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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland at College Park"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduatecat1974tenn 



at College 
Park 



Undergraduate 
Catalog 1974-75 




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Catalog 1974-75 




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Contents 



Board of Regents / v 
Calendar, Academic / v 
Campus/University Officers / v 
Catalogs Available / ix 
Chancellor's Message / Ix 
Plan of Academic Organization / viii 
Special Announcement / ix 
University Policy Statement / ix 

I — General Information / 1 

The University / 2 

Admission and Orientation / 3 

Expenses. Financial Aid and Scholarships / 8 

Academic Programs, Honors and Awards / 15 

Academic Regulations / 20 

Student and Special Services / 25 

General Regulations / 28 

II — Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 39 

Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences / 40 

College of Agriculture / 40 
Division of Arts and Humanities / 42 

School of Architecture / 44 

College of Journalism / 45 
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences / 46 

College of Business and Management / 46 
Division of Human and Community Resources / 47 

College of Education / 47 

College of Human Ecology / 49 

College of Library and Information Services / 51 

College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health / 51 
Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences 
and Engineering / 54 

College of Engineering / 54 
Professional Schools / 58 

III — Departments, Programs and Curricula / 61 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum / 62 

Aerospace Engineering / 62 

Afro-American Studies Program / 62 

Agriculture-General Curriculum / 63 

Agricultural and Extension Education / 63 

Agricultural and Resource Economics / 64 

Agricultural Chemistry / 64 

Agricultural Engineering / 64 

Agronomy / 65 

Air Science Program / 65 

American Studies Program / 66 



Animal Sciences / 66 

Anthropology Program / 67 

Architecture / 67 

Art/ 68 

Astronomy Program / 68 

Biochemistry / 74 

Biological Sciences Program / 69 

Botany / 69 

Business and Management / 70 

Business and Economic Research / 73 

Chemical Engineering / 73 

Chemistry / 74 

Child Study / 75 

Chinese Program / 75 

Civil Engineering /75 

Classical Languages and Literatures / 76 

Comparative Literature Program / 76 

Computer Science / 76 

Conservation and Resource Development 

Programs / 77 
Counseling and Personnel Services / 77 
Criminal Justice and Criminology / 77 
Dance / 78 

Early Childhood Elementary Education / 78 
Economics / 80 
Electrical Engineering / 81 
Engineering Materials Program / 82 
Engineering Sciences Program / 82 
English Language and Literature / 82 
Entomology / 82 

Family and Community Development / 83 
Fire Protection Engineering Program / 84 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics / 85 
Foods, Nutrition and Institution Administration / 85 
Food Science Program / 87 

French and Italian Languages and Literatures / 88 
General Honors / 88 
Geography / 88 
Geology / 89 
Germanic and Slavic Languages and 

Literatures / 89 
Governmental Research, Bureau of / 90 
Government and Politics / 90 
Health Education / 91 
Hearing and Speech Sciences / 91 
Hebrew Program / 92 
History / 92 
Horticulture / 92 

Housing and Applied Design / 93 
Industrial Education / 95 
Information Systems Management / 96 



Japanese Program / 97 

Journalism / 97 

Kinesiological Sciences / 104 

Library Science Education Curriculum / 97 

Linguistics Program / 98 

Materials Research / 98 

Mathematics / 98 

Measurement and Statistics / 99 

Mechanical Engineering / 99 

Meteorology Program / 100 

Microbiology / 101 

Molecular Physics, Institute for / 101 

Music / 101 

Nuclear Engineering Program / 102 

Philosophy / 102 

Physical Education / 103 

Physical Sciences Program / 104 

Physics and Astronomy / 105 

Pre-Professional Curricula / 105 

Pre-Dental Hygiene / 106 

Pre-Dentistry / 106 

Pre-Forestry / 106 

Pre-Law / 107 

Pre-Medical Technology / 107 

Pre-Medicine / 107 

Pre-Nursing / 108 

Pre-Pharmacy / 108 

Pre-Physical Therapy / 108 

Pre-Radiologic Technology / 108 

Pre-Theology / 109 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program / 109 

Other Pre-Professional Areas / 109 
Psychology / 109 
Recreation / 110 
Russian Area Program /111 
Secondary Education /111 
Social Foundations of Education / 118 
Sociology / 118 
Spanish and Portuguese Languages 

and Literatures / 118 
Special Education / 119 
Speech and Dramatic Art / 119 
Textiles and Consumer Economics / 120 
Urban Studies, Institute for / 121 
Zoology / 121 

IV — Course Offerings (Alphabetical Order 
by Course Code) / 123 

V— Faculty / 197 

Index / 221 



C jmpus and University Officers 



Academic Calendar, 1974-1975 



College Park Camput Administration 

Chancellor 
Charles E Bishop 

Vice Chancollor (or Academic Affairs 
George H Callcott 

Vice Chancellor tor Academic Planning 
and Policy 
Thomas B. Day 

Vice Chancellor (or Administrative Affairs 
John W. Dorsey 

Vice Chancellor (or Student A((airs 
William L. Thomas. Jr. (Acting) 



1974 Summer Seitiont 
First Summer Settlon, 1974: 

K/liiy 20, 21 
May 22 
(«1ay 27 
Juno 28 



Monday-Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Monday 
Friday 



Second Summer Session, 1974: 



July 1, 2 
July 3 
July 4 
August 9 



Monday-Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 



Registration 
Classes t>egln 
Memorial Day holiday 
Last day of classes 



Registration 
Classes t>egin 
Independence Day holiday 
Last day of classes 



Board of Regents 

Chairman 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan 

Vice Chairman 
Richard W. Case 

Secretary 

8. Herbert Brown 

Treasurer 

F. Grove Miller, Jr. 

Assistant Treasurer 
L. Mercer Smith 

Mrs. Michael J. Deegan, Jr. 
George C. Fry 
Young D. Hance, ex oflicio 
Samuel H. Hoover, D.D.S. 
Edward V. Hurley 
Hugh A. McMullen 
Joseph D. Tydings 
Emerson C. Walden. M.D. 



1974-75 Academic Year 
Fall Semester, 1974: 

August 26-27 
August 28 
August 28-30 
September 2 
September 3-11 
November 28-29 
December 11 
December 12 and 15 
December 13-20 
December 20 



Spring Semester, 1975: 

January 13-14 
January 15 
January 15-17 
March 24-28 
April 30 
May 1 
May 2-9 
May 11 



Monday-Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Wednesday-Friday 

Monday 

Tuesday- Wednesday 

Thursday-Friday 

Wednesday 

Thursday and Sunday 

Friday-Friday 

Friday, 2:00 p.m. 



Monday, Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Wednesday-Friday 

Monday-Friday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday-Friday 

Sunday, 2:00 p.m. 



Registration 

Classes tiegin 

Registration continues 

Labor Day holiday 

Late Registration 

Thanksgiving recess 

Last day of classes 

Exam study days 

Fall semester examination period 

Commencement 



Registration 

Classes begin 

Registration continues 

Spring recess 

Last day of classes 

Exam study day 

Fall semester examination penod 

Commencement 



Central Administration of the University 

President 
Wilson H. Elkins 

Vice President (or General Administration 
Donald W. OConnell 

Vice President (or Academic Affairs 
R. Lee Hornbake 

Vice President (or Graduate Studies 
and Research 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. 

Vice President (or Agricultural A((airs 
and Legislative Relations 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 



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Plan of Academic Organization 



Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences: 

College o( Agriculture: 
Agricultural and Extension Education 
Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Agricultural Engineering 
Agronomy 
Animal Science 
Dairy Science 
Horticulture 

Institute of Applied Agriculture 
Poultry Science 
Veterinary Science 



Other Units within the Division: 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Entomology 
Geology 
Microbiology 
Zoology 



Division of Arts and Humanities: 

School of Architecture 

College of Journalism 

Other Units within the Division: 
American Studies Program 
Art 

Classics 
Dance 
English 

French and Italian 
Germanic and Slavic 
History 
Music 

Oriental and Hebrew Program 
Philosophy 

Spanish and Portuguese 
Speech and Dramatic Art 



Division of Befiavioral and Social Sciences: 

College of Business and Management 

Other Units within the Division: 
Afro-American Studies 
Anthropology Program 
Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
Bureau of Governmental Research 
Economics 
Geography 

Government and Politics 
Hearing and Speech Sciences 
Information Systems Management 
Institute for Urban Studies 
Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology 
Linguistics Program 
Psychology 
Sociology 



Division of Human and Community Resources: 

College of Education: 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum 
Counseling and Personnel Services 
Early Childhood Elementary Education 
Industrial Education 
Institute for Child Study 
Measurement and Statistics 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 

College of Human Ecology: 

Family and Community Development 
Foods. Nutrition and Institution Administration 
Housing and Applied Design 
Textiles and Consumer Economics 

College of Library and Information Services 

College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health: 

Health Education 

Physical Education 

Recreation 



Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences 
and Engineering: 

College of Engineering: 
Aero-Space Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Fire Protection Curriculum 
Mechanical Engineering 

Other Units within the Division: 
Applied Mathematics Program 
Center for Materials Research 
Computer Science 
Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 

Mathematics 
Meteorology Program 
Institute for Molecular Physics 
Mathematics 
Physics and Astronomy 



ChanceJkx s Message 



University Polcy Statement 



Catalogs Available to You 



The taculty and slatf of our Campus know their 
commitment to serve students. But our task is to 
develop turlher our tradition of excellonce on this 
Campus, while keeping pace with innovation. 
In doing so. we must respond to the changing ex- 
pectations of students, faculty and society. 

It IS my hope that our concept of excellence will 
emphasize the dedication and scholarship of the 
lr>dividual student and professor. If excellence Is 
measured by our commitment to discover 
knowledge, we should reflect it in a spirit of inquiry, 
with a concern for humanity, so obviously neces- 
sary today. It IS our resolve that this Campus be 
a center where people come together for the 
common purpose of releasing their creative energies 
towards solving today's problems, a place where 
expectations are matched by performance. 

The diversity of course opportunities available 
will try the measure of each student's potential, 
and we anticipate that your participation in the 
many educational programs and cultural and social 
pursuits will make for well-informed citizens. We 
have tried to create an atmosphere that permits 
students a sense of individual identity and pride in 
self-accomplishment. 

I welcome you to a year of challenge. 

CHARLES E. BISHOP, Chancellor. 
College Park Campus 




The provisions of this publication are not to be 
regarded as an irrevocable contract between the 
student and the University of Maryland. Changes 
are effected from time to time in the general 
regulations and in the academic requirements 
There are established procedures for making 
changes, procedures which protect the Institution's 
integrity and the individual student's interest and 
welfare. A curriculum or graduation requirement, 
when altered, is not made retroactive unless the 
alteration is to the student's advantage and can be 
accommodated within the span of years normally 
required for graduation. When the actions of a stu- 
dent are judged by competent authority, using 
established procedure, to be detrimental to the inter- 
ests of the University community, that person may 
be required to withdraw from the University. 

The University of Maryland, in all its branches 
and divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal edu- 
cational and employment opportunity for people 
of every race, creed, ethnic origin, and sex. 

It is University policy that smoking in classrooms 
is prohibited unless all participants agree to the 
contrary. Any student has the right to remind the 
instructor of this policy throughout the duration of 
the class. 



Special Announcement 

The General University Requirements. The Board of 
Regents has approved a major revision of the 
undergraduate requirements. What has been known 
as "General Education Requirements." referred to 
in academic programs in previous editions of this 
Catalog, is henceforth replaced by "General 
University Requirements." 

Any student who entered the University prior to 
August. 1973. has the option of completing either 
the General Education Requirements or the 
General University Requirements. Students first 
entering the University in August, 1973. or after 
must comply with the new General University 
Requirements. 



Fr*« Inlormatlon Book: 

College Park publishes a free booklet. Maryland. 
lor prospective undergraduate students For a 
copy of this booklet, call 301/454-3924 or write to: 
Catalog Mailing. 4910 Calven Road College Park. 
Maryland 20742 



Catalog* for College Park 

College Park has three catalogs the Undergraduate 
Catalog, the Graduate Catalog and the Summer 
Sessions Catalog. 



Undergraduate Catalog 

The Undergraduate Catalog is lor College Park 
students and faculty. Students can obtain a copy 
in the Student Union at the beginning of the fall 
semester 1974. Bring your I.D. Copies are 
sent to each department on Campus for faculty. 
Newly admitted students receive copies at orienta- 
tion. Copies of the catalog are sent to all high 
school counselors in Maryland. DC. and Northern 
Virginia and to all public libraries and higher 
educational institutions m these three lurisdictions. 



Graduate Catalog, Graduate Bulletin 

For information about the Graduate Catalog or 
the Graduate Bulletin, call (301) 454-3141 ; or write 
the Graduate Offices. South Administration 
Building. College Park, Maryland 20742. 



Summer Sessions Catalog 

For information call 454-3347 or write to: Summer 
Sessions Offices. Turner Lab. College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 



College Park Campus Publications 
June 1974 




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The University 



Goals For College Park 

Our objectives are simply stated: to enrich our 
students; to encourage lliem to develop those har- 
monious ideals and fine relationships which 
characterize cultured individuals; to provide an 
atmosphere lor self-enlightenment in its w/idest 
sense, a complement to systematic learning in the 
arts, the humanities, the basic and applied sciences 
and the professional curricula; and to promote 
beneficial research and scholarship as a contri- 
bution to the welfare of the State, of the nation, 
and of the community of knowledge everywhere. 

Universities In General 

The contemporary university is a comprehensive 
educational institution offering a multiplicity of 
undergraduate programs that are closely related to 
the graduate and professional programs. 

Comprehensive universities as we know them in 
the United States have existed for less than a 
century, but their roots can be traced back to 
medieval history. The English college system served 
as the model for earliest American efforts at higher 
education. The ancient German university tradi- 
tion was joined with this in the 1870's to form 
the basic outlines of our present institutions. Practi- 
cal studies were grafted onto these more 
classically and theoretically oriented traditions by 
the agricultural emphasis of the land grant 
movement. 

With the explosion of scientific and technological 
knowledge in the early twentieth century, the role 
of the university in American society attained 
increased importance, and today almost all aspects 
of national life — social, economic, scientific, and 
cultural — benefit from its educational, research 
and service functions. 

College Park and the University of Maryland 

The College Park Campus of the University was 
opened in 1859 as the Maryland Agricultural 
College under a charter secured by a group of 
Maryland planters. After a disastrous fire in 1912, 
the State acquired control of the College and bore 
the cost of rebuilding. In 1920 the State took over 
the faculty-owned University in Baltimore founded 
in 1807. merging it with the State-owned institu- 
tion at College Park to form the present-day 
University of fvlaryland. 

In 1886 the Delaware Conference Academy was 
founded by the Methodist Church in Princess Anne, 
Maryland. Title to the institution was acquired by 
the State of Maryland in 1926, and it became a 
division of the University of Maryland in 1948. 
It was made an integral part of the University 
system with the name. University of Maryland 
Eastern Shore (UMES), in 1970. 

A new undergraduate branch campus known as 
University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), 
was opened at Catonsville in 1966. 

2 / General Information 



Libraries at College Park 

The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the general 
library of the University, containing reference 
works, periodicals, circulating books, and other 
materials in all fields of research and instruction. 
Branch libraries include the Undergraduate Library, 
the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, 
the Architecture Library, and the Chemistry Library. 

The libraries on the College Park Campus 
include approximately 1,400,000 volumes, nearly 
750,000 microfilm units, and approximately 15,200 
subscriptions to periodicals and newspapers, as 
well as many government documents, phonorecords, 
films, slides, prints, and music scores. 

The new Undergraduate Library, opened in 1973, 
seats 4,000 students and has a book capacity of 
200,000 volumes. It features a recreational reading 
collection of 5,000 paperbacks, a quadrophonic 
concert room, color video tape players and playback 
units, enclosed rooms equipped with instructor's 
consoles for the use of nonprint media materials, 
and wireless stereo headsets for tapes of lectures, 
plays, speeches, and music. The McKeldin Library 
mainly supports the graduate and research pro- 
grams of the University, but is also open to 
undergraduates. 

Special collections in the library system include 
those of Richard Van Mises in mathematics and 
applied mechanics; Max Born in the physical 
sciences; Thomas I. Cook in political science; 
Romeo Mansueti in the biological sciences; 
Katherine Anne Porter; Maryland; U.S. government 
publications (for which the University is a regional 
depository); documents of the United Nations, 
the League of Nations, and other international 
organizations; agricultural experiment station and 
extension service publications; maps from the 
U.S. Army Map Service; the files of the Industrial 
Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of 
America; the Wallenstein collection of musical 
scores; the Andre Kostelanetz Music Library; and 
research collections of the American Bandmasters 
Association, the National Association of Wind 
and Percussion Instructors and the Music Educators 
National Conference. In addition, the collections 
include microfilm productions of government 
documents, rare books, early journals, and 
newspapers. 

Other Area Resources. The College Park Campus 
area is in a region rich in research collections. In 
the Washington area are the Library of Congress, 
the National Archives, the Folger Library, the 
National Library of Medicine, the National Agricul- 
tural Library, and various academic and special 
libraries. In the Baltimore area, in addition to the 



University's own libraries at UMBC, and on the 
professional campus are the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library and the Maryland Historical Association 
Library. The Maryland Hall of Records is located 
in Annapolis. 

Campus Research Facilities 

The research programs at the University derive 
their existence and vigor from a faculty comprised 
of internationally recognized scholars and scien- 
tists. It is an advantage for undergraduate students 
to be aware of the University's research facilities 
as they plan their programs. 

Among the exceptional research facilities are: 
a 140 MeV cyclotron: a nuclear reactor; scanning 
electron microscopes: subsonic and hypersonic 
wind tunnels: an electron ring accelerator: a pre- 
cision encoder and pattern recognition device: 
a gravitational radiation detection system includ- 
ing a gravimeter on the moon; a quiescent plasma 
device (Q machine); a psychopharmacology lab- 
oratory; three retro-reflector arrays on the moon; 
rotating tanks for laboratory studies of meteorologi- 
cal phenomena; Van de Graaff accelerators; a 
laboratory for basic behavioral research; an assort- 
ment of computers; and the Astronomy 
Observatory. 

The College Park Campus also owns and operates 
one of the largest and most sophisticated long- 
wavelength radio telescopes (located in Clark 
Lake, Calif.) and a cosmic ray laboratory (located 
in New Mexico). 

In addition to these research opportunities in 
the biological, mathematical and physical sciences, 
research programs in the behavioral sciences, 
social sciences and education exist in many 
bureaus and institutes including: the Bureau of 
Business and Economic Research, Bureau of 
Educational Research and Field Services, Bureau 
of Governmental Research, Institute for Child 
Study, Institute for Criminal Justice and Crimi- 
nology, and the Institute for Urban Studies. 

Investigation in agriculture is an important aspect 
of University research. University farms total more 
than 2,000 acres. Breeding, selection in farm 
crops, and soil research are a part of the program, 
Work in these areas is augmented by X-ray equip- 
ment and an electron microscope. 

Summer Sessions 

The College Park Campus offers two summer 
sessions of six weeks each. The first session begins 
May 20 and ends June 28. The second session 
runs from July 1 to August 9. New freshmen ap- 
plicants who have met the regular University admis- 
sion requirements for fall enrollment may begin 
their studies during the summer rather than await 



the nexi (all term. By taking advantage ol this 
opportunity and continuing to attend summer ses- 
sions the time required tor completion ol a 
baccalaureate degree can be shortened by a year 
or more, depending upon the requirements ol the 
chosen curriculum and the rate ol progress. 

Many new students have lound that attendance 
during the summer sessions lacllltates the 
transition Irom secondary school to college. Courses 
ollered during the summer are the same in content 
and instruction as those ollered during the lall 
and spring semesters. 

The Summer Cultural and Recreational Program 
IS an important part of "Summer at Maryland." A 
Fine Arts Festival oKers a series of programs In 
art, dance, drama, film, and music, and outstanding 
perlormers in these media appear on the College 
Park Campus. Facilities for most sports and an 
intramural program in several team and individual 
sports are available to the students. 

For additional inlormation write lor a Summer 
Sessions Catalog which may be obtained from the 
Administrative Dean lor Summer Programs, 
College Park, Md. 20742. 

Admission and Orientation 
Undergraduate Admission 

The University of tvlaryland, in all its branches and 
divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal educa- 
tional and employment opportunity for people of 
every race, creed, ethnic origin and sex. 

Admissions Requirements 

The University of Maryland is a publicly-supported 
land grant institution dedicated primarily to the 
educational needs of Maryland residents. Within its 
responsibilities as a State facility, the University 
attracts a cosmopolitan student body, and each 
year oilers admission to a number of promis- 
ing men and women from other states and 
jurisdictions. All of the fifty states and ninety- 
three loreign nations are currently represented in 
the undergraduate population. 

4,614 new freshmen entered the College Park 
Campus ol the University of Maryland in Fall 1973. 
The typical freshman had a Verbal SAT score ol 480 
and Math SAT score ol 520. More than hall ol the 
entering freshman class ranked in the top 25% ol 
their high school graduating class. 

Freshmen — Maryland Residents 

In order to be admitted, Ireshmen applicants who 
are Maryland residents must meet ONE ol the lollow- 
ing THREE criteria lor admission: A. Have a "C" 
average in academic subjects in the 10th and 11th 
Grades and rank in the top hall of the high school 



graduation class, OR, B. Satisly the requirements 
outlined in the chart below. The chart indicates the 
combination ol academic grade point average 
and total SAT scores required to be eligible lor 
admission. 

II the applicant has taken the SAT several times, 
the University will use the highest set ol scores lor 
a single test date. 

To determine your eligibility lor admission based 
on the chart below: 

1. Calculate your academic grade point average 
in the 10th and 11th grades. A list ol the courses 
which the College Park Campus uses in computing 
the high school academic grade point average 

is provided below. 

2. Locate the line on the chart which indicates 
your highest total SAT scores for a single test dale. 
For example, if you took the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test twice and earned the following scores: 

1st test date Verbal 50 

Math 51 
2nd test date Verbal 53 

Math 50 
you would use the test scores for the second 
test date. 

3. If your academic grade point average is equal 
to or higher than the grade point average listed 
on the chart beside your highest total SAT score, 
you will be admitted to the College Park Campus. 

Minimum Requirements For Maryland Freshmen 
Applicants Using Total SAT Scores and Academic 
Grade Point Average as Criteria 



Total 
SAT 
Score 

40 .. 

41 .. 

42 .. 

43 .. 

44 .. 

45 .. 

46 .. 

47 .. 

48 .. 

49 .. 

50 .. 

51 .. 

52 .. 

53 .. 

54 .. 

55 .. 

56 .. 

57 .. 

58 .. 



Academic 

Grade 

Point 

Average 

2.48 

2.47 

2.45 

2.44 

2.43 

2.42 

2.40 

2.39 

2.38 

2.37 

2.35 

2.34 

2.33 

2.32 

2.30 

2.29 

2.28 

2.27 

2.25 



Total 
SAT 
Score 

59 . . 

60 .. 

61 .. 

62 . . 

63 . . 

64 .. 

65 .. 

66 .. 

67 . . 

68 . . 

69 . . 

70 . . 

71 . . 

72 .. 

73 .. 

74 .. 

75 . . 

76 .. 

77 .. 



Academic 

Grade 

Point 

Average 

2.24 

2.23 

2.22 

2.20 

2.19 

2.18 

2.17 

2.15 

2.14 

2.13 

2.12 

2.10 

2.09 

2.08 

2.07 

2.05 

2.04 

2.03 

2.02 



Total 
SAT 
Score 

78 .. 

79 .. 

80 .. 

81 .. 

82 .. 

83 .. 

84 .. 

85 .. 

86 .. 

87 .. 

88 .. 

89 .. 

90 .. 

91 .. 

92 .. 

93 .. 

94 .. 

95 .. 

96 .. 

97 .. 

98 .. 

99 .. 

100 .. 

101 .. 

102 .. 

103 .. 

104 .. 

105 .. 

106 .. 

107 .. 

108 .. 

109 .. 

110 .. 

111 .. 

112 .. 

113 .. 

114 .. 

115 .. 

116 .. 

117 .. 

118 .. 



Academic 

Grade 

Point 

Average 

2.01 

1.99 

1.98 

1.97 

1.96 

1.94 

1.93 

1.92 

1.91 

1 ,89 

1.88 

1.87 

1,86 

1.84 

1.83 

1.82 

1.81 

1.79 

1.78 

1.77 

1.76 

1.74 

1.73 

1.72 

1.71 

1.69 

1.68 

1 .67 

1.66 

1.64 

1.63 

1.62 

1.61 

1.59 

1.58 

1.57 

1.56 

1.54 

1.53 

1.52 

1.51 



Total 

SAT 

Score 

119 

120 

121 

122 

123 

124 . 

125 . 

126 .. 

127 .. 

128 . . 

129 .. 

130 . 

131 .. 

132 . . 

133 .. 

134 .. 

135 . 

136 .. 

137 .. 

138 .. 

139 .. 

140 . 

141 . . 

142 .. 

143 .. 

144 .. 

145 .. 

146 . . 

147 .. 

148 .. 

149 .. 

150 .. 

151 . . 

152 . . 

153 .. 

154 . . 

155 ,. 

156 . . 

157 .. 

158 .. 

159 .. 



Academic 

Grade 

Point 

Average 

1.49 

1 48 

1.47 

146 

1.44 

1.43 

1.42 

1.41 

1.39 

1.38 

1.37 

1.36 

1.34 

1.33 

1.32 

1.31 

1.29 

1.28 

1.27 

1.26 

1.24 

1.23 

1.22 

1.21 

1.20 

1.18 

1.17 

1.16 

1.15 

1.13 

1.12 

1.11 

1.10 

1.08 

1.07 

1.06 

1.05 

1.03 

1.02 

1.01 

1.00 



OR 0. Satisfy the requirements outlined in the chart 
below. The chart indicates the combination ol 
academic grade point average and high school 
class rank required to be eligible lor admission. 

To determine your eligibility lor admission based 
on the chart below: 

1. Calculate your academic grade point average 
in the 10th and 11th grades. A list ol the courses 
which the College Park Campus utilizes in com- 
puting the academic grade point average is 
provided below. 



General Inlormation / 3 



2. Compute your class rank. Class rank is ex- 
pressed as a percentile in the chart. To determine 
your percentile, divide the number of students in 
your graduating class into your class rank and 
subtract the result from 100. For example, a 
student who ranks 80 in a class of 110 would rank 
at the 28th percentile (110 divided into 80 equals 
72. 100 less 72 equals 28th percentile). 

3. Locate the line on the chart which indicates 
your class rank percentile. 

4. If your academic grade point average is equal 
to or higher than the grade point average listed 

on the chart beside your class rank percentile, 
you will be admitted to the College Park Campus. 

Minimum Requirements (or Maryland Freshmen 
Applicants Using High School Class Rank and 
Academic Grade Point Average as Criteria 

Academic Academic 

Class Grade Ciass Grade 

Ranl( Point Ranl< Point 

Percentile Average Percentile Average 

1 2.58 31 2.28 

2 2.57 32 2.27 

3 2.56 33 2.26 

4 2.55 34 2.25 

5 2.54 35 2.24 

6 2.53 36 2.23 

7 2.52 37 2.22 

8 2.51 38 2.21 

9 2.50 39 2.20 

10 2.49 40 2.19 

11 2.48 41 2.18 

12 2.47 42 2.17 

13 2.46 43 2.16 

14 2.45 44 2.15 

15 2.44 45 2.14 

16 2.43 46 2.13 

17 2.42 47 2.12 

18 2.41 48 2.11 

19 2.40 49 2.10 

20 2.39 50 2.09 

21 2.38 51 2.08 

22 2.37 52 2.07 

23 2.36 53 2.06 

24 2.35 54 2.05 

25 2.34 55 2.04 

26 2.33 56 2.03 

27 2.32 57 2.02 

28 2.31 58 2.01 

29 2.30 59 2.00 

30 2.29 60 1.99 

Use of Mid-Year Grades. The University will reserve 
a decision on the applications of (vlaryland resi- 
dents who do not meet the criteria outlined above 



until mid-year grades are available for the senior 
year in high school. The College Park Campus 
is unable to utilize the final high school marks in 
rendering decisions for applicants who are apply- 
ing for admission directly from high school. 

If your mid-year grades for the senior year in 
high school are available when your application 
is initially considered by the College Park admis- 
sions staff, they will be used in determining your 
eligibility for admission. 

Subjects Used for Computation of the High 
School Academic Grade Point Average. Because of 
variations in course titles in the secondary 
school systems, this listing is not inclusive. It does, 
however, provide you with examples of the types 
of courses the College Park Campus utilizes in 
computing the high school academic grade 
point average. 

English. Composition, Communications, Creative 
Writing, Conversational Language, Debate, 
Expressive Writing, Journalism, Language Arts, 
Literature, Public Speaking, Speech, World Litera- 
ture. 

Foreign Languages. French, German, Greek, 
Hebrew, Italian, Latin, Russian, Spanish. 

Mathematics. Advanced Topics, Algebra I, Algebra II, 
Analysis (or Elementary Analysis), Analytic 
Geometry, Calculus, Computer Math, Functions, 
Geometry, Mathematics II, Mathematics III, Mathe- 
matics IV, Matrices Probabilities, Modern Geometry, 
Probability and Statistics, E.A.M (Rev. Acad. Math), 
S.M.S.G., Modern Math, Trigonometry. 

Science. Advanced Biology, Advanced Chemistry, 
Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, General 
Science, Genetics, Geology, Laboratory Science, 
Physical Science, Physics, Space Science, 
Zoology. 

Social Studies. Afro-American Studies, American 
History, Ancient History, Anthropology, Child De- 
velopment, Civics-Citizenship, Contemporary 
Issues (C.I.S.S.), Cultural Areas, Cultural Heritage, 
Economics, Economic Citizenship, Ethics (if con- 
sidered to be Religion, not counted), European 
History, European History and Survey, Family Liv- 
ing, Far East, Pan American, Geography, Govern- 
ment, Humanities, International Affairs, Medieval 
History, Modern History, Modern Problems, 
National Government, Philosophy, Political Science, 
Problems of Democracy, Problems of 20th 
Century, Psychology, Sociology, State History, 
U.S. History, World Civilization, World Cultures. 

Other Requirements For Freshmen Applicants. The 

University requires freshmen to have earned a 
high school diploma prior to their first registration 
at the University. 



The SAT examination is required of all fresh- 
man applicants. Test results must be submitted 
directly to the College Park Campus by the Educa- 
tional Testing Service. You are strongly urged to 
include your social security number when register- 
ing for the SAT. This will expedite processing of 
your application for admission by the College Park 
Campus. The reporting code for the College Park 
Campus is 5814. Further information on the SAT 
may be obtained from high school guidance offices 
or directly from the Educational Testing Service, 
Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 

School of Architecture. Admission to the School 
of Architecture is competitive with selection based 
on previous academic achievement. 

Because of space limitations, all architecture 
applicants are encouraged to file an application by 
March 1. The School of Architecture does not 
accept entering students for the spring semester. 

Special Situations. The above admissions criteria 
have been developed primarily for the applicant who 
has recently been graduated from high school. The 
University recognizes that the above criteria may not 
be entirely relevant for applicants from the State 
of Maryland who have had military experience and/ 
or have worked for two or more years. If this 
situation applies to you, we call your attention to 
the following: 

High School Equivalence Examination. Maryland 
residents who are at least 19 years at age and have 
not received a high school diploma can be con- 
sidered for admission by presenting the high school 
General Educational Equivalency certificate. In 
order to be admitted to the College Park Campus, 
the applicant must present an average score of 50 
with no score below 40 on any of the five parts 
of the test or a minimum score of 45 on each of the 
five parts of the test. 

Maryland Residents Who Have Graduated from 
High School. Maryland residents who do not meet 
the admissions requirements outlined above for 
freshmen applicants should contact a counselor 
from the Office of Admissions. The counselor will 
assist you in evaluating the possibility of admission 
at College Park and will offer suggestions regard- 
ing your plans to attend college. 

Transfer Student Admission 
Undergraduate Students Transferring 
from Outside the University System 

A student who has attended any institution of higher 
learning following graduation from high school and 
attempted nine or more credits must be consid- 
ered for admission as a transfer student. 

General Statement. Students who were eligible for 
admission as high school seniors and who are 



4 / General Information 



in good academic and disciplinary standing at their 
previous institutions are eligible to be considered 
tor transfer. Maryland residents must have a C 
average in all previous college-level work to be 
admitted. Non-resident transfers are considered 
on the basts of competitive criteria. 
TIWM not Admltsibia as High School Senior*. 
Maryland residents who are not admissible as high 
school seniois must complete at least 28 semester 
semester hour^ with a C average at another 
institution before applying lor transfer admission. 

Transfer Students from Maryland Public 
Community Colleges. Maiyiand residents who at- 
tended Maryland public community colleges will be 
admitted after they have received the Associate of 
Arts degree or completed 56 semester hours 
with a C average. The University will use the 
average stated on the transcript by the sending in- 
stitution. In cases where there is more than one 
previous institution, the averages at all institutions 
attended will be cumulative. Where the number of 
students desiring admission exceeds the number 
that can be accommodated in a particular profes- 
sional or specialized program, admission will 
be based on criteria developed by the University to 
select the best qualified students. 

Exception to the 56 hour rule will be made for a 
student attempting to transfer into a program which 
Is not available at the student's community college 
in a full two-year program. In order to be admitted 
to the College Park Campus as an exception to 
the two-year rule, the applicant must obtain a 
letter from the transfer advisor at his/her com- 
munity college recommending that the University 
waive the two-year requirement in his/her case be- 
cause of problems with obtaining sufficient major 
program courses. 

School of Architecture. Admission to the School of 
Architecture in the Division of Arts and Humani- 
ties IS competitive with selection based on the 
transfer student's previous academic achievement. 

Because of space limitations, all architecture 
applicants are encouraged to file an application by 
March 1. The School of Architecture does not ac- 
cept entering students for the spring semester. 

Undergraduate Students Transferring 
from Within the University System 

A student seeking to move from one campus of the 
University to another must have been a regular 
degree-seeking student eligible to return to his 
original campus. 

Students who were special or non-degree stu- 
dents or students who have been academically dis- 
missed by one campus must contact the Admissions 
Office of the receiving campus. 



Students must apply within the normal deadlines 
and. where space is limited, admission to the now 
campus will be based on criteria designed to 
select the best qualified students. 

The Out-ol-State Applicant 

The University is very pleased to consider applica- 
tions from students who are not residents of the 
State of Maryland. Because the primary obligation 
of the University is to Maryland residents, admission 
for out-ol-State students is competitive. 

Non-Degree (Special) Student Admission 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do not 
desire to work toward a baccalaureate degree may 
be admitted as non-degree seeking (special) 
students. 

Special students who have received a bacca- 
laureate degree are advised that no credit earned 
while enrolled as special students may be applied 
at a later date to a graduate program. These post- 
baccalaureate students may enroll in undergraduate 
courses for which they possess the necessary 
prerequisites, but may not enroll in courses re- 
stricted to graduate students only. 

Non-degree seeking (special) students who do not 
have a baccalaureate degree or an R.N. must 
submit transcripts and meet regular admission 
standards. Transcripts are not required from stu- 
dents with baccalaureate degrees or an R.N. 

Because of space limitation, several departments 
require permission in advance to enroll as a non- 
degree student. Please contact the Office of 
Admissions for further information. 

Transfer of Credits 

Maryland Council for Higher Education Articulation 
Agreement. The University of Maryland fully 
ascribes to the Maryland Council for Higher Educa- 
tion Articulation Agreement. The complete text of 
the agreement follows: 

Preamble. The initial over-reaching objective of this 
committee has been to relate in operational ways 
the undergraduate programs offered in the public 
sector of higher education in Maryland including 
the Community Colleges, the State Colleges, and 
the campuses of the University. 

The intended principal benefactor is the student 
who is best served by current information about 
programs and protected by firm arrangements 
among the public segments of higher education in 
Maryland which permit him to plan a total degree 
program from the outset. With successful academic 
performance, he or she can make uninterrupted 
progress even though transfer is involved. The 
measure of the plan is maximum transferability of 
college level credits. Essentially, the transfer and 
native students are to be governed by the same 
academic rules and regulations. It is recognized that 



the guidance data essential to the Implementation 
of transfer arrangements go well t>eyond the scope 
of the present report 

In a complementary way tt>e State's Interests are 
served by having its highter education resources 
used optimally by reducing the time taken to com- 
plete a degree through the avoidance of repeated 
class experiences. 

The institutional interests are protected also by 
the systematic approach; they are relieved of the un- 
certainties of unplanned articulation without 
becoming production lir^ enterprises. 

The dynamics of higfier education preclude one- 
and-tor-all time curricula and perpetual grad- 
ing and retention systems as cases in point. 
However, within the general structure of this plan 
there is opportunity for continual updating of life 
details. 

In more specific ways the Committee has pro- 
ceeded (1) to recommend specific areas of agree- 
ment among the public Community Colleges, tfie 
State Colleges, and the State University pertaining 
to facilitating the transfer of students within tf>e 
segments of public higher education in the State: 
(2) to provide for a continuous evaluation and review 
of programs, policies, procedures, and relation- 
ships affecting transfer of students; and (3) to rec- 
ommend such revisions as are needed to promote 
the academic success and general well-being of 
the transfer student. 

Policies: 1. Public four-year colleges and the 
campuses of the University shall require attainment 
of an overall "C" average by Maryland resident 
transfer students as defined by the sending institu- 
tions as one standard for admission. If the student 
has two or more institutions, the overall "C " (2.0) 
will be computed on grades received in courses 
earned at all institutions attended, unless ttie stu- 
dent presents an Associate in Arts degree. 

a. Efforts shall be intensified among the sending in- 
stitutions to counsel students on the basis of their 
likelihood of success in various programs and at 
various institutions based on shared information 
(See par. 1 (b) and par. 9). 

b. Procedures for reporting the progress of students 
who transfer within the State shall t>e regularized as 
one means of improving the counseling of prospec- 
tive transfer students. In addition, each public in- 
stitution of higher education shall establish a 
position of student transfer to assist in accomplish- 
ing the policies and procedures outlined in this 
plan. 

2. Admissions requirements and curriculum 
prerequisites shall t>e stated explicitly, 
a. Course and semester hour requirements which 
students must meet in order to transfer with upper 
division standing shall be clearly stated. 



General Information / 5 



b. The establishment of articulated programs is 
required in professional and specialized curricula. 

c. Students shall be strongly encouraged to com- 
plete the requirements for the award of an Associate 
in Arts Degree or to complete successfully 56 
semester hours of credit before transfer. 

3. Information about transfer students who are 
capable of honors work or independent study shall 
be transmitted to the receiving institution. 

4. Transfer students from newly established pub- 
lic colleges which are functioning with the approval 
of the State Department of Education shall be 
admitted on the same basis as applicants from re- 
gionally accredited colleges. 

5. a. Students from Maryland Community Colleges 
who have been awarded the Associate in Arts de- 
gree or who have successfully completed 56 
semester hours of credit, in either case in college 
and university-parallel courses (see par. 6), and 
who attained an overall "C" (2.0) average, shall be 
eligible for transfer. Normally they will transfer 
without loss of credits and with junior standing pro- 
vided they have met the requirements and prerequi- 
sites established by the receiving institution within 
the major. Parenthetically, junior standing does 

not assure graduation within a two-year period of 
full-time study by a native student or by a transfer 
student. 

b. The Associate in Arts degree shall serve as the 
equivalent of the lower division general education 
requirements at the receiving institution where the 
total number of credits required in the general 
education program in the sending institution is 
equal to or more than that required in the receiving 
institution and where the credits are distributed 
among the arts and sciences disciplines. 

c. The determination of the major program require- 
ments for a baccalaureate degree, including 
courses in the major taken in the lower division, 
shall be the responsibility of the institution award- 
ing the degree. 

6. Credit earned at any public institution shall be 
transferable to any other public institution as long 
as that credit was designed specifically for a 
college or university-parallel program, and providing 
its acceptance is consistent with the policies of 

the receiving institution governing native students 
following the same program. Transfer of credits 
from terminal (career) programs shall be evaluated 
by the receiving institution on a course by course 
basis. Credits applied towards a specific major 
and minor shall be determined by the receiving 
institution in these cases. 

7. Credit earned in or transferred from a com- 
munity college shall normally be limited to approxi- 
mately half the baccalaureate degree program re- 



quirement and to the first two years of the under- 
graduate educational experience. 

8. Transfer students shall be given the option of 
satisfying graduation requirements which were in 
effect at the receiving institution at the time they 
enrolled as freshmen at the sending institution, 
subject to conditions or qualifications which apply 
to native students. 

9. Institutions shall notify each other as soon as 
possible of impending curriculum changes which 
may affect transferring students. When a change 
made by one institution necessitates some type 

of change at another institution, sufficient lead time 
shall be provided to effect the change with 
minimum disruption. The exchange of data con- 
cerning such academic matters as grading systems, 
student profiles, grading profiles, etc., is required. 

10. Community college students shall be encour- 
aged to choose as early as possible the institution 
and program into which they expect to transfer. 

11. Innovative programs in all institutions are en- 
couraged. Proposed programs which would have 
system-wide implications or which would affect 
student transfers to more than one institution must 
be reported to the Maryland Council for Higher 
Education. 

12. The Maryland Council for Higher Education 
Articulation Committee shall continue to review 
and evaluate current articulation policies and shall 
set additional policies as needed. In addition, the 
Maryland Council will publish a brochure annually 
listing the prerequisites within the major and pro- 
fessional programs of all public four-year colleges 
and universities in the State. 

13. In the event a transfer student believes he or 
she has not been accorded the consideration 
presented in this policy statement, he shall have 
the opportunity to have the situation explained or 
reconciled. 

Initially, differences of interpretation regarding 
the award of transfer credit shall be resolved 
between the student and the institution to which he 
is transferring. If a difference remains unresolved, 
the student shall present his evaluation of the 
situation to the institution from which he is trans- 
ferring. Representatives from the two institutions 
shall then have the opportunity to resolve the 
differences. 

The sending institution has the right to present an 
unresolved case to the Committee on Articulation 
by addressing the Maryland Council for Higher 
Education. The Committee on Articulation shall, 
through an appointed subcommittee, receive 
relevant documentation, opinions, and interpreta- 
tions in written form from the sending and receiving 
institution and from the student. Subcommittee 
deliberations will be confined to this written docu- 



mentation. The full committee shall act on the 
subcommittee recommendation. 

Copies of the committee recommendation shall be 
forwarded to the institutions involved through the 
Maryland Council for Higher Education. The Coun- 
cil shall then be advised of the institutional action 
within a ten-day period. 

A complaint on transfer status must be initiated 
by the student within the first semester of his enroll- 
ment in the receiving institution. 

14. While it is recognized that certain circum- 
stances may require a limitation on the size of 
junior classes, the State of Maryland should support 
four-year institutions so that all students in a trans- 
fer program who are awarded an Associate in Arts 
degree from a public community college shall 
have the opportunity to be admitted with full junior 
standing to a public four-year institution. Where 
the number of students desiring admission ex- 
ceeds the number that can be accommodated in 
a particular professional or specialized program, ad- 
mission will be based on criteria developed by the 
receiving institution to select the best qualified 
students. 

General Statement. In general, credit from academic 
courses taken at an accredited institution in areas 
that can be considered part of the students' 
University program and in which the student earned 
a grade of "C" or better will transfer. 

Credits Taken at Community Colleges. Credits 
earned in or transferred from a community college 
shall normally be limited to approximately half 
of the four-year baccalaureate degree requirement. 
Community college students who have previously 
earned credit at a four-year institution must in- 
clude those in the maximum academic credits 
transferable. 

Courses taken at a community college that have 
the same title as junior or senior level courses at 
the University may not generally be applied. 

A student with junior standing normally may not 
take any further credits at a community college 
regardless of the number of credits earned at a 
community college. In exceptional circumstances, 
however, the dean or division chairman may permit 
the student to take required courses at a community 
college. 

Credits Taken at a Maryland Public Community 
College. Students from Maryland Community 
Colleges who have been awarded the Associate in 
Arts Degree or who have successfully completed 56 
semester hours of credit, in either case in college 
and university-parallel courses, and who attained 
an overall "C" average shall normally transfer 
without loss of credits and with junior standing pro- 
vided they have met the requirements and 



6 / General Information 



prerequisites established by the receiving Institu- 
tion within the maior. 

Credit earned at any public institution shall be 
transferable to any other public institution as long 
as that credit was designed specifically for a college 
or university-parallel program, and provided its 
acceptance is consistent with the policies of the 
University governing native students following the 
same program. 

Transfer of credits from terminal (career) 
programs shall be evaluated by the receiving insti- 
tution on a course by course basis provided in the 
Maryland Council for Higher Education Articulation 
Agreement. 

Foreign Language Credit. Transfer foreign language 
credit IS usually acceptable in meeting require- 
ments Prospective students should consult the 
appropriate sections of this catalog to determine 
the specific requirements of various colleges and 
curricula 

Credit by Examination 

Advanced Placement Program. Students entering 
the University from secondary schools may obtain 
advanced placement and college credit on the 
basis of their performance on the College 
Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement 
Program examinations. These examinations are 
normally given to eligible high school seniors dur- 
ing the May preceding matriculation in college. 

The University will award advanced placement in 
accordance with the score requirements noted 
below for the following examinations: Biology. 
Chemistry. English. French, German, History, Latin, 
Mathematics, Physics, and Spanish. 

For achievement of a score of five or four on 
an approved examination, the student will be 
granted advanced placement and credit equivalent 
to two semester courses in that field: for achieve- 
ment of a score of three, advanced placement and 
credit equivalent of either one or two semester 
courses, depending on the field of the examination, 
will be granted. A student earning a score of 2 
on the English advanced placement examination 
will not need to take English Composition, but no 
credit will be given. 

Questions about University policy concerning the 
Advanced Placement Program may be addressed 
to the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies or to the Director of Admissions and Regis- 
trations. Detailed information about the examinations 
and registration procedures may be obtained 
from the Director of Advanced Placement Program, 
College Entrance Examination Board, 888 Seventh 
Avenue. New York. New York 10018. 

Determination of In-State Status For Admission, 
Tuition and Charge-Differential Purposes. The Board 
of Regents of the University of Maryland approved 



new regulations for the determination of in-«late 
status tor admission, tuition and charge-differential 
purposes at its meeting on September 21, 1973. 
The new regulations will be effective for the 
January 1974 term. 

Persons who are interested in obtaining a copy 
of the regulations or who wish assistance with 
their classification should contact: Office of Admis- 
sions, North Administration Building, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742— Phone 
(301) 454-4137. 

Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program 

The Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program is the 
minority recruitment unit within the Office of 
Minority Student Education. Through E.O R.P. the 
University seeks to achieve a more representative 
minority student population among Blacks, 
Spanish-speaking, American Indians, and Asian 
Americans. 

E.O.R.P. also coordinates housing and financial 
aid assistance for incoming minority students. The 
director and the Admissions Counselor staff can 
provide application information to interested parents 
and potential students. For more information con- 
tact: Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program, 
Director, Room 0107 North Administration BIdg., 
phone 454-4009. 

Foreign Student Admission 

The foreign student applying for admission to the 
undergraduate schools of the University of Maryland 
should make application at least six months in ad- 
vance of the term for which he is applying. He 
will be required to submit (1) an application for 
admission on a form furnished by the Admissions 
Office of the University upon request, (2) official 
copies of his secondary school preparation, (3) cer- 
tificates of completion of state secondary school 
examinations, and (4) records of college or uni- 
versity studies completed in schools in the United 
States or elsewhere (documents indicated in 
(2), (3), and (4) must be accompanied by certified 
English translations when original documents are in 
languages other than English). He will also be 
required to furnish proof of adequate finances 
(students on F visas are not permitted to work). 
Further he will need to furnish proof of his ability 
to read, write, speak, and understand English 
sufficiently well to pursue satisfactorily an approved 
course of study in one of the colleges/divisions 
of the University. Information can be obtained from 
the Office of the Director of International Education 
Services regarding the administration of the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) both 
in the United States and abroad. TOEFL is the 
standard test used by the University to determine 
English proficiency. 



Because the University of Maryland is a state 
university, it is limited in the numt>er of foreign 
students whom it can admit each year Consequent- 
ly, admission is extremely competitive and offered 
only to those applicants who are most highly 
qualified. 

The foreign student accepted for admission to 
the University will receive from the Director of 
International Education Services the appropriate 
immigration form needed to secure a student 
visa from the American consul. 

Every foreign student is expected to notify the 
Director of Foreign Student Affairs as to the 
approximate date of his arrival at the University 
and arrange to arrive in time lor the special orienta- 
tion program that precedes registration. The Office 
of the Director is located in the North Administra- 
iion Building, Room 222-A. 

Application Procedures 

Application Forms. Application forms may be ob- 
tained by writing to: 
Office of Admissions 
North Administration Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

Application forms are available in high school 
guidance offices and college counseling centers. 

All applicants must comply fully with the direc- 
tions printed on the application form. Incomplete 
forms cannot be processed. 

Application Fee. A non-refundable SI 5 00 applica- 
tion fee is required with each application. 

Application deadlines. The University strongly 
urges an early application lor all applicants. 

Summer and Fall 1974 Semesters: 

October 1, 1973 
Applications accepted for 6/74 and 8/74. 

November 15, 1973 
Deadline for receipt of applications, transcripts, 
and SAT results (freshman only) for freshmen and 
transfer students, who wish to be considered for an 
early decision for 8/74. Students who meet this 
deadline and are eligible for admission will receive 
their application for on-Campus housing in the first 
mailing from the Office of Resident Life. This mail- 
ing will occur approximately February 15, 1974. 

March 1. 1974 
Deadline for foreign student applications. 

May 1, 1974 
Deadline for all undergraduate applications for 
8/74. 

June 14, 1974 
Deadline for transcripts and SAT results for 
freshmen applicants for 8/74. 

July 1, 1974 
Deadline for transcripts for transfer applicants 
for 8/74. 



General Infonnation / 7 



Expenses, Financial Aid and Scholarships 



Spring 1975 Semester: 

June 3, 1974 
Applications accepted for 1/75. 

August 1, 1974 
Deadline for foreign student applications. 

November 1, 1974 
Deadline for all undergraduate applications. 

Novennber 15, 19774 
Deadline for receipt for all transcripts. 

The University reserves the right to return the 
unprocessed application of non-resident freshmen 
and transfer students when our quotas for these 
students have been filled. Because of space 
limitations tfie University cannot offer admission to 
all qualified out-of-state applicants. An early 
application is. therefore, essential. 
Exceptions. Applications for the School of Archi- 
tecture including supporting documents must be 
received not later than March 1. 
Foreign students are required to submit their 
applications not later than February 1 for the fall 
semester and not later than August 1 for the spring 
semester. 

Readmission and Reinstatement 
Students who do not maintain continuous registra- 
tion must apply for readmission or reinstatement 
when they desire to return to the University. See 
sections below on Withdrawals from the University 
and Minimum Requirements for Retention and 
Graduation. 

Readmission. A student who has interrupted his 
registration for one or more semesters and who was 
in good academic standing or on scholastic pro- 
bation at the conclusion of his last semester must 
apply for readmission. 

Reinstatement. A student must apply for reinstate- 
ment if he has been academically dismissed, is 
ineligible for readmission, or has withdrawn from 
all courses in his last previous semester. 
Deadlines. To be considered for immediate rein- 
statement following dismissal at the end of the fall 
or spring terms, a currently enrolled student must 
apply no later than seven days before the first day 
of registration of the spring or second summer term. 
If dismissed at the end of the spring semester, a 
student may not apply for the first summer term. 

All other students must apply in accordance 
with the following deadlines: 
Fall term — July 1 
Spring term — November 1 
Summer term — May 1 
Applications. Application forms for readmission 
and reinstatement may be obtained from the 
Office of Admissions. 

Additional Information 

For additional information contact the Admissions 
Office, North Administration Building, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742; 
(301)454-5550. 

8 / General Information 



Graduate Student Admission 

Admission to graduate study at the University of 
Maryland is the responsibility of the Graduate 
School. Correspondence concerning application 
for admission to The Graduate School should be 
addressed to The Graduate School. University of 
Maryland. College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Orientation Programs 

Freshmen Orientation. Upon final admission to the 
University, the student will receive materials 
about the Freshman Orientation and Registration 
Program offered by the University of Maryland. 
All entering freshmen are urged to attend this 
program which is administered by the Orientation 
Office. The primary goals of the program are to 
inform the student about the University and help 
him register for the first semester. The program 
is conducted on the College Park Campus during 
the summer months and at other times during 
the year. Each freshman will attend with a group 
of his future classmates. The new student will 
engage in: 

1. Formal and informal discussions about 
University life and the standards of performance 
the University will expect of him. 

2. A conference with an academic advisor who 
will assist him in selecting and registering for 
courses. 

Through this program, the entering student 
receives a personalized and individual introduction 
to the University. 

Transfer Student Orientation. A special program is 
offered for transfer students. This program in- 
cludes a conference with advisors to explain 
academic requirements, registration for classes, 
and a general orientation to the Campus itself. The 
program is particularly geared to the needs of 
upper class students and their special concerns. 
Parent Orientation. Running concurrently with the 
summer programs for freshmen and transfer 
students is an orientation program for the parents 
of new students. Here, parents have an opportunity 
to learn about the academic, cultural, and social 
aspects of University life, from administrators and 
staff as well as from the student advisors who lead 
the studeiit groups. 

Expenses 

Registration is not completed or official until all 
financial obligations are satisfied. Returning stu- 
dents will not be permitted to complete registration 
until all financial obligations to the University 
including library fines, parking violation assess- 
ments and other penalty fees and service charges 
are paid in full. 

Although the University regularly mails bills to 
students, starting with an estimated bill approxi- 
mately one month prior to registration, it cannot 
assume responsibility for their receipt. If any stu- 
dent does not receive a bill before or shortly after 



the start of each semester, it is his/her responsibility 
to obtain a copy of the bill by coming to Room 1103, 
South Administration Building, between the hours 
of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

All checks or money orders should be made 
payable to the University of Maryland for the exact 
amount due. In cases where the University has 
awarded a grant, scholarship, or workship, the 
appropriate amount will be deducted on the first 
actual bill mailed approximately one month after 
the start of the semester. However, the first esti- 
mated bill mailed at the start of each semester 
may not include these deductions. ' 

Students may be severed from University services 
for delinquent indebtedness to the University 
which occurs or is discovered during a semester. 
In the event that severance occurs, the individual 
may make payment during the semester in which 
services were severed and these services will be 
restored. Students who are severed from University 
services and who fail to pay the indebtedness 
during the semester in which severance occurs 
will be ineligible to pre-register or register for sub- 
sequent semesters until the debt is cleared. In the 
event of actual registration in a subsequent 
semester by a severed student who has not settled 
his student account prior to that semester, such 
registration will be cancelled and no credit will 
be earned for the semester. 

No degree will be conferred, no grade issued, 
nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of 
record issued to a student who has not made 
satisfactory settlement of his account. 
An Important Fee Notice: 

Although changes in fees and charges ordinarily 
will be announced in advance, the University re- 
serves the right to make such changes without 
prior announcement. The Board of Regents at the 
time of this printing in May 1974 is considering 
changes in the room and board for 1974-75. It is ex- 
pected that action on these fees will be finalized 
in late June. 

Fees for Full-Time Undergraduate Resident and 
Non-Resident Students, 1974-75 Academic Year. 
(As of May 1974): 





fall 


Spring 






Semester 


Semester 


TofI 


Maryland Residents; 








General Foe'; 


% 349.00 


i 34900 


$ 6»e.00 


Board Contract"; 


325.00 


325.00 


eso.oo 


Lodging; 


235.00 


235.00 


470.00 


Health Service Fee; 


S.OO 


5.0O 


10.00 




S 914.00 


S 914.00 


St. 828.00 



2. Residenls of Ihe District of Columbia, 
Other States and Other Countries: 

General Fee*: $ 924.00 $ 924.00 $1,846.00 

Board Contract**: 325.00 325.00 650.00 

Lodging: 285.00 285.00 570.00 

Health Service Fee: 5.00 5.00 10.00 

$1,539.00 $1,539.00 $3,078.00 
'General Fee includes Fixed Fee of $560.00 for Maryland Resldants 
or $1710.00 tor residents of the District ol Columbia, other stales and 
toreign countries plus mandatory fees lor the following: Instrucltonal 
maierials. athletics, student activities, recreational tacililies. aux- 
iliary facilities and reo>slration. 
" (see next page) 



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Eiplanallon ol Feet. The application fee for the 
undergraduate programs and the summer sessions 
partially defrays the cost of processing applications 
tor admission to the University If a student en- 
rolls for the term tor which he applied, the fee is 
accepted m heu of the matriculation lee Applicants 
who have enrolled with the University of Maryland 
in Its Evening Division at College Park or 
Baltimore, or at one of its off-campus centers are 
not required to pay the fee since they have al- 
ready paid a matriculation fee. 

The Fixed Charges Fee is charged to help defray 
th« cost of operating the University's program at 
College Park. 

The Instructional Materials Fee represents a 
charge for instructional materials and/or laboratory 
supplies furnished to students. 

The Athletic Fee Is charged for the support of 
the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. All 
students are encouraged to participate In all ol 
the activities of this department or to attend the 
contests if they do not participate. 

The Student Activities Fee is a mandatory fee 
included at the request of the Student Government 
Association It is used in sponsoring various 
student activities, student publications and cultural 
programs. 

The Recreational Facilities Fee is paid into a 
fund which will be used to expand the recreational 
facilities on the College Park Campus, especially 
the Student Union Building. 

The Auxiliary Facilities Fee is paid Into a fund 
which is used for expansion and operation of vari- 
ous facilities such as roads, walks, campus lighting 
and other campus facilities. These facilities are 
not funded or are funded only in part from other 
sources. 

Other Fees 

Application Fee: $15.00 

Pre-College Orientation Program Registration 
Fee: $21.00 (two day program). $12.00 (one day 
program) 

Registration Fee: $5.00 (Charged as a separate 
lee for all registrants except full-time undergradu- 
ates) 

Late Application Fee: $25.00 

Matriculation Fee: SI 5.00 

Graduation Fee for Bachelor's degree: $15.00 



Room Deposit Fee payable upon application for 
dormitory room: $50.00 (To bo doduclod from Iho 
lirsl somestor room charges al rt'gislration) 

Student Health Fee (each semester): $5.00 
(Charged to all registrants each semester. Full- 
time employees and slall may not use Health 
Service Facilities and are not charged the Student 
Health Fee. Graduate Assistants are not full time 
employees.) 

Vehicle Registration Fee: $12.00 ($12.00 for first 
vehicle and $3 00 for each additional vehicle in ac- 
cordance with published regulations. Payable 
each academic year by all students registered 
for classes on the College Park Campus and who 
drive on the Campus. For cars registered for the 
spring semester only the fee is $6.00 on the first car 
and $1,50 for each additional vehicle.) 

Special Fee for students requiring additional 
preparation in Mathematics (MATH 001) per 
semester: $75.00 (Required of students whose cur- 
riculum calls for MATH 010 or 018 and who fall in 
qualifying examination for these courses. Students 
enrolled In this course and concurrently enrolled 
for 6 or more credit hours will be considered as 
full-time students for purposes of assessing 
fees.) (The $75.00 will be added to normal full-time 
charges lor these students). 

Fees for Auditors and courses taken for audit 
are the same as those charged for courses taken 
for credit at both the undergraduate and graduate 
levels. Audited credit hours will be added to hours 
taken for credit to determine whether or not an 
undergraduate student is full-time or part-time 
for fee assessment purposes. 

Special students are assessed fees In accord- 
ance with the schedule for the comparable under- 
graduate or graduate classification. 

Late Registration Fee: $20.00 (All students are 
expected to complete their registration, including 
the filing of Schedule Adjustment Forms on the 
regular registration days. Those who do not com- 
plete their registration during the prescribed 
days must pay this fee.) Registration is not complete 
until all fees, including outstanding SAR (Student 
Accounts Receivable) balances have been paid 
in full. Any payment which Is Insufficient to dis- 
charge the existing balance plus new fees leaves 
tuition unpaid and registration Incomplete. The 
$20 late fee will therefore be applied to all students 
who register and who have an outstanding 
indebtedness to the University. 

Change of Registration Fee: $2.00 (lor each 
course dropped or added after the Schedule 
Adjustment period) 

Special Examination Fee: $30.00 per course for 
full-time students: the part-time credit hour charge 
for part-time students: see part-time credit hour 
charges on prior schedule (above) 



Transcript of Record Fee: $2.00 (each copy) 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be 
charged for damage to property or equipment. 
Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, 
the individual student will be billed lor it; where 
responsibility cannot be fixed, the cost of repairing 
the damage or replacing equipment will be pro- 
rated, among the individuals involved 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checks: Payable 
for each check which is returned unpaid by the 
drawee bank on initial presentation because of in- 
sufficient funds, payment stopped, post-dating 
drawn against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $50.00: $5.00 

For checks from $50.01 to $100.00: $10.00 

For checks over $100.00: $20.00 

Library Charges: $.25 — Fine (or failure to return 
book from General Library before expiration of 
loan period per day 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve SheH 
before expiration of loan period 

First hour overdue on first day: $1.00 

After first hour on first day: S2.00 

Each additional day: $2.00 

In case ol loss or mutilation ol a book, satisfac- 
tory restitution must be made. 

Motor Vehicle Penalties — See page 37. 
Textbooks and Supplies 

Textbook and classroom supplies — These costs 
vary with the course pursued, but will average 
$85.00 per semester. 

Payment of Fees: All checks, money orders, or 
postal notes should be made payable to the 
University of Maryland. 

Withdrawal or Refund of Fees 

Any student compelled to leave the University at 
any time dunng the academic year should file an 
application for withdrawal, bearing the proper 
signature. In the Office of Registrations. If this is 
not done, the student will forfeit his right to any re- 
fund to which he would otherwise be entitled. 
The date used in computing refunds Is the date 
the application for withdrawal is filed In the Office 
of Registrations. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be per- 
mitted only with the written consent of the student's 
parent or guardian. 

Full time students withdrawing from the University 
will be credited for all academic fees charged to 
them in accordance with the following schedule: 

Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 00% 



General Information / 9 



No part of the charges for room and board is re- 
fundable except when the student officially with- 
draws from the University or when he is given 
permission by the appropriate officials of the Uni- 
versity to move from the residence halls and/or to 
discontinue dining hall privileges. In these cases, 
the room refund will be computed by multiplying the 
number of periods remaining times the pro rata 
weekly rate. Refunds to students having full board 
contracts will be calculated in a similar manner. 
No room and/or board refunds will be made 
after the fourteenth week of the semester. 

The Food Service identification cards (FSID) must 
be surrendered to the Office of Registrations 
before any refund will be processed. 

In computing refunds to students who have 
received the benefit of scholarships and loans from 
University Funds, the computation will be made in 
such a way as to return the maximum amount to 
the scholarship and loan accounts without loss to 
the University. 

A student who registers as a full-time undergradu- 
ate will receive no refund of the General Fee when 
courses are dropped (irrespective of the number of 
credit hours dropped) unless the student with- 
draws from the University. Hence, a student chang- 
ing from full-time to part-time after the first day 
of classes receives no refund. 

A student who registers as a part-time under- 
graduate student will be given a refund of the credit 
hour fee for courses dropped during the first week 
of classes. No refund will be made for courses 
dropped thereafter. 

A special refund schedule applies to full-time 
students who are drafted into the Armed Services 
or called up as Reservists. 

Transcript of Records 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of 
their scholastic records from the Registrations 
Office. There is a charge of $2.00 for each transcript. 
Checks should be made payable to the University 
of (vtaryland. Transcripts of records should nor- 
mally be requested in writing at least two weeks in 
advance of the date when the records are actually 
needed. No transcript of a student's record will 
be furnished any student or alumnus whose 
financial obligations to the University have not been 
satisfied. Except where required by law, no 
transcripts are released without written authoriza- 
tion of the student. 

Funds to Meet Personal Expenses 

In the past new students have sometimes arrived 
on Campus with a check payable to the University 
for an amount larger than that required to meet 
tuition costs and related expenses. They often 
expect to pay their University bill and receive a 
refund to meet personal expenses. However, the 



University is unable to accept such checks or to 
make refunds to students. 

Any students arriving early should have adequate 
personal funds to meet expenses. 

We recommend that those students arriving 
early and receiving financial aid from various 
sources request that their check be made payable 
to them instead of the University. This will allow 
the establishment of a personal bank account 
which can be used to pay for personal expenses 
and for University fees. 

Financial Aid 

The Office of Student Aid provides advice and 
assistance in the formulation of student financial 
plans and, in cooperation with other University 
offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships, 
loans, and part-time employment to deserving stu- 
dents. Scholarships, grants and loans are awarded 
on the basis of evident academic ability and 
financial need. In making awards, consideration is 
also given to character, achievement, participation 
in student activities, and to other attributes which 
may indicate success in college. It is the intent of 
the committee to make awards to those qualified 
who might not otherwise be able to pursue college 
studies. Part-time employment opportunities on 
campus are open to all students, but are dependent 
upon the availability of jobs and the student's 
particular skills and abilities. 

Additional information is available from the 
Director, Office of Student Aid, Room 2130, North 
Administration Building, University of Ivlaryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Scholarships and Grants 

Most scholarships are awarded to students before 
they enter the University. However, students who 
have completed one or more terms, and have not 
received such an award, are eligible to apply. Most 
of these scholarships are awarded to students who 
have earned a cumulative grade point average of 
3.0 (B) or better. Entering freshmen must submit 
applications before March 1; students already en- 
rolled in the University may submit applications 
between February 1 and May 1 in order to receive 
consideration for scholarship assistance for the 
ensuing year. Scholarship award letters are 
normally mailed between March 15 and June 15. 
Any applicant who does not receive an award 
letter during this period should assume that 
he has not been selected for a scholarship. 

Full Scholarships. The University awards 56 full 
scholarships covering board, lodging, fixed charges, 
and fees. Not more than twenty of these scholar- 
ships may be held by out-of-state students. 
Scholastic achievement and participation in student 
activities are given primary consideration. 



University Grants. The University awards to de- 
serving and qualified secondary school graduates a 
limited number of grants covering fixed charges 
only. 

Special Academic Scholarships. A limited number 
of scholarships are awarded each year to students 
of exceptional ability out of funds derived from 
Campus enterprises. The amount of these scholar- 
ships varies, depending upon the extent of need. 

Endowed Scholarships and Grants. The University 
has a number of endowed scholarships and special 
grants. These range in value from $100 to $1,000. 
Recipients are chosen by the University in ac- 
cordance with terms established by the donor. It 
is usually inadvisable for a student to apply for a 
specific scholarship. Each applicant will receive 
consideration for all scholarships for which he is 
eligible. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant. Un- 
der the provisions of the Education Amendments of 
1972, grants are available to encourage youth of ex- 
ceptional financial needs to continue their post 
secondary school education. A recipient must be a 
United States citizen enrolled as a full-time under- 
graduate. The amount of the grant must be 
matched by an equal amount of some other type 
of aid provided through the University. 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants. The federal 
government provides grants to approved students 
who need it to attend post high school educational 
institutions. The maximum award is $1400 minus 
the expected family contribution. In those years 
when Congressional appropriations are less 
than needed, eligible students will receive a percent- 
age of their entitlement. Applications are avail- 
able in senior high schools. 

Maryland State Scholarships. The General As- 
sembly of Maryland has created several programs of 
scholarships for Maryland residents who need 
financial help to obtain a college education. The 
undergraduate programs are (1) General State 
scholarships, (2) Senatorial scholarships, and 
(3) House of Delegates scholarships. Students wish- 
ing to apply for these scholarships should contact 
their guidance counselor if a high school senior 
or the Office of Student Aid if presently attending 
the University of Maryland. Students who are enter- 
ing college for the first time must take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test in November or December 
of their senior year. The test is not required of 
college students who have completed at least one 
academic year. A general application and a Par- 
ent's Confidential Statement should be filed with 
College Scholarship Service in Princeton, N.J. 
and a senatorial application with the student's 
state senator by December 1 for the following 
academic year. For additional information, contact 
the Maryland State Scholarship Board, 2100 
Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21218. 



10 / General Information 



Local and National Scholarships. In addition to 
th« scholarships provided by Ihe University ot 
Maryland, a student should give careful considera- 
tion to scholarship aid provided by local and 
national scholarship programs. Ordinarily, the high 
school principal or counselor will be w^ell informed 
as to these opportunities. 

Loans 

Loan funds to meet educational expenses are 
available for students enrolled in the University. The 
extent of financial need must be clearly estab- 
lished by providing a complete statement ot Ihe 
applicant's financial resources and estimated ex- 
penses for the academic year. 

Loan awards are normally granted on a yearly 
basis, although short-term and emergency loans are 
granted lor shorter periods. 

To apply lor a long-term loan, an application 
should normally be filed before May 1 (or the en- 
suing year If funds are available, applications may 
be considered at other times, but the student should 
b«ar m mind that it generally takes about six weeks 
to process a loan. 

Students applying (or a loan must have a 2.0 (C) 
average for courses taken the preceding semester. 
New students need a 2.5 average in academic 
subjects for the previous two years of school. 

Loans are not available for non-educational ex- 
penses nor are they available (or repayment of 
previously incurred indebtedness. 

National Direct Student Loan Program. This loan 
fund was established by the federal government in 
agreement with the University of Maryland to 
make low-interest loans available to students with 
clearly established financial need. Applicants must 
be United Stales nationals (citizens and permanent 
resident status) and must be enrolled for eight or 
more credit hours at day school on the College 
Park Campus. 

The average approved loan is about $700 per 
year. The borrower must sign a note. Repayment 
begins nine months after the borrower leaves school 
and must be completed within ten years there- 
after. No interest is charged until the beginning of 
the repayment schedule. Interest after that date 
is charged at the rate of three percent per annum. 

Cancellation provisions are available for qualided 
service as a teacher o( the handicapped and in 
low income schools. 

Institutional Student Loans. Institutional loan funds 
have been established through the generosity of 
University organizations, alumni, (acuity, staff, and 
friends. These loans are normally available at low 
interest rates to upperclassmen only. For specific 
information, the student should inquire at the 
Office of Student Aid. 

Nursing Student Loans and Scholarships. Under 
provisions o( the (ederal Nurses Training Act o( 1971, 



(inancial aid in the (orm o( loans or scholarships is 
available to qualided students. The recipient must 
be a full-time student in pursuit of a baccalaureate 
or graduate degree in nursing, and able to estab- 
lish financial need. Students submitting applications 
lor financial aid will automatically be considered 
for both scholarship and loan. 

On loans, repayment begins one year alter the 
borrower ceases to be a lull-lime student and must 
be completed within ten years. No interest is 
charged until the beginning of the repayment 
schedule. Interest alter that date accrues at the 
rate of three percent per annum. Cancellation pro- 
visions are available il Ihe borrower is employed 
as a nurse in a public or non-profit institution or 
agency; or in the event of permanent disability or 
death of Ihe borrower. 

Law Enforcement Education Program Loan and 
Grant. Loans: Qualified full-time pre-service stu- 
dents in approved fields may apply for loan 
assistance up to $2,200 per academic year. The loan 
IS cancelled at the rale of 25 percent per year of 
(ull-lime employment in criminal justice or repaid 
at the rale o( 7 percent simple interest, commencing 
six months alter termination of full-time study. 
Grants: In-service employees of police, courts and 
corrections agencies enrolled in courses related 
to law enforcement can receive up to $400 per 
semester (not to exceed cost of tuition and fees). 
Grant recipients must agree to remain in the service 
of their employing law enforcement agency for at 
least two years following completion of their 
courses. Any student who meets the eligibility re- 
quirements for both a loan and a grant may receive 
both concurrently. Interested students should con- 
tact either the Dean. University College, or 
Director, Institute ol Criminal Justice and Crimi- 
nology, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

Bank Loans. Loan programs have been established 
through the Maryland Higher Education Loan 
Corporation and the United Student Aid Fund 
which permit students to borrow money from their 
hometown banks. The programs enable undergradu- 
ates in good standing to borrow up to $1,500 per 
year, and notes may not bear more than seven 
percent simple interest. Monthly repayments begin 
ten months after graduation or withdrawal from 
school. The federal government will pay the in- 
terest lor eligible students, while Ihe student 
IS in school. Further details and a listing ol 
participating banks may be secured from the OKice 
of Student Aid. 
Part-time Employment 

More than one-half of the students at the University 
of Maryland earn a portion of their expenses. The 
Office of Student Aid serves without charge as 
a clearinghouse lor students seeking part-time 
work and employers seeking help. Many jobs are 



available in the residence halls, dmmg halls, 
libraries, laboratories and elsewhere on and off 
campus. 

Working during college years may olfer ad- 
vantages in addition to the obvious one ol financing 
a college education. The employed student has a 
special opportunity to learn new skills, to develop 
good work habits, and to learn how to get along 
with people. Sometimes part-time employment 
experience helps a student choose his vocation or 
IS helplul to him later in lollowing his vocation. 

Freshman students who do not need financial aid 
probably should not attempt to work during the 
lirst year at the University. However, students who 
need to work in order to attend the University are 
advised to consider employment in one of our 
dining halls. A student may earn approximately 
one-hall of his board and room by working nine 
hours per week. Alter one successful semester the 
work load may be increased to lull room and board 
at the request ol the student. 

For positions other than lood service, a student 
normally cannot make arrangements for employment 
until he is on Campus at the beginning ol a school 
session. Application must be made in person and 
the applicant should have a schedule ol his classes 
and study hours so that he can seek employment 
best suited to his tree time. 

The Office of Student Aid welcomes Ihe oppor- 
tunity to counsel a student about Ihe best type ol 
employment lor him. However, securing a position 
through intelligent application and retaining that 
position through good work is the responsibility 
of the individual. 
College Work-Study Program 
Under provisions ol the Educational Amendments 
ol 1972, employment may be awarded as a means of 
financial aid to students who, (1) are in need ol 
Ihe earnings from such employment in order to 
pursue a course ol study at a college or university, 
and (2) are capable of maintaining good standing 
in Ihe course of study while employed. Under Ihe 
work-study program, students may work up to 
llfteen hours per week during the school year and a 
maximum ol 40 hours during Ihe summer. 

It is the intent of Ihe Student Aid Committee to 
combine this type ol assistance with scholarships 
and loans so that students Irom low income families 
will be able to attend the University. 

Scholarships 

Regulations and procedures lor Ihe awarding ol 
scholarships are formulated by Ihe Committee on 
Financial Aids. The Board of Regents ol Ihe Uni- 
versity authorizes the award of a limited numljer of 
scholarships each year to deserving students. Ap- 
plicants are subject to the approval ol Ihe Director 
ol Admissions, insofar as qualifications for admis- 
sion to Ihe University are concerned. All recipients 



General Inlormation / 11 



are subject to the academic and non-academic 
regulations and requirements of the University. 

The recipient of the scholarship or grant is 
expected to make at least normal progress toward 
a degree, as defined by the Academic Regulations. 

The Committee reserves the right to review the 
scholarship program annually and to make adjust- 
ments in the amount and recipients of awards in 
accordance with the funds available and scholastic 
attainment. 

The general types of scholarships and grants are 
listed on pages 10 and 12. Specific endowed pro- 
grams are: 

Endowed and Annual Scholarships and Grants 

AFROTC College Scholarship Program. Four-year 
AFROTC scholarships are available to incoming 
freshmen who qualify. One thousand scholarships 
are awarded annually to qualified freshmen on a 
nationwide basis. Application for the Four-Year 
scholarship is normally accomplished during the 
senior year of high school. The AFROTC program 
also provides Two-Year, and Three-Year scholar- 
ships for selected cadets in the AFROTC program. 
Those selected receive money for full tuition, 
laboratory expenses, incidental fees, and an allow- 
dnce for books during the period of the scholarship. 
In addition, they receive nontaxable pay of $100 
per month. Any student accepted by the University 
of Maryland may apply for these scholarships. 
AFROTC membership is required if one receives an 
AFROTC scholarship. 

Air Force Warrant Officers Association Student 
Aid Program — Scholarship aid has been made avail- 
able by the Air Force Warrant Officers Association 
for worthy male or female undergraduate or 
graduate students in good standing, with preference 
given to children of Air Force Warrant Officers or 
other military personnel. 

Albright Scholarship — The Victor E. Albright 
Scholarship is open to graduates of Garrett County 
high schools who were born and reared in that 
county. 

Agricultural Development Foundation — A number 
of awards are made to agricultural students from 
a fund contributed by donors for general agricultural 
development. 

ALCOA Foundation Scholarship Awards of $750 
are given to outstanding students majoring in 
transportation, mechanical engineering, and fire 
protection engineering. 

Alumni Scholarships — A limited number of 
scholarships are made possible through the gifts 
of alumni and friends to the Alumni Annual Giving 
Program of the Office of Endowment and Gifts. 

Alumni Association of The School of Pharmacy 
Scholarships — The Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland 
makes available annually scholarships to qualified 



prepharmacy students on the basis of character, 
achievement and need. These scholarships are 
open only to residents of the State of Maryland. 
Each scholarship not exceeding $500 per academic 
year is applied to expenses at College Park. 

Alumni Band Scholarship — A limited number of 
awards to freshmen are sponsored by the University 
of Maryland Band Alumni Organization. Recipients 
are recommended by the Music Department after 
a competitive audition held in the spring. 

Ethel R. Arthur Memorial Scholarship — This 
memorial scholarship fund has been established 
by Irving J. Cohen, M.D. At least one $250 award 
is made each year by the Scholarship Committee. 
A preference is given to students from Baltimore. 

Alvin L. Aubinoe Student Aid Program — Scholar- 
ship grants up to $500 per school year to students 
in engineering, preferably those studying for careers 
in civil engineering, architecture or light construc- 
tion. 

Baltimore Panhellenic Association Scholarship — 
A scholarship is awarded annually by the Baltimore 
Panhellenic Association to a student entering the 
junior or senior class, who is an active member of 
a sorority, who is outstanding in leadership and 
scholarship and who needs financial assistance. 

Baltimore Sunpapers Scholarship in Journalism — 
The Board of Trustees of the A. S. Abell Founda- 
tion, Inc., contributes funds to provide one or more 
$500 scholarships to students majoring in editorial 
journalism. 

Bayshore Foods, Inc. Scholarship — A grant of 
$500 is made available annually to sons and 
daughters of employees of Bayshore Foods, Inc., 
of Easton, Md. 

Black and Decker Manufacturing Company 
Scholarship — A scholarship of $500 per year is pro- 
vided for a Maryland resident who promises to 
teach Industrial Arts or Vocational-Industrial 
Education in Maryland for two years after graduation. 
A preference is given to children of Black and 
Decker employees. 

Campus and Newcomers Scholarship — Awards 
are made from a fund created by the Campus and 
Newcomers Club of the University. 

Capitol Milk Producers Cooperative, Inc. Scholar- 
ship — A scholarship of $500 is awarded annually 
in the College of Agriculture, preferably to a 
student preparing for a career in the dairy industry. 

George C. Cook Scholarship — A full scholarship 
is made available by the Maryland Educational 
Foundation in memory of the late George C. Cook. 
Preference shall be given to students interested 
in a career in business administration or marketing. 

Dr. Ernest N. Cory Scholarship — This award is 
made annually to an outstanding junior or senior 
recommended by the College of Agriculture, 
preferably one majoring in Entomology. 



Da{ry Technology Scholarship and Grants — The 
Dairy Technology Society of Maryland and the 
District of Columbia provides a limited number of 
scholarships and grants-in-aid for students majoring 
in dairy products technology. 

Delaware-Maryland Plant Food Association 
Scholarship — A $200 annual award is made to an 
undergraduate who has an interest in agronomy and 
soil fertility work. 

Delmarva Traffic Club Scholarship — An annual 
award of $250 is made to a transportation student 
from the Delmarva Peninsula. 

Exel Scholarship — A substantial grant for en- 
dowed scholarships was made by Deborah B. Exel. 

James R. Ferguson Memorial Fund — A scholarship 
award is made annually to a student enrolled in 
Animal Science on the basis of academic achieve- 
ment and financial need. 

FMC Corporation Scholarship — An annual award 
of $500 is made available for a senior in chemical 
engineering. 

Anne Arundel County Volunteer Firemen's 
Association Grant — This tuition and fees grant is 
awarded to a high school graduate who will enroll 
in the fire protection curriculum in the College of 
Engineering. The award is normally for four years. 

Baltimore County Volunteer Fireman's Associa- 
tion Grant — This tuition and fees grant is awarded 
to a student who will enroll in the fire protection 
curriculum in the College of Engineering. The 
award is normally for four years. 

Ladies Auxiliary to The Maryland State Firemen's 
Association Grant — This $750 grant is awarded 
to an outstanding high school graduate who will en- 
roll in the fire protection curriculum in the College 
of Engineering. The award is normally available for 
four years. 

Maryland State Firemen's Association Grant — A 
tuition and fees scholarship is awarded annually 
to an outstanding high school student who enrolls 
in the fire protection curriculum of the College 
of Engineering. This scholarship is for four years. 

Prince Georges County Volunteer Firemen's 
Association Grant — An annual tuition and fees 
scholarship is awarded to an outstanding high 
school student who enrolls in the fire protection 
curriculum of the College of Engineering. 

Food Fair Stores Foundation Scholarships — 
Several scholarships are available for $250 per 
academic year. 

Frederick County Holstein Association Scholar- 
ship — A scholarship of $200 is awarded annually to 
a resident of Frederick County enrolled in the 
College of Agriculture. 

Victor Frenkil Scholarship — A scholarship of $250 
is granted annually by Mr. Victor Frenkil of Balti- 
more to a student from Baltimore City in the 
freshman class of the University. 



12 / General Information 



General Foods Scholarships — Three scholarships 
of $400 each are available to students in the 
College ol Agriculture majoring in Animal Science, 
Food Science or Dairy Science. Two awards are 
to be granted to students majoring in Food Science 
and the remaining one awarded to a student in 
the other areas. 

General Motors Scholarship. This scholarship is 
granted to an outstanding individual entering the 
freshman year. 

John D. Gilmore Scholarship has been established 
for the purpose of assisting deserving student 
athletes to obtain an education and participate in 
varsity athletics at the University of Maryland. 
The recipients should possess, as does John 0. 
Gilmore, outstanding dedication, determination and 
an undeniable will to win in athletic competition 
and to succeed in life. 

Goddard Memorial Scholarship — Several scholar- 
ships are available annually under the terms of 
the James and Sarah E. R. Goddard Memorial Fund 
established through the wills of Morgan E. 
Goddard and Mary Y. Goddard. 

Rose L. Grant Scholarship — At least $500 each 
year is made available to be awarded by the 
Scholarship Committee. 

John William Guckeyson Memorial Scholarship — 
A scholarship of $100 is granted annually by Mrs. 
Hudson Dunlap as a memorial to John William 
Guckeyson, an honored Maryland alumnus. 

Gudelsky Memorial Scholarship — The Gudelsky 
Foundation, Inc.. has established a scholarship in 
memory of Harry Gudelsky and Isadore M. Gudelsky. 

Staley and Eugene Hahn Memorial Scholarship 
Fund — Annual awards of $500 are made by Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter J. Hahn in memory of their sons 
to aid outstanding agricultural students from 
Frederick County. 

James Hartin Engineering Scholarship and Donald 
Peter Shaw Memorial Scholarship — These two 
scholarships of $300 each are made available 
annually by Mr. and Mrs. David C. Hartin. The first 
is awarded to a male student in the College of 
Engineering and the second to a male student 
in any college other than Education, or to a female 
student in nursing. These awards will be made to 
worthy students who are helping to earn their 
own college expenses. 

William Randolph Hearst Foundation Scholar- 
ships — These scholarships are made available 
through a gift of the Baltimore News American, one 
of the Hearst newspapers, in honor of William 
Randolph Hearst. Scholarships up to $1,000 are 
awarded annually to undergraduates pursuing a 
program of study in journalism. Scholarships up to 
$1,000 are awarded annually for graduate study in 
history. 



Robert Michael HIgginbolham Memorial Award 
Fund — This Fund has been endowed by Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles A. Higginbotham in memory of their 
son who was killed in Vietnam. Annual awards 
are made to promising junior students majoring In 
mathematics. 

A. M. Hollman Memorial Grant — This gift of $250 
per year is normally awarded as a supplement to 
some other type of student aid to a student with 
exceptional need. A preference is given to students 
from Montgomery County. The gift is made 
available by Mr. and Mrs. David B. Schwartz. 

Hyattsville Horticultural Society Scholarship — A 
scholarship of $200 is awarded to a student en- 
rolled in Horticulture. 

Inter-State Milk Producers' Cooperative, Inc. 
Scholarship — A scholarship of $300 is made avail- 
able to a student in agriculture in honor of Raymond 
Marvel, past-president o( the cooperative. 

lota Lambda Sigma (Nu Chapter) Scholarship — 
This $200 scholarship is awarded annually to a 
male student in the industrial education curriculum. 
The student must be a resident of the State of 
Maryland and signify his intention of teaching in 
Maryland. 

Paul H. Kea Memorial Scholarship Fund — This 
fund was established by the Potomac Valley Chapter 
of the American Institute ol Architects in memory 
of Paul H. Kea, a highly respected member of 
the chapter. 

Venia M. Keller Grant — The Maryland State 
Council of Homemakers' Club makes available this 
grant of $100 which is open to a Maryland young 
man or woman of promise who is recommended 
by the College ol Human Ecology. 

Kinghorne Fund Scholarship — A scholarship in 
honor of Mr. Joseph W. Kinghorne of the Class of 
1911 of the College of Agriculture shall be awarded 
to the student specializing in poultry science hav- 
ing the highest general average at the end of his 
or her sophomore year. The amount of the 
scholarship shall equal the tuition on the College 
Park Campus. 

Kiwanis Scholarship — The J. S. Ray Memorial 
Scholarship covering tuition is awarded by the 
Prince George's Kiwanis Club to a male resident 
of Prince George's County, Maryland, who, in 
addition to possessing the necessary qualifications 
for maintaining a satisfactory scholarship record 
must have a reputation of high character and attain- 
ment in general all-around citizenship. 

Kiwanis Club ol Laurel Scholarship — An annual 
award of $400 is made available to be awarded by 
the Scholarship Committee to needy students, 
preferably from the Laurel area. 

Laurel Race Course, Inc. Scholarship — This fund 
has been established to provide scholarships for 
students who are participating in the University 
Band. 



Leidy Chemical Foundation Scholarship — A 
scholarship of $500 is granted annually to a gradu- 
ate or undergraduate student preparing (or a 
career in the general field of chemistry. 

Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation 
Scholarship — The Trustees of the Christian R. and 
Mary F. Lindback Foundation provide an annual 
gift to the University, one-half of which is given 
for scholarships in agriculture and one-half for 
awards to the faculty for distinguished teaching. 

Helen Alelta Linthicum Scholarship — These 
scholarships, several in number, were established 
through the benefaction of the late Mrs. Aletta 
Linthicum, widow of the late Congressman Charles 
J. Linthicum, who served in Congress from the 
Fourth District of Maryland for many years. 

L/or7s International Scholarship — An award of $500 
is available to a freshman who competes in the 
Lions Club (District 22-C) Annual Band Festival. A 
recipient is recommended by the Music Department 
after a competitive audition in the spring. 

Loughborough Lions Club Scholarship — A 
scholarship providing tuition and fees is awarded 
to a graduate of Bethesda-Chevy Chase, Walt 
Whitman or Walter Johnson High Schools. The re- 
cipient is selected by the University on the basis of 
character and financial need. 

Lum's Restaurant Scholarship — An annual gift of 
$1000 is made to the University by Lum's Restaurant, 
8136 Baltimore Avenue, College Park to provide 
a scholarship to a student in the College of 
Business and Management. 

M Club Grants — The M Club of the University of 
Maryland provides each year a limited number o( 
awards. 

Maryland Cooperative Milk Producers, Inc. 
Scholarship — A scholarship of $500 is awarded an- 
nually in the College of Agriculture, preferably to 
a student preparing for a career in the dairy industry. 

Maryland-District ol Columbia Association ot 
Physical Plant Administrators Scholarship — A schol- 
arship for fixed charges and fees is made available 
to a junior or senior who is interested in making 
the administration of a physical plant his career. 
The recipient must be a resident of Maryland or 
the District of Columbia. 

Maryland Educational Foundation Grants — This 
fund has been established to provide assistance 
to worthy students. 

Maryland Electrilication Council Scholarship — 
This scholarship of $300 is awarded annually to an 
entering freshman or junior college transfer student 
enrolled in the agricultural engineering curriculum 
in either the College of Agriculture or the College 
of Engineering. 

Maryland Holstein Association Scholarship — The 
scholarship will be awarded to a deserving student 
in the College of Agriculture who has had a 



General Information / 13 



holstein project in 4-H or FFA. The award will be 
based on financial need, scholastic ability and 
leadership. 

Maryland and Virginia Milk Producers Association 
Scholarship — A scholarship of $500 is awarded 
annually in the College of Agriculture, preferably 
to a student preparing for a career in the dairy 
industry. 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholar- 
ship — The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
makes available annually scholarships to pre- 
pharmacy students on the basis of character, 
achievement and need. Each scholarship not ex- 
ceeding $500 per academic year is used in partial 
defrayment of fees and expenses at College 
Park. These scholarships are open only to residents 
of the State of Maryland. 

Maryland State Golf Association Scholarships — A 
limited number of $500 scholarships are available 
to undergraduates in the Agronomy Department 
who have an interest in golf turf work. 

Maryland Turfgrass Association Scholarship — A 
$250 annual award is made to an undergraduate 
who has an interest in agronomy and commercial 
sod production. 

George R. Merrill, Jr. Memorial Scholarship — 
Friends of former professor George R. Merrill, Jr. 
have established this endowed scholarship fund to 
benefit students in Industrial Education. 

Loren L. Murray and Associates Scholarships — 
This fund has been created to provide scholarships 
for Maryland residents who are admitted to the 
College of Education. 

Dr. Ray A. Murray Scholarship — This award, 
sponsored by Maryland Chapter No. 32 of the 
National Institute of Farm and Land Brokers, is to 
be made to a worthy sophomore in the Department 
of Agricultural and Resource Economics, College 
of Agriculture. 

Noxell Foundation Scholarships — Two scholar- 
ships are awarded to senior chemistry majors nomi- 
nated by the Department of Chemistry. 

Peninsula Horticultural Society Scholarship — The 
Peninsula Horticultural Society provides annually 
a $200 scholarship to the most deserving junior 
or senior student, a resident of Maryland from the 
Eastern Shore counties, who Is majoring in horti- 
culture or related subjects. 

Phi Eta Sigma Scholarship — A limited number of 
$100 scholarships are available to young men 
entering the sophomore class who have achieved 
an academic average of 3.5 or higher during the 
freshman year. 

Douglas Howard Phillips Memorial Scholarship — 
This scholarship fund has been endowed by Mr. 
and Mrs. Albanus Phillips, Jr. in honor of their son 
who met his untimely death in the spring before 
he was scheduled to attend the University, in order 
that worthy young male graduates of Cambridge, 



Maryland High School may have the opportunity 
he missed. 

William H. Price Scholarship — -This award is 
made annually to a worthy student who is already 
working to defray part of his college expenses. 

Presser Foundation Scholarship — Awards are 
made to undergraduate students who are pursuing 
their studies with the intention of becoming music 
teachers. 

Purchasing Management Association of Baltimore, 
Inc., Scholarship — An annual award of $500 is 
given annually to a junior or senior student in the 
College of Business and Management preparing for 
a career in business administration or business 
management. 

Ralston Purina Scholarship — A scholarship of $500 
is awarded annually to an incoming senior or 
junior of the College of Agriculture. 

Ensign Richard Turner Rea Memorial Scholar- 
ship — This scholarship fund has been established by 
Captain and Mrs. Richard F. Rea in honor of their 
late son who gave his life while on active duty 
in the U.S. Coast Guard. Two scholarships up to 
$500 each are awarded annually to students in 
engineering. 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships — The 
Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annual- 
ly several scholarships to prepharmacy students 
on the basis of achievement, character and need. 
Each scholarship not exceeding $500 per academic 
year is applied to the fees and expenses at 
College Park. Recipients must be residents of the 
State of Maryland. 

Mary Elizabeth Roby Memorial Scholarship — An 
endowed scholarship has been established by the 
University Park Republican Women's Club. Limited 
awards are made to women entering the junior or 
senior years who are studying in the field of 
political science. A preference is given to residents 
of Prince George's County. 

Vivian F. Roby Scholarships — This endowed 
fund was established through a bequest to the 
University of Maryland by Evalyn S. Roby in 
memory of her husband, class of 1912, to provide 
undergraduate scholarships to needy boys from 
Baltimore City and Charles County. 

Jack B. Sacks Foundation Scholarship — A schol- 
arship is available on behalf of the Women's 
Advertising Club of Washington, D.C. for a senior 
student majoring in the area of marketing with 
specific interests in advertising. 

Schluderberg Foundation Scholarship Grant — 
This grant of $500 is awarded in the College of 
Agriculture to a student enrolled in the animal 
science or food science curriculum. 

Dr. Fern Duey Schneider Grant — A $100 grant is 
available to a foreign woman student enrolled in 



the College of Education, who has completed at 
least one semester in residence at the University. 
Funds for the grant are contributed by the 
Montgomery and Prince George's County Chapters 
of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society. 

F. Douglass Sears Insurance Scholarship — Schol- 
arships for Maryland students preparing for 
careers in the insurance industry are made avail- 
able annually from a fund established by friends 
and associates of former State Insurance Commis- 
sioner F. Douglass Sears. 

Arthur H. Seidenspinner Scholarship — An en- 
dowed memorial scholarship fund has been 
established by Mrs. Seidenspinner to assist deserv- 
ing student athletes to obtain an education at the 
University. Both Mr. and Mrs. Seidenspinner have 
been long-time contributors to numerous student 
aid programs at the University. 

Southern States Cooperative Scholarships — Two 
scholarships are awarded each year to sons of 
Southern States members — one for outstanding 
work in 4-H Club and the other for outstanding 
work in FFA. The amount of each scholarship is $300 
per year and will continue for four years. 

Dr. Mabel S. Spencer Scholarship — This scholar- 
ship is awarded in honor of Dr. Spencer, dis- 
tinguished former Professor in the College of 
Education. A preference shall be given to students 
in Home Economics Education. 

T. B. Symons Memorial Fund — A scholarship 
award is made annually to a student enrolled in 
agriculture on the basis of academic achievement 
and financial need. 

Thomas H. Taliaferro Scholarship — Under the 
terms of the will of the late Jane G. S. Taliaferro a 
bequest has been made to the University of 
Maryland to provide scholarship aid to worthy 
students. 

Tau Beta Pi Scholarship Fund — A limited number 
of scholarships are made available each year to 
worthy engineering students by members and 
alumni of Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta PI 
Association, Inc., national engineering honor 
society. 

University Women's Club, Inc. Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund — A scholarship of $150 is awarded each 
year to a junior or senior woman student on the 
basis of academic record, financial need and 
qualities of leadership and character. The funds are 
contributed by the Memorial Fund Committee of 
the University Women's Club of Washington, D.C. 

Veterinary Science Scholarship — A scholarship 
of $300, provided by the veterinarians of Maryland, 
will be awarded to a student enrolled in Veterinary 
Science, selected on the basis of leadership, 
academic competence and financial need. 

Joseph M. Vial Memorial Scholarship in Agricul- 
ture — Scholarships totaling $600 per year are made 



14 / General Information 



available by Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Seidonspinner to 
be awarded upon the recommendation ol the 
College ol Agriculture. 

Western Electric Scholarship — Two scholarships 
are awarded to students in the College ol Engineer- 
ing. The amount ol the scholarship covers cost ol 
tuition, books and lees not to exceed $800 nor to 
be less than $400. 

Westinghouse Aerospace Division Scholarship— 
The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has estab- 
lished a scholarship to encourage outstanding 
students ol engineering and the physical sciences. 
The scholarship is awarded to a sophomore student 
and IS over a period ol three years in six install- 
ments ol $250. Students in electrical or mechanical 
engineering, engineering physics or applied mathe- 
matics are eligible lor the award. 

Women's Advertising Club of Baltimore Work/ 
Experience Scholarship — This award is available to 
an outstanding sophomore or junior interested in 
an advertising career. 

Women's Architectural League Scholarship — This 
lund has been established to aid worthy students 
in the School ol Architecture. 

Women's Club ot Bethesda Scholarship — Several 
scholarships are available to young women 
residents ol Montgomery County. Recipients must be 
accepted in the College ol Education or the School 
ol Nursing. 

Nicholas Brice Worthington Scholarship — A $500 
memorial scholarship is made available to a student 
in the College ol Agriculture by the descendants 
ol Nicholas Brice Worthington. one ol the lounders 
ol the Agricultural College. 



Accreditation 

The University ol Maryland is accredited by the 
Middle States Association ol Colleges and Secon- 
dary Schools and is a member ol the Association 
ol American Universities. In addition, individual 
schools and departments are accredited by such 
groups as the American Association ol Collegiate 
Schools ol Business, the American Chemical 
Society, the National Association ol Schools ol 
Music, the Section ol Legal Education and Admis- 
sions to the Bar ol the American Bar Association, 
the American Council ol Education lor Journalism, 
the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, 
the Council on Dental Education ol the American 
Dental Association, the Committee on Accreditation 
ol the American Library Association, the American 
Psychological Association, the Commission on 
Accreditation ol the Council on Social Work 
Education, the Council on Medical Education ol 
the American Medical Association, the Engineers' 



Council lor Prolessional Development, the National 
Council lor Accreditation ol Teacher Education. 

and the National League lor Nursing 

Office of Ihe Administrative Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies 

In addition to student services provided by the 
academic departments, the deans and the divisional 
ollices, the Ollice ol the Administrative Dean lor 
Undergraduate Studies is a source ol lurther assist- 
ance. This ollice coordinates all student advising, 
supervises the Bachelor ol General Studies Degree 
Program. General University Requirements, Uni- 
versity Honors Programs, assists in the development 
and coordination ol interdepartmental and inter- 
divisional studies and is responsible lor a number 
ol other student academic interests. Students 
with special academic problems or students who 
have not declared a major will be advised through 
the Oflice ol the Administrative Dean lor Under- 
graduate Studies, Room 1115, Undergraduate 
Library. 

Bachelor of General Studies Degree Program 

The Bachelor ol General Studies degree dillers 
Irom other current degrees in that it is a degree 
without a concentration in a specilic discipline or 
department. 

The BGS program permits the student to obtain 
c.n education in as broad a set ol disciplines or 
thought patterns as are ollered at the College Park 
Campus without insisting that he adhere to a 
previously delined curriculum with a departmental 
or divisional orientation. 

In this BGS program, the burden for motivation 
and direction is on the student. Good advice will 
guide him, but institutional commands will not 
compel him. Although this program is clearly a 
signilicant departure Irom current practices at this 
Campus, it does not depart Irom the high quality 
academic standards required ol other programs. 

Students who elect this program should specili- 
cally be aware that it is not designed to satisly 
graduate school admission requirements or pro- 
lessional employment requirements. The very 
concept ol the BGS is predicated on a broad rang- 
ing educational objective and not on the more 
specilic requirements ol graduate school and 
prolessional employment. It will be some time belore 
the attitude ol employers and graduate schools 
become clear toward the graduate ol the BGS pro- 
gram. Students electing it must be aware ol the 
uncertainties and accept the responsibilities. 

Additional inlormation may be obtained Irom 
Dr. Margaret Carthy in the Ollice ol the Dean lor 
Undergraduate Studies (telephone: 454-2530). 

Requirements 

To receive a Bachelor ol General Studies degree, a 
student must satisly the lollowing requirements: 



1. A minimum ol 120 credits must be accumulated 
with a grade point average ol at least 2.0 in 

all courses. 

2. No more than 30 credits in any one department 
may be applied toward the required 120 credits. 

3. The courses taken must be distributed over at 
least three divisions with a maximum ol 60 
credits in any one division counted toward Ihe 
required 120 credits. 

4. At least 45 credits must be taken at the upper 
level (courses numbered 300 or higher): a 2.0 
average must be obtained in all upper level 
courses. 

5. The student must be registered as only a 
Bachelor ol General Studies major lor at least 
the last 30 credits immediately preceding the 
awarding ol Ihe degree. A student who wishes to 
earn a second baccalaureate must satisly all 
University requirements lor the earning ol two 
degrees. 

6. The student pursuing the BGS program shall be 
advised by a laculty member either appointed by 
or acceptable to the Dean ol Undergraduate 
Studies. 

Academic Advisors 

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor whose 
lunction IS to aid the student in designing his 
program ol study. 
Special advisors are assigned to students in the 

preprofessional curricula. 

Undergraduate Degree Programs 

One major advantage ol attending a university 
campus is the broad range ol programs available. 
This diversity allows the student to change Irom one 
major to another without leaving the institution, 
to choose Irom a wide spectrum ol elective courses, 
and to benelit Irom daily contact with students ol 
diverse academic interests and backgrounds. 

The undergraduate majors available at College 
Park are as lollows: 

Aerospace Engineering 

Alro-American Studies 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agriculture, General 

Agronomy 

American Studies 

Animal Science 

Anthropology 

Architecture 

Art 

Astronomy 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 



General Inlormation /IS 



Business Administration 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Civil Engineering 

Comparative Literature 

Computer Science 

Conservation and Resource Development 

Cooperative Engineering Program 

Dance 

Early Childhood and Elementary Education 

Economics 

Education 

Education for Industry 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering, Undesignated 

English 

Entomology 

Family and Community Development 

Fire Protection 

Food, Nutrition and Institutional Administration 

Food Science 

French 

General Studies 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

Government and Politics 

Health Education 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

History 

Home Economics Education 

Horticulture 

Housing and Applied Design 

Industrial Education 

Information Systems Ivlanagement 

Journalism 

Kinesiological Sciences 

Latin 

Library Science Education 

Law Enforcement and Criminology 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering 

Microbiology 

Music 

Philosophy 

Psychology 

Physical Education 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Recreation 

Russian 

Russian Area Studies 

Secondary Education 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Special Education 

Speech and Dramatic Art 



Textiles and Consumer Economics 
Urban Studies 
Zoology 
General Undergraduate Advisement 

The Office of General Undergraduate Advisement is 
responsible for advising students who are com- 
pletely undecided as to their choice of major. 

This office also serves as a clearing house for 
information about all curricula and provides students 
with the opportunity of receiving advisement for 
curriculum choice. 

The Office of General Undergraduate Advisement 
is located in Room 3149 of the Undergraduate 
Library. The telephone number is 454-2733. 

Classification of Students 

No baccalaureate curriculum requires less than 
120 semester hours. Actual classifications run as 
follows: freshman, 1-27 semester hours; sophomore, 
28-55; junior, 56-85; and senior. 86 to at least 120. 

A student may register for upper division courses 
when granted junior standing by his college or 
division. This shall be based upon earning a 
minimum of 56 academic hours toward his degree, 
completing such course requirements as the college 
or division may direct, and possessing the minimum 
required grade point average to remain in the 
University. 

A senior at the University of Maryland who is 
within seven hours of completing the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval 
of his division chairman, the chairman of the de- 
partment concerned, and the Graduate School, 
register in the undergraduate division for graduate 
courses, which may later be counted for graduate 
credit toward an advanced degree at this Uni- 
versity. The total of undergraduate and graduate 
courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the 
semester. Excess credits in the senior year cannot 
be used for graduate credit unless proper pre- 
arrangement is made. Seniors who wish to register 
for graduate credit should apply to the Graduate 
School. 

Special Opportunities 

Advanced Placement 

Students entering the University from secondary 
school may obtain advanced placement and college 
credit on the basis of their performance on the 
College Board Advanced Placement examinations. 
These examinations are normally given to eligible 
high school seniors during the May preceding 
matriculation in college. 

For achievement of a score of five or four on a 
given examination, the student will be granted 
Advanced Placement and the credit equivalent of 
two semester courses in that field; for achievement 
of a score of three. Advanced Placement and the 



credit equivalent of either one or two semester 
courses, depending upon the field of the examina- 
tion, will be granted. A student earning a score of 
2 on the English Advanced Placement Examination 
will not need to take English Composition, but no 
credit will be given. 

The program allows students a maximum of 
thirty hours credit, which may be used to meet 
major, minor, or elective requirements; or, where 
appropriate. General University Requirements. The 
University's program includes the Advanced Place- 
ment Examinations in the following areas: biology, 
chemistry, English, French, German, history, Latin, 
mathematics, physics and Spanish. 

Questions about the program may be addressed 
to the Director of Admissions and Registrations, 
or the Dean for Undergraduate Studies. For detailed 
information about examinations and procedures 
in taking them, write to Director of Advanced 
Placement Program, College Entrance Examination 
Board, 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 
10027. 

Honors Program 

A number of unusual opportunities are available to 
the superior student through the establishment of 
Honors Programs. Under the Office of the Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies, a General Honors Program 
is available to qualified students throughout the 
Campus. In addition, departmental honors programs 
are offered for qualified majors by a number of 
the academic departments. 

General Honors, as its name suggests, enlarges 
the breadth of the student's generalized knowledge; 
the Departmental Honors increases the depth of 
his knowledge in his major discipline. Both offer 
the student challenging academic experiences 
characterized by small sections, active student par- 
ticipation, and an Honors faculty that encourages 
dialogue. Individually guided research and inde- 
pendent study are important features of Honors 
work. 

Each year a selected group of entering freshmen 
is invited into the General Honors Program on the 
basis of their high school records and standardized 
test scores. 

The more than 20 Departmental Honors Programs 
ordinarily begin in the junior year, although a few 
programs begin as early as the freshman year. 
By agreement, students in Secondary Education In 
the College of Education may participate in the 
departmental Honors Programs of the Division of 
Arts and Humanities and the Division of Mathe- 
matical and Physical Sciences and Engineering. 

The student who completes his Honors curriculum 
successfully is graduated with a citation in General 
or Departmental Honors, or with both. 

Interested high school students should write to 
the Director of Honors, 1102 Francis Scott Key Hall, 



16 / General Information 



University of Maryland. College Park. Maryland 
20742. 
Agriculture 

The College ot Agriculture has instituted a Depart- 
mental Honors Program in Agricultural Economics. 

Honor Societies 

Students who excel in scholarship and leadership 

may be invited to join the appropriate honor society. 

These include: 

'Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 

'Alpha Lambda Delta 

(Scholarship — Freshmen Women) 

Alpha Sigma Lambda 
(Adult Education) 

Alpha Zeta (Agriculture) 

Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting) 

Beta Gamma Sigma (Business and Management) 
"Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 
'Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 

lota Lambda Sigma (Industrial Education) 

Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 
'Morlar Board (Women's Scholarship 
and Leadership) 

Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 
'Omicron Delta Kappa (Men's 
Scholarship and Leadership) 

Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 

Phi Alpha Epsilon (Physical Education) 
'Phi Alpha Theta (History) 

Phi Beta Kappa (Liberal Arts) 

Phi Delta Kappa (Educational) 
'Phi Eta Sigma 

(Scholarship — Freshmen Men) 
'Phi Kappa Phi (Senior and Graduate 

Scholarship) 
'Phi Sigma (Biology) 

Pi Alpha Xi (Floriculture) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 
'Phi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 
■Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) 
'Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Sigma Alpha lota (Women's Music) 

Sigma Alpha Omicron (Bacteriology) 
'Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics) 
'Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) 
'Members of Association of College Honor 
Societies. 

Honors 

Scholarship Honors — Final honors for excellence 
in scholarship are awarded to one-fifth of the 
graduating class in each College. "High Honors" 
are awarded to the upper half of this group: 
"Honors ' to the lower half. To be eligible for honors, 
a student must complete at least two years of 



resident work (60 semester hours) at the University 
with an average ot B (3.0) or higher. 

The computation does not include grades for 
courses taken during the last semester o( 
registration before graduation. 

Milton Abramowitz Memorial Prize in Mathe- 
n^alics — A prize is awarded annually to a junior 
or senior student majoring in mathematics who has 
demonstrated superior competence and promise for 
future development in the field ot mathematics and 
its applications. 

Agricultural Alumni Award — Presented to a senior 
who during his collegiate career contributed most 
toward the advancement of the College of Agricul- 
ture. 

Alpha Chi Sigma Award — The Alpha Rho Chapter 
of the Alpha Chi Sigma Honorary Fraternity offers 
annually a years membership in the American 
Chemical Society to a senior majoring in Chemistry 
or Chemical Engineering whose average has been 
above 3.0 for three and one-half years. 

Alpha Lamba Delta Award — Presented to the 
senior member of the group who has maintained 
the highest average for three and a half years. She 
must have been in attendance in the institution for 
the entire time. 

Alpha Lamba Delta Senior Certilicate Award — 
Senior members of Alpha Lambda Delta, honorary 
scholastic society for women, who have maintained 
an average of 3.5. receive this certificate. 

Alpha Zeta Medal — The Professional Agricultural 
Fraternity of Alpha Zeta awards annually a medal 
to the agricultural student in the freshman class 
who maintains the highest average in academic 
work. 

Alumni Hamilton Award, This award is offered by 
the Engineering Alumni Chapter to the graduating 
senior in the College of Engineering who has most 
successfully combined proficiency in his major 
field of study with achievements — either academic, 
extra-curricular, or both — in the social sciences 
or humanities. 

American Association ot University Women 
Annual Graduate Prize. 

American Institute ot Aeronautics and Astro- 
nautics Award — Free memberships in the Institute 
for one year and cash prizes for the best paper 
presented at a Student Branch meeting and for the 
graduating aeronautical senior with the highest 
academic standing. 

American Institute ot Chemical Engineers Award — 
A certificate, pin and magazine subscription are 
awarded to the junior member of the Student 
Chapter who attained the highest overall scholastic 
average during his freshman and sophomore years. 

American Institute ot Chemists Award — Pre- 
sented for outstanding scholarship in chemistry and 
for high character. 



American Society ot Civil Enginoen Award — The 
Maryland Section of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers awards annually the first year's duet of 
an associate membership in the Society to a 
senior member of the Student Chapter on recom- 
mendation of the (acuity of the Deparlmenl of Civil 
Engineering. 

American Society ot Mechanical Engineer! 
Award — Presented to the Senior member who 
contributed most to the local chapter. 

American Society For Testing Mafer/als. — A stu- 
dent membership prize is awarded to an engineering 
senior in recognition of superior scholastic ability 
and demonstrated interest in engineering materials 
and their evaluation. 

Appleman-Norton Award in Botany — The Depart- 
ment of Botany offers a scholarship award of $100 
in honor of Emeritus Professors C. O. Appleman 
and J. 8. S. Norton to a senior major in Botany 
who IS considered worthy on the basis of demon- 
strated ability and excellence in scholarship. The 
scholarship is awarded by the committee on scholar, 
ships upon the recommendation of a committee 
of the faculty of the Department of Botany. 

Associated Women Students Awards — Presented 
for outstanding achievement, character, and 
service to the University. 

Dinah Berman Memorial Medal — The Dinah 
Berman Memorial Medal is awarded annually to the 
sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his class in the College of Engineering. 
This medal is given by Mr. Benjamin Berman. 

8'r7a/ B'rith Award — The B'nai B'rith Women of 
Prince George's County present a Book Award for 
excellence in Hebrew Studies. 

Business Education Award ol Merit — To a student 
in Business Education in recognition of outstanding 
achievement as a student. 

