of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions with applications to the physical sciences. 

Math 341 Theory of Numbers 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 

A study of the foundation of number theory with special 
attention being given to such topics as repeating decimals and 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 287 

congruences; number theoretic functions; diophantine equa- 
tions, continued fractions. 

Math 350 Foundations of Informal Geometry 

(Elementary) 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 160, 250, 251. 

This course includes a discussion of such topics as: con- 
gruences, measurement, paralleling similarity, concurrence of 
medians, altitudes, construction of proofs, practical applica- 
tions, elements of spherical and plane coordinate geometry. 
This will be a course of greater depth and generality than that 
found in the secondary school and will be in line with the cur- 
rent curriculum revisions. 

Math 351 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (Elementary) 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Math 160, 250, 251, 350. 

This course is designed to give an over-all view of funda- 
mental topics in trigonometry, analytic geometry, probability 
and statistics, permutations and combinations, the binomial 
theorem, sequences and fundamental calculus. 

Math 355 Foundations of Geometry I 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 375. 

The initial approach in this course is a synthetic treat- 
ment of Euclidean Geometry using Hilbert's axioms. Projec- 
tive geometry is studied in some detail in order to acquaint 
the student with non-Euclidean geometry. The relationships 
between Euclidean, projective, and other non-Euclidean ge- 
ometries are introduced. 

Math 356 Foundations of Geometry II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 355. 

This course treats and extends the topics of Math 355 from 
an analytic point of view. The study of projective transforma- 
tions and representations of conies are the major topics. 

Math 357 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 257. 

This course will extend the background of the student in 
elementary calculus and will consider infinite series, Taylor's 
and Maclaurin's expansions, partial differentiation, multiple 
integrals, and an introduction to ordinary differential equa- 
tions. 

Math 361 Ordinary Differential Equations 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 257. 

In this first course in differential equations the emphasis 
is placed on techniques of solution and elementary physical 
applications. A thorough study is made of differential equa- 
tions classified as order one — degree one, linear, and nonhomo- 
geneous. Solution techniques involving the differential oper- 
ator, the Laplace transform and infinite series are introduced. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Math 362 Probability and Statistics 3 cr. 

This course is intended for non-mathematics majors. The 
course emphasis is on applications as opposed to theoretical 
developments of principles and formulas. The topics covered 
in this course are: frequency distributions, measures of central 
tendency, variation, elementary probability, sampling, esti- 
mation, testing hypothesis, and linear correlation and re- 
gression. 

Math 363 Mathematical Statistics I 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 257. 

Probability theory necessary for an understanding of 
mathematical statistics will be developed in this course. 
Applications of the theory will be given with emphasis on the 
binomial, the Poisson, and the normal distributions. Distri- 
butions of sums and a central limit theorem will be developed. 
Statistical applications will include point and interval esti- 
mation and testing statistical hypothesis. 

Math 364 Mathematical Statistics II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 363. 

This course is a continuation of Math 363. Additional topics 
in mathematical statistics will be introduced both from the 
theoretical and from the applied point of view. Such topics are: 
correlation and regression theory; Chi-square, Student's "t", 
and F distributions; the Ney man-Pearson lemma and the 
likelihood ratio method of constructing tests of hypotheses; 
analysis of variance; properties of good estimators; and 
non-parametric methods. 

Math 366 Computer Math I 3 cr. 

Language rules of the FORTRAN compiler system are 
presented. FORTRAN is used for writing digital computer 
programs which are compiled and executed on the College 
computer. 

Math 367 Numerical Analysis 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Math 366, 357, 361. 

Errors in computation. Approximation of functions by 
polynomials. Iterative methods of solving equations. Matrices 
and systems of linear equations. Interpolation. Numerical dif- 
ferentiation and integration. Methods for solving ordinary dif- 
ferential equations on computers. 

Math 371 Linear Algebra I 3 cr. 

Topics considered in this course are vector spaces, linear 
transformations and matrices. The emphasis is on the theory 
for arbitrary finite dimensional spaces. Applications to Euclid- 
ean n-space are considered briefly. 

Math 375 Introduction to Modern Mathematics 3 cr. 

This course is a preparatory course to the courses Abstract 
and Linear Algebra. Advanced Calculus, and Geometry. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 289 

An introduction to formal logic sets the stage for a 
thorough study of the development of the complex number 
system from a postulational viewpoint, starting with the 
natural numbers, through the integers, rationals, reals and 
finally the complex numbers. The concepts of group, ring, 
integral domain and field are basic to the development. 

Math 376 Abstract Algebra 3 cr. 

This course consists of a development of the theory of in- 
tegral domains, fields, rings, and groups. It is designed to de- 
velop the student's power to think for himself and to improve 
his ability to construct formal proofs. 

Math 381 Advanced Calculus I 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 357. 

Topics from the calculus are treated with a more rigorous 
point of view. The course consists of a study of the real number 
system, point sets, functions, sequences, limits, continuity and 
uniform continuity, differentiation, indeterminate forms, and 
the Riemann integral. 

Math 382 Advanced Calculus II 3 cr. 

This course includes a study of functions of more than one 
variable, partial differentiation, multiple integration, line and 
surface integrals, Green's theorem, Stokes' theorem, infinite 
series, convergence and uniform convergence, and improper 
integrals. 

Ed 451 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary Schools 3 cr. 

The major objective of the course is to prepare teachers of 
mathematics for the modern secondary schools. The principal 
activities in the class are the preparation and presentation of 
lessons on concepts from the secondary schools mathematics 
courses; study of the principles of teaching and learning; ob- 
servations; study of current mathematics curricula; and learn- 
ing to use curriculum materials effectively. 

Math 452 Seminar in Mathematics 1-4 cr. 

This course requires the student to do independent study 
in some area of mathematics beyond the scope of the courses 
he has taken. The course is conducted in one of two ways. In 
the first method the student chooses the area for investigation 
upon the approval of the instructor. Upon completion of the 
study, the student gives an oral presentation of his findings to 
other members of the group. In the second method the various 
instructors offer seminars in selected topics. The student 
chooses the topic of interest to him and the class studies the 
particular topic in depth. 



290 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Math 461 Computer Math II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 366. 

Digital computers are analyzed as to size, type, usage, stor- 
age, auxiliary storage, input-output facilities and monitors. 
Symbolic programming and compiler systems are studied. 

Math 471 Seminar: Research Usage of Computers 

Prerequisite: Math 461. 

This course deals with selected topics using advanced pro- 
gramming techniques. 

El 313 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Math 101. 

In this course emphasis will be given to the place of arith- 
metic in the elementary school and to the recent changes in 
curriculum and method; to techniques for developing concepts 
and processes; to recent research in the field of arithmetic; and 
to books and materials helpful to prospective teachers. Obser- 
vation of master teachers at work will be planned. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

COLONEL WILLIAM S. WILEY, JR., Chairman of Department 

LTC ROBERT B. GINGRICH CPT ROBERT J. KELLY 

MAJ ROBERT M. HOFMANN CPT JOHN E. SECOR 

MAJ KEITH F. VANSANT SGM JOHN R. DALE, JR. 

MAJ FRANCIS V. CAMPI MSG WILLIAM L. SCHAFER 

MAJ WILLIAM V. MILLER, JR. SSG THEODORE DECHMAN, III 

CPT PAUL P. FOLEY SSG EDWARD N. SHELTON 

CPT ROBERT E. HAMILTON SSG GEORGE W. DETWEILER 
CPT CHARLES L. CUNIS 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsyl- 
vania, is authorized a Senior Division, Reserve Officers Train- 
ing Corps unit. The Senior Division ROTC program offers to 
the student the opportunity to prepare for the highest service 
of citizenship; it offers the right to contribute towards the 
preservation of the freedoms that U.S. citizenship offers. It is 
from the knowledge that one is preparing to take his place as 
a defender of American liberty, in the ranks that have enrolled 
numberless citizen soldiers before him, that comes the greatest 
reward and meaning of ROTC and Reserve Officer Service. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ENROLLMENT 

The general requirements for enrollment in the ROTC are 
that the student be a citizen of the United States, physically 
qualified as prescribed by the Department of the Army, ac- 
cepted by the institution as a regularly enrolled student, not 
less than 14 years of age, but less than 24 years of age at the 
time of enrollment. For continuance in the ROTC the student 
must successfully complete such general survey or screening 
tests as are given to determine eligibility for admittance to the 
Advanced Course and agree in writing upon admission to the 
advanced course to complete the course of instruction offered, 
unless released by the Department of the Army. Veterans may 
receive credit for portions of the ROTC military course for 
military service completed prior to enrollment in ROTC. 

WHAT ROTC OFFERS 

Uniforms, equipment, ROTC textbooks are issued without 
cost to formally enrolled cadets. 

Students having successfully completed the Basic Course, 
or having at least four months of active service in the Armed 
Forces, and meeting the Advanced Course admission require- 
ments are paid a retainer fee, currently amounting to $50.00 
per month during the time they are taking the Advanced 
Course. 



292 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

After the student completes the Advanced Course and re- 
ceives his baccalaureate degree from the university he is eligi- 
ble for a commission as a second lieutenant in the United 
States Army Reserve. 

Students who have completed the first year Advanced 
Course and have displayed outstanding qualities of military 
leadership, high moral character, and definite aptitude for 
military service are designated "Distinguished Military Stu- 
dents." Students so honored who maintain the standards until 
graduation are designated "Distinguished Military Graduates," 
and are eligible for appointment in the Regular Army. 

Policies affecting enrollment and continuance of students 
in the Senior Division of the Reserve Officers Training Corps 
are included in the provisions of the Selective Service Act of 
1950. This Act provides for military deferment of students 
(certain basic course students upon request, and all advanced 
course students) until completion of their academic course 
under the following conditions: 

1. Students enrolled in the ROTC must remain in good 
standing in both their academic and military courses. 

2. They must demonstrate proper and sufficient aptitude 
and leadership characteristics ultimately to qualify 
them for appointment as commissioned officers. 

3. They must attend and successfully complete summer 
training camp (usually at the end of the Junior year). 

4. They are required to sign an agreement to accept a com- 
mission in the Army, if and when tendered, and to serve 
not to exceed two (2) years on active duty as an officer, 
subject to call by the Secretary of the Army. 

SPECIAL FEES 

An Activity Fee of $3.00 is required of all ROTC Cadets 
to defray the cost of a name tag, cadet handbook, and the Mili- 
tary Ball. 

CURRICULUM IN MILITARY SCIENCE 

The Military Science curriculum covers four years and is 
divided into two courses: The Basic Course and the Advanced 
Course. 

THE BASIC COURSE 

The first two years of Military Science comprise the Basic 
Course which furnishes a background in basic military sub- 
jects. A minimum of three hours instruction each week is re- 
quired for the MS 101 and 102 courses and minimum of four 
hours for courses 203 and 204. 



INDIAN A UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 293 

1st Year 

MS 101 Military Science I V/ 2 cr. 

Instruction in Organization of the Army and ROTC; In- 
dividual Weapons and Marksmanship; and Leadership. 

MS 102 Military Science I V/2 cr - 

Instruction in United States Army and National Security; 
and Leadership. 

2nd Year 

MS 203 Military Science II V/ 2 cr - 

Instruction in Map Reading; Introduction to Tactics and 
Operations; and Leadership. 

MS 204 Military Science II V/ 2 cr. 

Instruction in American Military History; and Leadership. 



THE ADVANCED COURSE 

The second two years comprise the Advanced Course, each 
year of which consists of 105 hours of instruction in Military 
subjects and 45 hours of instruction in selected academic fields 
approved by the Professor of Military Science. Students who 
clearly demonstrate during their attendance in the Basic 
Course the qualities necessary to become a Reserve Officer of 
the U.S. Army may be selected for the Advanced Course. 

For admission to this course a student must fulfill the fol- 
lowing: have completed the Basic Course; be selected by the 
Professor of Military Science and the President of the Uni- 
versity; be 26 years of age or under at time of enrollment; 
meet physical requirements as established by the Department 
of the Army; execute a contract with the Government to finish 
the course, attend a six-week summer camp and accept a com- 
mission in the United States Army Reserve, if tendered. When 
the contract is signed, completion of the Advanced Course be- 
comes a requirement for graduation unless the contract is 
cancelled by the Department of the Army. 

3rd Year 

MS 305 Military Science III 3 cr. 

Instruction in Principles of Leadership; Military Teaching 
Methods; Branches of the Army; and Leadership Laboratory. 

MS 306 Military Science III 3 cr. 

Instruction in Infantry Tactics and Communication; Pre- 
Camp Orientation; Physical Training; Counterinsurgericy; and 
Leadership Laboratory. 



294 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



4th Year 

MS 407 Military Science IV 3 cr. 

Instruction in Operations, Company Duties; Army Admin- 
istration; Military Law; and Leadership Laboratory. 

MS 408 Military Science IV 3 cr. 

Instruction in Service Orientation; Role of the United 
States in World Affairs; Map Reading; Airmobile Operations; 
and Logistics. 

SUMMER CAMP 

The six week summer camp is usually attended by stu- 
dents upon completion of the first year of the Advanced 
Course; although, under certain circumstances cadets may at- 
tend summer camp following completion of the Advanced 
Course. Time at camp is devoted to the practical application 
and demonstration of principles and theories taught during the 
school year. While at camp each student will receive lodging, 
subsistence, uniforms, medical care, reimbursement for travel 
and pay in the amount of one hundred and fifty-one dollars 
and ninety-five cents ($151.95) per month. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



295 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

HUGH JOHNSON, Chairman 



WILLIAM R. BECKER 
ROBERT E. BERNAT 
DAVID T. BORST 
WALLIS D. BRAMAN 
ROBERT W. BURGGRAF 
CATHERINE C. CARL 
CHRISTINA CHA 
CHARLES A. DAVIS 
DANIEL DiCICCO 
GLADYS DUNKELBERGER 
OLIVE M. FORNEAR 
EDWIN J. FRY 
WALTER A. GOLZ 
ARVILLA T. HARROLD 
DELIGHT HEDGES 
H. EUGENE HULBERT 
DOMINIC J. INTILI 



C. DAVID McNAUGHTON 
RUSSEL C. NELSON 
GARY J. OLMSTEAD 
JANE V. OLMSTEAD 
LAURENCE J. PERKINS 
DANIEL PERLONGO 
PETER J. POPIEL 
ROBERT D. REYNOLDS 
NICOLO A. SARTURI 
ANN M. STAPLES 
JAMES G. STAPLES 
ELIZABETH D. STEWART 
LAWRENCE C. STITT 
PHILIP J. SWANSON 
RICHARD E. THORELL 
EVA VOUKLIZAS 
J. HERBERT WILDEBOOR 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
GENERAL EDUCATION 

Mus 101 Introduction to Music 3 s.h. 

The course "Introduction to Music" presumes no technical 
background, but does utilize as fully as possible the varied 
musical experiences of each individual to help him extend his 
interest as far as possible. One or two field trips are planned 
each semester to Pittsburgh to attend the Pittsburgh Opera 
and /or the Pittsburgh Symphony. In addition, various concerts 
of college organizations, cultural life events, and visiting artist 
concerts are required to augment the listening experiences of 
the student. 



MUSIC THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

Mus 111 Sight Singing I 2 s.h. 

Sight Singing I is designed to develop the student's skill 
at interpreting written music by the use of his own voice. 
Areas of study include: all major and minor scales; treble, alto, 
tenor, and bass clefs; all diatonic intervals; duple and triple 
meter with rhythmic dictation drills; phrase-wise thinking; 
and elementary form analysis. The sol-fa syllables with mov- 
able do are used. 

Mus 112 Sight Singing II 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Sight Singing I with a mark of C or better. 

A continuation of the development of skills in the areas 
of Sight Singing I, as well as the following additional areas: 
sensitivity to intonation, part singing, compound meters, writ- 
ten melodic and rhythmic dictation. 



296 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Mus 113 Ear Training I 1 s.h. 

Ear Training I involves dictation skills and notation in the 
following areas: primary harmonies in all inversions, and mel- 
odic dictation with implied and actual harmonies. 

Mus 114 Ear Training II 1 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Ear Training I with a mark of C or better. 