Citizenship Prize For Men — President Emeritus 
H. C. Byrd of the Class of 1908. annually presents 
this award to the member of the senior class who, 
during his collegiate career, has most nearly typified 
the model citizen and who has done most for the 
general advancement of the interests of the 
University. 

Citizenship Prize For Women — This prize is pre- 
sented annually as a memorial to Sally Sterling 
Boyd, by her children, to that member of the senior 
class who best exemplifies the enduring qualities 
of the pioneer woman. These qualities typify self 
dependence, courtesy, aggressiveness, modesty, ca- 
pacity to achieve objectives, willingness to sacrifice 
fo.- others, strength of character, and those other 
qualities that enabled the pioneer woman to play 
such a fundamental part in the building of the nation. 

The Carroll E. Cox Graduate Scholarship Award 
in Botany — To the outstanding graduate student in 
the Department of Botany during the last year. 



General Information / 17 



Bernard L. Crozier Award — The Maryland 
Association of Engineers awards a cash prize of 
twenty-five dollars to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the faculty, 
has made the greatest improvement in scholarship 
during his stay at the University. 

Virginia Dare Award — The Virginia Dare Extract 
Company awards annually a plaque and S25.00 to 
the outstanding student in ice cream manufacturing 
with an overall good standing in dairy science. 

The Dantorth Foundation and The Ralston Purina 
Awards — The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston 
Purina Company of St. Louis offer two summer 
awards to outstanding men students in the College 
of Agriculture, one for a student who has suc- 
cessfully completed his junior year, the other for 
a student who has successfully completed his 
freshman year. The purpose of these awards is to 
bring together outstanding young men for leadership 
training. 

The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston Purina 
Company of St. Louis offer two summer awards to 
outstanding Home Economics women students, 
one to a junior and one to a freshman. The purpose 
of these is to bring together outstanding young 
women for leadership training. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal — This sorority awards 
a medal annually to the woman who attains the 
highest average In academic work during the 
sophomore year. 

Delta Gamma Scholarship Award — This award is 
offered to the woman member of the graduating 
class who has maintained the highest average 
during three and one-half years at the University. 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key — This award is 
offered to a member of the graduating class who 
has maintained the highest scholastic average 
for the entire four-year course in the College of 
Business and K/lanagement. 

Nathan L. Drake Award — Presented by the Alpha 
Rho Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma to the most 
promising student who Is majoring in chemistry and 
has completed the sophomore year. 

Education Alumni Award — Presented to the out- 
standing senior man and senior woman in the 
College of Education. 

General Electric Company prize to the outstand- 
ing first year graduate student in physics and to the 
outstanding first year graduate student in astronomy. 

Goddard Medal — The James Douglass Goddard 
Memorial Medal is awarded annually to the male 
resident of Prince George's County born therein, 
who makes the highest average in his studies and 
who at the same time embodies the most manly 
attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne G. 
Goddard James of Washington, D.C. 

Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards — The University 
Theatre recognizes annually the man and woman 



members of the senior class who have oone most 
for the advancement of dramatics at the University. 

The Haskins and Sells Foundations, Inc. Award to 
the senior student in the College of Business and 
Management concentrating in accounting 
who has demonstrated excellent ability in this field 
of study. 

Home Economics Alumni Award — Presented to 
the female student outstanding in application of 
home economics in her present living and who 
shows promise of carrying these into her future 
home and community. 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering 
Award — The Washington Section of the Institute 
of Electrical and Electronics Engineers defrays the 
expenses of a year's membership as an associate 
in the institute for the senior doing the most to 
promote student branch activities. 

Joe Elbert James Memorial Award^Goid watch 
annually awarded to the graduating senior in horti- 
culture on basis of scholarship and promise of 
future achievement. 

Leidy Chemical Company Award to an outstanding 
student majoring in chemistry. 

Maryland Bankers Association Scholarship to the 
Virginia-Maryland Bankers Schools, University of 
Virginia. Awarded annually to a student majoring 
in finance In the College of Business and 
Management. 

Maryland-Delaware Press Association Annual 
Citation — Presented to the outstanding senior In 
journalism. 

Maryland Recreation and Parks Society Award 
to outstanding senior majoring in recreation. 

The Men's League Award to the male senior who 
gave the most to sports. 

Men's League Certificates — Offered for out- 
standing achievement, character and service to the 
University. 

Men's League Cup — This award is offered by the 
Men's League to the graduating male senior who 
has done the most for the male student body. 

Motor Fleet Supervisors Award to a student 
majoring in transportation In the College of Business 
and Management. 

National Society ol Fire Protection Engineers 
Awards — Presented to the most outstanding senior 
and sophomore in the fire protection curriculum. 

Noxzema Chemical Company Scholarship Award 
to an undergraduate student in chemistry. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal — This honorary 
sorority awards a medal annually to the freshman 
woman in the College of Home Economics who 
attains the highest scholastic average during the 
first semester. 

Phi Beta Kappa Junior Award — An award to be 
presented to the junior initiate into Phi Beta Kappa 
who has attained the highest academic average. 



Phi Beta Kappa — Leon P. Smith Award — The 
award of the Gamma of Maryland Chapter of Phi 
Beta Kappa is presented to the graduating senior 
with the highest cumulative scholastic average 
whose basic course program has been in the liberal 
studies. 

Phi Chi Theta Key— The Phi Chi Theta Key is 
awarded to the outstanding graduating senior 
woman in the College of Business and Manage- 
ment on the basis of scholarship, activities 
and leadership. 

Phi Sigma Awards for outstanding achievement 
in the biological sciences to an undergraduate 
student and a graduate student. 

Pi Delta Epsilon National Medal ol Merit Awards — 
Offered by the National Council of Pi Delta Epsilon 
to the outstanding senior woman and the outstanding 
senior man In journalism activities. 

Pi Delta Epsilon Award for outstanding service to 
communications In the field of broadcasting. 

Pi Delta Epsilon Award for outstanding service 
to communications in the field of business. 

Pi Delta Epsilon Award to the outstanding fresh- 
man in the field of communications. 

Pi Delta Epsilon Award for outstanding service to 
communications in the field of editorial journalism. 

Pi Tau Sigma Award — An annual handbook award 
to the most outstanding sophomore in mechanical 
engineering on the basis of scholastic average and 
instructors' ratings. 

Pilot Freight Carriers, Inc. Award to the senior 
student in the College of Business and Manage- 
ment who has majored In transportation and 
who has demonstrated competence in this field of 
study. 

Public Relations Society of America — The Balti- 
more Chapter of PRSRA presents an annual citation 
to the outstanding senior majoring in public re- 
lations. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award — This award is 
presented to a senior student majoring in micro- 
biology for high scholarship, character and leader- 
ship. 

The Sigma Chapter, Phi Delta Gamma Award to 
an outstanding woman who has completed require- 
ments for the doctoral degree. 

Dr. Leo and Rita Sklar General Honors Awards — 
Dr. Leo Sklar, A&S '37, and his wife, Rita Sklar, an- 
nually fund four awards for excellence In the General 
Honors Program. These awards are given to the 
Outstanding Student in the General Honors 
Program (S400), the Outstanding General Honors 
senior ($300). the Outstanding General Honors 
junior ($300), and the Outstanding General Honors 
sophomore ($300). 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award — The New York 
Southern Society, In memory of Its first president, 
awards annually medallions and certificates to 



18 / General Information 



one man and one woman in the graduatmg class 
and one non-student who evince in their daily life a 
spirit of lovo lor and helplulness to other men and 
women. 

7au Beta Pi Awerd—The Maryland Beta Chapter 
of Tau Beta Pi Association, national engineering 
honor society, awards an engineer's handbook 
to the junior in the College of Engineering who 
during his sophomore year has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship over that of his 
freshman year. 

The Homer Ulrich Award — The Homer Ulrich 
Honors Awards in Performance are presented each 
spring in honor of Homer Ulrich, Professor Emeritus 
and former Chairman of the Music Department. 
Three undergraduate and three graduate perform- 
ers are selected in a departmental competition to 
appear in a specially designated honors recital and 
to receive an honorarium. 

Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award — 
Awarded annually to the graduating senior who has 
maintained the highest scholastic achievement in 
the field of financial administration. The award 
consists of a silver medal embedded in clear 
plastic and one year's subscription to the Wall Street 
Journal. 

Air Force ROTO Awards 

Aerospace Education Foundation. W. Randolph 
Lovelace Memorial Award recognizes the most out- 
standing Air Force Association Award winner 
from each of the nine geographical areas. 

Air Force Association Award to the outstanding 
senior cadet who has excelled in Field Training, 
possesses individual leadership characteristics, 
ranks in the upper 10% of his class in the University 
and the upper 5% of his ROTC class, and has out- 
standing promotion potential. 

Air Force Times Award to the senior cadet who 
has demonstrated outstanding ability, initiative. 
and distinguished himself in bringing constructive 
attention to the AFROTC. 

Alumni Cup presented to the second semester Air 
Science senior cadet who has achieved the highest 
cumulative grade point average within the Corps 
of Cadets. 

American Fighter Aces Award recognizes the 
outstanding graduating cadet pilot in each geo- 
graphical area based on his performance and 
achievements as an AFROTC cadet and his per- 
formance in the Flight Instruction Program. 

American Legion ROTC General Military Excel- 
lence Awards to a senior (Gold Award) and a 
junior (Sliver Award) in the upper 25% of his 
AFROTC class demonstrating outstanding qualities 
in military leadership, discipline, and character. 

American Legion ROTC Scholastic Award to an 
outstanding senior (Gold Award) and junior (Silver 
Award) who are in the upper 10% of their class 



in the University and upper 25% of their AFROTC 
class, and who have demonstrated high qualities in 
military leadership. 

Angel Flight Freshman Award to the distinctive 
freshman cadet in the General Military Course. 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics 
Association Award to the outstanding senior cadet 
who IS preparing for a career in this technical area 
and has demonstrated outstanding qualities of 
military leadership, high moral character, and 
definite aptitude for military service. 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics 
Association Scholarship Award of one $500 scholar- 
ship annually to a sophomore AFROTC cadet for 
undergraduate or University study in electrical 
engineering, communications engineering and/or 
technical photography. 

Arnold Air Society CMC Cadet Award to the fresh, 
man or sophomore cadet who has demonstrated 
outstanding quality in areas of attitude, personal 
appearance, and military knowledge. 

Captain Lee S. Altpeter Memorial Scholarship 
Award to an outstanding sophomore or junior cadet 
in Category IP (pilot) who is a member of the Arnold 
Air Society. 

Coblentz Memorial Cup to the best drilled Flight 
within the Corps of Cadets. 

Commandant ol Cadets Award to the senior cadet 
whose increased officership potential has been 
significantly reflected in a Cadet Corps activity 
under his management. 

Daughters ot Founders and Patriots ol America 
Award to a qualified sophomore cadet who has 
demonstrated qualities of dependability, good char- 
acter, adherence to military discipline, leadership 
potential, patriotism, and an understanding of 
the importance of the American Heritage. 

Daughters ot The American Revolution Award to 
the senior cadet who has demonstrated high 
qualities of dependability, good character, adher- 
ence to military discipline, and leadership ability. 

Disabled American Veterans Cup to the senior 
cadet who has displayed outstanding leadership, 
scholarship, and citizenship. 

General Dynamics AFROTC Cadet Award to the 
sophomore cadet who has demonstrated outstanding 
leadership qualities and who possesses a positive 
attitude, good personal appearance, high 
personal attributes, military courtesy, and high 
officer potential. 

George M. Reiley Award to the member of the 
Flight Instruction Program showing the highest 
aptitude for flying as demonstrated by his perform- 
ance in the program. 

Governor's Cup to the most outstanding Squadron 
within the Corps of Cadets. 

Legion ot Valor Bronze Cross ol Achievement 
Award recognizes one cadet from each geographi- 



cal area tor his performance and achievements as 
an AFROTC cadet. 

Military Order ol World Wars Award to the 
Aerospace Studies cadet(s) recognized as the most 
improved within his year category (freshman, 
sophomore, junior or senior). 

National Delense Transportation Association 
Award to the outstanding senior cadet majoring in 
transportation. 

National So/ourners Award to an outstanding 
sophomore or junior cadet who has contributed the 
most to encourage and demonstrate Americanism 
within the Corps of Cadets and on the Campus. 

Prolessor ol Aerospace Studies Award to the 
senior cadet who has distinguished himself through 
excellence of leadership in the Corps of Cadets. 

Reserve Officers Association Awards to the senior 
cadet (Gold Award) and junior cadet (Silver Award), 
demonstrating outstanding academic achievement 
in AFROTC subject matter and highest officer 
potential. Ribbons of merit are presented to mem- 
bers of the freshman and sophomore classes. 

Society ot American Military Engineers Award to 
recognize 20 junior or senior cadets nationally 
displaying outstanding scholastic achievement and 
leadership and majoring in the field ot engineering. 

Sons ot The American Revolution Award to a 
junior cadet in the Two-Year Program or a freshman 
cadet in the Four-Year Program who has shown 
a high degree of merit in his leadership qualities, 
soldierly bearing and all around excellence in the 
AFROTC program studies and activities. 

Sun Newspaper Award to the best drilled sopho- 
more cadet in the Corps of Cadets. 

Athletic Awards 

Atlantic Coast Conference Award — A plaque is 
awarded each year to a senior in each conference 
school for excellence in scholarship and athletics. 

The Alvin L. Aubinoe Basketball Trophy — This 
trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe for the senior 
who has contributed most to the squad. 

The Alvin L. Aubinoe Football Trophy — This 
trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe for the unsung 
hero of the current season. 

The Alvin L. Aubinoe Track Trophy — This trophy 
IS offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe for the senior who 
has contributed most to the squad during the time 
he was on the squad. 

Bob Beall-Tommy Marcos Trophy — This trophy is 
awarded to the best football lineman of the year. 

John T. Bell Swimming Award — To the year's 
outstanding swimmer or diver. 

Louis W. Berger Trophy — Presented to the out- 
standing senior baseball player. 

Andrew M. Cohen Tennis Trophy — This trophy is 
awarded to the member of the tennis team who, 
judged by his teammates, contributed the most to 
tennis. 



General Information / 19 



William P. Cole, III, Memorial Lacrosse Award— 
This award, offered by the teammates of William P. 
Cole, III, and the coaches of the 1940 National 
Champion team, is presented to the outstanding 
midfielder. 

The George C. Cook Memorial Scholarship 
Trophy — Awarded annually to a member of the 
football team with the highest scholastic average. 

Joe Deckman-Sam Silver Trophy— This trophy is 
offered by Joseph H. Deckman and Samuel L. Silver 
to the most improved defense lacrosse player. 

Geary F. Eppley Award — Offered by Benny and 
Hotsy Alperstein to the graduating male senior 
athlete who, during his three years of varsity com- 
petition, lettered at least once and attained the 
highest over-all scholastic average. 

Halbert K. Evans Memorial Track Award — This 
award, given in memory of "Hermie" Evans, of the 
Class of 1940, by his friends, is presented to a 
graduating senior trackman. 

Jack Faber-AI Heagy Unsung Hero Award — Pre- 
sented to the player who best exemplifies 
determination, will to win, and pride in accomplish- 
ment. 

Herbert H. Goodman Memorial Trophy — This 
trophy is awarded to the most outstanding wrestler 
of the year. 

Jim Kehoe Ring Award — A Maryland Ring is 
awarded to the member of the track team whose 
dedication to excellence most closely exemplifies 
that of Jim Kehoe, one of t^aryland's greatest 
trackmen. 

Charles Leroy Mackert Trophy — This trophy is 
offered by William K. Krouse to the Maryland stu- 
dent who has contributed most to wrestling while 
at the University. 

Maryland Ring — The Maryland Ring is offered as 
a memorial to Charles L. Linhardt, of the Class of 
1912, to the Maryland man who is adjudged the 
best athlete of the year. 

Charles P. McCormick Trophy — This trophy is 
offered by Charles P. McCormick to the senior let- 
terman who has contributed most to swimming 
during his collegiate career. 

Edwin Powell Trophy — This trophy is offered by 
the Class of 1913 to the player who has rendered 
the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

Silvester Watch For Excellence in Athletics — A 
gold watch, given in honor of former President of 
the University, R. W. Silvester, is offered annually 
to "the man who typifies the best in college 
athletics." 

TEKE Trophy — This trophy is offered by the 
Maryland Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity 
to the student who during his four years at the 
University has rendered the greatest service to foot- 
ball. 



Robert E. Theoteld Memorial — This trophy is pre- 
sented by Dr. and Mrs. Harry S. Hoffman and is 
awarded to the golfer who most nearly exemplifies 
the competitive spirit and strong character of Robert 
E. Theofeld, a former member of the boxing team. 

The Dr. Reginald Van Trump Truitt Award — This 
award is given to a senior attackman in lacrosse 
(midfield or attack) for scholastic attainments and 
team performance. 

University of Maryland Alumni Swimming Associa- 
tion Scholar Athlete Award — This award is given 
to the swimmer who has compiled the best combina- 
tion academic and aquatic record. 

Music Awards 

Assistant Director's Award to the outstanding 
member of the Symphonic Band. 

Director's Award to the concert band member who 
demonstrated the most improvement in musician- 
ship during the year. 

Kappa Kappa Psi Award to the most outstanding 
band member of the year. 

Sigma Alpha lota Alumnae Award for outstanding 
musical performance. 

Sigma Alpha lota Dean's Honor Award for 
service and dedication. 

Sigma Alpha lota Honor Certificate to the senior 
with the highest scholastic average. 

Sigma Alpha lota Leadership Award based on 
personality, student activities, fraternity service, and 
scholarship. 

Tau Beta Sigma Award to the outstanding band 
sorority member of the year. 

Awards are presented to the members of the Uni- 
versity Bands, the University Orchestras, and the 
Men's and Women's Glee Clubs who serve faithfully 
throughout the year. 

Student Government Awards 

Keys are awarded to the members of the SGA 
Legislature and Certificates of Appreciation to the 
members of the Cabinet. 
General University Requirements 

In order to provide educational breadth for all 
students, there have been established the General 
University Requirements. These requirements con- 
sist of 30 semester hours of credit distributed among 
the three areas listed below. (For an exception to 
this regulation, see the Bachelor of General Studies 
Program.) At least 6 hours must be taken in each 
area. At least 9 of the 30 hours must be taken 
at the 300 level or above. None of the 30 hours 
may be counted toward published departmental, 
college or divisional requirements for a degree. 
Area A. 6-12 hours elected in the Divisions of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences; Mathematical and 



Physical Sciences and Engmeering. 
Area B. 6-12 hours in the Divisions of Behavioral 
and Social Sciences; Human and Community Re- 
sources. 

Area C. 6-12 hours in the Division of Arts and 
Humanities. 

In meeting these area requirements, students 
may choose from among any undergraduate courses 
for which they are qualified. Students are urged 
to consult with academic advisors for guidance 
in determining which courses in each area best 
fit individual needs and interests. 

Demonstration of competency in English com- 
position: unless the student has been exempted 
from English composition, at least one course in 
this subject will be required. Exemption is granted 
if the student earns an acceptable score on the 
Illinois Rhetoric Test administered by the Depart- 
ment of English (score announced annually), or a 
score of 2 on the English Advanced Placement Test, 
or by satisfactory completion of a similar course 
at another institution. Students taking a course to 
satisfy this requirement may apply the credits 
toward the 30-hour General University Require- 
ment but may not count these credits toward the 
satisfaction of the minimum 6-hour requirement in 
any of the three designated areas. Credit for 
such a course may be in addition to the 12-hour 
maximum in any area. 

Students who entered the University prior to 
June, 1973 have the option of completing require- 
ments under the former General Education Program 
rather than the new General University Require- 
ments. Each student is responsible for making 
certain that the various categories of either set of 
requirements have been satisfied prior to certifica- 
tion for the degree. Assistance and advice may be 
obtained from the academic advisor, the Offices of 
position: unless the student has been exempted 
the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies, 
or the Administrative Dean for Summer Programs. 

In meeting these area requirements students 
may choose from among any undergraduate courses 
for which they are qualified. The student may 
select either the pass-fail or letter grading option 
for these courses as outlined on pages 22 and 23. 
Special note lor foreign students 
The foreign student is required to take a special 
classification test in English before registering 
for the required English courses. He may be re- 
quired to take Foreign Language 001 and 002 — 
English for Foreign Students— be/ore registering 
for English 101. 
Registration 

1 . To attend classes at the University of Maryland 
it IS necessary to process an official registration. 
Registration is final and official when all fees are 
paid. Instructions concerning registration are given 



20 / General Information 



in the Schedule of Classes Issued at the beginning 
oteach new semester. 

2. The schedule adjustment period shall be the 
tirst 10 days o( classes. During that period, the 
student may drop or add courses and sections with 
no charge. Courses dropped during this period 
will be made available to other students desiring to 
add. Courses so dropped during this registration 
period will nor appear on the student's permanent 
record. Courses may be added, where space is 
available, during this period and will appear on the 
student's permanent record along with other 
courses previously listed. Alter this schedule ad- 
justment period, courses may not be added without 
special permission ol the instructor and the Dean 
or Divisional Officer of the academic unit in which 
the student is enrolled. 

3. After this schedule adjustment period, all 
courses for which the student is enrolled (or sub- 
sequently adds) shall remain as a part of the 
student's permanent record. The student's status 
shall be considered as lull-time if the number of 
credit hours enrolled at this time is 9 or more. 
Courses may be dropped with no academic penalty 
for a total period of 10 weeks in which there are 
classes, starting from the first day of classes. The 
permanent record will be marked W to indicate this. 
(See Marking System below.) After this initial sched- 
ule adjustment period a charge shall be made for 
each course dropped or added. (See Schedule ol 
Fees above.) 

4. An official class list lor each course being 
offered is issued each semester to the appropriate 
department by the Office of Registrations. No student 
is permitted to attend a class if his name does 

not appear on the class list. Instructors must report 
discrepancies to the Office of Registrations. At 
the end o' the semester, the Office of Registrations 
Issues to each department official grade cards. The 
instructors mark the final grades on the grade 
cards, sign the cards and return them to the Office 
of Registrations. 

5. Courses taken at another campus of the Uni- 
versity or at another institution concurrent with 
regular registration on the College Park Campus 
may not be credited without approval in advance by 
the Divisional Officer of the Division from which 

the student expects a degree. The same rule applies 
to off-Campus registration or registrations in the 
summer school of another institution. 

6. A student who is eligible to remain at the College 
Park Campus may transfer among curricula, col- 
leges, divisions, or other academic units except 
where limitations on enrollments have been ap- 
proved by the Board of Regents. 

7. In all cases ol transfer from one division to 
another on the College Park Campus, the Divisional 
Officer of the receiving division, with the approval 



of the student, shall indicate which courses, if any, 
in the student's previous academic program are 
not applicable to his new program, and shall notify 
the Office of Registrations of the adjustments which 
are to be made in determining the student's 
progress toward a degree. Deletions may occur 
both in credits attempted and correspondingly In 
credits earned. This evaluation shall be made upon 
the student's initial entry into a new program, not 
thereafter. If a student transfers within one division 
from one program to another, his record evaluation 
shall be made by the Divisional Officer in the same 
way as if he were transferring divisions. II the 
student subsequently transfers to a third division, 
the Divisional Officer of the third division shall 
make a similar initial adjustment; courses marked 
"nonapplicable" by the second Divisional Officer 
may become applicable in the third program. 
8. In the cases of non-divisional students, the 
Dean lor Undergraduate Studies shall assume the 
responsibilities normally delegated to Divisional 
Officers. 

Degrees and Ceilificates 

The University confers the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of General Studies, 
Bachelor of f^usic. Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy, Bachelor of Architecture, fkflaster of Arts, 
Master of Arts in American Civilization, f^^aster of 
Business Administration, Master of Education, 
Master of Music, Master of Science, Master of 
Library Science, Master of Social Work, Doctor of 
Dental Surgery, Doctor of Education, Doctor of 
Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Musical 
Arts, Doctor of Business Administration, and 
Juris Doctor. 

Students in specified two-year curricula may be 
awarded certificates. 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a 
student who has had less than one year of resident 
work in this University. The last thirty semester 
credits in any curricula leading to a baccalaureate 
degree must be taken in residence at the University. 
Candidates for the baccalaureate degree in curricula 
which combine work at College Park and Baltimore 
must complete a minimum of thirty semester 
credits at College Park. 

The requirements for graduation vary according 
to the character of work in the different colleges, 
divisions and schools. Full information regarding 
specific college and division requirements for 
graduation will be found in Section II of this catalog. 

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must 
file a formal application for it with the Registrations 
Office. This must be done by the end of the third 
week of the semester or the second week of the 
summer session at the end of which he expects 
to graduate. 



Credit Unit and Load 

The somoslor hour, which Is the unit of credit, is 
the equivalent ol a subject pursued one period a 
week for one semester. Two or three periods of 
laboratory or field work are equivalent to one lecture 
or recitation period. The student is expected to 
devote three hours a week In classroom or lab- 
oratory or in outside preparation for each credit 
hour in any course. 

In order for an undergraduate student to complete 
most curricula in the designated amount of time, 
his semester credit load must range from 12 to 
19 hours, so that he would complete from 30 to 36 
hours each year toward his degree. A student 
registering for less than 12 hours or more than 
19 hours per semester must have the special 
approval of his Dean or Divisional Officer.* 

Examinations 

1. A final examination shall be given in every 
undergraduate course. Exceptions may be made with 
the approval of the chairman of the department 

and the dean or division chairman. In order to 
avoid basing too much of the semester grade upon 
the final examination, additional tests, quizzes, 
term papers, reports and the like should be used 
to determine a student's comprehension of a course. 
The order of procedure in these matters Is left to 
the discretion of departments or professors and 
should be announced to a class at the beginning 
of a course. All final examinations must be held on 
the examination days of the Official Final Examina- 
tion Schedule. No final examination shall be given 
at a time other than that scheduled in the Official 
Examination Schedule without written permission 
of the department chairman. 

2. To expedite arrangements for commencement, 
final grades of undergraduate candidates for de- 
grees are based on evaluations available at the 
time grades are required to be submitted. 

3. A file of all final examination questions must be 
kept by the chairman ol each department. 

4. The chairman of each department is respons- 
ible for the adequate administration of examinations 
in courses under his jurisdiction. The deans and 
division chairmen should present for consideration 
the matter of examinations in staff conferences from 
time to time and investigate examination pro- 
cedures in their respective colleges and divisions. 

5. Every examination shall be designed to require 
for its completion not more than the regularly 
scheduled period. 

6. A typewritten, mimeographed or printed set of 
questions shall be placed in the hands of every 
examinee In every test or examination requiring 



'The following svmtBtar course load* ere considered rull-llfn* 
meir respective sieas: Tuition and Fee Asseumeni. 9 s h. 
HousinQ. 9 s.n.. Plan of Uinimum nequiramenis For Graduatio 
12 s.li.; Foreign Students. 12 s n.; and alMeles need 24 sn. a y« 



General Information / 21 



at least one period, unless the dean of the college 
or the division chairman has authorized some 
other procedure. 

7. Each instructor must safeguard his examination 
questions and all trial sheets, drafts and stencils. 

8. Each instructor should avoid the use of exam- 
ination questions which have been included in 
recently given examinations and should prepare 
examinations that will make dishonesty difficult. 

9. Only clerical help approved by the department 
chairman shall be employed in the preparation or 
reproduction of tests or examination questions. 

10. Proctors must be in the examination room at 
least ten minutes before the hour of a final 
examination. Provisions should be made for proper 
ventilation, lighting and a seating plan. At least 
one of the proctors present must be sufficiently 
cognizant of the subject matter of the examination 
to deal authoritatively with inquiries arising from 
the examination. 

11. Books, papers, etc., belonging to the student, 
must be left in a place designated by the instructor 
before the student takes his seat, except in such 
cases where books or work sheets are permitted. 

12. Students should be seated at least every 
other seat apart, or its equivalent, i.e., about three 
feet. Where this arrangement is not possible 
some means must be provided to protect the 
integrity of the examination. 

13. "Blue books" only must be used in periodic 
or final examinations, unless special forms are 
furnished by the department concerned. 

14. If mathematical tables are required in an 
examination, they shall be furnished by the instruc- 
tor. If textbooks are used, this rule does not apply. 

15. Proctors must exercise all diligence to pre- 
vent dishonesty and to enforce proper examination 
decorum, including abstention from smoking. 

16. Where an instructor must proctor more than 
40 students, he should consult the chairman of 

his department concerning proctorial assistance. An 
instructor should consult his department chairman 
if in his opinion a smaller number of students for 
an examination requires the help of another 
instructor. 

17. No student who leaves an examination room 
will be permitted to return, except in unusual 
circumstances, in which case permission to do so 
must be granted by the proclor prior to the student's 
departure. 

18. All conversation will cease prior to the pass- 
ing out of examination papers, and silence will be 
maintained in the room during the entire examina- 
tion period. 

19. Examination papers will be placed face down 
on the writing surface until the examination is 
officially begun by the proctor. 

20. Examination papers will be kept flat on the 
writing surface at all times. 



Irregularities in Examinations 

1. In cases involving charges of academic irregu- 
larities or dishonesty in an examination, class work 
or course requirements by an undergraduate stu- 
dent, the instructor in the course shall report to 
his instructional department chairman any informa- 
tion received and the facts within his knowledge. 
If the chairman of the instructional department 
determines that there is any sound reason for be- 
lieving that academic dishonesty may be involved, 
he shall refer the matter to the dean of the college 
or school. The dean will then confer with the dean 
of the student's college or school and will check 
the Judiciary Office records to determine if the 
student has any record of prior offenses involving 
academic dishonesty. The dean will then consult 
with the student involved, and if the afleged 
academic dishonesty is admitted by the student 
and is his first offense of this nature, the dean 
may authorize the department chairman to dispose 
of the charges, limiting the maximum penalty to 
disciplinary probation and a grade of F in the 
course, provided the penalty is accepted by the 
student in writing. In such case the department 
chairman will make a written report of the matter, 
mcluding the action taken, to the dean of the stu- 
dent's college or school and to the Judiciary Office. 

If the case is not disposed of in the above 
manner, the dean of the instructional department 
will appoint an ad hoc Committee on Academic 
Dishonesty consisting of one member from the 
faculty of the college or school administered by the 
dean as chairman, one undergraduate student, 
and one member from the faculty of the student's 
college or school appointed by the dean of that 
college or school. If the student's dean and the dean 
administering the instructional department are the 
same, a second member of the faculty of the 
college or school concerned is appointed. 

The dean of the instructional department will refer 
the specific report of alleged academic dishonesty 
to this ad hoc committee and the committee will 
hear the case. The hearing procedures before this 
committee will in general conform to those required 
for student judicial boards. The committee may 
impose the normal disciplinary actions and/or 
impose a grade of F in the course. 

The chairman of the committee will report its 
actions to the dean of the student's college or 
school and to the Judiciary Office. The dean of the 
instructional department will advise the student 
in writing of the disciplinary action of the committee, 
and also advise him of his right to file an appeal 
to the Adjunct Committee on Student Conduct. 

The student may file his appeal in accordance 
with the normal procedures to the Adjunct Com- 
mittee with the dean of the instructional department 
and the latter will forward it to the chairman of 



the Adjunct Committee. The chairman of the 
Adjunct Committee will notify the student in writing 
of the time, date, and place of the hearing. 
2. In cases involving charges of academic irregu- 
larities or dishonesty in an examination, class 
work or course requirements by a graduate student, 
the above procedure will be followed except that: 

a. The chairman of the instructional department 
will refer the matter to the Dean for Graduate 
Studies. 

b. The ad hoc Committee on Academic Dis- 
honesty will be appointed by the Dean for Graduate 
Studies and will consist of two members of the 
Graduate School faculty, one serving as chairman, 
and one graduate student. 

Marking System 

1 . The following symbols are used on the student's 
permanent record for all courses in which he is 
enrolled after the initial registration and schedule 
adjustment period: A, B, C, D, F, I, P, S, and W. 
These marks remain as part of the student's perma- 
nent record and may only be changed by the 
original instructor on certification, approved by the 
department chairman and Divisional Officer, that 

an actual mistake was made in determining or 
recording the grade. 

2. The mark of A denotes excellent mastery of the 
subject. It denotes outstanding scholarship. In 
computations of cumulative or semester averages, 
a mark of A will be assigned a value of 4 quality 
points per credit hour. (See Minimum Requirments 
For Retention and Graduation below.) 

3. The mar/( of B denotes good mastery of the 
subject. It denotes good scholarship. In com- 
putation of cumulative or semester averages a mark 
of B will be assigned 3 quality points per credit 
hour. 

4. The marl< of C denotes acceptable mastery. It 
denotes the usual achievement expected. In com- 
putation of cumulative or semester averages a 
mark of C will be assigned a value of 2 quality 
points per credit hour. 

5. The mark of D denotes borderline understand- 
ing of the subject. It denotes marginal performance, 
and it does not represent satisfactory progress 
toward a degree. In computations of cumulative or 
semester averages a mark of D will be assigned 

a value of 1 quality point per credit hour. 

6. The mark of F denotes failure to understand the 
subject. It denotes unsatisfactory performance. In 
computations of cumulative or semester averages a 
mark of F will be assigned a value of quality 
points per credit hour. 

7. The mark of P \s a student option mark, 
equivalent to A, B, C, or D. (See Pass-Fail option 
below.) The student must inform the Office of 
Registrations of his selection of this option by the 



22 / General Information 



end o( the schedule ad|ustmenl period. In com- 
pulation of cumulative averages a mark of P will 
not be included. In compulation of quality points 
achieved tor a semestor, a mark of P will be as- 
signed a value of 2 quality points per credit hour. 
(See Minimum Requirements For Retention and 
Graduation below.) 

8. The mark ot S is a department option mark 
which may be used to denote satisfactory participa- 
tion by a student In progressing thesis projects, 
orientation courses, practice teaching and the like. 
In computation of cumulative averages a mark of 

S will not be included. In computation of quality 
points achieved lor a semester, a mark of S will be 
assigned a value of 2 quality points per credit hour. 

9. The mark I is an exceptional mark which is an 
instructor option. It is given only to a student whose 
work in a course has been qualitatively satisfactory, 
when, because of illness or other circumstances be- 
yond his control, he has been unable to complete 
some small portion of the work of the course. In no 
case will the mark I be recorded for a student who 
has not completed the major portion of the work of 
the course. The student will remove the I by com- 
pleting work assigned by the instructor; it is the 
student's responsibility to request arrangements 

tor completion of the work. The work must be 
completed by the end of the next semester in which 
the course is again offered and in which the student 
is in attendance at the College Park Campus; 
otherwise the I becomes terminal (equivalent to 
W). Exceptions to the time period cited above may 
be granted by the student's Dean or Divisional 
Officer upon the written request of the student if 
circumstances warrant further delay. If the instructor 
is unavailable, the department chairman will, upon 
request of the student make appropriate arrange- 
ments for the student to complete the course re- 
quirements. It is the responsibility of the instructor 
or department chairman concerned to return the 
appropriate supplementary grade report to the 
Office of Registrations promptly upon completion 
of the work. The I cannot be removed through 
re-registration lor the course or through the tech- 
nique of "credit by examination. " In any event this 
mark shall not be used in any computations. 

10. The mark W is used to denote that the student 
withdrew from a course in which he was enrolled 
at the end of the schedule adjustment period. This 
mark shall not be used in any computation, but tor 
information and completeness is placed on the 
permanent record by the Office of Registrations. 
The Office of Registrations will promptly notify the 
instructor that the student has withdrawn from the 
course. 

11. Audit. A student may register to audit a course 
or courses in which space is available. The notation 
AUD will be place on his transcript for each course 



audited. A notation to the effect that this symbol 
does not imply attendance or any other elfort in 
the course will be included on the transcript in the 
explanation of the grading system. 

Pass-Fail Option 

1. An undergraduate who has completed 15 or 
more credit hours at the College Park Campus and 
has a cumulative average ot at least 2.00 may 
register for courses on the Pass-Fail option during 
any semester or summer session. 

2. Certain divisional requirements, major require- 
ments or field of concentration requirements do 
not allow the use of the Pass-Fail option. Certain 
courses within a department may be designated by 
that department as not available under the Pass-Fail 
option. It IS the responsibility of each student elect- 
ing this option to ascertain in conjunction with his 
Divisional Officer, Dean, department or major 
advisor, whether the particular courses will be 
applicable to his degree requirements under the 
Pass-Fail option. 

3. No more than 20 percent of the credits offered 
toward the degree may be taken on the Pass-Fail 
option basis. 

4. Students registering for a course under the 
Pass-Fail option are required to complete all regular 
course requirements. Their work will be evaluated 
by the instructor by the normal procedure for 
letter grades. The instructor will submit the normal 
grade. The grades A, B, C. or D will be automatically 
converted by the Office of Registrations to the 
grade P on the student's permanent record. The 
grade F will remain as given. The choice of grading 
option may be changed only during the schedule 
adjustment period for courses in which the student 

is currently registered. 

Credit by Examination for Undergraduate 
Studies 

1 . Credit may earned by examination for any 
undergraduate course, for which a suitable 
examination has been adopted or prepared by 

the department granting the credit. When standard- 
ized CLEP (College Level Examination Program) 
examinations are available they may be used. 
The list of courses for which credit may be earned 
by examination will be made available through 
the office of the Administrative Dean for Under- 
graduate Studies. 

2. Any student may take a course by examination 
by obtaining an application form from the Ad- 
ministrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies, paying 
the requisite fees, and taking the examination 

at a time mutually agreeable to the student and 
the department offering the course. 

3. The applicant must be formally admitted to the 
University of Ivlaryland, and be in good academic 



standing. Posting of credit, however, will be 
delayed until the student is registered. 

4. Application lor credit by examination Is 
equivalent to registration for a course: however, 
the following conditions apply; 

A. A student may cancel his application at any 
lime prior to completion of the examination 
with no entry on his permanent record. 
(Equivalent to the registration adjustment 
period.) 

B. The instructor makes the results ot the examina- 
tion available to the student prior to formal 
submission of the grade. Before formal 
submission of the grade, a student may elect 
not to have this grade recorded. In this case 

a symbol of "W" is recorded. (Equivalent to the 
drop procedure.) 

C. No course may be attempted more than twice. 

D. The instructor must certify on the report of 
the examination submitted to the Registrations 
Office that copies of the examination questions 
or identifying information in the caseot 
standardized examinations, and the student's 
answers have been filed with the chairman ot 
the department offering the course. 

5. Letter grades earned on examinations to 
establish credit (if accepted by the student) are 
entered on the students transcript and used in 
computing his cumulative grade point average. A 
student may elect to take an examination for credit 
on a "Pass-Fail" basis under the normal "Pass- 
Fail" regulations. 

6. Undergraduate students may earn by examina- 
tion no more than half the credits required for 

the degree. 

7. Fees for Credit by Examination are as follows: 

A. Fees for CLEP and other standardized exami- 
nations are determined externally and are not 
altered by the University. These credits are 
treated as transfer credits. 

B. Full-time students are charged S30.00 for each 
course examination regardless of the numtjer 

of credits. This fee is paid upon application 
for the examination and is not refundable 
regardless of whether or not the student com- 
pletes the examination. 

C. Part-time students are charged in the same 
cost-per-credit-hour basis as though they were 
taking the course in the regular manner. 

Junior Standing 

1. A student is permitted to register for upper 
division courses when granted Junior Standing by 
his college. This permission shall be based upon 
earning a minimum of 56 academic hours toward 
his degree, completing such course requirements as 
the college may direct, and possessing the 
minimum required grade point average to remain in 
the University. 



General Information / 23 



2. Exceptional students having completed forty- 
eight (48) semester hours of academic credits and 
having the approval of the department involved will 
be permitted to enroll for sufficient upper division 
courses to complete a normal program. That is, 
such students must carry low/er division courses 
to total fifty-six (56) semester hours of academic 
credits and the remainder may be in courses num- 
bered in the 300-499 range. 

Degree Requirements 

1. It is the responsibility of departments, colleges, 
divisions, or appropriate academic units to estab- 
lish and publish clearly defined degree require- 
ments. Responsibility for knowing and meeting all 
degree requirements for graduation in any 
curriculum rests with the student. Not later than 

the close of his junior year, the student should 
check with the proper authorities to ascertain his 
standing in this respect. For this purpose the student 
should be sure to preserve the copy of the semester 
grade report issued by the Office of Registrations 
at the close of each semester. 

2. In order to earn a baccalaureate degree the 
last 30 semester credits of any curriculum must 

be taken in residence at the College Park Campus. 
Candidates for degrees in pre-professional com- 
bined programs must complete at least 30 semester 
credits at College Park. The minimum residence 
required for a baccalaureate degree is 30 semester 
hours; nothing stated below modifies in any way 
this basic requirement. Included in these 30 semes- 
ter hours will be a minimum of 15 semester hours 
in courses numbered 300 or above, including at 
least 12 semester hours required in the major field 
(in curricula requiring such concentration). All 
candidates for degrees should plan to take their 
senior year in residence since the advanced work 
of the major study normally occurs in the last 
year of the undergraduate course. At least 24 of the 
last 30 credits must be done in residence at the 
College Park Campus; i.e., a student who at the 
time of his graduation will have completed 30 
semester hours in residence may be permitted to 
do not more than 6 semester hours of his final 
30 credits of record in another institution, provided 
that he secures in advance written permission 
from his dean or divisional chairman. The student 
must be enrolled in the program from which he 
plans to graduate when registering for the last 15 
credits of his program. These requirements apply 
also to the third year of pre-professional combined 
degree programs. 

3. While many University curricula require more 
semester hours than 120, no baccalaureate curricu- 
lum requires less than 120 credit hours. It is the 
student's responsibility to familiarize himself with 



the requirements of his curriculum. The student is 
urged to avail himself of the advice on these matters 
in the departments, colleges, divisions, or Office of 
Academic Affairs. A student who wishes to earn a 
second baccalaureate degree in the University is 
required to complete the additional studies regularly 
prescribed for that degree, involving at least one 
year's additional residence and the earning of 
at least 30 additional credits. 

4. A general C (2.00) average is required for 
graduation in all curricula. (See Minimum Require- 
ments For Retention and Graduation.) 

5. Applications for diplomas must be filed with the 
Office of Registrations during the registration 
period or not later than the end of the second week 
of classes of the regular semester or at the end 

of the second week of the summer session, at the 
end of which the candidate expects to receive 
his degree. Applications filed after the third week 
of classes of a regular semester or Friday of the 
second week of a summer session will be retained 
until the next semester (session) when degrees will 
be awarded. 

Attendance 

1. The University expects each student to take 
full responsibility for his academic work and 
academic progress. The student, to progress satis- 
factorily, must meet the quantitative and qualitative 
requirements of each course for which he is 
registered. Students are expected to attend classes 
regularly, for consistent attendance offers the 
most effective opportunity open to all students to 
gain a developing command of the concepts and 
materials of their course of study. However, attend- 
ance in class, in and of itself, is not a criterion 

for the evaluation of the student's degree of suc- 
cess or failure. Furthermore, absences (whether 
excused or unexcused) do not alter what is ex- 
pected of the student qualitatively and quantitative- 
ly. Except as provided below, absences will not be 
used in the computation of grades, and the record- 
ing of student absences will not be required 
of the faculty. 

2. In certain courses in-class participation is an 
integral part of the work of the course. A few 
examples would be courses in public speaking and 
group discussion, courses emphasizing conversation 
in foreign languages, certain courses in physical 
education, and certain laboratory sessions. Each 
department shall determine which of its courses 

fall in this category. It shall be the responsibility 
of the instructor in such courses to inform each 
class at the beginning of the semester that in-class 
participation is an integral part of the work of the 
course and that his absences will be taken into 
account in the evaluation of his work in the course. 

3. Laboratory meetings required special prepara- 
tion of equipment and materials by the staff. A 



student who is not present for a laboratory exercise 
has missed that part of the course and cannot 
expect that he will be given an opportunity to make 
up this work later in the term. 

4. Special provision for freshmen: the freshman 
year is a transitional year. Absences of freshmen in 
the basic freshman courses will be reported to the 
student's dean or division officer when the student 
has accumulated more than three unexcused 
absences. 

5. Excuses for absences (in basic freshman 
courses and in courses where in-class participation 
Is a significant part of the work of the course) 

will be handled by the instructor in the course in 
accordance with the general policy of his depart- 
ment and college. 

6. Examinations and tests: it is responsibility 

of the student to keep himself informed concerning 
the dates of announced quizzes, tests and exami- 
nations. An instructor is not under obligation to 
give a student a make-up examination unless the 
student can present evidence that his absence 
was caused by illness or by participating in Uni- 
versity activities at the request of University 
authorities. A make-up examination, when permitted, 
is given at the convenience of the instructor, but 
must not interfere with the student's regularly 
scheduled classes. 

Deficiency Reports 

1. Reports of unsatisfactory work (less than C) 

will be made only for freshmen in the basic freshman 
courses. It will be the obligation of all students to 
assume full responsibility for their academic 
progress without depending upon receiving official 
warning of unsatisfactory work. 

2. Reports of unsatisfactory work for freshmen 
in the basic freshman courses will be submitted to 
the student's dean or division officer at the end 
of the seventh week of the semester. 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students 

The University reserves the right to request at any 
time the withdrawal of a student who cannot or 
does not maintain the required standard of scholar- 
ship, or whose continuance in the University would 
be detrimental to his or her health, or to the health 
of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to 
the authorities of the University. Specific scholastic 
requirements are set forth in the Minimum Require- 
ments for Retention and Graduation. 

Withdrawals From The University 

1 . Should a student desire or be compelled to 
withdraw from the University at any time, he must 
secure a notice of withdrawal from his divisional 
officer, obtain the proper signatures, and submit 
the notice along with his University identification 
cards to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for 



24 / General Information 



student and Special Services 



student Allairs. This ollico will tile ttie withdrawal 
wilti Itie Oltice of Registrations wtiicti will record 
a mark of W (or all courses and notify the instructors 
ol the withdrawal. 

2. The edective date o( withdrawal as (ar as 
refunds are concerned is the dale that the notice is 
received by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs. The Office of Registrations will 
record the effective date of withdrawal on the 
students permanent record 
Readmission and Reinstatement 
Readmission 

1 A student whose continuous attendance at the 
University has been interrupted, but who was in 
good academic standing, or on academic probation, 
at the end of the last regular semester for which 
he was registered, must apply to the Office of 
Admissions for readmission. He will be readmitted 
to the program in which he was last registered. 

Reinstatement 

1. A student who withdraws from the University 
must apply (or reinstatement to the Secretary of 
the Petition Board. Office of Admissions. 

2. A student who has been dropped (or scholastic 
reasons may appeal in writing to the Secretary of 
the Admissions Petition Board, Office of Admissions, 
for reinstatement. The committee is empowered 

to grant relief m unusual cases, if the circum- 
stances warrant such action. 

3. A student who has been dropped from the 
University (or scholastic reasons, and whose 
petition for reinstatement is denied, may again 
petition after a lapse of at least one semester. 
Minimum Requirements (or Retention 
and Graduation 

1. A minimum of 120 credits of successfully com- 
pleted (not I, F, or W) course credits are required 
for graduation in any degree curriculum. (See 
Degree Requirements and Credit By Examination 
above.) Credits transferred, or earned during prior 
admissions terminating in academic dismissal or 
withdrawal and followed by readmission, will be 
applicable toward meeting credit requirements for 
a degree. (See Readmission and Reinstatement 
above.) 

2. A full-time student will be placed on academic 
probation at the end of any semester in which he 
does not achieve a total of 24 quality points for 
that semester, except that he will not be placed 
on academic probation (or this reason if he earns 
at least a 2.0 average on a registration (at the end 
of the schedule adjustment period) of 9-1 1 credits. 
Exceptions are also allowed for all full-time students 
in their first semester of registration on the College 
Park Campus, who must earn at least 18 quality 
points for that semester. This exception does not 



apply to students who have earned more than 
8 credits through previous registration in the 
University. 

3. Any student, full- or part-time, who fails to 
maintain a minimum cumulative average of 1.95 at 
the end of any semester following that in which 
the total of credits completed at the College Park 
Campus (with grades of A, B, C, D, P, S, or F), plus 
any credits transferred, is 45 credits, will be placed 
on academic probation. Credits completed with 
grades of A, B, C, D, and F, but not S, P, or I will 

be used in the computation of the cumulative 
average. The 1.95 requirement applies to first 
semester transter students who transter 45 or more 
credits. 

4. A student who does not meet the academic 
standards (or any given semester will be placed on 
probation and must display acceptable pertorm- 
ance in quality points and cumulative average (i( 
applicable) during the next semester in order to 
regain good academic standing. A student will be 
dismissed at the end o( the second consecutive, 
or (ourth total, semester o( unacceptable pertorm- 
ance. Courses (or which the mark W is recorded are 
excluded (rom all such computations or credit 
requirements. 

5. A student who has been academically dis- 
missed and who is reinstated, will be academically 
dismissed again i( he does not meet the academic 
standards for any two additional semesters after 
his return. In the computation of his cumulative 
average after return, all credits earned at the 
University of Maryland will be used. 

6. When a student is placed on academic pro- 
bation or is academically dismissed, the action shall 
be entered on the student's official and permanent 
record. 

7. Any course may be repeated, but if a student 
repeats a course in which he has already earned 

a mark of A, B, C, D. P or S, the subsequent attempt 
shall not increase the total hours earned toward 
the degree. Only the higher mark will be used in 
computation of the students cumulative average. 
However, the student's quality points in a given 
semester shall be determined by that semester's 
grades. 

8. Any appeal from the regulations governing 
academic probation or academic dismissal shall 
be directed to the Petition Board, which shall be 
empowered to grant relief in unusual cases, if the 
circumstances warrant such action. 



OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 

Health Center 

The Health Center provides immediate outpatient 
and short-term inpatient medical care for illnesses 
and injuries not requiring hospitalization but pre- 
venting students from attending classes. In addition 
to general medical and psychiatric services, other 
services include allergy treatment, physical therapy 
and rehabilitation, environme/ital health and safety, 
and preventive medicine. Emergency services are 
available to part-time students and all services are 
available to full-time students. Office location: 
Health Center (across from Student Union). Tele- 
phone: 454-3444. 

Athletics 

The University of Maryland Athletic Department 
fields varsity teams in football, soccer, and cross 
country in the fall: basketball, fencing, swimming, 
wrestling, and indoor track during the winter: and 
baseball, golf, tennis, lacrosse, and outdoor track 
in the spring. Freshman schedules also prevail in 
football and basketball. Maryland is a member of the 
Atlantic Coast Conference, which also includes 
Clemson, Duke, North Carolina, North Carolina 
State. Virginia, and Wake Forest. The University 
has won the Carmichael Cup, symbolic of top 
overall athletic performance in the ACC, in all 
except three of the first ten years the trophy has 
been in existence. 

Women's teams in the following six sports repre- 
sent the University of Maryland in intercollegiate 
competition: field hockey, volleyball, swimming, 
basketball, tennis, and lacrosse. The schedules in- 
clude teams from Washington, D.C.. Maryland, 
Virginia, and Pennsylvania; the teams also compete 
in appropriate local, state and regional tournaments. 

OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 
Food Service 

The goal of the University Food Service is to 
provide nutritionally balanced and tastefully pre- 
pared meals, served in an atmosphere that is 
esthetically pleasant and relaxing. Office location: 
Hill Area Dining Hall. Telephone: 454-2901. 

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 
Career Development Center 

The Career Development Center encourages and 
assists all students in contacting prospective em- 
ployers and in determining economic and 
occupational trends for career determination. 

Career cdvisors, programs, services and facilities 
are geared toward broadening students' knowledge 
of graduate school, government, education, busi- 
ness, and industrial opportunities. An excellent 
resource is the Career Library (Room 26 of the 
Career Development Center). 



General Information / 25 



Seniors within two semesters of graduation are 
encouraged to participate in the on-Campus inter- 
view program with employers from late October to 
early April. Further details on this program are 
available in the Career Development Center. 

All seniors graduating in the College of Education 
(except Education for Industry majors) are required 
to file credentials with the Career Development 
Center. Office location: Cumberland Hall basement. 
Telephone: 454-2813. 
Minority Student Education 
The Office of Ivlinority Student Education was offi- 
cially created on July 1, 1972 as a result of proposals 
and recommendations submitted to the Chancellor 
from the Campus Black Community and the Study 
Commission on Student Life. It is responsible for 
addressing the needs of minority students during 
their experience at the University of f^aryland. 
This responsibility takes the Office of r\/linority 
Student Education through a broad range of 
concerns, from the introduction of minority students 
to the University to special supportive programs, 
with special emphasis on the areas o\ recruitment, 
retention and graduation. 

OlvlSE seeks to develop a comprehensive 
academic articulation program that will facilitate 
better utilization of, and linkages with existing 
University resources. This includes providing 
minority students with meaningful career advise- 
ment in areas that offer both good job opportuni- 
ties and good salaries. For general program informa- 
tion, contact: Director, Office of l^inority Student 
Education, Room 3151 Undergraduate Library, 
Phone: 454-5385/5495. 

The Office is directly responsible for the admin- 
istration of the Intensive Educational Development 
Program and Upward Bound, the Cultural Study 
Center, the Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program, 
and the Nyumburu Community Cultural Center. 
The following is a brief description of the pro- 
grams administered by the Office of l^mority Student 
Affairs. 

Intensive Educational Development 
The I.E.D. program developed from a 1968 pilot 
project for twenty students and has expanded into a 
broad-based support program enrolling over 400 
students each year. 

The program is designed to serve the student who 
is handicapped by poverty, environment problems, 
racism, and previously unrewarding educational 
experiences. I.E.D. focuses on providing programs 
and services — including tutoring, reading, study 
skills development, and specially designed curricula 
and courses that enhance the retention potential 
for minority students on the College Park Campus. 
During the summer program, I.E.D. students who 
will enter school in the fall take courses in mathe- 



matics and English as part of their preparation for 
the fall semester. 

Counseling and tutorial assistance is also avail- 
able throughout the academic year to minority 
students who are not enrolled in the program. 
Intensive Educational Development, Room 217, 
North Administration Building, Phone 454-4646/4647. 

Upward Bound Program 

The University of l^aryland Upward Bound Program 
is designed to provide academic and counseling 
assistance to capable but underachieving high 
school students with the purpose of preparing them 
to pursue some form of post-secondary education. 
Upward Bound seeks to provide the opportunity 
for each student to learn skills that will widen 
his educational and cultural perspectives and to 
discover his potential to achieve. 

Upward Bound students are selected from high 
schools in Prince George's and (Montgomery 
counties, and are recommended to the program 
through high school principals, teachers, counselors, 
talent search, social service agencies, and individ- 
uals knowledgeable about the program. The 
academic skills development and counseling 
services are available to students throughout the 
school year and during the six-week summer pro- 
gram. 

Persons interested in further information regard- 
ing Upward Bound Program should contact Director, 
Room 200, West Education Annex, University of 
IVIaryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, Phone: 
454-2116. 

Cultural Study Center 

The purpose of the Cultural Study Center is to 
study minority and other student-cultural subgroups 
at the University of l\/laryland. The Center is headed 
by a minority faculty member, and its research 
areas include the socioeconomic and psychological 
development and background of minority students, 
their Campus experiences, academic and social 
adjustments, and problems of student life. This 
information assists the Office of ivlinority Student 
Education in planning curriculum and program de- 
velopment for the minority student population. 
The Cultural Study Center seeks to produce 
positive change by distribution of its research find- 
ings to the administration, faculty, students and 
other groups. The Cultural Study Center hopes to 
produce "data that make a difference" in how 
students from various cultural groups are viewed, 
and will take the responsibility of following up its 
research findings by pointing out and encouraging 
appropriate action to initiate positive changes when- 
ever the findings clearly indicate that such changes 
could and should be made. 



The Cultural Center is located in Shoemaker 
Hall, Room 17, University of (Maryland, College Park, 
(Maryland 20742. Office number: 454-4698. 

Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program 

The Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program is the 
minority recruitment unit within the Office of 
ivlinority Student Education. Through E.O.R.P. the 
University seeks to achieve a more representative 
minority student population among black, 
Spanish-speaking, American Indians, and Asian 
Americans. 

Minority students interested in applying to the 
University of Maryland should request information 
and application materials from this Office. 
For more information contact: 

Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program 
Room 0107, North Administration BIdg. 
Phone — 454-4844 

Nyumburu Community Center 

Nyumburu (Swahili word meaning "freedom house") 
Center functions throughout the year to present a 
wide range of cultural events through a variety 
of art forms, and the humanities. Programs and 
activities presented by Nyumburu focus on the 
black experience as it exists in the United States, 
the Caribbean and and Africa. 

Cultural offerings at Nyumburu include 
symposia and workshops conducted by visiting 
artists and scholars in the areas of creative writing 
and literature, art, music, drama and dance. A 
Festival of Black Arts, and a Writer's Conference, 
held annually, highlight specific areas of cul- 
tural achievement and contribution by minority 
peoples. 

In cooperation with the Department of Afro- 
American Studies. Nyumburu is engaged in 
research projects, such as examining the sources 
of black creativity and historical contributions, and 
the artist's conception of his role in the life of the 
community. 

In addition to these activities, Nyumburu Center 
serves as the host/sponsor of several student clubs 
and activities. 

For information concerning scheduled activities 
and events contact Nyumburu Community Center, 
Building CC, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland 20742, Phone: 454-5648. 

Student Aid 

The Office of Student Aid administers a variety of 
financial assistance and student employment oppor- 
tunities, primarily based on the need of the applicant. 
The staff of the office is available for individual 



26 / General Information 



counseling on mallors porlinoni lo the (inancJal 
planning o( the student body 

Internalional Education Services 

The Ollico ot Inlernational Education Services pro- 
vides a wide variety of services designed to assist 
foreign students lo make the necessary adjustment 
to American university and community lile and to 
help them derive the maximum benefit from their 
experience in the United States. Services include ad- 
vising on admission to the University, issuance of 
immigration documents, special orientation pro- 
grams, emergency loans, assistance with securing 
housing, information about educational, cultural, 
and social opportunities, and personal advising. 
Some of these services are available also for visiting 
foreign faculty. For American students, the Office 
provides information about opportunities for travel 
and study abroad. 

Information, forms and assistance in making 
necessary arrangements for complying with im- 
migration regulations are available at the Office of 
International Education Services. Information re- 
garding the filing of income tax returns may 
also be secured from the same office. 

Foreign students are subject to the same regula- 
tions that govern the academic lite and personal 
conduct of American students enrolled in the 
University. Office location: 2nd floor. North Admin- 
istration Building. Telephone: 454-2936, 

Student Affairs 

OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Division of Student Affairs is responsible for 
programs and services which enhance the life 
and welfare of students. 

Commuter Affairs, Resident Life. Orientation. 
Greek Affairs. Counseling Center, Judiciary Office, 
Student Activities, and the Student Union are 
organized to facilitate individual student develop- 
ment by meeting specific student needs. In addition, 
the offices within Student Affairs are striving to 
develop a Campus environment which fosters 
positive learning experiences and individual growth. 

Orientation 

Upon final admission to the University the new 
student will receive materials about the Orientation 
and Registration Program. All entering students 
are encouraged to attend. The primary goals of 
the program are to inform the student about the 
University, and to help him register for the first 
semester. Through this program the entering student 
receives a personalized and individual introduction 
to the University. 

Parents also have an opportunity to learn about 
University life through the Parent Orientation 
Program. 



Resident Life 

This office administers, supervises, and coordinates 
all aspects of the University residence facilities, 
including both management operation and 
educational-social-recreational programming. The 
residence accommodations are divided into semi- 
autonomous residential communities, each headed 
by a (ull-time professional director with a staff of 
full and part-time professional and para-profes- 
sional personnel. 

Each community enjoys considerable freedom to 
develop in a way which reflects the personalities, 
interests and needs of the residents. 

Office location: 3rd floor, North Administration 
Building. Telephone: 454-2711, 

Greek Affairs Office 

This office serves as the liaison between fularyland's 
twenty-one national sororities and twenty-four 
national fraternities, and the University administra- 
tion. The Director of Greek Life assists in the 
development of programs and operations for the 
Panhellenic and Intertraternity Councils. Through 
the utilization of total University resources, the 
staff assists the students with leadership and man- 
agement training, the coordination of philanthropic 
projects, membership recruitment, public relations, 
and the participation of the Greek system within 
the total education of the University community. 

The Commuter Affairs Office 

TtTe Commuter Affairs Office has been established 
to assist, advocate, and assess commuter 
students' desires, needs and problems while attend- 
ing the University of l^aryland. 

The office has established services which pro- 
vide assistance in helping the commuter become 
more a part of the University community. 

Off-Campus Housing — aids the student, faculty 
or staff who is seeking off-campus housing, with 
listings, information, free phone service and 
counsel on landlord-tenant problems. 

Car pools — a car pool program has been estab- 
lished as a low cost alternative to each student 
driving his own car. The students can sign up 
for the program at the beginning of each semester. 
If the car pool has three or more participants the 
students are eligible for preferred parking spaces. 
The car pool can help to provide financial gains 
for the communter and also provides the oppor- 
tunity for social contact with other commuters. 

University Commuters Association — The Commuter 
Affairs Office serves as the advisor to the 
University Commuters Association which occupies 
a unique position in the structure of the University 
as the official undergraduate student organization 
which represents the commuters' interests. UCA 
has the responsibility of providing social, athletic, 
and experimental programs for the commuters. 



Peer Commuter Countelors — This is a program to 
help new commuter students work through the 
problems and alienation often inherent in commut- 
ing. Upper class student volunteers have t>een 
trained as trouble shooters and helpers (or the 
commuting student. Peer counselors are always 
present to assist other students with any concern. 
StiuMIe Bus — The evening Campus Shuttle Bus 
system is operated by the Office of Commuter 
Affairs (or the security and convenience of all 
students. The service operates between 5 p.m. and 
1 a.m. seven days a week except holiday and 
vacation periods. The Office of Commuter Affairs 
is located in Room 121 1-H, in the Student Union. 
For further information call extension 5274 or 5275. 

Student Development 

The Office of Student Development provides a 
wide variety of educational experiences o( interest 
to students. These include: small group seminars 
on topics such as sex, drugs, racism, women's 
roles in society and human relations, principles 
and techniques o( organizational leadership, con- 
sulting help to student organizations including the 
Commuter Association, Student Government 
Association, Black Student Union, Greeks, Free 
University and a broad range of political, social, 
academic and religious associations. Office 
location: Student Union, Room 1211. Telephone: 
454-2827. 

Counseling Center 

Psychologists provide protessional counseling 
services for students with educational-vocational 
and emotional-social adjustment problems. Educa- 
tional specialists provide individual and group work 
for improving reading and study skills. No appoint- 
ment is needed for initial conferences. 

Available in the reception lobby are occupational 
and educational intormation, plus tape recorded 
conversations with academic department chairmen 
about their disciplines. 

National testing programs (CLEP, GRE, Miller 
Analogies, etc.) are administered by the Counseling 
Center as well as testing for counseling purposes. 
Office location: Shoemaker Building. Telephone: 
454-2931. 

Entertainment and Cultural Activities 
An extensive schedule of entertainment is available 
throughout the year on Campus. Concerts, dances, 
drama, and speakers representing all tastes and 
points of view are arranged for the enjoyment of 
the Campus community, f^any o( these are (unded 
by the Student Government Association and are (ree 
to University students. For some there is a minimal 
charge. The Otfice o( Entertainment and Cultural 
Activities is the coordinating oftice (or these 
occasions. 



General intormation / 27 



Religious Programs 

A broad range of religious traditions is represented 
by the several chaplains and religious advisors at 
the University. Individually and cooperatively, they 
offer many services including counseling, worship, 
study opportunities here and abroad, personal 
growfth groups, and opportunities for service and 
involvement. Office location: University IVIemorial 
Chapel. Telephone: 454-2925. 
Student Union Services and Facilities 
The Union is open daily: 

IVIonday-Thursday — 7 a.m.-IVIidnight 
Friday —7 a.m. -2 a.m. 

Saturday — 8 a.m.-2 a.m. 

Sunday — 12 noon-IVIidnight 

Services include: 
Bookstore 
Bulletin Boards 
Check Cashing 
Display Showcases 

Financial banking facilities provided by a 
branch of a local bank 
Food Service 
Snack Bar 
Cafeteria 
Dining Room 
Pizza Shop 
Vending Room 
Coffee House Lounge 
Pub 

Banquets and Catering 
Information Center 
Lounges 
Ivleeting Rooms 

Size from 8-1000 people 
Movies (Movie Theater) 
Notary Public(s) 
Recreation Center 
Bowling Lanes 
Billiards Room 
Table Games Rooms 
Pin Ball Machines 
Sign Shop 

Signs — plastic, letterpress, embossograf 
Duplicating — ditto, mimeograph, offset 
Copy Machine 
Student Offices 
TV Room 
Ticket Office 

Campus Concerts 
Selected off-Campus events 
Youth Fare Cards 
Tobacco Shop 
U.S. Postal Service Automated Facility 



Directory 

Information and Reservations 454-2801 

Administrative Offices 454-2807 

Food Service 454-2805 

Ticket Office 454-2803 

Bowling and Billiards 454-2804 

UMporium (bookstore) 454-3222 

Judiciary Office 

The Campus Judiciary Office effects discipline of 
the undergraduate students. Under the framework 
of a judiciary program, which emphasizes personal 
growth and development, the aims of judicial 
actions are largely educative and preventive. 
Judiciary Office staff members review all reports of 
alleged misconduct, contact those individuals in- 
volved and in most instances schedule the case 
for hearing. Office location: 2nd floor, North 
Administration Building. Telephone: 454-2927. 

General Regulations 

(The following provisions and procedures are 
subject to change. The University reserves the 
right to make modifications following reasonable 
notice to the University community. For the most 
current revisions, consult the Judiciary Office 
staff.) 

General Policy 

By reason of its responsibility to promote its edu- 
cational purposes, the University of Maryland has 
the inherent right to preserve order and maintain 
stability through the setting of standards of conduct 
and the prescribing of procedures for the enforce- 
ment of such standards. The University of 
Maryland embraces the tenet that the exercise of 
individual rights must be accompanied by an 
equal amount of individual responsibility. By ac- 
cepting membership in the University community, 
a student acquires rights in, as well as responsibili- 
ties to, the whole University community. 

University students are recognized as being 
both citizens in the larger community and members 
of an academic community. In his role as citizen, 
the student is free to exercise his fundamental 
constitutional rights. Rights and responsibilities 
under local, state and national laws are neither 
abridged nor extended by status as a student at 
the University of Maryland. However, as a member 
of an academic community, he is expected 
particularly to fulfill those behavioral responsibili- 
ties which attend his membership and which are 
necessitated by the University's pursuit of its stated 
objectives. Within this context, the appropriate- 
ness and acceptability of student behavior will 
be evaluated by its relation to the recognized edu- 
cational purposes of the Institution. 



Broadly stated, the missions of the University of 
Maryland are to extend the boundaries of 
knowledge, to provide educational opportunities 
to those who seek and need them, and to Instruct 
the community, state, and nation in the uses to 
which knowledge and education may be put. The 
pursuit of these objectives can be carried on only 
in an atmosphere of personal and academic 
freedom, one in which the rights and responsibilities 
of all members of the academic community are 
fully protected. The maintenance and/or restoration 
of such an atmosphere is the basis for a disciplinary 
structure within the University. 

Official University sanctions will be imposed or 
other appropriate action taken only when a student's 
observable behavior distinctly and significantly in- 
terferes with the University's (1) primary educational 
objectives and/or (2) subsidiary responsibilities of 
protecting the safety, welfare, rights, and property 
of all members of the University community, persons 
coming onto University property and of the Uni- 
versity itself. 

Students charged with a violation of University 
regulations or policies are guaranteed fundamental 
fairness in the handling of the charges, the conduct 
of hearings, the imposition of sanctions, and the 
right of appeal. 

Tfie University Judiciary Program 

It is assumed that discipline is properly the concern 
of the entire University community — the student 
body, the faculty, the staff, and the administration. 
Particular provision is made in the Judiciary pro- 
gram for students to adjudicate cases of student 
misconduct. 

Administration of discipline of the University of 
Maryland is the primary responsibility of the 
Judiciary Office. Its staff attempts to provide lead- 
ership for the overall program by advising and 
directing the efforts of students, faculty and ad- 
ministration in disciplinary concerns. Specifically, 
their main functions are (1) processing reports and 
correspondence which deal with disciplinary mat- 
ters. (2) interviewing and counseling and coordi- 
nating the activities of the various student judicial 
boards, (4) reviewing and/or approving the 
recommendations of these boards, and (5) main- 
taining a central file of student disciplinary records. 
In addition, the Judiciary Office lends assistance 
to and promotes intercommunication among other 
individuals and University offices concerned with 
student misconduct. 

The functionally substantive segment of the pro- 
gram contains the various student judicial boards. 
At each level they serve to encourage adherence 
to University policies and regulations, to adjudicate 
cases of student misconduct, and to provide for the 
offender opportunity to benefit from peer group 
judgment. Members of the boards are chosen from 



28 / General Information 



among (he most academically capable and per- 
sonally responsible students at the University. 
There are approximately 75 students participating 
on the lollowing student boards: Area Judicial 
Boards, one in each ol the six maior residential 
areas: Student Trafdc Board and Traldc Appeals 
Board: Campus Judicial Board: and Central Student 
Judicial Board Matters that have come before 
these boards range Irom parking tickets to major 
University disruptions 

General Statement 
Student Responsibility 

Students are expected to conduct themselves at all 
times in a manner consistent with the University's 
responsibility of ensuring to all members of the 
University community the opportunity to pursue 
their educational objectives, and of protecting the 
safety, welfare, rights, and property of all members 
ol the University itself. 

Suspension of a Student from Class 

Discipline m the classroom is the responsibility of 
the faculty member in charge of the class. Mis- 
behavior of a type that interferes with the educa- 
tional efficiency of a class will be considered 
sufficient cause for suspending a student from the 
class. II a student is suspended from class for 
disciplinary reasons, he should report immediately 
to the department chairman. The department chair- 
man will investigate the incident and will report it 
to the academic dean or division chairman and 
to the Judiciary Office, in order to determine 
whether or not past disciplinary action has been 
taken against the student. The department head 
will then write a letter to the student indicating the 
disposition of the case. The student will be required 
to present this letter to his instructor before he 
can be readmitted to class. A copy of this letter 
will be sent to the Judiciary Office. 

Disruption of a class by a student not enrolled in 
that class can be referred to the Judiciary Office. 
Disruption by a non-student can be referred to the 
Campus police. 

Suspension of a Student from Activities 
or University Facilities 

The individual or group of individuals in charge of 
any department, division, organization, building, 
facility or any other unit of the University, (e.g.. Din- 
ing Hall, Student Union, etc.) shall be responsible 
for student discipline within such units. The person 
responsible for each unit may suspend the student 
or student organization from the unit. The 
suspended student or representative of the student 
organization will be referred immediately to the 
Judiciary Office. The Judiciary Office will investi- 
gate the incident and notify the student of further 



disposition of the case. The individual responsible 
for the suspension will be notified before the 
student or his organization can be readmitted. A 
file of such actions shall be kept in the Judiciary 
Office 

Identification Cards 

Official University ol Maryland student identification 
cards and transaction plates are issued to all reg- 
istered undergraduate and graduate students. The 
identification card and the transaction plate are 
for use only by the student to whom issued and 
may not be transferred or loaned to another in- 
dividual for any reason. Violators will be referred 
to the Judiciary Office. Loss of either the I.D. card 
or the transaction plate, or both, should be reported 
at once to the ID. card section. Office of Admissions 
and Records. A replacement fee of $3.00 for each 
Item IS required prior to the creation of authorized 
duplicates. 

General University Regulations Which 
Apply to all Students 

The lollowing behavior may result in referral to the 
Judiciary Office for appropriate action. Typically, 
disciplinary sanctions will be imposed not only for 
individual misconduct which demonstrates a disre- 
gard for institutional behavioral standards, but also 
for conduct which indicates disregard for the 
rights and welfare of others as members of an 
academic community. Such conduct may ultimately 
call into question the student's membership in the 
University community, either because he has vio- 
lated elementary standards of behavior necessary 
for the maintenance of an educational milieu or 
because his continued presence at the University 
adversely affect the ability of others to pursue 
their educational goals. 

Violation of Fire Regulations. This includes failure 
to comply with evacuation procedures, tampering 
with fire-protection apparatus, use or possession 
of fireworks or firearms, or use of open-flame 
devices or combustible materials which endangers 
the safety or well-being of the University community: 
or unauthorized use of electrical equipment. 
Behavior Which Jeopardizes the Safety or Well- 
Being of Other Members of the University Com- 
munity or Persons Coming onto University Property. 
This includes, but is not limited to, physical 
harassment of, or interference with firemen, 
policemen or other persons engaged in the per- 
formance of their official duties: physical abuse 
or threatening physical abuse of any person on 
University property; forcible detention of any 
person on University property. 

Unauthorized Possession, Use, or Distribution of 
Alcoholic Beverages on or in University Property. 
University policy, consistent with State and County 



laws, restricts on-Campu« use of alcoholic t>evar- 
ages in specified areas. 

Pottession, U»e, Sale or Ditlribution on or in 
Unlverdty Property of Illegal Drug* or ol Drugs for 
Which the Required Pretcriptlon Hat Not Been 
Obtained. This includes possession, uso. distribu- 
tion, sale, manufacture or processing of illegal or 
unprescribed narcotics, drugs, and/or hallucino- 
genic substances. 

Destruction, Theft, Attempted Theft, or Impairment 
of Personal or University Property. This includes 
both intentional and negligent acts. Disciplinary 
action may include a requirement of restitution. 
Unauthorized Possession or Use of University 
Keys. Keys to rooms or buildings on the University 
Campus may be obtained only through official 
channels and may not be duplicated for any purpose. 

Unauthorized Entry into or Presence in a Uni- 
versity Building or Facility. Except for properly 
scheduled use, classroom, administration and rec- 
reation buildings are closed to general student use 
on holidays. Saturday afternoon. Sundays and 
after 12 midnight during the week. Students may 
use a building or facility for a specified purpose 
upon written permission from a member of the 
faculty with approval of the academic or administra- 
tive officer normally having control over such 
building or facility, which permission may l>e re- 
voked or withdrawn. 

Falsification, Forgery, or Modification of any 
Official University Record. This includes, but is not 
limited to. identification and transaction cards, 
absence excuses, parking stickers, transcripts, 
examinations, grade cards, admission applica- 
tions, etc. 

Plagiarism, Cheating and Other Academic Irregu- 
larities. A student who violates accepted academic 
procedure may be referred to the dean of his college 
or chairman of his division or to an Ad Hoc Com- 
mittee on Academic Dishonesty. (See irregularities 
in Examinations for specifics) 

Failure to Meet Financial Obligations to the 
University. This includes failure to pay delinquent 
accounts and use of worthless checks or money 
orders in payment to the University for tuition, 
board, fees, library fines, traffic penalties, etc. 

Obstruction of, Disruption of, or Interference 
With Any University Activity of an Academic Nature; 
Actions on the Part of Students Which Sub- 
stantially Obstruct, Disrupt, or Interfere with 
Non-Academic Activities on University Premises 
by Members or Authorized Non-Members of the 
University Community. 

Violations ol University Resident Life Regulations. 

While incidents involving violations of Housing 
regulations may be referred to the Judiciary 



General Information / 29 



Office, other administrative action, having the 
same effect as disciplinary action, is possible 
under the terms of the Housing Contract. 

Violations of University Campus Traffic Rules 
and Regulations. 

Enforcement Procedures 

It is the general expectation that individuals and 
groups will abide by the behavioral guidelines 
established by this policy statement. Compliance 
with these minimal standards for responsible con- 
duct is a necessary condition for maintaining an 
educational environment. 

Reports of alleged student misconduct may be 
submitted to the Judiciary Office in writing by any 
member of the University community. Reports of 
alleged academic dishonesty shall be submitted 
to the pertinent academic department. 

Action taken will follow procedures establishes.! 
by the University. 

Should violations continue beyond the enforce- 
ment capabilities of the University staff, such 
outside assistance as is necessary will be requested. 

Proceedings Before Hearings 

Matters referred to the Judiciary Office shall be 
investigated as appropriate. It is the responsibility 
of this office to interpret the alleged misconduct 
in terms of the published regulations of the Uni- 
versity and to identify those specific charges that 
will be brought against the student{s) involved. 
Disciplinary proceedings will be instituted only for 
behavior alleged to have been a violation of a 
University regulation. This office is responsible for 
instituting the proper proceedings. In all such 
instances, the welfare and development of the in- 
dividual student and the interests of the University 
are the primary concerns. 

After reviewing the report of misconduct, specify- 
ing the applicable charges, and obtaining any 
additional information deemed desirable, the 
Judiciary Office may make disposition of the case 
in one of the following ways: 

1. Discuss the case with the student(s) in- 
volved and advisor, if any; inform the accused stu- 
dent(s) of the nature and source of the charges; 
outline the hearing procedures and possible 
consequences. In cases in which the student admits 
involvement (guilt) and in which he expressly 
requests an administrative hearing, the Judiciary 
Office may impose the appropriate disciplinary 
sanction(s). 

2. Defer disciplinary action pending review by 
psychological or medical authorities. 

3. Refer the report of alleged misconduct, a 
statement of specific charges, and all other relevant 
information/material to the appropriate student 
judicial body. 



Disciplinary Actions 

Following are those sanctions which may be im- 
posed on a student as a result of an administrative 
or judicial board hearing; 

Disciplinary Reprimand. A disciplinary reprimand is 
written notification from a University official to a 
student containing a warning that repeated infrac- 
tions of regulations may result in more severe 
disciplinary action. A record of the letter will be 
filed in the Judiciary Office. The student's parents 
may be notified. 

Conduct Probation. This action involves a period 
of time, not to exceed one year, in which a student 
is expected to show a positive change in behavior. 
In addition, conditions and restrictions as deemed 
appropriate may be imposed, including revocation 
of specific privileges and recommendations for 
counseling interviews with the Judiciary Office. 
The student's parents may be notified. A violation 
of conduct probation may be the basis for more 
severe disciplinary action. 

Dismissal From University Housing. In the case of 
a serious violation of house rules, residence 
hall probation, or housing regulations, a student 
may be dismissed from University housing for a 
specified period of time. Such dismissal results 
in a percentage room and board refund, according 
to the regular University refund policy. (This 
sanction is distinct from the administrative pro- 
visions for contract termination contained in the 
Resident Life contract.) 

Disciplinary Probation. This action involves a 
period of time not to exceed one year during which 
a student who has been involved in a disciplinary 
situation (or repeated violations) is given an op- 
portunity to prove that he can become a responsible 
and effective member of the University community. 

Unless waived by the judicial board or admin- 
istrative officer, the following conditions are im- 
posed on the student during disciplinary probation: 

1. A student may not represent the University 

in any extracurricular activity, such as intercollegiate 
athletics, debate teams. University Theatre, or 
band; however, he may participate in informal 
activities of a recreational nature sponsored by 
the University. 

2. A student may not run for or hold office in the 
Student Government Association or the Graduate 
Student Federation or in any organization that 

is recognized by the University. 

Any additional conditions or restrictions as 
deemed appropriate may be imposed on the student 
on disciplinary probation. 

If a student is found guilty of any infraction of 
University regulations or policies while on 
disciplinary probation or violation of the conditions 
and restrictions of the disciplinary probation, the 
student will be subject to further disciplinary 



action, including suspension or expulsion from the 
University. 

When a student is placed on disciplinary proba- 
tion the Judiciary Office will notify the appropriate 
University authorities of the disciplinary action 
and may notify the student's parents. 

At the end of the probationary period, the stu- 
dent's case will be reviewed by the Judiciary Office. 
If all conditions of the disciplinary action have 
been met satisfactorily, the student will be consid- 
ered to be in good standing with respect to conduct. 

Suspension from the University. A student's 
suspension from the University shall be for an in- 
definite period of time. However, the judicial board 
recommending this action must specify the date 
at which he subsequently may apply to the Judiciary 
Office for readmission, and in no case will this 
date be later than one year after the effective 
date of the suspension. The academic record of 
the student will not in any way affect this application 
for readmission after the suspension for disciplinary 
reasons. All recommendations for suspension from 
appropriate judicial bodies must be approved by 
the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. Parents 
are notified in all cases. Notation of this action 
is made on the student's official transcript. 

During the period of suspension, the student is 
excluded from classes and from all other rights and 
privileges which are accorded to students in 
good standing. The student may not participate in 
any University-sponsored activity, or the activities of 
any recognized University organization. During 
the period of suspension, the student is not per- 
mitted on University property without express written 
permission from the Director of Security. If a 
suspended student violates these provisions or 
violates a University regulation or policy while on 
University property or in relation to a University 
activity, as determined after the opportunity for a 
hearing, he shall be subject to further disciplinary 
action in the form of explusion. 

a. Suspended Suspension by Vice Chancellor 
for Students Affairs. 

Suspension is withheld pending careful evalua- 
tion of a student's behavior during a probationary 
period not to exceed one year. If the student is 
involved in any further offense, this suspension 
of disciplinary action may be summarily revoked 
by the Vice Chancellor and the original decision 
of suspension from the University enforced. 

b. Deferred Suspension by Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs. 

This IS a suspension which becomes effective 
after a specific future date. It is normally used 
near the end of a semester to avoid financial 
penalty that would be entailed by an immediate 
suspension. Probationary status will exist during 
this period identical to suspended suspension 
above. 



30 / General Information 



Expulsion from lh« University. This Is the most 
sonous penally and results rn a complete separa- 
tion ol the relations l>etweon the University and 
the student. Parents are informed and permanent 
notification appears on the student's official 
transcript Expulsion must be approved by the 
Chancollor. 

Appeals 

Any disciplinary action may be appealed to the 
next higher judicial body. In all cases, the request 
tor appeal must be submitted in writing to the 
Judiciary Office within 10 calendar days from the 
date of the letter notifying the student of the 
decision. If the tenth day falls on a weekend or 
holiday, the time is extended to the next regular 
work day. 

If no appeal Is taken within 10 calendar days 
alter notice of the decision, the decision shall be 
final and conclusive. 

A written brief stating contentions concerning 
the case may tie presented by the appellate at 
the time of filing the appeal. The appellate body 
will review the request for appeal and written briefs 
or other supporting documentation to determine 
if it presents a substantial question within the scope 
of review. The scope of review shall be limited to 
consideration of the following questions: (1) whether 
the adjudicatory process of the Initial hearing was 
conducted fairly and In conformity with properly 
prescribed procedures; (2) whether there Is new 
evidence or relevant facts not brought out in the 
original hearing because it was not known to the 
party at that time: (3) whether the adjudication 
was supported by substantial evidence: (4) whether 
the regulations Involved were properly acquired 
in the particular case: (5) whether the sanction 
imposed was in due proportion to the gravity of 
the conduct. All appeals (except those from area 
judicial boards) shall be taken upon the record made 
before the original panel. The appellate body may 
only allirm, modify or remand the original decision. 
Pending the outcome of the appeal hearing, the 
disciplinary sanctions stipulated in the original 
decision shall not be imposed. 

Part III 

Disciplinary Rules and Procedures 

(Adopted by the Board of Regents March 19, 1971. 
These rules and procedures are those used In 
extraordinary or emergency situations as deter- 
mined by the chancellor.) 

A. General 

The following rules and procedures are hereby de- 
clared to be In addition to and supplementary of 
any and all rules and regulations which are now or 
hereafter may be applicable to any campus under the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Regents of the Uni- 



versity (the Regents). The lunsdictlon conferred in 
the plans tor the Undergraduate Judicial System 
and the Graduate Judicial System adopted in 1969, 
as from lime to time amended, is hereby preserved, 
provided, however, that when the procedures speci- 
fied in this Part III shall have been iniliated, in 
accordance with the terms hereof, this Part III shall 
control, and all such jurisdiction shall be transferred 
to and shall be governed by the procedural and 
substantive context of this Part III. Any prior action 
ol the Board which might be construed to be in- 
consistent with the delegation of power hereby 
made is rescinded to the extent of such Inconsist- 
ency. 

8. Procedure 

1 This Part III shall apply to all cases where, in 
the judgment of the president or his delegate, the 
chancellor, a student has violated any one or more 
of the rules established by Section C hereof, and 
where the president or his delegate, the chancellor, 
has followed the requirements ol this Section B. If 
a determination has been made as provided in 
this Paragraph 1, and notice has been served in 
accordance with Paragraph 3 hereof, then, and in 
such event, the provisions of this Part III shall 
control the case to the exclusion of any other gen- 
eral and academic regulations applicable to any 
campus of the University. 
2. If the president, or the chancellor, has con- 
cluded, upon prima lacie evidence, that a student 
has violated one or more of the rules established by 
Section C hereof, then the president or the 
chancellor may serve such student with notice that 
he may be subject to disciplinary action Including 
suspension or expulsion and that a hearing will be 
held to determine the matter, such notice to be in 
the form and containing the Information required 
by Paragraph 3 hereof. The chancellor, or, in his 
absence, his designee, may temporarily suspend a 
student for an Interim period pending a disciplinary 
hearing, such temporary suspension to become 
Immediately effective without prior notice, when- 
ever In his judgement there Is evidence of severe 
misconduct Indicating that the continued presence 
of the student on the University campus poses a 
threat to University property, to members of 
the University community, to himself, or to the 
stability and continuance of normal University 
functions. A student suspended on an Interim basis 
shall be given the opportunity to promptly appear 
personally before the chancellor or in his absence 
his designee and to have a hearing on the following 
Issues only: 

(a) the reliability of the information on the stu- 
dents misconduct, including the matter of his 
Identity; 

(b) whether the misconduct and surrounding cir- 
cumstances reasonably indicate that the removal of 



the student from the University campus is required 
to safeguard himself, members of the University 
community. University property, or the continuance 
of normal University functions. 

This Part III shall become applicable only upon 
the condition that the president, or his delegate, the 
chancellor, has invoked the procedures contained 
in this Part III within ten (10) days after the receipt 
by the president or his delegate, the chancellor, 
of the prima facie evidence required by this para- 
graph. Unless or until the student has been served 
with notice in accordance with this Part III, the 
discipline of any student shall be controlled by 
plans for the Undergraduate Judicial System and 
Graduate Judicial System adopted in 1969, as from 
time to time amended, or by any other system which 
has been established m accordance with legally 
approved standards that may have l>een or may be 
adopted for any campus ol the University. 
3. The procedures and substance of this Part III 
shall be initiated only upon written notice being 
served on the student personally or sent to the 
student involved at his address appearing on the 
records of the University, by certified mail, advising 
him of the following (personal service or the receipt 
by the University of a return receipt of mailing 
being hereby defined as "service with notice."): 

(a) a specific description of the misconduct with 
which he is charged and a list of those rules in 
Section C hereof which he has allegedly violated 

by such misconduct, together with a copy of any 
written complaint relating to the case; 

(b) that he shall be provided a hearing as pro- 
vided in this Part III not less than lour (4) nor more 
than fourteen (14) calendar days after the effective 
date of service of notice, such hearing to be held 
even If he chooses not to appear, and such notice 
shall specify a date, time and place for the hearing; 

(c) that the hearing will be open to the public 
and press unless he requests that it be closed and 
Its proceedings and decisions considered con- 
fidential; 

(d) that he shall be permitted to inspect at the 
office of the chancellor or In some other designated 
office on Campus In advance of the hearing any 
affidavits, exhibits, or written evidence which the 
University intends to submit at the hearing; 

(e) that he may be accompanied and represented 
at the hearing by an advisor of his choice, who 
may be an attorney; 

(f) that he shall be permitted to hear the evi- 
dence presented against him and that he shall be 
permitted to question at the hearing any witness 
who gives evidence against him; 

(g) that he shall have the opportunity to present 
his version at the hearing by way of affidavits, 
exhibits, and witnesses: 

(h) that he has been temporarily suspended 
from the University, if that be the case; and 



General Information / 31 



(i) if relevant, notice of the possible denial of 
financial aid pursuant to Section 497 of the 
Education Amendments of 1972 (P.L. 90-575). 

4, A. All Part III cases shall be heard, in the first 
instance, by a University Judicial Board (the 
Board). 

B. An accused student or the person presenting 
the case for the University may request of the chan- 
cellor the disqualification of any member of the 
Board selected to serve thereon for the hearing by 
submitting a letter to the chancellor showing that 
such member is related or has had a business 

or close personal association with the accused 
student, with the complaintant, or with any person 
who has been substantially and adversely affected 
by the student's alleged conduct. The chancellor 
may conduct such investigation of the ground 
for disqualification as he sees fit. The previous 
participation as a Board member in a hearing 
involving the accused student shall not be grounds 
for disqualification. The decision of the chancellor 
as to whether or not there are sufficient grounds 
for disqualification is final. If an accused student 
chooses to invoke the rights conferred by this sub- 
paragraph, his hearing before the Board shall be 
postponed for such period of time (not to exceed 
seven [7] calendar days) which will enable the 
chancellor to determine whether the disqualification 
of any member of the Board is warranted. 

C. The Board shall be appointed for each of the 
i;ampuses of the University by the president or by 
his delegate, the chancellor. The Board shall be 
composed of either five (5) or seven (7) members, 
at the discretion of the appointing authority. One 
of the members of the Board shall be a member 

of the administration of the University. The remain- 
mg members of the Board shall be equally divided 
between students and members of the University 
faculty. Both undergraduates and graduate students 
shall be represented on the Board at all times. 
The student members of the Board shall be chosen 
(if undergraduates) by lot from the members of 
all existing judicial boards and (if graduate students) 
by lot from a panel to be maintained by the student 
members of the Graduate Student Association. 
The faculty members of the Board shall be chosen 
by lot from a panel of not less than thirty (30) to be 
maintained by the senate of the appropriate campus, 
and in the absence of such list by the chancellor. 
The members of the Board shall select the chair- 
man, f^ore than one Board may be established 
from time to time at the discretion of the appoint- 
ing authority. A majority vote of the Board shall 
be sufficient to decide any case that may come 
before it. 

5. The following rules shall apply to any hearing 
conducted by the Board: 



(a) A student shall file with the Board his address 
to which notice of its decision may be mailed, 

and the mailing of such decision to such address 
shall be conclusively presumed to comply with the 
notification required by the first sentence of 
Paragraph 10 hereof. All hearings shall be open 
to the public, but the Board may restrict the number 
of observers to that which the hearing room may 
comfortably accommodate. A student appearing 
before the Board may request that the hearing 
shall be closed to the public, and this request shall 
be honored by the Board. Sequestration of witnesses 
may be ordered. The Board may exclude from 
the hearing any person, other than the student 
charged, whose conduct disrupts, disturbs or de- 
lays the proceedings. Should the student charged 
engage in conduct that impedes the progress of 
the hearing, or makes a fair hearing impossible, 
the Board may pass an order suspending such 
student from the University, and such suspension 
shall thereafter continue until after the hearing, or 
any adjournment thereof, shall have been concluded 
and the appeal therefrom, if any, shall have been 
heard and decided. In addition, the Board may 
adjourn the proceeding, and in such a case the 
suspension of such student (whether made by the 
chancellor in accordance with Paragraph 2 hereof 
or by the Board in accordance with this subpara- 
graph 5(a) shall continue until after the conclusion 
of the adjourned hearing and the time for appeal 
therefrom has expired. 

(b) a pending criminal or civil trial involving the 
accused student will not be considered grounds 
for postponement of the disciplinary hearing, unless 
the date of the judicial trial conflicts with the date 
of the University hearing. 

(c) A student may be represented at a hearing 
before the Board by an advisor, who may be an 
attorney. The Board may be assisted in the conduct 
of the hearing by a legal advisor (either the director 
of the Judiciary Office or some other qualified 
individual). 

(d) The student or his advisor shall have the 
opportunity to question all witnesses, to present 
witnesses m his own behalf, to present any other 
evidence, and to make an opening and closing 
statement. 

(e) The person who shall bring the charges 
under these rules shall be the chancellor or the act- 
ing chancellor. Evidence against a student shall be 
presented by a person designated by the chancellor. 
The person presenting the case for the University, 
the University's attorney, and the Board shall have 
the opportunity to question all witnesses and to 
present witnesses and evidence relating to the 
charge specified in the notice. 

(f) Formal rules of evidence shall not be appli- 
cable to disciplinary hearings, and any evidence 

or testimony which the Board believes to be relevant 



to a fair determination of the charges specified 
in the notice may be admitted. Hearsay evidence or 
documents not verified may be admitted for the 
purpose of explaining or corroborating other 
evidence but shall not be sufficient to support a 
determination of the truth of the charges unless 
such hearsay or documentary evidence would be ad- 
missible in judicial proceedings. 

(g) A student charged under this Part III shall 
be presumed innocent, and the burden of proof 
shall be the responsibility of the University. A stu- 
dent charged under this Part III shall not be required 
to testify before the Board, and his failure or 
refusal to so testify shall not be construed as an 
admission against interest. 

(h) A full and complete record shall be made of 
the proceedings before the Board. A recording or 
other suitable device shall be used. A copy of this 
record shall be supplied to the student. A student 
may arrange to have a court stenographer present 
at his own expense. 

(i) Rulings on evidence and all other matters 
relating to the hearing shall be made by the Board, 
and such ruling shall be binding upon all parties. 

(j) If a student fails to appear for a hearing after 
having been duly served with notice thereof as 
required by Paragraph 3 hereof, the hearing shall 
be adjourned, and in such case the suspension of 
such student (if the student has been suspended) 
shall continue until after the conclusion of the 
adjourned hearing and the appeal therefrom, if any, 
shall have been heard and decided. If the Board 
determines, upon clear and convincing evidence, 
that the accused student has willfully failed to 
appear for the hearing, the Board may order the 
immediate suspension of such student from the 
University. 

(k) If a student leaves the hearing before its 
conclusion without the permission of the Board, 
the hearing shall be adjourned, and in such case 
the suspension of such student (if the student has 
been suspended) shall continue until after the con- 
clusion of the adjourned hearing and the appeal 
therefrom, if any, shall have been heard and 
decided. Withdrawal by a student from the hearing 
shall be grounds for his temporary suspension 
from the University by the Board. 

(I) Students charged with misconduct arising 
from a single incident or occurrence may have 
their hearings joined either at the request of the 
students involved or at the request of the chan- 
cellor. Requests for joint hearings shall be decided 
by the Board. The Board may sever a student's 
case from others involved in a joint hearing at any 
stage in the proceedings, and without affecting the 
progress of other cases involved, where it appears 
necessary to insure a fair hearing for all. 



32 / General Information 



6. It a hearing has been adjourned tor cause. It 
shall be rescheduled within ten (10) calendar days 
Irom Its originally scheduled date. No notice ol 
such ad|ourned hearing must be given to the stu- 
dent involved, but a reasonable effort to so notify 
him shall be made. At any adiourned hearing, the 
rules established in paragraph 4 hereof shall 
control. 

7. The Board shall make Its findings based upon 
substantial evidence produced before it. Such find- 
ings shall be contained in a written report, which 
shall be submitted to the chancellor of the campus, 
within five (5) days of the close of the hearing. 
The report shall contain: 

(a) A finding that the student did or did not 
commit the acts charged; 

(b) II the finding is that the student did commit 
the acts charged, a further finding that the acts 
committed did or did not constitute a violation of 
the rules established in Section C of this Pan III; 

(c) If the finding is that the student did commit 
the act charged, and if the student Is the recipient 
of funds under a program enumerated In Section 
497 of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Public 
Law 90-575), a further finding as to whether the act 
was of a serious nature and contributed to a sub- 
stantial disruption of the administration of the 
University so as to warrant discontinuance for a 
period ol two years, any further payment to, or for 
the direct benefit of the student under any of the 
programs specified In the aforesaid Section 497 

of the Education Amendments of 1972; and 

(d) A penalty, if any, to be imposed. 

8. If the Board finds that a penalty should be 
imposed as provided by paragraph 7(d) hereof, it 
may invoke the following sanctions: 

(a) disciplinary reprimand, or 

(b) conduction probation, or 

(c) dismissal from University housing, or 

(d) disciplinary probation, or 

(e) suspension from the University, or 
(f) expulsion from the University. 

If the Board imposes the sanctions provided by 
sub-paragraphs (a) to (d) of this paragraph, then 
the prior suspension of the accused student. If any, 
shall be lifted, and the continued discipline of the 
student shall be as provided In the order of the 
Board. If the Board finds the accused student Inno- 
cent of the offense with which he was charged, 
his temporary suspension, if any, shall be lifted. In 
all cases where a temporary suspension has been 
lifted, the student shall be given an opportunity to 
complete interrupted academic work. In invoking 
the power to sanction a student as provided hereby, 
the Board may consider any prior disciplinary action 
taken against the student involved. 

9. In the event that the Board shall fail to submit 
a report to the chancellor of its findings and recom- 



mendations within seven (7) calendar days after 
the close of the hearing, then the chancellor 
shall promptly give notice to the accused student 
and appoint another University Judicial Board as 
required by these rules, and thereafter a new 
heanng shall be held by such successor Board, all 
in accordance with the rules contained in this 
Part III. 

10. Within ten (10) calendar days after notice of 
the Board's decision the student may appeal that 
decision. If no such appeal is taken, the order of the 
Board shall be final and conclusive. Such appeal 
shall be noted by filing a written request therefore 
with the chancellor which shall state the grounds 
upon which the appeal is taken and shall also 

state the address of the appellant, which address 
shall be used by the appellate agency for the service 
of notice as required by Paragraph 11 hereof. 
If the student shall have been suspended, any 
such appeal shall continue that suspension, not- 
withstanding the sanctions, if any. Imposed by the 
Board as provided by Paragraph 8 hereof. The 
student charged shall have the option to appeal 
either to: 

(a) the chancellor of the Campus, or 

(b) the president of the University, or 

(c) an arbitrator as provided for by Paragraph 
12 hereof. 

11. All appeals, as provided by Paragraph 10 
hereof, shall be taken upon the record made before 
the Board. No testimony or other evidence shall 

be Introduced before the appellate officer. How- 
ever, the parties may submit written briefs stating 
their contentions concerning the case and may 
be represented before the appellate officer by a 
representative or legal counsel who may present 
oral arguments on their behalf. The appeal shall be 
heard within fourteen (14) days after It has been 
noted In accordance with Paragraph 10 hereof. The 
student-appellant shall be sent a notice of the time 
and place for the hearing of the appeal; the require- 
ment of notification contained in this paragraph 
shall be satisfied by the mailing thereof to the 
student-appellant at his address shown on his notice 
of appeal as required by Paragraph 10 hereof. 
The appellate officer may affirm, modify, revise or 
reverse the decision of the Board, or he may 
remand the case to the Board for further proceed- 
ings not inconsistent with Its findings, but he may 
not increase the sanctions imposed by the Board. 
The decision of the appellate officer shall be made 
In writing; It shall be made within ten (10) days 
after he has heard the case; his decision shall be 
final and binding upon the parlies; the decision shall 
be communicated In writing to the accused student 
by the appellate officer and to the parents or legal 



guardians of the student if he is under the age of 
twenty-one (21) years. 

12. The accused student may appeal the decision 
of the Board to an impartial arbitrator appointed 
directly by the National Center for Dispute 
Settlement of the American Arbitration Association 
(NCOS). Such appointment may be challenged by 
either party for good cause. The NCOS shall decide 
the question of good cause. In addition to the re- 
quirements of Paragraph 10 hereof, the student 
shall initiate the arbitration by mailing or delivering 
in person two copies of a notice of a desire to 
arbitrate to the National Center tor Dispute Settle- 
ment. 1815 H Street. NW, Washington, DC. 20006, 
which notice shall constitute a contract on behalf of 
the student that he shall be bound thereafter 
by the decision of the National Center for Dispute 
Settlement. The arbitration shall be conducted 
in accordance with the Community Dispute Settle- 
ment Rules of the National Center for Dispute Settle- 
ment to the extent such rules are not Inconsistent 
with the provisions of these rules. Where any 
such inconsistency may exist, these rules shall 
be controlling. Questions of such inconsistency 
shall be decided by the arbitrator. The costs of the 
arbitration proceeding shall be borne equally by 
the student and the University. A student who is 
unable to pay his share of these costs may petition 
the University to bear the whole cost of the arbitra- 
tion, provided that the petition plus supporting 
documents Is submitted to the chancellor for his 
decision prior to the filing of a notice of a desire to 
arbitrate. 

C. Ojscipllnary Rules 

1, The disciplinary rules contained in this section 
C are the rules which may invoke the procedures 
stated In section B hereof. 

(a) Violation of fire regulations, failure to comply 
with evacuation procedures, tampering with fire- 
protection apparatus, use of fireworks, or use of 
open-flame devices or combustible materials which 
endanger the safety or well-being of the University 
community; or unauthorized use of electrical 
equipment. 

(b) Unauthorized entry into or presence in a 
University building or facility. Except for properly 
scheduled use, classroom, administration and 
recreation buildings are closed to general student 
use on holidays, Saturday afternoon, Sundays and 
after 12 midnight during the week. Students may 
use a building or facility for a specified purpose 
upon written permission from a member of the 
faculty with approval of the academic or admin- 
istrative officer normally having control over such 
building or facility, which permission may be 
revoked or withdrawn. 

(c) Obstruction of. disruption of, or interference 
with any University activity ol an academic nature; 



General Information / 33 



actions on the part of students which substantially 
obstruct, disrupt or interfere with non-academic 
activities on University premises by members or 
authorized non-members of the University com- 
munity. 

(d) Destruction, theft, attempted theft, or impair- 
ment of University property. 

(e) Behavior which jeopardizes the safety or 
well-being of other members of the University 
community, or persons coming onto University 
property; physical harassment of, or interference 
with firemen, policemen or other persons engaged 
in the performance of their official duties; physical 
abuse or threatening physical abuse of any person 
on University property; forcible detention of any 
person on University property. 

(f) Possession, use, sale or distribution on or 
in University property of illegal drugs or of drugs 
for which the required prescription has not been 
obtained. 

(g) The possession or use of bombs or explosive 
devices of any character; the threat, either made 
orally or in writing, that any bomb or explosive 
device has been or may be implanted in or upon 
any property or building of the University. 

Part IV 

Selected Policy Statements 

The following is not intended to be an exhaustive 
statement of all University policies and regulations. 
The appropriate University office should be con- 
tacted for information regarding specific activities 
or use of specific facilities. 

Policy On Amplifying Equipment 

(As adopted by University Senate, June 2, 1970) 

1. Public address systems, loudspeakers and other 
forms of sound amplifying equipment may be used 

in any of the following outdoor areas of the 
campus: 

a. Physical education and intramural field 
between University Boulevard and parking 
area 1. 

b. North Ivlall between Campus Drive and 
Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

c. South IVIall between Regents Drive and 
Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

d. Athletic practice fields east of Byrd Stadium. 

2. The use of public address systems, loudspeak- 
ers and other forms of sound amplifying equipment 
must be restricted in the Central Mall area between 
8 a.m. and 6 p.m. on class days in order to 
minimize the likelihood of disturbing classes and 
other academic activities. However, such equipment 
may be used in the Central l^all during these hours 

if the procedures outlined below are followed. All 
equipment used in Central Mall must be secured 



through the Office of the Director of the Physical 
Plant or through the S.G.A. office. 

a. Public address systems, loudspeakers and 
other forms of sound amplifying equipment (except 
in "b" below), must be secured from the Office of 
the Director of Physical Plant, South Administration 
Building, by requesting such equipment in writing 
at least twelve (12) hours in advance. Any Uni- 
versity student or organization which fulfills the 
following requirements will be permitted to use the 
amplifying equipment. 

(1) An individual must be currently enrolled as 
a student, part-time or full-time, at the 
University or currently employed by the Uni- 
versity. 

(2) Any organization or activity must have been 
recognized by the SGA Legislature and must 
at the time of the request have official 
recognition as a University organization or 
activity. 

b. Bullhorns will be available upon surrender 
of the I.D. card in the SGA office and in the Office 
of the Director of the Physical Plant. Bullhorns 
secured in this manner may be used on the Central 
Mall without prior permission. Any individual may 
use only one bullhorn at a time. 

3. Public address systems, loudspeakers and other 
forms of sound amplifying equipment may be used 

in outdoor areas of the campus other than those 
listed above (sections 1 and 2) by securing ap- 
proval in writing at least 5 days in advance from 
the Facilities Use Committee by application to 
the Office of the Director of the Physical Plant. 
Approval will be granted for use of amplifying 
equipment in these areas only if there is a high 
probability that the planned activity will not dis- 
rupt or disturb other University activities or if the 
area has not been previously reserved. Permission 
will be granted to use amplifying equipment in 
the vicinity of residence halls only upon specific 
written request of the student government of 
the residence halls affected. 

4. Individual students or organizational representa- 
tives using amplifying equipment must accept 
responsibility for any complaints or disturbances 
or disruption received from persons in University 
academic and/or residence buildings. 

Policy On Demonstrations 

(As adopted by University Senate, June 2, 1970) 

I. General Slatement 

a. The University of Maryland cherishes the right 
of individual students or student groups to dissent 
and to demonstrate, provided such demonstrations 
do not disrupt normal campus activities, or infringe 
upon the rights of others. 

b. On the other hand, the University will not 
condone behavior which violates the freedom of 
speech, choice, assembly, or movement of other 



individuals or groups. In short, responsible dissent 
carries with it a sensitivity for the civil rights of 
others. 

c. Accordingly, the University will take what- 
ever steps it deems necessary to (1 ) protect the right 
of any individual or group to demonstrate and 
publicly proclaim any view, however unpopular; 
(2) protect the freedom of speech, assembly and 
movement of any individual or group which is the 
object of demonstrations. 

To achieve the foregoing objectives the following 
guidelines have been developed for operation at 
College Park: 

II. Guidelines For General Demonstrations 

a. Unscheduled demonstrations, "teach-ins," 
rallies, or equivalent activities may be held by 
recognized university organizations and activities, 
full or part-time students, and current employees of 
the University in the areas defined below provided 
that the activity does not interfere with any function 
for which that space has been reserved in advance. 

1. The Central Mall 

2. Physical education and intramural field be- 
tween University Boulevard and parking area 1. 

3. Athletic practice fields east of Byrd Stadium 

4. North Mall between Campus Drive and 
Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

5. South Mall between Regents Drive and 
Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

All activities in these areas must be conducted 
so as to avoid interference with the regularly 
scheduled functions of the library and/or class- 
rooms adjacent to the area and in compliance with 
the provisions contained in llg, 1-8. 

Failure to reserve space will not invalidate the 
privilege of conducting the appropriate activity. 
However, in the event of two or more groups desir- 
ing to use a given space, an approved space 
reservation will take precedence over an unsched- 
uled activity. If two or more groups desire a space 
when no reservation has been made, the first come, 
first served principle will apply. 

b. Recognized University organizations and activi- 
ties, full or part-time students, and current em- 
ployees of the University who wish to schedule a 
demonstration, "teach-in," rally, or equivalent 
activity, may request the space through the facilities 
reservation procedure up to 24 hours in advance. 
Demonstrations will be permitted in the locations 
outlined in lla, above, unless the space has previ- 
ously been reserved or is in use for academic 
activities or intercollegiate athletic team practices. 
Demonstrations may be held at other locations on 
the campus subject to approval by the Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs. Students who par- 
ticipate in demonstrations which have not been 
approved may be considered in violation of Uni- 
versity policy. (Except as provided in lla, above.) 



34 / General Information 



c. Demonstrations, rallies or "leach-ins" may be 
conducted in or adjacent to any residential building 
with the specific written concurrence ol the student 
government ol the unit or area concerned. Any 
such rallies, demonstrations or "teach-ins" which 
may be authorized by the appropriate student 
government must conform to the general procedures 
contained in llg. 1-8. 

d. Demonstrations in the lorm ol parades on 
streets may be conducted with the specific approval 
ol route and time secured 48 hours in advance 
Irom the University Public Safety and Security 
Olfice. 

e. Although groups may sponsor or organize 
demonstrations, rallies, "teach-ins," or picketing 
activities, the tact of group sponsorship or organi- 
zation in no way relieves individuals of the 
responsibility for their own conduct, and each 
individual participating in such activities is account- 
able tor compliance with the provisions ol this 
policy. 

f. Persons not members ol the University student 
body, faculty or stall may participate in demonstra- 
tions, rallies, picketing, leach-ins or equivalent 
activities only upon invitation by a bona tide stu- 
dent, laculty or stall member. All non-students are 
obligated to the terms ol this policy during 
participation in such activities. Since persons not 
students, laculty or staff members are not subject 
to University discipline procedures, failure to comply 
with terms ol this policy may result in action under 
terms ol appropriate Maryland law. 

g. In addition to the above provisions, the lollowing 
guidelines will apply to all demonstrations. 

1. Reasonable access to and exit Irom any 
office or building must be maintained. The right-of- 
way on public streets and sidewalks will be main- 
tained. 

2. Demonstrators will not attempt to lorce the 
cancellation or interruption ol any event spon- 
sored by a University ollice or by a laculty or 
student group or by any group authorized to use 
University lacilities. 

3. Classes or other educational activities in 
classroom buildings and the library will not be dis- 
rupted. 

4. The use ol public address systems, loud- 
speakers, etc., in the vicinity ol academic and 
residence buildings will follow procedures set forth 
above. 

5. Demonstrations may be carried on inside ol 
ol University buildings only as provided in Sections 
lie and 4 or with approval ol the Facilities Use 
Committee as outlined in the University General 
and Academic Regulations. 

6. Where an invited speaker is the object ol 
protest, students and laculty may demonstrate 
outside the building where the lecture will take 



place. Demonstrators who wish to enter the building 
must do so as members ol the audience and must 
give the speaker a respectlul hearing. Signs, 
placards or other paraphernalia associated with a 
demonstration will not be carried into the building. 

7. University property must be protected at all 
times. 

8. The safety and well-being ol members of 

the University community collectively and individual- 
ly must be protected at all times, 
h. Complaints received Irom users ol the Library 
or classrooms adjacent to the delined areas (lla.) 
will be grounds lor disciplinary action against 
individuals and/or groups sponsoring or participat- 
ing in rallies, "teach-ins" or demonstrations in 
these areas. 

III. Guidelines For Demonstrations In Connection 
With Placement Programs 

a. Anyone wishing to question or protest the on- 
Campus presence ol any recruiting organization 
should contact the Director ol the Career Develop- 
ment Center or his representative in advance. 

b. Should any member ol the University Com- 
munity wish to discuss or protest the internal 
policies ol any recruiting organization, the Director 
ol the Career Development Center must be con- 
tacted lor assistance in communicating directly 
with the appropriate representatives of said 
organization. 

c. Demonstration guidelines outlined in Section 
llg. 1-8 are applicable. 

d. Demonstrations in conjunction with placement 
programs conducted in the Career Development 
Centers Cumberland Hall facility or other facility 
shall be considered not to infringe upon the rights 
ol others and the normal lunctioning ol placement 
programs provided that demonstrations are con- 
ducted outside ol the lacility and do not interlere 
with tree and open access to the Career Develop- 
ment Center lacilities by those students, laculty, 
staff, and visitors who wish to conduct business 
within the framework ol established placement 
programs. 

IV. Special Guideline Pertaining to the 
Student Union 

a. No demonstrations, rallies, "teach-ins" or 
equivalent activities may be held in the lobbies or 
corridors of the Student Union. 

b. Demonstrations may be held in assigned rooms 
of the Student Union by recognized student 
organizations lollowing procedures lor reserving 
space which have been outlined by the Student 
Union Board. 