A continuation of the development of dictational and nota- 
tional skills of Ear Training I as well as the following areas: 
secondary triads, seventh chords, and modulation to related 
keys. 

Mus 115 Theory I 3 s.h. 

Mus 116 Theory II 3 s.h. 

Mus 215 Theory HI 3 s.h. 

(three 
consecutive 
semesters) 

A study of the compositional devices of the 18th and 19th 
centuries. Emphasis upon melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, and 
formal structures, with occasional reference to contrapuntal 
implications. The student is aided in gaining a mastery of these 
devices through written exercises for various media, analysis 
of examples in composer's works, and performance at the key- 
board. 

Mus 216 Theory IV 3 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Theory I, II, III. 

A study of the compositional devices of the latter half of 
the 19th century and first half of the 20th century. The student 
is aided in gaining a mastery of these devices through the same 
means indicated above for Theory I, II, III. 

Mus 217 Keyboard Harmony I 1 s.h. 

Prerequisite: A nominal amount of facility at the key- 
board. 

Keyboard Harmony I is designed to develop keyboard 
skills in the student so he may realize and produce in sound 
the basic harmonic progressions involved in the primary 
chords in all inversions. 

Mus 218 Keyboard Harmony II 1 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Keyboard Harmony I. 

A continuation of Keyboard Harmony I involving skills 
with secondary chords and their dominants, chromatic har- 
monv and mc complex progressions. 

Mus 304 Form and Analysis I 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Theory IV. 

A thorough study of the smaller forms of music. The stu- 
dent will analyze as many of the smaller forms as possible, 
both through listening and reading of the works. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 297 



Mus 305 Form and Analysis II 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Form and Analysis I. 

A thorough study of the larger forms of music in the 
same manner as Form and Analysis I. 

Mus 306 Counterpoint I 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Theory IV. 

After an intensive study and analysis of the style of the 
16th Century contrapuntal writing, the student will do orig- 
inal writing using the techniques and devices of the period. As 
time permits, the same approach will be made to explore the 
style of the 17th and 18th Century composers. 

Mus 307 Counterpoint II 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Counterpoint I. 

A continuation of the study, analysis, and restricted writ- 
ing of the 17th and 18th Century composers. Consideration will 
be given to the free contrapuntal techniques used by later 
composers. 

Mus 308 Fugue and Canon 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Counterpoint I. 

The application of contrapuntal techniques within these 
two specific forms through analysis, assigned exercises, and 
creative writing. 

Mus 309 Orchestration I 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Theory IV. 

All the instruments of the orchestra are studied from the 
viewpoint of their contribution to the total sound of the en- 
semble. Ranges and timbres are considered as well as actual 
arranging of selected music for each section, full orchestra, 
band, and other instrumental organizations. Whenever possi- 
ble, the arrangements are performed in class or by one of the 
organizations of the college. 

Mus 310 Orchestration II 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Orchestration I. 

A continuation of Orchestration I with more emphasis 
placed on larger projects and the programming of outstanding 
works in university concerts. 

Mus 315 Theory V 3 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Theory IV. 

Many of the harmonic idioms of the past half century will 
be considered, such as: comparative analysis of dissonance; 
poly tonality; polyrhythms; atonalism and the 12 tone system; 
and microtonalism. Original writing in these styles will be 
required. 

Mus 411 Composition I 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Theory IV. 

Instruction in Composition I will of necessity be highly 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



individualized due to the uniqueness of the creative process. 
Compositional devices will be studied through the analysis of 
works by major composers. Students will do original works in 
the smaller forms of music. 

Mus 412 Composition II 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Composition I. 

A continuation of Composition I with the emphasis placed 
more on the larger forms of music. Outstanding works will be 
programmed by university organizations. 

MUSIC LITERATURE AND HISTORY 

Mus 220 Music Literature I 2 s.h. 

Major works of the Eighteenth Century will be studied 
and analyzed as to form, style, and their place in the musical 
world of the various periods. 

Mus 221 Music Literature II 2 s.h. 

Major works of the Nineteenth Century will be covered 
in the same manner as Music Literature I. 

Mus 301 History of Music I 3 s.h. 

A study of the development of music from the ancient 
Greek and Roman cultures through the Baroque period. Al- 
though the approach is an historical one, considerable analytic 
listening is required. 

Mus 302 History of Music II 3 s.h. 

Starting with the Eighteenth Century with Haydn and 
Mozart, History of Music II is the study of the development of 
music to the present. Analytic listening is required through 
all available sources. 

Mus 316 Literature of the Major I 2 s.h. 

The student will research the literature of his major in- 
strument or voice with the assistance of his private instructor 
and the instructor of the course. 

Mus 317 Literature of the Major II 2 s.h. 

The student will continue his research from Literature of 
the Major I. 

Mus 320 Music of the Ancient World 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

A concentrated study of music from the early Greeks up 
to the Middle Ages, including considerable emphasis on plain- 
song or Liturgical music of the early church. 

Mus 321 Music of the Middle Ages 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

Starting with the Jongleurs, Troubadors, and Trouveres of 
the Early Middle Ages, this course deals with the literature of 
music through English and Burgundian Schools at the close 
of the Middle Ages. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 299 

Mus 322 Renaissance Music 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

Beginning with Ockeghem and ending with Palestrina and 
his contemporaries, the music literature of this age is carefully 
and thoroughly studied. 

Mus 323 The Baroque Era 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

The Baroque Era extends from Monteverdi through Bach 
and Handel, and considers both vocal and instrumental forms, 
styles, and practices of the era. 

Mus 324 Eighteenth Century Music 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

Although Mozart and Haydn comprise the greater portion 
of 18th Century music, the Rococo Period involves D. Scarlatti 
and C. P. E. Bach as well. The mature development of the son- 
ata and symphony comprise a considerable portion of this 
study. 

Mus 325 The Early Romantic Period 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

Beethoven, Schubert, Rossini, Weber, Mendelssohn, Ber- 
lioz, Schumann, and Chopin are the major composers to be 
studied in the Early Romantic Period. 

Mus 326 The Late Romantic Period 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

Wagner, Verdi, Glinka, Bruckner, Meyerbeer, Liszt, Gou- 
nod, Brahms, Offenbach, Smetana, J. Strauss, Grieg, Bizet, 
Moussorgsky, Saint-Saens, Tschaikowsky, Massenet, Franck, 
Borodin, Rimski-Korsakoff, Wolf, R. Strauss, Mahler, Faure, 
Puccini, Dvorak, MacDowell, and Elgar are the major com- 
posers of this study. 

Mus 420 Contemporary Music 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

Beginning with Debussy, Ravel and the other impression- 
ists, touching on Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Webern, Honneger, 
Milhaud, et al. Contemporary Music ends with today and to- 
morrow. Various trends, styles, techniques are noted; judg- 
ments are attempted on the more experimental forms; and 
limited predictions of trends are ventured. 

Mus 421 American Music 3 s.h. 

Prerequisites: History of Music I and II. 

American Music is a study of the History and Literature 
of Music in America from 1600 to the present day. Early Amer- 
ican musical heritages are traced from pre-revolutionary 
America to our day. 



300 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



CONDUCTING 

Mus 311 Fundamentals of Conducting 2 s.h. 

Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental physical skills 
of the conducting process. Various beat patterns will be mas- 
tered and elementary score reading and interpretation will be 
considered. 

Mus 312 Choral Conducting 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Conducting. 

Choral Conducting will provide the opportunity for the 
student to apply his basic conducting techniques to the choral 
area. Each student will conduct the rest of the class in many 
of the standard choral works of the literature. Also a survey 
of suitable literature, organizational problems, voice testing, 
rehearsal techniques, program building, interpretation, and 
diction will be included. 

Mus 313 Instrumental Conducting 2 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Conducting. 

Instrumental Conducting will provide the student with the 
opportunity to apply his basic conducting skills to the various 
instrumental ensembles. Each student will conduct the rest of 
the class as well as the available instrumental ensembles in 
the department. Also a survey of suitable literature, organiza- 
tional problems, audition procedures, rehearsal techniques, 
program building, and interpretation will be considered. 

Mus 401 Choral Score Reading 2 s.h. 

Prerequisites: Harmony IV, and Choral Conducting. 

Choral Score Reading is designed for the student who 
wishes to further develop his skills at interpreting choral 
scores. Some of the units are: reading 3, 4, 5, and 6 line scores; 
problems of editing music of various periods; further develop- 
ment of skill with various clefs; developing a sense of tempi; 
and practice in score reduction at the keyboard. 

Mus 402 Instrumental Score Reading 2 s.h. 

Prerequisites: Harmony IV, and Instrumental Conducting. 

Instrumental Score Reading serves a similar purpose. 
Some of the units are: developing skill in reading 12 lines to 
full orchestral or band scores of 32 lines; editing and bowing 
problems of various periods; developing skill with clefs and 
transpositions; developing a sense of tempi; and reducing full 
scores at the keyboard. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

El 211 Music for the Elementary Grades 2 s.h. 

(See the Elementary section for a course description.) 
El 212 Teaching Music in the Elementary Grades 3 s.h. 

(See the Elementary section for a course description.) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 301 



Mus 204 Rhythmic Movement I (Eurhythmies I) 1 s.h. 

Rhythmic Movement I develops musical perception 
through physical response; stimulates creative imagination 
through group and individual interpretations; and promotes 
bodily coordination, poise, and precision. 

Mus 205 Eurythmics II 1 s.h. 

Prerequisite: Rhythmic Movement I. 

Rhythmic Movement II continues the skill development 
begun in Eurythmics I and further provides each student with 
the opportunity to direct others; to master and to teach a 
repertory of folk dances; and to organize the work to fit the 
needs and capacities of elementary pupils. 

Mus 331 Elementary Methods 2 s.h. 

Included in Elementary Methods are the following topics: 
analytical study of texts, recordings, equipment, instruments, 
and other material suitable to musical development of elemen- 
tary pupils; proper treatment of the child voice; selection, use, 
and teaching of rote songs; rhythmic activities and develop- 
ment; music reading; part singing; planning and organization; 
guided observations; and evaluation techniques. 

Mus 333 Secondary Methods 2 s.h. 

The following topics will be treated: the General Music 
Class, choral organizations, the changing voice, techniques of 
instruction including team teaching and programmed learning, 
high school theory courses, high school music literature 
courses, scheduling, administrative problems, curriculum de- 
velopment, evaluation of materials and equipment, evaluative 
techniques, and guided observations. 

Mus 334 Instrumental Methods 2 s.h. 

A treatment of the necessary understandings, techniques, 
equipment, and materials necessary to develop an effective in- 
strumental music program in the public schools. Demonstra- 
tions and laboratory work are designed to give the student the 
competencies needed to meet successfully the various teaching 
situations in instrumental music from the grades through the 
high school. Guided observations are required. 

Mus 405 Piano Pedagogy 2 s.h. 

Prerequisites: Junior Standing in Piano, and a piano ma- 
jor or minor. 

A survey of all current and significant past developments 
in the teaching of piano both privately and in small and large 
classes. The various piano methods are analyzed, compared, 
criticized, and adapted to each individual's use. 

Mus 406 Voice Pedagogy 2 s.h. 

Prerequisites: a voice major or minor, and permission of 
the instructor. 



302 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

A survey of all current and significant past developments 
in the teaching of voice both privately and in small and large 
classes. The various vocal methods are analyzed, compared, 
criticized, and adapted to each individual's use. 

Mus 407 Master Class in Organ 2 s.h. 

Prerequisites: for organ majors only with the organ in- 
structor's permission. 

From time to time the organ instructor will accept from 
four to eight organ majors for this course. Every student will 
observe every other student's instruction and demonstrations 
of various techniques of teaching organ will be given. 

Mus 408 Marching Band Techniques 2 s.h. 

The following topics are considered; building a band show; 
alignment of ranks and files; development of a standard pace 
of 6 to 5 and 8 to 5; selection of music; instrumentation; tech- 
niques of developing morale; and fundamentals of uniform 
design. 

Ed 421 Student Teaching 12 s.h. 

The music major will begin his practice teaching with 
observations and various simple teaching assignments, gradu- 
ally assuming greater teaching responsibilities on the elemen- 
tary, junior and senior high school levels in instrumental and 
vocal music. A university faculty member coordinates the 
work of the student teacher and his school supervisor. 

Ed 422 Professional Practicum (Including School Law) 2 s.h. 

Significant problems of an advanced nature, and closely 
related to student teaching, are introduced in order to insure 
further professional growth. Observing of other teaching situ- 
ations, reading of books and professional journals, along with 
reports and discussions at conferences, will aid in this growth. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Class Instruction 

The following courses are designed to acquaint the student 
with basic skills in each particular area. The classes are con- 
ducted in a similar manner to those in the public schools but 
for different purpose. 

Mus 151 Class Voice I 1 s.h. 

Mus 152 Class Voice II 1 s.h. 

Mus 153 Class Piano I 1 s.h. 

Mus 154 Class Piano II 1 s.h. 

Mus 155 Strings Seminar 1 s.h. 

Mus 156 Class Strings 1 s.h. 

Mus 157 Class Percussion I 1 s.h. 

Mus 158 Class Percussion II 1 s.h. 

Mus 159 Brass Seminar 1 s.h. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 303 

Mus 160 Class Brass 1 s.h. 

Mus 161 Woodwind Seminar 1 s.h. 

Mus 162 Class Woodwinds 1 s.h. 

Mus 353 French Diction 2 s.h. 

Mus 354 German Diction 2 s.h. 

Mus 475 Music Laboratory s.h. 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION 

Two semester hours credit for each half-hour lesson and 
ten hours practice per week for one semester. The instructor 
will determine which series applies. 

100-150 Series, for Freshmen 
200-250 Series, for Sophomores 
300-350 Series, for Juniors 
400-450 Series, for Seniors 
Available in the following performance areas: 



Piano (Pno) 


01 


Clarinet (Clar) 


11 


Organ (Ogn) 


02 


Oboe (Ob) 


12 


Harpsichord (HpCh) 


03 


Bassoon (Bssn) 


13 


Harp (Hrp) 


04 


Saxophone (Sax) 


14 


Voice (Vce) 


05 


Trumpet (Trpt) 


15 


Violin (Vln) 


06 


French Horn (FrH) 


16 


Viola (Via) 


07 


Trombone (Trb) 


17 


Cello (Cel) 


08 


Baritone Horn (BaH) 


18 


Bass Viol (BsV) 


09 


Tuba (Tba) 


19 


Flute (Fl) 


10 


Percussion (Perc) 


20 



Course Description 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE PIANO 

(Section 01) 

Mus 100-150 Section 01 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

All major scales, four octaves in sixteenth notes at M.M. 
90-96, and all root position arpeggios four octaves in sixteenth 
notes at M.M. 90-96 will be studied. The following pieces from 
the piano repertoire will be studied: Bach, Two and Three-part 
Inventions; Bach, Sonatinas; Beethoven Sonatas; Haydn So- 
natas; Kuhlau Sonatas; Mozart Sonatas; Mendelssohn, Songs 
without words; Chopin, easier Nocturnes, Preludes, Waltzes, 
and Polonaises; Modern pieces such as, Kabalevsky's Sonatina, 
Debussy's Arabesque, and Tcherepnin's Bagatelle. The student 
will be required to memorize at least two pieces. 

Mus 200-250 Section 01 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

All major and three forms of the minor scales, four octaves 
in sixteenth notes at a quarter note equaling M.M. 120, and all 



304 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

root position major and minor arpeggios four octaves in six- 
teenth notes at a quarter note equaling M.M. 120 will be stud- 
ied. The following pieces from the piano literature will be 
studied: Bach, Three-part Inventions; Bach French Suites; 
Beethoven Sonatas; Haydn Sonatas; Mozart Sonatas; Schubert, 
Impromptus, Moments, Musicaux; Chopin, Nocturnes and 
Polonaises; Schumann, Op. 2, 82, 89; Works of impressionist 
and modern composers such as Debussy, Bartok, Gershwin, 
Dello Joio, Kabalevsky, and Shostakovich. Continued memori- 
zation will take place as required by the instructor. 