V. Guidelines For Picketing 

a. Legal Rights and Limitations. 

Orderly picketing is a legally established lorm ol 

expression which recognizes the Individual's right 



ol tree expression subject only to such reasonable 
limitations as are imposed by State legislation and 
University regulations. These limitations are in- 
tended to protect the rights ol the picketer, the 
student body and the public with particular concern 
lor salety, preservation ol normal academic life 
and order, and the protection of persons and 
property, 
b. Conduct of Picketers. 

1. Picketers are subject to those regulations 
listed above m Section II, g, 1-8. 

2. Picketers will not disrupt any University 
activity by making excessive noise in the vicinity ol 
any University building. 

3. The University Health Service is off-limits to 
picketers because special silence and other wel- 
fare and safety factors are involved. 

Alcoholic Beverage Policy and Procedures 

Policy 

Regulations forbid unauthorized possession, use 

or distribution of alcoholic beverages on or in 

University property. University policy is consistent 

with State and County laws and restricts on-Campus 

use of alcoholic tjeverages in specified areas. 

interpretation 

1. Age — Students under 18 years of age may not 
possess, consume or distribute alcoholic beverages, 
of any type. 

2. Licensing — Temporary licenses are available 
through the Board ol License Commissioners lor 
Prince George's County, Maryland, consistent 
with existing County and State law. 

3. Restricted Areas — Alcoholic beverages may not 
be possessed, consumed or distributed in any 
academic facility, except where specific, written 
approval has been obtained for the event from 

the individual or department responsible for the 
operation of that facility. This restriction applies to 
all dining halls, cafeterias, classroom and office 
buildings, libraries, laboratories, administrative 
buildings, and athletic facilities. 

When planning an event where alcoholic bever- 
ages will be brought in by the individual consumers, 
or will be given away, or where donations will be 
invited, the following procedures should be 
followed: 

1. Receive written approval lor the use ol your 
lacility — in the residence areas check lor any 
local restrictions established by unit governments. 

2. Secure and complete the Registration 01 A 
Student Social Event lorm in the Olfice ol Student 
Development. (Suite 1211, Student Union.) 

3. Secure and complete the Alcoholic Beverage 
Registration lorm which names the person 
responsible lor the event. 



General information / 35 



Part V 

Motor Vehicles 

Parking facilities at the University are extremely 
limited and are primarily intended for use by com- 
muting students, f^ost parking areas are located on 
the periphery of the Campus and are usually five 
or six blocks away from residence halls and class- 
room buildings. 

Freshman and sophomore resident students are 
not permitted to register motor vehicles on Campus; 
however, they may obtain on-campus weekend 
parking privileges. Any freshman or sophomore 
(i.e., a student who has earned fewer than 56 
academic credits) who needs a motor vehicle for 
work, or for any other purpose, should consider 
making off-Campus living arrangements. 

Motor scooters, motorcycles, motor-bikes, or 
bicycles are not permitted inside any residence hall. 
They must be parked in those outside areas 
specifically marked for them. 

Campus Traffic Rules and Regulations 
(Academic Year 1974-1975) 

These regulations apply to all who drive motor 
vehicles on any part of the Campus at College Park. 

1. Purpose of Traffic Regulations 

a. To facilitate the work of the University by 
providing parking space for those who need it most. 

b. To provide parking space for University 
visitors and guests. 

c. To protect pedestrian traffic. 

d. To assure access at all times for ambulance 
and fire-fighting apparatus. 

e. To control vehicular traffic on the Campus. 

2. Registration of Veliicles: 

a. All motor vehicles, including motorcycles and 
scooters, operated on campus by a person associ- 
ated with the University, must be registered with 
the Vehicle Registration Office regardless of 
ownership, except as noted in Regulation 2c. 

All student vehicles must be registered in the name 
of the student who is the legal operator of the 
vehicle. 

b. Student vehicles must be registered for the 
current academic year during the applicable 
registration period. A registration charge will be 
made for each vehicle. This Fee Cannot Be 
Refunded. 

1. FALL SEIVIESTER beginning in August 

for first vehicle $12.00 

Each additional vehicle 3.00 

2. SPRING SEfvlESTER beginning in January 

for first vehicle 6.00 

Each additional vehicle 3.00 

3. SUMMER SEMESTER 3.00 

Each additional vehicle 3.00 

All Registrations will expire on the next following 
Auc =! P ■ Proof of ownership or legal control will 



be required for multiple registrations. Students 
applying tor registration ol additional vehicles 
must present the State vehicle license number and 
the University ol Maryland registration number ol 
their initially registered vehicle tor the current 
academic year. No charge will be made for 
replacement of registration sticker required due 
to damaged bumper of a registered vehicle or 
because of a replacement for a registered vehicle. 
Remnants of stickers to be replaced MUST be 
turned in at the Motor Vehicle Registration Desk. 

c. Resident students who have earned less than 
56 semester credits shall be prohibited from 
operating a motor vehicle on the College Park 
Campus, and from registering a vehicle under pro- 
visions of these regulations, except for special 
weekend privileges as provided in regulation 2d. 
This prohibition applies to any freshman or sopho- 
more student residing within one (1) mile radius 

of the Library, providing said residence is other 
than that shown as student's legal residence at time 
of registration. 

d. Resident students who have earned less than 
56 semester credits are permitted to operate a 
motor vehicle on the College Park Campus during 
the hours from 5:00 P.M. Friday to 12 midnight 
Sunday only. Vehicles operated on the campus 
under provisions of this regulation must be regis- 
tered in accordance with regulations 2a and 2b. 
Special "weekend" registration stickers will be 
issued. Vehicles displaying weekend stickers will be 
considered not registered if observed on the 
campus at any time other than the specified week- 
end period. 

e. Parking permits for faculty and staff are issued 
initially at the time of employment. Subsequent 
renewals will be scheduled at times designated. 

f. Only one set of parking permits for each 
vehicle is authorized. 

g. Vehicles are not considered officially registered 
until permits are affixed on front and rear bumpers 
or on metal plates affixed to license plates, 

plainly visible. 

h. Temporary parking permits for visiting groups 
and for special reasons and conditions are available. 
Requests should be made to the Motor Vehicle 
Administration Section — Telephone Ext. 4242. Medi- 
cal and handicapped permits are available 
upon request. 

i. Parking permits must not be transferred to any 
vehicle other than the one for which they were 
originally issued. 

j. Parking permits must not be defaced or altered 
in any manner. 
3. Traffic Regulations: 

a. All motor vehicles are subject to the University 
traffic regulations while on the University Campus. 



The University assumes no responsibility for loss or 
damage to private property. 

b. All traffic and parking signs must be obeyed. 

c. It is impossible to mark with signs all areas of 
University property where parking is prohibited. 
Parking or driving is definitely prohibited on grass 
plots, tree plots, construction areas, or any place 
which will mar the landscaping of the Campus. 
create a safety hazard or interfere with the use of 
University facilities. 

d. All regulations must be observed during registra- 
tion and examination periods, except as may be 
otherwise indicated by official signs. During final 
examination periods and the Summer School 
session, registered vehicles may park in any num- 
bered parking area except Areas 5, 6, and 9. 

e. Operation of any motor vehicle in such a man- 
ner as to create excessive noise or smoke, or 
operation of any vehicle which is in an unsafe 
condition, will result in revocation of parking 
permit and issuance of a Maryland State Summons 
for violation of Article 6616 Annotated Code of 
Maryland. 

f. Pedestrians shall have the right-of-way at all 
times. 

g. The maximum speed on campus roads is 20 
miles per hour. During changes of classes and in 
areas of pedestrian traffic cars must be driven more 
slowly. 

h. Vehicles operated by faculty/staff and students, 
including motorcycles and scooters, must be parked 
in assigned areas only. Certain parking areas are 
restricted to Faculty and Academic Staff at all 
times. This restriction is indicated on the official 
sign at the entrance to the area. In all other parking 
areas, unrestricted parking is permitted from 
5:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M. Monday thru Thursday, and 
from 5:00 P.M. Friday to 7:00 A.M. Monday, 
i. Any motor vehicle parked in violation of Uni- 
versity traffic regulations or abandoned on campus 
IS subject to removal and impounding at the ex- 
pense of the owner or operator. (See Regulation 4c.) 
J. Specific spaces in parking areas shall not be 
reserved or marked for any department or individual, 
k. If an unregistered vehicle is used as an emerg- 
ency substitute for a registered vehicle, it must 
be parked in the regularly assigned area and an 
immediate report made to the Motor Vehicle 
Administration Section — Ext. 4242. 
I. In parking areas which have marked spaces and 
lanes, a vehicle must be parked in one space only, 
leaving clear access to adjacent spaces, and 
without blocking driving lanes or creating a hazard 
for other drivers, 
m. Parking is not permitted at crosswalks. 



36 / General Information 



n. Parking or standing is prohibited on all campus 
roads and lire lanes at ail limes, 
o. In cases where individuals are permitted to 
register more than one vehicle (or parking on the 
campus, only one ol these vehicles may be parked 
In the assigned area at any time. 
p. Metered parking spaces must be used in ac- 
cordance with requirements as stated on oMicial 
signs. Non-registered student vehicles parked In 
metered spaces will be in violation o) Section 2A. 
q. The (act that a vehicle is parked in violation o( 
any regulation and does not receive a violation 
notice does not mean that the regulation is no 
longer in ellect. 

4. Traffic Information: 

a. The Ofdce o( the Campus Police is located in 
the Service Building and may be reached on 
University Campus telephone Ext. 3555. 

b. The Cashier's OKice and the Motor Vehicle 
Administration Section are In the Service Building. 
Campus telephone Ext. 4242. 

c. The term abandonment, as it relates to auto- 
mobiles parked on properly owned or leased by the 
University o( Maryland, shall mean any one or 
more o( the (ollowing conditions: 

(1) Any vehicle which has not been moved for 
thirty (30) days and whose owner or other claimant 
the University Is unable to locate. 

(2) Any vehicle which has not been moved 

(or thirty (30) days and whose identitied owner or 
other claimant reluses to move it. 

(3) Any vehicle on which current license plates 
are not displayed and which has not been moved 
(or ten (10) days. 

(4) Any vehicle which has not been moved in 
seven (7) days due to an inoperative condition 
caused by the removal of necessary parts or a 
wrecked condition. 

(5) A special Board composed of designed mem- 
bers of the traffic committee will consider and act 
upon requests for exceptions to any traffic regula- 
tion. All actions of this Board will be final. 

5. Penalties: 

a. Any person connected with the University who 
operates an unregistered vehicle on the Campus, 

or who registers such a vehicle in any way contrary 
to the provisions of these regulations, will be 
subject to payment of a fifteen ($15.00) dollar 
penalty in addition to the penalty (or any other 
regulation violation connected therewith. 

b. Violations of any campus traffic regulation other 
than improper registration or overtime meter 
parking will result in penalty as listed below: 

(a) Penalty for parking a registered vehicle 
in a parking area other than properly 
assigned area $5.00 

(b) Parking a registered vehicle on a road- 



way. In a posted lire lane or posted no 

parking area $5.00 

(c) Parking any vehicle. Including cycles, on 
walks, grass area, plazas, and any other 
places not designated as areas for park- 
ing or driving without special permit 
signed by head ol Grounds Division $5.00 

Violator will be additionally liable (or 
amount o( any specific damage caused 
by such action. 

c. Overtime parking in any metered space will 
result in penalty o( one ($1.00) dollar (or each 
maximum time period on meter. 

d. Violations are payable within ten (10) calendar 
days from date of issue at the oftice of the Cashier 
in the General Services Building and an additional 
penalty of $2.00 will be imposed (or failure to settle 
violations on time. 

e. Visitors and guests notices issued to University 
visitors must be signed and returned either in 
person or by mail to the Vehicle Registration 
Cashier, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
20742, or to the University Official visited. Viola- 
tion notices must be returned 10 days alter 

date ol issue. The violation may be voided at 

the discretion of the Vehicle Registration Office, 

and if not voidable will be returned for payment. 

(. Violations Involving an unregistered vehicle 

owned by a member o( the Immediate (amily of a 

student may be charged to the students account 

unless settled by the individual receiving the ticket. 

In accordance with stated privileges granted to 

visitors and guests. 

g. Persistent violators of tradic regulations will be 

referred to the Judiciary Office for appropriate 

action. 

h. Vehicles parked in roadways, fire lanes and 

other areas as described in Section 3c are subject 

to being towed at owners expense. 

6, Appeals: 

An Appeals Board composed of a minimum of three 
students who are members of the Student Tra(fic 
Board meets regularly to consider appeals (rom 
students charged with violations. Students wishing 
to appeal a violation must register at the appeals 
table outside the Judiciary Otfice, 2nd floor. North 
Administration Building, where the date and time 
for the appeal will be furnished the appellant. 
Traffic tickets must be appealed within ten (10) 
calendar days from the date of Issuance. Overtime 
parking meter violations are not subject to appeal. 

7. Parking Areas For Students: 

Area 1 — West of Cole Activities Building, between 

Stadium Drive and Campus Drive 
Area 2 — North of Denton Hall Dorm Complex 
Area 3 — Southwest Corner of Campus 
Area 4 — North of Heavy Research Laboratory 



Area 7— East of US No. 1, at North Gate 

Area 11 — Northeast of Asphalt Institute Building 

8. Parking Areas For Faculty, Staff and 

Assigned Resident Students Only: 

Area 5 — Student Housing Area East Side Campus, 

Leonardtown Modular Units 
Area '6 — North o( Dining Hall No. 5 and East 

o( Elklon Dorm 
Area '9 — Vicinity o( Cambridge Hall Dorm Complex 
Area 10— East o( U.S. No. 1, North o( 

Fraternity Row 
Area 12— South o( Allegany Hall 
Area 14 — Loop Roads Front and Rear o( Houses 

on Fraternity Row 
Area 15 — Rear 7402 Princeton Avenue 
Area 17 — Special Parking (or use o( Center (or 

Adult Education 
Area "A — West End of BPA Building 
Area AA — West of Fine Arts and Education 

Classroom Building 
Area "B — Adjacent to Computer Science Center 
Area BB — West of Chemistry Building 
Area C — Adjacent to Turner Laboratory (Dairy) 
Area CC — Barn area 
Area "D — Rear of Journalism Building 
Area DD — East of Space Sciences Building 
Area 'E — Adjacent to Engineering Buildings 
Area EE — North of Engineering Laboratory 

Building 
Area "F — Adjacent to Fire Service Extension 

Building 
Area FF — East of Animal Science Building 
Area "G — Between Silvester Hall and Skinner 

Building 
Area GG— North of Adult Education Center 

Building 
Area "H — Adjacent to Symons Hall and 

Holzaplel Hall 
Area HH — Adjacent to H. J. Patterson Hall — Botany 
Area I — Rear of Molecular Physics Building 
Area J — West of Annapolis Hall 
Area K — Adjacent to General Service Building 
Area KK — West of New Physical Education 

Building 
Area L — Administration-Armory Loop 
Area "M — Adjacent to Infirmary 
Area N — Rear of J. M. Patterson Hall — Industrial 

Education 
Area O — East and West of School of Architecture 
Area OO — Adjacent to Zoology-Psychology 

Building and Undergraduate Library 
Area P — East of Wind Tunnel 
Area "PP — Between Math Building and Cyclotron 
Area — Rear of Jull Hall 
Area *R — Circle in front of Byrd Stadium Field 

House, Stadium Garage and adjacent to 

Prelnkert Field House 
Area RR — East of Asphalt Institute 



General Information / 37 



Area "S — Special Food Service 

Area T — North of Engineering Laboratory 

Building 
Area TT— Service Area West of Physics Building 
Area U — Rear of McKeldin Library 
Area UU— North end 3 Lot 
Area V — Open area between Building DD and 

Building EE 
Area 'W — Between Skinner Building and 

Taliaferro Hall 
Area 'XX— West— New Chemistry Wing 
Area Y— West of Chapel 
Area 'YY — West of Cumberland Hall 
Area Z — Adjacent to Cole Field House, West Side 
Area "Z — Rear Cole Field House 
Area LC — Lord Calvert Apartments 
Area UH — University Hills Apartments 



38 / General Information 



Divisions, Coleges and Schools 



Prior to development of the academic 
reorganization, the departments, programs, 
institutes and the like were grouped within colleges 
and schools which, traditionally, were the 
largest academic units. In the new structure, 
colleges and schools are grouped within larger 
Divisions as may be seen by referring to the 
plan at the front of the Catalog. In addition, some 
academic departments and programs exist 
within the Divisions independently of colleges 
and schools. This section describes the new 
organization, its purposes and functions in detail. 
A knowledge of Divisions and their interrelation- 
ships will help you in planning your education. 

Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
The Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
offers educational opportunities for students in 
subject matter relating to living organisms 
and their interaction with one another and with 
the environment. Education in all aspects of 
agriculture is included. Programs of study 
include those involving the most fundamental 
concepts of biological science and chemistry and 
the use of knowledge in daily life as well as 
the application of economic and engineering 
principles in planning the improvement of life. 
In addition to pursuing the baccalaureate degree, 
a number of students in this Division engage in 
Pre-professional education in such fields as Pre- 
l^edicine, Pre-Dentistry. and Pre-Veterinary 
Medicine. 

The student may obtain a Bachelor of Science 
Degree with a major in any of the departments 
and curricula listed. Students in pre-professional 
programs may, in certain circumstances, obtain 
a B.S. degree following three years on Campus 
and one successful year in a professional school. 

Structure of Ifie Division. The Division of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences includes the 
following departments and programs: 

1. Within the College of Agriculture. 

a. Departments: Agricultural Engineering, 
Agricultural and Extension Education, Agricul- 
tural and Resource Economics, Agronomy, 
Animal Science, Dairy Science, Horticulture, 
Poultry Science, and Veterinary Science. 

b. Programs or Curricula: Agricultural 
Chemistry, Conservation and Resource Develop- 
ment, Food Science, Pre-Forestry, and Pre- 
Veterinary Medicine. 

c. Institute of Applied Agriculture. 

2. Divisional Units — Non-College. 

a. Departments: Botany, Chemistry, Entomology, 
Geology, Microbiology, Zoology. 

b. Programs or Curricula: Biological Sciences, 
Pre-Dentistry, and Pre-Medicine. 



Admission. Requirements for admission to the 
Division are the same as those for admission to 
the other units of the University. Application must 
be made to the Director of Admissions, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

The student who intends to pursue a program 
of study in the Division of Agricultural and 
Life Sciences should include the following subjects 
in his high school program: English, four units; 
college preparatory mathematics (algebra, plane 
geometry), three or four units; biology, chemistry, or 
physics, two units; history and social sciences, 
one or more units. 

Students who wish to major in chemistry, 
botany, microbiology, or zoology, or who wish 
to follow a pre-medical or pre-dental program, 
should include four units of college preparatory 
mathematics (algebra, plane geometry, 
trigonometry, and more advanced mathematics, 
if available). They should also include chemistry 
and physics. 

Each entering student in this Division will be 
assigned a faculty advisor who will help him/her 
select a course program designed to meet 
his/her goals and objectives. As soon as a student 
selects a major field of study an advisor repre- 
senting that department or program will be 
assigned. 

Students following pre-professional programs 
will be advised by individuals knowledgeable 
about them. 

In addition to the educational resources on the 
Campus, students with specific interests have an 
opportunity to utilize libraries and other resources 
of the several government agencies located close 
to the Campus. Laboratories where research 
related to agriculture and marine biology is 
conducted throughout the State are available to 
students with special interests. 
Degree Requirements: Students graduating from 
the Division must complete at least 120 credits with 
an average of 2.0 in all courses applicable 
towards the degree. Included in the 120 credits 
must be: 

1. General University Requirements (30 credits) 

2. Division Requirements: 

a. Chemistry: Any one course in chemistry 
numbered 102 or higher; b. Mathematics: Any one 
course in mathematics numbered 100 or higher; 
c. Biological Sciences: Any one course carrying 
three or more credits selected from offerings of 
the Departments of Botany, Entomology, 
Microbiology or Zoology, or any interdepartmental 
course approved for this purpose by the Division 
(e.g.. Biology 101). 

3. Requirements of the major and supporting 
areas, which are listed under individual program 
headings. 



Agriculture 

The College of Agriculture offers educational 
programs with a broad cultural and scientific base. 
Students are prepared for careers in agriculturally 
related sciences, technology and business. 

The application of knowledge to the solution 
of some of man's most critical problems concerning 
adequate amounts and quality of food, and the 
quality of the environment in which he lives, are 
important missions of the College. 

This original College of the University of Maryland 
at College Park was chartered in 1856. The College 
of Agriculture has a continuous record of leader- 
ship in education since that date. It became the 
beneficiary of the Land-Grant Act of 1862. 

The College of Agriculture continues to grow and 
develop as part of the greater University, providing 
education and research activities enabling man 
to use his environment and natural resources to 
best advantage while conserving basic resources 
for future generations. 

Advantages of Location and Facilities. Educational 

opportunities in the College of Agriculture are 
enhanced by the nearby location of several research 
units of the federal government. Of particular 
interest is the Agricultural Research Center at 
Beltsville and the U. S. Department of Agriculture 
Headquarters in Washington, D.C. The National 
Agricultural Library is an important resource for 
information at the Beltsville location. 

Related research laboratories of the National 
Institutes of Health, military hospitals. National 
Aeronautics and Space Agency, and the National 
Bureau of Standards are in the vicinity. Interaction 
of faculty and students with personnel from 
these agencies is encouraged. Teaching and 
research activities are conducted with the coopera- 
tion of scientists and professional people in 
government positions. 

Instruction in the basic biological and physical 
sciences, social sciences and engineering principles 
is conducted in well-designed classrooms and 
laboratories. The application of basic principles to 
practical situations is demonstrated for the student 
in numerous ways. 

Modern greenhouses are available for breeding 
and propagation of a wide variety of plants, work 
on the control of weeds and improved cultural 
practices. 

Herds of dairy and beef cattle and flocks of 
poultry are kept on the Campus for teaching and 
research purposes. 

Several operating farms, located in central 
Maryland, southern Maryland and on the Eastern 
Shore, support the educational programs in 
Agriculture by providing locations where important 
crops, animals and poultry can be grown and 



40 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



mainialned under practical and research conditions. 
These farms add an important dimension to the 
courses olfcred in Agriculture. Data from these 
operations and Irom cooperating producers and 
processors ol agricultural products are utilized 
by students interested in economics, teaching, 
engineering, and conservation, as they relate 
to Agriculture, as well as by those concerned with 
biology or management ol agricultural crops 
and animals 

General Inlormalion. The College ol Agriculture 
oilers a variety ol lour year programs leading to the 
Bachelor ol Science degree . 

Today's agriculture is a highly complex and 
extremely eflicient industry which includes supplies 
and services used in agricultural production, the 
production process, and the marketing, processing 
and distribution ol products to meet the consumers' 
needs and wants. 

Instruction in the College ol Agriculture includes 
the lundamental sciences and emphasizes the 
precise course information that its graduates must 
employ in the industrialized agriculture of today, 
and helps develop the foundation for their role 
in the future. Course programs in specialized areas 
may be tailored to fit the particular needs ol the 
individual student. 

Previous training in agriculture is not a 
prerequisite lor study in the College of Agriculture. 
Careers for men and women with rural, suburban 
or urban backgrounds are available in agriculture 
and its allied industries. 

Graduates of the College of Agriculture have 
an adequate educational background for careers 
and continued learning after college in business. 
production, teaching, research, extension, and 
many other professional fields. 

Requirements For Admission. Admission 
requirements to the College of Agriculture are the 
same as those of the University. 

For students entering the College ol Agriculture 
It IS recommended that their high school preparatory 
courses should include English, 4 units: mathe- 
matics. 3 units: biological and physical sciences, 
3 units: and history or social sciences, 2 units. 
Four units ol mathematics should be elected by 
students entering agricultural engineering or agri- 
cultural chemistry. 

Junior Standing. To earn Junior standing a student 
must complete 56 credit hours ol academic 
work and attain the required grade point average. 

Requirements For Graduation. Each student must 
complete at least 120 credit hours in academic 
subjects with a minimum grade point average 
ol 2.0 (C). 



Honors Program. The Honors Program is approved 
lor ma/ors in Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
The objective ol the Honors Program is to 
recognize superior scholarship and to provide 
opportunity lor the excellent student to broaden his 
perspective and to increase the depth ol his 
studies. 

The programs in Honors are administered by 
Departmental Honors Committees and supervised by 
the College Committee on Honors. Students in the 
College ol Agriculture, who are in the top 20 
percent ol their class at the end ol their lirst year 
may be considered lor admission into the Honors 
Program. 01 this group up to 50 percent may be 
admitted. 

Sophomores or lirst semester Juniors will be 
considered upon application Irom those students 
in the upper 20 percent ol their class. While 
application may be made until the student enters 
his sixth semester, early entrance into the program 
is recommended. Students admitted to the 
program enjoy certain academic privileges. 

On the basis ol the student's performance during 
his participation in the Honors Program, the 
department may recommend the candidate for the 
appropriate degree with (departmental) honors, 
or for the appropriate degree with (departmental) 
high honors. Successful completion ol the Honors 
Program will be recognized by a citation in the 
Commencement Program and by an appropriate 
entry on the student's record and diploma. 
Faculty Advisement. Each student in the College 
of Agriculture is assigned to a lacully advisor. 
Advisors normally work with a limited number of 
students and are able to give individual guidance. 

Students entering the Ireshman year with a 
definite choice ol curriculum are assigned to 
departmental advisors for counsel and planning of 
all academic programs. Students entering the 
freshman year, who have not selected a definite 
curriculum, are assigned to a general advisor 
who assists with the choice of freshman electives 
and, during the course of the year, acquaints 
students with opportunities in the curriculums in 
the College ol Agriculture and in other divisions ol 
the University. II by the close of the freshman 
year a student makes no definite choice of a 
specialized curriculum, he continues under the 
guidance ol his advisor in the General Agriculture 
curriculum. 

Scholarships. A number of scholarships are 
available lor students enrolled in the College of 
Agriculture. These include awards by the 
Agricultural Development Fund, Bayshore Foods, 
Inc., Capitol Milk Producers Cooperative, Inc., 
Dairy Technology Society ol Maryland and the 
District ol Columbia, Delaware-Maryland Plant 



Food Association, Inc., Dr. Ernest N. Cory Trust 
Fund, Danlorth Foundation, Frederick County 
Holstein Association, General Foods Fund, The 
Staley and Eugene Hahn Memorial Scholarship 
Fund, Hyattsville Horticultural Society, Inter-Slate 
Milk Producers, The Kinghorne Fund Scholarship, 
Lindback Foundation, Maryland Cooperative Milk 
Producers, Inc., Maryland Electrilication Council, 
Maryland Turlgrass Association, Maryland Stale 
Goll Association, Maryland and Virginia Milk 
Producers, Inc., Maryland Veterinarians, Dr. Ray A. 
Murray Scholarship Fund. NOPCO, Ralston 
Purina Company, The Schluderberg Foundation, 
Southern States Cooperative, Inc., The Leander F. 
Stuart Memorial Fund, the Joseph M. Vial Memorial 
Scholarship Program in Agriculture and the 
Nicholas Brice Worlhington Scholarship. 
Student Organizations. Students lind opportunity 
for varied expression and growth in the several 
voluntary organizations sponsored by the College of 
Agriculture. These organizations are: Agricultural 
Economics Club, Block and Bridle. Dairy Science 
Club, Collegiate 4-H Club, Future Farmers ol 
America, Agronomy Club, and the Veterinary 
Science Club. 

Alpha Zeta is a national agricultural honor 
Iraternily. Members are chosen Irom students in 
the College of Agriculture who have attained the 
scholastic requirements and displayed leadership 
in agriculture. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up ol 
representatives Irom the various student 
organizations in the College ol Agriculture. Its 
purpose is to coordinate activities ol these 
organizations and to promote work which is 
benelicial to the College. 

Required Courses. Courses required for students in 
the College ol Agriculture are listed in each 
curriculum. The program ol the Ireshman year is 
similar lor all curriculums. Variations in programs 
will be suggested based on students' interests 
and test scores. 

Typical Freshman Program — College ol Agriculture 

I 

ENGL 101 3 

BOTN 101 * 

MATH 3 

ANSC 101 3 

ZOOL 101 

AGRO 100 2 

AGRO 101 

AGRI 101 ' 

SPCH 107 

General University Requirement 

Total Credits 16 1 

Two-Year Program — Institute o( Applied 
Agriculture. The programs of study olfered by the 
Institute ol Applied Agriculture will assist men 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 41 



and women interested in preparing for specific 
jobs in the broad fields of applied science and 
business in agriculture. 
Tfiree major programs are currently offered: 

1. Business Farming — technical training for 
farm operation, or a career in businesses providing 
supplies and services to those in production 
agriculture. 

2. Turtgrass and Golf Course Management — 
concentrates on the technical and management 
skills required for commercial turf production and 
for occupations in the rapidly expanding field 

of turf management associated with parks, 
highways, utility companies, golf courses and other 
recreational facilities. 

3. Ornamental Horticulture and Nursery 
Management — a program leading toward several 
occupational choices including greenhouse 
management, nursery management, landscape 
management, and floral design and sales. 

Courses taken in these programs are not 
transferable for degree credits at the University 
of (Maryland. Students satisfactorily completing 
two years of study are awarded an appropriate 
certificate. For additional information write: Director, 
Institute of Applied Agriculture, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Cooperative Extension Service. Cooperative 
Extension work, established by State and federal 
laws in 1914, extends practical information beyond 
the classrooms of the University of Maryland to 
young people and adults — both rural and urban — 
throughout the State of Maryland. Major 
program areas include agriculture and environment, 
family living, youth development, and community 
development. 

The educational endeavors of the Cooperative 
Extension Service are financed jointly by federal. 
State and county governments. In each county 
and in Baltimore City there is a competent staff of 
extension agents assigned to conduct educational 
work in program areas consistent with the 
needs of the people of the county and as funds 
permit. The county staff is supported by a staff of 
specialists located at the University, and, through 
their mutual efforts, they assist local people in 
seeking solutions to their problems. 

The Cooperative Extension Service works in 
close harmony and association with many groups 
and organizations. In addition to work on farms 
and with agri-businesses, extension programs 
are aimed at many rural non-farm and urban 
family consumers. Thousands of boys and girls 
gain leadership knowledge and experience and are 
provided practical educational instruction in 
4-H clubs and other youth groups. 



To accomplish its mission, the Cooperative 
Extension Service works closely with other 
agricultural divisions of the University and units of 
the University outside of agriculture, as well as 
State and federal agencies and private groups. 
It arranges and conducts thousands of short courses, 
workshops and conferences in various fields of 
interest held both on the College Park Campus 
and at other locations throughout the State. 
A wide variety of publications and radio and 
television are used extensively to reach the 
people of Maryland. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station. The Maryland 
Agricultural Experiment Station is currently 
conducting more than 200 research projects. These 
are conducted by faculty who supervise and 
direct research assistants, graduate and under- 
graduate students and technicians. The research 
may be conducted in laboratories or at one of 
the nine field locations throughout Maryland 
operated by the Experiment Station or even in fields, 
herds or flocks of cooperating farmers. 

The overall objective of the Experiment Station 
is to enhance all aspects of Maryland agriculture 
for the benefit of farmers, agribusiness and 
consumers through optimal utilization, conservation 
and protection of soil and water resources. 
Genetic principles are studied and applied in the 
improvement of turf and ornamentals, vegetable 
crops, field crops, poultry, dairy and other animals. 
Similarly, pathological principles are of concern 
in improvement of methods of identification, 
prevention and/or control of plant and animal 
diseases. Biochemistry plays an important role 
in evaluating the nutritional quality of crops 
produced, the efficiency of feed conversion by 
poultry and animals or the quality of plant and 
animal products for human consumption. Research 
in progress is concerned with improvement of 
processing systems to enhance food quality on 
one hand and the impact of nutritional deficiencies 
and means of remedying these on the other. 
Also directly in the consumer area is the study of 
clothing quality. 

Improved production techniques including waste 
utilization or disposal require studies involving 
soil-moisture-plant relationships and plant, bird 
or animal-environment relationships and also 
studies of the applications of engineering for 
producing or maintaining the optimal environment 
for biological systems. 

Studies of biological and mechanical methods as 
well as improved chemical control of insects in 
the field, forests, food processing chain and the 
home are continuous. 

The socio-economics of changing agricultural 
systems are a major research area and increasing 



attention Is being oriented towards rural 
development, including resource utilization for 
non-farm residents and recreation. 

The Maryland Agricultu-al Experiment Station 
was established in 1888 to comply with the 
Hatch Act of 1887 authorizing the establishment 
of an agricultural experiment station at the Land 
Grant Colleges. Actually, the charter of the 
Maryland Agricultural College in 1856 specifically 
authorized establishment of a demonstration farm. 
The Station is supported by federal funds under 
the Hatch Act as amended. State appropriations, 
grants and contracts with State and federal 
agencies and by gifts or other support from 
individuals and agribusinesses. 

The Division of Arts and Humanities 

The Division of Arts and Humanities offers its 
students a variety of educational opportunities. In 
addition to the traditional liberal education 
associated with humanistic studies, the student is 
offered the opportunity of majoring in a chosen 
discipline. This element of depth serves both as 
an integral part of the student's education and 
as a foundation for further professional training 
or pursuits. 

Students majoring in the arts may elect either a 
humanistically oriented program or a 
professionally oriented program in one of the 
creative and/or performing areas. The creative and 
performing artist holds a key role in the cultural 
studies and development of a university. Therefore, 
special consideration for these varied needs and 
interests is essential. 

The Division of Arts and Humanities offers 
possibilities for the development of a variety of 
multi-or interdisciplinary studies, independent and 
general study programs and special intensive 
programs designed for individual student needs; 
the latter possibly certificated by individual 
academic departments, schools or the Division. This 
diversity, enhanced by the divisional structure, is 
essential to the growth of a modern university. 
In addition to its major programs, the Division 
serves students from the entire Campus who wish 
to take courses in the arts and humanities. 

The units in the Division are: School of 
Architecture, College of Journalism, American 
Studies Program. Department of Art, Depart- 
ment of Classical Languages and Literatures, 
Department of Dance. Department of English, 
Department of French and Italian Languages 
and Literatures, Department of Germanic and Slavic 
Languages and Literatures, Department of History, 
Department of Music, Oriental and Hebrew 
Program, Department of Philosophy, Department 
of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and 



42 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Softools 



Literaturos, and Oopartmont of Speech and 
Oramalic Art. 

Enlranc* R«qulr*m«nU. The student who intends to 
pursue a program ol study in the Division of Arts and 
Humanities should include the lollowmg subjects in 
a high school program: English, lour units; College 
Preparatory Mathematics (Algebra. Plane 
Geometry), three or (our units; Foreign Language, 
two or more units; Biology, Chemistry or Physics, 
two units; History and Social Sciences, one or 
more units. However, students who lack such 
preparation should not be discouraged automatically 
from investigating the possibility ol enrolling in 
the Division. Its goals include continuing education 
toward enhancement ol the quality ol intellectual 
and cultural lite lor all who have the capacity and 
motivation to participate. Since knowledge 
IS gained in many ways, every ellort will be made 
to give due recognition lor independent 
accomplishment. Students who wish to pursue 
study in the creative and perlormmg arts must seek 
to develop necessary skills to the greatest extent 
possible belore application. The special skills 
and materials associated with the arts make 
considerable training and experience prior to 
college absolutely essential il the student wishes 
to enroll in the professional degree programs 
oKered in the arts. Students applying lor entrance 
to these programs may be required to audition, 
present slides or a portlollo as a part of the 
admission requirements. Entrance requirements 
lor the School of Architecture and the College of 
Journalism are given below. 

Degrees. Students of this Division who satisfactorily 
complete curricula with majors In departments ol 
the humanities and arts are awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. Those who complete 
satisfactorily a special professional program In 
the Department of Music are awarded the degree ol 
Bachelor ol Music. The School ol Architecture 
awards the B. Arch, degree; the B.S. is awarded 
by the College of Journalism. 

General and Divisional Requirements for Degrees. 

Until such time as divisional requirements are an- 
nounced the requirements (or foreign language 
and speech of the former College of Arts and 
Sciences will remain In effect, excluding the School 
o( Architecture and College ol Journalism. For con- 
venience, these requirements are given below. If 
the divisional requirements change, all students 
enrolled In the Division ol Arts and Humanities 
will have the option ol either continuing under 
requirements which existed at the time of entrance 
or changing to the new requirements. Students who 
were registered in the College of Arts and 
Sciences prior to August 1973 will be able to 
complete degree programs offered by the College. 



The baccalaureate degree from the College ol 
Arts and Sciences, or the Division ol Arts and 
Humanities at the present lime, may be conlerred 
upon a student who has satisfied the following 
requirements: 

1. General Education or General University 
Requirements. 

2. College ol Arts and Sciences requirements. 
(See below) 

3. Major Department, College or School 
Requirements. 

4. Completion ol a minimum ol 120 academic 
credits (not including, under the old General 
Education Program, required physical education 
and Health 105) with at least a C average. 

Note: The School of Architecture requires 161 credit 
hours for graduation. 

College of Arts and Sciences Requirements. These 
requirements as Indicated above are to apply 
until new policies of the Division of Arts and 
Humanities are published. 
I. Foreign Language. The College requires a 
certain degree of exposure to, and hopefully 
proliciency in, the knowledge ol a language and 
culture of some country other than Anglo-American. 
This may be met in several ways: 
A. 

1. A student who has successfully completed at 
least through "level 3" of one foreign language at 
the high school level, or 

2. A student who has successfully completed at 
least two years "level 2" of two different foreign 
languages at the high school level need not take 
additional foreign languages at the college level 
to satisfy the requirements of the College. 

B. A student who does not meet the require- 
ments under paragraph A, must show proficiency 
through the Intermediate level of college 
language. This may be done as follows: 

1. Take the placement examination in the 
language In which he has background — two years 
In high school — and begin at the college level 
Indicated by the test and continue through the 
intermediate level; or 

2. Pass the proficiency test for intermediate level 
given by the respective language departments. 

Referring to paragraph A, the following should be 
noted: 

a) Certain departments still require language at 
the college level to fulfill major requirements. 
Also, certain honor societies still require language 
at the college level among the requirements for 
selection to membership; In many graduate 
programs, proficiency In foreign languages Is still 
required, while the requirement for professional 
schools varies, and it becomes the responsibility 



ol the student to meet the requirements of the 
school ol his choice. 

b) In interpreting this paragraph, the College 
accepts the information that appears on the stu- 
dent's high school transcript at the time he 
registers tor his first semester at the University. 

At the present lime, the languages which may 
be offered to meet this requirement are Chinese. 
French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese 
Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and 
Swahili. 

Foreign students may satisly this requirement by 
ottering twelve hours ol English In addition to 
the regular English composition requirement. A 
lorelgn student may not meet the foreign language 
requirement by taking freshman or sophomore 
courses In his native language. 

Normally a student shall not be (jermitled to 
repeat a foreign language course t>elow Course 200 
for credit if he has successfully completed a 
higher numbered course than the one he wishes 
to repeat. 

II. Speech. If a student has had one full unit of 
public speaking in high school covenng an entire 
academic year, he is not required to take a 
speech course at the college level, though he 
may elect to do so. 

Those students who need to take speech at the 
college level to complete the one-semester 
requirement may choose one course trom the 
following: SPCH 100. 107, 125, or 220. In certain 
situations other courses may be substituted: 
e.g.. pre-law students may take SPCH 230. 

Major Requirements. Each student chooses a 
field of concentration (major). He may make this 
choice as early as he wishes; however, once he 
has earned 56 hours of acceptable credit he must 
choose a major before his next registration. 

In programs leading to the baccalaureate 
degree, the student must also have a secondary 
field of concentration (supporting courses). The 
courses constituting the major and the supporting 
courses must conlorm to the requirements of the 
department in which the work is done. 

The student must have an average of not less 
than C in the Introductory courses in the lield 
in which he intends to major . 

A major shall consist, in addition to the lower 
division departmental prerequisites, ol 24-40 hours, 
at least twelve ol which must be in courses num- 
bered 300 or 400 and at least twelve ol which must 
be taken in the University ol Maryland. 

Each major program Includes a group ol 
supporting courses," lormerly called minors, 
that are designed to contribute to a better 
understanding ol the major. The nature and 
number ol these courses are under the control of 
the major department. 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 43 



The average grade of the work laken for the 
major must be at least C; some departments will 
count toward satisfaction of the major 
requirement no course completed with a grade 
of less than C. The average grade of the work 
taken in the major and supporting courses 
combined must be at least C. A general average 
of C in courses taken at the University of 
Maryland is required for graduation. 

Courses taken to fulfill General University Re- 
quirements may not be used toward divisional, 
major, or supporting courses requirements. 

Junior Requirements. To attain junior standing, 
a student must acquire a minimum of 56 academic 
semester hours and be eligible to re-register 
in the University. 

Advisors. Each freshman in the Division will be 
assigned to a faculty advisor who will help the 
student, during his first year, to select his courses 
and to determine what his field of major concentra- 
tion should be. 

The student at the sophomore level and above 
will be advised by a faculty member in his major 
department. 

Students in the School of Architecture and 
College of Journalism should consult their deans. 

Certification of High School Teachers. If courses 
are properly chosen in the field of education, 
a prospective high school teacher can prepare 
for high school positions, with a major and 
supporting courses in certain of the departments 
of this Division. A student who wishes to work 
for a teacher's certificate must consult the 
College of Education in the second semester of 
his sophomore year and apply for admission 
to the "Teacher Education" program. 

Honors. The aim of the General Honors Programs 
is to recognize and encourage superior scholarship. 
To this end, Honors work offers the gifted student 
challenging opportunities to work in small groups 
with carefully chosen instructors and to move 
at a speed appropriate to his capacities in an 
atmosphere conducive both to independent 
study and to growth in intellectual maturity. The 
Division conducts both General and Departmental 
Honors Programs spanning the four undergraduate 
years. The General Honors Program is discussed 
in the Department Section under "Honors 
Program." 

For information concerning the Departmental 
Honors Programs, consult the various depart- 
mental entries in this catalog. It may, however, 
be remarked that the Departmental Honors 
Programs are administered by an Honors Committee 
within each department. Admission to a Depart- 
mental Honors Program ordinarily occurs at the 
beginning of the first or second semester of the 



student's junior year. As a rule, only students 
with a cumulative grade point average of at least 
3.0 are admitted. A comprehensive examination 
over the field of his major program is given to 
a candidate near the end of his senior year. On 
the basis of the student's performance on the 
Honors Comprehensive Examination and in meeting 
such other requirements as may be set by the 
Departmental Honors Committee, the faculty 
may vote to recommend the candidate for the 
appropriate degree with (departmental) honors 
or for the appropriate degree with (departmental) 
high honors. Successful candidacy will be 
symbolized by appropriate announcement in the 
commencement program and by citation on the 
student's academic record and diploma. 

Students in the General and Departmental 
Honors Programs enjoy some academic privileges 
similar to those of graduate students. 

Kappa Tau Alpha. The IVIaryland chapter of Kappa 
Tau Alpha was chartered in 1961. Founded in 1910, 
this national honorary society has 39 chapters at 
universities offering graduate or undergraduate 
preparation for careers in professional journalism. 
It is dedicated to recognition and promotion of 
scholarship in journalism. Among its activities is 
an annual award for an outstanding piece of 
published research in journalism and mass com- 
munications. (Also see College of Journalism) 

Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest 
and most widely respected honorary fraternity in 
'he United States. Invitation to membership is 
based not only on outstanding scholastic achieve- 
ment, but also on breadth of liberal arts studies 
completed while enrolled at the University of 
IVIaryland. Gamma of IVIaryland chapter has 
liaison faculty members in the various depart- 
ments in the Division of Arts and Humanities with 
whom students may discuss membership selection. 
It should be kept in mind that requirements for 
national honorary societies, such as completion 
of language and mathematics courses, often differ 
from the local college, division or university 
requirements. 

Schools and Colleges of The Division 

School of Architecture 

School of Architecture. The School of Architecture 
offers a five-year undergraduate professional 
program leading to the degree. Bachelor of 
Architecture. Future plans include development 
of other environmental design programs at the 
graduate and undergraduate level. 

The School was awarded accreditation by the 
National Architectural Accreditation Board, 
June 1972, insuring that past, present, and future 



students will be eligible for registration in all 
50 states upon meeting experience requirements 
and passing the standard examination. The School 
IS an associate member of the Association of 
Collegiate Schools of Architecture, and is assigned 
to that organization's Northeastern Region. 

The curriculum presents the basic requisite 
skills and the opportunity to develop the knowledge 
to begin professional work. The School's goal is 
to prepare students for professional service in 
helping solve the nation's environmental problems. 

Opportunities in Architecture. A rapidly growing 
population, together with expanding industrial 
development, has taxed the resources of cities 
throughout the world. Large segments of these 
urban populations are overcrowded, under- 
serviced and deprived of many of the amenities 
which city life has provided in the past, fulany 
cities find themselves on the edge of economic, 
political and social disaster. Whole ethnic, racial 
and economic groups live in a continuing situation 
of frustration. This urban crisis, which has come 
into being over the last generation, promises to 
dominate our domestic life in the United States for 
at least the generation to come. 

The complexity of these problems, precluding 
easy attribution of causes and simple 
solutions, has generated great change in the 
environmental design professions and in the other 
social disciplines. Where they once stood apart, 
they are now committed to a common purpose. 
Each of them has had to broaden its vision of 
service and concern and has come to recognize 
the worth and value of the techniques and insights 
of the others. 

In architecture, these exchanges have influenced 
procedures, services and goals of the profession. 
Recent years have seen the introduction of the 
ideas of urban sociology and the behavioral 
sciences into the area of professional concern, 
and the inclusion into professional procedures of 
linear programming, computer technology, 
operations research, mathematical and gaming 
simulation, and the use of analog models. The 
scope of architectural services, once confined to 
the design, supervision and construction of 
buildings, has been broadened to include 
programming, developmental planning operations 
research, project feasibility studies, and other 
new professional activities. Finally, the role of 
the architect is expanding from a narrow concern 
with building design to a broad concern for develop- 
mental change, and his goal has developed from 
a preoccupation with beauty to a commitment 
to contribute to the enhancement of the 
quality of life. 



44 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



' t>se observations indicate both ttie great need 
t'ducaled and trained professionals, and the 
relevancy and excitement which characterize 
the prolession today. Perhaps at no lime in history 
has architecture posed as great a challenge, 
or ottered so great a promise ol personal 
lultillmeni to its successful practitioners. There are 
many opportunities for employment and careers in 
architectural practice. Additional education and 
experience also quality a graduate for a career 
in city or regional planning. 

Moreover, the general nature of an architectural 
education is such that some graduates elect 
and achieve successful careers in related fields 
in civil service, commerce or industry. 

The Curriculum. The program permits students to 
enter the School of Architecture either directly 
from high school or after one year of general 
college work without extending the time required 
tor completion of degree requirements. 

Students in the first year may take an introduc- 
tory course in architecture as well as general 
courses. In the second year, the student begins his 
professional education in basic design and building 
construction as well as continuing his general 
education. The basic environmental design studio 
explores specific architectural problems 
as well as the general problems inherent 
in making objects and spaces. In the third year, 
coordinated courses in building design and 
technology introduce the student to the ecological, 
physiographic, physiological, social, and physical 
generators of architectural design. In the fourth 
year, this process is continued, but the emphasis is 
on urban design: the environmental context, 
the historical and situational context, urban sys- 
tems, and theoretical, aesthetic and sociological 
considerations. In the fifth year of design, the 
student is offered an opportunity to choose a com- 
prehensive topical problem from several 
offered each year, or to work independently. Special 
studies in technical areas as well as building 
design and case studies in urban planning may 
be included. 

All of the design studio courses emphasize 
environmental design problem-solving experiences, 
as well as lectures, reading assignments, and field 
trips that advance the students skills. In 
addition to the design and technical courses, the 
student is required to take two semesters of 
architectural history, physics, mathematics, and a 
distribution of elective courses. 

The general requirements of the University apply 
to the architecture program. In addition, students 
are specifically required to complete a mathematics 
series terminating with IvIATH 221. Ivlost students 
find it necessary to begin college math with 



IVIATH 115. followed by MATH 220 and 221. In 
addition, architecture students are required to 
complete PHYS 121. 

Location. The School is housed in a contemporary 
air-conditioned building on the Campus about 
10 miles from Washington. D.C.. and 30 miles from 
Baltimore. Maryland. This location, in the center 
of a large urban concentration, offers many 
opportunities for the Schools program and the 
student's growth. 

The School of Architecture building provides 
studio space, a library, exhibit space, a shop, a 
photo lab. classrooms, and lecture hall facilities. 
Library. The Architectural School Library at present 
comprises some 13,000 volumes. It is expected 
that the library will number 15,000 volumes by 
1974. This will make it one of the major architectural 
school libraries in the nation. The library subscribes 
to about 120 foreign and domestic periodicals 
providing resources in urban sociology, building 
technology and urban planning as well as in 
architecture. 

Visual Aids. The visual aids library comprises 
about 55.000 35-mm color slides in architecture, 
landscape architecture, and urban planning. 
A goal for 1977 is 100,000 slides. The collection 
also includes films and photographs. Visual aid 
equipment is available (or classroom use. 

Admission. Because there is a fixed limit to the 
number of candidates who can be admitted 
each year, it is important that the following 
instructions be carefully followed: 

1 . Students applying from high school: write 
the Director of Admissions. University of Maryland. 
College Park. Md. 20742 for application instructions; 

2. Students who have completed work at other 
universities: write the Director of Admissions, 
University of Maryland. College Park. Md. 20742 
for application instructions: 

3. Students transferring from other colleges or 
divisions of the University of Maryland: pick up 

an application form at the School of Architecture 
and return it to the assistant dean of the School, 
together with a record of all work taken at the 
University of Maryland. 

Deadlines: all application procedures should be 
completed and materials in hand at the University 
by March 1. Applications received after this date, 
but before the University deadline dates for 
new students and for transfer students, will be 
considered only on a space-available basis. 

Financial Assistance. For promising young men 
and women who might not otherwise be able to 
attend the University's School of Architecture, 
a number of grants and scholarships are available, 



some earmarked specifically for architectural 
studentB. New students must apply before 
March 15. Students already enrolled may apply 
before May 1 All requests for information con- 
corning these awards should be directed to 
Director. Student Aid. University of Maryland. 
Colleqe Park Md 20742 

College of Journalism 

College of Journalism. The College of Journalism, 
at the University of Maryland, stands at the 
doorstep of the Nations Capital and the world's 
news center. It is an ideal location for the study o( 
journalism, public relations, and mass communi- 
cations because many of the world's important 
journalists, great news events, and significant 
communications activities are near at hand. 

The College is within easy reach of five of the 
nation's top 20 newspapers the Baltimore Sun, 
the Baltimore News-American, the Washington 
Post, the Washington Star-News, and the production 
offices of the Wall Street Journal. The College 
also has easy access to the Washington press 
corps — the large bureaus ol the Associated Press. 
United Press International, New York Times, and 
many other American and foreign newspapers: also 
major networks and broadcasting news bureaus 
such as NBC. CBS. and ABC; also news, business, 
and special-interest magazines, and representatives 
of the book publishing industry. 

The College is close to the sources of news, 
including the White House, executive departments 
and agencies. Supreme Court, and Congress. 
It is near many major non-governmental representa- 
tive bodies such as associations, scientific and 
professional organizations, foreign representatives, 
2nd international agencies. 

The College has six primary objectives: 1) to 
insure a liberal education for journalists and mass 
communicators; 2) to provide professional 
development, including training in skills and 
techniques necessary for effective communication; 
3) to increase public understanding of journalism 
and mass communication; 4) to advance knowledge 
through research and publication; 5) to raise the 
quality of journalism through critical examination 
and study; and 6) to provide continuing relation- 
ship with professional journalists and their 
societies. 

The College curriculum in news editorial 
journalism is accredited by The American Council 
on Education for Journalism. The College is a 
member of The American Association of Schools 
and Departments of Journalism. The Association for 
Education in Journalism, and The American Society 
of Journalism School Administrators. 

Student journalism organization chapters include 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 45 



Sigma Delta Chi. Women in Communication, 
Pi Delta Epsilon. Kappa Tau Alpha, Kappa Alpha 
Mu, and a charter chapter of the Public Relations 
Student Society of America. 

The College offers specialized work in news 
reporting and editing, public relations, advertising, 
news broadcasting, news photography, and 
communication theory and research. 

The College maintains close liaison with student 
publications and communications, including the 
student daily newspaper, yearbook, feature 
magazine, course guide, literary magazine, Campus 
radio station, and Campus television workshop. 

The College also provides summer internships 
in professional work and part-time on-the-job 
training opportunities. 

Advanced students in news reporting may work 
in Washington as correspondents for participating 
newspapers in the fvlaryland-Delaware-D.C. Press 
Association. Students in this advanced program 
cover the White House, Congress, government 
agencies and departments for publication. 

Students may declare their intention to major 
in journalism at the beginning of any semester, 
but normally this is done before their junior 
year. Students select and work with one faculty 
member as their advisor during the course of their 
study at the University. 

Typing ability and English proficiency are 
required of all students. Majors must maintain a C 
average in courses taken in the College. Students 
must receive at least a C in Journalism 200 and 
201 before they will be allowed to major in 
Journalism. 

The Division of Behavorial and Social Sciences 

The Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

consists of faculty and students who are involved 
in research and teaching relating to the analysis and 
solution of behavioral and social problems. The 
Division, organized in 1972. contains academic 
departments which were formerly administered by 
the College of Arts and Sciences and the College 
of Business and Public Administration, in addition 
to a new College of Business and Management. 
The Division is designed to extend and support 
learning in the traditional disciplines while 
creating conditions for the development of inter- 
disciplinary approaches to recurring social 
problems. Divisional students might choose to 
concentrate their studies in the traditional fields, 
or may be interested in focusing on interdisciplinary 
study. As part of its response to society's need 
for resolution of the ever more complex problems 
of modern civilization, the University must promote 



the utilization of knowledge generated by a 
cross fertilization of disciplines. The Division will 
facilitate the grouping and regrouping of faculty 
across disciplinary lines for problem-oriented 
research and teaching. The interaction of faculty 
and students in overlapping fields will be 
encouraged and supported. 

In order to promote the exchange of ideas, 
education, and knowledge, each unit of the Division, 
including the College of Business and Manage- 
ment, will be concerned with both applied and 
theoretical aspects of the resolution of social 
problems. Practicums and internships will be 
utilized increasingly for the purpose of relating 
theoretical and empirical concepts in pursuit 
of the Division's concern with conditions in 
society. 

The units in the Division are: The College of 
Business and Management, Department of Afro- 
American Studies, Anthropology Program, 
Department of Economics, Department of 
Geography, Department of Government and Politics, 
Department of Information Systems Management, 
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, 
Department of Sociology, Department of 
Psychology, Institute of Criminal Justice and 
Criminology, Institute of Urban Studies, and the 
Linguistics Program. 

In addition to these departments, programs and 
institutes, the Division includes the Bureau of 
Business and Economic Research and the Bureau 
of Governmental Research. 

For the present year (1974-1975) the Academic 
Council of the Division has decided that in order 
to complete the degree requirements for the 
Division the student must successfully complete 
120 hours of course work with an average of C as 
required by the University Academic Regulations 
which must include: 

1) the courses required by the General University 
Requirements and 

2) the major and supporting courses with an average 
of C that are required by each Academic Unit 

in the Division. 

Students who matriculated in departments 
originally in the College of Business and Public 
Administration or in departments in the College of 
Arts and Sciences shall have the option of 
completing their degrees and requirements as 
stated under the old college requirements, 
including the previous General Education Require- 
ments or under the new divisional requirements. 

Entrance Requirements. Requirements for admission 
to the Division are the same as the requirements 
for admission to the University. 

Degrees. The University confers the following 
degrees, as appropriate, on students completing 



programs of study in the academic units in the 
Divisions: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of 
Business Administration, Doctor of Business 
Administration, Doctor of Philosophy. Each 
candidate for a degree must file in the Office of 
Admissions and Registrations, prior to a date 
announced for each semester, a formal application 
for the appropriate degree. 

Graduation Requirements. A minimum of 120 hours 
of credit with an average of C. which must include 
the 30 hours specified by the General University 
Requirements and the specific major and support- 
ing course requirements of the College of Business 
and Management or of the programs in the 
academic units of the Division, are required for 
graduation. 

Senior Residence Requirement. All candidates for 
degrees should plan to take their senior year 
in residence since the advanced work of the major 
study normally occurs in the last year of the 
undergraduate course sequence. At least 24 of the 
last 30 credits must be done in residence. For 
example, a student, who at the time of his gradua- 
tion, will have completed 30 semester hours in 
residence may be permitted to do no more than 
6 semester hours of final 30 credits of record 
in another institution, provided he secures permis- 
sion in advance from his dean or the Division 
Chairman. The student must be enrolled in the 
division from which he plans to graduate when 
registering for the last 15 credits of his program. 

Honors: The Chairman's List of Distinguished 
Students. Any student who has passed at least 
12 hours of academic work in the preceding 
semester, without failure of any course, and with 
an average grade on all courses of at least 3.5 will 
be placed on the Chairman's List of Distinguished 
Students. 

College of Business and Management 

The College of Business and Management is ideally 
located to serve students interested in economics, 
geography, information systems management, and 
political science. Downtown Washington is only 
25 minutes away in one direction, while the 
Baltimore business district is less than an hour 
in the other. There is frequent transportation 
service from College Park to each city. Qualified 
students may obtain a first-hand view of the 
far-flung economic and political activities of the 
national government and may utilize the libraries 
and other facilities available in Washington. 
The College's five instructional units offer 
a broad range of curricula in professional fields 
and in social science disciplines. The separate 
programs of study frequently draw upon courses 



46 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



jmplomeniary fields wilhin the college The 
iivo sections and the major sections offerings are: 

Business Administration: The General Curriculum 
in Business Administration, Accounting. Finance. 
Marketing. Personnel and Industrial Relations. 
Production Management. Management Science — 
Statistics. Transportation, and Combined Business 
Administration and Law. 

Entrance Requirements. Requirements for admis- 
sion to ttie college are those of the University. 

To assure a likelihood of success in the college. 
It IS recommended that the student have four 
units of English, three or more units of college 
preparatory mathematics — including a minimum 
of two units of algebra and one unit of geometry, 
one or more units of history and social science. 
two or more units of natural science, and two 
or more units of foreign language. Students 
expecting to enroll in the College of Business and 
Management should pursue the precollege program 
in high school. 

Statement of Policy on the Transfer of Credit 
from Other Institutions. The College of Business 
and Management subscribes to the policy that a 
student's undergraduate program, below his 
junior year.* should include no advanced, 
professional-level courses. This policy is based 
on the conviction that the value derived from 
these advanced courses is materially enhanced 
when based upon a sound foundation in the liberal 
arts. 

In adhering to the above policy it is the practice 
of the College of Business and Management to 
accept in transfer from another accredited 
institution no more than 12 semester hours of 
work in Business Administration courses when they 
have been taken as part of a curricular program 
below the junior year. Similar limitations may 
be placed upon the transfer of credit in other 
professional areas. 

The 12 semester hours of Business Administration 
acceptable m transfer are specifically Identified 
as three (3) semester hours in an introductory 
business course, three (3) semester hours in 
business statistics, and six (6) semester hours of 
elementary accounting. In addition, a single course 
in data processing may be considered for transfer. 
but only for elective credit. Thus, it is anticipated 
that the student transferring from another 
institution will have devoted the majoi share of 
his academic effort, below the junior year, to the 
completion of basic requirements in the liberal arts. 

Degrees. The University confers the following 
degrees on students completing programs of study 

•Th« l«rm ■ t>«low Ihe junior ye«r" is dfllined as thai penod of col- 
■afiiat* •nrollmant wherein a student has accumulated sixty, or lewer. 
semester hours of transferable academic credit. 



in the College: Bachelor of Science. Master of Arts, 
Master of Business Administration, Doctor of 
Business Administration, and Doctor of Philosophy. 
Each candidate for a degree must file in the 
Registrations Office, prior to a date announced for 
each semester, a formal application for a degree. 

Junior Standing. A student is permitted to register 
tor upper division courses when granted Junior 
standing by his college. The permission will be 
based upon earning a minimum of 56 academic 
hours toward his degree, completing such course 
requirements as the college may direct, and 
possessing the minimum required grade point 
average to remain in Ihe University. 

Graduation Requirements. A minimum of 120 
semester hours of credit with an average of C is re- 
quired for graduation. A minimum of 57 hours of 
the required 120 hours must be in upper division 
courses, with the exception that the student may, 
with the consent of the dean, offer certain lower 
division courses in mathematics, natural science 
and foreign language in partial fulfillment of the 
requirement. Usually the programs within Ihe College 
will require that Ihe student have, in addition to an 
overall C average, an average of C or better in 
those courses comprising Ihe student's depart- 
mental area of study. The lime normally required to 
complete Ihe requirements for Ihe bachelor's 
degree is eight semesters. 

Division of Human and Community Resources 
The Division of Human and Community Resources 

includes Ihe faculties and programs of Ihe College 
of Education. Ihe College of Human Ecology, the 
College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health, and Ihe College of Library and Information 
Services. The programs of the Division are 
essentially professional. They are designed to 
prepare teachers and school service personnel; 
professionals Interested in Ihe quality of life of the 
individual, groups and Ihe community factors 
which influence Ihe interaction of people; those 
who are responsible for community health, recrea- 
tion programs and activities; technical, public 
and school librarians, and information scientists. 

The Division offers bachelor's, master's, and 
doctorate degrees in most of its programs in addi- 
tion to various professional certificates. The 
professional programs are accredited by the 
National Council lor Accreditation of Teacher 
Education, the Maryland Stale Department of 
Education, the American Library Association Com- 
mittee on Accreditation, and the American Home 
Economics Association. Unless otherwise stated the 



regulations and degree requirements of the present 
colleges constituting the new Division shall 
remain in effect until revised policies of Ihe Division 
are published. 

In addition to emphasis on teaching and research 
the Division aspires to a broader contribution of its 
special knowledge and expertise to the University 
and community at large. Specifically, the following 
Colleges and their respective departments are 
included in the Division: 

College of Education: Department of Administra- 
tion, Supervision and Curriculum, Department of 
Counseling and Personnel Services, Department of 
Early Childhood-Elementary Education, Depart- 
ment of Industrial Education, Department of 
Measurement and Statistics, Department of 
Secondary Education, Department of Special 
Education, Institute For Child Study, Social and 
Foundations Area. 

College of Human Ecology: Department of Family 
and Community Development, Department of 
Foods. Nutrition and Institution Administration, 
Department of Housing and Applied Design, 
Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics. 

College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health: Department of Health Education. 
Department of Physical Education, and Department 
of Recreation. 

College of Library and Information Services. 
This College, a separate professional College 
committed solely to graduate study and research. 
IS administered by a dean who is directly responsible 
to the Chancellor of the College Park Campus 
through the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. 

College of Education 

The College of Education offers programs for 
persons preparing lor Ihe following educational 
endeavors: 1) teaching in colleges, secondary 
schools, middle schools, elementary schools, 
kindergarten and nursery schools; 2) teaching in 
special education programs; 3) school librarians 
and resource specialists: 4) educational work in 
trades and industries; 5) pupil personnel, counsel- 
ing and guidance services; 6) supervision and 
administration; 7) curriculum development; 8) re- 
habilitation programs; 9) evaluation and research. 
Because of the location of the University in the 
suburbs of the Nation's Capital, unusual facilities 
for the study of education are available to its 
students and faculty. The Library of Congress, 
the library of the United States Office of Education, 
and special libraries of other government agencies 
are accessible, as well as the information services 
of the National Education Association, American 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 47 



Council on Education. United States Office of 
Education, and other organizations, public and 
private. The school systems of the District of 
Columbia. Baltimore and the counties of tvlaryland 
offer generous cooperation. 

The teacher education programs preparing early 
childhood, elementary school and secondary 
school teachers at the bachelor's degree and 
masters degree levels, and the programs preparing 
school service personnel (elementary and sec- 
ondary school principals, general school administra- 
tors, supervisors, curriculum coordinators, guid- 
ance counselors, student personnel administrators, 
and vocational rehabilitation counselors) at the 
master's, advanced graduate specialist and doctoral 
degree levels are all fully accredited by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. 

Requirements for Admission. All students desiring 
to enroll in the College of Education must apply 
to the Director of Admissions of the University of 
Maryland at College Park and meet the admissions 
requirements detailed in Section I of this dialog. 
There are no specific secondary school course 
requirements for admission, but a foreign language 
is desirable in some of the programs, and courses 
in fine arts, trades, and vocational subjects are 
also desirable for some programs. 

Candidates for admission whose high school or 
college records are consistently \0'm are strongly 
advised not to seek admission to the College of 
Education. 

Students with baccalaureate degrees who have 
applied for admission as special students must 
have received prior permission from the appropriate 
department. 

Guidance in Registration. Students who intend to 
leach (except agriculture and physical education) 
should register in the College of Education in order 
that they may have the continuous counsel and 
guidance of the faculty directly responsible for 
teacher education at the University of Maryland. 
At the time of matriculation each student is as- 
signed to a member of the faculty who acts as the 
student's advisor. The choice of subject areas 
within which the student will prepare to teach will 
be made under faculty guidance during the 
freshman year. The student will confer regularly 
with the faculty advisor in the College of Education 
responsible for his teaching major. 

While It may be possible to make satisfactory 
adjustments as late as the junior year for students 
from other colleges who have not already entered 
upon the sequence of professional courses, it is 
highly desirable that the student enter the particular 
program in Education in the freshman year. 

General Requirements of the College. Minimum 
requirements for graduation are 120 semester 



hours. Specific program requirements for more than 
the minimum must be fulfilled. 

In addition to the General University Require- 
ments and the specific requirements for each 
curriculum, the College requires a minimum of 20 
semester hours of education courses and 3 
semester hours of speech. 

Marks in all required upper division courses in 
education and in subjects in major and minor 
fields must be C or higher, except in the case of 
student teaching where a grade of S is required. A 
general average of C or higher must be main- 
tained. (See Admission to Teacher Education.) 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules 
of the College of Education must be recommended 
by the student's advisor, department chairperson, 
and approved by the dean. 

Students who are not enrolled in the College of 
Education but who. through an established 
cooperative program with another college, are 
preparing to teach and wish to register in profes- 
sional education courses required for certification 
must meet all curricular and scholastic require- 
ments of the College of Education. 

Majors and Minors. There is no College requirement 
for a minor although various programs 
provide course sequence options and minors can 
be developed in most programs. Specific program 
plans should be consulted. In the Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education curriculum students must 
complete at least 80 semester hours of academic 
content in courses other than Education, which 
includes an area of concentration of at least 
18 semester hours. 

Admission to Teacher Education. All students, full 
or part-time, who are in a teacher education cur- 
riculum, must apply to the Admission to Teacher 
Education Committee for admission to teacher 
education at the beginning of the semester im- 
mediately after earning 42 hours. Transfer students 
with 42 or more hours of acceptable transfer 
credit must apply at time of transfer. Transfer 
students must complete a minimum of 12 hours at 
Maryland before their applications will be processed. 
Post-graduate certification students and those 
working for certification only must apply at the 
beginning of their program. Application forms may 
be obtained from the College of Education Records 
Office. 

In considering applications, the following guide- 
lines have been established by the committee: 

1 . No student will be allowed to enroll in EDHD 
300 and methods classes until he has received 
full approval. 

2. Full approval is always granted with the under- 
standing that the student will have a successful 
field experience in EDHD 300 and that any 



case may be reconsidered by the committee if 
subsequent academic performance declines. 

3. Secondary education applicants must show 
evidence of ability to achieve on an above aver- 
age level in courses directly related to their 
major field. 

4. Applicants must be of good moral and ethical 
character. This will be determined as fairly 
as possible from such evidence as advisors' 
recommendations and records of serious 
Campus delinquencies. 

5. Applicants must be physically and emotionally 
capable of functioning as teachers. This will 
mean freedom from serious chronic illness, emo- 
tional instability and communicable disease, 

as determined in cooperation with the Health 
Service and the Counseling Center. 

6. Applicants must be free of serious speech 
handicaps. 

The purpose of the screening procedure associ- 
ated with admission to teacher education is to 
insure that graduates of the teacher education 
program will be well prepared for teaching and can 
be recommended for certification with confidence. 

Student Teaching. In order to be admitted to a 
course in student teaching, a student must have 
been admitted to the Teacher Education Program 
(see above), have a physician's certificate indicating 
that the applicant is free of communicable 
diseases, and the consent of the department. 
Application must be made with the Director of 
Laboratory Experiences by the middle of the 
semester which precedes the one in which student 
teaching will be done. Any applicant for student 
teaching must have been enrolled previously at the 
University of Maryland for at least one semester. 

Certification of Teachers. The Maryland State De- 
partment of Education certifies to teach in the 
approved public schools of the State only graduates 
of approved colleges who have satisfactorily 
fulfilled subject-matter and professional require- 
ments. The curricula of the College of Education 
fulfill State Department requirements for certifica- 
tion. 

Degrees. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts and 
Bachelor of Science are conferred by the College of 
Education. The determination of which degree is 
conferred is dependent upon the amount of liberal 
arts study included in a particular degree program. 

Organization. The College of Education is 
organized into seven departments and an institute 
as listed under the Division of Human and Com- 
munity Resources. The non-departmental area of 
Social Foundations offers courses in history, 
philosophy, and sociology of education. 



48 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



Unique specialized services tor students, faculty, 
leactiers and schools are ottered ttirough Itie 
lollowing centers: 

Arlthmalic Center. The Arithmetic Center provides 
a Mathematics Laboratory tor undergraduate and 
graduate students, and a program ol clinical 
diagnostic and corrective/ remedial services tor 
children Clinic services are a part ot a program in 
elementary school mathematics at the graduate 
level 

Bureau ol Educational Research and Field 
Sarvicas. The Bureau ol Educational Research and 
Field Services has been established to (1) encour- 
age and stimulate basic research bearing on 
different aspects ol the educative process: (2) pro- 
vide assistance in designing, implementing and 
evaluating research protects initiated by local 
school systems: (3) coordinate school systems' 
requests tor consultants with the rich and varied 
professional competencies that are available on 
the University faculty. 

Curriculum Laboratory. The Curriculum Laboratory 
provides students, faculty and teachers in the field 
with materials and assistance in the area of 
curriculum. An up-to-date collection of curriculum 
materials includes texts, simulations, learning 
packages, programs, resource kits, charts, study 
guides, curriculum studies, and bibliographies. 

Educational Technology Center. The center is 
designed as a multi-media facility for students and 
faculty of the College. It distributes closed-circuit 
television throughout the building, provides audio- 
visual equipment and service, a computer terminal, a 
learning lab. and instruction in all aspects of 
instructional materials, aids, and new media. Pro- 
duction and distribution rooms and a studio are 
available for closed-circuit television and a video 
tape system. Laboratories are available for graphic 
and photographic production with facilities for 
faculty research and development in the use of 
instructional media. Supporting the professional 
faculty in the operation of the center are media 
specialists. 

Onice ol Laboratory Experiences. The Office of 
Laboratory Experiences is designed to accom- 
modate the laboratory experiences ol students 
preparing to teach by arranging for all field experi- 
ences. In this capacity it administers the Teacher 
Education Centers and serves as liaison between 
the University programs and the public schools. 
Student applications for all levels of field experi- 
ences, including student teaching, are processed 
through this office. 

Music Educators National Conference Historical 
Center. The University of fwlaryland and the Music 



Educators National Conference established the 
MENC Historical Center in 1965 lor the purpose of 
building and maintaining a research collection 
which would reflect the development and current 
practices in music education Located in McKeldin 
Library, the center includes study space and is 
prepared to assist scholars in the field. Materials 
in the following categories are collected: archival 
documents of MENC: instructional materials; pro- 
fessional publications: curricular, administrative, 
and philosophical materials; manuscripts, personal 
letters and other historical materials. 

Center lor Young Children. Housed in the College 

of Education, the demonstration nursery- 
kindergarten program services the University in 
the following ways: (1 ) acts as a center in which 
individual professors or students may conduct 
research: (2) serves as a unit for undergraduate 
students to have selected experiences with young 
children, such as student teaching, child study, 
and other forms of participation in a program lor 
young children: (3) provides a setting in which 
educators from within and without the University 
can come for sources of ideas relative to the 
education ol young children. 

Reading Center. The Reading Center provides clini- 
cal diagnostic and corrective services to a limited 
number of children. These services are a part 
of the program in corrective/remedial reading 
offered to teachers on the graduate level. 

Science Teaching Center. The Science Teaching 
Center has been designed to serve as a representa- 
tive facility of its type to fulfill its functions of 
undergraduate and graduate science teacher educa- 
tion, science supervisor training, basic research 
in science education, aid to inservice teachers 
and supervisors, and consultative services, on 
all levels, kindergarten through community college. 
Its reference library features relevant periodicals, 
science and mathematics textbooks, new curricu- 
lum materials, and works on science subjects 
and their operational aspects. Its fully equipped re- 
search laboratory, in addition to its teaching 
laboratories for science methods courses, pro- 
vides project space for both faculty and students. 

Since 1962 the Science Teaching Center has 
served as the headquarters for the activities of the 
Science Teaching Materials Review Committee 
of the National Science Teachers Association. 
The Information Clearinghouse on Science and 
Mathematics Curricular Developments, started here 
that year also, is the International Clearinghouse 
for A.A.A.S., N.S.F. and UNESCO. Within the center 
IS gathered the software" and "hardware " of 
science education in what is considered to be one 
of the most comprehensive collections of such 
materials in the world. 



Student and Prolestional Organizations. The College 
sponsors a chapter ol the Student National Edu- 
cation Association, which is open to undergradu- 
ate students on the College Park Campus. 
A student chapter of the Council lor Exceptional 
Children is open to undergraduate and graduate 
students interested in working with exceptional 
children. A student chapter ol the Music Edu- 
cators National Conlerence (MENC) is sponsored 
by the Department ol Music, and the Industrial 
Education Department has a chapter ol the 
American Society ol Tool and Manulactunng 
Engineers and a chapter ol the American Industrial 
Arts Association. 

In several departments there are inlormal 
organizations ol students. 

Career OevelopmenI Center University Credentials 
Service. All seniors graduating in the College of 
Education (except Education for Industry majors) 
are required to file credentials with the Career 
Development Center. Credentials consist ol the 
permanent record ol a student's academic prepara- 
tion and recommendations from academic and 
professional sources. An initial registration lee 
enables the Career Development Center to send a 
student's credentials to interested educational 
employers, as indicated by the student. 

Students who are completing teacher certification 
requirements, advanced degrees and are 
interested in a teaching, administrative or research 
position in education, or who are completing 
advanced degrees in library science, may also 
file credentials. 

Other services include vacancy listing in sec- 
ondary schools and institutions of higher learning, 
notifications of interest-related positions, on-Campus 
interviews with State and out-of-State school 
systems, and descriptive information on school 
systems throughout the country. 

This service is also available to alumni. For 
further information contact Mrs. Anna Tackett, 
assistant director, Career Development Center, 
Cumberland Hall basement; or phone 454-2813. 
On-Campus Courses. Through the University 
College, a number ol courses in education are 
offered in Baltimore, in other centers in Maryland 
and overseas. These courses are chosen to meet 
the needs of groups of students in various centers. 
In these centers, on a part-time basis, a student 
may complete a part of the work required lor 
an undergraduate or a graduate degree. Announce- 
ments of such courses may be obtained by ad- 
dressing requests to the Dean. University College, 
College Park, Maryland. 

College of Human Ecology 

The College of Human Ecology reflects the progress 

and growth made by Home Economics in recent 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 49 



years in directing its focus toward the needs of 
individuals and society. Tfie College shares in the 
obligation of all higher education to provide a broad 
based education for every individual as preparation 
for living in close harmony with the environment in 
both the immediate and long-range future. 

Human Ecology is an applied field of study, 
interdisciplinary in nature, which studies the indi- 
vidual and/or living unit' and the interactive 
nature of those factors in communities which 
impinge upon them. It draws upon the basic disci- 
plines of the natural, social, and behavioral 
sciences and the arts for application and utilization. 
The curricula afford the opportunity for improving 
the quality of life in man's near environment. 

The College seeks to provide the proper balance 
of educational experiences which prepares an 
individual in the professional context as well as 
those experiences which benefit him personally as 
a fully functioning and contributing member of 
society. This includes grounding in basic and 
applied skills, as well as providing an atmosphere 
where creativity may flourish to enhance our 
potential for developing innovative solutions to 
human societal problems of living. 

The faculty utilizes existing knowledge and gen- 
erates new knowledge, techniques and methods 
based on research, while providing opportunities 
through laboratory, practical and field experiences 
for making knowledge and innovative discovery 
more meaningful to the individual. Through these 
experiences the faculty experiments with varying 
relevant techniques and methods by which the 
individual can transfer to the society-at-large new 
ideas and techniques for more effective interaction 
within the social and physical ecosystems in 
which we function. 

Through teaching, research and service the 
College provides appropriate, comprehensive, 
quality education programs that prepare students 
for professional positions directed toward the 
improvement of conditions contributing to: 

1. The individual's psycho-social development. 

2. The quality and availability of community 
resources which enrich family life (in all its 
various forms). 

3. Effective resource utilization including consumer 
competence. 

4. The individual's physiological health and 
development. 

5. The physical and aesthetic components of man's 
environment, 

6. Effective use of leisure time. 

In accordance with the philosophy of this College 
all four departments are interrelated and co- 
operate in the achievement of these goals. The 
activities of the Department of Family and 
Community Development emphasize goals 



1 through 3; the Department of Food, Nutrition and 
Institution Administration, 2 through 4; and with 
different foci and priorities, the activities of the 
Departments of Textiles and Consumer Economics, 
and Housing and Applied Design emphasize goals 
2, 3 and 5. Goal 3 requires consumer competence 
in food, clothing, shelter, transportation, insurance, 
medical, recreation, etc., and is an integrative, 
interdisciplinary, educational concept which 
necessitates major input from all four departments. 
Goal 6 is becoming increasingly important with a 
reduced work week and increases in the over-65 
population, and also suggests interdepartmental 
and interdisciplinary programs. 

Objectives 

1. Offer appropriate comprehensive bachelor, 
master and doctoral programs that address the 
six goals stated above. 

2. Maximize resources and resource utilization in 
order to accomplish the six goals stated above. 

3. Act as a resource to the University community 
to stimulate awareness and interest in the 
problems of applying knowledge for improving 
the quality of life. 

Special Facilities and Activities. The College of 
Human Ecology building follows the Campus 
tradition in style, and a construction program has 
been initiated to provide expanded facilities. A 
management center is maintained on the Campus 
for resident experiences in management activities 
of family life. 

Located between two large cities, the College 
provides unusual opportunities for both faculty 
and students. In addition to the University's 
general and specialized libraries, Baltimore and 
Washington furnish added library facilities. The art 
galleries and museums, the government bureaus 
and city institutions stimulate study and provide 
enriching experiences for students. 

Student Organizations 

AATT— Student Chapter. The Student Chapter of 
the American Association for Textile Technology 
provides students with an early opportunity to 
become associated with the professional organiza- 
tion of AATT, and to advance at the local level the 
aims and goals of the parent National Association. 

Through speakers from the textiles and apparel 
industry, members are kept abreast of the latest 
techniques and ideas in textiles, as well as coming 
m contact with prospective future employers. 

The chapter hopes to establish several intern 
programs to provide its members with an oppor- 
tunity to gain some vocational experience before 
graduation. 

All undergraduate students, including freshmen, 
are eligible to join AATT if their curriculum 
includes at least one major course in the field of 
textiles. 



A.I.D. — Student Chapter. The University of 
Maryland Student Chapter of the American 
Institute of Interior Designers is sponsored by the 
professional chapter of A.I.D., Washington, D.C. 
Interior Design majors from the sophomore class 
upwards may become members. Contacts and 
exchanges with professionals and fellow students 
at meetings sponsored by both groups orient the 
student to the job market and keep him informed 
of new directions in the profession. The A.I.D. 
professional chapter sponsors "A Day with a 
Designer' and assists in locating summer jobs for 
upperclass interior design majors. 

Collegiate Home Economics Organization. The 
University of Maryland Collegiate Home Economics 
Organization is the student affiliate of the 
American Home Economics Association and the 
Maryland Home Economics Association. Welcoming 
any Human Ecology major into its membership, 
the organization meets once a month, and links 
the professional world to the college student 
through different programs. 

The Collegiate Home Economics Organization 
is the student's opportunity to join a professional 
group prior to graduation and to participate on a 
student level in the national association. 

Each speaker or demonstrator provides the 
Collegiate Home Economics Organization member 
with ideas and suggestions for professional 
preparation by introducing the member to the many 
facets of Human Ecology. 

The Organization gives both students and 
faculty a chance to work together and meet on an 
informal basis and to open up better channels of 
communication among themselves as well as the 
outside professional world. 

N.S.I.D. — Student Chapter. The student chapter 
of the National Society of Interior Designers pro- 
motes interchange of ideas between students and 
professionals through jointly sponsored meetings. 
Student members are kept advised by the national 
office of N.S.I.D. as to developments within the 
organization and a national job referral service 
is provided for design graduates. 

Omicron Nu. A national honor society whose ob- 
jectives are to recognize superior scholarship, to 
promote leadership and to stimulate an appreciation 
for graduate study and research in the field of 
home economics and related areas. Graduate 
students, seniors and second semester juniors are 
eligible for election to membership. 

Student Senate. This elected, advisory group of 
students promotes the interests of the College of 
Human Ecology. Student representatives to the 
College Assembly, College Council and Standing 
Committees of the College Assembly are named 
from this group. 

Financial Aid. A Loan Fund, composed of contri- 
butions by the District of Columbia Home 



50 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



Economics Association. Maryland Chapter o( 
Omicron Nu, and personal gitts, Is available through 
the University Oflice of Student Aid. 
Admission. All students desiring to enroll in the 
College of Human Ecology must apply to the 
Director of Admissions of the University of Maryland 
at College Park. 

Degrees. The degree of Bachelor of Science is 
conferred for the satisfactory completion, with an 
average of C or better, of a prescribed curriculum 
of 120 academic semester hour credits. No grade 
below C is acceptable in the departmental 
courses which are required for a departmental 
major. 

Student Load. The student load in the College of 
Human Ecology varies from 15-18 credits. A stu- 
dent wishing to carry more than 18 credits must 
have a "B" grade average and permission of 
the dean. 

A minimum of 120 academic credits is required 
for graduation. However, for certification in 
some professional organizations, additional credits 
are required. Consult your advisor. 
General Inlormatlon. Specific inquiries concerning 
undergraduate or graduate programs in the 
College of Human Ecology may be directed to the 
chairmen of the various departments or the Dean, 
College of Human Ecology, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 
Curricula. A student may elect one of the following 
curricula, or a combination of curricula: food. 
nutrition, dietetics, or institution administration 
(food service): family, community, or management 
and consumer studies; home economics education; 
housing, advertising design, interior design. 
costume design, or crafts; textile science, textile 
marketing, textiles and apparel or consumer 
economics. A student who wishes to teach home 
economics may register in home economics edu- 
cation in the College of Human Ecology under 
the Department of Family and Community 
Development or in the College of Education. 
Required Courses. The curricula leading to a major 
in the College of Human Ecology are organized 
into four broad professional categories: (1) scientific 
and technical areas. (2) educational, community 
and family life areas, (3) consumer service areas, 
and (4) design areas. These represent the broad 
professional fields which graduates are eligible 
to enter and pursue their chosen work. The posi- 
tions vary in nature, scope and title, but require 
similar general studies background and funda- 
mentals for specialization. 

Individual programs of study are developed 
cooperatively with faculty advisors to provide a 



balanced and sequential arrangement of studies In 
preparation for the chosen field. University, College 
and departmental requirements are identified for 
curricula in each of the departments. 

All students in the College of Human Ecology, 
in addition to meeting the General University Re- 
quirements, are required to complete a series or 
sequence of courses to satisfy University, College 
and departmental requirements. The remaining 
courses needed to complete a program of study are 
elected by the student with the approval of his 
advisor. 

The final responsibility of meeting all the require- 
ments or a specific major rest with each 
individual student 

College of Human Ecology Requirements. (For 
every student depending on the Major). 
APDS 101 — Fundamentals ol Design OR 

Human Ecology Elective* 3 

TEXT 105 — Textiles in Contemporary Living OR 

Human Ecology Elective" 3 

FOOD 110 — Food and Nutrition of Individuals and 

Families or NUTR 100 — Elements of Nutrition OR 

Human Ecology Elective* 3 

FMCD 250 — Decision Making in Family Living OR 

Human Ecology Elective' 3 

Root Discipline Requirements Outside the College 

SOCY or ANTH Course 3 

PSYC Course 3 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics or 201 . . . 3 

SPCH Course 2-3 

*Human Ecology Elective to be taken in depanmenis other than Major 
Department 

College of Library and Information Services 

The College ol Library and Information Services is a 

graduate program which draws its students from 
many undergraduate disciplines. Although many 
of the College of Library and Information Services 
students have degrees in the social sciences and 
humanities, there is an increasing interest in 
people with diverse backgrounds — in the sciences, 
for example. The continued influence of 
scientific advances, the variations in clientele and 
service patterns, and the constantly shifting char- 
acter of the societal scene are among the factors 
which have significantly influenced and will doubt- 
less influence all the more in the future the 
scope and character of library functions and 
responsibilities. The library and information profes- 
sional in the 1970's must have competence in 
many disciplines if he is to serve well in the infor- 
mation centers, urban areas, public libraries, and 
school libraries. The College of Library and 
Information Services is a visionary school, attempt- 
ing to produce people to fill contemporary needs. 
The undergraduate program was established for 
the purpose of preparing school librarians at the 
initial certification level, but the program is in 
a transitional state. In the library field there Is 



currently an emphasis on diversified staffing pat- 
terns and career ladder opportunities, because of 
the need for persons with varying levels of skills 
to work in diversified library environments. Tfiere 
IS an attempt to broaden the undergraduate pro- 
gram to fulfill these needs. The revised program 
will provide opportunities for students in under- 
graduate disciplines other than education to enroll 
in undergraduate courses in librarianship. The goal 
ol this revised program will be to combine broad 
undergraduate subject matter competence with 
courses in librarianship with the intent of produc- 
ing personnel to fill special roles in the library 
field where special needs are increasing, such as in 
federal libraries, public libraries, and information 
centers. While the undergraduate program fulfills 
a great need in training school library personnel 
and persons to fill special roles. tf>e master's 
degree program in the College of Library and 
Information Services is the recognized avenue 
for preparing fully qualified professionals In the 
library field. 

For information regarding the undergraduate 
library science education program, refer to the 
Index listing for: "Departments. Programs and 
Curricula, Library Science Education Curriculum." 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health 

The College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health provides preparation leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree in the following pro- 
fessional areas: physical education, (two options), 
health education and recreation. The College also 
offers curricula in safety education, elementary 
physical education and kinesiological sciences. 
The College provides a research laboratory 
for faculty members and students who are 
interested in investigating the effects of exercise 
and various physical education activities upon 
the body, as well as determining methods and 
techniques of teaching various sports. 

The service section of each department offers a 
wide variety of courses for all University students. 
These courses may not only be used to fulfill the 
new General University Requirements, but may 
also be used as electives. 

In addition to its various on-Campus offerings, 
this College regularly conducts courses in physical 
education, health education and recreation in 
various parts of the State of Maryland and con- 
ducts v/orkshops wherever requested by proper 
officials. 

Facilities. Five separate buildings are used for the 
Intramural Sports Program for men, the WRA 
Program for women, the Professional Physical 
Education Program, the Health Education Program, 
and the Recreation Program. 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 51 



Indoor Activities. STUDENT ACTIVITIES BULIDING. 
This building houses the offices of the Department 
of Intercollegiate Athletics and the College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health. It 
contains six activity teaching stations: the main 
arena, the swimming pool, the small gym, the 
weight training room, the wrestling room, and the 
judo room. In addition, there are ten classrooms, a 
research laboratory, a safety and driver education 
center, and a conference room. 

The main arena of this building has 19,796 sq. ft. 
of floor space. This arena provides facilities for 
class work in basketball, volleyball, badminton, 
and fencing. 

The swimming pool is divided into two areas by 
a permanent bulkhead. The shallow end is 42 x 24 
feet and the large area is 42 x 75 feet with a depth 
ranging from 4 to 13 feet. 

The small gymnasium is used for gymnastics, 
including tumbling, trampolining and all types of 
apparatus work. The total floor space is 9,462 
sq. ft. 

The weight-training classroom is equipped with 
sufficient weights for 1 1 stations of three men each. 

There is a wrestling room containing 8,056 
sq. ft. 

PREINKERT FIELD HOUSE. Preinkert Field House 
contains offices for faculty in physical education 
and health education. There is a regulation size 
swimming pool, 75 x 35 feet, equipped with 
two one-meter diving boards. In the gymnasium, 
90 X 50 feet, classes are held in badminton, volley- 
ball, and basketball. An adjacent classroom is 
used for professional classes. The dance studio, 
used for dance and fundamentals of movement 
classes, is 40 x 60 feet. 

In addition to the above areas, there are locker 
and shower rooms used by women enrolled in 
physical education and those participating in rec- 
reational activities and a small lounge for major 
students. 

ARMORY. The Armory is used primarily for the 
intramural program. It houses the offices of the 
director of intramurals and an athletic equipment 
room from which students may secure equipment 
for recreational purposes. The 28,880 sq. ft. 
of floor space has four basketball courts, with bad- 
minton and volleyball courts superimposed on them. 
This facility is also used as an indoor track, 
with indoor vaulting, high and broad jump pits, 
a one-tenth mile track, and a 70 yard straightaway. 

COLISEUM. The Coliseum is used as a supple- 
mentary facility for intramurals and physical 
education classes for men and women. Included in 
the facilities are an equipment issue room, shower 
and lock rooms for men and women, a 
classroom, an adapted physical education labora- 
tory, and office space for several of the men's 
and women's physical education staff. 



The 6,555 square feet of floor space is used 
primarily for co-educational classes in square and 
social dance and as an intramural basketball court. 
However, there are five badminton and two 
volleyball courts available for co-ed class instruc- 
tion. 

NEW PHYSICAL EDUCATION BUILDING. The first 
phase of a projected three-phase, multimillion dollar 
facility has been completed on the north Campus 
near the Cambridge dorm complex. This initial 
building has tv;o regulation basketball courts, ten 
badminton courts, three volleyball courts, eight 
handball courts, men's and women's locker rooms 
and the first portion of the research laboratory. It in- 
cludes some 40,000 square feet and cost approxi- 
mately 1.5 million dollars. Eight new lighted tennis 
courts are located near this building. 

HEALTH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT/EAST 
EDUCATION ANNEX. This building provides offices 
for faculty and graduate assistants of the 
Department of Health Education. 

Outdoor Activities. THE STADIUM. The stadium, 
with a seating capacity of 33,536 has a one-quarter 
mile cinder track with a 220-yard straightaway. Pits 
are available for pole vaulting and high and 
broad jumping. Immediately east of the stadium 
are facilities for the shot put, discus and javelin 
throw. The College of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Health uses these facilities for classes in 
track and field. Also east of the stadium are three 
practice football fields, the baseball stadium, and 
a practice baseball, lacrosse, and soccer field. 
The College uses some of these facilities for major 
skill classes in football, soccer, and baseball. West 
of the stadium are four combination soccer-touch 
football play fields, complete with goal posts, and 
four Softball fields with wire backstops for physical 
education classes and recreational use. 

Surrounding the Armory are four touch football 
fields and eight softball fields, encompassing 18.4 
acres. These fields, and the four in the Fraternity 
Row are used for intramurals. 

Immediately west of the Cole Activities Building 
are 14 all-weather tennis courts. A modern 18-hole 
golf course was opened in 1957. This 204-acre 
course includes two lakes, and an additional 
5.8-acre golf driving range for instructional pur- 
poses. The golf driving range, equipped with lights, 
and the golf course greatly add to present 
recreational facilities. An outdoor playing field 
300 feet by 600 feet is also provided for touch 
football, soccer, speedball and softball. 

The outdoor facilities adjacent to the Preinkert 
Field House include four hard-surfaced tennis 
courts, and a combination hockey and lacrosse 
field. 



Research Laboratory. One of the important aspects 
of advanced study at the University of Maryland 
is research. To encourage research, the College 
of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
makes available to the student a well-equipped 
research laboratory. Students and faculty alike are 
encouraged to make use of the laboratory and its 
facilities for the purpose of conducting their special 
research projects. 

General Information — Entrance Requirements. All 

students desiring to enroll in the College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health must 
apply to the Director of Admissions of the University 
of Maryland at College Park. 

Sixteen units of high school credits are required 
for admittance to this College. Required high 
school subjects are: four units of English, one unit 
of social science and one unit of natural science. 
Desirable high school subjects include: algebra, 
plane geometry and additional natural and physical 
sciences, such as chemistry and physics. 

Satisfactory health and physical vigor are es- 
sential for persons pursuing a career in the areas 
of this College. 

Guidance. At the time of matriculation and first 
registration, each student is assigned to a member 
of the faculty of the College who acts as the stu- 
dent's academic advisor. This faculty member 
will be in physical education, recreation or health 
education, depending on the student's choice of 
curriculum. The student should confer regularly 
with his advisor prior to each registration. 

Normal Load. The normal University load for stu- 
dents is 12-21 credit hours per semester. No 
student may register for more than 19 hours unless 
he has a "B" average for the preceding semester 
and approval of the dean of the college. 

Eleclives. Electives should be planned carefully, 
and well in advance, preferably during the orienta- 
tion course the first semester, or with the student's 
academic advisor during the second semester. It 
is important to begin certain sequences as soon 
as possible to prevent later conflict. Electives may 
be selected from any department of the University 
in accordance with a student's professional needs. 
Those selected must meet with the approval of 
the advisor and the dean of the College. 

Freshman and Sophomore Program. The work of 
the first two years in this College is designed to 
accomplish the following purposes: (1) provide 
a general basic or core education and prepare for 
later specialization by giving a foundation in 
certain basic sciences; (2) develop competency in 
those basic techniques necessary for successful 
participation in the professional courses of the last 
two years. 



52 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



While much ot thd academic courta work will 
be alike, the technique courses will vary con- 
siderably in the dilleront curriculums The technique 
courses must be satislactorily completed, or com- 
petencies demonstrated before the student can be 
accepted lor the advanced courses in methods 
arKl in student teaching. II is very important that 
each roquiromoni be met as it occurs. 
Student Teaching. Opportunity is provided lor stu- 
dent teaching experience in physical education 
and health education. The student devotes eight 
weeks during the last semester ol his senior year to 
observation, participation, and teaching under a 
qualilied supervising teacher in an approved ele- 
mentary, lunior or senior high school or in a 
combined program at the elementary and secondary 
levels. A University supervisor Irom the College ol 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health visits 
the student periodically and conlers with both the 
student teacher and the cooperating teacher, 
giving assistance when needed. 

To be eligible lor student teaching, the student 
must (1) have the recommendation ot the 
University supervising teacher, and (2) must have 
lullilled all required courses lor the B.S. degree 
except those in the Block Student Teaching 
Semester, excluding those exceptions approved 
by each department. The student must obtain a 
grade ol C or better in all professional courses in 
his curriculum and he must register for all courses 
in the "Block" concurrently. Those desiring to 
teach at the elementary level must have sucess- 
fully completed PHED 420 and must split their 
teaching experience into 4 hours of EDSE 374 and 
4 hours ol EDEL 336. Those desiring an elementary 
minor in physical education must also complete 
PHED 155. 157 and 495. 

Field Work. Recreation major students are expected 
to carry out a number ol field experiences during 
their University career; volunteer or part-time 
recreation employment during the school year, 
summer employment in camps or at playgrounds, 
etc. These experiences culminate in a senior 
semester ol field work lor which a student receives 
credit and during which the student works as a 
stall member (for 20 hours per week) in the field 
ol recreation in which he or she hopes to be 
employed, such as public recreation, recreation 
lor the exceptional, agencies (Y's, Scouts, etc.), 
military recreation, etc. 

Degrees. The degree ol Bachelor of Science is 
conferred upon students who have met the condi- 
tions ol their curricula as herein prescribed 
by the College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health. 

Each candidate lor a degree must file a formal 
application with the Registrations Office during the 



registration period, or not later than the end ol 
the third week ol classes ol the regular semester, 
or at the end ol the second week ol the summer 
session, prior to the date ol graduation. 

Certllicalion. The Maryland State Department ol 
Education certifies lor teaching only when an 
applicant has a tentative ap|>oinlment to teach in 
a Maryland county school No certilicate may be 
secured by application of the student on graduation. 
Course content requirements for certification are 
indicated with each curriculum. Certilicalion Is 
specilically limited to graduates who "rank 
academically in the upper lour-lilths ol the class 
and who make a grade ol C or better in student 
teaching. In order to insure the meeting ol these 
requirements, students will not be approved lor 
student teaching except as indicated above. A stu- 
dent intending to quality as a teacher in Baltimore, 
Washington or other specilic situations should 
secure a statement ol certification requirements 
before starting work in the junior year and discuss 
them with his academic advisor. 

Student Organizations 

fvlAJGRS' CLUB: All students enrolled in the Col- 
lege are eligible lor membership in this organiza- 
tion. It conducts various professional meetings, 
brings in speakers and promotes various co- 
recreational activities. It has sponsored trips to 
district and national conventions of the American 
Association lor Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation, and is chartered as a student major 
club of that organization. 

AOUALINERS: This synchronized swimming club 
is open to all men and women registered in the 
University. Through weekly meetings the group 
concentrates on additional stroke perfection, 
individual and group stunts, diving, and experi- 
mentation with various types ol accompaniment 
and choreographic techniques. An original water 
show is presented each spring and several 
demonstrations are given each year. Tryouts are 
held twice a year — once at the beginning ol the 
lall semester, and again after the water show during 
the spring semester. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND RECREATION AND 
PARKS SOCIETY: In the fall of 1959 the University 
of Maryland Recreation and Parks Society was 
formed by the undergraduate and graduate major 
and minor students ol the College. The society, 
an alliliate of the State and national recreation 
organizations, provides opportunities for University 
and community service, for rich practical experi- 
ence, and tor social experiences lor those students 
having a mutual prolessional recreation interest. 

GYMKANA TROUPE: The Gymkana Troupe in- 
cludes men and women students Irom all Colleges 
who wish to express themselves through the medium 



ol gymnastics These individuals coordinate tlMir 
talents in order to produce an exhibitional perform- 
anco that has been seen in many places including 
Bermuda, Iceland, the Azores, Idaho, Montana, 
and the eastern seat>oard ol the United States. 
The organization has three principal objectives: 
(1) to provide heallhlul, co-recreational activities 
that provide lun lor the students during their 
leisure hours: (2) to promote gymnastics in this 
locality; and (3) to entertain our students and people 
in other communities. 

This organization is co-sponsored by the 
Physical Education Department and the Student 
Government Association, and it welcomes any 
student, regardless ol the amount ol experience, 
to ioin. 

INTRAMURALS FOR MEN: The Intramural Depart- 
ment oilers an extensive opportunity lor all men 
to participate in a recreational program ol either 
individual or team sports. A variety ol activities are 
available to lill the student's leisure time and 
develop skills which may be earned over into later 
life. Also, many desirable attributes, such as lair 
play, leadership, teamwork, and sportsmanship, 
are encouraged and developed by the student 
participating in the program. 

Leagues and tournaments are conducted in the 
following sports: touch football, horseshoe pitching, 
tennis, cross country, track and field, basketball, 
table tennis, badminton, boxing, wrestling, 
bowling, volleyball, swimming, foul shooting, 
and Softball. 

Management and officiating in intramural sports 
are conducted by students maioring in physical 
education under the supervision of the director ol 
intramurals and under policies and regulations 
established by the Intramural Council. 

WEIGHT LIFTING CLUB: The University of Mary- 
land Weight Lifting Club is open to all students and 
faculty for exercise with the weights throughout 
the week during specified hours. 

The University of Maryland Olympic Bart>ell Club 
IS a more highly organized group of the original 
club. It is recognized by the Student Government 
Association. Bi-monthly meetings are held which 
assist in leadership, oiler clinics and demonstra- 
tions, etc.; participate in competition, and earn 
awards ol recognition. 

WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIATION: All 
women students ol the University are members 
ol the Women's Recreation Association, an affiliate 
of the Athletic and Recreational Federation of 
College Women. Under the leadership of its elected 
student officers and representatives and appointed 
sports managers, the WRA sponsors a program 
of intramural, extramural and interest group 
activities. These activities seek to develop new in- 
terests and skills tor leisure-time enjoyment, 
provide opportunities tor continuing both old and 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 53 



new interests, and provide a democratic atmosphere 
for educational leadership experiences. Included 
are free and tournament play in archery, badmin- 
ton, basketball, bowling, fencing, field hockey, 
golf, Softball, swimming, table tennis, and volley- 
ball: social events, and co-recreational activities 
in bowling, badminton, and volleyball. Intramural 
tournaments are organized through the dormitory, 
sorority, and day commuter groups of the Uni- 
versity. Opportunities are also provided for 
officiating experience and for the earning of official 
WNORC ratings in basketball, field hockey, swim- 
ming and volleyball. 

Various special groups and clubs interested in 
recreation exist on Campus outside the Women's 
Recreation Association program and offer rich 
opportunities for the development of their recrea- 
tional interest. Some of these are the Terrapin Trail 
Club, Chess Club, Sailing Club, Ski Club, and 
musical and dramatic groups. 

PHI ALPHA EPSILON: Honorory Society of the 
College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health. 

The purpose of this organization is to recognize 
academic achievement and to promote professional 
growth by sponsoring activities in the fields 
of physical education, recreation, health and 
related areas. 

Students shall qualify for membership at such 
time as they shall have attained junior standing 
in physical education, health or recreation, and have 
a minimum overall average of 2.7 and a minimum 
professional average of 3.1. Graduate students 
are invited to join after 10 hours of work with 
a 3.3 average. The organization is open to both 
men and women. 

SIGMA TAU EPSILON: This society, founded in 
1940, selects those women who have attained an 
overall 2.5 average and demonstrated outstanding 
leadership, service and sportsmanlike qualities 
in the organization and activities of the Women's 
Recreation Association and its affiliated groups. 

ETA SIGI^A GAMIvlA. Epsilon chapter was estab- 
lished at the University of fv/laryland in fvlay of 
1969. This professional honorary organization for 
health educators was established to promote 
scholarship and community service for health 
majors at both the graduate and undergraduate 
levels. Students may apply after two consecutive 
semesters with a 2.75 cumulative average. 

The Division of Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences and Engineering 

The role of the University in society has three 
closely interrelated parts: education, the search for 
new knowledge, and specialized service to the 
community and the nation. 



The Division of Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences and Engineering contributes to all of 
these functions. 

The Division recognizes teaching as its central 
mission. This includes the teaching of under- 
graduates, both those within the Division seeking 
a scientific career and those in other specialities 
who desire an introduction to the realm of science: 
the teaching of graduate students, who will 
become the next generation of teachers and 
professional scientists and engineers; and teaching 
at the post-doctoral and research level, for those 
advanced specialists on their way to assuming 
major responsibilities at the senior level. The 
Division provides an intellectual environment that 
enables each student to realize his potential 
and that offers flexible educational programs to 
meet a variety of needs. Research into the 
improvement of teaching and the development of 
new curricula will be a continuing activity in 
the Division. 

The search for new knowledge is one of the 
most challenging activities of mankind. The 
university is one of the key institutions in society 
where fundamental research is emphasized. 
Within the Division of Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences and Engineering, research, teaching of 
the use of research tools, and teaching of the 
meaning of research in our modern society plays 
a vital role in programs of higher education. 

Structure of the Division. The Division of 
Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Engineer- 
ing encompasses the following departments and 
programs: 

1) Within the College of Engineering: Department 
of Aerospace Engineering, Department of Chemical 
Engineering. Department of Civil Engineering. 
Department of Electrical Engineering, Fire 
Protection Engineering Program, Department of 
Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering 
Program, Engineering Materials Program, Engineer- 
ing Sciences Program. Fire Service Extension 
Department. Wind Tunnel Operations Department, 
and Cooperative Engineering Education Program. 

2) Other departments and programs: Department 
of Computer Science. Department of Mathematics, 
Department of Physics and Astronomy. Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, 
Institute for Molecular Physics, Applied 
Mathematics Program. Astronomy Program. Center 
for Materials Research, Chemical Physics Program, 
Meteorology Program, and Physical Sciences 
Program. 

Divisional Requirements. There are no divisional 
requirements beyond program requirements and 
General University Requirements for undergraduate 
degree programs. 



Science Communication. The University of Maryland 
offers several interdisciplinary approaches to 
the training of science communicators, ranging 
from specialization in one science or engineering 
with background in communication to specializing 
m lournalistic communication with background 
coursework in the sciences. Each of the several 
program options can be tailored to the needs of 
individual students. 

Undergraduate students interested in science 
communications can choose from a wide range 
of possibilities. For example, some may want a 
career writing about the general happenings of the 
day in the physical and life sciences. Or, some 
students may prefer writing about the span from 
a pure science to its applied technology. Others 
may prefer writing about one field — such as 
agronomy, astronomy, geology — and its impact on 
society — in ecological problems, space exploration, 
and plate tectonics. 

The following are several approaches: 
Writing about the physical sciences: A recommended 
approach would be to take the Physical 
Sciences Program with a minor in Journalism. 
The Physical Sciences Program consists of a 
basic set of courses in physics, chemistry and 
mathematics, followed by a variety of courses 
chosen from these and related disciplines: 
astronomy, geology, meteorology, and computer 
science. 

Writing about the life sciences: A recommended 
approach would be to take the Biological Sciences 
Program with a minor in Journalism. The Biological 
Sciences Program includes work in botany, 
entomology, microbiology, and zoology, and 
introduces the student to the general principles 
and methods of each of these biological sciences. 
Writing about engineering: A recommended 
approach would be to take the BS-Engineering 
Program with a minor in Journalism. The BS- 
Engineering Program blends two or three fields of 
engineering or applied science. 
Writing about a specific field: A recommended 
approach would be to take a departmental major 
in any of the sciences, agriculture, or engineering 
and a minor in Journalism. 

Journalism combined with an overview of the 
sciences:A Journalism major could take selected 
science courses that provide a familiarity with 
scientific thought and application. 

Engineering 

The College of Engineering offers four-year 
programs leading either to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science with curriculum designation in Aero- 
space Engineering. Agricultural Engineering, 
Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical 
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, or Fire 
Protection, or to the degree of Bachelor of 



54 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



Science in Engineering with an Engineering option 
or an Applied Science option. In addition, each 
of the foregoing degree programs may be pursued 
through the five-year Maryland Plan lor Cooperative 
Engineering Education The engineering programs 
integrate those oloments; (1) basic sciences, 
including mathematics, physics, chemistry; 
(2) engineering sciences including mechanics of 
solids and fluids, engineering materials, thermo- 
dynamics, electricity, and magnetism: (3) profes- 
sional studies in ma|or fields of engineering 
specialization; and (4) general studies including 
liberal arts and social studies as part of the General 
University Requirements. 
General Information. Increasingly, the boundary 
between engineers and applied scientists or 
applied mathematicians becomes less distinct. The 
various branches of engineering similarly interact 
with each other, as technical problems become 
more sophisticated, and require a combined 
attack from several disciplines. The engineer 
occupies an intermediate position between science 
and the public, because, in addition to understand- 
ing the scientific principles of a situation, he Is 
concerned with the timing, economics and values 
that define the useful application of those 
principles. 

Each program lays a broad base for continued 
learning after college in professional practice, 
in business or industry, in public service, or in 
graduate study and research. 

College Regulations. 1. The responsibility for proper 
registration and for satisfying stated prerequisites 
for any course must rest with the student — as 
does the responsibility for proper achievement in 
courses in which he is enrolled. Each student 
should be familiar with the provisions of this 
catalog. Including the Academic Regulations, 
contained in Section I, General Information, and 
other pertinent regulations. 

2. Required courses In mathematics, physics and 
chemistry have highest priority: and It Is strongly 
recommended that every engineering student 
register for mathematics and chemistry — or 
mathematics and physics — each semester until he 
has fully satisfied requirements of the College of 
Engineering in these subjects. 

3. To be eligible for a bachelor's degree in the 
College of Engineering, a student must have an 
average of at least C — 2.0 — (a) in all subjects 
applicable to his degree, and (b) In all junior- 
senior courses in his major department. Responsi- 
bility for knowing and meeting all degree 
requirements for graduation in any curriculum 
rests with the student 

4. A student In the College of Engineering may 
audit a course only with the understanding that 



the course may not be taken for credit subsequent 
to his registration as audit He must also have 
the consent of the department offering the course. 
Forms requesting permission to audit courses are 
available in the Engineenng Student Affairs 
Office, J 1107. 

5. The College of Engineering requires that a 
minimum of eighteen (18) semester credit hours 
out of the 30 hour General University Requirement 
be taken in the general area of humanities and 
social sciences (H&SS). The program selected 
should be planned to reflect a rationale or to 
fulfill an objective appropriate to the engineering 
profession and to increase the engineer's awareness 
of his social responsibilities and Improve his 
abilities to consider related factors in the decision- 
making process. Skill, or professionally oriented 
courses treating such subjects as accounting, 
industrial management, finance, personnel 
administration, the performing arts, certain 
education courses, and introductory foreign 
languages normally do not fulfil this objective and 
may not be included in the eighteen (18) semester 
hour requirement of the College. In general, 
course prefixes that would satisfy this require- 
ment include: AASP, Afk^ST, ANTH, ARTH, CMLT, 
DANC, DART, ECON, ENGL (except composition 
orwriting), GEOG, GNED, GVPT, HIFN, HIST, 
HIUS, HONR, PHIL, PSYC, SOCY, URBS. In addition, 
some specific courses which satisfy College 
requirements Include: AGRO 103, AREC 240, 
RATV 124, MUSC 130, ARCH 270, and upper 
division literature courses in foreign languages. 

Structure of Engineering Curricula. Courses In the 
normal curriculum or program and prescribed 
credit hours leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science (with curriculum designation) are outlined 
in the sections pertaining to each department in 
the College of Engineering. No student may 
modify the prescribed number of hours without 
special permission from the dean of his college. 
The courses in each curriculum may be classified 
in the following categories: 

1. Courses In the General University Require- 
ments — An engineering student must include 
eighteen credits of humanities and social sciences 
in his program of general studies. 

2. Courses in the physical sciences — mathe- 
matics, chemistry, physics. 

3. Collateral engineering courses— engineering 
sciences, and other courses approved for one 
curriculum but offered by another department. 

4. Courses in the major department. 

A student should obtain written approval for any 
substitution of courses from the department 
chairman and the dean of his college. 

The courses in each engineering curriculum, 
as classified above, form a sequential and develop- 



mental pattern in subject matter. In this respect, 
curricula in engineering may differ from curricula 
in other colleges. Some regulations which are 
generally applicable to all students (see the 
Academic Regulations) may need clarification for 
purposes of orderly administration among engirteer- 
ing students. Moreover, the College of Engineering 
establishes policies which supplement the 
University regulations. 

Basic Format of the Freshman-Sophomore 
Years in Engineering. The freshman and sophomore 
years in engineering are designed to lay a strong 
foundation in mathematics, physical sciences 
and the engineering sciences upon which the 
student will later develop his professional program 
during the upper division (junior and senior) years. 
The College course requirements lor the fresfi- 
man year are the same for all students, regardless 
of their intended professional career, and at>out 
75% of the sophomore year course requirements 
are common, thus affording the student a maximum 
flexibility in choosing his specific area of engi- 
neering specialization. Although the engineering 
student selects his major field at the start of his 
sophomore year, this intramural program 
commonality affords the student the maximum 
flexibility of choice or interdepartmental transfer up 
to the end ol his sophomore year 

General College Requirements for th« 
Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Credit Hrt. 

A General University Requirements . 15 

B. Mathematics IS 

Four courses In mathematics are r«<)ulrad 
to be selected from MATH 140, 141, 240. 
241. and 246. 

C. Physical Sciences 19 

A minimum of 19 credit hours in Physics 
and Chemistry must be completed, with not 
loss than seven (7) in either field. 

Engineering Sciences 9 

Nine (9) credit hours must t>e completed in 
the Engineering Sciences, to be selected 
from ENES 101. ENES 110. ENES 220 and 
ENES 221. Each is a three (3) credit hour 
course. 
E Engineering Sciences. Mathematics. Physical 

Sciences or Major Field Engineering 8 

Eight (8) credit hours to complete the 
Ireshman-sophomore year requirements 
may be in any ol the fields indicated, but 
no more than six (6) credit hours may have 
a major field designation. 
Total Minimum Academic Credits in freshman- 
sophomore years 66 

Basic Freshman Curriculum in Engineering. All 
freshmen in the College of Engineering are required 
to complete the following basic curriculum for 
freshmen regardless of whether the student plans 
to proceed through one of the major field desig- 
nated baccalaureate degree programs or follow 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 55 



any of the multidisciplinary, non-designated degree 
curricula that are sponsored by the College. 

Semester 
Course No. and Title I II 

CHEM 103, 104 — General Chemistry" .4 4 

PHYS 161— General Ptiysics I 3 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I. 11 4 4 

ENES 101 — Intro. Engr. Science 3 

ENES 110 — Mectianics 3 

General University Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

Students who are not prepared to schedule MA,1H 140 
are advised to register (or a preparatory course — MATH 
115 — as part of their General University Requirement. 
These students are also advised to attend summer school 
following their freshman year to complete MATH 141 and 
PHYS 161 prior to entrance into the sophomore year of 
study. MATH 141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for 
many courses required in the sophomore year. 

••QuahI.ed students may elect lo lake CHEM 105 and 106 (4 cr, hrs, 
each) instead ol CHEM 103 and 104 

The Sophomore Year in Engineering. With the 
beginning of his sophomore year the student 
selects his sponsoring academic department 
(Aerospace, Agricultural, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, 
Fire Protection, or IVIechanical Engineering), and 
this department assumes the responsibility for 
the student's academic guidance, counseling 
and program planning from that point until the 
completion of the degree requirements of that 
department as well as the College. 

Sophomore Curriculum in Engineering 

Semester 

I II 

General University Requirements .... 3 3 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations , . 3 

PHYS 262, 263 — General Physics 4 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials . , 3' 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3* 

Major field or related courses 2 or 4 2 or 5" 

Total Credits 16 or 18 15 or 18 

•For spectlic requirements, see tiie curriculum listing in each engi- 
neering department. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering. The 

"B.S. -Engineering" program is designed to serve 
three primary functions: (1) to prepare those 
students who wish to use the breadth and depth of 
their engineering education as a preparatory 
vehicle for entry into post-baccalaureate study in 
such fields as medicine, law. or business administra- 
tion; (2) to continue their engineering training in 
the graduate area of some of the newer inter- 
disciplinary fields of engineering such as environ- 
mental engineering, bio-medical engineering, 
systems engineering, and many others: and finally 
(3) those students who do not plan the normal 
professional practice of a designated engineering 
field upon graduation but wish to use a broader 
engineering training to serve in auxiliary and sup- 



porting aspects of engineering related industries. 
The program is designed to give the maximum 
flexibility for tailoring a program to the specific 
future career plans of the student. To accomplish 
these objectives, the program has two optional 
paths: an engineering option and an applied science 
option. 

The "Engineering" option should be particularly 
attractive to those students contemplating graduate 
study or professional employment in the interdiscipli- 
nary engineering fields such as environmental engi- 
neering, bio-engineering, bio-medical engineering, 
and systems and control engineering, or for 
preparatory entry into graduate work in materials 
engineering or nuclear engineering, which are 
currently offered only at the graduate level at 
IVlaryland. For example, a student contemplating 
graduate work in environmental engineering might 
combine chemical and civil engineering for his 
program: a student interested in systems and con- 
trol engineering graduate work might combine 
electrical engineering with aerospace, chemical, or 
mechanical engineering. 

The "Applied Science" option should be particu- 
larly attractive to those students who do not plan 
on professional engineering careers, but wish 
to use the intellectual and developmental abilities 
of an engineering education as a means of 
furthering career objectives. Graduates of the 
Applied Science Option may aspire to graduate 
work or an ultimate career in a field of science, law, 
medicine, business, or a variety of other attractive 
opportunities which build upon a combination of 
engineering and a field of science. Entrance 
requirements for Law and Medical Schools can be 
met readily under the format of this program. In the 
applied science program, any field in the University 
in which the student may earn a B.S. degree is 
an acceptable secondary science field, thus 
affording the student a maximum flexibility of 
choice for his personal career planning. 

Listed below are the minimum requirements for 
B.S. -Engineering degree with either an Engineering 
option or an Applied Science option. The 66 
semester credit hours required for the completion 
of the junior and senior years is superimposed 
upon the freshman and sophomore curriculum of 
the chosen primary field of engineering. The 
student, thus, does not make a decision whether 
to take the designated or the undesignated degree 
in an engineering field until the beginning of his 
junior year. In fact, he can probably delay the 
decision until the spring term of his junior year 
with little or no sacrifice, thus affording the student 
ample time for decision. Either program may be 
taken on the regular 4-year format or under the 
Maryland Plan for Cooperative Engineering 
Education. 



Junior-Senior Requirements for the Degree of 
B.S. — Engineering 



Requirements 
General Univ. Req. 
Mathematics, 

Physical Sciences, 

required ^ 
Engineering 

Sciences '• ' 
Primary Field ■* 
Secondary Field 

Approved 
Electives ^- " 



Sr. Research/Project •' 



Engineering Applied 

Option Science Option 

15 sh. 15 sh. 



3 sh. 



3 sh. 



6 sh. 2 6 sh. 

24 sh. (Engr.) 18 sh. (Engr.) 

12 sh. (Engr.) 12 sh. (Sci- 
ence) 



6 sh. (Tech- 
nical) 



9 or 10 sh. 



Engineering Fields of Concentration available 
under the B.S. -Engineering program as primary 
fields within either the Engineering option or the 
Applied Science option are as follows: 
Aerospace Engineering Electrical Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering Engineering Materials 

Chemical Engineering Mechanical Engineering 

Civil Engineering Nuclear Engineering 

In addition, the field of Fire Protection is avail- 
able within the applied science option as a primary 
field. All engineering fields of concentration may 
be used as a secondary field within the engineering 
option. 

(1) Engineer sciences, lor the purpose ot this degree, are IhOM 
courses in the Engineering College prelixed by ENES. or. are in an 
engineering lield not his primary or secondary tield ot engineering 



(2) Students following 



|4| All 



jineering" option may use up to six 
and below in his primary or his sec- 

e course work in the mathemallcs, 
gineering sciences or elective areas must be 
el (number) and above. 

> used to fulfill the fields of concentration re- 
quirements (36 sh. in the engineering option and 30 in the Applied 
Science option) must be at the 300 course level (number) and above. 

(5) For the applied science option each student is required — unless 
specifically excused, and if excused. 15 sh. of approved electives 
will be required — to satisfactorily complete a senior level project or 
research assignment relating his engineering and science fields ol 

(6) In the Engineering option, the 6 sh. of electives must be technical 
(math, physical sciences, or engineering sciences but may not be In 
ihe primary or secondary fields of concentration). In the Applied 
Science option, the approved electives should be selected to 
strengthen the students program, consistent with his career objec- 
tives Courses in the primary or secondary fields of concentration 
may be used to satisfy the approved electives requirement. 

General Requirements for the B.S.-Engineering 
Degree. All undergraduate students in engineering 
will select their major field sponsoring depart- 
ment at the beginning of their second year 
regardless of whether they plan to proceed to a 
designated or an undesignated degree. A student 
wishing to elect the undesignated degree program 
may do so at any time following the completion 
of his sophomore year, or a minimum of 50 earned 
credits towards any engineering degree, and at 
least one semester prior to the time he expects 
to receive the baccalaureate degree. As soon as 



56 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



trie student elects to seek an undesignated 
baccalaureate degree in engineering, his cur- 
riculum planning, guidance and counseling will be 
the responsibility of the "Undesignated Degree 
Program Advisor" in his primary field depart- 
ment. At least one semester before the expected 
degree is to be granted, the student must file an 
"Application (or Admission to Candidacy (or the 
Degree of Bachelor o( Science in Engineering" 
with the Dean's 0((ice o( the College of Engineering. 
The candidacy (orm must be approved by the 
chairman o( the primary (leld department, the 
primary engineering and the secondary (ield 
advisors and the college (acuity committee on 
"Undesignated Degree Programs." This com- 
mittee has the responsibility (or implementing all 
approved policies pertaining to this program and 
reviewing and acting on the candidacy (orms 
died by the student. 

Specidc University and College academic regu- 
lations apply to this undesignated degree program 
in the same manner as they apply to the 
conventional designated degree programs. For 
example, the academic regulations o( the University 
apply as stated in the College Park Catalog of 
the University o( Maryland, and the College require- 
ment o( 2.00 (actor in his major (ield during the 
funior and senior years apply. For the purpose of 
implementation of such academic rules, the credits 
in the primary engineering field and the credits 
in the secondary field are considered to count as 
"the Major" for such academic purposes. 

Environmental Engineering. Environmental engi- 
neering is the application o( basic engineering 
and science to the problems o( our 
environment to ensure optimum environmental 
quality. In recent years, man has suffered a 
continually deteriorating environment. A truly profes- 
sional engineer involved in the study o( 
environmental engineering must see the total 
picture and relate it to his particular mission 
whether this be air pollution, water quality control, 
environmental health or solid and liquid waste 
disposal. The total picture includes urban systems 
design, socio-economic (actors, regional planning, 
transportation, recreation, water resource develop- 
ment, and land and resource conservation. 
A student who selects the B.S. -Engineering 
degree program can specialize in environmental 
engineering by proper selection o( primary and 
secondary fields (rom the wide selection o( courses 
related to environmental engineering given by the 
various departments in the College. 

Engineering-Medicine. Engineering has become an 
integral part of the medical profession. Heart 
pumps, synthetic kidneys, heart-lung machines, and 
artificial organs are a (ew o( the advancements 



in medical technology developed by teams o( 
engineers and physicians. Diagnostic procedures 
have been greatly enhanced by the use o( com- 
puters and electronic testing machines. The 
physican who has an engineering background is 
in a better position to communicate and work 
with engineers on medical technological develop- 
ment. 

The Bachelor o( Science in Engineering degree 
provides an excellent opportunity (or a student 
to meet the entrance requirements (or medical 
school while earning an engineering degree. 

The above examples o( environmental engineer- 
ing and engineering-medicine are only two 
applications o( the Bachelor o( Science in Engineer- 
ing degree program. Many other examples could 
be listed. Students interested in a (lexible 
curriculum in engineering should give consideration 
to this program. 

Dual Degree Program. The Dual Degree Program 
IS a cooperative arrangement between the College 
of Engineering and Frostburg State College 
which allows students to earn undergraduate 
degrees (rom both institutions in a (ive-year pro- 
gram. A student in the Dual Degree Program will 
attend Frostburg State College (or approximately 
three (3) academic years (minimum 90 hours) 
and the University o( Maryland, College o( 
Engineering for approximately two (2) academic 
years (minimum hours required — determined 
individually, approximately 60 hours). 

After completing the academic requirements 
of Frostburg State College (usually at the end 
of the first year at the University of Maryland), 
the student shall be awarded a bachelors degree 
from Frostburg State College. 

Dual degree candidates may participate in any 
of the baccalaureate degree programs in the 
College of Engineering. 

Frostburg State College offers a full range of 
studies in the liberal arts and sciences. Students 
in the program will complete general studies 
requirements, a specified ma|or program and 
certain pre-engmeering courses while at Frostburg. 
Complete information regarding the requirements 
of the (irst three years may be obtained by 
contacting Dr. Paul Trichel, Associate Dean, 
Frostburg State College, Frostburg, Md. 21532. 

Cognate Activities. Departments in the College o( 
Engineering which contribute signidcantly to 
activities in education, research and professional 
service include the Department of Wind Tunnel 
Operations and the Fire Service Extension 
Department. These departments work closely 
with academic departments of the University in 
areas of common interest. The scope of work in 
each department area is outlined briefly in 
paragraphs which follow. 



Fellowship grants and contracts (or fundamental 
research contribute to the overall protessional- 
scientidc activity of the •ta((o( the Collage, Th« 
sta(( o( the CoKege o( Enginaenng availabta for 
research studies will be glad to discuss proposed 
problems o( importance to industry and o( public 
interest where means can be found (or the 
cooperative researches: such studies may be 
undertaken with the approval of the administration 
o( the University. 

Wind Tunnel Operations Department. The Wind 

1 unnel Operations Department conducts a 
program o( experimental research and develop- 
ment in cooperation with the aircraft industry, 
agencies of government and other industries with 
problems concerning aerodynamics. Testing 
programs cover a vinety of subjects including all 
ty(>es of aircraft, ships, parachutes, radar antennas, 
trucks, automobiles, structures, and exterior 
equipment sub/ect to high winds. 

The Department has a 7 75x1 1-foot wind tunnel 
that can be operated at speeds from to 240 mph. 
This facility has powered model drive equipment, 
and auxiliary vacuum and high pressure air sup- 
plies (or boundary layer control studies. Supporting 
shops include complete woodworking, machine 
shop, photographic, and instrumentation (acilities. 

The (ull-time staff of the department includes 
engineering, computing, shop, and technical 
operations personnel. This staff cooperates with 
other faculty and students m the College of 
Engineering on problems o( mutual interest. 
Fire Service Extension Department. The Fire 
Service Extension Department provides in-service 
training (or volunteer, municipal and industrial 
fire fighters, officers, rescue and ambulance per- 
sonnel and serves in an advisory capacity in 
matters of fire prevention, fire protection, (ire 
safety regulations, and emergency care. Classes 
are conducted throughout Maryland by local 
instructors who work under the guidance of senior 
instructors of the department. Basic training is 
given In the fundamentals of dremanship. An 
advanced course covers the technical (ield of fire 
prevention, control and extinguishment. Specialized 
courses are ottered for fire officers in tactics, 
strategy of fire suppression and in fire department 
administration. A training course of 42 clock 
hours (or heavy duty rescue operations is also 
available. An increasingly important program is 
that o( establishing and improving fire prevention 
and fire protection in Maryland industry, institutions 
and mercantile establishments. 

Emergency care courses incorporating the 
latest techniques in the treatment of the sick and 
injured are now made available through the depart- 
ment. Short courses in specialized subject areas. 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 57 



such as instructor training, hydraulics, fire pumps, 
aerial apparatus, and industrial fire protection 
are conducted at the University at different times 
throughout the year. 

Additional information may be obtamed from the 
Director, Fire Service Extension Department, 
University of Maryland, College Park. Md. 20742. 
Co-operative Engineering Education Program. The 
Maryland Plan for Co-operative Engineering Edu- 
cation at the University of Maryland, offered by 
the College of Engineering, presents a five-year 
program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. 
The academic requirements for students following 
the Co-op Plan of Education are identical to the 
academic requirements for those students follovi/ing 
the regular four-year program. In addition to the 
normal academic requirements, the Co-op student 
has scheduled periods of professional internship 
which must be satisfactorily completed to 
qualify for the baccalaureate degree under the 
Co-op Plan. 

The Co-op Plan begins after the student has 
completed the freshman and sophomore require- 
ments of his major field. This Co-op Plan involves 
only the last half of the student's baccalaureate 
program, the junior and senior years. The 
alternating plan of study and professional intern- 
ship lengthens this normal two-year period to 
three calendar years. Delaying entry into the 
Co-op Plan until the junior year offers considerable 
educational advantages to the student. The student 
retains the normal freshman-sophomore program 
years to afford time for the selection of his 
major field of engineering ... or even whether 
he wishes to continue in engineering . . . without 
committing himself to either the regular four-year 
or the Co-op Plan of education. A more mature 
and meaningful series of professional internship 
assignments are possible, to benefit both the 
student and his professional partner. Also, the 
plan is readily adaptable to the needs of the student 
transferring to the University from the engineering 
transfer programs of the community colleges. 

Students are selected for the Co-op Plan from 
applications filed with the Co-operative Education 
Office of the College of Engineering. While the 
student applies during his sophomore year, he must 
have completed the sophomore year requirements 
before formal entry into the program. A student must 
have a minimum 2.0 grade point average at the 
University of Maryland in order to qualify for the 
program. 

The Maryland Plan for Co-operative Engineering 
Education is shown in the tabulation below. 
Briefly, in Plans I and II, the Co-op student spends 
three semesters and two summers in resident 
study and three semesters and one summer in 
professional internship (70 weeks) to complete his 



baccalaureate degree requirements; all students 
complete the program with student-residence at 
the University. In these two plans students begin 
interning during the spring and fall semesters 
respectively. In Plan III the Co-op student begins 
interning in the summer and spends three 
semesters and one summer in resident study and 
two semesters and two summers in professional 
internship (60 weeks). The study-residence periods 
are the normal semester or eight-week summer ses- 
sions at the University; the internship periods are 
of twenty-weeks duration during the fall and 
spring semesters and ten weeks during the 
summer. It should be emphasized that these plans 
are guides, and some variation is permissible. 
Note: The student must have completed all 
freshman and sophomore requirements of his 
major field before entry into the Co-op Plan. 





Plan 1 


Plan II 


Plan III 


SUMMER 






Intern (1) 


FALL 

SPRING 

SUMMER 


Study 
Intern (1,2) 
Study 


Intern (1,2) 
Study 
Intern (3) 


Study 

Intern (2.3) 
Study 


FALL 

SPRING 

SUMMER 


Intern (3,4) 
Study 
Intern (5) 


Study 
Intern (4,5) 
Study 


Intern (4.5) 
Study 
Intern (6) 


FALL 

SPRING 

SUMMER 


Study 
Intern (6.7) 
Study 


Intern (6.7) 

Study 

Study 


Study 



Students make their own arrangements for 
board and lodging while on their periods of intern- 
ship. Frequently the participating industrial 
company or governmental agency will assist the 
student in locating good, inexpensive lodging. 
The internship wages are paid directly to the 
student by his employer. 

During the semesters or summer sessions in 
which the student attends school, he pays the 
regular tuition and fees assessed by the University. 
A $30.00 fee is charged for each 10-week period 
of professional internship. There is one 10-week 
period when a student interns during the summer 
and three double periods (20 weeks each) when 
he interns during the fall or spring semesters. 
The professional intern fee is payable at the 
beginning of each intern period and is not refund- 
able. 

Professional Schools 

Dental Hygiene. The primary responsibility of the 
dental hygiene profession is to promote optimal 
oral health through the provision of preventive and 
educational services complementary to those within 
the purview of the dental profession. 

In clinical office practice the dental hygienist's 
services are provided under the supervision of a 
dentist and are defined and governed by State 
dental practice acts. Although minor differences 
exist between state laws, in general, those services 



which constitute permissible dental hygiene 
practice include; obtaining the patient's medical 
and dental history; conducting a preliminary clini- 
cal oral examination of the teeth and surrounding 
tissues for diagnosis by the dentist; performing 
diagnostic procedures (x-rays, impressions for 
study casts, saliva tests, oral cytologic smears, 
etc.) for use by the dentist; providing a complete 
oral prophylaxis (removal of all hard and soft 
deposits and stains and polishing of natural and re- 
stored surfaces of the teeth); applying topical 
medicaments and preventive agents; and assisting 
with office duties as assigned by the dentist. The 
dental hygienist also assumes a major role in patient 
education and counseling and supervision of 
oral hygiene practices. 

Although the majority of dental hygienists are 
employed in dental offices, there are numerous 
opportunities and a growing need for those with 
baccalaureate and graduate degrees in dental 
hygiene education, community or public health, 
private and public institutions, commissioned 
service in the Armed Forces, research, and other 
special areas of practice. The dental hygienist's 
activities in these areas are dependent in varying 
degrees upon dental knowledge and skills in pro- 
viding clinical services. However, additional study 
beyond the basic dental hygiene curriculum is es- 
sential preparation for advanced professional 
career opportunities. 

Program Description. Dental hygiene offers only a 
four-year baccalaureate degree program. The 
curriculum includes two years of preprofessional 
courses, a third year of intensive dental and dental 
hygiene study with clinical application and a fourth 
year of advanced clinical practice and upper di- 
vision electives in a recommended area of study, 
which will constitute a minor related to a specialized 
area of dental hygiene practice. The first two 
years of the preprofessional curriculum include 
humanities and social science requirements of the 
University of Maryland, dental hygiene education 
accreditation requirements and elective lower 
division courses. Completion of the preprofessional 
curriculum at the University of Maryland or an- 
other campus will be required for eligibility to 
apply for enrollment in dental hygiene as a junior. 
Admissions and Applications Procedures 
High School Students. High school students who 
wish to enroll in the Pre-Dental Hygiene curriculum 
should request applications directly from the 
Admissions Office of the University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Young women or men who wish to prepare for 
a baccalaureate degree program in dental hygiene 
should pursue an academic program in high school 
including the following recommended subjects: 
biology, chemistry, math, and physics. 



58 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 



Pre-Dental Hygieno Students. Pre-Denlal Hygiene 
students who have completed three semesters of the 
prolessional curriculum should request an ap- 
plication at the end of the third semester from the 
Department of Dental Hygiene, University of 
Maryland School of Dentistry. Baltimore. Md. 21201. 
Applications lor the Baltimore campus should t>e 
received no later than June 1 prior to ttie tall 
semester lor which the student wishes to enroll. 

Only those students who have successfully 
completed the two year preprotessional curriculum 
at the University of Maryland or another college 
or university will be eligible for admission to the 
department. Because enrollment must be extremely 
limited, registration in the preprotessional cur- 
riculum does not assure the student of acceptance 
in the dental hygiene program. All applicants will 
be required to submit Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test 
scores (DHAT information is available from the 
Department of Dental Hygiene) and to appear for 
a personal interview at the discretion of the Dental 
Hygiene Committee on Admissions. A minimum 
of C average in the preprotessional curriculum 
will be required, and preference will be given to 
those students who have maintained high scholastic 
records. 

Registered Dental Hygienists. Registered dental 
hygienists who have completed a two year accred- 
ited dental hygiene program at another college or 
university, should apply to enroll in the pre- 
protessional curriculum at one of the three 
University of Maryland campuses. Upon completion 
of general education, basic and social science, 
advanced dental hygiene courses and elective re- 
quirements at the University of Maryland, dental 
hygiene credits will be evaluated for transferability 
by the Department of Dental Hygiene and the 
Baltimore Campus Director of Admissions. Regis- 
tered dental hygienists should write directly to 
the Department of Dental Hygiene for additional 
information. 

Further Information. Information about the pre- 
protessional curriculum or the transfer program for 
registered dental hygienists may be obtained from 
Room 203, Turner Laboratory, on the College Park 
Campus. 

Medical Technology. The University of Maryland 
Medical Technology program is four years in 
length, leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. 
The first three years are devoted to basic studies 
at the College Park Campus. The last year (12 full 
months) is spent in clinical studies at University 
Hospital on the Baltimore City campus of the 
University of Maryland. 

This program is administered by the School of 
Medicine. The curriculum in medical technology 
complies with the requirements and recommenda- 



tions of the Board of Schools of the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists (and the American 
Medical Association Council on Medical Education). 
Graduates of the program will be eligible to take 
the examination for certification given by the Board 
of Registry of the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists. 

Applicants must have a high school degree and 
should have at least three years of college 
preparatory mathematics and throe years of 
science, which involves chemistry and physics. 

The School of Nursing. The program in professional 
nursing leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing, is available to women and 
men students without regard to race, color or 
creed. The School of Nursing is approved by the 
Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses and 
accredited by the National League for Nursing. 
Admission and Progression 
High School Preparation 

Students should enroll in the college preparatory 
program in high school. The following subjects are 
specifically required by the School of Nursing in 
addition to other academic subjects required for 
high school graduation. 

Subjects Required Units 

Mathematics (college preparatory) 2 

Biology 1 

Chemistry 1 

Students who do not meet the above require- 
ments at admission to the University must make up 
deficiencies prior to classification as pre-profes- 
sional nursing students. 

Further Information. Information about the lower 
division program may be obtained from Room 209. 
Turner Laboratory, on the College Park Campus. 
Upper division program information may be obtained 
from the School of Nursing, 655 West Lombard 
Street, Baltimore, Md. 21201. 
The School of Pharmacy. The purposes of the 
School of Pharmacy are to train students for the 
efficient, ethical practice of all branches of 
pharmacy; to instruct students in general scientific 
and cultural subjects so they can read critically, 
express themselves clearly and think logically as 
members of a profession and citizens of a democ- 
racy; and to guide students into productive 
scholarship and research for the increase of 
knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of 
pharmacy. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education. 
The School holds membership in the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 



Correspondence. AM correspondence prior to 
entrance in the Preprotessional Program of the Five- 
Year Curriculum at College Park should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Md. 20742. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in tha 
Professional Program of the Five- Year Curriculum 
should be addressed to the School of Pharmacy. 
University of Maryland. 636 W. Lombard Street. 
Baltimore, Md. 21201. 

On the College Park Campus the Pharmacy 
student advisor's office is in the Turner Laboratory, 
Room 202. telephone number. 454-2540. 

Five-Year Program. A minimum of the five aca- 
demic years of satisfactory college work is required 
for the completion of the present pharmacy cur- 
riculum of the University of Maryland. This live-year 
curriculum meets the minimum requirements estab- 
lished by the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy and the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. 

At the University of Maryland the five-year pro- 
gram consists of two years of a preprotessional 
and a three-year pharmacy program. The preprotes- 
sional program is not available in Baltimore, but 
may be obtained at the College Park. Baltimore 
County (UMBO, or Eastern Shore (UMES) cam- 
puses of the University of Maryland or at any other 
accredited university or junior or senior college 
where appropriate courses are offered. 

Interested secondary school students are invited 
to write to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy 
in Baltimore for a catalog concerning the School 
and for literature about the opportunities in the 
pharmacy profession. 

Recommended High School Preparation. The com- 
pletion of an academic program containing the 
following courses is required for enrollment in 
the School of Pharmacy: 

Recommended Required 
Subjects Units Units 

English 4 4 

College Preparatory Mathematics — 

Including algebra (1). plane geometry 

(1) and additional unrts in advanced 

algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry. 

or advanced mathematics 4 2 

Physical Sciences (Chemistry and 

Physics) 2 1 

History and Social Sciences 2 1 

Eioiogical Sciences 1 

Foreign l_anguage — German or 

French 2 

Unspecified academic subjects . t 8 

Total 16 16 

Admission to the Professionaf Program at 
Baltimore. Only the three-year professional program 
is offered in Baltimore. 



Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools / 59 



students of all races, colors and creeds are 
equally admissible. It is the objective of the Uni- 
versity of (Vlaryland Baltimore City campus to 
enroll students with diversified bacl<grounds in 
order to make the educational experience more 
meaningful for each student. 
From College Park Campus 
Students w/ho have completed the prescribed 
preprofessional program at College Park with a 
scholastic average of not less than C (2.0), and who 
are in good standing will be considered for ad- 
vancement to the pharmacy program in Baltimore, 
subject to the decision of the Admissions Commit- 
tee of the School of Pharmacy. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the 
Baltimore division of the School of Pharmacy, each 
student will be required to file an application with the 
Baltimore Office of Admissions and Registrations. 
Physical Therapy. The Department of Physical 
Therapy offers a four-year program divided into 
a preprofessional division and professional division. 
The preprofessional requirements may be com- 
pleted on any of the University of f^/laryland 
campuses, or any regionally accredited University 
or College. The professional division courses are 
offered only on the Baltimore City campus. The 
physical therapy curriculum is approved by the 
Council of Ivledical Education of the American 
Medical Association in collaboration with the 
American Physical Therapy Association. 

The professional services of the physical therapist 
are offered to people who are disabled by illness 
or accident or were born with a handicap. Clinical 
practitioners are responsible for the evaluation 
of each patient's ability, disability and potential 
for recovery. The most common areas of disorder 
include neuromuscular, musculo-skeletal, sensory 
motor, and related cardio-vascular and respiratory 
functions. 

On the basis of test findings a treatment program 
is planned and implemented within the referral 
of the licensed physician or dentist with whom 
contact is maintained regarding patient care and 
progress. Treatment techniques include the 
therapeutic use of heat, cold, water, electricity, 
light, ultra-sound, massage, exercise and functional 
training. Instruction is given to the patient, the 
family and others who might help during the treat- 
ment and convalescent period. 

Most physical therapists are employed in hospital 
clinics, rehabilitation centers, private practice, 
schools for handicapped children and nursing 
homes. 

Advanced degree programs are available in a 
few universities and colleges across the country. A 
Master's and Ph.D. degree enable physical 
therapists to hold positions in education, research, 
administration and as consultants. 



Admission Information 

High school students who are interested in physical 
therapy should enroll in the college preparatory 
program. The subjects specifically recommended 
for adequate background are biology, chemistry, 
physics and three units of mathematics. Completion 
of a year of high school public speaking will pro- 
vide exemption from the college speech 
requirement. 

For an application for admission to the 
University of Maryland's College Park Campus, 
write to: Admissions Office, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Pre-Prolessional. Admission to the lower division 
is open to all students meeting the University re- 
quirements. Enrollment as a freshman or sophomore 
does not guarantee admission to the junior year 
of the professional program. 

Profession. Admission to the upper division is 
limited to approximately 50 students. Selection of 
applicants is based on academic achievement and a 
personal interview. 

Students are accepted into the junior class only 
in the fall semester. 

Beginning October 1st of the year preceding 
enrollment in the Baltimore division, each student Is 
required to file an application with the Baltimore 
Office of Admissions. 

Further Information. Information may be obtained 
on the College Park Campus in the Turner Labora- 
tory, Room 203. 

Information concerning the upper division may be 
obtained by contacting the Department of Physical 
Therapy, Allied Health Professions Building, 
32 S. Green Street, Baltimore, Md. 21201. 
Radiologic Technology. The University of Maryland 
Radiologic Technology Program is four years in 
duration, leading to a Bachelor of Science degree 
and the prerequisites to take the Examination of the 
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists to 
become a Registered Technologist (ARRT). The 
initial two years are devoted to fulfilling the pre- 
professional requirements at the College Park 
Campus. (See pre-radiological requirements listed 
elsewhere in this catalog.) The junior year is 
completed at the University of Maryland Baltimore 
City campus. The senior year is conducted at 
the Baltimore City campus and either the College 
Park Campus or the University of Maryland campus 
at Baltimore (UMBO). Clinical practice (practicum 
at the University of Maryland Hospital) is obtained 
in both the junior and senior years and the 
summer between the junior and senior years. 
Admission of students to the Baltimore City 
campus is extremely selective. Students must 
closely adhere to the pre-professional requirements 
listed elsewhere in this catalog, and they must 
maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 



or better to be considered for acceptance to the 
Baltimore campus. 

For additional information on the Radiologic Tech- 
nology Program, write the Division of Radiologic 
Technology, Allied Health Professions Building, 
32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201. 



60 / Academic Divisions, Colleges and Schools 




i 



Departmerls, Programs and Orrictia 



Administration. Supervision and Curriculum 

Professor and Chairman: Stephens. 
Professors: Anderson. Berman, Carbone, Dudley, 
McClure. Newell, Van Zwoll. Wiggin, Wedberg. 
Associate Professors: Goldman, Kelsey, McLoone, 
Perrin. 

Assistant Professors: Bennett, Goodrlcti, Hemp- 
stead, Statom. Splaine. 
Instructors: Coplan. Gibson. Lyons. 

The programs in this department are all at the 
graduate level and include preparation of school 
superintendents, principals, supervisors, curriculum 
directors, and administrative specialists in the 
areas of finance and business administration, per- 
sonnel administration, public relations, and educa- 
tional facilities. In addition, there are programs for 
the preparation of professors and research workers 
in all of the above areas. Preparation programs 
leading to administrative positions in junior colleges 
and other institutions of higher learning are avail- 
able through a joint major in administration-higher 
education. 

Aerospace Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: Anderson. 

Professors: Corning, Ivlelnik. Pai, Rivello, Sherwood. 

Associate Professors: Donaldson, Jones, Plotkin, 

Schaeffer. 

Assistant Professor: Barlow. 

Instructor: Greenwood. 

Lecturers: Billig, Fleig. Jr., Wilson. 

Aerospace engineering is focused on the physical 
understanding and design considerations of air- 
craft and space vehicles of all kinds. For example, 
consider the high-speed flight of an Air Force F-111, 
or the blast off and flight of NASA's future Space 
Shuttle. The airflow over the wings, fuselage and 
tail surfaces create lift, drag and moment on the 
aircraft. If the velocity is high enough, such as 
during re-entry of the Apollo into the Earth's 
atmosphere, then the temperature of the airflow 
becomes extremely high, the air becomes chemical- 
ly reacting, and heating of the vehicle's surface 
becomes a major problem. The study of how and 
why the airflow produces these forces, moments 
and healing is called Aerodynamics. In turn, the 
motion of the aircraft or space vehicle will respond 
to, indeed will be determined by. the aerodynamic 
forces and moments. The study of the motion and 
flight path of such vehicles is called Flight 
Mechanics. Of course, while executing this motion, 
the vehicle must be structurally sound, that is, its 
surface and internal structure must be able to with- 
stand the severe forces and loads associated with 
flight. The study of the mechanical behavior of 
materials, stresses and strains, deflections and 
vibrations that are associated with the structure of 
the vehicle itself is called Flight Structures. In the 



same vein, the motion of any aircraft or space 
vehicle must be initiated and maintained by a pro- 
pulsive mechanism such as the classic combination 
of a reciprocating engine with a propeller, or the 
more modern turbojets, ramjets and rockets. The 
study of the physical fundamentals of how these 
engines work is called Flight Propulsion. Finally, all 
of the above are synthesized into one system with 
a specific application — such as a complete DC-10 
or a Skylab — through a discipline called Aerospace 
Vehicle Design. 

The Department of Aerospace Engineering at the 
University of r\/laryland offers a rigorous and bal- 
anced education which includes all of the above 
disciplines. The goal of this program is to create 
professionally oriented aerospace engineers with 
an understanding of the physical fundamentals 
underlying atmospheric and space flight, and with 
the capability of applying this knowledge for useful 
and exciting purposes. Moreover, the physical back- 
ground and design synthesis that marks aerospace 
engineering education also prepares a student to 
work productively in other fields. For example, at 
this moment aerospace engineers are actively 
working on the solution of environmental and 
societal problems, on the energy crisis, and in the 
field of medicine. 

Aerospace Engineering Curriculum 
Basic Freshman Year 

Semester 

Course No. and Title i II 

CHEM 103. 104 — General Chemistry" • .4 4 

PHYS 161— General Physics I 3 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I, II 4 4 

ENES 101 — Intro. Engr. Science 3 

ENES 110— l^echanics 3 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

Students who are not prepared to schedule 
MATH 140 are advised to register for a preparatory 
course — MATH 115 — as part of their General 
University Requirement. These students are also ad- 
vised to attend summer school following their 
freshman year to complete MATH 141 and PHYS 161 
prior to entrance into the sophomore year of study. 
MATH 141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for many 
courses required in the sophomore year. 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 240 — Algorithmic Analysis & 

Computer Programming 2 

ENES 243 — Digital Computer Laboratory .1 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENAE 201. 202 — Introduction to Aerospace 

Engineering I. II 2 2 

ENAE 203 — Technical Report Writing ... 1 

Total Credits 17 16 



Semester 
Junior Year I II 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 3 

ENES 221 — Dynamics 3 

ENME 216 — Thermodynamics • 3 

ENEE 300— Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 

ENAE 305 — Aerospace Laboratory I 2 

ENAE 345 — Introduction to Dynamics of 

Aerospace Systems 3 

ENAE 351. 352— Flight Structures I. II ' . . 4 3 

ENAE 371— Aerodynamics I • 3 

Total Credits 16 17 

'*Qualitied students may elect to take CHEM t05 and 106 (4 cr ht». 

each) instead of CHEM 103 and 104. 

Senior Year Credits 

ENAE 471 — Aerodynamics II 3 

ENAE 475 — Viscous Flow & Aerodynamic Heating 3 

ENAE 401 — Aerospace Laboratory II 2 

ENAE 402 — Aerospace Laboratory III 1 

ENAE 461— Flight Propulsion I 3 

General Univ. Requirements 9 

Design Elective '-' 3 

Applied Dynamics Elective ■' 3 

Aerospace Elective ■• 3 

Technical Elective ^ 3 

Total Credits 33 

' students planning to take ENAE 462 Flight Ptopulsion II as a senior 
olective should take ENME 216. ENAE 371. and ENAE 471 one se- 
mester earlier than shown In the above curriculum and delay ENAE 
351 and ENAE 352 by one semester. 

-The student shall take one of the following design courses. 
ENAE 411 Aircraft Design 
ENAE 412 Design of Aerospace Vehicles 

' The student shall take one course which utilizes dynamics in a 
system analysis The following courses are offered: 
ENAE 445 Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehicles 
ENAE 455 Aircraft Vibrations 

' Three credits must be taken from elective courses offered by tlie 
Aerospace Engineering Department. Currently offered courses are: 
ENAE 457 Flight Structures III 
ENAE 462 Flight Propulsion II 
ENAE 472 Aerodynamics III 
ENAE 473 Aerodynamics of High Speed Flight 
ENAE 488 Topics in Aerospace Engineering 
ENAE 499 Elective Research 

Courses listed under 2 and 3 above and not used to meet the re- 
quirements of 2 and 3 may also be elected to lulfill requirement 4. 
■■ Any 3 credit technical course with a course number of 300 or above 
may be taken as a technical elective Courses available as Aerospace 
Electives may be used as Ihe technical elective 
Course Code Prefi«— ENAE 

Afro-American Studies Program 

Professor and Acting Director: Taylor. 

Assistant Director: Nzuwah. 

Assistant Professor: Landry. 

Lecturers: Nasibi. Ndissi. 

Instructor: Smyley. 

Visiting Associate Professor: Coleman. 

The Afro-American Studies Program offers a 

Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Sciences degree 

to students who declare a major in Afro-American 

Studies and who fulfill the academic requirements 

of this degree program. 

Students who want to take a major in another 
department, as well as follow a concentration 
outside his major of 18 hours of upper division 
course work, with an emphasis on black life and 
experiences, can receive a Certificate in Afro- 
American Studies. This work includes courses in 
art. African languages, economics, English, 



62 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



geography, history, music, political scioncos. 
sociology and speech. 

Undergraduates In good standing may enroll In 
the program by contacting an advisor in the Afro- 
American Studies Program. Students pursuing a 
major or certificate must meet the general university 
and division requirements. 

Students who plan to major in Afro-American 
Studies must complete a total of 36 hours of Afro- 
American Studies courses. At least 24 of the 36 
hours must be in upper division courses (300-400 
numbers). Twelve hours of basic courses are 
required. To fulfill this requirement, all majors 
should select the twelve hours of basic courses out 
of the following courses: AASP 100, AASP 200, 
AASP 202, AASP 300. AASP 311, AASP 312, 
AASP 403, AASP 410 and AASP 411. 

To receive a Certificate in Afro-American Studies, 
the student must enroll and receive a satisfactory 
grade in at least three (3) of the required courses 
which must include AASP 401, Seminar in Afro- 
American Studies. In addition, the student may also 
choose a number of approved courses from a list 
of recommended electives to meet the minimum re- 
quirements of 18 credit hours. 

Students wishing to enter the program should 
consult with the director of Afro-American Studies 
regarding prerequisites, approved electives and 
introductory courses. 
Agriculture — General Curriculum 
The General Agriculture curriculum provides for 
the development of a broad understanding in 
agriculture. 

The flexibility of this curriculum permits selection 
of electives that will meet individual vocational 
plans in agriculture and agriculturally related busi- 
ness and industry. 

General Agriculture He<iuiremenls Semester 

Credit Hours 

General Universily Requiremenis 30 

BOTN 101— General Botany" * 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology . 4 

CHEM 103 — College Ctiemistry I • 4 

CHEM 104 — College Chemistry II 4 

MATH — • 3 

AGEN 100 — Intro, to Ag Eng 3 

AGEN 20O— Intro 10 Farm. Mech 2 

AGRO 100 — Crop Prod. Lab 2 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

ANSC 101 — Princ of Animal Sci 3 

ANSC 203 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

ANSC — • • 3 

AREC 250 — Elements of Ag. & Res. Econ. . . 3 

AREC — • • 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 4 

ENTH/I 252— Insect Pest of Ag. Crops 3 

HORT — • • 3 

RLED 464— Rural Life in Mod Soc 3 

Community Development related. Life 

Science related, or Accounting 6 

Electives (15 credit liours 300 or above) 26 

•S«tiiN OivifOOil RMu'rxTMittt 

**Slud«nt m«v S0l*ct any cour««{l) having fQwrmi hour* in tn» 

<]*parlm«nt indicalad. 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

Protossor and Acting Chairman Pollonborgor 

Protessors Longest, Rydon. 

Associate Professor: Nelson. 

Assistant Protessors: Klement, Seibel, Sorter. 

Instructors: Glee, Klavon, Tonnant. 

Faculty Research Assistant: Owen. 

Programs are offered in education and other applied 
behavioral sciences needed by persons preparing 
to teach agriculture or to enter extension work, 
community development, and other continuing 
education careers. 

Three undergraduate curriculum options are avail- 
able. The agricultural education curriculum is de- 
signed primarily for persons who wish to prepare 
for teaching agriculture in the secondary schools. 
The extension education options are designed for 
those preparing to enter the Cooperative Extension 
Service or other agencies engaged in educational 
and development programs. Any option may lead 
to a variety of other career opportunities in public 
service, business and industry, communications, 
research, and college teaching. 

Students preparing to become teachers of agricul- 
ture — including horticulture, agribusiness or other 
agricultural related subjects — should have had ap- 
propriate experience with the kind of agriculture 
they plan to teach or should arrange to secure 
that experience during summers while in college. 
In order to be able to serve as advisors of high 

school chapters of the FFA upon graduation, 

students in the agricultural education curriculum 

are expected to participate in the Collegiate Chapter 

of the Future Farmers of America. 

Departmental Requirements: All Options 

BOTN 101 — General Botany lor Agriculture 
Students 

CHEM 103. 104 — College Chemistry I, II 

MATH 105 — Fundamentals of Mathematics 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 

EDUC 300 — Human Development and Learning" 

RLED 464 — Rural Lite in Modern Society 

RLED 303 — Teaching Materials and 
Demonstrations 

Agricultural Education Option 

EDUC 301 — Foundations of Education 

RLED 302 — Introduction to Agricultural Education 

RLED 305 — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer 

Groups 

RLED 311 — Teaching Secondary Vocational 

Agriculture 

RLED 313— Student Teaching 

RLED 315 — Student Teaching 

RLED 398 — Seminar in Agricultural Education 
AGEN 100 — Introduction to Agricultural 

Engineering 

AGEN 200 — Introduction to Farm Mechanics .... 

AGEN 305 — Farm Mechanics 

AGRO 100 — Crop Production laboratory 



4.4 



AGRO 102 — Crop Piodoclioo 

or 
AGRO 406 — Forage Crop Produclioo 2 

AGRO 202— Oerteral Soilt * 

ANSC 101— Principle* ol Aninul Scl«nc« 3 

ANSC 203 — Feeds and Fe«ding 3 

AREC 400 — Farm Managemanl 

or 
AREC 407— Financial Analy*it of Farm BufirtMa 3 

BOTN 221— Oneawt of Plant! 4 

ENTM 252— Agricultural InMCU artd PmU 3 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 

or 
HORT 231 — GreentiouM Managairwnl 

or 
HORT 271- Plant Propagation 3 

Extension Education: Agricultural Science and 
Youth Devetopmanl Options 

PSY 221— Social Psychology 3 

RLED 323 — Developing Youth Programs 3 

RLED 325 — Directed E«p«rlence in Extension 

Education ' 5 

RLED 327 — Program Planning in Extension 

Education 3 

RLED 422 — Extension Education 3 

RLED 423 — Extension Communications 3 

•PSVC lOO— Inlfodocllon 10 PtycnolOffy O cr»<I.lt, and tOMO «<*— 
Educational Paychology (3 crodilf) may t>« awOaMulod by Crta«»»on 
Education aludanlt 

Extension Education: Agricultural Science Option 

AGEN 100 — Introduction to Agricultural 

Engmeering . - . 3 

AGRO 100 — Crop Production Laboratory 2 

AGRO 102 — Crop Production ... 2 

AGRO 202 — General Soils * 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203 — Feeds and Feeding 3 

AREC 406 — Farm Management 

or 
AREC 407— Financial Analysts ol the 

Farm Business 3 

AREC 452 — Economics of Resource Development 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases ol Planu * 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insects and Po»U 3 

HORT 222 — Vegetable Production 

or 
HORT 231 — Greenhouse Management 

or 
HORT 271— Plant Propagation 3 

Extension Education: Youth Development Option 

RLED 426 — Development and Management ol 

EKlension Youth Programs 3 

EDHD 411 — Child Growth and Development 3 

EDHD 413 — Adolescent Development 3 

FMCD 105 — Introduction to Family Living 3 
HLTH 450 — Health Problems ol Children 

and Youth 3 

PSYC 333 — Child Psychology 3 

CRIM 450 — Juvenile Delinquency 3 
RECR 460 — Leadership Techniques and 

Practices 3 
RECR 490 — Organization and Administration 

ol Recreation 3 

RECR 420 — Program Planning 3 



Departments, Programs and Currteula / 63 



Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Professor and Chairman: Curtis. 
Professors: Beal, Bender, Bishop, Foster, Ishee, 
Lessley, Moore, Murray, Poffenberger, Smith, 
Stevens, Tuthill, and Wysong. 
Associate Professors: Belter, Cain, Hardle, 
Hoecker, Lawrence, Via. 
Assistant Professors: Crothers, Marasco. 
Facuity Research Associate: Bellows. 
Visiting Professor: Abrahamsen. 
Visiting Assistant Professors: Carlson, Nash, 
Noetzel, Vondruska. 

Visiting Faculty Research Associates: KInoshlta, 
Miller. 

This curriculum combines training In the business, 
economics and International aspects of agricultural 
production and marketing with the biological and 
physical sciences basic to agriculture. Programs 
are available for students In agricultural economics, 
agricultural business. International agriculture, and 
resource economics. Students desiring to enter 
agricultural marketing or business affiliated with 
agriculture may elect the agricultural business 
option; and those interested In foreign service may 
elect the International agriculture option. Students 
primarily interested In the broad aspects of pro- 
duction and management as it is related to the 
operation of a farm business may elect the agri- 
cultural economics option. Those Interested In 
training In the broad area of resource management 
and evaluation may elect the resource economics 
option. 

In these programs, students are trained for 
employment In agricultural business firms; for posi- 
tions in sales or management; for local, state, or 
federal agencies; for extension work; for high school 
and college teaching; for research, and for farm 
operation or management. 

Courses for the freshman and sophomore years 
are essentially the same for all students. In the 
junior year the student selects the option of his 
choice. Courses In this department are designed to 
provide training In the application of economic 
principles to the production, processing, distribu- 
tion, and merchandising of agricultural products 
and the effective management of our natural 
and human resources, as well as the inter- 
relationship of business &nd industry associated 
with agricultural products. The curriculum Includes 
courses in general agricultural economics, market- 
ing, farm management, prices, resource economics, 
agricultural policy, and internatlor 1 agricultural 
economics. 

Required of All Students * 

Credit Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

Biological Sciences" ' 3 

Chemistry' * 3 



AREC 404 — Prices of Agricultural Products . . 3 

BSAD 220 — Principles of Accounting 3 

BSAD 230 — Business Statistics I 

or 
AGRI 301 — Introduction to Agricultural 

Biometrics 3 

ECON 201 — Principles of Economics I 3 

ECON 203 — Principles of Economics II 3 

ECON 401 — National Income Analysis 3 

ECON 403 — Intermediate Price Ttieory 3 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Matfiematics" . 3 

MATH 111 — Introduction to Mathematics ... 3 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus 3 

Technical Agriculture" " " 9 

45 

•The students total program must contain a minimum of ts Cfedit 
hours of courses in Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
••Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

•••A minimum ol nine hours of technical agriculture must be selected 
in consultation with the students advisor 

Agribusiness Option 

Each student must take the following; 

AREC 406 — Farm Management 3 

AREC 427 — The Economics of Marketing 

Systems for Agricultural Commodities ... 3 

AREC 432 — Introduction to National Resource 

Policy 3 

Otfier courses in Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 3 

Electives 33 

Agricultural Economics Option 

Each student must take the following: 

AREC 406 — Farm Management 3 

ECON 425 — Mathematical Economics 
or 

ENGL 291 — Expository Writing 3 

MATH 221— Elementary Calculus 3 

Statistics 3 

Other courses in Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 9 

Electives , 24 

International Agriculture Option 

Each student must take the following: 
AREC 445 — World Agricultural Development 

and the Quality of Life 3 

ECON 415 — Introduction to Economic 

Development of Underdeveloped Areas ... 3 

ECON 440 — International Economics 3 

Other courses in Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 9 

Electives 27 

Resource Economics Option 

Each student must take the following: 
AREC 240 — Environment and Human Ecology 3 

AREC 452 — Economics of Resource 

Development 3 

ECON 450 — Introduction to Public Finance . . 3 

Other Courses in Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 6 

Electives 30 

Course Code Prefix— AREC 

Agricultural Chemistry Curriculum 

This curriculum insures adequate Instruction In the 
fundamentals of both the physical and biological 
sciences. It may be adjusted through the selection 
of electives to fit the student for work In agricultural 



experiment stations, soil bureaus, geological 
surveys, food laboratories, fertilizer industries, and 
those handling food products. 

Credit Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

Required of All Students: 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry 1 or 

CHEM 105" 4 

CHEM 104 — College Chemistry II or 

CHEM 106 4 

CHEM 201— College Chemistry III or 

CHEM 211 3 

CHEM 202 — College Chemistry 111 Laboratory 

or CHEM 212 2 

CHEM 203— College Chemistry IV or 

CHEM 213 3 

CHEM 204— College Chemistry IV Laboratory 

or CHEM 214 2 

CHEM 321 — Quantitative Analysis 4 

AGRO 202 — General Soils 4 

GEOL 100 — Geology 3 

MATH 141— Analysis II • 4 

PHYS 141— Principles of Physics 4 

PHYS 142 — Principles of Physics 4 

Electives in Biology" 6 

Electives in Agricultural Chemistry 10 

Electives 33 

•Satisfies Divisional Requirements 

Agricultural Engineering 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Harris. 
Professors: Green, Winn, Jr. 
Associate Professors: Cowan, Felton, Hummel, 
Merkel, Wheaton. 

Assistant Professors: Grant, Rebuck, Ross, 
Stewart. 

Lecturer: Holton. 
Instructor: Carr. 

Visiting Research Associate: Wlllson. 
Agricultural engineering utilizes both the physical 
and biological sciences to help meet the needs of 
our Increasing world population for food, natural 
fiber and improvement or maintenance of the 
environment. Scientific and engineering principles 
are applied to the conservation and utilization of 
soil and water resources for food production and 
recreation; to the utilization of energy to improve 
labor efficiency and to reduce laborious and menial 
tasks; to the design of structures and equipment 
for housing or handling of plants and animals to 
optimize growth potential; to the design of resi- 
dences to Improve the standard of living for the rural 
population; to the development of methods and 
equipment to maintain or increase the quality of 
food and natural fiber; to the flow of supplies 
and equipment to the agricultural and aquacultural 
production units; and to the flow of products from 
the production units and the processing plants to 
the consumer. The agricultural engineer places 
emphasis on maintaining a high quality environment 
as they work toward developing efficient and 
economical engineering solutions. 



64 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



The undergraduate curriculum provides oppor- 
tunity to prepare (or many interesting and challeng- 
ing careers in design, management, research, 
education, sales, consulting, or international service. 
The program of study includes a broad base ol 
mathematical, physical and engineering sciences 
combined with basic biological sciences. Twenty 
hours ol electives give flexibility so that a student 
may plan a program according to his major interest. 

Departmental Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
AGEN 324— Enginoeiing Dynamics o( 

Biological Materials 3 

AGEN 424 — Functional and Environmental 

Design ol Agricultural Structures 3 

AGEN 343 — Functional Design ol Machinery 

and Equipment 3 

AGEN 421 — Power Systems . 3 

AGEN 422 — Soil and Water Engineering . 3 

ENCE 350— Structural Analysis 3 

ENES 101 — Intro Engineering Science . . 3 

ENES 1 10— Mechanics 3 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENME 300 — Materials Science and Engineering 

or 
ENCE 300 — Fund ol Engineering Materials 3 

ENME 216 — Thermodynamics 3 

ENME 342 or ENCE 330— Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENEE 300 — Prin. o( Electrical Engineering . . 3 

MATH 140 141— Analysis I. II 4,4 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246 — Oillerenlial Equations 

or 
ENCE 381 — Applied Math in Engineering 

or 
ENME 380 — Applied Math in Engineering 3 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 

Of 

BOTN 101 — General Botany 4 

CHEM 103. 104— College Chemistry I. II 4, 4 

PHYS 161 262. 263— General Physics 3.4.4 

Technical Electives" 14 

General University Requirements'* 30 

Electives 6 

'Tvcbnical vlectiv** ralattd to litid of conunlration. must b« M- 
■•cted Irom i d«panm«nlally •pprov*d lit!. Eight credit! must b« 
300 i«v«i and atwve 

"Students must consull with departmental advisors to ensure tl>e 
selection ot eppropriate courses for irteir particular program of study. 

Agronomy 

Chairman and Professor: Miller. 

Professors: Axley. Clark. Decker, Foss, Hoyert, 

McKee. Strlckling. 

Associate Professors: Aycock. Bandel. Fanning, 

Miller, Parochetti. 

Assistant Professors: Burt, Hall. Hawes. Hofmann, 

Mulchi. Newcomer. Wolf. 

Visiting Associate Professor: Caldwell. 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Weber. 

Faculty Research Assistants: Armbruster, Mulford, 

Smith, Varano. 

Instructor: Rivard. 



Instruction is otiorod in crop science and soil 
science. A turl and urban agronomy option Is 
ollered under crop science and a conservation o( 
soil, water and environment option is ollered under 
soil science. These options appeal to students who 
are interested in urban problems or environmental 
science. The agronomy curricula are flexible and 
allow the student either to concentrate on basic 
science courses that are needed (or graduate work 
or to select courses that prepare him for employ- 
ment at the bachelor's degree level as specialists 
with park and planning commissions, road comis- 
sions. extension service, soil conservation service, 
and other governmental agencies. Many graduates 
with the bachelors degree are also employed by 
private corporations such as goll courses and seed, 
fertilizer, chemical, and farm equipment companies. 

Agronomy students who follow the Journalism- 
Science Communication option are prepared to 
enter the field o( science communication. Opportuni- 
ties in this area are challenging and diverse. Stu- 
dents who are interested in public relations may 
find employment with industry or governmental 
agencies. Others may become writers and. in some 
cases, science editors for newspapers, publishing 
houses, radio, and television. Technical and pro- 
fessional journals hire students trained in this field 
as editors and writers. Also, this training is valuable 
to students who (ind employment in university 
extension programs, as a large part o( their work 
involves written communication with the public. 

Students completing graduate programs are pre- 
pared (or college teaching and research, or research 
and management positions with industry and 
governmental agencies. 

Additional inlormation on opportunities in agron- 
omy may be obtained by writing to the Department 
o( Agronomy. 

Department Requirements. (22-23 semester hours) 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
CHEM 103 — College Chemistry f 4 

CHEM 104 — College Chemistry II 4 

MATH — • 3-4 

BOTN 101— General Botany* 4 

AGRO 100 — Crops Laboratory 2 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

AGRO 398 — Senior Seminar 1 

'Satisfies Division ol Agricultural and Life Sciences 
requirements. 

Crop Science Curriculum. (68 semester hours) 

Semesfer 
Credit Hours 

AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses 6 

AGRO — Advanced Soils Courses 6 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 221 — Diseases ol Plants 4 

BOTN 441 — Plant Physiology 4 

Electives 45 

Crop Science options are listed under Crop and Soil 
Sciertce Options. 



Soil Science Curriculum. (68 temetler hours) 

Semester 
Credit Houn 
AGRO — Advanced Crops Courses 4 

AQRO 414 — Soil Classification and 

Geography 4 

AGRO 417— Soil Physics 3 

AGRO 421— Soil Chemitlry 3 

Elective! 54 

Soil Science optioni are itiiad und«r Crop tnd Soil 
Semnce Optio/it 

Crop and Soil Science Option* 

Tur( and Urban Agronomy Option 

A student following this option m the Crop Science 

curriculum must include the following courMS 

among his electives: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

AGRO 405 — Tuft Management 3 

AGRO 415 — Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

HORT 160 — Introduction to the Art of 

Landscaping 3 

HORT 453 — Woody Plant Materials 3 

RECR 495 — Planning, Design, and 

Maintenance of Parl< and Recreational 

Areas and Facilities 3 

Conservation of Soil, Water, and 
Environment Option 

A student following this option in the Soil Science 
curriculum must include the following courses 
among his electives: 

Semester 
Credit Hour* 
AGRO 412— Soil and Water Conservation . 3 

AGRO 423 — Soil-Water Pollution 3 

AGRO 415 — Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

AGEN 432 — General Hydrology 3 

AGRI 489 — Air Pollution Biology 3 

BOTN 211 — Principles ot Conservation 3 

GEOG 445 — Climatology .3 

Journalism-Science Communication Option 

A student following this option in the Crop Science 
or Soil Science curriculum must elect journalism 
and basic science and math courses in addition to 
the required curriculum courses. Many combinations 
will be acceptable. The advisor can aid in helping 
the student plan an appropriate program. 

Course Code Prefn— AGHO 

Air Force Aerospace Studies Program 

The Air Force ROTC program provides pre- 
professional education for future Air Force com- 
missioned o(ficers. Courses are o((ered as electives, 
and enable college men and women to earn a 
commission in the United States Air Force while 
completing their University degree requirements. 

Two Programs Offered 

Four-Year Program. The Four-Year Program is sub- 
divided into two separate programs. The General 
Military Course (CMC) is normally for freshmen and 
sophomores. Those who successfully complete the 
GMC may apply (or the Protessional 0(ficer Course 



Departments. Programs and Curricula / 65 



(POC) which is the final two years of AFROTC. 
Progression into the POC is not automatic but is 
limited to selected students only. Students in the 
four-year program must attend four weeks of field 
training at a designated Air Force base during the 
summer after completing the sophomore year of 
college. To enter the AFROTC program, one should 
inform his advisor and register for classes in the 
same manner as for other courses. 
Two-Year Program. The Professional Officer Course 
(POC) IS normally offered m the junior and senior 
years, but may be taken by graduate students other- 
wise qualified. This program is especially attrac- 
tive for those unable to take the four-year program, 
particularly transfer students. Evaluation of candi- 
dates is normally begun during the first semester 
of the sophomore year, since each student must 
meet physical and mental standards set by the 
Air Force. Interested students should contact the 
Chairman, Air Force Aerospace Studies Program as 
early in the sophomore year as possible. Students 
in the two-year program must attend six weeks 
of field training at a designated Air Force base 
during the summer preceding entry into the two- 
year academic program. The academic program for 
the last two years (POC) is identical with the final 
two years of the four-year program. 

The Curriculum: 

General Military Course — freshman year, ARSC 100 
and ARSC 101 ; sophomore year, ARSC 200 and 
ARSC 201. The courses for the freshman and sopho- 
more years are "U.S. Military Forces in the Con- 
temporary World" and "Growth and Development of 
Aerospace Power" respectively. In the first two 
years, cadets attend academic classes once each 
week. In addition, they receive one hour of Leader- 
ship and Management Laboratory each week. 
Professional Officer Course — junior year, ARSC 300 
and ARSC 301 ; senior year, ARSC 302 and ARSC 
303. The courses for the junior and senior years are 
"National Security Forces in Contemporary 
American Society" and "Air Force Leadership and 
Management" respectively. They require three class 
hours, plus one hour of Leadership and Manage- 
ment Laboratory per week. 

The AFROTC College Scholarship Program pro- 
vides scholarships for selected cadets each year 
in the AFROTC program. Those selected receive 
money for tuition, laboratory expenses, incidental 
fees, and books for up to eight semesters. In addi- 
tion, they receive nontaxable monthly allowance 
of $100. 

Students in the Two-Year and Four- Year program 
enrolled in the Professional Officer Course receive 
nontaxable monthly pay of $100 for the two-year 
period regardless of their scholarship status. Stu- 
dents also receive monetary compensation (plus 
quarters and subsistence) while attending either the 

66 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



four-week or the six-week Field Training Session. 

To be accepted into the Professional Officer 
Course the student must: complete the General 
Military Course and a four-week Field Training 
Session, or the six-week Field Training Session; 
pass the Air Force Officer Qualification Test; be 
physically qualified; enlist in the Air Force Reserve; 
be in good academic standing; meet age require- 
ments; and possess the necessary qualities of 
leadership and citizenship. Successful completion 
of the Professional Officer Course and a bachelor's 
degree are the prerequisites for a commission as 
a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force. 

Students who have prior military service or 
ROTC training with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, 
Coast Guard, or Air Force will be evaluated and 
allowed appropriate credit toward meeting the re- 
quirements for the General Military Course. 
Professional Officer Course (Advanced) credits are 
transferable. 

Attendance at Aerospace Studies classes is 
mandatory. Unexcused absences will reduce the 
term grade. Excessive absences and/or misconduct 
will be cause for dismissal. 

Seniors who qualify to become Air Force pilots 
receive a free sevi-hour flight instruction program. 
Cadets are instructed by competent civilian in- 
structors. This training enables them to earn their 
private pilot's license before graduating from 
college. 

American Studies Program 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Lounsbury. 
Professor: Beall. 
Assistant Professor: Mintz. 

The program offers a comprehensive, interdiscipli- 
nary investigation of American culture as defined 
in historical and contemporary sources. Majoring 
in a curriculum of generous breadth — ranging 
from creative self-expression to environmental 
studies and the mass media — the undergraduate 
student may benefit from the perspectives empha- 
sized by specialists in both the humanities and the 
social sciences. In addition to gaining a general 
awareness of the multiple dimensions of American 
civilization, each major is expected to select an 
area of concentration in either American literature 
or American history. The program's faculty provide 
integrative courses, designed to offer a conceptual 
framework for the diversified materials of the tra- 
ditional disciplines, in the student's junior and 
senior years. 

Prerequisites; six hours of American history or 
American literature or three hours of each. The 
undergraduate major requires 42 semester hours 
(24 hours minimum at the 300-400 level), consisting 
of courses in American Studies and various 
related disciplines. Courses applicable to American 
Studies are offered in the following departments, 
programs and colleges; 



English, History, Government and Politics, Sociol- 
ogy, Afro-American Studies, Anthropology, Archi- 
tecture, Art, Comparative Literature, Dramatic Arts, 
Economics, Education, Geography, Journalism, 
Music, Philosophy, Psychology, Radio-Television- 
Film, and Speech Communication. 

No course with a grade lower than "C" may be 
counted towards the major. 

A major in American Studies will follow this cur- 
riculum; 

1. American Studies 426, 427 (Culture and the 
Arts in America) or American Studies 436, 437 
(Readings in American Studies) in the junior year 
and American Studies 446, 447 (Popular Culture in 
America) in the senior year. 

2. Twelve hours of either American literature or 
history. 

3. Nine hours in each of two of the remaining 
above listed departments. 

Note; To meet one of the nine hour require- 
ments, a student, with the approval of his advisor, 
may substitute related courses from one of the 
following sequences; 

Afro-American Studies. Courses in art, 
English, government, history and sociology. 

Area Studies and Comparative Culture. The 
study of one foreign culture. Courses must be drawn 
from at least two of the following fields; art, com- 
parative literature, English, history, and a foreign 
language. 

Creative and Performing Arts. Production, studio 
or technical courses in art, English, music, radio 
and television. 

Personality and Culture. Courses in anthropology, 
education, and psychology. 

Philosophy and Fine Arts. Courses in art, music 
and philosophy. 

Popular Arts and Mass Communications. Courses 
in dramatic arts, journalism, radio-television-film. 

Urban and Environmental Studies. Courses in 
architecture, economics, government, sociology. 

Course Code Preli«— AMST 

Animal Sciences 
Department of Animal Science 

Professor and Chairman: Young. 

Professors: Green, Leffel. 

Associate Professors: Buric, DeBarthe, Goodwin 

(Extension). 

Assistant Professor: McCall. 

instructors: Curry. 

Department of Dairy Science 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Mattick. 

Professors: Cairns, Keeney, King, Vandersall, 

Williams. 

Assistant Professors: Bull, Douglass, Holdaway, 

Westhoff. 

Instructor: Seely. 

Faculty Research Assistant: Kennett. 



Oapartment of Poultry Scltnca 

Associate Professor and Chairman Thomas. 

Professor: Shaltner, 

Associate Professor: Bigbee. 

Faculty Research Associate: Rubin 

Assistant Professors: Carter. Coon, Heath. Pollard, 

Soares, Wabeck. 

Extension Assistant Professor: Nicholson (Senior 

Agent). 

Department of Veterinary Science 

Professor and Chairman: Hammond. 

Associate Professors: Mohanty, Outta, Albert, 

Marquardt. Johnson. 

Assistant Professors: Campbell. Gorgacz. Ingling. 

The curriculum m animal science offers a broad 
background in general education, basic sciences, 
and agricultural sciences, and the opportunity for a 
student to emphasize that phase of animal agri- 
culture In which he is specifically interested. Each 
student will be assigned to an advisor according 
to the program he plans to pursue. 

Curriculum requirements in Animal Sciences can 
be completed through the Departments of Animal 
Science. Dairy Science or Poultry Science. Pro- 
grams of elective courses can be developed which 
provide major emphasis on beef, cattle, sheep, swine 
or horses, dairy or poultry. Each student is expected 
to develop a program of electives In consultation 
with an adviser by the beginning of the junior year. 

Covrv* Code Pf«tn— ANSC 

Objectives. The following specific objectives have 
been established for the program in animal 
sciences. 

1. To acquaint students with the role of animal 
agriculture in our cultural heritage. 

2. To prepare students for careers in the field of 
animal agriculture. These include positions of 
management and technology associated with ani- 
mal, dairy, or poultry production enterprises; 
positions with marketing and processing organiza- 
tions: and positions in other allied fields, such as 
feed, agricultural chemicals and equipment firms. 

3. To prepare students for entrance to veterinary 
schools. 

4. To prepare students for graduate study and 
Subsequent careers in teaching, research and ex- 
tension, both public and private. 

5. To provide essential courses for the support 
of other academic programs of the University. 

Required of All Students: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

Required of All Studertis: 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 3 

FDSC 111 — Inlroduclion to Food Science . 3 

ANSC 201 — Basic Principles of Animal 
Genetics 3 



ANSC ?1l — Anatomy of Oometlic Animals 
ANSC 212— Applied Animal Physiology 
ANSC 401— Fundamentals of Nutrition 
ANSC 412 — Introduction to Diiaasat ol 

Animals 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry r 
CHEM 104 — College Chemistry 11 
MICB 200 — General Microbiology 
ZOOL 101— General Zoology' 
SPCH 107— Public Speaking . 
MATH — • 



Electives 



46 



Anthropology Program 

Professor and Director: Kerley. 
Professor: Williams. 

Associate Professors: Anderson. Hoffman. Rosen. 
Assistant Professors: Dessamt. MIgliazza. Schacht, 
Stewart. Thurman. 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Remy. 
Visiting Lecturer: Ortner. 

The Anthropology Program offers beginning and 
advanced course work in the four principal sub- 
divisions of the discipline: physical anthropology, 
linguistics, archaeology and ethnology. Courses in 
these subdivisions may be used to fulfill the minor 
or "supporting courses" requirement in some pro- 
grams leading to the B.A. degree. They also may, 
at the discretion of the Department of Sociology, 
be counted toward a major in Sociology. 

Anthropology Major: The fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for a major in anthropology leads to 
the B.A. degree. All majors are required to take 
30 hours in anthropology. 18 of which must be 
selected from the following courses: ANTH 101, 102, 
401, 441. or 451. 371 or 461. and 397. It should be 
noted, however, that if ANTH 101 is used to satisfy 
the General University requirement in Social 
Science, it may not be counted as a part of the 
30 required semester hours for the major. The 18 
hours of required courses insures that the major 
becomes familiar with all areas of anthropology. No 
one area therefore, receives special emphasis, for 
It Is believed that such specialization should occur 
during graduate study, preferably at the Ph.D. 
level. Thus the student is broadly prepared in the 
ways man has evolved culturally and physically. 
A statement of course requirements and recom- 
mended sequences of courses is available in the 
departmental office. 

No course with a grade of less than C may be 
used to satisfy major requirements. 

ANTH 101 or its equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor, is prerequisite to all other courses in 
Anthropology. 

Couru CoO* Pulii— ANTH 



Archlteclura 

Proleaaor and Dean Hill. 

Assistant Dean: Fogle. 

Professors Cochran (part-time), Schleainger, 

Skiadaressis (visiting). D. Wiebenson. 

Associate Professors: Oegeiman, Mutton, Potts, 

Shaefler. 

Assistant Professors. Bechhoeter, Biasdel, 

Chabrowe, Fullenwider, Jadin, Kaskey, Uazaris, 

Lewis, Senkevitch. 

Lecturers: Adams, Bell, Feild, Fogle. Kramer, 

Sanders. Thomas. J. Wiet>enson. Wilkes. 

Admin. Assl.: Ratcliff. 

Curator of Visual Aids: Alley. 

Librarian: Neal. 

Students in architecture are required to complete 
a minimum ol 161 credits of work for the Bachelor 
of Architecture degree. In addition to prescribed 
courses in the School of Architecture, students are 
required to complete a number of credits in elec- 
tives offered elsewhere in the University. The 
requirements tor graduation are tabulated below: 

FALL SEMESTER 
Isl Year 
Arch 170 Int. to BIL 

GUR - 

GUR - 

GUR -• 

Elective 



GUR-' . 
3 GUR = 
3 GUR- 
3 GUR- 
3 Elective 



15 



2nd Year 
Arch 200 Basic Env. 

Design 

Arch 220 Hist of 

Arch I 

Arch 214 BIdg. 

Const. I 

Phys 121 

Math 221 



3rd Year 
Arch 300 Arch Studio I 
Arch 310 Arch Scl. 

and Tech I ' 

Arch 360 Site 

Analysis' 

Arch Hist or 

Theory Opt 

Arch 314 or 

CMSC 103' 



4ih Year 
Arch 400 Arch Studio 



Arch 201 Basic Env. 

Design . . 

Arch 221 Hist, ol 

Arch II 
Arch 215 BIdg. 

Constr. II 

Elective 

Elective 



Arch 301 Arch Studio 



II 



III 



Arch 410 Arch Sci. 

and Tech III 

Arch 350 Theories of 

Urb. Fm.' 

GUR = 

Elective 



Arch 311 Arch Sci. 

and Tech II 

Arch 342 Studies in 

Vis Design' 
Arch Hist or Theory 

Opt 
GUR - 



Arch 401 Arch Studio 



IV 



Arch 411 Arch Sci. 
and Tech IV . . . 

GUR= 

Elective 

Elective 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 67 



5th Year 
Arch 500 Adv, Top. 

Prob 

Arch 570 Prof. Mgmt. 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 



Arch 501 Adv. Top. 

Prob 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 



15 



17 Total Credits: 161 

NOTE; At least 12 of the 39 elective credits must be 
taken outside the School of Architecture and 12 taken 
from elective courses offered in the School of 
Architecture (not counting courses taken to meet the 
Arch History or Theory option). 
' Physics 121 and Main 221 are prerequisites 10 Atch 310', Malh 221 



■ GUR— General Un 
'indrcales that this 
Course Code Prelix— ARCH 

Art 

Professor and Chairman: Levitine. 
Professors: Bunts, deLeiris, Detiny, Jamieson, 
Lembach, Lynch, t^aril. 
Associate Professors: Campbell, DiFederico, 
Pemberton, Rearick, Stites. 

Assistant Professors: Bickley, Dilllnger, Farquhar, 
Forbes, Gelman, Green, Klank, Niese, Schwartz, 
Withers. 

Lecturers: deMonte, Ferraioli, Green, Griffin, 
fHommel, Landgren, Lapinski, Spiro, Valtchev. 
Instructors: deLeiris, Raid, Samuels. 
Two majors are offered in art: art history and 
studio. The student who majors in art history is 
committed to the study and scholarly interpretation 
of existing works of art, from the prehistoric era to 
our times, while the studio major stresses the stu- 
dent's direct participation in the creation of works 
of art. 

In spite of this difference, both majors are rooted 
in the concept of art as a humanistic experience, 
and share an essential common aim: the develop- 
ment of aesthetic sensitivity, understanding, and 
knowledge. For this reason, students in both majors 
are required to progress through a "common 
curriculum," which will ensure a broad grounding in 
both aspects of art; then each student will move into 
a "specialized curriculum" with advanced courses 
in his own major. 

A curriculum leading to a degree in art education 
is offered in the College of Education with the co- 
operation of the Department of Art. 
Common Curriculum 

(Courses required in major unless taken as part 
of supporting area as listed below.) 
ARTH 100. Introduction to Art. (3) 
ARTH 260. History of Art (3) 
ARTH 261. History of Art. (3) 
ARTS 100. Design I. (3) 
ARTS 110. Drawing I. (3) 



Specialized Curricula 

Art History Major A 

5 junior-senior level History of Art courses (one each 
from 3 of the following areas: Ancient-lvledieval, 
Renaissance-Baroque, 19th-20th century, non- 
Western.) (15) 

1 additional Studio Art course. 

Supporting Area 

12 coherently related non-art credits approved by an 
advisor. Six of these credits must be taken 
in one department, and must be at junior-senior 
level. (12) 

Art History Major B 

5 junior-senior level History of Art courses (one 
each from 3 of the following areas: Ancient- 
IVIedieval, Renaissance-Baroque, 19th-20th 
century, non-Western.) (15) 

3 additional courses in any level History of Art. (9) 

Supporting Area 

ARTS 100. Design I (from common curriculum). 

ARTS 110. Drawing I (from common curriculum). 

2 Studio Art courses at junior-senior level. (6) 

Total required credit hours, combined Major and 
Supporting Area — 45. Additional History of Art or 
Studio courses may be applied. Total combined Art 
hours may not exceed 42 in Major A; total in 
combined Major and Supporting Area may not 
exceed 54 in Major B. 

Studio Art Major A 

ARTS 200. Intermediate Design. (3); or alternative 
ARTS 210. Drawing II. (3) 
ARTS 220. Painting I. (3) 
ARTS 310. Drawing III. (3) 
ARTS 330. Sculpture I. (3) 
ARTS 340. Printmaking I or ARTS 344. Print- 
making II. (3) 
1 additional junior-senior level Studio course. (3) 
1 advanced History of Art course. (3) 

Supporting Area 

12 coherently related non-Art credits approved by 
an advisor. Six of these credits must be 
taken in one department and must be at a junior- 
senior level. (12) 

Studio Art Major B 

ARTS 200. Intermediate Design. (3); or alternative 
ARTS 210. Drawing II. (3) 
ARTS 220. Painting I. (3) 
ARTS 310. Drawing III. (3) 
ARTS 330. Sculpture I. (3) 
ARTS 340. Printmaking I or ARTS 344. Print- 
making II. (3) 
1 additional junior-senior level Studio Art course. (3) 



Supporting Area in History of Art 
ARTH 260. History of Art (from common curricu- 
lum). (3) 
ARTH 261. History of Art (from common curricu- 
lum). (3) 
2 History of Art courses at junior-senior level. (6) 

Total required credit hours, combined Major and 
Supporting Area — 51 in Major A, 45 in Major B. 
Additional History of Art or Studio courses may be 
applied. Total combined Art hours may not exceed 
42 in Major A; total in combined Major and Sup- 
porting Area may not exceed 54 in Major B. 

No course with a grade less than C may be used 
to satisfy major requirements. 

Course Cods Preli»e5— ARTE ARTH, ARTS 

Astronomy Program 

Professor and Chairman of Physics and Astronomy: 

Laster. 

Professor and Director of Astronomy: Ken. 

Professors: Brandt (P.T.), Erickson. Kundu, 

Opik (P.T.), Westerhout. 

Associate Professors: A'Hearn, Bell, Harrington, 

Matthews, Rose, V.P. Smith, Wentzel, Zipoy, 

Zuckerman. 

Assistant Professors: Simonson, Trimble. 

Faculty Research Associate: Scott. 

Visiting Research Associate: de la Noe. 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers a 
major in Astronomy. The Astronomy Program office 
IS located in the Space Sciences Building. Astron- 
omy students are given a strong undergraduate 
preparation in astronomy, physics and mathematics, 
as well as encouragement to take a wide range of 
other liberal arts courses. The Astronomy Program 
is designed to be quite flexible, in order to take 
advantage of students' special talents or interests 
after the basic requirements for a sound astronomy 
education have been met. Students preparing for 
graduate studies will have an opportunity to choose 
from among many advanced courses available in 
astronomy, mathematics and physics. The pro- 
gram is designed to prepare students both for 
graduate work and for positions in governmental and 
industrial laboratories and observatories. 

Students intending to major in astronomy who 
have a high school course in physics and who have 
adequate preparation in mathematics to qualify 
for admission to MATH 140 will ordinarily take the 
introductory physics courses PHYS 181, 182, 283 
and 284, or their equivalent during their freshman 
and sophomore years. Those students who do 
not decide to major in astronomy or physics until 
after their freshman or sophomore year or enter as 
transfer students will often have taken other 
introductory courses in physics (i.e. PHYS 161, 
262, 263). Students will find further details in the 
pamphlet entitled Department Requirements tor a 
B.S. degree m Astronomy, which is available from 



68 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Iho Astronomy Program Office. Tfiis pamphlet 
outlines many different approacfies for an astronomy 
major. 

ASTR 180 (Descriptive and Analytical Astronomy) 
IS the introductory astronomy course required of 
astronomy majors. It may be taken in the freshman 
or sophomore year. It is followed by another 
required course, ASTR 210 (Practical Astronomy). 
Some students may not decide to maior in astronomy 
until they have already taken ASTR 100 and 105 
(Introduction to Astronomy and Modern Astron- 
omy). Such students should, as a rule, still fulfill 
the ASTR 180 requirement: only students with a 
grade of B or better in ASTR 100 and 105 will be 
encouraged to major in astronomy. The astronomy 
faculty IS currently considering expanding ASTR 
180 into a two semester course. A new introductory 
one semester course, ASTR 350, may be offered 
lor junior level students with appropriate physics 
background. 

Astronomy majors are required to take the 
following physics courses: PHYS 181, 182. 283. 
284 (161, 262, 263 plus 404, 405 or equivalent may 
be substituted) 285, 286. and PHYS 421-422 or 
410-411. Required supporting courses are MATH 140, 
141, and 240. or 246. or 241. The introductory 
astronomy courses. ASTR 180 and 210. plus any 
two 400-level ASTR courses (6 credits) complete the 
requirements. The program requires that the stu- 
dent maintain an average grade of C in all astron- 
omy courses: moreover, the average grade of all 
the required physics and mathematics courses must 
also be C or better. Any student who wishes to be 
recommended for graduate work in astronomy 
must maintain a B average. He (she) should also 
consider including several additional advanced 
courses, beyond the minimum required, to be 
selected from astronomy, physics and mathematics. 

Honors in Astronomy. The Honors Program offers 
students ot exceptional ability and interest in 
astronomy an educational program with a number of 
special opportunities for learning. Honors sections 
are offered in several courses, and there are many 
opportunities for part-time research participation 
which may develop into full-time summer projects. 
An honors seminar is offered for advanced students: 
credit may be given for independent work or study: 
and certain graduate courses are open for credit 
toward the bachelor's degree. 

Students for the Honors Program are accepted by 
the Department's Honors Committee on the basis 
of recommendations from their advisors and other 
faculty members. Most honors candidates submit 
a written report on their research project, which, 
together with an oral comprehensive examination in 
the senior year, concludes the program which may 
lead to graduation "with Honors (or High Honors) 
in Astronomy." 



Courses For Non-Science Majort. There are a 
variety of Astronomy courses offered for those who 
are interested in learning about the subject but do 
not wish to major in it. These courses do not require 
any background in mathematics or physics and are 
geared especially to the non-science major. ASTR 
100 IS a general survey course that briefly covers 
all of the major parts of Astronomy. ASTR 110 
IS the lab that can be taken with or after ASTR 100. 
ASTR 105 IS at the same level as ASTR 100 except 
It covers a few topics in depth rather than many 
briefly. It has ASTR 100 as a prerequisite. ASTR 398 
IS offered to non-scientists who want to learn 
about a particular field in depth: the subject matter 
will change each semester and will cover topics 
like: the solar system, our Galaxy, the Universe, 
etc. ASTR 398 has no prerequisite beyond junior 
standing. 

Coufso Good Pfehx— ASTR 

Biological Sciences Program 

This program is designed for the student who is in- 
terested in a broader education In the biological 
sciences than is available in the programs for majors 
in the various departments of the Division of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences. It Is appropriate for 
the entering student who wishes to explore the 
various areas of biology before specializing In the 
program offered by a single department, or students 
desiring to specialize In a discipline constituted 
by courses from the various departments in the 
biological sciences. With the proper selection of 
courses beyond the basic requirements, this pro- 
gram is suitable for the pre-dental, pre-medical or 
pre-veterinary student who plans to earn a B.S. 
degree before entering professional school. 

Preparation for graduate study in a specialized 
area of biology is readily accomplished under this 
program by the judicious selection of junior-senior 
level courses supporting the proposed area of 
graduate concentration. Where the proposed area 
of graduate specialization lies within a single 
departmental discipline, it may be desirable for the 
student to transfer to the program for majors in 
that department. 

The student in this program may emphasize work 
in botany, entomology, microbiology or zoology 
and will be advised by the department or curriculum 
in which most of the work is taken. Alternatively, 
the student may concentrate in a specialized area of 
biology (i.e., ecology, genetics, and physiology) 
which cuts across department boundaries. In this 
case, an advisor competent in the area of emphasis 
will be selected. Students in the pre-professional 
programs should also seek advice from advisors 
for the respective programs. Students in the program 
who wish to prepare for secondary school science 
teaching should contact the staff of the Science 



Teaching Center ot the College of 6ducation for in- 
formation concerning requirements for certification. 
Curriculum. All students in the Biological Sciences 
Program must satisfy the requirements of the 
University of Maryland at College Park and the re- 
quirements of the Division of Agricultural and Life 
Sciences. 

Required introductory courses in the biological 
sciences: BOTN 101, ENTM 200. MICB 200. 200L 
101. These courses must be passed with an aver- 
age grade of at least C. The pre-professional student 
should lake ZOOL 293 as well. 

Required supporting courses in mathematics and 
physical sciences: MATH 110, 111: CHEM 103. 104; 
PHYS 121, 122. The student working in most areas 
of biology will also need the second year of 
Chemistry (CHEM 201-204; or 211-214). Additional 
work in chemistry may also be required by the 
student's advisor, in accordance with the needs of 
the student's field of emphasis. The pre-professional 
student must include CHEM 201-204 or 211-214 
in his program. 

Advanced courses in the biological sciences: 
The student must complete at least 30 semester 
hours of advanced work selected from the fields of 
botany, entomology, microbiology, and zoology. Of 
these credits at least 18 must be at the 300 and 
400-level and be taken in at least two of the four 
departments. The following courses in psychology 
may be counted as part of the required 30 semester 
hours, but may not be used to satisfy the require- 
ment of 18 semester hours at the advanced level: 
PSYC 402. 403. 410, 462, 479. 

Botany 

Professor and Chairman: Sisler. 

Prolessors: Corbett, Galloway, Kantzes, Klarman, 

Krusberg. D. T. Morgan. Patterson. Stern, Weaver. 

Research Prolessor: Sorokin. 

Associate Professors: Bean, Curtis, Karlander, 

Lockard. O. D. Morgan. Rappleye. 

Assistant Professors: Barnett. Bottino. Broome, 

Harrison. Motta, Reveal, Stevenson, Van Valkenburg. 

Research Associate: Queen. 

Faculty Research Assistant: Cockrell, Ragsdale. 

Instructors: Grigg, Higgins. 

The Department offers work in the major fields of 
physiology, pathology, ecology, taxonomy, anatomy- 
morphology, and genetics. 

The required courses for the freshman and 
sophomore years are the same for all students. In 
the junior and senior years, the student elects 
botany courses to suit his particular interest. 
Courses are required in other subjects to satisfy 
General University Requirements which contribute 
toward a broad cultural education, and to support 
the courses selected in the chosen field of txstany. 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 69 



The curriculum provides a complete survey of 
the field of botany, and lays a good foundation 
for graduate work in botany in preparation for teach, 
ing and for research in experiment stations or 
private research laboratories. 

Students who wish to meet the requirements for 
certificates in secondary education may elect 
basic courses in education. An additional semester 
will usually be necessary to take certain courses 
in education, including the required practice 
teaching. As long as the demand continues, a 
series of advanced courses will be offered in rota- 
tion in the summer session, especially for teachers 
working toward the degree of Master of Education 
in science teaching. 

The Department of Botany has instituted an 
Honors Program which a student may enter if he 
desires and if he meets the requirements of the 
program. 

Department of Botany Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BOTN 101— General Botany 4 

eOTN 202— Ttie Plant Kingdom 4 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 4 

BOTN 414— Plant Genetics 3 

BOTN 416— Plant Anatomy 4 

BOTN 441 — Plant Ptiysiology 4 

BOTN 462— Plant Ecology 2 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry 1" 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

(i/IATH 110. Ill — Introduction to Mathematics 

or MATH 140, 141' 6 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 4 

RHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology* 4 

Botany electives or related courses 10 

Electives 24 

General University Requirements 30 

'Satisfy Di^fision requiremenls 
Course Code Preli»— BOTN 

Business and Management 

Dean: Lamone; Haslem, Asst. Dean; 

Edelson, Asst. Dean. 

Professors: H. Anderson, Carroll, Dawson, Fisher, 

Greer, Hille, Levine, Locke, Marvin, Taff, Wright. 

Associate Professors: Ashmen, Fromovitz. Gannon, 

Hynes, Leete, Loeb, Nash, Nickels, Olson, Paine, 

Spivey, Thieblot, Widhelm. 

Assistant Professors: C. Anderson, R. Anderson, 

Bedingfield, Corwin, Falthzik, Ford, Handorf, 

Hargrove, Holmberg, Jolson, Kuehl, Lynagh, May, 

Neuman, Pegnetter, Poist, Solomon. 

Lecturers: Taylor, Treichel. 

Instructors: Baker, Buckingham, Dalton, Doilney, 

Edelman, Fulks, Grazer, Hicks, Kovach, Levine, 

Max, Lindsay, Lubell, Matthews, Matlingly, 

McConnell, Morash, Patton, Raffield, Rice, 

Rymer, Silberg, Stewart, Thomas. 



70 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Business organizations are set up primarily for the 
purpose of producing and distributing goods and 
services. Modern business administration requires 
a knowledge and understanding of organizational 
structures, operations and environments. The 
curricula of the College of Business and Manage- 
ment emphasize the principles and problems 
involved in the development of organizations and in 
the formulation and implementation of their policies. 

Study Programs in the College. The programs of 
study in the College of Business and Management 
are so arranged as to facilitate concentrations 
according to the major functions of business man- 
agement. This plan is not, however, based on the 
view that these major divisions are independent 
units, but rather that each is closely related to and 
dependent on the others. Every student in business 
and management is required to complete satis- 
factorily a minimum number of required basic 
subjects in the arts, sciences and humanities as 
prerequisites to work in the major management 
fields. 

At least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of 
academic work required for graduation must be 
in business administration subjects. A minimum of 
57 hours of tfie required 120 hours must be in upper 
division courses, with the exception that the 
student may, with the consent of the dean, offer 
certain lower division courses in mathematics, 
natural science and foreign language in partial ful- 
fillment of the requirement. In addition to the 
requirement of an overall average of C in academic 
subjects, and average of C in business administra- 
tion subjects is required for graduation. Electives 
in the curricula of the department may, with the 
consent of the advisor, be taken in any department 
of the University if the student has the necessary 
prerequisites. 

A business and management honors program is 
open to business and management majors entering 
their junior year. Students must have an academic 
average of at least 3.0 to be eligible for admittance 
to this program. 

Honor Societies 

Beta Gamma Sigma. The Alpha of Maryland Chapter 
of Beta Gamma Sigma was chartered in 1940. The 
purpose of this honorary society is to encourage 
and reward scholarship and accomplishment 
among students of commerce and business admin- 
istration; to promote the advancement of education 
in the art and science of business; and to foster 
integrity in the conduct of business operations. 
Chapters of Beta Gamma Sigma are chartered 
only in schools holding membership in the American 
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. 
Third and fourth year students in business admin- 
istration are eligible; in his third year, a student 
must rank in the highest four percent of his class, 



and in his fourth year, he must rank in the highest 
ten percent in order to be considered for selec- 
tion. 

Tlie Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. This is awarded 
annually to the student who has maintained the 
highest scholastic standing during the entire 
course of study in business administration or eco- 
nomics. Delta Sigma Pi was founded at New York 
University on November 7, 1907. The Gamma Sigma 
of Maryland chapter was chartered at the Uni- 
versity in 1950. Delta Sigma Pi is a professional 
fraternity organized to foster the study of business 
in universities; to encourage scholarship, social 
activity, and the association of students for their 
mutual advancement by research and practice; 
to promote closer affiliation between the commercial 
world and students of commerce; and to further 
a higher standard of commercial ethics and 
culture, as well as the civic and commercial wel- 
fare of the community. Members are selected from 
the College of Business Management on the basis 
of leadership, scholastic standing and promise of 
future business success. 
Beta Alpha PsI, Tau Chapter. Founded in 1919, 
Beta Alpha Psi, the National Accounting Honorary 
Fraternity, has continuously strived to create a 
mutually beneficial and informative relationship with 
the professional community. A semester's pro- 
gram includes such activities as social functions, 
guest speakers from the profession, community 
services, such as free income tax advice to low 
income families, and the culmination of the semes- 
ter with the Pledge Initiation Banquet. Membership 
is open to both men and women who are majoring 
in accounting and have achieved a 3.00 average 
in their accounting courses and a 2.75 overall 
average. 
Freshman and Sophomore Requirements 



GU Requirements 

MATH 110. Ill and 220 or (140" and 141) 

SPCH 100 

BSAD 110 

BSAD 220A and 221A (220 and 221") .. 

ECON 201 and 203 

BSAD 230 {231* •■) 



Hours 

30 

9 (8) 

3 

3 



•For ManageiT 



6 
3 

SCI-STATS « STAT-IFSM Ma|ocs; optional lor 



A Typical Program for First Two Years 

Required Courses in Addition to General 
University Requirements: 
Freshman Year 

GUR 9 GUR 

BSAD 110 or SPCH 100 or 

SPCH 100 3 BSAD 110 . 

MATH 110 (or MATH 111 (or 

140) 3 (4) 141) 



3 
3 (4) 



Total 15-16 



Total 15-16 



Sopnoniott Year 

OUR 6 9* GUR 8 

BSAD 220 t220A( 3 ECON 203 3 

ECON 201 3 BSAD 221 (221A( 3 

MATH 220- 3 BSAD 230 (231) 3 

Total 15 Toial 15 

•3 houii Oun tubllilut»d lo< M*TM ?» o. M«NAaEMeNT-»CI-»TAT» 

t STAT IFSM m.i.iri 

Junior and Senior Requirements 

BSAO 340 — Business Finiincc 3 

BSAD 350 — Marketing Pnnciples and Oiganlzatton 3 

BSAD 364— Management and Organization Theory 3 

BSAD 380 — Business Law 3 

BSAD 495 — Business Policies 3 

Total ^5 

In addition to the above, two 300 or 400 level 
courses must be taken in economics, at least one o( 
which must be: ECON 401. National Income 
Analysis; ECON 403, Intermediate Price Theory: 
ECON 430. Money and Banking; or ECON 440. 
International Economics. (Note: Finance Majors see 
Finance economics requirement.) 

At least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of 
academic work required for graduation must be 
in business and management subjects. In addition 
to the requirement of an overall average of C in 
academic subjects, an average of C in business and 
management subjects is required for graduation. 
Eleclives in the curricula of the college may. 
with the consent of the advisor, be taken in any 
department of the University if the student has the 
necessary prerequisites. 

General Curriculum in Business Administration. The 
General Curriculum in Business Administration is 
designed for those who desire a broad program 
in management. The curriculum contains a relatively 
large number of elective courses. Selection is 
subject to approval by an advisor and must con- 
tribute to a program of courses closely balanced 
between (1) a functional field, (2) the various 
basic areas of management and (3) non-business 
fields. 

Students selecting this curriculum will take the 
basic courses required for all students in the 
College of Business and Management. In addition, 
students will take: 

(1) The (ollowing required courses: Semester 

Hours 
BSAD 351 — Marketing Management or 
BSAO 450— Marketing Research Methods ... 3 

BSAD 360 — Personnel Management I or 

BSAD 362 — Labor Relations 3 

BSAD 370 — Principles ol Transportation or 
BSAD 371 — Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management 3 

BSAD 301— Electronic Data Processing or 
BSAD 332 — Operations Research I or 

BSAO 385 — Production Management 3 

BSAD 482 — Business and Government 3 

15 



(2) Three semester hours from the loHowing. 

BSAO 321 — Cost Accounting 

BSAD 431— Design ol Statistical Eipeiimenu 

In Business 

BSAO 440 — Financial Management 

BSAO 481— Public Utilities 3 

Total 18 

Thus, the upper division requirements are 
Junior-senior roquiremenis lor all 

College ol Business and Management 

students IS 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 16 

Eleclives in 300 or 400 level economics 

courses at least one of which must 

be ECON 401. 403. 430. or 440 6 

Upper division eleclives to complete 120 

s h. required lor graduation 21 

Total junior-senior year requirements 60 

Accounting. Accounting, in a limited sense, is the 
analysis, classification and recording of financial 
events and the reporting of the results of such 
events for an organization. In a broader sense, ac- 
counting consists of all financial devices for 
planning, controlling and appraising performance 
of an organization. In this broader sense, accounting 
includes among its many facets financial planning, 
budgeting, accounting systems, financial manage- 
ment controls, financial analysis of performance, 
financial reporting, internal and external auditing, 
and taxation of business. 

The accounting curriculum provides an educa- 
tional foundation for careers in accounting and a 
foundation for future advancement in other manage- 
ment areas whether in private business organiza- 
tions, government agencies, or public accounting 
firms. Students who select this curriculum will 
complete the freshman and sophomore require- 
ments for all students in the College of Business and 
Management. 

Course requirements for the junior and senior 
years are: 

(1) The junior-senior requirements for all stu- 
dents in the College of Business and Management, 

(2) the following courses: 

Semester 
Hours 
IFSM 401— Electronic Data Processing 3 

BSAD 310. 311 — Intermediate Accounting ... 6 
BSAD 320 — Accounting Systems 

BSAD 321 — Cost Accounting 3 

BSAD 323 — Income Tax Accounting 3 

and 9 semester hours Irom the following: 
BSAD 420. 421 — Undergraduate Accounting 

Seminar 
BSAD 422 — Auditing Theory and Practice 
BSAD 424 — Advanced Accounting 
BSAD 425 — CPA Problems 
BSAD 427— Advanced Auditing Theory and 

Practice 
BSAO 426 — Advanced Cost Accounting 



Thus, the upper division ol requirement* for 
accounting majors are: 
Junior-eenior requirements lor all Busirwss- 

Managemant itudenit 15 

Junior-senior accounting requiremenu 

(minimum) 21 

IFSM 401 — Electronic Data Processing 3 

Eleclives in 300 or 4(M level economics 

courses at least one ol which must be 

ECON 401. 403 430. or 440 8 

Eleclives (to complete 120 semester hours 

required for graduation) 15 

Total Junior-Senior Year Requirements 60 

For graduates ol the University ol Maryland, the 
educational requirement ol the Maryland State 
Board ol Public Accountancy lor taking the C.P.A. 
examination without practical experience totals 
thirty semester hours ol accounting courses plus 
SIX semester hours ol business law. Students wish- 
ing to satisfy the Board's requirements must include 
BSAO 422 in their undergraduate program. 
Students not wishing to satisfy the Board's require- 
ments to sit for the C.P.A. examination without 
experience are eligible to take the examination 
after obtaining two years of practical experience 
satisfactory to the Board. 

A student planning to take the C.P.A. examination 
in a state other than Maryland should determine 
the course requirements, if any, for that state and 
arrange his program accordingly. 
Finance. The finance curriculum is designed to 
familiarize the student with the institutions, theory 
and practice involved in the allocation of financial 
resources within the private sector, especially 
the firm. It is also designed to incorporate lounda- 
tion study in such related disciplines as economics 
and the quantitative areas. 

The finance curriculum provides an educational 
foundation for careers involving financial analysts 
and management, investment analysis and portfolio 
management, investment banking, banking and 
international finance; it also provides a foundation 
for graduate study in business administration, 
quantitative areas, economics, and law. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curricu- 
lum concentration in finance are: 

Semester 
Hours 

(1) The following required courses 

IFSM 401 — Electronic Data Processing . 3 
ECON 430 — Money and Banking 3 

BSAC 332 — Operations Research lor 

Management Decisions 3 

BSAD 343 — Investnoenis 3 

plus 

(2) 'Two ol the following courses 
BSAD 440 — Financial Management 

BSAO 443 — Security Analysis and Valuation 

BSAO 445 — Commercial Bank Management 

BSAD 481 — Public Utilities 6 

and 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 71 



(3) Ore o( the following courses (check 
prerequisites): 
IFSM 402 — Electronic Data Processing 

Applications 
BSAD 430 — Linear Statistical Models in 

Business 
BSAD 431 — Design of Statistical Experiments 

in Business 
BSAD 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in 

Business 
BSAD 434 — Operations Research I 
MATH — Three semester hours of mathematics 

beyond the college requirement 3 

Total 21 

The upper division requirements are summarized 

as follows: 

Junior-senior requirements for all 

college students 15 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 21 

One course in economics selected from 

ECON 401. 403, 431, 450, 402, and 440 3 

Electives to complete the 120 semester hours 

required for graduation 21 

Total Junior-Senior year requirements 60 

Insurance and Real Estate. Students interested in 
insurance or real estate may concentrate either in 
general business or finance and plan witti their 
advisors a group of electives to meet their special- 
ized needs. Courses offered in insurance and real 
estate include risk management, principles of 
risk and insurance, real estate principles and urban 
land management. 

Marketing. Marketing involves the functions per- 
formed in getting goods and services from producers 
to users. Career opportunities exist in manufactur- 
ing, wholesaling and retailing and include sales 
administration, marketing research, advertising and 
merchandising. 

Students preparing for work in marketing re- 
search are advised to elect additional courses in 
Management Science — statistics. 

In addition to the courses taken by all students 
in the College of Business and Management, the 
marketing program consists of: 

(1) The following required courses: 
BSAD 332 — Operations Research for 

Management Decisions 3 

BSAD 351 — Marketing Management 3 

BSAD 352— Advertising 3 

BSAD 450 — Marketing Research Methods 3 

Total required 12 

and 

(2) six semester hours from the following: 
IFSM 401 — Electronic Data Processing 
BSAD 353 — Retail Management 

BSAD 371 — Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management 6 

BSAD 431 — Design of Statistical 

Experiments in Business 
BSAD 453 — Industrial Marketing 
BSAD 451 — Consumer Analysis 
BSAD 454 — International Marketing 
BSAD 452 — Promotion Management 

Total 18 

72 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Thus, the upper division requirements are: 
Junior-senior requirements for all departmental 

students 15 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 

Electives in 300 or 400 level economics courses 

at least one of which must be ECON 401, 403, 

430, or 440 6 

Electives to complete 120 semester hours 

required for graduation 21 

Total, junior-senior year requirements 60 

Personnel and Labor Relations. Personnel admin- 
istration has to do with the direction of human 
effort. It is concerned with securing, maintaining and 
utilizing an effective working force. People profes- 
sionally trained in personnel administration find 
career opportunities in business, in government, in 
educational institutions, and in charitable and 
other organizations. 

(1) The required courses are: 

BSAD 360 — Personnel Management 3 

BSAD 362 — Labor Relations 3 

BSAD 460 — Personnel Management: Analysis 

& Problems 3 

BSAD 464 — Organizational Behavior 3 

BSAD 462 — Labor Legislation 3 

Total required 15 

and 

(2) three hours from the following: 
BSAD 467 — Undergraduate Seminar in 

Personnel Management 
BSAD 385 — Production Management 
PSYC 461 — Personnel and Organizational 

Psychology 
PSYC 451 — Principles of Psychological Testing 
PSYC 452 — Psychology of Individual 

Differences 
SOCY 462 — Industrial Sociology 
SOCY 447 — Small Group Analysis 
GVPT 411 — Public Personnel Administration 
JOUR 330 — Public Relations 3 

Total 18 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 
Junior-senior requirements for all departmental 

students 15 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 

Electives in 300 or 400 level economics courses 

at least one of which must be ECON 401. 403, 

430, or 440 6 

Electives to complete 120 semester hours required 

lor graduation 21 

Total, junior-senior year requirements 60 

Production Management. This curriculum is designed 
to acquaint the student with the problems of or- 
ganization and control in the field of production 
management. Theory and practice with reference 
to organization, policies, methods, processes and 
techniques are surveyed, analyzed and evaluated. 

The courses in addition to those required of all 
students in the College of Business and Manage- 
ment are: 

(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 321 — Cost Accounting 3 

BSAD 360— Personnel Management 3 



BSAD 385— Production Management 3 

BSAD 485 — Advanced Production Management . 3 

Total required 12 

and 
(2) six hours from the following: 

BSAD 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in 

Business 
BSAD 353 — Industrial Marketing 
BSAD 362 — Labor Relations 
BSAD 332 — Operations Research for 
Management 
BSAD 371 — Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management 6 

Total 18 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 
Junior-senior requirements for all college 

students 15 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 

Electives in 300 or 400 level economics courses 

at least one of which must be ECON 401, 403. 

430, or 440 6 

Electives to complete 120 semester hours required 

for graduation 21 

Total junior-senior year requirements 60 

Management Science — Statistics. In the manage- 
ment science-statistics curriculum, the student will 
have the option of concentrating primarily in 
statistics or primarily in management science. The 
two options are described below. 
The Statistics Option. Statistics consists of a body 
of methods for utilizing probability theory in 
decision-making processes. Important statistical 
activities ancillary to the decision-making process 
are the systematization of quantitative data and 
the measurement of variability. Some specialized 
areas within the field of statistics are: sample 
surveys, forecasting, quality control, design of 
experiment, Bayesian decision processes, actuarial 
statistics, and data processing. Statistical meth- 
ods — for example, sample survey techniques — are 
widely used in accounting, marketing, industrial 
management, and government applications. 

An aptitude for applied mathematics and a desire 
to understand and apply scientific methods to 
significant problems are important prerequisites 
for the would-be statistician. 

Students planning to major in statistics must 
take MATH 140-141. 

Students selecting this curriculum will take, in 
addition to the courses required for all students in 
the College of Business and Management: 

(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 430 — Linear Statistical Models in 

Business 3 

BSAD 432 — Sample Surveys in Business and 

Economics 3 

BSAD 434 — Operations Research I 3 

BSAD 438 — Topics in Statistical Analysis 
for Business and Management 3 

and 

(2) six semester hours from the following: 
IFSM 401 — Electronic Data Processing 



BSAO 433 — Slalistical Decision Theory in 

Business 
BSAD 435 — Operations Research II 
BSAO 430 — Applicalions of Mathematical 

Progiammmg in Management Science 
BSAD 4S0— Marketing Research Methods 
STAT 400— Probability and Statistics I 6 

Toldl '8 

TtM Management Science Option. Management 
Science — Operations Research can be defined as 
the application o( scientific methodology by inter- 
disciplinary teams to problems Involving the control 
o( organized man-machine systems so as to pro- 
vide solutions which best serve the purposes o( 
the organization as a whole. 

Practitioners in this (ield are employed by large 
organizations (military, governmental, private indus- 
trial, private consulting), to analyze operations in 
the light o( organizational goals and recommend 
changes requisite to goal fuKillment. 

Students planning to major in this (ield must com- 
plete MATH 140-141 prior to junior standing. 
Students considering graduate work in this (ield 
should complete MATH 240-241 as early as possible 
in their careers. Note: MATH 240-241 may be 
counted as upper division elective credit. 

Students electing this curriculum will take, in 
addition to the courses required (or all students in 
the College o( Business and Management: 

(1) The lollowing required courses; 
BSAO 430 — Linear Slalistical Models in 

Business 3 

BSAD 434 — Operations Research I 3 

BSAD 435 — Operations Research II 3 

BSAO 436 — Applications of Mathematical 

Programming in Management Science 3 

Total 12 

ar>d 

(2) Sii semester hours from the lollowing: 
BSAO 432 — Sample Surveys in Business and 

Economics 
BSAO 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in 

Business 
BSAD 438 — Topics in Statistical Analysis (or 

Business and Management 
STAT 400— Applied Probability & Statistics I 
IFSM 401 — Electronic Data Processing 
IFSM 410 — Information Processing Problems 

of Administrative. Economic, and 

Political Systems 
IFSM 436 — Introduction to System Analysis 
BSAD 385 — Production Management 
BSAD 485 — Advanced Production Management 6 

Total 18 

Thus, the upper division requirements are (or both 

options; 

Junior-senior requirements for all college students • 15 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 

Electives in 300 or 400 level economics courses 

at least one of which must be ECON 401. 403. 

430 or 440 6 



Eiactivet to complete 120 ah. required lor 

graduation 21 

Total luniorsenior requirement 60 

Transportation. Transportation involves the move- 
ment of persons and goods in the satis(action 
o( human needs. The curriculum in transportation 
includes an analysis o( the services and manage- 
ment problems, such as pricing, (mancing, and 
organization. o( the (ive modes o( transport — air, 
motor, pipelines, railroads, and water — and covers 
the scope and regulation o( transportation in our 
economy. 

The etfectlve management o( transportation in- 
volves a study o( the components o( physical 
distribution and the interaction o( procurement, the 
level and control o( inventories, warehousing, 
material handling, transportation, and data 
processing. 

The curriculum in transportation is designed to 
prepare students to assume responsible positions 
with carriers, governmental agencies, and traftic and 
physical distribution management in industry. 

Course requirements are, in addition to the 
junior-senior requirements (or all students in the 
College o( Business and Management: 

(1) Tiie tollowing required courses: 
BSAD 332 — Operations Research (or 

Management Decisions 3 

BSAD 370 — Principles of Transportation 3 

BSAD 371— Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management 3 

BSAD 470 — Motor Transportation 3 

BSAD 473 — Advanced Transportation Problems 3 

Total 15 

and 

(2) Three semester hours to be selected from 
the following: 

BSAD 471 — Water Transportation 

BSAD 472 — Commercial Air Transportation 

BSAD 474— Urban Transport and Urban 

Development 
BSAO 481— Public Utilities 
BSAD 392 — Introduction to International 

Business Management 3 

Total required 18 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements (or all college students 15 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 

Electives in 300 or 400 level economics courses 
at least one of which must be ECON 401. 403, 

430. or 440 6 

Electives to complete 120 s.h. required 
for graduation 21 

Total junior-senior year requirements 60 

Combined Business Administration and Law 
Program. The College of Business and Management 
offers a combined Business Administration-Law 
Curriculum in which the student completes three 
years in the General Curriculum in Business Ad- 
ministration in the colleges and a (ourth year 



o( work in the Law School o( the University ot 
Maryland. Admission to the Law School is contingent 
upon meeting the applicable standards ol that 
school Individual students are responsible to 
secure from the Law School its current admission 
requirements. The student must complete ail the 
courses required o( students in the department, the 
courses normally required (or the general cur- 
riculum in Business Administration through the 
junior year, and enough credits to equal a minimum 
of 90 semester hours. No business law course can 
be Included in the 90 hours. The last year o( 
college work belore entering the Law School must 
be completed in residence at College Park. At 
least 30 hours o( work must be in courses numbered 
300 or above. 

The Bachelor o( Science degree is conferred 
upon students who complete the first year in the 
Law School with an average grade of C or better. 

Business and Economic Research 

Professor and Acting Director: Cumberland. 

Professors Cumberland. Harris. 

y4ssoc/are Professor: Fisher. 

Assistant Professor: King. 

The (unctions o( the Bureau o( Business and 

Economic Research are research, education and 

public service. 

The research activities o( the bureau are pri- 
marily (ocused on basic research in the (ield o( 
regional, urban and environmental studies Although 
the bureau's long-run research program is carried 
out largely by its own sta(f, faculty members from 
other departments also participate. The bureau 
also undertakes cooperative research programs with 
the sponsorship o( federal and state governmental 
agencies, research foundations and other groups. 

The educational functions of the bureau are 
achieved through active participation by advanced 
graduate and undergraduate students in the 
bureau's research program. This direct involve- 
ment of students in the research process under 
(acuity supervision assists students in their degree 
programs and provides research skills that equip 
students (or responsible posts in business, govern- 
ment and higher education. 

The bureau observes its service responsibilities to 
government, business, and pnvate groups pri- 
marily through the publication and distribution o( 
its research (indings. In addition, the bureau Rtaff 
welcomes the opportunity to be ot service to gov- 
ernmental, business and private groups by consulting 
with them on problems in business and economics, 
particularly those related to regional development. 

Chemical Engineering 

Acting Chairman: Gomezplata. 

Professors: Arsenault, Beckmann, Cadman, Duffey, 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 73 



Marchello, Munno, Schroeder. Silverman. Skolnick, 
Smith, 

Associate Professors: Almenas. Bolsaitis. Gentry. 
Johnson, Regan. Roush. Sheaks, Spain, Spivak, 
Assistant Professors: Hatch, Kugelman. 
Lecturers: Belcher. Dedrick. Paauwe. Salah (P-T). 
Chemical engineering involves the application of 
sound engineering and economic principles — and 
basic sciences of mathematics, physics and chem- 
istry — to process industries concerned with the 
chemical transformation of matter. The chemical 
engineer is primarily concerned with research and 
process development leading to new chemical 
process ventures or a better understanding of exist- 
ing ones: with the efficient operation of the 
complete chemical plant or its component units; 
with the technical services engineering required 
for improving and understanding chemical plant 
operation and the products produced: with the 
chemical sales and economic distribution of the 
chemical plant product; and with the general man- 
agement and executive direction of chemical 
process industry plants and industrial complexes. 