Mus 300-350 Section 01 
Junior-Grades V to VI 

Continued technical development of all scales and arpeg- 
gios will take place as required by the instructor. The follow- 
ing material from the piano repertoire will be studied: Bach, 
Preludes and Fugues; Bach Suites; Handel Suites; more diffi- 
cult Sonatas of Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart, and of the Roman- 
tic composers; easier pieces of Brahms; Schumann, Faschings- 
schwank; pieces by impressionist and contemporary compos- 
ers. Further memorization will take place as required by the 
instructor. 

Mus 400-450 Section 01 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

With balanced programming in mind, Baroque, Pre-classic, 
Classic, and Modern repertoire will be selected. Upon approv- 
al by a faculty hearing, a full or half recital may be given. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE ORGAN 

(Section 02) 

Mus 100-150 Section 02 
Freshman — Grades III to rV 

Study from the following composers' beginners books will 
be emphasized: Harold Gleason, Richard Enright, Flor Peeters 
(Little Organ Book), and David Johnson. Pieces from the 
organ literature such as Bach, Little Preludes and Fugues; 
Bach, Orgelbuchlein; Gordon Young, Baroque Suite; Wilbur 
Held, Nativity Suites; Max Reger, Chorale Preludes; and 
Healy Willan, Hymn Preludes will be studied. In addition, 
the Trios of Rheinberger, Alcrechtberger, and Schneider will 
be used to supplement the first year program. Selected Hymns 
will be studied as required by the instructor. 

Mus 200-250 Section 02 
Sophomore — Grades rV to V 

Study of organ collections such as Karg-Elert, Chorale- 
Improvisations; Vierne, 24 pieces in Free Styles; Walcha, 25 
Chorale-Preludes and miscellaneous pieces such as Franck, 
Cantabile; Boellmann, Gothique Suite; and Langlais, Neuf 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 305 



Pieces will take place. The following organ works of Bach 
will be studied: more difficult Chorale-Preludes from the Or- 
gelbuchlein, 12 Chorale-Preludes-Bach (Edited by Glynn), 
Prelude and Fugue in E Minor (The Cathedral), Fantasia in 
C Minor, Prelude and Fugue in C Major, and the Prelude in C 
Minor. Continued selected Hymns will be studied as required 
by the instructor. 

Mus 300-350 Section 02 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued study will be made of the organ literature with 
emphasis on the following material: Franck — Fantasie in C, 
Fantasie in A, and Piece Heroique; Brahms, Chorale-Preludes; 
Bach — Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, Prelude in D Major, 
Prelude in F Minor, and the First Trio Sonata; Historical 
Organ Recitals Vol. 1, Forerunners of Bach (Edited by Bon- 
net); Dupre, Antiphons; Sowerby, Carillon; Langlais, Suite 
Medievale; and Mendelssohn Sonatas. Some transposition of 
Hymns will take place as required by the instructor. 

Mus 400-450 Section 02 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

Hymn transposition, modulations, and the adaptation of 
piano solos to the organ will take place as required by the in- 
structor. Further study will be made of the organ repertoire 
with emphasis on the following material: Franck, Three 
Chorales; Allain, Litanies; Bach — Toccata in D Minor (Dor- 
ian), Prelude and Fugue in A Minor, Prelude and Fugue in 
B Minor, Fugue in E Flat Major (St. Anne's), Trio Sonatas, 
and Schubler Chorale-Preludes; Vierne, Finale from the First 
Symphony and Pieces of Fantasie; and Mulet, Carillon-Sortie 
and Thou Art the Rock. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR HARPSICHORD 

(Section 03) 

See instructor. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR HARP 

(Section 04) 

See instructor. 

VOICE 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

1. The student should be able to sing simple standard clas- 
sic art songs with acceptable tone quality and intona- 
tion. 

2. Three selections should be prepared all of which will be 
sung in English. These may be folk songs or selections 
from any standard Art Song Collection. (Popular or 
"hit" tunes are unacceptable.) 



306 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



3. A level of proficiency will be determined at the time of 
entrance. 

4. All transfer students must be heard by the voice staff 
jury. 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION 

1. The level of each student will be determined by the 
voice staff jury at the end of each semester. 

2. The specific degree requirements for undergraduate 
students are explained as follows. Voice-piano majors 
must have a repertoire in English and in two foreign 
languages and shall have attained Level VI as a mini- 
mum for the Bachelor of Science Degree with a major 
in Music Education. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR VOICE 

(Section 05) 

Mus 100-150 Section 05 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

All American and English folk literature and an introduc- 
tion to Italian will be studied. The student will be required to 
sing the Romantic Period song literature in Italian. Each stu- 
dent will build a repertoire of sacred and secular songs as re- 
quired by the individual teachers. 

Mus 200-250 Section 05 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

German folk songs and simple art songs having suitable 
tempi and language facility will be studied. An introduction 
will be made to Haydn, Handel, and less difficult songs by Pur- 
cell. There will be a continuation of the Italian classic reper- 
toire and less difficult Lieder. A thorough study of the Roman- 
tic and the Contemporary English songs of greater musical 
complexity will be made. The student's performance should 
demonstrate an expansion of musical tastes and an apprecia- 
tion of vocal literature. 

Mus 300-350 Section 05 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

At this level the student must display a grasp of vocal 
techniques enabling him to meet the approval of the voice 
staff. An introduction will be made of Romantic operatic arias, 
easy oratorial, and simple songs in French. The student will 
continue to broaden his repertoire through continued study of 
Italian and more difficult German Lieder. The student will also 
sing arias from the Baroque era of composers, including Bach, 
Handel, Scarlatti, and Pergolesi. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 307 

Mus 400-450 Section 05 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

The student's technical mastery will become evident in 
Italian, German, and French. In addition, the student may 
study any special interests for his own enrichment. (Such as 
language facility for vocal literature in Spanish, Russian, etc.) 
Recital preparation and a continuation of technique and any 
specialization will also take place. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE VIOLIN 

(Section 06) 

Mus 100-150 Section 06 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

The Flesch Scale System will be used to study selected 
three octave scales and scales in thirds, sixths, and octaves. The 
following Etudes will be used: Wohlfahrt, Op. 45 Book II; Kay- 
ser, Studies Op. 20; Hofmann, Double-Stop Studies; Kreutzer, 
42 Studies. A study of solo material will be made with empha- 
sis on Sonatinas by Schubert and Telemann, and Concertos by 
Seitz (Nos. 1 and 3), Accolay, and Vivaldi (A Minor). 

Mus 200-250 Section 06 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continuation of the Flesch Scale System will be used to 
study selected three octave scales and scales in thirds, sixths, 
octaves, and harmonics. Etude study will include Kayser's 
Studies Op. 20 and Kreutzer's 42 Studies. Continued study of 
the solo repertoire will be made with emphasis on Sonatas by 
Handel, Mozart, and Vivaldi; and Concertos by Bach, Haydn, 
Nardini, and Viotti. 

Mus 300-350 Section 06 
Juniors — Grades V to VI 

Continuation of the Flesch Scale System will be used to 
study selected three octave scales and scales in thirds, sixths, 
octaves, tenths, and harmonics. Etude study will include 
Kreutzer's 42 Studies and Fiorillo's 36 Etudes. A study of the 
solo repertoire will include Sonatas by Corelli, Handel, Mozart, 
Beethoven, and Romances; and Concertos by Bach, Haydn, 
Mozart (G Major), and Viotti. 

Mus 400-450 Section 06 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

Continued technical development of the Flesch Scale Sys- 
tem will take place as required by the instructor. The follow- 
ing Etudes will be used: Kreutzer, 42 Studies; Fiorillo, 36 
Etudes; Rode, Caprices. Further study of the solo literature 
will be made with emphasis on Sonatas by Bach (violin-piano, 
and solo partita in E Major), Corelli, Beethoven, and Mozart 
(D Major), and Saint Saens (B Minor); and Paganini's Pertual 
Motion. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE VIOLA 

(Section 07) 

Mus 100-150 Section 07 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

The Flesch Scale System will be used to study selected 
three octave scales and scales in thirds, sixths, and octaves. 
The following Etudes will be used: Sitt, Viola Method, Etudes; 
Bruni, 25 Studies; Kreutzer, 42 Studies. A study of solo mater- 
ial will be made with emphasis on Sonatas by Marcello and 
Telemann, and Concertos by Seitz (Nos. 1 and 3) and Accolay. 

Mus 200-250 Section 07 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continuation of the Flesch Scale System will be used to 
study selected three octave scales in thirds, sixths, octaves, and 
harmonics. Etude study will include Kreutzer's 42 Studies and 
Lifschey's Double-Stop Studies. Continued study of the solo 
repertoire will be made with emphasis on Sonatas by Mozart 
and Telemann, and Concertos by Handel, Hoffmeister, and 
Telemann. 

Mus 300-350 Section 07 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continuation of the Flesch Scale System will be used to 
study selected three octave scales and scales in thirds, sixths, 
octaves, tenths, and harmonics. The following Etudes will be 
used: Kreutzer, 42 Studies; Lifschey, Double-Stop Studies; 
Fiorillo, 36 Etudes. A study of the solo repertoire will include 
Sonatas by Bach (Gamba and piano, and Solo Cello Suites), 
Boccherini, Honegger, Schumann, and Marchenbilder; and 
Concertos by Handel, Hoffmeister, Rolla, and Stamitz. 

Mus 400-450 Section 07 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

Continued technical development of the Flesch Scale Sys- 
tem will take place as required by the instructor. The follow- 
ing Etudes will be used: Kreutzer, 42 Studies; Fiorillo, 36 
Etudes; Rode, Caprices. Further study of the solo literature 
will be made with emphasis on Sonatas by Bach (Gamba and 
Piano, and Solo Cello Suites), Brahms and Hindemith; Con- 
certos by Boccherini, Handel, and Hindemith; and Bloch's 
Suite Hebraique. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE VIOLONCELLO 

(Section 08) 

Mus 100-150 Section 08 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

Scales through the fourth position and the ability to tune 
the violoncello will be studied as required by the instructor. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 309 

The following Etudes will be used: Werner, Studies, Book 1; 
Dotzauer - Klingenberg, Studies, Book II; Grutzmacher, Daily 
Exercises; Grutzmacher, Technology, Book I. 

Mus 200-250 Section 08 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Scales through the seventh position in three octaves will 
be studied as required by the instructor. Continued Etude 
study will include Franchomme's 12 Studies. A study of solo 
material will be made with emphasis on Vivaldi Sonatas, Han- 
del Sonatas, Goltermann's Concerti Nos. 3 and 4, and selected 
short pieces. 

Mus 300-350 Section 08 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

All scales in four octaves and emphasis on varied bowings 
will be studied as required by the instructor. Continued Etude 
study will include Duport's Etudes. Continued study of the 
solo literature will be made with emphasis on Romberg's Con- 
certo No. 2, Sonatas by Sammartini and Breval, Saint Saens' 
Concerto, and Bach's Suite in G Major. 

Mus 400-450 Section 08 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

All major and minor scales in four octaves emphasizing 
thirds, sixths, and octaves will be studied as required by the 
instructor. Franchomme's 12 Caprices, Boellmann's Symphonic 
Variations, and Bach's Suite in D Minor will be studied by the 
student. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR STRING BASS 

(Section 09) 

Mus 100-150 Section 09 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

All scales and arpeggios in two octaves will be studied as 
required by the instructor. A general review of selected ma- 
terial from the Simandl Method, Book I, a thorough knowledge 
of all positions through VII, and an introduction to the thumb 
position will be made. The Simandl, Etudes and the Sturm, 
110 Studies (Vol. 1) will be studied by the student. A study of 
solo material will be made including Oscar Zimmerman's 
Solos for Bass, Marcello's Sonata in E Minor, the Galliard 
Sonatas, ensemble material, and Indiana University Symphony 
bass parts of works currently performed. 

Mus 200-250 Section 09 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

All scales and arpeggios in three octaves will be studied 
as required by the instructor. The following Etudes will be 
used: Simandl, New Method, Book II; Sturm, 110 Studies, Book 
II; Hrabe, Studies; Storch-Hrabe, Studies. Continued study of 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



the solo repertoire will be made with emphasis on Sonatas of 
Marcelli, Vivaldi, and Corelli; Capuzzi's Concerto; orchestral 
studies; ensemble material; and Indiana University Symphony 
bass parts of works currently performed. 

Mus 300-350 Section 09 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

All scales and arpeggios are required with a continuation 
of technical development. Simandl New Method, Book II and 
Storch-Hrabe Studies, Book II will be studied by the student. 
Solo literature with emphasis on Baroque Sonatas, contempor- 
ary works, orchestral studies, ensemble material, and Indiana 
University Symphony bass parts of works currently performed 
will be studied. 

Mus 400-450 Section 09 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

Continued technical development will take place as re- 
quired by the instructor. There will be a review of selected 
Etudes previously studied and additional study of the Nanny, 
20 Etudes. Further study of the solo repertoire will be made 
with emphasis on Baroque works, the Hindemith Sonata, con- 
temporary works, ensemble material, and Indiana University 
Symphony bass parts of works currently performed. Proper 
recital preparation will be taken if the student is eligible. 



APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE FLUTE 

(Section 10) 

Mus 100-150 Section 10 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

Major and minor scales in all keys will be studied as re- 
quired by the instructor. Representative material to be used: 
Eck, Tone Development; Berbeguier, 18 Etudes (Barrere); An- 
dersen, 24 Studies, Op. 33. A study of solo material with em- 
phasis on Handel's Seven Sonatas will be made. The Hugues 
Duets, Volume II and the Kuhlau Duets, Op. 10 will supple- 
ment the first year program. 

Mus 200-250 Section 10 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Seventh Chords and arpeggios in all keys will be studied 
as required by the instructor. Representative material to be 
used: Maquarre, Daily Exercises; Moyse, Tone Studies; Ander- 
sen, 24 Studies, Op. 33; Karg-Elert, 30 Caprices, Op. 107. Con- 
tinued study of the solo repertoire will be made including the 
Mozart Concertos in G and D. The Kuhlau Duets, Op. 80 and 
81 and the Mozart Duets will supplement the second year pro- 
gram. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 311 

Mus 300-350 Section 10 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued technical development will take place as re- 
quired by the instructor. Representative material to be used: 
Andersen, Studies, Op. 30 and 63; Taffanel-Gaubert, 17 Daily 
Studies. Study of the solo literature with emphasis on the 
Bach Seven Sonatas and standard solo literature will be made. 
The Kuhlau Duets, Op. 102 and 87 will supplement the third 
year program. 

Mus 400-450 Section 10 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

Representative material to be used: Bach Studies; Ander- 
sen Studies, Op. 15; Jean- Jean, 18 Modern Etudes. Further 
study of the solo repertoire with emphasis on French solo lit- 
erature and selected orchestral studies will take place. The 
Kuhlau Duets, Op. 39 will supplement the fourth year pro- 
gram. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE CLARINET 

(Section 11) 

Mus 100-150 Section 11 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

All major and minor scales in two octaves will be studied 
as required by the instructor. Selected studies from Blancou, 
Schmidt (Lazarus Vol. II), and Perier's 20 Etudes will be 
studied by the student. A study of solo material will be made 
with emphasis on Hite's 18 Short Pieces for Clarinet and Piano 
and selected solos from Concert and Contest Collections. 

Mus 200-250 Section 11 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

All scales and arpeggios are required with a continuation 
of technical development. The following Etudes will be used: 
Baermann, Div. Ill; Perier, Etudes De Genre et DTnterpreta- 
tion, Book I and II; Jean Jean, Progressive Studies, Vol. I and 
II; Rose, 32 Etudes. Continued study of the solo repertoire will 
be made with emphasis on Stubbin's Selected Solos from Re- 
cital Pieces. 