Because of this wide range of ultimate applica- 
tions, the chemical engineer finds interesting and 
diverse career opportunities in such varied fields as 
chemical (inorganic and organic), food processing 
and manufacture, metallurgical, nuclear and energy 
conversion, petroleum (refining, production, or 
petrochemical), and pharmaceutical industries. 
Additional opportunities are presented by the re- 
search and development activities of many public 
and private research institutes and allied agencies. 

The Chemical Engineering Department offers a 
curriculum to prepare the undergraduate for a chal- 
lenging career in any of the aforementioned fields 
of interest — a curriculum that will prepare him for 
continued graduate study or immediate industrial 
employment following the baccalaureate degree. 

The program is developed around three areas: 
chemical, materials and nuclear engineering. In 
addition, the development of programs in applied 
polymer science, and biological and environmental 
health engineering has been initiated. These new 
programs are interdisciplinary with other depart- 
ments of the University. 

Basic Freshman Year 

Semester 

Course No. and Title I II 

CHEM 103. 104— General Chemistry" .4 4 

PHYS 161— General Physics I 3 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I. II 4 4 

ENES 101— Intro. Engr. Science 3 

ENES 110— Mechanics 3 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

••Qoaliliea sludenls may elect 10 lake CHEM 105 and 106 (4 ct. hrs 
eachi inslead ol CHEM 103 and 104 

Students who are not prepared to schedule 
MATH 140 are advised to register for a preparatory 



course — t^ATH 115 — as part of their General Uni- 
versity Requirement. These students are also 
advised to attend summer school following their 
freshman year to complete IvIATH 141 and PHYS 161 
prior to entrance into the sophomore year of study. 
IVIATH 141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for 
many courses required in the sophomore year. 

Semester 
Sophomore Year 1 H 

General Univ. Requirements 3 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262. 263 — General Physics II, III . , 4 4 

ENES 220— Mechanics ol Materials 3 

CHEM 201. 203— College Chemistry III. IV 3 3 

CHEM 204 — College Chemistry Laboratory 

IV 2 

ENCH 215 — Chemical Engineering Analysis 

I 3 

ENCH 250 — Chemical Engineering Analysis 

II 2 

Total 17 17 

Junior Year 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

ENCH 440 — Chemical Engr. Kinetics 3 

ENCH 442— Chemical Engineering Systems 

Analysis and Dynamics 2 

ENCH 443 — Dynamics and Control Lab 1 

CHEM 481, 482— Physical Chemistry ... 3 3 

CHEM 430 — Chemical Measurements 

Laboratory I 3 

Technical Elective 2 

ENCH 295 — Chemical Process Thermo . , 3 

ENCH 425. 427 — Transfer and Transport 

Process 1. II 4 3 

Total 16 17 

Senior Year 

General Univ. Requirements 6 6 

ENEE Electives 3 

ENCH 333— Seminar 1 

ENCH 437— Chemical Engineering Lab. .3 

ENCH 445 — Process Engr. and Design ... 3 

ENCH 447 — Chem. Engineering Econ 2 

Technical Electives* 5 * 

Total 17 16 

•At least nine credits ol lectinical electives must be taken at ttie 
300 level 

Chemistry 

Chairman: Vanderslice. 
Associate Chairman: Castellan. 
Professors: Castellan. Gardner. Goldsby, Gordon, 
Grim. Henery-Logan. Holmlund. Jaquith. Keeney, 
Lippincott, Munn, Pickard, Ponnamperuma, Pratt, 
Purdy, Reeve, Rollinson, Stewart, Stuntz, 
Vanderslice, Veitch. 

Associate Professors: Ammon. Bellama. Boyd, 
Davis, DeVoe, Huheey, Jarvis, Kasler, Khanna, 
Lakshmanan, fylartin, (Vlazzocchi, Ivliller, t^oore, 
O'Haver, Sampugna, Staley, Viola, W/alters. 
Assistant Professors: Alexander. Campagnoni, 
Hansen, Helz. Murphy, Olin, Sommer, Tossell, Zoller. 



Visiting Assistant Professor: Satek. 
Research Professor: Bailey. 
Visiting Professors. Breger. Freeman. Rose. 
Emeritus Professor: Svirbely. 
Lecturers: Heikkinen, Kilbourne. 
Instructors: Doherty, Gamble, Ingangi, Rodez. 
Stuntz. 

Teaching Associates: Hageman. Tatum. Wolfe. 
The curriculum in chemistry is centered around a 
basic core of 30 credits (18 lower-division and 12 
upper-division) in chemistry. An additional two 
credits must be chosen from among other upper- 
division courses in chemistry. The program is 
designed to provide the maximum amount of flexi- 
bility to students seeking preparation for either the 
traditional branches of chemistry or to interdis- 
ciplinary fields. Students wishing a degree program 
specifically certified by the American Chemical 
Society must elect more than the minimum number 
of elective credits in chemistry and must choose 
judiciously among the upper-division courses 
offered. In addition, the ACS-certified degree pro- 
gram presently recommends German or Russian. 
A sample program .listing only the required or 
recommended courses, is given below. It is ex- 
pected that each semester's electives will include 
courses intended to satisfy the general requirements 
of the University or of the Division of Agricultural 
and Life Sciences, plus others of the student's 
choice. 

FIRST YEAR 

Chem 103 or 105 4 Chem 104 or 106 4 

Math 140" 4 Math 141' 4 

Electives 7 Electives 7 



ally placed 



15 

MATH 



15 



ay MATH 140 and 141 



SECOND YEAR 

Chem 201 or 211 3 Chem 203 or 213 3 

Chem 202 or 212 2 Chem 204 or 214 2 

Physics 141 4 Physics 142 4 

Electives 6 Electives 6 



15 



15 



THIRD YEAR 

Chem 430 3 Chem 431 3 

Chem 481 3 Chem 482 3 

Electives 9 Electives 9 



15 



15 



FOURTH YEAR 

Electives 15 Electives IS 

For American Chemical Society certification the 
student should consult his or her advisor for course 
recommendations that will meet certification re- 
quirements. 

Biochemistry. The Chemistry Department also offers 
a major in biochemistry. The program requires 
one of the lower-division chemistry sequences; 



74 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



ChecTKslry 461 and 462; Chom(stfy 481 and 482: 
Chemistry 430 and 464: and nino crodils ol approved 
biological science thai must include at least one 
upper-division course. A sample program, listing 
only the required courses, is given below. It is ex- 
pected that each somoslers electives will include 
courses intended to satisfy the general requirements 
ol the University or ol Ihe Division of Agricultural 
and Life Sciences, plus others ol the student's 
choice. 

FIRST YEAR 

Chom 103 or 105 4 Chem 104 or 106 4 

Matt) 140" 4 Math 141 4 

Eleclives" 7 Electives 7 

15 15 

■Studanll inioiMy pucod In MATH IIS will dolay MATH UO and 

It (he first vear eloclivos include at least onu 



SECOND YEAR 

Chem 201 or 211 3 Chem 203 or 213 3 

Chem 202 or 212 2 Chem 204 or 214 2 

Physics 141 4 Physics 142 4 

Eleclives 6 Eleclives 6 



15 15 
THIRD YEAR 

3 Chem 482 3 

3 Chem 464 2 

. . 3 Chem 462 3 

. . 6 Eleclives 7 



Chem 481 
Chem 430 
Chem 461 
Eleclives . 



15 15 

FOURTH YEAR 

Eleclives 15 Eleclives 15 

The Chemistry Department's Honors Program be- 
gins in the junior year. Interested students should 
see the Departmental Honors Committee lor further 
inlormation. 

Agricultural Chemistry. This curriculum insures 
adequate instruction in the lundamentals of both 
the physical and biological sciences. It may be ad- 
lusted through the selection of electives to fit the 
student for work in agricultural experiment stations, 
soil bureaus, geological surveys, food laboratories, 
fertilizer industries, and those handling food 
products. 

Credit Hours 
General University Requirements 30 

Required of All Students: 

CHEM 103 — College Chemistry I or 

CHEM 105- 4 

CHEM 104 — College Chemistry II or 

CHEM 106 4 

CHEM 201— College Chemistry III or 

CHEM 211 3 

CHEM 202— College Chemistry III Laboratory 

or CHEM 212 2 

CHEM 203— College Chemistry IV or 

CHEM 213 3 

CHEM 204 — College Chemistry IV Laboratory 

or CHEM 214 2 



CHEM 321— Ouanlltallve Analyiln 
AGRO 202— General Soils . . 

GEOL 100 — Geology 

MATH 141— Analysis If 

PHYS 141— Principles ol Physics 
PHYS 142— Principles ol Physics 

Electives In Biology' 

Electives In Agricultural Chemistry 
Electives 



Course Coda Pielii— CHEM 

Child Study, Institute (or 

Director and Prolessor: Morgan. 
Professors: Chapin, Goering, Kurtz, Perkins. 
Associate Professors: Diltmann, Eliot, Flatter, 
Gardner, Hardy, Hatfield, Huebner, Kyle, Matleson, 
Milhollan, Rogolsky. 

Assistant Professors: Ansello, Bennett, Davidson, 
Green. Hunt, Koopman, Marcus, Shillett, Svoboda, 
Tyler, Wolk. 

Instructors: Walter, Long. 

The Institute lor Child Study carries on the following 
activities: (1) It undertakes basic research in hu- 
man development; (2) It synthesizes research 
lindings Irom many sciences that study human 
beings: (3) It plans, organizes and provides con- 
sultant service programs of direct child study by 
in-service teachers in individual schools or in 
municipal, county or state systems: (4) It offers 
course programs and field training to qualified 
graduate students, preparing them to render expert 
consultant service to schools and for college 
teaching of human development. 

Undergraduate courses and workshops are de- 
signed for prospective teachers, in-service teachers 
and other persons interested in human develop- 
ment. Certain prerequisites are set up with the 
course sequences, but these prerequisites are 
modilied by the student's previous experience in 
direct study of children. 

Course Code Prolyl— EDHD 

Chinese Program 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Chin. 
Lecturers: Loh. Chen. 
instructors: Lee, Wang. 
The program offers two series of courses, the 
language series and the content series. The lan- 
guage series consists of four levels ol instruction: 
the elementary, the intermediate, the advanced, and 
a level of specialized courses such as Readings in 
Chinese History and Literature, Classical 
Chinese, etc. In addition, there is a course entitled 
Review of Elementary Chinese to bridge the gap 
between Elementary and Intermediate Chinese for 
those students who have had some exposure to the 
language but who are not ready for Intermediate 
Chinese. 

The content series contains courses in Chinese 
civilization, literature, and linguistics. They do not 



presuppose previous training in the Chinese 
language except for Chinese Linguistics, which 
IS a course dealing with the sounds and gram- 
matical system ol the Chinese language and 
Its comparison with English. Since the illustrative 
materials in this course are in Chinese, Ihe comple- 
tion ol Intensive Elementary Chinese or its 
equivalent is required. 

The elementary Chinese course is intensified, 
meeting 8 hours per week, for which students re- 
ceive 12 credits in one year (6 per semester). The 
intensive program is designed to give students a 
solid foundation of the language In all four skills ol 
speaking, hearing, reading, and writing (char- 
acters). The instructional approach is audio-lmguat 
and communication-oriented. 

Presently the program offers a minor in Chinese. 
It consists of 18 credit hours of which 6 must be 
in Chinese Linguistics. 

Civil Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: Carter. 
Professors: Lepper, Oils, Ragan. 
Associate Professors: Birkner, Colville, Cookson, 
Cournyn, Garber, Hall, Heins, Israel, Piper. 
Sternberg, Wedding, Witczak. 
Assistant Professors: Albrechl, Loutzenheiser, 
McCuen, Mulinazzi, Yoo (Visiting). 
Lecturers: Powers. LeRoy. 

Civil Engineering Curriculum. Civil engineering is 
concerned with the planning, design, construction 
and operation of large facilities associated with 
man's environment. Civil engineers specialize in 
such areas as environmental engineering, trans- 
portation systems, structures, water resource 
development, water supply and pollution control, 
urban and regional planning, construction man- 
agement, and air pollution control. Many civil 
engineers enter private practice as consulting 
engineers or start their own businesses in the con- 
struction industry. Others pursue careers with local, 
state, and federal agencies or with large 
corporations. 

The undergraduate program is founded on the 
basic sciences and emphasizes the development 
of a high degree of technical competence. The 
program orients the student toward computer aided 
design techniques and prepares him to incorporate 
new concepts that will develop during his profes- 
sional career. Further, the program stresses the 
balance between technical efficiency and the needs 
of society. The graduate is prepared to enter one 
of the areas mentioned above, or he can move into 
new areas of specialization such as oceanographic 
engineering or the development of facilities for 
extra-terrestrial environments. 

At no time has man been more concerned with 
the quality of his environment. Man is concerned 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 75 



with broad environmental problems such as pollu- 
tion and the operation of his transportation systems. 
Man is also concerned with problems such as a 
need lor new approaches in the design and con- 
struction of buildings. The civil engineering profes- 
sion faces the greatest challenge in its history as 
It assumes a central role in the solution of the 
physical problems facing the urban-regional 
complex. 

Basic Freshman Year 

Semester 

Course No. and Title I II 

CHEM 103. 104 — General Chemistry" ..4 4 

PHYS 161 — General Physics I 3 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I, II 4 4 

ENES 101 — Intro. Engr. Science 3 

ENES 1 10 — Mechanics 3 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

Students who are not prepared to schedule 
MATH 140 are advised to register for a preparatory 
course — MATH 115 — as part of their General Uni- 
versity Requirement. These students are also 
advised to attend summer school following their 
freshman year to complete MATH 141 and PHYS 161 
prior to entrance into the sophomore year of study. 
MATH 141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for 
many courses required in the sophomore year. 

■•Qualified students may elect to take CHEM 105 and 106 (4 cr. hrs. 
eact^) instead of CHEM 103 and 104. 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations for 

Scientists and Engineers 3 

PHYS 262. 263 — General Physics 

II. Ill 4 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials . . 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENCE 280 — Engineering Survey 

Measurements 3 

ENCE 221 — Introduction to 

Environmental Engineering 3 

General University Requirements . . 3 3 

Total Credits 17 16 

Junior Year 

ENCE 300 — Fundamentals of 

Engineering Materials 3 

ENCE 330 — Basic Fluid Mechanics . . 3 
ENCE 340 — Fundamentals of Soil 

Mechanics 3 

ENCE 350. 351 — Structural Analysis 

and Design I. II 3 3 

ENCE 360 — Engineering Analysis and 

Computer Programming 4 

ENCE 370 — Fundamentals of 

Transportation Engineering 3 

ENME 215 — Principles of Mechanical 

Engineering 
or 
ENCH 295 — Chemical Process 

Thermodynamics 3 

ENCE — Technical Elective (Group A, 

B, C. or D)* 3 



General University Requirements 6 

Total Credits 16 18 

■See notes concerning electives. 

Senior Year 

ENCE — Technical Elective (Group A, 

B. C. or D)" 7 3-" 

ENCE — Technical Elective (Group E, 

F. or G)' 3"' 3"" 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 

Technical Elective" ' 3 

General University Requirements .... 6 3 

Total Credits 16 15 

"See notes concerning Tectinical Electives. 

■■One course from the available Technical Electives in Civil Engineer- 
ing cr approved Technical Elective outside department. 
■•■These numbers represent Ihree-semester-credit courses. Additional 
semester credits wilt be involved to the extent that courses carrying 

Notes Concerning Technical Electives in 

Civil Engineering 

A minimum of 22 credit hours of technical electives 

are required as follows: 

(1) All 3 courses from one area of concentration 
A, B. C, or D. 

(2) 1 course in one other area of concentration 
A, B. C, or D. 

(3) 6 hours in areas of concentration E. F. or G. 

(4) Any one course in the following list or ap- 
proved technical course outside the department. 

Areas of Concentration 



(E) Mechanics and 

Materials 
ENCE 410 (3) 
ENCE 411 (4) 

(F) Soil Mechanics 
ENCE 440 (3) 
ENCE 441 (3) 

(G) Systems Analysis 

and Planning 
ENCE 420 (3) 
ENCE 461 (3) 
(H) Special Studies 

(Max. 3 credits) 
ENCE 489 (3) 



(A) Structures 

ENCE 450 (3) 

ENCE 451 (4) 

ENCE 460 (3) 
(8) Water Resources 

ENCE 430 (4) 

ENCE 431 (3) 

ENCE 432 (3) 

(C) Environmental 
ENCE 433 (3) 
ENCE 434 (3) 
ENCE 435 (4) 

(D) Transportation 
ENCE 470 (4) 
ENCE 471 (3) 
ENCE 472 (3) 

Course Code Prefix— ENCE 

Classical Languages and Literatures 

Professor and Chairman: Avery. 
Associate Professor: Hubbe. 
Lecturer: Iversen. 
Instructor: Clapper. 

Major in Latin: LATN 101, 102, 203 and 204 or their 
equivalent must have been completed before a 
student may begin work on a major. A major con- 
sists of a minimum of twenty-four hours beginning 
with LATN 305, twelve hours of which must t>e taken 
in 400-level courses. In addition, a student major- 
ing in Latin will be required to take as supporting 
courses LATN 170, HIFN 456, and HIFN 410. He 



IS urged to pursue a strong supporting program in 
Greek. The following courses are recommended as 
electives: HIST 251 and 252, ARTH 402 and 403, 
and PHIL 310. No course in the Latin language with 
a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major 
requirements. 

Normally no placement tests are given in the 
classical languages. The following schedule will 
apply in general in determining the course level at 
which students will register for Latin. 

Students offering or 1 unit of Latin will register 
for LATN 101. 

Students offering 2 units of Latin will register 
for LATN 203. 

Students offering 3 units of Latin will register 
for LATN 204. 

Students offering 4 units of Latin will register for 
LATN 305. 

However, those presenting 2, 3 or 4 units of 
preparatory work may register initially for the next 
higher course by demonstrating proficiency through 
a placement test. Students whose stage of 
achievement is not represented here are urgently 
invited to confer with the chairman of the depart- 
ment. Students who wish to continue the study 
of Greek should likewise confer with the chairman 
of the department. 

Course Code Prefixes— LATN GREK 

Comparative Literature Program 

Advisory Committee on Comparative Literature: 
Kenny, Jones, Swigger, MacBain, Hering. 
Nemes. 

Professors: Goodwyn, Jones, Perloff, Salamanca. 
Associate Professors: Berry, Coogan, Greenwood, 
Smith, Walt. 

Assistant Professors: Swigger, Gilbert. 
Undergraduates may emphasize comparative litera- 
ture as they work toward a degree in one of the 
departments of literature. Each student will be 
formally advised by the faculty of his "home" de- 
partment. In general, every student will be required 
to take CMLT 401 and CMLT 402. and during his 
last year, CMLT 496. The various literature depart- 
ments concerned will have additional specific 
requirements. 

Students emphasizing comparative literature are 
expected to develop a high degree of com- 
petence in at least one foreign language. 

Course work may not be limited to the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. 

LATN 170 is highly recommended. 

Computer Science 

Acting Chairman, Professor: Atchison. 
Professors: Atchison, Chu. Edmundson, Glasser, 
Heilprin, Kanal, Minker, Ortega, RheinboldL 



76 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Aiaociale Prol»ssor»: Austing, Vandergralt. 

Asiislanl ProlesiOis: Agrawala, Basili. Feldman, 

Hagerly. Hamlel, Hecht. Lay, McClellan. Mills, 

Noonan. Rieger. ZelKowitz. 

Instructors: Nagel (P.T.). VanderBrug, Rauscher. 

Underwood (P.T ). Ford (P.T.). 

The Department o( Computer Science offers a 

B.S. degree in Computer Science The program 

IS designed to meet the throe broad objectives 

of service to the community, qualification for 

employment, and preparation tor graduate work. 

The student may choose from a large variety 
of computer science courses in areas such as ap- 
plications, computer systems, information process- 
ing, languages, numerical analysis, and theory of 
computing. There are no requirements tor specific 
courses outside of the major. This provides the 
student with the flexibility to select courses in areas 
of interest and in line with the student's goals 
after graduation. 

The course of study for each Computer Science 
major must include at least 30 credit hours of 
CMSC courses with an overall average of C or better. 
All CMSC courses are counted in the major. A 
minimum of 24 of the 30 credit hours must be at 
the 300-400 levels. CMSC 1 10 and 120. or their 
equivalents, are required of all students without 
previous computer background. Any student with 
suitable programming background obtained in high 
school, in a course from another department or 
institution, or through employment may be exempted 
from CMSC 110. In each year beyond the fresh- 
man level the student has a choice of computer 
science courses. 

Each student's curriculum must also satisfy the 
General University Requirements. Additional 
courses as electives must be completed to obtain 
the minimum 120 credit hours required for gradua- 
tion. 

An Honors Program is being developed. Further 
Information about the undergraduate program or 
about the M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs in 
Computer Science may be obtained from the 
Departmental Office. 

Computing facilities available to the student 
include a UNIVAC 1108/1106 system with numerous 
remote units which are provided by the Computer 
Science Center for all academic activities of the 
Campus. In addition, the Department has a POP 
11/45 system, which can be used as a laboratory 
facility in advanced systems courses. 

Conservation and Resource Development Pro- 
grams. The development and use of natural 
resources (including water, soil, minerals, fresh 
water and marine organisms, wildlife, air and human 



resources), are essential to the full growth of an 
economy. 

The curriculum in Conservation and Resource 
Development is designed to instill concepts of the 
efficient development and ludicious management of 
natural resources. The study of the problems 
associated with use of natural resources will 
acquaint students with their role in economic de- 
velopment while maintaining concern for the 
quality of the environment. 

Students will prepare for professional and 
administrative positions in land and water con- 
servation projects, for careers in operational, 
administrative, educational .and research work in 
land use. fish and wildlife management, natural re- 
source management, recreational area development, 
and management, or for graduate study in any of 
the several areas within the biological sciences. 

Students will pursue a broad education program 
and then elect subjects concentrated in a specifc 
area of interest. A student will be assigned an 
advisor according to his area of interest. 

Students will be encouraged to obtain summer 
positions which will give them technical laboratory 
or field experience in their chosen interest area. 
Basic Curriculum Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
General University Requirements 30 

BOTN 101 — General Botany' 4 

CHEM 103 — College Chemislry r 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

AGRI 301 — Introduction to Agricultural 

Biometrics 3 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

GEOL 100 — Introductory Physical 

Geology 3 

ENTM— 3 

FCON— 3 

MATH-— 9 41 

Option Requirements'* 

Fisli and Wildlife Management 9 

Zoology 9 

Related Field 3 

Electives 28 49 

Plant Resource Management 

Plant Management 9 

Botany 9 

Related Field 3 

Electives 28 49 

Pest Management 

Pest Management 9 

Entomology 9 

Related Field 3 

Electives 28 49 

Water Resource Management 
Water Resource Management .... 9 
Agronomy and Agricultural 

Engineering 6 

Related Field 6 

Electives 28 49 

Resource Management 

Resource Management 9 



Eeonofflici or 
Agricultural and 
Retourca Economicii 

Rslaied Field 

Eiectivoi 



CounMlIng and Personnel Services 

Departmont Chairman Marx. 
Professors Byrne. Hoyt. Magoon, Pumroy. 
Associate Prolessors: Allan, Greenberg. Lawrence 
Martin. Ray. Rhoads, Stern. 

Assistant Prolessors Birk. Carlson. Chasnoff. Colby. 
Freeman. Gump. Kafka. Kneger, Levine. Medvene. 
Spielbichler. Westbrook. 
Instructors: Davidson, Kahn. 

Programs of preparation are offered by the Depart- 
ment of Counseling and Personnel Services at 
the master's degree, advanced graduate specialist 
and doctoral degree levels (or counselors in 
elementary and secondary schools, rehabilitation 
agencies, community agencies, college and uni- 
versity counseling centers. It also offers programs 
of preparation for other personnel services: college 
student personnel administration, visiting teacher 
and psychological services in schools. 

Coufir Code Pr.I,<— EOCP 

Criminal Justice and Criminology 

Prolessor and Director: Lepns. 
Criminology Program: 

Associate Prolessors: Maida, Tennyson. 

Lecturer: Debro. 
Law Enlorcement Curriculum: 

Assistant Prolessors: Ingraham, Johnson. 

Lecturer: Calder. 

Part-Time Lecturers: Kobetz. Wolman. 

Advisory Council: The Advisory Council is made up 
of representatives of the areas of education, 
law. psychiatry, psychology, public administration 
social work, sociology, and University College: 
Professor Richard P. Claude, Department of 
Government and Politics: Dr. Stanley J. Drazek, 
Vice Chancellor, University College: Professor 
Abraham Dash, School of Law: Dr. Jonas Rappe- 
port. Psychiatric Institute; Professor Joan Hunt. 
Institute of Child Study: Dean Daniel Thursz, School 
of Social Work; Professor Robert S. Waldrop. De- 
partment of Psychology. 

Advisory Board: The Advisory Board is made up 
of representatives of the state agencies in the field 
of law enforcement and corrections, representatives 
of appropriate private agencies and organizations 
as well as representatives of national agencies 
and organizations: Mr. Norman A. Carlson, 
Director, Bureau of Prisons, U.S. Department of 
Justice: Mr. Dulaney Foster, Chief Judge Supreme 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 77 



Bench of Baltimore City: Mr. Robert J. Lally, Secre- 
tary, Department of Public Safety and Correctional 
Services, State of IVIaryland: Mr. Donald D. 
Pomerleau, The Police Commissioner, City of 
Baltimore: Mr. Milton G. Rector, Executive Director, 
National Council on Crime and Delinquency; Dr. 
E. Preston Sharp, General Secretary. The American 
Correctional Association: Mr. Quinn Tamm, 
Executive Director, International Association of 
Chiefs of Police. 

The purpose of the Institute is to provide an or- 
ganizational and administrative basis for the 
interests and activities of the University, its faculty 
and students in the areas usually designated as 
law enforcement, criminology and corrections. The 
Institute is to promote study and teaching concern- 
ing the problems of crime and delinquency by 
offering and coordinating academic programs in the 
area of law enforcement, criminology and correc- 
tions: managing research in these areas; and 
conducting demonstration projects. 

The Institute comprises as its component parts: 
1 The Criminology Program. 

2. The Law Enforcement Curriculum. 

3. The program leading to a Bachelor of Arts in 
General Studies with specializations in law 
enforcement and corrections offered by the 
University College. 

4. Other appropriate divisions to be developed 
for the areas of research and demonstration 
projects. 

The major in criminology and corrections com- 
prises 36 hours of course work: 18 hours in 
Criminology, 6 hours in Law Enforcement, and 
3 hours each in statistics and methodology. PSYC 
331 or 431 are required. PSYC 451 is strongly 
recommended, or a substitute in consultation with 
an advisor. Eighteen hours in social science 
disciplines are required as a supporting sequence, 
9 of them in one social science discipline. Regarding 
the specific courses to be taken, the student is 
required to consult with an advisor. No grade lower 
than C may be used toward the major. 

Cou-se Code Prefix— GRIM 

The major in law enforcement comprises 30 hours 
of course work in law enforcement and criminology, 
the latter being offered as courses in the Criminol- 
ogy Program, divided as follows: 18, but not 
more than 24, hours in law enforcement; 6, but not 
more than 12, hours in criminology. Student may use 
an additional 6 hours to bring the major up to 
36 hours. In addition to major requirements student 
must take 6 hours in methodology and statistics, 
and a supporting sequence of courses totalling 
18 hours must be taken in government and politics, 
psychology or sociology (see recommended list 
in the Institute office). No grade lower than C 
may be used toward the major. 

Course Code Prel.x— LENF 



Dance 

Chairman and Associate Prolessor: Ryder. 

Professor: Madden. 

Associate Professor: Rosen. 

Assistant Professors: McCann, A. Warren, 

L. Warren, Witt. 

Instructors: Brunner, Frank, Freivogel, Reynolds, 

Rooney, Sheppard. 

Assistant Instructors: Paine, Smith. 

The offerings in the Department of Dance are 

intended to serve the needs of students who wish to 

make dance their major effort and also to provide 

opportunity for those students who would like to 

explore the role of dance as an art form. Courses 

serve to develop knowledge of different cultures 

and arts by studying the place of dance in diverse 

societies, and in relation to other art forms. Guest 

artists are scheduled throughout the year, and from 

time to time a resident artist is teaching. 

For those students who choose to major in dance, 
the department provides courses of training which 
prepare them for performance, choreography, and 
continuation of studies of dance and related arts 
at the graduate level. It is also possible for the 
student to choose dance history, criticism or dance 
archives as a career. The curriculum includes music 
for dance and rhythmic invention as well as 
related theatre subjects. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded to those 
whose interest is basically in the cultural, per- 
forming and composing aspects of the dance and 
teaching on the college level. The Bachelor of 
Science degree is offered with a major in teaching. 

It should be noted that the dance major pro- 
grams are demanding of faculty and students 
alike, implying the giving of time, energy and 
dedication to the program. Students prepared to 
meet this challenge are warmly welcomed. 

Courses in dance theory, literature, and technique 
(modern, ballet, and ethnic) are open to all stu- 
dents who have completed the specified 
prerequisites, acquired the equivalent experience, 
or secured the permission of the chairman of the 
department. Performing groups and a professional 
company are open to qualified students. 
The Bachelor of Arts Degree. The Department re- 
quirement includes a core program of 14 hours in 
dance techniques and 24 in theory and literature. 
Dance majors are required to take 12 hours in 
related disciplines and to be in a technique course 
each semester. 

No course with a grade of less than C may be 
applied toward the fulfillment of the course require- 
ments for a major in dance. 

Students are placed in technique classes ac- 
cording to their level of achievement and progress. 

Course Code Preln— DANC 



Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

Professor and Department Cl^airman: Weaver. 
Professors: Goff, Leeper. 
Associate Prolessor: Amershek. 
Assistant Professors: Church, Seefeldt. 
Elementary Education — 
Professors: Ashlock. Duffey, O'Neill, Weaver, 
J. W. Wilson, R. M. Wilson. 
Associate Professors: Dietz, Eley, Gantt, Herman, 
Roderick, Sullivan, Williams. 
AssistanJ Professors: Anderson, Hutchings, 
Jantz, Johnson, McCuaig, Paserba, 
Schumacher, Sunai. 

The Department of Early Childhood-Elementary 
Education offers two undergraduate curricula lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Science degree: 

1. Early Childhood Education — for the preparation 
of teachers in nursery school, kindergarten 

and primary grades (grades one, two and three). 

2. Elementary Education — for the preparation of 
teachers of grades one through six. 

Students who wish to become certificated teach- 
ers for nursery school and/or kindergarten must 
follow the early childhood education curriculum 
{1. above). Students who seek certification for 
teaching the intermediate grades must follow the 
elementary education curriculum (2. above). 
Students who plan to teach in the primary grades 
can achieve certification in either 1. or 2. 

After June commencement 1972, all students 
graduating in early childhood education or elemen- 
tary education will fulfill the requirements of the 
appropriate present curriculum or its counterpart 
as of June 1966, depending upon the date of 
admission to the Department of Early Childhood- 
Elementary Education. 

Area of Academic Concentration. Students in early 
childhood-elementary education are required to 
develop within their degree programs an area of 
academic concentration consisting of a minimum of 
18 semester hours, at least 12 semester hours 
beyond required work in the areas. Approved areas 
are: anthropology, astronomy, botany, chemistry, 
economics, English, fine arts (art, dance, drama, 
and music), foreign language, geography, geology, 
health, history, mathematics, natural sciences 
(astronomy, botany, chemistry, geology, meteorol- 
ogy, physics, zoology), philosophy, physics, 
psychology, recreation, social science (economics, 
government and politics, psychology, sociology), 
and zoology. 

Graduation Requirements. One hundred twenty (120) 
academic credits are necessary for graduation. At 
least 80 of the academic credits must be in fields 
other than education. 

Early Childhood Education 

(Nursery-Kindergarten-Primary) 

The Early Childhood Education curriculum has as 



78 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



lis primary goal Ihe preparation oi nursery school, 
Kindergarten and primary teachers. 

Observation and student teaching are done in 
the University Nursery-Kindergarten School on Ihe 
Campus and In approved schools In nearby com- 
munities. 

Graduates receive a Bachelor ol Science degree 
and meet the requirements lor certllicatlon lor 
leaching kindergarten, nursery school and primary 
grades in Maryland, the District ol Columbia, 
Baltimore and many states. Students should have 
had extensive expenence in working with children 
prior to the junior year. 

Semester 



II 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101 — Composition or 

ENGL 171 — Honors Composition 

or alternate 

English Literature 

SPHR 202 — Fundamentals ol General 

American Speech or 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking or 
SPCH 110 — Voice and Diction . . 
EDEL 299 — School Service 

Semester" 

MUSC 155 — Fundamentals 

ARTE 100 — Fundamentals of 

Art Education or 

APDS 101 — Fundamentals ol 

Design 

BOTN too — General Botany or 

BIOL 101 or 

ENTM 100 — Insects or 
MICB 200 — General Microbiology or 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

ASTR 100 — Introduction to Astronomy or 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry or 
GEOL 100 — Geology or 

PHYS 111— Elements ol Physics: 

Mechanics. Heat and Sound 

HIST 221— History ol the U.S. to 1865 or 

HIST 222— History ol the U.S. since 
1865 or 

HIST 223 — Social and Cultural History 
ol Early America or 

HIST 224 — Social and Cultural History 
ol Modern America or 

HIST 225— The U.S. in World 

AKairs 

Approved elective 



14 or 15 15 or 16 

"Volunlfsr S«rvice S«metler may be subsliluled 

*Tw« of (he three science requlrementt must be laborelory courses. 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

MATH 210 — Elements ol Mathematics 4 

MATH 211 — Elements ol Geometry . 4 

GEOG 100 — Introduction to 

Geography 3 

ECON 201 or ECON 205 or ANTH 101 

or GNED 260 or GVPT 170 or 

GVPT 100 or GVPT 300 or 

PSYC 100 or SOCY 100 3 3 

BOTN 100 or ENTM 100 or MICB 200 or 

ZOOL 101 or ASTR 101 or 

GEOL 100 or PHYS 111 or 

BIOL 101 3 or 4' 



HIST 231 — Latin American History or 

HIST 232— Latin American History or 

HIST 241— Western Civilization or 

HIST 242— Western Civilization or 

HIST 251— The Humanities or 

HIST 252— The Humanities or 

HIST 253— History ol England and 
Great Britain or 

HIST 254 — History ol England and 
Great Britain or 

HIST 261— Far Eastern Civilization or 

HIST 262— Far Eastern Civilization or 

HIST 271— Islamic Civilization or 

HIST 272— Islamic Civilization . . 
Approved Electives 3 

16or17 1 

'Two of Ihe three science requirements must be laboratory courses 

Junior and Senior Years 
Semester V 
EDHD 300E — Human Development and 

Learning ' 6 

Academic Concentration, Academic 

Electives 9 

15 

Semester VI 

Prolessional Semester A* 

EDEL 340 — Teaching Strategies lor 

Young Children 3 

EDEL 341— The Young Child in His 

Social Environment 3 

EDEL 342— The Teaching ol Reading — 

Early Childhood 3 

EDEL 332— Student Teaching, K-3 6 

15 

'Prerequisite to Professions] Semester B. 

Semester VII 

Professional Semester B 

EDEL 343— The Young Child in His 

Physical Environment 3 

EDEL 344 — Creative Activities and 

Materials lor the Young Child 3 

EDEL 330 — Student Teaching, Nursery 

School 3 

MUED 450— Music in Early Childhood 

Education 3 

EDSF 301 — Foundations ol Education 3 



15 



to Professional Semesle 



Semester VIII' 

General University Requirements, 
Area ol Academic Concentration, 
Academic Electives 9-15 

9-15 
'Interchangeable with Semesters VI and Vlt 

Elementary Education. This curriculum is designed 
lor regular undergraduate students who wish to 
qualify for teaching positions in elementary schools. 
Students who complete the curriculum will receive 
the Bachelor ol Science degree, and they will 
meet the Maryland State Department of Education 
requirements for the Standard Professional 
Certilicate in Elementary Education. The curriculum 
also meets certification requirements in many 
other states. Baltimore and the District of Columbia. 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101 or ENGL 171— Honors 

Composite or alternate 

English Literature 

SPHR 202— Fundamenuis ol Qaneril 

American Speech or 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking or 

SPCH 110— Voice and Diction . . 
EDEL 299— School Service 
Semester 

MUSC 155 — Fundamentals 
ARTE 100 — Fundamentals ol An 

Education or 

APDS 101— Fundanoentals ol 

Design 

BOTN 100 — General Botany or 
BIOL 101 or 

ENTM 100— Insects or 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology or 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 

ASTR 100 — Introduclion to Astronomy or 

CHEM 103 — General Chemistry or 

GEOL 100 — Geology or 

PHYS 111— Elements ol Physics; 

Mechanics. Heat and Sound 

HIST 221— History ol the U.S. to 1865 or 

HIST 222 — History ol the US. since 
1865 or 

HIST 223 — Social and Cultural History 
of Early America or 

HIST 224 — Social and Cultural History 
of Modern America or 

HIST 225— The U.S. in World 

Affairs 

Approved elective 



14 or IS IS or 16 

'Two or the three science reouiremenls must be laboratory courses 

Sophomore Year 

English Literature 3 

MATH 210 — Elements of Mathematics 4 

MATH 211 — Elements ol Geometry . 4 

GEOG lOO^Introduction to 

Geography 3 

ANTH 101 or ECON 205 or 

GNED 260 or GVPT 170 or 

GVPT 100 or GVPT 300 or 

PSYC 100 or SOCY 100 3 3 

BOTN 100 or ENTM 100 or MICB 200 or 

ZOOL 101 or ASTR 100 or 

GEOL too or PHYS 111 or 

BIOL 101 3 or 4" 

HIST 231 — Latin American History or 

HIST 241— Western Civilization or 

HIST 242— Western Civilization or 

HIST 251 — The Humanities or 

HIST 252 — The Humanities or 

HIST 253 — History ol England and 
Great Britain or 

HIST 254 — History ol England and 
Great Britain or 

HIST 261 — Far Eastern Civilization or 

HIST 262 — Far Eastern Civilization or 

HIST 271 — Islamic Civilization or 

HIST 272 — Islamic Chrilization 3 

Approved Electives 3 3 

16 or 17 16 

'Two of the three scer^ce requ"em«mi must be laboratory courses 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 79 



Junior and Senior Years 
Semester V 

EDHD 300E — Human Development" 6 

General University Requirements. 
Area of Academic Concentration or 
Academic Electives 9 

15 

•Prerequisite lo Professional Semester. 

Semester VI 

Professional Semester" 

EDEL 350 — The Teaching of Language 

Arts — Elementary 3 

EDEL 351 — The Teaching of 

fvlathematics — Elementary 3 

EDEL 352 — The Teaching of Reading — 

Elementary 3 

EDEL 353 — The Teaching of Science — 

Elementary 3 

EDEL 354 — The Teaching of Social 

Studies — Elementary 3 

15 

•Prerequisite to student teaching. 

Courses are blocked; i.e. one section of students 
remains together for all five methods courses. 
Students spend two days each week in school 
classrooms applying concepts and methods presented 
in methods courses. 

Semester VII 

EDEL 333 — Student Teaching 11 

Semester VIII" 

General University Requirements. 
Area of Academic Concentration, or 
Academic Electives 12 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education 3 



15 



3rchange3ble with Semeste 



Physical Education and Health Education Curriculum 
— Elementary School. Students nnajoring in ele- 
nnentary education may pursue an area of 
specialization in elementary school physical educa- 
tion and health education. Students interested in 
this area should consult the Dean of the College of 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

Music Education Curriculum — Elementary School. 

Students majoring in elementary education may 
pursue an area of specialization in elementary 
school music education with vocal or instrumental 
emphasis, and thereby qualify for the Bachelor 
of Science certificate in special subjects. 

In order to fulfill requirements in this area, the 
following courses should be taken in addition to 
those required in the elementary education 
curriculum. Students are also required to pass the 
Musicianship Examination given by the Music 
Education Division before the students enroll for 
student teaching. (Students should consult their 
advisor in music education for details.) 

A. General Music, 18 semester hours. Music 
theory, MUSC 150, 151, 250 (3.3,4); music literature 
and history, MUSC 131, 331 (3,3); conducting, 
MUSC 490 (2). 



B. Applied Music, 14 semester hours divided 
between private and class instruction. Students 
must complete MUSC 209 on their major instrument. 
Students in the instrumental option elect six 
semester hours of class instruction from MUSC 
113-122; 213. 

C. Professional Courses, eight semester hours. 
Methods. MUED 462 for vocal emphasis, or MUED 
410 (2) for instrumental emphasis; six semester 
hours of student teaching. 

Foreign Language — Elementary School (FLES). 
Foreign Language Curriculum — Early Childhood- 
Elementary majors, foreign language majors, and 
secondary education foreign language majors are 
eligible for admission. Students interested in FLES 
should contact the Foreign Language Education 
advisor in the Department of Secondary Education 
for further information concerning the requirements 
for certification in FLES. 

Course Code Prelix— EDEL 

Economics 

Chairman: Dillard. 

Professors: Adelman. Almon, Bergmann. Bishop, 
Cumberland, Dillard, Gruchy, Harris, McGuire, 
O'Connell, Olson, Schultze. Ulmer, V\/onnacott. 
Associate Professors: Aaron, Adams, Bennett, 
Clague, Dodge, Dorsey, Fisher, Knight (Associate 
Chairman), McLoone,' (Dept. of Education), Meyer, 
Singer, Straszheim, W/einslein. 
Assistant Professors: Atkinson. Betancourt, 
Christensen, Huh, King, Layher, MacRae, Madan, 
Peterson, Quails, Schiller, Vroman, Weiss. 
Lecturers: Bailey, Boorman, Dardis.' (Home Eco- 
nomics). Day, Hinrichs. Lady, Measday, Pierce, 
Snow, West, Whitman, Yang. 
Instructors: Bowman, Doilney, Guelzo. Neri, Oelhaf, 
Schwer. 

•Joint appointment with indicated department 

The study of economics is designed to give students 
an understanding of the American economic 
system and our country's economic relations with 
the rest of the world, and the ability to analyze the 
economic forces which largely determine the 
national output of goods and services, the level of 
prices, and the distribution of income. It is also 
designed to prepare students for graduate study, and 
for employment opportunities in private business, 
the Federal government, state and local govern- 
ment, universities and research institutions. Demand 
for college graduates trained in Economics con- 
tinues to be strong, and this is among the fields of 
undergraduate study strongly recommended for 
students planning to study law, or enter public 
administration, as well as those who plan to become 
professional economists. 

Requirements For The Economics Major. In addition 
to the thirty-hour General University Requirements, 
the requirements lor the Economics major are: 



(1) Mattiematics. 

Six credit hours. No specific courses are required, 
but the combination of MATH 110 (Introduction to 
Mathematics) and MATH 220 (Elementary Calculus) 
is highly recommended, for those who take only 
six hours. Students planning to do graduate study in 
Economics are strongly urged to take more than 
the minimum six-hour mathematics requirement, 
since graduate programs emphasize the application 
of mathematical and statistical techniques in the 
analysis of economic problems. 

The Economics major should take mathematics 
courses early in his college career, in order to 
gain an understanding of mathematical principles 
which will assist him in his later course work 
in Economics. 

(2) Upper Division Courses Outside of Economics. 
Twelve credit hours. The Economics major 

must earn credit for twelve hours of upper division 
work in non-Economics courses (in addition to 
the nine hours of upper-division courses required as 
part of the General University Requirements.) For 
purposes of this requirement, the student may 
count any of the following as an "upper-division" 
course: any course numbered 300 or above; any 
course in mathematics beyond the six hours re- 
quired of all Economics majors; and any course in 
a department for which the prerequisites are the 
equivalent of one year of college-level work in 
that department. In particular, a second-year college 
course in foreign languages may be counted as 
"upper division." 

(3) Economics Courses. 

Thirty-six credit hours. The Economics major must 
earn 36 credit hours in Economics. Courses re- 
quired of all majors are: ECON 201, 203, 310 
(formerly 110), 401, 403, and 421. 

(In lieu of Economics 421 — Economic Statistics), 
the student may take one of the following statistics 
courses: BSAD 230, BSAD 231, or STAT 400. A 
student v/ho takes ECON 205 before deciding to 
major in Economics may continue on into ECON 
203, without being required to take ECON 201.) 

The remainder of the 36 hours may be chosen 
from among any other Economics courses and from 
the following courses in Business Administration: 
BSAD 230. 231, 431. 432. 481. (However, a student 
who takes ECON 421 may not also receive credit 
for BSAD 230 or BSAD 231. and a student may not 
receive credit for ECON 105 if he has previously 
taken any two courses from among ECON 201, 203, 
and 205.) 

The student must earn an average grade of not 
less than C in lower-division Economics courses 
in order to be accepted as an Economics major. 
To graduate as a major, he must pass the minimum 
of 36 hours in Economics with an average grade 
of not less than C. 



80 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



S*qu«nc« of CourMt. The Dopartment ol Economics 
does not specify a rigid sequence in which courses 
are to be taken, but it urges its ma|ors to observe 
the following recommendations. 

By the end of his sophomore year, the Economics 
maior should have at least completed 6 hours of 
mathematics, ECON 201. 203. and 310. ECON 201 
should be taken before ECON 203. Upon completion 
of ECON 203. the student should promptly lake 
ECON 401. 403. or both, in the following semester, 
since these are intermediate theory courses of 
general applicability in later course work. He 
should take ECON 421 (or equivalent) at an early 
stage, since an understanding of statistical tech- 
niques will be helpful in other courses. (ECON 421 
may be completed before other 400-level Economics 
courses, since its only prerequisite is MATH 110 
or equivalent.) 

Economics majors should take ECON 401 prior 
to taking ECON 430 or 440. and ECON 403 prior 
to taking ECON 450. 454, 460. or 470. Special 
sections for maiors are usually offered each semes- 
ter in ECON 430 and 440, and it is recommended 
that students have completed ECON 401 and 403 
before enrolling in these sections. 

Those students planning to pursue graduate study 
in Economics should try to include ECON 422 
(Quantitative Methods) and ECON 425 (Mathe- 
matical Economics) in their programs, and should 
also consider entering the Deparlmental Honors 
Program, if qualified. 

Each Economics major may select, or be as- 
signed, a faculty member as an adviser, and is 
encouraged to consult his adviser for course recom- 
mendations and other information. He is also 
welcome, and should feel completely free, to seek 
advice at any time from any other faculty member in 
the Department. 

Economics Honors Program. The Departmental 
Honors Program is a three-semester (9 credit hour) 
program which a student enters at the beginning 
of his last three semesters at the University. It 
emphasizes seminar discussions of selected topics 
in Economics, and independent research and writ- 
ing, with faculty supervision. The program 
culminates in the student's presentation of an honors 
thesis, in the final semester. To be eligible for the 
Honors Program, a student must have a cumulative 
grade-point average of not less than 3.0. 

Electrical Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: DeClaris. 

Professors: Chu, DeClaris, Hochuli, Ligomenides, 

Lin, Newcomb, Reiser, Rutelli (Emeritus), 

Taylor. Wagner, Weiss. 

Associate Professors: Basham, Emad, Harger, Kim, 

Lee, Levine, Moore, Pugsley, Rao, Simons, Torres, 

Tretter, Zajac. 

Assistant Professors: Baras, Boston. Eden, 

Ephremides, Palicio. Gallman, OGrady, 



Paez, Rhee, Silio, Zaki. 

Lecturer: Alexander, Colburn, Pottala. 

Instructor: Castro. 

Flexibility is the main characteristic of the new (1973) 

program. The student can specialize more than 

before, or he can have a broader education, as he 

chooses. This is established through broader elective 

structure both within and outside the Electrical 

Engineering Department. 

Specialization areas available to the student are: 
Biomedical, Circuits, Communications. Computers, 
Control, and Electrophysics. These areas include 
such fields as: Electronics, Integrated Circuits, Bio- 
electronics, Solid State Devices, Lasers, Radar, 
Radio. Space Navigation, Information Theory, 
Telemetry, Antennas, Automatic Control, System 
Theory. Cybernetics, Computer Software and Hard- 
ware, Particle Accelerators, Electromechanical 
Transducers. Energy Conversion, and many others. 

Apprenticeship programs allow qualified under- 
graduate students to work with research laboratory 
directors in the Department, thus giving the stu- 
dent a chance for a unique experience in research 
and engineering design. 

Projects in Electrical Engineering allow under- 
graduate students to do independent study under 
the guidance of a faculty member in an area of 
mutual interest. 

A new Fundamentals Laboratory and several 
Specialty Laboratory courses have been established. 
These are self contained and may be taken inde- 
pendently of related theoretical courses. These 
laboratories provide theoretical and practical 
experience in classical and modern topics using up 
to date equipment. 

The boundary between electrical engineering and 
applied mathematics or applied physics is becom- 
ing steadily less distinct, particularly at the research 
level. Simultaneously, the technological problems 
and needs of society are becoming steadily more 
complex. The engineer is the intermediary between 
science and society. To solve the problems of 
modern society he must fully understand the most 
modern devices and methodologies available. To 
find the best solution he must have a very broad 
interdisciplinary education. To find a solution that is 
also acceptable to society he must be concerned 
with the economic, ecologic and human factors in- 
volved in the problem. Finally, current research 
topics frequently require a thorough knowledge of 
advanced mathematics and physics. 

The new curriculum of the Electrical Engineering 
Department reflects the diverse requirements cited 
above. A basic mathematical, physical and engineer- 
ing sciences foundation is established m the first 
two years. Once this foundation is established, 
the large number of electrical engineering courses 
and the flexibility of the elective system allow a 
student to specialize or diversify and to prepare for a 



career either as a practicing engineer or for more 
theoretically oriented graduate work. 

To go along with this freedom, the Department 
has a system of undergraduate advising. The stu- 
dent IS encouraged to discuss his program and 
career plans with his advisor in order to get 
maximum benefit from the new curriculum. 
Eteclrical Engineering Curriculum 
Batic Frethman Year 

Semattei 
Course No. and Title / II 

CHEM 103. 104 — General Chemisirv'' A A 

PHYS 161— General Physics I 3 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I. II 4 4 

ENES 101 — Intro. Engr. Science i 

ENES 1 10— Mechanics 3 

General Univ Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

"Ouahlitd •lu<Mnu mn tta Is UU CHEU lot and tOS 14 a In 

richj rniiead ol CHEM 103 and 104 

Students who are not prepared to schedule MATH 

140 are advised to register lor a preparatory course 
— MATH 115 — as part of their General University 
Requirement. These students are also advised 

to attend summer school following their freshman 
year to complete MATH 141 and PHYS 161 prior to 
entrance into the sophomore year of study. MATH 

141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for many 
courses required in the sophomore year. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR / // 

General Univ Requirements 3 3 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations 3 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

PHYS 262. 263 — General Physics II. Ill . . 4 4 

ENES 240 — Algorithmic Analysis and 

Computer Programming 2 

ENES 243 — Digital Computer t^aboratory .1 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENEE 204 — Systems and Circuits I 3 

ENEE 250 — Computer Stnjctures 3 

Total Credits 17 16 

JUNIOR YEAR I II 

MATH xxx — (Elective Advanced Math) 3 

ENEE 322 — Signal and System Theory ... 3 

ENEE 380 — Electromagnetic Theory ... 3 

ENEE 381 — Electromagnet Wave 

Propagation 3 

ENEE 304 — Systems and Circuits II 3 

ENEE 305 — Fundamental Lat>oratory .... 2 

ENEE 320 — Engineering Probability 3 

ENEE 314 — Electronic Circuits 3 

ENEE xxx — Advanced Elective Laboratory . 2 

Electives* 3 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

SENIOR YEAR ( // 
ENEE xxx — Specialty Electives (in the 

same area) 3 3 

Electives* 6 9 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 15 15 

*0f tr>e «>oM««r eiect(v« cr*di1s a nttntmvm of lhre« credits must 

t>« t'C" E'ect'icil E«5tn»*»"*g af*^ a <".«.m.jm ni n.n^ c'^'I'M *">"> 

Departments, Programs and Curricula / 81 



otho; lields ol onglnefnng. mainemalics. physics, or olhor suitable 
sclenlilic disciplines The remaining six credit hours are technical 
electivos. and may be taken from Electrical Engineering or other 
engineering and technical areas (Including mathematics, physics, or 
other scientific tields). 

Technical electives available in Electrical Engi- 
neering are described in the course listings. Any 
Electrical Engineering course numbered 400 to 499 
inclusive that is not specifically excluded in its 
description may be used as part of a technical 
elective program. All other technical electives must 
be of 300 level or higher. If a lower level course 
(not specified as a degree requirement) is prerequi- 
site to a 300 or higher level technical elective, the 
student should plan to take such a lower level 
course under his General University Requirements, 
otherwise, less than 300 level courses do not count 
as technical electives towards a degree in 
Electrical Engineering. In all cases the student's 
elective program must be approved by an Electrical 
Engineering advisor and, in addition, by the Office 
of Undergraduate Studies of the Electrical Engineer- 
ing Department. 

Throughout the year students are urged to contact 
the Electrical Engineering Office of Undergraduate 
Studies for advice or any other matters related to 
their studies. 

The specialty electives for the six specialization 
areas are listed below. The specialty elective 
courses can be taken in any order or simultaneously. 
Consult departmental offerings each semester or 
consult the Office of Undergraduate Studies for 
plans on future offerings of these specialty elective 
courses. 

ENEE Specialty Electives 
Circuits: 

ENNE 414— Network Analysis (3) 

ENEE 416 — Network Synthesis (3) 
Communications: 

ENEE 420 — Communication Theory (3) 

ENEE 421 — Introduction to Information Theory (3) 
Biomedical: 

ENEE 434 — Introduction to Neural Networks 
and Signals (3) 

ENEE 435 — Electrodes and Electrical Processes 
in Biology and Medicine (3) 
Computers: 

ENEE 444— Logic Design of Digital Systems (3) 

ENEE 446 — Computer Architecture (3) 
Control: 

ENEE 460— Control Systems (3) 

ENEE 462— Systems, Control and Computation (3) 
Electrophysics: 

ENEE 480 — Electromagnetic Properties of 
IVIaterials (3) 

ENEE 481— Antenna (3) 

ENEE Advanced Elective Laboratories 

ENEE 413— Electronics Laboratory (2) 
ENEE 445— Computer Laboratory (2) 



ENEE 461— Control Systems Laboratory (2) 
ENEE 483 — Electromagnetic IVIeasurements 

Laboratory (2) 
An approved laboratory research program (such 

as ENEE 419 — Apprenticeship) may be substituted 

for the advanced elective laboratory. 

course Code Predx — ENEF 

Engineering Materials Program 

Professors: Armstrong," Arsenault," Asimow,* 
Marcinkowski,' Skolnick." 
Associate Professors: Bolsaitis," and Spain." 
Engineering materials is the study of the relationship 
between structure and properties of materials. 
The principles of physics, chemistry and mathe- 
matics are applied to metals, ceramics, polymers 
and composite materials used in industrial applica- 
tions. In addition to the traditional area of metal- 
lurgy, engineering materials includes the fields of 
solid state physics and polymer and materials 
science and their application to modern industrial 
problems. Because of the extensive use of materials, 
the engineer finds a wide variety of interesting 
career opportunities in many companies and 
laboratories. 

Programs of study in engineering materials at the 
undergraduate and graduate level are offered 
through the Chemical and IVIechanical Engineering 
Departments. Students may use Engineering 
Materials as a field of concentration in the Bachelor 
of Science in Engineering Program. The following 
courses can be used to satisfy the Materials field 
of concentration: ENMA 462, 463, 464, 470, 471, 
472, and 473. 

Coi^rse Code Prefix— ENMA 

•Member of Mechanical Engineering Department 

"Member of Chemical Engineering Department 

Engineering Sciences Program 

Engineering science courses represent a common 
core of basic material offered to students of several 
different departments. All freshman and sophomore 
students of Engineering are required to take 
ENES 101, ENES 110. and ENES 221. Other 
ENES courses 220, 240, and 243 are specified 
by the different departments or taken by the student 
as electives. The responsibility for teach- 
ing the Engineering Science courses is divided 
among the Civil, Mechanical, Chemical and 
Electrical Engineering Departments. In addition to 
the core courses noted above, several courses of 
general interest to engineering or non-engineering 
students have been given ENES designations. 

Course Code Prefix— ENES 

English Language and Literature 

Chairman and Professor: Kenny. 
Professors: Bode, Bryer. Freedman, Hovey, 
Isaacs, Lawson, Lutwack, McManaway, Manning, 



Mish, Murphy, Myers, Panichas, Perloff. Russell, 
Salamanca, Schoeck, Whittemore. 
Associate Professors: Barnes. Barry, Birdsall, 
Brown, Coleman, Coogan, Cooper, Fry, Greenwood, 
Hamilton, G. Herman, Holton, Houppert, Howard, 
Jellema, Kinnaird, Kleine, Miller, M., 
Peterson, Smith, Thorberg, Vitzthum, Wait, 
Ward, Wilson. 

Assistant Professors: Beauchamp, Cate, Cothran, 
Dunn, Gallick, Hamilton. D. James, Kelly, Kenney, 
Kimble, Martin, Moore, Nutku, Rowe, Rutherford, 
Steinberg, Swigger, Tyson, Van Egmond, Weigaiit. 
Lecturesr: Jabbour, Miller, J. Sewell. 
Instructors: Buhlig, Demaree, Ference, Gold, 
Potash. Reggy, Stevenson, Townsend. Trousdale. 
The English major requires 36 credits beyond the 
University composition requirement. For the specific 
distribution requirements of these 36 credits, 
students should consult the English Depart- 
ment's advisors. A student may pursue a 
major with emphasis in English, American or Com- 
parative Literature; in folklore, creative writing, or 
linguistics; or in preparation for secondary school 
teaching. Students interested in secondary teach- 
ing should make it known to the department as early 
in their college career as possible. 

No course with a grade less than C may be used 
to satisfy major requirements. 

In selecting supporting or elective subjects, stu- 
dents majoring in English, particularly those who 
plan to do graduate work, should give special 
consideration to courses in French, German, Latin, 
philosophy, and history. 

Honors: The Department of English offers an honors 
program, primarily for majors but open to others 
with the approval of the Departmental Honors 
Committee. Interested students should ask for de- 
tailed information from an English Department 
advisor no later than the beginning of their junior 
year. 

Course Code Prefix— ENGL 

Entomology 

Chairman and Professor: Bay. 

Professors: Bickley, Harrison, Jones, Menzer, 

Messersmith, Steinhauer. 

Associate Professors: Davidson, Harding, 

Krestensen. 

Assistant Professors: Caron, Dively, Reichelderfer, 

Wood. 

Lecturers: Heimpel, Sangler. 

This curriculum prepares students for various 
types of entomological positions or for graduate 
work in any of the specialized areas of entomology. 
Professional entomologists are engaged in funda- 
mental and applied research in university, 
government, and private laboratories; regulatory 
and control activities with federal and state 



82 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



agencies: commercial pesi control and post man- 
agement services: sales and development programs 
Willi chemical companies and other commercial 
organizations, consulting, extension work; and 
leaching 

Most of the lirst two years of the curriculum Is 
devoted to obtaining the essential background. In 
the lumor and senior years there is an opportunity 
tor some specialization or (or electing courses in 
preparation lor graduate work. Students contem- 
plating graduate work are strongly advised to elect 
courses in physics, modern foreign languages, 
mathematics and biometrics 

Department ol Entomology Requirements 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

ZOOL 293 — Animal Diversity 4 

BOTN 101 — General Botany" 4 

CHEM 103. 104 — College Chemistry I. II 4 4 
CHEHtl 201. 202 — College Chemistry III and 

College Chemistry Laboratory Ml 3. 2 

MATH* 6 

GENETICS 3 

2 of the following 3 courses 

BOTN 212 — Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 221 — Diseases of Plants 4 

CHEM 461— Biochemistry I 3 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 4 

ENTM 200 — Introductory Entomology 3 

ENTM 421 — Insect Taxonomy and Biology . 4 

ENTM 432— Insect Morphology 4 

ENTM 442 — Insect Physiology 4 

2 of the following 3 courses 

ENTM 451 — Economic Entomology . . 4 

ENTM 462— Insect Pathology 3 

ENTM 472 — Medical and Veterinary 

Entomology 4 

ENTM 498 — Seminar 1 

ENTM 399— Special Problems 2 

Electives 18 23 

■■e C:et> P-e' ■ FNTM 

Family and Community Development 
Professor and Chairman Gaylin. 
Associate Professors: Brabble. Lemmon. Myricks. 
Wilson. 

Assistant Professors: Churaman. Orvedal. Rubin. 
Instructor: Garrison. 

Lecturer: Brown. Cohen. Greenwald. Lieberman, 
Ryder. Sojit. 

The Department of Family and Community Develop- 
ment integrates and applies aspects of the natural 
and social sciences as well as the human arts — all 
o( which enhance man's quest for a more fully 
functioning life. It places particular emphasis upon 
the allied departments within the College of Human 
Ecology which in turn addresses itself to the prob- 
lems of man and his immediate environment. 

Specifically. Family and Community Development 
provides the applied human science generalist with 
alirm foundation of knowledge of family and com- 
munity dynamics leading to service teaching, and 
research vocations. It also serves the University 



community by offering general courses germane to 
problems ol living in a complex society, and 
stresses the concept of the family as the working 
interlace between man, his society and the world 
around him. 

There are lour specific though related foci within 
the program leading to specialized areas of en- 
deavor within the applied human sciences. 

I. Family Studies: This course ol study stresses 
a working knowledge ol the growth of individuals 
throughout the hie span with particular emphasis 
on integeneralional aspects of family living. It 
examines the pluralistic family forms and life styles 
within our post-technological complex society and 
the development ol the individual within the lamily 
within the community. 

II. Community Studies: This program emphasizes 
the processes of social change and the individual 

as agent within that process. It is grounded upon 
the knowledge ol community structure and the 
workings and interactions of the various subsystems. 
Its summary goals are the identlicatlon and utili- 
zation ol community resources for the enhancement 
of a better life for the Individuals within the social 
system. 

III. Management and Consumer Studies: This 
program focuses upon the use of resources of the 
home and Its impact upon the community. It 
examines the integration of Individual, familial and 
societal value of our technological society for the 
purposes of goal Implementation within that society. 
It Is the area of study most directly concerned with 
quality of life and the preparing of the individual 
for effective consumer decisions through the under- 
standing of the interrelationship of consumers, 
business, and government. 

IV. Home Economics Education: Although often 
narrowly perceived as delimited to the role ol edu- 
cator within a secondary school setting. Home 
Economics Education has a larger purview and 
responsibility, i.e.. that of introducing and imple- 
menting through education at all levels, the theories, 
skills and philosophy ol the attainment of a better 
life for all men. women and children. Thus it is 

the major Interpreter of the ramification and po- 
tential Impact of Home Economics — the applied 
human sciences. 

These areas ol concentration will prepare students 
for roles as family life educators, extension 
specialists, consumer consultants, mental health 
team members, and teachers of home economics 
at the secondary level. 

Family Studies Curriculum. Supportive courses will 

be selected from either Human Ecology or 

Sociology-Psychology. 

Typical Semester 

Freshman Year Hours 

ENGL 101 — Composition 3 

PSYC 3 



FMCD 105 — Inlroduclion to Family Living 3 
HUMAN ECOLOGY COURSES (outside 

FMCD) 9 

SOCY or ANTH 3 

General Univerglty Requirements 9 

Total 30 

Typical Ssmeder 

Sophomore Year Hourt 

SPCH 2 3 

ECON 201 or 205 . 3 

FMCD 250 — ^Decision Making m Family Living 3 

FMCD 260 — Interpersonal Lilestyles 3 

Supportive Courses 6 

FMCD 270 — Prolessional Seminar 2 

General University Requirements 12 

Total 31 32 

Ssmesrer 

Junior Year Hourt 

FMCD 431 — Family Cnsis and Rehabililalion 3 

FMCD 330^Family Patterns 3 

EDHD 413. 306 or 411 — Human Development or 

Development Courses 6 

FMCD 332— The Child in the Family . 3 

Supportive Courses 8 

General University Requirements 9 

Total 30 

Semesfer 
Senior Year Hourt 

FMCD 487 — Legal Aspects ol Family Problems 3 

FMCD Elective 3 

FMCD 344. 345 or 346— Practicum or 446— 

Living Experience with Families 3 6 

Supponive Courses 6 

Electives 10 14 

Total 28 29 

Community Studies Curriculum. Supportive courses 
will be chosen from the following areas: 

Human Ecology courses. 

Sociology and/or psychology or family life 
courses In the Department of Family and Community 
Development beyond the core requirements. 

Government and/or economics, or management 
and consumer problems courses in the Department 
of Family and Community Development beyond the 
core requirements. 

Semesrer 
Typical Freshman Year Hours 

SOCY or ANTH 3 

Human Ecology Courses (outside FMCD) 9 

FMCD 105 — Introduction to Family Living 3 

PSYC 3 

General University Requirements 12 

Total 30 

Semester 
Typical Sophomore Year Hours 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals ol Economics 3 

FMCD 250 — Decision-Making in Family Living ... 3 

SPCH 2-3 

FOOD 200 or Elective 3 

FMCD 270 — Prolessional Seminar 2 

General University Requirements 3 

Supponive Courses 15 

Total 31-32 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 83 



Semester 
Typical Junior Year Hours 

FMCD 330— Family Patterns or SOCY 443 3 

FMCD 341^Personal and Fannily Finance 3 

SOCY 230 — Dynamics o( Social Interaction 3 

FOOD 260 — Meal Management or 

FOOD 300 — Economics o( Food Consumption . 3 

Supportice Courses 6-7 

General University Requirements 9 

Electives 3 

Total 30-31 

Semester 
Typical Senior Year Hours 

FMCD 345 — Practicum in Community 

or FMCD 344 — Resident Experience 

or FMCD 346 — Living Experience with Families 3 

FMCD 370 — Communication Skills and 

Techniques 3 

SOCY 330 — Community Organization or 

Substitute 3 

Supportive Courses 3 

Electives courses to complete 120 hrs 7-9 

General University Requirements 6 

Total 30 

Management and Consumer Studies Curriculum. 
Supportive courses will be selected in blocks from 
economics, business administration, public 
relations, sociology, psychology, family life, or 
consumer economics. 

Semester 
Typical Freshman Year Hours 

SOCY or ANTH 3 

PSYC 3 

Human Ecology Courses (outside FMCD) 9 

SPCH 2-3 

General University Requirements 13-14 

Total 30-32 

Semester 
Typical Sophomore Year Hours 

FMCD 250 — Decision Making in Family Living ... 3 

FMCD 270 — Professional Seminar 2 

ECON 201 and 203 6 

SOCY 230 — Dynamics of Social Interaction 3 

FMCD 280 — Household Equipment or 

Space Utilization or HSAD 241 — Family 

Housing 3-4 

General University Requirements 7-9 

Electives 3-6 

Total 25-33 

Semester 
Typical Junior Year Hours 

FMCD 330— Family Patterns 3 

FMCD 341 — Personal and Family Finances 3 

PSYC 221— Social Psychology 3 

FOOD or NUTR 3 

Statistics 3 

FMCD 443— Consumer Problems 3 

Supportive Courses 3 

General University Requirements 3 

Electives 6 

Total 30 



84 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Semester 
Typical Senior Year Hours 

FMCD 332— The Child in the Family 3 

FMCD 344 — Resident Experience or 

FMCD 345 — Practicum 3 

CNEC or TXAP 3 

Supportive Courses 6 

Electives 9 

Total 30 

Home Economics Education 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is de- 
signed for students vi/fio are preparing to teacfi 
home economics in the secondary schools. It 
includes study of each area of home economics and 
the supporting disciplines. 

Fifteen hours of the total curriculum include an 
area of concentration which must be unified in con- 
tent and will be chosen by the student.' 

Semester 
FRESHMAN YEAR / // 

FMCD 250 — Decision Making in Family 

Living 3 

FMCD 105 — Introduction to Family Living 3 
FOOD 110— Food and Nutrition of 

Individuals and Family or NUTR 100 — 

Elements of Nutrition 3 

EDSE 151 — Freshman Seminar in Home 

Economics Education 1 

TEXT 105 — Textiles in Contemporary 

Living 3 

General University Requirements 3 

APDS 101 — Fundamentals of Design . . 3 

General University Requirements 6 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology .... 3 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Total 16 15 

Semester 
SOPHOMORE YEAR ; // 

SPCH 100— Public Speaking 3 

TXAP 221— Apparel I (if exempted, may 

take TXAP 222 or TXAP 425) 3 

CHEM 103 — College Chemistry I 4 

General University Requirements 6 

HSAD 240 — Design and Furnishings in 

the Home or HSAD 241 — Family 

Housing 3 

EDSE 210 — Sophomore Seminar in Home 

Economics Education 1 

FOOD 200 — Scientific Principles of Food . . 3 

FMCD 332— The Child in the Family or 

EDHD 411 — Child Growth and 

Development 3 

General University Requirements 6 

Total 16 16 

Semesfer 
JUNIOR YEAR / /; 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

FMCD 280 — Household Equipment and 

Space Utilization or FMCD 443 — 

Consumer Problems or FMCD 341 — 

Personal and Family Finance 3(4) 

FOOD 260 — Meal Management 3 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 



FMCD 344 — Resident Experience in Home 

Management or FMCD 344B — 

Practicum in Home Management 3 

EDSE 380 — Field Experience in 

Organization and Administration of a 

Child Development Laboratory 1 

EDSE 425— Curriculum Development in 

Home Economics 3 

Area of Concentration 6 

General University Requirements 9 

Total 18(19) 19 

Semester 
SENIOR YEAR / // 

EDSE 347 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation 3 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education (1)(2) 

EDSE 370 — Student Teaching in Secondary 

Schools: Home Economics 8 

FMCD 260 — Interpersonal Lifestyles or 

SOCY 443 — The Family and Society .... 3 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education 3 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology or 

MICR 200 — General Microbiology 4 

Area of Concentration 9 



Total 

•Area of Concent atic 
A) Including 



14 



19 



smesler hours- 
im of two home economics courses or m applied 
linder of \he 15 tiou s in supporting behavioral, 

physical and biological sciences, philosophy geography and history. 

B) Of the 15 hours, nine must be upper divisional courses. 

Course Code Prefixes — FMCD HOEC 

Fire Protection Engineering Program 

Professor and Chairman: Bryan. 
Assistant Professor: Hickey, 
Lecturer: Watts. 

Fire protection is concerned with the scientific and 
technical problems of preventing loss of life and 
property from fire, explosion and related hazards, 
and of evaluating and eliminating hazardous condi- 
tions. 

The fundamental principles of fire protection are 
relatively well-defined and the application of these 
principles to a modern industrialized society has 
become a specialized activity. Control of the 
hazards in manufacturing processes calls for an 
understanding not only of measures for fire protec- 
tion but of the processes themselves. Often the 
most effective solution to the problem of safe- 
guarding a hazardous operation lies in the 
modification of the process rather than in the 
installation of special extinguishing equipment. The 
expert in fire protection must be prepared to decide 
in any given case what is the best and most eco- 
nomical solution of the fire prevention problem. His 
recommendations are often based not only on 
sound principles of fire protection but on a thorough 
understanding of the special problems of the 
individual property. 

Modern lire protection utilizes a wide variety of 
mechanical and electrical equipment which the stu- ■ 



dent must understand in principle before he can 
apply them to special problems. The (ire protection 
curriculum emphasizes the scientific, technical and 
humanitarian aspects of lire protection and the 
development of the individual student. 

The problems and challenges which confront the 
specialist in fire protection include the reduction 
and control of fire hazards due to processes subject 
to fire or explosion in respect to design, Installation 
and handling, involving both physical and human 
factors: the use of buildings and transportation 
facilities to restrict the spread of fire and to facilitate 
the escape of occupants in case of (ire: the design, 
installation and maintenance of fire detection 
and extinguishing devices and systems: and the 
organization and education of persons (or (ire pre- 
vention and fire protection. 

Basic Freshman Year 

Semester 

Course No ano Title / " 

CHEIUI 103. 104— General Chemistry" ... 4 4 

PHYS 161— General Physics I 3 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I. II 4 4 

ENES 101— Intro. Engr. Science 3 

ENES 110— Mechanics 3 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

"Qualified sludenl) may elect to take CHEM 105 and t06 (4 cr rirs. 
eacn) mtlead ot CHEM 103 and 104 

Students who are not prepared to schedule MATH 

140 are advised to register (or a preparatory course 
— MATH 115 — as part of their General University 
Requirement. These students are also advised 

to attend summer school following their freshman 
year to complete MATH 141 and PHYS 161 prior to 
entrance into the sophomore year o( study. MATH 

141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for many 
courses required in the sophomore year. 

Semester 
SOPHOMORE YEAR / // 

General Univ Requirements 3 3 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262. 263 — General Physics M, III . . 4 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENFP 251 — Fire Protection Engineering ... 1 
ENFP 280 — Urban Fire Problem Analysis 3 

ENFP 290 — Ignition and Combustion 
Phenomenon 2 

Total 17 16 

Semester 
JUNIOR NEAR / II 

General Umv. Requirements 6 3 

CMSC 110 — Elementary Algorithmic 

Analysis or ENCE 360 — Engineering 

Analysis and Computer Programming . 3 

ENME 320 — Thermodynamics or 

ENCE 295 — Chemical Process 

Thermodynamics 3 

ENCE 300 — Fundamentals of Engineering 

Materials 3 



ENCE 330 — Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENFP 310 — Fire Protection Syatams 

Design 3 

ENFP 312— Fire Protection Fluids I 3 

ENFP 320 — Pyromelrlcs ol Materials 3 

ENFP 321— Functional and Structural 

Evaluation 3 

Approved Electlves 2 

Total 18 17 

Semesfer 

SENIOR YEAR / II 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

ENEE 300 — Principles o( Electrical 

Engineering 3 

ENCE 350 — Fundamentals of Structural 

Analysis or ENME 411 — Introduction to 

Industrial Engineering 3 

ENME 410 — Operations Research I or 

BSAD 332 — Operations Research I 3 

ENNU 215 — Introduction to Nuclear 

Technology 3 

ENFP 415 — Fire Protection Fluids II ... . 3 

ENFP 411 — Systems Approach to Fire 

Protection Design 3 

ENFP 414— Life Safety Analysis 3 

ENFP 416 — Problem Synthesis and 

Design 3 

Technical Electlves 3 3 

Total 18 18 

Course Code Pielix— ENFP 

Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

Professor and Director: Crane. 

Professors: Babusi<a, Brush,- Crane, DeClaris,^ 

Dorfman,' Elsasser, Faller. Hubbard, Jones, 

Karlovitz, Kellogg. Koopman, Landsberg, Lashinsky, 

Olver, Ortega, ■ Pai, Tidman, Weiss,-' Wilkerson, 

Wu, Yorke, Zwanzig. 

Professors (Visiting or Part-Time): Aziz,' Bhatia,' 

Fritz, Northrop. 

Associate Professors: Coplan, Guernsey, Israel," 

Matthews, Rodenhuis, Rosenberg, Thompson, 

Vernekar. 

Associate Professors (Visiting or Part-Time): 

Mcllrath, Miller, Ogilvie, Papadopoulos. 

Assistant Professors: Ellingson. 

Assistant Professors (Visiting or Part-Time): McClure, 

Winsor. 

Research Associates: Conrad, Foster, Gillis, 

Goforth. Grover, Overcamp, Siskind. 

Visiting Lecturers: Bonner, Gerrity. 

Professors Emeritus: Burgers, Martin. 

Instructor: Li. 

> Joint wim Universily ol Maryland Baltimore County 

■ Joint wiiri History. 

■ Joint wilh Electrical Engineering. 

* Joint writh Physics. 

- Joint witr> Computer Science and Mathematics 

* Joint with Civil Engineering 

The (acuity o( the Institute (or Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics direct their primary attention to 
(lelds o( multidisciplinary and applied science which 
aflord challenging opportunities (or classroom 
instruction and (or thesis research. With the 



exception ol meteorology,* in which the Institute 
o((ers a (ull graduate program to the Ph.D. level, 
the course oKerings and thesis research guidance ol 
Institute (acuity are conducted either through the 
graduate program in applied mathematics or under 
the auspices o( other departments. Students inter- 
ested in studying or working with Institute (acuity 
should direct inquiries to the Director, IFDAM, 
College Park, Maryland 20742. 

The areas ol interest in the Institute are con- 
stantly evolving and include both experimental and 
theoretical work. Current topics ol interest include 
lluid dynamics, physical oceanography, glaciology 
atmospheric circulation, physics ol the upper 
atmosphere and magnetosphere, a wide variety o( 
problems in plasma physics, atomic physics, various 
aspects o( space and planetary science, atmo- 
spheric pollution, statistical mechanics o( physical 
and living systems, history o( science, theoretical 
and applied numerical analysis, control theory, 
epidemiology and biomathematics, the analysis o( a 
number o( current problems ol societal interest 
such as public health, plus many diverse eKorts in 
basic mathematics. The Meteorology Program lea- 
tures a number ol research areas including 
climatology, air pollution, tropical behavior, optical 
properties o( the atmosphere, micro-meteorology 
and (luid properties o( the atmosphere. 

The Institute also hosts a wide variety o( seminars 
in the various (ields o( its interest. Principal among 
these are the general seminars in plasma physics, 
meteorology, applied mathematics, (luid dy- 
namics, and in atomic and molecular physics. 
ln(ormation about these can be obtained by writing 
the Director or by calling (301) 454-2636. 

Financial support (or highly qualihed graduate 
students is available through research assistantships 
(unded by grants and contracts, and through 
teaching assistantships in related academic depart- 
ments. 

•Sec lie soparale l.st.ng lor ihc Meleoroioay Program 

Foods, Nutrition and Institution Administration 

Ctiairman and Professor: Prather. 
Associate Professors: Ahrens, Butler, Cox, Eheart. 
Visiting Assistant Professors: Manchester. 
Instructors: Bouwkamp, Cantrell, Graham, Knighton. 
Lecturers: Boehne, Stewart. 

Visiting Lecturers: Accountius, laconboni, Mehlman. 
Visiting Instructors: Martin, Palmer. 
The area o( (ood, nutrition and institution admin- 
istration IS broad and o((ers many diverse 
professional opportunities. Courses introduce the 
student to the principles ol selection, preparation 
and utilization ol lood lor human health and the 
welfare o( society. Emphasis is placed on the sci- 
entitic, cultural and prolessional aspects ol this 
broad area ol (ood and nutrition. The department 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 85 



offers six areas of emphasis: experimental foods, 
community nutrition, nutrition research, dietetics, 
institution administration, and coordinated dietetics. 
Each program provides for competencies in several 
areas of work; however, each option is designed 
specifically for certain professional careers. 

All areas of emphasis have in common several 
courses within the department and the University; 
the curricula are identical in the freshman year. 

Experimental foods is designed to develop com- 
petency in the scientific principles of food and their 
reactions. Physical and biological sciences in rela- 
tion to foods are emphasized. The program is 
planned for students who are interested in product 
development, quality control and technical re- 
search in foods. The nutrition research program is 
designed to develop competency in the area of 
nutrition for students who wish to emphasize 
physical and biological sciences. The community 
nutrition program emphasizes applied community 
nutrition. Dietetics develops an understanding and 
competency in food, nutrition and management 
as related to problems of dietary departments; 
the curriculum includes courses necessary to meet 
the academic requirement for American Dietetic 
Association internship and membership. The 
coordinated dietetic clinical program includes 
internship experience coordinated with the didactic 
components and the students are eligible for 
membership in the American Dietetic Association 
upon graduation. Institution administration emphasis 
is related to the administration of quantity food 
service in universiy and college residence halls and 
student unions, school lunch programs in ele- 
mentary and secondary schools, restaurants, coffee 
shops, and industrial cafeterias. 

Coordinated Dietetics Emphasis 



Semester 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

General Univ. Requirements ' 

FOOD 110 — Food and Nutrition of 

Individuals and Families 

tVIATH 110 or 115 

SPCH Requirement 

FOOD 105 — Professional Orientation ... 
FOOD 240 — Science of Food Preparation 

Total 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

CHEN^ 201. 202— Chemistry III 

CHEM 261 — Introductory Biochemistry . . 
FOOD 250 — Science of Food Preparation 

FOOD 260 — Meal Management 

ZOOL 201. 202 — Anatomy and Physiology 

General Univ. Requirements 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

PSYC Requirement 

Total 



Semester 
JUNIOR YEAR ( // 

NUTR 300 — Science of Nutrition 4 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Human Nutrition .... 3 

lADM 300 — Food Service Organization 

and Management 3 

lADM 430 — Ouantily Food Production 3 

lADM 460, 470 — Administrative Dietetics 

I. II 3 3 

lADM 440 — Food Service Personnel 

Administration 2 

lADM 420 — Quantity Food Purchasing .... 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 

EDHD 460 — Educational Psychology 3 

Total 15 15 

Semesrer 
SENIOR YEAR / // 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Requirement ... 3 

SOCY or ANTH Requirement 3 

NUTR 460— Therapeutic Human Nutrition 3 

NUTR 480 — Applied Diet Therapy 3 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics .3 

Elective 3 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

NUTR 470 — Community Nutrition 3 

NUTR 485 — Applied Community Nutrition . . 3 

Total 15 15 

Dietetics Emphasis 

Semester 

FRESHMAN YEAR / // 

General Univ. Requirements ' 7 11 

FOOD 110 — Food and Nutrition of 

Individuals and Families 3 

MATH 110 or 115 3 

SPCH Requirement 2 

FOOD 105 — Professional Orientation .... 1 

FOOD 240 — Science of Food Preparation . . 3 

Total 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

CHEM 201, 202— Chemistry III 5 

FOOD 250 — Science of Food Preparation 3 

PSYC Requirement 3 

ZOOL 201, 202 — Anatomy and 

Physiology 4 4 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics . . 3 

CHEM 261— Introductory Biochemistry .... 3 

FOOD 260 — Meal Management 3 

General Univ. Requirement 3 

Total 15 16 

Semester 
JUNIOR YEAR / /' 

NUTR 300 — Science of Nutrition 4 

lADM 300 — Food Service Organization 

and Management 3 

General Univ. Requirement 3 3 

SOCY or ANTH Requirement 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 • 3 

lADM 420 — Ouantily Food Purchasing .... 3 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Human Nutrition . . 3 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology .... 4 

Total 



6 14 

Semester 

I II 



SENIOR YEAR 

NUTR 460 — Therapeutic Human Nutrition 



1 16 

Semester 
II 



General Univ. Requirement 3 

lADM 430 — Quantity Food Production . 3 

lADM 440 — Food Service Personnel 

Administration 2 

EDHD 460 — Educational Psychology . . 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 

Electives 6 4 

Total 14 13 

Experimental Food Emphasis 

Semester 
FRESHMAN YEAR I II 

MATH 110 or 115 3 

FOOD 110 — Food and Nutrition of 

Individuals 3 

General Univ. Requirements ' 4 4 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 3 

FOOD 105 — Professional Orientation ... 1 

SPCH Requirement 2 

PSYC Requirement 3 

SOCY or ANTH Requirement 3 

Total 14 15 

Semester 

SOPHOMORE YEAR / // 
CHEM 201, 202— College Chemistry III .. 5 
FOOD 240, 250 — Science of Food 

Preparation 3 3 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

CHEM 261 — Introductory Biochemistry .... 3 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 4 

General Univ. Requirements ' 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

Total 15 16 

Semester 

JUNIOR YEAR / II 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

Electives - 6 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

NUTR 300 — Science of Nutrition 4 

FOOD 400, 450 — Advanced and 

Experimental Food Science 3 3 

FDSC 412 or 413— Principles of Food 

Processing I, II 3 

Total 16 15 

Semester 

SENIOR YEAR / II 

PHYS 111 — Elements of Physics 3 

FDSC 422 — Food Product Research 

and Development 3 

FDSC 432— Analytical Quality Control .... 3 

Electives- 6 4 

General Univ. Requirements 6 4 

Total 15 14 

- Nine hours of the 19 electives must be selected trom the loiiowing 

AGHI 401— Agricutlursl Biometrics (3) or FDSC 431— St«listlc»l 

Duality Control (3) 
CHEM 219- Elements ol Quantitative Analysis (31 
Any 300 or 400 level NUTR course 
FOOD 260— Meal Management (3) 
FOOD 300— Economics ol Food Consumption (3) 
FOOD 445— Advanced Food Science Lab. O) 
FOOD 480— Food Additives 13) 
FOOD 490 — Special Problems in Foods (3) 
FDSC 430— Food MiciobioloBy (3) 
FDSC 4t2 or 413 if not talten above 
lADM 430— Ouantily Food Production (3) 
FMCD 370 — Communications Skills and Techniques in Home 

Economics (3) 



86 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



CMru m ;a; <ra i«<iu<>« 



(nclud* 30 hou(» Uajort muil I 
>f majOf couitnt For •lampi*. 
MuDenI mull lelicl CHEM 103 a> 
»«l ine 0«n«i«l Unlvsitily RsQuir 



liMUIullon Admlnittrallon Emphasis 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

MATH 110 or 115 

Qsrwral Univ Requiremenis ' 

FOOD 110 — Food and Nulrilion of 

Individuals and Families 
FOOD 105 — Piotossional Orientation 
CHEM 104— Chemistry II 
SOCY or ANTH Requlramenl . . 
FOOD ?40— Science ot Food 

Preparation 

SPCH Requiromenl 

Total 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

FOOD 250 — Science of Food Preparation 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 
200L 201. 202 — Anatomy — Physiology 
ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

General Univ Requirements 

PSYC Requirement 

Total 

JUNIOR YEAR 

General Univ Requirements 

NUTR 300 — Science ol Nutrition 

lAOM 300 — Food Service Organization 

and Management 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

BSAO 220. 221— Accounting 

lADM 420 — Ouanlily Food Purchasing . . 
Eiectives 

Total 

SENIOR YEAR 

lADM 430 — Quantity Food Production . . 

lADM 440 — Food Service Personnel 

Administration 

lADM 450 — Food Service Equipment and 

Planning 

BSAO 380 or ECON 470— Business Law 

or Labor Economics 

lAOM 350 or 490 — Special Problems or 

Praclicum in Institution 

Administration 

General Univ. Requiremenis 

Eieciives 



Community Nulrilion Emphasis 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

General Univ Requirements ' . 

MATH 110 or lis 

FOOD 110 — Food and Nutrition of 

Individuals and Families 

FOOD 105 — Professional Orientation . . 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

FOOD 240 — Science ol Food Preparation 
SPCH Requirement 



15 15 

Semester 



S0m0M»r 

SOPHOMORE YEAH I II 

CHEM 201, 202— Chemistry III 5 

PSYC Requirement 3 

FOOD 250— Science of Food Preparation 3 

200L 201. 202— Anatomy & Physlotogy . 4 4 

General Univ Requirements 6 

FOOD 260 — Meal Management 3 

CHEM 261— Introductory Biochemistry ... 3 

Total 15 16 

Semester 

JUNIOR YEAR / // 

NUTR 300 — Science of Nutrition 4 

SOCY or ANTH Requirement 3 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 4 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Nutrition 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 3 

General Univ Requirements 3 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics . . 3 

Elective 3 

Total 14 15 

Semester 

SENIOR YEAR / // 

NUTR 460 — Therapeutic Human Nutrition 3 

NUTR 470 — Community Nutrition 3 

EDHD 460 — Educational Psychology .... 3 

Methods of Teaching Course 3 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

Eiectives 6 6 

Total 15 15 

Nutrition Research Emphasis 

Semesler 
FRESHMAN YEAR / // 

General Univ. Requirements ' 8 10 

MATH 110 or 115 3 

FOOD 110— Food and Nutrition of 

Individuals and Families 3 

FOOD 105 — Professional Orientation . . 1 

SPCH Requirement 2 

FOOD 240 — Science ol Food Preparation 3 

Total 15 15 



Semester 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

CHEM 201, 202— Chemistry III 

PSYC Requirement 

FOOD 250 — Science of Food Preparation 
ZOOL 201. 202 — Anatomy & Physiology . 

General Univ. Requirements 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

MICB 200 — General Microbiology 

SOCY or ANTH Requirement 

Total 

JUNIOR YEAR 

General Univ. Requirements 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

CHEM 461, 462— Biochemistry 

CHEM 463, 464— Biochemistry Lab 

NUTR 300 — Science of Nutrition 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Human Nutrition . 

Total 



SENIOR YEAR 

AGRI 401— Agricultural Biomsirics . . 
NUTR 490 — Special Problems in Nutrition 
ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

General Univ Requirerrtents 

Eiectives 



Total 



15 



-rOOO MUTR. FDSC. lAOM 

Food Science Program 

Professor and Coordinator: King (Dairy Science), 
Professors Young (Animal Science), Keeney, Mat- 
tick (Dairy Sctence), Kramer. Stark, Twigg, Wiley 
(Horticulture). 

Associate Professors: Cowan (Agricultural Engineer, 
ing). Buric fAmmal Science). Bigbee. Thomas 
(Poultry Science). 

Assistant Professors: Turner. Westhoff (Dairy 
Science), Heath (Poultry Science). 
Food Science is concerned with all aspects of pre- 
senting food to the consumer in a manner that 
would satisfy mans r>eeds both nutritionally and 
aesthetically. The Food Science Curriculum is based 
on the application of the fundamentals of the 
physical and biological sciences to the production, 
procurement, preservation, processing, packaging 
and marketing of foods. Specialization is offered 
in the areas of meats, milk a/>d dairy products, fruits 
and vegetables, poultry and poultry products and 
seafood products. 

Opportunities for careers in food science are 
available in industry, universities and government. 
Specific positions for food scieniists include product 
development, production management, engir>eering, 
research, quality control, technical sales and 
service, teaching, and environmental health. 



Total 



General University Requirements . 
Curriculum Requirements 

CHEM 103 — College Chemistry r 
MICB 200 — General Microbiology" 

MATH- 

AGEN 313 — Mechanics of Food Processing 
ANSC 401— Fundamentals of Nutrition . . . 

CHEM 104 — College Chemistry II 

CHEM 201, 202— College Chemistry III 

and College Chemistry Laboratory III 
FDSC 111— Introduction to Food Science 

FDSC 398— Seminar 

FDSC 412, 413— Principles of Food 

Processing I, II 

FDSC 421 — Food Chemistry 

FDSC 422 — Food Product Research and 

Development 

FDSC 430 — Food Microbiology 
FDSC 431— Food Quality Control . 
FDSC 432— Food Quality Control 

Laboratory 

FDSC Commodity Courses" 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics . 
Eiectives 

*S«lisriM Divisional R«Quir«m«nls 
••FDSC 442 «5l 461 471 or 482 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 87 



French and Italian Languages and Literatures 

Professor and Chairman: MacBain. 
Professors: Bingham, Quynn (Emeritus). Rosenfield. 
Associate Professors: Demaitre, Fink, Hall, Tarica. 
Assistant Professors: Gilbert, Hicks, Lebreton- 
Savigny. McArthur, Meijer. 
Lecturer: Lloyd-Jones. 

Instructors: Barrabini, Bondurant, Dubois. Tubbs, 
Vaccarelli. 

The Department offers a major in French which 
consists of a total of 33 credits of French courses at 
the 200 level or above. The French major must 
complete FREN 201 . 251 . 252. 301 . 302. any one 
of 211.311.312, one of 401, 405 and four French 
courses from those numbered 330 to 499 — one 
of which must be a literature course. (FREN 390, 
478. and 479 may not be counted among the five.) 
The French major is required to take a further 12 
credits in supporting courses from a list approved 
by the Department. An average grade of "C" is the 
minimum acceptable in the major field. Students 
intending to apply for teacher certification should 
consult the Director of Undergraduate Advising. 
Dr. Marianne Ivteijer, as early as possible in order to 
plan their programs accordingly. 

Honors. The department offers an honors program 
in French for students of superior ability. Honors 
work normally begins in the first semester of the 
junior year, but a qualified student may enter as 
early as the sophomore year or as late as the 
second semester of the junior year. Honors students 
are required to take at least two courses from 
those numbered 491 H, 492H, and 493H together with 
494H, Honors Independent Study, and 495H, Honors 
Thesis Research. Honors students must take a 
final comprehensive examination based on the 
honors reading list. Admission of students to the 
honors program, their continuance in the program 
and the final award of honors are the prerogative 
of the Departmental Honors Committee. 

Course Code Prelixes— FREN. ITAL 

General Honors Program 

Director: Portz. 

The General Honors Program consists of about 600 
students. Members of the Program are permitted to 
enroll in small, honors sections of basic courses 
in many departments and are given the opportunity 
of participating in special, upper-level General 
Honors seminars and independent study. Suc- 
cessful General Honors students are graduated with 
a citation in General Honors, and notation of this 
accomplishment is made upon their diplomas and 
transcripts. General Honors also involves an 
elaborate extra-curricular program. Student partici- 
pation in decision-making in all aspects of General 
Honors is encouraged. 



Students from any Division or College on the 
College Park Campui are eligible to apply for 
admission to the Program. Admission to the General 
Honors Program is ordinarily made at the same 
time as admission to the University, although a 
special and separate application form is required 
for General Honors. 

Admission requirements are not fixed, but relative 
to the background, accomplishments, and motiva- 
tion of the applicant. Very generally it may be 
said that students are selected on the basis of 
grades, rank in class, national test scores, and rec- 
ommendations from high school teachers and coun- 
selors. In addition, however, subjective factors 
are taken into very serious consideration. 

Students customarily apply during their senior 
year in high school, but in-University students 
are also admitted during their careers at the Uni- 
versity, and student transferring from other 
institutions are accepted into General Honors upon 
presentation of a distinguished record, especially if 
they come to Maryland from another Honors 
program. 

The College Park Campus also operates 
25 Departmental Honors Programs designed pri- 
marily for the majoring student. Most of these 
Programs begin in the junior year, although there 
are a few exceptions (Botany, English, History, 
Mathematics, and Psychology), and are administered 
by Committees at the Departmental level. For 
information, see the descriptions under the various 
departmental entries in this catalog, or contact 
the Honors Office, as below. 

The General Honors Program is administered by 
the Director and by the General Honors Committee 
which also acts as an advisory and regulatory 
body. For application forms, brochure, and infor- 
mation, write to Dr. John Portz. Director, Honors 
Office. University of Maryland. College Park, 
Maryland 20742. 

Course Code Prelix— HONR 

Geography 

Professor and Ctiairman: Harper. 
Professors: Ahnert, Deshler, Fonaroff, Hu. 
Associate Professors: Brodsky, Chaves, Mitchell, 
Thompson, Wiedel. 

Assistant Professors: Cirrincione, Dando, Groves, 
Lewis, Muller. 

Lecturers: Christian, Rosenthal, Roswell, Yoshioka. 
Geography studies the spatial patterns and inter- 
actions of natural, cultural and socio-economic 
phenomena on earth's surface. The field thus em- 
braces aspects of both the physical and the social 
sciences, which are applied in the analysis of 
patterns of distribution of individual phenomena, to 
the study of complex interrelations of phenomena 
found in a given region, and to the synthesis of 
geographic regions. A geographer should, therefore, 



acquire background knowledge in certain aspects 
of the physical as well as the social sciences. 

Field work and map analysis have been the basic 
tools of research for the geographer. In recent years 
these have been augmented by the use of tech- 
niques of air photo interpretation and presently by 
the development of methods of interpreting data 
obtained from the remote sensing devices of space 
satellites. Modern geography also is making in- 
creasing application of quantitative methods, 
including the use of statistics and systems analysis, 
so that mathematical training is becoming increas- 
ingly important for a successful career in geography. 

Today geographers are employed in a wide 
range of positions. Geographers in the federal 
government work in the Departments of State, 
Interior. Defense. Agriculture. Housing and Urban 
Affairs, and Health, Education, and Welfare. They 
are on the staffs of the legislative research branch, 
the Library of Congress and the National Archives. 
At the state and local government level there is 
an increasing demand for geographers in planning 
positions. And in recent years more and more 
geographers have found employment in private 
industry working on problems of industrial and com- 
mercial location and market analysis. Teaching at 
all levels from elementary school through graduate 
work continues to employ more geographers each 
year. Some have found geography to be an ex- 
cellent background for careers in the military, 
journalism and general business; others have simply 
found the broad perspective of geography an ex- 
cellent base for a general education. Most 
professional positions in geography require graduate 
training. 

Requirements For An Undergraduate Major. Within 

any of the general major programs it is possible 
for the student to adjust his program to fit his 
particular individual interests. The major totals 33 
semester hours. 
The required courses of the geography major are: 

Hours 

1. Geography Core (GEOG 201. 202. 203. 300) 12 

2. Field Study (Selected from GEOG 380, 381. 382, 
383, 384) 3 

3. A regional course 3 

4. Elective systematic and technique courses 15 

Total 33 

The Geography Core — The following four courses 
form the minimum essential base upon which ad- 
vanced work in geography can be built: 
GEOG 201 — Introduction to Physical Geography .... 3 
GEOG 202 — Introduction to Cultural Geography .... 3 
GEOG 203 — Introduction to Econonnic Geography . . 3 
GEOG 300 — Introduction to Research & Writing .... 3 

The three lower division courses are to be com- 
pleted prior to GEOG 300 and all other upper 
division courses. GEOG 201. 202. and 203 may be 
taken in any order and a student may register for 



88 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



more than one In any semester. GEOG 300 is 
specitically designed as a preparation lo upper di- 
vision work and should be taken upon completion 
of one or two upper division courses. Upon consulta- 
tion with a department advisor, a reasonable load 
ol other upper division work in geography may be 
taken concurrently with GEOG 300. 

The Field Study Requirement — The field study re- 
quirement may be completed in either of two ways, 
depending on which is available in the schedule: 
(1) by taking Geography 380 — Local Field Course, 
3 hours or (2) by taking three out ol lour of the fol- 
lowing one-hour field study courses each stressing 
a different aspect of geographic field work: GEOG 
381— Field Study: Physical; GEOG 382— Field Study: 
Rural: GEOG 382— Field Study: Urban: GEOG 
384 — Field Study: f^elhods. Normally two of the 
different one-hour courses will be offered each 
semester, and the student should arrange lo take 
them as is convenient during the junior and senior 
years. 

Introduction lo Geography— <3eography 100: Intro- 
duction to Geography is a general education course 
lor persons who have had no previous contact with 
the discipline in high school or for persons plan- 
ning lo lake only one course in geography. It 
provides a general overview of the field rather 
than of a single specialized subdivision. Credit for 
this course is not applied to the major. 

Areas of Specialization. Although the major pro- 
gram IS flexible and can be designed to fit any in- 
dividual student's own interest, several specializa- 
tions attract numbers of students. They are: 

Urbar) Geography and Regional Development — 
Provides preparation for careers in planning and 
teaching. Majors electing this specialty take de- 
partmental courses in urban geography, industrial 
location, transportation, and economic geography 
among others and supporting courses in urban 
sociology, urban economics, urban transportation, 
and the urban studies program outside the depart- 
ment. 

Physical Geography — For students with special 
interest in the natural environment and in its 
interaction with the works of man. This specializa- 
tion consists of departmental courses in geomor- 
phology. climatology, and resources, and of 
supporting courses in geology, soils, meteorology, 
hydrology, and botany. 

Cartography — Prepares students for careers in 
map design, compilation and reproduction. The 
department offers various courses in thematic 
mapping, cartographic history and theory, map 
evaluation, and map and photo interpretation. For 
additional training students are advised to take 
supporting courses in art and civil engineering. 

Cultural Geography — Of interest to students par- 
ticularly concerned with the geographic aspects of 



population, politics, and other social and cultural 
phenomena, and with historical geography. In 
addition to departmental course offerings this 
specialization depends on work in sociology, an- 
thropology, government and politics, history, and 
economics. 

For further information on any of these areas of 
interest the student should contact a departmental 
advisor. 

All math programs should be approved by a 
departmental advisor 

Suggested Study Program For Geography 

Freshman Year Hours 

GEOG 100 — Inlroduction lo Geography (Does 

not count toward geography major) 3 

GEOG 201 — Introductory Physical Geography 3 

General University Requirements and/or 

eleclives 24 

30 

Sophomore Year 

GEOG 202 — Introductory Cultural Geography 3 

GEOG 203 — introductory Economic Geography .... 3 
General University Requirements and/or 
eleclives 24 

30 

Junior Year 

GEOG 300 — Introduction to Research and Writing 

in Geography 3 

GEOG — A regional geography course 3 

GEOG — Field courses 3 

GEOG — Elective 3 

General University Requirements and/or 

eleclives 18 

30 
Senior Year 

GEOG — Courses to complete major 12 

Eleclives 18 



Total 



120 



Geography Minor and Secondary Education 
Geography Specialization 

College ol Education Majors 

Secondary Education Majors with a concentration 
in geography are required to take 27 hours in the 
content field. Geography 201, 202. 203, 490 and a 
field course are required. The remaining 15 hours 
of the program consist of 3 hours of regional 
geography and 12 hours of upper-division systematic 
courses. For majors in Elementary Education and 
others needing a geography course for teaching 
certification. Geography 100 is the required course. 

Geography minors should take at least Geog. 201, 
202 and 203 in the Geography core and 300 is 
recommended. As with the major these courses 
should be taken before any others. 

Course Code Ptelix— GEOG 



Geology 

Associate Protessor and Acting Chairman: Siegrist. 
Associate Professors: Segovia. Slifel. 
Assistant Professors: Ridky, Weidner, Wylie. 

Credit Houri 
Gsneral Universlly Requirements 30 

Divisional Requirements 

Biological Science 3 or 4 

MATH. CHEM (See Below) 
Departmental Requirements 24 

GEOL 100 (3) 

GEOL 102 (3) 

GEOL 110 (1) 

GEOL 112 (1) 

GEOL 399 (1) 

GEOL 422 (3) 

GEOL 431 (4) 

GEOL 441 (3) 

Geology Summer Camp (5) 
Supporting Requirements 24 

CHEM 103. 104 (4, 4) 

MATH 140, 141 (4, 4) 

PHYS 121. 122 (4. 4) 
Eleclives 38 or 39 

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 

Professor and Chairman: Hering. 
Professors: Best, Dobert, Hinderer. Jones. 
Associate Professors: Berry, Fleck. Hitchcock. 
Assistant Professors: Dulbe. Elder, Irwin. KostovskI, 
Pfister. 

Instructors: Kornetchuk. Lindes. 
Lecturer: Vollmer. 

General. Two types of undergraduate majors are 
offered in both German and Russian: one for the 
general student or the future teacher, and the other 
for those interested in a rounded study of a foreign 
area for the purpose of understanding another 
nation through its literature, history, sociology, and 
other aspects. Both of these majors confer the 
B.A. degree. The department also offers M.A. and 
Ph.D. degrees in German language and literature. 

An undergraduate major in either category con- 
sists of a total of 33 hours with a C average, beyond 
the basic language requirement. 

In selecting minor or elective subjects, students 
majoring in German or Russian, particularly those 
who plan to do graduate work, should give special 
consideration to courses in French, Spanish. Latin, 
philosophy, history, and English. 

Language and Literature Major: 
German. German 221. which may be taken con- 
currently with German 321 or 322. is required unless 
waived by the chairman of the department. Specific 
minimum requirements in the program are: three 
courses in advanced language (one from each set; 
301-302. 311-312. 401-402); two semesters of the 
survey of literature courses (321-322); six literature 
courses on the 400-level, two of which may be taken 
in comparative literature. Taking honors courses 
as substitute for the 400-level literature courses 
requires special permission from the chairman of 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 89 



the department and in no case may more than two 
honors courses be selected for this purpose. 

Russian. The specific minimum requirements are: 
one from each set: 201-202, 301-302, 311-312, 
401-402; two semesters of the survey of literature 
courses (321-322). plus 15 hours of literature courses 
on the 400-level. 
Foreign Area Major: 

German. Specific requirements in this major are: 
three courses in advanced language (one from each 
set: 301-302. 311-312, 401-402); a 2-semester sur- 
vey (321-322); two courses in civilization (421-422); 
four courses in German literature on the 400-level, 
two of which may be replaced by Comparative 
Literature 401 and 402. Supporting courses should 
be selected in consultation with the student's ad- 
visor. 

Russian. Specific requirements in this major are: 
three courses in advanced language (one from each 
set: 201-202, 301-302, 311-312); Russian 321 and 
322; Russian 401 and 402; plus 12 hours of literature 
courses on the 400-level, two of which may be re- 
placed by Comparative Literature 401 and 402. 
Supporting courses should be selected in consulta- 
tion with the student's advisor. 
Honors. A student majoring in German who, at the 
time of application, has a general academic average 
of at least 3.0 and 3.5 or above in his major field, 
is eligible for admission to the Honors program of 
the department. Application should be directed to 
the chairman of the Honors Committee. Honors 
work normally begins in the first semester of the 
junior year but a qualified student may enter as 
early as the sophomore year or as late as the second 
semester of the junior year. 

Honors students are required to take two of the 
Honors reading courses 398H and the independent 
study course, 397H. 

Besides completing an independent study project, 
all graduating seniors who are candidates for 
Honors must take an oral examination. Admission of 
students to the Honors Program, their continu- 
ance in the program, and the final award of Honors 
are the prerogative of the Departmental Honors 
Committee. 

Lower Division Courses. Students with only one 
year of high school language may take courses 
111 and 112 in that language for credit. Students 
who have had two or more years of German or 
Russian in high school and wish to continue 
with that language must take the placement exam. 

Students who, as a result of the placement exam, 
place in 113 must complete 115. They may not take 
courses 111-112 for credit unless there has been 
a four-year lapse of time between their high 
school language course and their first college 
course in that language. Those who place above 

90 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



115 have fulfilled the language requirement for 
the B.A. degree in the Division of Arts and Humani- 
ties. 

Transfer students with college credit have the 
option of continuing at the level for which they are 
theoretically prepared, of taking a placement 
examination, or of electing courses 113 for 
credit. If a transfer student takes 113 for 
credit, he may retain transfer credit only for the 
equivalent of course 1 1 1 . A transfer student 
placing lower than his training warrants may ignore 
the placement but DOES SO AT HIS OWN RISK. 

If a student has received a D in a course and 
completes the next higher course, he cannot go 
back to repeat the original D. 

A student whose native language is German or 
Russian may not meet the college requirement by 
taking courses through 312 in that language. There 
is a special option by which foreign students may 
offer a combination of FOLA 001 and 002 (English 
for Foreign Students) and 12 hours of English 
courses to satisfy both the English and foreign 
language requirements. 

Course Code Prelixes— GERM, RUSS 

Governmental Research 

Director: Burdette. 
Associate Protessor: Stone. 
Research Associate: Feldbaum. 
Lecturers: Eppes, Azzaretto, Behre, Kelleher, 
Peterson, Thompson. 
Faculty Research Assistant: Rouse. 
Activities of the Bureau of Governmental Research 
relate primarily to the problems of State and local 
government in Maryland. The bureau engages in 
research and publishes findings with reference to 
local, State and national governments and their 
interrelationships. It undertakes surveys and offers 
Its assistance and service to units of government 
in Maryland and serves as a clearinghouse of infor- 
mation for them. The bureau furnishes opportunities 
for qualified students interested in research and 
career development in State and local administra- 
tion. 

Urban affairs have become a central focus with 
the establishment of an Urban Research Group, 
which draws on a variety of interdisciplinary faculty 
interests within the University. 

The Maryland Technical Advisory Service, a di- 
vision of the bureau, provides consulting services 
to county and municipal governments of the State. 
Technical consultation and assistance are provided 
on specific problems in such areas as preparation 
of charters and codes or ordinances, fiscal man- 
agement, personnel management, utility and other 
service operations, planning and zoning, and 
related local or intergovernmental activities. The 
staff analyzes and shares with governmental officials 
information concerning professional developments 



and opportunities for new or improved programs 
and facilities. 

Government and Politics 

Professor and Department Chairman: Piper. 

Professors: Anderson, Burdette, Dillon, Harrison, 

Hathorn, Hsueh, Jacobs, McNelly, Murphy, Plischke. 

Associate Professors: Claude. Conway, Devine, 

Glendening, Koury, Ranald, Reeves, Stone, Terchek, 

Wilkenfeld, Wolfe. 

Assistant Professors: Bechtold, Butterworth, 

Chaples, Glass, Heisler, Ingles, Kapungu, 

Lanning, McCarrick, Melnick, Oliver, Strouse, 

Werlin. 

Lecturers: Barber, Flyr. 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Helms. 

The Department of Government and Politics offers 
programs designed to prepare students for govern- 
ment service, politics, foreign assignments, 
teaching, a variety of graduate programs, and for 
intelligent and purposeful citizenship. 

At the junior/ senior level students may pursue 
the general government curriculum or they may 
pursue a more specialized curriculum either in 
international affairs or in public administration. 

Course Code Prefix— GVPT 

Requirements for the Government and Politics 
Major. Government and Politics majors must take a 
minimum of 36 semester hours in government 
courses and may not count more than 42 hours in 
government toward graduation. No course in which 
the grade is less than C may be counted as part 
of the major. No courses may be taken on a pass-fall 
basis. 

The government and politics fields are as follows: 
(1) American government and politics; (2) com- 
parative government; (3) international affairs; (4) 
political theory; (5) public administration; (6) public 
law; and (7) public policy and political behavior. 

All government majors are required to take 
GVPT 100, 170, 220, 441 or 442 (Political Theory), 
and such other supporting courses as specified by 
the department. They must take one course from 
three separate government fields as designated 
by the department. 

All departmental majors shall take ECON 205 or 
ECON 201. In addition, the major will select courses 
from one of the following options: (a) methodology, 
(b) foreign language, (c) philosophy and history of 
science, or (d) pre-law. A list of courses which 
will satisfy each option is available in the depart- 
mental office. In addition, all majors shall take one 
course in which the student will be introduced 
on a systematic basis to the literature that deals 
with American race relations. A list of approved 
courses is available in the departmental office. 

All students majoring in government must fulfill 
the requirements of a minor, which involves the 



completion ot 15 semester hours (rom approved 
departments other than GVPT At least six o( the 15 
hours must be taken at the 300-400 level from a 
single department Students maionng In govern- 
ment with specialization in international affairs 
may choose to take all minor courses either In 
geographical area studies or on a departmental 
basis, geographical area minors may be chosen, 
with the consent of the departmental advisor, 
from the following: Africa. East Asia. Europe, Latin 
America, the Middle East, and the Soviet Union. 
General majors and majors specializing in public 
administration may not minor in geographical area 
studies. 

Students who major in government may apply 
tor admission to the GVPT Honors Program during 
the second semester of their sophomore year. 
Additional information concerning the Honors Pro- 
gram may be obtained at the departmental offices. 

Departmental majors who have completed at least 
75 hours towards a degree and at least 15 hours in 
GVPT are eligible to participate in the Depart- 
ment's Academic Internship Program. 

Health Education 

Professors Burt. Johnson, Kenel. 

Associate Professors: Girdano, Leviton, Miller, Tifft. 

Assistant Professors: Althoff, Clearwater, Girdano, 

Needle, Stone. 

Instructors: Butler, doCarmo, Sands. 