Mus 300-350 Section 11 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued technical development will take place as re- 
quired by the instructor. The following Etudes will be used: 
Langenus, Vol. Ill; Perier, Trente Etudes; Bozza, 12 Etudes. A 
continued study of the solo literature will be made with em- 
phasis on the Mozart Concerto, Weber Concertos, and moder- 
ately difficult contemporary concerti and sonatas, 



312 INDIANA U NIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Mus 400-450 Section 11 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

Further technical development will take place as required 
by the instructor. The following Etudes will be used: Stark, 
Twenty-Four Studies in all Tonalities; Jean Jean, Sixteen 
Modern Etudes; and orchestral studies. Further study of the 
solo repertoire will be made with emphasis on Perier's Recueil 
De Sonates Vol. I and II; Sonatas by Brahms, Hindemith, Ber- 
stein, Martinu, and Poulenc; and chamber music of all periods. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE OBOE 

(Section 12) 

Mus 100-150 Section 12 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

Major and minor scales will be studied as required by the 
instructor. Special tone and scale studies will be used to em- 
phasize basic performance skills. A study of Etudes by com- 
posers such as Barret and Prestini will be made. Solo material 
will be studied with emphasis on Handel's Sonatas. In addi- 
tion, an introduction to reed making will take place. 

Mus 200-250 Section 12 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continued study of major and minor scales with emphasis 
on the study of vibrato will take place. There will be a contin- 
uation of the study of Etudes including Barret's 15 Grand 
Studies and Ferling's 48 Etudes. A study of the solo repertoire 
will include works by Telemann, Corelli, and Schumann. Con- 
tinued reed making study will take place. 

Mus 300-350 Section 12 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

All scales are required, with special studies selected by the 
instructor for expression and control. A continued study of 
Etudes by Ferling and Prestini will take place. Continued 
study will be made of the solo literature with emphasis on 
works of composers such as Haydn and Albinoni. 

Mus 400-450 Section 12 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

Continued technical development will take place as re- 
quired by the instructor. Further study of Etudes by Gillet and 
Hugot will take place. The study of the solo repertoire will 
continue with emphasis on works of composers such as Mozart 
and Hindemith. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE BASSOON 

(Section 13) 

Mus 100-150 Section 13 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

Major and minor scales in all keys will be studied as re- 
quired by the instructor. The fundamentals of the bassoon in- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 313 



eluding embouchure, care of instrument, breathing, posture, 
and tone will be emphasized. An introduction to' reed making 
will take place. A study of Weissenborn's Method for the Bas- 
soon Vol. I & II will be made. Solo repertoire with emphasis on 
Cohen's Danse Grotesque, Kesner's Clown Festival, and Moz- 
art's Bassoon Concerto (Third Movement) will be studied. 

Mus 200-250 Section 13 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Seventh chords and arpeggios in all keys will be studied 
as required by the instructor. A continuation of the funda- 
mentals of the bassoon will take place. The student will be re- 
quired to perform on the reeds he makes. A study of Weissen- 
born's Fifty Advanced Studies will be made. Continued study 
will be made of the solo literature with emphasis on the 
Galliard Sonatas (Vol. I and II), Bach's unaccompanied Vio- 
loncello Suites, Mozart's Bassoon Concerto in Bb (First Move- 
ment), and Schoenbach's Solos for the Bassoon Player. 

Mus 300-350 Section 13 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued study of reed making will take place. The L. 
Milde Studies in All Keys (Op. 24) and the L. Milde-Kovar 
Concert Studies (Vol. I) will be studied by the student. Con- 
tinued study will be made of the solo repertoire with emphasis 
on Bourdeau, Premier Solo; Bach, unaccompanied Violoncello 
Suites; Phillips, Concert Piece; and Hindemith, Sonata for 
Bassoon. 

Mus 400-450 Section 13 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

Further study of reed making will take place. A continued 
study of the solo repertoire will take place with emphasis on 
Mozart, Bassoon Concerto in Bb (K. 191), memorized; Miro- 
shinikov, Scherzo; Saint-Saens, Sonata for Bassoon; Vivaldi, 
Concerto in La Minor and La Notte; and orchestral excerpts. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE SAXOPHONE 

(Section 14) 

Mus 100-150 Section 14 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

The fundamentals of saxophone playing with emphasis on 
embouchure, breathing, and alternate fingerings will be 
studied. The following selected studies will be u c ed: DeVille, 
Universal Saxophone Method; Blemant, Melodic Studies Book 
I and II; Ferling, 48 Etudes. A study of solo material will be 
made with emphasis on Handel's Sonata #3 (Violin), 
Rameau's Gavotte et Minuet, Schubert's The Bee, and 
Whitney's Rumba. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Mus 200-250 Section 14 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continued fundamental work including all scales and 
arpeggios will take place. The following Etudes will be used: 
Ferling, 48 Etudes; Labanchi, 33 Concert Etudes; Rascher, 24 
Intermezzi; Bassi, 27 Virtuoso Studies. Continued study of the 
solo repertoire will be made with emphasis on Bozza's Aria, 
Eccles' Sonata, Gurewich's Capriccio, Bach's 2nd Sonata 
(Flute), and Bilotti's Sonata. 

Mus 300-350 Section 14 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued technical development will take place as re- 
quired by the instructor. The following Etudes will be used: 
Labanchi, 33 Concert Etudes; Bassi, 27 Virtuoso Studies; 
Tascher, 24 Intermezzi; Hugot, 25 Grand Etudes. Continued 
study will be made of the solo literature with emphasis on 
Debussy's Rhapsodic Larsson's Concerto, Tcherepnin's 
Sonatine Sportive, and Mozart's Concerto (Bassoon). 

Mus 400-450 Section 14 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

Further technical development will take place as required 
by the instructor. Etude study will include Hugot's 25 Grand 
Etudes and Bozza Douze Etudes-Caprices. Further study will 
be made of the solo repertoire with emphasis on Creston's 
Sonata, Ibert's Concertino da Camera, Mazellier's Fantasie 
Ballet, Milhand's Scaramouche and Dubois' Divertimento. 
There will be preparation for a Senior Recital if the student 
is eligible and a study of saxophone, bassoon, and 'cello litera- 
ture. 



APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE TRUMPET 

(Section 15) 

Mus 100-150 Section 15 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

A review of the basic principles of tone production, correct 
embouchure, proper breath control, simple articulation, con- 
trol of dynamics, correct fingerings, and double and triple 
tonguing will be made. Major and minor scales and arpeggios 
in five sharps and five flats will be studied as required by the 
instructor. The following Etudes will be used: Edwards-Hovey, 
Method for Trumpet, Book I and II; Endresen, Supplementary 
Studies; Gower-Voxman, Advanced Method, Vol. I; Hering, 
40 Progressive Studies and 32 Etudes for Trumpet; Duhem, 36 
Melodic Studies; Arban, Complete Methods; Schlossberg, Daily 
Drills and Technical Studies; Clarke, Technical Studies. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 315 

Mus 200-250 Section 15 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continued study of scales and arpeggios will take place 
as required by the instructor. Further study of Schlossberg's 
Daily Drills and Technical Studies, Clarke's Technical Stu- 
dies, and Arban's Complete Method will be made, with ad- 
ditional study of Bousquet's 36 Celebrated Studies, Hering's 28 
Etudes, Brandt's Orchestral Etudes, and Sachse's 100 Etudes. A 
study of the solo repertoire will be made with emphasis on the 
following: Thome, Fantaisie; Delmas. Chorale and Variations; 
Handel-Fitzgerald, Aria con Variazioni; and Barat, Andante et 
Scherzo. Transposition will be required of the student to 
trumpet in C, A, D, and F. In addition, advanced double and 
triple tonguing will be studied. 

Mus 300-350 Section 15 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continuation of all scales, advanced double and triple 
tonguing, and transposition to C, A, D, F, Ab, Eb, and E 
trumpet will take place. Further study of Schlossberg's Daily 
Drill and Technical Studies and Clarke's Technical Studies will 
be made, with additional study of Bartold's Orchestral Studies, 
Brandt's Last Etudes, Williams' Transposition, and Charlier's 
36 Etudes. Continued study will be made of the solo literature 
with emphasis on the Haydn Concerto, Bitsch's Four Variations 
on a Theme of Domenico Scarlatti, the Hindemith Sonata, and 
Enesco's Legende. 

Mus 400-450 Section 15 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

Further technical development will take place as re- 
quired by the instructor. There will be a continuation of the 
Junior Grade Level Program for transposition, Etude study, 
and solo material. 



APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE FRENCH HORN 

(Section 16) 

Mus 100-150 Section 16 
Freshman — Grades HI to IV 

Fundamentals of tone production, posture (Including right 
hand position), embouchure, breath control, basic articulations, 
control of dynamics, correct fingerings, proper tone quality, 
and methods of muting will be studied. The following Etudes 
will be used: A. Horner, Primary Studies for the French Horn; 
J. Singer, Embouchure Building for French Horn; M. Pottag 
(Editor), Preparatory Melodies (from the Schantl studies); 
G. Pares, (revised by Whistler) Scale Studies; and Pottag and 
Andraud (Editors) . 335 Selected Studies for French Horn, Book 
I. Technical development will take place of the scales and 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



arpeggios in keys with five sharps and five flats. A study of 
solo material will be made including the following: Voxman 
(Editor), solos from Concert and Contest Collection; Jones 
(Editor), Solos for the Horn Player; Mozart, Concert Rondo, 
K. 371; Mozart, easier movements of Horn Concertos; and 
Haydn, Second Concerto in D. Beginning transposition to E, 
Eb, and D horn will take place. 

Mus 200-250 Section 16 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Major and minor scales and arpeggios in keys with five 
sharps and five flats will be further developed. Transposition 
will be continued to G and A horn. The study of Etudes will 
take place with emphasis on the completion of Pottag and 
Andraud, 335 Selected Studies, Book I; and Pottag (Editor), 
Horn Passages, Book I. Continued study of the solo literature 
will be made including Haydn's First Concerto in D, Mozart's 
Third Concerto in Eb (K. 447) and First Concerto in D (K. 
412), Busser's Concert Piece in D (Op. 39), Saint-Saens Concert 
Piece (Op. 94), and S. Adler's Sonata (Music for Brass). 

Mus 300-350 Section 16 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

All major and minor scales and arpeggios will be studied 
as required by the instructor. Transposition will be continued 
to C and Bb horn. The following Etudes will be used: Pottag 
and Andraud (Editors), 305 Selected . . . Studies, Book II; Van- 
der Woude (Edited by Farkas), Pre-Virtuoso Studies; and Pot- 
tag (Editor) , Horn Passages, Book II. Solo repertoire with em- 
phasis on Mozart's Second Concerto in Eb (K. 417) and Fourth 
Concerto in Eb (K. 495), Dukas' Villanelle, Chabrier's Lar- 
ghetto, Beethoven's Sonata (Op. 17), B. Heiden's Sonata (1939), 
and R. Strauss' Concerto No. 1 (Op. 11) will be studied. 

Mus 400-450 Section 16 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

Continued technical development will take place as re- 
quired by the instructor. Continued study of Etudes will take 
place with emphasis on the completion of Pottag and Andraud, 
305 Selected . . . Studies, Book II; and Pottag (Editor), Horn 
Passages, Book III. Further study will be made of the solo 
repertoire with emphasis on Strauss' Concerto No. 2, G. Jacob's 
Concerto, R. Schumann's Adagio and Allegro (Op. 70), and P. 
Hindemith's Sonata (1939). 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE TROMBONE 

(Section 17) 

Mus 100-150 Section 17 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

Major and Minor Scales will be studied as required by the 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 317 

instructor. The Remington Warm-Up Routine .will be used 
with an emphasis on legato style. The following Etudes will be 
used: Rochut Melodious Etudes, Book I; Blazhevich Clef Stud- 
ies; Slama, 66 Etudes. A study of solo material will be made, 
including the Galliard Sonatas and Solos for the Trombone 
Player by H. Smith. 

Mus 200-250 Section 17 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continued study of major and minor scales, and a contin- 
uation of the Remington Warm-Up with emphasis on legato 
style will be made. The following Etudes will be used: Rochut 
Melodious Etudes, Books I & II; Blazhevich Clef Studies; Kop- 
prasch Studies, Book I; Lafosse, School of Sight Reading, 
Books I & II; Blume-Fink, 36 Studies for Trombone with F 
Attachment. Solo repertoire with emphasis on the Vivaldi 
Sonatas and the Marcello Sonatas will be studied. 

Mus 300-350 Section 17 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued study of the major and minor scales, and a con- 
tinuation of the Remington Warm-Up routine with emphasis 
on technical development and study on the Bb-F trombone will 
take place. The following Etudes will be used: Rochut (Becker 
Edition); Schroeder, 170 Studies for Cello; D. Gabrielli, 7 
Ricercars. Continued study will be made of the solo literature 
with emphasis on Bach and Handel transcriptions, the Davison 
Sonata, the Sanders Sonata, and the Rimsky-Korsakov Con- 
certo. 

Mus 400-450 Section 17 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

All scales are required with a continuation of technical de- 
velopment and work on the Remington Warm-Up routine. The 
following Etudes will be used: Bach Cello Suites transcribed 
for tenor trombone by Lafosse; Lafosse School of Sight Read- 
ing, Books III & IV; and orchestral excerpts. Further study 
will be made of the solo repertoire with emphasis on the 
Hindemith Sonata, the McKay Sonata, and the Gordon Jacob 
Concerto. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE EUPHONIUM 

(Section 18) 

Mus 100-150 Section 18 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

Major and minor scales will be studied as required by the 
instructor. A definite warm-up routine will be established with 
emphasis on breath control and lip slurs. The following Etudes 
will be used: Reinhardt, Concone Studied: Arban, Complete 
Method; Coxman, Selected Studies; Rochut, Melodious Etudes, 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Book I. The following solo material will be studied: Smith, 
Castleton Solo Collections; Porret, 6 Esquisses; and the Galli- 
ard Sonatas. 

Mus 200-250 Section 18 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continued study of major and minor scales and arpeggios, 
and also a continuation of the warm-up routine will be made 
with emphasis on multiple articulations and legato studies. The 
following Etudes will be used: Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Book 
I; Arban, Complete Method; Blume, 36 Studies, Kopprasch, 60 
Etudes, Book I. Study of the solo repertoire will include the 
Galliard Sonatas, Vivaldi-Ostrander Transcriptions of Sonatas 
I-VI, and Guilmant's Concert Piece. 

Mus 300-350 Section 18 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued technical development of all major and minor 
scales and arpeggios will take place. The following Etudes will 
be used: Blazhevich, Clef Studies; Rochut, Melodious Etudes, 
Book II; Kopprasch, 60 Etudes, Book II; Blume, 36 Studies. 
Continued study will be made of the solo literature with em- 
phasis on Barat's Andante et Allegro, Vivaldi-Ostrander Tran- 
scriptions of Sonatas I-VI, and Marcello and Handel transcrip- 
tions. 

Mus 400-450 Section 18 
Senior— Grades VI to VII 

All scales are required with a continuation of technical 
development. The following Etudes will be used: Blazhevich, 
Clef Studies; Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Book II; Kopprasch, 
60 Etudes, Book II. Further study will be made of the solo 
repertoire with emphasis on Barat's Piece in E-flat minor, 
various Baroque transcriptions, and orchestral and band ex- 
cerpts. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR THE TUBA 

(Section 19) 

Mus 100-150 Section 19 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

Major and minor scales will be studied as required by the 
instructor. An introduction of a daily warm-up routine for em- 
bouchure development will take place. The following Etudes 
will be used: Rochut Melodious Etudes, Book I; Tyrrell, Ad- 
vanced Studies for BB flat tuba; Reinhardt, Selection of Con- 
cone Studies. A study of solo material will be made from the 
Ostrander Concert Album. 

Mus 200-250 Section 19 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Continued study of major and minor scales and arpeggios, 
and also a continuation of the warm-up routine will be made 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OK PENNSYLVANIA 



with emphasis on multiple articulations and legato studies. 
The following Etudes will be used: Rochut Melodious Etudes, 
Book I; Tyrrell, Advanced Studies for BB flat Tuba; Cimera, 
73 Advanced Studies, Blazhevich, 70 Etudes for BB flat Tuba. 
Solo repertoire with emphasis on Bach-Bell, Air and Bourree; 
Beach, Lamento; and the Galliard Sonatas will be studied. 

Mus 300-350 Section 19 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

Continued technical development in scales and arpeggios 
will take place. The following Etudes will be used: Rochut 
Melodious Etudes, Book II; Kopprasch, 60 Etudes; Blazhevich, 
70 Etudes for BB flat Tuba; Cimera, 73 Advanced Studies. Con- 
tinued study will be made of the solo literature with emphasis 
on the Vivaldi-Ostrander Sonatas, the Holmes Lento, the Hart- 
ley Sonatina, and orchestral excerpts. 