The curriculum is designed to prepare the student 
to give leadership in the development of both school 
and community health. Graduates of the depart- 
mental program have placement opportunities as 
health educators in the public schools, community 
colleges, as well as in the public and voluntary 
health agencies. 

Health Curriculum 

Semester 
FRESHMAN YEAR / // 

ENGL — General University Requirement 3 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 4 

CHEM 103. 104— General Chemistry 4 4 

HLTH 130— Intro 10 Health 3 

MLTH 140 — Personal and Community 

Health 3 

General University Requirement 3 3 

Eleclives 3 3 

Total 16 17 

Semester 

SOPHOMORE YEAR f II 
ZOOL 201. 202 — Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 4 4 

HLTH 106— Drug Use and Abuse 3 

HLTH 150— First Aid and Safely 1 

HLTH 270— Safety Education 3 

General University Requirement 3 9 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 17 



Somejrer 
JUNIOR YEAR / // 

HLTH 480 — Measurement in Health 

Education 3 

HLTH 310 — Intioducllon to School 

Health Education 2 

HLTH 420— Methods and Materials In 

Health Education 3 

HLTH 477— Fundamentals of Sex 

Education 3 

HLTH 489— Independent Study 3 

EDUC 300 — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

EDUC 301— Foundations ot Education .... 3 

General University Requirement 3 3 

Eleclives 3 

Total 17 15 

Semester 
SENIOR YEAR / " 

HLTH 340 — Curriculum Instruction and 

Observation 3. 

HLTH 450— Health Problems of Children 

and Youth 3 

HLTH 390 — Org. & Adm. of School 

Health Programs 3 

EDSi 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 3 

EDSE 367 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

HLTH 489— Independent Studies 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 17 

Degree Requirements in Health Education. Require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
health education are as follows: 

Sem. 
Cr. 
Foundation science courses (ZOOL 101, 201, 202; 

CHEM 103. 104) 20 

General University Requirements 30 

Professional Health Education courses (HLTH 106, 

103. 140. 150. 270. 310. 420, 477. 489. 340. 450 

480. 390) 39 

Education requirements (EDUC 300, 301; 

EDSE 330. 367) 20 

Electives 21 

Total 130 

Minor in Health Education — 24 Hour Minor. Twelve 
semester hours in health education (HLTH 140, 
150. 310,420, 450). 

Twelve semester hours in related areas: 
Six semester hours of biological science. 
Six semester hours of psychology or human 
development. 

Minor in Safety Education. Students wishing to 
obtain a minor in safety education and become 
certified to teach safety and driver education in 
junior and senior high schools should take the fol- 
lowing courses: HLTH 150 (1). HLTH 260 (2), HLTH 
270 (3), HLTH 280 (3), HLTH 305 (3), HLTH 345 (3), 
ENPF 280 (3), and ENPF 290 (3). In addition, six 
hours of psychology (other than the general educa- 
tion requirements are required. 

Coursa Code Pieln— HLTH 



Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Professor and Chairman: Newby. 

Research Professor: Causey. 

Associate Professor: Baker. 

Research Associate Professor: Spuehler. 

Assistant Professors: Bankson, Bernthal, Boss, 

Doudna, Hamlet, Kumin, Weiner. 

Research Assistant Professors: Elkins. Wintercorn. 

Instructors: Beck. Braunslein, Serota. 

Faculty Research Associate: Revoile. 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Worthington. 

Court. Codo P.el.i-HESP 

The departmental curriculum leads to the Bachelor 
ot Arts degree and prepares the student to under- 
take graduate work in the fields of speech 
pathology, audiology, and speech and hearing 
science. In other words, the undergraduate pro- 
gram in this department is a preprofessional one. 
The student who wishes to work professionally as a 
speech pathologist or audiologist must complete 
at least 30 semester hours of graduate course work 
in order to meet state and national certification re- 
quirements. 

The undergraduate major must complete 30 
semester hours of courses in the Department of 
Hearing and Speech Sciences and 18 semester 
hours of courses in allied fields. No course with a 
grade less than C may be used to satisfy major 
course requirements. 

Major Courses. The undergraduate major in 
Hearing and Speech Sciences will take 30 credits 
in the following courses: 

Second Year 

HESP 202 — Fundamentals ol Hearing and Speech 
Science (3) (Prerequisite for all upper level courses) 

Third Year 

HESP 302— Speech Pathology I (3) 

HESP 305 — Anatomy and Physiology ol the 

Speech Mechanism (3) 
HESP 312 — Instrumentation in Hearing and Speech 

Science (3) 
HESP 411 — Introduction to Audiology (3) 
HESP 400 — Speech and Language Development 

of Children (3) 
HESP 403 — Introduction to Phonetic Science (3) 

Fourth Year 

HESP 404 — Speech Pathology II (3) 

HESP 406— Speech Pathology III (3) 

HESP 408 — Clinical Practice (1-2) 

HESP 410 — Principles and Methods in Speech 
Therapy (3) 

HESP 412 — Rehabilitation of the Hearing- 
Handicapped (3) 

HESP 414 — Seminar (3) (Independent Study) 

Supporting Courses. The undergraduate student 
with a major in Hearing and Speech Sciences will 
take a total of six courses. 18 credits, as designated 
in these supporting areas of study: 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 91 



Required: One of the following courses in 
statistics. 
EDMS 451— Introduction to Educational 

Statistics (3) 
PSYC 200 — Statistical t^eltiods in Psyctiology (3) 
SOCY 201 — Introductory Statistics for 

Sociology (3) 

The student will select four courses, 12 credits, 
from the following: 

PSYC 206 — Developmental Psyctiology (3) 
PSYC 221— Social Psyctiology (3) 
PSYC 301— Biological Basis of Behavior (3) 
PSYC 331— Introduction to Abnormal Psyctiology (3) 
PSYC 333 — Ctiild Psychology {3)" 
PSYC 335 — Personality and Adjustment (3) 
PSYC 400 — Experimental Psychology: Learning 

lulotivation (4) 
PSYC 410 — Experimental Psychology: Sensory 

Processes I (4) 
PSYC 422 — Language and Social Communication (3) 
PSYC 423 — Advanced Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC 431— Abnormal Psychology (3)" 
PSYC 433 — Advanced Topics in Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC 435— Personality (3) 

•These two are strongly tecommended 

The student will select one course such as these, 
3 credits, from the following: 

HLTH 450 — Health Problems of Children and Youth (3) 
EDHD 411 — Child Growth and Development (3) 
EDHD 413 — Adolescent Development (3) 
EDHD 445 — Guidance of Young Children (3) 
EDSP 470 — Introduction to Special Education (3) 
EDSP 471 — Characteristics of Exceptional Children — 

Mentally Retarded (3) 
EDSP 475 — Education of the Slow Learner (3) 
EDSP 491 — Characteristics of Exceptional Children — 

Perceptual Learning Problems {3) 
LING 100 — Introduction to Linguistics (3) 
LING 101— Language and Culture (3) 

These are suggestions. A course of the student's 
choosing may be substituted with the approval of 
an advisor. 

Hebrew Program 

Assistant Professor and Director: Greenberg. 
Visiting Professor: Iwry. 
Instructors: Klein, Landa, Barnea. 

A minor in Hebrew language and literature consists 
of 18 semester hours. Six of these hours must be in 
courses on the 400-level. 

Students who have never studied Hebrew, or 
who have little knowledge beyond reading and 
writing, may register for Elementary Hebrew without 
taking a placement examination. Students who 
have studied Hebrew in a Hebrew high school or 
day school, in Israel, or at another university are 
required to take the placement examination. On 
questions of placement above the Hebrew 115 level, 
students should consult Professor Samuel Iwry. 

Course Code Prefix -HE8H 



History 

Chairman: Rundell. 

Professors: Bauer (Emeritus), Brush, Callcott, 
Carter, Cole, Duffy. Foust, Gilbert, Gordon, Haber, 
Harlan. Jashemski, Kent, IVIerrill, Olson, H., Prange, 
Schuessler, Smith, E. G., Sparks, Yaney. 
Visiting Professor: Grossman. 
Associate Professors: Belz, Berry, Breslow, 
Cockburn. Farrell, Folsom, Greenberg, Giffin, 
Grimsted, Matossian, Mayo, Olson, K., 
Stowasser, Warren. 

Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Ekiund, Flack. 
Harris. Hoffman, Holum, Kaufman, Lampe, l\/lajeska, 
McCusker, Nicklason, Perinbam, Ridgway, 
Williams, Wright. 
Lecturer: H. Smith. 

The Department of History seeks to broaden the 
student's cultural background through the study of 
history and to provide preparation for those in- 
terested in law, publishing, teaching, journalism, 
service, and graduate study. 

A faculty advisor will assist each major in 
planning a curriculum to meet his personal interests. 
A "program plan," approved by the advisor, should 
be filed with the Department as soon as possible. 
Students should meet regularly with their ad- 
visors to discuss the progress of their studies. 

Major Requirements 

A. Candidates for a B.A. in History are required 
to complete 39 hours in History courses. 

8. The undergraduate major must attain a grade 
of C or higher in each of the courses submitted 
to fulfill the 39-hour requirement. 

C. A minimum of twelve of the 39 hours must be 
taken at the 300 or 400 levels. 

D. The only mandatory course is HIST 389, Pro- 
seminar in Historical Writing (3 hours). 

E. Before registering for HIST 389, the student is 
required to have demonstrated proficiency in 
English composition by 

(1) passing (or getting credit by examination in) 
ENGL 101 or 171 or equivalent, with a grade 
of C or higher; or 

(2) receiving an appropriate score on the 
Advanced Placement examination 

Supporting Courses. History majors are required to 
take nine hours at the 300 or 400 levels in appropri- 
ate supporting areas outside the History Depart- 
ment. These courses do not all have to be in the 
same department but the choice of courses must 
be approved in writing by a faculty advisor. The 
grade of C or higher is required in each of the 
courses submitted to fulfill this requirement. 

General University Requirements in History. All 

History courses on the 100, 200, 300 and 400 levels 
are open to students seeking to meet the University 
requirements in Area C (Division of Arts and Hu- 
manities) with the exception of HIST 256, 257, 389, 



395, 396, 399. A few other courses are open only 
to students who satisfy specified prerequisites, but 
that does not limit them to history majors. It should 
be noted that Special Topics courses— HIST 298, 389 
and 498 — are offered on several different subjects 
of general interest each semester; descriptions 
may be obtained from the History Department office. 
Honors in History. Students who major or minor in 
history may apply for admission to the History 
Honors Program during the second semester of 
their sophomore year. Those who are admitted to 
the program substitute discussion courses and a 
thesis for some lecture courses and take an oral 
comprehensive examination prior to graduation. 
Successful candidates are awarded either honors 
or high honors in history. 

The History Department offers pre-honors work 
in American history in western civilization. Consult 
Schedule of Classes for specific offerings each 
semester. Students in these sections meet in a dis- 
cussion group instead of attending lectures. They 
read widely and do extensive written work on their 
own. Pre-honors sections are open to any student 
and are recommended for students in General 
Honors, subject only to the instructor's approval. 
Students who intend to apply for admission to the 
History Honors Program should take as many of 
them as possible during their freshman and sopho- 
more years. 

Course Code PreliMes— HIST, HIFN, HIUS 

Horticulture 

Chairman and Professor: Stark. 
Professors: Kramer, Link, Reynolds, Rogers, 
Shanks, Thompson, Twigg, and Wiley. 
Associate Professors: Angell, Baker, Schales, 
Soergel. 

Assistant Professors: Beste, Bouwkamp. Gouin, 
fVlcClurg. 

Visiting Professor: Borthwick. 
Research Associate: Prasad. 
Instructors: Mityga, Todd. 
Lecturers: Hendee, Herman. 
Visiting Lecturer: Koch. 

The horticulturist combines a knowledge of the 
basic sciences with an intimate knowledge of 
plants and their requirements in an effort to help 
meet the food needs of the world population and to 
help beautify man's surroundings. The horticulturist, 
specifically, is involved with fruit production 
(pomology), vegetable production (olericulture), 
greenhouse plant production (floriculture), produc- 
tion of ornamental trees and shrubs, post-harvest 
horticulture, and the tasteful planning of gardens 
and ornamental plantings (landscape design). Horti- 
cultural principles are essential to designing the 
landscape for improvement of the human environ- 
ment. Post-harvest horticulture is involved with the 



92 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



•torage and transportation ol horticultural products 
until they reach the consumer. 

The curriculum in Horticulture prepares students 
lor a future in commercial production ol the horti- 
cultural crops, and lor employment in the horticul- 
tural industries such as Iruit and vegetable 
processing, seed production and sales, agricultural 
chemical sales and service. Ilorist shops and garden 
centers, and as horticulturists lor parks, highway 
systems, botanic gardens and arborotums. 

Majors may prepare lor work with handicapped 
persons as horticultural therapists by electing ap- 
propriate courses in the social sciences and in 
recreation. The Horticultural Education option is 
designed lor those who wish to teach horticulture in 
the secondary schools. It prepares the graduate 
with a basic knowledge ol horticulture and includes 
the courses required lor certilication to teach in 
Maryland. 

Advanced studies in the Department, leading to 
the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, are available to out- 
standing students having a strong horticultural 
motivation lor research, university teaching and/or 
extension education. 

Curriculum In Horticulture Credit Hours 

Gonoral Uni.ei5il> Requiremenis . . 30 
Ocpartmenlal Requirements — All Options: 

AGRO 202— General Soils < 

BOTN 101— General Botany' -» 

BOTN 221- Diseases ol Plants 4 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology * 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry T 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

HORT 271 — Plant Propagation 3 

MORT 398 — Seminar 1 

MATH" 3 

31 

'S«l<sh«« Divisional Requirements 

Complete the requirements in one of the following 
options: 
Roriculture and Omamental Horticulture Option: 

BOTN 212 — Plant Taxonomy 3 

HORT 132 — Garden Management 2 
HORT 160 — Introduction to the Art ol 

Landscaping 3 

HORT 231 — Greenhouse Management 3 

HORT 260 — Basic Landscape Composition 2 

HORT 274— Genetics ol Cultivated Plants 3 

HORT 451 — Technoogy ol Ornamentals 3 

HORT 453. 454— Woody Plant Materials 3. 3 
HORT 432 — Fundamentals o( Greenhouse 

Crop Production or 

HORT 456 — Production and Maintenance 

ol Woody Plants 3 

Electives 31 

59 
Horticultural Education Option: 

AGRO 405 — Turl Management 3 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 3 

HORT 111— Tree Fruit Production 3 

HORT 132 — Garden Management 2 

HORT 160 — Introduction to Art ol 

Landscaping 3 



HORT 222— Vegetable Production . 3 

HORT 231 — Greenhouse Management 3 

HORT 260— Basic Landscape Composition 2 

HORT 453— Woody Plant Malerlnls 3 
EDUC 300 — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

EDUC 301 — Foundations ol Education 3 
RLEO 302 — Introduction to Agricultural 

Education 2 
RLED 303 — Teaching Materials and 

Demonstrations 2 

RLEO 305 — Teaching Young and Adult 

Farmer Groups 1 

RLED 311— Teaching Secondary Vocational 

Agriculture 3 

RLED 313— Student Teaching 5 

RLED 315— Student Teaching 14 

Fieri, vo^ 8 11 

59 
Pomology and Olericulture Option: 

ENTM 252— Insect Pests ol Agricultural 

Crops 4 

HORT 111. 112 — Tree Fruit Production . 3. 2 

HORT 212 — Berry Production 3 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 3 

HORT 274 — Genetics o( Cultivated Plants 3 

HORT 411— Technology o( Fruits 3 

HORT 422— Technology ol Vegetables 3 
HORT 474 — Physiology ot Maturation and 

Storage ol Horticultural Crops 3 

Electives 32 

59 

Course Codu PrcLi HORT 

Housing and Applied Design 

Professor and Chairman: Shearer. 

Associate Professor: IvIcWhinnie. 

Assistant Professors: Fish. Nelson, Ritzmann, Roper. 

Instructors: Dean, Erdahl, Hillerman, Holvey, Irby, 

Odiand. 

Lecturers: Davis, Lawrence, Ribalta. 

The Department of Housing and Applied Design 

offers programs of concentration in five areas of 

design: Advertising; Costume; Crafts; Housing; 

Interior. 

The goal of providing a broad general education 
is in addition to individually and professionally 
oriented instruction in design. Programs include the 
philosophy and method common to the various 
areas of design and provide theoretical and techni- 
cal bases pertinent to each. This foundation is 
basic to specific problem-solving activities which 
are applicable to the demands of a chosen design 
area. 

Advertising Design: The Advertising Design curricu- 
lum is constructed to establish a foundation in the 
field of graphic communication. Courses are 
structured and arranged to provide students with 
the ability to conceptualize imaginatively and to 
acquire and apply a discriminating introspection 
for visual form. Courses in Art History and related 
areas provide breadth as well as depth. Opportuni- 
ties to examine related fields are offered through 
elective courses. Students graduating from this 



curriculum gain a broad educational experience 
qualifying them to initiate a career in many areas ol 
graphic communications. 

Costume Design: The Costume curriculum is a pro- 
lessionally oriented program designed to prepare 
students for employment in the many-faceted 
fashion industry. The advanced courses encourage 
interviews and on-the-job contacts with working 
professionals. The program is tailored to the stu- 
dent's career goals by careful selection of elective 
courses and the allied area block. Graduates 
completing this ma|or may choose careers in 
fashion design, lashion illustration, display, sales 
promotion, lashion reporting and public relations, 
lashion co-ordination, and photography. 

Crafts Design: The Crafts curriculum provides the 
student with a wide range ol art and design experi- 
ence, built upon a broad general education. After 
exposure to studio work in various cralt media, the 
student should specialize in at least one area in 
order to become prolessionally prolicient in both 
design and execution. The opportunities for em- 
ployment are primarily teaching in recreational 
and adult education programs, directing various 
forms of craft programs for the government, and as 
a practicing craftsman. 

Housing: This program is aimed at the exploration 
of the factors underlying housing problems, the 
extent of these problems as they exist today, and a 
projection to future trends and needs. Through 
integration of relevant research findings from 
sociology, economics, architecture, psychology 
and design, the program provides a transdiscipli- 
nary conceptual framework for the development of 
applied research/problem-solving methods, and 
contributes to the understanding of social and 
behavioral implications of housing processes and 
effective design. 

Interior Design: This curriculum, successfully com- 
pleted, provides the student with sufficient back- 
ground in design theory, in history or architecture, 
interiors and furnishings, in functional and 
imaginative problem solving, and in techniques of 
presentation to qualify for affiliation with profes- 
sional organizations. Student organizations and 
internships provide meaningful contact with 
practicing professionals. 

Advertising Design Curriculum 

Typical Freshman Year 

APOS 101 3 

ARTS 110 3 

SPEECH Course 2-3 

General University Requirement 6 

APDS 102 3 

EDIN lOlA 2 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

General University Requirement 3 

SOCY or ANTH Course 3 

28 29 
Departments, Programs and Curricula / 93 



Typical Sophomore Year 

APDS 103 3 

PSYC Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

APDS 210 3 

APDS 237 2 

APDS 211 3 

APDS 230 3 

EDIN 134 3 

General University Requirement 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

Typical Junior Year 29 

General University Requirement 6 

ECON 205 3 

APDS 320 3 

APDS 330 3 

ARTH 450 or other upper level Art Hist 3 

APDS 331 3 

APDS 332 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

General University Requirement 6 

Typical Senior Year 30 

APDS 430 3 

APDS 337 2 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

Elective 3 

APDS 380 2 

APDS 431 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

Elective 5 

General University Requirement 3 

31 
Costume Curriculum 

Typical Freshman Year 

APDS 101 3 

ARTS 1 108 3 

General University Requirement 6 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

APDS 102 3 

APDS 210 3 

General University Requirement 6 

SOCY or ANTH Course 3 

Typical Sophomore Year 30 

APDS 103 3 

APDS 211 3 

SPEECH Course 2-3 

General University Requirement 6 

APDS 220 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

APDS 330 or substitution 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Elective 3 

Typical Junior Year 29-30 

APDS 320 3 

APDS 237 2 

PSYC Course 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

APDS 331 or substitution 3 

APDS 321 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

General University Requirement 3 

ECON 205 3 

Supporting Course 3 

32 



Typical Senior Year 

APDS 322 4 

APDS 332 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

APDS 380 2 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 2 

29 
Crafts Curriculum 

Typical Freshman Year 

APDS 101 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

General University Requirement 6 

PSYC Course 3 

APDS 102 3 

General University Requirement 3 

SOCY or ANTH Course 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

APDS 210 3 

Typical Sophomore Year 30 

APDS 103 3 

EDIN 102 3 

General University Requirement 6 

Elective 3 

APDS 211 3 

CRAF 240 3 

SPEECH Course 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Typical Junior Year 30 

CRAF 220 3 

CRAF 241 3 

APDS 230 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

CRAF 230 3 

CRAF 320 3 

APDS 237 2 

ECON 205 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Elective 2-3 

Typical Senior Year 31-32 

CRAF 330 3 

CRAF 420 3 

CRAF 428 or 438 or 448 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

APDS 380 (CRAF Section) 2 

CRAF 428 or 438 or 448 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

CRAFTS Elective 3 

General University Requirement 3 

29 
Housing Curriculum 

Typical Freshman Year 

APDS 101 3 

SPEECH Course 2-3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

SOCY or ANTH Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

APDS 102 3 

APDS 210 3 

TEXT 150 3 



PSYC Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

29 30 

Typical Sophomore Year 

APDS 103 3 

HSAD 240 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

HSAD 246 3 

General University Requirement 3 

HSAD 241 3 

General University Requirement 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

PSYC 221 3 

General University Requirement 3 

30 
Typical Junior Year 

HSAD 342 3 

FMCD 260 or substitution 3 

General University Requirement 6 

TXAP 221 or TEXT 355 3 

HSAD 343 3 

SOCY 230 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Elective 3 

30 
Typical Senior Year 

FMCD 330 3 

ECON 205 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

Elective 3 

FMCD 332 3 

HSAD 442 3 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 1 

31 
Interior Design Curriculum 

(Interior Design courses must be taken in sequence.) 
Typical Freshman Year 

APDS 101 3 

General University Requirement 3 

EDIN 101A 2 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

SOCY or ANTH Course 3 

General University Requirement 6 

APDS 102 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

APDS 210 3 

2a 

Typical Sophomore Year 

APDS 103 3 

SPEECH Course 2-3 

APDS 237 2 

HSAD 246 3 

General University Requirement 6 

ECON 205 3 

PSYC Course 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 3 

Geneial University Requirement 6 

31 32 
Typical Junior Year 

TEXT 150 3 

HSAD 340 3 



94 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



MSAO 342 

Ganaral Univeriily Requliemeni 

Suppoclino-Block CourM 

HSAD 341 

MSAO 343 

G«ne>al Univctiily Raquiremeni 
SuppoilingBlock Couisa 
ARTH Elective 



Typical Senior Year 

HSAD 344 

TEXT 463 

Supporling-Block Cours* 
General Unlvertlly Requlrament 

Elective 

HSAD 345 or 380 

HSAO 440 
HSAD 441 
Eleclivo 



3 4 



29 30 

r Cod. Pt.f....-*PDS Cn*F MSAD 

Industrial Education 

Professor and Chairman: Maley. 
Professors Harrison. Luetkemeyer. 
Associate Professors: Beatly, Crosby, Mietus, 
Stough, Tierney. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Burkart, Gelina. 
Herschbach. 

Instructors: Gemmill. Giblin. Hastings, Lloyd, 
Rickerl. Starkweather. Vaglia. 
The Department of Industrial Education offers pro- 
grams leading to teacher certification in industrial 
arts and vocational-industrial education. It also 
offers a program in education for industry which 
prepares individuals for supervisory and industrial 
management positions, and an industrial technology 
program for persons with advanced technical 
preparation who wish to teach in technical institutes 
or junior colleges. 

Three curricula are administered by the Industrial 
Education Department: (1) Vocational-Industrial 
Education. (2) Industrial Arts Education and (3) Edu- 
cation for Industry. The overall offering includes 
t>oth undergraduate and graduate programs leading 
to the degrees of: Bachelor of Science. Master of 
Education. Master of Arts, Doctor of Education, and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

The vocational-industrial curriculum may lead 
either to certification as a vocational-industrial 
teacher with no degree involved or to a Bachelor 
of Science degree, including certification. The 
University of Maryland is designated as the institu- 
tion which shall offer the Trade and Industrial" 
certification courses and hence the courses which 
are offered are those required for certification in 
Maryland. The vocational-industrial curriculum re- 
quires trade competence as specified by the Mary- 
land State Plan for Vocational Education. A person 
who aspires to be certified should review the State 
plan and may well contact Maryland State Depart- 



ment of Education officials. If the person has In 
mind teaching in a designated city or county, he 
may discuss his plans with the vocational-industrial 
official of that city or county inasmuch as there 
are variations in employments and training pro- 
cedures. 

Industrial Arts Education. The Industrial Arts Educa- 
tion curriculum prepares persons to teach industrial 
arts at the secondary school level. It is a four- 
year program leading to a Bachelor of Science 
degree. While trade or industrial experience con- 
tributes significantly to the background of the 
industrial arts teacher, previous work experience is 
not a condition of entrance into this curriculum. 
Students who are enrolled in the curriculum are 
encouraged to obtain work in industry during the 
summer months. Industrial arts as a secondary 
school subject area is a part of the general educa- 
tion program characterized by extensive laboratory 
experiences. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

General University Requirements 

CHEM 102 or 103 — General Chemistry 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

EDIN 101 — Mechanical Drawing 

EDIN 102 — Elementary Woodworking 

EDIN 112— Shop Calculations 

EDIN 262 — Machine Shop Practice . . . 

EDIN 121 — Mechanical Drawing 

EDIN 122— Machine Woods I 

ED'N 134 — Graphic Arts 



Semester 



Total 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

General University Requirements 

PHYS 111 or 112— Elements of Physics 
EDIN 127— Elec -Electronics I 

EDIN 133 — Power Transportation 

EDIN 241 — Architectural Drawing 

ECON 205 — Fund of Economics 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 

EDIN 247- Elec.-Electronics I 

EDIN 223— Arc and Gas Welding 

EDIN 210— Foundry 

Total 



EOIN 464 — Shop Organization and 
Management 

EOIN Elective 

EDIN 466 — Ed Foundalioni of Ind ArU 

Tolnl 



JUNIOR YEAR 

General University Requirements (upper 

level) 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and 

Learning 

EDIN 226 — General Metals 

EDIN Elective (Laboratory) 

EDSF 301 — Found, of Education 

EDIN 311 — Lab Practicum in Ind. Arts . 
EDIN 450 — Training Aids Development . 



Total 



SENIOR YEAR 

EDIN 340 — Cur . Instr.. & Obser> 

ED'N 347 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools - . . 
EDSE 330 — Pnn & Methods of 

Secondary Education 



14 



15 



Vocational-lnduatrial Education. The vocational- 
industrial curriculum is a four-year program of 
studies leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
education. It is intended to develop the necessary 
competencies for the effective performance of 
the tasks of a vocational teacher. In addition to 
establishing the adequacy of the student's skills in 
a particular trade and the development of Instruc- 
tional efficiency, the curriculum aims at the 
professional and cultural development of the indi- 
vidual. Courses are included which would enrich the 
person's scientific, economic, psychological and 
sociological understandings. The vocational- 
certification courses for the State of Maryland are a 
part of the curriculum requirements. 

Persons pursuing this curriculum must present 
documentary evidence of having an apprenticeship 
or comparable learning period and journeyman 
experience. This evidence of background and 
training is necessary in order that the trade examina- 
tion phase of the curriculum may be accomplished. 

Persons having completed the necessary certi- 
fication courses prior to working on the degree 
program may use such courses toward meeting 
graduation requirements. However, after certification 
course requirements have been met, persons con- 
tinuing studies toward a degree must take courses 
in line with the curriculum plan and University regu- 
lations. For example, junior level courses cannot 
be taken until the student has reached full junior 
standing. 

Ser»7esfer 



// 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

General University Requirement 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 

EDIN 112 — Shop Calculations 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 

or 
MATH 105 — Fundamentals ol Mathematics 

Total 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

General University Requirement 

Physical Sciences 

PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology 

CHEM 103 or equivalent 

EDIN Elective (Laboratory) 

Total 

Trade Examination 

JUNIOR YEAR 

EDIN 450 — Training Aids 

EDIN 465 — Modem Industry 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and 
Learning 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 95 



2 13 

20 

Semester 



EDiN 462 — Occupational Analysis and 
Coufse Conslruction 3 

General University Requirement (upper 

level) 3 3 

EDIN 471 — Principles and History of 
Vocational Education 3 

EDIN 357 — Tests and Measurements 3 

EDIN Elective (Professional) 3 

Total 15 15 

Semester 
SENIOR YEAR ' « 

EDIN 350— ftflethods of Teacfiing 3 

EDSE 330 — Principles and fWlethods of 

Secondary Education 3 

EDIN 347— Student Teacfiing in 

Secondary Scfiools 8 

EDIN Electives (Professional) 6 

EDSF 301 — Social Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDIN 464 — Shop Organization and 

(Management 3 

General University Requirement (upper 

level) 3 

Total 14 15 

•StudenI Teaching HequitemenI In Vocational Education, 

Persons currently teaching in ttie secondary 
schools with three or more years of satisfactory 
experience at that level are not required to take 
EDIN 347 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools. 
Evidence of satisfactory teaching experience shall 
be presented in the form of written statements 
from the principal area supervisor and department 
head in the school where such teaching is done. 
Instead of the eight credits required for student 
teaching, the individual meeting the above qualifi- 
cations will have eight additional semester hours 
of elective credits. 

Elective Credits. Courses in history and philosophy 
of education, sociology, speech, psychology, eco- 
nomics, business administration and other allied 
areas may be taken with the permission of the 
student's advisor. 

Elective courses in the technical area (shop and 
drawing) will be limited to courses and subjects 
not covered in the trade training experience. 
Courses dealing with advanced technology and re- 
cent improvements in field practices will be 
acceptable. 

Vocational-Industrial Certification. A person to 
become certified as a trade industrial and service 
occupations teacher in the State of IVIaryland must 
successfully complete 18 credit hours of instruction. 

The following courses must be included in the 
18 credit hours of instruction: 
EDIN 350— tvlettiods of Teaching 
EDIN 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management 
EDIN 457 — Tests and IVIeasurements 
EDIN 462 — Occupational Analysis and Course 

Construction 



The remainder of the credit hours shall be met 
through the election of the following courses: 
EDIN 450 — Training Aids Development 
EDIN 461 — Principles of Vocational Guidance 
EDIN 465 — lulodern Industry 
EDIN 471 — History and Principles of Vocational 

Education 
EDCP 410 — Introduction to Counseling and Personnel 

Services 
EDCP 411 — Ivlental Hygiene in the Classroom 
Educational Psychology or its equivalent 

A person in Vocational-Industrial Education may 
use his certification courses toward a Bachelor of 
Science degree. In doing so the general require- 
ments of the University and his college must be 
met. A maximum of 20 semester hours of credit 
may be earned through examination in the trade in 
which the student has competence. Prior to taking 
the examination, the student shall provide docu- 
mentary evidence of his apprenticeship or learning 
period and journeyman experience. For further 
information about credit by examination refer to the 
academic regulations. 

Education For Industry. The Education for Industry 
curriculum is a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree. The purpose of the 
program is to prepare persons for jobs within 
industry and, as such, it embraces four major areas 
of competence: (a) technical competence, (b) hu- 
man relations and leadership competence, (c) com- 
munications competence, and (d) social and civic 
competence. 

Semester 
FRESHfVIAN YEAR / // 

General University Requirement 6 6 

SOCY 100 — Sociology of American Life 3 

EDIN 101 — IVIechanical Drawing I or 

(Transfr) 2 

EDIN 112— Shop Calculations or (Transfr) 3 

EDIN 121 — tvlechanical Drawing II 2 

EDIN 122— Woodworking II 
or 

EDIN 127— Electricity-Electronics I 3 

EDIN 223— Arc and Gas Welding 1 

EDIN 262 — Machine Shop Practice I 3 

EDIN 210— Foundry 1 

MATH llO^lntroduction to Mathematics 

or 
MATH 115 — Introductory Analysis 3 

Total 17 16 

Semester 
SOPHOMORE YEAR / h 

General University Requirement 3 € 

EDIN 124— Sheet Metal Work 2 

BSAD 110 — Business Enterprise 3 

SPCH 107— Public Speaking 2 

PHYS 111-112— Elements of Physics 
(Mechanics and Heat and Sound), 
(Magnetism, Electricity and Optics) .3 3 

or 
PHYS 121-122— Fundamentals of Physics 
(Mechanics and Heat), (Sound, Optics, 
Magnetism, Electricity) 4 4 



ECON 201 — Principles of Economics 

or 
ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 3 
PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology . . 3 

EDIN 184 — Organized and Supervised 
Work Experience' 3 

Total 17-18 14-15 

Semester 

JUNIOR YEAR / // 

General University Requirement (upper 

level) 3 3 

PSYC 361 — Survey of Industrial 

Psychology 3 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 4 

EDIN Elective 2 

EDIN Shop Elective or (Transfr) .... 2 

EDIN 324 — Organized and Supervised 

Work Experience* 3 

EDIN 443— Industrial Safety Education I . 2 

444 — Industrial Safety Education II . . 2 

BSAD 360 — Personnel Management 3 

SOCY 462 — Industrial Sociology 3 

•• 3 3 

Total 20 16 

Semester 
SENIOR YEAR / // 

General University Requirement (upper 

level) 3 

BSAD 362— Industrial Relations 3 

BSAD 385 — Production Management 3 

EDIN 465— Modern Industry 

or 
EDIN 425 — Industrial Training in Industry 

or 
EDIN 475 — Recent Technological Develop- 
ments in Products and Processes .... 3 3 

EDIN Elective 2 

EDIN Shop Elective or (Transfr) 2 

•• 6 3 

Total 15 13 

•Summer Session 

"Trnstr" relefs to technical credit to be transferred by A. A. degree 

'refers to technical credit for A. A. degree students or Option 

Courses for regular students. 

Further Information on option courses Is available In the Industrial 

Education Department 

Information Systems Management 

Chairman: Courtright. 

Professor: Sibley. 

Assistant Professors: Sayani, Testa. 

Instructors: Chappell, Deutsch, Smith. 

Lecturers: Golding, Lemmer. 

The program of studies in information systems man- 
agement is designed to meet the needs of those 
wishing to concentrate on the application of the 
digital computer to the analysis, design and admin- 
istration of information systems. Students 
who expect to enter business administration, public 
administration or organizations in other fields will 
find that this program offers a relevant preparation. 

The student entering this program will place 
emphasis on the study of digital computer applica- 
tions, relevant organizational and social implica- 



96 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



tions. and mathematical methods. With the aid ot a 
faculty advisor, the student may wish to develop 
a secondary lield ot interest such as business and 
management administration, computer science, 
economics, mathematics, psychology, public ad- 
ministration, the social sciences, or related areas o( 
his choice. 

Information Systems Management Curriculum. For 

students enrolled under General University 
Requirements. 

Semester 
FRESHMAN YEAR ' /' 

MATH 140 141— Analysis I and II 4 4 

General University Requirements 9 9 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 16 

Semester 

SOPHOMORE YEAR / II 

eSAD 220. 221— Principles of Accounting 3 3 

ECON 201, 203 — Principles of Economics 3 3 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

CMSC 103 or 110 — Introductory Algorithmic 

Methods or Elementary Algorithmic 

Analysis 3 

BSAD 231 — Business Statistics I 3 

General University Requirements 3 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 15 

Semester 
JUNIOR YEAR ' " 

IFSM 401— Electronic Data Processing . . 3 
IFSM 402 — Electronic Data Processing 

Applications 3 

BSAD 434 — Operations Research I 3 

eSAD 435 — Operations Research II 3 

BSAD 430 — Linear Statistical Models in 

Business 3 

ECON 401. 403. 430, or 440 (any two) . 3 3 

General University Requirements 3 6 

Total 15 15 

Semesrer 
SENIOR YEAR / '/ 

IFSM 410 — Information Processing 

Problems of Models of Administrative. 

Economic, and Political Systems 3 

IFSM 436 — Introduction to Systems 

Analysis 3 

IFSM 420 — Information Processing and 

Computational Problems in 

Operations Analysis 3 

BSAD 436 — Topics in Statistical Analysis 

lor Business and Management 3 

Electives 9 6 

Total 15 12 

Cotjrs* CCHle Prari>— IFSU 

Japanese Program 

Instructor: Higuchi. 

Three semesters of Japanese are now offered. The 
approach is audio-lingual and communication 
oriented. The courses are open to all students in- 
terested in Japanese and East Asian studies. 

Cour>« Code — JAPN 



College of Journalism 

Prolessor and Dean Hiebert. 

Professors: Bryan, Crowell. Martin, Newsom. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Grunig, Sommer. 

Assistant Professors: Flippen. Geraci, Hoyf, 

Lee, Petrick, 

Lecturers: Dawson (PT), Hymes (PT). 

Requirements For The Journalism Major. The re- 
quirements lor graduation are given below: 

I. General University Requirements. 

II. College Requirements: 

A. MATH 1 10 (or other higher MATH course ap- 
proved by advisor). 

B. Foreign Language; through intermediate level 
(104 or 115). 

C. Speech Communication (three credits; oral 
communication preferred). 

D. Social Sciences (twelve credits; a minimum of 
three credits in each of the following categories). 

1 . Sociology or Anthropology (preferably social 
problems or organization). 

2. Psychology (preferably general principles or 
social). 

3. Economics (preferably general principles). 

4. Government and Politics (preferably Ameri- 
can government or principles of government). 

III. Professional Requirements: 

(Note: Typing ability and English language pro- 
ficiency are required of all students. Majors must 
maintain a "C" average in courses taken in the Col- 
lege. Students must receive at least a "C" in 
Journalism 200 and 201 before they will be allowed 
to major in Journalism). 

JOUR 200 and 201 are required of all Journalism 
majors. In addition, 24 credit hours in upper division 
journalism courses, including JOUR 310, News 
Editing, are required. 

At least six credit hours should be taken in one 
of the following sequences for depth in a special 
field of journalism: 
JOUR 320 and 321— News Editorial. 
JOUR 330 and 331 — Public Relations. 
JOUR 340 and 341 — Advertising. 
JOUR 350 and 351 — News Photography. 
JOUR 360 and 361— News Broadcasting. 

All journalism majors should elect at least six 
credit hours from the following courses for breadth 
in mass communication: 
JOUR 400 — Law of Mass Communication. 
JOUR 410 — History of Mass Communication. 
JOUR 420 — Government and Mass Communication. 
JOUR 430 — Comparative Mass Communication Systems. 
JOUR 440 — Public Opinion and Mass Communication. 

IV. Non-Journalism Requirements: 

12-18 credit hours in upper-division courses in one 
subject outside of the College of Journalism. 

12-18 credit hours of upper-division, non-journalism 
electives, to be spread or concentrated according 
to individual needs. 



Minimum upper-division credits lor graduation. . 57 
Total Lower and Upper-Division 120 

Library Science Education Curriculum 
Professor: James. 
Assistant Prolesor: Lukenbill. 

All students anticipating work in library science 
education should consult with advisors in this area 
at the beginning ol the freshman year Students en- 
rolled in this curriculum will pursue a Bachelor of 
Arts degree with an area of concentration of 36 hours 
in one of the following: humanities, social sciences, 
science, or foreign languages. Students may con- 
centrate in a subject area subsumed under one of 
these four fields, or they may choose a broad 
spectrum of courses in one of the lour areas under 
the guidance of their advisors. The minor of 18 
hours will be library science education. 

Students in library science education will com- 
plete eight semester hours in Directed Library 
Experience as their student teaching requirement. It 
will involve two and a half days per week, lor 16 
weeks. This period will be divided into two sections, 
with eight weeks in a secondary school. A con- 
current weekly seminar will also be a part of this 
experience. Students completing this curriculum 
will be eligible for certification as elementary or 
secondary school librarians. 

1973-1974 Library Science Degree Plan 

Semester 

FRESHMAN YEAR / " 

General University Requirements 6 6 

SPCH 100— Public Speaking 3 

Electives 6 3 

Area of Concentration 6 

Total 15 15 

Semester 
SOPHOMORE YEAR / II 

General University Requirements 6 3 

Electives 3 3 

Area of Concentration 6 9 

Total 15 15 

Semesfer 
JUNIOR YEAR ' " 

General University Requirements (300 and 

above level) 3 6 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

EDAD 370 — Introduction to Librarianship 3 
EDAD 371 — Basic Reference and 

Information Sources 3 

EDAD 372 — Cataloging and Classification 

ol Library Materials 3 

EDAD 373 — Library Materials for 

Children 3 

Total 15 15 

Semester 
SENIOR YEAR / " 

Area of Concentration 12 3 

EDSF 301 — Foundations ol Education ... 3 

EDAD 374 — Library Materials for Youth .... 3 

Departments, Programs and Curricula / 97 



EDAD 375 — School Library Administration 
and Service 

EDAD 334 — Directed Library Experiences 
in Elementary Sctiools with seminar . . 

EDAD 335 — Directed Library Experience 
in Secondary Schools with seminar . . . 



Total 



Linguistics Program 

Associate Professor and Director: Dingwall. 
Assistant Professor: Fidelholtz. 
The program in linguistics is designed to provide 
students with a comprehensive and consistent view 
of the accomplishments, methodology and problems 
of modern linguistic science which has as its aim 
the explication of the facts of specific natural 
languages as well as of natural language in gen- 
eral. While any educated man will benefit from an 
understanding of the structure and development of 
language, those who expect to become scholars 
and teachers of anthropology, English, foreign 
languages, philosophy, psychology, or speech will 
find a background in linguistics invaluable. Although 
there is not an undergraduate major in linguistics 
at this time, courses in linguistics may be used to 
fulfill the supporting course requirements in some 
programs leading to the B.A. or B.S. degree. 

Course Code Prel.)i — LING 

Materials Research 

Director: Lippincott. 
Associate Director: Brasch. 

Advisory Committee: Ginter (Institute for Molecular 
Physics), Walters (Chemistry). Lin (Electrical Engi- 
neering), Minkiewicz (Physics and Astronomy), 
Marcinkowski (Mechanical Engineering), Silverman 
MPES Division (Chemical Engineering), Bolsaitus 
(Chemical Engineering). 

The Center of Materials Research is an interde- 
partmental organization which has as its function 
the support of graduate research and education in 
the field of materials sciences. This support con- 
sists of funds for the aid of graduate students 
working towards advanced degrees, post-doctoral 
research appointments, the granting of research sup- 
port to university faculty working in the materials 
sciences and the purchases of capital equipment 
needs for graduate students or faculty research 
programs. It also operates service and research 
facilities which are shared jointly by graduate 
students and faculty from several departments. 

The scientific management of this program rests 
solely within the University through the Director 
of the Center of Materials Research, aided by an 
associate director and an Advisory Committee. 
Faculty participating in the program represent the 
following departments: Chemical Engineering, 
Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Horticulture, 



Mechanical Engineering, Molecular Physics, and 
Physics. 

Funds for the Center come from both University 
and government sources, the largest single source 
being the National Science Foundation. Individual 
faculty members obtain NSF support for their re- 
search when their proposals to the Center of 
Materials Research are approved by the CMR 
Committee and the Director. The nation's industry 
and defense needs have created a great demand 
for detailed knowledge of materials and their 
properties; for example, basic research in materials 
sciences is important if one is to prevent failure of 
material components in anything from relatively 
simple automobile or airplane parts or a biomaterials 
component associated with a kidney transplant. 
The University thus has a role in educating stu- 
dents for advanced degrees, both in research and 
in training, who have both the knowledge and the 
expertise to work with and use the sophisticated 
materials now so commonplace in our modern 
technology. 

Areas of research activity include high pressure 
phenomena; intermolecular interactions; spectra 
and structural studies; electronic and mechanical 
properties of materials; electronic structure and 
fundamental interactions in solids, interaction of 
radiation with materials; mechanical properties such 
as defect and dislocation phenomena, and char- 
acterization of materials; neutron scattering and 
diffraction; metallurgy and materials properties of 
polymers. 

The program is interdisciplinary in nature since it 
cuts across the normal departmental lines to bring 
many disciplines to bear on the complex nature 
of the many materials problems. 

The CMR provides central facilities containing 
the most modern available instrumentation for use 
by participating members of the Center. The facilities 
include: X-Ray Photo-Electron Spectroscopy; Elec- 
tron Microscope; X-Ray; Molecular Spectroscopy; 
Sample Preparation; Coordinated Laser; Crystal 
Growth; Mechanical Testing; High Field Supercon- 
ducting Magnet. 

IVIathematics 

Professor and Cliairman: Goldhaber. 
Professors: Adams, Antman, Auslander, 
Benedetto, Brace, Chu, Correl, Douglis. 
Edmundson,' Ehrlich, Goldberg, Goldstein, Good, 
Gray, L. Greenberg. Gulick, Heins, Horvath, Hummel. 
Jackson, Kirwan, Kleppner, Kubota. Lehner. 
Lipsman, Lopez-Escobar, Maltese, Mikulski, 
Ortega,'" Pearl, Reinhart. Rheinboldt,' 
Stellmacher, Strauss, Syski, Vesentini, Zedek. 
Associate Professors: Alexander, Berg, Bernstein, 
Cook, Cooper, Dancis, Ellis. Fey," Green, Helzer, 
Henkelman." Johnson, Lay, Markley, Neri, Osborn, 
Owings, Sather, Schafer, Schneider, Warner, 



Wolfe, Yang, Zaicman. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Berenstein, 

Currier, Davidson," Fay, Fields, R. Greenberg, 

Halperin. W. Hill, Liu. Mucci, Nagarsenker, Niebur, 

Schmidt, Shepherd, Smith, Sweet. Winkelnkemper. 

Instructors: Brown, Chernjck, Hildenbrand, 

Kilbourn, Lepson, Locksley, McClay, Meyers, 

Sorensen, Steely, Wagner. 

Faculty Research Assistants: R. Hill, Dribin. 

* Joint Appoinlmenl: Computer Science Center. 
"Joint Appointment: Department ol Secondary Education. 
■•■Joint Appointment- Computer Science Center and IFDAM. 

The program in mathematics leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Mathematics offers stu- 
dents training in mathematics in preparation for 
graduate work, teaching and positions in govern- 
ment or industry. 

A student intending to major in mathematics 
should complete the introductory sequence MATH 
140, 141, 240, 241 or the corresponding honors 
sequence MATH 150, 151, 250, 251 and should have 
an average grade of at least B in these courses. 

A mathematics major is required to complete 
with at least a grade of C MATH 403, 410, 411, and 
one of MATH 240, 400, 405. A total of eight upper 
division courses (24 credits) in mathematics or 
statistics With a grade of at least C is required. 

The requirements are detailed in a departmental 
brochure which is available through the Under- 
graduate Mathematics Office. Appropriate courses 
taken at other universities or through University 
College may be used to fulfill these requirements, 
but at least four of the eight required upper division 
mathematics courses must be taken in the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics. 

In addition to the above, a mathematics major 
must include at least 10 credit hours of science 
supporting course work with a grade average of 
at least "C. " A list of approved science sequences 
may be obtained from the Mathematics Under- 
graduate Office. 

The following sample programs are illustrative; 
variations are possible. 

1 . Emphasis on computational mathematics: 
Math 140-241, Math474. 475. 405, 410, 411, 470, 

414, 415, 444, 477. Supporting area: CMSC 110 (as 
early as possible), CMSC 210, 420, 440. 

2. Preparation lor secondary teaching: Math 
140-241; Math 410. 411, 402, or 403, 450. 430 or 431, 
470, or 444, 406, or Stat 400 EDSE 372. Supporting 
area: EDUC 300, 301. EDSE 350, and 330. Immedi- 
ately after completing at least 42 credits, the student 
must apply for and be admitted to teacher education. 

3. Preparation lor graduate work in Mathe- 
matics: Math 140-241; Math 410. 411, 403. second 
semester of 403 or 405, 413 (or 660), 432 (or 730). At 
least two additional courses chosen from Math 414, 

415. 416, 417, 433, 436, 446. 447, 470; Stat 410, 
41 1 , 420; or graduate courses in Math. 



98 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



4 Pieparation lor employment upon gradua- 
tion Prospective employers look lor applied course 
work. For courses in this area statistics courses at 
the 400 level should be considered as well as Math 
401. 413. 414. 463. 470. 415. and 472. To prepare (or 
employment, in most cases, some background in 
computer science is recommended. 

5. Suggested course combinations in statistics: 
For a student with a B A. seeking work requiring 
some statistical background, the minimal program is 
Stat 400-401. To work primarily as a statistician. 
one should combine Stat 400-401 with at least one 
more statistics course, most suitably Slat 450. A 
stronger sequence is Stat 410-420-421-450. This 
offers a better understanding and wider knowledge 
ol statistics and is a general purpose program 
(i.e. does not specify one area of applications). For 
economics applications Stat 400-401-450-477 
should be considered. For operations research 
Stat 477 and/or 411 should be added or perhaps 
substituted for Stat 450. To prepare for graduate 
work. Stat 410-420-421 give the best background, 
with Stat 41 1 . 450 and 477 added at some later stage. 

Since most of the non-English mathematical lit- 
erature is written in French. German or Russian. 
students intending to continue studying mathematics 
in graduate school should obtain a reading 
knowledge of at least one of these languages. 

Honors in Mathematics. The (Mathematics Honors 
Program is designed for students showing excep- 
tional ability and interest in mathematics. Its aim is 
to give a student the best possible mathematical 
education. Participants are selected by the Depart- 
mental Honors Committee during the first semester 
of their junior year. To graduate with honors in 
mathematics they must take four credits of (MATH 
398 and pass a final written and oral comprehensive 
examination. A graduate course of three credits of 
independent study may be substituted for two 
credits of MATH 398. The rest of the program is 
flexible. Independent work is encouraged and can be 
done in place of formal course work. A student 
need not maior in mathematics to participate in the 
honors program. 

The Mathematics Department also offers a special 
Mathematics Departmental honors calculus se- 
quence (MATH 150. 151. 250. 251) for promising 
freshmen with a strong mathematical background 
(usually including calculus). Enrollment in the 
sequence is normally by invitation but any interested 
student may apply to the Mathematics Depart- 
mental Honors Committee for admission. 

Participants in the General Honors Program may 
enroll in special honors sections of the regular 
calculus sequence (MATH 140H. 141H. 240H. 241H). 
They may enroll in the honors calculus sequence 
if invited by the Mathematics Departmental Honors 
Committee. However, the Mathematics Departmental 



Honors calculus sequence and the General Honors 
Program are distinct, and enrollment in one does 
not imply acceptance in the other. 

Neither honors calculus sequence is prerequisite 
lor participating in the Mathematics Honors Pro- 
gram, and students in these sequences need not be 
mathematics majors. 

Pi Mu Epsilon. The local chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon, 
national honorary mathematics fraternity, meets 
frequently to discuss mathematical or educational 
topics of interest to undergraduates. The programs 
are open to the public. 

Placement in Mathematics Courses. The department 
has a large offering to accommodate a great variety 
of backgrounds, interests and abilities. The de- 
partment permits a student to take any course for 
which he has the appropriate background regard- 
less of formal course work. For example, a student 
with a high school calculus course may be per- 
mitted to begin in the middle of the calculus 
sequence even if he does not have advanced stand- 
ing. Students may obtain undergraduate credit 
for mathematics courses in any of the following 
ways: passing the appropriate CEEB Advanced 
Placement examination, passing standardized CLEP 
examinations, and through the department's Credit- 
by-Examination. Students are urged to consult 
with advisors from the Mathematics Department 
to assist with proper placements. 

Course Code Preft>es— MITH STAT 

Measurements and Statistics 

Protessor and Department Chairman: Giblette. 
Prolessors: Dayton, Stunkard. 
Associate Prolessors: Johnson, Schafer, Sedlacek. 
Assistant Prolessors: Rogers, Macready. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
Programs available in the Department of Measure- 
ment and Statistics lead to the Master of Arts degree 
(thesis or non-thesis option) and to the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. In addition to the general 
masters degree, three specialist programs are 
available: evaluation specialist, statistical analysis 
specialist, and measurement specialist. Potential 
iob placements include: evaluators of various 
projects in curriculum offices in state or county 
school systems: federal projects: government statis- 
tical positions, private research organizations: 
testing specialists in government, state and local 
school systems, and private test construction organi- 
zations. The doctoral program is intended to 
produce persons qualified to: teach at the college 
level in the field of educational measurement and 
research methodology: conduct research studies in 
the field of education: advise in the conduct of re- 
search studies: and administer programs in the 
above areas. 



Persons interested in majoring in the Department 
must display above average aptitude and interest 
in quantitative methods as applied in the behavioral 
sciences. 

C(ui.« Coo. c.ff . 1 : 1.I-. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Chairman: Dally. 

Prolessors: Allen. Anand. Armstrong, Asimow, 
Berger, Cunniff, Hsu, Jackson, MarcinkowskI, 
Sayre, Jr., Shreeve. Jr., Talaal, Weske (Emeritus), 
Wockenfuss, Yang. 

-4ssoc/afe Prolessors: Buckley, Jr., Hayleck, Jr., 
Fourney. Marks. Morse. Sallet. Walston. 
Assistant Prolessors: Andry, Jr., Holloway, Hurdis, 
Kirk. Kobayashi, Owens. Sargent, Scheffler, Tsui. 
Lecturer: Seigel. 

Instructors (Part-time): Hagner. Whitbeck. 
Assistant Instructors: Keydel. Lomas. McKindra, 
Thomson. 

Visiting Prolessor: Irwin. 
Visiting Assistant Prolessors: Sadananda, Wu. 
The primary function of the mechanical engineer is 
to create devices, machines, structures or processes 
which are used to advance the welfare of man- 
kind. Design, analysis and testing are the essential 
steps in these developments. Of particular im- 
portance are the aspects of engineering science 
and art relating to the generation and transmission 
of mechanical power, the establishment of both ex- 
perimental and theoretical models of mechanical 
systems, the static and dynamic behavior of fluids 
and the optimization of materials in design. 
Emphasis is also given to the proper co-ordination 
and management of facilities and personnel to 
achieve a successful product or service. 

The responsibility of the Mechanical Engineering 
profession is extremely broad. The following divi- 
sions of the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers indicate many of the technical areas in 
which the mechanical engineer may work: air pollu- 
tion, applied mechanics, automatic controls, aviation 
and space, biomechanical and human factors, de- 
sign engineering, diesel and gas engine power, 
energetics, fluids engineering, fuels, gas turbine, 
heat transfer, management, materials handling, 
metals engineering, nuclear engineering, petroleum, 
power, pressure vessels and piping, process indus- 
tries, railroad, rubber and plastics, safety, solar 
energy, textiles and underwater technology. 

There are many career opportunities in all o( 
these fields. In particular, the areas of design, sys- 
tems analysis, management, consulting, research, 
maintenance, production, teaching and sales offer 
challenging and rewarding futures. 

Because of the wide variety of professional oppor- 
tunities available to the mechanical engineer, the 
curriculum is designed to provide the student with 
a thorough training in basic fundamentals including 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 99 



physics, chemistry, mathematics, mechanics, thermo- 
dynamics, materials, heat transfer, electronics, 
power and design. The curriculum leads to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in l\/lechanical Engi- 
neering which is usually sufficient for early career 
opportunities in industry or the government. Ad- 
vanced graduate programs are available for con- 
tinued study leading to Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 

Basic Freshman Year Semester 

Course No. and Title ' " 

CHEM 103. 104 — General Chemistry* • ..4 4 

PHYS 161— General Physics I 3 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I. II 4 4 

ENES 101— Intro. Engr. Science 3 

ENES 110 — Mechanics 3 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

Students who are not prepared to schedule MATH 

140 are advised to register for a preparatory course 
— MATH 115 — as part of their General University 
Requirement. These students are also advised 

to attend summer school following their freshman 
year to complete MATH 141 and PHYS 161 prior to 
entrance Into the sophomore year of study. MATH 

141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for many 
courses required in the sophomore year. 

•■Qualilicd sludenls may elect to lake CHEM 105 and 106 (4 cr. hrs. 
each) instead ol CHEM 103 and 104. 

Semesrer 
SOPHOMORE YEAR / // 

General University Requirements 3 3 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262. 263 — General Physics II, III 4 4 

ENES 220 — Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENME 200 — Introduction to Mechanical 

Engineering 3 

ENME 216 — Thermodynamics I 3 

Total 17 16 

Semester 
JUNIOR YEAR / II 

General University Requirements 3 6 

ENEE 300 — Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 

ENEE 301— Electrical Engr. Lab 1 

ENME 300 — Materials Engineering 3 

ENME 301— Materials Engr. Lab 1 

ENME 321 — Transfer Processes 3 

ENME 342— Fluid Mechanics I 3 

ENME 343 — Fluid Mechanics Lab 1 

ENME 360 — Dynamics of Machinery .... 3 

ENME 381 — Measurements Laboratory .... 3 

ENME 382 — Engr. Anal, and Computer 

Programming 3 

Total 17 16 

Semester 

SENOR YEAR / // 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ENME 400 — Machine Design 3 

ENME 401 — Mechanical Engineering 

Analysis and Design 4 

100 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



ENME 421 — Energy Conversion I 3 

ENME 480 — Engineering Experimentation . . 3 

Technical Elective *6 '6 

Total 15 16 

'Except with the special pertnission of the Department Chairman, the 
students will be required to take 9 of the elective credits in the 
Engineering College, 6 of which must be in the Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Department. 

Technical Electives 

ENME 341 — Gas Dynamics 3 

ENME 380 — Applied Mathematics in Engr 3 

ENME 402 — Selected Topics in Engr. Design 3 

ENME 403 — Automatic Controls 3 

ENME 410 — Operations Research I 3 

ENME 411 — Introduction to Industrial Engineering ... 3 

ENME 414 — Solar Energy — Applications in Buildings . 3 

ENME 422 — Energy Conversion II 3 

ENME 423 — Environmental Engineering 3 

ENME 424 — Advanced Thermodynamics 3 

ENME 442— Fluid Mechanics II 3 

ENME 450 — Mechanical Engineering Analysis 

for the Oceanic Environment 3 

ENME 451 — Mechanical Engineering Systems 

for Underwater Operations 3 

ENME 452 — Physical and Dynamical Oceanography . . 3 

ENME 453 — Ocean Waves. Tides and Turbulences ... 3 

ENME 460 — Elasticity and Plasticity I 3 

ENME 461 — Dynamics II 3 

ENME 462 — Introduction to Engineering Acoustics ... 3 

ENME 463 — Mechanical Engineering Analysis 3 

ENME 465 — Introductory Fracture Mechanics 3 

ENME 481 — Engineering Experimentation 3 

ENME 488 — Special Problems 3 

ENME 489 — Special Topics in Mechanical 

Engineering 3 

In the Mechanical Engineering Department there 
are several divisions of specialization which in- 
clude: design and system analysis, energy conver- 
sion, solid and fluid mechanics and materials. The 
undergraduate student may select technical elec- 
tives from one or more of these areas of specializa- 
tion. Students planning to continue on in the 
graduate program should preferably choose 
electives to provide the best background for their 
major area. The subject material of interest to each 
field of specialization is: 

I. Industrial and Systems Engineering 

a. Systems design 

b. Systems analysis 

c. Operations research 

d. Engineering management 

II. Energy 

a. Thermodynamics 

b. Heat transfer 

c. Energy conversion 

d. Solar energy 

III. Fluid Mechanics 

a. Compressible and incompressible flow 

b. Viscous flow 

c. Hydrodynamics 

d. Marine and ocean engineering 



IV. Solid Mechanics 

a. Continuum mechanics 

b. Dynamics, vibrations and acoustics 

c. Elasticity, plasticity and viscoelasticity 

d. Plates, shells and structures 

e. Experimental mechanics 

V. Materials 

See listing under Engineering Materials 

section. 
Opportunities are also available for students to 
take advanced work in engineering management, 
operations research, marine and ocean engineering, 
bio-mechanical engineering, environmental engi- 
neering, acoustics, bio-mechanics and experimental 
stress analysis. 

Course Code Prefix— ENME 

Meteorology Program 

Professor and Director: Landsberg. 

Professor: Faller. 

Visiting Professor: Fritz. 

Associate Professors: Israel,' Rodenhuis, 

Thompson, Vernekar. 

Assistant Professor: Ellingson. 

Instructor: Li. 

Visiting Lectuerers: Bonner, Witting. 

Research Associate: Overcamp. 

Faculty Research Assistant: Kaylor. 



The program in Meteorology, part of the Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, offers 
a number of courses of interest to undergraduate 
students. 

These courses provide an excellent undergradu- 
ate background for those students who wish to do 
graduate work in the fields of atmospheric and 
oceanic science, meteorology, air pollution, and 
other environmental sciences. The interdisciplinary 
nature of studies in meteorology and oceanography 
assures that all science oriented students will gain 
a broadened view of physical science as a whole, 
as well as the manner in which the more pure 
sciences may be applied to understand the behavior 
of our environment. 

Because of its interdisciplinary nature the study 
of meteorology requires a firm background in the 
basic sciences of physics, chemistry and mathe- 
matics. For this reason it is inappropriate to offer a 
B.S. degree in Meteorology. Undergraduate stu- 
dents interested in pursuing a bachelor's degree 
program preparatory to further study or work in 
meteorology are urged to consider the Physical 
Sciences Program, in which they can include sev- 
eral courses in meteorology. 



Microbiology 

Chairman Young. 

Professors Colwell. Doelsch, Faber (Emeritus), 

Hetrick, Lalter, Pelczar. 

Associate Professors: Cook. MacQuillan. Roberson. 

Assistar)! Professors: Vailuzls. Voll. Weiner. 

Lecturer Janicki, Krichevsky, Stadtman. 

Instructor: Howell. 

The Department ol Microbiology has as its primary 
aim providing the student with thorough and rigor- 
ous training in microbiology. This entails knowledge 
ol the basic concepts of bacterial cytology, physi- 
ology, taxonomy, metabolism, and genetics, as well 
as an understanding ol the biology ol inlectious 
disease, immunology, general virology, and various 
applications ol microbiological principles to public 
health and industrial processes. In addition, the 
department pursues a broad and vigorous program 
ol basic research, and encourages original thought 
and investigation in the above-mentioned areas. 

The department also provides desirable courses 
lor students majoring in allied departments who 
wish to obtain vital, supplementary inlormatlon. 
Every elfort has been made to present the subject 
matter ol microbiology as a basic core ol material 
that IS pertinent to all biological sciences. 

The curriculum outlined below, which leads to a 
bachelor's degree, includes the basic courses in 
microbiology and allied fields. 

A student planning a maior in microbiology 
should consult his advisor during the first year. The 
supporting courses should be chosen only from 
the biological or physical sciences. 

No course with a grade less than C may be used 
to satisfy maior requirements. 

The department has an Honors Program, and in- 
formation concerning this program may be obtained 
Irom the department. 

Twenty-lour semester hours ol microbiology 
courses are required. This includes MICB 200 — Gen- 
eral Microbiology (4). and MICB 440 — Pathogenic 
Microbiology (4). At least sixteen additional semes- 
ter hours must be taken Irom: MICB 280 — Ecology 
and Microbial Genetics (3). MICB 290 — Applied 
Microbiology (4). MICB 300 — Microbiological Litera- 
ture (1). MICB 322— Microbiology and the Public 
(3), MICB 399— Microbiological Problems (3), 
Laboratory. MICB 450 — Immunology (4), MICB 460 — 
General Virology (4), MICB 470 — Microbial Physi- 
ology (4), and MICB 490 — Microbial Fermentations 
(2). MICB 491 — Microbial Fermentations Laboratory 
(2). Also required as supporting courses are: CHEM 
103, 194— College Chemistry I, II (4, 4). CHEM 201, 
202 — College Chemistry III and College Chemistry 
Laboratory III (3. 2), CHEM 203. 204— College Chem- 
istry IV and College Chemistry Laboratory IV (3, 2), 
CHEM 461, 462— Biochemistry (3. 3). MATH 110, 
1 11 — Introduction to Mathematics (3. 3) or equiva- 
lent, PHYS 121, 122— Fundamentals ol Physics 



(4,4), ZOOL 101— General Zoology (4), and lour 
additional semester hours ol biological sciences 
(MATH 220, 221— Introductory Calculus is recom- 
mended but not required.) 

c.uMo r V p„' , uirii 

Molecular Physics 

Professor and Director: Benesch. 
Professors: Benedict, Zwanzig.' 
Associate Professors: DeRocco, GInter, Krisher, 
Sengers. 

Visiting Associate Professor: Tillord. 
Assistant Professor: Gammon. 
/Research Associates: Covey, Cook. 
The Institute lor Molecular Physics serves as an 
ideal place to bring together physicists, chemists, 
engineers, etc. to work on problems ol mutual in- 
terest to the advantage ol both. The graduate degree 
program in Chemical Physics is administered 
lointly by the Institute and the Chemistry and 
Physics Departments. 

The current research activities Include theoretical 
and experimental studies in the broad fields of inter- 
molecular forces (equation ol state of liquids and 
gases, critical phenomena, transport phenomena 
In gases and plasmas, molecular collisions and scat- 
tering processes, biological systems), molecular 
structure (spectroscopy from the microwave to the 
vacuum ultraviolet, upper atmospheric and auroral 
phenomena, planetary atmospheres, potential energy 
curves, molecular quantum mechanics), chemical 
and physical kinetics, laser studies, statistical 
mechanics and biophysics. 

This broad range of Interests reflects the inter- 
disciplinary nature of both the Institute for Molecular 
Physics and the Chemical Physics program. All of 
the faculty members at the Institute are working in 
scientific areas which did not exist ten years ago. 
Accordingly, the students who are drawn to the 
Institute for training and research tend to be 
those who are Interested in problems which lie 
somewhat outside the more conventional disciplines. 
The programs are quite flexible with regard to con- 
tent and pace, and research groups often combine 
faculty and post-doctoral, graduate, and under- 
graduate students. 

' Joinl «ilh Fluid Dynamics 

Music 

Professor and Chairman: Troth. 

Professors: Berman. Bernstein, deVermond, Gordon, 

Grentzer, Helm. Helm, Hudson, Johnson, Moss, 

Taylor. Traver. Ulrich (Emeritus). 

Associate Professors: Blum, Fanos. Garvey, Head, 

Horton. McClelland. Meyer, Montgomery, 

Nossaman, Pennington, Schumacher, Serwer, 

Shelley, Springmann, True, Wakefield. 

Assistant Professors: Barnett. Bryn-Julson, Davis, 

Etheridge, Fleming. Gallagher. Gould, Haley, Kuhn, 

Olson, Payerle, Robinson, Seldler, Signell, Skldmore, 



Wachhaus, Wilson. 

tnstruclors: Beatty, Heath, Mueller, Roesner. 

The objectives ol the department are (1) to help the 
general student develop sound critical judgment 
and discriminating taste in the art ol music: (2) to 
provide prolessional musical training based on 
a loundation in the liberal arts: (3) to prepare 
students for graduate work in the field: and (4) to 
prepare them to teach music in the public schools. 
To these ends, two degrees are ollered: the Bachelor 
ol Music, with a major in theory, composition, 
history and literature, or music performance: and 
the Bachelor ol Arts, with a major in music. The 
Bachelor ol Science degree, with a major in music 
education, is ollered in the Department ol Secondary 
Education, In the College ol Education: course 
ollerings and degree programs are described In 
the sections relating to that department. This 
degree program, however, is administered within 
the Music Department. 

Courses in music theory, literature and music 
perlormance are open to all students who have 
completed the specilled prerequisites, or their 
equivalents, 11 teacher time and lacllities permit. The 
University Bands. Chamber Singers, Chapel Choir, 
Madrigal Singers, Orchestra, University Chorale, and 
University Chorus, as well as the smaller ensembles, 
are likewise open to all qualilied students. 

The Bachelor ol Music Degree. The curriculum lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Music is designed 
for students who wish to prepare lor music teaching 
on the college level. Pre-college experiences In 
music are expected. A list ol specilic courses is 
available In the departmental oflice. A grade ol C 
or above is required in each major course. 

Bachelor of Music (Pert.: Piano) 

Sample Program 
Freshman Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 108/109 2 2 

MUSC 131 3 

MUSC 150/151 3 3 

University and Division Requirements 
and Free Electives 6-8 9-11 

14-16 14-16 

Sophomore Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 208/209 4 4 

MUSC 106/107 2 2 

MUSC 250/251 4 4 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives . 4-6 4-6 

14-16 14-16 

Junior Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 408/409 4 4 

MUSC 330/331 3 3 

MUSC 450 3 

MUSC Elective - 2 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives 4-€ 5-7 

14-16 14-16 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 101 



Senior Year 

MUSC 418/419 

MUSC 460 

MUSC 470 

MUSC 467 

MUSC Elective 

University and Division Requirements 
and Free Electives 



Fall Spring 



14-16 14-16 



Bachelor of Music (Composition) 

Sample Program 
Frestiman Year Fall Sprmg 

MUSC 108/109 2 2 

MUSC 131 3 

MUSC 150/151 3 3 

University and Division Requirements 
and Free Electives 6-8 9-11 

14-16 14-16 

Soptiomore Year Fall Sprmg 

MUSC 208/209 2 2 

MUSC 106/107 2 2 

MUSC 250/251 4 4 

MUSC 478 2 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives 6-8 4-6 

14-16 14-16 

Junior Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 408 2 

MUSC 206/207 2 2 

MUSC 330/331 3 3 

MUSC 450 3 

MUSC 460/461 2 2 

MUSC 479 2 2 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives 0-2 5-7 

14-16 14-16 

Senior Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 406 2 

MUSC 466 3 

MUSC 470 - 2 

MUSC 479 2 2 

MUSC 486/487 2 2 

MUSC Elective 3 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives 2-4 8-10 

14-16 14-16 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree. The curriculum lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in 
musiC is designed for students whose interests are 
cultural rather than professional. A list of specific 
courses is available in the departmental office. A 
grade of C or above is required in each major 
course. 

Bachelor of Arts (KAusic) 

Sample Program 
Freshman Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 108/109 2 2 

MUSC 131 3 

MUSC 150/151 3 3 

University and Division Requirements 
and Free Electives 6-8 9-1 1 

14-16 14-16 



Sophomore Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 208/209 2 2 

MUSC 250/251 4 4 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives 8-10 8-10 

14-16 14-16 

Junior Year Fall Spring 

MUSC 408 2 

MUSC 330/331 3 3 

MUSC 450 3 

MUSC 460 - 2 

Supporting Area 3 3 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives 3-5 6-8 

14-16 14-16 

Senior Year Fall Spring 

MUSC Electives 3 3 

Supporting Area 3 3 

University and Division Requirements 

and Free Electives 8-10 8-10 



14-16 14-16 



Course Code Pr< 



s— MUSC, MUED 



Nuclear Engineering Program 

Professors: Duffey, Johnson, l\/lunno. Silverman. 
Associate Professors: Almenas, Roush,' Sheaks. 
Assistant Professor: Blair. 
Part-Time Professor: Goldman. 
Lecturers: Belcher, Salah (P-T). 

•Joint appornlment with Ptiysics 

Nuclear engineering deals with the practical use 
of nuclear energy from nuclear fission, fusion and 
radioisotope sources. The major use of nuclear 
energy is in electric power generation. Other uses 
are in the areas of chemical processing, medicine, 
instrumentation, and isotope tracer analysis. The 
nuclear engineer is primarily concerned with the 
design and operation of energy conversion devices 
ranging from very large reactors to miniature nuclear 
batteries, and with the use of nuclear reactions in 
many environmental, biological and chemical 
piocesses. Because of the wide range of uses for 
nuclear systems, the nuclear engineer finds inter- 
esting and diverse career opportunities in a variety 
of companies and laboratories. 

Programs of study in nuclear engineering at the 
undergraduate and graduate level are offered 
through the Chemical Engineering Department. Stu- 
dents may use nuclear engineering as a field of 
concentration in the Bachelor of Science in Engi- 
neering program. 

Students choosing nuclear engineering as their 
primary field may pursue the following general 
curriculum. Students electing nuclear engineering 
as their secondary field should seek advice from a 
member of the nuclear engineering faculty. 

Basic Freshman Year 

Semester 
Course No. and Title I H 

CHEM 103. 104 — General Chemistry" .4 4 

PHYS 161— General Physics I 3 



MATH 140, 141— Analysis I, II 4 4 

ENES 101— Intro. Engr. Science 3 

ENES 110— Mechanics 3 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

Total 17 17 

■■Qualified students may eiecl to lalie CHEU 10S and 106 (4 cr. hrs 
each) instead ol CHEM 103 and 104 

Students who are not prepared to schedule MATH 

140 are advised to register for a preparatory course 
— MATH 115 — as part of their General University 
Requirement. These students are also advised 

to attend summer school following their freshman 
year to complete MATH 141 and PHYS 161 prior to 
entrance into the sophomore year of study. MATH 

141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for many 
courses required in the sophomore year. 

Semester 

SOPHOMORE YEAR / // 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

MATH 246 — Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics II. Ill . . 4 4 
ENES 220 — Mechanics ol Materials .... 3 
CMSC 100 — Intro, to Use of Computers .1 

Secondary Field Elective 2 3 

ENNU 215— Intro, to Nuc. Tech 3 

Total 17 16 

JUNIOR YEAR 

General Univ. Requirements 3 3 

ENNU 320 — Nuc, Reactor Operation .... 3 

ENNU 430 — Radioisotope Power Sources . . 3 

ENNU 450— Reactor Engr. I 3 

PHYS 371— Modern Phys. for Engr 3 

Secondary Field Courses 3 3 

ENES Electives 3 3 

Technical Elective 3 

Total 18 15 

SENIOR YEAR 

General Univ. Requirements 6 3 

ENNU 455— Nuc. React. Engr. II 3 

ENNU 480 — Reactor Core Design 3 

ENNU Electives 3 6 

Secondary Field Courses 3 3 

Technical Electives 3 

Total 18 15 

Course Code Pielix— ENNU 

Philosophy 

Chairman and Professor: Gorovitz. 

Professors: Pasch, Perkins, Schlaretzki. Svenonius. 

Associate Professors: Brown, Celarier. Lesher, 

Martin, Suppe. 

Assistant Professors: Johnson, Kress, Odell. 

The undergraduate course offerings of the Depart- 
ment of Philosophy are, as a group, intended both to 
satisfy the needs of persons wishing to make 
philosophy their major field and to provide ample 
opportunity for other students to explore the sub- 
ject. In general, the study of philosophy can contrib- 
ute to the education of the university student by 
giving him or her experience in critical and imagina- 



102 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



tivo rellection on fundamental concepts and 
principles, by acquainting him or her with some of 
(he philosophical beliefs which have influenced 
•nd are influencing his own culture, and by familiar- 
izing him or nor with some classic philosophical 
writings through careful reading and discussion of 
them. The department views philosophy essentially 
as an activity, which cultivates articulateness. ex- 
pository skill, and logical rigor. Students in 
philosophy courses can expect their work to be 
subjected to continuing critical scrutiny. Courses 
designed with these objectives primarily in mind in- 
clude PHIL 100 (Intcoduction to Philosophy). 
PHIL 170 (Elementary Logic and Semantics). PHIL 
140 (Ethics). PHIL 236 (Philosophy of Religion), and 
the historical courses 305. 310. 320. 325. and 326. 

For students interested particularly in philo- 
sophical problems arising within their own special 
disciplines, a number of appropriate courses are 
available: PHIL 233 (Philosophy in Literature). 
PHIL 250 (Philosophy of Science). PHIL 345 (Social 
and Political Philosophy). PHIL 360 (Philosophy of 
Language). PHIL 330 (Philosophy of Art). PHIL 457 
(Philosophy of History). PHIL 450 (Topics in the 
Philosophy of Science), and PHIL 474 (Induction 
and Probability). 

Pre-law students may be particularly interested in 
such courses as PHIL 140 (Ethics). PHIL 345 (Politi- 
cal and Social Philosophy), and PHIL 447 (Philos- 
ophy of Law). Students in the biological sciences 
or in pre-medical curricula may be particularly inter- 
ested in Philosophy of Biology, (fvloral Problems in 
Medicine). 

The departmental requirements for a major in 
philosophy are as follows: (1) a total of at least 
30 hours in philosophy, not including PHIL 100: 
(2) PHIL 140. 271. 310. 320. 326. and at least two 
courses numbered 399 and above; (3) a grade of C 
or better m each course counted toward the fulfill- 
ment of the major requirement. 

For students of exceptional ability and interest 
in philosophy, the department offers an honors 
program. Information regarding this special curricu- 
lum may be obtained from the departmental advisors. 

The Department presents visiting speakers from 
this country and abroad in its colloquium series, 
scheduled throughout the academic year. In addi- 
tion, members of the department and advanced 
graduate students lecture on topics of current 
significance in the Graduate Workshop and in the 
undergraduate Philosophy Club. 

Co^jfM Coile Pf«(ix— PHIL 

Physical Education 

Chairman and Professor: Husman. 

Professors: Clarke. Eyier, Humphrey. Husman, 

Kramer. 

Associate Professors: Church. Cronin. Dotson. 

Mult. Ingram. Kelley. Love. SantaK/laria. Steel. 

Assistant Professors: Arrighi, Campbell, Dainis, 



Freundschuh, Fnnger. Jackson, Johnson, Kesler, 
Krouse. McKnight, Tyler, VanderVelden, Wrenn. 
Instructors: Allen. Bartley. Bohren, Drum. Farrah. 
Fielding. Griffiths, Kizabeth, Long, fvlcHugh, 
f^urray, Rees, Sigler, Tyler, Wood. 
Lecturers: Fry. Noss. Redding. 

This curriculum prepares students (1) for teaching 
physical education in the secondary school. (2) for 
coaching, and (3) for leadership in youth and adult 
groups which offer a program of physical activity. 
The first two years of this curriculum are considered 
to be an orientation period in which the student has 
an opportunity to gain an adequate background in 
general education as well as in those scientific 
areas closely related to this field of specialization. In 
addition, emphasis is placed upon the development 
of skills in a wide range of motor activities. 
Further, students are encouraged to select related 
areas, especially in the fields of biology, social 
science, psychology, health education, and recrea- 
tion as fields of secondary interest. These ma- 
terially increase the vocational opportunities which 
are available to a graduate in physical education. 

Equipment: Students may be required to pro- 
vide individual equipment for certain courses. 

Uniforms: Suitable uniforms, as prescribed by the 
College, are required for the activity classes and 
for student teaching. These uniforms should be 
worn only during professional activities. 

Men — During the freshman and sophomore years, 
men will wear red and black T-shirts, black trunks, 
white socks, gym shoes, supporter, and sweat suit. 

Women — Appropriate uniforms, ankle socks, and 
tennis shoes. 

For Student Teaching — An appropriate teaching 
costume will be selected under the guidance of 
the supervisor of student teaching before the 
beginning of the junior year. 

Physical Education Curriculum For Men 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

SPCH 107— Public Speaking 2 

PHED 180 — Introduction to Physical 

Education 2 

PHED 182— Rhythmic Activities 2 

PHED 185. 187— Skills Laboratory 2 2 

PHED 274M— Aquatics 2 

General University Requirements 6 7 

Electives 3 6 

Total 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201. 202 — Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 4 4 

PHED 261 M. 263M— Skills Laboratory ... 2 2 
Science Group Requirement (Physics 

or Chemistry) 4 

HLTH 150— First Aid and Safety 1 

General University Requirement 6 6 

Electives 4 1 

Total 17 17 



Junior Year 

PHED 400— Kmoslolofly 4 

PHED 30SM. 307M— Skills Laooiaiory 2 2 

PHED 420 — Physical Education for the 

Elementary School 3 

PHED 493— History and Philosophy of 

Sporl and Physical Education . 3 

Theory ol Coaching Elective 

(PHED 323, 325 or 326) 2 

PHED 480— Measurement In Physical 

Education and Health 3 

EDUC 300 — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

General University Requirement 5 

Electives 4 

Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

EDUC 301— Foundations ol Education 3 

PHED 333— Adapted Physical Education 2 
EDSE 330— Principles and Methods ol 

Secondary Education 3 

EDSE 374— Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

PHED 460— Theory ol Exercise 3 

PHED 381 — Advanced Training and 

Conditioning 3 

PHED 490— Organization and 

Administration ol Physical Education 3 

PHED 314 — Methods. Curriculum and 

Observation lor Secondary Schools .... 3 

Electives 3 3 

Total •' 17 

Physical Education Curriculum For Women 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

SPCH 107— Public Speaking 2 

PHED 180 — Introduction to Physical 

Education and Health 2 

PHED 181 — Fundamentals ol Movement . 2 

PHED 182 — Rhythmic Activities 2 

DANC 100 — Dance Techniques 2 

PHED 186. 190— Skills Laboratory 2 2 

General University Requirements 7 9 

Electives 4 

Total 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201. 202 — Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 4 4 

Science Group Requirement (Physics 

or Chemistry) 4 

HLTH 150— First Aid and Safety 1 

PHED 262W. 264W— Skills Laboratory . . 2 2 

PHED 274W— Aquatics 2 

PHED 282W — Organization and 

Administration ol Intramurals 1 

General University Requirements 6 3 

Electives 3 2 

Total 17 17 

Junior Year 

PHED 400— Kinesiology 4 

PHED 305V\^. 307W— Skills Laboratory .2 2 

EDUC 300 — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

PHED 493 — History and Philosophy of 

Sports and Physical Education 3 

PHED 420 — Physical Education for the 

Elementary Schools 3 

Departments, Programs and Curricula / 103 



PHED 324W— Theory of Coaching 2 

PHED 480 — Measuremeni in Physical 

Education and Health 3 

General University Requirements 2 3 

Electives 4 

Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

EDUC 301 — Foundations o( Education . . 3 

EDUC 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 3 

EDSE 374 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

PHED 333— Adapted Physical Education .2 

PHED 460 — Theory of Exercise 3 

PHED 490 — Organization and 

Administration of Physical Education .... 3 

PHED 314 — Methods in Physical Education 

in Secondary Schools . 3 

Electives 6 3 

Total 17 17 

Minor in Physical Education. 20 semester hours in 

physical education and 4 semester hours in cognate 

areas. 

Required Courses. Men— PHED 180. 185t^, 1871^, 

261M, 263IV1 (2-6): 314; 323, 325 or 326. 

Women— PHED ISO: 186W, 190W, 262W, 264W 
(2-6): 314;324W. 

Elective Courses. Men and Women — PHED 
274. 333, 381, 400, 460, 480, 485, 487, 490, 493. 

If planning to teach, the cognate courses for men 
should be HLTH 140 and HLTH 150: for women, 
HLTH 150 and HLTH 420. 

Note: To be certified to teach in Maryland, 30 
semester hours are required in physical education 
in addition to the following or equivalent, ZOOL 101, 
201, 202 and chemistry or physics. 

Minor in Elementary Physical Education. There are 
two plans for a minor in elementary school physical 
education. Plan A is for students in the Department 
of Physical Education, and Plan B is for students out- 
side the Department of Physical Education. 

I. Plans A. (for students in this department) 

10 semester hours in elementary school physical 
education courses and 10 hours in cognate 
areas. 

Required Courses. PHED 183, 184, 420, 495. 

Elective Courses. 10 hours in any of the following 
cognate areas: human development, elementary 
education, biological science, health education. 
(Not more than 6 hours shall be taken in any one 
cognate area.) 

Student Teaching. Students will be required to do 
four weeks of their eight weeks student teaching at 
the elementary school level in physical education. 

II. Plan B. (for students outside this department) 
13 semester hours in elementary school physical 
education courses and 10 hours in cognate 
areas. 

104 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Required Courses. PHED 183, 184, 330, 420, 495. 

Elective Courses. 10 hours in any of the following 
cognate areas: human development, elementary 
education, biological science, health education. 
(Not more than 6 hours shall be taken in any one 
cognate area.) 

Kinesiological Sciences. A new degree curriculum 
is available for interested students from the 
Department of Physical Education. It is designed 
for those students who are vitally interested in the 
fascinating realm of sport and the human activity 
sciences, but not necessarily interested in prepar- 
ing for teaching in the public schools. The body 
of knowledge explored by this curriculum may be 
described briefly as follows: 
The history of sport, both ancient and con- 
temporary, its philosophical foundations and the 
study of social factors as they relate to human 
behavior. 

Biomechanics, exercise physiology, the theoretical 
bases and effects of physical activity, neuromotor 
learning and the psychological factors inherent 
in physical performance. 
The quantification and description of perform- 
ance and the relation of these factors to human 
development. 

The program makes possible the broad use of 
elective credit so that various student interests 
may be combined on an interdisciplinary basis. 
With such possibilities available, graduates could 
reasonably set their sights on occupations in the 
paramedical fields, such as stress testing and 
human factors, athletic involvements such as 
trainers, scouts, sports publicists, or advance to 
further study in the therapies, as well as graduate 
work in physical education and allied fields. 

The Honors Program in Physical Education. The aim 

of the Honors Program is to encourage superior 
students by providing an enriched program of 
studies which will fulfill their advanced interests and 
needs. Qualified students are given the opportunity 
to undertake intensive and often independent 
studies wherein initiative, responsibility and in- 
tellectual discipline are fostered. To qualify for 
admission to the program: 

1. A freshman must have a "B" average in aca- 
demic (college prep) curriculum of an accredited 
high school. 

2. A sophomore must have an accumulative GPA of 
3.00 in all college courses of official registration. 

3. All applicants must have three formal recom- 
mendations concerning their potential, char- 
acter, and other related matters. 

4. All applicants must be accepted by the Faculty 
Honors Committee. 

In completing the program, all honors students 

must: 

1. Participate in an honors seminar where theses 



and other relevant research topics are studied. 

2. Pass a comprehensive oral examination cover- 
ing subject matter background. 

3. Successfully prepare and defend the honors 
thesis. 

On the basis of the students performance in 'he 
above program, the college may vote to recom- 
mend graduation without honors, with honors, or 
With high honors. 

Physical Sciences Program 

Chairman: Smith, 

Astronomy: Matthews, Chemistry: Jaquith, 
Computer Science: Vandergraft, Geology: Stifel, 
Mathematics: Schneider, Meteorology: Thompson, 
Physics: deSilva, S. Zorn. 

Purpose. This program is suggested for many types 
of students: those whose interests cover a wide 
range of the physical sciences: those whose inter- 
ests have not yet centered on any one science: 
students interested in a career in an interdiscipli- 
nary area within the physical sciences, students who 
seek a broader undergraduate program than is 
possible in one of the traditional physical sciences, 
preprofessional students (prelaw, premedical); or 
students whose interests in business, technical 
writing, advertising or sales require a broad techni- 
cal background. This program can also be useful 
for those planning science-oriented or technical 
work in the urban field: some of the Urban Studies 
courses should be taken as electives. Students 
contemplating this program as a basis for prepara- 
tion for secondary school science teaching are 
advised to consult the Science Teaching Center 
staff of the College of Education for additional re- 
quirements for teacher certification. 

The Physical Sciences Program consists of a basic 
set of courses in physics, chemistry and mathe- 
matics, followed by a variety of courses chosen 
from these and related disciplines: astronomy, 
geology, meteorology and computer science. 
Emphasis is placed on a broad program as con- 
trasted with a specialized one. 

Students are advised by members of the Physical 
Sciences Committee. This committee is composed 
of faculty members from each of the represented 
disciplines and some student representatives. As- 
signment of advisor depends on the interest of the 
student, e.g., one interested principally in chemistry 
will be advised by the chemistry member of the 
committee. Students whose interests are too general 
to classify in this manner will normally be advised 
by the chairman of the committee. 

The Curriculum. The basic courses include MATH 
140, 141 and one other math course for which 
MATH 141 is a prerequisite (11 or 12 credits): CHEM 
103 and 104, or 105 and 106 (8 credits): Physics 
162. 262.263(11 credits): or 141. 142 (8 credits): or 



181. 182. 283, 284 (16 credits): or 221, 222 (10 cred- 
its): or Physics 121, 122 (ollowed by Physics 262 
(12 credits). 

The choice of the physics sequence depends on 
the student's future ain^s and his background. 
PHYS 161. 262. 263 is the standard sequence rec- 
ommended tor most Physical Science majors. This 
sequence will enable the student to continue with 
intermediate level and advanced courses. PHYS 141. 
142 IS available to students who wish a less exten- 
sive background in physics than is represented by 
Physics 161-263 or 181-284. Students desiring a 
strong background in physics are urged to enroll in 
PHYS 181. 182. 283. 284. This is the sequence also 
used by Physics maiors and leads directly into the 
advanced physics courses. PHYS 221. 222 is de- 
signed for Education maiors. and therefore is 
suitable for students thinking in terms of a teaching 
career. PHYS 121. 122 plus 262 is offered as an 
option only for students who have already taken 
PHYS 121, 122 and then decide to major in Physical 
Sciences. This sequence should not be selected by 
students already in or just starting the program. 
The rationale for requiring PHYS 262 to follow 121, 
122 is to ensure that students have some physics 
with calculus (121. 122 do not have a calculus 
corequsite). 

Beyond these basic courses the student must 
complete 24 credits of which 12 must be at the 
300 or 400 level, chosen from the following dis- 
ciplines: Chemistry, physics, mathematics, astron- 
omy, geology, meteorology, and computer science. 
Students presenting Physics 284 as part of their 
basic curriculum may include these four credits 
among these 24 credits. The 24 credits must be so 
distributed that he has at least six credits in each of 
any three of the above listed disciplines. The pro- 
gram requires an average grade of at least "C " 
in courses counting toward the major, including 
both the basic plus the broader set of courses. 

Students who wish to depart from the stipulated 
curriculum may present their proposed program for 
approval by the Physical Science Committee. An 
honors program is available to qualified students 
in their senior year. 

Certain courses offered in these fields are not 
suitable for Physical Science majors and cannot 
count as part of the requirements of the program. 
These include any courses corresponding to a lower 
level than the basic courses specified above 
(e.g. fvlATH 1 15), or any of the following: ASTR 100, 
105, CHEIvl 101, 102, 107, CfvISC 100, 103. GEOL 
120, 431,432, 460, 489, t^ATH 105, 110, 111, 115, 
210, 211,478, 481,483, 484, PHYS 111, 112, 114, 
117. 400. 401. 

Honors Program. The Physical Sciences honors pro- 
gram offers students the opportunity for research 
and independent study. Interested students should 
request details from theii advisor. 



Physics and Astronomy 

Professor and Chairman: Laster. 

Professor and Director of Astronomy Program: Kerr. 

Assistant Professor and Associate Chairman: 

Falk. 

Professors: Alley, Banerjee, Bhagat, Brill, Davidson, 

Day, Dorfman, Erickson, Ferrell. Glasser, Glover, Iff, 

Greenberg. Griem. Griffin, Holmgren, Hornyak, 

Kerr, Krall, Kundu, MacDonald. Marion. 

IVIisner. Myers. Oneda. Pati. Prange. Pugh. Reiser, 

Snow, Sucher. Trivelpiece, Wall. Weber. Westerhout, 

Yodh. G.T. Zorn. 

Professors (Part-time): Brandt, Fowler, Friedman, 

Hayward, McDonald, Opik. Rado, Slawsky. 

Associate Professors: A'Hearn. Anderson. Bardasis, 

Beall, Bell. Currie. DeSilva, Dragt. Earl. Falk. Fivel, 

Click, Gloeckler. Goldenbaum. Harrington. Kacser. 

H. Kim. Y. S. Kim, Korenman. Matthews, Minkiewicz. 

Roos, Rose, Roush, Smith, P. Steinberg, 

Stephenson, Jr., Wentzel, Woo, Zipoy, B. S. Zorn, 

Zuckerman. 

Associate Professors (Part-time): Bennett, Dixon, 

Hammer. Johnson. Pechacek. 

Assistant Professors: Barnett. Brayshaw, Chang. 

Chang. Chant. Connors. Drew. Ellsworth, Glosser. 

Goldberg. Gowdy. Greene. Guillory. Hill. Layman. 

Martin. McClellan, OGallagher, Redish. Richard. 

Simonson. R. Steinberg. 

Assistant Professors (Part-time): Khoury, Larson. 

Visiting Assistant Professors: Bahl, Clavelli, Pereira, 

Trimble. 

The Physics program includes a broad range of 
undergraduate courses designed to satisfy the 
needs of almost every student, from the advanced 
physics major to the person taking a single intro- 
ductory physics course. In addition, there are 
various opportunities for personally directed studies 
between student and professor, and many under- 
graduate "research " opportunities also are available. 
For further information consult "Department Re- 
quirements for a B.S. degree in Physics." available 
from the Department, 

Courses For Non-Majors. The department offers 
several courses which are intended for students 
other than physics majors. PHYS 101. 102. 106. 
Ill and 112 withouta laboratory and PHYS 114. 
117 and 120 with laboratory are designed to satisfy 
the General University distribution requirements, 
PHYS 121. 122 or 141. 142 satisfy the requirements 
for professional schools such as medical and 
dental, and PHYS 161. 262. 263 satisfy the intro- 
ductory physics requirement for most engineering 
programs. PHYS 318 is a one semester course 
stressing contemporary topics for those who have 
completed a year of one of the above sequences. 
In addition. PHYS 420 is a one semester modern 
physics course for advanced students in science or 
engineering. Either the course sequence 161, 262, 



263. or the full sequence 181. 182. 283, 284 is suit- 
able for mathematics students and those who 
major in other physical sciences. 

The Physics Major. The way most physics majors 
will begin their work is with a two-year basic se- 
quence of physics courses. PHYS 181. 182. 283. 

284. accompanied by the laboratory courses PHYS 

285. 286 in the second year. Transfer students who 
come with a different set of introductory courses 
either will be put into an appropriate course in this 
sequence or will take bridging courses, such as 
PHYS 404, 405, and then go on to advanced courses; 
usually they will not repeat work previously done 

by taking the entire basic sequence. 

The minimum requirement for a physics major is 
38 semester hours of work in physics, including four 
laboratory courses and PHYS 410. 411, 421 and 422, 
plus MATH 140, 141, 240. 241 (or 150, 151, 250) 
and one additional 3 or 4 credit mathematics 
course. After taking the basic sequence, the stu- 
dent will have some flexibility in his program, and 
he will be able to take specialty courses, such as 
those in nuclear physics or solid-state physics, 
which are of particular interest to him. In addition, a 
student interested in doing research may choose 
to do a bachelor's thesis under the direction of a 
member of the faculty. 

It is planned to phase in a new sequence of 
courses, with laboratory, to replace PHYS 181. 192, 
283, 284, 285 beginning in the fall semester 1974. 
See the Department of Schedule of Classes for 
further information. 

Honors In Physics. The Honors Program offers to 
students of good ability and strong Interest In 
physics a greater flexibility in their academic pro- 
grams, and a stimulating atmosphere through 
contacts with other good students and with individ- 
ual faculty members. There are opportunities for 
part-time research participation which may develop 
into full-time summer projects. An honors seminar 
IS offered for advanced students: credit may be 
given for independent work or study, and certain 
graduate courses are open for credit toward the 
bachelors degree. 

Students are accepted by the department's 
Honors Committee on the basis of recommendations 
from their advisors and other faculty members, 
usually in the second semester of their junior year. 
A final written and oral comprehensive examina- 
tion in the senior year is optional, but those who 
pass the examination will graduate "with honors m 
physics." 

CouiM Cofle P'etn— PHYS 

Pre-Professlonal Curricula 

There are a number of programs developed to pre- 
pare the pre-professional student. These curricula, 
some rather general and others quite specific, are 
designed to give the student the best background 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 105 



to succeed in his advanced training, to fill under- 
graduate requirements of professional schools, 
and to fit in with the requirements established by the 
organizations associated with the respective 
professions. 

Pre-professional programs require that the student 
maintain a grade point average higher than the 
mmimum for graduation. The student may fulfill re- 
quirements by majoring in almost any discipline in 
some programs, provided the specific requirements 
of the pre-professional program are met. The suc- 
cessful completion of the pre-professional program 
does not guarantee admission to professional 
school. Each school has its own admissions require- 
ments and criteria, generally based upon the grade 
point average in the undergraduate courses, the 
scores in aptitude tests (Medical College Admis- 
sion Test, Law Admission Test, Dental Aptitude 
Test, etc.), a personal interview, and letters sent by 
the Evaluation Committee of the college. For the 
specific admissions requirements, the student is 
urged to study the catalog of the professional 
school of his choice. 

Although completion of the bachelor's degree is 
a normal prerequisite for admission for dental, law, 
and medical schools, three professional schools 
of the University of Maryland in Baltimore — Dentis- 
try, Law, and Medicine — have arrangements 
whereby a student who meets requirements detailed 
below may be accepted for professional school 
after three years (90 academic hours). For the stu- 
dents to be eligible for the "combined degree," the 
final thirty hours prior to entry into the Schools of 
Dentistry, Law, and Medicine must be taken in 
residence. After the successful completion of thirty 
hours of work in professional school, the student 
may be eligible for a bachelor's degree. 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 

The first two years of the pre-professional curricu- 
lum are as follows: 

1st 2nd 

Freshman Year Sem. Sem. 

English Composition 101 3 

Zoology (General) 100 4 

Chemistry 103 and 104 4 4 

Psycho'ogy 100 — General 3 

Sociology 100 — Introduction 3 

Humanities 9 

Physical Education (1) (1) 

Total 14 16 

1st 2nd 

Sophomore Year Sem. Sem. 

Zoology 201 and 202 

Human Anatomy & Physiology 4 4 

Microbiology 200 4 

Nutrition 200 3 

Social Science* ' 3 3 

Humanities' 3 3 

Electives (lower division) 3 3 

Total 17 16 



'Humanities courses must be selected from at least three of the 

following areas: literature, history, philosophy, fine arts, speech, 

math or language. 

•■Social Sciences must include General Psychology and Sociology 

with the remaining six credits selected from courses in: psychology. 

sociology, government and politics, economics, anthropology, or 

geography. 

Although courses may be interchanged during 
the first two years, it is required that chemistry 
precede microbiology and nutrition to enable its 
application to these two subjects. It should be noted 
that Zoology 101 is a prerequisite for Zoology 201, 
202 (Human Anatomy in Physiology) at the 
University of Maryland. 

Pre-Denlistry 

The pre-dental program is based upon the require- 
ments and recommendations of the various dental 
schools, and the requirements for a baccalaureate 
degree from the College Park Campus, following 
either the four-year program or the combined Arts- 
Dentistry program. The curriculum is designed to 
prepare the student for the Dental Aptitude Test, 
which is normally taken in the spring of the junior 
year. 

The following program will satisfy the science re- 
quirements of most dental schools for either the 
three-year program (90 academic hours) or the 
four-year program (120 academic hours). 
The suggested program is as follows: 

Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

Recommended for dental school 
Chemistry (general, inorganic, and organic) , , . 18 
CHEM 103, 104, 201, 202, 203, 204, or 
CHEM 105, 106, 211, 212, 213, 214 

Zoology 16 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 

ZOOL 246— Genetics 

ZOOL 290 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 

ZOOL 430 — Vertebrate Embryology 

Mathematics 6-12 

Mathematics through calculus 

(MATH 141 or 221) is strongly recommended 

Physics 121, 122 or 141, 142 8 

Division requirements variable 

Major and supporting course requirements . . variable 
Electives, to complete the 90 or 120 hours required 

Four-Year Program. No specific major is required 
for favorable consideration by a dental school admis- 
sions committee. By intelligent planning starting in 
his freshman or sophomore year, the student can 
meet the requirements for the B.S. or B.A. degree 
in most major programs and can include in his 
course work any courses specifically prescribed by 
dental schools of his choice. The student is urged 
to work closely with his pre-dental and major 
advisors in this planning. 

Three-year Arts-Dentistry Program. Students 
whose performance during the first two years is 
exceptional may seek admission to the University of 
Maryland Dental School at the end of their third 
year (90 academic hours). No undergraduate major 
IS required for this program; the work of the first 



year in the School of Dentistry is considered as the 
major. Students in this program will select support- 
ing courses from any one of the following combi- 
nations: 

Zoology — -six hours on the 300-400 level. 

Microbiology — eight hours on the 300-400 level. 

CHEM 321— plus three hours on the 300-400 level 
in any natural science. 

CHEM 461 , 462, 463, and 464. 

Nine hours on the 300-400 level in any one de- 
partment of the arts, humanities, or social 
sciences. 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Dentistry 
program may receive the B.S. degree (Arts-Dentisfi7) 
after satisfactory completion of the first year at 
the University of Maryland Dental School upon 
recommendation by the Dean of the Dental School 
and approval by the College Park Campus, the 
degree to be awarded in August following the 
first year of Dental School. 

Schedule: The pre-dental student usually in- 
cludes in the first year schedule chemistry, mathe- 
matics and zoology, and English if needed. The 
second year should include the second year of 
chemistry, comparative vertebrate morphology 
(ZOOL 290) (and genetics if not already completed) 
and mathematics if needed. The third year should 
include PHYS 121, 122 or 141, 142 and vertebrate 
embryology (ZOOL 430). The student fills out his 
schedule with General University Requirements, di- 
visional requirements, major department require- 
ments and electives. 

Courses in comparative anatomy and statistics 
(such as PSYC 200 or SOCY 201) are most strongly 
recommended by the University of Maryland Dental 
School. 

Pre-Forestry 

The pre-forestry students are advised in the Botany 
Department. The State of Maryland has an agree- 
ment with the Southern Regional Education Board 
and North Carolina State University providing for 
five Maryland residents who have completed two 
years study in pre-forestry and have been accepted 
in the School of Forestry at North Carolina State 
University. The State of Maryland will make payment 
toward the non-resident tuition for a period not to 
exceed two years (four semesters) in accordance 
with the funds appropriated in the State budget 
for this purpose. 

The Pre-Forestry Curriculum Includes: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

ENGL 101 3 

EOTN 101 4 

ZOOL 101 4 

MATH 110, 111, 220, 221 12 

CHEM 103, 104 8 

PHYS 121, 122 8 

SPCH 107 2 



106 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



BOTN 212 3 

HORT 171 3 

Economica 3 

Students planning lor three years in the pre- 
forestry curriculum should include BOTN 221, 
ENTM 200. AGRO 102. AGEN 100. AGRO 202. and 
BOTN 211. 

Pre-Law 

Although some law schools will consider only ap- 
plicants with a B A or B S. degree, others will 
accept applicants who have successfully completed 
a three-year program of academic work. Most law 
schools do not prescribe specific courses which 
a student must present (or admission, but do require 
that the student follow one o( the standard pro- 
grams offered by the undergraduate college. Many 
laws schools require that the applicant take the 
Law School Admissions Test, preferably in July or 
October of the academic year preceding his entry 
into professional school. 

Four-Year Program. The student who plans to 
complete the requirements (or the B.A. or B.S. 
degree before entering law school should select a 
major deld o( concentration. The pre-law student 
otten (ollows a Bachelor of Arts program with a 
major in American studies. English, history, eco- 
nomics, political science (government and politics). 
psychology, sociology, or speech; a few pre-law 
students follow a bachelor of science program. 

Three-year Arts-Law Program. The student who 
plans to enter law school at the end of his third 
year should complete the General University Re- 
quirements. During his junior year he will complete 
the requirements for a "minor" (18 semester hours 
in one department. 6 hours being at the 300-400 
level). His program during the first three years 
should include all of the basic courses required for 
a degree (including the 18-hour "minor" course 
program) and all divisional and University require- 
ments. The academic courses must total 90 hours, 
and must be passed with a minimum average of 2.0. 
To be acceptable to law schools, however, students 
in virtually all cases must have a considerably 
higher average. 

Students with exceptional records who are ac- 
cepted to the School of Law o( the University of 
Maryland under the Arts-Law program may receive 
a B.A. degree (Arts-Law) alter satisfactory com- 
pletion of the first year of law school, upon 
recommendation by the Dean of the University of 
Maryland Law School and approval by the College 
Park Campus. The degree is awarded in August 
following the first year of law school (or after 30 
credit hours are completed). 

Pre-Medical Technology 

The University of Maryland Medical Technology 
program is four years in duration, leading to a 



Bachelor of Science Degree. The (irst three years 
are devoted to basic studies. The last year is spent 
in clinical studies at University Hospital on the 
Baltimore City campus of the University of Maryland. 

This program is administered by the School of 
of Medicine. The curriculum in medical technology 
complies with the requirements and recommenda- 
tions of the Board of Schools o( the American 
Society o( Clinical Pathologists( and the American 
Medical Association Council on Medical Education.) 
Graduates o( the program will be eligible to take 
the examination for certilication given by the Board 
o( Registry of the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists. 

Admission. Applicants must meet the admission re- 
quirements of the University of Maryland. At least 
three years of College Preparatory mathematics 
and at least three years of science, including chem- 
istry and physics, are strongly recommended. 

Curriculum. Students must complete 90 semester- 
hours or more in academic subjects before being 
admitted to the senior year. The following courses 
are intended as a guide for the student in planning 
a curriculum which will meet both the University 
of Maryland requirements for graduation and the 
special requirements for the Registry Examination 
administered by the A.S.C.P. Board of Schools. 

Near the completion of the pre-professional re- 
quirements, the student submits an application to 
the Baltimore campus. If the student is accepted, he 
or she will spend a full twelve month residency 
where he or she rotates among several laboratory 
services and receives technical instruction in 
hematology, serology, clinical chemistry, pathogenic 
microbiology, and such other topics as are in- 
cluded in laboratory medicine. 

Credits 
CHEMISTRY (16-credit minimum) 

CHEM 103. 104— College Chemistry I. II 4. 4 

Additional 8 credits from the following courses 

CHEM 203. 204— College Chemistry IV 3 

and College Chemistry Laboratory IV 2 

CHEM 321 — Quantitative Analysis 4 

CHEM 461 . 463— Biochemistry I 3 

and Biochemistry Laboratory I 2 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (16-credit minimum) 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 4 

MICR 200 — General Microbiology 4 

Additional 8 credits from the following courses 
ZOOL 

ZOOL 246 — Genetics 4 

ZOOL 290 — Comparative Vertebrate 

Morphology 4 

ZOOL 411 — Cellular Biology 4 

MICB 440 — Pathogenic Microbiology 4 

MATHEMATICS (6 credits) 

MATH 110 or 115 3 

MATH 111 3 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

CHEM 261 302. and 462; ZOOL 475 and 495; 

MICB 450 and 460; PHYS 121 and 122; 

PSYC 200 



GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 

AREA A — not required lor medical technology 

students 
AREA B — 6-credits required 

Any 6 credits from courses listed under either 
ol 1*16 two divisions Human and Community 
Resources; Behavioral and Social Sciences. 
AREA C — 12-credits required 

SPCH 100 3 

An additional 9 credits from any ol the course* 
listed in the Division of Arts and Humanities. 
(Students will be required either to show pro- 
ficiency in English composition — the Illinois 
Rhetoric Test — or to take ENGL 101. Introduc- 
lio-i to Writing). 

Pre-Mediclne 

The pre-medical program is based upon the require- 
ments and recommendations o( American Medical 
schools, and the requirements (or a baccalaureate 
degree (rom the College Park Campus, (ollowing 
either the (our-year program or the combined Arls- 
Medicine program. The curriculum is designed to 
prepare the student (or the Medical College Admis- 
sion Test, which is normally taken in the spring of 
the junior year. 

The following program will satisfy the science 
requirements of most medical schools for either 
the three-year program (90 academic hours) or the 
(our-year program (120 academic hours): 

Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

Medical school requirements 

Chemistry (general, inorganic, and organic) 18 

CHEM 103. 104. 201. 202. 203. 204. or 

CHEM 105. 106. 211. 212. 213, 214 
Zoology '6 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 

ZOOL 246 — Genetics 

ZOOL 290 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology 

ZOOL 430 — Vertebrate Embryology 
Mathematics 6 12 

Mathematics through calculus 

(MATH 141 or 221) is strongly recommended 

Physics 121. 122 or 141. 142 8 

Division requirements variable 

Major and supporting course requirements variable 

Electives. to complete the 90 to 120 hours required 

Four-Year Program. No specitic major is required 
for favorable consideration by a medical school ad- 
missions committee. By intelligent planning starting 
in the freshman or sophomore year, the student can 
meet the above requirements as well as the require- 
ments of most majors for the B.A. or B.S. degree. 
The student is urged to work closely with his pre- 
medical and major advisors in this planning. A 
student who enters the pre-medical program late 
in his college career may find an additional year of 
study necessary (either as a special student or as 
a regular undergraduate). 

Three-year Arts-Medicine Program. A student 
whose performance during the first two years is 
exceptional may seek admission to the University 
of Maryland Medical School at the end of the third 
year (90 academic hours). During his third year he 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 107 



will need to complete all the requirements listed 
above, with the exception of the major and regular 
supporting course program. Four additional hours 
on the 300-400 level in appropriate science courses 
will satisfy the supporting course requirements 
of the Arts-Medicine Program. 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Medicine 
program may receive the B.S. degree (Arts- 
Medicine) after satisfactory completion of the first 
year at the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine (30 academic hours), upon recommenda- 
tion by the Dean of the School of Medicine and 
approval by the College Park Campus. The degree 
is awarded in August following the first year of 
medical chool. 

Schedule. The pre-medical student usually in- 
cludes in his first year schedule chemistry, mathe- 
matics and zoology, and English if needed. The 
second year should include the second year of 
chemistry, comparative vertebrate morphology 
(ZOOL 290) (and genetics if not already completed) 
and mathematics if needed. The third year should 
include PHYS 121, 122 or 141, 142 and vertebrate 
embryology (ZOOL 430). The student fills out his 
schedule with General University requirements, 
divisional requirements, major department require- 
ments and electives. 

Pre-Nursing 

It is required that all students, including registered 
nurses, enrolled in or transferring to the program 
in nursing use the following guidelines for the fresh- 
man and sophomore years: 

Semester 
Hours 

Englisfi Composition 3 

Ctiemistry (including content in organic 

chemistry) 6-8 

Human Anatomy and Physiology 6-8 

Microbiology 3-4 

Social Sciences 12 

Humanities" 15 

Nutrition (recommended) , 3 

Electives 7-12 

Minimum requirements for Junior status 59-60 

Social Sciences include Sociology, Psychology, Political 

Science. Economics. Geography, Anthropology 
Humanities include Literature. History, Philosophy, Foreign 

Languages, Mathematics, Fine Arts 
'Courses musl include at least one In sociology and one in psy- 
chology. 
"Courses musl be selected from at least ttiree departments. 

The specific courses taken by basic students on 
the College Park Campus are; 

Semester 
Hours 

Chemistry 103, 104 4, 4 

English 101 3 

Zoology 101 4 

Humanities (Literature, history, philosophy, 

fine arts, math, language)' 15 

Psychology 100 3 

Sociology 100 3 



108 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Other social sciences (sociology, psychology, 

government and politics, economics, 

geography) 6 

Zoology 201 , 202 4, 4 

Microbiology 200 4 

Nutrition 200 (recommended) 3 

Elective 3 

60 

•Courses must be selected from at least ttiree of ttie areas listed. 

Pre-Pharmacy 

The preprofessional curriculum is designed to 
provide the student with those courses that satisfy 
the needs for a more liberal education as well as 
the scientific prerequisite courses for entrance into 
the professional program. 