Mus 400-450 Section 19 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

All scales are required with a continuation of technical 
development. The following Etudes will be used: Rochut Mel- 
odious Etudes, Book II; Blazhevich, 70 Etudes for BB flat 
Tuba; Kopprasch, 60 Etudes. Further study will be made of 
the solo repertoire with emphasis on the Hindemith Sonata, 
the Hartley Sonata, transcriptions of Mozart Horn Concertos, 
and orchestral excerpts. 

APPLIED MUSIC LEVELS FOR PERCUSSION 

(Section 20) 

Mus 100-150 Section 20 
Freshman — Grades III to IV 

The study of all snare drum rudiments and selected rudi- 
mental solos will take place. Selected studies from Sternburg, 
Podemski, and Goldenberg will be used to supplement the 
snare drum program. Emphasis will be made on two and three 
drum timpani technique. Selected studies from Goodman and 
Friese-Lepak will be used for the timpani program. A study of 
keyboard percussion instruments will be made. The keyboard 
program will consist of selected studies from Goldenberg and 
Bailey, and solos to be selected from the flute and violin liter- 
ature of Bach, Handel, Corelli, and Vivaldi. Special study will 
be made of percussion accessories such as cymbals, triangle, 
tambourine, etc. 

Mus 200-250 Section 20 
Sophomore — Grades IV to V 

Advanced studies from Pace, Albright, Cirone, Colgrass, 
and Benson will be used for the snare drum program. Timpani 
solos for three and four drums by composers such as Goodman, 
Bergamo, Ramey, Graeffe, Britton, Wuebold, and Jones will be 



320 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

studied. A continuation of the Freshman keyboard studies will 
be made. The Goldenberg Etudes, selected studies and solos 
for three and four mallets, and selected studies for xylophone 
and vibraphone will be used to supplement the Sophomore 
keyboard program. 

Mus 300-350 Section 20 
Junior — Grades V to VI 

There will be a continuation of the Sophomore snare drum 
program with additional study of Colgrass duets and Leavitt 
Studies. A continuation of the Sophomore timpani program 
will take place with additional selected excerpts from the band 
and orchestral repertoire. The continued keyboard program 
will consist of solos to be selected from contemporary original 
literature for keyboards by composers such as Creston, Fraz- 
eur, Diemer, and Ulrich. 

Mus 400-450 Section 20 
Senior — Grades VI to VII 

Further technical development will take place on all per- 
cussion instruments as required by the instructor. Study will 
be made of works for multiple percussion ensembles by com- 
posers such as Milhaud, Stern, Russell, Pie Petit, and Bozza. 

ENSEMBLES 

If one of the music ensembles is in need of a particular 
player because of the uniqueness of the instrument or voice, 
the student may be asked to participate in more than one en- 
semble. 

Mus 120 Brass Ensemble 

Mus 121 Chamber Ensembles, Vocal or String 

Mus 122 University Chorale 

Mus 123 Concert Band 

Mus 124 Indiana Glee Club 

Mus 125 Indiana Marching Band 

Mus 126 Opera Theater 

Mus 127 Percussion Ensemble 

Mus 128 University Theater Orchestra 

Mus 129 Indiana Symphony Orchestra 

Mus 130 Trombone Ensemble 

Mus 131 Indiana Wind Ensemble 

Mus 132 Women's Chorus 

Mus 133 Woodwind Ensembles 

Ensembles carry no credit. The student will receive a mark 
of S or U. An unsatisfactory grade will be reflected in a lower 
grade in Private Instruction. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 821 

PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT 

ROBERT M. HERMANN, Chairman 

BENJAMIN C. CHAN VINCENT J. FERRARA 

RICHARD S. DAVIS ARTHUR KANNWISHER 

JOHN L. KIPP 

The Philosophy Department offers, in addition to the in- 
troductory course, a variety of electives designed to serve the 
needs of two kinds of students. Those whose primary interests 
are in other disciplines will find one or more philosophy 
courses which relate directly to their fields. Most of these 
carry no prerequisite. 

Students wishing to major in philosophy must take a total 
of 33 semester hours in the field, including Phil. 221, 222, 324, 
325, 328, and 430. Minors are required to take a total of 21 
semester hours, including Phil. 221, 222, 324, 325, and 328. 
While course numbers indicate the years in which courses are 
expected to be scheduled, some flexibility is permitted. It 
should be noted, however, that Phil. 120 is prerequisite to sev- 
eral later courses. Exceptions to this requirement may be made 
only with departmental permission. 

Phil 120 Introduction to Philosophy 3 cr. 

A survey of basic issues and fundamental concepts. De- 
signed for the beginning student, this course attempts a criti- 
cal appraisal of the major "isms" of philosophy. Emphasis is 
placed upon an understanding of problems in the field, rather 
than upon individual thinkers. 

Phil 110 World Religions 3 cr. 

A non-sectarian and introductory course in which material 
from several academic disciplines is brought to focus on reli- 
gion as an objective problem. Defining "religion" — forms of 
worship in prehistoric cultures — regional and national religions 
of the past — history and comparative theology of major con- 
temporary faiths — religious behavior viewed psychologically 
and sociologically — some philosophical perspectives. 

Philosophy Electives 

Phil 221 Logic I— General Logic 3 cr. 

The Art of Reasoning — The Science of Critical Thinking. 
Designed for the general student, this course aims at a basic 
familiarity with the broad range of problems currently of in- 
terest to logicians, together with the acquisition of at least 
minimal skill in the evaluation of inferential claims. 

Phil 222 Ethics 3 cr. 

An introduction to significant ethical theory. Selected 
writings both ancient and modern are examined and discussed 



322 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

critically. The student is encouraged not only to develop a con- 
sistent ethical formulation of his own, but to make application 
of each view studied to current moral problems. 

Phil 321 Logic II— Deductive Systems 3 cr. 

More technical in content than Logic I, Logic II is con- 
cerned primarily with deduction. Students are given a sub- 
stantial grasp of modern symbolic axiom systems. Concrete 
applications of symbolic logic will be examined, as well as 
some of the more sophisticated problems and paradoxes which 
currently vex logicians. (Prerequisite: Phil 221). 

Phil 323 Political Philosophy 3 cr. 

An examination of major theories of political organization. 
Such substantial works as Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics, 
Hobbes' Leviathan, Rousseau's Social Contract, and Locke's 
Second Treatise of Civil Government are studied in depth. 
(See also in Pol. Sci. electives). 

Phil 324 History of Philosophy I 3 cr. 

A survey of the major thinkers of the ancient and medi- 
eval worlds with emphasis on the essential thought of selected 
philosophers. Special attention will be given to the pre-Socra- 
tics, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas. (Prerequisite: 
Phil 120). 

Phil 325 History of Philosophy II 3 cr. 

A continuation of Phil 324 beginning with 17th century 
rationalism and ending with the 19th century precursors of 
contemporary philosophies. (Prerequisite: Phil 120. It is not 
required but strongly recommended that Phil 324 and 325 be 
taken in sequence.) 

Phil 327 American Philosophic Thought 3 cr. 

A study of the more original and influential philosophic 
postures developed in America from the colonial period to the 
present, and of the men who gave them their most complete 
expressions. (Prerequisite: Phil 120). 

Phil 328 Aesthetics 3 cr. 

Studies in the meaning and value of man's aesthetic ex- 
perience. The nature and significance of art — its role in human 
experience — bases of aesthetic judgments. Theories of art from 
Plato to Dewey are examined and discussed critically. 

Phil 329 Philosophy of Religion 3 cr. 

An examination of the major theories and problems of 
philosophy in relation to religion. Such topics and the exist- 
ence of God, evil, religious language, existentialism, and mys- 
ticism will be explored. The works of thinkers such as Hume, 
Kant, Aquinas, Tillich, Buber, Royce, Stace, Kierkegaard, J. 
Huxley, and Augustine will be studied. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 823 

Phil 330 Philosophy of Science 3 cr. 

The basic nature and structure of scientific thought. Prob- 
lems of physical and social science will be examined in rela- 
tion to philosophy. The nature of scientific laws, induction, 
causation, the logic of explanation, probability, the role of 
mathematics in science, and the place of value in science will 
be explored. No special or technical background required. 

Phil 410 Contemporary Philosophy 3 cr. 

A survey in depth of the contemporary philosophic scene 
— pragmatism, positivism, logical and linguistic analysis, ex- 
istentialism, phenomenology, current realism and idealism. 
(Prerequisite: Phil 120 or departmental permission.) 

Phil 430 Readings Colloquium 3 cr. 

Designed for the student making a primary concentration 
in philosophy, this course centers around discussion of an in- 
tensive reading program, and includes a research project of 
thesis quality. (Admission by special permission only.) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 

RICHARD E. BERRY, Chairman 



GARY L. BUCKWALTER 
JERRY K. EDDY 
MING T. LU 
JOHN K. MATOLYAK 
PATRICK J. McNAMARA 
MARILYN E. NOZ 



DAVID L. RAMSEY 
DANIEL G. REIBER 
RICHARD D. ROBERTS 
PAUL M. WADDELL 
DENNIS W. WHITSON 
JAMES G. WRAY, JR. 
PATSY A. ZITELLI 



PHYSICS COURSES 

Phys 111-112 Physics I and II 3 cr. each 

This is a two-semester non-calculus course in general col- 
lege physics. The primary purpose of the course is to provide 
a General Physics course for students in Biology, Chemistry, 
Mathematics and Physics. The first semester is concerned pri- 
marily with classical physics, which includes the topics: Me- 
chanics, Heat, and Electricity. The second semester of the 
course is concerned primarily with modern physics, which in- 
cludes: Physical Optics, Quantum Mechanics, and Nuclear 
Physics. Students taking this course will generally take the 
Physics Laboratory I and II course, Phys 121-122 concurrently. 
Three hours lecture per week. 

Phys 121-122 Physics Laboratory I and II 1 cr. each 

This laboratory course is normally taken concurrently 
with, or after successfully completing, Physics 111-112. It may 
be taken separately by any students who wish an introduction 
to physical laboratory techniques. The types of instruments 
used in the Laboratory course include: oscilloscopes, power 
supplies, signal generators, desk calculators, computers, chart 
recorders, vacuum tube voltmeters, potentiometers, thermo- 
couples as well as the usual measuring instruments for length, 
mass, and time. Three hour laboratory period per week. 

Phys 222 Mechanics I 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 331, Math 257. 

The mechanics included in Physics 111 is recast in the 
language of calculus and extended to the following topics: 
Dynamics of a particle under different force laws, central force 
including planetary and satellite motion, energy in particle 
dynamics, statics including virtual work, systems of particles 
and an introduction to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. 
Three hours lecture per week. 

Phys 223 Mechanics n 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 222, Math 357. 

This course, the sequel to Physics 222, includes: mechanics 
of a rigid body, constraints, oscillations, wave motion, mechan- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 325 

ics of fluid and introduction to advanced mechanics, relativistic 
mechanics, and wave mechanics. Three hours lecture per week. 

Phys 231 Electronics 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Physics 111 and 112, Math 157. 

This course introduces electronic circuitry and instrumen- 
tation. A brief introduction to circuit theory includes direct 
current transients, alternating currents, and response of sim- 
ple networks to pulses and square waves. This theory is then 
applied equally to vacuum-tube circuits and transistor circuits. 
The laboratory provides opportunity for each student to use 
dual-trace oscilloscopes, signal generators, and power supplies. 
The following concepts are emphasized in the course: frequen- 
cy response, input and output impedance, feedback, and elec- 
tronic noise. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory 
per week. 

Phys 242 Optics 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 111, 112, Math 257. 

This course deals with such topics as reflection and re- 
fraction at surfaces, optical instruments, polarization, inter- 
ference and diffraction of light. Three hours lecture and three 
hours laboratory per week. 

Phys 322 Electricity and Magnetism I 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 111, 112, Math 357. 

The first part of the course is devoted to a review of vec- 
tor calculus including gradient divergence and curl. The topics 
covered include electrostatic potential theory, dielectrics, di- 
pole theory and magnetostatics. Maxwell's equation for static 
fields are employed in solving problems. Legendre's poly- 
nomials and other approximation methods are used to solve 
Laplace's equation. Three hours lecture per week. 

Phys 323 Electricity and Magnetism II 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Phys 322. 

This course, a sequel to Phys 322, develops the time de- 
pendent form of Maxwell's equations. The principal topics in- 
cluded are electromagnetic induction, vector potential, mag- 
netism, radiation fields, and poynting vector. Three hours 
lecture per week. 

Phys 331 Atomic and Nuclear Physics 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 111, 112, Math 357. 

This course is an introduction to the particle and wave 
properties of matter, atomic structure, and radioactivity. The 
laboratory experiments will include many of the basic ex- 
periments in atomic and nuclear physics. Three hours lecture 
and three hours laboratory per week. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Phys 342 Heat and Thermodynamics 4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 111, 112, Math 357. 

Thermometry, the laws of thermodynamics, low tempera- 
ture physics, Carnot cycle, entropy, the properties of ideal gas, 
and heat transfer are studied. In the laboratory the funda- 
mental laws are tested and an introduction is given to high 
vacuum techniques and cryogenics. Three hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory per week. 

Phys 421-422 Selected Experiments I and II 3 cr. each 

Prerequisites: Phys 231, 331. 

These two courses offer training in lab skills and modern 
instrumentation involved in individual research. The skills 
taught are those needed for independent research in industry 
and in thesis research projects in universities; as such, it is 
also useful to educators, who need to know the methods of the 
research scientist, and need the skills in using modern equip- 
ment in teaching. The two courses are independent of each 
other. 

Selected Experiments I includes experiments selected from 
the following topics: advanced optics, microwaves, radio and 
optical astronomy, semi-conductor properties, cryogenics, and 
classic experiments in atomic physics. 

Selected Experiments II includes experiments selected 
from the following topics: Mossbauer effect, laser modulation, 
magnetic resonance, cosmic rays, and classic experiments in 
nuclear physics. Six hours laboratory per week. 

Phys 472 Modern Physics 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 331, Math 257. 

This course serves as a survey of nuclear physics. Nuclear 
size, nuclear mass, reaction theory, types of radioactive decay, 
nuclear models, nuclear forces and elementary particles are 
some of the topics covered. Three hours lecture per week. 

Phys 483-484 Quantum Mechanics I and II 3 cr. each 

Prerequisites: Phys 222, 331, Math 361. 

These courses develop quantum mechanics following the 
method of Schrodinger. The theory is applied to the properties 
of the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, the electron in 
a magnetic field and the radioactive decay of alpha particles. 
The general principles of quantum mechanics are related to 
atomic structure and the periodic table. Three hours lecture 
per week. 

Phys 498 Problems in Physics 1-4 cr. 

Prerequisites: Phys 111, 112, Math 157. 

This course provides an opportunity to study special topics 
in physics such as Fourier Series, Vibrating String Theory, 
Vector Analysis, or to carry on experimental projects such as 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 327 

constructing lasers, and analyzing the corona of the sun. In 
general, the student deals in a more sophisticated manner with 
topics which receive elementary treatment in the regular 
courses. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

Sci 105 Physical Science I 4 cr. 

A study of the physical world, focusing on the funda- 
mental concepts of matter and energy. Emphasis is placed on 
what science is, how scientific knowledge is acquired, and the 
emergence of the more fundamental chemistry, geology, and 
physics. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory. 

Sci 106 Physical Science II 4 cr. 

See course descriptions in Chemistry Department. 

Sci 401 The Growth of Science and Its Concepts I 3 cr. 

Traces the development of science concepts like time, mat- 
ter and motion in Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Geology 
and Physics and their interaction with the growing society of 
Western Civilization from the earliest beginnings to the time 
of Newton. The treatment of these concepts will be essentially 
non-mathematical. Three hours per week. 

Sci 402 The Growth of Science and Its Concepts II 3 cr. 

The influence and development of the concepts like time, 
matter and motion on Science and Western Civilization are 
studied from Newton to the present time with its emphasis on 
the ideas of Relativity and Quantum Theory. Stress will be 
placed on the non-mathematical understanding of the basic 
ideas. Science 402 may be taken without having Science 401 
with the permission of the instructor. Three hours per week. 