First Year Credits 

Chemistry 103. 104 8 

Mathematics 115, 140 (Introductory and 

Elementary Analysis) 6-7 

Zoology 101 (or Biology) 4 

English 101 (Composition) 3 

Elective (Social Sciences) 3 

Elective (non-specific) 3 

28 

Second Year 

Chemistry 201, 202, 203, 204 *10 

Physics 121, 122 (Fundamentals) 8 

Elective (Humanities) 6 

English 201 (Literature) 3 

Elective (non-specific) 3 

Elective (Social Science) 3 

"~33 

•r^iimum requirement lor organic ctiemistry is 8 credits, 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

The minimum requirements for entry into the junior 
year of the professional program total 60 credits. 
AREA A: 

•MATH 110, 111 6 credits 

or MATH 220 or 

MATH 140 (3 credits + 3 electives) 

CHEM 103, 104 8 credits 

PHYS 121, 122 8 credits 

ZOOL 101 4 credits 

ZOOL (102, 201, 202, 209, 246, 290) 4 credits 

AREA B: 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 3 credits 

(Afro-American Studies. Anthropology, 
Economics, Government and Politics. 
Urban Studies, Sociology, Geography) 

PSYCH 100 3 credits 

PSYCH (one course above the 

Intro, level) 3 credits 

AREA C: 

ENGL 101 3 credits 

(Students with advanced credit or exemp- 
tion may substitute a 3 credit elective) 

SPCH 100 3 credits 

(Students with one year of high school 
speech may substitute a 3 credit elective) 

ARTS AND HUMANITIES 6 credits 

(Courses chosen from: History, Literature, 
Foreign Language, Philosophy, Apprecia- 
tion ot: Art, Music, Drama. Dance) 

Electives 9 credits 

'Selections may be made in any area witti no more than 2 credits 
01 skills or activities courses accepted. Introductory or review courses 
below ttie level required in Biology. Ctiemistry. Ptiysics and Mattie- 
matics. IM»Y NOT be used as electives. 



The following are suggested electives with no 
order of preference: BTPT 110 — Physical Therapy 
Orientation (1 credit). Health Education (2 or 3 
credits). Recreation (3 credits), Business Admin- 
istration (3 credits). Child Study and Development 
(3 credits). Psychology (3 credits), Computer 
Science (3 credits). Biology or Zoology, Chemistry, 
Physical Education (1 to 4 credits), Special Educa- 
tion. 

Students who have completed the pre-profession- 
al course requirements (60 credits) may use the 
following courses as additional credits towards a 
degree: PSYC 200— Statistics, PHED 400— Kine- 
siology, PHED 460 — Physiology of Exercise, and 
Biomedical Instrumentation offered by Electrical 
Engineering. 

Pre-Physical Curriculum 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall 

MATH 3 

CHEM 103 4 

ENGL 101 3 

PSYC 100 or SPCH 100 3 

Elective 1-3 

Total Semester Credit Load 14 16 

Spring 

MATH 3 

CHEM 104 4 

PSYC 100 or SPCH 100 3 

ZOOL 101 4 

Elective 1 4 

Total Semester Credit Load 15-18 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall 
Freshman Year 

PHYS 121 4 

ARTS & HUMANITIES 3 

PSYC 3 

ZOOL 4 

Elective 1-4 

Total Semester Credit Load 15-18 

Spring 

PHYS 122 4 

ARTS & HUMANITIES 3 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 1-4 

Total Semester Credit Load 14-17 

Pre-Radiologic Technology 
Requirements: Students must contact an advisor, 
immediately, upon entering the pre-radiologic tech- 
nology program. Information regarding advisors 
is available in Room 203 of Turner Laboratory on 
the College Park Campus. 

Students must complete 60 semester hours in 
academic subjects prior to being officially admitted 
to the junior year at the Baltimore City campus. 
Students should apply for admission to the junior 



year after completion of 45 semester hours. The 
following courses must be closely adhered to by the 
student in planning a curriculum that will be 
recognized by the University of Maryland lor 
graduation, and by the American Registry of 
Radiologic Technologists for the Registry Examina- 
tion. 

A student who is already registered with the 
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists 
.nust also comply with the following admission 
requirements. 
English 101 3 

Eng'ish Requuemeni 6 

Speech Requirement 3 

Physics 121-122 8 

Chemistry 103-104 8 

Bio'ogy or Zoology 8 

Math lis or no (115 preferred) 3 

Psychology Requirement 3 

Socio'ogy Requirement 3 

Fine Arts or Philosophy Requirement 3 

Eiectives Required 12 

Total .60 

Pre-Theology 

The College of Agriculture cooperates with the 
officers of any theological seminary who desire to 
urge prospective students to pursue courses in 
agriculture as a preparation for the rural ministry. 
Such pre-theologlcal students may enroll for a 
semester or more or for the usual four-year program 
of the College. In either case they should enroll as 
members of the general curriculum in the College 
of Agriculture. Students desiring to pursue a pre- 
theological program in the College of Agriculture 
of the University of Maryland should consult with 
the president or admissions officer of the theological 
seminary which they expect to attend. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

The pre-velerinary medicine program is based upon 
the requirements established by the Colleges of 
Veterinary Medicine where students who are resi- 
dents of Maryland may be offered admission. 

There is no College of Veterinary Medicine in 
Maryland. However, the State of Maryland partici- 
pates under an agreement with the Southern 
Regional Education Board for the education of 
Maryland residents in veterinary medicine. Up to 
twelve spaces a year in the College of Veterinary 
Medicine at the University of Georgia, and up to six 
places in the four years at Tuskegee Institute are 
reserved for qualified Maryland residents who may 
be offered admission by the respective institutions. 

The University of Maryland also has an agree- 
ment with The Ohio State University under which a 
maximum of six Maryland residents may be offered 
admission each year by the College of Veterinary 
Medicine at Ohio State University. 



The Colleges of Veterinary Medicine at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia, The Ohio State University and 
Tuskegee Institute have the final and exclusive 
authority on all matters related to admission. 

It is not possible for Colleges of Veterinary 
Medicine to admit all eligible applicants. Therefore, 
pre-protessional students are urged to also consider 
alternate objectives in a program leading to the 
B.S. degree. 

Undergraduate students who have completed 
three years in the pre-veterinary program in the 
University of Maryland College of Agriculture and 
have not been admitted to a college of veterinary 
medicine may transfer to one of the curriculums at 
the University of Maryland in order to complete 
the B.S. degree. 

No specific major is required for favorable con- 
sideration by a veterinary school admissions 
committee. 

The course requirements listed represent the 
minimum requirements for admission to the Colleges 
of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, 
Tuskegee Institute and Ohio State. 

Chemistry 14 

Physics 6 

Mathematics 3 

Biology (including genetics) 10 

English 6 

Humanities and Social Studies 14 

Eiectives* 10 



Combined Degree Curriculum — College of Agricul- 
ture and Veterinary Medicine. Students enrolled 
in the College of Agriculture who have completed 
at least 90 hours, including all University. Division 
and College requirements, plus additional credits 
in Animal Science, may qualify for the B.S. degree 
from the University of Maryland. College of Agricul- 
ture, upon successfull completion in a College of 
Veterinary Medicine of at least 30 semester hours. 

Combined Degree Requirements 

COMBINED DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

General University Requirements 30 

ANSC 221 — Fundamentals of Animal Production .... 3 

ANSC 211 — Anatomy of Domestic Animals 4 

ANSC 212 — Applied Animal Physiology 4 

BOTN 101 — General Bolany* 4 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 4 

ZOOL 102— The Animal Phyla 4 

Mathematics (must include at least 3 credits 

of Calculus)* 6 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104 — College Chemistry II 4 

CHEM 201— College Chemistry Ml 3 

CHEM 202— College Chemistry Laboratory III 2 

CHEM 203 — College Chemistry IV 3 

CHEM 204— College Chemistry Laboratory IV 2 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PHYS 122 — Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

Eiectives 5 

'Satisfies Divitional Raquiramania 



Additional information at>out this program may t>e 
obtained from the Department of Veterinary Science. 

Other Pre-ProfeMional Area* 

Academic preparation for several other professions 
such as optometry, osteopathy and podiatry is 
available For the requirements of these professional 
schools, please consult their respective catalogs. 

Psychology 

Chairman: Barllett. 

Professors: Anderson. Crites. Fretz. Goldstein, 

Gollub, Hodos. Norton, Levinson. Martin, Mclntire, 

Mills. Scholnick, Steinman, Taylor. Tyler. Waldrop. 

Associate Professors: Brown. Dies. Larkin, 

Schneider, Sigall, Smith, Sternheim, Teitelbaum, 

Ward. 

Assistant Professors: Barrett, Carroll, Claiborn, 

Coursey, Dachler. Gatz, Holmgren, Johnson. 

Meltzer. Osterhouse. Specter. 

Joint Appointment: Locke. Prof.. Coll. Bus. 4 Mgmt. 

Instructors (Part-time): Castro. McHugh. Merigan. 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Jensen. 

Affiliated Faculty: 

Freeman. Assoc. Pro., Coun. Cntr. 

Gelso, Asst. Prof.. Coun. Cntr. 

Tanney, Asst. Pro., Coun. Cntr. 

McKenzie. Assoc. Prof.. Coun. Cntr. 

Pavey. Asst. Pro., Coun. Cntr. 

Magoon. Prof., Coun. Cntr. 

Mills. Prof.. Coun. Cntr. 

Pumroy, Prof.. Coll. Educ. 
Psychology can t>e classified as a biological science 
(Bachelor of Science degree) and a social science 
(Bachelor of Arts degree) and offers academic 
programs related to both of these fields. The under- 
graduate curriculum in psychology provides an 
organized study of the behavior of man and other 
organisms in terms of the biological conditions and 
social factors which Influence such behavior. In 
addition, the undergraduate program is arranged to 
provide opportunities for learning that will equip 
qualified students to pursue further study of 
psychology and related fields in graduate and pro- 
fessional schools. 

Students who are interested in the biological 
aspects of behavior tend to choose a program 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree, while 
those interested primarily in the social factors of 
behavior tend to choose the Bachelor of Arls 
degree. The choice of program is made in consulta- 
tion with, and requires the approval of. an academic 
advisor. 

Departmental requirements are tt>e same for tlie 
Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Arts 
degrees. A minimum of 31 hours of psychology 
course work is required: courses taken must include 
PSYC 100, 200, and eight additional courses. In 
order to assure breadth these additional eight 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 109 



courses must be selected from four different areas 

(two from each! area). 

The areas and courses are as follows: 
Area I Area II Area III Area IV 

206 221 331 361 

301 333 451 

310 420 335 452 

400 422 431 461 

402 423 433 462 

403 440 435 467 
410 441 

412 Honors 430C 

453 

At least one course of tfiese eigtit must be eitfier 
PSYC 400, 410, or 420. All majors are also required 
to fake MATH 111 or 1 40, or 220 and at least one 
laboratory science course outside of Psycfiology. 
'One additional, more advanced matfi or science 
course (selected from the list appearing in the 
Departmental Program Guide) must also be taken. 
■Approved courses include: 
ZOOL 201 or hiigiier. except ZOOL 207S. 270 

and 280 
MATH 141 or higtier, except 210, 211, and 220 
CHEM 201 or higher, except 302 
PHYS 141 or higher, except 181, 221, 222. 400 

and 401 
MICB 200 or higher 
CMSC 210 or higher 

These math and science courses may be used as 
part of the General University requirements or for 
the supporting course requirements described 
below/, but not for both. IVIajors in psychology are 
urged to take their mathematics and science 
courses in their first two years. 

The supporting courses to supplement the work 
in the major for the Bachelor of Science degree 
must include 18 hours in mathematics and science, 
beyond those courses required by the college. A 
minimum of two courses must be laboratory courses, 
and at least three courses (or 9 hours) must be 
chosen at the advanced level (as described above). 
The particular laboratory and advanced courses 
must be approved by an academic advisor in the 
Department of Psychology. 

The supporting courses for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree must include 18 hours which are chosen 
in related fields to supplement work in the major. 
Of these 18 hours, six must be chosen at the 300 
and 400 level. This set of courses must be approved 
by an academic advisor in psychology. 

Although a minimum of thirty-one (31) hours of 
psychology course work is required for a Psy- 
chology major, each and every Psychology course 
taken by the major student must be counted as 
hours towards the Psychology major. The student 
majoring in Psychology cannot use any Psychology 
course towards the University or Divisional course 
requirements. 



110 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



A grade of C or better must be earned in PSYC 
100, 200 and all 400 level courses or the course 
must be repeated until a C or better is earned. The 
departmental grade point average will be a 
cumulative computation of all grades earned in 
PSYC and must be 2.0 or above. 

Students desiring to enter graduate study in 
certain areas of psychology are advised to take an 
additional laboratory course and/or participate in 
individual research projects. Such students should 
consult an advisor for information about prerequi- 
sites for graduate study in psychology. 

It should be noted that there are three course 
content areas that have two courses, one in the 
300 sequence and one in the 400 sequence. These 
include abnormal (331 and 431) personality (335 and 
435), child psychology (333 and 433). and industrial 
psychology (361 and 461). The courses in the 300 
sequence provide general surveys of the field 
and are intended for non-majors who do not plan 
further in-depth study. The courses in the 400 
sequence provide more comprehensive study with 
particular emphasis on research and methodology. 
The 400 series are intended primarily for psy- 
chology majors. It should be further noted that a 
student may not receive credit for both: 

PSYC 331 and PSYC 431 

PSYC 333 and PSYC 433 

PSYC 335 and PSYC 435 
or 

PSYC 361 and PSYC 461 

Honors. The Department of Psychology also offers 
a special program for the superior student which 
emphasizes independent study and research. Stu- 
dents may be eligible to enter the Honors Program 
who have a 3.3 grade average in all courses or the 
equivalent, who are in the junior year, and who 
demonstrate interest and maturity indicative of 
success in the program. Students in their sopho- 
more year should consult their advisor or the 
Departmental Honors Committee for further infor- 
mation. 

Course Code Prefix— PSYC 

Recreation 

Professor and Chairman: Harvey. 
Associate Professors: Churchill, Strobell. 
Assistant Professor: Leedy. 
Instructors: Becker, Colton, Fain, Thompson. 
Visiting Instructors: Bushart, Hutchison, Stevenson, 
Hawkins, Jarrell, Sperling, Guftafon, Kershaw. 
The increased amount of leisure time existent in 
our society because of the rapid development of 
modern civilization, and the imperative need for 
guidance in the wise use of that leisure time, has 
made society cognizant of the need for trained 
recreation leaders. 

This curriculum, therefore, is designed to meet 
the needs of students who wish to qualify for the 



many positions in the field of recreation, and the 
needs of those students who desire a background 
in skills which will enable them to render distinct 
contributions to community life. The College draws 
upon various other departments and colleges 
within the University for courses to balance and 
enrich its offerings for its recreation curriculum. 

Those majoring in recreation have opportunity for 
observation and practical experience in local, 
county, state, and federal public recreation pro- 
grams, in social and group work agency programs, 
and in the various programs of the Armed Forces, 
American Red Cross, local hospitals, etc. I^ajor 
students are encouraged to select an 'option area' 
of interest around which to center their elective 
courses (for instance: public recreation, recreation 
for the ill and handicapped, outdoor recreation, 
program planning, and resource planning and 
management). 

A very active student University of Maryland 
Recreation and Parks Society, an affiliate of the 
comparable state and national organizations, exer- 
cises degrees of leadership in selecting the annual 
"outstanding senior" and "outstanding alumnus" 
awards, in the granting of the various city, county 
and state society recreation scholarships, in the 
programming of the annual 'Governor's Conference 
on Recreation,' etc. It also provides opportunities 
for university and community services, for rich 
practical experience, and for social experiences for 
those students having a mutual professional 
recreation interest. 

Recreation Curriculum 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

APDS 101— Fundamentals of Design .... 3 

HLTH 150— First Aid 1 

HLTH 140 — Personal and Community 

Health 3 

PHED 182 — Rhythmic Activities 2 

RECR 130 — History and Introduction 

to Recreation 2 

PHED 185. 186, 261 or 262— Skills 
Laboratory 2 or 2 

SPCH 100— Public Speaking 3 

GVPT 170 — American Government 3 

General University Requirements (mini- 
mum of 6, maximum of 12 hrs. in each 
of three areas: A — Science and Ivlath; 
B — Behavioral and Social Science, Hu- 
man and Community Resources: C — 
Arts and Humanities) 9 3 

Total 14-16 15-17 

Sophomore Year 

PECR 150 — Camp Counseling (if 

no experience) 2 

RECR 220 — Corecreational Games 

and Programs 2 

RECR 221 — Naturelore 2 

GRAF 102 or EDIN 106— Recreational 

Crafts or Industrial Arts in the 

Elementary School 2 

SPCH 220 — Group Discussion 3 



MUSC 155— Fundamenlals tor the 

Clasiroom Teacher 3 

Optional Requirements -^ 

General University Requirements .6 6 

Elective) 3 3 

Total 1' '9 

Junior Year 

PHED 305M. 305W. 307M or 307W— Skills 

Laboratory 2 or 2 

RECR 420— Program Planning 3 

RECR 460— Leadership Techniques and 

Practices 3 

RECR 495 — Planning. Design, and 

Maintenance ol Park and Recreation 

Areas and Facilities 3 

RECR 450— Camp Management (it 

previous experience) 3 

PHED 420 — Physical Education lor the 

Elementary School (or subslitute) .3 
EDHO 306 — Study of Human Behavior 

(or subslitute) 3 

Option Requirements 3 3 

General University Requirements 6 

Total 15-17 15-17 

Senior Year 

RECR 490 — Organization and 

Administration ol Recreation 3 

RECR 349 — Observation and Field 

Work in Recreation 8 

SOCY 330 — Community Organization 

(or substitute) 3 

DART 311 or 440 — Play Production or 

Children's Dramatics 3 

Option Requirements 3 

Eleclives 3 3 

Total 18 14 

TOTAL 130-131 hrs. (depending on camping 
course selection) 

Minor In Recreation (24 hours) 

18 semester hours in recreation and 6 semester hours in 
cognate areas, including in the 18 hours the following: 
10 hours in RECR 130. 150. 221. 420. 450. 325. 460. 495 

or 490; RECR 220; SOCY 330 or substitute 
6 hours ol vKork in areas ol the recreational skills — 

nature, arts and crafts, speech and dramatics — but not 

in the area of the student's major. 
2 hours of work in the areas of swimming, sports and 

dance skills. 

or 
Other courses approved by the advisor and the various 
departments involved, depending upon the student's in- 
terest and background. 

plus 
Elective courses (6 hours) selected with the approval of 
the advisor. 

Area ol Academic Concentration (18 hours). Stu- 
dents in early childhood-elementary education are 
required to develop within their degree programs an 
area of academic concentration consisting of a 
minimum of 18 semester hours. One of the approved 
areas is recreation. 

CoutM Oxs* Pfe'i— RECR 



Russian Area Program 

Director Yanoy 

This program is for the student who wants to 
concentrate his studies in the humanities and the 
social sciences on the Russian area. II includes 
work m language and literature, history, 
government and politics, economics, and geo- 
graphy. The student may emphasize any one of 
these disciplines in completing his courses. The 
program prepares the student for graduate work in 
the Russian area, but by proper selection of 
courses a student may concentrate his worl< 
sufficiently in one discipline to be able to take up 
graduate work in this particular field. 

The student following this program must meet 
the general requirements (or a degree. He 
should select Russian to meet the foreign 
language requirement. 

The student must complete at least 30 hours of 
work in the Russian area, including 12 hours of 
advanced courses in Russian language. 6 hours in 
Russian history, 6 hours in Russian government, 3 
hours in Soviet economics, and 3 hours in Soviet 
geography. 

The student must complete an additional 18 
hours of advanced work in the above disciplines. 
Of these 18. at least 12 must all be in one ol the 
departments and at the 300-400 level. 

Normally, the student's advisor will be a Russian 
specialist in the department in which he does 
most of his work. 
Secondary Education 
Professor and Chairman: Risinger. 
Art Education — 

Professor: Lembach. 

Associate Professors: Longley. McWhinnie. 

Lecturer: White. 
Business Education — 

Associate Professors: Anderson. Peters. 

instructors: Hall, O'Neill, Vignone. 
Dance Education — 

Professor: Warren. 
Distributive Education 

Assistant Professor: Ricci. 
Englisti Education: 

Professor: Woolf. 

Associate Professor: Carr. 

Assistant Professor: James. 
Foreign Language Education — 

Assistant Professors: Baird, DeLorenzo. McArlhur, 
Pfister. 
Home Economics Education — 

Associate Professor: Lemmon. 

Assistant Professors: Brown, Green. 

Instructor: (filler. 
Mattiematics Education — 
Professor: Walbesser. 



Associate Professors: Davidson, Fey, Honkelman. 

Assistant Professors: Cole, Tunis. 
Music Education — 

Professors: Grentzer, Taylor. 

Associate Professor: Blum. 

Assistant Professor: Shelley. 
Physicat Education (Men) 

Assistant Professor: Wrenn. 
Physical Education (Women) 

Associate Professor: Love. 
Reading Education — 

Associate Professor: Brigham. 

Assistant Professor: Davey. 
Science Education — 

Professors: Gardner, Lockard. 

Assistant Professors: Golmon, Layman. Ridky. 
Social Studies Education — 

Professors: Campbell, Grambs. 

Associate Professors: Adkins, Farrell. 

Assistant Professor: Cirrincione. 
Speech Education — 

Lecturer: Schickert. 

Instructor: Carter. 

Secondary Education. The Department of 
Secondary Education is concerned with the 
preparation ol teachers of middle schools, junior 
high schools, and senior high schools in the 
following areas; art, dance, distributive education. 
English, foreign languages, general business, 
home economics, mathematics, music, secretarial 
education, science, social studies, and speech 
and drama. 

In the areas of art and music, teachers are 
prepared to teach in both elementary and secondary 
schools. Majors in physical education and 
agriculture are offered in the College ol Physical 
Education. Recreation, and Health and the College 
ol Agriculture in cooperation with the College of 
Education. Majors in reading are offered only at 
the graduate level, requiring a bachelor's degree, 
certification, and at least two years of successful 
teaching experience as prerequisites. 

All students who pursue the Bachelor of Arts 
degree in secondary education are required to 
complete two years (12 semester hours) or the 
equivalent of a foreign language on the college 
level. If a student has had three years of one foreign 
language or two years of each of two foreign 
languages as recorded on his high school trans- 
cript, he is not required to take any foreign langu- 
ages in the college, although he may elect to do so. 

If a student is not exempt from the foreign 
language requirement, he must complete courses 
through the 104 level of a modem foreign language 
or 204 level of a classical language. 

In the modern languages. French. German, 
and Spanish, he should take the placement test in 
the language in which he has had work if he wishes 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 111 



to continue the same language; his language 
instruction would start at the level indicated by the 
test. With classical languages, he would start at 
the level indicated in the catalog. 

For students who come under the provisions 
above, the placement test may also serve as a 
proficiency test and may be taken by a student any 
time (once a semester) to try to fulfill the 
language requirement. 

Students who have studied languages other than 
French. German, or Spanish, or who have lived 
for two or more years in a foreign country where 
a language other than English prevails, shall be 
placed by the chairman of the respective language 
section, if feasible, or by the chairmen of the 
foteign language departments. Native speakers of 
a foreign language shall satisfy the foreign langu- 
age requirements by taking 12 semester hours of 
English. 

All students who elect the secondary education 
curriculum will fulfill the preceding general require- 
ments and also prepare to teach one or more 
school subjects which will involve meeting specific 
requirements in particular subject matter fields. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in the 
teaching fields of art, English, foreign languages, 
mathematics, social studies, and speech and 
drama. The Bachelor of Science degree is offered 
in art, dance, distributive education, general 
business, home economics, mathematics, music, 
science, secretarial education, and speech and 
drama. 

The student teaching semester is a full-time com- 
mitment and interference with this commitment 
because of employment is not permitted. 

Living arrangements, including transportation 
for the student teaching assignments, are 
considered the responsibility of the student. 

An Education. Students in art education enroll in 
one of two programs, elementary or secondary 
art education. The proposed programs are listed 
below: 

Secondary Art Education Curriculum 

Freshman Year I II 

Semester 
ENGL 101 — Composition or alternate ... 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 3 

ARTH 100 — Introduction to Art 3 

ARTS 100 — Design I or APDS 101 

or ARTE 100 3 

ARTS 110 — Drawing I 3 

Foreign Language ' or Electives 3 3 

Total 12 IS 

^ Required foreign language credit, 2 years or equivalent. 

Sophomore Year 

EDSE 260 — Introduction to Art Education 3 

General University Requirements 6 6 

Foreign Language or Electives 3 3 



ARTH 260, 261— Art History 3 

ARTS 220 — Painting I 

APDS 103 — Three Dimensional Design 

(or ARTS 200 or APDS 102) 

ARTS 210— Drawing II 3 

Total 18 

Junior Year 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

General University Requirements 6 

Electives 

ARTS 340 — Printmaking I or 

APDS 230 — Silkscreen Printing 3 

ARTS 330 — Sculpture I 

Total 15 

Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education ... 3 

GRAF 220 — Ceramics 6 

Electives in Crafts 3 

EDSE 340 — Curriculum, Instruction. 

Observation — Art 3 

EDUC 440 — Audio-Visual Education or 

Education Elective 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 360 — Student Teaching in the 

Secondary School 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

Total 15 

Elementary Art Education Curriculum 

s 

Freshman Year I 

ENGL 101 — Composition or Alternate . . 3 

General University Requirements 6 

ARTH 100 — Introduction to Art 

ARTS 100 — Design I or ARTE 100 — 

Fundamentals of Art or APDS 101 . 3 

ARTS 110 — Drawing I 3 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

Electives 

Total 15 

Sophomore Year 

EDSE 260 — Introduction to Art Education 3 

General University Requirements 6 

ARTH 260. 261— Art History 3 

ARTS 220 — Painting I 

CRAF 220 — Ceramics 

Electives 3 

Total 15 

Junior Year 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

General University Requirements 3 

ARTS 330 — Sculpture I 3 

Electives 3 

APDS 103 — Three Dimensional Design 

(or ARTS 20O or APDS 102 or 

EDSE 440) 

ARTS 340 — Printmaking or APDS — 

Silkscreen Printing 

Total 15 

Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education ... 3 

EDEL 41 2A — Art in the Elementary School 3 



Electives m Crafts 3 

Electives 9 

EDUC 440 — Audio-Visual Education or 

Education Elective 3 

EDEL 311 — The Child and the Curriculum . . 3 

EDEL 332 — Student Teaching in the 

Elementary School 8 

Total 18 14 

Business Education. Three curricula are offered for 
preparation of teachers of business subjects. The 
General Business Education curriculum qualifies 
for teaching all business subjects except shorthand. 
Providing thorough training In general business, 
including economics, this curriculum leads to 
teaching positions on both junior and senior high 
school levels. 

The Secretarial Education curriculum Is adapted 
to the needs of those who wish to become teachers 
of shorthand as well as other business subjects. 

The Distributive Education curriculum prepares 
students for vocational teaching requirements in 
cooperative marketing and merchandising 
programs. 

General Business Education 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

General University Requirements 9 6 

SPCH Public Speaking 3 

BSAD 110 — Elements of Business 

Enterprise 3 

MATH 110. Ill — Introduction to 

Mathematics 3 3 

EDSE 100. 101 — Principles of Typewriting 

and Intermediate Typewriting 2 2 

Total 14 17 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ECON 100 — Economic Developments 3 

ECON 201. 203— Principles of Economics 3 3 

EDSE 200 — Office Typewriting Problems .2 

Business Electives 3 

EDSE 201 — Survey of Office Machines .. 2 
BSAD 220. 221 — Principles of Accounting 3 3 

GEOG 203 — Introductory Economic 
Geography 3 

Total 16 15 

Junior Year 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

IFSM 401 — Electronic Data Processing .... 3 

BSAD 350 — Marketing Principles and 

Organization 3 

BSAD 380 — Business Law 3 

Electives 300 to 400 level course in 

Economics 3 

General University Requirements 3 6 

Electives 6 

Total 18 15. 

Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education . . 3 
IFSM 402 — Electronic Data Processing 
Applications 3 



112 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



EOSE 341— Curriculum. Instruction, and 

Observation — Business Subjscis 
EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 489— Field Experience 

EOSE 300 — Techniques ol Teaching 

Ottice Skills 

EDSE 36t— Student Teaching In the 

Secondary Schools 

EOSE 415 — Financial and Economic 

Education 

EOSE 416— Financial and Economic 

Education 



Olslribulive Education 

Se 
Freshman Year I 

General University Requirements 9 

BSAD 110 — Business Enterprise 3 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 
ECON 201— Principles o( Economics 3 

ECON 203 — Principles ol Economics ... 

Total 15 

Sophomore Year 

BSAD 220 — Principles ol Accounting 3 

BSAD 221 — Principles ol Accounting 

Business Electives 9 

General University Requirements 3 

Total IS 

Junior Year 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

BSAD 350 — Marlteting Principles and 

Organization 3 

BSAD 351 — Marketing Management 3 

BSAD 360 — Personnel Management I 3 

BSOA 353 — Retailing 

BSAD 380— Business Law 

EOSE 423B — Field Experience — DE 

General University Education 

Upper Division 3 

Total 18 

Senior Year 

EOSF 301— Foundations ol Education 3 

EDSE 420 — Organization and Coordination 

ol Distributive Education Programs 3 

BSAD 352 — Advertising 3 

EDSE 341 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods ol 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

EOSE 363 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 

Eleclives 6 

Total 15 

Secretarial Education 

S 
Fresnman Year ' 

General University Requirements 9 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

EDSE 100 — Principles ol Typewriting 

(II Exempt, BSAD 110) 2 
EOSE 101 — Intermediate Typewriting 



EDSE 102. 103— Principles ol 

Shorthand I, II 

General University Raqulremanis 



Total 



Sophomore Year 

Business Electives 

BSAD 220, 221— Principles ol Accounting 
ECON 201, 203 — Principles ol Economics 
EDSE 200 — Ollice Typewriting Problems 
EDSE 201— Survey ol Ollice Machines , 
EDSE 204 — Advanced Shorthand and 

Transcription 
EOSE 205 — Problems in Transcription , . 

Total 

.lunior Year 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 

EDSE 304— Administrative Secretarial 

Procedures 

BSAD 380 — Business Law 

Electives 

IFSM 401— Electronic Data Processing 
Elective in General University 

Requirements (Upper Division) 



Total 

Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations ol Education 
EDSE 305 — Secretarial Ollice Practice , 
EDSE 300 — Techniques ol Teaching 

Ollice Skills 

EDSE 341 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation — Business Subjects 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods ol 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

EDSE 361 — Student Teaching in Secondary 

Schools 

Electives — 300 or 400 Level 



ART (Studio or History) 

ZOOL 201- Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 
DANC 248A — Dance Techniques 
PHEO ISO — Rhythmic Activities 
MUSC 130 — Survey ol Music Literature 
ZOOL 202 — Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 
DANC 348 — Dance Techniques 
DANC 208 — Elementary Dance 

Composition 
Elective 

Total 
Junior Year 

General University Requirements 
DANC 389 — Dance Techniques . 
DANC 470 — Creative Dance lor Children 
DANC 400 — Advanced Choreographic 

Forms 

PHEO 400 — Kinesiology 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 

DANC 499 — Advanced Dance Techniques 
DANC 305 — Development ol Dance 

Progression 

Total 

Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations ol Education 

DANC 484 — Theory and Philosophy 

ol Dance 

DANC 492 — Percussion and Music 

Sources lor Dance 

EDSE 342 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods ol 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

EDSE 362— Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 



Total 



Dance Education. The Dance Education curriculum 
prepares students lor teaching in the public 
schools, for further graduate study, and for 
possible teaching in college. 



Freshman Year 

General University Requirements 
ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 
DANC 100 — Dance Techniques 
HEALTH 105 — Science and Theory ol 

Health 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 
DANC 102 — Rhythmic Invention (or Dance 

DANC 200 — Introduction to Dance 

DANC 104 — Dance Techniques 

DART 120— Acting 



Semester 
I II 

9 3 



Total 

PHED 066-078 

I, 040-065 

II PHED 066-078 

9 040-065 

3 Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 
MUSC 150 — Theory ol Music or 
2 MUSC 155 — Fundamentals lor the 
Classroom Teacher 



8 



Total 15 1. 

English Education. A major in English requires 45 
semester hours as lollows: ENGL 201: 211 or 212; 
481 ; 403 or 404 or 405: or 221 or 222; 482: 493: 
three hours each in a type, and period: 9 hours 
electives. Related Fields: SPCH 100 and 240. 

Semester 
Freshman Year ' ' 

General University Requirements 12 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

Foreign Language 3 

Elective 

Total 15 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 9 

ENGL 201: 202 or 211, 212 or 

221. 222 3 

SPCH 240 — Oral Interpretation 

Foreign Language 3 

Elective 

Total 15 

Junior Year 

EDHD 3(X)S — Human Development and 

Learning 

ENGL 403 or 404 or 405 



15 



Departments. Programs and Curricula / 113 



American Literature and English 

Literature 3 3 

ENGL 481 — Introduction to English 

Grammar 3 

ENGL 493 — Advanced Expository Writing 3 

English (period) 3 

English (type) 3 

ENGL 482— History of the English 

Language 3 

Free electives 3 

Total 15 18 

Senior Year 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 1 

EDSE 344 — Curriculum. Instruction and 

Observation 3 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 2 

EDSE 453 — The Teaching of Reading in 

the Secondary Schools 3 

EDSE 364 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

ENGL period (major figure) 3 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education . . 3 

English electives 9 

Total 17 15 

Foreign Language Education. The Foreign Lan- 
guage Education curriculum is designed for prospec- 
tive foreign-language teachers in secondary 
schools. 

Classical Language-Latin. A minor for teaching 
Latin requires 24 prescribed semester hours based 
upon two years of high school Latin. These students 
should take LATN 203, 204, 305. 351, 352, 361, 401, 
402. Students who have had four years of high 
school Latin should begin with LATN 305 and 
should select two additional courses from among 
LATN 403, 404. 405. 

Prospective Latin teachers are urged to elect 
courses which will lead to a second area of 
concentration. 

Modem Foreign Languages. All prospective 
foreign language teachers must take a minimum of 
42 semester hours in the foreign languages in- 
cluding the following courses which are required for 
certification: one year of conversation, one year of 
advanced grammar and composition, one year of 
survey of literature, one year of advanced literature 
(400 level) and one semester of advanced civiliza- 
tion (300 or 400 level) or previously approved 
equivalents. 

'Foreign Language Education Majors are 
strongly urged to elect courses which will lead to 
a second area of concentration (i.e. a second 
foreign language. Teaching English to Speakers of 
Other Languages. English. Social Studies, etc.) 

It is recommended that students who plan to 
teach a foreign language contact the appropriate 
Foreign Language Education advisor early in their 
college career (preferably Freshman year) so that 
they can plan an integrated program of specialized, 
professional and liberal education. 



Secondary Foreign Language Education 

Freshman Year 

General University Requirements 

SPEECH 100— Public Speaking 

intarmediate Foreign Language (or 
appropriate level as determined by 
placement exam) 

Electives* 



Total 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

Foreign Language — Grammar and 

Composition 

Foreign Language — Survey of Literature . 
Foreign Language — Advanced 

Conversation 

Electives' 

Total 

Junior Year 

General University Requirements (upper 
level) 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 
Learning 

Foreign Language— Literature (400 level) 

Foreign Language — Civilization 

Electives in Foreign Language or Related 
Area (i.e. advanced language courses, 
second language. Introduction to 
Linguistics, Cultural Anthropology, 
Historic Geography of the Hispanic 
World, etc.)* 

Foreign Language — Elective (400 level) . 



Total 

Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education . . 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 
Secondary Education 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

EDSE 345 — Curriculum Instruction, 
Observation 

EDSE 365 — Student Teaching in the 
Secondary Schools 

Elective from EDUC 440 — Audio-Visual 
Education. EDSE 499T — Teaching 
English as a Secondary Language. 
EDSE 453 — The Teaching of Reading 
in the Secondary School, or 
EDSE 499X— Bilingual Education 

General University Requirements (upper 
level) 

Electives" 



Total 



15 



FMCD 105 — Introduction to Family Living 
FOOD 110 — Food and Nutrition ol 

Individuals and Family or NUTR 100 — 

Elements of Nutrition 

EDSE 151 — Freshman Seminar in 

Home Economics 

TEXT 105 — Textiles in Contemporary 

Living 

General University Requirements 

APDS 101 — Fundamentals of Design .... 
PSYC 100 — Introduction to Psychology . . 
SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology . . 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

TXAP 221 — Apparel I (if exempted, may 

take TXAP 222 or TXAP 425) 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 

General University Requirements 

HSAD 240 — Design and Furnishings in the 

Home or HSAD 241 — Family Housing . . 
EDSE 210 — Sophomore Seminar in Home 

Economics Education 

FOOD 200 — Scientific Principles ol Food 
FMCD 332 — The Child in the Family or 

EDHD 411 — Child Growth and 

Development 

Total 

Junior Year 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 
Learning 

FMCD 280 — Household Equipment and 
Space Utilization or FMCD 443 — 
Consumer Problems or FMCD 341 — 
Personal and Family Finance 

FOOD 260 — Meal Management 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals ol Economics 

FMCD 344 — Resident Experience in Home 
Management or FMCD 344B — Practicum 
in Home Management 

EDSE 380 — Field Experience in 
Organization and Administration of 
a Child Development Laboratory 

EDSE 425 — Curriculum Development in 
Home Economics 

Area of Concentration 

General University Requirements 



Home Economics Education. The Home Economics 
Education curriculum is designed for students who 
are preparing to teach home economics. It includes 
study of each area of home economics and the 
supporting disciplines. 

Fifteen hours of the total curriculum include an 
area of concentration which must be unified in 
content and which will be chosen by the student." 



3(4) 



Total 

Senior Year 

EDSE 347 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

EDSE 370 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools: Home Economics 
FMCD 260 — Family Relations or 

SOCY 443 — The Family and Society . 
EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education . 
ZOOL 101 — General Zoology or 

MICR 200 — General Microbiology ... 
Area of Concentration 



18(19) 



Freshman Year 

FMCD 250 — Decision Making in Family 
Living 



II 



Total 14 19 

'Area of Conc«nlration: IS semester hours. 

A) Including maximum or two tiome economics courses or in applied 
area, with the remainder of the 1S hours in supporting behavioral, 
physical and biclogical sciences, philosophy, geography and history. 

B) Ot the 1S hours, nine must be upper divisional courses. 



114 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Mathemallct Educallon. A maior In mathemotlcs 
requires trie complel(on o( MATH 241 or Its 
•quivalenl and a minimum ol IS semostor hours ot 
malh«mdlics courses at the 400 lovei. These 400 
(•v«l courses must include MATH 403. 450 and one 
ol lh« geometry courses. 430 or 431. The remainder 
of the courses m mathematics are to be selected 
with the approval o( the advisor. The maior must 
be supported by one ol the following science 
sequences: CHEM 103 and 104; PHYS 121 and 
122 and 181 and 182 or 221 and 222 or 161 and 262: 
BOTN 100 and three additional hours in BOTN 
courses: ZOOL 101 and three additional hours In 
ZOOL courses: ASTR 180 and 110 and three more 
hours ol ASTR (none of which Include ASTR 100 
or 105). The following sample program is one way to 
fulfill requirements. 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication 3 

MATH 140 141— Analysis I 

Analysis II 4 4 

Science Requirement 35 3-5 

General University Requirement 3 6 

Total 13-15 13-15 

Sophomore Year 

MATH 240. 241— Linear Algebra, 

Analysis III 4 4 

General University Requirement 6 6 

Eleclives 5-7 5-7 

Total 15-17 15-17 

Junior Year 

MATH 430 — Geometric Transformations 

or MATH 431 — Foundations ol 

Geometry 3 

MATH 402 — Algebraic Structures or 

MATH 403 — Introduction to Abstract 

Algebra 3 

MATH 450 — Fundamental Concepts of 

Matliematics 3 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

EOSE 350 — Curriculum. Instruction, 

Observation — Mathematics* 3 

Mathematics Eleclives (400 level) 3 

General University Requirement 3 6 

Total ... 15 15 

Senior Year 

Mathematics Eleclives (400 level) 3 

EDSF 301 — Foundations ol Education .... 3 

EOSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 2 

EOSE 489 — Field Experience 1 

EOSE 372 — Student Teaching In 

Secondary School Mathematics 8 

Education Elective 3 

Eleclives 10 

Total 14 16 

'Must b« taiitn t«m«tt«r prior to ttudtnl tatcMng 

Music Education. The curriculum in music leads to a 
Bachelor ol Science degree in education with a 



maior in music education. It is planned to meet the 
growing demand lor specialists, supervisors and 
resource teachers in music in the schools. The 
program provides training in the teaching ol 
vocal and instrumental music and leads to 
cortilicalion to teach music at both elementary and 
secondary school levels in Maryland and many 
other states. There are two options. The vocal 
option is lor students whose principal Instrument 
IS voice or piano: the Instrumental option is lor 
students whose principal instrument is an orchestral 
or band instrument. 

All students are carelully observed at various 
stages ol their programs by members ol the 
Music Education laculty. This is intended to insure 
the maximum development and growth ol each 
student's prolessional and personal competencies. 
Each student is assigned to an advisor who guides 
him through the various stages ol advancement in 
the program ol music and music education. 

instrumental Option 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

MUSC 108. 109— Applied Music 

(principal instr.) 2 2 

MUSC 131 — Introduction to Music . . 3 

MUSC 150. 151— Theory ol Music . . 3 3 

MUSC 102. 103— Class Piano 2 2 

ENGL 101 — Composition or 

alternate 3 

SPCH 110 — Voice and Diction 3 

General University Requirements . . 3 6 

Total 16 16 

MUSC 129G— Orchestra or 

MUSC 129— Band (1) (1) 

Sophomore Year 

MUSC 208. 209— Applied Music 

(principal instr ) 2 2 

MUSC 250. 251— Advanced Theory 

ol Music 4 4 

MUSC 113, 114, 116. 117— Class Study 

ol Instruments (3-4 courses) 2 or 4 2 or4 

ENGL 201, 202— World Literature or 

alternates 3 3 

General University Requirements ... 6 3 

Total 17 or 19 14 or 16 

MUSC 229G— Orchestra or 

MUSC 2291— Band (1) (1) 

MUSC 129 — Chamber Music Ensemble 

(elective) (1) (1) 

Semester 
Junior Year I II 

MUSC 408. 409 — Applied Music 

(principal instr.) 2 2 

MUSC 330. 331— History ol Music . 3 3 

MUSC 490 491— Conducting 2 2 

MUSC 120. 213 — Class Study of 

Instruments (2 or 3 courses) 2 2 or 4 

MUED 410— Methods ol Class 

Instrumental Instruction 2 

MUEO 470 — Music in Secondary 

Schools 2 

EDHO 300S — Human Development 

and Learning 6 



Guneral University Requirement 3 

Total 17 14 or 16 

MUSC 329G — Orchestra or 

MUSC 3291- Band (1) (1) 

MUSC 329 — Chamber Music Eniamble 

(elective) (1) (1) 

Senior Year 

MUSC 41S— Applied Music 

(principal instr.) 2 

MUSC 100— Class Voice 2 

MUSC 486 — Orcheslrallon 2 or 3 

MUED 420 — Band and Orchestra 

Techniques and Administration 3 

EOSE 373. EDEL 335— Student 

Teaching 8 

EDSF 301— Foundations ol 

Education 3 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods 

ol Secondary Education 2 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 1 

General University Requirements . . 6 3 

Total 17 or 18 14 

MUSC 329G — Orchestra or 

MUSC 3291— Band (1) (1) 

MUSC 329 — Chamber Music Ensemble 

(elective) (1) 

Vocal Option 

Semester 

Freshman Year t II 

MUSC 108. 109— Applied Music 

(principal instr.) 2 2 

MUSC 131 — Introduction to Music 3 

MUSC 150. 151— Theory ol Music 3 3 

MUSC 100— Class Voice, MUSC 099B — 

Applied Music (voice), MUSC 102. 

103 — Class Piano 2 2 

ENGL 101 — Composition or alternate 3 

SPCH 110 — Voice and Diction 3 

General University Requirements 3 6 

Total 16 16 

MUSC 129A— Men's Glee Club, 

MUSC 129B— Women's Chorus, 

MUSC 129 — Chamber Ensemble, or 

MUSC 129C— University Choir (1) (1) 

Sophomore Year 

MUSC 208, 209— Applied Music 

(principal instr.) 2 2 

MUSC 200. 201— Advanced Class Voice . 2 2 

MUSC 202. 203 — Advanced Class Piano . 2 2 

MUSC 250. 251 — Advanced Theory ol 

Music 4 4 

ENGL 201, 202— World Literature or 

alternates 3 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Total 16 16 

MUSC 229A— Mens Glee Club, 

MUSC 229B— Women's Chorus, 

MUSC 229 — Chamber Music Ensemble, 

or MUSC 229C — University Choir (1) (1) 

Junior Year 

MUSC 408. 409 — Applied Music 

(principal instr.) 2 2 

MUSC 110— Class Study ol 

String Instruments. MUSC 111— Class 

Study ol String Instruments 2 2 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 115 



MUSC 330, 331— History ol Music 3 3 

MUSC 490. 491— Conducting 2 2 

MUED 462 — Music for the Elementary 

School Specialist 2 

MUED 470 — Music in Secondary Schools . 2 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning ^ 

General University Requirement 3 

Total 14 17 

MUSC 329A — Men's Glee Club, 

MUSC 329B — Women's Chorus, 

MUSC 329 — Chamber Music Ensemble, 

or MUSC 329C— University Choir (1) (1) 

Senior Year 

MUSC 410 — Applied Music 

(principal instr.) 2 

MUED 480 — The Vocal Music Teacher 

and School Organization 2 

MUED 472 — Methods and Materials in 

Vocal Music for Secondary Schools 2 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 2 1 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

EDEL 375, EDSE 373— Student Teaching 4 4 

General University Requirements 6 6 

Total 19 16 

MUSC 329A — Men's Glee Club, 
MUSC 329B — Women's Chorus, 
MUSC 329 — Chamber Music Ensemble, 
or MUSC 329C— University Choir (1) 

Physical Education and Health. This curriculum is 
designed to prepare students for teacliing physical 
education in elementary and secondary schools. 
To obtain full particulars on course requirements, 
the student should refer to the sections on the 
Department of Physical Education and the 
Department of Health Education, 
Science Education. A science major consists of 52 
semester hours study in the academic sciences. 

The following courses are required for all 
Science Education majors: BOTN 101: CHEt^ 103: 
CHEM 104: PHYS 121. 122 or 221, 222 and 
ZOOL 101; and a year of mathematics. Additional 
courses are selected from the academic sciences, 
with the approval of the student's advisor, so as 
to provide a minimum of 36 hours in a particular 
science teaching area, e.g., biology, chemistry, 
physics, and earth sciences, as noted below. 

Preparation for biology teaching will include 
BOTN 202: ZOOL 102; I^IGB 200; genetics 
(ZOOL 246 or BOTN 414); Human Anatomy and 
Physiology (ZOOL 201 and/or 202): a field course 
in both Botany and Zoology (BOTN 212, 462-464, 
or 417; ZOOL 270-271, 480 or ENTM 200); 
CHEM 201, 202. 

Preparation for chemistry teaching will include 
CHEM 103, 104, 201, 202, 203, 204, 481, 482, 498 
and upper division courses such as CHEM 321, 
401, 403, 421, 440, 461. Math preparation should 
include MATH 115, 140, 141. MATH 240 and 241 or 
246 are also recommended. 



Preparation for physics teaching will include math 
through at least MATH 240, and 241 and 246 also 
recommended. Physics courses will include intro- 
ductory physics with calculus (PHYS 221, 222), 
lab courses (PHYS 285. 286), Intermediate 
Theoretical Physics (PHYS 404, 405), and Modern 
Physics (PHYS 420). In addition, a physics teacher 
should take course work in Astronomy (ASTR 110, 
180). Participation in PSSC or Harvard Project 
Physics courses (when offered) would be 
desirable. 

Preparation for earth science teaching will include 
one year of biology (BOTN 101 and ZOOL 101), 
one year of chemistry (CHEM 103 and 104), one 
year of physics (PHYS 221, 222 preferred), MATH 
115 and 140, and at least 30 hours of earth 
sciences with 18 hours concentration in one of the 
earth science fields and six hours minimum in each 
of two other earth science areas: GEOL 100, 
102, 110, 112, 421, 422, 431, 441, 460, 489, 499; 
ASTR 100 and 105, 110, 180, 410, 498; GEOG 440, 
445, 446, 441, 370, 372, 462. 

Biology 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

BOTN 101— General Botany 4 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 4 

MATH 110— Introduction to 

Mathematics I 3 

MATH 111— Introduction to 

Mathematics II 3 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

SPCH 100— Public Speaking 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Total 14 17 

Sophomore Year 

BOTN 202— The Plant Kingdom 4 

ZOOL 102— The Animal Phyla 4 

MICR 200 — General Microbiology 4 

CHEM 201— College Chemistry III 3 

CHEM 202— College Chemistry III 

Laboratory 2 

General University Requirements 6 9 

Total 15 17 

Junior Year 

ZOOL 246 or BOTN 414— Genetics 4 

ZOOL 201 — Human Anatomy and 

Physio'ogy 4 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I . . 4 

PHYS 122 — Fundamentals of Physics M .... 4 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

General University Requirements 6 3 

Total 14 17 

Senior Year 

BOTN 212 or BOTN 417 or 

BOTN 462-464— Field Studies 3 

ZOOL 270-271 or ZOOL 480 or 

ENTM 200— Field Studies 3 

Biology Elective 3 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education ... 3 



EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods ol 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

EDSE 352 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation 

EDSE 375 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 

Total 

Chemistry 

Semester 
Freshman Year I I 

BOTN 101 — General Botany 4 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 

CHEM 103 — College Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 

MATH 140— Analysis I 3 

MATH 141 — Analysis II 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

General University Requirements 3 

Total 14 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 201 — College Chemistry III 3 

CHEM 202— College Chemistry III 

Laboratory 2 

CHEM 203— College Chemistry IV 

CHEM 204— College Chemistry IV 

Laboratory 

Mathematics or Chemistry Elective 

General University Requirements 12 

Total 17 

Junior Year 

CHEM 481— Physical Chemistry I 3 

CHEM 482— Physical Chemistry II 

CHEM 498 — Special Topics in Chemistry 

(lAC) 3 

PHYS 221— General Physics I 5 

PHYS 222— General Physics II 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

Mathematics or Chemistry Elective 

Total 17 

Senior Year 

Chemistry Elective 3 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education ... 3 
EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

EDSE 352 — Curriculum. Instruction and 

Observation 

EDSE 375 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 

General University Requirements 6 

Total 6 

Earth Science 

Freshman Year 

BOTN 101— General Botany 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 

GEOL 100 — Physical Geology 

GEOL 110 — Physical Geology Laboratory 

GEOL 102 — Historical Geology 

GEOL 112 — Historical Geology Laboratory 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

MATH 110 — Introduction to 
Mathematics I 



14 



18 



14 



14 



Semester 



116 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



MATH 1)1— Intioducllon to 

Malhemallcs II . 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Total 1< " 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 103 — College Chemistry I * 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II . . . 4 

GEOL 422— Minerology 3 

GEOL 441— Structural Geology 3 

PHYS 121 — Fundamentals ot Physics I . 4 

PHYS 122 — Fundamentals o( Physics V, . . 4 

Reneral University Requirements 3 6 

Total 14 17 

Junior Year 

GEOG 440 — Geomorphology 3 

ASTR 100 — Introduction to Astronomy . 3 

ASTR 105 — Modern Astronomy 3 

ASTR 110 — Modern Astronomy Laboratory 1 

EOHS 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 3 

General University Requirements 6 6 

Geology Electives 3 3 

Total 15 16 

Senior Year 

GEOL 460 — Earth Science 3 

EOSF 301- Foundations of Education . . 3 

EOSE 330— Prmciples and Methods of 

Secondary Education 2 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 1 

EDSE 352 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation 3 

EOSE 375 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

General University Requirements 3 

Earth Science Electives 4 

Tola' 13 14 

Physics 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

CHEM 103 — College Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

MATH 140 — Analysis I 4 

MATH 141— Analysis 11 4 

PHYS 221— General Physics I 5 

PHYS 222— General Physics II : 5 

SPCH too— Public Speaking 3 

General University Requirements 3 

Total 16 16 

•The physics major sequence (181. 182. 293. 284) or 

the engineering sequence (161, 162. 263) may be used 

and appropriate course changes in the remainder of 

the program will be made. 

Sophomore Year 

PHYS 285 — Intermediate Physics 

Experiments I 2 

ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 4 

BOTN 101— General Botany I 4 

PHYS 286 — Intermediate Physics 

Experiments II 2 

ASTR 380 — Astronomy and Astrophysics .3 
MATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

General University Requirements 3 9 

Total 16 15 



Junior Year 

PHYS 404 — Intermediate Theoretical 

Mechanics 

PHYS 405— Intermediate Theoretical 

Electricity and Magnetism 

PHYS 420— Modern Physics for Engineers 
ASTR 410 — Introduction to 

Astrophysics II 

EDHD 300S — Human OevelopmenI and 

Learning 

General University Requirements 

Total 

Senior Year 

PHYS 406 — Optics 

PHYS 499 — Special Problems in Physics 
PHYS 305 — Physics Shop Techniques . . 

General University Requirements 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education . 
FOSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 

EDSE 352 — Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation 

EDSE 375 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 



14 



Total 13 

Social Studies Education 
Option 1 (History Concentration) 

Requires 57 semester hours of which at least 27 
must be m history, including HIST 221. 222, 241, 
242 and 12 hours of 300 or 400-level history 
courses including HIST 389; 30 hours of related 
social sciences as outlined below^: 

At least one course in each of the following areas: 
geography, sociology (or ANTH 101), government 
and politics, and two courses in economics. Fifteen 
semester hours of social science electives are 
required of which nine hours must be in the 300 or 
400 level. These courses may be selected from any 
one or combination of relevant fields. The 
selection of the courses or fields is at the discretion 
of the advisor as a defensible area of study. 
Option I 



Semester 



Freshman Year 

General University Requirement 

SPCH 100 — Public Speaking 

HIST 221. 222— History of the 

United States to 1865. History of the 
US. since 1865 (or 6 hours of any 
U.S. History approved by advisor) . . . 

GEOG 100 — Introduction to Geography 

GVPT 170 — American Government .... 

SOCY 100 — Introduction to Sociology 
(or ANTH 101) 



Total 

Sophomore Year 

HIST 241. 242— Western Civilization (or 

6 hours of any non U.S. History 

approved by advisor) 
ECON 110 — Economic Developments . 
ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Social Science Electives 

General University Requirements 



History Electives 3 3 

Tout IS 15 

Junior Year 

Social Science Elective* 3 3 

History Electives 3 3 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 6 

General University Requlremenu 9 3 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education 3 

HIST 389 — Proseminar in Historical 

Writing 3 

Social Science Electives 3 

Electives 6 

EDSE 353 — Curriculum. Instruction and 

Observation 3 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods ot 

Secondary Education 2 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 1 

EDSE 453 — Teaching ot Reading in 

Secondary Schools 3 

EDSE 376 — Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

Total 15 17 

Option II (Geography Concentration). Requires 57 
semester hours of which 27 hours must be in 
geography. Geography 201. 202, 203, 490, and one 
field experience course are required. The remaining 
hours in geography must be upper division 
systematic geography courses with one course in 
regional geography included. Fifteen semester 
hours of social science and history courses must 
include at least one course in sociology (or 
anthropology) one in government and politics, two 
courses in economics, and two courses in American 
history. The remaining fifteen hours of social 
science and history courses are electives from any 
one or combination of relevant fields forming a 
defensible area of study. This area is defined in 
coniunction with the advisor of the program. 
Speech and Drama Education. A major in speech 
and drama requires 37 semester hours. It is the 
policy to build a program of study in anticipation of 
the needs of prospective teachers in the com- 
munication field. The following speech courses are 
required: SPCH 100, 200, 110. 220, 350, 325, 
DART 120 and HESP 401. plus 15 hours of 
electives in speech, drama or radio/television. 
Students desiring a Bachelor of Arts degree must 
also meet departmental foreign language 
requirements. 

Speech and Drama Education 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication 3 

DART 110 — Introduction to the Theatre . . 3 

DART 120— Acting 3 

SPCH 110A— Voice and Diction 3 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 117 



RATO 124— Mass Media in the 

20th Century 

General University Requirements 9 

Total 15 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 3 

SPCH 350 — Foundations of 

Communication 

SPCH 200 — Advanced Public Speaking . . 3 

SPCH 220 — Group Discussion 

Major Area: Electives in Speech 

and Drama 

Minor Area: English suggested 9 

Total 15 

Junior Year 

SPCH 477 — Speech Communication and 

the Study o( Language Acquisition . . - 3 

SPCH 125 — Parliamentary Lav* 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and 

Learning 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education ... 3 

Minor Area: English suggested 6 

General University Requirements 

(300 level or above) 3 

Total 15 

Senior Year 

HESP 401 — Survey of Speech Disorders 3 

EDSE 330 — Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 2 

EDSE 489 — Field Experience 

Minor Area: English suggested 9 

EDSE 354— Speech and Drama Methods 
EDSE 377 — Student Teaching in 

Speech Drama 

Education Elective 



Tot, 



14 



15 



Social Foundations of Education Area 

Professor and Chairman: Male. 
Associate Professors: Agre. Huden, Lindsay, Noll. 
Assistant Professors: Finkelstein, Hopkins. 
The Social Foundations area in the College of 
Education offers courses in the history and 
philosophy of education and the Foundations of 
Education course required of all students majoring 
in Education (EDSF 301). These courses treat the 
educational enterprise as it relates to the political, 
social, and economic structure of society and the 
values which undergird a particular society. 
"Freedom in Education" and "Existentialism and 
Education" are examples of topics offered through 
workshops in this area. A broad perspective is 
sought both for classroom teachers and prospec- 
tive leaders in the profession. 

The area also offers the masters degree and 
doctorates in comparative education (the study of 
educational systems in other regions of the world); 
history of education, philosophy of education; 
and sociology of education. 

Course Code Prefix— EDSF 



Sociology 

Associate Professor and Acting Chairman: Lenger- 
man. 

Professors: Dager, Hoffsommer (Emeritus), Janes, 
Lejins (Joint appointment with Institute of Criminal 
Justice and Criminology). 
Associate Professors: Cussler, Henkel, Hirzel, 
Mclntyre, Meeker, Pease. 
Assistant Professors: Braddock, Finsterbusch, 
Franz, Greisman, Harper, Hornung, J. Hunt, L. Hunt, 
Kruegel, Landry (Joint appointment with Afro- 
American Studies), Miller, Mortimer, Schwartz, 
Weisman. 

Lecturers: Parris, Richardson, Weitzel-O'Neill. 
Instructors: Hughes, Thune, Weakland. 
Visiting Professors: Ploch, Lavender. 

The major in sociology offers: (1) a general educa- 
tion especially directed toward understanding the 
complexities of modern society and its social 
problems by using basic research and statistical 
skills; (2) a broad preparation for various types of 
professions, occupations, and services dealing with 
people; and (3) preparation of qualified students 
for graduate training in sociology. 

The student in sociology must complete 45 
hours of Departmental Requirements, none of which 
can be taken pass-fail. Thirty of these hours are 
in sociology course work which must be completed 
with a minimum grade average of C: 12 hours are 
in required core courses, and 18 hours are 
electives, of which 12 hours must be at the 300- 
400 level. Required core courses for all majors 
are Socy 200, Socy 201, Socy 202, and Socy 203. 
These courses should be taken in the Sophomore 
year with Socy 200, 201 being followed by Socy 
202, 203. 

Three hours of Mathematics (110; 115; 140; 220 
or their equivalents) are required of majors and are 
a pre-requisite for Socy 201 . 

The supporting course requirement for majors is 
12 hours of a coherent series of courses from 
outside of the department which relate to the 
major substantive or research interests in 
sociology. These courses need not come from the 
same department, but at least 6 hours must be 
from the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 
The following are those recommended by the 
Sociology Undergraduate Committee for use as 
supporting courses for majors: ANTH 102, 
CMSC 103. ECON 205, GVPT 100, 170, 260; 
HIST 224, PHIL 170, 250, 455; PSYC 100. Further 
information about suggested supporting courses 
can be obtained in the Undergraduate Office 
(Room 2130, Taliaferro). Students should supply the 
Undergraduate Office with their proposed list of 
supporting courses for advisor's approval. 
Note: The Undergraduate Committee is giving careful 
consideration to making the supporting course require- 



ment a much more specific outline of courses (rom 
which the majors may choose. 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and 
Literatures 

Chairman and Professor: Hesse. 

Professors: Goodwyn, Gramberg, Marra-Lopez, 

Mendeloff, Nemes. 

Associate Professors: Rovner, Sosnowsl<i. 

Assistant Professors: Baird,' Igel, Natella, Norton. 

Instructors: Barilla, Borroto, Diz, Garcia, Lesman, 

Rentz, Sandra. 

•Joint Appointment Secondary Education 

tVlajors. Two types of undergraduate majors are 
offered in Spanish: one for the general student or 
the future teacher, and the other for those 
interested in a rounded study of a foreign area for 
the purpose of understanding another nation 
through its literature, history, sociology, economics, 
and other aspects. Both of these majors confer 
the B.A. degree. 

An undergraduate major in either language and 
literature or area studies requires a total of 39 
hours with a average, above the basic foreign 
language requirement. 

Language and Literature Major. Courses; SPAN 201, 
221. 301-302; 311 or 312, 321-322 or 323-324; 401 
or 402 plus five courses on the 400 level in 
literature (one of which may be elected outside of 
the field of literature) for a total of 39 hours. 

Twelve hours of supporting courses, two of 
which must be on the 300-400 level in a single 
department other than Spanish and education. 
Suggested areas: government and politics, art, 
history, philosophy, and comparative literature, etc., 
for a combined total of 51 hours. 
Foreign Area Major. The area study major in 
Spanish endeavors to provide the student with the 
knowledge of the various aspects of Spain and 
Spanish America. Specific requirements in this 
major are SPAN 201, 301-302, 311-312, 321-322 or 
323-324, 424-425 or 446-447, and twelve credits of 
Spanish literature in courses numbered 408-498, 
for a total of 39 hours. 

Twelve hours of supporting courses, six of 
which must be on the 300-400 level in a single 
department other than Spanish and education. 
Suggested areas: economics, government and 
politics, geography, history, philosophy, etc., for 
a combined total of 51 hours. 

Honors in Spanish. A student whose major is 
Spanish and who, at the time of application, has a 
general academic average of 3.0 and 3.5 in his 
major field may apply to the Chairman of the Honors 
Committee for admission to the Honors Program of 
the department. Honors work normally begins in the 
first semester of the junior year, but a qualified 
student may enter as early as the sophomore year 



118 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



or as late as the second semester ol the |unlor 
year. Honors students are required to take two 
courses from those numbered 491. 492. 493. and the 
semmar numbered 496. as well as to meet other 
requirements tor a major in Spanish. There will 
be a linal comprehensive examination covering the 
honors reading list which must be taken by all 
graduating seniors who are candidates lor honors. 
Admission o( students to the Honors Program. 
tf>eir continuance in the program, and the final 
award ol honors are the prerogative ol the 
Departmental Honors Committee. 
Elementary Honors. SPAN 102H in Spanish is 
limited to specially approved candidates who have 
passed SPAN 101 with high grades, passing Spanish 
allow them to enter 104H or 201. 

Lower Division Courses. The elementary and 
intermediate courses in Spanish and Portuguese 
consist ol three semesters ol lour credits each 
(101. 102. 104). The language requirement lor the 
B.A. degree in the Division ol Arts and Humanities 
IS satisled by passing 104 or equivalent. 

Spanish 101 may be taken lor credit by those 
students who have had two or more years ol Span- 
ish in high school, provided they obtain the 
permission ol the Chairman ol the Department. 
Students starting in SPAN 101 must lollow the pre- 
scribed sequence of SPAN 101, 102. and 104. 

Transler students with college credit have the 
option ol continuing at the next level ol study, or 
ol taking a placement examination, or ol electing 
courses 103 or 104. II a transfer student takes 
course 103 for credit, he retains transfer credit only 
lor the equivalent ol course 101. A transfer student 
placing lower than his training warrants may ignore 
the placement but DOES SO AT HIS OWN RISK. If 
he takes 104 for credit, he retains transfer credit 
lor the equivalent ol courses 101 and 102. 

A student whose native language is Spanish or 
Portuguese may not use either language to satisfy 
the Arts and Humanities language requirement. 

If a student has received a D in a course, ad- 
vanced and completed the next higher course, he 
cannot go back and repeat the original D. 

Caul. Coac Pro- .es^ SPAN PORT 

Special Education 

Professors: Ashcrolt. Hebeler, Simms. 
Associate Professors: James. Seidman. 
Assistant Professors: Griel. McCabe, Peck. 
lr)slructors: Gadling. Sherman. 

The Special Education Department offers an 
undergraduate program which prepares students 
lor a teaching position in either an elementary or 
secondary level special education program. 
Students who complete the undergraduate program 
receive the Bachelor ol Science degree and meet 
Maryland State Department of Education require- 



ments lor the standard prolessional certllicate In 
special education. 

Students at the undergraduate level pursue a 
sequential program in the broad area of learning 
differences, concentrating either in the area ol the 
mentally retarded or learning disabilities. Progress 
through the program is dependent upon the stu- 
dents achieving the requisite special teaching 
competencies required lor graduation. Field 
experiences are required of all students in the de- 
partment prior to their student teaching experiences. 
An area of supporting academic content consisting 
of 15 credit hours beyond the General Education 
Requirement is included in each student's program. 
This supporting academic content may be developed 
in and among the areas of psychology, 
sociology, anthropology, and hearing and speech. 

128-130 semester hours are necessary lor 
graduation. 

Each undergraduate student is assigned a 
laculty advisor. The student consults with his ad- 
visor regarding specific details ol his program, 
alternatives, etc. The following represents a 
"typical" program. 
Freshman Year Credits 

General University Requirements 12 

ARTE 100 — Fundamentals ol Art Education 3 

MUSC ISS^Fundamentals lor the 

Classroom Teacher 3 

SPCH 100 or 202 or 110 3 

General Eleclives 6 

Supporting Academic Content 3 

Total 30 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 9 

MATH 210. 211— Elements ol Math; 

Elements ol Geometry 8 

EDSP 288 — Field Placement in Special 

Education i 

Supporting Academic Content 6 

General Eleclives 9 

Tola: 33 

Junior Year 

General University Requirements 

(upper level) 9 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and 

Learning g 

Supporting Academic Content 3 

EDEL 326— Teaching of Reading 2 

EDEL 305 — Language Arts in the 

Elementary School 2 

EDEL 307 — Social Studies in the 

Elementary School 2 

EDSP 470 — Introduction to Special Education .... 2 
EDSP 471 or 491— Characteristics ol 

Exceptional Children 3 

EDSP 472 or 492— Education o( 

Exceptional Children 3 

Total 33 



Senior Year 

Supporting Academic Content 3 

EDEL 314 — Mathematics in the 

Elementary School 2 

EDEL 302 — Science in the Elementary School 2 

EDSF 301— Foundations ol Education 3 

EDSP 473 — Curriculum lor Exceptional 

Children 3 

EDSP 489 — Field Placement in Special 

Education (optional) (2) 

EDSP 349 — Student Teaching ol Exceptional 

Children 8 

EDEL 333 — Student Teaching in the 

Elementary School 8 

PHED 420 or MUED 352 or EDEL 312— 

Physical Education. Music or Art in the 

Elementary School 3 

Total 32-34 

TOTAL CREDITS: 128-130 

Speech and Dramatic Art 

Associate Professor and Acting Ctiairman: Linkow. 
Professors: Aylward. Pugliese. Strausbaugh (Emeri- 
tus). 

Associate Professors: Kirkley. Linkow. Meersman. 
Niemeyer. OLeary. Vaughan. G. S. Weiss. Wolvin. 
Assistant Professors: Croft. Falcione, Jamieson. 
Kolker. Moore, J. Onder. Provensen. Starcher, 
Zelenka. 

Instructors: Carter. Cokely. Cougle. Doyle. 
DuMonceau. Elliot. Fox. Klann. Lea. Nagatani. 
P. Onder. Paver. Pearson. Smulowitz. Williams. 
Lecturers: Hawkins. McCleary. Miles, Kraus, 
Schickert. F. Weiss. M. Weiss. 

The departmental curricula lead to the 
Bachelor ol Arts degree and permit the student to 
develop a program with emphasis in one of the 
three areas ol the department: (1) Speech 
communication (political communication, organiza- 
tional communication, urban communication, 
educational communication, and interpersonal 
communication). (2) Dramatic art (educational 
theater, acting, directing, producing, theater history, 
and technical theater), (3) Radio-television-lilm 
(broadcasting, programming, directing, broadcast 
law and regulation, international broadcasting, film 
production, and contemporary cinema). In 
cooperation with the Department ol Secondary 
Education, the department provides an opportunity 
lor teacher certification in the speech and drama 
education program. 

The curriculum is designed to provide: (1) a 
liberal education through special study of the arts 
and sciences ol human communication. (2) 
preparation lor numerous opportunities in business, 
government, media and related industries, and 
education. 

Since communication is a dynamic field, the 
course offerings are under constant review and 
development, and the interested student should 



Departments, Programs and Curricula / 119 



obtain specific information about a possible pro- 
gram from a departmental advisor. 

The major requirements are: 30 flours of course 
work in any of tfie divisions, exclusive of ttiose 
courses taken to satisfy University or Divisional 
requirements. Of the 30 hours, at least 15 must be 
upper division in the 300 or 400 series. No course 
with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy 
major requirements. 

Each of the possible concentrations in the de- 
partment requires certain courses in order to pro- 
vide a firm foundation for the work in that area. 
Specific information about these course require- 
ments and course options for the supporting 
(minor) program should be obtained from an 
advisor in the particular area. 

The department offers numerous specialized 
opoortunities for those interested through co- 
curricular activities in theater, film, television, 
radio, readers' theatre, debate and forensics. For 
the superior student an Honors Program is 
available, and interested students should consult 
their advisor for further information no later than 
the beginning of their junior year. 

Course Code Prefixes— SPCH. DART. RTVF 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 

Chairman and Professor: Smith. 

Professor: Dardis. 

Associate Professor: Buck. 

Assistant Professors: Block, Hacklander, Heagney, 

Spivak, Wilbur (Emeritus). 

Instructors: Marro, Pledger. 

Visiting Professors: Clark, Fourt, Thain, Yeh. 

Students may select one of four majors. Each offers 

diverse professional opportunities. Through 

supportive courses students add to their major 

studies a concentration of work in an allied area 

such as art, business, economics, family services, 

journalism, sciences, or speech and dramatic art. 

In the textile science major emphasis is placed 
on the scientific and technological aspects of the 
field. Graduates will be qualified for employment in 
many facets of the textile industry including re- 
search and testing laboratories, consumer 
technical service and marketing programs, and in 
buying and product evaluation. 

There are three areas of concentration in the 
Textiles and Apparel major — Apparel Design, 
Fashion Merchandising, and Consumer Textiles. 
Graduates in the first two areas may work as 
fashion designers, fashion coordinators, 
consultants to the home sewing industry and retail 
store buyers. The Consumer Textiles area is de- 
signed to prepare students for careers in publicity, 
promotion, consumer information and extension. 

Graduates of the textile marketing major will be 
qualified for careers in business where they will 
function as communicators between the textile pro- 



ducer and consumer in merchandising and fashion 
promotion, in consumer education programs and in 
textile production promotion and development. 

Graduates completing the major in consumer 
economics will be able to provide liaison between 
the consumer and producers and distributors of 
goods and services utilized directly by families and 
may work in consumer education programs, in mar- 
keting and consumer relation divisions in business 
and industry, or in government agencies providing 
consumer services. 

A department Honors Program permits out- 
standing undergraduates to explore in depth on an 
mdividual basis a program of work which will 
strengthen their undergraduate program and their 
professional mterests. Students selected for the 
program must have a "B" average or better to be 
considered. Students in the honors program par- 
ticipate in a junior honors seminar and present a 
senior thesis. 

Freshman Year (Common To All Majors) 

English Requirement 3 3 

Math 110 or 115 3 4 

Sociology Course 3 

Speech Course 2 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 

Textiles In Contemporary Living 

TEXT 105 (CNEC 100 for CNEC majors) 3 

Physical Science (CHEM 103, 104 or 

105, 106) 4 4 

Psychology Course 3 

16-17 15-16 
Textiles and Apparel 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Economics 201 and 203 3 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

(APDS 101) 3 

Apparel I & II TEXT 221 & 222 3 3 

Introduction to Textile Materials TEXT 150 3 
Textile Materials: Evaluation and 

Characterization TEXT 250 3 

Elective 3 

15 15 
Junior Year 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 

Textile Science: Chemical Structure and 

Properties of Fibers TEXT 452 or 

Environmental Textiles TEXT 355 3 

General University Requirements 12 

Marketing BSAD 350 3 

Depart. Elective 6 

Electives 6 

Senior Year 30 
TEXT 441 — Clothing and Human Behavior 

or CNEC 437 — Consumer Behavior 3 

TEXT 465 — Economics of the Textile and 

Apparel Industries or CNEC 435 — 

Economics of Consumption 3 

General University Requirements 12 

Dept. Elective 6 

Electives 6 

~30 



Textile Marketing 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

Economics 201 and 203 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

(APDS 101) 

TEXT 221 and 222 or 

Department Electives 

Introduction to Textile Materials 

TEXT 150 

Textile Materials: Evaluation and 

Characterization TEXT 250 . . . 
Elective 



Semester 

Hours 
3 3 

3 3 



Junior Year 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course . 

Environmental Textiles TEXT 355 

BSAD 230 

General University Requirements 

Marketing BSAD 350 

BSAD Requirement* 

Electives 



•Selected from BSAD 351. 352. 353. 360. 450 and 452. 

Senior Year 

Clothing and Human Behavior TEXT 441 

or Consumer Behavior CNEC 437 

Text Science: Chemical Structure and 

Properties of Fibers TEXT 452 

Economics of the Textile and Apparel 

Industries TEXT 465 

General University Requirements 

BSAD Requirement* 

Electives 

Textile Science 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

Introduction to Textiles TEXT 150 

Textile Materials: Evaluation and 

Characterization TEXT 250 

Chemistry 201. 202, 203, 204 or 

211, 212. 213. 214 



Semester 
Hours 



Math 140. 141 or 110, 111 3-4 



Junior Year 

Physics 141. 142 or 121, 122 

Textile Science: Chemical Structure and 

Properties of Fibers TEXT 452 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

Statistics 

Economics 201 and 203 

General University Requirements 



Senior Year 

Textile Science: Finishes TEXT 454 or 
Textile Science: Chemistry and Physics 
of Fibers and Polymers TEXT 456 ... 

Economics of the Textile and Apparel 
Industries TEXT 465 or Economics of 
Consumption CNEC 435 

General University Requirements 

Electives 



120 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Contumer Economics 

Sophomore Y«ar 

Qanaral University Requiremenia 
Economics ?01 and 203 
HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

IFOOD 110 or NUTR 100) 

inlroduciion to Textile Materials 

TEXT 150 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

(HSAD 241) 

Math 111 or ISO or Statistics BSAO 230 

Consumer Product Information 

Elective (Math 141 tor students 

completing this math sequence) . 



Somobter 
Hours 



Junior Year 

Economics of Consumption CNEC 435 

General University Requirements 

Consumer Product Information 

Statistics BSAD 230 or 330 

Economics 401 and 403 



Senior Year 

Consumer Behavior CNEC 437 

The Consumer and the Law CNEC 431 

General University Requirements 

Marketing BSAO 350 

Electives 



CouiM Cod* PkIIim— TEXT. CNEC 

NOTe TXAP prof'ses hiivo b««n changed lo TEXT. Course conteni 

Urban Studies Program 

Protessor and Director: Murphy. 
Professors: Harper, Janes. K\d6. 
Assistant Professors: Christian. Groves. 
Lecturers: Colman. Knipe. 
Instructor: Taubalij. 

This interdisciplinary program is designed for 
students interested in government and other public 
service careers and graduate study in urban affairs, 
as well as for students who wish to understand 
urban society. The faculty is drawn from six col- 
leges and schools of the University. The B.A. in 
Urban Studies degree can be given by any of the 
colleges or schools on Campus which wish to par- 
ticipate in the program. 

The program assumes a comprehensive ap- 
proach to urbanism and includes attention to the 
total metropolitan area, including suburbs as well as 
central cities, their interrelationship, and state and 
federal policy. In addition to an interdisciplinary or 
multi-disciplinary staff, the program will include 
students from a variety of disciplines, a wide 
variety of research projects, and a set of "core" 
seminars dealing with cities or urbanization as they 
involve economic factors, social problems, political 
and governmental activities, and environmental 
and physical aspects. Contemporary urban problems 
will be emphasized and modern methodological and 
analytical techniques will be considered. 



Requirement*, In general, for a Bachelor's degree 
in Urban Studies, a student should register in a 
division, college or school, satisfy University, 
division and college or school requirements, and 
complete course work in urban and urban-oriented 
subject matter. 
The maior in Urban Studies requires 42 credits: 
15 in URBS core courses 
15 in urban oriented courses within a depart- 
ment or program selected as a disciplinary 
urban specialization. 
12 within one of three basic fields and from 
at least two departments. 
The URBS Core Courses include the following: 
URBS 210— Survey of the Field and Urban 

Studies 
URBS 260 — Introduction to Interdisciplinary 

Urban Studies 
URBS 320— The City and the Developing Na- 
tional Culture of the United States 
URBS 350— Introduction to Urban Field Study 
URBS 395— Pro-Seminar in Urban Literature 
URBS 399 — Independent Study in Urban 

Topics 
URBS 430 — Practicum in the Urban Commun- 
ity and Urban Organizations 
URBS 480— Urban Theory and Simulation 
The prerequisites for the 300 and 400 core courses 
are six hours selected from 100 and 200 level 
courses in Architecture, Business Administration, 
Economics. Education, Geography, Government 
and Politics. History, Journalism, and Sociology. 
Departments and programs currently offering 
sufficient urban oriented courses for the disciplin- 
ary urban specialization include: Afro-American 
Studies. Agricultural and Extension Education, 
Agricultural and Resource Economics, American 
Studies, Anthropology, Architecture, Business Ad- 
ministration, Chemical Engineering. Chemistry, Civil 
Engineering. Computer Science, Criminal Justice 
and Criminology, Economics, Education, English, 
Family and Community Development, Geography, 
Government and Politics, Health, History, Informa- 
tion Systems H/1anagement, Journalism, Meteoro- 
logy, Physical Sciences, Psychology, Recreation. 
Sociology, and Speech and Dramatic Art. 

The three basic fields and the departments whose 
courses meet the requirements are: 
1. Social-economic-behavioral: 

Afro-American Studies. Agricultural Ex- 
tension Education, Agricultural and Resource 
Economics. Architecture, Business Admin- 
istration. Criminal Justice and Criminology. 
Economics. Education. Family and Community 
Development, Cultural Geography, Govern- 
ment and Politics, Health. Information Sys- 
tems Management. Journalism. Psychology. 
Recreation, and Sociology. 



2. Physical-environmental: 

Chemical Engineering. Chemistry, Civil 
Engineering, Computer Science, Physical 
Geography, Geology. Health, Landscape, 
Architecture, Meteorology, Physical Sciences, 

3. Historlcal-cultural-humamstic: 
Afro-American Studies. American Studies, 
Anthropology, Architecture, Education, Eng- 
lish, History, Journalism, Recreation, Sociol- 
ogy, and Speech and Dramatic Art. 

'.ouf»« Co<J« Pfofn— UBBS 

Zoology Undergraduate Program 

Professor and Chairman: Corliss 

Assistant Chairman: Haley. 

Professors: Anaslos, Brinkley, Brown, Clark. 

Grollman. Haley, Highlon. Jachowski. Ramm. 

Schleidt. 

Associate Professors: Barnelt, Contrera. Goode. 

Imberski. Levitan, LInder, Morse, Pierce. 

Potter. Small. 

Assistant Professors: Allan. Gill. Higgins. Morton, 

Rees, Vermeij. Woodin. 

Research Professors: Eisenberg.* Flyger.* 

Glinos,* Otto." 

Instructors: Eraser. Knox. Korr. Moore, Neidhardt. 

Piper. Rabin. Spalding. 

Faculty /Research Associates: Doss. Farr. 

•Adjunct members of Ihe faculty 

I. Description of Program 

The Department of Zoology offers a program leading 
to a B.S. with a major in Zoology. The program Is 
planned to give each student an appreciation of 
the diversity of the problems studied by zoologists 
and an opportunity to explore, in detail, the kinds 
of problems delineating the specialized fields of 
Zoology and the nature of observation and experi- 
mentation appropriate to investigations within these 
fields. The requirements of 26 hours in Zoology, 
including one course in each of four broad areas, 
together with supporting courses in Chemistry. 
Mathematics, and Physics, permit students to de- 
velop their interests in the general field of Zoology 
or to concentrate in a special area. Courses in 
Zoology satisfying the broad area requirements are 
offered at the sophomore and junior-senior levels 
and may be taken upon completion of the prerequi- 
sites for a chosen course. Majors are urged to 
complete the required supporting course in Chemis- 
try. Mathematics, and Physics as early as possible 
since these courses are prerequisites for many 
courses in Zoology. 

All majors are required to complete a minimum of 
26 credit hours in Zoology with an average grade 
of C. Fourteen of the twenty-six hours must be 
earned in 300-400 level courses and two of these 
courses must have accompanying laboratories. Most 
Zoology courses that are accepted for credit to- 
ward the major have been grouped into four 



Departments. Programs and Curricula / 121 



broad areas based upon the level of biological 
organization studied. The areas and their cor- 
responding courses are: I. cells and cell organelles 
(ZOOL 246,411, 413, 415, 446, 447); II, tissues, 
organs and organ systems (ZOOL 201. 202, 421, 422, 
426, 495); III, organisms (ZOOL 102, 230, 290, 293, 
430, 472, 475, 481, 482, 483, 492); and IV, popu- 
lations and communities of organisms (ZOOL 270, 
271, 440, 444, 460, 461, 470, 471, 480). One 3 or 4 
credit course in each of these areas is required. 
ZOOL 271 must accompany ZOOL 270, and ZOOL 
471 must accompany ZOOL 470 for these courses 
to fulfill the Area IV requirement. Additional 
courses to complete the required 26 hours in 
Zoology may be selected from any of the under- 
graduate courses in Zoology except ZOOL 101, 
General Zoology (4); ZOOL 146, Heredity and Man 
(3); ZOOL 181, Ecology of the Oceans (3); and 
ZOOL 207S, Development of the Human Body (2). 
Up to seven hours of credit in ZOOL 319, Special 
Problems in Zoology, and ZOOL 328, Selected 
Topics in Zoology may be used to fulfill the fourteen 
required hours at the 300-400 level providing all 
other requirements are met. 

Required supporting courses are: CHEM 103. 104, 
College Chemistry I and II (4, 4) or CHEM 105, 
106, Principles of College Chemistry I and II (4,4); 
CHEM 201, 202, College Chemistry III, and Lab- 
oratory (3,2) or CHEM 211, 212, Principles of College 
Chemistry III and Laboratory (3,2); Mathematics 
through one year of Calculus, i.e., completion of 
MATH 220, 221, Elementary Calculus (3,3) or 
MATH 140, 141, Analysis I, II (4,4); PHYS 121, 122, 
Fundamentals of Physics (4,4) or PHYS 141, 142, 
Principles of Physics (4,4); and one of the follow- 
ing courses: AGRI 301, Introduction to Agricultural 
Biometrics (3); AGRI 401, Agricultural Biometrics (3); 
CHEM 203, 204, College Chemistry IV and Labora- 
tory (3,2); PSYC 200, Statistical Methods in 
Psychology (3); SOCY 201, Introductory Statistics 
for Sociology (3); STAT 400, Applied Probability 
and Statistics I (3); or STAT 464, Introduction to 
Biostatistics (3). 

Although sample programs for Zoology majors in- 
terested in different fields may be obtained from 
the Zoology office, it is strongly recommended that 
all majors consult a Zoology Department advisor at 
least once every year. Majors planning to specialize 
in a particular field of Zoology should satisfy the 
area requirements during their freshman and 
sophomore years and take the 400 level courses in 
their chosen specialty. Students desiring to enter 
graduate study in certain areas of Zoology should 
take Biochemistry, Physical Chemistry, Advanced 
Statistics, Advanced Mathematics, and/or Philos- 
ophy of Science as a part of their undergraduate 
electives. Courses of interest to Zoology majors 
in Animal Science, Anthropology, Botany, Electrical 
Engineering, Entomology, Geography, Geology, 



Microbiology, and Psychology are listed in the 
Undergraduate Catalogue under the appropriate 
departments. 

Honors. The Department of Zoology also offers a 
special program for the exceptionally talented and 
promising student. The Honors Program empha- 
sizes the scholarly approach to independent study. 
Information regarding this program may be obtained 
from the departmental office or from the chairman 
of the Zoology Honors Program 

II. Curriculum For Zoology Majors 

There are no specific courses in zoology required 
of all majors. ZOOL 101, General Zoology, is avail- 
able for students who need an introductory course 
before proceeding to more advanced zoology 
courses. Competence equivalent to the successful 
completion of ZOOL 101 is prerequisite to all 
zoology courses that are accepted for credit toward 
the major. Credits earned in ZOOL 101 are not 
accepted for credit toward the major. 

One 3 or 4 credit course must be selected from 
each of the following areas. For acceptance as an 
Area IV requirement, ZOOL 271 must accompany 
ZOOL 270, and ZOOL 471 must accompany 
ZOOL 470. 
AREA I 

ZOOL 246-- Genetics (4) 

ZOOL 411— Cell Biology (4) 

ZOOL 413— Biophysics (3) 

ZOOL 415— Cell Differentiation (3) 

ZOOL 446 — Molecular Genetics (3) 

ZOOL 447 — Experimental Genetics (4) 
AREA II 

ZOOL 201 — Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4) 

ZOOL 202 — Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) 

ZOOL 421— Physiology of Excitable Cells (4) 

ZOOL 422 — Vertebrate Physiology (4) 

ZOOL 426 — General Endocrinology (3) 

ZOOL 495 — Mammalian Histology (4) 
AREA III 

ZOOL 102— The Animal Phyla (4) 

ZOOL 230 — Developmental Biology (4) 

ZOOL 290 — Comparative Vertebrate Morphology (4) 

ZOOL 293 — Animal Diversity (4) 

ZOOL 430 — Vertebrate Embryology (4) 

ZOOL 472 — General Protozoology (4) 

ZOOL 475— General Parasitology (4) 

ZOOL 481 — Biology of Marine and Estuarine 
Invertebrates (4) 

ZOOL 482 — Marine Vertebrate Zoology (4) 

ZOOL 483 — Vertebrate Zoology (4) 

ZOOL 492— Form and Pattern in Organisms (3) 
AREA IV 

ZOOL 270 — Population Biology and 
General Ecology (3) 

ZOOL 271 — Population Biology and 
General Ecology Laboratory (1) 

ZOOL 440— Evolution (3) 

ZOOL 444 — Advanced Evolutionary Biology (3) 

ZOOL 460— Ethology (3) 

ZOOL 461— Ethology Laboratory (3) 

ZOOL 470 — Advanced Animal Ecology (2) 

ZOOL 471 — Laboratory and Field Ecology (2) 

ZOOL 480— Aquatic Biology (4) 



III. Requirements For Zoology Courses 

The major must earn a total of 26 credits in 
zoology, above the ZOOL 101 level, with an average 
grade of C. One 3 or 4 credit course must be 
taken in each of the four areas of restricted elec- 
tives, fourteen credits must be earned at the 
300-400 level and two courses at the 300-400 level 
must be courses with accompanying laboratory. 
In addition to the above courses, students may 
submit a total of seven credits earned in the follow- 
ing courses toward the 26 hour requirements. 
ZOOL 205— History of Zoology (1) 
ZOOL 206— Zoological Literature (1) 
ZOOL 209— Basic Study in Zoology (1-4) 
ZOOL 319— Special Problems in Zoology (1-2) 
ZOOL 328— Selected Topics in Zoology (1-4) 

Students participating in the General or Depart- 
mental Honors Programs may submit credits earned 
in the following courses toward the 26 hours 
requirement. 

ZOOL 308H — Honors Seminar (1) 

ZOOL 309H— Honors Independent Study (1-4) 

ZOOL 318H— Honors Research (1-2) 

IV. Required Supporting Courses 

1. CHEM 103. 104, College Chemistry I and II (4,4), 
or CHEM 105, 106, Principles of College 
Chemistry I and II (4,4). 

2. CHEM 201, 202, College Chemistry III and Lab- 
oratory (3,2) or CHEM 211, 212, Principles of 
College Chemistry III and Laboratory (3,2). 

3. Mathematics through one year of calculus; i.e. 
completion of MATH 220, 221, Elementary 
Calculus (3,3) or MATH 140, 141, Analysis I, 

II (4,4). 

4. Physics 121, 122, Fundamentals of Physics 
(4,4) or Physics 141, 142, Principles of 
Physics (4,4). 

5. One of the following courses: 

AGRI 301 — Introduction to Agricultural Biometrics (3) 
AGRI 401— Agricultural Biometrics (3) 
CHEM 203. 204— College Chemistry IV and 

Laboratory (3, 2) 
MATH 240— Linear Algebra (4) 
PSYC 200 — Statistical Methods in Psychology (3) 
SOCY 201 — Introductory Statistics for 

Sociology (3) 
STAT 400— Applied Probability and Statistics I (3) 
STAT 464— Introduction to Biostatistics (3) 



122 / Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Course Offerings 



Afro-American Studies 
AASP 100 Introduction to Alro-American 
Studies. (3) A survey of significant 
aspects of black life and Ihougfit which 
are reflected in black literature, music 
and art. This interdisciplinary course 
examines the African cultural and histori- 
cal backgrounds and traces the develop- 
ment of black culture in Africa, the 
United States and the Caribbean from 
the fifteenth century to contemporary 
times. Emphasis is placed upon the social, 
political and economic changes in black 
life that have influenced the ideas of 
black artists and spokesmen. 
AASP 101 Elementary Swahili. (3) An 
introductory course in the Swahili lan- 
guage. Study of linguistic structure and 
development of audiolingual ability. 
Three recitations and one laboratory hour 
per week. 

AASP 102 Intermediate Swahili. (3) Three 
recitations and one laboratory per week- 
Further study of linguistic structure and 
development of audiolingual and writing 
ability, and introduction to the reading of 
literary texts 

AASP 112 Advanced Swahili. (3) For 
students who wish to develop fluency and 
confidence in the speaking, reading and 
writing of Swahili language. Discussions in 
Swahili. 

AASP 200 African Civilization. (3) A sur- 
vey of African civilizations from 4500 B.C. 
to present. Analysis of traditional social 
systems. Discussion of the impact of 
European colonization on these civiliza- 
tions. Analysis of the influence of tra- 
ditional African social systems on modern 
African institutions as well as discussion 
of contemporary processes of Africaniza- 
tion. 

AASP 202 Black Culture in the United 
States. (3) The course examines im- 
portant aspects of American Negro life 
and thought which are reflected in Afro- 
American literature, drama, music and art. 
Beginning with the cultural heritage of 
slavery, the course surveys the changing 
modes of black creative expression from 
the nineteenth century to the present. 
AASP 300 The Black Community and 
Public Policy. (3) A study of the role and 
impact of the black community in public 
policy formulation; scope and methods in 
public policy focusing on specific prob- 
lems in the black community; analysis 
and review of relationships between the 
policy makers and the community. With 
permission of the program, students 
may elect to devote time to specific com- 
munity projects as part of the require- 
ments of the course. The student will not 
serve in an agency in which he is 
already employed. 

AASP 311 The African Slave Trade. (3) 
The relationship of the slave trade of 
Africans to the development of British 
capitalism and its industrial revolution; and 



to the economic and social development 
of the Americas. 

AASP 312 Social and Cultural Effects 
of Colonization and Racism. (3) A com- 
parative approach lo the study of the 
social and cultural effects of colonization 
and racism on black people in Africa. 
Latin America and in the United States — 
community and family life, religion, 
economic institutions, education and art- 
istic expression. 

AASP 397 Senior Reading and Research 
Seminar in Afro-American Studies. (3) An 
interdisciplinary reading and research 
senior seminar for majors in Afro- 
American studies or majors in other de- 
partments or programs who have com- 
pleted at least 18 hours of Afro-American 
studies courses. Emphasis on research 
and writing methods in Afro-American 
studies. A senior thesis will be completed 
during the course. 

AASP 400 Directed Readings in Afro- 
American Studies. (3) The readings will be 
directed by the director of Afro-American 
studies. Topics to be covered: the topics 
will be chosen by the director to meet 
the needs and interests of individual stu- 
dents. 

AASP 401 Seminar in Afro-American 
Studies. (3) The theory and concepts of 
the social and behavioral sciences as 
they relate to Afro-American studies. 
Required for the certificate in Afro- 
American Studies. Prerequisites; at least 
15 hours of Afro- American studies or 
related courses or permission of the 
director. 

AASP 403 The Development of a Black 
Aesthetic. (3) An analysis of selected 
areas of black creative expression in the 
arts for the purpose of understanding 
the informing principles of style, tech- 
niques, and cultural expression which make 
up a black aesthetic. Prerequisite, com- 
pletion of ENGL 443 or AASP 302 or 
consent of instructor. 
AASP 410 Contemporary African Ideolo- 
gies. (3) Analysis of contemporary African 
ideologies. Emphasis on philosophies of 
Nyerere, Nkrumah, Senghor, Sekcu. Tcure. 
Kaunda. Cabral, et al. Discussion of the 
role of African ideologies on moderni- 
zation and social change. 
AASP 411 Nineteenth Century Black Re- 
sistance Movements. (3) A comparative 
description of the black resistance move- 
ments in Africa and America during 
the nineteenth century; analysis of their 
relationship, similarities and dissimilari- 
ties as well as their impact on twentieth 
century black nationalism 
AASP 428 Special Topics in Black De- 
velopment. (3) A multi-disciplinary and 
inter-disciplinary educational experience 
concerned with questions relevant to the 
development of black people everywhere. 
Development implies political, economic. 



social, and cultural change among other 
things. Consequently, a number of topics 
may be examined and studied. 
AASP 429 Special Topics in Black Cul- 
ture. (3) An interdisciplinary approach to 
the role of black artists around the 
world. Emphasis is placed upon contri- 
butions of the black man in Africa, 
the Caribbean and the United States to 
the literary arts, the musical arts, the 
performing arts, and the visual arts. 
Course content will be established in 
terms of those ideas and concepts which 
reflect the cultural climate of the era 
in which they were produced. Attention 
to individual compositions and works of 
art through lectures, concepts, field trips, 
and audio-visual devices. 

Agricultural Engineering 

AGEN 100 Basic Agricultural Engineering 
Technology. (3) An introduction to the 
application of engineering concepts. 
Topics include quantitation and measure- 
ment; mechanical, thermal, fluid and elec- 
trical principles and their relationship to 
biological systems and materials of 
agricultural and aquacultural products (for 
non-engineering majors). 
AGEN 200 Introduction to Farm Me- 
chanics. (2) One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week. A study of the 
hand tools and power equipment and 
their safe use as it applies to mechanized 
farms. Principles and practice in arc 
and gas welding, cold metal and sheet 
metal work are provided. Also, tool fitting, 
woodworking, plumbing, blue print read- 
ing and use of concrete 
AGEN 232 Water, A Renewable Re- 
source. (3) Occurrence and distribution of 
water. Review of both natural and man- 
made water resource systems. Basics of 
water quality and waste water treatment. 
AGEN 305 Farm Mechanics. (2) Two lab- 
oratory periods a week, available only 
to seniors in agricultural education. This 
course consists of laboratory exercises 
in practical farm shop and farm equipment 
maintenance, repair, and construction 
projects, and a study of the principles of 
shop organization and administration. 
AGEN 313 Mechanics of Food Process- 
ing. (4) Three lectures and one labora- 
tory Prerequisite PHYS 111 or 121. 
Applications in the processing and 
preservation of foods of power transmis- 
sion, hydraulics, electricity, thermodynam- 
ics, refrigeration, instruments and con- 
trols, materials handling and time and 
motion analysis. 

AGEN 324 Engineering Dynamics of 
Biological Materials. (3) Three lectures per 
week Prerequisite, ENME 340. Investi- 
gates the physcal parameters (impact, 
temperature, humidity, light, etc) govern- 
ing the response of biological materials. 
Analysis of unit operation and their 



effect on the physical and quality 
characteristics of agricultural products. 
AGEN 343 — Functional Design of 
Machinery and Equipment. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one two hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite. ENES 221. Theory and 
methods of agricultural machine design. 
Application of machine design principles 
and physical properties of soils and 
agricultural products in design of machines 
lo perform specific tasks. 
AGEN 401 Agricultural Production 
Equipment. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite, AGEN 
100, Principles of operation and functions 
of power and machinery units as related 
to tillage, cutting, conveying, and 
separating units; and control mechanisms. 
Principles of internal combustion engines 
and power unit components. 
AGEN 402 Agricultural Materials Handling 
and Environmental Control. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite. AGEN 100 Characteristics 
of construction materials and details of 
agricultural structures. Fundamentals 
of electricity, electrical circuits, and 
electrical controls. Materials handling 
and environmental requirements of farm 
products and animals. 
AGEN 421 Power Systems. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one two hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites, ENI^E 216, ENEE 300 
and ENfiflE 340. Analysis of energy con- 
version devices including internal 
combustion engines, electrical and 
hydraulic motors. Fundamentals of power 
transmission and coordination of power 
sources with methods of power trans- 
mission. 

AGEN 422 Soil and Water Engineer- 
ing. (3) Three lectures per week 
Prerequisite, ENME 340, Applications of 
engineering and soil sciences in erosion 
control, drainage, irrigation and water- 
shed management. Principles of agricul- 
tural hydrology and design of water 
control and conveyance systems. 
AGEN 424 Functional and Environmental 
Design of Agricultural Structures. (3) Two 
lectures and one hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, AGEN 324. An analyti- 
cal approach to the design and planning 
of functional and environmental require- 
ments of plants and animals in semi-or 
completely enclosed structures. 
AGEN 432 General Hydrology. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Qualitative aspects of 
basic hydrologic principles pertaining 
to the properties, distribution and circula- 
tion of water as related to public interest 
in water resources. 

AGEN 433 Engineering Hydrology. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisites. 
MATH 246, ENCE 330 or ENME 340. 
Properties, distribution and circulation of 
water from the sea and in the atmosphere 
emphasizing movement overland, in 
channels and through the soil profile. 



124 / Course Otferings 



Ouai'talive and quanliialive faclois are 

AOEN 435 Aquacultural Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite consent ol Uepdrlniuru A 
Study ol the ongineoring aspects ol 
development utilization and conservation 
ol aqualic systems Emphasis will be on 
harvesting and processing aquatic ani- 
mals or plants as related to other lacols ol 
water resources management 
AQEN 489 Special Problems In Agricul- 
tural Engineering. (1-3) Prerequisite, ap- 
proval ol department Student will select 
an engineering problem and prepare a 
technical report The problem may 
include design, experimentation, and/or 
data analysis 

AGEN 499 Special Problems In Farm 
Mechanics. (1-3) Prerequisite approval ol 
department Not acceptable lor majors 
in agricultural engineering Problems 
assigned in proportion to credit 

Agriculture 

AGRI 101 Introduction to Agriculture. (1) 

RcquireJ ol all beginning Ireshmen and 
sophomores m agriculture Other students 
must gel the consent ol the instructor 
A series ol lectures introducing the stu- 
dent to the broad field ol agriculture 
AGRI 301 Introduction to Agricultural 
Blometrices. (3) Two lectures and one 
lalxsratory period per week Prerequisite. 
University Malh requirement Descrip- 
tive statistics, sampling, conlidence 
interval estimation introduction to hy- 
pothesis testing, simple, regression and 
correlation Course emphasis shall be on 
application ol simple statistical techniques 
and on interpretation of the statistical 
results 

AGRI 401 Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week Prerequisite. MATH 115 or 
equivalent Probability, measures ol 
central tendency and dispersion, frequency 
distnbutions, tests of statistical hy- 
potheses regression, analysis, multiway 
analysis with emphasis on the 
use of statistical methods in agricultural 
research 

AGRI 489 Special Topics in Agricul- 
ture. (1-3) Credit according to time sched- 
uled and organization ol the course A 
lecture series organized to study in 
depth a selected phase ol agriculture not 
normally associated with one ol the 
e«isting programs 

Agronomy 

AGRO 100 Crops Laboratory. (2) Two 
laboratory periods a week Demonstration 
and application ol practices in the 
identilication. distribution and manage- 
AGRO 102 Crop Production (2) Pre- 
requisite AGRO 100 or concurrent enroll- 
ment therein Culture use improvement, 
ment ol lield crops 



adaptation, diitribulion. and history ol 

lield crops 

AGRO 103 World Crept and Food 

Supply. (3) An introduction to the relation- 
ship ol crops with civilitation The past, 
present, and future inleraclions ol the 
biology ol crop plants with world allairs 
and population will be studied The 
luture impact of crops on world allairs 
will bo emphasized 

AGRO 10S Soil and 111* Environment. (3) 
A study of soils as an irreplaceable 
natural resource, imponance ol soils In 
the ecosystem, and analysis ol land re- 
source areas in the U S Discussion ol 
soils as a pollutant and the pollution 
ol soils by various agents and the role 
ol soil as a medium lor storage, de- 
contamination or inactivation ol pollutants 
AGRO 202 General Soils. (4) Three 
lectures and one laboratory period a 
week Prerequisite. CHEM 103 or permis- 
sion ol instructor. A study ol the lunda- 
mentals of soils including their origin, 
development, relation to natural sciences, 
elfect on civilization, physical properties, 
and chemical properties 
AGRO 398 Senior Seminar. (1) Reports 
by seniors on current scientilic and 
practical publications pertaining to 
agronomy. 

AGRO 403 Crop Breeding. (3) Prerequi- 
site. BOTN 414 or ZOOL 246 Principles 
and methods ol breeding annual sell and 
cross-pollinated plant and perennial 
lorage species 

AGRO 404 Tobacco Production. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BOTN 100. A study of the 
history, adaptation, distribution, culture, 
and improvement of various types ol 
tobacco, with special emphasis on prob- 
lems in Maryland tobacco production. 
Physical and chemical factors associated 
with yield and quality of tobacco will be 
stressed 

AGRO 405 Turf Management. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite. BOTN 100 A study ol 
principles and practices ol managing 
turl for lawns, golf courses, athletic 
fields, playgrounds, airlields and highways 
lor commercial sod production 
AGRO 406 Forage Crop Production. (2) 
Prerequisite. BOTN 100. AGRO 100 or con- 
current enrollment therein Study ol the 
production and management of grasses 
and legumes for quality hay. silage, and 
pasture 

AGRO 407 Cereal Crop Production. (2) 
Prerequisite. BOTN 100. AGRO 100 or 
concurrent enrollment therein. Study 
of the principles and practices ol corn, 
wheat, oats, barley, rye. and soybean 
production 

AGRO 411 Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 
Prerequisite, AGRO 202 A study of the 
chemical, physical, and biological char- 
acteristics of soils that are important in 



growing crop* Sou deficiencies ol phy*i- 
cal, chemical, or biological nature and 
their correction by the u*« ol lim«, 
lertilizers. and rotation* are di*cu*a«d 
and Illustrated 

AGRO 412 Commerctol Faftiilier*. (3) 
Proroquisito AGRO 202 or permission ol 
instructor A study of Ihe manulacluring 
ol commercial fertilizers and their use 
in soils lor ellicient crop production 
AGRO 413 Soli and Water CofWVfva- 
tlon. (3) Two lectures and one lat>oratory 
period a week Prerequisite. AGRO 202 or 
permission of instructor A study of the 
importance and causes of soil erosion, 
methods of soil erosion control, and the 
ellecl of conservation practices on soil- 
moisture supply Special emphasis is 
placed on larm planning for soil and water 
conservation The laboratory period will 
be largely devoted to lield trips 
AGRO 414 Soil Classification and 
Geography. (4) Three lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
AGRO 202 or permission ol instructor. 
A study of the genesis, morphology, 
classilicaiion and geographic distribution 
of soils The broad principles governing 
soil lormation are explained. Attention Is 
given to the influence ol geographic 
factors on the development and use of the 
soils in the United States and other parts 
of the world The laboratory periods 
will be largely devoted to field trips 
and to a study of soil maps of various 
countries. 

AGRO 415 Soil Survey and Land Use. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week An introduction to soil survey 
interpretation as a tool in land use both In 
agricultural and urban situations The 
implications of soil problems as delineated 
by soil surveys on land use will be 
considered 

AGRO 417 Soil Physics. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite. AGRO 202 and a course in 
Physics, or permission of instructor A 
study of physical properties of soils 
with special emphasis on relationship to 
soil productivity. 

AGRO 421 Soil Chemistry. (3) One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, AGRO 202 or permission 
ol instructor A study ol the chemical 
composition ol soils: cation and anion ex- 
change: acid, alkaline and saline soil 
conditions: and soil fixation of plant 
nutrients Chemical methods of soil 
analysis will be studied with emphasis 
on their relation to fertilizer requirements 
AGRO 422 Soil Biochemistry. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a 
week Prerequisite. AGRO 202. CHEM 104 
or consent of instructor A study of 
biochemical processes involved in the 
lormation and decomposition of organic 
soil constituents Significance of soil- 



btoclMmical processes involved in plant 

nutrition will be considered 

AGRO 423 SoN-Waler Pollution. (3) Pre- 

requi&'ir tjjiL*iground in liiology and 
ChElM 104 Rosciion and lalu ol pesticides 
agricultural lartilizers industrial and 
animal wastes in soil and water will be 
discussed Their relation to the environ- 
ment will be emphasized 
AGRO 451 Cropping System*. (2) Pre- 
requisite AGRO 102 or equivalent The 
coordination ol mlormation Irom various 
courses in the development ol balanced 
cropping systems, appropriate to different 
objectives m various areas of the state 
and nation 

AGRO 452 Sead Production and DlsUibu- 
tion. (2) One lecture and one laboratory 
penod a week Prerequisite, AGRO 102 
equivalent A study ol seed production, 
processing, and distribution, federal and 
state seed control programs: seed 
laboratory analysis: release of new varie- 
ties, and maintenance of foundation seed 
stocks. 

AGRO 453 Weed Control. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite. AGRO 102 or equivalent 
A study ol the use ol cultural practices and 
chemical herbicides in the control of 
weeds. 

AGRO 499 Special Problems in Agron- 
omy. (1-3) Prerequisites. AGRO 202 406 
■507 or permission of instructor A detailed 
study including a written report ol an 
important problem in agronomy 

American Studies 
AMST 426 Culture and the Arts In 
America. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing 
A study ol American institutions, the in- 
tellectual and esthetic climate Irom the 
Colonial period to the present 
AMST 427 Culture and Ihe Art* in 
America. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing 
A study of American institutions, the in- 
tellectual and esthetic climate Irom the 
Colonial period to the present 
AMST 438 Readings in American 
Sludia*. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing 
An historical survey ol American values as 
presented m various key writings. 
AMST 437 Readings in American 
Studies. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing 
An historical survey of American values as 
presented m various key writings 
AMST 446 Popular Culture in America. (3) 
Prerequisite junior standing and permis- 
sion of instructor A survey ol Ihe his- 
torical development of the popular arts 
and modes of popular entertainment 
in America 

AMST 447 Popular Culture in 
Amefica. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing 
and AMST 446 Intensive research in 
the sources and themes of contemporary 
American popular culture 



Course Offerings / 125 



Animal Sciences 
ANSC 101 Principles of Animal 
Science. (3) Two lectures and one, two- 
hour laboratory period per week. A 
comprehensive course, including the de- 
velopment of animal science, its contribu- 
tions to the economy, characteristics o( 
animal products, (actors of efficient and 
economical production and distribution. 
ANSC 201 Basic Principles of Animal 
Genetics. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. The basic 
principles and laws of l^endelian genetics 
as applied to economically important 
domestic animals. Included will be gene 
action and interaction, linkage and 
crossing over, recombination, cytological 
maps, chromosomal aberrations, muta- 
tions, structure of the genetic material and 
regulation of genetic information 
ANSC 203 Feeds and Feeding. (3) Credit 
not allowed for ANSC major. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisites, CHEIVI 103, 104, 
Elements of nutrition, source, characteris- 
tics and adaptability of the various feed- 
stuffs to the several classes of livestock. 
A study of the composition of feeds, the 
nutrient requirements of farm animals 
and the formulation of economic diets and 
rations for livestock. 
ANSC 211 Anatomy of Domestic Ani- 
mals. (4) Three lectures and one laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite. ZOOL 101. A 
systematic gross and microscopic com- 
parative study of the anatomy of the major 
domestic animals. Special emphasis is 
placed on those systems important 
in animal production. 

ANSC 212 Applied Animal Physiology. (4) 
Three lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period per week Prerequisite, 
ANSC 211 or equivalent. The physiology 
of domesticated animals with emphasis on 
functions related to production, and the 
physiological adaption to environmental 
influences. 

ANSC 221 Fundamentals of Animal 
Production. (3) Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period per week. This course 
deals with the adaptation of beef cattle, 
sheep, swine and horses to significant and 
specific uses. Breeding, feeding, manage- 
ment practices and criteria for evaluating 
usefulness are emphasized. 
ANSC 222 Livestock Evaluation. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite, ANSC 221 or permis- 
sion of instructor. A study of type and 
breed characteristics of beef cattle, 
sheep and swine and the market classes of 
livestock which best meet present day 
demands. One field trip of about two days 
duration is made, during which students 
participate in the Annual Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Livestock Clinic. 

ANSC 223 Seminar. (1) One lecture per 
week. Reviews, reports and discussions 



of pertinent subjects in animal science. 
ANSC 226 Man, Culture, Animals. (2) A 

general study of the importance of animals 
in the cultural development of man. 
Historical and contemporary uses of par- 
ticular animal species will be explored. 
Environmental limitations to human 
development which have been overcome 
by man-animal relationships will be 
emphasized. 

ANSC 230 Introduction To Horse 
Management. (3) Two lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period per week. A 
general course in horse management 
for students who intend to work in activi- 
ties closely related to the horse industry. 
The basis for the usefulness of horses to 
individuals and society will be developed 
by application of the principles of 
nutrition, physiology, anatomy, genetics, 
behavior, and environmental control. 
ANSC 242 Dairy Production. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite. ANSC 101, A com- 
prehensive course in dairy breeds, 
selection of dairy cattle, dairy cattle nutri- 
ents, feeding and management. 
ANSC 244 Dairy Cattle Type Ap- 
praisal. (1) Freshmen, by permission of 
instructor. Two laboratory periods. 
Analysis of dairy cattle type with emphasis 
on the comparative judging of dairy 
cattle. 

ANSC 252 Introduction to the Diseases 
ol Wildlife. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL 101. The principal 
diseases of North American wildlife will be 
briefly considered. For each disease, 
specific attention will be given to the fol- 
lowing: signs evidenced by the affected 
animal or bird, causative agent, means of 
transmission and effects of the disease 
on the population of the species involved. 
Also included where appropriate is a 
consideration of the threat that each 
disease may pose to man or his domestic 
animals, 

ANSC 261 Advanced Poultry Judging. (1) 
Prerequisite. ANSC 101. One lecture or 
laboratory period per week. The theory 
and practice of judging and culling by 
physical means is emphasized, including 
correlation studies of characteristics 
associated with productivity Contestants 
for regional collegiate judging competi- 
tions will be selected from this class. 
ANSC 262 Commercial Poultry Manage- 
ment. (3) Prerequisite. ANSC 101. A sym- 
posium of finance, investment, plant layout, 
specialization, purchase of supplies and 
management problems in baby chick, 
egg, broiler and turkey production; fore- 
manship, advertising, selling By-products, 
production and financial records. Field 
trips required. 

ANSC 301. Advanced Livestock Evalua- 
tion. (2) Two laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisites. ANSC 222 and per- 



mission of instructor. An advanced course 
in meat animal evaluation designed to 
study the relationship and limitations that 
exist in evaluating breeding and market 
animals and the relationship between the 
live market animal and its carcass. 
Evaluating meat carcasses, wholesale meat 
cuts and meat grading will be empha- 
sized. The most adept students enrolled 
in this course are chosen to represent 
the University of f^aryland in Intercollegi- 
ate Judging Contests. 
ANSC 332 Horse Management. (3) Pre- 
requisite, ANSC 230. Ivlajor topics include 
nutrition, reproduction, breeding, per- 
formance evaluation, basic training and 
management techniques. 
ANSC 337 The Science of Horse 
Training. (2) Summer only. Prerequisites. 
ANSC 230. 332, and permission of instruc- 
tor, fvlajor topics include evaluation of 
behavioral repertory, use of positive 
and negative reinforcement, successive 
approximation, as techniques for the 
basic training of the horse. The basic 
training to include leaching an untrained 
horse to lunge, accept tack, drive, be 
mounted and perform certain movements 
while being ridden, 

ANSC 398 Seminar. (1) Prerequisite, ap- 
proval of the staff. Presentation and dis- 
cussion of current literature and research 
work in animal science, or in fish and 
wildlife management. Repeatable to a 
maximum of two hours. 
ANSC 399 Special Problems in Animal 
Science. (1-2) Prerequisite, approval of 
staff. Work assigned in proportion to 
amount of credit. A course designed for 
advanced undergraduates in which specific 
problems relating to animal science will 
be assigned. 

ANSC 401 Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEfVI 104: ANSC 212 recommended. 
A study of the fundamental role of all 
nutrients in the body including their diges- 
tion, absorption and metabolism. 
Dietary requirements and nutritional de- 
ficiency syndromes of laboratory and 
farm animals and man will be considered. 
ANSC 402 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisites, IVIATH 110, ANSC 

401 or permission of instructor. A critical 
study of those factors which influence 

the nutritional requirements of ruminants, 
swine and poultry. Practical feeding 
methods and procedures used in formu- 
lation of economically efficient rations 
will be presented. 

ANSC 403 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisites. lyiATH 110. ANSC 

402 or permission of instuclor, A critical 
study of those factors which influence 
the nutritional requirements of ruminants, 
swine and poultry. Practical feeding 



methods and procedures used in formu- 
lation of economically efficient rations will 
be presented. 

ANSC 406 Environmental Physiology. (3) 
Prerequisites, anatomy and physiology 
The specific anatomical and physiological 
modifications employed by animals 
adapted to certain stressful environments 
will be considered. Particular emphasis 
will be placed on the problems of 
temperature regulation and water bal- 
ance. Specific areas for consideration will 
include: animals in cold (including hiber- 
nation), animals in dry heal, diving animals 
and animals in high altitudes. 
ANSC 407 Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 
An advanced course primarily designed 
for teachers of vocational agriculture and 
county agents. It includes a study of the 
newer discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, 
breeding and management, 
ANSC 411 Biology and Management 
of Shellfish. (4) Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Field trips, identification, biology, man- 
agement, and culture of commercially- 
important molluscs and Crustacea. Pre- 
requisite, one year of biology or zoology. 
This course will examine the shell fisheries 
of the world, but will emphasize those of 
the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and 
Chesapeake Bay. 

ANSC 412 Introduction to Diseases of 
Animals. (3) Prerequisite, fvllCB 200 and 
ZOOL 101. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period per week. This course gives 
basic instruction in the nature of disease: 
including causation, immunity, methods 
of diagnosis, economic importance, 
public health aspects and prevention and 
control of the common diseases of sheep, 
cattle, swine, horses and poultry. 
ANSC 413 Laboratory Animal Manage- 
ment. (3) A comprehensive course in 
care and management of laboratory ani- 
mals Emphasis will be placed on 
physiology, anatomy and special uses tor 
the different species. Disease prevention 
and regulations for maintaining animal 
colonies will be covered. Field trips will be 
required. 

ANSC 414 Biology and Management of 
Fish. (4) Prerequisite, one year of biology 
or zoology. Two lectures and two three- 
hour laboratories a week. Fundamentals 
of individual and population dynamics: 
theory and practice of sampling fish 
populations: management schemes. 
ANSC 416 Wildlife Management. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory. An introduc- 
tion to the interrelationships of game 
birds and mammals with their environ- 
ment, population dynamics and the 
principles of wildlife management. 
ANSC 422 Meats. (3) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisite. ANSC 221 A course designed to 
give the basic facts about meat as a 



126 / Course OHering* 



lood and the (actors inlluencing accapt- 
ability. marKeiing and quality ol tresh 
meats It includes comparisons ol char- 
acteristics ot live animals with their 
carcasses grading and evaluating 
carcasses as well as wholesale cuts, and 
the distribution and merchandising of 
the nation s meat supply Lat>oratory 
periods are conducted in packing houses, 
meal distribution centers, retail outlets 
and Universily moats laboratory 
ANSC 433 LIverslocIt Management. (3) 
Ono locturu and Iwo labomlory periods 
per week Prorequisilo. ANSC 401 
Application ot various phases ot animal 
science to the management and produc- 
tion ol boot cnlllo. shoop and swine 
ANSC 424 Livestock Management. (3) 
One lecture and Iwo laboratory periods 
per week Prerequisite ANSC 423 
Applications ol various phases ol animal 
science to the management and produc- 
tion ol beol cattle, sheep and swine 
ANSC 426 Principles ol Breeding. (3) 
Second semester Three lectures per 
week Prerequisites. ANSC 201 or 
equivalent. ANSC 222. ANSC 423 or 424 
Graduate credit (1-3 hours) allowed with 
permission ol instructor The practical 
aspects ol animal breeding, heredity, 
variation, selection, development, systems 
ol breeding and pedigree study are con- 
sidered 

ANSC 442 Dairy Callie Breeding. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week Prerequisites. ANSC 242. and 
ANSC 201 A specialized course in 
breeding dairy cattle Emphasis is placed 
on methods ol evaluation and selection, 
systems ol breeding and breeding pro- 
grams 

ANSC 444 Analysis ol Dairy Production 
Syalems. (3) Prerequisites. AGEC 406 
and ANSC 203 or 214. or permission ol 
instructor The business aspects ol dairy 
larming including an evaluation ol the 
costs and returns associated with 
each segment The economic impact ol 
pertinent management decisions is 
studied Recent developments in animal 
nutrition and genetics, agricultural eco- 
r>omics. agricultural engineering, and 
agronomic practices are discussed as they 
apply to management ol a dairy herd 
ANSC 446 Physiology ol Mammalian 
Reproduction. (3) Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period per week 
Prerequisite. ZOOL 422 or ANSC 212. 
Anatomy and physiology or reproductive 
processes in wild and domesticated 
mammals 

ANSC 452 Avian Physiology. (2) (Alter- 
nate even years) one three-hour laboratory 
period per week Prerequisites, a basic 
course in animal physiology The basic 
physiology ol the bird is discussed, 
excluding the reproductive system Special 
emphasis is given to physological dil- 
lerences between birds and other 
vertebrates. 



ANSC 4S2 Physiology ol Halchablllty. (1) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week Prerequisite. ZOOL 421 or 422 
The physiology ol embryonic development 
as related to principles ol hatchabilily 
and problems ol incubation encountered 
in the hatchery industry are discussed. 
ANSC 464 Pouilry Hygiene. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week 
Prerequisites. MICB 200 and ANSC 101 
Virus, bacterial and protozoan diseases, 
parasitic diseases, prevention, control 
and eradication. 

ANSC 466 Avian Anatomy (3) Two lec- 
tures and ono laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite. ZOOL 102 Gross and 
microscopic structure, dissection and 
demonstration 

ANSC 467 Pouilry Breeding and Feed- 
ing. (1) This course is designed primarily 
lor teachers ol vocational agriculture 
and extension service workers. The lirsl 
hall will be devoted to problems con- 
cerning breeding and the development ol 
breeding stock. The second hall will be 
devoled to nutrition 
ANSC 477 Pouilry Products and 
Marketing. (1) This course is designed 
primarily lor teachers ol vocational agri- 
culture and county agents. It deals with 
the lactors allecting the quality ol poultry 
products and with hatchery management 
problems, egg and pouilry grading, 
preservation problems and market outlets 
lor Maryland poultry. 
ANSC 480 Special Topics in Fish and 
Wildllle Management (3) Three lectures. 
Analysis ol various stale and lederal pro- 
grams related to fish and wildllle 
management This would include: lish 
stocking programs. Maryland deer man- 
agement program, warm water lish 
management, acid drainage problems, 
water quality, water (owl management, 
wild lurkey management and regulations 
relative to the administration o( these 
program;, 

ANSC 487 Special Topics In Animal 
Science. (1) Prerequisite, permission ol in- 
structor This course is designed pri- 
marily lor teachers ol vocational 
agriculture and extension service person- 
nel One primary topic to be selected 
mutually by the instructor and students 
will t?e presented each session 

Anthropology 

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthro- 
pology — Archaeology and Physical 
Anthropology. (3) May be taken (or credit in 
the general education program General 
gereral patterns ol the development ol 
human culture; the biological and mor- 
phological aspects ol man viewed in 
his cultural setting 

ANTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology- 
Cultural Anihropoiogy and Linguistics. (3) 
Social and cultural principles as 
exemplilied in ethnographic descriptions. 



The study ot language within the context 

ol anthropology 

ANTH 221 Man and EnvlronmcnL (3) A 

geographical introduction to ethnology 
emphasizing the relations between cultural 
lorms and natural environment 
ANTH 241 Introduction to Archaeol- 
ogy. (3) A survey ol the basic aims and 
methods ol archaeological held work and 
interprelalion. with emphasis on the 
reconstruction ol prehistoric ways ol llle. 
ANTH 261 Introduction to Physical 
Anthropology. (3) The biological evolution 
o( man. including the process ol race 
lormalion. as revealed by the study ol 
the (ossil record and observation ol 
modern (orms 

ANTH 271 Language and Culture. (3) 
A non-technical introduction to linguistics, 
with special consideration ol the relations 
between language and other aspects ol 
culture (Listed also as LING 101). 
ANTH 371 inlroducllon to Linguitlici. (3) 
Introduction to the basic concepts ol 
modern descriptive linguistics. Phonology, 
morphology, syntax. Examinations ol the 
methods ol comparative linguistics, 
internal reconstruction, dialect geography. 
(Listed also as ENGL 280 and LING 100). 
ANTH 389 Research Problems. (1-6) Pre- 
requisite: permission ol instructor Intro- 
ductory training in anthropological 
research methods The student will prepare 
a paper embodying the results ol an 
appropriate combination ol research 
techniques applied to a selected problem 
in any deld ol anthropology 
ANTH 397 Anthropological Theory. (3) 
Prerequisite, permission o( instructor. 
A survey o( the historical development 
and current emphasis in the theoretical ap- 
approaches o( all lields ol anthropology, 
providing an integrated (rame ol relerence 
(or the discipline as a whole 
ANTH 401 Cultural Anthropology- 
Principles and Processes. (3) Prerequisite, 
ANTH 101. 102. or 221 An examination 
ol the nature ol human culture and its 
processes, both historical and (unclional 
The approach will be topical and 
theoretical rather than descriptive 
ANTH 402 Cultural Anthropology- World 
Ethnography. (3) Prerequisite. ANTH 101 
102. or 221 A descriptive survey ol the 
culture areas ol the world through an 
examination ol the ways ol selected 
representative societies 
ANTH 412 Peoples and Cultures of 
Oceania. (3) A survey ol the cultures ol 
Polynesia. Micronesia, Melanesia and 
Australia Theoretical and cultural- 
historical problems will be emphasized 
ANTH 414 Ethnology ol Africa. (3) Pre- 
requisites, ANTH 101 and 102 The native 
peoples and cultures ol Africa and their 
historical relationships, with emphasis 
on that portion ol the continent south 
o( the Sahara. 



ANTH 417 Peoples and Culture* of th« 
Far East. (3) A ;>urvoy ol the ma|or socio- 
political systems ol China Korea and 
Japan Major anthropological quetliont 
will be dealt with in presenting this 
material 

ANTH 423 Ethnology of the Soulh- 
we«L (3) Prerequisites ANTH 101 and 
102 Culture history, economic and social 
institutions, religion, and mythology ol 
the Indians ol the Southwest United 
Stales 

ANTH 424 Ethnology of North Anwrtca. 
(3) Prercquisiles, ANTH 101 and 102 The 
native people and cultures ol North 
America north ol Mexico and their his- 
torical relationships, including the eKects 
ol contact with European-derived 
populations 

ANTH 426 Ethnology of Middle America. 
(3) Prerequisites, ANTH 101 and 102 
Cultural background and modern social 
economic and religious lile ol Indian 
and Mesitzo groups in Mexico and Central 
America; processes ol acculturation and 
currents in cultural development 
ANTH 431 Social Organization ol 
Primitive Peoples. (3) Prerequisites, 
ANTH 101 and 102 A comparative survey 
o( the structures ol non-literate and (oik 
societies, covering both general pnnciples 
and special regional developments 
ANTH 434 Religion of Primlthre 
Peoples. (3) Prerequisites. ANTH 101 and 
102. A survey o( the religious systems 
ol primitive and lolk societies, with 
emphasis on the relation ol religion to 
other aspects ot culture 
ANTH 436 Primitive Technology and 
Economy. (3) A survey o( technology, (ood 
economy and general economic 
processes in non-industrial societies 
ANTH 437 Polilic* and Government In 
Primitive Society. (3) A combined survey 
ol politics in human societies and ol im- 
portant anthropological theories concern- 
ing this aspect ol society 
ANTH 441 Archaeology of the Old 
World. (3) Prerequisite. ANTH 101 or 241 
A survey ol the archaeological materials 
ol Europe, Asia and Alrica. with emphasis 
on chronological and regional inter- 
relationships 

ANTH 451 Archaeology of the New 
World. (3) Prerequisite. ANTH 101 or 241 
A survey ol the archaeological materials 
ol North and South America with 
emphasis on chronological and regional 
interrelationships 

ANTH 461 Advanced Physical Anthro- 
pology. (3) Prerequisites. ANTH 101 or 
261 A technical introduction to the 
hereditary, morphological, physiological 
and behavioral characteristics ol man 
and his primate ancestors and relatives, 
with emphasis on evolutionary processes. 



Course Otferings / 127 



ANTH 498 Field Methods in Ethnology. 
(1-6) Field training in the collection and 
recording of ethnological data. 
ANTH 499 Field Methods in Archaeology. 
(1-6) Field training in the techniques of 
Archaeological survey and excavation. 

Applied Design 

APDS 101 Fundamentals of Design. (3) 

Knowledge of basic art elements and 
principles gained through design problems 
which employ a variety of media. 
APDS 102 Design II. (3) Prerequisite, 
APDS 101 Continued exploration of design 
as a means of visual expression with 
added emphasis on color and lighting. 
APDS 103 Design III — Three-Dimensional 
Design. (3) Three studio periods. Pre- 
requisites, APDS 101, 102. Creative efforts 
directed to discriminating use of form, 
volume, depth, and movement. 
APDS 104 Survey of Art History. (3) A 
rapid survey of western culture expressed 
through and influenced by the visual arts: 
monumental and residential architecture: 
furniture, textiles and costume: painting 
and sculpture, 

APDS 210 Presentation Techniques. (3) 
Three studio periods. Prerequisites, APDS 
101, 102 or equivalent. Comparative 
approach to basic presentation tech- 
niques used in the several areas of 
commercial design. 
APDS 211 Action Drawing — Fashion 
Sketching. (3) Three studio periods Pre- 
requisites, APDS 101 and consent of in- 
structor. Study of the balance and 
proportion of the human figure. Sketch 
techniques applied to action poses and 
fashion drawing in soft and lithograph 
pencils, pastels, water color, ink. Draw- 
ing from model. 

APDS 212 Design Workshop For 
Transfers. (5) Prerequisite, APDS 101 or 
equivalent. Provides opportunity for trans- 
fer students to remove deficiencies in 
lower-level design courses. Study of 
color, lighting and presentation techniques, 
lylay be taken no later than one semester 
after transfer into department, 
APDS 220 Introduction to Fashion 
Design. (3) Three studio periods. Pre- 
requisite, APDS 101 or equivalent. Basic 
fashion figure drawing. Original designs 
rendered in transparent and opaque 
water color, soft pencil, pastels, and ink. 
Primarily for non-majors. 
APDS 230 Silk Screen Printing. (3) Three 
laboratory periods. Prerequisites, APDS 
101. 102, or equivalent. Use of silk 
screen processes in execution of original 
designs for commercial production. 
APDS 237 Photography. (2) One lecture, 
three hours laboratory. Prerequisites, 
APDS 101, 102. or equivalent- Study of 
fundamental camera techniques. Explora- 
tion of the expressive possibilities in 
relation to the field of design and visual 
communication. 



APDS 320 Fashion Illustration. (3) First 
semester. Three studio periods. Prerequi- 
sites. APDS 101, 102, 103, 210, 211, 
Fabric and clothing structure as they 
relate to illustration. Opportunity to ex- 
plore rendering styles and techniques 
appropriate to reproduction methods cur- 
rently used in advertising. Guidance in 
development of individuality in presenta- 
tions 

APDS 321 Fashion Design and Illustra- 
tion. (3) Three studio periods. Prerequisite. 
APDS 320. Design and illustration of 
fashions appropriate to the custom market 
and to mass production. 
APDS 322 Advanced Costume. (4) Pre- 
requisite, APDS 320 or 321. Advanced 
problems in fashion illustration or design. 
Problems chosen with consent of in- 
structor. 

APDS 330 Typography and Lettering. (3) 
Three studio periods. Prerequisites. 
APDS 101. 102. Experience in hand 
lettering techniques as a means of under- 
standing lettering styles in design com- 
position. Recognition of type faces used 
in advertisement, book and magazine 
layout. Effect of printing processes on 
design choices. 

APDS 331 Advertising Layout. (3) Three 
studio periods. Prerequisites, APDS 330, 
EDIN 101A. Design of advertising layouts 
from initial idea to finished layout. 
Typography and illustration as they re- 
late to reproduction processes used 
in direc'i advertising. 
APDS 332 Display Design. (3) Three 
studio periods. Prerequisites, EDIN 101A, 
APDS 330 or equivalent. Application of 
design principles to creative display 
appropriate to exhibits, design shows, 
merchandising. Display construction. 
APDS 337 Advanced Photography. (2) 
Two studio periods. Prerequisite, APDS 
237. Composition, techniques and lighting 
applicable to illustration, documentation, 
advertising design, and display. 
APDS 380 Professional Seminar. (2) Two 
lecture-discussion periods. Prerequisite, 
junior standing and consent of instructor. 
Exploration of professional and career 
opportunities, ethics, practices. Profes- 
sional organizations. Portfolio evaluation, 

APDS 430 Advanced Problems in 
Advertising Design. (3) Two studio periods. 
Prerequisite, APDS 331. Advanced prob- 
lems in design and layout planned for 
developing competency in one or more 
areas of advertising design. 
APDS 431 Advanced Problems in 
Advertising Design. (3) Two studio periods 
Prerequisite, APDS 430. Advanced prob- 
lems in design and layout planned for 
developing competency in one or more 
areas of advertising design. 
APDS 437 Advanced Photography. (3) 
Three studio periods. Continuation of 
APDS 337. 



APDS 499 Individual Problems in Ap- 
plied Design. (3-4) 

A — Advertising 

B — Costume 

Open only to advanced students who, 

with guidance, can work independently. 

Written consent of instructor. 

Architecture 

ARCH 170 Introduction to the Built 
Environment. (3) Introduction of (1) con- 
ceptual, perceptual, behavioral and 
technical aspects of the environment: and, 
(2) methods of analysis, problem solving 
and implementation. For students not 
majoring in architecture. Prerequisites, 
none. Lecture, seminar, three hours per 
week. 

ARCH 200 Basic Environmental De- 
sign. (4) Introduction to the processes of 
visual and architectural design, including 
the study of visual design fundamentals. 
Field problems involving the student in 
the study of actual developmental 
problems. Lecture, studio, 9 hours per 
week. 

ARCH 201 Basic Environmental De- 
sign. (4) Prerequisite, ARCH 200 with a 
grade of C or better. Introduction to the 
processes of visual and architectural 
design, including the study of visual design 
fundamentals. Field problems involving 
the student in the study of actual de- 
velopmental problems. Lecture and studio, 
9 hours per week. 

ARCH 214 Materials and Methods of 
Construction I. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Architecture students only or permission 
of instructor. An introduction to the 
materials of construction, their properties 
attributes and deficiencies. 
ARCH 215 Materials and Methods of 
Construction II. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Architecture students only or permission 
of instructor. Describes the methods by 
which the architect combines materials to 
produce structural systems. 
ARCH 220 History of Architecture. (3) 
Survey of architectural history. Lecture, 
three hours per week. 
ARCH 221 History of Architecture. (3) 
Prerequisite, ARCH 120. Continuation of 
survey of architectural history. Lecture, 
three hours per week. 
ARCH 240 Basic Photography. (2) Pro- 
vides a student with the basic concepts of 
clarity and organization on a two- 
dimensional surface and stresses photog- 
raphy as a tool for visual communication. 
Lecture one hour per week, three hours of 
laboratory per week. 

ARCH 242 Drawing I. (2) Introduces the 
student to basic techniques of sketching 
and use of various media. 
ARCH 300 Architecture Studio I. (4) 
Prerequisites. ARCH 201 with a grade of 
C or better. Correquisite, ARCH 310. 
Develops a basic understanding of the 



elements of environmental control, basic 
structural systems, building processes 
materials, and the ability to manipulate 
them. Lecture and studio, 9 hours per 
week. 

ARCH 301 Architecture Studio II. (4) 
Prerequisite, ARCH 300 with a grade of C 
or better. Corequisite, ARCH 311, De- 
velops a basic understanding of the forms 
generated by different structural systems, 
environmental controls and methods of 
construction. Lecture and studio, 9 hours 
per week. 

ARCH 310 Architectural Science and 
Technology I. (4) Prerequisite, ARCH 201 
with a grade of C or better, ARCH 215, 
MATH 221, and PHYS 121. Corequisite, 
ARCH 300. Introduction to architectural 
science and technology treating principles 
of structures, environmental mechanical 
controls, and construction. Lecture and 
studio, 6 hours per week. 
ARCH 311 Architectural Science and 
Technology II. (4) Prerequisite, ARCH 300 
and ARCH 310 with a grade of C or 
better. Corequisite. ARCH 301. Develops 
working knowledge of the design princi- 
ples and parameters of three areas of 
architectural science and technology 
structures, environmental-mechanical 
controls, and construction. Lecture and 
studio, 6 hours per week. 
ARCH 314 Computer Applications in 
Architecture. Prerequisite, ARCH 201 or 
permission of instructor. Introduction to 
computer programming and utilization, 
with emphasis on architectural appli- 
cations. Lecture, laboratory. 
ARCH 322 Studies in Medieval Archi- 
tecture. (3) Limited to architecture stu- 
dents or by permission of the instructor. 
Architectural innovations from the 
Carolingian through the Gothic periods. 
Lecture, three hours per week. 
ARCH 324 Studies in Renaissance 
Architecture. (3) Limited to architecture 
students or by permission of the instructor. 
Study of Renaissance architectural 
principles and their development in the 
Baroque period. Lecture, three hours per 
week 

ARCH 326 Studies In Modern Architec- 
ture. (3) Limited to architecture students 
or by permission of the instructor. Study 
of architectural problems from 1750 to 
the present. Lecture, three hours per 
week. 

ARCH 340 Advanced Photography. (2) 
Prerequisite. ARCH 240. Allows the stu- 
dent to investigate independently areas of 
photographic communication not covered 
in the basic course. Lecture, one hour 
per week, three hours laboratory. 
ARCH 342 Studies in Visual Design. (3) 
Studio work at an intermediate level in 
visual design divorced from architectural 
problem solving Prerequisite, ARCH 201. 
Lecture, studio work, three hours per 
week. 



128 / Course Offerings 



ARCH 3S0 Theory ol Urban Form. (3) 

UrDan spiiliiil forms ol Iho past and 
preseni ihuones ol detign ol complexes 
ol Duildmgs urban space and communilies 
Lecture Ihreo hours per woeK 
ARCH 352 The Architect In Ihe Com- 
munity. (3) Tho architecl s rolo m iho 
social and political dynamics ol urban 
environmental design docision-making 
processes, including study ol determina- 
tion and expression ol user needs, com- 
munity aspirations, lormal and informal 
program and design review processes. 
Seminar, one hour per week. Held observa- 
tion, approximately three hours per 
week 

ARCH 360 Basic Site Analysis. (3) Study 
ol criteria and principles essential to 
the support ol natural systems in physical 
Site development For architecture 
students or by permission of instructor. 
Lecture-laboratory, three hours per week 
ARCH 370 Theories and Literature of 
Architecture. (3) Limited to architecture 
students or by permission ol the instructor 
Provides an understanding ol some his- 
torical and present theories of archi- 
tectural design readings and seminar 
discussions Lecture, three hours per 
week 

ARCH 372 Signs. Symbols and Messages 
In Architecture. (3) Limited to architec- 
ture students or by permission of the 
instructor Class limited to 15-20 students 
Signs and symbols in buildings and cities. 
messages conveyed and purposes for 
conveying these messages. Readings, 
photographic reports and minor problem- 
solving assignments. Lecture, three hours 
per week 

ARCH 374 Computer Aided Environ- 
mental Design. (3) Applications of 
computer-aided design in architecture, 
using existing problem-solving routines 
and computer graphic techniques Pre- 
requisite ARCH 201 CMSC 103 Lecture, 
three hours per week 
ARCH 376 The Architectural Program 
as Functional Form Generator. (3) A study 
ol architectural programming as derived 
from functional needs ol man in his 
environment Analysis, synthesis and 
evaluation ol categories ol needs with 
concentration on human response to 
forms generated by programs with 
emphasis on non-quantifiable human 
needs Architecture majors or by permis- 
sion ol the instructor Lectures, seminars, 
lield trips, three hours per week, 
ARCH 400 Architecture Studio ill. (4) 
Prerequisites ARCH 301 with a grade of 
C or better, and ARCH 311 Corequisite. 
ARCH 410. except by permission ol the 
dean. Continuation of design studio, 
with emphasis on comprehensive building 
design and introductcion to urban design 
factors Lecture and studio 9 hours per 
week. 



ARCH 401 Architecture Studio iV. (4) 

Pivroguisiios. ARCH 400 with a grade of 
C or bettor and ARCH 410, Corequisite. 
ARCH 411. except by permission ol 
tho dean Continuation of design studio 
with emphasis on urban design factors 
Lecture and studio. 9 hours per week. 
ARCH 410 Building Sydemi ill. (4) Pro- 
requisites. ARCH 301 and ARCH 311 with 
a grade ol C or better Corequisite. 
ARCH 400. except by permission ol Ihe 
dean Application of principles in archi- 
tectural structures, environmental controls 
and construction Lecture and studio. 
SIX hours per week 
ARCH 411 Building Systems iV. (4) 
Prerequisites. ARCH 400 and ARCH 410 
with a grade ol C or better. Corequisite. 
ARCH 401 except by permission of the 
dean. Application of principles and further 
analysis ol systems and hardware in 
architectural structures, environmental 
controls and construction Lecture and 
studio, six hours per week, 
ARCH 413 Structural Systems In Archi- 
tecture. (3) Theory and application of 
selected complex structural systems as 
they relate to architectural decisions. Pre- 
requisite. ARCH 410 or by permission ol 
the instructor. Seminar, three hours per 
week. 

ARCH 414 Solar Energy Applications 
For Buildings. (3) Prerequisites, ARCH 311. 
or ENME 321. or permisson ol instructor. 
Methods of utilizing solar energy to 
provide heating, cooling, hot water, and 
electricity lor buildings and related 
techniques lor reducing energy consump- 
tion. Crosshsled as ENME 414 
ARCH 418 Independent Studies in 
Architectural Science. (1-6) Repeatable to 
a maximum ol six credits Independent 
research in architectural science and 
technology. 

ARCH 420 History ol American Architec- 
ture. (3) Survey history of American 
architecture from the 17th century to the 
present Lecture, three hours per week. 
ARCH 422 French Architecture 1750- 
1800. (3) French architectural theory and 
practice of the second half ol the ISIh 
century, A reading knowledge ol French 
will be required Colloquium and inde- 
pendent research By permission of the 
instructor, 

ARCH 424 History ol Russian Architec- 
ture. (3) Survey history of Russian archi- 
tecture Irom the 10th century Lecture. 
Ihree hours per week 
ARCH 426 Readings In Contemporary 
Architecture. (3) Prerequisite. ARCH 326 
Readings and analysis ol recent archi- 
tectural criticism Seminar, three hours per 
week 

ARCH 427 Independent Studies in Ihe 
History ol Architecture. (3) Permission ol 
Ihe instructor Independent research in 
architectural history. Lecture three hours 
per week. 



ARCH 430 Problems and Methods of 
Architectural Pretarvalion. (3) Pioroqui- 
site. ARCH 420 or by permission ol in- 
structor Examination ol social, cultural, 
and economic values allecting the theory 
and practice ol architectural preserva- 
tion in America, with emphasis upon 
tho rationale and methods for Ihe 
documentation, evaluation, and utilization 
of existing architectural resources. Field 
■rips 

ARCH 447 Advanced Seminar in 
Photography. (3) Prerequisites, ARCH 340 
or APOS 337 or JOUR 351. and consent 
of instructor Advanced study ol photo- 
graphic criticism through empirical 
methods, lor students prolicient in photo- 
graphic skills Photographic assignments, 
laboratory, seminar, three hours per 
week 

ARCH 450 Introduction to Urban Plan- 
ning. (3) Inlroduclion to city planning 
theory, methodology and techniques, deal- 
ing with normative, urban, structural, 
economic, social aspects of the city: 
urban planning as a process. Architec- 
tural majors or by permission of the 
instructor Lecture, seminar, three hours 
per week 

ARCH 451 Urban Design Seminar. (3) 
Prerequisite. ARCH 350 or permission ol 
instructor. Advanced investigation into 
problems of analysts and evaluation ol the 
design ol urban areas, spaces and 
complexes vilh emphasis on physical and 
social considerations, elfects of public 
policies, through case studies. Field 
observations 

ARCH 472 Economic Determinants of 
Architecture. (3) Introduction ol economic 
aspects of present day architecture: 
government policy, land evaluation, and 
project linancing: construction materials 
and labor costs: cost analysis and con- 
trol systems. Architecture majors, except 
by permission of instructor. Lecture, 
seminar. Ihree hours per week, 
ARCH 478 Directed Studies in Architec- 
ture. (1-4) Directed study under individual 
laculty guidance with enrollment limited 
to advanced undergraduate students. 
Project proposals must receive a recom- 
mendation from the school curriculum 
committee and approval of the dean of 
the school prior to registration. Public 
oral presentation to the faculty of a final 
report of project will be required at 
final submission for credit. 
ARCH 500 Advanced Topical Problems in 
Architecture 1. (5) Prerequisite. ARCH 401 
With a grade ol C or better Oilers 
several studio options in advanced topical 
problems from among which the student 
selects one. Studies are structured 
under generic titles and include lec- 
tures, field trips and assigned readings 
as well as directed independent work. 
Offered fall term only. Lecture and studio 



12 hours per week Architecture majors 
only 

ARCH 501 Advanced Topical Problem* 
In Architecture II. (6) Prerequisite ARCH 
500 With a gradu of C or better Offers 
several studio options in advanced topical 
problems Irom among which the student 
selects one Studios are structured 
under generic titles and include lectures. 
Iiold trips, assigned readings as well as 
directed independent work Olfered spring 
term only. Lecture and studio 12 hours per 
week 

ARCH 512 Advanced Structural Analyti* 
in Architecture. (3) Qualitative and 
quantiiative analysis and design ol se- 
lected complex structural systems and 
methods. Prerequisite. ARCH 411 Labora- 
tory, field trips, three hours per week 
ARCH 514 Environmenlai Sytlemt In 
Architecture. (3) Qualitative analysis ol 
selected environmental systems as design 
determinants Prerequisite. ARCH 411 
Lecture, laboratory, three hours per 
week. 

ARCH 570 introduction to Protettional 
Management. (2) Introduction to archi- 
tectural prolessional practice management, 
including social, organizational project 
management, legal and cost-control 
aspects of the performance of complex, 
comprehensive environmental design 
services. Prerequisite. ARCH 401 Lecture. 
two hours per week 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 
AREC 240 Environment and Human 
Ecology. (3) Pollution and human crowding 
in the modern environment Causes and 
ecological costs of these problems. 
Public policy approaches to the solution 
of problems in environment and human 
ecology 

AREC 250 Elements of Agricuilurai and 
Resource Economics. (3) An introduction 
to economic principles of production, 
marketing, agricuilurai prices and in- 
comes, larm labor, credit, agricultural 
policies, and government programs. 
AREC 251 Marketing of Agricuilurai 
Products. (3) The development of market- 
ing, its scope, channels, and agencies 
ol distribution, lunctions. costs, methods 
used and services rendered. 
AREC 398 Seminar. (1) Students will 
obtain experience in the selection, 
preparation and presentation of economic 
topics and problems which will be sub- 
jected to critical analysis, 
AREC 399 Spa<:lal Problems. (1-2) Con- 
centrated reading and study in some 
phase ol problem in agricultural eco- 
nomics 

AREC 404 Prices ol Agricuilurai 
Products. (3) An introduction to agricultur- 
al price behavior Emphasis is placed on 
the use ol price information in the 
decision-making process, the relation ol 
supply and demand in determining agri- 



Course OHerings / 129 



cultural prices, and the relation of prices 
to grade, time, location, and stages of 
processing in tfie marl<eting system. The 
course includes elementary methods 
of price analysis, the concept of parity 
and the role of price support programs 
in agricultural decisions. 
AREC 406 Farm Management. (3) The 
organization and operation of the farm 
business to obtain an income consistent 
with family resources and objectives. 
Principles of production economics and 
other related fields are applied to the 
individual farm business. Laboratory 
period will be largely devoted to field trips 
and other practical exercises. 
AREC 407 Financial Analysis of the 
Farm Business. (3) Application of economic 
principles to develop criteria for a 
sound farm business, including credit 
source and use, preparing and filing in- 
come tax returns, methods of appraising 
farm properties, the summary and 
analysis of farm records, leading to 
effective control and profitable operation 
of the farm business. 

AREC 410 Horse Industry Economics, (3) 
Prerequisite. ANSC 230 and 232. An intro- 
duction to the economic forces affecting 
the horse industry and to the economic 
tools required by horse farm managers, 
trainers, and others in the industry. 
AREC 414 Introduction to Agricultural 
Business Management. (3) The different 
forms of businesses are investigated. 
Management functions, business indicators, 
measures of performance, and operation- 
al analysis are examined. Case studies 
are used to show applications of man- 
agement techniques. 

AREC 427 The Economics of Marketing 
Systems For Agricultural Commodities. (3) 
Basic economic theory as applied to the 
marketing of agricultural products, includ- 
ing price, cost, and financial analysis. 
Current developments affecting market 
structure including effects of contractual 
arrangement, vertical integration, govern- 
mental policies and regulation. 
AREC 432 Agricultural Policy and 
Programs. (3) A study of public policies 
and programs related to the problems of 
agriculture. Description analysis and 
appraisal of current policies and programs 
will be emphasized. 
AREC 445 World Agricultural Develop- 
ment and the Quality of Life. (3) An 
examination of the key aspects of the 
agricultural development of less developed 
countries related to resources, technology, 
cultural and social setting, population, 
infrastructure, incentives, education, and 
government. Environmental impact of 
agricultural development, basic economic 
and social characteristics of peasant 
agriculture, theories and models of agri- 
cultural development, selected aspects of 
agricultural development planning. 



AREC 452 Economics of Resource 
Development. (3) Economic, political, and 
institutional factors which influence the 
use of land resources. Application of 
elementary economic principles in under- 
standing social conduct concerning the 
development and use of natural and 
man-made resources. 
AREC 453 Economic Analysis of Natural 
Resources. (3) Rational use and reuse 
of natural resources. Theory and methodol- 
ogy of the allocation of natural resources 
among alternative uses. Optimum state 
of conservation, market failure, safe 
minimum standard, and cost-benefit 
analysis. 

AREC 484 Introduction to Econometrics 
in Agriculture. (3) An introduction to the 
application of econometric techniques 
to agricultural problems with emphasis 
on the assumptions and computational 
techniques necessary to derive statistical 
estimates, test hypotheses, and make 
predictions with the use of single 
equation models. Includes linear and non- 
linear regression models, internal least 
squares, discriminant analysis and factor 
analysis. 

AREC 485 Applications of Mathematical 
Programming In Agriculture, Business, 
and Economic Analysis, (3) This course 
IS designed to train students in the 
application of mathematical programming 
(especially linear programming) to solve 
a wide variety of problems in agriculture, 
business and economics. The primary 
emphasis is on setting up problems and 
interpreting results. The computational 
facilities of the computer science center 
are used extensively. 
AREC 489 Special Topics in Agricultural 
and Resource Economics. (3) Repeatable 
to a maximum of 9 credits. 
AREC 495 Honors Reading Course in 
Agricultural and Resource Economics I. (3) 
Selected readings in political and eco- 
nomic theory from 1700 to 1850. This 
course develops a basic understanding 
of the development of economic and po- 
litical thought as a foundation for under- 
standing our present society and its 
cultural heritage. Prerequisite, accept- 
ance in the honors program of the depart- 
ment of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics. 

AREC 496 Honors Reading Course In 
Agricultural and Resource Econom- 
ics II. (3) Selected readings in political and 
economic theory from 1850 to the 
present. This course continues the devel- 
opment of a basic understanding of 
economic and political thought begun 
in AREC 495 by the examination of 
modern problems in agricultural and 
resource economics in the light of the 
material read and discussed in AREC 495 
and AREC 496. Prerequisite, successful 
completion of AREC 495 and registration 
in the honors program of the department 
of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 



Air Science 

ARSC 100 General Military Course 
(Freshmen). (1) General military course — 
freshman year. ARSC 100 and 101. In the 
first two years, cadets meet academic 
classes once per week. In addition, they 
receive one hour of corps training 
each week. 

ARSC 101 General Military Course 
(Freshmen), (1) General military course — 
freshman year, ARSC 100 and 101. In the 
first two years, cadets meet academic 
classes once per week. In addition, they 
receive one hour of corps training 
each week. 

ARSC 200 General Military Course 
(Sophomores). (1) General military course 
— sophomore year, ARSC 200 and 201. 
In the first two years, cadets meet 
academic classes once per week. In addi- 
tion, they receive one hour of corps 
training each week. 
ARSC 201 General Military Course 
(Sophomores). (1) General military course 
—sophomore year. ARSC 200 and 201. 
In the first two years, cadets meet 
academic classes once per week. In addi- 
tion, they receive one hour of corps 
training each week. 

ARSC 300 Professional Officer Course 
(Juniors). (3) The growth and development 
of aerospace power. Requires three 
class hours, plus one hour of corps train- 
ing per week. 

ARSC 301 Professional Officer Course 
(Juniors). (3) The growth and development 
of aerospace power. Requires three 
class hours, plus one hour of corps train- 
ing per week. 

ARSC 302 Professional Officer Course 
(Seniors). (3) The professional officer. Re- 
quires three class hours, plus one hour 
of corps training per week, 
ARSC 303 Professional Officer Course 
(Seniors), (3) The professional officer. Re- 
quires three class hours, plus one hour 
of corps training per week. 

Art Education 

ARTE 100 Fundamentals of Art Educa- 
tion. (3) Two hours of laboratory and 
two hours of lecture per week. Funda- 
mental principles of the visual arts for 
teaching on the elementary level. 
Elements and principles of design and 
theory of color. Studio practice in different 
media. 

Art History 

ARTH 100 Introduction to Art. (3) Basic 
tools of understanding visual art. This 
course stresses major approaches such 
as techniques, subject matter, form, and 
evaluation. Architecture, sculpture, paint- 
ing, and graphic arts will be discussed. 
Required of all art majors in the first 
year. 



ARTH 260 History o( Art. (3) A survey of 
western art as expressed through archi- 
tecture, sculpture and painting. Prehistoric 
times to Renaissance, 
ARTH 261 History of Art. (3) A survey of 
western art as expressed through archi- 
tecture, sculpture and painting from 
Renaissance to the present. 
ARTH 284 Introduction to African Art. (3) 
General concepts preparing the student 
lor a better understanding of African 
cultures through an appreciation of their 
art. 

ARTH 320 Masterpieces of Painting. (3) 
A study of the contributions of a few 
major painters, ranging from Giotto to 
Titian. 

ARTH 321 Masterpieces of Painting. (3) 
A study of the contributions of a few 
ma)or painters, ranging from El Greco to 
Picasso. 

ARTH 330 Masterpieces ol Sculpture. (3) 
A study of the contributions of a few 
major sculptors, ranging from Polykleitos 
to Ghiberti. 

ARTH 331 Masterpieces of Sculpture. (3) 
A study of the contributions of a few 
major sculptors, ranging from Ghiberti 
to Ivloore. 

ARTH 338 Special Topics in Art and 
Music. (3) Open to non-majors and majors 
m art or music: listed also as tvlUSC 338, 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits, 
ARTH 340 Masterpieces of Architec- 
ture. (3) A study of great architecture 
from Stonehenge to the Cathedral at 
Pisa. 

ARTH 341 Masterpieces of Architec- 
ture. (3) A study of great architecture from 
Abbaye-Aux-Hommes to Dulles Airport. 
ARTH 402 Classical Art (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting in the classical 
cultures. First semester will stress 
Greece 

ARTH 403 Classical Art. (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting in the classical 
cultures. Second semester will stress 
Rome. 

ARTH 404 Bronze Age Art. (3) Art of the 
Near East. Egypt and Aegean. 
ARTH 406 Art of the East. (3) Architec- 
ture, sculpture and painting. First semester 
will stress India. 

ARTH 407 Art of the East. (3) Architec- 
ture, sculpture and painting. Second 
semester will stress China and Japan. 
ARTH 410 Early Christian and 
Byzantine Art. (3) Architecture, sculpture. 
painting, and mosaic of early Christian 
Rome, the Near East and the Byzantine 
Empire. 

ARTH 412 Medieval Art. (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting in the middle 
ages. First semester will stress 
Romanesque 

ARTH 413 Medieval Art. (3) Architecture, 
sculpture and painting in the middle 



130 / Course OHerings 



agos Second semester will stress the 
Goiriic F'orioJ 

ARTH 416 Northern European Painting 
In the ISth Century (3) Pamting in the 
NcltKvi.mJ:. li.iitr ana Germany 
ARTH 417 Northern European Painting 
In the 16lh Century. (3) Painting m the 
Netherlands Franco and Germany 
ARTH 422 Early Ranalttanc* Art In 
Italy. (3) Archiloclurc. sculpture and paint- 
ing Irom about 1400 to 1430 
ARTH 423 Early Renalttance Art In 
Italy. (3) Architecture sculpture and paint- 
ing Horn about 1430 to 1475 
ARTH 424 High Ranaiiaanca Art In 
Italy. (3) Architecture sculpture and 
pnmiing Irom about 1475 to 1500 
ARTH 42S High Renaissance Art In 
Italy. (3) Architecture, sculpture and 
painting Irom about 1500 to 1525 
ARTH 430 European Baroque Art (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting ol the 
ma|Or southern European centers in the 
17th century 

ARTH 431 European Baroque Art. (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting ol the 
maior northern European centers in the 
17th century 

ARTH 434 French Painting. (3) French 
painting Irom 1400 to 1600 From Fouquet 
to Poussin. 

ARTH 435 French Painting. (3) French 
painting Irom 1600 to 1800 From LeBrun 
to David 

ARTH 440 19th Century European Art. (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting m 
Europe From Neo-Classicism to 
Romanticism 

ARTH 441 19th Century European Art. (3) 
Architecture sculpture and painting in 
Europe From Realism, to Impressionism 
and Symbolism 

ARTH 44S Impressionism and Neo- 
Impresslonism. (3) Prerequisite ARTH 260. 
261 or consent ol instructor. History of 
Impressionism and Neo-lmpressionism: 
artists styles art theories, criticism, 
sources and induence on 20th century 
ARTH 450 20th Century Art. (3) Painting, 
sculpture and architecture Irom the late 
19Ih century to 1920 

ARTH 451 20th Century Art. (3) Painting, 
sculpture and architecture Irom 1920 to 
the present 

ARTH 454 Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Century Sculpture. (3) Trends in sculpture 
Irom neo-classicism to the present. 
Emphasis will be put on the redefinition 
ol sculpture during the 20th century. 
ARTH 460 History ol the Graphic Arts. (3) 
Prerequisite, ARTH 100, or ARTH 260 and 
261. or consent ol instructor Graphic 
techniques and styles in Europe Irom 1400 
to 1600: contributions ol major artists 
ARTH 462 African Art. (3) First semester, 
the cultures west ol the Niger River 



(Nigeria through Mali) from 400 B C to 
the present The art is studied through its 
Iconography and function in the culture 
and the intercultural inlluences upon 
the artists, including a study ol the 
societies, culls and ceremonies during 
which the art was used. 
ARTH 463 African Art. (3) Second 
semester, the cultures east and south of 
Nigeria The art is studied through its 
iconography and lunction in the culture 
and the intercultural inlluences upon the 
artists, including a study of the societies, 
cults and ceremonies during which the 
art was used 

ARTH 464 African Art Research. (3) 
Seminar with concentration on particular 
aspects ol Alrican art. The course is 
given at the Museum ol Alrican Art in 
Washington. D C 

ARTH 470 Latin American Art. (3) Art of 
the Pre-Hispanic and the Colonial periods. 
ARTH 471 Latin American Art. (3) Art ol 
the 19lh and 20th centuries 
ARTH 476 History of American Art. (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting in the 
United States from the Colonial period to 
about 1875 

ARTH 477 History of American Art. (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting in the 
United States Irom about 1875 to the 
present 

ARTH 489 Special Topics in Art 
History. (3) Prerequisite, consent ol de- 
partment head or instructor. May be 
repeated to a maximum of six credits. 
ARTH 498 Directed Studies In Art 
History I. (2-3) For advanced students, by 
permission o( department chairman. 
Course may be repeated for credit if 
content differs 

ARTH 499 Directed Studies in Art 
History II. (2-3) 

Art Studio 

ARTS too Design. (3) Principles and 

elements of design through manipulation 

and organization ol materials in two and 

three dimensions 

ARTS 110 Drawing I. (3) Six hours per 

week An introductory course with a 

variety ol media and related techniques. 

Problems based on still life, figure and 

nature 

ARTS 200 Intermediate Design. (3) Six 

hours per week Prerequisites. ARTS 100. 

110 A continuation ol Design I with more 

individually structured problems in terms 

of form, composition and meaning. 

ARTS 210 Drawing II. (3) Six hours per 

week Prerequisites ARTS 100. 110 

Original compositions Irom the ligure and 

nature supplemented by problems of 

personal and expressive drawing 

ARTS 215 Anatomical Drawing. (3) Six 

hours per week. Prerequisites. ARTS 210 

or permission ol instructor A drawing 



course based on the study ol anatomical 
structure emphasizing the human body 
ARTS 220 Painting I. (3) Six hours per 
week Prorequuitos ARTS KM 110 Basic 
tools and language ol painting Oil and 
watercolor 

ARTS 277 Architectural Prasantallon. (3) 
Six hours per week Prerequisites, ARTS 
100. 110 Techniques of wash and water- 
color m architectural, interior and 
landscape architectural rendering 
ARTS 310 Drawing III. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite ARTS 210 Emphasis 
on understanding organic lorm. as it is 
related to study Irom the human ligure 
and to pictorial composition 
ARTS 320 Painting II. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisites ARTS 210. 220. 
Original compositions based upon nature, 
ligure and still life, supplemented by 
expressive painting. Choice ol media. 
ARTS 324 Painting III. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite, ARTS 320 Creative 
painting for advanced students Problems 
require a knowledge ol pictorial struc- 
ture. Development of personal direction. 
Choice ol media 

ARTS 330 Sculpture I. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite. ARTS 210 (For stu- 
dents majoring in art history, by permis- 
sion ol department ) Volumes, masses 
and planes, based on the use ol 
plastic earths. Simple armature construc- 
tion and methods of casting. 
ARTS 334 Sculpture II. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite, ARTS 330. Nature as 
a point of developing ideas into organic 
and architectural forms 
ARTS 335 Sculpture III. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite. ARTS 334. Problems 
involving plastic earths and other 
material capable of being modeled or 
cast Choice of individual style encour- 
aged 

ARTS 340 Prinlmaking I. (3) Six hours 
per week Prerequisite. ARTS 210 (For stu- 
dents majoring in art history, by per- 
mission of department ) Basic prinlmak- 
ing techniques m relief intaglio, and 
planographic media. 

ARTS 344 Printmaking II. (3) Six hours 
per week Prerequisite. ARTS 210 One 
print media including extensive study 
of color processes Individually structured 
problems. 

ARTS 404 Experiments In Visual 
Processes. (3) Six hours per week Pre- 
requisites, either ARTS 220. 330 or 340, 
Investigation and execution ol process 
oriented art Group and individual experi- 
mental projects 

ARTS 410 Drawing IV. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite. ARTS 310 Advanced 
drawing, with emphasis on human figure, 
its structure and organic likeness to 
lorms in nature Compositional problems 
deriving from this relationship are 
also stressed. 



ARTS 420 Painting IV. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite, ARTS 324 Creative 
painting Emphasis on personal direction 
and sell-criticism Group seminars 
ARTS 430 Sculpture IV. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite. ARTS 335 Problems 
and techniques of newer concepts, 
utilizing various materials, such as plastics 
and metals Technical aspects of welding 
stressed 

ARTS 440 Prinlmaking III. (3) Six hours 
per week Prerequisite ARTS 340 and 
344 Contemporary eiperimental techniques 
of one print medium with group discus- 
sions 

ARTS 441 Printmaking IV. (3) Six hours 
per week Prerequisite, ARTS 440 
Continuation ol ARTS 440 
ARTS 489 Special Problems In Studio 
Arts. (3) Prerequisite consent of instructor. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six hours 
ARTS 498 Directed Studies in Studio 
Art (2-3) For advanced students, by 
permission of department chairman. 
Course may be repeated for credit if 
content differs 

Astronomy 

ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy. (3) 

Every semester An elementary course in 
descriptive astronomy, especially ap- 
propriate lor non-science students. Sun 
moon, planets, stars and nebulae, 
galaxies, evolution. The course is 
illustrated with slides and demonstrations 
of instruments, 

ASTR 105 Introduction to Modem 
Astronomy. (3) Three lectures per week 
Prerequisite. ASTR 100 An elementary 
course in modern astronomy elaborating 
some of the topics which could only be 
mentioned bnelly in ASTR 100 Appropri- 
ate lor non-science students 
ASTR 110 Astronomy Laboratory. (1) 
Two hours of laboratory work per week 
Prerequisite previous or concurrent en- 
rollment in ASTR 100 Exercises include 
use ol photographs ol moon, stars, 
nebulae and galaxies and spectra, experi- 
ments demonstrating scientilic concepts 
used in astronomy Daytime and night- 
time observations il weather permits 
Appropriate lor non-science majors 
ASTR 180 Descriptive and Analytical 
Astronomy. (3) Fall semester. Three lec- 
tures per week. A general survey course 
intended lor science majors. Pre- 
requisite. MATH 115 or equivalent: a 
knowledge ol trigonometry and logarithms 
will be assumed This introductory 
course will deal with the sun and the 
solar system stars and astrophysics, 
stellar systems and cosmology II should 
not be taken by students who have 
already taken ASTR 100 and 105 
ASTR 210 Practical Astronomy. (2-3) 
Prerequisites, ASTR 180 and MATH 140 
ASTR 100 and 105 may be substituted for 
ASTR 180 il approved by instructor One 



Course Offerings / 131 



lecture and two-hour laboratory per 
week. (2-3 credits, according to work 
done.) This course is designed primarily 
lor astronomy majors and will give the 
student familiarity with techniques used 
by astronomers and an understanding 
o( how astronomical data are obtained. 
Students registered (or two credits will not 
be required to do all the exercises. 
Topics will include coordinate systems, 
optics, photometry, binary stars, distance 
determination. Hertzsprung-Russell dia- 
gram, solar observations, moon, galactic 
structure and galaxies 
ASTR 288 Special Projects in Astron- 
omy. (1-3) Prerequisite, permission of the 
instructor. Independent study, short 
research projects, tutorial reading, and 
assisting with faculty research and teach- 
ing under special supervision. Repeatable 
to a maximum of six credits. 
ASTR 398 Special Topics in Astron- 
omy. (3) Prerequisite, junior standing or 
consent of instructor. This course is 
designed primarily for students not major- 
ing in astronomy and is suitable for non- 
science students. It will concentrate 
study in some limited field in astronomy 
which will vary from semester to semester 
Possible subjects for study are the solar 
system, extragalactic astronomy and 
cosmology, the inconstant universe. Re- 
peatable to a maximum of six credits. 
ASTR 399 Honors Seminar. (1-15) Credit 
according to work done. Enrollment is 
limited to students admitted to the 
honors program in astronomy. 
ASTR 400 Introduction to Astro- 
physics I. (3) Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite or corequisite. PHYS 422 or 
consent of instructor. Spectroscopy, 
structure of the atmospheres of the sun 
and other stars. Observational data and 
curves of growth. Chemical composition. 
ASTR 401 Introduction to Astro- 
physics II. (3) Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite. ASTR 400 A brief survey of 
stellar structure and evolution, and ol the 
physics of low-density gasses. such as 
the interstellar medium and the solar 
atmosphere. Emphasis is placed on a 
good understanding of a few theoretical 
concepts that have wide astrophysical 
applications. 

ASTR 410 Observational Astronomy. (3) 
Prerequisites, working knowledge of 
calculus, physics through PHYS 284, or 
263. and three credits of astronomy. An in- 
troduction to current methods of obtain- 
ing astronomical information including 
radio, infrared, optical, ultra-violet, and 
x-ray astronomy. The laboratory work will 
involve photographic and photoelectric 
observations with the department's 
optical telescope and 21-cm line 
spectroscopy, flux measurements and inter- 
ferometry with the department's radio- 
telescopes. 



132 / Course Offerings 



ASTR 411 Observational Astronomy. (3) 

Prerequisites, ATR 410, working knowledge 
of calculus, physics through PHYS 284. 
or 263. and three credits ol astronomy 
An introduction to current methods ol 
obtaining astronomical information includ- 
ing radio, infrared, optical, ultra-violet, 
and x-ray astronomy. The laboratory work 
will involve photographic and photo- 
electric observations with the depart- 
ments optical telescope and 21-cm line 
spectroscopy, flux measurements and inter- 
lerometry with the department's radio- 
telescopes Observatory work on individual 
projects. Every semester. 
ASTR 420 Introduction to Galactic 
Research. (3) Three lectures per week 
Prerequisite. MATH 141 and at least 12 
credits of introductory physics and 
astronomy courses. Stellar motions, meth- 
ods of galactic research, study of our 
own and nearby galaxies, clusters of 
stars. 

ASTR 450 Celestial Mechanics. (3) Three 
lectures a week. Prerequisite. PHYS 410 
or consent ol instructor. Celestial 
mechanics, orbit theory, equations of 
motion. 

ASTR 498 Special Problems in Astron- 
omy. (1-6) Prerequisite, major in physics or 
astronomy and or consent of advisor. 
Research or special study Credit accord- 
ing to work done. 

Biology 

BIOL 101 Organization and Interrelation- 
ships in the Biological World. (3) An 

introductory lecture course for the non- 
science major emphasizing the funda- 
mental organization, processes and inter- 
dependence of living organisms and the 
biological effects associated with 
human influences on the ecosystem 

Botany 

BOTN 100 General Botany For Non- 
Science Students. (4) Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. A basic 
course in plant biology specifically 
designed to meet the educational needs of 
the general or non-science student. 
Emphasis is placed on an ecological ap- 
proach to studying fundamental concepts 
and processes of plants, and stressing 
the importance of plant life to human 
welfare Credit not allowed both BOTN 
100 and 101. 

BOTN 101 General Botany. (4) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week. 
A basic course in plant biology specifical- 
ly designed to meet the educational 
needs of students majoring in the 
physical or biological sciences. This 
course prepares students for advanced 
courses in plant science. Emphasis is 
placed on fundamental biological principles 
and mechanisms governing higher plant 
life in the ecosystem. (Credit not allowed 
lor both BOTN 100 and 101). 



BOTN 202 Plant Kingdom. (4) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week 
Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or equivalent. 
A brief evolutionary study of Algae, fungi, 
liverworts, mosses, ferns and their 
relatives, and the seed plants, emphasiz- 
ing their structure, reproduction, habitats, 
and economic importance. 
BOTN 211 Principles ol Conservation. (3) 
Three lectures per week. A study of the 
principles of economical use of our 
natural resources including water, soil, 
plants, minerals, wildlife and man. 
BOTN 212 Plant Taxonomy. (3) One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 100 or equivalent. 
An introductory study of plant classifica- 
tion, based on the collection and 
identification of local plants. 
BOTN 221 Diseases of Plants. (4) Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or equiva- 
lent. An introductory study of the symp- 
toms and causal agents of plant diseases 
and measures for their control. 
BOTN 389 Tutorial Readings in Botany 
(Honors Course). (2-3) Prerequisite, admis- 
sion to the department of botany honors 
program. A review of the literature deal- 
ing with a specific research problem 
in preparation for original research to 
be accomplished in BOTN 399. Papers will 
be assigned and discussed in frequent 
sessions with the instructor. 
BOTN 398 Seminar. (1) Repeatable to a 
maximum of two semester hours credit- 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 
Discussion and readings on special topics, 
current literature, or problems and 
progress in all phases of botany. Minor 
experimental work may be pursued ol 
facilities and the qualifications of the 
students permit For seniors only, majors 
and minors in botany or biological science. 
BOTN 399 Research Problems in 
Botany. (1-3) Prerequisites. 20 hours of 
botany courses and permission of the in- 
structor. Research and or integrated 
reading in botany under the direction and 
close supervision of a member of the 
faculty. May be repeated for a maximum 
of six credits. 

BOTN 401 History and Philosophy ol 
Botany. (1) Prerequisites. 20 semester 
credit hours in biological sciences includ- 
ing BOTN 100 or equivalent. Discussion 
of the development of ideas and 
knowledge about plants, leading to a 
survey of contemporary work in botanical 
science. 

BOTN 402 Plant Microtechnique. (3) 
BOTN 405 Systematic Botany. (3) Two 
two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite. BOTN 212 or equivalent. An 
advanced study of the principles of 
systematic botany. Laboratory practice 
with difficult plant families including 
grasses, sedges, legumes, and composites. 
Field trips arranged. 



BOTN 407 Teaching Methods in 
Botany. (2) Four two-hour laboratory dem- 
onstration periods per week, for eight 
weeks. Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or 
equivalent. A study of the biological 
principles ol common plants, and demon- 
strations, projects, and visual aids suitable 
(or teaching in primary and secondary 
schools. 

BOTN 411 Plant Anatomy. (3) Summer or 
University College. Lectures and labs 
to be arranged The origin and develop- 
ment of the organs and the tissue systems 
in the vascular plants 
BOTN 413 Plant Geography. (2) Pre- 
requisite. BOTN 100 or equivalent. A 
study of plant distribution throughout the 
world and the factors generally associated 
with such distribution. 
BOTN 414 Plant Genetics. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BOTN 100 or equivalent. The 
basic principles of plant genetics are pre- 
sented: the mechanics of transmission 
of the hereditary factors in relation to the 
life cycle of seed plants, the genetics 
of specialized organs and tissues, spon- 
taneous and induced mutations of basic 
and economic significance gene action, 
genetic maps, the fundamentals of poly- 
ploidy, and genetics in relation to methods 
of plant breeding are the topics consid- 
ered. 

BOTN 415 Plants and Mankind. (2) Pre- 
requisite. BOTN 100 or equivalent. A 
survey of the plants which are utilized by 
man. the diversity of such utilization, and 
their historic and economic significance. 
BOTN 416 Principles ol Plant 
Anatomy. (4) Two lectures and two 
two-hour laboratory periods per week. 
The origin and development of cells, tis- 
sues, and tissue system ol vascular plants 
with special emphasis on seed-bearing 
plants. Particular stress is given to the 
comparative, systematic, and evolutionary 
study of the structural components of 
the plants Prerequisite, general botany. 
BOTN 417 Field Botany and Tax- 
onomy. (2) Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or 
general biology. Four two-hour laboratory 
penods a week lor eight weeks. The 
identification of trees, shrubs, and herbs. 
emphasizing the native plants of Maryland. 
Manuals, keys, and other techniques will 
be used. Numerous short Held trips will 
be taken. Each student will make an 
individual collection. 
BOTN 419 Natural History ol Tropical 
Plants. (2) Prerequisite, one course in 
plant taxonomy or permission of instructor. 
An introduction to tropical vascular 
plants with emphasis on their morphologi- 
cal, anatomical, and habital peculiarities 
and major taxonomic features, geographic 
distribution and economic utilization of 
selected families Two one-hour lectures 
per week. 

BOTN 422 Research Methods in Plant 
Pathology. (2) Two laboratory periods a 



we«k Prerequitile. BOTN 221 or 
equivalent Advanced (taming m the basic 
research tochniquos and molhods of 
plant pdlhology 

BOTN 424 Olagnotit and Control ol 
PUnI Olaeatet. (3) Prurt>guis<it< BOTN 221 
Three lectures per wook A study of 
various pidnt Oisoasos gioupcJ accord- 
ir>g to the manner in which the host plants 
are altectod Emphasis will be placed on 
recognition of symptoms of the various 
types of diseases and on methods of 
transmission and control ol the pathogens 
involved 

BOTN 425 Diseases ol Ornamentals 
and Turf. (2) Prerequisite BOTN 221 Two 
lectures per week Designed (or those 
students who need practical experience in 
recognition and control ol ornamentals 
and turf diseases The symptoms and 
current control measures lor diseases 
in these crop areas will be discussed 
BOTN 426 Mycology. (4) Two lectures 
and two two-hour laboratory periods per 
week An introductory study of mor- 
phology, classification, life histories, 
and economics ol the lungi 
BOTN 427 Field Plant Pathology. (1) 
Summer session lecture and laboratory to 
be arranged Prerequisite. BOTN 221. or 
equivalent The techniques of pesticide 
evaluation and the identification and 
control ol diseases of Maryland crops 
are discussed Offered in alternate years 
or more frequently with demand. 
BOTN 441 Plant Physiology. (4) Two 
lectures and one four-hour laboratory 
period a week Prerequisites. BOTN 100 
and general chemistry Organic chemistry 
strongly recommended A survey of the 
general physiological activities of 
plants. 

BOTN 462 Plant Ecology. (2) Prerequi- 
site. BOTN 100 Two lectures per week 
The dynamics ol populations as affected 
by environmental factors with special 
emphasis on the structure and composition 
of natural plant communities, both 
terreslial and aquatic. 
BOTN 463 Ecology of Marsh and Dune 
Vegetation. (2) Two lectures a week 
Prerequisites BOTN 100 An examination 
ol the biology of higher plants m dune 
and marsh ecosystems 
BOTN 464 Plant Ecology Laboratory. (1) 
First semester Prerequisite. BOTN 462 or 
its equivalent or concurrent enrollment 
therein One three-hour laboratory period 
a week The application ol field and 
experimental methods to the qualitative 
and quantitative study of vegetation and 
environmental (actors 
BOTN 47S Algal Syslemalics. (4) One 
lecture and two three hour laboratory 
periods per week Prerequisites. BOTN 
IOC. 202. or permission of instructor 
An intensive study of algal structures, 
morphology, classification and nomencla- 



ture Including preparation, preservation 

and identilicatlon procedures 

BOTN 477 Marine Plant Biology. (4) 

Prerequisite. BOTN 100 or general biology 
plus organic chemistry or the consent of 
the instructor Five one-hour lectures 
and three three-hour laboratories each 
week for six weeks An introduction to the 
taxonomic. physiological and biochemical 
characteristics ol marine plants which 
are basic to their role in the ecology 
o( (he oceans and estuaries 
BOTN 497 Special Problems In Marine 
Research. (1-3) Prerequisites BOTN 100 
or general biology plus organic chemistry 
or consent ol Instructor Recommended 
concurrent or previous enrollment in BOTN 
477. marine plant biology An experi- 
mental approach lo problems in marine 
research dealing primarily with phyto- 
plankton. the larger algae, and marine 
spermatophytes Emphasis will be placed 
on their physiological and biochemical 
activities 

Business Administration 

BSAD 001 Workshop. (3) This course 

does not carry credit towards any degree 

at the University. 

BSAD 110 Business Enterprise. (3) A 

survey course covering the internal and 

(unctional organization o( a business 

enterprise, its organization and control 

BSAD 220 Principles ol Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing The 

principles ol accounting for business 

enterprise and the use of accounting data 

in making business decisions 

A — Limited to non-accounting majors. 

See description above (or BSAD 220. 
BSAD 221 Principles of Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisites. BSAD 220 or 220A. The 
principles of accounting (or business enter- 
prise and the use of accounting data in 
making business decisions 
A — Limited to non-accounting majors 

See description above for BSAD 221 
BSAD 230 Business Statistics I. (3) Pre- 
requisite. MATH 220 or consent of instruc- 
tor An introductory course in statistical 
concepts including probability (rom a 
naive set theory approach random vari- 
ables and their properties, and the 
probability distributions ol selected dis- 
crete and continuous random variables 
The concepts o( sampling, sampling 
distributions, and the application o( these 
concepts lo estimation hypothesis testing 
are included as are brief surveys of the 
regression and anova models. This 
course may not be taken for credit by 
management science statistics and IFSM 
majors 

BSAD 231 Business Statistics I. (3) Pre- 
requisite. MATH 141 or consent of instruc- 
tor For management science, statistics 
and IFSM majors An introductory course 
in statistical concepts including probabil- 



ity from a naive set theory approach, 
random variables and their properties, 
and Iho probability distributions of 
selected discrete and continuous random 
variables. The concepts of sampling, 
sampling distributions, and the application 
of those concepts to estimation hypothesis 
testing are included as are briel surveys 
ol the regression and anova models 
BSAD 301 Electronic Data Processing. (3) 
Students enrolled in the Department o( 
Business Administration curricula will 
register (or IFSM 401 For detailed infor- 
mation on prerequisites and description 
of the course, refer to IFSM 401 The 
credits earned in IFSM 401 may be 
included in the total credits earned in the 
area of concentration in Business Admin- 
istration 

BSAD 302 Electronic Data Processing 
Applications. (3) Students enrolled in the 
Department o( Business Administration 
curricula will register (or IFSM 402 For 
detailed information on prerequisites 
and description of the course, refer to 
IFSM 402 The credits earned in IFSM 402 
may be included in the total credits 
earned in the area ol concentration in 
Business Administration. 
BSAD 310 Intermediate Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite. BSAD 221 or 221A A com- 
prehensive study o( the theory and 
problems of valuation of assets, application 
of funds, corporation accounts and 
statements, and the interpretation of 
accounting statements 
BSAD 311 Intermediate Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite. BSAD 221 or 221A. A com- 
prehensive study of the theory and 
problems of valuation of assets, application 
of funds, corporation accounts and 
statements and the interpretation of ac- 
counting statements. 

BSAD 320 Accounting Systems. (3) Pre- 
requisite. BSAD 220 A study of the 
(actors involved in the design and installa- 
tion o( accounting systems: the organi- 
zation, volume and types o( transactions, 
charts o( accounts, accounting manuals, 
the reporting system 

BSAD 321 Cost Accounting. (3) Prerequi- 
site. BSAD 221 or 221A A study 0( 
the basic concepts o( product costing 
and cost analysis (or management plan- 
ning and control Emphasis is placed on 
the role of the accountant in organiza- 
tional management, analysis of cost be- 
havior, standard cost, budgeting, responsi- 
bility accounting and relevant costs for 
decision making 

BSAD 323 Income Tax Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite BSAD 221 or 221A A study 
of the important provisions of the federal 
tax laws, using illustrative examples 
selected questions and problems and 
the preparation of returns 
BSAD 332 Operations Research for 
Management Decisions. (3) Prerequisite. 



MATH 220 BSAD 230 Surveys the 
philosophy, techniques and applications 
of operations research to managerial 
decision making The course is designed 
primarily for students not majoring in 
management science, statistics, or IFSM 
Techniques covered include linear pro- 
gramming, transportation and assignment 
models Markov processes, inventory and 
queuing models Emphasis is placed on 
formulating and solving decision problems 
in the functional areas of management 
BSAD 340 Business Finance. (3) Pre- 
requisite BSAD 221 This course deals 
with principles and practices involved in 
the organization financing, and rehabilita- 
tion o( business enterprises, the various 
types of securities and their use m rais- 
ing funds, apportioning income, risk, 
and control, intercorporate relations, and 
new developments Emphasis is on solu- 
tion of problems of financial policy faced 
by management 

BSAD 343 InvestmenU. (3) Prerequisite. 
BSAD 340 An introduction to financial 
investments Topics include securities and 
securities market; investment risks, 
returns, and constraints: ponfolio policies; 
and institutional investment policies 
BSAD 350 Marketing Principles and 
Organization. (3) Prerequisite. ECON 203 
or 205 This is an introductory course in 
the lield of marketing Its purpose is to 
give a general understanding and appreci- 
ation of the forces operating institutions 
employed, and methods followed in 
marketing agricultural products natural 
products, services and manufactured 
goods 

BSAD 351 Marketing Management (3) 
Prerequisites BSAD 230 and 350 A study 
of the work of the marketing division in a 
going organization The work of develop- 
ing organizations and procedures tor the 
control of marketing activities is 
surveyed. The emphasis throughout the 
course is placed on the determination of 
policies, methods and practices for the 
effective marketing of various forms of 
manufactured products 
BSAD 352 Advertising. (3) Prerequisite. 
BSAD 350 A study of the role o( advertis- 
ing in the American economy, the impact 
o( advertising on our economic and social 
life, the methods and techniques currently 
applied by advertising practitioners; the 
role of the newspaper, magazine, and 
other media in the development of an 
advertising campaign, modern research 
methods to improve the effectiveness of 
advertising and the organization of the 
advertising business 
BSAD 353 Retail ManagemenL (3) Pre- 
requisites. BSAD 220 and 350 Retail store 
organization, location, layout and store 
policy: pricing policies price lines, 
brands, credit policies, records as a guide 
to buying: purchasing methods; super- 
vision of selling; training and supenrision 



Course Offerings / 133 



of retail sales force; and administrative 

problems. 

BSAD 360 Personnel Management. (3) 

The basic course in personnel manage- 
ment includes manpower planning, re- 
cruitment, selection, development, com- 
pensation, and appraisal of employees. 
Explores the impact of scientific manage- 
ment and unionism on these functions. 
BSAD 362 Labor Relations. (3) A study 
of the development and methods of 
organized groups in industry with refer- 
ence to the settlement of labor disputes 
An economic and legal analysis of labor 
union and employer association activities, 
arbitration, mediation, and conciliation; 
collective bargaining, trade agreements, 
strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company 
unions, employee representation, and 
injunctions. 

BSAD 364 Management and Organization 
Theory. (3) The development of manage- 
ment and organization theory. Nature of 
the management process and function and 
its future development. The role of the 
manager as an organizer and director, 
the communication process, goals and 
responsibilities. 

BSAD 370 Principles of Transportation. 
(3) Prerequisite. ECON 203 or 205 A 
general course covering the five fields of 
transportation, their development, service. 
and regulation 

BSAD 371 Traffic and Physical 
Distribution Management. (3) Prerequisite, 
Junior standing Examines the manage- 
ment aspects of the business firm in 
moving their raw materials and finished 
goods, through traffc. warehousing, 
industrial packaging, materials handling, 
and inventory A systematic examination of 
the trade-off possibilities and management 
alternatives to minimize cost of product 
flow and maximizing customer service is 
provided. 

BSAD 380 Business Law. (3) Legal 
aspects of business relationships, con- 
tracts, negotiable instruments, agency, 
partnerships, corporations, real and 
personal property, and sales. 
BSAD 381 Business Law. (3) Legal 
aspects of business relationships, con- 
tracts, negotiable instruments, agency, 
partnerships, corporations, real and 
personal property, and sales. 
BSAD 385 Production Management. (3) 
Studies the operation of a manufacturing 
enterprise, concentrating on the 
economies of production. Introduces a 
grounding in analytical method early so 
that the broad problem areas of system 
design, operation and control can be 
based upon the analytical method 
BSAD 390 Risk Management. (3) Pre- 
requisite. MATH 111- Designed to acquaint 
the student with the nature and signi- 
ficance of risk in business enterprise. The 
problems relating to both pure and 



speculative risk in business are con- 
sidered; and methods of solution involv- 
ing risk assumption, transfer, reduction, 
and the use of insurance are analyzed as 
aids in management decision making. 
BSAD 391 Principles of Risk and 
Insurance. (3) Prerequisite, fVIATH 111. 
Emphasizes the use of insurance in 
resolving problems involving personal 
and business risks. Life, accident and 
health, fire and casualty, automobile, and 
marine insurance are examined as means 
of dealing with these risks. The theory 
and legal aspects of insurance are con- 
sidered, as well as the quantitative 
measurement of risks. 
BSAD 392 Introduction to International 
Business Management. (3) Prerequisite. 
ECON 203 or 205. A study of the domestic 
and foreign environmental factors affecting 
the international operations of U.S. 
business firms The course also covers 
the administrative aspects of international 
marketing, finance and management. 
BSAD 393 Real Estate Principles. (3) 
Prerequisite. ECON 203 or 205. This 
course covers the nature and uses of 
real estate, real estate as a business, 
basic principles, construction problems 
and home ownership, city planning, and 
public control and ownership of real 
estate. 

BSAD 401 Introduction to Systems 
Analysis. (3) Students enrolled in the 
department of business administration 
curricula will register for IFSM 436. For 
detailed information on prerequisites and 
descriptions of the course, refer to 
IFSIVI 436. The credits earned in IFSIVI 436 
may be included in the total credits earned 
in the area of concentration in business 
administration 

BSAD 420 Undergraduate Accounting 
Seminar. (3) Prerequisite. Senior standing 
as an accounting major or consent of 
instructor. Enrollment limited to upper 
one-third of senior class. Seminar cover- 
age of outstanding current non-text 
literature, current problems and case 
studies in accounting. 
BSAD 421 Undergraduate Accounting 
Seminar. (3) Prerequisite. Senior standing 
as an accounting major or consent of 
instructor. Enrollment limited to upper 
one-third of senior class. Seminar 
coverage of outstanding current non-text 
literature, current problems and case 
studies in accounting. 
BSAD 422 Auditing Theory and Practice. 
(3) Prerequisite, BSAD 311 A study of the 
principles and problems of auditing and 
application of accounting principles to 
the preparation of audit working papers 
and reports. 

BSAD 423 Apprenticeship in Accounting. 
(0) Prerequisites, l^inimum of 20 semester 
hours in accounting and the consent of 
the accounting staff. A period of 



apprenticeship is provided with nationally 
known firms of certified public accountants 
from about January 15 to February 15. 
BSAD 424 Advanced Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite. BSAD 311. Advanced ac- 
counting theory to specialized problems 
in partnerships, ventures, consignments, 
installment sales, insurance, statement of 
affairs, receivers accounts, realization and 
liquidation reports, and consolidation of 
parent and subsidiary accounts. 
BSAD 425 CPA Problems. (3) Pre- 
requisite, BSAD 311, or consent of 
instructor, a study of the nature, form and 
content of CPA. examinations by means 
of the preparation of solutions to, and an 
analysis of, a large sample of OP. A. 
problems covering the various accounting 
fields. 

BSAD 426 Advanced Cost Accounting. 
(2) Prerequisite. BSAD 321. A continuation 
of basic cost accounting with special 
emphasis on process costs, standard 
costs, joint costs, and by-product cost. 
BSAD 427 Advanced Auditing Theory 
and Practice. (3) Prerequisite. BSAD 422 
Advanced auditing theory and practice and 
report writing. 

BSAD 430 Linear Statistical Models in 
Business. (3) Prerequisite. BSAD 230 or 
consent of instructor. Model building 
involving an intensive study of the general 
linear stochastic model and the applica- 
tions of this model to business 
problems. The model is derived in matrix 
form and this form is used to analyze both 
the regression and anova formulations of 
the general linear model. 
BSAD 431 Design of Statistical 
Experiments in Business. (3) Prerequisite, 
BSAD 230 or 231 Surveys anova models, 
basic and advanced experimental design 
concepts. Non-parametric tests and cor- 
relation are emphasized. Applications of 
these techniques to business problems in 
primarily the marketing and behavioral 
sciences are stressed. 
BSAD 432 Sample Survey Design for 
Business and Economics. (3) Prerequisite. 
BSAD 230 or 231. Design of probability 
samples. Simple random sampling, 
stratified random sampling, systematic 
sampling, and cluster sampling designs 
are developed and compared for efficiency 
under varying assumptions about the 
population sampled. Advanced designs 
such as multistage cluster sampling 
and replicated sampling are surveyed. 
Implementing these techniques in 
estimating parameters of business models 
IS stressed. 

BSAD 433 Statistical Decision Theory in 
Business. (3) Prerequisite, BSAD 231 or 
consent of instructor. Bayesian approach 
to the use of sample information in 
decision-making. Concepts of loss, risk, 
decision criteria, expected returns, and 
expected utility are examined. Application 



of these concepts to decision-making in 
the firm in various contexts are 
considered. 

BSAD 434 Operations Research I. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 230, MATH 240 or 
permission of instructor. Designed pri- 
marily for students maioring in manage- 
ment science, statistics, and information 
systems management. It is the first semes- 
ter of a two semester introduction to the 
philosophy, techniques and applications of 
operations research Topics covered in- 
clude linear programming, postoptimaiity 
analysis, network algorithms, dynamic 
programming, inventory and equipment re- 
placement models. 

BSAD 435 Operations Research 11. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 434. or permission of 
instructor. The second semester of a two- 
part introduction to operations research. 
The primary emphasis is on stochastic 
models in management science. Topics 
include stochastic linear programming, 
probabilistic dynamic programming. 
Markov processes, probabilistic inven- 
tory models. Queuing theory and 
simulation 

BSAD 436 Applications of Mathematical 
Programming in Management Science. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 434 or permission of 
instructor. Theory and applications of 
linear, integer, and nonlinear programming 
models to management decisions. Topics 
covered include the basic theorems of 
linear programming; the matrix formu- 
lation of the simplex, and dual simplex 
algorithms; decomposition, cutting plane, 
branch and bound, and implicit enumera- 
tion algorithms; gradient based al- 
gorithms; and quadratic programming. 
Special emphasis is placed upon model 
formulation and solution using prepared 
computer algorithms. 
BSAD 438 Topics in Statistical Analysis 
for Business Management. (3) Prerequi- 
site, BSAD 430 and MATH 240 or per- 
mission of the instructor. Selected topics 
in statistical analysis which are relevant to 
management for students with knowledge 
of basic statistical methods. Topics 
include evolutionary operation and re- 
sponse surface analysis, forecasting 
techniques, pathologies of the linear model 
and their remedies, multivariate models, 
and non-parametric models. 
BSAD 440 Financial Management (3) 
Prerequisite. BSAD 340. Analysis and dis- 
cussion of cases and readings relating 
to financial decisions of the firm. The 
application of finance concepts to the 
solution of financial problems is 
emphasized. 

BSAD 443 Security Analysis and Valua- 
tion. (3) Prerequisite, BSAD 343 Study 
and application of the concepts, methods, 
models, and empirical findings to the 
analysis, valuation, and selection of securi- 
ties, especially common stock. 



134 / Course Offerings 



BSAO 445 CommafClal Bank Manag*- 



(1> 



.ind 



functions, poncios. oigdiiiidlion. sUuc- 
lute. services, and regulation are consid- 
ered 

BSAD 4S0 Marketing Research 
Metl>ods. (3) Pieioquisilos BSAO 230 and 
350 Rocommendod Itint BSAD 430 be 
taKen prior to this course Ttiis course Is 
intended to develop skill in the use ol 
scientific methods in the acquisition, 
analysis and interpretation ol marketing 
data It covers the specialized fields ot 
marketing research: the planning ot survey 
projects, sample design, tabulation pro- 
cedure and report preparation. 
BSAD 451 Consumer Analysis. (3) Pre- 
requisites BSAD 350 and 351 Recom- 
mended that PSYC 100 and 221 be taken 
pnor to this course Considers the grow/ing 
importance ot the American consumer 
in the marketing system and the need 
to understand him Topics include the 
foundation considerations underlying con- 
sumer behavior such as economic, 
social, psychological and cultural (actors 
Analysis ot the consumer in marketing 
situations— as a buyer and user of 
products and services — and in relation to 
the various mdivid'jal social and marketing 
factors aflecting his behavior The 
influence ol marketing communications 
IS also considered 

BSAO 452 Promotion Management. (3) 
Prerequisites, BSAD 350 and 352. This 
course is concerned with the way in which 
business drms use advertising, personal 
selling, sales promotion, and other 
methods as part o( their marketing pro- 
gram The case study method is used to 
present problems taken (rom actual 
business practice Cases studied illustrate 
problems in the use and coordination ol 
demand stimulation methods as well as 
analysis and planning Research, testing 
and statistical control of promotional 
activities are also considered 
BSAD 454 International Marketing. (3) 
Prerequisites BSAD 350 plus one other 
marketing course The industrial and busi- 
ness sector of the marketing system is 
considered rather than the household or 
ultimate consumer sector Industrial 
products range from raw materials and 
supplies to the major equipment in a plant, 
business oflice or institution Topics 
include product planning and introduc- 
tion, market analysis and forecasting, 
channels pricing, field sales force 
management, advertising, marketing cost 
analysis, and government relations. Par- 
ticular attention is given to industrial, 
business and institutional buying policies 



and practice and to the analysis ot 
buyer behavior 

BSAD 454 Intemallonal Marketlitg. (3) 
Pioiuquisiles. BSAD 350 plus any other 
maikoting course A study ol the marketing 
lunctlons Irom the viewpoint of the inter- 
national executive In addition to the 
coverage ol international marketing 
policies relating to product adaptation, 
distribution, pricing, communications, and 
distribution, priving, communications, and 
cost analysis, consideration Is given to 
the cultural, legal, linancial, and organiza- 
tional aspects ol inlornational marketing 
BSAD 455 Sales Management. (3) The 
role ol the sales manager, both at head- 
quarters and in the liold, in the manage- 
ment ol people, resources and marketing 
lunctlons. An analysis ol the problems 
involved in sales organization, lorecast- 
ing. planning, communicating, evaluating 
and controlling Attention is given to the 
application ol quantitative techniques and 
pertinent behavioral science concepts 
In the management ol the sales ellort and 
sales (orce 

BSAD 460 Personnel Management — 
Analysis and Problems. (3) Prerequisite. 
BSAD 360, Recommended. BSAD 230. Re- 
search findings, special readings, case 
analysis, simulation, and (ield investiga- 
tions are used to develop a better 
understanding ol personnel problems, 
alternative solutions and their practical 
ramiticalions. 

BSAD 462 Labor Legislation. (3) Case 
method analysis o( the modern law of 
industrial relations. Cases include the de- 
cisions of administrative agencies, 
courts and arbitration tribunals. 
BSAD 454 Organizational Behavior. (3) 
Prerequisite. BSAD 364 An examination 
ol research and theory concerning the 
lorces which contribute to the behavior 
of organizational members Topics covered 
include: work group behavior, supervisory 
behavior, intergroup relations, employee 
goals and attitudes, communication prob- 
lems, organizational change, and organi- 
zational goals and design, 
BSAD 467 Undergraduate Seminar In 
Personnel Management. (3) Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. This course is open 
only to the top one-third ol undergraduate 
majors in personnel and labor relations 
and is offered during the fall semester 
ol each year Highlights major develop- 
ments Guest lecturers make periodic 
presentations 

BSAD 470 Motor Transportation. (3) 
Prerequisite. BSAD 370. The development 
and scope ol the motor carrier industry: 
dilferent types ol carriers, economics ol 
motor transportation, service available, led- 
eral regulation, highway linancing. 
allocation ol cost to highway users, high- 
way barriers. 



BSAD 471 Water Trantporlallon (3) Pre- 
requisite, BSAD 370 Water carriers Ol all 
types, dovolopmont and types ol services, 
trade routes, inland watenwoys, company 
organization, the American Merchant 
Marino as a lactor in national activity 
BSAD 472 Commarclal Air Trantporla- 
tlon. (3) Prerequisite. BSAO 370 The air 
Iransporlation system ol the United States, 
airways, airports, airlines Federal regula- 
tion ol air transportation: economics, 
equipment, operations, financing, selling 
of passenger and cargo services. Air mall 
development and services 
BSAD 473 Advanced Trantporlallon 
Problems. (3) Prerequisite, BSAD 370 
A critical examination of current govern- 
ment transportation policy and proposed 
solutions. Urban and intercity managerial 
transport problems are also considered 
BSAD 474 Urban Transport and Urban 
Development. (3) Prerequisite, ECON 203 
or 205 An analysis of the role of urban 
transportation in present and future 
urban development. The interaction ol 
transport pricing and service, urban plan- 
ning, institutional restraints, and public 
land uses is studied. 
BSAD 480 Legal Environment ol Busi- 
ness. (3) The course examines the 
principal ideas in law stressing those 
which are relevant for the modern business 
executive. Legal reasoning as it has 
evolved in this country will be one ol the 
central topics ol study. Several leading 
antitrust cases will be studied to illustrate 
vividly the reasoning process as well as 
the interplay ol business, philosophy, and 
the various conceptions ol the nature ol 
law which give direction to the process 
Examination of contemporary legal prob- 
lems and proposed solutions, especially 
those most likely to affect the business 
community, are also covered 
BSAD 481 Public Utilities. (3) Prerequi- 
site. ECON 203 or 205 Using the regu- 
lated industries as specilic examples, 
attention is locused on broad and general 
problems in such diverse lields as con- 
stitutional law. administrative law. public 
administration, government control ol 
business, advanced economic theory, 
accounting, valuation and depreciation, 
taxation, linance. engineering, and man- 
agement 

BSAD 482 Business and Government. (3) 
Prerequisite. ECON 203 or 205 A study 
of the role of government in modern eco- 
nomic life. Social control ol business as 
a remedy lor the abuses ol business 
enterprise arising (rom the decline ol 
competition. Criteria of limitations on gov- 
ernment regulation ol private enterprise. 
BSAD 485 Advanced Production Man- 
agement (3) Prerequisite. BSAO 385. A 
study of typical problems encountered by 
the factory manager The objective is to 
develop the ability to analyze and solve 
problems in management control o( 



production and in the lormulalion ol pro- 
duction policies Among the topics covered 
are plant location, production planning 
and control, methods analytls. and time 
study 

BSAD 490 Urban Land Managemanl. (3) 
Covori the managerial and decision mak- 
ing aspects ol urban land and property 
Included are such subjects as land use 
and valuation matters 
BSAD 493 Honori Study. (3) First 
semester ol the senior year Prerequisite, 
candidacy lor honors in business adminis- 
tration The course is designed lor 
honors students who have elected to con- 
duct intensive study (independent or 
group) The student will work under the 
direct guidance ol a (acuity advisor 
and the chairman o( the honors committee 
They shall determine that the area ol 
study is ol a scope and intensity deserving 
ol a candidate's attention. Formal written 
and or oral reports on the study may be 
required by the laculty advisor and or 
chairman ol the honors program Group 
meetings of the candidates may be called 
at the discretion ol the laculty advisors 
and /or chairman ol the honors com- 
mittee. 

BSAD 494 Honors Study. (3) Second 
semester ol the senior year Prerequisit" 
BSAD 493. and continued candidacy lor 
honors in business administration The 
student shall continue and complete the 
research initiated in BSAD 493. additional 
reports may be required at the discretion 
ol the faculty advisor and honors program 
chairman Group meetings may be held. 
BSAD 495 Business Policies. (3) Pre- 
requisites, BSAD 340 350, 364. and senior 
standing A case study course in which 
the aim is to have the student apply 
what he has learned of general man- 
agement principles and their specialized 
functional applications to the overall man- 
agement function in the enterprise 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 
BSOS 101 Introduction to the Behavioral- 
Social Sciences, (3) An inlroduction to 
modern behavioral and social sciences: 
brief history, underlying principles, meth- 
ods and trends of the major behavioral 
and social science disciplines Selected 
contemporary problems and their handling 
by several appropriate disciplines of 
the behavioral-social sciences 
BSOS 308 Contemporary Issues — Inter- 
disciplinary Approaches. (3) An inter- 
disciplinary analysis of current public 
policy issues ol international, national and 
community import Senior standing recom- 
mended. This course may be repeated 
once lor credit, provided a dillerent topic 
is offered 

Pliysical Therapy 
BTPT 110 Physical Therapy Orienta- 
tion. (1) General introductory course to the 



Course Offerings / 135 



profession of physical therapy and its 
relationship to other health professions 
Orientation of the student is done by 
visual aids, discussions, and visits to 
physical therapy departments. 
BTPT 111 Physical Therapy Orienta- 
tion. (1) Continuation of BTPT 110 

Chemistry 

CHEM 101 Introductory College Chem- 
istry. (2) Two lectures and one recitation 
per weel<. An introduction to the study of 
matter This course is intended to be 
followed by CHEI^ 103. This course may 
not be taken for credit by students with 
credit in CHEM 001. 003. 005, 102. 103. 
or 105 or their equivalents. This course 
may not be taken to satisfy the general 
education science requirement 
CHEM 102 Chemistry of Man's 
Environment. (4) Three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Non- 
mathematical presentation of basic 
chemical principles and applications in 
cosmochemistry. geochemistry, biochemis- 
try, and nuclear chemistry. Particular 
emphasis is placed on the development 
of man's environment and his effect upon 
it. This course is for the general student 
and does not satisfy the requirements 
of the professional schools. 
CHEM 103 College Chemistry I. (4) Three 
lectures, one recitation, and one three- 
hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite. 
CHEM 101 or satisfactory performance on 
qualifying test. The first semester of a 
general chemistry sequence intended for 
students whose curricula require a year 
or more of chemistry to provide a 
working knowledge of the science. 
nature and composition of matter; chemi- 
cal calculations: atomic structure: solu- 
tions. 

CHEM 104 College Chemistry II. (4) 
Three lectures, one recitation, and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequi- 
site. CHEM 103 or 105. A continuation 
of CHEM 103 The chemistry of carbon, 
aliphatic compounds; acids and bases, 
aromatic compounds; stereochemistry; 
Halides: amines and amides; acids, esters; 
carbohydrates; natural products. 
CHEM 105 Principles of College Chem- 
istry I. (4) Three lectures, one recitation, 
and one three-hour laboratory per week. A 
more rigorous treatment of the material 
of CHEM 103. Admission by invitation 
of the chemistry department based on per- 
formance on a qualifying test. 
CHEM 106 Principles of College Chem- 
istry II. (4) Three lectures, one recitation, 
and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 103 or 105 and con- 
sent of the chemistry department. A more 
rigorous treatment of the material of 
CHEM 104. 

CHEM 107 Chemistry and Man. (3) Lec- 
ture course intended for non-chemistry 
majors. The impact of chemistry on 
man. The chemistry of the universe around 

136 / Course Offerings 



us, of life, of the body, of the mind, of 
food and drugs, of consumer goods, 
and of everyday living. Basic knowledge 
of chemistry helpful to the intelligent 
citizen of today. 

CHEM 201 College Chemistry III. (3) 
Three lectures and one recitation per 
week. Prerequisite. CHEM 104 or 106. A 
continuation of CHEM 104. Organic 
chemistry, with emphasis on molecular 
structure; stereochemistry, conformational 
analysis; substitution reactions; carbonium 
ions: spectroscopy; aromaticity; syn- 
thetic processes. This course must be 
accompanied by CHEM 202 unless credit 
for CHEM 202 has previously been 
established. 

CHEM 202 College Chemistry Labora- 
tory III. (2) One lecture and one three-hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
104 or 106 A laboratory course to ac- 
company CHEM 201. This course must be 
accompanied by CHEM 201, 
CHEM 203 College Chemistry IV. (3) 
Three lectures and one recitation per 
week. Prerequisite. CHEM 104 or 106. In- 
troductory analytical and theoretical 
chemistry. Bonding theory; electrochemis- 
try; molecular energetics and structure: 
chemical dynamics; equilibrium; determi- 
nation of composition of matter. This 
course must be accompanied by CHEM 
204 unless credit for CHEM 204 has 
previously been established. 
CHEM 204 College Chemistry Labora- 
tory IV. (2) One lecture and one three- 
hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite. 
CHEM 104 or 106. A laboratory course to 
accompany CHEM 203. This course must 
be accompanied by CHEM 203. 
CHEM 211 Principles of College Chem- 
istry III. (3) Three lectures and one 
recitation per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 
104 or 106 and consent of the chemistry 
department. A more rigorous treatment 
of the material of CHEM 201. This course 
must be accompanied by CHEM 212 
unless credit for CHEM 212 has previous- 
ly been established, 
CHEM 212 Principles of College 
Chemistry Laboratory III. (2) One lecture 
and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 104 or 106 and 
consent of the chemistry department. A 
more rigorous treatment of the material 
of CHEM 202, This course must be 
accompanied by CHEM 211. 
CHEM 213 Principles of College 
Chemistry IV. (3) Three lectures and one 
recitation per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
104 or 106 and consent of chemistry 
department, A more rigorous treatment 
of the material of CHEM 203. This course 
must be accompanied by CHEM 214 un- 
less credit for CHEM 214 has previously 
been established 

CHEM 214 Principles of College Chemis- 
try Laboratory IV. (2) One lecture and 



one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite. CHEM 104 or 106 and consent 
of the chemistry department. A more 
rigorous treatment of the material of 
CHEM 204. This course must be accom- 
panied by CHEM 213, 
CHEM 261 Elements of Biochemistry. (3) 
For undergraduate students who desire a 
one-semester biochemistry course rather 
than a two-semester sequence Course 
covers basic chemistry and metabolism 
of most molecules of biological im- 
portance. Not open to students with credit 
in CHEM 461. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 104, 
CHEM 302 Radiochemical Safety Pro- 
cedures. (1) One lecture per week A 
lecture and demonstration course. Radia- 
tion hazards, principles and practices of 
radiation safety, federal (ABC. ICC) codes 
and state public health 
CHEM 321 Quantitative Analysis. (4) 
Two lectures and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisites. 
CHEM 203-204 or 213-214. Volumetric, 
gravimetric, electrometric. and colorimetric 
methods. Intended for students in agri- 
cultural chemistry, general physical sci- 
ence, science education, etc. 
CHEM 398 Special Projects. (2) Honors 
projects for undergraduate students. 
CHEM 399 Introduction to Chemical 
Research. (1-2) Prerequisite, junior 
standing. Registration only upon consent 
of the course coordinator. The course will 
allow students to conduct basic research 
under the supervision of a member of 
the department May be repeated for credit 
to a maximum of four credits. 
CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. 
CHEM 481. 

CHEM 403 Radiochemistry. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite, one year of 
college chemistry and one year of 
college physics. Radioactive decay; intro- 
duction to properties of atomic nuclei: 
nuclear processes in cosmology; chemi- 
cal, biomedical and environmental appli- 
cations of radioactivity: nuclear 
processes as chemical tools: interaction 
of radiation with matter. 
CHEM 421 Advanced Quantitative 
Analysis. (3) Three lectures per week Pre- 
requisites. CHEM 430 and 482 or con- 
current registration. An examination of 
some advanced topics in quantitative 
analysis including nonaqueous titrations, 
precipitation phenomena, complex 
equilibria, and the analytical chemistry 
of the less familiar elements, 
CHEM 423 Organic Quantitative 
Analysis. (2) Two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 203- 
204 or 213-214. and consent of the in- 
structor. The semi-micro determination 
of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, halogen 
and certain functional groups. 



CHEM 430 Chemical Measurements 
Laboratory I. (3) One lecture and two 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Corequisite. CHEM 481. An introduction to 
the principles and applications of 
quantitative techniques useful in chemis- 
try, with emphasis on modern instrumenta- 
tion Computer programming, electronic 
circuits, spectroscopy, chemical separa- 
tions, 

CHEM 431 Chemical Measurements 
Laboratory II. (3) One lecture and two 
three-hour laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 481; corequisite. 
CHEM 482. An introduction to the princi- 
ples and applications of quantitative 
techniques useful in chemistry, with 
emphasis on modern instrumentation. 
Communications techniques, vacuum sys- 
tems, therochemistry. phase equilibria, 
chemical kinetics, electrochemistry. 
CHEM 433 Chemical Synthesis. (3) One 
lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisites. CHEM 
201-202 or 211-212, and 203-204 or 213-214. 
CHEM 441 Advanced Organic Chemis- 
try. (3) Prerequisite. CHEM 481. An ad- 
vanced study of the compounds of carbon, 
with special emphasis on molecular 
orbital theory and organic reaction 
mechanisms. 

CHEM 443 Qualitative Organic 
Analysis. (3) One lecture and two-three 
hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisites, CHEM 201-202 or 211-212, and 
203-204 or 213-214 The systematic identifi- 
cation of organic compounds. 
CHEM 461 Biochemistry I. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisites. CHEM 
203-204 or 213-214. or permission of in- 
structor. A comprehensive introduction to 
general biochemistry wherein the 
chemistry and metabolism of carbohy- 
drates, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins 
are discussed. 

CHEM 462 Biochemistry II. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 
461 A continuation of CHEM 461. 
CHEM 463 Biochemistry Laboratory I. (2) 
Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week Prerequisite. CHEM 461 or concur- 
rent registration in CHEM 461. 

CHEM 464 Biochemistry Laboratory II. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite. CHEM 462 or concur- 
rent registration in CHEM 462. and CHEM 
430 or CHEM 463. 

CHEM 472 Principles of Geochem- 
istry. (3) Three lectures per week Pre- 
requisite. CHEM 104 or equivalent, and 
senior standing A survey of historical and 
modern theories of the origin of the 
universe and the solar system. The origin 
of elements and their distributions in 
space, on extra-terrestrial bodies and 
on earth. Discussion of the origin of 
igneous rocks, of the physical and chemi- 
cal factors governing development and 



d>*l(ibution of sodlmentary rocKs. ol 
th« (tmosphera. Organic sedimonls. the 
internal structures ol earth and the 
planets, the role ol isotopes In geo- 
thermometry and in the solution ol other 
problems 

CHEM 473 Gcochemlslry ol Solids. (3) 
Three lectures per week Prerequisili- 
CHEM 482 or GEOL 423 Principles ol 
crystal chemistry applied to structures, 
properties and reactions ol minerals 
and non-metallic solids Emphasis is 
placed on the relation ol structural stabil- 
ity to bonding, ionic me charge order- 
disorder, polymorphism and isomorphism 
CHEM 474 EnvlronmanUI Chemlttry. (3) 
Three lectures per week Prerequisite. 
CHEM 461 or equivalent The sources ol 
various elements and chemical reactions 
between them m the atmosphere and 
hydrosphere are treated Causes and bio- 
logical ellects ol air and water pollution 
by certain elements are discussed 
CHEM 475 Chemical Oceaf>o«raphy. (3) 
Three lectures per week Prerequisite. 
CHEM 103 or equivalent, and one addition- 
al semester ol physical science An 
introduction to physical, chemical and 
geological processes that occur in the 
manne environment including physical 
and chemical properties ol sea water. 
geology ol the sea lloor, general circula- 
tion ol the ocean, currents, waves, and 
tKtes 

CHEM 481 Physical Chemistry I. (3) Three 
lectures per week Prerequisite. CHEM 
203-204 or 213-214 MATH 141. PHYS 142 
or PHYS 263 (PHYS 263 may be taken 
concurrently with CHEM 481) or consent ol 
instructor A course primarily (or 
chemists and chemical engineers. 
CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry II. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite. 
CHEM 481 or consent ol instructor. A 
course primarily (or chemists and chemical 
engineers 

CHEM 485 Advanced Physical Chemis- 
try. (2) Prerequisite CHEM 482 Quantum 
chemistry and other selected topics 
CHEM 486 Advanced Physical Chemistry 
Laboratory. (2) Two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week Prerequisites, CHEM 
482 and consent o( instructor 
CHEM 498 Special Topics In Chemis- 
try. (3) Three lectures or two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory per week 
Prerequisite varies with the nature ol the 
topic being considered Course may be 
repeated lor credit 11 the subject matter is 
substantially ditterent. but not more than 
three credits may be accepted in satis- 
laction ol major supporting area require- 
ments (or chemistry majors 

Chinese 

CHIN 101 Intensive Elementary 
Chinese. (6) Introduction to reading, writ- 
ing, and spealting Chinese with an 



emphasis on mastering the euentiala o> 
pronunciation, basic characters and 
structural patterns Eight hours per week 
CHIN 102 intensive EiemenUry 
Chinese. (6) Introduction to reading, writ- 
ing, and speaking Chinese with an 
emphasis on mastering the essentials ol 
pronunciation, basic characters and struc- 
tural patterns Eight hours per week 
CHIN 103 Review ol Elementary Chinese. 
(3) Designed lor students with prior ex- 
perience with the Chinese language, 
either written or spoken, who have need 
ol lurther preparation belore entering 
CHIN 201 CHIN 103 may be taken 
simultaneously with CHIN 201. 104 with 
202. on recommendation ol the director 
ol the Chinese program 
CHIN 104 Review ol Elementary 
Chinese. (3) Designed lor students with 
prior experience with the Chinese lan- 
guage, either written or spoken, who have 
need ol luture preparation belore enter- 
ing CHIN 201 CHIN 103 may be taken 
simultaneously with CHIN 201. 104 with 
202. on recommendation ol the director 
ol the Chinese program. 
CHIN 201 intermediate Chinese. (3) 
Three recitations per week: additional 
electronic laboratory in CHIN 201. Pre- 
requisite. CHIN 102 or equivalent. Read- 
ing o( texts designed to give some 
knowledge o( Chinese li(e, thought and 
culture 

CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese. (3) 
Three recitations per week Prerequisite. 
CHIN 201 or equivalent Reading ol texts 
designed to give some knowledge ol 
Chinese lile, thought and culture. 
CHIN 301 Advanced Chinese. (3) Ad- 
vanced level study o( language patterns 
and syntax as well as development 
ot vocabulary and skills necessary to 
prepare the student (or eventual use o( 
original sources. Prerequisite. CHIN 201. 
202. or permission o( the director o( the 
Chinese program 

CHIN 302 Advanced Chinese. (3) Ad- 
vanced level study ol language patterns 
and syntax as well as development o( 
vocabulary and skills necessary to pre- 
pare the student (or eventual use o( 
original sources Prerequisite. CHIN 201, 
202, or permission ol the director ol the 
Chinese program 

CHIN 401 Readings Irom Chinese 
History. (3) Prerequisite. CHIN 302 or 
equivalent, based on Anthology ol His- 
torians (rom the Chou to the Ching 
dynasties. 

CHIN 402 Readings (rom Chinese His- 
tory. (3) Prerequisite. CHIN 302 or 
equivalent Based on Anthology o( His- 
torians (rom the Chou to the Ching 
Dynasties 

CHIN 403 Classical Chinese 1. (3) Pre- 
requisite. CHIN 302 Introductory classical 



ChineM using literary and historical 
sources in the original language 
CHIN 404 Ciasslcai ChineM II. (3) Pre- 
requisite. CHIN 302 Further classical 
studios by various writers (rom (amouB 
philosophers to prominoni scholars bo- 
tore the now culture movement 
CHIN 411 Chinese Civilization. (3) This 
course supplements GEOQ 422: cultural 
geography ol China and Japan It deals 
with Chinese literature, art, lolklore. his- 
tory, government, and groat men The 
course IS given in English. 
CHIN 412 Chineaa Civilization. (3) De- 
velopments in China since 1911 The 
course is given in English, 
CHIN 413 Survey ol Chinese LHaratura 
In Translation 1. (3) The background and 
development ol Chinese literature (rom 
the earliest philosophical writings through 
the poetry ol the Sung Dynasty (13lh 
century AD). 

CHIN 414 Survey o( Chinese Literature 
in Translation II. (3) Yuan dynasty drama 
through Ming and Ching novels and 
essays to the modern and revolutionary 
short stories, essays and poetry o( 
twentieth century China 
CHIN 421 Chinese Linguistics. (3) Pre- 
requisite, CHIN 102 or equivalent- 
CHIN 422 Chinese Linguistics. (3) Pre- 
requisite, CHIN 102 or equivalent 

Comparative Literature 

CMLT 401 introductory Survey ol 

Comparative Literature. (3) Survey o( the 

background o( European literature 
through study of Greek and Latin litera- 
ture in English translations, discussing 
the debt of modern literature to the 
ancients 

CMLT 402 Introductory Survey o( Com- 
parative Literature. (3) Study ol 
medieval and modern continental 
literature. 

CMLT 411 The Greek Drama. (3) The 
chief works of Aeschylus. Sophocles. 
Euripides, and Aristophanes in English 
translations. Emphasis on the historic 
background, on dramatic structure, and 
on the effect of the attic drama upon the 
mind of the civilized world, 
CMLT 415 The Old Testament at 
Literature. (3) A study of sources, devel- 
opment and literary types- 
CMLT 416 New Testament as Litera- 
ture. (3) A study of the books of the 
New Testament, with attention to the 
relevant historical background and to 
the transmission o( the text A knowledge 
of Greek is helpful, but not essential 
CMLT 421 The Classical Tradition and 
Its inlluence in the Middle Ages and the 
Renaissance. (3) Emphasis on major 
writers Reading knowledge o( Greek or 
Latin required. 



CMLT 422 The Classical Tradition and 
lit inlluence In the Middle Age* and 
the Renaissance. (3) Emphasis on major 
writers Reading knowledge o( Greek or 
Latin required 

CMLT 430 LHaratura ol the Mkldia 
Ages, (3) Narrative, dramatic and lyric 
liloraluro ol the middle ages studied in 
translation 

CMLT 433 Dante and lh« Romance 
Tradition. <3) A reading o( The Divine 
Comedy to enlighten tihe discovery ot 
reality in western literature 
CMLT 461 RomanUcltm— Early 
Stages. (3) Emphasis on England. France 
and Germany Reading knowledge of 
French or German required 
CMLT 462 Romanticism — Rowcring and 
inlluence. (3) Emphasis on England 
France and Germany Reading knowledge 
o( French or German required 
CMLT 469 The ContlnenUi Novel. (3) 
The novel in translation from Stendhal 
through the Existentialists selected from 
literatures of France Germany, Italy, 
Russia, and Spam 

CMLT 470 Ibsen and The ContlnenUi 
Drama. (3) Emphasis on the major work 
of Ibsen, with some attention given to 
selected predecessors, contemporaries 
and successors 

CMLT 479 Major Contemporary 
Authors. (3) 

CMLT 488 Genres. (3) A study of a 
recognized literary form, such as tragedy 
epic, satire, literary criticism, comedy 
tragicomedy, etc. The course may be 
repeated for cumulative credit up to 
six hours when diflerent material is 
presented. 

CMLT 489 Major Vtfrtters. (3) Each se- 
mester two major writers (rom diHerent 
cultures and languages will be studied 
Authors will be chosen on the basis of 
significant relationships of cultural and 
aesthetic contexts, analogies behween 
their respective works, and the impor- 
tance of each writer to his literary 
tradition 

CMLT 496 Conterence Course in Com- 
parative Literature. (3) Second semester 
A tutorial type discussion course corre- 
lating the courses m various literatures 
which the student has previously taken 
with the primary themes and masterpieces 
o( world literature This course is re- 
quired of undergraduate majors in com- 
parative literature, but must not l>e 
taken until the final year o( the student's 
program 

CMLT 498 Selected Topics in Compara- 
tive Literature. (3) 

Computer Science 

CMSC 100 Introduction to Use ol the 

Digital Computer. (1) An introduction to 
the use of Fortran (or solution o( simple 
computational tasks. The use o( a con- 



Course Offerings / 137 



versalional mode to simplify the com- 
putational process will be emphasized 
Where possible students will be assigned 
to sections ol comparable background. 
Examples and problems (or the sections 
will be chosen appropriate to the back- 
ground of the students. 
CMSC 103 Introduclion to Computing for 
Non-Majors. (3) Two lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period each week. 
Basic concepts of fortran. Elements of 
computer organization. Algorithms in 
the computational solution of problems. 
Survey of non-numeric and numeric 
applications. Programming projects 
CIMSC 110 Introduction to Computer Pro- 
gramming. (3) Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period each week. 
Construction of algorithms for the efficient 
solution of computational problems. 
Elements of fortran. Programming tech- 
niques and implementation, including 
debugging and documentation. 
CMSC 120 Intermediate Computer 
Programming. (3) Prerequisite, CIVISC 110 
or equivalent Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period each week. 
Elements of structured programming, 
program design, testing, and documenta- 
tion Development of large programs. 
CMSC 210 Assembly Language 
Programming. (3) Two lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite. CMSC 120 or equivalent, 
logical basis of computer structure, ma- 
chine representation of numbers and 
characters, flow of control, instruction 
codes, arithmetic and logical operations, 
indexing and indirect addressing, input- 
output, push-down stacks, symbolic rep- 
resentation of programs and assembly 
systems, subroutine linkage, macros, 
interpretive systems, and recent advances 
in computer organization. Several com- 
puter projects to illustrate basic con- 
cepts. 

CMSC 220 Introduction to File 
Processing. (3) Prerequisite. CIVISC 120 
or equivalent. Characteristics and use of 
peripheral memory devices for sequential 
and direct access file processing. Tech- 
niques such as sorting and searching, 
hash coding, and table look-up. 
CMSC 250 Introduction to Discrete 
Structures. (3) Prerequisite. CMSC 110 
and MATH 111 or equivalent. Funda- 
mental mathematical concepts and alge- 
braic structures, such as sets, rela- 
tions, functions, semigroups, monoids, 
and boolean algebras Introduction to 
the theory of graphs and trees and their 
realization as computer programs. Em- 
phasis on examples and applications 
rather than mathematical rigor, 
CMSC 268 Numerical Calculus Lab- 
oratory. (1-2) Two hours laboratory per 
week for each credit hour Prerequisite, 
MATH 240, or concurrent registration 



138 / Co