328 INDI ANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

RICHARD F. HEIGES, Chairman 

PATRICK A. CARONE ROBERT L. MORRIS 

EDWARD CHASZAR DOROTHY A. PALMER 

RONALD C. GREEN EDWARD E. PLATT 

JAMES R. HORNER JAMES L. REILEY 

DAVID S. KEENE BERT A. SMITH 

RAYMOND L. LEE JOHN W. SMITH 

Basic Courses 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 3 cr. 

This course is largely concerned with our Federal and 
State governments. Emphasis is placed upon the constitutional 
basis of government, organization and structure of govern- 
ment, division of governmental powers, Federal and State re- 
lations, public finance, organization and role of political par- 
ties, and the place of the citizen in government. In a study of 
the functions and services of government, attention is given 
such problems as foreign policy and world relations, economic 
and social security, and the promotion of the general welfare. 

PolS 120 Introduction to Political Science 3 cr. 

An introduction examination of the methodology and sub- 
ject matter of political science. (Restricted to majors and 
minors.) 

PolS 250 Contemporary Political Problems 3 cr. 

This course emphasizes the dynamics of government as 
they are evidenced in public opinion, pressure groups, politi- 
cal parties and our governmental institutions. Attention is also 
directed toward the political-economic nexus within American 
society. 

PolS 251 State and Local Government 3 cr. 

Institutions and processes of state and local governments, 
with special attention to Pennsylvania. Emphasis is placed on 
the nature of federalism, state constitutions, parties and in- 
terest groups, the legislature, office of governor, the judiciary, 
and role of state and local government in an urban society. 

PolS 280 Comparative Government 3 cr. 

Analyzes the major foreign political systems, with empha- 
sis upon contemporary Europe including the Soviet Union. 
Authoritarian and democratic systems are compared, with the 
emphasis upon institutions and processes. 

PolS 281 International Relations 3 cr. 

Consideration is given to the fundamentals of the state 
system, sovereignty and nationalism; the elements of national 
power; the diplomatic, legal, economic, organizational and mil- 



INDIA NA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 329 

itary relations of states; procedures for the settlement of dis- 
putes; power-security problems and patterns of power to cope 
with the problems. The course attempts to provide a concep- 
tual framework on the basis of which international events can 
be sorted out and made meaningful. 

PolS 283 American Foreign Policy 3 cr. 

An analysis of the formulation and execution of American 
foreign policy. An examination of the roles of the formal gov- 
ernmental institutions, mass media, interest groups, and public 
opinion in the policy-making process. Special emphasis to be 
given to contemporary foreign policy problems. 

PolS 298-299 News Interpretation 1 cr. 

The course is designed to provide students with techniques 
for intelligent reading of the daily newspaper and weekly news 
magazines and to give some understanding of current affairs 
at the state, national and international level. 

American Studies 

PolS 350 The Presidency 3 cr. 

An examination of the Office of President with attention 
to constitutional foundations, evolution, structure, powers, and 
functions. Evaluation of the changing nature of the office with- 
in the American political system. Some comparisons are made 
between presidential and parliamentary systems and between 
the offices of President and Governor. 

PolS 351 Legislative Process 3 cr. 

Organization and procedure of the United States Congress 
with special reference to the theory and practice of representa- 
tive government, lobbying, and bicameralism. 

PolS 352 Public Opinion 3 cr. 

A study of the nature of public opinion within the politi- 
cal system. Attention is given to the formation of public opin- 
ion and its expression, propaganda, and mass media, and in- 
terest groups. 

PolS 353 American Political Parties 3 cr. 

The role of people, parties and pressure groups in the poli- 
tics of American democracy. Attention will be devoted to: 
campaign activities of candidates; party support for the candi- 
dates; voting behavior; sectional and historic roots of national 
politics; the institutional politics of Congress and the Presi- 
dency; the competition for power among business, labor, ag- 
riculture, and the other major organized interests. 

PolS 354 Metropolitan Problems 3 cr. 

Analyzes the multiplicity of problems facing our metro- 
politan areas. Contemporary developments such as urban re- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



newal, the shrinking tax base, federal aid to cities, subsidized 
mass transit, municipal authorities, and political consolidation 
are examined. Pennsylvania municipalities are contrasted with 
those of other states. 

PolS 358 Judicial Process 3 cr. 

Explores the nature and limits of judicial power, the 
courts as policy-making bodies, the selection of judges, the 
decision process, the external forces impinging on the courts, 
and the role of the Supreme Court in its relationship with 
Congress, the Presidency, and federalism. Judicial biographies 
and case studies are included. 

PolS 359 Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties 3 cr. 

A study of the development of constitutional law through 
leading Supreme Court decisions. Topics treated include the 
scope of federal powers, civil liberties and civil rights, the na- 
ture of judicial review, federal-state relations. Attention is 
given to the continuing controversy over the role of the Su- 
preme Court in American society. 

Political Theory 

PolS 360 Political Philosophy 3 cr. 

The evolution of the Western political tradition of Con- 
stitutionalism from Plato and Aristotle to Locke and Montes- 
quieu. The religious (Judeo-Christian) and rational (Graeco- 
Roman) foundations. Medieval theories of authority and rep- 
resentation in church and state. Early modern theories of the 
state and sovereignty (Bodin and Hobbes). Emphasis on anal- 
ysis of writings of leading theorists. Concepts of law, natural 
rights, liberty and equality, and justice are treated in detail. 

PolS 361 Modern Political Thought 3 cr. 

The development of political thought since the mid-16th 
century (Rousseau). Classic Liberalism of the Philosophic 
Radicals. Conservative thought since Burke. The nature and 
origin of modern irrational ideologies such as fascism and na- 
tional socialism. Socialist thought (Marxist and non-Marxist). 
Contemporary collectivist liberalism. 

Public Administration 

PolS 370 Public Administration 3 cr. 

A survey of the major areas of public administration, with 
emphasis on theories of organization and structural organiza- 
tion and dysfunctions of the bureaucratic system, personnel 
processes, executive functions, financial administration, the 
politics of administration, public relations, and problems of 
democratic control of bureaucracy. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 331 

PolS 371 Federal Administrative Policy 3 cr. 

An intensive study of the role of federal agencies and their 
administrators in determining and developing public policy. 
Public administration in practice is emphasized by utilizing 
case studies. 

International Studies 

I. E. 101 World Politics 3 cr. 

An analysis of the contemporary (Post 1945) state system 
and the forces shaping the world in which the student lives. 
Subtopics include the revolution in military technology, the 
nationalist and social revolutions in developing nations and 
the confrontation of Communism with the Western democra- 
cies. The student is given a framework within which he can 
analyze contemporary international politics. 

PolS 282 International Organizations 3 cr. 

An analysis of the purposes, functions, structure, and his- 
tory of international political organizations in the twentieth 
century such as the United Nations, its predecessor, the League 
of Nations, the Organization of American States, and other 
regional institutions. 

PolS 380 Soviet Politics 3 cr. 

Essential features of the Communist party and govern- 
ment of the U.S.S.R., including geographical and historical 
background and ideological and theoretical foundations. 

PolS 381-386 Political Systems 3 cr. 

An intensive, comparative study of the government and 
politics of a selected region. 

PolS 381 Latin America 

PolS 382 Africa 

PolS 383 Asia 

PolS 384 Middle East 

PolS 385 Central and Eastern Europe 

PolS 386 Atlantic Community 

PolS 389 Developing Nations 3 cr. 

An examination of the major political problems encoun- 
tered by the developing nations. Topics for study and discus- 
sion include: Political characteristics of the emerging nations; 
the impact of economics and social change upon political struc- 
ture; evolving patterns of political development; and tech- 
niques of nation-building. 

Research, Study, and Methodology 

PolS 401-402 Readings in Political Science 3 cr. 

Readings and brief written assignments on a specific top- 
ic determined by the instructor in charge. 



332 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

PolS 410 Honors in Political Science 3 cr. 

Directed readings and one or more papers; topic to be se- 
lected by instructor and student. Prerequisite: 15 s.h. in Social 
Sciences, including 9 s.h. in Political Science, 'B' average in 
Social Sciences, and permission of department chairman and 
instructor. 

PolS 499 Scope and Methods of Political Science 3 cr. 

Explores the nature of the debate in the discipline over the 
proper parameter and goals of Political Science. Emphasizes 
the means available to the discipline in its effort to obtain 
political knowledge and to explain political phenomena. Gen- 
eral familiarity with such methodologies as roll-call and pop- 
ular voting analysis, role analysis, content analysis, game 
theory, computer simulation, legislative history, survey re- 
search, philosophical discourse, decision-making, power struc- 
ture analysis and various forms of model-building will be pro- 
vided; and in-depth experience with one or more of these tools 
of research will be required. (Open only to Seniors, Political 
Science majors and minors; prerequisites: PolS 111 and 120.) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



888 



PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

ROBERT D. MAGEE, Chairman of Department 



BRUCE D. CARTWRIGHT 
KENNETH F. EDGAR 
TERENCE A. GERACE 
D. ROBERT JACOBS 
JAMES KLINEDINST 
STANLEY W. LORE 



BLANCHE W. McCLUER 
GARY PATTON 
JOHN W. RE1D 

Affiliate Members : 
HERBERT I. LEVIT 
NOEL A. PLUMMER 



Psychology Courses 

Psy 201 General Psychology (General Education Course 

for all Education students and Psychology Majors) 3 cr. 

This is an introduction to the scientific study of the be- 
havior of living organisms. The student will acquire a psy- 
chological vocabulary, know the major psychological concepts 
and principles will understand the application of the scientific 
method to psychology, be able to distinguish between empirical 
psychological facts and theories, develop a critical attitude 
toward popular generalizations and misconceptions, and, to 
a degree, understand others and himself better. 

Psy 202 Advanced General Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A course designed to extend one's knowledge of general 
psychology as a science. An extension of general psychology 
for science and liberal arts students who desire acquaintance 
with topics in perception, the senses, and human learning. 
Weekly demonstrations and laboratory exercises. Laboratory 
periods by arrangements. 

Psy 221 Historical Trends in Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A comprehensive overview of the historical antecedents 
of contemporary systems of psychology. Philosophical and 
scientific thought will be considered as it is related to the 
establishment and continuing development of psychology. 

Psy 310 Behavioral Statistics 3 cr. 

An introduction to both Descriptive and Interpretative 
Statistics as applied to behavioral science data. A non-mathe- 
matical course, with emphasis on the appropriate application 
of statistical tools. 

Psy 311 Experimental Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Psy 201, Math 362 (or Psy 310). 

A laboratory course on designing, conducting and evalu- 
ating experiments. Students carry out both original and clas- 
sical experiments in the major areas of psychology. Outstand- 
ing studies in each area are surveyed. Two lecture periods plus 
one double-period laboratory session. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Psy 352 Mental Hygiene 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A course designed for aiding the development of strong, 
hygienic personalities; mental hygiene as related to the child, 
adolescent, and teacher in the home, classroom, and social 
situation; maladjustments and mental diseases with emphasis 
on prevention. 

Psy 353 Child Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

This course aims to study the developmental changes in 
intellectual, emotional, motor, and social behavior from early 
infancy to adolescence. Outstanding experimental, clinical and 
theoretical contributions that show the important practical 
relationships between self-understanding, understanding of 
others, and the process of helping children to discover them- 
selves will be given special attention. 

Psy 354 Developmental Psychology 3 cr. 

V Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A comprehensive study of the principles of psychological 
development in the individual from conception to old age. 
Emphasis is on research methodology and experimental evi- 
dence pertaining to developmental principles. 

Psy 355 Adolescent Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

This course is a study of the adolescent, his growth and 
development, behavior, personality, and problems. All areas 
in his experience will be considered, the physical, mental, emo- 
tional, social. 

Psy 362 Physiological Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

This course will be an intensive study of the physiological 
bases of behavior, with respect to the receptor, adjustive and 
effector systems. Selected principles of psychophysics and 
neuroanatomy are emphasized. (Departmental consent re- 
quired) 

Psy 363 Perception 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A study of perceptive processes, their acquisition, and 
their effects upon the individual. Sensory mechanisms and 
their thresholds as well as responses to complex stimuli are 
also included. 

Psy 371 Personality 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

The leading experimental and clinical findings on person- 
ality and motivation and the major theories of personality, in- 
cluding Freudian theories. (Departmental consent required) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 836 

Psy 372 Introduction to Psychological Measurement 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A survey of psychological measurement techniques, with 
emphasis on the theoretical assumptions underlying these 
techniques and discussion of the interpretation and limitations 
of the measuring instruments. The course includes a consider- 
ation of individual and group tests, objective and projective 
techniques, and self-rating scales. 

Psy 391 Psychology of Learning 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

The description and analysis of theories of the learning 
processes. Discussion of experimental findings relating to the 
acquisition, maintenance, and control of behavioral changes in 
terms of these theories. 

Psy 451 Psychological Practicum 3-9 cr. 

Under the supervision of the Psychology Department se- 
lected students receive experience in the application of psy- 
chological technique. (Departmental consent required) 

Psy 452 Social Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A study of the interaction of people, either in pairs or in 
groups. Examination of the effects of their respective person- 
alities, motives, attitudes and cultural backgrounds upon each 
other. Also a study of leadership, role playing, group conform- 
ity and group effectiveness. 

Psy 461 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

The systematic study of the full range of psychological 
functioning from the basic and accepted normal to the most 
extreme aberrations. Etiology, dynamics, symptomatology, 
treatment, and prognosis of the psychoneuroses, psychoses, 
psychomatic disorders, character disorders, and disorders of 
intelligence constitute the major emphases of the course. 

Psy 481 Industrial Psychology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Psy 201. 

A systematic consideration of the practical applications 
of psychology to business and industry. Attention is given to 
the effects of industrial organization upon individual motiva- 
tion. Problems of communications, personnel, and the develop- 
ment of social relationships within the industrial setting are 
studied. 

Psy 491 Senior Seminar in Psychology 3 cr. 

Open only to students with a specialization in psychology 
and senior standing. Discussion of the basic concepts in psy- 
chology, their evolution, and their current status. Exploration 
of current research and trends in the various areas of psy- 
chology. (Departmental consent required) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SCIENCE DIVISION 

DWIGHT E. SOLLBERGER, Science Coordinator 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

Biol 103 General Biology I 4 cr. 

This course deals with the principles of biology. Topics 
include cellular structure and physiology, growth and repair, 
reproduction and development, control sources of food energy, 
inheritance, and man's interrelationship with his biological 
environment. The classification of plants and animals is re- 
viewed briefly. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory. 

Biol 104 General Biology II 4 cr. 

A continuation of General Biology I. Three hours lecture 
and two hours laboratory. 

^ Sci 105 Physical Science I 4 cr. 

A study of the physical world, focusing on the fundament- 
al concepts of matter and energy. Emphasis is placed on what 
science is, how scientific knowledge is acquired, and the emer- 
gence of the more fundamental physical laws. Topics include 
those often associated with astronomy, chemistry, geology and 
physics. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory. 

Sci 106 Physical Science II 4 cr. 

A continuation of Physical Science I. Three hours lecture 
and two hours laboratory. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUHtEMENT 

Ed 451 Teaching Science in the Secondary School 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: 12 hours of work in major field. Two hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory work per week. 

This course is designed to make the prospective science 
teacher aware of some of the important problems in science 
education. Emphasis is laid on lesson planning, construction of 
unit outlines, demonstrations, and open-ended laboratory ex- 
periences. Each student is required to investigate the latest 
curricular emphasis in his field. 

SPECIAL SCIENCE COURSES 

Sci 311 Elements of Earth Science 3 cr. 

This course is designed to make elementary teachers more 
aware of the science in their environment. While the biological 
environment is briefly reviewed, greater stress is placed upon 
the areas of geology, astronomy and meteorology. Field study 
and lectures strive to include both scientific principles and 
practical classroom activities that the teacher may use in the 
elementary classroom. 



INDI ANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 337 

El 312 Teaching of Elementary Science 3 cr. 

The fundamental areas of physics and chemistry are cov- 
ered in this course. Student participation is fundamental to 
their understanding of the basic principles that can be trans- 
ferred to the elementary classroom, and to their familiariza- 
tion with scientific equipment. The latter part of the course is 
devoted to a survey of the biological environment and con- 
tinues the work begun in Elementary Science. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE DIVISION 

RAYMOND L. LEE, Social Science Coordinator 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

(Required of all students) 

Hist 102 History of Civilization II 3 cr. 

This course deals with man's development from 1600 to 
the present. Among the topics discussed are: The Commercial 
Revolution; the Age of Reason; the Age of Revolution — politi- 
cal, economic, and social the rise of constitutional govern- 
ments; nationalism and the clash of cultures incident to the 
growth of empire. Considerable attention is given to democ- 
racy, capitalism, communism, fascism, and socialism as the ma- 
jor ideologies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The 
course concludes with an examination of the various formulas 
for world order proposed or attempted since 1900. 

Hist 104 History of the United States and 

Pennsylvania II 3 cr. 

A course in the history of the United States and Pennsyl- 
vania from 1865 to the present in which the industrialization 
of America, urbanization, the rise of organized labor, and the 
development of a distinctly American culture are stressed. 
Attention is also given to the political, economic, and social 
reform movements of this period in our history as well as to 
the increasing role of the United States in world affairs. 

PolS 111 American Citizenship 3 cr. 

This course is largely concerned with our Federal and 
State governments. Emphasis is placed upon the constitutional 
basis of government, organization and structure of govern- 
ment, division of governmental powers, Federal and State re- 
lations, public finance, organization and role of political par- 
ties, and the place of the citizen in government. In a study of 
the functions and services of government, attention is given 
such problems as foreign policy and world relations, economic 
and social security, and the promotion of the general welfare. 

Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr. 

Following a brief survey of man's place in nature, the 



888 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

course focuses on the concept of culture and on the divergent 
answers that cultures give to the basic questions of man's ex- 
istence. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE HONORS PROGRAM 

SS 491 Social Science Honors 3 cr. 

Prerequisites include a B average in Social Science courses, 
an average which must be maintained during the honors pro- 
gram. 

Admission to the Social Science Honors course is by in- 
vitation only. Students will do independent research over two 
semesters under the direction of a department member. 

SS 492 Social Science High Honors 3 cr. 

This course is an extension of SS 491. Admission by in- 
vitation. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT 

Ed 451 Teaching Social Studies in the 

Secondary Schools 3 cr. 

This course provides an opportunity for the prospective 
teacher to develop understandings and competencies for teach- 
ing social studies. Emphases in the course include: values and 
goals in social studies, the teaching process, materials and 
learning activities, evaluation of learning, and planning for 
classroom teaching. This course is a prerequisite to student 
teaching in the social studies. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



839 



SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

RALPH R. IRELAND. Chairman 



HERBERT L. BENTON 
VIRGINIA G. GERALD 
BROOKE V. GRANT 
RUDOLF R. KRAUS 



MYRON H. LEVENSON 
ESKO E. NEWHILL 
ANJA H. OLIN-HALE 
DOWNEY D. RAIBOURN 
WALTER T. SHEA 



^Soc 151 Principles of Sociology 3 cr. 

Sociology is the science of the structure and functioning of 
human groups. Taking culture concepts and social institutions 
as its basic materials, it explores the content, methodology, and 
interrelationships of those studies seeking to record and ex- 
plain man's social behavior in the modern world. Problems of 
social change, and the attendant efforts to direct and control 
such change, are integral parts of the course. 

Soc 331 Contemporary Social Problems 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

A course which explores pressing social issues and the 
solutions offered for their alleviation. Within its scope fall race 
and minority discrimination, juvenile delinquency, crime, fam- 
ily disintegration, personal maladjustment, population shifts, 
the role of culture, the nature of social change, and the pos- 
sibility of social planning. Problems are defined and solutions 
are explored in the light of historical, political, economic, 
social, and anthropological data. 

Soc 332 Racial and Cultural Minorities 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

A study of national, racial and religious minorities and 
divergent heritages in our national life. 

Soc 333 Juvenile Delinquency 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

Principal topics are the cause of delinquency, its forms, 
consequences, and the methods that may best be used in its 
prevention. 

Soc 334 Population Problems 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

The focus is upon population growth and distribution. The 
present "population explosion" will be a topic of central in- 
terest. 

Soc 335 Social Stratification 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

A study of social status patterns and social mobility. Deter- 
minants of social class divisions and the consequences of class 
distinction for individuals and society will be discussed. 



340 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OP PENNSYLVANIA 

Soc 336 Sociology of the Family 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

The relationships between types of family interaction and 
extrafamilial problems are emphasized, as well as the impact 
of social change on the structure and functions of the family. 

Soc 337 World Cultures 3 cr. 

Students are provided with a minimal orientation to the 
study of the cultural diversity of human societies. There will 
be an emphasis on the determinants of cultural variability and 
the problem of ethnocentrism resulting from this diversity. 

Soc 338 Introduction to Social Work 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

The principles of social work; their application to prob- 
lems of family and child welfare; casework and group tech- 
niques. 

Soc 339 American Communities 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

An analysis of the social structure of communities at the 
local level in relation to the national community structure. 
Examination of current problems and future trends. 

Soc 340 Industrial Sociology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

Work and the milieu of the worker; social organiza- 
tions in industry; problems of the worker; industrial morale 
and teamwork; social adjustment of the worker; and the re- 
lation of industry to the community and society. 

Soc 341 Sociology of Education 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology. 

A sociological approach to the understanding of the role 
of educational institutions in American society will be pre- 
sented with special emphasis on the status and role of the pub- 
lic school teacher. 

Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology 3 cr. 

Following a brief survey of man's place in nature, the 
course focuses on the concept of culture and on the divergent 
answers that cultures give to the basic questions of man's 
existence. 

Anth 211 Cultural Anthropology 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Anthropology. 

A survey of problems and theories in the science of cul- 
ture. Each student makes a study of a particular major anthro- 
pologist or theoretical approach. 

Anth 312 World Ethnography 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Anthropology. 
Study in depth of specific non-literature cultures to ex- 
plore questions of cultural integration. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 341 

Anth 313 Old World Archaeology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Anth 110 Intro to Anthropology, Anth 317 
Archaeological Techniques. 

Prehistory of Europe and Asia from Paleolithic through 
Neolithic developments. Emphasis on technology, chronology, 
ecology, and culture processes. 

Anth 314 Ethnology of North American Indians 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Anthropology. 

A survey of the culture history and culture area charac- 
teristics of the Indians of North America. Detailed study of 
representative groups will be related to historical, functional, 
and ecological concepts. 

Anth 315 North American Archaeology 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology, 
Anth 317 Archaeological Techniques. 

Prehistory of North American Indians, emphasizing tech- 
nology and stylistics, history and cultural ecology. 

Anth 316 The Anthropology of Religion 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology. 

The nature, function and universal characteristics of re- 
ligion in human society will be dealt with by utilizing the 
cross-cultural approach. Theories concerning religious phe- 
nomena will serve as topics for discussion. 

Anth 317 Archaeological Techniques 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology. 

History of Archaeology, methods, theories and techniques 
for chronological and cultural analysis of non-literate and 
literate cultures. 

Anth 318 Museum Methods 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology. 

Lecture and laboratory course concentrating on the history 
of museums, natural science and anthropological museum 
methods and techniques, providing practical experience in ex- 
hibit preparation and installation. 

Anth 319 Social Structure and Function 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology. 

A survey concerning the mechanisms of integration in 
social organization and their role in the development of soci- 
eties. The Family, Kinship and Ideological systems will be 
stressed. 

Anth 320 Archaeological Field School 3 cr. 

Prerequisites: Anth 110 Introduction to Anthropology. 

Field excavation of selected archaeological sites in Indiana 
and adjacent counties. Opportunity for varied experience in 
historic and prehistoric Indian sites, both open sites and rock 
shelters. 



842 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



SPECIAL EDUCATION AND CLINICAL SERVICES 

MORTON MORRIS, Chairman of Department 



MARIE K. BAHN 
NELSON H. BORMANN 
MAUDE O. BRUNGARD 
WILLIAM P. CHAPMAN 
GENE A. FELIX 
MARSHALL G. FLAMM 



MARION M. GEISEL 
RICHARD P. MEASE 
ESTHER M. SHANE 
ROMAYNE L. POUNDS 
EUGENE F. SCANLON 
DOROTHY M. SNYDER 



This department offers three options for student majors. 
Each option follows a prescribed sequence of courses. Students 
may elect to major in any one of the following fields of ex- 
ceptionality: 

A. EDUCATION FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED. 

B. SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY. 

C. REHABILITATION EDUCATION. 

Students in other departments not intending to major in 
any of the options who wish to improve their understanding 
of exceptionality, may, with permission of the instructor, elect 
certain courses. 

Introductory Courses 
(These courses are open to all students) 

SpE 220 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 cr. 

This introductory course gives students an opportunity to 
survey the characteristics, needs, problems, and behavior pat- 
terns of those children who deviate sufficiently from the "nor- 
mal" to be considered exceptional. Consideration will be given 
to those who fall intellectually both above and below the av- 
erage; to those who are handicapped visually, acoustically, or- 
thopedically, medically, or in respect to speech patterns. Be- 
havior disorders resulting from brain impairment will also be 
considered. 

SpE 215 Child Development 3 cr. 

Childhood foundations of human growth and development 
are considered in this course. Research from various disciplines 
are studied in terms of understanding physical, mental, social 
and emotional factors and how these interrelate throughout 
childhood development. Implications of growth and develop- 
ment are considered in aspects of adjustment to home, school, 
and community life. 

SpH 254 Speech Development and Improvement 3 cr. 

This course involves a study of those aspects of speech and 
hearing problems pertaining to the classroom situation. Types 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 848 

of speech and hearing disorders, conducting speech improve- 
ment lessons, classroom aids for the speech and hearing defec- 
tive child, and school and community resources for these chil- 
dren are emphasized. Open to both education and speech and 
hearing majors. 

A. EDUCATION FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED 

Students may become certified as teachers of the mentally 
retarded by pursuing a coordinated sequence of prescribed 
courses and by fulfilling requirements for student teaching 
with the mentally retarded. The program also provides a foun- 
dation for pursuing additional work at the graduate level. Fur- 
ther specialized training in mental retardation offers oppor- 
tunities for qualified persons in administration, supervision, 
vocational rehabilitation and related fields. 
I. Basic Courses in Mental Retardation 

SpE 320 Psychology of Mentally Retarded Children 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: SpE 220 Introduction to Exceptional Chil- 
dren. 

This course will point up the importance of viewing re- 
tarded children and youth as living, adjusting individuals who 
respond to many kinds of personal and social situations and 
who are capable of far more than usually imagined. The im- 
portance is stressed of the ways in which the retarded develop, 
learn, and adapt to various home, school, community, or shel- 
tered settings. 

Art 330 Arts and Crafts for the Mentally Retarded 3 cr. 

The materials and processes of arts and crafts are studied 
for opportunities they offer in the training, therapy and educa- 
tion of students who are mentally retarded, crippled, or need 
special help for any reason. (Offered by Art Department). 

SpE 301 Reading and Other Language Arts for the 

Mentally Retarded 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: El 222 or Ed 362. 

This course deals with the preparation and execution of 
teaching units in reading, vocabulary development, spelling, 
handwriting, and /or written communication. The emphasis 
will be on what retarded children can reasonably be expected 
to do at elementary and secondary levels. Consideration will be 
given to objectives, procedures and experiences designed to 
meet the unique needs of the mentally retarded. 

SpE 411 Health and Physical Education for 

Exceptional Children 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: SpE 220. 

This course will provide an opportunity for the prospective 
teacher of the mentally retarded to gain a thorough under- 
standing of a program of health, physical education and recre- 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ation as it applies to individuals with mental and physical 
handicaps. Special attention will be given to the needs of chil- 
dren with physical handicaps or developmental problems 
which may accompany mental retardation. 

SpE 431 Curriculum and Methods for the 

Mentally Retarded 3 cr. 

(Open only to qualified seniors). 

This course will consider the basic content and method 
for teaching the mentally retarded. Emphasis will be placed 
upon organization of curriculum in the fundamentals and in 
social and pro-vocational skills for daily living. Resource ma- 
terials used for instruction at elementary and secondary levels 
will be explored. 

SpE 255 Development of Language in Children 3 cr. 

This course explores not only the levels and sequences of 
the child's linguistic acquisition at various ages but also his 
burgeoning sensitivity to extra-language information by which 
he must operate with others, and the complex processes in- 
strumental in the formulation of his responses. 

El 313 Teaching of Math in the Elementary School 3 cr. 

(See course description under ELEMENTARY EDUCA- 
TION DEPARTMENT). 

Elem 222 Teaching of Reading 3 cr. 

(See course description under ELEMENTARY EDUCA- 
TION DEPARTMENT). 

Electives and Courses for Teachers Completing Special Educa- 
tion Requirements: 

Mus Ed 310 Music for the Mentally Retarded 2 cr. 

Prerequisite: El 211 Music for Elementary Grades. 

The concept of the function of music in the light of the 
mentally retarded child will be developed from the standpoint 
of functional use rather than critical evaluation of skill devel- 
opment. Materials will be surveyed, evaluated, and selected 
for use as well as specific techniques of presentation. 

SpE 420 Teaching Mentally Retarded Children 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: SpE 220 Introduction to Exceptional Chil- 
dren. 

This course will consider the basic design, philosophy, and 
procedure developed for teaching mentally retarded children. 
Emphasis will be placed upon how to organize for teaching 
the mentally retarded child, how to guide the activities of the 
mentally retarded child, and how to teach the "fundamental 
processes" to the mentally retarded child. 

SpE 421 Student Teaching of the Mentally Retarded 3 cr. 

Students will be required both to observe and to partici- 
pate in the teaching of mentally handicapped students. (Or- 
dinarily this course will be offered in conjunction with SpE 
451 for Summer School Students.) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYL VANIA 346 

SpE 451 Special Class Methods for the Mentally Retarded 3 cr. 

Prerequisite: SpE 220. 

The chief emphasis of this course will be upon practical 
and workable methods and materials which can be used ef- 
fectively with slow-learning children. It is intended as a sup- 
plement to SpE 420 as well as to serve as a course in specific 
techniques which the classroom teacher will find to be valua- 
ble in actual classroom teaching of the mentally retarded. 

SpE 216 Mental Health in the Schools 3 cr. 

This course aims to acquaint the student with the advan- 
tages and ideals of education for mental health and human re- 
lations. The concept of mental health is developed in terms of 
optimal human functioning and concentrates on positive as- 
pects and modifications of behavior rather than on malfunc- 
tioning and clinical treatment of mental and emotional dis- 
orders. The practical application of mental health principles in 
the school setting is emphasized. 

B. SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 

The curriculum in Speech Pathology and Audiology pre- 
pares students to meet Pennsylvania State Certification re- 
quirements to act as Speech and Hearing Therapists or Speech 
Correctionists in the public schools. It is also designed to en- 
courage and promote students' participation in graduate pro- 
grams of Speech Education leading to careers in Speech Path- 
ology or Audiology. 

Students are urged to follow the eight semester sequence 
of courses in orderly progression. Required courses provide a 
background in (1) fundamental information applicable to the 
normal development and use of speech, hearing, and language; 
(2) a study of various types of speech, language, and hearing 
disorders — their classification, causes, manifestations, and ap- 
propriate evaluative and remedial procedures; and (3) effec- 
tive use of information obtained from related dsciplines about 
the sensory, physical, emotional, social, and /or intellectual 
status of a child or an adult. The Speech and Hearing Clinic 
serves as a laboratory for required clinical practice. Student 
participation in a public school speech and hearing program is 
also a requirement. 

Students not intending to obtain certification in this field 
but who are interested in assisting children to develop better 
communication skills may, with permission of instructor, elect 
certain courses in the curriculum. Persons in Public School 
Nursing are encouraged to enroll in Introduction to Audiology. 



346 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



I. REQUIRED BASIC COURSES: SPEECH PATHOLOGY 
AND AUDIOLOGY 

SpH 111 Fundamentals of Speech and Hearing 3 cr. 

(Prerequisite for all other required courses in the division 
except Phonetics.) 

Introduction to the study of the physiological, acoustical, 
and scientific processes involved in the production and recep- 
tion of speech. The genetic development of speech sounds, and 
factors that hinder or facilitate speech and language acquisi- 
tion. 

SpH 122 Phonetics 3 cr. 

Detailed study of the phonemes of American-English 
speech from a physical and acoustical point of view. Develop- 
ment of proficiency in the use of the International Phonetic 
Alphabet for transcription and translation of speech sounds. 

SpH 222 Introduction to Audiology 3 cr. 

The auditory function, anatomy of the auditory mechan- 
ism, the psychophysics of sound, types and causes of hearing 
loss, measurement of hearing, and educational considerations 
for the hearing handicapped child. 

SpH 232 Speech Pathology I (Non-Organic) 3 cr. 

Basic orientation to the major types of non-organic speech 
disorders, their prevalence, symptoms, and causes. The func- 
tional disorders of articulation, voice, and rhythm will be em- 
phasized with some consideration given to treatment. 

SpH 251 Anatomy and Physiology of the 

Speech and Hearing Mechanism 3 cr. 

Consideration of the genetic development, structure, and 
function of the organs of speech and hearing. Anatomical sys- 
tems involved in respiration, phonation, articulation and hear- 
ing, and the relationships between the systems in the produc- 
tion and reception of speech. 

SpH 310 Speech Clinic I 2-3 cr. 

Orientation to theory and technique of speech and hearing 
therapy as applied to specific clients. Diagnosis of problems 
and planning programs of treatment. Introduction to lesson 
planning and writing of case history and reports. Observation 
of clients. 

SpH 311 Speech Reading and Auditory Training 3 cr. 

(Prerequisite: SpH 222 Introduction to Audiology). 

The teaching of the basic principles of understanding lan- 
guage by observing the speaker's lips and facial expressions, 
and developing maximal use of residual hearing. Educational 
and rehabilitative considerations for hard-of-hearing children 
and adults. 



INDIA NA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 347 

SpH 312 Organization and Administration of 

Speech & Hearing Programs 3 cr. 

(Meets requirement for Professional Ed. Course). 

Consideration of varied procedures in establishing and 
maintaining speech and hearing programs. The philosophy 
and methodology for work with speech and hearing handi- 
capped children in the public schools. Techniques of screening 
and other case finding methods, scheduling, record keeping, 
teacher and parental counseling, and coordination with other 
school activities. 

SpH 320 Speech Clinic II 2-3 cr. 

Experience in working with individuals or groups of per- 
sons who exhibit speech or hearing problems. Lesson plan- 
ning, writing of reports and case histories of a detailed nature. 

SpH 321 Psychology of Speech and Language 3 cr. 

The nature of speech and language as a behavioral influ- 
ence and as a communicative code; behavior in response to 
language and psychological principles involved. Normal 
evolvement of social, motor, and speech skills will be empha- 
sized and their inter-relationships in making satisfactory per- 
sonal adjustments. 

SpH 331 Speech Pathology II (Organic) 3 cr. 

A study of the etiologies, diagnosis, and symptoms of 
speech defects associated with structural anomalies and physio- 
logical dysfunction. Voice disorders, cleft palate, cerebral pal- 
sy, and defects of symbolization will be treated. 

II. REQUIRED COURSES IN RELATED AREAS: 

SpE 220 Introduction to Exceptional Children 

(See Course Description under Introductory Courses: Spe- 
cial Education and Clinical Services) . 

El 222 Teaching of Reading 

(See Course Description under Elementary Education 
Dept.) 

Ed 362 Developmental Reading 

(See Course Description under Elementary Dept.) 

III. SUGGESTED ELECTIVES IN RELATED AREAS 

SpE 215 Child Development 

(See Course Description under Introductory Courses, Spe- 
cial Education and Clinical Services.) 
or 

Psy 215 Child Development 

(See Course Description under Elementary Education 
Dept.) 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Eng 251 History of the English Language 

(See Course Description under English Dept.) 

El 313 Teaching of Math in Elementary School 

(See Course Description under Elementary Ed.) 

Psy 352 Mental Hygiene 

(See Course Description under Psychology courses — elec- 
tives.) 

Eng 364 Trends in Linguistics 

(See Course Description under English Dept.) 

Ling 421 Language and Society 

(See Course Description under Foreign Language Dept.: 
Linguistics) . 

IV. ELECTIVES IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDI- 
OLOGY 

(Offerings vary from term to term). 
SpH 410 Articulation Disorders 3 cr. 

Detailed consideration of the speech-sound production 
disorders in children and adults. Etiology of articulation dis- 
orders, methods of testing articulation and techniques of ther- 
apy for persons exhibiting articulation disorders. Current 
thinking and research in the field is emphasized. Open only 
to majors. 

SpH 474 Faculty-Student Research Projects 1-2 cr. 

Investigation of worthwhile problems within the limits of 
the resources of the Speech and Hearing Clinic. Collection of 
data, data analysis, and the writing of an article to be submit- 
ted for publication. Open only to seniors, and with the permis- 
sion of the faculty. Should be taken for two semesters, one 
credit each. 

SpH 412 Cleft Palate 2 cr. 

A study of the embryology of the facial and cranial skull 
with emphasis on the development of the oral pharyngeal 
structures associated with speech; theories of etiology, classi- 
fications of lip and palatal clefts; methods of surgical and 
prosthetic repair with consideration to the appropriateness 
and feasibility of a specific procedure; principles and methods 
of speech and language training. 

SpH 404 Diagnostic Methods 2 cr. 

A compilation and evaluation of diagnostic resources ap- 
plicable to evaluation of speech disorders bases for selection of 
appropriate materials in differential diagnoses; interpretation 
of test results and their significance in planning future ther- 
apy. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 349 

SpH 418 Voice 2 cr. 

An advanced study of the theory of voice production with 
emphasis on physiology, pathology and malfunctioning which 
produce voice defects; the possible relationship of disorders of 
voice and disorders of personality; diagnostic methods and 
therapeutic considerations for both organic and psychogenic 
disorders. Special attention will be given to therapy for the 
laryngectomized. 

SpH 440 Advanced Audiology 2 cr. 

The identification of types of hearing loss by special audi- 
ological tests — speech audiometry, Bekesy, SAL, tone decay, 
PGSR; interpretation of the audiogram and its relevancy to 
diagnosis and remedial procedures; functions and character- 
istics of hearing aids with respect to speech reception and dis- 
crimination. 

SpH 416 Stuttering 2 cr. 

An intensive study of the nature of the stuttering disorder 
and its effects in the dynamics of personality development, 
evaluation of prevalent causal theories and their implications 
for both symtomological and psychological methods of treat- 
ment as adapted to individuals or group situations. Review of 
pertinent and recent research topics. 

SpH 450 Speech Science 2 cr. 

A physiological, neurological, and acoustical study of the 
communicative process with special attention to speech moni- 
toring, controls and perception. Emphasis will be placed on 
current research methodology, clinical instrumentation, and 
laboratory techniques. 

V. COURSES FOR NON-MAJORS 

SpH 254 Speech Development and Improvement 3 cr. 

A study of those aspects of speech and hearing problems 
pertaining to the classroom situation. Types of speech and 
hearing disorders, conducting speech improvement lessons, 
classroom aids for the speech and hearing defective child, and 
school and community resources for these children. Required 
for majors in Special Education: Mentally Retarded, and sug- 
gested for Elementary Education majors. 

SpH 354 Audiometry for Public School Nurses 3 cr. 

An intensive review of the physiology of hearing; the eti- 
ologies and classifications of hearing loss; the use of audio- 
metric testing equipment in the schools; interpretation of the 
audiogram; and the role of the nurse in public health hearing 
programs. 



350 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



C. REHABILITATION EDUCATION 

The following curriculum in Rehabilitation Education is 
offered to student majors seeking career opportunities with 
health and welfare agencies and institutions. Although origin- 
ally identified with the needs of the war disabled, the benefits 
of Rehabilitation have been extended to the larger require- 
ments of civilian handicapped. Demands for trained personnel 
in Rehabilitation have grown accordingly. The program in Re- 
habilitation Education also provides basic training and a foun- 
dation for pursuing additional work at the graduate level. Non- 
majors may elect certain courses with permission of the in- 
structor. 

SpR 310 The Physical Basis of Disability 3 cr. 

This course explores the structural and physiological 
changes from the normal occurring in selected disabilities of 
individuals whom the rehabilitation coordinator frequently 
encounters: the blind and visually handicapped; the cardiac, 
diabetic, and amputee; the deaf and hard-of-hearing; the cere- 
bral-palsied, cleft palate, the cerebro-vascular accident, and the 
laryngectomized. Prerequisites: General Biology and Intro- 
duction to the Exceptional Child. 

SpR 321 Psychological Basis of Disability 3 cr. 

This course seeks to clarify and lend understanding to gut 
responses of fear, anger, embarrassment, frustration, bewilder- 
ment, and loneliness which influence the behavior and rela- 
tionships of handicapped individuals and rehabilitation work- 
ers alike. The emphasis is on the processes by which such gut 
responses develop, their influence on the individual's outlook 
toward his disability, his selfhood, and the society in which he 
lives. Prerequisites: General Psychology and Introduction to 
Sociology. 

SpR 320 Principles and Methods of Rehabilitation 3 cr. 

This course attempts to delineate the roles played by and 
the information gained from members of the professional dis- 
ciplines of physical, orthopedic, and internal medicine; psy- 
chiatry, psychology, otology, opthomalogy, audiology, speech 
pathology, prosthodontics, physical and occupational therapy, 
special education; and how the rehabilitation coordinator used 
such diagnostic information in evaluating and helping the dis- 
abled individual to plan a regimen for the acquisition of skills 
or education which will enable him to pursue as independently 
and as fully as possible a normal way of life. 

Prerequisites: SpR 310. 

SpR 411 Occupational Information 3 cr. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the rehabilita- 
tion coordinator with types of jobs, the levels of education of 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA , 351 

skill necessary for occupational success, methods of job train- 
ing and assessment, and the influence of appropriate, finan- 
cially productive employment on the personality development 
and social outlook of the disabled, legal aspects and legislation 
affecting job placement. 

SpR 421 Clinical Information in Rehabilitation 3 cr. 

Students are introduced to medical and psychosocial in- 
formation, procedures, and terminology used in rehabilitation. 
Clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and methods of treatment are 
surveyed, as these procedures relate to rehabilitation of dis- 
abled persons. 

SpR 410 Field Training in Rehabilitation I 6 cr. 

SpR 420 Field Training in Rehabilitation II 6 cr. 

The emphasis in this unit is the development of the student 
rehabilitation coordinator by close association with a paid pro- 
fessional working with disabled clients in a public or private 
agency. Writing and analysis of case reports, counseling of cli- 
ents, understanding of agency responsibilities and limitations, 
referral, follow-up, and final evaluation of client's ability to 
function with various degrees of autonomy. 

RELATED AREAS 

SpE 220 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 cr. 

SpE 320 Psychology of the Mentally Retarded 3 cr. 

SpE 255 Development of Language in Children 3 cr. 

or 
SpH 254 Speech Development and Improvement 3 cr. 



852 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



INDEX 



Absence and Tardiness 61 

Activity Fee 74 

Administrative Organization of College 4 

Admission Policy 47 

Advance Registration Deposit 56 

Advisory System 52*68 

Art Department 168 

Course Description 189 

Athletics 79 

Automobile Registration 68 

B 

Baggage 70 

Banking Services 76 

Biology Department 98-137 

Course Description 196 

Buildings 89 

Business Department 124 

Course Description 203 



Calendar 8 

Chairman of Departments 4 

Chemistry Department 99-219 

Course Description 219 

Clubs and Class Organization 77 

College Board Examinations 47 

Continuing Education 181 

Counseling & Guidance Department ....226 

Course Numbers 82 

Criminology Department 114 

Criteria Governing Continuance in 

College 62 

Cultural Life Series 133 



Damage Fees 55 

Degree Fee 66 

Delinquent Accounts 66 

Dental Hygienist Degree Curriculum . . 140 
Departments 

Art 189 

Biology 196 

Business 203 

Chemistry 219 

Economics 220 

Educational Psychology 231 

Elementary 233 

English 237 

Foreign Languages 243 

Foundations of Education 249 

Geography 260 

Geoscience 267 

Health and Physical Education 261 

History 271 

Home Economics 276 

Learning Resources 284 

Mathematics 285 

Military Science 291 

Music 295 

Philosophy 821 

Physic* 824 



Political Science 328 

Science 336 

Social Science 161 

Sociology-Anthropology Department .339 

Special Education 342 

Dining Room Policy (Women) 68 

Dining Room Policy (Men) 69 



Earth and Space Science 139 

Education for Safe Living 183 

Educational Psychology Department ...231 

Education of Mentally Retarded 343 

Economics Department 106 

Course Description 227 

Elementary Education 149 

Course Description 233 

English Department 87-150 

Course Description 237 

Entrance Examinations 47 

Emeriti 29 



Faculty t! 

Fees, Deposits, Repayment 55 

Financial Aids f>7 

Foreign Languages Department 90-152 

Course Description 243 

Foundations of Education Department 249 
Fraternities 78 

G 

General Education 83 

Geography Department 109-154 

Course Description 250 

Geoscience Department 141 

Course Description 257 

Grade Reports 62 

Graduate School 44 



Handbook 76 

Health and Physical Education 

Department 261 

Health Services 179 

Certification in Field of Education 

for Safe Living 264 

History Department 113-162 

Course Description 271 

Home Economics Department 174 

Course Description 276 

Housing Fee 65 

Housing Policy (Women) 68 

Housing Policy (Men) 70 

How Bills & Charges Are to Be Paid . . 57 

How to Apply for Admission 47 

Humanities-L.A 87 

1 

Infirmary 71 

Infirmary Fee 65 

Inter-disciplinary Studies 86 

International Studies 118 

Institutional Food Sve 176 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



853 



INDEX 



Junior Standing 63 

Junior Year Abroad 86 



Course Description 333 

Public School Nursing 167 



Key for Course Numbers 



82 



Q 

Quality Points 61 



Late Registration Fee 66 

Laundry 71 

Library 46 

Loans 63 

Location of University 38 

Learning Resources 284 



M 

Mail 72 

Medical Technology 181 

Mathematics Department 104-166 

Course Description 285 

Military Science Department 291 

Special Fees 66-292 

Course Description 293 

Music Department 92-168 

Course Description 296 

Ensembles 320 

Private Instruction 303 



N 

Natural Science and Mathematics .... 88 

Natural Science 96 

Nursing Department 187 



O 

Off Campus Centers 181 

Other Charges 66 

Out-of -State Students Fee 66 



Part-Time Study 49 

Pre Programming and Registration ... 60 
Philosophy Department 96 

Course Description 321 

Physics Department 101-167 

Course Description 324 

Placement Service 72 

Political Science Department 117 

Course Description 328 

Pre-Prof essional Studies 86 

Private Accounts 66 

Private Instruction in Music 55-303 

Professional Education & Certification 135 
Psychology Department 121 



Rehabilitation Education 148-349 

Readmission Policy 60 

Religious Life 78 

Repayments 56 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 74 



S 

Selective Service Regulations 73 

Saturday Campus Classes 49-133 

Scholarships . . , 68 

School of Arts & Sciences 84 

Science Division 336 

Social Science- LA 106 

School of Education 134 

School of Fine Arts 163 

Social Science Division 161 

Sociology-Anthropology Department . . 122 

Course Description 339 

Special Education 146-342 

Speech and Hearing 147 

Speech and Theater 89 

Student Activity Fee 65 

Summary of Enrollment 81 

Student Cooperative Association 74 

Student Employment 66 

Student Government 79 

Student Supplies 71 

Summer Sessions 46 

Summer Sessions Fees 56 

Supervising Teachers 30 



Time of Payments 67 

Transfer Students 49 

Transcript Fee 66 



U 

Urban Regional Planning Ill 

University Lodge 76 

University, Present and Past 38 

University School 136 



Valladolid Program 86 

Vacation and Guest Charges 71 

Veterans 73 



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